VTBIRD
Received From Subject
8/21/18 4:31 am Charlotte and Hal Bill <cgbbill...> Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
8/20/18 7:57 pm Peter Riley <priley55...> Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
8/20/18 5:51 pm Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...> Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
8/20/18 5:09 pm Donald Clark <sapsbks...> [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
8/20/18 3:26 pm Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...> Re: [VTBIRD] Egrets
8/20/18 12:30 pm Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...> Re: [VTBIRD] Egrets
8/20/18 9:30 am Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] exhilarating, moving, a few OTT but don't miss the Phalarope
8/20/18 7:34 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Egrets
8/19/18 5:13 pm John Snell <jrsnelljr...> Re: [VTBIRD] Flying ants
8/19/18 5:09 pm Donald Clark <sapsbks...> [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
8/19/18 4:50 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> Re: [VTBIRD] Flying ants
8/19/18 4:06 pm Spencer Hardy <curlewsandpiper17...> [VTBIRD] Flying ants
8/19/18 6:37 am Monica Cuoco <monica_cuoco...> Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
8/19/18 2:19 am Jim Mead <jimmead4...> [VTBIRD] Shorebird Migration
8/18/18 3:50 pm Scott Morrical <smorrica...> [VTBIRD] Shorebirds @ Dead Creek & Shelburne Bay
8/18/18 2:03 pm Joe Cuoco <jcuoco...> Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
8/18/18 12:40 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Warblers etc.Mount Independence, Aug 18, 2018
8/18/18 11:58 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] warblers etc.- Mount Independence, Aug 18, 2018
8/17/18 6:21 pm Donald Clark <sapsbks...> [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
8/17/18 10:33 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Warblers- West Rutland Marsh IBA, Aug 16, 2018
8/17/18 10:32 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Great Egret - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 17, 2018
8/17/18 7:22 am anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Nearby: Brown Booby in Pittsfield, Mass.
8/17/18 7:12 am anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Nearby: Brown Booby in Pittsfield, Mass.
8/17/18 6:30 am Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...> [VTBIRD] Nearby: Brown Booby in Pittsfield, Mass.
8/15/18 1:39 pm anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Western Vagrant Hummers
8/15/18 1:07 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Coopers hawks Union St Brandon, Aug 15, 2018
8/14/18 4:03 pm Paul Miksis <pjmiksis...> [VTBIRD] Nighthawk
8/14/18 5:02 am Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...> [VTBIRD] Shorebirding with North Branch Nature Center
8/13/18 11:02 am Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...> [VTBIRD] Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
8/13/18 10:38 am Maeve Kim <maevulus...> [VTBIRD] fledgling House Wrens
8/13/18 8:11 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Bobolinks Union St Brandon, Aug 13, 2018
8/13/18 8:09 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Buckner Mem. Preserve/Bald Mtn. - Poultney River/East Bay IBA, Aug 12, 2018
8/11/18 10:22 am Mitchell Harrison <000002ef5c1f1853-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] egrets
8/11/18 4:25 am JJ Allen <jjapple88...> [VTBIRD] Black Terns
8/10/18 6:58 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Bobolinks Union St Brandon, Aug 10, 2018
8/9/18 10:03 am carolclyde <carolclyde...> [VTBIRD] Black backed gulls
8/9/18 7:23 am Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> [VTBIRD] Kestrels
8/9/18 6:00 am FRED BATES <batesx2...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Grace Cong. Church, Aug 9, 2018
8/9/18 3:56 am Jim Mead <jimmead4...> [VTBIRD] Glossy Ibis and Least Bittern seen at Delta Park
8/8/18 10:11 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Hermit thrush Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 8, 2018
8/7/18 7:15 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Green Herons--Brandon Pearl St, Aug 7, 2018
8/5/18 4:53 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Caspian terns plus- Shipyard Road, Highgate Springs, Aug 4, 2018
8/4/18 4:05 pm Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Sparrow
8/4/18 11:26 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Sparrows
8/3/18 3:55 pm Chris Rimmer <crimmer...> [VTBIRD] Mansfield wrap-up
8/3/18 3:17 pm Roy Zartarian <royz...> Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
8/3/18 1:20 pm John Holme <00000062fa0d6268-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] broad-winged hawk
8/3/18 9:07 am Chip Darmstadt <chip...> Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
8/3/18 7:13 am Tom Slayton <slayton.tom...> Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
8/3/18 7:08 am Kay Johnson <0000002d57029402-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
8/3/18 3:22 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Grasshopper sp
8/2/18 6:12 pm Steve Smith <ethologicac...> Re: [VTBIRD] Chickering Bog closed ?
8/2/18 9:40 am Pat Folsom <pfols...> Re: [VTBIRD] Lyla Slayton
8/2/18 5:52 am Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> [VTBIRD] New eBird Checklist Review Messages
8/2/18 5:37 am Pat Folsom <pfols...> [VTBIRD] Lyla Slayton
8/1/18 1:19 pm LaBarr, Mark <MLaBARR...> Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
8/1/18 1:11 pm David Capen <David.Capen...> Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
8/1/18 7:10 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Pewees Brandon Hollow Road, Aug 1, 2018
8/1/18 4:56 am Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...> Re: [VTBIRD] Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this year?
7/31/18 5:37 pm Ian Worley <iworley...> [VTBIRD] Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this year?
7/30/18 5:57 pm Patti Haynes <patti.haynes...> Re: [VTBIRD] Tracy Road pond birds plus an owl
7/30/18 4:20 pm Carl Runge <0000009209546543-dmarc-request...> Re: [VTBIRD] Eastern Towhee
7/30/18 2:59 pm Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> Re: [VTBIRD] Eastern Towhee
7/30/18 2:34 pm Linda Graves <ljoslyngross...> [VTBIRD] Eastern Towhee
7/30/18 11:20 am Walter Ellison <rossgull61...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/30/18 11:14 am Jane Stein <jeshawks...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/30/18 10:57 am Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/30/18 6:53 am Roy Zartarian <royz...> [VTBIRD] Tracy Road pond birds plus an owl
7/30/18 6:38 am Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/30/18 6:12 am Cynthia Crawford <cynthia.crawford...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/30/18 6:07 am david merker <buteojamaica...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside hawk
7/30/18 6:04 am david merker <buteojamaica...> [VTBIRD] Roadside hawk
7/30/18 5:35 am Sue <2birdvt...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/30/18 5:00 am Ron Payne <rpayne72...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/30/18 4:36 am Jane Stein <jeshawks...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/30/18 3:20 am Cynthia Crawford <cynthia.crawford...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/29/18 7:30 pm Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/29/18 7:06 pm Jane Stein <jeshawks...> Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/29/18 6:25 pm cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...> [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
7/29/18 6:17 am Tom slayton <slayton.tom...> Re: [VTBIRD] Chickering Bog closed ?
7/29/18 3:45 am Henry Burton <hwb1919...> [VTBIRD] Chickering Bog closed ?
7/27/18 1:20 pm Chris Rimmer <crimmer...> [VTBIRD] Mansfield update - field season (and avian activity) winding down
7/27/18 11:57 am SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] hummers- Brandon Hollow Road, Jul 27, 2018
7/27/18 5:57 am Jean Arrowsmith <jeanbird...> [VTBIRD] Hummers
7/26/18 7:02 am Kate Olgiati <2grackle...> [VTBIRD] black-billed cuckoo calling in S. Barnard
7/25/18 6:19 pm Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...> Re: [VTBIRD] Birds of Chile program at the Birds of Vermont Museum, Thursday at 6:30
7/25/18 2:10 pm Peg Clement <clementpeg...> Re: [VTBIRD] Birds of Chile program at the Birds of Vermont Museum, Thursday at 6:30
7/25/18 11:49 am E Talmage <bovm_erin...> [VTBIRD] Birds of Chile program at the Birds of Vermont Museum, Thursday at 6:30
7/25/18 6:36 am Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> Re: [VTBIRD] VT Bird Checklist Updated
7/25/18 6:34 am FRED BATES <batesx2...> Re: [VTBIRD] VT Bird Checklist Updated
7/24/18 1:57 pm Ruth Stewart <birder_rws...> Re: [VTBIRD] VT Bird Checklist Updated
7/24/18 12:46 pm Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> [VTBIRD] VT Bird Checklist Updated
7/24/18 7:28 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Wrens
7/24/18 5:57 am Eric Hynes <erichynes28...> [VTBIRD] Banded Semipalmated Sandpiper at Shelburne Bay Monday afternoon
7/24/18 5:23 am Sue <2birdvt...> [VTBIRD] Bobolinks! Union St Brandon, Jul 24, 2018
7/23/18 1:52 pm FRED BATES <batesx2...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Grace Cong. Church, Jul 23, 2018
7/22/18 6:37 pm Peg Clement <clementpeg...> [VTBIRD] Red Rocks, Burlington
7/22/18 6:26 pm Roy Pilcher <00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Old Marsh Pond WMA - Loon Watch Day
7/22/18 5:28 pm Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request...> [VTBIRD] Shorebird migration
7/22/18 11:49 am Walter Medwid <wmedwid...> [VTBIRD] osprey abandon old nest site and build new one nearby
 
Back to top
Date: 8/21/18 4:31 am
From: Charlotte and Hal Bill <cgbbill...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
And I see them only in the river valleys, either over the river or not that
far from the river -- the Missisquoi, the Trout, the Gihon, the Lamoille....

On Mon, Aug 20, 2018 at 10:57 PM Peter Riley <priley55...> wrote:

> Richard, I regularly see small numbers of C. Nighthawks flying over Essex
> Jct. near Five Corners at this time of year. Hard to know why you don't see
> them in Jericho. I will say that the birds I see are always traveling west,
> perhaps following the leading line of the Winooski River. The largest group
> I've had was thirteen birds.
> Good luck,
> Peter
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Richard Littauer <
> <richard.littauer...>
> Sent: Monday, August 20, 2018 8:51:35 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
>
> That sounds great! Well done.
>
> I spent two hours outside with binoculars looking up today from a field in
> Jericho. Can you help me figure out why my count is 0? Where should I be
> looking?
>
> Richard
>
> On Monday, August 20, 2018, Donald Clark <sapsbks...> wrote:
>
> > The count for this evening was 266 with the largest group of 49.
> >
> > Don Clark
> > Grafton
> >
>
>
> --
> Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
> <http://www.burntfen.com>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/20/18 7:57 pm
From: Peter Riley <priley55...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
Richard, I regularly see small numbers of C. Nighthawks flying over Essex Jct. near Five Corners at this time of year. Hard to know why you don't see them in Jericho. I will say that the birds I see are always traveling west, perhaps following the leading line of the Winooski River. The largest group I've had was thirteen birds.
Good luck,
Peter
________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Sent: Monday, August 20, 2018 8:51:35 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count

That sounds great! Well done.

I spent two hours outside with binoculars looking up today from a field in
Jericho. Can you help me figure out why my count is 0? Where should I be
looking?

Richard

On Monday, August 20, 2018, Donald Clark <sapsbks...> wrote:

> The count for this evening was 266 with the largest group of 49.
>
> Don Clark
> Grafton
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/20/18 5:51 pm
From: Richard Littauer <richard.littauer...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
That sounds great! Well done.

I spent two hours outside with binoculars looking up today from a field in
Jericho. Can you help me figure out why my count is 0? Where should I be
looking?

Richard

On Monday, August 20, 2018, Donald Clark <sapsbks...> wrote:

> The count for this evening was 266 with the largest group of 49.
>
> Don Clark
> Grafton
>


--
Richard | @richlitt <https://twitter.com/richlitt> | burntfen.com
<http://www.burntfen.com>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/20/18 5:09 pm
From: Donald Clark <sapsbks...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
The count for this evening was 266 with the largest group of 49.

Don Clark
Grafton
 

Back to top
Date: 8/20/18 3:26 pm
From: Charlie La Rosa <charlie.larosa...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Egrets
One on the NH side of the CT River in Brattleboro.

Charlie La Rosa
Brattleboro


"Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can." — Arthur Ashe



On Mon, Aug 20, 2018 at 3:29 PM, Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
> wrote:

> Great white egret on Sodom Pond in Adamant!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Aug 20, 2018, at 10:33 AM, Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:
> >
> > Great egrets are showing up in and around Brandon today.
> > Two on private farm pond and one in Jones Pond south of town.
> > Sue Wetmore
> >
> > Sent from my iPod
>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/20/18 12:30 pm
From: Ruth Coppersmith <coppersmithruth...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Egrets
Great white egret on Sodom Pond in Adamant!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 20, 2018, at 10:33 AM, Sue <2birdvt...> wrote:
>
> Great egrets are showing up in and around Brandon today.
> Two on private farm pond and one in Jones Pond south of town.
> Sue Wetmore
>
> Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 8/20/18 9:30 am
From: Veer Frost <0000038039fb4cf6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] exhilarating, moving, a few OTT but don't miss the Phalarope
Entries from photographers from all over the world, if you'd like to
see. Veer Frost, Passumpsic
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2018/aug/20/2018-bird-photographer-of-the-year-in-pictures
Samuel Beckett on writing: '_Holes in paper open and take me fathoms
from anywhere'_
_Dwell in the essential _I Ching
Sent using Hushmail
 

Back to top
Date: 8/20/18 7:34 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Egrets
Great egrets are showing up in and around Brandon today.
Two on private farm pond and one in Jones Pond south of town.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 8/19/18 5:13 pm
From: John Snell <jrsnelljr...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Flying ants
Lots of clay in Montpelier and LOTS of small flying ants tonight. Everyone downtown was swatting and brushing and wondering. The swallows were just “making hay!”


Still learning to see,

John Snell

http://www.johnsnell.photography <http://www.eyeimagein.com/>
http://www.stilllearningtosee.com <http://www.stilllearningtosee.com/>

> On Aug 19, 2018, at 7:50 PM, Ian Worley <iworley...> wrote:
>
> Neat Spencer!
>
> Can we assume the flying ants are most predominate where there are sandy soils and sand depots as is typical in Vermont where rivers ran into glacier-dammed lakes at the end of the last ice age in Vermont 10-12,000 or so years ago? So we folks with clay soils are out of luck for the numbers of birds you are seeing, and Don Clark counts by the hundreds and thousands every year at Westminster Station?
>
> Ian
>
> ==============================
>
>
> On 8/19/2018 7:05 PM, Spencer Hardy wrote:
>> One of my favorite late summer natural events is the mass hatching of flying ants (queens and drones). It seems to happen (or at least I notice it) early in the evening right about the 20th of August, when the first landbird migrants are showing up. In past years in Norwich I’ve had Cape May Warblers and Philadelphia Vireos grabbing ants a few feet from my face. Tonight in Richmond there are at least 17 Common Nighthawks doing laps way above town a Red-breasted Nuthatch making long flights up into the sky to grab the ants. I’ve also picked up at least 6 Monarchs floating south and 2 Great Black-backed Gulls headed down the Winooski.
>>
>> Anyone else enjoying the ants tonight?
>>
>> Spencer Hardy
 

Back to top
Date: 8/19/18 5:09 pm
From: Donald Clark <sapsbks...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
A good flight tonight with 693 birds passing through from 5-7:30. Looks like it could be a good year with these numbers so early.

Don Clark
Grafton
 

Back to top
Date: 8/19/18 4:50 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Flying ants
Neat Spencer!

Can we assume the flying ants are most predominate where there are sandy
soils and sand depots as is typical in Vermont where rivers ran into
glacier-dammed lakes at the end of the last ice age in Vermont 10-12,000
or so years ago?  So we folks with clay soils are out of luck for the
numbers of birds you are seeing, and Don Clark counts by the hundreds
and thousands every year at Westminster Station?

