LABIRD
Received From Subject
1/18/20 11:41 am Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...> [LABIRD-L] New Iberia CBC summary
1/18/20 10:08 am Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...> [LABIRD-L] Car vs Foot Hours - CBC effort
1/17/20 6:15 pm Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] White pelicans at Lake Road Lacombe
1/17/20 10:11 am Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...> [LABIRD-L] LOS Winter Meeting
1/16/20 6:27 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
1/16/20 2:20 pm Marty Floyd <000000188c541d04-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
1/16/20 1:18 pm joan garvey <joanmgarvey1...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
1/16/20 12:51 pm Mac Myers <budogmacm...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
1/16/20 10:40 am Melvin Weber <mweber...> [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
1/14/20 1:18 pm Aelita J Pinter <apinter...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Fascinating Salvia spellings for the birds
1/14/20 1:04 pm Paul Dickson <Paul...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Fascinating Salvia spellings for the birds
1/14/20 12:46 pm Henry, Donata R <droome...> [LABIRD-L] Fascinating Salvia spellings for the birds
1/13/20 3:29 pm R Sherman <abutilon.pictum...> [LABIRD-L] Brown Pelican near Gonzales
1/13/20 2:01 pm Rob Dobbs <rcdobbs...> [LABIRD-L] Lacassine-Thornwell CBC summary, and goose numbers
1/13/20 1:51 pm Rob Dobbs <rcdobbs...> [LABIRD-L] White Lake CBC summary
1/12/20 8:13 pm Robert Thomas <00000208a4519d96-dmarc-request...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
1/12/20 5:53 pm Daniel Lane <barbetboy...> [LABIRD-L] Cape May Warbler at Baton Rouge's Capitol Lake
1/12/20 5:48 pm Aelita J Pinter <apinter...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
1/12/20 3:42 pm Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
1/12/20 12:05 pm Paul Dickson <Paul...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
1/12/20 11:33 am Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
1/10/20 5:15 pm Paul Conover <zoiseaux...> [LABIRD-L] Reporting your rare birds
1/10/20 12:13 pm Susan Edmunds <000000208257709a-dmarc-request...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Attendance for Whooping Crane Shooter's Arraignment Hearing?
1/10/20 10:04 am Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...> [LABIRD-L] Attendance for Whooping Crane Shooter's Arraignment Hearing?
1/10/20 8:04 am Jane Patterson <seejanebird...> [LABIRD-L] Registration is open for Spring Birding Basics classes
1/9/20 8:40 pm Sherry, Thomas W <tsherry...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Bruce Fleury
1/9/20 7:56 pm Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Bruce Fleury
1/9/20 7:11 pm Henry, Donata R <droome...> [LABIRD-L] Bruce Fleury
1/9/20 11:01 am John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...> [LABIRD-L] eBird and the New Year
1/9/20 6:43 am Bill Fontenot <natrldlite...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Wood Stork - Abita Springs
1/8/20 3:41 pm Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Wood Stork - Abita Springs
1/8/20 2:59 pm Tracey & David Banowetz <banowetz...> [LABIRD-L] Wood Stork - Abita Springs
1/8/20 7:48 am Chris Burke <c.davidburke1009...> [LABIRD-L] Unsubscribe
1/8/20 7:33 am Tom Trenchard <trench19...> [LABIRD-L] New yard bird, day #2
1/8/20 7:00 am Larry Raymond <0000014505365302-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Natchitoches CBC
1/7/20 8:33 am programs braudubon.org <programs...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] BRAS Presentation Thurs, Jan 9th
1/6/20 7:20 pm glenn ousset <gousset...> [LABIRD-L] Ash-throated Flycatcher in New Orleans
1/6/20 5:26 pm Jane Patterson <seejanebird...> [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] BRAS Presentation Thurs, Jan 9th
1/6/20 9:47 am Rob Dobbs <rcdobbs...> [LABIRD-L] Sweet Lake - Cameron Prairie CBC summary
1/6/20 9:44 am Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> [LABIRD-L] Western Tanager
1/5/20 10:13 am David Booth <david...> [LABIRD-L] Lake Charles CBC Results
1/4/20 7:31 pm Jed Pitre <feralbiologist...> [LABIRD-L] Thibodaux CBC results
1/4/20 10:49 am Jane Patterson <seejanebird...> [LABIRD-L] Tropical Kingbird still at Cap Lakes BTR
1/4/20 9:43 am Oscar Johnson <ojohns7...> [LABIRD-L] Western Kingbird and Ash-throated Flycatcher Baton Rouge
1/4/20 8:00 am Terri Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Reserve-Bonne Carre Spillway CBC
1/4/20 6:11 am Melvin Weber <mweber...> [LABIRD-L] Reserve-Bonne Carre Spillway CBC
1/3/20 4:11 pm Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...> [LABIRD-L] Blue Grosbeak and intensive batture survey in Old Jefferson
1/3/20 1:49 pm John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...> [LABIRD-L] Claiborne CBC
1/3/20 1:22 pm David Muth <MuthD...> [LABIRD-L] Venice CBC
1/1/20 12:42 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Black-headed Grosbeak at Feeder, New Orleans
1/1/20 12:21 pm James V Remsen <najames...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Tropical Kingbird Baton Rouge
1/1/20 6:58 am Holly Morales <tashayoda3...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Slidell-Northshore CBC
1/1/20 6:50 am Wise, Jon <Wise...> [LABIRD-L] Ruddy Ducks in Metairie
12/31/19 1:52 pm Wendy Rihner <wrihner...> [LABIRD-L] Slidell-Northshore CBC
12/30/19 9:21 am Oscar Johnson <ojohns7...> [LABIRD-L] Tropical Kingbird Baton Rouge
12/29/19 2:09 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Black-headed Grosbeak at Feeder, New Orleans
12/29/19 1:24 pm Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...> [LABIRD-L] New Iberia CBC date change - now Jan 5
12/29/19 9:25 am Sherry, Thomas W <tsherry...> [LABIRD-L] Black-headed Grosbeak at Feeder, New Orleans
12/29/19 8:00 am James W. Beck <loxosceles928...> [LABIRD-L] Pine Siskin - Marrero
12/29/19 5:59 am Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Redhead 'irruptions'?
12/29/19 4:49 am Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Redhead 'irruptions'?
12/28/19 8:31 am Bonnie Ardoin <000000d00dff04cd-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Black Headed Grosbeak
12/28/19 7:38 am janine robin <janinerobin1982...> [LABIRD-L] Bell's vireo
12/27/19 2:25 pm Matt Brady <podoces...> [LABIRD-L] Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher, S of Crowley
12/27/19 12:22 pm Toddy Guidry <guidrys...> [LABIRD-L] Redhead 'irruptions'?
12/27/19 10:43 am Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
12/27/19 7:43 am Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
12/27/19 7:11 am Jeffrey W. Harris <jwharris30...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
12/27/19 7:04 am Philip Bradley <0000018eaa441e8c-dmarc-request...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
12/27/19 5:15 am Bill Fontenot <natrldlite...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
12/26/19 8:39 pm Katherine Gividen <katherine...> [LABIRD-L] Summer Tanager
12/26/19 12:29 pm Philip Bradley <0000018eaa441e8c-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] FOS birds
12/26/19 11:12 am Charles Williams <chazbizz91...> [LABIRD-L] Juncos
12/26/19 9:54 am Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...> [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
12/25/19 2:55 pm Matt Brady <podoces...> [LABIRD-L] Empid sp and Black-and Whiye Warbler, Tickfaw SP
12/25/19 1:27 pm Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Cheneyville-Lecompte CBC 29 December 2010 Status?
12/25/19 8:32 am Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...> [LABIRD-L] Harlan’s Hawk at Bayou Sauvage
12/25/19 7:15 am Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...> [LABIRD-L] Cheneyville-Lecompte CBC 29 December 2010 Status?
12/24/19 7:18 pm Toddy Guidry <guidrys...> [LABIRD-L] Palmetto ISland CBC
12/24/19 12:03 pm Ellie Avegno <elliea...> [LABIRD-L] Bird feast
12/24/19 7:22 am Sandra Barbier <sandabar10...> [LABIRD-L] goldfinch
12/24/19 6:43 am Marybeth Lima <marybeth.lima...> [LABIRD-L] Western kingbird
12/22/19 11:31 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> [LABIRD-L] AR Tropical Kingbird and Extralimital Vagrancy
12/22/19 12:33 pm zoiseaux <zoiseaux...> [LABIRD-L] falcon
12/21/19 8:48 am janine robin <janinerobin1982...> [LABIRD-L] In the Blind today WYES 3pm
12/19/19 2:47 pm Nancy L Newfield <nancy...> Re: [LABIRD-L] alpha bird codes
12/19/19 2:04 pm programs braudubon.org <programs...> [LABIRD-L] BRAS Presentation Thurs, Jan 9th
12/19/19 1:14 pm D Gallacher <gallachr...> [LABIRD-L] alpha bird codes
12/19/19 12:22 pm CAPS LOCK <richardtemplejr...> [LABIRD-L] Say's Phoebe at Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge 12/19/2019
12/19/19 12:18 pm Robert Thomas <00000208a4519d96-dmarc-request...> Re: [LABIRD-L] request for info on trying for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers in evening
12/19/19 11:50 am Philip Bradley <0000018eaa441e8c-dmarc-request...> [LABIRD-L] Testing site for CBC gem
12/19/19 11:00 am Bill Vermillion <bill.gcjv...> Re: [LABIRD-L] request for info on trying for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers in evening
12/19/19 9:55 am Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...> [LABIRD-L] Creole CBC highlights
 
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Date: 1/18/20 11:41 am
From: Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] New Iberia CBC summary
LAbirders,

On January 5, 16 birders split into 6 parties to cover the 12th New Iberia CBC and found 124 species, same as last year, and slightly above the average for the CBC. A total of 33 species were exclusive to a single party, so everyone did a great job contributing to the overall total.

Three new species for the count were tallied: BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCK (count week only), YELLOW RAIL, and SOLITARY SANDPIPER. Other unusual finds included: ROYAL TERN, RED-TAILED (WESTERN) HAWK, LARK SPARROW, and HENSLOW'S SPARROW.

New Iberia CBC counters hit several high collective counts this year (not correcting for effort), which in part I suspect is due to the relativley high effort for this CBC this year, but is also a consequence of this year being fairly birdy. High counts included: Ross's Goose (10), Wood Duck (76), Blue-winged Teal (90), Killdeer (463), Greater Yellowlegs (36), Least Sandpiper (12), Neotropic Cormorant (258), White Ibis (1095), Sharp-shinned Hawk (4), Red-tailed Hawk (82), Red-bellied Woodpecker (70), Downy Woodpecker (30), House Wren (39), Gray Catbird (20), Chipping Sparrow (155), Vesper Sparrow (5), Orange-crowned Warbler (80), and Pine Warbler (140).

Happy birding,
Erik Johnson
Sunset, LA
Erik.johnson AT audubon.org
 

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Date: 1/18/20 10:08 am
From: Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Car vs Foot Hours - CBC effort
LAbirders,

If you are a CBC participant or compiler, please read this. Each year, I end up having to correct a couple dozen misunderstandings about the different between "by car" versus "by foot" effort during the Christmas Bird Counts. Here is a simple explanation that unfortunately isn't easy to find in the CBC resources available online.

As soon as you exit the confines of your car, even if you are standing right next to or on top of said car, this should be reported as by foot effort. If you are INSIDE a car, only then is the effort considered "by car." The distinction is not in how you got to a location, but in the ability to detect birds at any given moment of your survey. If you are outside a car, you can see and hear a lot more birds than from inside a car.

Generally speaking, birders spend more time outside a car than inside on almost any CBC route. And when outside a car (i.e., performing foot effort), it's rare to move more than 1 or 1.5 miles per foot hour. These are the kinds of things that I look for when reviewing the CBC data each year.

Note that to perfectly track entering and exiting a car over the course of a day requires an inordinant amount of effort. I'm not asking for that necessarily. But along the way, it's a good idea to make periodic notes to yourself about your birding effort so that you can be reasonably close once you report your effort to the compiler.

Please do me a favor and double-check what you have reported to the compilers, and compilers, please double-check that this is being reported to you correctly. Thank you!

Erik Johnson
CBC Regional Compiler
Erik.johnson AT audubon.org
 

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Date: 1/17/20 6:15 pm
From: Terence Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] White pelicans at Lake Road Lacombe
I drove down Lake Road in Lacombe Friday evening after work.  Around 520, as it was getting dark, heading back from the end of the road, where the lake is, I saw many white birds flying into the swamp.  I assumed the egrets were coming in to roost.  As I got closer, I saw the birds were in the water, not in the swamps, and they were white pelicans!  Must have been about 200 of them!  They moved as a unit from the grassy edge of the swamp to closer into the bayou and began to feed in unison, making their way down the bayou toward the lake.   It was almost dark by this time so I could not get a good picture, but it was an amazing sight!
I do love going down Lake Road and take every opportunity I can when I work on the Northshore.  I was also treated to a northern harrier, a very light red tailed hawk, a bald eagle, many pied billed grebes and common gallinules, and a few great egrets and great blue herons.  At the end of Lake Road, at the lake itself, there were a few flotillae of coots a hundred yards or so off the shore, making three groups.  Very similar to what I saw in the bayou on Paris Road the day before in Chalmette, though much greater number.
Happy birding, y'all!
Terri
 

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Date: 1/17/20 10:11 am
From: Judith ONeale <losbirdlady...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] LOS Winter Meeting
Today is the last day to reserve a Saturday night dinner for the LOS winter
meeting. Please let me know if you plan to attend and have not registered.
Dinner options: Fried Catfish, Chicken Tenders, Vegan Gumbo.

Thanks,
Judith

--
Judith O'Neale
LOS Treasurer
Lafayette LA
 

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Date: 1/16/20 6:27 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
Marty and LABIRDers,

I think I made my first ever Christmas Bird Count in 1975 and quickly
became a willing 'victim' of many since then. Of late, I have been
entering some selected accounts from original notes into eBird. One from
the Reserve-Bonnet Carré Spillway in 1977 was especially memorable:

"Chris et al.,

Funny that this should come up. I have been entering old records into
eBird and I have a handwritten account, including numbers, of the 1977
CBC. Strangely, my notes do not include fellow participants. We logged a
single Short-eared Owl. Though his name is not on this list, I believe
that Tom Trenchard was one of my partners. Among the other highlights were
10 Loggerhead Shrikes and 4 Purple Martins.

