TEXBIRDS
Received From Subject
4/20/21 4:53 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-20-21 FIVE warbler sp., Blue Grosbeak @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/19/21 4:36 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-19-21 (69 Species/. 9 warblers @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/19/21 1:48 pm Gary Richards <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender grcolts for DMARC) [texbirds] South Padre Island Birding-April 19, 2021
4/18/21 5:42 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-18-21 (70 species,8warblers@Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/17/21 7:22 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-17-21 Black-capped Vireo 3rd day @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/17/21 7:41 am J Crouch <dipper2c...> [texbirds] Peregrine Falcon contact Dan Hillsman
4/15/21 5:59 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-15-21 Bullock’s, Hooded @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/15/21 1:02 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: FOS Summer Tanager and Ruby-throated Hummer in NW Austin today April 15
4/15/21 9:17 am drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC) [texbirds] FOS Summer Tanager and Ruby-throated Hummer in NW Austin today April 15
4/14/21 6:23 pm Me <loeraroel...> [texbirds] South Bandera County White-tailed Kite
4/14/21 4:33 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-14-21 Bullock’s, G.Kiskadee @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/14/21 5:32 am Jack Chiles <chilesjack995...> [texbirds] Tuesday morning bird census, Hagerman NWR, 04-13-21
4/13/21 7:12 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-13-21 SEVEN warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/13/21 10:36 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-13-21 Black-capped Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/13/21 9:34 am Becky Reyes <breyes...> [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
4/12/21 6:31 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-12-21 Whip-poor-will @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/12/21 5:50 pm drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC) [texbirds] TOS Spanish for Birders Class online Monday April 19 at 6 p.m. - registration ends April 15
4/12/21 5:06 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-12-21 FIVE warbler species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/11/21 5:47 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-11-21 SIX warbler sp @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/10/21 3:46 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-10-21 FIVE warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/10/21 3:07 pm Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for March -Long
4/9/21 10:19 pm Troy Hibbitts <alterna2627...> [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
4/9/21 4:35 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-9-21 SIX warbler species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/9/21 3:49 pm Clayton Leopold <passerinaciris12...> [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
4/9/21 4:19 am Dell Little <dellel1119...> [texbirds] Re: Norias Division access
4/9/21 3:24 am Ray Porter <ray.porter314...> [texbirds] Norias Division access
4/8/21 7:06 pm David McDonald <dkmmdpa...> [texbirds] Re: Harrier takes small bird over my car
4/8/21 6:15 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Harrier takes small bird over my car
4/8/21 6:06 pm David McDonald <dkmmdpa...> [texbirds] Harrier takes small bird over my car
4/8/21 4:00 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-8-2021 FIVE warbler species
4/8/21 1:49 pm drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC) [texbirds] Broadwings back in Austin April 7, 2021
4/7/21 6:54 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-7-21 Seven Warbler sp. 50 total species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/7/21 11:57 am David Scott <scottrpts...> [texbirds] Gray Vireo at Big Bend
4/7/21 11:17 am Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC) [texbirds] RFI: Gray Vireo
4/7/21 4:29 am Dell Little <dellel1119...> [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
4/7/21 2:55 am Mark Welch <welch.mark3...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/7/21 2:15 am Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...> [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
4/6/21 7:52 pm Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...> [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
4/6/21 7:37 pm Kelly Bryan <kelly.b.bryan...> [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
4/6/21 7:29 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
4/6/21 6:30 pm Lamont Brown <lamont...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/6/21 6:24 pm <kjones4...> [texbirds] RFI Gray Vireo
4/6/21 2:57 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-6-21 SEVEN warbler sp./36 wa.@ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/6/21 9:52 am Jessica Tanguma <jtanguma...> [texbirds] Edinburg Scenic Wetlands List
4/6/21 9:31 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Bolivar Flats yesterday.
4/6/21 1:10 am Erik Breden <erik.breden...> [texbirds] Spring is in the Air
4/5/21 6:32 pm Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/5/21 4:34 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-5-21 Total species 51 @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/5/21 3:59 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/5/21 3:07 pm Bob Friedrichs <bird.fried...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/5/21 2:54 pm Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/5/21 2:06 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/5/21 12:46 pm John Blackwell <john.a.blackwell51...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/5/21 12:30 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/5/21 12:05 pm Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/5/21 10:15 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
4/5/21 8:50 am John Blackwell <john.a.blackwell51...> [texbirds] Pine siskins and feeders
4/4/21 12:06 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Bolivar to High Island Thursday, Migrants and wind
4/4/21 11:52 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-4-21 THIRTY warblers at once Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/3/21 7:11 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-3-21 Chuck-Will’s-Widow calling Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4/2/21 3:48 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 4-2-21 FIVE warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/31/21 8:20 pm drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC) [texbirds] Bill Clark raptor ID presentation for TOS April 9 & 10, 2021
3/31/21 7:47 pm drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC) [texbirds] March 31st Chuck in Austin
3/31/21 12:54 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Down on the coast Monday Bryan Beach to Texas City
3/31/21 11:48 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Down on the coast last Friday, new and old birds and a meeting with Monty
3/30/21 6:43 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-30-21 FIVE warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/30/21 4:18 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Long-billed Thrasher, Onion Creek Greenbelt (Travis Co.)
3/29/21 5:15 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-29-21 SEVEN warbler species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/29/21 12:18 pm Shelly Plante <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender Shelly.Plante for DMARC) [texbirds] Sponsorship available for youth Birding Classic teams
3/28/21 7:50 am Brent Ortego <brentortego...> [texbirds] Texas Breeding Bird Surveys
3/27/21 4:30 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-27-21 Audubon’s Oriole + 6 warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/27/21 1:06 pm Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC) [texbirds] Cassin's Finch
3/27/21 9:15 am paul sellin <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender pjsellin for DMARC) [texbirds] Kerr Co. HOH reopening --longish
3/26/21 5:34 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-26-21 Audubon’s Oriole/50 species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/26/21 4:22 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-27-21 Clay Taylor/Swarovski’s impromptu show and tell
3/25/21 4:34 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-25-21 FIVE warbler sp @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/25/21 2:47 pm Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...> [texbirds] Re: Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
3/24/21 8:12 pm Letha S <letha.slagle...> [texbirds] Re: Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
3/24/21 7:39 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
3/24/21 5:02 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-24-21 (49 species) Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/24/21 3:09 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Egyptian Goose breeding records in Bastrop Co. ?
3/24/21 1:19 pm Richard Harman <rharmanintx...> [texbirds] Egyptian Goose breeding records in Bastrop Co. ?
3/24/21 1:17 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-24-21 Audubon’s Oriole @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/24/21 12:11 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
3/24/21 11:14 am Petra Hockey <phockey...> [texbirds] Espiritu Santo Bay and Matagorda Island after the freeze
3/24/21 9:30 am Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC) [texbirds] Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
3/23/21 7:38 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-23-21 Eastern Towhee, Clay-colored Sparrow @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
 
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Date: 4/20/21 4:53 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-20-21 FIVE warbler sp., Blue Grosbeak @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-20-21 FIVE warbler sp. Blue Grosbeak @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Slower day today with fun visitors. Major cold front hit >6 pm with significant wind
Warblers: Black-and-white Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler
Other: Blue Grosbeak, Blue-headed Vireo, Hutton’s Vireo, White-eyed Vireo, Indigo Bunting, Painted Bunting

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/19/21 4:36 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-19-21 (69 Species/. 9 warblers @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-19-21 (69 Species/. 9 warblers @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Very exciting day with lots of activity and fun visitors! People are also finding a lot of warblers in Don’s Woods and Old Growth Forest
Warblers: BLUE-WINGED WARBLER, Black-and-white Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Northern Parula, Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Golden-cheeked Warbler(heard by many)
Other highlights: Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Yellow-breasted Chat, Chuck-Will’s-Widow, Eastern Kingbird, Lesser Yellowlegs, Hutton’s Vireo, Indigo Bunting, Painted Bunting, Blue-headed Vireo, American Crow, American Kestrel, Blue Grosbeak, Tree Swallow
Night birds from last night: 4 Chuck-Will’s-Widow, 1 Eastern Whip-poor-will

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/19/21 1:48 pm
From: Gary Richards <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender grcolts for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] South Padre Island Birding-April 19, 2021
Christy & I joined some friends today for some SPI (South Padre Island) birding.
It was a phenomenal day with a fall-out of birds.

Gary Richards, Harlingen, TX

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
Mottled Duck
Blue-winged Teal
Redhead
Pied-billed Grebe
Brown Pelican
Neotropic Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant
Least Bittern
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Tricolored Heron
Reddish Egret
Cattle Egret
Green Heron
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
White Ibis
Glossy Ibis
Roseate Spoonbill
Osprey
Virginia Rail
Sora
Purple Gallinule
Common Moorhen
American Coot
Killdeer
Upland Sandpiper
Sanderling
Pectoral Sandpiper
Dunlin
Stilt Sandpiper
Short-billed Dowitcher
Black-necked Stilt
Laughing Gull
Roseate Tern
Rock Pigeon
Mourning Dove
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Golden-fronted Woodpecker
Eastern Wood-Pewee
Great Kiskadee
Couch's Kingbird
White-eyed Vireo
Purple Martin
Barn Swallow
Marsh Wren
Swainson's Thrush
Hermit Thrush
Wood Thrush
Gray Catbird
Northern Mockingbird
Tennessee Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Cape May Warbler
Bay-breasted Warbler
Black-and-white Warbler
American Redstart
Prothonotary Warbler
Swainson's Warbler
Ovenbird
Waterthrush sp.
Kentucky Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Hooded Warbler
Wilson's Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Summer Tanager
Chipping Sparrow
Clay-colored Sparrow
Lark Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
Swamp Sparrow
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Blue Grosbeak
Indigo Bunting
Painted Bunting
Dickcissel
Red-winged Blackbird
Yellow-headed Blackbird
Great-tailed Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
Orchard Oriole
Baltimore Oriole

Number of Species: 89Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

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Date: 4/18/21 5:42 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-18-21 (70 species,8warblers@Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-18-21 (70 species,8warblers@Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Putting out report before night birds add to this list—70 species when Justin updates his checklist with Eastern Towhee that he forgot to list; 8 warblers +Golden-cheeked Warbler reported that I didn’t count; 12 Sparrow species

Warblers: Nashville Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Common Yellow-throat, Yellow Warbler +#9 is Golden-cheeked Warbler that was reported
Sparrows: 12
Other: American Crow, Brown Thrasher, Long-billed Thrasher, Painted Bunting, Indigo Bunting, Broad-winged Hawk, Blue Grosbeak, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Hutton’s Vireo, Both Western and Couch’s Kingbirds, Franklin’s Gulls, Eastern Towhee
Lots of fun visitors and more night birds to add to the list tonight. Follow the blue hyperlink to the EBird reports

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/17/21 7:22 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-17-21 Black-capped Vireo 3rd day @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-17-21 Black-capped Vireo 3rd day @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Black-capped Vireo have been seen/heard Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday. All in the same territory. With northerly winds, I don’t expect it to leave yet.
Wet weather all yesterday and strong northerly winds all today, but we managed 43 species. 4 Chuck-Will’s-Widow’s tonight and one nightjar was seen today. Please don’t bother them, they nest here, along with Common Pauraque.
Better weather tomorrow, but still from the North. Birds like to rest here before they hit the escarpment.
Thanks to all our visitors!


Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/17/21 7:41 am
From: J Crouch <dipper2c...>
Subject: [texbirds] Peregrine Falcon contact Dan Hillsman
A South Austin falconer viewed a posted eBird checklist photo and believed
that a notably large falcon seen Sunday next to Guadalupe River State Park
was an escaped bird during storm damage a month ago.

He exercised it in Buda and Kyle near the Niederwald Soil Conservation Lake
and formerly in Kenedy. He can provide photos of it's distinctive marks.

If you should spot it, let him know.

He said it is very tame and would answer a whistle or come to you. It
remained perched the 90 minutes we birded a very large field around it
while a Kestral was also in locations near it.

<danhillsman...>

(512) 963-3402

If you are on Texas Chase Birds you might post on their Facebook page.

Julie Crouch

 

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Date: 4/15/21 5:59 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-15-21 Bullock’s, Hooded @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-15-21 Bullock’s, Hooded @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Warblers: Black-and-white Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler
Others: Western Kingbird,Bullock’s Oriole, Indigo Bunting, Painted Bunting, Franklin’s Gulls, Chuck-Will’s-Widow, Blue Grosbeak, Chimney Swift
Sparrows 10 species

Lots of fun visitors and Chip Clouse just left for a late day visit. Thanks to all for helping with EBird data!

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/15/21 1:02 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: FOS Summer Tanager and Ruby-throated Hummer in NW Austin today April 15
When I worked on the former IBM campus in the '70s until 1999, I monitored
these kingbirds, there was a power station and other infrastructure and
there were usually around 5 pairs on the 70+ acres. They pretty much were
quite regular, coming in with the Painted Buntings that used to breed
behind there. April 21-23. I might add that L. Shrikes used to breed on
that campus with sometimes 4 pairs. I don't find them around town in the
summer much these days.. Had quite a few Chipping and some singing
Clay-colored Sparrows passing thru this AM

On Thu, Apr 15, 2021 at 11:17 AM drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...>
wrote:

> Hi Texbirders,
>
> A very slow-moving cold front finally made it into northwest Austin early
> this morning, dropping temperatures about 10 degrees into the low 60's,
> accompanied by a breeze from the northwest. Perhaps as a result of the
> cooler temps, the hummingbirds were feeding more regularly at my feeder,
> and I was surprised to discover that one of the adult males was a
> Ruby-throat, when the gorget flashed orange-red instead of black and
> purple. It was dark all the way to the chin, ruling out male Broad-tailed
> Hummer. This is a week or two earlier than I usually see spring migrant
> Ruby-throats in my neighborhood on the eastern edge of the Edwards Plateau
> in northwest Austin. They appear briefly in the spring, then I don't
> usually see male Ruby-throats again until late July or August.
>
> Yesterday at dusk I thought I heard my FOS Summer Tanager singing neraby,
> but there was too much noise from wind and traffic to be sure. This
> morning, though, I could clearly hear a Summer Tanager singing from the
> nearby greenbelt and even closer. April 15 is a fairly typical date for me
> to first hear this bird in northwest Austin, although I've had the as early
> as April 9 (in 2019, I believe). Their looud, whistled, slightly burry song
> is perhaps my favorite bird song among local breeders. I'm curious to see
> (if this one sticks around) what this bird looks like, as I had a
> first-summer male last summer that established a persistent territory ad
> came into my yard occasionally to bathe and drink.
>
> April 15 is also often when I see my first Western Kingbirds nearby. I
> checked the HEB parking lot on the way in to the office today, but none
> there yet as far as I could tell.
>
> Spring is springing!
>
> Good birding ya'll,
>
> Byron "Doc" Stone, Austin, Tx
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

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Date: 4/15/21 9:17 am
From: drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] FOS Summer Tanager and Ruby-throated Hummer in NW Austin today April 15
Hi Texbirders,
A very slow-moving cold front finally made it into northwest Austin early this morning, dropping temperatures about 10 degrees into the low 60's, accompanied by a breeze from the northwest. Perhaps as a result of the cooler temps, the hummingbirds were feeding more regularly at my feeder, and I was surprised to discover that one of the adult males was a Ruby-throat, when the gorget flashed orange-red instead of black and purple. It was dark all the way to the chin, ruling out male Broad-tailed Hummer. This is a week or two earlier than I usually see spring migrant Ruby-throats in my neighborhood on the eastern edge of the Edwards Plateau in northwest Austin. They appear briefly in the spring, then I don't usually see male Ruby-throats again until late July or August.
Yesterday at dusk I thought I heard my FOS Summer Tanager singing neraby, but there was too much noise from wind and traffic to be sure. This morning, though, I could clearly hear a Summer Tanager singing from the nearby greenbelt and even closer. April 15 is a fairly typical date for me to first hear this bird in northwest Austin, although I've had the as early as April 9 (in 2019, I believe). Their looud, whistled, slightly burry song is perhaps my favorite bird song among local breeders. I'm curious to see (if this one sticks around) what this bird looks like, as I had a first-summer male last summer that established a persistent territory ad came into my yard occasionally to bathe and drink.
April 15 is also often when I see my first Western Kingbirds nearby. I checked the HEB parking lot on the way in to the office today, but none there yet as far as I could tell.
Spring is springing!
Good birding ya'll,
Byron "Doc" Stone, Austin, Tx
 

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Date: 4/14/21 6:23 pm
From: Me <loeraroel...>
Subject: [texbirds] South Bandera County White-tailed Kite
Today I birded an area near Hill Country State Natural Area and had a nice list of species. A neat surprise was a single White-tailed Kite hunting in a large field between the hills! I’ve also been seeing a pair in far north Uvalde County south of Utopia.


1 Eastern Screech-Owl
1 Ladder-backed Woodpecker
1 American Kestrel
3 Ash-throated Flycatcher
1 Brown-crested Flycatcher
2 White-eyed Vireo
2 Hutton's Vireo
5 Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay
2 Black-crested Titmouse
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
1 Canyon Wren
2 Olive Sparrow
2 Field Sparrow
9 Lark Sparrow
5 Vesper Sparrow
1 Canyon Towhee
2 Black-and-white Warbler
1 Orange-crowned Warbler
2 Nashville Warbler
3 Yellow-rumped Warbler
1 Yellow-throated Warbler
6 Golden-cheeked Warbler
2 Black-throated Green Warbler
3 Summer Tanager

1 White-tailed Kite

Roel
China Grove



 

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Date: 4/14/21 4:33 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-14-21 Bullock’s, G.Kiskadee @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-14-21 Bullock’s, G.Kiskadee @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

SIX warbler species: Black-and-white Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler
Other highlights: Great Kiskadee heard for second day by many, Bullock’s Oriole, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Indigo Bunting, Hutton’s Vireo, House Wren, Yellow-breasted Chat

Lots of visitors today and covering for my leaving—I was delighted with one rush of warblers to the pond before I left.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/14/21 5:32 am
From: Jack Chiles <chilesjack995...>
Subject: [texbirds] Tuesday morning bird census, Hagerman NWR, 04-13-21
The morning started out cool, light jacket weather, with a stiff
northeastern breeze. We started by going down Raasch Trail not seeing much
activity, just the usual vultures, titmice, chickadees etc. We then went
north to the Goode area and Dead Woman Pond. About the only activity there
was a flyby Wood Duck and an assortment of shorebirds on the shore of the
lake.Later as we ventured down Wildlife Drive we found a group of six
mature Yellow-headed Blackbirds on the shore. Then we continued out to the
end of Plover Pad and found some American White Pelicans, and Forster's
Terns sitting on a sandbar. We also saw both Neotropic and Double-crested
Cormorants there. As we continued on to the other pads we saw a good
number of shorebirds, mostly Baird's Sandpipers, Pectoral Sandpipers and
Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs. As we continued on to Silliman Marsh we saw
the large group of Long-billed Dowitchers that have been around for some
time. We also saw some arriving first of season Franklin Gulls. Later in
Mineral Marsh we saw a lot of ducks including 7 male Cinnamon Teals and
American Wigeons. On our way to Meadow Pond we saw a first of season
Swainson's Thrush and 4 first of season Summer Tanagers. In a field on the
west side of the refuge we saw a flock of Upland Sandpipers. We had a
flyover immature Bald Eagle at Goode and Lucy was present early on. We
finished the day with 86 species.
eBird Checklist - 13 Apr 2021 - Hagerman NWR - 86 species
<https://ebird.org/checklist/S85472942>
Jack Chiles, Texas master naturalist and volunteer, Hagerman NWR.

