VTBIRD
Received From Subject
5/28/20 7:53 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
5/28/20 2:38 pm Ian Clark <ian...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
5/28/20 1:16 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
5/28/20 9:50 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] bobolinks Fair Haven Municipal Airport, May 28, 2020
5/28/20 7:13 am Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> Re: [VTBIRD] LIsten for Whip-poor-wills this spring!
5/28/20 6:29 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 28, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/27/20 7:58 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] Heron Rookery on Rte 7 Arlington - and BOBCAT!
5/27/20 7:53 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
5/27/20 4:39 pm Peter Riley <priley55...> [VTBIRD] Yellow-throated Vireo
5/27/20 12:30 pm Roy Pilcher <00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Heron Rookery on Rte 7 Arlington - and BOBCAT!
5/27/20 10:13 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
5/27/20 9:13 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 27, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center; Part 2
5/27/20 9:08 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 27, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/27/20 6:52 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Pomainville
5/27/20 5:45 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Scarlet Tanager unusual around here (I think)
5/27/20 5:31 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 27, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/26/20 7:37 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Heron Rookery on Rte 7 Arlington - and BOBCAT!
5/26/20 7:20 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Golden-wing Warbler
5/26/20 11:44 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Tuesday edition
5/26/20 11:41 am Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...> Re: [VTBIRD] Pomainville WMA, Pittsford, May 25, 2020
5/26/20 11:13 am Bridget Butler <birddiva...> [VTBIRD] Birds & Beers VT Online This Thursday!
5/26/20 10:13 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Memorial Day edition
5/26/20 5:31 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 26, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/25/20 5:50 pm Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Pomainville WMA, Pittsford, May 25, 2020
5/25/20 10:25 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Warblers Chittenden Brook Trail, May 25, 2020
5/25/20 10:21 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Chittenden Brook Trail, May 25, 2020
5/25/20 10:11 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
5/25/20 8:27 am Susan Fogleman <sfogleman...> Re: [VTBIRD] Female Birds
5/25/20 7:10 am Bridget Butler <birddiva...> [VTBIRD] Female Birds & Larry's Warblers
5/25/20 6:28 am Victoria Arthur <singtolive57...> Re: [VTBIRD] May 25, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/25/20 5:46 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 25, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/24/20 9:38 pm Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee?
5/24/20 1:46 pm Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
5/24/20 12:50 pm Bob Phillips <155bphillips...> [VTBIRD] Leucistic Robin
5/24/20 12:05 pm Ron Payne <rpayne72...> Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee?
5/24/20 10:54 am Susan Fogleman <sfogleman...> Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
5/24/20 10:28 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 24, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/24/20 8:43 am Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> [VTBIRD] Tennessee?
5/24/20 7:30 am Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
5/24/20 6:34 am Sue <2birdvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
5/24/20 6:30 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 24, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/24/20 6:00 am Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
5/24/20 4:57 am LaBarr, Mark <Mark.LaBarr...> [VTBIRD] Golden-wings and Blue-wings
5/24/20 4:47 am LaBarr, Mark <Mark.LaBarr...> Re: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.
5/24/20 4:27 am Larry Levine <levine5279...> Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
5/24/20 3:04 am Craig Provost <cprovost88...> [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
5/23/20 6:17 pm Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> Re: [VTBIRD] Possible Orange-crowned Warbler. Seeking ID advice
5/23/20 5:33 pm Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...> [VTBIRD] FOY Common Nighthawk
5/23/20 5:06 pm Larry Levine <levine5279...> [VTBIRD] Possible Orange-crowned Warbler. Seeking ID advice
5/23/20 2:38 pm Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> Re: [VTBIRD] Fwd: Killer loon
5/23/20 2:12 pm Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird Cam, Saturday edition
5/23/20 1:29 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird Cam, Saturday edition
5/23/20 12:45 pm Jane Stein <jeshawks...> Re: [VTBIRD] Fwd: Killer loon
5/23/20 12:21 pm Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> Re: [VTBIRD] Shoveler, new Essex County bird
5/23/20 11:56 am Charlie Teske <cteske140...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: Killer loon
5/23/20 11:25 am Steven Lamonde <slamonde...> Re: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.
5/23/20 11:02 am David Guertin <dave...> Re: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.
5/23/20 10:48 am Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> [VTBIRD] Shoveler: new bird Essex County
5/23/20 8:13 am David Gusakov <dgusakov...> [VTBIRD] rose-breasted grosbeaks
5/23/20 6:03 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 23, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/23/20 4:40 am Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.
5/22/20 6:05 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] Union St Brandon, May 22, 2020
5/22/20 6:03 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
5/22/20 2:49 pm Carol Yarnell <yarnellcarol1219...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 1:05 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
5/22/20 11:52 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Orange-crowned warbler Cadwell Loop, May 22, 2020
5/22/20 11:50 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Union St Brandon, May 22, 2020
5/22/20 10:56 am Peg Clement <clementpeg...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
5/22/20 10:34 am slybeck <slybeck...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 9:00 am Kit Hood <kithood3...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 8:50 am sarah rosedahl <0000016265cd738b-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 8:40 am Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 8:25 am maevulus <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 8:13 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 22, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/22/20 8:11 am Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 8:10 am Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 8:07 am Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 8:06 am Brenna <dbgaldenzi...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 8:03 am Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 7:21 am Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
5/22/20 7:08 am Michaela Granstrom <000005caf7780209-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] winged warbler
5/21/20 7:03 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] Cogman Road / Ghost Hollow Road, West Haven, May 20, 2020
5/21/20 6:22 pm kfinch <kfinch51...> [VTBIRD] Peent!
5/21/20 1:12 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
5/21/20 10:55 am Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Pittsford Trails-Cadwell Loop, May 21, 2020
5/21/20 9:17 am Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Cogman Road / Ghost Hollow Road, West Haven, May 20, 2020
5/21/20 6:08 am Scott Morrical <smorrica...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
5/21/20 5:40 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 21, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/21/20 2:44 am Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] RTHB
5/20/20 4:04 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Swainson's Thrush
5/20/20 3:28 pm Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Gallinule in Norwich -- PHOTOS
5/20/20 3:08 pm Jim Block <jim...> [VTBIRD] Gallinule in Norwich -- PHOTOS
5/20/20 1:52 pm Betty Holton <bholton...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
5/20/20 12:59 pm Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...> Re: [VTBIRD] Wildcat Rd., Chittenden, VT, May 20, 2020
5/20/20 12:02 pm Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
5/20/20 11:24 am Pat Folsom <pfols...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
5/20/20 11:10 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Wildcat Rd., Chittenden, VT, May 20, 2020
5/20/20 10:56 am Betty Holton <bholton...> [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
5/20/20 10:53 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 20, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center; Part 2
5/20/20 8:47 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
5/20/20 7:09 am Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...> Re: [VTBIRD] Prothonatary Warbler???
5/20/20 6:21 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 20, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/20/20 5:33 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Tuesday edition
5/20/20 3:53 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] a bit of splendor (thrushes, wood and veery)
5/19/20 6:50 pm Michael Foster <mfoster...> [VTBIRD] Prothonatary Warbler???
5/19/20 6:25 pm Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...> Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
5/19/20 5:21 pm Neil Buckley <bucklenj...> Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
5/19/20 5:09 pm Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...> Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
5/19/20 5:07 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] Cerulean Warbler, southern end of Snake Mountain, Bridport
5/19/20 4:26 pm Eric Wood <ericw5...> Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
5/19/20 3:07 pm Ed Green <edgreen3...> [VTBIRD] RUFFED GROUSE
5/19/20 11:26 am Betty Holton <bholton...> Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
5/19/20 11:25 am Neil Buckley <bucklenj...> Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
5/19/20 11:17 am Cynthia Crowley <Cynthia.Crowley...> [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
5/19/20 11:11 am Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> [VTBIRD] Join the Vermont Backyard Bird Quest—23 May 2020
5/19/20 9:57 am Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> [VTBIRD] Miles Pond Railroad east
5/19/20 9:54 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Mount Independence, May 19, 2020
5/19/20 5:52 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 19, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/19/20 3:50 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] First ever Indigo Bunting at our Richmond home
5/19/20 2:48 am Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> Re: [VTBIRD] First ever Indigo Bunting at our Richmond home
5/19/20 2:31 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Warbling Vireo before sunrise
5/18/20 7:04 pm Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] First ever Indigo Bunting at our Richmond home
5/18/20 3:17 pm Kit Hood <kithood3...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: This morning
5/18/20 12:44 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition and introducing Bee Cam
5/18/20 11:23 am Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, May 18, 2020
5/18/20 9:55 am Sue <2birdvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Tanagers
5/18/20 9:44 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Tanagers
5/18/20 6:50 am Ann Curran <acurran802...> [VTBIRD] Burlington backyard first
5/18/20 6:46 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 18, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/18/20 5:12 am Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] cranberry viburnum
5/18/20 4:28 am Mus <musbird...> [VTBIRD] Mystery egg
5/17/20 8:02 pm Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> Re: [VTBIRD] A little Northern Flicker Hanky-Panky
5/17/20 5:37 pm cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...> [VTBIRD] A little Northern Flicker Hanky-Panky
5/17/20 4:57 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Cape Mays
5/17/20 1:02 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird.
5/17/20 10:28 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
5/17/20 8:03 am LINDA M Verchereau <daylilies56...> [VTBIRD] Common Merg
5/17/20 7:44 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Warblers
5/17/20 6:51 am R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] 3 Indigo Buntings
5/17/20 6:47 am R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] A grand morning in Derby
5/17/20 6:17 am kfinch <kfinch51...> [VTBIRD] Mocker
5/17/20 5:48 am Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] A grand morning in Derby
5/17/20 5:34 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 17, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/17/20 5:25 am Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...> [VTBIRD] Indigo Buntings and more!
5/16/20 7:06 pm Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Warblers etc in BTV/South Burlington
5/16/20 1:11 pm Jeff MacQueen <jmacqueen65...> Re: [VTBIRD] White Pelicans
5/16/20 1:08 pm Martha Rice <mhbrice...> [VTBIRD] White Pelicans
5/16/20 12:33 pm Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...> [VTBIRD] Nesting Fish Crows in Bennington
5/16/20 11:44 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> Re: [VTBIRD] May 16, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/16/20 11:07 am Poleysgmavt <poleys...> [VTBIRD] Visitors
5/16/20 10:03 am Sandy Turner <tmsprgrn...> Re: [VTBIRD] May 16, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/16/20 9:51 am Ed Green <edgreen3...> [VTBIRD] FOY Ruby Throated Hummingbird
5/16/20 9:29 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Saturday edition
5/16/20 8:56 am Graham Bates <batesg...> [VTBIRD] FOY Swifts and bobolinks in Rochester
5/16/20 8:22 am Chip Darmstadt <chip...> [VTBIRD] Berlin Pond goodies
5/16/20 8:04 am lawlor <lawlor.coleen...> [VTBIRD] Franklin Airport
5/16/20 6:24 am Gail Straw <gailstraw...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill Cranes from egg on
5/16/20 6:14 am Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...> [VTBIRD] Snowy Egret Windsor VT
5/16/20 5:45 am Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill Cranes from egg on
5/16/20 5:15 am maevulus <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] Sandhill Cranes from egg on
5/16/20 5:11 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 16, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5/16/20 2:43 am J J Allen <jjapple88...> [VTBIRD] Seven male Orioles
5/15/20 7:38 pm Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...> [VTBIRD] Parula.
5/15/20 3:38 pm Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
5/15/20 3:14 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
5/15/20 3:13 pm Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Common Loons - Kent Pond, Killington
5/15/20 2:38 pm Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
5/15/20 2:31 pm Ian Clark <ian...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
5/15/20 1:58 pm Barclay Morris <bemorris...> [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer
5/15/20 1:38 pm Barclay Morris <bemorris...> [VTBIRD] FOY in Grand Isle
5/15/20 12:42 pm Poleysgmavt <poleys...> Re: [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
5/15/20 12:33 pm Nita <nita.hwf...> Re: [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
5/15/20 12:04 pm Bob Phillips <155bphillips...> [VTBIRD] FOY ORIOLES
5/15/20 11:32 am Peg Clement <clementpeg...> Re: [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
5/15/20 11:02 am Jane Stein <jeshawks...> Re: [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
5/15/20 9:15 am BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...> [VTBIRD] Rainbow of color.
5/15/20 9:10 am maevulus <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] Cape May and other warblers
5/15/20 8:11 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 15, 2020: Thetford Center con't
5/15/20 7:17 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Cape May warbler
5/15/20 6:28 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Cape May
5/15/20 6:08 am <bflewelling3263...> [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
5/15/20 5:57 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Female Oriole arrives, goes to work
5/15/20 5:52 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 15, 2020: Thetford Center
5/15/20 5:49 am Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> [VTBIRD] FOY Oriole Monkton
5/14/20 6:24 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Amazing finale for May 14
5/14/20 4:24 pm David Guertin <dave...> Re: [VTBIRD] Baltimore Oriole show
5/14/20 3:40 pm Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...> Re: [VTBIRD] Baltimore Oriole show
5/14/20 2:41 pm David Guertin <dave...> [VTBIRD] Baltimore Oriole show
5/14/20 2:36 pm Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] FOY female hummer
5/14/20 2:34 pm Pat Folsom <pfols...> Re: [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer- South Burlington
5/14/20 2:18 pm Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer- South Burlington
5/14/20 1:00 pm Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb...> Re: [VTBIRD] Cape Mays in E. Dorset
5/14/20 12:15 pm Sue <2birdvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Cape Mays in E. Dorset
5/14/20 11:55 am Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
5/14/20 10:27 am R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Cape Mays in E. Dorset
5/14/20 10:14 am Peg Clement <clementpeg...> Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
5/14/20 9:10 am Ron Payne <rpayne72...> [VTBIRD] Cape May Warblers, Middlebury
5/14/20 6:59 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
5/14/20 5:34 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 14, 2020: Thetford Center
5/13/20 1:39 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
5/13/20 8:55 am Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
5/13/20 8:42 am Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
5/13/20 8:41 am Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
5/13/20 7:12 am Claudia P. Kinder <cpkinder...> Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
5/13/20 7:03 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] at last a warbler in a still very cold garden
5/13/20 6:31 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 13, 2020: Thetford Center
5/13/20 5:34 am Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> Re: [VTBIRD] Black-crowned Night-heron
5/13/20 5:17 am LINDA M Verchereau <daylilies56...> [VTBIRD] Black-crowned Night-heron
5/13/20 5:16 am Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
5/13/20 3:47 am Alice Grau <alicecgrau...> [VTBIRD] more firsts!
5/12/20 8:10 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Orioles and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
5/12/20 8:08 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] 65+ White-throated Sparrows
5/12/20 4:57 pm John Snell <jrsnelljr...> [VTBIRD] FOY hummer in Montpelier
5/12/20 4:52 pm Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] FOY hummer
5/12/20 1:39 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Tuesday edition
5/12/20 12:33 pm Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...> [VTBIRD] Pamela Coleman please look out for this "odd oriole"
5/12/20 12:08 pm Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...> [VTBIRD] Could it be?? a Troupial/Baltimore Oriole in Danby??
5/12/20 6:25 am Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sparrows
5/12/20 6:12 am Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Indigo Bunting - Rutland Town, May 12, 2020
5/12/20 5:34 am Barbara Martin <000004a3ed1ddcdc-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sparrows
5/12/20 5:28 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 12, 2020: Thetford Center
5/12/20 5:14 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Sparrows
5/11/20 3:31 pm Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] FOY Orioles and one Indigo Bunting in Mt Tabor
5/11/20 1:26 pm Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Orange-crowned Warbler, Burlington
5/11/20 1:12 pm Cherrie Corey <cherrie.corey62...> [VTBIRD] Returning friends
5/11/20 1:08 pm Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] great day in Jericho Center!
5/11/20 1:02 pm Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] D & H Rail Trail--Castleton to South St., May 11, 2020
5/11/20 12:28 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Tanager
5/11/20 12:06 pm Ann Curran <acurran802...> [VTBIRD] Burlington mockingbird
5/11/20 11:24 am LKulas <lkulas...> [VTBIRD] NYTimes: 7 Tips for Watching Birds During the Spring Lockdown
5/11/20 11:04 am Anthony Hill <anhinga13...> Re: [VTBIRD] VTBIRD Digest - 9 May 2020 to 10 May 2020 (#2020-123)
5/11/20 9:17 am Kit Hood <kithood3...> [VTBIRD] Today
5/11/20 8:55 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition
5/11/20 7:42 am Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition
5/11/20 7:33 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition
5/11/20 6:28 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] mystery eggs, now mystery bird(s)
5/11/20 6:26 am Ian Worley <iworley...> Re: [VTBIRD] mystery eggs, now mystery bird(s)
5/11/20 6:14 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] mystery eggs, now mystery bird(s)
5/11/20 6:10 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 11, 2020: Thetford Center
5/11/20 4:35 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Singing White-crowned sparrows, one sparrow behavior imitated by chickadee
5/10/20 3:42 pm David Guertin <dave...> [VTBIRD] Tufted Duck on Lake Champlain
5/10/20 3:21 pm Brenna <dbgaldenzi...> Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
5/10/20 3:10 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
5/10/20 2:47 pm alison wagner <alikatofvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
5/10/20 2:01 pm Elinor Osborn <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
5/10/20 11:49 am Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
5/10/20 11:18 am Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] Yellow rumps Derby
5/10/20 10:49 am Elinor Osborn <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
5/10/20 10:04 am Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
5/10/20 6:32 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Bobolinks
5/10/20 5:30 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 10, 2020: Thetford Center
5/10/20 5:29 am Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> [VTBIRD] Magical Windows
5/10/20 4:56 am John Snell <jrsnelljr...> [VTBIRD] FOY Catbird in Montpelier
5/9/20 5:19 pm Bonnie Dundas <kinglet...> [VTBIRD] birding big day
5/9/20 4:29 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> Re: [VTBIRD] Question about eBird
5/9/20 4:17 pm Larry Levine <levine5279...> [VTBIRD] Question about eBird
5/9/20 1:41 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Saturday edition
5/9/20 11:42 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 9, 2020: Thetford Center; part 2
5/9/20 11:34 am Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...> [VTBIRD] OOPS! I guess its called an Eastern Towhee
5/9/20 11:33 am Katharine Thompson <kthom22...> [VTBIRD] Too many people send personal messages to entire VT bird list serve
5/9/20 11:15 am Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...> [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer in Danby
5/9/20 11:06 am Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...> [VTBIRD] FOY Rufous Sided Towhee in the snow in Danby
5/9/20 9:38 am Mus <musbird...> [VTBIRD] Yellow Rumped Warbler
5/9/20 6:00 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 9, 2020: Thetford Center
5/8/20 3:21 pm Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Ruby throated in Richmond
5/8/20 2:00 pm Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer Mt Tabor
5/8/20 1:35 pm Katharine Thompson <kthom22...> Re: [VTBIRD] apologies
5/8/20 1:25 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
5/8/20 1:24 pm Katharine Thompson <kthom22...> Re: [VTBIRD] apologies
5/8/20 12:45 pm Roy Pilcher <00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Old Marsh Pond WMA - Fair Haven (131 acres), May 7, 2020
5/8/20 9:30 am Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> [VTBIRD] On the off chance one of you is a programmer
5/8/20 8:31 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
5/8/20 8:31 am Diana <dlee3...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
5/8/20 7:23 am Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
5/8/20 6:53 am Diana <dlee3...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
5/8/20 6:10 am Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch...> [VTBIRD] Request for assistance – song recordings of migrating Mourning Warblers
5/8/20 5:44 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 8, 2020: Thetford Center
5/8/20 5:32 am Mamuniaangel <000002fe774c7bcd-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
5/8/20 5:07 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
5/8/20 4:51 am Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Wood ducks and Broad Winged Hawk
5/8/20 4:29 am Michael Foster <mfoster...> Re: [VTBIRD] Wood ducks and Broad Winged Hawk
5/8/20 4:28 am Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...> Re: [VTBIRD] Wood ducks and Broad Winged Hawk
5/8/20 4:00 am Michael Foster <mfoster...> [VTBIRD] Wood ducks and Broad Winged Hawk
5/8/20 2:59 am Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] Whip-poor-wills -- Bridport
5/7/20 7:11 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files
5/7/20 6:52 pm Michele Patenaude <Michele.Patenaude...> Re: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, May 7, 2020
5/7/20 6:35 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, May 7, 2020
5/7/20 4:54 pm Kaye Danforth <000003762748b609-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] FOY rose-breasted grosbeak
5/7/20 3:11 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files
5/7/20 2:30 pm Tracey Busony <curtandtracey27...> Re: [VTBIRD] Chukar
5/7/20 12:30 pm Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...> [VTBIRD] Bennington Fish Crows
5/7/20 9:46 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Chukar
5/7/20 7:43 am Mus <musbird...> [VTBIRD] Yellow Bellied Sapsucker
5/7/20 7:29 am Nita <nita.hwf...> [VTBIRD] FOY Baltimore Oriole - Waterbury Center
5/7/20 6:26 am Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Emerald Lake
5/7/20 6:17 am Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...> [VTBIRD] Yellow -rumped
5/7/20 5:38 am Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Emerald Lake
5/7/20 5:06 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 7, 2020: Thetford Center
5/7/20 4:57 am jennifer megyesi <fatroosterfarm...> Re: [VTBIRD] VTBIRD Digest - 5 May 2020 to 6 May 2020 (#2020-119)
5/7/20 3:46 am Mus <musbird...> [VTBIRD] FOYs in Randolph Center
5/6/20 6:07 pm Charlie Teske <cteske140...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hair raising tale to share
5/6/20 4:25 pm Sarah Fellows <towanda2...> [VTBIRD] Rusty blackbirds!
5/6/20 2:54 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] [SPAM?:*******] - White-throats
5/6/20 2:49 pm Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hair raising tale to share
5/6/20 2:41 pm Ann Curran <acurran802...> [VTBIRD] Burlington birds
5/6/20 2:03 pm Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] FOY Catbird
5/6/20 1:42 pm Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] apologies
5/6/20 1:39 pm Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
5/6/20 1:28 pm Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
5/6/20 12:32 pm Pat Folsom <pfols...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
5/6/20 12:10 pm Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Pittsford Trails-Cadwell Loop, May 6, 2020
5/6/20 12:07 pm Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition. /Flash
5/6/20 11:14 am Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] FOY Rose Breasted Grosbeak
5/6/20 10:38 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition. /Flash
5/6/20 10:01 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> Re: [VTBIRD] May 6, 2020: Thetford Center
5/6/20 9:49 am Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
5/6/20 9:44 am Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
5/6/20 9:35 am kfinch <kfinch51...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
5/6/20 8:33 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
5/6/20 8:29 am Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Emerald Lake
5/6/20 8:23 am Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
5/6/20 8:10 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
5/6/20 8:08 am edgreen3 <edgreen3...> [VTBIRD] FOY Rose Breasted Grosbeak
5/6/20 8:03 am Mike Carlo <000005daa78fa2c0-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] May 6, 2020: Thetford Center
5/6/20 7:32 am Cynthia Seybolt <cynthiavt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
5/6/20 7:03 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 6, 2020: Thetford Center
5/6/20 6:51 am Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
5/6/20 6:31 am alison wagner <alikatofvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hair raising tale to share
5/6/20 6:16 am Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hair raising tale to share
5/6/20 6:15 am Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] Hair raising tale to share
5/6/20 5:14 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
5/5/20 2:38 pm Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> [VTBIRD] Northern Mockingbird
5/5/20 1:56 pm Diana <dlee3...> Re: [VTBIRD] Who says sweet sweet sweet I"m so very sweet
5/5/20 10:05 am Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan...> [VTBIRD] "Solving Sparrows" Now Posted Online
5/5/20 9:18 am Graham Bates <batesg...> [VTBIRD] FOY Common Yellowthroat in Rochester!
5/5/20 8:07 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] rose-breasted grosbeak
5/5/20 7:43 am Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...> Re: [VTBIRD] Who says sweet sweet sweet I"m so very sweet
5/5/20 7:24 am David L. Webb <David.L.Webb...> Re: [VTBIRD] Who says sweet sweet sweet I"m so very sweet
5/5/20 6:51 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Nashville warbler
5/5/20 6:36 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 5, 2020: Thetford Center
5/5/20 5:44 am Peg Clement <clementpeg...> [VTBIRD] Owls, Red Rock, S. Burlington
5/5/20 5:31 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Actual bluebird cam, Tuesday edition
5/5/20 5:28 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Tuesday edition
5/4/20 3:38 pm Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition
5/4/20 1:23 pm Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...> Re: [VTBIRD] Who says sweet sweet sweet I"m so very sweet
5/4/20 1:21 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition
5/4/20 11:37 am Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh , May 4, 2020
5/4/20 10:47 am David L. Webb <David.L.Webb...> Re: [VTBIRD] Who says sweet sweet sweet I"m so very sweet
5/4/20 10:46 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] FOY Rose-breasted Grosbeak
5/4/20 10:44 am Graham Bates <batesg...> [VTBIRD] FOY Kingbird in Rochester!
5/4/20 10:35 am Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...> [VTBIRD] Who says sweet sweet sweet I"m so very sweet
5/4/20 10:14 am Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...> [VTBIRD] FOY white crowned in Danby
5/4/20 10:03 am BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...> [VTBIRD] FOY Rose-breasted Grosbeak
5/4/20 9:50 am Linda Gross <ljoslyngross...> Re: [VTBIRD] May 4, 2020: Thetford Center
5/4/20 9:28 am Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...> Re: [VTBIRD] FOY catbird in Rochester
5/4/20 8:50 am Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...> Re: [VTBIRD] White-crowned Sparrows
5/4/20 8:23 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 4, 2020 con't: Thetford Center
5/4/20 8:20 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] thrushes en masse
5/4/20 7:23 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Thrushes Hollow Rd., Brandon, May 4, 2020
5/4/20 7:01 am Avery Fish <afish2021...> Re: [VTBIRD] White-Crowned Sparrow and FOY House Wren, Monkton
5/4/20 6:54 am Becky Giroux <ravenrr...> [VTBIRD] Hummingbird
5/4/20 6:46 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Warblers
5/4/20 6:35 am Avery Fish <afish2021...> Re: [VTBIRD] White-Crowned Sparrow and FOY House Wren, Monkton
5/4/20 6:26 am Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> [VTBIRD] White-Crowned Sparrow and FOY House Wren, Monkton
5/4/20 6:21 am Sandy Witherell <homefarm...> [VTBIRD] White-crowned Sparrows
5/4/20 6:16 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 4, 2020: Thetford Center
5/4/20 5:25 am Graham Bates <batesg...> [VTBIRD] FOY catbird in Rochester
5/4/20 5:12 am Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> [VTBIRD] Wood Thrush
5/3/20 1:23 pm Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] W. Rutland Marsh
5/3/20 12:42 pm Kathy Leonard <Kathyd.leonard...> [VTBIRD] Warblers are arriving
5/3/20 9:23 am Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Killington Marsh, May 3, 2020
5/3/20 9:19 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 3, 2020
5/3/20 8:48 am Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> [VTBIRD] Hummer
5/3/20 8:29 am tarmat <tarmat...> [VTBIRD] New arrivals
5/3/20 8:25 am Larry Levine <levine5279...> [VTBIRD] Mills Riverside Park
5/3/20 8:24 am Peter Riley <priley55...> Re: [VTBIRD] Morristown Yellow-rumped fallout
5/3/20 7:16 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] W. Rutland Marsh
5/3/20 6:19 am R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] help needed with sound
5/3/20 5:57 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] help needed with sound
5/3/20 5:40 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 3, 2020: Thetford center
5/3/20 5:40 am Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...> [VTBIRD] Morristown Yellow-rumped fallout
5/3/20 4:56 am Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
5/2/20 7:51 pm Scott Sainsbury <scott...> Re: [VTBIRD] help needed with sound
5/2/20 7:46 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, May 2, 2020
5/2/20 5:22 pm Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...> Re: [VTBIRD] chickadee with a sweet tooth
5/2/20 2:49 pm Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam
5/2/20 2:26 pm Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] help needed with sound
5/2/20 1:48 pm Ian Clark <ian...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam
5/2/20 1:43 pm Kevin Thorley <elron8711...> Re: [VTBIRD] FOY Brown Thrasher
5/2/20 1:08 pm CAMERON O'CONNOR <cameron103...> Re: [VTBIRD] chickadee with a sweet tooth
5/2/20 12:51 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Hollow Rd., Brandon, May 2, 2020
5/2/20 12:03 pm Mike Sargent <msargent...> Re: [VTBIRD] Listen for Whip-poor-wills this spring!
5/2/20 11:47 am Jasper Barnes <Jasper.Barnes...> Re: [VTBIRD] chickadee with a sweet tooth
5/2/20 11:35 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] chickadee with a sweet tooth
5/2/20 11:35 am Mus <musbird...> [VTBIRD] FOY Brown Thrasher
5/2/20 11:11 am alison wagner <alikatofvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 10:29 am Mamuniaangel <000002fe774c7bcd-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 10:26 am Mamuniaangel <000002fe774c7bcd-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 10:05 am Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 9:39 am Kim Sargeant <grammiekims...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 9:22 am Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 9:13 am Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 9:06 am Barbara Powers <barkiepvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Beaver Pond Visit-slide show and music
5/2/20 8:09 am Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> Re: [VTBIRD] Swallows
5/2/20 7:58 am Jane Stein <jeshawks...> Re: [VTBIRD] Swallows
5/2/20 7:55 am Drew Bush <dbush...> [VTBIRD] sign-off
5/2/20 7:47 am Nita <nita.hwf...> Re: [VTBIRD] Swallows
5/2/20 7:45 am Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes <cth4...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 7:44 am Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 7:24 am Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 7:19 am Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 7:08 am Steven Lamonde <slamonde...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 7:05 am Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> [VTBIRD] Mystery bird song in Monkton
5/2/20 6:50 am Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> [VTBIRD] FOY Hermit Thrush
5/2/20 5:34 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 2, 2020: Thetford Center
5/1/20 6:56 pm Linda P. McElvany <lindap.mack...> [VTBIRD] Summer Tanager in Williston
5/1/20 6:32 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] Whip-poor-will. Snake Mountain Road, Weybridge
5/1/20 3:10 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] Albino Robin, Milton, VT
5/1/20 1:53 pm Avery Fish <afish2021...> Re: [VTBIRD] I’m interested in tonite webinar
5/1/20 1:44 pm Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] FOY RB Grosbeak Mt Tabor
5/1/20 1:40 pm pam voss <pkroutvoss2...> [VTBIRD] I’m interested in tonite webinar
5/1/20 12:51 pm Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] FOY House Wren
5/1/20 12:46 pm Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> [VTBIRD] LIsten for Whip-poor-wills this spring!
5/1/20 11:30 am Janet Warren <jwarren...> [VTBIRD] Swallows
5/1/20 10:56 am Russ Ford <russell.f.ford...> [VTBIRD] Palm Warblers Lake Carmi
5/1/20 10:47 am Larry Rogers <larryandmona1...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: VTBIRD Quirk
5/1/20 6:57 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Waterthrushes May 1, 2020
5/1/20 6:42 am Brenna <dbgaldenzi...> Re: [VTBIRD] Time to take bird feeders down for the season
5/1/20 6:37 am Martha McClintock <mbmcclintock...> Re: [VTBIRD] Time to take bird feeders down for the season
5/1/20 6:33 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] May 1, 2020: Thetford Center
5/1/20 5:00 am sarah rosedahl <0000016265cd738b-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
5/1/20 4:14 am Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 7:50 pm cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...> [VTBIRD] Beaver Pond Visit-slide show and music
4/30/20 7:25 pm Brenna <dbgaldenzi...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 7:21 pm LKulas <lkulas...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 7:15 pm Liz Lee <lizl...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 7:01 pm Brenna <dbgaldenzi...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 6:59 pm Brenna <dbgaldenzi...> [VTBIRD] Time to take bird feeders down for the season
4/30/20 5:30 pm Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 4:32 pm Mark Paul <mrpbirder...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 4:30 pm LKulas <lkulas...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 4:19 pm Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 4:00 pm alison wagner <alikatofvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 3:57 pm Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> Re: [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 3:36 pm Mark Paul <mrpbirder...> [VTBIRD] bird feeders
4/30/20 3:14 pm Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Oriole!
4/30/20 11:55 am Elizabeth Alton <redbnuthatch...> [VTBIRD] Albino Robin, Milton, VT
4/30/20 11:34 am Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Black Vultures over UVM
4/30/20 10:39 am Sue <2birdvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] April 30, 2020: Thetford Center
4/30/20 9:25 am Susan Fogleman <sfogleman...> Re: [VTBIRD] April 30, 2020: Thetford Center
4/30/20 9:16 am Sandy Turner <tmsprgrn...> Re: [VTBIRD] April 30, 2020: Thetford Center
4/30/20 6:30 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] April 30, 2020: Thetford Center
4/29/20 7:34 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Swallows
4/29/20 12:24 pm Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Kingfisher
4/29/20 10:26 am kfinch <kfinch51...> [VTBIRD] Barn swallow
4/29/20 8:39 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Palm Warbler Pittsford Trails - Cadwell Loop, Apr 29, 2020
4/29/20 7:29 am Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> [VTBIRD] Winter Wren
4/29/20 6:03 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] April 29, 2020: Thetford Center
4/29/20 4:15 am Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> [VTBIRD] American Kestrels
4/28/20 12:27 pm Mark Paul <mrpbirder...> Re: [VTBIRD] Red-headed wodpeckers
4/28/20 12:25 pm David Eberly <david.eberly...> Re: [VTBIRD] Red-headed wodpeckers
4/28/20 12:22 pm Peterson, Bruce B. <peterson...> [VTBIRD] Red-headed wodpeckers
4/28/20 6:14 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] April 28, 2020: Thetford Center
 
Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 7:53 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
Thanks for the detailed info, Ian. i come from a library/media bkgd, but
little knowledge of 'video conversion', etc. Obviously, there's a lot of
editing that goes into your posts... but what fun watching the progression.
I suppose someone could figure out how many times the male feeds as
compared to the female?? ruth

On Thu, May 28, 2020 at 5:38 PM Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:

> I'm old enough to think of actually splicing film when someone says
> 'physically.' For this video, I took a bunch of the 12-second clips and
> combined them in a freebie format converting program.
>
> The camera is just a cheap WiFi camera that I had left over from another
> project. I hadn't anticipated how popular the birds would be. The camera is
> always on, but not recording. The motion sensor saves a clip when it sees
> motion, but I've got to watch each and download them separately. The longer
> clips are recorded with me manually starting and stopping the recording.
> Then downloading, converting to a format that people can see, then
> uploading to my site. This has been enough fun that I'm going to experiment
> with some better cameras. Hopefully, ones that don't require fiddling with
> every clip before uploading.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of R Stewart
> Sent: Wednesday, May 27, 2020 10:53 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
>
> Doesn't look like very restful night duty for Mrs. Are you physically
> splicing the footage that we see before posting? Is the camera running
> 24/7? I noticed removal of the fecal sack by 'ingestion!'
>
> ruth stewart
> e dorset
>
> On Wed, May 27, 2020 at 1:13 PM Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>
> > Trying to answer Ruth's question, 'what happens at night?' The camera
> > will record a 12-second clip when it detects motion (takes five
> > minutes to reset, so the maximum is 12 clips per hour). Today's video
> > is a series of 12-second clips spliced together. It is in black &
> > white because the light source is infrared LEDs. The LEDs are supposed
> > to emit outside of the bird's range of vision, they shouldn't notice
> > when the IR is on.
> >
> >
> >
> > FLV
> >
> > http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-27-2020.html
> >
> >
> >
> > MP4
> >
> > http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> > %%%%%% %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> >
> >
> >
> > Ian Clark
> > PO Box 51
> >
> > West Newbury, VT 05085
> >
> > (848) 702-0774
> >
> > www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
> >
> >
> >
>
> --
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset VT
>


--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 2:38 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
I'm old enough to think of actually splicing film when someone says 'physically.' For this video, I took a bunch of the 12-second clips and combined them in a freebie format converting program.

The camera is just a cheap WiFi camera that I had left over from another project. I hadn't anticipated how popular the birds would be. The camera is always on, but not recording. The motion sensor saves a clip when it sees motion, but I've got to watch each and download them separately. The longer clips are recorded with me manually starting and stopping the recording. Then downloading, converting to a format that people can see, then uploading to my site. This has been enough fun that I'm going to experiment with some better cameras. Hopefully, ones that don't require fiddling with every clip before uploading.


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of R Stewart
Sent: Wednesday, May 27, 2020 10:53 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition

Doesn't look like very restful night duty for Mrs. Are you physically splicing the footage that we see before posting? Is the camera running 24/7? I noticed removal of the fecal sack by 'ingestion!'

ruth stewart
e dorset

On Wed, May 27, 2020 at 1:13 PM Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:

> Trying to answer Ruth's question, 'what happens at night?' The camera
> will record a 12-second clip when it detects motion (takes five
> minutes to reset, so the maximum is 12 clips per hour). Today's video
> is a series of 12-second clips spliced together. It is in black &
> white because the light source is infrared LEDs. The LEDs are supposed
> to emit outside of the bird's range of vision, they shouldn't notice
> when the IR is on.
>
>
>
> FLV
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-27-2020.html
>
>
>
> MP4
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
>
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%% %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>
>

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 1:16 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
It is a warm afternoon and the chicks seem to be having trouble getting
comfortable. But, they're already blue! Mom pops in with a tasty grasshopper
about 0:55.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-28-2020.html



MP4
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



I've added a three more MP4s from May 23, the day the chicks hatched. In
one, Mom decides Junior is taking too long to get out of the egg. She picks
up the half shell he's in and dumps him out, then disposes of the eggshell.
In another video, after the third chick hatches, Mom eats the eggshell. My
guess is that it helps her replenish calcium. Five eggs must take a lot of
calcium for a little bird. Anyone know?





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 9:50 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] bobolinks Fair Haven Municipal Airport, May 28, 2020
Bobolinks were busy doing display flights.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Fair Haven Municipal Airport, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 28, 2020 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.0 mile(s)
> 30 species
>
> Mourning Dove 2
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Green Heron 1
> Turkey Vulture 4
> Northern Flicker 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Eastern Kingbird 1
> Yellow-throated Vireo 1
> Warbling Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 3
> Blue Jay 1
> American Crow 3
> Common Raven 2
> Tufted Titmouse 1
> Barn Swallow 3
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> European Starling 2
> American Robin 6
> American Goldfinch 3
> Savannah Sparrow 4
> Song Sparrow 4
> Eastern Towhee 1
> Bobolink 11 males were display flying
> Red-winged Blackbird 13
> Brown-headed Cowbird 1
> Common Grackle 1
> Ovenbird 1
> Common Yellowthroat 3
> Pine Warbler 1
> Indigo Bunting 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69756493
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 7:13 am
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] LIsten for Whip-poor-wills this spring!
Hey Kent,

I've been trying to find these birds in Washington County, to no avail. I'm
curious; do you have any suggestions for what kind of habitat is best for
them? Where I've been looking doesn't seem to have worked.

Thank you,
Best,
Richard

On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 3:46 PM Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
wrote:

> If you stand outside around dusk on a warm evening beginning in May, you
> might just hear a distinctive call: whip-poor-will, whip-poor-will! A male
> Eastern Whip-poor-will is somewhere nearby and the Vermont Center for
> Ecostudies wants to know!
>
> The Eastern Whip-poor-will is listed as a threatened species in
> Vermont—making monitoring populations incredibly important. Due to their
> nocturnal habits during non-breeding season, little is known about their
> migration, however we estimate that they arrive in southern Vermont around
> May 1st and in northern Vermont by May 10th.
>
> *How can you help? *
>
> Please submit a checklist to Vermont eBird for your Eastern Whip-poor-will
> searches. All you need to do is go outside about 20 minutes after sunset,
> listen for the males’ distinctive calls, and record them with your phone.
> Males will usually start calling about 30 minutes after sunset and continue
> until it gets too dark. Please submit a checklist to Vermont eBird for
> your Eastern
> Whip-poor-will searches. If you hear any, make sure to add the recordings
> to your list! However, if you do not hear any, please record that you
> observed “0” Whip-poor-wills. While it may feel silly to write it in,
> zeroes provide us with valuable information about a species’ absence in an
> area.
>
> In their breeding season, Whip-poor-wills favor open areas with sandy soils
> and pine stands or large powerline cuts, however we lack robust data on
> where they stop in Vermont. They could be just about anywhere—including
> downtown Burlington! So, even if you do not have much time during the day,
> you can go for a walk at sunset. Just make sure to bring your headlamp and
> phone to record frogs, snipe, owls, and, hopefully, Whip-poor-wills!
>
> https://ebird.org/vt/news/help-record-vermonts-whip-poor-wills
>
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
> Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>
>
> <http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/28/20 6:29 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 28, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
63 degrees, wind S 3mph, not nearly enough to keep mosquitos at bay. (I
marinate under a denim jacket for that.) Sky: overcast and bright; clouds
on the move. Permanent streams creep and whisper; channels narrow to within
a heartbeat of puddles. Red oak catkins: thin, stringy, and clustered, hang
like confetti from leaf axils. Compared to *zoftig *catkins of birch and
aspen an oak's are anemic. The tree itself: a restaurant, either sit-down
or take-out. Red oak acorns keep all winter (unlike those of white oak) and
feed the masses: crow, blue jay, turkey, grouse, bear, deer, gray fox,
raccoon, and rodents beyond naming. While working on a master's degree, I
unzipped many fishers caught during New Hampshire's trapping season; their
stomachs jammed with acorns, not porcupine (or cat).

The slurred whistle of eastern wood pewee (FOY) out of the oaks. Like that
of chickadee and white-throated sparrow, a song easy to mimic. A poignant
whistle, *PEEaweee*, all the more poignant in late August when nearly every
other neotropical bird has gone home.

Best bird: red-shouldered hawk, scanning the marsh from a pine limb.
Flushes. Warblers: black-throated blue; black-throated green;
chestnut-sided; yellowthroat; Nashville; black and white; yellow; ovenbird.
Although it may not be the most numerous warbler, ovenbird by far the most
conspicuous; calls attention to itself . . . like Hermione Granger
impatiently waving her hand in class to be noticed. Tanager singing in red
oak, framed by scraggly catkins. If a rose-breasted grosbeak sounds like a
robin that's taken opera lesson, a tanager sounds like a robin with a
pack-a-day habit.

In 2019, approximately fourteen thousand pairs of bald eagles nested in the
continental United States. In New York alone, the number approached five
hundred pairs, more than the entire lower forty-eight states had in 1963
when DDT had brought the birds to their knees. Their success can be traced
back to June 16, 1962, the day *The New Yorker* published the first of
three installments of Rachel Carson's *Silent Spring*, which spawned the
modern environmental movement amid shoals of apathy. I think of this as I
brush mosquitos away from my face.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 7:58 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Heron Rookery on Rte 7 Arlington - and BOBCAT!
None. This nesting area is located in VT - USA - North America. 😏

On Wed, May 27, 2020 at 3:30 PM Roy Pilcher <
<00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> A question Ruth- How many ROOKS did you see in the HERONRY?
> Cheers, Roy Pilcher
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Tue, May 26, 2020 10:37 pm
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Heron Rookery on Rte 7 Arlington - and BOBCAT!
>
> On the way home from N Bennington Martha Pfeiffer and I stopped to tally
> maybe 3 occupied nests at rte 7 heron rookery - 2 adults at 2 nests and
> some white fuzz showing. What first caught our eye was a black and white
> bird which we thought was a BAEA. We parked, walked back and it flew when
> we weren't looking before we could get a positive ID. Before flight we we
> more thinking osprey. Either one would be first in s Vt as nesters. The
> nest most to the N. at the rookery is at the top of a tall snag. It is flat
> and looks much more substantial than the heron nests. We began to speculate
> osprey?? Has anyone else seen osprey in area or evidence of nesting? I
> know there have been several report of BAEA, but don't think 2 at once.
> Only 5 tree swallows😓
>
> Further N on there was a dead critter in the s bound lane. We both did a
> double take and turned around. It, indeed, was a roadkill bobcat who was
> still limp. The ravens were circling. I dragged it off the road.. to then
> confirm sex - a nursing female - a whole family probably down the tubes,
> unless the yg are old enough, and Dad good enough to keep them fueled. So
> sad. In beautiful shape. Posted to I-naturalist. Should other departments
> be notified. I have added the link to my i-nat report. Not sure if others
> can see it or how it can be share. Please advise....
>
>
> https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=any&user_id=ruthstewart&verifiable=any
>
>
>
> --
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset VT
>


--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 7:53 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
Doesn't look like very restful night duty for Mrs. Are you physically
splicing the footage that we see before posting? Is the camera running
24/7? I noticed removal of the fecal sack by 'ingestion!'

ruth stewart
e dorset

On Wed, May 27, 2020 at 1:13 PM Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:

> Trying to answer Ruth's question, 'what happens at night?' The camera will
> record a 12-second clip when it detects motion (takes five minutes to
> reset,
> so the maximum is 12 clips per hour). Today's video is a series of
> 12-second
> clips spliced together. It is in black & white because the light source is
> infrared LEDs. The LEDs are supposed to emit outside of the bird's range of
> vision, they shouldn't notice when the IR is on.
>
>
>
> FLV
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-27-2020.html
>
>
>
> MP4
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
>
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>
>

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 4:39 pm
From: Peter Riley <priley55...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Yellow-throated Vireo
This afternoon at Woodside in Essex there was a Yellow-throated Vireo about two hundred yards east of the overlook bench just where the trail turns right and heads back down into the riparian habitat. It was singing pretty constantly so it shouldn't be too hard to get a look. Of course, it was up in the canopy but did come down to the mid-levels for a bit.
All other birds ID'd were the usual suspects but it seems like there's a Redstart singing every 50 feet or so in there. I've found several nests in the past few days and a Least Flycatcher nest, too.
Good birding to all.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 12:30 pm
From: Roy Pilcher <00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Heron Rookery on Rte 7 Arlington - and BOBCAT!
A question Ruth- How many ROOKS did you see in the HERONRY?
Cheers, Roy Pilcher

-----Original Message-----
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
To: <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Tue, May 26, 2020 10:37 pm
Subject: [VTBIRD] Heron Rookery on Rte 7 Arlington - and BOBCAT!