I can remember many fine birding adventures on Reserve-Bonnet Carré
Spillway CBCs. Once I was partnered with Sid Gauthreaux and we slogged
across the muddy forebay area in hip waders and I sunk kneedeep. After
taking 20 or so minutes to extricate myself, we completed our mission,
which included the entire spillway and both east and west levees, plus the
town of Norco, Prescott Road and C C Road.

My first Reserve-Bonnet Carré Spillway CBC was in 1975 and the only year I
failed to participate was 2016.

Those were the days . . .

*Iron Nan*"

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 4:20 PM Marty Floyd <
<000000188c541d04-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> So sorry to see this go. I unfortunately missed this years count (and many
> others) because of knee replacement.
>
> Having same problems with my counts. Don't know of any solution to attract
> young birders.
>
> Had someone ask me why we are still doing CBCs since we now have ebird.
> Don't think my response convinced him.
>
> Thank you for your years of dedication.
>
> Marty Floyd
>


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

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Date: 1/16/20 2:20 pm
From: Marty Floyd <000000188c541d04-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
So sorry to see this go. I unfortunately missed this years count (and many others) because of knee replacement.

Having same problems with my counts. Don't know of any solution to attract young birders.

Had someone ask me why we are still doing CBCs since we now have ebird. Don't think my response convinced him.

Thank you for your years of dedication.

Marty Floyd
 

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Date: 1/16/20 1:18 pm
From: joan garvey <joanmgarvey1...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
I’m sorry it’s coming to an end and congratulate you on a job well done.

Thanks Melvin!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 16, 2020, at 12:40 PM, Melvin Weber <mweber...> wrote:
>
> A few years ago, back in 1958, 4 teenage boys, now armed with real binoculars loaned to them by Dr. Lowery, conducted the first ever Reserve-Bonnet Carre’ Spillway Christmas Count. They covered the area within walking distance from their homes along with a sample of Cypress Swamp reached by bicycle. This effort resulted in a tally of 82 species (I think). Common birds then included Bobwhites and Ground Doves as yard birds.
>
>
>
> Skip forward to 1969 for the second Reserve-Bonnet Carre’ Spillway count, after US Army tours and college. For the next 50 years this count was held drawing in at least 43 different observers including many “Big Name” birders, which tallied a total of around 243 species. In 1996, 24 observers tallied 150 species, our highest ever.
>
>
>
> Gone are the rice fields, cow pastures, cornfields and other rural landscapes of that first count, now replaced by mostly cane fields and houses. The protected spillway excluded.
>
>
>
> Also gone are the enthusiastic young birders who lived for the weekends and holidays so they could explore new areas and record new birds. Today our grandkids never notice a bird unless it appears in their video games.
>
>
>
> For several years we have been beating a dying horse for one more count---one more time. Now, with 50 years of CBC data, I will let it rest in peace.
>
>
>
> I really appreciate the dedication of so many, who show up year after year helping to keep this traditional count alive. I now free you to do other counts, probably closer to your homes.
>
>
>
> Thank You
 

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Date: 1/16/20 12:51 pm
From: Mac Myers <budogmacm...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
Melvin and Labird,

That is a fine, elegiac post. I'm sorry to see the count go, but I
certainly understand.

Mac

On Thu, Jan 16, 2020 at 12:40 PM Melvin Weber <mweber...> wrote:

> A few years ago, back in 1958, 4 teenage boys, now armed with real
> binoculars loaned to them by Dr. Lowery, conducted the first ever
> Reserve-Bonnet Carre’ Spillway Christmas Count. They covered the area
> within walking distance from their homes along with a sample of Cypress
> Swamp reached by bicycle. This effort resulted in a tally of 82 species (I
> think). Common birds then included Bobwhites and Ground Doves as yard birds.
>
>
>
> Skip forward to 1969 for the second Reserve-Bonnet Carre’ Spillway count,
> after US Army tours and college. For the next 50 years this count was held
> drawing in at least 43 different observers including many “Big Name”
> birders, which tallied a total of around 243 species. In 1996, 24 observers
> tallied 150 species, our highest ever.
>
>
>
> Gone are the rice fields, cow pastures, cornfields and other rural
> landscapes of that first count, now replaced by mostly cane fields and
> houses. The protected spillway excluded.
>
>
>
> Also gone are the enthusiastic young birders who lived for the weekends
> and holidays so they could explore new areas and record new birds. Today
> our grandkids never notice a bird unless it appears in their video games.
>
>
>
> For several years we have been beating a dying horse for one more
> count---one more time. Now, with 50 years of CBC data, I will let it rest
> in peace.
>
>
>
> I really appreciate the dedication of so many, who show up year after year
> helping to keep this traditional count alive. I now free you to do other
> counts, probably closer to your homes.
>
>
>
> Thank You
 

Back to top
Date: 1/16/20 10:40 am
From: Melvin Weber <mweber...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Reserve CBC
A few years ago, back in 1958, 4 teenage boys, now armed with real binoculars loaned to them by Dr. Lowery, conducted the first ever Reserve-Bonnet Carre’ Spillway Christmas Count. They covered the area within walking distance from their homes along with a sample of Cypress Swamp reached by bicycle. This effort resulted in a tally of 82 species (I think). Common birds then included Bobwhites and Ground Doves as yard birds.



Skip forward to 1969 for the second Reserve-Bonnet Carre’ Spillway count, after US Army tours and college. For the next 50 years this count was held drawing in at least 43 different observers including many “Big Name” birders, which tallied a total of around 243 species. In 1996, 24 observers tallied 150 species, our highest ever.



Gone are the rice fields, cow pastures, cornfields and other rural landscapes of that first count, now replaced by mostly cane fields and houses. The protected spillway excluded.



Also gone are the enthusiastic young birders who lived for the weekends and holidays so they could explore new areas and record new birds. Today our grandkids never notice a bird unless it appears in their video games.



For several years we have been beating a dying horse for one more count---one more time. Now, with 50 years of CBC data, I will let it rest in peace.



I really appreciate the dedication of so many, who show up year after year helping to keep this traditional count alive. I now free you to do other counts, probably closer to your homes.



Thank You
 

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Date: 1/14/20 1:18 pm
From: Aelita J Pinter <apinter...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Fascinating Salvia spellings for the birds
Interesting!

The spelling "gesnerae" is the feminine genitive singular, the "ii" ending is masculine. For example, I would have guessed opuntiaeflora would be preferable to opuntiiflora, i.e., using the genitive for the [feminine] "Opuntia". Learn something new and wonderful every day.

Lita Pinter

________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Henry, Donata R <droome...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2020 2:46 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...> <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fascinating Salvia spellings for the birds

WARNING: This email originated outside of the University of New Orleans system. The sender of this email could not be validated and may not actually be the person in the From field. Do NOT click links or open attachments if the message seems suspicious in any way. Never provide your user ID or password.



From Steve Darwin, a consummate botanist:

SHORT ANSWER:
According to the International Plant Name Index, Salvia gesneriiflora Lindley & Paxton, published in 1851, is the correct name. Salvia gesneriifolia, published by Lemaire one year later, was a spelling mistake. This makes sense: the flowers ("flora") of this salvia resemble those of Gesneria, the leaves (folia) not so much.

OTHER INFORMATION:
Interestingly, the spelling originally used by Lindley and Paxton was gesneraeflora, which, under Article 60 of the INTERNATIONAL CODE OF NOMENCLATURE FOR ALGAE, FUNGI, AND PLANTS, is considered to be a word-compounding error. Example given under Article 60: " ... the use of the genitive singular case ending of Latin first-declension nouns instead of a connecting vowel is treated as an error to be corrected ... The epithet of Pereskia opuntiaeflora DC. (in Mm. Mus. Hist. Nat. 17: 76. 1828) is to be spelled opuntiiflora, and that of Myrosma cannaefolia L. f. (Suppl. Pl. 80. 1782), cannifolia."

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

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Date: 1/14/20 1:04 pm
From: Paul Dickson <Paul...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Fascinating Salvia spellings for the birds
Labird: As charter member of LABIRD, experience has shown me that if we just keep the discussion going we eventually draw out the educators and get educated!
So the answer is that this was a mistake from the 1850's still being made, discussed and corrected in 2020. How cool.
One of the varietal names is easier: 'Tequila'.
Glad you asked Iron Nan!
(Regardless of spelling 'Tequila' doesn't survive the winter for me in Caddo Parish. I've tried it several times.)
Paul Dickson

-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Henry, Donata R
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2020 2:46 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fascinating Salvia spellings for the birds

From Steve Darwin, a consummate botanist:

SHORT ANSWER:
According to the International Plant Name Index, Salvia gesneriiflora Lindley & Paxton, published in 1851, is the correct name. Salvia gesneriifolia, published by Lemaire one year later, was a spelling mistake. This makes sense: the flowers ("flora") of this salvia resemble those of Gesneria, the leaves (folia) not so much.

OTHER INFORMATION:
Interestingly, the spelling originally used by Lindley and Paxton was gesneraeflora, which, under Article 60 of the INTERNATIONAL CODE OF NOMENCLATURE FOR ALGAE, FUNGI, AND PLANTS, is considered to be a word-compounding error. Example given under Article 60: " ... the use of the genitive singular case ending of Latin first-declension nouns instead of a connecting vowel is treated as an error to be corrected ... The epithet of Pereskia ‘opuntiaeflora’ DC. (in Mém. Mus. Hist. Nat. 17: 76. 1828) is to be spelled opuntiiflora, and that of Myrosma ‘cannaefolia’ L. f. (Suppl. Pl. 80. 1782), cannifolia."
 

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Date: 1/14/20 12:46 pm
From: Henry, Donata R <droome...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fascinating Salvia spellings for the birds
From Steve Darwin, a consummate botanist:

SHORT ANSWER:
According to the International Plant Name Index, Salvia gesneriiflora Lindley & Paxton, published in 1851, is the correct name. Salvia gesneriifolia, published by Lemaire one year later, was a spelling mistake. This makes sense: the flowers ("flora") of this salvia resemble those of Gesneria, the leaves (folia) not so much.

OTHER INFORMATION:
Interestingly, the spelling originally used by Lindley and Paxton was gesneraeflora, which, under Article 60 of the INTERNATIONAL CODE OF NOMENCLATURE FOR ALGAE, FUNGI, AND PLANTS, is considered to be a word-compounding error. Example given under Article 60: " ... the use of the genitive singular case ending of Latin first-declension nouns instead of a connecting vowel is treated as an error to be corrected ... The epithet of Pereskia ‘opuntiaeflora’ DC. (in Mém. Mus. Hist. Nat. 17: 76. 1828) is to be spelled opuntiiflora, and that of Myrosma ‘cannaefolia’ L. f. (Suppl. Pl. 80. 1782), cannifolia."
 

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Date: 1/13/20 3:29 pm
From: R Sherman <abutilon.pictum...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Brown Pelican near Gonzales
This morning around 9:15 there was at least one Brown Pelican flying above
the pond (borrow pit) next to the Cabela's at I-10 and LA 30. Immature
plumage. I was driving down the interstate in the fog, so I couldn't stop
to see if there was more than one, or if there was anything else
interesting.
 

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Date: 1/13/20 2:01 pm
From: Rob Dobbs <rcdobbs...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Lacassine-Thornwell CBC summary, and goose numbers
The Lacassine NWR – Thornwell CBC was held for the 18th time on Fri. Dec.
20, 2019. Thirteen participants covered the count circle and tallied a
total of 141 species, which is 15 species below the 17-year average of 157.
Related, the number of participants was also dramatically down from the
17-year average of 29 participants. Nevertheless, we had some good birds,
including White-tailed Kite, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Western Meadowlark
(new for the count), Northern Waterthrush, 2 Black-and-white Warblers,
Yellow-throated Warbler, and Summer Tanager. We had high counts for Tree
Swallow, Gray Catbird, and Chipping Sparrow. Notable misses included
Cackling Goose, which had never been missed, and Hooded Merganser, American
Avocet, Brown Creeper, and Field Sparrow, which had only been missed 2-3
times previously.



Having heard from many locals/hunters that geese numbers seem low this
winter, and thinking the same myself, or at least thinking that geese are
particularly patchy this year, I compared numbers of geese counted this
year to their average counts on the White Lake, Lacassine-Thornwell, and
Sweet Lake-Cameron Prairie CBCs. Raw counts of Greater White-fronted Goose
were only 13% and 32% of their averages within the Lac-Thorn and Sweet-Cam
CBC circles, respectively; raw counts of Snow Goose were 29% and 78% of
their averages within those circles. Numbers of geese per party hour show
the same pattern: white-fronts being 20% and 34% of average at Lac-Thorn
and Sweet-Cam, respectively, and Snow Goose being 42% and 91%. At White
Lake Snow Goose numbers were near average, but low numbers of white-fronts
were also apparent there (raw count 66% of average; geese per party hour
56% of average).

--
Rob Dobbs
Lafayette, LA
 

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Date: 1/13/20 1:51 pm
From: Rob Dobbs <rcdobbs...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] White Lake CBC summary
The 9th White Lake CBC was held Tues. Dec. 17, 2019. Many, many thanks to
the 12 participants for braving the 15-20 mph NNW wind—gusting to 30
mph—all day long (this was especially pleasant with temps in the low-mid
40s and overcast skies). Not surprisingly, our species total of 135 was
lower than normal; over its pre-2019 eight-year history this count averaged
145 species. Among the many misses, Hooded Merganser, Turkey Vulture,
Eastern Screech-Owl, and Golden-crowned Kinglet had never been missed
previously. There were many other low counts, almost certainly due, at
least in large part, to the conditions. (In fairness, however, many of
these low counts were only low by 1 or 2 individuals.)



But there were highlights as well, including Great Kiskadees (4 birds—2
each by 2 parties in widely different localities), Couch’s Kingbird
(vocal), Yellow-headed Blackbird, Bronzed Cowbird (a count first!), Summer
Tanager, and Indigo Bunting. High counts included Northern Pintail,
American Woodcock, Glossy Ibis, Lark Sparrow, and Boat-tailed and
Great-tailed grackles. Bonaparte’s Gull and Osprey were also nice birds,
with each recorded on only two previous counts.



Many thanks again to our intrepid participants, the staff of White Lake
Wetlands Conservation Area, and numerous private land owners for access to
property.

