LABIRD
Received From Subject
6/18/19 7:02 pm Timothy Gioe <timothy.gioe...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
6/17/19 4:30 pm Johnson, Erik <ejohnson...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?
6/17/19 2:08 pm Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?
6/17/19 1:49 pm John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?
6/17/19 1:27 pm Jeffrey W. Harris <jwharris30...> [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbirds declining?
6/17/19 1:19 pm Mac Myers <budogmacm...> [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?
6/14/19 7:59 pm Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> [LABIRD-L] Perils of Long Distance IDs with Binoculars - Crowley Waste Treatment Plant 6/13/19
6/14/19 6:18 pm Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...> [LABIRD-L] BBS -- Frogmore, Enterprise, and Trout routes
6/14/19 1:53 pm Johnson, Erik <ejohnson...> [LABIRD-L] Esplanade Ave (NOLA) night-heron rookery
6/14/19 12:56 pm Shively, Steve -FS <000001e5cc319de1-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Swallow-tailed Kite
6/13/19 2:00 pm Jane Patterson <seejanebird...> [LABIRD-L] Fall Birding Classes - info on braudubon.org
6/9/19 9:47 pm Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Bogue Chitto
6/8/19 6:20 am Seth Nehrbass <snehrbass...> [LABIRD-L] Eastern screech owl photo op now
6/7/19 1:53 pm Kevin Colley <kcolley71...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Rails and Rice Festival
6/7/19 5:56 am Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Northshore easy birding
6/6/19 7:03 pm Jeffrey W. Harris <jwharris30...> [LABIRD-L] Rails and Rice Festival
6/6/19 6:51 pm David Booth <david...> [LABIRD-L] Frigate bird in West Baton Rouge Parish today
6/5/19 7:14 am Terry Davis <terkchip...> [LABIRD-L] Hummer yard location #2. Wild red morning glory and scarlet sage seeds wanted.
6/4/19 2:55 pm Terry Davis <terkchip...> Re: [LABIRD-L] IVAN 2 BBS- 06-04-19
6/4/19 2:54 pm Terry Davis <terkchip...> [LABIRD-L] IVAN 2 BBS- 06-04-19
6/1/19 11:17 am Mac Myers <budogmacm...> [LABIRD-L] WF Goose research
5/31/19 2:30 pm Jane Patterson <seejanebird...> [LABIRD-L] Can you check on a Pelican?
5/31/19 6:38 am Bill Vermillion <bill.gcjv...> [LABIRD-L] LALIT - Habitat selection by Great Egrets in LA and SC
5/29/19 1:38 pm Krista Adams <kadams11...> [LABIRD-L] 1st Annual Purple Martin and Garden Event - June 1st in Denham Springs
5/28/19 8:00 pm Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Joyce boardwalk Tuesday afternoon, 5/28/19
5/28/19 7:53 pm Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Swallow tailed kite sighting
5/28/19 6:51 am Terri Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Brown boobies in St Tammany parish
5/27/19 11:38 am Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Dolphins, bunnies, purple gallinules, and fulvous whistling ducks!
5/27/19 9:18 am James V Remsen <najames...> [LABIRD-L] Saturday 5 October pelagic trip
5/26/19 5:59 pm janine robin <janinerobin1982...> [LABIRD-L] Brown boobies in St Tammany parish
5/25/19 9:20 pm Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
5/25/19 10:45 am Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Lacassine and Pintail accessibility, re flooding
5/25/19 10:36 am Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Lacassine and Pintail accessibility, re flooding
5/24/19 6:33 pm Rose Must <rosem.must...> [LABIRD-L] HELP
5/23/19 1:51 pm programs braudubon.org <programs...> [LABIRD-L] *Rescheduled* BRAS potluck, election and presentation Thurs, May 30th
5/21/19 7:32 am Paul Dickson <Paul...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
5/21/19 6:27 am bill fontenot <natrldlite...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
5/20/19 8:51 pm Terry Davis <terkchip...> [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
 
Back to top
Date: 6/18/19 7:02 pm
From: Timothy Gioe <timothy.gioe...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
Hello all,

This is my first post, so I apologize if this is the incorrect format. I
have been subscribing to the emails since March, and have thoroughly
enjoyed everyone's knowledge and expertise. I have learned tons from this
forum, and hope to broaden my birding knowledge for years to come.

I just wanted to report that I saw about 12 to 15 cedar waxwings circling
my street today around 645 pm. This was in Covington, Louisiana in Country
Club Estate's, south of i12.

From what I have read, most waxwings have migrated by this time of year,
correct?

They have eaten the berries from my holly tree on two different occasions
the last few months. But I assume there are still more in the area. I moved
here in November 2018 from New Orleans with my wife and two toddlers, so
cannot tell you if this is the yearly norm.

I have not tried submitting to ebird yet (do not have a template created
yet), but will be happy to do so.

Anyways, hope this was helpful and thank you for all of your help and hard
work!

Sincerely,
Tim Gioe


On Sat, May 25, 2019, 11:20 PM Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...>
wrote:

> labirders,
>
> Today I still had 10 Cedar Waxwings (exact count when group flew) in the
> yard in Jena (La Salle Parish), which is now late enough that I needed to
> pull up "Rarities" when submitting to eBird. The species has been heard
> daily at this locale since at least 5/18/19, when there was at least 50. I
> hadn't submitted sightings since the 20th (~15 birds). They seem to be
> hanging around wild cherry trees. It'll be interesting to see how long they
> linger.
>
> Jonathan Clark
>
> On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 10:51 PM Terry Davis <terkchip...> wrote:
>
> > Hey all, Late this afternoon around 5:30 I noted at least 2 lingering
> > Cedar Waxwing in the huge red mulberry in the center of the parking lot
> at
> > the boat launch area at RRNWR Headquarters unit in south Bossier City.
> This
> > isn’t unusual at all but I’ll try to be watching, when possible, toward
> > end of month to see if any are still lingering. The berries are notably
> > late ripening this year with well over half still green, then rest red
> but
> > could count on one hand those that were blackening but not fully
> > there.,Wild grape is very abundant in this area and is beginning to take
> > over the north side of this grand old tree. This should be removed, imop.
> >
> > Also I just noted this afternoon that Ellis pottery on Airline at
> > Barksdale Blvd in bossier has Salvia greggi 1 gallon for A BUCK apiece!
> > There are LOTS of red remaining! That’s a SUPER good deal for a better
> than
> > average hummer plant!
> >
> > Cheers and good birding,
> >
> > Terry Davis
> > Bossier City
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/19 4:30 pm
From: Johnson, Erik <ejohnson...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?
The Cornell wizards that run eBird have recently produced trend and status maps for over 100 species. Go to their homepage and look ALL the way at the bottom under "Science." Unfortunately, they haven't done an analysis on Eastern Kingbird yet...and the ones they do have only span the last 10-15 years.
https://ebird.org/science/status-and-trends

Or, you can go to the Breeding Bird Survey website and query the data to your heart's content. From 1967-2015 in Louisiana, it indicates a -1.5% annual decline, which equates to approximately a 50% decline over the entire period.
https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBS/

Erik Johnson
Sunset, LA
Ejohnson AT Audubon.org



-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> On Behalf Of Jay V Huner
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 4:09 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?

Well,

Has anyone looked at the eBird numbers, by parish/county, for the past few years? Maybe Matt Brady knows of some "easy" way to do that without having to do parish/county one by one?

Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Dillon" <kisforkryptonite...>
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 3:49:19 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?

