VTBIRD
Received From Subject
8/15/20 4:29 am Diana <dlee3...> Re: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Northern Mockingbirds
8/15/20 4:27 am Diana <dlee3...> [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Northern Mockingbirds
8/14/20 8:14 am Susan Tiholiz <stiholiz...> Re: [VTBIRD] August 14, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/14/20 7:38 am Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Checking in on our loon family
8/14/20 7:06 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 14, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/13/20 9:20 am Jane Stein <jeshawks...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummer in charge
8/13/20 7:08 am Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...> [VTBIRD] Wilson's Storm-Petrel post-Isaias
8/13/20 6:49 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 13, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/13/20 6:23 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Hummer in charge
8/13/20 4:38 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] water level at Dead Creek?
8/12/20 6:50 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 12, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/12/20 6:26 am anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] when are RTHU no longer "juvenile"?
8/11/20 1:02 pm Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Carolina wren singing persistently
8/11/20 11:05 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] when are RTHU no longer "juvenile"?
8/11/20 11:04 am Kate Olgiati <2grackle...> Re: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with American lady Butterfly
8/11/20 9:56 am Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> [VTBIRD] Nocturnal Flight Calls Listserv for Vermont
8/11/20 8:20 am Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Warbler wave
8/11/20 8:10 am Charlie Teske <cteske140...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge
8/11/20 6:55 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Carolina wren singing persistently
8/11/20 6:16 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 11, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/11/20 5:30 am maevulus <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] corvids taking squash leaves???
8/11/20 5:25 am maevulus <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] hummers still around, plus
8/11/20 4:27 am Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> Re: [VTBIRD] FW: Vt. Fish & WIldlife Reports
8/11/20 4:00 am Brennan Michaels <owlhousevt...> Re: [VTBIRD] FW: Vt. Fish & WIldlife Reports
8/10/20 7:37 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Aug 9, 2020
8/10/20 2:49 pm Gmail okra <ihateokra88...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge
8/10/20 1:59 pm Kevin Tolan <Kevin.Tolan...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge
8/10/20 11:22 am maevulus <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] Swamp Sparrow
8/10/20 11:05 am Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> Re: [VTBIRD] Swamp Sparrow
8/10/20 11:00 am Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> [VTBIRD] FW: Vt. Fish & WIldlife Reports
8/10/20 10:47 am Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> [VTBIRD] Swamp Sparrow
8/10/20 9:15 am Morin, Doug <Doug.Morin...> [VTBIRD] VTFW Bird Reports
8/10/20 7:19 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 10, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford center
8/9/20 11:55 am Kyle Jones <lkjones13...> [VTBIRD] Swallow-tailed Kite West Lebanon, NH
8/9/20 8:20 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 9, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/8/20 2:40 pm Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge
8/8/20 7:51 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 8, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/7/20 2:27 pm Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Another breakfast with the loon family
8/7/20 2:10 pm Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] Cedar waxwings
8/7/20 12:45 pm Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 7, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/7/20 11:57 am Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...> Re: [VTBIRD] Broad-winged Hawk migration
8/7/20 9:54 am Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...> [VTBIRD] Broad-winged Hawk migration
8/6/20 1:26 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] e coast birds in vt?
8/6/20 8:19 am Diana <dlee3...> [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with American lady Butterfly
8/6/20 6:50 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 6, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/5/20 5:06 pm Cedar Stanistreet <thedancingfiddle...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mudflats Chittenden Cty?
8/5/20 8:50 am Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mudflats Chittenden Cty?
8/5/20 7:52 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 5, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/5/20 5:21 am B Bobolinks <0000035f721cf148-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Mudflats Chittenden Cty?
8/4/20 3:03 pm Chris Rimmer <crimmer...> [VTBIRD] Mansfield update
8/4/20 1:06 pm Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...> Re: [VTBIRD] Shorebirds
8/4/20 11:56 am Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - Aug 3 - Colchester Causeway
8/4/20 9:53 am Scott Morrical <smorrica...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - Aug 3 - Colchester Causeway
8/4/20 7:46 am Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> Re: [VTBIRD] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - Aug 3 - Colchester Causeway
8/4/20 6:35 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 4, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/4/20 5:38 am Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - Aug 3 - Colchester Causeway
8/3/20 10:10 am Cedar Stanistreet <thedancingfiddle...> Re: [VTBIRD] Red Crossbills - help with type ID?
8/3/20 9:38 am Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...> Re: [VTBIRD] Red Crossbills - help with type ID?
8/3/20 8:30 am John Snell <jrsnelljr...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Mysterious Life of Birds Who Never Come Down - The New York Times
8/3/20 8:26 am Cedar Stanistreet <thedancingfiddle...> [VTBIRD] Red Crossbills - help with type ID?
8/3/20 6:32 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 3, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/3/20 6:29 am Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] The Mysterious Life of Birds Who Never Come Down - The New York Times
8/3/20 6:02 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] photo essay on an extraordinary outing "Least Bittern Big Day' by JBlock
8/2/20 1:51 pm Peterson, Bruce B. <peterson...> Re: [VTBIRD] Shorebirds
8/2/20 12:09 pm Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Shorebirds
8/2/20 9:38 am Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...> Re: [VTBIRD] Whimbrels heading south from Missisquoi
8/2/20 8:23 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 2, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
8/2/20 8:13 am Clem Nilan <vtclem...> Re: [VTBIRD] Whimbrels heading south from Missisquoi
8/2/20 7:51 am Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] - 1 Aug 2020 - Mount Independence - 40 species
8/2/20 7:01 am Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...> [VTBIRD] Whimbrels heading south from Missisquoi
8/2/20 5:30 am Howard Muscott <HMuscott...> Re: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
8/2/20 5:04 am Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...> [VTBIRD] Shorebirds
8/1/20 8:02 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
8/1/20 7:59 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] Putney Mtn Hawkwatch 2020
8/1/20 5:45 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] August 1, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/31/20 12:16 pm Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 30, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/31/20 9:58 am Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Cadwell Trail
7/31/20 9:44 am Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Cadwell Trail
7/31/20 5:43 am Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> Re: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
7/31/20 5:17 am Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> Re: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
7/31/20 5:16 am Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
7/30/20 4:53 pm suki russo <0000001d6c4a8152-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Putney Mtn Hawkwatch 2020
7/30/20 6:16 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 30, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/30/20 2:05 am Kate Olgiati <2grackle...> Re: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Gray Catbirds
7/29/20 12:12 pm Diana <dlee3...> [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Gray Catbirds
7/29/20 7:12 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 29, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/29/20 5:48 am Marylyn Pillsbury <000001cae55256d1-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, final double feature
7/28/20 7:09 pm Sarah Fellows <towanda2...> Re: [VTBIRD] carolina wren napping upside down
7/28/20 6:33 pm Linda Gionti <lgionti...> [VTBIRD] carolina wren napping upside down
7/28/20 5:08 pm Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, final double feature
7/28/20 7:07 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 28, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/27/20 3:09 pm Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, likely penultimate edition
7/27/20 7:49 am Mamuniaangel <000002fe774c7bcd-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] re barn swallows and current events
7/27/20 6:52 am Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
7/27/20 6:05 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 27, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/27/20 4:27 am Ian Worley <iworley...> Re: [VTBIRD] re barn swallows and current events
7/27/20 4:05 am maevulus <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] re barn swallows and current events
7/26/20 8:03 pm Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...> Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
7/26/20 6:28 pm Josephine Hingston <josephine.hingston...> Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
7/26/20 5:34 pm Martha Adams <martha.adams60...> Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
7/26/20 4:40 pm Rita Pitkin <ritapitkin15...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
7/26/20 3:55 pm Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
7/26/20 10:46 am Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
7/26/20 10:01 am maevulus <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] does anyone have photos of ...
7/26/20 9:54 am Charles Gangas <0000051a71a2f355-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] does anyone have photos of ...
7/26/20 9:52 am Charles Gangas <0000051a71a2f355-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] does anyone have photos of ...
7/26/20 9:49 am Ed Green <edgreen3...> Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
7/26/20 8:04 am Debbie Lyter <mndlyter...> Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
7/26/20 8:03 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
7/26/20 7:55 am edgreen3 <edgreen3...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders
7/26/20 7:09 am maevulus <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] does anyone have photos of ...
7/26/20 6:53 am Janet Warren <jwarren...> [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
7/26/20 6:20 am Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] renesting warblers
7/26/20 6:16 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 26, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/26/20 6:00 am maevulus <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] renesting warblers
7/25/20 4:58 pm Bill Whitehair <william.whitehair...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders
7/25/20 4:19 pm Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders
7/25/20 3:57 pm Brenna <dbgaldenzi...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders
7/25/20 3:33 pm Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Saturday edition
7/25/20 3:01 pm Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders
7/25/20 7:04 am Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Merlin in South Burlington
7/25/20 5:28 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 25, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/25/20 4:58 am Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...> Re: [VTBIRD] Pigeon
7/25/20 4:15 am Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...> Re: [VTBIRD] Phoebe nest
7/24/20 6:25 pm Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Pigeon
7/24/20 4:22 pm alison wagner <alikatofvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Phoebe nest
7/24/20 4:10 pm Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
7/24/20 3:44 pm Chris Rimmer <crimmer...> [VTBIRD] Week 7 Mansfield update
7/24/20 2:38 pm Janet <musbird...> [VTBIRD] Phoebe nest
7/24/20 10:21 am Diana <dlee3...> [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Northern Flickers
7/24/20 8:56 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 24, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/23/20 5:20 pm Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
7/23/20 2:43 pm H Nicolay <sqrlma...> [VTBIRD] Ravens in Monkton
7/23/20 7:00 am kfinch <kfinch51...> Re: [VTBIRD] July 23, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/23/20 5:09 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 23, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/22/20 3:37 pm David Guertin <dave...> Re: [VTBIRD] Black and white warbler and resistant caters
7/22/20 2:56 pm Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
7/22/20 7:51 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 22, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/22/20 6:53 am Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] Black and white warbler and resistant caters
7/22/20 6:04 am Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> Re: [VTBIRD] White-throated Sparrow song
7/21/20 2:58 pm Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> Re: [VTBIRD] Fwd: racial justice x birding
7/21/20 1:44 pm anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mansfield update
7/21/20 12:05 pm Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Return of Bluebird cam!
7/21/20 10:50 am Chris Rimmer <crimmer...> [VTBIRD] Mansfield update
7/21/20 10:05 am Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> [VTBIRD] White-throated Sparrow song
7/21/20 5:47 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 21, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/20/20 6:02 pm Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
7/20/20 3:28 pm maevulus <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
7/20/20 3:02 pm anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
7/20/20 2:00 pm Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> Re: [VTBIRD] July 18, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/20/20 1:36 pm Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
7/20/20 1:09 pm Mike Sargent <msargent...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
7/20/20 12:32 pm Diana <dlee3...> [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Wild Turkeys
7/20/20 11:24 am John Holme <00000062fa0d6268-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] July 18, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/20/20 10:43 am Jane Stein <jeshawks...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
7/20/20 10:01 am anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
7/20/20 5:33 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 20, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/19/20 6:24 pm Gmail okra <ihateokra88...> Re: [VTBIRD] Yellow throated warbler sighted Derby
7/19/20 4:44 pm Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb...> Re: [VTBIRD] Songs
7/19/20 4:31 pm Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] Yellow throated warbler sighted Derby
7/19/20 1:53 pm maevulus <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] Songs
7/19/20 1:34 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Songs
7/19/20 10:03 am Noel Dodge <noel.dodge...> Re: [VTBIRD] using ebird
7/19/20 7:08 am Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...> Re: [VTBIRD] using ebird
7/19/20 5:14 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 19, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford
7/18/20 8:13 pm Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...> Re: [VTBIRD] using ebird
7/18/20 7:57 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> [VTBIRD] using ebird
7/18/20 3:35 pm Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Least Bittern, shorebirds, terns - Highgate Springs
7/18/20 11:45 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 18, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/17/20 12:42 pm Fowle, Margaret <Margaret.Fowle...> [VTBIRD] Chimney Swift survey - inclusivity and safety
7/17/20 5:33 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 17, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
7/17/20 2:54 am Kate Olgiati <2grackle...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grackles
7/16/20 4:39 pm Sarah Fellows <towanda2...> Re: [VTBIRD] Grackles
7/16/20 4:17 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Grackles
7/16/20 6:36 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] July 16, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
 
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Date: 8/15/20 4:29 am
From: Diana <dlee3...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Northern Mockingbirds
Sorry here is the link:
My latest video about the amazing mockingbird.

https://youtu.be/qgKsNAUqF7s
 

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Date: 8/15/20 4:27 am
From: Diana <dlee3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Northern Mockingbirds
My latest video about the amazing mockingbird.
 

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Date: 8/14/20 8:14 am
From: Susan Tiholiz <stiholiz...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] August 14, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
Blackberries available here anytime...

Susan Tiholiz
214-478-7395 (cell)


> On Aug 14, 2020, at 10:06 AM, Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> wrote:
>
> 5:59 a.m. 56 degrees, SSW 1 mph. Sky: visible above the ground fog, which
> rises out of the Ompompanoosuc River valley, and out of every stream, pond,
> lake, and wetlands in the watershed; clouds feathery and dispersed; one
> disassembles and recasts itself as tic-tac-toe board, stands thinly curved
> and plumed, silver-rimmed and radiant. Permanent streams: upper, a crippled
> flow, silent and shallow; lower, a rocky tribute to what was once a stream
> . . . and will be yet again. Soon, I hope. It's a thirsty world out there.
> Wetlands: rising mist softens colors; renders greens and browns two F-stops
> overexposed. Pond: a river of vapor flows out of the wetlands through a gap
> in the brush, crosses the road, and merges with malnourished pond fog;
> then, drifts southeast toward the sun; orb webs sag with dew. A hummingbird
> pollinates jewelweed. The dogs and I pause for blackberries, small, sweet
> and juicy, seeds of stone.
>
>
> From out of the ground fog, a yellow-billed cuckoo swallows his voice,
> hollow and repetitive. He could eat all day and all night and still not
> keep up the webworms, which hang their homes, laundry-like from ashes,
> cherries, apples, and my sacred black walnut—nineteen tenements at last
> count. Several times a day, I loiter around my bedroom window, hoping to
> glimpse a hungry cuckoo. Days shorten; time runs down.
>
>
> Three pewees remind me that they're still here. In praise of summer, a
> red-eyed vireo carols in the pines; in praise of autumn, red squirrels busy
> harvesting green pine cones. A titmouse, in praise of what I'm not sure,
> whistles loudly . . . not loud enough to provoke a band of four chickadees,
> which feed diffidently (and quietly) in the beeches. One blue jay honks;
> another apes a red-shouldered hawk.
>
> Three pewees remind me that they're still here. In praise of summer, a
> red-eyed vireo carols in the pines; in praise of autumn, red squirrels busy
> harvesting green pine cones. A titmouse, in praise of what I'm not sure,
> whistles loudly . . . not loud enough to provoke a band of four chickadees,
> which feed diffidently (and quietly) in the beeches. One blue jay honks;
> another apes a red-shouldered hawk.
>
>
> A hermit thrush flits across the road and joins a robin in the leaf litter,
> the quest for food, the possible loading and unloading of blacklegged
> ticks—the dance of millennia. Lyme disease did not magically appear in
> Lyme, Connecticut, backyards in the 1970s. Biologists working in the
> Dominican Republic found evidence of a spirochete bacterium similar to the
> one that causes Lyme disease, *Borrelia burgdorferi*, in the gut of a tick
> imprisoned in amber. The tick and its cargo were more than fifteen million
> years old. And, biologists from the Yale School of Public Health found
> evidence the *B. burgdorferi* has been coursing through North
> American forests for at least sixty thousand years, long before humans
> arrived on the continent. After sequencing the full genomes of one hundred
> forty-eight spirochetes, the biologists determined that *B.
> burgdorferi* originated in
> the Northeast and, aided by charitable birds, spread south to the Gulf
> Coast and west to California.
>
>
> Mild winters and wet summers favor blacklegged ticks, which move on average
> twenty-eight miles further north each year. Hungry larvae and nymphs catch
> rides north on ground-feeding birds (robins, hermit thrushes, and catbirds,
> for instance)—meals and transportation all-inclusive.
>
>
> I was dining in an outdoor restaurant the other evening. Sometime between
> the last French fry and paying the bill, I removed a blacklegged tick nymph
> from my thigh. Too small to crush and not wanting to toss it in the path of
> someone else, I had one option for disposal . . . submersion in a mound of
> ketchup. A rudimentary fossil, a gift for future paleontologists to
> explain.
 

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Date: 8/14/20 7:38 am
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Checking in on our loon family
I was lucky enough to get to spend two mornings on the pond with our little
loon family. Tuesday's visit had a very pleasant surprise! Take a look at
some pix at:

https://www.ianclark.com/blog/2020/8/checking-in-on-our-loon-family







%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51
West Newbury, VT 05085
(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.ianclark.com/>
 

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Date: 8/14/20 7:06 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 14, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:59 a.m. 56 degrees, SSW 1 mph. Sky: visible above the ground fog, which
rises out of the Ompompanoosuc River valley, and out of every stream, pond,
lake, and wetlands in the watershed; clouds feathery and dispersed; one
disassembles and recasts itself as tic-tac-toe board, stands thinly curved
and plumed, silver-rimmed and radiant. Permanent streams: upper, a crippled
flow, silent and shallow; lower, a rocky tribute to what was once a stream
. . . and will be yet again. Soon, I hope. It's a thirsty world out there.
Wetlands: rising mist softens colors; renders greens and browns two F-stops
overexposed. Pond: a river of vapor flows out of the wetlands through a gap
in the brush, crosses the road, and merges with malnourished pond fog;
then, drifts southeast toward the sun; orb webs sag with dew. A hummingbird
pollinates jewelweed. The dogs and I pause for blackberries, small, sweet
and juicy, seeds of stone.


From out of the ground fog, a yellow-billed cuckoo swallows his voice,
hollow and repetitive. He could eat all day and all night and still not
keep up the webworms, which hang their homes, laundry-like from ashes,
cherries, apples, and my sacred black walnut—nineteen tenements at last
count. Several times a day, I loiter around my bedroom window, hoping to
glimpse a hungry cuckoo. Days shorten; time runs down.


Three pewees remind me that they're still here. In praise of summer, a
red-eyed vireo carols in the pines; in praise of autumn, red squirrels busy
harvesting green pine cones. A titmouse, in praise of what I'm not sure,
whistles loudly . . . not loud enough to provoke a band of four chickadees,
which feed diffidently (and quietly) in the beeches. One blue jay honks;
another apes a red-shouldered hawk.

Three pewees remind me that they're still here. In praise of summer, a
red-eyed vireo carols in the pines; in praise of autumn, red squirrels busy
harvesting green pine cones. A titmouse, in praise of what I'm not sure,
whistles loudly . . . not loud enough to provoke a band of four chickadees,
which feed diffidently (and quietly) in the beeches. One blue jay honks;
another apes a red-shouldered hawk.


A hermit thrush flits across the road and joins a robin in the leaf litter,
the quest for food, the possible loading and unloading of blacklegged
ticks—the dance of millennia. Lyme disease did not magically appear in
Lyme, Connecticut, backyards in the 1970s. Biologists working in the
Dominican Republic found evidence of a spirochete bacterium similar to the
one that causes Lyme disease, *Borrelia burgdorferi*, in the gut of a tick
imprisoned in amber. The tick and its cargo were more than fifteen million
years old. And, biologists from the Yale School of Public Health found
evidence the *B. burgdorferi* has been coursing through North
American forests for at least sixty thousand years, long before humans
arrived on the continent. After sequencing the full genomes of one hundred
forty-eight spirochetes, the biologists determined that *B.
burgdorferi* originated in
the Northeast and, aided by charitable birds, spread south to the Gulf
Coast and west to California.


Mild winters and wet summers favor blacklegged ticks, which move on average
twenty-eight miles further north each year. Hungry larvae and nymphs catch
rides north on ground-feeding birds (robins, hermit thrushes, and catbirds,
for instance)—meals and transportation all-inclusive.


I was dining in an outdoor restaurant the other evening. Sometime between
the last French fry and paying the bill, I removed a blacklegged tick nymph
from my thigh. Too small to crush and not wanting to toss it in the path of
someone else, I had one option for disposal . . . submersion in a mound of
ketchup. A rudimentary fossil, a gift for future paleontologists to
explain.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/13/20 9:20 am
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummer in charge
Years ago when I lived in the inner burbs of Boston, there were no
hummingbirds. One had to travel to have any hope of seeing one. But late
one summer, an immature hummer suddenly showed up in the yard and chased
one of the resident chickadees around and around and up and down for some
time. No red feeder anywhere in the yard.

Jane
(Shoreham)

On Thu, 13 Aug 2020 09:23:22 -0400, Veer Frost
<0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> wrote:
> Just watched a male Rubythroat fly fierce rings around a male
> Goldfinch, chasing it from the feeder area. All summer the resident
> Rubythroats have been checking out the red sunflower seed feeder
> before moving to their own. I think this possible/probable migrant
> hummer might have been protecting the 'squirrel proof' feeder that
> only comes in its favorite color.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
 

Back to top
Date: 8/13/20 7:08 am
From: Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Wilson's Storm-Petrel post-Isaias
Hi All,

Marshall Iliff added a lot of commentary on his logic in deciding to bird Lake Memphremagog after the passage of tropical storm Isaias. It is definitely worth a read:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S72130432

Good birding!
Allan
 

Back to top
Date: 8/13/20 6:49 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 13, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:45 a.m. 56 (refreshing) degrees, wind ESE 1 mph. Sky: clouds thinly
streaked, a peach infusion. Permanent streams: upper, carries on in
silence; lower, a husk of itself; empty on the surface, puddle dwindles to
a moist suggestion. Wetlands: a bowl of thin mist hovers over the reeds;
jagged treetops comb the morning sky; the breath of wildness, a landscape
made more beautiful by moisture. A pileated agrees; tattoos a tree trunk.
Pond: calm surface; gaunt, rolling fog; an unattended parade of methane
bubbles, bantam half-domes set adrift, short-lived like random thoughts.
Blackberries ripen and the very last of the red-flowering raspberries.
Milkweed pods swell; leaves unchewed. Monarchs scarce, at least, in this
valley. Fall webworm tents abundant; grow more prominent by the day; a
spectacle of caterpillars, each almost an inch long.

DOR: juvenile white-footed mouse, big ears peppered with nymphal ticks. In
the 1980s, I removed one or two American dog ticks (*Dermacentor variabilis*)
from my collie each summer. Today, both German shepherds tested positive
for Lyme disease, although both are asymptomatic. Before I gave them
chewable repellents, I tweezed dozens of ticks off them March to November.
I regularly vacuumed engorged, Lima bean-shaped ticks off the floor, tiny
legs sculling the air like puppets on a string, one of evolution's most
significant appendage-torso mismatches.

Recently, I asked Northern Vermont University biologist Allan Giese, a
blacklegged tick specialist, what accounts for the dramatic increase in
both tick species and populations in the Northeast, he answered
unflinchingly. *Climate change*. According to Giese, there's been—and
continues to be—a worldwide increase in ticks, which spread northward and
into higher elevations.

Gil Raynor, one of Long Island's premier birders died of Rocky Mountain
spotted fever, in the 1970s, a disease delivered by an American dog tick
and misdiagnosed by the hospital staff. Beside spotted fever and Lyme
disease, ticks also transmit *babesiosis*, which has malaria-like symptoms.
*Powassan*, a viral infection that triggers encephalitis and averages seven
reported cases a year, including a death a few years ago in Saratoga.
*Anaplasmosis,* like Lyme disease, is also carried by black-legged
ticks (*Ixodes
scapularis*). It's the second most common tick-borne disease in Vermont,
with symptoms including headache, malaise, nausea, and confusion, very
similar symptoms to excessive livingroom quarantining.

Ticks move like zombies; one speed, one direction, a stiff, endless,
methodical forward plod . . . best described as *creepy*. Small spiders,
which are often mistaken for ticks, are all animation, scurrying, and
stopping, eight-legged windup toys that feast on ticks as well as sundry
other small things.

A small vial of alcohol sits on my desk, an eternal bath for three pickled
blacklegged tick nymphs, each no bigger than the period at the end of this
sentence, small enough to fit in a mouse's ear . . . three tiny alarming
arachnids, a gift from Alan Giese. The Northeast has the highest rates of
Lyme disease per capita in the country. But, if we truly understood tick
biology, we could reserve the worst of our primal fears for the dark night.
Mother ticks do *not* pass the spirochete bacteria that causes Lyme disease
to their eggs. Larva hatch clean and only later pick up Lyme disease from
feeding on the infected blood of white-footed mice and chipmunks, the most
competent reservoir hosts (as well as on ground-feeding birds). Only nymphs
and adults pass the disease to us.

Spraying pesticides around your yard might have the unintended consequence
of killing spiders, a principal predator of the blacklegged tick. Then,
ground-feeding birds like robins and thrushes carry ticks onto your
property long before the spiders recover. Desiccation kills blacklegged
ticks, which is why they avoid pine woods and on sweltering August days
retreat under moist woodland leaf litter. Drought decimates blacklegged
ticks; they avoid mowed lawns, even uncut meadows, the domain of the
thicker-carapaced American dog tick.

Giese has never suffered Lyme disease. He's never even been bitten. Here's
his formula for safely traipsing around outdoors: carry a change of
clothes, cook your field clothes in the car-carrier or at home in the drier
for ten minutes; take a shower. A rough washcloth removes embedded nymphs,
which swirl down the drain like so many flecks of dirt.

Hummingbirds chase each other around the feeder, in and out of the cherry
tree. Red-breasted nuthatch announces its presence (and doesn't stop);
house wren in the pines, a rickety-rackety song. Pewee shortens its song, a
half a plaintive whistle; one red-eyed vireo still has something to sing
about. Goldfinches, flashing yellow, dominate the soundscape. Red squirrels
busy themselves in the pines, both white and red; harvest cones ahead of
the crossbills.

Robins, silent but active, transport blacklegged ticks . . . preen robin,
preen.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/13/20 6:23 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummer in charge
Just watched a male Rubythroat fly fierce rings around a male
Goldfinch, chasing it from the feeder area. All summer the resident
Rubythroats have been checking out the red sunflower seed feeder
before moving to their own. I think this possible/probable migrant
hummer might have been protecting the 'squirrel proof' feeder that
only comes in its favorite color.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
 

Back to top
Date: 8/13/20 4:38 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] water level at Dead Creek?
Has anyone paddled Dead Creek WMA recently - either from Route 17 to the Stone Dam, or from the Brilyea Access south?
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 8/12/20 6:50 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 12, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:56 a.m. 66 degrees, wind NNE 3 mph. Sky: bright moon in the east
hollowing out, horns showing; wispy clouds, some with a hint of peach;
ground fog defines streams, river, and marshes; a graceful sunrise, could
have been included in *In Wilderness is the Preservation of the World *
(1962)*,* Eliott Porter's romance with New England woods. Permanent
streams: upper, pinched and silent, but still on the move; lower, a puddle
with a vague pulse, more ghost than current; retreats below ground well
before the road. Wetlands: fog thick in the middle, thin on the edges; a
top-knot of moisture. Pond: more haze than mist; a suggestion of current,
shallowest of furrows; blame the breeze.

DOR: brightly colored carnage. A scarab beetle, orange and black. A red
eft; struck down on its way to a new life in the marsh. Everywhere, on
rainy nights, amphibians move. In the 1980s, on the first warm, rainy
nights of April, a series of vernal pools on either side of a well-travel
Norwich road invited disaster. Every year, I'd join a group of friends to
escort spotted and Jefferson salamanders to their spawning pools.
Charismatic megafauna of the temporary pools, gorgeous, vulnerable, and
slow. We'd save dozens . . . maybe more. Dozens more were killed. Rainy
night amphibian rescue: crossing-guards or underpasses; otherwise, learn
the Mourners Kaddish *Yitgadal v'yitadash sh' mei raba . . .* Which a
student once recited, on a rainy south Florida night, when I backed over a
pig frog.

AOR: robin, calling and pecking, hops up a neighbor's driveway. A pair of
crows. What holds their interest? Not a roadkill. Sunday evening, Thetford
Center, an adult turkey vulture on State Road 113, fed on a
fresh roadkilled skunk. Zipped up my windows against the odor, which,
unfortunately, accompanied me home.

A steady drone of crickets. In the woods, here and there, a drizzle of
caterpillar poop, tiny pellets bounce off cushioning leaves, what
biologists call *frass*, spills out of patches of maples and ashes; a
digestive storm; woodland fertilizer. Sounds like rain. Looks like rain . .
. not.

An agitation of red squirrels rushes around the white pines, harvesting
green cones. Both nuthatches call. One pewee. One red-eyed vireo (I
linger). Jays vocally robust: honking, hollering, screeching.

In the absence of waxwings, I break for blackberries, tangled and taloned
canes hung with fruit, refreshingly juicy, raven black. One for me. One for
each dog. One for me. Succumb to berries, eat until stultified . . . and
then eat some more. Just when virtually everything else hits the pause
button, blackberries catch my attention . . . and work their mysterious
spell.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/12/20 6:26 am
From: anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] when are RTHU no longer "juvenile"?
Maeve - your "different-looking" hummer is a classic case of an adult male Ruby-throat in heavy body and head molt.  They started this molt 1-2 weeks ago.  Some progress through this molt rather cleanly, while others like this guy do it so intently that it looks messy.  He'll get over it.
Juv males this time of year look like their sisters and mothers with one exception.  Their white throats are finely streaked with green, referred to sometimes as bearded, and may have 1-5 scattered red feathers.  Otherwise, they have three, white-tipped, outer tail feathers like the females as opposed to the deeply forked black tail of the ad male.
 
Bob YunickSchenectady, NY


-----Original Message-----
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
To: <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Tue, Aug 11, 2020 2:04 pm
Subject: [VTBIRD] when are RTHU no longer "juvenile"?

We had an explosion of hummingbird activity this morning, with four and possibly five around for almost an hour. Two had red throats. Checklist with photos https://ebird.org/checklist/S72318300 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S72318300> To our eyes, the two males looked similarly brilliant and ruby-throated. I’ve seen juvenile males with just a few red feathers but neither of us have ever seen one looking like this. We could have a migratory male coming through from further north - or are some juveniles truly ruby-throated by this time of year? (And when should we stop calling them “juvenile” and start saying “immature”?)
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 1:02 pm
From: Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Carolina wren singing persistently
Here in Mt Tabor too, at least one carolina singing like crazy.  Pam

On Tuesday, August 11, 2020, 10:44:29 AM EDT, Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> wrote:

It started up yesterday evening, then lasted nearly an hour this
morning. Makes a nice change from the robot House wren but also
noticed a touch of migration anxiety.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
   

 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 11:05 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] when are RTHU no longer "juvenile"?
We had an explosion of hummingbird activity this morning, with four and possibly five around for almost an hour. Two had red throats. Checklist with photos https://ebird.org/checklist/S72318300 <https://ebird.org/checklist/S72318300> To our eyes, the two males looked similarly brilliant and ruby-throated. I’ve seen juvenile males with just a few red feathers but neither of us have ever seen one looking like this. We could have a migratory male coming through from further north - or are some juveniles truly ruby-throated by this time of year? (And when should we stop calling them “juvenile” and start saying “immature”?)
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 11:04 am
From: Kate Olgiati <2grackle...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with American lady Butterfly
Thank you Diana! This is great!

