VTBIRD
Received From Subject
6/17/19 6:16 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] first Hairy youngster having a lesson
6/16/19 7:54 pm R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
6/16/19 6:42 am Karan Cutler <kdcutler42...> Re: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
6/16/19 5:25 am Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> Re: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
6/16/19 3:15 am Mus <musbird...> [VTBIRD] Nestlings in the wrong places
6/15/19 5:07 am Sandy Witherell <homefarm...> Re: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
6/14/19 2:22 pm Chris Rimmer <crimmer...> [VTBIRD] Mansfield update
6/14/19 11:33 am Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
6/14/19 10:48 am Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...> [VTBIRD] Indigo Bunting, Rose Breasted GB
6/14/19 9:13 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Thrushes
6/14/19 4:26 am Kim Likakis <kim.likakis...> Re: [VTBIRD] Owl Surprise
6/13/19 5:22 am Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] Owl surprise ... western Addison County
6/13/19 4:57 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Brown Thrasher NEK
6/12/19 3:14 pm Sue <2birdvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Pileated in Brattleboro
6/12/19 2:35 pm Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...> Re: [VTBIRD] Pileated in Brattleboro
6/11/19 7:23 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] Vermont birds and wonderful words
6/10/19 5:09 pm Ralph Palmer <palmer.r.violin...> [VTBIRD] Pileated in Brattleboro
6/10/19 10:51 am Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> [VTBIRD] Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
6/9/19 7:33 pm Chris Rimmer <crimmer...> [VTBIRD] Mansfield banding season kicks off quietly
6/9/19 7:16 pm Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
6/9/19 3:26 pm J Wazny <turtlefeathers4...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
6/9/19 9:02 am Alice Grau <alicecgrau...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
6/9/19 7:23 am Linda P. McElvany <lindap.mack...> [VTBIRD] Brant Goose still there
6/9/19 7:19 am Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
6/9/19 7:10 am Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...> [VTBIRD] Winged Warblers
6/9/19 4:32 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
6/9/19 4:04 am Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
6/8/19 3:05 pm Dale J Martin <dale...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Woodpecker-photos
6/8/19 2:41 pm John Missing <johnmissing64...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Woodpecker-photos
6/8/19 2:33 pm cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...> [VTBIRD] Unusual Woodpecker-photos
6/7/19 8:11 pm Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Brant
6/6/19 12:52 pm Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings! SORRY, LIST
6/6/19 11:35 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
6/6/19 11:35 am Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> [VTBIRD] birding trips with VCE
6/6/19 4:36 am Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...> [VTBIRD] helping out a bird researcher friend of my daughter's
6/5/19 8:09 pm Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> [VTBIRD] Sandpipers?
6/5/19 8:44 am Patti Haynes <patti.haynes...> [VTBIRD] Chimney Swift documentation
6/3/19 4:53 pm Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Least Bittern - Buckner Preserve - Photos
6/3/19 4:51 pm Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Least Bittern - Buckner Preserve - Photos
6/3/19 4:39 pm Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> Re: [VTBIRD] Least Bittern - Buckner Preserve - Photos
6/3/19 3:36 pm Mike Sargent <msargent...> [VTBIRD] Least Bittern - Buckner Preserve - Photos
6/3/19 9:10 am Terry Marron <tgmarron...> Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
6/3/19 3:18 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] olive-sided flycatchers west side of the state (Thetford Center)
6/2/19 7:17 pm Ruth Stewart <birder_rws...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
6/2/19 3:48 pm Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Grasshopper Sparrow
6/2/19 3:24 pm Michele Patenaude <michelep...> Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
6/2/19 6:36 am Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> Re: [VTBIRD] Citizen Science
6/2/19 5:31 am Jim Block <jim...> Re: [VTBIRD] When Songbirds Fall to Earth
6/2/19 4:49 am Mitchell Harrison <000002ef5c1f1853-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
6/1/19 7:24 pm Rich Kelley <rich...> Re: [VTBIRD] Citizen Science
6/1/19 6:41 pm Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...> [VTBIRD] Citizen Science
6/1/19 5:32 pm Betty Holton <bholton...> Re: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
6/1/19 2:44 pm Ian Clark <recipes...> [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
6/1/19 2:18 pm Bob Phillips <155bphillips...> Re: [VTBIRD] Pix of birds and critters from the Upper Valley
6/1/19 2:17 pm Bob Phillips <155bphillips...> Re: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
6/1/19 10:50 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
6/1/19 10:38 am Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
6/1/19 10:37 am Ian Clark <lenscapon...> [VTBIRD] Pix of birds and critters from the Upper Valley
6/1/19 10:03 am Bridget Butler <birddiva...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking Down PHVIs
6/1/19 7:05 am Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
5/31/19 6:20 pm Rich Kelley <rich...> Re: [VTBIRD] Mud Pond bird walk
5/31/19 4:23 pm Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
5/31/19 2:43 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs --- and some comments about Yellow-bellied and Olive-sided Flycatchers. TYP0
5/31/19 1:24 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
5/31/19 1:12 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs --- and some comments about Yellow-bellied and Olive-sided Flycatchers.
5/31/19 1:02 pm Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
5/31/19 9:41 am Mike Sargent <msargent...> [VTBIRD] Philadelphia vireos
5/31/19 9:11 am Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
5/31/19 6:41 am Ian Worley <iworley...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
5/31/19 6:20 am Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
5/31/19 4:32 am Terry Marron <tgmarron...> [VTBIRD] Mud Pond bird walk
5/30/19 7:46 pm Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
5/30/19 6:17 pm Mus <musbird...> [VTBIRD] Hummers at Oranges
5/30/19 7:19 am Bridget Butler <birddiva...> [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
5/29/19 5:35 pm cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...> [VTBIRD] Wilson's Snipe
5/29/19 5:25 pm Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> Re: [VTBIRD] eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
5/29/19 3:56 pm Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
5/29/19 3:41 pm Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...> [VTBIRD] eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
5/29/19 1:53 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] Midday Nighthawk, close flyby, southern end of Snake Mountain, Cornwall/Bridport
5/29/19 1:47 pm Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan...> [VTBIRD] When Songbirds Fall to Earth
5/29/19 1:02 pm Jane Stein <jeshawks...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
5/29/19 12:22 pm <blackpoll...> <blackpoll...> [VTBIRD] Possible Swainson's warbler
5/29/19 11:01 am alison wagner <alikatofvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Another great Mourning in cemetery
5/29/19 10:26 am Alice Grau <alicecgrau...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
5/29/19 10:25 am Alice Grau <alicecgrau...> Re: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
5/29/19 10:03 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] A third Catbird showed up today...
5/29/19 9:59 am Jeanne Elias <moosewoman...> [VTBIRD] Phen Basin Bird walk 7 Am Thursday
5/29/19 9:12 am alison wagner <alikatofvt...> [VTBIRD] Another great Mourning in cemetery
5/29/19 8:43 am Frank Rounds <frankrounds...> [VTBIRD] Bald eagles in Essex
5/29/19 4:23 am Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...> [VTBIRD] bobolinks
5/29/19 3:44 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Pileated
5/28/19 6:09 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Cuckoos
5/28/19 1:43 pm FRED BATES <batesx2...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 28, 2019
5/28/19 1:26 pm Jane Stein <jeshawks...> [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
5/27/19 7:10 am Holly Brough <000004a95212da17-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] VT Grassland Birds Talk, Tuesday May 28, 6PM Free event
5/27/19 4:40 am Alice Grau <alicecgrau...> Re: [VTBIRD] An abundance of hummers
5/27/19 4:38 am Alice Grau <alicecgrau...> Re: [VTBIRD] An abundance of hummers
5/26/19 3:02 pm Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...> [VTBIRD] Blue winged warbler West Rutland Marsh
5/26/19 2:43 pm Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> [VTBIRD] An abundance of hummers
5/26/19 10:52 am Aves Artist <remy.avesart...> [VTBIRD] Eastern Meadowlark- New Haven, Vermont
5/26/19 8:54 am Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...> Re: [VTBIRD] Tenn. warbler
5/26/19 7:13 am Scott Morrical <smorrica...> Re: [VTBIRD] Tenn. warbler
5/26/19 6:30 am CLYDE YARNELL <carolclyde...> [VTBIRD] Tenn. warbler
5/26/19 5:06 am carolclyde <carolclyde...> [VTBIRD] Indigo bunting
5/25/19 1:22 pm Ron Payne <rpayne72...> Re: [VTBIRD] Least BitterN, Otter View Park, Middlebury
5/25/19 4:39 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Tennessee warbler
5/25/19 4:23 am Marylyn Pillsbury <000001cae55256d1-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Indigo Buntings
5/25/19 3:13 am BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...> [VTBIRD] Indigo Buntings
5/24/19 6:45 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] An almost Nightjar duet ... southern end of Snake Mountain, Cornwall
5/24/19 5:45 pm Mike Kira <mikekira...> [VTBIRD] Nighthawks
5/24/19 12:36 pm Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Red Rocks Warblers
5/24/19 12:01 pm Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...> [VTBIRD] Amazing Warbler Numbers
5/24/19 10:34 am Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> Re: [VTBIRD] warblers this year
5/24/19 10:08 am Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] warblers this year
5/24/19 9:36 am Marie Couture <endlesssummer54...> [VTBIRD] Indigo bunting
5/24/19 9:22 am Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...> [VTBIRD] front yard Thetford Center
5/24/19 6:48 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] 11 Chimney swifts!
5/24/19 6:15 am Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...> Re: [VTBIRD] June 1st Master Naturalist Bird Walk
5/24/19 5:15 am Brennan Michaels <owlhousevt...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
5/24/19 4:48 am R Stewart <2cnewbirds...> Re: [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh - May 23
5/24/19 3:59 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
5/24/19 3:48 am hilke breder <htbreder...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
5/23/19 4:29 pm Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh - May 23
5/23/19 4:10 pm Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
5/23/19 3:59 pm H Nicolay <sqrlma...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
5/23/19 3:27 pm Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] accidental hummingbird perch
5/23/19 2:47 pm Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] accidental hummingbird perch
5/23/19 2:21 pm Poleysgmavt <poleys...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
5/23/19 2:06 pm Maeve Kim <maevulus...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
5/23/19 1:49 pm Poleysgmavt <poleys...> Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
5/23/19 1:20 pm Katharine Thompson <kthom22...> Re: [VTBIRD] Wilson's
5/23/19 1:09 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Wilson's
5/23/19 9:13 am Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Colchester Pond Warblers
5/23/19 9:10 am Bridget Butler <birddiva...> [VTBIRD] Birders - You Are Needed!
5/23/19 8:16 am Kate Olgiati <2grackle...> Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
5/23/19 8:02 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] White-crowned sparrows still here
5/23/19 6:23 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
5/23/19 6:18 am Fowle, Margaret <mfowle...> [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
5/23/19 5:56 am Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> Re: [VTBIRD] White-crowned sparrows still here
5/23/19 5:04 am Terry Marron <tgmarron...> [VTBIRD] June 1st Master Naturalist Bird Walk
5/22/19 8:43 pm Rich Kelley <rich...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bird Walks Galore! 7am tomorrow, 4pm tomorrow -Thursday 5/23
5/22/19 7:14 pm Steven Lamonde <slamonde...> [VTBIRD] 104 species in Swanton & Highgate today
5/22/19 4:21 pm Peterson, Bruce B. <peterson...> [VTBIRD] Egrets, Middlebury
5/22/19 4:12 pm Craig Provost <cprovost88...> Re: [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh Walk - May 23
5/22/19 3:58 pm Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Least Bitter, Otter View Park, Middlebury
5/22/19 3:56 pm Patrick Phillips <phillipspatj...> Re: [VTBIRD] Colchester Pond - very birdy!
5/22/19 3:31 pm Ron Payne <rpayne72...> [VTBIRD] Least Bitter, Otter View Park, Middlebury
5/22/19 2:59 pm Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh Walk - May 23
5/22/19 11:24 am Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...> [VTBIRD] Prairie Warbler, Bay breasted, cape may: victory WMA
5/22/19 11:12 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] White-crowned sparrows still here
5/22/19 10:58 am Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...> Re: [VTBIRD] Counting birds in images
5/22/19 10:57 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Bird walk
5/22/19 10:35 am Gmail okra <ihateokra88...> Re: [VTBIRD] Dorothy Gale's wisdom
5/22/19 10:06 am Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld...> [VTBIRD] Colchester Pond - very birdy!
5/22/19 9:15 am alison wagner <alikatofvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Dorothy Gale's wisdom
5/22/19 9:03 am Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> [VTBIRD] Counting birds in images
5/22/19 9:01 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] warblers everywhere in Jericho Center!
5/22/19 8:22 am alison wagner <alikatofvt...> [VTBIRD] Dorothy Gale's wisdom
5/22/19 4:33 am Jeanne Elias <moosewoman...> [VTBIRD] Bird Walks Galore! 7am tomorrow, 4pm tomorrow -Thursday 5/23
5/21/19 2:40 pm Harry <hadamek...> Re: [VTBIRD] PHOTOS from the 20th Annual "Birding with Bill in Boltonville" event
5/21/19 2:19 pm Nancy Goodrich <nancyg3219...> Re: [VTBIRD] PHOTOS from the 20th Annual "Birding with Bill in Boltonville" event
5/21/19 1:09 pm Nita <nita.hwf...> [VTBIRD] Kingfisher in Stowe
5/21/19 12:19 pm Jim Block <jim...> [VTBIRD] PHOTOS from the 20th Annual "Birding with Bill in Boltonville" event
5/21/19 11:21 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Warblers Hawk Hill Trails, May 21, 2019
5/21/19 9:31 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Bobolink
5/21/19 9:10 am Alice Grau <alicecgrau...> [VTBIRD] Bobolink
5/21/19 8:04 am Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Greenmount Cemetery still active
5/21/19 4:12 am david merker <buteojamaica...> Re: [VTBIRD] VTBIRD Digest - 19 May 2019 to 20 May 2019 (#2019-123)
5/21/19 3:15 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Pileated
5/20/19 7:19 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Warblers Old Brandon Rd, May 20, 2019
5/20/19 6:18 pm Scott Morrical <smorrica...> Re: [VTBIRD] Warbler jackpot - Burlington
5/20/19 1:06 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Warblers
5/20/19 9:47 am Coleen Lawlor <lawlor.coleen...> [VTBIRD] Windham White Wing Scoter reported in error this morning. 5/20/19
5/20/19 9:21 am Chip Darmstadt <chip...> Re: [VTBIRD] foy
5/20/19 6:11 am Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] Cerulean Warblers, southern end of Snake Mountain, Bridport/Cornwall
5/20/19 5:50 am Mary and Ken Spencer <spencermk...> [VTBIRD] Scarlet Tanager
5/20/19 5:05 am Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...> [VTBIRD] foy
5/20/19 4:37 am Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] 100+ Species in Rutland County
5/20/19 3:28 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual death
5/20/19 2:56 am BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual death
5/20/19 2:37 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual death
5/20/19 2:28 am BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...> [VTBIRD] Unusual death
 
Back to top
Date: 6/17/19 6:16 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] first Hairy youngster having a lesson
The female was tempting her red-fronted-forehead-young with a bit of
suet to follow her about feeder area...nibble, fly, nibble fly, then
both drank deeply from water tray.Delight.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
__
_Dwell in the essential _I Ching
Sent using Hushmail
 

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Date: 6/16/19 7:54 pm
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
And how about the report I just got of a bluebird nest box nest with an
array of metal screws mixed in! She does not live near a construction
project or hardware store!

On Fri, Jun 14, 2019 at 2:33 PM Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> wrote:

> We couldn't have propane delivered this week because, as the delivery man
> discovered, we have a nest of House Sparrows filled with nestlings under
> the
> cap of the propane tank. Who's property is this anyway???
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge
>
 

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Date: 6/16/19 6:42 am
From: Karan Cutler <kdcutler42...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
Or a wren laying her eggs in my wicker bike basket. Had to use the bike so
I nailed the basket to the wall of th carport and she carried on. Three
healthy chicks.

On Sun, Jun 16, 2019, 8:25 AM Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> wrote:

> And that reminds me of a House Finch nest in a hanging basket of artificial
> plastic flowers on my parents' back porch, also many years ago (the '70s in
> PA). I think they nested there several years until my parents closed in
> the porch.
>
> --Ken Copenhaver
>
> On Sat, Jun 15, 2019 at 8:07 AM Sandy Witherell <homefarm...>
> wrote:
>
> > Ah, reminds me of the active House Finch nest ensconced within the
> > needleless Christmas wreath hanging on my parents' little-used front door
> > -
> > those many years ago.
> >
> > Sandy Witherell
> > Shoreham
> >
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Barbara Brosnan
> > Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 2:33 PM
> > To: <VTBIRD...>
> > Subject: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
> >
> > We couldn't have propane delivered this week because, as the delivery man
> > discovered, we have a nest of House Sparrows filled with nestlings under
> > the
> > cap of the propane tank. Who's property is this anyway???
> >
> >
> >
> > Barbara Brosnan
> >
> > Weybridge
> >
>
 

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Date: 6/16/19 5:25 am
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
And that reminds me of a House Finch nest in a hanging basket of artificial
plastic flowers on my parents' back porch, also many years ago (the '70s in
PA). I think they nested there several years until my parents closed in
the porch.

--Ken Copenhaver

On Sat, Jun 15, 2019 at 8:07 AM Sandy Witherell <homefarm...>
wrote:

> Ah, reminds me of the active House Finch nest ensconced within the
> needleless Christmas wreath hanging on my parents' little-used front door
> -
> those many years ago.
>
> Sandy Witherell
> Shoreham
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Barbara Brosnan
> Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 2:33 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
>
> We couldn't have propane delivered this week because, as the delivery man
> discovered, we have a nest of House Sparrows filled with nestlings under
> the
> cap of the propane tank. Who's property is this anyway???
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge
>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/16/19 3:15 am
From: Mus <musbird...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Nestlings in the wrong places
Phoebes always nested above the lights inside my barn, for years. Last year some critter got their babies, so they didn’t come this year. Or did they? I was digging in my veggie garden the other day and a Phoebe kept fussing at me. Turns out they have a nest on the stern seat of my upside-down canoe hanging under the barn over-hang roof. Two babies in there! Hope it’s the right place this time.

> On Jun 16, 2019, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...> wrote:
>
> There is 1 message totaling 32 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. nestlings in all the wrong places
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 15 Jun 2019 08:07:27 -0400
> From: Sandy Witherell <homefarm...>
> Subject: Re: nestlings in all the wrong places
>
> Ah, reminds me of the active House Finch nest ensconced within the
> needleless Christmas wreath hanging on my parents' little-used front door -
> those many years ago.
>
> Sandy Witherell
> Shoreham
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Barbara Brosnan
> Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 2:33 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
>
> We couldn't have propane delivered this week because, as the delivery man
> discovered, we have a nest of House Sparrows filled with nestlings under the
> cap of the propane tank. Who's property is this anyway???
>
>
>
> Barbara Brosnan
>
> Weybridge
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 14 Jun 2019 to 15 Jun 2019 (#2019-148)
> *************************************************************
 

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Date: 6/15/19 5:07 am
From: Sandy Witherell <homefarm...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
Ah, reminds me of the active House Finch nest ensconced within the
needleless Christmas wreath hanging on my parents' little-used front door -
those many years ago.

Sandy Witherell
Shoreham

-----Original Message-----
From: Barbara Brosnan
Sent: Friday, June 14, 2019 2:33 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places

We couldn't have propane delivered this week because, as the delivery man
discovered, we have a nest of House Sparrows filled with nestlings under the
cap of the propane tank. Who's property is this anyway???



Barbara Brosnan

Weybridge
 

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Date: 6/14/19 2:22 pm
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mansfield update
This week's VCE banding session on Mansfield again encountered surprisingly
low avian activity. After a promising start weatherwise (clear, calm, warm)
on Wednesday evening, with 19 mist net captures, Thursday dawned cloudy,
breezy and chilly. Both dusk and dawn choruses were light, and we captured
only 10 birds in 24 nets yesterday. It's so far unclear whether numbers are
actually down on the ridgeline, or activity simply low. Nesting is
definitely underway, as at least some females of most species showed full
or early-stage incubation patches (Blackpoll Warbler being the exception).

To view some of Mike Sargent's terrific photos and read a summary of our
first two Mansfield sessions, see
https://vtecostudies.org/blog/vces-28th-mansfield-season-begins-on-a-quiet-chilly-note/

I hope to have more to report next week!

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/
 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/19 11:33 am
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] nestlings in all the wrong places
We couldn't have propane delivered this week because, as the delivery man
discovered, we have a nest of House Sparrows filled with nestlings under the
cap of the propane tank. Who's property is this anyway???



Barbara Brosnan

Weybridge
 

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Date: 6/14/19 10:48 am
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Indigo Bunting, Rose Breasted GB
Surprised to see a beautiful male Indigo Bunting at our feeder just now.
FOY for us; and we figured we'd missed out this year, having seen none in
May. Also yesterday a male RBGB. Maybe this weather brought them in?
Eugenia
Rutland
 

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Date: 6/14/19 9:13 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Thrushes
This morning on Hollow Road in Brandon a hermit thrush sang its ethereal song while a wood thrush "bup bupped" nearby . Finally located it and saw it had nesting material in its beak.
A phoebe was on a nest under a well head roof.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

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Date: 6/14/19 4:26 am
From: Kim Likakis <kim.likakis...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Owl Surprise
"Last night at 10:47........"

Very elegant, Ian, as usual. Thanks.

Kim
Bennington
 

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Date: 6/13/19 5:22 am
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Owl surprise ... western Addison County
Last night at 10:47, I was near the end of a standardized, annual
Whip-poor-will survey, at a point-count station on Hallock Road near the
border of New Haven and Waltham.  The moon was bright, the sky clear but
for a few, very thin high clouds. A horizon of silhouetted Snake
Mountain and the distant Adirondacks rose above sweeping farm fields at
my stop not from a tired barn.  In the gentlest of breezes the only
sounds were the ambient night sounds absent of any vehicles, equipment,
or late night dogs.  Listening intently, hands cupped at my ears, I
could hear no Whip-poor-wills, but I thought maybe there might have been
a very faint owl-like hoo.  Perhaps an all too familiar, audio mirage
Ron Payne and I call "Ambient Owl".

I dug deeper into that hushed wall of sound and found it again, well
enough to grab on to it with focus.  Ah yes, an owl in the far distance
.... simple, relaxed hoos evenly spaced, 20 or so at time. Pause, and 20
more.  Pause, and 20 more. Continued for over ten minutes span.  A
Long-eared Owl, in June not mid-winter.  In June when fledglings have
turned to branchlings, and parents are about to teach nocturnal foraging.

Birds of North America notes Long-eareds are usually silent most of the
year except during breeding. Such has proved true here in western
Addison County.    But... I have heard a similar song once before in
summer, also in mid-June, also during the annual Whip-poor-will survey,
also with bright moon and a mountain-silhouetted horizon above broadly
sweeping fields, also shortly after 10:30 pm .... at Hardscrabble Road
in Bristol near the Monkton line, June 15th, 2011.

Ian
 

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Date: 6/13/19 4:57 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Brown Thrasher NEK
Foraging below the window alongside Mourning Dove, the thrasher's bulk
and rich chestnut color contrasting the pale dove.Nice to see the
famously nervous dove placid beside a power bird with manners, poss an
anomalous moment.
Veer Frost, Passumpsic
 

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Date: 6/12/19 3:14 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Pileated in Brattleboro
Same here in Brandon---- first a female then the male.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

> On Jun 12, 2019, at 5:35 PM, Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...> wrote:
>
> We have a female pileated who's been loving our suet quite a lot this
> spring.
>
> On Mon, Jun 10, 2019, 8:09 PM Ralph Palmer <palmer.r.violin...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi -
>>
>> We had an unusual visitor this afternoon. You can see a poor video at :
>> <
>>
>> https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Paju7d6FeKPnPldarXBCAMVlHeXzDjgZ/view?usp=sharing
>>
>> All the best,
>>
>> Ralph
>>
>> --
>> Ralph Palmer
>> Brattleboro, VT
>> USA
>> <palmer.r.violin...>
>>
 

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Date: 6/12/19 2:35 pm
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Pileated in Brattleboro
We have a female pileated who's been loving our suet quite a lot this
spring.