Mac/LABIRD,

I live among pastures and had a kingbird in my yard earlier today, as I do all summer. One odd observation I’ve made over the years is that they are much more plentiful in the pm hours rather than am. I can go out in the morning and scarcely find one or two. By mid-afternoon, though, name a number, and we can probably reach it. So, I don’t know what time of day you were driving, but if it was during the morning, that might at least partially account for lower numbers.

John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2019, at 3:19 PM, Mac Myers <budogmacm...> wrote:
>
> Last week I drove from Eunice, LA to Greenwood, MS, and returned. The
> total distance was just under 700 miles, including a couple of short
> excursions around Greenwood. Except for the Eunice/Alexandria leg, and
> a couple of very short stretches in the delta, I took different
> routes. I avoided interstates except for I-49 near Alexandria, and
> I-20 from Vicksburg to Monroe on the return. I took a lot of back roads, especially in the delta.
> The trip included various habitats, including lots of ag lands, pine
> and hardwood forests, pastures, and mixed use areas around businesses
> and houses. I saw a grand total of ONE Eastern Kingbird. Now, I was
> driving not getting out and birding, but I was alert and paying
> attention to birds. And kingbirds are usually rather conspicuous. In
> fact, I saw more shrikes (not
> many) than kingbirds. Over the last few years, I've noticed the
> extreme scarcity of E. Kingbirds in the rice country during breeding
> season. They seem to be in reasonable numbers once one gets south of
> there into the marsh/pasture country.
>
> I'm curious if others have noticed a decline in kingbirds, especially
> in central and northern LA where I have much less experience.
>
> On a more positive note, the number of Cliff Swallows was really
> impressive. I saw them at more than half of the bridges/overpasses
> that I crossed.
>
> Mac
>
> <https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww
> .avast.com%2Fsig-email%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dlink%26utm_
> campaign%3Dsig-email%26utm_content%3Dwebmail%26utm_term%3Dicon&amp;dat
> a=02%7C01%<7Cejohnson...>%7C7ed7c17933ad46d7202108d6f3680115%
> 7C9c32b1b1b0c8422db7a7859d1beca523%7C0%7C0%7C636964025362489084&amp;sd
> ata=toTuh50DOtdql26Pt2E09JR0udvByfC5jxnxe8%2FWvZA%3D&amp;reserved=0>
> Virus-free.
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.avast.com&amp;
> data=02%7C01%<7Cejohnson...>%7C7ed7c17933ad46d7202108d6f36801
> 15%7C9c32b1b1b0c8422db7a7859d1beca523%7C0%7C0%7C636964025362489084&amp
> ;sdata=7FQ%2FsoeV4V5cAWEFchqfULJHi5OLtZXI5BVczKaGEL4%3D&amp;reserved=0
> <https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww
> .avast.com%2Fsig-email%3Futm_medium%3Demail%26utm_source%3Dlink%26utm_
> campaign%3Dsig-email%26utm_content%3Dwebmail%26utm_term%3Dlink&amp;dat
> a=02%7C01%<7Cejohnson...>%7C7ed7c17933ad46d7202108d6f3680115%
> 7C9c32b1b1b0c8422db7a7859d1beca523%7C0%7C0%7C636964025362489084&amp;sd
> ata=yiCAnT20U3yOWChjgQRHYZ63Du3%2F%2FEkqA%2BhHMkflClw%3D&amp;reserved=
> 0> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/19 2:08 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?
Well,

Has anyone looked at the eBird numbers, by parish/county, for the past few years? Maybe Matt Brady knows of some "easy" way to do that without having to do parish/county one by one?

Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "John Dillon" <kisforkryptonite...>
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 3:49:19 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?

Mac/LABIRD,

I live among pastures and had a kingbird in my yard earlier today, as I do all summer. One odd observation I’ve made over the years is that they are much more plentiful in the pm hours rather than am. I can go out in the morning and scarcely find one or two. By mid-afternoon, though, name a number, and we can probably reach it. So, I don’t know what time of day you were driving, but if it was during the morning, that might at least partially account for lower numbers.

John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2019, at 3:19 PM, Mac Myers <budogmacm...> wrote:
>
> Last week I drove from Eunice, LA to Greenwood, MS, and returned. The total
> distance was just under 700 miles, including a couple of short excursions
> around Greenwood. Except for the Eunice/Alexandria leg, and a couple of
> very short stretches in the delta, I took different routes. I avoided
> interstates except for I-49 near Alexandria, and I-20 from Vicksburg to
> Monroe on the return. I took a lot of back roads, especially in the delta.
> The trip included various habitats, including lots of ag lands, pine and
> hardwood forests, pastures, and mixed use areas around businesses and
> houses. I saw a grand total of ONE Eastern Kingbird. Now, I was driving not
> getting out and birding, but I was alert and paying attention to birds. And
> kingbirds are usually rather conspicuous. In fact, I saw more shrikes (not
> many) than kingbirds. Over the last few years, I've noticed the extreme
> scarcity of E. Kingbirds in the rice country during breeding season. They
> seem to be in reasonable numbers once one gets south of there into the
> marsh/pasture country.
>
> I'm curious if others have noticed a decline in kingbirds, especially in
> central and northern LA where I have much less experience.
>
> On a more positive note, the number of Cliff Swallows was really
> impressive. I saw them at more than half of the bridges/overpasses that I
> crossed.
>
> Mac
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/19 1:49 pm
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?
Mac/LABIRD,

I live among pastures and had a kingbird in my yard earlier today, as I do all summer. One odd observation I’ve made over the years is that they are much more plentiful in the pm hours rather than am. I can go out in the morning and scarcely find one or two. By mid-afternoon, though, name a number, and we can probably reach it. So, I don’t know what time of day you were driving, but if it was during the morning, that might at least partially account for lower numbers.

John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 17, 2019, at 3:19 PM, Mac Myers <budogmacm...> wrote:
>
> Last week I drove from Eunice, LA to Greenwood, MS, and returned. The total
> distance was just under 700 miles, including a couple of short excursions
> around Greenwood. Except for the Eunice/Alexandria leg, and a couple of
> very short stretches in the delta, I took different routes. I avoided
> interstates except for I-49 near Alexandria, and I-20 from Vicksburg to
> Monroe on the return. I took a lot of back roads, especially in the delta.
> The trip included various habitats, including lots of ag lands, pine and
> hardwood forests, pastures, and mixed use areas around businesses and
> houses. I saw a grand total of ONE Eastern Kingbird. Now, I was driving not
> getting out and birding, but I was alert and paying attention to birds. And
> kingbirds are usually rather conspicuous. In fact, I saw more shrikes (not
> many) than kingbirds. Over the last few years, I've noticed the extreme
> scarcity of E. Kingbirds in the rice country during breeding season. They
> seem to be in reasonable numbers once one gets south of there into the
> marsh/pasture country.
>
> I'm curious if others have noticed a decline in kingbirds, especially in
> central and northern LA where I have much less experience.
>
> On a more positive note, the number of Cliff Swallows was really
> impressive. I saw them at more than half of the bridges/overpasses that I
> crossed.
>
> Mac
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/19 1:27 pm
From: Jeffrey W. Harris <jwharris30...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbirds declining?
Hello Mac/LABIRD,

The numbers of Eastern Kingbirds seem steady up here in northeast
Mississippi. I have only been birding this area for 7 years, but this
species seems quite abundant on farms and open pastures and on the shores
of open lakes and ponds. I might have said their numbers might be higher
here than last year. I know this is not Louisiana, but I thought my
experience might counter a large general decline. It might be a local and
temporary reduction, or maybe there is so change in agricultural practices
affecting the local distribution of the birds.