 

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Date: 4/13/21 7:12 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-13-21 SEVEN warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-13-21 SEVEN warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Warblers: Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Tennessee Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler
Other spotlights: Indigo Bunting, Common Raven, Great-crested Flycatcher, Hutton’s Vireo
Warbler Pond was very slow with Sharp-shinned Hawk harassing the pond today. Old Barn had 5 warbler species and Black-capped Vireo coming for water, with some duplicates with Warbler Pond

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/13/21 10:36 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-13-21 Black-capped Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-13-21 Black-capped Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Sarah had Black-capped Vireo today—so excited, plus 5 warbler species at her location, which will be unnamed for now

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/13/21 9:34 am
From: Becky Reyes <breyes...>
Subject: [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
Hi everyone,
The days are getting warmer and we are seeing a few migrating warblers on
our grounds. Another sign of spring for us is the arrival of the
Gull-billed terns that we will see regularly during this time at our North
Pond. Our Naturalist Educator, Jessica Tanguma, and her bird walk group
today spotted 2 Green Kingfishers chasing each other at the Canal Overlook.
Below is this morning's bird list.


Happy Birding!

Species Count

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 4

Blue-winged Teal 5

Northern Shoveler 11

Plain Chachalaca 8

Least Grebe 5

Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 11

Inca Dove 3

White-tipped Dove 1

Mourning Dove 2

Chimney Swift 2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird 1

Buff-bellied Hummingbird 1

American Coot 4

Spotted Sandpiper 1

Laughing Gull 5

Gull-billed Tern 1

Neotropic Cormorant 31

Double-crested Cormorant 2

Snowy Egret 1

Cattle Egret 7

Green Heron 1

Black-crowned Night-Heron 1

Green Kingfisher 2

Ladder-backed Woodpecker 1

Great Kiskadee 2

White-eyed Vireo 2

Green Jay 2

Black-crested Titmouse 1

Purple Martin 15

swallow sp. 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2

House Wren 1

Curve-billed Thrasher 2

Long-billed Thrasher 1

Northern Mockingbird 3

Olive Sparrow 1

Clay-colored Sparrow 3

Lark Sparrow 4

Lincoln's Sparrow 2

Brown-headed Cowbird 2

Great-tailed Grackle 8

Black-and-white Warbler 3

Tennessee Warbler 1

Nashville Warbler 1

Northern Cardinal 4

Indigo Bunting 2

*Becky Reyes*

Interpretive Naturalist

Edinburg Scenic Wetlands & World Birding Center


PO Box 1079

714 Raul Longoria Rd

Edinburg, Texas 78540

956.381.9922 O 956.381-0175 F

<breyes...>

www.cityofedinburg.com
www.EdinburgWBC.org

follow us:
<https://www.facebook.com/EdinburgWBC/> [image:
https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork]
<https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork>

 

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Date: 4/12/21 6:31 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-12-21 Whip-poor-will @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-12-21 Whip-poor-will @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Don is fixing broken equipment and heard Whip-poor-will calling @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/12/21 5:50 pm
From: drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] TOS Spanish for Birders Class online Monday April 19 at 6 p.m. - registration ends April 15
Hi Texbirders,Have you had enough of shut-ins and lockdowns? Are you beginning to see light at the end of the long pandemic tunnel?Maybe like me you've even begun to consider post-pandemic travel again?
Then maybe you should start getting ready for foreign travel and sign up for TOS's Spanish for Birders class which will be taught online Monday evening April 19 from 6 to 9 p.m. by Christy Esmahan of Austin.
I've taken Christy's class once before and I liked it so much that I plan to take it again next Monday!The class is comprehensive but efficient , and she has a handout with lots of illustrations, including lots of bird photos.She covers bird names, bird anatomy, behavior, directions, equipment and much more.And she covers some Spanish language basics; you don't have to already be fluent in Spanish to benefit from this course.
The class is a fundraiser for TOS and is open to TOS members and non-members alike; fee is $35.The session will also be recorded so that registrants can view or review the material later at their own convenience.
Link to information about the class is here
http://texasbirds.org/events.php

You need to have a Neon membership to register, which simply requires that you provide your name and a valid email address and create a password for your account.If you have ever registered online for a TOS meeting or workshop, then you already have a Neon account.
¡Nos vemos!
Byron Stone de Austin, Tx



 

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Date: 4/12/21 5:06 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-12-21 FIVE warbler species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-12-21 FIVE warbler species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Repeated visits to the pond with a huge one with ~35 warblers, mostly Nashville Warbler coming to the pond. Excited to have several FOS. I’m amazed at the beauty of Myrtle Yellow-rumped Warbler in breeding plumage!
WARLER sp 5: Nashville Warbler >30, gorgeous Myrtle Yellow-rumped Warblers, Black-and-white Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler
OTHER: Bronzed Cowbird, Barred Owl, Yellow-breasted Chat, Hutton’s Vireo, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Eastern Towhee, Indigo Bunting

You can see all the birds listed at the blue hyperlink

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/11/21 5:47 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-11-21 SIX warbler sp @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-11-21 SIX warbler sp @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Warblers: Nashville Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler
Others: Pyrrhuloxia, Hutton’s Vireo, Summer Tanager

I had to be gone most of today, but was here for one of the major invasions of ~25 warblers, mostly Nashville Warbler, with splattering of other species for added interest. I’m amazed at how many Nashville Warbler we have here! Thanks to our visitors for adding to the list

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/10/21 3:46 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-10-21 FIVE warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-10-21 FIVE warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Warblers: Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, didn’t put numbers today

9 sparrow species; Hutton’s Vireo

Very windy conditions out of the NE today and not conducive to great birding—we only counted the Nashville Warbler that we saw once and not their return trips throughout the day—two would fight every time they came in.

Fun visitors

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/10/21 3:07 pm
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for March -Long
Lubbock received 2.31 inches of rain during March (thanks mostly to
two days featuring torrential rains), well above the expected total
for the month of 1.10 inches, bringing the year’s total to 3.56
inches, well above the average to-date total of 2.40 inches. Despite
the good rainfall, according to the US Drought Monitor, 100% of our
fifteen county region remains in a state of drought, with over 50% in
a state of severe to exceptional drought. Temperatures have been
moderate to warm and we have seen, in addition to the ongoing
onslaught of Cedar Waxwings and Pine Siskins, more than a few somewhat
early arrivals. It will be interesting to see what kind of impact the
severe freeze event of February has on spring insect and bud crops but
it is a bit early to draw any conclusions regarding recoveries. It
definitely appeared to have an impact on songbird abundance in our
region particularly with regards to smaller species such as kinglets
and wrens.

Regional summaries of eBird data cannot be acquired in a timely
fashion. As a result, records submitted to eBird may not appear in
this report. Reports from the region that are submitted to the
texbirds or leasbirds listservs can be reviewed in a timely fashion
and should appear.

As always, the county follows the site in ( ) and birds are mentioned
by virtue of rarity, atypical abundance, or atypical scarcity. Water
Treatment Ponds have come to feature so prominently in these reports
that they will, henceforth, be referred to as WTP.

BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING DUCK: 1 at Guy and Andrews Parks (Lubbock)
from 3/16/21 through 3/26/21 (KT, SA, JBu, JoC, WC, JCr, BK, PKe, JM,
KM, BSh, LZ) – FORMERLY ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION; NOW AN ANNUAL
VISITOR WITH SIGHTING MOVING EVER NORTHWARD INTO THE PANHANDLE ITSELF.

SNOW GOOSE: 1 at City Farm (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) and 1 at White
River Lake (Crosby) on 3/19/21 (ML) the only sightings – LOW;
REPRESENTATIVE OF THE EARLY DEPARTURE OF GEESE FROM THE REGION THIS
YEAR.

WOOD DUCK: Twelve reports of 1-6 birds in the region (Crosby, Lubbock)
during the period (SA, JoC, DHa, AH, DM, DS, EW) – ABOUT AVERAGE; A
BIT OF A REBOUND FROM A ROUGH FEBRUARY.

BLUE-WINGED TEAL: Eighteen reports of 1-7 birds in the region (Crosby,
Hale, Lubbock) during the period (SA, JoC, AH, PKe, ML, DM, NP, EW) –
GOOD NUMBER OF SIGHTINGS AND CLOSE TO AVERAGE NUMBER OF SIGHTINGS FOR
THIS EARLY IN THE SEASON.

CINNAMON TEAL: Fourteen reports of 1-4 birds in the region (Crosby,
Hale, Lubbock) during the period (SA, JoC, JrC, WC, JCr, AH, PKe, LEAS
trip, ML, DM, NP, EW) – GOOD NUMBERS BUT STILL A BIT LOW IN NUMBERS AT
THE END OF THE PERIOD.

CANVASBACK: 2 at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock) on 3/5/21 (AR), 2 at Lake
Two (Lubbock) from 3/9/21 through 3/14/21 (PKi, AH), 4 at Andrews Park
(Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH), and 2 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on
3/14/21 (AH) the only reports received – A TAD ON THE LOW SIDE.

REDHEAD: 9 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/1/21 (JoC), 1 at Andrews Park
(Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH), and 2 at Lake Two (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH)
the only report – VERY LOW.

GREATER SCAUP: 1 at Gillham-Howell Park (Terry) on 3/6/21 (MDL) and 1
at Lake Two (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) the only reports – LOW COMPARED
TO THE PANHANDLE OVERALL BUT A GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS FOR OUR PART OF
THE REGION.

COMMON MERGANSER: 30 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/1/21 (JoC) and 3/2/21
(PKi), 60 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/3/21 (ML), and 2 at Ransom
Lake (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) – GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS AND GOOD
NUMBERS.

SCALED QUAIL: 1 at the Wheeler Ranch (Crosby) on 3/4/21 (ML), 6 at
Muleshoe NWR (Bailey) on 3/7/21 (NW), 3 at Yellowhouse Canyon
(Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH), and 2 at the Wheeler Ranch (Crosby) on
3/27/21 (ML) – ABOUT AVERAGE GIVEN THAT LITTLE EFFORT WAS REPORTED
FROM THE BETTER AREAS FOR THE SPECIES.

RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 2 at CR 50 x FM 175 (Hale) on 3/7/21 (NP), 3
near Hale Center (Hale) on 3/7/21 (NP), 1 near Lorenzo (Crosby) on
3/23/21 (GK), 1 northeast of Plainview (Hale) on 3/28/21 (NP), and 1
below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (DH, AH) – ABOUT AVERAGE; IT IS TO
BE EXPECTED THAT THIS SPECIES WOULD TOUGH IT THROUGH A HARD WEATHER
EVENT.

LESSER PRAIRIE CHICKEN: 99 in Cochran County (Cochran) on 3/2/21 (DH,
JMc) – EVIDENTLY, BIRDS ARE CONCENTRATING NEAR ANTHROPOGENIC FOOD
SOURCES AS THE SEVERE WINTER WEATHER EVENT HAS HAD AN IMPACT ON NATIVE
VEGETATION.

EARED GREBE: 1 at Lake Two (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) and 2 at White
River Lake (Crosby) on 3/23/21 (ML) the only reports – LOW.

INCA DOVE: 1-4 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) throughout the period (NN)
and 1 reported from another Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (CR, FR)
– STILL HANGING ON.

COMMON POORWILL: 1 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/23/21 (ML) – THE
FIRST REPORT OF THE SEASON.

BLACK-NECKED STILT: 5 at the Lorenzo Playa (Crosby) on 3/27/21 (ML), 6
at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/29/21 (JoC), and 2 at the 103rd x Chicago
Playa (Lubbock) on 3/30/21 (PKe) the first of the season – RIGHT ON
TIME BY CONTEMPORARY STANDARDS.

AMERICAN AVOCET: 1 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/11/21 (ML), 1 at
the 103rd x Chicago Playa (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (HB), 3 at Maxey Park
(Lubbock) on 3/17/21 (AH), 3 at Post City Park (Garza) on 3/22/21
(TS), and 3-7 at Guy Park (Lubbock) from 3/23/21 through 3/26/21 (SA,
JoC, BK) the first of the season – RIGHT ON TIME BY CONTEMPORARY
STANDARDS.

LONG-BILLED CURLEW: 175 in a field in Cochran County (Cochran) on
3/2/21 (DH, JMc) and six reports of 1-10 birds at various sites in
(Lubbock) during the period (HB, JoC, JCr, DHa, DH, AH, PKi, LEAS
trip, JM, KM, CR, FR, BSh) – GOOD NUMER OF REPORTS AND EXCELLENT
NUMBERS FOR THIS EARLY IN THE SEASON.

LEAST SANDPIPER: 1-2 at White River Lake (Crosby) from 3/3/21 through
3/11/21 (ML) and 5 at the TTU HSC fields (Lubbock) on 3/13/21 (AH) – A
TAD LOW; GIVEN THEIR DISAPPEARANCE IN LATE FEBRUARY THESE MIGHT BE
EARLY MIGRANTS.

LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER: Seven reports of 1-10 birds and three reports
of 24-33 birds in the region (Crosby, Hale, Lubbock) during the period
(JoC, AH, PKi, ML, NP) – GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS AND GOOD NUMBERS FOR
THIS EARLY IN THE SEASON.

SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 1 at Givens Park (Hale) on 3/28/21 (NP) –
HISTORICALLY, ACCIDENTAL IN WINTER OR THIS EARLY IN SPRING; NOW CLOSE
TO EXPECTED.

WILSON’S SNIPE: 1 at the FM 789 Wetlands (Hale) on 3/7/21 (NP) and 1
at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) – DISAPPEARED FROM THE
REGION AFTER THE FEBRUARY WEATHER EVENT; THESE ARE PROBABLY ARRIVALS
FROM THE SOUTH.

GREATER YELLOWLEGS: Eight reports of 1-6 birds in the region (Crosby,
Hale, Lubbock) during the period (AH, GK, ML, NP) – A TAD LOW; SEEM TO
BE REBOUNDING A BIT SLOWLY FROM FEBRUARY.

WILSON’S PHALAROPE: 1 at the Lorenzo Playa (Crosby) on 3/23/21 (GK)
and 1-2 at the Lorenzo Rookery (Crosby) on 3/28/21 (ML, DM, EW) – SOME
FAIRLY EARLY REPORTS.

BONAPARTE’S GULL: 1-3 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/20/21 (JBu, JoC, PKe,
JM) and 2 over the TTU HSC Campus (Lubbock) on 3/22/21 (AH) the only
reports – ABOUT AVERAGE.

FRANKLIN’S GULL: 1 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/20/21 (JM) and 1 at
White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/23/21 (ML) the only reports – ABOUT
AVERAGE FOR THIS EARLY IN THE SEASON.

RING-BILLED GULL: 1 at Ransom Lake (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) and 32 at
Ransom Lake (Lubbock) on 3/15/21 (GK) – WHILE THE SPECIES PERSISTED AT
DEEPER LAKES IN THE REGION (WHITE RIVER LAKE) AFTER THE FREEZE, THIS
WAS EVIDENCE OF A REBOUND IN LUBBOCK.

HERRING GULL: 1 at the Hale Center WTP (Hale) on 3/7/21 (NP) the only
report – A TAD LOW.

NEOTROPIC CORMORANT: 1 at White River Lake (Crosby) throughout the
period (ML) and 1 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) through the latter
half of the period (JoC, AH) – FORMERLY ACCIDENTAL IN THE REGION; NOW
A LOW-DENSITY PERMANENT RESIDENT.

AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 3 at White River Lake (Crosby) from 3/3/21
through 3/11/21 (ML), 3 at Post City Park (Garza) on 3/22/21 (BSc),
and 44 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/23/21 (ML) – GOOD NUMBER OF
REPORTS AND GREAT NUMBERS.

AMERICAN BITTERN: 1 at Mae Simmons Park (Lubbock) on 3/21/21 (BSc) the
only report – CASUAL, AT BEST, IN THE REGION AT THIS TIME.

GREAT EGRET: 1 at Dupree Park (Lubbock) on 3/26/21 (HB) and 3/27/21
(NN), 1 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 3/26/21 (SA) and 3/28/21
(DM, EW), and one over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 3/29/21 (AH) –
DISAPPEARED FROM THE REGION AFTER THE FEBRUARY WEATHER EVENT; THESE
ARE BIRDS REBOUNDING INTO THE REGION.

WHITE-FACED IBIS: 1 at the Lorenzo Playa (Crosby) on 3/27/21 (ML) –
FORMERLY ACCIDENTAL THIS EARLY IN THE YEAR; LATE MARCH RECORDS ARE
BECOMING REGULAR.

TURKEY VULTURE: 1 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/7/21 (ML), 1 over
a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 3/13/21 (AH), 3 at City Farms (Lubbock) on
3/14/21 (AH), and 3 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH)
the only reports from the first half of the month – LATE TO ARRIVE (WE
HAVE COME TO EXPECT A FEW IN LATE FEBRUARY) AND DIDN’T START FILLING
IN UNTIL THE LAST WEEK OF THE MONTH.

OSPREY: Eight reports of single birds spread across six sites in
(Lubbock) during the period (JoC, JrC, JCr, DHa, DM, NN, EW, LZ) –
GOOD NUMBERS FOR MARCH.

BALD EAGLE: 1 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/23/21 (ML) the sole
report received – A BIT LOW AFTER A VERY GOOD FEBRUARY.

HARRIS’S HAWK: 1 at the Himmel Farm (Crosby) on 3/13/21 (KH), 2 over
the TTU HSC Campus (Lubbock) on 3/16/21 (DH), and 1 at the Ranching
Heritage Center (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (AH) – GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS FOR
THIS IRREGULAR VISITOR AND OCCASIONAL BREEDER.

SWAINSON’S HAWK: 1 near Lorenzo (Crosby) on 3/16/21 (ML), 1 in west
Lubbock (Lubbock) on 3/25/21 (WC), 1 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) on
3/27/21 (JCr, PKe), and 1 over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock)on 3/30/21 (SA)
– RUNNING JUST A TAD LATE.

GOLDEN-FRONTED WOODPECKER: 1 at the Lubbock Cemetery (Lubbock) on
3/1/21 (JoC) – THE ONLY REPORT FROM ABOVE THE CAPROCK ESCARPMENT.

YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCK: 1 at the Lubbock Cemetery (Lubbock) from
3/1/21 through 3/14/21 (JoC, AH, JM), 1 in the Tech Terrace
Neighborhood (Lubbock) on 3/12/21 (SA), and 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock)
on 3/28/21 (AH) – ABOUT AVERAGE; FOLK NEED TO BE AWARE OF RED-NAPED
SAPSUCKERS THAT MOVER THROUGH THE REGION IN APRIL.

DOWNY WOODPECKER: 1 at the Lubbock Cemetery (Lubbock) throughout the
period (JoC, PKe, PKi, BSh), 1 in Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on
3/14/21 (AH), and 2 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (DH, AH) –
GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS AND NUMBERS FOR THIS LATE IN THE SEASON.

PEREGRINE FALCON: 1 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 3/27/21 (AH) and 1 at
the TTU HSC Campus (Lubbock) on 3/29/21 (AH) – ABOUT AVERAGE.

PRAIRIE FALCON: 1 at City Farms (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) and 1 over a
Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 3/27/21 (AH) – ABOUT AVERAGE FOR THIS LATE
IN THE SEASON.

ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER: 1 on the TTU HSC Campus (Lubbock) on 3/24/21
(AH) the only report received – RUNNING LATE AND LOW THIS YEAR.

WESTERN KINGBIRD: 1 at the 19th x Quaker Playa (Lubbock) on 3/25/21
(AH) and 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 3/29/21 (AH) – RUNNING A BIT
LATE AND LOW THIS YEAR.

SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER: 1 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (AH) –
RUNNING A BIT LATE AND MORE THAN A BIT LOW THIS YEAR.

DUSKY FLYCATCHER: 1 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) on 3/26/21 (JoC, WC, JCr,
photographs) and on 3/27/21 (JoC, JCr, PKe, photographs) – A VERY
EARLY REPORT; VERIFIED BY REVIEW BY SEVERAL eBIRD REVIEWERS.

Empidonax sp. : Probably the same bird but recorded call notes
suggestive of HAMMOND’S FLYCATCHER at Clapp Park (Lubbock) on 3/28/21
(JM, recording).

BLACK PHOEBE: 1 at Jennings Park (Lubbock) from 3/26/21 (JoC, JrC, WC,
JCr, PKe) and on 3/27/21 (SA, JBu, JoC, DHa, AH, PKe, JK, JM, JN), 1
at Lubbock Lake Landmark (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (JoC, DM, EW) – FORMERLY
ACCIDENTAL IN THE REGION; NOW ANNUAL AND CLOSING ON PERMANENT RESIDENT
STATUS.

EASTERN PHOEBE: 1 at Ransom Lake (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) and 1 at
Clapp Park (Lubbock) on 3/26/21 (JrC) the only reports – LOW.

SAY’S PHOEBE: 1 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/11/21 (ML), 1 at
Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH), 1-2 at McAlister Park
(Lubbock) on 3/15/21 (JCr, NN), and 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on
3/28/21 (PKe) – GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS AND NUMBERS.

VERMILION FLYCATCHER: 1 at Jennings Park (Lubbock) from 3/26/21 (HB,
JoC, JrC, WC, JCr, DHa, PKe, KT, photographs) through 3/31/21 (SA,
JBu, JoC, DHa, AH, PKe, JK, JM, KM, JN, BSh, MSm, KT) – FORMERLY
ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION; NOW CASUAL CLOSING ON ANNUAL.

WOODHOUSE’S SCRUB JAY: 1 at Muleshoe NWR (Bailey) on 3/7/21 (NW) the
only report – QUITE POSSIBLY THE SAME BIRD THAT WAS SEEN AT THE SITE
ON THE CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT.

COMMON RAVEN: Ten reports of 1-3 birds in the region (Crosby, Lubbock)
during the period (JoC, JrC, DH, AH, ML, JMc) – ABOUT AVERAGE, WITH
MOST REPORTS COMING FROM BELOW OR ALONG THE CAPROCK ESCARPMENT.

BANK SWALLOW: 1 at the LEAS Nature Trail (Lubbock) on 3/27/21 (LEAS
trip) and 3 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) on 3/29/21 (JoC) – VERY EARLY
REPORTS.

TREE SWALLOW: Nine reports of 1-5 birds in the region (Crosby, Hale,
Lubbock) during the period (JoC, AH, PKe, LEAS trip, ML, NP) – GOOD
NUMBER OF REPORTS AND GOOD NUMBERS FOR THIS EARLY.

NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: 1 at Lake Two (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH)
and 2 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (AH) the only reports – FAIRLY
EARLY REPORTS.

PURPLE MARTIN: Nine reports of 1-7 bird, one report of 21 birds, and
one report of 27 birds in the region (Crosby, Hale, Lubbock) during
the period (JG, PJ, LEAS trip, ML, NP) – ABOUT AVERAGE WITH SEVERAL
COLONY-RUNNING FOLK REPORTING IN.

BARN SWALLOW: 2 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) the sole report
from the first half of the period; filled in rapidly thereafter – A
LITTLE LATE AND A LITTLE LOW.

CLIFF SWALLOW: 15 at the LEAS Nature Trail (Lubbock) on 3/27/21 (LEAS
trip), 4 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (AH), and 1 at Lake Six
(Lubbock) on 3/30/21 (JBo) the reports thus far – A WEE BIT LATE.

BUSHTIT: 4 at the Lubbock Cemetery (Lubbock) on 3/1/21 (JoC) – STILL
PRESENT AFTER A GAP IN REPORTS – DON’T KNOW WHETHER THESE BIRDS
PERSISTED THROUGH THE TOUGH PERIOD IN FEBRUARY OR IF THESE ARE BIRDS
RETURNING FROM ELSEWHERE.

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 1-2 at the Lubbock Cemetery (Lubbock) from
3/2/21 through 3/10/21 (PKi, BSh), 1 at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock)on
3/14/21 (AH), and 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 3/25/21 (JCr) –
ABOUT AVERAGE.

ROCK WREN: 1 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/3/21 (ML) the only report – LOW.

CANYON WREN: 1 at Ransom Lake (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) the only report – LOW.

HOUSE WREN: 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) and 1 at
Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/30/21 (JBo) the only reports – A TAD LOW BUT
THINGS SHOULD PICK UP IN APRIL.

WINTER WREN: 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (DH, AH,
photographs) the only report – A TAD LOW.

BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER: 1 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/19/21 (ML)
and 3/23/21 (ML) the only reports – A TAD LOW.

EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 2 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/3/21 (ML), 1 in
a Tahoka yard (Lynn) on 3/13/21 (MDL), 2 at Yellowhouse Canyon
(Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH), and 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on
3/16/21 (JCr) the only reports – A TAD LOW.

WESTERN BLUEBIRD: 7 at the Wheeler Ranch (Crosby) on 3/16/21 (ML) and
1 at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock) on 3/19/21 (PKe) – ABOUT AVERAGE;
NOTHING LIKE THE IRRUPTIVE EVENT SUGGESTED BY NUMBERS JUST TO THE
NORTH EARLIER IN THE SEASON.

MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD: 1 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/3/21 (ML), 23
at the Wheeler Ranch (Crosby) on 3/4/21 (ML), 2 in Yellowhouse Canyon
(Lubbock) on 3/9/21 (JrC, WC), 8 in Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on
3/16/21 (JCr), and 1 at Lubbock Lake Landmark (Lubbock) on 3/19/21
(JCr) – ABOUT AVERAGE; NOTHING LIKE THE IRRUPTIVE EVENT SUGGESTED BY
NUMBERS JUST TO THE NORTH EARLIER IN THE SEASON.

TOWNSEND’S SOLITAIRE: Seven reports of single birds at various sites
in (Lubbock) during the period (SA, JoC, JrC, AH, PKe, BSh) – A TAD
BETTER THAN AVERAGE FOR THIS LATE IN THE SEASON.

HERMIT THRUSH: 2 at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock) on 3/5/21 (AR) and 1 at
Clapp Park (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (HB) the only reports – LOW; FORAGE
MAY HAVE BEEN IMPACTED BY THE FEBRUARY FREEZE.

GRAY CATBIRD: 1 at Lake Six (Lubbock) throughout the period (AH) and 1
in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) throughout the period (GK) – ACCIDENTAL IN
WINTER; THIS HAS BEEN A GOOD WINTER FOR THE SPECIES THROUGHOUT THE
PANHANDLE.

BROWN THRASHER: 1 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) on 3/24/21 (JrC) and 1 below
Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (DH, AH) – THE ONLY REPORTS FROM ABOVE
THE CAPROCK ESCARPMENT.

SAGE THRASHER: 1 at Hale Center (Hale) on 3/7/21 (NP), 1 at White
River Lake (Crosby) on 3/11/21 (ML), 1 at City Farm (Lubbock)on
3/14/21 (AH), 1 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 3/15/21 (JCr), 1 at
Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 3/16/21 (JCr), 2 at City Farms
(Lubbock) on 3/17/21 (BSh), 2 at Lubbock Lake Landmark (Lubbock) on
3/19/21 (JCr), 2 at the Wheeler Ranch (Crosby) on 3/27/21 (ML), and 4
in the vicinity of Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (PKe) and on 3/30/21
(JBo) – EXCELLENT NUMBER OF REPORTS AND NUMBERS – AN IRRUPTIVE SPRING
EVENT?

CEDAR WAXWING: Thirty-eight reports of 1-10 birds, twelve reports of
11-25 birds, eight reports of 26-50 birds, three reports of 65-95
birds, one report of 120 birds, and one report of 136 bird in the
region (Bailey, Crosby, Hale, Lubbock) during the period (SA, JBo, KD,
JoC, JrC, JCr, DH, AH, KH, HJ, GJ, PKe, ML, DM, NN, NP, BSh, KT, NW,
EW) – THE STRONGEST MOVEMENT OF THE SPECIES INTO THE REGION THAT I CAN
RECALL CONTINUED – VERY IMPRESSIVE.

PINE SISKIN: Fourteen reports of 1-20 birds, twenty-one reports of
11-25 birds, twenty-six reports of 26-50 birds, and seven reports of
60-80 birds in the region (Crosby, Hale, Hockley, Lubbock, Lynn)
during the period (SA, JCr, MDL, DH, AH, JH, GJ, PJ, GK, PKe, LEAS
trip, ML, DM, JM, NN, NP, BSh, KT, EW) – THE IRRUPTIVE EVENT WAS
STARTING TO SPIN DOWN A BIT BUT WAS STILL THE MOST REMARKABLE AVIAN
PHENOMENON OF THE SEASON!

LESSER GOLDFINCH: 3 females and 1 male in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on
3/1/21 (GJ, PJ), 2 at Ransom Lake (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH), 1 in a
Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 3/19/21 (NN), 1 at White River Lake (Crosby)
on 3/23/21 (ML), and 1-2 in a Plainview yard (Hale) from 3/27/21
through 3/30/21 (NP) – A GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS AND GOOD NUMBERS FOR
SO EARLY IN THE SEASON; SOME HAD OVERWINTERED, SOME WERE NEW ARRIVALS.

AMERICAN PIPIT: 18 at White River Lake (Crosby) on 3/3/21 (ML) and 2
at City Farms (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) – GIVEN THE POOR NUMBERS IN
THE WINTER, AT LEAST SOME OF THESE WERE SPRING MOVEMENT BIRDS.

GRASSHOPPER SPARROW: 1 northeast of Plainview (Hale) on 3/28/21 (NP) –
A FAIRLY EARLY REPORT FOR THE REGION; POSSIBLY A WINTERING BIRD.

LARK SPARROW: 1 at the Wheeler Ranch (Crosby) on 3/27/21 (ML) and 1
below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (DH, AH) the first reports of the
spring – RIGHT ON TIME, A TAD LOW THUS FAR.

CHIPPING SPARROW: 1 at the Lockwood Farm (Crosby) on 3/16/21 (ML) was
probably the first of the season. Six reports of 1-10 birds in the
region (Bailey, Lubbock) during the remainder of the period (JBo, WB,
KC, DH, AH, JM, JN) – ABOUT AVERAGE FOR THIS EARLY IN THE SEASON.

CLAY-COLORED SPARROW: 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (DH, AH),
2 on the TTU HSC Campus (Lubbock) on 3/29/21 (AH), and 1 at Lake Six
(Lubbock) on 3/30/21 (JBo) – ABOUT AVERAGE FOR THIS EARLY IN THE
SEASON.

BREWER’S SPARROW: 1 at the Wheeler Ranch (Crosby) on 3/4/21 (ML), 1 in
Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 3/9/21 (JCr), 1 in a Lubbock yard
(Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH), 2-3 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) from
3/15/21 (JCr) to 3/16/21 (JoC), 2 at the Lockwood Farm (Crosby) on
3/16/21 (ML), 1-3 at Lubbock Lake Landmark (Lubbock) from 3/18/21
through 3/20/21 (JrC, WC, JoC, JCr), 2 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) on
3/19/21 (KM), 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 3/21/21 (BJ, GJ, PJ), 1
at Clapp Park (Lubbock) from 3/23/21 through 3/31/21 (JoC, JrC, JCr,
PKe, DM, JM, EW), 7 at Muleshoe NWR (Bailey) on 3/23/21 (WB, KC), 1 on
the TTU HSC Campus (Lubbock) on 3.23.21 (AH), 2 at the 103rd Street x
Chicago Avenue Playa (Lubbock) on 3/25/21 (JoC), 3 on the TTU Campus
(Lubbock) on 3/26/21 (JN), 2 at the Wheeler Ranch (Crosby) on 3/27/21
(ML) 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (DH, AH, PKe), 2 at Lubbock
Lake Landmark (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (JoC), 3 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on
3/30/21 (JBo), and 1 at the 103rd Street x Chicago Avenue Playa
(Lubbock) on 3/30/21 (PKe) – THIS IS, BY VIRTUE OF BEING THE STRONGEST
MOVEMENT I HAVE EVER SEEN OF THE SPECIES THROUGH THE REGION, THE BIRD
OF THE MONTH.

SWAMP SPARROW: 1 in Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 3/14/21 (AH) and 1
below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (DH, AH) – THE SPECIES SEEMED TO
DISAPPEAR AFTER THE FEBRUARY FREEZE; THESE ARE PROBABLY PASSAGE BIRDS.

YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD: Eleven reports of 1-9 birds, one report of 17
birds, and one report of 21 birds in the region (Crosby, Floyd, Hale,
Lubbock) during the period (JoC, JrC, JCr, SH, AH,ML, NP, BSh, WW) –
VERY GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS AND GOOD NUMBERS FOR THIS EARLY IN THE
SEASON.

BRONZED COWBIRD: 1 male at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 3/28/21 (AH) – THIS
CEMENTS IT; THE SPECIES HAS SUCCESSFULLY OVERWINTERED IN THE REGION
FOR THE FIRST TIME!

ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER: 1 at Aztlan Park (Lubbock) on 3/2/21 (PKi) and
1 at Jennings Park (Lubbock) on 3/27/21 (AH) the only reports – LOW.

OBSERVERS: SA=Sheri Anderson, JBo=Joseph Borros, WB=Will Britton,
JBu=Joel Buford, HB=Holly Bundock, KC=Kirsti Carr, JoC=Joe Cochran,
JrC=Jordan Cochran, WC=Whitney Cochran, JCr=Jim Crites, MDL=Manuel De
Leon, KD=Ken Dixon, DHa=Danny Hancock, DH=Drew Harvey, SH=Susan Heath,
AH=Anthony Hewetson, KH=Kelly Himmel, HJ=Heather Jenkins, GJ=George
Jury, PJ=Pat Jury, BK=Barry Keith, GK=Glenda Kelly, PKe=Peter Keyel,
PKi=Phillip Kite, (LEAS trip=Joe Cochran, Jordan Cochran, Joe Heppert,
Kathy Heppert, Barry Keith, Glenda Kelly, Phillip Kite, Diana LaManna,
Debbie McMjullen, Gloria Paraskeva, Matt Smith, Gary Terrell, Eric
Wolf, Lena Zappia), ML=Mark Lockwood, JMc=Jon McIntyre, DM=Debbie
McMullen, JM=Jennifer Miller, KM=Kassie Moore, NN=Nancy Neill,
JN=Johny Nelson, JP=John Pike, NP=Niler Pyeatt, AR=Ari Rice,
CR=Clarice Robertson, FR=Floyd Robertson, BC=Bobby Schat, BSh=Brad
Shine, MS=Maura Smith, TS=Tom SoRelle, KT=Kathy Teague, NW=Nicholas
Warren, WW=William Wenthe, EW=Eric Wolf, LZ= Lena Zappia.

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock
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Date: 4/9/21 10:19 pm
From: Troy Hibbitts <alterna2627...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
FM 334 at Chalk Bluff in NW Uvalde Co is pretty reliable.  There are records on FM 3199 as you come down the slope to the west Nueces.  I also see them annually at Kickapoo Cavern SP on the Pine Canyon loop.  All 3 of these sites have Black-capped Vireos in good numbers as well

Troy HibbittsBrackettville, TX





 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/21 4:35 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-9-21 SIX warbler species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-9-21 SIX warbler species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

6 Warbler species and two Hutton’s Vireo in the back area and more out on the property that were heard in different areas. Before Paul arrived, I was watching one, while another was calling in the distance. Females aren’t known to sing. Warblers: Black-and-white Warbler, 5 Orange-crowned Warbler, 27 Nashville Warbler, 2 Yellow-rumped Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler and these are numbers at the pond only.
I had a medical procedure for my Trigeminal Neuralgia today, so started birding late morning—it was quiet for 1.5 hr and then a mob came in. 22 Nashville Warbler and others with the first mob. Yellow-breasted Chat also came in.
Warbler Pond is only by permission—you have to be totally quiet and not move around and with covid, I limit numbers. Clothing that blends in important too. Most get bored with most of the time quiet, so I discourage people from being there—the birds are roaming the woods and you are just as likely to find them on trails and Margie’s Woods and Margie’s Meadow is the prime spot. The sunny side of Elm trees is their favorite for juicy bugs. We have Sharp-shinned Hawk, Cooper’s Hawk and Red-shouldered Hawk that like that pond too and the birds are very hawk wary.
Tonight is going to be a major migration movement—most excited!



Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/21 3:49 pm
From: Clayton Leopold <passerinaciris12...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
I concur on the Sheffield rest area. Could also catch Black-capped Vireo
there as well.

Clayton, Linsey and Laiken Leopold
Texas City, Texas

On Tue, Apr 6, 2021, 20:25 <kjones4...> wrote:

> I will be birding Big Bend NP area in late April. Driving from Austin.
>
>
>
> I’d appreciate any tips on where to find Gray Vireos.
>
>
>
> Kent Jones
>
> Austin
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/21 4:19 am
From: Dell Little <dellel1119...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Norias Division access
No, you have to be sign up for a King Ranch Tour.

On Fri, Apr 9, 2021 at 5:24 AM Ray Porter <ray.porter314...> wrote:

> I went by the location for the owl at 5 pm, but gate was closed. Is
> there public access to this road?
>
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>
> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking
> permission
> from the List Owner
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/21 3:24 am
From: Ray Porter <ray.porter314...>
Subject: [texbirds] Norias Division access
I went by the location for the owl at 5 pm, but gate was closed. Is
there public access to this road?