On the way home from N Bennington Martha Pfeiffer and I stopped to tally
maybe 3 occupied nests at rte 7 heron rookery - 2 adults at 2 nests and
some white fuzz showing. What first caught our eye was a black and white
bird which we thought was a BAEA. We parked, walked back and it flew when
we weren't looking before we could get a positive ID. Before flight we we
more thinking osprey. Either one would be first in s Vt as nesters. The
nest most to the N. at the rookery is at the top of a tall snag. It is flat
and looks much more substantial than the heron nests. We began to speculate
osprey??  Has anyone else seen osprey in area or evidence of nesting?  I
know there have been several report of BAEA, but don't think 2 at once.
Only 5 tree swallows😓

Further N on there was a dead critter in the s bound lane. We both did a
double take and turned around. It, indeed, was a roadkill bobcat who was
still limp. The ravens were circling. I dragged it off the road.. to then
confirm sex - a nursing female - a whole family probably down the tubes,
unless the yg are old enough, and Dad good enough to keep them fueled. So
sad. In beautiful shape. Posted to I-naturalist. Should other departments
be notified. I have added the link to my i-nat report. Not sure if others
can see it or how it can be share. Please advise....

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=any&user_id=ruthstewart&verifiable=any



--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 10:13 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
Trying to answer Ruth's question, 'what happens at night?' The camera will
record a 12-second clip when it detects motion (takes five minutes to reset,
so the maximum is 12 clips per hour). Today's video is a series of 12-second
clips spliced together. It is in black & white because the light source is
infrared LEDs. The LEDs are supposed to emit outside of the bird's range of
vision, they shouldn't notice when the IR is on.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-27-2020.html



MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 9:13 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 27, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center; Part 2
10:32 a.m. 78 degrees (starting to cook), wind SSE 3 mph (not enough to
push mosquitos away). In a dip on the eastern ridge, just above a rock
outcrop, The female goshawk spots, aimlessly looking for her. She flies
just above the canopy, screaming; lands in full view, then flies, lands,
flies . . . ad infinitum. She's stout and manuverable, a Jimmy Brown among
birds. In fact, if I had to draft a football team composed solely of
diurnal birds of prey, the goshawk's my fullback, no question . . . maybe
the entire backfield rolled into one robust, energetic bundle of life.
(Peregrine's my wide receiver, also no question.)

While the hawk leads me around, a hermit thrush and a blackburian warbler
sing in hemlock shade, unfazed. Background vocals for tiny hawklets.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 9:08 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 27, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
10:32 a.m. 78 degrees (starting to cook), wind SSE 3 mph (not enough to
wash mosquitos away). In a dip on the eastern ridge, just above a rock
outcrop, I look for the female goshawk, which spots me first, aimlessly
wandering around. She flies just above the canopy, screaming; lands in full
view, then flies, lands, flies . . . ad infinitum. She's stout and
manuverable, the Jimmy Brown of birds. In fact, if I had to draft a
football team composed solely of diurnal birds of prey, the goshawk's the
fullback, maybe an entire backfield rolled into one robust, energetic
bundle of life. (Peregrine's my wide receiver.)

While the hawk makes her presence known, a hermit thrush and a
blackburian warbler sing in hemlock shade, unfazed. Background vocals for
tiny hawklets.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 6:52 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pomainville
I visited Pomainville early this morning. Anyone planning to go should do so soon as the grass is getting tall. Also early morning can be very wet.
Lots of bird activity, bobolinks,
alder, willow, great crested flycatchers, bb cuckoos, yellow and common yellowthroat warblers and others.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 5:45 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Scarlet Tanager unusual around here (I think)
Gorgeous male singing persistently atop huge old oak, made his way
still singing into near hills rimming this valley/river spot. They
nested where I used to live (high elev), a thrill.Veer Frost,
Passumpsic NEK
_ _

_The biologist EO Wilson has warned that, as the extinction rate
climbs, humans are entering “The Eremocene” – the Age of
Loneliness._ --Robert Macfarlane_ _

___ _

Sent using Hushmail
 

Back to top
Date: 5/27/20 5:31 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 27, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:14 a.m. 60 degrees, windless out of the N (says my weather app). No
breath to the morning. Still enough and cool enough for mist to gather
above the wetland and nearly erase the western shoreline. No sign of Mount
Ascutney. Intermittent streams at a standstill, puddling. Some already dry.
The two permanent streams I cross each morning, the wetland's umbilical
connection to the east, flow slowly and quietly, moving far less water and
freight than last month. Still enough for mosquitos, which accompany me
every step of the way.

Last night I heard gray treefrogs (*Dryophytes versicolor*).
First-of-the-year in the Hollow. They're on their way to water; a uvular
trill or three rains down from the aspens. A gray treefrog is Vermont's
version of a chameleon. Inside thighs are bright, eye-popping, yellow,
everything else variable: green, gray, black, brown, almost white. Unlike a
*real* chameleon, the frog transitions outfit slowly, too slow to watch.
Memory: I owe the only ruby-throated hummingbird nest I ever found to a
gray treefrog. Some years ago, while looking through my camera's
viewfinder, framing a treefrog, an out-of-focus hummingbird flew in to view
and then settled into a tiny lichen-decorated nest, just behind the frog.

DOR: Pre-shed milk snake, her skin dulled by winter. She was large enough
to swallow a chipmunk. Slow enough to be run over on her way to the wetland
. . . to a smorgasbord of rodents.

AOR: Robin and junco grit gathering. And a slug that appears lost.

Just beyond the snake carcass, a broad-winged hawk flushes from a roadside
limb, silent as mist. Like goshawks, broadwings hunt from perches, often
adjacent to a woodland opening (i.e. roads). Unlike goshawks, however, no
chase involved, just a devilish drop. American toads, chipmunks, and garter
snakes preferred menu items. A male mallard stands on the shoreline of the
pond; too big to entice a broadwing. (Not too big for a goshawk.) Turkeys
gobble in the woods above the pond. First time I've heard them there. A
black-throated blue warbler (FOY) singing in ash. Did he arrive last night
or did I just miss him for the past two weeks?

Chestnut-side warbler, untroubled by mosquitos, singing in the cherry,
again. Guttural and predicable. Not likely headed for a 2021 Grammy
nomination. But what a marvelous looking bird . . . and trusting. An
uncompleted story within a panorama of time that stretches from an
unpeopled past into an unimagined future, a colorful package of genetic
material endless honed by the world it lives in.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 7:37 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Heron Rookery on Rte 7 Arlington - and BOBCAT!
On the way home from N Bennington Martha Pfeiffer and I stopped to tally
maybe 3 occupied nests at rte 7 heron rookery - 2 adults at 2 nests and
some white fuzz showing. What first caught our eye was a black and white
bird which we thought was a BAEA. We parked, walked back and it flew when
we weren't looking before we could get a positive ID. Before flight we we
more thinking osprey. Either one would be first in s Vt as nesters. The
nest most to the N. at the rookery is at the top of a tall snag. It is flat
and looks much more substantial than the heron nests. We began to speculate
osprey?? Has anyone else seen osprey in area or evidence of nesting? I
know there have been several report of BAEA, but don't think 2 at once.
Only 5 tree swallows😓

Further N on there was a dead critter in the s bound lane. We both did a
double take and turned around. It, indeed, was a roadkill bobcat who was
still limp. The ravens were circling. I dragged it off the road.. to then
confirm sex - a nursing female - a whole family probably down the tubes,
unless the yg are old enough, and Dad good enough to keep them fueled. So
sad. In beautiful shape. Posted to I-naturalist. Should other departments
be notified. I have added the link to my i-nat report. Not sure if others
can see it or how it can be share. Please advise....

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?place_id=any&user_id=ruthstewart&verifiable=any



--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 7:20 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Golden-wing Warbler
Bird report from Martha Pfeiffer and Ruth Stewart


348 Whipstock Road, Bennington, Vermont, US (42.898, -73.257), Bennington,
Vermont, US
May 26, 2020 8:26 AM - 10:11 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.3 mile(s)
27 species (+1 other taxa)

Wild Turkey 3 Only MP saw
Great Blue Heron 1 Fly over
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Pileated Woodpecker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 4 Only MP heard
Eastern Kingbird 1
Red-eyed Vireo 5
Blue Jay 1
American Crow 2
Black-capped Chickadee 5
Tufted Titmouse 1 only MP saw/heard
Gray Catbird 6
Wood Thrush 6 pair seen. One CN. Rest heard. Active song compared to
last year
American Robin 1
Field Sparrow 2
Song Sparrow 2
Baltimore Oriole 2
Common Grackle 3
Ovenbird 5
Golden-winged/Blue-winged Warbler 1 Two quick views of bird foraging
in leafed tree. Definite yellow on wings with black bib/throat and white
belly. Experienced enough with this specie to know what it was, but not
enough of a view to determine if hybrid.
Common Yellowthroat 3
American Redstart 2
Yellow Warbler 1
Chestnut-sided Warbler 5
Black-throated Blue Warbler 2
Scarlet Tanager 3
Northern Cardinal 2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69695758

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 11:44 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Tuesday edition
We get a good view of the chicks huddled together. Mom returns home, counts
her chicks, settles for a second, counts her chicks again, then remembers
she has an appointment elsewhere.



http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-26-2020.html



http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 11:41 am
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Pomainville WMA, Pittsford, May 25, 2020
Thanks for the report, Sue. Heading there later this week. What's the tick
situation there? (We were tick free at Cadwell on Sunday.)

On Mon, May 25, 2020, 8:50 PM Susan Elliott <
<00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Today at Pomainville WMA - the season is well underway. Saw two female
> Wood Ducks with a long train of ducklings behind each of them and a Song
> Sparrow carrying a huge caterpillar.
> Sue and Marv Elliott
> Pomainville WMA, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 25, 2020 9:42 AM - 12:59 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.67 mile(s)
> 49 species
>
> Canada Goose 2
> Wood Duck 21
> Mallard 7
> Mourning Dove 2
> Virginia Rail 2
> Sora 1
> Spotted Sandpiper 1
> American Bittern 1
> Turkey Vulture 2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Downy Woodpecker 1
> Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted) 3
> American Kestrel 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 1
> Alder Flycatcher 4
> Willow Flycatcher 3
> Least Flycatcher 4
> Great Crested Flycatcher 2
> Eastern Kingbird 4
> Yellow-throated Vireo 1
> Warbling Vireo 5
> American Crow 3
> Common Raven 2
> Black-capped Chickadee 4
> Tree Swallow 9
> Barn Swallow 1
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
> European Starling 2
> Gray Catbird 2
> Veery 4
> Wood Thrush 1
> American Robin 4
> Cedar Waxwing 6
> American Goldfinch 6
> Chipping Sparrow 1
> Song Sparrow 19
> Swamp Sparrow 7
> Bobolink 5
> Baltimore Oriole 3
> Red-winged Blackbird 17
> Brown-headed Cowbird 2
> Common Grackle 7
> Ovenbird 1
> Common Yellowthroat 20
> American Redstart 3
> Yellow Warbler 11
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
> Northern Cardinal 1
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69623866
>
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 11:13 am
From: Bridget Butler <birddiva...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Birds & Beers VT Online This Thursday!
Greetings All!

Birds & Beers VT will be hosted by the Mad Birders online on Thursday, May
28th at 7:30 pm! Our brewery site was to be Collaborative Brewing in
Waitsfield, but we'll have to wait a bit longer to gather in person. You
can still pick up beverages from them curbside seven days a week from 3-6
pm. Visit their website to learn how. <https://www.collabbrewvt.com/>

This month, I'll be asking you to share your best bird song impersonations,
so start practicing!

I’ll be hosting Birds & Beers online for the foreseeable future! Please
make sure you connect with me through Facebook or through the Birds & Beers
VT mailing list so that you’ll receive the online link information.

Here's the Zoom link for Thursday night:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81773330966?pwd=cFp6SGQ3L1QwSEVsMUpwM0FIY2k1QT09
<https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81773330966?pwd=cFp6SGQ3L1QwSEVsMUpwM0FIY2k1QT09&fbclid=IwAR0umUcSMQWk15ehKTItknbLKsdecIORVse-SD7O9tuN5kHfe2oW_43Po28>

Meeting ID: 817 7333 0966
Password: 009359

Cheers!
Bridget

*Bridget Butler*

*Bird Diva Consulting*
*PO Box 613*
*St. Albans VT 05478*
*(802) 393-4147*
*Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com/>*
*Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
*Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
*Instagram: @BirdDiva <https://www.instagram.com/birddiva/>*
*Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT>*
*Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*


<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
www.avast.com
<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 10:13 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Memorial Day edition
We get a good look at the chicks before mom shows up with food. She settles
for just a second before heading back out. Dad makes a cameo appearance
about the 2:00 mark. Mom returns about 5:00 and settles in.


FLV:
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-25-2020.html



MP4:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/26/20 5:31 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 26, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:17 a.m. 57 degrees, wind NNE 1 mph. Sky: nothing to consider, thick,
uniform skin of gray, wall to wall; not a highlight to be found. Male
flowers of white ash everywhere, a great sweep of procreant energy, now
spent; now, woodside litter. Ash, lagging behind all its neighboring
hardwoods, makes up for a slow start (as usual); then, all at once, an
explosion of leaves and flowers. Baby ash leaves, daintily compound, take
their time growing . . . still, the tree looks like a rice painting, each
twig holding a perfect small bouquet, emerald green and lacey. A tree, like
a mammal, with separate sexes. As a boy, playing on the sandlots of Long
Island, I was under the spell of white ash; the only wood that ever spoke
to me. Its pitch; its resonance. I lived for that sound. Sitting in the
bleachers, at the Stadium, far from home plate, I held my breath whenever
Mickey Mantle launched a baseball. Oh, such a distinctive *crack*. A
chill-producing crack. White ash and white ash only. Who had ever heard of
an aluminum baseball bat?



Mosquitos are here. Twenty years ago, when beaver ruled, a small legion of
dead pine stood in the wetland, their boney, horizontal branches a perch
for everything from bald eagle to kingbird; a dozen pairs of swallows
nested out there. Mostly, tree swallows, maybe a rough-winged swallow or
two. Today, only one tree stands, branchless . . . not a swallow to be
seen. Note to self: put up swallow boxes . . . everywhere. Bead the wetland
with boxes, a necklace of wood.



Fastidious and oblivious (at least to me), a chickadee preens under its
wing, held at a crooked angle. I stop to watch. Mosquitos stop to feed.
Across the road, the chestnut-sided warbler sings in the black cherry,
salutation to an unseen sun.



A large bird flies over the road. One flap, then another; and then sail,
arrow straight through the heart of the flat- morning light. Gone in an
eye-blink. It’s a pattern I know. A goshawk? Maybe yes. Maybe no. But the
potential to see one is real, as the potential to see a bobcat, a
collateral gift from an already generous landscape.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/20 5:50 pm
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pomainville WMA, Pittsford, May 25, 2020
Today at Pomainville WMA - the season is well underway. Saw two female Wood Ducks with a long train of ducklings behind each of them and a Song Sparrow carrying a huge caterpillar. 
Sue and Marv Elliott
Pomainville WMA, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 25, 2020 9:42 AM - 12:59 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.67 mile(s)
49 species

Canada Goose  2
Wood Duck  21
Mallard  7
Mourning Dove  2
Virginia Rail  2
Sora  1
Spotted Sandpiper  1
American Bittern  1
Turkey Vulture  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  3
American Kestrel  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Alder Flycatcher  4
Willow Flycatcher  3
Least Flycatcher  4
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  4
Yellow-throated Vireo  1
Warbling Vireo  5
American Crow  3
Common Raven  2
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Tree Swallow  9
Barn Swallow  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  1
European Starling  2
Gray Catbird  2
Veery  4
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  4
Cedar Waxwing  6
American Goldfinch  6
Chipping Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  19
Swamp Sparrow  7
Bobolink  5
Baltimore Oriole  3
Red-winged Blackbird  17
Brown-headed Cowbird  2
Common Grackle  7
Ovenbird  1
Common Yellowthroat  20
American Redstart  3
Yellow Warbler  11
Chestnut-sided Warbler  2
Northern Cardinal  1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69623866



 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/20 10:25 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warblers Chittenden Brook Trail, May 25, 2020
Forgot to include:
Mourning warbler
Common yellowthroat
Chestnut- sided warbler
These heard on as I drove up the access road.

Sent from my iPod
>
> A lovely hike this morning. The painted trillium were numerous and beautiful.
> Sue Wetmore
>>
>> Chittenden Brook Trail, Rutland, Vermont, US
>> May 25, 2020 8:20 AM - 11:50 AM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 3.9 mile(s)
>> 17 species
>>
>> Hairy Woodpecker 1
>> Blue-headed Vireo 3 songs were slightly off the norm.
>> Red-eyed Vireo 11
>> Blue Jay 4
>> American Crow 1
>> Black-capped Chickadee 2
>> Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
>> Winter Wren 3 all singing
>> Hermit Thrush 1
>> American Robin 5
>> Ovenbird 13
>> Louisiana Waterthrush 1
>> American Redstart 2
>> Blackburnian Warbler 1
>> Black-throated Blue Warbler 12
>> Black-throated Green Warbler 6 all singing
>> Scarlet Tanager 1
>>
>> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69624530
>>
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/20 10:21 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Chittenden Brook Trail, May 25, 2020
A lovely hike this morning. The painted trillium were numerous and beautiful.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Chittenden Brook Trail, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 25, 2020 8:20 AM - 11:50 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.9 mile(s)
> 17 species
>
> Hairy Woodpecker 1
> Blue-headed Vireo 3 songs were slightly off the norm.
> Red-eyed Vireo 11
> Blue Jay 4
> American Crow 1
> Black-capped Chickadee 2
> Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
> Winter Wren 3 all singing
> Hermit Thrush 1
> American Robin 5
> Ovenbird 13
> Louisiana Waterthrush 1
> American Redstart 2
> Blackburnian Warbler 1
> Black-throated Blue Warbler 12
> Black-throated Green Warbler 6 all singing
> Scarlet Tanager 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69624530
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/20 10:11 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
The fifth chick hatched early this morning. Mom and dad spent the day
hauling food in.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-24-2020.html



MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/20 8:27 am
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Female Birds
You make some good points, Bridget. Years ago I was inspired by the tale of a well-known NY state birder named Dorothy who would never add a bird to her life list until she saw the female. I decided then and there that paying attention to the female of a species actually helped me learn more about that species, its behaviors, etc. than just ticking off a sighting based upon the “usual male characteristics.” And I really love it that more research is now directed toward female song and filling in those gaps in our knowledge. Thanks for your post on this subject!

Susan Fogleman
Campton NH



Susan Fogleman
<sfogleman...> <mailto:<sfogleman...>


“The universe is under no obligation to make sense to you.”
Neil deGrasse Tyson








> On May 25, 2020, at 10:09 AM, Bridget Butler <birddiva...> wrote:
>
> Greetings All!
>
> I've been watching the discussion roll out about Larry Levine's warbler ID
> challenge over the past few days on Facebook and here on the list serve.
>
> I'm wondering, how do we gauge our confidence level identifying female
> birds? And, is this an opportunity to fine-tune our skills in how we look
> at and assess female birds in terms of identification?
>
> This weekend a number of folks celebrated and participated in Birdathons
> and big days counting as many bird species as possible in one day. *Some
> other folks celebrated *Female Bird Day
> <https://femalebirdday.wordpress.com/?fbclid=IwAR2HW1wFdY_meOKuL9Rc2N_SibWMzNukuDQiiPStRzUu4L04Y5AsUCsnnrE>
> *,* a movement to draw attention to current knowledge, gaps in knowledge,
> and research about female birds.
>
> This year, my seven-year old son called me out for not writing down the
> female bird species we see on our Backyard Big Year List. He very wisely
> told me that "females should count too". We now mark our list accordingly
> when we've seen either sex or when the sexes are not distinguishable by
> plumage.
>
> AND, my skills are growing and changing as my attention has been called to
> notice female birds and female bird song.
>
> So, I think another way to look at Larry's photo is to see the opportunity
> here to push our observation skills a bit further. Spend a little more dirt
> time watching and noticing, especially without attachment to making a quick
> identification. And, make a point to search out and notice female birds,
> with an awareness of how we are engaging our senses to do so. Sharing our
> approach to doing so might also help the birding community as a whole
> improve their skill set around female birds.
>
> I encourage folks to check out the Female Bird Day website
> <https://femalebirdday.wordpress.com/?fbclid=IwAR2HW1wFdY_meOKuL9Rc2N_SibWMzNukuDQiiPStRzUu4L04Y5AsUCsnnrE>.
> Take
> a look at the links to some of the current research on female birds and the
> gaps in our collective knowledge.
>
> Thanks all for the discussion on Larry's Warbler! It's certainly inspired
> me to pay more attention on my birding adventures.
>
> Cheers!
> Bridget
>
> *Bridget Butler*
>
> *Bird Diva Consulting*
> *PO Box 613*
> *St. Albans VT 05478*
> *(802) 393-4147*
> *Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com/>*
> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
> *Instagram: @BirdDiva <https://www.instagram.com/birddiva/>*
> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT>*
> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/20 7:10 am
From: Bridget Butler <birddiva...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Female Birds & Larry's Warblers
Greetings All!

I've been watching the discussion roll out about Larry Levine's warbler ID
challenge over the past few days on Facebook and here on the list serve.

I'm wondering, how do we gauge our confidence level identifying female
birds? And, is this an opportunity to fine-tune our skills in how we look
at and assess female birds in terms of identification?

This weekend a number of folks celebrated and participated in Birdathons
and big days counting as many bird species as possible in one day. *Some
other folks celebrated *Female Bird Day
<https://femalebirdday.wordpress.com/?fbclid=IwAR2HW1wFdY_meOKuL9Rc2N_SibWMzNukuDQiiPStRzUu4L04Y5AsUCsnnrE>
*,* a movement to draw attention to current knowledge, gaps in knowledge,
and research about female birds.

This year, my seven-year old son called me out for not writing down the
female bird species we see on our Backyard Big Year List. He very wisely
told me that "females should count too". We now mark our list accordingly
when we've seen either sex or when the sexes are not distinguishable by
plumage.

AND, my skills are growing and changing as my attention has been called to
notice female birds and female bird song.

So, I think another way to look at Larry's photo is to see the opportunity
here to push our observation skills a bit further. Spend a little more dirt
time watching and noticing, especially without attachment to making a quick
identification. And, make a point to search out and notice female birds,
with an awareness of how we are engaging our senses to do so. Sharing our
approach to doing so might also help the birding community as a whole
improve their skill set around female birds.

I encourage folks to check out the Female Bird Day website
<https://femalebirdday.wordpress.com/?fbclid=IwAR2HW1wFdY_meOKuL9Rc2N_SibWMzNukuDQiiPStRzUu4L04Y5AsUCsnnrE>.
Take
a look at the links to some of the current research on female birds and the
gaps in our collective knowledge.

Thanks all for the discussion on Larry's Warbler! It's certainly inspired
me to pay more attention on my birding adventures.

Cheers!
Bridget

*Bridget Butler*

*Bird Diva Consulting*
*PO Box 613*
*St. Albans VT 05478*
*(802) 393-4147*
*Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com/>*
*Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
*Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
*Instagram: @BirdDiva <https://www.instagram.com/birddiva/>*
*Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT>*
*Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*


<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
www.avast.com
<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/20 6:28 am
From: Victoria Arthur <singtolive57...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] May 25, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
Thank you, Ted for the beautiful moments you have captured. Today, being my
birthday, I'm thinking of my grown kids and their growing here at our home,
dubbed "the Skyranch", where so many species abound through, and around,
our property. Where their love and respect for the natural world began, and
continues today, giving them solace and peace that they know how to find
just by walking out into it. You and your wife surely provided that for
your boys by your fine examples. Be well.

On Mon, May 25, 2020 at 8:46 AM Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> wrote:

> 5:17 a.m. 42 degrees, wind NNE 1 mph. Sky: mottled but mostly blue,
> wispy clouds coalesce in the south. Tributaries quiet down; veeries picking
> up the slack, singing along both permanent streams. A windrow of yellow
> birch catkins gathers along the edge of the road. Ash buds open; leaves and
> lacy. Against the sky, one small ash reminds me of a Japanese rice
> painting; every twig of every angled branch supports a bouquet of tiny
> leaves. As if to highlight a sense of the Far East, two chickadees and a
> Tennessee warbler measure the bouquets and then tweeze out inchworms,
> *Geometrid
> *moth larva, one after the other.
>
> Across the road, a chestnut-side warbler in a small black cherry sings,
> head back, beak to the sky . . . eye-level and arm's length. Does it get
> better than this? Even my dogs notice.
>
> Rose-breasted grosbeak makes music high in a maple; a heartfelt song that
> reminds me of my boys' childhood, when every grosbeak brought from them a
> burst of unbridled enthusiasm; a transient celebration of black and white
> and red, which lasted as long as the bird stayed in view . . . our world
> always richer for it. Thoughts of my boys entwine with grosbeak lyrics.
> This was once their valley, seat of their childhood. A synthesis of dry and
> wet they named *Coyote Hollow*, homage to the wild canids that sang them to
> sleep the night we moved in, a quarter of a century ago. Here they grew up
> in a landscape engorged in detail, often roaming with abandon, untethered
> from time and, momentarily, from responsibility. Blessed by their mother,
> they gathered tadpoles and cocoons and little snakes with red bellies;
> incubated turtle eggs and snake eggs; discovered where the vultures nested
> and the otter played. Cared for a weasel and a kestrel. For Casey and
> Jordy, Coyote Hollow forever stains their memory, beauty tinged with
> sadness. This is where life's earliest lessons were learned, and their
> mother's bones are here to remind them.
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/25/20 5:46 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 25, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:17 a.m. 42 degrees, wind NNE 1 mph. Sky: mottled but mostly blue,
wispy clouds coalesce in the south. Tributaries quiet down; veeries picking
up the slack, singing along both permanent streams. A windrow of yellow
birch catkins gathers along the edge of the road. Ash buds open; leaves and
lacy. Against the sky, one small ash reminds me of a Japanese rice
painting; every twig of every angled branch supports a bouquet of tiny
leaves. As if to highlight a sense of the Far East, two chickadees and a
Tennessee warbler measure the bouquets and then tweeze out inchworms,
*Geometrid
*moth larva, one after the other.

Across the road, a chestnut-side warbler in a small black cherry sings,
head back, beak to the sky . . . eye-level and arm's length. Does it get
better than this? Even my dogs notice.

Rose-breasted grosbeak makes music high in a maple; a heartfelt song that
reminds me of my boys' childhood, when every grosbeak brought from them a
burst of unbridled enthusiasm; a transient celebration of black and white
and red, which lasted as long as the bird stayed in view . . . our world
always richer for it. Thoughts of my boys entwine with grosbeak lyrics.
This was once their valley, seat of their childhood. A synthesis of dry and
wet they named *Coyote Hollow*, homage to the wild canids that sang them to
sleep the night we moved in, a quarter of a century ago. Here they grew up
in a landscape engorged in detail, often roaming with abandon, untethered
from time and, momentarily, from responsibility. Blessed by their mother,
they gathered tadpoles and cocoons and little snakes with red bellies;
incubated turtle eggs and snake eggs; discovered where the vultures nested
and the otter played. Cared for a weasel and a kestrel. For Casey and
Jordy, Coyote Hollow forever stains their memory, beauty tinged with
sadness. This is where life's earliest lessons were learned, and their
mother's bones are here to remind them.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 9:38 pm
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee?
Thanks, Ron!

--Miriam

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 24, 2020, at 3:05 PM, Ron Payne <rpayne72...> wrote:
>
> Yes, a three-stage trill. That's a Tennessee.
>
>
>
> ---
> Ron Payne
> Middlebury, VT
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, 24 May 2020 11:43:32 -0400, Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> wrote:
>
> I have a terrible auditory memory - it takes me many repeated hearings to get a song to stick in my head so I can immediately recall the singer. Double-checked this and pretty sure it’s a Tennessee Warbler but would love confirmation - couldn’t get eyes on the bird. Heard at my house in Monkton. (Lots of other stuff in the background too.)
>
> Thanks! https://www.dropbox.com/s/yefz1elrtx950vc/052420%20Tennessee.m4a?dl=0
>
> Miriam Lawrence
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 1:46 pm
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
Blessed be the peacemakers.....

On 5/24/2020 1:54 PM, Susan Fogleman wrote:
> Peace! I have an idea: Let’s call it “Larry’s Warbler” and just not worry about who thinks what. Photos can often be phrustrating.
>
> Susan Fogleman
> Campton NH
>
>
> Susan Fogleman
> <sfogleman...>
>
> "the fate of all conservationists [who] fall in love with the earth [is] to die broken hearted.”
> Nigel Collar
>
>> On May 24, 2020, at 10:30 AM, Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> wrote:
>>
>> I have no problem being in the minority. It is not a popularity contest. I responded to a request for an opinion which I have given. My reasons are there for all to consider. I remember once on the Records Committee we had a lengthy discussion of photos submitted of a flycatcher. There were a number of "experts" on the committee. We talked at length, then had a vote. About half of the members called the bird an Eastern Phoebe; the rest of the committee called it an empidonax. The report was accepted as a "flycatcher species."
>>
>> The point of the discussion is not who is "right." The point is that some IDs are not easy and sometimes it is better to leave a bird as a "possible" or as unidentified. Photos are tricky and can be very misleading. This is something that all serious birdwatchers should learn to appreciate.
>>
>> Fred
>>
>> On 5/24/2020 9:34 AM, Sue wrote:
>>> Well you are in the minority as others have agreed with me.
>>> I guess we'll agree to disagree.
>>> Sue
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPod
>>>
>>>> On May 24, 2020, at 9:00 AM, Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Just for the record, I continue to feel the bird pictured was an adult female Tennessee Warbler rather than a female Black-throated Blue. Unfortunately, the photos are now gone from Larry's checklist, but my strong sense from looking at them earlier was that the face of the bird lacked the dark auriculars of Bl-thr Blue (see Sibley). I think also the bill appeared quite pointed which would argue in favor of Tennessee (but without reviewing the photos I can only say this tentatively). Also I thought the gray head head of the bird pictured contrasted a bit with the the back which I fancied had a greenish tinge. Black-throated Blue would have a more slate-like cast, more or less continuous from crown down nape to mantle. I also think Larry's thinking that the bird might be an Orange-crowned should not be overlooked. I have seen hundreds of Orange-crowned in Arizona, Texas, Florida etc and never been tempted to call one a Black-throated Blue. Tennessee is the obvious villain, so to speak; even Nashville is a more likely candidate if the eye ring is not well seen. As for the eye arcs, I just didn't see them as sufficiently evident in the photos to say they pointed to Black-throated Blue.
>>>>
>>>> Photos are (or can be) very tricky. Sometimes people just see them differently, even after careful study. I guess I would have to look at these again. I certainly could be wrong. But I would go with the more likely candidate. I saw nothing in the photos to eliminate an adult female Tennessee in spring plumage. We aren't talking about the young birds seen in the fall.
>>>>
>>>> Fred Pratt
>>>>
>>>>> On 5/24/2020 6:11 AM, Craig Provost wrote:
>>>>> I think your photo shows a female Black-Throated Blue Warbler.
>>>>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 12:50 pm
From: Bob Phillips <155bphillips...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Leucistic Robin
A leucistic Robin has been seen repeatedly in my yard for the past two days.

Bob Phillips
Graniteville, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 12:05 pm
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tennessee?
Yes, a three-stage trill. That's a Tennessee.

 

---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT






On Sun, 24 May 2020 11:43:32 -0400, Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> wrote:

I have a terrible auditory memory - it takes me many repeated hearings to get a song to stick in my head so I can immediately recall the singer. Double-checked this and pretty sure it’s a Tennessee Warbler but would love confirmation - couldn’t get eyes on the bird. Heard at my house in Monkton. (Lots of other stuff in the background too.)

Thanks! https://www.dropbox.com/s/yefz1elrtx950vc/052420%20Tennessee.m4a?dl=0

Miriam Lawrence

Sent from my iPhone
 
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 10:54 am
From: Susan Fogleman <sfogleman...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
Peace! I have an idea: Let’s call it “Larry’s Warbler” and just not worry about who thinks what. Photos can often be phrustrating.

Susan Fogleman
Campton NH


Susan Fogleman
<sfogleman...>

"the fate of all conservationists [who] fall in love with the earth [is] to die broken hearted.”
Nigel Collar

> On May 24, 2020, at 10:30 AM, Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> wrote:
>
> I have no problem being in the minority. It is not a popularity contest. I responded to a request for an opinion which I have given. My reasons are there for all to consider. I remember once on the Records Committee we had a lengthy discussion of photos submitted of a flycatcher. There were a number of "experts" on the committee. We talked at length, then had a vote. About half of the members called the bird an Eastern Phoebe; the rest of the committee called it an empidonax. The report was accepted as a "flycatcher species."
>
> The point of the discussion is not who is "right." The point is that some IDs are not easy and sometimes it is better to leave a bird as a "possible" or as unidentified. Photos are tricky and can be very misleading. This is something that all serious birdwatchers should learn to appreciate.
>
> Fred
>
> On 5/24/2020 9:34 AM, Sue wrote:
>> Well you are in the minority as others have agreed with me.
>> I guess we'll agree to disagree.
>> Sue
>>
>> Sent from my iPod
>>
>>> On May 24, 2020, at 9:00 AM, Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Just for the record, I continue to feel the bird pictured was an adult female Tennessee Warbler rather than a female Black-throated Blue. Unfortunately, the photos are now gone from Larry's checklist, but my strong sense from looking at them earlier was that the face of the bird lacked the dark auriculars of Bl-thr Blue (see Sibley). I think also the bill appeared quite pointed which would argue in favor of Tennessee (but without reviewing the photos I can only say this tentatively). Also I thought the gray head head of the bird pictured contrasted a bit with the the back which I fancied had a greenish tinge. Black-throated Blue would have a more slate-like cast, more or less continuous from crown down nape to mantle. I also think Larry's thinking that the bird might be an Orange-crowned should not be overlooked. I have seen hundreds of Orange-crowned in Arizona, Texas, Florida etc and never been tempted to call one a Black-throated Blue. Tennessee is the obvious villain, so to speak; even Nashville is a more likely candidate if the eye ring is not well seen. As for the eye arcs, I just didn't see them as sufficiently evident in the photos to say they pointed to Black-throated Blue.
>>>
>>> Photos are (or can be) very tricky. Sometimes people just see them differently, even after careful study. I guess I would have to look at these again. I certainly could be wrong. But I would go with the more likely candidate. I saw nothing in the photos to eliminate an adult female Tennessee in spring plumage. We aren't talking about the young birds seen in the fall.
>>>
>>> Fred Pratt
>>>
>>>> On 5/24/2020 6:11 AM, Craig Provost wrote:
>>>> I think your photo shows a female Black-Throated Blue Warbler.
>>>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 10:28 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 24, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
11:46 a.m. 64 degrees, wind SSE 10 mph, exactly what warblers (and I)
waited for two weeks ago. Refreshing, if quiet. A large bird sails over the
trees, in and out of view; across a bay of reeds and cattails, wings
tucked, long tail pinched. I'm not sure what it is . . . I'm sure what it
isn't, though. It's neither a red-shouldered nor a broad-winged; not a
red-tailed nor a raven. I'm left with two choices: crow and goshawk
(wistful thinking).

A black-and-white warbler on a maple limb, striped like a cartoon jailbird,
sings a song barely audible; an *hors d'oeuvre *for a goshawk. A red-eyed
vireo, a between-meal snack, sings tediously and tenuously, not up to its
usual standards. A more substantial morsel, a robin picks through the
leaf-litter . . . more too its breast rust-red feathers. I imagine the
goshawk know that.

And, the day continues . . .
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 8:43 am
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Tennessee?
I have a terrible auditory memory - it takes me many repeated hearings to get a song to stick in my head so I can immediately recall the singer. Double-checked this and pretty sure it’s a Tennessee Warbler but would love confirmation - couldn’t get eyes on the bird. Heard at my house in Monkton. (Lots of other stuff in the background too.)

Thanks! https://www.dropbox.com/s/yefz1elrtx950vc/052420%20Tennessee.m4a?dl=0

Miriam Lawrence

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 7:30 am
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
I have no problem being in the minority. It is not a popularity contest.
I responded to a  request for an opinion which I have given. My reasons
are there for all to consider. I remember once on the Records Committee
we had a lengthy discussion of photos submitted of a flycatcher. There
were a number of "experts" on the committee. We talked at length, then
had a vote. About half of the members called the bird an Eastern Phoebe;
the rest of the committee called it an empidonax. The report was
accepted as a "flycatcher species."

The point of the discussion is not who is "right." The point is that
some IDs are not easy and sometimes it is better to leave a bird as a
"possible" or as unidentified. Photos are tricky and can be very
misleading. This is something that all serious birdwatchers should learn
to appreciate.

Fred

On 5/24/2020 9:34 AM, Sue wrote:
> Well you are in the minority as others have agreed with me.
> I guess we'll agree to disagree.
> Sue
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
>> On May 24, 2020, at 9:00 AM, Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> wrote:
>>
>> Just for the record, I continue to feel the bird pictured was an adult female Tennessee Warbler rather than a female Black-throated Blue. Unfortunately, the photos are now gone from Larry's checklist, but my strong sense from looking at them earlier was that the face of the bird lacked the dark auriculars of Bl-thr Blue (see Sibley). I think also the bill appeared quite pointed which would argue in favor of Tennessee (but without reviewing the photos I can only say this tentatively). Also I thought the gray head head of the bird pictured contrasted a bit with the the back which I fancied had a greenish tinge. Black-throated Blue would have a more slate-like cast, more or less continuous from crown down nape to mantle. I also think Larry's thinking that the bird might be an Orange-crowned should not be overlooked. I have seen hundreds of Orange-crowned in Arizona, Texas, Florida etc and never been tempted to call one a Black-throated Blue. Tennessee is the obvious villain, so to speak; even Nashville is a more likely candidate if the eye ring is not well seen. As for the eye arcs, I just didn't see them as sufficiently evident in the photos to say they pointed to Black-throated Blue.
>>
>> Photos are (or can be) very tricky. Sometimes people just see them differently, even after careful study. I guess I would have to look at these again. I certainly could be wrong. But I would go with the more likely candidate. I saw nothing in the photos to eliminate an adult female Tennessee in spring plumage. We aren't talking about the young birds seen in the fall.
>>
>> Fred Pratt
>>
>>> On 5/24/2020 6:11 AM, Craig Provost wrote:
>>> I think your photo shows a female Black-Throated Blue Warbler.
>>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 6:34 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
Well you are in the minority as others have agreed with me.
I guess we'll agree to disagree.
Sue

Sent from my iPod

> On May 24, 2020, at 9:00 AM, Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> wrote:
>
> Just for the record, I continue to feel the bird pictured was an adult female Tennessee Warbler rather than a female Black-throated Blue. Unfortunately, the photos are now gone from Larry's checklist, but my strong sense from looking at them earlier was that the face of the bird lacked the dark auriculars of Bl-thr Blue (see Sibley). I think also the bill appeared quite pointed which would argue in favor of Tennessee (but without reviewing the photos I can only say this tentatively). Also I thought the gray head head of the bird pictured contrasted a bit with the the back which I fancied had a greenish tinge. Black-throated Blue would have a more slate-like cast, more or less continuous from crown down nape to mantle. I also think Larry's thinking that the bird might be an Orange-crowned should not be overlooked. I have seen hundreds of Orange-crowned in Arizona, Texas, Florida etc and never been tempted to call one a Black-throated Blue. Tennessee is the obvious villain, so to speak; even Nashville is a more likely candidate if the eye ring is not well seen. As for the eye arcs, I just didn't see them as sufficiently evident in the photos to say they pointed to Black-throated Blue.
>
> Photos are (or can be) very tricky. Sometimes people just see them differently, even after careful study. I guess I would have to look at these again. I certainly could be wrong. But I would go with the more likely candidate. I saw nothing in the photos to eliminate an adult female Tennessee in spring plumage. We aren't talking about the young birds seen in the fall.
>
> Fred Pratt
>
>> On 5/24/2020 6:11 AM, Craig Provost wrote:
>> I think your photo shows a female Black-Throated Blue Warbler.
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 6:30 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 24, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:21 a.m. 38 degrees, wind SSW 1 mph. Sky: blue and blue, with filagrees of
white. Streams slow down; no longer in a hurry, expose sandbars, which
lengthen and widen by the day. Ash buds opening, slowly. Oak leaves bigger,
greener. Black cherry flower buds ready to pop. Pin cherry already has.
Mist rolls off the pond; none in the wetland.

The morning belongs to black-throated green warblers and ovenbirds,
vigorously singing, jockeying for land ownership, however temporary,
allocating resources within every dip and outcrop in the Hollow . . . the
great land grab of 2020, repeated each year, endlessly until time stops. As
to me, a roadside attraction holding a pair of leashed German shepherds,
the birds care not a whit . . . sing and sing and sing some more.

Farther down the valley, a fluffed-out chestnut side warbler perches on a
cherry twig, trimmed in cool light, a voice like Nina Simone, husky and
sweet. And veeries sing morsels of song, picking up choral slack left by
hermit thrushes, now handicapped by domestic chores. A robin wanders up a
dried stream bed, flipping matted leaves, finds one worm, and then another.
Pileated laughs, loudly and infectiously. A blue jay cobbles together a
song, part honk, part hawk. The drum of a grouse.

For a moment I can imagine a spinning Earth, a landscape leavened by
sunshine, where a tide of chlorophyll rises impeccably and (almost)
imperceptibly by the day, by the hour, by the moment out of Carolina and
eventually reaching into Coyote Hollow . . . gift of a ripening season.
And, me, stuck at home, attending the harvest.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 6:00 am
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
Just for the record, I continue to feel the bird pictured was an adult
female Tennessee Warbler rather than a female Black-throated Blue.
Unfortunately, the photos are now gone from Larry's checklist,  but my 
strong sense from looking at them earlier was that the face of the bird
lacked the dark auriculars of Bl-thr Blue (see Sibley). I think also the
bill appeared quite pointed which would argue in favor of Tennessee (but
without reviewing the photos I can only say this tentatively). Also I
thought the gray head head of the bird pictured contrasted a bit with
the the back which I fancied had a greenish tinge. Black-throated  Blue
would have a more slate-like cast, more or less continuous from crown
down nape to mantle. I also think Larry's thinking that the bird might
be an Orange-crowned should not be overlooked. I have seen hundreds of
Orange-crowned  in Arizona, Texas, Florida etc and never been tempted to
call one a Black-throated Blue. Tennessee is the obvious villain, so to
speak; even Nashville is a more likely candidate if the eye ring is not
well seen. As for the eye arcs, I just didn't see them as sufficiently
evident in the photos to say they pointed to Black-throated Blue.

Photos are (or can be) very tricky. Sometimes people just see them
differently, even after careful study. I guess I would have to look at
these again. I certainly could be wrong. But I would go with the more
likely candidate. I saw nothing in the photos to eliminate an adult
female Tennessee in spring plumage. We aren't talking about the young
birds seen in the fall.

Fred Pratt

On 5/24/2020 6:11 AM, Craig Provost wrote:
> I think your photo shows a female Black-Throated Blue Warbler.
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 4:57 am
From: LaBarr, Mark <Mark.LaBarr...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Golden-wings and Blue-wings
Greetings all,
Great to hear the discussions on Vermivora (the genus of Golden-wings and Blue-wings and everything in between). Over the years as Audubon Vermont has pursued various Golden-winged Warbler conservation efforts we have acquired a large array variation in plumage and song. Never a dull moment. Audubon and its partners (USFWS Partners Program, VTFWD Habitat Stamp Program, NRCS, VT Land Trust, local towns, conservation commissions and local land trusts and of course private landowners) have also developed and implemented an number of successful management strategies for making sure the right habitat remains there for them here in the Champlain Valley (https://vt.audubon.org/news/habitat-work-champlain-valley) . With a high level GIS Golden-wing Warbler Habitat Model developed by Steven Lamonde we have been able to identify areas to focus our efforts and by overlaying our sightings with what we find on eBird we are slowly but surely coming to a better understand how the Vermivora are using the changing habitats of the Champlain Valley. Kudos to Ian and Steven for refining these efforts on how we record this great variety of plumage characteristics and song. Keep up the good work and if you have questions about ongoing conservation efforts please don't hesitate to reach out.

Mark

Mark LaBarr
Audubon Vermont
<Mark.LaBarr...><mailto:<Mark.LaBarr...>


Mark LaBarr
Conservation Program Manager
Audubon Vermont
802-434-3068
<mlabarr...><mailto:<mlabarr...>
Pronouns: he, him, his
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 4:47 am
From: LaBarr, Mark <Mark.LaBarr...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.
Greetings all,
Great to hear the discussions on Vermivora (the genus of Golden-wings and Blue-wings and everything in between). Over the years as Audubon Vermont has pursued various Golden-winged Warbler conservation efforts we have acquired a large array variation in plumage and song. Never a dull moment. Audubon and its partners (USFWS Partners Program, VTFWD Habitat Stamp Program, NRCS, VT Land Trust, local towns, conservation commissions and local land trusts and of course private landowners) have also developed and implemented a number of successful management strategies for making sure the right habitat is there for them here in the Champlain Valley (https://vt.audubon.org/news/habitat-work-champlain-valley) . With a high level GIS Golden-wing Warbler Habitat Model developed by Steven Lamonde we have been able to identify areas to focus our efforts and by overlaying our sightings with what we find on eBird we are slowly but surely coming to a better understand how the Vermivora are using the changing habitats of the Champlain Valley. Kudos to Ian and Steven for refining these efforts on how we record this great variety of plumage characteristics and song. Keep up the good work and if you have questions about ongoing conservation efforts please don't hesitate to reach out.

Mark

Mark LaBarr
Audubon Vermont
<Mark.LaBarr...>

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Ian Worley
Sent: Saturday, May 23, 2020 7:41 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.

Hi everyone,

Lots of reports of winged-warblers in eBird from the Champlain Valley the last two weeks.  Below is the information email I sent out a week ago, in case you didn't see it.

There are many good documentations coming in.  To date about 85% of photos submitted as Blue-winged Warblers appear to be correct IDs. About 40% of photos submitted as Golden-winged Warblers are hybrids and not a pure Golden-winged.  About 70% of submissions with no photos are doing nice jobs of enumerating numerous diagnostic features that serve to identify pure Blue-wingeds and Golden-wingeds, and hybrids.  The remainder of the submissions don't describe enough characteristics to fulfill the ID.