Sincerely,

Jeff Harris

Starkville, MS
 

Back to top
Date: 6/17/19 1:19 pm
From: Mac Myers <budogmacm...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Eastern Kingbird--declining?
Last week I drove from Eunice, LA to Greenwood, MS, and returned. The total
distance was just under 700 miles, including a couple of short excursions
around Greenwood. Except for the Eunice/Alexandria leg, and a couple of
very short stretches in the delta, I took different routes. I avoided
interstates except for I-49 near Alexandria, and I-20 from Vicksburg to
Monroe on the return. I took a lot of back roads, especially in the delta.
The trip included various habitats, including lots of ag lands, pine and
hardwood forests, pastures, and mixed use areas around businesses and
houses. I saw a grand total of ONE Eastern Kingbird. Now, I was driving not
getting out and birding, but I was alert and paying attention to birds. And
kingbirds are usually rather conspicuous. In fact, I saw more shrikes (not
many) than kingbirds. Over the last few years, I've noticed the extreme
scarcity of E. Kingbirds in the rice country during breeding season. They
seem to be in reasonable numbers once one gets south of there into the
marsh/pasture country.

I'm curious if others have noticed a decline in kingbirds, especially in
central and northern LA where I have much less experience.

On a more positive note, the number of Cliff Swallows was really
impressive. I saw them at more than half of the bridges/overpasses that I
crossed.

Mac

<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/19 7:59 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Perils of Long Distance IDs with Binoculars - Crowley Waste Treatment Plant 6/13/19
I had occasion to visit the Crowley Waste Treatment Plant yesterday. I got there about 3 PM and the place closes at 4 PM. A ride, weather conditions permitting, around the perimeter is about a mile and a half. The place is usually covered with ducks in the winter and is a place where one can occasionally find odd waterfowl in the summer. Well, I didn't stop and pull out my scope when I saw a Ruddy Duck, twice, and a Lesser Scaup, once. But, I did take some long distance pictures with my point and shoot Nikon P-520 (thanks Arthur Liles). Posted the report last night, Downloaded images an hour or so ago. Imagine my embarrassment to find that the scaup was a Ring-necked Duck and that one of the Ruddy Ducks was a Hooded Merganser! Anyway, a link to the corrected ebird list is found below.

I was a bit surprised to find out, when I signed in to the facility, that there had not been another birder there since April 6th of this year. The place really is worth visiting but you'll have to hoof it if the levees are wet.

Jay Huner



https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57351717
 

Back to top
Date: 6/14/19 6:18 pm
From: Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] BBS -- Frogmore, Enterprise, and Trout routes
labirders,

This is a bit belated, but I thought I'd share some findings from the
three Breeding Bird Survey routes that I surveyed this year. The bird
numbers I give for each route are total birds detected along that route,
combing those at the BBS stops (3-minute point counts) with those detected
in between. A route is 50 stops at half-mile intervals, same stops each
year and surveyed close to the same date each year.

I did the Frogmore route (northern and central Concordia Parish) on June
2. This is the fifth year that I've surveyed this route. The habitat is
alluvial plain dominated by farmland, with areas of bottomland hardwoods,
swampy spots, human habitation. This year my father Roland, who sometimes
joins me on BBS's, drove for this route.
Prothonotary Warbler numbers this year were nearly double last year's --
24 vs. 13. Similar deal with Yellow-billed Cuckoo -- 42 this year, 25 last
year. One oddity was an American Robin foraging on a gravel road (Ames Rd,
stop 36) inside dense bottomland hardwood forest. Seemed to me to be an odd
spot to find a robin this time of year, well away from someone's yard or a
neighborhood park.
This year I detected no Blue-gray Gnatcatchers on this route. No
Northern Bobwhite this year, though I had them on this route at least two
previous years. Some other species that I've found on this route during one
or more previous BBS's that weren't detected this year include: Tricolored
Heron, Plegadis ibis sp., Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawks, Red-headed
Woodpecker, American Kestrel, Horned Lark.
Last year several species that I'd come to expect went undetected, but
they were back this year. These include: Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (3),
Pileated Woodpecker (3), Red-eyed Vireo (2), Swainson's Warbler (2), and
Dickcissel (3). Welcome back, gang.

I did the Enterprise route (northern and central Catahoula Parish) on
June 3. This is the ninth year that I've done this route. Habitat for first
~35 stops is hilly uplands, the rest is lowland including some currently
flooded woods, and significant human habitation and agricultural areas.
The first 11 or so stops (Catahoula Church Rd and part of Old Columbia
Rd) include the "prettiest" woods on this route (what's left of them), and
are generally the best stretch for warbler diversity. I was surprised by
how many Northern Parulas I was finding along Catahoula Church Rd (first 4
miles of route) this time. Last year I had a total of only 3 No. Parula
along the whole route, 2 of those along Catahoula Church Rd. This year I
had 14 along the whole route, 11 of those on C. Church Rd. I had 7
Black-&-white Warblers this year along the upland portions of the route,
verses last year's 1.
There was a lot of logging going on in the Chalk Hills -- stop 15 was
basically useless, and I had to skip stop 16. Noise, dust, and passing
equipment and trucks made for less than ideal conditions along some of the
roads from there south a ways.
I had a Wild Turkey this year (stop 24). I find them on about half the
years on this route. The one that sometimes gobbles at stop 6 wasn't heard
this year (the pines around the hardwood gully were logged last year, but
it was still there then. That cutover has since been sprayed and not much
grows there now.).
On the negative side, I had only 2 Swainson's Warblers this year, both
on C. Church Rd. Last year I had 7, scattered along the first 35 stops. No
American Redstarts this year, though some years I get one, once a few.
Common Yellowthroat -- 2 this year, 9 last year.
Other species that I find on this route regularly enough but which went
undetected this year include: Chuck-will's-widow; Red-shouldered,
Broad-winged, and Red-tailed Hawks; and Eastern Kingbird. Species that I've
had on one to three years in the past but which were missed this year
include: Northern Bobwhite, Wood Stork, No. Flicker, and Scissor-tailed
Flycatcher.
One neat observation was seeing a large flock of White Ibises passing
through the Chalk Hills at stop 13, coming from the direction of flooded
Ouachita River bottoms to the NE, flying SW, the direction of the Catahoula
Lake system and all that backwater. They'd just gained enough altitude to
clear the smaller trees on the hilltop.

I did the Trout route (central La Salle Parish) on June 9. This is the
first year that I've done this route, which was previously surveyed by
Michael Seymour. This covers familiar territory close to home for me, an
includes some stretches of road that I regularly bird, such as Zimmer Creed
Rd. The BBS was a really interesting new way to look at some familiar
places. All 50 stops are in the uplands dominated by hilly pine plantation
type situations, but also with significant areas around human habitation,
pastures, and the like.
Nothing too unusual, though there were slightly disappointing numbers
for some warblers. I had 5 Swainson's, 4 Worm-eating, and 2 Black-&white,
which I would say would be about 40-60% of what I'd have predicted for each
of those based on years of birding in this area, except that this year has
seen these birds missing at some spots where I'd come to expect them each
breeding season, or just generally somewhat less frequently detected in
appropriate habitat in this area this breeding season. My impression. No
Northern Parula or LA Waterthrush, though I might have expected them at one
or two of the creek bottoms.
I guess I was a little bit surprised by the number of Chipping Sparrows
(7) and Painted Buntings (6) I detected along this route. Both are
expected, its just that they were perhaps 30-50% over what I might have
predicted detecting based on birding a lot at nearby locales in similar
habitat. Just a very small pleasant surprise.