Ian

==============================


On 8/19/2018 7:05 PM, Spencer Hardy wrote:
> One of my favorite late summer natural events is the mass hatching of flying ants (queens and drones). It seems to happen (or at least I notice it) early in the evening right about the 20th of August, when the first landbird migrants are showing up. In past years in Norwich I’ve had Cape May Warblers and Philadelphia Vireos grabbing ants a few feet from my face. Tonight in Richmond there are at least 17 Common Nighthawks doing laps way above town a Red-breasted Nuthatch making long flights up into the sky to grab the ants. I’ve also picked up at least 6 Monarchs floating south and 2 Great Black-backed Gulls headed down the Winooski.
>
> Anyone else enjoying the ants tonight?
>
> Spencer Hardy
 

Back to top
Date: 8/19/18 4:06 pm
From: Spencer Hardy <curlewsandpiper17...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Flying ants
One of my favorite late summer natural events is the mass hatching of flying ants (queens and drones). It seems to happen (or at least I notice it) early in the evening right about the 20th of August, when the first landbird migrants are showing up. In past years in Norwich I’ve had Cape May Warblers and Philadelphia Vireos grabbing ants a few feet from my face. Tonight in Richmond there are at least 17 Common Nighthawks doing laps way above town a Red-breasted Nuthatch making long flights up into the sky to grab the ants. I’ve also picked up at least 6 Monarchs floating south and 2 Great Black-backed Gulls headed down the Winooski.

Anyone else enjoying the ants tonight?

Spencer Hardy
 

Back to top
Date: 8/19/18 6:37 am
From: Monica Cuoco <monica_cuoco...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
That’s fantastic. I like him and that local watch so much. Hope you’re having a good weekend. Love you.

> On Aug 18, 2018, at 5:03 PM, Joe Cuoco <jcuoco...> wrote:
>
> Hope to see you again this year at Westminster Station
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Aug 17, 2018, at 9:21 PM, Donald Clark <sapsbks...> wrote:
>>
>> Decided to check to see if there was any activity a few of days before my official start. Was not disappointed with 243 birds passing through from 5:30-7. The largest groups were of 38,40,48,34. Let the fun begin.
>>
>> Don Clark
>> Grafton
 

Back to top
Date: 8/19/18 2:19 am
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Shorebird Migration
Hello all,

Now that the unusual for VT, "adult breeding plumage" shorebird migration has occurred, we are now at the beginning and just into the "heart" of our usual migration. The NNW winds from yesterday morning brought in many new arrivals. I did a very quick search of shorebirds reported yesterday throughout the state, but I may have missed some (sorry if I did). I tallied 17 total species. There were 3 "hotspots" in particular from yesterday- 1) Shelburne Bay (SB)- 8 species, 2) Delta Park (DP)- 10 species & 3) Farrell Access (FA)- 11 species. So, if you or anyone you know is in need of a "shorebird fix", I would highly recommend visiting one or all 3 of those locations sometime today. We are forecasted to receive another wind today out of the north. It may bring in some more new arrivals. Good luck if you can get out there today.

17 species:

Black-bellied Plover- DP
Semipalmated Plover- SB,DP,FA
Killdeer- SB,FA
Greater Yellowlegs- SB,DP,FA
Lesser Yellowlegs- SB,DP,FA
Solitary Sandpiper- Porter Brook Rd. in Hardwick
Spotted Sandpiper- FA
Ruddy Turnstone- DP
Sanderling- SB,DP
Semipalmated Sandpiper- SB,DP,FA
Least Sandpiper- SB,DP,FA
White-rumped Sandpiper- FA
Baird's Sandpiper- SB,DP,FA
Pectoral Sandpiper- FA
Stilt Sandpiper- DP
Short-billed Dowitcher- FA
Wilson's Snipe- Campbell Bay in West Swanton

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
 

Back to top
Date: 8/18/18 3:50 pm
From: Scott Morrical <smorrica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Shorebirds @ Dead Creek & Shelburne Bay
Greetings,

Ted Murin and I, joined by Bill and Mae Mayville and others, visited the Shelburne Bay boat launch this morning where there were a few interesting shorebirds including:

2 Sanderlings
7/7 Least/Semipalmated Sandpipers
3/6 Greater/Lesser Yellowlegs
3 Killdeer

Later, following a tip from Jim Mead, Ted and I visited the Farrell Access of Dead Creek, where there was a major shorebird show in progress:

3 Baird’s (1 ad., 2 juv.)
1 White-rumped
2 Pectoral
30 Semipalmated
70 Least Sandpipers
10 Semipalmated Plovers
20 Killdeer
2 Short-billed Dowitchers
123 Lesser Yellowlegs (not a typo)
2 Greater Yellowlegs

Also 1 Merlin at Farrell, Caspian Terns at both locations. Full lists are on eBird.

Cheers,
Scott Morrical,
South Burlington



Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/18/18 2:03 pm
From: Joe Cuoco <jcuoco...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
Hope to see you again this year at Westminster Station

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 17, 2018, at 9:21 PM, Donald Clark <sapsbks...> wrote:
>
> Decided to check to see if there was any activity a few of days before my official start. Was not disappointed with 243 birds passing through from 5:30-7. The largest groups were of 38,40,48,34. Let the fun begin.
>
> Don Clark
> Grafton
 

Back to top
Date: 8/18/18 12:40 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warblers etc.Mount Independence, Aug 18, 2018
Weather didn't deter me in hiking Mt. Indy. In addition to birds there a multitude of mushrooms were everywhere on the orange trail.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

>
> Mount Independence, Addison, Vermont, US
> Aug 18, 2018 8:45 AM - 12:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> 24 species
>
> Mourning Dove 1
> Ring-billed Gull 3
> Osprey 2
> Bald Eagle 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 8
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 5
> Blue Jay 5
> American Crow 3
> Common Raven 3
> Black-capped Chickadee 5
> White-breasted Nuthatch 2
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
> Gray Catbird 1
> Cedar Waxwing 5
> American Goldfinch 2
> Chipping Sparrow 4
> Black-and-white Warbler 1
> American Redstart 1
> Magnolia Warbler 1
> Canada Warbler 1
> Northern Cardinal 3
> Indigo Bunting 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47923031
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/18/18 11:58 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] warblers etc.- Mount Independence, Aug 18, 2018
A hike around the trails today had the following plus a multitude of various mushrooms!

Sue Wetmore
>
> Mount Independence, Addison, Vermont, US
> Aug 18, 2018 8:45 AM - 12:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.0 mile(s)
> 24 species
>
> Mourning Dove 1
> Ring-billed Gull 3
> Osprey 2
> Bald Eagle 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 8
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 5
> Blue Jay 5
> American Crow 3
> Common Raven 3
> Black-capped Chickadee 5
> White-breasted Nuthatch 2
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
> Gray Catbird 1
> Cedar Waxwing 5
> American Goldfinch 2
> Chipping Sparrow 4
> Black-and-white Warbler 1
> American Redstart 1
> Magnolia Warbler 1
> Canada Warbler 1
> Northern Cardinal 3
> Indigo Bunting 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47923031
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/17/18 6:21 pm
From: Donald Clark <sapsbks...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Westminster Station Nighthawk Count
Decided to check to see if there was any activity a few of days before my official start. Was not disappointed with 243 birds passing through from 5:30-7. The largest groups were of 38,40,48,34. Let the fun begin.

Don Clark
Grafton
 

Back to top
Date: 8/17/18 10:33 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Warblers- West Rutland Marsh IBA, Aug 16, 2018
Warblers were moving through the area yesterday.
Sue Wetmore et al
>
> West Rutland Marsh IBA, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 16, 2018 7:00 AM - 10:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.7 mile(s)
> 43 species
>
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 3
> Mourning Dove 9
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 10
> Great Blue Heron 3
> Red-tailed Hawk 1
> Belted Kingfisher 1
> Downy Woodpecker 2
> Northern Flicker 1
> American Kestrel 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 3
> Alder Flycatcher 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Great Crested Flycatcher 1
> Eastern Kingbird 2
> Red-eyed Vireo 5
> Blue Jay 14
> American Crow 6
> Common Raven 3
> Barn Swallow 16
> Black-capped Chickadee 4
> Tufted Titmouse 3
> Red-breasted Nuthatch 2
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> House Wren 1
> Marsh Wren 1
> Gray Catbird 6
> European Starling 12
> Cedar Waxwing 36
> American Goldfinch 23
> Song Sparrow 1
> Swamp Sparrow 2
> Baltimore Oriole 1
> Red-winged Blackbird 13
> Common Grackle 12
> Black-and-white Warbler 4
> Common Yellowthroat 8 common yellowthroat checking out the swamp sparrows
> American Redstart 4
> Blackburnian Warbler 2
> Yellow Warbler 1
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 6
> Black-throated Blue Warbler 1
> Northern Cardinal 6
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47902522
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/17/18 10:32 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Great Egret - Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 17, 2018
A new species for this road was a surprise, a great egret.

Sue Wetmore
>
> Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 17, 2018 8:45 AM - 11:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.4 mile(s)
> 22 species
>
> Wood Duck 1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
> Mourning Dove 5
> Great Egret 1
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 3
> Eastern Phoebe 5
> Red-eyed Vireo 5
> Blue Jay 3
> American Crow 6
> Common Raven 2
> Black-capped Chickadee 2
> American Robin 8
> Gray Catbird 4
> European Starling 8
> Cedar Waxwing 7
> American Goldfinch 3
> Eastern Towhee 1
> Common Yellowthroat 2
> Prairie Warbler 1
> Northern Cardinal 3
> House Sparrow 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47902253
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/17/18 7:22 am
From: anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Nearby: Brown Booby in Pittsfield, Mass.
Sorry for the brevity of this post, I thought I was responding directly to Rich Guthrie, not to VTBIRD. The "Bill" I refer to is Bill Lee, a mutual friend of Rich and mine. His wife was on Martha's Vineyard and saw a boat pull into port with a Brown Booby on its bow, having ridden in from some distance at sea.


Mea culpa,


Bob Yunick
Schenectady, NY



-----Original Message-----
From: anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...>
To: VTBIRD <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 17, 2018 10:12 am
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Nearby: Brown Booby in Pittsfield, Mass.

Wonder if it is the same one seen recently on MV by Bill's wife, Christine.


Bob


99+


0


0






-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...>
To: VTBIRD <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 17, 2018 9:30 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Nearby: Brown Booby in Pittsfield, Mass.

For those in the southern Vermont area: There's a Brown Booby (second
inland Massachusetts record) on Onota Lake, Pittsfield. It is viewable from
the public beach in Burbank Park.

--
Richard Guthrie
 

Back to top
Date: 8/17/18 7:12 am
From: anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Nearby: Brown Booby in Pittsfield, Mass.
Wonder if it is the same one seen recently on MV by Bill's wife, Christine.


Bob


99+


0


0






-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...>
To: VTBIRD <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 17, 2018 9:30 am
Subject: [VTBIRD] Nearby: Brown Booby in Pittsfield, Mass.

For those in the southern Vermont area: There's a Brown Booby (second
inland Massachusetts record) on Onota Lake, Pittsfield. It is viewable from
the public beach in Burbank Park.

--
Richard Guthrie
 

Back to top
Date: 8/17/18 6:30 am
From: Richard Guthrie <richardpguthrie...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Nearby: Brown Booby in Pittsfield, Mass.
For those in the southern Vermont area: There's a Brown Booby (second
inland Massachusetts record) on Onota Lake, Pittsfield. It is viewable from
the public beach in Burbank Park.

--
Richard Guthrie
 

Back to top
Date: 8/15/18 1:39 pm
From: anneboby <00000038cbe79a41-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Western Vagrant Hummers
Hello Vermont and nearby New York Hummer People - the vagrant western hummer season has begun in New England with the recent sighting of two Selasphorus hummers (thought to be Rufous) in Berkshire County, MA. Please examine the hummers coming to your feeders and if one of them doesn't look "quite right" as a Ruby-throat, you may have a western visitor.


Or, as the season progresses into Sep/Oct and you have a hummer at your feeder beyond the date by which time your "regular" Ruby-throats would have departed, you may have a visiting western vagrant. Identifying these birds accurately as to species/age/sex requires careful notation of plumage features and critical measurements with bird in hand.


As a federally and NY/VT-licensed hummer bander, I am available to help identify any of these rare westerners should your feeder be graced with one.


Bob Yunick
Schenectady, NY
 

Back to top
Date: 8/15/18 1:07 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Coopers hawks Union St Brandon, Aug 15, 2018
As I stepped from the car a red-tail hawk flew by with a kingbird in pursuit. It actually landed briefly on the hawk pecking at it! Tyrannus tyrannus at work. A Cooper's hawk flew by next and a little later a second one appeared.
The most unusual thing was the flight calls of a loon.
Sue Wetmore
Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded
>
> Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 15, 2018 7:00 AM - 8:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 26 species
>
> Wood Duck 1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 23
> Mourning Dove 4
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
> Common Loon 1 Flight call heard several times.
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Cooper's Hawk 2
> Red-tailed Hawk 1
> Barred Owl 1
> Belted Kingfisher 2
> Downy Woodpecker 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Eastern Kingbird 2 One bird harassed the red-tail.
> Blue Jay 1
> American Crow 7
> Tree Swallow 1
> Barn Swallow 9
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> American Robin 1
> Gray Catbird 2
> Cedar Waxwing 11
> American Goldfinch 2
> Song Sparrow 5
> Red-winged Blackbird 16
> Common Yellowthroat 2
> American Redstart 1
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47865052
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/14/18 4:03 pm
From: Paul Miksis <pjmiksis...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Nighthawk
First of “fall”. A lone nighthawk feeding among the swifts high over downtown Brattleboro, 6:45pm, Tuesday.
Paul Miksis
 

Back to top
Date: 8/14/18 5:02 am
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Shorebirding with North Branch Nature Center
Hello VT Birders!

While it may not feel it yet, fall migration is upon us. Shorebirds have
already begun heading south, and now is the time to brush up on your ID
skills. Join me at North Branch for two opportunities to dip into
shorebirds as part of our new Biodiversity University (BioU) series. First
will be an evening presentation next Thursday, August 23, from 7-8:30 pm at
North Branch Nature Center in Montpelier. Second will be a day trip to the
Missisquoi area in search of shorebirds on Saturday, August 25 from
7am-4pm. The trip will costs $35 for NBNC members and $45 for non-members.
Follow the links below for more information and to register. I hope to see
some of you there!

BioU: Shorebirds - Evening Presentation
<https://www.facebook.com/events/286986985185929/>

Shorebird Quest to the Missisquoi Delta
<https://www.eventbrite.com/e/shorebird-quest-to-the-missisquoi-delta-tickets-48654158899?aff=efbevent>

Zac Cota
Teacher Naturalist
North Branch Nature Center


--
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
175 Depot Street
Hyde Park, VT 05655
(802) 696-8613 cell
<zcotaweaver...>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/13/18 11:02 am
From: Ken Copenhaver <copenhvr...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Missisquoi NWR Bird Monitoring Walk
Join us as we monitor a variety of bird species at Missisquoi National
Wildlife Refuge.

This month's Bird Monitoring Walk will be on Saturday August 18, 2018 on
the Jeep Trail. Meet at 8:00 AM at the Louie's Landing fishing access on
Rte 78, about 3.5 miles west of Swanton village. We will meet at the gate
and drive in to the trail head at Mac's Bend. If you have any questions,
email me at <copenhvr...>

The monthly walks gather long-term data on the presence of birds, their
abundance, and changes in populations. The information we gather is entered
into the Vermont e-Bird database where data is stored by the Cornell Lab of
Ornithology. These walks are appropriate for all levels of birders and
provide a wonderful opportunity to learn about birds throughout the
seasons. Led by Ken Copenhaver and Julie Filiberti, Friends of Missisquoi
National Wildlife Refuge board members.

After 100 months of walks we have observed 156 species. (Last month we
added Palm Warbler and Carolina Wren.) Hope to see you there!


