TEXBIRDS
Received From Subject
3/24/19 8:50 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-24-19 Male PAINTED Bunting @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/24/19 8:12 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] STKIs. Local interest
3/24/19 7:37 am Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: South Llano River SP and Junction Birding Festival
3/24/19 6:48 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] All County Challenge 2019 March 23, 2019 update
3/23/19 8:01 pm Kenny Anderson <kennya290...> [texbirds] Re: South Llano River State Park Birding Festival
3/23/19 7:58 pm Holly Platz <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender Holly.Platz for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: South Llano River State Park Birding Festival
3/23/19 7:52 pm Holly Platz <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender Holly.Platz for DMARC) [texbirds] South Llano River State Park Birding Festival
3/23/19 6:31 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-23-19 Four Warbler sp, Hutton’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/23/19 3:34 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Spotting scope
3/23/19 3:26 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds]
3/23/19 10:54 am Gary Richards <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender grcolts for DMARC) [texbirds] Martin Dies, Jr. State Park Birds
3/23/19 10:36 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 23, 2019
3/23/19 10:12 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Mountain Plovers, shorebirds (San Patricio Co.)
3/22/19 6:22 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] 2019 All Counties Challenge Update 3/22/2019
3/22/19 10:06 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 22, 2019
3/22/19 7:05 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] Re: 3-22-19 Hutton’s Vireo continue @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/22/19 6:58 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-22-19 Hutton’s Vireo continue @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/21/19 5:59 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Waterfowl in the Panhandle
3/21/19 12:52 pm <mitch...> [texbirds] Re: Texas Hill country inquiry
3/21/19 12:49 pm James Purcell <jpurcell1616...> [texbirds] Wilson's Plovers at Bolivar?
3/21/19 12:46 pm David Hanson <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender dhanson139 for DMARC) [texbirds] eBird -- Baytown Nature Center (UTC 039) -- Mar 21, 2019
3/21/19 12:13 pm Donna Silvers <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender silvers713 for DMARC) [texbirds] Cinnamon Teal - Galveston
3/21/19 10:54 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 21, 2019
3/21/19 9:10 am Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...> [texbirds] Re: Texas Hill country inquiry
3/21/19 8:33 am James Purcell <jpurcell1616...> [texbirds] Texas Hill country inquiry
3/20/19 6:35 pm Garett Hodne <garyhodne...> [texbirds] May 25th Texas Pelagic is almost full!
3/20/19 9:37 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 20, 2019
3/20/19 6:09 am <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender dhanson139 for DMARC) [texbirds] Baytown Nature Center Bird Count for March
3/19/19 11:08 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 19, 2019
3/19/19 10:45 am Becky Reyes <breyes...> [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
3/18/19 6:54 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Re: Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
3/18/19 2:39 pm <fcndc...> [texbirds] Re: Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
3/18/19 2:35 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
3/18/19 2:34 pm <fcndc...> [texbirds] Fwd: Seeking way forward on Texas early March eBird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
3/18/19 2:26 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
3/18/19 1:39 pm Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC) [texbirds] Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
3/18/19 11:38 am Leslie Calvert <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender calvertles for DMARC) [texbirds] Utopia birds
3/18/19 10:52 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 18, 2019
3/18/19 9:43 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Eurasian Wigeon, San Angelo (Tom Green Co.)
3/18/19 9:38 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Golden-crowned Sparrow, Balmorhea (Reeves Co.)
3/17/19 8:18 pm <mitch...> [texbirds] Lost Maples
3/17/19 6:17 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-17-18 Whip-poor-will @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/17/19 10:29 am Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...> [texbirds] Decent day on Norias in spite of the cold and drizzle
3/16/19 7:06 pm Tom Toporowski <tomtopski...> [texbirds] Golden-cheeked Warbler Sighting
3/16/19 4:59 pm Petra Hockey <phockey...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/16/19 2:24 pm Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC) [texbirds] Black-capped Vireo
3/16/19 12:22 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/16/19 12:11 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/16/19 12:07 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/16/19 11:53 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/16/19 10:57 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/16/19 10:41 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 16, 2019
3/16/19 10:28 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/16/19 9:30 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Board Walk at Shoveler Pond, Anahuac NWR
3/15/19 2:10 pm Jace Stansbury <jstansbury...> [texbirds] Sea Rim State Park- Gambusia Trail
3/15/19 10:58 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 15, 2019
3/14/19 6:55 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Bird Alarm RBA for Texas
3/14/19 1:33 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: John Kelly, birder from Austin, passed away
3/14/19 12:07 pm Big Bend Home <leehoy...> [texbirds] Re: John Kelly, birder from Austin, passed away
3/14/19 11:54 am Jane F Tillman <jtillman...> [texbirds] John Kelly, birder from Austin, passed away
3/14/19 10:52 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] Hawkwatch
3/14/19 10:48 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 14, 2019
3/14/19 9:11 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Eastern Whip-poor-will, Common Poorwills - Commons Ford Ranch (Travis Co.)
3/14/19 8:40 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Eastern Whip-poor-will, Common Poorwills - Commons Ford Ranch (Travis Co.)
3/13/19 4:45 pm <jkestner...> [texbirds] Swainson's Hawk
3/13/19 3:49 pm Petra Hockey <phockey...> [texbirds] Ganado area - Swallow-tailed Kites and more
3/13/19 3:08 pm Timothy Brush <timothy.brush...> [texbirds] Morelet's Seedeater continues at Salineno
3/13/19 10:23 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 13, 2019
3/12/19 4:17 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] RFI eBird reviewer for Brazos County
3/12/19 12:45 pm David Hanson <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender dhanson139 for DMARC) [texbirds] Swallow-tailed Kite
3/12/19 11:08 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Short-tailed Hawk in Leakey (Real Co.)
3/12/19 10:49 am Becky Reyes <breyes...> [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
3/12/19 10:29 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 12, 2019
3/12/19 10:22 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 12, 2019
3/12/19 9:52 am Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/12/19 9:36 am Robert Becker <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender robertjbecker for DMARC) [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou Nature Center (Harris County)
3/12/19 4:52 am Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...> [texbirds] Re: Glaucous-winged Gull
3/11/19 9:02 pm Matt Heindel <mtheindel...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 8:58 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 8:29 pm Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 7:22 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 3-11-19 Harris’s, Pelicans, Nuthatch, Grasshopper @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3/11/19 7:09 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 6:41 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 6:31 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 6:22 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 6:16 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 6:12 pm <bertf...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 6:03 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 6:01 pm Kenny Anderson <kennya290...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 5:52 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 5:44 pm Phockey <phockey...> [texbirds] Fwd: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 5:41 pm Phockey <phockey...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 5:32 pm Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...> [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/11/19 5:22 pm Phockey <phockey...> [texbirds] Re: Glaucous-winged Gull
3/11/19 4:47 pm Christian Walker <christian.walker...> [texbirds] Trip to Nolan County (Sweetwater) - Western Screech-Owl, Mountain Plovers
3/11/19 2:06 pm Brent Ortego <brentortego...> [texbirds] USGS Breeding Bird Survey Volunteers Needed - 2nd request
3/11/19 1:55 pm Andrew Donnelly <acadonnelly...> [texbirds] Re: Glaucoma-winged Gull
3/11/19 12:52 pm Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...> [texbirds] Re: Glaucoma-winged Gull
3/11/19 12:26 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 11, 2019
3/11/19 12:10 pm Dan Smith <dan...> [texbirds] Re: Glaucoma-winged Gull
3/11/19 11:53 am Tizard Ian <itizard...> [texbirds] Re: Glaucoma-winged Gull
3/11/19 11:35 am <fcndc...> [texbirds] Glaucoma-winged Gull
3/11/19 10:57 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 11, 2019
3/11/19 7:37 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
3/10/19 7:22 pm Jane F Tillman <jtillman...> [texbirds] Re: Summer Tanager ?
3/10/19 3:36 pm Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for February - Longish
3/10/19 1:39 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Summer Tanager ?
3/9/19 11:46 am Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> [texbirds] Warblers
3/9/19 10:39 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] Hawk Watch
3/9/19 10:38 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 9, 2019
3/9/19 5:02 am Todd McGrath <skua...> [texbirds] Western Gull
3/8/19 10:55 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 8, 2019
3/7/19 11:02 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] Hawk Watch
3/7/19 11:01 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 7, 2019
3/7/19 10:57 am <nina...> [texbirds] TRPA at Armand Bayou, Harris County
3/7/19 8:34 am Becky Reyes <breyes...> [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center- American Goldfinches
3/6/19 12:25 pm Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC) [texbirds] Tropical Parula Armand Bayou (Harris County) midday today
3/6/19 10:40 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 6, 2019
3/5/19 12:41 pm Jane F Tillman <jtillman...> [texbirds] Request for info on the Western Gull, White Rock Lake
3/5/19 10:24 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 5, 2019
3/5/19 10:02 am Becky Reyes <breyes...> [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
3/4/19 10:08 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] 2019 eBird Game - February Report - of Interest to TCC/eBird Folk Only
3/4/19 9:42 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 4, 2019
3/4/19 9:38 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] 2019 Photography Game - February Report
3/3/19 9:53 am Jane F Tillman <jtillman...> [texbirds] Definitions of Short, Medium and Long Distance Migrants
3/3/19 6:59 am Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...> [texbirds] 65 species on King Ranch
3/2/19 10:51 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 2, 2019
3/1/19 7:23 pm Garett Hodne <garyhodne...> [texbirds] Subject: The 2019 Season for Texas Pelagics gets underway early this year.
3/1/19 10:48 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 1, 2019
3/1/19 8:10 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Golden-crowned Sparrow, Hwy. 118 (Jeff Davis Co.)
2/28/19 10:44 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 28, 2019
2/28/19 7:50 am Lois Hughes <loisnjake...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
2/28/19 7:11 am Mark Welch <welch.mark3...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
2/27/19 6:44 pm Danny Set <hlaas...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
2/27/19 10:41 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 27, 2019
2/27/19 9:48 am Judy Heffner <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender judyhef for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: Bird Song - ask and ye shall receive...
2/26/19 1:00 pm <artm1966...> [texbirds] Barn Swallows on Nest
2/26/19 12:51 pm <jkestner...> [texbirds] field trip opportunity
2/26/19 12:13 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song - ask and ye shall receive...
2/26/19 12:04 pm Dan Smith <dan...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/26/19 11:50 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song - ask and ye shall receive...
2/26/19 11:42 am John and Glennah Trochet <trochetj...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/26/19 10:47 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 26, 2019
2/26/19 10:29 am Becky Reyes <breyes...> [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
2/25/19 7:09 pm Kelly Bryan <kelly.b.bryan...> [texbirds] Davis Mountains Property
2/25/19 6:42 pm Lubbockites <lubbockites...> [texbirds] Re: FW: Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 5:41 pm Robert Reeves <birder.reeves...> [texbirds] Re: FW: Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 5:37 pm Robert Reeves <birder.reeves...> [texbirds] Re: FW: Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 1:57 pm Barrett Pierce <bpierce...> [texbirds] FW: Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 1:51 pm Kenny Anderson <kennya290...> [texbirds] Re: UT Peregrine Lays First Egg of Season
2/25/19 1:11 pm Mark Welch <welch.mark3...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 1:09 pm Bruce Calder <calder.tx...> [texbirds] UT Peregrine Lays First Egg of Season
2/25/19 12:34 pm Gary Richards <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender grcolts for DMARC) [texbirds] Palo Alto Battlefield Birds
2/25/19 11:06 am Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...> [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 25, 2019
2/25/19 10:35 am <trochetj...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 10:34 am <jkestner...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 10:20 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] WESTERN GULL, White Rock Lake (Dallas Co.)
2/25/19 10:14 am Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 9:59 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 9:52 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 9:41 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/25/19 9:14 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 8:37 pm Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 3:47 pm PJS <pjsmolen...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 1:47 pm Dan Smith <dan...> [texbirds] Re: Grackles using tools
2/24/19 1:37 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Grackles using tools
2/24/19 1:04 pm Dan Smith <dan...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
2/24/19 12:31 pm Ralph <rreed1049...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 12:25 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
2/24/19 12:21 pm Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 12:16 pm WD Williams <wdwt1938...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
2/24/19 12:11 pm L Markoff <canyoneagle...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
2/24/19 12:02 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 12:01 pm Charles Backus <backus829...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 11:55 am Jane F Tillman <jtillman...> [texbirds] Bird Song
2/24/19 11:54 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Fwd: Re: Mustang Island Aplomados - update
2/24/19 11:51 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 11:22 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
2/24/19 11:07 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 10:53 am Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...> [texbirds] query: Mountain Plover in Hidalgo or Cameron this winter?
2/24/19 10:15 am Andrew Donnelly <acadonnelly...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 10:09 am Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender segast23 for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
2/24/19 9:24 am Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...> [texbirds] Bird Song
2/24/19 8:45 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 6:17 am Brent Ortego <brentortego...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 5:24 am Bob White <bobwhitebsacbc...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 4:46 am Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 4:40 am D D Currie <ddbirder...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 4:15 am Dan Smith <dan...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/24/19 4:03 am Dell Little <dellel1119...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/23/19 7:41 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/23/19 6:21 pm Donna Silvers <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender silvers713 for DMARC) [texbirds] Fwd: Re: Mustang Island Aplomados - update
2/23/19 5:24 pm L Markoff <canyoneagle...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/23/19 5:17 pm Phockey <phockey...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/23/19 5:17 pm Erik Breden <erik.breden...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/23/19 4:12 pm <bertf...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/23/19 4:04 pm Jason Leifester <jasonleifester...> [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
2/23/19 2:48 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Bird Song.
2/23/19 10:32 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 23, 2019
2/23/19 10:08 am <jkestner...> [texbirds] Re: Mustang Island Aplomados - update
2/23/19 8:33 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Mustang Island Aplomados - update
2/22/19 7:13 pm Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Aplomado Falcons - Mustang Island
2/22/19 4:33 pm Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...> [texbirds] 78 species in five hours on Santa Gertrudis division of King Ranch
2/22/19 10:21 am Sue Ewan <ewans...> [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 22, 2019
2/22/19 9:22 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Re: What do you think is going on with this Blue-winged Teal?
 
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Date: 3/24/19 8:50 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-24-19 Male PAINTED Bunting @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-24-19 Male PAINTED Bunting @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Just observed—they nest here and we used to have banded birds show up each year, but Brent hasn’t banded for awhile and we don’t have banded ones. The cities know to protect our fence lines from destruction since they love messy fence lines to nest in and they are cooperative with us, which we greatly appreciate!

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 3/24/19 8:12 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] STKIs. Local interest
Two Swallow-tailed Kites just west of Webberville over river. 8:22AM. HO
Prothonotary too.
--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

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Date: 3/24/19 7:37 am
From: Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: South Llano River SP and Junction Birding Festival
Holly wasn't providing any kind of comprehensive list that we might see, but yes, Black-capped Vireo is probably as easy to see at South Llano River SP as any public place in Texas. In places just get out of your car and look/listen. The festival dates are also within the time frame where it is possible to get 100 species in a day as we will be going to some locations outside the state park where we can add to the list i.e. Junction Wastewater Facility etc. I will be leading the tours around town. 
Birding is picking up in the area as species move in. One of the park hosts photographed a beautiful male Hooded Oriole a week ago. This is a species I have only seen once here (very quickly) about 10 years ago. I get sporadic reports of this bird on ranches in the area from time to time, mainly south of Junction toward Leakey. The tail-less Gray Catbird is just weird looking. There is a current photo on ebird as the bird feeds on the peanut butter feeder. This bird is very regular at the Juniper Blind and has been here all winter. Golden-cheeked Warblers seem to be in better numbers than last year. I recorded 8 yesterday on my near 2 mile hike up the Warbler Trail with a group of park visitors. I was hearing Golden-cheeks the entire time I was in their habitat. Shorebird activity at the wastewater ponds has been a little slow. Shorebirds frequent the far pond which is not visible from the road. The combination lock on the middle gate is mine and I can go in anytime or open it for visitors (if I am available!). I have been working with city officials to manage the water level in the pond so it will be just right for shorebirds i.e. a "little water and a little mud". The middle gate is usually always open on Wednesdays as that is the day the city personnel takes their water samples for testing. If it is open drive in as the workers know what people wearing binoculars are doing. Mr. Roberts may ask you what you are seeing. I always advise city personnel to expect more business during the spring. 
Rhandy J. HeltonJunction, Texas
 

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Date: 3/24/19 6:48 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] All County Challenge 2019 March 23, 2019 update
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1xTZoMJOvFU0tkXxz0TEJlwsZFJVn3Fcf&usp=sharing

2019 All Counties Challenge update: I finished off 51 counties in 4 days to
complete the panhandle and the NW portion of Llano Estacado. I have now
visited all counties north of I20 and west of Tarrant County. Yesterday I
didn't have it in me to reach Cooke and Denton Counties. I wasn't sleeping
well on the trip and have been suffering from some congestion that seems to
have morphed into a full on upper respiratory infection. I thought
everywhere was really quite yesterday, turns out both my ears where really
clogged and that turned into dueling earaches by Montague County so I
turned toward home. That brings me 151 counties birded and 3265 ticks. I've
now broken the high county mark of 150 counties in 2017. My road trip

Sparrows where sparse already. The exception was Lake McClellan in Gray
County. I had large numbers of Song Sparrows there and 8 species total
including a snazy Golden-crowned Sparrow. Hawk numbers where thin too. No
much for migrants back yet, but I never for tired of hearing the singing
Western Meadowlawks!