Below is a link to a blog post with the complete bird lists from each of
these routes this year and more details about these BBS's, some pics and
videos.
https://falloutbird2014.blogspot.com/2019/06/breeding-bird-surveys-2019-frogmore.html

Jonathan Clark
Jena LA

..............
 

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Date: 6/14/19 1:53 pm
From: Johnson, Erik <ejohnson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Esplanade Ave (NOLA) night-heron rookery
LAbirders,

Each year (at least over the last few years), a small group of ~30-75 pairs of Black-crowned Night-Herons nest in the live oaks above Esplanade Avenue between N Rocheblave and N Tonti. I've hesitated to publicize the location, but there is an ongoing issue that has been brought to my attention that is challenging to address. Once the chicks become a certain age, they leave the nest and some fall to the street, where they are quickly hit by passing cars.
https://goo.gl/maps/CZTfkksHwBy18QvT8

A few people from the neighborhood have tried several times to put up signs, which immediately get stolen or vandalized. Some chicks they have tried to rehabilitate with help. I can't say that I have solutions on how to help here, except man-power to "steward" the nesting area, like people carrying signs to slow traffic down, and to potentially move fallen chicks to safety before they are hit. What I don't know is how much this happens at night (perhaps when the colony is more active).

If you are interested in helping with this in whatever way you can - ideas, time, signs, etc. - please contact me off-list.

Something that worked well in a similar situation in San Francisco a few years ago was that Golden Gate Audubon Society organized an "Art Flash Mob" to increase awareness. Given New Orleans' deep connection with art, this might be a fun thing to try, should someone want to organize it.
https://goldengateaudubon.org/blog-posts/art-flash-mob-for-oakland-herons/

Best,
Erik Johnson
Director of Bird Conservation, Audubon Louisiana
Ejohnson AT Audubon.org
 

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Date: 6/14/19 12:56 pm
From: Shively, Steve -FS <000001e5cc319de1-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Swallow-tailed Kite
Dave Moore, Forest Botanist for Kisatchie National Forest, reports a Swallowtailed Kite in Grant Parish, 0.5 miles NW of south grant elementary circling over trees headed west. 1405 Friday July 14, 2019.


Steve Shively





This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.
 

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Date: 6/13/19 2:00 pm
From: Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fall Birding Classes - info on braudubon.org
Hello all!

Information regarding the fall sessions of our Birding Basics classes is
now online at braudubon.org/events-and-field-trips.

--Jane Patterson
Pres, BR Audubon Society

September 2019

Fall Birding Basics Class - OLLI
Mondays - September 9, 16, 23, and 30 from 8am to 11 am at White Oak Estate
and Gardens, 17660 George Oneal Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70817

This class is designed for the beginning bird watcher. It will consist of 4
weekly sessions. In the first session, you will be introduced to binoculars
and field guides and basic information about birdwatching. The following
three weeks, we will go on bird walks around the property and identify as
many birds as possible. Bird walks may last up to 2 hours (at a very
leisurely pace) so mobility is required. After the bird walks, we will
review what we've seen and discuss tips and tricks for identifying birds by
sight and sound. During the last class, I will offer resources and
information on where and how to use your new birding skills. Binoculars and
field guides will be provided during the class sessions.

This class will be offered through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute
(OLLI). Must be a member of OLLI. Fee will be charged.

Please see the OLLI class registration page to register:
http://www.outreach.lsu.edu/Enrichment/OLLI-at-LSU

DATE: Sept 9, 16, 23, and 30 (series of 4 classes -- runs for 4 consecutive
Mondays)

TIME: 8:00 - 11:00AM

LOCATION: White Oak Estate and Gardens, 17660 George Oneal Rd, Baton Rouge,
LA 70817
------------------------------

Fall Birding Basics Class - Hilltop Arboretum
Mondays - September 9, 16, 23, and 30 from 7pm to 9pm. 4 Field Trips -
Saturdays - Sept 14, 21, 28, and Oct 6 (Sunday).

The fee is $50 (Plus $3.08 Eventbrite registration fee) and covers all 4
classes as well as field trips.

This series of 4 classes is designed for the person who is interested in
birds but hasn't a clue what they're looking at. We will start with the
basics: binoculars and field guides. Then we'll move on to tips and advice
on bird identification. Finally, we'll finish up with resources you can use
to find great birds all across the state of Louisiana (and beyond). But the
real value from the class comes from the field trips that will be offered
with each class. We'll see birds in the wild and learn to identify them.

Binoculars and field guides will be provided for participants. Class is
limited to 15 people.

DATE: Mondays - September 9, 16, 23, and 30. Field Trips: Saturdays - Sept
14, 21, 28, and Oct 6 (Sunday).

TIME: 7:00 - 9:00PM for class. 7:30 to 10:30 am for Field Trips

LOCATION: Hilltop Arboretum, 11855 Highland Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70810

FEE & REGISTRATION:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fall-birding-basics-hilltop-tickets-62613311099
Fee is $50 plus Eventbrite surcharge.
------------------------------

Fall Birding Basics Class - Ponchatoula
Dates - Sept 11, 18, 25 and Oct 2. Wednesday morning 8am to 11am. at PARD
gym on N. Hoover Rd., Ponchatoula

This class is designed for the beginning bird watcher. It will consist of 4
weekly sessions. In the first session, you will be introduced to binoculars
and field guides and basic information about birdwatching. The following
three weeks, we will go on bird walks around the property and identify as
many birds as possible. Bird walks may last up to 2 hours (at a very
leisurely pace) so mobility is required. After the bird walks, we will
review what we've seen and discuss tips and tricks for identifying birds by
sight and sound. During the last class, I will offer resources and
information on where and how to use your new birding skills. Binoculars and
field guides will be provided during the class sessions. Class is limited
to 15 people.

DATE: Sept 11, 18, 25, and Oct 2

TIME: 8am to 11 am

LOCATION: Ponchatoula Area Recreation District 1 - Hoover Rd, Ponchatoula

Fee and Registration: Fee is $23.00 plus Eventbrite surcharge - total
$24.86. Register here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pard-fall-birding-class-tickets-62612704284
(Please note: if you are particularly interested in the class, but unable
to pay the fee, please contact me directly: <seejanebird...>)
 

Back to top
Date: 6/9/19 9:47 pm
From: Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Bogue Chitto
Sunday my husband and I had a nice day at Bogue Chitto
We were able to go down to the gorge boardwalk
Lots of singing going on!  I wish I knew bird songs!
We were delighted to have both a male and female summer tananger.  We actually saw a few male summer tanangers.  Chickadees on the boardwalk as well.

We saw a brown thrasher by the RV sites.
We had a red headed woodpecker on the power line by the horse rental area.  Also brown headed cowbird there.
We went to the fishing lake by the splash park and had not only a Mississippi Kite fly over, but first, a swallow tailed kite!
Swallow tailed kite was flying west, Dr. Peter!
The river was gorgeous, and we even found the river overlook, where, again, lots of singing, but nobody would show themselves!
Definitely had white eye vireos singing away.
I would highly recommend going up there.  Beautiful place.
Bring bug spray!
Thanks to all who gave input!
Terri
 

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Date: 6/8/19 6:20 am
From: Seth Nehrbass <snehrbass...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Eastern screech owl photo op now
Dear All

We currently have an eastern screech owl perched in our backyard at 453
Audubon Boulevard in New Orleans It is in the same perch where I observed
it Sunday from around 9am until 1pm. I suspect it might be around for
hours. If you would like to photograph it or simply view it, please call
or text me at 504-813-8815.