When submitting more than one bird for a species or hybrid category, be sure to describe each individual bird.

It is nice to see so many descriptions of the vocalizations.  Taken as a whole they clearly illustrate that any pure species or hybrid might sing any of the songs.  Which means, of course, at least in the Champlain Valley population the song is not a diagnostic feature separating species.

When looking at possible pure Golden-wingeds, don't forget to note if there is any yellow wash on the breast or belly, which would indicate a hybrid.  Likewise, carefully look at and document the color of wing bars on any bird you see well enough to do so.  If the wing-panel on a possible Golden-winged is not essentially solid, a good description is helpful.

Gorgeous weather this holidaty weekend continues for tracking down these gorgeous species!  It seems that some new locations are being found.

Best wishes,

Ian
========================
May 17, 2020

Hello birders in search of the "winged-warblers" in Vermont.

These fascinating birds are back, perhaps where you have seen them before, or in newly evolving habitats as abandoned fields begin to fill with shrubs and trees.  Or maybe a familiar site has changed enough that it is no longer suitable.

This would be a good time to revisit, or visit for the first time, some documents which will tell you about the winged-warbler complex, what to look for when viewing the birds and identifying each individual, and how to submit to eBird.

----- For a Vermont background on the wing-warbler complex in the state, read about the "Golden-winged Warbler Conservation" project underway by Vermont Audubon:
https://vt.audubon.org/conservation/golden-winged-warbler-conservation

----- In that website is this link to a detailed article about the two species and their hybrids. Two important aspect of these birds are (a) vocalizations heard can not be used to determine whether the bird singing is one or the other of the species or a hybrid, and (b) IDs are dependent upon combinations of many plumage characteristics.  Here is the link:

https://vt.audubon.org/sites/default/files/static_pages/attachments/winged-warblers._how_to_tell_a_pure_species_from_a_hybrid._7-10-19e.pdf

*******----- The last page (page 7) of that article is a table to keep handy as you bird.  It has eleven diagnostic features to look for, features that will help you decide if the bird you are viewing is one of the two species, a named hybrid, a hybrid of some mix of characteristics, or not possible to figure our from what you saw or heard.

----- For figuring out how to submit your observation to eBird, use this guide from the Vermont eBird website:
https://ebird.org/vt/news/golden-blue-winged-warbler-potpourri-how-to-submit-to-ebird

As always, if you are able to photograph a bird or birds, multiple views are much more helpful than a single photo.  eBird allows up to ten photos per species.

Happy warblering!

Ian
Vermont eBird reviewer for the Champlain Valley

 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 4:27 am
From: Larry Levine <levine5279...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
Hey Craig

Yes. I see that now. Several folks have made that suggestion. I was hoping for the O-c Warbler.

Hope you are well
Larry
On May 24, 2020, 6:04 AM -0400, Craig Provost <cprovost88...>, wrote:
> I think your photo shows a female Black-Throated Blue Warbler.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/20 3:04 am
From: Craig Provost <cprovost88...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Larry"s Warbler
I think your photo shows a female Black-Throated Blue Warbler.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 6:17 pm
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Possible Orange-crowned Warbler. Seeking ID advice
Larry, I think your caution is well taken. An Orange-crowned should have
a dark line through the eye which I don't see on these photos. Also, it
usually shows eye crescents both above and below the eye. And the
eyebrow on your bird is more whitish than I would expect on an
Orange-crowned. Of course, the undertail coverts (yellow on an
Orange-crowned) are definitive but not visible in your photos. I agree
this bird is very tempting as an Orange-crowned but I think it is a
Tennessee.

Fred Pratt

On 5/23/2020 8:05 PM, Larry Levine wrote:
> Hi VT Birders
>
> I saw what I think was an Orange-crowned Warbler at Hinesburg Town Forest this morning. I am seeking some expert identification advice. I am just not sure. I am also thinking it may be a Tennessee Warbler. I have a few pictures attached on my ebird list. See link below.
>
> I had about a 10 second look and took only 2 quick pics.
>
> Thanks
> Larry Levine
> Jericho
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69505515
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 5:33 pm
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Common Nighthawk
Hawking insects just now over Ludlow village. Such a treat to see!

Zac Cota

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 5:06 pm
From: Larry Levine <levine5279...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Possible Orange-crowned Warbler. Seeking ID advice
Hi VT Birders

I saw what I think was an Orange-crowned Warbler at Hinesburg Town Forest this morning. I am seeking some expert identification advice. I am just not sure. I am also thinking it may be a Tennessee Warbler. I have a few pictures attached on my ebird list. See link below.

I had about a 10 second look and took only 2 quick pics.

Thanks
Larry Levine
Jericho

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69505515
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 2:38 pm
From: Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Fwd: Killer loon
Hurray for the “under bird” but the loon chick still died😥.

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 23, 2020, at 2:56 PM, Charlie Teske <cteske140...> wrote:
>
> 
>
>
>
>
> FYI--Don't be venturing near the loon nests!
>
> https://www.mainepublic.org/post/maine-loon-killed-bald-eagle-stabbing-it-heart-examination-shows
> --
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 2:12 pm
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird Cam, Saturday edition
!!!Brilliant and moving to see this, thank you for sharing, Ian! I
seem to see a blue hairband on that otherwise undressed chick : ).Veer

On 5/23/2020 at 4:29 PM, "Ian Clark" wrote:We have our first chick!
This is his? first meal. A second chick hatched
about 2:30 p.m. We're watching and waiting for the others.
FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-23-2020.html
MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 1:29 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird Cam, Saturday edition
We have our first chick! This is his? first meal. A second chick hatched
about 2:30 p.m. We're watching and waiting for the others.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-23-2020.html



MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

<http://www.IanClark.com> www.IanClark.com


 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 12:45 pm
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Fwd: Killer loon
Wow! Thanks for linking to this!

Jane
(Shoreham)

On Sat, 23 May 2020 14:56:18 -0400, Charlie Teske
<cteske140...> wrote:
> FYI--Don't be venturing near the loon nests!
> �
>
https://www.mainepublic.org/post/maine-loon-killed-bald-eagle-stabbing-it-heart-examination-shows
> --
>
>
> �
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 12:21 pm
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Shoveler, new Essex County bird
One other note for the day: I managed to catch a female Black-backed
Woodpecker trying to find the perfect place to drum on a standing dead snag,
interesting variation for those that are into this:



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S69514750



Tom
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 11:56 am
From: Charlie Teske <cteske140...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: Killer loon





FYI--Don't be venturing near the loon nests!

https://www.mainepublic.org/post/maine-loon-killed-bald-eagle-stabbing-it-heart-examination-shows
--



 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 11:25 am
From: Steven Lamonde <slamonde...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.
Hi Dave,

While eBird does not have profile pages for the winged-warbler hybrids, you
can explore maps of hybrid sightings via eBird:

Golden-winged Warbler x Blue-winged Warbler (hybrid)
<https://ebird.org/map/x00669?neg=true&env.minX=-173.92238248913338&env.minY=-20.913408122522927&env.maxX=51.0776175108666&env.maxY=64.64590782287743&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2020>
Brewster's Warbler (hybrid)
<https://ebird.org/map/brewar?neg=true&env.minX=-173.92238248913338&env.minY=-20.913408122522927&env.maxX=51.0776175108666&env.maxY=64.64590782287743&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2020>
Lawrence's Warbler (hybrid)
<https://ebird.org/map/lawwar?neg=true&env.minX=-79.48272199999998&env.minY=41.426977826938874&env.maxX=-65.42022199999998&env.maxY=46.24132036285134&zh=true&gp=true&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2020>

Enjoy!

Steven
<https://ebird.org/map/x00669?neg=true&env.minX=-173.92238248913338&env.minY=-20.913408122522927&env.maxX=51.0776175108666&env.maxY=64.64590782287743&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=1-12&bmo=1&emo=12&yr=all&byr=1900&eyr=2020>

On Sat, May 23, 2020 at 2:01 PM David Guertin <dave...> wrote:

> Ian,
>
> I really appreciate your efforts in clarifying the winged-warblers. I
> had been guilty of thinking of hybrids solely in terms of the
> Brewster's/Lawrence's hybrids named in the field guides, but have come
> to learn that it's way more interesting than that! Thank you for the
> education. These birds are fascinating. There's a male that has
> settled in near my house which I had previously identified as a
> Golden-winged, because that's what it looks like -- mostly. But a
> conspicuous wash of yellow on his breast indicates that he is indeed a
> hybrid.
>
> And there's nothing wrong with that!
>
> I want to find out more about hybrids that are being seen around here,
> and what different types of hybrids, because they are so interesting,
> but unfortunately eBird only seems to allow searching for "pure"
> species. I can search for Blue-wings, or Golden-wings, but not
> hybrids. To me, that's too bad, because they're as interesting in
> their own right as the pure species, other than the fact that they
> don't "count" for a checklist.
>
> I'll still enjoy the mostly-but-not-pure-Golden-winged Warbler at home
> as long as he chooses to stick around!
>
> Oh, and one other thing: our local not-quite-Golden-winged Warbler has
> been singing no less than three different variations of his song, one
> of which is a simple bee-bzzz that sounds just like a Blue-winged
> Warbler. So yeah, as you point out, song is not such a reliable
> characteristic of these birds.
>
> Dave G.
>
> Quoting Ian Worley <iworley...>:
>
> > Hi everyone,
> >
> > Lots of reports of winged-warblers in eBird from the Champlain
> > Valley the last two weeks. Below is the information email I sent
> > out a week ago, in case you didn't see it.
> >
> > There are many good documentations coming in. To date about 85% of
> > photos submitted as Blue-winged Warblers appear to be correct IDs.
> > About 40% of photos submitted as Golden-winged Warblers are hybrids
> > and not a pure Golden-winged. About 70% of submissions with no
> > photos are doing nice jobs of enumerating numerous diagnostic
> > features that serve to identify pure Blue-wingeds and
> > Golden-wingeds, and hybrids. The remainder of the submissions don't
> > describe enough characteristics to fulfill the ID.
> >
> > When submitting more than one bird for a species or hybrid category,
> > be sure to describe each individual bird.
> >
> > It is nice to see so many descriptions of the vocalizations. Taken
> > as a whole they clearly illustrate that any pure species or hybrid
> > might sing any of the songs. Which means, of course, at least in
> > the Champlain Valley population the song is not a diagnostic feature
> > separating species.
> >
> > When looking at possible pure Golden-wingeds, don't forget to note
> > if there is any yellow wash on the breast or belly, which would
> > indicate a hybrid. Likewise, carefully look at and document the
> > color of wing bars on any bird you see well enough to do so. If the
> > wing-panel on a possible Golden-winged is not essentially solid, a
> > good description is helpful.
> >
> > Gorgeous weather this holidaty weekend continues for tracking down
> > these gorgeous species! It seems that some new locations are being
> > found.
> >
> > Best wishes,
> >
> > Ian
> > ========================
> > May 17, 2020
> >
> > Hello birders in search of the "winged-warblers" in Vermont.
> >
> > These fascinating birds are back, perhaps where you have seen them
> > before, or in newly evolving habitats as abandoned fields begin to
> > fill with shrubs and trees. Or maybe a familiar site has changed
> > enough that it is no longer suitable.
> >
> > This would be a good time to revisit, or visit for the first time,
> > some documents which will tell you about the winged-warbler complex,
> > what to look for when viewing the birds and identifying each
> > individual, and how to submit to eBird.
> >
> > ----- For a Vermont background on the wing-warbler complex in the
> > state, read about the "Golden-winged Warbler Conservation" project
> > underway by Vermont Audubon:
> > https://vt.audubon.org/conservation/golden-winged-warbler-conservation
> >
> > ----- In that website is this link to a detailed article about the
> > two species and their hybrids. Two important aspect of these birds
> > are (a) vocalizations heard can not be used to determine whether the
> > bird singing is one or the other of the species or a hybrid, and (b)
> > IDs are dependent upon combinations of many plumage
> > characteristics. Here is the link:
> >
> >
> https://vt.audubon.org/sites/default/files/static_pages/attachments/winged-warblers._how_to_tell_a_pure_species_from_a_hybrid._7-10-19e.pdf
> >
> > *******----- The last page (page 7) of that article is a table to
> > keep handy as you bird. It has eleven diagnostic features to look
> > for, features that will help you decide if the bird you are viewing
> > is one of the two species, a named hybrid, a hybrid of some mix of
> > characteristics, or not possible to figure our from what you saw or
> > heard.
> >
> > ----- For figuring out how to submit your observation to eBird, use
> > this guide from the Vermont eBird website:
> >
> https://ebird.org/vt/news/golden-blue-winged-warbler-potpourri-how-to-submit-to-ebird
> >
> > As always, if you are able to photograph a bird or birds, multiple
> > views are much more helpful than a single photo. eBird allows up to
> > ten photos per species.
> >
> > Happy warblering!
> >
> > Ian
> > Vermont eBird reviewer for the Champlain Valley
>


--
Steven Lamonde
Conservation Biology (MS) candidate
Adjunct Faculty - Department of Environmental Studies
Manager - Antioch Spatial Analysis Lab
Antioch University New England
Keene, New Hampshire
<slamonde...>
(339) 236-1421
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 11:02 am
From: David Guertin <dave...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.
Ian,

I really appreciate your efforts in clarifying the winged-warblers. I
had been guilty of thinking of hybrids solely in terms of the
Brewster's/Lawrence's hybrids named in the field guides, but have come
to learn that it's way more interesting than that! Thank you for the
education. These birds are fascinating. There's a male that has
settled in near my house which I had previously identified as a
Golden-winged, because that's what it looks like -- mostly. But a
conspicuous wash of yellow on his breast indicates that he is indeed a
hybrid.

And there's nothing wrong with that!

I want to find out more about hybrids that are being seen around here,
and what different types of hybrids, because they are so interesting,
but unfortunately eBird only seems to allow searching for "pure"
species. I can search for Blue-wings, or Golden-wings, but not
hybrids. To me, that's too bad, because they're as interesting in
their own right as the pure species, other than the fact that they
don't "count" for a checklist.

I'll still enjoy the mostly-but-not-pure-Golden-winged Warbler at home
as long as he chooses to stick around!

Oh, and one other thing: our local not-quite-Golden-winged Warbler has
been singing no less than three different variations of his song, one
of which is a simple bee-bzzz that sounds just like a Blue-winged
Warbler. So yeah, as you point out, song is not such a reliable
characteristic of these birds.

Dave G.

Quoting Ian Worley <iworley...>:

> Hi everyone,
>
> Lots of reports of winged-warblers in eBird from the Champlain
> Valley the last two weeks.  Below is the information email I sent
> out a week ago, in case you didn't see it.
>
> There are many good documentations coming in.  To date about 85% of
> photos submitted as Blue-winged Warblers appear to be correct IDs.
> About 40% of photos submitted as Golden-winged Warblers are hybrids
> and not a pure Golden-winged.  About 70% of submissions with no
> photos are doing nice jobs of enumerating numerous diagnostic
> features that serve to identify pure Blue-wingeds and
> Golden-wingeds, and hybrids.  The remainder of the submissions don't
> describe enough characteristics to fulfill the ID.
>
> When submitting more than one bird for a species or hybrid category,
> be sure to describe each individual bird.
>
> It is nice to see so many descriptions of the vocalizations.  Taken
> as a whole they clearly illustrate that any pure species or hybrid
> might sing any of the songs.  Which means, of course, at least in
> the Champlain Valley population the song is not a diagnostic feature
> separating species.
>
> When looking at possible pure Golden-wingeds, don't forget to note
> if there is any yellow wash on the breast or belly, which would
> indicate a hybrid.  Likewise, carefully look at and document the
> color of wing bars on any bird you see well enough to do so.  If the
> wing-panel on a possible Golden-winged is not essentially solid, a
> good description is helpful.
>
> Gorgeous weather this holidaty weekend continues for tracking down
> these gorgeous species!  It seems that some new locations are being
> found.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Ian
> ========================
> May 17, 2020
>
> Hello birders in search of the "winged-warblers" in Vermont.
>
> These fascinating birds are back, perhaps where you have seen them
> before, or in newly evolving habitats as abandoned fields begin to
> fill with shrubs and trees.  Or maybe a familiar site has changed
> enough that it is no longer suitable.
>
> This would be a good time to revisit, or visit for the first time,
> some documents which will tell you about the winged-warbler complex,
> what to look for when viewing the birds and identifying each
> individual, and how to submit to eBird.
>
> ----- For a Vermont background on the wing-warbler complex in the
> state, read about the "Golden-winged Warbler Conservation" project
> underway by Vermont Audubon:
> https://vt.audubon.org/conservation/golden-winged-warbler-conservation
>
> ----- In that website is this link to a detailed article about the
> two species and their hybrids. Two important aspect of these birds
> are (a) vocalizations heard can not be used to determine whether the
> bird singing is one or the other of the species or a hybrid, and (b)
> IDs are dependent upon combinations of many plumage
> characteristics.  Here is the link:
>
> https://vt.audubon.org/sites/default/files/static_pages/attachments/winged-warblers._how_to_tell_a_pure_species_from_a_hybrid._7-10-19e.pdf
>
> *******----- The last page (page 7) of that article is a table to
> keep handy as you bird.  It has eleven diagnostic features to look
> for, features that will help you decide if the bird you are viewing
> is one of the two species, a named hybrid, a hybrid of some mix of
> characteristics, or not possible to figure our from what you saw or
> heard.
>
> ----- For figuring out how to submit your observation to eBird, use
> this guide from the Vermont eBird website:
> https://ebird.org/vt/news/golden-blue-winged-warbler-potpourri-how-to-submit-to-ebird
>
> As always, if you are able to photograph a bird or birds, multiple
> views are much more helpful than a single photo.  eBird allows up to
> ten photos per species.
>
> Happy warblering!
>
> Ian
> Vermont eBird reviewer for the Champlain Valley
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 10:48 am
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Shoveler: new bird Essex County
Using a spotting scope to bird at Mud Pond in Granby Friday I only saw the
head and part of the bill of a duck hidden in grasses across the pond for
just 2 seconds. (200 yards away) My first thought was Northern Shoveler but
the duck never came into the open. It was followed by a hen that I could get
no view of worthwhile. At home I made out my eBird report and decided not to
add the 'shoveler' sighting. After 3 hours of thought I went back and added
the duck to my report. My hesitation was although I don't keep lists, eBird
was letting me know this would be the 200 species I reported on eBird from
Essex County and it would be a new bird for that county. Still it bothered
me not to have some 'documentation' other than my eye witness account. This
morning on my way to Moose Bog I stopped at Meadow Street in Island Pond. At
5:15a.m. at the sewage ponds there were 2 Male Northern Shovelers waiting
for me to get my documentation photo! So in 23 hours' time at 2 different
locations a total of 4 Northern Shovelers in Essex County which had never
had reports of them before.



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S69513531



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S69457963



Tom Berriman
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 8:13 am
From: David Gusakov <dgusakov...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] rose-breasted grosbeaks
3 pairs nesting in the neighborhood. Their long vocalizations seem to be a story
about Ricky, and always include several repetitions of “Ricky is for real, hahahaha!”

DG
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 6:03 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 23, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:08 a.m. 48 degrees, wind ENE 1 mph, barely a noticeable breath. Clouds:
knuckle-like piles and mare's tails across the sky, cirrus and serious;
whites and light gray with the faintest hint of magenta. Some as
luminous as newly minted coins. Long rents between the shaped and shapeless
moisture . . . runs of azure straight to Valhalla.

The valley: green from wetland to ridge. No wonder the intermittent streams
stagnate and the permanent ones run quietly . . . the trees are
conduits between ground and sky, just like the science book says. Rain
soaks into the ground. Roots siphon water. Leaves exhale it, twenty-four
seven. Millions and millions of gallons of groundwater become
clouds, again. One big aqueous family. Although I'm part of that majestic
cycle, I cannot stop thinking of goshawks, out on a limb . . . watching.
Waiting.

A veery's cascading song. Behind a curtain for trees, a grouse drums on a
log stage, heedless and lonely. An alluring dance . . . but he can't be
sure who's watching. It's a brittle situation, one on the cusp of paralytic
fear. A century ago, a winter influx of goshawks on Martha's Vineyard
helped eliminate the last heath hens on Earth. "History," wrote E. O.
Wilson, "is not the prerogative of the human species. In the living world
there are millions of histories."

High in a bigtoothed aspen, framed by clusters of bright-green leaves, a
red-eyed vireo sings his tedious song. On and on and into the morning.
Above the vireo, a sapsucker rings a limb. A resident of a world gripped by
pandemic, I head home footloose and fancy-free
. . . homeboy at home.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/20 4:40 am
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird. ** Update.
Hi everyone,

Lots of reports of winged-warblers in eBird from the Champlain Valley
the last two weeks.  Below is the information email I sent out a week
ago, in case you didn't see it.

There are many good documentations coming in.  To date about 85% of
photos submitted as Blue-winged Warblers appear to be correct IDs. About
40% of photos submitted as Golden-winged Warblers are hybrids and not a
pure Golden-winged.  About 70% of submissions with no photos are doing
nice jobs of enumerating numerous diagnostic features that serve to
identify pure Blue-wingeds and Golden-wingeds, and hybrids.  The
remainder of the submissions don't describe enough characteristics to
fulfill the ID.

When submitting more than one bird for a species or hybrid category, be
sure to describe each individual bird.

It is nice to see so many descriptions of the vocalizations.  Taken as a
whole they clearly illustrate that any pure species or hybrid might sing
any of the songs.  Which means, of course, at least in the Champlain
Valley population the song is not a diagnostic feature separating species.

When looking at possible pure Golden-wingeds, don't forget to note if
there is any yellow wash on the breast or belly, which would indicate a
hybrid.  Likewise, carefully look at and document the color of wing bars
on any bird you see well enough to do so.  If the wing-panel on a
possible Golden-winged is not essentially solid, a good description is
helpful.

Gorgeous weather this holidaty weekend continues for tracking down these
gorgeous species!  It seems that some new locations are being found.

Best wishes,

Ian
========================
May 17, 2020

Hello birders in search of the "winged-warblers" in Vermont.

These fascinating birds are back, perhaps where you have seen them
before, or in newly evolving habitats as abandoned fields begin to fill
with shrubs and trees.  Or maybe a familiar site has changed enough that
it is no longer suitable.

This would be a good time to revisit, or visit for the first time, some
documents which will tell you about the winged-warbler complex, what to
look for when viewing the birds and identifying each individual, and how
to submit to eBird.

----- For a Vermont background on the wing-warbler complex in the state,
read about the "Golden-winged Warbler Conservation" project underway by
Vermont Audubon:
https://vt.audubon.org/conservation/golden-winged-warbler-conservation

----- In that website is this link to a detailed article about the two
species and their hybrids. Two important aspect of these birds are (a)
vocalizations heard can not be used to determine whether the bird
singing is one or the other of the species or a hybrid, and (b) IDs are
dependent upon combinations of many plumage characteristics.  Here is
the link:

https://vt.audubon.org/sites/default/files/static_pages/attachments/winged-warblers._how_to_tell_a_pure_species_from_a_hybrid._7-10-19e.pdf

*******----- The last page (page 7) of that article is a table to keep
handy as you bird.  It has eleven diagnostic features to look for,
features that will help you decide if the bird you are viewing is one of
the two species, a named hybrid, a hybrid of some mix of
characteristics, or not possible to figure our from what you saw or heard.

----- For figuring out how to submit your observation to eBird, use this
guide from the Vermont eBird website:
https://ebird.org/vt/news/golden-blue-winged-warbler-potpourri-how-to-submit-to-ebird

As always, if you are able to photograph a bird or birds, multiple views
are much more helpful than a single photo.  eBird allows up to ten
photos per species.

Happy warblering!

Ian
Vermont eBird reviewer for the Champlain Valley
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 6:05 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Union St Brandon, May 22, 2020
YO! A Meadow Lark and 4 species of swallows! Lucky you!


rstewart
e dorset

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 2:50 PM Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:

> Much more bird activity since the warm up.
> Sue Wetmore
> >
> > Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> > May 22, 2020 6:45 AM - 8:05 AM
> > Protocol: Traveling
> > 1.0 mile(s)
> > 40 species
> >
> > Canada Goose 10
> > Mallard 2 2 young ducklings unattended by female
> > Ruffed Grouse 1
> > American Bittern 1
> > Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
> > Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> > Downy Woodpecker 1
> > Great Crested Flycatcher 3
> > Eastern Kingbird 1
> > Yellow-throated Vireo 1
> > Warbling Vireo 2
> > Red-eyed Vireo 1
> > Blue Jay 2
> > American Crow 1
> > Common Raven 1
> > Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2
> > Tree Swallow 1
> > Barn Swallow 6
> > Cliff Swallow 5
> > Gray Catbird 1
> > Eastern Bluebird 2
> > Veery 1
> > Wood Thrush 1
> > American Robin 2
> > American Goldfinch 1
> > Song Sparrow 5
> > Swamp Sparrow 4
> > Bobolink 6
> > Eastern Meadowlark 1
> > Baltimore Oriole 1
> > Red-winged Blackbird 16
> > Common Grackle 4
> > Ovenbird 1
> > Northern Waterthrush 1
> > Common Yellowthroat 9
> > Yellow Warbler 1
> > Chestnut-sided Warbler 1
> > Scarlet Tanager 2
> > Northern Cardinal 1
> > Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
> >
> > View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69467260
> >
> > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
> https://ebird.org/home)
>


--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 6:03 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
My bluebirds hatched yesterday and Mom & Pop are all day busy. But what
happens at night? Does Mom spend the night on the nest? Soon the answer
will reveal itself on your cam.

Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 4:05 PM Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:

> Mrs. spent a quieter morning. She spent most of it in the box. She did run
> a
> few errands and can't resist looking out. No sign of chicks yet.
>
>
>
> FLV
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-22-2020.html
>
>
> MP4
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
>
>
>
> The bees have been cleaning the hive, getting rid of the debris from the
> previous occupants. The beekeeper tells me their number will increase
> rapidly once they have the hive up to snuff.
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bees/20200522-5.mp4
>
>
>
> My feeders have been attracting most of the usual suspects and a few less
> frequent visitors over the last few days. I got a chance to sit and catch
> up
> with the visitors, you can see a few pix at:
> https://www.ianclark.com/blog/2020/5/the-usual-suspects-may-2020
>
>
>
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>
>

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 2:49 pm
From: Carol Yarnell <yarnellcarol1219...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
I have bought Welch's natural jelly without corn syrup.

On Fri, May 22, 2020, 10:21 AM Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> wrote:

> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape
> jelly
> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
> okay?
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 1:05 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
Mrs. spent a quieter morning. She spent most of it in the box. She did run a
few errands and can't resist looking out. No sign of chicks yet.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-22-2020.html


MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



The bees have been cleaning the hive, getting rid of the debris from the
previous occupants. The beekeeper tells me their number will increase
rapidly once they have the hive up to snuff.

http://ian.ianclark.com/bees/20200522-5.mp4



My feeders have been attracting most of the usual suspects and a few less
frequent visitors over the last few days. I got a chance to sit and catch up
with the visitors, you can see a few pix at:
https://www.ianclark.com/blog/2020/5/the-usual-suspects-may-2020





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 11:52 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Orange-crowned warbler Cadwell Loop, May 22, 2020
Lots of singing and territorial interaction.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Pittsford Trails - Cadwell Loop, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 22, 2020 8:45 AM - 11:15 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> Checklist Comments: only did the east trail
> 31 species
>
> Wood Duck 1
> Mallard 2
> Mourning Dove 1
> Downy Woodpecker 1
> Hairy Woodpecker 1
> Northern Flicker 1
> Least Flycatcher 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 2
> Warbling Vireo 3
> Blue Jay 1
> Black-capped Chickadee 2
> White-breasted Nuthatch 3
> Gray Catbird 7
> Brown Thrasher 1
> Veery 4
> American Goldfinch 12
> White-throated Sparrow 1
> Song Sparrow 15
> Lincoln's Sparrow 1
> Baltimore Oriole 1
> Red-winged Blackbird 3
> Common Grackle 6
> Tennessee Warbler 1
> Orange-crowned Warbler 1 dull yellow overall , under tail dull yellow warbler, broken white eye ring, no wing bars, dusky yellow back.
> Common Yellowthroat 11
> American Redstart 8
> Yellow Warbler 5
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 1
> Northern Cardinal 4
> Indigo Bunting 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69467817
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 11:50 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Union St Brandon, May 22, 2020
Much more bird activity since the warm up.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 22, 2020 6:45 AM - 8:05 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 40 species
>
> Canada Goose 10
> Mallard 2 2 young ducklings unattended by female
> Ruffed Grouse 1
> American Bittern 1
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Downy Woodpecker 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 3
> Eastern Kingbird 1
> Yellow-throated Vireo 1
> Warbling Vireo 2
> Red-eyed Vireo 1
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow 1
> Common Raven 1
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2
> Tree Swallow 1
> Barn Swallow 6
> Cliff Swallow 5
> Gray Catbird 1
> Eastern Bluebird 2
> Veery 1
> Wood Thrush 1
> American Robin 2
> American Goldfinch 1
> Song Sparrow 5
> Swamp Sparrow 4
> Bobolink 6
> Eastern Meadowlark 1
> Baltimore Oriole 1
> Red-winged Blackbird 16
> Common Grackle 4
> Ovenbird 1
> Northern Waterthrush 1
> Common Yellowthroat 9
> Yellow Warbler 1
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 1
> Scarlet Tanager 2
> Northern Cardinal 1
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69467260
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 10:56 am
From: Peg Clement <clementpeg...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
I am now on Walker Road in Ferrisburg and seeing the sandhill crane about 25 yards from me foraging in the same field that Scott and Betty spoke about the last two days.

Peg Clement
Burlington

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 21, 2020, at 9:08 AM, Scott Morrical <smorrica...> wrote:
>
> Just saw the Sandhill Crane on Walker Road in Ferrisburg, where Betty described. It was literally walking along Walker Road! Good thing traffic is light. Photos later.
> Scott Morrical
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 20, 2020, at 4:52 PM, Betty Holton <bholton...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>>
>>
>> Hi sorry the crane is in Ferrisberg. Betty
>>
>>
>> On Wed, 20 May 2020 13:56:13 -0400, Betty Holton <bholton...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Birding on Walker Rd and saw one sandhill crane foraging in plowed field. I was looking for this bird after a
>> local told me he had seen the bird twice. It is located near Deer Valley Farm across the road where the field has been plowed. Betty
>> �
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 10:34 am
From: slybeck <slybeck...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
I feed all natural grape jelly.

Susan Lybeck
West Haven, Vt.

> On May 22, 2020, at 11:47 AM, sarah rosedahl <0000016265cd738b-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> They love oranges at my house.
> Sarah
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>
> On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 11:25 AM, maevulus<maevulus...> wrote: On 2020-05-22 10:19, Barbara Brosnan wrote:
>> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape
>> jelly
>> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
>> okay?
>>
>>
>>
>> Barbara Brosnan
>>
>> Weybridge
> Many store-bought jellies have corn syrup or corn-based sweeteners in
> them, and there's been some debate about whether these are healthy for
> birds. I can't find any study proving one way or the other, though. This
> post has some of the argument:
> https://blog.lauraerickson.com/2019/06/feeding-jelly-to-birds.html
> You can buy BirdBerry Jelly, which the orioles around here absolutely
> love. You can also feed them homemade jellies, which have nothing but
> fruit, sugar, water and pectin. I've tried quince and currant jellies
> with success.
> Several articles warn about putting out too much jelly at one time for
> several reasons. It's best to offer small batches each morning.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 9:00 am
From: Kit Hood <kithood3...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
Why not cut an orange in half? Works well.
Kit Hood
On May 22, 2020, at 11:11 AM, Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> wrote:

HFCSyrup, sorry...

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 11:10 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???

Right, but the FDA doesn't think that we were being compromised by FHCSyrup either. There are other options, right?

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 11:03 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???

AS far as I know grape jelly is the preferred treat for orioles and I have never heard of them being compromised by the syrup.

> On May 22, 2020, at 10:19 AM, Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> wrote:
>
> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape jelly
> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
> okay?
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:50 am
From: sarah rosedahl <0000016265cd738b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
They love oranges at my house. 
Sarah

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Fri, May 22, 2020 at 11:25 AM, maevulus<maevulus...> wrote: On 2020-05-22 10:19, Barbara Brosnan wrote:
> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape
> jelly
> is not good for the orioles she is feeding.  Anyone know if it is still
> okay?
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge
Many store-bought jellies have corn syrup or corn-based sweeteners in
them, and there's been some debate about whether these are healthy for
birds. I can't find any study proving one way or the other, though. This
post has some of the argument:
https://blog.lauraerickson.com/2019/06/feeding-jelly-to-birds.html
You can buy BirdBerry Jelly, which the orioles around here absolutely
love. You can also feed them homemade jellies, which have nothing but
fruit, sugar, water and pectin. I've tried quince and currant jellies
with success.
Several articles warn about putting out too much jelly at one time for
several reasons. It's best to offer small batches each morning.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center

 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:40 am
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
Right. It stands to say that if birds are canaries in the coal mine and if HFCSyrup and too much sugar are really bad for humans, then they can't be great for the birds.

There have been some emails today on the WV listserv discussing the lack of flying insects down south here due to the colder temps we've had. It hasn't been pretty for the birds this spring, either. If there was a year that the BBS (Breeding Bird Survey) REALLY needed to be run, this is one. I'd say that if whatever state you are in has relaxed its stay-at-home orders, and if your BBS route stays in legal, safe areas, perhaps try to run your route(s) to keep a good data stream. I plan on it here, and will turn in my data to my regional coordinators.

Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of maevulus <maevulus...>
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 11:24 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???

On 2020-05-22 10:19, Barbara Brosnan wrote:
> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape
> jelly
> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
> okay?
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge
Many store-bought jellies have corn syrup or corn-based sweeteners in
them, and there's been some debate about whether these are healthy for
birds. I can't find any study proving one way or the other, though. This
post has some of the argument:
https://blog.lauraerickson.com/2019/06/feeding-jelly-to-birds.html
You can buy BirdBerry Jelly, which the orioles around here absolutely
love. You can also feed them homemade jellies, which have nothing but
fruit, sugar, water and pectin. I've tried quince and currant jellies
with success.
Several articles warn about putting out too much jelly at one time for
several reasons. It's best to offer small batches each morning.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:25 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
On 2020-05-22 10:19, Barbara Brosnan wrote:
> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape
> jelly
> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
> okay?
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge
Many store-bought jellies have corn syrup or corn-based sweeteners in
them, and there's been some debate about whether these are healthy for
birds. I can't find any study proving one way or the other, though. This
post has some of the argument:
https://blog.lauraerickson.com/2019/06/feeding-jelly-to-birds.html
You can buy BirdBerry Jelly, which the orioles around here absolutely
love. You can also feed them homemade jellies, which have nothing but
fruit, sugar, water and pectin. I've tried quince and currant jellies
with success.
Several articles warn about putting out too much jelly at one time for
several reasons. It's best to offer small batches each morning.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:13 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 22, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:08 a.m. 41 degrees, wind ENE 0 mph. Sky: blue with thin, wispy clouds,
gilded by sunlight. Ostrich fern unfurled; more like a tapered tail feather
than a fiddlehead, well beyond consumption. Cinnamon and interrupted fern
are also knee-high. Bracken's first appearance roadside, purple-green. Ash
still in bud; still good for spotting warblers. Hazelnut flower buds swell,
sheltered by toothy, mint-green leaves. Yellow birch catkins
yellow. Brushstrokes of sunlight run down the western flank; chlorophyll
runs up, awakening oaks, their leaves as tiny as a mouse ear.

Late yesterday afternoon, my neighbor led me into a wooded crease on the
northeastern shoulder of the Hollow, not too far from his house. Halfway up
an unimposing pine, a pair of goshawks had wedged their nest, a great
burden of sticks, substantial for substantial birds. The female (much the
larger) tore through the weave of branches screaming at us. Perched and
flew, always screaming. The male, also screaming, appeared and
disappeared, never perched. Magisterial birds . . . pale as moonlight.
Red-eyes that burn holes in squirrels and hare. Grouse's grim reaper. For
me, unalloyed magic giving weight to a landscape without being seen. In
fact, until yesterday, I had no idea they were there.

A magisterial gymnast. Gravity assists a peregrine. Goshawks assist
themself, scorch nearly 40 mph through the woods, twisting and turning
between branches, around trees, diving into brambles. Type A personality,
maybe, triple-A. Goshawks are an epitome of hyperactivity, acutely and
deadly focused like heat-seeking missiles. A shrew with wings, a
hummingbird with appetite, a goshawk burns calories, needs food. A pair
hunt many valleys, perhaps entire watersheds and ranges. Which is why
they're as rare as Indianhead pennies.

Immediately, these birds loan the Hollow their unimpeachable gravitas.
Bitterns beware.

A sapsucker, PowerBar for a goshawk, taps the same maple, the fifth morning
in a row. A pair of pine warblers chase each other from spruce to cherry.
After the pines leave, a chestnut-sided warbler lands and then sings. A
female goldfinch, not impressed, shoos him away.

Some core of desire satisfied, I slowly walk toward home thinking of
goshawks; my view of the neighborhood has undergone a seismic shift.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:11 am
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
HFCSyrup, sorry...

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 11:10 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???

Right, but the FDA doesn't think that we were being compromised by FHCSyrup either. There are other options, right?

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 11:03 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???

AS far as I know grape jelly is the preferred treat for orioles and I have never heard of them being compromised by the syrup.

> On May 22, 2020, at 10:19 AM, Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> wrote:
>
> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape jelly
> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
> okay?
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:10 am
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
Right, but the FDA doesn't think that we were being compromised by FHCSyrup either. There are other options, right?

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Sent: Friday, May 22, 2020 11:03 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???

AS far as I know grape jelly is the preferred treat for orioles and I have never heard of them being compromised by the syrup.

> On May 22, 2020, at 10:19 AM, Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> wrote:
>
> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape jelly
> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
> okay?
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:07 am
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
same as hummingbird food. The sugar gives them energy.

> On May 22, 2020, at 11:06 AM, Brenna <dbgaldenzi...> wrote:
>
> I don’t see how feeding wildlife highly processed sugary jelly could be good for them.
>
> Brenna
> www.ProtectOurWildlifeVT.org
>
> Sent from my iPhone, which has been known to mess with me.
>
>> On May 22, 2020, at 11:03 AM, Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> wrote:
>>
>> AS far as I know grape jelly is the preferred treat for orioles and I have never heard of them being compromised by the syrup.
>>
>>> On May 22, 2020, at 10:19 AM, Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> wrote:
>>>
>>> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape jelly
>>> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
>>> okay?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Barbara Brosnan
>>>
>>> Weybridge
>>
>>
>>
>> Eve Ticknor
>> <edticknor...>
>>
>> Box 2206
>> Prescott, On
>> K0E 1T0
>>
>> 24 Birch Ave
>> Willsboro, NY
>> 12996
>>
>> "Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
>> (Quaker blessing)



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:06 am
From: Brenna <dbgaldenzi...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
I don’t see how feeding wildlife highly processed sugary jelly could be good for them.

Brenna
www.ProtectOurWildlifeVT.org

Sent from my iPhone, which has been known to mess with me.

> On May 22, 2020, at 11:03 AM, Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> wrote:
>
> AS far as I know grape jelly is the preferred treat for orioles and I have never heard of them being compromised by the syrup.
>
>> On May 22, 2020, at 10:19 AM, Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> wrote:
>>
>> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape jelly
>> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
>> okay?
>>
>>
>>
>> Barbara Brosnan
>>
>> Weybridge
>
>
>
> Eve Ticknor
> <edticknor...>
>
> Box 2206
> Prescott, On
> K0E 1T0
>
> 24 Birch Ave
> Willsboro, NY
> 12996
>
> "Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
> (Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 8:03 am
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
AS far as I know grape jelly is the preferred treat for orioles and I have never heard of them being compromised by the syrup.

> On May 22, 2020, at 10:19 AM, Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> wrote:
>
> A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape jelly
> is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
> okay?
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 7:21 am
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Grape jelly???
A neighbor just asked me if the corn syrup (or anything else) in grape jelly
is not good for the orioles she is feeding. Anyone know if it is still
okay?



Barbara Brosnan

Weybridge
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/20 7:08 am
From: Michaela Granstrom <000005caf7780209-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] winged warbler
The highlight of my morning walk was watching and listening to a blue-winged warbler sing from the top of a small elm tree, golden in the sun.
ID points to blue-wing.
Though reports usually include both names?

We have nesting building Baltimore Orioles. The nest has a two foot long string with a weedy tassel hanging from the bottom of the tangle.

Both male and female bluebirds are out looking for food. Others In the yard are nesting phoebes, downy woodpecker, cardinals, ruby-throated hummingbirds at the feeder, great crested flycatcher, house wren, red-winged blackbirds, robins, goldfinch, catbird.

Michaela Granstrom
River Rd, New Haven
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 7:03 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Cogman Road / Ghost Hollow Road, West Haven, May 20, 2020
I noticed not Red-eyed Vireo on your list... interestingly!

On Thu, May 21, 2020 at 12:17 PM Susan Elliott <
<00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Quite a nice morning on Cogman Road in West Haven yesterday. Highlights
> were a Blue-winged Warbler, a Yellow-billed Cuckoo and two male Orchard
> Orioles. We heard a second 'bees buzz' but were unable to locate for
> positive ID of a second winged warbler.
> Sue Elliott
> Cogman Road / Ghost Hollow Road, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 20, 2020 9:50 AM - 12:24 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.35 mile(s)
> Checklist Comments: Cogman Rd
> 52 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1
> Killdeer 2
> Spotted Sandpiper 2
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Turkey Vulture 2
> Red-tailed Hawk 1
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
> Downy Woodpecker 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 1
> Least Flycatcher 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 2
> Eastern Kingbird 3
> Yellow-throated Vireo 3
> Blue-headed Vireo 1
> Warbling Vireo 4
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow 3
> Common Raven 1
> Black-capped Chickadee 1
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1
> Tree Swallow 2
> Red-breasted Nuthatch 2
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3
> Winter Wren 1
> Gray Catbird 5
> Eastern Bluebird 2
> Wood Thrush 1
> American Robin 2
> American Goldfinch 5
> Chipping Sparrow 2
> Field Sparrow 1
> White-crowned Sparrow 1
> Song Sparrow 6
> Orchard Oriole 2
> Baltimore Oriole 7
> Red-winged Blackbird 16
> Brown-headed Cowbird 4
> Common Grackle 5
> Ovenbird 2
> Louisiana Waterthrush 1
> Blue-winged Warbler 1
> Golden-winged/Blue-winged Warbler 1
> Black-and-white Warbler 2
> Common Yellowthroat 5
> American Redstart 1
> Yellow Warbler 2
> Black-throated Green Warbler 1
> Northern Cardinal 2
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 2
> Indigo Bunting 4
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69379275
>
>
>
>

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 6:22 pm
From: kfinch <kfinch51...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Peent!
8:45 p.m. on May 21, and Woodcocks are doing their sky dance in both our front and rear fields.  ❤    Ken Finch    Chester
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 1:12 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
Today is the twelfth day that Mrs. has been on the eggs. No chicks yet. Mr.
seems to be getting impatient. He's been hanging around the box more than
usual and he peers in every time Mrs. runs an errand. Tune in tomorrow and
Saturday to see the big day.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-21-2020.html



MP4:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 10:55 am
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pittsford Trails-Cadwell Loop, May 21, 2020
Lots of bird activity along the Cadwell Loop in Pittsford this morning.
Sue and Marv Elliott
Pittsford Trails-Cadwell Loop, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 21, 2020 8:15 AM - 11:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.55 mile(s)
52 species

Canada Goose  2
Wood Duck  12
Mallard  3
Mourning Dove  5
Ruby-throated Hummingbird  1
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Great Blue Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
Alder Flycatcher  1
Willow Flycatcher  1
Least Flycatcher  3
Eastern Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  3
Warbling Vireo  11   
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  3
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  2
Tree Swallow  5
White-breasted Nuthatch  5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2
House Wren  1
European Starling  6
Gray Catbird  12
Eastern Bluebird  1
Veery  3
American Robin  4
American Goldfinch  13
White-throated Sparrow  1
Savannah Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  25
Swamp Sparrow  2
Bobolink  6
Baltimore Oriole  4
Red-winged Blackbird  17
Common Grackle  8
Black-and-white Warbler  1
Tennessee Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  18
American Redstart  11
Yellow Warbler  9
Chestnut-sided Warbler  4
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  2
Northern Cardinal  2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69413404



 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 9:17 am
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cogman Road / Ghost Hollow Road, West Haven, May 20, 2020
Quite a nice morning on Cogman Road in West Haven yesterday. Highlights were a Blue-winged Warbler, a Yellow-billed Cuckoo and two male Orchard Orioles. We heard a second 'bees buzz' but were unable to locate for positive ID of a second winged warbler.
Sue Elliott
Cogman Road / Ghost Hollow Road, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 20, 2020 9:50 AM - 12:24 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.35 mile(s)
Checklist Comments:    Cogman Rd
52 species (+1 other taxa)

Yellow-billed Cuckoo  1
Killdeer  2
Spotted Sandpiper  2
Great Blue Heron  1
Turkey Vulture  2
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1
Least Flycatcher  1
Eastern Phoebe  1
Great Crested Flycatcher  2
Eastern Kingbird  3
Yellow-throated Vireo  3
Blue-headed Vireo  1
Warbling Vireo  4
Blue Jay  2
American Crow  3
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  1
Tree Swallow  2
Red-breasted Nuthatch  2
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  3
Winter Wren  1
Gray Catbird  5
Eastern Bluebird  2
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  2
American Goldfinch  5
Chipping Sparrow  2
Field Sparrow  1
White-crowned Sparrow  1
Song Sparrow  6
Orchard Oriole  2    
Baltimore Oriole  7
Red-winged Blackbird  16
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
Common Grackle  5
Ovenbird  2
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Blue-winged Warbler  1   
Golden-winged/Blue-winged Warbler  1    
Black-and-white Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  5
American Redstart  1
Yellow Warbler  2
Black-throated Green Warbler  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  2
Indigo Bunting  4

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69379275



 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 6:08 am
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
Just saw the Sandhill Crane on Walker Road in Ferrisburg, where Betty described. It was literally walking along Walker Road! Good thing traffic is light. Photos later.
Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 20, 2020, at 4:52 PM, Betty Holton <bholton...> wrote:
>
> 
>
>
> Hi sorry the crane is in Ferrisberg. Betty
>
>
> On Wed, 20 May 2020 13:56:13 -0400, Betty Holton <bholton...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
> Birding on Walker Rd and saw one sandhill crane foraging in plowed field. I was looking for this bird after a
> local told me he had seen the bird twice. It is located near Deer Valley Farm across the road where the field has been plowed. Betty
> �
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 5:40 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 21, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:22 a.m. 40 degrees, wind NNE 0 mph, my world as still as stone. Blue sky
stained by a pair of sunlit contrails, conspicuous by their absence
these past two months. So novel the appearance of jets, I follow one with
binoculars as it spews shiny carbon emissions across the sky vault. NNE
heading SSW. Flights from Europe to JFK or Dulles, maybe. When will I
board a commercial plane again?