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

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Date: 3/23/19 8:01 pm
From: Kenny Anderson <kennya290...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: South Llano River State Park Birding Festival
Am I missiing something- surely anyone attending a South Llano festival,
would reasonably expect Black-capped Vireo to be part of the experience?

On Sat, Mar 23, 2019 at 9:52 PM Holly Platz <dmarc-noreply...>
wrote:

> Hello Texbirders,
>
>
> As the former Interpreter at South Llano River State Park, I wanted to let
> folks know that registration for the 2nd Annual South Llano River State
> Park Birding Festival is still open. The Festival will be held Friday,
> April 26th through Sunday, April 29th. Last year as the Park Interpreter at
> South Llano River SP, I was part of the planning committee for this
> Festival, and it is very near to my heart. I wanted to reach out and extend
> an invitation for you to attend this event at one of the best birding spots
> in the western Hill Country.
>
>
> Building on last year's success, this year South Llano River State Park
> and the Friends of South Llano River State Park are partnering with a local
> nonprofit, the Llano River Watershed Alliance, as well as Texas Tech
> University Llano River Field Station, to make the Festival even better.
>
>
> Here's a quote from their press release:
>
> "The Festival will feature last year’s popular events, the Golden-cheeked
> Warbler Walks, Birding the Riparian, guided photography sessions in the
> park’s four popular bird blinds, and the Big Sit!. This year’s Festival
> will also include two additional activities, Birding Around Town field
> trips and Birding Golf Cart Tours of the Llano River Field Station. The Big
> Sit! will again be held on Sunday morning. Last year over 50 species were
> identified at the Big Sit!, including an immature Bald Eagle and a
> Peregrine Falcon."
>
>
> Registration closes this Tuesday. Registration cost is now $80, which
> includes two activities, rather than the original $100 for three
> activities. To request a registration packet, email
> <southllanoriverbirdingfestival...>
> <southllanoriverbirdingfestival...>
> <southllanoriverbirdingfestival...>
> You can also check out the Festival's Facebook page at
> www.facebook.com/slrspbirdingfestival
> <http://www.facebook.com/slrspbirdingfetival.>
>
> Thanks to the many birders around the state who are guiding at this
> Festival, and to those of you who have already registered. Hope more of you
> can make it!
>
>
> Good birding,
>
>
> Holly Platz
>
>
>
> Holly Platz
>
> Interpretive Ranger
>
> Guadalupe River State Park/Honey Creek State Natural Area
>
> 3350 Park Road 31
>
> Spring Branch, Texas 78070
> (830) 438-2656 – Park Office
>
> (830) 214-3635 – Cell
>
> <holly.platz...>
>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 3/23/19 7:58 pm
From: Holly Platz <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender Holly.Platz for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: South Llano River State Park Birding Festival
The festival goes from Friday April 26th through Sunday April 28th (not 29th).

Sorry for the typo.


Holly Platz

________________________________
From: Holly Platz
Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2019 9:50:59 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: South Llano River State Park Birding Festival


Hello Texbirders,


As the former Interpreter at South Llano River State Park, I wanted to let folks know that registration for the 2nd Annual South Llano River State Park Birding Festival is still open. The Festival will be held Friday, April 26th through Sunday, April 29th. Last year as the Park Interpreter at South Llano River SP, I was part of the planning committee for this Festival, and it is very near to my heart. I wanted to reach out and extend an invitation for you to attend this event at one of the best birding spots in the western Hill Country.


Building on last year's success, this year South Llano River State Park and the Friends of South Llano River State Park are partnering with a local nonprofit, the Llano River Watershed Alliance, as well as Texas Tech University Llano River Field Station, to make the Festival even better.


Here's a quote from their press release:


"The Festival will feature last years popular events, the Golden-cheeked Warbler Walks, Birding the Riparian, guided photography sessions in the parks four popular bird blinds, and the Big Sit!. This years Festival will also include two additional activities, Birding Around Town field trips and Birding Golf Cart Tours of the Llano River Field Station. The Big Sit! will again be held on Sunday morning. Last year over 50 species were identified at the Big Sit!, including an immature Bald Eagle and a Peregrine Falcon."


Registration closes this Tuesday. Registration cost is now $80, which includes two activities, rather than the original $100 for three activities. To request a registration packet, email <southllanoriverbirdingfestival...><mailto:<southllanoriverbirdingfestival...><mailto:<southllanoriverbirdingfestival...>

You can also check out the Festival's Facebook page at www.facebook.com/slrspbirdingfestival<http://www.facebook.com/slrspbirdingfestival>
<http://www.facebook.com/slrspbirdingfetival.>


Thanks to the many birders around the state who are guiding at this Festival, and to those of you who have already registered. Hope more of you can make it!


Good birding,


Holly Platz



Holly Platz

Interpretive Ranger

Guadalupe River State Park/Honey Creek State Natural Area

3350 Park Road 31

Spring Branch, Texas 78070
(830) 438-2656 Park Office

(830) 214-3635 Cell

<holly.platz...><mailto:<holly.platz...>




 

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Date: 3/23/19 7:52 pm
From: Holly Platz <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender Holly.Platz for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] South Llano River State Park Birding Festival
Hello Texbirders,


As the former Interpreter at South Llano River State Park, I wanted to let folks know that registration for the 2nd Annual South Llano River State Park Birding Festival is still open. The Festival will be held Friday, April 26th through Sunday, April 29th. Last year as the Park Interpreter at South Llano River SP, I was part of the planning committee for this Festival, and it is very near to my heart. I wanted to reach out and extend an invitation for you to attend this event at one of the best birding spots in the western Hill Country.


Building on last year's success, this year South Llano River State Park and the Friends of South Llano River State Park are partnering with a local nonprofit, the Llano River Watershed Alliance, as well as Texas Tech University Llano River Field Station, to make the Festival even better.


Here's a quote from their press release:


"The Festival will feature last years popular events, the Golden-cheeked Warbler Walks, Birding the Riparian, guided photography sessions in the parks four popular bird blinds, and the Big Sit!. This years Festival will also include two additional activities, Birding Around Town field trips and Birding Golf Cart Tours of the Llano River Field Station. The Big Sit! will again be held on Sunday morning. Last year over 50 species were identified at the Big Sit!, including an immature Bald Eagle and a Peregrine Falcon."


Registration closes this Tuesday. Registration cost is now $80, which includes two activities, rather than the original $100 for three activities. To request a registration packet, email <southllanoriverbirdingfestival...><mailto:<southllanoriverbirdingfestival...><mailto:<southllanoriverbirdingfestival...>

You can also check out the Festival's Facebook page at www.facebook.com/slrspbirdingfestival<http://www.facebook.com/slrspbirdingfestival>
<http://www.facebook.com/slrspbirdingfetival.>


Thanks to the many birders around the state who are guiding at this Festival, and to those of you who have already registered. Hope more of you can make it!


Good birding,


Holly Platz



Holly Platz

Interpretive Ranger

Guadalupe River State Park/Honey Creek State Natural Area

3350 Park Road 31

Spring Branch, Texas 78070
(830) 438-2656 Park Office

(830) 214-3635 Cell

<holly.platz...><mailto:<holly.platz...>







 

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Date: 3/23/19 6:31 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-23-19 Four Warbler sp, Hutton’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-23-19 Four Warbler sp, Hutton’s Vireo @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Spent a little time birding today—Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Hutton’s Vireo, Sandhill Cranes, Red-breasted Nuthatch & singing Brown Thrasher @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary & wildflowers and butterflies getting very exciting—love Spring! Sparrows still around.

Visitor instructions Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary —please introduce yourself briefly & pick day and approximate time via link below
http://www.warblerwoods.org/visitor-instructions.html

Decades of eBird data:
https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2019&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L213585

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 3/23/19 3:34 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Spotting scope
With David's permission:

I have a Brunton Eterna 80mm EP, waterproof spotting scope, 20-60X, angled
eyepiece, including a padded carrying case for sale.
The instrument has not been in the field more than on 33-4 occasions and,
given my age and limited mobility, I no longer ave a use for it.
If you are interested in purchasing this scope, you may contact me at
979.777,5938, or leave s message at 99.846.3226, or email me at
<kbronold2...>

Keith Arnold

 

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Date: 3/23/19 3:26 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds]
Spotting scope

 

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Date: 3/23/19 10:54 am
From: Gary Richards <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender grcolts for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Martin Dies, Jr. State Park Birds
Birds observed by Christy and myself from March 19-22 at Martin Dies, Jr. State Park in eastern Texas.

Wood Duck
Mallard
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Anhinga
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
White Ibis
Black Vulture
Turkey Vulture
Osprey
Bald Eagle
Red-tailed Hawk
American Kestrel
Common Moorhen
American Coot
Sandhill Crane
Ring-billed Gull
Mourning Dove
Barred Owl
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Red-headed Woodpecker
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Pileated Woodpecker
White-eyed Vireo
Blue Jay
American Crow
Barn Swallow
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Carolina Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
Eastern Bluebird
Hermit Thrush
Northern Mockingbird
Brown Thrasher
European Starling
Cedar Waxwing
Northern Parula
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Black-throated Green Warbler
Yellow-throated Warbler
Pine Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
Northern Cardinal
Red-winged Blackbird
American Goldfinch

Number of Species: 59

Plus 2 alligators!

Gary RichardsEdit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

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Date: 3/23/19 10:36 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 23, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
Several Northern Parulas were seen and heard along the Chachalaca trail on this mornings walk. A surprise was to see Bronzed Cowbirds in dead trees just off of Willow #3, as well as Common Gallinules.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
Hawk Watch continues daily: 8am 1pm.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX


Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 23, 2019 8:30 AM - 11:25 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
50 species (+2 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 5
Cinnamon Teal 2
Northern Shoveler 5
Gadwall 8
Mottled Duck 4
Plain Chachalaca 8
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 1
White-tipped Dove 2
Mourning Dove 4
Sora 4
Common Gallinule 2
American Coot 5
Black-necked Stilt 3
Greater Yellowlegs 1
Great Egret 1
Little Blue Heron 1
Turkey Vulture 1
Northern Harrier 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 2
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 1
Great Kiskadee 4
Tropical Kingbird 1
Couch's Kingbird 10
Tropical/Couch's Kingbird 2
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 1
White-eyed Vireo 5
Green Jay 2
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 3
Purple Martin 6
Tree Swallow 5
Black-crested Titmouse 5
Verdin 6
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 15
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Clay-colored Thrush 1
Long-billed Thrasher 2
European Starling 2
Olive Sparrow 3 One Heard only
Hooded Oriole 3
Altamira Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 75
Bronzed Cowbird 2
Orange-crowned Warbler 4
Common Yellowthroat 2
Northern Parula 2
Northern/Tropical Parula 1 Heard only
Northern Cardinal 5
House Sparrow 5

View this checklist online at https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS54134982&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cb2cbbc25af924d380d2008d6afb18a5b%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636889574389815982&amp;sdata=mbMiGAjWnLrYAhU1EwW2zG34R3qKIrz794BaZQZPtGc%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Feur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com%2F%3Furl%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Febird.org%252Fview%252Fchecklist%252FS54134982%26data%3D02%257C01%257C%257Cb2cbbc25af924d380d2008d6afb18a5b%257C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%257C1%257C0%257C636889574389815982%26sdata%3DmbMiGAjWnLrYAhU1EwW2zG34R3qKIrz794BaZQZPtGc%253D%26reserved%3D0&data=02%7C01%7C%7C653c29c57f2f405389fd08d6afb2334e%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636889577225430477&sdata=7le8Msc46E1eH7qqOk2vhQiEuMAEaGplrjNRVSgi91c%3D&reserved=0>

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Date: 3/23/19 10:12 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Mountain Plovers, shorebirds (San Patricio Co.)
Texbirds,

Shorebird migration was in full swing this past week. Between March 20 and
21 there was a light but steady stream of N-bound Upland Sandpipers going
overhead. American Golden-Plovers were passing by in small flocks, low to
the ground and higher up. Small groups of Pectoral Sandpipers were present
at multiple locations with standing water along with a handful of Solitary
Sandpipers. A flock of no fewer than 44 Mountain Plovers were in a twice or
thrice tilled sorghum field south of FM 1488 and west of CR 33 near Edroy.

Good birding,
Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

 

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Date: 3/22/19 6:22 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] 2019 All Counties Challenge Update 3/22/2019
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1xTZoMJOvFU0tkXxz0TEJlwsZFJVn3Fcf&usp=sharing

2019 All Counties Challenge update: I managed 12 counties today to being my
total to 142 counties, 3160 county ticks, and averaging 22 species per
county. Notable birds where a Western Grebe at Lake Meredith, Snow Geese in
Dallam County not far from the Thomson Grove, and Sandhill Cranes in
Lipscomb County. A first for me was a dark morph Ferruginous Hawk in Dallam
County also not far from Thompson Grove. Storms kept me on paved roads on
the NW panhandle. I'm always blown away by the Rita Blanca Grasslands, its
just an amazing beautiful place, even in a storm Western Meadow Larks where
still singing.

I saved the SE three panhandle counties for tomorrow, Wheeler,
Collingsworth, and Childress. I'll work my way down US287 on my way home
tomorrow, hopefully making 12 counties in a hit an run operation. If that
works out I'll be at 154 with just 100 counties to go.

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

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Date: 3/22/19 10:06 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 22, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
With the sunshine came the birds. A delightful morning around Willow Lakes.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
Hawk Watch continues daily: 8am 1pm.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 22, 2019 8:32 AM - 11:27 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.17 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk around Willow lakes
55 species (+1 other taxa)

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 1
Blue-winged Teal 10
Cinnamon Teal 2
Northern Shoveler 8
Gadwall 11
Mottled Duck 4
Plain Chachalaca 8
Least Grebe 3
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Eurasian Collared-Dove 1
Inca Dove 2
White-tipped Dove 1
White-winged Dove 4
Mourning Dove 3
Sora 3
American Coot 4
Killdeer 7
Great Egret 2
Turkey Vulture 4
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1
Harris's Hawk 1
Swainson's Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 7
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1 Heard only
Great Kiskadee 9
Tropical Kingbird 1
Couch's Kingbird 5
Tropical/Couch's Kingbird 2
White-eyed Vireo 4
Green Jay 10
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 3
Purple Martin 1
Tree Swallow 6
Black-crested Titmouse 4
Verdin 4
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Long-billed Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 1
Olive Sparrow 2
Lincoln's Sparrow 4
Altamira Oriole 5
Red-winged Blackbird 55
Brown-headed Cowbird 1
Great-tailed Grackle 5
Louisiana Waterthrush 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 2
Common Yellowthroat 3
Tropical Parula 1 Yellow breast to the feet, no eye arcs, continuing bird
Northern Cardinal 3
House Sparrow 3

View this checklist online at https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS54103054&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C718cbbe35ffc42b93c8208d6aee7ad48%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636888707393387903&amp;sdata=9b5UNvyBTh0e4pSTQJxwbNVxAD5eKLt3uY9fPdE57Ro%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS54103054&data=02%7C01%7C%7C55d6febc4740421efd4608d6aee7bc20%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636888707641802832&sdata=Psey1oQwEP461tcCGw%2B7xG91XGut%2BRjbfNnCvTOcMsI%3D&reserved=0>

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Date: 3/22/19 7:05 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: 3-22-19 Hutton’s Vireo continue @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Correction—First nesting documentation of Hutton’s Vireo EAST of IH 35 in the nation
Sorry

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

> On Mar 22, 2019, at 8:58 AM, Susan Schaezler <susan...> wrote:
>
> 3-22-19 Hutton’s Vireo continue @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
>
> Right now, the Hutton’s Vireo are calling and singing and being seen—we have the first photo evidence of one in 2003 & 2011, we had the first nesting Hutton’s Vireo west of IH 35 in the nation & you can find the video online. We have had them every month of the year and they are resident. Remember to check those toes out—they are purple/bluish down to the toes—kinglets always have beige feet and the legs is what I see first from my perspective.
>
> Here is our data—you will note that we are very active the first 10 days of May
> https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2019&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L213585
>
> To visit—please follow the instructions and introduce yourself and pick a day and approximate time so that I can easily input it—here is the link
> Visitor instructions Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
>
> http://www.warblerwoods.org/visitor-instructions.html
>
> Susan Schaezler
> WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
> 501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
> Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
> Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

 

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Date: 3/22/19 6:58 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-22-19 Hutton’s Vireo continue @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-22-19 Hutton’s Vireo continue @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Right now, the Hutton’s Vireo are calling and singing and being seen—we have the first photo evidence of one in 2003 & 2011, we had the first nesting Hutton’s Vireo west of IH 35 in the nation & you can find the video online. We have had them every month of the year and they are resident. Remember to check those toes out—they are purple/bluish down to the toes—kinglets always have beige feet and the legs is what I see first from my perspective.