--Ken Copenhaver

For information on other refuge events, visit: http://friendsofmissisquoi.
org/

<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>
Virus-free.
www.avg.com
<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/13/18 10:38 am
From: Maeve Kim <maevulus...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] fledgling House Wrens
Three from the latest brood (at least the second clutch this year, possibly the third) fledged this morning and spent over an hour balancing precariously on various bits of lawn furniture, fluttering and lurching from one perch to another as if they were drunk, their stubby little wings beating like mad. Each time they’d make it to the relative safety of a new perch, they’d teeter back and forth for a few seconds and then look all around, as if wanting applause for such brave and daring flights.
Maeve Kim
Jericho Center
 

Back to top
Date: 8/13/18 8:11 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks Union St Brandon, Aug 13, 2018
Bobolinks continue to cruise the hay field.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded message:

> From: <ebird-checklist...>
> Date: August 13, 2018 at 11:04:09 AM EDT
> To: <2birdvt...>
> Subject: eBird Report - Union St Brandon, Aug 13, 2018
>
> Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 13, 2018 7:00 AM - 8:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 26 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Wood Duck 1
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 7
> Belted Kingfisher 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Hairy Woodpecker 1
> Empidonax sp. 1
> Eastern Phoebe 4
> Eastern Kingbird 1
> American Crow 7
> Common Raven 1
> Tree Swallow 1
> Barn Swallow 4
> Black-capped Chickadee 1
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> House Wren 1
> Gray Catbird 1
> European Starling 1
> Cedar Waxwing 5
> Common Yellowthroat 6
> Song Sparrow 6
> Northern Cardinal 2
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 1
> Bobolink 55 birds in hay field where they bred this year. All doing flight call, all looking like female plumage.
> Red-winged Blackbird 2
> Common Grackle 1
> American Goldfinch 2
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47822469
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/13/18 8:09 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Buckner Mem. Preserve/Bald Mtn. - Poultney River/East Bay IBA, Aug 12, 2018
Saturday at Buckner was productive. Such a beautiful location.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Buckner Mem. Preserve/Bald Mtn. - Poultney River/East Bay IBA, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 12, 2018 7:30 AM - 11:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.5 mile(s)
> 36 species
>
> Great Blue Heron 4
> Green Heron 2
> Osprey 2
> Bald Eagle 1
> Ring-billed Gull 2
> Mourning Dove 1
> Belted Kingfisher 2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1
> Downy Woodpecker 2
> Hairy Woodpecker 2
> Northern Flicker 1
> Pileated Woodpecker 2
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Eastern Kingbird 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 3
> Blue Jay 14
> American Crow 2
> Barn Swallow 20
> Black-capped Chickadee 1
> Tufted Titmouse 2
> Carolina Wren 1
> American Robin 1
> Gray Catbird 1
> Brown Thrasher 1
> Black-and-white Warbler 1
> American Redstart 1
> Chipping Sparrow 2
> Field Sparrow 1
> Song Sparrow 2
> Scarlet Tanager 1
> Northern Cardinal 3
> Indigo Bunting 8
> Orchard Oriole 2 female yellowish rather than the more orange color, male deep chestnut color.
> Common Grackle 1
> American Goldfinch 14
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47822321
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/18 10:22 am
From: Mitchell Harrison <000002ef5c1f1853-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] egrets
Two great egrets have been hanging out the past four days on the Connecticut River near the mouth of the Cold River.  Also saw a spotted sandpiper, a great blue heron, common mergansers and many cedar waxwings fly catching.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/11/18 4:25 am
From: JJ Allen <jjapple88...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Black Terns
5 of them in the middle of Lake Champlain off Thompson’s Point working the wind
 

Back to top
Date: 8/10/18 6:58 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks Union St Brandon, Aug 10, 2018
Bobolinks were flying about the fields this morning all singing flight songs.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

>
> Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 10, 2018 8:00 AM - 9:11 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.0 mile(s)
> 25 species
>
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Osprey 1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1
> Belted Kingfisher 1
> Eastern Phoebe 2
> Eastern Kingbird 1
> Blue-headed Vireo 1
> American Crow 8
> Common Raven 1
> Barn Swallow 3
> Cliff Swallow 1
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> Eastern Bluebird 1
> Veery 1 emphatic call note
> Gray Catbird 1
> European Starling 1
> Cedar Waxwing 6
> Common Yellowthroat 2
> American Redstart 1
> Yellow Warbler 1 singing weakly
> Song Sparrow 3
> Northern Cardinal 1
> Bobolink 21 all flying about in field calling
> Red-winged Blackbird 8
> American Goldfinch 4
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47758359
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/9/18 10:03 am
From: carolclyde <carolclyde...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Black backed gulls
Two black backed gulls on Alburgh Dunes State Park beach at 10:30 a.m. mixed in with lots of ring billed gulls.Carol Yarnell 


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9+, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/9/18 7:23 am
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Kestrels
Our Kestrel box was empty this year. We had adults here in the spring, in and out of the box and chasing away any and all interlopers. Poof! One day they were gone. Just yesterday I heard a Kestrel scolding and am thinking that they may have left our box but did not leave the area. Ever hopeful!

Mundi
North Pownal


Mundi Smithers


The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/9/18 6:00 am
From: FRED BATES <batesx2...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Grace Cong. Church, Aug 9, 2018
Two very vocal Peregrine Falcons were observed from our window this morning on the steeple of Grace Church.

Fred and Lana Bates
Rutland
>
> Grace Cong. Church, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 9, 2018 7:00 AM - 7:10 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 1 species
>
> Peregrine Falcon 2
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47739915
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/9/18 3:56 am
From: Jim Mead <jimmead4...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Glossy Ibis and Least Bittern seen at Delta Park
Hello all,

I jumped a Least Bittern while walking toward the west, through the marshy area along the northern edge of the park. It picked up and flew north for about 20’ then put back down into the marsh. Seen at 5:50 a.m. Then I jumped a Glossy Ibis which was standing in the water on the north side of the tall grass, three minutes later. It flew toward the north, came back and landed in the bay for about 30 seconds. It then flew south, circled back and then flew north until it was out of sight. I last saw it at 6:01 a.m. It may return later on. . .

Enjoy Birds,

Jim Mead
 

Back to top
Date: 8/8/18 10:11 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Hermit thrush Hollow Rd., Brandon, Aug 8, 2018
This morning a trio of hermit thrushes sang their lovely melodies while pewees added their plaintive songs. Towhees have given up on tea and just said drink.
One immature warbler fed and refused to be identified---possibilities are, magnolia, pine or prairie warbler.
Sue Wetmore
> Hollow Rd., Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 8, 2018 8:20 AM - 10:20 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.1 mile(s)
> 22 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Turkey Vulture 4 All sitting on individual poet poles.
> Mourning Dove 5
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 5 All singing, some just parts of the song, others the full song.
> Red-eyed Vireo 3
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow 5
> Black-capped Chickadee 2
> Tufted Titmouse 1
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> Hermit Thrush 3 All three singing
> American Robin 7
> Gray Catbird 3
> Cedar Waxwing 7
> Common Yellowthroat 1
> American Redstart 2
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 1
> warbler sp. (Parulidae sp.) 1
> Field Sparrow 1 Still singi
> Song Sparrow 1
> Eastern Towhee 2
> Northern Cardinal 2
> American Goldfinch 7
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47726146
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/7/18 7:15 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Green Herons--Brandon Pearl St, Aug 7, 2018
Up early to beat the heat found the usual high number of green herons foraging in the small marsh on Pearl St. A hopeful male indigo bunting belted out his melody while red-eyed vireos sang their incessant songs. Wood duck family sedately swam about while the Canada geese joined the horses in a pasture.
Sue Wetmore
>
> Brandon Pearl St, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 7, 2018 6:00 AM - 7:30 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.1 mile(s)
> 30 species
>
> Canada Goose 18
> Wood Duck 11
> Mallard 3
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Green Heron 6 all hunting in the small marsh which is being taken over by loosestrife. Small chunky heron, long pointed bill, short legs, chestnut colored neck, dark crown. These have been at this marsh for years in similar numbers. Probable nesters nearby.
> Mourning Dove 5
> Eastern Phoebe 3
> Great Crested Flycatcher 1
> Eastern Kingbird 2
> Red-eyed Vireo (Red-eyed) 3
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow 7
> Barn Swallow 4
> Black-capped Chickadee 5
> White-breasted Nuthatch 2
> House Wren 1
> Carolina Wren 1
> American Robin 13
> Gray Catbird 3
> European Starling 3
> Cedar Waxwing 1
> Black-and-white Warbler 2
> Common Yellowthroat 1
> American Redstart 1
> Song Sparrow 5
> Northern Cardinal 4
> Indigo Bunting 1
> Common Grackle 1
> American Goldfinch 5
> House Sparrow 3
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47705568
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/5/18 4:53 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Caspian terns plus- Shipyard Road, Highgate Springs, Aug 4, 2018
While disappointed in missing the grasshopper sparrow at the airport the show put on by the three species of terns made up for that! In addition a the large congregation of great egrets was a bonus.
Sue Wetmore and Ali Wagner
>
> Shipyard Road, Highgate Springs, Franklin, Vermont, US
> Aug 4, 2018 9:20 AM - 10:05 AM
> Protocol: Stationary
> 25 species
>
> Wood Duck 46
> Mallard 38
> American Black Duck 4
> Pied-billed Grebe 4
> Double-crested Cormorant 6
> Great Blue Heron 4
> Great Egret 28 large all white heron sized birds, all perched on various sites.
> Osprey 3
> Spotted Sandpiper 2
> Ring-billed Gull 42
> Caspian Tern 31 large tern with heavy orange bill, seen perched and fishing. One pair had a juvenile begging food.
> Black Tern 4
> Common Tern 6
> Mourning Dove 6
> Belted Kingfisher 2
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Eastern Kingbird 1
> Purple Martin 1
> American Robin 3
> European Starling 1
> Song Sparrow 1
> Northern Cardinal 1
> Red-winged Blackbird 2
> American Goldfinch 4
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47653441
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/18 4:05 pm
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Sparrow
Forgot to say a field sparrow was heard at the Franklin Airport.
Sue Wetmore & Ali Wagner

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/18 11:26 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Sparrows
The only sparrow present at the Franklin County Airport was a song sparrow. Grasshopper, vesper and Savannah were not to be found.

Sue Wetmore & Ali Wagner

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/18 3:55 pm
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mansfield wrap-up
VCE's field crew ascended to the Mansfield ridgeline this past Tuesday for
a final summer banding session, thankful that a threatening forecast never
materialized. Very warm temperatures, light winds and mostly clear skies
made for an evening that couldn't have been more summerlike and
comfortable. Birds, however, were extremely quiet, and captures
surprisingly low, as they were last week. Despite setting up more nets than
usual (27), we captured only 5 individuals by nightfall. Even reliable dusk
vocalizers like robins, Bicknell's Thrushes, and White-throated Sparrows
went virtually silent. We were easily consoled, however, by spectacular
planetary viewing through my spotting scope, with Venus, Jupiter, Saturn
and Mars all drawing rave reviews.

Forgetting how much shorter daylength has become since the June solstice,
we were back on the ridgeline well before 4:30 am to open nets. Clouds had
moved across the sky, and we waited a good 30 minutes for dawn to break. As
it turns out, losing that extra bit of sleep was a very worthwhile
sacrifice, as our first net check produced a much-anticipated Northern
Saw-whet Owl, a bird I had rashly predicted (and even tried to lure in with
post-dusk playback) for the past two weeks. All present were thrilled, and
everyone was able to enjoy a handheld encounter with the diminutive,
remarkably placid bird. We seldom capture this nocturnal predator on
Mansfield (understandably, as we don't run nets at night), but N. Saw-whets
are probably more common than any of us suspect, especially in years like
this following bountiful cone crops, when rodent prey (e.g., red-backed
voles) are more abundant.

The remainder of Wednesday morning yielded surprisingly little action,
either in or outside of our nets. We ended up with a 2-day total of only 24
captures (compared to 62 on 26-27 June, 53 on 10-11 July, 46 on 18-19
July). Especially perplexing was the scarcity of young-of-the-year birds --
only 11, of which 5 were non-local Black-throated Blue and Green warblers.
Unless the current Mansfield breeding season was a bust, with widespread
nest failures, I simply can't explain the near-absence of free-flying
juveniles of common montane forests species in our nets -- we didn't
capture a single hatching-year Blackpoll or Yellow-rumped warbler,
Dark-eyed Junco, or White-throated Sparrow! Our season-long observations
indicated that red squirrels were almost non-existent (despite the immense
2017 cone crop), so nesting productivity should have been high. Conditions
until recently have been abnormally dry, and we did not sample insects or
other arthropods, but it seems unlikely that food supply per se limited
breeding success. There were no catastrophic weather events, so
weather-related nest failures seem unlikely. It could simply be that our
limited netting (one day per week) doesn't provide a representative sample
of the birds present in any given week. It will be interesting to return in
mid-September and see who is still on the ridgeline -- though of course
we'll also catch passage migrants then -- and to learn what fall banding
operations like Manomet in coastal MA experience for captures of montane
species like Blackpolls and Yellow-rumps.

Nearly every adult passerine we captured was well into its flight feather
molt, which may explain lower captures of that age class, as heavily
molting birds are not inclined to fly much. One male Blackpoll Warbler was
almost startling in appearance, literally intermediate between its breeding
and winter plumages. A male Bicknell's Thrush, first banded in 2013 and
captured twice already this season, was likely incapable of any sustained
flight. These two birds signal the seasonal transition that is underway, as
long-distance migrants undergo their all-important annual molt. This
process, which replaces worn feathers with a new and more robust set, is
crucial for the impending fall migration. Molt, especially of flight
feathers, is energetically costly, so most songbirds sandwich it between
the end of nesting and the beginning of migration.

This individual thrush (and many others on the mountain) has only been back
from its Caribbean winter quarters for 2+ months, yet it is already
preparing to return! I couldn't help being struck by this realization, and
that VCE will again follow the species down there, as we have since 1994. I
fully expect we'll return to the Sierra Maestra of southeastern Cuba for a
third consecutive winter, as we seek to determine the species'
distribution, abundance and habitat use on the island. For anyone
interested, VCE's good friend (and professional videographer) Michael Sacca
has put together a nice piece from my iPhone video clips in Cuba's Pico
Turquino National Park this past January-February. You can view it here:
https://youtu.be/prgObKVYmyk.

Returning the focus to Mansfield, our two-day banding total of 24 birds (17
last week) included:

Northern Saw-whet Owl -- 1 new adult, probable male (small body size, wing
length), captured in pre-dawn.
Bicknell's Thrush -- 5 (4 new juveniles, 1 within-season retrap of a
heavily-molting male originally banded in 2013.
Swainson's Thrush -- 2 new adults (male in early primary molt, female in
heavy flight feather molt)
American Robin -- 2 (new adult male and free-flying juvenile)
American Redstart -- 1 new hatching-year male
Blackpoll Warbler -- 4 (3 new adults [1 male, 2 females]; one within-retrap
female, all in heavy molt
Black-throated Blue Warbler -- 2 hatching-year females
Black-throated Green Warbler -- 4 (1 adult male in early primary molt, 3
hatching-year birds)
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- 1 new SY female, not yet molting
White-throated Sparrow -- 2 adults (new male in early primary molt,
within-season retrap female)

View our Wednesday morning eBird checklist (with several of Mike Sargent's
excellent photos) at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47609999

This session concluded our 2018 breeding season field work on Mansfield.
Despite the past two weeks' low success rate, we had an excellent season
overall, with > 800 mist net captures. I'll summarize and give some context
to these sometime in the next couple of weeks. Team VCE will return for a
wrap-up outing in mid-September, both to see which breeders are still
present and to intercept some migrants. That trip rarely fails to produce a
surprise or two, so stay tuned.

To see several others of Mike Sargent's outstanding photos, check out our
blog post at
https://vtecostudies.org/blog/mansfield-wrap-molt-migration-and-a-crowd-pleasing-owl/.
Thanks to all who visited and participated during the past 10 weeks!

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/

<http://vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/18 3:17 pm
From: Roy Zartarian <royz...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
Check out North Hero State Park at the turtle nesting area. I was there
yesterday (Thursday, 8/2) & saw at least 35 Caspian Terns.