Kate

On Thu, Aug 6, 2020 at 11:19 AM Diana <dlee3...> wrote:

> This is technically not about birds, but butterflies are beautiful flying
> creatures like birds.
> Ignore if you are not interested, but many of us like birds AND
> butterflies.
>
> https://youtu.be/v3u6v8pDHag
>


--
Katherine Olgiati
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 9:56 am
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Nocturnal Flight Calls Listserv for Vermont
As many of you have already noticed, the birds are starting to move again.
Shorebirds are showing up on Lake Champlain. Weird migrants are getting
blown in by tropical storms. The woods are getting quieter. Chimney Swifts
and Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are disappearing. All of this means it's
time, again, for nocturnal flight call monitoring. NFC monitoring is the
fun and relatively obscure sport of setting up a microphone pointing at the
sky, recording passing migrants overnight, and then analyzing hours of
recordings the next day, using software to speed up the process.

In order to facilitate discussions in Vermont about NFCs, Larry Clarfeld
and I have set up a listserv at UVM just for talking about NFCs. If you're
interested in this topic, come join us!

Subscribe here: https://list.uvm.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=NFC (or, drop me or
Larry an email)

So far, it's relatively low-traffic, but we expect it to pick up when we
start posting checklists. We'd love to have more posters or interested
birders on it. You can always elect to have the list served as a digest, so
you can read it at your leisure once a week or month.

Our goal, this season, is to be much more stringent in our documentation of
individual birds, so that we can build a clear guide of what species we
know we can identify by NFC, and what species we can't.

Beyond that, as always, our goal is to simply have fun sitting and
listening like a ham radio operator, sharing birds that we'd almost never
see by daylight. I've logged Yellow-bellied Flycatchers, Cape May Warblers,
and Gray-cheeked/Bicknell Thrushes in downtown Montpelier, for instance.
Larry's already logged the first migrant of the season - a Canada Warbler,
in suburban Essex <https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S72233061>. What could be
more exciting than that?

Bird on,
Richard

--
Richard | birdinginvermont.com
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 8:20 am
From: Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warbler wave
This morning 6:30a.m. on Wildcat Rd.
a nice mixed flock of warblers were madly feeding. Yellow-billed cuckoo sang on end. Vireos both red-eyed and blue-headed were present. Merlin perched on a dead snag.
Loons were heard wailing from Chittenden Reservoir and the big surprise was two moose in Lefferts
Pond munching on aquatic plants.
Sue Wetmore
Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 8:10 am
From: Charlie Teske <cteske140...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge
It may be fine for the bobolinks if you hay now but there are many pollinators out there that would love it if you waited till after the first frost. Just sayin'.



On Mon, 10 Aug 2020 20:59:49 +0000, Kevin Tolan <Kevin.Tolan...> wrote:

Hi Walter,

y pollinators 
Mowing timing is dictated by the species of grass, weather (rains, droughts, etc), farmer availability, and desired nutrient content of the hay. In general, the "safe date" we recommend for being able to mow with limited impact on survival is August 1st. Check out this nesting calendar to get a better sense of their breeding timeline.


As you mentioned, the nesting season is over and hatch-year birds have gained the ability to fly extended distances, so mowing the field now will have much less of an impact than if it was done a month earlier. After nesting, now that the birds are less territorial, they can fly to a nearby field (or meadow that may not necessarily be suitable for breeding) to flock and stage for migration, as they're already begun to form mixed-family flocks and aren't holding territory.


Please feel free to shoot me an email if you have more questions regarding grassland birds!


Kevin Tolan
He/Him/His
Grassland Bird Outreach Coordinator

Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420, Norwich, VT 05055 (mailing)
20 Palmer Ct, White River Junction, VT 05001 (physical)

802-649-1431 x205
<grasslands...>



________________________________
From: Vermont Birds on behalf of Walter Medwid
Sent: Saturday, August 8, 2020 5:40 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge

The Dunn refuge (Derby)has been managed for bobolinks by VT DFW. Most of
the fields were mowed today while bobolinks were still present in large
numbers. The nesting season is over but it seems surprising that the
grasslands would be mowed while birds are still present. If anyone has
knowledge about the timing of mowing, I would welcome it. Thanks.
 
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 6:55 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Carolina wren singing persistently
It started up yesterday evening, then lasted nearly an hour this
morning. Makes a nice change from the robot House wren but also
noticed a touch of migration anxiety.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK

 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 6:16 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 11, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:45 a.m. 64 degrees, wind NW 0 mph. Sky: clear above a ground fog, thick
and mobile that rolls up the valley, often to the treetops; leaf
condensation sounds like rain, drips like rain, feels like rain; in the
east, the moon, a bit less than half, peeks through the mist. Permanent
streams: inspired by last night's thunderstorm; upper, purls in the narrow,
water-deep segment, mumbles in the broader, shallower; lower, puddle chain
extends closer to the wetlands before petering out. Intermittent streams:
moist; rock-ribs slick. Wetlands: fog a meringue; far shore a memory. Pond:
still and misty; no sign of activity on the surface; just beyond the south
shore, a red squirrel moves along an avenue of pine limbs, tree to tree,
chattering. Orb webs sag, strands strung with dew; concentric necklaces,
each bead an inverted reflection of the valley.

DOR: small green frog (*Lithobates clamitans*), a brief terrestrial life.
AOR: hermit thrush, hushed and hurried, hops along the margin of the road.

Three hummingbirds (no males), in the dimness of dawn, chaos around the
feeder. Pewee, veiled by fog, whistles from several outposts as I walk down
the driveway. One faithfully persistent red-eyed vireo . . . but *just* one.
A yellow-billed cuckoo, a sober demeanor, a sulking behavior, gives voice
to the density of the fog, a series of wooden knocks. At home, Casey's
walnut, a veritable apartment complex of webworm tents, at least thirteen
on one side, some sprawling, waits for a cuckoo . . . needs a cuckoo,
desperately, before caterpillars desolate the foliage. Whenever I walk past
my bedroom window, I pause, hoping to glimpse a cuckoo, hunched over,
tweezing caterpillars from webs.

No matter how apparently bland the sunrise, or forlorn the song of the
pewee, sunrise *still* nourishes. Ushers me into a new day, as though
dawn's soft hand leads the way.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 5:30 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] corvids taking squash leaves???
About ten days ago, three leaves disappeared off a large Hubbard squash
we were growing on an experimental "hugelkultur" mound. It didn't look
at all like insect damage; the leaves were completely gone, as if cut
off with scissors. The mound is over four feet high and steep-sided, so
a rabbit didn't seem to be a likely suspect; also, we've never had
rabbits or deer or woodchucks bother with tough and prickly squash
leaves. A few days ago, all the rest of the leaves disappeared, also as
if snipped off. There's a smudge a few inches from the stems that looks
like a large bird footprint. Would a crow or a raven take large leaves?
This has totally mystified us!
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 5:25 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] hummers still around, plus
The male Ruby-throated Hummingbird is still around, along with an adult
female and one juvenile. (Earlier in the season, we thought there were
two juveniles but we haven't seen more than one for several weeks now.)
All three come to nectar feeders, but they're also feeding on jewelweed
blossoms and on something in the veggie garden (I think pole bean
flowers - or perhaps tiny insects). Along with the hummingbirds, early
this morning was full of bird activity, more than in recent days. At
least nine crows were mobbing something unseen, along with chickadees,
blue jays and a robin. The male Common Yellowthroat was actively
feasting in an old apple tree, and a catbird was checking out the
blackberries. There were also goldfinches, a House Wren, and a Red-eyed
Vireo.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 4:27 am
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] FW: Vt. Fish & WIldlife Reports
The link was malformed in the email (the final "rts" was missing). Here it
is, again:
https://vtfishandwildlife.com/watch-wildlife/bird-watching/vermont-bird-reports

Best,
R

On Tue, Aug 11, 2020 at 7:00 AM Brennan Michaels <owlhousevt...>
wrote:

> Hi Tom,
> I went to your link and it says it has been removed. Can you tell me what
> it was about and the essence of it.
> thanks, brennan michaels
>
> On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 2:00 PM Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
> wrote:
>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Subject: Vt. Fish & WIldlife Reports
> >
> >
> >
> > This link may work better for VT. Fish & Wildlife Bird Reportds:
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> https://vtfishandwildlife.com/watch-wildlife/bird-watching/vermont-bird-repo
> > rts
> >
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/20 4:00 am
From: Brennan Michaels <owlhousevt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] FW: Vt. Fish & WIldlife Reports
Hi Tom,
I went to your link and it says it has been removed. Can you tell me what
it was about and the essence of it.
thanks, brennan michaels

On Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 2:00 PM Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:

>
>
>
>
> Subject: Vt. Fish & WIldlife Reports
>
>
>
> This link may work better for VT. Fish & Wildlife Bird Reportds:
>
>
>
>
> https://vtfishandwildlife.com/watch-wildlife/bird-watching/vermont-bird-repo
> rts
>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/10/20 7:37 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Aug 9, 2020
Indeed, there are birds starting to move through/around.... on Sun I had a
fly though by an m and f oriole, as well as visits by phoebe, house wren
who have been absent in yd for a couple of weeks... and a Chestnut-sided
warbler who couldn't quite decide to forage for insects or try a sunflower
seed.


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: <ebird-checklist...>
Date: Mon, Aug 10, 2020 at 10:32 PM
Subject: eBird Report - My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Aug
9, 2020
To: <2cnewbirds...>


My yard birds - 324 Morse Hill Rd. E. Dorset, Bennington, Vermont, US
Aug 9, 2020 10:30 AM - 11:10 AM
Protocol: Stationary
Checklist Comments: 77 deg. Mostly cloudy
17 species

Mourning Dove 6
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 2
Red-bellied Woodpecker 0 1st day none seen or heard
Downy Woodpecker 1
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Eastern Phoebe 1 brief sit on clothes line.. faint beige wingbars
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 1
Black-capped Chickadee 2
Tufted Titmouse 1
House Wren 1 in yd after several days absence
House Finch 2
American Goldfinch 6
Song Sparrow 1
Baltimore Oriole 2 Brief stop at feeder -he- and suet - she
Red-winged Blackbird 3
Chestnut-sided Warbler 1 fall plumage
Northern Cardinal 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S72302913

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

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Date: 8/10/20 2:49 pm
From: Gmail okra <ihateokra88...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge
This is great information. We are managing our meadows for bobolinks as well. It is being mown by a very understanding farmer but he was anxious to get in and mow this past week. The bobolinks got quiet a couple weeks ago and they have flocked up - 20-30 birds. We too were fearful and I watched the flock go up on the mow day, August 5, as the tractor moved through. I’m reassured to hear that we didn’t jump the gun.

Michael R. Haas, VMD, MS
(610) 533-9443
1286 Hazen Notch Rd.
Lowell, VT 05847
<ihateokra88...>

“Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.”
- Victor Frankl



> On Aug 8, 2020, at 5:40 PM, Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> wrote:
>
> The Dunn refuge (Derby)has been managed for bobolinks by VT DFW. Most of
> the fields were mowed today while bobolinks were still present in large
> numbers. The nesting season is over but it seems surprising that the
> grasslands would be mowed while birds are still present. If anyone has
> knowledge about the timing of mowing, I would welcome it. Thanks.
 

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Date: 8/10/20 1:59 pm
From: Kevin Tolan <Kevin.Tolan...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge
Hi Walter,


Mowing timing is dictated by the species of grass, weather (rains, droughts, etc), farmer availability, and desired nutrient content of the hay. In general, the "safe date" we recommend for being able to mow with limited impact on survival is August 1st. Check out this nesting calendar<https://vtecostudies.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/2020-BOBO-Nesting-Calendar.pdf> to get a better sense of their breeding timeline.


As you mentioned, the nesting season is over and hatch-year birds have gained the ability to fly extended distances, so mowing the field now will have much less of an impact than if it was done a month earlier. After nesting, now that the birds are less territorial, they can fly to a nearby field (or meadow that may not necessarily be suitable for breeding) to flock and stage for migration, as they're already begun to form mixed-family flocks and aren't holding territory.


Please feel free to shoot me an email if you have more questions regarding grassland birds!


Kevin Tolan
He/Him/His
Grassland Bird Outreach Coordinator

Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420, Norwich, VT 05055 (mailing)
20 Palmer Ct, White River Junction, VT 05001 (physical)

802-649-1431 x205
<grasslands...>



________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Sent: Saturday, August 8, 2020 5:40 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge

The Dunn refuge (Derby)has been managed for bobolinks by VT DFW. Most of
the fields were mowed today while bobolinks were still present in large
numbers. The nesting season is over but it seems surprising that the
grasslands would be mowed while birds are still present. If anyone has
knowledge about the timing of mowing, I would welcome it. Thanks.
 

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Date: 8/10/20 11:22 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Swamp Sparrow
On 2020-08-10 13:47, Tom Berriman wrote:
> At the swamp on South America Pond Road this morning I heard the preent
> of
> what I thought was an American Woodcock. A second later I said no way,
> it's
> a Common Nighthawk. After 5 or 7 minutes of looking for it somehow it
> was
> behind me now. Only the preent wasn't from either of those two birds it
> was
> coming from a Swamp Sparrow. It made me stop and question how many
> eBird
> reports with 'heard' birds are off the mark. I hear Blue jays at
> Wenlock
> that imitate the clicking calls of Black backed Woodpeckers all year
> long. I
> hear fledgling Black-capped Chickadees that sound like Boreal
> Chickadees.
> And Blue headed Vireos can sound like three of four different species.
> And
> the variety of Song Sparrow songs can be made into any rare sparrow you
> need
> for your yearly list. I downloaded an audio of the Swamp Sparrow on my
> report.
>
> <https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S72280480>
> https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S72280480
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
I once belly-crawled through wild raspberry bushes to get closer to a
very unusual-sounding bird at the Hinesburg Town Forest. At various
times in the twenty minutes or so I'd listened, I'd thought of various
sparrows, a catbird, a Hermit Thrush, and some warbler. It turned out to
be a Tufted Titmouse.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

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Date: 8/10/20 11:05 am
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Swamp Sparrow
Do you remember that Song Sparrow we heard years ago up in Essex County
that absolutely sounded like a Rufous-sided Towhee? (Or is it an Eastern
Towhee?)

But, as you know, I have long been critical of over-reliance on "heard
only" ID's.

Fred Pratt

On 8/10/2020 1:47 PM, Tom Berriman wrote:
> At the swamp on South America Pond Road this morning I heard the preent of
> what I thought was an American Woodcock. A second later I said no way, it's
> a Common Nighthawk. After 5 or 7 minutes of looking for it somehow it was
> behind me now. Only the preent wasn't from either of those two birds it was
> coming from a Swamp Sparrow. It made me stop and question how many eBird
> reports with 'heard' birds are off the mark. I hear Blue jays at Wenlock
> that imitate the clicking calls of Black backed Woodpeckers all year long. I
> hear fledgling Black-capped Chickadees that sound like Boreal Chickadees.
> And Blue headed Vireos can sound like three of four different species. And
> the variety of Song Sparrow songs can be made into any rare sparrow you need
> for your yearly list. I downloaded an audio of the Swamp Sparrow on my
> report.
>
> <https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S72280480>
> https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S72280480
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
 

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Date: 8/10/20 11:00 am
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] FW: Vt. Fish & WIldlife Reports




Subject: Vt. Fish & WIldlife Reports



This link may work better for VT. Fish & Wildlife Bird Reportds:



https://vtfishandwildlife.com/watch-wildlife/bird-watching/vermont-bird-repo
rts
 

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Date: 8/10/20 10:47 am
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Swamp Sparrow
At the swamp on South America Pond Road this morning I heard the preent of
what I thought was an American Woodcock. A second later I said no way, it's
a Common Nighthawk. After 5 or 7 minutes of looking for it somehow it was
behind me now. Only the preent wasn't from either of those two birds it was
coming from a Swamp Sparrow. It made me stop and question how many eBird
reports with 'heard' birds are off the mark. I hear Blue jays at Wenlock
that imitate the clicking calls of Black backed Woodpeckers all year long. I
hear fledgling Black-capped Chickadees that sound like Boreal Chickadees.
And Blue headed Vireos can sound like three of four different species. And
the variety of Song Sparrow songs can be made into any rare sparrow you need
for your yearly list. I downloaded an audio of the Swamp Sparrow on my
report.

<https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S72280480>
https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S72280480



Tom Berriman
 

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Date: 8/10/20 9:15 am
From: Morin, Doug <Doug.Morin...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] VTFW Bird Reports
Hi folks,

The Department of Fish and Wildlife has developed a series of online posts we're calling the Bird Report. These Reports are an opportunity to highlight seasonal patterns, interesting behaviors, and things to look for throughout the state. They also give a glimpse into the work the Department does with all manner of birds. Our August 7 report includes weather fronts, common nighthawks, shrubland bird habitat, and more.

Reports are posted every two weeks, and can be found here: https://vtfishandwildlife.com/watch-wildlife/bird-watching/vermont-bird-reports. There's even an option to subscribe and receive them right in your email!

Doug Morin
Bird Project Leader
VT Department of Fish & Wildlife
<doug.morin...>

 

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Date: 8/10/20 7:19 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 10, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford center
5:35 a.m. 65 degrees, wind N 1 mph. Sky: clear; bright half-moon,
mid-valley, lords it over the ground fog, which advances from the wetlands,
a thick, narrow band that extends the dim-light of dawn throughout the
pastures and adjacent woods. Permanent streams: upper, hushed, and inches
forward; lower, gurgles downhill to the road, dies on the other side; a
shrinking puddle, sans water striders, a visible end of the waterline.
Wetlands: fog dissipates; a thin, hazy layer, mid-marsh that rolls uphill.
Pond: surface, a sparse cauldron of methane bubbles; slowly rises, pops,
and fades; bequeaths a run of subtle ripples that quickly flatten-out.
Goldenrod blooms. And Joe-Pye-weed blooms. Blackberry ripens.

Woodcock flushes out of a damp gully, a maelstrom of flapping. A sapsucker
whines, a pewee slurred whistle, sad song. A crow caws loudly, an agitated
broadcast that renders all other birdsong mute by comparison. A nagging
catbird reminds me of a dissatisfied toddler. A solitary red-eyed vireo,
full-throated and persistent, prolongs the ebb of Neotropical song.
Yellow-billed cuckoo, swallow-voiced and hungry, on hand for the horde of
fall webworms, which swell on the leaves of lilac, cherry, apple, and black
walnut. For the webworms: many leaves; limited protein; continually eating,
continually growing. For the cuckoo: webworm bonanza.

Provident red squirrels remind me of my own winter chores. Mouth like
shears, snip green pine cones, which splash through layers of maple leaves:
cut and drop. A squirrel, cone in mouth, heads down a pine trunk. Lots of
chatter. Lots to harvest. Lots of storage . . . for me, one *big* seasonal
alert. My own August program: order wood, plant more lettuce, prune maples
around the barn. Overcome inertia.

Lisp of cedar waxwings. A bird I haven't seen in the valley all summer
flies into a patch of blackberries. Eats ebony berries; leaves coral
berries to ripen. I follow the waxwing's example—blackberries: the juicy,
sweet taste of midsummer. In late June of 1978 (seems like yesterday),
Linny and I rode bicycles around the Adirondacks. Up and down. Birded by
ear. Songs seeping through helmets, revealing approximate elevations by the
voices of various thrushes and warblers. Peddling, early one morning, we
kept flushing cedar waxwings up from the uncut road shoulder. Curious about
the birds' activity, we stopped—parted grasses, heavy with dew. The ground
was speckled red, dense with wild strawberries, each no bigger than a
pinkie nail. We ate until our fingers and lips were stained. Then, took a
cup of berries back to camp and made delicious pancakes. All the while,
indebted to waxwings . . .

A debt I'm reminded of this morning, as time, unspooling like a snake,
twists in directions I cannot fathom.
 

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Date: 8/9/20 11:55 am
From: Kyle Jones <lkjones13...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Swallow-tailed Kite West Lebanon, NH
Several birders had a swallow-tailed kite just across the river from Vermont in West Lebanon, NH this morning (Aug 9). It was last reported heading east, but may be worth keeping an eye out for along the CT River. Check eBird and the Upper Valley listserv for details and pics.

Kyle Jones
 

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Date: 8/9/20 8:20 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 9, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
6:00 a.m. 62 degrees, wind NW 1 mph. Sky: ground fog blankets the valley;
visibility less than a hundred yards; a magical transformation; the kind of
fog that must have hidden George Washington's nine thousand troops, on the
morning of August 27, 1776, when they rowed across the East River, from
Brooklyn to Lower Manhattan, to avoid surrendering to British General Howe,
which would have promptly ended the Revolution. *Incredibly, yet again, *wrote
the historian David McCollough, *circumstances—fate, luck, Providence, the
hand of God, as would be said so often—intervened*. Coyote Hollow fog, not
as transformative, less historically significant, just as inventive,
however, just as profound, and, likely, just as gorgeous . . . a terrain
ground down by soft, ephemeral moisture. Contours hid; colors faded; tree
crowns cleaved. Hawk can't see. Merganser swims with impunity.

Permanent streams: refreshed by yesterday's thunderstorm, which dropped
more rain in half-an-hour than Tropical Storm Isaias in an entire
afternoon. Upper: swollen and boisterous; Lower: flows all the way home;
water striders back; skate on water tension, dimpling the surface;
graceful, quick, lethal. Intermittent streams: resurrected. Wetlands:
chowder fog. Pond: a mist-in; one painted turtle breaks the surface,
yellow-striped neck a fog-penetrating beacon (needs a log to haul out on);
snapping turtle patrols the far end, body submerged, head periscoped; a
hungry island of antiquity.

DOR: many mosquitos, carcasses complements of me; recently hatch; recently
slapped, pinched, ground.
AOR: hen turkey and a poult.

Hairy woodpecker muted taps, feeding quietly. Three red-breasted nuthatches
*yank*. A titmouse and a pewee whistle. A pocket of chickadees. One
red-eyed vireo, a fog-bound virtuoso. A soaked jay, feathers more gray than
blue. Goldfinches flit above every uncut meadow or pasture; robins silent,
go about their business unseen.

Two yellow-billed cuckoos call, a door-knocking *ku, ku, ku, ku, ku, *seeping
like mist out of crowns of ash and cherry. If I walked at the pace cuckoos
move through the canopy, I wouldn't arrive home until lunchtime. I wait . .
. and wait. Finally, a glimpse. No more. A long, thin bird, as yellow-brown
as bleached leaves, belly immaculately white, sits hunched over.
Nicknamed *rain
crow *because of a supposed tendency call before a storm, cuckoos, both
black-billed and yellow-billed, are disinclined to weather-predicting in
Coyote Hollow, and probably everywhere else.

Yellow-billed cuckoo: seventeen days from egg-laying to fledging; doesn't
get any faster. A chick's feathers erupt from sheaths in less than two
hours; also, it doesn't get any quicker. Loves to eat giant, slow-moving
insects: smooth, spiny, and hairy caterpillars, katydids, grasshoppers,
cicadas, crickets; occasionally, treefrogs and nestlings. A cuckoo eats so
many bristly caterpillars its stomach fills with noxious, indigestible
spines; then, like a cat spitting up a hairball, it spits up the entire
lining of its abdomen, a process frequently repeated during the year.

A glimpse of the cuckoo is all I get, a furtive bird veiled by leaves—sulks
in Coyote Hollow and winters east of the Andes. To get there, cuckoo must
expose itself. Exhausted birds feed aplomado falcons over the plains of
Mexico; a tiger shark caught offshore from Sarasota, Florida, had cuckoo
feet and feathers in its stomach. I struggle to see more than a hunched
bird doubled over in discontent, white belly obscured. Leashes in hand, I
listen to the cuckoo's swallowed, hollowed voice *ku, ku, ku, ku, ku—a*
communique from a secretive, itinerant bird. I may not see a yellow-billed
again for years.

Bat behind the barn door, again.

2020: summer of the comet; summer of the cuckoo. Memorandums from beyond a
pandemic.
 

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Date: 8/8/20 2:40 pm
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks and Dunn Refuge
The Dunn refuge (Derby)has been managed for bobolinks by VT DFW. Most of
the fields were mowed today while bobolinks were still present in large
numbers. The nesting season is over but it seems surprising that the
grasslands would be mowed while birds are still present. If anyone has
knowledge about the timing of mowing, I would welcome it. Thanks.
 

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Date: 8/8/20 7:51 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 8, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
6:09 a.m. 60 degrees, wind W 1 mph. Sky: cloud bound and bruised;
bellyaching, expectant; a composite of shapes, some weighty. Permanent
streams: upper eases toward the finish line; last night's storm birthed a
puddle in the bed of the lower, slowly leaching away like a dream. Woods:
brooding and sober; a Hansel and Gretel grimness. Wetlands: colors dense;
air still; the wall of evergreens across the marsh appears solid, an
impenetrable fortress of spruce, fir, hemlock, and pine. Pond: surface
rippleless and fogless; directly overhead, a cloud the size of Montana
speaks in tongues. I listen. Then, hurriedly leave.

Yesterday, a bear visited my neighbor, who lives high on the eastern rim of
the Hollow, not far from the sadness of the goshawks. Having had bears in
the barn and in the garage, disassembling bird feeders, tipping buckets of
sweet feed and cans of black-oil sunflower seeds, I overcame inertia; moved
the birder feeders indoors for the night. I rely on my dogs to tell me when
a bear's around. They burn to be loosed, their bark primordial and
chilling; alertness overtakes their faces (not kibble alertness; something
more barbarous). Canine determination and bruin expediency were both born
in the halls of Ice Age when both bears and wolves came in larger sizes.

Dogs will drive a bear across the valley, their voices trailing behind
them. They know no boundaries. Often, the bear trees and stays there until
the dogs get bored (or hungry). When a bear climbs a tree, the dogs stop
and bay, an urgency to their bark that echos an ancient unscripted script.
I listened to a retreating bear, once, by tracing the domino effect of my
neighbor's dogs, which transferred barking one to the other, all the way
down the valley.

This morning, I return the feeders to their pole. Within moments,
goldfinches and doves, which waited stoically in the maples, appear,
filling the yard with enthusiasm. The forlorn cooing of the dove, which
sounds like an owl with a broken heart, belies true feelings, alive and
well, happy to be fed. Here and there, a honking jay. Clusters of
chickadees. House wren, a volley of sound. Out of the darkling forest,
pewee whistles summer away. One lingering red-eyed vireo sings to himself.
Daylight dwindles. How much longer before the river of broadwings peel from
the base of a thermal and glide to Bolivia? Or the peregrine, also en route
to Bolivia, rips through a thermal at 100 mph? The thrill of the seasons .
. . anticipation makes the Dog Days bearable.

A red eft, moving like an alligator or camel, an unstable gait, legs on one
side, then the other, left, right, left, below fern and fleabane. Heads to
the marsh to become a newt, a lasting transformation. The clock turns.
 

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Date: 8/7/20 2:27 pm
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Another breakfast with the loon family
Well, they had breakfast and weren't really in the mood to share. But that's
OK, I was happy just to watch. Our two chicks look like they're doing well.
They've grown, their feathers are coming in, they're diving - real,
controlled dives, and foraging on their own. That doesn't save the parents
from having to forage for them as well.

There are some pix up at:



https://www.ianclark.com/blog/2020/8/breakfast-with-the-loon-chicks



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

Ian Clark
PO Box 51
West Newbury, VT 05085
(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.ianclark.com/>
 

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Date: 8/7/20 2:10 pm
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cedar waxwings
The waxwings have been extra abundant this summer in Derby by Memphremagog.
I find myself in the unusual position of saying, upon identifying an
unknown bird in the brush, oh it’s just a waxwing.
 

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Date: 8/7/20 12:45 pm
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 7, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:49 a.m. 52 degrees, wind W 1 mph. Sky: mostly clear; a few streaks and a
tubular, fuzzy white caterpillar of cloud lurks just to the east of
mid-sky; ground fog; the moon, a smidgeon more than half, leans west; a
world brushed with dew; bowl and doily spiderwebs highlight the lawn.
Permanent streams: upper, same as yesterday, volume turned down, listlessly
heads toward wetlands; a rendezvous of waters; lower, a memory that haunts
a streambed. Wetlands: a bowl of upwardly mobile mist; a world of
silhouettes; by the middle of the marsh green turns gray; brown turns gray;
gray turns grayer and paler against the western sky. The pond: crickets,
keeping pace with the temperature, barely audible. Halfheartedly, catbird
meows. Other birds on strike; drift through woods as silent as smoke.

Culvert stones still damp from a water-dripping belly. A lithe, playful
beast had decamped the puddled marsh, crossed under the road, and scaled
the berm, through the culvert and into the brown world of the pond. A
narrow trail in the brush piques the dogs' interest. We're all beside
ourselves, jubilant, adrift in full-blown otter daydreams. Dogs, nuzzling
wet grass, aware of so much, read a script I cannot possibly imagine.
Breath deeply; snort like pigs, basking in otter essence. Ten legs. Six
eyes. Three noses, one of which not up to the task of unraveling mysteries
of a roving otter. Excitement . . . palpable.

Water surface skin-tight, brown and empty, veiled in a careless drift of
fog. Nowhere an otter.

An itinerant fisherman. A wanderer of the backwaters. Otter crosses hills,
perhaps miles from open water. I saw one dead on the interstate once. A
royal (but sad) DOR far from its natal element. This otter may be in New
Hampshire dining in brutal elegance on bullhead, or nearby, asleep in the
derelict beaver lodge, beyond the alders. The crown prince of the
watershed, the court jester of the reeds, otter galivants through life . .
. touching me in absentia.
 

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Date: 8/7/20 11:57 am
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Broad-winged Hawk migration
I’ve been watching Broad-winged adults (with heavy wing and tail molt) circling high and or low, and eventually drifting out of sight. So far they have been the local birds that nested in my area, and have not started migration. I see them every day doing their mid day flights. Yesterday I heard and watched a juvenile calling while chasing and flying with an adult. I noticed this behavior in 2 different Broad-winged hawk families yesterday.

I’m getting my eyes and neck in shape for hawk migration season.

Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT




> On Aug 7, 2020, at 12:54 PM, Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...> wrote:
>
> Happy Friday. I've got some broadies trickling by overhead in Bennington.
> They are circling up and heading south at migration height along with some
> Monarchs and swallows.
>
> This is my favorite time of year! I plan on recording as much hawk
> migration as possible from my yard. Eyes to the skies...
> --
> Gretchen E. Nareff
> Bennington, VT
 

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Date: 8/7/20 9:54 am
From: Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Broad-winged Hawk migration
Happy Friday. I've got some broadies trickling by overhead in Bennington.
They are circling up and heading south at migration height along with some
Monarchs and swallows.

This is my favorite time of year! I plan on recording as much hawk
migration as possible from my yard. Eyes to the skies...
--
Gretchen E. Nareff
Bennington, VT
 

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Date: 8/6/20 1:26 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] e coast birds in vt?
How in the world did jed gray's US birding list show up in VT e-bird?

--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

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Date: 8/6/20 8:19 am
From: Diana <dlee3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with American lady Butterfly
This is technically not about birds, but butterflies are beautiful flying creatures like birds.
Ignore if you are not interested, but many of us like birds AND butterflies.

https://youtu.be/v3u6v8pDHag
 

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Date: 8/6/20 6:50 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 6, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:35 a.m. 49 degrees, wind E 0 mph. Sky: a thin sheet of striated clouds,
pale pink wash; three-quarter moon mid-valley, bright but fading. Permanent
streams: upper, a slight murmur, less water than yesterday; lower, a
visible flow, faintly audible, and then retreats underground, again—the
landscape *beyond* thirsty. Wetlands: low, sparse ground-hugging fog
softens colors across the marsh; serrated crowns of evergreens in sharp
relief. Pond: quiet surface; mist like pipe smoke, slightly adrift, and
then straight up. Overripe: red raspberries. Peaking: blueberries. Coming
on: blackberries. Very few monarchs, which saddens me. Very few
dragonflies, too. Cold morning forces deer flies and mosquitos into
lockdown. For the first time in two months, I wore my denim jacket to stay
warm, not as a fortress against flies.

AOR: a distant chipmunk, motionless, hastily mistaken for a thrush; a
grit-mining robin

The morning belongs to goldfinches, everywhere and noisy. Pewees whistling
less enthusiastically; one across the pasture hawks a moth and returns to
the same oak limb . . . over and over. Treetop jays, a family group of
three, either gathering green acorns or plucking cold-numbed caterpillars.
Red-eyed vireos reassure me that they haven't left. Junco trills; keeps to
the shadows.

Two birds, more significant than either a robin or a jay, longer but
thinner, move unhurriedly, in a high aspen crown. Screened by leaves and
frustratingly unidentifiable. I look into the convergence of green, set in
motion by the slow-moving birds. Two minutes. Five minutes. Ten minutes.
The birds in the aspen. Me on the road, chafing. The dogs puzzled but
accepting. Eventually, I glimpse a cuckoo. Which species? Who knows . . . a
veil of leaves conspires against me. Back at the barn, a yellow-billed
cuckoo calls from the edge of the pasture, a hollow, swallowed note that
hangs in the fresh air for a lukewarm moment.

When John Muir wrote, *Between every two pine trees there is a door leading
to a new life, *he referred to the high and mighty Sierras. Had he walked
between two maples in the rounded, less dramatic mountains of the
Northeast, he might have made the very same comment. Our rolling terrain,
far from rawboned and lofty, offers the same invitation, the same mystery
to solve, and equal opportunity to lose yourself in the grand sweep of
Earth. The sun always rises somewhere.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/5/20 5:06 pm
From: Cedar Stanistreet <thedancingfiddle...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Mudflats Chittenden Cty?
Hi all,

I checked Delta Park and the Colchester Causeway this afternoon. The lake is up, so the mudflats are diminished, but the sand island is still there and had a few shorebirds on it. But the wind was fierce and increasing, so by the time I got to the causeway, I could hardly hold my scope steady, and any small birds were hunkered down.
The wind is supposed to die down overnight though, so hoping for a good morning tomorrow!

- Cedar

> On Aug 5, 2020, at 11:50 AM, Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> wrote:
>
> On a slightly related note, Spencer Hardy and I went out this morning to
> check the mudflats on Wrightsville Reservoir in Montpelier. There were a
> handful of Spotted and Solitary Sandpipers, but nothing too out of the
> ordinary - we were hoping for some fallout. It may be that the wind wasn't
> strong enough to push birds up here from the hurricane. If anyone has any
> insights on birds in Colchester post-storm, I'd be interested in hearing
> them!
>
> R
>
> On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 8:21 AM B Bobolinks <
> <0000035f721cf148-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> Has anyone checked the status of the mudflats at the Colchester Causeway,
>> Delta Park, Shelburne Bay, etc. yet this morning? We’re heading out now,
>> but can’t be everywhere at once! Updates on the conditions Since
>> yesterday’s rain would be very much appreciated. Thanks in advance,Mae
>> Mayville Essex
>>
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
>>
>
>
> --
> Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
> <http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/5/20 8:50 am
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Mudflats Chittenden Cty?
On a slightly related note, Spencer Hardy and I went out this morning to
check the mudflats on Wrightsville Reservoir in Montpelier. There were a
handful of Spotted and Solitary Sandpipers, but nothing too out of the
ordinary - we were hoping for some fallout. It may be that the wind wasn't
strong enough to push birds up here from the hurricane. If anyone has any
insights on birds in Colchester post-storm, I'd be interested in hearing
them!

R

On Wed, Aug 5, 2020 at 8:21 AM B Bobolinks <
<0000035f721cf148-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Has anyone checked the status of the mudflats at the Colchester Causeway,
> Delta Park, Shelburne Bay, etc. yet this morning? We’re heading out now,
> but can’t be everywhere at once! Updates on the conditions Since
> yesterday’s rain would be very much appreciated. Thanks in advance,Mae
> Mayville Essex
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/5/20 7:52 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 5, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:45 a.m. 62 degrees, wind 2 mph; aspen leaves in motion. Sky: mottled;
bright with peach highlights; air refreshed; leaves and needles hung with
rain. Permanent streams: upper and lower bound for glory; flowing and
gurgling, although *not* quite as loud as I had expected; both unload in
the marsh. Intermittent streams: flowing and vaguely humming; attenuated
and shallower than permanent streams, with which they merge; a woodland
circulatory system that begins as mushy depressions strewn across the
hillside; many linger as seeps and springs. A rainless day or two, the
water table recedes; intermittent streams dry up, a mockery of the tropical
storm. Wetlands: more vibrant than yesterday; a run of green and beige with
*spirea* flower heads pinking the drier rims; mist an afterthought. Pond:
trace exhalations drift east; across a faintly jiggled surface, the
reflection of two black-eyed Susans, an upside-down Monet. Crickets louder
than birds. A rain of ash seeds loosened by the wind (I thought they had
all come down a month ago); junco food. A colony of maidenhair fern, wet
fronds tilt toward the road, overlap like snake scales. Small limbs and
twigs and a thirty-foot snag brought down by the high wind, a forest
pruning. Old leaning aspen still upright.

Pre sunrise, three hummingbirds, hovering, and chasing each other around
the feeder. A pair of robins quietly clucking. Four other parties in the
maples. Blue jays and crows, red-breasted nuthatch, a fluty thrush deep in
the woods, a solitary red-eyed vireo reminds me he's still around, still
singing.

Several hundred feet above the marsh, flying due south, one barn swallow en
route to Central or South America. A graceful little bird, alone in a vast
sky, headed toward the seaboard. I recall August gatherings of barn
swallows above Cape Cod, and the barrier beaches of Long Island, gracefully
(and gratefully) hawking greenhead flies over the salt marsh. All motion,
like campfire sparks, twisting and turning, mouths agape trolling for
flies. Occasionally, a merlin, also on the move, chased one straight up the
sky ladder, where a delicate bird—no matter how graceful—staggers in the
turbulence, becomes vulnerable.

Enchanted, I watch the swallow arrows away; above the spires of pine and
spruce, above the crowns of maple and beech; an envoy from beyond,
vanishing into the morning like a thought unleashed. Migration: the great
unifier; stitches together seemingly disparate worlds; ignores boundaries,
ideologies, religions, misinformation, fake news, political parties,
pandemics, reminds me that like the constellated sky, Earth carries the
fascinating burden of its own history, enticing and ebullient—the admission
ticket: stop and look.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/5/20 5:21 am
From: B Bobolinks <0000035f721cf148-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mudflats Chittenden Cty?
Has anyone checked the status of the mudflats at the Colchester Causeway, Delta Park, Shelburne Bay, etc. yet this morning?  We’re heading out now, but can’t be everywhere at once! Updates on the conditions Since yesterday’s rain would be very much appreciated. Thanks in advance,Mae Mayville Essex


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 3:03 pm
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mansfield update
Yet another tardy Mansfield update from last week:
https://vtecostudies.org/blog/mansfield-update-ybfls-nswos-and-foys/. We'll
be back up there tomorrow night for our final summer banding session,
hoping that Asaias might toss something intriguing and unexpected our way.

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/
 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 1:06 pm
From: Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Shorebirds
Thanks for the feedback. I did not think it was a stilt sandpiper but the
distinct line through the eye had me puzzled.
Martha

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 4:51 PM Peterson, Bruce B. <peterson...>
wrote:

> I would call #1 a lesser yellowlegs. Stilt Sandpiper's bill is usually
> noticeably droopy. The dark breast could be evidence of an intermediate
> plumage or mud. #2 looks like a White-rumped to me. Streaks on the side
> separate it from Semipalmated, and dark legs rule out Least. Good Find!!
> As far as the dowitchers are concerned, at this time of year I usually just
> sigh and enjoy them.
>
> Best, Bruce Peterson
>
> On 8/2/20, 8:04 AM, "Vermont Birds on behalf of Martha & Bill McClintock"
> <VTBIRD...> on behalf of <mbmcclintock...> wrote:
>
> The shorebirds are here but my id skills are a bit rusty.... the
> pictures
> were taken at the Mississquoi delta. They are highly cropped and
> lighting
> adjusted... I would appreciate any ideas. I have thoughts but am not
> sure.
>
> 1. Could this be a stilt sandpiper. It was with lesser yellowlegs.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/50178762197/in/dateposted-public/
>
> 2. White rumped sandpiper?
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/50178765837/in/dateposted-public/
>
> 3. Probably short billed but who can tell the difference? Not I!
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/50178746502/in/dateposted-public/
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
> Martha McClintock
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 11:56 am
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - Aug 3 - Colchester Causeway
Good luck. You certainly wrote a careful description. I also remember
something about streaking along the lower flanks, but I'm vague as to
whether that applies to a juvenile. Most of my books are with my son
John, so I am talking mostly from memory.

(still) Pipit

On 8/4/2020 12:53 PM, Scott Morrical wrote:
> Fred,
>
> You are absolutely right that it merits meticulous study. I can confirm the supercilium, or my impressions of it anyway, which I will describe in my RSD. Regarding the “portliness” of this bird, I am aware of what the field guides say and indeed my first impressions included that the bird seemed “plump“. However, my comparisons with PESA are indirect as I never had the bird in the same scope view with a Pec. Also my impression of “plumpness” may be meaningless since the wind was howling which no doubt affected the posture of birds while feeding on the sandbar. And naturally I don’t have a photo, so my impressions are all that I have. So yes, caution is clearly warranted, but I have to go with where the field marks that I could observe lead me, until someone gets a better view or some photos that confirm or debunk. Meanwhile there is a really interesting shorebird out there, unless it is already on its way to Australia via South America!
>
> Scott
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Aug 4, 2020, at 10:45 AM, Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> wrote:
>>
>> This bird merits meticulous study. Two considerations not specifically addressed in your description: 1) structure, that is "similar overall" as described in your notes or "slightly more portly" than Pectoral as noted in some field guides; and 2) bold supercilium "wider behind eye" This last characteristic should be readily apparent.
>>
>> Without confirmation of above characteristics, I would be cautious....
>>
>> Fred Pratt
>>
>>> On 8/4/2020 8:38 AM, Scott Morrical wrote:
>>>
>>> Yesterday morning (8/3/20) between about 9:15-9:30 AM I observed what I believe was a juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Colchester Causeway. Probably the same bird was seen briefly by Ted Murin at the same location on the previous day (8/2/20). I will be posting a detailed Rare Species Description of the bird today. Meanwhile, here are the key details: Medium-sized shorebird, similar in size and overall structure to Pectoral Sandpipers that were also present. Very bright plumage. Bright buffy color on the breast was very prominent and attention- grabbing. Marks on breast were confined to a narrow band of faint streaks across the upper breast. The bright buffy color extended over the entire breast and was completely unstreaked below that narrow band. This pattern is characteristic of juvenile STSA and unlike any plumage of PESA that I have ever observed or learned about. On the bird’s upper parts, rufous feather edges on tertials, greater coverts and scapulars was also brighter than in nearby PESAs. The bird’s head pattern included a bold white supercilium and a rusty brown cap. The bill was shorter than nearby PESAs’ bills. Legs were dull yellow. In flight the upper wing pattern had dark flight feathers and hardly any wing stripe. The rump and upper tail coverts were dark down the middle to the tip of the tail, white with dark streaks on the sides. I believe that all of these features are consistent with juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, and eliminate known plumages of Pectoral Sandpiper, the most similar species likely to be seen in North America.
>>>
>>> Apologies for this late posting, but I needed to review my notes and thoughts about the bird, and also do some research, since this would be a first state record as well as a significant regional rarity.
>>>
>>> Scott Morrical,
>>> South Burlington
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 9:53 am
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - Aug 3 - Colchester Causeway
Fred,

You are absolutely right that it merits meticulous study. I can confirm the supercilium, or my impressions of it anyway, which I will describe in my RSD. Regarding the “portliness” of this bird, I am aware of what the field guides say and indeed my first impressions included that the bird seemed “plump“. However, my comparisons with PESA are indirect as I never had the bird in the same scope view with a Pec. Also my impression of “plumpness” may be meaningless since the wind was howling which no doubt affected the posture of birds while feeding on the sandbar. And naturally I don’t have a photo, so my impressions are all that I have. So yes, caution is clearly warranted, but I have to go with where the field marks that I could observe lead me, until someone gets a better view or some photos that confirm or debunk. Meanwhile there is a really interesting shorebird out there, unless it is already on its way to Australia via South America!

Scott

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 4, 2020, at 10:45 AM, Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> wrote:
>
> This bird merits meticulous study. Two considerations not specifically addressed in your description: 1) structure, that is "similar overall" as described in your notes or "slightly more portly" than Pectoral as noted in some field guides; and 2) bold supercilium "wider behind eye" This last characteristic should be readily apparent.
>
> Without confirmation of above characteristics, I would be cautious....
>
> Fred Pratt
>
>> On 8/4/2020 8:38 AM, Scott Morrical wrote:
>>
>> Yesterday morning (8/3/20) between about 9:15-9:30 AM I observed what I believe was a juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Colchester Causeway. Probably the same bird was seen briefly by Ted Murin at the same location on the previous day (8/2/20). I will be posting a detailed Rare Species Description of the bird today. Meanwhile, here are the key details: Medium-sized shorebird, similar in size and overall structure to Pectoral Sandpipers that were also present. Very bright plumage. Bright buffy color on the breast was very prominent and attention- grabbing. Marks on breast were confined to a narrow band of faint streaks across the upper breast. The bright buffy color extended over the entire breast and was completely unstreaked below that narrow band. This pattern is characteristic of juvenile STSA and unlike any plumage of PESA that I have ever observed or learned about. On the bird’s upper parts, rufous feather edges on tertials, greater coverts and scapulars was also brighter than in nearby PESAs. The bird’s head pattern included a bold white supercilium and a rusty brown cap. The bill was shorter than nearby PESAs’ bills. Legs were dull yellow. In flight the upper wing pattern had dark flight feathers and hardly any wing stripe. The rump and upper tail coverts were dark down the middle to the tip of the tail, white with dark streaks on the sides. I believe that all of these features are consistent with juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, and eliminate known plumages of Pectoral Sandpiper, the most similar species likely to be seen in North America.
>>
>> Apologies for this late posting, but I needed to review my notes and thoughts about the bird, and also do some research, since this would be a first state record as well as a significant regional rarity.
>>
>> Scott Morrical,
>> South Burlington
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 7:46 am
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - Aug 3 - Colchester Causeway
This bird merits meticulous study. Two considerations not specifically
addressed in your description: 1) structure, that is "similar overall"
as described in your notes or "slightly more portly" than Pectoral as
noted in some field guides; and 2) bold supercilium "wider behind eye"
This last characteristic should be readily apparent.

Without confirmation of above characteristics, I would be cautious....

Fred Pratt

On 8/4/2020 8:38 AM, Scott Morrical wrote:

> Yesterday morning (8/3/20) between about 9:15-9:30 AM I observed what I believe was a juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Colchester Causeway. Probably the same bird was seen briefly by Ted Murin at the same location on the previous day (8/2/20). I will be posting a detailed Rare Species Description of the bird today. Meanwhile, here are the key details: Medium-sized shorebird, similar in size and overall structure to Pectoral Sandpipers that were also present. Very bright plumage. Bright buffy color on the breast was very prominent and attention- grabbing. Marks on breast were confined to a narrow band of faint streaks across the upper breast. The bright buffy color extended over the entire breast and was completely unstreaked below that narrow band. This pattern is characteristic of juvenile STSA and unlike any plumage of PESA that I have ever observed or learned about. On the bird’s upper parts, rufous feather edges on tertials, greater coverts and scapulars was also brighter than in nearby PESAs. The bird’s head pattern included a bold white supercilium and a rusty brown cap. The bill was shorter than nearby PESAs’ bills. Legs were dull yellow. In flight the upper wing pattern had dark flight feathers and hardly any wing stripe. The rump and upper tail coverts were dark down the middle to the tip of the tail, white with dark streaks on the sides. I believe that all of these features are consistent with juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, and eliminate known plumages of Pectoral Sandpiper, the most similar species likely to be seen in North America.
>
> Apologies for this late posting, but I needed to review my notes and thoughts about the bird, and also do some research, since this would be a first state record as well as a significant regional rarity.
>
> Scott Morrical,
> South Burlington
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 6:35 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 4, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:41 a.m. 61 degrees, wind 2 mph. Sky: drearily overcast; the air thick
enough to slice and serve; *rain* on the scale between a mist and a
sprinkle; the sound of dripping leaves pervades sunrise, heaven threatens
to unload. Permanent streams: upper, shallow and silent, grudgingly flows;
lower, underground like a mole; all that remains is a damp grove and
water-smoothed rocks. Wetlands: tarnished and thirsty. Pond:
drizzle-dimpled; tight and tiny ripples, overlapping and light-catching;
hard to pull me away . . . but the dogs try.

Soundscape: tanager on a mission, still singing in the driveway oaks;
red-breasted nuthatch cuts into the morning with a series of *yanks*, a
barb of a call compared to the piercing stiletto-call of the hawk, which
sits somewhere above the marsh, water beads on his feathers, his eyes blink
out the rain; a flock of jays; three chickadees; a forlorn crow crying in
the pines, a bird that rarely advocates socially-distancing. I stop to
admire the tedious persistence of a red-eyed vireo, also alone, in the
hardwoods singing his heart out; other vireos (and most flycatchers and
warblers) have better things to do. Perhaps, an urge to carbo-load and get
out of town? Webworm tents expand into townhouses and condos; takeout
cuckoo food.

Alone, at sunrise, day after day since the middle of March, I've walked my
two dogs to the pond. I've paused in admiration of the revolving seasons,
the puckered landscape, and all the creatures that people the valley.
Concurrently. I've; expanded my vocabulary to include the *new *COVID-19
words and phrases: social-distancing; self-isolation; home-quarantine;
self-monitoring; drive-thru tests; contact-tracing; super-spreader;
droplets; and fresh mashups: *quarantini* (the fusion of quarantine and
martini), *coronageddon*, *coronapocalypse,* and my absolute favorite
*covidiot*, of whom I've encountered more than a few. My own contribution
to this list, which sadly endures . . . *socially-starved.*
 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 5:38 am
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Sharp-tailed Sandpiper - Aug 3 - Colchester Causeway
Yesterday morning (8/3/20) between about 9:15-9:30 AM I observed what I believe was a juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpiper at Colchester Causeway. Probably the same bird was seen briefly by Ted Murin at the same location on the previous day (8/2/20). I will be posting a detailed Rare Species Description of the bird today. Meanwhile, here are the key details: Medium-sized shorebird, similar in size and overall structure to Pectoral Sandpipers that were also present. Very bright plumage. Bright buffy color on the breast was very prominent and attention- grabbing. Marks on breast were confined to a narrow band of faint streaks across the upper breast. The bright buffy color extended over the entire breast and was completely unstreaked below that narrow band. This pattern is characteristic of juvenile STSA and unlike any plumage of PESA that I have ever observed or learned about. On the bird’s upper parts, rufous feather edges on tertials, greater coverts and scapulars was also brighter than in nearby PESAs. The bird’s head pattern included a bold white supercilium and a rusty brown cap. The bill was shorter than nearby PESAs’ bills. Legs were dull yellow. In flight the upper wing pattern had dark flight feathers and hardly any wing stripe. The rump and upper tail coverts were dark down the middle to the tip of the tail, white with dark streaks on the sides. I believe that all of these features are consistent with juvenile Sharp-tailed Sandpiper, and eliminate known plumages of Pectoral Sandpiper, the most similar species likely to be seen in North America.

Apologies for this late posting, but I needed to review my notes and thoughts about the bird, and also do some research, since this would be a first state record as well as a significant regional rarity.

Scott Morrical,
South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 10:10 am
From: Cedar Stanistreet <thedancingfiddle...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Red Crossbills - help with type ID?
Allan,

Thanks for the info! I had seen that article, but had since forgotten about it. I'll get in touch with Matt or Tim.

- Cedar

> On Aug 3, 2020, at 12:36 PM, Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...> wrote:
>
> Hi Cedar,
>
> You've probably seen the informative eBird article on crossbill types, but if not, here's the link:
> https://ebird.org/news/crossbills-of-north-america-species-and-red-crossbill-call-types/
>
> Matt Young and Tim Spahr are very responsive in ID'ing crossbill types from recordings:
> <may6...>
> <tspahr44...>
>
> Allan
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Cedar Stanistreet
> Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 11:26 AM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Red Crossbills - help with type ID?
>
> Hi!
>
> There’s been a flock of Red Crossbills near Putney for the past few days, and I’m curious what other people think about which type they are. I’m leaning towards type 1, but there’s something that has me still not ruling out type 5, or even type 10.
>
> Here’s the best recording I have gotten so far with my phone:
> https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/253262531 <https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/253262531>
>
> - Cedar
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 9:38 am
From: Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Red Crossbills - help with type ID?
Hi Cedar,

You've probably seen the informative eBird article on crossbill types, but if not, here's the link:
https://ebird.org/news/crossbills-of-north-america-species-and-red-crossbill-call-types/

Matt Young and Tim Spahr are very responsive in ID'ing crossbill types from recordings:
<may6...>
<tspahr44...>

Allan

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Cedar Stanistreet
Sent: Monday, August 3, 2020 11:26 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Red Crossbills - help with type ID?

Hi!

There’s been a flock of Red Crossbills near Putney for the past few days, and I’m curious what other people think about which type they are. I’m leaning towards type 1, but there’s something that has me still not ruling out type 5, or even type 10.

Here’s the best recording I have gotten so far with my phone:
https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/253262531 <https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/253262531>

- Cedar
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 8:30 am
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Mysterious Life of Birds Who Never Come Down - The New York Times
And absolutely beautiful read on all counts. Give yourself a treat today!

> On Aug 3, 2020, at 9:28 AM, Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> wrote:
>
> The Mysterious Life of Birds Who Never Come Down - The New York Times
>
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/29/magazine/vesper-flights.html
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 8:26 am
From: Cedar Stanistreet <thedancingfiddle...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Red Crossbills - help with type ID?
Hi!

There’s been a flock of Red Crossbills near Putney for the past few days, and I’m curious what other people think about which type they are. I’m leaning towards type 1, but there’s something that has me still not ruling out type 5, or even type 10.

Here’s the best recording I have gotten so far with my phone:
https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/253262531 <https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/253262531>

- Cedar
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 6:32 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 3, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:18 a.m. 70 degrees, wind S 6 mph. Sky: an Etch A Sketch pad that begins
with a run of low, puffy, socially-distanced clouds that drift
boat-like into the north; high white sheets above them hold their position;
everything begins to pinken and lighten with sunrise, and then disperses
and reforms; a mutating atmosphere cleansed by the wind that sets trees
swaying and moaning, and holds mosquitoes at bay. Permanent streams:
struggling but nevertheless inspired by yesterday's showers; upper, a faint
gurgle and noticeable current; lower, puddle extends through the culvert,
under the road, before receding below the surface and flowing unseen into
the waiting marsh. Wetlands: somber; the wind, gestures, pulsates across
the reeds as though across a flat, featureless prairie; a refreshed world
in perpetual motion. Dew settles nowhere. Pond: wind sets the tone; surface
still; surrounding trees a conniption, branches flap as though attempting
to take off. Late white ash seed drop. Goldenrod and jewelweed bloom. A
deer snorts, loudly; dogs on alert.

DOR: ruffed grouse, brown phase with a broken neck; most have shocked the
hell out of the driver. Green frog, small and pulverized.
AOR: robin; adorable red eft, barely an inch long and vividly orange. When
I was seven years old, on a Jewish retreat in the Catskills, I caught a red
eft. My father thought it was a lizard. Said it was poisonous. On the
toxicology front, he was *right, *but I convinced him I'd lunch with the
family at Grossinger's and not put the salamander in my mouth. I kept the
red eft in a jar with wet leaves for the three days; released it,
teary-eyed, just before we headed back to Long Island.

Birds in the woods: pewee and red-eyed vireo, the only Neotropical migrants
that have something to sing about; crow, robin, and a flock of jays kvetch
on the edge of a clearing. How do treetop warblers pick caterpillars off
flapping leaves?

Birds at the feeders: four hummingbirds, all in overdrive; a dozen
mourning doves, wings swishing; purple finches; and goldfinches, calling
and singing, have the pastures to themselves. I haven't seen either
evening- or red-breasted grosbeak families in several weeks. Insects in the
woods keep chickadees, titmice, and nuthatches from making little more than
a cameo appearance.

Behind the barn door: little brown bats, the party of five, canceled their
reservation and moved elsewhere.

In preparation for Tropical Storm Isaias, I've been filling the gullies in
my driveway and daydreaming about the possibility of a fallout of tropical
seabirds. Maybe brown booby. Or sandwich tern. Or gull-billed tern. Maybe
lonely sooty tern swept out of the Caribbean, entrained in the cone of the
storm, heads this way. Long Island, which stretches west to east for one
hundred twenty miles, was a land net; every hurricane that battered the
Island brought displaced birds; more than once a frigatebird or tropicbird.
On occasion, gypsy birds disembark in Vermont. In mid-May 2006, grounded by
heavy weather, approximately seventy north-bound red- and red-necked
phalaropes, more a sprinkle than a fallout were grounded on ponds and lakes
in Vermont and New Hampshire.

A minimal number to be sure scattered over nineteen thousand square-miles .
. . but how lucky was I to see a bird that summers with musk ox and
winters with blue whales in my home town?
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 6:29 am
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] The Mysterious Life of Birds Who Never Come Down - The New York Times
The Mysterious Life of Birds Who Never Come Down - The New York Times


https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/29/magazine/vesper-flights.html
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 6:02 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] photo essay on an extraordinary outing "Least Bittern Big Day' by JBlock
This Jim Block photo essay on an extraordinary outing among the
fish-hunters is unmissable, rich in imagery as you'd expect but the
natural history matter of a bittern's tail wag? Evidence right here!
: )
Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEKps tried to 'forward' I take it that's not
'done' on the listserv

You can view it from this link :
https://www.jimblockphoto.com/2020/08/least-bittern-big-day/

 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/20 1:51 pm
From: Peterson, Bruce B. <peterson...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Shorebirds
I would call #1 a lesser yellowlegs. Stilt Sandpiper's bill is usually noticeably droopy. The dark breast could be evidence of an intermediate plumage or mud. #2 looks like a White-rumped to me. Streaks on the side separate it from Semipalmated, and dark legs rule out Least. Good Find!! As far as the dowitchers are concerned, at this time of year I usually just sigh and enjoy them.

Best, Bruce Peterson

On 8/2/20, 8:04 AM, "Vermont Birds on behalf of Martha & Bill McClintock" <VTBIRD...> on behalf of <mbmcclintock...> wrote:

The shorebirds are here but my id skills are a bit rusty.... the pictures
were taken at the Mississquoi delta. They are highly cropped and lighting
adjusted... I would appreciate any ideas. I have thoughts but am not sure.

1. Could this be a stilt sandpiper. It was with lesser yellowlegs.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/50178762197/in/dateposted-public/

2. White rumped sandpiper?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/50178765837/in/dateposted-public/

3. Probably short billed but who can tell the difference? Not I!
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/50178746502/in/dateposted-public/

Thanks in advance,

Martha McClintock


 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/20 12:09 pm
From: Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Shorebirds
I checked likely areas for shorebirds from Lapham Bay to where Dead Creek empties into the Otter Creek. Not much mud at any of the areas.
The best sighting was 9 ruddy turnstones at Turkey Lane in Panton.
Spotted sandpiper and killdeer were present. Caspian terns were at several stops.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/20 9:38 am
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Whimbrels heading south from Missisquoi
A flock of 11 Whimbrels touched down on a flats along the Hudson/Mohawk
junction in Cohoes (near Albany), New York at about 6:20 AM, Aug. 2nd.

Then - a flock of 10 flew by Piermont Pier on the Hudson River in Rockland
County, NY (~120 miles from Cohoes) at about 9:40 AM same day.

My son reports unusual numbers along the south shore of Lake Ontario and at
the Niagara River in western, New York State.

Seems to be Whimbrel moving day.

Rich Guthrie

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020 at 11:13 AM Clem Nilan <vtclem...> wrote:

> Jacob, Max, Jim M, Brian and I had eighteen Whimbrels at Colchester
> Railroad Causeway at 8:55am at mudflats by Law Island (first island from
> Colchester side). They were here for about an hour before flying south.
>
> On Sun, Aug 2, 2020, 10:01 AM Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...> wrote:
>
> > I was birding at Campbell's Bay (8:45, 8/2) and two Whimbrels flew by
> > relatively high, heading south. Perhaps looking for mudflats further
> south
> > on Lake Champlain?
> >
> > Allan
>


--
Richard Guthrie
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/20 8:23 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 2, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:34 a.m. 60 (delightful) degrees; wind NE 0 mph. Sky: coagulation of
clouds; a few with silver brush strokes; opening reluctantly; a fogless
sunrise. Intermittent streams: a cleft in the woods lined with pine needles
and other woodland debris. Permanent streams: upper a hushed trickle; lower
retreats underground farther upstream, abandoning its bed of water-abraded
stones, bones of the hillside that two months ago hid blackfly larva and
pickerel frog tadpoles. Wetlands: quiet and without fog; a tired shade of
green, more buff than verdant, dulled by the progression of summer. Pond:
thin, rolling mist, more an exhalation than an outpour. Old big-toothed
aspen, sparsely leafed and leaning, a serious widow-maker hanging straight
down; punky wood, easily excavated; a prospective tenement for cavity
nesters. If my physical health mirrored the aspen, I'd be partially bald
and teetering; in need of a walker. A chickadee, less interested in my
sylvan opinions, finds a source of caterpillars in the aspen leaves; plucks
a few . . . and then decamps, leaving me to ruminate.

