TEXBIRDS
Received From Subject
8/9/20 2:24 pm <LTHOMPSON54...> [texbirds] NO Lucifer Hummingbird in Gruene
8/9/20 12:27 pm Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for July - Longish
8/8/20 6:47 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 8-8-20 Yellow Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
8/8/20 12:04 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Pictures from the Coast Thursday
8/8/20 7:23 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] To make bird listing easier
8/7/20 9:45 pm Marie Stewart <littlebitrv...> [texbirds] Hawk Watch in Cameron County?
8/7/20 7:09 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 8-7-20 Prairie Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
8/7/20 3:43 pm Willie Sekula <williebird22...> [texbirds] Male Lucifer Hummingbird in Gruene
8/7/20 11:16 am Susan Heath <sheath...> [texbirds] Smith Point Hawk Watch
8/7/20 8:11 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] Fall Migration @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
8/6/20 6:39 am Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler...> [texbirds] Re: Tropical Kingbird and locally rare swallows, McCamey (Upton Co.)
8/5/20 8:22 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] RFI: eBird Reviewer for Crockett County
8/5/20 6:44 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Tropical Kingbird and locally rare swallows, McCamey (Upton Co.)
8/5/20 4:04 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Great Texas Birding Classic Fantasy Birding
8/4/20 5:58 pm Jack Chiles <chilesjack995...> [texbirds] Tuesday morning bird census, Hagerman NWR, 08-04-20
8/4/20 5:49 am Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler...> [texbirds] Re: RFI: would a juvenile Myiarchus sp. respond ...
8/3/20 8:33 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: RFI: would a juvenile Myiarchus sp. respond to a tape the same as an adult?
8/3/20 8:17 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: RFI: would a juvenile Myiarchus sp. respond to a tape the same as an adult?
8/3/20 9:52 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 8-3-20 Juv American Robin & Blue-gray Gnatcatcher @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
8/3/20 8:54 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Birds and pictures from the coast last Thursday, July 30
8/3/20 7:51 am <bertf...> [texbirds] RFI: would a juvenile Myiarchus sp. respond to a tape the same as an adult?
8/1/20 1:05 pm Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] 2020 eBird Game - July Report - of Interest to TCC/eBird Folk
8/1/20 12:10 pm Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] 2020 Photographic Game - July Report
8/1/20 8:24 am Judy Kestner <jkestner...> [texbirds] Re: texbirds Digest V9 #200
8/1/20 8:16 am Douglas Smith <cdr.dsmith81...> [texbirds] Help Needed with Audio ID
8/1/20 8:14 am G. Joan Holt <joanholt...> [texbirds] Re: texbirds Digest V9 #200
8/1/20 5:35 am Ron Weeks <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender ronweeks for DMARC) [texbirds] Tropical Kingbirds at Quintana
7/31/20 8:22 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Tropical Kingbirds, Rankin (Upton Co.)
7/30/20 8:10 pm Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher
7/30/20 3:32 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/30/20 3:29 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/30/20 3:27 pm Timothy Brush <timothy.brush...> [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/30/20 1:59 pm Barbara Pankratz <dmarc-noreply-modpost...> (Redacted sender bbpankratz for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/30/20 1:59 pm Curt Harwerth <dmarc-noreply-modpost...> (Redacted sender curtandirene for DMARC) [texbirds] BG gnatcatcher
7/29/20 10:35 pm Noreen Baker <gnbaker92...> [texbirds] Update on Red-billed Tropicbird
7/29/20 1:45 pm Lamont Brown <lamont...> [texbirds] Brown Booby Grapevine Lake continues
7/28/20 11:15 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/28/20 11:03 am Charmaine Ganson <cgtimes2...> [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/28/20 9:44 am Warblers Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary <warblerwoods...> [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/28/20 9:19 am Dan Smith <dan...> [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/28/20 9:15 am Mark Welch <welch.mark3...> [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/28/20 9:02 am Linda Valdez <ldvaldez...> [texbirds] Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
7/28/20 8:02 am Shawn Hayes <hayessg...> [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
7/28/20 6:37 am Boyd Sanders <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender Boyd.Sanders for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: Hurricane Hanna birds at Lake Casa Blanca (Webb Co.)
7/28/20 6:16 am <scott...> [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
7/27/20 12:58 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] More old publications.
7/27/20 9:13 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Hurricane Hanna birds at Lake Casa Blanca (Webb Co.)
7/27/20 7:39 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Hurricane Hanna birds at Lake Casa Blanca (Webb Co.)
7/26/20 10:35 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Coastal birding last Thursday illustrated
7/26/20 5:48 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Magnificent Frigatebird, Laredo
7/25/20 10:47 am John and Glennah Trochet <trochetj...> [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
7/25/20 5:50 am <scott...> [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
7/24/20 6:22 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
7/24/20 6:02 pm Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC) [texbirds] Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
7/24/20 5:51 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
7/24/20 4:17 pm Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC) [texbirds] Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
7/24/20 12:07 pm Stennie Meadours <stenmead...> [texbirds] Spotted Sandpiper in San Leon
7/24/20 11:40 am Mark Welch <welch.mark3...> [texbirds] Re: ?utf-8?Q?Purple_Martins_and_Swainson’s_Hawk_-_Stafford,?=?utf-8?Q?_TX?Message-Id: <5F60851D-F404-4AA9-9D11-4460B15A4BCE...>
7/24/20 11:26 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Re: ?utf-8?Q?Purple_Martins_and_Swainson’s_Hawk_-_Stafford,?=?utf-8?Q?_TX?Message-Id: <5F60851D-F404-4AA9-9D11-4460B15A4BCE...>
7/24/20 6:00 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Historical Article: The Scarlet Ibis in Texas in The Condor 1918
7/23/20 9:54 pm Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC) [texbirds] Historical Article: The Scarlet Ibis in Texas in The Condor 1918
7/23/20 6:42 pm Nina S <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender birds.nina for DMARC) [texbirds] =?utf-8?Q?Purple_Martins_and_Swainson’s_Hawk_-_Stafford,?=?utf-8?Q?_TX?Message-Id: <5F60851D-F404-4AA9-9D11-4460B15A4BCE...>
7/23/20 8:16 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 7-23-20 Black-throated-green Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/21/20 2:45 pm justin.bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby and NOW Brown Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
7/21/20 11:50 am Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...> [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County
7/21/20 11:30 am Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...> [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County
7/21/20 11:15 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County
7/21/20 11:06 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County
7/21/20 10:32 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] Re: 7-21-20 Golden-cheeked Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/21/20 10:27 am Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...> [texbirds] Re: Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?
7/21/20 10:20 am Paula Channell <dmarc-noreply-modpost...> (Redacted sender pchannell34 for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
7/21/20 10:19 am Ann Kovich <akovich49...> [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
7/21/20 10:17 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?
7/21/20 10:10 am Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...> [texbirds] Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?
7/21/20 9:41 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
7/21/20 9:38 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: 7-21-20 Golden-cheeked Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/21/20 7:33 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 7-21-20 correction Black-throated-green Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/21/20 7:07 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 7-21-20 Golden-cheeked Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/20/20 4:21 pm Bobby Hughes <bobby...> [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
7/20/20 3:25 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
7/20/20 2:55 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
7/20/20 2:36 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
7/20/20 7:50 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Coastal birding and pictures from Thursday
7/18/20 9:21 am Birding Center Naturalist <naturalist...> [texbirds] Golden-cheecked Warbler on South Padre Island 7/17
7/18/20 5:19 am Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler...> [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun - help!
7/17/20 7:22 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 7-17-20 Orchard & Waterthrush @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/17/20 4:35 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
7/17/20 3:49 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
7/17/20 3:22 pm sandfalcon1 <sandfalcon...> [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
7/17/20 12:37 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
7/17/20 11:53 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] Re: Bastrop Bobwhite
7/17/20 11:39 am Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender segast23 for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: Bastrop Bobwhite
7/17/20 8:47 am Susan Heath <sheath...> [texbirds] Red Knot records
7/17/20 8:36 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
7/17/20 7:35 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
7/17/20 7:25 am Philip Rostron <philiprostron...> [texbirds] Bastrop Bobwhite
7/16/20 10:35 am Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
7/16/20 10:11 am Mark Welch <welch.mark3...> [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
7/16/20 8:46 am <bertf...> [texbirds] birding in 1882 by shotgun
7/13/20 12:38 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 7-13-20 Yellow-billed Cuckoo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/13/20 10:47 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Pictures from the coast last week
7/13/20 10:06 am <mitch...> [texbirds] Re: 7-12-20 Cassin’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/12/20 4:47 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] Re: 7-12-20 Cassin’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/12/20 4:27 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 7-12-20 Cassin’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/12/20 12:48 pm Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...> [texbirds] MBTA change comment period ending soon
7/12/20 10:37 am Clayton Leopold <passerinaciris12...> [texbirds] Montezuma Quail
7/11/20 5:10 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
7/11/20 5:05 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
7/11/20 4:50 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Fwd: Booby spotted on Lake Sam Rayburn
7/11/20 4:43 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Lubbock Area Birding Summary for June - Short
7/11/20 12:05 pm Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for June - Short
7/10/20 11:43 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Coast Thursday, black rails, black terns, baby birds and shorebirds coming and going
 
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Date: 8/9/20 2:24 pm
From: <LTHOMPSON54...>
Subject: [texbirds] NO Lucifer Hummingbird in Gruene
I was in Gruene behind The Barn (formerly Buck Pottery) from 9-11:45
Saturday and also for awhile in the early evening, with no luck.
Lynn ThompsonNew Braunfels

 

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Date: 8/9/20 12:27 pm
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for July - Longish
Lubbock received 1.85 inches of rain during July, just below the
expected total for the month of 1.91 inches, with 9.03 inches of rain
for the year, well below the expected year-to-date total of 11.16
inches. Water levels continue to decline throughout the region which
is, as expected, leading to a birder-friendly concentration of
post-breeding waders and migrant songbirds at human-maintained parks
and playas in the region but, overall, poor numbers of expected
species in the region.

Regional summaries of eBird data cannot be acquired in a timely
fashion. As a result, records submitted to eBird may not appear in
this report. Reports from the region that are submitted to the
texbirds or leasbirds listservs can be reviewed in a timely fashion
and should appear.

As always, the county follows the site in ( ) and birds are mentioned
by virtue of rarity, atypical abundance, or atypical scarcity. Water
Treatment Ponds have come to feature so prominently in these reports
that they will, henceforth, be referred to as WTP.

CANADA GOOSE: 26 at Dupree Park (Lubbock) on 7/19/20 (CR, FR) and 98
at McCullough Park (Lubbock) on 7/26/20 (GK) – THE FIRST REPORTS THAT
SEEM TO HAVE AT LEAST SOME ELEMENT OF MIGRATION; IF SO RUNNING EARLY,
AGAIN, THIS YEAR.

HOODED MERGANSER: 1 female at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) from 7/15/20
to 7/31/20 (GK, BSh, photographs) – A VERY EARLY RECORD FOR THE
REGION.

RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 1 spotted below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 7/19/20
(BSh) was the only report – LOW.

RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD: 1 male in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 7/31/20 (AH)
the first of the season – RIGHT ON TIME.

BROAD-TAILED HUMMINGBIRD: 1 female in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on
7/25/20 (JCr) was the first of the season – AN EARLY PASSAGE BIRD,
PARTICULARLY FOR A FEMALE BIRD.

BLACK-NECKED STILT: several at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 7/10/20
(WW), 8 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 7/19/20 (GK), 2 at the CR 198 x FM
207 Playa (Crosby) on 7/21/20 (LZ), and 4 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on
7/26/20 (AH) the only reports – A TAD LOW BUT LITTLE EFFORT IN
LIKELIEST SITES REPORTED.

AMERICAN AVOCET: 36 at CR 198 x FM 207 Playa (Crosby) on 7/20/20 (LZ)
and 1 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 7/26/20 (AH) the only reports – VERY
LOW BUT LITTLE EFFORT FROM PLAYAS REPORTED DURING THE MONTH.

WILLET: 1 near Hale Center (Hale) on 7/7/20 (JA, TA) – FORMERLY
ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION; NOW KNOWN TO BE ANNUAL BUT THIS WAS AN EARLY
RECORD.

BAIRD’S SANDPIPER: 1 at the CR 198 x FM 207 Playa (Crosby) on 7/21/20
(LZ) the only report – RIGHT ON TIME BUT LOW.

LEAST SANDPIPER: 1 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 7/10/20 (WW), 1 -2
at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 7/19/20 (GK), and 1 at Maxey Park (Lubbock)
on 7/26/20 (AH) the only reports – RUNNING A TAD EARLY BUT LOW NUMBERS
SO FAR.

SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 1 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 7/12/20 (AH),
1-5 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 7/19/20 (GK), 2 at Maxey Park (Lubbock)
on 7/26/20 (AH), and 2 at the Smyer Playa (Hockley) on 7/29/20 (BSh) –
RATHER GOOD NUMBERS FOR SO EARLY IN THE SEASON.

SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 1 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) on 7/10/20 (WW) –
RUNNING A BIT EARLY.

GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 18 at the CR 198 x FM 207 Playa (Crosby) on
7/20/20 (LZ) and 1 at the CR 198 x FM 207 Playa (Crosby) on 7/21/20
(LZ) the only reports – ON TIME BUT FEW REPORTS.

LESSER YELLOWLEGS: 1 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 7/12/20 (AH) –
RUNNING A BIT EARLY.

BLACK TERN: 1 east of Plainview (Hale) on 7/12/20 (AK) and 1 at Leroy
Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 7/29/20 (AH) – THE FIRST REPORT WAS MORE THAN
A BIT EARLY; THE SECOND REPORT WAS RIGHT ON TIME.

GREAT EGRET: Six reports of 1-6 birds and two reports of 17-21 birds
at various sites in (Lubbock) during the period (JCr, AH, GJ) – ABOUT
AVERAGE FOR LUBBOCK COUNTY; NO REPORTS FROM ELSEWHERE IN THE REGION.

SNOWY EGRET: Five reports of 1-2 birds, one report of 17 birds, one
report of 53 birds, one report of 57 birds, and one report of 113
birds at various sites in (Lubbock) during the period (JCr, AH, GJ,
GK,JM, BSh, LZ) – ABOUT AVERAGE FOR LUBBOCK COUNTY; NO REPORTS FROM
ELSEWHERE IN THE REGION.

CATTLE EGRET: 42-181 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) during the period
(JCr, AH, GK) and 8-16 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) during the
period (MH, LZ) – ABOUT AVERAGE FOR LUBBOCK COUNTY; NO REPORTS FROM
ELSEWHERE IN THE REGION.

YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON: 2 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) on 7/10/20 (JCr)
the only report – LOW.

COOPER’S HAWK: 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 7/1/20 (MH) and 1
at Mae Simmons Park (Lubbock) on 7/12/20 (BSc) – BY HISTORICAL
STANDARDS THESE ARE EARLY REPORT BUT THE SPECIES IS BREEDING IN THE
PANHANDLE PROPER WITH SOME REGULARITY NOW AND LUBBOCK MIGHT WELL
SUPPORT BREEDING BIRDS.

PEREGRINE FALCON: 1 at the Bison Road Playa (Hockley) on 7/29/20 (BSh)
– AN EARLY REPORT.

PRAIRIE FALCON: 1 at the TTU HSC Campus (Lubbock) on 7/30/20 (AH) – A
VERY EARLY REPORT.

EASTERN PHOEBE: 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 7/26/20 (LZ) the
only report – LOW BUT NO EFFORT REPORTED FROM THE EASTERN COUNTIES.

NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: 2 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 7/26/20
(AH) – A TAD EARLY.

PURPLE MARTIN: 9 adults and 2 dead nestlings in a Lubbock yard
(Lubbock) on 7/12/20 (GJ, PJ), 6 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on
7/13/20 (GB), 2 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 7/15/20 (GJ, PJ), and 2
at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 7/26/20 (AH) the only reports – LOW BUT NO
REPORTS CAME IN FROM OUTLYING COUNTIES THAT USUALLY SUPPORT GOOD
COLONIES.

VERDIN: 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 7/1/20 (MH) the only
report – A BIT LOW.

BUSHTIT: 4 at Lake Six (Lubbock) on 7/27/20 (ZS) and 8 at Lake Six
(Lubbock) on 7/28/20 (BSh) – FORMERLY REGULAR IN THE REGION; VERY GOOD
NUMBERS BY CONTEMPORARY STANDARDS.

ROCK WREN: 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 7/1/20 (MH) the only
report – LOW BUT NO EFFORT REPORTED FROM THE EASTERN COUNTIES.

CHIPPING SPARROW: 8 along the Purina Mountain Bike Trail (Lubbock) on
7/27/20 (LZ) – AN EARLY REPORT AND A VERY GOOD NUMBER FOR AN EARLY
REPORT.

YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD: 12 at the Smyer Playa (Hockley) on 7/29/20
(BSh) the only report – ABOUT AVERAGE FOR SUMMER.

BRONZED COWBIRD: 1 male at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 7/26/20 (AH) the
only report – LOW.

LOUISIANA/NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH: 1 in Plainview (Hale) on 7/22/20 (AK,
NP) – IF A LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH A BIT EARLY; IF A NORTHERN
WATERTHRUSH THE EARLIEST REPORT, BY WEEKS, ON RECORD.

LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH: 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 7/19/20 (JM, BSh)
and 1 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 7/26/20 (AH) – EARLY REPORTS.

WESTERN TANAGER: 1 male along Armadillo Road (Hockley) on 7/13/20 (WW)
– AN EXTRAORDINARILY EARLY REPORT.

OBSERVERS: JA=Jayna Adams, TA=T. Jay Adams, GB=Gail Barnes, JCr=Jim
Crites, AH=Anthony Hewetson, MH=Mike Hensley, GJ=George Jury, PJ=Pat
Jury, AK=Andrew Kasner, GK=Glenda Kelly, JM=Jennifer Miller, NP=Niler
Pyeatt, CR=Clarice Robertson, FR=Floyd Robertson, BSc=Bobby Schat,
BSh=Brad Shine, WW=William Wenthe, LZ=Lena Zappia.

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock
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Date: 8/8/20 6:47 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 8-8-20 Yellow Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
8-8-20 Yellow Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Lots of action today with fun birds—will share a weird molt Orchard Oriole and Yellow Warbler that we had today. You can follow the blue hyperlink to get to our bird records for the day or ever.



Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 8/8/20 12:04 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Pictures from the Coast Thursday
Started the day on east beach on galveston. Odd showers around in several
directions but not there despite the forecast of lots of sun. Bits of rain
all day but not while I was walking. More and more people are out and about
early walking and jogging.

Driving across the causeway, I had no gulls, terns or pelicans for probably
the first time ever. Same on the ferry ride over to Bolivar so fish may be
scarce. Fishermen I saw did not have fish.

Not many birds about on the way down the ship channel due to lots of
walkers and joggers. Had a few plover fly in from bolivar to roost in the
roped off area. There were a few western willets and likely the same winter
plumaged american avocets and a freshly arrived ring-billed gull. The same
were over on bolivar when I arrived.

Walking back up the channel I found a fair group of small plovers and peeps
roosting way out in the fenced off area. Later they were swooped on by the
adult caracara and ended up out on the ship channel. Had about 30 wilson's
plovers along with 10 piping, 12 snowy plovers and 2 semipalmated plus
sanderlings and western sandpipers.

Banded plovers were all old friends including a snowy banded way up on the
missouri river in 2012 and an old local bird. The banded pipings were
veterans of the area but had young of the year chicks with them. Here is
the 2012 snowy

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938488

Tern numbers changed again with lots of sandwich terns this week where they
have been absent for several weeks both here and on Bolivar. They were also
routed a couple of times by the caracara who caught what looked like a
western sandpiper. Adult/Young pairs of caspian terns were around but only
1 blck tern for the day.

My favorite little pond in Port Bolivar is now denuded of birds following
the arrival of a largish alligator a couple of years ago. It ate all the
ducks and finally cleaned out the neotropic cormorants who thought they
were safe perched up on a couple of posts. The alligator can do a standing
high jump and pluck them off.

Only 43 marbled godwits were in Fort Travis but more out on the flats. Lots
of folks walking around in shorts and really attracting mosquitoes so
beware walking in the grass there.

Over on Bolivar, more shorebirds continue to arrive and molt. This
long-billed curlew is likely the one that summered with bleached feathers

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938489

The first black-bellied plover was back still in breeding plumage

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938491

And very tired from the flight from the arctic

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938492

Again, almost no least terns on the day (1 and 7) for each side of the
channel. But there were none of the little minnows they grab from the
channels perhaps the result of Hanna

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938490

Only a couple of black skimmers but there was a chick of the year

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938493

One greater yellowlegs was preening and calling. As it called more
responded that were roosting back in there and they came out to join

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938494

Eventually there were a dozen

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938497

They have to work to get enough water in the bill to wet the feathers.
Eventually they were flushed by a yellow-crowned night heron that went
right overhead.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938496

Only a few reddish egrets

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938498

While down by the reeds, the seaside sparrows were calling up a storm and
complaining. Apparently they did not like the large seahorse that was
grazing on the reeds where they were feeding

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938499

An old timer piping plover was busy feeding

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938501

And a young of the year bird was also finding much to eat

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938502

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938504

Short-billed dowitchers only had a few remaining brown feathers

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938505

A western sandpiper is semipalmated like a semipalmated sandpiper

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938507

This bird is likely one of the summering birds

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938508

And this one is a new arrival with one new winter feather showing well

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938508

The single whimbrel is likely the one that summered

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938510

There were about 70 wilson's plovers on the flats, most resting. One
locally banded

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938513

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938512

About the time I left they started moving out to the water edge to feed as
the tide continued to ebb. A couple of dozen piping and snowy plovers plus
a dozen semipalmated added to the group. No large flocks of roosting
sanderlings or western sandpipers but birds were back in the marsh and
starting to come out to the beach. Saw one of the summering dunlin. The
caracara stayed back in the marsh.

Missed birds at the usual spots along the coast heading to High Island
except caracara. Lots of terns along the shore near high island

Hit rain along 1985 and good rain on Pear Orchard Road. A swainson's hawk
was trying to dry off as the light rain continued

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170938514

Tried to find land bird migrants without any luck. There were a few cliff
swallows around east beach but no streams of birds yet. One should be able
to find maybe 10 warbler species now in places like high island but the bug
count was high when I stopped the car without opening the windows. Heat,
rain and bugs made walking an unevent in Smith Oaks. But birds should be in
little patches but are not. Maybe they will come in a rush next week. Next
week will always have great birds.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/8/20 7:23 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] To make bird listing easier
With the banding through the years @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary, I learned to use the code—first 2 letters of first name and first two of last name, things with hyphenated took first letter of two hyphenated words and last two of last name.

I use an iPad Pro and have added these into text replacement and don’t have to write it out
Settings; general; keyboard; text replacement
The above will get you to the area to add all of these and so much more

Hope this helps some of you, I assume many are already doing it.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 8/7/20 9:45 pm
From: Marie Stewart <littlebitrv...>
Subject: [texbirds] Hawk Watch in Cameron County?
I would like to join one if there is one? Does the Birding and Nature
Center do one? Does one of the other birding spots? Please let me know
if there is one. If not do you have a place that you go to watch for
Hawks during Migration.

I have done the one at Bentsen -Rio Grande Val. SP many different times
over the years for Hidalgo Co.

Marie Stewart
Alamo, Texas

Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
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Date: 8/7/20 7:09 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 8-7-20 Prairie Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
8-7-20 Prairie Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Prairie Warbler today, which is ironic, since in the second week of August, we had another one, with pictures, years ago. I saw with bare eyes, so I didn’t have a good opportunity, but Don had a good view of it and wrote down the details and then checked guide to make sure that was what it was! I grabbed my camera and the battery was dead, so I was changing my battery and lost my opportunity to have it in the open and as it moved about. For me, it was an “if only” moment! Here is Don’s eBird notes.

Details: “Moved short distances quickly across the Warbler Pond background, low to medium height, and then flew back to the woods behind the pond. Yellow undersides and throat but white toward vent; somewhat faint black streaks on flank; smudgy whitish/yellowish eye ring with smudgy line through the eye.“

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 8/7/20 3:43 pm
From: Willie Sekula <williebird22...>
Subject: [texbirds] Male Lucifer Hummingbird in Gruene
Scott Shaw found a male lucifers hummingbird near a pottery store in Gruene near Mew Braunfels in Monday. It was still visiting a stand of salvia.Near a large live oak.

https://goo.gl/maps/icKp6jTsxTThip7K9

Willie Sekula
Falls City

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/7/20 11:16 am
From: Susan Heath <sheath...>
Subject: [texbirds] Smith Point Hawk Watch
Texbirders,



The Smith Point Hawk Watch will resume on August 15th (one week from
tomorrow!). Bob Baez is returning to count again this year. We welcome
visitors but keep the following in mind. Masks are required for all visitors
on the tower. We realize it is hot and the hawk watch is outside but the
confines of the tower will keep people from being able to socially distance
appropriately. Most of the top deck will be cordoned off with no visitors
allowed so Bob can work safely. Therefore only five people will be allowed
on the top deck at a time. Volunteers will be filling in for Bob on Tuesdays
so he can have a day off and they may choose to close of the entire top deck
to visitation while they are there. Please respect these boundaries! I do
not want our volunteers to be put in the position of having to be the covid
police. Let's all work together to keep things safe for everyone. Remember
that before there was a tower, people simply stood in the parking and
watched the birds fly over. That is a good option in this year of covid. Bob
will do his best to yell out any special birds that are passing by. The
Chambers County Department of Economic Development is providing an ADA
port-o-potty, a regular port-o-potty AND a hand washing station this year.
If you get a chance please drop them a note thanking them 508 S. Main St.
Anahuac, TX 77514 or 409-267-2692. They are very supportive of the hawk
watch and we want to make sure they know it is appreciated.



Lastly if your organization plans to bring a group to the hawk watch, could
you let me know so I can put it on our calendar. That way we can try to make
sure we have enough volunteers to handle the days when there will be a lot
of people. And speaking of volunteering, if you'd like to volunteer, please
contact me directly. Thanks everyone! Looking forward to seeing some raptors
overhead soon!



Sue



Susan A. Heath PhD

Director of Conservation Research

Gulf Coast Bird Observatory

The opinions expressed are my own and not necessarily those of the company.




 

Back to top
Date: 8/7/20 8:11 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fall Migration @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Fall migration is always fun, but you have to be attentive—they just show up and as our data from last year shows, it was very late in the year. We had a documented Black-throated-green Warbler in July this year and today, had a very exciting warbler that we happen to have a record of the second week of August from years ago. Sadly, no picture—my battery went out as I grabbed my camera and you know how that goes, either binoculars or camera choice and then it was gone—I’m always prepared with a spare, but it takes time. Don wrote down his notes of his observation and then looked up and it agreed with one species. So, look at this list and bird longer into the season than you usually do—you would be surprised what is out there.

2019 FALL MIGRATION
Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe/TX
Multiples on many, but not listed and many had pictures
8-17 American Redstart
8-20 American Redstart
8-21 American Redstart, Yellow Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler
8-24 Yellow Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler
8-28 Yellow-breasted Chat(yes, know not wa) Yellow Warbler
8-30 Wilson’s Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Yellow-breasted Chat
9-1 Mourning Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler
9-3 Mourning Warbler
9-7 Mourning Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Yellow Warbler
9-8 Mourning Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler
9-14 Mourning Warbler, Yellow-breasted Chat, Yellow Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler
9-16 Mourning Warbler
9-18 Mourning Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Yellow Warbler
9-19 Nashville Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler
9-21 Mourning Warbler 2, American Redstart
9-22 Mourning Warbler 2,American Redstart,Yellow Warbler,Wilson’s Warbler,Nashville Warbler
9-23 Mourning Warbler 2, Yellow Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Common Yellowthroat
9-24 Mourning Warbler 4, Yellow-breasted Chat, Wilson’s Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler
9-26 BLUE-WINGED WARBLER w/pictures
9-28 Yellow-breasted Chat, Nashville Warbler, American Redstart, Yellow Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler
9-29 Blue-winged Warbler
10-2 Yellow Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler
10-4 Yellow-breasted Chat, Black-and-white Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, American Redstart, Yellow Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler
10-5 Yellow-breasted Chat, WORM-EATING WARBLER
10-6 Mourning Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Painted Bunting, Black-and-white Warbler, American Redstart, Wilson’s Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler
10-7 Yellow Warbler, Painted Bunting, Nashville Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Wilson’s Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow Warbler
10-8 PAINTED BUNTING, Wilson’s Warbler, American Redstart, Nashville Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Black-throated-green Warbler
10-9 Mourning Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler
10-13 Common Yellowthroat
10-27 Black-throated-green Warbler
11-7 Nashville Warbler
11-12 SWAMP SPARROW
Hutton’s Vireo in 2019

https://ebird.org/barchart?r=L213585&bmo=1&emo=12&byr=2019&eyr=2019&spp=hutvir

All time record



Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 8/6/20 6:39 am
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Tropical Kingbird and locally rare swallows, McCamey (Upton Co.)
Justin,

I’m not sure what you meant by the following comment:

"There were a handful of juvenile Cliffs mixed in with the abundant Cave Swallows but not very many. I think these historic reports are more indicative of mis-identifications rather than a changing demographic of Petrochelidon swallows in the area.”