Here is our data—you will note that we are very active the first 10 days of May
https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2019&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L213585

To visit—please follow the instructions and introduce yourself and pick a day and approximate time so that I can easily input it—here is the link
Visitor instructions Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

http://www.warblerwoods.org/visitor-instructions.html

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 3/21/19 5:59 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Waterfowl in the Panhandle
For the most part the playas of the panhandle are empty of water and birds
right now. An exception I found today was FM1062 running from west of
Canyon, TX to US385 in Deaf Smith County I found at least 6 playa covered
in ducks there, most with close to a thousand ducks on them. Most of the
playas are in Deaf Smith County.
--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

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Date: 3/21/19 12:52 pm
From: <mitch...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Texas Hill country inquiry

Lost Maples St. Natural Area has lots of them...

Mitch Heindel
Utopia
www.utopianature.com


> I'm a birder from CT and I am doing a birding cross-country road trip
> this summer, and I'll be passing through central TX in early July. I
> am hoping to see three species in particular:
>
> Golden-cheeked Warbler
> Black-capped Vireo
> Black-crested Titmouse
>
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
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Date: 3/21/19 12:49 pm
From: James Purcell <jpurcell1616...>
Subject: [texbirds] Wilson's Plovers at Bolivar?
Hello TX birders,

Thank you so much for the influx of responses about my inquiry with the
Texas hill species! I'm sorry to post again, but I completely forgot to
include in my previous message that I will also be looking for Wilson's
Plovers on the Bolivar Penninsula.

It looks like a pretty big area, so I'm wondering if anybody has
suggestions for specific spots on the peninsula to try checking for this
species.

Thanks again for all your help!

James Purcell
Fairfield, CT

 

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Date: 3/21/19 12:46 pm
From: David Hanson <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender dhanson139 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] eBird -- Baytown Nature Center (UTC 039) -- Mar 21, 2019
Baytown Nature Center (UTC 039)
Mar 21, 2019
7:58 AM
Traveling
6.00 miles
405 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes
Comments: Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.9.0 Build 9

12 Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
2 Blue-winged Teal
1 Mallard
4 Mottled Duck
2 Pied-billed Grebe
16 Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
6 White-winged Dove
2 Clapper Rail
3 Sora
1 American Coot
5 Killdeer
1 Spotted Sandpiper
1 Willet
60 Laughing Gull
1 Ring-billed Gull
4 Forster's Tern
2 Royal Tern
68 Neotropic Cormorant
4 American White Pelican
8 Brown Pelican
2 Great Blue Heron
3 Great Egret
3 Snowy Egret
2 Little Blue Heron
2 Tricolored Heron
8 Black-crowned Night-Heron
8 White Ibis
2 Roseate Spoonbill
34 Black Vulture
2 Turkey Vulture
2 Osprey
2 Northern Harrier
1 Red-tailed Hawk
1 Belted Kingfisher
2 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 Loggerhead Shrike
2 White-eyed Vireo
7 Blue Jay
2 Purple Martin
1 Sedge Wren
10 Marsh Wren
2 Carolina Wren
3 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
4 Ruby-crowned Kinglet
1 Eastern Bluebird
1 Hermit Thrush
1 Gray Catbird
13 Northern Mockingbird
40 European Starling
1 White-crowned Sparrow
4 White-throated Sparrow
2 Seaside Sparrow
3 Savannah Sparrow
6 Swamp Sparrow
16 Red-winged Blackbird
50 Brown-headed Cowbird
6 Great-tailed Grackle
1 Orange-crowned Warbler
15 Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle)
15 Northern Cardinal
4 House Sparrow

Number of Taxa: 62


Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 3/21/19 12:13 pm
From: Donna Silvers <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender silvers713 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Cinnamon Teal - Galveston
Their is a pair of Cinnamon Teal on the West end of Galveston Island at Point San Luis. When proceeding West on 3005, past Sea Isle, turn right on Bay Water Dr. They are in the first pond with the dock, mixed with some BW Teal.

Dean and Donna Silvers


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Date: 3/21/19 10:54 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 21, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
It was a beautiful morning on the refuge! There was a yellow-orb in the sky that changed bird behavior and put smiles on birders faces! Highlights were all three Kingfishers, both Parulas, and a Northern Waterthrush. Both Parulas were heard and seen on Willow #3 & #4.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
Hawk Watch continues daily: 8am 1pm.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX


Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 21, 2019 8:24 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.49 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
62 species

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 14 Flying over
Blue-winged Teal 17
Cinnamon Teal 2
Gadwall 18
Ring-necked Duck 2
Plain Chachalaca 3
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 3
Inca Dove 8
Common Ground-Dove 2
White-tipped Dove 2
White-winged Dove 1
Sora 3
American Coot 1
Killdeer 4
Solitary Sandpiper 2
Greater Yellowlegs 3
Anhinga 3
American White Pelican 11
Great Blue Heron 3
Snowy Egret 1
Black Vulture 7
Turkey Vulture 47
Harris's Hawk 2
Gray Hawk 2
Ringed Kingfisher 2 flyover Willow
Belted Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 1 canal near the VC
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 8
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 3
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 3 2 Heard only
Great Kiskadee 6
Couch's Kingbird 4
White-eyed Vireo 4
Green Jay 9
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 6
Tree Swallow 36
Cave Swallow 3
Black-crested Titmouse 3
Verdin 5
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 21
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Clay-colored Thrush 2
Long-billed Thrasher 3
Northern Mockingbird 2
Olive Sparrow 5
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Altamira Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 25
Brown-headed Cowbird 1
Great-tailed Grackle 4
Northern Waterthrush 1
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 9
Nashville Warbler 2
Common Yellowthroat 1
Northern Parula 2
Tropical Parula 1 Yellow breast to the legs dark face continuing bird
Northern Cardinal 3
House Sparrow 3

View this checklist online at https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS54074707&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C5230a6f1d1a64465486808d6ae238932%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636887864972684521&amp;sdata=Sn8iv%2B%2Be5GbZDep5TF9PEupNXNEUfwOYnviCj6ik7A0%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS54074707&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cb01852f3d49745ad51b808d6ae2398a0%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636887865232477335&sdata=XooX%2Blzidi1pHiAmbr%2FJqyPOnjKgWCZKUMAkY9j5ArU%3D&reserved=0>

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C5230a6f1d1a64465486808d6ae238932%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636887864972684521&amp;sdata=ed3gatGqoUe0IfqQtIG6deAIgSWthWVzBWWZhaYTbEY%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cb01852f3d49745ad51b808d6ae2398a0%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636887865232487340&sdata=9GI4Z4yClQw61CepGxzKSmZVDsnEKFpT0xLrRnuxHM4%3D&reserved=0>)


 

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Date: 3/21/19 9:10 am
From: Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Texas Hill country inquiry
All three species can be seen at South Llano River State Park. You might
research it through eBird, as well.

On Thu, Mar 21, 2019 at 10:33 AM James Purcell <jpurcell1616...>
wrote:

> Hello TX birders,
>
> I apologize if this is a double post, but I didn't receive any responses
> so I'm not sure my original email went through.
>
> I'm a birder from CT and I am doing a birding cross-country road trip this
> summer, and I'll be passing through central TX in early July. I am hoping
> to see three species in particular:
>
> Golden-cheeked Warbler
> Black-capped Vireo
> Black-crested Titmouse
>
> If anybody could give me specific locations for these species, especially
> if there are locations where I can get all three of them, info would be
> greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance for your help!
>
> James Purcell
> Fairfield, CT
>


--
Jim Sinclair (TX-ESA)
TOS Life Member
Kingsville, TX

"The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of
thinking we were at when we created them." - Albert Einstein

 

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Date: 3/21/19 8:33 am
From: James Purcell <jpurcell1616...>
Subject: [texbirds] Texas Hill country inquiry
Hello TX birders,

I apologize if this is a double post, but I didn't receive any responses so
I'm not sure my original email went through.

I'm a birder from CT and I am doing a birding cross-country road trip this
summer, and I'll be passing through central TX in early July. I am hoping
to see three species in particular:

Golden-cheeked Warbler
Black-capped Vireo
Black-crested Titmouse

If anybody could give me specific locations for these species, especially
if there are locations where I can get all three of them, info would be
greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance for your help!

James Purcell
Fairfield, CT

 

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Date: 3/20/19 6:35 pm
From: Garett Hodne <garyhodne...>
Subject: [texbirds] May 25th Texas Pelagic is almost full!
Hi Seabirders and Pelagic Fans,

The May 25th Texas Pelagic from Freeport is almost full with only 3 spaces
remaining. This exploratory trip to the eastern East breaks area is a first
for Texas Pelagics to explore this far east in Texas waters. It is worth
pointing out that there have been only two other May pelagics run in Texas.
The first was way back on May 28th, 1994, 25 years ago! This was the very
first Pelagic run by Dwight Peake and Mark Elwonger from Port O'Connor
during their 6 year run of organizing Pelagics in offshore Texas. The second
May pelagic was on May 21st , 2004 from South Padre Island on board the
Osprey.



This May 28th , 1994 trip proved to be a great success and found a nice
assortment of seabirds including one of only two accepted (so far) records
of Black-capped Petrel. Black-capped Petrels have since been seen and
photographed a couple more times from tuna fishing boats during the fall in
the last couple years. The trip report can be found here:
https://texaspelagics.com/2013/08/09/poc-1994-05-28/



If you are interested in joining us for a true adventure of discovery don't
delay in signing up here: https://texaspelagics.com/2019-schedule/

Good Seabirding,

Gary Hodne

Garett 'Gary' Hodne



www.TexasPelagics.com <http://www.TexasPelagics.com>

281-684-5425










 

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Date: 3/20/19 9:37 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 20, 2019
TROPICAL PARULA, GROOVE-BILLED ANI
Good morning Texbirders, Took our time on the Chachalaca Trail and Willow
Lakes, then to Hawk Watch and feeders. Tried to stay out of the mud, but
the birds called us farther! Birders don't seem to mind as long as lifers
are possible. Birdwalks 8:30AM and Birding Van Tours 1:30PM daily, except
Sundays. These continue through the end of March. Happy Birding!
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas


Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 20, 2019 8:15 AM - 11:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.75 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk to Willow Lakes, Hawk Watch and feeders
53 species (+1 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 15
Cinnamon Teal 4
Northern Shoveler 4
Gadwall 30
American Wigeon 1
Ring-necked Duck 1
Plain Chachalaca 4
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Inca Dove 4
Common Ground-Dove 2
White-tipped Dove 3
White-winged Dove 4
Mourning Dove 2
Groove-billed Ani 2 Along fence near Hawk Watch at levee
Sora 3
Common Gallinule 4
American Coot 4
Killdeer 2
Great Blue Heron 1
Harris's Hawk 1
Broad-winged Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 4
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
Great Kiskadee 4
Couch's Kingbird 1
Tropical/Couch's Kingbird 2
White-eyed Vireo 6
Green Jay 5
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 35
Tree Swallow 1
Barn Swallow 1
Black-crested Titmouse 8
Verdin 2
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 25
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Clay-colored Thrush 1
Long-billed Thrasher 3
Olive Sparrow 4
Hooded Oriole 2
Altamira Oriole 4
Red-winged Blackbird 50
Great-tailed Grackle 10
Louisiana Waterthrush 2
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 3
Common Yellowthroat 4
Tropical Parula 1 Singing and seen along Willow Lake #4, continues
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 3
Northern Cardinal 2
House Sparrow 3

 

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Date: 3/20/19 6:09 am
From: <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender dhanson139 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Baytown Nature Center Bird Count for March

This months bird count at the Baytown Nature Center is tomorrow March 21st. Sorry for the late notice!We will meet behind the entrance building just before 8am. As usual entrance for the bird count is free.
David Hanson281-813-2657
 

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Date: 3/19/19 11:08 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 19, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
Lots of mud on the refuge today, however, the participants persevered and some good birds were observed several Olive Sparrows came into full view, as well as a Tropical Parula on the back of Willow #4.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
Hawk Watch continues daily: 8am 1pm.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 19, 2019 8:35 AM - 12:08 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.24 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk, Willow Lake
46 species (+2 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 7
Cinnamon Teal 6
Northern Shoveler 4
Gadwall 4
Least Grebe 1
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 5
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 1
Sora 3
American Coot 3
Killdeer 2
Greater Yellowlegs 1
Great Egret 1
Harris's Hawk 1
Gray Hawk 2
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 2
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 2 1 Heard only
Least Flycatcher 1
Great Kiskadee 3
Tropical/Couch's Kingbird 1
White-eyed Vireo 9
Green Jay 1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 3
Purple Martin 1
Tree Swallow 3
Cave Swallow 3
Black-crested Titmouse 3
Verdin 3 1 Heard only
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 2
Bewick's Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 34
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Clay-colored Thrush 1
Long-billed Thrasher 1
Olive Sparrow 5
Lincoln's Sparrow 2
Altamira Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 72
Great-tailed Grackle 4
Black-and-white Warbler 3
Orange-crowned Warbler 5
Common Yellowthroat 6
Tropical Parula 1 Continuing bird no eye arc's complete yellow breast
Northern/Tropical Parula 1 Heard only
Northern Cardinal 2
House Sparrow 3

View this checklist online at https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS54013984&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C7ceee24299ac4607240108d6ac916780%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636886137831511506&amp;sdata=fi6JDHfeUH%2Fpg0V8Pi252gg9hOYzdkKcb9APdAOd79o%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS54013984&data=02%7C01%7C%7C61f6afe211954f6cc60d08d6ac91764a%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636886138079660587&sdata=TpJ6HOSE6xs43B1TgPrhfFt89sk3Zfrmz5vaKzUm50s%3D&reserved=0>

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C7ceee24299ac4607240108d6ac916780%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636886137831511506&amp;sdata=kLjvw2hO11ce8JUOFEiklXgoNOsIPsBs%2B2q%2FvCwvbp8%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&data=02%7C01%7C%7C61f6afe211954f6cc60d08d6ac91764a%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636886138079670592&sdata=OChv30OmF5AumViXtxhDjVm9VWp%2BZ66N%2BYx2PTcjcBs%3D&reserved=0>)


 

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Date: 3/19/19 10:45 am
From: Becky Reyes <breyes...>
Subject: [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
Hi everyone,
Had a nice bird walk this morning. The Ringed Kingfisher made a brief
appearance at North Pond and the green kingfisher was also spotted at North
Pond. For Lots of birds can be seen at South Pond, I highly recommend it.
Below is this morning's bird list.

Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center, Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 19, 2019 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
44 species

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 9
Blue-winged Teal 6
Northern Shoveler 10
Mottled Duck 2
Plain Chachalaca 4
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 28
Inca Dove 2
White-tipped Dove 1
Mourning Dove 1
Buff-bellied Hummingbird (Northern) 1
American Coot 7
Black-necked Stilt 1
Killdeer 1
Spotted Sandpiper 2
Forster's Tern 2
Anhinga 1
Neotropic Cormorant 28
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Snowy Egret 7
Tricolored Heron 1
Green Heron 2
Black-crowned Night-Heron 1
Ringed Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 1
Great Kiskadee 4
Couch's Kingbird 3
White-eyed Vireo 1
Purple Martin 8
House Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Curve-billed Thrasher 1
Long-billed Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 3
Lesser Goldfinch 2
American Goldfinch 1
Red-winged Blackbird 8
Great-tailed Grackle 11
Orange-crowned Warbler 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 4
Wilson's Warbler 1
Northern Cardinal 4

*Becky Reyes*
Naturalist Educator
Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center

<http://www.cityofedinburg.com/>
Office: (956) 381-9922
Fax: (956) 381-0715
<vguzman...>www.EdinburgWBC.org
<http://www.edinburgwbc.org/>
*<breyes...> <vguzman...>*

follow us:
<https://www.facebook.com/EdinburgWBC/> [image:
https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork]
<https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork>

 

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Date: 3/18/19 6:54 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
For what it's worth, Jones in his field guide "Birds of Belize" lists
Vaux's as resident in the interior of Belize and calls coastal migrating
birds Chimney. He notes the Belize Vaux's are none migratory and "Migrant
subspecies from N.A, (C.v. Vauxi). with paler throat and breast, has not
been documented in Belize"

Howell says "Migrant vauxi from W N.A. occur mid-Sep-May, wintering from
cen Mexico to W Honduras, and are F to C transients (Apr-May, Mid-Sep-Oct)
in NW Mexico"

Howell gives dates of migrating Chimney's as mid-Mar-mid-May on Atlantic
Slope from Honduras through E Mexico. Jones lists Chimney as "status in
spring less clear but apparently an UC transient, late Mar to late Apr.
Occas. recorded at cayes" The cayes are the offshore islands in Belize.

My take is a March Chaetura is most likely a Chimney and in April migrating
Chimneys will swamp out any chance of a migrating record of Vaux. The
migration path of southern Vaux does not seem to use the Gulf Coast and or
Trans-gulf paths. I would speculate the LA Vaux likely use a path much like
a Rufus Hummingbird and are not coastal en-route. If I am correct, then a
March Chaetura ON THE COAST can assumed to be a Chimney.


On Mon, Mar 18, 2019 at 4:26 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
wrote:

> 3.) I guess it would be safe to place all before MARCH 1 vs 15 as
> "Chaetura species" ...Paul probably has more detailed records and dates
> than are on Ebird in recent years. I personally have had some early CHSWs
> on the coast. I recall a March 6 date primarily as on that same day my FOY
> Am. Golden Plovers were coming in as well at Port O'Connor as a handful of
> birds..That said incoming, weary CHSWs are mostly silent and maybe that ID
> challenge....Also are Vaux's really trans-gulf migrants? Any data on them
> from the rigs? . ..I think that March 1 date would be reasonable excluding
> documented observations. Paul Kyle? Others? BTW Behrstock, Eubanks and
> Weeks give the inclusive dates for CHSW on the UTC as March 9 -Dec. 6. I
> am quoting here .............."and there are records from Jan and Feb,
> including 8 Feb, 1954 and 19 Feb, 1954 in Houston. The Freeport CBC also
> recorded an unidentified swift on 19 Dec. 1993. We note, however, that
> George Lowery and his students once found wintering Vaux's so any wintering
> swift along our coast (UTC only ?)should be considered Chaetura species
> until a certain Identification can be made." ........ I don't know how to
> search Ebird for early reports/dates along the gulf coast in near real time
> for the US....There is probably a way to get those early dates without
> having to go state by state. I have Lowery and have read his accounts
> before but I don't have it at this house to accurately quote. Just my .02.
>
>
> On Mon, Mar 18, 2019 at 3:39 PM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...>
> wrote:
>
>> Texbirders:
>> Following the early March Chimney vs Vaux discussion with some interest.
>> As far as guidance for ebird review for the early March period for eastern
>> Texas, what should be the recommendation be for ebird reviewers?
>> ......,............................................
>>
>> CHOICE1: As chimney vs Vaux ID is extremely difficult to establish in the
>> field and several sources indicate Chimney far more likely than Vaux in
>> early March, should we recommend 1) accept Chimney swift for notes that
>> establish Chaetura swift but that do not eliminate non-Chimney Chaetura
>> from say March 5? - 14
>> ......................................................................,
>>
>> CHOICE 2: or should we be more cautious due to ID differentiation
>> difficulty and instead recommend 2) reject Chimney swift—only accept “
>> Chaetura sp. “ prior to March 15 in Texas for notes that establish it as a
>> Chaetura swift. This will likely mean almost every early March Chimney
>> Swift ebird observation will be rejected.
>> .........,,....................,,,,.,,.................
>> Or is there a CHOICE 3?
>>
>> John Berner
>> W. Houston
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
>> <https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/?.src=iOS>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/19 2:39 pm
From: <fcndc...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
There is a population on Cozumel too, resident I think. Always thought one of those could make it to Texas, Yucatán Vireo did.


Fred Collins
Waller, Texas
Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 18, 2019, at 4:33 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I just checked Vaux's non-breeding range and it appears they do overwinter along the norther coast of S. America, but I don't know if that population is from the US or Mexico and CA....?
>
>> On Mon, Mar 18, 2019 at 4:25 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>> 3.) I guess it would be safe to place all before MARCH 1 vs 15 as "Chaetura species" ...Paul probably has more detailed records and dates than are on Ebird in recent years. I personally have had some early CHSWs on the coast. I recall a March 6 date primarily as on that same day my FOY Am. Golden Plovers were coming in as well at Port O'Connor as a handful of birds..That said incoming, weary CHSWs are mostly silent and maybe that ID challenge....Also are Vaux's really trans-gulf migrants? Any data on them from the rigs? . ..I think that March 1 date would be reasonable excluding documented observations. Paul Kyle? Others? BTW Behrstock, Eubanks and Weeks give the inclusive dates for CHSW on the UTC as March 9 -Dec. 6. I am quoting here .............."and there are records from Jan and Feb, including 8 Feb, 1954 and 19 Feb, 1954 in Houston. The Freeport CBC also recorded an unidentified swift on 19 Dec. 1993. We note, however, that George Lowery and his students once found wintering Vaux's so any wintering swift along our coast (UTC only ?)should be considered Chaetura species until a certain Identification can be made." ........ I don't know how to search Ebird for early reports/dates along the gulf coast in near real time for the US....There is probably a way to get those early dates without having to go state by state. I have Lowery and have read his accounts before but I don't have it at this house to accurately quote. Just my .02.
>>
>>
>>> On Mon, Mar 18, 2019 at 3:39 PM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>>> Texbirders:
>>> Following the early March Chimney vs Vaux discussion with some interest. As far as guidance for ebird review for the early March period for eastern Texas, what should be the recommendation be for ebird reviewers? ......,............................................
>>>
>>> CHOICE1: As chimney vs Vaux ID is extremely difficult to establish in the field and several sources indicate Chimney far more likely than Vaux in early March, should we recommend 1) accept Chimney swift for notes that establish Chaetura swift but that do not eliminate non-Chimney Chaetura from say March 5? - 14 ......................................................................,
>>>
>>> CHOICE 2: or should we be more cautious due to ID differentiation difficulty and instead recommend 2) reject Chimney swift—only accept “ Chaetura sp. “ prior to March 15 in Texas for notes that establish it as a Chaetura swift. This will likely mean almost every early March Chimney Swift ebird observation will be rejected. .........,,....................,,,,.,,.................
>>> Or is there a CHOICE 3?
>>>
>>> John Berner
>>> W. Houston
>>>
>>> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
____________________________________________________________
Judge Judy Steps Down After 23 Years Over This Controversy
glancence-hality.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/5c900fb99ed30fb80135st03vuc
 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/19 2:35 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
I just checked Vaux's non-breeding range and it appears they do overwinter
along the norther coast of S. America, but I don't know if that population
is from the US or Mexico and CA....?

On Mon, Mar 18, 2019 at 4:25 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
wrote:

> 3.) I guess it would be safe to place all before MARCH 1 vs 15 as
> "Chaetura species" ...Paul probably has more detailed records and dates
> than are on Ebird in recent years. I personally have had some early CHSWs
> on the coast. I recall a March 6 date primarily as on that same day my FOY
> Am. Golden Plovers were coming in as well at Port O'Connor as a handful of
> birds..That said incoming, weary CHSWs are mostly silent and maybe that ID
> challenge....Also are Vaux's really trans-gulf migrants? Any data on them
> from the rigs? . ..I think that March 1 date would be reasonable excluding
> documented observations. Paul Kyle? Others? BTW Behrstock, Eubanks and
> Weeks give the inclusive dates for CHSW on the UTC as March 9 -Dec. 6. I
> am quoting here .............."and there are records from Jan and Feb,
> including 8 Feb, 1954 and 19 Feb, 1954 in Houston. The Freeport CBC also
> recorded an unidentified swift on 19 Dec. 1993. We note, however, that
> George Lowery and his students once found wintering Vaux's so any wintering
> swift along our coast (UTC only ?)should be considered Chaetura species
> until a certain Identification can be made." ........ I don't know how to
> search Ebird for early reports/dates along the gulf coast in near real time
> for the US....There is probably a way to get those early dates without
> having to go state by state. I have Lowery and have read his accounts
> before but I don't have it at this house to accurately quote. Just my .02.
>
>
> On Mon, Mar 18, 2019 at 3:39 PM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...>
> wrote:
>
>> Texbirders:
>> Following the early March Chimney vs Vaux discussion with some interest.
>> As far as guidance for ebird review for the early March period for eastern
>> Texas, what should be the recommendation be for ebird reviewers?
>> ......,............................................
>>
>> CHOICE1: As chimney vs Vaux ID is extremely difficult to establish in the
>> field and several sources indicate Chimney far more likely than Vaux in
>> early March, should we recommend 1) accept Chimney swift for notes that
>> establish Chaetura swift but that do not eliminate non-Chimney Chaetura
>> from say March 5? - 14
>> ......................................................................,
>>
>> CHOICE 2: or should we be more cautious due to ID differentiation
>> difficulty and instead recommend 2) reject Chimney swift—only accept “
>> Chaetura sp. “ prior to March 15 in Texas for notes that establish it as a
>> Chaetura swift. This will likely mean almost every early March Chimney
>> Swift ebird observation will be rejected.
>> .........,,....................,,,,.,,.................
>> Or is there a CHOICE 3?
>>
>> John Berner
>> W. Houston
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
>> <https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/?.src=iOS>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/19 2:34 pm
From: <fcndc...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: Seeking way forward on Texas early March eBird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
John, et al.
>
> In this discussion, no one has mentioned Birdlife of Houston, Galveston and the Upper Texas Coast by Eubanks, Behrstock and Weeks. This extremely well researched work summarized data for the UTC at the time it was published in 2006.
>
> It list early dates for Chimney Swift as March 9, 11, 14. Regular dates mid-March-late October, late dates 5,11November and 6 Dec.
> Simmons 1914 reported arrival dates for Chimney Swift March 24-30. Clearly birds arrival dates inch forward as average temperatures warm but mostly from increased observation and reporting.
>
> Chimney Swifts in early March, though unusual are not uncommon. To assume they are equally likely to be Vaux’s Swifts is a great leap. December through February Swifts are an entirely different matter and Chaetura species is likely the best was to report them.
>
> And for the record, birders in Texas have had Vaux’s Swifts in their sights for more than 50 years, likely closer to 100. Olberholser was wondering about them before any of us were born.
>
>
> Fred Collins, Director
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
> 281-357-5324
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
> Steve Radack Commissioner
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
> Texbirders:
> Following the early March Chimney vs Vaux discussion with some interest. As far as guidance for ebird review for the early March period for eastern Texas, what should be the recommendation be for ebird reviewers? ......,............................................
>
> CHOICE1: As chimney vs Vaux ID is extremely difficult to establish in the field and several sources indicate Chimney far more likely than Vaux in early March, should we recommend 1) accept Chimney swift for notes that establish Chaetura swift but that do not eliminate non-Chimney Chaetura from say March 5? - 14 ......................................................................,
>
> CHOICE 2: or should we be more cautious due to ID differentiation difficulty and instead recommend 2) reject Chimney swift—only accept “ Chaetura sp. “ prior to March 15 in Texas for notes that establish it as a Chaetura swift. This will likely mean almost every early March Chimney Swift ebird observation will be rejected. .........,,....................,,,,.,,.................
> Or is there a CHOICE 3?
>
> John Berner
> W. Houston
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
____________________________________________________________
Top Gut Doctor: I Beg Americans To Throw Out This Vegetable
dr-pedre-md.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/5c900e6f3ee17e6d520fst03vuc
 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/19 2:26 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
3.) I guess it would be safe to place all before MARCH 1 vs 15 as
"Chaetura species" ...Paul probably has more detailed records and dates
than are on Ebird in recent years. I personally have had some early CHSWs
on the coast. I recall a March 6 date primarily as on that same day my FOY
Am. Golden Plovers were coming in as well at Port O'Connor as a handful of
birds..That said incoming, weary CHSWs are mostly silent and maybe that ID
challenge....Also are Vaux's really trans-gulf migrants? Any data on them
from the rigs? . ..I think that March 1 date would be reasonable excluding
documented observations. Paul Kyle? Others? BTW Behrstock, Eubanks and
Weeks give the inclusive dates for CHSW on the UTC as March 9 -Dec. 6. I
am quoting here .............."and there are records from Jan and Feb,
including 8 Feb, 1954 and 19 Feb, 1954 in Houston. The Freeport CBC also
recorded an unidentified swift on 19 Dec. 1993. We note, however, that
George Lowery and his students once found wintering Vaux's so any wintering
swift along our coast (UTC only ?)should be considered Chaetura species
until a certain Identification can be made." ........ I don't know how to
search Ebird for early reports/dates along the gulf coast in near real time
for the US....There is probably a way to get those early dates without
having to go state by state. I have Lowery and have read his accounts
before but I don't have it at this house to accurately quote. Just my .02.


On Mon, Mar 18, 2019 at 3:39 PM Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...>
wrote:

> Texbirders:
> Following the early March Chimney vs Vaux discussion with some interest.
> As far as guidance for ebird review for the early March period for eastern
> Texas, what should be the recommendation be for ebird reviewers?
> ......,............................................
>
> CHOICE1: As chimney vs Vaux ID is extremely difficult to establish in the
> field and several sources indicate Chimney far more likely than Vaux in
> early March, should we recommend 1) accept Chimney swift for notes that
> establish Chaetura swift but that do not eliminate non-Chimney Chaetura
> from say March 5? - 14
> ......................................................................,
>
> CHOICE 2: or should we be more cautious due to ID differentiation
> difficulty and instead recommend 2) reject Chimney swift—only accept “
> Chaetura sp. “ prior to March 15 in Texas for notes that establish it as a
> Chaetura swift. This will likely mean almost every early March Chimney
> Swift ebird observation will be rejected.
> .........,,....................,,,,.,,.................
> Or is there a CHOICE 3?
>
> John Berner
> W. Houston
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
> <https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/?.src=iOS>
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/19 1:39 pm
From: Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Seeking way forward on Texas early March ebird Chaetura (needletail swift) review.
Texbirders:Following the early March Chimney vs Vaux discussion with some interest. As far as guidance for ebird review for the early March period for eastern Texas, what should be the recommendation be for ebird reviewers? ......,............................................
CHOICE1: As chimney vs Vaux ID is extremely difficult to establish in the field and several sources indicate Chimney far more likely than Vaux in early March, should we recommend 1) accept Chimney swift for notes that establish Chaetura swift but that do not eliminate non-Chimney Chaetura from say March 5? - 14 ......................................................................,
CHOICE 2: or should we be more cautious due to ID differentiation difficulty and instead recommend 2) reject Chimney swift—only accept “ Chaetura sp. “ prior to March 15 in Texas for notes that establish it as a Chaetura swift. This will likely mean almost every early March Chimney Swift ebird observation will be rejected.  .........,,....................,,,,.,,.................Or is there a CHOICE 3?
John BernerW. Houston 

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/19 11:38 am
From: Leslie Calvert <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender calvertles for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Utopia birds
Just had a beautiful male Rufous Hummingbird chasing away my Black Chinned,  as usual.  First time I have ever seen one in the spring.Other highlights on our ranch are Golden Cheek Warblers, Yellow throated warblers, Yellow Rumped,   Hutton's Vireo,   White eyed Vireo (lots), Spotted Towhee, Pine Siskins, Sandhills flying over,  and the usuals.   What a beautiful day!!!!!!