Loon, too high in the sky to have left nearby Lake Fairlee, angles
southeast, trailing its voice across a tessellation woods and marshes; a
rain of tremolos spills over Coyote Hollow; if the call could be liquefied,
streams would be gushing. Neck extended, back humped. Wide webbed feet,
which extend beyond little tails, calibrate the wind. A loon is heavy, up
to fourteen pounds; its bones robust; its wings small by comparison to its
weight. Always flapping, never gliding. And fast . . . seventy miles per
hour, arrow straight. In pursuit of fish, a loon may hold its breath for
five minutes and dive more than two hundred feet into the cold, dark abyss
of a northern lake. A family of four eats over a thousand pounds of fish in
fifteen weeks. Long-lived, up to thirty years. Loyal, mates for life. But,
like many modern human marriages, couples winter apart, sometimes separated
by more than a thousand miles, alone or as a member of a raft, where loons
bunch together at night and ride rolling Atlantic.

Summer 1977: I surveyed loons for New Hampshire Audubon, one of the best
summer jobs I ever had. Had kyack would travel, literally everywhere from
Lake Umbagog to Massabesic Lake. One afternoon that summer, I lunched with
a loon biologist from Syracuse University, Judy McIntyre, who, at age
forty-five, had written her doctoral thesis on the common loon, while she
raised three children. Her thesis remains the loon Bible. An
exquisite biologist with a sense of humor. "Anyone who has seen a loon egg
is apt to remember it first for its size," McIntyre wrote. "Any female loon
who has ever laid one no doubt remembers it for the same reason."

McIntyre had told me a species of black fly that feeds almost exclusively
on loon blood was responsible for more than twenty percent of nest
abandonment. Female black flies, which drive loons crazy, find the nest by
the scent of loon semen that males dribble everywhere when they mate; at
nearly forty million years old, loons may reveal the *first* case premature
ejaculation. I've not been able to verify (or disprove) the semen portion
of the story . . . I've not forgotten it either.

Loon overhead, laughing at the quirkiness of evolution . . . possibly at my
gullibility?
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/20 8:13 am
From: Clem Nilan <vtclem...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Whimbrels heading south from Missisquoi
Jacob, Max, Jim M, Brian and I had eighteen Whimbrels at Colchester
Railroad Causeway at 8:55am at mudflats by Law Island (first island from
Colchester side). They were here for about an hour before flying south.

On Sun, Aug 2, 2020, 10:01 AM Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...> wrote:

> I was birding at Campbell's Bay (8:45, 8/2) and two Whimbrels flew by
> relatively high, heading south. Perhaps looking for mudflats further south
> on Lake Champlain?
>
> Allan
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/20 7:51 am
From: Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] - 1 Aug 2020 - Mount Independence - 40 species
Here is the link to my Mt. Independence hike yesterday.
I hiked the west orange trail and the blue trail. No mud, a few bugs but most pleasant.

https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S72040160
Sue Wetmore


Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/20 7:01 am
From: Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Whimbrels heading south from Missisquoi
I was birding at Campbell's Bay (8:45, 8/2) and two Whimbrels flew by relatively high, heading south. Perhaps looking for mudflats further south on Lake Champlain?

Allan
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/20 5:30 am
From: Howard Muscott <HMuscott...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
Please remove me from the list.

Thanks

Howard S. Muscott, Ed.D. Director
NH Center for Effective Behavioral Interventions and Supports at SERESC
165 South River Road Unit F
Bedford, NH 03110
603-440-8141; <hmuscott...>
www.nhcebis.seresc.net

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Sent: Saturday, August 1, 2020 11:01 PM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds

Richard, Would you mind sharing the steps to find these photos on ebird.
Still learning....

On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 8:43 AM Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
wrote:

> The smooth coloration is a good indicator of European Starlings, too. You
> can sort photos on eBird using the filters to show only immature ones; take
> a look at these photos of young starlings,
> <
> https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=eursta&mediaType=p&q=European%20Starling%20-%20Sturnus%20vulgaris&age=i
> >
> and compare them to RWBLs. That helped me, here.
>
> On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 8:17 AM Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
> wrote:
>
> > Yes, young starlings.
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Martha Pfeiffer <
> > <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...>
> > Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 8:16 AM
> > To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
> > Subject: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
> >
> > Ruth Stewart and I encountered a flock of blackbirds late in the
> afternoon
> > and cannot differentiate them from starlings or red-winged blackbirds.
> > Photos are attached to the checklist below if you care to take a look and
> > offer your suggestions. None that we could spot had yellow beaks yet to
> me
> > the beak shows more like a starling than red-ing. Juvenile starlings do
> > have black beaks? Another bird puzzle to figure out!
> >
> > https://ebird.org/checklist/S71939854
> >
> > Martha in Dorset
> >
>
>
> --
> Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
> <http://www.burntfen.com>
>


--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/20 5:04 am
From: Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Shorebirds
The shorebirds are here but my id skills are a bit rusty.... the pictures
were taken at the Mississquoi delta. They are highly cropped and lighting
adjusted... I would appreciate any ideas. I have thoughts but am not sure.

1. Could this be a stilt sandpiper. It was with lesser yellowlegs.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/50178762197/in/dateposted-public/

2. White rumped sandpiper?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/50178765837/in/dateposted-public/

3. Probably short billed but who can tell the difference? Not I!
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/50178746502/in/dateposted-public/

Thanks in advance,

Martha McClintock
 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/20 8:02 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
Richard, Would you mind sharing the steps to find these photos on ebird.
Still learning....

On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 8:43 AM Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
wrote:

> The smooth coloration is a good indicator of European Starlings, too. You
> can sort photos on eBird using the filters to show only immature ones; take
> a look at these photos of young starlings,
> <
> https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=eursta&mediaType=p&q=European%20Starling%20-%20Sturnus%20vulgaris&age=i
> >
> and compare them to RWBLs. That helped me, here.
>
> On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 8:17 AM Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
> wrote:
>
> > Yes, young starlings.
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Martha Pfeiffer <
> > <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...>
> > Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 8:16 AM
> > To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
> > Subject: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
> >
> > Ruth Stewart and I encountered a flock of blackbirds late in the
> afternoon
> > and cannot differentiate them from starlings or red-winged blackbirds.
> > Photos are attached to the checklist below if you care to take a look and
> > offer your suggestions. None that we could spot had yellow beaks yet to
> me
> > the beak shows more like a starling than red-ing. Juvenile starlings do
> > have black beaks? Another bird puzzle to figure out!
> >
> > https://ebird.org/checklist/S71939854
> >
> > Martha in Dorset
> >
>
>
> --
> Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
> <http://www.burntfen.com>
>


--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/20 7:59 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Putney Mtn Hawkwatch 2020
So sad to hear this...

On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 7:53 PM suki russo <
<0000001d6c4a8152-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> The safe successful continuation of the Hawkwatch isour goal this
> season. Thisfall due to the Covid 19 pandemic Putney Mountain Hawkwatch
> will be postingonly a limited number of observers on the mountain for any
> given day. Over theyears many ‘Friends of the Watch’ have also spent time
> with the designatedwatch crew. Sadly this year we are asking others to not
> visit even as we areseverely curtailing our own numbers. Hopefully these
> steps will let thosepresent maintain needed social distancing while
> monitoring raptor flights.
> Eachday’s volunteers will be exclusively from those who are on
> our roster of longtime qualified personnel. They will work from a very
> limited, roped off,watcher-only area and only those with assigned duties
> can be accommodated. Dueto the overall narrow scope of the summit clearing
> itself and the trail usethat also occurs there we feel that it is
> imperative that other casual visitorsto the watch do not congregate in and
> restrict movement through that area.
>
> ThePutney Mountain Hawkwatch has done an annual fall raptor count
> since 1974. Datacollected at the site is part of the Raptor Population
> Index, a study of raptorpopulation trends in the Northeast. Since 2003
> Monarch Butterfly flights havealso been recorded. Watch results will be
> posted daily and can be viewed at www.hawkcount.org.
>
> JoAnne Russo
> Saxtons River, VT
>


--
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/20 5:45 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] August 1, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:30 a.m. 57 degrees, wind SSE 1 mph. Sky: colorless and hidden by
metastisizing ground fog, which dulls the green of the canopy. Upper
permanent stream: lost its voice, flows with limp. Lower: a puddle with a
pulse that retreats underground, infusing the marsh below the surface, a
liquid teleprompter whose vital contribution remains off camera. Wetlands:
fettered by fog; across the fen, the spires of pine and hemlock rise above
the hardwoods, out of the clouds; limbed islands in a sea of mist. Pond:
more murk than mist, ascends straight up like campfire smoke on a still
night, charmed by two painted turtles that sink below the surface, their
widening ripples overlap and merge like goofy cartoon eyes. No deerflies.
Plenty of goldenrod.

August lull: pockets of birdsong framed by *long* stretches of silence. A
delusional tanager, loud and hidden in the trees and fog, again, sings as
though its May. A jay and a house wren above the bones of the lower stream.
A red-eyed vireo, unaccompanied, a solo in the density of the mist. Across
the wetlands, an owl barks, a pruned rendition of the nocturnal
chart-topper. A robin with *chutzpah*, less than twenty feet away, leads
the dogs and me down the road; rush, pause, rush and then flies behinds us
. . . and begins again. The song of a hermit thrush, quelled by distance,
reduced to a suggestion. A red-breasted nuthatch, a tricycle-horn call,
rising and tedious. A titmouse whistles. Then, surprisingly, from above the
fog, a loon tremolos, a bone-chilling call that transforms the morning into
anything but mundane. I stop. Bound by fog and inside the long green
tunnel, there's nowhere for me to look, so I listen. *If he were human*,"
wrote John McPhee, *it would be the laugh of the deeply insane.*

The delicacy of a foggy August morning . . . surprise me morning, surprise
me.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/31/20 12:16 pm
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 30, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:34 a.m. 57 delightful degrees; wind SE 1 mph. Sky: who knows? Eclipsed by
ground fog, thick enough to drip off leaves; fog spreads like the Tenth
Plague on the House of Egypt; visibility a hundred yards or less. Permanent
streams: upper creeps west toward the marsh, a shadow of itself; lower
reduced to two puddles; water elsewhere a rumor; the striders, long
gone, have given up. Wetlands: contours obscured in the density of the fog,
more chowder than soup. Pond: tendrils of mist; a single painted turtle
floating; sees me and sinks like a stone. The hum of crickets rises from
the berm. No otter. No merganser. No bittern. Milkweed pods ripen. No sign
of a monarch. Where is* Very Hungry Caterpillar(s)*, which ought to be
stripping down leaves? Webworm tents multiply and swell, mostly in black
cherry; one in alder (a dietary mixup)—cuckoo silent or gone or waits in
the murk for the fog to disperse.

In 1927, hermit thrush became State Bird of Vermont. There were more than a
hundred other birds to choose from.

Hermit thrush, a virtuoso in the gloaming, distills the mist into scraps of
song, hollow and haunting like a crippled flute. Half a dozen thrushes
sing; half a dozen fragments as ephemeral as the summer sun. A maverick and
solitary songbird returns to the stage for an encore performance after
others fade away—scaps of a song in the morning fog. I pause spellbound.
Thrushes sing mid-level in the woods, below the canopy, above the floor.
Does the leafy ceiling direct and amplify sound? Ovenbirds also sing at
mid-level but their voice, loud and sharp, bludgeons. Thrushes soothe and
quench; roll out of hidden crags and recesses. Ushers me into the moment,
prisoner of the moment for a moment . . . which all I *really* have.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/31/20 9:58 am
From: Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cadwell Trail
Here’s the link to my walk this morning in Pittsford.
Sue Wetmore
https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S71982132


Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 7/31/20 9:44 am
From: Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cadwell Trail
Here’s the link to my walk this morning in Pittsford.
Sue Wetmore
https://ebird.org/vt/checklist/S71982132


Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 7/31/20 5:43 am
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
The smooth coloration is a good indicator of European Starlings, too. You
can sort photos on eBird using the filters to show only immature ones; take
a look at these photos of young starlings,
<https://ebird.org/media/catalog?taxonCode=eursta&mediaType=p&q=European%20Starling%20-%20Sturnus%20vulgaris&age=i>
and compare them to RWBLs. That helped me, here.

On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 8:17 AM Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> wrote:

> Yes, young starlings.
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Martha Pfeiffer <
> <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...>
> Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 8:16 AM
> To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
>
> Ruth Stewart and I encountered a flock of blackbirds late in the afternoon
> and cannot differentiate them from starlings or red-winged blackbirds.
> Photos are attached to the checklist below if you care to take a look and
> offer your suggestions. None that we could spot had yellow beaks yet to me
> the beak shows more like a starling than red-ing. Juvenile starlings do
> have black beaks? Another bird puzzle to figure out!
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71939854
>
> Martha in Dorset
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/31/20 5:17 am
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
Yes, young starlings.

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 8:16 AM
To: <VTBIRD...> <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds

Ruth Stewart and I encountered a flock of blackbirds late in the afternoon and cannot differentiate them from starlings or red-winged blackbirds. Photos are attached to the checklist below if you care to take a look and offer your suggestions. None that we could spot had yellow beaks yet to me the beak shows more like a starling than red-ing. Juvenile starlings do have black beaks? Another bird puzzle to figure out!

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71939854

Martha in Dorset
 

Back to top
Date: 7/31/20 5:16 am
From: Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] ID for blackbirds
Ruth Stewart and I encountered a flock of blackbirds late in the afternoon and cannot differentiate them from  starlings or red-winged blackbirds.  Photos are attached to the checklist below if you care to take a look and offer your suggestions.  None that we could spot had yellow beaks yet to me the beak shows more like a starling than red-ing.  Juvenile starlings do have black beaks?  Another bird puzzle to figure out!

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71939854

  Martha in Dorset
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/20 4:53 pm
From: suki russo <0000001d6c4a8152-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Putney Mtn Hawkwatch 2020
       The safe successful continuation of the Hawkwatch isour goal this season. Thisfall due to the Covid 19 pandemic Putney Mountain Hawkwatch will be postingonly a limited number of observers on the mountain for any given day. Over theyears many ‘Friends of the Watch’ have also spent time with the designatedwatch crew. Sadly this year we are asking others to not visit even as we areseverely curtailing our own numbers. Hopefully these steps will let thosepresent maintain needed social distancing while monitoring raptor flights.
         Eachday’s volunteers will be exclusively from those who are on our roster of longtime qualified personnel. They will work from a very limited, roped off,watcher-only area and only those with assigned duties can be accommodated. Dueto the overall narrow scope of the summit clearing itself and the trail usethat also occurs there we feel that it is imperative that other casual visitorsto the watch do not congregate in and restrict movement through that area.

         ThePutney Mountain Hawkwatch has done an annual fall raptor count since 1974. Datacollected at the site is part of the Raptor Population Index, a study of raptorpopulation trends in the Northeast. Since 2003 Monarch Butterfly flights havealso been recorded. Watch results will be posted daily and can be viewed at www.hawkcount.org.

JoAnne Russo
Saxtons River, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/20 6:16 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 30, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:13 a.m. 61 degrees, wind NNE 0 mph. Sky: a line or two of clouds in the
south, bright everywhere else, gradually lightening lumen by lumen, as the
heaven wipes sleep from its eyes. Permanent streams: emulating birdsongs
both streams drying up; detectable pulse in upper; ratcheting scarcity in
lower, joins the water table below the surface. Wetlands: a suggestion of
ground fog, the softest of brushstrokes that thickens and spreads; a green
frog, the sole voice across a vast marsh. Pond: a mist maker; the hum of
crickets replaces the chatter of birds; bubbles of methane rising from the
sediments gives me something to watch . . . otherwise an unmarred surface,
dark as the Black Hole of Calcutta.

A great blue heron, pipe neck folded and stilt legs trailing, toes
impossibly long, up in the south above the outflow, where frogs convene,
wings extend and curved downward like a long, narrow umbrella. What
scientists and architects call *camber*, the calling card of a mythic and
ubiquitous wading bird*. *Great blue heron: the silhouette of nobility; the
voice of indigestion. Mantled by mist, circling, circling, circling. As
still as stone.

Morning of the hermit thrush, sweet voices electrify the gloom. I want to
bottle up the song of the blueberry-voiced bird, to be preserved like
summer jam; and then replayed on drizzly November mornings; thrush song
rising within me, a euphoric ascendancy . . . a welcome counterpoint during
a spell of bleakness. Hermit thrushes make my world a better place.
 

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Date: 7/30/20 2:05 am
From: Kate Olgiati <2grackle...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Gray Catbirds
Thank you!

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 3:12 PM Diana <dlee3...> wrote:

> This week’s video is about the strikingly handsome gray catbird.
> https://youtu.be/-mh6nmbLokw
>


--
Katherine Olgiati
 

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Date: 7/29/20 12:12 pm
From: Diana <dlee3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Gray Catbirds
This week’s video is about the strikingly handsome gray catbird.
https://youtu.be/-mh6nmbLokw
 

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Date: 7/29/20 7:12 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 29, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:28 a.m. 57 delightful degrees; wind ENE 0 mph. Sky: separating sheet of
clouds in the north; clear with a wash of peach across the south. Woods
twilit; meadows and pastures full of warm light. Permanent streams: mute,
barely moving. Wetlands: wisps of mist rising into the air; absorbed and
gone; across the marsh, webworm tents visible, increasing and expanding; as
if in celebration of the impending bounty of hairy caterpillars, a
yellow-billed cuckoo calls three times then stops. Pond: surface calm and
brown; rolling mist in a hurry to go nowhere; periscoping painted turtle,
yellow stripes against brown water.

DOR: American toad and recently transformed green frog
AOR: Robin looking for roadkilled insects

Robin in charge of tunes, singing everywhere, chase each other around the
treetops like kids on the playground. Stop to scold a red squirrel, which
facing down the trunk, annoyingly flicks its tail. Calling, titmice,
chickadees, and white-breasted nuthatches hint of things to come. Shy
tanager, although more substantiated than the Lost Dutchman's Mine, hides
in the green sweep of the canopy, singing and singing, a seasonal curtain
call . . . a farewell solo. Red-shouldered hawk cries, lancing open the
morning . . . all the world listens. How could you not? Moved to mimic, a
blue jay, decent impressionist but no Will Ferrell, covers the
red-shouldered but fools no one.

A knot of five little brown bats, two days in a row, behind the barn down.

For much of the summer, once the day heated up, I watched a pair of turkey
vultures float over the wetlands, gently rocking back and forth, feathered
kites adrift. They'd dip over the marshland, rise over the valley's western
rim, and disappear behind a bank of trees. I assumed that birds searched
for food, flesh pinned to hide; maybe a deer carcass or a raccoon; perhaps
a mouse that could be swallowed whole like an aspirin. One April, eleven
years ago, while counting rattlesnakes in the Bull Run Mountains of
northern Virginia, I startled a turkey vulture, hidden within a jumble of
boulders. The bird took flight, ascending through a hole in the canopy,
circled a few times, and then perched halfway up a nearby oak. Silently,
and with good reason, the vulture followed my every move. In the boulder
cave from which it had emerged were two large, cream-colored eggs, each
decorated with a disarray of brown, Jackson Pollack spots and squiggles as
if the artist had stood above them with his dripping paintbrush.

Later that summer, while scaling the western rim of the Hollow, my boys,
attracted by sibilant whispers and the smell of rotting meat, found another
vulture nest. Inside a stone alcove, two nearly full-grown juvenile turkey
vultures stood upright and portly, as gray as twilight and as fuzzy as a
faux fur pillow; a downy white shawl around their shoulders and necks.
Almost two-feet tall, they were the quintessential adolescents: upset,
awkward, bitterly protesting, but ready soar.

Yesterday, from the confines of my porch, I watched a vulture cut lazy
circles in the sky, fingering the wind above the fertile stretch of
marshland, preferring the air to the ground, looking and sniffing for a
carcass. Borne on a breeze, hatched amid a fortress of rock, the *very*
essence of a hot summer day. Enough to make me forget that the washed-out
driveway needs repair.
 

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Date: 7/29/20 5:48 am
From: Marylyn Pillsbury <000001cae55256d1-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, final double feature
Thanks for sending. A great gift to see them in nest. Marylyn Pillsbury So Hero
On Wednesday, July 29, 2020 Ian Clark <VTBIRD...> wrote:
And the time has come to say goodbye.  Chicks Two and Three fledged together early last evening. Our last chick wasn’t convinced on the idea. He spent a while pondering heading out last night before deciding to sleep on it. This morning, Mom spent some time calling from her perch in the front yard. The chick would go to the door and look out, but couldn’t make the leap. He final went at 1024 this morning. The chicks and parents have been coming and going around the yard since.

And, Elvis, our kingbird, showed up with a couple hungry chicks in tow this afternoon as well.
And, so, we’ll conclude with a double feature. We’ve got chicks Two and Three taking the leap last night and Four going this morning. Keep watching after Four leaves, he surprises one of the parents who shows up a couple minutes later with a snack.

The files are uploading at 8:00 this evening, they should be ready shortly. Copy & paste the link:

https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847
 

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Date: 7/28/20 7:09 pm
From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] carolina wren napping upside down
??????? Must have been telling you to take a break!
Will try for another social with Laura!
Hope you are dipping in your stream in this weather!
Sal

> On Jul 28, 2020, at 9:33 PM, Linda Gionti <lgionti...> wrote:
>
> This morning I had a curious encounter with a carolina wren. I was sitting in the living room with the door open. A carolina wren appeared next to a pot of petunias on the deck, 15 feet away from me. It just sat there looking at me calmly for some time, even when I got up to get my binoculars. Then it hopped a few inches up onto a horizontal steel cable and slowly swung upside down, beak pointing straight down. It stayed like that for a good 5 minutes, and appeared to close its eyes and nap. Then it stirred and fluttered off into the scrubby underbrush of the backyard. I’m figuring it was perhaps a juvenile given how unperturbed it was with my presence. Could the napping upside down thing have been a random occurrence owing to its gripping a slippery metal cable right at the moment it was possessed by the need to sleep? I took a few pictures of it in acrobatic nap pose. I’m wondering if any of you have witnessed anything like this or have insights to share? It was also surprising because I haven’t had a carolina wren here since March 10 of this year.
>
> -Linda
> on the border of Huntington and Starksboro
 

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Date: 7/28/20 6:33 pm
From: Linda Gionti <lgionti...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] carolina wren napping upside down
This morning I had a curious encounter with a carolina wren. I was sitting in the living room with the door open. A carolina wren appeared next to a pot of petunias on the deck, 15 feet away from me. It just sat there looking at me calmly for some time, even when I got up to get my binoculars. Then it hopped a few inches up onto a horizontal steel cable and slowly swung upside down, beak pointing straight down. It stayed like that for a good 5 minutes, and appeared to close its eyes and nap. Then it stirred and fluttered off into the scrubby underbrush of the backyard. I’m figuring it was perhaps a juvenile given how unperturbed it was with my presence. Could the napping upside down thing have been a random occurrence owing to its gripping a slippery metal cable right at the moment it was possessed by the need to sleep? I took a few pictures of it in acrobatic nap pose. I’m wondering if any of you have witnessed anything like this or have insights to share? It was also surprising because I haven’t had a carolina wren here since March 10 of this year.

-Linda
on the border of Huntington and Starksboro
 

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Date: 7/28/20 5:08 pm
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, final double feature
And the time has come to say goodbye. Chicks Two and Three fledged together early last evening. Our last chick wasn’t convinced on the idea. He spent a while pondering heading out last night before deciding to sleep on it. This morning, Mom spent some time calling from her perch in the front yard. The chick would go to the door and look out, but couldn’t make the leap. He final went at 1024 this morning. The chicks and parents have been coming and going around the yard since.

And, Elvis, our kingbird, showed up with a couple hungry chicks in tow this afternoon as well.
And, so, we’ll conclude with a double feature. We’ve got chicks Two and Three taking the leap last night and Four going this morning. Keep watching after Four leaves, he surprises one of the parents who shows up a couple minutes later with a snack.

The files are uploading at 8:00 this evening, they should be ready shortly. Copy & paste the link:

https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847
 

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Date: 7/28/20 7:07 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 28, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:35 a.m. 69 degrees, wind S 2 mph. Sky: freckled and streaked; soft-hued
blue and pink and lavender; many clouds with silver rims if not linings.
Scattered veils of steam rise from several wetlands, some far off; cotton
balls, rawboned and wispy, on an otherwise green landscape. Permanent
streams: soft hum and slow flow; predacious water striders, skating on
creeping puddles, wait for breakfast to fall in. Wetlands: a gaunt and
partial bowl of mist. Pond: unaccompanied female hooded merganser, again
flushes, wings singing; launches herself into wetlands; welcomed by a
ribbon of open water; painter turtle sculls at the surface. Webworm tents
expanding in cherry trees; one in alder.

Late July; east-central Vermont, the long valley of the Connecticut River:
red-shouldered hawk slings its voice out of a nearby marsh, up and over the
western ridge; arrows of sound piercing the morning. A pewee whistles, sad
little darts of music; tanager in the oaks . . . I still can't see him,
blood-red and loud. Woods filling up with light if not birdsong. Raindrops
dripping off leaves louder than birds. Long stretches of leaf splat and
bird silence. Finally and surprisingly, *NO* red-eyed vireos. After
enduring three months of my constant teasing, they've left me to face
winter alone.

A pair of robins, dueting from opposite sides of the road, a pocket of
music. Draws me in. Quietest walk since late March. Two months ago, I
struggled to keep up with all the songsters, one linear serenade all the
way to the pond. Pileated drumbeat rolls in from across the marsh. From far
off, a hermit thrush and a veery, both ethereal as ever, voices as thin as
mist. A yellow-billed cuckoo calls from the hardwoods, a hollow, swallowed
*cu* like a modulated bittern, long pauses; here for fall webworms.

One bat behind the barn door, an archetype of sixty million years of
evolution. An ambassador from Deep Time, born in the evolutionary cleft
left by dinosaurs. A radical mammal that incorporated flight. An eater of
hundreds of mosquitos a night; also, as a group, the reservoir host of a
litany of zoonotic viruses, including SARS, MERS, Ebola, Nipah, and rabies.
We brought bats white-nosed syndrome. Bats brought us COVID-19.

Bats tolerate viruses, a biological corruption. The elevated body
temperature required for flight holds most germs at bay. According to one
recent investigation, the physiological strain of flying produced leaky
cells in bats that release scaps of free-floating DNA. Bats tolerate these
wafting bits of DNA without a severe immune response, thus avoiding
inflammation and possible grounding; hence, a hospitable environment
predisposed to invading viruses, which linger indefinitely or are delivered
to more susceptible mammals . . . pigs and civets. Or us. Which is why bats
should not be commodities. Let them hawk insects and pollinate flowers.

The moral of this tale: eating bats . . . barbaric; watching bats . . .
immense and purposeful pleasure.
 

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Date: 7/27/20 3:09 pm
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, likely penultimate edition
Our first intrepid chick ventured out into the world about 11:00 this morning. As of about 6:00, the three others remain in the box. Our adventurer hasn’t gone far. He’s hanging around the deck, with mom and dad still bringing him meals. Elvis, our resident kingbird, stopped by for a few minutes to check him out. I’m a little surprised the parents didn’t run him off – it seems like he’d be competition for the bugs.

A couple people have asked why they’re getting a message like “you’re leaving the GMX service” when you click on the link. I’m using a webmail service, GMX, for the list messages. The VTBird list doesn’t like my ‘official’ email for some reason. Just easier for me to use GMX. And, messages to the UV Birders list are easier just to CC.

Not sure why some of you have had problems with the last few days videos. When I get a chance, I’ll try reencoding them and reposting.
 