On Mon, Jun 10, 2019, 8:09 PM Ralph Palmer <palmer.r.violin...>
wrote:

> Hi -
>
> We had an unusual visitor this afternoon. You can see a poor video at :
> <
>
> https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Paju7d6FeKPnPldarXBCAMVlHeXzDjgZ/view?usp=sharing
> >
>
> All the best,
>
> Ralph
>
> --
> Ralph Palmer
> Brattleboro, VT
> USA
> <palmer.r.violin...>
>
 

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Date: 6/11/19 7:23 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Vermont birds and wonderful words
Later this month, I’m doing a brand-new program for OLLI-UVM called “Wings of a Bird, Heart of a Poet”. In the on-campus class, we’ll see beautiful photos of Vermont birds and hear beautiful poetry and prose about those same flying creatures. For the follow-up field trip, we’ll meet in our backyard to watch birds and, if people wish, write our own lovely words. We’ll be joined for both the class and the field trip by a well-known Burlington poet! For more information and to register, go to https://learn.uvm.edu/program/osher-life-long-learning/olli-on-campus-courses/#summer <https://learn.uvm.edu/program/osher-life-long-learning/olli-on-campus-courses/#summer> and scroll down.
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

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Date: 6/10/19 5:09 pm
From: Ralph Palmer <palmer.r.violin...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pileated in Brattleboro
Hi -

We had an unusual visitor this afternoon. You can see a poor video at :
<
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Paju7d6FeKPnPldarXBCAMVlHeXzDjgZ/view?usp=sharing
>

All the best,

Ralph

--
Ralph Palmer
Brattleboro, VT
USA
<palmer.r.violin...>
 

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Date: 6/10/19 10:51 am
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge. This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday
June15, 2019 on the Old Railroad Passage Trail. Meet at 8:00 AM at the
parking lot on Tabor Road, about 1 mile south of the refuge Visitor
Center. If you have any questions, email me at <copenhvr...>

The monthly walks gather long-term data on the presence of birds, their
abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather is entered
into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology. These walks are appropriate for all levels of birders and
provide a wonderful opportunity to learn about birds throughout the
seasons. Led by Ken Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi
National Wildlife Refuge board members.

After 110 months of walks we have observed 158 species. Hope to see you
there!

--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/
 

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Date: 6/9/19 7:33 pm
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mansfield banding season kicks off quietly
After an impatient wait for weather to break, going back to last week, VCE
finally kicked off our 28th consecutive Mt. Mansfield field season on
Thursday. Three of us arrived on the ridgeline during late afternoon to set
up 15 nets. Conditions were, to no one's surprise, very wet underfoot, with
trails either running rivulets or muddy seeps. However, the air was dry,
skies clear, winds light, and optimism high. Avian activity did not meet
expectations, as few birds sang or called, even through dusk. In fact, the
dusk chorus was about as uninspired as any I can remember for early June.
We caught only 5 birds, including the season's first Bicknell's Thrush, a
female banded last June.

Morning dawned clear, calm and cool, with clouds draping the valleys below.
Vocal activity continued to be surprisingly light, and we captured only
another 24 birds. It's too early to know whether spring's cool and wet
weather has delayed breeding (we did note evidence of active nesting, with
White-throated Sparrows and Dark-eyed Juncos showing incubation patches),
there are fewer birds present than "normal", or activity is simply subdued.
I'm guessing this current stretch of warmer temperatures and drier
conditions will stimulate birds to start singing and moving around more,
and that we'll see a boost in activity this coming week.

Among the 29 birds we netted:

Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 -- return ASY male banded on 6-27-18
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher 1
Winter Wren 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Bicknell's Thrush 5 -- 2 new males, 1 unknown sex (probably female), 1
return male from 2016, 1 return female from 2018
Swainson's Thrush 2 -- 1 new male, 1 return female from 2016
American Robin 1 -- return male from 2017
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) 2 -- 1 return male from 2017, 1 new female
with full incubation patch
White-throated Sparrow 5 -- 2 new males, 1 new female, 1 unknown sex, 1
return male from 2017
Blackpoll Warbler 5 -- 2 new males, 1 new female, 1 return male and female
from 2018
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 5 -- 2 new males, 1 new female, 2 return
males from (2016 and 2018)

Chris

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/
 

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Date: 6/9/19 7:16 pm
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
Today was a tough day for my catbirds. At 10:00 AM the nest was in full
sun and mama catbird was sitting on the eggs (3 of them now), panting. She
was apparently on the nest to shade them from the direct sun.
Unfortunately, the rhubarb is next to my garden area which I HAD to till
today if I'm ever going to get a garden planted this year. (It was way too
muddy to till until now.) As the tiller got closer and closer to the nest,
row by row, she stuck tight until I was about 6 feet away. (It's a big,
loud rototiller, so she was very brave to stay so long!) When she flew off
the nest, I cut a large rhubarb leaf and stem and positioned it to shade
the eggs. When I moved on to another section of the garden, I saw that she
had returned to the nest, under the rhubarb leaf shade. I hope she
appreciated my efforts, if not my rototilling! By later in the afternoon
the nest was shaded by trees. I don't know what she'll do tomorrow if it's
sunny again. Seems like a very exposed location for a nest, between the
sun and being so close to the ground. Next I need to plant seeds, which
will be another disturbance.

--Ken

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019 at 6:26 PM J Wazny <turtlefeathers4...> wrote:

> Wow! What a surprise. I've been enjoying "surprise" visitors to my
> hummingbird feeders on a regular basis...a male hairy woodpecker a pair of
> orioles! and of course, the hummingbirds. The only one interested in the
> oriole feeder is a rose breasted grosbeak. Today I had a catbird eating
> the orioles' orange. I've learned this is normal, but it was new to me.
> Enjoy your yard's visitors, Jo Anne
>
> p.s. Maybe you'll get some photos once they hatch.
>
> On Sun, Jun 9, 2019 at 7:04 AM Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> wrote:
>
>> I was very surprised to find a catbird nest on a rhubarb plant. Photos
>> on eBird report:
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57218608
>>
>>
>> --Ken Copenhaver
>>
>> --
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
>> "Missisquoi Birders" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
>> email to missisquoi-birders+<unsubscribe...>
>> To post to this group, send email to <missisquoi-birders...>
>> To view this discussion on the web visit
>> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/missisquoi-birders/<CADR7qPZWdDoiMpbMVfG_JWLqy5yVzJ5OP-YP8vPpwoqZvOBGOQ...>
>> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/missisquoi-birders/<CADR7qPZWdDoiMpbMVfG_JWLqy5yVzJ5OP-YP8vPpwoqZvOBGOQ...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
>> .
>> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>>
> --
> "The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice." M.
> L. King
>
 

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Date: 6/9/19 3:26 pm
From: J Wazny <turtlefeathers4...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
Wow! What a surprise. I've been enjoying "surprise" visitors to my
hummingbird feeders on a regular basis...a male hairy woodpecker a pair of
orioles! and of course, the hummingbirds. The only one interested in the
oriole feeder is a rose breasted grosbeak. Today I had a catbird eating
the orioles' orange. I've learned this is normal, but it was new to me.
Enjoy your yard's visitors, Jo Anne

p.s. Maybe you'll get some photos once they hatch.

On Sun, Jun 9, 2019 at 7:04 AM Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> wrote:

> I was very surprised to find a catbird nest on a rhubarb plant. Photos on
> eBird report:
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57218608
>
>
> --Ken Copenhaver
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Missisquoi Birders" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to missisquoi-birders+<unsubscribe...>
> To post to this group, send email to <missisquoi-birders...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/missisquoi-birders/<CADR7qPZWdDoiMpbMVfG_JWLqy5yVzJ5OP-YP8vPpwoqZvOBGOQ...>
> <https://groups.google.com/d/msgid/missisquoi-birders/<CADR7qPZWdDoiMpbMVfG_JWLqy5yVzJ5OP-YP8vPpwoqZvOBGOQ...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
> For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
>
--
"The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice." M. L.
King
 

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Date: 6/9/19 9:02 am
From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
adorable

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
Sent: Sunday, June 9, 2019 7:04 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest

I was very surprised to find a catbird nest on a rhubarb plant. Photos on
eBird report:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57218608

--Ken Copenhaver
 

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Date: 6/9/19 7:23 am
From: Linda P. McElvany <lindap.mack...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Brant Goose still there
Sunday 8:30 AM - Brant remains at Burlington Perkin's Pier, foraging on the lawn. Large noisy flock of Canada Geese "V-ed" north ... it was not interested in joining them. Linda McElvany
 

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Date: 6/9/19 7:19 am
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
I will look twice before cutting my own rhubarb. Beautiful little eggs. Good luck to the new family.
Barbara Brosnan
Weybridge

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 9, 2019, at 7:32 AM, Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Funny and delightful, thank you!Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
>
> On 6/9/2019 at 7:05 AM, "Ken Copenhaver" wrote:I was very surprised
> to find a catbird nest on a rhubarb plant. Photos on
> eBird report:
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57218608
>
> --Ken Copenhaver
>
 

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Date: 6/9/19 7:10 am
From: Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Winged Warblers
This morning, Bill and I observed three winged warblers in a scrubby lot in
Westford. All three preferred tops of trees and were rather distant but I
did get poor pictures. We saw all three in same area and same time so I
am sure there were three.

One was singing a typical blue winged song. Another a golden-winged song.
The third did not sing. I plan on reporting all three as hybrids but if
anyone was willing to look at the pictures and share thoughts, I would
appreciate it.

<http://goog_593655729>
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/48030279807/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/48030175221/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/mbmcclintock/48030175006/in/dateposted-public/

I do have more photos but not better ones.

Martha
(usually birding in) Westford
 

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Date: 6/9/19 4:32 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
Funny and delightful, thank you!Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK

On 6/9/2019 at 7:05 AM, "Ken Copenhaver" wrote:I was very surprised
to find a catbird nest on a rhubarb plant. Photos on
eBird report:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57218608

--Ken Copenhaver
 

Back to top
Date: 6/9/19 4:04 am
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Unusual Catbird nest
I was very surprised to find a catbird nest on a rhubarb plant. Photos on
eBird report:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57218608

--Ken Copenhaver
 

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Date: 6/8/19 3:05 pm
From: Dale J Martin <dale...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Woodpecker-photos
It is staining from the nesting cavity. Seems to be lots of them here in the N.E. this year.

Regards,

Dale


Dale J. Martin

Massapoag Pond Photography
1070 Lancaster Avenue
Lunenburg, MA 01462

Email: <dale...>
Website: www.massapoag.org
Facebook: Massapoag Pond Facebook <http://www.facebook.com/pages/Massapoag-Pond-Photography/132774786759834>

Phone: 978-582-1049
Mobile: 508-849-7730





> On Jun 8, 2019, at 5:33 PM, cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...> wrote:
>
> We have an odd-looking woodpecker here in Norwich. It looks pretty much
> like a Hairy WP, but where there should be white, it is mostly reddish
> brown. Same size as a Hairy, and seems to act like an adult-contends for a
> place at suet rather aggressively, no begging sounds. (We are hearing young
> at this point, but I've never seen a fledgling like this!).
>
> Photos here:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157708992624088
>
> Any ideas, anyone?
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> www.creaturekinships.net, www.creaturekinships.com
> <http://www.creaturekinships.net>
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
 

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Date: 6/8/19 2:41 pm
From: John Missing <johnmissing64...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual Woodpecker-photos
I was recently in Costa Rica and saw Hairys that resemble the bird in your
picture.

On Sat, Jun 8, 2019 at 5:33 PM cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
wrote:

> We have an odd-looking woodpecker here in Norwich. It looks pretty much
> like a Hairy WP, but where there should be white, it is mostly reddish
> brown. Same size as a Hairy, and seems to act like an adult-contends for a
> place at suet rather aggressively, no begging sounds. (We are hearing young
> at this point, but I've never seen a fledgling like this!).
>
> Photos here:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157708992624088
>
> Any ideas, anyone?
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> www.creaturekinships.net, www.creaturekinships.com
> <http://www.creaturekinships.net>
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
>
--
John
917-714-3386
 

Back to top
Date: 6/8/19 2:33 pm
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Unusual Woodpecker-photos
We have an odd-looking woodpecker here in Norwich. It looks pretty much
like a Hairy WP, but where there should be white, it is mostly reddish
brown. Same size as a Hairy, and seems to act like an adult-contends for a
place at suet rather aggressively, no begging sounds. (We are hearing young
at this point, but I've never seen a fledgling like this!).

Photos here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157708992624088

Any ideas, anyone?
Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.net, www.creaturekinships.com
<http://www.creaturekinships.net>
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/19 8:11 pm
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Brant
A single (continuing?) Brant was at Perkins Pier in Burlington this evening, waddling along on the recently- flooded lawn, unperturbed by sunset watchers and jazz festival goers.
Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 6/6/19 12:52 pm
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings! SORRY, LIST
thought this was going to Margaret Fowle!

On 6/6/2019 at 2:35 PM, "Veer Frost" wrote:Hi Margaret, I want to
make an observation in connection with the CHSW
checklists I've shared today with the Survey.
I'm afraid there will be some confusion as, right about in the middle
of these checklists, my 'location' changes. But this is because when I
was new to ebird my understanding was that birders were reporting from
recognizable WMAs or parks or natural areas, that sort of thing, so I
thought the very nearest landmark to me being Passumpsic River falls,
that's where I should report from. This error went uncorrected until I
read the link for submitting to the Survey, and it clearly says how to
note where you birded with a green flag. I immediately altered my
location to : 55 Grange Hall Lane. So that's the actual 'spot' for my
sightings of the swifts. These are all overhead sweeps, I've never
seen them enter or leave a chimney, but it's on my radar to try to do
so.
Sorry for the confusion! My FOY was 10May so I've just shared all CHSW
sightings and will continue to do so until mid June. Thank you, Veer
 

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Date: 6/6/19 11:35 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
Hi Margaret, I want to make an observation in connection with the CHSW
checklists I've shared today with the Survey.
I'm afraid there will be some confusion as, right about in the middle
of these checklists, my 'location' changes. But this is because when I
was new to ebird my understanding was that birders were reporting from
recognizable WMAs or parks or natural areas, that sort of thing, so I
thought the very nearest landmark to me being Passumpsic River falls,
that's where I should report from. This error went uncorrected until I
read the link for submitting to the Survey, and it clearly says how to
note where you birded with a green flag. I immediately altered my
location to : 55 Grange Hall Lane. So that's the actual 'spot' for my
sightings of the swifts. These are all overhead sweeps, I've never
seen them enter or leave a chimney, but it's on my radar to try to do
so.
Sorry for the confusion! My FOY was 10May so I've just shared all CHSW
sightings and will continue to do so until mid June. Thank you, Veer

On 5/23/2019 at 9:18 AM, "Margaret Fowle" wrote:Hi VT Birders -

Audubon Vermont is working with Vermont Fish and Wildlife to conduct a
swift "blitz" this spring and summer. See info below. We've created
a special Chimney Swift project on eBird, so if you submit any
sightings, please share with the project named "CHSW_Survey." More
information and instructions can be found on our website at
http://vt.audubon.org/conservation/chimney-swift-recovery

In an attempt to evaluate the population size and critical habitat for
Chimney Swifts in Vermont, Audubon VT is gathering as many
observations of Chimney Swifts as possible, with special attention
paid to the following urban areas in Vermont:

- Barre

- Bennington

- Burlington

- Brattleboro

- Essex

- Manchester

- Middlebury

- Montpelier

- Newport

- Rutland

- St. Johnsbury

- Swanton

- Springfield

- White River Junction

- Woodstock
We ask people to focus efforts to look for Chimney Swifts during two
different time periods:

1) Mid/late May - mid-June

2) Mid/late July - mid- August
The best time of day to observe Chimney Swifts is in the late
evening/dusk. Take an evening stroll in your neighborhood or favorite
swift sighting area with your binoculars and count the number and
location where you see and hear the birds.
For more information on how to identify Chimney Swifts by sight and
sound, see https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/chimney-swift and
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Chimney_Swift

Please submit your observations to eBird. If you have already seen
Chimney Swifts this year and have submitted your sightings on eBird,
please go back to share those sightings with the Chimney Swift survey
project (CHSW_Survey).

Thank you! Enjoy your evenings out and about looking for these
wonderful birds.

-
Margaret Fowle
Conservation Biologist
w: 802.434.4806 (home office)
c: 802.238.0046
Pronouns: she, her, hers

Audubon Vermont
255 Sherman Hollow Rd
Huntington, VT 05462
www.vt.audubon.org
 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/19 11:35 am
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] birding trips with VCE
VCE is offering two special, multi-day field excursions in 2019: a June
trip to observe Common Loons in a remote area of Vermont’s fabled Northeast
Kingdom, and a September trip to enjoy the spectacle of fall migration on
Monhegan Island, Maine. Both trips feature fantastic birding opportunities,
special access to VCE staff expertise, lots of great food and camaraderie,
and a wonderful few days of fresh air and fun! We hope you choose to join
us on one or both adventures.

*June 26-28 -- Loon Lakes and Summer Songbirds*: Tucked into Vermont’s
northeastern corner lies the tiny town of Averill. Moose outnumber people,
and the night sky is truly dark. Here, three watery gems – Forest, Great
Averill, and Little Averill lakes – are home to nesting Common Loons. Join
us for three days of exploring loon lakes, birding boreal forests, and
simply enjoying this remote, special place. There are just a few spaces
left. Learn more at https://vtecostudies.org/loon-trip/

*September 26-29 -- Fall Migration on Monhegan Island:* Ten miles off
Maine’s midcoast, songbirds pour from the skies at dawn on Monhegan Island.
Whales feed offshore. And Monarch butterflies stop to find rare nectar at
sea. Join us to experience all that this unique island has to offer, and
unrivaled fall migration birding! Learn more at
https://vtecostudies.org/monhegan-island/
<https://vtecostudies.org/monhegan-island/>


____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201
Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>

<http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/19 4:36 am
From: Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] helping out a bird researcher friend of my daughter's
"Do you like science? Would you like to help us to do some scientific
research RIGHT NOW? If your answer is yes please consider taking a few
minutes to fill out the survey here: https://forms.gle/mRVB3dAgW52bExn46
<https://forms.gle/mRVB3dAgW52bExn46?fbclid=IwAR2tOrx7ga_5gowaIbIcLL_hU02QEKCB4i_06uZEFc5cTTnll4OwL0lDoNU>

--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
 

Back to top
Date: 6/5/19 8:09 pm
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Sandpipers?
This morning at Fairfield Swamp I saw a flock of about 90 small shorebirds,
flying in a tight, synchronized group, with sudden turns, all staying
together. They flew back and forth repeatedly at the far side of the swamp
from me for about 3 minutes, always staying in a tight, fast-moving flock.
They appeared to be medium brown above and white below, with no noticeable
wing markings at that distance. Wings were long and pointed. I got a
poor photo, from which I did a count, but it's not good enough for an ID.
By the time I set up my scope for a hopefully better look, they were gone.

What species of shorebird is possible in June in VT that would fly in tight
formation, as described, and in such numbers? Also, being so far inland
from the lake seems unusual. My best guess is SESA, but I didn't find any
reports in May and June in recent years of more than a dozen or so at a
time.

I can email my photo to anyone who would care to take a look, but I really
don't think it will help much except to confirm the count and the tight
formation of the flock.

--Ken Copenhaver
 

Back to top
Date: 6/5/19 8:44 am
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Chimney Swift documentation
I often see and hear Chimney Swifts around my home. I use the eBird mobile app for most of my lists these days but noticed there was no special ‘type of observation’ for specifically recording them. I thought there was and Apologies to the person who posted that information on this list serve. Please contact me at my personal email to give me some guidance.

Thank you
Patti

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/19 4:53 pm
From: Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Least Bittern - Buckner Preserve - Photos
Correction, I meant great shots Mike!

On Monday, June 3, 2019, 6:36:57 PM EDT, Mike Sargent <msargent...> wrote:

On Saturday I arrived at Ward Marsh just in time to hear the final whip-poor-will song of the morning. Shortly afterward, a least bittern appeared on the scene. It assumed an intensely-focused hunting mode, and I was able to shoot a series of photos as it caught and swallowed a fish. They're at:

http://www.uvm.edu/~msargent/birds

 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/19 4:51 pm
From: Pamela Coleman <0000003fbb1e7534-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Least Bittern - Buckner Preserve - Photos
Wow! Great shots Eve!

On Monday, June 3, 2019, 7:39:17 PM EDT, Eve Ticknor <edticknor...> wrote:

Gorgeous photos, Mike!!

> On Jun 3, 2019, at 6:36 PM, Mike Sargent <msargent...> wrote:
>
> On Saturday I arrived at Ward Marsh just in time to hear the final whip-poor-will song of the morning. Shortly afterward, a least bittern appeared on the scene. It assumed an intensely-focused hunting mode, and I was able to shoot a series of photos as it caught and swallowed a fish. They're at:
>
> http://www.uvm.edu/~msargent/birds



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

Today is a new day. Today is a gift. Make the most of it.
 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/19 4:39 pm
From: Eve Ticknor <edticknor...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Least Bittern - Buckner Preserve - Photos
Gorgeous photos, Mike!!

> On Jun 3, 2019, at 6:36 PM, Mike Sargent <msargent...> wrote:
>
> On Saturday I arrived at Ward Marsh just in time to hear the final whip-poor-will song of the morning. Shortly afterward, a least bittern appeared on the scene. It assumed an intensely-focused hunting mode, and I was able to shoot a series of photos as it caught and swallowed a fish. They're at:
>
> http://www.uvm.edu/~msargent/birds



Eve Ticknor
<edticknor...>

Box 2206
Prescott, On
K0E 1T0

24 Birch Ave
Willsboro, NY
12996

Today is a new day. Today is a gift. Make the most of it.
 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/19 3:36 pm
From: Mike Sargent <msargent...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Least Bittern - Buckner Preserve - Photos
On Saturday I arrived at Ward Marsh just in time to hear the final whip-poor-will song of the morning. Shortly afterward, a least bittern appeared on the scene. It assumed an intensely-focused hunting mode, and I was able to shoot a series of photos as it caught and swallowed a fish. They're at:

http://www.uvm.edu/~msargent/birds
 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/19 9:10 am
From: Terry Marron <tgmarron...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
We saw 8 Chimney Swifts last night in Burlington on our way to see Patti LaBelle.

> On June 2, 2019 at 3:29 PM Michele Patenaude <michelep...> wrote:
>
>
> The chimney at Morrel Hall at UVM USA roosting site for CHSW and I have counted up to 190 individuals dropping into the chimney in 2017. Are used to work at the Howe library at UVM- and WOOD would get a minute count the birds on a regular basis. I retired into 2017 and have not counted them since then. I have talked to Alan Strong about the birds and about protecting the chimney. He is aware of the birds at Morrill Hall, but I am not sure if he has taken any steps. I am going to try to go there this evening and count the CHSW.
>
> Michele Patenaude
> 172 Woodbury Road
> Burlington, VT 05408
> 802-862-4085
>
> > On May 23, 2019, at 9:18 AM, Fowle, Margaret <mfowle...> wrote:
> >
> > Hi VT Birders -
> >
> > Audubon Vermont is working with Vermont Fish and Wildlife to conduct a swift "blitz" this spring and summer. See info below. We've created a special Chimney Swift project on eBird, so if you submit any sightings, please share with the project named "CHSW_Survey." More information and instructions can be found on our website at http://vt.audubon.org/conservation/chimney-swift-recovery
> >
> > In an attempt to evaluate the population size and critical habitat for Chimney Swifts in Vermont, Audubon VT is gathering as many observations of Chimney Swifts as possible, with special attention paid to the following urban areas in Vermont:
> >
> > - Barre
> >
> > - Bennington
> >
> > - Burlington
> >
> > - Brattleboro
> >
> > - Essex
> >
> > - Manchester
> >
> > - Middlebury
> >
> > - Montpelier
> >
> > - Newport
> >
> > - Rutland
> >
> > - St. Johnsbury
> >
> > - Swanton
> >
> > - Springfield
> >
> > - White River Junction
> >
> > - Woodstock
> > We ask people to focus efforts to look for Chimney Swifts during two different time periods:
> >
> > 1) Mid/late May - mid-June
> >
> > 2) Mid/late July - mid- August
> > The best time of day to observe Chimney Swifts is in the late evening/dusk. Take an evening stroll in your neighborhood or favorite swift sighting area with your binoculars and count the number and location where you see and hear the birds.
> > For more information on how to identify Chimney Swifts by sight and sound, see https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/chimney-swift and https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Chimney_Swift
> >
> > Please submit your observations to eBird. If you have already seen Chimney Swifts this year and have submitted your sightings on eBird, please go back to share those sightings with the Chimney Swift survey project (CHSW_Survey).
> >
> > Thank you! Enjoy your evenings out and about looking for these wonderful birds.
> >
> > -
> > Margaret Fowle
> > Conservation Biologist
> > w: 802.434.4806 (home office)
> > c: 802.238.0046
> > Pronouns: she, her, hers
> >
> > Audubon Vermont
> > 255 Sherman Hollow Rd
> > Huntington, VT 05462
> > www.vt.audubon.org<http://www.vt.audubon.org/>

Terry Marron
Williston VT


Stay Amazed!
 