--
Rob Dobbs
Lafayette, LA
 

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Date: 1/12/20 8:13 pm
From: Robert Thomas <00000208a4519d96-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
All comments here are correct, but the correct spelling is the one appearing in the original species description unless another publication corrected any corruption/error in the original description. Mistaken spellings or Latinization of terms are not uncommon but the rules require corrections/emendation be published and not just corrected without justification. Bob

Robert. A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director
Center for Environmental Communication
Loyola University

> On Jan 12, 2020, at 7:47 PM, Aelita J Pinter <apinter...> wrote:
>
> IMO it should be spelled with two i's.
>
> Here's why. The name means "Gessner's flower". It's named after "Gessner" (don't know why the namer dropped one "s" - that would be an error - OK, so, Gesner). To put it in Latin, first you latinize (is that a word?) his name, ergo, Gesnerius (nominative case). Then you have to put it in the genitive (i.e., Gesner's). In Latin, for a word ending in "ius", the genitive would be Gesnerii (as in "In nomine Patris et Filii et....").
>
> 'tis what I remember from my Latin teacher's explanation of how to convert a non-Latin name into Latin. Someone with more than my rudimentary knowledge of Latin, please correct me.
>
> Needless to say, not everyone follows the rules by a long shot.
>
> Merely my $0.02
>
> Lita Pinter
>
>
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
> Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 5:41 PM
> To: <LABIRD-L...> <LABIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
>
> WARNING: This email originated outside of the University of New Orleans system. The sender of this email could not be validated and may not actually be the person in the “From” field. Do NOT click links or open attachments if the message seems suspicious in any way. Never provide your user ID or password.
>
>
>
> It's *Salvia gesneriflora*...
>
> https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FSalvia_gesneriflora&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Capinter...>%7C2c1c1d22191b48ebc41908d797b90483%7C31d4dbf540044469bfeedf294a9de150%7C0%7C0%7C637144693214890837&amp;sdata=aBd61EdaCbqt2Eg5lOrqslTy2Vd5KUMa0sqxJr8wR%2BE%3D&amp;reserved=0
>
> Steve Cardiff
>
>> On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:05 PM Paul Dickson <Paul...> wrote:
>>
>> Iron Nan and curious Latin nomenclature nerds everywhere,
>> Though it is unscientific to guess, I am going to make an educated guess
>> so at least I am not being uneducated.
>> In Latin, though I was not educated in it, Gesneriaceae is the African
>> Violet family. Folia means leaf and flora means flower. So the spellings
>> are really two different names: “African violet leaf-like” and “African
>> violet flower-like”.
>> So which was the Salvia named for the leaf or the flower?
>> My bet is on the leaf.
>> But that is just a guess.
>> Paul Dickson
>>
>> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds
>> [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Nancy L Newfield
>> Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 1:33 PM
>> To: <LABIRD-L...>
>> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
>>
>> Hello Y'All,
>>
>> Happy New Year! Welcome to new challenges. I've been nosing around the
>> fringes of various scientific disciplines for much of my life. I like to
>> rely on scientific nomenclature as much as our more generally used common
>> names for many living things - and herein lies the crux of my problem.
>>
>> I keep a list of the various plants that I grow [or try to grow] in order
>> to attract hummingbirds. And, having picked up on Dennis Demcheck's nectar
>> evaluation project of years ago, I keep readings of the nectar values of
>> each species, subspecies, cultivar and hybrid combination.
>>
>> A recently acquired plant has begun to bloom and when I pulled the tag out
>> of the pot to add the nectar value to my list, I discovered that the label
>> name was different from the catalogue name.
>>
>> The plant is Salvia gesneriiflora or Salvia gesneriifolia, depending on
>> which reference has the scientific name spelled correctly. Two flowers
>> produced about 20 microliters of 26.4% nectar. When I recommend the plant
>> of others, I want to be able to provide them with the correct spelling so
>> they can be sure of what plant they are getting. Additionally, I will
>> contact my source in order to ensure that his clients receive accurate
>> information.
>>
>> The following site used both names interchangeably as if it did not make
>> any difference:
>>
>> https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.californiagardens.com%2FPlant_Pages%2FSalvia%2Fsalvia_gesneriiflora.htm&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Capinter...>%7C2c1c1d22191b48ebc41908d797b90483%7C31d4dbf540044469bfeedf294a9de150%7C0%7C0%7C637144693214890837&amp;sdata=9VcXBo7V1AsZQvsvvW37T5Dke%2FKjsE7NrP5yxoZjkpY%3D&amp;reserved=0
>> <
>> https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.californiagardens.com%2FPlant_Pages%2FSalvia%2Fsalvia_gesneriiflora.htm&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Capinter...>%7C2c1c1d22191b48ebc41908d797b90483%7C31d4dbf540044469bfeedf294a9de150%7C0%7C0%7C637144693214890837&amp;sdata=9VcXBo7V1AsZQvsvvW37T5Dke%2FKjsE7NrP5yxoZjkpY%3D&amp;reserved=0
>>>
>>
>> Any help?
>>
>> Iron Nan
>> --
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>> Nancy L Newfield
>> Casa Colibrí
>> Metairie, Louisiana USA
>> <nancy...><mailto:<nancy...>
>> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>>
>
> NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

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Date: 1/12/20 5:53 pm
From: Daniel Lane <barbetboy...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Cape May Warbler at Baton Rouge's Capitol Lake
Hey all,

While checking in on the Tropical Kingbird and Prairie Warbler at BR's
Capitol Lake yesterday, I found a female Cape May Warbler that disappeared
before I could document it or get others on it (Matt Brady and Andre
Moncrieff both showed up within an hour to search). Several of us returned
this morning and relocated the bird, well-documented by Oscar Johnson. Once
again, the bird disappeared after a brief time of viewing. Both
observations were near the office buildings north of the pump station on
the central west shore of Capitol Lake. Matt also found a Baltimore Oriole
in Arsenal Park.

eBird list here including photos of the Cape May:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S63319885

Good birding,
Dan Lane

--
Research Associate
LSU Museum of Natural Science
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA

and

Guide
Field Guides Tours Inc.
Austin, Texas, USA
 

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Date: 1/12/20 5:48 pm
From: Aelita J Pinter <apinter...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
IMO it should be spelled with two i's.

Here's why. The name means "Gessner's flower". It's named after "Gessner" (don't know why the namer dropped one "s" - that would be an error - OK, so, Gesner). To put it in Latin, first you latinize (is that a word?) his name, ergo, Gesnerius (nominative case). Then you have to put it in the genitive (i.e., Gesner's). In Latin, for a word ending in "ius", the genitive would be Gesnerii (as in "In nomine Patris et Filii et....").

'tis what I remember from my Latin teacher's explanation of how to convert a non-Latin name into Latin. Someone with more than my rudimentary knowledge of Latin, please correct me.

Needless to say, not everyone follows the rules by a long shot.

Merely my $0.02

Lita Pinter




________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 5:41 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...> <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question

WARNING: This email originated outside of the University of New Orleans system. The sender of this email could not be validated and may not actually be the person in the From field. Do NOT click links or open attachments if the message seems suspicious in any way. Never provide your user ID or password.



It's *Salvia gesneriflora*...

https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FSalvia_gesneriflora&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Capinter...>%7C2c1c1d22191b48ebc41908d797b90483%7C31d4dbf540044469bfeedf294a9de150%7C0%7C0%7C637144693214890837&amp;sdata=aBd61EdaCbqt2Eg5lOrqslTy2Vd5KUMa0sqxJr8wR%2BE%3D&amp;reserved=0

Steve Cardiff

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:05 PM Paul Dickson <Paul...> wrote:

> Iron Nan and curious Latin nomenclature nerds everywhere,
> Though it is unscientific to guess, I am going to make an educated guess
> so at least I am not being uneducated.
> In Latin, though I was not educated in it, Gesneriaceae is the African
> Violet family. Folia means leaf and flora means flower. So the spellings
> are really two different names: African violet leaf-like and African
> violet flower-like.
> So which was the Salvia named for the leaf or the flower?
> My bet is on the leaf.
> But that is just a guess.
> Paul Dickson
>
> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds
> [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Nancy L Newfield
> Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 1:33 PM
> To: <LABIRD-L...>
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
>
> Hello Y'All,
>
> Happy New Year! Welcome to new challenges. I've been nosing around the
> fringes of various scientific disciplines for much of my life. I like to
> rely on scientific nomenclature as much as our more generally used common
> names for many living things - and herein lies the crux of my problem.
>
> I keep a list of the various plants that I grow [or try to grow] in order
> to attract hummingbirds. And, having picked up on Dennis Demcheck's nectar
> evaluation project of years ago, I keep readings of the nectar values of
> each species, subspecies, cultivar and hybrid combination.
>
> A recently acquired plant has begun to bloom and when I pulled the tag out
> of the pot to add the nectar value to my list, I discovered that the label
> name was different from the catalogue name.
>
> The plant is Salvia gesneriiflora or Salvia gesneriifolia, depending on
> which reference has the scientific name spelled correctly. Two flowers
> produced about 20 microliters of 26.4% nectar. When I recommend the plant
> of others, I want to be able to provide them with the correct spelling so
> they can be sure of what plant they are getting. Additionally, I will
> contact my source in order to ensure that his clients receive accurate
> information.
>
> The following site used both names interchangeably as if it did not make
> any difference:
>
> https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.californiagardens.com%2FPlant_Pages%2FSalvia%2Fsalvia_gesneriiflora.htm&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Capinter...>%7C2c1c1d22191b48ebc41908d797b90483%7C31d4dbf540044469bfeedf294a9de150%7C0%7C0%7C637144693214890837&amp;sdata=9VcXBo7V1AsZQvsvvW37T5Dke%2FKjsE7NrP5yxoZjkpY%3D&amp;reserved=0
> <
> https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.californiagardens.com%2FPlant_Pages%2FSalvia%2Fsalvia_gesneriiflora.htm&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Capinter...>%7C2c1c1d22191b48ebc41908d797b90483%7C31d4dbf540044469bfeedf294a9de150%7C0%7C0%7C637144693214890837&amp;sdata=9VcXBo7V1AsZQvsvvW37T5Dke%2FKjsE7NrP5yxoZjkpY%3D&amp;reserved=0
> >
>
> Any help?
>
> Iron Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibr
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...><mailto:<nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>

NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

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Date: 1/12/20 3:42 pm
From: Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
It's *Salvia gesneriflora*...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvia_gesneriflora

Steve Cardiff

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 2:05 PM Paul Dickson <Paul...> wrote:

> Iron Nan and curious Latin nomenclature nerds everywhere,
> Though it is unscientific to guess, I am going to make an educated guess
> so at least I am not being uneducated.
> In Latin, though I was not educated in it, Gesneriaceae is the African
> Violet family. Folia means leaf and flora means flower. So the spellings
> are really two different names: “African violet leaf-like” and “African
> violet flower-like”.
> So which was the Salvia named for the leaf or the flower?
> My bet is on the leaf.
> But that is just a guess.
> Paul Dickson
>
> From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds
> [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Nancy L Newfield
> Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 1:33 PM
> To: <LABIRD-L...>
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
>
> Hello Y'All,
>
> Happy New Year! Welcome to new challenges. I've been nosing around the
> fringes of various scientific disciplines for much of my life. I like to
> rely on scientific nomenclature as much as our more generally used common
> names for many living things - and herein lies the crux of my problem.
>
> I keep a list of the various plants that I grow [or try to grow] in order
> to attract hummingbirds. And, having picked up on Dennis Demcheck's nectar
> evaluation project of years ago, I keep readings of the nectar values of
> each species, subspecies, cultivar and hybrid combination.
>
> A recently acquired plant has begun to bloom and when I pulled the tag out
> of the pot to add the nectar value to my list, I discovered that the label
> name was different from the catalogue name.
>
> The plant is Salvia gesneriiflora or Salvia gesneriifolia, depending on
> which reference has the scientific name spelled correctly. Two flowers
> produced about 20 microliters of 26.4% nectar. When I recommend the plant
> of others, I want to be able to provide them with the correct spelling so
> they can be sure of what plant they are getting. Additionally, I will
> contact my source in order to ensure that his clients receive accurate
> information.
>
> The following site used both names interchangeably as if it did not make
> any difference:
>
> http://www.californiagardens.com/Plant_Pages/Salvia/salvia_gesneriiflora.htm
> <
> http://www.californiagardens.com/Plant_Pages/Salvia/salvia_gesneriiflora.htm
> >
>
> Any help?
>
> Iron Nan
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Nancy L Newfield
> Casa Colibrí
> Metairie, Louisiana USA
> <nancy...><mailto:<nancy...>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/20 12:05 pm
From: Paul Dickson <Paul...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
Iron Nan and curious Latin nomenclature nerds everywhere,
Though it is unscientific to guess, I am going to make an educated guess so at least I am not being uneducated.
In Latin, though I was not educated in it, Gesneriaceae is the African Violet family. Folia means leaf and flora means flower. So the spellings are really two different names: “African violet leaf-like” and “African violet flower-like”.
So which was the Salvia named for the leaf or the flower?
My bet is on the leaf.
But that is just a guess.
Paul Dickson

From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds [mailto:<LABIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Nancy L Newfield
Sent: Sunday, January 12, 2020 1:33 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question

Hello Y'All,

Happy New Year! Welcome to new challenges. I've been nosing around the
fringes of various scientific disciplines for much of my life. I like to
rely on scientific nomenclature as much as our more generally used common
names for many living things - and herein lies the crux of my problem.

I keep a list of the various plants that I grow [or try to grow] in order
to attract hummingbirds. And, having picked up on Dennis Demcheck's nectar
evaluation project of years ago, I keep readings of the nectar values of
each species, subspecies, cultivar and hybrid combination.

A recently acquired plant has begun to bloom and when I pulled the tag out
of the pot to add the nectar value to my list, I discovered that the label
name was different from the catalogue name.

The plant is Salvia gesneriiflora or Salvia gesneriifolia, depending on
which reference has the scientific name spelled correctly. Two flowers
produced about 20 microliters of 26.4% nectar. When I recommend the plant
of others, I want to be able to provide them with the correct spelling so
they can be sure of what plant they are getting. Additionally, I will
contact my source in order to ensure that his clients receive accurate
information.