Copy & paste the line

https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847
 

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Date: 7/27/20 7:49 am
From: Mamuniaangel <000002fe774c7bcd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] re barn swallows and current events
I was thinking the same thing...looking for something to control in a world spinning out of control....forgive him.  But keep your barn open!Angel


-----Original Message-----
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
To: <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 27, 2020 7:05 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] re barn swallows and current events

The persnickety neighbor might be under a lot of stress right now that's
completely unrelated to birds. People have lost jobs and seen their
offspring struggle with job loss. People are scared about sickness and
are feeling the tensions of reduced freedom to roam and many
restrictions and anxieties every time they go out into their
communities. People are made ill themselves by every morning's news. I
think many little irritations can explode into big ones easily in this
environment! - The swallows migrating should be one less thing grating
on this grouchy neighbor's mood.
(Charlie, I loved your list and copied it out for frequent rereading!)
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

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Date: 7/27/20 6:52 am
From: Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
Thanks Charlie! So appreciate your listing of the simple joys and challenges of life in rural VT. I like the idea of reading Frost and then having a friendly chat with the neighbor. Sounds like he just needs some information, some suggestions and to hear a different perspective.
Good luck,
Ruth C.
Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 26, 2020, at 11:03 PM, Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...> wrote:
>
> Hmmm. Is there a utility wire that goes above his deck or to the peak of
> his house that the birds often use as a perch? How much poop is on your own
> roof and car?
>
> Is he blaming the barn swallows simply because they are the most obvious
> birds that he notices? After all, they do fly around a lot in search of
> insects and go in and out of the barn frequently. I'll bet there are plenty
> of robins and sparrows about that also are pooping. I don't know how large
> your barn is. Are there pigeons around?
>
> At any rate....the young should soon be fledged if they haven't yet,
> activity in your barn will decrease, and the swallows will head south
> fairly soon. Additionally, if we choose to live in the country in Vermont,
> there are certain things we have to accept. Muddy roads. Dusty roads. Bumpy
> roads. Salted roads. Icy roads. The smell of freshly spread manure. Well,
> one can actually gain an appreciation of that. Storms of "mixed
> precipitation". Potato beetles and tomato hornworms. Still haven't gained
> an appreciation of them! Aphids. Spider webs. Cluster flies. Blackflies.
> Horse flies. Deer flies. Mosquitoes. Chervil. Poison parsnip. Poison ivy.
> Knotweed. House mice. Bats in the attic. Fresh strawberries. The smell of
> apple blossoms, lilacs, and newly mowed hay. A gillion stars, and sometimes
> a comet, and the Milky Way in the inky sky at night. Owls and coyotes
> calling from the woods. Curious otters. Cows grazing in emerald green
> pastures. Horses on hillsides. Families of grouse running across the road
> with mother grouse holding her ground and acting as crossing guard. Crunchy
> apples. Sweet corn. October foliage. Fresh cider. Maple syrup. Bloodroot in
> April. A little swallow poop is a small price to pay, I think.
>
> Sounds to me like he's just very particular about cleanliness and
> appearance. Many of us pay no mind to such things and simply hope for a
> good rain at regular intervals.
>
> You might take him up on his offer to meet in the shade with a lemonade in
> hand but with the proviso that you both read and discuss "Mending Wall" by
> Robert Frost before you begin your discussion of barn swallows and bird
> droppings.
>
> If that doesn't help you reach an accommodation, you could get a rooster.
>
> Good luck.
>
> Charlie La Rosa
> So. Washington
>
>> On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 9:28 PM Josephine Hingston <
>> <josephine.hingston...> wrote:
>> We have a barn full also and - I guess luckily - no close neighbors. We
>> work in the barn frequently and they do get used to us, but we are still
>> sometimes dive bombed, but never ever worry about them actually making
>> impact (although if your neighbor is flailing at them they may not be able
>> to evade - I would argue neighbor hit them in that case). 25 yrs of
>> peaceful coexistence - they do eat a lot of insects and also keep a lot of
>> berry eating birds out of the raspberry patch coincidentally, which is
>> appreciated.
>> Could neighbor hang shiny things (CDs, can lids, etc) around their deck to
>> deter, or as Mark suggested, use plastic owls? Also like Mark, I confess
>> some skepticism to the claim of significant droppings accumulating on their
>> property... in our experience, the main accumulation of droppings (free,
>> seedless fertilizer!) occurs directly below the nests, but haven't been
>> studying! This time of year the berry eater poop is much more noticable and
>> I wonder if your neighbor is confused. Keeping the garage closed is of
>> course not your responsibility. Your barn is valuable habitat for a
>> protected species.
>> Neighbor honestly seems a little out of whack, from here, but I'm of course
>> biased, so predisposed to read their email with skepticism and disdain -
>> but please be cautious, protective and vigilant on behalf of your
>> delightful swallow neighbors! Keep us posted!
>> On Sun, Jul 26, 2020, 8:34 PM Martha Adams <martha.adams60...>
>> wrote:
>>> Yes, they are protected and they will also be migrating before too long.
>>> There is really nothing you can do now, I think, and hopefully your
>>> neighbor will understand that. It’s too bad he’s so cranky. I hope this
>>> won’t ruin the pleasure you get from watching the swallows.
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>> On Jul 26, 2020, at 1:46 PM, Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
>> wrote:
>>>> We too have a barn chock full of Barn Swallows and they are noisy in
>>> the morning, for sure. That is a small price to pay for having a mosquito
>>> free yard. They do make a serious mess just below each nest. Meh....who
>>> cares. They are protected, it is your barn. Those Barn Swallows will
>> find a
>>> way in even if you were to try to close them out; I’ve seen them fly
>>> through knot holes in barn siding.
>>>> Wishing you an amenable solution.
>>>> Mundi
>>>> North Pownal
>>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>> The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking
>> of
>>> morality by religion.
>>>> Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008
>>>>>> On Jul 26, 2020, at 12:49 PM, Ed Green <edgreen3...> wrote:
>>>>>> It sounds like it would be one of the more bug free areas around.
>>>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>>>> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Debbie
>>>> Lyter
>>>>>> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 11:04 AM
>>>>>> To: <VTBIRD...>
>>>>>> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
>>>>>> This is crazy. How does he know that its the swallows doing the all
>>>> “bombing”? Birds are going to go where and when they want to no matter
>>>> what. He could put up some of those fake owls to keep them away. Its not
>>>> like YOU can control where they go poop. Keep enjoying you birds and just
>>>> tell your neighbor that its just nature taking its course. That's my 3
>>>> cents worth.
>>>>>> Mark Lyter Sr
>>>>>> From: Janet Warren
>>>>>> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 9:53 AM
>>>>>> To: <VTBIRD...>
>>>>>> Subject: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
>>>>>> Greetings,
>>>>>> Below is an e-mail from our next-door neighbor. We have had barn
>>>> swallows nesting in our barn for fourteen years, and they have obviously
>>>> been here far longer, given the number of nests we found in the barn when
>>>> we moved in. We generally have four or five pairs nesting each season.
>> We
>>> do live fairly close to the neighbor, but this is the first complaint. As
>>> far as I could see from where I am, there are no droppings on his roofs,
>> or
>>> porch, and there are six on mine . He has always kept his garage closed
>>> most of the time. It does not seem reasonable to me that he should expect
>>> us to deny the swallows access to a barn they have been inhabiting since
>>> time immemorial.
>>>>> I’ll be devastated if I lose them. I wait eagerly in the spring for
>>> their arrival, and my health may make this one my last. I would welcome
>>> the thoughts of fellow listers on this matter.
>>>>> ~Janet Warren
>> ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
>>>>> Greetings from next door. I would like to bring to your attention just
>>> how demoralizing it is to have to deal with what appears to me to be an
>>> out-of-control bird explosion in our immediate area, at least
>> demoralizing
>>> to me and from my perspective. I can't tell you the impact of multiple
>>> cleaning of bird poop off of my house and my cars, my back deck and my
>>> roofs, that I regularly have to do. I can no longer leave my garage doors
>>> open as the swallows swoop in and out , sometimes out at the motivation
>> of
>>> a swinging broom, and it is not my desire to have them roost in there, or
>>> anywhere. I wash bird poop off of my decks and do it again the next day.
>>> Ditto with cars. My side garden looks like a casualty from the London
>>> Blitz. Then there is the "ick" factor. I know that it's just a matter of
>>> time before I become their hit zone, and even a one-time occurrence would
>>> cause me to explode.
>>>>> Really, it is bordering on the intolerable, one that you have noticed
>>> as well or have seen for yourselves as the birds (mostly swallows) swoop
>>> and dive almost all day over your property, my property, my driveway and
>>> garage and the fields to the east, or their roosting spots (the peak of
>> my
>>> garage roof and second level barn door ledge), and I hope we could engage
>>> in some understanding of the impact of the present conditions and arrive
>> at
>>> a plausible solution. Perhaps I could learn something from you that would
>>> add to what I don't know or am not aware of, I am hopeful that e could
>>> engage as neighbors with a concern.
>>>>> I just don't ever remember these nuisance birds in such numbers, and
>>> for me it's become a problem. I was going to walk over last week during a
>>> late afternoon shade sit to bring this up with you but you had company,
>>> clearly not the right time. I hope the right time is soon. Thank you both
>>> for whatever attention you may wish to give to this issue.
>> _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>>>>> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 7/27/20 6:05 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 27, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:27 a.m. 71 degrees, wind S 2 mph. Sky: overcrowded and three-dimensional;
highlights here and there, most pastel pink; slightly more open in the
south; sun buried behind a bank of clouds; oppressively muggy like dawn in
the tropics. Woods: dull, dark, dank; the air stagnant. Permanent streams:
on the move but in need of a transfusion of moisture, which the sky seems
unwilling to donate. Wetlands: an open bowl of green; a few dragonflies on
patrol. Pond: two idling painted turtles; female hooded merganser bolts
over the brown surface, rises, turns west, and pitches into the wetlands.
Down from eight chicks to one last week. Now, either an empty nester or a
mother in mourning . . . or both. Duck lifestyle: male, just a sperm donor.
We have much more in common with swans and geese, which maintain lifelong
family bonds. Queen Anne's lace blooms along the road and, overhead, in
black cherry, the first fall webworm tents.

DOR: third-year garter snake
AOR: a robin (of course, what would they do without roads?); a red left,
intensely orange and red-spotted. Meant to be seen, particularly by the
robin, a devoted catholic feeder.

Vocal momentum: red-eyed vireos and robins; sing like there's no tomorrow.
Two tanagers, screened by oak leaves and in need of a voice coach. Again,
and to no avail, I strain to see them. Muted chorus: pewees, phoebes,
juncos, lonely crow, jays,
goldfinches. The fractured song of a hermit thrush, emissary from the dim
woods, brightens the morning more than the sun, which remains buried by
congested clouds. A flock of more than twenty turkeys takes issue with me.
Explodes in every direction, the world resonating with thunderous wing
beats and halfhearted gobbles. Then, stillness.

Behind the barn door . . . two bats, both close to the slivered opening. As
an undergraduate in Indiana heartland, I spent summer nights helping a prof
with a bat-banding project. Banding bats is like banding birds, except you
have to be more careful when you remove a bat from a mist net. Bats are not
more delicate than a bird; in fact, bats are more substantial than
songbirds of equal size. You take care because bats have *sharp* little
teeth and carry diseases, you don't want to get.

At twilight, more than a thousand little brown bats (*Myotis lucifugus*)
and big brown bats (*Eptesicus fuscus*) would leave their communal nursery
in a derelict barn. Outside, the bats trolled the night sky for insects.
Exiting the barn, they had to pass through a gauntlet of mist nets. We
caught thirty or forty each night and then fixed them with aluminum
anklets; the world sizzled with bat energy and reeked of ammonia. Pure
Hitchcock: crumbling barn; fidgety nets strung across the doorway; clouds
of bats fluttering in and out of headlamp beams. Discordant, high-pitched
squeals; an electric broadcast suitable for a nightmare.

Not long ago, my two-stall horse barn hosted a dozen little brown bats.
Half an hour after sunset, the bats took wing above the pasture, each the
moving epicenter of a limitless and entwined oval. Some came to the porch
light like fish to chum. I miss the bats the way I missed butterflies and
bees that had frequented my boyhood gardens in the late 1950s, and then
suddenly vanished in a haze of backyard pesticides.

It's hard to say when—or if—bats will return to the vacant airspace above
my pastures. I take solace in these two barn bats, survivors of their own
crippling epidemic. Survivors, yes, survivors . . . and that's what matters.
 

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Date: 7/27/20 4:27 am
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] re barn swallows and current events
And it is wicked hot and humid ......

On 7/27/2020 7:05 AM, maevulus wrote:
> The persnickety neighbor might be under a lot of stress right now
> that's completely unrelated to birds. People have lost jobs and seen
> their offspring struggle with job loss. People are scared about
> sickness and are feeling the tensions of reduced freedom to roam and
> many restrictions and anxieties every time they go out into their
> communities. People are made ill themselves by every morning's news. I
> think many little irritations can explode into big ones easily in this
> environment! - The swallows migrating should be one less thing grating
> on this grouchy neighbor's mood.
> (Charlie, I loved your list and copied it out for frequent rereading!)
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

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Date: 7/27/20 4:05 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] re barn swallows and current events
The persnickety neighbor might be under a lot of stress right now that's
completely unrelated to birds. People have lost jobs and seen their
offspring struggle with job loss. People are scared about sickness and
are feeling the tensions of reduced freedom to roam and many
restrictions and anxieties every time they go out into their
communities. People are made ill themselves by every morning's news. I
think many little irritations can explode into big ones easily in this
environment! - The swallows migrating should be one less thing grating
on this grouchy neighbor's mood.
(Charlie, I loved your list and copied it out for frequent rereading!)
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 8:03 pm
From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
Hmmm. Is there a utility wire that goes above his deck or to the peak of
his house that the birds often use as a perch? How much poop is on your own
roof and car?

Is he blaming the barn swallows simply because they are the most obvious
birds that he notices? After all, they do fly around a lot in search of
insects and go in and out of the barn frequently. I'll bet there are plenty
of robins and sparrows about that also are pooping. I don't know how large
your barn is. Are there pigeons around?

At any rate....the young should soon be fledged if they haven't yet,
activity in your barn will decrease, and the swallows will head south
fairly soon. Additionally, if we choose to live in the country in Vermont,
there are certain things we have to accept. Muddy roads. Dusty roads. Bumpy
roads. Salted roads. Icy roads. The smell of freshly spread manure. Well,
one can actually gain an appreciation of that. Storms of "mixed
precipitation". Potato beetles and tomato hornworms. Still haven't gained
an appreciation of them! Aphids. Spider webs. Cluster flies. Blackflies.
Horse flies. Deer flies. Mosquitoes. Chervil. Poison parsnip. Poison ivy.
Knotweed. House mice. Bats in the attic. Fresh strawberries. The smell of
apple blossoms, lilacs, and newly mowed hay. A gillion stars, and sometimes
a comet, and the Milky Way in the inky sky at night. Owls and coyotes
calling from the woods. Curious otters. Cows grazing in emerald green
pastures. Horses on hillsides. Families of grouse running across the road
with mother grouse holding her ground and acting as crossing guard. Crunchy
apples. Sweet corn. October foliage. Fresh cider. Maple syrup. Bloodroot in
April. A little swallow poop is a small price to pay, I think.

Sounds to me like he's just very particular about cleanliness and
appearance. Many of us pay no mind to such things and simply hope for a
good rain at regular intervals.

You might take him up on his offer to meet in the shade with a lemonade in
hand but with the proviso that you both read and discuss "Mending Wall" by
Robert Frost before you begin your discussion of barn swallows and bird
droppings.

If that doesn't help you reach an accommodation, you could get a rooster.

Good luck.

Charlie La Rosa
So. Washington

On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 9:28 PM Josephine Hingston <
<josephine.hingston...> wrote:

> We have a barn full also and - I guess luckily - no close neighbors. We
> work in the barn frequently and they do get used to us, but we are still
> sometimes dive bombed, but never ever worry about them actually making
> impact (although if your neighbor is flailing at them they may not be able
> to evade - I would argue neighbor hit them in that case). 25 yrs of
> peaceful coexistence - they do eat a lot of insects and also keep a lot of
> berry eating birds out of the raspberry patch coincidentally, which is
> appreciated.
>
> Could neighbor hang shiny things (CDs, can lids, etc) around their deck to
> deter, or as Mark suggested, use plastic owls? Also like Mark, I confess
> some skepticism to the claim of significant droppings accumulating on their
> property... in our experience, the main accumulation of droppings (free,
> seedless fertilizer!) occurs directly below the nests, but haven't been
> studying! This time of year the berry eater poop is much more noticable and
> I wonder if your neighbor is confused. Keeping the garage closed is of
> course not your responsibility. Your barn is valuable habitat for a
> protected species.
>
> Neighbor honestly seems a little out of whack, from here, but I'm of course
> biased, so predisposed to read their email with skepticism and disdain -
> but please be cautious, protective and vigilant on behalf of your
> delightful swallow neighbors! Keep us posted!
>
> On Sun, Jul 26, 2020, 8:34 PM Martha Adams <martha.adams60...>
> wrote:
>
> > Yes, they are protected and they will also be migrating before too long.
> > There is really nothing you can do now, I think, and hopefully your
> > neighbor will understand that. It’s too bad he’s so cranky. I hope this
> > won’t ruin the pleasure you get from watching the swallows.
> >
> > Sent from my iPad
> >
> > > On Jul 26, 2020, at 1:46 PM, Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
> wrote:
> > >
> > > We too have a barn chock full of Barn Swallows and they are noisy in
> > the morning, for sure. That is a small price to pay for having a mosquito
> > free yard. They do make a serious mess just below each nest. Meh....who
> > cares. They are protected, it is your barn. Those Barn Swallows will
> find a
> > way in even if you were to try to close them out; I’ve seen them fly
> > through knot holes in barn siding.
> > > Wishing you an amenable solution.
> > >
> > > Mundi
> > > North Pownal
> > >
> > > Sent from my iPad
> > >
> > > The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking
> of
> > morality by religion.
> > > Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008
> > >
> > >> On Jul 26, 2020, at 12:49 PM, Ed Green <edgreen3...> wrote:
> > >>
> > >> It sounds like it would be one of the more bug free areas around.
> > >>
> > >> -----Original Message-----
> > >> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Debbie
> > Lyter
> > >> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 11:04 AM
> > >> To: <VTBIRD...>
> > >> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
> > >>
> > >> This is crazy. How does he know that its the swallows doing the all
> > “bombing”? Birds are going to go where and when they want to no matter
> > what. He could put up some of those fake owls to keep them away. Its not
> > like YOU can control where they go poop. Keep enjoying you birds and just
> > tell your neighbor that its just nature taking its course. That's my 3
> > cents worth.
> > >> Mark Lyter Sr
> > >> From: Janet Warren
> > >> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 9:53 AM
> > >> To: <VTBIRD...>
> > >> Subject: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
> > >>
> > >> Greetings,
> > >>
> > >> Below is an e-mail from our next-door neighbor. We have had barn
> > swallows nesting in our barn for fourteen years, and they have obviously
> > been here far longer, given the number of nests we found in the barn when
> > we moved in. We generally have four or five pairs nesting each season.
> We
> > do live fairly close to the neighbor, but this is the first complaint. As
> > far as I could see from where I am, there are no droppings on his roofs,
> or
> > porch, and there are six on mine . He has always kept his garage closed
> > most of the time. It does not seem reasonable to me that he should expect
> > us to deny the swallows access to a barn they have been inhabiting since
> > time immemorial.
> > >> I’ll be devastated if I lose them. I wait eagerly in the spring for
> > their arrival, and my health may make this one my last. I would welcome
> > the thoughts of fellow listers on this matter.
> > >>
> > >> ~Janet Warren
> > >>
> >
> ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
> > >>
> > >> Greetings from next door. I would like to bring to your attention just
> > how demoralizing it is to have to deal with what appears to me to be an
> > out-of-control bird explosion in our immediate area, at least
> demoralizing
> > to me and from my perspective. I can't tell you the impact of multiple
> > cleaning of bird poop off of my house and my cars, my back deck and my
> > roofs, that I regularly have to do. I can no longer leave my garage doors
> > open as the swallows swoop in and out , sometimes out at the motivation
> of
> > a swinging broom, and it is not my desire to have them roost in there, or
> > anywhere. I wash bird poop off of my decks and do it again the next day.
> > Ditto with cars. My side garden looks like a casualty from the London
> > Blitz. Then there is the "ick" factor. I know that it's just a matter of
> > time before I become their hit zone, and even a one-time occurrence would
> > cause me to explode.
> > >>
> > >> Really, it is bordering on the intolerable, one that you have noticed
> > as well or have seen for yourselves as the birds (mostly swallows) swoop
> > and dive almost all day over your property, my property, my driveway and
> > garage and the fields to the east, or their roosting spots (the peak of
> my
> > garage roof and second level barn door ledge), and I hope we could engage
> > in some understanding of the impact of the present conditions and arrive
> at
> > a plausible solution. Perhaps I could learn something from you that would
> > add to what I don't know or am not aware of, I am hopeful that e could
> > engage as neighbors with a concern.
> > >>
> > >> I just don't ever remember these nuisance birds in such numbers, and
> > for me it's become a problem. I was going to walk over last week during a
> > late afternoon shade sit to bring this up with you but you had company,
> > clearly not the right time. I hope the right time is soon. Thank you both
> > for whatever attention you may wish to give to this issue.
> > >>
> >
> _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________=
> > >>
> > >> --
> > >> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> > >> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
> >
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 6:28 pm
From: Josephine Hingston <josephine.hingston...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
We have a barn full also and - I guess luckily - no close neighbors. We
work in the barn frequently and they do get used to us, but we are still
sometimes dive bombed, but never ever worry about them actually making
impact (although if your neighbor is flailing at them they may not be able
to evade - I would argue neighbor hit them in that case). 25 yrs of
peaceful coexistence - they do eat a lot of insects and also keep a lot of
berry eating birds out of the raspberry patch coincidentally, which is
appreciated.

Could neighbor hang shiny things (CDs, can lids, etc) around their deck to
deter, or as Mark suggested, use plastic owls? Also like Mark, I confess
some skepticism to the claim of significant droppings accumulating on their
property... in our experience, the main accumulation of droppings (free,
seedless fertilizer!) occurs directly below the nests, but haven't been
studying! This time of year the berry eater poop is much more noticable and
I wonder if your neighbor is confused. Keeping the garage closed is of
course not your responsibility. Your barn is valuable habitat for a
protected species.

Neighbor honestly seems a little out of whack, from here, but I'm of course
biased, so predisposed to read their email with skepticism and disdain -
but please be cautious, protective and vigilant on behalf of your
delightful swallow neighbors! Keep us posted!

On Sun, Jul 26, 2020, 8:34 PM Martha Adams <martha.adams60...> wrote:

> Yes, they are protected and they will also be migrating before too long.
> There is really nothing you can do now, I think, and hopefully your
> neighbor will understand that. It’s too bad he’s so cranky. I hope this
> won’t ruin the pleasure you get from watching the swallows.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Jul 26, 2020, at 1:46 PM, Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> wrote:
> >
> > We too have a barn chock full of Barn Swallows and they are noisy in
> the morning, for sure. That is a small price to pay for having a mosquito
> free yard. They do make a serious mess just below each nest. Meh....who
> cares. They are protected, it is your barn. Those Barn Swallows will find a
> way in even if you were to try to close them out; I’ve seen them fly
> through knot holes in barn siding.
> > Wishing you an amenable solution.
> >
> > Mundi
> > North Pownal
> >
> > Sent from my iPad
> >
> > The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking of
> morality by religion.
> > Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008
> >
> >> On Jul 26, 2020, at 12:49 PM, Ed Green <edgreen3...> wrote:
> >>
> >> It sounds like it would be one of the more bug free areas around.
> >>
> >> -----Original Message-----
> >> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Debbie
> Lyter
> >> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 11:04 AM
> >> To: <VTBIRD...>
> >> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
> >>
> >> This is crazy. How does he know that its the swallows doing the all
> “bombing”? Birds are going to go where and when they want to no matter
> what. He could put up some of those fake owls to keep them away. Its not
> like YOU can control where they go poop. Keep enjoying you birds and just
> tell your neighbor that its just nature taking its course. That's my 3
> cents worth.
> >> Mark Lyter Sr
> >> From: Janet Warren
> >> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 9:53 AM
> >> To: <VTBIRD...>
> >> Subject: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
> >>
> >> Greetings,
> >>
> >> Below is an e-mail from our next-door neighbor. We have had barn
> swallows nesting in our barn for fourteen years, and they have obviously
> been here far longer, given the number of nests we found in the barn when
> we moved in. We generally have four or five pairs nesting each season. We
> do live fairly close to the neighbor, but this is the first complaint. As
> far as I could see from where I am, there are no droppings on his roofs, or
> porch, and there are six on mine . He has always kept his garage closed
> most of the time. It does not seem reasonable to me that he should expect
> us to deny the swallows access to a barn they have been inhabiting since
> time immemorial.
> >> I’ll be devastated if I lose them. I wait eagerly in the spring for
> their arrival, and my health may make this one my last. I would welcome
> the thoughts of fellow listers on this matter.
> >>
> >> ~Janet Warren
> >>
> ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
> >>
> >> Greetings from next door. I would like to bring to your attention just
> how demoralizing it is to have to deal with what appears to me to be an
> out-of-control bird explosion in our immediate area, at least demoralizing
> to me and from my perspective. I can't tell you the impact of multiple
> cleaning of bird poop off of my house and my cars, my back deck and my
> roofs, that I regularly have to do. I can no longer leave my garage doors
> open as the swallows swoop in and out , sometimes out at the motivation of
> a swinging broom, and it is not my desire to have them roost in there, or
> anywhere. I wash bird poop off of my decks and do it again the next day.
> Ditto with cars. My side garden looks like a casualty from the London
> Blitz. Then there is the "ick" factor. I know that it's just a matter of
> time before I become their hit zone, and even a one-time occurrence would
> cause me to explode.
> >>
> >> Really, it is bordering on the intolerable, one that you have noticed
> as well or have seen for yourselves as the birds (mostly swallows) swoop
> and dive almost all day over your property, my property, my driveway and
> garage and the fields to the east, or their roosting spots (the peak of my
> garage roof and second level barn door ledge), and I hope we could engage
> in some understanding of the impact of the present conditions and arrive at
> a plausible solution. Perhaps I could learn something from you that would
> add to what I don't know or am not aware of, I am hopeful that e could
> engage as neighbors with a concern.
> >>
> >> I just don't ever remember these nuisance birds in such numbers, and
> for me it's become a problem. I was going to walk over last week during a
> late afternoon shade sit to bring this up with you but you had company,
> clearly not the right time. I hope the right time is soon. Thank you both
> for whatever attention you may wish to give to this issue.
> >>
> _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________=
> >>
> >> --
> >> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> >> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 5:34 pm
From: Martha Adams <martha.adams60...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
Yes, they are protected and they will also be migrating before too long. There is really nothing you can do now, I think, and hopefully your neighbor will understand that. It’s too bad he’s so cranky. I hope this won’t ruin the pleasure you get from watching the swallows.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 26, 2020, at 1:46 PM, Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> wrote:
>
> We too have a barn chock full of Barn Swallows and they are noisy in the morning, for sure. That is a small price to pay for having a mosquito free yard. They do make a serious mess just below each nest. Meh....who cares. They are protected, it is your barn. Those Barn Swallows will find a way in even if you were to try to close them out; I’ve seen them fly through knot holes in barn siding.
> Wishing you an amenable solution.
>
> Mundi
> North Pownal
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
> Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008
>
>> On Jul 26, 2020, at 12:49 PM, Ed Green <edgreen3...> wrote:
>>
>> It sounds like it would be one of the more bug free areas around.
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Debbie Lyter
>> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 11:04 AM
>> To: <VTBIRD...>
>> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
>>
>> This is crazy. How does he know that its the swallows doing the all “bombing”? Birds are going to go where and when they want to no matter what. He could put up some of those fake owls to keep them away. Its not like YOU can control where they go poop. Keep enjoying you birds and just tell your neighbor that its just nature taking its course. That's my 3 cents worth.
>> Mark Lyter Sr
>> From: Janet Warren
>> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 9:53 AM
>> To: <VTBIRD...>
>> Subject: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
>>
>> Greetings,
>>
>> Below is an e-mail from our next-door neighbor. We have had barn swallows nesting in our barn for fourteen years, and they have obviously been here far longer, given the number of nests we found in the barn when we moved in. We generally have four or five pairs nesting each season. We do live fairly close to the neighbor, but this is the first complaint. As far as I could see from where I am, there are no droppings on his roofs, or porch, and there are six on mine . He has always kept his garage closed most of the time. It does not seem reasonable to me that he should expect us to deny the swallows access to a barn they have been inhabiting since time immemorial.
>> I’ll be devastated if I lose them. I wait eagerly in the spring for their arrival, and my health may make this one my last. I would welcome the thoughts of fellow listers on this matter.
>>
>> ~Janet Warren
>> ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
>>
>> Greetings from next door. I would like to bring to your attention just how demoralizing it is to have to deal with what appears to me to be an out-of-control bird explosion in our immediate area, at least demoralizing to me and from my perspective. I can't tell you the impact of multiple cleaning of bird poop off of my house and my cars, my back deck and my roofs, that I regularly have to do. I can no longer leave my garage doors open as the swallows swoop in and out , sometimes out at the motivation of a swinging broom, and it is not my desire to have them roost in there, or anywhere. I wash bird poop off of my decks and do it again the next day. Ditto with cars. My side garden looks like a casualty from the London Blitz. Then there is the "ick" factor. I know that it's just a matter of time before I become their hit zone, and even a one-time occurrence would cause me to explode.
>>
>> Really, it is bordering on the intolerable, one that you have noticed as well or have seen for yourselves as the birds (mostly swallows) swoop and dive almost all day over your property, my property, my driveway and garage and the fields to the east, or their roosting spots (the peak of my garage roof and second level barn door ledge), and I hope we could engage in some understanding of the impact of the present conditions and arrive at a plausible solution. Perhaps I could learn something from you that would add to what I don't know or am not aware of, I am hopeful that e could engage as neighbors with a concern.
>>
>> I just don't ever remember these nuisance birds in such numbers, and for me it's become a problem. I was going to walk over last week during a late afternoon shade sit to bring this up with you but you had company, clearly not the right time. I hope the right time is soon. Thank you both for whatever attention you may wish to give to this issue.
>> _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________=
>>
>> --
>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 4:40 pm
From: Rita Pitkin <ritapitkin15...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
Wow Ian - you have a regular Bluebird baby farm there. Thanks for sharing.


On Sun, Jul 26, 2020 at 6:55 PM Ian Clark <lenscapon...> wrote:

> Today was the first day the chicks might have fledged. By popular demand,
> they've been held over for at least another day. Enjoy them while they're
> here!
>
> Copy & paste the link:
>
> https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 3:55 pm
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Sunday edition
Today was the first day the chicks might have fledged. By popular demand, they've been held over for at least another day. Enjoy them while they're here!
 
Copy & paste the link:

https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 10:46 am
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
We too have a barn chock full of Barn Swallows and they are noisy in the morning, for sure. That is a small price to pay for having a mosquito free yard. They do make a serious mess just below each nest. Meh....who cares. They are protected, it is your barn. Those Barn Swallows will find a way in even if you were to try to close them out; I’ve seen them fly through knot holes in barn siding.
Wishing you an amenable solution.