Back to top
Date: 6/3/19 3:18 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] olive-sided flycatchers west side of the state (Thetford Center)
After four days of calling, the bird finally moved on over the weekend.

I heard the bird each morning around 5:00-5:15 call from the woods adjacent
to our 65-acre fen. Since beaver moved back this spring (and it's never
stopped raining) water levels are higher than they've been in almost two
decades, which may have appealed to the olive-sided (for a few days). This
is also the first spring in many years that I haven't heard parulas singing
from and presumably nesting in the lichen-laden spruce along the west side
of the wetland.

Bitterns have been back for more than a month. No snipe or rails (so far).
Red-shoulders and barred owls continue to hunt the edges. A single male
alder flycatcher carved out a territory in the southeastern corner.

Several chestnut-sided warblers and a single Nashville have moved into the
open woods and the stand of saplings that have grown up in a two-acre patch
cut, seven years post cut.

Now that the bulk of the migrants have passed through it's fun to see what
I've got left.

Ted
 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 7:17 pm
From: Ruth Stewart <birder_rws...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
I have just returned from birding along the N shore of L. Erie in Canada.. spending a week at Pt Pelee. The predominate warblers there were also Bay-breasted, Cape May and TE as well. I was wondering whether the reason we don't see them much in VT is because they migrate further west of here.... but maybe it's those spruce bud worms after all. Conversely... very few Yellow-rumped Warblers

Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...>
Sent: Saturday, June 1, 2019 10:05 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs

Hi All,

One other issue that hasn't come up in the Philadelphia-Red-eyed conversation.

There have been a number of studies that show that Philadelphia Vireos (PHVI) actually mimic the songs of Red-eyed Vireos (REVI). Because PHVI are smaller, they lose out to REVIs in interspecific competition. The rationale is that if a PHVI sounds like a REVI, they will actually escape any sort of agonistic encounters. ("Oh...just another REVI"). For those who do want to get into the minute differences in song between the two species, there is an article in the latest issue of Birding.

For those of you who have witnessed the amazing Cape May, Bay-breasted, Tennessee show this spring, presumably associated with Quebec's spruce-budworm outbreaks, it does make one wonder if PHVIs also show some sort of spatial response to these caterpillars. Some of the research that was conducted on PHVI at Hubbard Brook in NH was done during years of a significant moth eruption (Heterocampa guttivitta). Once the outbreak passed, PHVI have been all but absent in that forest.

Allan
South Burlington


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Liz Lackey
Sent: Friday, May 31, 2019 7:23 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs

My two cents,

PHVIs jump out at me cuz they look like the cute puppy version of a REVI. Specifically rounded head, no neck, and smaller bill in proportion to head. And for me to complete the id as PHVI, I need to detect yellow, even if faint, somewhere on the upper breast, or throat. PHVI have black lores, the area between the eye and bill. WAVI do not have black lores.

I wouldnt be able to id this vireo by song. And I consider myself to have a good ear.

Ive only seen PHVI during migration season.

Hope this helps.

Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT

> On May 30, 2019, at 10:19 AM, Bridget Butler <birddiva...> wrote:
>
> Greetings All!
>
> I feel like I'm seeing a number of reports on Philadelphia Vireos in a
> number of different places recently.
>
> I've not much experience with this bird and have been reading up on
> tips for identifying the bird (including studying images) in relation
> to other vireos and warblers like the Tenessee Warbler. I'm wondering
> if I'm seeing them but just not really locking in on an id.
>
> Wondering if those of you with experience with this bird might share
> your own thinking on how to tease this bird out from others? What do
> you look for or notice in terms of both plumage AND behaviors?
>
> Thanks in advance!
> Bridget
>
>
> *Bridget Butler*
>
> *Bird Diva Consulting*
> *PO Box 613*
> *St. Albans VT 05478*
> *(802) 393-4147*
> *Website: www.birddiva.com<http://www.birddiva.com> <http://www.birddiva.com>*
> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva<http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>
> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>* *Birder Broker:
> http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT>* *Crows In
> Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_
> campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com<http://www.avast.com>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_
> campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 3:48 pm
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Grasshopper Sparrow
The Grasshopper Sparrow first seen by Andrea Burke this morning is still present at West Rutland Marsh.

On the east side of Marble Street, north of the green house, in the field with the large shed and a house partially hidden by trees. Closer to the road than the house and shed.

Sue and Marv Elliott, C. J. Frankiewicz.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 3:24 pm
From: Michele Patenaude <michelep...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
The chimney at Morrel Hall at UVM USA roosting site for CHSW and I have counted up to 190 individuals dropping into the chimney in 2017. Are used to work at the Howe library at UVM- and WOOD would get a minute count the birds on a regular basis. I retired into 2017 and have not counted them since then. I have talked to Alan Strong about the birds and about protecting the chimney. He is aware of the birds at Morrill Hall, but I am not sure if he has taken any steps. I am going to try to go there this evening and count the CHSW.

Michele Patenaude
172 Woodbury Road
Burlington, VT 05408
802-862-4085

> On May 23, 2019, at 9:18 AM, Fowle, Margaret <mfowle...> wrote:
>
> Hi VT Birders -
>
> Audubon Vermont is working with Vermont Fish and Wildlife to conduct a swift "blitz" this spring and summer. See info below. We've created a special Chimney Swift project on eBird, so if you submit any sightings, please share with the project named "CHSW_Survey." More information and instructions can be found on our website at http://vt.audubon.org/conservation/chimney-swift-recovery
>
> In an attempt to evaluate the population size and critical habitat for Chimney Swifts in Vermont, Audubon VT is gathering as many observations of Chimney Swifts as possible, with special attention paid to the following urban areas in Vermont:
>
> - Barre
>
> - Bennington
>
> - Burlington
>
> - Brattleboro
>
> - Essex
>
> - Manchester
>
> - Middlebury
>
> - Montpelier
>
> - Newport
>
> - Rutland
>
> - St. Johnsbury
>
> - Swanton
>
> - Springfield
>
> - White River Junction
>
> - Woodstock
> We ask people to focus efforts to look for Chimney Swifts during two different time periods:
>
> 1) Mid/late May - mid-June
>
> 2) Mid/late July - mid- August
> The best time of day to observe Chimney Swifts is in the late evening/dusk. Take an evening stroll in your neighborhood or favorite swift sighting area with your binoculars and count the number and location where you see and hear the birds.
> For more information on how to identify Chimney Swifts by sight and sound, see https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/chimney-swift and https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Chimney_Swift
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird. If you have already seen Chimney Swifts this year and have submitted your sightings on eBird, please go back to share those sightings with the Chimney Swift survey project (CHSW_Survey).
>
> Thank you! Enjoy your evenings out and about looking for these wonderful birds.
>
> -
> Margaret Fowle
> Conservation Biologist
> w: 802.434.4806 (home office)
> c: 802.238.0046
> Pronouns: she, her, hers
>
> Audubon Vermont
> 255 Sherman Hollow Rd
> Huntington, VT 05462
> www.vt.audubon.org<http://www.vt.audubon.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 6:36 am
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Citizen Science
Another two cents that may give you some pleasure and reassurance.

penny one: very few of us are "experts" myself included, even though I
have birded actively for nearly fifty years. Birding is a very enjoyable
hobby/pastime/opportunity to observe and appreciate nature. It is also a
very humbling occupation; the more we learn, the more we realize we
don't know - and we all have made mistaken identifications. Carelessness
and over-confidence are the biggest dangers birdwatchers need to guard
against.

penny two: from your description I think you were looking at a
Philadelphia Vireo. Your general description is good and you
specifically mention three critical fieldmarks: the dark crown (darker
than Warbling, less distinct than Red-eye), the dark eye line through
and back from the eye, and, most importantly, the yellow wash on breast.
It is not a "perfect" description in that you don't address bill size
and lack of wingbars but nonetheless yours is a report that should be
submitted to e-bird.

I love your eagerness to learn and improve.

Fred Pratt


On 6/1/2019 10:24 PM, Rich Kelley wrote:
> My 2 cents... and I can't speak about the scientific data, but please don't stop.
>
> From the perspective of someone that's spent a lot of time in the woods before finally deciding to check out 'that website Julie & Ken were always mentioning', I'll just say that eBird makes me a better birder.
>
> Several reasons for it, and a lot of them are because of the data that's in there. Reading other people's descriptions, discovering new locations, or being able to compare my results against someone's list from the same area, all depends on that info being in there in the first place. Even if it's not perfect, anything is more valuable than nothing.
>
> Almost every birder I know will say that they're not an expert, if all their submissions stopped coming in, VT eBird would be a very lonely place.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of Martha & Bill McClintock
> Sent: Saturday, June 1, 2019 9:41 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Citizen Science
>
> Like most of you, I have had a busy spring. Although I have found many opportunities to bird, I have not been good about recording on eBird and
> many observations sit in my notebook. One unreported bird was an
> incidental I saw on my way to the mailbox. It was at my eye height and only two or three yards away on the lower branches of an apple tree. We looked at each other for, maybe, three minutes before he had had enough of me. In that time, I carefully studied field marks because this bird was
> just not "right". I thought it was a warbling vireo. It was a bit smaller
> and vaguely plumper looking that a red-eyed. It definitely lacked the distinct crown and banded eyeline that red-eyed vireos have. It had a yellow wash on the breast and the head markings were close but just didn't match the warbling vireos that I frequently see. The crown of the head was quite a bit darker than the warbling and there was a distinct, dark eye line. There was no singing. I vowed that I would never again go to the mailbox without my camera (a vow I have since repeatedly broken.) and I went up to the house to immediately check my three bird books because it just didn't match the warbling. I decided, with some excitement, that the bird was a Philadelphia.
>
> Then I read all the posts about the PHVIs. And I was glad that I had not posted my observation. Experts "arguing" about mis-identified PHVIs made me think that my poor attempt could not be right.
>
> I am an amateur birder. I love it. I love learning and getting better but I will never be an expert. There are too many other things that I love as well. Poor Ian spends too much time sending me written emails when I "oops". His correspondence is always respectful, educational, and encouraging. I am very appreciative of his work. Some of the emails about the PHVI made me wonder...Should citizen science be open to anyone or only for experts? How "bad" is "too bad" a birder to post? What is the danger when participants incorrectly post? Are scientists who use this data
> trained in how to spot "bad" posts? Would it be better if I, less than an
> expert" stopped posting on eBird and just kept my notebooks?
>
> I would appreciate thoughts (or links to articles). I have a deep respect for science, nature and the environment though I enjoy it a lot more than I know about it!
>
> Martha
> (Usually birding in) Westford
>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/2/19 5:31 am
From: Jim Block <jim...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] When Songbirds Fall to Earth
Hi Bryan,

Thanks. Wonderful story and photos. Sure wish I was there.

I got as a Christmas gift from my wife a camera I had considered for a year and you recommended strongly, the Sony RX10 IV. It has some flaws, but I love it. It is great to have a long and wide lens in one package, especially when I can't or don't want to carry a big lens and tripod. I've used it quite a bit this spring for birds and fox kits, and it is now the camera I carry on long hikes.

Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Bryan Pfeiffer
Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 4:48 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] When Songbirds Fall to Earth

Greetings, VTBIRDers:

From the fog in the Gulf of Maine last week, songbirds dropped to Monhegan Island in a fallout like I’ve rarely seen: warblers were flycatching in plain view on beaches and bedrock. I wrote an essay about it, mostly for folks who’ve never seen anything like this and for those of us who no longer see it often enough. Yeah, it’s not from Vermont, but you’ll see lots of images of tired warblers (thanks in large part to Vermonter Josh Lincoln).

https://bryanpfeiffer.com/2019/05/28/when-songbirds-fall-to-earth/

Best,
— Bryan
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.bryanpfeiffer.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

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Date: 6/2/19 4:49 am
From: Mitchell Harrison <000002ef5c1f1853-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
Some of these shots are contest-entry quality. Incredible!
On Saturday, June 1, 2019, 8:32:15 PM EDT, Betty Holton <bholton...> wrote:

   


&nbsp;
Amazing shots Ian.

On Sat, 1 Jun 2019 11:48:31 -0400, Ian Clark  wrote:

Yesterday at Symes Pond in Ryegate, I had a ringside seat to the most
viscous loon fight I've ever seen. There is an established pair with an egg
in the nest and an intruder wouldn't take the hint to leave. For over an
hour, I watched as the fight escalated from displaying and aggressive
diving, to a long wing rowing chase to a brutal fight where one was
determined to drown the other. For many minutes, I was sure he'd succeeded
(if I was able to keep them straight, one involved in the fight was the
resident male. A fourth loon flew over and he yodeled). Eventually the other
loon remerged from some brush along the shore. At one point in the wing
rowing chase, the loon being chased ran out of pond and continued 20-25 feet
up the bank - the furthest by far I've seen a live loon from the water.



Of course, with a neat photo op unfolding in front of me, the light was
miserable for photos. Go figure. You can see some of the pix at:
http://ianclark.com/critters/loon-fight.php
&nbsp;
 

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Date: 6/1/19 7:24 pm
From: Rich Kelley <rich...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Citizen Science
My 2 cents... and I can't speak about the scientific data, but please don't stop.

From the perspective of someone that's spent a lot of time in the woods before finally deciding to check out 'that website Julie & Ken were always mentioning', I'll just say that eBird makes me a better birder.

Several reasons for it, and a lot of them are because of the data that's in there. Reading other people's descriptions, discovering new locations, or being able to compare my results against someone's list from the same area, all depends on that info being in there in the first place. Even if it's not perfect, anything is more valuable than nothing.

Almost every birder I know will say that they're not an expert, if all their submissions stopped coming in, VT eBird would be a very lonely place.

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of Martha & Bill McClintock
Sent: Saturday, June 1, 2019 9:41 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Citizen Science

Like most of you, I have had a busy spring. Although I have found many opportunities to bird, I have not been good about recording on eBird and
many observations sit in my notebook. One unreported bird was an
incidental I saw on my way to the mailbox. It was at my eye height and only two or three yards away on the lower branches of an apple tree. We looked at each other for, maybe, three minutes before he had had enough of me. In that time, I carefully studied field marks because this bird was
just not "right". I thought it was a warbling vireo. It was a bit smaller
and vaguely plumper looking that a red-eyed. It definitely lacked the distinct crown and banded eyeline that red-eyed vireos have. It had a yellow wash on the breast and the head markings were close but just didn't match the warbling vireos that I frequently see. The crown of the head was quite a bit darker than the warbling and there was a distinct, dark eye line. There was no singing. I vowed that I would never again go to the mailbox without my camera (a vow I have since repeatedly broken.) and I went up to the house to immediately check my three bird books because it just didn't match the warbling. I decided, with some excitement, that the bird was a Philadelphia.

Then I read all the posts about the PHVIs. And I was glad that I had not posted my observation. Experts "arguing" about mis-identified PHVIs made me think that my poor attempt could not be right.

I am an amateur birder. I love it. I love learning and getting better but I will never be an expert. There are too many other things that I love as well. Poor Ian spends too much time sending me written emails when I "oops". His correspondence is always respectful, educational, and encouraging. I am very appreciative of his work. Some of the emails about the PHVI made me wonder...Should citizen science be open to anyone or only for experts? How "bad" is "too bad" a birder to post? What is the danger when participants incorrectly post? Are scientists who use this data
trained in how to spot "bad" posts? Would it be better if I, less than an
expert" stopped posting on eBird and just kept my notebooks?

I would appreciate thoughts (or links to articles). I have a deep respect for science, nature and the environment though I enjoy it a lot more than I know about it!

Martha
(Usually birding in) Westford
 

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Date: 6/1/19 6:41 pm
From: Martha & Bill McClintock <mbmcclintock...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Citizen Science
Like most of you, I have had a busy spring. Although I have found many
opportunities to bird, I have not been good about recording on eBird and
many observations sit in my notebook. One unreported bird was an
incidental I saw on my way to the mailbox. It was at my eye height and
only two or three yards away on the lower branches of an apple tree. We
looked at each other for, maybe, three minutes before he had had enough of
me. In that time, I carefully studied field marks because this bird was
just not "right". I thought it was a warbling vireo. It was a bit smaller
and vaguely plumper looking that a red-eyed. It definitely lacked the
distinct crown and banded eyeline that red-eyed vireos have. It had a
yellow wash on the breast and the head markings were close but just didn't
match the warbling vireos that I frequently see. The crown of the head was
quite a bit darker than the warbling and there was a distinct, dark eye
line. There was no singing. I vowed that I would never again go to the
mailbox without my camera (a vow I have since repeatedly broken.) and I
went up to the house to immediately check my three bird books because it
just didn't match the warbling. I decided, with some excitement, that the
bird was a Philadelphia.

Then I read all the posts about the PHVIs. And I was glad that I had not
posted my observation. Experts "arguing" about mis-identified PHVIs made
me think that my poor attempt could not be right.

I am an amateur birder. I love it. I love learning and getting better but
I will never be an expert. There are too many other things that I love as
well. Poor Ian spends too much time sending me written emails when I
"oops". His correspondence is always respectful, educational, and
encouraging. I am very appreciative of his work. Some of the emails about
the PHVI made me wonder...Should citizen science be open to anyone or only
for experts? How "bad" is "too bad" a birder to post? What is the danger
when participants incorrectly post? Are scientists who use this data
trained in how to spot "bad" posts? Would it be better if I, less than an
expert" stopped posting on eBird and just kept my notebooks?

I would appreciate thoughts (or links to articles). I have a deep respect
for science, nature and the environment though I enjoy it a lot more than I
know about it!

Martha
(Usually birding in) Westford
 

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Date: 6/1/19 5:32 pm
From: Betty Holton <bholton...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix



&nbsp;
Amazing shots Ian.

On Sat, 1 Jun 2019 11:48:31 -0400, Ian Clark wrote:

Yesterday at Symes Pond in Ryegate, I had a ringside seat to the most
viscous loon fight I've ever seen. There is an established pair with an egg
in the nest and an intruder wouldn't take the hint to leave. For over an
hour, I watched as the fight escalated from displaying and aggressive
diving, to a long wing rowing chase to a brutal fight where one was
determined to drown the other. For many minutes, I was sure he'd succeeded
(if I was able to keep them straight, one involved in the fight was the
resident male. A fourth loon flew over and he yodeled). Eventually the other
loon remerged from some brush along the shore. At one point in the wing
rowing chase, the loon being chased ran out of pond and continued 20-25 feet
up the bank - the furthest by far I've seen a live loon from the water.



Of course, with a neat photo op unfolding in front of me, the light was
miserable for photos. Go figure. You can see some of the pix at:
http://ianclark.com/critters/loon-fight.php
&nbsp;
 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 2:44 pm
From: Ian Clark <recipes...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
Yesterday at Symes Pond in Ryegate, I had a ringside seat to the most
viscous loon fight I've ever seen. There is an established pair with an egg
in the nest and an intruder wouldn't take the hint to leave. For over an
hour, I watched as the fight escalated from displaying and aggressive
diving, to a long wing rowing chase to a brutal fight where one was
determined to drown the other. For many minutes, I was sure he'd succeeded
(if I was able to keep them straight, one involved in the fight was the
resident male. A fourth loon flew over and he yodeled). Eventually the other
loon remerged from some brush along the shore. At one point in the wing
rowing chase, the loon being chased ran out of pond and continued 20-25 feet
up the bank - the furthest by far I've seen a live loon from the water.



Of course, with a neat photo op unfolding in front of me, the light was
miserable for photos. Go figure. You can see some of the pix at:
http://ianclark.com/critters/loon-fight.php
 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 2:18 pm
From: Bob Phillips <155bphillips...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Pix of birds and critters from the Upper Valley
Thanks again Ian!

On Sat, Jun 1, 2019 at 1:37 PM Ian Clark <lenscapon...> wrote:

> I've posted a few shots of critters and birds from around the Upper Valley
> this spring at: http://ianclark.com/critters/spring-2019.php.
>
> Plenty of the usual suspects - Tom turkey, Attics goldfinch, Sandy Piper,
> Annette Titmouseketeer, Buzzard Aldrin, Ruby Valentino, Charles the
> chipping
> sparrow, blue jay Edgar Hoover, Thelonious chipmunk, fox kits and more.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
> %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
>
>
>
> Ian Clark
> PO Box 51
>
> West Newbury, VT 05085
>
> (848) 702-0774
>
> www.IanClark.com
>
 

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Date: 6/1/19 2:17 pm
From: Bob Phillips <155bphillips...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
What an incredible sequence!!

On Sat, Jun 1, 2019 at 1:49 PM Veer Frost <
<0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Astonishing sequence, but the final (that I could see) really
> brilliant with that teal 'necklace' a kind of anchor around which
> water and motion and E-motion swirl. wow. thank you.Veer Frost
>
> On 6/1/2019 at 1:38 PM, "Ian Clark" wrote:Yesterday at Symes Pond in
> Ryegate, I had a ringside seat to the most
> viscous loon fight I've ever seen. There is an established pair with
> an egg
> in the nest and an intruder wouldn't take the hint to leave. For over
> an
> hour, I watched as the fight escalated from displaying and aggressive
> diving, to a long wing rowing chase to a brutal fight where one was
> determined to drown the other. For many minutes, I was sure he'd
> succeeded
> (if I was able to keep them straight, one involved in the fight was
> the
> resident male. A fourth loon flew over and he yodeled). Eventually the
> other
> loon remerged from some brush along the shore. At one point in the
> wing
> rowing chase, the loon being chased ran out of pond and continued
> 20-25 feet
> up the bank - the furthest by far I've seen a live loon from the
> water.
> Of course, with a neat photo op unfolding in front of me, the light
> was
> miserable for photos. Go figure. You can see some of the pix at:
> http://ianclark.com/critters/loon-fight.php
>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 10:50 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
Astonishing sequence, but the final (that I could see) really
brilliant with that teal 'necklace' a kind of anchor around which
water and motion and E-motion swirl. wow. thank you.Veer Frost

On 6/1/2019 at 1:38 PM, "Ian Clark" wrote:Yesterday at Symes Pond in
Ryegate, I had a ringside seat to the most
viscous loon fight I've ever seen. There is an established pair with
an egg
in the nest and an intruder wouldn't take the hint to leave. For over
an
hour, I watched as the fight escalated from displaying and aggressive
diving, to a long wing rowing chase to a brutal fight where one was
determined to drown the other. For many minutes, I was sure he'd
succeeded
(if I was able to keep them straight, one involved in the fight was
the
resident male. A fourth loon flew over and he yodeled). Eventually the
other
loon remerged from some brush along the shore. At one point in the
wing
rowing chase, the loon being chased ran out of pond and continued
20-25 feet
up the bank - the furthest by far I've seen a live loon from the
water.
Of course, with a neat photo op unfolding in front of me, the light
was
miserable for photos. Go figure. You can see some of the pix at:
http://ianclark.com/critters/loon-fight.php
 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 10:38 am
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Loon territorial dispute pix
Yesterday at Symes Pond in Ryegate, I had a ringside seat to the most
viscous loon fight I've ever seen. There is an established pair with an egg
in the nest and an intruder wouldn't take the hint to leave. For over an
hour, I watched as the fight escalated from displaying and aggressive
diving, to a long wing rowing chase to a brutal fight where one was
determined to drown the other. For many minutes, I was sure he'd succeeded
(if I was able to keep them straight, one involved in the fight was the
resident male. A fourth loon flew over and he yodeled). Eventually the other
loon remerged from some brush along the shore. At one point in the wing
rowing chase, the loon being chased ran out of pond and continued 20-25 feet
up the bank - the furthest by far I've seen a live loon from the water.



Of course, with a neat photo op unfolding in front of me, the light was
miserable for photos. Go figure. You can see some of the pix at:
http://ianclark.com/critters/loon-fight.php
 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 10:37 am
From: Ian Clark <lenscapon...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pix of birds and critters from the Upper Valley
I've posted a few shots of critters and birds from around the Upper Valley
this spring at: http://ianclark.com/critters/spring-2019.php.

Plenty of the usual suspects - Tom turkey, Attics goldfinch, Sandy Piper,
Annette Titmouseketeer, Buzzard Aldrin, Ruby Valentino, Charles the chipping
sparrow, blue jay Edgar Hoover, Thelonious chipmunk, fox kits and more.











%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%
%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%



Ian Clark
PO Box 51

West Newbury, VT 05085

(848) 702-0774

www.IanClark.com
 

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Date: 6/1/19 10:03 am
From: Bridget Butler <birddiva...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking Down PHVIs
Thank you, everyone, for such a thorough discussion about identifying PHVIs!

I have learned a great deal from what everyone has shared here and from
what folks sent me off-list. And it will definitely influence how I observe
birds moving forward and how I report and describe what I see.