Seth Nehrbass
 

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Date: 6/7/19 1:53 pm
From: Kevin Colley <kcolley71...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rails and Rice Festival
Jeff,

I don’t believe it has been scheduled yet. Normally it is held during the last week of October. However that can change slightly based on the rice harvest. I would contact Donna Dittmann (the event organizer) directly or try the website snowyegretenterprises.com to get the latest details.

Kevin Colley


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 6, 2019, at 9:03 PM, Jeffrey W. Harris <jwharris30...> wrote:
>
> Hello LA Birders,
>
> I have a friend who would like to attend this year's event. Has it been
> scheduled yet? If so, where can I send him for details about registration,
> field trips, etc.? Thanks for your help.
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Jeff Harris
 

Back to top
Date: 6/7/19 5:56 am
From: Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Northshore easy birding
My husband and I are hoping to do a day trip on Sunday to do birding/photography on the northshore, crossing the Causeway from Metairie, and heading north.
Is the boardwalk at Bogue Chitto SP in Franklinton open?  I'm worried because of the weather and high waters we've had lately.
We would like to drive up to the park, just drive around it, so he can see it, and we may even go up to the Ag Center that way.

Also, is Lake Road in Lacombe passable right now?  I really enjoy driving down there.
We may try to do Big Branch if I can find it, the small boardwalk there, if that's open.  I've never been there alone, only as part of a group, so any tips to get there would be appreciated.

We'll definitely go to Sunset Point.
I'm treating him to a trip to Second and Charles for his birthday/Father's Day and dinner at Tres Yeun, one of his bucket list restaurants, after the birding, so don't want to do anything too messy or strenuous, but want him to be able to get some nice pictures, even if no birds, and see these beautiful places.

Thanks for any input!
Terri
 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/19 7:03 pm
From: Jeffrey W. Harris <jwharris30...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Rails and Rice Festival
Hello LA Birders,

I have a friend who would like to attend this year's event. Has it been
scheduled yet? If so, where can I send him for details about registration,
field trips, etc.? Thanks for your help.

Sincerely,

Jeff Harris
 

Back to top
Date: 6/6/19 6:51 pm
From: David Booth <david...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Frigate bird in West Baton Rouge Parish today
I don’t know if it was the storm, but I observed a Frigatebird soaring in a thermal with two Missisdippi Kites above the St. John the Baptist Cathedral about 3:30 this afternoon.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/5/19 7:14 am
From: Terry Davis <terkchip...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Hummer yard location #2. Wild red morning glory and scarlet sage seeds wanted.
Hey all, I’ve done very little toward it so far but will definitely be trying to get my hummingbird thing on at the new house I bought 8 months ago, just a very little at a time.

I’d be extremely happy to pay for any trouble and shipping and handling- that is- If anyone has any extra seeds of the very small-flowered wild red morning glory- Ipomoea coccinea- to be exact, they’d be greatly appreciated! Also any seeds of good cultivars or just of the wild scarlet sage/Salvia coccinea. It has been all but absent in the local nurseries for quite a few years since way back a few years after “Lady in Red”, “Coral Nymph” and a few other cultivars were widely available for a good stretch of years. Although I’m a small landscaper and licensed horticulturist, hummingbird and native plant gardens are somewhat of a hard thing for many to catch onto in this area, representing a notably small niche within the business of landscaping. With that said, I’ve fallen out of the circles over the years of keeping track of various improved cultivars of Salvia, Cuphea, Abutilon and other well known hummer plants. I’d been living in an apartment with no usable yard except a few porch pots for the past 15 plus years. Van, Nancy and others/ , don’t go to any trouble on my account but any up-to-date info regarding this would be awesomely welcome!! I’ll also be sharing the seeds with Charlie Lyon as we’re well on our way to getting his yard back up to hummer standards! Currently we both have a couple cultivars of Salvia microphylla, guaranitica and greggi, plus a “David Verity”-like Cuphea ignea. Another that’s been super rare locally are various Abutilon. If any locals are reading this, I’d like to get my hands on a few rootlets of the old fashioned parlor maple or any other developed hummer-friendly cultivars of Abutilon. I’ve got a couple of spots that I believe A megapotamicum would do well in. I also have a few sunny spots that I believe will host the now seemingly impossible-to-find tree tobacco-.Nicotiana glauca.

For now, the Salvia and small-flowered wild red morning glory seeds just by themselves would be awesome!! Again, let me know if anything I need to send to cover the trouble. My new address is 1902 Lee st in Bossier but my mailing address is:
Terry Davis
1900 Lee St.
Bossier City, La. 71112

I don’t want anyone going to any trouble and there’s no rush on this. Also once again, any shared info on recent developments and progression of hummer gardening/ new types/cultivars and even refreshment of an ancient mind on old time favorites and direction toward other written works on the subject would be awesome and a very big THANK YOU in advance!! If any nw La locals see this, please forward to the Shreveport group if you read

Cheers,

Terry

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 6/4/19 2:55 pm
From: Terry Davis <terkchip...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] IVAN 2 BBS- 06-04-19
Birding not birfing, that is! Fat fingers and phones don’t mix!! 0;

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 4, 2019, at 4:53 PM, Terry Davis <terkchip...> wrote:
>
> Hey Labirders, Outstanding Shreveport birder Larry Raymond and I spent a very enjoyable morning running the Ivan 2 BBS which lies mostly within the confines of northeast Bossier parish. We had really good numbers- and possible personal bests for the run of a few species! On the down side, although none of our misses except possibly Chimney Swift, then maybe Common Grackle were notable, the total number of misses were, contributing to overall low species totals. Also some single species counts were notably low-
>
> Highlights-
>
> Wood Duck-2. Unfortunately between stops
> Inca Dove- 1. Now somewhat expected.
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo- Lots- but that’s quite usual here.
> Barred Owl- calling mid-morning at 2 separate stops.
> Killdeer- 1- ...but after/between stops.
> Yellow-crowned Night-Heron- 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker- High! Maybe also a personal best for count?
> Northern Flicker- Miss. Not too bad.
> Pileated Woodpecker- Great numbers! Possibly best ever for count?
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher- 3- as 1,2 at separate stops. One more than usual.
> Red-eyed Vireo- piles! Quite usual on route
> Blue Jay- High!
> Brown-headed Nuthatch- several. Can be missed here even though habitat often exceptional
> Swainson’s Warbler- 2. Singers at consecutive stops.
> Louisiana Waterthrush- 1. Often missed.
> Summer Tanager- lots! Fairly usual.
> Black-and-White Warbler- 4-5. Good numbers this early during run! All were singing makes but unfortunately at least 3 were between stops or after time.
> Dickcissel- 1 . Singing malevunfortunately not actually on but within ~1 mile of route near end. Was almost expected for a stretch of a few years quite awhile back but not had in recent years.
>
> Low lights-
>
> Eurasian Collared-Dove- Miss.
> Chimney Swift- MISS!
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird- Miss. Most introduced mimosa along route, where most frequently seen, were all nearly through flowering until we reached northern boundaries of run.
> Mississippi Kite- Miss
> Red-tailed Hawk- Miss- but not a horrendous one.
> Downy Woodpecker- 1- LOW!
> Hairy Woodpecker- 1. Miss but not awful.
> Eastern Wood-Pewee- 4? Low- and at least 3 of those singing between stops or after time.
> Eastern Phoebe- 3-5. Would’ve been super high 10 plus years ago but this is now somewhat low.
> American Crow- seemed notably lower than usual.
> Fish Crow- 1. Low!
> Barn Swallow- Low!
> Wood Thrush- 2- LOW! Only one countable at an actual stop!
> Brown Thrasher- Miss- but often missed early on.
> Northern Mockingbird- LOW!
> Eastern Towhee- 2? Notably LOW in comparison to past several plus years.
> Chipping Sparrow- Low! But as Brown Thrasher regarding timing.
> Brown-headed Cowbird- Low. Should’ve placed in highlights above!? O;
> Common Grackle- MISS. Somewhat notable but by no means ever “common” here.
> Northern Parula- Miss. But not really expected. Had all normal breeding warblers of area but this one. Worm-eating and American Redstart are both too rare here to be considered misses.
> Indigo Bunting- somewhat low.
>
> Cheers and good birfing!
>
> Terry Davis
> Bossier City, La.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/4/19 2:54 pm
From: Terry Davis <terkchip...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] IVAN 2 BBS- 06-04-19
Hey Labirders, Outstanding Shreveport birder Larry Raymond and I spent a very enjoyable morning running the Ivan 2 BBS which lies mostly within the confines of northeast Bossier parish. We had really good numbers- and possible personal bests for the run of a few species! On the down side, although none of our misses except possibly Chimney Swift, then maybe Common Grackle were notable, the total number of misses were, contributing to overall low species totals. Also some single species counts were notably low-