I tried to check eBird checklists for Upton County Petrochelidon swallows but I couldn’t quite get to an historical list of sightings of the two. However, there certainly has been a sea change in the proportions of these two species since the 1970s. I don’t know when the first reports of Cave Swallow in the county were; the first eBird report dates from just 2012 which corresponds to the TCC era. While the species was undoubtedly present earlier than that, it’s likely that Cliff Swallow was the predominent species of the two well into the 1980s or 1990s.

So what time frame are you referencing by “historic reports"?

Chuck Sexton
AustinEdit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 8/5/20 8:22 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] RFI: eBird Reviewer for Crockett County
Texbirds,

I am seeking to contact the eBird reviewer for Crockett County. I can't
seem to find it listed on the master spreadsheet of World eBird reviewers.
It might be one of those counties that is relegated to one of the statewide
reviewers. For such a large and diverse county that could use extra
attention, that would be very unfortunate. Any information would be
appreciated.

Thank you!

Justin Bosler
Midland, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 8/5/20 6:44 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Tropical Kingbird and locally rare swallows, McCamey (Upton Co.)
Texbirds,

If instead of birding virtually you'd like to actually escape to the new
"tropics" in the thinly populated counties of West Texas -- such as Crane,
Irion, or Upton -- to name just a few, there are exotic species awaiting
discovery. Today, I found another *Tropical Kingbird*, this time at
the *McCamey
WTP*, that was being harried by a begging juvenile Western (or hybrid?)
Kingbird. In most respects, it appeared to be a classic juvenile Western
but I will have to dig into the finer ID criteria to rule out a hybrid
offspring. Needless to say, I was shocked and would have overlooked the
adult Tropical had it not vocalized in opposition to the relentless
youngster. How widespread are TKs away from the Rio Grande in the
Trans-Pecos and Permian Basin?

There were also a few rare swallows in with the masses of Barn and Cave
Swallows, including 3+ Tree, 4-5 Northern Rough-winged and at least 5 Bank
Swallows. Despite what historic eBird reports indicate, Cliff Swallows are
uncommon to rare in the county and especially so away from localized
breeding sites March through June. There were a handful of juvenile Cliffs
mixed in with the abundant Cave Swallows but not very many. I think these
historic reports are more indicative of mis-identifications rather than a
changing demographic of Petrochelidon swallows in the area.

Good birding, however you choose to do it!

Justin Bosler
Midland, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 8/5/20 4:04 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Great Texas Birding Classic Fantasy Birding
Ever wanted to try the six day tournament of the Great Texas Birding
Classic but didn't have the time or the funding to make a competitive run
of it? Ever feel a tad bit guilty about the idea of driving 3000 plus miles
in a week for birding? This is your lucky year! I was just talking with
Matt Smith of www.fantasybirding.com and he is willing to add a special six
day Great Texas Birding Classic game to Fantasy Birding to coincide with
the actual Great Texas Birding Classic. In this game on the website you
will be allowed to pick six weekend fantasy big day runs in Texas on six
Saturdays and Sundays in October and the winner will be one with the
largest cumulative list from the six days.
On a Fantasy Birding big day your route always starts at sunrise for your
first site. You must arrive at your last site by sunset of that day. For
planning your travel time is automatically calculated and you are assumed
to spend 1 hour at each site. Typically you can string together 6-9 sites
in a day depending on how far you travel between sites. You score will be
all the birds reported to eBird on that day in the 5 km radius circle
around your sites. So your planning needs to include what birds are there
and will anyone be birding there and turning in a list to eBird. You could
pick the Norias Unit of the Kenedy Ranch, but will someone eBird a
Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl there that day?
Fantasy Birding has lots of games and there is a Big Day contest every
Saturday if you would like to practice. There are lots of big year contests
too, ABA, Texas, Global, etc..
Fantasy Birding is free, but Matt accepts donations to fund the site. If
you start playing and are having fun, it would be good to donate something
like the amount you would spend birding one day, or even just lunch on that
day.
I think this new game is going to be fun and test your birding knowledge
and logistics skills; and you can sleep in on the day of the game! Lots of
the Fantasy Birding regulars will play, lets make sure the top winners are
all Texas Birders!

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 5:58 pm
From: Jack Chiles <chilesjack995...>
Subject: [texbirds] Tuesday morning bird census, Hagerman NWR, 08-04-20
Today was a very nice day for August with a light breeze blowing from the
east. Quite a few of the shorebirds that have been here lately pulled out
with the wind change. The only shorebirds that we could find were a couple
of Pectoral Sandpipers, 12 Least Sandpipers, 19 Spotted Sandpipers and 32
Killdeer. We found a total of 5 White Ibis all immatures, one at Martin
Branch and the rest at Deaver Pond. There were a few Yellow Warblers in
the Button Bushes along the pad roads. We found a total of 35 Wood Ducks.
This is one of the best times of year to see them.There were a good number
of egrets and herons, among them 2 Tricolored Herons and 4 Green Herons.
Bunting numbers were low. We finished the morning with 58 Species.
https://ebird.org/checklist/S72106416
Jack Chiles, Texas master naturalist and volunteer, Hagerman NWR.

 

Back to top
Date: 8/4/20 5:49 am
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI: would a juvenile Myiarchus sp. respond ...
TexBirders,

Some of the original research that showed overlapping ranges of Great-crested, Brown-crested, and Ash-throated was done in central Texas and published back in the 1970s. As I recall, an important part of that research was song playback experiments, but I’m afraid I can’t remember the outcomes and a reprint of that research is probably buried in my garage! If someone were to do a deep dive on Google Scholar or SORA, you might turn up that paper. If I come across it, I’ll post the citation.

Chuck Sexton
AustinEdit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 8:33 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI: would a juvenile Myiarchus sp. respond to a tape the same as an adult?
While there is no closeness between the “songs” of these two species, there
are elements which a juvenile Great Crested might mistake for its own
species. It wouldn’t be the first example of a “mistaken” response. Yet,
The real question as to why we have reports that conflict on responses to
the recordings.

My two cents.

Keith

On Mon, Aug 3, 2020 at 10:17 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
wrote:

> Bert,
>
> That would be pretty odd and not enough proof to confirm a rare Myiarchus
> flycatcher. Also, juveniles aren't really wandering from their home ranges
> yet, so for the observer to posit that it was likely a juvenile
> Brown-crested Flycatcher (by its apparent behavioral response) would imply
> local breeding. It seems like a stretch to me.
>
> Good birding,
>
> Justin Bosler
> Midland, Texas
>
> On Mon, Aug 3, 2020 at 9:51 AM <bertf...> wrote:
>
>> Texbirders,
>>
>> A Myiarchus sp. was reported in Brazos County. While a physical
>> description was also supplied, the key mark was the birds response to a
>> recording. The observer wrote, “Immediate fly by response to Brown-crested
>> call 3 different times. Great-crested call (twice) elicited no response."
>>
>> Other birders went out to the same area 3 days later and their thoughts
>> were that it was a juvenile Great Crested Flycatcher. They wrote, “we did
>> try playing Brown-crested to the bird on Friday and didn't get any
>> response. It was calling before we attempted playback but the call didn't
>> sound like Great-crested or Brown crested. Didn't sound like an
>> Ash-throated either. My guess is that this was a juvenile bird making some
>> juvenile specific noise I'm not familiar with.”
>>
>> Since it was three days later, we can’t be sure it was the same bird seen
>> previously.
>>
>> My question is, “Would a juvenile Great Crested respond to a
>> Brown-crested call?”
>>
>> Bert Frenz
>>
>> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>
>> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>>
>> eBird reviewer, Belize
>>
>> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>
>> <Bert2...>
>>
>> www.bafrenz.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 8:17 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: RFI: would a juvenile Myiarchus sp. respond to a tape the same as an adult?
Bert,

That would be pretty odd and not enough proof to confirm a rare Myiarchus
flycatcher. Also, juveniles aren't really wandering from their home ranges
yet, so for the observer to posit that it was likely a juvenile
Brown-crested Flycatcher (by its apparent behavioral response) would imply
local breeding. It seems like a stretch to me.

Good birding,

Justin Bosler
Midland, Texas

On Mon, Aug 3, 2020 at 9:51 AM <bertf...> wrote:

> Texbirders,
>
> A Myiarchus sp. was reported in Brazos County. While a physical
> description was also supplied, the key mark was the birds response to a
> recording. The observer wrote, “Immediate fly by response to Brown-crested
> call 3 different times. Great-crested call (twice) elicited no response."
>
> Other birders went out to the same area 3 days later and their thoughts
> were that it was a juvenile Great Crested Flycatcher. They wrote, “we did
> try playing Brown-crested to the bird on Friday and didn't get any
> response. It was calling before we attempted playback but the call didn't
> sound like Great-crested or Brown crested. Didn't sound like an
> Ash-throated either. My guess is that this was a juvenile bird making some
> juvenile specific noise I'm not familiar with.”
>
> Since it was three days later, we can’t be sure it was the same bird seen
> previously.
>
> My question is, “Would a juvenile Great Crested respond to a Brown-crested
> call?”
>
> Bert Frenz
>
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Belize
>
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> <Bert2...>
>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 9:52 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 8-3-20 Juv American Robin & Blue-gray Gnatcatcher @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
8-3-20 Juv American Robin & Blue-gray Gnatcatcher @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Fun morning with a juv/hy American Robin and actually getting another picture of Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. Always a surprise or delight for each day. We get American Robin off and on, including the Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, which I have included the eBird data from 22 yr of public data for here at the end.





Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 8:54 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Birds and pictures from the coast last Thursday, July 30
Got down to Galveston at sunrise on the tail end of a very local very wet
thunderstorm which was heading east as I went east. It left lots of water
in the ditches and gutters on on Baedecker Road. However it only rained a
little out at the beach and only a small wet area in what is usually the
deepest water along the way.

The rain did stir up the nighthawks and horned larks who were flying around
and then perched up to dry.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922174

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922173

At least two pairs of horned larks raised young. Hanna changed the beach
some with a former cove rather filled in and resulted in very high
overwash. No sargassum but a good bit of water hyacinth piles and not many
birds feeding there

Had 8 piping plovers including a great lakes banded bird, 10 snowy plover
for the first numbers of the fall and 4 wilson's plovers including 2 young
of the year birds that stayed together. Mainly western sandpipers and
willets. The flock of least terns was elsewhere except for a single bird.
No black and 2 caspian tern. A single lesser black-backed gull was along
the channel and probably the same bird later moved to bolivar flats.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922175

A single magnificent frigatebird was over the ferry which has been
abandoned by the usual gulls, grackles and pigeons as riders are encouraged
to stay in the cars.

The rain had the 200+ marbled godwits and about 40 short-billed dowitchers
happily feeding at Fort Travis but no other grass feeders and there are
still no puddles there.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922177

Going out Retillon Road, several black rails were calling from the little
slough. If you go out Retillon from the highway, you go past the 2 ponds on
the left and then a largish sandy area on the right where you can pull out.
Keep going and there is a smaller sandy area on the right. Park there and
on the left there is a single sort scraggle salt cedar. A slough runs
southeast toward the beach just before the salt cedar and the rails call
from that slough. They were not calling when I left a couple of hours later.

The beach was well washed after Hanna. Going east, the area of the cut has
been a great resting area for terns and plovers with other birds in the
water. The cut was not there but had moved a good ways east and now
extended straight out into the gulf. Lots of wave action on the beach that
was underwater for a couple days and not many feeding birds. Bolivar flats
iitself was changed in small bits but was washed clean of cover except for
hyacinths.

Had more snowy plovers (10), 10 piping plovers, and 25 wilson's. Only one
banded piping plover but it was seen repeatedly. It is one of the 2012
cohort banded locally. Did very well feeding

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922189

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922190

Not sure what this was but not the usual worm

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922192

The commonest bird on the flats was about 150 western willets

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922187

They had a single short-billed dowitcher napping with them

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922186

And western sandpipers were joining the nappers

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922187

Heading east, I got my first young black skimmer of the summer. They are
the last of the coast nesters to bring young down to the beaches each year.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922185

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170922184

Driving across 1985, the really big field on the northeast corner of Pear
Orchard road had great habitat for fresh water shorebirds but no fresh
water shorebirds other than a couple of black-necked stilts and a greater
yellowlegs.

The rookery at shoveler pond at Anahuac is winding down. Still a few cattle
egrets and more white-faced ibis young calling but most will be gone soon.

No buteos again this week after 2 swainson's hawks last week and the beach
caracara were not around when I was there although a brown pelican had been
well eaten on bolivar flats.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/3/20 7:51 am
From: <bertf...>
Subject: [texbirds] RFI: would a juvenile Myiarchus sp. respond to a tape the same as an adult?
Texbirders,

A Myiarchus sp. was reported in Brazos County. While a physical description
was also supplied, the key mark was the birds response to a recording. The
observer wrote, "Immediate fly by response to Brown-crested call 3 different
times. Great-crested call (twice) elicited no response."

Other birders went out to the same area 3 days later and their thoughts were
that it was a juvenile Great Crested Flycatcher. They wrote, "we did try
playing Brown-crested to the bird on Friday and didn't get any response. It
was calling before we attempted playback but the call didn't sound like
Great-crested or Brown crested. Didn't sound like an Ash-throated either. My
guess is that this was a juvenile bird making some juvenile specific noise
I'm not familiar with."

Since it was three days later, we can't be sure it was the same bird seen
previously.

My question is, "Would a juvenile Great Crested respond to a Brown-crested
call?"

Bert Frenz

Oaks & Prairies of Texas

eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas

eBird reviewer, Belize

NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas

<Bert2...> <mailto:<Bert2...>

www.bafrenz.com <http://www.bafrenz.com/>






 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/20 1:05 pm
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] 2020 eBird Game - July Report - of Interest to TCC/eBird Folk
Greetings All:

This is probably only of interest to folk who are interested in the
Texas Century Club and/or obsessed with eBird. In other words: if you
aren't interested in this sort of stuff feel free to hit the delete
button.

This is the second year of, hopefully, a two year project so I am
going to hit the reset button a wee bit. Though I have seen over 100
species in all 36 Oregon and all 254 Texas counties, I am way behind
on entering my historical data into eBird and at the beginning of
January of 2019, with 221 months of data not yet entered into eBird,
had but 14 Oregon and 71 Texas counties over 100 in eBird.

During 2019 I entered almost all of my Oregon data (still had October
1996 through December 1997) but finished off my OCC game with at least
100 species in all 36 counties ... and I made serious headway with the
Texas data (still had February of 2005 through December of 2011 to
go), getting up to 130 counties with over 100 species on my eBird
list.

In January I entered six months of historical data (October 1996
through December 1996 and February 2005 through April 2005) as well as
January itself, bringing me down to 92 months of un-entered historical
data. In February I entered twelve months of historical data (January
through April of 1997 and May through December of 2005) as well as
February itself, getting down to 80 months of un-entered historical
data. In March I entered fifteen months of historical data (May 1997
through December 1997 and January 2006 through July of 2006) as well
as March itself, getting down to 65 months of un-entered historical
data. In April I entered eight months of historical data (August 2006
through March 2007) as well as April itself, getting down to 57 months
of un-entered historical data. In May I entered 10 months of
historical data (April 2007 through December 2001 and January of
2011*) as well as May itself, getting down to 47 months of un-entered
historical data. In June I entered eleven months of historical data
(January through November of 2008) as well
as June itself, getting down to 36 months of un-entered historical
data.

In July, with drought and heat reducing local birding to very little
and the need to tend my yard to very little, I entered twelve months
of historical data (December 2008 through November of 2009) as well as
July itself, getting down to 24 months of un-entered historical data.

I managed to add sixteen counties (Anderson, Armstrong, Carson,
Childress, Dallam, Deaf Smith, Hall, Hardeman, Hartley, Hemphill,
King, Martin, Oldham, San Patricio, Schleicher, and Willacy) to my
eBirded TCC list, bringing me up to 180 out of 254 eBirded to TCC
status.

August brings with it the start of classes and, with COVID-19 very
much affecting the way I will be teaching medical students, the month
promises to be stressful. The only way I see getting a lot of data
entry happening is if I find myself using eBird data entry, instead of
bourbon and bad movies, as a form of stress relief:)

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/20 12:10 pm
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] 2020 Photographic Game - July Report
I'm going to give it one more try: while polishing off the historical
data for eBird I'm going to take it easy and try, once more, to have a
good year in the yard, shooting for 40 species of butterfly, 0 species
of amphibian (should be able to achieve that goal:)), 2 species of
reptile, 80 species of bird, and 4 species of mammal - with at least
90% of the critters seen photographed.

Next year, by gosh and by golly, I will do something different:)

June was much worse than I hoped - as rain in the region dodged my
yard until the last few days of the month, a massive heat wave
dominated the month, and flowers, butterflies, and birds responded
accordingly. I also seem to have lost my box turtles ... or they gave
up on coming up this year.

During July I spotted 12 species of butterfly, 0 species of amphibian,
1 species of reptile, 24 species of bird, and 4 species of mammal,
bringing me up to 32 species of butterfly, 0 species of amphibian, 1
species of reptile, 47 species of bird, and 4 species of mammal -
80%, 100%, 50%, 58.75%, and 100% of my taxonomic goals for the year.
Of the eighty-four species seen so far this year, I have photographs
of seventy-six (90.48%).

I think that August will be better as the last few days of July
brought flower-replenishing rains to my yard, things seem to be
cooling down and, if nothing else, August usually brings migrant
hummingbirds and the first fall batch of butterflies.

The July list follows, coded as *= new, (y) = photographed:

Nysa Roadside Skipper
Giant Swallowtail*
Cabbage White
Lyside Sulphur
Gray Hairstreak
Marine Blue
Reakirt's Blue
American Snout
Monarch
Gulf Fritillary(y)
Red Admiral
Painted Lady

Mediterranean Gecko

Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared Dove
White-winged Dove
Mourning Dove
Common Nighthawk
Chimney Swift
Rufous Hummingbird*(y)
Killdeer*
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Egret
Turkey Vulture
Mississippi Kite
Western Kingbird
Blue Jay
Barn Swallow(y)
Cliff Swallow
American Robin
Curve-billed Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
House Sparrow
House Finch
Great-tailed Grackle
Northern Cardinal

Eastern Gray Squirrel
North American Deermouse
House Mouse*(y)
Feral Cat

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/20 8:24 am
From: Judy Kestner <jkestner...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: texbirds Digest V9 #200
I was cutting my husband's hair on the back patio last evening when I
heard a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. Almost cut his ear off in my
excitement!

Nice to have them back.

Judy Kestner
Calallen (NW Corpus Christi)

-----------------------------------------From: "G. Joan Holt"
To: "texbirds digest users", "<texbirds...>" "
Cc:
Sent: Saturday August 1 2020 10:14:31AM
Subject: [texbirds] Re: texbirds Digest V9 #200

We have a ranch in Northern Duval County and have spent a lot of
time here this year due to Covid 19. We have been seeing Blue-gray
Gnatcachers regularly - in March, April, June and July. Usually see 1
or 2. They are regular winter birds usually coming in Aug or Sept.
Joan and Scott Holt

Joan

-------------------------
FROM: FreeLists Mailing List Manager
SENT: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:05:47 AM
TO: texbirds digest users
SUBJECT: texbirds Digest V9 #200 texbirds Digest Thu, 30 Jul 2020
Volume: 09 Issue: 200

In This Issue:
[texbirds] Update on Red-billed Tropicbird
[texbirds] BG gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Noreen Baker
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 00:34:00 -0500
Subject: [texbirds] Update on Red-billed Tropicbird

Texbirders,
As some of you may have seen from posts on other lists, my family and
I
were in Port Aransas over the weekend and were fortunate to find a
Red-billed Tropicbird resting on the beach Sunday morning after
Hurricane Hanna had passed through the area. At the time I was not
able to
post to Texbirds but contacted Eric Carpenter to get the word out in
case
anyone else had the chance to try for the bird. I later learned that
folks
who did come out were unable to refind it. As we left the beach,
several
other folks had noticed the bird and at least one person was trying
to
contact the local animal rescue facility in case the bird needed
help. Out
of curiosity, I contacted the facility today to see if they had
picked up
the bird, and if they had, to see how it was doing. The employee I
spoke to
indicated that they had indeed received numerous calls about the bird
but
were also unable to find it when they went out to look for it. They
did
however speak to one lady who was keeping an eye on the bird who said
it
had gotten up and was moving around a bit, and that at one point she
was
distracted for a couple of minutes and when she looked back, it was
gone.
So it seems like it was unhurt and as soon as it rested enough, it
wasted
no time in heading back out to sea, which I was happy to hear. I did
eventually get the sighting in eBird with photos (link below in case
anyone
is interested). I'm not sure about the age of the bird, but it
appeared to
be somewhere between juvenile and adult.

[1]https://ebird.org/tx/checklist/S71887452 [2]

Thanks,
Noreen Baker
Austin, TX

------------------------------

From: "Curt Harwerth" (Redacted sender
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 01:10:29 -0500
Subject: [texbirds] BG gnatcatcher

As this was a topic recently, I thought I would chime in. I’m in
extreme North Bexar county. I keep monthly lists for my neighborhood
for the last 3 years. I get them Sep and Oct and then March/April/May.
I had one today. This is the first one I’ve seen in July in my area.

Curt Harwerth
San Antonio

Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 23:59:35 +0000 (UTC)
From: "Barbara Pankratz" (Redacted sender "bbpankratz" for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

were easily 30+ gnatcatchers along the road and fence row. I had
never seen anything like it, and contacted a local birder there asking
about it. He said he too had seen it like that before and guesses it
to be a pre-migration event. It was something to see!
Barbara Pankratz
On Tuesday, July 28, 2020, 01:02:57 PM CDT, Charmaine Ganson wrote:

We have them here in Leakey all year round and they breed here.

Charmaine Ganson

Leakey, TX

- From: Linda Valdez
- To: "texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx"
- Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 11:01:03 -0500

As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small
bird that
was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a
Blue Gray
Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter,
is it to
early for them to be here?
ldv
Linda D Valdez
ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx

------------------------------

From: Timothy Brush
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 22:26:02 +0000

Can be migrants or maybe wandering birds this early. They do breed
locally across STX and I gather more commonly in the Hill Country.
Tim Brush
Edinburg, TX
Get Outlook for Android< [3]https://aka.ms/ghei36 [4]>
________________________________
From: <texbirds-bounce...> on behalf of Clay Taylor
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 1:14:52 PM
To: <ldvaldez...> ; <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

External Mail

This email originated outside of The University of Texas Rio Grande
Valley.
Please exercise caution when clicking on links or opening
attachments.

All �

I had a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in my Corpus Christi yard on Monday
afternoon � my First of Season. The interesting thing about the
sighting was the BGGN was getting HAMMERED by a female Black-chinned
Hummingbird, which chased it through the trees and bushes a good 20
feet. Hmmm�maybe I need to look for a hummingbird nest there�

Clay Taylor

TOS Life Member

Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX

401-965-9064

From: <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Linda Valdez
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 11:01 AM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small
bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked
like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill
Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?

ldv

Linda D Valdez

<ldvaldez...>

------------------------------

From: Joseph Kennedy
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 17:28:29 -0500
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

By the end of August there are good numbers of gnatcatchers migrating
through Smith Point at the hawk watch. One of the very first land
bird
migrants that are out in the open.
On Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 1:02 PM Charmaine Ganson
wrote:

> We have them here in Leakey all year round and they breed here.
>
>
>
> Charmaine Ganson
>
> Leakey, TX
>
>
>
> - *From*: Linda Valdez
> - *To*: "texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx"
> - *Date*: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 11:01:03 -0500
>
>
> As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small
bird that
>
> was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a
Blue Gray
>
> Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all
winter, is it to
> early for them to be here?
> ldv
> Linda D Valdez
> ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx
>
>
>

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

------------------------------

From: Susan Schaezler
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 17:31:01 -0500

I pulled up 22 yr of eBird public data from Warbler Woods Bird
Sanctuary and found unexpected results

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, [5]http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
[6]
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

> On Jul 28, 2020, at 11:19 AM, Dan Smith wrote:
>
> The distribution map for Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in Birds of the
World Online, shows the Hill Country to be within the species’
breeding range and year-round presence being just south of about San
Antonio. I should think finding one in the area at just about any time
is quite possible.
>
> Dan Smith
> <dan...>
> 512-451-2632
> [7]http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com [8]
>
> "Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not
constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their
gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.
>
>
>
>
>> On Jul 28, 2020, at 11:01 AM, Linda Valdez wrote:
>>
>> As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very
small bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it
looked like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the
Hill Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?
>> ldv
>> Linda D Valdez
>> <ldvaldez...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Jul 2020 03:09:28 +0000 (UTC)
From: "Rhandy Helton" (Redacted sender "rjhelton" for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher

I estimated 100 gnatcatchers yesterday on my ebird visit. Justin
Bosler was passing through the area and he estimated 150. The fence
line along the road into the Junction WTP was cleared a couple years
ago but a large Pecan was left as were a couple of mesquites and
acacia further down. These trees were loaded with gnatcatchers. I have
noticed this phenomenon before, usually later in the summer. The ponds
attract a multitude of small insect i.e. midges, gnats etc. as not
much impounded water in Kimble County. I think the birds are getting
fat before migrating out later. I don't see gnatcatchers here in
winter. Yesterday I also had a Black-capped Vireo along the fence line
and in the large pecan, and not exactly its habitat.
Rhandy J. HeltonJunction, Texas

------------------------------

End of texbirds Digest V9 #200
******************************



Links:
------
[1] https://ebird.org/tx/checklist/S71887452
[2] https://ebird.org/tx/checklist/S71887452
[3] https://aka.ms/ghei36
[4] https://aka.ms/ghei36
[5] http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
[6] http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
[7] http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com
[8] http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com


 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/20 8:16 am
From: Douglas Smith <cdr.dsmith81...>
Subject: [texbirds] Help Needed with Audio ID
 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/20 8:14 am
From: G. Joan Holt <joanholt...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: texbirds Digest V9 #200
We have a ranch in Northern Duval County and have spent a lot of time here this year due to Covid 19. We have been seeing Blue-gray Gnatcachers regularly - in March, April, June and July. Usually see 1 or 2. They are regular winter birds usually coming in Aug or Sept.
Joan and Scott Holt

Joan

________________________________
From: FreeLists Mailing List Manager <ecartis...>
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 12:05:47 AM
To: texbirds digest users <ecartis...>
Subject: texbirds Digest V9 #200

texbirds Digest Thu, 30 Jul 2020 Volume: 09 Issue: 200

In This Issue:
[texbirds] Update on Red-billed Tropicbird
[texbirds] BG gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
[texbirds] Re: Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Noreen Baker <gnbaker92...>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 00:34:00 -0500
Subject: [texbirds] Update on Red-billed Tropicbird

Texbirders,
As some of you may have seen from posts on other lists, my family and I
were in Port Aransas over the weekend and were fortunate to find a
Red-billed Tropicbird resting on the beach Sunday morning after
Hurricane Hanna had passed through the area. At the time I was not able to
post to Texbirds but contacted Eric Carpenter to get the word out in case
anyone else had the chance to try for the bird. I later learned that folks
who did come out were unable to refind it. As we left the beach, several
other folks had noticed the bird and at least one person was trying to
contact the local animal rescue facility in case the bird needed help. Out
of curiosity, I contacted the facility today to see if they had picked up
the bird, and if they had, to see how it was doing. The employee I spoke to
indicated that they had indeed received numerous calls about the bird but
were also unable to find it when they went out to look for it. They did
however speak to one lady who was keeping an eye on the bird who said it
had gotten up and was moving around a bit, and that at one point she was
distracted for a couple of minutes and when she looked back, it was gone.
So it seems like it was unhurt and as soon as it rested enough, it wasted
no time in heading back out to sea, which I was happy to hear. I did
eventually get the sighting in eBird with photos (link below in case anyone
is interested). I'm not sure about the age of the bird, but it appeared to
be somewhere between juvenile and adult.

https://ebird.org/tx/checklist/S71887452

Thanks,
Noreen Baker
Austin, TX



------------------------------

From: "Curt Harwerth" <dmarc-noreply-modpost...> (Redacted sender
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 01:10:29 -0500
Subject: [texbirds] BG gnatcatcher

As this was a topic recently, I thought I would chime in. I’m in extreme North Bexar county. I keep monthly lists for my neighborhood for the last 3 years. I get them Sep and Oct and then March/April/May. I had one today. This is the first one I’ve seen in July in my area.
Curt Harwerth
San Antonio

Sent from my iPhone

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 23:59:35 +0000 (UTC)
From: "Barbara Pankratz" <dmarc-noreply-modpost...> (Redacted sender "bbpankratz" for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

were easily 30+ gnatcatchers along the road and fence row. I had never seen anything like it, and contacted a local birder there asking about it. He said he too had seen it like that before and guesses it to be a pre-migration event. It was something to see!
Barbara Pankratz
On Tuesday, July 28, 2020, 01:02:57 PM CDT, Charmaine Ganson <cgtimes2...> wrote:

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We have them here in Leakey all year round and they breed here.