The following site used both names interchangeably as if it did not make
any difference:
http://www.californiagardens.com/Plant_Pages/Salvia/salvia_gesneriiflora.htm<http://www.californiagardens.com/Plant_Pages/Salvia/salvia_gesneriiflora.htm>

Any help?

Iron Nan
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...><mailto:<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/20 11:33 am
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Spelling Question
Hello Y'All,

Happy New Year! Welcome to new challenges. I've been nosing around the
fringes of various scientific disciplines for much of my life. I like to
rely on scientific nomenclature as much as our more generally used common
names for many living things - and herein lies the crux of my problem.

I keep a list of the various plants that I grow [or try to grow] in order
to attract hummingbirds. And, having picked up on Dennis Demcheck's nectar
evaluation project of years ago, I keep readings of the nectar values of
each species, subspecies, cultivar and hybrid combination.

A recently acquired plant has begun to bloom and when I pulled the tag out
of the pot to add the nectar value to my list, I discovered that the label
name was different from the catalogue name.

The plant is Salvia gesneriiflora or Salvia gesneriifolia, depending on
which reference has the scientific name spelled correctly. Two flowers
produced about 20 microliters of 26.4% nectar. When I recommend the plant
of others, I want to be able to provide them with the correct spelling so
they can be sure of what plant they are getting. Additionally, I will
contact my source in order to ensure that his clients receive accurate
information.

The following site used both names interchangeably as if it did not make
any difference:
http://www.californiagardens.com/Plant_Pages/Salvia/salvia_gesneriiflora.htm

Any help?

Iron Nan
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/20 5:15 pm
From: Paul Conover <zoiseaux...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Reporting your rare birds
Labird,

      I'm currently adding reports to the LBRC page in preparation for
the upcoming LBRC meeting. If you've had the good luck to see a Review
List species (Review List here:
http://www.losbird.org/lbrc/ReviewList2019.pdf ), please submit a
report/photos. Several species have been reported in good numbers this
winter (Black-headed Grosbeak, Couch's Kingbird, etc.), and every one of
those records is valuable to the permanent record.

     If you've never submitted a report and need assistance, please
email me off-list and I'll let you know what to do.

Thanks,

Paul Conover
 

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Date: 1/10/20 12:13 pm
From: Susan Edmunds <000000208257709a-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Attendance for Whooping Crane Shooter's Arraignment Hearing?
Federal or Parish Courrthouse?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 10, 2020, at 12:04 PM, Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...> wrote:
>
> Dear LABIRD:
> The Orleans Audubon Society would like to know who is planning to attend
> the January 21 arraignment hearing in Lafayette for the Whooing Crane
> killer. Our attorneys feel it is important to have a showing of interest
> from the community. Also, we would very much appreciate a report of the
> proceedings.
>
> Reminder: The arraignment hearing for Kaenon Constantin, who shot and
> killed two Whooping Cranes in Acadia Parish in May of 2016, will take place
> on January 21, 2020 at 10:30 a.m. at the Lafayette Courthouse.
>
> Please contact me off-list if you are planning to attend.
>
> Thank you,
>
> Jennifer Coulson
> President
> *Orleans Audubon Society*
> Sign up for free OAS email announcements here:
> https://mailchi.mp/faf69a03b4e9/orleansaudubon
 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/20 10:04 am
From: Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Attendance for Whooping Crane Shooter's Arraignment Hearing?
Dear LABIRD:
The Orleans Audubon Society would like to know who is planning to attend
the January 21 arraignment hearing in Lafayette for the Whooing Crane
killer. Our attorneys feel it is important to have a showing of interest
from the community. Also, we would very much appreciate a report of the
proceedings.

Reminder: The arraignment hearing for Kaenon Constantin, who shot and
killed two Whooping Cranes in Acadia Parish in May of 2016, will take place
on January 21, 2020 at 10:30 a.m. at the Lafayette Courthouse.

Please contact me off-list if you are planning to attend.

Thank you,

Jennifer Coulson
President
*Orleans Audubon Society*
Sign up for free OAS email announcements here:
https://mailchi.mp/faf69a03b4e9/orleansaudubon
 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/20 8:04 am
From: Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Registration is open for Spring Birding Basics classes
Registration is now open for Spring Birding Basics classes in Baton Rouge
and Ponchatoula.

Link to Ponchatoula class:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pard-spring-2020-birding-basics-class-tickets-88167887525

Link to Hilltop Arboretum class in Baton Rouge:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/hilltop-spring-2020-birding-basics-class-tickets-88164619751

Class will also be offered through the Osher Lifelong Institute at LSU
(OLLI) on the same dates as the Hilltop class but in the morning (8am -
11am) at White Oak Estates in Baton Rouge. Registration is not yet open
for that class.

All classes are limited to 15 participants, so claim your spot early!

--Jane Patterson
Baton Rouge Audubon
 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/20 8:40 pm
From: Sherry, Thomas W <tsherry...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Bruce Fleury
Jay,
Thanks for all you did to support Bruce's research. You played a big role in educating us all about crawfish. Your support of Bruce meant a tremendous amount to me.
--Tom

Thomas W. Sherry (<tsherry...>)
Professor, Dept. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118
Siegel Professor of Social Entrepreneurship, Phyllis M. Taylor Center for Social Innovation and Design Thinking, Tulane University
President Elect, American Ornithological Society


"The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of those who have not viewed the world." --Alexander von Humboldt




________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...>
Sent: Thursday, January 9, 2020 9:55 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...> <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Bruce Fleury

External Sender. Be aware of links, attachments and requests.

Bruce contacted me in the early 1990s to arrange collaboration to evaluate the significance of crawfish farms as wading bird habitat. His work with Tom Sherry demonstrated conclusively that increases in wading bird populations in Louisiana was tied directly to expansion of crawfish aquaculture in the state. He'll be missed.

Jay Huner
________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Henry, Donata R <droome...>
Sent: Thursday, January 9, 2020 3:11 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...> <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Bruce Fleury

Bruce Fleury, a beloved professor at Tulane, passed away on January 3rd. He completed his dissertation on Louisianas wading birds, taught ornithology for many, many years, and recently completed a Great Courses series on the Scientific Wonder of Birds. Many of us knew and admired him as a professor, mentor, colleague, friend and fellow bird enthusiast. Please keep Bruce in your thoughts on your next birding trip. He will be missed.

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.legacy.com%2Fobituaries%2Fnola%2Fobituary.aspx%3Fn%3Dbruce-edward-fleury%26pid%3D194967831&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Ctsherry...>%7C6641fd6ea4d94f0a224c08d79581022d%7C9de9818325d94b139fc34de5489c1f3b%7C0%7C0%7C637142253680960394&amp;sdata=50vEpf%2B3YCe%2Bc01c7MsAAGy39X%2FW9V4Gd67Zjkt1pNI%3D&amp;reserved=0

Donata
 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/20 7:56 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Bruce Fleury
Bruce contacted me in the early 1990s to arrange collaboration to evaluate the significance of crawfish farms as wading bird habitat. His work with Tom Sherry demonstrated conclusively that increases in wading bird populations in Louisiana was tied directly to expansion of crawfish aquaculture in the state. He'll be missed.

Jay Huner
________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Henry, Donata R <droome...>
Sent: Thursday, January 9, 2020 3:11 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...> <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Bruce Fleury

Bruce Fleury, a beloved professor at Tulane, passed away on January 3rd. He completed his dissertation on Louisianas wading birds, taught ornithology for many, many years, and recently completed a Great Courses series on the Scientific Wonder of Birds. Many of us knew and admired him as a professor, mentor, colleague, friend and fellow bird enthusiast. Please keep Bruce in your thoughts on your next birding trip. He will be missed.

https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/nola/obituary.aspx?n=bruce-edward-fleury&pid=194967831

Donata
 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/20 7:11 pm
From: Henry, Donata R <droome...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Bruce Fleury
Bruce Fleury, a beloved professor at Tulane, passed away on January 3rd. He completed his dissertation on Louisiana’s wading birds, taught ornithology for many, many years, and recently completed a Great Courses series on the Scientific Wonder of Birds. Many of us knew and admired him as a professor, mentor, colleague, friend and fellow bird enthusiast. Please keep Bruce in your thoughts on your next birding trip. He will be missed.

https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/nola/obituary.aspx?n=bruce-edward-fleury&pid=194967831

Donata

 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/20 11:01 am
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] eBird and the New Year
LABIRD users,

The New Year would be a great time to commit to making more documentation in eBird. Many people use eBird simply as a personal listing tool, and that’s fine, but we ask all types of eBird users to remember that other users, often people you know, use your public sightings in order to find birds themselves and often to learn from you. When dealing with a public tool like eBird, good documentation equals good communication, and without that, the attempt to use eBird as a tool of public good becomes more difficult. Additionally, we reviewers also have to make a judgement on whether to accept your records into the database based solely on the information that you provide.

Here are a few examples to consider:

- stakeout rarities: writing “stakeout” or something similar is not always helpful documentation. The comments section is mostly intended for plumage, behavior, and/or habitat information that is detailed enough to be useful to reviewers, to other users, and even to the observer. Reviewers won’t always require helpful documentation for a stakeout species, and the demand for it can vary with circumstances. If, for example, there is reason to think your observation may be the last one of a previously documented stakeout, it’s very helpful to provide clear details so all interested parties can determine the best known date of departure for the bird. And generally, adding a photo or even a brief description doesn’t take much effort on the part of any user, and it often greatly increases the scientific value of the sighting. For instance, it may help uncover changes the bird is going though, like molt. Also consider that sharing lists makes it easy to add that rarity to your year/parish/life list, but if the original list creator adds comments, those comments getting shared to all parties, which is very simply and helpful. Finally, we all make mistakes, and supplying a written description of the bird or examining our photos for submission may lead to the realization that the sighting was in error and may consequently keep us on our toes in the future. It’s happened to everyone.

- comments on target species or uncommon species: many, many eBird users look through bird records to find where they can get their next American Bittern or Lincoln’s Sparrow or Barn Owl. So, when you turn in a list, remember you’re turning in a public list. This means that comments on location and habitat may be just as important to some users as plumage. If a new birder is looking for an American Bittern and notices that you reported one from Cameron Prairie but gave no information on its whereabouts, how does that help the new birder? Writing comments like “first 100 feet on the left side of the boardwalk” or “between SW corner and observation platform” is all you have to do to help someone out. Otherwise, it’s like being the only person to find a Sprague’s Pipit at an LOS weekend but not sharing the location with anyone else. Additionally, ANY flagged species requires some sort of comment because it was either flagged because it was unusual or because the count was unusually high. But generally, please describe the field marks that you observed that allowed you to identify the bird (and eliminate other candidates), and the circumstances of the observation (distance to bird, lighting conditions, duration of observation). Doing that will often render any need for follow-up communication with a reviewer unnecessary."

- no, you don’t have to make comments for everything (but you can of course if you want to): As a rule of thumb, just keep in mind that eBird is a public tool, so if there’s a good chance other birders would want to know, you should probably make a comment. Additionally, please keep in mind that the flagging system in eBird exists for the sole reason of prompting the user to make helpful comments about identification, habitat, how you arrived at a certain number, etc.

- veteran birders aren’t off the hook: a lot of people think veteran birders get a pass; they don’t. In fact, we’d like veteran birders to lead by example with documentation and be good stewards of birding through their comments. Louisiana is as bountiful with great birders as it is with the birds themselves, and it would be wonderful and very practical to wander through eBird maps and reports and consistently see well-written, clear, helpful notes by veteran birders that newer birders can learn from.

- If you want to see the fruits of laboring over good documentation, please check out the newsletter of the Louisiana Bird Records Committee.
http://www.losbird.org/lbrc/LBRCNewsletter2019.pdf <http://www.losbird.org/lbrc/LBRCNewsletter2019.pdf>
http://www.losbird.org/lbrc/LBRC%20Newsletter%202018.pdf <http://www.losbird.org/lbrc/LBRC%20Newsletter%202018.pdf>

Happy New Year!
Your Louisiana eBird Reviewers
 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/20 6:43 am
From: Bill Fontenot <natrldlite...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Wood Stork - Abita Springs
Dear Tracey—

Re: unusual, yes, especially at this date. Relocate that racal and try for a pic!

Re: Money Hill, this site was monitored for many years by Olga and Walter Clifton. That blessed pair of humans contributed much to our bird knowledge in that part of the Florida parishes. Almost all of our avian frugivory records involving black gum (Nyssa sylvatica), for example, came from trees at Money Hill.

Hoping you and Dave will pick up the torch(!), and KNOWING that local native plant species will figure largely in your own landscape, happy 2020 to ya, and all Labirders!

bill fontenot
lafayette parish, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 8, 2020, at 4:59 PM, Tracey & David Banowetz <banowetz...> wrote:
>
> My husband and I just observed an adult wood stork at one of the ponds in the Money Hill subdivision of Abita Springs. We’ve only recently moved here and are still (re)learning the birds associated with this habitat. Is this something unusual? It certainly got us excited.
>
> Kind regards,
> Tracey Banowetz
> Abita Springs, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/20 3:41 pm
From: Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Wood Stork - Abita Springs
Ms. Banowetz,

Wood Storks are unusual anywhere in Louisiana during the winter. They are usually found in Louisiana during late spring into late summer. I believe that a Wood Stork has been reported in your area in past winters. Maybe the same bird?

Jay Huner
________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Tracey & David Banowetz <banowetz...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 8, 2020 10:59 AM
To: <LABIRD-L...> <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Wood Stork - Abita Springs

My husband and I just observed an adult wood stork at one of the ponds in the Money Hill subdivision of Abita Springs. Weve only recently moved here and are still (re)learning the birds associated with this habitat. Is this something unusual? It certainly got us excited.

Kind regards,
Tracey Banowetz
Abita Springs, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/20 2:59 pm
From: Tracey & David Banowetz <banowetz...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Wood Stork - Abita Springs
My husband and I just observed an adult wood stork at one of the ponds in the Money Hill subdivision of Abita Springs. We’ve only recently moved here and are still (re)learning the birds associated with this habitat. Is this something unusual? It certainly got us excited.

Kind regards,
Tracey Banowetz
Abita Springs, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/20 7:48 am
From: Chris Burke <c.davidburke1009...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Unsubscribe
I have been relocated to Pennsylvania and will no longer be birding in Louisiana. Thank you.

