LABIRD
Received From Subject
5/23/18 9:08 am Trond Nilsen <trond.nilsen...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Even small spaces can provide surprises in town.......(Catbird)
5/23/18 8:15 am Matt Conn <mconn...> [LABIRD-L] Even small spaces can provide surprises in town.......(Catbird)
5/22/18 5:30 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kites
5/22/18 4:56 pm Susan Edmunds <000000208257709a-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kites
5/22/18 4:45 pm Wise, Jon <Wise...> [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kites
5/22/18 8:45 am Linda Stewart <stewknig...> [LABIRD-L]
5/21/18 6:06 pm Jay Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Hack Messgae to Labird
5/21/18 5:47 pm glenn ousset <gousset...> [LABIRD-L] Hack Messgae to Labird
5/21/18 5:36 pm glenn ousset <gousset...> [LABIRD-L]
5/21/18 6:24 am glenn ousset <gousset...> [LABIRD-L]
5/20/18 9:53 am Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> [LABIRD-L] Fwd: highlight upcoming LOS trips
5/20/18 4:29 am John Romano <birderjuan...> [LABIRD-L] A big thanks to this list
5/18/18 12:56 pm Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/18/18 11:32 am Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/18/18 6:20 am Johnson, Wood -FS <woodjohnson...> Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/18/18 6:10 am Johnson, Wood -FS <woodjohnson...> Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/16/18 7:52 pm Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/16/18 7:43 pm Wise, Jon <Wise...> Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/16/18 6:58 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/16/18 6:39 pm glenn ousset <gousset...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/16/18 7:39 am Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...> [LABIRD-L] Sat., May 19 - Birding Trip to Bogue Chitto NWR and Honey Island Swamp
5/16/18 7:24 am Trond Nilsen <trond.nilsen...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Great read
5/16/18 5:28 am John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/15/18 7:17 pm Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...> [LABIRD-L] Great read
5/15/18 3:45 pm Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/15/18 3:38 pm Lana downing <lanadowning...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/15/18 3:36 pm Lana downing <lanadowning...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/15/18 3:06 pm Wise, Jon <Wise...> Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/15/18 2:55 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
5/15/18 9:46 am Aelita J Pinter <apinter...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
5/15/18 9:23 am Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast /// European Starlings!
5/15/18 8:18 am Trond Nilsen <trond.nilsen...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
5/15/18 7:29 am Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
5/15/18 7:24 am Robert Thomas <rathomas...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
5/15/18 6:23 am Bill Vermillion <bill.gcjv...> [LABIRD-L] Shrike's breakfast
5/15/18 6:12 am janine robin <janinerobin1982...> [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
5/14/18 8:22 am Bill Vermillion <bill.gcjv...> [LABIRD-L] late report shorebirds SW LA and other
5/13/18 6:35 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Breeding Pair in Residential Area
5/13/18 6:14 pm Jeffrey Cowell <jeffrey.g.cowell...> [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Breeding Pair in Residential Area
5/13/18 5:14 pm Philip Bradley <pbradley60...> [LABIRD-L] New yard bird
5/13/18 2:05 pm Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...> [LABIRD-L] Nesting MS Kite in E. Carroll
5/12/18 11:33 am John Whittle <000000acdbc01b4f-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L]
5/10/18 7:16 am John Romano <birderjuan...> [LABIRD-L] Recovered Roadrunner and WB Nuthatch Photos
5/10/18 6:23 am Tom Hickcox <cometkazie1...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Beep-beep
5/9/18 9:07 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> [LABIRD-L] Beep-beep
5/9/18 11:55 am Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...> [LABIRD-L] Birding the Bonnet Carre Spillway on Sat., May 12
5/8/18 7:00 pm James V Remsen <najames...> [LABIRD-L] Brown Pelican at Morganza Forebay
5/8/18 5:17 pm Jonathan Rotondo-McCord <jrmtomburg...> [LABIRD-L] Swallow-tailed Kite between Mandeville & Madisonville
5/6/18 1:51 pm James V Remsen <najames...> [LABIRD-L] Peveto info request from yesterday
5/6/18 1:37 pm Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Couturie today- nothing
5/6/18 10:41 am Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...> [LABIRD-L] Couturie today- nothing
5/6/18 6:01 am Johnson, Erik <ejohnson...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Hudsonian godwits
5/6/18 12:47 am bonjule <bonjule...> Re: [LABIRD-L] LABIRD-L Digest - 4 May 2018 to 5 May 2018 (#2018-121)
5/5/18 8:39 pm Paul Conover <zoiseaux...> [LABIRD-L] LOS Shorebirding Field Trip
5/5/18 6:58 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through
5/5/18 6:55 pm Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...> [LABIRD-L] squirrels and bird houses
5/5/18 3:12 pm Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
5/5/18 2:35 pm Holly Morales <tashayoda3...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through
5/5/18 1:16 pm Chris Johnston <cmjohnston...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
5/5/18 12:26 pm Marybeth Lima <marybeth.lima...> [LABIRD-L] Hudsonian godwits
5/4/18 11:36 am Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...> [LABIRD-L] Gunter Loop, West Carroll Parish
5/2/18 10:40 pm Becky Lloyd <becky...> [LABIRD-L] Red-shouldered Hawk Nest- 3 chicks, Uptown
5/2/18 6:26 pm Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> [LABIRD-L] Calling Whip-poor-wills
5/2/18 5:48 pm Philip Bradley <pbradley60...> [LABIRD-L] Fifteen minutes
5/2/18 3:15 pm James W. Beck <loxosceles928...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Hummingbirds used in voodoo
5/2/18 3:11 pm Harriett Pooler <harriett.pooler...> [LABIRD-L] Hummingbirds used in voodoo
5/2/18 12:35 pm Ed Wallace <mottledduck...> Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
5/2/18 12:34 pm Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...> Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
5/2/18 11:44 am Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
5/2/18 11:34 am Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...> Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
5/2/18 10:46 am Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...> [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
5/2/18 8:34 am Philip Bradley <pbradley60...> [LABIRD-L] SexEd moment
5/2/18 7:39 am Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
5/2/18 7:34 am James V Remsen <najames...> [LABIRD-L] Bruce Beehler's Louisiana bird trip
5/2/18 7:18 am Jane Patterson <seejanebird...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
5/2/18 6:55 am Joan Garvey <joanmgarvey1...> [LABIRD-L] bird article
5/2/18 6:21 am janine robin <janinerobin1982...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through
5/2/18 6:14 am Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through
5/2/18 5:12 am Jay Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
5/1/18 7:29 pm Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla...> [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
5/1/18 1:57 pm Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...> Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting and Fall Meeting
5/1/18 9:50 am Joelle Finley <jjf1946...> [LABIRD-L] Continuing Long-tailed Ducks
5/1/18 8:37 am Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting
5/1/18 6:10 am Kevin Leigh <kevinleigh...> [LABIRD-L] Cameron Parish
5/1/18 4:24 am Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch...> [LABIRD-L] Request for assistance - recordings of migrating Mourning Warbler songs
5/1/18 4:12 am Mark Pethke <mdpethke...> [LABIRD-L] RB Grosbeak
4/30/18 6:43 pm Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> [LABIRD-L] Cliff Swallow Colonies and Whip-poor-will in CENLA
4/30/18 6:33 pm Terri Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Bobolinks in Baton Rouge
4/30/18 6:22 pm Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Pat Lonnecker
4/30/18 4:36 pm Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
4/30/18 3:09 pm Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] RB Grosbeak
4/30/18 2:38 pm Mac Myers <budogmacm...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
4/30/18 2:35 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] RB Grosbeak
4/30/18 2:19 pm Matt Brady <podoces...> [LABIRD-L] LSUMNS Big Day results
4/30/18 2:07 pm Paul Dickson <Paul...> [LABIRD-L] Pat Lonnecker
4/30/18 12:43 pm Hans van Beek <hvanbeek...> [LABIRD-L] RB Grosbeak
4/30/18 11:04 am James V Remsen <najames...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
4/30/18 10:33 am Jay Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Cerulean Warbler Acadia Par. 4/28 Srikes
4/30/18 10:07 am James V Remsen <najames...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
4/30/18 9:48 am Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Cerulean Warbler Acadia Par. 4/28
4/30/18 9:35 am cecil tarver <exk5hdl...> [LABIRD-L] white wing dove
4/30/18 9:29 am James V Remsen <najames...> [LABIRD-L] Cerulean Warbler Acadia Par. 4/28
4/29/18 8:03 pm Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...> [LABIRD-L] SE LA departure
4/29/18 6:18 pm H. Putnam <0000003a70918a06-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Broad-tailed Hummingbird
4/29/18 6:08 am Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
4/29/18 2:44 am Evelyn Cooper <emcooper...> Re: [LABIRD-L] red bellied woodpecker
4/28/18 7:58 pm Jed Pitre <feralbiologist...> [LABIRD-L] Black-whiskered Vireo
4/28/18 7:23 pm John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...> [LABIRD-L] Willet flock at Lake Claiborne.
4/28/18 5:10 pm Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...> [LABIRD-L] red bellied woodpecker
4/28/18 3:13 pm Philip Bradley <pbradley60...> [LABIRD-L] FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
4/28/18 12:21 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
4/28/18 9:54 am John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...> [LABIRD-L] Excellent morning at Corney Lake, Claiborne Parish.
4/28/18 9:09 am Heather Amuny <haamuny...> [LABIRD-L] Sabine NWR Walkway
4/28/18 6:33 am Puget Sound Birds <pugetsoundbird...> [LABIRD-L] Major Headwinds Make it a Tough Day for migrants on Whiskey Is.
4/27/18 10:33 pm Aelita J Pinter <apinter...> Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
4/27/18 9:16 pm David Muth <MuthD...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Strange things afoot on Rutherford Beach
4/27/18 6:01 pm janine robin <janinerobin1982...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Bobolinks in Baton Rouge
4/27/18 5:52 pm James V Remsen <najames...> [LABIRD-L] Bobolinks in Baton Rouge
4/27/18 4:10 pm Steven Liffmann - <sliffmann...> <sliffmann...> [LABIRD-L] Purple Martins - Algiers Point
4/27/18 2:31 pm Jody Shugart <jodyshugart...> [LABIRD-L] Strange things afoot on Rutherford Beach
4/27/18 1:17 pm James W. Beck <loxosceles928...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Veerys near Talisheek
4/27/18 1:05 pm Joelle Finley <jjf1946...> [LABIRD-L] YHBb
4/27/18 1:03 pm Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...> [LABIRD-L] Veerys near Talisheek
4/27/18 12:19 pm Heather Amuny <haamuny...> [LABIRD-L] Peveto Today
4/27/18 10:20 am Jane Patterson <seejanebird...> [LABIRD-L] 2 STKI over Grilletta on Grand Isle
4/27/18 8:44 am Jay Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Bird song in NE LA
4/27/18 7:22 am janine robin <janinerobin1982...> Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
4/27/18 7:16 am Bob Thomas <rathomas...> Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
4/27/18 7:07 am Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
4/27/18 6:01 am Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...> [LABIRD-L] Bird song in NE LA
4/26/18 2:37 pm Celeste Louque <000000ea3956ffb6-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Swallow-tailed Kite and Mississippi Kite
4/26/18 1:55 pm Steven Liffmann - <sliffmann...> <sliffmann...> [LABIRD-L] Swallow tailed Kites (4)
4/26/18 9:58 am James W. Beck <loxosceles928...> [LABIRD-L] Golden-winged Warbler, others - Virgil Forest, New Orleans (restricted access)
4/26/18 5:29 am James W. Beck <loxosceles928...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks flycatching
4/26/18 5:02 am Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks flycatching
4/25/18 6:21 pm Paul Conover <zoiseaux...> [LABIRD-L] 2018 LBRC Newsletter now online!
4/25/18 6:01 pm Jay V Huner <jvh0660...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Continuing Black-legged Kittiwake, dearth of shorebirds, SW LA
4/25/18 5:43 pm Matt Brady <podoces...> [LABIRD-L] Continuing Black-legged Kittiwake, dearth of shorebirds, SW LA
4/25/18 5:25 pm Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...> Re: [LABIRD-L] migrants in Jena
4/25/18 4:09 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Grosbeak Day
4/25/18 3:19 pm James W. Beck <loxosceles928...> [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks flycatching
4/25/18 2:48 pm James W. Beck <loxosceles928...> [LABIRD-L] Yellow-breasted Chat for the yard!
4/25/18 1:12 pm Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...> [LABIRD-L] migrants in Jena
4/25/18 9:16 am Jean Landry <JLANDRY...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: 150 Bobolinks on Grand Isle
4/25/18 8:23 am Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Grosbeak Day
4/25/18 8:16 am Aelita J Pinter <apinter...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Grosbeak Day
4/25/18 7:15 am Irvin Louque <irvinlouque...> [LABIRD-L] The LOS Meeting and the City Nature Challenge
4/25/18 4:40 am JKFruge' <jkfruge...> [LABIRD-L] Peveto Woods and Sabine Wetland Walkway -- Cameron Parish -- April 24
 
Back to top
Date: 5/23/18 9:08 am
From: Trond Nilsen <trond.nilsen...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Even small spaces can provide surprises in town.......(Catbird)
A good read Matt, thanks!

Good birding!
Trond

> 23. mai 2018 kl. 17:15 skrev Matt Conn <mconn...>:
>
> The past few years I have tried to keep a list of La birds, house birds, birds at some land I own out of town (town is Lafayette ), a Parish list, and an office list here in town. I don't always keep them up but try to. I'm still surprised when I find a new bird in our tiny little habitat in the city.
>
> My office is near the intersection of two of the busiest roads in Lafayette, (Pinhook and Kaliste Saloom), lots of concrete and cars and buildings. We do have two live oaks (on either side of the building), a few Chinese Elms, Palm trees, and a 3 foot wide strip of Bamboo between our parking lot and the hotel next door. The back side of our building is adjacent to a cemetery with some mature Loblolly Pine and scattered Live Oaks (I'm sure most of our birds are coming from there), no water features for several blocks (Vermillion River ¬Ĺ mile away as the Red Bellied Woodpecker flies). In the winter our parking lot near the skinny bamboo strip has Dark Eyed Juncos, occasional Red-breasted Nuthatch in the Live Oak... Yellow Warblers, Kinglets, Common Yellowthroat, Northern Waterthrush, Hooded Warblers regularly in the Spring migration, Wilson's Warbler, Vireos, Parulas, Buntings, had Worm Eater in the parking lot a few weeks ago as well as an Eastern Screech, have spotted Bald Eagle overhead...Roseate Spoonbill, nearly all the Egrets (any way that's not the entire list but the ones I remember at the moment).
> Yesterday morning as I walked into work a bird was singing something fierce...very loud and constant and did not know it but knew it was not a regular in the parking lot. I was in a hurry and preoccupied with an upcoming conference call (typical town-folk workday no?) so I passed through the doors and tried to remember the call later (that never works out for me). This morning same bird so I stopped this time to check.....I thought Vireo at first but....not. Went back to truck and got binos and scanned the Chinese Elm where all the singing was coming and found the culprit screaming out the notes. Grey Catbird, head held high singing at the top if his lungs. Not a crazy find....they are common at all my other spots... but I am still constantly surprised at what shows up in this busy place with such a small amount of habitat.
>
> Point being, even in the big city keep your eyes and ears open and maybe don't let the everyday rat race distract you from the simple (and calming) pleasures of birding and finding a new bird for the list. Or enjoying the regulars.
>
> P.S. I think I am going to sneak a few new seedlings (Hackberry, Deciduous Holly...who knows?) into the space just to help my feathered friends when they show up to surprise me.
>
> Have a good day yall.
>
>
> Matt Conn
 

Back to top
Date: 5/23/18 8:15 am
From: Matt Conn <mconn...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Even small spaces can provide surprises in town.......(Catbird)
The past few years I have tried to keep a list of La birds, house birds, birds at some land I own out of town (town is Lafayette ), a Parish list, and an office list here in town. I don't always keep them up but try to. I'm still surprised when I find a new bird in our tiny little habitat in the city.

My office is near the intersection of two of the busiest roads in Lafayette, (Pinhook and Kaliste Saloom), lots of concrete and cars and buildings. We do have two live oaks (on either side of the building), a few Chinese Elms, Palm trees, and a 3 foot wide strip of Bamboo between our parking lot and the hotel next door. The back side of our building is adjacent to a cemetery with some mature Loblolly Pine and scattered Live Oaks (I'm sure most of our birds are coming from there), no water features for several blocks (Vermillion River Ĺ mile away as the Red Bellied Woodpecker flies). In the winter our parking lot near the skinny bamboo strip has Dark Eyed Juncos, occasional Red-breasted Nuthatch in the Live Oak... Yellow Warblers, Kinglets, Common Yellowthroat, Northern Waterthrush, Hooded Warblers regularly in the Spring migration, Wilson's Warbler, Vireos, Parulas, Buntings, had Worm Eater in the parking lot a few weeks ago as well as an Eastern Screech, have spotted Bald Eagle overhead...Roseate Spoonbill, nearly all the Egrets (any way that's not the entire list but the ones I remember at the moment).
Yesterday morning as I walked into work a bird was singing something fierce...very loud and constant and did not know it but knew it was not a regular in the parking lot. I was in a hurry and preoccupied with an upcoming conference call (typical town-folk workday no?) so I passed through the doors and tried to remember the call later (that never works out for me). This morning same bird so I stopped this time to check.....I thought Vireo at first but....not. Went back to truck and got binos and scanned the Chinese Elm where all the singing was coming and found the culprit screaming out the notes. Grey Catbird, head held high singing at the top if his lungs. Not a crazy find....they are common at all my other spots... but I am still constantly surprised at what shows up in this busy place with such a small amount of habitat.

Point being, even in the big city keep your eyes and ears open and maybe don't let the everyday rat race distract you from the simple (and calming) pleasures of birding and finding a new bird for the list. Or enjoying the regulars.

P.S. I think I am going to sneak a few new seedlings (Hackberry, Deciduous Holly...who knows?) into the space just to help my feathered friends when they show up to surprise me.

Have a good day yall.


Matt Conn
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/18 5:30 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kites
Jon et al.,

Mississippi Kites have not been much in evidence here at my place all
spring. HOWEVER, yesterday, I spied a recently fledged kite atop the
tallest Bald Cypress on the block. Obviously, something was going on
behind my back. Don't mind at all. They can keep their secrets.

Nan

On Tue, May 22, 2018 at 6:45 PM, Wise, Jon <Wise...> wrote:

> Further to the ongoing discussion, I noticed a Kite nest in my backyard in
> Metairie in the top of a live oak this evening. I had seen a pair the past
> week so am very excited that they nested.
> Also, the crows don’t seem to like this very much.
>
> Jon W. Wise
>
>
> Chaffe McCall L.L.P. CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission,
> including attachments, if any, is intended for use only by the addressee(s)
> named herein and contains confidential and/or privileged information. Any
> unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is strictly
> prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender
> immediately by reply e-mail or telephone and delete the original and
> destroy all electronic and other copies of this message. If you are the
> intended recipient but do not wish to receive communications through this
> medium, please so advise the sender immediately.
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/18 4:56 pm
From: Susan Edmunds <000000208257709a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kites
Two MIKIs have been aloft over our neighborhood NNW of New Iberia’s City Park for the last three weeks. There is usually a nest in our area every year in the oaks.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/18 4:45 pm
From: Wise, Jon <Wise...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kites
Further to the ongoing discussion, I noticed a Kite nest in my backyard in Metairie in the top of a live oak this evening. I had seen a pair the past week so am very excited that they nested.
Also, the crows don’t seem to like this very much.

Jon W. Wise


Chaffe McCall L.L.P. CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission, including attachments, if any, is intended for use only by the addressee(s) named herein and contains confidential and/or privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail or telephone and delete the original and destroy all electronic and other copies of this message. If you are the intended recipient but do not wish to receive communications through this medium, please so advise the sender immediately.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/22/18 8:45 am
From: Linda Stewart <stewknig...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L]
http://like.duncanparkingusa.com

Linda Stewart
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/18 6:06 pm
From: Jay Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Hack Messgae to Labird
If you get a link without a reasonable explanation, it’s almost certainly bad news to open the link!

Jay Huner

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 21, 2018, at 7:47 PM, glenn ousset <gousset...> wrote:
>
> Message from me to Labird, no subject, listing a link was definitely a hack. Do not open it.No contacts other than Labird recipients reported receiving the email. I wonder if it selects lists.Thanks for the alert.
> Glenn Ousset
 

Back to top
Date: 5/21/18 5:47 pm
From: glenn ousset <gousset...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Hack Messgae to Labird
Message from me to Labird, no subject, listing a link was definitely a hack. Do not open it.No contacts other than Labird recipients reported receiving the email. I wonder if it selects lists.Thanks for the alert.
Glenn Ousset 
 

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Date: 5/21/18 5:36 pm
From: glenn ousset <gousset...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L]
All recipients;
This is definitely a hack. Do not open it. No contacts other than Labird recipients have reported receiving the message.I wonder if it selects lists.Thanks for the alert.
Glenn Ousset

On Monday, May 21, 2018 8:24 AM, glenn ousset <gousset...> wrote:


http://get.placesyouwilllike.com

Glenn Ousset


 

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Date: 5/21/18 6:24 am
From: glenn ousset <gousset...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L]
http://get.placesyouwilllike.com

Glenn Ousset
 

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Date: 5/20/18 9:53 am
From: Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: highlight upcoming LOS trips
Labirders-
Just a reminder of upcoming "LOS Field Trip Series" trips:

9 June 2018 (Saturday). Vernon Parish Pineywoods Breeding birds. Leader:
Rob Dobbs.


21 July 2018 (Saturday). Cajun Prairie early fall Shorebird ID. Leaders
Donna Dittmann & Steve Cardiff.


20-22 August 2018 (Monday-Wednesday). Road trip west to West Texas to
attend the Davis Mountains Hummingbird Celebration (DMHC); Louisiana to
Castroville, TX on Monday 20 August, Castroville to Fort Davis, TX on
Tuesday 21 August, birding in Jeff Davis County, TX on Wednesday 22 August,
then DMHC activities 23-26 August. Leaders 20-22 August, Steve Cardiff &
Donna Dittmann.


All of these trips still have vacancies. See latest LOS News (
http://losbird.org/news/1803_244_news.pdf ) for participation requirements
and additional details. NOTE: trips are free (but donations to LOS gladly
accepted!), but LOS Membership is required. Contact Donna L. Dittmann (
<donnaldittmann...> ) to make reservations.


Steve Cardiff
 

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Date: 5/20/18 4:29 am
From: John Romano <birderjuan...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] A big thanks to this list
When I mentioned on this list about a month ago, that I had lost some
recent bird documentation photos, a least 5 or 6 people whom I did not
know, offered advise and help to recover the photos. I would like to thank
all.

John Romano
Breaux Bridge, LA
 

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Date: 5/18/18 12:56 pm
From: Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
Yes, I saw this behavior yesterday and didn't have a chance to report it.

I was at Lakeside Toyota in the morning and observed that number circling not only by the building and on top of the Marriott there, but also swooping down into the lanes of Causeway Boulevard.

Quite an exciting spectacle!

Beautiful birds!





Terence Skelton
<tadskelton...>





-----Original Message-----
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...>
To: LABIRD-L <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Fri, May 18, 2018 1:32 pm
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question

Mississippi Kites were up to their usual early summer antics today at the south end of the Causeway bridge in Metairie, a swarm circling along one side of the Lakeway buidling (highrise) at 11:30 and again when I exited the bridge at 1:00. At the latter time, there were 15 circling low adjacent to the building's south face- one swooped very low in the garage entrance there, a few inches over the pavement, and probably even went briefly inside the garage doorway.


Peter Yaukey

________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 7:28:26 AM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question

Nancy/LABIRD,

I work at Minden High School in Webster Parish, and we always have kites here near the end of the spring semester. Monday while I was on afternoon bus duty, I watched a pair circling above the old oaks in the residential neighborhood where the school is. They seemed to be courting, with one (I assume the male), doing impressive acrobatic dives, swoops, and rolls from about 150 feet up down into one of our parking lots and pulling back just about 8 or 10 feet from the ground. If you’ve ever seen an old prop stunt plane at an airshow zoom straight down at the ground doing rolls, it did that once. Very cool.