Charmaine Ganson

Leakey, TX



- From: Linda Valdez <ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx>
- To: "texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
- Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 11:01:03 -0500

As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that
was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray
Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to
early for them to be here?
ldv
Linda D Valdez
ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx





------------------------------

From: Timothy Brush <timothy.brush...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 22:26:02 +0000

Can be migrants or maybe wandering birds this early. They do breed locally across STX and I gather more commonly in the Hill Country.
Tim Brush
Edinburg, TX
Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>
________________________________
From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> on behalf of Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 1:14:52 PM
To: <ldvaldez...> <ldvaldez...>; <texbirds...> <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher


External Mail

This email originated outside of The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley.
Please exercise caution when clicking on links or opening attachments.

All �



I had a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in my Corpus Christi yard on Monday afternoon � my First of Season. The interesting thing about the sighting was the BGGN was getting HAMMERED by a female Black-chinned Hummingbird, which chased it through the trees and bushes a good 20 feet. Hmmm�maybe I need to look for a hummingbird nest there�





Clay Taylor

TOS Life Member

Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX

401-965-9064







From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Linda Valdez
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 11:01 AM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Blue Gray Gnatcatcher



As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?

ldv

Linda D Valdez

<ldvaldez...><mailto:<ldvaldez...>








------------------------------

From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 17:28:29 -0500
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

By the end of August there are good numbers of gnatcatchers migrating
through Smith Point at the hawk watch. One of the very first land bird
migrants that are out in the open.
On Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 1:02 PM Charmaine Ganson <cgtimes2...>
wrote:

> We have them here in Leakey all year round and they breed here.
>
>
>
> Charmaine Ganson
>
> Leakey, TX
>
>
>
> - *From*: Linda Valdez <ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx>
> - *To*: "texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> - *Date*: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 11:01:03 -0500
>
>
> As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that
>
> was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray
>
> Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to
> early for them to be here?
> ldv
> Linda D Valdez
> ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx
>
>
>


--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>




------------------------------

From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
Date: Thu, 30 Jul 2020 17:31:01 -0500

I pulled up 22 yr of eBird public data from Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary and found unexpected results


Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

> On Jul 28, 2020, at 11:19 AM, Dan Smith <dan...> wrote:
>
> The distribution map for Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in Birds of the World Online, shows the Hill Country to be within the species’ breeding range and year-round presence being just south of about San Antonio. I should think finding one in the area at just about any time is quite possible.
>
> Dan Smith
> <dan...>
> 512-451-2632
> http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com
>
> "Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.
>
>
>
>
>> On Jul 28, 2020, at 11:01 AM, Linda Valdez <ldvaldez...> wrote:
>>
>> As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?
>> ldv
>> Linda D Valdez
>> <ldvaldez...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>


------------------------------

Date: Fri, 31 Jul 2020 03:09:28 +0000 (UTC)
From: "Rhandy Helton" <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender "rjhelton" for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher

I estimated 100 gnatcatchers yesterday on my ebird visit. Justin Bosler was passing through the area and he estimated 150. The fence line along the road into the Junction WTP was cleared a couple years ago but a large Pecan was left as were a couple of mesquites and acacia further down. These trees were loaded with gnatcatchers. I have noticed this phenomenon before, usually later in the summer. The ponds attract a multitude of small insect i.e. midges, gnats etc. as not much impounded water in Kimble County. I think the birds are getting fat before migrating out later. I don't see gnatcatchers here in winter. Yesterday I also had a Black-capped Vireo along the fence line and in the large pecan, and not exactly its habitat.
Rhandy J. HeltonJunction, Texas

------------------------------

End of texbirds Digest V9 #200
******************************

 

Back to top
Date: 8/1/20 5:35 am
From: Ron Weeks <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender ronweeks for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Tropical Kingbirds at Quintana
TexBirders,

Found a pair of calling Tropical Kingbirds at the house at the end of the Quintana bridge at dawn this morning. They have been in the smaller palms on the west side of the house.

Ron

Sent from my iPhone
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from the List Owner


 

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Date: 7/31/20 8:22 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Tropical Kingbirds, Rankin (Upton Co.)
Texbirds,

Just a quick note regarding a pair of Tropical Kingbirds at the Dub Day
Arena and Park off Hwy 329 in Rankin. This is a very small park with
cultivated pines, elms, cottonwoods, mulberries, pecans etc. next to a
rodeo arena. The kingbirds were in the cottonwoods at the center of the
park adjacent to the green stage and picnic area. I believe they have a
nest but I'm unsure of the status of it, and it's awfully late in the
summer for Tyrannids to have an active nest. I will follow up in the coming
week.

I was also surprised to have an adult Zone-tailed Hawk hunting in the park
and a Least and Willow Flycatcher along the eastern boundary fence line.

Good birding,
Justin Bosler
Midland, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/20 8:10 pm
From: Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher
I estimated 100 gnatcatchers yesterday on my ebird visit. Justin Bosler was passing through the area and he estimated 150. The fence line along the road into the Junction WTP was cleared a couple years ago but a large Pecan was left as were a couple of mesquites and acacia further down. These trees were loaded with gnatcatchers. I have noticed this phenomenon before, usually later in the summer. The ponds attract a multitude of small insect i.e. midges, gnats etc. as not much impounded water in Kimble County. I think the birds are getting fat before migrating out later. I don't see gnatcatchers here in winter. Yesterday I also had a Black-capped Vireo along the fence line and in the large pecan, and not exactly its habitat. 
Rhandy J. HeltonJunction, Texas
 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/20 3:32 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
I pulled up 22 yr of eBird public data from Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary and found unexpected results



Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

> On Jul 28, 2020, at 11:19 AM, Dan Smith <dan...> wrote:
>
> The distribution map for Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in Birds of the World Online, shows the Hill Country to be within the species’ breeding range and year-round presence being just south of about San Antonio. I should think finding one in the area at just about any time is quite possible.
>
> Dan Smith
> <dan...>
> 512-451-2632
> http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com
>
> "Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.
>
>
>
>
>> On Jul 28, 2020, at 11:01 AM, Linda Valdez <ldvaldez...> wrote:
>>
>> As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?
>> ldv
>> Linda D Valdez
>> <ldvaldez...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/20 3:29 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
By the end of August there are good numbers of gnatcatchers migrating
through Smith Point at the hawk watch. One of the very first land bird
migrants that are out in the open.

On Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 1:02 PM Charmaine Ganson <cgtimes2...>
wrote:

> We have them here in Leakey all year round and they breed here.
>
>
>
> Charmaine Ganson
>
> Leakey, TX
>
>
>
> - *From*: Linda Valdez <ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx>
> - *To*: "texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> - *Date*: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 11:01:03 -0500
>
>
> As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that
>
> was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray
>
> Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to
> early for them to be here?
> ldv
> Linda D Valdez
> ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx
>
>
>


--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/20 3:27 pm
From: Timothy Brush <timothy.brush...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
Can be migrants or maybe wandering birds this early. They do breed locally across STX and I gather more commonly in the Hill Country.
Tim Brush
Edinburg, TX

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>
________________________________
From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> on behalf of Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 1:14:52 PM
To: <ldvaldez...> <ldvaldez...>; <texbirds...> <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher


External Mail

This email originated outside of The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley.
Please exercise caution when clicking on links or opening attachments.

All



I had a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in my Corpus Christi yard on Monday afternoon my First of Season. The interesting thing about the sighting was the BGGN was getting HAMMERED by a female Black-chinned Hummingbird, which chased it through the trees and bushes a good 20 feet. Hmmmmaybe I need to look for a hummingbird nest there





Clay Taylor

TOS Life Member

Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX

401-965-9064







From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Linda Valdez
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 11:01 AM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Blue Gray Gnatcatcher



As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?

ldv

Linda D Valdez

<ldvaldez...><mailto:<ldvaldez...>







 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/20 1:59 pm
From: Barbara Pankratz <dmarc-noreply-modpost...> (Redacted sender bbpankratz for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
I was in Junction today and stopped briefly at the WTP there, where there were easily 30+ gnatcatchers along the road and fence row.  I had never seen anything like it, and contacted a local birder there asking about it.  He said he too had seen it like that before and guesses it to be a pre-migration event.  It was something to see!
Barbara Pankratz
On Tuesday, July 28, 2020, 01:02:57 PM CDT, Charmaine Ganson <cgtimes2...> wrote:

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We have them here in Leakey all year round and they breed here.

 

Charmaine Ganson

Leakey, TX

 

- From: Linda Valdez <ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx>
- To: "texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
- Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 11:01:03 -0500

As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that 
was all gray with white outer-tail feathers.  To me it looked like a Blue Gray 
Gnatcatcher.  I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to 
early for them to be here?
ldv
Linda D Valdez
ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx

 

 

Back to top
Date: 7/30/20 1:59 pm
From: Curt Harwerth <dmarc-noreply-modpost...> (Redacted sender curtandirene for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] BG gnatcatcher
As this was a topic recently, I thought I would chime in. I’m in extreme North Bexar county. I keep monthly lists for my neighborhood for the last 3 years. I get them Sep and Oct and then March/April/May. I had one today. This is the first one I’ve seen in July in my area.
Curt Harwerth
San Antonio

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 7/29/20 10:35 pm
From: Noreen Baker <gnbaker92...>
Subject: [texbirds] Update on Red-billed Tropicbird
Texbirders,

As some of you may have seen from posts on other lists, my family and I
were in Port Aransas over the weekend and were fortunate to find a
Red-billed Tropicbird resting on the beach Sunday morning after
Hurricane Hanna had passed through the area. At the time I was not able to
post to Texbirds but contacted Eric Carpenter to get the word out in case
anyone else had the chance to try for the bird. I later learned that folks
who did come out were unable to refind it. As we left the beach, several
other folks had noticed the bird and at least one person was trying to
contact the local animal rescue facility in case the bird needed help. Out
of curiosity, I contacted the facility today to see if they had picked up
the bird, and if they had, to see how it was doing. The employee I spoke to
indicated that they had indeed received numerous calls about the bird but
were also unable to find it when they went out to look for it. They did
however speak to one lady who was keeping an eye on the bird who said it
had gotten up and was moving around a bit, and that at one point she was
distracted for a couple of minutes and when she looked back, it was gone.
So it seems like it was unhurt and as soon as it rested enough, it wasted
no time in heading back out to sea, which I was happy to hear. I did
eventually get the sighting in eBird with photos (link below in case anyone
is interested). I'm not sure about the age of the bird, but it appeared to
be somewhere between juvenile and adult.

https://ebird.org/tx/checklist/S71887452

Thanks,
Noreen Baker
Austin, TX

 

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Date: 7/29/20 1:45 pm
From: Lamont Brown <lamont...>
Subject: [texbirds] Brown Booby Grapevine Lake continues
As of this morning, 29 July the Brown Booby continued from Murrell Park,
Grapevine Lake Denton County.

Lamont Brown
Euless

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Date: 7/28/20 11:15 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
All -

I had a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in my Corpus Christi yard on Monday afternoon - my First of Season. The interesting thing about the sighting was the BGGN was getting HAMMERED by a female Black-chinned Hummingbird, which chased it through the trees and bushes a good 20 feet. Hmmm...maybe I need to look for a hummingbird nest there...


Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
401-965-9064



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Linda Valdez
Sent: Tuesday, July 28, 2020 11:01 AM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Blue Gray Gnatcatcher

As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?
ldv
Linda D Valdez
<ldvaldez...><mailto:<ldvaldez...>




 

Back to top
Date: 7/28/20 11:03 am
From: Charmaine Ganson <cgtimes2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher


We have them here in Leakey all year round and they breed here.



Charmaine Ganson

Leakey, TX



* From: Linda Valdez <ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx>
* To: "texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx" <texbirds@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
* Date: Tue, 28 Jul 2020 11:01:03 -0500

As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird
that
was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue
Gray
Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it
to
early for them to be here?
ldv
Linda D Valdez
ldvaldez@xxxxxxxxxxx




 

Back to top
Date: 7/28/20 9:44 am
From: Warblers Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary <warblerwoods...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
Here is Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary bird from yesterday and I concentrated hard on getting a photo, worrying about rarity, although Don has had one off and on. They are around.


Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

> On Jul 28, 2020, at 11:02 AM, Linda Valdez <ldvaldez...> wrote:
>
> As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?
> ldv
> Linda D Valdez
> <ldvaldez...>
>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 7/28/20 9:19 am
From: Dan Smith <dan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
The distribution map for Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in Birds of the World Online, shows the Hill Country to be within the species’ breeding range and year-round presence being just south of about San Antonio. I should think finding one in the area at just about any time is quite possible.

Dan Smith
<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>
512-451-2632
http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com <http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com/>

"Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.




> On Jul 28, 2020, at 11:01 AM, Linda Valdez <ldvaldez...> wrote:
>
> As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?
> ldv
> Linda D Valdez
> <ldvaldez...> <mailto:<ldvaldez...>
>
>
>
>


 

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Date: 7/28/20 9:15 am
From: Mark Welch <welch.mark3...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
Had them nest here for the 1st time in my 40 yrs watching: just one pair,
methinks, judging by the # of youngsters..
Mark
Outside Dripping, West of Weird.

On Tue, Jul 28, 2020 at 11:02 AM Linda Valdez <ldvaldez...> wrote:

> As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird
> that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a
> Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all
> winter, is it to early for them to be here?
> ldv
> Linda D Valdez
> <ldvaldez...>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/28/20 9:02 am
From: Linda Valdez <ldvaldez...>
Subject: [texbirds] Blue Gray Gnatcatcher
As I was getting dressed to go out this morning, I saw a very small bird that was all gray with white outer-tail feathers. To me it looked like a Blue Gray Gnatcatcher. I know we have them here in the Hill Country all winter, is it to early for them to be here?
ldv
Linda D Valdez
<ldvaldez...>





 

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Date: 7/28/20 8:02 am
From: Shawn Hayes <hayessg...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
I seem to recall this being a listserv for Texas bird sightings. While I understand the need to discuss these issues perhaps this discussion could be moved to some social networking forum instead of the listserv. Maybe I’m not clear of the posting rules but I use this for finding out if a masked booby showed up due to the hurricane.

Any news on Hurricane vagrants?

Cheers,
Shawn

Shawn G Hayes, PhD
Austin, TX
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 28, 2020, at 8:16 AM, <scott...> wrote:
>
> 
> So, if I hate everybody, I can’t be a racist. Good to know. What other specious arguments can be made to excuse racism and white supremacy? Don’t be shy now. Fly that freak flag high!
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of John and Glennah Trochet
> Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2020 12:47 PM
> To: <scott...>
> Cc: <jcazberner...>; Texbirds <texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
>
> Dear TexBirders,
>
> I am not going to dispute the assertion that FMB wrote disparagingly of people of the borderlands, or to defend her. I have not read the papers referred to in this space. But I had the same initial impression of John Whitehead when I read his Exploration of Mount Kinabalu, North Borneo. But elsewhere in the book he expressed similar withering opinions of fellow Brits and other Europeans. In sum, he seemed to possess a general misanthropy. So there is another possible, though probably less likely, explanation for the views regarding peoples of different recent backgrounds held by Mrs. Bailey.
>
> Best,
> John Trochet
> Sacramento
>
> On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 5:50 AM <scott...> wrote:
> Thanks for the caveat. There is no acceptable level of white supremacy.
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Berner Family (Redacted sender "jcazberner" for DMARC)
> Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 8:00 PM
> To: Texbirds <texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
>
> Texbirders:
>
>
> One trigger warning on the article. Florence is what I in 2020 would easily call racist in her descriptions of the people in the border region. Best to enjoy her colorful bird and flower descriptions and realize that her unfortunate attitude towards people was presumably regrettably typical for 1900.
>
>
> John Berner
> Houston, TX
>
>
> --
> John Trochet
> Sacramento, California
> <trochetj...>

 

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Date: 7/28/20 6:37 am
From: Boyd Sanders <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender Boyd.Sanders for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Hurricane Hanna birds at Lake Casa Blanca (Webb Co.)
Howdy All!

If your planning on getting in some birding at one of your Texas State Parks, make sure to check online for special alerts for the park you want to visit. Some have special hours and capacity limits. Also, make reservations before you go, even for day-use. This guarantees entry to the park for that day. If your planning a weekend visit, get those reservations well in advance. Some parks are not taking transactions at the park headquarters so reservations are a must.

I checked Lake Casa Blanca’s park alert and they are open Fridays through Sundays and closed the Monday through Thursday with a limit of 250 people on weekend days.

So, make some reservations and come on out and bird your Texas State Parks.

And as Justin says…

Good birding!

Boyd Sanders
Interpreter/Volunteer Coordinator
Tyler State Park

From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Justin Bosler
Sent: Monday, July 27, 2020 11:12 AM
To: 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Hurricane Hanna birds at Lake Casa Blanca (Webb Co.)




ALERT: This email came from an external source. Do not open attachments or click on links in unknown or unexpected emails.
Texbirds,

With most parks being closed these days, you have to get creative in how you access key birding locations (especially after driving over 6 hours to get there). Despite it being a state park, Lake Casa Blanca International State Park was closed to the public. Why the exception from other state parks? Good question.

Part of the lake and, most importantly, the sandbar with the bird activity was visible from the El Ranchito Road access here:

https://goo.gl/maps/SBYxzeDAxJ3fcyUu7

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Mon, Jul 27, 2020 at 9:37 AM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...><mailto:<justin.bosler...>> wrote:
Texbirds,

Yesterday's storm birding results were quite unprecedented for modern times. Although I was unable to find any "mega" rarities, the cumulative diversity and totals of several coastal species were remarkable. I sat on the Falcon Lake Dam for over 4 hours mid-morning to early afternoon and while I racked up an impressive checklist, I failed to locate any true seabirds. More on that in a separate post.

After a brief dawn visit -- that was rather unexciting -- I returned to Lake Casa Blanca in Laredo late afternoon and hit the jackpot, with apparent first county records of Magnificent Frigatebird (7+), Black Skimmer (6) and Royal Tern. Also, at least 3 Common Terns which are rarely reported in the county and a very rare-in-July Ring-billed Gull.

What did others find yesterday?

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

Lake Casa Blanca Intl. SP (HOTE 117), Webb, Texas, US
Jul 26, 2020 5:07 PM - 6:47 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
51 species (+1 other taxa)

Mexican Duck 3
Eurasian Collared-Dove 18
White-winged Dove 36
Mourning Dove 6
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1
Black-necked Stilt (Black-necked) 26+
Killdeer 4
Stilt Sandpiper 16 (one group, returned to sandbar in PM)
peep sp. 30+
Spotted Sandpiper 2
Greater Yellowlegs 2 (large yellowlegs, comparable in size to BNST, vocal)
Laughing Gull 14 (mixed ages, about 4-5 fresh juv., at least 14)
Ring-billed Gull 1 (presumed advanced first summer, blue-gray bill w/ dark tip, black primary covs, slight "hooded" appearance)
Least Tern 24 (at least 24, one group numbering 14+)
Black Tern 6 (3 alt. ad., 3 first summer)
Common Tern 3 (1-2 ad., 1 first summer)
Forster's Tern 3
Royal Tern 1 (presumed basic ad., flying and diving as well as resting on sandbar)
Black Skimmer 6 (one group, resting on sandbar initially, then appearing to forage around perimeter of sandbar in typical skimming fashion, lousy digiscoped photos; *very rare away from immediate coast)
Magnificent Frigatebird 7 (as many as 3 ad. m, 2 ad. f, 2 imm., photos of most; **very rare away from immediate coast, 1st record for Webb)
Neotropic Cormorant 8
Great Blue Heron (Blue form) 3
Great Egret 6
Snowy Egret 20
Little Blue Heron 2
Green Heron 2
Black-crowned Night-Heron 5
Turkey Vulture 20
Osprey (carolinensis) 2 (at least 2 gliding around, possibly 3)
Green Kingfisher 2
Golden-fronted Woodpecker (Northern) 2
Great Kiskadee 8
Couch's Kingbird 7
Western Kingbird 4
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 3
White-eyed Vireo 1
Purple Martin 25
Bank Swallow 5
Barn Swallow (American) 20
Cave Swallow 10
Bewick's Wren 1
Cactus Wren 2
Northern Mockingbird 4
House Finch 3
Hooded Oriole 1
Bullock's Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 60
Bronzed Cowbird 2
Brown-headed Cowbird 8
Great-tailed Grackle 30
Common Yellowthroat 4
Northern Cardinal 4
 

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Date: 7/28/20 6:16 am
From: <scott...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
So, if I hate everybody, I can’t be a racist. Good to know. What other specious arguments can be made to excuse racism and white supremacy? Don’t be shy now. Fly that freak flag high!



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of John and Glennah Trochet
Sent: Saturday, July 25, 2020 12:47 PM
To: <scott...>
Cc: <jcazberner...>; Texbirds <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)



Dear TexBirders,



I am not going to dispute the assertion that FMB wrote disparagingly of people of the borderlands, or to defend her. I have not read the papers referred to in this space. But I had the same initial impression of John Whitehead when I read his Exploration of Mount Kinabalu, North Borneo. But elsewhere in the book he expressed similar withering opinions of fellow Brits and other Europeans. In sum, he seemed to possess a general misanthropy. So there is another possible, though probably less likely, explanation for the views regarding peoples of different recent backgrounds held by Mrs. Bailey.



Best,

John Trochet

Sacramento



On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 5:50 AM <scott...> <mailto:<scott...> > wrote:

Thanks for the caveat. There is no acceptable level of white supremacy.



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> > On Behalf Of Berner Family (Redacted sender "jcazberner" for DMARC)
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 8:00 PM
To: Texbirds <texbirds...> <mailto:<texbirds...> >
Subject: [texbirds] Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)



Texbirders:



One trigger warning on the article. Florence is what I in 2020 would easily call racist in her descriptions of the people in the border region. Best to enjoy her colorful bird and flower descriptions and realize that her unfortunate attitude towards people was presumably regrettably typical for 1900.



John Berner

Houston, TX






--

John Trochet
Sacramento, California
<trochetj...> <mailto:<trochetj...>


 

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Date: 7/27/20 12:58 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] More old publications.
--
Posting to the listserv as I don't have all the email addresses I wanted.
Looked through some of my old stuff last night and found the following,
some of which have already been mentioned. If you want me to look for
anything in particular, I brought them back to town.

Checklist of birds of Dallas County (Stillwell 1939)
Checklist of the Birds of Texas (Wolfe 1956)
Birds of Brewster County Texas (1937)

I also found a prize I had forgotten:
The Birds of Oklahoma (Margaret M. Nice, 1931).....A bit of personal
history. This was a book my father used as a teen in the30s and beyond. I
never saw that copy as I recall but snapped this one up when I found it.
Some really good entries in here, I remember reading about the prairie
chickens and raptors especially.

Have more I need to get to soon.

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/27/20 9:13 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Hurricane Hanna birds at Lake Casa Blanca (Webb Co.)
Texbirds,

With most parks being closed these days, you have to get creative in how
you access key birding locations (especially after driving over 6 hours to
get there). Despite it being a state park, Lake Casa Blanca International
State Park was closed to the public. Why the exception from other state
parks? Good question.

Part of the lake and, most importantly, the sandbar with the bird activity
was visible from the El Ranchito Road access here:

https://goo.gl/maps/SBYxzeDAxJ3fcyUu7

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Mon, Jul 27, 2020 at 9:37 AM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
wrote:

> Texbirds,
>
> Yesterday's storm birding results were quite unprecedented for modern
> times. Although I was unable to find any "mega" rarities, the cumulative
> diversity and totals of several coastal species were remarkable. I sat on
> the Falcon Lake Dam for over 4 hours mid-morning to early afternoon and
> while I racked up an impressive checklist, I failed to locate any true
> seabirds. More on that in a separate post.
>
> After a brief dawn visit -- that was rather unexciting -- I returned to
> Lake Casa Blanca in Laredo late afternoon and hit the jackpot, with
> apparent first county records of Magnificent Frigatebird (7+), Black
> Skimmer (6) and Royal Tern. Also, at least 3 Common Terns which are rarely
> reported in the county and a very rare-in-July Ring-billed Gull.
>
> What did others find yesterday?
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
> Lake Casa Blanca Intl. SP (HOTE 117), Webb, Texas, US
> Jul 26, 2020 5:07 PM - 6:47 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 0.5 mile(s)
> 51 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Mexican Duck 3
> Eurasian Collared-Dove 18
> White-winged Dove 36
> Mourning Dove 6
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1
> Black-necked Stilt (Black-necked) 26+
> Killdeer 4
> Stilt Sandpiper 16 (one group, returned to sandbar in PM)
> peep sp. 30+
> Spotted Sandpiper 2
> Greater Yellowlegs 2 (large yellowlegs, comparable in size to BNST,
> vocal)
> Laughing Gull 14 (mixed ages, about 4-5 fresh juv., at least 14)
> Ring-billed Gull 1 (presumed advanced first summer, blue-gray bill w/
> dark tip, black primary covs, slight "hooded" appearance)
> Least Tern 24 (at least 24, one group numbering 14+)
> Black Tern 6 (3 alt. ad., 3 first summer)
> *Common Tern* *3* (1-2 ad., 1 first summer)
> Forster's Tern 3
> *Royal Tern* *1* (presumed basic ad., flying and diving as well as
> resting on sandbar)
> *Black Skimmer* *6 * (one group, resting on sandbar initially, then
> appearing to forage around perimeter of sandbar in typical skimming
> fashion, lousy digiscoped photos; *very rare away from immediate coast)
> *Magnificent Frigatebird* *7* (as many as 3 ad. m, 2 ad. f, 2 imm.,
> photos of most; **very rare away from immediate coast, 1st record for Webb)
> Neotropic Cormorant 8
> Great Blue Heron (Blue form) 3
> Great Egret 6
> Snowy Egret 20
> Little Blue Heron 2
> Green Heron 2
> Black-crowned Night-Heron 5
> Turkey Vulture 20
> Osprey (carolinensis) 2 (at least 2 gliding around, possibly 3)
> Green Kingfisher 2
> Golden-fronted Woodpecker (Northern) 2
> Great Kiskadee 8
> Couch's Kingbird 7
> Western Kingbird 4
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 3
> White-eyed Vireo 1
> Purple Martin 25
> Bank Swallow 5
> Barn Swallow (American) 20
> Cave Swallow 10
> Bewick's Wren 1
> Cactus Wren 2
> Northern Mockingbird 4
> House Finch 3
> Hooded Oriole 1
> Bullock's Oriole 2
> Red-winged Blackbird 60
> Bronzed Cowbird 2
> Brown-headed Cowbird 8
> Great-tailed Grackle 30
> Common Yellowthroat 4
> Northern Cardinal 4
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/27/20 7:39 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Hurricane Hanna birds at Lake Casa Blanca (Webb Co.)
Texbirds,

Yesterday's storm birding results were quite unprecedented for modern
times. Although I was unable to find any "mega" rarities, the cumulative
diversity and totals of several coastal species were remarkable. I sat on
the Falcon Lake Dam for over 4 hours mid-morning to early afternoon and
while I racked up an impressive checklist, I failed to locate any true
seabirds. More on that in a separate post.

After a brief dawn visit -- that was rather unexciting -- I returned to
Lake Casa Blanca in Laredo late afternoon and hit the jackpot, with
apparent first county records of Magnificent Frigatebird (7+), Black
Skimmer (6) and Royal Tern. Also, at least 3 Common Terns which are rarely
reported in the county and a very rare-in-July Ring-billed Gull.

What did others find yesterday?

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

Lake Casa Blanca Intl. SP (HOTE 117), Webb, Texas, US
Jul 26, 2020 5:07 PM - 6:47 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
51 species (+1 other taxa)

Mexican Duck 3
Eurasian Collared-Dove 18
White-winged Dove 36
Mourning Dove 6
Yellow-billed Cuckoo 1
Black-necked Stilt (Black-necked) 26+
Killdeer 4
Stilt Sandpiper 16 (one group, returned to sandbar in PM)
peep sp. 30+
Spotted Sandpiper 2
Greater Yellowlegs 2 (large yellowlegs, comparable in size to BNST,
vocal)
Laughing Gull 14 (mixed ages, about 4-5 fresh juv., at least 14)
Ring-billed Gull 1 (presumed advanced first summer, blue-gray bill w/
dark tip, black primary covs, slight "hooded" appearance)
Least Tern 24 (at least 24, one group numbering 14+)
Black Tern 6 (3 alt. ad., 3 first summer)
*Common Tern* *3* (1-2 ad., 1 first summer)
Forster's Tern 3
*Royal Tern* *1* (presumed basic ad., flying and diving as well as
resting on sandbar)
*Black Skimmer* *6 * (one group, resting on sandbar initially, then
appearing to forage around perimeter of sandbar in typical skimming
fashion, lousy digiscoped photos; *very rare away from immediate coast)
*Magnificent Frigatebird* *7* (as many as 3 ad. m, 2 ad. f, 2 imm.,
photos of most; **very rare away from immediate coast, 1st record for Webb)
Neotropic Cormorant 8
Great Blue Heron (Blue form) 3
Great Egret 6
Snowy Egret 20
Little Blue Heron 2
Green Heron 2
Black-crowned Night-Heron 5
Turkey Vulture 20
Osprey (carolinensis) 2 (at least 2 gliding around, possibly 3)
Green Kingfisher 2
Golden-fronted Woodpecker (Northern) 2
Great Kiskadee 8
Couch's Kingbird 7
Western Kingbird 4
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 3
White-eyed Vireo 1
Purple Martin 25
Bank Swallow 5
Barn Swallow (American) 20
Cave Swallow 10
Bewick's Wren 1
Cactus Wren 2
Northern Mockingbird 4
House Finch 3
Hooded Oriole 1
Bullock's Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 60
Bronzed Cowbird 2
Brown-headed Cowbird 8
Great-tailed Grackle 30
Common Yellowthroat 4
Northern Cardinal 4

 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 10:35 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Coastal birding last Thursday illustrated
Did my weekly loop around east galveston bay on Thursday with many
different birds than on the previous week. Tides ahead of Hanna were
already high and you could only see where the galveston jetty was by some
wave action. Over on Bolivar, much of the area where birds fed in recent
weeks was well under water. People were arriving to camp for the weekend
and some set up on the water side of a recent higher tide debris line.
Looking at the beach cameras over the last couple of days, there was no
beach on bolivar and most of the galveston side was also flooded. No good
birds seen on camera unlike the brown booby a couple of weeks ago off the
east beach camera with pelicans.