Ribbons of water run quieter than yesterday; some barely so. Dry gullies
dry along the road. Depressions in the woods shrink to bowls of mud, which
gather curious robins. Mist from the pond, which is scarcely noticeable in
the wetland, rises straight up. Two male mallards, one decidedly lighter
than the other, graze the shoulder of the main channel. A hen wood duck
flies out of the reeds, circles, and then disappears over the trees.



Warblers songs by descending volume: ovenbird (screams); redstart;
yellowthroat; chestnut-sided; black-throated green; parula; Nashville;
black and white (murmurs), sings high, both its voice and its perch, nests
low, often at the base of a tree. A fussy junco, picking grit on the side
of the road, inspects pebbles as though panning for gold. I stop and watch.
Above me, a chickadee, foraging in needle clusters of red pine, just as
fussy as junco. Neither birds nor I am in a big hurry.



Have the solitary sandpipers left the wetland to snapping turtle, whose
investment is for life? Have sandpipers headed tor muskeg after having
traced the rim of the continent, after having followed the Connecticut
River north lonely from the sea . . . after having paused for a beguiling
moment for my consideration?
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/20 2:44 am
From: Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] RTHB
Three females turned up on my rhododendron in Richmond this morning. This is the average arrival date of the first male in past years.

Sent from my irresistible flat thing.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 4:04 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Swainson's Thrush
While the birding was exceptionally slow and quiet this a.m., it was again,
quality not quantity that ruled.
I rarely see Swainson's Thrush at all in migration, let alone on the
breeding ground, but there was an incredible showing today. Note the lack
of warblers or water related birds at the pond on this property.

Frosts, Bennington, Vermont, US
May 20, 2020 8:44 AM - 10:04 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.4 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: 50s. Clear. Very quiet. Most activity at cemetery
16 species

Hooded Merganser 1 Female
Eastern Phoebe 1
Warbling Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 1
American Crow 1
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
Gray Catbird 5
Swainson's Thrush 10 7 actively feeding in the cemetery on lawn;
excellent long time, close views. Tried to get photo unsuccessfully. Three
others were in 'open' feeding on forest road. Brown bird with no rufous
overtones; distinctive buff ring around eye and face. Breast more speckled
than Veery, but less than larger (seen side by side), rufous WOTH.
Wood Thrush 1 WOTH and Swainson's seen together for comparison
American Robin 4
American Goldfinch 1
Swamp Sparrow 3
Red-winged Blackbird 8
Common Grackle 2
Ovenbird 3
Common Yellowthroat 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69366046

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 3:28 pm
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Gallinule in Norwich -- PHOTOS
Wonderful find and photo! Many thanks for sharing, VeerPassumpsic

On 5/20/2020 at 6:08 PM, "Jim Block" wrote:If you would like to see a
few photo of the Common Gallinule that Kathy
Thompson discovered this morning in the Pompy area of Vermont, you can
click
this link:

https://www.jimblockphoto.com/2020/05/common-gallinule-in-norwich/
Jim Block

Etna, NH
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 3:08 pm
From: Jim Block <jim...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Gallinule in Norwich -- PHOTOS
If you would like to see a few photo of the Common Gallinule that Kathy
Thompson discovered this morning in the Pompy area of Vermont, you can click
this link:

https://www.jimblockphoto.com/2020/05/common-gallinule-in-norwich/



Jim Block

Etna, NH
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 1:52 pm
From: Betty Holton <bholton...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane



Hi sorry the crane is in Ferrisberg. Betty


On Wed, 20 May 2020 13:56:13 -0400, Betty Holton <bholton...> wrote:




Birding on Walker Rd and saw one sandhill crane foraging in plowed field. I was looking for this bird after a
local told me he had seen the bird twice. It is located near Deer Valley Farm across the road where the field has been plowed. Betty

 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 12:59 pm
From: Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Wildcat Rd., Chittenden, VT, May 20, 2020
On Wed, May 20, 2020, 2:10 PM SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> wrote:

> It is still early spring in the mountains with lots of wild flowers in
> bloom.
> Sue Wetmore
> >
> > Wildcat Rd., Chittenden, VT, Rutland, Vermont, US
> > May 20, 2020 8:00 AM - 9:45 AM
> > Protocol: Traveling
> > 1.0 mile(s)
> > Checklist Comments: sunny and mild
> > 32 species
> >
> > Canada Goose 5
> > Wood Duck 3
> > Ruffed Grouse 2
> > Mourning Dove 1
> > Great Blue Heron 4
> > Broad-winged Hawk 2
> > Pileated Woodpecker 1
> > Blue-headed Vireo 1
> > Red-eyed Vireo 1
> > Blue Jay 4
> > Common Raven 1
> > Black-capped Chickadee 7
> > Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
> > Brown Creeper 1
> > Winter Wren 2
> > Gray Catbird 1
> > American Robin 3
> > Purple Finch 1
> > American Goldfinch 2
> > Dark-eyed Junco 1
> > Song Sparrow 4
> > Swamp Sparrow 1
> > Red-winged Blackbird 4
> > Common Grackle 3
> > Ovenbird 1
> > Northern Waterthrush 2
> > Black-and-white Warbler 1
> > Common Yellowthroat 6
> > American Redstart 2
> > Magnolia Warbler 1
> > Yellow Warbler 1
> > Yellow-rumped Warbler 4
> >
> > View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69376446
> >
> > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
> https://ebird.org/home)
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 12:02 pm
From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
My son-in-law had seen a sandhill crane in a corn stubble field at the
intersection of Bear Notch Rd and Chelsea Rd in East Corinth several times.
I hesitated to report it because I had ventured over there several times
and had only seen Canada geese and mallards in the field and didn't want to
send people out on what would likely be only a wild goose chase. (Sorry.
Couldn't resist.) He got some very good photos of the crane, however. The
field is now green and waiting for the plow, but it's nice to know that the
cranes seem to be seen more frequently than in the past. Maybe just my
impression, however.
Charlie La Rosa
So. Washington, VT

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 2:24 PM Pat Folsom <pfols...> wrote:

> What town, Betty?
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Betty Holton" <bholton...>
> To: "VT Bird" <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 1:56:13 PM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
>
> Birding on Walker Rd and saw one sandhill crane foraging in plowed field.
> I was looking for this bird after a�
> local told me he had seen the bird twice. It is located near Deer Valley
> Farm across the road where the field has been plowed. �Betty
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 11:24 am
From: Pat Folsom <pfols...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane
What town, Betty?

----- Original Message -----
From: "Betty Holton" <bholton...>
To: "VT Bird" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 20, 2020 1:56:13 PM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane

Birding on Walker Rd and saw one sandhill crane foraging in plowed field. I was looking for this bird after a�
local told me he had seen the bird twice. It is located near Deer Valley Farm across the road where the field has been plowed. �Betty
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 11:10 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Wildcat Rd., Chittenden, VT, May 20, 2020
It is still early spring in the mountains with lots of wild flowers in bloom.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Wildcat Rd., Chittenden, VT, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 20, 2020 8:00 AM - 9:45 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> Checklist Comments: sunny and mild
> 32 species
>
> Canada Goose 5
> Wood Duck 3
> Ruffed Grouse 2
> Mourning Dove 1
> Great Blue Heron 4
> Broad-winged Hawk 2
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Blue-headed Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 1
> Blue Jay 4
> Common Raven 1
> Black-capped Chickadee 7
> Red-breasted Nuthatch 1
> Brown Creeper 1
> Winter Wren 2
> Gray Catbird 1
> American Robin 3
> Purple Finch 1
> American Goldfinch 2
> Dark-eyed Junco 1
> Song Sparrow 4
> Swamp Sparrow 1
> Red-winged Blackbird 4
> Common Grackle 3
> Ovenbird 1
> Northern Waterthrush 2
> Black-and-white Warbler 1
> Common Yellowthroat 6
> American Redstart 2
> Magnolia Warbler 1
> Yellow Warbler 1
> Yellow-rumped Warbler 4
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69376446
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 10:56 am
From: Betty Holton <bholton...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Sandhill crane



Birding on Walker Rd and saw one sandhill crane foraging in plowed field. I was looking for this bird after a
local told me he had seen the bird twice. It is located near Deer Valley Farm across the road where the field has been plowed. Betty
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 10:53 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 20, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center; Part 2
11:27 a.m. Wind SSE, 4 mph. Standing in the middle of the wetland. Blind
channels and pockets drying. The shallowest already dry or clogging with
gem-green algae, closing in from edge to edge. Behind me, to the northwest,
a great pyramid where a palette of greens rise like the tide, upslope to
the summit, still reddish-brown with mini oak leaves.

Yellowthroat plays by the rules: wears a mask and self-isolates on an
island of sweet gale. I walk to him, slowly, not watching my feet. Sink to
my knees in a mote of unconsolidated muck, a bird's way of
social-distancing. Safe and sound, yellowthroat keeps on singing. Now,
watching a bittern watch me. Birding on an organic trampoline, as out of
place in bittern's world as he is in mine.

A pair of solitary sandpipers (FOY), on the their way north, work the edge
of the main channel. Trusting and silent. Too busy foraging for
aquatic insects and wood frog tadpoles, which hatch in the heat. Within
twenty feet. No need for binoculars. Dark back, speckled. White eyering and
pale gray-legs legs, the color of aspen catkins. After getting my fill of
birds I rarely see, I leave them to probe and pick along the margins of a
drying pool, across from an antediluvian turtle, the size of a kitchen
sink.

A green frogs hops on folded reeds. A painted turtle slides off a log. A
swamp sparrows trills. A hen wood duck flushes; then, a male mallard. I
stand for a while, drinking in the early afternoon. My time alone bestowed
to me by a pandemic. *When the thumb of fear lifts*, wrote Mary Oliver,
mother of wild verse, *we are so alive.*
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 8:47 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
Mrs. has been fidgeting in the box again this morning. And, she's trying to
keep up with what's going on in the neighborhood outside.



Flash:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-20-2020.html



MP4:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



And, if you haven't gotten a enough yet, take a look at the 68 minute long
clip from yesterday:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/mp4/20200519-long.mp4



The bees all headed out early, there isn't much action in the hive this
morning. I'll check back in on them later.





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 7:09 am
From: Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Prothonatary Warbler???
Having just seen a Prothonitary Warbler in NY at the Montezuma NWR COMPLEX, I'd be uncomfortable calling this a PRWA.

RESIST


> On May 19, 2020, at 9:50 PM, Michael Foster <mfoster...> wrote:
>
> I was walking through the forest at the Windsor Grasslands WMA this morning. I had a great morning with some nice shots of a blue winged warbler and many others. As I was walking down, a bird came off of the ground and flew right by me. I only got a brief glimpse of yellow but it landed on some shrubs not far from me and I got a couple of shots (exactly the same) off before it flew off. There was no sound and nothing I could latch onto for ID, so I did not add the bird to my checklist thinking maybe I could ID it from the photo. This still had me stumped, and I posted it on a forum for bird ID. All there agreed on Prothonatary warbler. I have still not added it to my checklist, because I want to be sure. I know this would be a quite rare find. Here are links to the 2 photos I got. Any opinions??
> https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-qGQbDq8/1/ffc87c04/L/i-qGQbDq8-L.jpg <https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-qGQbDq8/1/ffc87c04/L/i-qGQbDq8-L.jpg>
> https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-zfpc757/0/24bcb313/XL/i-zfpc757-XL.jpg <https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-zfpc757/0/24bcb313/XL/i-zfpc757-XL.jpg>
>
> Michael Foster
> Website breezyhillturning.com
> Email <mfoster.vt...>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 6:21 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 20, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:13 a.m. 38 degrees, wind NNW 1 mph, on life support. Sky: clear and
rose-petal pink in the south; pale blue in the north. Shallowest
intermittent streams reduced thrumb prints, long and narrow; deeper ones
whisper, their current barely visible. Mist rises out of the pond,
dissipates in the cool air; veils the wetland softens color . . . the
valley's gentle exhalation. Barred owl, close by, its hollow, rhythmic
voice echoing off the hills. Coyote Hollow, again and again and once again,
the embodiment of Zen stillness. For the moment, there is no place I'd
rather be.

Awakening woodland a fount of life: wood thrush; chestnut-sided warbler;
common yellowthroat; black and white warbler; American redstart; winter
wren, picking up the musical slack; house wren, animated as ever;
red-eyed-vireo; blue-headed vireo; eastern phoebe; least flycatcher; great
crested flycatcher (FOY), not seen (or heard) since pre-COVID jungle
rambles in Costa Rica; white-throated sparrow; song sparrow; tufted
titmouse, especially loud; black-capped chickadee, especially admonishing
*dee-dee-dee-dee*; American goldfinch, yolk yellow; American bittern; wild
turkey. A handful of peepers.

Female sapsucker quietly works maple for the fifth day in a row. A pair of
wood thrush chase each other through streamside shrubs. One pauses to sing.
Theodore Roosevelt, from his Northshore home on Sagamore Hill, declared,
"Our most beautiful singers are the wood thrushes." He should have
traipsed across the Long Island pine barrens with Whitman, where the poet
and the hermit thrush had intimate dealings. At the moment, here in Coyote
Hollow, it's all wood thrush; hermits having secreted themselves away in
the cups of elaborate ground nests, warming pale blue eggs, maybe, feeding
helpless, grotesque-looking chicks.

A chestnut-side warbler croons in aspen. Bird and canopy touched by first
rays of sunlight, everything below in shade. Picks inchworms off delicate
leaves then expresses himself . . . *pleased, pleased, pleased to MEET-YA*.
Charismatic microfauna—white cheeks, yellow crown, chestnut sides framing
an otherwise immaculately white belly and breast. Warbler glowing in
infant light amid infant leaves . . . the sweet spot of the morning.

How fortunate I am to wander out my front door into a beckoning landscape.
Here living things have meaning in terms of what they do. Rhetorically,
Yeats wondered, *How can we know the dancer from the dance?* Had been
standing with me this morning on the edge of this dirt road, in this little
valley in east-central, Vermont, one of ten thousand—a random valley,
culled by me only because I live here—he might have written, *How can we
know the light from the bird?*
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 5:33 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Tuesday edition
Tuesday afternoon with the Moody Bluebirds. Mrs. just can't quite seem to
get comfortable in the box, she resettles several times and scratches a few
itches.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-19-2020.html



MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



Bees:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bees/bees.html







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/20 3:53 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] a bit of splendor (thrushes, wood and veery)
Both singing from/near garden trees. It surely was a long winter.Veer
Frost, Passumpsic NEK
_ _

_The biologist EO Wilson has warned that, as the extinction rate
climbs, humans are entering “The Eremocene” – the Age of
Loneliness._ --Robert Macfarlane_ _

___ _

Sent using Hushmail
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 6:50 pm
From: Michael Foster <mfoster...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Prothonatary Warbler???
I was walking through the forest at the Windsor Grasslands WMA this morning. I had a great morning with some nice shots of a blue winged warbler and many others. As I was walking down, a bird came off of the ground and flew right by me. I only got a brief glimpse of yellow but it landed on some shrubs not far from me and I got a couple of shots (exactly the same) off before it flew off. There was no sound and nothing I could latch onto for ID, so I did not add the bird to my checklist thinking maybe I could ID it from the photo. This still had me stumped, and I posted it on a forum for bird ID. All there agreed on Prothonatary warbler. I have still not added it to my checklist, because I want to be sure. I know this would be a quite rare find. Here are links to the 2 photos I got. Any opinions??
https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-qGQbDq8/1/ffc87c04/L/i-qGQbDq8-L.jpg <https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-qGQbDq8/1/ffc87c04/L/i-qGQbDq8-L.jpg>
https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-zfpc757/0/24bcb313/XL/i-zfpc757-XL.jpg <https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-zfpc757/0/24bcb313/XL/i-zfpc757-XL.jpg>

Michael Foster
Website breezyhillturning.com
Email <mfoster.vt...>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 6:25 pm
From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
If Burlington City Hall received enough phone calls requesting that they
hold off for a few weeks and why the city might relent, but if the
landowner has made all the necessary arrangements and a crew is ready to do
the job it might simply be too late for the birds if they are not removed
quickly. If the birds are out of luck, we can hope that they will try a
second nesting. Tough situation for the vultures in any event.
Charlie La Rosa
So. Washington

On Tue, May 19, 2020 at 8:21 PM Neil Buckley <bucklenj...>
wrote:

> Wow, Gretchen that is depressing. However, thanks for the detailed and
> informed explanation. It sounds as if legal options are pretty limited.
> This is just sad and not only because this is the first time BVs have been
> documented nesting in VT.
>
> On Tue, May 19, 2020 at 8:09 PM Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...>
> wrote:
>
> > Hi folks. As of right now, migratory birds and their nests are protected
> by
> > federal law, not state, so you need to contact USFWS in NH. However,
> under
> > the latest interpretation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (M-opinion
> > published 12/2017), bird nests do not get as much protection as they once
> > did. I previously worked for the USFWS and one of my jobs was teaching
> the
> > newest interpretation of the MBTA. I'd be happy to explain what is and
> > isn't legal. Many states, including Vermont, are now trying to pass their
> > own legislation in light of this new interpretation, which allows
> > incidental take of migratory birds.
> >
> > Best case scenario here is that the birds don't have eggs/young yet and
> the
> > barn is torn down immediately. If they already have eggs or nestlings,
> > there are a couple options, but legally (at least federally), the barn
> can
> > be torn down even if there is a nest in there, and especially if the City
> > deems it a hazard. I know it's absurd and unfortunate, but that's what
> the
> > USFWS solicitor decided. If the barn is torn down just for the sake of
> > tearing the barn down and the nest is incidentally destroyed, nothing
> > illegal took place. If the nest is intentionally destroyed for the sake
> of
> > destroying the nest, that is illegal. "Good Samaritans" may legally take
> > eggs or nestlings to licensed rehabilitators in an attempt to prevent
> total
> > loss of a nest. The other organizations and agencies mentioned can help
> > with that part, as can I if you'd like.
> >
> > The M-opinion did not change the MBTA itself, just the current
> > interpretation. It is possible that a future administration will reverse
> > the M-opinion or that new legislation will pass. However, the way it is
> now
> > makes it easier for big industries to do their jobs. You can't sell
> > electricity if you're always in court over killing birds with power
> > lines...
> >
> > Please note, I'm not offering legal advice and I'm not saying it's okay
> to
> > go out and tear bird-occupied buildings down all around town!
> >
> > Responding with the knowledge of a federal biologist and the opinion of a
> > private citizen,
> > Gretchen E. Nareff
> > Bennington, VT
> >
>
>
> --
> Dr. Neil Buckley, M.Sc., Ph.D.
> Associate Professor and Chairman
> Department of Biological Sciences
> SUNY Plattsburgh,
> Plattsburgh, NY 12901
> 518 564 5165
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 5:21 pm
From: Neil Buckley <bucklenj...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
Wow, Gretchen that is depressing. However, thanks for the detailed and
informed explanation. It sounds as if legal options are pretty limited.
This is just sad and not only because this is the first time BVs have been
documented nesting in VT.

On Tue, May 19, 2020 at 8:09 PM Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...>
wrote:

> Hi folks. As of right now, migratory birds and their nests are protected by
> federal law, not state, so you need to contact USFWS in NH. However, under
> the latest interpretation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (M-opinion
> published 12/2017), bird nests do not get as much protection as they once
> did. I previously worked for the USFWS and one of my jobs was teaching the
> newest interpretation of the MBTA. I'd be happy to explain what is and
> isn't legal. Many states, including Vermont, are now trying to pass their
> own legislation in light of this new interpretation, which allows
> incidental take of migratory birds.
>
> Best case scenario here is that the birds don't have eggs/young yet and the
> barn is torn down immediately. If they already have eggs or nestlings,
> there are a couple options, but legally (at least federally), the barn can
> be torn down even if there is a nest in there, and especially if the City
> deems it a hazard. I know it's absurd and unfortunate, but that's what the
> USFWS solicitor decided. If the barn is torn down just for the sake of
> tearing the barn down and the nest is incidentally destroyed, nothing
> illegal took place. If the nest is intentionally destroyed for the sake of
> destroying the nest, that is illegal. "Good Samaritans" may legally take
> eggs or nestlings to licensed rehabilitators in an attempt to prevent total
> loss of a nest. The other organizations and agencies mentioned can help
> with that part, as can I if you'd like.
>
> The M-opinion did not change the MBTA itself, just the current
> interpretation. It is possible that a future administration will reverse
> the M-opinion or that new legislation will pass. However, the way it is now
> makes it easier for big industries to do their jobs. You can't sell
> electricity if you're always in court over killing birds with power
> lines...
>
> Please note, I'm not offering legal advice and I'm not saying it's okay to
> go out and tear bird-occupied buildings down all around town!
>
> Responding with the knowledge of a federal biologist and the opinion of a
> private citizen,
> Gretchen E. Nareff
> Bennington, VT
>


--
Dr. Neil Buckley, M.Sc., Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chairman
Department of Biological Sciences
SUNY Plattsburgh,
Plattsburgh, NY 12901
518 564 5165
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 5:09 pm
From: Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
Hi folks. As of right now, migratory birds and their nests are protected by
federal law, not state, so you need to contact USFWS in NH. However, under
the latest interpretation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (M-opinion
published 12/2017), bird nests do not get as much protection as they once
did. I previously worked for the USFWS and one of my jobs was teaching the
newest interpretation of the MBTA. I'd be happy to explain what is and
isn't legal. Many states, including Vermont, are now trying to pass their
own legislation in light of this new interpretation, which allows
incidental take of migratory birds.

Best case scenario here is that the birds don't have eggs/young yet and the
barn is torn down immediately. If they already have eggs or nestlings,
there are a couple options, but legally (at least federally), the barn can
be torn down even if there is a nest in there, and especially if the City
deems it a hazard. I know it's absurd and unfortunate, but that's what the
USFWS solicitor decided. If the barn is torn down just for the sake of
tearing the barn down and the nest is incidentally destroyed, nothing
illegal took place. If the nest is intentionally destroyed for the sake of
destroying the nest, that is illegal. "Good Samaritans" may legally take
eggs or nestlings to licensed rehabilitators in an attempt to prevent total
loss of a nest. The other organizations and agencies mentioned can help
with that part, as can I if you'd like.

The M-opinion did not change the MBTA itself, just the current
interpretation. It is possible that a future administration will reverse
the M-opinion or that new legislation will pass. However, the way it is now
makes it easier for big industries to do their jobs. You can't sell
electricity if you're always in court over killing birds with power lines...

Please note, I'm not offering legal advice and I'm not saying it's okay to
go out and tear bird-occupied buildings down all around town!

Responding with the knowledge of a federal biologist and the opinion of a
private citizen,
Gretchen E. Nareff
Bennington, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 5:07 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cerulean Warbler, southern end of Snake Mountain, Bridport
While walking this evening in the deciduous canopied woods on the lower
slope of Snake Mountain south, with puppy Gus, as the sun slipped below
the ridge above, I heard faintly the song of a Cerulean Warbler,
repeated multiple times for about 45 seconds.  My timepiece said 6:39
pm; the first time I've ever heard one so late in the day.

But this is not the first occurrence of the species here.  This makes
the 13th consecutive year for the species in the wooded ledges above our
house.  The earliest date among those years was the 9th of May.  That
certainly wasn't going to happen this year.

------------------------------------

Last year on the 25th, a fine team of birders many of you know, came
searching in hopes of some good photographs: Jim Mead, Henry Trombley,
Clem Nilan, and Graham Rice.  They indeed accomplished their goal with
many outstanding photos.  See some of them here:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S56710009

A particular highlight was the discovery of a female, who flew down
close to us for multiple good looks. Look for her portrait in this
checklist photo suite.  For each of the team of four it was a lifer, as
females are rarely located in Vermont.

Ian
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 4:26 pm
From: Eric Wood <ericw5...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
along with the mentioned VT Fish and Wildlife Dept., other contacts may be: Burlington has, or had, a field naturalist with the Parks Dept - Alicia Daniels, also, VT Center for Eco Studies, UVM Ornithology, and Green Mt. Audubon. Hopefully the right people can intervene quickly.

-Eric
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 3:07 pm
From: Ed Green <edgreen3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] RUFFED GROUSE
Came across a male in the woods showing yellowish courting colors on his
neck. He scurried off to fast into the brush to get a picture.



Underhill
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 11:26 am
From: Betty Holton <bholton...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs



Hi you might try calling the city and ask for an extension for the tear down till the baby’s have left the nest. Betty


On Tue, 19 May 2020 18:17:15 +0000, Cynthia Crowley <Cynthia.Crowley...> wrote:

Hi all,


Just wondering if anyone has any advice or other thoughts about a situation I'm in. I'm renting an apartment in the Old North End with an old falling-down barn in the back yard. Black vultures have been breeding and almost certainly nesting in the barn.


After who knows how many years of this barn falling down, it's now (of course, because 2020 should ruin everything good) that my landlord wants to have it torn down. Not because of the vultures, but because there have been complaints to the city about the barn. It sounds like the city called him and asked him to take immediate action. He's told me to move my tomatoes out of the way of where the roll-off dumpster will be situated, so I think this thing is moving as quickly as possible.


I asked him to see about waiting a few months, but he wasn't receptive to it. He relays to me that it's an urgent issue with the city.


Is there anything I can do about this? Does it matter?


Thanks,

Cynthia

 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 11:25 am
From: Neil Buckley <bucklenj...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
Hi Cynthia:

I would call the VT fish and game department immediately. Black Vultures
are migratory birds and protected from harassment while nesting.

Neil

On Tue, May 19, 2020 at 2:17 PM Cynthia Crowley <Cynthia.Crowley...>
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
>
> Just wondering if anyone has any advice or other thoughts about a
> situation I'm in. I'm renting an apartment in the Old North End with an old
> falling-down barn in the back yard. Black vultures have been breeding and
> almost certainly nesting in the barn.
>
>
> After who knows how many years of this barn falling down, it's now (of
> course, because 2020 should ruin everything good) that my landlord wants to
> have it torn down. Not because of the vultures, but because there have been
> complaints to the city about the barn. It sounds like the city called him
> and asked him to take immediate action. He's told me to move my tomatoes
> out of the way of where the roll-off dumpster will be situated, so I think
> this thing is moving as quickly as possible.
>
>
> I asked him to see about waiting a few months, but he wasn't receptive to
> it. He relays to me that it's an urgent issue with the city.
>
>
> Is there anything I can do about this? Does it matter?
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Cynthia
>


--
Dr. Neil Buckley, M.Sc., Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chairman
Department of Biological Sciences
SUNY Plattsburgh,
Plattsburgh, NY 12901
518 564 5165
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 11:17 am
From: Cynthia Crowley <Cynthia.Crowley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Advice or thoughts on a bulldozing project with nesting BVs
Hi all,


Just wondering if anyone has any advice or other thoughts about a situation I'm in. I'm renting an apartment in the Old North End with an old falling-down barn in the back yard. Black vultures have been breeding and almost certainly nesting in the barn.


After who knows how many years of this barn falling down, it's now (of course, because 2020 should ruin everything good) that my landlord wants to have it torn down. Not because of the vultures, but because there have been complaints to the city about the barn. It sounds like the city called him and asked him to take immediate action. He's told me to move my tomatoes out of the way of where the roll-off dumpster will be situated, so I think this thing is moving as quickly as possible.


I asked him to see about waiting a few months, but he wasn't receptive to it. He relays to me that it's an urgent issue with the city.


Is there anything I can do about this? Does it matter?


Thanks,

Cynthia
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 11:11 am
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Join the Vermont Backyard Bird Quest—23 May 2020
On Saturday May 23rd, spring migration will be at its peak in Vermont. Join
us on Vermont's biggest birding day – the Vermont Backyard Bird Quest 2020.
And help us celebrate and document all the spring birds across the Green
Mountain State.
_________________________________________________________________
See full article with links on Vermont eBird:
https://ebird.org/vt/news/join-the-vermont-backyard-bird-quest-23-may-2020
__________________________________________________________________

Although birding—and life in general—has changed for all of us in recent
months, spring’s arrival and the return of migrant birds continue on pace.
With the recent passage of most waterfowl through Vermont, we birders now
eagerly await the flood of songbirds that is just beginning to gather
momentum. Spring migration is an exhilarating phenomenon, which now brings
welcome comfort and rejuvenation to us all during these disconcerting times.

The Vermont Backyard Bird Quest is modeling this one-day effort at
recording all of Vermont’s birds after traditional “Big Sits” (24 hours of
birding within a 17-foot diameter circle) and “patch birding.” We are
asking people to bird individually (or with their families) on May 23,
either from a single spot or by thoroughly exploring a defined “patch”
around or near their home.

Participating is easy. Wherever you are in Vermont, you can be a part of
the Vermont eBird community on May 23rd. Please remember to always put
safety first and follow all local safety guidelines and closures. You can
even enjoy birds from inside your home and still be part of the Vermont
Backyard Bird Quest.

If you can spare at least 5 or 10 minutes, report your observations to
Vermont eBird online or with the free eBird Mobile app. If you have more
time, submit checklists of birds throughout the day at different times. You
never know what you might spot. Your observations help us better understand
Vermont bird populations through products like these amazing animated
abundance maps brought to you by eBird Science using data collected by bird
watchers like you!

How many checklists can we collect as a Vermont eBird team in one day?
During the 2016 May big day, Vermont eBirders recorded 480 checklists
comprising 181 bird species! Will you join us on May 23rd and make the
Vermont Backyard Bird Quest 2020 the year that we surpass 500 bird
checklists, in one day, scattered across Vermont? Maybe we can top 190
species in one day, too? Help us set a new Vermont eBird record and help
collect data for science and conservation at the same time!

During the Vermont Backyard Bird Quest, we have a unique opportunity to
celebrate and help protect the things we hold dear. That’s why this year,
VCE’s birding team, the Green Mountain Goatsuckers, will include all
members of our staff for a special 24-hour marathon of socially-distanced
birding. We need your help. Each of us will be scouring our backyards and
favorite local patches to find over 150 bird species and raise funds for
VCE’s conservation and science projects.

Have fun, enjoy the birds you find, stay safe, and share your sightings on
Vermont eBird. Because in our world, every bird counts.



____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201
Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>

<http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 9:57 am
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Miles Pond Railroad east
The old railroad tracks, east of the Miles Pond Beach parking lot is still
one of the least visited Essex County Birding Hotspots. Used so little that
the railroad bed is becoming overgrown. But for 3 weeks in May it is an
especially great place to bird.



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S69313531/media



Tom Berriman
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 9:54 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mount Independence, May 19, 2020
Eight warbler species plus
FOY wood pewee singing.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Mount Independence, Addison, Vermont, US
> May 19, 2020 7:30 AM - 11:15 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.9 mile(s)
> 41 species
>
> Ring-billed Gull 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 1
> Least Flycatcher 1
> Eastern Phoebe 2
> Great Crested Flycatcher 8
> Yellow-throated Vireo 1
> Blue-headed Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 7
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow 3
> Common Raven 2
> Black-capped Chickadee 4
> Tufted Titmouse 1
> Gray Catbird 8
> Veery 1
> Swainson's Thrush 1
> Wood Thrush 3
> American Robin 9
> House Finch 3
> American Goldfinch 8
> Chipping Sparrow 6
> White-throated Sparrow 1
> Song Sparrow 6
> Baltimore Oriole 1
> Red-winged Blackbird 2
> Brown-headed Cowbird 2
> Common Grackle 1
> Ovenbird 8
> Black-and-white Warbler 1
> Common Yellowthroat 1
> American Redstart 3
> Northern Parula 1
> Magnolia Warbler 2
> Pine Warbler 1
> Yellow-rumped Warbler 5
> Black-throated Green Warbler 1
> Scarlet Tanager 5
> Northern Cardinal 6
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 2
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69317880
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 5:52 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 19, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:08 a.m. 39 degrees, wind WNW 1 mph, barely a pulse. Intermittent streams,
more dark slashes than ribbons of water, slow puddly creeps, soon to stop
moving altogether. Ash in bud, dark knobs like knuckles bulge at the end of
twigs; every other tree in leaf. Baby beech leaves, which drooped
yesterday, rise today; close to horizontal. Small patches of tender sugar
maple leaves on the road, a dozen or more per patch. No sign of foul play:
neither holes in the leaves nor chew marks. Some with petioles, some
without. (Spring in its infancy already dropping leaves.) Alders twigs,
where the yellowthroats sing, a band of tiny, purple buttons . . . female
flowers.

Two veeries (FOY), along the northeast edge of the wetland, their fluty and
descending song, full-bodied and haunting, spirals out of the willows. The
voice of avatars. No way to pass through the valley without pausing for a
veery or any other species of thrush (even a husky-voiced robin). A million
years before Tuvan throat-singers learned to mimic the sounds of the
Russian steppe, a thrush began to harmonize with itself; to produce paired
notes, independently and simultaneously, deep within its voice box.
Poignant and evocative, their voices echo across Coyote Hollow and, for a
moment, render every other sound less significant.

As if to counterpoint the veeries: a white-breasted nuthatch calls from the
pines, a short series of nasal *yanks*, evoking an image of Harpo Marx
honking his toy horn.

A female sapsucker drills her maple, third day in a row. Muffled taps
nearly inaudible. Imbibes sap. Her mate drums a distant tree, a volley of
discordant raps, a territorial proclamation. American redstart (FYO). Male
mallards have the main channel of the wetland to themselves. No geese. No
mergansers. In the background, a guttural red-winged blackbird. A bittern
raising Cain in the northwest corner . . . peepers beware.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 3:50 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] First ever Indigo Bunting at our Richmond home
Yesterday two Indigo bunting males were here, seed finding, but not
singing. Have had them before but not to stay. Veer,Passumpsic

On 5/19/2020 at 5:49 AM, "Tom Berriman" wrote:I too found an Indigo
Bunting at home which was the first new 'yard bird' in
5 years yesterday afternoon. A Scarlet Tanager was singing loudly and
endlessly announcing his arrival and when I went out to say welcome
back,
there was the bunting foraging along the edge of the lawn. Hello
stranger,
what the heck are you doing in this neck of the woods!
Tom
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 2:48 am
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] First ever Indigo Bunting at our Richmond home
I too found an Indigo Bunting at home which was the first new 'yard bird' in
5 years yesterday afternoon. A Scarlet Tanager was singing loudly and
endlessly announcing his arrival and when I went out to say welcome back,
there was the bunting foraging along the edge of the lawn. Hello stranger,
what the heck are you doing in this neck of the woods!



Tom
 

Back to top
Date: 5/19/20 2:31 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warbling Vireo before sunrise
Tiny singer I associate with leaf out, which is late and struggling
around here, its beautiful, questioning song, oh what oh what oh what
are we doing...Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
_ _

_The biologist EO Wilson has warned that, as the extinction rate
climbs, humans are entering “The Eremocene” – the Age of
Loneliness._ --Robert Macfarlane_ _

___ _

Sent using Hushmail
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 7:04 pm
From: Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] First ever Indigo Bunting at our Richmond home
Sitting out in the screen porch while on a phone call with a client, I saw a brilliant blue that my brain tried to turn into a Bluebird. No chance. I’ve never seen one at our house, but there it was in the rhododendron. Spectacular benefit of working from home. An unnoticeable distraction to the client.


Jared


Jared Katz Photography
823 Snipe Ireland Road
Richmond, VT 05477
(802) 343-4102
<jdkatzvt...>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 3:17 pm
From: Kit Hood <kithood3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: This morning
Ruffed Grouse 1
Scarlet Tanager male 1 (first heard then seen)
YB Sapsucker male 1
Ovenbird 2 ( 8 heard)
Hermit Thrush 1 (3 heard)
BC Chickadee 3
Redstart female 1
Tree Swallow pair
Raven 1
Pileated WP 1
Hairy Wp 1 (heard)
Wood Thrush 1 (heard)
Indigo Bunting 1 (heard)
American Robin 2 (heard)
Blue-headed Vireo

NEARLY ALL feeder birds of both sexes are eating suet. B. Orioles, Gray Catbirds, Brown Thrashers, RW Blackbirds, RB and Evening Grosbeaks, RB and WB Nuthatches, Indigo Bunting(male only), Cardinals, BC chickadees, E. Starlings, Common Grackles, Mourning Doves, Hairy and Downey WPs. Exceptions are the various sparrows, Robins, House Wrens and Goldfinches.

B. Orioles not only eating suet and sunflower chips but drinking hummingbird nectar and going through an orange a day!

A lot of song from our pond... toads’ shrill melody. Hundreds lookin for love!

Kit Hood
Sharon
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 12:44 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition and introducing Bee Cam
Some more of Mrs. Moody's doings this morning. She settles for a few minutes
at a time. Then fidgets, occasionally checks the eggs and frequently pops up
to look out.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-18-2020.html



MP4:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



And not bird related, but possibly of interest. My neighbor liked the
bluebird cam so much, he asked if we could rig a camera in his bee hive. He
introduced the bees to the hive last Saturday. You can check it out here:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bees/bees.html



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 11:23 am
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, May 18, 2020
Nice to be back at Northwood Park in Rutland Town for the first time this season (it had been closed earlier due to Covid). Winter Wrens, Blackburnian Warblers and the Louisiana Waterthrush, among others, are all back singing in their usual locations.
Highlight was SIX Swainson's Thrushes - two along the wooded trail and four feeding in the lawn near the ball fields with one Swainson's wannabe Veery. 
Sue Elliott
Northwood Park Loop, Rutland Town, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 18, 2020 9:44 AM - 12:05 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.28 mile(s)
44 species

Mallard  2
Common Merganser  1
Mourning Dove  1
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Red-tailed Hawk  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  1
Least Flycatcher  2
Eastern Phoebe  1
Blue-headed Vireo  2
Red-eyed Vireo  4
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  7
Black-capped Chickadee  11
White-breasted Nuthatch  1
Brown Creeper  1
House Wren  1
Winter Wren  3
Gray Catbird  2
Veery  3
Swainson's Thrush  6    
Hermit Thrush  3
American Robin  3
American Goldfinch  6
Chipping Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  3
Ovenbird  8
Louisiana Waterthrush  1
Black-and-white Warbler  4
Common Yellowthroat  2
American Redstart  3
Northern Parula  3
Magnolia Warbler  2
Blackburnian Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  6
Black-throated Blue Warbler  5
Pine Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  6
Black-throated Green Warbler  4
Scarlet Tanager  1
Northern Cardinal  2
Indigo Bunting  2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69268528



 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 9:55 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tanagers
That would be male tanagers.
Fumble fingers to blame.

Sent from my iPod

> On May 18, 2020, at 12:43 PM, Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:
>
> This morning on Hollow Rd tanagers both make and female seen.
> Sue Wetmore
>>
>> Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
>> May 18, 2020 7:30 AM - 10:10 AM
>> Protocol: Traveling
>> 1.0 mile(s)
>> 40 species
>>
>> Canada Goose 2
>> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1
>> Mourning Dove 2
>> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
>> Downy Woodpecker 1
>> Pileated Woodpecker 1
>> Northern Flicker 1
>> Eastern Phoebe 2
>> Great Crested Flycatcher 4
>> Eastern Kingbird 2
>> Yellow-throated Vireo 1
>> Red-eyed Vireo 4
>> Blue Jay 1
>> American Crow 6
>> Common Raven 2
>> Tree Swallow 2
>> White-breasted Nuthatch 2
>> House Wren 7
>> Gray Catbird 7
>> Veery 2
>> Hermit Thrush 2
>> Wood Thrush 1
>> American Robin 2
>> House Sparrow 5
>> House Finch 2
>> American Goldfinch 6
>> Chipping Sparrow 4
>> Song Sparrow 5
>> Eastern Towhee 5
>> Red-winged Blackbird 1
>> Brown-headed Cowbird 1
>> Ovenbird 10
>> Common Yellowthroat 3
>> American Redstart 3
>> Chestnut-sided Warbler 3
>> Pine Warbler 1
>> Scarlet Tanager 4
>> Northern Cardinal 4
>> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
>> Indigo Bunting 3
>>
>> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69265537
>>
>> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 9:44 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Tanagers
This morning on Hollow Rd tanagers both make and female seen.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 18, 2020 7:30 AM - 10:10 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 40 species
>
> Canada Goose 2
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1
> Mourning Dove 2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Downy Woodpecker 1
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Northern Flicker 1
> Eastern Phoebe 2
> Great Crested Flycatcher 4
> Eastern Kingbird 2
> Yellow-throated Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 4
> Blue Jay 1
> American Crow 6
> Common Raven 2
> Tree Swallow 2
> White-breasted Nuthatch 2
> House Wren 7
> Gray Catbird 7
> Veery 2
> Hermit Thrush 2
> Wood Thrush 1
> American Robin 2
> House Sparrow 5
> House Finch 2
> American Goldfinch 6
> Chipping Sparrow 4
> Song Sparrow 5
> Eastern Towhee 5
> Red-winged Blackbird 1
> Brown-headed Cowbird 1
> Ovenbird 10
> Common Yellowthroat 3
> American Redstart 3
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 3
> Pine Warbler 1
> Scarlet Tanager 4
> Northern Cardinal 4
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
> Indigo Bunting 3
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69265537
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 6:50 am
From: Ann Curran <acurran802...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Burlington backyard first
To our surprise and delight, a male Baltimore Oriole visited on May 15 & 16, along with a FOY White-crowned Sparrow and a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak, for a record day of 17 species at our house.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 6:46 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 18, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:11 a.m. 49 degrees, Wind S, 0 mph, a *very *weak planetary exhale. Sky:
lackluster and blue-gray; clouds, a shapeless skin of moisture strung from
east to west. Nothing special. Intermittent streams move quietly. Permanent
streams still polish rocks. The vertical fluff of coltsfoot seed
heads radiates around the seed petal-like, which makes the flowers
superficially appear to be dwarf ox-eye daisies. White ash in bud; every
other tree species in leaf.



Warblers: nine species. Vireos: two species. Flycatchers: two species.
Thrushes: two species. Plus, all the usual suspects. A flock of parulas
arrived last night and sing from crowns of white pine; toneless
buzzes rising with the sun. Watching them cramps my neck. Two
black-throated green warblers perch close to each other in adjoining
hemlocks. Sing, their phrases rising, falling, and rising again. Birds of
cool, shady woods, of damp ravines, black-throated greens are as much a
part of rhododendron and Fraser hemlock in the Great Smokey Mountains as
they are of ledgy outcrops and eastern hemlock in the Greens. Their
enthusiasm and unifying devotion define the place, as much as the trees
themselves. When he sings his little heart out, hemlocks come to life. In
fact, black-throated greens are to hemlock woods what lox is to bagels, an
inseparable combination . . . each made infinitely better by the presence
of the other.



Flyover loon, silent. Bittern calling. A female sapsucker bleeds a sugar
maple, the same arrhythmic tapping, though much quieter than her mate's
territorial proclamations. Back to me, she imbibes sap; her grayish-white
stippling blending into the maple bark. Up the tree, she moves.
Begins again. No warblers or hummingbirds visit the holes today.



On the south end of the pond, a pair of house wrens chases each other
around. Beyond Type-A personalities, house wrens could be clinically
diagnosed with ADHD; everything about them is perpetual, both physically
and acoustically. Male sings a disjointed mix of warbles, trills, hisses,
bubbly notes that, rising and falling, sounds *much* too loud for such a
small bird. Never a dull moment in the wonderful world of house
wrens; they're the perfect antidotes for depression, my concentration
refocused in a nanosecond. Wrens, devilishly chaotic, demand attention,
command attention. I forgive them for every nest they trashed, for every
hole they poked in a bluebird egg, both minor infractions in the Big
Picture of interspecies coexistence. Feeling blue or unfocused, COVID-19
got you down . . . look for a house wren.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 5:12 am
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] cranberry viburnum
Birds showed little interest in our fully berried cranberry viburnum over
the course of the winter. But now, cedar waxwings, chickadees, catbirds and
chipmunks can seem to get enough of the berries. I suspect the berries have
matured over the winter making their taste improve-perhaps fermented now.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/18/20 4:28 am
From: Mus <musbird...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mystery egg
I have a pond a fair distance down a field from my house and in this weather have only gone down there a few times this spring. On two occasions, though, I flushed a pair of mallards. Didn’t see a nest, though. Last week I went down there and lo and behold there was an egg on my dock, a big duck-sized egg. Mystifying. I went back down yesterday and oddly it was still there, not eaten by anything. Anybody have any ideas? Why it was “laid” there and why it’s still there?
Janet Watton
Randolph Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 8:02 pm
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] A little Northern Flicker Hanky-Panky
Love it!