John Dillon
Athens, LA



> On May 15, 2018, at 5:36 PM, Lana downing <lanadowning...> wrote:
>
> Just saw one being chased by an angry Mockingbird.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 15, 2018, at 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>>
>> LABIRDers,
>>
>> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
>> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
>> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
>> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>>
>> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
>> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
>> folks's take on this.
>>
>> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>>
>> Nan
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa Colibrí
>> Metairie, Louisiana USA
>> <nancy...>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

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Date: 5/18/18 11:32 am
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
Mississippi Kites were up to their usual early summer antics today at the south end of the Causeway bridge in Metairie, a swarm circling along one side of the Lakeway buidling (highrise) at 11:30 and again when I exited the bridge at 1:00. At the latter time, there were 15 circling low adjacent to the building's south face- one swooped very low in the garage entrance there, a few inches over the pavement, and probably even went briefly inside the garage doorway.


Peter Yaukey

________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 7:28:26 AM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question

Nancy/LABIRD,

I work at Minden High School in Webster Parish, and we always have kites here near the end of the spring semester. Monday while I was on afternoon bus duty, I watched a pair circling above the old oaks in the residential neighborhood where the school is. They seemed to be courting, with one (I assume the male), doing impressive acrobatic dives, swoops, and rolls from about 150 feet up down into one of our parking lots and pulling back just about 8 or 10 feet from the ground. If youíve ever seen an old prop stunt plane at an airshow zoom straight down at the ground doing rolls, it did that once. Very cool.

John Dillon
Athens, LA



> On May 15, 2018, at 5:36 PM, Lana downing <lanadowning...> wrote:
>
> Just saw one being chased by an angry Mockingbird.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 15, 2018, at 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>>
>> LABIRDers,
>>
>> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
>> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
>> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
>> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>>
>> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
>> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
>> folks's take on this.
>>
>> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>>
>> Nan
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa ColibrŪ
>> Metairie, Louisiana USA
>> <nancy...>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

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Date: 5/18/18 6:20 am
From: Johnson, Wood -FS <woodjohnson...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
A follow up, better explanation of eBird "abundance" values for a given species:
What is Abundance?

"Abundance" is the average number of birds reported on all checklists within a specified date range and region. These data tell us what we might to expect when going out birding on an average day. The checklists used in this calculation include those that didn't report the species, providing a measure of relative abundance or how commonly the bird is reported compared to all other species in the region. For example, when looking at data for New York we see that during the week starting 15 May we can expect to find roughly 1 Yellow Warbler while out birding. In contrast, in the same region during the same week we see that zero Rough-legged Hawks, primarily a winter visitor, can be expected in an average day's birding








-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Wise, Jon
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:44 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question

For what it’s worth, while I was golfing in Audubon Park last week, I saw 12-15 birds circling and in some cases diving over the fairways. So they seem to be all over the New Orleans metro area now.

Jon W. Wise

> On May 16, 2018, at 8:59 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>
> This Message originated outside of Chaffe McCall's system.
>
> Thanks, Glenn. My perception is the same as yours. On my way home
> from the gym at Elmwood this afternoon, I saw 15 to 20 aloft, mostly
> along Airline Highway. Maybe not quite as many as I observed along
> the same route last year, but a seemingly healthy number.
>
> Nan
>
>> On Wed, May 16, 2018 at 8:38 PM, glenn ousset <gousset...> wrote:
>>
>> I feel that I am so far seeing fewer than usual in Chalmette and
>> Arabi and around the Audubon La Nature Center on my urban surveys. I
>> am seeing sufficient numbers that I am still hoping that this may be
>> an effect of late arrival and/or nesting activity.
>>
>> Glenn Ousset
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield
>> <nancy...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> LABIRDers,
>>
>> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
>> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood
>> and I am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am
>> not sure that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>>
>> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just
>> remembering July and August when young are on the wing. I would like
>> to hear other folks's take on this.
>>
>> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>>
>> Nan
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa Colibrí
>> Metairie, Louisiana USA
>> <nancy...>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>


Chaffe McCall L.L.P. CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission, including attachments, if any, is intended for use only by the addressee(s) named herein and contains confidential and/or privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail or telephone and delete the original and destroy all electronic and other copies of this message. If you are the intended recipient but do not wish to receive communications through this medium, please so advise the sender immediately.




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.
 

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Date: 5/18/18 6:10 am
From: Johnson, Wood -FS <woodjohnson...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
Following the advice of someone's suggestion, I looked at eBird's records of abundance of MS kites in East Baton Rouge Parish between January and May, 2013 - 2018. As I understand it, these "Abundance" numbers are sort of "weighted" by taking into account all lists submitted and are then presented in the figures by week. So lists indicating zero Mississippi kites also are taken into account. There are several other ways to look at the data and perhaps someone else may have better numbers. But here's one interpretation.

The figures are presented as line graphs. Differing peak abundance values in various weeks make sense; arriving birds may peak, then decline before peaking again as waves of migrants appear. The numbers below indicate the # of kites one would expect to put on his/her list on the largest peak (week) of each year between Jan. 1 and May 31 (or through May 18, 2018). (So for other weeks in Apr or May, there may be smaller peaks).

It looks like that in the last 5 years, Mississippi kite numbers have varied a bit as one would expect. The greatest weekly count in this time period was in 2015, when 5 kites per list were reported during a week period in May.

EBR Parish birders in 2018 have indeed reported fewer MS kites in the "peak week." But we still have a little under 2 weeks remaining in May, so that could change if kites are a little late getting here this year.

YEAR Abund.
2013 2.6
2014 1.6
2015 5.0
2016 2.4
2017 1.8
2018 0.9




-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Wise, Jon
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:44 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question

For what it’s worth, while I was golfing in Audubon Park last week, I saw 12-15 birds circling and in some cases diving over the fairways. So they seem to be all over the New Orleans metro area now.

Jon W. Wise

> On May 16, 2018, at 8:59 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>
> This Message originated outside of Chaffe McCall's system.
>
> Thanks, Glenn. My perception is the same as yours. On my way home
> from the gym at Elmwood this afternoon, I saw 15 to 20 aloft, mostly
> along Airline Highway. Maybe not quite as many as I observed along
> the same route last year, but a seemingly healthy number.
>
> Nan
>
>> On Wed, May 16, 2018 at 8:38 PM, glenn ousset <gousset...> wrote:
>>
>> I feel that I am so far seeing fewer than usual in Chalmette and
>> Arabi and around the Audubon La Nature Center on my urban surveys. I
>> am seeing sufficient numbers that I am still hoping that this may be
>> an effect of late arrival and/or nesting activity.
>>
>> Glenn Ousset
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield
>> <nancy...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> LABIRDers,
>>
>> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
>> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood
>> and I am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am
>> not sure that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>>
>> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just
>> remembering July and August when young are on the wing. I would like
>> to hear other folks's take on this.
>>
>> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>>
>> Nan
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa Colibrí
>> Metairie, Louisiana USA
>> <nancy...>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>


Chaffe McCall L.L.P. CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission, including attachments, if any, is intended for use only by the addressee(s) named herein and contains confidential and/or privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail or telephone and delete the original and destroy all electronic and other copies of this message. If you are the intended recipient but do not wish to receive communications through this medium, please so advise the sender immediately.




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.
 

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Date: 5/16/18 7:52 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
Pursuant to this question about the abundance and arrival of Mississippi Kites, has anyone bothered to see what past ebird data show (not shows as data is plural) and see what data have accumulated so far this spring?

Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jon Wise" <Wise...>
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 16, 2018 9:43:46 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question

For what it’s worth, while I was golfing in Audubon Park last week, I saw 12-15 birds circling and in some cases diving over the fairways. So they seem to be all over the New Orleans metro area now.

Jon W. Wise

> On May 16, 2018, at 8:59 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>
> This Message originated outside of Chaffe McCall's system.
>
> Thanks, Glenn. My perception is the same as yours. On my way home from
> the gym at Elmwood this afternoon, I saw 15 to 20 aloft, mostly along
> Airline Highway. Maybe not quite as many as I observed along the same
> route last year, but a seemingly healthy number.
>
> Nan
>
>> On Wed, May 16, 2018 at 8:38 PM, glenn ousset <gousset...> wrote:
>>
>> I feel that I am so far seeing fewer than usual in Chalmette and Arabi
>> and around the Audubon La Nature Center on my urban surveys. I am seeing
>> sufficient numbers that I am still hoping that this may be an effect of
>> late arrival and/or nesting activity.
>>
>> Glenn Ousset
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> LABIRDers,
>>
>> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
>> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
>> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
>> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>>
>> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
>> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
>> folks's take on this.
>>
>> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>>
>> Nan
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa Colibrí
>> Metairie, Louisiana USA
>> <nancy...>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>


Chaffe McCall L.L.P. CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission, including attachments, if any, is intended for use only by the addressee(s) named herein and contains confidential and/or privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail or telephone and delete the original and destroy all electronic and other copies of this message. If you are the intended recipient but do not wish to receive communications through this medium, please so advise the sender immediately.
 

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Date: 5/16/18 7:43 pm
From: Wise, Jon <Wise...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
For what it’s worth, while I was golfing in Audubon Park last week, I saw 12-15 birds circling and in some cases diving over the fairways. So they seem to be all over the New Orleans metro area now.

Jon W. Wise

> On May 16, 2018, at 8:59 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>
> This Message originated outside of Chaffe McCall's system.
>
> Thanks, Glenn. My perception is the same as yours. On my way home from
> the gym at Elmwood this afternoon, I saw 15 to 20 aloft, mostly along
> Airline Highway. Maybe not quite as many as I observed along the same
> route last year, but a seemingly healthy number.
>
> Nan
>
>> On Wed, May 16, 2018 at 8:38 PM, glenn ousset <gousset...> wrote:
>>
>> I feel that I am so far seeing fewer than usual in Chalmette and Arabi
>> and around the Audubon La Nature Center on my urban surveys. I am seeing
>> sufficient numbers that I am still hoping that this may be an effect of
>> late arrival and/or nesting activity.
>>
>> Glenn Ousset
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> LABIRDers,
>>
>> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
>> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
>> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
>> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>>
>> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
>> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
>> folks's take on this.
>>
>> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>>
>> Nan
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa Colibrí
>> Metairie, Louisiana USA
>> <nancy...>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>


Chaffe McCall L.L.P. CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission, including attachments, if any, is intended for use only by the addressee(s) named herein and contains confidential and/or privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail or telephone and delete the original and destroy all electronic and other copies of this message. If you are the intended recipient but do not wish to receive communications through this medium, please so advise the sender immediately.
 

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Date: 5/16/18 6:58 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
Thanks, Glenn. My perception is the same as yours. On my way home from
the gym at Elmwood this afternoon, I saw 15 to 20 aloft, mostly along
Airline Highway. Maybe not quite as many as I observed along the same
route last year, but a seemingly healthy number.

Nan

On Wed, May 16, 2018 at 8:38 PM, glenn ousset <gousset...> wrote:

> I feel that I am so far seeing fewer than usual in Chalmette and Arabi
> and around the Audubon La Nature Center on my urban surveys. I am seeing
> sufficient numbers that I am still hoping that this may be an effect of
> late arrival and/or nesting activity.
>
> Glenn Ousset
>
>
>
>
> On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
> wrote:
>
>
> LABIRDers,
>
> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>
> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
> folks's take on this.
>
> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
>
>


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/18 6:39 pm
From: glenn ousset <gousset...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
I feel that I am so far seeing fewer than usual in Chalmette and Arabi  and around the Audubon La Nature Center on my urban surveys. I am seeing sufficient numbers that I am still hoping that this may be an effect of late arrival and/or nesting activity. 
Glenn Ousset
 

On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:


LABIRDers,

Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
urban/suburban areas.  I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
am seeing 2 or 3 daily.  However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
that I am seeing as many as in previous years.

It seemed that they arrived later than usual.  Maybe I am just remembering
July and August when young are on the wing.  I would like to hear other
folks's take on this.

Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.

Nan
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/18 7:39 am
From: Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Sat., May 19 - Birding Trip to Bogue Chitto NWR and Honey Island Swamp
*Orleans Audubon Birding Trips*
*Bogue Chitto National Wildlife Refuge and Honey Island* -- Half-day birding
trip
*Date:* Saturday, May 19
*Time:* 7:30 a.m.
*Location:* Meet at the entrance to the Pearl River Wildlife Management
Area, Exit 5b (Honey Island Swamp) off of I-59. Good chance to see
Swallow-tailed Kite and 10 species of breeding warblers including
Swainson’s.
Leader: Glenn Ousset, cell: (504) 495-4284
*Note:* To bird in the Pearl River Wildlife Management Area you will need a
hunting or fishing license, or a Wild Louisiana Annual Stamp ($5.00), or a
Wild Louisiana One Day Stamp ($2.00). Louisiana residents 60 years old and
older are exempt. Stamps are sold at WalMart, Puglia’s Sporting goods, 1925
Veterans Blvd
<https://maps.google.com/?q=1925+Veterans+Blvd&entry=gmail&source=g>.,
504-837-0291 or purchase online from LDWF: https://la-web.s3licensing.com/

Birding trips are co-hosted by Orleans Audubon and the Crescent Bird Club.
All are welcome. Bring binoculars and drinking water, wear hiking shoes or
boots. A hat, sun screen, other protection from the elements and insect
repellent are advisable. Call the trip leader if you have questions.

To sign up for free OAS meeting and field trip announcements, send a
message to the email address below.


*Orleans Audubon Society *<orleansaudubon...>
www.jjaudubon.net
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/18 7:24 am
From: Trond Nilsen <trond.nilsen...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Great read
Really fun to read, thanks Mary!

Cheers
Trond

> 16. mai 2018 kl. 04:17 skrev Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...>:
>
> Many of yall are probably familiar but if not.... happened on this bird
> blogger and writer today. Nick Lund, Very good and humorous. The two
> articles I tagged - State birds what they should be - and It's okay to
> hate starlings are very enjoyable to read.
>
>
> http://www.thebirdist.com/
>
> http://www.thebirdist.com/2013/04/state-birds-what-they-should-be.html
>
> https://www.audubon.org/news/birdist-rule-72-its-okay-hate-starlings
>
> mjimenez
 

Back to top
Date: 5/16/18 5:28 am
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
Nancy/LABIRD,

I work at Minden High School in Webster Parish, and we always have kites here near the end of the spring semester. Monday while I was on afternoon bus duty, I watched a pair circling above the old oaks in the residential neighborhood where the school is. They seemed to be courting, with one (I assume the male), doing impressive acrobatic dives, swoops, and rolls from about 150 feet up down into one of our parking lots and pulling back just about 8 or 10 feet from the ground. If you’ve ever seen an old prop stunt plane at an airshow zoom straight down at the ground doing rolls, it did that once. Very cool.

John Dillon
Athens, LA



> On May 15, 2018, at 5:36 PM, Lana downing <lanadowning...> wrote:
>
> Just saw one being chased by an angry Mockingbird.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On May 15, 2018, at 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>>
>> LABIRDers,
>>
>> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
>> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
>> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
>> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>>
>> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
>> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
>> folks's take on this.
>>
>> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>>
>> Nan
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa Colibrí
>> Metairie, Louisiana USA
>> <nancy...>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 7:17 pm
From: Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Great read
Many of yall are probably familiar but if not.... happened on this bird
blogger and writer today. Nick Lund, Very good and humorous. The two
articles I tagged - State birds what they should be - and It's okay to
hate starlings are very enjoyable to read.


http://www.thebirdist.com/

http://www.thebirdist.com/2013/04/state-birds-what-they-should-be.html

https://www.audubon.org/news/birdist-rule-72-its-okay-hate-starlings

mjimenez
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 3:45 pm
From: Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
I regularly have Mississippi Kites nesting in my neighborhood as well, in Bissonet Plaza, right off Power Boulevard.

I happened to go by St. Rita's in Harahan yesterday and observed a large kettle of kites, over a dozen, riding the thermals above the school building.

I agree with Nancy, in that they seemed to arrive later this year. I always thought it was in March, but I could be wrong.

As Jon noted, they like to perch on the power lines, and I see them by my church, St. Philip Neri, as well as along Kawanee, from Power to Houma.

They are always tormented by the crows, who seem to run the neighborhood around here, but I am happy they are sticking it out and building their nests here once again.

Happy birding!

Terri





Terence Skelton
<tadskelton...>





-----Original Message-----
From: Lana downing <lanadowning...>
To: LABIRD-L <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Tue, May 15, 2018 5:38 pm
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question

That is, I saw a Mississippi Kite being chased by a Mockingbird over our house in Franklin.

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 15, 2018, at 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>
> LABIRDers,
>
> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>
> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
> folks's take on this.
>
> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 3:38 pm
From: Lana downing <lanadowning...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
That is, I saw a Mississippi Kite being chased by a Mockingbird over our house in Franklin.

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 15, 2018, at 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>
> LABIRDers,
>
> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>
> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
> folks's take on this.
>
> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 3:36 pm
From: Lana downing <lanadowning...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
Just saw one being chased by an angry Mockingbird.

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 15, 2018, at 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>
> LABIRDers,
>
> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>
> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
> folks's take on this.
>
> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 3:06 pm
From: Wise, Jon <Wise...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] [EXTERNAL] [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
My experience in Metairie near the lake this spring is pretty consistent with the last five years or so. We have a regular group of kites who perch on the power lines on Avron between Clearview Parkway and Transcontinental. I hear and see them every night now above my home on Purdue Drive, sometimes seeing as many as five circling above. They are not particularly shy of humans or automobiles and everyone seems to give them their space.


Sent from my iPad

> On May 15, 2018, at 4:55 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:
>
> This Message originated outside of Chaffe McCall's system.
>
> LABIRDers,
>
> Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
> urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
> am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
> that I am seeing as many as in previous years.
>
> It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
> July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
> folks's take on this.
>
> Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>


Chaffe McCall L.L.P. CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission, including attachments, if any, is intended for use only by the addressee(s) named herein and contains confidential and/or privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail or telephone and delete the original and destroy all electronic and other copies of this message. If you are the intended recipient but do not wish to receive communications through this medium, please so advise the sender immediately.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 2:55 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Question
LABIRDers,

Last week or so, there was a query about Mississippi Kites nesting in
urban/suburban areas. I responded that they nest in my neighborhood and I
am seeing 2 or 3 daily. However, driving around Metairie, I am not sure
that I am seeing as many as in previous years.

It seemed that they arrived later than usual. Maybe I am just remembering
July and August when young are on the wing. I would like to hear other
folks's take on this.

Please post to the list so all can benefit from your opinions.

Nan
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 9:46 am
From: Aelita J Pinter <apinter...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
Trond, you wrote:

>>>Over here in Norway we kinda like them, their arrival heralds the coming of spring and the end of winterís cold and ice, and we love that.

Exactly - I remember that very well! We used to put up nest boxes for them. Over the winter these were taken over by sparrows.

Every spring we watched the same spectacle, starlings evicting the sparrows. The sparrows would brace themselves inside the nest box, screeching their little heads off as the starlings tried to drag them out - by a wing, by a leg, anything they could get a hold of. The battle could last for quite a while, sparrows are tough cookies. In the end the starlings always won.

Lita Pinter
New Orleans




> 15. mai 2018 kl. 16:24 skrev Robert Thomas <rathomas...>:
>
> Assume this is commonly seen by listserv members, but I watched a crow
> pecking at a juvenile starling while I sat at a traffic light in Metairie.
> The crow was surrounded by several adult starlings who were agitated, but
> not attacking the crow. The crow ultimately flew away with the juvie,
> followed by the starlings.
> Crow eating starlings - for whom do you feel compassion???
>
> On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 8:11 AM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
> wrote:
>
>> My husband, Paul, just observed an American crow pulling out a MOLE from
>> it's small round hole ( where we sprinkle seed for the birds). The crow
>> pecked it, then held it up in it's bill, then dropped it and pecked again.
>> The crow did this 2 or 3 times, then flew off with it.
>> Janine Robin
>> Folsom LA
>> St Tammany parish
>>
>
>
>
> --
> *Robert A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director*
> Loyola Distinguished Scholar Chair in Environmental Communication
> Center for Environmental Communication
> School of Mass Communication
> &
> Environmental Program Faculty
> Loyola University Box 199
> New Orleans, LA 70118 USA
> Office: 327 Communications/Music Complex
> Voice 504-865-2107
> Cell 504-909-6568
> Fax 504-865-3799
> @DrBobNatureNote
> https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.loyno.edu%2Flucec&data=01%7C01%<7Capinter...>%7Cfa15a2231cb54498e29808d5ba7712bf%7C31d4dbf540044469bfeedf294a9de150%7C0&sdata=1GWIrTFNoHyHR13NH7f4lV9zYfIn9QaUMPSR7zvuxcU%3D&reserved=0

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 9:23 am
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast /// European Starlings!
Somewhat odd how the Royal "We" "hate" invasive species of birds including European Starlings, Rock Pigeons, Eurasian Collard-Doves and House Sparrows. Yet, these birds are handsome, adaptive species that will likely never be excluded from North America. We have so changed the landscape and ecology of this continent that these "hated" species are important components of the altered ecosystems in which they thrive.

It's high time that we come to acknowledge "defeat" and enjoy these handsome birds. Rating a species as good or bad is very subjective.

Wonder how many blasts I'll get for this opinion? But, we've lost.

Jay Huner

PS - Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks and House Finches are invasive species but are native to North America.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Trond Nilsen" <trond.nilsen...>
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2018 10:18:02 AM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast

Over here, some years ago I witnessed two magpies kill one adult starling, taking turns pecking. Pretty gruesome sight. And it wasn’t food they were after, because finished they just flew off...

That did not rock my feelings for magpies however, theyr’e still one of my favourites. I have a couple nesting in my garden now, foul language of course but smart and pretty..

I know you guys don’t like starlings. Over here in Norway we kinda like them, their arrival heralds the coming of spring and the end of winter’s cold and ice, and we love that.

Good birding y’all, spring is finally here!
Trond
SE Norway

> 15. mai 2018 kl. 16:24 skrev Robert Thomas <rathomas...>:
>
> Assume this is commonly seen by listserv members, but I watched a crow
> pecking at a juvenile starling while I sat at a traffic light in Metairie.
> The crow was surrounded by several adult starlings who were agitated, but
> not attacking the crow. The crow ultimately flew away with the juvie,
> followed by the starlings.
> Crow eating starlings - for whom do you feel compassion???
>
> On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 8:11 AM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
> wrote:
>
>> My husband, Paul, just observed an American crow pulling out a MOLE from
>> it's small round hole ( where we sprinkle seed for the birds). The crow
>> pecked it, then held it up in it's bill, then dropped it and pecked again.
>> The crow did this 2 or 3 times, then flew off with it.
>> Janine Robin
>> Folsom LA
>> St Tammany parish
>>
>
>
>
> --
> *Robert A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director*
> Loyola Distinguished Scholar Chair in Environmental Communication
> Center for Environmental Communication
> School of Mass Communication
> &
> Environmental Program Faculty
> Loyola University Box 199
> New Orleans, LA 70118 USA
> Office: 327 Communications/Music Complex
> Voice 504-865-2107
> Cell 504-909-6568
> Fax 504-865-3799
> @DrBobNatureNote
> www.loyno.edu/lucec
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 8:18 am
From: Trond Nilsen <trond.nilsen...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
Over here, some years ago I witnessed two magpies kill one adult starling, taking turns pecking. Pretty gruesome sight. And it wasn’t food they were after, because finished they just flew off...

That did not rock my feelings for magpies however, theyr’e still one of my favourites. I have a couple nesting in my garden now, foul language of course but smart and pretty..

I know you guys don’t like starlings. Over here in Norway we kinda like them, their arrival heralds the coming of spring and the end of winter’s cold and ice, and we love that.

Good birding y’all, spring is finally here!
Trond
SE Norway

> 15. mai 2018 kl. 16:24 skrev Robert Thomas <rathomas...>:
>
> Assume this is commonly seen by listserv members, but I watched a crow
> pecking at a juvenile starling while I sat at a traffic light in Metairie.
> The crow was surrounded by several adult starlings who were agitated, but
> not attacking the crow. The crow ultimately flew away with the juvie,
> followed by the starlings.
> Crow eating starlings - for whom do you feel compassion???
>
> On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 8:11 AM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
> wrote:
>
>> My husband, Paul, just observed an American crow pulling out a MOLE from
>> it's small round hole ( where we sprinkle seed for the birds). The crow
>> pecked it, then held it up in it's bill, then dropped it and pecked again.
>> The crow did this 2 or 3 times, then flew off with it.
>> Janine Robin
>> Folsom LA
>> St Tammany parish
>>
>
>
>
> --
> *Robert A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director*
> Loyola Distinguished Scholar Chair in Environmental Communication
> Center for Environmental Communication
> School of Mass Communication
> &
> Environmental Program Faculty
> Loyola University Box 199
> New Orleans, LA 70118 USA
> Office: 327 Communications/Music Complex
> Voice 504-865-2107
> Cell 504-909-6568
> Fax 504-865-3799
> @DrBobNatureNote
> www.loyno.edu/lucec
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 7:29 am
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
LABIRDers,

Both observations are very cool!