Leslie Reed CalvertUtopia, Texas
 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/19 10:52 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 18, 2019
Good afternoon Texbirders, We were joined by 5 who endured the mud and
were rewarded with some sought after birds. See our list below for location.
The Groove-billed Anis (2) were not seen on our birdwalk, however reported
by Dave Seal at the Hawk Watch from the levee...continuing for the 3rd day.
Birdwalks 8:30AM and Birding Van Tours 1:30PM daily, except Sundays through
March.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas

TROPICAL PARULA, LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH, GROOVE-BILLED ANI
Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 18, 2019 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Willow Lakes and Tower area
45 species

Blue-winged Teal 25
Cinnamon Teal 7
Northern Shoveler 6
Gadwall 30
American Wigeon 1
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 4
White-tipped Dove 2
Mourning Dove 1
Sora 3
Common Gallinule 2
American Coot 7
Killdeer 1
Long-billed Dowitcher 2
Solitary Sandpiper 1
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 1
Harris's Hawk 3
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 3
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
Peregrine Falcon 1
Great Kiskadee 6
Couch's Kingbird 2
White-eyed Vireo 4
Green Jay 3
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 8
Black-crested Titmouse 6
Verdin 2
House Wren 3
Carolina Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 30
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Clay-colored Thrush 1
Olive Sparrow 2
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Altamira Oriole 1
Red-winged Blackbird 40
Great-tailed Grackle 6
Louisiana Waterthrush 1 Seen along Willow Lake #2, at culvert near
south end if Tower Trail. Vocalizing harsh chip note.
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 5
Common Yellowthroat 5
Tropical Parula 1 First heard, then seen well by entire group along
Willow Lake #4. No dark breast band.
Northern Cardinal 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53981380

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/19 9:43 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Eurasian Wigeon, San Angelo (Tom Green Co.)
Texbirds,

A male Eurasian Wigeon has been present for over a week now at the South
Unit of San Angelo State Park in San Angelo. Possibly best seen from the
boat ramp according to a couple eBird reports. I'm surprised it hasn't made
it on here. The records have not yet been validated in eBird but it was
well-documented yesterday.

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/19 9:38 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Golden-crowned Sparrow, Balmorhea (Reeves Co.)
Texbirds,

A second immature Golden-crowned Sparrow in the Trans-Pecos this winter;
this time in downtown Balmorhea (Reeves Co.) thanks to Cecilia Riley and
Mike Gray:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53941922

Map:
https://goo.gl/maps/hYFiLG6cSMG2

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/19 8:18 pm
From: <mitch...>
Subject: [texbirds] Lost Maples

Hi birders,

Today Kathy and I walked up Can Creek at Lost Maples a bit past
the ponds. We heard over a dozen and saw about 8 Golden-cheeked
Warbler, many greatly. As many Black-and-white, my earliest yet
(n~16 springs here) return date for a singing territorial Louisiana
Waterthrush, my earliest migrant Nashville Warbler locally, my FOS
Yellow-throated Vireo was not my earliest. At least 10 Orange-
crowned is a wave of migrants as was a dozen Myrtle Warbler. A
few Yellow-throated are singing as well. Seven species of warblers
is pretty springy here. The now-flowering Maples were where most
of the action was. Madrone and Redbud were in bloom too.

We heard one Olive Sparrow, a few White-tipped Dove, some singing
Canyon Wrens, saw a female Scott&apos;s Oriole, Rufous-crowned
Sparrow, Inca Dove, a Zone-tailed Hawk briefly, did not see the
Hammond's Flycatcher that was wintering, and did not hear any
Black-capped Vireo. Lots of Wide-eyed and Hutton's Vireo though,
texana Scrub-Jay. A mile and change south of Vanderpool on the way
up there was my earliest ever local Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on a
fenceline. I have heard an old saying that once you see one, it
won't freeze. It was 34dF here when we left Utopia, and HQ said
it had to have been 32 there at Lost Maples.

It was pretty birdy despite lots being yet to arrive.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia,

P.S. I can't think of any good birder I trust that does not
trust in Oberholser. Apparently I don't trust anyone that
doesn't trust Oberholser/BLOT. In Oberholser we trust.
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

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Date: 3/17/19 6:17 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-17-18 Whip-poor-will @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-17-18 Whip-poor-will @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Whip started calling at 8 pm tonight—we were out two nights ago wo luck. Clay-colored Sparrows around too & Paul had Black-and-white Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Nashville Warbler.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/19 10:29 am
From: Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...>
Subject: [texbirds] Decent day on Norias in spite of the cold and drizzle
A group of 8 of us spent the day on the Norias division of the King
Ranch. It was cold and drizzly most of the day, but we recorded 49
species, including Ferruginous Pygmy-owl, White-tailed Hawk, Sprague's
Pipit, Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet, and Tropical Parula. Complete list
at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53938480

--
Jim Sinclair (TX-ESA)
TOS Life Member
Kingsville, TX

"The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of
thinking we were at when we created them." - Albert Einstein

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 7:06 pm
From: Tom Toporowski <tomtopski...>
Subject: [texbirds] Golden-cheeked Warbler Sighting


Sent from my iPhone
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Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

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Date: 3/16/19 4:59 pm
From: Petra Hockey <phockey...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Texbirders,

a few things need to be straightened out regarding this continuing thread.

First, referring to Justin’s assumption that "BLOT was written well before Vaux’s Swifts were confirmed wintering along the northern Gulf of Mexico" and his effort to minimize the importance and reliability of information and data from Oberholser’s A Bird Life of Texas (BLOT), it must be said that a quick first hand look into the tome 1, page 476 would have made him realize that he is absolutely mistaken. Not only does Oberholser write a whole chapter about the Vaux’s Swift, he includes the information that the species rarely winters north to s. Louisiana and adds sighting dates that lead him to declare it “hypothetical” for Texas. Therefore we can safely assume that Oberholser was well aware of the presence of Vaux’s Swift along the northern Gulf of Mexico during the winter months and any extreme early date he gave for Chimney Swift would have taken that into consideration.

Also, I continue to be perplexed by the “shock” Justin proclaims that an ebird reviewer would have accepted a Chimney Swift report with scant details from 9 March. I am reminded of that saying “if you hear hoofbeats (in this case, see a swift on 9 March on the Texas coast) think horse (Chimney) not Zebra (Vaux’s). We have read a first hand report from Paul Kyle, Project Director of the Chimney Swift Conservation Association, who draws on decades of first hand observations and reliable reports from his vast network of associates which have reported Chimney Swifts as early as 1 March. Add to that the recent very interesting and timely observation and report from Bob Becker who saw thousands of Chimney Swift on 7 March streaming north just offshore from Belize City. Highly unlikely that there wouldn’t have been some smaller numbers ahead of this big push. And then there is the Handbook of Texas Birds by Lockwood and Freeman, which Justin considers a somewhat more reliable source than BLOT, and which gives the migration window as starting in early March. The fact that this publication does not give individual sighting dates that the authors based their migration time frame on is purely one of space constraints but believe me, a lot of reliable, published, pre e-bird sources were laboriously sifted through to arrive at those dates.

If Justin chooses to disregard all that and remain of the opinion that a Vaux’s Swift on 9 March would be just as or even more likely than a Chimney Swift it is, of course, his prerogative but I hope Texbirders will keep the above preponderance of data in mind and not jump to the conclusion that a 9 March swift is likely a Vaux’s.

Disregarding/calling into question records that pre-date ebird and the advent of digital photography feels a bit like re-inventing the wheel to me.

Petra Hockey
Port O’Connor, TX




> Subject: Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
> Date: Sat Mar 16 2019 12:28 pm
> From: justin.bosler AT gmail.com
>
> Petra, Texbirds,
>
> The TOS Handbook of Texas Birds mentions early March, though no specific date(s) is/are provided. However, unless the 19 Feb record was photographed, sound recorded or collected as a specimen it probably cannot be verified as a Chimney Swift, instead it was likely assumed to be one. If I'm not mistaken, BLOT was written well before Vaux's Swifts were confirmed wintering along the northern Gulf of Mexico.


> Subject: Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
> Date: Sat Mar 16 2019 12:57 pm
> From: justin.bosler AT gmail.com
>
> Matt,
>
> You've done a better job of getting across my point. Why not Chaetura species? The eBird reviewer accepted the record as Chimney Swift with scant details provided. That's what I found shocking. I posited Vaux's because that is the only other Chaetura species that's been documented with both specimen and photographs in the northern Gulf of Mexico. And, they are occurring with more frequency in the winter to our east.
>
> Also, it's just as much advent of widely-accessible digital photography and sound recording as it is eBird when it comes to better record-keeping. Voucher specimens and hearsay are all we have to go off of when it comes to historical records. Personally, that's why I put less faith in BLOT than more modern resources such as the TOS Handbook.
>
> Best regards,Justin BoslerAustin, Texas


 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 2:24 pm
From: Rhandy Helton <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender rjhelton for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Black-capped Vireo
I had a single very early Black-capped Vireo male at South Llano River State Park around noon today (Mar 16). I located the bird by song and, with some effort, got a clear, quick look in the thick brush. I usually don't record this species until the last week of March but BLOT shows an extreme early date of March 13. Golden-cheeked Warblers were first reported at the park on March 9 and have been fairly easy to observe since then. I had 4 singing males a little after noon today, when the sun finally came out after a brisk morning. 
Rhandy J. HeltonJunction, Texas
 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 12:22 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Brush,

You’re right on. The original 5 million words were cut to one million, much of which is “summarized” in the maps.

Keith

P.S. The A&M Sterling A. Evans library has the complete original manuscript on microfilm; if I remember correctly, it takes five reels!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 16, 2019, at 1:50 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> If one knew just how extensive BLOT actually is one would place much more faith in it. The two Vol.s as published represent only a fraction of the materials available to the editors at the time after Oberholser's death the in 1963. Edgar Kincaid and numerous others spent years editing and bring up to date his MS. . If all materials were use the tome would otherwise have been 4-5-6-7 vol.s perhaps which was deemed impractical... Also many, if not most records are backed up by specimen records and in fact within the accounts each species and in many cases subspecies, are listed where the specimen records were taken..Though it does not provide where those specimens are, nor a specimen number. For that one needs to dig deeper into the original MS which exists only as a hard copy (in many boxes) or the miro-fisch stored at a very locations. Indeed at one time, maybe still, one could purchase all that film at UT...Regardless, it is available to the researcher at both UT Library and the TCWC and elsewhere. Dr. Arnold can expound on that if he wishes....A huge amount of what is published in BLOT and other journals of old make up the information in the Handbook and the access to that otherwise, to the average birder, is a bit distant. NAB has filled in the gaps between 1973 to the advent of Ebird....And if one ever has the opportunity to help in editing the quarterly Texas contributions to NAB , one will see just how carefully the information provided by birders gets vetted...There is no hearsey in regards to the Handbook etc. If there is a well vetted and trusted observation without documentation it is usually treated as a report in the Handbook. ..........
> ...As far as the swifts go, both of the Chaeturas have detailed species accounts in BLOT though that information is condensed for the Handbook. Indeed there it provides numerous possible sightings of Vaux's including the famous Dec. 20, 1910 account of 7 birds taken from a stovepipe in Port O'Connor by R. D. Frazier (I think Dr. Casto did an article on him..?)...Unfortunately the whereabouts of those specimens, if they were prepared, is unknown and assuming they were correctly identified in the hand. There are a number of other reports mentioned in the account mostly in the winter from the coastal region. Mark Lockwood or others can provide more info or correct me if I have said anything here that is less than accurate...The point being...BLOT is IMO the most important single published document on Texas birds that has ever been published and may always be. There are a few other fine old resources such as Simmons 1925, Strecker 1912 etc., however Oberholser incorporated the significant portions of those if not all in his original MS.
>
>> On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 12:57 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:
>> Matt,
>>
>> You've done a better job of getting across my point. Why not Chaetura species? The eBird reviewer accepted the record as Chimney Swift with scant details provided. That's what I found shocking. I posited Vaux's because that is the only other Chaetura species that's been documented with both specimen and photographs in the northern Gulf of Mexico. And, they are occurring with more frequency in the winter to our east.
>>
>> Also, it's just as much advent of widely-accessible digital photography and sound recording as it is eBird when it comes to better record-keeping. Voucher specimens and hearsay are all we have to go off of when it comes to historical records. Personally, that's why I put less faith in BLOT than more modern resources such as the TOS Handbook.
>>
>> Best regards,
>> Justin Bosler
>> Austin, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 11:02 PM Matt Heindel <mtheindel...> wrote:
>>> I found this post concerning and was traveling during the day, and see some experienced people have weighed in on this before I could give it time, but I’d like to expand on some earlier comments.
>>>
>>> Although the majority of CHSW do not come in until later in March (or later) the notion that an earlier bird in March might be as likely, much less more likely a Vaux’s is not prudent and there is no factual basis to support the comment. Yes, the LSU folks have done a nice job on their Vaux’s (as they do on everything!), and there are small wintering numbers in SoCal, as well. Had this report come from Jan, I think the comments might be more logical. But as Brush notes, record keeping pre-dates eBird- disturbing how often this basic fact has to be repeated. BLOT is worth its weight in gold as Petra infers.
>>>
>>> I am all for curiosity, but for those who want to enter into a non Chimney Swift Chaetura discussion, you cannot jump to Vaux’s without a trip down the rabbit hole into a few congeners from further south. Just imagine sorting out the movements of this group! I once spent some time in the museum drawers at the Smithsonian and LSU and wondered how anything but a specimen (or stunning photos) would suffice when it comes to eliminating some southern Chaetura. So even a mid winter Chaetura would need to be measured against the Chapman’s et al swifts. If you’re in March, any time in March, the default has to be Chimney. Does it mean an early one can’t be something else? Of course not, but there is no data to support it being as likely another species. If you want to be Uber-conservative and use Chaetura sp, awesome, feel free.
>>>
>>> The database is swollen with incorrect reports, either created by a lack of understanding, a desire for that rarity, or a combination of both. I gave up worrying about the sanctity of eBird moons ago, but still prefer that birders focus on getting the ID right. Most people are well intended and we still have enough erroneous reports without the encouragement, so let’s help…...
>>>
>>> Matt Heindel
>>> <mtheindel...>
>>> Fair Oaks Ranch, TX
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:36 AM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Texbirds,
>>>>
>>>> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>>>>
>>>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>>>>
>>>> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>>>>
>>>> Stay curious, my friends.
>>>>
>>>> Justin Bosler
>>>> Austin, Texas
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 12:11 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Justin,

One correction to your essay: Vaux Swifts were discovered wintering in Louisiana well be fore the final editing of BLOT ( and Oberholser was likely aware of it).

Nonetheless, this has been an interesting and worthwhile discussion.