Miriam Lawrence

> On May 17, 2020, at 8:37 PM, cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...> wrote:
>
> I was lucky to have had a camera on hand while watching 2 Northern Flickers
> nest building and mating. These are huge crops, but some came out pretty
> clear. This is a slideshow with music my yours truly...a slow-ish
> rendition of Debussy's "Page D'Album". .
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/creaturekinships/49907417377/in/album-72157714347831702/
> Cynthia Crawford
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Photographs, Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> www.creaturekinships.net
> *Online Puzzles: https://www.creaturekinships.net/puzzles
> <https://www.creaturekinships.net/puzzles>*
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 5:37 pm
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] A little Northern Flicker Hanky-Panky
I was lucky to have had a camera on hand while watching 2 Northern Flickers
nest building and mating. These are huge crops, but some came out pretty
clear. This is a slideshow with music my yours truly...a slow-ish
rendition of Debussy's "Page D'Album". .
https://www.flickr.com/photos/creaturekinships/49907417377/in/album-72157714347831702/
Cynthia Crawford
*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Photographs, Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.net
*Online Puzzles: https://www.creaturekinships.net/puzzles
<https://www.creaturekinships.net/puzzles>*
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 4:57 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cape Mays
Here is the list from this morning in Brandon .
Sue Wetmore
>
> Brandon Pearl St, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 17, 2020 7:00 AM - 10:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> 49 species
>
> Wood Duck 1
> Mallard 1
> Mourning Dove 3
> Virginia Rail 1
> Wilson's Snipe 1
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Northern Harrier 1
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
> Downy Woodpecker 2
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Northern Flicker 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 2
> Eastern Kingbird 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 2
> Blue Jay 7
> American Crow 6
> Black-capped Chickadee 3
> Tree Swallow 3
> Barn Swallow 3
> House Wren 6
> European Starling 4
> Gray Catbird 9
> Brown Thrasher 2
> Wood Thrush 1
> American Robin 10
> House Sparrow 2
> House Finch 1
> American Goldfinch 27
> Chipping Sparrow 1
> White-crowned Sparrow 2
> Song Sparrow 7
> Eastern Towhee 1
> Bobolink 2
> Red-winged Blackbird 12
> Brown-headed Cowbird 4
> Common Grackle 8
> Ovenbird 2
> Tennessee Warbler 1
> Common Yellowthroat 4
> American Redstart 1
> Cape May Warbler 3 Chestnut ear patch surrounded with bright yellow, breast yellow with dark streaks, white wing patch. Female not as bright, ear patch dull breast yellow with dark streaks.
> Yellow Warbler 1
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 1
> Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
> Northern Cardinal 8
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
> Indigo Bunting 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69240867
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 1:02 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Golden and Blue-winged Warblers ... IDing, and submitting to eBird.
Hello birders in search of the "winged-warblers" in Vermont.

These fascinating birds are back, perhaps where you have seen them
before, or in newly evolving habitats as abandoned fields begin to fill
with shrubs and trees.  Or maybe a familiar site has changed enough that
it is no longer suitable.

This would be a good time to revisit, or visit for the first time, some
documents which will tell you about the winged-warbler complex, what to
look for when viewing the birds and identifying each individual, and how
to submit to eBird.

----- For a Vermont background on the wing-warbler complex in the state,
read about the "Golden-winged Warbler Conservation" project underway by
Vermont Audubon:
https://vt.audubon.org/conservation/golden-winged-warbler-conservation

----- In that website is this link to a detailed article about the two
species and their hybrids. Two important aspect of these birds are (a)
vocalizations heard can not be used to determine whether the bird
singing is one or the other of the species or a hybrid, and (b) IDs are
dependent upon combinations of many plumage characteristics.  Here is
the link:

https://vt.audubon.org/sites/default/files/static_pages/attachments/winged-warblers._how_to_tell_a_pure_species_from_a_hybrid._7-10-19e.pdf

*******----- The last page (page 7) of that article is a table to keep
handy as you bird.  It has eleven diagnostic features to look for,
features that will help you decide if the bird you are viewing is one of
the two species, a named hybrid, a hybrid of some mix of
characteristics, or not possible to figure our from what you saw or heard.

----- For figuring out how to submit your observation to eBird, use this
guide from the Vermont eBird website:
https://ebird.org/vt/news/golden-blue-winged-warbler-potpourri-how-to-submit-to-ebird

As always, if you are able to photograph a bird or birds, multiple views
are much more helpful than a single photo.  eBird allows up to ten
photos per species.

Happy warblering!

Ian
Vermont eBird reviewer for the Champlain Valley
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 10:28 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
Sunday morning bluebirds. Mrs. fidgets a bit, stops to count the eggs -
she's probably turning them, but hard to tell from this camera angle - about
3:35 Mr. shows up with some breakfast for her.



Some of you told me that you couldn't see several days of the MP4 videos. I
converted them again and uploaded the new versions.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-17-2020.html



MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

<http://www.IanClark.com> www.IanClark.com


 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 8:03 am
From: LINDA M Verchereau <daylilies56...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Common Merg
Early this morning, 1 male, on the river close to Taylor St. bridge.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 7:44 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warblers
Cape May warblers both male & female plus a Tennessee moving through Brandon on Pearl St. this morning.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 6:51 am
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] 3 Indigo Buntings
Here in my yard seems to be the most active these mornings. For less than
30 sec. there were 3 Indigo Buntings perched near my feeder, with 3
orioles, 2 rose-b grosbeaks, Hairy Wdp (black & white color) & bluejays
lingering longer.... and 2 hummers zipping by the window too.

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 6:47 am
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] A grand morning in Derby
Those warblers must be overflying the southern part of VT as we have only
been seen one or two individuals of a specie and then maybe only a handful
of different specie.

Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset

On Sun, May 17, 2020 at 8:48 AM Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> wrote:

> A warm start to the day (unusual in itself) brought a great variety of
> species-scarlet tanagers, RBGs, blue headed vireos, and a good range of
> warblers from No. waterthrush, parulas, black throated blues , pines,
> chestnut sided, to bay breasted.
>


--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 6:17 am
From: kfinch <kfinch51...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mocker
Had a Mockingbird in our Chester yard this morning -- only the 2nd time I've seen one here.  Also 2 FoY Indigo Buntings.    Ken Finch
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 5:48 am
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] A grand morning in Derby
A warm start to the day (unusual in itself) brought a great variety of
species-scarlet tanagers, RBGs, blue headed vireos, and a good range of
warblers from No. waterthrush, parulas, black throated blues , pines,
chestnut sided, to bay breasted.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 5:34 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 17, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:21 a.m. (Two minutes after sunrise), 45 degrees. Windless and damp. Sky
clouded over, a rumpled blanket with holes and tears in the east, radiant
along their edges, lit by hidden sun . . . again. Wetland: greener and
greener; green visible form my front yard ) or so I think). Coltsfoot in
seed. Trillium and sessile bellwort and round-leafed hepatica in flower.
Bigtoothed aspen catkins begin to litter the road. Yellow birch: a riot of
mustard-colored catkins, a thousand two-inch bottlebrushes, pollen sacs
await their appointment with the wind. Woods a quilt of pastel, a dozen
shades of green, like the names of Benjamin Moore paint chips: kelly green;
forest green; avacado green; lime green, more yellow than green; emerald
green. Red maple leaves, for the time being, more red than green. Aspen
more gray than green. Pine needles a somber green.

Woke up to titmice, whistling loudly and sharply, in the front yard. To the
west, owl in the patch-cut calling above the turkeys, which still sound
ramped up. Bittern in the north end of the wetland, called all night; still
calls. Robins around the yard noisey; quiet elsewhere. Chickadees and
juncos singing. Pair of Canada geese fly in from the northeast, honking;
join mallard (his head a deeper green than the reeds; a blend of malachite
and olive, perhaps). Geese exist southwest, their voices fading in the
distance.

One hermit thrush seen, none heard. Four Nashville warblers and one
Tennessee warbler, neither of which nest in the Volunteer State. Tennessee
pasing through Coyote Hollow but Nahvilles, following a plan pioneered last
week by ovenbirds, divvy the valley; sing with alacrity and verve above the
edge of footpaths, driveways, and woodland openings, pausing to feed now
and again amid clusters of baby leaves. A female *myrtle* warbler visits a
fresh ring of sapsucker holes, while the sapsucker, preoccupied, practices
Morse Code elsewhere.

Three male yellowthroats, bolt upright in alders, singing. Poster-bird for
COVID-19: wears mask and practise social-distancing.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/17/20 5:25 am
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Indigo Buntings and more!
Male and female IB this morning, plus another male. Both males visited
feeders for a couple of hours yesterday, as did a male and female Oriole
(suet and hummingbird feeders). Also beautiful Magnolia Warbler, Northern
Parula and American Redstart flitting in the trees. First ever backyard
Magnolia and Parula for us!!
Eugenia Cooke
Rutland
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 7:06 pm
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warblers etc in BTV/South Burlington
Hello:

This morning Ted Murin & I birded Greenmount Cemetery (GC), Salmon Hole Park, and St. Joseph’s Cemetery (SJC) in Burlington, and Red Rocks Park (RRP) in South Burlington. Highlights included:

Cape May Warblers @ GC (2), SJC (1), and RRP (1)

Swainson’s Thrush @ RRP

15 warbler species at RRP:
American Redstart
Black-and-White
Blackburnian
Blackpoll
Black-throated Green
Black-throated Blue
Cape May
Chestnut-sided
Common Yellowthroat
Magnolia (heard only)
Northern Parula
Northern Waterthrush
Ovenbird
Pine
Yellow-rumped

Meanwhile, birds in my yard today included:

2 male Ruby-throated hummingbirds coming to sugar-water feeders all day.
2 male Baltimore Orioles coming to suet feeders all day.

Scott Morrical,
South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 1:11 pm
From: Jeff MacQueen <jmacqueen65...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] White Pelicans
Unfortunately, they flew off around 9:45.

On Saturday, May 16, 2020, Martha Rice <mhbrice...> wrote:

> This morning at 9:30 a.m. there were 3 White Pelicans on Lake Morey in
> Fairlee.
>
> Seen and photographed by Megan Bennitt
>
> Martha Rice
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 1:08 pm
From: Martha Rice <mhbrice...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] White Pelicans
This morning at 9:30 a.m. there were 3 White Pelicans on Lake Morey in Fairlee.

Seen and photographed by Megan Bennitt

Martha Rice
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 12:33 pm
From: Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Nesting Fish Crows in Bennington
The Fish Crows at the Elm Street Market in Bennington are now building a
nest behind the store. I observed them carrying nesting material and
quietly calling to each other. Even without other crows around, I could
tell they were smaller. I did get another recording, however, and will post
it to eBird.

I had singing Cape May and Tennessee Warblers in my yard this morning.
Yesterday I had a Blackpoll Warbler in Mount Tabor and I had a male
Ruby-throated Hummingbird at my feeder shortly before the storm blew in.

--
Gretchen E. Nareff
Bennington, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 11:44 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] May 16, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
Yes, they are beautiful, if difficult to hear.

Pura Vida,
Ted

On Sat, May 16, 2020 at 1:03 PM Sandy Turner <tmsprgrn...> wrote:

> Argh - you have to rub it in about hearing the Blackburnian Warbler. It's
> been a good 3 years since we've heard one, but still see one now and then -
> not too shabby!
>
> Cheers, Sandy and Mark Turner
> Lyman, NH
>
> On Sat, May 16, 2020 at 8:11 AM Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> wrote:
>
> > 5:25 a.m. 50 degrees, NW wind 4 mph. Saturated atmosphere: cloud
> > ceiling thicker than cloud cellar, an extensive canopy of moisture born
> of
> > the sky touching the earth, like a jungle sunrise without the sun. Mount
> > Ascutney screened by mist. What's left of the moon remains hidden behind
> > the eastern hills, the sun (somewhere) passes by.
> >
> > Last night: not ideal migration conditions. Warblers like paper airplanes
> > do better with a tailwind, stay aloft longer, cover more ground,
> > expend less energy. Thus far, 2020 spring migration in Coyote Hollow:
> more
> > spillout than fallout; more dribble than spate; more whisper than shout.
> > Today's warbler roster: black-throated green; black and white; northern
> > parula (FOY); yellowthroat; ovenbird (three); yellow; blackburnian (FOY),
> > and Nashville. Real fallout: May 16, 2016, Magee Marsh, south shore of
> Lake
> > Erie, western, Ohio: Jordan and I overwhelmed by nineteen species of
> > warblers, many eye-level and arm's lengths, idled on wooden railings and
> > benches, flitting through shrubs. Exhausted warblers. Hungry warblers.
> > Arriving at warp speed. Some so close we took their portraits with
> > cellphones. Waves of bay-breasted and Cape May warblers, birds I don't
> > often see in Vermont. Dozens of hooded and prothonotary warblers, birds I
> > never see in Vermont. There were birds beyond counting. Joyous and
> > bewildered, we just looked and looked . . . The fallout also included
> > rock-star birders, Victor Emanuel and Kenn Kaufman, among them, both of
> > whom we also checked out.
> >
> > A migratory event not to be repeated in Coyote Hollow today, however.
> > Stereophonic walk: south of me, bittern calls from the reeds; north of
> me,
> > turkeys gobble in the oaks. In between: a wood thrush sings (perhaps
> he'll
> > stay); two winter wrens, songs somewhat subdued. A Nashville warbler
> sings
> > and probes new leaves high in a cherry tree, breakfast table cum stage,
> > wandering between old webworm webs, which hang like frayed socks. His
> > two-part song enriches my walk. Pairs of chickadees heedless of
> > social-distancing, forage too close. Blackburnian warbler song seeps out
> > from a veil of hemlock branches. Who needs AARP's weekly invitation to
> have
> > my hearing tested . . . I can still hear blackburnian high notes, the
> > tinkling of distant chimes. More whisperer than crooner.
> >
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 11:07 am
From: Poleysgmavt <poleys...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Visitors
Today’s visitors included a male and female oriole, a male indigo bunting and a male Rose-breasted grosbeak.
We’re still watching for our first hummer.

Denis and Maria Poley
Richmond, VT

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 10:03 am
From: Sandy Turner <tmsprgrn...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] May 16, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
Argh - you have to rub it in about hearing the Blackburnian Warbler. It's
been a good 3 years since we've heard one, but still see one now and then -
not too shabby!

Cheers, Sandy and Mark Turner
Lyman, NH

On Sat, May 16, 2020 at 8:11 AM Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> wrote:

> 5:25 a.m. 50 degrees, NW wind 4 mph. Saturated atmosphere: cloud
> ceiling thicker than cloud cellar, an extensive canopy of moisture born of
> the sky touching the earth, like a jungle sunrise without the sun. Mount
> Ascutney screened by mist. What's left of the moon remains hidden behind
> the eastern hills, the sun (somewhere) passes by.
>
> Last night: not ideal migration conditions. Warblers like paper airplanes
> do better with a tailwind, stay aloft longer, cover more ground,
> expend less energy. Thus far, 2020 spring migration in Coyote Hollow: more
> spillout than fallout; more dribble than spate; more whisper than shout.
> Today's warbler roster: black-throated green; black and white; northern
> parula (FOY); yellowthroat; ovenbird (three); yellow; blackburnian (FOY),
> and Nashville. Real fallout: May 16, 2016, Magee Marsh, south shore of Lake
> Erie, western, Ohio: Jordan and I overwhelmed by nineteen species of
> warblers, many eye-level and arm's lengths, idled on wooden railings and
> benches, flitting through shrubs. Exhausted warblers. Hungry warblers.
> Arriving at warp speed. Some so close we took their portraits with
> cellphones. Waves of bay-breasted and Cape May warblers, birds I don't
> often see in Vermont. Dozens of hooded and prothonotary warblers, birds I
> never see in Vermont. There were birds beyond counting. Joyous and
> bewildered, we just looked and looked . . . The fallout also included
> rock-star birders, Victor Emanuel and Kenn Kaufman, among them, both of
> whom we also checked out.
>
> A migratory event not to be repeated in Coyote Hollow today, however.
> Stereophonic walk: south of me, bittern calls from the reeds; north of me,
> turkeys gobble in the oaks. In between: a wood thrush sings (perhaps he'll
> stay); two winter wrens, songs somewhat subdued. A Nashville warbler sings
> and probes new leaves high in a cherry tree, breakfast table cum stage,
> wandering between old webworm webs, which hang like frayed socks. His
> two-part song enriches my walk. Pairs of chickadees heedless of
> social-distancing, forage too close. Blackburnian warbler song seeps out
> from a veil of hemlock branches. Who needs AARP's weekly invitation to have
> my hearing tested . . . I can still hear blackburnian high notes, the
> tinkling of distant chimes. More whisperer than crooner.
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 9:51 am
From: Ed Green <edgreen3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Ruby Throated Hummingbird
Put out my feeders and within 10 minutes a female checked it out.



Underhill, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 9:29 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Saturday edition
Mrs. returns from first breakfast and takes a few moments to settle in for
the morning. Or at least until second breakfast.



I've reuploaded several MP4 videos from the last few days. If you had
trouble seeing them, give them another try.

FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/blubebirds/bbirds-5-16-2020.html





MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/blubebirds/bbirds-mp4.html







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 8:56 am
From: Graham Bates <batesg...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Swifts and bobolinks in Rochester
A swarm of 14 Chimney Swifts was doing as their name implies, and dropping
into the chimney at the Rochester elementary school this morning. A small
flock of bobolinks was also seen in the fields behind the school. Nice
morning birding!

Graham

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Graham Bates <batesg...>
Date: Sat, May 16, 2020 at 11:53 AM
Subject: eBird -- 222 S Main St, Rochester US-VT (43.8721,-72.8099) -- May
16, 2020
To: Graham Bates <batesg...>


222 S Main St, Rochester US-VT (43.8721,-72.8099)
May 16, 2020
11:15 AM
Traveling
0.50 miles
30 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 2.0.13 Build 2.0.122

14 Chimney Swift
1 Belted Kingfisher
2 Northern Flicker
4 Black-capped Chickadee
20 European Starling
1 Purple Finch
6 American Goldfinch
4 Song Sparrow
9 Bobolink
6 Red-winged Blackbird
1 Common Grackle
2 Common Yellowthroat

Number of Taxa: 12


Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 8:22 am
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Berlin Pond goodies
Some interesting birds on the pond this morning. A Common Tern was keeping
a Bonaparte's Gull company mid pond (south end). Also a small flock of 3
White-winged Scoters.
And interested to a Rusty Blackbird alarm calling while 2 ravens appeared
to be looking for grackle nests to raid!
Happy birding,
Chip
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 8:04 am
From: lawlor <lawlor.coleen...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Franklin Airport
Lot’s of change in habitat at the airport, I see the expansion is very large. Only one towhee heard today.

Does anyone know if it will continue to be managed for grassland birds? While I was there this morning there was lots of talk of mowing by a couple of men who were walking the field. “We need a farmer in here to mow before it gets too long.”

Coleen Lawlor

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 6:24 am
From: Gail Straw <gailstraw...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill Cranes from egg on
Thank you, Maeve! This video is wonderful, and the photos at their website
are also great. I actually was working about a week and a half ago, and
looked up from the computer to see a Sandhill Crane fly low over my back
yard in South Burlington. A very surreal moment!

Loved this!
Thanks again,

Gail Straw
South Burlington

On Sat, May 16, 2020 at 8:15 AM maevulus <maevulus...> wrote:

> Good morning - An old high school friend who now lives in Florida has
> put together a video of his neighborhood's resident pair of cranes. I
> debated posting the link because they're not Vermont birds - but they
> are a species that nests and raises young here, and the photos are
> delightful. Here's the link: https://youtu.be/tRNLU0PmDQY
>
> I was somewhat concerned that the lawns look either like artificial turf
> or like grass that's been heavily treated with ChemLawn. I've read about
> the dangers to many kinds of mammals from the stuff that people use to
> make their lawns "beautiful", but does anyone know of any studies about
> young birds and lawn "treatments"? The cranes have raised colts in that
> area for more than twenty years.
>
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 6:14 am
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Snowy Egret Windsor VT
Seen just now flying over downtown Windsor, trailing behind a Great Egret.

Zac Cota

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 5:45 am
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sandhill Cranes from egg on
Love the video! Those are confident cranes to raise young so close to humans. I love in Ontario and I know of an area where we have Sandhills who breed there but too secretive and in general we do not know exactly where, as it should be.
Thank you for showing this.

> On May 16, 2020, at 8:14 AM, maevulus <maevulus...> wrote:
>
> Good morning - An old high school friend who now lives in Florida has put together a video of his neighborhood's resident pair of cranes. I debated posting the link because they're not Vermont birds - but they are a species that nests and raises young here, and the photos are delightful. Here's the link: https://youtu.be/tRNLU0PmDQY
>
> I was somewhat concerned that the lawns look either like artificial turf or like grass that's been heavily treated with ChemLawn. I've read about the dangers to many kinds of mammals from the stuff that people use to make their lawns "beautiful", but does anyone know of any studies about young birds and lawn "treatments"? The cranes have raised colts in that area for more than twenty years.
>
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 5:15 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Sandhill Cranes from egg on
Good morning - An old high school friend who now lives in Florida has
put together a video of his neighborhood's resident pair of cranes. I
debated posting the link because they're not Vermont birds - but they
are a species that nests and raises young here, and the photos are
delightful. Here's the link: https://youtu.be/tRNLU0PmDQY

I was somewhat concerned that the lawns look either like artificial turf
or like grass that's been heavily treated with ChemLawn. I've read about
the dangers to many kinds of mammals from the stuff that people use to
make their lawns "beautiful", but does anyone know of any studies about
young birds and lawn "treatments"? The cranes have raised colts in that
area for more than twenty years.

Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 5:11 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 16, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:25 a.m. 50 degrees, NW wind 4 mph. Saturated atmosphere: cloud
ceiling thicker than cloud cellar, an extensive canopy of moisture born of
the sky touching the earth, like a jungle sunrise without the sun. Mount
Ascutney screened by mist. What's left of the moon remains hidden behind
the eastern hills, the sun (somewhere) passes by.

Last night: not ideal migration conditions. Warblers like paper airplanes
do better with a tailwind, stay aloft longer, cover more ground,
expend less energy. Thus far, 2020 spring migration in Coyote Hollow: more
spillout than fallout; more dribble than spate; more whisper than shout.
Today's warbler roster: black-throated green; black and white; northern
parula (FOY); yellowthroat; ovenbird (three); yellow; blackburnian (FOY),
and Nashville. Real fallout: May 16, 2016, Magee Marsh, south shore of Lake
Erie, western, Ohio: Jordan and I overwhelmed by nineteen species of
warblers, many eye-level and arm's lengths, idled on wooden railings and
benches, flitting through shrubs. Exhausted warblers. Hungry warblers.
Arriving at warp speed. Some so close we took their portraits with
cellphones. Waves of bay-breasted and Cape May warblers, birds I don't
often see in Vermont. Dozens of hooded and prothonotary warblers, birds I
never see in Vermont. There were birds beyond counting. Joyous and
bewildered, we just looked and looked . . . The fallout also included
rock-star birders, Victor Emanuel and Kenn Kaufman, among them, both of
whom we also checked out.

A migratory event not to be repeated in Coyote Hollow today, however.
Stereophonic walk: south of me, bittern calls from the reeds; north of me,
turkeys gobble in the oaks. In between: a wood thrush sings (perhaps he'll
stay); two winter wrens, songs somewhat subdued. A Nashville warbler sings
and probes new leaves high in a cherry tree, breakfast table cum stage,
wandering between old webworm webs, which hang like frayed socks. His
two-part song enriches my walk. Pairs of chickadees heedless of
social-distancing, forage too close. Blackburnian warbler song seeps out
from a veil of hemlock branches. Who needs AARP's weekly invitation to have
my hearing tested . . . I can still hear blackburnian high notes, the
tinkling of distant chimes. More whisperer than crooner.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/20 2:43 am
From: J J Allen <jjapple88...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Seven male Orioles
> seven male Orioles at once yesterday Friday at a friend’s orange slice feeder in Montpelier. A riot of orange color.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 7:38 pm
From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Parula.
Great close looks at male parula in lilacs just outside my window while
washing dishes this afternoon. Sometimes it's easy!
Charlie La Rosa
So. Washington
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 3:38 pm
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
Whatever happened, I can see today’s MP4!

> On May 15, 2020, at 6:12 PM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>
> Your Friday bluebird update. Mrs. has been mostly in the box all day. She
> pops up now and again to keep track of what's going on in the yard. She has
> been out on several errands throughout the day. Dad has been coming and
> going, making several trips to feed her. We've been on the deck for the
> first time this year over the last couple days. Mrs. stopped to look at our
> dogs, decided we were all boring and went about her business.
>
> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on our deck in West
> Newbury, VT. We're expecting the eggs to hatch between May 21 and 23.
>
> FLV
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-15-2020.html
>
>
>
> MP4
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 3:14 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
Your Friday bluebird update. Mrs. has been mostly in the box all day. She
pops up now and again to keep track of what's going on in the yard. She has
been out on several errands throughout the day. Dad has been coming and
going, making several trips to feed her. We've been on the deck for the
first time this year over the last couple days. Mrs. stopped to look at our
dogs, decided we were all boring and went about her business.

We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on our deck in West
Newbury, VT. We're expecting the eggs to hatch between May 21 and 23.

FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-15-2020.html



MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 3:13 pm
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Common Loons - Kent Pond, Killington
Two loons on Kent Pond this morning! With one on the usual nesting spot. We're further along in the season than it seems!
A bonus bird, a White-winged Scoter, was also present.
Sue Elliott
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 2:38 pm
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
Ian, I stopped seeing the MP4 around the 10th. Nothing came through today. I don’t understand why the change since I have not changed anything on my computer. Eve

> On May 15, 2020, at 5:29 PM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>
> Hi -
>
> Tried mailing you a file this morning to see if you could play it, your server bounced it back. Can you still see the earlier videos? Today's is uploading, should be available in a few minutes
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of Eve Ticknor
> Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2020 2:55 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
>
> Unfortunately your MP4 does not work on my computer anymore. I lost you several days ago. Not sure if anyone has any suggestions. I have a MacBookAir
>
>> On May 14, 2020, at 9:57 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>>
>> Checking in on our bluebirds Thursday morning. Mrs. spends a few
>> seconds peering out her window, sits in the doorway for a moment,
>> decides not to go out, settles in, checks the eggs then changes her
>> mind and heads out after all.
>>
>>
>>
>> FLV
>>
>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-14-2020.html
>>
>>
>>
>> MP4
>>
>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
>>
>>
>>
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>> %%%%%% %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>
>>
>>
>> Ian Clark
>> PO Box 51
>>
>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>
>> (848) 702-0774
>>
>> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>>
>>
>
>
>
> Eve Ticknor
> <edticknor...>
>
> Box 2206
> Prescott, On
> K0E 1T0
>
> 24 Birch Ave
> Willsboro, NY
> 12996
>
> "Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
> (Quaker blessing)



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 2:31 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
Hi -

Tried mailing you a file this morning to see if you could play it, your server bounced it back. Can you still see the earlier videos? Today's is uploading, should be available in a few minutes


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of Eve Ticknor
Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2020 2:55 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition

Unfortunately your MP4 does not work on my computer anymore. I lost you several days ago. Not sure if anyone has any suggestions. I have a MacBookAir

> On May 14, 2020, at 9:57 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>
> Checking in on our bluebirds Thursday morning. Mrs. spends a few
> seconds peering out her window, sits in the doorway for a moment,
> decides not to go out, settles in, checks the eggs then changes her
> mind and heads out after all.
>
>
>
> FLV
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-14-2020.html
>
>
>
> MP4
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%% %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 1:58 pm
From: Barclay Morris <bemorris...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer
Male in the feeder

Barclay
East Shore Grand Isle
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 1:38 pm
From: Barclay Morris <bemorris...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY in Grand Isle
Our first Yellow-rumped yesterday and male Baltimore Oriole today

Barclay
East Shore Grand Isle
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 12:42 pm
From: Poleysgmavt <poleys...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
We had a male about 1:00 on our sunflower seed feeder.
It’s been a few years since we’ve had one.

Denis and Maria Poley
Richmond, VT

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 15, 2020, at 3:33 PM, Nita <nita.hwf...> wrote:
>
> FOY indigo bunting in Waterbury Center today too.
>
> Nita
>
>> On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 2:32 PM Peg Clement <clementpeg...> wrote:
>>
>> And Stephanie scored me a jar of wipes so I’m feeling particularly lucky
>> right now
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>>> On May 15, 2020, at 2:02 PM, Jane Stein <jeshawks...> wrote:
>>>
>>> I had one at mine early this morning. That rich jewel-tone color is
>>> absolutely jaw-dropping, isn't it?
>>>
>>> Jane
>>> (Shoreham)
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Fri, 15 May 2020 09:08:46 -0400, <bflewelling3263...> wrote:
>>>> Two beautiful Indigo Buntings at my Rt.73 feeder this morning.
>>>>
>>>> Bruce Flewelling
>>>>
>>>> RT. 73, Rochester
>>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 12:33 pm
From: Nita <nita.hwf...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
FOY indigo bunting in Waterbury Center today too.

Nita

On Fri, May 15, 2020 at 2:32 PM Peg Clement <clementpeg...> wrote:

> And Stephanie scored me a jar of wipes so I’m feeling particularly lucky
> right now
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 15, 2020, at 2:02 PM, Jane Stein <jeshawks...> wrote:
> >
> > I had one at mine early this morning. That rich jewel-tone color is
> > absolutely jaw-dropping, isn't it?
> >
> > Jane
> > (Shoreham)
> >
> >
> >> On Fri, 15 May 2020 09:08:46 -0400, <bflewelling3263...> wrote:
> >> Two beautiful Indigo Buntings at my Rt.73 feeder this morning.
> >>
> >> Bruce Flewelling
> >>
> >> RT. 73, Rochester
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 12:04 pm
From: Bob Phillips <155bphillips...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY ORIOLES
Enjoyed a rainbow this morning- Baltimore Orioles, cardinal, goldfinches,
purple finches, rose-breasted grosbeak, and blue jays.
All in Graniteville while I zoomed my day away.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 11:32 am
From: Peg Clement <clementpeg...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
And Stephanie scored me a jar of wipes so I’m feeling particularly lucky right now

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 15, 2020, at 2:02 PM, Jane Stein <jeshawks...> wrote:
>
> I had one at mine early this morning. That rich jewel-tone color is
> absolutely jaw-dropping, isn't it?
>
> Jane
> (Shoreham)
>
>
>> On Fri, 15 May 2020 09:08:46 -0400, <bflewelling3263...> wrote:
>> Two beautiful Indigo Buntings at my Rt.73 feeder this morning.
>>
>> Bruce Flewelling
>>
>> RT. 73, Rochester
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 11:02 am
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
I had one at mine early this morning. That rich jewel-tone color is
absolutely jaw-dropping, isn't it?

Jane
(Shoreham)


On Fri, 15 May 2020 09:08:46 -0400, <bflewelling3263...> wrote:
> Two beautiful Indigo Buntings at my Rt.73 feeder this morning.
>
> Bruce Flewelling
>
> RT. 73, Rochester
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 9:15 am
From: BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Rainbow of color.
Wow! Purple Finch, Goldfinch, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Indigo Bunting and Male and Female Baltimore Oriole, all at the same time on the feeders or in the adjacent lilac bush.

Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 9:10 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Cape May and other warblers
People have commented on the apparent scarcity of warblers and warbler
song in the woods this spring. We haven't been far from home, but the
bird activity in our yard (small woods on one side, wetlands on another,
open field on a third) has been exciting and gratifying. (I was
beginning to think that the birds were altering their regular routes in
an act of kindness to two home-bound birders, but I realize the greatly
increased yard count is actually a factor of how much more time we're
spending here than usual.) Warblers haven't been constant but when they
come through the flocks are quite large. We've seen many Yellow-rumps, a
few Black-throated Green, a Chestnut-sided, a Common Yellowthroat, a
female Cape May, a Nashville, and at least four mystery species, as well
as hearing the regular resident Ovenbird from the woods across the
street.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 8:11 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 15, 2020: Thetford Center con't
A male rose-breasted grosbeak, eating maple buds, a study in contrast and
simplicity. Like the old joke, *What's black and white and re(a)d all
over?* For
a birder, the answer is grosbeak, not newspaper. Ivory colored bill set in
black face; red breast against a white chest and belly; a black back; a
white rump. Inner tail feathers: black. Outer tail feathers: white. Black
wings with white blotches and bars. And he can sing, sweetly.

On the south end of the pond, a pair of house wrens inspect a cavity in
busted red pine. Male sings, loudly; varying pace between a typewriter—not
my pace; someone who can actually type—and a machinegun, an
uninterrupted explosion of noise.

Phoebes nest-building in the barn. Behind the west-facing barn door: little
brown bat. Might be the same bat I watched last evening troll for insects
above the upper pasture. At the turn of the twenty-first century, we had
ten or twelve behind the door. Now, one . . . becomes a cause for
celebration.vt
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 7:17 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cape May warbler
The list from Hollow Rd.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 15, 2020 7:00 AM - 9:15 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.4 mile(s)
> Checklist Comments: overcast mild
> 44 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Canada Goose 1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
> Turkey Vulture 4
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Downy Woodpecker 1
> Hairy Woodpecker 1
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Northern Flicker 2
> Empidonax sp. 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 1
> Blue Jay 16
> American Crow 8
> Common Raven 2
> Black-capped Chickadee 5
> Tufted Titmouse 1
> Tree Swallow 2
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> House Wren 6
> European Starling 4
> Gray Catbird 10
> Eastern Bluebird 2
> Hermit Thrush 3
> Wood Thrush 1
> American Robin 8
> House Sparrow 1
> House Finch 1
> American Goldfinch 4
> Chipping Sparrow 3
> Field Sparrow 1
> Song Sparrow 3
> Eastern Towhee 5
> Red-winged Blackbird 1
> Ovenbird 9
> Black-and-white Warbler 3
> Common Yellowthroat 2
> American Redstart 1
> Cape May Warbler 1
> Yellow Warbler 1
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
> Pine Warbler 1
> Scarlet Tanager 1
> Northern Cardinal 3
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S69080368
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 6:28 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cape May
On Hollow Rd this morning after neck breaking looks I finally saw a Cape May S warbler at the too of a tall tree.
Seems as if the birds were given permission to sing as the length of the road was musical.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 6:08 am
From: <bflewelling3263...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY - Indigo Buntings
Two beautiful Indigo Buntings at my Rt.73 feeder this morning.

Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 5:57 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Female Oriole arrives, goes to work
On the orange slices this morning, and grabbing at fraying end of a
bit of dangling nylon line just now, fingers crossed this is for nest
possibility.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
_ _

_The biologist EO Wilson has warned that, as the extinction rate
climbs, humans are entering “The Eremocene” – the Age of
Loneliness._ --Robert Macfarlane_ _

___ _

Sent using Hushmail
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 5:52 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 15, 2020: Thetford Center
5:11 a.m. 50 degrees, NW wind 2 mph. An absence of a down jacket, ski cap,
and winter gloves. Waning moon eclipsed by a blanket of high clouds, corner
to corner, blue-gray, ready to release. Woodland and wetland: viridescent.
Beech leaves unwrapped, tiny, delicate, vibrant. Sugar maple leaves open,
flowers extending. Leafless shadbush, white-petaled, lights up the eastern
rim of the wetland.

Last night, a Wonder World of Warblers? Not quite, not yet. I see one
Nashville; hear four ovenbirds, one black and white, three yellowthroats,
one black-throated green (FOY). A male *myrtle* visits a skirt of sapsucker
holes that ring a maple*. *Sips sap; punctuates meal with a burst of song.
Pissed off woodpecker flies in, screams, the sound a cat might make if you
stepped on its tail. Routs warbler, which vanishes into spring. Sapsucker,
a more or less beaked dowser, goes back to excavating a network of tiny
cavities, rings around the tree; muted taps barely audible from
twenty feet. Before long (I hope), a hummingbird will come to this same
hole, drink sap and eat fresh culled insects that also came for sap;
eventually, to select a personal sapsucker and defend it from interloping
hummingbirds. (Red flowers are in a *very* limited edition in mid-May.)
Hummingbird and sapsucker engage in a one-sided relationship called
*commensalism *that benefits one species while neither helping nor harming
the other—like a coyote catching ground squirrels that exit the back door,
while an oblivious badger, head in hole, bores through the front.

What makes spring so fascinating? I've grown tired of winter, yearn for
pulsing life, for rich color, for warm weather. For voices in the night.
Spring's arrival, though trending earlier and earlier during my lifetime,
is unscheduled, unpredictable, uncompromising. No two are ever the same.
Spring is the hermit thrush, the virtuoso of our seasons, inventive and
breathtaking. I thrive on the variety and surprise, on the urgency of the
season. Spring in Vermont delivers in spades. And I'm stuck at home,
watching.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/20 5:49 am
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Oriole Monkton
I know we're a bit late to the Oriole party here, but FOY just showed up
singing outside our house today. We've had them breeding (or attempting to
breed) on our property for a number of years so hopefully this gent is here
to stay.

--Miriam Lawrence
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 6:24 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Amazing finale for May 14
While having 'not usually seen around my yard birds' this a.m., (thrasher,
indigo buntings) the birds seen from 6:30-7:30 pm were Flicker,
Ruby-crowned Kinglet, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER (maybe a yd first!), Hermit
Thrush, Yellow-rumped Warbler. None of these were seen earlier in the day.

I hope there are more coming!!
--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 4:24 pm
From: David Guertin <dave...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Baltimore Oriole show
Wow. Yeah, that's pretty close to what I saw, except in this case all
the actual beak-to-beak combat took place in the air.

Dave G.

On 5/14/20 6:40 PM, Richard Guthrie wrote:
> Check out the nock down drag out battle photos on my Facebook site. Brutal.
>
> Richard Guthrie
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 14, 2020, at 5:40 PM, David Guertin <dave...> wrote:
>>
>> I was birding this morning here in Cornwall and was treated to an amazing show by two male Baltimore Orioles. They were engaged in what I assume was a spectacular territorial boundary dispute, singing at each other from adjacent branches in the same tree, as they hopped from branch to branch down opposite sides of the trunk. It went on and on for about a minute, until they got inches apart, still singing at each other, beaks practically touching. It finished up with an aerial tussle, after which the bird that was consistently in the lower position flew off to another nearby tree. The birds were still singing at each other when I left.
>>
>> Whew!
>>
>> Dave G.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 3:40 pm
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Baltimore Oriole show
Check out the nock down drag out battle photos on my Facebook site. Brutal.

Richard Guthrie

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 14, 2020, at 5:40 PM, David Guertin <dave...> wrote:
>
> I was birding this morning here in Cornwall and was treated to an amazing show by two male Baltimore Orioles. They were engaged in what I assume was a spectacular territorial boundary dispute, singing at each other from adjacent branches in the same tree, as they hopped from branch to branch down opposite sides of the trunk. It went on and on for about a minute, until they got inches apart, still singing at each other, beaks practically touching. It finished up with an aerial tussle, after which the bird that was consistently in the lower position flew off to another nearby tree. The birds were still singing at each other when I left.
>
> Whew!
>
> Dave G.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 2:41 pm
From: David Guertin <dave...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Baltimore Oriole show
I was birding this morning here in Cornwall and was treated to an
amazing show by two male Baltimore Orioles. They were engaged in what I
assume was a spectacular territorial boundary dispute, singing at each
other from adjacent branches in the same tree, as they hopped from
branch to branch down opposite sides of the trunk. It went on and on for
about a minute, until they got inches apart, still singing at each
other, beaks practically touching. It finished up with an aerial tussle,
after which the bird that was consistently in the lower position flew
off to another nearby tree. The birds were still singing at each other
when I left.

Whew!

Dave G.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 2:36 pm
From: Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY female hummer
At feeder in Brownsville just now

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 2:34 pm
From: Pat Folsom <pfols...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer- South Burlington
First one arrived in my yard in Waitsfield this afternoon at 4 PM. Hooray!

----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott Morrical" <smorrica...>
To: "VT Bird" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Thursday, May 14, 2020 5:18:21 PM
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer- South Burlington

Male RTHU, just arrived. Went straight to feeders, now perched on his favorite tree branch from last year (assuming same bird).
Scott Morrical,
South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 2:18 pm
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer- South Burlington
Male RTHU, just arrived. Went straight to feeders, now perched on his favorite tree branch from last year (assuming same bird).
Scott Morrical,
South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 1:00 pm
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Cape Mays in E. Dorset
I agree. It’s very quiet here. Evergreen in Jericho.

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 14, 2020, at 3:15 PM, Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:
>
> I agree with low numbers and not much singing here in Brandon . One has to really work to find the birds.
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
>> On May 14, 2020, at 1:27 PM, R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> wrote:
>>
>> Five Cape Mays and one Magnolia here this a.m., but other than a Black &
>> White, NO other warblers. And generally very quiet in my local wood patch.
>> Has anyone else noticed s/low numbers of birds in their local area?
>> Sometimes my feeder area is busier than the forests.
>>
>> New yard birds this a.m. 2 Indigo Buntings and a Brown Thrasher - probably
>> the first time I've seen a BRTh in feeder area rather than is bushes/scrub
>> around my house.
>>
>> Ruth Stewart
>> E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 12:15 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Cape Mays in E. Dorset
I agree with low numbers and not much singing here in Brandon . One has to really work to find the birds.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

> On May 14, 2020, at 1:27 PM, R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> wrote:
>
> Five Cape Mays and one Magnolia here this a.m., but other than a Black &
> White, NO other warblers. And generally very quiet in my local wood patch.
> Has anyone else noticed s/low numbers of birds in their local area?
> Sometimes my feeder area is busier than the forests.
>
> New yard birds this a.m. 2 Indigo Buntings and a Brown Thrasher - probably
> the first time I've seen a BRTh in feeder area rather than is bushes/scrub
> around my house.
>
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 11:55 am
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
Unfortunately your MP4 does not work on my computer anymore. I lost you several days ago. Not sure if anyone has any suggestions. I have a MacBookAir

> On May 14, 2020, at 9:57 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>
> Checking in on our bluebirds Thursday morning. Mrs. spends a few seconds
> peering out her window, sits in the doorway for a moment, decides not to go
> out, settles in, checks the eggs then changes her mind and heads out after
> all.
>
>
>
> FLV
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-14-2020.html
>
>
>
> MP4
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 10:27 am
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cape Mays in E. Dorset
Five Cape Mays and one Magnolia here this a.m., but other than a Black &
White, NO other warblers. And generally very quiet in my local wood patch.
Has anyone else noticed s/low numbers of birds in their local area?
Sometimes my feeder area is busier than the forests.

New yard birds this a.m. 2 Indigo Buntings and a Brown Thrasher - probably
the first time I've seen a BRTh in feeder area rather than is bushes/scrub
around my house.

Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 10:14 am
From: Peg Clement <clementpeg...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
Kent, I missed this webinar yesterday. Was it recorded at all, or can I look it up somewhere post-facto? Thank you.

Peg Clement
Burlington

> On May 13, 2020, at 8:16 AM, Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> wrote:
>
> All About Spring Migration
> Date: 5/13/2020 Time: 9:00AM
> Spring is an exhilarating time for naturalists, and especially for birders
> as our forests, fields and waterways fill with the sounds and colors of
> migrants. Join VCE Executive Director Chris Rimmer for a spring migration
> discussion! This webinar will provide an overview of spring migration,
> focusing on the songbirds (thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, and
> sparrows) that grace us in May. Some are here to nest, while others merely
> pass through en route to boreal habitats further north. Emphasis will be on
> the dazzling diversity of different species, their migration strategies,
> and how to learn their identification.
>
> Join with Google Meet
> meet.google.com/rhv-ermp-mmo
>
> Join by phone
> ‪+1 929-266-1521‬ PIN: ‪695 748 427‬#
>
>
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
> Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>
>
> <http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 9:10 am
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cape May Warblers, Middlebury
There were at least ten Cape May Warblers in the spruce trees at the West / St. Mary's Cemetery on the Middlebury College campus this morning. Also there were a Nashville Warbler, a good number of Yellow-Rumped Warblers, and one of the the local Merlins was making some noise.  
 

---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 6:59 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
Checking in on our bluebirds Thursday morning. Mrs. spends a few seconds
peering out her window, sits in the doorway for a moment, decides not to go
out, settles in, checks the eggs then changes her mind and heads out after
all.



FLV

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-14-2020.html



MP4

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/20 5:34 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 14, 2020: Thetford Center
5:28 a.m. 28 degrees, windless. Half-moon well to the east stares down the
sun, which remains hidden in the pleated landscape. Hints of magenta and
rose trim the edges of the eastern and western horizons. The summit of
Mount Ascutney in sharp relief. Frost in the wetlands. Mists rises out of
the pond. I heard owls last night; not this morning. No ducks, either. A
grouse drums in the distance, barley audible. Hermit thrushes and winter
wrens low key. Robins also quiet, hunt the road margins, engaged in
domestic chores. Bittern calls, just the cheek-popping second part; long
pauses between each pop. Even turkeys are subdued, muzzled by the calendar
and the weather. Mid-May as cold as mid-April; days of stiff, sere winds.
The world, my world, Coyote Hollow, a valley within a valley within a
valley within the vast corrugations of the Northeast, tries to find
equilibrium.



Six ovenbirds, singing, scattered in the woods (none in the front yard). A
wood thrush sings a clipped version of his song, just enough for me to
recognize the melody. Several yellowthroats halfheartly sing in the reeds.
Three swamp sparrows, hushed, chase each other around the alders.



A deer, white flag flying, bolts up slope. Dogs reassemble themselves;
stretch to full height, parabolic ears scanning . . . the way I might react
to a blackburnian warbler.



As quiet and as unassuming as the early morning has been, two months ago I
accepted an invitation that the coronavirus had given me; I began
to reacquaint Coyote Hollow, with the seemingly prosaic and mundane,
chickadee and blue jay and mourning dove, only to discover that the mote
was in my eye *not *in theirs. The valley and its inherent patterns, its
litany of actors are absolutely as fascinating as the day we met . . . for
decades I took them for granted, had forgotten how cool each one really
was. The pandemic offered me a path back into Coyote Hollow, a way to undo
a vestigial a relationship with my homeground.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 1:39 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
Mrs. spent much of the morning sitting on the eggs in the box. She did take
a break to go get breakfast and second breakfasts, early brunch and high
brunch.