Migrant birds are returning with my first red red knot on east beach.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903201

Very few small plovers, 2 piping, 2 snowy and 1 wilson's. Snowy plovers are
way down this fall as I have had none on Bolivar and the usual roost spots
have none.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903200

Another bird with a big change from prior years is the reddish egret

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903202

During the past few summers good numbers of the egrets were on bolivar and
most were 2nd year non-breeders. Up to a third were white phase birds. This
year numbers are maybe a third of past years and the proportion of white
birds is much smaller.

A roseate spoonbill was feeding like a woodstork, waiting to snap the bill
shut when it felt a goody

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903207

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903204

Fort Travis had 159 marbled godwits along with 6 short-billed dowitchers.
There are really lots of insect grubs in the grass there

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903203

Out on bolivar flats the common shorebirds were about 500 western
sandpipers and 200 sanderlings. The westerns were fresh arrivals in 3
roosting flocks. Most birds were roosting during my stay.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903221

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903223

Sanderlings are big birds compared to the western sandpipers

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903222

Least sandpipers continue to be missing from both sides of the ship channel
where they are common by now in the weed lines and dryer sand.

the noise on the flats and elsewhere is mainly the young royal terns who
really want to be fed

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903220

They mainly get one fish per trip and lots of begging goes nowhere. Other
royal terns now are starting to pirate fish from parents bring fish to
chicks with up to a dozen after the fish carrier. chicks learn to move out
of the flock in order to eat

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903219

Only 1 common and 1 caspian tern for the day and 0 black terns. Very small
numbers of sandwich terns as in recent years. They seem to be more shrimp
eaters rather than fish eaters and do better like at the Quintana jetty.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903219

Wilson's plovers were roosting in the old weed piles with 47 there
thursday. 6 had local red bands with 5 identified

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903228

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903229

The adult plovers are in heavy molt and old feathers stick out

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903230

Only 2 or 3 chicks of the year were present as many locals got flooded out
this summer

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903232

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903227

Some show off their bands

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903243

while others make them harder to read

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903241

Some of the young of the year royal tern chicks have very well marked
feather edges which will wear off during the fall

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903214

Bills on the sandwich terns can be all yellow

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903215

Mixed

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903217

or black

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903218

And he stepped out of the fish line

There are more laughing gulls further east on bolivar than on the flats or
Galveston east beach

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903211

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170903212

It will be interesting to see what changes Hanna brings to the beaches and
birds. Have been watching beach cameras and not seeing many birds at all.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/26/20 5:48 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Magnificent Frigatebird, Laredo
One adult female over Lake Casa Blanca among other sundry coastal species.

Justin Bosler
currently on route to Falcon Lake

 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/20 10:47 am
From: John and Glennah Trochet <trochetj...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
Dear TexBirders,

I am not going to dispute the assertion that FMB wrote disparagingly of
people of the borderlands, or to defend her. I have not read the papers
referred to in this space. But I had the same initial impression of John
Whitehead when I read his *Exploration of Mount Kinabalu, North Borneo*.
But elsewhere in the book he expressed similar withering opinions of fellow
Brits and other Europeans. In sum, he seemed to possess a general
misanthropy. So there is another possible, though probably less likely,
explanation for the views regarding peoples of different recent backgrounds
held by Mrs. Bailey.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 5:50 AM <scott...> wrote:

> Thanks for the caveat. There is no acceptable level of white supremacy.
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Berner Family (Redacted sender "jcazberner" for DMARC)
> *Sent:* Friday, July 24, 2020 8:00 PM
> *To:* Texbirds <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M.
> Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
>
>
>
> Texbirders:
>
>
>
> One trigger warning on the article. Florence is what I in 2020 would
> easily call racist in her descriptions of the people in the border region.
> Best to enjoy her colorful bird and flower descriptions and realize that
> her unfortunate attitude towards people was presumably regrettably typical
> for 1900.
>
>
>
> John Berner
>
> Houston, TX
>
>

--
John Trochet
Sacramento, California
<trochetj...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/25/20 5:50 am
From: <scott...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
Thanks for the caveat. There is no acceptable level of white supremacy.



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Berner Family (Redacted sender "jcazberner" for DMARC)
Sent: Friday, July 24, 2020 8:00 PM
To: Texbirds <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)



Texbirders:





One trigger warning on the article. Florence is what I in 2020 would easily call racist in her descriptions of the people in the border region. Best to enjoy her colorful bird and flower descriptions and realize that her unfortunate attitude towards people was presumably regrettably typical for 1900.





John Berner

Houston, TX


 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 6:22 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
There are a whole lot much worse :-)

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 8:02 PM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...>
wrote:

> Texbirders:
>
> One trigger warning on the article. Florence is what I in 2020 would
> easily call racist in her descriptions of the people in the border region.
> Best to enjoy her colorful bird and flower descriptions and realize that
> her unfortunate attitude towards people was presumably regrettably typical
> for 1900.
>
>
> John Berner
> Houston, TX
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 6:02 pm
From: Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Warning Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
Texbirders: 
One trigger warning on the article. Florence is what I in 2020 would easily call racist in her descriptions of the people in the border region. Best to enjoy her colorful bird and flower descriptions and realize that her unfortunate attitude towards people was presumably regrettably typical for 1900.


John BernerHouston, TX




 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 5:51 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
A book on Vernon Bailey by David Schmidly includes a lot about Florence
Bailey. She was the daughter of the first director of the u.S. Biological
Survey. She and her husband Vernon Bailey were an outstanding field team.

Keith Arnold

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 6:17 PM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...>
wrote:

> Texbirders:
>
> Another historical ornithology article I found interesting recounts a
> 1900 spring visit through a slice of Texas from Texarkana to the Rio Grande
> Valley and into Mexico by Florence M. Bailey (1863-1948) of the U.S. Bureau
> of Biological Survey. She was the first female member of the AOU, helped
> found the Washington D.C. Audubon Society and authored several of the
> earliest bird field guides in the U.S.
>
> Article in the 1916 Condor in three short parts about the trip.
>
> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v018n04/p0151-p0155.pdf
>
>
>
> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v018n05/p0183-p0190.pdf
>
>
>
> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v018n06/p0214-p0219.pdf
>
>
>
> John Berner
> Houston, TX
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 4:17 pm
From: Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Early Female Ornithologist Florence M. Bailey visits Texas & Mexico in 1900 (1916 Condor)
Texbirders: 
Another historical ornithology article I found interesting recounts a 1900 spring visit through a slice of Texas from Texarkana to the Rio Grande Valley and into Mexico by Florence M. Bailey (1863-1948) of the U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey. She was the first female member of the AOU, helped found the Washington D.C. Audubon Society and authored several of the earliest bird field guides in the U.S.
Article in the 1916 Condor in three short parts about the trip.https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v018n04/p0151-p0155.pdf
https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v018n05/p0183-p0190.pdf
https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v018n06/p0214-p0219.pdf

John BernerHouston, TX

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 12:07 pm
From: Stennie Meadours <stenmead...>
Subject: [texbirds] Spotted Sandpiper in San Leon
Yesterday, about 7:30 pm, while sitting on my little pier, I watched a
Spotted Sandpiper fly in for mid Galveston Bay and land on the rip-rap
shoreline. A possible fall migrant, right on schedule.

Stennie Meadours
Galveston County,
San Leon

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 11:40 am
From: Mark Welch <welch.mark3...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: ?utf-8?Q?Purple_Martins_and_Swainson’s_Hawk_-_Stafford,?=?utf-8?Q?_TX?Message-Id: <5F60851D-F404-4AA9-9D11-4460B15A4BCE...>
Very few martins this year outside Dripping Springs. Very weird...never
before ..lot's of vacant houses in the hood. What's that about?

Mark (West of Weird)

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 1:26 PM David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:

> checking radar loops on the RAP radar site and was able to see a large
> martin roost this morning in that area from the Killen radar over 150 miles
> away!
>
> see
> http://weather.rap.ucar.edu/radar/displayRad.php?icao=KGRK&prod=bref1&bkgr=gray&endDate=20200724&endTime=13&duration=4
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 8:42 PM Nina S <dmarc-noreply...>
> wrote:
>
>> This evening, tens of thousands of PMs at “The Fountains” mall in
>> Stafford.
>>
>> And a Swainson’s Hawk buzzing them!
>>
>> Nina Sitra
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>>
>> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking
>> permission
>> from the List Owner
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 11:26 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: ?utf-8?Q?Purple_Martins_and_Swainson’s_Hawk_-_Stafford,?=?utf-8?Q?_TX?Message-Id: <5F60851D-F404-4AA9-9D11-4460B15A4BCE...>
checking radar loops on the RAP radar site and was able to see a large
martin roost this morning in that area from the Killen radar over 150 miles
away!

see
http://weather.rap.ucar.edu/radar/displayRad.php?icao=KGRK&prod=bref1&bkgr=gray&endDate=20200724&endTime=13&duration=4


On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 8:42 PM Nina S <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:

> This evening, tens of thousands of PMs at “The Fountains” mall in Stafford.
>
> And a Swainson’s Hawk buzzing them!
>
> Nina Sitra
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>
> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking
> permission
> from the List Owner
>
>
>

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/20 6:00 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Historical Article: The Scarlet Ibis in Texas in The Condor 1918
Hi John: Thanks. Yes it is in the Handbook in the Unaccepted Birds
appendix as an escapee from the Gladys Porter zoo. Actual Oberholser
mentioned two birds.

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 11:54 PM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...>
wrote:

> Texbirders:
>
> I assume this article has been previously reviewed and rejected as
> anecdotal (Confusion with Roseate Spoonbill, specimens brought from other
> places) but still found it interesting. Article by R.A.Sell in the 1918
> Condor about possible occurrence of the Scarlet Ibis in Texas including a
> photo of a specimen supposedly shot in Texas, prepared by Professor
> Attwatter and displayed in Houston. Review of nine specimens, speculation
> if they are really from Texas and interviews with supposed Scarlet Ibis
> spotters in the 1910’s.
>
> Retrieved from the Sora database using Author “Sell” Date “1918”
>
>
> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v020n02/p0078-p0082.pdf
>
>
> John Berner
> Houston
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad <https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/?.src=iOS>
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/23/20 9:54 pm
From: Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Historical Article: The Scarlet Ibis in Texas in The Condor 1918
Texbirders:
I assume this article has been previously reviewed and rejected as anecdotal (Confusion with Roseate Spoonbill, specimens brought from other places) but still found it interesting. Article by R.A.Sell in the 1918 Condor about possible occurrence of the Scarlet Ibis in Texas including a photo of a specimen supposedly shot in Texas, prepared by Professor Attwatter and displayed in Houston. Review of nine specimens, speculation if they are really from Texas and interviews with supposed Scarlet Ibis spotters in the 1910’s.

Retrieved from the Sora database using Author “Sell” Date “1918”
https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/condor/v020n02/p0078-p0082.pdf
John BernerHouston 


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

 

Back to top
Date: 7/23/20 6:42 pm
From: Nina S <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender birds.nina for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] =?utf-8?Q?Purple_Martins_and_Swainson’s_Hawk_-_Stafford,?=?utf-8?Q?_TX?Message-Id: <5F60851D-F404-4AA9-9D11-4460B15A4BCE...>
This evening, tens of thousands of PMs at “The Fountains” mall in Stafford.

And a Swainson’s Hawk buzzing them!

Nina Sitra


Sent from my iPhone
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/23/20 8:16 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 7-23-20 Black-throated-green Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7-23-20 Black-throated-green Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Same bird as 7-21, fun birds each day!



Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 2:45 pm
From: justin.bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby and NOW Brown Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)

Thank you for the update, Laura! It's pretty nice when a Brown Booby ends up being a consolation prize when chasing a Masked Booby. This begs the question: whats in the water at Lake Grapevine?! (the right size fish? - joking).Good birding!Justin BoslerAustin, Texas Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Laura Shine <laurashine1422...> Date: 7/21/20 4:33 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <justin.bosler...> Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County) Hi, Justin.I don't know if you have seen the updates or not. The Masked Booby has not been seen again. There was an adult Brown Booby spotted today and seen multiple times. I was at the lake for over 4 hours searching and we spotted the Brown Booby around 1:30 PM. We were at Murrell Park looking South/Southwest. It stayed flying and feeding for about 15 minutes.Laura ShineGarland, TXOn Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 11:40 AM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:Texbirds,Any word on the Masked Booby this morning? I haven't seen any notifications on the facebook thread.Thank you!Justin BoslerAustin, TexasOn Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 9:28 PM Paula Channell <pchannell34...> wrote:Couldn't  go this afternoon/ evening.  Hoping for tomorrow morning. Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 8:03 PM, Justin Bosler<justin.bosler...> wrote: Any luck in refinding it?JustinOn Mon, Jul 20, 2020, 7:33 PM Paula Channell <pchannell34...> wrote:Thank you!Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 5:19 PM, justin.bosler<justin.bosler...> wrote:
The woman who found it said it was flying up and down the shoreline but failed to provide any details regarding where. I'm just the basic info messenger. JustinSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone-------- Original message --------From: Paula Channell <pchannell34...> Date: 7/20/20 4:58 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <justin.bosler...> Subject: Re: [texbirds] Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County) Where at Lake Grapevine?Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 4:36 PM, Justin Bosler<justin.bosler...> wrote: Texbirds,This just hit the Birds of Texas facebook page. There's a first-summer Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine in Tarrant/ Denton County today. It appears to be the first deep interior record for the state (per eBird). You might want to rush over there if you're close by.Good luck!Justin BoslerAustin, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 11:50 am
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County
What a shame this has to be done. Hidalgo County could really use the economic impact this 1st US record would produce. Great find Dan. Congratulations. We are all home being envious. I will start watching the swallow flock that congregates each evening at my house with great vigor.


Fred Collins
Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
20303 Draper Road
Tomball, Texas 77377

Commissioner Steve Radack
Precinct 3, Harris County
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com>



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Mary Beth Stowe
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 1:29 PM
To: <brushfreeman...>; <justin.bosler...>
Cc: '4 Texbirds Maillist' <texbirds...>; <antshrike1...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County

Just heard from Dan Jones: he’s closing his yard due to the shelter-in-place order. Would be nice if the bird hung around until August 6th (when the order is lifted)!

MB

Mary Beth Stowe
Alamo, TX
www.miriameaglemon.com<https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.miriameaglemon.com%2F&data=02%7C01%<7Cfred.collins...>%7Cbcdc7ef34af74bf0d52008d82da42ca2%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637309530432304623&sdata=4h799G0oZOvxaj%2B3DWg%2FpHWVUscazhTQiVBgt8lXXVU%3D&reserved=0>

From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 1:13 PM
To: <justin.bosler...><mailto:<justin.bosler...>
Cc: 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County

Cool. Been years since I have seen them, but see nothing to argue with regarding the find.. Definitely not a Mangrove IMHO though we need one of those too. :-) Great find Dan!

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 1:06 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...><mailto:<justin.bosler...>> wrote:
Texbirds,

In the checklist below, you'll find the latest photos of the swallow from this morning. It was seen up until 8:30 AM (according to Justin LeClaire). The dainty size and blackish vent/crissum are indicative of Blue-and-white Swallow and rule out Tachycineta swallows, Tree and Mangrove among others. Dan Jones obtained flight photos that might show feather wear and molt or the lack of molt (which is to be expected on an Austral species in July and can help in subspecific ID) along with underwing plumage and tail shape. It's suspected to be the highly migratory southern race, Pygochelidon cyanoleuca patagonica

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71693627<https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS71693627&data=02%7C01%<7Cfred.collins...>%7Cbcdc7ef34af74bf0d52008d82da42ca2%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637309530432314578&sdata=pa%2FX6gNEhVsMa%2BYeTRXHF0lRCYMcO8DtMKm5ku0Bu6Q%3D&reserved=0>

Best regards,

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:26 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...><mailto:<Fred.Collins...>> wrote:
Thanks for that. I was not aware of those restrictions. Too bad, not often a swallow will stay put.

Thanks,

Fred

From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...><mailto:<justin.bosler...>>
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 12:16 PM
To: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...><mailto:<Fred.Collins...>>
Cc: 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?

Hi Fred,

Thanks for creating an email thread regarding this very remarkable find, if proven to be a Blue-and-white Swallow of South American origin. Yes, it was seen by multiple birders this morning. The location is a private community so a lot of us are waiting to hear whether public access will be granted and how that will work given a number of complications, most notably a shelter-in-place order in Hidalgo County.

Standing by,

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:09 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...><mailto:<Fred.Collins...>> wrote:
Any more on this bird today?

Fred Collins
Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
20303 Draper Road
Tomball, Texas 77377

Commissioner Steve Radack
Precinct 3, Harris County
www.pct3.com<https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pct3.com%2F&data=02%7C01%<7Cfred.collins...>%7Cbcdc7ef34af74bf0d52008d82da42ca2%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637309530432314578&sdata=BfEdYOzgo%2BeWquo6xB1Z2Dra7mbO%2Bod4vMbtOK5hM%2Bc%3D&reserved=0>



--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 11:30 am
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County
Just heard from Dan Jones: he’s closing his yard due to the shelter-in-place order. Would be nice if the bird hung around until August 6th (when the order is lifted)!



MB



Mary Beth Stowe

Alamo, TX

<http://www.miriameaglemon.com> www.miriameaglemon.com



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 1:13 PM
To: <justin.bosler...>
Cc: 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County



Cool. Been years since I have seen them, but see nothing to argue with regarding the find.. Definitely not a Mangrove IMHO though we need one of those too. :-) Great find Dan!



On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 1:06 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> <mailto:<justin.bosler...> > wrote:

Texbirds,



In the checklist below, you'll find the latest photos of the swallow from this morning. It was seen up until 8:30 AM (according to Justin LeClaire). The dainty size and blackish vent/crissum are indicative of Blue-and-white Swallow and rule out Tachycineta swallows, Tree and Mangrove among others. Dan Jones obtained flight photos that might show feather wear and molt or the lack of molt (which is to be expected on an Austral species in July and can help in subspecific ID) along with underwing plumage and tail shape. It's suspected to be the highly migratory southern race, Pygochelidon cyanoleuca patagonica



https://ebird.org/checklist/S71693627



Best regards,



Justin Bosler

Austin, Texas



On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:26 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...> <mailto:<Fred.Collins...> > wrote:

Thanks for that. I was not aware of those restrictions. Too bad, not often a swallow will stay put.



Thanks,



Fred



From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> <mailto:<justin.bosler...> >
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 12:16 PM
To: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...> <mailto:<Fred.Collins...> >
Cc: 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...> <mailto:<texbirds...> >
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?



Hi Fred,



Thanks for creating an email thread regarding this very remarkable find, if proven to be a Blue-and-white Swallow of South American origin. Yes, it was seen by multiple birders this morning. The location is a private community so a lot of us are waiting to hear whether public access will be granted and how that will work given a number of complications, most notably a shelter-in-place order in Hidalgo County.



Standing by,



Justin Bosler

Austin, Texas



On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:09 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...> <mailto:<Fred.Collins...> > wrote:

Any more on this bird today?



Fred Collins

Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve

20303 Draper Road

Tomball, Texas 77377



Commissioner Steve Radack

Precinct 3, Harris County

www.pct3.com <https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pct3.com%2F&data=02%7C01%<7CFred.Collins...>%7Ce04bda9a031e4b204bea08d82d99c716%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637309485783902587&sdata=HTpwoE5R66%2FMI%2BwNUfPkXY8dgFu5KQE7FOcOe893jTQ%3D&reserved=0>








--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 11:15 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County
Cool. Been years since I have seen them, but see nothing to argue with
regarding the find.. Definitely not a Mangrove IMHO though we need one of
those too. :-) Great find Dan!

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 1:06 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
wrote:

> Texbirds,
>
> In the checklist below, you'll find the latest photos of the swallow from
> this morning. It was seen up until 8:30 AM (according to Justin LeClaire).
> The dainty size and blackish vent/crissum are indicative of Blue-and-white
> Swallow and rule out *Tachycineta* swallows, Tree and Mangrove among
> others. Dan Jones obtained flight photos that might show feather wear and
> molt or the lack of molt (which is to be expected on an Austral species in
> July and can help in subspecific ID) along with underwing plumage and tail
> shape. It's suspected to be the highly migratory southern race, *Pygochelidon
> cyanoleuca patagonica*
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71693627
>
> Best regards,
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
> On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:26 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
> <Fred.Collins...> wrote:
>
>> Thanks for that. I was not aware of those restrictions. Too bad, not
>> often a swallow will stay put.
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>>
>>
>> Fred
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, July 21, 2020 12:16 PM
>> *To:* Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
>> *Cc:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
>> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?
>>
>>
>>
>> Hi Fred,
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks for creating an email thread regarding this very remarkable find,
>> if proven to be a Blue-and-white Swallow of South American origin. Yes, it
>> was seen by multiple birders this morning. The location is a private
>> community so a lot of us are waiting to hear whether public access will be
>> granted and how that will work given a number of complications, most
>> notably a shelter-in-place order in Hidalgo County.
>>
>>
>>
>> Standing by,
>>
>>
>>
>> Justin Bosler
>>
>> Austin, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:09 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
>> <Fred.Collins...> wrote:
>>
>> Any more on this bird today?
>>
>>
>>
>> *Fred Collins*
>>
>> Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
>>
>> 20303 Draper Road
>>
>> Tomball, Texas 77377
>>
>>
>>
>> *Commissioner Steve Radack*
>>
>> Precinct 3, Harris County
>>
>> www.pct3.com
>> <https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pct3.com%2F&data=02%7C01%<7CFred.Collins...>%7Ce04bda9a031e4b204bea08d82d99c716%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637309485783902587&sdata=HTpwoE5R66%2FMI%2BwNUfPkXY8dgFu5KQE7FOcOe893jTQ%3D&reserved=0>
>>
>>
>>
>>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 11:06 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: probable Blue-and-white Swallow, Hidalgo County
Texbirds,

In the checklist below, you'll find the latest photos of the swallow from
this morning. It was seen up until 8:30 AM (according to Justin LeClaire).
The dainty size and blackish vent/crissum are indicative of Blue-and-white
Swallow and rule out *Tachycineta* swallows, Tree and Mangrove among
others. Dan Jones obtained flight photos that might show feather wear and
molt or the lack of molt (which is to be expected on an Austral species in
July and can help in subspecific ID) along with underwing plumage and tail
shape. It's suspected to be the highly migratory southern race, *Pygochelidon
cyanoleuca patagonica*

https://ebird.org/checklist/S71693627

Best regards,

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:26 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<Fred.Collins...> wrote:

> Thanks for that. I was not aware of those restrictions. Too bad, not often
> a swallow will stay put.
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
>
> Fred
>
>
>
> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, July 21, 2020 12:16 PM
> *To:* Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
> *Cc:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?
>
>
>
> Hi Fred,
>
>
>
> Thanks for creating an email thread regarding this very remarkable find,
> if proven to be a Blue-and-white Swallow of South American origin. Yes, it
> was seen by multiple birders this morning. The location is a private
> community so a lot of us are waiting to hear whether public access will be
> granted and how that will work given a number of complications, most
> notably a shelter-in-place order in Hidalgo County.
>
>
>
> Standing by,
>
>
>
> Justin Bosler
>
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:09 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
> <Fred.Collins...> wrote:
>
> Any more on this bird today?
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*
>
> Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
>
> 20303 Draper Road
>
> Tomball, Texas 77377
>
>
>
> *Commissioner Steve Radack*
>
> Precinct 3, Harris County
>
> www.pct3.com
> <https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pct3.com%2F&data=02%7C01%<7CFred.Collins...>%7Ce04bda9a031e4b204bea08d82d99c716%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637309485783902587&sdata=HTpwoE5R66%2FMI%2BwNUfPkXY8dgFu5KQE7FOcOe893jTQ%3D&reserved=0>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 10:32 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: 7-21-20 Golden-cheeked Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
This is why I asked Gil Eckrich to check the bird—I didn’t know I had the side image, my camera was having trouble focusing, but Gil has done this a long time and knows his Golden-cheeked Warbler and Black-throated-green Warbler. I just want the identification to be right.

What is interesting is—I have had a Black-throated-green Warbler in July before and wouldn’t count wo photo and it is on the public record, so was vetted back then—here is 22 yrs of records.



Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

> On Jul 21, 2020, at 11:38 AM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:
>
> 
> Susan,
>
> I'm pretty sure that you were correct with your initial ID. I would bet the farm on this being a first-fall female Golden-cheeked Warbler (GCWA). Although it's undoubtedly the toughest plumage to separate from Black-throated Green (BTNW), I feel that the dark, blackish-olive crown, blackish lores and near lack of yellow on the sides of the vent, along with the July date, all point toward Golden-cheeked over BTNW. The dark coloration on the auriculars may be more extensive than usual on young GCWA but I'm having a hard time judging whether it's a result of some yellow feathers missing or if the feathers are truly dark. Those who have more experience with the wide range of variation in GCWA plumage are encouraged to weigh in.
>
> Thanks for the photos and the challenge!
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>> On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 9:06 AM Susan Schaezler <susan...> wrote:
>> 7-21-20 Golden-cheeked Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
>> Every day of birding brings more excitement
>>
>> <image.jpg>
>>
>>
>> Susan Schaezler
>> WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
>> 501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
>> Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
>> Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 10:27 am
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?
Thanks for that. I was not aware of those restrictions. Too bad, not often a swallow will stay put.

Thanks,

Fred

From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 21, 2020 12:16 PM
To: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
Cc: 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?

Hi Fred,

Thanks for creating an email thread regarding this very remarkable find, if proven to be a Blue-and-white Swallow of South American origin. Yes, it was seen by multiple birders this morning. The location is a private community so a lot of us are waiting to hear whether public access will be granted and how that will work given a number of complications, most notably a shelter-in-place order in Hidalgo County.

Standing by,

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:09 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...><mailto:<Fred.Collins...>> wrote:
Any more on this bird today?

Fred Collins
Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
20303 Draper Road
Tomball, Texas 77377

Commissioner Steve Radack
Precinct 3, Harris County
www.pct3.com<https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pct3.com%2F&data=02%7C01%<7CFred.Collins...>%7Ce04bda9a031e4b204bea08d82d99c716%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637309485783902587&sdata=HTpwoE5R66%2FMI%2BwNUfPkXY8dgFu5KQE7FOcOe893jTQ%3D&reserved=0>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 10:20 am
From: Paula Channell <dmarc-noreply-modpost...> (Redacted sender pchannell34 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
Looking  now

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 11:41 AM, Justin Bosler<justin.bosler...> wrote: Texbirds,
Any word on the Masked Booby this morning? I haven't seen any notifications on the facebook thread.
Thank you!
Justin BoslerAustin, Texas
On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 9:28 PM Paula Channell <pchannell34...> wrote:

Couldn't  go this afternoon/ evening.  Hoping for tomorrow morning. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 8:03 PM, Justin Bosler<justin.bosler...> wrote: Any luck in refinding it?
Justin
On Mon, Jul 20, 2020, 7:33 PM Paula Channell <pchannell34...> wrote:

Thank you!

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 5:19 PM, justin.bosler<justin.bosler...> wrote: The woman who found it said it was flying up and down the shoreline but failed to provide any details regarding where. I'm just the basic info messenger. 
Justin

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Paula Channell <pchannell34...> Date: 7/20/20 4:58 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <justin.bosler...> Subject: Re: [texbirds] Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
Where at Lake Grapevine?