Chris Burke

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/20 7:33 am
From: Tom Trenchard <trench19...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] New yard bird, day #2
LaBirders,

Today my little Common Ground Dove made an appearance
around 8AM. Fortunately, I had the camera ready! According
to eBird it's a first January record for St. Tammany. I'd be
curious if anyone else is getting any Ground Doves.

BTW, yesterday he was associating with Inca Doves (5); today
he was with a couple of Mournings.

So, I'm ready for our Northshore Reviewer, Oscar!

Tom T.


**************
Tom Trenchard
Covington, LA
**************
 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/20 7:00 am
From: Larry Raymond <0000014505365302-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Natchitoches CBC
The 52nd Natchitoches CBC was held on Saturday, January 4, 2020.  Eleven participants fanned out in 5 teams to cover the circle and scored a respectable 111 species.  Best birds were a Couch's Kingbird found by Hubert Hervey and Matt Courtman (new to count - confirmed by vocalizations; paperwork will be submitted to LBRC) and Black-necked Stilt found by John Dillon and Gerry Click (new to count).  Other good birds included Common Gallinule (8 previous counts); Vermilion Flycatcher (13 previous counts and regular the last few years); Lark Sparrow (2 previous counts - found by Hubert and Matt); White-breasted Nuthatch (10 previous counts); Harris's Sparrow (10 previous counts); Henslow's Sparrow (7 previous counts - found by John Dillon and Gerry Click); and, Merlin (15 previous counts).  Thanks to all of the participants.  Larry
Larry R. Raymond, Shreveport
 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/20 8:33 am
From: programs braudubon.org <programs...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] BRAS Presentation Thurs, Jan 9th
**I just received a message from BREC that the Glenstone gate will be locked and all entry must be through the main gate, which is located on N. Oak Hills Pkwy. The presentation will still be held in our usual location - the Education Building (the one with the swamp mural painted on the front). You can now access the parking lot in front of the Education Building from the main entrance.


> On January 6, 2020 at 8:25 PM Jane Patterson <seejanebird...> wrote:
>
>
> Just a reminder that we are holding a great program this Thursday, January
> 9th. If you're familiar with Kelby Ouchley's work, you will want to be
> sure to attend!
>
> PRESENTATION TITLE: “Flora & Fauna of the Civil War” (with an emphasis on
> birds)
>
> PRESENTER: Kelby Ouchley
>
> Kelby Ouchley is a biologist and writer and managed National Wildlife
> Refuges for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for 30 years. Since 1995 he
> has written and narrated Bayou-Diversity, an award-winning weekly
> conservation program for public radio. His six published books include:
> Flora and Fauna of the Civil War; the novel Iron Branch; Bayou-Diversity:
> Nature and People in the Louisiana Bayou Country, Bayou-Diversity 2,
> American Alligator: Ancient Predator in the Modern World, and Natural
> Words: A Dictionary for Naturalists. He has received the Louisiana
> Governor’s Conservationist of the Year award. Kelby and his wife Amy live
> in Rocky Branch, Louisiana.
>
> PRESENTATION DESCRIPTION: Using the words of the war’s participants, Kelby
> Ouchley will discuss the roles of wild plants and animals in the Civil War
> including the impacts of the war on flora and fauna and conversely the
> impacts of these species on the conflict. For this talk, birds will be
> emphasized!
>
> DATE: Thursday, January 9th
>
> TIME: 7:00 - 8:00 PM; Refreshments offered 6:45 - 7:00 PM
>
> LOCATION: BREC's Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Building*
>
> 10533 N. Glenstone Place, Baton Rouge, LA 70810
>
> ****Please note that the location is NOT the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature
> Center. It is the Education Building, which is located on the back corner
> of N. Glenstone Place, a U-shaped street off of Bluebonnet Blvd. The
> Education Building has a swamp mural painted on the front.***
>
> Attendance is free for all BRAS Members, $3 at the door for non-BRAS
> Members and $2.50 for non-BRAS seniors (price of admission at the
> Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center).
>
> Please RSVP if you plan on attending (programs AT braudubon.org) so that we
> can add your name to the guest list.
>
> Thank you,
> Katie Percy
> Baton Rouge Audubon Society
 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/20 7:20 pm
From: glenn ousset <gousset...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Ash-throated Flycatcher in New Orleans
Renee Sawyer and I relocated an Ash-throated Flycatcher this morning at the Audubon La Nature Center in eastern New Orleans. It was first seen on Dec 30, IDed as a Myiarchus. Today, it was at the edge of the woods at the entrance on Lake Forest Blvd. The grounds of the Nature Center are opened daily at 8 am.

We also found an Indigo Bunting and a Painted Bunting pair at the wood lot edge in the little Deer Park development on Lake Forest Blvd, across from Joe Brown Park.

Glenn Ousset
 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/20 5:26 pm
From: Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Fwd: [LABIRD-L] BRAS Presentation Thurs, Jan 9th
Just a reminder that we are holding a great program this Thursday, January
9th. If you're familiar with Kelby Ouchley's work, you will want to be
sure to attend!

PRESENTATION TITLE: “Flora & Fauna of the Civil War” (with an emphasis on
birds)

PRESENTER: Kelby Ouchley

Kelby Ouchley is a biologist and writer and managed National Wildlife
Refuges for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for 30 years. Since 1995 he
has written and narrated Bayou-Diversity, an award-winning weekly
conservation program for public radio. His six published books include:
Flora and Fauna of the Civil War; the novel Iron Branch; Bayou-Diversity:
Nature and People in the Louisiana Bayou Country, Bayou-Diversity 2,
American Alligator: Ancient Predator in the Modern World, and Natural
Words: A Dictionary for Naturalists. He has received the Louisiana
Governor’s Conservationist of the Year award. Kelby and his wife Amy live
in Rocky Branch, Louisiana.

PRESENTATION DESCRIPTION: Using the words of the war’s participants, Kelby
Ouchley will discuss the roles of wild plants and animals in the Civil War
including the impacts of the war on flora and fauna and conversely the
impacts of these species on the conflict. For this talk, birds will be
emphasized!

DATE: Thursday, January 9th

TIME: 7:00 - 8:00 PM; Refreshments offered 6:45 - 7:00 PM

LOCATION: BREC's Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Building*

10533 N. Glenstone Place, Baton Rouge, LA 70810

****Please note that the location is NOT the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature
Center. It is the Education Building, which is located on the back corner
of N. Glenstone Place, a U-shaped street off of Bluebonnet Blvd. The
Education Building has a swamp mural painted on the front.***

Attendance is free for all BRAS Members, $3 at the door for non-BRAS
Members and $2.50 for non-BRAS seniors (price of admission at the
Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center).

Please RSVP if you plan on attending (programs AT braudubon.org) so that we
can add your name to the guest list.

Thank you,
Katie Percy
Baton Rouge Audubon Society
 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/20 9:47 am
From: Rob Dobbs <rcdobbs...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Sweet Lake - Cameron Prairie CBC summary
The 11th Sweet Lake – Cameron Prairie CBC was held Sat. Dec. 21, 2019. 14
participants in eight parties covered the count circle, and tallied a total
of 137 species. That number is 7 species under the count’s 10-year average
(144 species), but only 3 under the most recent 5-year average (140
species). (Similarly, our total of 14 participants was also below the
count’s 10-year average of 19 participants.)



Highlights included a remarkable 5 count firsts: Marbled Godwit, Fish Crow,
Black-and-white Warbler (long awaited!), Nashville Warbler, and
Black-throated Green Warbler. Additional highlights included Groove-billed
Ani (2 previous records), Northern Waterthrush (1 previous), 2 Prairie
Warblers by 2 parties (2 previous records), Grasshopper Sparrow (1
previous), and Western Meadowlark (1 previous).



The biggest miss was Lesser Scaup (missed only once previously). Other low
counts included Gadwall, Eurasian Collared-Dover, Wilson’s Snipe, Snowy
Egret, White-faced Ibis, and Cooper’s Hawk. High counts included White-eyed
and Blue-headed vireos, House Wren, Gray Catbird (128 vs previous high
count of 84), Hermit Thrush, Lincoln’s Sparrow, and Pine Warbler (143 vs
previous high of 103).



All parties had at least one exclusive, of which there was a collective
total of 20. Exclusives included all of the above-mentioned highlights
(except for Prairie Warbler), plus Wood Duck, American Avocet,
Black-bellied Plover, Laughing Gull, Black-crowned Night-Heron, Glossy
Ibis, Osprey, Hairy Woodpecker, Golden-crowned Kinglet, and Field Sparrow.



Many thanks to our 14 participants (!!), Cameron Prairie NWR, Sweet Lake
Land and Oil Co., and additional private land owners for access to
property.

--
Rob Dobbs
Lafayette, LA
 

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Date: 1/6/20 9:44 am
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Western Tanager
Reporting for James 'JZ' Beck:

'JZ' reports a female Western Tanager in the woodlot at the intersection
Hammond and Gawain in Gentllly. 'JZ' is unsure of public access, but in
the past, it has been covered on the New Orleans CBC.

The bird was with a mixed flock of warblers - Yellow-rumped and Pine.

*Iron Nan*
--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

Back to top
Date: 1/5/20 10:13 am
From: David Booth <david...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Lake Charles CBC Results
2019 Lake Charles CBC

This year we had the pleasure of setting a new high for this count of 121.
Established in the 1980s and abandoned four years later, it was resurrected
by Irvin Louque in January of 2016. This year the count was assumed by David
Booth when Irvin became the Compiler of the Sabine CBC. This makes the fifth
year since resuming the count. The Gulf Coast Bird Club has been the
sponsoring organization and many members and non-members have participated
over the years. This year we had eleven participants 8 of which are club
members and three were out of town volunteers. We thank each and every
volunteer for participating d making individual contributions. Notable birds
for this count were: Common Loon, Least Bittern, Bald Eagle, 71 Black
Skimmers, Black-and-white Warbler, Yellow Warbler and Lincoln's Sparrow.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/20 7:31 pm
From: Jed Pitre <feralbiologist...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Thibodaux CBC results
The 22nd Thibodaux CBC was held on Saturday, December 28 with 22 observers.
Volunteers counted a total of 117 species, beating our high count of 115
(count #97).
Every sector had at least 2 exclusives. We had our highest counts ever (not
accounting
for effort) of Carolina Chicadee (250) and Carolina Wren (222). Highlights
include:
Neotropic Cormorant (1), Broad-winged Hawk (1), Buff-bellied Hummingbird
(1),
Say's Phoebe (1), Winter Wren (2), Sedge Wren (1), Black and White Warbler
(4),
American Redstart (2), Yellow-throated Warbler (1), Grasshopper Sparrow
(1),
Vesper Sparrow (2) and Rusty Blackbird (7).

Thanks to all our volunteers that made this happen!

Delaina LeBlanc & Jed Pitre
 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/20 10:49 am
From: Jane Patterson <seejanebird...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Tropical Kingbird still at Cap Lakes BTR
If you’re doing the Baton Rouge CBC, ignore this message and concentrate on
your count :)

The tropical Kingbird is still present at the north end of the large
Capitol Lake. As others have observed, it was in the tallows at first,
being pestered by mockingbirds. It flew East across the lake and was last
seen fly catching from a short cypress tree on the northeast side of the
lake.

We did not find either Prairie or Wilson’s warbler in the northwest corner
of the lake. If someone finds them today, please let me know so I can add
them to the CBC list.

Thanks,
Jane Patterson
Counting birds in Baton Rouge.
 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/20 9:43 am
From: Oscar Johnson <ojohns7...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Western Kingbird and Ash-throated Flycatcher Baton Rouge
Beau Rapier round a Western Kingbird and an Ash-throated Flycatcher in the batture woodland on the Mississippi River levee in Baton Rouge, near the flagpole at the end of Skip Bergman Drive.

Oscar

--
Oscar Johnson

Ph.D. Candidate
Museum of Natural Science, Department of Biological Sciences
Louisiana State University
119 Foster Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
<ojohns7...> <henicorhina...>
http://www.oscarjohnson.net/
 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/20 8:00 am
From: Terri Skelton <00000140e212e0d0-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Reserve-Bonne Carre Spillway CBC
Wow! Awesome! Where were the vermillion and western kingbird seen?

Terri D. Skelton
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 4, 2020, at 8:11 AM, Melvin Weber <mweber...> wrote:
>
> On Dec 26, 10 observers in 6 parties found 126 species. Heavy fog till 8 or 9 am but then clear for the rest of the day. Highlights include 2 Western Kingbirds, a Vermillion, a Prairie Warbler and two Summer Tanagers. Other birds of interest include BB Whistling Duck, Bufflehead, Goldeneye, Neotropic Cormorant and Rusty Blackbird along with Buff-bellied, Black-chinned, Rufus type and Ruby Throated Hummers.. Lots of expected species missed this year as the number of observers dwindles, habitat loss, and climate change all play their part. Still I think we produced a pretty decent tally sheet.
 

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Date: 1/4/20 6:11 am
From: Melvin Weber <mweber...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Reserve-Bonne Carre Spillway CBC
On Dec 26, 10 observers in 6 parties found 126 species. Heavy fog till 8 or 9 am but then clear for the rest of the day. Highlights include 2 Western Kingbirds, a Vermillion, a Prairie Warbler and two Summer Tanagers. Other birds of interest include BB Whistling Duck, Bufflehead, Goldeneye, Neotropic Cormorant and Rusty Blackbird along with Buff-bellied, Black-chinned, Rufus type and Ruby Throated Hummers.. Lots of expected species missed this year as the number of observers dwindles, habitat loss, and climate change all play their part. Still I think we produced a pretty decent tally sheet.
 

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Date: 1/3/20 4:11 pm
From: Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Blue Grosbeak and intensive batture survey in Old Jefferson
LaBirders:

I devoted 5.5 hours on Jan 1-2 to doing an intensive survey of wintering birds in the batture woods and ponds between Causeway and Clearview in Old Jefferson. Highlight was a Blue Grosbeak, in weeds along the sand deposits on the river edge. A total of 52 species were detected. Over half the birds counted were Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks (635), which have taken a liking to one of the ponds in the area (not visible from the levee). Other highlites included Bald Eagle, Peregrine Falcon, Great Horned/Barred Owl (large owl fly-by), an immature Common Gallinule (very restricted within urban New Orleans), 46 Orange-crowned and 3 Wilson's Warblers. Surprisingly, I only had one Carolina Wren- I wonder if the prolonged river flood of last spring/summer drove them from these woods (?). Another highlight was an Armadillo, which I have never seen alive this far into New Orleans before.