FLV version:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-13-2020.html



MP4:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 8:55 am
From: Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
Thanks!
> On May 13, 2020, at 11:41 AM, Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> wrote:
>
> The video, and others too, will be posted at this link:
> https://val.vtecostudies.org/events/recorded-events/
>
> Kent
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
> Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>
>
> <http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 11:40 AM Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
> wrote:
>
>> Missed it. Is it a video I can watch later?
>>> On May 13, 2020, at 8:15 AM, Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> All About Spring Migration
>>> Date: 5/13/2020 Time: 9:00AM
>>> Spring is an exhilarating time for naturalists, and especially for
>> birders
>>> as our forests, fields and waterways fill with the sounds and colors of
>>> migrants. Join VCE Executive Director Chris Rimmer for a spring migration
>>> discussion! This webinar will provide an overview of spring migration,
>>> focusing on the songbirds (thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, and
>>> sparrows) that grace us in May. Some are here to nest, while others
>> merely
>>> pass through en route to boreal habitats further north. Emphasis will be
>> on
>>> the dazzling diversity of different species, their migration strategies,
>>> and how to learn their identification.
>>>
>>> Join with Google Meet
>>> meet.google.com/rhv-ermp-mmo
>>>
>>> Join by phone
>>> ‪+1 929-266-1521‬ PIN: ‪695 748 427‬#
>>>
>>>
>>> ____________________________
>>>
>>> Kent McFarland
>>> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
>>> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
>>> 802.649.1431 x201
>>> Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>
>>>
>>> <http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 8:42 am
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
The video, and others too, will be posted at this link:
https://val.vtecostudies.org/events/recorded-events/

Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201
Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>

<http://val.vtecostudies.org/>




On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 11:40 AM Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
wrote:

> Missed it. Is it a video I can watch later?
> > On May 13, 2020, at 8:15 AM, Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
> wrote:
> >
> > All About Spring Migration
> > Date: 5/13/2020 Time: 9:00AM
> > Spring is an exhilarating time for naturalists, and especially for
> birders
> > as our forests, fields and waterways fill with the sounds and colors of
> > migrants. Join VCE Executive Director Chris Rimmer for a spring migration
> > discussion! This webinar will provide an overview of spring migration,
> > focusing on the songbirds (thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, and
> > sparrows) that grace us in May. Some are here to nest, while others
> merely
> > pass through en route to boreal habitats further north. Emphasis will be
> on
> > the dazzling diversity of different species, their migration strategies,
> > and how to learn their identification.
> >
> > Join with Google Meet
> > meet.google.com/rhv-ermp-mmo
> >
> > Join by phone
> > ‪+1 929-266-1521‬ PIN: ‪695 748 427‬#
> >
> >
> > ____________________________
> >
> > Kent McFarland
> > Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> > PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> > 802.649.1431 x201
> > Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>
> >
> > <http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 8:41 am
From: Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
Missed it. Is it a video I can watch later?
> On May 13, 2020, at 8:15 AM, Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> wrote:
>
> All About Spring Migration
> Date: 5/13/2020 Time: 9:00AM
> Spring is an exhilarating time for naturalists, and especially for birders
> as our forests, fields and waterways fill with the sounds and colors of
> migrants. Join VCE Executive Director Chris Rimmer for a spring migration
> discussion! This webinar will provide an overview of spring migration,
> focusing on the songbirds (thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, and
> sparrows) that grace us in May. Some are here to nest, while others merely
> pass through en route to boreal habitats further north. Emphasis will be on
> the dazzling diversity of different species, their migration strategies,
> and how to learn their identification.
>
> Join with Google Meet
> meet.google.com/rhv-ermp-mmo
>
> Join by phone
> ‪+1 929-266-1521‬ PIN: ‪695 748 427‬#
>
>
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
> Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>
>
> <http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 7:12 am
From: Claudia P. Kinder <cpkinder...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
Thank you!!

Best,

Claudia Kinder

On Wed, May 13, 2020 at 8:16 AM Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
wrote:

> All About Spring Migration
> Date: 5/13/2020 Time: 9:00AM
> Spring is an exhilarating time for naturalists, and especially for birders
> as our forests, fields and waterways fill with the sounds and colors of
> migrants. Join VCE Executive Director Chris Rimmer for a spring migration
> discussion! This webinar will provide an overview of spring migration,
> focusing on the songbirds (thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, and
> sparrows) that grace us in May. Some are here to nest, while others merely
> pass through en route to boreal habitats further north. Emphasis will be on
> the dazzling diversity of different species, their migration strategies,
> and how to learn their identification.
>
> Join with Google Meet
> meet.google.com/rhv-ermp-mmo
>
> Join by phone
> ‪+1 929-266-1521‬ PIN: ‪695 748 427‬#
>
>
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
> Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>
>
> <http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 7:03 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] at last a warbler in a still very cold garden
Of course it's a beautiful Yellowrumped/Myrtle male, flashing among
barely open crabapple buds. so grateful.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK

On 5/13/2020 at 8:17 AM, "LINDA M Verchereau" wrote:Here in
Montpelier along the river near Taylor St. Bridge.

Linda M Verchereau
Montpelier
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 6:31 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 13, 2020: Thetford Center
5:08 a.m. 27 degrees, Wind SE 3 mph. Cloudless. Steamless. Frost in the
wetland. Half-moon east of center sky; above a duckless pond. In transit:
three geese, honking; one loon, lit by the morning sun, tremolos echo
across the valley. Is there a more haunting call on a chilly May morning?
Turkeys: gobble, strut, mate. Today, in the lower pasture, upslope from
alders that crowd north end of the wetland. For a moment I could imagine
the males, after two months of procreating, exhausted, washing up like
spent salmon along the shores of the lower pasture. They've become my new
yardstick for stamina.

Worth a slight digression: Yesterday afternoon, walking along the
snowmobile trail, I flushed a hen, literally underfoot. An incipient nest?
(Elsewhere, turkeys have begun to hatch. On Mother's Day morning, I found
an evacuated eggshell in Norwich.) Further along the trail, three
bushel-size depressions . . . turkey dust bathes, wallow-sites in the
sandy earth where birds asphyxiate feather mites. Last week, as I walked
through my living room, I noticed the young, glum male at the feeder—the
one who struts to no one in particular. He jiggled, left to right, wings
akimbo and tail fanned, released a cloud of dust, a veneer of which coated
the stonewall.

Morning of the ovenbirds, which must have ridden into Coyote Hollow last
night on the southeast breeze. Twelve singing along my three-quarter-mile
route. Several in full view, close at hand on horizontal branches mid-way
in trees. Screaming. Hollering. Reiterating. Ovenbirds look and behave like
thrushes, which are silent, again. Home, shortly after the sun crests the
eastern rim of the valley. Six ovenbirds in the front yard mixing with the
hoi polloi. One picks up a small numb earthworm. Slurps it down. Another
probes around the blueberries; displaces oak leaves. The rest mingle on the
lawn.

A remanence: Several years ago, while radio-tracking rattlesnakes with a
biologist on a ledge in the Champlain Valley, I found an ovenbird nest, a
domed-over, grassy structure, not unlike a Dutch oven with a portal in
front. The nest held five tan-colored eggs, heavily stippled. Several days
later, I was told all five hatched. Then, a week after their hatching came
a grimly fascinating peek into secret lives within a forest: the biologist
found the rattlesnake, bolus in its belly, coiled near the threshold of the
ovenbird nest. The nest was empty.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 5:34 am
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Black-crowned Night-heron
Thanks Linda.

It’s now in a tree, on the south side of the road, visible and closer to
the walking bridge. I apologise for scaring it (mostly, I want to apologise
to the bird.). Shoot.

On Wednesday, May 13, 2020, LINDA M Verchereau <daylilies56...>
wrote:

> Here in Montpelier along the river near Taylor St. Bridge.
>
> Linda M Verchereau
> Montpelier
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 5:17 am
From: LINDA M Verchereau <daylilies56...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Black-crowned Night-heron
Here in Montpelier along the river near Taylor St. Bridge.

Linda M Verchereau
Montpelier
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 5:16 am
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Webinar 9am today with Chris Rimmer on Spring Bird Migration
All About Spring Migration
Date: 5/13/2020 Time: 9:00AM
Spring is an exhilarating time for naturalists, and especially for birders
as our forests, fields and waterways fill with the sounds and colors of
migrants. Join VCE Executive Director Chris Rimmer for a spring migration
discussion! This webinar will provide an overview of spring migration,
focusing on the songbirds (thrushes, warblers, orioles, tanagers, and
sparrows) that grace us in May. Some are here to nest, while others merely
pass through en route to boreal habitats further north. Emphasis will be on
the dazzling diversity of different species, their migration strategies,
and how to learn their identification.

Join with Google Meet
meet.google.com/rhv-ermp-mmo

Join by phone
‪+1 929-266-1521‬ PIN: ‪695 748 427‬#


____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201
Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>

<http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/20 3:47 am
From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] more firsts!
FOY bobolinks yesterday in my neighbor's field in Bridport. And this morning, FOY ruby-throated hummingbird at my feeder by the window! Love this time of year...
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 8:10 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Orioles and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
May 12, 2020 6:45 AM - 8:45 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Checklist Comments: 42 deg. Cloudy. Breezy. Monitored front and back
feeders till 11 a.m.
22 species

Mourning Dove 3
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 2
Downy Woodpecker 3
Hairy Woodpecker 2
Blue Jay 4
Black-capped Chickadee 1
Eastern Bluebird 2 Both on fence briefly. Saw food exchange. He
remained vigilant rest of day. She 'busy'.
Veery 1
American Robin 2
House Finch 5
American Goldfinch 4
Chipping Sparrow 1
White-crowned Sparrow 1 First of year
White-throated Sparrow 6
Song Sparrow 2
Baltimore Oriole 4 Three Males is varying plumage
Red-winged Blackbird 3
Common Grackle 1
Common Yellowthroat 1 Surprised to see under rhododendron
Northern Cardinal 1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 8

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S68959531

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 8:08 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] 65+ White-throated Sparrows
Delighted to HEAR WOTHs and SEE at least one of all thrushes and foraging
Ovenbirds.

Forrests, E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
May 12, 2020 12:07 PM - 2:04 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.56 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: 45°, windy, slow activity, but quality made up for
quantity
20 species

Downy Woodpecker 1
American Kestrel 1
Blue-headed Vireo 3
Warbling Vireo 1
Blue Jay 2
Tufted Titmouse 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 8
Gray Catbird 3
Veery 3
Hermit Thrush 2
Wood Thrush 4
American Robin 3
White-throated Sparrow 64 54 crossed in front of me on an opening in
woods road
Eastern Towhee 1
Ovenbird 7
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Common Yellowthroat 2
Black-throated Blue Warbler 3 1 female
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Northern Cardinal 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S68934718

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home
)

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 4:57 pm
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY hummer in Montpelier
First of year hummer PLUS first ever white-crowned sparrow and Baltimore oriole in the yard. And, it did not snow today!




Still learning to see,

John

http://www.johnsnell.photography <http://www.eyeimagein.com/>
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com <http://www.stilllearningtosee.com/>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 4:52 pm
From: Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY hummer
In Brownsville just now!

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 1:39 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Tuesday edition
Mrs. checks the eggs, Mr. brings her some brunch then she settles into
incubate the eggs.



Flash version:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-12-2020.html



MP4 version linked here:
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 12:33 pm
From: Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pamela Coleman please look out for this "odd oriole"
Pamela,


Mt. Tabor is near Danby. Please see if this bird comes to your oranges


Sharon Turner
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 12:08 pm
From: Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Could it be?? a Troupial/Baltimore Oriole in Danby??
Could it be?? a Troupial/Baltimore Oriole in Danby??  The car went by in the road in front of thehouse where the bird was perched, and so I didnot get to the camera in time to take a picture.  I had a Baltimore Oriole earlier in theday.  That was very clear to me.  But this bird had a black head, a bill andeye that was black, The same size as the Baltimore Oriole yet orange at theback of the neck which would be “‘weird” for a Baltimore Oriole.  I have a Peterson guide dated copyright 1980and in the “EXOTICS: Introduced birds and escapes” page 302-303 it has an exactpicture of the bird I saw.  It wasidentified as number 8 “Troupial icterus icterus.”  I had a good long look at the bird inbinoculars very close to the house in the sunlight, unobstructed and am sure ofthe markings on the wing too, that would be odd for a Baltimore Oriole.  Could it be it is mating with the Baltimoreorioles and is now a cross?  Verystrange.  When I looked on the Cornellsite the teardrop shape at the eye wasn’t there, but the is no teardrop shapeon the bird in the Peterson guide I have either.  Mount Tabor Pamela Coleman please be on the lookout for it.  I am the only one to identify it, so I knowit doesn’t “count” as a valid sighting without a picture. I saw it about 2:00pm


Sharon Turner
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 6:25 am
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sparrows
Lots of White-throated Sparrows this morning at North Branch Nature Center
in Montpelier.

While walking around, I saw one flit into a bush - but I wasn't able to get
an ID on it more than just knowing that it had head stripes. That means it
could be either a White-throated or a White-crowned. Curious, I checked
eBird: there's an option for White-crowned/White-throated Sparrow
(Zonotrichia leucophrys/albicollis). Looking just now on the website using
the Species Map feature, it seems that no one has used it before in
Vermont. So, that's pretty cool - I'm the first person to see this very
rare species. Ok, I jest. I'm just the first person to identify using the
app that they frankly don't know what they saw. But I also learned from
this that they're in the same genus. Always fun to learn.

R

On Tue, May 12, 2020 at 8:34 AM Barbara Martin <
<000004a3ed1ddcdc-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Also had white throated sparrows. Love to see them digging (kicking
> really) through the mulch! Also had several white crowned sparrows. They
> are beautiful right now!!
>
> Barbara Martin
> South Burlington
>
> > On May 12, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:
> >
> > This morning my backyard was inundated with white-throated sparrows, at
> least 23!
> > Other sparrow species as well but no where near the white-throated gang.
> > Sue Wetmore
> > Brandon
> >
> > Sent from my iPod
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 6:12 am
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Indigo Bunting - Rutland Town, May 12, 2020
Excited to have an Indigo Bunting in our yard this morning, sitting in the sun and puffed up against the cold.

Sue Elliott

Heather Lane, Rutland Town, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 12, 2020 7:41 AM - 8:37 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 15 species
>
> Mourning Dove 2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Downy Woodpecker 1
> Hairy Woodpecker 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Blue Jay 1
> Black-capped Chickadee 1
> Tufted Titmouse 1
> White-breasted Nuthatch 2
> Purple Finch 3
> American Goldfinch 9
> Chipping Sparrow 1
> White-throated Sparrow 4
> Northern Cardinal 2
> Indigo Bunting 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S68909924
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 5:34 am
From: Barbara Martin <000004a3ed1ddcdc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sparrows
Also had white throated sparrows. Love to see them digging (kicking really) through the mulch! Also had several white crowned sparrows. They are beautiful right now!!

Barbara Martin
South Burlington

> On May 12, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:
>
> This morning my backyard was inundated with white-throated sparrows, at least 23!
> Other sparrow species as well but no where near the white-throated gang.
> Sue Wetmore
> Brandon
>
> Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 5:28 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 12, 2020: Thetford Center
5:14 a.m. 34 degrees. Wind WNW 4 mph. Half-moon in the east dimming by the
moment. Air washed clean by yesterday's rain. A painterly sky: lots of
shades of blues and whites; delicate tints of magenta suffuse thin clouds
in the west; thin clouds in the east . . . luminous. Mist rising off the
pond going nowhere. Puddled road hosts wandering slugs. Intermittent
streams murmur, again. Permanent streams shout and tumble. Robins
preoccupied incubating or noshing ground beetles, mum.

An unseen flock of geese passes by; an outpouring of honks. Red-eyed vireo,
fresh from the Amazon basin, doggedly sings in the maples (FOY). Considered
the most abundant songbird in the northern hardwood forest, red-eyed vireos
defend small territories and *must *sing almost constantly to maintain
boundaries. In the early 1950s, a biologist far more
mathematically inclined than I estimated that male red-eyes may sing more
than 20,000 songs a day, a persistence bordering on pathological (both the
bird and the man). The equivalent of woodland elevator music, red-eyed
vireos sing throughout the summer, long after other neotropical migrants
have toned it down (or left). Let the monotony begin.

White-throated sparrows poignantly announce their presence, their unalloyed
five-note whistle arguably one of Vermont's most idiosyncratic bird songs,
certainly one of the easiest to mimic. The sweet spot of the morning: rises
out of the front yard; the raspberry patch; the bramble-filled clear cut;
the edge of the road; the brushy border along the far side of the pond; the
spruce-hemmed wetland, well beyond my sightline. I whistle back, bilingual
in a world of deliciously chaotic sound, moved by the sparrow or reasons I
cannot fathom.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/20 5:14 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Sparrows
This morning my backyard was inundated with white-throated sparrows, at least 23!
Other sparrow species as well but no where near the white-throated gang.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 3:31 pm
From: Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Orioles and one Indigo Bunting in Mt Tabor
Four male orioles fighting over the 3 orange halfs, and one brilliant Indigo Bunting to brighten the rain and gloom today.  Pam
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 1:26 pm
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Orange-crowned Warbler, Burlington
Good afternoon,
At about 12:15 PM this afternoon I observed an Orange-crowned Warbler at Greenmount Cemetery in Burlington. Dull warbler with no tail spots, no wing bars. Dull grayish-olive above. Thin gray eye line with paler, thin supercilium. Underparts very pale gray on throat, pale yellow wash on belly, more distinct yellowish on undertail coverts. Entire underparts streaked with pale gray, except on throat. Solitary and silent. Moving back and forth between junipers in cemetery and deciduous trees downslope at back left side (facing from street) of cemetery. Scott Morrical,
South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 1:12 pm
From: Cherrie Corey <cherrie.corey62...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Returning friends
Today’s FOY list: indigo bunting, black-throated blue warblers, black-and-white warbler, and a house wren.


Cherrie Corey
Marlboro, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 1:08 pm
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] great day in Jericho Center!
This morning the plum trees were full of Yellow-rumped Warblers. A
Black-throated Green Warbler sang from an apple tree. There was a
Warbling Vireo in a willow. And this afternoon, a Gray Catbird and a
Baltimore Oriole made their debuts! (And the White-crowned Sparrow is
still hanging around, with a flock of five White-throated Sparrows.)
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 1:02 pm
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] D & H Rail Trail--Castleton to South St., May 11, 2020
Good birding along the D & H Rail Trail in Castleton this morning with nine species of warbler, nesting Eastern Bluebirds, a singing Baltimore Oriole and one White-crowned Sparrow.
Sue and Marv Elliott
D & H Rail Trail--Castleton to South St., Rutland, Vermont, US
May 11, 2020 10:30 AM - 12:53 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.7 mile(s)
49 species

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  1
Mourning Dove  4
Killdeer  2
Wilson's Snipe  1
Barred Owl  1
Belted Kingfisher  1
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker  3
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  2
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker (Yellow-shafted)  2
Least Flycatcher  5
Warbling Vireo  5
American Crow  2
Black-capped Chickadee  3
Tufted Titmouse  1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
House Wren  4
European Starling  1
Gray Catbird  7
Brown Thrasher  2
Eastern Bluebird  2
Veery  1
Hermit Thrush  1
American Robin  9
House Sparrow  1
House Finch  4
American Goldfinch  8
Chipping Sparrow  3
White-crowned Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  2
Song Sparrow  11
Swamp Sparrow  2
Bobolink  2
Baltimore Oriole  1
Red-winged Blackbird  5
Brown-headed Cowbird  4
Common Grackle  2
Ovenbird  2
Black-and-white Warbler  4
Common Yellowthroat  5
American Redstart  3
Yellow Warbler  2
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Black-throated Blue Warbler  1
Pine Warbler  1
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  4
Northern Cardinal  4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S68870338



 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 12:28 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Tanager
This morning a Scarlet tanager was singing on Hollow Rd. in Brandon.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 12:06 pm
From: Ann Curran <acurran802...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Burlington mockingbird
I looked at the Mayvilles’ checklist from yesterday when I saw the eBird alert about the fish crow, and I want to let people who are interested know that the mockingbird was still at the Mt Calvary Annex cemetery this morning.

I haven’t heard him sing since 5/3, the first day I saw him. Fred and I keep checking every day when we go out for walks, since we’re nearby.

Joy on a gloomy day.

Ann
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 11:24 am
From: LKulas <lkulas...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] NYTimes: 7 Tips for Watching Birds During the Spring Lockdown
I thought some might find this interesting.
A David Sibley article that was in the Sunday Times follows.

7 Tips for Watching Birds During the Spring Lockdown
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/08/opinion/sunday/bird-watching-coronavirus-lockdown.html?referringSource=articleShare


Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 11:04 am
From: Anthony Hill <anhinga13...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] VTBIRD Digest - 9 May 2020 to 10 May 2020 (#2020-123)
Get ready - on Mother's Day i had a male American Goldfinch attacking windows here in Flatland!

Anthony Hill
S. Hadley, MA
.

sent via my Android tablet; please excuse brevity and typos.

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...>
Sent: Monday, May 11, 2020 12:00:02 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 9 May 2020 to 10 May 2020 (#2020-123)

There are 13 messages totaling 611 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. FOY Catbird in Montpelier
2. Magical Windows
3. May 10, 2020: Thetford Center
4. Bobolinks
5. Moose Bog (6)
6. Yellow rumps Derby
7. Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
8. Tufted Duck on Lake Champlain

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 07:55:22 -0400
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr...>
Subject: FOY Catbird in Montpelier

Acting more like a robin, scratching and flipping leaves under a forsythia bush in full and snowy bloom, a catbird returns!

This snow WILL melt, right?! Thanks to mothers everywhere avian and other.


Still learning to see,

John

http://www.johnsnell.photography <http://www.eyeimagein.com/>
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com <http://www.stilllearningtosee.com/>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 08:29:48 -0400
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
Subject: Magical Windows

For the last month we have had, first a pair of Cardinals and most recently just the male, attacking all the windows and glass doors of our house. Just now I looked up to see a male Rose breasted Grosbeak attacking our dining room window. I guess it isn’t just the humans that are a bubble off plumb these days.

Mundi
North Pownal

Sent from my iPad

The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 08:30:19 -0400
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: May 10, 2020: Thetford Center

5:14 a.m. 34 degrees. Wind irrelevant. Three-quarter moon high above Coyote
Hollow, midway between eastern and western horizons. Faint, fainter,
faintest dusting of snow, mostly on moldering leaves along the edge of the
road. No ice. Eight geese pass over the house, northeast to southwest,
trailing their voices behind them. Last night, sometime after midnight, an
owl called from the edge of the wetland. Then, I heard commercial jetliner
in the north, very likely a Pond crossing. I listened until the sound of
jet engines eventually faded away like piece of music. Unable to fall back
to sleep, I considered the plane, only the second I'd noticed since the
coming of COVID. Where was it headed? Who rides the Red-eye? Then, I
realized that these past two months must have been heaven for landscape
photographers working a sky void of contrails . . . clouds and clouds
only.

The walk: business as usual. Road and gullies birdless. I toggle from one
bird to another. Thrushes and vireos have found their voice; the valley
richer for it. Four ovenbirds holler; tough birds; tough genes. Chickadees
hold a meeting in a hemlock. The background vocals (so *close *to stardom):
robin, nuthatches, sparrows, titmouse, junco, phoebe, black and white
warbler, *myrtle* warbler (only one this mornning), magnolia warbler (FOY),
mourning dove, blue jay. And, of course, bittern; whose clipped call issues
from a secret corner of the wetland.

My youngest son, Jordan, who graduated from Kenyon last year, works in the
cardiology department at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center and has hooked
a number of COVID patients to various heart monitors. Quarantining in my
house with Jordan is like playing Russian roulette. Thus, making each walk
in Coyote Hollow special, a second-coming of my childhood, when hours
passed for minutes—no worries, no plans, few intervening thoughts. The
coronavirus, at least at sunrise, has momentarily immersed me into my
homeground and into timelessness: such a gift, every iteration of birdsong
a thrill . . . homeboy at home.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 09:31:32 -0400
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: Bobolinks

Bobolinks are back in Brandon. Males were displaying and their welcomed tinkling song brightened this chilly morn.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 13:03:58 -0400
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: Moose Bog

I spent 2 hours at Moose Bog this morning, probably the least amount of time
I've ever spent there. Light snow falling, 32 degrees & 4" on ground still
left from the 6"-7" from yesterday with winds of 10-15 mph. Few birds were
vocalizing or moving around but it was surprising to hear a Blue-headed
Vireo singing. The Hermit Thrush were frantically foraging in the few places
where snow was minimal. Yellow-rumped Warblers and a lone Palm Warbler
foraged on top of the moss covered snow. For what I'm not sure.

Thanks to Dave Govatski as we clear and cut any fallen trees from the trail
year round. This winter after a heavy wet snow-fall we spent hours shaking
the trunks of all the Black Spruce we saw bent into 180 degree arcs before
they snapped. There were almost no Spruce Grouse in this area of Wenlock WMA
this past winter. I along with Dave checked for tracks at least 3 times a
week and perhaps only 2 or 3 times found any tracks at all. And weren't sure
which grouse species those tracks belonged to. The trail, to me, has gotten
nosier over the years from what seems like heavier traffic use on route 105.
Also many older trees have been knocked down by winds etc. and this has
opened up some of the natural 'noise block' between the road and trail.

The gravel path from the parking lot to viewing platform has increased the
use of this special place as a place to 'take the dog for a walk', many
unleashed. And of course the deposits dogs leave behind. In winter
Chickadees & Red-breasted Nuthatch now 'pester' visitors for peanuts but as
the spring approaches they have more important things to tend to and so far
it does not appear much harm is done by this 'bird feeding' (although a
biologist may have more reliable information on the cons of this). It also
seems there is an abundance of Red Squirrels, at least this past year and
that may have to do with the cone crop supply but probably not a good idea
to leave 'treats' behind thinking the Canada Jays will like them because the
squirrels are usually the ones who get them. Today it seemed weird to find a
Spruce Grouse in the snow but after all this is the Kingdom.



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S68797074



Tom Berriman



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 13:49:36 -0400
From: Elinor Osborn <elinor91...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

The lack of spruce grouse is very disturbing. Tom, is there anything we can do to help?
Elinor

Elinor Osborn Photography
1286 Lost Nation Rd
Craftsbury Common VT 05827

802 586-9994
<elinor91...>

http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com

On May 10, 2020, at 1:03 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

I spent 2 hours at Moose Bog this morning, probably the least amount of time
I've ever spent there. Light snow falling, 32 degrees & 4" on ground still
left from the 6"-7" from yesterday with winds of 10-15 mph. Few birds were
vocalizing or moving around but it was surprising to hear a Blue-headed
Vireo singing. The Hermit Thrush were frantically foraging in the few places
where snow was minimal. Yellow-rumped Warblers and a lone Palm Warbler
foraged on top of the moss covered snow. For what I'm not sure.

Thanks to Dave Govatski as we clear and cut any fallen trees from the trail
year round. This winter after a heavy wet snow-fall we spent hours shaking
the trunks of all the Black Spruce we saw bent into 180 degree arcs before
they snapped. There were almost no Spruce Grouse in this area of Wenlock WMA
this past winter. I along with Dave checked for tracks at least 3 times a
week and perhaps only 2 or 3 times found any tracks at all. And weren't sure
which grouse species those tracks belonged to. The trail, to me, has gotten
nosier over the years from what seems like heavier traffic use on route 105.
Also many older trees have been knocked down by winds etc. and this has
opened up some of the natural 'noise block' between the road and trail.

The gravel path from the parking lot to viewing platform has increased the
use of this special place as a place to 'take the dog for a walk', many
unleashed. And of course the deposits dogs leave behind. In winter
Chickadees & Red-breasted Nuthatch now 'pester' visitors for peanuts but as
the spring approaches they have more important things to tend to and so far
it does not appear much harm is done by this 'bird feeding' (although a
biologist may have more reliable information on the cons of this). It also
seems there is an abundance of Red Squirrels, at least this past year and
that may have to do with the cone crop supply but probably not a good idea
to leave 'treats' behind thinking the Canada Jays will like them because the
squirrels are usually the ones who get them. Today it seemed weird to find a
Spruce Grouse in the snow but after all this is the Kingdom.



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S68797074



Tom Berriman

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 14:17:44 -0400
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: Yellow rumps Derby

Waves of YRW have coming through...many working the trees for insects but
also searching the gorest floor to find food which has to be scarce with
temps in the low 40s with spotty flurries. One was bathing at the edge of a
stream despite the wintry conditions.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 14:47:34 -0400
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

Hi Elinor

Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.

It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
areas.

It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
direct cause..yet.

I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.

Tom

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 17:01:28 -0400
From: Elinor Osborn <elinor91...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

Thanks. So it sounds like many things may be affecting them, or not. There are almost never exact answers are there?
Elinor

Elinor Osborn Photography
1286 Lost Nation Rd
Craftsbury Common VT 05827

802 586-9994
<elinor91...>

http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com

On May 10, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

Hi Elinor

Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.

It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
areas.

It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
direct cause..yet.

I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.

Tom

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 17:47:23 -0400
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

The other thing I have noticed a few times I have been there...people "training" their dogs with radio collars and people with dogs to hunt bears. That can't be good for wildlife.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Elinor Osborn" <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...>
To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 5:01:28 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog

Thanks. So it sounds like many things may be affecting them, or not. There are almost never exact answers are there?
Elinor

Elinor Osborn Photography
1286 Lost Nation Rd
Craftsbury Common VT 05827

802 586-9994
<elinor91...>

http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com

On May 10, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

Hi Elinor

Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.

It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
areas.

It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
direct cause..yet.

I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.

Tom

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 18:08:57 -0400
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: Bluebird cam, Sunday edition

Mrs. moved into the box and spent last night on the eggs. I figured she'd
laid all she was going to. But, she surprised me with a fifth egg this
morning. She's spent most of the day sitting on them. That should start the
clock on incubation. Looks like sometime between May 21 and 23 for the
chicks to hatch.



Flash version:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-10-2020.html



Link to MP4 version



http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com<http://www.IanClark.com> <http://www.IanClark.com>



------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 18:21:14 -0400
From: Brenna <dbgaldenzi...>
Subject: Re: Moose Bog

Hi Alison,
You’re absolutely right. Bear hounders start “training” their dogs on June 1st on bear, which is not only obviously cruel to the bears and vulnerable cubs, but these dogs disrupt nesting ground birds and other wildlife. The dogs’ owners are miles away and have no control over their marauding hounds. Folks can learn more about it here: https://www.protectourwildlifevt.org/hunting-with-hounds

Bear hound “training” lasts all summer long and then bear hound hunting starts Sept 1 through end of Nov.

Brenna Galdenzi

Sent from my iPhone, which has been known to mess with me.

> On May 10, 2020, at 5:47 PM, alison wagner <alikatofvt...> wrote:
>
> The other thing I have noticed a few times I have been there...people "training" their dogs with radio collars and people with dogs to hunt bears. That can't be good for wildlife.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Elinor Osborn" <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...>
> To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 5:01:28 PM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
>
> Thanks. So it sounds like many things may be affecting them, or not. There are almost never exact answers are there?
> Elinor
>
> Elinor Osborn Photography
> 1286 Lost Nation Rd
> Craftsbury Common VT 05827
>
> 802 586-9994
> <elinor91...>
>
> http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com
>
> On May 10, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:
>
> Hi Elinor
>
> Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
> West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
> I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
> Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
> at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
> less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
> 3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
> mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
> season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
> females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.
>
> It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
> another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
> slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
> replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
> provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
> male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
> rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
> areas.
>
> It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
> trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
> direct cause..yet.
>
> I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
> try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
> have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.
>
> Tom

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 10 May 2020 18:41:54 -0400
From: David Guertin <dave...>
Subject: Tufted Duck on Lake Champlain

I'm delurking here to post my first message, prompted by my first-ever
sighting of a Tufted Duck on Lake Champlain, seen from the boat launch
under the Champlain Bridge in Addison. I was scanning a late-departing
raft of just over 20 scaup through the scope, trying to separate Lessers
from Greaters. I was able to positively identify two of each, when the
scope landed on something that wasn't actually a scaup. I first thought,
hey, a Ring-necked Du..., no wait a minute, that characteristic white
stripe is missing. And what's with that weird tuft of feathers hanging
down the back of his neck? Hey! Wait! That's a Tufted Duck! It's been a
while since I've seen a life bird, so that was pretty exciting.

There was also a group of 8 Buffleheads hanging out with these scaup.

Final count:

2 Lesser Scaup
2 Greater Scaup
18 scaup sp.
1 Tufted Duck(!)
8 Bufflehead
450 Double-crested Cormorants (They pretty much blanketed a good piece
of the middle of the lake.)
70 gull sp. (hanging out with the cormorants)
1 Caspian Tern

Dave G.

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 9 May 2020 to 10 May 2020 (#2020-123)
************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 9:17 am
From: Kit Hood <kithood3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Today
Morning birds in Sharon

Bobolink
Wood Thrush
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Ovenbird
Red-tailed Hawk
YB Sapsucker
Winter Wren
RB Grosbeak
Pine Warbler
Yellow-rumpled Warbler
Blue-headed Vireo
WB Nuthatch
Chickadee
Goldfinch
Blue Jay
RW Blackbird
Brown Thrasher
Gray Catbird
Downey Wp
Hairy Wp
Tree Swallow
House Wren
Northern Cardinal
Common Grackle
European Starling
Pileated Wp

3 Mallard Drakes (snoozing side-by-side by the pond. Last week they were mortal enemies, now all is forgiven. Hen is most likely nesting in the reeds)

Kit Hood
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 8:55 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition
Beautiful. Thank you, Veer,Passumpsic

On 5/11/2020 at 10:33 AM, "Ian Clark" wrote:Mrs. has definitely taken
to incubating the five eggs. We should see chicks
sometime between May 21 and 23. In today's video, she adjusts herself
and
the eggs before setting in. At about 2:05, Mr. shows up with some
breakfast
for her.
Flash version
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-11-2020.html

MP4 linked from here:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 7:42 am
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition
For me the MP4 version is coming in all black, where all the ones before showed up just fine?

> On May 11, 2020, at 10:31 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>
> Mrs. has definitely taken to incubating the five eggs. We should see chicks
> sometime between May 21 and 23. In today's video, she adjusts herself and
> the eggs before setting in. At about 2:05, Mr. shows up with some breakfast
> for her.
>
>
>
> Flash version
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-11-2020.html
>
> MP4 linked from here:
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 7:33 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Monday edition
Mrs. has definitely taken to incubating the five eggs. We should see chicks
sometime between May 21 and 23. In today's video, she adjusts herself and
the eggs before setting in. At about 2:05, Mr. shows up with some breakfast
for her.



Flash version
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-11-2020.html

MP4 linked from here:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html









%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 6:28 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] mystery eggs, now mystery bird(s)
The mystery eggs and chick appear to be Ruffed Grouse. Thanks for the
help!
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 6:26 am
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] mystery eggs, now mystery bird(s)
Ruffed Grouse maybe?

On 5/11/2020 9:13 AM, Maeve Kim wrote:
> We need help with IDing eggs, a nest, and a chick. Here are two photos:
>
> https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45584842
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 6:14 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] mystery eggs, now mystery bird(s)
We need help with IDing eggs, a nest, and a chick. Here are two photos:

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/45584842
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 6:10 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 11, 2020: Thetford Center
5:31 a.m. 38 degrees. Windless. Frostless. Snowless.
Meteorologically speaking, we seem to be trending in the right direction .
. . again. Pale half-moon halfway across Coyote Hollow. Sunlight cascading
down the valley's western flank. The air clear and clean, crystalline,
every tree and twig in sharp relief. Thin, sparse clouds, pink along the
edges. An altogether gorgeous morning. Beech leaves unwrapping; bud scales
peel back, fall off.

White-throated sparrows pair up. Both sexes sing. Blue-headed vireos pair
up. Both sexes don't sing. A wood thrush (FOY) hops from pine branch to
pine branch, caroling, an enchanting, ethereal but static song. As far as
avian troubadours go, I'm a hermit-thrush man all the way. Never quite as
intimate as a robin, when we lived in Hartland, in the 1980s, a wood thrush
was a dooryard nester. This bird, crooning his heart out, is the first wood
thrush I've heard in the Hollow in twenty-three years. Last year, mid-May
2019, a farmhouse in central Ohio, awaiting Jordan's graduation from
Kenyon: a wave of wood thrush put-in during the night; they were everywhere
and full-throated, which emphasized how few I see back home, in Vermont.
Too bad. They're not a wilderness thrush, like Bicknell's or Swainson's,
they're a trusting thrush; when I was a boy, wood thrush nested in the
older, wooded suburbs on Gold Coast, of Long Island. Every trip with my mom
to Sagamore Hill, Theodore Roosevelt's home in Oyster Bay, now a National
Monument, produced a wood thrush. Thought of the morning: What if William
McKinley had not been assassinated and Roosevelt had not become the
twenty-sixth president? Who among the next nineteen would have had the
foresight to preserve from exploitation two hundred thirty million acres of
land, of which fifty-one were designated national bird reservations and
four national game preserves, which eventually and collectively morphed
into the National Wildlife Refuge System? What other president believed
like an Iroquois elder that landscape and wildlife are the birthrights of
the unborn? For seven-and-a-half years Roosevelt kept a list of birds he
saw on the White House grounds. I saw my life wood thrush on his front
lawn.

No mergansers, today. No mallards. Bittern calling, second-part only. Three
common yellowthroats in the alders (FOY). One swamp sparrow in the
reeds (FOY). Both singing.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/20 4:35 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Singing White-crowned sparrows, one sparrow behavior imitated by chickadee
Two whitecrowns, here for more than a week, but this morning am
hearing the first sustained White-crowned song, a little touch of out
west, both singing from about 100' apart ...usually they pass through
northwards at speed but not this cold spring. One White-crowned
sparrow had taken up the habit of dropping onto the tiny open feeder
patronised by non perching nuthatches, chickadees, titmice, (anyone
else too big), really like a nest of eggs, and chowing down. Yesterday
evening a chickadee imitated this behavior, rather than taking the
seed and rushing away with it. Maybe not unusual but new to me.
Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 3:42 pm
From: David Guertin <dave...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Tufted Duck on Lake Champlain
I'm delurking here to post my first message, prompted by my first-ever
sighting of a Tufted Duck on Lake Champlain, seen from the boat launch
under the Champlain Bridge in Addison. I was scanning a late-departing
raft of just over 20 scaup through the scope, trying to separate Lessers
from Greaters. I was able to positively identify two of each, when the
scope landed on something that wasn't actually a scaup. I first thought,
hey, a Ring-necked Du..., no wait a minute, that characteristic white
stripe is missing. And what's with that weird tuft of feathers hanging
down the back of his neck? Hey! Wait! That's a Tufted Duck! It's been a
while since I've seen a life bird, so that was pretty exciting.

There was also a group of 8 Buffleheads hanging out with these scaup.

Final count:

2 Lesser Scaup
2 Greater Scaup
18 scaup sp.
1 Tufted Duck(!)
8 Bufflehead
450 Double-crested Cormorants (They pretty much blanketed a good piece
of the middle of the lake.)
70 gull sp. (hanging out with the cormorants)
1 Caspian Tern

Dave G.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 3:21 pm
From: Brenna <dbgaldenzi...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
Hi Alison,
You’re absolutely right. Bear hounders start “training” their dogs on June 1st on bear, which is not only obviously cruel to the bears and vulnerable cubs, but these dogs disrupt nesting ground birds and other wildlife. The dogs’ owners are miles away and have no control over their marauding hounds. Folks can learn more about it here: https://www.protectourwildlifevt.org/hunting-with-hounds

Bear hound “training” lasts all summer long and then bear hound hunting starts Sept 1 through end of Nov.

Brenna Galdenzi

Sent from my iPhone, which has been known to mess with me.

> On May 10, 2020, at 5:47 PM, alison wagner <alikatofvt...> wrote:
>
> The other thing I have noticed a few times I have been there...people "training" their dogs with radio collars and people with dogs to hunt bears. That can't be good for wildlife.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Elinor Osborn" <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...>
> To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 5:01:28 PM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
>
> Thanks. So it sounds like many things may be affecting them, or not. There are almost never exact answers are there?
> Elinor
>
> Elinor Osborn Photography
> 1286 Lost Nation Rd
> Craftsbury Common VT 05827
>
> 802 586-9994
> <elinor91...>
>
> http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com
>
> On May 10, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:
>
> Hi Elinor
>
> Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
> West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
> I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
> Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
> at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
> less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
> 3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
> mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
> season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
> females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.
>
> It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
> another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
> slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
> replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
> provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
> male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
> rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
> areas.
>
> It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
> trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
> direct cause..yet.
>
> I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
> try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
> have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.
>
> Tom
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 3:10 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
Mrs. moved into the box and spent last night on the eggs. I figured she'd
laid all she was going to. But, she surprised me with a fifth egg this
morning. She's spent most of the day sitting on them. That should start the
clock on incubation. Looks like sometime between May 21 and 23 for the
chicks to hatch.



Flash version:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-10-2020.html



Link to MP4 version



http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 2:47 pm
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
The other thing I have noticed a few times I have been there...people "training" their dogs with radio collars and people with dogs to hunt bears. That can't be good for wildlife.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Elinor Osborn" <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...>
To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Sunday, May 10, 2020 5:01:28 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog

Thanks. So it sounds like many things may be affecting them, or not. There are almost never exact answers are there?
Elinor

Elinor Osborn Photography
1286 Lost Nation Rd
Craftsbury Common VT 05827

802 586-9994
<elinor91...>

http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com

On May 10, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

Hi Elinor

Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.

It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
areas.

It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
direct cause..yet.

I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.

Tom
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 2:01 pm
From: Elinor Osborn <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
Thanks. So it sounds like many things may be affecting them, or not. There are almost never exact answers are there?
Elinor

Elinor Osborn Photography
1286 Lost Nation Rd
Craftsbury Common VT 05827

802 586-9994
<elinor91...>

http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com

On May 10, 2020, at 2:47 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

Hi Elinor

Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.

It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
areas.

It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
direct cause..yet.

I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.

Tom
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 11:49 am
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
Hi Elinor

Spruce Grouse are dispersed over three main areas in Essex County, Wenlock &
West Mountain WMA's and the Conte NWR (someone will correct me if I'm wrong)
I am not sure about the overall status and numbers of Spruce Grouse in
Vermont. For all I know they may be doing well at other locations. However
at the Moose Bog location (I mile by 1/3 mile area) there does seem to be
less than just a few years ago. As short as 4 years ago I have had at least
3 males this time of year (flutter flights at different locations within a
mile length of trail) and for the last 3 years can only eke out I male a
season. In Late March 2 years ago there were 5 adults together, 2 males & 3
females who may have been 'hanging out' together that winter.

It is still early in the breeding season maybe another male will pop up at
another lek along the trail. Also the habitat they like may be changing
slightly in that particular spot. As more trees fall and spruce trees are
replaced by other tree species and those areas that were more sheltered or
provided cover are now open, the area may become less desirable. While the
male doesn't seem to mind displaying in open area this time of year, the
rest of the year they probably would like to have 'cover' more than open
areas.

It may be to early to make too much of these observations. I don't think the
trail improvements or the increase in human activity and use has been the
direct cause..yet.

I guess what we can all do is just what good birders & photographers do and
try not to infringe on their personal space. That sounds timely LOL. But I
have a clock in my head and it signals when I've been 'visiting' too long.

Tom
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 11:18 am
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Yellow rumps Derby
Waves of YRW have coming through...many working the trees for insects but
also searching the gorest floor to find food which has to be scarce with
temps in the low 40s with spotty flurries. One was bathing at the edge of a
stream despite the wintry conditions.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 10:49 am
From: Elinor Osborn <0000037bc09f69f4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
The lack of spruce grouse is very disturbing. Tom, is there anything we can do to help?
Elinor

Elinor Osborn Photography
1286 Lost Nation Rd
Craftsbury Common VT 05827

802 586-9994
<elinor91...>

http://www.elinorosbornphotography.com

On May 10, 2020, at 1:03 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

I spent 2 hours at Moose Bog this morning, probably the least amount of time
I've ever spent there. Light snow falling, 32 degrees & 4" on ground still
left from the 6"-7" from yesterday with winds of 10-15 mph. Few birds were
vocalizing or moving around but it was surprising to hear a Blue-headed
Vireo singing. The Hermit Thrush were frantically foraging in the few places
where snow was minimal. Yellow-rumped Warblers and a lone Palm Warbler
foraged on top of the moss covered snow. For what I'm not sure.

Thanks to Dave Govatski as we clear and cut any fallen trees from the trail
year round. This winter after a heavy wet snow-fall we spent hours shaking
the trunks of all the Black Spruce we saw bent into 180 degree arcs before
they snapped. There were almost no Spruce Grouse in this area of Wenlock WMA
this past winter. I along with Dave checked for tracks at least 3 times a
week and perhaps only 2 or 3 times found any tracks at all. And weren't sure
which grouse species those tracks belonged to. The trail, to me, has gotten
nosier over the years from what seems like heavier traffic use on route 105.
Also many older trees have been knocked down by winds etc. and this has
opened up some of the natural 'noise block' between the road and trail.

The gravel path from the parking lot to viewing platform has increased the
use of this special place as a place to 'take the dog for a walk', many
unleashed. And of course the deposits dogs leave behind. In winter
Chickadees & Red-breasted Nuthatch now 'pester' visitors for peanuts but as
the spring approaches they have more important things to tend to and so far
it does not appear much harm is done by this 'bird feeding' (although a
biologist may have more reliable information on the cons of this). It also
seems there is an abundance of Red Squirrels, at least this past year and
that may have to do with the cone crop supply but probably not a good idea
to leave 'treats' behind thinking the Canada Jays will like them because the
squirrels are usually the ones who get them. Today it seemed weird to find a
Spruce Grouse in the snow but after all this is the Kingdom.



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S68797074



Tom Berriman
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 10:04 am
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Moose Bog
I spent 2 hours at Moose Bog this morning, probably the least amount of time
I've ever spent there. Light snow falling, 32 degrees & 4" on ground still
left from the 6"-7" from yesterday with winds of 10-15 mph. Few birds were
vocalizing or moving around but it was surprising to hear a Blue-headed
Vireo singing. The Hermit Thrush were frantically foraging in the few places
where snow was minimal. Yellow-rumped Warblers and a lone Palm Warbler
foraged on top of the moss covered snow. For what I'm not sure.