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Date: 4/8/21 7:06 pm
From: David McDonald <dkmmdpa...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Harrier takes small bird over my car
I hope so too!

On Thu, Apr 8, 2021 at 8:15 PM Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> wrote:

> Hopefully, the prey was a House Sparrow!👀
>
> On Thu, Apr 8, 2021 at 8:06 PM David McDonald <dkmmdpa...> wrote:
>
>> Hi Texbirders
>>
>> I had a novel experience today as I left my office in Pasadena
>>
>> A raptor and a small sparrow sized bird caught my eye about 10 meters
>> ahead of my car.
>>
>> Suddenly the raptor grabbed the small bird and it disappeared.
>>
>> The raptor had broad wide wings so I know it wasn't an accipiter or
>> falcon.
>>
>> He landed in a tree beside the road with his meal and as he landed I saw
>> the white rump!
>>
>> I have never seen a Harrier grab a bird in the air - usually it just
>> pounces on something on the ground.
>>
>> Always nature is amazing if we open our minds to the beauty - but I did
>> obviously feel sorry for the smaller bird - but such is nature
>>
>> I have never seen a harrier before in that built up area of Pasadena and
>> I have been working there for almost 50 years - so doubly amazing
>>
>> David McDonald
>> Friendswood TX
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/8/21 6:15 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Harrier takes small bird over my car
Hopefully, the prey was a House Sparrow!👀

On Thu, Apr 8, 2021 at 8:06 PM David McDonald <dkmmdpa...> wrote:

> Hi Texbirders
>
> I had a novel experience today as I left my office in Pasadena
>
> A raptor and a small sparrow sized bird caught my eye about 10 meters
> ahead of my car.
>
> Suddenly the raptor grabbed the small bird and it disappeared.
>
> The raptor had broad wide wings so I know it wasn't an accipiter or falcon.
>
> He landed in a tree beside the road with his meal and as he landed I saw
> the white rump!
>
> I have never seen a Harrier grab a bird in the air - usually it just
> pounces on something on the ground.
>
> Always nature is amazing if we open our minds to the beauty - but I did
> obviously feel sorry for the smaller bird - but such is nature
>
> I have never seen a harrier before in that built up area of Pasadena and I
> have been working there for almost 50 years - so doubly amazing
>
> David McDonald
> Friendswood TX
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/8/21 6:06 pm
From: David McDonald <dkmmdpa...>
Subject: [texbirds] Harrier takes small bird over my car
Hi Texbirders

I had a novel experience today as I left my office in Pasadena

A raptor and a small sparrow sized bird caught my eye about 10 meters ahead
of my car.

Suddenly the raptor grabbed the small bird and it disappeared.

The raptor had broad wide wings so I know it wasn't an accipiter or falcon.

He landed in a tree beside the road with his meal and as he landed I saw
the white rump!

I have never seen a Harrier grab a bird in the air - usually it just
pounces on something on the ground.

Always nature is amazing if we open our minds to the beauty - but I did
obviously feel sorry for the smaller bird - but such is nature

I have never seen a harrier before in that built up area of Pasadena and I
have been working there for almost 50 years - so doubly amazing

David McDonald
Friendswood TX

 

Back to top
Date: 4/8/21 4:00 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-8-2021 FIVE warbler species
4-8-2021 FIVE warbler species
34 species

Warblers: Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler
Other mentions: Blue Grosbeak, Sharp-shinned Hawk, Hutton’s Vireo, Blue-headed Vireo, White-eyed Vireo

We had several runs of large numbers of warblers today, but I sat there wo a single bird for 2.25 hr, until we had an invasion of lots of warblers and then another quiet time before the next—sitting is only for the patient ones. Birds concerned about Sharp-shinned Hawk & Cooper’s Hawk

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/8/21 1:49 pm
From: drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Broadwings back in Austin April 7, 2021
Hi Texbirders,I had my FOS Broadwinged Hawks in Austin yesterday, April 7, 2021 in two different locations in Northwest Hills, where they have become established as breeders over the last 4 or 5 years. I was traveling between office and home, not making any special effort to find Broadies or anything else.Both were single adult birds, but in locations where I have seen them in the past few years between early April and late summer.Spring is springing!
Good birding ya'll,
Byron Stone, Austin
 

Back to top
Date: 4/7/21 6:54 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-7-21 Seven Warbler sp. 50 total species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-7-21 Seven Warbler sp. 50 total species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Afternoon birding in the backyard was exceptional today. From about noon until 300p there were recurrent surges of birds that staged in or near the cedar tree, moved to the oak trees, visited the pond, played chase around the area, and left (briefly). Heavy action occurred for 15 to 45 minutes, paused, then resumed. Nashville Warblers were the most numerous ranging up to 20 at a time during the surges. One surge was initiated by five White-throated Sparrows, accompanied by several Chipping Sparrows; they were followed by Nashville, Orange-crowned, Black-and-White, Black-throated Green, and Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) warblers. Other surges included White-eyed Vireos, Ruby-crowned Kinglets, and of course Cardinals, Titmice, and Carolina Wrens.
One Tennessee Warbler was seen, and one Yellow Warbler was heard repeatedly. A Brown Thrasher made a cautious appearance and then bathed for at least a minute. A Cooper’s Hawk flew through and ended the fun birding.
Today’s highlights:
Warblers: Black-and-white Warbler, Tennessee Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Yellow Warbler .
Highlights: Hutton’s Vireo, Grasshopper Sparrow, Chimney Swift, Red-breasted Nuthatch, 11 Sparrow species

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 4/7/21 11:57 am
From: David Scott <scottrpts...>
Subject: [texbirds] Gray Vireo at Big Bend
I found the Windows Trail at Big Bend National Park a reliable place for
Gray Vireo.

David Scott
College Station

 

Back to top
Date: 4/7/21 11:17 am
From: Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] RFI: Gray Vireo
Kickapoo is solid. Also I have a hard copy record of Gray Vireo on FM 334 between Bracketville and Highway 55 that runs from Uvalde to Campwood. At Guadalupe NP I have had them on the Frijoles Ranch Trail and McKittrick Canyon Trail. McKittrick is good from now through May. At Big Bend the Basin and Blue Creek Canyon are pretty sure bets. Fort Lancaster Overlook is good but usually I just hear them down the canyon. The picnic side looked like it had burned the last time I was there. I have never recorded a Gray Vireo in Junction area (Kimble County) but the bird may be in the very far western part of the county where there are few roads and all the land is private. I have birded that picnic area between Fort Stockton and Marathon and is good place for Scott's Oriole and others. 
Rhandy J. HeltonJunction, Texas
 

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Date: 4/7/21 4:29 am
From: Dell Little <dellel1119...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
Just to add to the list. In Pecos County a good location is "Warnock Park
Picnic Area" on Hwy 385 south between Fort Stockton and Marathon. This
location isn't better than the previous mentioned, but is an area that is
not often mentioned. Plus the 1st 5 miles of Longfellow Ranch Road just
south of Warnock is an interesting habitat to spend time.

Dell Little
Fort Davis. TX

On Wed, Apr 7, 2021 at 4:15 AM Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
wrote:

> Again, easier to hear than see, but I had multiple birds at Kickapoo
> Caverns State Park (only open Friday through Monday)! Also had a
> territorial bird in the Chisos Basin at the road to the campground one year.
>
>
>
> Mary Beth Stowe
>
> Alamo, TX
>
> www.miriameaglemon.com
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Paul and Georgean Kyle
> *Sent:* Tuesday, April 6, 2021 9:53 PM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
>
>
>
> The Sheffield overlook is the first and only place we have ever seen Grey
> Vireos. Had forgotten all about it until Brush's post! It was back in the
> late 1970s before the highway bi-passed Sheffield. We got stranded there
> once when our Datsun pickup had an encounter with a deer on the way back
> from Big Bend.
>
> Paul
>
> On 4/6/2021 9:28 PM, Brush Freeman wrote:
>
> I don't have any sure fire locations that can be accessed. It has always
> for me been a easier to hear than see bird given private land issues. Ft.
> Lancaster area, the Sheffield overlook is a good place to at least hear
> them and if lucky see them Hwy 674 in Edwards Co. especially near the
> Edwards/Kinney county line. Junction area (see Ebird) ...JA bunch of
> places but just so few that are publicly accessible except from ROWs.. I
> know they are in Big Bend but I never had much luck with them there but did
> not spend much time trying...Hope others have better info for you.
>
>
>
> On Tue, Apr 6, 2021 at 8:24 PM <kjones4...> wrote:
>
> I will be birding Big Bend NP area in late April. Driving from Austin.
>
>
>
> I’d appreciate any tips on where to find Gray Vireos.
>
>
>
> Kent Jones
>
> Austin
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Paul and Georgean Kyle
>
>
>
> Sanctuary Stewards
>
> Travis Audubon's
>
> Chaetura Canyon Sanctuary
>
>
>
> Project Managers
>
> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/7/21 2:55 am
From: Mark Welch <welch.mark3...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
Fwiw, I had 2 PS during the polar weather that were keeling over on ground on my feeding stone and were defenseless: fluffed up, dazed, immobile, occasionally falling over . Sadly, our dog beat me to the birds each time. Also had a sick- behaving lesser GF, but he did manage to fly away & never seen again. No AGF or house finch acted strange, weak or were fluffed up like the PS.

Mark in Dripping Springs

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 6, 2021, at 8:31 PM, Lamont Brown <lamont...> wrote:
>
> 
> I may be late to the party on this topic. If this link has been shared, touch delete.
>
> According to the article, CDC has confirmed Salmonella in birds including Siskins in 8 states, although Texas is not one of them.
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/04/health/bird-feeders-salmonella-cdc.html?referringSource=articleShare
> Lamont Brown
> Euless

 

Back to top
Date: 4/7/21 2:15 am
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
Again, easier to hear than see, but I had multiple birds at Kickapoo Caverns State Park (only open Friday through Monday)! Also had a territorial bird in the Chisos Basin at the road to the campground one year.



Mary Beth Stowe

Alamo, TX

<http://www.miriameaglemon.com> www.miriameaglemon.com



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Paul and Georgean Kyle
Sent: Tuesday, April 6, 2021 9:53 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo



The Sheffield overlook is the first and only place we have ever seen Grey Vireos. Had forgotten all about it until Brush's post! It was back in the late 1970s before the highway bi-passed Sheffield. We got stranded there once when our Datsun pickup had an encounter with a deer on the way back from Big Bend.

Paul

On 4/6/2021 9:28 PM, Brush Freeman wrote:

I don't have any sure fire locations that can be accessed. It has always for me been a easier to hear than see bird given private land issues. Ft. Lancaster area, the Sheffield overlook is a good place to at least hear them and if lucky see them Hwy 674 in Edwards Co. especially near the Edwards/Kinney county line. Junction area (see Ebird) ...JA bunch of places but just so few that are publicly accessible except from ROWs.. I know they are in Big Bend but I never had much luck with them there but did not spend much time trying...Hope others have better info for you.



On Tue, Apr 6, 2021 at 8:24 PM <kjones4...> <mailto:<kjones4...> > wrote:

I will be birding Big Bend NP area in late April. Driving from Austin.



I’d appreciate any tips on where to find Gray Vireos.



Kent Jones

Austin






--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas








--
Paul and Georgean Kyle

Sanctuary Stewards
Travis Audubon's
Chaetura Canyon Sanctuary

Project Managers
Chimney Swift Conservation Association

 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/21 7:52 pm
From: Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
The Sheffield overlook is the first and only place we have ever seen
Grey Vireos.  Had forgotten all about it until Brush's post!  It was
back in the late 1970s before the highway bi-passed Sheffield.  We got
stranded there once when our Datsun pickup had an encounter with a deer
on the way back from Big Bend.

Paul

On 4/6/2021 9:28 PM, Brush Freeman wrote:
> I don't have any sure fire locations that can be accessed.  It has
> always for me been a easier to hear than see bird given private land
> issues.  Ft. Lancaster area, the Sheffield overlook is a good place to
> at least hear them and if lucky see them  Hwy 674 in Edwards Co.
> especially near the Edwards/Kinney county line.  Junction area (see
> Ebird) ...JA bunch of places but just so few that are
> publicly accessible except from ROWs..    I know they are in Big Bend
> but I never had much luck with them there but did not spend much time
> trying...Hope others have better info for you.
>
> On Tue, Apr 6, 2021 at 8:24 PM <kjones4...>
> <mailto:<kjones4...>> wrote:
>
> I will be birding Big Bend NP area in late April.  Driving from
> Austin.
>
> I’d appreciate any tips on where to find Gray Vireos.
>
> Kent Jones
>
> Austin
>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

--
Paul and Georgean Kyle

Sanctuary Stewards
Travis Audubon's
Chaetura Canyon Sanctuary

Project Managers
Chimney Swift Conservation Association


 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/21 7:37 pm
From: Kelly Bryan <kelly.b.bryan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
Kent,

Brush's suggestions are spot on. The Hwy 674 suggestion is Kickapoo Cavern
State Park where the species is fairly common. I would also add Devil's
River SNA north of Del Rio. An excellent spot for Gray Vireos. KBB

On Tue, Apr 6, 2021 at 9:29 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:

> I don't have any sure fire locations that can be accessed. It has always
> for me been a easier to hear than see bird given private land issues. Ft.
> Lancaster area, the Sheffield overlook is a good place to at least hear
> them and if lucky see them Hwy 674 in Edwards Co. especially near the
> Edwards/Kinney county line. Junction area (see Ebird) ...JA bunch of
> places but just so few that are publicly accessible except from ROWs.. I
> know they are in Big Bend but I never had much luck with them there but did
> not spend much time trying...Hope others have better info for you.
>
> On Tue, Apr 6, 2021 at 8:24 PM <kjones4...> wrote:
>
>> I will be birding Big Bend NP area in late April. Driving from Austin.
>>
>>
>>
>> I’d appreciate any tips on where to find Gray Vireos.
>>
>>
>>
>> Kent Jones
>>
>> Austin
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

--
Kelly B Bryan
China Spring, Texas

To support our bird banding projects and our educational outreach in the
greater west Texas area go to: http://www.westtexasavianresearch.org/

 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/21 7:29 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI Gray Vireo
I don't have any sure fire locations that can be accessed. It has always
for me been a easier to hear than see bird given private land issues. Ft.
Lancaster area, the Sheffield overlook is a good place to at least hear
them and if lucky see them Hwy 674 in Edwards Co. especially near the
Edwards/Kinney county line. Junction area (see Ebird) ...JA bunch of
places but just so few that are publicly accessible except from ROWs.. I
know they are in Big Bend but I never had much luck with them there but did
not spend much time trying...Hope others have better info for you.

On Tue, Apr 6, 2021 at 8:24 PM <kjones4...> wrote:

> I will be birding Big Bend NP area in late April. Driving from Austin.
>
>
>
> I’d appreciate any tips on where to find Gray Vireos.
>
>
>
> Kent Jones
>
> Austin
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/21 6:30 pm
From: Lamont Brown <lamont...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
I may be late to the party on this topic. If this link has been shared, touch delete.

According to the article, CDC has confirmed Salmonella in birds including Siskins in 8 states, although Texas is not one of them.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/04/health/bird-feeders-salmonella-cdc.html?referringSource=articleShare

Lamont Brown
Euless
 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/21 6:24 pm
From: <kjones4...>
Subject: [texbirds] RFI Gray Vireo
I will be birding Big Bend NP area in late April. Driving from Austin.



I'd appreciate any tips on where to find Gray Vireos.



Kent Jones

Austin


 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/21 2:57 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-6-21 SEVEN warbler sp./36 wa.@ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-6-21 SEVEN warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Seven warbler species, as long as both Myrtle and Audubon’s YR count as one species. I spent 2 hr with very little action with birds approaching the water or anywhere out there, but the birds were too scared of predators to come in, but at 1215 I left Don with my camera and I went in to get lunch and the mob came in, so I watched from the distance—Don had a very narrowed view of the action and didn’t know that you need to view the whole view every so often with binoculars to get all the numbers. I had 4 Yellow-rumped Warbler with different plumage and 1 Audubon’s Yellow-rumped warbler, 2 Wilson’s Warbler, 20 Nashville Warbler, 3 Orange-crowned Warbler, 3 Black-and-white Warbler, 1 Northern Parula, 3 Black-throated-green Warbler with 2 males and 1 female. Don also had 4 warblers at the Old Barn earlier. So that action lasted 35 min and I watched from a distance, but the different plumages was easier and I had Nashville Warbler all over the pond and vegetation behind and to the side of the pond. It then went back to quiet again. So action probably takes 3 hrs of quiet to get a short time of action and you have to be totally quiet and not move around and dress in nature’s colors to blend into the background. We have Don’s photos and my scanning the whole area. I didn’t want to go back while all the action was going on or I could have stopped it.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/21 9:52 am
From: Jessica Tanguma <jtanguma...>
Subject: [texbirds] Edinburg Scenic Wetlands List
Good morning, everyone!
We had 42 species for today's bird walk. Our group got an awesome view of a
Gull-billed Tern flying around the North Pond.
Here is the list for today's walk:
Species Count
Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 6
Blue-winged Teal 10
Northern Shoveler 18
Mottled Duck 2
Plain Chachalaca 2
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 21
Inca Dove 6
White-tipped Dove 2
Mourning Dove 3
Chimney Swift 5
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 3
American Coot 8
Black-necked Stilt 3
Gull-billed Tern 1
Neotropic Cormorant 25
Great Blue Heron 2
Great Egret 3
Snowy Egret 6
Cattle Egret 4
Green Heron 3
Black-crowned Night-Heron 4
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron 1
Swainson's Hawk 2
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 1
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 1
Great Kiskadee 3
White-eyed Vireo 2
Green Jay 2
Purple Martin 14
Tree Swallow 6
House Wren 2
Curve-billed Thrasher 4
Northern Mockingbird 1
House Sparrow 3
Red-winged Blackbird 12
Brown-headed Cowbird 2
Great-tailed Grackle 8
Orange-crowned Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Northern Cardinal 9
Have a great day!

Jessica Tanguma
Naturalist Educator
Edinburg Scenic Wetlands & World Birding Center


PO Box 1079

714 Raul Longoria Rd

Edinburg, Texas 78540

956.381.9922 O 956.381-0175 F

<jtanguma...> <breyes...>

www.cityofedinburg.com
www.EdinburgWBC.org <http://www.edinburgwbc.org/>

follow us:
<https://www.facebook.com/EdinburgWBC/> [image:
https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork]
<https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/21 9:31 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bolivar Flats yesterday.
Headed down to the dawn ferry yesterday as it looked like there would be
lots of open sand out on the flats and it did not disappoint.

The beach was wet with lots of standing water which spread out the birds.
They seemed very nervous like the harriers or peregrine had been around but
I never saw what caused dreads. About 9am, the tide started coming in
fairly rapidly and instead of feeding on the rising tide many of the birds
went to sleep.