Mundi
North Pownal

Sent from my iPad

The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008

> On Jul 26, 2020, at 12:49 PM, Ed Green <edgreen3...> wrote:
>
> It sounds like it would be one of the more bug free areas around.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Debbie Lyter
> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 11:04 AM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
>
> This is crazy. How does he know that its the swallows doing the all “bombing”? Birds are going to go where and when they want to no matter what. He could put up some of those fake owls to keep them away. Its not like YOU can control where they go poop. Keep enjoying you birds and just tell your neighbor that its just nature taking its course. That's my 3 cents worth.
> Mark Lyter Sr
> From: Janet Warren
> Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 9:53 AM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
>
> Greetings,
>
> Below is an e-mail from our next-door neighbor. We have had barn swallows nesting in our barn for fourteen years, and they have obviously been here far longer, given the number of nests we found in the barn when we moved in. We generally have four or five pairs nesting each season. We do live fairly close to the neighbor, but this is the first complaint. As far as I could see from where I am, there are no droppings on his roofs, or porch, and there are six on mine . He has always kept his garage closed most of the time. It does not seem reasonable to me that he should expect us to deny the swallows access to a barn they have been inhabiting since time immemorial.
> I’ll be devastated if I lose them. I wait eagerly in the spring for their arrival, and my health may make this one my last. I would welcome the thoughts of fellow listers on this matter.
>
> ~Janet Warren
> ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________
>
> Greetings from next door. I would like to bring to your attention just how demoralizing it is to have to deal with what appears to me to be an out-of-control bird explosion in our immediate area, at least demoralizing to me and from my perspective. I can't tell you the impact of multiple cleaning of bird poop off of my house and my cars, my back deck and my roofs, that I regularly have to do. I can no longer leave my garage doors open as the swallows swoop in and out , sometimes out at the motivation of a swinging broom, and it is not my desire to have them roost in there, or anywhere. I wash bird poop off of my decks and do it again the next day. Ditto with cars. My side garden looks like a casualty from the London Blitz. Then there is the "ick" factor. I know that it's just a matter of time before I become their hit zone, and even a one-time occurrence would cause me to explode.
>
> Really, it is bordering on the intolerable, one that you have noticed as well or have seen for yourselves as the birds (mostly swallows) swoop and dive almost all day over your property, my property, my driveway and garage and the fields to the east, or their roosting spots (the peak of my garage roof and second level barn door ledge), and I hope we could engage in some understanding of the impact of the present conditions and arrive at a plausible solution. Perhaps I could learn something from you that would add to what I don't know or am not aware of, I am hopeful that e could engage as neighbors with a concern.
>
> I just don't ever remember these nuisance birds in such numbers, and for me it's become a problem. I was going to walk over last week during a late afternoon shade sit to bring this up with you but you had company, clearly not the right time. I hope the right time is soon. Thank you both for whatever attention you may wish to give to this issue.
> _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________=
>
> --
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 10:01 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] does anyone have photos of ...
On 2020-07-26 12:54, Charles Gangas wrote:
> I may also have a few images of Bison-I can check.
>
> Best,
>
> Chuck
>
> Follow my photography on Instagram:
> Instagram.com/charlesgangas.photography
>
>> On Jul 26, 2020, at 12:52, Charles Gangas <dashlast...> wrote:
>>
>> Hello Maeve,
>>
>> I have a few images of Harris Hawks captured from Antelope Island,
>> Utah, and Ridgefiekd WMA, Washington.
>>
>> Best,
>>
>> Chuck Gangas
>>
>> Follow my photography on Instagram:
>> Instagram.com/charlesgangas.photography
>>
>>>> On Jul 26, 2020, at 10:09, maevulus <maevulus...> wrote:
>>>>
>>> bison and/or Black-billed Magpie and/or a western hawk (Harris or
>>> Gray or other)? I'm working on a class about birds in myths and
>>> legends from the first Americans and don't have pictures for one of
>>> the Cheyenne stories. Thanks!
>>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
Hello, Chuck – I got several pictures of Harris’ and Ferruginous Hawks
but not a one of a bison. That would be great. (I tried taking some off
the web but they’re very pixelated.) Thank you so much!
Maeve
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 9:54 am
From: Charles Gangas <0000051a71a2f355-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] does anyone have photos of ...
I may also have a few images of Bison-I can check.

Best,

Chuck

Follow my photography on Instagram:
Instagram.com/charlesgangas.photography

> On Jul 26, 2020, at 12:52, Charles Gangas <dashlast...> wrote:
>
> Hello Maeve,
>
> I have a few images of Harris Hawks captured from Antelope Island, Utah, and Ridgefiekd WMA, Washington.
>
> Best,
>
> Chuck Gangas
>
> Follow my photography on Instagram:
> Instagram.com/charlesgangas.photography
>
>>> On Jul 26, 2020, at 10:09, maevulus <maevulus...> wrote:
>>>
>> bison and/or Black-billed Magpie and/or a western hawk (Harris or Gray or other)? I'm working on a class about birds in myths and legends from the first Americans and don't have pictures for one of the Cheyenne stories. Thanks!
>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

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Date: 7/26/20 9:52 am
From: Charles Gangas <0000051a71a2f355-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] does anyone have photos of ...
Hello Maeve,

I have a few images of Harris Hawks captured from Antelope Island, Utah, and Ridgefiekd WMA, Washington.

Best,

Chuck Gangas

Follow my photography on Instagram:
Instagram.com/charlesgangas.photography

> On Jul 26, 2020, at 10:09, maevulus <maevulus...> wrote:
>
> bison and/or Black-billed Magpie and/or a western hawk (Harris or Gray or other)? I'm working on a class about birds in myths and legends from the first Americans and don't have pictures for one of the Cheyenne stories. Thanks!
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

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Date: 7/26/20 9:49 am
From: Ed Green <edgreen3...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
It sounds like it would be one of the more bug free areas around.

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Debbie Lyter
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 11:04 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0

This is crazy. How does he know that its the swallows doing the all “bombing”? Birds are going to go where and when they want to no matter what. He could put up some of those fake owls to keep them away. Its not like YOU can control where they go poop. Keep enjoying you birds and just tell your neighbor that its just nature taking its course. That's my 3 cents worth.
Mark Lyter Sr
From: Janet Warren
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 9:53 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0

Greetings,

Below is an e-mail from our next-door neighbor. We have had barn swallows nesting in our barn for fourteen years, and they have obviously been here far longer, given the number of nests we found in the barn when we moved in. We generally have four or five pairs nesting each season. We do live fairly close to the neighbor, but this is the first complaint. As far as I could see from where I am, there are no droppings on his roofs, or porch, and there are six on mine . He has always kept his garage closed most of the time. It does not seem reasonable to me that he should expect us to deny the swallows access to a barn they have been inhabiting since time immemorial.
I’ll be devastated if I lose them. I wait eagerly in the spring for their arrival, and my health may make this one my last. I would welcome the thoughts of fellow listers on this matter.

~Janet Warren
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Greetings from next door. I would like to bring to your attention just how demoralizing it is to have to deal with what appears to me to be an out-of-control bird explosion in our immediate area, at least demoralizing to me and from my perspective. I can't tell you the impact of multiple cleaning of bird poop off of my house and my cars, my back deck and my roofs, that I regularly have to do. I can no longer leave my garage doors open as the swallows swoop in and out , sometimes out at the motivation of a swinging broom, and it is not my desire to have them roost in there, or anywhere. I wash bird poop off of my decks and do it again the next day. Ditto with cars. My side garden looks like a casualty from the London Blitz. Then there is the "ick" factor. I know that it's just a matter of time before I become their hit zone, and even a one-time occurrence would cause me to explode.

Really, it is bordering on the intolerable, one that you have noticed as well or have seen for yourselves as the birds (mostly swallows) swoop and dive almost all day over your property, my property, my driveway and garage and the fields to the east, or their roosting spots (the peak of my garage roof and second level barn door ledge), and I hope we could engage in some understanding of the impact of the present conditions and arrive at a plausible solution. Perhaps I could learn something from you that would add to what I don't know or am not aware of, I am hopeful that e could engage as neighbors with a concern.

I just don't ever remember these nuisance birds in such numbers, and for me it's become a problem. I was going to walk over last week during a late afternoon shade sit to bring this up with you but you had company, clearly not the right time. I hope the right time is soon. Thank you both for whatever attention you may wish to give to this issue.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________=

--
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https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 7/26/20 8:04 am
From: Debbie Lyter <mndlyter...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
This is crazy. How does he know that its the swallows doing the all “bombing”? Birds are going to go where and when they want to no matter what. He could put up some of those fake owls to keep them away. Its not like YOU can control where they go poop. Keep enjoying you birds and just tell your neighbor that its just nature taking its course. That's my 3 cents worth.
Mark Lyter Sr
From: Janet Warren
Sent: Sunday, July 26, 2020 9:53 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0

Greetings,

Below is an e-mail from our next-door neighbor. We have had barn swallows nesting in our barn for fourteen years, and they have obviously been here far longer, given the number of nests we found in the barn when we moved in. We generally have four or five pairs nesting each season. We do live fairly close to the neighbor, but this is the first complaint. As far as I could see from where I am, there are no droppings on his roofs, or porch, and there are six on mine . He has always kept his garage closed most of the time. It does not seem reasonable to me that he should expect us to deny the swallows access to a barn they have been inhabiting since time immemorial.
I’ll be devastated if I lose them. I wait eagerly in the spring for their arrival, and my health may make this one my last. I would welcome the thoughts of fellow listers on this matter.

~Janet Warren
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Greetings from next door. I would like to bring to your attention just how demoralizing it is to have to deal with what appears to me to be an out-of-control bird explosion in our immediate area, at least demoralizing to me and from my perspective. I can't tell you the impact of multiple cleaning of bird poop off of my house and my cars, my back deck and my roofs, that I regularly have to do. I can no longer leave my garage doors open as the swallows swoop in and out , sometimes out at the motivation of a swinging broom, and it is not my desire to have them roost in there, or anywhere. I wash bird poop off of my decks and do it again the next day. Ditto with cars. My side garden looks like a casualty from the London Blitz. Then there is the "ick" factor. I know that it's just a matter of time before I become their hit zone, and even a one-time occurrence would cause me to explode.

Really, it is bordering on the intolerable, one that you have noticed as well or have seen for yourselves as the birds (mostly swallows) swoop and dive almost all day over your property, my property, my driveway and garage and the fields to the east, or their roosting spots (the peak of my garage roof and second level barn door ledge), and I hope we could engage in some understanding of the impact of the present conditions and arrive at a plausible solution. Perhaps I could learn something from you that would add to what I don't know or am not aware of, I am hopeful that e could engage as neighbors with a concern.

I just don't ever remember these nuisance birds in such numbers, and for me it's become a problem. I was going to walk over last week during a late afternoon shade sit to bring this up with you but you had company, clearly not the right time. I hope the right time is soon. Thank you both for whatever attention you may wish to give to this issue.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________=

--
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 7/26/20 8:03 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
Dear list on a summer day, this post by Janet is upsetting to read.
I'm sure birders are also lawyers. Could someone chime in even if to
shoot down what I'm thinking: that the birds are protected, that one's
barn is one's castle. Whether inconvenience caused by a bird is
Janet's responsibility or a force majeure : ).
Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK

On 7/26/2020 at 9:53 AM, "Janet Warren" wrote:Greetings,

Below is an e-mail from our next-door neighbor. We have had barn
swallows nesting in our barn for fourteen years, and they have
obviously been here far longer, given the number of nests we found in
the barn when we moved in. We generally have four or five pairs
nesting each season. We do live fairly close to the neighbor, but
this is the first complaint. As far as I could see from where I am,
there are no droppings on his roofs, or porch, and there are six on
mine . He has always kept his garage closed most of the time. It does
not seem reasonable to me that he should expect us to deny the
swallows access to a barn they have been inhabiting since time
immemorial.
I’ll be devastated if I lose them. I wait eagerly in the spring
for their arrival, and my health may make this one my last. I would
welcome the thoughts of fellow listers on this matter.

~Janet Warren
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Greetings from next door. I would like to bring to your attention just
how demoralizing it is to have to deal with what appears to me to be
an out-of-control bird explosion in our immediate area, at least
demoralizing to me and from my perspective. I can't tell you the
impact of multiple cleaning of bird poop off of my house and my cars,
my back deck and my roofs, that I regularly have to do. I can no
longer leave my garage doors open as the swallows swoop in and out ,
sometimes out at the motivation of a swinging broom, and it is not my
desire to have them roost in there, or anywhere. I wash bird poop off
of my decks and do it again the next day. Ditto with cars. My side
garden looks like a casualty from the London Blitz. Then there is the
"ick" factor. I know that it's just a matter of time before I become
their hit zone, and even a one-time occurrence would cause me to
explode.

Really, it is bordering on the intolerable, one that you have noticed
as well or have seen for yourselves as the birds (mostly swallows)
swoop and dive almost all day over your property, my property, my
driveway and garage and the fields to the east, or their roosting
spots (the peak of my garage roof and second level barn door ledge),
and I hope we could engage in some understanding of the impact of the
present conditions and arrive at a plausible solution. Perhaps I could
learn something from you that would add to what I don't know or am not
aware of, I am hopeful that e could engage as neighbors with a
concern.

I just don't ever remember these nuisance birds in such numbers, and
for me it's become a problem. I was going to walk over last week
during a late afternoon shade sit to bring this up with you but you
had company, clearly not the right time. I hope the right time is
soon. Thank you both for whatever attention you may wish to give to
this issue.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 7:55 am
From: edgreen3 <edgreen3...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders

I would use parachute cord and pulley system.  That's what I use under my eaves after bears took down the shepherd hooks.Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...> Date: 7/25/20 7:19 PM (GMT-05:00) To: <VTBIRD...> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders Ask Birds of  Vermont Museum what they  use.Sent from my iPad> On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:01 PM, Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...> wrote:> > I've had to stop feeding for the second year in a row because of a visiting bear who is very fond of my bird feeder.  Looking for a solution to bear proof a feeding station, someone made this suggestion: > > Place a 6" pipe over a 16 ft. 4 X 4, cement it into a 2 ft.hole in the ground.  Supposedly the bear cannot climb up the pipe. Bear can't grip it. Across the top of the 4x4 secure a 2X4 cut to length you want and that makes to arms extending - screw in hooks underneath from which the feeder will hang.  Use a long pole with a hook on the end to take the feeder down for refill.  Has anyone had success with such a contraption??  Keeping in mind it will be 14 feet high!> >   Martha Pfeiffer in Dorset>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 7:09 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] does anyone have photos of ...
bison and/or Black-billed Magpie and/or a western hawk (Harris or Gray
or other)? I'm working on a class about birds in myths and legends from
the first Americans and don't have pictures for one of the Cheyenne
stories. Thanks!
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 6:53 am
From: Janet Warren <jwarren...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] barn swallows in peril (complaint from neighbor0
Greetings,

Below is an e-mail from our next-door neighbor. We have had barn swallows nesting in our barn for fourteen years, and they have obviously been here far longer, given the number of nests we found in the barn when we moved in. We generally have four or five pairs nesting each season. We do live fairly close to the neighbor, but this is the first complaint. As far as I could see from where I am, there are no droppings on his roofs, or porch, and there are six on mine . He has always kept his garage closed most of the time. It does not seem reasonable to me that he should expect us to deny the swallows access to a barn they have been inhabiting since time immemorial.
I’ll be devastated if I lose them. I wait eagerly in the spring for their arrival, and my health may make this one my last. I would welcome the thoughts of fellow listers on this matter.

~Janet Warren
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Greetings from next door. I would like to bring to your attention just how demoralizing it is to have to deal with what appears to me to be an out-of-control bird explosion in our immediate area, at least demoralizing to me and from my perspective. I can't tell you the impact of multiple cleaning of bird poop off of my house and my cars, my back deck and my roofs, that I regularly have to do. I can no longer leave my garage doors open as the swallows swoop in and out , sometimes out at the motivation of a swinging broom, and it is not my desire to have them roost in there, or anywhere. I wash bird poop off of my decks and do it again the next day. Ditto with cars. My side garden looks like a casualty from the London Blitz. Then there is the "ick" factor. I know that it's just a matter of time before I become their hit zone, and even a one-time occurrence would cause me to explode.

Really, it is bordering on the intolerable, one that you have noticed as well or have seen for yourselves as the birds (mostly swallows) swoop and dive almost all day over your property, my property, my driveway and garage and the fields to the east, or their roosting spots (the peak of my garage roof and second level barn door ledge), and I hope we could engage in some understanding of the impact of the present conditions and arrive at a plausible solution. Perhaps I could learn something from you that would add to what I don't know or am not aware of, I am hopeful that e could engage as neighbors with a concern.

I just don't ever remember these nuisance birds in such numbers, and for me it's become a problem. I was going to walk over last week during a late afternoon shade sit to bring this up with you but you had company, clearly not the right time. I hope the right time is soon. Thank you both for whatever attention you may wish to give to this issue.
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 6:20 am
From: Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] renesting warblers
At Silver Lake in the campground yesterday, a chipping sparrow was gathering nesting material.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

> On Jul 26, 2020, at 9:01 AM, maevulus <maevulus...> wrote:
>
> Early this morning there were at least three Common Yellowthroats energetically gleaning in an old apple tree. One female flew down into the cattails with a good-sized something in her bill.
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

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Date: 7/26/20 6:16 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 26, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:26 a.m. 58 degrees, wind NNE 0 mph. Sky: mottled with flat blue-gray; as
the sun rises over the eastern escarpment, a single peach-tinged highlight
gradually infiltrates other clouds, until most buffed with silver. Fog
pockets sit above half dozen marshes, a serpentine ribbon above the East
Branch of the Ompompanoosuc River. Permanent streams: one a whisper; the
other a gurgle. Wetlands: vaguely softened by mist, which vanishes above
the trees. Pond: sans bittern and otter; surface calm and thoughtful, more
haze than ripple; second-year old tadpoles, joining terrestrial ranks,
reenact the 360 million-year-old drama that led eventually to Jonas Salk
and Derek Jeter. Thankfully, not a single deer fly.

Scarlet tanager sings, robustly. I peer high into the oaks, where leaves
hang green and guarded, my view buffered. Tanager plans it this way. But
why? Every feather of raiment—red body worthy of Benjamin Moore set against
wings as black as midnight—needs to be seen to be believed. His pack-a-day
voice draws attention, which is not his best attribute. It's the color,
jungle incarnate, that keeps me looking, keeps my neck frozen, and the dogs
puzzled.

House wren sings a clipped version of his chart-topping hit, hurriedly, as
though late for an appointment. A blue jay flies by with a caterpillar;
calls with its mouth full. Red-eyed vireo, a bird of intemperate song, a
vociferous opponent of the Dog Days, sings with early June enthusiasm.
Everyone else—white-throated sparrow, song sparrow, chickadee, both
nuthatches, catbird, mourning dove, purple finch, phoebe—sings an abridged
song. A yellow-billed cuckoo calls, again, an echo from down the valley . .
. I can get used to this.

One forlorn crow calls into a landscape empty of crows. No answer. I
*caw* back,
trying to make a lonely bird feel at home, black and shiny on a pine limb.
What became of his flock? Like people, crows crave company.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 6:00 am
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] renesting warblers
Early this morning there were at least three Common Yellowthroats
energetically gleaning in an old apple tree. One female flew down into
the cattails with a good-sized something in her bill.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/20 4:58 pm
From: Bill Whitehair <william.whitehair...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders
The Adirondack Wild Center inTupper Lake has a really extensive feeding station surrounded by a spectacularly stout electric fence. Aggressive, but it works.

Bill

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 25, 2020, at 7:19 PM, Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...> wrote:
>
> Ask Birds of Vermont Museum what they use.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:01 PM, Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> I've had to stop feeding for the second year in a row because of a visiting bear who is very fond of my bird feeder. Looking for a solution to bear proof a feeding station, someone made this suggestion:
>>
>> Place a 6" pipe over a 16 ft. 4 X 4, cement it into a 2 ft.hole in the ground. Supposedly the bear cannot climb up the pipe. Bear can't grip it. Across the top of the 4x4 secure a 2X4 cut to length you want and that makes to arms extending - screw in hooks underneath from which the feeder will hang. Use a long pole with a hook on the end to take the feeder down for refill. Has anyone had success with such a contraption?? Keeping in mind it will be 14 feet high!
>>
>> Martha Pfeiffer in Dorset
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/20 4:19 pm
From: Nancy PerleeBRISTOL <nperlee...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders
Ask Birds of Vermont Museum what they use.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 25, 2020, at 6:01 PM, Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I've had to stop feeding for the second year in a row because of a visiting bear who is very fond of my bird feeder. Looking for a solution to bear proof a feeding station, someone made this suggestion:
>
> Place a 6" pipe over a 16 ft. 4 X 4, cement it into a 2 ft.hole in the ground. Supposedly the bear cannot climb up the pipe. Bear can't grip it. Across the top of the 4x4 secure a 2X4 cut to length you want and that makes to arms extending - screw in hooks underneath from which the feeder will hang. Use a long pole with a hook on the end to take the feeder down for refill. Has anyone had success with such a contraption?? Keeping in mind it will be 14 feet high!
>
> Martha Pfeiffer in Dorset
>
 

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Date: 7/25/20 3:57 pm
From: Brenna <dbgaldenzi...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders
Hi Martha,
*Please - no bird feeders*. The bears will be attracted to the spilled seed
on the ground. They can smell the seed from a mile away.

Fish & Wildlife is begging people to take their feeders down from March -
December. I'm of the belief that those who leave feeders out should be
fined. Bears are being killed because they are habituating to human food
sources (compost, bird feeders, unsecured trash etc.) I just dealt with
this awful situation in my neighboring town:
https://www.waterburyroundabout.org/waterburyroundabout/ogzo6uhflksze915k1qm3nmza2d1a6

Read more on Fish & Wildlife's website here:
https://vtfishandwildlife.com/node/256

Brenna

Brenna Galdenzi
*President*
*Protect Our Wildlife **POW *

*A Vermont Non Profit Organization*

*www.ProtectOurWildlifeVT.org <http://www.ProtectOurWildlifeVT.org>*


*Only if we understand can we care. Only if we care will we help. Only if
we help shall they be saved.*
~Jane Goodall



On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 6:01 PM Martha Pfeiffer <
<0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I've had to stop feeding for the second year in a row because of a
> visiting bear who is very fond of my bird feeder. Looking for a solution
> to bear proof a feeding station, someone made this suggestion:
>
> Place a 6" pipe over a 16 ft. 4 X 4, cement it into a 2 ft.hole in the
> ground. Supposedly the bear cannot climb up the pipe. Bear can't grip it.
> Across the top of the 4x4 secure a 2X4 cut to length you want and that
> makes to arms extending - screw in hooks underneath from which the feeder
> will hang. Use a long pole with a hook on the end to take the feeder down
> for refill. Has anyone had success with such a contraption?? Keeping in
> mind it will be 14 feet high!
>
> Martha Pfeiffer in Dorset
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/20 3:33 pm
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Saturday edition
Another busy day for the yard birds. Ruby Valentino is under constant siege as he tries to protect HIS feeder. We had about a dozen hummingbirds mixing it up at one point. Our song sparrow perched near the deck and sang for a bit - I'm guessing he's glad all the chicks are taking care of themselves. Atticus led a charm of goldfinches on an inspection tour of our thistle which is just beginning to bloom. Fexlix the catbird hid in the azaleas just off the deck and tormented the dogs for a while. Margret thrasher grabbed some dinner off the lawn several times. And Magnon led our murder of crows in an exciting concert mid afternoon. Yesterday, when I didn't have time to photograph them, I counted 15 monarchs working the milkweed in the front yard. Today, set up with camera, just one wandered by, without stopping.
 
Meanwhile, the bluebirds - at least mom and dad, maybe a chick - kept up a steady schedule of deliveries to the chicks. The chicks spent much of the day talking things over, and peering out the door.
 
Copy and paste the link:
 
https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847[https://deref-gmx.com/mail/client/nVBh38Tl1Es/dereferrer/?redirectUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fderef-gmx.com%2Fmail%2Fclient%2FcMd-iCXcbsE%2Fdereferrer%2F%3FredirectUrl%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Fwww.ianclark.com%252Fp505766847]
 
 

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Date: 7/25/20 3:01 pm
From: Martha Pfeiffer <0000001a1bef7484-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bears & Bird Feeders
I've had to stop feeding for the second year in a row because of a visiting bear who is very fond of my bird feeder.  Looking for a solution to bear proof a feeding station, someone made this suggestion:

Place a 6" pipe over a 16 ft. 4 X 4, cement it into a 2 ft.hole in the ground.  Supposedly the bear cannot climb up the pipe. Bear can't grip it. Across the top of the 4x4 secure a 2X4 cut to length you want and that makes to arms extending - screw in hooks underneath from which the feeder will hang.  Use a long pole with a hook on the end to take the feeder down for refill.  Has anyone had success with such a contraption??  Keeping in mind it will be 14 feet high!

  Martha Pfeiffer in Dorset
 

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Date: 7/25/20 7:04 am
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Merlin in South Burlington
There is a Merlin at this moment (10:03 AM) perched at the tip top of the tall conifer tree across from Advance Auto Parts on Shelburne Rd In South Burlington.
- Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/25/20 5:28 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 25, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:41 a.m. 57 delightful degrees; wind ESE 0 mph. Sky: who knows; atmosphere
spreadable; congealed to a meringue thickness. Permanent streams: fill half
their beds; speaking with a faint aqueous lilt. Wetlands: fog makes the
marsh appear endless. Pond: surface taut and brown; if the otter's here
he'll have to send up a flare for me to find him. Bittern, standing on a
mowed shoreline, faces away from the pond, bill to the sky; up to his old
shinanigens; thinks I can't see him. I let him believe what he wants.
Joe-pye-weed blooms and black-eyed Susan fades. And the immediate world,
strung with dewy spiderwebs, glistens.

DOR: fresh pine cone, scales removed by a red squirrel and scattered, and
seeds eaten; what's left looks like a scrawny corn-cob or a naked squirrel
tail.
AOR: robin thrashing a small, hapless frog; maybe a peeper. If efts, which
wander with impunity, were not neon orange and toxic, there would not be
any left.

Feeder freeloaders: chickadees, doves, jays, purple finches, and
goldfinches.
Beyond the feeders: the morning belongs to red-eyed vireos, vinyl record
run-a-muck; everything whispers and suggestions. A tanager. An ovenbird.
Three phoebes chasing each other. A pileated hollers. A house wren. A
catbird sings a convoluted ensemble, reminiscent of the thickets behind
Jones Beach and Fire Island primary dunes, a watershed, a sound, and an
island away. Pewee needs to be more upbeat. Summer ripens.

I watched the comet (I hate the name) last night from the bridge over the
outflow from Lake Fairlee. A crescent moon sunk behind Gove Hill. Jupiter
and its troop of moons rose in the southeast. Comet appeared midway below
the Big Dipper's ladle; a wooly core with a million-mile debri trail, a
cosmic dust bunny stretched across an unfathomable distance. An ego
stabilizer from the dawn of the universe.

An owl hooted. A loon wailed. And I leaned on the warm hood of my car
humbled by the illusion of time and distance . . . a freeloader, much like
the birds at my feeder.
 

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Date: 7/25/20 4:58 am
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Pigeon
Not sure if same bird: white pigeon in our Rutland yard yesterday evening.
Could not see band. Black tip of tail, leucistic looking head.

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020, 9:25 PM Sue Wetmore <
<000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Today a nearly white racing pigeon here in Brandon. Bands on right leg
> green over red #458.
> Anyone missing a bird?
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/20 4:15 am
From: Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Phoebe nest
My phoebes chose the top of a hanging up garden hoe! in the garage. I
guess I should let it stay til next year.....

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 5:38 PM Janet <musbird...> wrote:

> Last year a Phoebe family raised a brood on the upside down seat of my
> overturned canoe over the rafters of my barn overhang. I thought that was
> really creative. But they are doing it again now! I didn’t know they
> would reuse an old nest from another year. Is this common?
> Janet Watton
> Randolph Center



--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 6:25 pm
From: Sue Wetmore <000006207b3956ac-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pigeon
Today a nearly white racing pigeon here in Brandon. Bands on right leg green over red #458.
Anyone missing a bird?
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 4:22 pm
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Phoebe nest
Yes, they'll do that after making a few home improvements...adding a little material!

Lucky you! Phoebes haven't nested at my house this year, although they are in the yard everyday!

Ali Wagner
Huntington

----- Original Message -----
From: "Janet Watton" <musbird...>
To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 5:38:28 PM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Phoebe nest

Last year a Phoebe family raised a brood on the upside down seat of my overturned canoe over the rafters of my barn overhang. I thought that was really creative. But they are doing it again now! I didn’t know they would reuse an old nest from another year. Is this common?
Janet Watton
Randolph Center
 

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Date: 7/24/20 4:10 pm
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Friday edition
The chicks had a busy morning. At least one of the chicks from the first brood was helping feed them, they got a steady stream of goodies throughout the morning. They're talking a lot these days. They took turns looking out the window and testing their wings. They were not quite as active this afternoon.

Copy & paste the link:
 
https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847
 
 
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 3:44 pm
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Week 7 Mansfield update
VCE's seventh banding session of 2020 on Mt. Mansfield yielded two
diminutive owls and a solid assortment of other species, several of them
non-local breeders. For details and Mike Sargent's awesome photos, check
out this blog post:
https://vtecostudies.org/blog/mansfield-update-owls-cones-and-crossbills/

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 2:38 pm
From: Janet <musbird...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Phoebe nest
Last year a Phoebe family raised a brood on the upside down seat of my overturned canoe over the rafters of my barn overhang. I thought that was really creative. But they are doing it again now! I didn’t know they would reuse an old nest from another year. Is this common?
Janet Watton
Randolph Center
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 10:21 am
From: Diana <dlee3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Northern Flickers
I made a video about Northern Flickers with some displaying and some family life.

https://youtu.be/ecjeX3mOj8k
 

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Date: 7/24/20 8:56 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 24, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:23 a.m. 62 degrees, wind NW 2 mph. Sky: foggy. Woods: soaked and
dripping. Permanent streams: aroused by rain; fuller and louder than
yesterday. Intermittent streams: current bearing. Wetlands: a bowl of mist;
far shoreline erased; dew-pendant spiderwebs stitched to reeds, glisten.
Pond: although the fog appears confused, heads east and then north and then
east again, my attention situates.

DOR: three-year-old garter snake, in perfect condition
AOR: hermit thrush and robin

A quiet morning. Robins tone down (someone must have complained about
yesterday's racket). Warblers hushed, hidden in woods or elsewhere. Lone
tanager in oak interrupts departure preparations; sings farewell to summer.
Try as I may, I still can't find him. Pewee whistles. Pileated yells, a
volley—*kuk, kuk, kuk—*forceful and wild. Sweet-voiced veery spins fog into
music. House wren ignites. Filling in auditory gaps, red-eyed vireos full
of robust glory, and, for a brief moment, make me forget that on the back
half of summer, chore-driven warblers turn attention to things other than
pieces of music.

At the pond, the outflow culvert similar to the bathroom faucet, a constant
leak. I stare at drip. Then, a clatter of pebbles. The dogs stiffen, and an
otter, emerging from an adventure in the wetlands, scrambles up the bank,
looks askance, and then passes through the drip, up the culvert and into
the pond, flat head just above the surface. Tiny ears. Black button eyes.
Nose, black, and full like the dogs'. Back straight and tail, a long,
muscular cable, arched. Swims back and forth; watches me watch
him, trailing a wake behind him. Otter submerges, leaves behind two
bubbles, and rings of undulating ripples, which turn reflections in Monets.
Surfaces with a fish and a gentle exhale, more a sigh than a blast. Dives,
again. A crayfish. Repeats seven more times. Seven more crayfish, one so
big that claws stick out of the otter's mouth, An imperial sportsman—the
crunching of bones and shells, an audible breakfast.

Above the otter: catbird cuts lose; kingfisher passes back and forth,
rattling. Bittern arrives from wetlands and settles on the mowed lawn, bill
pointing skyward. Looks at me, skeptically, and sways. Walks down to the
shore; nabs brand new green frogs. A second otter walks out of a bank of
ferns. Sees me. Walks back in.

Born of a delicate of a pond: otter's gentle breath; kingfisher's sharp
rattle; painted turtle floating spread-eagle, a poker chip with limbs.
Sunlight turns fog translucent, time stops. Immersed in inexhaustible
delight, I'm a privileged bystander captivated by the moment like the otter
. . . I have no option but to stay.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/23/20 5:20 pm
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Thursday edition
 

The chicks are getting very vocal and they're curious about what the world looks like. They've been taking turns peeking out the window.