Thanks to Dave Govatski as we clear and cut any fallen trees from the trail
year round. This winter after a heavy wet snow-fall we spent hours shaking
the trunks of all the Black Spruce we saw bent into 180 degree arcs before
they snapped. There were almost no Spruce Grouse in this area of Wenlock WMA
this past winter. I along with Dave checked for tracks at least 3 times a
week and perhaps only 2 or 3 times found any tracks at all. And weren't sure
which grouse species those tracks belonged to. The trail, to me, has gotten
nosier over the years from what seems like heavier traffic use on route 105.
Also many older trees have been knocked down by winds etc. and this has
opened up some of the natural 'noise block' between the road and trail.

The gravel path from the parking lot to viewing platform has increased the
use of this special place as a place to 'take the dog for a walk', many
unleashed. And of course the deposits dogs leave behind. In winter
Chickadees & Red-breasted Nuthatch now 'pester' visitors for peanuts but as
the spring approaches they have more important things to tend to and so far
it does not appear much harm is done by this 'bird feeding' (although a
biologist may have more reliable information on the cons of this). It also
seems there is an abundance of Red Squirrels, at least this past year and
that may have to do with the cone crop supply but probably not a good idea
to leave 'treats' behind thinking the Canada Jays will like them because the
squirrels are usually the ones who get them. Today it seemed weird to find a
Spruce Grouse in the snow but after all this is the Kingdom.



https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S68797074



Tom Berriman


 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 6:32 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks
Bobolinks are back in Brandon. Males were displaying and their welcomed tinkling song brightened this chilly morn.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 5:30 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 10, 2020: Thetford Center
5:14 a.m. 34 degrees. Wind irrelevant. Three-quarter moon high above Coyote
Hollow, midway between eastern and western horizons. Faint, fainter,
faintest dusting of snow, mostly on moldering leaves along the edge of the
road. No ice. Eight geese pass over the house, northeast to southwest,
trailing their voices behind them. Last night, sometime after midnight, an
owl called from the edge of the wetland. Then, I heard commercial jetliner
in the north, very likely a Pond crossing. I listened until the sound of
jet engines eventually faded away like piece of music. Unable to fall back
to sleep, I considered the plane, only the second I'd noticed since the
coming of COVID. Where was it headed? Who rides the Red-eye? Then, I
realized that these past two months must have been heaven for landscape
photographers working a sky void of contrails . . . clouds and clouds
only.

The walk: business as usual. Road and gullies birdless. I toggle from one
bird to another. Thrushes and vireos have found their voice; the valley
richer for it. Four ovenbirds holler; tough birds; tough genes. Chickadees
hold a meeting in a hemlock. The background vocals (so *close *to stardom):
robin, nuthatches, sparrows, titmouse, junco, phoebe, black and white
warbler, *myrtle* warbler (only one this mornning), magnolia warbler (FOY),
mourning dove, blue jay. And, of course, bittern; whose clipped call issues
from a secret corner of the wetland.

My youngest son, Jordan, who graduated from Kenyon last year, works in the
cardiology department at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center and has hooked
a number of COVID patients to various heart monitors. Quarantining in my
house with Jordan is like playing Russian roulette. Thus, making each walk
in Coyote Hollow special, a second-coming of my childhood, when hours
passed for minutes—no worries, no plans, few intervening thoughts. The
coronavirus, at least at sunrise, has momentarily immersed me into my
homeground and into timelessness: such a gift, every iteration of birdsong
a thrill . . . homeboy at home.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 5:29 am
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Magical Windows
For the last month we have had, first a pair of Cardinals and most recently just the male, attacking all the windows and glass doors of our house. Just now I looked up to see a male Rose breasted Grosbeak attacking our dining room window. I guess it isn’t just the humans that are a bubble off plumb these days.

Mundi
North Pownal

Sent from my iPad

The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/20 4:56 am
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Catbird in Montpelier
Acting more like a robin, scratching and flipping leaves under a forsythia bush in full and snowy bloom, a catbird returns!

This snow WILL melt, right?! Thanks to mothers everywhere avian and other.


Still learning to see,

John

http://www.johnsnell.photography <http://www.eyeimagein.com/>
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com <http://www.stilllearningtosee.com/>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 5:19 pm
From: Bonnie Dundas <kinglet...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] birding big day
Despite several inches of snow this morning, my son and I ventured out
to see what we could find. We mainly explored Shaftsbury's back roads.
We found more birds than we expected but were most impressed by the
fallout of thrushes. Bluebird, one Veery, Hermit Thrush, Wood Thrush and
American Robin. Also many (over 50) Ovenbirds. They were on every dirt
road and driveway we passed by.   A fun birding trip. Bonnie Dundas
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 4:29 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Question about eBird
Hi Larry,

I just looked and it is now showing for me.  I accessed online via computer.

It is a known glitch in eBird that refreshing the Recent Visits function
for hotspots can take several days.  Almost all other actions in eBird
are refreshed within 24 hours, with a lot of it happening during the night.

Check and see if it shows now for you.  If not, and you have another
kind of device see if it shows on that.

Ian
==========================

On 5/9/2020 7:17 PM, Larry Levine wrote:
> I have a general eBird question I am hoping someone can answer for me.
>
> I submitted an eBird list from the mobile app on May 3 for Mills Riverside Park and when I was just looking at the hotspot for Mills for recent visits, it is not showing on the eBird website.
>
> Thanks
> Larry
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 4:17 pm
From: Larry Levine <levine5279...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Question about eBird
I have a general eBird question I am hoping someone can answer for me.

I submitted an eBird list from the mobile app on May 3 for Mills Riverside Park and when I was just looking at the hotspot for Mills for recent visits, it is not showing on the eBird website.

Thanks
Larry
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 1:41 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Saturday edition
Up to four eggs now. Mrs. hasn't spent a night in the box yet. Safe to
assume she's done laying eggs when she starts? And what happens when eggs
freeze? We were down in the 20s here last night.



Today's video probably shows her laying the fourth egg. She came and fussed
about a couple times for 10-15 minutes, but I missed getting a look at the
eggs after she left every time. They were all there just after she departed
this time.

Flash version of today's video:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-9-2020.html



MP4 version is linked here:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 11:42 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 9, 2020: Thetford Center; part 2
12:23 p.m. 34 degrees. Wind out of the NW; 18 mph. Grasses and sedges,
compasses, point SE. Pines gossip. Hardwoods complain. Wind roars. It's
spitting snow. Patches linger in the woods; on the boughs of sapling pines,
which sag under the weight; on the north side of trunks and boulders; on
sheltered limbs. I wear a down jacket, ski cap, and insulated gloves, just
like on the bitter beach, in February.

Wild turkey flushes from feeders when I step outside. Flaps several times,
glides over the upper pasture, flaps some more, and glides across the lower
pasture, wings stubby and convex. Settles into a pine, a dirigible with
camber. Chickadees, dousing for food, keep busy (as always), probing lichen
thalli.

As if to punctuate a similarity with my boyhood on the beach, eleven
*myrtle* warblers, all males, settle into black cherry; hunt insects among
infant leaves and decrepit stems.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 11:34 am
From: Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] OOPS! I guess its called an Eastern Towhee
I have an ancient Peterson Field Guide book and learned on the Cornell site its called an Eastern Towhee now.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 11:33 am
From: Katharine Thompson <kthom22...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Too many people send personal messages to entire VT bird list serve
Hi, Ernie, can something be changed when users hit Reply....just hitting
reply puts all VT Bird users in the address. Most people do not check who
they are sending a message to....so over and over it goes to everyone. I
love VT bird list serve but so many emails I get are of a personal nature.
Can things be changed so Reply can be to the individual posting and Reply
All to the entire VT Bird list?
I am sure many would appreciate that.
Thanks, Kathy
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 11:15 am
From: Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer in Danby
A lone hummingbird approached the window where the towhee was feeding this morning , hovered just a second and flew off.  Its as if it were telling me it was freezing and saying you fed the towhee how about me?  If you can stand a little anthropomorphism.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 11:06 am
From: Sharon Turner <sharxxturner...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Rufous Sided Towhee in the snow in Danby
When we put seed on the ground to assist the ground feeders whose food opportunities were diminished by the snow cover earlier this morning about 9AM we found a single towhee hopping warily in the snow and pecking at the ground.  It comes and goes all day long and we had a good look at it several times.  Hooray!  Its still here after not seeing it this winter yet seeing it the two previous winters. I tried to send a picture but the Listserve wouldn't accept my image.  
The best to you and stay well and warm,
Sharon
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 9:38 am
From: Mus <musbird...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Yellow Rumped Warbler
To my astonishment I just now saw it (Myrtle Warbler, sigh) successfully competing with my zillions of goldfinches at my feeder (which, yes, is way up too high for bears). That is definitely a first.

Also this week the arrival of a house wren, catbird, white crowned sparrow, and a tree swallow flyover. All this in spite of 2 1/2 inches of snow.
Janet Watton
Randolph Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/20 6:00 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 9, 2020: Thetford Center
5:28 a.m. Sunrise, though you won't know it. 31 degrees. NW wind 9 mph.
Snowing, tiny flakes; thicker and wetter than a dusting. Snow inlays tender
leaves and bark crevices; traces branches and twigs; whitens boulders;
obscures much of the ground, except the road, where thrushes and robins,
silent as the snow, pick at tidbits. Thrushes and robins also foraged on
and around stone walls and along and in roadside gulleys, anywhere offering
patches bare ground. Where are juncos? For the moment, the world belongs to
chickadees, which, full of verve, sing and chase each other, animating and
normalizing a rather bizarre May morning. (The only way this morning could
be more bizarre is if birds wore PPEs and practised social-distancing.)

Three phoebes sitting on a apple limb, glumly, fluffed-out. One opens his
bill, half-heartedly attempts to sing. A male rose-breasted grosbeak
arrives at the feeder, breast a burst of color in a washed-out landscape.
Even turkeys, for the first time in two months, have nothing to report.

Bittern called last night, the clipped, cheek-popping call. Nothing from
the owls or the titmice or the woodpeckers, any of 'em, or the ovenbirds,
which must be in shock. One vireo sings. One wren, jauty as ever; the rest
hushed by snow. A half-heated song: a lone white-throated sparrows
whispers *Ol'
Sam Peabody*; cuts it off after two "Peabodys." A *myrtle* warbler ,forging
in a maple crown, dislodges snow. A flock of goldfinches, bright as
sunbeams, chatter.

Yesterday, a friend from Apollo Beach, Florida, told me that migants are
still passing up the penninsula in decent numbers. I imagine a thin wave of
Neotropical birds, stretching from Thetford (and beyond) to Apollo Beach,
fifteen hundred miles of birds. The migrant vanguards in Coyote Hollow
(what my family calls this valley) do the heavy lifting: frost; NW winds;
frozen ground; numb, motionless insects; iced-over puddles; and, now, snow.
Snow! If they survive they'll pass on tough-guy genes to the next
gereration; if not, birds and genes are out of circulation. When I first
came to the Upper Valley, in the fall of 1977, the Montshire Museum of
Science's ragtag bird collection had ten or twelve freeze-dried scarlet
tanagers and maybe a dozen or more warblers, vireos, swallows, and orioles,
all with the same collection date on their speciemen labels: May 7, 1976.
Back then, six inches of snow had blanketed the Connecticut River valley
for two days and the birds, forced to forge on the margins of Route 10,
eventually starved and were gathered and donated to the museum by Hanover
commuters.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 3:21 pm
From: Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Ruby throated in Richmond
We’ve had a male Tuby Throated Hummingbird at our feeder in Richmond 3 days in a row. He must be thrilled to have ready access to rich nectar as we look at frost in the near future!

Sent from my irresistible flat thing.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 2:00 pm
From: Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Hummer Mt Tabor
Put the feeders out Monday and finally one male showed up today. Boy are they late this year! Pam
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 1:35 pm
From: Katharine Thompson <kthom22...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] apologies
See Mauve's note below. It seems that when one hits reply, VT Bird should
be set up to reply to one individual and show that email
and if one wants email to go to ALL, that should be the Reply All option.

At the moment if one hits Reply, the message goes to all members of VT
bird.
This results in too many emails, I think.

On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 4:42 PM Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:

> I responded too fast to two notes, and ended up sending the messages to
> the whole listserv. Sorry.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 1:25 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
We've got a third egg this morning.



Flash version:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-8-2020.html





MP4 version:

http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/mp4/20200508-merged.mp4



Index of MP4 videos. There's no navigation on the actual video, just use the
'back' button in your browser to return to the index



http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html









%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 1:24 pm
From: Katharine Thompson <kthom22...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] apologies
On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 4:42 PM Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:

> I responded too fast to two notes, and ended up sending the messages to
> the whole listserv. Sorry.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 12:45 pm
From: Roy Pilcher <00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Old Marsh Pond WMA - Fair Haven (131 acres), May 7, 2020
Sounds of spring (7) and a picture or two.  Click to view the check list below.
Cheers, Roy Pilcher

-----Original Message-----
To: <shamwariVT...>
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 3:34 pm
Subject: eBird Report - Old Marsh Pond WMA - Fair Haven (131 acres), May 7, 2020

Old Marsh Pond WMA - Fair Haven (131 acres), Rutland, Vermont, US
May 7, 2020 9:35 AM - 12:30 PM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Checklist Comments:    Initial temperature 51 degrees F.
24 species

Canada Goose  2
Mallard  2
Mourning Dove  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1
Downy Woodpecker  1
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  1
Eastern Phoebe  2
Blue Jay  4
Common Raven  1
Black-capped Chickadee  4
Tufted Titmouse  3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  2
Gray Catbird  2
Eastern Bluebird  2
American Robin  6
American Goldfinch  2
Song Sparrow  2
Swamp Sparrow  1
Red-winged Blackbird  6
Pine Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler  8
Northern Cardinal  4
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  3

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S68558790

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 9:30 am
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] On the off chance one of you is a programmer
I've had a side project I've been working on for a while, which I've
recently managed to get going a bit further. It is a website which allows
you to upload your exported eBird data, and see the map breakdown for what
birds you've seen in individual *towns*, instead of counties. I like
knowing where I bird the most, and how close I'm getting to the 251-club
for birding. I also have functionality to show what birds you've seen in
the nine major Vermont bioregions (thanks for the help, VCE!), and to help
clarify targets a bit differently than eBird does.

I've managed to make the mapping software functional to show you what birds
you've seen in a ten mile radius, and I would love to have it done by
tomorrow to be able to have people see what birds they haven't seen locally
before Big Day. Even if it snows, knowing that you've never actually seen a
Swamp Sparrow or a Bittern close to home may encourage you to go to your
local swamp. I think that's awesome, and I want to share it.


However, I need a bit of help getting it out in time. The major need is for
an input form for people to put in their address; following that, easy
instructions for people to use the site. It's pretty close, but could use
some work. I just may not have the time.

Out of any chance: are any of you React or generic JavaScript developers?
Anyone want to help out today and see if we can push out a tool to help
make birding in Vermont more fun?

Figured I'd ask. Otherwise, I likely won't finish it today.

Best,
Richard

--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 8:31 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
I got it yesterday, Ian. Brilliant stuff! Could you please say if
there are links to the earlier videos, I'd like to forward. Thank you!
Veer, Passumpsic

On 5/8/2020 at 8:07 AM, "Ian Clark" wrote:Sorry if this shows up
twice. Sent it Thursday afternoon and it hasn't shown
up in my inbox..
We've got a second egg, laid just after 0900 this morning. For those
with
Flash, you can see it here:
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-7-2020.html. Mrs. lays an
egg
sometime during the video, perhaps someone with sharp eyes can tell
when.
About 50 seconds in, Mr. sticks his head in with a snack for Mrs.
For those that can't view Flash videos, try the videos at
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html. They're MP4
versions of
all the files. The image quality isn't as good (it wasn't great to
begin
with), but they're fun to watch. There's no 'back' link on the videos,
just
use your browser's back button.
From the win some, lose some department; this morning a friend caught
up to
me and showed me cell phone pix of a woodcock on her nest that he had
just
taken. While we were talking, we got to see a peregrine fly over (over
the
Newbury, VT, Vet Clinic). By the time I got to the woodcock nest, the
three
eggs had hatched, and the birds were nowhere to be found. Which
probably
means they were all right there looking at us.
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 8:31 am
From: Diana <dlee3...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
Thanks very much. I was just viewing the Flash version and couldn’t save that. My father-in-law has been a birder for about 90 years and I am sure he would like to see them, but a shortened version would be nicer.
Ian, would you mind if I download them, combine them and edit out some parts. Then can I put it online for others to see with a reference to you?

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Ryan Tomazin
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 10:23 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

If you click on Ian's mp4 option, you can right-click on each file to save it and then you can edit from there.

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Diana <dlee3...>
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 9:53 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

Is there a way to save these videos and trim out some parts but put them all together with one video.


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Mamuniaangel
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 9:07 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

One other tiny tech thing is to remove the period at the end of the web address in the search bar. Ian, as much as it is like fingernails on the blackboard, use the return key instead of punctuating a web address when sending the link.Those eggs are beautiful!!Angel Harris


-----Original Message-----
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
To: <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 7:17 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

Sorry if this shows up twice. Sent it Thursday afternoon and it hasn't shown
up in my inbox..



We've got a second egg, laid just after 0900 this morning. For those with
Flash, you can see it here:
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-7-2020.html. Mrs. lays an egg
sometime during the video, perhaps someone with sharp eyes can tell when.
About 50 seconds in, Mr. sticks his head in with a snack for Mrs.



For those that can't view Flash videos, try the videos at
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html. They're MP4 versions of
all the files. The image quality isn't as good (it wasn't great to begin
with), but they're fun to watch. There's no 'back' link on the videos, just
use your browser's back button.



From the win some, lose some department; this morning a friend caught up to
me and showed me cell phone pix of a woodcock on her nest that he had just
taken. While we were talking, we got to see a peregrine fly over (over the
Newbury, VT, Vet Clinic). By the time I got to the woodcock nest, the three
eggs had hatched, and the birds were nowhere to be found. Which probably
means they were all right there looking at us.







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com<http://www.IanClark.com> <http://www.IanClark.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 7:23 am
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
If you click on Ian's mp4 option, you can right-click on each file to save it and then you can edit from there.

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Diana <dlee3...>
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 9:53 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

Is there a way to save these videos and trim out some parts but put them all together with one video.


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Mamuniaangel
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 9:07 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

One other tiny tech thing is to remove the period at the end of the web address in the search bar. Ian, as much as it is like fingernails on the blackboard, use the return key instead of punctuating a web address when sending the link.Those eggs are beautiful!!Angel Harris


-----Original Message-----
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
To: <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 7:17 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

Sorry if this shows up twice. Sent it Thursday afternoon and it hasn't shown
up in my inbox..



We've got a second egg, laid just after 0900 this morning. For those with
Flash, you can see it here:
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-7-2020.html. Mrs. lays an egg
sometime during the video, perhaps someone with sharp eyes can tell when.
About 50 seconds in, Mr. sticks his head in with a snack for Mrs.



For those that can't view Flash videos, try the videos at
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html. They're MP4 versions of
all the files. The image quality isn't as good (it wasn't great to begin
with), but they're fun to watch. There's no 'back' link on the videos, just
use your browser's back button.



From the win some, lose some department; this morning a friend caught up to
me and showed me cell phone pix of a woodcock on her nest that he had just
taken. While we were talking, we got to see a peregrine fly over (over the
Newbury, VT, Vet Clinic). By the time I got to the woodcock nest, the three
eggs had hatched, and the birds were nowhere to be found. Which probably
means they were all right there looking at us.







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com<http://www.IanClark.com> <http://www.IanClark.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 6:53 am
From: Diana <dlee3...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
Is there a way to save these videos and trim out some parts but put them all together with one video.


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Mamuniaangel
Sent: Friday, May 8, 2020 9:07 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

One other tiny tech thing is to remove the period at the end of the web address in the search bar.  Ian, as much as it is like fingernails on the blackboard, use the return key instead of punctuating a web address when sending the link.Those eggs are beautiful!!Angel Harris


-----Original Message-----
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
To: <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 7:17 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

Sorry if this shows up twice. Sent it Thursday afternoon and it hasn't shown
up in my inbox..



We've got a second egg, laid just after 0900 this morning. For those with
Flash, you can see it here:
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-7-2020.html. Mrs. lays an egg
sometime during the video, perhaps someone with sharp eyes can tell when.
About 50 seconds in, Mr. sticks his head in with a snack for Mrs.



For those that can't view Flash videos, try the videos at
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html. They're MP4 versions of
all the files. The image quality isn't as good (it wasn't great to begin
with), but they're fun to watch. There's no 'back' link on the videos, just
use your browser's back button.



From the win some, lose some department; this morning a friend caught up to
me and showed me cell phone pix of a woodcock on her nest that he had just
taken. While we were talking, we got to see a peregrine fly over (over the
Newbury, VT, Vet Clinic). By the time I got to the woodcock nest, the three
eggs had hatched, and the birds were nowhere to be found. Which probably
means they were all right there looking at us.







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 6:10 am
From: Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Request for assistance – song recordings of migrating Mourning Warblers
Request for assistance – song recordings of migrating Mourning Warblers

I am once again writing to request your help and record Mourning Warbler songs from spring migrants. It is year 6 of my research using birdsong to study migratory connectivity of Mourning Warbler song populations. Our lab is interested in whether different song populations of the Mourning Warbler (Western, Eastern, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland) migrate together or separately to their respective breeding areas. Here is a link to the latest map with previous years’ results based on recordings from over 100 birders.

https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?hl=en&mid=1voXjBhvHZ0nwAv93_OBC_vCPuxQ&ll=38.892516009880424%2C-85.09712735&z=5

Preliminary results from the map indicate that 1) Western song populations are separating out from the rest of the pack and migrating throughout the mid-western states directly to the Prairie Provinces, 2) Eastern, Nova Scotia and Newfoundland song populations are migrating together along the Appalachian Mountains, 3) Nova Scotia and Newfoundland song populations are beginning to hug the Atlantic coast in New Jersey and New York.

We are in need of recordings from more mid-western states, eastern Colorado and the New England coast. All you need is a smartphone with a voice recording app and some luck. Videos with recordings are also helpful. The web page link below describes the project and how to make recordings on your Smartphone in more detail. Please send song recordings to the Mourning Warbler Sound Lab (jpitocch AT anselm.edu).

https://mowasongmapper.weebly.com/

There is also a link to a spring 2017 National Audubon Society story on this research.

Audubon Society reporting
http://www.audubon.org/magazine/spring-2017/this-guy-mapping-how-warblers-migrate-just

I would really appreciate your help and contributions this year to this Citizens Science Project.

Dr. Jay Pitocchelli
Chair, Biology Department
Saint Anselm College
Manchester, NH 03102
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 5:44 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 8, 2020: Thetford Center
5:28 a.m. A minute before sunrise. 31 degrees. Full moon in full view low
in the west, lit by a hill-hidden sun; moon brighter than blue sky. Mist
above the Ompompanoosuc; ground fog above the wetland. It poured last night
with a burst of wind. Road puddled and carmine spotted, littered with a
fresh crop of red maple flowers. Edge of the woods traced in snow.

An unseen loon, passing between Post Pond and Lake Fairlee, or so I
presume, overhead, laughing. Thrushes are silent as stone. Blue-headed
vireos, however, balkanize the valley; setting territories, marking
boundaries with slow, methodical songs and movements, branch to branch,
tree to tree. They're easy to see, easy to follow in the naked woods. In
front of me: spectacles, wing bars, white belly, yellow flanks, blue-gray
heads. In a week (or so), a screen of leaves will hide all but the vireo's
song. Like an old friend who has changed her name, of which I do have a
few—Jan became Choice Holiday, for instance—whenever I see a blue-headed
vireo I'm inclined to use its original name, the name I learned when we met
. . . *solitary vireo.*

Ditto for the lone yellow-rumped warbler in the aspen in front of me. Fifty
years ago, when we met on the dunes of Long Island, the bird was known
as *myrtle
warbler,* warbler of my boyhood. Wintering on the barrier beaches, eating
the hard, waxy fruits of bayberries, the source of the warbler's original
name; digesting wax; defecating seed. The Johnny Appleseed of bayberry.
But, in 1973, the *myrtle warbler* of the east and north was lumped
together with the *Audubon's warbler* of the west into a single species,
the *yellow-rumped warbler*. Soon, based on DNA evidence, they may again
become separate species. I certainly hope so. The name *myrtle warbler* tethers
the bird to a landscape, to a unique and critical ecological function.
Yellow-rump is *just *the color of its *tuchus.*
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 5:32 am
From: Mamuniaangel <000002fe774c7bcd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
One other tiny tech thing is to remove the period at the end of the web address in the search bar.  Ian, as much as it is like fingernails on the blackboard, use the return key instead of punctuating a web address when sending the link.Those eggs are beautiful!!Angel Harris


-----Original Message-----
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
To: <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Fri, May 8, 2020 7:17 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending

Sorry if this shows up twice. Sent it Thursday afternoon and it hasn't shown
up in my inbox..



We've got a second egg, laid just after 0900 this morning. For those with
Flash, you can see it here:
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-7-2020.html. Mrs. lays an egg
sometime during the video, perhaps someone with sharp eyes can tell when.
About 50 seconds in, Mr. sticks his head in with a snack for Mrs.



For those that can't view Flash videos, try the videos at
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html. They're MP4 versions of
all the files. The image quality isn't as good (it wasn't great to begin
with), but they're fun to watch. There's no 'back' link on the videos, just
use your browser's back button.



From the win some, lose some department; this morning a friend caught up to
me and showed me cell phone pix of a woodcock on her nest that he had just
taken. While we were talking, we got to see a peregrine fly over (over the
Newbury, VT, Vet Clinic). By the time I got to the woodcock nest, the three
eggs had hatched, and the birds were nowhere to be found. Which probably
means they were all right there looking at us.







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 5:07 am
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files - resending
Sorry if this shows up twice. Sent it Thursday afternoon and it hasn't shown
up in my inbox..



We've got a second egg, laid just after 0900 this morning. For those with
Flash, you can see it here:
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-7-2020.html. Mrs. lays an egg
sometime during the video, perhaps someone with sharp eyes can tell when.
About 50 seconds in, Mr. sticks his head in with a snack for Mrs.



For those that can't view Flash videos, try the videos at
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html. They're MP4 versions of
all the files. The image quality isn't as good (it wasn't great to begin
with), but they're fun to watch. There's no 'back' link on the videos, just
use your browser's back button.



From the win some, lose some department; this morning a friend caught up to
me and showed me cell phone pix of a woodcock on her nest that he had just
taken. While we were talking, we got to see a peregrine fly over (over the
Newbury, VT, Vet Clinic). By the time I got to the woodcock nest, the three
eggs had hatched, and the birds were nowhere to be found. Which probably
means they were all right there looking at us.







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 4:51 am
From: Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Wood ducks and Broad Winged Hawk
Marvelous!

Sent from my irresistible flat thing.

> On May 8, 2020, at 7:00 AM, Michael Foster <mfoster...> wrote:
>
> I put up a wood duck box on our pond about 3 years ago with little hope of it being used by a wood duck. Our pond is not large and open on 2 sides and fairly close to our house. There are woods on the far side, which is where I located the box, I was hoping that maybe a Hooded Merganser might use the box. Well we got lucky and a pair of Wood Ducks are nesting in the box. I attached a link to some photos of the pair taken about a week ago. This moringing my wife said she just saw the female go into the box. She must have been on the water. I hadn’t seen her, but the glare from the morning sun makes it hard to see the far side of the pond in the morning so she might have been on the water. There were a pair of male mallards on the water as well. Just after the female went in my wife said there is the male on the roof. I looked with binocs, and it was not the male, but a Broad Winged Hawk. Probably quite upsetting to the female,, but she stayed in the box. The hawk did not long. I have no idea, but hope that a hawk would not go into the box. I did put up a tube to protect from mammal predators. Does anyone know if a hawk will go into a box.
> Here’s a link to some shots I got of the pair. https://breezyhillphotography.smugmug.com/Wood-Ducks
> Michael Foster
> Website breezyhillturning.com
> Email <mfoster.vt...>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 4:29 am
From: Michael Foster <mfoster...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Wood ducks and Broad Winged Hawk
Sorry, this is in Springfield.

Michael Foster
Website breezyhillturning.com
Email <mfoster.vt...>

> On May 8, 2020, at 7:28 AM, Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...> wrote:
>
> Michael,
> Please remind the listserv in what town you made your observations.
> Much appreciated,
> Liz Lackey
> Stowe, VT
>
>> On May 8, 2020, at 7:00 AM, Michael Foster <mfoster...> wrote:
>>
>> I put up a wood duck box on our pond about 3 years ago with little hope of it being used by a wood duck. Our pond is not large and open on 2 sides and fairly close to our house. There are woods on the far side, which is where I located the box, I was hoping that maybe a Hooded Merganser might use the box. Well we got lucky and a pair of Wood Ducks are nesting in the box. I attached a link to some photos of the pair taken about a week ago. This moringing my wife said she just saw the female go into the box. She must have been on the water. I hadn’t seen her, but the glare from the morning sun makes it hard to see the far side of the pond in the morning so she might have been on the water. There were a pair of male mallards on the water as well. Just after the female went in my wife said there is the male on the roof. I looked with binocs, and it was not the male, but a Broad Winged Hawk. Probably quite upsetting to the female,, but she stayed in the box. The hawk did not long. I have no idea, but hope that a hawk would not go into the box. I did put up a tube to protect from mammal predators. Does anyone know if a hawk will go into a box.
>> Here’s a link to some shots I got of the pair. https://breezyhillphotography.smugmug.com/Wood-Ducks
>> Michael Foster
>> Website breezyhillturning.com
>> Email <mfoster.vt...>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 4:28 am
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Wood ducks and Broad Winged Hawk
Michael,
Please remind the listserv in what town you made your observations.
Much appreciated,
Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT

> On May 8, 2020, at 7:00 AM, Michael Foster <mfoster...> wrote:
>
> I put up a wood duck box on our pond about 3 years ago with little hope of it being used by a wood duck. Our pond is not large and open on 2 sides and fairly close to our house. There are woods on the far side, which is where I located the box, I was hoping that maybe a Hooded Merganser might use the box. Well we got lucky and a pair of Wood Ducks are nesting in the box. I attached a link to some photos of the pair taken about a week ago. This moringing my wife said she just saw the female go into the box. She must have been on the water. I hadn’t seen her, but the glare from the morning sun makes it hard to see the far side of the pond in the morning so she might have been on the water. There were a pair of male mallards on the water as well. Just after the female went in my wife said there is the male on the roof. I looked with binocs, and it was not the male, but a Broad Winged Hawk. Probably quite upsetting to the female,, but she stayed in the box. The hawk did not long. I have no idea, but hope that a hawk would not go into the box. I did put up a tube to protect from mammal predators. Does anyone know if a hawk will go into a box.
> Here’s a link to some shots I got of the pair. https://breezyhillphotography.smugmug.com/Wood-Ducks
> Michael Foster
> Website breezyhillturning.com
> Email <mfoster.vt...>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 4:00 am
From: Michael Foster <mfoster...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Wood ducks and Broad Winged Hawk
I put up a wood duck box on our pond about 3 years ago with little hope of it being used by a wood duck. Our pond is not large and open on 2 sides and fairly close to our house. There are woods on the far side, which is where I located the box, I was hoping that maybe a Hooded Merganser might use the box. Well we got lucky and a pair of Wood Ducks are nesting in the box. I attached a link to some photos of the pair taken about a week ago. This moringing my wife said she just saw the female go into the box. She must have been on the water. I hadn’t seen her, but the glare from the morning sun makes it hard to see the far side of the pond in the morning so she might have been on the water. There were a pair of male mallards on the water as well. Just after the female went in my wife said there is the male on the roof. I looked with binocs, and it was not the male, but a Broad Winged Hawk. Probably quite upsetting to the female,, but she stayed in the box. The hawk did not long. I have no idea, but hope that a hawk would not go into the box. I did put up a tube to protect from mammal predators. Does anyone know if a hawk will go into a box.
Here’s a link to some shots I got of the pair. https://breezyhillphotography.smugmug.com/Wood-Ducks
Michael Foster
Website breezyhillturning.com
Email <mfoster.vt...>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/20 2:59 am
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Whip-poor-wills -- Bridport
Last night the 7th of May, while listening for owls and Whip-poor-wills
behind our house on the east flank of the southern end of Snake
Mountain, at 8:46, 12 minutes after the end of civil twilight, two
Whip-poor-wills called off and on for about two minutes overlapping each
other.  They were in wooded, east-facing ledges that were selectively
logged a couple of years ago; adjacent to a small pasture.  It was
overcast and breezy.

This same location hosted Whip-poor-wills in the 1970s and likely
before. Since the 1800s, the clear-cut slopes and ledges were roamed by
foraging heifers, dry cows, and/or sheep; but by the 1970s they were
closing in with trees.  All along the east side of Snake Mountain the
same was occurring, with an absence of Whip-poor-wills from the 1970s
till about 10 years ago.

This site is 1.6 miles south of the well known Snake Mountain Road,
Weybridge Whip-poor-will location, where Whip-poor-wills were reported a
few days ago on the 1st and 3rd of May.

Ian
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 7:11 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files
Ian, Thanks for putting up the MP4 link. I just was able to watch today's
video 5/7. That whole viewing is awesome. Is the video activated by
motion? Is it 'on' all day? It looks as though the egg laying happen when
she had her head out the door???

On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 6:11 PM Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:

> We've got a second egg, laid just after 0900 this morning. For those with
> Flash, you can see it here:
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-7-2020.html. Mrs. lays an egg
> sometime during the video, perhaps someone with sharp eyes can tell when.
> About 50 seconds in, Mr. sticks his head in with a snack for Mrs.
>
>
>
> For those that can't view Flash videos, try the videos at
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html. They're MP4 versions of
> all the files. The image quality isn't as good (it wasn't great to begin
> with), but they're fun to watch. There's no 'back' link on the videos, just
> use your browser's back button.
>
>
>
> From the win some, lose some department; this morning a friend caught up to
> me and showed me cell phone pix of a woodcock on her nest that he had just
> taken. While we were talking, we got to see a peregrine fly over (over the
> Newbury, VT, Vet Clinic). By the time I got to the woodcock nest, the three
> eggs had hatched, and the birds were nowhere to be found. Which probably
> means they were all right there looking at us.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>
>

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 6:52 pm
From: Michele Patenaude <Michele.Patenaude...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, May 7, 2020
My House Wren arrived two days ago. I heard it sing only once. Soon it will be singing steadily.

Michele Patenaude
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085

> On May 7, 2020, at 9:35 PM, R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> wrote:
>
> House Wren. I thought I heard a House Wren calling, but with my diminished
> hearing I'm never sure of what the 'new' songs are... but, alas, I saw the
> little feather puff scoot around the corner of my house about an hour
> later. Few warblers yet. Doesn't look like great weather here for the
> Global Big Day.
>
>
>
> My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
> May 7, 2020 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
> Protocol: Stationary
> Checklist Comments: 50s Breezy, Partly sunny
> 21 species
>
> Canada Goose 3
> Mourning Dove 3
> Turkey Vulture 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Downy Woodpecker 2
> Hairy Woodpecker 2
> Northern Flicker 2
> Blue Jay 3
> American Crow 1
> Black-capped Chickadee 1
> House Wren 1 Thought I heard one...FOY. SAW one about 1 hr later.
> Eastern Bluebird 2 I believe incubation has begun
> American Robin 2
> House Finch 4
> American Goldfinch 5
> White-throated Sparrow 4
> Song Sparrow 1
> Red-winged Blackbird 3
> Brown-headed Cowbird 1
> Common Grackle 1
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S68576240
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
>
>
> --
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 6:35 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, May 7, 2020
House Wren. I thought I heard a House Wren calling, but with my diminished
hearing I'm never sure of what the 'new' songs are... but, alas, I saw the
little feather puff scoot around the corner of my house about an hour
later. Few warblers yet. Doesn't look like great weather here for the
Global Big Day.



My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
May 7, 2020 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Checklist Comments: 50s Breezy, Partly sunny
21 species

Canada Goose 3
Mourning Dove 3
Turkey Vulture 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
Downy Woodpecker 2
Hairy Woodpecker 2
Northern Flicker 2
Blue Jay 3
American Crow 1
Black-capped Chickadee 1
House Wren 1 Thought I heard one...FOY. SAW one about 1 hr later.
Eastern Bluebird 2 I believe incubation has begun
American Robin 2
House Finch 4
American Goldfinch 5
White-throated Sparrow 4
Song Sparrow 1
Red-winged Blackbird 3
Brown-headed Cowbird 1
Common Grackle 1
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S68576240

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 4:54 pm
From: Kaye Danforth <000003762748b609-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY rose-breasted grosbeak
One very handsome male lurking in the lilacs today. So nice to see their return.
Kaye in Hinesburg
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 3:11 pm
From: Ian Clark <ian...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition and MP4 files
We've got a second egg, laid just after 0900 this morning. For those with
Flash, you can see it here:
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-7-2020.html. Mrs. lays an egg
sometime during the video, perhaps someone with sharp eyes can tell when.
About 50 seconds in, Mr. sticks his head in with a snack for Mrs.



For those that can't view Flash videos, try the videos at
http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-mp4.html. They're MP4 versions of
all the files. The image quality isn't as good (it wasn't great to begin
with), but they're fun to watch. There's no 'back' link on the videos, just
use your browser's back button.



From the win some, lose some department; this morning a friend caught up to
me and showed me cell phone pix of a woodcock on her nest that he had just
taken. While we were talking, we got to see a peregrine fly over (over the
Newbury, VT, Vet Clinic). By the time I got to the woodcock nest, the three
eggs had hatched, and the birds were nowhere to be found. Which probably
means they were all right there looking at us.





%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 2:30 pm
From: Tracey Busony <curtandtracey27...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Chukar
What!

Sent from my iPad

> On May 7, 2020, at 12:44 PM, Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:
>
> A chukar is currently in Brandon on Carver St.
> Origin Unknown.
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 12:30 pm
From: Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bennington Fish Crows
At least two Fish Crows now. I was able to get some poor audio, which I
submitted to eBird and iNaturalist. They're hanging out between Main and
Elm Streets, between the market and the post office.

--
Gretchen E. Nareff
Bennington, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 9:46 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Chukar
A chukar is currently in Brandon on Carver St.
Origin Unknown.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 7:43 am
From: Mus <musbird...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Yellow Bellied Sapsucker
A very talented percussionist was rehearsing for a later avian symphony by banging on the top of an aluminum step ladder outside my library window today. That is an FOY, and maybe even on my life list.
Janet Watton
Randolph Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 7:29 am
From: Nita <nita.hwf...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Baltimore Oriole - Waterbury Center
Just saw my first oriole of the season!
Nita
Waterbury Center


On Thu, May 7, 2020 at 6:46 AM Mus <musbird...> wrote:

> I have had a pair of Rosebreasted Grosbeaks the past couple of days and a
> gorgeous male Baltimore Oriole showed up yesterday. Oranges now on my
> shopping list. BTW I am loving the humor on these pages since our
> sequestration began - today our hair-raising tales, oven teachers,
> white-whiskered puffbirds and the like. Keep it comin’.
>
> And no, my iMac is screaming at me about Adobe, too, so no bluebird cams
> for me either.
> Janet Watton
> Randolph Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 6:26 am
From: Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Emerald Lake
Thanks for the info Martha. Always a day late and a dollar short lol Pam


On Thursday, May 7, 2020, 08:38:33 AM EDT, Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Subject: Emerald Lake

"Has anyone heard of or seen how the birding at Emerald Lake has been?  Remembering the nice yellow-rump fallouts from recent years.  Thanks!  Pam"

Pam,  I suggest you go to Ebird/Bennington County and view all the recent checklists I and others have submitted.  I think the Yellow-rumped fall out for this year has gone through.

Cheers,  Martha in Dorset
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 6:17 am
From: Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Yellow -rumped
The trees were full of them at Bristol Pond yesterday afternoon.

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 5:38 am
From: Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Emerald Lake
Subject: Emerald Lake

"Has anyone heard of or seen how the birding at Emerald Lake has been?  Remembering the nice yellow-rump fallouts from recent years.  Thanks!  Pam"

Pam,  I suggest you go to Ebird/Bennington County and view all the recent checklists I and others have submitted.  I think the Yellow-rumped fall out for this year has gone through.

Cheers,  Martha in Dorset
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 5:06 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] May 7, 2020: Thetford Center
5:08 a.m. 38 degrees. Windless. Thin clouds, here and there; not enough to
hide the moon, which, nearly full and bright as a bulb, rests above the
western horizon, sporting a hint of rose, the gift of an unseen sun.
Although leaves are opening everywhere along the Connecticut River, the
hills a wash of pastel (autumn without the density of color), not nearly as
much happening up here, at 900-feet. Spring creeps into these hills: black
cherry still seems dormant, like this morning's frogs; sugar maple and
white ash buds swollen but not open, knobs on the ends of twigs. Alder,
however, flowers subtlely along the edge of the wetland. Tiny cones,
narrow, and maroon, await pollen. Willows catkins, yellow-green and loaded
with pollen, await wind, truant in the Northeast today but swirling
counter-clockwise everywhere else in eastern North America.

Ovenbirds scream, three maybe four. Thrushes, dumpster-diving through
worn-out leaves, still quiet. Blue-headed vireos, singing here and there,
divvy up the valley. A broad-winged hawk soars through the weft of
branches. Lands on a maple limb looks for a chipmunk or a garter snake. A
stubby hawk by hawk standards. (So stubby that I first thought it was a
barred owl.) Short, wide tail. Long, broad wings best for catching thermals
rising off rock-studded hilltops. Not so good for spirited chases, which
are best left to goshawks. I saw a forlorn broadwing last March pass above
La Selva Biological Station, on the Caribbean slope of Costa Rica.
Bereft of its own flock, which in Central America might have numbered in
the thousands, it trailed thirty turkey vultures, also headed north. Hawk
moves from tree to tree, staring at the forest floor, lingers with the
patience of Job.