I also neglected to post that I had a Nashville Warbler in this same stretch on 12/19.

Also, since I am interested in what habitat conditions are the minimum required to lure migrant birds to winter over in the city, for the last 15 years I have been eye-ing a small cattail swale between the busy lanes of Clearview Parkway at Jefferson Hwy, which is towered-over by the elevated ramps of the Huey P Long bridge approach. I have long wondered if any birds actually 1) were able to discover this spot; 2) were tolerant of the traffic, and 3) were sufficiently unintimidated by the bridgeworks looming overhead, to winter here. I finally got up the nerve to walk over to it (taking advantage of the quietness/slow traffic on New Years morning). There were 8 Swamp Sparrows and one Marsh Wren- both species hard to come by in dense urban New Orleans. I clapped several times to see if I could get a rail to respond, but no luck. Still, better than I expected.

PY



NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
 

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Date: 1/3/20 1:49 pm
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Claiborne CBC
LABIRD,

Yesterday was the 16th Claiborne CBC, and we literally only had about one hour without rain. I’d very much like to thank all the participants, especially so many new ones who made a long drive to help bird through about nine hours of rain! THANKS TO ALL!!!

Despite the miserable conditions and despite the fact that all but 2 or 3 territories had birders that had mostly never birded them, we had 98 species for the count with some nice highlights. Northern Pintail, Greater Scaup, Wild Turkey, Merlin, White-eyed Vireo, Pine Siskin, Rusty Blackbird, and Brewer’s Blackbird were all great finds. And although 98 species sounds low compared to South Louisiana counts, there are probably no more than about ten species that you could say were true misses. So, overall, it was a very productive count.

John Dillon
Athens, LA
Drying out today.
 

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Date: 1/3/20 1:22 pm
From: David Muth <MuthD...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Venice CBC
Despite morning fog and some rain causing delays, seven observers in two parties recorded 123 species, of which 17 will be boldfaced, including:

1 Chuck-will's-widow
4 Yellow-crowned Night-herons
2 Broad-winged Hawks
3 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
1 Bell's Vireo
1 Grasshopper Sparrow that posed for photos
1 Bullock's Oriole
16 Bronzed Cowbirds
13 species of warbler including
1 Ovenbird
2 Northern Waterthrush
1 Black-and-white
1 Bay-breasted (exceptional)
1 Yellow-throated (only)
2 Prairie
1 Black-throated Green
1 Indigo Bunting
2 Painted Buntings

David Muth
New Orleans
 

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Date: 1/1/20 12:42 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Black-headed Grosbeak at Feeder, New Orleans
Tom,

Looking at Missy Bowen's image of your Black-headed Grosbeak, I am pretty
sure that it was someone else who filched my Black-headed Grosbeak - and
that person is keeping mum.

*Iron Nan*

On Sun, Dec 29, 2019 at 11:25 AM Sherry, Thomas W <tsherry...>
wrote:

> I haven't seen any goldfinches or siskins yet in my yard in New Orleans
> I'm waiting), but I've had repeat visits this morning from a black-headed
> grosbeak, I'm guessing a first year male.
>
> Tom Sherry
>


--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

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Date: 1/1/20 12:21 pm
From: James V Remsen <najames...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Tropical Kingbird Baton Rouge
LABIRD: Tropical Kingbird update: This morning, the bird was on the east shore of the lake in isolated cypress trees much of the time, and thus only distantly visible, but finally crossed the lake and fed briefly in large tallow trees in NW corner.

Also, the Prairie Warbler spotted yesterday by Mark Meunier and Joan Garvey was see twice along the NW shore. The bird is s strongly marked male, thus bringing up the possibility that it is the same individual that wintered there last year.


===================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najames<at>LSU.edu

> On Dec 30, 2019, at 11:21 AM, Oscar Johnson <ojohns7...> wrote:
>
> I just re-found the kingbird reported a few days ago at Capitol Lakes. It is at the north end of the main lake by the Department of Insurance building (here: 30.4618187, -91.1857144) and is a calling Tropical Kingbird. I have photos and a poor recording which I will add to eBird soon.
>
> Oscar
>
> --
> Oscar Johnson
>
> Ph.D. Candidate
> Museum of Natural Science, Department of Biological Sciences
> Louisiana State University
> 119 Foster Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
> <ojohns7...> <henicorhina...>
> https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.oscarjohnson.net%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Cnajames...>%7Ce30969a66304417308bf08d78d4cb464%7C2d4dad3f50ae47d983a09ae2b1f466f8%7C0%7C0%7C637133232911297826&amp;sdata=1im5A1QgypEDCkOeOaQ9huJh5UceVA%2BEY1wITdgKJ1o%3D&amp;reserved=0
 

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Date: 1/1/20 6:58 am
From: Holly Morales <tashayoda3...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Slidell-Northshore CBC
Thank you Wendy for taking over as compiler for the count. We had a great
day, despite the weather!

On Tue, Dec 31, 2019 at 3:52 PM Wendy Rihner <wrihner...> wrote:

> The Slidell-Northshore CBC was held on December 29, quite a foggy day. I
> would like to give a shout out to all of the participants, especially my
> group, as we dealt with fog and rain and rainy fog for most of the morning.
>
> The species #s were low, a grand total of 116. But of that 116 were these
> highlights: Baltimore Oriole, a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak, a banded
> Rufous Hummingbird, a Buff-bellied and a female Ruby-throated.
>
> My group got a male Yellow-throated Warbler, the highlight of our day.
>
> Thanks to all, and Happy New Year to everyone!
>
> Wendy Rihner
>
 

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Date: 1/1/20 6:50 am
From: Wise, Jon <Wise...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Ruddy Ducks in Metairie
Pair swimming in Lafreniere Park lagoon now

Jon W. Wise


Chaffe McCall L.L.P. CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This e-mail transmission, including attachments, if any, is intended for use only by the addressee(s) named herein and contains confidential and/or privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail or telephone and delete the original and destroy all electronic and other copies of this message. If you are the intended recipient but do not wish to receive communications through this medium, please so advise the sender immediately.
 

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Date: 12/31/19 1:52 pm
From: Wendy Rihner <wrihner...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Slidell-Northshore CBC
The Slidell-Northshore CBC was held on December 29, quite a foggy day. I
would like to give a shout out to all of the participants, especially my
group, as we dealt with fog and rain and rainy fog for most of the morning.

The species #s were low, a grand total of 116. But of that 116 were these
highlights: Baltimore Oriole, a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak, a banded
Rufous Hummingbird, a Buff-bellied and a female Ruby-throated.

My group got a male Yellow-throated Warbler, the highlight of our day.

Thanks to all, and Happy New Year to everyone!

Wendy Rihner
 

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Date: 12/30/19 9:21 am
From: Oscar Johnson <ojohns7...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Tropical Kingbird Baton Rouge
I just re-found the kingbird reported a few days ago at Capitol Lakes. It is at the north end of the main lake by the Department of Insurance building (here: 30.4618187, -91.1857144) and is a calling Tropical Kingbird. I have photos and a poor recording which I will add to eBird soon.

Oscar

--
Oscar Johnson

Ph.D. Candidate
Museum of Natural Science, Department of Biological Sciences
Louisiana State University
119 Foster Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
<ojohns7...> <henicorhina...>
http://www.oscarjohnson.net/
 

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Date: 12/29/19 2:09 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Black-headed Grosbeak at Feeder, New Orleans
Tom, LABIRDers,

My Black-headed Grosbeak was MIA today. Does anybody know how to dust for
fingerprints on a bird?

*Iron Nan*


On Sun, Dec 29, 2019, 11:25 Sherry, Thomas W <tsherry...> wrote:

> I haven't seen any goldfinches or siskins yet in my yard in New Orleans
> I'm waiting), but I've had repeat visits this morning from a black-headed
> grosbeak, I'm guessing a first year male.
>
> Tom Sherry
>
 

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Date: 12/29/19 1:24 pm
From: Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] New Iberia CBC date change - now Jan 5
LAbird,

Please note that because of the weather forecast, the New Iberia CBC date has been moved from Jan 2 to now being scheduled for Jan 5. If you are interested in participating, please contact me off list.

The other Louisiana CBCs dates and compilers can be found on the LOS site here:
http://losbird.org/la_cbc_2019.pdf

Merry Christmas Bird Count Season!
Erik Johnson
Sunset, LA
 

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Date: 12/29/19 9:25 am
From: Sherry, Thomas W <tsherry...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Black-headed Grosbeak at Feeder, New Orleans
I haven't seen any goldfinches or siskins yet in my yard in New Orleans I'm waiting), but I've had repeat visits this morning from a black-headed grosbeak, I'm guessing a first year male.

Tom Sherry
 

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Date: 12/29/19 8:00 am
From: James W. Beck <loxosceles928...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Pine Siskin - Marrero
Just had a flyover siskin with a group of goldfinches here in our Marrero
yard. -jz

James W. Beck
Marrero, LA
 

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Date: 12/29/19 5:59 am
From: Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Redhead 'irruptions'?
Does anyone in the non hunting community ever check the DU and Delta Waterfowl sites?

Jay Huner
________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...>
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2019 12:49:31 AM
To: <LABIRD-L...> <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Redhead 'irruptions'?

I wonder if the grassbeds offshore aren't as productive this year? Any intel on numbers from their core habitat?

Erik Johnson
Sunset, LA




-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> On Behalf Of Toddy Guidry
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 2:22 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Redhead 'irruptions'?

With the recent 'irruptions' discussions, I've noticed significantly more Redheads in reports this year.

Not only did we have record number at the Palmetto Count, but I've heard numerous hunting reports from Kaplan to Gueydan about Redheads, sometimes as many as 5 per blind.

Most hunters say they've never seen this many in rice country. Scaup were not mentioned per se, but we had very good numbers of Scaup as well.



I'm wondering if this might also be food related or just a figment of my imagination.



Toddy Guidry
 

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Date: 12/29/19 4:49 am
From: Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Redhead 'irruptions'?
I wonder if the grassbeds offshore aren't as productive this year? Any intel on numbers from their core habitat?

Erik Johnson
Sunset, LA




-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> On Behalf Of Toddy Guidry
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 2:22 PM
To: <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Redhead 'irruptions'?

With the recent 'irruptions' discussions, I've noticed significantly more Redheads in reports this year.

Not only did we have record number at the Palmetto Count, but I've heard numerous hunting reports from Kaplan to Gueydan about Redheads, sometimes as many as 5 per blind.

Most hunters say they've never seen this many in rice country. Scaup were not mentioned per se, but we had very good numbers of Scaup as well.



I'm wondering if this might also be food related or just a figment of my imagination.



Toddy Guidry


 

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Date: 12/28/19 8:31 am
From: Bonnie Ardoin <000000d00dff04cd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Black Headed Grosbeak
big surprise this morning . First time in our yard, a female Black Headed Grosbeak. Nice late Xmas gift.
 

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Date: 12/28/19 7:38 am
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Bell's vireo
Looking at the location of where Kristina Riehl found the bird, it is a bit
further north than the previous Bell's vireo spot.
Is it on restricted property?
I don't have Ms Riehl's email to ask her privately....sorry.
Janine in Folsom, LA
 

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Date: 12/27/19 2:25 pm
From: Matt Brady <podoces...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Pacific-slope/Cordilleran Flycatcher, S of Crowley
Hello all. Earlier today Van Remsen had brief looks at a probable WESTERN
FLYCATCHER SE of Crowley.

This afternoon I was able to refind the bird and spend some time observing
it. It’s clearly either a Pacific-slope or Cordilleran, but given that it
basically only responded to Pac-slope calls, that’s where my money is
ID-wise. Unfortunately, it only gave the generic high, thin position call
twice (I was unable to record it), so the ID is not 100% confirmed to
species. The location is At the intersection of Primeaux and Wild Turkey,
off of LA 1115. There are some Live Oaks with a dense Privet understory on
the south side of the road, and that’s where the bird was. The bird was at
the edge of the woods, so no need to enter them, especially as they are
private property.

Also at this location was a flyover HARLAN’S HAWK.

I’ll submit an eBird checklist with photos this evening.

Matt Brady
Baton Rouge
 

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Date: 12/27/19 12:22 pm
From: Toddy Guidry <guidrys...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Redhead 'irruptions'?
With the recent 'irruptions' discussions, I've noticed significantly more
Redheads in reports this year.

Not only did we have record number at the Palmetto Count, but I've heard
numerous hunting reports from Kaplan to Gueydan about Redheads, sometimes as
many as 5 per blind.

Most hunters say they've never seen this many in rice country. Scaup were
not mentioned per se, but we had very good numbers of Scaup as well.



I'm wondering if this might also be food related or just a figment of my
imagination.



Toddy Guidry


 

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Date: 12/27/19 10:43 am
From: Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
We have had goldfinches in gum trees in the Alexandria area for about three weeks but none at feeders yet. A friend has siskins nearby this week. Nothing resembling a Purple Finch yet but were all over last year at this time.

Jay Huner
________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Dissemination of Information on Louisiana Birds <LABIRD-L...> on behalf of Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...>
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2019 3:43:23 AM
To: <LABIRD-L...> <LABIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch

Bill, LABIRD,
Up here in NE LA, the Purple finch arrival is similar most years with last year being the best PUFI year since I've moved back in 1999. Am Goldfinch arrive in late fall and usually come to the feeders in Jan. Pine Siskins are variable but tend to show up with AMGO. It is not unusual for me to see PISI reports in S La when I've seen none here. This is especially true sine all the pine trees in the yard died.
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish
 

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Date: 12/27/19 7:43 am
From: Roselie Overby <rosebird8791...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
Bill, LABIRD,
Up here in NE LA, the Purple finch arrival is similar most years with last year being the best PUFI year since I've moved back in 1999. Am Goldfinch arrive in late fall and usually come to the feeders in Jan. Pine Siskins are variable but tend to show up with AMGO. It is not unusual for me to see PISI reports in S La when I've seen none here. This is especially true sine all the pine trees in the yard died.
Roselie Overby
Oak Grove in W. Carroll Parish
 

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Date: 12/27/19 7:11 am
From: Jeffrey W. Harris <jwharris30...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
Hey All,

Reading about Snowy Owls suggests that not all irruptions signify a
negative relationship with food. In fact, many owls in irruptive years are
quite healthy. See writings by Scott Weidensaul.