The ruddy turnstones had been working flipping hyacinth piles but went to
bed

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538605

Sanderlings, dunlin and western sandpipers did the same

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538606

Had my first gray red knot of the spring

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538603

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538602

I did not see a snowy plover and the number of semipalmated plovers was way
down as the piping plover count. Since they have an alternate feeding area,
that may not mean they are gone.

However, most of the piping plovers are rapidly molting. 2 weeks ago they
looked quite ratty with tattered feathers. Now most of the bad feathers are
replaced

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538593

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538601

Some birds migrate after molting but others may fly directly to the nesting
grounds without an intermediate stop. Not sure what the piping plovers do.

A coupld of birds found a great worm patch with worms much bigger than the
normal small prey.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538597

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538598

They chew the worm up into a wad and then swallow

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538599

And a look at the tail pattern

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171538600

The american avocets continue to molt into breeding plumage and were moving
around a lot. There was a good flock of red-breasted mefgansers over near
the jetty but white pelican numbers were way down.

Went back across the ferry and tried Coast Guard Woods and a couple of
other stops. Had grackles a parula and a couple of calling
louisiana waterthrush.

We need a front. nd rain as all the area is in drought with some parts
switching to extreme drought. And the forecasts sort of say that the
coastal hiatus will rule for some time to come.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/21 1:10 am
From: Erik Breden <erik.breden...>
Subject: [texbirds] Spring is in the Air
Texbirders,

I ventured out today to Estero Llano Grande State Park in Weslaco (where
I live). The female Elegant Trogon is still being seen and I managed a
fleeting glimpse of her as she was moving through the Tropical Zone at
the park. No photos, however.

But, there were other birds around, including a number of warbler
migrants...also no photos, alas. But the park host showed me a
Screech-Owl with a large lizard in its bill. And a pair of Long-billed
Dowitchers at the pond by the Visitor Center were also nice to see.

A few photos can be seen at:

www.otterside.com/spring2021/index.htm

Enjoy!

Erik Breden
Weslaco, Texas
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 6:32 pm
From: Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
Subjectively, Georgean and I believed this malady in our PISIs was
Salmonella based our experience with the illness during 19 years of
licensed avian rehabilitation in the 1980s.  The symptoms were very
familiar to us.

On 4/5/2021 5:59 PM, Brush Freeman wrote:
> Thank you Mary, this is just the kind of value add data we need.  I
> hope others can provide additional similar.
>
> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 2:45 PM Mary Wight-Carter
> <Mary.Wight-Carter...>
> <mailto:<Mary.Wight-Carter...>> wrote:
>
> Hello all,
>
> I had Salmonella  isolated from a sick siskin that later died in
> northern Ellis county.  There were multiple siskin deaths after
> the big freeze and the freshest carcass was submitted for testing.
>   This bird had the classic lesions associated with Salmonella
> septicemia and Salmonella enterica was isolated.
>
> At the feeders, the sick birds would appear puffed and “slower
> than usual” prior to death.
>
> Mary Wight-Carter DVM, DACVP
>
> *From:*<texbirds-bounce...>
> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>
> <texbirds-bounce...>
> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> *On Behalf Of *Collins,
> Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3)
> *Sent:* Monday, April 5, 2021 2:05 PM
> *To:* <brushfreeman...> <mailto:<brushfreeman...>;
> <john.a.blackwell51...> <mailto:<john.a.blackwell51...>
> *Cc:* Texbirds <Texbirds...>
> <mailto:<Texbirds...>>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
>
> *EXTERNAL MAIL*
>
> I’m with Brush on this one. Below is more information from the
> USFWS lab in Wisconsin. We are going to submit more specimens soon.
>
> Below is a note from a bird banded with Harris County Mosquito
> Control.
>
> I just heard back, the goldfinch submitted to the USGS National
> Wildlife Health Center in Wisconsin tested positive for salmonella
> while the Pine Siskins (4) tested negative.  These birds all came
> from the same feeder over in Kingwood, and the reporter said they
> pretty much fell out of the sky, fluttered around, and then died
> in front of them.  They had been in the freezer for a few days
> before they contacted me, and they all tested negative for West
> Nile Virus.
>
> cid:<image003.png...>
>
> *From:*<texbirds-bounce...>
> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>
> <texbirds-bounce...>
> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> *On Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Monday, April 5, 2021 12:15 PM
> *To:* <john.a.blackwell51...>
> <mailto:<john.a.blackwell51...>
> *Cc:* Texbirds <Texbirds...>
> <mailto:<Texbirds...>>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
>
> So glad you said "in some parts of the country"   A recent report
> from LSU showed that numerous bird bodies, including perhaps from
> the Austin region,  tested for salmonella showed no traces of the
> disease in any of the samples of siskins and goldfinches they
> analyzed and that the quick deaths of these birds do not indicate
> such a reason.  They did not however know/say what to contribute
> the deaths too.  Others elsewhere postulate that there may be
> poisons or toxins in the various feeds.  I don't know but remain
> skeptical of the local salmonella proposal.  My feeders remain up
> with lots of finches and not a single sign of any fatalities since
> the big freeze.  For the Austin area, one should follow their
> conscience in terms of leaving feeders up.   I personally would
> like to see clinical proof of this reported malady for the Central
> Texas region instead of Facebook posts and hearsay before I
> completely buy into this.     I have posted Paul's letter
> previously to Texbird FB and elsewhere.  Thanks, John.
>
> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 10:50 AM John Blackwell
> <john.a.blackwell51...>
> <mailto:<john.a.blackwell51...>> wrote:
>
> I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many others.
> I'm now getting droves of them in spurts. They last a day or
> less and then another bunch comes in a day or two later. My
> question is about feeders in our area with respect to the
> salmonella outbreak in some parts of the country.  Is there
> much evidence of it around here and other than normal good
> cleaning practicing should additional measures be taken? I
> thought I would ask directly as I hadn't seen much local
> commentary on the topic.
>
>
>
> John A. Blackwell
> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
> *CAUTION: *This email originated from outside UTSW. Please be
> cautious of links or attachments, and validate the sender's email
> address before replying.
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> UTSouthwestern
>
> Medical Center
>
>
> The future of medicine, today.
>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

--
Paul and Georgean Kyle

Sanctuary Stewards
Travis Audubon's
Chaetura Canyon Sanctuary

Project Managers
Chimney Swift Conservation Association


 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 4:34 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-5-21 Total species 51 @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-5-21 total species 51

Lots of worry about the Cooper’s Hawk that bothers the birds off and on!
4 warbler species, Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler
10 sparrow species with Grasshopper Sparrow and Clay-colored Sparrow
Highlights: 2 American Crow, multiple Hutton’s Vireo—lots of males calling for mate, Broad-winged Hawk, SCRUB JAY

Paul had his highest species day—42 species today!
Fun visitors again and we are most appreciative of your help and love ebirders!

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 3:59 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
Thank you Mary, this is just the kind of value add data we need. I hope
others can provide additional similar.

On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 2:45 PM Mary Wight-Carter <
<Mary.Wight-Carter...> wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> I had Salmonella isolated from a sick siskin that later died in northern
> Ellis county. There were multiple siskin deaths after the big freeze and
> the freshest carcass was submitted for testing. This bird had the classic
> lesions associated with Salmonella septicemia and Salmonella enterica was
> isolated.
>
> At the feeders, the sick birds would appear puffed and “slower than usual”
> prior to death.
>
> Mary Wight-Carter DVM, DACVP
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3)
> *Sent:* Monday, April 5, 2021 2:05 PM
> *To:* <brushfreeman...>; <john.a.blackwell51...>
> *Cc:* Texbirds <Texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
>
>
>
> *EXTERNAL MAIL*
>
> I’m with Brush on this one. Below is more information from the USFWS lab
> in Wisconsin. We are going to submit more specimens soon.
>
>
>
> Below is a note from a bird banded with Harris County Mosquito Control.
>
>
>
> I just heard back, the goldfinch submitted to the USGS National Wildlife
> Health Center in Wisconsin tested positive for salmonella while the Pine
> Siskins (4) tested negative. These birds all came from the same feeder
> over in Kingwood, and the reporter said they pretty much fell out of the
> sky, fluttered around, and then died in front of them. They had been in
> the freezer for a few days before they contacted me, and they all tested
> negative for West Nile Virus.
>
>
>
>
>
> [image: cid:<image003.png...>]
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Monday, April 5, 2021 12:15 PM
> *To:* <john.a.blackwell51...>
> *Cc:* Texbirds <Texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
>
>
>
> So glad you said "in some parts of the country" A recent report from LSU
> showed that numerous bird bodies, including perhaps from the Austin
> region, tested for salmonella showed no traces of the disease in any of
> the samples of siskins and goldfinches they analyzed and that the quick
> deaths of these birds do not indicate such a reason. They did not however
> know/say what to contribute the deaths too. Others elsewhere postulate
> that there may be poisons or toxins in the various feeds. I don't know but
> remain skeptical of the local salmonella proposal. My feeders remain up
> with lots of finches and not a single sign of any fatalities since the big
> freeze. For the Austin area, one should follow their conscience in terms
> of leaving feeders up. I personally would like to see clinical proof of
> this reported malady for the Central Texas region instead of Facebook posts
> and hearsay before I completely buy into this. I have posted Paul's
> letter previously to Texbird FB and elsewhere. Thanks, John.
>
>
>
> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 10:50 AM John Blackwell <
> <john.a.blackwell51...> wrote:
>
> I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many others. I'm now
> getting droves of them in spurts. They last a day or less and then another
> bunch comes in a day or two later. My question is about feeders in our area
> with respect to the salmonella outbreak in some parts of the country. Is
> there much evidence of it around here and other than normal good cleaning
> practicing should additional measures be taken? I thought I would ask
> directly as I hadn't seen much local commentary on the topic.
>
>
>
> John A. Blackwell
> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
> *CAUTION: *This email originated from outside UTSW. Please be cautious of
> links or attachments, and validate the sender's email address before
> replying.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> UT Southwestern
>
> Medical Center
>
> The future of medicine, today.
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 3:07 pm
From: Bob Friedrichs <bird.fried...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
Just to add an observation to the discussion:

We had 50+ post-breeding Pine Siskins at our thistle feeders in Northern New Mexico during most of August and September 2020.

About every other day we would find a dead or sick bird exhibiting symptoms similar to those described below by Paul Kyle. We washed the thistle seed socks and moved them from time to time but the sick birds kept coming. Not sure of the reason that our birds were sick last fall but it sounds similar to what some are experiencing here in Texas.

Bob Friedrichs
Palacios

Sent from Bob's iPhone

> On Apr 5, 2021, at 4:54 PM, Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...> wrote:
>
>  For what it is worth, Georgean and I found at least two dozen dead Pine Siskins at Travis Audubon's Chaetura Canyon Sanctuary in northwest Travis County before, during and after the Polar Vortex event. We saw many more that exhibited the symptoms of illness - fluffed up feathers, lethargy, foraging on the ground unable to fly, roosting during the day with their heads tucked, etc. The findings / sightings tapered off slowly after the event. Now the few PISIs we see seem to be healthy and feeding on insects in the Live Oaks.
>
> I suppose we should have collected specimens and submitted them. But with the power out we were self-absorbed and concentrating on keeping the wood stoves burning.
>
> Paul
>
> On 4/5/2021 4:06 PM, Keith Arnold wrote:
>> An interesting topic, for sure. Two points: small songbirds have a life expectancy of 1.5 +/- o.25 years; in a large populations, birds die from several causes, including old age. I have had small birds die as I took them from a mist net - very likely from stress.
>>
>> I’m not down-playing salmonella; it can be a serious local problem. That said, birds die. It’s good to have those results from the F&W lab.
>>
>> Keith
>>
>> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 2:46 PM John Blackwell <john.a.blackwell51...> wrote:
>>> Thanks to all for the responses. I had stopped filling my feeders regularly but will return to normal now. I felt caution was in order until we had more data. Now we do. Thanks again.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> John A. Blackwell
>>> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>>>
>>> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021, 12:15 Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>>>> So glad you said "in some parts of the country" A recent report from LSU showed that numerous bird bodies, including perhaps from the Austin region, tested for salmonella showed no traces of the disease in any of the samples of siskins and goldfinches they analyzed and that the quick deaths of these birds do not indicate such a reason. They did not however know/say what to contribute the deaths too. Others elsewhere postulate that there may be poisons or toxins in the various feeds. I don't know but remain skeptical of the local salmonella proposal. My feeders remain up with lots of finches and not a single sign of any fatalities since the big freeze. For the Austin area, one should follow their conscience in terms of leaving feeders up. I personally would like to see clinical proof of this reported malady for the Central Texas region instead of Facebook posts and hearsay before I completely buy into this. I have posted Paul's letter previously to Texbird FB and elsewhere. Thanks, John.
>>>>
>>>> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 10:50 AM John Blackwell <john.a.blackwell51...> wrote:
>>>>> I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many others. I'm now getting droves of them in spurts. They last a day or less and then another bunch comes in a day or two later. My question is about feeders in our area with respect to the salmonella outbreak in some parts of the country. Is there much evidence of it around here and other than normal good cleaning practicing should additional measures be taken? I thought I would ask directly as I hadn't seen much local commentary on the topic.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> John A. Blackwell
>>>>> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>> Brush Freeman
>>>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>
> --
> Paul and Georgean Kyle
>
> Sanctuary Stewards
> Travis Audubon's
> Chaetura Canyon Sanctuary
>
> Project Managers
> Chimney Swift Conservation Association

 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 2:54 pm
From: Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
For what it is worth, Georgean and I found at least two dozen dead Pine
Siskins at Travis Audubon's Chaetura Canyon Sanctuary in northwest
Travis County before, during and after the Polar Vortex event.  We saw
many more that exhibited the symptoms of illness - fluffed up feathers,
lethargy, foraging on the ground unable to fly, roosting during the day
with their heads tucked, etc.  The findings / sightings tapered off
slowly after the event.   Now the few PISIs we see seem to be healthy
and feeding on insects in the Live Oaks.

I suppose we should have collected specimens and submitted them. But
with the power out we were self-absorbed and concentrating on keeping
the wood stoves burning.

Paul

On 4/5/2021 4:06 PM, Keith Arnold wrote:
> An interesting topic, for sure. Two points: small songbirds have a
> life expectancy of 1.5 +/- o.25 years; in a large populations, birds
> die from several causes, including old age. I have had small birds die
> as I took them from a mist net - very likely from stress.
>
> I’m not down-playing salmonella; it can be a serious local problem.
> That said, birds die. It’s good to have those results from the F&W lab.
>
> Keith
>
> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 2:46 PM John Blackwell
> <john.a.blackwell51...> <mailto:<john.a.blackwell51...>>
> wrote:
>
> Thanks to all for the responses. I had stopped filling my feeders
> regularly but will return to normal now.  I felt caution was in
> order until we had more data. Now we do. Thanks again.
>
>
>
>
> John A. Blackwell
> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>
> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021, 12:15 Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
> <mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:
>
> So glad you said "in some parts of the country"   A recent
> report from LSU showed that numerous bird bodies, including
> perhaps from the Austin region,  tested for salmonella showed
> no traces of the disease in any of the samples of siskins and
> goldfinches they analyzed and that the quick deaths of these
> birds do not indicate such a reason.  They did not however
> know/say what to contribute the deaths too.  Others elsewhere
> postulate that there may be poisons or toxins in the various
> feeds.  I don't know but remain skeptical of the local
> salmonella proposal.  My feeders remain up with lots of
> finches and not a single sign of any fatalities since the big
> freeze.  For the Austin area, one should follow their
> conscience in terms of leaving feeders up.   I personally
> would like to see clinical proof of this reported malady for
> the Central Texas region instead of Facebook posts and hearsay
> before I completely buy into this.     I have posted Paul's
> letter previously to Texbird FB and elsewhere.  Thanks, John.
>
> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 10:50 AM John Blackwell
> <john.a.blackwell51...>
> <mailto:<john.a.blackwell51...>> wrote:
>
> I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many
> others. I'm now getting droves of them in spurts. They
> last a day or less and then another bunch comes in a day
> or two later. My question is about feeders in our area
> with respect to the salmonella outbreak in some parts of
> the country.  Is there much evidence of it around here and
> other than normal good cleaning practicing should
> additional measures be taken? I thought I would ask
> directly as I hadn't seen much local commentary on the topic.
>
>
>
> John A. Blackwell
> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

--
Paul and Georgean Kyle

Sanctuary Stewards
Travis Audubon's
Chaetura Canyon Sanctuary

Project Managers
Chimney Swift Conservation Association


 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 2:06 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
An interesting topic, for sure. Two points: small songbirds have a life
expectancy of 1.5 +/- o.25 years; in a large populations, birds die from
several causes, including old age. I have had small birds die as I took
them from a mist net - very likely from stress.

I’m not down-playing salmonella; it can be a serious local problem. That
said, birds die. It’s good to have those results from the F&W lab.

Keith

On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 2:46 PM John Blackwell <john.a.blackwell51...>
wrote:

> Thanks to all for the responses. I had stopped filling my feeders
> regularly but will return to normal now. I felt caution was in order until
> we had more data. Now we do. Thanks again.
>
>
>
>
> John A. Blackwell
> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>
> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021, 12:15 Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
>> So glad you said "in some parts of the country" A recent report from
>> LSU showed that numerous bird bodies, including perhaps from the Austin
>> region, tested for salmonella showed no traces of the disease in any of
>> the samples of siskins and goldfinches they analyzed and that the quick
>> deaths of these birds do not indicate such a reason. They did not however
>> know/say what to contribute the deaths too. Others elsewhere postulate
>> that there may be poisons or toxins in the various feeds. I don't know but
>> remain skeptical of the local salmonella proposal. My feeders remain up
>> with lots of finches and not a single sign of any fatalities since the big
>> freeze. For the Austin area, one should follow their conscience in terms
>> of leaving feeders up. I personally would like to see clinical proof of
>> this reported malady for the Central Texas region instead of Facebook posts
>> and hearsay before I completely buy into this. I have posted Paul's
>> letter previously to Texbird FB and elsewhere. Thanks, John.
>>
>> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 10:50 AM John Blackwell <
>> <john.a.blackwell51...> wrote:
>>
>>> I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many others. I'm now
>>> getting droves of them in spurts. They last a day or less and then another
>>> bunch comes in a day or two later. My question is about feeders in our area
>>> with respect to the salmonella outbreak in some parts of the country. Is
>>> there much evidence of it around here and other than normal good cleaning
>>> practicing should additional measures be taken? I thought I would ask
>>> directly as I hadn't seen much local commentary on the topic.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> John A. Blackwell
>>> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 12:46 pm
From: John Blackwell <john.a.blackwell51...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
Thanks to all for the responses. I had stopped filling my feeders regularly
but will return to normal now. I felt caution was in order until we had
more data. Now we do. Thanks again.