Nan

On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 9:24 AM, Robert Thomas <rathomas...> wrote:

> Assume this is commonly seen by listserv members, but I watched a crow
> pecking at a juvenile starling while I sat at a traffic light in Metairie.
> The crow was surrounded by several adult starlings who were agitated, but
> not attacking the crow. The crow ultimately flew away with the juvie,
> followed by the starlings.
> Crow eating starlings - for whom do you feel compassion???
>
> On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 8:11 AM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
> wrote:
>
> > My husband, Paul, just observed an American crow pulling out a MOLE from
> > it's small round hole ( where we sprinkle seed for the birds). The crow
> > pecked it, then held it up in it's bill, then dropped it and pecked
> again.
> > The crow did this 2 or 3 times, then flew off with it.
> > Janine Robin
> > Folsom LA
> > St Tammany parish
> >
>
>
>
> --
> *Robert A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director*
> Loyola Distinguished Scholar Chair in Environmental Communication
> Center for Environmental Communication
> School of Mass Communication
> &
> Environmental Program Faculty
> Loyola University Box 199
> New Orleans, LA 70118 USA
> Office: 327 Communications/Music Complex
> Voice 504-865-2107
> Cell 504-909-6568
> Fax 504-865-3799
> @DrBobNatureNote
> www.loyno.edu/lucec
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 7:24 am
From: Robert Thomas <rathomas...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
Assume this is commonly seen by listserv members, but I watched a crow
pecking at a juvenile starling while I sat at a traffic light in Metairie.
The crow was surrounded by several adult starlings who were agitated, but
not attacking the crow. The crow ultimately flew away with the juvie,
followed by the starlings.
Crow eating starlings - for whom do you feel compassion???

On Tue, May 15, 2018 at 8:11 AM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
wrote:

> My husband, Paul, just observed an American crow pulling out a MOLE from
> it's small round hole ( where we sprinkle seed for the birds). The crow
> pecked it, then held it up in it's bill, then dropped it and pecked again.
> The crow did this 2 or 3 times, then flew off with it.
> Janine Robin
> Folsom LA
> St Tammany parish
>



--
*Robert A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director*
Loyola Distinguished Scholar Chair in Environmental Communication
Center for Environmental Communication
School of Mass Communication
&
Environmental Program Faculty
Loyola University Box 199
New Orleans, LA 70118 USA
Office: 327 Communications/Music Complex
Voice 504-865-2107
Cell 504-909-6568
Fax 504-865-3799
@DrBobNatureNote
www.loyno.edu/lucec
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 6:23 am
From: Bill Vermillion <bill.gcjv...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Shrike's breakfast
LaBird and Janine - funny you should mention breakfast foods and birds,
because I got an email from the Loggerhead Shrike Working Group listerv on
that theme. A member was staying at the Best Western in Port Allen. LA,
this past Saturday and observed a shrike picking up a piece of bacon off
the parking lot, flying to a tree and impaling the bacon! A photo of the
prey item was provided!

Bill Vermillion
 

Back to top
Date: 5/15/18 6:12 am
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Crow's breakfast
My husband, Paul, just observed an American crow pulling out a MOLE from
it's small round hole ( where we sprinkle seed for the birds). The crow
pecked it, then held it up in it's bill, then dropped it and pecked again.
The crow did this 2 or 3 times, then flew off with it.
Janine Robin
Folsom LA
St Tammany parish
 

Back to top
Date: 5/14/18 8:22 am
From: Bill Vermillion <bill.gcjv...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] late report shorebirds SW LA and other
Hi Labird,

Friday I ran a Buff-breasted Sandpiper survey route in Calcasieu, Jeff
Davis and Acadia Parishes with David Booth. Got some good zero data at
survey points for that species. Ah well. Similar to other reports shorebird
habitat was somewhat limited but there was some good habitat on Roche Road
(north side) which runs between Hwy 382 and Lyons Road near Thornwell,
coordinates 30.12709, -92.74880 - Stilt Sandpiper, Dunlin, Wilson's
Phalarope, peeps. Found a single Hudsonian Godwit on Lyons Road (west side)
30.15101, -92.72343. Also on Bluefish Road (south side) near the
intersection of Roy Road there were a small number of Whimbrel, Ruddy
Turnstone, and Black-bellied Plover. A couple of late-ish Savannah Sparrows
were of interest, one on Bluefish Road and the other on Parish Road 322 off
Old Spanish Trail.

Additionally, observed and photographed a Monk Parakeet in Ville Platte on
Saturday and Sunday.

Bill Vermillion
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/18 6:35 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Breeding Pair in Residential Area
Jeff, I live in a rather urban section of Metairie and Mississippi Kites
nest on my block. They seem to be quite adaptable.

On Sun, May 13, 2018 at 8:14 PM, Jeffrey Cowell <jeffrey.g.cowell...>
wrote:

> I’m new to LA so don’t know if a pair of kites nesting in a suburban area
> is unusual or not; this is in Shenandoah Estates. If anyone should want to
> observe there are chairs on the porch at 15843 Chantilly Ave. Birds have
> been observed mating in the tallest evergreen tree SW across the street.
> Both male and female stay within a couple of hundred yards early in the
> morning, then soar as heat increases. Nesting activity is in a shorter
> tree about 15 degrees right of the tall tree.
> --
> Jeff Cowell
> <jeffrey.g.cowell...>
> Baton Rouge LA
> (615) 870-4892
>
> <http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/631.html>
>
> <http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/26151.html>
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/18 6:14 pm
From: Jeffrey Cowell <jeffrey.g.cowell...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Mississippi Kite Breeding Pair in Residential Area
I’m new to LA so don’t know if a pair of kites nesting in a suburban area
is unusual or not; this is in Shenandoah Estates. If anyone should want to
observe there are chairs on the porch at 15843 Chantilly Ave. Birds have
been observed mating in the tallest evergreen tree SW across the street.
Both male and female stay within a couple of hundred yards early in the
morning, then soar as heat increases. Nesting activity is in a shorter
tree about 15 degrees right of the tall tree.
--
Jeff Cowell
<jeffrey.g.cowell...>
Baton Rouge LA
(615) 870-4892

<http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/631.html>

<http://www.quotationspage.com/quote/26151.html>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/18 5:14 pm
From: Philip Bradley <pbradley60...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] New yard bird
There is a White-winged Dove feeding in my yard.

Phil Bradley
Shreveport

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/18 2:05 pm
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Nesting MS Kite in E. Carroll
After being repelled by gnats last week, I was determined to get in at least
a short walk at the Bayou Macon WMA today. Gnats were still present but I
managed to stay out an hour and a half. While I know that other birds on
the list may be moving through, the Swainson's Thrush was the only definite
migrant. I was excited to see a Mississippi Kite carrying nesting material
and even more excited to see the nest not far from the trail. Too many
branches in the way to get a photo with the phone.

The complete list of 26 species is here
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45637794

Roselie Overby
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/18 11:33 am
From: John Whittle <000000acdbc01b4f-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L]
http://area.atpestcontrolonly.com

John
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/18 7:16 am
From: John Romano <birderjuan...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Recovered Roadrunner and WB Nuthatch Photos
Wow, I was actually able to recover the photos I accidentally erased from
Claiborne Parish trip back in April, thank to the help from Billy Jones.
Thanks much Billy. The first list below has photos of the Roadrunner at Mt
Mariah Methodist Chruch and the second list photos of the WB Nuthatch found
on Corny Lake Rd. Thanks again to John Dillion for the LOS trip.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44790039

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44783544

John Romano
Breaux Bridge
 

Back to top
Date: 5/10/18 6:23 am
From: Tom Hickcox <cometkazie1...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Beep-beep
There was a roadrunner on the Centenary College campus in Shreveport for
several weeks some time around 1950.† My dad taught at Centenary, we
lived on campus, and I remember it distinctly. It even made the paper.†
People tried to catch it and our dog Lady chased it to no avail.

There was no LaBird then to report it to so I don't know if there is any
documentation.† I was ten years old in 1950 and my dad was a birder.

Tom Hickcox


On 5/10/18 00:07, Charles Lyon wrote:
> LA-birders,
> This sighting was in north Webster Parish on April 10th, but Greater Roadrunners are hard to come by in most of Louisiana,
> so Iím making a belated post. It was found by a landowner who does not wish to be identified and who does not wish to have visitors.
> The roadrunner seems to be affectionate to her and has brought her objects including rose petals, clothes pins, and lizards. She
> calls him Peeping Tom as he will peer into her back door, but as do date he does not wish to come inside for a visit. Beep beep!
> The link to the eBird list and embedded photos of ďPeeping TomĒ are below.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45508754
>
> Charlie Lyon
> Shreveport, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/18 9:07 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Beep-beep
LA-birders,
This sighting was in north Webster Parish on April 10th, but Greater Roadrunners are hard to come by in most of Louisiana,
so Iím making a belated post. It was found by a landowner who does not wish to be identified and who does not wish to have visitors.
The roadrunner seems to be affectionate to her and has brought her objects including rose petals, clothes pins, and lizards. She
calls him Peeping Tom as he will peer into her back door, but as do date he does not wish to come inside for a visit. Beep beep!
The link to the eBird list and embedded photos of ďPeeping TomĒ are below.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45508754

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 5/9/18 11:55 am
From: Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Birding the Bonnet Carre Spillway on Sat., May 12
*Orleans Audubon Society Birding Trips Birding the Bonnet Carre Spillway*
(half-day trip)
*Date:* Saturday, May 12
*Time:* 7:30 a.m.
*Location:* Meet at the Spillway Headquarters. Take I-10 west, exit onto
I-310 then Airline Hwy (US 61) west, turn left onto Apple St., turn right
onto River Road. Park in the shell area near the lake on top of the levee.
You may need rubber boots.
*Leader:* Chris Brantley, cell: (985) 237-5399

Birding trips are co-hosted by Orleans Audubon and the Crescent Bird Club.
All are welcome. Bring binoculars and drinking water, wear hiking shoes or
boots. A hat, sun screen, other protection from the elements and insect
repellent are advisable. Call the trip leader if you have questions.


*Orleans Audubon Society *<orleansaudubon...>
www.jjaudubon.net
 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/18 7:00 pm
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Brown Pelican at Morganza Forebay
LABIRD: I ran up to Morganza Spillway this afternoon to see what the Forebay was like ‚ÄĒ it is full. So, depending on how long the water stays high, it has the potential to be fantastic for waterbirds this fall when drawn down. Currently, it is mostly birdless, except for big swarms of Neotropic Cormorants. I did see a young Brown Pelican (unusual inland) as well as a Common Loon and ad. Bald Eagle.

===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu

 

Back to top
Date: 5/8/18 5:17 pm
From: Jonathan Rotondo-McCord <jrmtomburg...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Swallow-tailed Kite between Mandeville & Madisonville
We usually have several Mississippi kites in Woodridge subdivision every
year, but the telltale shadow overhead this afternoon turned out to be a
fairly low-flying Swallow-tailed when I looked up, first I've ever seen
here in over 25 years.

--
Jonathan Rotondo-McCord
<jrmtomburg...>

"Esto fidelis, et noli iudicare."

"This above all: to thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the
night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man."
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/18 1:51 pm
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Peveto info request from yesterday
If anyone was birding Peveto Saturday between 10 and 2, could you please contact me off LABIRD concerning what you saw? Van Remsen

===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/18 1:37 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Couturie today- nothing
Well,

Them's the problems with good to perfect conditions for fall outs! The birds have to be present to fall out in the first place. And, even if they are there, they might have fallen short or overflown the area.

Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Peter H Yaukey" <PYaukey...>
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Sunday, May 6, 2018 12:40:51 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Couturie today- nothing

Despite the promising weather setup- cold front passage mid-day yesterday plus north winds continuing all night- there was not a single migrant in Couturie Forest from 630-715 this morning.


Go figure...


Peter Yaukey

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/18 10:41 am
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Couturie today- nothing
Despite the promising weather setup- cold front passage mid-day yesterday plus north winds continuing all night- there was not a single migrant in Couturie Forest from 630-715 this morning.


Go figure...


Peter Yaukey

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/18 6:01 am
From: Johnson, Erik <ejohnson...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Hudsonian godwits
The Hudsonian Godwits are still here. I'm looking at 8 right now. Nice find, Marybeth, and thanks for sharing!

Erik Johnson
S Lafayette, LA
ejohnson AT audubon.org
________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Marybeth Lima <marybeth.lima...>
Sent: Saturday, May 5, 2018 2:25:50 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Hudsonian godwits

Pair in wet field, Southwest corner of intersection of Highway 14 and Highway 91 (on Highway 91). Field contains lots of wading birds as well.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/6/18 12:47 am
From: bonjule <bonjule...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] LABIRD-L Digest - 4 May 2018 to 5 May 2018 (#2018-121)
Change email address to blabordejohnson@gmail,com


Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S¬ģ 6, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: LABIRD-L automatic digest system <LISTSERV...> Date: 5/6/18 12:00 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <LABIRD-L...> Subject: LABIRD-L Digest - 4 May 2018 to 5 May 2018 (#2018-121)
There are 7 messages totaling 483 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

  1. Hudsonian godwits
  2. Louisiana Life birding article (2)
  3. Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through (2)
  4. squirrels and bird houses
  5. LOS Shorebirding Field Trip

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 5 May 2018 14:25:50 -0500
From:    Marybeth Lima <marybeth.lima...>
Subject: Hudsonian godwits

Pair in wet field, Southwest corner of intersection of Highway 14 and Highway 91 (on Highway 91). Field contains lots of wading birds as well.

Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 5 May 2018 20:15:35 +0000
From:    Chris Johnston <cmjohnston...>
Subject: Re: Louisiana Life birding article

It is a generally accepted rule in journalism that you never let the
people you have interviewed review the piece prior to publication. They may
call you back to verify any quotes prior to publication, but this varies
greatly by the newspaper or magazine they are employed by and is
influenced by how close the reporter is to the publication deadline and how
busy they are (reporters today are very busy).

Some reporters will allow subjects to review pieces but it is highly
unusual and done on a case-by-case basis. For instance, NY TImes does not
allow it under any circumstance.

Christopher Johnston



On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 9:39 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
wrote:

> Jane et al.,
>
> Sometime in the past, I made a vow never to give interviews to newspapers.
> Lo and behold, I refused the "Times Picayune", so they wrote an article
> about me anyway, mentioning some of the plants [NOT] that I grew.  I was so
> fried about it that I consulted a lawyer about filing suit but I was
> assured that unless I had had major financial losses from the erroneous
> 'information', I did not have 'cause'.  Unfortunately, not all people who
> write for publications adhere to real professional standards.
>
> In 2014, I was interviewed by an editor for the Wall Street Journal.  He
> was appalled when I related the above and he called me back several times
> to make sure he was stating things correctly.  That is professionalism.
>
> Nan
>
> On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 9:18 AM, Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
> wrote:
>
> > Unfortunately, we are rarely granted the opportunity to review these
> > articles prior to publication.  It's not a bad article and does have
> pretty
> > photos of birds to grab folks' attention,even if they're not all our
> > birds!  For the record, I did not say that Peveto Woods is one of the
> > highest places in the state (!)  What I probably said was that it's one
> of
> > the places with the highest number of bird species recorded....sigh...
> >
> > --Jane Patterson
> >
> > On Tue, May 1, 2018 at 9:29 PM, Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla...>
> wrote:
> >
> > > LABIRD -
> > >
> > > The current, ie May/June, issue of "Louisiana Life" (glossy magazine,
> > 6-ish
> > > times a year) has a not-horrible article on birding around the state,
> > > including
> > > clips from interviews with some names some of you may recognize.
> > > Unfortunately,
> > > the photos they use to illustrate the article, while lovely, even
> > > stunning, in
> > > many cases don't fit.
> > >
> > > For instance, in the section on "Acadiana", the article mentions Lake
> > > Martin,
> > > and it mentions that you can see (among other species) kingfishers
> there.
> > > But
> > > the photo referenced is not a Belted Kingfisher, nor even the
> > long-staying
> > > Ringed Kingfisher that was there for a few years, but the Common
> > > Kingfisher of
> > > Eurasia and North Africa.
> > >
> > > In the Northern Louisiana section, they mention that you can see Horned
> > > Grebes
> > > in the winter, but the photo they used is of a breeding plumage bird we
> > are
> > > distinctly unlikely to see in the state. And in the section on the
> coast,
> > > when
> > > describing the birds that can be seen at Peveto Woods, they refer to
> > > grosbeaks,
> > > but we're treated not to a Rose-breasted or Blue Grosbeak, or even a
> > > Black-headed, but an Evening Grosbeak. At least they didn't use a
> Yellow
> > > Grosbeak or a Pine Grosbeak - small blessings, I suppose.
> > >
> > > There's a digital edition at
> http://www.myneworleans.com/Louisiana-Life/
> > > (right-hand side of that page).
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Kevin Morgan
> > > Baton Rouge LA
> > >
> >
>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>  Nancy L Newfield
>  Casa Colibrí
>  Metairie, Louisiana USA
>  <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 5 May 2018 16:34:57 -0500
From:    Holly Morales <tashayoda3...>
Subject: Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through

I had 8 in the feeder at one time earlier this week.  That was the most
we've ever seen. One male window crasher, but he eventually was able to fly
away.
Holly in Mandeville

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 8:20 AM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
wrote:

> Very cool! I still have them here in Folsom along with Indigo buntings and
> one Blue Grosbeak.
>
> On Wed, May 2, 2018, 8:14 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
> wrote:
>
> > LABIRDers,
> >
> > While sitting on the deck in back a little while ago, I was able to watch
> > as many as 6 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks visit a pan of moving water beneath
> a
> > mister just 4 feet away.  They just keep coming!
> >
> > Nan
> > --
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >  Nancy L Newfield
> >  Casa Colibrí
> >  Metairie, Louisiana USA
> >  <nancy...>
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >
>

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 5 May 2018 17:11:55 -0500
From:    Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: Louisiana Life birding article

Christopher,

If we've met, I profess senior amnesia as I don't recall who you are and whether or not you're in the news media. As I've said elsewhere in association with this "thread", I always prepared a 2-3 page, double-spaced report on the topic when a reporter was coming to interview me about a topic associated with my work - crawfish, in general, and, crawfish-bird interaction, in particular. Reporters, print or radio/TV don't have a lot of space/time. I made it a point to include pros/cons.

I started doing this after I had an experience somewhat similar to Nancy's. Except in my case, I spoke to the reporter and the reporter got it ALL wrong.

I wanted the reporters to have the facts whether or not they used them. I rarely had any "issues" with reports after I started doing that.

Now, in regards to the NY Times, I simply don't recall how I was contacted by a science reporter for that paper but I was contacted by a nice lady who came to interview me about crawfish and birds. Crawfish systems provide invaluable habitat for birds, especially those that eat crawfish - ask LDWF about their whoopers nesting in crawfish ponds and their wayward flock of about 8 or so DUMB whoopers that keep walking around public highways adjacent to crawfish-rice (working wetland) complexes in SW Louisiana.

I don't think the lady reporter sent me her copy to review but it was to the point and correct as regards the controversy between the farmers and the environmentalist who seem to think birds are "good" for crawfish ponds by thinning out smaller crawfish.

Lazy reporters deserve to be chastised for poor reporting BUT one issue is their editors. A report may be proper and to the point but the editor removes enough words to make it a cruddy report!

Remember, in politics, the most important thing is to make sure your name is spelled correctly!

Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Johnston" <cmjohnston...>
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Saturday, May 5, 2018 3:15:35 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article

It is a generally accepted rule in journalism that you never let the
people you have interviewed review the piece prior to publication. They may
call you back to verify any quotes prior to publication, but this varies
greatly by the newspaper or magazine they are employed by and is
influenced by how close the reporter is to the publication deadline and how
busy they are (reporters today are very busy).

Some reporters will allow subjects to review pieces but it is highly
unusual and done on a case-by-case basis. For instance, NY TImes does not
allow it under any circumstance.

Christopher Johnston



On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 9:39 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
wrote:

> Jane et al.,
>
> Sometime in the past, I made a vow never to give interviews to newspapers.
> Lo and behold, I refused the "Times Picayune", so they wrote an article
> about me anyway, mentioning some of the plants [NOT] that I grew.  I was so
> fried about it that I consulted a lawyer about filing suit but I was
> assured that unless I had had major financial losses from the erroneous
> 'information', I did not have 'cause'.  Unfortunately, not all people who
> write for publications adhere to real professional standards.
>
> In 2014, I was interviewed by an editor for the Wall Street Journal.  He
> was appalled when I related the above and he called me back several times
> to make sure he was stating things correctly.  That is professionalism.
>
> Nan
>
> On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 9:18 AM, Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
> wrote:
>
> > Unfortunately, we are rarely granted the opportunity to review these
> > articles prior to publication.  It's not a bad article and does have
> pretty
> > photos of birds to grab folks' attention,even if they're not all our
> > birds!  For the record, I did not say that Peveto Woods is one of the
> > highest places in the state (!)  What I probably said was that it's one
> of
> > the places with the highest number of bird species recorded....sigh...
> >
> > --Jane Patterson
> >
> > On Tue, May 1, 2018 at 9:29 PM, Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla...>
> wrote:
> >
> > > LABIRD -
> > >
> > > The current, ie May/June, issue of "Louisiana Life" (glossy magazine,
> > 6-ish
> > > times a year) has a not-horrible article on birding around the state,
> > > including
> > > clips from interviews with some names some of you may recognize.
> > > Unfortunately,
> > > the photos they use to illustrate the article, while lovely, even
> > > stunning, in
> > > many cases don't fit.
> > >
> > > For instance, in the section on "Acadiana", the article mentions Lake
> > > Martin,
> > > and it mentions that you can see (among other species) kingfishers
> there.
> > > But
> > > the photo referenced is not a Belted Kingfisher, nor even the
> > long-staying
> > > Ringed Kingfisher that was there for a few years, but the Common
> > > Kingfisher of
> > > Eurasia and North Africa.
> > >
> > > In the Northern Louisiana section, they mention that you can see Horned
> > > Grebes
> > > in the winter, but the photo they used is of a breeding plumage bird we
> > are
> > > distinctly unlikely to see in the state. And in the section on the
> coast,
> > > when
> > > describing the birds that can be seen at Peveto Woods, they refer to
> > > grosbeaks,
> > > but we're treated not to a Rose-breasted or Blue Grosbeak, or even a
> > > Black-headed, but an Evening Grosbeak. At least they didn't use a
> Yellow
> > > Grosbeak or a Pine Grosbeak - small blessings, I suppose.
> > >
> > > There's a digital edition at
> http://www.myneworleans.com/Louisiana-Life/
> > > (right-hand side of that page).
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Kevin Morgan
> > > Baton Rouge LA
> > >
> >
>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>  Nancy L Newfield
>  Casa Colibrí
>  Metairie, Louisiana USA
>  <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 5 May 2018 20:55:18 -0500
From:    Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...>
Subject: squirrels and bird houses

I hope these questions aren't  too annoying. but I had some red-bellied
woodpecker nesters in a partially dead pecan tree, but today I discovered a
squirrel nesting at the very top of the cut off tree. (someone before I
moved in  cut off most of the top branches probably a home threat, it's
very close to  the house) any who, I haven't seen my woodpeckers or heard
them in a day.. So I'm now looking at bird house options for the
woodpeckers and possibly blue birds, wrens , etc. ..before I spend a lot of
useless money, can someone inform me some best buys?  I live in northwest
Louisiana near a golf course and I can garden to accommodate birds. or just
send a link to an article or past reference. thanks.



and... I was a reporter and reported on birds and what Jay said was true
about editors. You'll write a story and they chop off inches and make it
sound ridiculous!. when i wrote about subjects that i found were over my
head i usually let my experts pre read, even though the norm for reporters
is, no pre-reads. I also found that a ridiculous norm.

mary jimenez

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 5 May 2018 20:58:19 -0500
From:    Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through

Holly, I think I must have hosted as many as 50 to 60 Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks over the past week or so.  As of this morning, there were still 2
adult males, 1 with a drooping wing, but after about 1300, all were gone.
It was fun while it lasted!