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 4:36 PM, Justin Bosler<justin.bosler...> wrote: Texbirds,
This just hit the Birds of Texas facebook page. There's a first-summer Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine in Tarrant/ Denton County today. It appears to be the first deep interior record for the state (per eBird). You might want to rush over there if you're close by.
Good luck!
Justin BoslerAustin, Texas








 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 10:19 am
From: Ann Kovich <akovich49...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
I went out to Rockledge Park this morning and walked about a mile on the
trail. Then drove over the dam to scan for it. No luck.
Ann Kovich

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020, 11:40 AM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
wrote:

> Texbirds,
>
> Any word on the Masked Booby this morning? I haven't seen any
> notifications on the facebook thread.
>
> Thank you!
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 9:28 PM Paula Channell <pchannell34...>
> wrote:
>
>> Couldn't go this afternoon/ evening. Hoping for tomorrow morning.
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
>>
>> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 8:03 PM, Justin Bosler
>> <justin.bosler...> wrote:
>> Any luck in refinding it?
>>
>> Justin
>>
>> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020, 7:33 PM Paula Channell <pchannell34...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> Thank you!
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
>>
>> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 5:19 PM, justin.bosler
>> <justin.bosler...> wrote:
>> The woman who found it said it was flying up and down the shoreline but
>> failed to provide any details regarding where. I'm just the basic info
>> messenger.
>>
>> Justin
>>
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>>
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Paula Channell <pchannell34...>
>> Date: 7/20/20 4:58 PM (GMT-06:00)
>> To: <justin.bosler...>
>> Subject: Re: [texbirds] Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton
>> County)
>>
>> Where at Lake Grapevine?
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
>>
>> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 4:36 PM, Justin Bosler
>> <justin.bosler...> wrote:
>> Texbirds,
>>
>> This just hit the Birds of Texas facebook page. There's a first-summer
>> Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine in Tarrant/ Denton County today. It appears
>> to be the first deep interior record for the state (per eBird). You might
>> want to rush over there if you're close by.
>>
>> Good luck!
>>
>> Justin Bosler
>> Austin, Texas
>>
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 10:17 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?
Hi Fred,

Thanks for creating an email thread regarding this very remarkable find, if
proven to be a Blue-and-white Swallow of South American origin. Yes, it was
seen by multiple birders this morning. The location is a private community
so a lot of us are waiting to hear whether public access will be granted
and how that will work given a number of complications, most notably a
shelter-in-place order in Hidalgo County.

Standing by,

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 12:09 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<Fred.Collins...> wrote:

> Any more on this bird today?
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*
>
> Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
>
> 20303 Draper Road
>
> Tomball, Texas 77377
>
>
>
> *Commissioner Steve Radack*
>
> Precinct 3, Harris County
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 10:10 am
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Any word on the Blue and White Swallow?
Any more on this bird today?

Fred Collins
Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
20303 Draper Road
Tomball, Texas 77377

Commissioner Steve Radack
Precinct 3, Harris County
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 9:41 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
Texbirds,

Any word on the Masked Booby this morning? I haven't seen any notifications
on the facebook thread.

Thank you!

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 9:28 PM Paula Channell <pchannell34...>
wrote:

> Couldn't go this afternoon/ evening. Hoping for tomorrow morning.
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
>
> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 8:03 PM, Justin Bosler
> <justin.bosler...> wrote:
> Any luck in refinding it?
>
> Justin
>
> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020, 7:33 PM Paula Channell <pchannell34...>
> wrote:
>
> Thank you!
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
>
> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 5:19 PM, justin.bosler
> <justin.bosler...> wrote:
> The woman who found it said it was flying up and down the shoreline but
> failed to provide any details regarding where. I'm just the basic info
> messenger.
>
> Justin
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Paula Channell <pchannell34...>
> Date: 7/20/20 4:58 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <justin.bosler...>
> Subject: Re: [texbirds] Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton
> County)
>
> Where at Lake Grapevine?
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
>
> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 4:36 PM, Justin Bosler
> <justin.bosler...> wrote:
> Texbirds,
>
> This just hit the Birds of Texas facebook page. There's a first-summer
> Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine in Tarrant/ Denton County today. It appears
> to be the first deep interior record for the state (per eBird). You might
> want to rush over there if you're close by.
>
> Good luck!
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 9:38 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: 7-21-20 Golden-cheeked Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Susan,

I'm pretty sure that you were correct with your initial ID. I would bet the
farm on this being a first-fall female Golden-cheeked Warbler (GCWA).
Although it's undoubtedly the toughest plumage to separate from
Black-throated Green (BTNW), I feel that the dark, blackish-olive crown,
blackish lores and near lack of yellow on the sides of the vent, along with
the July date, all point toward Golden-cheeked over BTNW. The
dark coloration on the auriculars may be more extensive than usual on young
GCWA but I'm having a hard time judging whether it's a result of some
yellow feathers missing or if the feathers are truly dark. Those who have
more experience with the wide range of variation in GCWA plumage are
encouraged to weigh in.

Thanks for the photos and the challenge!

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Tue, Jul 21, 2020 at 9:06 AM Susan Schaezler <susan...> wrote:

> 7-21-20 Golden-cheeked Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
> Every day of birding brings more excitement
>
>
>
> Susan Schaezler
> WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
> 501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
> Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
> Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 7:33 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 7-21-20 correction Black-throated-green Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7-21-20 correction Black-throated-green Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Didn’t think I had this angle—this seals Black-throated-green Warbler! Amazing what you find if you are out every day.



Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/20 7:07 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 7-21-20 Golden-cheeked Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7-21-20 Golden-cheeked Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Every day of birding brings more excitement



Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 4:21 pm
From: Bobby Hughes <bobby...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
Now, that’s a picture!

On Monday, July 20, 2020, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:

> Texbirds,
>
> Courtney Paine, who found the bird, says Rockledge Park on the county
> line.
>
> Good luck!
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
> On Mon, Jul 20, 2020, 4:35 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> wrote:
>
>> Texbirds,
>>
>> This just hit the Birds of Texas facebook page. There's a first-summer
>> Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine in Tarrant/ Denton County today. It appears
>> to be the first deep interior record for the state (per eBird). You might
>> want to rush over there if you're close by.
>>
>> Good luck!
>>
>> Justin Bosler
>> Austin, Texas
>>
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 3:25 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
Texbirds,

Courtney Paine, who found the bird, says Rockledge Park on the county line.

Good luck!

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Mon, Jul 20, 2020, 4:35 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:

> Texbirds,
>
> This just hit the Birds of Texas facebook page. There's a first-summer
> Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine in Tarrant/ Denton County today. It appears
> to be the first deep interior record for the state (per eBird). You might
> want to rush over there if you're close by.
>
> Good luck!
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 2:55 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
That is crazy! I believe you are correct. (BTW the first state record was
of a bird found in Matagorda near where Port O'Connor is now in June 1885.
I just happen to remember that somehow. :-)

On Mon, Jul 20, 2020 at 4:36 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
wrote:

> Texbirds,
>
> This just hit the Birds of Texas facebook page. There's a first-summer
> Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine in Tarrant/ Denton County today. It appears
> to be the first deep interior record for the state (per eBird). You might
> want to rush over there if you're close by.
>
> Good luck!
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 2:36 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine (Tarrant/Denton County)
Texbirds,

This just hit the Birds of Texas facebook page. There's a first-summer
Masked Booby at Lake Grapevine in Tarrant/ Denton County today. It appears
to be the first deep interior record for the state (per eBird). You might
want to rush over there if you're close by.

Good luck!

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/20 7:50 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Coastal birding and pictures from Thursday
Did my usual summer circuit around East Galveston Bay last Thursday
starting on Galveston's east beach. Tides were very low and receding a bit
with very little wind. Later in the am, the wind dropped entirely and the
waves on bolivar flats were in the 2 inch range with wide areas of mud and
slop. Lots of birds sleeping, soaking and not doing much.

East beach had very little around. No birds in the parking lots or roosting
in the fenced area. Had 2 each snowy, piping and wilson's plover. Added one
more banded piping plover when I got home and checked a practice shot to
see if the camera would fog up. That bird and 2 banded birds on Bolivar
were all born and bred in 2016 and have been wintering locally since then.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886616

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886630

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886631

There was a group of about 135 least terns resting near the jetty. I first
thought that a good part of them were non-breeders but quite a few were
young of the year raised other than at bolivar or east beach

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886615

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886614

One caspian tern and a flock way out on a sandbar of all royal terns made
up the rest of the water birds other than a few laughing gulls and a single
ring-billed gull.

The ferry ride and Port Bolivar had few birds. A black-crowned night heron
on a fence post

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886612

And a fledged black-necked stilt

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886613

Fort Travis had 2 marbled godwits.

There was a big change in birds on Bolivar Flats from a week ago. More
people likely moved some around and as it was siesta time,, many may have
been roosting back inside the fenced area.

Did get 14 piping plovers, mainly staying wet and preening but zero
wilson's and snowy plovers.

The big influx for the day was 240 western willets. There are really large
numbers of tiny minnows in the shallows and one group of the willets was
eating lots of the minnows trapped in a small pool. A total of 22
long-billed curlews was also a big jump in numbers.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886627

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886629

The bleached bird may have been the summering curlew

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886628

One banded american oystercatcher was my first in several trips

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886622

Also a single common tern

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886623

And a single lesser black-backed gull

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886626

Some of the laughing gulls have molted to winter plumage

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886624

The least terns on the flats sorted differently than across the bay as all
were adults

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886625

The piping plovers were feeding

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886635

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886633

Only a few western sandpipers, sanderlings, marbled godwits and ruddy
turnstones out in the open. The young of the year crested caracara was back
under some marsh grass in the shade.

The excitement for the day was provided by an adult caspian tern that took
a great dislike for my head. It flew right at my face yelling with its
mouth open as in this older picture.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/164096688

The young bird was sitting a good ways off with royal terns that showed no
interest in me and just wanted to sit in the cool water.

On the way in, there was a group of 45 common nighthawks feeding in a large
insect hatch over the vegetation nearest the sandy area west of the road.
More flew in to join them. A fledged horned lark was near the traditional
nest area.

Again no hawks along 1985 or heading up to I-10. The rookery in shoveler
pond is still going strong with mainly largish white-faced ibis chicks
calling but cattle egrets are still bringing food and standing around. Many
youngsters out of the nest waiting to get the urge to find their own food.
They were mowing along the access road and were feeding a large flock of
cattle egrets.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886609

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170886608

Some rice will be harvested fairly soon and can provide a good show as they
cut and in the day or so after when hawks ans herons scarf up the critters
that lived under the rice. Some away from the road already had harvest
equipment present.

And the forecast for this week includes daily thunder showers. If you are
out in black rail country like Anahuac and roads on Bolivar like Retillon,
Johnston, or Stingaree, the rails will respond with each clap of thunder
even if it is a couple of miles away. Might even get one to fly or run
across the road. Can also try Galveston Island State park but you have to
walk out the trail there which might not be so good with lightning nearby.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/20 9:21 am
From: Birding Center Naturalist <naturalist...>
Subject: [texbirds] Golden-cheecked Warbler on South Padre Island 7/17
Hello Texbirders,

Yesterday (7/17) i was lucky to find and get a snapshot of a Golden-cheeked
Warbler at the South Padre Island Birding & Nature Center. A very rare bird
in Cameron county with only a handful of records with two previous ones in
July. July seems like the window to get lucky with a wandering one along
the southern tip of the Texas coastline as they move to Mexican
non-breeding grounds. The bird was very active and I quickly lost it and
couldn't refind it. a few others searched for it with no luck.

Here's a link to my iNaturalist observation.
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/53416835

I also spotted a Black-and-White Warbler, migration is on its way!

Best of birding to everyone,
Javi Gonzalez

--
SPI Birding and Nature Center
*Naturalist Educator*
*Javier Gonzalez*
(956)761-6801
www.southpadreislandbirding.com
https://smile.amazon.com/ch/20-3288155
<https://www.amazon.com/gp/f.html?C=CWZK0AZZZD4W&K=A145RYS0FZRWO4&R=24PIEWJJRX62U&T=C&U=https%3A%2F%2Fsmile.amazon.com%2Fch%2F20-3288155%3Fref_%3Dpe_1723670_203812010&A=0PKXGRE801HRSAIKGLIOLIJ5ZGKA&H=DKURIURKNZD5U11ALDYZOV2S0DIA&ref_=pe_1723670_203812010>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/20 5:19 am
From: Chuck Sexton <gcwarbler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun - help!
Hey, TexBirders.

PLEASE PLEASE stop requoting entire previous posts when you make a reply to anything on this forum. In this recent thread, most of these comments are requoting Bert’s long extract of the old article. For those of us who read TexBirds in daily digest form, this has become a miles-long digest with short new comments interspersed in long streams of requotes. It’s nearly impossible to find your new post/thought/comment.

You can set this in your email preferences.

If you choose to selectively requote for clarity, that’s fine. Please be judicious about requotes on previous texts and make them relevant.

Chuck Sexton
Austin, TXEdit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 7:22 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 7-17-20 Orchard & Waterthrush @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7-17-20 Orchard & Waterthrush @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Two of the more interesting birds today was Tom’s Orchard Oriole, which Don had earlier in the week too, plus Louisiana Waterthrush that was in a seldom used water feature that Don managed to see from the house and took pictures through the window. Fun to see those!

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 4:35 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
I need to check BLOT, but I recall that nesting Longed-eared
Owls,historically, occurred in the El Paso and maybe the north central (?)
region.

Keith

On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 5:49 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
wrote:

> They are likely late winter residents...I found two once in (March 24,
> 2003) in SW Austin (now River Place area) during surveys. there I did not
> see a date associated with the account. Quoting the TOS Handbook, "spring
> migrants have found from early March through mid-April, with a few
> remaining into early May" Nesting birds have remained in the state until
> early July."
>
> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 5:22 PM sandfalcon1 <sandfalcon...> wrote:
>
>> I am curious what others think about the note about Long-eared Owls
>> encountered with the professor. Were these known to have nested in the
>> Hill Country or been permanent residents in the past? Or were these more
>> likely misidentified?
>>
>> Brandon Best
>> Arlington, TX
>>
>>
>> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
>> www.avast.com
>> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
>> <#m_422173021701410206_m_5853777345700640921_m_4155297379688633555_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 2:36 PM Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Search for field notes. The first page came up with Wetmore's 1911
>>> kansas notebook and mearns of quail fame has many. Other variations
>>> notebooks, field notes etc also work
>>>
>>> I found them as I check the newest additions periodically and some of
>>> them popped up
>>>
>>> Field notes texas has a lot about the glass mountains.
>>>
>>> The smithsonian has a major project to make this basic data readily
>>> available.
>>>
>>>
>>> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 10:35 AM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> One can also use S.O.R.A. (Searchable Online Research Archive) for
>>>> journals and papers going back to the 19th century. I'm not aware of
>>>> accessible private note transcripts within the collection however.. I was
>>>> in there several days ago looking for a paper on the Prehistoric Birds of
>>>> Texas.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 9:35 AM Joseph Kennedy <
>>>> <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> The Biodiversity Heritage Library has quite a few field notebooks of
>>>>> early Texas birding, wildlife and exploring.
>>>>>
>>>>> https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/
>>>>>
>>>>> The ones I checked are hard to read as there is lots of shorthand and
>>>>> you have to wander through to get a starting point of the location etc. You
>>>>> can search birds texas and get a great listing of data including the early
>>>>> years of the auk and other journals which go back into the 1880's. You can
>>>>> also select down to years to only get early stuff. Its interesting to see
>>>>> the results of study that reference Oberholser starting to do work etc.
>>>>>
>>>>> On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 10:46 AM <bertf...> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> I’m always searching for old records of Texas birds and comparing
>>>>>> birding then and now. I came across this interesting story of birding by
>>>>>> shotgun in Kerr County toward the end of the 19th century.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Lacey, Howard. "Notes on the Texan Jay." The Condor V, no. 6
>>>>>> (November-December 1903): 151-3.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On buying a small ranch in Kerr county, Texas, in the summer of 1882,
>>>>>> and stocking it with a few cows and other domestic animals, I began to
>>>>>> spend my spare time in studying the habits of the wild creatures that I
>>>>>> met, and at first gave nearly all my attention to the birds of the
>>>>>> neighborhood. Not finding anyone else who took much interest in such
>>>>>> things, I bought Coues’ Key to North American Birds, and with this and a
>>>>>> shot gun I by degrees learned the names of most of the birds that I saw as
>>>>>> I rode about the range. I dislike having to use the gun, so I made a point
>>>>>> of making a rough skin (a very rough one indeed at first) of everything
>>>>>> that I shot and could not identify.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> In 1893 I was fortunate enough to make the acquaintance of the “
>>>>>> professor” who was then living in San Antonio, with whom I have since taken
>>>>>> many pleas- ant little excursions, and between us we got to be on familiar
>>>>>> terms with most of our bird neighbors. One of the birds that I could not
>>>>>> place was our common jay, now known as the Texan jay (Aphelocoma texana).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> In December, 1894, when deer hunting on the head of the Nueces river,
>>>>>> I shot and skinned one of these birds and sent it to the professor. He sent
>>>>>> it on, I believe, to the late Captain Bendire, and it is now the type of
>>>>>> the species. In March, 1896, I heard that the jays were nesting on the
>>>>>> ranch of a friend about sixteen miles north of my place, so I rode over
>>>>>> there and on March 29th and 30th found several nests and took four or five
>>>>>> sets of eggs. These were carefully packed in an old cigar box and stowed
>>>>>> away in one of the saddle pockets, but unfortunately as I was taking a rest
>>>>>> and a lunch on my way home, the horse shook himself and of course the
>>>>>> saddle also, with the result that most of the eggs were broken.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> In 1898 the professor arranged to visit this same ranch with me, and
>>>>>> on April 4th we started in an old buckboard and had a fairly successful
>>>>>> trip, getting some good specimens of the birds and several clutches of
>>>>>> eggs. The ranch is situated at the head of one of the main branches of the
>>>>>> Guadalupe and takes in some of the divide between that river and the Llano.
>>>>>> As in other parts of the county the limestone rocks are in evidence
>>>>>> everywhere. Numerous little valleys run down toward the rivers, becoming
>>>>>> deeper and steeper as they approach the larger creek, and often forming
>>>>>> narrow canyons with high bluffs on both sides. Large trees are not
>>>>>> numerous, but the whole face of the country is covered with clumps of shin
>>>>>> oak and scrubby live oak. In these clumps we found the jays’ nests,
>>>>>> generally placed near the outside of a thicket, at from four to six feet
>>>>>> from the ground, and often conspicuous from quite a distance, as the shrubs
>>>>>> were only beginning to put out their leaves at that time. As a rule the
>>>>>> birds were setting and one nest contained young nearly ready to leave it.
>>>>>> The nests were composed of an outer basket of twigs not very firmly put
>>>>>> together, and lined rather neatly with grass, hair, and small root fibers.
>>>>>> They were rather more bulky than mockingbirds’ nests and the inner nest was
>>>>>> saucer shaped rather than cup shaped. Most of them were placed in the shin
>>>>>> oaks, but some few were in live oaks, and I have since found several in
>>>>>> cedar bushes. The birds are not so noisy as the common blue jay and are
>>>>>> particularly silent when near their nests. They have a habit of hopping
>>>>>> upwards through a thicket from twig to twig until they arrive at the top of
>>>>>> it, when they fly off with four or five harsh squeaks to the next clump of
>>>>>> brush, into which they dive headlong. It was a very warm day with the
>>>>>> thermometer in the shade of the gallery at the ranch standing well up in
>>>>>> the nineties, and tramping about through the thickets and picking our way
>>>>>> over the rocks was by no means light work, but the walk was so interesting
>>>>>> that we did not have time to think of getting tired. Of course we found
>>>>>> much to interest us besides the jays. An untidy platform of sticks in a
>>>>>> small Spanish oak tree, proved on investigation to be a road-runner’s nest,
>>>>>> containing six eggs, which from their unusually clear appearance, were
>>>>>> probably all of them fresh. One frequently finds eggs in different stages
>>>>>> of incubation in a roadrunner’s nest and sometimes eggs and young birds or
>>>>>> young birds of different sizes. Several times we disturbed deer. They were
>>>>>> in their fresh summer suits of red, having already discarded their gray
>>>>>> winter overcoats. As is so often the case when one is not hunting them,
>>>>>> they would stop to take a second look at us, offering pretty broadside
>>>>>> shots at fifty or sixty paces. In one extra dense thicket at the head of a
>>>>>> rough little hollow we found a pair of long-eared owls (Asio wilsonianus)
>>>>>> the first we had ever seen in the county; and on a rocky ridge just beyond
>>>>>> were a couple of burrowing owls. They flew a few yards and then settled on
>>>>>> some rocks, nodding their heads at us in their usual ludicrous fashion.
>>>>>> These owls do not breed in this county, but we see them every year in the
>>>>>> spring and autumn. There are no prairie dog towns on this side of the Llano
>>>>>> river, but plenty of them just across it and I have been told that the owls
>>>>>> breed over there. Many small flocks of migrating birds were seen, some of
>>>>>> them just arriving for the summer and others getting ready to leave us.
>>>>>> Conspicuous among the latter were the crown sparrows and lark buntings, the
>>>>>> male buntings already about half clothed in their striking summer plumage.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Large trees were rather scarce on the divide and were not very large
>>>>>> there except by comparison. They were principally isolated live oaks or
>>>>>> black-jacks and most of them contained nests of the red-tailed hawk,
>>>>>> usually old and deserted, but the new ones already contained either eggs or
>>>>>> young birds. Of course all the hollow trees we saw had to be closely
>>>>>> inspected and in one old stump we found a large pole cat peacefully taking
>>>>>> his siesta. We had a good look at him but were very careful not to disturb
>>>>>> his slumbers. He belonged to the white-backed, bare-nosed species and
>>>>>> appeared to be very fat, also, fortunately for us, very sleepy. In the
>>>>>> winter the Texan jays are generally in small parties of four or five
>>>>>> individuals, family parties probably. In the winter of 1896-1897 when large
>>>>>> numbers of the common eastern blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) visited us,
>>>>>> and it was not uncommon to see flocks of from fifty to one hundred of them,
>>>>>> our native jays did not mix with them but wandered about in their usual
>>>>>> small flocks. These flocks, however, were far more numerous than they have
>>>>>> ever been since. Probably a heavy crop of shin oak acorns in this
>>>>>> neighborhood and a failure of the mast in other places, attracted the birds
>>>>>> of both species. I have not seen the eastern jay here but once before; in
>>>>>> 1887 they were very plentiful. They remained until the middle of April on
>>>>>> both occasions, but none of them stayed here to breed.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Bert Frenz
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>>>>
>>>>>> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>>>>>>
>>>>>> eBird reviewer, Belize
>>>>>>
>>>>>> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>>>>
>>>>>> <Bert2...>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> www.bafrenz.com
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>>>>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>>>>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>
>>>> Brush Freeman
>>>> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
>>>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who
>> can never repay you.
>> -John Bunyan
>>
>>
>> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
>> www.avast.com
>> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
>> <#m_422173021701410206_m_5853777345700640921_m_4155297379688633555_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 3:49 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
They are likely late winter residents...I found two once in (March 24,
2003) in SW Austin (now River Place area) during surveys. there I did not
see a date associated with the account. Quoting the TOS Handbook, "spring
migrants have found from early March through mid-April, with a few
remaining into early May" Nesting birds have remained in the state until
early July."

On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 5:22 PM sandfalcon1 <sandfalcon...> wrote:

> I am curious what others think about the note about Long-eared Owls
> encountered with the professor. Were these known to have nested in the
> Hill Country or been permanent residents in the past? Or were these more
> likely misidentified?
>
> Brandon Best
> Arlington, TX
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#m_5853777345700640921_m_4155297379688633555_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>
> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 2:36 PM Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
> wrote:
>
>> Search for field notes. The first page came up with Wetmore's 1911 kansas
>> notebook and mearns of quail fame has many. Other variations notebooks,
>> field notes etc also work
>>
>> I found them as I check the newest additions periodically and some of
>> them popped up
>>
>> Field notes texas has a lot about the glass mountains.
>>
>> The smithsonian has a major project to make this basic data readily
>> available.
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 10:35 AM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> One can also use S.O.R.A. (Searchable Online Research Archive) for
>>> journals and papers going back to the 19th century. I'm not aware of
>>> accessible private note transcripts within the collection however.. I was
>>> in there several days ago looking for a paper on the Prehistoric Birds of
>>> Texas.
>>>
>>>
>>> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 9:35 AM Joseph Kennedy <
>>> <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
>>>
>>>> The Biodiversity Heritage Library has quite a few field notebooks of
>>>> early Texas birding, wildlife and exploring.
>>>>
>>>> https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/
>>>>
>>>> The ones I checked are hard to read as there is lots of shorthand and
>>>> you have to wander through to get a starting point of the location etc. You
>>>> can search birds texas and get a great listing of data including the early
>>>> years of the auk and other journals which go back into the 1880's. You can
>>>> also select down to years to only get early stuff. Its interesting to see
>>>> the results of study that reference Oberholser starting to do work etc.
>>>>
>>>> On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 10:46 AM <bertf...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I’m always searching for old records of Texas birds and comparing
>>>>> birding then and now. I came across this interesting story of birding by
>>>>> shotgun in Kerr County toward the end of the 19th century.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Lacey, Howard. "Notes on the Texan Jay." The Condor V, no. 6
>>>>> (November-December 1903): 151-3.
>>>>>
>>>>> On buying a small ranch in Kerr county, Texas, in the summer of 1882,
>>>>> and stocking it with a few cows and other domestic animals, I began to
>>>>> spend my spare time in studying the habits of the wild creatures that I
>>>>> met, and at first gave nearly all my attention to the birds of the
>>>>> neighborhood. Not finding anyone else who took much interest in such
>>>>> things, I bought Coues’ Key to North American Birds, and with this and a
>>>>> shot gun I by degrees learned the names of most of the birds that I saw as
>>>>> I rode about the range. I dislike having to use the gun, so I made a point
>>>>> of making a rough skin (a very rough one indeed at first) of everything
>>>>> that I shot and could not identify.
>>>>>
>>>>> In 1893 I was fortunate enough to make the acquaintance of the “
>>>>> professor” who was then living in San Antonio, with whom I have since taken
>>>>> many pleas- ant little excursions, and between us we got to be on familiar
>>>>> terms with most of our bird neighbors. One of the birds that I could not
>>>>> place was our common jay, now known as the Texan jay (Aphelocoma texana).
>>>>>
>>>>> In December, 1894, when deer hunting on the head of the Nueces river,
>>>>> I shot and skinned one of these birds and sent it to the professor. He sent
>>>>> it on, I believe, to the late Captain Bendire, and it is now the type of
>>>>> the species. In March, 1896, I heard that the jays were nesting on the
>>>>> ranch of a friend about sixteen miles north of my place, so I rode over
>>>>> there and on March 29th and 30th found several nests and took four or five
>>>>> sets of eggs. These were carefully packed in an old cigar box and stowed
>>>>> away in one of the saddle pockets, but unfortunately as I was taking a rest
>>>>> and a lunch on my way home, the horse shook himself and of course the
>>>>> saddle also, with the result that most of the eggs were broken.
>>>>>
>>>>> In 1898 the professor arranged to visit this same ranch with me, and
>>>>> on April 4th we started in an old buckboard and had a fairly successful
>>>>> trip, getting some good specimens of the birds and several clutches of
>>>>> eggs. The ranch is situated at the head of one of the main branches of the
>>>>> Guadalupe and takes in some of the divide between that river and the Llano.
>>>>> As in other parts of the county the limestone rocks are in evidence
>>>>> everywhere. Numerous little valleys run down toward the rivers, becoming
>>>>> deeper and steeper as they approach the larger creek, and often forming
>>>>> narrow canyons with high bluffs on both sides. Large trees are not
>>>>> numerous, but the whole face of the country is covered with clumps of shin
>>>>> oak and scrubby live oak. In these clumps we found the jays’ nests,
>>>>> generally placed near the outside of a thicket, at from four to six feet
>>>>> from the ground, and often conspicuous from quite a distance, as the shrubs
>>>>> were only beginning to put out their leaves at that time. As a rule the
>>>>> birds were setting and one nest contained young nearly ready to leave it.
>>>>> The nests were composed of an outer basket of twigs not very firmly put
>>>>> together, and lined rather neatly with grass, hair, and small root fibers.
>>>>> They were rather more bulky than mockingbirds’ nests and the inner nest was
>>>>> saucer shaped rather than cup shaped. Most of them were placed in the shin
>>>>> oaks, but some few were in live oaks, and I have since found several in
>>>>> cedar bushes. The birds are not so noisy as the common blue jay and are
>>>>> particularly silent when near their nests. They have a habit of hopping
>>>>> upwards through a thicket from twig to twig until they arrive at the top of
>>>>> it, when they fly off with four or five harsh squeaks to the next clump of
>>>>> brush, into which they dive headlong. It was a very warm day with the
>>>>> thermometer in the shade of the gallery at the ranch standing well up in
>>>>> the nineties, and tramping about through the thickets and picking our way
>>>>> over the rocks was by no means light work, but the walk was so interesting
>>>>> that we did not have time to think of getting tired. Of course we found
>>>>> much to interest us besides the jays. An untidy platform of sticks in a
>>>>> small Spanish oak tree, proved on investigation to be a road-runner’s nest,
>>>>> containing six eggs, which from their unusually clear appearance, were
>>>>> probably all of them fresh. One frequently finds eggs in different stages
>>>>> of incubation in a roadrunner’s nest and sometimes eggs and young birds or
>>>>> young birds of different sizes. Several times we disturbed deer. They were
>>>>> in their fresh summer suits of red, having already discarded their gray
>>>>> winter overcoats. As is so often the case when one is not hunting them,
>>>>> they would stop to take a second look at us, offering pretty broadside
>>>>> shots at fifty or sixty paces. In one extra dense thicket at the head of a
>>>>> rough little hollow we found a pair of long-eared owls (Asio wilsonianus)
>>>>> the first we had ever seen in the county; and on a rocky ridge just beyond
>>>>> were a couple of burrowing owls. They flew a few yards and then settled on
>>>>> some rocks, nodding their heads at us in their usual ludicrous fashion.
>>>>> These owls do not breed in this county, but we see them every year in the
>>>>> spring and autumn. There are no prairie dog towns on this side of the Llano
>>>>> river, but plenty of them just across it and I have been told that the owls
>>>>> breed over there. Many small flocks of migrating birds were seen, some of
>>>>> them just arriving for the summer and others getting ready to leave us.
>>>>> Conspicuous among the latter were the crown sparrows and lark buntings, the
>>>>> male buntings already about half clothed in their striking summer plumage.
>>>>>
>>>>> Large trees were rather scarce on the divide and were not very large
>>>>> there except by comparison. They were principally isolated live oaks or
>>>>> black-jacks and most of them contained nests of the red-tailed hawk,
>>>>> usually old and deserted, but the new ones already contained either eggs or
>>>>> young birds. Of course all the hollow trees we saw had to be closely
>>>>> inspected and in one old stump we found a large pole cat peacefully taking
>>>>> his siesta. We had a good look at him but were very careful not to disturb
>>>>> his slumbers. He belonged to the white-backed, bare-nosed species and
>>>>> appeared to be very fat, also, fortunately for us, very sleepy. In the
>>>>> winter the Texan jays are generally in small parties of four or five
>>>>> individuals, family parties probably. In the winter of 1896-1897 when large
>>>>> numbers of the common eastern blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) visited us,
>>>>> and it was not uncommon to see flocks of from fifty to one hundred of them,
>>>>> our native jays did not mix with them but wandered about in their usual
>>>>> small flocks. These flocks, however, were far more numerous than they have
>>>>> ever been since. Probably a heavy crop of shin oak acorns in this
>>>>> neighborhood and a failure of the mast in other places, attracted the birds
>>>>> of both species. I have not seen the eastern jay here but once before; in
>>>>> 1887 they were very plentiful. They remained until the middle of April on
>>>>> both occasions, but none of them stayed here to breed.
>>>>>
>>>>> Bert Frenz
>>>>>
>>>>> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>>>
>>>>> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>>>>>
>>>>> eBird reviewer, Belize
>>>>>
>>>>> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>>>
>>>>> <Bert2...>
>>>>>
>>>>> www.bafrenz.com
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>>>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>>>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>> Brush Freeman
>>> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
>>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> --
>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>
>
>
> --
> You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can
> never repay you.
> -John Bunyan
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
> <#m_5853777345700640921_m_4155297379688633555_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 3:22 pm
From: sandfalcon1 <sandfalcon...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
I am curious what others think about the note about Long-eared Owls
encountered with the professor. Were these known to have nested in the
Hill Country or been permanent residents in the past? Or were these more
likely misidentified?