Bittern calling. Grouse drumming. A rapid drumbeat. Sylvan tachycardia.
Male turkey scavenges spilled seeds under the feeders ignores me. Gray
squirrel cautious. Even the barn cat, my first line of defense against Lyme
disease, cowers under an Adirondack chair. If you didn't know that birds
are gorgeous reptiles—crocodiles are more closely related robins than to
turtles or lizards— watching a turkey would affirm the reptilian lineage .
. . a small dinosaur cloaked in iridescence. Running an animal genome in
the lab validates just how interesting and mysterious this planet really
is. No dull uniformity, natural selection follows mutable laws . . . and
everything and everybody is related to everything and everybody else . . .
the present and the past and the undreamed-of future are inseparable.
Darwin's unmistakable genius.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 4:57 am
From: jennifer megyesi <fatroosterfarm...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] VTBIRD Digest - 5 May 2020 to 6 May 2020 (#2020-119)
ian, your bluebird cam is the bomb. com. thank you. jenn

> On May 7, 2020, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...> wrote:
>
> There are 31 messages totaling 1249 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition. (6)
> 2. Hair raising tale to share (5)
> 3. May 6, 2020: Thetford Center (3)
> 4. FOY Rose Breasted Grosbeak (2)
> 5. The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ... (6)
> 6. Emerald Lake
> 7. Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition. /Flash (2)
> 8. Pittsford Trails-Cadwell Loop, May 6, 2020
> 9. apologies
> 10. FOY Catbird
> 11. Burlington birds
> 12. [SPAM?:*******] - White-throats
> 13. Rusty blackbirds!
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 08:13:15 -0400
> From: Ian Clark <ian...>
> Subject: Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
>
> An exciting development this morning!
>
>
>
> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
> Newbury, VT.
>
>
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 09:15:11 -0400
> From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
> Subject: Hair raising tale to share
>
> With my hair and beard growing out of control it was time for drastic
> action so my wife got out the electric shears and in moments the problem
> was addressed. The residue of white hair was left on the lawn thinking it
> might be of interest to nesting birds. This morning while heading out to do
> chores in the midst of the white pile was a chickadee loading up its bill
> with a carefully aligned wad of my locks. Recycling at its best.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 09:16:31 -0400
> From: Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
> Subject: Re: Hair raising tale to share
>
> Very cool Walter!
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 9:15 AM, Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> wrote:
>>
>> With my hair and beard growing out of control it was time for drastic
>> action so my wife got out the electric shears and in moments the problem
>> was addressed. The residue of white hair was left on the lawn thinking it
>> might be of interest to nesting birds. This morning while heading out to do
>> chores in the midst of the white pile was a chickadee loading up its bill
>> with a carefully aligned wad of my locks. Recycling at its best.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 09:31:34 -0400
> From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
> Subject: Re: Hair raising tale to share
>
> The chickadee must have resembled the Lorax
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Walter Medwid" <wmedwid...>
> To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 6, 2020 9:15:11 AM
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Hair raising tale to share
>
> With my hair and beard growing out of control it was time for drastic
> action so my wife got out the electric shears and in moments the problem
> was addressed. The residue of white hair was left on the lawn thinking it
> might be of interest to nesting birds. This morning while heading out to do
> chores in the midst of the white pile was a chickadee loading up its bill
> with a carefully aligned wad of my locks. Recycling at its best.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 09:51:03 -0400
> From: Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
> Subject: Re: Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
>
> Ian, would love to see your bluebird cams but my computer won’t let me. Says I need to update adobe flash player but then won’t let me do it. Would you be able to send them in a different format for me?
> Thanks!
> Ruth C.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>>
>> An exciting development this morning!
>>
>>
>>
>> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
>> Newbury, VT.
>>
>>
>>
>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>>
>>
>>
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>
>>
>>
>> Ian Clark
>> PO Box 51
>>
>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>
>> (848) 702-0774
>>
>> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>>
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 10:02:57 -0400
> From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
> Subject: May 6, 2020: Thetford Center
>
> 5:17 a.m. 26 degrees. Cloudless and windless. Frost throughout the wetland
> and pastures. Leaves of red maples, tiny and red, give the woods a ruddy
> complexion, as though trees could blush. Beech leaves unfurling. Ash buds
> swelling.
>
> Two herds of wild turkey calling from opposite ends of the wetland: one
> north, in the lower pasture; the other south, in a clear cut, just above
> the east side of the pond. Gobbling carries in the cold air, the valley
> stereophonic. Three ovenbirds (FOY) screaming in the pines: *teacher,
> teacher, teacher, teacher*. Teachers unresponsive, of course. They all
> self-isolating, online teaching.
>
> A junco on a low branch chipping, pink beak in relief against gray breast.
> A pair of sapsuckers duel twenty-feet apart. One on the resonant roadside
> maple limb, tapping the small, broken terminal end, which is barely bigger
> than he is; the other, up road plays the trunk of a standing dead beech. I
> see them both. They see each other. Preoccupied in their war of wood,
> percussionists are oblivious to me and to the dogs, which tug their
> leashes, wanting to walk. Gray squirrel crosses the road, heads up the
> driveway toward the feeders; dogs tug in another attention.
>
> Last night, I read an article that recently appeared in the journal *Ecology.
> **Topic:* an obscure aspect of migration. *The given: 1)* two billion birds
> cross the Gulf of Mexico twice each year, hemisphere to hemisphere; No
> surprise. *The given: 2)* along the way, thousands, maybe tens of
> thousands, maybe even millions perish. Flocks starve. Exhausted and
> disoriented, others land on the water and can't take off. Still, others fly
> too low and get engulfed by waves, swallowed by an unforgiving sea.
> Flocks hit oil rigs and boats. Still, no surprises. *The crux*, *the* *oddity
> of the article:* newborn tiger sharks wait off the coasts of Alabama and
> Mississippi for hapless migrants. A predictable pulse of protein for babies
> just learning how to hunt. Eleven different species identified in bellies
> of baby sharks: yellow-bellied sapsuckers, swamp sparrows, eastern
> kingbird, common yellowthroats among them. All birds that live in this
> valley. *"Notorious for their dietary breadth," *the authors wrote, tiger
> sharks eat almost anything: alive; dead, inorganic. Feeding with a
> proprietary air. Who knew that a stage in their lives tiger sharks depend
> on the sky to deliver protein. Loren Eisley, simplifying Francis Thompson,
> wrote *One could not pluck a flower without troubling a star*. I'm not sure
> either Eisley or Thompson had songbirds and sharks in mind . . . but it
> fits.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 10:32:42 -0400
> From: Cynthia Seybolt <cynthiavt...>
> Subject: Re: Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
>
> I have the same problem as Ruth with Adobe Flash. Another format would be
> great, if you can do it.
> Cynthia Seybolt
>
> On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 8:14 AM Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>
>> An exciting development this morning!
>>
>>
>>
>> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
>> Newbury, VT.
>>
>>
>>
>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>
>>
>>
>> Ian Clark
>> PO Box 51
>>
>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>
>> (848) 702-0774
>>
>> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> Cynthia T. Seybolt
> 150 Hawthorn Drive
> Shelburne VT 05482
> (802) 578-8234
> <cynthiavt...>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 15:03:22 +0000
> From: Mike Carlo <mcarlo33...>
> Subject: Re: May 6, 2020: Thetford Center
>
> Just once, I would be thrilled to hear a human school teacher emphatically respond, "I'm here, I'm here, I'm here!" while I was out birding...
> Mike Carlo in Sterling, VA
>
> On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 10:03:13 AM EDT, Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> wrote:
>
> 5:17 a.m. 26 degrees. Cloudless and windless. Frost throughout the wetland
> and pastures. Leaves of red maples, tiny and red, give the woods a ruddy
> complexion, as though trees could blush. Beech leaves unfurling. Ash buds
> swelling.
>
> Two herds of wild turkey calling from opposite ends of the wetland: one
> north, in the lower pasture; the other south, in a clear cut, just above
> the east side of the pond. Gobbling carries in the cold air, the valley
> stereophonic. Three ovenbirds (FOY) screaming in the pines: *teacher,
> teacher, teacher, teacher*. Teachers unresponsive, of course. They all
> self-isolating, online teaching.
>
> A junco on a low branch chipping, pink beak in relief against gray breast.
> A pair of sapsuckers duel twenty-feet apart. One on the resonant roadside
> maple limb, tapping the small, broken terminal end, which is barely bigger
> than he is; the other, up road plays the trunk of a standing dead beech. I
> see them both. They see each other. Preoccupied in their war of wood,
> percussionists are oblivious to me and to the dogs, which tug their
> leashes, wanting to walk. Gray squirrel crosses the road, heads up the
> driveway toward the feeders; dogs tug in another attention.
>
> Last night, I read an article that recently appeared in the journal *Ecology.
> **Topic:* an obscure aspect of migration. *The given: 1)* two billion birds
> cross the Gulf of Mexico twice each year, hemisphere to hemisphere; No
> surprise. *The given: 2)* along the way, thousands, maybe tens of
> thousands, maybe even millions perish. Flocks starve. Exhausted and
> disoriented, others land on the water and can't take off. Still, others fly
> too low and get engulfed by waves, swallowed by an unforgiving sea.
> Flocks hit oil rigs and boats. Still, no surprises. *The crux*, *the* *oddity
> of the article:* newborn tiger sharks wait off the coasts of Alabama and
> Mississippi for hapless migrants. A predictable pulse of protein for babies
> just learning how to hunt. Eleven different species identified in bellies
> of baby sharks: yellow-bellied sapsuckers, swamp sparrows, eastern
> kingbird, common yellowthroats among them. All birds that live in this
> valley. *"Notorious for their dietary breadth," *the authors wrote, tiger
> sharks eat almost anything: alive; dead, inorganic. Feeding with a
> proprietary air. Who knew that a stage in their lives tiger sharks depend
> on the sky to deliver protein. Loren Eisley, simplifying Francis Thompson,
> wrote *One could not pluck a flower without troubling a star*. I'm not sure
> either Eisley or Thompson had songbirds and sharks in mind . . . but it
> fits.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 11:07:56 -0400
> From: edgreen3 <edgreen3...>
> Subject: FOY Rose Breasted Grosbeak
>
> Underhill at 900 feet elevation on sunflower seed feeder.Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 11:10:20 -0400
> From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> Subject: The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
>
> ... is back!
> Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver
> pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor complained.
> The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary permits. Legal
> things moved slowly and the houses were completely done before there
> were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources Board. People
> had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked if I happened
> to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my testimony, when I
> mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the beaver pond on several
> occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened. When? What months of the
> year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and wetlands? One member of the
> Board explained to the gathering that bitterns are very sensitive to
> light pollution. His follow-up questions to the contractor focused on
> porch lights, spot lights, and yard lights.
> Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the wetlands
> could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of cedars and
> a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be either moved
> or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder, who ended up
> having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece by piece.
> The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned
> "housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise.
> There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of the
> area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized travel.
> Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to - and
> twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much more.
> The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and humans
> alike!
> Here's the whole list from today's walk:
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 11:23:19 -0400
> From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
> Subject: Re: Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
>
> I have the same trouble………….
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 9:51 AM, Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> wrote:
>>
>> Ian, would love to see your bluebird cams but my computer won’t let me. Says I need to update adobe flash player but then won’t let me do it. Would you be able to send them in a different format for me?
>> Thanks!
>> Ruth C.
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>>>
>>> An exciting development this morning!
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
>>> Newbury, VT.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Ian Clark
>>> PO Box 51
>>>
>>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>>
>>> (848) 702-0774
>>>
>>> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>>>
>>>
>
>
>
> Eve Ticknor
> <edticknor...>
>
> Box 2206
> Prescott, On
> K0E 1T0
>
> 24 Birch Ave
> Willsboro, NY
> 12996
>
> "Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
> (Quaker blessing)
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 15:29:10 +0000
> From: Pamela Coleman <perryfalcon1013...>
> Subject: Emerald Lake
>
> Has anyone heard of or seen how the birding at Emerald Lake has been? Remembering the nice yellow-rump fallouts from recent years. Thanks! Pam
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 11:33:32 -0400
> From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> Subject: Re: Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
>
> On 2020-05-06 11:23, Eve Ticknor wrote:
>> I have the same trouble………….
>>
>>> On May 6, 2020, at 9:51 AM, Ruth Coppersmith
>>> <coppersmithruth...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Ian, would love to see your bluebird cams but my computer won’t let
>>> me. Says I need to update adobe flash player but then won’t let me do
>>> it. Would you be able to send them in a different format for me?
>>> Thanks!
>>> Ruth C.
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>>> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> An exciting development this morning!
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
>>>> Newbury, VT.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Ian Clark
>>>> PO Box 51
>>>>
>>>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>>>
>>>> (848) 702-0774
>>>>
>>>> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>>>>
>>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Eve Ticknor
>> <edticknor...>
>>
>> Box 2206
>> Prescott, On
>> K0E 1T0
>>
>> 24 Birch Ave
>> Willsboro, NY
>> 12996
>>
>> "Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
>> (Quaker blessing)
> Me, too.
> Maeve Kim
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 12:34:52 -0400
> From: kfinch <kfinch51...>
> Subject: Re: The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
>
> Great story, Maeve!
> -------- Original message --------From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Date: 5/6/20 11:10 AM (GMT-05:00) To: <VTBIRD...> Subject: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ... ... is back!Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor complained. The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary permits. Legal things moved slowly and the houses were completely done before there were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources Board. People had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked if I happened to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my testimony, when I mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the beaver pond on several occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened. When? What months of the year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and wetlands? One member of the Board explained to the gathering that bitterns are very sensitive to light pollution. His follow-up questions to the contractor focused on porch lights, spot lights, and yard lights.Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the wetlands could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of cedars and a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be either moved or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder, who ended up having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece by piece.The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned "housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise. There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of the area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized travel.Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to - and twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much more. The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and humans alike!Here's the whole list from today's walk: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 12:44:26 -0400
> From: Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...>
> Subject: Re: Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
>
> My computer also won’t let me see your cam or up
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>>
>> An exciting development this morning! date my adobe.
>>
>>
>>
>> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
>> Newbury, VT.
>>
>>
>>
>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>>
>>
>>
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>
>>
>>
>> Ian Clark
>> PO Box 51
>>
>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>
>> (848) 702-0774
>>
>> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>>
>>
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 12:49:43 -0400
> From: Susan Elliott <ovenbird14...>
> Subject: Re: The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
>
> A great message about the importance of bird records.
>
> Sue Elliott
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 11:10 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>>
>> ... is back!
>> Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor complained. The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary permits. Legal things moved slowly and the houses were completely done before there were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources Board. People had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked if I happened to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my testimony, when I mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the beaver pond on several occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened. When? What months of the year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and wetlands? One member of the Board explained to the gathering that bitterns are very sensitive to light pollution. His follow-up questions to the contractor focused on porch lights, spot lights, and yard lights.
>> Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the wetlands could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of cedars and a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be either moved or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder, who ended up having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece by piece.
>> The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned "housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise. There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of the area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized travel.
>> Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to - and twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much more. The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and humans alike!
>> Here's the whole list from today's walk: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058
>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 13:01:36 -0400
> From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
> Subject: Re: May 6, 2020: Thetford Center
>
> Mike, that would be an interesting change of events, best accomplished
> loudly from a low branch. Please let me know when you encounter such a
> school teacher.
>
> Pura Vida,
> Ted
>
> On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 11:03 AM Mike Carlo <
> <000005daa78fa2c0-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> Just once, I would be thrilled to hear a human school teacher
>> emphatically respond, "I'm here, I'm here, I'm here!" while I was out
>> birding...
>> Mike Carlo in Sterling, VA
>>
>> On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 10:03:13 AM EDT, Ted Levin <
>> <tedlevin1966...> wrote:
>>
>> 5:17 a.m. 26 degrees. Cloudless and windless. Frost throughout the wetland
>> and pastures. Leaves of red maples, tiny and red, give the woods a ruddy
>> complexion, as though trees could blush. Beech leaves unfurling. Ash buds
>> swelling.
>>
>> Two herds of wild turkey calling from opposite ends of the wetland: one
>> north, in the lower pasture; the other south, in a clear cut, just above
>> the east side of the pond. Gobbling carries in the cold air, the valley
>> stereophonic. Three ovenbirds (FOY) screaming in the pines: *teacher,
>> teacher, teacher, teacher*. Teachers unresponsive, of course. They all
>> self-isolating, online teaching.
>>
>> A junco on a low branch chipping, pink beak in relief against gray breast.
>> A pair of sapsuckers duel twenty-feet apart. One on the resonant roadside
>> maple limb, tapping the small, broken terminal end, which is barely bigger
>> than he is; the other, up road plays the trunk of a standing dead beech. I
>> see them both. They see each other. Preoccupied in their war of wood,
>> percussionists are oblivious to me and to the dogs, which tug their
>> leashes, wanting to walk. Gray squirrel crosses the road, heads up the
>> driveway toward the feeders; dogs tug in another attention.
>>
>> Last night, I read an article that recently appeared in the journal
>> *Ecology.
>> **Topic:* an obscure aspect of migration. *The given: 1)* two billion birds
>> cross the Gulf of Mexico twice each year, hemisphere to hemisphere; No
>> surprise. *The given: 2)* along the way, thousands, maybe tens of
>> thousands, maybe even millions perish. Flocks starve. Exhausted and
>> disoriented, others land on the water and can't take off. Still, others fly
>> too low and get engulfed by waves, swallowed by an unforgiving sea.
>> Flocks hit oil rigs and boats. Still, no surprises. *The crux*, *the*
>> *oddity
>> of the article:* newborn tiger sharks wait off the coasts of Alabama and
>> Mississippi for hapless migrants. A predictable pulse of protein for babies
>> just learning how to hunt. Eleven different species identified in bellies
>> of baby sharks: yellow-bellied sapsuckers, swamp sparrows, eastern
>> kingbird, common yellowthroats among them. All birds that live in this
>> valley. *"Notorious for their dietary breadth," *the authors wrote, tiger
>> sharks eat almost anything: alive; dead, inorganic. Feeding with a
>> proprietary air. Who knew that a stage in their lives tiger sharks depend
>> on the sky to deliver protein. Loren Eisley, simplifying Francis Thompson,
>> wrote *One could not pluck a flower without troubling a star*. I'm not sure
>> either Eisley or Thompson had songbirds and sharks in mind . . . but it
>> fits.
>>
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 13:38:16 -0400
> From: Veer Frost <veer.frost...>
> Subject: Re: Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition. /Flash
>
> I'm no techie but learned long ago that Flash is a non starter for
> certain browsers both on a/c of security and of competition. Since
> WCAX weather videos don't play without it, I had to solve this. (no
> tv) I have no problem since switching to Firefox, and even that great
> browser sternly asks if I really want to allow Flash to play each time
> I view Ian's videos. Security also advises only download Flash
> directly from Oracle. I would never normally write about such things
> but Ian's videos have captured me utterly and will you, too! A great
> day for the bluebirds today! thanks Ian!
> Veer, Passumpsic NEK
>
> On 5/6/2020 at 12:44 PM, "Nancy PerleeBRISTOL" wrote:My computer also
> won’t let me see your cam or up
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark wrote:
>>
>> An exciting development this morning! date my adobe.
>>
>>
>>
>> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
>> Newbury, VT.
>>
>>
>>
>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>>
>>
>>
>>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>
>>
>>
>> Ian Clark
>> PO Box 51
>>
>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>
>> (848) 702-0774
>>
>> www.IanClark.com
>>
>>
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 14:13:45 -0400
> From: Marcia Baker <bakermlb...>
> Subject: Re: FOY Rose Breasted Grosbeak
>
> FOY female at feeder yesterday and today. Still awaiting the male.
>
> Marcia in Brownsville
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 11:08 AM, edgreen3 <edgreen3...> wrote:
>>
>> Underhill at 900 feet elevation on sunflower seed feeder.Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 15:06:32 -0400
> From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
> Subject: Re: Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition. /Flash
>
> I also use Firefox, which always asks if I want to allow FLASH to run.
>
> For Chrome users, I found this (but haven't tested it):
>
> *How to enable Flash in Chrome*
>
> 1. Scroll to the Flash tab.
> 2. Turn off “Block sites from running Flash.”
> 3. Go to a site that requires Flash.
> 4. Find the grey box marked “Click to enable Flash Player.”
> 5. Click the button and then confirm again in the pop-up.
>
> Thanks for the videos!
>
> --Ken Copenhaver
>
> On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 1:38 PM Veer Frost <
> <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> I'm no techie but learned long ago that Flash is a non starter for
>> certain browsers both on a/c of security and of competition. Since
>> WCAX weather videos don't play without it, I had to solve this. (no
>> tv) I have no problem since switching to Firefox, and even that great
>> browser sternly asks if I really want to allow Flash to play each time
>> I view Ian's videos. Security also advises only download Flash
>> directly from Oracle. I would never normally write about such things
>> but Ian's videos have captured me utterly and will you, too! A great
>> day for the bluebirds today! thanks Ian!
>> Veer, Passumpsic NEK
>>
>> On 5/6/2020 at 12:44 PM, "Nancy PerleeBRISTOL" wrote:My computer also
>> won’t let me see your cam or up
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark wrote:
>>>
>>> An exciting development this morning! date my adobe.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
>>> Newbury, VT.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Ian Clark
>>> PO Box 51
>>>
>>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>>
>>> (848) 702-0774
>>>
>>> www.IanClark.com
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 19:10:36 +0000
> From: Susan Elliott <ovenbird14...>
> Subject: Pittsford Trails-Cadwell Loop, May 6, 2020
>
> Several warbler species along the Cadwell Loop in Pittsford today, all singing. We also heard a Bobolink.
> Sue and Marv Elliott
> Pittsford Trails-Cadwell Loop, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 6, 2020 9:26 AM - 12:24 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.85 mile(s)
> 44 species
>
> Canada Goose 1
> Wood Duck 2
> Mallard 3
> American Black Duck 2
> Common Merganser 2
> Mourning Dove 4
> Spotted Sandpiper 1
> Great Blue Heron 2
> Northern Harrier 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
> Downy Woodpecker 4
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Warbling Vireo 8
> Blue Jay 3
> American Crow 4
> Black-capped Chickadee 5
> Tufted Titmouse 1
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow 7
> Tree Swallow 4
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
> White-breasted Nuthatch 3
> House Wren 1
> Gray Catbird 8
> American Robin 4
> American Goldfinch 14
> Chipping Sparrow 1
> White-throated Sparrow 3
> Song Sparrow 30
> Swamp Sparrow 3
> Eastern Towhee 1
> Bobolink 1
> Baltimore Oriole 1
> Red-winged Blackbird 18
> Brown-headed Cowbird 5
> Common Grackle 5
> Black-and-white Warbler 2
> Common Yellowthroat 2
> American Redstart 1
> Yellow Warbler 5
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 1
> Pine Warbler 2
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 3
> Northern Cardinal 6
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S68496795
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 15:32:00 -0400
> From: Pat Folsom <pfols...>
> Subject: Re: The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
>
> wonderful, Maeve!
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Susan Elliott" <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
> To: "VT Bird" <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 6, 2020 12:49:43 PM
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
>
> A great message about the importance of bird records.
>
> Sue Elliott
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 11:10 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>>
>> ... is back!
>> Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor complained. The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary permits. Legal things moved slowly and the houses were completely done before there were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources Board. People had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked if I happened to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my testimony, when I mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the beaver pond on several occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened. When? What months of the year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and wetlands? One member of the Board explained to the gathering that bitterns are very sensitive to light pollution. His follow-up questions to the contractor focused on porch lights, spot lights, and yard lights.
>> Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the wetlands could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of cedars and a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be either moved or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder, who ended up having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece by piece.
>> The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned "housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise. There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of the area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized travel.
>> Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to - and twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much more. The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and humans alike!
>> Here's the whole list from today's walk: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058
>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 16:28:40 -0400
> From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> Subject: Re: The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
>
> On 2020-05-06 12:49, Susan Elliott wrote:
>> A great message about the importance of bird records.
>>
>> Sue Elliott
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On May 6, 2020, at 11:10 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> ... is back!
>>> Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver
>>> pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor
>>> complained. The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary
>>> permits. Legal things moved slowly and the houses were completely done
>>> before there were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources
>>> Board. People had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked
>>> if I happened to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my
>>> testimony, when I mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the
>>> beaver pond on several occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened.
>>> When? What months of the year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and
>>> wetlands? One member of the Board explained to the gathering that
>>> bitterns are very sensitive to light pollution. His follow-up
>>> questions to the contractor focused on porch lights, spot lights, and
>>> yard lights.
>>> Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the
>>> wetlands could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of
>>> cedars and a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be
>>> either moved or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder,
>>> who ended up having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece
>>> by piece.
>>> The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned
>>> "housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise.
>>> There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of
>>> the area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized
>>> travel.
>>> Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to -
>>> and twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much
>>> more. The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and
>>> humans alike!
>>> Here's the whole list from today's walk:
>>> https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058
>>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> Definitely yes!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 16:38:52 -0400
> From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> Subject: Re: The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
>
> Hi, Pat – I hope you are staying well and safe during this very unusual
> spring! I’m so glad the virus didn’t break out last October or November,
> when we in the north country would have several dark and cold months
> ahead of us.
> Maeve
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 16:42:37 -0400
> From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> Subject: apologies
>
> I responded too fast to two notes, and ended up sending the messages to
> the whole listserv. Sorry.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 17:03:37 -0400
> From: Marcia Baker <bakermlb...>
> Subject: FOY Catbird
>
> Just arrived in Brownsville to snack on suet.
>
> Marcia
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 17:41:40 -0400
> From: Ann Curran <acurran802...>
> Subject: Burlington birds
>
> Spending more time walking the neighborhood, I'm rewarded with more of the
> Old North End birds, familiar and returning. Last week was the first time
> I've seen a Common Raven here, complaining while being chased out of the
> neighborhood by a dive-bombing crow. White-throated and Chipping Sparrows,
> and flickers have brightened gloomy days.
>
> But the Bird of the Week is a Northern Mockingbird that has been in one of
> the cemeteries on Pomeroy Street for at least four days. Only heard him
> sing one day so far.
>
> I wish we had bluebirds, grouse and hermit thrushes, but as so many of us
> on the list have discovered, there's always something to discover on your
> local patch.
>
> Thanks to all of you for your posts,
>
> Ann Curran
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 17:49:35 -0400
> From: Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti...>
> Subject: Re: Hair raising tale to share
>
> In the past I’ve seen chickadees stealing the dog’s fur from a brush left on my porch. This year I brushed my dog and filled up a suet feeder with the hair and placed it conspicuously on a stake in my front yard. So far I’ve seen both a White-breasted Nuthatch and a Phoebe taking it away for nesting. She’s a soft puppy so there are going to be some cozy nestlings!
> Julie
> Fairfax
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 9:15 AM, Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> wrote:
>>
>> With my hair and beard growing out of control it was time for drastic
>> action so my wife got out the electric shears and in moments the problem
>> was addressed. The residue of white hair was left on the lawn thinking it
>> might be of interest to nesting birds. This morning while heading out to do
>> chores in the midst of the white pile was a chickadee loading up its bill
>> with a carefully aligned wad of my locks. Recycling at its best.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 16:12:00 -0400
> From: Sue <2birdvt...>
> Subject: [SPAM?:*******] - White-throats
>
> Today white-throated sparrows were at the suet, a first for me observing that.
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 19:24:54 -0400
> From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2...>
> Subject: Rusty blackbirds!
>
> The trail off of Tracy road in south hero was very busy today.
> First off, two proud Canada geese had to help their brand new fluff balls over a log in the swamp. It was adorable. Lots and lots of yellow rumpled warblers twittering away amongst all the grackles and red winged blackbirds . A redstart came right up to look at me and showed himself off.Then a flock of at least 7 rusty blackbirds sang away ,trying to outdo the grackles. It was hard to count as they chased each other around among the red wings and grackles.Then , to top it off ,right past the heron rookery, the great horned owl was hanging with its kids in the nest, looking really proud.
> WOw!
>
> Sally Fellows
> Williston
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 6 May 2020 21:07:17 -0400
> From: Charlie Teske <cteske140...>
> Subject: Re: Hair raising tale to share
>
> And I was about to report a first NEK sighting of white-whiskered puffbird! Maybe next time.
>
>
>
> On Wed, 6 May 2020 17:49:35 -0400, Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti...> wrote:
>
> In the past I’ve seen chickadees stealing the dog’s fur from a brush left on my porch. This year I brushed my dog and filled up a suet feeder with the hair and placed it conspicuously on a stake in my front yard. So far I’ve seen both a White-breasted Nuthatch and a Phoebe taking it away for nesting. She’s a soft puppy so there are going to be some cozy nestlings!
> Julie
> Fairfax
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 9:15 AM, Walter Medwid wrote:
>>
>> With my hair and beard growing out of control it was time for drastic
>> action so my wife got out the electric shears and in moments the problem
>> was addressed. The residue of white hair was left on the lawn thinking it
>> might be of interest to nesting birds. This morning while heading out to do
>> chores in the midst of the white pile was a chickadee loading up its bill
>> with a carefully aligned wad of my locks. Recycling at its best.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 5 May 2020 to 6 May 2020 (#2020-119)
> ***********************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 5/7/20 3:46 am
From: Mus <musbird...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOYs in Randolph Center
I have had a pair of Rosebreasted Grosbeaks the past couple of days and a gorgeous male Baltimore Oriole showed up yesterday. Oranges now on my shopping list. BTW I am loving the humor on these pages since our sequestration began - today our hair-raising tales, oven teachers, white-whiskered puffbirds and the like. Keep it comin’.

And no, my iMac is screaming at me about Adobe, too, so no bluebird cams for me either.
Janet Watton
Randolph Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 6:07 pm
From: Charlie Teske <cteske140...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hair raising tale to share
And I was about to report a first NEK sighting of white-whiskered puffbird! Maybe next time.



On Wed, 6 May 2020 17:49:35 -0400, Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti...> wrote:

In the past I’ve seen chickadees stealing the dog’s fur from a brush left on my porch. This year I brushed my dog and filled up a suet feeder with the hair and placed it conspicuously on a stake in my front yard. So far I’ve seen both a White-breasted Nuthatch and a Phoebe taking it away for nesting. She’s a soft puppy so there are going to be some cozy nestlings!
Julie
Fairfax

> On May 6, 2020, at 9:15 AM, Walter Medwid wrote:

> With my hair and beard growing out of control it was time for drastic
> action so my wife got out the electric shears and in moments the problem
> was addressed. The residue of white hair was left on the lawn thinking it
> might be of interest to nesting birds. This morning while heading out to do
> chores in the midst of the white pile was a chickadee loading up its bill
> with a carefully aligned wad of my locks. Recycling at its best.
 
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 4:25 pm
From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Rusty blackbirds!
The trail off of Tracy road in south hero was very busy today.
First off, two proud Canada geese had to help their brand new fluff balls over a log in the swamp. It was adorable. Lots and lots of yellow rumpled warblers twittering away amongst all the grackles and red winged blackbirds . A redstart came right up to look at me and showed himself off.Then a flock of at least 7 rusty blackbirds sang away ,trying to outdo the grackles. It was hard to count as they chased each other around among the red wings and grackles.Then , to top it off ,right past the heron rookery, the great horned owl was hanging with its kids in the nest, looking really proud.
WOw!

Sally Fellows
Williston
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 2:54 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] [SPAM?:*******] - White-throats
Today white-throated sparrows were at the suet, a first for me observing that.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 2:49 pm
From: Julie Filiberti <vtfiliberti...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hair raising tale to share
In the past I’ve seen chickadees stealing the dog’s fur from a brush left on my porch. This year I brushed my dog and filled up a suet feeder with the hair and placed it conspicuously on a stake in my front yard. So far I’ve seen both a White-breasted Nuthatch and a Phoebe taking it away for nesting. She’s a soft puppy so there are going to be some cozy nestlings!
Julie
Fairfax

> On May 6, 2020, at 9:15 AM, Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> wrote:
>
> With my hair and beard growing out of control it was time for drastic
> action so my wife got out the electric shears and in moments the problem
> was addressed. The residue of white hair was left on the lawn thinking it
> might be of interest to nesting birds. This morning while heading out to do
> chores in the midst of the white pile was a chickadee loading up its bill
> with a carefully aligned wad of my locks. Recycling at its best.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 2:41 pm
From: Ann Curran <acurran802...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Burlington birds
Spending more time walking the neighborhood, I'm rewarded with more of the
Old North End birds, familiar and returning. Last week was the first time
I've seen a Common Raven here, complaining while being chased out of the
neighborhood by a dive-bombing crow. White-throated and Chipping Sparrows,
and flickers have brightened gloomy days.

But the Bird of the Week is a Northern Mockingbird that has been in one of
the cemeteries on Pomeroy Street for at least four days. Only heard him
sing one day so far.

I wish we had bluebirds, grouse and hermit thrushes, but as so many of us
on the list have discovered, there's always something to discover on your
local patch.

Thanks to all of you for your posts,

Ann Curran
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 2:03 pm
From: Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Catbird
Just arrived in Brownsville to snack on suet.

Marcia

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 1:42 pm
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] apologies
I responded too fast to two notes, and ended up sending the messages to
the whole listserv. Sorry.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 1:39 pm
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
Hi, Pat – I hope you are staying well and safe during this very unusual
spring! I’m so glad the virus didn’t break out last October or November,
when we in the north country would have several dark and cold months
ahead of us.
Maeve
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 1:28 pm
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
On 2020-05-06 12:49, Susan Elliott wrote:
> A great message about the importance of bird records.
>
> Sue Elliott
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 11:10 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> ... is back!
>> Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver
>> pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor
>> complained. The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary
>> permits. Legal things moved slowly and the houses were completely done
>> before there were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources
>> Board. People had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked
>> if I happened to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my
>> testimony, when I mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the
>> beaver pond on several occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened.
>> When? What months of the year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and
>> wetlands? One member of the Board explained to the gathering that
>> bitterns are very sensitive to light pollution. His follow-up
>> questions to the contractor focused on porch lights, spot lights, and
>> yard lights.
>> Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the
>> wetlands could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of
>> cedars and a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be
>> either moved or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder,
>> who ended up having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece
>> by piece.
>> The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned
>> "housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise.
>> There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of
>> the area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized
>> travel.
>> Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to -
>> and twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much
>> more. The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and
>> humans alike!
>> Here's the whole list from today's walk:
>> https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058
>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
Definitely yes!
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 12:32 pm
From: Pat Folsom <pfols...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
wonderful, Maeve!

----- Original Message -----
From: "Susan Elliott" <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
To: "VT Bird" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 6, 2020 12:49:43 PM
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...

A great message about the importance of bird records.

Sue Elliott

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 6, 2020, at 11:10 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>
> ... is back!
> Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor complained. The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary permits. Legal things moved slowly and the houses were completely done before there were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources Board. People had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked if I happened to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my testimony, when I mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the beaver pond on several occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened. When? What months of the year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and wetlands? One member of the Board explained to the gathering that bitterns are very sensitive to light pollution. His follow-up questions to the contractor focused on porch lights, spot lights, and yard lights.
> Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the wetlands could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of cedars and a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be either moved or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder, who ended up having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece by piece.
> The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned "housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise. There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of the area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized travel.
> Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to - and twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much more. The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and humans alike!
> Here's the whole list from today's walk: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 12:10 pm
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pittsford Trails-Cadwell Loop, May 6, 2020
Several warbler species along the Cadwell Loop in Pittsford today, all singing. We also heard a Bobolink. 
Sue and Marv Elliott
Pittsford Trails-Cadwell Loop, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 6, 2020 9:26 AM - 12:24 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.85 mile(s)
44 species

Canada Goose  1
Wood Duck  2
Mallard  3
American Black Duck  2
Common Merganser  2
Mourning Dove  4
Spotted Sandpiper  1
Great Blue Heron  2
Northern Harrier  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Downy Woodpecker  4
Pileated Woodpecker  1
Warbling Vireo  8
Blue Jay  3
American Crow  4
Black-capped Chickadee  5
Tufted Titmouse  1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow  7
Tree Swallow  4
Ruby-crowned Kinglet  1
White-breasted Nuthatch  3
House Wren  1
Gray Catbird  8
American Robin  4
American Goldfinch  14
Chipping Sparrow  1
White-throated Sparrow  3
Song Sparrow  30
Swamp Sparrow  3
Eastern Towhee  1
Bobolink  1
Baltimore Oriole  1
Red-winged Blackbird  18
Brown-headed Cowbird  5
Common Grackle  5
Black-and-white Warbler  2
Common Yellowthroat  2
American Redstart  1
Yellow Warbler  5
Chestnut-sided Warbler  1
Pine Warbler  2
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)  3
Northern Cardinal  6
Rose-breasted Grosbeak  1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S68496795



 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 12:07 pm
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition. /Flash
I also use Firefox, which always asks if I want to allow FLASH to run.

For Chrome users, I found this (but haven't tested it):

*How to enable Flash in Chrome*

1. Scroll to the Flash tab.
2. Turn off “Block sites from running Flash.”
3. Go to a site that requires Flash.
4. Find the grey box marked “Click to enable Flash Player.”
5. Click the button and then confirm again in the pop-up.

Thanks for the videos!

--Ken Copenhaver

On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 1:38 PM Veer Frost <
<0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I'm no techie but learned long ago that Flash is a non starter for
> certain browsers both on a/c of security and of competition. Since
> WCAX weather videos don't play without it, I had to solve this. (no
> tv) I have no problem since switching to Firefox, and even that great
> browser sternly asks if I really want to allow Flash to play each time
> I view Ian's videos. Security also advises only download Flash
> directly from Oracle. I would never normally write about such things
> but Ian's videos have captured me utterly and will you, too! A great
> day for the bluebirds today! thanks Ian!
> Veer, Passumpsic NEK
>
> On 5/6/2020 at 12:44 PM, "Nancy PerleeBRISTOL" wrote:My computer also
> won’t let me see your cam or up
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark wrote:
> >
> > An exciting development this morning! date my adobe.
> >
> >
> >
> > We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
> > Newbury, VT.
> >
> >
> >
> > http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> > %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> >
> >
> >
> > Ian Clark
> > PO Box 51
> >
> > West Newbury, VT 05085
> >
> > (848) 702-0774
> >
> > www.IanClark.com
> >
> >
> >
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 11:14 am
From: Marcia Baker <00000071bf45faf1-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] FOY Rose Breasted Grosbeak
FOY female at feeder yesterday and today. Still awaiting the male.

Marcia in Brownsville

Sent from my iPad

> On May 6, 2020, at 11:08 AM, edgreen3 <edgreen3...> wrote:
>
> Underhill at 900 feet elevation on sunflower seed feeder.Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 10:38 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition. /Flash
I'm no techie but learned long ago that Flash is a non starter for
certain browsers both on a/c of security and of competition. Since
WCAX weather videos don't play without it, I had to solve this. (no
tv) I have no problem since switching to Firefox, and even that great
browser sternly asks if I really want to allow Flash to play each time
I view Ian's videos. Security also advises only download Flash
directly from Oracle. I would never normally write about such things
but Ian's videos have captured me utterly and will you, too! A great
day for the bluebirds today! thanks Ian!
Veer, Passumpsic NEK

On 5/6/2020 at 12:44 PM, "Nancy PerleeBRISTOL" wrote:My computer also
won’t let me see your cam or up

Sent from my iPad

> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark wrote:
>
> An exciting development this morning! date my adobe.
>
>
>
> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
> Newbury, VT.
>
>
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>
>
>
>
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 10:01 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] May 6, 2020: Thetford Center
Mike, that would be an interesting change of events, best accomplished
loudly from a low branch. Please let me know when you encounter such a
school teacher.

Pura Vida,
Ted

On Wed, May 6, 2020 at 11:03 AM Mike Carlo <
<000005daa78fa2c0-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Just once, I would be thrilled to hear a human school teacher
> emphatically respond, "I'm here, I'm here, I'm here!" while I was out
> birding...
> Mike Carlo in Sterling, VA
>
> On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 10:03:13 AM EDT, Ted Levin <
> <tedlevin1966...> wrote:
>
> 5:17 a.m. 26 degrees. Cloudless and windless. Frost throughout the wetland
> and pastures. Leaves of red maples, tiny and red, give the woods a ruddy
> complexion, as though trees could blush. Beech leaves unfurling. Ash buds
> swelling.
>
> Two herds of wild turkey calling from opposite ends of the wetland: one
> north, in the lower pasture; the other south, in a clear cut, just above
> the east side of the pond. Gobbling carries in the cold air, the valley
> stereophonic. Three ovenbirds (FOY) screaming in the pines: *teacher,
> teacher, teacher, teacher*. Teachers unresponsive, of course. They all
> self-isolating, online teaching.
>
> A junco on a low branch chipping, pink beak in relief against gray breast.
> A pair of sapsuckers duel twenty-feet apart. One on the resonant roadside
> maple limb, tapping the small, broken terminal end, which is barely bigger
> than he is; the other, up road plays the trunk of a standing dead beech. I
> see them both. They see each other. Preoccupied in their war of wood,
> percussionists are oblivious to me and to the dogs, which tug their
> leashes, wanting to walk. Gray squirrel crosses the road, heads up the
> driveway toward the feeders; dogs tug in another attention.
>
> Last night, I read an article that recently appeared in the journal
> *Ecology.
> **Topic:* an obscure aspect of migration. *The given: 1)* two billion birds
> cross the Gulf of Mexico twice each year, hemisphere to hemisphere; No
> surprise. *The given: 2)* along the way, thousands, maybe tens of
> thousands, maybe even millions perish. Flocks starve. Exhausted and
> disoriented, others land on the water and can't take off. Still, others fly
> too low and get engulfed by waves, swallowed by an unforgiving sea.
> Flocks hit oil rigs and boats. Still, no surprises. *The crux*, *the*
> *oddity
> of the article:* newborn tiger sharks wait off the coasts of Alabama and
> Mississippi for hapless migrants. A predictable pulse of protein for babies
> just learning how to hunt. Eleven different species identified in bellies
> of baby sharks: yellow-bellied sapsuckers, swamp sparrows, eastern
> kingbird, common yellowthroats among them. All birds that live in this
> valley. *"Notorious for their dietary breadth," *the authors wrote, tiger
> sharks eat almost anything: alive; dead, inorganic. Feeding with a
> proprietary air. Who knew that a stage in their lives tiger sharks depend
> on the sky to deliver protein. Loren Eisley, simplifying Francis Thompson,
> wrote *One could not pluck a flower without troubling a star*. I'm not sure
> either Eisley or Thompson had songbirds and sharks in mind . . . but it
> fits.
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 9:49 am
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
A great message about the importance of bird records.

Sue Elliott

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 6, 2020, at 11:10 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>
> ... is back!
> Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor complained. The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary permits. Legal things moved slowly and the houses were completely done before there were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources Board. People had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked if I happened to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my testimony, when I mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the beaver pond on several occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened. When? What months of the year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and wetlands? One member of the Board explained to the gathering that bitterns are very sensitive to light pollution. His follow-up questions to the contractor focused on porch lights, spot lights, and yard lights.
> Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the wetlands could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of cedars and a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be either moved or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder, who ended up having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece by piece.
> The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned "housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise. There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of the area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized travel.
> Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to - and twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much more. The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and humans alike!
> Here's the whole list from today's walk: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 9:44 am
From: Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
My computer also won’t let me see your cam or up

Sent from my iPad

> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>
> An exciting development this morning! date my adobe.
>
>
>
> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
> Newbury, VT.
>
>
>
> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 9:35 am
From: kfinch <kfinch51...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
Great story, Maeve!
-------- Original message --------From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Date: 5/6/20 11:10 AM (GMT-05:00) To: <VTBIRD...> Subject: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ... ... is back!Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor complained. The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary permits. Legal things moved slowly and the houses were completely done before there were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources Board. People had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked if I happened to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my testimony, when I mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the beaver pond on several occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened. When? What months of the year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and wetlands? One member of the Board explained to the gathering that bitterns are very sensitive to light pollution. His follow-up questions to the contractor focused on porch lights, spot lights, and yard lights.Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the wetlands could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of cedars and a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be either moved or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder, who ended up having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece by piece.The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned "housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise. There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of the area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized travel.Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to - and twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much more. The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and humans alike!Here's the whole list from today's walk: https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 8:33 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
On 2020-05-06 11:23, Eve Ticknor wrote:
> I have the same trouble………….
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 9:51 AM, Ruth Coppersmith
>> <coppersmithruth...> wrote:
>>
>> Ian, would love to see your bluebird cams but my computer won’t let
>> me. Says I need to update adobe flash player but then won’t let me do
>> it. Would you be able to send them in a different format for me?
>> Thanks!
>> Ruth C.
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>>>
>>> An exciting development this morning!
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
>>> Newbury, VT.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Ian Clark
>>> PO Box 51
>>>
>>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>>
>>> (848) 702-0774
>>>
>>> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>>>
>>>
>
>
>
> Eve Ticknor
> <edticknor...>
>
> Box 2206
> Prescott, On
> K0E 1T0
>
> 24 Birch Ave
> Willsboro, NY
> 12996
>
> "Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
> (Quaker blessing)
Me, too.
Maeve Kim
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 8:29 am
From: Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Emerald Lake
Has anyone heard of or seen how the birding at Emerald Lake has been? Remembering the nice yellow-rump fallouts from recent years. Thanks! Pam
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 8:23 am
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition.
I have the same trouble………….

> On May 6, 2020, at 9:51 AM, Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> wrote:
>
> Ian, would love to see your bluebird cams but my computer won’t let me. Says I need to update adobe flash player but then won’t let me do it. Would you be able to send them in a different format for me?
> Thanks!
> Ruth C.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On May 6, 2020, at 8:14 AM, Ian Clark <ian...> wrote:
>>
>> An exciting development this morning!
>>
>>
>>
>> We're watching eastern bluebirds in a box mounted on my deck in West
>> Newbury, VT.
>>
>>
>>
>> http://ian.ianclark.com/bluebirds/bbirds-5-6-2020.html
>>
>>
>>
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>>
>>
>>
>> Ian Clark
>> PO Box 51
>>
>> West Newbury, VT 05085
>>
>> (848) 702-0774
>>
>> www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
>>
>>



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

"Be thou happy, be thou blest, from thy birth until thy rest.”
(Quaker blessing)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 8:10 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] The Bird That Helped Save a Swamp ...
... is back!
Years ago, two houses were built overlooking the Jericho Center beaver
pond, both too close and one actually in wetland. A neighbor complained.
The contractor hadn't applied for or received necessary permits. Legal
things moved slowly and the houses were completely done before there
were hearings. One hearing was before the Water Resources Board. People
had seen me walking back there with binoculars and asked if I happened
to have a list of birds. Of course I did! During my testimony, when I
mentioned having seen American Bitterns at the beaver pond on several
occasions, people on the WR Board stiffened. When? What months of the
year? Calling? Where exactly on the pond and wetlands? One member of the
Board explained to the gathering that bitterns are very sensitive to
light pollution. His follow-up questions to the contractor focused on
porch lights, spot lights, and yard lights.
Everything ended with a compromise: the house farthest from the wetlands
could remain but only with mitigation in the form of a row of cedars and
a change in outdoor lighting, but the other house had to be either moved
or removed. It was a financial disaster for the builder, who ended up
having to dismantle the large dwelling and move it piece by piece.
The beaver pond had faced an earlier threat: several hundred planned
"housing units" in the adjacent field. That too ended in a compromise.
There are a dozen or so houses clustered at one end and the rest of the
area is owned by that development and open for non-motorized travel.
Today we visited the beaver pond, as we often do, and listened to - and
twice saw! - an American Bittern. We also saw and heard so much more.
The pond and wetlands are a wonderful resource for wildlife and humans
alike!
Here's the whole list from today's walk:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S68491058
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 8:08 am
From: edgreen3 <edgreen3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FOY Rose Breasted Grosbeak
Underhill at 900 feet elevation on sunflower seed feeder.Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/20 8:03 am
From: Mike Carlo <000005daa78fa2c0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] May 6, 2020: Thetford Center
Just once, I would be thrilled to hear a human school teacher emphatically respond, "I'm here, I'm here, I'm here!" while I was out birding...
Mike Carlo in Sterling, VA

On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, 10:03:13 AM EDT, Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> wrote:

5:17 a.m. 26 degrees. Cloudless and windless. Frost throughout the wetland
and pastures. Leaves of red maples, tiny and red, give the woods a ruddy
complexion, as though trees could blush. Beech leaves unfurling. Ash buds
swelling.

Two herds of wild turkey calling from opposite ends of the wetland: one
north, in the lower pasture; the other south, in a clear cut, just above
the east side of the pond. Gobbling carries in the cold air, the valley
stereophonic. Three ovenbirds (FOY) screaming in the pines: *teacher,
teacher, teacher, teacher*. Teachers unresponsive, of course. They all
self-isolating, online teaching.

A junco on a low branch chipping, pink beak in relief against gray breast.
A pair of sapsuckers duel twenty-feet apart. One on the resonant roadside
maple limb, tapping the small, broken terminal end, which is barely bigger
than he is; the other, up road plays the trunk of a standing dead beech. I
see them both. They see each other. Preoccupied in their war of wood,
percussionists are oblivious to me and to the dogs, which tug their
leashes, wanting to walk. Gray squirrel crosses the road, heads up the
driveway toward the feeders; dogs tug in another attention.

Last night, I read an article that recently appeared in the journal *Ecology.
**Topic:* an obscure aspect of migration. *The given: 1)* two billion birds
cross the Gulf of Mexico twice each year, hemisphere to hemisphere; No
surprise. *The given: 2)* along the way, thousands, maybe tens of
thousands, maybe even millions perish. Flocks starve. Exhausted and
disoriented, others land on the water and can't take off. Still, others fly
too low and get engulfed by waves, swallowed by an unforgiving sea.
Flocks hit oil rigs and boats. Still, no surprises. *The crux*, *the* *oddity
of the article:* newborn tiger sharks wait off the coasts of Alabama and
Mississippi for hapless migrants. A predictable pulse of protein for babies
just learning how to hunt. Eleven different species identified in bellies
of baby sharks: yellow-bellied sapsuckers, swamp sparrows, eastern
kingbird, common yellowthroats among them. All birds that live in this
valley. *"Notorious for their dietary breadth," *the authors wrote, tiger
sharks eat almost anything: alive; dead, inorganic. Feeding with a
proprietary air. Who knew that a stage in their lives tiger sharks depend
on the sky to deliver protein. Loren Eisley, simplifying Francis Thompson,
wrote *One could not pluck a flower without troubling a star*. I'm not sure
either Eisley or Thompson had songbirds and sharks in mind . . . but it
fits.