Sincerely,

Jeff Harris

On Fri, Dec 27, 2019, 9:04 AM Philip Bradley <
<0000018eaa441e8c-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Although it's exciting to see irruption birds, it is really a sad thing as
> their populations dramatically decrease because of their efforts to find
> food.
>
> Phil Bradley
> Shreveport
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> > On Dec 27, 2019, at 7:15 AM, Bill Fontenot <natrldlite...> wrote:
> >
> > Erik/Labird —
> >
> > Yeah, the south Louisiana winter PUFI thing has always tilted toward
> enigmatic....in my experience here in the southern interior the “usual”
> winter PUFI pattern had their arrival stalled until the first of January (
> = PUFI very uncommon to rare on south LA CBC species lists. I participated
> and co-compiled the Pine Prairie CBC (the northernmost of south Louisiana
> CBCs) and it always represented my best chance to snag a CBC PUFI.
> >
> > This pattern was roughly similar to that of junco and siskin in south
> LA, with these two often making their appearances during CBC season.
> >
> > Nowadays it seems all bets are off re: any sort of definable winter
> pattern with PUFI and PISI down here; and i’m concerned that our
> increasing irruption year experiences down here equate to wild food crop
> failures in their traditional winter habitats to our north.
> >
> > Bill Fontenot
> > Lafayette parish, LA
> >
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Dec 26, 2019, at 11:55 AM, Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> LAbirders,
> >>
> >> There have literally been zero Purple Finches reported to eBird this
> fall/winter in Louisiana, which amounts to be the complete opposite of last
> year's banner irruption year. So I was pretty shocked to see a female-type
> Purple Finch at my feeder a few minutes ago. Except for one report from
> Gainsville, FL in November, this makes for the southern-most report in the
> east so far this winter. Fingers crossed a few more show up. I had a lot of
> fun watching and studying them last winter.
> >>
> >> No goldfinches yet (they're still hitting sweet gums and ash trees in
> my area) and only a handful of Chipping Sparrows so far.
> >>
> >> Happy birding,
> >> Erik Johnson
> >> Sunset, LA
>
 

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Date: 12/27/19 7:04 am
From: Philip Bradley <0000018eaa441e8c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
Although it's exciting to see irruption birds, it is really a sad thing as their populations dramatically decrease because of their efforts to find food.

Phil Bradley
Shreveport

Sent from my iPad

> On Dec 27, 2019, at 7:15 AM, Bill Fontenot <natrldlite...> wrote:
>
> Erik/Labird —
>
> Yeah, the south Louisiana winter PUFI thing has always tilted toward enigmatic....in my experience here in the southern interior the “usual” winter PUFI pattern had their arrival stalled until the first of January ( = PUFI very uncommon to rare on south LA CBC species lists. I participated and co-compiled the Pine Prairie CBC (the northernmost of south Louisiana CBCs) and it always represented my best chance to snag a CBC PUFI.
>
> This pattern was roughly similar to that of junco and siskin in south LA, with these two often making their appearances during CBC season.
>
> Nowadays it seems all bets are off re: any sort of definable winter pattern with PUFI and PISI down here; and i’m concerned that our increasing irruption year experiences down here equate to wild food crop failures in their traditional winter habitats to our north.
>
> Bill Fontenot
> Lafayette parish, LA
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Dec 26, 2019, at 11:55 AM, Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...> wrote:
>>
>> LAbirders,
>>
>> There have literally been zero Purple Finches reported to eBird this fall/winter in Louisiana, which amounts to be the complete opposite of last year's banner irruption year. So I was pretty shocked to see a female-type Purple Finch at my feeder a few minutes ago. Except for one report from Gainsville, FL in November, this makes for the southern-most report in the east so far this winter. Fingers crossed a few more show up. I had a lot of fun watching and studying them last winter.
>>
>> No goldfinches yet (they're still hitting sweet gums and ash trees in my area) and only a handful of Chipping Sparrows so far.
>>
>> Happy birding,
>> Erik Johnson
>> Sunset, LA
 

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Date: 12/27/19 5:15 am
From: Bill Fontenot <natrldlite...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
Erik/Labird —

Yeah, the south Louisiana winter PUFI thing has always tilted toward enigmatic....in my experience here in the southern interior the “usual” winter PUFI pattern had their arrival stalled until the first of January ( = PUFI very uncommon to rare on south LA CBC species lists. I participated and co-compiled the Pine Prairie CBC (the northernmost of south Louisiana CBCs) and it always represented my best chance to snag a CBC PUFI.

This pattern was roughly similar to that of junco and siskin in south LA, with these two often making their appearances during CBC season.

Nowadays it seems all bets are off re: any sort of definable winter pattern with PUFI and PISI down here; and i’m concerned that our increasing irruption year experiences down here equate to wild food crop failures in their traditional winter habitats to our north.

Bill Fontenot
Lafayette parish, LA


Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 26, 2019, at 11:55 AM, Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...> wrote:
>
> LAbirders,
>
> There have literally been zero Purple Finches reported to eBird this fall/winter in Louisiana, which amounts to be the complete opposite of last year's banner irruption year. So I was pretty shocked to see a female-type Purple Finch at my feeder a few minutes ago. Except for one report from Gainsville, FL in November, this makes for the southern-most report in the east so far this winter. Fingers crossed a few more show up. I had a lot of fun watching and studying them last winter.
>
> No goldfinches yet (they're still hitting sweet gums and ash trees in my area) and only a handful of Chipping Sparrows so far.
>
> Happy birding,
> Erik Johnson
> Sunset, LA
 

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Date: 12/26/19 8:39 pm
From: Katherine Gividen <katherine...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Summer Tanager
I have a Summer Tanager visiting the feeder in my backyard here in Baton Rouge. I did an incidental list on eBird with pictures to record it’s presence. It flagged it as rare for this time of year.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/26/19 12:29 pm
From: Philip Bradley <0000018eaa441e8c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] FOS birds
While at a rehab center following surgery to get a new neck (literally) I saw four Goldfinches and 7 Juncos the first week of December. I'm home now, and have had 9 Juncos in my yard for two days. During the Red River National Wildlife Refuge's CBC this past Saturday I had two Meadowlarks, 4 Common Snipes, and a bunch of Yellow-rumped Warblers (Myrtle form). The Neotropic Cormorant that I saw two days before the CBC was a no show.

Phil Bradley
Shreveport

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 12/26/19 11:12 am
From: Charles Williams <chazbizz91...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Juncos
Our first junco of the winter showed up this morning in Greenwell Springs,
EBR Parish. Mixing with white-throated sparrows on our patio.

Charles Williams
 

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Date: 12/26/19 9:54 am
From: Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Purple Finch
LAbirders,

There have literally been zero Purple Finches reported to eBird this fall/winter in Louisiana, which amounts to be the complete opposite of last year's banner irruption year. So I was pretty shocked to see a female-type Purple Finch at my feeder a few minutes ago. Except for one report from Gainsville, FL in November, this makes for the southern-most report in the east so far this winter. Fingers crossed a few more show up. I had a lot of fun watching and studying them last winter.

No goldfinches yet (they're still hitting sweet gums and ash trees in my area) and only a handful of Chipping Sparrows so far.

Happy birding,
Erik Johnson
Sunset, LA
 

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Date: 12/25/19 2:55 pm
From: Matt Brady <podoces...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Empid sp and Black-and Whiye Warbler, Tickfaw SP
Hello all. I went on an afternoon walk at Tickfaw State Park, Livingston
Parish, today. The highlight was a briefly and somewhat distantly seen
EMPIDPONAX SP. The Empid was about the midway point on the River Trail. It
was generally olive green, with a distinctly pointed, shaggy crest, obvious
yellowish-white eye ring (possibly pointed towards the rear), pale wing
bars, and tail flicking behavior. I couldn’t get much more on it that that,
as it began drizzling and the bird flew out of view. I tried playback of
Least, Pacific-slope, and Cordillerian, but had no response. If anyone
wants to try for the bird, it’s at 30.3836472, -90.6578808, which is about
the midpoint of the trail, ~1 mile from the end of the trail that is
chained off at the parking lot (it’s a loop). There’s a broken, white
plastic bucket by the side of the trail where I had the bird.


Another notable sighting was a female BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, at the first
footbridge after the parking lot, if you start at the chained off end of
the trail. Otherwise, I had a nice selection of expected hardwood winter
birds:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S62620639


Matt Brady

Baton Rouge
 

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Date: 12/25/19 1:27 pm
From: Steven W. Cardiff <scardif...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Cheneyville-Lecompte CBC 29 December 2010 Status?
Jay-
You might want to check the LOS News or the LOS Website “LA CBCs.”

Steve Cardiff

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 25, 2019, at 7:14 AM, Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...> wrote:
>
> Does anyone know the status of this CBC. I have no information about whether it is being held this year.
>
> Jay Huner
 

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Date: 12/25/19 8:32 am
From: Jennifer Coulson <jenniferocoulson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Harlan’s Hawk at Bayou Sauvage
Merry Christmas Everyone! I recently caught a fleeting glimpse of a very
dark Buteo over I-10 at Bayou Sauvage NWR, about 0.5 mi west of Irish
Bayou. I just saw it perched and it’s a Harlan’s Hawk (currently considered
a Red-tailed Hawk).

Jennifer Coulson
 

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Date: 12/25/19 7:15 am
From: Jay V Huner <jay.huner1...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Cheneyville-Lecompte CBC 29 December 2010 Status?
Does anyone know the status of this CBC. I have no information about whether it is being held this year.

Jay Huner
 

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Date: 12/24/19 7:18 pm
From: Toddy Guidry <guidrys...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Palmetto ISland CBC
The Palmetto Island CBC was held December 18, with cool temps topping out at
about 54F. The circle is centered at Palmetto Island State Park just south
of Abbeville in Vermilion Parish. It has very varied terrain types, which
always leads to good diversity in the count. Habitats range from bottomland
hardwood in and near Palmetto Island Park, nearby ag fields, freshwater and
brackish marshes(LDWF boat crew), Cajun prairies and the industrial
Cameron-like stretch in Intracoastal City along the Vermilion River and
Intracoastal Canal. The species count was 147, up from 144 last year but
still down from the 150+ from 2016 & 17. In general, bird numbers were
down, especially shorebirds. The 4 year running total for this count is now
up to 184 species.

9 groups, 15 observers

New to the count: Ash-Throated Flycatcher, Stilt Sandpiper, Yellow Crowned
Night-Heron, Swainson's Hawk(pending documentation)

Best of the rest: Black-White Warblers (4 groups, record high), Vermilion
flycatcher(6 groups, record high), Bronzed Cowbird, 18 species of waterfowl
including record high for Redheads(155) and BB Whistling Ducks(1000), 9
birds of prey species, 5 species of wrens

Worse misses - Glossy Ibis, Peregrine Falcon, Brown Creeper, House Finch and
still no hummer stakeouts! Not too many other misses.



If anyone would like to see the entire list, feel free to email me offlist.

Toddy Guidry


 

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Date: 12/24/19 12:03 pm
From: Ellie Avegno <elliea...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Bird feast
At my daughter’s house in Riverbend- about 12 cedar waxwings , 3 American robins, red bellied woodpecker- busy flying back & forth eating berries, seeds. First waxwings of season.
Natural source of water available.
Add Carolina wrens

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/24/19 7:22 am
From: Sandra Barbier <sandabar10...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] goldfinch
Saw my first American goldfinch in the yard near a sunflower seed feeder
Monday, and an Eastern phoebe hunting from the fence. As for berries, the
squirrels ate all the yaupon berries in the yard while they were still
green in about October. The oaks also seem nearly bare of any acorns,
compared to last year, when there were tons. I don't know how bad this will
be for birds, but the squirrels are going to have a tough winter in my yard.

--
Sandra Barbier
LaPlace, LA
 

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Date: 12/24/19 6:43 am
From: Marybeth Lima <marybeth.lima...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Western kingbird
Lynn Hathaway and I had a Western Kingbird at the Rigolets Marina yesterday
afternoon. The marina is located on Highway 90 near Fort Pike.

If you enter the parking lot (there are lots of places to park), and you
face the boat launch, there are two elevated power lines in front of you
that run the expanse of the short bayou/boat entrance into the Rigolets.
The kingbird was on those wires.

Good birding y'all,

Marybeth
 

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Date: 12/22/19 11:31 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] AR Tropical Kingbird and Extralimital Vagrancy
AR-birders and LA-birders too,

I am going to send this to both the AR and LA list serves as this record and my summary relates to birds found and potentially found in both states. Please refer to my comments and 10 photos included in my eBird
Report which is linked below, before reading further.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S62549953

As noted in my report, I went to Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff, AR on 12-13-19 (some Friday the 13th’s are luckier than others) and spent the afternoon with Arkansas’s first state record Tropical Kingbird. John Redman who along with
Delos McCauley was the first to document the bird the preceding day, met me upon my arrival and was a gracious host. Kenny Nichols had alerted me that morning while I was in route that the bird made a couple of TRKI vocalizations while he
was observing it, but he didn’t get recordings and the bird was largely silent. We have 9 documented TRKI records in Louisiana , and 21 documented Couch’s Kingbird (COKI) records, and our painful experience is that most off these birds tend to be
silent, making identification and separation of the two species difficult at best. Often the only way to elicit a vocal response is to use playback of previous recordings, and many birds are still unresponsive to playback. I found this the case initially with this bird,
and as noted in my eBird report comments, I resorted to a set of recordings I had of specific Texas and Arizona populations of subspecies satrapa. I tried Couch’s Kingbird recordings as well, and the only response I got was to the Texas population of satrapa.
The bird reacted vigorously flying around me and despite the reaction, it only vocalized a few times. It did not vocalize for me as I was getting video, and I didn’t persist with the playback. In regards to Joe Neal’s request for recordings, probably in regard to this individual,
the best chance to record it is to have one person use a south Texas bird recording, and other to immediately do the recording. This bird is non vocal for the most part and weakly to non-responsive to playback, but it did respond to me several times with typical TRKI
pip, pip, pip, pip call notes which completely eliminates the possibility of COKI. As I noted in my eBird report most likely this bird is not from the Arizona population as it made no response to playback from a bird of that population. The nominate subspecies melancholicus, which
occurs throughout most of South America, is a possible reverse austral migrant and I did not completely rule that out as I did not bring recordings of that subspecies, but I believe it is highly unlikely to be this subspecies.. There is one North American record for melancholicus of a
bird found on the Farallon Islands in California, but that record is debatable as per review by our own Steve Cardiff.