Brandon Best
Arlington, TX

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On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 2:36 PM Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
wrote:

> Search for field notes. The first page came up with Wetmore's 1911 kansas
> notebook and mearns of quail fame has many. Other variations notebooks,
> field notes etc also work
>
> I found them as I check the newest additions periodically and some of them
> popped up
>
> Field notes texas has a lot about the glass mountains.
>
> The smithsonian has a major project to make this basic data readily
> available.
>
>
> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 10:35 AM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
> wrote:
>
>> One can also use S.O.R.A. (Searchable Online Research Archive) for
>> journals and papers going back to the 19th century. I'm not aware of
>> accessible private note transcripts within the collection however.. I was
>> in there several days ago looking for a paper on the Prehistoric Birds of
>> Texas.
>>
>>
>> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 9:35 AM Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> The Biodiversity Heritage Library has quite a few field notebooks of
>>> early Texas birding, wildlife and exploring.
>>>
>>> https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/
>>>
>>> The ones I checked are hard to read as there is lots of shorthand and
>>> you have to wander through to get a starting point of the location etc. You
>>> can search birds texas and get a great listing of data including the early
>>> years of the auk and other journals which go back into the 1880's. You can
>>> also select down to years to only get early stuff. Its interesting to see
>>> the results of study that reference Oberholser starting to do work etc.
>>>
>>> On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 10:46 AM <bertf...> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I’m always searching for old records of Texas birds and comparing
>>>> birding then and now. I came across this interesting story of birding by
>>>> shotgun in Kerr County toward the end of the 19th century.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Lacey, Howard. "Notes on the Texan Jay." The Condor V, no. 6
>>>> (November-December 1903): 151-3.
>>>>
>>>> On buying a small ranch in Kerr county, Texas, in the summer of 1882,
>>>> and stocking it with a few cows and other domestic animals, I began to
>>>> spend my spare time in studying the habits of the wild creatures that I
>>>> met, and at first gave nearly all my attention to the birds of the
>>>> neighborhood. Not finding anyone else who took much interest in such
>>>> things, I bought Coues’ Key to North American Birds, and with this and a
>>>> shot gun I by degrees learned the names of most of the birds that I saw as
>>>> I rode about the range. I dislike having to use the gun, so I made a point
>>>> of making a rough skin (a very rough one indeed at first) of everything
>>>> that I shot and could not identify.
>>>>
>>>> In 1893 I was fortunate enough to make the acquaintance of the “
>>>> professor” who was then living in San Antonio, with whom I have since taken
>>>> many pleas- ant little excursions, and between us we got to be on familiar
>>>> terms with most of our bird neighbors. One of the birds that I could not
>>>> place was our common jay, now known as the Texan jay (Aphelocoma texana).
>>>>
>>>> In December, 1894, when deer hunting on the head of the Nueces river, I
>>>> shot and skinned one of these birds and sent it to the professor. He sent
>>>> it on, I believe, to the late Captain Bendire, and it is now the type of
>>>> the species. In March, 1896, I heard that the jays were nesting on the
>>>> ranch of a friend about sixteen miles north of my place, so I rode over
>>>> there and on March 29th and 30th found several nests and took four or five
>>>> sets of eggs. These were carefully packed in an old cigar box and stowed
>>>> away in one of the saddle pockets, but unfortunately as I was taking a rest
>>>> and a lunch on my way home, the horse shook himself and of course the
>>>> saddle also, with the result that most of the eggs were broken.
>>>>
>>>> In 1898 the professor arranged to visit this same ranch with me, and on
>>>> April 4th we started in an old buckboard and had a fairly successful trip,
>>>> getting some good specimens of the birds and several clutches of eggs. The
>>>> ranch is situated at the head of one of the main branches of the Guadalupe
>>>> and takes in some of the divide between that river and the Llano. As in
>>>> other parts of the county the limestone rocks are in evidence everywhere.
>>>> Numerous little valleys run down toward the rivers, becoming deeper and
>>>> steeper as they approach the larger creek, and often forming narrow canyons
>>>> with high bluffs on both sides. Large trees are not numerous, but the whole
>>>> face of the country is covered with clumps of shin oak and scrubby live
>>>> oak. In these clumps we found the jays’ nests, generally placed near the
>>>> outside of a thicket, at from four to six feet from the ground, and often
>>>> conspicuous from quite a distance, as the shrubs were only beginning to put
>>>> out their leaves at that time. As a rule the birds were setting and one
>>>> nest contained young nearly ready to leave it. The nests were composed of
>>>> an outer basket of twigs not very firmly put together, and lined rather
>>>> neatly with grass, hair, and small root fibers. They were rather more bulky
>>>> than mockingbirds’ nests and the inner nest was saucer shaped rather than
>>>> cup shaped. Most of them were placed in the shin oaks, but some few were in
>>>> live oaks, and I have since found several in cedar bushes. The birds are
>>>> not so noisy as the common blue jay and are particularly silent when near
>>>> their nests. They have a habit of hopping upwards through a thicket from
>>>> twig to twig until they arrive at the top of it, when they fly off with
>>>> four or five harsh squeaks to the next clump of brush, into which they dive
>>>> headlong. It was a very warm day with the thermometer in the shade of the
>>>> gallery at the ranch standing well up in the nineties, and tramping about
>>>> through the thickets and picking our way over the rocks was by no means
>>>> light work, but the walk was so interesting that we did not have time to
>>>> think of getting tired. Of course we found much to interest us besides the
>>>> jays. An untidy platform of sticks in a small Spanish oak tree, proved on
>>>> investigation to be a road-runner’s nest, containing six eggs, which from
>>>> their unusually clear appearance, were probably all of them fresh. One
>>>> frequently finds eggs in different stages of incubation in a roadrunner’s
>>>> nest and sometimes eggs and young birds or young birds of different sizes.
>>>> Several times we disturbed deer. They were in their fresh summer suits of
>>>> red, having already discarded their gray winter overcoats. As is so often
>>>> the case when one is not hunting them, they would stop to take a second
>>>> look at us, offering pretty broadside shots at fifty or sixty paces. In one
>>>> extra dense thicket at the head of a rough little hollow we found a pair of
>>>> long-eared owls (Asio wilsonianus) the first we had ever seen in the
>>>> county; and on a rocky ridge just beyond were a couple of burrowing owls.
>>>> They flew a few yards and then settled on some rocks, nodding their heads
>>>> at us in their usual ludicrous fashion. These owls do not breed in this
>>>> county, but we see them every year in the spring and autumn. There are no
>>>> prairie dog towns on this side of the Llano river, but plenty of them just
>>>> across it and I have been told that the owls breed over there. Many small
>>>> flocks of migrating birds were seen, some of them just arriving for the
>>>> summer and others getting ready to leave us. Conspicuous among the latter
>>>> were the crown sparrows and lark buntings, the male buntings already about
>>>> half clothed in their striking summer plumage.
>>>>
>>>> Large trees were rather scarce on the divide and were not very large
>>>> there except by comparison. They were principally isolated live oaks or
>>>> black-jacks and most of them contained nests of the red-tailed hawk,
>>>> usually old and deserted, but the new ones already contained either eggs or
>>>> young birds. Of course all the hollow trees we saw had to be closely
>>>> inspected and in one old stump we found a large pole cat peacefully taking
>>>> his siesta. We had a good look at him but were very careful not to disturb
>>>> his slumbers. He belonged to the white-backed, bare-nosed species and
>>>> appeared to be very fat, also, fortunately for us, very sleepy. In the
>>>> winter the Texan jays are generally in small parties of four or five
>>>> individuals, family parties probably. In the winter of 1896-1897 when large
>>>> numbers of the common eastern blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) visited us,
>>>> and it was not uncommon to see flocks of from fifty to one hundred of them,
>>>> our native jays did not mix with them but wandered about in their usual
>>>> small flocks. These flocks, however, were far more numerous than they have
>>>> ever been since. Probably a heavy crop of shin oak acorns in this
>>>> neighborhood and a failure of the mast in other places, attracted the birds
>>>> of both species. I have not seen the eastern jay here but once before; in
>>>> 1887 they were very plentiful. They remained until the middle of April on
>>>> both occasions, but none of them stayed here to breed.
>>>>
>>>> Bert Frenz
>>>>
>>>> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>>
>>>> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>>>>
>>>> eBird reviewer, Belize
>>>>
>>>> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>>
>>>> <Bert2...>
>>>>
>>>> www.bafrenz.com
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>


--
You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can
never repay you.
-John Bunyan

<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
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Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 12:37 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
Search for field notes. The first page came up with Wetmore's 1911 kansas
notebook and mearns of quail fame has many. Other variations notebooks,
field notes etc also work

I found them as I check the newest additions periodically and some of them
popped up

Field notes texas has a lot about the glass mountains.

The smithsonian has a major project to make this basic data readily
available.


On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 10:35 AM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
wrote:

> One can also use S.O.R.A. (Searchable Online Research Archive) for
> journals and papers going back to the 19th century. I'm not aware of
> accessible private note transcripts within the collection however.. I was
> in there several days ago looking for a paper on the Prehistoric Birds of
> Texas.
>
>
> On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 9:35 AM Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
> wrote:
>
>> The Biodiversity Heritage Library has quite a few field notebooks of
>> early Texas birding, wildlife and exploring.
>>
>> https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/
>>
>> The ones I checked are hard to read as there is lots of shorthand and you
>> have to wander through to get a starting point of the location etc. You can
>> search birds texas and get a great listing of data including the early
>> years of the auk and other journals which go back into the 1880's. You can
>> also select down to years to only get early stuff. Its interesting to see
>> the results of study that reference Oberholser starting to do work etc.
>>
>> On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 10:46 AM <bertf...> wrote:
>>
>>> I’m always searching for old records of Texas birds and comparing
>>> birding then and now. I came across this interesting story of birding by
>>> shotgun in Kerr County toward the end of the 19th century.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Lacey, Howard. "Notes on the Texan Jay." The Condor V, no. 6
>>> (November-December 1903): 151-3.
>>>
>>> On buying a small ranch in Kerr county, Texas, in the summer of 1882,
>>> and stocking it with a few cows and other domestic animals, I began to
>>> spend my spare time in studying the habits of the wild creatures that I
>>> met, and at first gave nearly all my attention to the birds of the
>>> neighborhood. Not finding anyone else who took much interest in such
>>> things, I bought Coues’ Key to North American Birds, and with this and a
>>> shot gun I by degrees learned the names of most of the birds that I saw as
>>> I rode about the range. I dislike having to use the gun, so I made a point
>>> of making a rough skin (a very rough one indeed at first) of everything
>>> that I shot and could not identify.
>>>
>>> In 1893 I was fortunate enough to make the acquaintance of the “
>>> professor” who was then living in San Antonio, with whom I have since taken
>>> many pleas- ant little excursions, and between us we got to be on familiar
>>> terms with most of our bird neighbors. One of the birds that I could not
>>> place was our common jay, now known as the Texan jay (Aphelocoma texana).
>>>
>>> In December, 1894, when deer hunting on the head of the Nueces river, I
>>> shot and skinned one of these birds and sent it to the professor. He sent
>>> it on, I believe, to the late Captain Bendire, and it is now the type of
>>> the species. In March, 1896, I heard that the jays were nesting on the
>>> ranch of a friend about sixteen miles north of my place, so I rode over
>>> there and on March 29th and 30th found several nests and took four or five
>>> sets of eggs. These were carefully packed in an old cigar box and stowed
>>> away in one of the saddle pockets, but unfortunately as I was taking a rest
>>> and a lunch on my way home, the horse shook himself and of course the
>>> saddle also, with the result that most of the eggs were broken.
>>>
>>> In 1898 the professor arranged to visit this same ranch with me, and on
>>> April 4th we started in an old buckboard and had a fairly successful trip,
>>> getting some good specimens of the birds and several clutches of eggs. The
>>> ranch is situated at the head of one of the main branches of the Guadalupe
>>> and takes in some of the divide between that river and the Llano. As in
>>> other parts of the county the limestone rocks are in evidence everywhere.
>>> Numerous little valleys run down toward the rivers, becoming deeper and
>>> steeper as they approach the larger creek, and often forming narrow canyons
>>> with high bluffs on both sides. Large trees are not numerous, but the whole
>>> face of the country is covered with clumps of shin oak and scrubby live
>>> oak. In these clumps we found the jays’ nests, generally placed near the
>>> outside of a thicket, at from four to six feet from the ground, and often
>>> conspicuous from quite a distance, as the shrubs were only beginning to put
>>> out their leaves at that time. As a rule the birds were setting and one
>>> nest contained young nearly ready to leave it. The nests were composed of
>>> an outer basket of twigs not very firmly put together, and lined rather
>>> neatly with grass, hair, and small root fibers. They were rather more bulky
>>> than mockingbirds’ nests and the inner nest was saucer shaped rather than
>>> cup shaped. Most of them were placed in the shin oaks, but some few were in
>>> live oaks, and I have since found several in cedar bushes. The birds are
>>> not so noisy as the common blue jay and are particularly silent when near
>>> their nests. They have a habit of hopping upwards through a thicket from
>>> twig to twig until they arrive at the top of it, when they fly off with
>>> four or five harsh squeaks to the next clump of brush, into which they dive
>>> headlong. It was a very warm day with the thermometer in the shade of the
>>> gallery at the ranch standing well up in the nineties, and tramping about
>>> through the thickets and picking our way over the rocks was by no means
>>> light work, but the walk was so interesting that we did not have time to
>>> think of getting tired. Of course we found much to interest us besides the
>>> jays. An untidy platform of sticks in a small Spanish oak tree, proved on
>>> investigation to be a road-runner’s nest, containing six eggs, which from
>>> their unusually clear appearance, were probably all of them fresh. One
>>> frequently finds eggs in different stages of incubation in a roadrunner’s
>>> nest and sometimes eggs and young birds or young birds of different sizes.
>>> Several times we disturbed deer. They were in their fresh summer suits of
>>> red, having already discarded their gray winter overcoats. As is so often
>>> the case when one is not hunting them, they would stop to take a second
>>> look at us, offering pretty broadside shots at fifty or sixty paces. In one
>>> extra dense thicket at the head of a rough little hollow we found a pair of
>>> long-eared owls (Asio wilsonianus) the first we had ever seen in the
>>> county; and on a rocky ridge just beyond were a couple of burrowing owls.
>>> They flew a few yards and then settled on some rocks, nodding their heads
>>> at us in their usual ludicrous fashion. These owls do not breed in this
>>> county, but we see them every year in the spring and autumn. There are no
>>> prairie dog towns on this side of the Llano river, but plenty of them just
>>> across it and I have been told that the owls breed over there. Many small
>>> flocks of migrating birds were seen, some of them just arriving for the
>>> summer and others getting ready to leave us. Conspicuous among the latter
>>> were the crown sparrows and lark buntings, the male buntings already about
>>> half clothed in their striking summer plumage.
>>>
>>> Large trees were rather scarce on the divide and were not very large
>>> there except by comparison. They were principally isolated live oaks or
>>> black-jacks and most of them contained nests of the red-tailed hawk,
>>> usually old and deserted, but the new ones already contained either eggs or
>>> young birds. Of course all the hollow trees we saw had to be closely
>>> inspected and in one old stump we found a large pole cat peacefully taking
>>> his siesta. We had a good look at him but were very careful not to disturb
>>> his slumbers. He belonged to the white-backed, bare-nosed species and
>>> appeared to be very fat, also, fortunately for us, very sleepy. In the
>>> winter the Texan jays are generally in small parties of four or five
>>> individuals, family parties probably. In the winter of 1896-1897 when large
>>> numbers of the common eastern blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) visited us,
>>> and it was not uncommon to see flocks of from fifty to one hundred of them,
>>> our native jays did not mix with them but wandered about in their usual
>>> small flocks. These flocks, however, were far more numerous than they have
>>> ever been since. Probably a heavy crop of shin oak acorns in this
>>> neighborhood and a failure of the mast in other places, attracted the birds
>>> of both species. I have not seen the eastern jay here but once before; in
>>> 1887 they were very plentiful. They remained until the middle of April on
>>> both occasions, but none of them stayed here to breed.
>>>
>>> Bert Frenz
>>>
>>> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>
>>> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>>>
>>> eBird reviewer, Belize
>>>
>>> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>
>>> <Bert2...>
>>>
>>> www.bafrenz.com
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 11:53 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bastrop Bobwhite
We also have a healthy population of Northern Bobwhite at Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary. Fun to see and hear more often.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

> On Jul 17, 2020, at 1:39 PM, Steve Gast (Redacted sender segast23 for DMARC) <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>
> In the last few weeks Texas Parks and Wildlife reported that this year is looking like a very good production year for quail and a population bounce. Perhaps your observations are evidence of this.
>
> Steve Gast
> Houston TX
>
>> On Jul 17, 2020, at 9:24 AM, Philip Rostron <philiprostron...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> Calling Northern Bobwhite this morning on Cottletown Rd just south of Old Antioch. This is over a mile from the ebird sighting on Old Antioch last month but it could easily be the same bird wandering along the powerline easement.
>> Probably pointless to speculate on origin (the species was essentially extirpated locally years ago) but it was flighty. Very few recent records in the county.
>>
>> Phil - Smithville.
>> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission from the List Owner
>
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>
> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
> from the List Owner
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 11:39 am
From: Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender segast23 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bastrop Bobwhite
In the last few weeks Texas Parks and Wildlife reported that this year is looking like a very good production year for quail and a population bounce. Perhaps your observations are evidence of this.

Steve Gast
Houston TX

> On Jul 17, 2020, at 9:24 AM, Philip Rostron <philiprostron...> wrote:
>
> 
> Calling Northern Bobwhite this morning on Cottletown Rd just south of Old Antioch. This is over a mile from the ebird sighting on Old Antioch last month but it could easily be the same bird wandering along the powerline easement.
> Probably pointless to speculate on origin (the species was essentially extirpated locally years ago) but it was flighty. Very few recent records in the county.
>
> Phil - Smithville.
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission from the List Owner

Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 8:47 am
From: Susan Heath <sheath...>
Subject: [texbirds] Red Knot records
Texbirders,



The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working on designating critical
habitat areas for Red Knots in Texas and they need some data. They have
already searched ebird and gotten records from the surveys being done by
GCBO, CBBEP, ABC and HAS. If you have in your notes any data that has not
been submitted to ebird between 2010 and 2020 of Red Knot counts of more
than 30 birds, especially anywhere between Mustang Island and the Sabine
River, can you send me the information? Thanks much.



Sue



Susan A. Heath PhD

Director of Conservation Research

Gulf Coast Bird Observatory

The opinions expressed are my own and not necessarily those of the company.




 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 8:36 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
One can also use S.O.R.A. (Searchable Online Research Archive) for journals
and papers going back to the 19th century. I'm not aware of accessible
private note transcripts within the collection however.. I was in there
several days ago looking for a paper on the Prehistoric Birds of Texas.


On Fri, Jul 17, 2020 at 9:35 AM Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
wrote:

> The Biodiversity Heritage Library has quite a few field notebooks of early
> Texas birding, wildlife and exploring.
>
> https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/
>
> The ones I checked are hard to read as there is lots of shorthand and you
> have to wander through to get a starting point of the location etc. You can
> search birds texas and get a great listing of data including the early
> years of the auk and other journals which go back into the 1880's. You can
> also select down to years to only get early stuff. Its interesting to see
> the results of study that reference Oberholser starting to do work etc.
>
> On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 10:46 AM <bertf...> wrote:
>
>> I’m always searching for old records of Texas birds and comparing birding
>> then and now. I came across this interesting story of birding by shotgun
>> in Kerr County toward the end of the 19th century.
>>
>>
>>
>> Lacey, Howard. "Notes on the Texan Jay." The Condor V, no. 6
>> (November-December 1903): 151-3.
>>
>> On buying a small ranch in Kerr county, Texas, in the summer of 1882, and
>> stocking it with a few cows and other domestic animals, I began to spend my
>> spare time in studying the habits of the wild creatures that I met, and at
>> first gave nearly all my attention to the birds of the neighborhood. Not
>> finding anyone else who took much interest in such things, I bought Coues’
>> Key to North American Birds, and with this and a shot gun I by degrees
>> learned the names of most of the birds that I saw as I rode about the
>> range. I dislike having to use the gun, so I made a point of making a rough
>> skin (a very rough one indeed at first) of everything that I shot and could
>> not identify.
>>
>> In 1893 I was fortunate enough to make the acquaintance of the “
>> professor” who was then living in San Antonio, with whom I have since taken
>> many pleas- ant little excursions, and between us we got to be on familiar
>> terms with most of our bird neighbors. One of the birds that I could not
>> place was our common jay, now known as the Texan jay (Aphelocoma texana).
>>
>> In December, 1894, when deer hunting on the head of the Nueces river, I
>> shot and skinned one of these birds and sent it to the professor. He sent
>> it on, I believe, to the late Captain Bendire, and it is now the type of
>> the species. In March, 1896, I heard that the jays were nesting on the
>> ranch of a friend about sixteen miles north of my place, so I rode over
>> there and on March 29th and 30th found several nests and took four or five
>> sets of eggs. These were carefully packed in an old cigar box and stowed
>> away in one of the saddle pockets, but unfortunately as I was taking a rest
>> and a lunch on my way home, the horse shook himself and of course the
>> saddle also, with the result that most of the eggs were broken.
>>
>> In 1898 the professor arranged to visit this same ranch with me, and on
>> April 4th we started in an old buckboard and had a fairly successful trip,
>> getting some good specimens of the birds and several clutches of eggs. The
>> ranch is situated at the head of one of the main branches of the Guadalupe
>> and takes in some of the divide between that river and the Llano. As in
>> other parts of the county the limestone rocks are in evidence everywhere.
>> Numerous little valleys run down toward the rivers, becoming deeper and
>> steeper as they approach the larger creek, and often forming narrow canyons
>> with high bluffs on both sides. Large trees are not numerous, but the whole
>> face of the country is covered with clumps of shin oak and scrubby live
>> oak. In these clumps we found the jays’ nests, generally placed near the
>> outside of a thicket, at from four to six feet from the ground, and often
>> conspicuous from quite a distance, as the shrubs were only beginning to put
>> out their leaves at that time. As a rule the birds were setting and one
>> nest contained young nearly ready to leave it. The nests were composed of
>> an outer basket of twigs not very firmly put together, and lined rather
>> neatly with grass, hair, and small root fibers. They were rather more bulky
>> than mockingbirds’ nests and the inner nest was saucer shaped rather than
>> cup shaped. Most of them were placed in the shin oaks, but some few were in
>> live oaks, and I have since found several in cedar bushes. The birds are
>> not so noisy as the common blue jay and are particularly silent when near
>> their nests. They have a habit of hopping upwards through a thicket from
>> twig to twig until they arrive at the top of it, when they fly off with
>> four or five harsh squeaks to the next clump of brush, into which they dive
>> headlong. It was a very warm day with the thermometer in the shade of the
>> gallery at the ranch standing well up in the nineties, and tramping about
>> through the thickets and picking our way over the rocks was by no means
>> light work, but the walk was so interesting that we did not have time to
>> think of getting tired. Of course we found much to interest us besides the
>> jays. An untidy platform of sticks in a small Spanish oak tree, proved on
>> investigation to be a road-runner’s nest, containing six eggs, which from
>> their unusually clear appearance, were probably all of them fresh. One
>> frequently finds eggs in different stages of incubation in a roadrunner’s
>> nest and sometimes eggs and young birds or young birds of different sizes.
>> Several times we disturbed deer. They were in their fresh summer suits of
>> red, having already discarded their gray winter overcoats. As is so often
>> the case when one is not hunting them, they would stop to take a second
>> look at us, offering pretty broadside shots at fifty or sixty paces. In one
>> extra dense thicket at the head of a rough little hollow we found a pair of
>> long-eared owls (Asio wilsonianus) the first we had ever seen in the
>> county; and on a rocky ridge just beyond were a couple of burrowing owls.
>> They flew a few yards and then settled on some rocks, nodding their heads
>> at us in their usual ludicrous fashion. These owls do not breed in this
>> county, but we see them every year in the spring and autumn. There are no
>> prairie dog towns on this side of the Llano river, but plenty of them just
>> across it and I have been told that the owls breed over there. Many small
>> flocks of migrating birds were seen, some of them just arriving for the
>> summer and others getting ready to leave us. Conspicuous among the latter
>> were the crown sparrows and lark buntings, the male buntings already about
>> half clothed in their striking summer plumage.
>>
>> Large trees were rather scarce on the divide and were not very large
>> there except by comparison. They were principally isolated live oaks or
>> black-jacks and most of them contained nests of the red-tailed hawk,
>> usually old and deserted, but the new ones already contained either eggs or
>> young birds. Of course all the hollow trees we saw had to be closely
>> inspected and in one old stump we found a large pole cat peacefully taking
>> his siesta. We had a good look at him but were very careful not to disturb
>> his slumbers. He belonged to the white-backed, bare-nosed species and
>> appeared to be very fat, also, fortunately for us, very sleepy. In the
>> winter the Texan jays are generally in small parties of four or five
>> individuals, family parties probably. In the winter of 1896-1897 when large
>> numbers of the common eastern blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) visited us,
>> and it was not uncommon to see flocks of from fifty to one hundred of them,
>> our native jays did not mix with them but wandered about in their usual
>> small flocks. These flocks, however, were far more numerous than they have
>> ever been since. Probably a heavy crop of shin oak acorns in this
>> neighborhood and a failure of the mast in other places, attracted the birds
>> of both species. I have not seen the eastern jay here but once before; in
>> 1887 they were very plentiful. They remained until the middle of April on
>> both occasions, but none of them stayed here to breed.
>>
>> Bert Frenz
>>
>> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>
>> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>>
>> eBird reviewer, Belize
>>
>> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>
>> <Bert2...>
>>
>> www.bafrenz.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 7:35 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
The Biodiversity Heritage Library has quite a few field notebooks of early
Texas birding, wildlife and exploring.

https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/

The ones I checked are hard to read as there is lots of shorthand and you
have to wander through to get a starting point of the location etc. You can
search birds texas and get a great listing of data including the early
years of the auk and other journals which go back into the 1880's. You can
also select down to years to only get early stuff. Its interesting to see
the results of study that reference Oberholser starting to do work etc.