Roy Zartarian
Visiting Connecticut birder

On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 10:13 AM, Tom Slayton <slayton.tom...> wrote:

> Could someone post a list of good places to see these congregations of
> Caspian Terns?
> Thanks!
>
> Tom Slayton
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/18 1:20 pm
From: John Holme <00000062fa0d6268-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] broad-winged hawk
We had a broad-winged hawk perched in our yard in Chester yesterday Aug.2 near a catbird nest.  I yelled at him & chased him away.  He returned at dusk to another part of our yard & we let him stay, hoping he'll find some field mice or voles to eat.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/18 9:07 am
From: Chip Darmstadt <chip...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
Delta Park is a good place Tom! Specifically, the bridge over the Winooski.
<chip...>

On Fri, Aug 3, 2018, 10:13 AM Tom Slayton <slayton.tom...> wrote:

> Could someone post a list of good places to see these congregations of
> Caspian Terns?
> Thanks!
>
> Tom Slayton
>
> On Wed, Aug 1, 2018 at 4:10 PM, David Capen <David.Capen...> wrote:
>
> > Here are some simple numbers to complement the detailed analysis
> presented
> > by Ian Worley, a day ago. In cooperation with TNC and NY DEC, I have
> > counted nests of most bird species on Four Bros Islands for may years.
> > Caspian Terns first nested on Island C in 2004, 5 nests. The nest count
> > increased steadily, reaching 76 in 2011 and 107 in 2012. By 2016, I
> counted
> > 169 nests. Numbers dropped to 145 in 2017 and 114 in 2018.
> >
> >
> > Island C also is the site of a large colony of Ring-billed Gulls, and
> > their numbers have increased in recent years, from about 9,000 nesting
> > pairs in 2009 to 13,000 pairs in 2018. Terns, for many years, maintained
> > their own piece of the island, but ring-bills have now crowded into the
> > tern neighborhood. This makes it more difficult to identify and count
> tern
> > nests, and it might be encouraging terns to pioneer other nesting sites.
> > Do we know of any other nesting sites in Lake Champlain?
> >
> >
> > Another note from Four Bros Island nest counts is that Great Egrets built
> > 18 nests in 2018, and all appeared to produce young.
> >
> >
> > Dave Capen
> >
> > Grand Isle
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic
> > digest system <LISTSERV...>
> > Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 12:00 AM
> > To: <VTBIRD...>
> > Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)
> >
> > There is 1 message totaling 131 lines in this issue.
> >
> > Topics of the day:
> >
> > 1. Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley
> this
> > year?
> >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> >
> > Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 20:36:53 -0400
> > From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
> > Subject: Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain
> Valley
> > this year?
> >
> > Hello all,
> >
> > August is upon us and Caspian Terns have been congregating, youngsters
> > and adults, throughout Lake Champlain.
> >
> > Folks have been talking about how many Caspian Terns there are this
> > year, including both north and south of the Champlain Bridge. There are
> > wonderings if Caspian Terns have been increasing in number in the
> > Champlain Valley in recent years? So I thought checking some numbers
> > from eBird for the past seven years would be interesting.
> >
> > Here is how I started:
> >
> > ----I found the two consecutive days within a week of July 31st that had
> > the highest daily totals of bird observations. Totals are the sum of the
> > highest number of birds reported at each site reporting at least one
> > Caspian Tern in the Champlain Valley that day
> >
> > ---- I then compared those numbers with a variety of parameters, using
> > the day of the pair with the highest total.
> >
> > Here are some tables:
> >
> > Highest day's total Caspian Terns
> > 2018 --- 112
> > 2017 --- 62
> > 2016 --- 17
> > 2015 --- 50
> > 2014 --- 54
> > 2013 --- 7
> > 2012 --- 50
> >
> > Highest number of Caspian Terns at a single site:
> > 2018 --- 43
> > 2017 --- 54
> > 2016 --- 8
> > 2015 --- 42
> > 2014 --- 45
> > 2013 --- 3
> > 2012 --- 41
> >
> > Average number of Caspian Terns at a single site per day with most
> > birds. "n" equals the number of different sites that day.
> > 2018 --- 12.2 n=10
> > 2017 --- 10.3 n=6
> > 2016 --- 2.1 n=8
> > 2015 --- 12.5 n=4
> > 2014 --- 18.0 n=3
> > 2013 --- 2.3 n=3
> > 2012 --- 16.7 n=3
> >
> > These numbers seem to say that this time of year, with mixtures of
> > adults and juveniles in the Champlain valley, that
> > (a) there can be notable variation among years in the abundance of
> > counted Caspian Terns,
> > (b) locally reported high counts at sites typically top out at 40-50
> > birds,
> > (c) the two of the three most recent years have more birds than any
> > of the previous five years,
> > (d) this year has a remarkable jump in the total numbers counted.
> > (e) Caspian Terns are becoming more widespread and/or more birders
> > are encountering them (vis-a-vis the "n" number)
> >
> > Now, there are many factors that come into play with numbers per day. By
> > selecting max numbers from a two week period, the hope is that a number
> > of those factors will be somewhat muted. One factor that we can get a
> > window on is the number of birders via the number of checklists. A
> > reasonable question is whether more birders mean more birds counted?
> >
> > Using the eBird graphs I obtained the number of checklists from the four
> > Vermont Champlain Basin Counties for the last week of July for each of
> > the seven years. Also among the graphs is one that shows how many of
> > the checklists have at least one Caspian Tern. A vertical line moveable
> > by the cursor will yield exact numbers. This allows the calculation of
> > the percentage of checklists with at least one of the terns.
> >
> > Testing to see if more checklists mean more counted birds, here are the
> > numbers: (checklist numbers vs. bird numbers)
> >
> > --- 315-112 (2018)
> > --- 278-17 (2016)
> > --- 272-62 (2017)
> > --- 183-54 (2014)
> > --- 169-50 (2012)
> > --- 164-50 (2015)
> > --- 152-7 (2013)
> >
> > Well this tells us that number of checklists can be divided into two
> > groups, 2016-2018 with more, and 2012-2015 with less. It also tells us
> > that the least number of checklists has the least number of birds, and
> > the largest number of checklist has the largest number of birds --- but
> > otherwise it is a jumble.
> >
> > Finally, are Caspian Terns more frequently reported percentage-wise in
> > recent times? Here are percentage of all checklists that had at least
> > one Caspian Tern on it:
> >
> > 2018 --- 12.4%
> > 2017 --- 3.5%
> > 2016 --- 10.2%
> > 2015 --- 2.4%
> > 2014 --- 3.9%
> > 2013 --- 5.0%
> > 2012 --- 7.3%
> >
> > The answer is "kinda", noting that the two highest percentages are in
> > the last three years. Otherwise there is little difference per year.
> >
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > Sooooo ...... What about the our opening question, are there more
> > Caspian Terns in recent years in the Champlain Basin?
> >
> > The answer seems to be: Yes, but the analysis cannot determine if it is
> > steady growth, or growth wearing the cloak of many factors that affect
> > population size and birder activity on an annual or multi-year basis.
> >
> > One thing is sure his year, there are a lot of birders gazing on many
> > Caspian Terns all up an down the lake right now, at this point in their
> > breeding season!
> >
> > Ian
> >
> > ------------------------------
> >
> > End of VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)
> > *************************************************************
> >
>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/18 7:13 am
From: Tom Slayton <slayton.tom...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
Could someone post a list of good places to see these congregations of
Caspian Terns?
Thanks!

Tom Slayton

On Wed, Aug 1, 2018 at 4:10 PM, David Capen <David.Capen...> wrote:

> Here are some simple numbers to complement the detailed analysis presented
> by Ian Worley, a day ago. In cooperation with TNC and NY DEC, I have
> counted nests of most bird species on Four Bros Islands for may years.
> Caspian Terns first nested on Island C in 2004, 5 nests. The nest count
> increased steadily, reaching 76 in 2011 and 107 in 2012. By 2016, I counted
> 169 nests. Numbers dropped to 145 in 2017 and 114 in 2018.
>
>
> Island C also is the site of a large colony of Ring-billed Gulls, and
> their numbers have increased in recent years, from about 9,000 nesting
> pairs in 2009 to 13,000 pairs in 2018. Terns, for many years, maintained
> their own piece of the island, but ring-bills have now crowded into the
> tern neighborhood. This makes it more difficult to identify and count tern
> nests, and it might be encouraging terns to pioneer other nesting sites.
> Do we know of any other nesting sites in Lake Champlain?
>
>
> Another note from Four Bros Island nest counts is that Great Egrets built
> 18 nests in 2018, and all appeared to produce young.
>
>
> Dave Capen
>
> Grand Isle
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic
> digest system <LISTSERV...>
> Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 12:00 AM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)
>
> There is 1 message totaling 131 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this
> year?
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 20:36:53 -0400
> From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
> Subject: Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley
> this year?
>
> Hello all,
>
> August is upon us and Caspian Terns have been congregating, youngsters
> and adults, throughout Lake Champlain.
>
> Folks have been talking about how many Caspian Terns there are this
> year, including both north and south of the Champlain Bridge. There are
> wonderings if Caspian Terns have been increasing in number in the
> Champlain Valley in recent years? So I thought checking some numbers
> from eBird for the past seven years would be interesting.
>
> Here is how I started:
>
> ----I found the two consecutive days within a week of July 31st that had
> the highest daily totals of bird observations. Totals are the sum of the
> highest number of birds reported at each site reporting at least one
> Caspian Tern in the Champlain Valley that day
>
> ---- I then compared those numbers with a variety of parameters, using
> the day of the pair with the highest total.
>
> Here are some tables:
>
> Highest day's total Caspian Terns
> 2018 --- 112
> 2017 --- 62
> 2016 --- 17
> 2015 --- 50
> 2014 --- 54
> 2013 --- 7
> 2012 --- 50
>
> Highest number of Caspian Terns at a single site:
> 2018 --- 43
> 2017 --- 54
> 2016 --- 8
> 2015 --- 42
> 2014 --- 45
> 2013 --- 3
> 2012 --- 41
>
> Average number of Caspian Terns at a single site per day with most
> birds. "n" equals the number of different sites that day.
> 2018 --- 12.2 n=10
> 2017 --- 10.3 n=6
> 2016 --- 2.1 n=8
> 2015 --- 12.5 n=4
> 2014 --- 18.0 n=3
> 2013 --- 2.3 n=3
> 2012 --- 16.7 n=3
>
> These numbers seem to say that this time of year, with mixtures of
> adults and juveniles in the Champlain valley, that
> (a) there can be notable variation among years in the abundance of
> counted Caspian Terns,
> (b) locally reported high counts at sites typically top out at 40-50
> birds,
> (c) the two of the three most recent years have more birds than any
> of the previous five years,
> (d) this year has a remarkable jump in the total numbers counted.
> (e) Caspian Terns are becoming more widespread and/or more birders
> are encountering them (vis-a-vis the "n" number)
>
> Now, there are many factors that come into play with numbers per day. By
> selecting max numbers from a two week period, the hope is that a number
> of those factors will be somewhat muted. One factor that we can get a
> window on is the number of birders via the number of checklists. A
> reasonable question is whether more birders mean more birds counted?
>
> Using the eBird graphs I obtained the number of checklists from the four
> Vermont Champlain Basin Counties for the last week of July for each of
> the seven years. Also among the graphs is one that shows how many of
> the checklists have at least one Caspian Tern. A vertical line moveable
> by the cursor will yield exact numbers. This allows the calculation of
> the percentage of checklists with at least one of the terns.
>
> Testing to see if more checklists mean more counted birds, here are the
> numbers: (checklist numbers vs. bird numbers)
>
> --- 315-112 (2018)
> --- 278-17 (2016)
> --- 272-62 (2017)
> --- 183-54 (2014)
> --- 169-50 (2012)
> --- 164-50 (2015)
> --- 152-7 (2013)
>
> Well this tells us that number of checklists can be divided into two
> groups, 2016-2018 with more, and 2012-2015 with less. It also tells us
> that the least number of checklists has the least number of birds, and
> the largest number of checklist has the largest number of birds --- but
> otherwise it is a jumble.
>
> Finally, are Caspian Terns more frequently reported percentage-wise in
> recent times? Here are percentage of all checklists that had at least
> one Caspian Tern on it:
>
> 2018 --- 12.4%
> 2017 --- 3.5%
> 2016 --- 10.2%
> 2015 --- 2.4%
> 2014 --- 3.9%
> 2013 --- 5.0%
> 2012 --- 7.3%
>
> The answer is "kinda", noting that the two highest percentages are in
> the last three years. Otherwise there is little difference per year.
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Sooooo ...... What about the our opening question, are there more
> Caspian Terns in recent years in the Champlain Basin?
>
> The answer seems to be: Yes, but the analysis cannot determine if it is
> steady growth, or growth wearing the cloak of many factors that affect
> population size and birder activity on an annual or multi-year basis.
>
> One thing is sure his year, there are a lot of birders gazing on many
> Caspian Terns all up an down the lake right now, at this point in their
> breeding season!
>
> Ian
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)
> *************************************************************
>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/18 7:08 am
From: Kay Johnson <0000002d57029402-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
David and others - Do you know if Island C was once colloquially called Grandma Cameron Island. My husband said Charlie Clark told him that name and my husband always called it that. We visited the island he knew by that name many times (1998-2008) to fish and watch the nesting Caspian terns and Ring-billed gulls. Those were good times. If a friend will take me, I will visit again based on your report. Best, Kay in Hinesburg


Kay Johnson
<kj813...>




-----Original Message-----
From: David Capen <David.Capen...>
To: VTBIRD <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Wed, Aug 1, 2018 4:11 pm
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance

Here are some simple numbers to complement the detailed analysis presented by Ian Worley, a day ago. In cooperation with TNC and NY DEC, I have counted nests of most bird species on Four Bros Islands for may years. Caspian Terns first nested on Island C in 2004, 5 nests. The nest count increased steadily, reaching 76 in 2011 and 107 in 2012. By 2016, I counted 169 nests. Numbers dropped to 145 in 2017 and 114 in 2018.


Island C also is the site of a large colony of Ring-billed Gulls, and their numbers have increased in recent years, from about 9,000 nesting pairs in 2009 to 13,000 pairs in 2018. Terns, for many years, maintained their own piece of the island, but ring-bills have now crowded into the tern neighborhood. This makes it more difficult to identify and count tern nests, and it might be encouraging terns to pioneer other nesting sites. Do we know of any other nesting sites in Lake Champlain?


Another note from Four Bros Island nest counts is that Great Egrets built 18 nests in 2018, and all appeared to produce young.


Dave Capen

Grand Isle




________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 12:00 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)

There is 1 message totaling 131 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this
year?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 20:36:53 -0400
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this year?

Hello all,

August is upon us and Caspian Terns have been congregating, youngsters
and adults, throughout Lake Champlain.

Folks have been talking about how many Caspian Terns there are this
year, including both north and south of the Champlain Bridge. There are
wonderings if Caspian Terns have been increasing in number in the
Champlain Valley in recent years? So I thought checking some numbers
from eBird for the past seven years would be interesting.

Here is how I started:

----I found the two consecutive days within a week of July 31st that had
the highest daily totals of bird observations. Totals are the sum of the
highest number of birds reported at each site reporting at least one
Caspian Tern in the Champlain Valley that day

---- I then compared those numbers with a variety of parameters, using
the day of the pair with the highest total.

Here are some tables:

Highest day's total Caspian Terns
2018 --- 112
2017 --- 62
2016 --- 17
2015 --- 50
2014 --- 54
2013 --- 7
2012 --- 50

Highest number of Caspian Terns at a single site:
2018 --- 43
2017 --- 54
2016 --- 8
2015 --- 42
2014 --- 45
2013 --- 3
2012 --- 41

Average number of Caspian Terns at a single site per day with most
birds. "n" equals the number of different sites that day.
2018 --- 12.2 n=10
2017 --- 10.3 n=6
2016 --- 2.1 n=8
2015 --- 12.5 n=4
2014 --- 18.0 n=3
2013 --- 2.3 n=3
2012 --- 16.7 n=3

These numbers seem to say that this time of year, with mixtures of
adults and juveniles in the Champlain valley, that
(a) there can be notable variation among years in the abundance of
counted Caspian Terns,
(b) locally reported high counts at sites typically top out at 40-50
birds,
(c) the two of the three most recent years have more birds than any
of the previous five years,
(d) this year has a remarkable jump in the total numbers counted.
(e) Caspian Terns are becoming more widespread and/or more birders
are encountering them (vis-a-vis the "n" number)

Now, there are many factors that come into play with numbers per day. By
selecting max numbers from a two week period, the hope is that a number
of those factors will be somewhat muted. One factor that we can get a
window on is the number of birders via the number of checklists. A
reasonable question is whether more birders mean more birds counted?