John A. Blackwell
Columbus, Tx. Colorado County

On Mon, Apr 5, 2021, 12:15 Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:

> So glad you said "in some parts of the country" A recent report from LSU
> showed that numerous bird bodies, including perhaps from the Austin
> region, tested for salmonella showed no traces of the disease in any of
> the samples of siskins and goldfinches they analyzed and that the quick
> deaths of these birds do not indicate such a reason. They did not however
> know/say what to contribute the deaths too. Others elsewhere postulate
> that there may be poisons or toxins in the various feeds. I don't know but
> remain skeptical of the local salmonella proposal. My feeders remain up
> with lots of finches and not a single sign of any fatalities since the big
> freeze. For the Austin area, one should follow their conscience in terms
> of leaving feeders up. I personally would like to see clinical proof of
> this reported malady for the Central Texas region instead of Facebook posts
> and hearsay before I completely buy into this. I have posted Paul's
> letter previously to Texbird FB and elsewhere. Thanks, John.
>
> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 10:50 AM John Blackwell <
> <john.a.blackwell51...> wrote:
>
>> I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many others. I'm now
>> getting droves of them in spurts. They last a day or less and then another
>> bunch comes in a day or two later. My question is about feeders in our area
>> with respect to the salmonella outbreak in some parts of the country. Is
>> there much evidence of it around here and other than normal good cleaning
>> practicing should additional measures be taken? I thought I would ask
>> directly as I hadn't seen much local commentary on the topic.
>>
>>
>>
>> John A. Blackwell
>> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 12:30 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
Thank you for clarifying Paul. I don't have your post in front of me but I
had thought you had a larger sample size. You mentioned Austin and central
Texas I believe in some context. I look forward very much to any further
insights from you. And thank you Fred.

On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 2:20 PM Paul Dickson <Paul...> wrote:

> We tested two Pine Siskins and a feeder near Shreveport, LA and both birds
> and the feeder were negative for Salmonella. A necropsy of the two Pine
> Siskins did not reveal any indication of Salmonella nor any clues that we
> could pick up as to the causative pathogen.
>
> Paul Dickson
>
> The Pinola Conservancy
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3)
> *Sent:* Monday, April 5, 2021 2:05 PM
> *To:* <brushfreeman...>; <john.a.blackwell51...>
> *Cc:* Texbirds <Texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
>
>
>
> I’m with Brush on this one. Below is more information from the USFWS lab
> in Wisconsin. We are going to submit more specimens soon.
>
>
>
> Below is a note from a bird banded with Harris County Mosquito Control.
>
>
>
> I just heard back, the goldfinch submitted to the USGS National Wildlife
> Health Center in Wisconsin tested positive for salmonella while the Pine
> Siskins (4) tested negative. These birds all came from the same feeder
> over in Kingwood, and the reporter said they pretty much fell out of the
> sky, fluttered around, and then died in front of them. They had been in
> the freezer for a few days before they contacted me, and they all tested
> negative for West Nile Virus.
>
>
>
>
>
> [image: cid:<image003.png...>]
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Monday, April 5, 2021 12:15 PM
> *To:* <john.a.blackwell51...>
> *Cc:* Texbirds <Texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
>
>
>
> So glad you said "in some parts of the country" A recent report from LSU
> showed that numerous bird bodies, including perhaps from the Austin
> region, tested for salmonella showed no traces of the disease in any of
> the samples of siskins and goldfinches they analyzed and that the quick
> deaths of these birds do not indicate such a reason. They did not however
> know/say what to contribute the deaths too. Others elsewhere postulate
> that there may be poisons or toxins in the various feeds. I don't know but
> remain skeptical of the local salmonella proposal. My feeders remain up
> with lots of finches and not a single sign of any fatalities since the big
> freeze. For the Austin area, one should follow their conscience in terms
> of leaving feeders up. I personally would like to see clinical proof of
> this reported malady for the Central Texas region instead of Facebook posts
> and hearsay before I completely buy into this. I have posted Paul's
> letter previously to Texbird FB and elsewhere. Thanks, John.
>
>
>
> On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 10:50 AM John Blackwell <
> <john.a.blackwell51...> wrote:
>
> I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many others. I'm now
> getting droves of them in spurts. They last a day or less and then another
> bunch comes in a day or two later. My question is about feeders in our area
> with respect to the salmonella outbreak in some parts of the country. Is
> there much evidence of it around here and other than normal good cleaning
> practicing should additional measures be taken? I thought I would ask
> directly as I hadn't seen much local commentary on the topic.
>
>
>
> John A. Blackwell
> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 12:05 pm
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
I'm with Brush on this one. Below is more information from the USFWS lab in Wisconsin. We are going to submit more specimens soon.

Below is a note from a bird banded with Harris County Mosquito Control.

I just heard back, the goldfinch submitted to the USGS National Wildlife Health Center in Wisconsin tested positive for salmonella while the Pine Siskins (4) tested negative. These birds all came from the same feeder over in Kingwood, and the reporter said they pretty much fell out of the sky, fluttered around, and then died in front of them. They had been in the freezer for a few days before they contacted me, and they all tested negative for West Nile Virus.


[cid:<image003.png...>]



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Monday, April 5, 2021 12:15 PM
To: <john.a.blackwell51...>
Cc: Texbirds <Texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders

So glad you said "in some parts of the country" A recent report from LSU showed that numerous bird bodies, including perhaps from the Austin region, tested for salmonella showed no traces of the disease in any of the samples of siskins and goldfinches they analyzed and that the quick deaths of these birds do not indicate such a reason. They did not however know/say what to contribute the deaths too. Others elsewhere postulate that there may be poisons or toxins in the various feeds. I don't know but remain skeptical of the local salmonella proposal. My feeders remain up with lots of finches and not a single sign of any fatalities since the big freeze. For the Austin area, one should follow their conscience in terms of leaving feeders up. I personally would like to see clinical proof of this reported malady for the Central Texas region instead of Facebook posts and hearsay before I completely buy into this. I have posted Paul's letter previously to Texbird FB and elsewhere. Thanks, John.

On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 10:50 AM John Blackwell <john.a.blackwell51...><mailto:<john.a.blackwell51...>> wrote:
I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many others. I'm now getting droves of them in spurts. They last a day or less and then another bunch comes in a day or two later. My question is about feeders in our area with respect to the salmonella outbreak in some parts of the country. Is there much evidence of it around here and other than normal good cleaning practicing should additional measures be taken? I thought I would ask directly as I hadn't seen much local commentary on the topic.


John A. Blackwell
Columbus, Tx. Colorado County


--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas



 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 10:15 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pine siskins and feeders
So glad you said "in some parts of the country" A recent report from LSU
showed that numerous bird bodies, including perhaps from the Austin
region, tested for salmonella showed no traces of the disease in any of
the samples of siskins and goldfinches they analyzed and that the quick
deaths of these birds do not indicate such a reason. They did not however
know/say what to contribute the deaths too. Others elsewhere postulate
that there may be poisons or toxins in the various feeds. I don't know but
remain skeptical of the local salmonella proposal. My feeders remain up
with lots of finches and not a single sign of any fatalities since the big
freeze. For the Austin area, one should follow their conscience in terms
of leaving feeders up. I personally would like to see clinical proof of
this reported malady for the Central Texas region instead of Facebook posts
and hearsay before I completely buy into this. I have posted Paul's
letter previously to Texbird FB and elsewhere. Thanks, John.

On Mon, Apr 5, 2021 at 10:50 AM John Blackwell <john.a.blackwell51...>
wrote:

> I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many others. I'm now
> getting droves of them in spurts. They last a day or less and then another
> bunch comes in a day or two later. My question is about feeders in our area
> with respect to the salmonella outbreak in some parts of the country. Is
> there much evidence of it around here and other than normal good cleaning
> practicing should additional measures be taken? I thought I would ask
> directly as I hadn't seen much local commentary on the topic.
>
>
>
> John A. Blackwell
> Columbus, Tx. Colorado County
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/21 8:50 am
From: John Blackwell <john.a.blackwell51...>
Subject: [texbirds] Pine siskins and feeders
I had a lot of pine siskins in the winter as did many others. I'm now
getting droves of them in spurts. They last a day or less and then another
bunch comes in a day or two later. My question is about feeders in our area
with respect to the salmonella outbreak in some parts of the country. Is
there much evidence of it around here and other than normal good cleaning
practicing should additional measures be taken? I thought I would ask
directly as I hadn't seen much local commentary on the topic.



John A. Blackwell
Columbus, Tx. Colorado County

 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/21 12:06 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bolivar to High Island Thursday, Migrants and wind
The forecast of a front and good north winds lured me down to the coast for
a dawn ferry ride. Again laughing gulls were along but not much else.

I had left home with the break between clouds and clear skies right
overhead and the line followed me and beat me to the coast. Along with the
clear skies came wind and combined with blowing sand left the car, me
including my ears filled with sand.

Instead of a north wind on bolivar thee was a strong east wind and even a
bit to the south which kept the tide in high and getting a little higher.
Most of the usual shorebird feeding area was under water except for a
corner was covered with white pelicans and american avocets. The avocets as
a group are getting redder heads and most were somewhere else

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534050

White pelicans continued to swim in and fly into the area

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534059

They make their own room on landing

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534057

and then it is on to preening

Some migrant herons were with the pelicans including cattle egrets and
little blue herons

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534051

A single reddish egret white phase bird was with them

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534054

The common birds were the sanderlings

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534055

with a few scattered piping plovers feeding in the wave area

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534053

and western sandpipers

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534056

More terns were arriving but only a handful of least terns

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534052

Wilson's plovers are paired and have started scolding anyone walking out on
the beach

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534060

Some are territorial but other pairs are out by the water including this
locally banded bird

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534061

This bird was guarding shoreline while the female ran back into the
vegetation

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534062

I had my first numbers of sandwich terns of the spring. This pair was
trying to mate or something

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534068

After 10 minutes the gentlemanly tern got no further despite constant
calling and encouragement from the female

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534069

Several of the sandwich terns had a nice pink wash on the breast which my
camera does not like to show

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534072

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534074

During most of the year and for most of the royal terns, they show a nice
orange bill.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534064

In the spring, a few develop a reddish bill

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534065

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534067

This bill is as red as a caspian tern

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534066

Laughing Gull bills will get a little redder than this bird

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534063

Worked my way to High Island without many birds. Good numbers of singing
northern parula and hooded warblers with a couple of orchard orioles in
Hook's Woods there.

Not a whole lot of migrants elsewhere. Stopped and saw the wintering
spotted towee near Boy Scout Woods where the louisiana waterthrush was in
front of the bleachers.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534080

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534078

You have to be quick as the towhee grabs a seed and heads for cover to eat
it

Had several woodpeckers tapping in Smith Oaks. All were yellow-bellied
sapsuckers

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534082

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534083

One played peekaboo from its favorite branch that had old sap wells

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171534084

There had been a few more birds present in the morning but by the time I
arrived they were more spread out.

Not many birds on 1985 but a swainson's hawk was at one of its usual places
but the red-atiled hawk was not at his usual spot and most americn kestrels
were not on the wires. Only a couple of northern harriers were migrating.

One pair of northern harriers is thinking about breeding on the UTC for my
first in several years. No sky dancing yet but he comes when she calls
which is a good sign. But without food.

Now that it is April, we can start to look for birds.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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Date: 4/4/21 11:52 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-4-21 THIRTY warblers at once Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-4-21 THIRTY warblers at once Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

I spent an hr wo a single bird and then they started coming in—560 photos, but nothing to catch the mob properly—I’m on pinpoint focus and if I change to auto, it has sound, which is bad. 30 warblers coming in at once—it was amazing—I finally put down the camera and counted birds of each species. Also, a Golden-cheeked Warbler was heard in the same spot as before by someone today. My checklist is posted below

https://ebird.org/checklist/S84772295

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/3/21 7:11 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-3-21 Chuck-Will’s-Widow calling Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-3-21 Chuck-Will’s-Widow calling Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Here is the video with the audio


Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 4/2/21 3:48 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 4-2-21 FIVE warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
4-2-21 FIVE warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

29 visitors today and parking was totally occupied—a hiking group joined us
Only a few EBird lists turned in
Black-and-white Warbler(multiple), Nashville Warbler 9, Black-throated-green Warbler 2, Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler. The warblers were seen in the woods and also at the water features and actually showed up more than usual, but I counted the maximum at one time.
Also had Hutton’s Vireo and Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Thanks for visiting—get your requests in early to get a parking spot—favorable winds tonight.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 3/31/21 8:20 pm
From: drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Bill Clark raptor ID presentation for TOS April 9 & 10, 2021
Hi Texbirders,Please see below for an announcement about another great raptor program that Bill Clark will present online for TOS next week.Registration closes April 6.Be there and be in a square (I will be).Good birding ya'll,Byron Stone, Austin, Tx 
TOS Advanced Raptor ID – Friday evening and Saturday April 9 & 10TOS is excited to announce that internationally-recognized expert (and Texas resident) Bill Clark will present another virtual class for us on raptor identification just in time for spring raptor migration in Texas. This class will be conducted via Zoom on Friday evening April 9, and Saturday April 10, 2021. The class will be recorded so that registrants can review the material on their own later, or in case they can’t be present for one or both days of the live presentations. Don’t let the title fool you! This class will cover material helpful to any birder with an interest in advancing their knowledge of raptor identification, regardless of whether they have taken a raptor class before. On Friday evening, Bill will review the 28 diurnal raptor species to be covered by type, ending with a more thorough coverage of vultures, Osprey, harrier, and falcons. The second hour on Friday will cover the many differences between Sharp-shinned Hawk and Cooper’s Hawk identification in the field. Saturday morning, Bill will cover in detail six species of buteonines, followed by coverage of our two eagles (not covered in the previous TOS virtual Raptor ID class). Saturday afternoon sessions begin with a detailed discussion of unusual raptor plumages. The final hour starts with coverage of three kites, then four rare raptors, two specialty falcons, how to document rarities, and a Raptor ID summary.Bill Clark has studied raptors since the 1960’s, when he first began to band migrant raptors. He has lived in the Rio Grande Valley since 2002, where he studies and bands resident and migrant raptors of south Texas. Bill has authored a field guide to the raptors of Europe, another for the raptors of Africa, one for the raptors of Mexico and Central America, and two different field guides to the raptors of North America. Bill has observed raptors in 56 different countries, and before the pandemic, he regularly conducted workshops on raptor identification in Texas, in other states and even on other continents.Fee for this virtual class is $100 for 6 hours of instruction. A significant portion of the proceeds will go to support TOS programs and activities.Registration is herehttp://texasbirds.org/events.phpIf you don’t already have an account with Neon, you will need to create one (using a valid email address) to register. If you have previously taken a TOS class or registered online for a TOS meeting, then you already have a Neon account. Don’t miss this great opportunity to advance your raptor identification skills just in time for spring migration!
 

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Date: 3/31/21 7:47 pm
From: drbirdie <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender drbirdie for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] March 31st Chuck in Austin
Hi Texbiders,I just heard what I believe is my earliest-ever Chuck-Will's Widow in Austin this evening, March 31st, in Northwest Hills.It's been a weird year.Byron "Doc" Stone, Austin
 

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Date: 3/31/21 12:54 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Down on the coast Monday Bryan Beach to Texas City
Headed down to Quintana for the sunrise and my first fallout of the spring
following the cold front and rain on the coast and got there a bit before
the sunrise.

Little blue herons and cattle egrets were moving east in good sized flocks.
One egret and several little blue flocks. A few fulvous whistling ducks
too. Very little on the beach driving down to the end of the driveable
beach. A local made it not advisable to bird the area so I missed the
oldsquaw.

I had not seen lesser black-backed gulls up on galveston county or the dike
since the freeze but bryan beach continues to be their stronghold with only
breeding plumaged birds present.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524352

Lots of long-calling

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524349

Stopped at the lagoons and found a trio of black-necked stilts were trying
to make a pair. When I arrived, 2 were beak-locked and tossing each other
around.

They ended up wing-biting

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524366

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524367

Then advancing to neck biting

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524369

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524368

And then head biting

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524371

And back to wing chomping

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524372

A red-breasted merganser was along the road

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524353

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524354

Royal terns are looking spiffy

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524356

and some are showing reddish beaks

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524355

There were redder birds but they were in bad light.

Driving up Elmers Island there were lots of sanderlings and western willets
moving. A flock of 24 piping plovers dropped in. One had a very interesting
band arrangement but they moved on right away going inland. Lots of birds,
plovers, avocets, skimmers sandpipers etc and I could get there without
trouble for the first time in a long time. The skimmer/avocet flock was
flushed by something up in the air a couple of times but I could not find
what they saw.

An osprey greeted me on a post

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524360

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524362

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524363

Stopped at migrant traps on Galveston and had 1 each catbird, hermit
thrush, hooded and black and white warbler and great crested flycatcher
plus 5 yellow-rumped warblers. No loons on 61st street and very little on
the texas city dike. Almost no pelicans but lots of cormorants.

But it still is March and the migrants can't be very far away both for time
and distance. Broad-wings starting to show in the valley and they will be
here soon.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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Date: 3/31/21 11:48 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Down on the coast last Friday, new and old birds and a meeting with Monty
Took the sunrise ferry across to Bolivar from Galveston. There were
laughing gulls around but not really following the boat. A few flights of
pelicans heading west.

Over on Bolivar, there were eastern willets everywhere I went. Lots of
noise. Most were paired or in threes. A few scissor-tailed flycatchers were
along Frenchtown Road and 1 eastern kingbird. The water had been over
Frenchtown Road from the Wednesday high water event and the rim of the road
still had water.

Fort Travis had a few golden plovers with a single black-bellied plover.
Yellow-headed blackbirds were in the usual spot near 24th street with the
grackles. One martin house was abandoned and another had birds.

Retillon Road had also had water and the flats had lots of water. Many
white and brown pelicans were off to the west feeding and scooping up
goodies. There was a flock of about 200 lesser yellowlegs feeding next
Retillon.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524318

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524322

They ignored me after a bit but did not like others passing

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524323

Most goodies were just picked up but some required a little more

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524326

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524324

A long walk down toward the jetty had relatively few birds other than
sanderlings. Lots of white pelicans and avocets were feeding and then going
to bed for a nap at low tide. 2 large flocks of avocets were swimming and
group feeding and over time joined the thousands of sleeping birds.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524264

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524266

White pelicans and avocets can mix pretty well until the pelicans decide to
go walking

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524266

When everyone else has to wake up and move

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524267

Some pelicans were awake

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524280

A few had knobs on their bills

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524282

One white pelican had a gray tinge

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524283

There were least sandpipers still there

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524272

One pair of gull-billed terns was very tame until my hat blew off directly
at them

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524269

There were 44 least terns in one group but I found none elsewhere on the day

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524273

The feeding flock had lots of semipalmated plovers

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524277

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524276

Lots of western willets were feeding and along the beach compared to trips
after the freeze. Most were molting into spring plumage

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524279

A few wilson's plovers were scattered around with 2 paired sets

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524278

Small numbers of snowy plovers continue

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524308

Very few short-billed dowitchers and this one had one spring feather

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524307

The common shorebird was western sandpipers

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524316

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524315

They were getting their spring plumage

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524313

Lots of chasing and displays with the tails raised showing the white

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524314

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524312

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524310

A couple of semipalmated sandpipers were calling with the westerns

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524305

The small plover flock included 20 piping, 6 wilson's, 5 snowy and 60
semipalmated.