On Sat, May 5, 2018 at 4:34 PM, Holly Morales <tashayoda3...> wrote:

> I had 8 in the feeder at one time earlier this week.  That was the most
> we've ever seen. One male window crasher, but he eventually was able to fly
> away.
> Holly in Mandeville
>
> On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 8:20 AM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
> wrote:
>
> > Very cool! I still have them here in Folsom along with Indigo buntings
> and
> > one Blue Grosbeak.
> >
> > On Wed, May 2, 2018, 8:14 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > LABIRDers,
> > >
> > > While sitting on the deck in back a little while ago, I was able to
> watch
> > > as many as 6 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks visit a pan of moving water
> beneath
> > a
> > > mister just 4 feet away.  They just keep coming!
> > >
> > > Nan
> > > --
> > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > >  Nancy L Newfield
> > >  Casa Colibrí
> > >  Metairie, Louisiana USA
> > >  <nancy...>
> > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > >
> >
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

------------------------------

Date:    Sat, 5 May 2018 22:39:16 -0500
From:    Paul Conover <zoiseaux...>
Subject: LOS Shorebirding Field Trip

Labird,

        The LOS shorebird field trip today had excellent weather, a
great group, and some great sights and sightings. The trip started out
in Jennings this morning with cool north winds and lightly overcast
skies that were excellent for shorebird viewing. We worked our way south
with a lot of east and west side-turns down quiet country roads, looking
for shorebird fields. With changes in rice culture, the muddy open
fields full of birds that used to be commonplace have become amazingly
scarce, replaced by precision-planted fields that birds can tuck
themselves away in. However, we did luck onto a nice pasture with
displaying Buff-breasted Sandpipers, another field with a good
comparison of alternate-plumage Golden and Black-bellied plovers, and a
few fields that offered small numbers of birds but great looks. We also
got in a few nice non-shorebird stops, including a scenic Cave Swallow
nesting colony in the middle of miles of rice fields.

         Our last shorebird stop was the shorebird spectacle on
Rutherford Beach Road that others have been posting or eBirding about
for a week or so, an expanse of mudflats densely speckled with thousands
of shorebirds composed largely of Stilt Sandpipers, Semipalmated
Sandpipers, and Wilson's Phalarope. The numbers were unbelievable, and
the looks up close and in optimum light.

        When the sun finally came out the temperature rose quickly, so
we retired to the shade of Willow Island to look for migrant songbirds.
Migrant action was slow, but what migrants were there showed off well.


Paul Conover

Lafayette

------------------------------

End of LABIRD-L Digest - 4 May 2018 to 5 May 2018 (#2018-121)
*************************************************************
 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/18 8:39 pm
From: Paul Conover <zoiseaux...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] LOS Shorebirding Field Trip
Labird,

        The LOS shorebird field trip today had excellent weather, a
great group, and some great sights and sightings. The trip started out
in Jennings this morning with cool north winds and lightly overcast
skies that were excellent for shorebird viewing. We worked our way south
with a lot of east and west side-turns down quiet country roads, looking
for shorebird fields. With changes in rice culture, the muddy open
fields full of birds that used to be commonplace have become amazingly
scarce, replaced by precision-planted fields that birds can tuck
themselves away in. However, we did luck onto a nice pasture with
displaying Buff-breasted Sandpipers, another field with a good
comparison of alternate-plumage Golden and Black-bellied plovers, and a
few fields that offered small numbers of birds but great looks. We also
got in a few nice non-shorebird stops, including a scenic Cave Swallow
nesting colony in the middle of miles of rice fields.

         Our last shorebird stop was the shorebird spectacle on
Rutherford Beach Road that others have been posting or eBirding about
for a week or so, an expanse of mudflats densely speckled with thousands
of shorebirds composed largely of Stilt Sandpipers, Semipalmated
Sandpipers, and Wilson's Phalarope. The numbers were unbelievable, and
the looks up close and in optimum light.

        When the sun finally came out the temperature rose quickly, so
we retired to the shade of Willow Island to look for migrant songbirds.
Migrant action was slow, but what migrants were there showed off well.


Paul Conover

Lafayette
 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/18 6:58 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through
Holly, I think I must have hosted as many as 50 to 60 Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks over the past week or so. As of this morning, there were still 2
adult males, 1 with a drooping wing, but after about 1300, all were gone.
It was fun while it lasted!

On Sat, May 5, 2018 at 4:34 PM, Holly Morales <tashayoda3...> wrote:

> I had 8 in the feeder at one time earlier this week. That was the most
> we've ever seen. One male window crasher, but he eventually was able to fly
> away.
> Holly in Mandeville
>
> On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 8:20 AM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
> wrote:
>
> > Very cool! I still have them here in Folsom along with Indigo buntings
> and
> > one Blue Grosbeak.
> >
> > On Wed, May 2, 2018, 8:14 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
> > wrote:
> >
> > > LABIRDers,
> > >
> > > While sitting on the deck in back a little while ago, I was able to
> watch
> > > as many as 6 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks visit a pan of moving water
> beneath
> > a
> > > mister just 4 feet away. They just keep coming!
> > >
> > > Nan
> > > --
> > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > > Nancy L Newfield
> > > Casa Colibrí
> > > Metairie, Louisiana USA
> > > <nancy...>
> > > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > >
> >
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/18 6:55 pm
From: Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] squirrels and bird houses
I hope these questions aren't too annoying. but I had some red-bellied
woodpecker nesters in a partially dead pecan tree, but today I discovered a
squirrel nesting at the very top of the cut off tree. (someone before I
moved in cut off most of the top branches probably a home threat, it's
very close to the house) any who, I haven't seen my woodpeckers or heard
them in a day.. So I'm now looking at bird house options for the
woodpeckers and possibly blue birds, wrens , etc. ..before I spend a lot of
useless money, can someone inform me some best buys? I live in northwest
Louisiana near a golf course and I can garden to accommodate birds. or just
send a link to an article or past reference. thanks.



and... I was a reporter and reported on birds and what Jay said was true
about editors. You'll write a story and they chop off inches and make it
sound ridiculous!. when i wrote about subjects that i found were over my
head i usually let my experts pre read, even though the norm for reporters
is, no pre-reads. I also found that a ridiculous norm.

mary jimenez
 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/18 3:12 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
Christopher,

If we've met, I profess senior amnesia as I don't recall who you are and whether or not you're in the news media. As I've said elsewhere in association with this "thread", I always prepared a 2-3 page, double-spaced report on the topic when a reporter was coming to interview me about a topic associated with my work - crawfish, in general, and, crawfish-bird interaction, in particular. Reporters, print or radio/TV don't have a lot of space/time. I made it a point to include pros/cons.

I started doing this after I had an experience somewhat similar to Nancy's. Except in my case, I spoke to the reporter and the reporter got it ALL wrong.

I wanted the reporters to have the facts whether or not they used them. I rarely had any "issues" with reports after I started doing that.

Now, in regards to the NY Times, I simply don't recall how I was contacted by a science reporter for that paper but I was contacted by a nice lady who came to interview me about crawfish and birds. Crawfish systems provide invaluable habitat for birds, especially those that eat crawfish - ask LDWF about their whoopers nesting in crawfish ponds and their wayward flock of about 8 or so DUMB whoopers that keep walking around public highways adjacent to crawfish-rice (working wetland) complexes in SW Louisiana.

I don't think the lady reporter sent me her copy to review but it was to the point and correct as regards the controversy between the farmers and the environmentalist who seem to think birds are "good" for crawfish ponds by thinning out smaller crawfish.

Lazy reporters deserve to be chastised for poor reporting BUT one issue is their editors. A report may be proper and to the point but the editor removes enough words to make it a cruddy report!

Remember, in politics, the most important thing is to make sure your name is spelled correctly!

Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Johnston" <cmjohnston...>
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Saturday, May 5, 2018 3:15:35 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article

It is a generally accepted rule in journalism that you never let the
people you have interviewed review the piece prior to publication. They may
call you back to verify any quotes prior to publication, but this varies
greatly by the newspaper or magazine they are employed by and is
influenced by how close the reporter is to the publication deadline and how
busy they are (reporters today are very busy).

Some reporters will allow subjects to review pieces but it is highly
unusual and done on a case-by-case basis. For instance, NY TImes does not
allow it under any circumstance.

Christopher Johnston



On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 9:39 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
wrote:

> Jane et al.,
>
> Sometime in the past, I made a vow never to give interviews to newspapers.
> Lo and behold, I refused the "Times Picayune", so they wrote an article
> about me anyway, mentioning some of the plants [NOT] that I grew. I was so
> fried about it that I consulted a lawyer about filing suit but I was
> assured that unless I had had major financial losses from the erroneous
> 'information', I did not have 'cause'. Unfortunately, not all people who
> write for publications adhere to real professional standards.
>
> In 2014, I was interviewed by an editor for the Wall Street Journal. He
> was appalled when I related the above and he called me back several times
> to make sure he was stating things correctly. That is professionalism.
>
> Nan
>
> On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 9:18 AM, Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
> wrote:
>
> > Unfortunately, we are rarely granted the opportunity to review these
> > articles prior to publication. It's not a bad article and does have
> pretty
> > photos of birds to grab folks' attention,even if they're not all our
> > birds! For the record, I did not say that Peveto Woods is one of the
> > highest places in the state (!) What I probably said was that it's one
> of
> > the places with the highest number of bird species recorded....sigh...
> >
> > --Jane Patterson
> >
> > On Tue, May 1, 2018 at 9:29 PM, Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla...>
> wrote:
> >
> > > LABIRD -
> > >
> > > The current, ie May/June, issue of "Louisiana Life" (glossy magazine,
> > 6-ish
> > > times a year) has a not-horrible article on birding around the state,
> > > including
> > > clips from interviews with some names some of you may recognize.
> > > Unfortunately,
> > > the photos they use to illustrate the article, while lovely, even
> > > stunning, in
> > > many cases don't fit.
> > >
> > > For instance, in the section on "Acadiana", the article mentions Lake
> > > Martin,
> > > and it mentions that you can see (among other species) kingfishers
> there.
> > > But
> > > the photo referenced is not a Belted Kingfisher, nor even the
> > long-staying
> > > Ringed Kingfisher that was there for a few years, but the Common
> > > Kingfisher of
> > > Eurasia and North Africa.
> > >
> > > In the Northern Louisiana section, they mention that you can see Horned
> > > Grebes
> > > in the winter, but the photo they used is of a breeding plumage bird we
> > are
> > > distinctly unlikely to see in the state. And in the section on the
> coast,
> > > when
> > > describing the birds that can be seen at Peveto Woods, they refer to
> > > grosbeaks,
> > > but we're treated not to a Rose-breasted or Blue Grosbeak, or even a
> > > Black-headed, but an Evening Grosbeak. At least they didn't use a
> Yellow
> > > Grosbeak or a Pine Grosbeak - small blessings, I suppose.
> > >
> > > There's a digital edition at
> http://www.myneworleans.com/Louisiana-Life/
> > > (right-hand side of that page).
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Kevin Morgan
> > > Baton Rouge LA
> > >
> >
>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/18 2:35 pm
From: Holly Morales <tashayoda3...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through
I had 8 in the feeder at one time earlier this week. That was the most
we've ever seen. One male window crasher, but he eventually was able to fly
away.
Holly in Mandeville

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 8:20 AM, janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
wrote:

> Very cool! I still have them here in Folsom along with Indigo buntings and
> one Blue Grosbeak.
>
> On Wed, May 2, 2018, 8:14 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
> wrote:
>
> > LABIRDers,
> >
> > While sitting on the deck in back a little while ago, I was able to watch
> > as many as 6 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks visit a pan of moving water beneath
> a
> > mister just 4 feet away. They just keep coming!
> >
> > Nan
> > --
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > Nancy L Newfield
> > Casa Colibrí
> > Metairie, Louisiana USA
> > <nancy...>
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/18 1:16 pm
From: Chris Johnston <cmjohnston...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
It is a generally accepted rule in journalism that you never let the
people you have interviewed review the piece prior to publication. They may
call you back to verify any quotes prior to publication, but this varies
greatly by the newspaper or magazine they are employed by and is
influenced by how close the reporter is to the publication deadline and how
busy they are (reporters today are very busy).

Some reporters will allow subjects to review pieces but it is highly
unusual and done on a case-by-case basis. For instance, NY TImes does not
allow it under any circumstance.

Christopher Johnston



On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 9:39 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
wrote:

> Jane et al.,
>
> Sometime in the past, I made a vow never to give interviews to newspapers.
> Lo and behold, I refused the "Times Picayune", so they wrote an article
> about me anyway, mentioning some of the plants [NOT] that I grew. I was so
> fried about it that I consulted a lawyer about filing suit but I was
> assured that unless I had had major financial losses from the erroneous
> 'information', I did not have 'cause'. Unfortunately, not all people who
> write for publications adhere to real professional standards.
>
> In 2014, I was interviewed by an editor for the Wall Street Journal. He
> was appalled when I related the above and he called me back several times
> to make sure he was stating things correctly. That is professionalism.
>
> Nan
>
> On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 9:18 AM, Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
> wrote:
>
> > Unfortunately, we are rarely granted the opportunity to review these
> > articles prior to publication. It's not a bad article and does have
> pretty
> > photos of birds to grab folks' attention,even if they're not all our
> > birds! For the record, I did not say that Peveto Woods is one of the
> > highest places in the state (!) What I probably said was that it's one
> of
> > the places with the highest number of bird species recorded....sigh...
> >
> > --Jane Patterson
> >
> > On Tue, May 1, 2018 at 9:29 PM, Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla...>
> wrote:
> >
> > > LABIRD -
> > >
> > > The current, ie May/June, issue of "Louisiana Life" (glossy magazine,
> > 6-ish
> > > times a year) has a not-horrible article on birding around the state,
> > > including
> > > clips from interviews with some names some of you may recognize.
> > > Unfortunately,
> > > the photos they use to illustrate the article, while lovely, even
> > > stunning, in
> > > many cases don't fit.
> > >
> > > For instance, in the section on "Acadiana", the article mentions Lake
> > > Martin,
> > > and it mentions that you can see (among other species) kingfishers
> there.
> > > But
> > > the photo referenced is not a Belted Kingfisher, nor even the
> > long-staying
> > > Ringed Kingfisher that was there for a few years, but the Common
> > > Kingfisher of
> > > Eurasia and North Africa.
> > >
> > > In the Northern Louisiana section, they mention that you can see Horned
> > > Grebes
> > > in the winter, but the photo they used is of a breeding plumage bird we
> > are
> > > distinctly unlikely to see in the state. And in the section on the
> coast,
> > > when
> > > describing the birds that can be seen at Peveto Woods, they refer to
> > > grosbeaks,
> > > but we're treated not to a Rose-breasted or Blue Grosbeak, or even a
> > > Black-headed, but an Evening Grosbeak. At least they didn't use a
> Yellow
> > > Grosbeak or a Pine Grosbeak - small blessings, I suppose.
> > >
> > > There's a digital edition at
> http://www.myneworleans.com/Louisiana-Life/
> > > (right-hand side of that page).
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Kevin Morgan
> > > Baton Rouge LA
> > >
> >
>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/5/18 12:26 pm
From: Marybeth Lima <marybeth.lima...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Hudsonian godwits
Pair in wet field, Southwest corner of intersection of Highway 14 and Highway 91 (on Highway 91). Field contains lots of wading birds as well.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 5/4/18 11:36 am
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Gunter Loop, West Carroll Parish
After running an errand on Gunter Loop Thursday and seeing how birdy it was,
I returned this morning to officially record the birds. The growing
secondary hardwood forest held a lot of Indigo Buntings, Yellow-Breasted
Chats, and Dickcissels. The Lark Sparrows were at the same area where I'd
seen them yesterday by the corn fields, but I missed the Horned Lark today.
I heard a few warblers in trees near the Bayou Macon. Since this is all
private land, one has to stay by the road. As it was, I received ugly
scowls from a couple of passing farmers hauling equipment and the parish
road crew patching the road. Despite that, I will try to remember to check
here next year earlier in migration. At least the woman on her riding mower
gave me a very friendly wave.

The full list of 35 species and a couple of Lark Sparrow photos can be seen
at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45253691

Roselie Overby
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 10:40 pm
From: Becky Lloyd <becky...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Red-shouldered Hawk Nest- 3 chicks, Uptown
I observed a Red-shouldered Hawk flying earlier in the afternoon over the
Walgreens parking lot on Carrollton and Maple. Two hours later while
walking in the area again I heard a ruckus and went to investigate. A guy
at the bus stop asked if I was looking at "that bird" and I said I was
coming over to see what all the fuss was about. Then I saw the hawk again
and pointed it out to him. He said the hawk had hit his head as he was
walking to the bus stop- he thought someone had thrown a rock at him! He
was wearing his La Madaleine uniform which included a high black cap (which
saved his head- or was it the reason for the dive bomb!).

I realized there must be a nest nearby. Finally I saw a chick looking over
the nest high up in the Live Oak. I returned later with binoculars and
camera. I observed 1 chick tugging at bloody fleshy food, then a second
chick took it's turn at the food, and a while later a third chick. The
adult returned after 45 minutes with more food just as the sun was setting.

The nest is on Carrollton Ave and Maple St.
The downtown side of Carrollton, 3rd Live Oak from Maple going toward the
river.

Here is a link to ebird list with a few pictures.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45201599

Becky Lloyd
New Orleans

--
Audubon Yoga Studio
511 Octavia
New Orleans, LA 70115
504-914-3999
http://www.AudubonYoga.com <http://www.audubonyoga.com/>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 6:26 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Calling Whip-poor-wills
Good Evening,

Monday evening around 8:07 PM, I heard what I took to be calling and flying Eastern Whip-poor-wills in the distance over the southeastern arm of Cotile Lake in NW Rapides Parish. I learned yesterday, much to my dismay, that whips don't sing when they are flying. They're silent. That's something I simply did not know. Well, where were the whips? The call is very distinct. I wasn't hearing things but it was way too dark to see the bird/birds.

There are snags in the lake. Multiple birds - at most four - may have been situated on snags and/or the shore. The calling gave the impression that whips were flying about over the lake. Had I known that whips don't call while flying, that's what I would have assumed.

There was a bright moon that evening and whips are supposed to find perches and ambush insects as they fly over silhouetted by the moon.

Is anyone too old to learn? Not me.

Jay Huner

PS - Heard no whips this evening but assume they are moving along in migration. Makes one wonder if the whips John Dillon has been monitoring in Claiborne Parish have been holding in place or are constantly moving to and past the site?
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 5:48 pm
From: Philip Bradley <pbradley60...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fifteen minutes
I was sitting on my son's patio for fifteen minutes this evening and saw numerous bird species. The bests were a Green Heron, m&f Baltimore Oriole, and a male Rose-breasted Grosbeak. There were Common Grackles, Red-winged Blackbirds, Mockingbirds, Turkey Vultures, Starlings, Chimney Swifts, Barn Swallows, Cardinals, Purple Martins, and a female American Goldfinch. Not bad for 15 minutes. The house is near the Red River and a recently cleared field in SE Shreveport.

Phil Bradley

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 3:15 pm
From: James W. Beck <loxosceles928...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Hummingbirds used in voodoo
Harriet and LABIRD,

Disturbing indeed...this was also posted to HUMNET previously. I guess the
good thing, if any, is that this is not a widespread, common practice.
Sick. -jz


On Wed, May 2, 2018, 5:11 PM Harriett Pooler <harriett.pooler...>
wrote:

> Labirders: this story is disturbing. I just read the article in Nat Geo and
> was very upset. Probably Nancy Newfield and Dave Patton and other hummer
> specialists knew about hummingbirds used as amulets and in potions but I
> was not aware of it. ...and just when I was thinking people were getting
> more attuned to the needs of birds......:-(
>
> Harriett Pooler
> Baton Rouge
>
>
>
> https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/04/wildlife-watch-illegal-hummingbird-trade-love-charm-mexico-witchcraft/?utm_source=NatGeocom&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=inside_20180430&utm_campaign=Content&utm_rd=17124382795
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 3:11 pm
From: Harriett Pooler <harriett.pooler...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Hummingbirds used in voodoo
Labirders: this story is disturbing. I just read the article in Nat Geo and
was very upset. Probably Nancy Newfield and Dave Patton and other hummer
specialists knew about hummingbirds used as amulets and in potions but I
was not aware of it. ...and just when I was thinking people were getting
more attuned to the needs of birds......:-(

Harriett Pooler
Baton Rouge


https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/04/wildlife-watch-illegal-hummingbird-trade-love-charm-mexico-witchcraft/?utm_source=NatGeocom&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=inside_20180430&utm_campaign=Content&utm_rd=17124382795
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 12:35 pm
From: Ed Wallace <mottledduck...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
I would have flown back from Virginia for one!

ed
________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 2, 2018 2:33 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist

No, just a slip on my part.

Sorry for getting everyone excited.



Judith O'Neale
Lafayette LA

From: R. Martin Guidry
Sent: Wednesday, May 2, 2018 2:31 PM
To: Judith ONeale
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist

Somebody had Townsendís Solitaire? Wow

Marty

On Wednesday, May 2, 2018, Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...> wrote:
An amazing bird count (194)with 25 warblers. Please send me any corrections and Sunday add-ons for Cameron Parish.

Please remember that the list is now restricted to those folks registered for the LOS spring meeting.

LOS Spring Meeting April 28, 2018
Cameron Parish
___Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
Fulvous Whistling-Duck
Wood Duck
Mottled Duck
Blue-winged Teal
___Northern Shoveler
Lesser Scaup
Red-breasted Merganser
Pied-billed Grebe
Rock Pigeon (I)
Eurasian Collared-Dove (I)
Inca Dove
___Common Ground Dove
White-winged Dove
___Mourning Dove
___Yellow-billed Cuckoo
___Black-billed Cuckoo
Common Nighthawk
___Chuck-will's-widow
Chimney Swift
___Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Clapper Rail
King Rail
___Virginia Rail
Sora
Purple Gallinule
Common Gallinule
American Coot
Black-necked Stilt
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Wilson's Plover
Semipalmated Plover
Killdeer
___Upland Sandpiper
Whimbrel
Long-billed Curlew
___Marbled Godwit
Ruddy Turnstone
Stilt Sandpiper
Sanderling
Dunlin
___Baird's Sandpiper
Least Sandpiper
___White-rumped Sandpiper
___Buff-breasted Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Semipalmated Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Long-billed Dowitcher
Spotted Sandpiper
Solitary Sandpiper
Greater Yellowlegs
Willet
Lesser Yellowlegs
Wilson's Phalarope
Laughing Gull
Ring-billed Gull
Herring Gull
Least Tern
Gull-billed Tern
Caspian Tern
Black Tern
Common Tern
Forster's Tern
Royal Tern
Sandwich Tern
Black Skimmer
Neotropic Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant
Anhinga
American White Pelican
Brown Pelican
American Bittern
Least Bittern
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
___Black-crowned Night-Heron
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
White Ibis
White-faced Ibis
Roseate Spoonbill
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Northern Harrier
___Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Swainson's Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
___Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl
Belted Kingfisher
___Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Crested Caracara
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Acadian Flycatcher
Great Crested Flycatcher
Eastern Kingbird
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Loggerhead Shrike
White-eyed Vireo
___Yellow-throated Vireo
___Philadelphia Vireo
___ Red-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
Fish Crow
Purple Martin
Tree Swallow
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
___Bank Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Sedge Wren
Marsh Wren
Carolina Wren
___Eastern Bluebird
___Townsend's Solitaire
Veery
___Gray-checked Thrush
Swainson's Thrush
___Wood Thrush
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling (I)
Cedar Waxwing
House Sparrow (I)
___American Goldfinch
___Ovenbird
___Worm-eating Warbler
Northern Waterthrush
___Golden-winged Warbler
___Blue-winged Warbler
___Black-and-white Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler
Swainson's Warbler
___Tennessee Warbler
___Nashville Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
___Hooded Warbler
___American Redstart
___Cerulean Warbler
Northern Parula
Magnolia Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Blackburnian Warbler
Yellow Warbler
Chestnut-sided Warbler
Blackpoll Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
___Canada Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
___Lark Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
___Nelson's Sparrow
Seaside Sparrow
___Song Sparrow
___Swamp Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Scarlet Tanager
Northern Cardinal
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Painted Bunting
Dickcissel
___Bobolink
Red-winged Blackbird
Eastern Meadowlark
___Yellow-headed Blackbird
Common Grackle
Boat-tailed Grackle
Great-tailed Grackle
Bronzed Cowbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole
Total 194


Judith O'Neale
Lafayette LA


--
Martin Guidry
6139 North Shore Drive
Baton Rouge, LA 70817
225-571-9726 (cell)
<guidryrmartin...>
Les Guťdry et Petitpas d'Asteur, Inc.
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~guedrylabinefamily
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~guidryrm/Guedry-Labine
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~guidryrm/clotiaux
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~guidryrm/butaud
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 12:34 pm
From: Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
No, just a slip on my part.