Highlights-

Wood Duck-2. Unfortunately between stops
Inca Dove- 1. Now somewhat expected.
Yellow-billed Cuckoo- Lots- but that’s quite usual here.
Barred Owl- calling mid-morning at 2 separate stops.
Killdeer- 1- ...but after/between stops.
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron- 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker- High! Maybe also a personal best for count?
Northern Flicker- Miss. Not too bad.
Pileated Woodpecker- Great numbers! Possibly best ever for count?
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher- 3- as 1,2 at separate stops. One more than usual.
Red-eyed Vireo- piles! Quite usual on route
Blue Jay- High!
Brown-headed Nuthatch- several. Can be missed here even though habitat often exceptional
Swainson’s Warbler- 2. Singers at consecutive stops.
Louisiana Waterthrush- 1. Often missed.
Summer Tanager- lots! Fairly usual.
Black-and-White Warbler- 4-5. Good numbers this early during run! All were singing makes but unfortunately at least 3 were between stops or after time.
Dickcissel- 1 . Singing malevunfortunately not actually on but within ~1 mile of route near end. Was almost expected for a stretch of a few years quite awhile back but not had in recent years.

Low lights-

Eurasian Collared-Dove- Miss.
Chimney Swift- MISS!
Ruby-throated Hummingbird- Miss. Most introduced mimosa along route, where most frequently seen, were all nearly through flowering until we reached northern boundaries of run.
Mississippi Kite- Miss
Red-tailed Hawk- Miss- but not a horrendous one.
Downy Woodpecker- 1- LOW!
Hairy Woodpecker- 1. Miss but not awful.
Eastern Wood-Pewee- 4? Low- and at least 3 of those singing between stops or after time.
Eastern Phoebe- 3-5. Would’ve been super high 10 plus years ago but this is now somewhat low.
American Crow- seemed notably lower than usual.
Fish Crow- 1. Low!
Barn Swallow- Low!
Wood Thrush- 2- LOW! Only one countable at an actual stop!
Brown Thrasher- Miss- but often missed early on.
Northern Mockingbird- LOW!
Eastern Towhee- 2? Notably LOW in comparison to past several plus years.
Chipping Sparrow- Low! But as Brown Thrasher regarding timing.
Brown-headed Cowbird- Low. Should’ve placed in highlights above!? O;
Common Grackle- MISS. Somewhat notable but by no means ever “common” here.
Northern Parula- Miss. But not really expected. Had all normal breeding warblers of area but this one. Worm-eating and American Redstart are both too rare here to be considered misses.
Indigo Bunting- somewhat low.

Cheers and good birfing!

Terry Davis
Bossier City, La.











Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 6/1/19 11:17 am
From: Mac Myers <budogmacm...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] WF Goose research
Following is some interesting information from LDWF research on WFGO.

http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/news/42865

<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
www.avast.com
<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
 

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Date: 5/31/19 2:30 pm
From: Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Can you check on a Pelican?
To birders in the Baton Rouge area,

Leslie Lattimore from Wings of Hope wildlife rehab had a call from a
concerned citizen about a White Pelican at the Capital Lakes today. She
said the person reporting it said it appeared it can fly...which makes it
even more curious as to why it's still here. Nevertheless, she's concerned
it's sick or wounded. If anyone is out and about and is able to view the
bird and report on its condition, that would be helpful. If the bird does
appear in need of help, you can notify Leslie at (225) 698-3168
<https://www.google.com/search?q=wings+of+hope&rlz=1C1CHBD_enUS787US787&oq=wings+of+hope&aqs=chrome..69i57j0j46j0l3.2239j0j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8#>

--Jane Patterson
Ponchatoula
 

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Date: 5/31/19 6:38 am
From: Bill Vermillion <bill.gcjv...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] LALIT - Habitat selection by Great Egrets in LA and SC
Hi Labird,

Given that bird reports have slowed down considerably, here's a tidbit:

Fidorra, J.C., P.C. Frederick, D.C. Evers, and K.D. Meyer. 2016. Selection
of human-influenced and natural wetlands by Great Egrets at multiple scales
in the southeastern USA. Condor: Ornithological Applications 118:46-56.

The authors tracked Great Egrets equipped with satellite transmitters (11
in SE coastal LA and 19 in SC) and also flew transects to look at habitat
use by unmarked Great Egrets in SW LA. The authors concluded from their
study that natural wetlands provided the majority of foraging habitat for
Great Egrets, but that some human-influenced wetlands (in LA crawfish ponds
especially during drawdown) were strongly selected. The authors also stated
that rice fields provided only a short window of foraging opportunity and
weren't selected over nearby natural wetlands.

Bill Vermillion
 

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Date: 5/29/19 1:38 pm
From: Krista Adams <kadams11...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] 1st Annual Purple Martin and Garden Event - June 1st in Denham Springs
Announcing an event I organized that will be held in Denham Springs at North Park this weekend.
1st Annual Purple Martin and Garden Event
June 1, 2019
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Pards North Park
30372 Eden Church Road
Denham Springs, LA 70726

Pards is excited to team up with The Adams Family and host its first annual Purple Martin and Garden Event on June 1, 2019, FREE to the public. This event will be held along the beautiful walking path at North Park in Denham Springs, Louisiana.
Krista Adams and family will share information about Purple Martins and why they are one of America's most well-loved songbirds. Purple Martins migrate each Spring to North America to nest and raise their young and are reliant on humans for their housing East of the Rocky Mountains. With May and June being a peak nesting time, these native birds will be on full display flying around for all to see at the Adams family conservation site at North Park.
The Louisiana Audubon Society will share information on bird banding and how it's one of the most important techniques used for studying and identifying individual birds. They'll also demonstrate on how to make nest boxes for other bird species, such as the Prothonotary Warblers, that readily use man made nest boxes.
The Denham Springs Garden Club and the Louisiana Master Gardener's organization will share information about gardening and provide tips on creating the ultimate backyard wildlife habitat.
The Louisiana Master Naturalists of Greater Baton Rouge will present information on birding and will have bird photography on display.
The Livingston Parish Library will bring the library to this event! Their new Bookmobile will be parked onsite full of nature-inspired books for all to view and Livingston parish residents to check out.
Capital Area Beekeepers Association will be available to provide information on bees and explain how they play a crucial part in our world.
Live Oak High School's Environmental Club recently participated in the Louisiana Envirothon at LSU AgCenter Botanic Gardens. The club will display their project that they presented in the category of Current Agriculture issues. The LOHS team placed third overall!
Student artwork will be on display from two local elementary schools: Eastside Elementary and Freshwater Elementary. Live Oak High School's Environmental Club will highlight their art talents by providing free face painting.
Tractor Supply, a sponsor of Purple Martin housing to our local schools, will have volunteers on hand to make sure everyone stays hydrated by providing bottled water during our event.
Please contact Krista Adams at <louisianapurplemartins...> with any questions about the event. Event updates can also be found on the Pards North Park Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1256776511156272/.
 