This listserv is still objecting to HMTL, you'll have to copy and paste the link:


https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847
 

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Date: 7/23/20 2:43 pm
From: H Nicolay <sqrlma...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Ravens in Monkton
Hi all. I am waiting for Ted Levin to describe the other worldly sounds of
hungry baby ravens. Its definitely a flat guttural note but instead of
coming up to pitch as fiddlers do it stays flat out of tune. And it is loud
and hauntingly obnoxious. It permeates our back forest, over and over
again, like plaintitive shouts of people entombed but not dead. There are
two babies. Fully feathered and flighted now. One smaller than the other.
Brazingly brought up in established crow territory. South of Raven Ridge.
First time in the 9 years we have lived here. I gave them a fresh rabbit
today. A rabbit that a few minutes earlier was munching on a carrot but
didn't have use of its back legs. The finders felt sorry for it and noticed
large tumors near its rear. I politely educated them that male rabbits are
well endowed. The ravens waited until the crows approached the kill. Later
the large male bearded raven ate first. Chunk after chunk. The male baby
raven croaked and pleaded and quivered his wings and got rewarded with a
few mouthfulls. A smaller raven stood nearby. The large raven seemed to
say; ok, its your turn to eat but when I get back from my walk its mine
again. The large raven walked a large circle through a mown field and back
towards the kill. He got annoyed the other raven, possibly the smaller
offspring, was still eating. A tussle ensued, she quivered her wings but
hierarchy is supreme and she stepped aside. In the end, the vultures
reigned and chased off the mighty raven.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/23/20 7:00 am
From: kfinch <kfinch51...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] July 23, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
Ted:  Your updates are always terrific, but this one is especially beautiful!
    Ken Finch, Chester
-------- Original message --------From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> Date: 7/23/20 8:09 AM (GMT-05:00) To: <VTBIRD...> Subject: [VTBIRD] July 23, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center 5:05 a.m. 64 degrees, wind ESE 2 mph. Sky: fog socked, off and on drizzle;pitter-patter of dripping leaves; Coyote Hollow reveals itselfincrementally like a Polaroid snapshot. Permanent streams: refreshed (abit) and gurgling. Wetlands: visible but slowly expanding. Pond: mobilequilling; a hypnotic run of ever-swelling concentric circles. Ferns andcoltsfoot upright and revived.Morning chorus. Lead singer: robins, everywhere resounding.Background vocals: scarlet tanager; ovenbird (one); chickadees,white-breasted nuthatch (two chicks chase a parent); veery (calling notsinging); red-eyed vireos (hard to believe that they're in the background);woodcock (flushed from the road; wings whirring); crows; blue jays;yellow-billed cuckoo (once again); white-throated sparrow (definitely thetruncated song); song sparrows; pileated (most percussive); barred owls(called all night and past dawn); house wren; goldfinches (an avian versionof Darlene Love, just *Twenty Feet From Stardom)*.One deer runs across the road less than fifty feet in front of us; dogstighten their leaches. Another deer bounds across the wetlands, shoulderhigh in reeds, tail immaculate and erect, a beacon in the mist. When KenKesey was asked how he felt about the Apollo Moon Landing, he replied thatwe don't deserve to be in space until we learn how to live on Earth. Myboys grew up watching and listening to the kaleidoscopic assemblage ofcreatures that lived in or passed through this valley. I wanted them tobond with their home ground; to track the seasons across the wetlands. Iwanted them to feel the muck rise between their toes; to their awakenedtheir curiosity to sounds of the night. I wanted them to contemplate thestars, to feel the *freedom* of uncluttered time when hours passed likeminutes when the magic of the world opened like a flower.The other night, when Casey called and said I had to stay up to see thefuzz-ball comet, we had come full circle, the child had become thefather of the man . . . and the father leaned on the hood of his car,childlike . . . and peered out into the night sky.
 

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Date: 7/23/20 5:09 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 23, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:05 a.m. 64 degrees, wind ESE 2 mph. Sky: fog socked, off and on drizzle;
pitter-patter of dripping leaves; Coyote Hollow reveals itself
incrementally like a Polaroid snapshot. Permanent streams: refreshed (a
bit) and gurgling. Wetlands: visible but slowly expanding. Pond: mobile
quilling; a hypnotic run of ever-swelling concentric circles. Ferns and
coltsfoot upright and revived.

Morning chorus. Lead singer: robins, everywhere resounding.
Background vocals: scarlet tanager; ovenbird (one); chickadees,
white-breasted nuthatch (two chicks chase a parent); veery (calling not
singing); red-eyed vireos (hard to believe that they're in the background);
woodcock (flushed from the road; wings whirring); crows; blue jays;
yellow-billed cuckoo (once again); white-throated sparrow (definitely the
truncated song); song sparrows; pileated (most percussive); barred owls
(called all night and past dawn); house wren; goldfinches (an avian version
of Darlene Love, just *Twenty Feet From Stardom)*.

One deer runs across the road less than fifty feet in front of us; dogs
tighten their leaches. Another deer bounds across the wetlands, shoulder
high in reeds, tail immaculate and erect, a beacon in the mist. When Ken
Kesey was asked how he felt about the Apollo Moon Landing, he replied that
we don't deserve to be in space until we learn how to live on Earth. My
boys grew up watching and listening to the kaleidoscopic assemblage of
creatures that lived in or passed through this valley. I wanted them to
bond with their home ground; to track the seasons across the wetlands. I
wanted them to feel the muck rise between their toes; to their awakened
their curiosity to sounds of the night. I wanted them to contemplate the
stars, to feel the *freedom* of uncluttered time when hours passed like
minutes when the magic of the world opened like a flower.

The other night, when Casey called and said I had to stay up to see the
fuzz-ball comet, we had come full circle, the child had become the
father of the man . . . and the father leaned on the hood of his car,
childlike . . . and peered out into the night sky.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/20 3:37 pm
From: David Guertin <dave...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Black and white warbler and resistant caters
Ha! Your story made me laugh. It reminded me of a loon I saw once who
had caught a fish that looked comically too big to swallow. That loon
worked at the fish for a good 10 minutes before it achieved just the
right alignment, and then, down the hatch.

And your comment about this morning being remarkably active this morning
was true here in Addison County as well. I couldn't believe all the
birds I saw this morning -- 40 species, including 8 warbler species! It
was like all the birds forgot it was the summer doldrums and we were
back in May, or at least June.

Except for the fact that all the immature birds flying around were
giving me identification fits. After a good half hour of warbler
perplexity, I now know without a doubt what an immature Blackburnian
Warbler looks like. For good measure, an adult male Blackburnian also
made a brief cameo appearance before disappearing again.

This morning's July warbler roll call:

Nashville Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Blackburnian Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Black-throated Blue Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Canada Warbler

(no Black-and-white Warbler, though, and no Ovenbirds either)

Fun times!

Dave G.

On 7/22/20 9:53 AM, Walter Medwid wrote:
> This morning’s walk on the Memphremagog bike path brought us a close up of
> a BWW working a brush pile. It was thoroughly searching the recent
> established pile until it happened upon a caterpillar -4 inches long- and
> was a twig mimic-geometrid I assume. The bird bite the “twig” and you could
> see the body construct so the bird knew it had something. It worked the
> caterpillar but it hung on fiercely with its hind legs and no matter how
> much it was stretch it clung. The bird finally decided to work at the part
> that wasn’t releasing and finally after a few seconds the caterpillar let
> go and the bird had this very large food item in its mouth and seemed
> unsure what to do now with such a large drooping corpse. Finally it worked
> the body down its mouth. The bird stayed in the same spot working a tree on
> the search for more food despite what had to be the equivalent of a 3
> course meal under its belt.
>
> A remarkably active birding morning up on the border.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/20 2:56 pm
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bluebird cam, Wednesday edition
Today's check-in on the bluebirds is up. There have been several bluebirds around the yard today. A freshly mowed lawn seemed to provide good hunting. About 3:30 in the clip, someone comes to the door and feeds a chick. Happens too quickly for me to tell who it was.
 
The list rejected the usual HTML message, you'll have to copy and paste the link:

https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847
 
 
{"email":"<lenscapon...>","defaultSignatureType":0,"textSignature":{"text":"Ian Clark\n(802) 429-2477"}}
 

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Date: 7/22/20 7:51 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 22, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:24 a.m. 60 degrees, wind SE 0 mph, an invigorating and breathless
sunrise. Sky: a crowd of malleable clouds; swirls and layers; blue-gray
with bright rims and shifting hints of mauve; a dynamic and mesmerizing
Rorschach test. Last evening, I watched a cloud evanesce, become a trace of
itself, and then dissolve into twilight like an Alkaselzer tablet in a
glass of water. Permanent streams: wait for rain (like everything else);
unhurried and lulled; losing ground to drought by the hour. Wetlands:
lusciously green; a suggestion of mist; across the marsh and far up the
western flank, a hermit thrush angelically vitalizes the morning; a green
frog, in need of tuning, joins in. Pond: threads of exfoliating vapor
quickly vanish; part of the cycle of water. Another critical part,* rain*,
remains a promise. I want something morning than a thunderstorm . . . a
classic and vitalizing soak. (Something my driveway can handle.)

A pair of unhurried robins, pecking and picking, lead me down the driveway.
Overhead, high in an oak, tanager rains down his long, raspy-phrased song,
not nearly as colorful as his plumage. Ovenbird silent. Alder flycatcher
silent.
Chestnut-sided warbler silent. Yellowthroat silent. The list goes on . . .
and on. Mnemonically, a pewee whistle, signals the next phase; insect
chorus replaces bird chorus. Predominant woodland minstrels are crickets;
grasshoppers; dog day harvest flies, big and green and popeyed, a
high-whining, electronic buzz that overwhelms an afternoon stroll. I
imagine I'd need headphones to endure chorusing seventeen-year cicadas.

A pair of red-shouldered hawks screech. Then, one after the other, pass
overhead, just above the green archway, still screaming. On view for a
nanosecond, their voices lagging behind them.

Last night, after ten o'clock, I stood on the bridge over the outlet of
Lake Fairlee and watched comet Neowise, low in the northwest. Below the
bottom lefthand star on the leading edge of the Bigger Dipper. Just a
smudge in the unmarred emptiness of the sky, a fuzzball with a broad, dimly
lit squirrels' tail. Headed west toward Colorado, toward Casey and Becky. I
watched the comet and thought of my son and daughter-in-law, on the verge
of Colorado National Monument; their home sky star-spangled and dark as
my cellar. Comet-perfect like Vermont night. Comet last passed this way
6,800 years ago, just after the discovery of cheese. Back then, lions lived
in England; leopards in Greece; steppe bison in Alaska; dwarf mammoths on
Wangle Island; jaguars in Florida; miniature elephants on Mediterranian
isles; ground sloths in Cuba. Hawaii was an unpeopled island chain. Fresh
from glacial refuges off the Carolina Coast, rattlesnakes returned to the
Northeast. Back then, no one rode a horse or ate rice.

So much happened in 6,800 years . . . a geologic eye blink. So much
happened in four months, a deplorable misstep.
Where are those three men on camels?
 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/20 6:53 am
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Black and white warbler and resistant caters
This morning’s walk on the Memphremagog bike path brought us a close up of
a BWW working a brush pile. It was thoroughly searching the recent
established pile until it happened upon a caterpillar -4 inches long- and
was a twig mimic-geometrid I assume. The bird bite the “twig” and you could
see the body construct so the bird knew it had something. It worked the
caterpillar but it hung on fiercely with its hind legs and no matter how
much it was stretch it clung. The bird finally decided to work at the part
that wasn’t releasing and finally after a few seconds the caterpillar let
go and the bird had this very large food item in its mouth and seemed
unsure what to do now with such a large drooping corpse. Finally it worked
the body down its mouth. The bird stayed in the same spot working a tree on
the search for more food despite what had to be the equivalent of a 3
course meal under its belt.

A remarkably active birding morning up on the border.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/20 6:04 am
From: Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] White-throated Sparrow song
Wow, interesting. I’m nonplussed. WhThSparrow’s was one of the few songs I could easily recognize. 🙁
Ruth C.

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 21, 2020, at 1:05 PM, Tom Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:
>
> Regarding recent findings of a changing White-throated Sparrow song from
> what we were familiar with here in Vermont, I finally was able to put a face
> to the 'weird' sparrow song I'd heard at Damon's Crossing the last two
> summers. Last year I didn't come close to finding the bird but this year I
> managed to get a few recordings of the song but the bird remained elusive.
> That is until I saw a White-throated Sparrow close to where I heard the
> singing. Today I was able to catch the sparrow singing this interesting song
> by digiscoping it from some distance. I thought the song sounded between a
> Song Sparrow & Lincoln's Sparrow. I posted a video at the link ( sorry for
> the wind interference) If anyone has any thoughts about the song they would
> be appreciated.
>
>
>
>
> <https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/50137652046/in/dateposted-public/>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/50137652046/in/dateposted-public/
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 2:58 pm
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Fwd: racial justice x birding
Thank you so much for sharing this, Leslie. I haven't heard of any similar
moderation or backlash here in Vermont. If anything, the opposite. But this
phenomenon is something to keep an eye out for.

Another similar conversation I've been following recently involves the
language shift from "citizen science" to "community science". This post
summarizes it well:
https://debspark.audubon.org/news/why-were-changing-citizen-science-community-science

Best,
Richard

On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 3:24 PM Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...> wrote:

> I thought the article in the link below might be interesting to our group -
> just a heads up to an issue that could surface at any time. Sent to me by
> my daughter in Seattle.
>
>
>
>
> https://kuow.org/stories/black-birders-ruffle-feathers-on-facebook?fbclid=IwAR0WpO7EQvoJY-61JLOWgTPqbrmLvSQeHLIh5gBYrKcT6uArDER-Qe5yLeY
>
> -B
>
>
> --
> Best regards,
>
> Leslie
>
> Leslie Nulty
> P.O. Box 1121
> Jericho Center, VT 05465
> home office: 802-899-4582
> cell: 802-324-1496
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 1:44 pm
From: anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Mansfield update
Chris - appreciate your report as usual.  The RCKI photo is a nice example of an SY bird based on the pointed shape of the exposed left R6.  Good luck with your current visit near heaven.
Bob Yunick


-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer...>
To: <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Tue, Jul 21, 2020 1:49 pm
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mansfield update

Another belated blog post from last week's Mansfield banding session,
featuring Mike Sargent's terrific photos. I'm headed up there again this
evening with a small team, and will do my best to report more promptly at
week's end.

https://vtecostudies.org/blog/mansfield-update-returning-sharpies-and-thrushes/

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/
 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 12:05 pm
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Return of Bluebird cam!
Our bluebirds are getting big!

We've been offline since the thunderstorm last Tuesday, there's a photo of
some lighting from our porch in with the bluebird videos. Just about the
time that shot was taken, our connection died. Our provider is Consolidated
Communications. They managed to do something many of us thought humanly
impossible - their support is worse than Fairpoint's was. After something
like 150 hours without service, when it was restored, the first thing I did
was check on the bluebirds.



Video and lightning shot at https://www.ianclark.com/p505766847



%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com <http://www.IanClark.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 10:50 am
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mansfield update
Another belated blog post from last week's Mansfield banding session,
featuring Mike Sargent's terrific photos. I'm headed up there again this
evening with a small team, and will do my best to report more promptly at
week's end.

https://vtecostudies.org/blog/mansfield-update-returning-sharpies-and-thrushes/

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/
 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 10:05 am
From: Tom Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] White-throated Sparrow song
Regarding recent findings of a changing White-throated Sparrow song from
what we were familiar with here in Vermont, I finally was able to put a face
to the 'weird' sparrow song I'd heard at Damon's Crossing the last two
summers. Last year I didn't come close to finding the bird but this year I
managed to get a few recordings of the song but the bird remained elusive.
That is until I saw a White-throated Sparrow close to where I heard the
singing. Today I was able to catch the sparrow singing this interesting song
by digiscoping it from some distance. I thought the song sounded between a
Song Sparrow & Lincoln's Sparrow. I posted a video at the link ( sorry for
the wind interference) If anyone has any thoughts about the song they would
be appreciated.




<https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/50137652046/in/dateposted-public/>
https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/50137652046/in/dateposted-public/



Tom Berriman


 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 5:47 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 21, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:19 a.m. 60 degrees (simply marvelous), wind ESE 1 mph (a cryptic breeze).
Sky: Casually clouded; wispy suggestion, bright with a rosy pink blush.
Red-shouldered hawk lording above the valley, a scream into empty air.
Permanent streams: limping to the finish line. Wetlands: a thin bowl of
dissipating mist that reminds me of cigar smoke in the overhead lights
above the boxing ring at Madison Square Garden, circa 1967, when Mohammad
Ali dismantled Zora Folley. If the hawk wants to perch, it has a
thousand horizontal options from which to fix its vision. Pond: outflow
culvert halting drips; rolling fog vanishes before reaching the treetops.
How many mornings am I going to look at the same emergent snag and think
it's a snapping turtle? A green frog, in need of tuning, twangs. A rain of
lavender raspberry petals. Jewelweed blooms; tiny orange trumpets,
hummingbird goblets, which transform into irresistible banana-shaped
seedpods that curl up and explode when touched; the unintended gift of a
hummingbird.

Tanager in the oaks; a vocal marathoner. Crows assemble by the pile,
discordantly cawing; harvest stale rolls and eggshells; ignore cucumber
peels and orange rinds. House wren, an audio sniper, rapidly fires from the
pines. Color may be subdued but not voice. An effervescent crooner; a
machine gun minstrel. So much sound from such a little bird. Everyone
should have a house wren in their neighborhood; there's never a dull moment
nor a silent one, full of verve and mischief. I wish I had assigned the
house wren as my boys' totem bird. The ideal bird to emulate. Full of life.
Every day's an adventure in sound, an excellent repertoire of trills,
rattles, bubbly notes, nasal whines flung carelessly from the thicket,
never a sad, gentle acoustical ballad. House wrens, which nest from
southern Canada to southern Argentina and on the Caribbean isles, are the
most widely distributed bird in the New World, a hemispheric bird that
ought to make every undocumented immigrant feel right at home
. . . even if we don't.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 6:02 pm
From: Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
Fantastic! Thank you very much!

Jared

Sent from my irresistible flat thing.

> On Jul 20, 2020, at 6:02 PM, anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Thank you Jared. Please let me offer advice to watchers at hummer feeders about who is whom as to age and sex. The bully ad. males have, as pictured in most field guides a deeply forked black tail, green back, whitish belly, and black throat which at the right angle of light is an iridescent brilliantly ruby red, giving them their name, as well as attracting their numerous female mates. The plumage of all of the season's newly fledged young, M or F, resembles more that of their mother than that of their father. All new young, M and F, have white-tipped tail feathers resembling their mother's plumage not their father's black, deeply forked outer tail feathers.
> But, one plumage characteristic does distinguish young males from their sisters and mothers. They have light-green streaking on their throat suggesting a bit of a beard (not really) that differentiates them from the white throats of their sisters and mothers.
> I hope this helps feeder watchers to better understand whom they are hosting. It's always a pleasure to watch these tiny mites,
> Bob Yunick
> Thanks so much for the information. Until Friday, we’d had one male and two-three females at our two feeders. Suddenly, as of Friday morning 7/18, there were three additional hummers.
>
>
> Jared
>
>
> Jared Katz Photography
> 823 Snipe Ireland Road
> Richmond, VT 05477
> (802) 343-4102
> <jdkatzvt...>
>
>
>> On Jul 20, 2020, at 1:00 PM, anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> Hello Hummer Lovers - on Fri, 7/17, I banded the first newly fledged imm. female Ruby-throat of the season at my Adirondack banding station at Jenny Lake in Saratoga Co., NY. Based on 29 years of banding records at this site, this date is 3 days earlier than the previous earliest date of 7/20. The average earliest date is 8/3, ranging as late as 8/25 in 2013.
>> Let me offer some further thoughts on the possibility of double brooding based on Cornell's information that the species can be single or double brooded. That guidance needs to be put into proper geographical perspective.
>> Northward bound male Ruby-throats hit the Gulf Coast last week of Feb based on many years of records gathered on HumNet. A few miles inland from that coast the breeding territory of Ruby-throats begins, stretching about 1100 mi. N into southern Canada at about 49 deg. N latitude. It is quite possible that Ruby-throats breeding in southern U.S. states can be double brooded if they begin breeding in Mar, but that possibility diminishes as one goes northward.
>> My Jenny Lake station is at 41deg, 16 min. N latitude at an elevation of 1250-1300 ft. Records there over 29 years show an average first banding date of adults 5/16, range 5/6-5/24; first banding date of a newly fledged imm. 8/3, range 7/20 (prior to this year)-8/25. The average last banding date is 9/3, range 8/25-9/23. In 16 of the 29 years, imm. have been banded into Sep, average last date 9/8 with dates of 12 of those 16 years occurring 9/1-9/10.
>> If an average female were to double brood, she would require 3-5 days to rehab her nest, 2 days to lay 2 eggs, 14 days to incubate and 18-23 days to fledge a second brood, a total of 37-44 days. Based on the average date of first banding of an imm. of 8/3, a female then attempting a second brood would take until 9/9-9/16 to bring off that brood. This puts her brood out of the nest past the average 9/3 departure date.
>> If we consider the case of the mother of the imm. I just banded on 7/17, and apply the same breeding time table to her, she could possibly pull off a second brood by 8/23-8/30 which, again, provides precious little time for her newbies to develop the stamina for their upcoming over 1000-mi migration to Central America.
>> At Jenny Lake, I have never seen male courting behavior after Jun. Lots of territorial conflicts at the feeders, yes. All in all, I feel double brooding at this latitude/elevation in the Adirondacks is not likely; the same would apply to the Green Mountains of VT. But, we live in changing times, including climate change and global warming which are affecting avian time tables. We just need further proof that Ruby-throats double brood in the mountains of the Northeast.
>> Bob Yunick
>> Jenny Lake and Schenectady, NY
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 3:28 pm
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
This has been a fascinating and educational thread, everyone! It's
making me look more closely at "our" hummingbirds and their behavior.
This morning, we had two short-billed youngsters actually sharing a
feeder (one on each side), getting along at least for that minute better
than some human siblings!
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 3:02 pm
From: anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
Thank you Jared. Please let me offer advice to watchers at hummer feeders about who is whom as to age and sex.  The bully ad. males have, as pictured in most field guides a deeply forked black tail, green back, whitish belly, and black throat which at the right angle of light is an iridescent  brilliantly ruby red, giving them their name, as well as attracting their numerous female mates. The plumage of all of the  season's  newly fledged young, M or F, resembles more that of their mother than that of their father.  All new young, M and F,  have white-tipped tail feathers resembling their mother's plumage not their father's black, deeply forked outer tail feathers.
But, one plumage characteristic does distinguish young males from their sisters and mothers.  They have light-green streaking on their throat suggesting a bit of a beard (not really) that differentiates them from the white throats of their sisters and mothers.
I hope this helps feeder watchers to better understand whom they are hosting.  It's always a pleasure to watch these tiny mites,
Bob Yunick
Thanks so much for the information. Until Friday, we’d had one male and two-three females at our two feeders. Suddenly, as of Friday morning 7/18, there were three additional hummers. 


Jared


Jared Katz Photography
823 Snipe Ireland Road
Richmond, VT 05477
(802) 343-4102
<jdkatzvt...>


> On Jul 20, 2020, at 1:00 PM, anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Hello Hummer Lovers - on Fri, 7/17, I banded the first newly fledged imm. female Ruby-throat of the season at my Adirondack banding station at Jenny Lake in Saratoga Co., NY.  Based on 29 years of banding records at this site, this date is 3 days earlier than the previous earliest date of 7/20.  The average earliest date is 8/3, ranging as late as 8/25 in 2013.
> Let me offer some further thoughts on the possibility of double brooding based on Cornell's information that the species can be single or double brooded.  That guidance needs to be put into proper geographical perspective.
> Northward bound male Ruby-throats hit the Gulf Coast last week of  Feb based on many years of records gathered on HumNet.  A few miles inland from that coast the breeding territory of Ruby-throats begins, stretching about 1100 mi. N into southern Canada at about 49 deg. N latitude.  It is quite possible that Ruby-throats breeding in southern U.S. states can be double brooded if they begin breeding in Mar, but that possibility diminishes as one goes northward.
> My Jenny Lake station is at 41deg, 16 min. N latitude at an elevation of 1250-1300 ft.  Records there over 29 years show an average first banding date of adults 5/16, range 5/6-5/24; first banding date of a newly fledged imm. 8/3, range 7/20 (prior to this year)-8/25.  The average last banding date is 9/3, range 8/25-9/23.  In 16 of the 29 years, imm. have been banded into Sep, average last date 9/8 with  dates of 12 of those 16 years occurring 9/1-9/10.
> If an average female were to double brood, she would require 3-5 days to rehab her nest, 2 days to lay 2 eggs, 14 days to incubate and 18-23 days to fledge a second brood, a total of 37-44 days.  Based on the average date of first banding of an imm. of 8/3, a female then attempting a second brood would take until 9/9-9/16 to bring off that brood. This puts her brood out of the nest past the average 9/3 departure date.
> If we consider the case of the mother of the imm. I just banded on 7/17, and apply the same breeding time table to her, she could possibly pull off a second brood by  8/23-8/30 which, again, provides precious little time for her newbies to develop the stamina for their upcoming over 1000-mi migration to Central America.
> At Jenny Lake, I have never seen male courting behavior after Jun.  Lots of territorial conflicts at the feeders, yes.  All in all, I feel double brooding at this latitude/elevation in the Adirondacks is not likely; the same would apply to the Green Mountains of VT.  But, we live in changing times, including climate change and global warming which are affecting avian time tables.  We just need further proof that Ruby-throats double brood in the mountains of the Northeast.
> Bob Yunick
> Jenny Lake and Schenectady, NY
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 2:00 pm
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] July 18, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
John,

You are most welcome. If you zip me your email I'll include you on my
Subtrack website, which posts a slightly more refined version of the
Vermont Birds post

Pur a Vida,
Ted

On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 2:24 PM John Holme <
<00000062fa0d6268-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Ted, Thanks so much for sharing your beautiful writing.
> John
> On Saturday, July 18, 2020, 02:45:42 PM EDT, Ted Levin <
> <tedlevin1966...> wrote:
>
> 5:08 a.m. 63 degrees, wind SSE 2 mph. Sky: thickly fogged, condensing on
> leaves and dripping; sounds like rain. I walk inside a cloud, where
> treetops are indistinct and green grades toward white. Spiderwebs hung with
> dew. Permanent streams: alive and well after yesterday's rain; flowing but
> not like April or May. Intermittent streams: seep and puddle. Wetlands: as
> though peering through chowder; opposite shore eclipsed by fog. Pond: a
> mist machine; surface smooth.
>
> Red-eyed vireos sing with mid-May intensity and persistence, everyone else
> turns the volume down. Neighborhood warblers vocally withdrew; only
> ovenbirds and chestnut-sided still singing, the ovenbirds loudly. Two
> tanagers, high in the oaks, carry on. Even though they're adorned in neon
> scarlet, there's no chance I'll see them; I can barely see the tops of the
> trees.
>
> Deer flies, little hollow tubes of hunger, desperate to be filled—gorgeous
> rainbowed eyes and large clear wings with dark bands, all the better to
> find me. Like mosquitoes and ticks, females imbibe blood to make and
> provision eggs. Her bladelike mouth slices through the skin, an
> anticoagulant keeps the blood flowing, and a spongy *labrum* laps it
> up. Males have weak mouths, sip nectar, and eat pollen. Growing up on Long
> Island, I faced greenheads, the coastal version of the deer fly, big
> emerald eyes, and even bigger appetites, which added a kamikaze element to
> adventuring in the salt marsh or fishing on a windless Great South Bay. The
> jumbo version of the deer fly is the horse fly, big enough to hit with a
> shovel, and a constant companion in photography blinds in the Everglades.
>
> I need to commission a dragonfly (or two) to hover above my head, to tether
> to my binoculars; I'd send it across the morning to sweep my personal space
> clear of deer flies. Unfortunately, the parade of dragonflies that paroled
> the wetlands left after the beaver decamped, leaving me behind to slap and
> pinch and swear.
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 1:36 pm
From: Jared Katz <000003825c43bc1a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
Thanks so much for the information. Until Friday, we’d had one male and two-three females at our two feeders. Suddenly, as of Friday morning 7/18, there were three additional hummers.


Jared


Jared Katz Photography
823 Snipe Ireland Road
Richmond, VT 05477
(802) 343-4102
<jdkatzvt...>


> On Jul 20, 2020, at 1:00 PM, anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Hello Hummer Lovers - on Fri, 7/17, I banded the first newly fledged imm. female Ruby-throat of the season at my Adirondack banding station at Jenny Lake in Saratoga Co., NY. Based on 29 years of banding records at this site, this date is 3 days earlier than the previous earliest date of 7/20. The average earliest date is 8/3, ranging as late as 8/25 in 2013.
> Let me offer some further thoughts on the possibility of double brooding based on Cornell's information that the species can be single or double brooded. That guidance needs to be put into proper geographical perspective.
> Northward bound male Ruby-throats hit the Gulf Coast last week of Feb based on many years of records gathered on HumNet. A few miles inland from that coast the breeding territory of Ruby-throats begins, stretching about 1100 mi. N into southern Canada at about 49 deg. N latitude. It is quite possible that Ruby-throats breeding in southern U.S. states can be double brooded if they begin breeding in Mar, but that possibility diminishes as one goes northward.
> My Jenny Lake station is at 41deg, 16 min. N latitude at an elevation of 1250-1300 ft. Records there over 29 years show an average first banding date of adults 5/16, range 5/6-5/24; first banding date of a newly fledged imm. 8/3, range 7/20 (prior to this year)-8/25. The average last banding date is 9/3, range 8/25-9/23. In 16 of the 29 years, imm. have been banded into Sep, average last date 9/8 with dates of 12 of those 16 years occurring 9/1-9/10.
> If an average female were to double brood, she would require 3-5 days to rehab her nest, 2 days to lay 2 eggs, 14 days to incubate and 18-23 days to fledge a second brood, a total of 37-44 days. Based on the average date of first banding of an imm. of 8/3, a female then attempting a second brood would take until 9/9-9/16 to bring off that brood. This puts her brood out of the nest past the average 9/3 departure date.
> If we consider the case of the mother of the imm. I just banded on 7/17, and apply the same breeding time table to her, she could possibly pull off a second brood by 8/23-8/30 which, again, provides precious little time for her newbies to develop the stamina for their upcoming over 1000-mi migration to Central America.
> At Jenny Lake, I have never seen male courting behavior after Jun. Lots of territorial conflicts at the feeders, yes. All in all, I feel double brooding at this latitude/elevation in the Adirondacks is not likely; the same would apply to the Green Mountains of VT. But, we live in changing times, including climate change and global warming which are affecting avian time tables. We just need further proof that Ruby-throats double brood in the mountains of the Northeast.
> Bob Yunick
> Jenny Lake and Schenectady, NY
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 1:09 pm
From: Mike Sargent <msargent...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
Thanks for your detailed and informative discussion. I had a fledgling show up at the feeder in my yard in South Burlington yesterday (7-19) and it returned today. Just as it had happened with its mother earlier this season, a chickadee eventually chased it away so it could take a drink from the moat. Nothing makes a chickadee look so big as when it's next to a hummingbird.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 12:32 pm
From: Diana <dlee3...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Into the Wild with Wild Turkeys
I uploaded a new video about wild turkeys( some fighting). Some of the video is from our trailcam.

https://youtu.be/_I-U5p0abnQ
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 11:24 am
From: John Holme <00000062fa0d6268-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] July 18, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
Ted,  Thanks so much for sharing your beautiful writing.
John
On Saturday, July 18, 2020, 02:45:42 PM EDT, Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> wrote:

5:08 a.m. 63 degrees, wind SSE 2 mph. Sky: thickly fogged, condensing on
leaves and dripping; sounds like rain. I walk inside a cloud, where
treetops are indistinct and green grades toward white. Spiderwebs hung with
dew. Permanent streams: alive and well after yesterday's rain; flowing but
not like April or May. Intermittent streams: seep and puddle. Wetlands: as
though peering through chowder; opposite shore eclipsed by fog. Pond: a
mist machine; surface smooth.