Sorry for getting everyone excited.



Judith O'Neale
Lafayette LA

From: R. Martin Guidry
Sent: Wednesday, May 2, 2018 2:31 PM
To: Judith ONeale
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist

Somebody had Townsend’s Solitaire?   Wow

Marty

On Wednesday, May 2, 2018, Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...> wrote:
An amazing bird count (194)with 25 warblers.  Please send me any corrections and Sunday add-ons for Cameron Parish.

Please remember that the list is now restricted to those folks registered for the LOS spring meeting.

LOS Spring Meeting  April 28, 2018
Cameron Parish
___Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
     Fulvous Whistling-Duck
     Wood Duck
     Mottled Duck
     Blue-winged Teal
___Northern Shoveler
     Lesser Scaup
     Red-breasted Merganser
     Pied-billed Grebe
     Rock Pigeon (I)
     Eurasian Collared-Dove (I)
     Inca Dove
___Common Ground Dove
     White-winged Dove
___Mourning Dove
___Yellow-billed Cuckoo
___Black-billed Cuckoo
     Common Nighthawk
___Chuck-will's-widow
     Chimney Swift
___Ruby-throated Hummingbird
     Clapper Rail
     King Rail
___Virginia Rail
     Sora
     Purple Gallinule
     Common Gallinule
     American Coot
     Black-necked Stilt
     American Avocet
     Black-bellied Plover
     Wilson's Plover
     Semipalmated Plover
     Killdeer
___Upland Sandpiper
     Whimbrel
     Long-billed Curlew
___Marbled Godwit
     Ruddy Turnstone
     Stilt Sandpiper
     Sanderling
     Dunlin
___Baird's Sandpiper
     Least Sandpiper
___White-rumped Sandpiper
___Buff-breasted Sandpiper
     Pectoral Sandpiper
     Semipalmated Sandpiper
     Short-billed Dowitcher
     Long-billed Dowitcher
     Spotted Sandpiper
     Solitary Sandpiper
     Greater Yellowlegs
     Willet
     Lesser Yellowlegs
     Wilson's Phalarope
     Laughing Gull
     Ring-billed Gull
     Herring Gull
     Least Tern
     Gull-billed Tern
     Caspian Tern
     Black Tern
     Common Tern
     Forster's Tern
     Royal Tern
     Sandwich Tern
     Black Skimmer
     Neotropic Cormorant
     Double-crested Cormorant
     Anhinga
     American White Pelican
     Brown Pelican
     American Bittern
     Least Bittern
     Great Blue Heron
     Great Egret
     Snowy Egret
     Little Blue Heron
     Tricolored Heron
     Cattle Egret
     Green Heron
___Black-crowned Night-Heron
     Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
     White Ibis
     White-faced Ibis
     Roseate Spoonbill
     Black Vulture
     Turkey Vulture
     Osprey
     Bald Eagle
     Northern Harrier
___Cooper's Hawk
     Red-shouldered Hawk
     Swainson's Hawk
     Red-tailed Hawk
___Great Horned Owl
     Barred Owl
     Belted Kingfisher
___Red-headed Woodpecker
     Red-bellied Woodpecker
     Downy Woodpecker
     Pileated Woodpecker
     Crested Caracara
     Merlin
     Peregrine Falcon
     Eastern Wood-Pewee
     Acadian Flycatcher
     Great Crested Flycatcher
     Eastern Kingbird
     Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
     Loggerhead Shrike
     White-eyed Vireo
___Yellow-throated Vireo
___Philadelphia Vireo
___ Red-eyed Vireo
     Blue Jay
     Fish Crow
     Purple Martin
     Tree Swallow
     Northern Rough-winged Swallow
___Bank Swallow
     Cliff Swallow
     Barn Swallow
     Carolina Chickadee
     Tufted Titmouse
     Sedge Wren
     Marsh Wren
     Carolina Wren
___Eastern Bluebird
___Townsend's Solitaire
     Veery
___Gray-checked Thrush
     Swainson's Thrush
___Wood Thrush
     Gray Catbird
     Brown Thrasher
     Northern Mockingbird
     European Starling (I)
     Cedar Waxwing
     House Sparrow (I)
___American Goldfinch
___Ovenbird
___Worm-eating Warbler
     Northern Waterthrush
___Golden-winged Warbler
___Blue-winged Warbler
___Black-and-white Warbler
     Prothonotary Warbler
     Swainson's Warbler
___Tennessee Warbler
___Nashville Warbler
     Kentucky Warbler
     Common Yellowthroat
___Hooded Warbler
___American Redstart
___Cerulean Warbler
     Northern Parula
     Magnolia Warbler
     Bay-breasted Warbler
     Blackburnian Warbler
     Yellow Warbler
     Chestnut-sided Warbler
     Blackpoll Warbler
     Yellow-rumped Warbler
     Yellow-throated Warbler
___Canada Warbler
     Yellow-breasted Chat
___Lark Sparrow
     Savannah Sparrow
___Nelson's Sparrow
     Seaside Sparrow
___Song Sparrow
___Swamp Sparrow
     White-crowned Sparrow
     Summer Tanager
     Scarlet Tanager
     Northern Cardinal
     Rose-breasted Grosbeak
     Blue Grosbeak
     Indigo Bunting
     Painted Bunting
     Dickcissel
___Bobolink
     Red-winged Blackbird
     Eastern Meadowlark
___Yellow-headed Blackbird
     Common Grackle
     Boat-tailed Grackle
     Great-tailed Grackle
     Bronzed Cowbird
     Brown-headed Cowbird
     Orchard Oriole
     Baltimore Oriole
Total  194


Judith O'Neale
Lafayette LA


--
Martin Guidry
6139 North Shore Drive
Baton Rouge, LA  70817
225-571-9726 (cell)
<guidryrmartin...>
Les Guédry et Petitpas d'Asteur, Inc.
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~guedrylabinefamily
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~guidryrm/Guedry-Labine
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~guidryrm/clotiaux
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~guidryrm/butaud¬


 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 11:44 am
From: Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
Can anyone confirm Common Ground Dove or Red-headed Woodpecker in Cameron
Parish on LOS Saturday?



Thanks,


Steve Cardiff
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 11:34 am
From: Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
Larry,

Yes, just missed adding it to list. Now it’s there.

Thanks,

Judith

Judith O'Neale
Lafayette LA

From: <lrraymond...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 2, 2018 1:26 PM
To: <losbirdlady...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist


Judith, Anne and I had a Reddish Egret behind the Couthouse on Saturday.  Larry

Larry R. Raymond
<lrraymond...>
318-347-3134


-----Original Message-----
From: Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...>
To: LABIRD-L <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Wed, May 2, 2018 12:46 pm
Subject: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
An amazing bird count (194)with 25 warblers. Please send me any corrections and Sunday add-ons for Cameron Parish.

Please remember that the list is now restricted to those folks registered for the LOS spring meeting.

LOS Spring Meeting April 28, 2018 Cameron Parish ___Black-bellied Whistling-Duck Fulvous Whistling-Duck Wood Duck Mottled Duck Blue-winged Teal ___Northern Shoveler Lesser Scaup Red-breasted Merganser Pied-billed Grebe Rock Pigeon (I) Eurasian Collared-Dove (I) Inca Dove ___Common Ground Dove White-winged Dove ___Mourning Dove ___Yellow-billed Cuckoo ___Black-billed Cuckoo Common Nighthawk ___Chuck-will's-widow Chimney Swift ___Ruby-throated Hummingbird Clapper Rail King Rail ___Virginia Rail Sora Purple Gallinule Common Gallinule American Coot Black-necked Stilt American Avocet Black-bellied Plover Wilson's Plover Semipalmated Plover Killdeer ___Upland Sandpiper Whimbrel Long-billed Curlew ___Marbled Godwit Ruddy Turnstone Stilt Sandpiper Sanderling Dunlin ___Baird's Sandpiper Least Sandpiper ___White-rumped Sandpiper ___Buff-breasted Sandpiper Pectoral Sandpiper Semipalmated Sandpiper Short-billed Dowitcher Long-billed Dowitcher Spotted Sandpiper Solitary Sandpiper Greater Yellowlegs Willet Lesser Yellowlegs Wilson's Phalarope Laughing Gull Ring-billed Gull Herring Gull Least Tern Gull-billed Tern Caspian Tern Black Tern Common Tern Forster's Tern Royal Tern Sandwich Tern Black Skimmer Neotropic Cormorant Double-crested Cormorant Anhinga American White Pelican Brown Pelican American Bittern Least Bittern Great Blue Heron Great Egret Snowy Egret Little Blue Heron Tricolored Heron Cattle Egret Green Heron ___Black-crowned Night-Heron Yellow-crowned Night-Heron White Ibis White-faced Ibis Roseate Spoonbill Black Vulture Turkey Vulture Osprey Bald Eagle Northern Harrier ___Cooper's Hawk Red-shouldered Hawk Swainson's Hawk Red-tailed Hawk ___Great Horned Owl Barred Owl Belted Kingfisher ___Red-headed Woodpecker Red-bellied Woodpecker Downy Woodpecker Pileated Woodpecker Crested Caracara Merlin Peregrine Falcon Eastern Wood-Pewee Acadian Flycatcher Great Crested Flycatcher Eastern Kingbird Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Loggerhead Shrike White-eyed Vireo ___Yellow-throated Vireo ___Philadelphia Vireo ___ Red-eyed Vireo Blue Jay Fish Crow Purple Martin Tree Swallow Northern Rough-winged Swallow ___Bank Swallow Cliff Swallow Barn Swallow Carolina Chickadee Tufted Titmouse Sedge Wren Marsh Wren Carolina Wren ___Eastern Bluebird ___Townsend's Solitaire Veery ___Gray-checked Thrush Swainson's Thrush ___Wood Thrush Gray Catbird Brown Thrasher Northern Mockingbird European Starling (I) Cedar Waxwing House Sparrow (I) ___American Goldfinch ___Ovenbird ___Worm-eating Warbler Northern Waterthrush ___Golden-winged Warbler ___Blue-winged Warbler ___Black-and-white Warbler Prothonotary Warbler Swainson's Warbler ___Tennessee Warbler ___Nashville Warbler Kentucky Warbler Common Yellowthroat ___Hooded Warbler ___American Redstart ___Cerulean Warbler Northern Parula Magnolia Warbler Bay-breasted Warbler Blackburnian Warbler Yellow Warbler Chestnut-sided Warbler Blackpoll Warbler Yellow-rumped Warbler Yellow-throated Warbler ___Canada Warbler Yellow-breasted Chat ___Lark Sparrow Savannah Sparrow ___Nelson's Sparrow Seaside Sparrow ___Song Sparrow ___Swamp Sparrow White-crowned Sparrow Summer Tanager Scarlet Tanager Northern Cardinal Rose-breasted Grosbeak Blue Grosbeak Indigo Bunting Painted Bunting Dickcissel ___Bobolink Red-winged Blackbird Eastern Meadowlark ___Yellow-headed Blackbird Common Grackle Boat-tailed Grackle Great-tailed Grackle Bronzed Cowbird Brown-headed Cowbird Orchard Oriole Baltimore Oriole Total 194

Judith O'Neale
Lafayette LA
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 10:46 am
From: Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting Checklist
An amazing bird count (194)with 25 warblers. Please send me any corrections and Sunday add-ons for Cameron Parish.

Please remember that the list is now restricted to those folks registered for the LOS spring meeting.

LOS Spring Meeting April 28, 2018 Cameron Parish ___Black-bellied Whistling-Duck Fulvous Whistling-Duck Wood Duck Mottled Duck Blue-winged Teal ___Northern Shoveler Lesser Scaup Red-breasted Merganser Pied-billed Grebe Rock Pigeon (I) Eurasian Collared-Dove (I) Inca Dove ___Common Ground Dove White-winged Dove ___Mourning Dove ___Yellow-billed Cuckoo ___Black-billed Cuckoo Common Nighthawk ___Chuck-will's-widow Chimney Swift ___Ruby-throated Hummingbird Clapper Rail King Rail ___Virginia Rail Sora Purple Gallinule Common Gallinule American Coot Black-necked Stilt American Avocet Black-bellied Plover Wilson's Plover Semipalmated Plover Killdeer ___Upland Sandpiper Whimbrel Long-billed Curlew ___Marbled Godwit Ruddy Turnstone Stilt Sandpiper Sanderling Dunlin ___Baird's Sandpiper Least Sandpiper ___White-rumped Sandpiper ___Buff-breasted Sandpiper Pectoral Sandpiper Semipalmated Sandpiper Short-billed Dowitcher Long-billed Dowitcher Spotted Sandpiper Solitary Sandpiper Greater Yellowlegs Willet Lesser Yellowlegs Wilson's Phalarope Laughing Gull Ring-billed Gull Herring Gull Least Tern Gull-billed Tern Caspian Tern Black Tern Common Tern Forster's Tern Royal Tern Sandwich Tern Black Skimmer Neotropic Cormorant Double-crested Cormorant Anhinga American White Pelican Brown Pelican American Bittern Least Bittern Great Blue Heron Great Egret Snowy Egret Little Blue Heron Tricolored Heron Cattle Egret Green Heron ___Black-crowned Night-Heron Yellow-crowned Night-Heron White Ibis White-faced Ibis Roseate Spoonbill Black Vulture Turkey Vulture Osprey Bald Eagle Northern Harrier ___Cooper's Hawk Red-shouldered Hawk Swainson's Hawk Red-tailed Hawk ___Great Horned Owl Barred Owl Belted Kingfisher ___Red-headed Woodpecker Red-bellied Woodpecker Downy Woodpecker Pileated Woodpecker Crested Caracara Merlin Peregrine Falcon Eastern Wood-Pewee Acadian Flycatcher Great Crested Flycatcher Eastern Kingbird Scissor-tailed Flycatcher Loggerhead Shrike White-eyed Vireo ___Yellow-throated Vireo ___Philadelphia Vireo ___ Red-eyed Vireo Blue Jay Fish Crow Purple Martin Tree Swallow Northern Rough-winged Swallow ___Bank Swallow Cliff Swallow Barn Swallow Carolina Chickadee Tufted Titmouse Sedge Wren Marsh Wren Carolina Wren ___Eastern Bluebird ___Townsend's Solitaire Veery ___Gray-checked Thrush Swainson's Thrush ___Wood Thrush Gray Catbird Brown Thrasher Northern Mockingbird European Starling (I) Cedar Waxwing House Sparrow (I) ___American Goldfinch ___Ovenbird ___Worm-eating Warbler Northern Waterthrush ___Golden-winged Warbler ___Blue-winged Warbler ___Black-and-white Warbler Prothonotary Warbler Swainson's Warbler ___Tennessee Warbler ___Nashville Warbler Kentucky Warbler Common Yellowthroat ___Hooded Warbler ___American Redstart ___Cerulean Warbler Northern Parula Magnolia Warbler Bay-breasted Warbler Blackburnian Warbler Yellow Warbler Chestnut-sided Warbler Blackpoll Warbler Yellow-rumped Warbler Yellow-throated Warbler ___Canada Warbler Yellow-breasted Chat ___Lark Sparrow Savannah Sparrow ___Nelson's Sparrow Seaside Sparrow ___Song Sparrow ___Swamp Sparrow White-crowned Sparrow Summer Tanager Scarlet Tanager Northern Cardinal Rose-breasted Grosbeak Blue Grosbeak Indigo Bunting Painted Bunting Dickcissel ___Bobolink Red-winged Blackbird Eastern Meadowlark ___Yellow-headed Blackbird Common Grackle Boat-tailed Grackle Great-tailed Grackle Bronzed Cowbird Brown-headed Cowbird Orchard Oriole Baltimore Oriole Total 194

Judith O'Neale
Lafayette LA
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 8:34 am
From: Philip Bradley <pbradley60...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] SexEd moment
My 7 year old grandson comes to my house after school to relax and then do his homework. We often look out of the window to look at any visiting birds. Yesterday, a pair of Mourning Doves were performing a courtship dance. My grandson mentioned that one of them had a blue head. I explained that it was the male, and that he was courting the female. I said, "let's get to your homework", but my grandson was mesmerized by the doves' dance. He then laughed and said, "he jumped on her back; why did he do that?" I told my SEVEN year old grandson that the male was putting his sperm into the female's eggs. He made a pensive face and asked if roosters do that to hens. I said yes but that most of the chicken eggs we eat don't have the sperm in them.
In the teaching profession we call this a teachable moment; for me it was a squirmable moment. Is seven too young for sex education? He seemed unphased by it and did his homework.

Phil Bradley

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 7:39 am
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
Jane et al.,

Sometime in the past, I made a vow never to give interviews to newspapers.
Lo and behold, I refused the "Times Picayune", so they wrote an article
about me anyway, mentioning some of the plants [NOT] that I grew. I was so
fried about it that I consulted a lawyer about filing suit but I was
assured that unless I had had major financial losses from the erroneous
'information', I did not have 'cause'. Unfortunately, not all people who
write for publications adhere to real professional standards.

In 2014, I was interviewed by an editor for the Wall Street Journal. He
was appalled when I related the above and he called me back several times
to make sure he was stating things correctly. That is professionalism.

Nan

On Wed, May 2, 2018 at 9:18 AM, Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
wrote:

> Unfortunately, we are rarely granted the opportunity to review these
> articles prior to publication. It's not a bad article and does have pretty
> photos of birds to grab folks' attention,even if they're not all our
> birds! For the record, I did not say that Peveto Woods is one of the
> highest places in the state (!) What I probably said was that it's one of
> the places with the highest number of bird species recorded....sigh...
>
> --Jane Patterson
>
> On Tue, May 1, 2018 at 9:29 PM, Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla...> wrote:
>
> > LABIRD -
> >
> > The current, ie May/June, issue of "Louisiana Life" (glossy magazine,
> 6-ish
> > times a year) has a not-horrible article on birding around the state,
> > including
> > clips from interviews with some names some of you may recognize.
> > Unfortunately,
> > the photos they use to illustrate the article, while lovely, even
> > stunning, in
> > many cases don't fit.
> >
> > For instance, in the section on "Acadiana", the article mentions Lake
> > Martin,
> > and it mentions that you can see (among other species) kingfishers there.
> > But
> > the photo referenced is not a Belted Kingfisher, nor even the
> long-staying
> > Ringed Kingfisher that was there for a few years, but the Common
> > Kingfisher of
> > Eurasia and North Africa.
> >
> > In the Northern Louisiana section, they mention that you can see Horned
> > Grebes
> > in the winter, but the photo they used is of a breeding plumage bird we
> are
> > distinctly unlikely to see in the state. And in the section on the coast,
> > when
> > describing the birds that can be seen at Peveto Woods, they refer to
> > grosbeaks,
> > but we're treated not to a Rose-breasted or Blue Grosbeak, or even a
> > Black-headed, but an Evening Grosbeak. At least they didn't use a Yellow
> > Grosbeak or a Pine Grosbeak - small blessings, I suppose.
> >
> > There's a digital edition at http://www.myneworleans.com/Louisiana-Life/
> > (right-hand side of that page).
> >
> >
> >
> > Kevin Morgan
> > Baton Rouge LA
> >
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 7:34 am
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Bruce Beehler's Louisiana bird trip
LABIRD: Bruce Beehler is a renowned naturalist (perhaps best known to birders for guide to birds of New Guinea) based at the Smithsonian who was in Louisiana for a week and did a nice blogpost on his recent visit:

https://birdsandnaturenorthamerica.blogspot.com/

===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 7:18 am
From: Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
Unfortunately, we are rarely granted the opportunity to review these
articles prior to publication. It's not a bad article and does have pretty
photos of birds to grab folks' attention,even if they're not all our
birds! For the record, I did not say that Peveto Woods is one of the
highest places in the state (!) What I probably said was that it's one of
the places with the highest number of bird species recorded....sigh...

--Jane Patterson

On Tue, May 1, 2018 at 9:29 PM, Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla...> wrote:

> LABIRD -
>
> The current, ie May/June, issue of "Louisiana Life" (glossy magazine, 6-ish
> times a year) has a not-horrible article on birding around the state,
> including
> clips from interviews with some names some of you may recognize.
> Unfortunately,
> the photos they use to illustrate the article, while lovely, even
> stunning, in
> many cases don't fit.
>
> For instance, in the section on "Acadiana", the article mentions Lake
> Martin,
> and it mentions that you can see (among other species) kingfishers there.
> But
> the photo referenced is not a Belted Kingfisher, nor even the long-staying
> Ringed Kingfisher that was there for a few years, but the Common
> Kingfisher of
> Eurasia and North Africa.
>
> In the Northern Louisiana section, they mention that you can see Horned
> Grebes
> in the winter, but the photo they used is of a breeding plumage bird we are
> distinctly unlikely to see in the state. And in the section on the coast,
> when
> describing the birds that can be seen at Peveto Woods, they refer to
> grosbeaks,
> but we're treated not to a Rose-breasted or Blue Grosbeak, or even a
> Black-headed, but an Evening Grosbeak. At least they didn't use a Yellow
> Grosbeak or a Pine Grosbeak - small blessings, I suppose.
>
> There's a digital edition at http://www.myneworleans.com/Louisiana-Life/
> (right-hand side of that page).
>
>
>
> Kevin Morgan
> Baton Rouge LA
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 6:55 am
From: Joan Garvey <joanmgarvey1...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] bird article
About a year after Katrina I was home-bound taking care of my Mom who had
Alzheimer's. I noticed a hummingbird in the yard and decided to learn more
about the species and eventually ended up at the library. I came across
Nancy's hummingbird book and contacted her for more help planting my yard. I
was fortunate to have a female Rufous visit the yard and Nancy was able to
band her. I named her "Sweet Pea" after my Mom's nickname. Sweet Pea was
subsequently recaptured off the coast of Washington State the following
spring. She made the news on Whidbey Island but unfortunately the spin they
put on it was that she was lost down here and went the wrong way. They also
said she was named Sweet Pea after the flowers she favored.
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 6:21 am
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through
Very cool! I still have them here in Folsom along with Indigo buntings and
one Blue Grosbeak.

On Wed, May 2, 2018, 8:14 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> wrote:

> LABIRDers,
>
> While sitting on the deck in back a little while ago, I was able to watch
> as many as 6 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks visit a pan of moving water beneath a
> mister just 4 feet away. They just keep coming!
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 6:14 am
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks continue to Move Through
LABIRDers,

While sitting on the deck in back a little while ago, I was able to watch
as many as 6 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks visit a pan of moving water beneath a
mister just 4 feet away. They just keep coming!

Nan
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 5/2/18 5:12 am
From: Jay Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
Whenever I was interviewed by a reporter while Director of the USL/ULL Crawfish Research Center, I always provided the reporter with a two-thee page double spaced report about the topic. I also offered to review their reports before publication. Issues like this rarely occurred.

In this case a polite note to the magazine’s editor and/or the author might do wonders for future reference.

This sort of reminds me of the movie ‚ÄúThe Big Day‚ÄĚ. Any mediocre birder would know the problems but after thinking about it chuckle and welcome the publicity.

Jay Huner

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 1, 2018, at 9:29 PM, Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla...> wrote:
>
> LABIRD -
>
> The current, ie May/June, issue of "Louisiana Life" (glossy magazine, 6-ish
> times a year) has a not-horrible article on birding around the state, including
> clips from interviews with some names some of you may recognize. Unfortunately,
> the photos they use to illustrate the article, while lovely, even stunning, in
> many cases don't fit.
>
> For instance, in the section on "Acadiana", the article mentions Lake Martin,
> and it mentions that you can see (among other species) kingfishers there. But
> the photo referenced is not a Belted Kingfisher, nor even the long-staying
> Ringed Kingfisher that was there for a few years, but the Common Kingfisher of
> Eurasia and North Africa.
>
> In the Northern Louisiana section, they mention that you can see Horned Grebes
> in the winter, but the photo they used is of a breeding plumage bird we are
> distinctly unlikely to see in the state. And in the section on the coast, when
> describing the birds that can be seen at Peveto Woods, they refer to grosbeaks,
> but we're treated not to a Rose-breasted or Blue Grosbeak, or even a
> Black-headed, but an Evening Grosbeak. At least they didn't use a Yellow
> Grosbeak or a Pine Grosbeak - small blessings, I suppose.
>
> There's a digital edition at http://www.myneworleans.com/Louisiana-Life/
> (right-hand side of that page).
>
>
>
> Kevin Morgan
> Baton Rouge LA
 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/18 7:29 pm
From: Kevin Morgan <cowboyinbrla...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Louisiana Life birding article
LABIRD -

The current, ie May/June, issue of "Louisiana Life" (glossy magazine, 6-ish
times a year) has a not-horrible article on birding around the state, including
clips from interviews with some names some of you may recognize. Unfortunately,
the photos they use to illustrate the article, while lovely, even stunning, in
many cases don't fit.