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Date: 5/28/19 8:00 pm
From: Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Joyce boardwalk Tuesday afternoon, 5/28/19
I birded Joyce boardwalk after working in Hammond today, from about 245 to 445.
I had a few prothonatory warblers, a couple of parula warblers, and a yellow throated warbler toward the end of the boardwalk.
As I was leaving the boardwalk, I had a swallow tailed kite fly overhead.
Despite being 110 in my car when I got in, the boardwalk was very pleasant.  Bring water with you to stay hydrated.  Take advantage of the very nice benches that you can sit and relax and even have unwitting birds alight near you!

While sitting at the end of the boardwalk, I had a prothonatory alight right across from me and eat a bug.
As I walked back, a prothonatory was eating a very large grasshopper for quite a while several feet in front of me, and I was able to stop and watch him.
Very thankful that we have this beautiful place for the public to visit.
 

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Date: 5/28/19 7:53 pm
From: Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Swallow tailed kite sighting
As I was leaving Joyce Boardwalk today, Tuesday, 5/28/19, I had a swallow tailed kite fly over me, heading toward the end of the boardwalk. This was at about 445 pm.
 

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Date: 5/28/19 6:51 am
From: Terri Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Brown boobies in St Tammany parish
Woohoo! So excited! Thanks for heads up!

Terri D. Skelton
Sent from my iPhone

> On May 26, 2019, at 7:58 PM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...> wrote:
>
> Just received a phone call from Malise Prieto who is at this time out
> sailing in Lake Pontchartrain with her husband Rick Delaune.
> They have seen and photographed 3 BRBO, 2 IM and 1 Adult that are perched
> on the three recently installed metal pilings. These pilings are about 1/4
> mile east of the causeway bridge and at about the 18 mile marker heading
> north. Co-ordinates are N 30°17'47, W 90°04'53.
> Malise has photos and will enter in ebird when she gets home.
> They're back!!!
> Janine Robin
 

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Date: 5/27/19 11:38 am
From: Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Dolphins, bunnies, purple gallinules, and fulvous whistling ducks!
My husband Dan and I took an adventure Sunday May 26, starting off first at our favorite place, Rips Rookery.  Lots of birds, and little blue and cattle egret babies.  No spoonbill babies, but good amount sitting on nests and courting.  Also great egrets sitting on nests.
Very hot, so luckily, we arrived close to 8 am, and we stayed until about 11 am.
Not yet hungry for lunch, as we did grab and go breakfast, we headed toward Cameron.
We used the Cameron Motel as our destination address, and had a very good lunch as Anchors Up, who has catered the LOS meeting.
We then crossed the Cameron ferry and were treated to many DOLPHINS!  Hooray!
We drove all the way to Peveto, made a brief stop there, no birds, but lots of BUNNY RABBITS!
We drove back to the ferry and headed to Pintail.
We were not expecting much, as we had driven past it on the way down and didn't see anything compared to the last time we had gone, in the winter, with all the geese, but by this time, it was mid to late afternoon, so we were hopeful.
Well worth the trip!
We were treated to our first purple gallinule right before the boardwalk parking lot, and after we parked and looked for where he had gone into the vegetation, we were treated to a king rail just walking down the road, right in the middle of the road!  Of course, I was beside myself and did not attempt pics, but Dan took many, which unfortunately came out fuzzy.  But I had good long looks at him and it was definitely a king rail!
We found the purple gallinule as we went onto the boardwalk, actually in a tree along the path.  More purple gallinules in the marsh, visible from the boardwalk.  We stopped shortly along the boardwalk,  heading back to the car, so we could complete Pintail drive and perhaps make it to Lacassine before dark.
Lots and lots and lots of purple gallinules.  A few caracara being vigorously chased by red wing blackbirds.   A very nice green heron and a few good size gators.
As we were leaving Pintail Drive, as we were stopping to photograph a nice flock of glossy/white face ibis, a flock of fulvous whistling ducks flew in.  Wow, what a treat!
We quickly drove to Lacassine, again, catching its beautiful sunset.   Not enough time to bird, but a nice drive.  One day, we will get to Lacassine before dusk and get to spend time there.  But it is my husband's favorite place for sunset shots.
So, a nice, but long day, and surprisingly productive for such a hot day.  
We arrived home close to 1 am, thankfully being able to sleep in today on Memorial Day.
Hope you all are having a wonderful holiday weekend.
Happy birding and have a great summer!
Terri
 

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Date: 5/27/19 9:18 am
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Saturday 5 October pelagic trip
Our 25 May trip had to be cancelled due to wind and heavy seas, so I scheduled another one for 5 October. From Venice, all day, heading for blue water. About 5 spots remain. Let me know if interested, OFF LABIRD, and I can send you further information. Van Remsen

===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu
 

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Date: 5/26/19 5:59 pm
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Brown boobies in St Tammany parish
Just received a phone call from Malise Prieto who is at this time out
sailing in Lake Pontchartrain with her husband Rick Delaune.
They have seen and photographed 3 BRBO, 2 IM and 1 Adult that are perched
on the three recently installed metal pilings. These pilings are about 1/4
mile east of the causeway bridge and at about the 18 mile marker heading
north. Co-ordinates are N 30°17'47, W 90°04'53.
Malise has photos and will enter in ebird when she gets home.
They're back!!!
Janine Robin
 

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Date: 5/25/19 9:20 pm
From: Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
labirders,

Today I still had 10 Cedar Waxwings (exact count when group flew) in the
yard in Jena (La Salle Parish), which is now late enough that I needed to
pull up "Rarities" when submitting to eBird. The species has been heard
daily at this locale since at least 5/18/19, when there was at least 50. I
hadn't submitted sightings since the 20th (~15 birds). They seem to be
hanging around wild cherry trees. It'll be interesting to see how long they
linger.

Jonathan Clark

On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 10:51 PM Terry Davis <terkchip...> wrote:

> Hey all, Late this afternoon around 5:30 I noted at least 2 lingering
> Cedar Waxwing in the huge red mulberry in the center of the parking lot at
> the boat launch area at RRNWR Headquarters unit in south Bossier City. This
> isn’t unusual at all but I’ll try to be watching, when possible, toward
> end of month to see if any are still lingering. The berries are notably
> late ripening this year with well over half still green, then rest red but
> could count on one hand those that were blackening but not fully
> there.,Wild grape is very abundant in this area and is beginning to take
> over the north side of this grand old tree. This should be removed, imop.
>
> Also I just noted this afternoon that Ellis pottery on Airline at
> Barksdale Blvd in bossier has Salvia greggi 1 gallon for A BUCK apiece!
> There are LOTS of red remaining! That’s a SUPER good deal for a better than
> average hummer plant!
>
> Cheers and good birding,
>
> Terry Davis
> Bossier City
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/25/19 10:45 am
From: Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Lacassine and Pintail accessibility, re flooding
Those locations should not be flooded.