I do hope as a community of birders that we continue to improve/build our
skills and to support others in doing so as well. This may mean taking a
step back to return to core observational skills and really "showing your
work" so-to-speak like we had to in grade school with math problems.

I find that I'm at the point as a birder where I'm trying to hone in on my
own descriptions of birds *based on what I see/hear* rather than relying on
what I've been *told I should see/hear* by others or by a field guide.

Thank you all for sharing your fabulous photos, observations & descriptions
to help me build my birding skills!

Bridget

*Bridget Butler*

*Bird Diva Consulting*
*PO Box 613*
*St. Albans VT 05478*
*(802) 393-4147*
*Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com>*
*Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
*Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
*Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT>*
*Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*


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Date: 6/1/19 7:05 am
From: Allan Strong <Allan.Strong...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
Hi All,

One other issue that hasn't come up in the Philadelphia-Red-eyed conversation.

There have been a number of studies that show that Philadelphia Vireos (PHVI) actually mimic the songs of Red-eyed Vireos (REVI). Because PHVI are smaller, they lose out to REVIs in interspecific competition. The rationale is that if a PHVI sounds like a REVI, they will actually escape any sort of agonistic encounters. ("Oh...just another REVI"). For those who do want to get into the minute differences in song between the two species, there is an article in the latest issue of Birding.

For those of you who have witnessed the amazing Cape May, Bay-breasted, Tennessee show this spring, presumably associated with Quebec's spruce-budworm outbreaks, it does make one wonder if PHVIs also show some sort of spatial response to these caterpillars. Some of the research that was conducted on PHVI at Hubbard Brook in NH was done during years of a significant moth eruption (Heterocampa guttivitta). Once the outbreak passed, PHVI have been all but absent in that forest.

Allan
South Burlington


-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Liz Lackey
Sent: Friday, May 31, 2019 7:23 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs

My two cents,

PHVIs jump out at me cuz they look like the “cute puppy” version of a REVI. Specifically rounded head, no neck, and smaller bill in proportion to head. And for me to complete the id as PHVI, I need to detect yellow, even if faint, somewhere on the upper breast, or throat. PHVI have black lores, the area between the eye and bill. WAVI do not have black lores.

I wouldn’t be able to id this vireo by song. And I consider myself to have a good ear.

I’ve only seen PHVI during migration season.

Hope this helps.

Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT

> On May 30, 2019, at 10:19 AM, Bridget Butler <birddiva...> wrote:
>
> Greetings All!
>
> I feel like I'm seeing a number of reports on Philadelphia Vireos in a
> number of different places recently.
>
> I've not much experience with this bird and have been reading up on
> tips for identifying the bird (including studying images) in relation
> to other vireos and warblers like the Tenessee Warbler. I'm wondering
> if I'm seeing them but just not really locking in on an id.
>
> Wondering if those of you with experience with this bird might share
> your own thinking on how to tease this bird out from others? What do
> you look for or notice in terms of both plumage AND behaviors?
>
> Thanks in advance!
> Bridget
>
>
> *Bridget Butler*
>
> *Bird Diva Consulting*
> *PO Box 613*
> *St. Albans VT 05478*
> *(802) 393-4147*
> *Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com>*
> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva
> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>* *Birder Broker:
> http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT>* *Crows In
> Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_
> campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_
> campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

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Date: 5/31/19 6:20 pm
From: Rich Kelley <rich...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Mud Pond bird walk
Anyone interested in carpooling from the Franklin county / Milton / Colchester area? I know it's short notice.

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of Terry Marron
Sent: Friday, May 31, 2019 7:32 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mud Pond bird walk

"Join" - us for a bird walk in Williston at the Mud Pond Conservation Area. We will meet at 8 am at the parking lot off South Rd. Parking is limited so carpool if you can. We will bird till 11 am or so, but longer if the birding is good. Feel free to come and go as you want. Bring binoculars, water, bug dope, snack...Trails are muddy in spots so wear good boots. RSVP <tgmarron...> mailto:<tgmarron...>


Terry Marron
Williston VT

Stay Amazed!
 

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Date: 5/31/19 4:23 pm
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
My two cents,

PHVIs jump out at me cuz they look like the “cute puppy” version of a REVI. Specifically rounded head, no neck, and smaller bill in proportion to head. And for me to complete the id as PHVI, I need to detect yellow, even if faint, somewhere on the upper breast, or throat. PHVI have black lores, the area between the eye and bill. WAVI do not have black lores.

I wouldn’t be able to id this vireo by song. And I consider myself to have a good ear.

I’ve only seen PHVI during migration season.

Hope this helps.

Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT

> On May 30, 2019, at 10:19 AM, Bridget Butler <birddiva...> wrote:
>
> Greetings All!
>
> I feel like I'm seeing a number of reports on Philadelphia Vireos in a
> number of different places recently.
>
> I've not much experience with this bird and have been reading up on tips
> for identifying the bird (including studying images) in relation to other
> vireos and warblers like the Tenessee Warbler. I'm wondering if I'm seeing
> them but just not really locking in on an id.
>
> Wondering if those of you with experience with this bird might share your
> own thinking on how to tease this bird out from others? What do you look
> for or notice in terms of both plumage AND behaviors?
>
> Thanks in advance!
> Bridget
>
>
> *Bridget Butler*
>
> *Bird Diva Consulting*
> *PO Box 613*
> *St. Albans VT 05478*
> *(802) 393-4147*
> *Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com>*
> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT>*
> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

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Date: 5/31/19 2:43 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs --- and some comments about Yellow-bellied and Olive-sided Flycatchers. TYP0
Eagle-eyed Larry Haugh has spotted a rather key typo.

Here is the proper wording of a sentence below:

"As a general theme, based on eBird data all three species are as close
to absent as they can be in June, July, and August in the Lake
Champlain/Champlain Lowlands.  Virtually all reports during these three
months to eBird are inadequately documented and/or prove to be in error."

Thanks Larry ...

Ian
======================================

On 5/31/2019 4:12 PM, Ian Worley wrote:
> Hello all,
>
> Many of you know that I am the eBird reviewer for the four Champlain
> Valley counties of Vermont.  And eBirders know that Philadelphia
> Vireos are usually flagged for review.  Pertinent to the ID
> conversation here started by Bridget is some information of
> expectations for that species and two species of flycatchers that are
> often flagged as well ..... Yellow-bellied Flycatcher and Olive-sided
> Flycatcher.
>
> All three share a similar pattern in the Champlain regarding
> seasonality and geographical distribution.
>
> The Champlain Valley counties include Lake Champlain, the Champlain
> Lowlands, and the Green Mountains (foothills and mountains).
>
> Most of the ID errors of the three species occur with submissions to
> eBird from along Lake Champlain and from the Champlain Lowlands.
>
> As a general theme all three species are as close to absent as they
> can be in June, August, and September in the Lake Champlain/Champlain
> Lowlands.  Virtually all reports during these three months to eBird
> are inadequately documented and/or prove to be in error.
>
> In spring migration Philadelphia Vireos appear in the Lowlands in
> quite low numbers, mostly in the last two weeks of May.  ID errors and
> inadequately documented birds are very common during this period.  
> During fall migration is when the species is most likely to be seen in
> the Lowlands, almost always in September.  For many birders this is
> one of the Fall highlight birds.  This is the peak time for their
> observation in the Lowlands, and well documented individuals seem to
> help other birders locate the species more easily as the month wears on.
>
> With a few exceptions Yellow-bellied Flycatcher submissions during
> spring migration in the Lowlands are usually inadequately documented
> or errors.  Overall, the few documented individuals have been in the
> last three weeks of May.  Documented individuals are very sparse
> during fall migration, from the last week of August through the first
> two weeks of September.
>
> Olive-sided Flycatchers, of these three species, are the most scarce
> in the Champlain Lowlands; at least as reflected in the eBird data.
> They also have a high level of inadequately documented and mistakenly
> identified birds.  The very few documented reports are during the last
> three weeks of May during spring migration. They are essentially
> absent in the Lowland during the Fall migration.
>
> ---------------------------------
> Overall, these three species need good quality documentation whenever
> located along Lake Champlain and the in the Champlain Lowlands. Thanks
> to Bridget Butler for getting this conversation going!
>
> If only seen, multiple defining characteristics are important for a
> successful documentation.  Vocalizations (with no recordings) by
> themselves are inadequate for documentation, and for Philadelphia
> Vireo almost useless in most cases.  Audio recordings are best when
> there are multiple repeats of songs, and when the sonograms are
> clear.  Multiple photos are much better than a single photo.
>
> As most of you eBirders know, the same bird is often reported by
> several birders.  The more birders that see what is likely the same
> bird at a location, the subsequent documentation of the bird can be
> somewhat less thorough.  But beware, every season there are instances
> where some birders will document a bird with the phrase "continuing
> bird", or "seen by others", or "known to be at location" ..... not
> knowing that the original observation was found to be in error or
> inadequately documented.
>
> -----------------------------------
> As most of us know these last three weeks of May have been an
> seemingly unrivaled Vermont bonanza of migrants, especially warblers
> and other passerines.  Included have been numerous reports of
> Philadelphia Vireos and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers. For the most part
> I have been holding back on reviewing these submission until the flood
> is over.  In the near future I will work my way through the three
> species, looking at all the submissions during this spring.
>
> Good birding all .....
>
> Ian
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 1:24 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
Hi Miriam,

I have extremely limited knowledge about vireo hybridization.  I've
heard of hybridization between Philadelphia and Red-eyed Vireos. There
must be more known than I know about since the eBird taxonomy offers
this choice:   "Philadelphia X Red-eyed Vireo (hybrid).

I know of one study, at least, documenting hybridization between
Warbling Vireos and Red-eyed Vireos.  There are likely more studies
since the eBird taxonomy offers this choice:  "Warbling X Red-eyed Vireo
(hybrid).

Not aware of anything firm about Warbling and Philadelphia hybridization.

eBird

On 5/31/2019 4:02 PM, Miriam Lawrence wrote:
> Perhaps a silly question, but are these two species known to hybridize at all - and if so, any possibility you had a hybrid there?
>
> --Miriam Lawrence
>
>
>> On May 31, 2019, at 12:11 PM, Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> At the Conte NWR yesterday Matt and I heard a slightly slower/different
>> singing vireo than the 'typical' Red-eyed Vireo song heard all summer long.
>> We decided it was worth investigating and quickly found a Red eyed at the
>> top of a birch tree 125 feet away. While I make great effort not to use play
>> back devices (and frown on their overuse) as an experiment and because I've
>> frequently questioned just what is the difference in those 2 species songs,
>> I played the Philadelphia Vireo song. I got an immediately response from the
>> Red eyed which flew down to within 12 feet to investigate. I guess it wasn't
>> much of an experiment now that I think about it but I was curious to see if
>> a Red eyed responded to the Philadelphia song, it did...but now that just
>> opened a whole new set of questions for me. Anyway I am always thinking and
>> looking for yellow/yellowish throat area with Philadelphia Vireo.I don't see
>> one every year..I just looked at my 'sketchy' past records of that species
>> with few if any comments. Over 12 years, September being the month I
>> reported seeing one and with two reports in the last week of May.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
>> nothing.
>>
>>
>>
>> Tom Berriman
>>
>> 802-626-9071
>>
>>
>>
>> <https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/
>>
>>
>>
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 1:12 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs --- and some comments about Yellow-bellied and Olive-sided Flycatchers.
Hello all,

Many of you know that I am the eBird reviewer for the four Champlain
Valley counties of Vermont.  And eBirders know that Philadelphia Vireos
are usually flagged for review.  Pertinent to the ID conversation here
started by Bridget is some information of expectations for that species
and two species of flycatchers that are often flagged as well .....
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher and Olive-sided Flycatcher.

All three share a similar pattern in the Champlain regarding seasonality
and geographical distribution.

The Champlain Valley counties include Lake Champlain, the Champlain
Lowlands, and the Green Mountains (foothills and mountains).

Most of the ID errors of the three species occur with submissions to
eBird from along Lake Champlain and from the Champlain Lowlands.

As a general theme all three species are as close to absent as they can
be in June, August, and September in the Lake Champlain/Champlain
Lowlands.  Virtually all reports during these three months to eBird are
inadequately documented and/or prove to be in error.

In spring migration Philadelphia Vireos appear in the Lowlands in quite
low numbers, mostly in the last two weeks of May.  ID errors and
inadequately documented birds are very common during this period.  
During fall migration is when the species is most likely to be seen in
the Lowlands, almost always in September.  For many birders this is one
of the Fall highlight birds.  This is the peak time for their
observation in the Lowlands, and well documented individuals seem to
help other birders locate the species more easily as the month wears on.

With a few exceptions Yellow-bellied Flycatcher submissions during
spring migration in the Lowlands are usually inadequately documented or
errors.  Overall, the few documented individuals have been in the last
three weeks of May.  Documented individuals are very sparse during fall
migration, from the last week of August through the first two weeks of
September.

Olive-sided Flycatchers, of these three species, are the most scarce in
the Champlain Lowlands; at least as reflected in the eBird data. They
also have a high level of inadequately documented and mistakenly
identified birds.  The very few documented reports are during the last
three weeks of May during spring migration.  They are essentially absent
in the Lowland during the Fall migration.

---------------------------------
Overall, these three species need good quality documentation whenever
located along Lake Champlain and the in the Champlain Lowlands. Thanks
to Bridget Butler for getting this conversation going!

If only seen, multiple defining characteristics are important for a
successful documentation.  Vocalizations (with no recordings) by
themselves are inadequate for documentation, and for Philadelphia Vireo
almost useless in most cases.  Audio recordings are best when there are
multiple repeats of songs, and when the sonograms are clear.  Multiple
photos are much better than a single photo.

As most of you eBirders know, the same bird is often reported by several
birders.  The more birders that see what is likely the same bird at a
location, the subsequent documentation of the bird can be somewhat less
thorough.  But beware, every season there are instances where some
birders will document a bird with the phrase "continuing bird", or "seen
by others", or "known to be at location" ..... not knowing that the
original observation was found to be in error or inadequately documented.

-----------------------------------
As most of us know these last three weeks of May have been an seemingly
unrivaled Vermont bonanza of migrants, especially warblers and other
passerines.  Included have been numerous reports of Philadelphia Vireos
and Yellow-bellied Flycatchers.  For the most part I have been holding
back on reviewing these submission until the flood is over.  In the near
future I will work my way through the three species, looking at all the
submissions during this spring.

Good birding all .....

Ian
 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 1:02 pm
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
Perhaps a silly question, but are these two species known to hybridize at all - and if so, any possibility you had a hybrid there?

--Miriam Lawrence


> On May 31, 2019, at 12:11 PM, Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...> wrote:
>
>
>
> At the Conte NWR yesterday Matt and I heard a slightly slower/different
> singing vireo than the 'typical' Red-eyed Vireo song heard all summer long.
> We decided it was worth investigating and quickly found a Red eyed at the
> top of a birch tree 125 feet away. While I make great effort not to use play
> back devices (and frown on their overuse) as an experiment and because I've
> frequently questioned just what is the difference in those 2 species songs,
> I played the Philadelphia Vireo song. I got an immediately response from the
> Red eyed which flew down to within 12 feet to investigate. I guess it wasn't
> much of an experiment now that I think about it but I was curious to see if
> a Red eyed responded to the Philadelphia song, it did...but now that just
> opened a whole new set of questions for me. Anyway I am always thinking and
> looking for yellow/yellowish throat area with Philadelphia Vireo.I don't see
> one every year..I just looked at my 'sketchy' past records of that species
> with few if any comments. Over 12 years, September being the month I
> reported seeing one and with two reports in the last week of May.
>
>
>
>
>
> The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
> nothing.
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
> 802-626-9071
>
>
>
> <https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/
>
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 9:41 am
From: Mike Sargent <msargent...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Philadelphia vireos
2 weekends ago, several other observers and I saw and photographed an unquestionable Philadelphia vireo in Burlington's Greenmount Cemetery. We were fortunate that the bird was singing a duet with a red-eyed vireo in an adjacent tree, allowing for a comparison of the subtle differences in their songs. The only other Philadelphia vireo I've seen in Vermont was on the summit ridge of Mount Mansfield last summer. Chris Rimmer caught it in one of his nets, affording everyone extreme closeup views as the bird was examined and banded.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 9:11 am
From: Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs


At the Conte NWR yesterday Matt and I heard a slightly slower/different
singing vireo than the 'typical' Red-eyed Vireo song heard all summer long.
We decided it was worth investigating and quickly found a Red eyed at the
top of a birch tree 125 feet away. While I make great effort not to use play
back devices (and frown on their overuse) as an experiment and because I've
frequently questioned just what is the difference in those 2 species songs,
I played the Philadelphia Vireo song. I got an immediately response from the
Red eyed which flew down to within 12 feet to investigate. I guess it wasn't
much of an experiment now that I think about it but I was curious to see if
a Red eyed responded to the Philadelphia song, it did...but now that just
opened a whole new set of questions for me. Anyway I am always thinking and
looking for yellow/yellowish throat area with Philadelphia Vireo.I don't see
one every year..I just looked at my 'sketchy' past records of that species
with few if any comments. Over 12 years, September being the month I
reported seeing one and with two reports in the last week of May.





The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing.



Tom Berriman

802-626-9071



<https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/>
https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/




 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 6:41 am
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
eBird has the option of entering "Philadelphia/Warbling Vireo"

Ian
====================================

On 5/31/2019 9:20 AM, Fred and Chris Pratt wrote:
> I have little (perhaps no) doubt that this species has been
> over-reported in Vermont, especially in spring. I have birded in this
> state for nearly fifty years and have seen (to my satisfaction)
> Philadelphia Vireo perhaps five or six times during spring migration.
> Quite frankly, I would NEVER identify this species on the basis of
> song alone  - I know of at least three experienced birders besides
> myself who have admitted to being positive a singing bird was a
> Philadelphia Vireo only to find a Red-eye when the bird showed itself.
> Ken is absolutely correct when he emphasizes using multiple criteria
> when identifying this species. In fact, that is an important guideline
> for identifying any difficult and/or rare species.
>
> As to the bird Ken describes in his posting, I would say bravo for a
> very careful observation and description - but I would also say this:
> I would not conclude that the bird you saw was a Philadelphia Vireo.
> It may well have been a Phialdelphia but, as you say yourself, it
> "looked very much like a Warbling Vireo." Further, you state
> explicitly that you "could not discern any yellow" on the breast - but
> that is the one field mark I would insist on for safely identifying
> this species. To me this is a case where I would have to leave the
> bird unidentified; that is, it was either a Warbling Vireo singing a
> strange song or an unusually drab  Philadelphia Vireo without showing
> its trademark yellow on throat or breast. If I had to guess, I would
> probably agree this bird was a Philadelphia (some of the drawings in
> Sibley look like your bird even though his text emphasizes a yellow
> throat) but to me this is a case where I think the observer should
> admit to uncertainty.
>
> Fred Pratt
>
> On 5/30/2019 10:45 PM, Ken Copenhaver wrote:
>> Hi Bridget,
>>
>> I'm no expert on this species, but here is my report on a PHVI that I
>> observed on 5/16/18 at Fairfield Swamp WMA -- French Hill Access.  I
>> think
>> it shows my thought process in narrowing it down to a PHVI vs. REVI:
>>
>> "Compared with Red-eyed Vireo: song slower, weaker, less insistent,
>> choppier, more pauses; dark eye line and light eyebrow stripe were
>> barely
>> noticeable; less active than typical REVI; body more compact, less
>> sleek.
>> Clear, pale breast--could not discern any yellow. Looked very much
>> like a
>> Warbling Vireo; If it hadn't been singing, I would have assumed it was a
>> WAVI. I listened to this bird for about 10 minutes and watched it
>> high in a
>> tree for several minutes, during which I had some clear views of its
>> head
>> and breast."
>>
>> I would add that it's easy to jump to conclusions on this species, so I
>> think it's important to distinguish it from REVI by more than one
>> criteria,
>> including song, appearance, and behavior.  In this case, it was the
>> non-typical REVI song that caused me to look at this bird more
>> closely.  I
>> was fortunate that it stayed in view long enough to get a good look
>> at it.
>> There might be others who are more experienced with PHVI and can ID
>> it more
>> readily, but for myself, I want to see several factors before
>> declaring it
>> a PHVI.
>>
>> --Ken Copenhaver
>>
>> On Thu, May 30, 2019 at 10:19 AM Bridget Butler <birddiva...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Greetings All!
>>>
>>> I feel like I'm seeing a number of reports on Philadelphia Vireos in a
>>> number of different places recently.
>>>
>>> I've not much experience with this bird and have been reading up on
>>> tips
>>> for identifying the bird (including studying images) in relation to
>>> other
>>> vireos and warblers like the Tenessee Warbler. I'm wondering if I'm
>>> seeing
>>> them but just not really locking in on an id.
>>>
>>> Wondering if those of you with experience with this bird might share
>>> your
>>> own thinking on how to tease this bird out from others? What do you
>>> look
>>> for or notice in terms of both plumage AND behaviors?
>>>
>>> Thanks in advance!
>>> Bridget
>>>
>>>
>>> *Bridget Butler*
>>>
>>> *Bird Diva Consulting*
>>> *PO Box 613*
>>> *St. Albans VT 05478*
>>> *(802) 393-4147*
>>> *Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com>*
>>> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva
>>> <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
>>> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
>>> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
>>> <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
>>>> *
>>> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>>>
>>>
>>> <
>>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
>>>
>>> Virus-free.
>>> www.avast.com
>>> <
>>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
>>>
>>> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 6:20 am
From: Fred and Chris Pratt <pipit...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
I have little (perhaps no) doubt that this species has been
over-reported in Vermont, especially in spring. I have birded in this
state for nearly fifty years and have seen (to my satisfaction)
Philadelphia Vireo perhaps five or six times during spring migration.
Quite frankly, I would NEVER identify this species on the basis of song
alone  - I know of at least three experienced birders besides myself who
have admitted to being positive a singing bird was a Philadelphia Vireo
only to find a Red-eye when the bird showed itself. Ken is absolutely
correct when he emphasizes using multiple criteria when identifying this
species. In fact, that is an important guideline for identifying any
difficult and/or rare species.

As to the bird Ken describes in his posting, I would say bravo for a
very careful observation and description - but I would also say this: I
would not conclude that the bird you saw was a Philadelphia Vireo. It
may well have been a Phialdelphia but, as you say yourself, it "looked
very much like a Warbling Vireo." Further, you state explicitly that you
"could not discern any yellow" on the breast - but that is the one field
mark I would insist on for safely identifying this species. To me this
is a case where I would have to leave the bird unidentified; that is, it
was either a Warbling Vireo singing a strange song or an unusually drab 
Philadelphia Vireo without showing its trademark yellow on throat or
breast. If I had to guess, I would probably agree this bird was a
Philadelphia (some of the drawings in Sibley look like your bird even
though his text emphasizes a yellow throat) but to me this is a case
where I think the observer should admit to uncertainty.

Fred Pratt

On 5/30/2019 10:45 PM, Ken Copenhaver wrote:
> Hi Bridget,
>
> I'm no expert on this species, but here is my report on a PHVI that I
> observed on 5/16/18 at Fairfield Swamp WMA -- French Hill Access. I think
> it shows my thought process in narrowing it down to a PHVI vs. REVI:
>
> "Compared with Red-eyed Vireo: song slower, weaker, less insistent,
> choppier, more pauses; dark eye line and light eyebrow stripe were barely
> noticeable; less active than typical REVI; body more compact, less sleek.
> Clear, pale breast--could not discern any yellow. Looked very much like a
> Warbling Vireo; If it hadn't been singing, I would have assumed it was a
> WAVI. I listened to this bird for about 10 minutes and watched it high in a
> tree for several minutes, during which I had some clear views of its head
> and breast."
>
> I would add that it's easy to jump to conclusions on this species, so I
> think it's important to distinguish it from REVI by more than one criteria,
> including song, appearance, and behavior. In this case, it was the
> non-typical REVI song that caused me to look at this bird more closely. I
> was fortunate that it stayed in view long enough to get a good look at it.
> There might be others who are more experienced with PHVI and can ID it more
> readily, but for myself, I want to see several factors before declaring it
> a PHVI.
>
> --Ken Copenhaver
>
> On Thu, May 30, 2019 at 10:19 AM Bridget Butler <birddiva...> wrote:
>
>> Greetings All!
>>
>> I feel like I'm seeing a number of reports on Philadelphia Vireos in a
>> number of different places recently.
>>
>> I've not much experience with this bird and have been reading up on tips
>> for identifying the bird (including studying images) in relation to other
>> vireos and warblers like the Tenessee Warbler. I'm wondering if I'm seeing
>> them but just not really locking in on an id.
>>
>> Wondering if those of you with experience with this bird might share your
>> own thinking on how to tease this bird out from others? What do you look
>> for or notice in terms of both plumage AND behaviors?
>>
>> Thanks in advance!
>> Bridget
>>
>>
>> *Bridget Butler*
>>
>> *Bird Diva Consulting*
>> *PO Box 613*
>> *St. Albans VT 05478*
>> *(802) 393-4147*
>> *Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com>*
>> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
>> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
>> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
>>> *
>> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>>
>>
>> <
>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
>> Virus-free.
>> www.avast.com
>> <
>> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
>> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/31/19 4:32 am
From: Terry Marron <tgmarron...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mud Pond bird walk
"Join" - us for a bird walk in Williston at the Mud Pond Conservation Area. We will meet at 8 am at the parking lot off South Rd. Parking is limited so carpool if you can. We will bird till 11 am or so, but longer if the birding is good. Feel free to come and go as you want. Bring binoculars, water, bug dope, snack...Trails are muddy in spots so wear good boots. RSVP <tgmarron...> mailto:<tgmarron...>


Terry Marron
Williston VT

Stay Amazed!
 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/19 7:46 pm
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
Hi Bridget,

I'm no expert on this species, but here is my report on a PHVI that I
observed on 5/16/18 at Fairfield Swamp WMA -- French Hill Access. I think
it shows my thought process in narrowing it down to a PHVI vs. REVI:

"Compared with Red-eyed Vireo: song slower, weaker, less insistent,
choppier, more pauses; dark eye line and light eyebrow stripe were barely
noticeable; less active than typical REVI; body more compact, less sleek.
Clear, pale breast--could not discern any yellow. Looked very much like a
Warbling Vireo; If it hadn't been singing, I would have assumed it was a
WAVI. I listened to this bird for about 10 minutes and watched it high in a
tree for several minutes, during which I had some clear views of its head
and breast."