For instance, in the section on "Acadiana", the article mentions Lake Martin,
and it mentions that you can see (among other species) kingfishers there. But
the photo referenced is not a Belted Kingfisher, nor even the long-staying
Ringed Kingfisher that was there for a few years, but the Common Kingfisher of
Eurasia and North Africa.

In the Northern Louisiana section, they mention that you can see Horned Grebes
in the winter, but the photo they used is of a breeding plumage bird we are
distinctly unlikely to see in the state. And in the section on the coast, when
describing the birds that can be seen at Peveto Woods, they refer to grosbeaks,
but we're treated not to a Rose-breasted or Blue Grosbeak, or even a
Black-headed, but an Evening Grosbeak. At least they didn't use a Yellow
Grosbeak or a Pine Grosbeak - small blessings, I suppose.

There's a digital edition at http://www.myneworleans.com/Louisiana-Life/
(right-hand side of that page).



Kevin Morgan
Baton Rouge LA
 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/18 1:57 pm
From: Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting and Fall Meeting
It was indeed a good spring meeting. We had 72 folks registered for the meeting.

We are looking forward to the fall meeting, which we are planning to hold in Cameron. Since we don’t know what the timeline is for the proposed LNG plant, we are recommending that if you think you might be attending the fall meeting and plan to stay at the Cameron Motel you should go ahead and make your reservation for October 25-26. I believe you can cancel 72 hours before the date of reservation.

We are also looking into some other dinner choices. The Anchor Up has done a good job with our menu but we realize that some folks would prefer a non-fried option. Information will be in the fall LOS News.

Thanks to all who attended. Hope to see you in the fall.

Judith

Judith O'Neale
Lafayette LA

From: Steven W. Cardiff
Sent: Tuesday, May 1, 2018 10:37 AM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting

Labirders-
Last weekend's LOS Spring Meeting at Cameron was a great success.
Although there weren't any blockbuster vagrants and the beaches were packed
with non-birders, everyone saw plenty of birds and the Friday and Saturday
night meetings were interesting and well attended. I want to especially
congratulate Dr. R. D. "Dan" Purrington, recipient of the 2018 George H.
Lowery Award. Well-deserved and overdue! We will post up the Saturday
bird list soon.

Donna Dittmann and I led the LOS Field Trip Series "Cameron Parish
Big Day" tour with 7 participants, which began at the Lacassine NWR HQ area
and subsequently visited other Cameron Parish locations including Lacassine
Pool, Sweet Lake, Rutherford Beach Road, Willow Island, and Davis Road/East
Jetty Beach. Although none of us saw every species, Donna and I had a
combined 155 species for the day, not bad given the distance covered, lack
of fallout conditions, and many "easy misses." Highlights were adult Bald
Eagle at Streeter Road, Northern Harrier at Lacassine Pool, Yellow-headed
Blackbirds at Sweet Lake, spectacular numbers of shorebirds at Rutherford
Beach Road, and Long-billed Curlew and Buff-breasted Sandpiper (Rec Center
fields) and Bronzed Cowbird at Willow Island. Of course, the group was
thrilled with point blank looks at Purple Gallinules, Wilson's Phalaropes,
Least Bitterns, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Veery, Gray-cheeked, Swainson's
and Wood thrushes (on the lawn at Willow Island), and Dickcissels eating
mulberry fruit (Pine Pasture Road).

Cheers,

Steve Cardiff
 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/18 9:50 am
From: Joelle Finley <jjf1946...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Continuing Long-tailed Ducks
2 female Long-tailed Ducks continue on Rutherford Beach east of the
entrance road just past the overflowing blue garbage barrel, about 3/4
miles from entrance road. Initially on the beach but entered the water and
stayed in the breakers. 11:30 a.m.
Joelle Finley, Ken Harris and Becky Lloyd
New Orleans
 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/18 8:37 am
From: Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] LOS Spring Meeting
Labirders-
Last weekend's LOS Spring Meeting at Cameron was a great success.
Although there weren't any blockbuster vagrants and the beaches were packed
with non-birders, everyone saw plenty of birds and the Friday and Saturday
night meetings were interesting and well attended. I want to especially
congratulate Dr. R. D. "Dan" Purrington, recipient of the 2018 George H.
Lowery Award. Well-deserved and overdue! We will post up the Saturday
bird list soon.

Donna Dittmann and I led the LOS Field Trip Series "Cameron Parish
Big Day" tour with 7 participants, which began at the Lacassine NWR HQ area
and subsequently visited other Cameron Parish locations including Lacassine
Pool, Sweet Lake, Rutherford Beach Road, Willow Island, and Davis Road/East
Jetty Beach. Although none of us saw every species, Donna and I had a
combined 155 species for the day, not bad given the distance covered, lack
of fallout conditions, and many "easy misses." Highlights were adult Bald
Eagle at Streeter Road, Northern Harrier at Lacassine Pool, Yellow-headed
Blackbirds at Sweet Lake, spectacular numbers of shorebirds at Rutherford
Beach Road, and Long-billed Curlew and Buff-breasted Sandpiper (Rec Center
fields) and Bronzed Cowbird at Willow Island. Of course, the group was
thrilled with point blank looks at Purple Gallinules, Wilson's Phalaropes,
Least Bitterns, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Veery, Gray-cheeked, Swainson's
and Wood thrushes (on the lawn at Willow Island), and Dickcissels eating
mulberry fruit (Pine Pasture Road).

Cheers,

Steve Cardiff
 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/18 6:10 am
From: Kevin Leigh <kevinleigh...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Cameron Parish
My wife and I birded Cameron Parish on Sunday. We tallied 93 species with only six warblers. Photos of our outing are at the following link:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/27240392@N05/albums/72157666436444597


Kevin Leigh
Arnaudville, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/18 4:24 am
From: Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Request for assistance - recordings of migrating Mourning Warbler songs
It is year 4 of this project and I am writing once again to post an
opportunity to participate in a Citizens Science Project that involves
recording migrating Mourning Warbler songs.I am interested in whether
different song populations of Mourning Warblers (Western, Eastern, Nova
Scotia, Newfoundland) migrate together or separately to their respective
areas of the species’ breeding range.All you need is a smartphone with a
voice recording app and some luck.The web page link below describes the
project and how to make recordings on your Smartphone in more
detail.There is also a link to the map with previous year’s results
based on recordings from many volunteers.

https://mowasongmapper.weebly.com/

Here is a link to the recent national Audubon Society story on this
research.

Audubon Society reporting

http://www.audubon.org/magazine/spring-2017/this-guy-mapping-how-warblers-migrate-just

Please send song recordings to the Mourning Warbler Sound Lab
(jpitocchATanselm.edu).

I would really appreciate your help and contributions this year to this
Citizens Science Project.

Dr. Jay Pitocchelli

Biology Department

Saint Anselm College

Manchester, NH 03102
 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/18 4:12 am
From: Mark Pethke <mdpethke...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] RB Grosbeak
A male has been at our feeders in SE Baton Rouge the past several days and
a female was present Saturday. Our last RB Grosbeak sighting in our yard
was 2007.
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 6:43 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Cliff Swallow Colonies and Whip-poor-will in CENLA
Did my bird walk around Industrial Street in southern Alexandria while getting my truck serviced this morning. Last year, there was a Cliff Swallow colony on one of the bridges at the two ends of the street. These cross a "diversion" canal. Today, there were remains of mud nests with a few Barn Swallows either using or renovating them. I've seen this situation before where one year there are many, many Cliff Swallow nests on bridge structure and the following year, nothing but deteriorating mud nests. Seems to be an interesting situation.

About 8:07 PM tonight, pretty dark here at Cotile Lake in NW Rapides Parish, I made a cast and was reeling in my lure when I could swear I was hearing an Eastern Whip-poor-will calling from out over the southeast arm of the lake. Well, as luck would have it, a nice white perch (black crappie) struck and I didn't have time to stop and pull out my iphone and play the call/song. Did land the fish! My attention was diverted by the fish - supper Wednesday night - but the bird was clearly flying and calling covering some hundreds of yards in front of me.

Jay Huner
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 6:33 pm
From: Terri Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Bobolinks in Baton Rouge
I have an assignment on someroulas in Baton Rouge in the afternoon. I'd like to try to see bobolinks if they are still around. Any recommendations of areas I can drive by safely that I may be able to spot them?

Terri D. Skelton
Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 27, 2018, at 7:52 PM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
>
> LABIRD: locals interested in Bobolinks: the grassy fields on River Road west of Ben Hur had several singing males late this afternoon (as well as a number of territorial Dickcissels, these also for first half-mile east as well). I strongly recommend NOT going there except on weekends, and even then being very careful ‚ÄĒ too much traffic and almost nowhere to pull off.
>
> ===================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najames<at>LSU.edu
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 6:22 pm
From: Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Pat Lonnecker
Paul, that was beautiful and makes me more sure in my effort to become a
true birder that not only loves the birds but wants to bird in protection
of the birds and nature. They are a harbinger for almost everything. Thank
you. Mjimenez

On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 4:06 PM, Paul Dickson <Paul...>
wrote:

> LABIRD: Long-time Shreveport LOS member Pat Lonnecker died yesterday. Pat
> was a birder before birding was cool. Pat's interest in birds continued
> beyond the untimely death of her ornithologist husband and rubbed off on
> many friends. She was truly beloved in the NW LA birding clique for 50
> years .
> I grew up in her neighborhood. Straightforward and generous, she supported
> my interest in birds and in conservation many times over. I attended my
> first spring LOS meeting in Cameron at about age 12 because Pat told Horace
> Jeter that I was old enough and that he should take me. She frequently told
> Horace what to do and when she did, he did it. She was right. I saw the big
> league, met Lowery and Newman et al, and picked a direction. At age 15, I
> played her a bird song I had recorded on a cheap recorder and she promptly
> went into a closet and got out her late husband's parabola and microphone,
> and then handed it to me along with a demonstration on how to tune it. 10
> minutes elapsed time to start something that has continued since. Many
> years, and much kindness later, she helped with the creation of the Red
> River National Wildlife Refuge by making sure that I remembered that it
> would be worth the work. When it was done, she and several others made me a
> quilt which I treasure. Even when her vision was nearly gone, she went out
> birding with friends, went on a CBC, attended BSG meetings. Pat seemed to
> always know the right thing to do and had a matter of fact way of
> inspiring. And she loved birds.
> Paul Dickson
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 4:36 pm
From: Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
Mac et al.-
Shrikes, Eastern Kingbirds, meadowlarks, Orchard Orioles, Common
Nighthawks all seem to be getting decimated in ag areas. Northern
Mockingbirds, Red-winged Blackbirds, etc. seem to be more resilient.
Would be an interesting project. Neonicotinoid pesticides are often
mentioned as a major contributing factor. Need more studies. Meanwhile,
shrikes are quickly approaching "Threatened" status.....

Steve Cardiff

On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 4:37 PM, Mac Myers <budogmacm...> wrote:

> How about Eastern Kingbirds? They appear to be in "normal" numbers once one
> gets to the southern edge of rice country, near the marsh interface, But in
> the rice country proper, it seems to me they have suffered drastic declines
> within the last ten years, mostly in the last five. Perhaps it is merely
> coincidental, but this is the same time period in which genetically
> modified, herbicide resistant (readily recognized because they are
> drill-planted in rows) rice varieties have come to dominate in the region.
> Fields of these rice varieties require far less water (formerly used to
> suppress weeds such as red rice) and appear to provide far less good
> habitat for shorebirds. Instead, the weeds are destroyed by the aerial
> application of herbicides (which the older rice varieties could not have
> withstood). Do these herbicides deplete the insect prey base? Are these
> herbicides finding their way into insect populations and subsequently into
> kingbirds, shrikes, and meadowlarks? It may be mere coincidence, but it
> might be worth investigating.
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_
> source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_
> source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#m_-1767667236357818191_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>
> On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 1:03 PM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
>
> > I looked for an all-day April rice country list from 1980s and turned up
> > my 1988 list from northern Vermilion Par., literally on the other side of
> > Bayou Queue de Tortue from Saturday’s list:
> >
> > 126 Loggerhead Shrikes in 60 miles.
> >
> > Also 2 Bobwhites and 94 E. Meadowlarks ‚ÄĒ more signs of times gone bye-bye
> >
> >
> > ===================
> >
> > Dr. J. V. Remsen
> > Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> > Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> > LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> > najames<at>LSU.edu
> >
> > > On Apr 30, 2018, at 12:07 PM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
> > >
> > > LABIRD: indeed, very scary. Based on birds/road mile in the late
> 1980s,
> > I should have had at least 1 pair per mile in ag habitat. i.e. about 40
> on
> > my ebird lists totals for the sites with good habitat. I had 4 birds. I
> > don’t remember any others in the between-site intervals either, which
> would
> > have doubled my mileage had I kept track of birds. It is sad to think
> that
> > back in the 80s and 90s, we thought that our dense rice-country
> populations
> > were immune to whatever was causing declines elsewhere in USA.
> > >
> > > ===================
> > >
> > > Dr. J. V. Remsen
> > > Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> > > Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> > > LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> > > najames<at>LSU.edu
> > >
> > >> On Apr 30, 2018, at 11:48 AM, Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
> > wrote:
> > >>
> > >> How many Loggerhead Shrikes?
> > >>
> > >> Donna and I cruised through Jeff DAvis on Friday afternoon and
> Saturday
> > and had zero shrikes. Finally saw a few along Rossignol and Fruge and
> then
> > they are somewhat more conspicuous along the immediate coast. Scary.
> > >>
> > >> Steve Cardiff
> > >>
> > >> On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 11:29 AM, James V Remsen <najames...>
> > wrote:
> > >> LABIRD: Given the unusually high number of land bird migrants inland
> in
> > Louisiana, I decided to spend Saturday looking for them in Acadia and
> Jeff
> > Davis parishes, both of which suffer from sampling artifacts in terms of
> > few records of land bird migrants. As just one example, Jeff. Davis has
> no
> > spring record of Magnolia or Am. Redstart!
> > >>
> > >> As expected, volume was low. Quality, however, made up for that in
> > terms of a male Cerulean Warbler, 1 Philadelphia and 1 Warbling Vireo,
> and
> > 1 Scissor-tailed in Acadia, and Chestnut-sideds in both Acadia and Jeff.
> > Davis.
> > >>
> > >> Additional migrants: INBU 8, Red-eyed 7, Catbird 6, Blue Grosbeak 5,
> > Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4, Summer Tanager 4, Baltimore Oriole 3, 2 each of
> > Ruby-throat, Acadian F., Swainson’s Thrush, Wood Thrush, Black-and-white,
> > and singles of Tennessee, Yellow W., Chat, Scarlet Tanager, Orchard
> > Oriole. If I’d been able to get out there a couple of days earlier,
> > warbler totals would likely have been higher.
> > >>
> > >> Also of minor interest: a likely new Cave Swallow breeding site in
> > southern Acadia.
> > >>
> > >> Shorebirds: remarkably scarce, as has been my impression all spring.
> > As noted by Matt and others, good habitat is increasingly scarce, but
> even
> > fields that looked like they should be loaded were nearly devoid of
> birds.
> > >>
> > >> Van Remsen
> > >>
> > >> ===================
> > >>
> > >> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> > >> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> > >> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> > >> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> > >> najames<at>LSU.edu
> > >>
> > >>
> > >
> >
> >
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 3:09 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] RB Grosbeak
For what it's worth, I had a male and female today - at least detected - at my home at Cotile Lake in NW Rapides Parish. A friend who lives in southern Grant Parish basically east of here had 5+ at her feeders today and has had as many for the past several days.

Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Nancy L Newfield" <nancy...>
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, April 30, 2018 4:34:27 PM
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] RB Grosbeak

Thanks for the report. I usually see a smattering of Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks through late April and the first week of May. I counted a dozen
at one time this morning. I have been out since about noon and just
counted 5 on the feeders. I also observed a White-winged Dove yesterday
and today as well as a Painted Bunting yesterday and an Indigo Bunting or
two both days.

Mississippi Kites arrived here over the weekend. This is a late first
arrival for me, but . . .

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were late arriving, but now I am seeing as many
as 3 daily.

Nan

On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 2:43 PM, Hans van Beek <hvanbeek...> wrote:

> Indeed an unusual year. Until this Saturday had not seen a RBGB on my
> feeders for at least 4 or 5 tears. Now had 3 males for several hours and a
> female that has hung around for 3 days so far.
> University Acres
> Baton Rouge
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 2:38 pm
From: Mac Myers <budogmacm...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
How about Eastern Kingbirds? They appear to be in "normal" numbers once one
gets to the southern edge of rice country, near the marsh interface, But in
the rice country proper, it seems to me they have suffered drastic declines
within the last ten years, mostly in the last five. Perhaps it is merely
coincidental, but this is the same time period in which genetically
modified, herbicide resistant (readily recognized because they are
drill-planted in rows) rice varieties have come to dominate in the region.
Fields of these rice varieties require far less water (formerly used to
suppress weeds such as red rice) and appear to provide far less good
habitat for shorebirds. Instead, the weeds are destroyed by the aerial
application of herbicides (which the older rice varieties could not have
withstood). Do these herbicides deplete the insect prey base? Are these
herbicides finding their way into insect populations and subsequently into
kingbirds, shrikes, and meadowlarks? It may be mere coincidence, but it
might be worth investigating.

<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
www.avast.com
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<#m_-1767667236357818191_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 1:03 PM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:

> I looked for an all-day April rice country list from 1980s and turned up
> my 1988 list from northern Vermilion Par., literally on the other side of
> Bayou Queue de Tortue from Saturday’s list:
>
> 126 Loggerhead Shrikes in 60 miles.
>
> Also 2 Bobwhites and 94 E. Meadowlarks ‚ÄĒ more signs of times gone bye-bye
>
>
> ===================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najames<at>LSU.edu
>
> > On Apr 30, 2018, at 12:07 PM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
> >
> > LABIRD: indeed, very scary. Based on birds/road mile in the late 1980s,
> I should have had at least 1 pair per mile in ag habitat. i.e. about 40 on
> my ebird lists totals for the sites with good habitat. I had 4 birds. I
> don’t remember any others in the between-site intervals either, which would
> have doubled my mileage had I kept track of birds. It is sad to think that
> back in the 80s and 90s, we thought that our dense rice-country populations
> were immune to whatever was causing declines elsewhere in USA.
> >
> > ===================
> >
> > Dr. J. V. Remsen
> > Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> > Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> > LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> > najames<at>LSU.edu
> >
> >> On Apr 30, 2018, at 11:48 AM, Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> How many Loggerhead Shrikes?
> >>
> >> Donna and I cruised through Jeff DAvis on Friday afternoon and Saturday
> and had zero shrikes. Finally saw a few along Rossignol and Fruge and then
> they are somewhat more conspicuous along the immediate coast. Scary.
> >>
> >> Steve Cardiff
> >>
> >> On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 11:29 AM, James V Remsen <najames...>
> wrote:
> >> LABIRD: Given the unusually high number of land bird migrants inland in
> Louisiana, I decided to spend Saturday looking for them in Acadia and Jeff
> Davis parishes, both of which suffer from sampling artifacts in terms of
> few records of land bird migrants. As just one example, Jeff. Davis has no
> spring record of Magnolia or Am. Redstart!
> >>
> >> As expected, volume was low. Quality, however, made up for that in
> terms of a male Cerulean Warbler, 1 Philadelphia and 1 Warbling Vireo, and
> 1 Scissor-tailed in Acadia, and Chestnut-sideds in both Acadia and Jeff.
> Davis.
> >>
> >> Additional migrants: INBU 8, Red-eyed 7, Catbird 6, Blue Grosbeak 5,
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4, Summer Tanager 4, Baltimore Oriole 3, 2 each of
> Ruby-throat, Acadian F., Swainson’s Thrush, Wood Thrush, Black-and-white,
> and singles of Tennessee, Yellow W., Chat, Scarlet Tanager, Orchard
> Oriole. If I’d been able to get out there a couple of days earlier,
> warbler totals would likely have been higher.
> >>
> >> Also of minor interest: a likely new Cave Swallow breeding site in
> southern Acadia.
> >>
> >> Shorebirds: remarkably scarce, as has been my impression all spring.
> As noted by Matt and others, good habitat is increasingly scarce, but even
> fields that looked like they should be loaded were nearly devoid of birds.
> >>
> >> Van Remsen
> >>
> >> ===================
> >>
> >> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> >> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> >> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> >> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> >> najames<at>LSU.edu
> >>
> >>
> >
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 2:35 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] RB Grosbeak
Thanks for the report. I usually see a smattering of Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks through late April and the first week of May. I counted a dozen
at one time this morning. I have been out since about noon and just
counted 5 on the feeders. I also observed a White-winged Dove yesterday
and today as well as a Painted Bunting yesterday and an Indigo Bunting or
two both days.

Mississippi Kites arrived here over the weekend. This is a late first
arrival for me, but . . .

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were late arriving, but now I am seeing as many
as 3 daily.

Nan

On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 2:43 PM, Hans van Beek <hvanbeek...> wrote:

> Indeed an unusual year. Until this Saturday had not seen a RBGB on my
> feeders for at least 4 or 5 tears. Now had 3 males for several hours and a
> female that has hung around for 3 days so far.
> University Acres
> Baton Rouge
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 2:19 pm
From: Matt Brady <podoces...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] LSUMNS Big Day results
Hello all. On April 26th, three LSUMNS grad student (Glaucia Del Rio, Oscar
Johnson, and myself) and an undergrad (Marky Mutchler) ran our annual
LSUMNS big day fundraiser. It was a great day, and despite missing a suite
of pretty easy species, we ended up with a total of 204 species. A detailed
account will follow in the LSUMNS newsletter, but briefly we started at
midnight in Baton Rouge with an American Robin and other stake-out and
nocturnal species (including a long-staying Greater White-fronted Goose),
made a few stops at Whiskey Bay and in the Rice Country, then were in
Kisatchie National Forest for dawn. Our first really big highlight was a
surprise fallout of migrants at Kincaid Reservoir: in 62 minutes we managed
to record 62 species, including large numbers of Baltimore Orioles, several
Warbling Vireos, large numbers of Yellow-rumped Warblers (our only ones of
the day) among 14 species of warblers, and a selection of other migrants.
Along Castor Plunge Road, we recorded a Nashville Warbler, one of only a
handful of spring records from central Louisiana. By the time we left
Woodworth at 8:30, we were already over 100 species. We then dropped down
to the rice country via US 165, where we added a number of other species
(but not the hoped-for shorebirds), including a female Brewer's Blackbird
and a Franklin's Gull along Patterson Road, and a big flock (~1000) of
Fulvous Whistling-Ducks on Cormier Village Road. South of I-10, we picked
up a few additional species along Fruge, and a few more at Cameron Prairie
NWR. We made it to the coast by 12:45, and added most of the usual migrants
as we hit the usual coastal hotspots (Oak Grove, Rutherford Beach, Willow
Island, East Jetty, Peveto). By 5:30, we were on our way to Lighthouse
Woods (securing permission for this restricted access site well in
advance), but were tragically turned back at the security checkpoint due to
a fire at the nearby Cheniere LNG facility. At this point we had little
hope of shooting for the record (221 species), so we opted to go back to
Peveto to comb through the abundance of migrants a little more thoroughly.
A heard only Swamp Sparrow near the pond was our last species of the day.

Our complete list can be found here:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45008405. If you look closely, you'll
note some of our bad misses, including: Anhinga, Black-crowned Night-Heron,
Glossy Ibis, American Golden-Plover, Marbled Godwit, Dunlin(!),
White-rumped Sandpiper(!!), Gull-billed Tern, Northern Rough-winged
Swallow, Worm-eating Warbler, Cerulean Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler,
Bobolink, and Bronzed Cowbird. With a bit of luck, the record could have
been within our grasp. Despite this, we still had a great time, and managed
to see a very nice selection of Louisiana's birdlife in a relatively short
amount of time. Thank you to all who donated!