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 10:46 AM <bertf...> wrote:

> I’m always searching for old records of Texas birds and comparing birding
> then and now. I came across this interesting story of birding by shotgun
> in Kerr County toward the end of the 19th century.
>
>
>
> Lacey, Howard. "Notes on the Texan Jay." The Condor V, no. 6
> (November-December 1903): 151-3.
>
> On buying a small ranch in Kerr county, Texas, in the summer of 1882, and
> stocking it with a few cows and other domestic animals, I began to spend my
> spare time in studying the habits of the wild creatures that I met, and at
> first gave nearly all my attention to the birds of the neighborhood. Not
> finding anyone else who took much interest in such things, I bought Coues’
> Key to North American Birds, and with this and a shot gun I by degrees
> learned the names of most of the birds that I saw as I rode about the
> range. I dislike having to use the gun, so I made a point of making a rough
> skin (a very rough one indeed at first) of everything that I shot and could
> not identify.
>
> In 1893 I was fortunate enough to make the acquaintance of the “
> professor” who was then living in San Antonio, with whom I have since taken
> many pleas- ant little excursions, and between us we got to be on familiar
> terms with most of our bird neighbors. One of the birds that I could not
> place was our common jay, now known as the Texan jay (Aphelocoma texana).
>
> In December, 1894, when deer hunting on the head of the Nueces river, I
> shot and skinned one of these birds and sent it to the professor. He sent
> it on, I believe, to the late Captain Bendire, and it is now the type of
> the species. In March, 1896, I heard that the jays were nesting on the
> ranch of a friend about sixteen miles north of my place, so I rode over
> there and on March 29th and 30th found several nests and took four or five
> sets of eggs. These were carefully packed in an old cigar box and stowed
> away in one of the saddle pockets, but unfortunately as I was taking a rest
> and a lunch on my way home, the horse shook himself and of course the
> saddle also, with the result that most of the eggs were broken.
>
> In 1898 the professor arranged to visit this same ranch with me, and on
> April 4th we started in an old buckboard and had a fairly successful trip,
> getting some good specimens of the birds and several clutches of eggs. The
> ranch is situated at the head of one of the main branches of the Guadalupe
> and takes in some of the divide between that river and the Llano. As in
> other parts of the county the limestone rocks are in evidence everywhere.
> Numerous little valleys run down toward the rivers, becoming deeper and
> steeper as they approach the larger creek, and often forming narrow canyons
> with high bluffs on both sides. Large trees are not numerous, but the whole
> face of the country is covered with clumps of shin oak and scrubby live
> oak. In these clumps we found the jays’ nests, generally placed near the
> outside of a thicket, at from four to six feet from the ground, and often
> conspicuous from quite a distance, as the shrubs were only beginning to put
> out their leaves at that time. As a rule the birds were setting and one
> nest contained young nearly ready to leave it. The nests were composed of
> an outer basket of twigs not very firmly put together, and lined rather
> neatly with grass, hair, and small root fibers. They were rather more bulky
> than mockingbirds’ nests and the inner nest was saucer shaped rather than
> cup shaped. Most of them were placed in the shin oaks, but some few were in
> live oaks, and I have since found several in cedar bushes. The birds are
> not so noisy as the common blue jay and are particularly silent when near
> their nests. They have a habit of hopping upwards through a thicket from
> twig to twig until they arrive at the top of it, when they fly off with
> four or five harsh squeaks to the next clump of brush, into which they dive
> headlong. It was a very warm day with the thermometer in the shade of the
> gallery at the ranch standing well up in the nineties, and tramping about
> through the thickets and picking our way over the rocks was by no means
> light work, but the walk was so interesting that we did not have time to
> think of getting tired. Of course we found much to interest us besides the
> jays. An untidy platform of sticks in a small Spanish oak tree, proved on
> investigation to be a road-runner’s nest, containing six eggs, which from
> their unusually clear appearance, were probably all of them fresh. One
> frequently finds eggs in different stages of incubation in a roadrunner’s
> nest and sometimes eggs and young birds or young birds of different sizes.
> Several times we disturbed deer. They were in their fresh summer suits of
> red, having already discarded their gray winter overcoats. As is so often
> the case when one is not hunting them, they would stop to take a second
> look at us, offering pretty broadside shots at fifty or sixty paces. In one
> extra dense thicket at the head of a rough little hollow we found a pair of
> long-eared owls (Asio wilsonianus) the first we had ever seen in the
> county; and on a rocky ridge just beyond were a couple of burrowing owls.
> They flew a few yards and then settled on some rocks, nodding their heads
> at us in their usual ludicrous fashion. These owls do not breed in this
> county, but we see them every year in the spring and autumn. There are no
> prairie dog towns on this side of the Llano river, but plenty of them just
> across it and I have been told that the owls breed over there. Many small
> flocks of migrating birds were seen, some of them just arriving for the
> summer and others getting ready to leave us. Conspicuous among the latter
> were the crown sparrows and lark buntings, the male buntings already about
> half clothed in their striking summer plumage.
>
> Large trees were rather scarce on the divide and were not very large there
> except by comparison. They were principally isolated live oaks or
> black-jacks and most of them contained nests of the red-tailed hawk,
> usually old and deserted, but the new ones already contained either eggs or
> young birds. Of course all the hollow trees we saw had to be closely
> inspected and in one old stump we found a large pole cat peacefully taking
> his siesta. We had a good look at him but were very careful not to disturb
> his slumbers. He belonged to the white-backed, bare-nosed species and
> appeared to be very fat, also, fortunately for us, very sleepy. In the
> winter the Texan jays are generally in small parties of four or five
> individuals, family parties probably. In the winter of 1896-1897 when large
> numbers of the common eastern blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) visited us,
> and it was not uncommon to see flocks of from fifty to one hundred of them,
> our native jays did not mix with them but wandered about in their usual
> small flocks. These flocks, however, were far more numerous than they have
> ever been since. Probably a heavy crop of shin oak acorns in this
> neighborhood and a failure of the mast in other places, attracted the birds
> of both species. I have not seen the eastern jay here but once before; in
> 1887 they were very plentiful. They remained until the middle of April on
> both occasions, but none of them stayed here to breed.
>
> Bert Frenz
>
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Belize
>
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> <Bert2...>
>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/20 7:25 am
From: Philip Rostron <philiprostron...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bastrop Bobwhite
Calling Northern Bobwhite this morning on Cottletown Rd just south of Old Antioch.  This is over a mile from the ebird sighting on Old Antioch last month but it could easily be the same bird wandering along the powerline easement.
Probably pointless to speculate on origin (the species was essentially extirpated locally years ago) but it was flighty.  Very few recent records in the county.

Phil - Smithville.

 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/20 10:35 am
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
The SMU specimens, at least in part, have been in our collections for
several years.

Keith

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 12:10 PM Mark Welch <welch.mark3...> wrote:

> This is absolutely marvelous.
>
> Mark, outside Dripping/Fitzhugh.
>
> On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 10:46 AM <bertf...> wrote:
>
>> I’m always searching for old records of Texas birds and comparing birding
>> then and now. I came across this interesting story of birding by shotgun
>> in Kerr County toward the end of the 19th century.
>>
>>
>>
>> Lacey, Howard. "Notes on the Texan Jay." The Condor V, no. 6
>> (November-December 1903): 151-3.
>>
>> On buying a small ranch in Kerr county, Texas, in the summer of 1882, and
>> stocking it with a few cows and other domestic animals, I began to spend my
>> spare time in studying the habits of the wild creatures that I met, and at
>> first gave nearly all my attention to the birds of the neighborhood. Not
>> finding anyone else who took much interest in such things, I bought Coues’
>> Key to North American Birds, and with this and a shot gun I by degrees
>> learned the names of most of the birds that I saw as I rode about the
>> range. I dislike having to use the gun, so I made a point of making a rough
>> skin (a very rough one indeed at first) of everything that I shot and could
>> not identify.
>>
>> In 1893 I was fortunate enough to make the acquaintance of the “
>> professor” who was then living in San Antonio, with whom I have since taken
>> many pleas- ant little excursions, and between us we got to be on familiar
>> terms with most of our bird neighbors. One of the birds that I could not
>> place was our common jay, now known as the Texan jay (Aphelocoma texana).
>>
>> In December, 1894, when deer hunting on the head of the Nueces river, I
>> shot and skinned one of these birds and sent it to the professor. He sent
>> it on, I believe, to the late Captain Bendire, and it is now the type of
>> the species. In March, 1896, I heard that the jays were nesting on the
>> ranch of a friend about sixteen miles north of my place, so I rode over
>> there and on March 29th and 30th found several nests and took four or five
>> sets of eggs. These were carefully packed in an old cigar box and stowed
>> away in one of the saddle pockets, but unfortunately as I was taking a rest
>> and a lunch on my way home, the horse shook himself and of course the
>> saddle also, with the result that most of the eggs were broken.
>>
>> In 1898 the professor arranged to visit this same ranch with me, and on
>> April 4th we started in an old buckboard and had a fairly successful trip,
>> getting some good specimens of the birds and several clutches of eggs. The
>> ranch is situated at the head of one of the main branches of the Guadalupe
>> and takes in some of the divide between that river and the Llano. As in
>> other parts of the county the limestone rocks are in evidence everywhere.
>> Numerous little valleys run down toward the rivers, becoming deeper and
>> steeper as they approach the larger creek, and often forming narrow canyons
>> with high bluffs on both sides. Large trees are not numerous, but the whole
>> face of the country is covered with clumps of shin oak and scrubby live
>> oak. In these clumps we found the jays’ nests, generally placed near the
>> outside of a thicket, at from four to six feet from the ground, and often
>> conspicuous from quite a distance, as the shrubs were only beginning to put
>> out their leaves at that time. As a rule the birds were setting and one
>> nest contained young nearly ready to leave it. The nests were composed of
>> an outer basket of twigs not very firmly put together, and lined rather
>> neatly with grass, hair, and small root fibers. They were rather more bulky
>> than mockingbirds’ nests and the inner nest was saucer shaped rather than
>> cup shaped. Most of them were placed in the shin oaks, but some few were in
>> live oaks, and I have since found several in cedar bushes. The birds are
>> not so noisy as the common blue jay and are particularly silent when near
>> their nests. They have a habit of hopping upwards through a thicket from
>> twig to twig until they arrive at the top of it, when they fly off with
>> four or five harsh squeaks to the next clump of brush, into which they dive
>> headlong. It was a very warm day with the thermometer in the shade of the
>> gallery at the ranch standing well up in the nineties, and tramping about
>> through the thickets and picking our way over the rocks was by no means
>> light work, but the walk was so interesting that we did not have time to
>> think of getting tired. Of course we found much to interest us besides the
>> jays. An untidy platform of sticks in a small Spanish oak tree, proved on
>> investigation to be a road-runner’s nest, containing six eggs, which from
>> their unusually clear appearance, were probably all of them fresh. One
>> frequently finds eggs in different stages of incubation in a roadrunner’s
>> nest and sometimes eggs and young birds or young birds of different sizes.
>> Several times we disturbed deer. They were in their fresh summer suits of
>> red, having already discarded their gray winter overcoats. As is so often
>> the case when one is not hunting them, they would stop to take a second
>> look at us, offering pretty broadside shots at fifty or sixty paces. In one
>> extra dense thicket at the head of a rough little hollow we found a pair of
>> long-eared owls (Asio wilsonianus) the first we had ever seen in the
>> county; and on a rocky ridge just beyond were a couple of burrowing owls.
>> They flew a few yards and then settled on some rocks, nodding their heads
>> at us in their usual ludicrous fashion. These owls do not breed in this
>> county, but we see them every year in the spring and autumn. There are no
>> prairie dog towns on this side of the Llano river, but plenty of them just
>> across it and I have been told that the owls breed over there. Many small
>> flocks of migrating birds were seen, some of them just arriving for the
>> summer and others getting ready to leave us. Conspicuous among the latter
>> were the crown sparrows and lark buntings, the male buntings already about
>> half clothed in their striking summer plumage.
>>
>> Large trees were rather scarce on the divide and were not very large
>> there except by comparison. They were principally isolated live oaks or
>> black-jacks and most of them contained nests of the red-tailed hawk,
>> usually old and deserted, but the new ones already contained either eggs or
>> young birds. Of course all the hollow trees we saw had to be closely
>> inspected and in one old stump we found a large pole cat peacefully taking
>> his siesta. We had a good look at him but were very careful not to disturb
>> his slumbers. He belonged to the white-backed, bare-nosed species and
>> appeared to be very fat, also, fortunately for us, very sleepy. In the
>> winter the Texan jays are generally in small parties of four or five
>> individuals, family parties probably. In the winter of 1896-1897 when large
>> numbers of the common eastern blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) visited us,
>> and it was not uncommon to see flocks of from fifty to one hundred of them,
>> our native jays did not mix with them but wandered about in their usual
>> small flocks. These flocks, however, were far more numerous than they have
>> ever been since. Probably a heavy crop of shin oak acorns in this
>> neighborhood and a failure of the mast in other places, attracted the birds
>> of both species. I have not seen the eastern jay here but once before; in
>> 1887 they were very plentiful. They remained until the middle of April on
>> both occasions, but none of them stayed here to breed.
>>
>> Bert Frenz
>>
>> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>
>> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>>
>> eBird reviewer, Belize
>>
>> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>
>> <Bert2...>
>>
>> www.bafrenz.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/20 10:11 am
From: Mark Welch <welch.mark3...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: birding in 1882 by shotgun
This is absolutely marvelous.

Mark, outside Dripping/Fitzhugh.

On Thu, Jul 16, 2020 at 10:46 AM <bertf...> wrote:

> I’m always searching for old records of Texas birds and comparing birding
> then and now. I came across this interesting story of birding by shotgun
> in Kerr County toward the end of the 19th century.
>
>
>
> Lacey, Howard. "Notes on the Texan Jay." The Condor V, no. 6
> (November-December 1903): 151-3.
>
> On buying a small ranch in Kerr county, Texas, in the summer of 1882, and
> stocking it with a few cows and other domestic animals, I began to spend my
> spare time in studying the habits of the wild creatures that I met, and at
> first gave nearly all my attention to the birds of the neighborhood. Not
> finding anyone else who took much interest in such things, I bought Coues’
> Key to North American Birds, and with this and a shot gun I by degrees
> learned the names of most of the birds that I saw as I rode about the
> range. I dislike having to use the gun, so I made a point of making a rough
> skin (a very rough one indeed at first) of everything that I shot and could
> not identify.
>
> In 1893 I was fortunate enough to make the acquaintance of the “
> professor” who was then living in San Antonio, with whom I have since taken
> many pleas- ant little excursions, and between us we got to be on familiar
> terms with most of our bird neighbors. One of the birds that I could not
> place was our common jay, now known as the Texan jay (Aphelocoma texana).
>
> In December, 1894, when deer hunting on the head of the Nueces river, I
> shot and skinned one of these birds and sent it to the professor. He sent
> it on, I believe, to the late Captain Bendire, and it is now the type of
> the species. In March, 1896, I heard that the jays were nesting on the
> ranch of a friend about sixteen miles north of my place, so I rode over
> there and on March 29th and 30th found several nests and took four or five
> sets of eggs. These were carefully packed in an old cigar box and stowed
> away in one of the saddle pockets, but unfortunately as I was taking a rest
> and a lunch on my way home, the horse shook himself and of course the
> saddle also, with the result that most of the eggs were broken.
>
> In 1898 the professor arranged to visit this same ranch with me, and on
> April 4th we started in an old buckboard and had a fairly successful trip,
> getting some good specimens of the birds and several clutches of eggs. The
> ranch is situated at the head of one of the main branches of the Guadalupe
> and takes in some of the divide between that river and the Llano. As in
> other parts of the county the limestone rocks are in evidence everywhere.
> Numerous little valleys run down toward the rivers, becoming deeper and
> steeper as they approach the larger creek, and often forming narrow canyons
> with high bluffs on both sides. Large trees are not numerous, but the whole
> face of the country is covered with clumps of shin oak and scrubby live
> oak. In these clumps we found the jays’ nests, generally placed near the
> outside of a thicket, at from four to six feet from the ground, and often
> conspicuous from quite a distance, as the shrubs were only beginning to put
> out their leaves at that time. As a rule the birds were setting and one
> nest contained young nearly ready to leave it. The nests were composed of
> an outer basket of twigs not very firmly put together, and lined rather
> neatly with grass, hair, and small root fibers. They were rather more bulky
> than mockingbirds’ nests and the inner nest was saucer shaped rather than
> cup shaped. Most of them were placed in the shin oaks, but some few were in
> live oaks, and I have since found several in cedar bushes. The birds are
> not so noisy as the common blue jay and are particularly silent when near
> their nests. They have a habit of hopping upwards through a thicket from
> twig to twig until they arrive at the top of it, when they fly off with
> four or five harsh squeaks to the next clump of brush, into which they dive
> headlong. It was a very warm day with the thermometer in the shade of the
> gallery at the ranch standing well up in the nineties, and tramping about
> through the thickets and picking our way over the rocks was by no means
> light work, but the walk was so interesting that we did not have time to
> think of getting tired. Of course we found much to interest us besides the
> jays. An untidy platform of sticks in a small Spanish oak tree, proved on
> investigation to be a road-runner’s nest, containing six eggs, which from
> their unusually clear appearance, were probably all of them fresh. One
> frequently finds eggs in different stages of incubation in a roadrunner’s
> nest and sometimes eggs and young birds or young birds of different sizes.
> Several times we disturbed deer. They were in their fresh summer suits of
> red, having already discarded their gray winter overcoats. As is so often
> the case when one is not hunting them, they would stop to take a second
> look at us, offering pretty broadside shots at fifty or sixty paces. In one
> extra dense thicket at the head of a rough little hollow we found a pair of
> long-eared owls (Asio wilsonianus) the first we had ever seen in the
> county; and on a rocky ridge just beyond were a couple of burrowing owls.
> They flew a few yards and then settled on some rocks, nodding their heads
> at us in their usual ludicrous fashion. These owls do not breed in this
> county, but we see them every year in the spring and autumn. There are no
> prairie dog towns on this side of the Llano river, but plenty of them just
> across it and I have been told that the owls breed over there. Many small
> flocks of migrating birds were seen, some of them just arriving for the
> summer and others getting ready to leave us. Conspicuous among the latter
> were the crown sparrows and lark buntings, the male buntings already about
> half clothed in their striking summer plumage.
>
> Large trees were rather scarce on the divide and were not very large there
> except by comparison. They were principally isolated live oaks or
> black-jacks and most of them contained nests of the red-tailed hawk,
> usually old and deserted, but the new ones already contained either eggs or
> young birds. Of course all the hollow trees we saw had to be closely
> inspected and in one old stump we found a large pole cat peacefully taking
> his siesta. We had a good look at him but were very careful not to disturb
> his slumbers. He belonged to the white-backed, bare-nosed species and
> appeared to be very fat, also, fortunately for us, very sleepy. In the
> winter the Texan jays are generally in small parties of four or five
> individuals, family parties probably. In the winter of 1896-1897 when large
> numbers of the common eastern blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) visited us,
> and it was not uncommon to see flocks of from fifty to one hundred of them,
> our native jays did not mix with them but wandered about in their usual
> small flocks. These flocks, however, were far more numerous than they have
> ever been since. Probably a heavy crop of shin oak acorns in this
> neighborhood and a failure of the mast in other places, attracted the birds
> of both species. I have not seen the eastern jay here but once before; in
> 1887 they were very plentiful. They remained until the middle of April on
> both occasions, but none of them stayed here to breed.
>
> Bert Frenz
>
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Belize
>
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> <Bert2...>
>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/20 8:46 am
From: <bertf...>
Subject: [texbirds] birding in 1882 by shotgun
I'm always searching for old records of Texas birds and comparing birding
then and now. I came across this interesting story of birding by shotgun in
Kerr County toward the end of the 19th century.



Lacey, Howard. "Notes on the Texan Jay." The Condor V, no. 6
(November-December 1903): 151-3.

On buying a small ranch in Kerr county, Texas, in the summer of 1882, and
stocking it with a few cows and other domestic animals, I began to spend my
spare time in studying the habits of the wild creatures that I met, and at
first gave nearly all my attention to the birds of the neighborhood. Not
finding anyone else who took much interest in such things, I bought Coues'
Key to North American Birds, and with this and a shot gun I by degrees
learned the names of most of the birds that I saw as I rode about the range.
I dislike having to use the gun, so I made a point of making a rough skin (a
very rough one indeed at first) of everything that I shot and could not
identify.

In 1893 I was fortunate enough to make the acquaintance of the " professor"
who was then living in San Antonio, with whom I have since taken many pleas-
ant little excursions, and between us we got to be on familiar terms with
most of our bird neighbors. One of the birds that I could not place was our
common jay, now known as the Texan jay (Aphelocoma texana).

In December, 1894, when deer hunting on the head of the Nueces river, I shot
and skinned one of these birds and sent it to the professor. He sent it on,
I believe, to the late Captain Bendire, and it is now the type of the
species. In March, 1896, I heard that the jays were nesting on the ranch of
a friend about sixteen miles north of my place, so I rode over there and on
March 29th and 30th found several nests and took four or five sets of eggs.
These were carefully packed in an old cigar box and stowed away in one of
the saddle pockets, but unfortunately as I was taking a rest and a lunch on
my way home, the horse shook himself and of course the saddle also, with the
result that most of the eggs were broken.

In 1898 the professor arranged to visit this same ranch with me, and on
April 4th we started in an old buckboard and had a fairly successful trip,
getting some good specimens of the birds and several clutches of eggs. The
ranch is situated at the head of one of the main branches of the Guadalupe
and takes in some of the divide between that river and the Llano. As in
other parts of the county the limestone rocks are in evidence everywhere.
Numerous little valleys run down toward the rivers, becoming deeper and
steeper as they approach the larger creek, and often forming narrow canyons
with high bluffs on both sides. Large trees are not numerous, but the whole
face of the country is covered with clumps of shin oak and scrubby live oak.
In these clumps we found the jays' nests, generally placed near the outside
of a thicket, at from four to six feet from the ground, and often
conspicuous from quite a distance, as the shrubs were only beginning to put
out their leaves at that time. As a rule the birds were setting and one nest
contained young nearly ready to leave it. The nests were composed of an
outer basket of twigs not very firmly put together, and lined rather neatly
with grass, hair, and small root fibers. They were rather more bulky than
mockingbirds' nests and the inner nest was saucer shaped rather than cup
shaped. Most of them were placed in the shin oaks, but some few were in live
oaks, and I have since found several in cedar bushes. The birds are not so
noisy as the common blue jay and are particularly silent when near their
nests. They have a habit of hopping upwards through a thicket from twig to
twig until they arrive at the top of it, when they fly off with four or five
harsh squeaks to the next clump of brush, into which they dive headlong. It
was a very warm day with the thermometer in the shade of the gallery at the
ranch standing well up in the nineties, and tramping about through the
thickets and picking our way over the rocks was by no means light work, but
the walk was so interesting that we did not have time to think of getting
tired. Of course we found much to interest us besides the jays. An untidy
platform of sticks in a small Spanish oak tree, proved on investigation to
be a road-runner's nest, containing six eggs, which from their unusually
clear appearance, were probably all of them fresh. One frequently finds eggs
in different stages of incubation in a roadrunner's nest and sometimes eggs
and young birds or young birds of different sizes. Several times we
disturbed deer. They were in their fresh summer suits of red, having already
discarded their gray winter overcoats. As is so often the case when one is
not hunting them, they would stop to take a second look at us, offering
pretty broadside shots at fifty or sixty paces. In one extra dense thicket
at the head of a rough little hollow we found a pair of long-eared owls
(Asio wilsonianus) the first we had ever seen in the county; and on a rocky
ridge just beyond were a couple of burrowing owls. They flew a few yards and
then settled on some rocks, nodding their heads at us in their usual
ludicrous fashion. These owls do not breed in this county, but we see them
every year in the spring and autumn. There are no prairie dog towns on this
side of the Llano river, but plenty of them just across it and I have been
told that the owls breed over there. Many small flocks of migrating birds
were seen, some of them just arriving for the summer and others getting
ready to leave us. Conspicuous among the latter were the crown sparrows and
lark buntings, the male buntings already about half clothed in their
striking summer plumage.

Large trees were rather scarce on the divide and were not very large there
except by comparison. They were principally isolated live oaks or
black-jacks and most of them contained nests of the red-tailed hawk, usually
old and deserted, but the new ones already contained either eggs or young
birds. Of course all the hollow trees we saw had to be closely inspected and
in one old stump we found a large pole cat peacefully taking his siesta. We
had a good look at him but were very careful not to disturb his slumbers. He
belonged to the white-backed, bare-nosed species and appeared to be very
fat, also, fortunately for us, very sleepy. In the winter the Texan jays are
generally in small parties of four or five individuals, family parties
probably. In the winter of 1896-1897 when large numbers of the common
eastern blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata) visited us, and it was not uncommon
to see flocks of from fifty to one hundred of them, our native jays did not
mix with them but wandered about in their usual small flocks. These flocks,
however, were far more numerous than they have ever been since. Probably a
heavy crop of shin oak acorns in this neighborhood and a failure of the mast
in other places, attracted the birds of both species. I have not seen the
eastern jay here but once before; in 1887 they were very plentiful. They
remained until the middle of April on both occasions, but none of them
stayed here to breed.

Bert Frenz

Oaks & Prairies of Texas

eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas

eBird reviewer, Belize

NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas

<Bert2...> <mailto:<Bert2...>

www.bafrenz.com <http://www.bafrenz.com/>








 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 12:38 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 7-13-20 Yellow-billed Cuckoo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7-13-20 Yellow-billed Cuckoo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Today, I was Blessed with 35 min of Yellow-billed Cuckoo and figured there was a male around with all the displaying and then he came in, but wasn’t interested. They move so slow and being patient until the end was a challenge and it was getting blazing hot. 102.4 right now @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary. I had 174 photos to weed out. Every day is an adventure. Be safe around water features, we had a report of a rattlesnake in the tree over a water feature, which has happened before. Wasn’t there when Don returned, so no pictures. Be safe










Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 10:47 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Pictures from the coast last week
Walking out to the beach from the east beach parking lot on Galveston, a
caracara flew over my head going to the same place. He landed down past the
jetty and was eating on a well eaten and plucked laughing gull

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867083

On the way back to the car he was eating on a well eaten hardhead

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867084

The beaches near the jetty and over on Bolivar had the first decent amount
of sargassum present in years but nothing like the windrows of some past
years. It was greatly appreciated by the birds who did a lot of poking and
prodding including a single snowy plover

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867087

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867086

Just down the beach a bit from the bollards on bolivar flats, an osprey was
making use of the sanctuary markers

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867155

A piping plover was also using the sargassum

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867164

As did the semipalmated plover but not here

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867170

Wilson's plovers were starting to gather prior to migrating

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867190

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867191

Only a couple of young sandwich terns were present among the many royal
tern chicks

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867169

And a single pair of least terns were still interested in making baby terns

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867154

My first black terns of the fall was off with shorebirds rahter than other
terns

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867148

Found the 4 summering dunlin

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867150

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867153

A summering black-bellied plover showed how small peeps can be and the
western sandpiper is the largest of the 3 usual beach peeps

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867149

Returning ruddy turnstones keep their breeding colors for a few days

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867166

Or out on the flats could be called turnweeds as they flip sargassum
clumps. The clumps had been stranded for a bit but still had lots of
goodies iinside. You only find sea horses and pipfishes as the weed first
hits the surf and they are found just as fast by the gulls and terns.

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867165

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867168

Newly arrived short-billed dowitchers keep probing and are one of the fast
molters

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867171

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867172

Western sandpipers are also weed pickers but also use the clumps as shelter
from the wind

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867182

though most of the several hundred were sleeping

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867183

Newly arrived western willets were also sleeping

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867184

But kept an eye on things

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867186

The ones feeding seemed to mainly find small clams

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867188

But most were sleeping come late morning

https://pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/170867189

I did not see a single band on any of the birds on the trip despite lots of
looking. Even some of the regular locals were missing. But they will show
up another day.



--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/20 10:06 am
From: <mitch...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: 7-12-20 Cassin’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

As I presume others see this bird... ?

This looks like a Bell's Vireo to me. They can show an
eye-line, an eye-ring, a spectacle, or any combo of those.
Probably an immature (hatch-year) bird based on the amount
of yellow below. The adults I am seeing right now are
pretty washed out and pale below.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia



On 2020-07-12 16:26, Susan Schaezler wrote:
> 7-12-20 Cassin’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
>
> Today’s fun bird—this one had exposure changed to lighten it.
> Susan & Don Schaezler
>
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 4:47 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: 7-12-20 Cassin’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Having some discussions on the bird, wanted to include the notes and more pictures—sadly, the lighting was worse than when we first saw the bird, where it was very pale and not like young White-eyed Vireo or Bell’s Vireo, but ready for discussion
Don’s EBird report today
1
Details: Vireo with general appearance of being somewhat long and slender, distinct white eye ring and spectacles, dark eyes, upperparts and head uniformly light gray, underparts white with some yellow on flanks toward tail, tail gray but with significant yellow on top as if tail feathers had yellow edges, two white wing bars, plumage between the wingbars same gray color as that of upperparts and coverts above upper wingbars. Photo available.
Media:
© Don Schaezler Macaulay Library
© Don SchaezlerMacaulay Library



Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

> On Jul 12, 2020, at 6:26 PM, Susan Schaezler <susan...> wrote:
>
> 
> 7-12-20 Cassin’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
>
> Today’s fun bird—this one had exposure changed to lighten it. Susan & Don Schaezler
> <image.jpg>
>
>
> Susan Schaezler
> WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
> 501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
> Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
> Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 4:27 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 7-12-20 Cassin’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7-12-20 Cassin’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Today’s fun bird—this one had exposure changed to lighten it. Susan & Don Schaezler


Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 12:48 pm
From: Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...>
Subject: [texbirds] MBTA change comment period ending soon
Hi All,

I apologize if there has already been a similar post on the listserv but this is important! I am forwarding an email that was sent out to the TN listserv about the proposed changes to incidental take for the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Removing fines for incidental take of birds via industry went into effect in 2017 and now they are trying to make the change permanent. Please submit your comments about this proposed change to the Fish & Wildlife Service by July 20. The process to submit a comment was easy and I was able to familiarize myself with the proposed changes, compose my letter, and submit it in about 20 minutes. In the email below, Cyndi did a great job of providing the information and resources necessary to accomplish this important task.