The first species I think of as a potential reverse austral migrant from South America to North America is Fork-tailed Flycatcher, but care is needed here in regards to making assumptions. We now have 7 records for this species in LA and I understand there is also one for AR.
Although throughout most of North America, the southern nominate South American subspecies savana is the expected extralimital vagrant, our last two records in LA are of the subspecies monachus. This subspecies which resides in southern Mexico, Central America and extends to
Columbia and Venezuela, is a vagrant from south of the border, but not a reverse austral migrant, and is of a completely different population group. Extralimital vagrants in regards to FTFL can be from different subspecies, as is potentially the case for TRKI.

In regards to TRKI in Louisiana, of our 9 records, only one has been documented in the north part of the state. That was a bird noted in Mooringsport on the edge of Caddo Lake from December 2, 2012 until January 29, 2013. This location is 25 miles south of Arkansas, so perhaps the Pine Bluff
bird will linger until the cold of winter forces it to depart to insect laden places further south. As noted in a couple of my photos, there is a good bit of wear to its wing and tail flight feathers, but hopefully it is structurally sound enough to redirect south as opposed too starve when the cold sets in.
This is bird of the resacas and golf courses of south Texas, and throughout much of its range TRKI’s are in direct contact with massive numbers of humans, so I doubt human disturbance will be much of an issue. You can find them on almost every city street and wire line throughout much of Central
and South America. It was doing as much ground foraging as aerial fly-catching which probably relates to the cold weather and greater insect abundance closer too the ground. I suspect this type of behavior will increase as the temperatures decline. I heard a good bit of audible bill snapping during my
observation period which suggests at present it is successful enough in catching enough bugs to survive. It also spent some time in the maligned Chinese Tallows, which probably attract enough insects to attract the bird, and it appeared to be either scraping wax from the tallow seeds, eating them, or
doing both. There is good bit of oil in tallow seeds, so perhaps consumption of tallow seeds may help it survive as well.

In regards to COKI, we have 21 records in Louisiana, and three of these are in north Louisiana. All of our north Louisiana records are fall/winter records, and the dates are as follows:

11-4-14 to 1-13-15

11-27-06 to 12-3-07

1-2-06 to 1-29-06

I understand there is one AR record for this species and that was a Lake Millwood record not too far from LA. Perhaps there is a greater probability that the next non Western yellow-bellied kingbird record in AR as well as in north LA will be Couch’s Kingbird and not Tropical Kingbird. In Louisiana the vast majority
of our winter Western Kingbird records are in the south part of the state, with increasing frequency toward the southeast. Any winter yellow-bellied kingbird from north LA throughout all of AR, should be held in suspicion as being Tropical/Couch’s until proven otherwise.

My last comment relates to Ash-throated Flycatcher. In Louisiana we removed this species from our review list in 1996, and at that time we had close to 50 documented records. Since then my guess is that we have recorded over 200 additional sightings state wide, and we have had numerous sightings in northwest LA
as well. I saw one most recently about four weeks ago on November 23rd at the Headquarters Unit of the Red River NWR in Bossier Parish, and I wouldn’t be surprised if the bird didn’t fly through Arkansas to get there. I am baffled as to why there are only two records for this species in Arkansas. Erik Johnson just reported
a Great Crested Flycatcher as being documented on the Creole CBC in southwest LA on December 14th. This is probably our first ever winter record for this species, and any Myiarchus species seen in North America other than peninsular Florida in winter is probably Ash-throated Flycatcher until proven otherwise. We do
consistently see Brown-crested Flycatcher in winter in far southeast LA, so I guess this is an exception. Van Remsen recently sent me an excellent article on vagrancy as it relates to Ash-throated Flycatcher and the bottom line is that reproductive success with the production of more young relates to an increase in population.
The increase in population relates to the increased number of first year birds that have a greater tendency to become vagrants and this pattern of vagrancy is also influenced by weather patterns and especially wind flow and direction. Probability is that this correlates at some level with vagrancy as related to TRKI, COKI, and
FTFL was well.

Everybody have a great holiday season, and also tis the season for CBC’s and potential vagrants too.

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA














 

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Date: 12/22/19 12:33 pm
From: zoiseaux <zoiseaux...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] falcon
Had a large very brown falcon doing aerial gymnastics over very busy i10 between Roanoke and Welsh a few minutes ago.  I never got a good look and I went back on the frontage road to try to find it but I couldn't. . Just an FYI. Paul  Conover Lafayette Message typed with one thumb; ignore language conventions. 
 

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Date: 12/21/19 8:48 am
From: janine robin <janinerobin1982...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] In the Blind today WYES 3pm
Hello New Orleans area birder's.
This documentary was aired recently on LPB but our area could not access it.
In the Blind is a documentary on the traditions and culture of waterfowl
hunting in Louisiana.
Includes global conservation efforts to preserve and restore bird
populations, migratory flyways and the habitat.
I heard it was beautifully done.
WYES is chnl 12 on DTV.
Look in your guide for WYES.
 

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Date: 12/19/19 2:47 pm
From: Nancy L Newfield <nancy...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] alpha bird codes
Yes, D, there is more than one set of 4-letter codes [both created by the
same person] and there is a 6-letter set of codes.

https://www.birdpop.org/docs/misc/Alpha_codes_tax.pdf

Embedded above is the site I am required to use for bird banding. In
general, I do not use the codes because beginning birders may be
confused. This was a hot topic around the 'turn of the century' on every
listserv to which I subscribe. To me, it might be acceptable to use the
English common name in the subject line and then follow up with codes. I
recall someone once posting an entire day list of about 80 species using
all 4-letter codes. If one has not learned all for North America, it is
very tedious to look them up. Therefore your message may not reach all the
readers you wish to reach. A 5th grade teacher in my childhood must have
dictated that we write things out rather than abbreviate.

*Iron Nan*

On Thu, Dec 19, 2019 at 3:14 PM D Gallacher <gallachr...> wrote:

> I am confused. I could not immediately think of the four-letter alpha bird
> code for Eurasian collared dove, so I looked it up. However, I found more
> than one choice (EUCD or ECDO), depending upon the source. Could someone
> please tell me the accepted source for LABIRD? And could you provide a link
> to that source? I have been getting quite a run around on the Internet.
> Even eBird lets me search for EUCD or ECDO, and brings up Eurasian collared
> dove for both! Thanks!



--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
<nancy...>
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

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Date: 12/19/19 2:04 pm
From: programs braudubon.org <programs...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] BRAS Presentation Thurs, Jan 9th
Hi All,
 
Hoping to get this one on your calendar before the holidays. We are extremely excited to host Kelby Ouchley for our next Baton Rouge Audubon Society presentation, which is scheduled for three weeks from today – Thursday, January 9th. You do not need to be a BRAS member to attend. 
 
PRESENTATION TITLE: “Flora & Fauna of the Civil War”
 
PRESENTER: Kelby Ouchley
 
Kelby Ouchley is a biologist and writer and managed National Wildlife Refuges for the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service for 30 years. Since 1995 he has written and narrated Bayou-Diversity, an award-winning weekly conservation program for public radio. His six published books include:  Flora and Fauna of the Civil War; the novel Iron Branch; Bayou-Diversity: Nature and People in the Louisiana Bayou Country, Bayou-Diversity 2, American Alligator: Ancient Predator in the Modern World, and Natural Words: A Dictionary for Naturalists.  He has received the Louisiana Governor’s Conservationist of the Year award. Kelby and his wife Amy live in Rocky Branch, Louisiana.
 
PRESENTATION DESCRIPTION:  Using the words of the war’s participants, Kelby Ouchley will discuss the roles of wild plants and animals in the Civil War including the impacts of the war on flora and fauna and conversely the impacts of these species on the conflict.  For this talk, birds will be emphasized!
 
DATE:  Thursday, January 9th    
 
TIME:  7:00 - 8:00 PM; Refreshments offered 6:45 - 7:00 PM
 
LOCATION: BREC's Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center's *Education Building*
 
10533 N. Glenstone Place, Baton Rouge, LA 70810
 
*Please note that the location is NOT the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center. It is the Education Building, which is located on the back corner of N. Glenstone Place, a U-shaped street off of Bluebonnet Blvd. The Education Building has a swamp mural painted on the front.
 
Attendance is free for all BRAS Members, $3 at the door for non-BRAS Members and $2.50 for non-BRAS seniors (price of admission at the Bluebonnet Swamp Nature Center).
 
Please RSVP if you plan on attending (programs AT braudubon.org) so that we can add your name to the guest list.
 
Thank you,
Katie Percy
Baton Rouge Audubon Society
 

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Date: 12/19/19 1:14 pm
From: D Gallacher <gallachr...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] alpha bird codes
I am confused. I could not immediately think of the four-letter alpha bird code for Eurasian collared dove, so I looked it up. However, I found more than one choice (EUCD or ECDO), depending upon the source. Could someone please tell me the accepted source for LABIRD? And could you provide a link to that source? I have been getting quite a run around on the Internet. Even eBird lets me search for EUCD or ECDO, and brings up Eurasian collared dove for both! Thanks!
 

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Date: 12/19/19 12:22 pm
From: CAPS LOCK <richardtemplejr...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Say's Phoebe at Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge 12/19/2019
Say's phoebe spotted at Rockefeller Refuge at 1:00 PM. The link to my
ebird report with pictures follow.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S62447682

Richard Temple
 

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Date: 12/19/19 12:18 pm
From: Robert Thomas <00000208a4519d96-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] request for info on trying for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers in evening
I’ve had the same experience at Big Branch.

Robert. A. Thomas, Ph.D., Professor & Director
Center for Environmental Communication
School of Communication & Design
Loyola University
New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 USA
Cell 504-909-6568
Office 504-865-2107
Fax 504-865-2333
Www.loyno.edu/lucec

> On Dec 19, 2019, at 1:00 PM, Bill Vermillion <bill.gcjv...> wrote:
>
> Hi Peter, LABIRD,
>
> I've "roosted" Red-cockaded Woodpeckers successfully in the evening at a
> couple of places (though not at Big Branch). On one of those occasions the
> bird almost flew directly into the nest cavity without a sound and I had
> the briefest of looks in poor light. The other bird spent a little more
> time calling and foraging before entering the cavity.
>
> Bill Vermillion
>
>> On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 8:05 PM Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...> wrote:
>>
>> LAbirders:
>>
>> I commonly take visiting birders up to see the Red-cockadeds at Boy Scout
>> Rd at first light when they leave their roost holes, but have never tried
>> when they return to them in the evening. Does anyone have any experience
>> trying to get them as nightfall is approaching and they (presumably) return
>> to their holes?
>>
>> (I am aware that they are seen periodically during the daylight hours, but
>> that takes some luck- am trying to figure out whether they can be reliably
>> observed in the evenings as they come to roost for the night)
>>
>> Thanks for any input in advance,
>>
>> Peter Yaukey
>>
>> NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is
>> intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information
>> that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under
>> applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
>> notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the
>> information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this
>> communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether
>> in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately
>> contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the
>> telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
>>
 

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Date: 12/19/19 11:50 am
From: Philip Bradley <0000018eaa441e8c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Testing site for CBC gem
I was checking out a new site for the Red River Wildlife Refuge CBC this Saturday when I saw a Neotropic Cormorant flying down the Red River just south of the Jimmie Davis Bridge.

Phil Bradley
SE Shreveport

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 12/19/19 11:00 am
From: Bill Vermillion <bill.gcjv...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] request for info on trying for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers in evening
Hi Peter, LABIRD,

I've "roosted" Red-cockaded Woodpeckers successfully in the evening at a
couple of places (though not at Big Branch). On one of those occasions the
bird almost flew directly into the nest cavity without a sound and I had
the briefest of looks in poor light. The other bird spent a little more
time calling and foraging before entering the cavity.

Bill Vermillion

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 8:05 PM Peter H Yaukey <PYaukey...> wrote:

> LAbirders:
>
> I commonly take visiting birders up to see the Red-cockadeds at Boy Scout
> Rd at first light when they leave their roost holes, but have never tried
> when they return to them in the evening. Does anyone have any experience
> trying to get them as nightfall is approaching and they (presumably) return
> to their holes?
>
> (I am aware that they are seen periodically during the daylight hours, but
> that takes some luck- am trying to figure out whether they can be reliably
> observed in the evenings as they come to roost for the night)
>
> Thanks for any input in advance,
>
> Peter Yaukey
>
> NOTICE: This message, including all attachments transmitted with it, is
> intended solely for the use of the Addressee(s) and may contain information
> that is PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL, and/or EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE under
> applicable law. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
> notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution, or use of the
> information contained herein is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. If you received this
> communication in error, please destroy all copies of the message, whether
> in electronic or hard copy format, as well as attachments and immediately
> contact the sender by replying to this email or contact the sender at the
> telephone numbers listed above. Thank you!
>
 

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Date: 12/19/19 9:55 am
From: Johnson, Erik <Erik.Johnson...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Creole CBC highlights
Hello LAbirders,

The Creole CBC was run on Saturday, Dec 14. We had the most observers (30) in a very long time, even allowing us to divide up one large sector into two thoroughly covered areas. Despite heavy fog until mid-morning slowing things down early on, the sun soon came out and it was very birdy. We managed our best species total in years - unofficially at 157 + 2 count-week species (Rose-breasted Grosbeak and Lark Sparrow).

Four birds new to the count included: Sandhill Crane, Great Crested Flycatcher (1st ever winter record in LA??), Say's Phoebe, and Bronzed Cowbird. The only LBRC review-list species found was a Black-headed Grosbeak. Other bold-faced rarities were Fulvous Whistling-Duck (11), Surf Scoter (1), Eastern Whip-poor-will (1), Yellow Rail (4), Lesser Black-backed Gull (1), Yellow-crowned Night-Heron (2), Empidonax sp. (1), Wood Thrush (1), Northern Waterthrush (1), Hooded Warbler (1), Prairie Warbler (1), and Western Tanager (1). The rail drag crew also had a very quick look at what was thought to be a Black Rail, but it alluded adequate documentation.

Thanks to all that helped make such a successful count!

Happy birding,
Erik Johnson
Sunset, LA
<Erik.Johnson...>
 

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