Good birding,

Matt Brady and the 2018 LSUMNS team
Baton Rouge
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 2:07 pm
From: Paul Dickson <Paul...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Pat Lonnecker
LABIRD: Long-time Shreveport LOS member Pat Lonnecker died yesterday. Pat was a birder before birding was cool. Pat's interest in birds continued beyond the untimely death of her ornithologist husband and rubbed off on many friends. She was truly beloved in the NW LA birding clique for 50 years .
I grew up in her neighborhood. Straightforward and generous, she supported my interest in birds and in conservation many times over. I attended my first spring LOS meeting in Cameron at about age 12 because Pat told Horace Jeter that I was old enough and that he should take me. She frequently told Horace what to do and when she did, he did it. She was right. I saw the big league, met Lowery and Newman et al, and picked a direction. At age 15, I played her a bird song I had recorded on a cheap recorder and she promptly went into a closet and got out her late husband's parabola and microphone, and then handed it to me along with a demonstration on how to tune it. 10 minutes elapsed time to start something that has continued since. Many years, and much kindness later, she helped with the creation of the Red River National Wildlife Refuge by making sure that I remembered that it would be worth the work. When it was done, she and several others made me a quilt which I treasure. Even when her vision was nearly gone, she went out birding with friends, went on a CBC, attended BSG meetings. Pat seemed to always know the right thing to do and had a matter of fact way of inspiring. And she loved birds.
Paul Dickson
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 12:43 pm
From: Hans van Beek <hvanbeek...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] RB Grosbeak
Indeed an unusual year. Until this Saturday had not seen a RBGB on my
feeders for at least 4 or 5 tears. Now had 3 males for several hours and a
female that has hung around for 3 days so far.
University Acres
Baton Rouge
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 11:04 am
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
I looked for an all-day April rice country list from 1980s and turned up my 1988 list from northern Vermilion Par., literally on the other side of Bayou Queue de Tortue from Saturday’s list:

126 Loggerhead Shrikes in 60 miles.

Also 2 Bobwhites and 94 E. Meadowlarks ‚ÄĒ more signs of times gone bye-bye


===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu

> On Apr 30, 2018, at 12:07 PM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
>
> LABIRD: indeed, very scary. Based on birds/road mile in the late 1980s, I should have had at least 1 pair per mile in ag habitat. i.e. about 40 on my ebird lists totals for the sites with good habitat. I had 4 birds. I don’t remember any others in the between-site intervals either, which would have doubled my mileage had I kept track of birds. It is sad to think that back in the 80s and 90s, we thought that our dense rice-country populations were immune to whatever was causing declines elsewhere in USA.
>
> ===================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najames<at>LSU.edu
>
>> On Apr 30, 2018, at 11:48 AM, Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> wrote:
>>
>> How many Loggerhead Shrikes?
>>
>> Donna and I cruised through Jeff DAvis on Friday afternoon and Saturday and had zero shrikes. Finally saw a few along Rossignol and Fruge and then they are somewhat more conspicuous along the immediate coast. Scary.
>>
>> Steve Cardiff
>>
>> On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 11:29 AM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
>> LABIRD: Given the unusually high number of land bird migrants inland in Louisiana, I decided to spend Saturday looking for them in Acadia and Jeff Davis parishes, both of which suffer from sampling artifacts in terms of few records of land bird migrants. As just one example, Jeff. Davis has no spring record of Magnolia or Am. Redstart!
>>
>> As expected, volume was low. Quality, however, made up for that in terms of a male Cerulean Warbler, 1 Philadelphia and 1 Warbling Vireo, and 1 Scissor-tailed in Acadia, and Chestnut-sideds in both Acadia and Jeff. Davis.
>>
>> Additional migrants: INBU 8, Red-eyed 7, Catbird 6, Blue Grosbeak 5, Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4, Summer Tanager 4, Baltimore Oriole 3, 2 each of Ruby-throat, Acadian F., Swainson’s Thrush, Wood Thrush, Black-and-white, and singles of Tennessee, Yellow W., Chat, Scarlet Tanager, Orchard Oriole. If I’d been able to get out there a couple of days earlier, warbler totals would likely have been higher.
>>
>> Also of minor interest: a likely new Cave Swallow breeding site in southern Acadia.
>>
>> Shorebirds: remarkably scarce, as has been my impression all spring. As noted by Matt and others, good habitat is increasingly scarce, but even fields that looked like they should be loaded were nearly devoid of birds.
>>
>> Van Remsen
>>
>> ===================
>>
>> Dr. J. V. Remsen
>> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
>> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
>> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
>> najames<at>LSU.edu
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 10:33 am
From: Jay Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Cerulean Warbler Acadia Par. 4/28 Srikes
I was in the Jeff Davis landfill area and northward on La 192 into Allen Parish. I probably saw 4-5 shrikes but didn’t record them. Similar number in Fruge Road region in Calcasieu Parish.

Today had two maybe three shrikes I the Industrial Street area of urban Alexandria. Louisiana.

Jay Huner

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 30, 2018, at 11:48 AM, Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> wrote:
>
> How many Loggerhead Shrikes?
>
> Donna and I cruised through Jeff DAvis on Friday afternoon and Saturday and
> had zero shrikes. Finally saw a few along Rossignol and Fruge and then
> they are somewhat more conspicuous along the immediate coast. Scary.
>
> Steve Cardiff
>
>> On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 11:29 AM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
>>
>> LABIRD: Given the unusually high number of land bird migrants inland in
>> Louisiana, I decided to spend Saturday looking for them in Acadia and Jeff
>> Davis parishes, both of which suffer from sampling artifacts in terms of
>> few records of land bird migrants. As just one example, Jeff. Davis has no
>> spring record of Magnolia or Am. Redstart!
>>
>> As expected, volume was low. Quality, however, made up for that in terms
>> of a male Cerulean Warbler, 1 Philadelphia and 1 Warbling Vireo, and 1
>> Scissor-tailed in Acadia, and Chestnut-sideds in both Acadia and Jeff.
>> Davis.
>>
>> Additional migrants: INBU 8, Red-eyed 7, Catbird 6, Blue Grosbeak 5,
>> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4, Summer Tanager 4, Baltimore Oriole 3, 2 each of
>> Ruby-throat, Acadian F., Swainson’s Thrush, Wood Thrush, Black-and-white,
>> and singles of Tennessee, Yellow W., Chat, Scarlet Tanager, Orchard
>> Oriole. If I’d been able to get out there a couple of days earlier,
>> warbler totals would likely have been higher.
>>
>> Also of minor interest: a likely new Cave Swallow breeding site in
>> southern Acadia.
>>
>> Shorebirds: remarkably scarce, as has been my impression all spring. As
>> noted by Matt and others, good habitat is increasingly scarce, but even
>> fields that looked like they should be loaded were nearly devoid of birds.
>>
>> Van Remsen
>>
>> ===================
>>
>> Dr. J. V. Remsen
>> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
>> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
>> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
>> najames<at>LSU.edu
>>
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 10:07 am
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Loggerhead Shrike declines
LABIRD: indeed, very scary. Based on birds/road mile in the late 1980s, I should have had at least 1 pair per mile in ag habitat. i.e. about 40 on my ebird lists totals for the sites with good habitat. I had 4 birds. I don’t remember any others in the between-site intervals either, which would have doubled my mileage had I kept track of birds. It is sad to think that back in the 80s and 90s, we thought that our dense rice-country populations were immune to whatever was causing declines elsewhere in USA.

===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu

> On Apr 30, 2018, at 11:48 AM, Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> wrote:
>
> How many Loggerhead Shrikes?
>
> Donna and I cruised through Jeff DAvis on Friday afternoon and Saturday and had zero shrikes. Finally saw a few along Rossignol and Fruge and then they are somewhat more conspicuous along the immediate coast. Scary.
>
> Steve Cardiff
>
> On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 11:29 AM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:
> LABIRD: Given the unusually high number of land bird migrants inland in Louisiana, I decided to spend Saturday looking for them in Acadia and Jeff Davis parishes, both of which suffer from sampling artifacts in terms of few records of land bird migrants. As just one example, Jeff. Davis has no spring record of Magnolia or Am. Redstart!
>
> As expected, volume was low. Quality, however, made up for that in terms of a male Cerulean Warbler, 1 Philadelphia and 1 Warbling Vireo, and 1 Scissor-tailed in Acadia, and Chestnut-sideds in both Acadia and Jeff. Davis.
>
> Additional migrants: INBU 8, Red-eyed 7, Catbird 6, Blue Grosbeak 5, Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4, Summer Tanager 4, Baltimore Oriole 3, 2 each of Ruby-throat, Acadian F., Swainson’s Thrush, Wood Thrush, Black-and-white, and singles of Tennessee, Yellow W., Chat, Scarlet Tanager, Orchard Oriole. If I’d been able to get out there a couple of days earlier, warbler totals would likely have been higher.
>
> Also of minor interest: a likely new Cave Swallow breeding site in southern Acadia.
>
> Shorebirds: remarkably scarce, as has been my impression all spring. As noted by Matt and others, good habitat is increasingly scarce, but even fields that looked like they should be loaded were nearly devoid of birds.
>
> Van Remsen
>
> ===================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najames<at>LSU.edu
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 9:48 am
From: Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Cerulean Warbler Acadia Par. 4/28
How many Loggerhead Shrikes?

Donna and I cruised through Jeff DAvis on Friday afternoon and Saturday and
had zero shrikes. Finally saw a few along Rossignol and Fruge and then
they are somewhat more conspicuous along the immediate coast. Scary.

Steve Cardiff

On Mon, Apr 30, 2018 at 11:29 AM, James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:

> LABIRD: Given the unusually high number of land bird migrants inland in
> Louisiana, I decided to spend Saturday looking for them in Acadia and Jeff
> Davis parishes, both of which suffer from sampling artifacts in terms of
> few records of land bird migrants. As just one example, Jeff. Davis has no
> spring record of Magnolia or Am. Redstart!
>
> As expected, volume was low. Quality, however, made up for that in terms
> of a male Cerulean Warbler, 1 Philadelphia and 1 Warbling Vireo, and 1
> Scissor-tailed in Acadia, and Chestnut-sideds in both Acadia and Jeff.
> Davis.
>
> Additional migrants: INBU 8, Red-eyed 7, Catbird 6, Blue Grosbeak 5,
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4, Summer Tanager 4, Baltimore Oriole 3, 2 each of
> Ruby-throat, Acadian F., Swainson’s Thrush, Wood Thrush, Black-and-white,
> and singles of Tennessee, Yellow W., Chat, Scarlet Tanager, Orchard
> Oriole. If I’d been able to get out there a couple of days earlier,
> warbler totals would likely have been higher.
>
> Also of minor interest: a likely new Cave Swallow breeding site in
> southern Acadia.
>
> Shorebirds: remarkably scarce, as has been my impression all spring. As
> noted by Matt and others, good habitat is increasingly scarce, but even
> fields that looked like they should be loaded were nearly devoid of birds.
>
> Van Remsen
>
> ===================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najames<at>LSU.edu
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 9:35 am
From: cecil tarver <exk5hdl...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] white wing dove
had my fist ever white wing dove on my feeder this morning

--
Cecil Tarver
8273 Aubin St
Denham Springs
La
70726

<exk5hdl...>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/18 9:29 am
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Cerulean Warbler Acadia Par. 4/28
LABIRD: Given the unusually high number of land bird migrants inland in Louisiana, I decided to spend Saturday looking for them in Acadia and Jeff Davis parishes, both of which suffer from sampling artifacts in terms of few records of land bird migrants. As just one example, Jeff. Davis has no spring record of Magnolia or Am. Redstart!

As expected, volume was low. Quality, however, made up for that in terms of a male Cerulean Warbler, 1 Philadelphia and 1 Warbling Vireo, and 1 Scissor-tailed in Acadia, and Chestnut-sideds in both Acadia and Jeff. Davis.

Additional migrants: INBU 8, Red-eyed 7, Catbird 6, Blue Grosbeak 5, Rose-breasted Grosbeak 4, Summer Tanager 4, Baltimore Oriole 3, 2 each of Ruby-throat, Acadian F., Swainson’s Thrush, Wood Thrush, Black-and-white, and singles of Tennessee, Yellow W., Chat, Scarlet Tanager, Orchard Oriole. If I’d been able to get out there a couple of days earlier, warbler totals would likely have been higher.

Also of minor interest: a likely new Cave Swallow breeding site in southern Acadia.

Shorebirds: remarkably scarce, as has been my impression all spring. As noted by Matt and others, good habitat is increasingly scarce, but even fields that looked like they should be loaded were nearly devoid of birds.

Van Remsen

===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/18 8:03 pm
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] SE LA departure
I just (9:20) counted six apparent northbound songbird migrants silhouetted against the full moon in five minutes, a fairly good rate. It matches radar echoes that appear to be starting to arise from areas south of New Orleans.


A few more notes are on my blog, birdingneworleans.blogspot.com, together with a pic of a Wood Thrush I found at 10 pm last night stunned in front of a hotel facade on the West Bank in Harvey, which presumably was attempting to leave last night (when radar showed a departure as well).


PY

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/18 6:18 pm
From: H. Putnam <0000003a70918a06-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Broad-tailed Hummingbird
Delighted to have a mature male Broad-tailed Hummingbird at the home of Bob and Darlene Daigle in Basile, Acadia Parish,  Louisiana.  He made his appearance yesterday, April 28th and was still buzzing around late this afternoon.  
Helena PutnamBasile, LASW Evangeline Parishalong the banks of Bayou Nezpique
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/18 6:08 am
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
LABIRDers,

The 'Grosbeak Show' seems to be slacking off. Maximum so far today has
been 11.

Nan

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 9:06 AM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
wrote:

>
> I'm seeing another day of heavy Rose-breasted Grosbeak traffic at the
> feeders, which I am keeping well-stocked with sunflower seed. I need to
> put more peanut butter suet out, too.
>
> Just a few minutes ago, I counted 15 Grosbeaks on the feeder, but
> something spooked them all and now they are gone . . . maybe for a little
> while, maybe for good. Fun while it lasts . . .
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/18 2:44 am
From: Evelyn Cooper <emcooper...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] red bellied woodpecker
I have many, many natural cavities all around my property and my yard. I have at least two pairs of Red-bellied Woodpeckers that come to my feeder year round. They bring their young to the feeder too. I know they are not nesting in any of my nestboxes, so they are nesting in the natural cavities. I also have Red-headed Woodpeckers do the same. Plus, I have a pair of Pileated Woodpeckers that have shown up a few times right outside my yard and pecked on trees. They have never come to the feeder.
Evelyn Cooper
Delhi, LA
www.labayoubluebirdsociety.org


-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Mary Jimenez
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 7:10 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] red bellied woodpecker

I have a pair of red-bellied woodpeckers nesting in a rather dead pecan tree in my backyard. Unusual or not so much? I've been reading but have not determined.

I also saw my first up close yellow warbler today thanks to some binoculars. A male.

I don't know if it's important but my backyard is a public golf course in a old neighborhood, so lots of old trees.

Mjimenez
NW Louisiana
 

Back to top
Date: 4/28/18 7:58 pm
From: Jed Pitre <feralbiologist...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Black-whiskered Vireo
Sorry for the late post.

Delaina LeBlanc and I found a Black-whiskered Vireo
today in Grand Isle State Park near the fishing pier.

eBird report: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S45050631

Jed Pitre
Thibodaux, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 4/28/18 7:23 pm
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Willet flock at Lake Claiborne.
Had a flock of 84 Willets at Lake Claiborne in Claiborne Parish today. Parish record species. Photos/videos/vocal recordings. Very birdy day with 100 species, 21 of which were warblers.

John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/28/18 5:10 pm
From: Mary Jimenez <mary.jimenez509...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] red bellied woodpecker
I have a pair of red-bellied woodpeckers nesting in a rather dead pecan
tree in my backyard. Unusual or not so much? I've been reading but have not
determined.

I also saw my first up close yellow warbler today thanks to some
binoculars. A male.

I don't know if it's important but my backyard is a public golf course in a
old neighborhood, so lots of old trees.

Mjimenez
NW Louisiana
 

Back to top
Date: 4/28/18 3:13 pm
From: Philip Bradley <pbradley60...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
I had my FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher in Shreveport at the intersection of E. Bert Kouns and E. Kings Hwy. It appeared to be a female given the tail length.

Phil Bradley
SE Shreveport

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 4/28/18 12:21 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
I was out all morning, banding hummingbirds and counting Grosbeaks in
Covington, but came home to fine 15 on the now empty feeders. The ratio of
males and females has now shifted to where females outnumber males by a
small margin. I'll keep serving sunflower seed as long as the show
continues.

Nan

On Sat, Apr 28, 2018 at 12:32 AM, Aelita J Pinter <apinter...> wrote:

> Bob, that's surprising since I live no more than 15 blocks from Aimée. In
> today's mob of RB grosbeaks, molting males (in a great variety of molt
> stages) and females outnumbered breeding-plumaged males.
>
>
> Lita
>
> ________________________________
> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <
> <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Bob Thomas <rathomas...>
> Sent: Friday, April 27, 2018 9:16 AM
> To: <LABIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
>
> I live about 1.5 mi from Nancy (as the grosbeck flies) and I hav 25 at the
> moment. Same pattern of daily visits she has been reporting - including
> indigos. Daughter Aimee lives in NOLA near Nashville & Claiborne and has
> seen NONE.
>
> On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 9:06 AM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
> wrote:
>
> > I'm seeing another day of heavy Rose-breasted Grosbeak traffic at the
> > feeders, which I am keeping well-stocked with sunflower seed. I need to
> > put more peanut butter suet out, too.
> >
> > Just a few minutes ago, I counted 15 Grosbeaks on the feeder, but
> something
> > spooked them all and now they are gone . . . maybe for a little while,
> > maybe for good. Fun while it lasts . . .
> >
> > Nan
> > --
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > Nancy L Newfield
> > Casa Colibrí
> > Metairie, Louisiana USA
> > <nancy...>
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >
>
>
>
> --
> *Robert A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director*
> Loyola Distinguished Scholar Chair in Environmental Communication
> Center for Environmental Communication
> School of Mass Communication
> &
> Environmental Program Faculty
> Loyola University Box 199
> New Orleans, LA 70118 USA
> Office: 327 Communications/Music Complex
> Voice 504-865-2107
> Cell 504-909-6568
> Fax 504-865-3799
> @DrBobNatureNote
> https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=
> www.loyno.edu%2Flucec&data=01%7C01%<7Capinter...>%
> 7C52bc3fd3699247eba1d708d5ac4971c4%7C31d4dbf540044469bfeedf294a9d
> e150%7C0&sdata=rAMDl%2FCk0yFdK8%2BFIJ7UhKPe7vRrmJqZlSvPQ7ayTTU
> %3D&reserved=0
>
> NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is
> intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information
> that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under
> applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
> notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the
> information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this
> communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether
> in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately
> contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the
> telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 4/28/18 9:54 am
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Excellent morning at Corney Lake, Claiborne Parish.
20 warbler sp (including Chat), all 6 expected vireos, Black-billed Cuckoo, Swainson's Thrush.

John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/28/18 9:09 am
From: Heather Amuny <haamuny...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Sabine NWR Walkway
There are still a lot of birds at the walkway this morning. We saw Tennessee, Philadelphia, Chestnut-sided, Bay-breasted, Blackburnian, Worm-eating, Red-eyed Vireo, Baltimore, Orchard, Indigo, Blue Grosbeak, Green Heron nesting.
Heather and Jack Amuny

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/28/18 6:33 am
From: Puget Sound Birds <pugetsoundbird...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Major Headwinds Make it a Tough Day for migrants on Whiskey Is.
To add to the migration record, Landon Jones and I had a major movement of
migrants on Whiskey Is. yesterday while monitoring the beach nourishment
project there. There were many birds flying in from the Gulf in the
morning, with species like bay-breasted on the beach! The winds were not
too strong in the morning, and we saw some birds just kept on going. While
not having the opportunity to actually 'bird' we could not help document
many catbirds, thrushes and warblers, when they land at your feet! There
were, unfortunately, many casualties of this system. I came across a dead
scarlet tanager, 2 waterthrushes and 2 catbirds just lying on the sand.
All appear to be Second Year birds, facing their first journey north.
There must have been a major mortality from this late system.

Sorry I cannot be at the LOS meeting to give my hurrah to Dan Purrington,
but all I can say is that Dan has been a great mentor to me for the past,
well, many years...

don norman
Cocodrile, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 10:33 pm
From: Aelita J Pinter <apinter...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
Bob, that's surprising since I live no more than 15 blocks from Aimťe. In today's mob of RB grosbeaks, molting males (in a great variety of molt stages) and females outnumbered breeding-plumaged males.


Lita

________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Bob Thomas <rathomas...>
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2018 9:16 AM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks

I live about 1.5 mi from Nancy (as the grosbeck flies) and I hav 25 at the
moment. Same pattern of daily visits she has been reporting - including
indigos. Daughter Aimee lives in NOLA near Nashville & Claiborne and has
seen NONE.

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 9:06 AM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
wrote:

> I'm seeing another day of heavy Rose-breasted Grosbeak traffic at the
> feeders, which I am keeping well-stocked with sunflower seed. I need to
> put more peanut butter suet out, too.
>
> Just a few minutes ago, I counted 15 Grosbeaks on the feeder, but something
> spooked them all and now they are gone . . . maybe for a little while,
> maybe for good. Fun while it lasts . . .
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa ColibrŪ
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>



--
*Robert A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director*
Loyola Distinguished Scholar Chair in Environmental Communication
Center for Environmental Communication
School of Mass Communication
&
Environmental Program Faculty
Loyola University Box 199
New Orleans, LA 70118 USA
Office: 327 Communications/Music Complex
Voice 504-865-2107
Cell 504-909-6568
Fax 504-865-3799
@DrBobNatureNote
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.loyno.edu%2Flucec&data=01%7C01%<7Capinter...>%7C52bc3fd3699247eba1d708d5ac4971c4%7C31d4dbf540044469bfeedf294a9de150%7C0&sdata=rAMDl%2FCk0yFdK8%2BFIJ7UhKPe7vRrmJqZlSvPQ7ayTTU%3D&reserved=0

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 9:16 pm
From: David Muth <MuthD...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Strange things afoot on Rutherford Beach
A major influx was taking place this afternoon west of the ferry. We noted dozens of migrants in the beach scrub and in the salt cedars near the corral just west of Holly Beach. Peveto was full of birds dominated by Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, catbirds and thrushes but plenty of variety as well.

Unfortunately radar showed what looked like a big take off from the coast after it got dark.

We will see tomorrow,

David Muth
New Orleans

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 27, 2018, at 4:31 PM, Jody Shugart <jodyshugart...> wrote:
>
> There are no unusual amount of Migrant song birds at Rutherford Beach right
> now. Dozens of Baltimore Orioles and lots of Indigo Buntings. In the salt
> Cedar patch on the west side of the community I found black-and-white
> warblers, golden-winged warbler, Bay breasted warbler, as well as a Wood
> Thrush, great sheets thrush, and an unknown empid. No sign of the long
> tailed duck or Kittiwake.
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 6:01 pm
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Bobolinks in Baton Rouge
And for those near Washington parish, I saw 6 BOBO in the tall grass across
from the maintenance barn on Bethel Rd. See link for location.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44993992
Janine Robin

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018, 7:52 PM James V Remsen <najames...> wrote:

> LABIRD: locals interested in Bobolinks: the grassy fields on River Road
> west of Ben Hur had several singing males late this afternoon (as well as a
> number of territorial Dickcissels, these also for first half-mile east as
> well). I strongly recommend NOT going there except on weekends, and even
> then being very careful ‚ÄĒ too much traffic and almost nowhere to pull off.
>
> ===================
>
> Dr. J. V. Remsen
> Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
> Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
> LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> najames<at>LSU.edu
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 5:52 pm
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Bobolinks in Baton Rouge
LABIRD: locals interested in Bobolinks: the grassy fields on River Road west of Ben Hur had several singing males late this afternoon (as well as a number of territorial Dickcissels, these also for first half-mile east as well). I strongly recommend NOT going there except on weekends, and even then being very careful ‚ÄĒ too much traffic and almost nowhere to pull off.

===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu

 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 4:10 pm
From: Steven Liffmann - <sliffmann...> <sliffmann...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Purple Martins - Algiers Point
My FOS Purple Martins have arrived. 