Supporting Alternative B is the best option to protect birds. I know the onslaught of environmental law repeals and requests to submit comments seems endless lately, but now is the time to speak up and I encourage everyone to take a few minutes to do so for the birds that we love!

Best,
Jennifer

---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Cynthia Routledge <routledges...>
Date: Sat, Jul 11, 2020 at 4:39 PM
Subject: [TN-Bird] HAVE YOU ACTED??
To: Tn Bird <tn-bird...>


HAVE YOU COMMENTED YET?? Please take time to send in your comments ON THIS VERY IMPORTANT MATTER!



Bird protections are under attack in a major way and we have two weeks to make our voices heard. In 2017 the Administration ceased enforcement of penalties for bird deaths caused by avoidable industrial hazards. Now the Fish and Wildlife Service wants to codify that rule. The new rule would apply the Migratory Bird Treaty Act protections only when an activity “purposefully” kills birds. The comment period for the draft Environmental Impact Statement for this new rule is midnight July 20th. Submit your comments here.

https://www.regulations.gov/comment?D=FWS-HQ-MB-2018-0090-8411

This link summarizes the Alternatives in the draft EIS. Alternative B is the best alternative to return the protections we have traditionally relied on. You should make reference to this in your letter.

https://www.fws.gov/birds/news/200605MBTA.php

This link takes you to an excellent description of what the loss of these protections would mean and has talking points you can use for your letter

https://abcbirds.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/MBTA-DEIS-talking-points.pdf?eType=EmailBlastContent&eId=a1553894-24c1-4bcf-aa5c-2e60a5c87d96



THANK YOU!

Cheers!

<")

( \

/ |` Cyndi Routledge

Conservation and Policy Committee of TOS

TOS Secretary

Southeastern Avian Research

www.southeasternavianresearch.org





--
Jennifer Miller
Lubbock, TX

(o,o)
/)_)
" "

Blog - http://foundnature.weebly.com/index.html

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 10:37 am
From: Clayton Leopold <passerinaciris12...>
Subject: [texbirds] Montezuma Quail
Other than being in appropriate habitat, does anyone have any tips on where
to find montezuma quail in Kinney and Edwards counties? I'll be out in the
area this weekend. Also is Ravens rock, off of 520, a ranch or private
property?

Thanks in advance.

--
Clayton & Linsey Leopold
Texas City

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 5:10 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
I would agree that both birds are adults. I suspect that they have a strong
pair bond and when one couldn't make the migration north late winter/early
spring, that it's mate chose to stay behind along with it. Birding
coverage, away from home, has been way down during these COVID times, so I
wouldn't be surprised if they went undetected for months.

Just my two cents,

Justin Bosler
Alpine, Texas

On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 9:40 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:

> Justin these are both adult birds and obviously not juveniles...As Rich
> has stated, this is a heavily birded area, large area, had they been here
> previously they would have no doubt been reported earlier....I would tend
> to give more credence to naturally occurring pair on or near the Texas
> coastal plains as a result of post breeding dispersal than I would any
> single bird especially if found up on the plains and playas of NW Texas
> Just my thoughts on it. But keeping an open mind. BTW captive-raised
> birds are tagged and or banded and frankly, I am not sure just how
> frequently SACRs are kept in captivity down here....
>
> On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 8:51 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> wrote:
>
>> Bert, Brush, and Texbirds:
>>
>> How do we know it was a juvenile versus an adult in its rusty-brownish
>> "painted" plumage? Most populations of Sandhill Cranes are known to
>> preen dirt/mud into their feathers for camouflage during the summer months
>> when they can no longer rely on safety in numbers. I suspect it was a
>> mis-identified summering 2nd-year/adult but photos would help to confirm
>> one way or the other.
>>
>> As for the Granger Lake "pair", I would suspect that they never left in
>> February-March (or were released by a private collector(?) or a rehabber
>> recently). In addition to the records provided by Bert, there are summer
>> records in the South Plains from June and July. Ill or injured cranes do a
>> great job of hiding/ concealing themselves until they are healthy and
>> flight capable. They can go undetected for months.
>>
>> For example, I surveyed this same playa regularly in spring and summer of
>> 2017 and did not discover this adult until late July:
>>
>> https://ebird.org/checklist/S38332561
>>
>> Good birding,
>> Justin Bosler
>> Midland, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 8:22 PM <bertf...> wrote:
>>
>>> Brush,
>>>
>>> While your sighing is indeed early, it is not unprecedented. A juvenile
>>> Sandhill Crane was reported 16 July 2004 in Round Top, Fayette County. The
>>> bird had been present already around 8 July and was still present 23 July.
>>> I wrote to you at the time, but I do not know if you had a chance to visit
>>> the place.
>>>
>>> Another Sandhill Crane was at Richland Creek W.M.A. Freestone on 16 Jul
>>> 2009 (Tim Fennell).
>>>
>>> Bert Frenz
>>>
>>> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>
>>> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>>>
>>> eBird reviewer, Belize
>>>
>>> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>>
>>> <Bert2...>
>>>
>>> www.bafrenz.com
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
>>> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
>>> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 8, 2020 1:07 PM
>>> *To:* bobby schat <bobbyschat...>
>>> *Cc:* <Fred.Collins...>; <Texbirds...>
>>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I guess I am being a bit lazy here as I could research it but it is just
>>> easier to ask. Where is the westernmost known general breeding location on
>>> the coastal plain? Is this pair considered to be the result of a
>>> post-breeding dispersal? To be a bit more precise on the location of
>>> these, a couple of miles south of Granger Lk. in Williamson Co. and south
>>> of Hwy 1331 near CR 418. Thank you.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 9:41 AM bobby schat <bobbyschat...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Really cool to see this kind of longitudinal movement in SHCR, I have
>>> done some work on Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR near Gautier Miss. Which
>>> is about 600 road miles east, a lot of those birds where banded, I could
>>> not see any bands on the cranes. This is not say there not from Miss. ,
>>> some did get jewelry. The population in Florida are not band as well.
>>> There has always been the question when the resident pop. would get crowded
>>> and birds start to move around in some type of longitudinal migration.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
>>> Windows 10
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> *From: *Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
>>> *Sent: *Tuesday, July 7, 2020 3:37 PM
>>> *To: *<brushfreeman...>; <texbirds...>
>>> <Texbirds...>
>>> *Subject: *[texbirds] Re: Sandhills
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Most surprising. Eubanks et al shows early date of Oct 13 for the UTC. I
>>> wonder if these are resident non migratory birds wandering in from the east?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> *Fred Collins*
>>>
>>> Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
>>>
>>> 20303 Draper Road
>>>
>>> Tomball, Texas 77377
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> *Commissioner Steve Radack*
>>>
>>> Precinct 3, Harris County
>>>
>>> www.pct3.com
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
>>> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
>>> *Sent:* Tuesday, July 7, 2020 3:16 PM
>>> *To:* <texbirds...>
>>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Sandhills
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> A pair found near Granger Lk. this AM feeding in newly disc'ed wheat
>>> field July 7. Thoughts for those of you not on social media.
>>>
>>>
>>> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71234172
>>> <https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS71234172&data=02%7C01%<7Cfred.collins...>%7Cde883b5d814f4bb3fd1308d822b2b35f%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637297498193937661&sdata=6nzwjpeWIg1hJyBG4gMh14HYw5GXG%2BO94fdRUHlKp9o%3D&reserved=0>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Brush Freeman
>>>
>>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Brush Freeman
>>>
>>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 5:05 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
Bert,

Aside from crown color (red in adult), aging Sandhill Cranes in the summer
would require a close look at the feather wear, either fresh or worn. Both
adults and immatures would appear brownish. The observer's description is
lacking in that regard. Given the staccato barking call that was
described, it may, in fact, be an immature bird that is at least one year
of age, so, technically, no longer a juvenile.

Bird on!

Justin Bosler
Alpine, Texas



On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 10:12 AM <bertf...> wrote:

> Justin,
>
> Here are the original notes from the observer on why he thought it was a
> juvenile at Round Top:
>
> “I think it is a juvenile because our Birds of Texas book shows the adult
> and juvenile sand hill crane. The adult is shown as much lighter in color
> than the juvenile. The bird makes a very weird sound when beginning flight
> (it can fly, does not seem injured, although it flies close to the
> ground). Not exactly a whooping, more like a staccato barking.”
>
> Bert
>
>
>
> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 8, 2020 8:51 PM
> *To:* Bert Frenz <bertf...>
> *Cc:* Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>; bobby schat <
> <bobbyschat...>; Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
> <Fred.Collins...>; 4 Texbirds Maillist <Texbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
>
>
>
> Bert, Brush, and Texbirds:
>
>
>
> How do we know it was a juvenile versus an adult in its rusty-brownish
> "painted" plumage? Most populations of Sandhill Cranes are known to
> preen dirt/mud into their feathers for camouflage during the summer months
> when they can no longer rely on safety in numbers. I suspect it was a
> mis-identified summering 2nd-year/adult but photos would help to confirm
> one way or the other.
>
>
>
> As for the Granger Lake "pair", I would suspect that they never left in
> February-March (or were released by a private collector(?) or a rehabber
> recently). In addition to the records provided by Bert, there are summer
> records in the South Plains from June and July. Ill or injured cranes do a
> great job of hiding/ concealing themselves until they are healthy and
> flight capable. They can go undetected for months.
>
>
>
> For example, I surveyed this same playa regularly in spring and summer of
> 2017 and did not discover this adult until late July:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S38332561
>
>
>
> Good birding,
>
> Justin Bosler
>
> Midland, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 8:22 PM <bertf...> wrote:
>
> Brush,
>
> While your sighing is indeed early, it is not unprecedented. A juvenile
> Sandhill Crane was reported 16 July 2004 in Round Top, Fayette County. The
> bird had been present already around 8 July and was still present 23 July.
> I wrote to you at the time, but I do not know if you had a chance to visit
> the place.
>
> Another Sandhill Crane was at Richland Creek W.M.A. Freestone on 16 Jul
> 2009 (Tim Fennell).
>
> Bert Frenz
>
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Belize
>
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> <Bert2...>
>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 8, 2020 1:07 PM
> *To:* bobby schat <bobbyschat...>
> *Cc:* <Fred.Collins...>; <Texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
>
>
>
> I guess I am being a bit lazy here as I could research it but it is just
> easier to ask. Where is the westernmost known general breeding location on
> the coastal plain? Is this pair considered to be the result of a
> post-breeding dispersal? To be a bit more precise on the location of
> these, a couple of miles south of Granger Lk. in Williamson Co. and south
> of Hwy 1331 near CR 418. Thank you.
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 9:41 AM bobby schat <bobbyschat...> wrote:
>
> Really cool to see this kind of longitudinal movement in SHCR, I have done
> some work on Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR near Gautier Miss. Which is
> about 600 road miles east, a lot of those birds where banded, I could not
> see any bands on the cranes. This is not say there not from Miss. , some
> did get jewelry. The population in Florida are not band as well. There has
> always been the question when the resident pop. would get crowded and birds
> start to move around in some type of longitudinal migration.
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
> Windows 10
>
>
>
> *From: *Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
> *Sent: *Tuesday, July 7, 2020 3:37 PM
> *To: *<brushfreeman...>; <texbirds...>
> <Texbirds...>
> *Subject: *[texbirds] Re: Sandhills
>
>
>
> Most surprising. Eubanks et al shows early date of Oct 13 for the UTC. I
> wonder if these are resident non migratory birds wandering in from the east?
>
>
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*
>
> Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
>
> 20303 Draper Road
>
> Tomball, Texas 77377
>
>
>
> *Commissioner Steve Radack*
>
> Precinct 3, Harris County
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Tuesday, July 7, 2020 3:16 PM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Sandhills
>
>
>
>
> A pair found near Granger Lk. this AM feeding in newly disc'ed wheat field
> July 7. Thoughts for those of you not on social media.
>
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71234172
> <https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS71234172&data=02%7C01%<7Cfred.collins...>%7Cde883b5d814f4bb3fd1308d822b2b35f%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637297498193937661&sdata=6nzwjpeWIg1hJyBG4gMh14HYw5GXG%2BO94fdRUHlKp9o%3D&reserved=0>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 4:50 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Fwd: Booby spotted on Lake Sam Rayburn
Fred and Texbirds;

It was definitely in Angelina County as the observer reported it riding
their bass boat into the boat launch at Monterey Park:

https://www.google.com/maps/@31.2069234,-94.4011232,13z

I do not know of any subsequent observations.

Good birding!

Justin Bosler
Alpine, Texas

On Thu, Jul 2, 2020 at 4:56 PM <fcndc...> wrote:

> I have not seen this on Texbirds. Not sure which County either but figured
> some folks would like to know about it.
>
> Fred Collins
>
> Walker, Texas
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>
> *From:* Mark McLafferty
> *Date:* July 2, 2020 at 12:12:08 PM CDT
> *To:* Fred Collins <fcndc...>
> *Subject:* *Booby spotted on Lake Sam Rayburn*
>
>
>
>
>
> Kindest Regards
> Mark McLafferty
> 281-932-7422
> BuyLandMan.com
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________
>
> Top News - Sponsored By Newser
> <https://www.newser.com/?utm_source=part&utm_medium=uol&utm_campaign=rss_taglines_more>
>
> - *Florida's Daily Case Total Now Has 5 Digits*
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> - *Texas Governor Makes Big Shift on Masks*
> <http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3142/5efe57d77803e57c32743st02vuc2>
> - *Herman Cain, Maskless at Tulsa Rally, Hospitalized*
> <http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3142/5efe57d792c6c57c32743st02vuc3>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 4:43 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Lubbock Area Birding Summary for June - Short
Hi Anthony and Texbirds,

There was a report of at least 2 Bushtits at the Eastlawn Memorial Gardens
Cemetery in Lubbock in late June. Was that report invalid?

Thank you!

Justin Bosler

On Sat, Jul 11, 2020 at 2:05 PM Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
wrote:

> Lubbock received 1.85 inches of rain during June, well below the
> expected total for the month of 3.04 inches, with 7.18 inches of rain
> for the year, well below the expected year-to-date total of 9.25
> inches. Water levels are declining throughout the region which will
> probably, should the drought continue, lead to a birder-friendly
> concentration of post-breeding waders and migrant songbirds at
> human-maintained parks and playas in the region but, overall, poor
> numbers of expected species in the region. On the other hand, we
> could get inundated with rains late in July, rendering my previous
> prediction vaguely comical.
>
> Regional summaries of eBird data cannot be acquired in a timely
> fashion. As a result, records submitted to eBird may not appear in
> this report. Reports from the region that are submitted to the
> texbirds or leasbirds listservs can be reviewed in a timely fashion
> and should appear.
>
> As always, the county follows the site in ( ) and birds are mentioned
> by virtue of rarity, atypical abundance, or atypical scarcity. Water
> Treatment Ponds have come to feature so prominently in these reports
> that they will, henceforth, be referred to as WTP.
>
> SCALED QUAIL: 2 at the Yoakum Dunes WMA (Yoakum) on 6/24/20 (BSc) the
> only report – LOW BUT, WITH BREEDING BIRD SURVEYS CANCELED DUE TO
> COVID-19, THERE WAS LITTLE EFFORT IN THE BETTER AREAS FOR THE SPECIES.
>
> INCA DOVE: 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/7/20 (CR, FR) the only
> report – LOW EVEN BY RECENT YEARS’ STANDARDS.
>
> SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 1 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 6/24/20 (JM) and 1
> at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) – BOTH FAIRLY EARLY;
> GENERALLY NOT EXPECTED UNTIL WELL INTO JULY.
>
> NEOTROPIC CORMORANT: 1 over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/16/20 (AH),
> 1 over the same yard on 6/21/20 (AH), and 2 at Leroy Elmore Park
> (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) the only reports – FORMERLY ACCIDENTAL TO
> THE REGION; NOW A LOW-DENSITY PERMANENT RESIDENT.
>
> GREAT EGRET: 1-2 over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) daily throughout the
> period (AH) and 7 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) the
> only reports received – ABOUT AVERAGE; NO VISITS REPORTED TO SITES
> OUTSIDE OF LUBBOCK.
>
> SNOWY EGRET: 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 6/1/20 (JCr), 11 at Leroy
> Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH), and 2 over a Lubbock yard
> (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) the only reports – ABOUT AVERAGE; NO VISITS
> REPORTED TO SITES OUTSIDE OF LUBBOCK.
>
> CATTLE EGRET: 3 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 6/1/20 (JCr), 72 at
> Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 6/17/20 (JCr), 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon
> (Lubbock) on 6/21/20 (BSc), 1 over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/23/20
> (AH), 1 over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/27/20 (AH), 35 at Leroy
> Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH), and 2 over a Lubbock yard
> (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) the only reports – LOW, EVEN AT THE FEW
> SITES VISITED.
>
> COOPER’S HAWK: 1 at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20(BSc) –
> FORMERLY CONSIDERED ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION IN SUMMER; THERE ARE NOW
> BREEDING PAIRS FOUND IN THE PANHANDLE PROPER ANNUALLY AND WELL-WOODED
> AREAS IN OUR REGION ARE WORTH KEEPING AN EYE ON FOR THIS CRITTER.
>
> RED-HEADED WOODPECKER: 1 -2 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock)
> throughout the period (JCr, BSc, DS) – THIS IS PROBABLY AS FAR WEST AS
> THE SPECIES MIGHT BE EXPECTED AS A BREEDER IN THE REGION.
>
> SAY’S PHOEBE: 1 at the Yoakum Dunes WMA (Yoakum) on 6/24/20 (BSc) the
> only report - LOW BUT, WITH BREEDING BIRD SURVEYS CANCELED DUE TO
> COVID-19, THERE WAS LITTLE EFFORT IN THE BETTER AREAS FOR THE SPECIES.
>
> PURPLE MARTIN: At least six pairs in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock)
> throughout the period (GJ, PJ), 2 at Guy Park (Lubbock) on 6/4/20
> (WW), and 2 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/7/20 (JK, JM) the only
> reports - LOW BUT, WITH BREEDING BIRD SURVEYS CANCELED DUE TO
> COVID-19, THERE WAS LITTLE EFFORT IN SOME OF OUR REGULAR SITES FOR THE
> SPECIES.
>
> BLACK-CRESTED TITMOUSE: 3 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 6/17/20
> (JCr) the only report – FAIRLY FAR WEST, PARTICULARLY DURING SUMMER,
> FOR THE REGION.
>
> EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 2 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 6/21/20 (BSc) –
> FAIRLY FAR WEST FOR THE SPECIES IN THE REGION.
>
> AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 3 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 6/1/20 (JCr) – A
> VERY LATE DATE!
>
> BRONZED COWBIRD: 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 6/1/20 (JCr) the only
> report - LOW BUT, WITH BREEDING BIRD SURVEYS CANCELED DUE TO COVID-19,
> THERE WAS LITTLE EFFORT IN SOME OF OUR REGULAR SITES FOR THE SPECIES.
>
> OBSERVERS: GB=Gail Barnes, JCr=Jim Crites, AH=Anthony Hewetson,
> GJ=George Jury, PJ=Pat Jury, JK=Jim Kringle, JM=Jennifer Miller,
> CR=Clarice Robertson, FR=Floyd Robertson, BSc=Bobby Schat, DS=David
> Shelburne, WW=William Wenthe.
>
> Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>
> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking
> permission
> from the List Owner
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 12:05 pm
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for June - Short
Lubbock received 1.85 inches of rain during June, well below the
expected total for the month of 3.04 inches, with 7.18 inches of rain
for the year, well below the expected year-to-date total of 9.25
inches. Water levels are declining throughout the region which will
probably, should the drought continue, lead to a birder-friendly
concentration of post-breeding waders and migrant songbirds at
human-maintained parks and playas in the region but, overall, poor
numbers of expected species in the region. On the other hand, we
could get inundated with rains late in July, rendering my previous
prediction vaguely comical.

Regional summaries of eBird data cannot be acquired in a timely
fashion. As a result, records submitted to eBird may not appear in
this report. Reports from the region that are submitted to the
texbirds or leasbirds listservs can be reviewed in a timely fashion
and should appear.

As always, the county follows the site in ( ) and birds are mentioned
by virtue of rarity, atypical abundance, or atypical scarcity. Water
Treatment Ponds have come to feature so prominently in these reports
that they will, henceforth, be referred to as WTP.

SCALED QUAIL: 2 at the Yoakum Dunes WMA (Yoakum) on 6/24/20 (BSc) the
only report – LOW BUT, WITH BREEDING BIRD SURVEYS CANCELED DUE TO
COVID-19, THERE WAS LITTLE EFFORT IN THE BETTER AREAS FOR THE SPECIES.

INCA DOVE: 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/7/20 (CR, FR) the only
report – LOW EVEN BY RECENT YEARS’ STANDARDS.

SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 1 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 6/24/20 (JM) and 1
at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) – BOTH FAIRLY EARLY;
GENERALLY NOT EXPECTED UNTIL WELL INTO JULY.

NEOTROPIC CORMORANT: 1 over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/16/20 (AH),
1 over the same yard on 6/21/20 (AH), and 2 at Leroy Elmore Park
(Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) the only reports – FORMERLY ACCIDENTAL TO
THE REGION; NOW A LOW-DENSITY PERMANENT RESIDENT.

GREAT EGRET: 1-2 over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) daily throughout the
period (AH) and 7 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) the
only reports received – ABOUT AVERAGE; NO VISITS REPORTED TO SITES
OUTSIDE OF LUBBOCK.

SNOWY EGRET: 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 6/1/20 (JCr), 11 at Leroy
Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH), and 2 over a Lubbock yard
(Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) the only reports – ABOUT AVERAGE; NO VISITS
REPORTED TO SITES OUTSIDE OF LUBBOCK.

CATTLE EGRET: 3 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 6/1/20 (JCr), 72 at
Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 6/17/20 (JCr), 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon
(Lubbock) on 6/21/20 (BSc), 1 over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/23/20
(AH), 1 over a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/27/20 (AH), 35 at Leroy
Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH), and 2 over a Lubbock yard
(Lubbock) on 6/28/20 (AH) the only reports – LOW, EVEN AT THE FEW
SITES VISITED.

COOPER’S HAWK: 1 at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock) on 6/28/20(BSc) –
FORMERLY CONSIDERED ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION IN SUMMER; THERE ARE NOW
BREEDING PAIRS FOUND IN THE PANHANDLE PROPER ANNUALLY AND WELL-WOODED
AREAS IN OUR REGION ARE WORTH KEEPING AN EYE ON FOR THIS CRITTER.

RED-HEADED WOODPECKER: 1 -2 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock)
throughout the period (JCr, BSc, DS) – THIS IS PROBABLY AS FAR WEST AS
THE SPECIES MIGHT BE EXPECTED AS A BREEDER IN THE REGION.

SAY’S PHOEBE: 1 at the Yoakum Dunes WMA (Yoakum) on 6/24/20 (BSc) the
only report - LOW BUT, WITH BREEDING BIRD SURVEYS CANCELED DUE TO
COVID-19, THERE WAS LITTLE EFFORT IN THE BETTER AREAS FOR THE SPECIES.

PURPLE MARTIN: At least six pairs in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock)
throughout the period (GJ, PJ), 2 at Guy Park (Lubbock) on 6/4/20
(WW), and 2 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/7/20 (JK, JM) the only
reports - LOW BUT, WITH BREEDING BIRD SURVEYS CANCELED DUE TO
COVID-19, THERE WAS LITTLE EFFORT IN SOME OF OUR REGULAR SITES FOR THE
SPECIES.

BLACK-CRESTED TITMOUSE: 3 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 6/17/20
(JCr) the only report – FAIRLY FAR WEST, PARTICULARLY DURING SUMMER,
FOR THE REGION.

EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 2 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 6/21/20 (BSc) –
FAIRLY FAR WEST FOR THE SPECIES IN THE REGION.

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 3 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 6/1/20 (JCr) – A
VERY LATE DATE!

BRONZED COWBIRD: 1 below Lake Six (Lubbock) on 6/1/20 (JCr) the only
report - LOW BUT, WITH BREEDING BIRD SURVEYS CANCELED DUE TO COVID-19,
THERE WAS LITTLE EFFORT IN SOME OF OUR REGULAR SITES FOR THE SPECIES.

OBSERVERS: GB=Gail Barnes, JCr=Jim Crites, AH=Anthony Hewetson,
GJ=George Jury, PJ=Pat Jury, JK=Jim Kringle, JM=Jennifer Miller,
CR=Clarice Robertson, FR=Floyd Robertson, BSc=Bobby Schat, DS=David
Shelburne, WW=William Wenthe.

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/20 11:43 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Coast Thursday, black rails, black terns, baby birds and shorebirds coming and going
Did my weekly loop around the coast yesterday and had a good day. Started
on east beach on Galveston with the young crested caracara working over the
tern flock for breakfast but it had to scavenge a well plucked and eaten
laughing gull and then found a partly eaten hardhead in some sargassum.

There actually was a good bit of sargassum on parts of the beaches which
was greatly enjoyed by the birds. It had come in earlier and so was picked
over but still had food for the shorebirds.

Not many shorebirds on East Beach. A single snowy plover and 3 wilson's
plovers were joined by newly arrived semipalmated plovers and western
willets. The local eastern willets and the american avocet flock have
departed. One piping plover and a single rough-winged swallow among the
barn swallows.

Eastern willets were gone from a number of sites but still at others. My
past summers have shown that local groups all migrate at the same time but
others wait a few days. They also arrive back as a group in March. Most
will be gone within a week or so except for late nesters, or re-nesters
that have youngsters. The youngsters go with the adults in most cases.

Each summer american avocets linger after the main bolivar flock leaves.
Sometime around the end of June almost all of the avocets go somewhere else
and there there only a couple last week and this week.

Almost all the terns on the beaches and flats were royal terns with lots of
chicks. The sandwich terns have moved elsewhere as they did last summer.
They seem to specialize more in shrimp so that diet choice may move them
around. Parent royals bring food to chicks in the flock are starting to be
set on by other terns. It will be very lively out there in coming weeks
until the chicks are no longer fed.

One pair of least terns on Bolivar flats was still doing the "give me a
fish and we can mate act" but there were only say a dozen there and one on
east beach.

Two black terns had just dropped in on the flats for the first of the
summer. Did not see any crossing over 1985 or Anahuac.

Nothing on the ferry ride and only one warbler in port bolivar crossing the
road and vanishing. Painted buntings still singing at several sites.

The stars of the day were either 2 or 3 black rails along Retillon road in
the same spot where they lived 3 summers ago. I have stopped every trip
since then with no luck until today when somebody called grrrr.

A few more grrrr's and then a kick grrrrr. Two birds called back and forth
and maybe one answered from the west side of Retillon. If you come from the
beach, stop where there is a sandy pulloff on the right before the sandy
pulloffs on the left. Walk a little bit north and there is a single
scraggle salt cedar. Past it a little damp slough of short green grass runs
back southeast to the beach and the rails were calling just past the salt
cedar. I had them calling about 11:30. Three years ago there were more
birds again east of Retillon but opposited the dirt pulloffs on the west
side of the road. Did not hear them there.

It is drying so they may not hang around.

Eastern willets were along Retillon but not the roads to the east. Still on
Yacht Basin Road.

Good shorebirds on the flats. About 500 western sandpipers have arrived
still in breeding plumage. They appeared tired and slept as well as
feeding. Looked for goodies among them and found one each least and
semipalmated sandpiper. 4 dunlins continue to summer and maybe 50 western
willets have arrived. 12 piping plovers and 40 semipalmated plovers joined
3 summering black-bellied plovers. Wilson's plovers are starting to flock
and there were about 35 birds.

Newly arrived short-billed dowitchers were in high breeding plumage as were
several marbled godwits. Only a single long-billed curlew. Newly arrived
ruddy turnstones were turning the sargassum and finding goodies.

The summering osprey was not on its usual perches which have been taken
over by brown pelicans. It was perched on one the the nesting area signs
down the flats.before heading back towards port bolivar.

Looped around Anahuac on the way home and the rookery was going well. Lots
of youngsters out with 5 species of newly fledged birds on a reed bed.
White-faced ibis chicks were making more noise than the cattle egrets. No
buteos again for the day and only 2 turkey vultures but the black vulture
pair were on their pole.

I spent several hours walking the beaches and you do need water out there
but that is normal for the season.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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