Red-eyed vireos sing with mid-May intensity and persistence, everyone else
turns the volume down. Neighborhood warblers vocally withdrew; only
ovenbirds and chestnut-sided still singing, the ovenbirds loudly. Two
tanagers, high in the oaks, carry on. Even though they're adorned in neon
scarlet, there's no chance I'll see them; I can barely see the tops of the
trees.

Deer flies, little hollow tubes of hunger, desperate to be filled—gorgeous
rainbowed eyes and large clear wings with dark bands, all the better to
find me. Like mosquitoes and ticks, females imbibe blood to make and
provision eggs. Her bladelike mouth slices through the skin, an
anticoagulant keeps the blood flowing, and a spongy *labrum* laps it
up. Males have weak mouths, sip nectar, and eat pollen. Growing up on Long
Island, I faced greenheads, the coastal version of the deer fly, big
emerald eyes, and even bigger appetites, which added a kamikaze element to
adventuring in the salt marsh or fishing on a windless Great South Bay. The
jumbo version of the deer fly is the horse fly, big enough to hit with a
shovel, and a constant companion in photography blinds in the Everglades.

I need to commission a dragonfly (or two) to hover above my head, to tether
to my binoculars; I'd send it across the morning to sweep my personal space
clear of deer flies. Unfortunately, the parade of dragonflies that paroled
the wetlands left after the beaver decamped, leaving me behind to slap and
pinch and swear.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 10:43 am
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
Fascinating info. Thank you!

Jane
(Shoreham)

On Mon, 20 Jul 2020 17:00:49 +0000, anneboby
<00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> wrote:
> Hello Hummer Lovers - on Fri, 7/17, I banded the first newly fledged
imm.
> female Ruby-throat of the season at my Adirondack banding station at
Jenny
> Lake in Saratoga Co., NY.  Based on 29 years of banding records at this
> site, this date is 3 days earlier than the previous earliest date of
7/20. 
> The average earliest date is 8/3, ranging as late as 8/25 in 2013.
> Let me offer some further thoughts on the possibility of double brooding
> based on Cornell's information that the species can be single or double
> brooded.  That guidance needs to be put into proper geographical
> perspective.
> Northward bound male Ruby-throats hit the Gulf Coast last week of  Feb
> based on many years of records gathered on HumNet.  A few miles inland
from
> that coast the breeding territory of Ruby-throats begins, stretching
about
> 1100 mi. N into southern Canada at about 49 deg. N latitude.  It is
quite
> possible that Ruby-throats breeding in southern U.S. states can be
double
> brooded if they begin breeding in Mar, but that possibility diminishes
as
> one goes northward.
> My Jenny Lake station is at 41deg, 16 min. N latitude at an elevation of
> 1250-1300 ft.  Records there over 29 years show an average first banding
> date of adults 5/16, range 5/6-5/24; first banding date of a newly
fledged
> imm. 8/3, range 7/20 (prior to this year)-8/25.  The average last
banding
> date is 9/3, range 8/25-9/23.  In 16 of the 29 years, imm. have been
banded
> into Sep, average last date 9/8 with  dates of 12 of those 16 years
> occurring 9/1-9/10.
> If an average female were to double brood, she would require 3-5 days to
> rehab her nest, 2 days to lay 2 eggs, 14 days to incubate and 18-23 days
to
> fledge a second brood, a total of 37-44 days.  Based on the average date
of
> first banding of an imm. of 8/3, a female then attempting a second brood
> would take until 9/9-9/16 to bring off that brood. This puts her brood
out
> of the nest past the average 9/3 departure date.
> If we consider the case of the mother of the imm. I just banded on 7/17,
> and apply the same breeding time table to her, she could possibly pull
off
> a second brood by  8/23-8/30 which, again, provides precious little time
> for her newbies to develop the stamina for their upcoming over 1000-mi
> migration to Central America.
> At Jenny Lake, I have never seen male courting behavior after Jun.  Lots
> of territorial conflicts at the feeders, yes.  All in all, I feel double
> brooding at this latitude/elevation in the Adirondacks is not likely;
the
> same would apply to the Green Mountains of VT.  But, we live in changing
> times, including climate change and global warming which are affecting
> avian time tables.  We just need further proof that Ruby-throats double
> brood in the mountains of the Northeast.
> Bob Yunick
> Jenny Lake and Schenectady, NY
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 10:01 am
From: anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummers, they are out
Hello Hummer Lovers - on Fri, 7/17, I banded the first newly fledged imm. female Ruby-throat of the season at my Adirondack banding station at Jenny Lake in Saratoga Co., NY.  Based on 29 years of banding records at this site, this date is 3 days earlier than the previous earliest date of 7/20.  The average earliest date is 8/3, ranging as late as 8/25 in 2013.
Let me offer some further thoughts on the possibility of double brooding based on Cornell's information that the species can be single or double brooded.  That guidance needs to be put into proper geographical perspective.
Northward bound male Ruby-throats hit the Gulf Coast last week of  Feb based on many years of records gathered on HumNet.  A few miles inland from that coast the breeding territory of Ruby-throats begins, stretching about 1100 mi. N into southern Canada at about 49 deg. N latitude.  It is quite possible that Ruby-throats breeding in southern U.S. states can be double brooded if they begin breeding in Mar, but that possibility diminishes as one goes northward.
My Jenny Lake station is at 41deg, 16 min. N latitude at an elevation of 1250-1300 ft.  Records there over 29 years show an average first banding date of adults 5/16, range 5/6-5/24; first banding date of a newly fledged imm. 8/3, range 7/20 (prior to this year)-8/25.  The average last banding date is 9/3, range 8/25-9/23.  In 16 of the 29 years, imm. have been banded into Sep, average last date 9/8 with  dates of 12 of those 16 years occurring 9/1-9/10.
If an average female were to double brood, she would require 3-5 days to rehab her nest, 2 days to lay 2 eggs, 14 days to incubate and 18-23 days to fledge a second brood, a total of 37-44 days.  Based on the average date of first banding of an imm. of 8/3, a female then attempting a second brood would take until 9/9-9/16 to bring off that brood. This puts her brood out of the nest past the average 9/3 departure date.
If we consider the case of the mother of the imm. I just banded on 7/17, and apply the same breeding time table to her, she could possibly pull off a second brood by  8/23-8/30 which, again, provides precious little time for her newbies to develop the stamina for their upcoming over 1000-mi migration to Central America.
At Jenny Lake, I have never seen male courting behavior after Jun.  Lots of territorial conflicts at the feeders, yes.  All in all, I feel double brooding at this latitude/elevation in the Adirondacks is not likely; the same would apply to the Green Mountains of VT.  But, we live in changing times, including climate change and global warming which are affecting avian time tables.  We just need further proof that Ruby-throats double brood in the mountains of the Northeast.
Bob Yunick
Jenny Lake and Schenectady, NY
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 5:33 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 20, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:12 a.m. 71 degrees, wind S 5 mph. Sky: overcast with striations; then a
mackerel sky, dappled and ribbed with clouds, ruffled and torn; openings
basted in pastel peach; fractured clouds edged in mauve; a sprawling and
moveable and feast; an aerial landscape that belongs in an intimate Eliot
Porter photograph. Permanent streams: took a big hit in yesterday's heat;
more pulse than flow. Wetlands: only mist rises under my denim jacket; a
doe grazes reeds, her head barely above the surface; a rich red-brown,
offset by the green of the marsh. Pond: still and brown; whirligig beetles
motoring in little concentric circles; around and around as if stuck in a
low gear. A male kingfisher, the first I've seen here all year, stares down
the pond; tadpoles and frogs beware; flies from tree to tree, rattling as
though deeply disturbed. Is this a local kingfisher hatched in an esker
along the Connecticut River, who grew up in the company of bank swallows
and woodchucks, above an uncluttered river silenced by COVID, or a
messenger from beyond this small valley, slowly working his way to jungles
of Panama? Either or, he pauses for a snack on his way somewhere else.

Tanager sings up the sun, his breast and back the color of molten metal
until extinguished by the seasons . . . too soon to contemplate. A lone
ovenbird screams his little heart out; makes up for all other ovenbirds,
which have taken the morning off. Chickadee whistles, a short, reassuring
two notes sure to light up a late February morning seems out of place in
the doldrums. A phoebe hacks. A troop of jays hollers. A nuthatch stutters;
it doesn't matter which species, they both stutter; this one happens to be
a red-breasted nuthatch. A titmouse whistles, two-noted and loudly.

Robins, full-throated and exuberant, everywhere rally; drowns out vireos,
which is a monumental achievement. Robins parade their earth-toned breasts
around the road, in the trees, fearless and personable; emissaries from the
lawns of my boyhood. A bird that marks the travels of my life. We've
crossed paths in the open spruce of Alaska; in the soybean fields of
Indiana; on the slopes of the Sierras, the Rockies, the Cascades, the
Appalachians; from coast to coast and along the lip of Hudson Bay and the
Bay of Fundy; along the margin of significant north-south and west-east
rivers, in dark flocks one winter constellating by the thousands in the
Everglades. I can't go anywhere on the continent without the company of a
robin, which is why I'm devoted to them. Early this summer, a robin nested
in the basket of a friend's scooter, high on a shelve in the back of her
garage. They're dependable, attractive, of good voice, an intimate and
cheerful bird, the ideal antidote for the blues. I take solace in robins.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/20 6:24 pm
From: Gmail okra <ihateokra88...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Yellow throated warbler sighted Derby
Wow! That’s a rare bird up here - nice!




Michael R. Haas, VMD, MS
(610) 533-9443
1286 Hazen Notch Rd.
Lowell, VT 05847
<ihateokra88...>

“Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.”
- Victor Frankl



> On Jul 19, 2020, at 7:31 PM, Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> wrote:
>
 

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Date: 7/19/20 4:44 pm
From: Evergreen Erb <evergreenerb...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Songs
I agree with Maeve. I am noticing actually more birdsong in the morning
than I did in June. Just today, my beloved winter wren was still singing,
and quite close to the house...thank you, dear wren, I love your song! But
many others are singing also when I go out at 6 am with my pup (Cardinal,
Song sparrow, Catbird, Yellowthroats, Chest-nut sided Warblers, Veery,
Hermit thrush, Wood thrush, etc), and all through the day! I am really
enjoying it, and feeling like I want to hold on to it, which of course I
can't. So, I will try to be present to it while it's here. Evergreen in
Jericho

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of maevulus
Sent: Sunday, July 19, 2020 4:53 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Songs

There's less song now, yes - but I've been astonished this year by how
frequent some songs are this late in the breeding season. Maybe it's just
because I'm home all the time and paying more attention, but I can't
remember ever hearing Common Yellowthroats and Chestnut-sided Warblers
singing so often in July. We hear our resident catbird daily, along with
Song Sparrows, American Robins (including one virtuoso that welcomes each
dawn with twenty minutes or more of truly glorious song), goldfinches, House
Finches, Red-eyed Vireos and even an occasional shout-out from a
Rose-breasted Grosbeak. The Ovenbird across the street sang regularly until
about a week ago.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/20 4:31 pm
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Yellow throated warbler sighted Derby
While watching for the pending storms to hit from my deck, I did hear a
bird call that was completely unfamiliar in the brush before me. Soon after
hearing the call I spotted a warbler ( I thought) working the trees for
insects on the side of my house. I had my binocs and spotted the bird but
could not identify it. I made mental notes of the markings and watched it
until it flew away. I grabbed two guides and determined it to be a yellow
throated warbler-a bird I had never seen before. So distinctive with the
bright yellow upper throat and a black mask. Tried to enter it into my
ebird list for the day but ebird won’t pull up the species on my iPhone.
What a treat to see this most unexpected species.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/20 1:53 pm
From: maevulus <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Songs
There's less song now, yes - but I've been astonished this year by how
frequent some songs are this late in the breeding season. Maybe it's
just because I'm home all the time and paying more attention, but I
can't remember ever hearing Common Yellowthroats and Chestnut-sided
Warblers singing so often in July. We hear our resident catbird daily,
along with Song Sparrows, American Robins (including one virtuoso that
welcomes each dawn with twenty minutes or more of truly glorious song),
goldfinches, House Finches, Red-eyed Vireos and even an occasional
shout-out from a Rose-breasted Grosbeak. The Ovenbird across the street
sang regularly until about a week ago.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/20 1:34 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Songs
I'm sure we all have noticed the decrease in bird song. Yet still there are some species that continue to delight us.
Hermit thrush always a favorite continues. A rival to the thrush melodies is winter wren who was robustly singing this morning along Short Swamp Rd in Brandon. Such a complex song from this tiny songster amazes!
Birds rock!
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

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Date: 7/19/20 10:03 am
From: Noel Dodge <noel.dodge...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] using ebird
Hi Ruth, Yes please! Adding that code makes sorting the eBird data a much
easier task. Pulling all records by state for even a single species can be
an enormous chunk of data. Detailed notes on breeding behavior are also
helpful. There are several state agencies (Including VFWD whom I work for)
using or exploring using eBird data to help map new breeding occurrences
across states for species of concern.
I co-authored a paper on it last year:
https://www.natureserve.org/biodiversity-science/publications/using-citizen-science-data-support-conservation-environmental

I’m hoping to find the time in the future to attempt to replicate the study
with Vermont data. Just have to find the time!
-Noel Dodge



On Sun, Jul 19, 2020 at 10:08 AM Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...>
wrote:

> I have a new Cedar Waxwing nest in my yard.
>
> On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 11:13 PM Richard Guthrie <
> <richardpguthrie...>
> wrote:
>
> > I believe Some species may be trying for a second or third brood (
> Vireos,
> > Cardinal, Robin, etc,) While others may be hanging around in extended
> > family groups with Dad (or Mom) holding down the territory boundaries.
> >
> > Then there are those that are done and getting ready to leave town (if
> > they haven’t done so already).
> >
> > I’m expecting to see some migrant passerines in my yard any day now.
> > Yellow Warbler, which doesn’t breed here, comes to mind. Many swallows of
> > each species are already going by in impressive numbers.
> >
> > Rich Guthrie
> > NewBaltimore
> > The Greene County
> > New York
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> > > On Jul 18, 2020, at 10:57 PM, R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> wrote:
> > >
> > > Is there value in adding a breeding code such as H -Appropriate
> Habitat,
> > S
> > > - singing, or P - pair in suitable habitat at this point in the season?
> > > Except for AMGO, aren't most birds nesting or finished, rather than
> > > potentially nesting?
> > > -
> > > Ruth Stewart
> > > E. Dorset VT
> >
> --
> Gretchen E. Nareff
> Bennington, VT
>
--
Sent from Gmail Mobile
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/20 7:08 am
From: Gretchen Nareff <marshbirder...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] using ebird
I have a new Cedar Waxwing nest in my yard.

On Sat, Jul 18, 2020 at 11:13 PM Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...>
wrote:

> I believe Some species may be trying for a second or third brood ( Vireos,
> Cardinal, Robin, etc,) While others may be hanging around in extended
> family groups with Dad (or Mom) holding down the territory boundaries.
>
> Then there are those that are done and getting ready to leave town (if
> they haven’t done so already).
>
> I’m expecting to see some migrant passerines in my yard any day now.
> Yellow Warbler, which doesn’t breed here, comes to mind. Many swallows of
> each species are already going by in impressive numbers.
>
> Rich Guthrie
> NewBaltimore
> The Greene County
> New York
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jul 18, 2020, at 10:57 PM, R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> wrote:
> >
> > Is there value in adding a breeding code such as H -Appropriate Habitat,
> S
> > - singing, or P - pair in suitable habitat at this point in the season?
> > Except for AMGO, aren't most birds nesting or finished, rather than
> > potentially nesting?
> > -
> > Ruth Stewart
> > E. Dorset VT
>
--
Gretchen E. Nareff
Bennington, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/20 5:14 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 19, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford
5:21 a.m. 63 degrees, wind ENE 1 mph. Sky: flat white with a hint of peach;
the air thick with visible humidity; no separation between ground and sky,
everything and everywhere a shroud of fog. Permanent streams: current
slowing but still babbling. Intermittent streams: a trickle and puddles.
Wetlands: encased in fog; visibility reduced to halfway across; it looks
like the film set for the remake of *The Creature From the Black Lagoon*. I
can't see the mid-marsh snag, the red-shouldered hawk's post; if a
pterodactyl perched there, I wouldn't know it. Pond: cranking out the mist.

DOR: a lousy night for green frogs, which scatter in huddled wreckage; one
adult, and four recently transformed tadpoles out for a fatal evening
ramble.
AOR: a pair of robins, always robins. Flattened frogs don't interest them.

Two tanagers, hidden in leaves and fog, sing in the oaks, a series of
hoarse and raspy phrases over and over. Pack-a-day songbirds that make
similarly patterned robins sound like Sam Cooke. One last look before they
leave; one glimpse of an indescribable red, set off by coal-black wings, so
intense I need sunglasses . . . that's all I want—one last glimpse before
the color drains.

The musical fabric of the neighborhood: Four white-breasted nuthatches on
the trunk of white pine and a small crowd of chickadees in hemlocks. Can
winter be far off? Out of the density of the fog, a red-shouldered hawk
screams, and a barred owl barks. An alder flycatcher, the first I've heard
in a month, an ascending *rrrep*, *rrrep; *sounds like angry phoebe. A
yellow-billed cuckoo, a soft, hollow note repeated at intervals,
suggests the call of an America bittern wearing a face mask.

A flock of loquacious jays, ten or twelve, an extended family on a Sunday
outing in pines and streamside maples. Fog and jays; suggestions of October
in bowels of summer. They don't seem to be feeding. Just chasing each other
around like kids on a playground, a wild troop of blue jays enlivens an
otherwise quiet morning, motionless as fog.

Three red-eyed vireos by the lower permanent stream engaged in a musical
battle royale, each bird singing a phrase every couple of seconds,
stupefyingly repetitive. *Here-I-am, up-in-the-tree, here-I-am*. The
dullest of musical messengers, ho-hum songbirds but feathered metronomes,
all the same, which set to music the beat of the Earth, the spin of a
summer ineluctably en route into autumn.

In the meantime, I have more raspberries than I know what to do with.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/20 8:13 pm
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] using ebird
I believe Some species may be trying for a second or third brood ( Vireos, Cardinal, Robin, etc,) While others may be hanging around in extended family groups with Dad (or Mom) holding down the territory boundaries.

Then there are those that are done and getting ready to leave town (if they haven’t done so already).

I’m expecting to see some migrant passerines in my yard any day now. Yellow Warbler, which doesn’t breed here, comes to mind. Many swallows of each species are already going by in impressive numbers.

Rich Guthrie
NewBaltimore
The Greene County
New York

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 18, 2020, at 10:57 PM, R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> wrote:
>
> Is there value in adding a breeding code such as H -Appropriate Habitat, S
> - singing, or P - pair in suitable habitat at this point in the season?
> Except for AMGO, aren't most birds nesting or finished, rather than
> potentially nesting?
> -
> Ruth Stewart
> E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/20 7:57 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] using ebird
Is there value in adding a breeding code such as H -Appropriate Habitat, S
- singing, or P - pair in suitable habitat at this point in the season?
Except for AMGO, aren't most birds nesting or finished, rather than
potentially nesting?
-
Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset VT
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/20 3:35 pm
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Least Bittern, shorebirds, terns - Highgate Springs
Hello - this morning Ted Murin and I birded Goose Bay/mouth of Dead Creek by scope from Shipyard Rd In Highgate Springs. Highlights included 1 Least Bittern, 1 Short-billed Dowitcher, and 2 Semi-palmated Plovers among other shorebirds and waders; 2 Black Terns and 2 Common Terns among many Caspian Terns. Complete list is on eBird.

Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/18/20 11:45 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 18, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:08 a.m. 63 degrees, wind SSE 2 mph. Sky: thickly fogged, condensing on
leaves and dripping; sounds like rain. I walk inside a cloud, where
treetops are indistinct and green grades toward white. Spiderwebs hung with
dew. Permanent streams: alive and well after yesterday's rain; flowing but
not like April or May. Intermittent streams: seep and puddle. Wetlands: as
though peering through chowder; opposite shore eclipsed by fog. Pond: a
mist machine; surface smooth.

Red-eyed vireos sing with mid-May intensity and persistence, everyone else
turns the volume down. Neighborhood warblers vocally withdrew; only
ovenbirds and chestnut-sided still singing, the ovenbirds loudly. Two
tanagers, high in the oaks, carry on. Even though they're adorned in neon
scarlet, there's no chance I'll see them; I can barely see the tops of the
trees.

Deer flies, little hollow tubes of hunger, desperate to be filled—gorgeous
rainbowed eyes and large clear wings with dark bands, all the better to
find me. Like mosquitoes and ticks, females imbibe blood to make and
provision eggs. Her bladelike mouth slices through the skin, an
anticoagulant keeps the blood flowing, and a spongy *labrum* laps it
up. Males have weak mouths, sip nectar, and eat pollen. Growing up on Long
Island, I faced greenheads, the coastal version of the deer fly, big
emerald eyes, and even bigger appetites, which added a kamikaze element to
adventuring in the salt marsh or fishing on a windless Great South Bay. The
jumbo version of the deer fly is the horse fly, big enough to hit with a
shovel, and a constant companion in photography blinds in the Everglades.

I need to commission a dragonfly (or two) to hover above my head, to tether
to my binoculars; I'd send it across the morning to sweep my personal space
clear of deer flies. Unfortunately, the parade of dragonflies that paroled
the wetlands left after the beaver decamped, leaving me behind to slap and
pinch and swear.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 12:42 pm
From: Fowle, Margaret <Margaret.Fowle...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Chimney Swift survey - inclusivity and safety
Dear VT Birders -


Thanks to everyone who has been submitting Chimney Swift sightings to eBird. We are continuing the survey through the rest of the summer, now with a focus on locating important roost sites. Please see the website<https://vt.audubon.org/conservation/chimney-swift-recovery-project> for more info, and thanks for your help.



We recognize that safety in the outdoors while birding and monitoring is not equal for all of us. Black birders, LGBTQIA+ birders, female-identifying birders, and birders with disabilities all face additional barriers to being safe and accessing opportunities to participate in Audubon's community science work.



We want to be sure that everyone is safe when out surveying for Chimney Swifts, especially since this year's monitoring protocol is focused on finding Chimney Swift nesting and roosting sites at dusk. If you are interested in participating in Chimney Swift monitoring, we recommend that you go out with a birding buddy.



Audubon Vermont is coordinating the matching of Chimney Swift monitoring birding buddies. You can either request a birding buddy or volunteer to be a birding buddy by filling out a brief online<https://act.audubon.org/a/%20swift-buddy> form to provide us with your name, email address, and town. When you request a birding buddy we will get you in contact with someone who has offered to join other birders in your area. We will not share this list with the public, but will reach out privately to individuals. Rae Bronenkant will be coordinating this program. If you have further questions please email her directly at <rae.bronenkant...><mailto:<rae.bronenkant...>



COVID-19 safety considerations for birding buddies:

o If you are a member of a vulnerable population, we ask you take extra precautions for COVID-19 safety while volunteering (older adults, people with medical conditions, racial and ethnic minority groups, people who are pregnant or nursing, people with developmental disabilities, or newly resettled refugee populations - see CDC guidelines<https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/index.html> for more information)

o Please follow COVID-19 safety guidelines:

* Stay at least 6 feet from others at all times.

* Wear a cloth mask or face covering.

* Monitor your health for symptoms of respiratory illness (fever, cough, and/or shortness of breath) and check your temperature before birding with your birding buddy.

* Wash hands often with soap and warm water for 20 seconds. If those aren't available, use a hand sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol.

* Avoid surfaces that are touched often, such as handrails.
* Do NOT share binoculars, field guides, or phones.
-Margaret
-
Margaret Fowle
Conservation Biologist
w: 802.434.4806 (home office)
c: 802.238.0046
Pronouns: she, her, hers

Audubon Vermont
255 Sherman Hollow Rd
Huntington, VT 05462
www.vt.audubon.org<http://www.vt.audubon.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 5:33 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 17, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:27 a.m. 58 degrees, wind SSE 5 mph; treetops in motion. Sky: bright,
congested, and without definition (the sort of atmosphere that would
detract from a landscape photograph); low ceiling, a seamless sheet of
clouds that alternates from drizzle to shower, steady and gentle. Permanent
streams: in motion but slowing down. Intermittent streams: on life support;
one a trickle; the other a necklace of puddles. Wetlands: luxuriantly
green, the recipient of seeps, dribbles, flows, and rain. If beaver were
here, there'd be a temporary pond, water from rim to rim, an aqueous crib
for catfish and minnows, and a deafening assemblage of frogs. Pond: the
surface a blend of raindrops and air-gulping tadpoles; pock and rippled, a
mesmerizing sheet of dancing water. Unaccompanied, a bullfrog bellows, the
counterpoint to the soft chips of yellowthroats and song sparrows. The
flowers of Queen Ann's lace and milkweed decorate the treeless berm that
leads up to the pond. Flowers of black-eyed Susan and oxeye daisy wither.

Except for ovenbirds and yellowthroats, most warblers conspicuously hushed
or gone. Red-eyed vireos take time off; *only* two sings. . . as persistent
and repetitive as humidity. A solitary veery calls. A song sparrow starts
to sing; thinks the better of it and stops, abruptly midsong. Two rough
patches of blue jays, family groups, separated by more than half a mile,
ripping around the canopy, effusive and loud. Rowdy. Full-grown chicks beg.
Parents accede their hard-edged, tweezer beaks crammed with living food.

Outside the barn: an ominous cloud of grackles descend on the raspberries.
Arms stretched and shaking at the wrists, I am my own scarecrow.

Inside the barn: no bat behind the door. Fat toad left the water bowl and
moved into the tack room. Seems content. Fills in for Roberto, the missing
cat. I greet the toad. No response.

Through a sieve of raindrops and across the valleys, a red-shouldered hawk
flings its voice, a declaration of undisguised satisfaction. Just when the
world seems stagnant, when heat and humidity clampdown, when mid-summer
melancholy sets in, I'm reminded that forces at work across the calendar
make every day a new adventure. Like fingerprints and iris scans, days are
*not* alike, each one a fine mesh net flung widely and indifferently across
the wrinkled landscape . . . and you never know what you'll receive.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 2:54 am
From: Kate Olgiati <2grackle...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grackles
They are lovely birds!

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 7:17 PM Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:

> Here in Brandon large flocks of grackles are congregating on lawns and
> flying to night roosting sites.
> Shades of Hitchcock's "The Birds".
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod



--
Katherine Olgiati
 

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Date: 7/16/20 4:39 pm
From: Sarah Fellows <towanda2...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Grackles
We just had 30 go through and never have them here???

SAlly Fellows
Williston, by

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 16, 2020, at 7:17 PM, Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:
>
> Here in Brandon large flocks of grackles are congregating on lawns and flying to night roosting sites.
> Shades of Hitchcock's "The Birds".
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/20 4:17 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Grackles
Here in Brandon large flocks of grackles are congregating on lawns and flying to night roosting sites.
Shades of Hitchcock's "The Birds".
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/20 6:36 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] July 16, 2020: Coyote Hollow, Thetford Center
5:23 a.m. 63 degrees, wind SSE 3 mph. Sky: lineated clouds, wispy clouds,
cloud mounds and valleys, many with a hint of peach and mauve, a painterly
sky; a shifting landscape of moisture. Permanent streams: flowing and
chatty. Intermittent streams: muddy and saturated; a chain of barely
flowing puddles; preparing to aestivate. Wetlands: quietly green; not a
hint of steam; a breeze across the reeds. Pond: earth brown; a gaunt mist
rolls east.

Out of a neighboring valley, a red-shouldered hawk screams, a high,
drawn-out squeal, crystalline and sharp; over and over and over; a rain of
verbal arrows that sounds like a blue jay on steroids or, said the other
way, a blue jay sounds like a red-shouldered hawk on barbituates.
Red-shouldered hawk, scream of screams. It's not the disspirited cackle of
a bald eagle or the none-stop yelling of a goshawk or the discordant notes
of a peregrine. Like the wistful notes of Miles Davis, the cry of a
red-shouldered hawk is meant to be savored. Hangs in the air for a moment,
tapers and fades. Repeats. Fades. Repeats. Adds life to a world already
alife.

I don't have to see the hawk. Just knowing it's out there hurling its voice
like a javelin is quite enough.

Tanager in oaks. Ovenbird in maples. Red-eyed vireo everywhere (or so it
seems). A black-billed cuckoo, calling out of shadows across the wetlands,
its voice a cuckoo drizzle rather than a hawk storm. Then, as if on cue,
a bird flies into the big, decrepit aspen, the one with widow-maker limb
that hangs straight down. A cuckoo? It's the right size. Its movements
measured and screened. As reticent as a rock. Picks something off the back
of a leaf. A caterpillar? A treefrog? Hidden by fluttering aspen leaves. I
wait, expectantly, for disclosure. Then, a jay flies into the aspen:
another and another and another. Five blue jays comb through the canopy. A
taciturn family that's more concerned with dining than chattering. Right
size; wrong bird. Four jays move on. One stays.

From far away and high above, the red-shouldered hawk screams, an
otherworldly scream, interstitial entertainment filtering down the columns
of a July morning. Colors my walk. The dogs, oblivious, tug their leashes;
and remaining blue jay methodically picks at leaves . . . and another
morning unfurls like a blossom.
 

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