I would add that it's easy to jump to conclusions on this species, so I
think it's important to distinguish it from REVI by more than one criteria,
including song, appearance, and behavior. In this case, it was the
non-typical REVI song that caused me to look at this bird more closely. I
was fortunate that it stayed in view long enough to get a good look at it.
There might be others who are more experienced with PHVI and can ID it more
readily, but for myself, I want to see several factors before declaring it
a PHVI.

--Ken Copenhaver

On Thu, May 30, 2019 at 10:19 AM Bridget Butler <birddiva...> wrote:

> Greetings All!
>
> I feel like I'm seeing a number of reports on Philadelphia Vireos in a
> number of different places recently.
>
> I've not much experience with this bird and have been reading up on tips
> for identifying the bird (including studying images) in relation to other
> vireos and warblers like the Tenessee Warbler. I'm wondering if I'm seeing
> them but just not really locking in on an id.
>
> Wondering if those of you with experience with this bird might share your
> own thinking on how to tease this bird out from others? What do you look
> for or notice in terms of both plumage AND behaviors?
>
> Thanks in advance!
> Bridget
>
>
> *Bridget Butler*
>
> *Bird Diva Consulting*
> *PO Box 613*
> *St. Albans VT 05478*
> *(802) 393-4147*
> *Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com>*
> *Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
> *Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
> *Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT
> >*
> *Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*
>
>
> <
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon
> >
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link
> >
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/19 6:17 pm
From: Mus <musbird...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummers at Oranges
I have hung out two orange feeders, each holding two halves. The catbirds and the orioles are duking it out with each other on these, and the four halves are empty and dry as a bone at the end of EACH DAY!

On the subject of hummers, I have four females that sip at the same feeder at the same time, although there are two other feeders on the other side of the house. Occasionally a male shows up.

AND, the oriole is scarfing down peanut butter at my feeder, sharing it graciously with chickadees, woodpeckers, catbirds, and red squirrels. I have two of these and they are also both empty at the end of the day. Quite a diner I am running here. (PS : all feeders way out of the height-range of bears)
Janet Watton
Randolph Center

> On May 30, 2019, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...> wrote:
>
> There are 17 messages totaling 459 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Pileated
> 2. bobolinks
> 3. Bald eagles in Essex
> 4. Another great Mourning in cemetery (2)
> 5. Phen Basin Bird walk 7 Am Thursday
> 6. A third Catbird showed up today...
> 7. Hummer at oranges (3)
> 8. Possible Swainson's warbler
> 9. When Songbirds Fall to Earth
> 10. Midday Nighthawk, close flyby, southern end of Snake Mountain,
> Cornwall/Bridport
> 11. eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler (3)
> 12. Wilson's Snipe
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 06:44:42 -0400
> From: Sue <2birdvt...>
> Subject: Pileated
>
> I have a pair of pileated woodpeckers visiting suet feeders. Two crows also enjoy this, first time I've witnessed them doing this.
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 07:22:54 -0400
> From: Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...>
> Subject: bobolinks
>
> Monday, in the field behind the Jericho town garage.
>
> --
> Best regards,
>
> Leslie
>
> Leslie Nulty
> P.O. Box 1121
> Jericho Center, VT 05465
> home office: 802-899-4582
> cell: 802-324-1496
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 11:42:53 -0400
> From: Frank Rounds <frankrounds...>
> Subject: Bald eagles in Essex
>
> This morning around 8:30 I watched two adult bald eagles at Woodside Park in Essex, flying parallel to the river, both carrying food in their bills.
> Also saw a pair of indigo buntings copulating, and a pair of phoebes carrying food to their nest.
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 12:12:45 -0400
> From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
> Subject: Another great Mourning in cemetery
>
> Hi VT birders, I had another satisfying start to my work day this morning in the Hinesburg Village Cemetery. I was surprised to find a Mourning Warbler in the wetland area, singing away! I have described the location in my eBird report which is attached. I wonder WHO the next bird will be!
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55997553
>
> Ali
> Huntington
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 12:59:15 -0400
> From: Jeanne Elias <moosewoman...>
> Subject: Phen Basin Bird walk 7 Am Thursday
>
> The Mad Birders’ last Thursday morning walk will take place tomorrow 5/30 at 7am at Phen Basin.
> We are in full swing on Spring Migration
> So join us.
> For details see Madbirders.org
> Happy Birding!
>
> Nevertheless, she persisted!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 13:03:40 -0400
> From: Veer Frost <veer.frost...>
> Subject: A third Catbird showed up today...
>
> and I was lucky to be out observing the garden species and over my
> head saw one catbird repeatedly approach another with bill raised
> skyward and opening and closing, like silent singing, meanwhile what
> I'm taking to be the resident male made lunging motions at this guy
> and the presumed female (but really how can you tell, this could have
> been a female pursuing another's mate) made her mewing sounds and
> evaded... after a more definitive chase the third has not been seen
> again ... I wonder which one won. Encounters like this seem to happen
> most often in the feeding area, which has lots of cover, I've wondered
> if showing off a food source helps in courtship. the times I've seen a
> male hummingbird's courting dance it's been in proximity to a feeder.
>
> Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
> __
> Sent using Hushmail
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 17:24:55 +0000
> From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
> Subject: Re: Hummer at oranges
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
> Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 4:26 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
>
> A male hummer has been visiting today and apparently feeding from the
> orange halves I've hung for the Orioles, even though he's got a clean,
> well-filled sugar water feeder on the other side of the house. As far as I
> can tell, I've got two male hummers, had them for about 10 days or so with
> no sign of a female (poor boys). What's with the oranges? Has anybody
> else seen this?
>
> Jane Stein
>
> (Shoreham)
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 17:26:02 +0000
> From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
> Subject: Re: Hummer at oranges
>
> Yes. First year I put out oranges for my orioles, and the hummers are enjoying them too! Alice, Bridport
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
> Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 4:26 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
>
> A male hummer has been visiting today and apparently feeding from the
> orange halves I've hung for the Orioles, even though he's got a clean,
> well-filled sugar water feeder on the other side of the house. As far as I
> can tell, I've got two male hummers, had them for about 10 days or so with
> no sign of a female (poor boys). What's with the oranges? Has anybody
> else seen this?
>
> Jane Stein
>
> (Shoreham)
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 14:01:11 -0400
> From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
> Subject: Re: Another great Mourning in cemetery
>
> WRONG eBird checklist in first message! I'll try again!
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56861002
>
> Thanks! Ali
>
>
> From: "alikatofvt" <alikatofvt...>
> To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 12:12:45 PM
> Subject: Another great Mourning in cemetery
>
> Hi VT birders, I had another satisfying start to my work day this morning in the Hinesburg Village Cemetery. I was surprised to find a Mourning Warbler in the wetland area, singing away! I have described the location in my eBird report which is attached. I wonder WHO the next bird will be!
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55997553
>
> Ali
> Huntington
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 15:22:21 -0400
> From: "<blackpoll...>" <blackpoll...>
> Subject: Possible Swainson's warbler
>
> For anyone birding Conte Wenlock area. Just a heads up on the Peanut Dam Road, Conte. 2 tenths mile from turn around. Recordings being triple verrified. No visual sighting. Ebird post in a few hours with audio. Bird song recorded Saturday noon.
>
> Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 16:02:02 -0400
> From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
> Subject: Re: Hummer at oranges
>
> Cool! Thanks. I've put out oranges in past years and the hummers didn't
> come to them. I wouldn't think they'd be sweet enough for them.
>
> Jane
>
> (Shoreham)
>
>
> On Wed, 29 May 2019 17:26:02 +0000, Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
> wrote:
>> Yes. First year I put out oranges for my orioles, and the hummers are
>> enjoying them too! Alice, Bridport
>>
>> ________________________________
>> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein
>> <jeshawks...>
>> Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 4:26 PM
>> To: <VTBIRD...>
>> Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
>>
>> A male hummer has been visiting today and apparently feeding from the
>> orange halves I've hung for the Orioles, even though he's got a clean,
>> well-filled sugar water feeder on the other side of the house. As far
> as I
>> can tell, I've got two male hummers, had them for about 10 days or so
> with
>> no sign of a female (poor boys). What's with the oranges? Has anybody
>> else seen this?
>>
>> Jane Stein
>>
>> (Shoreham)
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 16:48:01 -0400
> From: Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan...>
> Subject: When Songbirds Fall to Earth
>
> Greetings, VTBIRDers:
>
> From the fog in the Gulf of Maine last week, songbirds dropped to Monhegan Island in a fallout like I’ve rarely seen: warblers were flycatching in plain view on beaches and bedrock. I wrote an essay about it, mostly for folks who’ve never seen anything like this and for those of us who no longer see it often enough. Yeah, it’s not from Vermont, but you’ll see lots of images of tired warblers (thanks in large part to Vermonter Josh Lincoln).
>
> https://bryanpfeiffer.com/2019/05/28/when-songbirds-fall-to-earth/
>
> Best,
> — Bryan
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> www.bryanpfeiffer.com
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 16:53:34 -0400
> From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
> Subject: Midday Nighthawk, close flyby, southern end of Snake Mountain, Cornwall/Bridport
>
> Just past 1:00pm this afternoon, I was walking along the edge of an
> extend piece of our yard that looks down into a shallow wooded, bubbling
> stream gully ... casually paying attention to all those voices that
> inevitably turn out to be Redstarts. A bird of larger wing flew out of
> the thin understory of tall maples and oaks on the opposite side of the
> gully, triggered the voice in my head who said "Oh, there's our
> Sharp-shinned. But just as instantly, as the bird flew diagonally
> across in front of me, below my eye level so I could see it well from
> above, it was clear from that vantage that it was no Sharpy but a
> graceful, pointy-winged denizen with brilliant white wing-patches
> flashing in the shade, long-tailed, neckless Common Nighthawk .......
> glide, three deep strokes, glide, aerobatic turn to the right, disappear
> behind an Oak .......
>
> Ian
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 18:41:41 -0400
> From: Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...>
> Subject: eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
>
> Under warbler sp. In the eBird report is an audio file:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56722900
>
>
>
>
>
> eBird report from this morning same location:
>
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56879586
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
> nothing.
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
> 802-626-9071
>
>
>
> <https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 18:56:11 -0400
> From: Veer Frost <veer.frost...>
> Subject: Re: eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
>
> An absolute thrill, Tom, thank you...exciting even among so many
> exceptional warbler reports, so many reasons to be grateful for this
> listserv!Veer
>
> On 5/29/2019 at 6:41 PM, "Thomas Berriman" wrote:Under warbler sp. In
> the eBird report is an audio file:
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56722900
> eBird report from this morning same location:
>
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56879586
> The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
> nothing.
> Tom Berriman
>
> 802-626-9071
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Thu, 30 May 2019 00:25:14 +0000
> From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
> Subject: Re: eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
>
> Congrats, Tom, I think that is exactly what you have there, unless another bird learned Swainson's song. Bell-clear sliding whistles, nicely-defined ending. One lost little bird.
>
> In West Virginia, the song is described as "sweet, sweet Sistersville", as there is a town by that name in WV. Ironically, I don't think they've ever had Swainson's Warblers there...
>
> Cheers,
>
> Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 6:41 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
>
> Under warbler sp. In the eBird report is an audio file:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56722900
>
>
>
>
>
> eBird report from this morning same location:
>
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56879586
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
> nothing.
>
>
>
> Tom Berriman
>
> 802-626-9071
>
>
>
> <https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 29 May 2019 20:34:36 -0400
> From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
> Subject: Wilson's Snipe
>
> I was in Windsor today near the corner of Marton Rd and Hunt Rd where
> there is a wetland and wandering brook. Nice place to see/hear a Wilson's
> Snipe. I think I was hearing 2. Managed to get a flight sequence which I
> made into a composite photo. You can hear one calling here:
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56879826
> and see a better picture here:
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157708828786573
>
> Several warblers there, swallows, bobolinks....
>
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> www.creaturekinships.net, www.creaturekinships.com
> <http://www.creaturekinships.net>
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 28 May 2019 to 29 May 2019 (#2019-132)
> *************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 5/30/19 7:19 am
From: Bridget Butler <birddiva...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Breaking down PHVIs
Greetings All!

I feel like I'm seeing a number of reports on Philadelphia Vireos in a
number of different places recently.

I've not much experience with this bird and have been reading up on tips
for identifying the bird (including studying images) in relation to other
vireos and warblers like the Tenessee Warbler. I'm wondering if I'm seeing
them but just not really locking in on an id.

Wondering if those of you with experience with this bird might share your
own thinking on how to tease this bird out from others? What do you look
for or notice in terms of both plumage AND behaviors?

Thanks in advance!
Bridget


*Bridget Butler*

*Bird Diva Consulting*
*PO Box 613*
*St. Albans VT 05478*
*(802) 393-4147*
*Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com>*
*Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
*Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
*Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT>*
*Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*


<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
www.avast.com
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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 5:35 pm
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Wilson's Snipe
I was in Windsor today near the corner of Marton Rd and Hunt Rd where
there is a wetland and wandering brook. Nice place to see/hear a Wilson's
Snipe. I think I was hearing 2. Managed to get a flight sequence which I
made into a composite photo. You can hear one calling here:
https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56879826
and see a better picture here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157708828786573

Several warblers there, swallows, bobolinks....


Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
www.creaturekinships.net, www.creaturekinships.com
<http://www.creaturekinships.net>
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 5:25 pm
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
Congrats, Tom, I think that is exactly what you have there, unless another bird learned Swainson's song. Bell-clear sliding whistles, nicely-defined ending. One lost little bird.

In West Virginia, the song is described as "sweet, sweet Sistersville", as there is a town by that name in WV. Ironically, I don't think they've ever had Swainson's Warblers there...

Cheers,

Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 6:41 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler

Under warbler sp. In the eBird report is an audio file:



https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56722900





eBird report from this morning same location:

https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56879586









The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing.



Tom Berriman

802-626-9071



<https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/>
https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 3:56 pm
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
An absolute thrill, Tom, thank you...exciting even among so many
exceptional warbler reports, so many reasons to be grateful for this
listserv!Veer

On 5/29/2019 at 6:41 PM, "Thomas Berriman" wrote:Under warbler sp. In
the eBird report is an audio file:
https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56722900
eBird report from this morning same location:

https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56879586
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing.
Tom Berriman

802-626-9071
https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 3:41 pm
From: Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] eBird checklist with audio of Swainson's Warbler
Under warbler sp. In the eBird report is an audio file:



https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56722900





eBird report from this morning same location:

https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56879586









The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing.



Tom Berriman

802-626-9071



<https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/>
https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/




 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 1:53 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Midday Nighthawk, close flyby, southern end of Snake Mountain, Cornwall/Bridport
Just past 1:00pm this afternoon, I was walking along the edge of an
extend piece of our yard that looks down into a shallow wooded, bubbling
stream gully ... casually paying attention to all those voices that
inevitably turn out to be Redstarts.  A bird of larger wing flew out of
the thin understory of tall maples and oaks on the opposite side of the
gully, triggered the voice in my head who said "Oh, there's our
Sharp-shinned.  But just as instantly, as the bird flew diagonally
across in front of me, below my eye level so I could see it well from
above, it was clear from that vantage that it was no Sharpy but a
graceful, pointy-winged denizen with brilliant white wing-patches
flashing in the shade, long-tailed, neckless Common Nighthawk .......
glide, three deep strokes, glide, aerobatic turn to the right, disappear
behind an Oak .......

Ian
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 1:47 pm
From: Bryan Pfeiffer <bryan...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] When Songbirds Fall to Earth
Greetings, VTBIRDers:

From the fog in the Gulf of Maine last week, songbirds dropped to Monhegan Island in a fallout like I’ve rarely seen: warblers were flycatching in plain view on beaches and bedrock. I wrote an essay about it, mostly for folks who’ve never seen anything like this and for those of us who no longer see it often enough. Yeah, it’s not from Vermont, but you’ll see lots of images of tired warblers (thanks in large part to Vermonter Josh Lincoln).

https://bryanpfeiffer.com/2019/05/28/when-songbirds-fall-to-earth/

Best,
— Bryan
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
www.bryanpfeiffer.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 1:02 pm
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
Cool! Thanks. I've put out oranges in past years and the hummers didn't
come to them. I wouldn't think they'd be sweet enough for them.

Jane

(Shoreham)


On Wed, 29 May 2019 17:26:02 +0000, Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
wrote:
> Yes. First year I put out oranges for my orioles, and the hummers are
> enjoying them too! Alice, Bridport
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein
> <jeshawks...>
> Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 4:26 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
>
> A male hummer has been visiting today and apparently feeding from the
> orange halves I've hung for the Orioles, even though he's got a clean,
> well-filled sugar water feeder on the other side of the house. As far
as I
> can tell, I've got two male hummers, had them for about 10 days or so
with
> no sign of a female (poor boys). What's with the oranges? Has anybody
> else seen this?
>
> Jane Stein
>
> (Shoreham)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 12:22 pm
From: <blackpoll...> <blackpoll...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Possible Swainson's warbler
For anyone birding Conte Wenlock area. Just a heads up on the Peanut Dam Road, Conte. 2 tenths mile from turn around. Recordings being triple verrified. No visual sighting. Ebird post in a few hours with audio. Bird song recorded Saturday noon.

Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 11:01 am
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Another great Mourning in cemetery
WRONG eBird checklist in first message! I'll try again!

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56861002

Thanks! Ali


From: "alikatofvt" <alikatofvt...>
To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2019 12:12:45 PM
Subject: Another great Mourning in cemetery

Hi VT birders, I had another satisfying start to my work day this morning in the Hinesburg Village Cemetery. I was surprised to find a Mourning Warbler in the wetland area, singing away! I have described the location in my eBird report which is attached. I wonder WHO the next bird will be!

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55997553

Ali
Huntington
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 10:26 am
From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
Yes. First year I put out oranges for my orioles, and the hummers are enjoying them too! Alice, Bridport

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 4:26 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges

A male hummer has been visiting today and apparently feeding from the
orange halves I've hung for the Orioles, even though he's got a clean,
well-filled sugar water feeder on the other side of the house. As far as I
can tell, I've got two male hummers, had them for about 10 days or so with
no sign of a female (poor boys). What's with the oranges? Has anybody
else seen this?

Jane Stein

(Shoreham)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 10:25 am
From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 28, 2019 4:26 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges

A male hummer has been visiting today and apparently feeding from the
orange halves I've hung for the Orioles, even though he's got a clean,
well-filled sugar water feeder on the other side of the house. As far as I
can tell, I've got two male hummers, had them for about 10 days or so with
no sign of a female (poor boys). What's with the oranges? Has anybody
else seen this?

Jane Stein

(Shoreham)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/19 10:03 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] A third Catbird showed up today...
and I was lucky to be out observing the garden species and over my
head saw one catbird repeatedly approach another with bill raised
skyward and opening and closing, like silent singing, meanwhile what
I'm taking to be the resident male made lunging motions at this guy
and the presumed female (but really how can you tell, this could have
been a female pursuing another's mate) made her mewing sounds and
evaded... after a more definitive chase the third has not been seen
again ... I wonder which one won. Encounters like this seem to happen
most often in the feeding area, which has lots of cover, I've wondered
if showing off a food source helps in courtship. the times I've seen a
male hummingbird's courting dance it's been in proximity to a feeder.

Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
__
Sent using Hushmail
 

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Date: 5/29/19 9:59 am
From: Jeanne Elias <moosewoman...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Phen Basin Bird walk 7 Am Thursday
The Mad Birders’ last Thursday morning walk will take place tomorrow 5/30 at 7am at Phen Basin.
We are in full swing on Spring Migration
So join us.
For details see Madbirders.org
Happy Birding!

Nevertheless, she persisted!
 

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Date: 5/29/19 9:12 am
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Another great Mourning in cemetery
Hi VT birders, I had another satisfying start to my work day this morning in the Hinesburg Village Cemetery. I was surprised to find a Mourning Warbler in the wetland area, singing away! I have described the location in my eBird report which is attached. I wonder WHO the next bird will be!

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55997553

Ali
Huntington
 

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Date: 5/29/19 8:43 am
From: Frank Rounds <frankrounds...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bald eagles in Essex
This morning around 8:30 I watched two adult bald eagles at Woodside Park in Essex, flying parallel to the river, both carrying food in their bills.
Also saw a pair of indigo buntings copulating, and a pair of phoebes carrying food to their nest.
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/29/19 4:23 am
From: Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] bobolinks
Monday, in the field behind the Jericho town garage.

--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
 

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Date: 5/29/19 3:44 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pileated
I have a pair of pileated woodpeckers visiting suet feeders. Two crows also enjoy this, first time I've witnessed them doing this.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

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Date: 5/28/19 6:09 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cuckoos
Two black billed cuckoos today---- one heard and seen the other heard at the W. Rutland Marsh in the vicinity of the green house.

Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

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Date: 5/28/19 1:43 pm
From: FRED BATES <batesx2...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - West Rutland Marsh IBA, May 28, 2019
> A wet walk at the West Rutland Marsh and the Pleasant St. power line. We saw the Least Bittern and the American Bittern at the marsh and also Prairie Warbler and a Field Sparrow on the power line. Great day with my son Graham. Then we were treated to lunch by my wife Lana. A great day.
>
>
> >
> > West Rutland Marsh IBA, Rutland, Vermont, US
> > May 28, 2019 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
> > Protocol: Traveling
> > 1.5 mile(s)
> > 36 species
> >
> > Canada Goose X
> > Mallard X
> > Mourning Dove X
> > Black-billed Cuckoo X
> > Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
> > American Bittern 1
> > Least Bittern 1 Seen from the end of the board walk flying from left to right. seen by both observers.
> > Belted Kingfisher 1
> > Downy Woodpecker 1
> > Pileated Woodpecker 1
> > Alder Flycatcher X
> > Willow Flycatcher X
> > Eastern Phoebe 1
> > Eastern Kingbird 2
> > Warbling Vireo X
> > Blue Jay X
> > American Crow X
> > Tree Swallow X
> > Barn Swallow X
> > Black-capped Chickadee X
> > House Wren X
> > Marsh Wren X
> > Veery X
> > American Robin X
> > Gray Catbird X
> > European Starling X
> > Cedar Waxwing X
> > American Goldfinch X
> > Song Sparrow X
> > Swamp Sparrow X
> > Red-winged Blackbird X
> > Common Grackle X
> > Ovenbird X
> > Common Yellowthroat X
> > Yellow Warbler X
> > Chestnut-sided Warbler X
> >
> > View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56844741
> >
> > This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

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Date: 5/28/19 1:26 pm
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummer at oranges
A male hummer has been visiting today and apparently feeding from the
orange halves I've hung for the Orioles, even though he's got a clean,
well-filled sugar water feeder on the other side of the house. As far as I
can tell, I've got two male hummers, had them for about 10 days or so with
no sign of a female (poor boys). What's with the oranges? Has anybody
else seen this?