Keith
Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 16, 2019, at 12:27 PM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:
>
> Petra, Texbirds,
>
> The TOS Handbook of Texas Birds mentions early March, though no specific date(s) is/are provided. However, unless the 19 Feb record was photographed, sound recorded or collected as a specimen it probably cannot be verified as a Chimney Swift, instead it was likely assumed to be one. If I'm not mistaken, BLOT was written well before Vaux's Swifts were confirmed wintering along the northern Gulf of Mexico.
>
> My main point for starting this thread, more broadly, is a call for observers to be more scrutinizing and careful field observers and to try and reduce their assumptions about what they think they SHOULD be seeing or what they WANT to be seeing when out in the field; but rather, what ID can be conservatively reached from what was actually observed. I see it happening all the time when birding in guided groups. Last week while in Mexico I watched as an experienced guide called a not-too-distant hovering American Kestrel a White-tailed Kite while we were speeding down the highway. It was a quick knee-jerk ID that they instantly committed to because that species was on the brain (having missed it for the tour), without consideration for the vastly more abundant American Kestrel and their full range of hunting behaviors. Admittedly, conclusions are quickly jumped to and mistakes are sometimes made, but if we approach bird identification with caution and limit biases, we can vastly limit the number of observer errors. This is most important when considering public databases and what, ultimately, could become established ornithological record.
>
>
> Good birding!
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:40 PM Phockey <phockey...> wrote:
>> For those who do not own the 2 tome “The Bird Life of Texas” by Oberholser I thought I would share that the arrival dates of Chimney Swift in spring are given as mid to late March which puts the sighting in question a scant 6 days earlier. However, the extreme early date for spring is given as 19 February.
>>
>> Petra Hockey
>> Port O’Connor, TX
>>
>> “Subject: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>> Date: Mon Mar 11 2019 9:37 am
>> From: justin.bosler AT gmail.com
>>
>> Texbirds,
>> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>>
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>>
>>
>> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>>
>> Stay curious, my friends.
>> Justin BoslerAustin, Texas
>> Sent from my iPhone”

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 12:07 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
If one knew just how extensive BLOT actually is one would place much more
faith in it. The two Vol.s as published represent only a fraction of the
materials available to the editors at the time after Oberholser's death in
1963. Edgar Kincaid and numerous others spent years editing and bringing
up to date his MS. . If all materials were used, the tome would
otherwise have been 4-5-6-7 vol.s perhaps which was deemed impractical...
Also many, if not most records are backed up by specimen records and in
fact within the accounts each species and in many cases subspecies, are
listed where the specimen records were taken..Though it does not provide
where those specimens are, nor a specimen number. For that one needs to
dig deeper into the original MS which exists only as a hard copy (in many
boxes) or the miro-fisch stored at a very locations. Indeed at one time,
maybe still, one could purchase all that film at UT...Regardless, it is
available to the researcher at both UT Library and the TCWC and elsewhere.
Dr. Arnold can expound on that if he wishes....A huge amount of what is
published in BLOT and other journals of old make up the information in the
Handbook and the access to that otherwise, to the average birder, is a bit
distant. NAB has filled in the gaps between 1973 to the advent of
Ebird....And if one ever has the opportunity to help in editing the
quarterly Texas contributions to NAB , one will see just how carefully the
information provided by birders gets vetted...There is no hearsey in
regards to the Handbook etc. If there is a well vetted and trusted
observation without documentation it is usually treated as a report in the
Handbook. ..........
...As far as the swifts go, both of the Chaeturas have detailed species
accounts in BLOT though that information is condensed for the Handbook.
Indeed there it provides numerous *possible sightings of Vaux's *including
the famous Dec. 20, 1910 account of 7 birds taken from a stovepipe in Port
O'Connor by R. D. Frazier (I think Dr. Casto did an article on
him..?)...Unfortunately the whereabouts of those specimens, if they were
prepared, is unknown and assuming they were correctly identified in the
hand. There are a number of other reports mentioned in the account mostly
in the winter from the coastal region. Mark Lockwood or others can
provide more info or correct me if I have said anything here that is less
than accurate...The point being...BLOT is IMO the most important single
published document on Texas birds that has ever been published and may
always be. There are a few other fine old resources such as Simmons 1925,
Strecker 1912 etc., however Oberholser incorporated the significant
portions of those if not all in his original MS.


On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 12:57 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
wrote:

> Matt,
>
> You've done a better job of getting across my point. Why not Chaetura
> species? The eBird reviewer accepted the record as Chimney Swift with scant
> details provided. That's what I found shocking. I posited Vaux's because
> that is the only other Chaetura species that's been documented with both
> specimen and photographs in the northern Gulf of Mexico. And, they are
> occurring with more frequency in the winter to our east.
>
> Also, it's just as much advent of widely-accessible digital photography
> and sound recording as it is eBird when it comes to better record-keeping.
> Voucher specimens and hearsay are all we have to go off of when it comes to
> historical records. Personally, that's why I put less faith in BLOT than
> more modern resources such as the TOS Handbook.
>
> Best regards,
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>
> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 11:02 PM Matt Heindel <mtheindel...> wrote:
>
>> I found this post concerning and was traveling during the day, and see
>> some experienced people have weighed in on this before I could give it
>> time, but I’d like to expand on some earlier comments.
>>
>> Although the majority of CHSW do not come in until later in March (or
>> later) the notion that an earlier bird in March might be as likely, much
>> less more likely a Vaux’s is not prudent and there is no factual basis to
>> support the comment. Yes, the LSU folks have done a nice job on their
>> Vaux’s (as they do on everything!), and there are small wintering numbers
>> in SoCal, as well. Had this report come from Jan, I think the comments
>> might be more logical. But as Brush notes, record keeping pre-dates eBird-
>> disturbing how often this basic fact has to be repeated. BLOT is worth its
>> weight in gold as Petra infers.
>>
>> I am all for curiosity, but for those who want to enter into a non
>> Chimney Swift Chaetura discussion, you cannot jump to Vaux’s without a trip
>> down the rabbit hole into a few congeners from further south. Just imagine
>> sorting out the movements of this group! I once spent some time in the
>> museum drawers at the Smithsonian and LSU and wondered how anything but a
>> specimen (or stunning photos) would suffice when it comes to eliminating
>> some southern Chaetura. So even a mid winter Chaetura would need to be
>> measured against the Chapman’s et al swifts. If you’re in March, any time
>> in March, the default has to be Chimney. Does it mean an early one can’t be
>> something else? Of course not, but there is no data to support it being as
>> likely another species. If you want to be Uber-conservative and use
>> Chaetura sp, awesome, feel free.
>>
>> The database is swollen with incorrect reports, either created by a lack
>> of understanding, a desire for that rarity, or a combination of both. I
>> gave up worrying about the sanctity of eBird moons ago, but still prefer
>> that birders focus on getting the ID right. Most people are well intended
>> and we still have enough erroneous reports without the encouragement, so
>> let’s help…...
>>
>> Matt Heindel
>> <mtheindel...>
>> Fair Oaks Ranch, TX
>>
>>
>>
>> On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:36 AM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> Texbirds,
>>
>> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
>> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
>> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
>> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
>> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
>> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
>> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
>> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
>> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
>> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
>> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>>
>> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
>> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
>> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>>
>> Stay curious, my friends.
>>
>> Justin Bosler
>> Austin, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 11:53 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
If one knew just how extensive BLOT actually is one would place much more
faith in it. The two Vol.s as published represent only a fraction of the
materials available to the editors at the time after Oberholser's death the
in 1963. Edgar Kincaid and numerous others spent years editing and bring
up to date his MS. . If all materials were use the tome would otherwise
have been 4-5-6-7 vol.s perhaps which was deemed impractical... Also many,
if not most records are backed up by specimen records and in fact within
the accounts each species and in many cases subspecies, are listed where
the specimen records were taken..Though it does not provide where those
specimens are, nor a specimen number. For that one needs to dig deeper
into the original MS which exists only as a hard copy (in many boxes) or
the miro-fisch stored at a very locations. Indeed at one time, maybe
still, one could purchase all that film at UT...Regardless, it is available
to the researcher at both UT Library and the TCWC and elsewhere. Dr.
Arnold can expound on that if he wishes....A huge amount of what is
published in BLOT and other journals of old make up the information in the
Handbook and the access to that otherwise, to the average birder, is a bit
distant. NAB has filled in the gaps between 1973 to the advent of
Ebird....And if one ever has the opportunity to help in editing the
quarterly Texas contributions to NAB , one will see just how carefully the
information provided by birders gets vetted...There is no hearsey in
regards to the Handbook etc. If there is a well vetted and trusted
observation without documentation it is usually treated as a report in the
Handbook. ..........
...As far as the swifts go, both of the Chaeturas have detailed species
accounts in BLOT though that information is condensed for the Handbook.
Indeed there it provides numerous *possible sightings of Vaux's *including
the famous Dec. 20, 1910 account of 7 birds taken from a stovepipe in Port
O'Connor by R. D. Frazier (I think Dr. Casto did an article on
him..?)...Unfortunately the whereabouts of those specimens, if they were
prepared, is unknown and assuming they were correctly identified in the
hand. There are a number of other reports mentioned in the account mostly
in the winter from the coastal region. Mark Lockwood or others can
provide more info or correct me if I have said anything here that is less
than accurate...The point being...BLOT is IMO the most important single
published document on Texas birds that has ever been published and may
always be. There are a few other fine old resources such as Simmons 1925,
Strecker 1912 etc., however Oberholser incorporated the significant
portions of those if not all in his original MS.

On Sat, Mar 16, 2019 at 12:57 PM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
wrote:

> Matt,
>
> You've done a better job of getting across my point. Why not Chaetura
> species? The eBird reviewer accepted the record as Chimney Swift with scant
> details provided. That's what I found shocking. I posited Vaux's because
> that is the only other Chaetura species that's been documented with both
> specimen and photographs in the northern Gulf of Mexico. And, they are
> occurring with more frequency in the winter to our east.
>
> Also, it's just as much advent of widely-accessible digital photography
> and sound recording as it is eBird when it comes to better record-keeping.
> Voucher specimens and hearsay are all we have to go off of when it comes to
> historical records. Personally, that's why I put less faith in BLOT than
> more modern resources such as the TOS Handbook.
>
> Best regards,
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>
> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 11:02 PM Matt Heindel <mtheindel...> wrote:
>
>> I found this post concerning and was traveling during the day, and see
>> some experienced people have weighed in on this before I could give it
>> time, but I’d like to expand on some earlier comments.
>>
>> Although the majority of CHSW do not come in until later in March (or
>> later) the notion that an earlier bird in March might be as likely, much
>> less more likely a Vaux’s is not prudent and there is no factual basis to
>> support the comment. Yes, the LSU folks have done a nice job on their
>> Vaux’s (as they do on everything!), and there are small wintering numbers
>> in SoCal, as well. Had this report come from Jan, I think the comments
>> might be more logical. But as Brush notes, record keeping pre-dates eBird-
>> disturbing how often this basic fact has to be repeated. BLOT is worth its
>> weight in gold as Petra infers.
>>
>> I am all for curiosity, but for those who want to enter into a non
>> Chimney Swift Chaetura discussion, you cannot jump to Vaux’s without a trip
>> down the rabbit hole into a few congeners from further south. Just imagine
>> sorting out the movements of this group! I once spent some time in the
>> museum drawers at the Smithsonian and LSU and wondered how anything but a
>> specimen (or stunning photos) would suffice when it comes to eliminating
>> some southern Chaetura. So even a mid winter Chaetura would need to be
>> measured against the Chapman’s et al swifts. If you’re in March, any time
>> in March, the default has to be Chimney. Does it mean an early one can’t be
>> something else? Of course not, but there is no data to support it being as
>> likely another species. If you want to be Uber-conservative and use
>> Chaetura sp, awesome, feel free.
>>
>> The database is swollen with incorrect reports, either created by a lack
>> of understanding, a desire for that rarity, or a combination of both. I
>> gave up worrying about the sanctity of eBird moons ago, but still prefer
>> that birders focus on getting the ID right. Most people are well intended
>> and we still have enough erroneous reports without the encouragement, so
>> let’s help…...
>>
>> Matt Heindel
>> <mtheindel...>
>> Fair Oaks Ranch, TX
>>
>>
>>
>> On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:36 AM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> Texbirds,
>>
>> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
>> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
>> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
>> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
>> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
>> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
>> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
>> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
>> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
>> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
>> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>>
>> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
>> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
>> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>>
>> Stay curious, my friends.
>>
>> Justin Bosler
>> Austin, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 10:57 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Matt,

You've done a better job of getting across my point. Why not Chaetura
species? The eBird reviewer accepted the record as Chimney Swift with scant
details provided. That's what I found shocking. I posited Vaux's because
that is the only other Chaetura species that's been documented with both
specimen and photographs in the northern Gulf of Mexico. And, they are
occurring with more frequency in the winter to our east.

Also, it's just as much advent of widely-accessible digital photography and
sound recording as it is eBird when it comes to better record-keeping.
Voucher specimens and hearsay are all we have to go off of when it comes to
historical records. Personally, that's why I put less faith in BLOT than
more modern resources such as the TOS Handbook.

Best regards,
Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas



On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 11:02 PM Matt Heindel <mtheindel...> wrote:

> I found this post concerning and was traveling during the day, and see
> some experienced people have weighed in on this before I could give it
> time, but I’d like to expand on some earlier comments.
>
> Although the majority of CHSW do not come in until later in March (or
> later) the notion that an earlier bird in March might be as likely, much
> less more likely a Vaux’s is not prudent and there is no factual basis to
> support the comment. Yes, the LSU folks have done a nice job on their
> Vaux’s (as they do on everything!), and there are small wintering numbers
> in SoCal, as well. Had this report come from Jan, I think the comments
> might be more logical. But as Brush notes, record keeping pre-dates eBird-
> disturbing how often this basic fact has to be repeated. BLOT is worth its
> weight in gold as Petra infers.
>
> I am all for curiosity, but for those who want to enter into a non Chimney
> Swift Chaetura discussion, you cannot jump to Vaux’s without a trip down
> the rabbit hole into a few congeners from further south. Just imagine
> sorting out the movements of this group! I once spent some time in the
> museum drawers at the Smithsonian and LSU and wondered how anything but a
> specimen (or stunning photos) would suffice when it comes to eliminating
> some southern Chaetura. So even a mid winter Chaetura would need to be
> measured against the Chapman’s et al swifts. If you’re in March, any time
> in March, the default has to be Chimney. Does it mean an early one can’t be
> something else? Of course not, but there is no data to support it being as
> likely another species. If you want to be Uber-conservative and use
> Chaetura sp, awesome, feel free.
>
> The database is swollen with incorrect reports, either created by a lack
> of understanding, a desire for that rarity, or a combination of both. I
> gave up worrying about the sanctity of eBird moons ago, but still prefer
> that birders focus on getting the ID right. Most people are well intended
> and we still have enough erroneous reports without the encouragement, so
> let’s help…...
>
> Matt Heindel
> <mtheindel...>
> Fair Oaks Ranch, TX
>
>
>
> On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:36 AM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> wrote:
>
> Texbirds,
>
> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>
> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>
> Stay curious, my friends.
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 10:41 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 16, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
Due to last nights rain, we chose to follow the graveled Chachalaca trail. A wonderful group joined with the search for a warbler or two among the large flock of migrating Blue-gray Gnatcatchers. It was a quiet, misty morning on Willow Lakes.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
Hawk Watch continues daily: 8am 1pm.


Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 16, 2019 8:27 AM - 11:33 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.5 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk, walked back and forth on Chachalaca trail
41 species

Blue-winged Teal 7
Cinnamon Teal 3
Northern Shoveler 4
Gadwall 22
American Wigeon 8
Green-winged Teal 1
Least Grebe 1
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Inca Dove 1
Common Ground-Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 1
Sora 3
American Coot 1
Long-billed Dowitcher 3
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 2
Northern Harrier 1
Harris's Hawk 1
Gray Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 1
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1 Heard only
Great Kiskadee 1
Couch's Kingbird 1
White-eyed Vireo 1
Green Jay 1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 3
Purple Martin 1
Tree Swallow 1
Cave Swallow 1
Verdin 1
Carolina Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 43
Altamira Oriole 1
Red-winged Blackbird 28
Common Yellowthroat 1
Wilson's Warbler 1
Northern Cardinal 1
House Sparrow 1

View this checklist online at https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53890677&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cacfbaf9b3e564b82faf308d6aa2fef8e%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636883520184001996&amp;sdata=djvEKDKqYENSCNS2qw4h9pnb0ZYeZEoZ%2FrsbkEEsd%2F8%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53890677&data=02%7C01%7C%7C49910acce0ff46b17f6008d6aa2ffeae%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636883520436701319&sdata=BTEy3DHBVmC6RmhgwrhuudxkwOBAQgxkMFJvjYWZ6%2Fg%3D&reserved=0>

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cacfbaf9b3e564b82faf308d6aa2fef8e%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636883520184001996&amp;sdata=7VPK1It8RAoXMb3Mg%2FMoiEE3YtQEaOIRXPv0207BukI%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&data=02%7C01%7C%7C49910acce0ff46b17f6008d6aa2ffeae%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636883520436711330&sdata=Rl554lD99fv9YcAQpmecGpBCAP41nioXvVN%2FpGN3kzQ%3D&reserved=0>)


 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 10:28 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Petra, Texbirds,

The TOS Handbook of Texas Birds mentions early March, though no specific
date(s) is/are provided. However, unless the 19 Feb record was
photographed, sound recorded or collected as a specimen it probably cannot
be verified as a Chimney Swift, instead it was likely assumed to be one. If
I'm not mistaken, BLOT was written well before Vaux's Swifts were confirmed
wintering along the northern Gulf of Mexico.