Best regards, Steven Liffmann 
 266 Abalon CourtNew Orleans, La. 70114Cell# 504.416.1615Tel# 504.368.0961  Fax# 504.368.0962
Website: www.yoursourceforstone.com
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 2:31 pm
From: Jody Shugart <jodyshugart...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Strange things afoot on Rutherford Beach
There are no unusual amount of Migrant song birds at Rutherford Beach right
now. Dozens of Baltimore Orioles and lots of Indigo Buntings. In the salt
Cedar patch on the west side of the community I found black-and-white
warblers, golden-winged warbler, Bay breasted warbler, as well as a Wood
Thrush, great sheets thrush, and an unknown empid. No sign of the long
tailed duck or Kittiwake.
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 1:17 pm
From: James W. Beck <loxosceles928...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Veerys near Talisheek
We (Linda Kingsland and Tommy Walker and I) had 3 on private property in
Hahnville today, along with 6 Swainson's and 9 Wood Thrushes. All were
quite vocal, but only WOTH singing. -jz

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018, 3:03 PM Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...>
wrote:

> Today Tom and I had at least 7 Veerys in a large patch of bottomland
> hardwood forest east of Talisheek (private property).
>
> Jennifer
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 1:05 pm
From: Joelle Finley <jjf1946...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] YHBb
Yellow-headed Bb at 7943 Fruge Rd. By rice dryers. Male and female.
Joelle Finley
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 1:03 pm
From: Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Veerys near Talisheek
Today Tom and I had at least 7 Veerys in a large patch of bottomland
hardwood forest east of Talisheek (private property).

Jennifer
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 12:19 pm
From: Heather Amuny <haamuny...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Peveto Today
There are not as many birds as we had yesterday, but still a lot of variety:
Golden-wing, Blue-wing, Chestnut-sided, Bay-breasted, Black and White, Redstart, Hooded, Common Yellow-throat, Black-throated Green, Tennessee, Yellow Warbler, Red-eyed Vireo, Swainson’s Thrush, Gray-cheeked and Wood Thrush, Painted and Indigo Buntings, Summer and Scarlet Tanagers, Baltimore and Orchard Orioles, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and Catbirds.
Heather AMUNY

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 10:20 am
From: Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] 2 STKI over Grilletta on Grand Isle
Was just treated to two swallow tailed kites circling overhead in the
Grilletta tract on grand isle.

Jane Patterson
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 8:44 am
From: Jay Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Bird song in NE LA
Not a lot of diversity at Sabine Walkway but birds everywhere .

Jay Huner

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 27, 2018, at 8:01 AM, Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...> wrote:
>
> A quick walk around the yard was filled with bird song. Rose-breasted
> Grosbeaks, Indigo buntings, one each E. Bluebird, Orchard Oriole, Baltimore
> Oriole, House Finch, Mourning Dove, White-throated Sparrow, Carolina
> Wren--all singing or calling. Add in the wheezy call of Cedar Waxwings
> ready to eat more mulberries. Is anything left on the coast for LOS? I did
> not hear nor see any warblers. Hope some are still in Cameron.
> Roselie Overby
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 7:22 am
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
Folsom yard, seeing about 7 RBGR for about 4 or 5 days now. Still have 25+
INBU and one female BLGR. She (or one just like her) has been visiting the
yard for about a week. Saw FOS yard Kentucky warbler yesterday and hear it
singing today.
Janine Robin
St Tammany parish NW corner

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018, 9:16 AM Bob Thomas <rathomas...> wrote:

> I live about 1.5 mi from Nancy (as the grosbeck flies) and I hav 25 at the
> moment. Same pattern of daily visits she has been reporting - including
> indigos. Daughter Aimee lives in NOLA near Nashville & Claiborne and has
> seen NONE.
>
> On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 9:06 AM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
> wrote:
>
> > I'm seeing another day of heavy Rose-breasted Grosbeak traffic at the
> > feeders, which I am keeping well-stocked with sunflower seed. I need to
> > put more peanut butter suet out, too.
> >
> > Just a few minutes ago, I counted 15 Grosbeaks on the feeder, but
> something
> > spooked them all and now they are gone . . . maybe for a little while,
> > maybe for good. Fun while it lasts . . .
> >
> > Nan
> > --
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> > Nancy L Newfield
> > Casa Colibrí
> > Metairie, Louisiana USA
> > <nancy...>
> > ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> >
>
>
>
> --
> *Robert A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director*
> Loyola Distinguished Scholar Chair in Environmental Communication
> Center for Environmental Communication
> School of Mass Communication
> &
> Environmental Program Faculty
> Loyola University Box 199
> New Orleans, LA 70118 USA
> Office: 327 Communications/Music Complex
> Voice 504-865-2107
> Cell 504-909-6568
> Fax 504-865-3799
> @DrBobNatureNote
> www.loyno.edu/lucec
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 7:16 am
From: Bob Thomas <rathomas...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
I live about 1.5 mi from Nancy (as the grosbeck flies) and I hav 25 at the
moment. Same pattern of daily visits she has been reporting - including
indigos. Daughter Aimee lives in NOLA near Nashville & Claiborne and has
seen NONE.

On Fri, Apr 27, 2018 at 9:06 AM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
wrote:

> I'm seeing another day of heavy Rose-breasted Grosbeak traffic at the
> feeders, which I am keeping well-stocked with sunflower seed. I need to
> put more peanut butter suet out, too.
>
> Just a few minutes ago, I counted 15 Grosbeaks on the feeder, but something
> spooked them all and now they are gone . . . maybe for a little while,
> maybe for good. Fun while it lasts . . .
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>



--
*Robert A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director*
Loyola Distinguished Scholar Chair in Environmental Communication
Center for Environmental Communication
School of Mass Communication
&
Environmental Program Faculty
Loyola University Box 199
New Orleans, LA 70118 USA
Office: 327 Communications/Music Complex
Voice 504-865-2107
Cell 504-909-6568
Fax 504-865-3799
@DrBobNatureNote
www.loyno.edu/lucec
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 7:07 am
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] More Grosbeaks
I'm seeing another day of heavy Rose-breasted Grosbeak traffic at the
feeders, which I am keeping well-stocked with sunflower seed. I need to
put more peanut butter suet out, too.

Just a few minutes ago, I counted 15 Grosbeaks on the feeder, but something
spooked them all and now they are gone . . . maybe for a little while,
maybe for good. Fun while it lasts . . .

Nan
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 4/27/18 6:01 am
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Bird song in NE LA
A quick walk around the yard was filled with bird song. Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks, Indigo buntings, one each E. Bluebird, Orchard Oriole, Baltimore
Oriole, House Finch, Mourning Dove, White-throated Sparrow, Carolina
Wren--all singing or calling. Add in the wheezy call of Cedar Waxwings
ready to eat more mulberries. Is anything left on the coast for LOS? I did
not hear nor see any warblers. Hope some are still in Cameron.
Roselie Overby
 

Back to top
Date: 4/26/18 2:37 pm
From: Celeste Louque <000000ea3956ffb6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Swallow-tailed Kite and Mississippi Kite
Hey Birders,I saw a Swallow-tailed Kite while traveling on LA 642 in Paulina at 1:00pm today. It was flying just over the Live Oak trees near Murphy Road. We have also been spotting Mississippi Kites soaring above this week.
Good birding,Celeste LouquePaulina, LA (St. James Parish)
 

Back to top
Date: 4/26/18 1:55 pm
From: Steven Liffmann - <sliffmann...> <sliffmann...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Swallow tailed Kites (4)
Driving back to NOLA on I10 right past Gramercy I had 4 Swallow tailed Kites fly over below tree line, make that 5!!  Just now. 


Best regards, Steven Liffmann  266 Abalon CourtNew Orleans, La. 70114Cell# 504.416.1615Tel# 504.368.0961  Fax# 504.368.0962
Website: www.yoursourceforstone.com
 

Back to top
Date: 4/26/18 9:58 am
From: James W. Beck <loxosceles928...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Golden-winged Warbler, others - Virgil Forest, New Orleans (restricted access)
While working in Virgil Forest in New Orleans near Dillard University this
morning, there were quite a few migrants around, but I didn't have plenty
of time. Highlights were a singing male Golden-winged Warbler,
Gray-cheeked, Swainson's & Wood Thrushes and others. Entire list:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44962333

--
James W. Beck
City of New Orleans Mosquito & Termite Control Board
2100 Leon C. Simon Dr.
New Orleans, LA 70122
<loxosceles928...>
<jwbeck...>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/26/18 5:29 am
From: James W. Beck <loxosceles928...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks flycatching
There was an emergence of Camponotus pennsylvanicus (Black Carpenter Ant)
males yesterday and we noted the grosbeaks, Summer Tanagers, Great Crested
Flycatchers and mockingbirds all sallying out and capturing them. -jz

On Thu, Apr 26, 2018, 7:02 AM Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
wrote:

>
> JZ,
>
> Here in old Metairie, mine are also eating peanut butter suet. This
> morning, I counted 10 males and 4 females. They were coming in before
> daybreak. I suspect that the number of individuals is really higher than I
> can detect because some come in, then depart only to be replaced by an
> identical individual.
>
> A couple of Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks flew over low before daybreak as
> well.
>
> Nan
>
> On Wed, Apr 25, 2018 at 5:19 PM, James W. Beck <loxosceles928...>
> wrote:
>
>> Like Nancy and others, we are enjoying good numbers of RBGRs in our yard
>> (with up to 18 today!). A new foraging behavior in this species (for me,
>> I believe) is both sexes actively flycatching! I really don't recall ever
>> witnessing this in RBGRs... -jz
>>
>
>
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/26/18 5:02 am
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks flycatching
JZ,

Here in old Metairie, mine are also eating peanut butter suet. This
morning, I counted 10 males and 4 females. They were coming in before
daybreak. I suspect that the number of individuals is really higher than I
can detect because some come in, then depart only to be replaced by an
identical individual.

A couple of Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks flew over low before daybreak as
well.

Nan

On Wed, Apr 25, 2018 at 5:19 PM, James W. Beck <loxosceles928...>
wrote:

> Like Nancy and others, we are enjoying good numbers of RBGRs in our yard
> (with up to 18 today!). A new foraging behavior in this species (for me,
> I believe) is both sexes actively flycatching! I really don't recall ever
> witnessing this in RBGRs... -jz
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 4/25/18 6:21 pm
From: Paul Conover <zoiseaux...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] 2018 LBRC Newsletter now online!
Labird,

     A high point of every spring, the 2018 LBRC Newsletter is out, and
this year's model is a deluxe edition including 2 new first state
records and a great photo spread. Many thanks again to Donna Dittmann
for the massive amount of effort she puts into this undertaking every year.

http://www.losbird.org/lbrc/lbrc.htm


Paul Conover

Lafayette
 

Back to top
Date: 4/25/18 6:01 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jvh0660...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Continuing Black-legged Kittiwake, dearth of shorebirds, SW LA
Yes, rice farmers are dry till planting rice. Once it starts to come up, they'll put a shallow flood on it, let that go, and follow with a permanent flood once it gets 6" or so high. This reduces silt pollution from draining fields and greatly reduces the amount of water - water free, fuel to pump it out of the ground is not. Economics have forced farmers to modify farming practices.

Now, what you need is a failed crawfish field - no crop - which is being allowed to dry or which is being drained. The food resources in a system that has been flooded since September-October is a lot more bird friendly than a rice field that has been dry all winter and into the spring.

By the way, when looking for shorebird fields, you might do well to contact the area Parish Agent with the Cooperative Extension Service.

The fields off Musselwhite Road in Allen Parish north of Oberlin might be good based on the situation about 10 days ago.

Jay Huner

----- Original Message -----
From: "Matt Brady" <podoces...>
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:42:51 PM
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Continuing Black-legged Kittiwake, dearth of shorebirds, SW LA

Hi LABIRDers. I did a bit of scouting for the LSUMNS Big Day fundraiser
that is happening tomorrow (still not too late to donate! ‚Äď
http://www.lsu.edu/mns/news/2018/bigdayfundraiser-2018.php) in the Fruge
Road area of southern Calcasieu Parish. Almost all fields were depressingly
dry. Apparently rice farmers are using a new method to plant rice that
minimizes the amount of water needed early in the season. This results in
vast areas of barren dirt ‚Äď terrible shorebird habitat. In fact, I found
virtually no shorebirds at all anywhere along Fruge, Chalkley, Arceneaux,
Pine Pasture, or Highway 27. Farther east, the situation is similar until
one gets to the Thornwell area, where a few fields were flooded, and had
decent numbers of Dowitchers, peeps, Yellowlegs and the like. Non-shorebird
highlights in the Fruge area included a handful of SCISSOR-TAILED
FLYCATCHERS, SWAINSON'S HAWKS, and CRESTED CARACARAS along Fruge south of
LA 14. At the grain elevators just south of the corner of Rossignol and
Fruge, a single adult male YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD continues.

Farther south, the Pintail Loop at Cameron Prairie NWR held a couple of
lingering NORTHERN HARRIERS, which seemed late to me; otherwise, there were
no lingering ducks of interest and no shorebirds (but habitat was very
limited). There were a few migrants at the Oak Grove Sanctuary, but
diversity was decent with 12 species of warblers and all four expected
brown-backed Thrushes. I finally found decent numbers of shorebirds along
Rutherford Beach Road, where there were several hundred STILT SANDPIPERS
and a scattering of WESTERN and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, as well as Lesser
Yellowlegs, American Avocets, and the like. At Rutherford Beach itself, the
BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE continues on the beach itself, a little farther east
than the location described by Sam Saunders in his report on eBird. It was
just east (left when facing the Gulf) of the public access, in a flock of
Least Terns. It wasn't looking especially great, so I hope it survives at
least another 24 hours for the Big Day. If anyone does find it dead, it'd
be great to salvage the carcass for the LSU Museum of Natural Science (feel
free to contact me off-list). An AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER flew by as well.

Good birding,

Matt Brady
Baton Rouge
 

Back to top
Date: 4/25/18 5:43 pm
From: Matt Brady <podoces...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Continuing Black-legged Kittiwake, dearth of shorebirds, SW LA
Hi LABIRDers. I did a bit of scouting for the LSUMNS Big Day fundraiser
that is happening tomorrow (still not too late to donate! ‚Äď
http://www.lsu.edu/mns/news/2018/bigdayfundraiser-2018.php) in the Fruge
Road area of southern Calcasieu Parish. Almost all fields were depressingly
dry. Apparently rice farmers are using a new method to plant rice that
minimizes the amount of water needed early in the season. This results in
vast areas of barren dirt ‚Äď terrible shorebird habitat. In fact, I found
virtually no shorebirds at all anywhere along Fruge, Chalkley, Arceneaux,
Pine Pasture, or Highway 27. Farther east, the situation is similar until
one gets to the Thornwell area, where a few fields were flooded, and had
decent numbers of Dowitchers, peeps, Yellowlegs and the like. Non-shorebird
highlights in the Fruge area included a handful of SCISSOR-TAILED
FLYCATCHERS, SWAINSON'S HAWKS, and CRESTED CARACARAS along Fruge south of
LA 14. At the grain elevators just south of the corner of Rossignol and
Fruge, a single adult male YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD continues.

Farther south, the Pintail Loop at Cameron Prairie NWR held a couple of
lingering NORTHERN HARRIERS, which seemed late to me; otherwise, there were
no lingering ducks of interest and no shorebirds (but habitat was very
limited). There were a few migrants at the Oak Grove Sanctuary, but
diversity was decent with 12 species of warblers and all four expected
brown-backed Thrushes. I finally found decent numbers of shorebirds along
Rutherford Beach Road, where there were several hundred STILT SANDPIPERS
and a scattering of WESTERN and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS, as well as Lesser
Yellowlegs, American Avocets, and the like. At Rutherford Beach itself, the
BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE continues on the beach itself, a little farther east
than the location described by Sam Saunders in his report on eBird. It was
just east (left when facing the Gulf) of the public access, in a flock of
Least Terns. It wasn't looking especially great, so I hope it survives at
least another 24 hours for the Big Day. If anyone does find it dead, it'd
be great to salvage the carcass for the LSU Museum of Natural Science (feel
free to contact me off-list). An AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER flew by as well.

Good birding,

Matt Brady
Baton Rouge
 

Back to top
Date: 4/25/18 5:25 pm
From: Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] migrants in Jena
Labirders,

Here's the eBird list for those who might be interested.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44944636 A shiny gold doubloon to the
birder who can tell me what kind of flycatcher that is with just those two
crumby photos to go by. I'm leaning Alder/Willow (but I have a terrible
record of getting 'little greenish flycatcher' i.d.s wrong, so I often have
to avoid putting a precise label on them). No vocalization from the bird.
There were lots of termites flying around at the yard, as elsewhere in
Jena today, and the insectivorous birds were literally eating it up.

Jonathan Clark

On Wed, Apr 25, 2018 at 3:12 PM, Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...>
wrote:

> Labirders,
>
> In the yard since 1:00 p.m.: Black-and-white Warbler - 1 male,
> Blackburnian Warbler - 1 male, Yellow Warbler - 1 male, Cerulean Warbler -
> 1 male, Tennessee Warbler - 1 male; at least one male Rose-breasted
> Grosbeak and at least 7 male Indigo Buntings joining the cardinals and WT
> Sparrows at bird seed; 2 male Baltimore Orioles; an Emp sp.; small kettle
> of 11 MS Kites. Still outside, so maybe more : )
> Will do ebird report later.
>
> Happy Birding!
> Jonathan Clark
>
> .
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/25/18 4:09 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Grosbeak Day
Y'All,

The 'Grosbeak Incursion' continues. As many as 9 males have been observed
together at a single time.

Nan

On Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 6:17 PM, Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
wrote:

>
> Today's delight was the invasion of the Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. As many
> as 8 at a time have crowded the seed feeders with about equal numbers of
> males and females. They have been hungry, too. I'm guessing that a dozen
> or more have cycled through this establishment. I even had to make an
> 'emergency' trek to the feed and seed store, lest I run out before these
> invited guests move out. What fun!
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 4/25/18 3:19 pm
From: James W. Beck <loxosceles928...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks flycatching
Like Nancy and others, we are enjoying good numbers of RBGRs in our yard
(with up to 18 today!). A new foraging behavior in this species (for me,
I believe) is both sexes actively flycatching! I really don't recall ever
witnessing this in RBGRs... -jz
 

Back to top
Date: 4/25/18 2:48 pm
From: James W. Beck <loxosceles928...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Yellow-breasted Chat for the yard!
Linda and I just had and obtained a voice recording of a YBCH singing in
our Marrero yard! One I never thought thought we'd get for our yard list.
-jz
 

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Date: 4/25/18 1:12 pm
From: Jonathan Clark <falloutbird1...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] migrants in Jena
Labirders,

In the yard since 1:00 p.m.: Black-and-white Warbler - 1 male,
Blackburnian Warbler - 1 male, Yellow Warbler - 1 male, Cerulean Warbler -
1 male, Tennessee Warbler - 1 male; at least one male Rose-breasted
Grosbeak and at least 7 male Indigo Buntings joining the cardinals and WT
Sparrows at bird seed; 2 male Baltimore Orioles; an Emp sp.; small kettle
of 11 MS Kites. Still outside, so maybe more : )
Will do ebird report later.

Happy Birding!
Jonathan Clark

.
 

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Date: 4/25/18 9:16 am
From: Jean Landry <JLANDRY...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: 150 Bobolinks on Grand Isle
Many thanks for posting!

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jane Patterson
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 1:26 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: 150 Bobolinks on Grand Isle

Sorry for the delay on this. Hopefully they are still hanging out!

--Jane
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Joelle Finley <jjf1946...>
Date: Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 11:01 AM
Subject: Bobolinks
To: Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>


Hi Jane, I couldn't post this to LABIRD because I couldn't get rid of Jean's NC logo. Can you try please?
Joelle

From Jean Landry on Grand Isle

Jay Lafont (Thomas Bradberry’s brother in law) called a few minutes ago to ask me to post on LA Bird that on Cedar Lane, Grand Isle there is a flock of Bob-o Links…huge..about 150 birds in the field. He was so excited that he was almost hyperventilating!

Take care.

Jean

 

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Date: 4/25/18 8:23 am
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Grosbeak Day
Lita, I have not seen an Indigo Bunting or a Blue Grosbeak. Rose-breasted
Grosbeaks came in hot and heavy this morning, but now most seem to be
gone. A couple of Gray Catbirds and a Common Yellowthroat showed up
yesterday afternoon.

Nan

On Wed, Apr 25, 2018 at 10:15 AM, Aelita J Pinter <apinter...> wrote:

>
> Same here, Nan. It's been a non-stop stream of indigo buntings for the
> past 2.5 weeks; 1.5 weeks ago they were joined by blue grosbeaks, then RB
> grosbeaks starting last weekend. Plus summer tanagers, etc., sprinkled in.
> Early evening arrivals yesterday were catbirds and a lone ovenbird. A very
> welcome change from the hordes of house sparrows.
>
> About three weeks ago bronzed cowbirds started showing up at the feeders.
> Mixed feelings about that.
>
>
> All of the above being kept on their toes by regular visits from 2
> Cooper's hawks.
>
>
> Lita
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana
> Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Nancy L Newfield <
> <nancy...>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, April 24, 2018 6:17 PM
> *To:* <LABIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* [LABIRD-L] Grosbeak Day
>
> Today's delight was the invasion of the Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. As many
> as 8 at a time have crowded the seed feeders with about equal numbers of
> males and females. They have been hungry, too. I'm guessing that a dozen
> or more have cycled through this establishment. I even had to make an
> 'emergency' trek to the feed and seed store, lest I run out before these
> invited guests move out. What fun!
>
> Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
> NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is
> intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information
> that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under
> applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
> notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the
> information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this
> communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether
> in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately
> contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the
> telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
>



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

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Date: 4/25/18 8:16 am
From: Aelita J Pinter <apinter...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Grosbeak Day
Same here, Nan. It's been a non-stop stream of indigo buntings for the past 2.5 weeks; 1.5 weeks ago they were joined by blue grosbeaks, then RB grosbeaks starting last weekend. Plus summer tanagers, etc., sprinkled in. Early evening arrivals yesterday were catbirds and a lone ovenbird. A very welcome change from the hordes of house sparrows.

About three weeks ago bronzed cowbirds started showing up at the feeders. Mixed feelings about that.


All of the above being kept on their toes by regular visits from 2 Cooper's hawks.


Lita


________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Sent: Tuesday, April 24, 2018 6:17 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Grosbeak Day

Today's delight was the invasion of the Rose-breasted Grosbeaks. As many
as 8 at a time have crowded the seed feeders with about equal numbers of
males and females. They have been hungry, too. I'm guessing that a dozen
or more have cycled through this establishment. I even had to make an
'emergency' trek to the feed and seed store, lest I run out before these
invited guests move out. What fun!

Nan
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa ColibrŪ
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

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Date: 4/25/18 7:15 am
From: Irvin Louque <irvinlouque...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] The LOS Meeting and the City Nature Challenge
LABIRD:

This weekend (Friday-Monday), the Southwest Louisiana region will be
participating in the City Nature Challenge, a friendly competition between
over 60 cities worldwide to see who can find the most nature. SWLA isn't
exactly a city, but it was the region that made sense for the
organizer--the SWLA Master Naturalists
<https://www.swlamasternaturalists.org/>.

All sightings posted to iNaturalist in the Southwest Louisiana region will
count towards our effort. It just happened to coincide with the LOS
meeting weekend, which should boost the count!

Check out iNaturalist <https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/about> when you
can, and we'd love to see your observations of birds, other critters,
plants, and fungi this weekend!

I'll be at the LOS meeting on Friday evening with additional info and
hopefully answer any questions regarding iNaturalist or the City Nature
Challenge. Feel free to reply off list with any questions in the meantime.

Learn more about the City Nature Challenge here: citynaturechallenge.org/.
See my iNaturalist observations here:
www.inaturalist.org/observations/ilouque.

Thanks,
Irvin Louque
Lake Charles
 

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Date: 4/25/18 4:40 am
From: JKFruge' <jkfruge...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Peveto Woods and Sabine Wetland Walkway -- Cameron Parish -- April 24
Yesterday (April 24) was an outstanding birding day at Baton Rouge Audubon's Peveto Woods and Sabine Refuge Walkway in Cameron Parish. It was a 15 warbler day for me. Others -- orioles, tanagers, RB Grosbeaks, buntings were amazing to see in such numbers. Early afternoon, the water feature (mister) was the place to be as warblers entertained us and the larger birds came by for a shower also. The mulberry trees at Sabine are still loaded with berries. Dickcissels were a nice surprise on the ground by the mulberry trees in late afternoon.

Good Birding!!
Judy Fruge'
Lake Charles, LA
 

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