Jane Stein

(Shoreham)
 

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Date: 5/27/19 7:10 am
From: Holly Brough <000004a95212da17-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] VT Grassland Birds Talk, Tuesday May 28, 6PM Free event
Noah Perlut is giving a great talk Shelburne Farms Coach Barn about his
years of research on individual families of Bobolinks and Savannah Sparrows
that have been returning to VT year after year. Details at link.
https://shelburnefarms.org/calendar/event/community-farming-grassland-birds-a-local-conservation-strategy-0


--

Holly Brough

Director of Communications | 802-985-0324

Shelburne Farms: Educating for a Sustainable Future

1611 Harbor Road, Shelburne, Vermont 05482

www.shelburnefarms.org | Twitter <http://www.twitter.com/shelburnefarms> |
Facebook <https://www.facebook.com/ShelburneFarms> | Instagram
<http://instagram.com/shelburnefarms>
 

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Date: 5/27/19 4:40 am
From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] An abundance of hummers
Yes. I generally have one pair, but this year there are at least two buzzing around my flowers and feeder in Bridport. They seem to get into squabbles, and I know they are territorial, so maybe some will win and drive the others away.
________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
Sent: Sunday, May 26, 2019 5:43 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] An abundance of hummers

We have lived here since 2010 and in all that time Ive never had to clean and refill my feeders once a day or day and a half. This year has been quite remarkable in that respect. Not only that but occasionally when I look out there are two birds calmly feeding together. Anyone else experiencing more hummers than usual?

Mundi
North Pownal

Sent from my iPad

The greatest tragedy in mankinds entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008
 

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Date: 5/27/19 4:38 am
From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] An abundance of hummers
________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
Sent: Sunday, May 26, 2019 5:43 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] An abundance of hummers

We have lived here since 2010 and in all that time Ive never had to clean and refill my feeders once a day or day and a half. This year has been quite remarkable in that respect. Not only that but occasionally when I look out there are two birds calmly feeding together. Anyone else experiencing more hummers than usual?

Mundi
North Pownal

Sent from my iPad

The greatest tragedy in mankinds entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008
 

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Date: 5/26/19 3:02 pm
From: Eugenia Cooke <euge24241...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Blue winged warbler West Rutland Marsh
Heard the bee-buzz Bronx cheer for 10 minutes before finally seeing the
Blue Winged on the powerline. Great looks! Also heard then seen multiple
Prairie warblers and a lovely singing field sparrow. A Bobolink (likely on
a nest) in field on east side of Marble St. near old shooting area.
Saturday heard then seen Black billed cuckoo, also on Marble St.
Much to see, two great mornings WRM.
 

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Date: 5/26/19 2:43 pm
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] An abundance of hummers
We have lived here since 2010 and in all that time I’ve never had to clean and refill my feeders once a day or day and a half. This year has been quite remarkable in that respect. Not only that but occasionally when I look out there are two birds calmly feeding together. Anyone else experiencing more hummers than usual?

Mundi
North Pownal

Sent from my iPad

The greatest tragedy in mankind’s entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke 1917 - 2008
 

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Date: 5/26/19 10:52 am
From: Aves Artist <remy.avesart...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Eastern Meadowlark- New Haven, Vermont
Hi VT Birders,

Saw a lone Eastern Meadowlark singing on a power line on the Northern end
of Munger St in New Haven.

Remy
 

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Date: 5/26/19 8:54 am
From: Miriam Lawrence <mirslamlawrence...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tenn. warbler
Heard at least two singing in the trees off Susie Wilson Road (Ewing Place) in Essex at 11:30 this morning.

--Miriam Lawrence


> On May 26, 2019, at 9:30 AM, CLYDE YARNELL <carolclyde...> wrote:
>
> At least a half dozen Tennessee warblers in the wild apple tree blossoms in my back yard this morning.
>
> Carol Yarnell
> South Alburgh
 

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Date: 5/26/19 7:13 am
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tenn. warbler
Ted Murin and I counted, conservatively, 13 Tennessees yesterday while walking Long Point, Ferrisburgh and environs. Probably many more out there that we couldn’t confirm.
Scott

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 26, 2019, at 9:30 AM, CLYDE YARNELL <carolclyde...> wrote:
>
> At least a half dozen Tennessee warblers in the wild apple tree blossoms in my back yard this morning.
>
> Carol Yarnell
> South Alburgh
 

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Date: 5/26/19 6:30 am
From: CLYDE YARNELL <carolclyde...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Tenn. warbler
At least a half dozen Tennessee warblers in the wild apple tree blossoms in my back yard this morning.

Carol Yarnell
South Alburgh
 

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Date: 5/26/19 5:06 am
From: carolclyde <carolclyde...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Indigo bunting
First one I have seen on the Point of Tongue Road in South Alburgh. Carol Yarnell Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
 

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Date: 5/25/19 1:22 pm
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Least BitterN, Otter View Park, Middlebury
I heard the Least Bittern at Otter View Park in Middlebury a little before 4pm this afternoon. I was near the "council ring" of stones in the Northeast corner of the field when I heard the "chuckling" call from the other side of the trees in the marsh to the East.

A neighbor who lives near the park reported to me that she had heard it around 9am from the boardwalk too.

 

---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT






On Wed, 22 May 2019 18:31:23 -0400, Ron Payne wrote:

This afternoon while doing my Birdathon for Otter Creek Audubon, I was walking down the boardwalk at Otter View Park in Middlebury and a Least Bittern flushed from ten feet away then immediately resettled in the marsh. That's only the second time I've ever seen one.


---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
 
 

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Date: 5/25/19 4:39 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Tennessee warbler
Have spent days trying to i.d. persistent song of warbler I could not
get a view of foraging high in big old and heavily blooming
crabapples. Yesterday finally entered 'passerine' sp in ebird thinking
it a lost cause, because it was none of the songs normally sung in
this garden. This early morning I posted myself very still with binos
and sure enough the singer of a song my Golden guide (yes) correctly
describes as 'loud, unevenly spaced chips, more rapid at the end' made
himself available at a lower altitude (all-white underparts
diagnostic), singing constantly. Naturally I checked Audubon guide and
Cornell (which seems to have no definitive voice for Tennessee), but
the Audubon songs are all spot on. a good birding day to all.Veer
Frost, Passumpsic NEK
Sent using Hushmail
 

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Date: 5/25/19 4:23 am
From: Marylyn Pillsbury <000001cae55256d1-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Indigo Buntings
Several sightings in So Hero over the last few weeks. My first ever.

Marylyn Pillsbury
So Hero
 

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Date: 5/25/19 3:13 am
From: BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Indigo Buntings
Today marks the 10th straight day I have had Indigo Buntings at my feeders. Two males in breeding plumage and one male in non-breeding plumage. This is the longest period they have stayed around my yard. They are usually gone after two or three days.


Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester
 

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Date: 5/24/19 6:45 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] An almost Nightjar duet ... southern end of Snake Mountain, Cornwall
Just before 9:00pm in the field behind our house, while listening to a
Barred Owl wondering "Who cooks for you" I heard a Common Nighthawk
peenting as it flew low overhead.  As its notes faded away, a
Whip-poor-will began to sing from near the edge of the field. Then only
frogs parted the silence.

Ian
 

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Date: 5/24/19 5:45 pm
From: Mike Kira <mikekira...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Nighthawks
4 common nighthawks hunting over the Otter Creek in Vergennes about 10 minutes ago
Mike Winslow

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/24/19 12:36 pm
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Red Rocks Warblers
This morning at Red Rocks Park in South Burlington: large numbers of warblers foraging high in the canopy. Tennessee Warbler was the dominant species.
6 Tennessee Warblers (that I could directly confirm, probably a serious undercount)
4 Bay-breasted Warblers
2 Northern Parulas
1 Blackburnian Warbler
Also Blackpoll, American Redstart, Black-throated Blue, Black-and-White, Pine, Magnolia, Ovenbird, plus Winter Wren and Scarlet Tanager.
Scott Morrical,
South Burlington

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/24/19 12:01 pm
From: Liz Lackey <lackeytomliz...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Amazing Warbler Numbers
I had a first for my birding experiences in Vermont.

Mid-morning I was watching what I thought were a few warblers foraging high in a row of trees along the road at the edge of intact forest. It was difficult viewing conditions with the gusty cold north wind blowing the leaves and branches. Then I noticed warblers just pouring out of the upper reaches of these trees, flying south (afore the wind) across a small pasture and diving into or over the forest on the other side of this opening. I stood opened mouth and watched. And then remembered to start counting. 53 individuals and about a minute later it was all over. This was a low count as I didn’t include the first birds I saw.

I listened and looked for evidence of this flock later but couldn’t find them.

The only thing I could compare it to was standing on the dike at Higbee’s Beach in Cape May NJ, watching the reverse migration of warblers at dawn on a “big day” during fall migration.

Awaiting my next awe,

Liz Lackey
Stowe, VT
 

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Date: 5/24/19 10:34 am
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] warblers this year
I'll add that in Pennsylvania, our western PA region was pretty light on warblers, whereas central and eastern PA were pretty hot. Vermont looks to have benefited from that push. Great for all of you!

Cheers,

Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Sent: Friday, May 24, 2019 1:08 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] warblers this year

To add to other comments...the warbler waves have been remarkable this year
perhaps in part due to weather conditions that have kept them from moving
on quite as fast. I have never seen as many Cape Mays and Wilsons nor heard
them calling as much as this spring. Canadas, Magnolias, Blackburnians, and
redstarts have also been far more numerous. from Derby
 

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Date: 5/24/19 10:08 am
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] warblers this year
To add to other comments...the warbler waves have been remarkable this year
perhaps in part due to weather conditions that have kept them from moving
on quite as fast. I have never seen as many Cape Mays and Wilsons nor heard
them calling as much as this spring. Canadas, Magnolias, Blackburnians, and
redstarts have also been far more numerous. from Derby
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/19 9:36 am
From: Marie Couture <endlesssummer54...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Indigo bunting
Just observed an Indigo bunting eating seeds from the screen below my bird feeder. In Shelburne, off Spear street.

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>
 

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Date: 5/24/19 9:22 am
From: Ted Levin <tedlevin1966...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] front yard Thetford Center
singing olive-sided flycatcher

For the third year in a row a pair of evening grosbeaks at our feeders. The
past two years they've brought their chicks, begging and begging, to the
feeders.
 

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Date: 5/24/19 6:48 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] 11 Chimney swifts!
Around 6 this morning...never seen this many before, time to learn how
to put swift sightings onto the new reporting mechanism on ebird!
Their wild circling/chatter overhead really looked like chases as if
two families competing?Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
Sent using Hushmail
 

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Date: 5/24/19 6:15 am
From: Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] June 1st Master Naturalist Bird Walk
Thanks - I will try to be there.

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 8:04 AM Terry Marron <tgmarron...> wrote:

> When - Saturday June 1st - 8 am - 11 am
>
> Where - Mud Pond Conservation Area , Williston
>
> Join the Williston Master Naturalist Bird Walk series at Mud Pond off
> South Rd in Williston. This is a 141 acre area that includes a peat bog
> pond and surrounded by upland forest. It has an average depth of 10' depth
> and is characteristic of both bog and fen - acidic and neutral water
> chemistry.
>
> We will walk out to the viewing platform and then back out and around to
> the other side if time allows. Feel free to come and go as needed. Parking
> is limited so carpool if possible. There is a Park and Ride in Richmond off
> I-89 and in the village across from the Federated Church. RSVP
> <tgmarron...> mailto:<tgmarron...>
>
>
> Terry Marron
> Williston VT
>
> Stay Amazed!
>


--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
 

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Date: 5/24/19 5:15 am
From: Brennan Michaels <owlhousevt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
I agree with Maeve completely. Also Monsanto is now putting the poisonous
herbicide in the seed that is planted, so truly the plant is NOT safe to
eat. So much of this GMO stuff has nothing whatever to do with feeding
humans, I understand we have an oversupply of food not a scarcity. and the
truth they are finding out now is that the organic plants actually produce
higher quality and quantity than the GMOs. The only reason GMOs exist is so
that the monopoly giant, Monsanto can make loads of money!!!!!
brennan michaels

On Fri, May 24, 2019 at 6:59 AM Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:

> My objection to GMOS, and why I avoid them, isn’t because of fear of
> eating them. I agree: they’re safe to eat. But they’re not safe to grow!
> The most commonly used GMOs were developed to be resistant to herbicides so
> those chemicals can be used heavily to prepare the soil (to kill off every
> other plant but not the one being raised). Heavy use of herbicides is BAD:
> bad for the land because it allows year-after-year monocultures to be
> grown; bad for pollinators upon which our entire food supply relies; and
> bad for the farmers using the stuff. (We’ve all read about the large
> penalty recently levied against Monsanto for damage to a farmer who used
> their products and died.)
> Maeve Kim
> Jericho Center
>
> > On May 24, 2019, at 6:48 AM, hilke breder <htbreder...> wrote:
> >
> > We have had GMOs since the dawn of agriculture, it's called selective
> > breeding. Inserting genes in corn, for example, does not breed
> Frankenstein
> > corn. It's a safe technique that's helping feed the growing number of
> > humans on our planet, you and me and our kids included. There's a nice
> > informative video on this subject by Neil deGrasse Tyson:
> > https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMDhUsxom0U
> > Hilke Breder
> > Brattleboro, VT
> >
> > On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 4:49 PM Poleysgmavt <poleys...> wrote:
> >
> >> Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten
> that
> >> some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for
> the
> >> orioles (and squirrels).
> >> I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies
> >> contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose
> corn
> >> syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar
> label to
> >> make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many
> people
> >> buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always
> bought
> >> and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
> >> Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.
> >>
> >> Denis Poley
> >> Richmond, VT
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPhone
> >>
> >>> On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and
> >> jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole
> things!
> >> As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After
> two
> >> days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her
> underneath)
> >> deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an
> >> orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to
> the
> >> ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
> >>> I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the
> >> lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard.
> She
> >> dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the
> edge
> >> of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn.
> She
> >> zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She
> tore
> >> up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY
> >> dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
> >>> Score one for humans!
> >>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >>>
> >>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/19 4:48 am
From: R Stewart <2cnewbirds...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh - May 23
Super write-up, pictures and day!! Thanks for the report, Sue. ruth
stewart

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 7:29 PM Susan Elliott <
<00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> A banner day at West Rutland Marsh, but not because of the 'marsh' birds.
> Seventy-eight species including 20 warbler species plus a Philadelphia
> Vireo and Yellow-bellied Flycatcher:
>
>
> http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/journal/2019/5/23/west-rutland-marsh-may-2019.html
>
> Sue Ellliott
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/19 3:59 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
My objection to GMOS, and why I avoid them, isn’t because of fear of eating them. I agree: they’re safe to eat. But they’re not safe to grow! The most commonly used GMOs were developed to be resistant to herbicides so those chemicals can be used heavily to prepare the soil (to kill off every other plant but not the one being raised). Heavy use of herbicides is BAD: bad for the land because it allows year-after-year monocultures to be grown; bad for pollinators upon which our entire food supply relies; and bad for the farmers using the stuff. (We’ve all read about the large penalty recently levied against Monsanto for damage to a farmer who used their products and died.)
Maeve Kim
Jericho Center

> On May 24, 2019, at 6:48 AM, hilke breder <htbreder...> wrote:
>
> We have had GMOs since the dawn of agriculture, it's called selective
> breeding. Inserting genes in corn, for example, does not breed Frankenstein
> corn. It's a safe technique that's helping feed the growing number of
> humans on our planet, you and me and our kids included. There's a nice
> informative video on this subject by Neil deGrasse Tyson:
> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMDhUsxom0U
> Hilke Breder
> Brattleboro, VT
>
> On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 4:49 PM Poleysgmavt <poleys...> wrote:
>
>> Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten that
>> some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for the
>> orioles (and squirrels).
>> I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies
>> contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose corn
>> syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar label to
>> make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many people
>> buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always bought
>> and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
>> Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.
>>
>> Denis Poley
>> Richmond, VT
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>>>
>>> We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and
>> jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things!
>> As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two
>> days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath)
>> deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an
>> orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the
>> ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
>>> I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the
>> lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She
>> dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge
>> of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She
>> zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore
>> up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY
>> dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
>>> Score one for humans!
>>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>>>
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/24/19 3:48 am
From: hilke breder <htbreder...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
We have had GMOs since the dawn of agriculture, it's called selective
breeding. Inserting genes in corn, for example, does not breed Frankenstein
corn. It's a safe technique that's helping feed the growing number of
humans on our planet, you and me and our kids included. There's a nice
informative video on this subject by Neil deGrasse Tyson:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMDhUsxom0U
Hilke Breder
Brattleboro, VT

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 4:49 PM Poleysgmavt <poleys...> wrote:

> Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten that
> some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for the
> orioles (and squirrels).
> I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies
> contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose corn
> syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar label to
> make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many people
> buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always bought
> and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
> Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.
>
> Denis Poley
> Richmond, VT
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
> >
> > We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and
> jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things!
> As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two
> days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath)
> deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an
> orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the
> ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
> > I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the
> lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She
> dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge
> of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She
> zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore
> up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY
> dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
> > Score one for humans!
> > Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 4:29 pm
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh - May 23
A banner day at West Rutland Marsh, but not because of the 'marsh' birds. Seventy-eight species including 20 warbler species plus a Philadelphia Vireo and Yellow-bellied Flycatcher: 

http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/journal/2019/5/23/west-rutland-marsh-may-2019.html

Sue Ellliott
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 4:10 pm
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
Oh, dear. I feel awful about making Helena cry! I generally like all critters (and I enjoy watching squirrels), but I think I’ve been hardened by years of watching squirrels and chipmunks make off not only with birdseed but with blueberries, raspberries, and every single currant from last year’s bumper crop. (That was chipmunks, who were uncanny about judging exactly one day before the currants would be perfectly ripe. Then they’d strip the bush completely.)
I will try to look at these furry visitors more kindly in the future!
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center

> On May 23, 2019, at 6:59 PM, H Nicolay <sqrlma...> wrote:
>
> Hi Maeve. I always enjoy your posts but throwing a stick at a nursing
> squirrel made me cry. I have rehabilitated many hundreds of squirrels and
> find them fascinating critters and doting parents. Here in Monkton we
> deliberately feed the squirrels (good stuff such as cuttlebone, peanut
> butter walnut cookies, nuts in the shell, and veggies and fruits. ) We also
> feed the Orioles and many other species of birds but our squirrels come
> first. Its currently a tough time for squirrels due to the poor tree mast
> last Fall. Regards. Helena. North Stream Wildlife Rescue. Monkton. VT.
>
> On Thu, May 23, 2019, 5:06 PM Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>
>> We found a mixed fruit jelly made specifically for birds, with very few
>> ingredients. (I think we got it at Guy’s Farm and Yard.)
>> Maeve
>>
>>> On May 23, 2019, at 4:49 PM, Poleysgmavt <poleys...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten
>> that some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for
>> the orioles (and squirrels).
>>> I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies
>> contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose corn
>> syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar label to
>> make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many people
>> buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always bought
>> and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
>>> Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.
>>>
>>> Denis Poley
>>> Richmond, VT
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>>> On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and
>> jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things!
>> As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two
>> days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath)
>> deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an
>> orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the
>> ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
>>>> I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the
>> lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She
>> dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge
>> of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She
>> zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore
>> up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY
>> dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
>>>> Score one for humans!
>>>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>>>>
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 3:59 pm
From: H Nicolay <sqrlma...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
Hi Maeve. I always enjoy your posts but throwing a stick at a nursing
squirrel made me cry. I have rehabilitated many hundreds of squirrels and
find them fascinating critters and doting parents. Here in Monkton we
deliberately feed the squirrels (good stuff such as cuttlebone, peanut
butter walnut cookies, nuts in the shell, and veggies and fruits. ) We also
feed the Orioles and many other species of birds but our squirrels come
first. Its currently a tough time for squirrels due to the poor tree mast
last Fall. Regards. Helena. North Stream Wildlife Rescue. Monkton. VT.

On Thu, May 23, 2019, 5:06 PM Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:

> We found a mixed fruit jelly made specifically for birds, with very few
> ingredients. (I think we got it at Guy’s Farm and Yard.)
> Maeve
>
> > On May 23, 2019, at 4:49 PM, Poleysgmavt <poleys...> wrote:
> >
> > Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten
> that some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for
> the orioles (and squirrels).
> > I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies
> contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose corn
> syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar label to
> make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many people
> buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always bought
> and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
> > Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.
> >
> > Denis Poley
> > Richmond, VT
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
> >>
> >> We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and
> jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things!
> As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two
> days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath)
> deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an
> orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the
> ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
> >> I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the
> lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She
> dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge
> of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She
> zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore
> up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY
> dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
> >> Score one for humans!
> >> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
> >>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 3:27 pm
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] accidental hummingbird perch
Beautiful. I hang dried ropes of pulled up woodbine vine root (it
takes over otherwise), on which feeder birds land, swing, rest, and
watch for chances.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK

On 5/23/2019 at 5:47 PM, "Walter Medwid" wrote:I found a beautiful
piece of slender driftwood along the lake and brought
it home to figure out how best to place it. I leaned it against the
deck
railing a dozen feet away from a hummingbird feeder.

Turns out the hummingbirds have found it to be the perfect perch to
rest
after feeding instead of flying to the edge of the woods. The slender
branches have been a good fit for hummingbird feet.
The perch allows us to view the birds close up. Other bird species
have
taken to using it as well. A simple addition that has made a big
change in
hummingbird behavior.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 2:47 pm
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] accidental hummingbird perch
I found a beautiful piece of slender driftwood along the lake and brought
it home to figure out how best to place it. I leaned it against the deck
railing a dozen feet away from a hummingbird feeder.

Turns out the hummingbirds have found it to be the perfect perch to rest
after feeding instead of flying to the edge of the woods. The slender
branches have been a good fit for hummingbird feet.
The perch allows us to view the birds close up. Other bird species have
taken to using it as well. A simple addition that has made a big change in
hummingbird behavior.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 2:21 pm
From: Poleysgmavt <poleys...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
👍🏻

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 23, 2019, at 5:06 PM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>
> We found a mixed fruit jelly made specifically for birds, with very few ingredients. (I think we got it at Guy’s Farm and Yard.)
> Maeve
>
>> On May 23, 2019, at 4:49 PM, Poleysgmavt <poleys...> wrote:
>>
>> Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten that some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for the orioles (and squirrels).
>> I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose corn syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar label to make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many people buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always bought and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
>> Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.
>>
>> Denis Poley
>> Richmond, VT
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>>>
>>> We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things! As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath) deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
>>> I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
>>> Score one for humans!
>>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>>>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 2:06 pm
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
We found a mixed fruit jelly made specifically for birds, with very few ingredients. (I think we got it at Guy’s Farm and Yard.)
Maeve

> On May 23, 2019, at 4:49 PM, Poleysgmavt <poleys...> wrote:
>
> Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten that some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for the orioles (and squirrels).
> I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose corn syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar label to make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many people buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always bought and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
> Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.
>
> Denis Poley
> Richmond, VT
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>>
>> We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things! As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath) deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
>> I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
>> Score one for humans!
>> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 1:49 pm
From: Poleysgmavt <poleys...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
Until I read Maeve’s posting about oranges and jelly I had forgotten that some people put out jelly (most commonly grape) along with oranges for the orioles (and squirrels).
I would like to remind (or inform) everyone that most commercial jellies contain genetically modified ingredients in the form of high-fructose corn syrup. You may want to read the ingredients list on your jelly jar label to make sure it doesn’t contain a sugar substitute. Unfortunately many people buy the same brand of jelly that they (and their mother) have always bought and don’t realize that the sugar has been replaced with a GMO product.
Our orioles deserve the best we can give them.

Denis Poley
Richmond, VT

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 23, 2019, at 9:23 AM, Maeve Kim <maevulus...> wrote:
>
> We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things! As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath) deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
> I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
> Score one for humans!
> Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 1:20 pm
From: Katharine Thompson <kthom22...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Wilson's
Yes!! The most exciting...even in the Upper Valley!
Any Cerulean at Rt 4 rest area??
Happy birding!
Kathy

On Thu, May 23, 2019, 4:09 PM Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:

> Just now in out yard a Wilson's warbler singing away.
> This has been the most exciting spring birding that I can remember.
> Sue Wetmore
> Brandon
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 1:09 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Wilson's
Just now in out yard a Wilson's warbler singing away.
This has been the most exciting spring birding that I can remember.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 9:13 am
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Colchester Pond Warblers
I just spent the last 90 minutes birding Colchester Pond, west side, and below the bridge. The birding was not epic, but it was still excellent. Here are the highlights:

1 Philadelphia Vireo
1 Louisiana Waterthrush, singing, along stream below one-lane bridge.
4 Cape May Warblers
1 Wilson’s Warbler
1 Tennessee Warbler
1 Northern Waterthrush
1 Black-and-White Warbler
3 Blackpoll Warblers
4-5 Magnolia Warblers
1 Chestnut-sided Warbler
3-4 American Redstarts
5-6 Common Yellowthroats
8-10 Yellow Warblers

Complete checklist will be posted on eBird later today.

Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 9:10 am
From: Bridget Butler <birddiva...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Birders - You Are Needed!
Greetings All!

Nathaniel Sharp from VCE and I began pairing landowners with birders this
week for the new Birder Broker project. We're in need of a few more birders
and we've got landowners ready to welcome you to their land in the
following places:

Grand Isle
The Cold Hollow Mountains - think Montgomery, Richford, Enosburgh
The NEK - think the Burke Lydon area

If you are interested, experienced using eBird, and would like an
opportunity to bird private property while paying it forward for bird
conservation please, PLEASE visit the Birder Broker site to sign-up to be
paired-up with a landowner who wants a birder to come to visit their
property this June and July.

For details and to register visit: bit.ly/BirderBroker_SignUp

Thank you!
Bridget

*Bridget Butler*

*Bird Diva Consulting*
*PO Box 613*
*St. Albans VT 05478*
*(802) 393-4147*
*Website: www.birddiva.com <http://www.birddiva.com>*
*Facebook: www.facebook.com/birddiva <http://www.facebook.com/birddiva>*
*Twitter: @BirdDiva <https://twitter.com/birddiva>*
*Birder Broker: http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT <http://bit.ly/BirderBrokerVT>*
*Crows In Vermont: http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT <http://bit.ly/CrowsInVT>*


<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
www.avast.com
<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

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Date: 5/23/19 8:16 am
From: Kate Olgiati <2grackle...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
Chimney Swifts In Downtown Rutland.

There are chimney swifts living in the chimney of the abandoned Rutland
Herald Building in downtown Rutland. That building is scheduled for
demolition to make way for a new hotel. Will a new chimney structure for
the birds be part of this building project?

Kate & Dory

On Thu, May 23, 2019 at 9:18 AM Fowle, Margaret <mfowle...> wrote:

> Hi VT Birders -
>
> Audubon Vermont is working with Vermont Fish and Wildlife to conduct a
> swift "blitz" this spring and summer. See info below. We've created a
> special Chimney Swift project on eBird, so if you submit any sightings,
> please share with the project named "CHSW_Survey." More information and
> instructions can be found on our website at
> http://vt.audubon.org/conservation/chimney-swift-recovery
>
> In an attempt to evaluate the population size and critical habitat for
> Chimney Swifts in Vermont, Audubon VT is gathering as many observations of
> Chimney Swifts as possible, with special attention paid to the following
> urban areas in Vermont:
>
> - Barre
>
> - Bennington
>
> - Burlington
>
> - Brattleboro
>
> - Essex
>
> - Manchester
>
> - Middlebury
>
> - Montpelier
>
> - Newport
>
> - Rutland
>
> - St. Johnsbury
>
> - Swanton
>
> - Springfield
>
> - White River Junction
>
> - Woodstock
> We ask people to focus efforts to look for Chimney Swifts during two
> different time periods:
>
> 1) Mid/late May - mid-June
>
> 2) Mid/late July - mid- August
> The best time of day to observe Chimney Swifts is in the late
> evening/dusk. Take an evening stroll in your neighborhood or favorite
> swift sighting area with your binoculars and count the number and location
> where you see and hear the birds.
> For more information on how to identify Chimney Swifts by sight and sound,
> see https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/chimney-swift and
> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Chimney_Swift
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird. If you have already seen
> Chimney Swifts this year and have submitted your sightings on eBird, please
> go back to share those sightings with the Chimney Swift survey project
> (CHSW_Survey).
>
> Thank you! Enjoy your evenings out and about looking for these wonderful
> birds.
>
> -
> Margaret Fowle
> Conservation Biologist
> w: 802.434.4806 (home office)
> c: 802.238.0046
> Pronouns: she, her, hers
>
> Audubon Vermont
> 255 Sherman Hollow Rd
> Huntington, VT 05462
> www.vt.audubon.org<http://www.vt.audubon.org/>
>


--
Katherine Olgiati
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 8:02 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] White-crowned sparrows still here
Yes, very nice company! I tell myself not to hope they stay but do :
).VeerPassumpsic

On 5/23/2019 at 8:56 AM, "Barbara Brosnan" wrote:We have had White
Crowned Sparrows since April 5 and they, too, are still here.
Singing. Quite pleasant company.

Barbara Brosnan
Weybridge

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Veer
Frost
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 2:12 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] White-crowned sparrows still here

A bit surprised to see them most days unless still migrating. FOY
Least flycatcher.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
__
Sent using Hushmail
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 6:23 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] The Squirrel, The Jelly and The Birder
We’ve been getting great enjoyment from feeding orioles oranges and jelly - and then the orange halves started disappearing. The whole things! As if a monstrous bird had swooped down and snatched them away. After two days, we saw a squirrel (a female with young, judging from her underneath) deftly getting around the squirrel guard and running off with half an orange. A while later, we looked out the window and saw her jumping to the ground holding in her mouth the little metal cup holding jelly!
I charged out of the house, yelling. The squirrel streaked across the lawn. I followed. She dashed up a small tree. I shook the tree, hard. She dropped to the ground at my feet, her teeth still clenched around the edge of the jelly cup. She raced behind the barn. I raced behind the barn. She zipped around a woodpile. I zipped (well, as well as a human can). She tore up another tree. I picked up a stick and threw it at her. She FINALLY dropped the metal cup, right side up, still full of jelly.
Score one for humans!
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/19 6:18 am
From: Fowle, Margaret <mfowle...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Please submit your Chimney Swift Sightings!
Hi VT Birders -

Audubon Vermont is working with Vermont Fish and Wildlife to conduct a swift "blitz" this spring and summer. See info below. We've created a special Chimney Swift project on eBird, so if you submit any sightings, please share with the project named "CHSW_Survey." More information and instructions can be found on our website at http://vt.audubon.org/conservation/chimney-swift-recovery

In an attempt to evaluate the population size and critical habitat for Chimney Swifts in Vermont, Audubon VT is gathering as many observations of Chimney Swifts as possible, with special attention paid to the following urban areas in Vermont:

- Barre

- Bennington

- Burlington

- Brattleboro

- Essex

- Manchester

- Middlebury

- Montpelier

- Newport

- Rutland

- St. Johnsbury

- Swanton

- Springfield

- White River Junction

- Woodstock
We ask people to focus efforts to look for Chimney Swifts during two different time periods:

1) Mid/late May - mid-June

2) Mid/late July - mid- August
The best time of day to observe Chimney Swifts is in the late evening/dusk. Take an evening stroll in your neighborhood or favorite swift sighting area with your binoculars and count the number and location where you see and hear the birds.
For more information on how to identify Chimney Swifts by sight and sound, see https://www.audubon.org/field-guide/bird/chimney-swift and https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Chimney_Swift

Please submit your observations to eBird. If you have already seen Chimney Swifts this year and have submitted your sightings on eBird, please go back to share those sightings with the Chimney Swift survey project (CHSW_Survey).

Thank you! Enjoy your evenings out and about looking for these wonderful birds.

-
Margaret Fowle
Conservation Biologist
w: 802.434.4806 (home office)
c: 802.238.0046
Pronouns: she, her, hers

Audubon Vermont
255 Sherman Hollow Rd
Huntington, VT 05462
www.vt.audubon.org<http://www.vt.audubon.org/>
 

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Date: 5/23/19 5:56 am
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] White-crowned sparrows still here
We have had White Crowned Sparrows since April 5 and they, too, are still here. Singing. Quite pleasant company.

Barbara Brosnan
Weybridge

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Veer Frost
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 2:12 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] White-crowned sparrows still here

A bit surprised to see them most days unless still migrating. FOY
Least flycatcher.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
__
Sent using Hushmail
 

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Date: 5/23/19 5:04 am
From: Terry Marron <tgmarron...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] June 1st Master Naturalist Bird Walk
When - Saturday June 1st - 8 am - 11 am

Where - Mud Pond Conservation Area , Williston

Join the Williston Master Naturalist Bird Walk series at Mud Pond off South Rd in Williston. This is a 141 acre area that includes a peat bog pond and surrounded by upland forest. It has an average depth of 10' depth and is characteristic of both bog and fen - acidic and neutral water chemistry.

We will walk out to the viewing platform and then back out and around to the other side if time allows. Feel free to come and go as needed. Parking is limited so carpool if possible. There is a Park and Ride in Richmond off I-89 and in the village across from the Federated Church. RSVP <tgmarron...> mailto:<tgmarron...>


Terry Marron
Williston VT

Stay Amazed!
 

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Date: 5/22/19 8:43 pm
From: Rich Kelley <rich...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bird Walks Galore! 7am tomorrow, 4pm tomorrow -Thursday 5/23
If the weather holds, I'm thinking of running down for the afternoon walk, if anyone wants to ride down. Leaving from Williston just after 3pm.

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of Jeanne Elias
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 7:33 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bird Walks Galore! 7am tomorrow, 4pm tomorrow -Thursday 5/23

Join the Mad Birders at 7am at the Geiger Property 2 miles up Center Fayston Road for a morning walk in Fayston, VT

Second walk of the day is @ 4pm on the Boardwalk section of the Mad River Path on Carroll Road near the Big Picture Theatre. Waitsfield, VT

At 5pm we’ll convene at the adjacent Lawson’s Liquids Taproom and quaff our thirst with fantastic local beer while we swap bird stories in a conversation featuring the Bird Diva- Bridget Butler!

For questions email <info...>

Happy Birding
Jeannie Elias
Fayston
 

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Date: 5/22/19 7:14 pm
From: Steven Lamonde <slamonde...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] 104 species in Swanton & Highgate today
While out searching for Golden- and Blue-winged Warblers for Audubon
Vermont, plus a few side stops, I tallied 104 species between Swanton and
Highgate. 101 of these came before noon!

Highlights included Black Tern, Grasshopper and Vesper Sparrow,
Golden-winged Warbler (including an often elusive female), American
Woodcock, nesting Warbling Vireo and Rose-breasted Grosbeak,
Yellow-throated Vireo, Eastern Whip-poor-will, and White-winged Scoter.

Yesterday, American Redstart seemed to be the most abundant warbler, and
today Tennessee Warblers seemed to be everywhere!

Good birding,
Steven Lamonde
--
Steven Lamonde
Conservation Biology (MS) candidate
Adjunct Faculty - Department of Environmental Studies
Manager - Antioch Spatial Analysis Lab
Antioch University New England
Keene, New Hampshire
<slamonde...>
(339) 236-1421
 

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Date: 5/22/19 4:21 pm
From: Peterson, Bruce B. <peterson...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Egrets, Middlebury
Just now, well 7:10 pm, four herons flew up from the marsh behind my house. Two were clearly snowy egrets. The other two appeared to be overall blue-grey, but they were gone in the woods before I could make a positive identification. Had this been Brigantine or Cape May, they would have been definite Little Blues.. So I’m left with an intriguing possible. Anyone driving Creek Road should keep an eye out.

Bruce Peterson
 

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Date: 5/22/19 4:12 pm
From: Craig Provost <cprovost88...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh Walk - May 23
Hello Sue,
Do you ever do walks on the weekends? At some point I would like to spend
some time birding with folks down there but during the work week I can't
bird that far from home (I do get birding in on my way to and from work
though).

Also, do you park at the end of Book Road and then walk west on Cogman? It
is gated and back in the winter months I noticed a sign on the north end of
Ghost Hollow that says it is not a through road. I did meet the gentleman
that owns the former dairy farm, and now mostly cutting/milling wood. Nice
guy (at least based on my few minute conversation with him). I was standing
along the road above the farm listening to a Tennessee Warbler when he
pulled up to say hello.

Be nice if collectively Rutland County could overtake the rest and take the
County Cup this year. Thank you.

On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 5:58 PM Susan Elliott <
<00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Tomorrow, May 23, Rutland County Audubon will hold its monthly walk around
> West Rutland Marsh. Sora, Viginia, Least Bittern and American Bittern have
> all been reported there this year.
> Meet at the boardwalk on Marble Street at 7 a.m. Go the whole 3.7 mile
> route or go halfway.
> Free and open to all!
> Sue Elliotthttp://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 3:58 pm
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Least Bitter, Otter View Park, Middlebury
I don't think you should be bitter in the least.
Bruce MacPhersonSouth Burlington


-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72...>
To: VTBIRD <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Wed, May 22, 2019 6:31 pm
Subject: [VTBIRD] Least Bitter, Otter View Park, Middlebury

This afternoon while doing my Birdathon for Otter Creek Audubon, I was walking down the boardwalk at Otter View Park in Middlebury and a Least Bittern flushed from ten feet away then immediately resettled in the marsh. That's only the second time I've ever seen one.


---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
 

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Date: 5/22/19 3:56 pm
From: Patrick Phillips <phillipspatj...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Colchester Pond - very birdy!
Wow! What a day! Nice work.
Pat

On Wed, May 22, 2019 at 1:06 PM Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld...> wrote:

> Hi VTBirders,
>
> This morning was epic at Colchester Pond. The west and south sides of the
> pond were most productive but birds were practically everywhere with the
> warblers being particularly abundant. I birded with John Peckham and Jacob
> Crawford and between us we tallied 85 species including 23 species of
> warblers. Some highlights included more than 30 (!) Cape May and 20
> Bay-breasted Warblers, Semipalmated Plovers and Least Sandpipers (found by
> John), and many others. A Prairie Warbler seen there yesterday was not
> relocated. Hopefully some of these birds stick around for others to
> observe. My eBird checklist (to be amended with photos at some point) is
> below:
>
> https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56618505
>
> Good Birding,
> Larry Clarfeld
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 3:31 pm
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Least Bitter, Otter View Park, Middlebury
This afternoon while doing my Birdathon for Otter Creek Audubon, I was walking down the boardwalk at Otter View Park in Middlebury and a Least Bittern flushed from ten feet away then immediately resettled in the marsh. That's only the second time I've ever seen one.


---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 2:59 pm
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] West Rutland Marsh Walk - May 23
Tomorrow, May 23, Rutland County Audubon will hold its monthly walk around West Rutland Marsh. Sora, Viginia, Least Bittern and American Bittern have all been reported there this year.
Meet at the boardwalk on Marble Street at 7 a.m. Go the whole 3.7 mile route or go halfway. 
Free and open to all!
Sue Elliotthttp://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/
 

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Date: 5/22/19 11:24 am
From: Thomas Berriman <blackpoll...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Prairie Warbler, Bay breasted, cape may: victory WMA
At 46 degrees and 8-10 mph winds this morning in Victory WMA I almost called
it quits. Fortunately walking along the road slightly north of the
'Blowdown' I ran into several warbler species with Bay breasted being the
primary warbler. While trying to catch some snap shots of them a Cape May
arrived along with a handful of Magnolias, Nashville and Yellow-rumped. A
Canada Jay called and so did a Black-backed Woodpecker but I had no time to
bother with them. The Bay breasted foraged for a good 40 minutes singing and
interacting with one another before moving on.

Then things got really exciting. Bob, Pete and Karen from Rutland arrived
and were headed into the blowdown to bird. We spent a few minutes on the
road looking for a Canada Warbler when I heard the weirdest sounding
Northern Parula sing. Zeroing in on the song I realized it was a Prairie
Warbler 25 feet away. I think a first for eBird Essex County. The warbler
was very accommodating and gave us great views while singing every half
minute or so. On my eBird report I listed 7 Bay breasted but I was so busy
taking photos I'm sure there were several more. Nikon's new Z-7 allows you
to crop 90% of a Jpeg so documentation of warblers is no problem.



https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56619396





The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing.



Tom Berriman

802-626-9071



<https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/>
https://www.flickr.com/photos/blackpoll1/




 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 11:12 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] White-crowned sparrows still here
A bit surprised to see them most days unless still migrating. FOY
Least flycatcher.Veer Frost, Passumpsic NEK
__
Sent using Hushmail
 

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Date: 5/22/19 10:58 am
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Counting birds in images
Thanks, Kent! I’ve been saving big flock photos for years hoping something like this would come along. It’ll be fun to put these in and see how my counts differ.

Zac

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 22, 2019, at 12:02 PM, Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> wrote:
>
> Perhaps some of you are like me and get better counts of huge flocks later
> by looking at an image of the flock. It sure makes it easier, but it can be
> tedious in software like photoshop or the like, or even in ImageJ. I found
> this software from AMNH called DotDotGoose and thought I'd share it for
> those that might find it useful for making better counts of giant bird
> flocks.
> https://biodiversityinformatics.amnh.org/open_source/dotdotgoose/
>
> Best,
> Kent
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
> Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>
>
> <http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 10:57 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bird walk
Thus Saturday at Mt Independence at 8:00 a.m. I will be leading a bird walk.
Park fee $5.00 .
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 10:35 am
From: Gmail okra <ihateokra88...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Dorothy Gale's wisdom
Great writing, great checklist! 😊

Michael R. Haas, VMD, MS
(610) 533-9443
1286 Hazen Notch Rd.
Lowell, VT 05847

"The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now."

-- Chinese Proverb


> On May 22, 2019, at 12:14 PM, alison wagner <alikatofvt...> wrote:
>
> P.S. It dawned on me I could have shared a few check lists...
>
> Hineburg Village Cemetery:
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56573175
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55997553
>
> Camels Hump Alpalca Farm/fallow fields:
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56615068
>
> Ali
>
>
> From: "alikatofvt" <alikatofvt...>
> To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 11:22:45 AM
> Subject: Dorothy Gale's wisdom
>
> Hello Warbling Birders,
>
> Last summer I participated in Bridget Butler's premier SLOW BIRDING workshop in southern Vermont. Since then, I have enjoyed birding more at home or locally (while on my way to work, for example) versus regularly traveling long distances. This spring, on my way to work, I have stopped in at the Hinesburg Village Cemetery for early morning birding on several occasions. It has been heavenly during this spring's migration. Starting at the top of the hill, as the rising sun slowly warms the trees and wakens prey for birds, you can follow the warm wave of warblers west. Situated on a west facing slope, it is a birder's paradise, with ideal ergonomic conditions: stand uphill and look eye level, into the crowns of trees to your west. Yesterday morning I set out with this goal, of working my way down the hills of the cemetery, but ended up spending nearly the entire time at the top. Regardless of wind and rain, the birds were active and plentiful! Woods, brooks, wetland, shrubs and open areas, this spot is hot!
>
> This morning I decided to try the Camels Hump Alpalca Farm fallow fields, across the street from my driveway (Highland Drive) in Huntington Center. I used to visit this spot regularly, but it changed significantly a few years back when goats grazed there....then came the motocross course the landowner's son created. Now the goats are gone, as well as the teenage racing craze. The goats opened up some great habitat and the birds have returned! If you "happen" to be in my neighborhood, you should check this spot out: cultivated fields, fallow fields, vernal pools, (submerged VAST trail), Cobb Brook, Huntington River, forests nearby...
>
> To sum it up, I share Dorothy Gale's quote from The Wizard of OZ: "If I ever go looking for my heart's desire again, I won't look any further than my own back yard."
>
> Ali
> Huntington
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 10:06 am
From: Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Colchester Pond - very birdy!
Hi VTBirders,

This morning was epic at Colchester Pond. The west and south sides of the
pond were most productive but birds were practically everywhere with the
warblers being particularly abundant. I birded with John Peckham and Jacob
Crawford and between us we tallied 85 species including 23 species of
warblers. Some highlights included more than 30 (!) Cape May and 20
Bay-breasted Warblers, Semipalmated Plovers and Least Sandpipers (found by
John), and many others. A Prairie Warbler seen there yesterday was not
relocated. Hopefully some of these birds stick around for others to
observe. My eBird checklist (to be amended with photos at some point) is
below:

https://ebird.org/vt/view/checklist/S56618505

Good Birding,
Larry Clarfeld
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 9:15 am
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Dorothy Gale's wisdom
P.S. It dawned on me I could have shared a few check lists...

Hineburg Village Cemetery:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56573175

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55997553

Camels Hump Alpalca Farm/fallow fields:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56615068

Ali


From: "alikatofvt" <alikatofvt...>
To: "Vermont Birds" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 11:22:45 AM
Subject: Dorothy Gale's wisdom

Hello Warbling Birders,

Last summer I participated in Bridget Butler's premier SLOW BIRDING workshop in southern Vermont. Since then, I have enjoyed birding more at home or locally (while on my way to work, for example) versus regularly traveling long distances. This spring, on my way to work, I have stopped in at the Hinesburg Village Cemetery for early morning birding on several occasions. It has been heavenly during this spring's migration. Starting at the top of the hill, as the rising sun slowly warms the trees and wakens prey for birds, you can follow the warm wave of warblers west. Situated on a west facing slope, it is a birder's paradise, with ideal ergonomic conditions: stand uphill and look eye level, into the crowns of trees to your west. Yesterday morning I set out with this goal, of working my way down the hills of the cemetery, but ended up spending nearly the entire time at the top. Regardless of wind and rain, the birds were active and plentiful! Woods, brooks, wetland, shrubs and open areas, this spot is hot!

This morning I decided to try the Camels Hump Alpalca Farm fallow fields, across the street from my driveway (Highland Drive) in Huntington Center. I used to visit this spot regularly, but it changed significantly a few years back when goats grazed there....then came the motocross course the landowner's son created. Now the goats are gone, as well as the teenage racing craze. The goats opened up some great habitat and the birds have returned! If you "happen" to be in my neighborhood, you should check this spot out: cultivated fields, fallow fields, vernal pools, (submerged VAST trail), Cobb Brook, Huntington River, forests nearby...

To sum it up, I share Dorothy Gale's quote from The Wizard of OZ: "If I ever go looking for my heart's desire again, I won't look any further than my own back yard."

Ali
Huntington
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 9:03 am
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Counting birds in images
Perhaps some of you are like me and get better counts of huge flocks later
by looking at an image of the flock. It sure makes it easier, but it can be
tedious in software like photoshop or the like, or even in ImageJ. I found
this software from AMNH called DotDotGoose and thought I'd share it for
those that might find it useful for making better counts of giant bird
flocks.
https://biodiversityinformatics.amnh.org/open_source/dotdotgoose/

Best,
Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201
Twitter: @kpmcfarland <https://twitter.com/KPMcFarland>

<http://val.vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 9:01 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] warblers everywhere in Jericho Center!
This morning made it official: This is THE best warbler spring in my life. This morning while planting the veggie garden (with binoculars close at hand!), I enjoyed at least nine species. The old apple tree and flowering plums held Northern Parula, Magnolia, Bay-breasted (the first I’ve seen in a few years), American Redstart, Cape May, Chestnut-sided and Black-throated Green. (And a possible Worm-eating. I’m hoping to get a better look.) Nearby were Ovenbirds and Common Yellowthroats - along with Warbling Vireo, House Wren, Baltimore Orioles, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, cardinals, chickadees, Red-winged Blackbirds, grackles, titmice, a passing Red-tailed Hawk, Blue Jays, catbirds, robins and our resident Easter Phoebe.
Any ideas about why this spring has been so amazing? We went to a talk Saturday at Missisquoi by a man who works for Fish and Wildlife and will join The Nature Conservancy next week, and he said this spring - not the last few - is historically normal. We’re all moaning about the long cold spring, but maybe it’s just what so many native plants and returning migrants need. Yes??
Maeve Kim, Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 8:22 am
From: alison wagner <alikatofvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Dorothy Gale's wisdom
Hello Warbling Birders,

Last summer I participated in Bridget Butler's premier SLOW BIRDING workshop in southern Vermont. Since then, I have enjoyed birding more at home or locally (while on my way to work, for example) versus regularly traveling long distances. This spring, on my way to work, I have stopped in at the Hinesburg Village Cemetery for early morning birding on several occasions. It has been heavenly during this spring's migration. Starting at the top of the hill, as the rising sun slowly warms the trees and wakens prey for birds, you can follow the warm wave of warblers west. Situated on a west facing slope, it is a birder's paradise, with ideal ergonomic conditions: stand uphill and look eye level, into the crowns of trees to your west. Yesterday morning I set out with this goal, of working my way down the hills of the cemetery, but ended up spending nearly the entire time at the top. Regardless of wind and rain, the birds were active and plentiful! Woods, brooks, wetland, shrubs and open areas, this spot is hot!