Steve Cardiff

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 25, 2019, at 12:36 PM, Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Seeing that a lot of areas are flooded right now, I wanted to put out a feeler as to whether one can drive through Lacassine and Pintail right now.
> My husband and I will head to Rips very early Sunday morning, check out the birds, eat lunch, and then perhaps drive to Lacassine, or even as far as Pintail if we can make it. Want to take advantage of the long days of summer and the day after to recuperate.
>
> Wanted to find out if Pintail and Lacassine drives are accessible or if they're flooded over right now.
> Also wanting to find out if the roads to and from are accessible.
>
> We'll get back on 90 after Rips and head west from there, and depending on what time it is, we'll either hit Pintail or Lacassine.I'm guessing Highway 14 will be involved at some point, so want to make sure that's accessible.
> Thanks for any input!
> Terri
 

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Date: 5/25/19 10:36 am
From: Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Lacassine and Pintail accessibility, re flooding
Seeing that a lot of areas are flooded right now, I wanted to put out a feeler as to whether one can drive through Lacassine and Pintail right now.
My husband and I will head to Rips very early Sunday morning, check out the birds, eat lunch, and then perhaps drive to Lacassine, or even as far as Pintail if we can make it.  Want to take advantage of the long days of summer and the day after to recuperate.

Wanted to find out if Pintail and Lacassine drives are accessible or if they're flooded over right now.
Also wanting to find out if the roads to and from are accessible.

We'll get back on 90 after Rips and head west from there, and depending on what time it is, we'll either hit Pintail or Lacassine.I'm guessing Highway 14 will be involved at some point, so want to make sure that's accessible.
Thanks for any input!
Terri
 

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Date: 5/24/19 6:33 pm
From: Rose Must <rosem.must...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] HELP
Sent from Mail for Windows 10
 

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Date: 5/23/19 1:51 pm
From: programs braudubon.org <programs...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] *Rescheduled* BRAS potluck, election and presentation Thurs, May 30th
Hi All, 

We finally secured a room for the presentation, election and potluck gathering that was previously cancelled because of a storm. Please note that the location is no longer BREC's Bluebonnet Swamp. We are now hosting the event at Hilltop Arboretum.  
 
We hope that you will join us for a virtual birding tour around Cuba! Prior to the presentation we will enjoy a potluck meal together, as well as vote on nominees for the BRAS board. Please contribute a dish if you can join us.  

PRESENTATION TITLE: “Cuba: Birds, Cars and Cigars”

PRESENTER: Joelle Finley & Ken Harris

DESCRIPTION: Join Joelle Finley, Ken Harris and Jane Patterson on their latest adventure to Cuba, a land so close but yet so far. We will visit the Bay of Pigs in search of Cuba's 26 endemic species including the world’s smallest bird, the Bee Hummingbird, and the bird that inspired the colors of the Cuban flag, the Cuban Trogon. Tour Old Havana, a couple of historic towns, and visit one of the Keys with shimmering turquoise water.

DATE: Thursday, May 30th

TIME: Potluck 6:00 – 6:45 PM; Elections 6:45 PM; Presentation 7:00 – 8:00 PM

LOCATION: LSU Hilltop Aboretum; 11855 Highland Road. PLEASE NOTE: parking can be limited. Please park in nearby neighborhood if the lot is full. Be considerate of neighbors.

Attendance is free for all attendees, but we are encouraging a donation to Hilltop as a way to say thank you for the use of their beautiful facility. Cash or check only, please.

Please RSVP if you plan on attending (<programs...>) so that we can add your name to the guest list.


Thank you,
Katie Percy
Baton Rouge Audubon Society
www.braudubon.org
 

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Date: 5/21/19 7:32 am
From: Paul Dickson <Paul...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
Ditto the late mulberries in my yard. I have a wide variety selected trees that I target for varied ripening times. All are behind their usual schedule but particularly the early ones that are usually ripe April 20- May 10 are just now finishing up (May 1-20). I missed out on late April migrants because my mulberries were not ready until the first days of May. The later ones are not so out of schedule. I suspect the February and March consistent cold we had.
Paul Dickson

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of bill fontenot
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 8:27 AM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!

Hey Terry, mulberries crazy late here in southern interior as well.....our white mulberry (Morus alba) hasn’t even started.....normally it’s peaking 25 april- 05 may......

also agree that grapevine should be removed from the mulberry in RR-NWR parking lot!

regards,
bill fontenot
n lafayette parish, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 20, 2019, at 10:51 PM, Terry Davis <terkchip...> wrote:
>
> Hey all, Late this afternoon around 5:30 I noted at least 2 lingering Cedar Waxwing in the huge red mulberry in the center of the parking lot at the boat launch area at RRNWR Headquarters unit in south Bossier City. This isn’t unusual at all but I’ll try to be watching, when possible, toward end of month to see if any are still lingering. The berries are notably late ripening this year with well over half still green, then rest red but could count on one hand those that were blackening but not fully there.,Wild grape is very abundant in this area and is beginning to take over the north side of this grand old tree. This should be removed, imop.
>
> Also I just noted this afternoon that Ellis pottery on Airline at Barksdale Blvd in bossier has Salvia greggi 1 gallon for A BUCK apiece! There are LOTS of red remaining! That’s a SUPER good deal for a better than average hummer plant!
>
> Cheers and good birding,
>
> Terry Davis
> Bossier City
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/21/19 6:27 am
From: bill fontenot <natrldlite...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
Hey Terry, mulberries crazy late here in southern interior as well.....our white mulberry (Morus alba) hasn’t even started.....normally it’s peaking 25 april- 05 may......

also agree that grapevine should be removed from the mulberry in RR-NWR parking lot!

regards,
bill fontenot
n lafayette parish, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 20, 2019, at 10:51 PM, Terry Davis <terkchip...> wrote:
>
> Hey all, Late this afternoon around 5:30 I noted at least 2 lingering Cedar Waxwing in the huge red mulberry in the center of the parking lot at the boat launch area at RRNWR Headquarters unit in south Bossier City. This isn’t unusual at all but I’ll try to be watching, when possible, toward end of month to see if any are still lingering. The berries are notably late ripening this year with well over half still green, then rest red but could count on one hand those that were blackening but not fully there.,Wild grape is very abundant in this area and is beginning to take over the north side of this grand old tree. This should be removed, imop.
>
> Also I just noted this afternoon that Ellis pottery on Airline at Barksdale Blvd in bossier has Salvia greggi 1 gallon for A BUCK apiece! There are LOTS of red remaining! That’s a SUPER good deal for a better than average hummer plant!
>
> Cheers and good birding,
>
> Terry Davis
> Bossier City
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/20/19 8:51 pm
From: Terry Davis <terkchip...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Cedar Waxwing 05/20/19 and hummer plant deal of century!
Hey all, Late this afternoon around 5:30 I noted at least 2 lingering Cedar Waxwing in the huge red mulberry in the center of the parking lot at the boat launch area at RRNWR Headquarters unit in south Bossier City. This isn’t unusual at all but I’ll try to be watching, when possible, toward end of month to see if any are still lingering. The berries are notably late ripening this year with well over half still green, then rest red but could count on one hand those that were blackening but not fully there.,Wild grape is very abundant in this area and is beginning to take over the north side of this grand old tree. This should be removed, imop.

Also I just noted this afternoon that Ellis pottery on Airline at Barksdale Blvd in bossier has Salvia greggi 1 gallon for A BUCK apiece! There are LOTS of red remaining! That’s a SUPER good deal for a better than average hummer plant!

Cheers and good birding,

Terry Davis
Bossier City

Sent from my iPhone
 

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