The plover of the day was Monty of chicago and internet fame. Maybe the
only plover with his own website

He had been seen earlier in the season but not by me until Friday when he
came in close

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524331

Nice little bird. His mate Rose wintered on the west coast of Florida with
one of the chicks of last summer (there were 3)

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524332

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524333

And was fattening up for the season on Lake Michigan with lots of worms

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524334

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524336

Unbanded plovers were feeding well too

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524339

A nearby fence had a morning dove

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524275

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524274

And a house sparrow

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/171524270

Driving up the peninsula I did not find many other migrants (or birds).
Walking around High Island had a calling hooded warbler and neat birds at
the rookery. Heard my only house wren since the freeze. Added hermit thrush
and brown thrasher to my list of birds missing since the freeze

Lots of northern harriers were heading east along Retillon and Pear Orchard
Road. Often there were 2 or 3 in sight at one time. One resident red-tailed
hawk and 2 lingering american kestrels.

Rice farming is starting with one area already flooding with double
cropping in mind. First time in many years that I know of. No birds yet and
only one section had water. A couple of other fields had signs of dike
making. If there is double cropping, there could be really good birds this
summer during and after the first cutting.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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Date: 3/30/21 6:43 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-30-21 FIVE warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-30-21 FIVE warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Early evening warbler frenzy at the Warbler Pond today with Black-and-white Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler. Multiples of several in a short time-frame—they spend their time roaming Margie’s Meadow and Margie’s Woods to Thomas’ Meadow and come in for water every so often.

Thanks to our visitors today! We didn’t have much time to bird today, so I really enjoyed this wild visit to the pond.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 3/30/21 4:18 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Long-billed Thrasher, Onion Creek Greenbelt (Travis Co.)
Texbirds,

On Saturday, 27 March, Nick Komar Jr. found a territorial Long-billed
Thrasher along the Onion Creek Greenbelt. The bird continues this
afternoon/evening in the same area and is vigorously singing. There are
very few legit records for the county and probably equally as many
mis-identifed Brown Thrashers over the years. Come on out and get a
verified one!

Coordinates of it's favored singing perch here:
30.1671016, -97.7482072

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
with a brief moment of time off in Austin, Texas

 

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Date: 3/29/21 5:15 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-29-21 SEVEN warbler species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-29-21 SEVEN warbler species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Northern Parula

Lots of birds roaming the woods and water features—fun visitors and hope for good help each day—last visitor just leaving after driving from Lubbock to here and now to Houston area for home, but they had the Eastern Towhee late today! Thanks Debbie!

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 3/29/21 12:18 pm
From: Shelly Plante <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender Shelly.Plante for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Sponsorship available for youth Birding Classic teams
Hi All,

Texas Ornithological Society is again sponsoring several youth teams in the Great Texas Birding Classic (www.birdingclassic.org<http://www.birdingclassic.org>) and there are a few spots left! If you have been working with some kids or teens on birding and think that the Birding Classic would offer a fun chance for them to be a part of an event, work toward new birding goals, support habitat conservation, and get a cool new t-shirt, please let me know and we may be able to cover your team registration with this TOS sponsorship. We have about $1500 left, which would fund 3-6 teams, depending on which categories you entered, so please let me know asap if you're interested so I can reserve funds.

The registration deadline is the end of the day this Thursday, April 1st (no foolin'!!). I hope you can join the fun!

Thanks,
Shelly
______________________
Shelly Plante
Nature Tourism Manager
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department-HQ
4200 Smith School Road, Austin, TX 78744
Office: 512-389-4500
Cell: 512-241-9163


 

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Date: 3/28/21 7:50 am
From: Brent Ortego <brentortego...>
Subject: [texbirds] Texas Breeding Bird Surveys
The U.S. Geological Survey Breeding Bird Survey office indicated they would support conducting the breeding bird survey this year after a year of absence due to Covid-19 precautions. For people who were signed up 2 years ago, you should be receiving your route packet in the mail in mid April with additional instructions on how to conduct the route with Covid-19 precautions.

Listed below are 11 routes which are currently vacant and we are seeking a volunteer to run a route during one day in May or June.

Sincerely,


Brent Ortego




BREEDING BIRD SURVEY VOLUNTEERS NEEDED 2nd Request to fill 10 Routes.

This is my 2nd request for volunteer sign-up to conduct roadside breeding bird surveys (BBS) in Texas during 2021. There are 0 vacancies in West Texas, 0 in the Panhandle, 1 in North Central Texas, 0 in Central, 2 in Northeast Texas, 0 in Southeast Texas, 2 in Coastal Prairie, and 6 in South Texas. Read below for more details.

For those not familiar with the survey methodology, the BBS is the National Survey which is the primary source for breeding bird population trends in the nation. This survey has about 3000 randomly located routes across the United States. Each route is 24.5 miles long with 50 stops spaced 0.5 miles apart. At each stop during a 3-minute period, the observer tallies all birds seen within ¼ mile and all birds heard. The route lasts from 30 minutes before sunrise until you finish which is normally about 11 a.m. The route needs to be run ONCE each year during the months of May or June; exact dates vary with each route. It might require a pre-survey scouting trip just to familiarize yourself with the route, and a little paper/computer work after the route is done. The observer needs to be able to identify most of the birds along the route by call and all by sight. Along routes in agricultural areas, this might only mean about 20 species by call, but in more complex forested areas it might mean 70 species.
• U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2018. Adaptive Harvest
National and local conservation organizations regularly use BBS data (see www.stateofthebirds.org) in their analysis. They focus very strongly on breeding bird population trends generated by YOUR DATA, and also used bird density data extensively. Partners In Flight has developed models to estimate breeding density and distribution for all species they are tracking with BBS data. Other examples of products created with BBS data are:

Management: 2019 Hunting Season. U.S. Department of Interior, Washington, D.C. 72 pp.
• Seamans, M. E. 2018. Band-tailed pigeon population status, 2018. U.S. DOI, Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Migratory Bird Management, Washington, D.C.
• Kramer et al. 2018. Population trends in Vermivora warblers are linked to strong migratory connectivity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115: E3192-E3200.
• Betts et al. 2018. Old‐growth forests buffer climate‐sensitive bird populations from warming. Diversity and Distributions 24:439–447.
• Fedy et al. 2018. Distribution of priority grassland bird habitats in the Prairie Pothole Region of Canada. Avian Conservation and Ecology 13(1).
• Ruegg et al. 2018. Ecological genomics predicts climate vulnerability in an endangered southwestern songbird. Ecology Letters 21: 1085-1096.
• Using North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data to guide conservation in the Prairie Pothole Region (https://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/refuges/hapet.php<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fws.gov%2Fmountain-prairie%2Frefuges%2Fhapet.php&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594208641&sdata=7hhIcfFqr4iJhS4olO413XqXOaMH5YmMoG37JonDI9M%3D&reserved=0>)
• Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database (http://pif.birdconservancy.org/ACAD<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fpif.birdconservancy.org%2FACAD&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594218634&sdata=bXN9BJaLc2wfO%2B6g3LyBBNeR0cbF%2BcrzIgBPszfcI%2Fg%3D&reserved=0>)
• Partners in Flight Population Estimates Database (http://pif.birdconservancy.org/PopEstimates<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fpif.birdconservancy.org%2FPopEstimates&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594228644&sdata=cR0D8mOZDL94v559pM7xavSewxBo95hP4TDmpAXh5rU%3D&reserved=0>)
• US Air Force Bird Avoidance Model (http://www.usahas.com/faq.html<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usahas.com%2Ffaq.html&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594238649&sdata=Xl6MYsJbQ83JvMpkc4NjBaXkYtWfIf7tX8Nm9ZKaRUM%3D&reserved=0>)
• US Environmental Protection Agency Report on Environment (https://cfpub.epa.gov/roe/indicator.cfm?i=83<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fcfpub.epa.gov%2Froe%2Findicator.cfm%3Fi%3D83&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594248660&sdata=8HGSO1jJUWYqhM6FCoy9nWLYES%2FQ%2FWa%2Fld0xQE23zpU%3D&reserved=0>)

www.birds.cornell.edu/home/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/DECLINE-OF-NORTH-AMERICAN-AVIFAUNA-SCIENCE-2019.pdf



Texas has 196 BBS routes and 11 vacancies. The National Office has started listing routes as vacant when they have not received data from a volunteer for two years. If you see your route listed as vacant, check your files and resubmit your data because the National Office has not received it.

This seems like a lot of routes, but it is not for a state our size. Due to the variability of the data, we are trying to run at least 14 routes per ecological area and there are 10 ecological areas in Texas. This should provide us a statistically valid sample of population trends of birds breeding near highways. We are getting close to obtaining this sample size in every bird region. We always have problems getting qualified birders to do routes in the more rural parts of the State. While there are plenty of good birders in Texas, the birders are concentrated in urban areas and the birds are spread throughout the State causing logistics problems of running routes in remote parts of the Texas. A classic example is West Texas and the Panhandle, lots of country and few birders.

When you volunteer, I will need your NAME, MAILING ADDRESS, E-MAIL, TELEPHONE NUMBER and ROUTE of interest. I can be contacted at:

<brentortego...>

Vacant routes are listed below by geographic areas. Species data for each route can be obtained at the link = https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/RouteMap/Map.cfm. Those areas with the largest numbers of vacancies are the areas needing the most help.


PANHANDLE

0 Vacancies


WEST TEXAS


0Vacancies



NORTHCENTRAL TEXAS

Route 353 Hawley Jones County
1994 – 2013; 18 years; 34-50 species; expect 45

CENTRAL TEXAS

0 Vacancies

NORTHEAST TEXAS

Route 056 Morton Harrison County
1970 – 2012; 30 years; 40-76 species; expect mid 50’s
13 species of warblers; historic Bachman’s Sparrow site


Route 071 Dike Hopkins County
1969 – 2016; 37 years; 31-64 species, expect mid 50’s
6 species of woodpeckers and warblers

SOUTHEAST TEXAS

0 Vacancies

COASTAL PRAIRIE

Route 013 Indianola Calhoun County
1967 – 2014; 40 years; 21-60 species, expect 50
Coastal mix of species. Historically had Black Rail.

Route 306 Oyster Lake Matagorda County
1995-2019; 19 years; 44-70 species, expect 50. Starts in coastal
Marsh and extends inland thru coastal prairie to ag. Quail, herons,
Painted Bunting and Dickcissel are common.


SOUTH TEXAS

Route 016 George West Live Oak
1967-2019; 27 years; 40-68 species; expect 60.
Mostly thorn-scrub communities. Abundant
quail, doves & thrashers. 4species of orioles.

Route 098 Raymondville Willacy County
1969 – 2014; 43 years; 28-72 species; expect 50
South Texas mix.

Route 115 El Sauz Starr County
1993 – 2015; 15 years; 45-59 species; expect 50
Typical Brush Country species.

Route 308 Three Rivers Live Oak County
1994-2019; 21 years; 41-65 species; expect 58.
Mostly thorn-scrub communities. Abundant quail,
doves & thrashers. 4species of orioles.

Route 409 Millett 2 La Salle County
2013 – 2017; 5 years; 50-60 species, expect 55
3 species of Orioles, lots of quail

Route 410 Cavasara Creek Zapata County
1995 – 2013; 12 years; 28-56 species; expect 50
Brush Country community




https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/RouteMap/Map.cfm location of route maps

https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBS/learning/ BBS Methods

Brent Ortego
<brentortego...><mailto:<brentortego...>
Victoria, TX



Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/21 4:30 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-27-21 Audubon’s Oriole + 6 warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-27-21 Audubon’s Oriole + 6 warbler sp. @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Fun day with Clay Taylor show and tell on iphone tricks and optic short-cuts, which 10 people enjoyed.
Birdwise—50 species. 6 warbler species. 9 sparrow species
Audubon’s Oriole seen by one group and heard only by a second; Hutton’s Vireo, Brown Thrasher and Long-billed Thrasher, Clay-colored Sparrow

Thanks to our >19 visitors today

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/21 1:06 pm
From: Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Cassin's Finch
There are at least 5 Cassin's Finches (2 males, 3 females) at South Llano River State Park in Junction. The birds are hanging around park host feeders near the maintenance facility not far from and behind the park office. Please be respectful and view from the asphalt public road. The birds have been frequenting the large trees in front of the smaller camper, which is nearest the road. They may be at Agarita Bird Blind, as it is not far away, but I haven't checked. 
Rhandy J. HeltonJunction, Texas
 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/21 9:15 am
From: paul sellin <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender pjsellin for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Kerr Co. HOH reopening --longish

Texbirders,
Heart of the Hills Fisheries Science Center (HOH) at 5103 JunctionHighway, Mountain Home, TX 78058, the top eBird Hotspot for Kerr County (HOTW 069),will reopen to the public on a limited basis starting Wednesday, April 7th,8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and then on each Wednesday, when not a state holiday, such asApril 21st.  A kiosk at the office parkinglot will have a sign-in sheet. As HOH Director David Buckmeier explained to mevia email yesterday, HOH, like many other public institutions and businesses, hasreduced its onsite personnel for Covid reasons. He is going to dedicate enough personnel on Wednesdays to open HOH, consistentwith safe practices and to fulfill HOH’s main purpose, to support the TPWD’sInland Fisheries Division’s scientific mission.  He will post notices if HOH can't be open on a particular Wednesday, besides state holidays.  Unlike many of TPWD’s facilities, such state parks, HOH is not organizedfor public visits, but due to the interest of birders and others, DirectorBuckmeier is reopening HOH.  Visitsinside the office are discouraged, and will require masking up and otherCovid-related safe practices.  Notices onthe kiosks at the main gate and office parking lot will go into moredetail.  Director Buckmeier will considerother visiting arrangements, such as for the West Kerr CBC and othersituations.  TPWD/HOH has a Facebook pageand internet website presence with more details and contact info.  Maybe one of you FB users could repost toTexbirds FB.   Take care and be well. 
 

Paul Sellin      

Near Ingram, TX


 

Back to top
Date: 3/26/21 5:34 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-26-21 Audubon’s Oriole/50 species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-26-21 Audubon’s Oriole/50 species @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

50 species & lots of fun visitors! Here is today’s summary
AUDUBON’S ORIOLE
6 warblers: Black-and-white Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Nashville Warbler
11 Sparrow sp. Grasshopper Sparrow most fun
Hutton’s Vireo, Clay-colored Sparrow, Common Raven, Brown Thrasher, Long-billed Thrasher, Barn Swallow,

To visit: http://www.warblerwoods.org/visitor-instructions.html

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 3/26/21 4:22 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-27-21 Clay Taylor/Swarovski’s impromptu show and tell
3-27-21 Clay Taylor/Swarovski’s impromptu show and tell

Clay has a trip to San Antonio tomorrow, so he wants to come to Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary and offered to do an impromptu gathering here 830-1030. He has to have time to get the Hutton’s Vireo while here, before his afternoon outing. If you want to see the latest from Swarovski, email me to reserve a spot and make arrangements to get through the gate. Clay is great at showing how to digiscope and other fun stuff and he doesn’t sell stuff—just informs.

We had 50 species today, including Audubon’s Oriole; 6 warbler species; 11 sparrow species. I will post our report in another post. This event just happened and I wanted to get it out.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/21 4:34 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-25-21 FIVE warbler sp @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-25-21 FIVE warbler sp @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Black-and-white Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler,, Orange-crowned Warbler, Brown Creeper, Brown Thrasher

Fun mix of birds today and more exciting Birders—tomorrow is supposed to be a better migration day. No rain overnight.

Hope you can join us sometime! It’s our home too, so this explains the process to visit

http://www.warblerwoods.org/visitor-instructions.html

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/21 2:47 pm
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
I am skeptical about hybrid ducks in urban water bodies. Domestic "barnyard" ducks are Mallard in origin, who knows what genes lurk among them. They all hybridize readily. Mottled Ducks have begun to use these urban waters more extensively and no doubt are hybridizing with whatever ducks are there. Trying to assign these hybrids to origin is hazardous. Perhaps Mexican Ducks could turn up on the UTC but more likely in my opinion is that some random cross is more likely to resemble a Mexican Duck here than it is for one to fly here from the Rio Grande.


[cid:<image005.png...>]



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Berner Family
Sent: Wednesday, March 24, 2021 11:31 AM
To: Texbirds <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?

Texbirders:

Letha Slagel photographed a tame pair of unusual ducks at Deputy GoForth/ Horsepen Creek Park in Harris County. Although the identity of the female is unclear (need pictures of speculum, tail in flight and back of the head) the male appears to be a hybrid Mexican x Mottled. The bird has characteristics of both species. The question is, are there any northern mallard components. I consulted Steve Mlodinow author of an ABA article on Mexican Ducks who feels it is a Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid.

Comments and more photos of the clean orange billed female welcomed. Pair is tame and still present.

Be cautioned however there are at least three similar pairs throughout the lake plus other northern mallard combinations and domestic ducks . Two of the males in those similar pairs have a faint dark green sheen on the back of the head indicating Northern Mallard heritage but look similar from the side toLetha's bird.

This is obviously an identification area fraught with peril. You cannot identify some of these kinds of ducks. Here is Steve's note referring to the March 21 link below to Letha's photos

Hello John

Fascinating bird.
So, cutting to the answer, the male does look like a Mottled x Mexican Duck, a bird that is truly rare. One would assume the female the same, or perhaps a Mexican Duck, but I can't say much from these photos about her.

The speculum pattern and tail are fine for Mexican Duck, and the speculum is obviously wrong for Mottled Duck. The black at the gape is limited to the bill as far as I can tell, and does not actually involve the feathering. Mottled Ducks can have this pattern, or a spot of black feathering at the gape. Mexican Ducks can have a bit of black on the bill at the gape (not nearly as commonly as in Mottled Duck), as this bird does, and do sometimes have black feathering at the gape as well, though Mexican Ducks with black feathering at the gape have it as part of a thin line that extends down from the eyeline (different from the pattern in Mottled).

But, the pale face with limited dark markings is really classic for Mottled Duck and wrong for Mexican. While it is conceivable for a Mexican Duck to have such a pale face, I think the pale face combined with the dark at the gape really make a hybrid the most likely correct identification.