Using the eBird graphs I obtained the number of checklists from the four
Vermont Champlain Basin Counties for the last week of July for each of
the seven years. Also among the graphs is one that shows how many of
the checklists have at least one Caspian Tern. A vertical line moveable
by the cursor will yield exact numbers. This allows the calculation of
the percentage of checklists with at least one of the terns.

Testing to see if more checklists mean more counted birds, here are the
numbers: (checklist numbers vs. bird numbers)

--- 315-112 (2018)
--- 278-17 (2016)
--- 272-62 (2017)
--- 183-54 (2014)
--- 169-50 (2012)
--- 164-50 (2015)
--- 152-7 (2013)

Well this tells us that number of checklists can be divided into two
groups, 2016-2018 with more, and 2012-2015 with less. It also tells us
that the least number of checklists has the least number of birds, and
the largest number of checklist has the largest number of birds --- but
otherwise it is a jumble.

Finally, are Caspian Terns more frequently reported percentage-wise in
recent times? Here are percentage of all checklists that had at least
one Caspian Tern on it:

2018 --- 12.4%
2017 --- 3.5%
2016 --- 10.2%
2015 --- 2.4%
2014 --- 3.9%
2013 --- 5.0%
2012 --- 7.3%

The answer is "kinda", noting that the two highest percentages are in
the last three years. Otherwise there is little difference per year.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sooooo ...... What about the our opening question, are there more
Caspian Terns in recent years in the Champlain Basin?

The answer seems to be: Yes, but the analysis cannot determine if it is
steady growth, or growth wearing the cloak of many factors that affect
population size and birder activity on an annual or multi-year basis.

One thing is sure his year, there are a lot of birders gazing on many
Caspian Terns all up an down the lake right now, at this point in their
breeding season!

Ian

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)
*************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/18 3:22 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Grasshopper sp
Has anyone seen the grasshopper sparrow at the Franklin County Airport in the past two days?
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/18 6:12 pm
From: Steve Smith <ethologicac...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Chickering Bog closed ?
Didn't notice till when it's closed but it is closed.

> On Jul 29, 2018, at 6:45 AM, Henry Burton <hwb1919...> wrote:
>
> I was told Chickering Bog was closed till August 1st due to nesting
> Goshawks. Is that true ?
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/18 9:40 am
From: Pat Folsom <pfols...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Lyla Slayton
Whoops, Lyla's service is Friday, August 10th.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Pat Folsom" <pfols...>
To: "VT Bird" <VTBIRD...>
Sent: Thursday, August 2, 2018 5:37:16 AM
Subject: [VTBIRD] Lyla Slayton

Hi Friends,

Some sad news for all who knew her - Our friend, Lyla Slayton, of Highgate has passed away. She had struggled with health issues, including Parkinson's Disease, in recent years. This year she was not able to be at her beloved camp in Highgate Springs, where she welcomed birders to watch for shorebirds from her lawn for many years.

Lyla's obituary is on the Day Funeral Home website in Randolph. Her service will be Friday, Sept. 10 at 1:30 at the funeral home.

RIP, Lyla

Pat Folsom,
Waitsfield
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/18 5:52 am
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] New eBird Checklist Review Messages
Hello Vermont eBirders,

We are excited to announce a small change to the checklist view page that
reflects an important part of eBird’s data quality. Every eBird record goes
through a review process to make sure that the publicly-displayed data are
useful for eBirders everywhere. This data quality process occurs on two
basic levels: the checklist (e.g., did the checklist cover a single birding
spot or an entire country?), and the species (e.g., was the species
correctly identified, counted properly). We have now added new messages
that highlight the importance of the checklist review, how it impacts
public display of records, and, in some cases, how checklists can be
improved to make them useful for science and your fellow eBirders.


Learn more on the Vermont eBird blog -
https://ebird.org/vt/news/ebird-checklist-review-messages

And w
e’d like to thank the volunteer data experts that help us keep Vermont
eBird data strong – Zac Cota, Sue Elliott, Spencer Hardy, Kyle Jones, Kent
McFarland, Craig Provost, and Ian Worley. Every record entered into eBird
is checked for accuracy, first by automated filters that flag unusual
records, and then by expert reviewers who devote their personal time to
ensure that your lists and the eBird database are as accurate as possible.
Additionally, Kent McFarland, Ron Payne, and Ian Worley are hotspot editors
for Vermont. If you run into them while out birding, let them know you are
thankful for their hard work and contribution behind the scenes at Vermont
eBird
!

Thanks,
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201
Twitter: @KPMcFarland
val.vtecostudies.org

<http://vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 8/2/18 5:37 am
From: Pat Folsom <pfols...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Lyla Slayton
Hi Friends,

Some sad news for all who knew her - Our friend, Lyla Slayton, of Highgate has passed away. She had struggled with health issues, including Parkinson's Disease, in recent years. This year she was not able to be at her beloved camp in Highgate Springs, where she welcomed birders to watch for shorebirds from her lawn for many years.

Lyla's obituary is on the Day Funeral Home website in Randolph. Her service will be Friday, Sept. 10 at 1:30 at the funeral home.

RIP, Lyla

Pat Folsom,
Waitsfield
 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/18 1:19 pm
From: LaBarr, Mark <MLaBARR...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
Thanks Dave...no Caspian's nesting on the common tern islands although I see them there from time to time. They like to roost in City Bay N. Hero.

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 1, 2018, at 4:11 PM, "David Capen" <David.Capen...> wrote:
>
> Here are some simple numbers to complement the detailed analysis presented by Ian Worley, a day ago. In cooperation with TNC and NY DEC, I have counted nests of most bird species on Four Bros Islands for may years. Caspian Terns first nested on Island C in 2004, 5 nests. The nest count increased steadily, reaching 76 in 2011 and 107 in 2012. By 2016, I counted 169 nests. Numbers dropped to 145 in 2017 and 114 in 2018.
>
>
> Island C also is the site of a large colony of Ring-billed Gulls, and their numbers have increased in recent years, from about 9,000 nesting pairs in 2009 to 13,000 pairs in 2018. Terns, for many years, maintained their own piece of the island, but ring-bills have now crowded into the tern neighborhood. This makes it more difficult to identify and count tern nests, and it might be encouraging terns to pioneer other nesting sites. Do we know of any other nesting sites in Lake Champlain?
>
>
> Another note from Four Bros Island nest counts is that Great Egrets built 18 nests in 2018, and all appeared to produce young.
>
>
> Dave Capen
>
> Grand Isle
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...>
> Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 12:00 AM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)
>
> There is 1 message totaling 131 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this
> year?
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 20:36:53 -0400
> From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
> Subject: Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this year?
>
> Hello all,
>
> August is upon us and Caspian Terns have been congregating, youngsters
> and adults, throughout Lake Champlain.
>
> Folks have been talking about how many Caspian Terns there are this
> year, including both north and south of the Champlain Bridge. There are
> wonderings if Caspian Terns have been increasing in number in the
> Champlain Valley in recent years? So I thought checking some numbers
> from eBird for the past seven years would be interesting.
>
> Here is how I started:
>
> ----I found the two consecutive days within a week of July 31st that had
> the highest daily totals of bird observations. Totals are the sum of the
> highest number of birds reported at each site reporting at least one
> Caspian Tern in the Champlain Valley that day
>
> ---- I then compared those numbers with a variety of parameters, using
> the day of the pair with the highest total.
>
> Here are some tables:
>
> Highest day's total Caspian Terns
> 2018 --- 112
> 2017 --- 62
> 2016 --- 17
> 2015 --- 50
> 2014 --- 54
> 2013 --- 7
> 2012 --- 50
>
> Highest number of Caspian Terns at a single site:
> 2018 --- 43
> 2017 --- 54
> 2016 --- 8
> 2015 --- 42
> 2014 --- 45
> 2013 --- 3
> 2012 --- 41
>
> Average number of Caspian Terns at a single site per day with most
> birds. "n" equals the number of different sites that day.
> 2018 --- 12.2 n=10
> 2017 --- 10.3 n=6
> 2016 --- 2.1 n=8
> 2015 --- 12.5 n=4
> 2014 --- 18.0 n=3
> 2013 --- 2.3 n=3
> 2012 --- 16.7 n=3
>
> These numbers seem to say that this time of year, with mixtures of
> adults and juveniles in the Champlain valley, that
> (a) there can be notable variation among years in the abundance of
> counted Caspian Terns,
> (b) locally reported high counts at sites typically top out at 40-50
> birds,
> (c) the two of the three most recent years have more birds than any
> of the previous five years,
> (d) this year has a remarkable jump in the total numbers counted.
> (e) Caspian Terns are becoming more widespread and/or more birders
> are encountering them (vis-a-vis the "n" number)
>
> Now, there are many factors that come into play with numbers per day. By
> selecting max numbers from a two week period, the hope is that a number
> of those factors will be somewhat muted. One factor that we can get a
> window on is the number of birders via the number of checklists. A
> reasonable question is whether more birders mean more birds counted?
>
> Using the eBird graphs I obtained the number of checklists from the four
> Vermont Champlain Basin Counties for the last week of July for each of
> the seven years. Also among the graphs is one that shows how many of
> the checklists have at least one Caspian Tern. A vertical line moveable
> by the cursor will yield exact numbers. This allows the calculation of
> the percentage of checklists with at least one of the terns.
>
> Testing to see if more checklists mean more counted birds, here are the
> numbers: (checklist numbers vs. bird numbers)
>
> --- 315-112 (2018)
> --- 278-17 (2016)
> --- 272-62 (2017)
> --- 183-54 (2014)
> --- 169-50 (2012)
> --- 164-50 (2015)
> --- 152-7 (2013)
>
> Well this tells us that number of checklists can be divided into two
> groups, 2016-2018 with more, and 2012-2015 with less. It also tells us
> that the least number of checklists has the least number of birds, and
> the largest number of checklist has the largest number of birds --- but
> otherwise it is a jumble.
>
> Finally, are Caspian Terns more frequently reported percentage-wise in
> recent times? Here are percentage of all checklists that had at least
> one Caspian Tern on it:
>
> 2018 --- 12.4%
> 2017 --- 3.5%
> 2016 --- 10.2%
> 2015 --- 2.4%
> 2014 --- 3.9%
> 2013 --- 5.0%
> 2012 --- 7.3%
>
> The answer is "kinda", noting that the two highest percentages are in
> the last three years. Otherwise there is little difference per year.
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Sooooo ...... What about the our opening question, are there more
> Caspian Terns in recent years in the Champlain Basin?
>
> The answer seems to be: Yes, but the analysis cannot determine if it is
> steady growth, or growth wearing the cloak of many factors that affect
> population size and birder activity on an annual or multi-year basis.
>
> One thing is sure his year, there are a lot of birders gazing on many
> Caspian Terns all up an down the lake right now, at this point in their
> breeding season!
>
> Ian
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)
> *************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/18 1:11 pm
From: David Capen <David.Capen...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Caspian Tern Abundance
Here are some simple numbers to complement the detailed analysis presented by Ian Worley, a day ago. In cooperation with TNC and NY DEC, I have counted nests of most bird species on Four Bros Islands for may years. Caspian Terns first nested on Island C in 2004, 5 nests. The nest count increased steadily, reaching 76 in 2011 and 107 in 2012. By 2016, I counted 169 nests. Numbers dropped to 145 in 2017 and 114 in 2018.


Island C also is the site of a large colony of Ring-billed Gulls, and their numbers have increased in recent years, from about 9,000 nesting pairs in 2009 to 13,000 pairs in 2018. Terns, for many years, maintained their own piece of the island, but ring-bills have now crowded into the tern neighborhood. This makes it more difficult to identify and count tern nests, and it might be encouraging terns to pioneer other nesting sites. Do we know of any other nesting sites in Lake Champlain?


Another note from Four Bros Island nest counts is that Great Egrets built 18 nests in 2018, and all appeared to produce young.


Dave Capen

Grand Isle




________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 12:00 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)

There is 1 message totaling 131 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this
year?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Jul 2018 20:36:53 -0400
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this year?

Hello all,

August is upon us and Caspian Terns have been congregating, youngsters
and adults, throughout Lake Champlain.

Folks have been talking about how many Caspian Terns there are this
year, including both north and south of the Champlain Bridge. There are
wonderings if Caspian Terns have been increasing in number in the
Champlain Valley in recent years? So I thought checking some numbers
from eBird for the past seven years would be interesting.

Here is how I started:

----I found the two consecutive days within a week of July 31st that had
the highest daily totals of bird observations. Totals are the sum of the
highest number of birds reported at each site reporting at least one
Caspian Tern in the Champlain Valley that day

---- I then compared those numbers with a variety of parameters, using
the day of the pair with the highest total.

Here are some tables:

Highest day's total Caspian Terns
2018 --- 112
2017 --- 62
2016 --- 17
2015 --- 50
2014 --- 54
2013 --- 7
2012 --- 50

Highest number of Caspian Terns at a single site:
2018 --- 43
2017 --- 54
2016 --- 8
2015 --- 42
2014 --- 45
2013 --- 3
2012 --- 41

Average number of Caspian Terns at a single site per day with most
birds. "n" equals the number of different sites that day.
2018 --- 12.2 n=10
2017 --- 10.3 n=6
2016 --- 2.1 n=8
2015 --- 12.5 n=4
2014 --- 18.0 n=3
2013 --- 2.3 n=3
2012 --- 16.7 n=3

These numbers seem to say that this time of year, with mixtures of
adults and juveniles in the Champlain valley, that
(a) there can be notable variation among years in the abundance of
counted Caspian Terns,
(b) locally reported high counts at sites typically top out at 40-50
birds,
(c) the two of the three most recent years have more birds than any
of the previous five years,
(d) this year has a remarkable jump in the total numbers counted.
(e) Caspian Terns are becoming more widespread and/or more birders
are encountering them (vis-a-vis the "n" number)

Now, there are many factors that come into play with numbers per day. By
selecting max numbers from a two week period, the hope is that a number
of those factors will be somewhat muted. One factor that we can get a
window on is the number of birders via the number of checklists. A
reasonable question is whether more birders mean more birds counted?

Using the eBird graphs I obtained the number of checklists from the four
Vermont Champlain Basin Counties for the last week of July for each of
the seven years. Also among the graphs is one that shows how many of
the checklists have at least one Caspian Tern. A vertical line moveable
by the cursor will yield exact numbers. This allows the calculation of
the percentage of checklists with at least one of the terns.

Testing to see if more checklists mean more counted birds, here are the
numbers: (checklist numbers vs. bird numbers)

--- 315-112 (2018)
--- 278-17 (2016)
--- 272-62 (2017)
--- 183-54 (2014)
--- 169-50 (2012)
--- 164-50 (2015)
--- 152-7 (2013)

Well this tells us that number of checklists can be divided into two
groups, 2016-2018 with more, and 2012-2015 with less. It also tells us
that the least number of checklists has the least number of birds, and
the largest number of checklist has the largest number of birds --- but
otherwise it is a jumble.

Finally, are Caspian Terns more frequently reported percentage-wise in
recent times? Here are percentage of all checklists that had at least
one Caspian Tern on it:

2018 --- 12.4%
2017 --- 3.5%
2016 --- 10.2%
2015 --- 2.4%
2014 --- 3.9%
2013 --- 5.0%
2012 --- 7.3%

The answer is "kinda", noting that the two highest percentages are in
the last three years. Otherwise there is little difference per year.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sooooo ...... What about the our opening question, are there more
Caspian Terns in recent years in the Champlain Basin?

The answer seems to be: Yes, but the analysis cannot determine if it is
steady growth, or growth wearing the cloak of many factors that affect
population size and birder activity on an annual or multi-year basis.

One thing is sure his year, there are a lot of birders gazing on many
Caspian Terns all up an down the lake right now, at this point in their
breeding season!