This morning I decided to try the Camels Hump Alpalca Farm fallow fields, across the street from my driveway (Highland Drive) in Huntington Center. I used to visit this spot regularly, but it changed significantly a few years back when goats grazed there....then came the motocross course the landowner's son created. Now the goats are gone, as well as the teenage racing craze. The goats opened up some great habitat and the birds have returned! If you "happen" to be in my neighborhood, you should check this spot out: cultivated fields, fallow fields, vernal pools, (submerged VAST trail), Cobb Brook, Huntington River, forests nearby...

To sum it up, I share Dorothy Gale's quote from The Wizard of OZ: "If I ever go looking for my heart's desire again, I won't look any further than my own back yard."

Ali
Huntington
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/19 4:33 am
From: Jeanne Elias <moosewoman...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bird Walks Galore! 7am tomorrow, 4pm tomorrow -Thursday 5/23
Join the Mad Birders at 7am at the Geiger Property 2 miles up Center Fayston Road for a morning walk in Fayston, VT

Second walk of the day is @ 4pm on the Boardwalk section of the Mad River Path on Carroll Road near the Big Picture Theatre. Waitsfield, VT

At 5pm we’ll convene at the adjacent Lawson’s Liquids Taproom and quaff our thirst with fantastic local beer while we swap bird stories in a conversation featuring the Bird Diva- Bridget Butler!

For questions email <info...>

Happy Birding
Jeannie Elias
Fayston
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/19 2:40 pm
From: Harry <hadamek...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] PHOTOS from the 20th Annual "Birding with Bill in Boltonville" event
Hello Jim,

Thank you for your wonderful photos. They are greatly appreciated.

Harry

On 5/21/2019 3:19 PM, Jim Block wrote:
> Birding and photography in the rain is challenging, but we persisted last
> Friday morning in Newbury, VT. Bill Shepard taught us a lot, and I managed
> to get photos of a Veery, Green Heron, and Chestnut-sided Warbler. You can
> see photos from the event here:
>
> https://www.jimblockphoto.com/2019/05/birding-with-bill-in-boltonville/
>
>
>
> Jim Block
>
> Etna, NH
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/19 2:19 pm
From: Nancy Goodrich <nancyg3219...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] PHOTOS from the 20th Annual "Birding with Bill in Boltonville" event
Thanks to Jim Block for wonderful photos for those of us unable to join
you!!
Nancy Goodrich, Shelburne

On Tue, May 21, 2019 at 3:19 PM Jim Block <jim...> wrote:

> Birding and photography in the rain is challenging, but we persisted last
> Friday morning in Newbury, VT. Bill Shepard taught us a lot, and I managed
> to get photos of a Veery, Green Heron, and Chestnut-sided Warbler. You can
> see photos from the event here:
>
> https://www.jimblockphoto.com/2019/05/birding-with-bill-in-boltonville/
>
>
>
> Jim Block
>
> Etna, NH
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/19 1:09 pm
From: Nita <nita.hwf...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Kingfisher in Stowe
Fun to see a Kingfisher at the Little River in Stowe this afternoon.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/19 12:19 pm
From: Jim Block <jim...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] PHOTOS from the 20th Annual "Birding with Bill in Boltonville" event
Birding and photography in the rain is challenging, but we persisted last
Friday morning in Newbury, VT. Bill Shepard taught us a lot, and I managed
to get photos of a Veery, Green Heron, and Chestnut-sided Warbler. You can
see photos from the event here:

https://www.jimblockphoto.com/2019/05/birding-with-bill-in-boltonville/



Jim Block

Etna, NH
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/19 11:21 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warblers Hawk Hill Trails, May 21, 2019
This morning in Brandon the Hawk Hill Trails were alive with warblers. Some seen and some heard. Scarlet tanager pair gave a close up view.
Wildflowers as well were nice.
Sue Wetmore et al

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded
>
> Hawk Hill Trails, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 21, 2019 8:04 AM - 12:05 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.38 mile(s)
> 51 species
>
> Canada Goose 2
> Turkey Vulture 1
> Bald Eagle 1 immature
> Broad-winged Hawk 1
> Barred Owl 1
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 2
> Downy Woodpecker 2
> Hairy Woodpecker 1
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Northern Flicker 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 3
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 3
> Yellow-throated Vireo 1
> Blue-headed Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 13
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow 2
> Common Raven 2
> Black-capped Chickadee 2
> Tufted Titmouse 2
> Red-breasted Nuthatch 2
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> House Wren 1
> Winter Wren 1
> Veery 1
> Hermit Thrush 1
> American Robin 2
> Chipping Sparrow 1
> Song Sparrow 8
> Swamp Sparrow 1
> Ovenbird 12
> Louisiana Waterthrush 1
> Black-and-white Warbler 1
> Tennessee Warbler 2
> Nashville Warbler 1
> Common Yellowthroat 5
> American Redstart 3
> Cape May Warbler 1
> Northern Parula 1
> Magnolia Warbler 1
> Bay-breasted Warbler 4 two in location on the trail, two about 1/2 mile later
> Blackburnian Warbler 7
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
> Black-throated Blue Warbler 3
> Pine Warbler 3
> Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 2
> Black-throated Green Warbler 4
> Canada Warbler 1
> Scarlet Tanager 6
> Northern Cardinal 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56581392
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/19 9:31 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Bobolink
Also, foy Indigo Bunting up here in Passumpsic, even in overcast a
peerless blue! Veer Frost

On 5/21/2019 at 12:10 PM, "Alice Grau" wrote:First of the year
bobolinks blending in with the dandelions in the fields next to my
Bridport home.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/19 9:10 am
From: Alice Grau <alicecgrau...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bobolink
First of the year bobolinks blending in with the dandelions in the fields next to my Bridport home.
 

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Date: 5/21/19 8:04 am
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Greenmount Cemetery still active
Good morning:
It was a chilly and breezy morning at Greenmount Cemetery in Burlington. Nevertheless in about 40 minutes of birding I was able to find:

2 Philadelphia Vireos
2 Red-eyed Vireos
4 Bay-breasted Warblers (2m + 2f)
1 Northern Parula
2 Magnolia Warblers
2 American Redstarts

Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/21/19 4:12 am
From: david merker <buteojamaica...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] VTBIRD Digest - 19 May 2019 to 20 May 2019 (#2019-123)
We had a catbird at them yesterday

David Merker
Etna, New Hampshire
Cape May Raptor Banding Project Inc.

www.capemayraptors.org<http://www.capemayraptors.org/>
<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>

#deletefacebook<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>


On May 21, 2019, at 12:00 AM, VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...><mailto:<LISTSERV...>> wrote:

There are 14 messages totaling 391 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Unusual death (4)
2. 100+ Species in Rutland County
3. foy (2)
4. Scarlet Tanager
5. Cerulean Warblers, southern end of Snake Mountain, Bridport/Cornwall
6. Grantham, NH - 15 warblers, 48 species in 2 hours on Sunday
7. Windham White Wing Scoter reported in error this morning. 5/20/19
8. Warblers
9. Warbler jackpot - Burlington
10. Warblers Old Brandon Rd, May 20, 2019

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 05:28:32 -0400
From: BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...><mailto:<bflewelling3263...>>
Subject: Unusual death

Yesterday afternoon, I found a dead Mourning Dove. While looking it over to see if I could figure out why it died, I found a 1" long small twig embedded in its breast. There was no other sign of trauma. Has anyone ever seen anything like that?


Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 05:37:23 -0400
From: Veer Frost <veer.frost...><mailto:<veer.frost...>>
Subject: Re: Unusual death

Please say I'm wrong, my imagination jumps to a deliberate thing, a
shock when I was coming online to report one of the best moments of
the spring, FOY Veery singing in first light.Veer Frost, Passumpsic
NEK

On 5/20/2019 at 5:28 AM, "BRUCE FLEWELLING" wrote:Yesterday
afternoon, I found a dead Mourning Dove. While looking it over to see
if I could figure out why it died, I found a 1" long small twig
embedded in its breast. There was no other sign of trauma. Has anyone
ever seen anything like that?
Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 05:55:54 -0400
From: BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...><mailto:<bflewelling3263...>>
Subject: Re: Unusual death

I can't believe it was a deliberate act. It was maybe 1/8" in diameter, and it appeared dead so it was stiff. My thought is that it ran into it while landing on a limb.

Bruce


On May 20, 2019 at 5:37 AM Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...><mailto:<0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>> wrote:


Please say I'm wrong, my imagination jumps to a deliberate thing, a
shock when I was coming online to report one of the best moments of
the spring, FOY Veery singing in first light.Veer Frost, Passumpsic
NEK

On 5/20/2019 at 5:28 AM, "BRUCE FLEWELLING" wrote:Yesterday
afternoon, I found a dead Mourning Dove. While looking it over to see
if I could figure out why it died, I found a 1" long small twig
embedded in its breast. There was no other sign of trauma. Has anyone
ever seen anything like that?
Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 06:28:33 -0400
From: Veer Frost <veer.frost...><mailto:<veer.frost...>>
Subject: Re: Unusual death

Thank you, Bruce, I'd say too much tv if I owned one : ). Birds can
seem to be made out of air itself.Veer

On 5/20/2019 at 5:56 AM, "BRUCE FLEWELLING" wrote:I can't believe it
was a deliberate act. It was maybe 1/8" in diameter, and it appeared
dead so it was stiff. My thought is that it ran into it while landing
on a limb.

Bruce
On May 20, 2019 at 5:37 AM Veer Frost wrote:


Please say I'm wrong, my imagination jumps to a deliberate thing, a
shock when I was coming online to report one of the best moments of
the spring, FOY Veery singing in first light.Veer Frost, Passumpsic
NEK

On 5/20/2019 at 5:28 AM, "BRUCE FLEWELLING" wrote:Yesterday
afternoon, I found a dead Mourning Dove. While looking it over to
see
if I could figure out why it died, I found a 1" long small twig
embedded in its breast. There was no other sign of trauma. Has
anyone
ever seen anything like that?
Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 11:37:08 +0000
From: Susan Elliott <ovenbird14...><mailto:<ovenbird14...>>
Subject: 100+ Species in Rutland County

Each year Rutland County Audubon attempts to count 100 species in Rutland County in one day. On May 18 we surpassed our goal, ending up with 106 species. As with everywhere else in Vermont on Saturday, warbler was the word of the day, with 23 warbler species seen or heard on our count. The full report and list is here:
http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/journal/2019/5/19/trip-report-century-count-xxiv-may-18.html

Sue Elliott

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 08:19:23 -0400
From: Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...><mailto:<lenulty84...>>
Subject: foy

red-breasted nuthatch
indigo bunting
white-crowned sparrow

Could my "Connecticut Warbler" have been a "Nashville?" except that the
grey was on the throat....Hasn't come back so no photos....

--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 08:50:25 -0400
From: Mary and Ken Spencer <spencermk...><mailto:<spencermk...>>
Subject: Scarlet Tanager

We had a Scarlet Tanager come and check out our orange slices this morning. I had no idea that they would be attracted by that also. It was a thrill to see him so close.

Mary Spencer
Duxbury

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 09:11:32 -0400
From: Ian Worley <iworley...><mailto:<iworley...>>
Subject: Cerulean Warblers, southern end of Snake Mountain, Bridport/Cornwall

Two Cerulean Warblers were singing this morning from the location on the
southern end of Snake Mountain in woods behind our home, where they have
been reported since 2008. Typically they have been first noted the
second week of May.

Ian

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 14:16:55 +0000
From: "Sheridan Brown (Birds)" <birds...><mailto:<birds...>>
Subject: Grantham, NH - 15 warblers, 48 species in 2 hours on Sunday

A Sunday morning walk at the Sawyer Brook Headwaters parcel in Grantham, NH, yielded 48 species. The first birds of the day included a barred owl hunting along the edges of a large vernal pool and an American Bittern calling loudly from a 30-acre beaver dam wetland on the parcel.

Warblers were numerous, with repeated good looks at Bay-Breasted Warbler, Blackburninan Warbler, Canada Warbler, and Magnolia Warbler among others.

I've been focusing my birding on the Sawyer Brook Headwaters, as I'm part of efforts to permanently protect the 386-acre parcel. It includes highest-ranked wildlife habitat and some clearings from 2013 and 2014 timber harvesting that could be great mourning warbler habitat (a species I had in another similar area in Grantham last June). You can learn more about the parcel at https://granthambirdclub.com .

E-Bird Checklist from Sunday: https://ebird.org/nh/view/checklist/S56486355

Good Birding,

Sheridan Brown
Grantham, NH

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 12:21:08 -0400
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip...><mailto:<chip...>>
Subject: Re: foy

I was wondering about that Leslie! Nashville's do have that prominent eye
ring - and females have a grey throat. The behavior you described suggests
Nashville as well!
Best, Chip


Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org<http://www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org>



-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...><mailto:<VTBIRD...>> On Behalf Of Leslie Nulty
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 8:19 AM
To: <VTBIRD...><mailto:<VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] foy

red-breasted nuthatch
indigo bunting
white-crowned sparrow

Could my "Connecticut Warbler" have been a "Nashville?" except that the
grey was on the throat....Hasn't come back so no photos....

--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 12:47:18 -0400
From: Coleen Lawlor <lawlor.coleen...><mailto:<lawlor.coleen...>>
Subject: Windham White Wing Scoter reported in error this morning. 5/20/19

Hope this did not inconvenience anyone.


Coleen Lawlor

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 16:06:43 -0400
From: Sue <2birdvt...><mailto:<2birdvt...>>
Subject: Warblers

A walk down Old Brandon Rd. had 11 warbler species. The breathtaking scene was 7 bay-breasteds feeding in hemlocks and cedars. Some hawked insects like a flycatcher. Added bonus was Cape Mays.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 21:18:34 -0400
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...><mailto:<smorrica...>>
Subject: Re: Warbler jackpot - Burlington

Larry’s post about Greenmount Cemetery, Burlington, inspired several birders plus myself to visit this morning (Monday 5/20). Since I haven’t seen any other posts about it yet, I can report the following:
3 Philadelphia Vireos.
7 Bay-breasted Warblers.
1 Cape May Warbler.
Also Blackburnian, Magnolia, Chestnut-sided, American Redstart, Black-throated Green, Nashville, and Yellow-rumped Warblers.
Phenomenal looks at most of these.
Cheers,
Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone

On May 19, 2019, at 7:05 PM, Liz <lizl...><mailto:<lizl...>> wrote:



BTW-your grandparents on this side eloped too!Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: B Bobolinks <0000035f721cf148-dmarc-request...><mailto:<0000035f721cf148-dmarc-request...>>
Date: 5/19/19 1:53 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: <VTBIRD...><mailto:<VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Warbler jackpot - Burlington

Thank you for getting the word out, Larry. That was amazing! Bay-breasted warblers were practically dripping from the cedars!Mae MayvilleEssex Junction Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhoneOn Sunday, May 19, 2019, 11:09 AM, Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld...><mailto:<lclarfeld...>> wrote:Hi VTBIRDERS,There are currently very nice variety of Warblers in Greenmount Cemetery inBurlington. Highlights thus far have includes Cape May, Bay breasted,Wilson's, blackpol, Magnolia, Tennessee, and more...Good birding,Larry

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 20 May 2019 22:19:34 -0400
From: Sue <2birdvt...><mailto:<2birdvt...>>
Subject: Warblers Old Brandon Rd, May 20, 2019

Here is the list from this afternoon.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded

Old Brandon Rd, Rutland, Vermont, US
May 20, 2019 1:30 PM - 4:40 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 mile(s)
44 species

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 6
Mourning Dove 1
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
Solitary Sandpiper 1
Turkey Vulture 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 2
Alder Flycatcher 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
Great Crested Flycatcher 2
Eastern Kingbird 3
Yellow-throated Vireo 1
Warbling Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 10
Blue Jay 5
American Crow 3
Common Raven 1
Black-capped Chickadee 1
Tufted Titmouse 1
Veery 1
Wood Thrush 2
American Robin 6
Gray Catbird 5
European Starling 1
American Goldfinch 2
Chipping Sparrow 2
Song Sparrow 4
Swamp Sparrow 1
Baltimore Oriole 4
Red-winged Blackbird 1
Brown-headed Cowbird 3
Ovenbird 6
Common Yellowthroat 3
American Redstart 2
Cape May Warbler 2
Northern Parula 1
Magnolia Warbler 1
Bay-breasted Warbler 7 Chestnut crown, throat and sided. Black face, two white wing bars. Females was duller, faint chestnut wash on sides.
Yellow Warbler 4
Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Canada Warbler 1
Scarlet Tanager 1
Northern Cardinal 2
House Sparrow 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56563890

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 19 May 2019 to 20 May 2019 (#2019-123)
*************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/19 3:15 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pileated
A female pileated woodpecker has been feeding on suet in our yard for more than a week.
A crow has also taken advantage of this suet.
Sue Wetmore
Brandon

Sent from my iPod
 

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Date: 5/20/19 7:19 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warblers Old Brandon Rd, May 20, 2019
Here is the list from this afternoon.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded
>
> Old Brandon Rd, Rutland, Vermont, US
> May 20, 2019 1:30 PM - 4:40 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> 44 species
>
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 6
> Mourning Dove 1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
> Solitary Sandpiper 1
> Turkey Vulture 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 2
> Alder Flycatcher 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 2
> Eastern Kingbird 3
> Yellow-throated Vireo 1
> Warbling Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 10
> Blue Jay 5
> American Crow 3
> Common Raven 1
> Black-capped Chickadee 1
> Tufted Titmouse 1
> Veery 1
> Wood Thrush 2
> American Robin 6
> Gray Catbird 5
> European Starling 1
> American Goldfinch 2
> Chipping Sparrow 2
> Song Sparrow 4
> Swamp Sparrow 1
> Baltimore Oriole 4
> Red-winged Blackbird 1
> Brown-headed Cowbird 3
> Ovenbird 6
> Common Yellowthroat 3
> American Redstart 2
> Cape May Warbler 2
> Northern Parula 1
> Magnolia Warbler 1
> Bay-breasted Warbler 7 Chestnut crown, throat and sided. Black face, two white wing bars. Females was duller, faint chestnut wash on sides.
> Yellow Warbler 4
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
> Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
> Canada Warbler 1
> Scarlet Tanager 1
> Northern Cardinal 2
> House Sparrow 2
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56563890
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 6:18 pm
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Warbler jackpot - Burlington
Larry’s post about Greenmount Cemetery, Burlington, inspired several birders plus myself to visit this morning (Monday 5/20). Since I haven’t seen any other posts about it yet, I can report the following:
3 Philadelphia Vireos.
7 Bay-breasted Warblers.
1 Cape May Warbler.
Also Blackburnian, Magnolia, Chestnut-sided, American Redstart, Black-throated Green, Nashville, and Yellow-rumped Warblers.
Phenomenal looks at most of these.
Cheers,
Scott Morrical

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 19, 2019, at 7:05 PM, Liz <lizl...> wrote:
>
>
>
> BTW-your grandparents on this side eloped too!Sent from my Verizon 4G LTE smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: B Bobolinks <0000035f721cf148-dmarc-request...>
> Date: 5/19/19 1:53 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Warbler jackpot - Burlington
>
> Thank you for getting the word out, Larry. That was amazing! Bay-breasted warblers were practically dripping from the cedars!Mae MayvilleEssex Junction Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhoneOn Sunday, May 19, 2019, 11:09 AM, Larry Clarfeld <lclarfeld...> wrote:Hi VTBIRDERS,There are currently very nice variety of Warblers in Greenmount Cemetery inBurlington. Highlights thus far have includes Cape May, Bay breasted,Wilson's, blackpol, Magnolia, Tennessee, and more...Good birding,Larry
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 1:06 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warblers
A walk down Old Brandon Rd. had 11 warbler species. The breathtaking scene was 7 bay-breasteds feeding in hemlocks and cedars. Some hawked insects like a flycatcher. Added bonus was Cape Mays.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 9:47 am
From: Coleen Lawlor <lawlor.coleen...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Windham White Wing Scoter reported in error this morning. 5/20/19
Hope this did not inconvenience anyone.


Coleen Lawlor
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 9:21 am
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] foy
I was wondering about that Leslie! Nashville's do have that prominent eye
ring - and females have a grey throat. The behavior you described suggests
Nashville as well!
Best, Chip


Chip Darmstadt, Executive Director
North Branch Nature Center
(802) 229-6206
www.NorthBranchNatureCenter.org



-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> On Behalf Of Leslie Nulty
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 8:19 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] foy

red-breasted nuthatch
indigo bunting
white-crowned sparrow

Could my "Connecticut Warbler" have been a "Nashville?" except that the
grey was on the throat....Hasn't come back so no photos....

--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 6:11 am
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Cerulean Warblers, southern end of Snake Mountain, Bridport/Cornwall
Two Cerulean Warblers were singing this morning from the location on the
southern end of Snake Mountain in woods behind our home, where they have
been reported since 2008.   Typically they have been first noted the
second week of May.

Ian
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 5:50 am
From: Mary and Ken Spencer <spencermk...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Scarlet Tanager
We had a Scarlet Tanager come and check out our orange slices this morning. I had no idea that they would be attracted by that also.  It was a thrill to see him so close.

Mary Spencer
Duxbury
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 5:05 am
From: Leslie Nulty <lenulty84...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] foy
red-breasted nuthatch
indigo bunting
white-crowned sparrow

Could my "Connecticut Warbler" have been a "Nashville?" except that the
grey was on the throat....Hasn't come back so no photos....

--
Best regards,

Leslie

Leslie Nulty
P.O. Box 1121
Jericho Center, VT 05465
home office: 802-899-4582
cell: 802-324-1496
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 4:37 am
From: Susan Elliott <00000032e9152660-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] 100+ Species in Rutland County
Each year Rutland County Audubon attempts to count 100 species in Rutland County in one day. On May 18 we surpassed our goal, ending up with 106 species. As with everywhere else in Vermont on Saturday, warbler was the word of the day, with 23 warbler species seen or heard on our count. The full report and list is here: 
http://rutlandcountyaudubon.org/journal/2019/5/19/trip-report-century-count-xxiv-may-18.html

Sue Elliott
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 3:28 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual death
Thank you, Bruce, I'd say too much tv if I owned one : ). Birds can
seem to be made out of air itself.Veer

On 5/20/2019 at 5:56 AM, "BRUCE FLEWELLING" wrote:I can't believe it
was a deliberate act. It was maybe 1/8" in diameter, and it appeared
dead so it was stiff. My thought is that it ran into it while landing
on a limb.

Bruce
> On May 20, 2019 at 5:37 AM Veer Frost wrote:
>
>
> Please say I'm wrong, my imagination jumps to a deliberate thing, a
> shock when I was coming online to report one of the best moments of
> the spring, FOY Veery singing in first light.Veer Frost, Passumpsic
> NEK
>
> On 5/20/2019 at 5:28 AM, "BRUCE FLEWELLING" wrote:Yesterday
> afternoon, I found a dead Mourning Dove. While looking it over to
see
> if I could figure out why it died, I found a 1" long small twig
> embedded in its breast. There was no other sign of trauma. Has
anyone
> ever seen anything like that?
> Bruce Flewelling
>
> RT. 73, Rochester
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 2:56 am
From: BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual death
I can't believe it was a deliberate act. It was maybe 1/8" in diameter, and it appeared dead so it was stiff. My thought is that it ran into it while landing on a limb.

Bruce


> On May 20, 2019 at 5:37 AM Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>
> Please say I'm wrong, my imagination jumps to a deliberate thing, a
> shock when I was coming online to report one of the best moments of
> the spring, FOY Veery singing in first light.Veer Frost, Passumpsic
> NEK
>
> On 5/20/2019 at 5:28 AM, "BRUCE FLEWELLING" wrote:Yesterday
> afternoon, I found a dead Mourning Dove. While looking it over to see
> if I could figure out why it died, I found a 1" long small twig
> embedded in its breast. There was no other sign of trauma. Has anyone
> ever seen anything like that?
> Bruce Flewelling
>
> RT. 73, Rochester
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 2:37 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Unusual death
Please say I'm wrong, my imagination jumps to a deliberate thing, a
shock when I was coming online to report one of the best moments of
the spring, FOY Veery singing in first light.Veer Frost, Passumpsic
NEK

On 5/20/2019 at 5:28 AM, "BRUCE FLEWELLING" wrote:Yesterday
afternoon, I found a dead Mourning Dove. While looking it over to see
if I could figure out why it died, I found a 1" long small twig
embedded in its breast. There was no other sign of trauma. Has anyone
ever seen anything like that?
Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester
 

Back to top
Date: 5/20/19 2:28 am
From: BRUCE FLEWELLING <bflewelling3263...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Unusual death
Yesterday afternoon, I found a dead Mourning Dove. While looking it over to see if I could figure out why it died, I found a 1" long small twig embedded in its breast. There was no other sign of trauma. Has anyone ever seen anything like that?


Bruce Flewelling

RT. 73, Rochester
 

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