My main point for starting this thread, more broadly, is a call for
observers to be more scrutinizing and careful field observers and to try
and reduce their assumptions about what they think they SHOULD be seeing or
what they WANT to be seeing when out in the field; but rather, what ID can
be conservatively reached from what was actually observed. I see it
happening all the time when birding in guided groups. Last week while in
Mexico I watched as an experienced guide called a not-too-distant hovering
American Kestrel a White-tailed Kite while we were speeding down the
highway. It was a quick knee-jerk ID that they instantly committed to
because that species was on the brain (having missed it for the tour),
without consideration for the vastly more abundant American Kestrel and
their full range of hunting behaviors. Admittedly, conclusions are quickly
jumped to and mistakes are sometimes made, but if we approach bird
identification with caution and limit biases, we can vastly limit the
number of observer errors. This is most important when considering public
databases and what, ultimately, could become established ornithological
record.


Good birding!
Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:40 PM Phockey <phockey...> wrote:

> For those who do not own the 2 tome “The Bird Life of Texas” by Oberholser
> I thought I would share that the arrival dates of Chimney Swift in spring
> are given as mid to late March which puts the sighting in question a scant
> 6 days earlier. However, the extreme early date for spring is given as 19
> February.
>
> Petra Hockey
> Port O’Connor, TX
>
> *“Subject: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)*
> Date: Mon Mar 11 2019 9:37 am
> From: justin.bosler AT gmail.com
>
>
> Texbirds,
> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli... <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745>
>
>
> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>
> Stay curious, my friends.
> Justin BoslerAustin, Texas
>
> Sent from my iPhone”
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/19 9:30 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Board Walk at Shoveler Pond, Anahuac NWR
The board walk at Anahuac NWR on the Shoveler Pond loop is going to be
closed for replacing the deck starting Monday, March 18, 2019.

The refuge management is hoping the work can be completed by mid-April, but
the contractor has 60 days to finish the work so it could take that long.

The plan had been to start this work much earlier but that didn't happen
unfortunately.



--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/19 2:10 pm
From: Jace Stansbury <jstansbury...>
Subject: [texbirds] Sea Rim State Park- Gambusia Trail
Just a note to tell everyone if you're thinking of going to the Gambusia
Trail boardwalk at Sea Rim State Park- the boardwalk is closed due to a
portion of it collapsing. The Game Warden told me it would probably not
re-open until this summer.



Jace Stansbury

Nederland, TX

http://www.naturejournals.blogspot.com

https://instagram.com/jaceman57/






 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/19 10:58 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 15, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
The wind and cold front of the past days has landed several migrants in the refuge several different waterfowl and flycatchers.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
Hawk Watch continues daily: 8am 1pm.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 15, 2019 8:13 AM - 11:53 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.35 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk Pintail lakes and Willow lakes
68 species

Blue-winged Teal 37
Cinnamon Teal 4
Northern Shoveler 4
Gadwall 7
American Wigeon 10
Mottled Duck 16
Northern Pintail 2
Green-winged Teal 8
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Eared Grebe 2
White-tipped Dove 1
Sora 2
American Coot 4
Black-necked Stilt 26
American Avocet 1
Killdeer 6
Least Sandpiper 20
Pectoral Sandpiper 1
Long-billed Dowitcher 25
Wilson's Snipe 5
Greater Yellowlegs 10
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Neotropic Cormorant 2
Double-crested Cormorant 3
Great Egret 2
Snowy Egret 2
Cattle Egret 9
White Ibis 21
White-faced Ibis 4
Black Vulture 3
Turkey Vulture 2
White-tailed Kite 1
Northern Harrier 2
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1
Harris's Hawk 2
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 3
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 3
American Kestrel 1
Vermilion Flycatcher 1
Ash-throated Flycatcher 1
Great Crested Flycatcher 1
Great Kiskadee 8
Tropical Kingbird 1
Couch's Kingbird 6
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 11
White-eyed Vireo 3
Green Jay 5
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 36
Tree Swallow 3
Bank Swallow 3
Barn Swallow 2
Black-crested Titmouse 7
Verdin 1
House Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 63 Large flock in migration
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Northern Mockingbird 1
Olive Sparrow 2 Heard only
Lincoln's Sparrow 2
Western Meadowlark 6
Hooded Oriole 1
Altamira Oriole 3
Red-winged Blackbird 125
Great-tailed Grackle 16
Orange-crowned Warbler 8
Common Yellowthroat 1
Northern Cardinal 3

View this checklist online at https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53856228&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C28d4092ada3b49ecc3df08d6a96cedfb%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636882682640650443&amp;sdata=znvcZxy%2BA9QxsaIt6Y9gl6lDYHw%2BiiGUGcJQY9AaHCA%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53856228&data=02%7C01%7C%7Ce14110ae1918463f9aee08d6a96cff9d%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636882682935453159&sdata=W4AcQWO6VnJ5fYwWXKLP2vTDn%2BeAKiW8Kt85i6VUM4I%3D&reserved=0>

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Back to top
Date: 3/14/19 6:55 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bird Alarm RBA for Texas
I have been in discussions with Bird Alarm, a rare bird alert app widely
used in Sweden and a few other Scandinavian Counties. It looks like I am
going to be able to bring it to Texas and a test is being set up right now.
You can read a bit about the app here: https://www.birdalarm.com/About

The alerts come to your phone as a notification from the app, not unlike
you would get from email, a text message, etc. A user submits an alarm and
other are notified. location details, bird details, and even photos can be
shared with the app.

To keep things simple I've requested that alerts will only be accepted for
TBRC Review Species, so unlike the Texas RBA I tried, I'm not going to
reinvent the wheel on what is a rare bird for Texas.

Alerts can be filtered, there will be a ranking of the birds based on the
number of accepted TBRC occurrences, and you will be able to limit the
region of the alerts you get too.

The cost will be about $40 per person per year. What I need now is some
input on the interest. Taking into account the price are you interested and
would you subscribe?

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/19 1:33 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: John Kelly, birder from Austin, passed away
Very sad to hear this...Very intelligent man...Though it has been years
since I have seen him, we once shared several activities involving TAS.


On Thu, Mar 14, 2019 at 2:07 PM Big Bend Home <leehoy...> wrote:

> Wow, John was a great guy and helped me in many ways as I got involved in
> Travis Audubon. So sorry to hear this.
>
> Lee Hoy
> Fort Davis, TX
>
>
>
> Lee Hoy
> <bigbendtours...>
> 432.386.6855
> www.tourbigbend.com
>
>
> On Mar 14, 2019, at 1:52 PM, Jane F Tillman <jtillman...> wrote:
>
> I thought some of you may remember John Kelly who was active with Travis
> Audubon for many years, serving on the Board and also the Travis Audubon
> Bird Records Committee dating back to the days of Ed Kutac.
> John passed away Monday.
> https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/austin-tx/john-kelly-8203874
>
> If you have a memory to share, please let me know as I'd like to compile a
> blog post for Travis Audubon.
> Thanks.
> Jane Tillman
> Austin
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/19 12:07 pm
From: Big Bend Home <leehoy...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: John Kelly, birder from Austin, passed away
Wow, John was a great guy and helped me in many ways as I got involved in Travis Audubon. So sorry to hear this.

Lee Hoy
Fort Davis, TX




Lee Hoy
<bigbendtours...>
432.386.6855
www.tourbigbend.com


> On Mar 14, 2019, at 1:52 PM, Jane F Tillman <jtillman...> wrote:
>
> I thought some of you may remember John Kelly who was active with Travis Audubon for many years, serving on the Board and also the Travis Audubon Bird Records Committee dating back to the days of Ed Kutac.
> John passed away Monday.
> https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/austin-tx/john-kelly-8203874
>
> If you have a memory to share, please let me know as I'd like to compile a blog post for Travis Audubon.
> Thanks.
> Jane Tillman
> Austin
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/19 11:54 am
From: Jane F Tillman <jtillman...>
Subject: [texbirds] John Kelly, birder from Austin, passed away
I thought some of you may remember John Kelly who was active with Travis
Audubon for many years, serving on the Board and also the Travis Audubon
Bird Records Committee dating back to the days of Ed Kutac.
John passed away Monday.
https://www.dignitymemorial.com/obituaries/austin-tx/john-kelly-8203874

If you have a memory to share, please let me know as I'd like to compile a
blog post for Travis Audubon.
Thanks.
Jane Tillman
Austin

 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/19 10:52 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] Hawkwatch
Santa Ana Hawkwatch begins tomorrow!
Come and spend a few hours watching the sky! Daily 8am to 1pm, until April 15.

John and Sue Ewan, USFWS Volunteers


 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/19 10:48 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 14, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
Interesting morning with lots of dense humidity. However, the walk to Pintail Lakes was very productive with a few very new birders. Wonderful shorebirds and good sparrow sightings.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 14, 2019 8:25 AM - 11:46 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.83 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk, Pintail lakes
67 species

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 6
Mottled Duck 8
Plain Chachalaca 4
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Inca Dove 4
Common Ground-Dove 4
White-tipped Dove 1
White-winged Dove 2
Mourning Dove 1
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 1
Sora 1
American Coot 1
Black-necked Stilt 13
American Avocet 1
Killdeer 5
Least Sandpiper 57
Long-billed Dowitcher 27
Wilson's Snipe 2
Solitary Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 2
Anhinga 1
Double-crested Cormorant 1
American White Pelican 1
Great Egret 11
Snowy Egret 2
White Ibis 21
White-faced Ibis 8
Turkey Vulture 1
White-tailed Kite 1
Harris's Hawk 2
White-tailed Hawk 1
Gray Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 4
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 1
Peregrine Falcon 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
Vermilion Flycatcher 3
Great Kiskadee 9
Couch's Kingbird 5
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 5
White-eyed Vireo 2
Green Jay 3
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 3
Tree Swallow 6
Barn Swallow 2
Cave Swallow 1
Verdin 3 Heard only
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 5
Long-billed Thrasher 3
Olive Sparrow 3
Lark Sparrow 2
Savannah Sparrow 2
Lincoln's Sparrow 2
Hooded Oriole 1
Altamira Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 75
Bronzed Cowbird 1
Great-tailed Grackle 15
Black-and-white Warbler 2
Orange-crowned Warbler 3
Common Yellowthroat 4
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 3
Northern Cardinal 3

View this checklist online at https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53811573&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Ccc58a71711f947d56d4708d6a8a0c614%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636881805795273657&amp;sdata=h6NHYtAi3AYOjCQbiso6DucfndSKx5G%2BLZqcgebnSgI%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53811573&data=02%7C01%7C%7C903cf3174d624cbe240508d6a8a0d9d4%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636881806129288223&sdata=zc8gQSVtihbhve95Qkq5Sp6A1taC1ci%2FC4uzVvbvALA%3D&reserved=0>

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Back to top
Date: 3/14/19 9:11 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eastern Whip-poor-will, Common Poorwills - Commons Ford Ranch (Travis Co.)
Nice and early on the Whip....At out Utley place we regularly have Whips in
the spring, but in 34 years the earliest one I have ever heard calling was
March 22, there the Chuck-wills-widows usually do not arrive until around
April 1 though I have had a few in late March on occasion.

On Thu, Mar 14, 2019 at 10:40 AM Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
wrote:

> Texbirds,
>
> Last evening, like clockwork, about one half hour after sunset (8:00 PM
> locally), two Common Poorwills and one Eastern Whip-poor-will sounded off
> at the waterfall canyon at Commons Ford Ranch Metro Park in Travis County.
> Both species fell silent within 10 or so minutes. Timing really is
> everything when seeking out nightjars. I will share coordinates of exactly
> where I was standing to listen which is about 100 meters or so from where
> the whip sounded off. More or less I was on the Waterfall Trail trailhead
> close to the forest-prairie interface.
>
> 30.337244, -97.892622
>
> Good birding,
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/19 8:40 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Eastern Whip-poor-will, Common Poorwills - Commons Ford Ranch (Travis Co.)
Texbirds,

Last evening, like clockwork, about one half hour after sunset (8:00 PM
locally), two Common Poorwills and one Eastern Whip-poor-will sounded off
at the waterfall canyon at Commons Ford Ranch Metro Park in Travis County.
Both species fell silent within 10 or so minutes. Timing really is
everything when seeking out nightjars. I will share coordinates of exactly
where I was standing to listen which is about 100 meters or so from where
the whip sounded off. More or less I was on the Waterfall Trail trailhead
close to the forest-prairie interface.

30.337244, -97.892622

Good birding,
Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/19 4:45 pm
From: <jkestner...>
Subject: [texbirds] Swainson's Hawk
On the way out of Beeville this afternoon a lovely Swainson's Hawk was soaring over Hwy. 181. Yesterday about 6 Long-billed Curlews flew over the same highway, just north of Skidmore. And the day before that, I encountered a "flock" (not sure if that term fits) of about 200 small bats flying east, where Hwy. 181 and US Hwy 77 meet at Sinton. I thought, in the dusk, that they were swallows.

Judy Kestner
Calallen (NW Corpus Christi)

Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/19 3:49 pm
From: Petra Hockey <phockey...>
Subject: [texbirds] Ganado area - Swallow-tailed Kites and more
Texbirders,

Yesterday, 3-12, Ladd and I birded several locations in and around Ganado.

In Devers Creek Park (a location called Jaycee Park on ebird hotspot) we observed 2 Swallow-tailed Kites cruising and feeding over the wooded area alongside the creek. This is the same spot that hosted at least 4 adult and 2 juvenile STKIs in July 2018. The kites were seen from both north and south of W. Sutherland Ave. Also still present is the Barred Owl I photographed last year. Black-and-white Warblers and singing N. Parula had arrived among many other resident and wintering birds.

The boat ramp on HW 59 at Lake Texana (a little west of the town of Ganado) was quite birdy with 67 species seen in just over half an hour incl. at least 4 singing N. Parula, Black-and white Warblers, 2 Bald Eagles, 5 Anhinga.

The Formosa-Tejano Wetlands south of Ganado on the east side of HW 172 had a good assortment of ducks although many were semi hidden among emerging vegetation. Highlights included a Least Grebe, 4 Cinnamon Teal, 1 Greater Scaup, lots of Wilson’s Snipe and a good variety of raptors incl. juv. White-tailed Hawk, Bald Eagle and a very pale Krider’s Red-tailed Hawk. I scoped this location from the observation tower and also found a small flock of golden-plovers in the adjacent pastures.

Complete trip lists can be found on ebird.

Petra Hockey
Port O’Connor, Calhoun Co.Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

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Date: 3/13/19 3:08 pm
From: Timothy Brush <timothy.brush...>
Subject: [texbirds] Morelet's Seedeater continues at Salineno
This morning (March 13) several birders, including myself, got great looks at a singing seedeater at the end of the river trail, at the little arroyo. We heard it singing from a low perch along the river at first, then saw it singing from higher perched on various trees on either side of the arroyo. Heard Audubon's Orioles singing, saw male Hooded Oriole later at the feeding station, but missed Red-billed Pigeon on an otherwise perfect morning.
Tim Brush,
Edinburg, TX

 

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Date: 3/13/19 10:23 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 13, 2019
Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US TROPICAL PARULA
Mar 13, 2019 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk Chachalaca Trail along Willow Lakes and
Tower Area
44 species

Good Afternoon Texbirders...a Tropical Parula continues along south west
side of Willow Lakes #5 near covered deck.
Unfortunately, it was not seen on our morning bird walk, but by others with
good photos which we saw. The bird was
singing as well and seen by many. Birdwalks 8:30AM and Birding Van Tours
1:30PM, daily except Sundays through
the end of March.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas


Blue-winged Teal 20
Cinnamon Teal 2
Northern Shoveler 2
Gadwall 25
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 2
Green-winged Teal 4
Plain Chachalaca 2
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 1
White-tipped Dove 2
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 1
Sora 3
American Coot 2
Greater Yellowlegs 1
Turkey Vulture 8
Northern Harrier 1
Harris's Hawk 2
White-tailed Hawk 1
Ringed Kingfisher 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 4
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 1
Crested Caracara 1
Vermilion Flycatcher 1
Great Kiskadee 4
Couch's Kingbird 4
White-eyed Vireo 4
Green Jay 3
Tree Swallow 6
Black-crested Titmouse 6
Verdin 2
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Long-billed Thrasher 1
Olive Sparrow 1
Lincoln's Sparrow 2
Altamira Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 40
Orange-crowned Warbler 1
Northern Cardinal 5
House Sparrow 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53775765

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

 

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Date: 3/12/19 4:17 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] RFI eBird reviewer for Brazos County
Thank you for any information that you can provide.