Ian

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 30 Jul 2018 to 31 Jul 2018 (#2018-201)
*************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/18 7:10 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Pewees Brandon Hollow Road, Aug 1, 2018
Eastern wood-pewees were "perweeing" early this morning as they hawked insects. Towhees still drinking
A broadwing flew ahead of me as I walked the road.
> Sue Wetmore

> Brandon Hollow Road, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Aug 1, 2018 7:00 AM - 9:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.2 mile(s)
> 26 species
>
> Turkey Vulture 1
> Broad-winged Hawk 1
> Mourning Dove 2
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
> Pileated Woodpecker 1 drumming on power pole
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 4 perwee call
> Warbling Vireo 1 singing a weak song
> Red-eyed Vireo 3
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow 2
> Black-capped Chickadee 1
> Eastern Bluebird 1
> Hermit Thrush 2 still singing
> American Robin 4
> Gray Catbird 3
> Cedar Waxwing 4
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 1
> Field Sparrow 1 still singing
> Song Sparrow 2
> Swamp Sparrow 1
> Eastern Towhee 3 all still singing.
> Northern Cardinal 3
> Indigo Bunting 2 pair very agitated
> Common Grackle 1
> American Goldfinch 7
> House Sparrow 2
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47581289
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/18 4:56 am
From: Zacheriah Cota-Weaver <zcotaweaver...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this year?
Ian,

Fascinating! Thanks as always for sharing your dives into the data. You can
bump the single site high for 2018 to 46; I had a big group on the sandbar
at Delta Park on Monday.

Zac

On Tue, Jul 31, 2018 at 8:36 PM, Ian Worley <iworley...> wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> August is upon us and Caspian Terns have been congregating, youngsters and
> adults, throughout Lake Champlain.
>
> Folks have been talking about how many Caspian Terns there are this year,
> including both north and south of the Champlain Bridge. There are
> wonderings if Caspian Terns have been increasing in number in the Champlain
> Valley in recent years? So I thought checking some numbers from eBird for
> the past seven years would be interesting.
>
> Here is how I started:
>
> ----I found the two consecutive days within a week of July 31st that had
> the highest daily totals of bird observations. Totals are the sum of the
> highest number of birds reported at each site reporting at least one
> Caspian Tern in the Champlain Valley that day
>
> ---- I then compared those numbers with a variety of parameters, using the
> day of the pair with the highest total.
>
> Here are some tables:
>
> Highest day's total Caspian Terns
> 2018 --- 112
> 2017 --- 62
> 2016 --- 17
> 2015 --- 50
> 2014 --- 54
> 2013 --- 7
> 2012 --- 50
>
> Highest number of Caspian Terns at a single site:
> 2018 --- 43
> 2017 --- 54
> 2016 --- 8
> 2015 --- 42
> 2014 --- 45
> 2013 --- 3
> 2012 --- 41
>
> Average number of Caspian Terns at a single site per day with most birds.
> "n" equals the number of different sites that day.
> 2018 --- 12.2 n=10
> 2017 --- 10.3 n=6
> 2016 --- 2.1 n=8
> 2015 --- 12.5 n=4
> 2014 --- 18.0 n=3
> 2013 --- 2.3 n=3
> 2012 --- 16.7 n=3
>
> These numbers seem to say that this time of year, with mixtures of adults
> and juveniles in the Champlain valley, that
> (a) there can be notable variation among years in the abundance of
> counted Caspian Terns,
> (b) locally reported high counts at sites typically top out at 40-50
> birds,
> (c) the two of the three most recent years have more birds than any of
> the previous five years,
> (d) this year has a remarkable jump in the total numbers counted.
> (e) Caspian Terns are becoming more widespread and/or more birders are
> encountering them (vis-a-vis the "n" number)
>
> Now, there are many factors that come into play with numbers per day. By
> selecting max numbers from a two week period, the hope is that a number of
> those factors will be somewhat muted. One factor that we can get a window
> on is the number of birders via the number of checklists. A reasonable
> question is whether more birders mean more birds counted?
>
> Using the eBird graphs I obtained the number of checklists from the four
> Vermont Champlain Basin Counties for the last week of July for each of the
> seven years. Also among the graphs is one that shows how many of the
> checklists have at least one Caspian Tern. A vertical line moveable by the
> cursor will yield exact numbers. This allows the calculation of the
> percentage of checklists with at least one of the terns.
>
> Testing to see if more checklists mean more counted birds, here are the
> numbers: (checklist numbers vs. bird numbers)
>
> --- 315-112 (2018)
> --- 278-17 (2016)
> --- 272-62 (2017)
> --- 183-54 (2014)
> --- 169-50 (2012)
> --- 164-50 (2015)
> --- 152-7 (2013)
>
> Well this tells us that number of checklists can be divided into two
> groups, 2016-2018 with more, and 2012-2015 with less. It also tells us
> that the least number of checklists has the least number of birds, and the
> largest number of checklist has the largest number of birds --- but
> otherwise it is a jumble.
>
> Finally, are Caspian Terns more frequently reported percentage-wise in
> recent times? Here are percentage of all checklists that had at least one
> Caspian Tern on it:
>
> 2018 --- 12.4%
> 2017 --- 3.5%
> 2016 --- 10.2%
> 2015 --- 2.4%
> 2014 --- 3.9%
> 2013 --- 5.0%
> 2012 --- 7.3%
>
> The answer is "kinda", noting that the two highest percentages are in the
> last three years. Otherwise there is little difference per year.
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Sooooo ...... What about the our opening question, are there more Caspian
> Terns in recent years in the Champlain Basin?
>
> The answer seems to be: Yes, but the analysis cannot determine if it is
> steady growth, or growth wearing the cloak of many factors that affect
> population size and birder activity on an annual or multi-year basis.
>
> One thing is sure his year, there are a lot of birders gazing on many
> Caspian Terns all up an down the lake right now, at this point in their
> breeding season!
>
> Ian
>



--
Zacheriah T. Cota-Weaver
175 Depot Street
Hyde Park, VT 05655
(802) 696-8613 cell
<zcotaweaver...>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/31/18 5:37 pm
From: Ian Worley <iworley...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Are there notably lots more Caspian Terns in the Champlain Valley this year?
Hello all,

August is upon us and Caspian Terns have been congregating, youngsters
and adults, throughout Lake Champlain.

Folks have been talking about how many Caspian Terns there are this
year, including both north and south of the Champlain Bridge. There are
wonderings if Caspian Terns have been increasing in number in the
Champlain Valley in recent years?  So I thought checking some numbers
from eBird for the past seven years would be interesting.

Here is how I started:

----I found the two consecutive days within a week of July 31st that had
the highest daily totals of bird observations. Totals are the sum of the
highest number of birds reported at each site reporting at least one
Caspian Tern in the Champlain Valley that day

---- I then compared those numbers with a variety of parameters, using
the day of the pair with the highest total.

Here are some tables:

Highest day's total Caspian Terns
2018 --- 112
2017 --- 62
2016 --- 17
2015 --- 50
2014 --- 54
2013 --- 7
2012 --- 50

Highest number of Caspian Terns at a single site:
2018 --- 43
2017 --- 54
2016 --- 8
2015 --- 42
2014 --- 45
2013 --- 3
2012 --- 41

Average number of Caspian Terns at a single site per day with most
birds.  "n" equals the number of different sites that day.
2018 --- 12.2        n=10
2017 --- 10.3        n=6
2016 ---  2.1        n=8
2015 --- 12.5        n=4
2014 --- 18.0        n=3
2013 ---  2.3        n=3
2012 --- 16.7        n=3

These numbers seem to say that this time of year, with mixtures of
adults and juveniles in the Champlain valley, that
   (a) there can be notable variation among years in the abundance of
counted Caspian Terns,
   (b) locally reported high counts at sites typically top out at 40-50
birds,
   (c) the two of the three most recent years have more birds than any
of the previous five years,
   (d) this year has a remarkable jump in the total numbers counted.
   (e) Caspian Terns are becoming more widespread and/or more birders
are encountering them (vis-a-vis the "n" number)

Now, there are many factors that come into play with numbers per day. By
selecting max numbers from a two week period, the hope is that a number
of those factors will be somewhat muted. One factor that we can get a
window on is the number of birders via the number of checklists.  A
reasonable question is whether more birders mean more birds counted?

Using the eBird graphs I obtained the number of checklists from the four
Vermont Champlain Basin Counties for the last week of July for each of
the seven years.  Also among the graphs is one that shows how many of
the checklists have at least one Caspian Tern. A vertical line moveable
by the cursor will yield exact numbers.  This allows the calculation of
the percentage of checklists with at least one of the terns.

Testing to see if more checklists mean more counted birds, here are the
numbers: (checklist numbers vs. bird numbers)

--- 315-112 (2018)
--- 278-17  (2016)
--- 272-62  (2017)
--- 183-54  (2014)
--- 169-50  (2012)
--- 164-50  (2015)
--- 152-7   (2013)

Well this tells us that number of checklists can be divided into two
groups, 2016-2018 with more, and 2012-2015 with less.  It also tells us
that the least number of checklists has the least number of birds, and
the largest number of checklist has the largest number of birds --- but
otherwise it is a jumble.

Finally, are Caspian Terns more frequently reported percentage-wise in
recent times?  Here are percentage of all checklists that had at least
one Caspian Tern on it:

2018 --- 12.4%
2017 --- 3.5%
2016 --- 10.2%
2015 --- 2.4%
2014 --- 3.9%
2013 --- 5.0%
2012 --- 7.3%

The answer is "kinda", noting that the two highest percentages are in
the last three years. Otherwise there is little difference per year.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sooooo ...... What about the our opening question, are there more
Caspian Terns in recent years in the Champlain Basin?

The answer seems to be:  Yes, but the analysis cannot determine if it is
steady growth, or growth wearing the cloak of many factors that affect
population size and birder activity on an annual or multi-year basis.

One thing is sure his year, there are a lot of birders gazing on many
Caspian Terns all up an down the lake right now, at this point in their
breeding season!

Ian
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 5:57 pm
From: Patti Haynes <patti.haynes...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Tracy Road pond birds plus an owl
I’m so glad the Connecticut Birder is out and about 😘

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 30, 2018, at 9:52 AM, Roy Zartarian <royz...> wrote:
>
> 7/28/2018 - South Hero, Tracy Rd pond - 3 Great Blue Herons, 2 Belted
> Kingfishers, 1 Great Egret, 1 Green Heron, 1 Solitary Sandpiper.
>
> Late morning on the same date as I was driving south on I 89 between exit
> 17 & 16 I spotted something jump up from the grass along the road side to a
> branch overhead - a Barred Owl!
>
> Roy Zartarian
> visiting Connecticut birder
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 4:20 pm
From: Carl Runge <0000009209546543-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Eastern Towhee
This is quite typical for towhees in my winter Georgia coast habitat.
Carl

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 30, 2018, at 5:58 PM, Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...> wrote:
>
> Hi Linda,
>
> I live in prime Towhee country and what you describe has happened here with some frequency over the years. When it first happened I was really flummoxed. Were my ears deceiving me? Was this a young bird practicing his song? I guess that I’ll never know. This year the resident Towhee is in full voice “drink your tea”.
>
> Best,
>
> Mundi
> North Pownal
>
>
> Mundi Smithers
>
>
> The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
> Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Jul 30, 2018, at 5:34 PM, Linda Graves <ljoslyngross...> wrote:
>>
>> I heard a relatively loud, single call/song quite continuously from an unknown (to me) soul a few weeks ago. After some brief pishing, an Eastern Towhee made his appearance. He has been hanging around my neighborhood for awhile now and only sings this one note, never the usual “drink your tea”. Wondering if this is a usual occurrence for a Towhee?
>> Linda Graves, a most inexperienced birder!
>> South Burlington
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 2:59 pm
From: Mundi Smithers <amen1farm...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Eastern Towhee
Hi Linda,

I live in prime Towhee country and what you describe has happened here with some frequency over the years. When it first happened I was really flummoxed. Were my ears deceiving me? Was this a young bird practicing his song? I guess that I’ll never know. This year the resident Towhee is in full voice “drink your tea”.

Best,

Mundi
North Pownal


Mundi Smithers


The greatest tragedy in mankind's enitire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion.
Arthur C Clarke (1917-2008)





> On Jul 30, 2018, at 5:34 PM, Linda Graves <ljoslyngross...> wrote:
>
> I heard a relatively loud, single call/song quite continuously from an unknown (to me) soul a few weeks ago. After some brief pishing, an Eastern Towhee made his appearance. He has been hanging around my neighborhood for awhile now and only sings this one note, never the usual “drink your tea”. Wondering if this is a usual occurrence for a Towhee?
> Linda Graves, a most inexperienced birder!
> South Burlington
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 2:34 pm
From: Linda Graves <ljoslyngross...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Eastern Towhee
I heard a relatively loud, single call/song quite continuously from an unknown (to me) soul a few weeks ago. After some brief pishing, an Eastern Towhee made his appearance. He has been hanging around my neighborhood for awhile now and only sings this one note, never the usual “drink your tea”. Wondering if this is a usual occurrence for a Towhee?
Linda Graves, a most inexperienced birder!
South Burlington
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 11:20 am
From: Walter Ellison <rossgull61...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
This bird is a classic adult Broad-winged Hawk (note sharp white banding in
tail), perhaps a bit scruffy looking because of molt. Brown eye alone means
it is not an accipiter of any age. It's feet look like typical buteo feet,
with shorter toes than an accipiter. They are woodland nesters who should
be expected to be found sitting in roadside trees as they frequently hunt
from a perch.

Nancy Martin & Walter Ellison
formerly Woodstock/Hartland, VT now Chestertown, MD

On Mon, Jul 30, 2018 at 1:57 PM, Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...> wrote:

> I’m with Jane. BW is a hawk with which I have little familiarity. Don’t
> have much w/Goshawk either. I just knew it wasn’t a Coop. I watched one of
> the juvies on a pole this morning, vocalizing and looking like he didn’t
> know what to do next.
>
> RESIST
>
>
> > On Jul 30, 2018, at 9:38 AM, Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...> wrote:
> >
> > Considering I have a family of Cooper's Hawks IMBY that I've been
> observing for the past month-6 weeks, I'm going with NOGO. My "parents" are
> sub-adults and do not have this plumage and their eyes are still yellow
> (will transition to red). This hawk has brown. Keep posting.
> >
> > Lin Garrepy
> > Syracuse, NY
> > ________________________________
> > From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Ryan Tomazin <
> <wvwarblers...>
> > Sent: Monday, July 30, 2018 2:30 AM
> > To: <VTBIRD...>
> > Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
> >
> > I'm not familiar with NOGOs, but in looking at a lot of photos, the
> immatures seem to usually have vertical striping, rather than the
> horizontal barring that this bird has. That seems to match a Broad-winged
> Hawk more. Yes? No?
> >
> > Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA
> >
> > ________________________________
> > From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <
> <jeshawks...>
> > Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2018 10:05 PM
> > To: <VTBIRD...>
> > Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
> >
> > Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
> > hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
> > Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
> > to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?
> >
> > The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
> > congenitally deformed?
> >
> > Jane Stein
> > (Shoreham)
> >
> >
> >> On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
> >> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
> >> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
> >> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
> >>
> >> Photos here:
> >>
> >> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
> >>
> >> Cynthia Crawford
> >>
> >> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> >> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> >> NEW WEB SITE:
> >> www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<htt
> p://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>>
> >>
> >> www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<htt
> p://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>>
> >> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> >> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
> >> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
> >> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
> >> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
> >>
>



--
Observing Nature is like unwrapping a big pile of presents every time you
take a walk
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 11:14 am
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
Funny image! I've seen literally tens of thousands of BWs fly overheard
in central Mass. during those big migration pushes in early September,
but despite many years of hawkwatching, I've only had one quick glimpse
of one at near eye level in a woodsy edge. Never even occurred to me
that this bird could be a Broadie.

I did have the pleasure once of watching three newly fledged Coops
fooling around and playing on the ground for several hours once, though.
They were energetic and quarrelsome and put on quite a show.