Best Wishes
Steve M****************

John Berner


eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other taxa)<https://gcc02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS83825200&data=04%7C01%<7Cfred.collins...>%7C8b3c74c533774ae153ec08d8eee23033%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637522002534977472%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=UvNaglO0U%2BslFMnLpEoAc5o%2FhjZAO9flm%2BoiIoNbtYU%3D&reserved=0>

[cid:<image006.jpg...>]


[Text Box:]
eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other taxa)

By Letha Slagle

Submitted by Letha Slagle.



eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other taxa)<https://gcc02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS83947388&data=04%7C01%<7Cfred.collins...>%7C8b3c74c533774ae153ec08d8eee23033%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637522002534987400%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=DFILnqyD6%2Fxs6xNHOExcLSBqsVDP3JCUC5tDIYUQGXs%3D&reserved=0>

[cid:<image008.jpg...>]


[Text Box:]
eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other taxa)

By Letha Slagle

Submitted by Letha Slagle.



Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad<https://gcc02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Foverview.mail.yahoo.com%2F%3F.src%3DiOS&data=04%7C01%<7Cfred.collins...>%7C8b3c74c533774ae153ec08d8eee23033%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637522002534987400%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=%2B8GbZmFq%2BRscOGLA2d5kG%2FirseZtNBE5NA6VcLhFjE4%3D&reserved=0>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/21 8:12 pm
From: Letha S <letha.slagle...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
Extremely grateful to John Berner and the two experts who commented on my
reports. I was able to spend a full hour with the birds today in less
harsh light and got more photos of the panels, tails and faces of both
birds. I ended up with a different opinion. I think that the male is
identical to the pure Mexican Duck displayed as figure 3 in Mlodinow's ABA
article. I think the female is hybrid Mottled Mexican. I wish that my
original photos that were evaluated had been in less direct light and
suspect the conclusion would have been different. The new captures with
details of reasoning are in simply as duck sp. today at Horsepen Creek
while they are evaluated. Cheers all, good birding, Letha

On Wed, Mar 24, 2021, 9:39 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:

> John, Texbirds,
>
> While I don't see the pale buffy, finely streaked cheek of a classic
> Mottled Duck or any other convincing traits of MODU, for that matter, I am
> interested in learning more about the variation observed in adult male
> Mexican Duck before settling on the hybrid theory. I also wanted to
> comment that it would be 10 or even 100 times more likely for this pair of
> birds to be pure or predominantly pure Mexican Ducks as opposed to the
> infinitesimally low odds of TWO hybrid Mexican x Mottled Ducks of opposite
> sexes somehow locating one another and pairing up.
>
> It appears as though in times of drought throughout much of its range,
> Mexican Duck may wander more widely. Wyoming just documented its
> second-ever record this week. However, only time will tell now that
> Mexican Duck has been elevated to full species status and will be given
> more attention and greater scrutiny.
>
> Bird on,
> Justin Bosler
> Big Spring, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Mar 24, 2021, 11:30 AM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...>
> wrote:
>
>> Texbirders:
>>
>> Letha Slagel photographed a tame pair of unusual ducks at Deputy
>> GoForth/ Horsepen Creek Park in Harris County. Although the identity of
>> the female is unclear (need pictures of speculum, tail in flight and back
>> of the head) the male appears to be a hybrid Mexican x Mottled. The bird
>> has characteristics of both species. The question is, are there any
>> northern mallard components. I consulted Steve Mlodinow author of an ABA
>> article on Mexican Ducks who feels it is a Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid.
>>
>> Comments and more photos of the clean orange billed female welcomed. Pair
>> is tame and still present.
>>
>> Be cautioned however there are at least three similar pairs throughout
>> the lake plus other northern mallard combinations and domestic ducks . Two
>> of the males in those similar pairs have a faint dark green sheen on the
>> back of the head indicating Northern Mallard heritage but look similar from
>> the side toLetha’s bird.
>>
>> This is obviously an identification area fraught with peril. You cannot
>> identify some of these kinds of ducks. Here is Steve’s note referring to
>> the March 21 link below to Letha’s photos
>>
>> Hello John
>>
>> Fascinating bird.
>> So, cutting to the answer, the male does look like a Mottled x Mexican
>> Duck, a bird that is truly rare. One would assume the female the same, or
>> perhaps a Mexican Duck, but I can't say much from these photos about her.
>>
>> The speculum pattern and tail are fine for Mexican Duck, and the speculum
>> is obviously wrong for Mottled Duck. The black at the gape is limited to
>> the bill as far as I can tell, and does not actually involve the
>> feathering. Mottled Ducks can have this pattern, or a spot of black
>> feathering at the gape. Mexican Ducks can have a bit of black on the bill
>> at the gape (not nearly as commonly as in Mottled Duck), as this bird does,
>> and do sometimes have black feathering at the gape as well, though Mexican
>> Ducks with black feathering at the gape have it as part of a thin line that
>> extends down from the eyeline (different from the pattern in Mottled).
>>
>> But, the pale face with limited dark markings is really classic for
>> Mottled Duck and wrong for Mexican. While it is conceivable for a Mexican
>> Duck to have such a pale face, I think the pale face combined with the dark
>> at the gape really make a hybrid the most likely correct identification.
>>
>> Best Wishes
>> Steve M****************
>>
>> John Berner
>>
>>
>> eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other
>> taxa) <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83825200>
>>
>> eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other
>> taxa)
>>
>> By Letha Slagle
>>
>> Submitted by Letha Slagle.
>> <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83825200>
>>
>>
>>
>> eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other
>> taxa) <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83947388>
>>
>> eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other
>> taxa)
>>
>> By Letha Slagle
>>
>> Submitted by Letha Slagle.
>> <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83947388>
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad <https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/?.src=iOS>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/21 7:39 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
John, Texbirds,

While I don't see the pale buffy, finely streaked cheek of a classic
Mottled Duck or any other convincing traits of MODU, for that matter, I am
interested in learning more about the variation observed in adult male
Mexican Duck before settling on the hybrid theory. I also wanted to comment
that it would be 10 or even 100 times more likely for this pair of birds to
be pure or predominantly pure Mexican Ducks as opposed to the
infinitesimally low odds of TWO hybrid Mexican x Mottled Ducks of opposite
sexes somehow locating one another and pairing up.

It appears as though in times of drought throughout much of its range,
Mexican Duck may wander more widely. Wyoming just documented its
second-ever record this week. However, only time will tell now that Mexican
Duck has been elevated to full species status and will be given more
attention and greater scrutiny.

Bird on,
Justin Bosler
Big Spring, Texas






On Wed, Mar 24, 2021, 11:30 AM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...>
wrote:

> Texbirders:
>
> Letha Slagel photographed a tame pair of unusual ducks at Deputy
> GoForth/ Horsepen Creek Park in Harris County. Although the identity of
> the female is unclear (need pictures of speculum, tail in flight and back
> of the head) the male appears to be a hybrid Mexican x Mottled. The bird
> has characteristics of both species. The question is, are there any
> northern mallard components. I consulted Steve Mlodinow author of an ABA
> article on Mexican Ducks who feels it is a Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid.
>
> Comments and more photos of the clean orange billed female welcomed. Pair
> is tame and still present.
>
> Be cautioned however there are at least three similar pairs throughout the
> lake plus other northern mallard combinations and domestic ducks . Two of
> the males in those similar pairs have a faint dark green sheen on the back
> of the head indicating Northern Mallard heritage but look similar from the
> side toLetha’s bird.
>
> This is obviously an identification area fraught with peril. You cannot
> identify some of these kinds of ducks. Here is Steve’s note referring to
> the March 21 link below to Letha’s photos
>
> Hello John
>
> Fascinating bird.
> So, cutting to the answer, the male does look like a Mottled x Mexican
> Duck, a bird that is truly rare. One would assume the female the same, or
> perhaps a Mexican Duck, but I can't say much from these photos about her.
>
> The speculum pattern and tail are fine for Mexican Duck, and the speculum
> is obviously wrong for Mottled Duck. The black at the gape is limited to
> the bill as far as I can tell, and does not actually involve the
> feathering. Mottled Ducks can have this pattern, or a spot of black
> feathering at the gape. Mexican Ducks can have a bit of black on the bill
> at the gape (not nearly as commonly as in Mottled Duck), as this bird does,
> and do sometimes have black feathering at the gape as well, though Mexican
> Ducks with black feathering at the gape have it as part of a thin line that
> extends down from the eyeline (different from the pattern in Mottled).
>
> But, the pale face with limited dark markings is really classic for
> Mottled Duck and wrong for Mexican. While it is conceivable for a Mexican
> Duck to have such a pale face, I think the pale face combined with the dark
> at the gape really make a hybrid the most likely correct identification.
>
> Best Wishes
> Steve M****************
>
> John Berner
>
>
> eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other
> taxa) <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83825200>
>
> eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other
> taxa)
>
> By Letha Slagle
>
> Submitted by Letha Slagle.
> <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83825200>
>
>
>
> eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other
> taxa) <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83947388>
>
> eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other
> taxa)
>
> By Letha Slagle
>
> Submitted by Letha Slagle.
> <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83947388>
>
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad <https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/?.src=iOS>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/21 5:02 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-24-21 (49 species) Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-24-21 (49 species) Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Today’s summary
Audubon’s Oriole, Brown Creeper, Red-breasted Nuthatch
4 species of warblers, Black-and-white Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Yellow-throated Warbler
11 species of sparrows, including Grasshopper Sparrow, Clay-colored Sparrow (we had Eastern Towhee late yesterday, not in this count)

What an exciting day with huge numbers of birds in Margie’s Woods and awesome sounds, BugsRus!
We are still missing a few checklists for the day—thanks to all our visitors
We can’t wait until tomorrow! Birding is like a Scavenger Hunt each day!

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/21 3:09 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Egyptian Goose breeding records in Bastrop Co. ?
Yes there was a neighborhood going into South Shore of Lake Bastrop that
had pairs with goslings for a while but that was before the fire. Since
then the only case I know of was the pair at Crystal Lake and that has been
a while too. Maybe 2013-14 timeframe. I have heard there were geese over
there around Lake Thunderbird but I never saw them and don't know if they
had offspring. Also the retention pond on the King Ranch turf farm had a
resident pair but it has been a while since I have been in there. The
ponds by the entrance on Steven F. Austin Blvd off 71 (was gated and maybe
still is ) sported a few these geese for a while...I saw a couple of older
imm.s there once. I believe the Goebels lived in that subdivision or
maybe still do and may have more insight on that.


On Wed, Mar 24, 2021 at 3:19 PM Richard Harman <rharmanintx...>
wrote:

> The continuing pair in Bastrop at the ponds behind Home Depot now have
> eight goslings in tow.
>
> Are there any previous breeding records in Bastrop County?
>
> Richard Harman
> Elgin, TX
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/21 1:19 pm
From: Richard Harman <rharmanintx...>
Subject: [texbirds] Egyptian Goose breeding records in Bastrop Co. ?
The continuing pair in Bastrop at the ponds behind Home Depot now have
eight goslings in tow.

Are there any previous breeding records in Bastrop County?

Richard Harman
Elgin, TX

 

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Date: 3/24/21 1:17 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-24-21 Audubon’s Oriole @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-24-21 Audubon’s Oriole @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

When you don’t have a camera, you improvise with your binoculars and digiscope with your iphone! The trees are full of birds right now in one of our forests.




Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 3/24/21 12:11 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
Body feather patterns are important indicators though likely won't hold
true in hybrids, but at least you can eliminate a few possibilities.

On Wed, Mar 24, 2021 at 11:30 AM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...>
wrote:

> Texbirders:
>
> Letha Slagel photographed a tame pair of unusual ducks at Deputy
> GoForth/ Horsepen Creek Park in Harris County. Although the identity of
> the female is unclear (need pictures of speculum, tail in flight and back
> of the head) the male appears to be a hybrid Mexican x Mottled. The bird
> has characteristics of both species. The question is, are there any
> northern mallard components. I consulted Steve Mlodinow author of an ABA
> article on Mexican Ducks who feels it is a Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid.
>
> Comments and more photos of the clean orange billed female welcomed. Pair
> is tame and still present.
>
> Be cautioned however there are at least three similar pairs throughout the
> lake plus other northern mallard combinations and domestic ducks . Two of
> the males in those similar pairs have a faint dark green sheen on the back
> of the head indicating Northern Mallard heritage but look similar from the
> side toLetha’s bird.
>
> This is obviously an identification area fraught with peril. You cannot
> identify some of these kinds of ducks. Here is Steve’s note referring to
> the March 21 link below to Letha’s photos
>
> Hello John
>
> Fascinating bird.
> So, cutting to the answer, the male does look like a Mottled x Mexican
> Duck, a bird that is truly rare. One would assume the female the same, or
> perhaps a Mexican Duck, but I can't say much from these photos about her.
>
> The speculum pattern and tail are fine for Mexican Duck, and the speculum
> is obviously wrong for Mottled Duck. The black at the gape is limited to
> the bill as far as I can tell, and does not actually involve the
> feathering. Mottled Ducks can have this pattern, or a spot of black
> feathering at the gape. Mexican Ducks can have a bit of black on the bill
> at the gape (not nearly as commonly as in Mottled Duck), as this bird does,
> and do sometimes have black feathering at the gape as well, though Mexican
> Ducks with black feathering at the gape have it as part of a thin line that
> extends down from the eyeline (different from the pattern in Mottled).
>
> But, the pale face with limited dark markings is really classic for
> Mottled Duck and wrong for Mexican. While it is conceivable for a Mexican
> Duck to have such a pale face, I think the pale face combined with the dark
> at the gape really make a hybrid the most likely correct identification.
>
> Best Wishes
> Steve M****************
>
> John Berner
>
>
> eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other
> taxa) <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83825200>
>
> eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other
> taxa)
>
> By Letha Slagle
>
> Submitted by Letha Slagle.
> <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83825200>
>
>
>
> eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other
> taxa) <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83947388>
>
> eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other
> taxa)
>
> By Letha Slagle
>
> Submitted by Letha Slagle.
> <https://ebird.org/checklist/S83947388>
>
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad <https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/?.src=iOS>
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

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Date: 3/24/21 11:14 am
From: Petra Hockey <phockey...>
Subject: [texbirds] Espiritu Santo Bay and Matagorda Island after the freeze
Texbirders:

Taking advantage of calm wind and mirror-flat water we checked out Espiritu Santa Bay and the center part of Matagorda Island yesterday. It was the first visit after the Deep Freeze.

I feared for the little Brown Booby colony around the small gas wells. They had been present for several years and lately numbered up to 16 individuals. None were found and many/most/all (?) are presumed to have perished. A highlight from the center part of the bay was a large pre-migratory flock of 53 Common Loons with a smaller Pacific mixed in and an even larger flock of 240 Red-breasted Mergansers. Their wings made a lot of wind noise when they flew away from our boat.

On Matagorda Island we checked around the headquarters, along several runways, a freshwater pond and “The Triangle" (an area with more trees than much of the rest of the island). Overall the number of small birds was quite low, as expected after the vicious freeze. No kinglet, no gnatcatcher, just 1 Eastern Phoebe. But we did find a nice mixed warbler flock with our first of season Blue-winged Warbler, several Black-throated Green, N. Parula and Nashvilles. 9 warbler species total were present. The 10 sparrow species were unusually high for the island but numbers of individuals were very low. We watched 2 Clay-colored, 2 Lark, 1 White-crowned, 1 Grasshopper, 1 Vesper, 1 Song, 3 Swamp, 3 Chipping, 5 Lincoln’s and 15 Savannah Sparrows. Many of those are pretty uncommon on the island. Long-billed Thrashers were in full song on their perches. The first Scissor-tailed Flycatchers had arrived and Barn Swallows were migrating along the barrier island in a constant slow stream. In total
we tallied 77 species in 2.5 hours. Complete list has been posted to e-bird.

An afternoon walk along less than 0.5 mile of shoreline along the bayside of the island at Josephine’s Motte had 15 dead Green Sea Turtles and countless desiccated fishes of many different species.

Petra Hockey
Port O’Connor, Calhoun Co.






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Date: 3/24/21 9:30 am
From: Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid in Harris County?
Texbirders:
Letha Slagel photographed a tame pair of unusual ducks at Deputy GoForth/  Horsepen Creek Park in Harris County. Although the identity of the female is unclear (need pictures of speculum, tail in flight and back of the head) the male appears to be a hybrid Mexican x Mottled. The bird has characteristics of both species. The question is, are there any northern mallard components. I consulted Steve Mlodinow author of an ABA article on Mexican Ducks who feels it is a Mexican x Mottled Duck hybrid.
Comments and more photos of the clean orange billed female welcomed. Pair is tame and still present.
Be cautioned however there are at least three similar pairs throughout the lake plus other northern mallard combinations and domestic ducks . Two of the males in those similar pairs have a faint dark green sheen on the back of the head indicating Northern Mallard heritage but look similar from the side toLetha’s bird.
This is obviously an identification area fraught with peril. You cannot identify some of these kinds of ducks. Here is Steve’s note referring to the March 21 link below to Letha’s photos 
Hello John
Fascinating bird. So, cutting to the answer, the male does look like a Mottled x Mexican Duck, a bird that is truly rare. One would assume the female the same, or perhaps a Mexican Duck, but I can't say much from these photos about her.
The speculum pattern and tail are fine for Mexican Duck, and the speculum is obviously wrong for Mottled Duck. The black at the gape is limited to the bill as far as I can tell, and does not actually involve the feathering. Mottled Ducks can have this pattern, or a spot of black feathering at the gape. Mexican Ducks can have a bit of black on the bill at the gape (not nearly as commonly as in Mottled Duck), as this bird does, and do sometimes have black feathering at the gape as well, though Mexican Ducks with black feathering at the gape have it as part of a thin line that extends down from the eyeline (different from the pattern in Mottled). 
But, the pale face with limited dark markings is really classic for Mottled Duck and wrong for Mexican. While it is conceivable for a Mexican Duck to have such a pale face, I think the pale face combined with the dark at the gape really make a hybrid the most likely correct identification.
Best WishesSteve M****************
John Berner


eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other taxa) 

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eBird Checklist - 21 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 9 species (+3 other taxa)

By Letha Slagle

Submitted by Letha Slagle.
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eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other taxa) 

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eBird Checklist - 23 Mar 2021 - Horsepen Creek Park - 6 species (+3 other taxa)

By Letha Slagle

Submitted by Letha Slagle.
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Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

 

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Date: 3/23/21 7:38 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-23-21 Eastern Towhee, Clay-colored Sparrow @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-23-21 Eastern Towhee, Clay-colored Sparrow @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Some of the birds today, Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Eastern Towhee, Clay-colored Sparrow, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Brown Thrasher, Long-billed Thrasher, and I’m not sure if anyone checked on the Louisiana Waterthrush at the Scout Pond Dam today. I was busy with a medical procedure for my Trigeminal Neuralgia today, so I didn’t get to bird much. We were blessed with .33” of rain last night and missed the hail and severe storms.

Warbler mobs like to roam from Margie’s Woods towards the parking lot and to Thomas’ Meadow, plus the rest of the areas, especially meadows. Don’t forget to concentrate on the sunny side of the tree, since that activates the bugs, which most of our desired birds are after. The Huichache trees in the 2nd Field and the 1 st Field are also good targets. I have always found that insect-loving birds prefer the Elms to the oaks and I assume it is due to having more bugs.

Lots of visitors each day, so much fun!

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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