Jane
(Shoreham)


On 7/30/2018 1:57 PM, Linnea Garrepy wrote:
> I’m with Jane. BW is a hawk with which I have little familiarity. Don’t have much w/Goshawk either. I just knew it wasn’t a Coop. I watched one of the juvies on a pole this morning, vocalizing and looking like he didn’t know what to do next.
>
> RESIST
>
>
>> On Jul 30, 2018, at 9:38 AM, Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...> wrote:
>>
>> Considering I have a family of Cooper's Hawks IMBY that I've been observing for the past month-6 weeks, I'm going with NOGO. My "parents" are sub-adults and do not have this plumage and their eyes are still yellow (will transition to red). This hawk has brown. Keep posting.
>>
>> Lin Garrepy
>> Syracuse, NY
>> ________________________________
>> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
>> Sent: Monday, July 30, 2018 2:30 AM
>> To: <VTBIRD...>
>> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
>>
>> I'm not familiar with NOGOs, but in looking at a lot of photos, the immatures seem to usually have vertical striping, rather than the horizontal barring that this bird has. That seems to match a Broad-winged Hawk more. Yes? No?
>>
>> Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA
>>
>> ________________________________
>> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
>> Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2018 10:05 PM
>> To: <VTBIRD...>
>> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
>>
>> Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
>> hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
>> Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
>> to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?
>>
>> The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
>> congenitally deformed?
>>
>> Jane Stein
>> (Shoreham)
>>
>>
>>> On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
>>> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
>>> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
>>> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
>>>
>>> Photos here:
>>>
>>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
>>>
>>> Cynthia Crawford
>>>
>>> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
>>> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
>>> NEW WEB SITE:
>>> www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>>
>>>
>>> www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>>
>>> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
>>> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
>>> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
>>> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
>>> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>>>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 10:57 am
From: Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
I’m with Jane. BW is a hawk with which I have little familiarity. Don’t have much w/Goshawk either. I just knew it wasn’t a Coop. I watched one of the juvies on a pole this morning, vocalizing and looking like he didn’t know what to do next.

RESIST


> On Jul 30, 2018, at 9:38 AM, Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...> wrote:
>
> Considering I have a family of Cooper's Hawks IMBY that I've been observing for the past month-6 weeks, I'm going with NOGO. My "parents" are sub-adults and do not have this plumage and their eyes are still yellow (will transition to red). This hawk has brown. Keep posting.
>
> Lin Garrepy
> Syracuse, NY
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
> Sent: Monday, July 30, 2018 2:30 AM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
>
> I'm not familiar with NOGOs, but in looking at a lot of photos, the immatures seem to usually have vertical striping, rather than the horizontal barring that this bird has. That seems to match a Broad-winged Hawk more. Yes? No?
>
> Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA
>
> ________________________________
> From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
> Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2018 10:05 PM
> To: <VTBIRD...>
> Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
>
> Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
> hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
> Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
> to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?
>
> The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
> congenitally deformed?
>
> Jane Stein
> (Shoreham)
>
>
>> On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
>> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
>> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
>> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
>>
>> Photos here:
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
>>
>> Cynthia Crawford
>>
>> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
>> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
>> NEW WEB SITE:
>> www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>>
>>
>> www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>>
>> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
>> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
>> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
>> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
>> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 6:53 am
From: Roy Zartarian <royz...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Tracy Road pond birds plus an owl
7/28/2018 - South Hero, Tracy Rd pond - 3 Great Blue Herons, 2 Belted
Kingfishers, 1 Great Egret, 1 Green Heron, 1 Solitary Sandpiper.

Late morning on the same date as I was driving south on I 89 between exit
17 & 16 I spotted something jump up from the grass along the road side to a
branch overhead - a Barred Owl!

Roy Zartarian
visiting Connecticut birder
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 6:38 am
From: Linnea Garrepy <mwtic...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
Considering I have a family of Cooper's Hawks IMBY that I've been observing for the past month-6 weeks, I'm going with NOGO. My "parents" are sub-adults and do not have this plumage and their eyes are still yellow (will transition to red). This hawk has brown. Keep posting.

Lin Garrepy
Syracuse, NY
________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2018 2:30 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk

I'm not familiar with NOGOs, but in looking at a lot of photos, the immatures seem to usually have vertical striping, rather than the horizontal barring that this bird has. That seems to match a Broad-winged Hawk more. Yes? No?

Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2018 10:05 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk

Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?

The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
congenitally deformed?

Jane Stein
(Shoreham)


On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
>
> Photos here:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> NEW WEB SITE:
> www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>>
>
> www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>>
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 6:12 am
From: Cynthia Crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
Hey, Ron-thanks! I should not have described it as "Road Side"!! Didn't meant to imply a species. It was just "beside the road", very close! ;)
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 6:07 am
From: david merker <buteojamaica...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside hawk
Gos would also have lemon yellow eyes as a juvenile.



David Merker
Etna, New Hampshire
Cape May Raptor Banding Project Inc.

www.capemayraptors.org<http://www.capemayraptors.org>
<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>

#deletefacebook<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>



________________________________
From: david merker <buteojamaica...>
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2018 9:04 AM
To: Vermont Birds
Subject: Roadside hawk


That is an adult Broad-winged Hawk. Gos would have a distinct eye stripe and vertical barring not horizontal... Also it would be LARGE. With a super long tail with marked under tail coverts.



David Merker
Etna, New Hampshire
Cape May Raptor Banding Project Inc.

www.capemayraptors.org<http://www.capemayraptors.org>
<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>

#deletefacebook<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>



________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...>
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2018 12:00 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 27 Jul 2018 to 29 Jul 2018 (#2018-199)

There are 5 messages totaling 164 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Chickering Bog closed ? (2)
2. Roadside Hawk (3)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2018 06:45:22 -0400
From: Henry Burton <hwb1919...>
Subject: Chickering Bog closed ?

I was told Chickering Bog was closed till August 1st due to nesting
Goshawks. Is that true ?

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2018 09:17:19 -0400
From: Tom slayton <slayton.tom...>
Subject: Re: Chickering Bog closed ?

Yes, it's closed. Not sure about reopening date.
Tom Slayton

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 29, 2018, at 6:45 AM, Henry Burton <hwb1919...> wrote:
>
> I was told Chickering Bog was closed till August 1st due to nesting
> Goshawks. Is that true ?

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2018 21:24:44 -0400
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
Subject: Roadside Hawk

Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.

Photos here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
NEW WEB SITE:
www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>

www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
Castle & Court Music for Harp:
http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2018 22:05:24 -0400
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: Roadside Hawk

Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?

The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
congenitally deformed?

Jane Stein
(Shoreham)


On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
>
> Photos here:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> NEW WEB SITE:
> www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>
>
> www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2018 02:30:45 +0000
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: Roadside Hawk

I'm not familiar with NOGOs, but in looking at a lot of photos, the immatures seem to usually have vertical striping, rather than the horizontal barring that this bird has. That seems to match a Broad-winged Hawk more. Yes? No?

Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2018 10:05 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk

Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?

The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
congenitally deformed?

Jane Stein
(Shoreham)


On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
>
> Photos here:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> NEW WEB SITE:
> www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>>
>
> www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>>
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 27 Jul 2018 to 29 Jul 2018 (#2018-199)
*************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 6:04 am
From: david merker <buteojamaica...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Roadside hawk
That is an adult Broad-winged Hawk. Gos would have a distinct eye stripe and vertical barring not horizontal... Also it would be LARGE. With a super long tail with marked under tail coverts.



David Merker
Etna, New Hampshire
Cape May Raptor Banding Project Inc.

www.capemayraptors.org<http://www.capemayraptors.org>
<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>

#deletefacebook<https://twitter.com/hashtag/deletefacebook?src=hash>



________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of VTBIRD automatic digest system <LISTSERV...>
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2018 12:00 AM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: VTBIRD Digest - 27 Jul 2018 to 29 Jul 2018 (#2018-199)

There are 5 messages totaling 164 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Chickering Bog closed ? (2)
2. Roadside Hawk (3)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2018 06:45:22 -0400
From: Henry Burton <hwb1919...>
Subject: Chickering Bog closed ?

I was told Chickering Bog was closed till August 1st due to nesting
Goshawks. Is that true ?

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2018 09:17:19 -0400
From: Tom slayton <slayton.tom...>
Subject: Re: Chickering Bog closed ?

Yes, it's closed. Not sure about reopening date.
Tom Slayton

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 29, 2018, at 6:45 AM, Henry Burton <hwb1919...> wrote:
>
> I was told Chickering Bog was closed till August 1st due to nesting
> Goshawks. Is that true ?

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2018 21:24:44 -0400
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
Subject: Roadside Hawk

Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.

Photos here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
NEW WEB SITE:
www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>

www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
Castle & Court Music for Harp:
http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Jul 2018 22:05:24 -0400
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: Roadside Hawk

Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?

The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
congenitally deformed?

Jane Stein
(Shoreham)


On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
>
> Photos here:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> NEW WEB SITE:
> www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>
>
> www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Jul 2018 02:30:45 +0000
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: Roadside Hawk

I'm not familiar with NOGOs, but in looking at a lot of photos, the immatures seem to usually have vertical striping, rather than the horizontal barring that this bird has. That seems to match a Broad-winged Hawk more. Yes? No?

Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2018 10:05 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk

Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?

The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
congenitally deformed?

Jane Stein
(Shoreham)


On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
>
> Photos here:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> NEW WEB SITE:
> www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>>
>
> www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>>
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>

------------------------------

End of VTBIRD Digest - 27 Jul 2018 to 29 Jul 2018 (#2018-199)
*************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 5:35 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
Very perceptive of you!
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod

> On Jul 30, 2018, at 8:00 AM, Ron Payne <rpayne72...> wrote:
>
> I agree with Broad-winged. But one thing is for sure, it's not a Roadside Hawk (Rupornis magnirostris). ;-)
>
>
> ---
> Ron Payne
> Middlebury, VT
>
>
>
> On Mon, 30 Jul 2018 06:20:28 -0400, Cynthia Crawford wrote:
>
> I think it is likely a Broad-winged Hawk, after getting feedback from several people- feet are normal, apparently.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 5:00 am
From: Ron Payne <rpayne72...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
I agree with Broad-winged. But one thing is for sure, it's not a Roadside Hawk (Rupornis magnirostris). ;-)


---
Ron Payne
Middlebury, VT



On Mon, 30 Jul 2018 06:20:28 -0400, Cynthia Crawford wrote:

I think it is likely a Broad-winged Hawk, after getting feedback from several people- feet are normal, apparently.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 4:36 am
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
Well, that explains why it doesn't look quite right for either big
accipiter. BW never even crossed my mind. You so seldom see them, or I
don't, low down and at close range like that.

On 7/30/2018 6:20 AM, Cynthia Crawford wrote:
> I think it is likely a Broad-winged Hawk, after getting feedback from several people- feet are normal, apparently.
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/18 3:20 am
From: Cynthia Crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
I think it is likely a Broad-winged Hawk, after getting feedback from several people- feet are normal, apparently.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/29/18 7:30 pm
From: Ryan Tomazin <wvwarblers...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
I'm not familiar with NOGOs, but in looking at a lot of photos, the immatures seem to usually have vertical striping, rather than the horizontal barring that this bird has. That seems to match a Broad-winged Hawk more. Yes? No?

Ryan Tomazin - Bridgeville, PA

________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2018 10:05 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk

Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?

The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
congenitally deformed?

Jane Stein
(Shoreham)


On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
>
> Photos here:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> NEW WEB SITE:
> www.creaturekinships.net<http://www.creaturekinships.net>
>
> www.creaturekinships.com<http://www.creaturekinships.com>
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/29/18 7:06 pm
From: Jane Stein <jeshawks...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
Boy, that sure looks like an immie Goshawk to me. Coops and Gos are
hard to distinguish at that age, but the shape in that posture is pure
Gos. I'd have to hit my hawk ID books to be sure, and I don't have time
to do that right now. Do you think that's possible?

The feet do look deformed to my eye, maybe injured early on or
congenitally deformed?

Jane Stein
(Shoreham)


On 7/29/2018 9:24 PM, cynthia crawford wrote:
> Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
> Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
> diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.
>
> Photos here:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285
>
> Cynthia Crawford
>
> *Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
> Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
> NEW WEB SITE:
> www.creaturekinships.net
>
> www.creaturekinships.com
> MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
> EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
> Castle & Court Music for Harp:
> http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
> BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/29/18 6:25 pm
From: cynthia crawford <cynthia.crawford...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Roadside Hawk
Took these pictures through my car windshield. Not sure of the i.d.-
Thinking Cooper's Hawk. It's feet look strange- they remind me of a
diseased Hairy WP I once had here. Hope this is not the case.

Photos here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/albums/72157699616754285

Cynthia Crawford

*Creature Kinships and Natural Affinities*
Animal and Nature Paintings, Portraits and Prints
NEW WEB SITE:
www.creaturekinships.net

www.creaturekinships.com
MORE PHOTOS and ARTWORK: http://pbase.com/creaturekinships
EVEN MORE PHOTOS: https://www.flickr.com/photos/33836164@N03/
Castle & Court Music for Harp:
http://galleries.creaturekinships.com/?page_id=59
BLOG: http://creature-kinships.blogspot.com/
 

Back to top
Date: 7/29/18 6:17 am
From: Tom slayton <slayton.tom...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Chickering Bog closed ?
Yes, it's closed. Not sure about reopening date.
Tom Slayton

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 29, 2018, at 6:45 AM, Henry Burton <hwb1919...> wrote:
>
> I was told Chickering Bog was closed till August 1st due to nesting
> Goshawks. Is that true ?
 

Back to top
Date: 7/29/18 3:45 am
From: Henry Burton <hwb1919...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Chickering Bog closed ?
I was told Chickering Bog was closed till August 1st due to nesting
Goshawks. Is that true ?
 

Back to top
Date: 7/27/18 1:20 pm
From: Chris Rimmer <crimmer...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Mansfield update - field season (and avian activity) winding down
What a difference a week can make. The VCE team returned to Mansfield on
Tuesday-Wednesday this week, expecting far worse weather than we
encountered, but also more birds. The forecast gale-force southerly winds
were less than anticipated, alternating between periods of virtual calm and
sustained gusts of 20-25 mph. Showers and thunderstorms never materialized,
though clouds lowered on Tuesday night. As everywhere, it was very warm and
extremely humid. I banded in shorts for the first time in years!

Despite conditions that were favorable, if not ideal, for mist netting, we
had surprisingly few captures, ending up with only 17 birds total. Sights
and sounds of activity were correspondingly low, with virtually no dusk or
dawn chorus, and little evidence of family groups or free-roaming
juveniles. No finches were seen or heard. Many adults were in early or
mid-stages of flight feather molt, which may partly explain our lower
capture rates (birds fly less when molting wings and tail), but the
scarcity of immatures, both in and outside of our nets, was hard to
explain. On roughly the same dates a year ago, we tallied 57 captures, of
which >40 were young-of-the-year.

Notables included overdue captures of the season's first juvenile
Bicknell's Thrush and American Robin, as well as an out-of-habitat juvenile
Song Sparrow.

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher -- 1 female with refeathering brood patch
Red-breasted Nuthatch -- 2 (free-flying juvenile and adult in heavy flight
feather molt)
Bicknell's Thrush -- 2 (free-flying juvenile [FOY], within-season retrap
female in early primary molt)
American Robin -- 2 free-flying juveniles
Blackpoll Warbler -- 1 within-season retrap female in heavy flight feather
molt
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) -- 4 (free-flying juvenile and 3 new males
[2 in early primary molt])
Dark-eyed Junco (Slate-colored) -- 2 free-flying juveniles
White-throated Sparrow -- 2 (free-flying juvenile, new adult male in early
primary molt)
Song Sparrow -- 1 free-flying juvenile

I suspect this week's low captures were due, at least in part, to weather,
perhaps a combination of wind, humidity, and wet vegetation on Wed.
morning. Next week's visit will be our last of the summer, and I fully
expect a very active session, with some northern hardwoods species and
perhaps an early boreal migrant or two. Stay tuned.

To see some of Chuck Gangas's great photos (of avian and human subjects),
check out this blog post:
https://vtecostudies.org/blog/mansfield-update-hatch-years-predominate/

________________________

Chris Rimmer
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x202
http://vtecostudies.org/

<http://vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/27/18 11:57 am
From: SUE WETMORE <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] hummers- Brandon Hollow Road, Jul 27, 2018
The early morning walk began with both beautiful thrushes singing their ethereal songs.
While photographing a rosy maple moth a hummingbird flew about me feeding on the evening primrose, so close I could hear the wings hum as it past my head.
Nature rocks!!
Sue Wetmore
> ---------- Original Message ---------
>
> Brandon Hollow Road, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Jul 27, 2018 7:30 AM - 10:00 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.2 mile(s)
> 24 species
>
> Turkey Vulture 1
> Mourning Dove 3
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 2
> Northern Flicker 1
> Pileated Woodpecker 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Eastern Kingbird 2
> Red-eyed Vireo 2
> Blue Jay 2
> American Crow 3
> Barn Swallow 1
> Hermit Thrush 1
> Wood Thrush 1
> American Robin 5
> Gray Catbird 4
> Cedar Waxwing 3
> Field Sparrow 2
> Song Sparrow 4
> Eastern Towhee 4 all singing some form of their song
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 2 birds were doing the weep call, appeared to be juveniles
> Red-winged Blackbird 5
> Common Grackle 4
> House Finch 1
> American Goldfinch 10
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47479760
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 7/27/18 5:57 am
From: Jean Arrowsmith <jeanbird...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Hummers
Never before having seen hummers at my bee balm, this morning there was a female working them with a male maybe yard above her doing a modified courting U, a foot or two deep. Then they flew off together. Renesting?

Jean Arrowsmith
Lincoln, VT
 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/18 7:02 am
From: Kate Olgiati <2grackle...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] black-billed cuckoo calling in S. Barnard
While wearing the humidity like a coat this morning up at the barn, I heard
the loud 3-note call of a black-billed cuckoo.

--
Katherine Olgiati
 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/18 6:19 pm
From: Barbara Brosnan <bbrosnan...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Birds of Chile program at the Birds of Vermont Museum, Thursday at 6:30
What??????

-----Original Message-----
From: Vermont Birds [mailto:<VTBIRD...>] On Behalf Of Peg Clement
Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2018 5:10 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Birds of Chile program at the Birds of Vermont Museum, Thursday at 6:30

Hello and thank you for the notice. Question: what does the donation go toward X? Bird museum?

Also maybe I am missing it but I can’t see and your announcement where the presentation will take place. In past years I have gone to Shirley’s house.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 25, 2018, at 2:48 PM, E Talmage <bovm_erin...> wrote:
>
> Join us this Thursday for a program all about the birds of Chile!
> PENGUINS and PUMAS, PLOVERS and PELICANS, PLANT-CUTTERS and PARAKEETS:
> CHILE HAS IT ALL
> with Shirley Johnson
> Thursday, July 26 • 6:30 – 8:00pm
>
> Shirley Johnson will share photographs and information about the birds——and more!——she and her husband saw on their November 2017 trip to Chile, where they traveled from Santiago to Tierra del Fuego. Yes, they really did see all those species mentioned!
>
> Suggested donation: $10 • refreshments
>
> Call or email if you have any questions. Pre-registration appreciated, but not required.Thank you,ErinErin Talmage--
> Executive Director
> Birds of Vermont Museum
> 900 Sherman Hollow Road
> Huntington, VT 05462
> 802-434-2167
> www.birdsofvermont.org
 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/18 2:10 pm
From: Peg Clement <clementpeg...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] Birds of Chile program at the Birds of Vermont Museum, Thursday at 6:30
Hello and thank you for the notice. Question: what does the donation go toward X? Bird museum?

Also maybe I am missing it but I can’t see and your announcement where the presentation will take place. In past years I have gone to Shirley’s house.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 25, 2018, at 2:48 PM, E Talmage <bovm_erin...> wrote:
>
> Join us this Thursday for a program all about the birds of Chile!
> PENGUINS and PUMAS, PLOVERS and PELICANS, PLANT-CUTTERS and PARAKEETS:
> CHILE HAS IT ALL
> with Shirley Johnson
> Thursday, July 26 • 6:30 – 8:00pm
>
> Shirley Johnson will share photographs and information about the birds——and more!——she and her husband saw on their November 2017 trip to Chile, where they traveled from Santiago to Tierra del Fuego. Yes, they really did see all those species mentioned!
>
> Suggested donation: $10 • refreshments
>
> Call or email if you have any questions. Pre-registration appreciated, but not required.Thank you,ErinErin Talmage--
> Executive Director
> Birds of Vermont Museum
> 900 Sherman Hollow Road
> Huntington, VT 05462
> 802-434-2167
> www.birdsofvermont.org
 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/18 11:49 am
From: E Talmage <bovm_erin...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Birds of Chile program at the Birds of Vermont Museum, Thursday at 6:30
Join us this Thursday for a program all about the birds of Chile!
PENGUINS and PUMAS, PLOVERS and PELICANS, PLANT-CUTTERS and PARAKEETS:
CHILE HAS IT ALL
with Shirley Johnson
Thursday, July 26 • 6:30 – 8:00pm

Shirley Johnson will share photographs and information about the birds——and more!——she and her husband saw on their November 2017 trip to Chile, where they traveled from Santiago to Tierra del Fuego. Yes, they really did see all those species mentioned!

Suggested donation: $10 • refreshments

Call or email if you have any questions. Pre-registration appreciated, but not required.Thank you,ErinErin Talmage--
Executive Director
Birds of Vermont Museum
900 Sherman Hollow Road
Huntington, VT 05462
802-434-2167
www.birdsofvermont.org
 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/18 6:36 am
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] VT Bird Checklist Updated
Click on the hyperlink - Vermont Bird Checklist - right at the top on that
page.
It will open a PDF of the list.
Kent

____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201
Twitter: @KPMcFarland
val.vtecostudies.org

<http://vtecostudies.org/>

On Wed, Jul 25, 2018 at 9:34 AM, FRED BATES <batesx2...> wrote:

> Under which heading in the web site will I find the Bird Checklist updated.
> Thanks
> Fred
> > On July 24, 2018 at 3:45 PM Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
> wrote:
> >
> >
> > The VT Bird Checklist has been updated by the Vermont Bird Records
> > Committee to comply with the latest AOS taxonomic changes. You can find
> it
> > here at <
> > https://vtecostudies.org/wildlife/wildlife-watching/
> vbrc/bird-checklists/>.
> > Thanks to Ted Murin for annually leading these updates for VBRC. Changes
> > included:
> >
> > - English name of Gray Jay changed (restored) to Canada Jay
> > - Changed genus of Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers and shuffled woodpecker
> > species sequence
> > - Split storm-petrels into two families - Southern and Northern
> > storm-petrels
> > - Changed Procellariiformes family sequence
> > - Shuffled species sequence of Accipitridae (again)
> > - Changed genus of several sparrows and shuffled sparrow species
> sequence
> >
> > Thank you,
> > Kent
> > ____________________________
> >
> > Kent McFarland
> > Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> > PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> > 802.649.1431 x201
> > Twitter: @KPMcFarland
> > val.vtecostudies.org
> >
> > <http://vtecostudies.org/>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/18 6:34 am
From: FRED BATES <batesx2...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] VT Bird Checklist Updated
Under which heading in the web site will I find the Bird Checklist updated.
Thanks
Fred
> On July 24, 2018 at 3:45 PM Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...> wrote:
>
>
> The VT Bird Checklist has been updated by the Vermont Bird Records
> Committee to comply with the latest AOS taxonomic changes. You can find it
> here at <
> https://vtecostudies.org/wildlife/wildlife-watching/vbrc/bird-checklists/>.
> Thanks to Ted Murin for annually leading these updates for VBRC. Changes
> included:
>
> - English name of Gray Jay changed (restored) to Canada Jay
> - Changed genus of Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers and shuffled woodpecker
> species sequence
> - Split storm-petrels into two families - Southern and Northern
> storm-petrels
> - Changed Procellariiformes family sequence
> - Shuffled species sequence of Accipitridae (again)
> - Changed genus of several sparrows and shuffled sparrow species sequence
>
> Thank you,
> Kent
> ____________________________
>
> Kent McFarland
> Vermont Center for Ecostudies
> PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
> 802.649.1431 x201
> Twitter: @KPMcFarland
> val.vtecostudies.org
>
> <http://vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/18 1:57 pm
From: Ruth Stewart <birder_rws...>
Subject: Re: [VTBIRD] VT Bird Checklist Updated
Thank you (and Ted) for the VERMONT BIRD CHECKLIST!



Ruth Stewart
E. Dorset, VT


________________________________
From: Vermont Birds <VTBIRD...> on behalf of Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 3:45 PM
To: <VTBIRD...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] VT Bird Checklist Updated

The VT Bird Checklist has been updated by the Vermont Bird Records
Committee to comply with the latest AOS taxonomic changes. You can find it
here at <
https://vtecostudies.org/wildlife/wildlife-watching/vbrc/bird-checklists/>.
Bird Checklists | Vermont Center for Ecostudies<https://vtecostudies.org/wildlife/wildlife-watching/vbrc/bird-checklists/>
vtecostudies.org
Vermont Bird Checklist This checklist includes all species for which acceptable specimen, photographic, or written documentation exists for Vermont. The list



Thanks to Ted Murin for annually leading these updates for VBRC. Changes
included:

- English name of Gray Jay changed (restored) to Canada Jay
- Changed genus of Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers and shuffled woodpecker
species sequence
- Split storm-petrels into two families - Southern and Northern
storm-petrels
- Changed Procellariiformes family sequence
- Shuffled species sequence of Accipitridae (again)
- Changed genus of several sparrows and shuffled sparrow species sequence

Thank you,
Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201
Twitter: @KPMcFarland
val.vtecostudies.org

<http://vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/18 12:46 pm
From: Kent McFarland <kmcfarland...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] VT Bird Checklist Updated
The VT Bird Checklist has been updated by the Vermont Bird Records
Committee to comply with the latest AOS taxonomic changes. You can find it
here at <
https://vtecostudies.org/wildlife/wildlife-watching/vbrc/bird-checklists/>.
Thanks to Ted Murin for annually leading these updates for VBRC. Changes
included:

- English name of Gray Jay changed (restored) to Canada Jay
- Changed genus of Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers and shuffled woodpecker
species sequence
- Split storm-petrels into two families - Southern and Northern
storm-petrels
- Changed Procellariiformes family sequence
- Shuffled species sequence of Accipitridae (again)
- Changed genus of several sparrows and shuffled sparrow species sequence

Thank you,
Kent
____________________________

Kent McFarland
Vermont Center for Ecostudies
PO Box 420 | Norwich, Vermont 05055
802.649.1431 x201
Twitter: @KPMcFarland
val.vtecostudies.org

<http://vtecostudies.org/>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/18 7:28 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Wrens
My noisy Carolina wrens have departed and I figured they nested in the yard. Today I found the nest--- in an unused stovepipe! Lovely nest and all have fledged.
Sue Wetmore

Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/18 5:57 am
From: Eric Hynes <erichynes28...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Banded Semipalmated Sandpiper at Shelburne Bay Monday afternoon
Hello Vermont Birders:

Yesterday afternoon I had the pleasure of birding with Ali Wagner for a few
hours. We set out looking for southbound shorebirds. Our first stop,
Shelburne Bay, proved to be our most productive location. An hour of
scoping from the point produced a nice assortment of shorebirds:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47407001

Noteworthy species were a single Short-billed Dowitcher and a banded
Semipalmated Sandpiper (SESA). The SESA showed a metal band on the upper
left leg and a pale, lime green flag tag on the upper right leg. I did not
see any bands on the tarsi (lower leg). Unfortunately the banded bird never
got close enough to read the engraving on the flag tag. Who knows if it
will stick around but if anyone is visiting this site, please keep your eye
out for the marked bird. If someone is able to read the alpha numeric code
on the flag tag, we can learn where and when it was banded and if it has
been spotted anywhere else. It's like finding buried treasure.

Good birding,
Eric
.....................
Eric Hynes
Telluride, CO
---------------------
Field Guides Birding Tours
www.fieldguides.com
http://fieldguides.com/guides/eric-hynes
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/18 5:23 am
From: Sue <2birdvt...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Bobolinks! Union St Brandon, Jul 24, 2018
A cloud of bobolinks flew up from the grasses this morning. It appeared to be a mixed flock of some adults and many juveniles . A black-billed cuckoo called in the distance.
Sue Wetmore
Sent from my iPod

Begin forwarded
>
> Union St Brandon, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Jul 24, 2018 7:00 AM - 7:45 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 23 species
>
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 15
> Black-billed Cuckoo 1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1
> Belted Kingfisher 1
> Willow Flycatcher 1
> Eastern Phoebe 1
> Eastern Kingbird 1
> Warbling Vireo 1
> American Crow 1
> Barn Swallow 2
> White-breasted Nuthatch 1
> American Robin 4
> Gray Catbird 1
> European Starling 4
> Common Yellowthroat 1
> Yellow Warbler 1
> Song Sparrow 4
> Swamp Sparrow 1
> Northern Cardinal 3
> Bobolink 53 Hay field is under the bobolink program and birds were a mixed flock of adults and recently fledged juveniles. Majority had plumage of immatures.
> Red-winged Blackbird 16
> American Goldfinch 3
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47418994
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)
 

Back to top
Date: 7/23/18 1:52 pm
From: FRED BATES <batesx2...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Grace Cong. Church, Jul 23, 2018
We were out for a walk between showers when we heard the Peregrines making a racket on the steeple of Grace Church.
Fred and Lana Bates
Rutland


>
>
> Grace Cong. Church, Rutland, Vermont, US
> Jul 23, 2018 3:15 PM
> Protocol: Incidental
> 1 species
>
> Peregrine Falcon 2 Sitting on the star on the Grace Church steeple.
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47408118
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 6:37 pm
From: Peg Clement <clementpeg...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Red Rocks, Burlington
Adult Osprey seen calling ceaselessly this afternoon from a tree at the viewpoint, outlet over Shelburne.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 6:26 pm
From: Roy Pilcher <00000022ffe6db53-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Fwd: eBird Report - Old Marsh Pond WMA - Loon Watch Day
Adult loon and chick observed along with 24 additional species.


Cheers, Roy Pilcher



-----Original Message-----
From: ebird-checklist <ebird-checklist...>
To: shamwariVT <shamwariVT...>
Sent: Sun, Jul 22, 2018 9:23 pm
Subject: eBird Report - Old Marsh Pond WMA - Fair Haven (131 acres), Jul 21, 2018

Old Marsh Pond WMA - Fair Haven (131 acres), Rutland, Vermont, US
Jul 21, 2018 8:15 AM - 10:35 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.8 mile(s)
Comments: Vermont Loon Watch Day. Initial temperature 67 degrees.
25 species

Wood Duck 4
Common Loon 2 Pond more than 50% covered with flowering waterlilies. Depth uncertain!. Dive duration of adult, short.
Great Blue Heron 1
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Mourning Dove 1
Black-billed Cuckoo 1 Heard several times with long intervening intervals. Last call very close.
Belted Kingfisher 1
Downy Woodpecker 2
Great Crested Flycatcher 3
Warbling Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 4
Blue Jay 4
Black-capped Chickadee 2
Wood Thrush 2
American Robin 2
Gray Catbird 1
Common Yellowthroat 2
Song Sparrow 1
Swamp Sparrow 1
Eastern Towhee 1
Scarlet Tanager 1
Northern Cardinal 3
Indigo Bunting 1
Red-winged Blackbird 1
American Goldfinch 6

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47364958

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org/vt)
 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 5:28 pm
From: Bruce MacPherson <00000017afe5cb7a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] Shorebird migration
Here we are at the end of July and shorebird migration has begun. This afternoon I counted 61 Least Sandpipers, 6 Lesser Yellowlegs, and 4 Killdeer feeding along the shoreline at Shelburne Bay. Many more to come.


Bruce MacPherson
South Burlington
 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 11:49 am
From: Walter Medwid <wmedwid...>
Subject: [VTBIRD] osprey abandon old nest site and build new one nearby
I'm curious if anyone would have insight into why a nest site that has been
used for several years including at the start of this year, then abandoned
for a new nest built this year and perhaps 200 yards from the old? The old
nest is very large. Thanks.
 

Join us on Facebook!