Kind regards,

Justin Bosler
currently in Centerville, Texas

 

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Date: 3/12/19 12:45 pm
From: David Hanson <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender dhanson139 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Swallow-tailed Kite
Had a Swallow-tailed Kite fly over just a few minutes ago 14:30 and kept going in a Southerly direction. We are in East Chambers co, Texas. Wife saw it and came running in to get me. I was hanging upside down on my inversion table so I didn’t make it out quick enough.

David Hanson

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 3/12/19 11:08 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Short-tailed Hawk in Leakey (Real Co.)
Texbirds,

Steve Svedeman photographed a light morph adult Short-tailed Hawk in Leakey
(pronounced Lake-ee), Real County, last Thursday, 7 March. Definitely worth
following up on if you're in the area or close by.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53685144

Location map:
https://goo.gl/maps/TpaPJp3YdyD2

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
currently in Centerville, Texas

 

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Date: 3/12/19 10:49 am
From: Becky Reyes <breyes...>
Subject: [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
Hi everyone,
The weather was nice during this morning's bird walk. The Green Kingfisher
made an appearance at North Pond where it constantly plunged into the water
to catch fish. The grounds was made noisy by the Northern Cardinals, Purple
Martins, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Plain Chachalacas and Ruby-crowned
Kinglets. South Pond had all the ducks that were seen this morning. Below
is this morning's bird list.

Happy Birding!!

Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center, Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 12, 2019 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
42 species

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 2
Blue-winged Teal 11
Northern Shoveler 9
Mottled Duck 1
Plain Chachalaca 8
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 15
Inca Dove 2
Common Ground-Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 1
Mourning Dove 1
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 1
American Coot 7
Black-necked Stilt 13
Killdeer 1
Anhinga 1
Neotropic Cormorant 34
American White Pelican 1
Great Egret 2
Snowy Egret 6
Cattle Egret 2
Black-crowned Night-Heron 9
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron 2
Ringed Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 2
Great Kiskadee 2
Couch's Kingbird 1
White-eyed Vireo 1
Purple Martin 11
House Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 5
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Long-billed Thrasher 2
Northern Mockingbird 3
Olive Sparrow 1
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Red-winged Blackbird 22
Great-tailed Grackle 7
Orange-crowned Warbler 3
Wilson's Warbler 2
Northern Cardinal 4

*Becky Reyes*
Naturalist Educator
Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center

<http://www.cityofedinburg.com/>
Office: (956) 381-9922
Fax: (956) 381-0715
<vguzman...>www.EdinburgWBC.org
<http://www.edinburgwbc.org/>
*<breyes...> <vguzman...>*

follow us:
<https://www.facebook.com/EdinburgWBC/> [image:
https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork]
<https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork>

 

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Date: 3/12/19 10:29 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 12, 2019
Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 12, 2019 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk to Pintail Lakes and Willow Lakes, also
feeders
58 species (+1 other taxa)

Good Afternoon Texbirders, We had a large group of birders and with very
windy conditions we still enjoyed seeing many south Texas specialties. It
appears that ducks and shorebirds are thinning out and heading north.
Resident birds are pairing up and beginning nesting as we await the hawk
and passerine migration.
Birdwalks 8:30AM and Birding Van Tours 1:30PM daily, except Sundays,
through the end of March. Hawk Watch begins March 15th.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas


Blue-winged Teal 12
Cinnamon Teal 3
Northern Shoveler 2
Gadwall 20
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 4
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 6
Inca Dove 1
Common Ground-Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 2
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 1
Sora 3
American Coot 5
Black-necked Stilt 25
Least Sandpiper 5
Long-billed Dowitcher 15
Wilson's Snipe 1
Solitary Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 12
Lesser Yellowlegs 1
Neotropic Cormorant 1
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Great Blue Heron 2
Great Egret 2
Snowy Egret 4
White Ibis 15
White-faced Ibis 6
Turkey Vulture 6
Northern Harrier 1
Harris's Hawk 3
Belted Kingfisher 2
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 6
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 1
Peregrine Falcon 1
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1 Heard
Vermilion Flycatcher 1
Great Kiskadee 8
Couch's Kingbird 3
White-eyed Vireo 4
Green Jay 4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1
swallow sp. 3
Black-crested Titmouse 7
Verdin 2
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
Long-billed Thrasher 2
Northern Mockingbird 1
Olive Sparrow 1
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Altamira Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 31
Great-tailed Grackle 12
Orange-crowned Warbler 2
Common Yellowthroat 2
Northern Cardinal 4
House Sparrow 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53740289

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

 

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Date: 3/12/19 10:22 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 12, 2019
Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 12, 2019 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk to Pintail Lakes and Willow Lakes, also
feeders
58 species (+1 other taxa)

Good Afternoon Texbirders, We had a large group of birders and with very
windy conditions we still enjoyed seeing many south Texas specialties. It
appears that ducks and shorebirds are thinning out and heading north.
Resident birds are pairing up and beginning nesting as we await the hawk
and passerine migration.
Birdwalks 8:30AM and Birding Van Tours 1:30PM daily, except Sundays,
through the end of March. Hawk Watch begins March 15th.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas


Blue-winged Teal 12
Cinnamon Teal 3
Northern Shoveler 2
Gadwall 20
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 4
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 6
Inca Dove 1
Common Ground-Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 2
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 1
Sora 3
American Coot 5
Black-necked Stilt 25
Least Sandpiper 5
Long-billed Dowitcher 15
Wilson's Snipe 1
Solitary Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 12
Lesser Yellowlegs 1
Neotropic Cormorant 1
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Great Blue Heron 2
Great Egret 2
Snowy Egret 4
White Ibis 15
White-faced Ibis 6
Turkey Vulture 6
Northern Harrier 1
Harris's Hawk 3
Belted Kingfisher 2
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 6
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 1
Peregrine Falcon 1
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1 Heard
Vermilion Flycatcher 1
Great Kiskadee 8
Couch's Kingbird 3
White-eyed Vireo 4
Green Jay 4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1
swallow sp. 3
Black-crested Titmouse 7
Verdin 2
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
Long-billed Thrasher 2
Northern Mockingbird 1
Olive Sparrow 1
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Altamira Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 31
Great-tailed Grackle 12
Orange-crowned Warbler 2
Common Yellowthroat 2
Northern Cardinal 4
House Sparrow 1

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53740289

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

 

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Date: 3/12/19 9:52 am
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Hey, Matt, thanks for raising the possibility of non-U.S. Chaetura (I think). In fact, I believe a new Chaetiurs species was described from Mexico or Central America in the last year or two.

Keith

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 11, 2019, at 11:01 PM, Matt Heindel <mtheindel...> wrote:
>
> Chaetura
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Date: 3/12/19 9:36 am
From: Robert Becker <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender robertjbecker for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou Nature Center (Harris County)
On March 7, at 10 a.m., I was on a small boat on the Gulf of Mexico about two miles offshore from Belize City. I observed a steady stream of migrating Chimney Swifts flying by, close to the surface of the water. I watched them for 10 minutes or so and estimate their numbers at ~5,000.
Belize City is 924 miles in a straight line from Galveston, where I live. If they flew straight across nonstop, at their maximum unassisted flight speed of 36 miles per hour (Schnell and Hellack, University of Oklahoma, 1977), they would have reached the Texas coastline at approximately 11 a.m. on March 8. More likely, the swifts continued northward along the coast of Central America, where they staged somewhere on the Yucatan Peninsula, about 600 miles from Texas.
In any case, some of them could have reached our coast last week and dispersed from there. I don't know which species was seen at Armand Bayou, but it is reasonable to assume a Chimney Swift could have arrived there by the timetable described above. The lack of eBird reports prior to mid-March does not negate this possibility. Bob BeckerGalveston
 

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Date: 3/12/19 4:52 am
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Glaucous-winged Gull
Hi, all!



Just wanted to relay that it’s actually the Rio Grande Valley Birding Site (note, “Birding”, not “Birds”) that has all the discussion, not my personal site! Thanks,



MB



Mary Beth Stowe

Alamo, TX

<http://www.miriameaglemon.com> www.miriameaglemon.com



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Phockey
Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 7:21 PM
To: Texbirds <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Glaucous-winged Gull




Funny, how auto-correct created a vision challenged gull .

For anybody interested in this subject I recommend checking out Mary Beth Stowe’s Facebook site, entry from 9 March . The photos of the gull and a whole string of interesting discussion is posted there .

Petra Hockey
Port O’Connor, TX


“Subject: Glaucoma-winged Gull
Date: Mon Mar 11 2019 13:34 pm
From: fcndc AT juno.com <http://juno.com>





Mary Beth Stowe reported one at the Brownsville dump. Twofold nice photos. I am no Gull guy but looks correct. I know there is at least one previous Texas record but seems to me it should be more discussion and reporting of such a rare species.

Congratulations Mary Beth.

Fred Collins
Waller Texas
Sent from my iPhone”



















 

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Date: 3/11/19 9:02 pm
From: Matt Heindel <mtheindel...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
I found this post concerning and was traveling during the day, and see some experienced people have weighed in on this before I could give it time, but I’d like to expand on some earlier comments.

Although the majority of CHSW do not come in until later in March (or later) the notion that an earlier bird in March might be as likely, much less more likely a Vaux’s is not prudent and there is no factual basis to support the comment. Yes, the LSU folks have done a nice job on their Vaux’s (as they do on everything!), and there are small wintering numbers in SoCal, as well. Had this report come from Jan, I think the comments might be more logical. But as Brush notes, record keeping pre-dates eBird- disturbing how often this basic fact has to be repeated. BLOT is worth its weight in gold as Petra infers.

I am all for curiosity, but for those who want to enter into a non Chimney Swift Chaetura discussion, you cannot jump to Vaux’s without a trip down the rabbit hole into a few congeners from further south. Just imagine sorting out the movements of this group! I once spent some time in the museum drawers at the Smithsonian and LSU and wondered how anything but a specimen (or stunning photos) would suffice when it comes to eliminating some southern Chaetura. So even a mid winter Chaetura would need to be measured against the Chapman’s et al swifts. If you’re in March, any time in March, the default has to be Chimney. Does it mean an early one can’t be something else? Of course not, but there is no data to support it being as likely another species. If you want to be Uber-conservative and use Chaetura sp, awesome, feel free.

The database is swollen with incorrect reports, either created by a lack of understanding, a desire for that rarity, or a combination of both. I gave up worrying about the sanctity of eBird moons ago, but still prefer that birders focus on getting the ID right. Most people are well intended and we still have enough erroneous reports without the encouragement, so let’s help…...

Matt Heindel
<mtheindel...>
Fair Oaks Ranch, TX



> On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:36 AM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:
>
> Texbirds,
>
> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745 <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745>
>
> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>
> Stay curious, my friends.
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 8:58 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
If you have a video from Texas that would be amazing. I am sure that along
with others that have been around a bit, the flight behavior is well known
and what is the best ID feature and how they act near a nest location
etc.....IE They don't soar much if any as do CHSWs.....? BTW...I do not
have Bent here and very few ever read his profiles now, but as I recall the
diff. between CHSW and VASW are worth a read. I think I have his accounts
at the other place, or it may be online now...?



On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 10:28 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
wrote:

> All -
>
> I am currently sitting in IAH waiting for my delayed flight to CRP to
> bring me home after 11 days on the road.
>
> Tomorrow, when I can write coherently, I will give you the flight ID key
> to telling Chimney vs. Vaux’s through photos. A series of flight shots or
> a still image from a decently-focused flight video should give you enough
> to make a positive ID.
>
> It’s all about the head profile - Overbite vs. Bullet-head. Now that we
> can include photos on TexBirds, I will show examples.
>
> C’mon, United, fix that darned plane - I want to go home!
>
> Clay Taylor
> TOS Life Member
> Swarovski Optik N.A.
> (Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:03 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> PS...There is a Vaux's specimen in the TCWC my brother found dead and
> provided from his chimney in Oregon should anyone wish to visit that in
> College Station. I don't have the specimen number off hand.
> .
>
> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:51 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
> wrote:
>
>> There have been many reports of Vaux's in Texas and likely a lot were
>> solid IDs, a couple of photos were even provided however it is a tough
>> thing to document and has yet to pass TBRC muster. A good video or a
>> specimen may be what it takes. I have seen a couple a in Texas including
>> one at Hornsby Bend along with one of the most travelled birders on the
>> planet. It was obvious at the time. I get to study them as they breed
>> in my brother's Silverton, Oregon chimney....I can't recall Dates on the
>> CHSW arrivals but have seen some early ones...I do recall one from 3/6 in
>> Port O'Connor and some that hit a really cold, cold front once and were
>> clinging to the sides of trees there as well (photos) but I forget the date
>> on that.
>>
>> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:32 PM Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Justin and All,
>>>
>>> Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in
>>> Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have
>>> received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the
>>> Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift
>>> sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID
>>> solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of
>>> Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.
>>>
>>> Brush Freeman, please weigh in!
>>>
>>> Best regards,
>>>
>>> Paul and Georgean Kyle
>>> Sanctuary Stewards
>>> Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
>>> www.TravisAudubon.org
>>>
>>> Project Directors
>>> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
>>> www.ChimneySwifts.org
>>>
>>> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
>>> *Sent:* Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
>>> *To:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
>>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>>>
>>> Texbirds,
>>>
>>> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
>>> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
>>> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
>>> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
>>> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
>>> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
>>> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
>>> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
>>> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
>>> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
>>> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>>>
>>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>>>
>>> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
>>> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
>>> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>>>
>>> Stay curious, my friends.
>>>
>>> Justin Bosler
>>> Austin, Texas
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 8:29 pm
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
All -

I am currently sitting in IAH waiting for my delayed flight to CRP to bring me home after 11 days on the road.

Tomorrow, when I can write coherently, I will give you the flight ID key to telling Chimney vs. Vauxs through photos. A series of flight shots or a still image from a decently-focused flight video should give you enough to make a positive ID.

Its all about the head profile - Overbite vs. Bullet-head. Now that we can include photos on TexBirds, I will show examples.

Cmon, United, fix that darned plane - I want to go home!

Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 11, 2019, at 8:03 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:

PS...There is a Vaux's specimen in the TCWC my brother found dead and provided from his chimney in Oregon should anyone wish to visit that in College Station. I don't have the specimen number off hand.
.

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:51 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:
There have been many reports of Vaux's in Texas and likely a lot were solid IDs, a couple of photos were even provided however it is a tough thing to document and has yet to pass TBRC muster. A good video or a specimen may be what it takes. I have seen a couple a in Texas including one at Hornsby Bend along with one of the most travelled birders on the planet. It was obvious at the time. I get to study them as they breed in my brother's Silverton, Oregon chimney....I can't recall Dates on the CHSW arrivals but have seen some early ones...I do recall one from 3/6 in Port O'Connor and some that hit a really cold, cold front once and were clinging to the sides of trees there as well (photos) but I forget the date on that.

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:32 PM Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...><mailto:<dwa...>> wrote:
Justin and All,

Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vauxs Swift neither does ID solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of Vauxs Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.

Brush Freeman, please weigh in!

Best regards,

Paul and Georgean Kyle
Sanctuary Stewards
Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
www.TravisAudubon.org<http://www.TravisAudubon.org>

Project Directors
Chimney Swift Conservation Association
www.ChimneySwifts.org<http://www.ChimneySwifts.org>

From: Justin Bosler<mailto:<justin.bosler...>
Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
To: 4 Texbirds Maillist<mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)

Texbirds,

As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745

Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.

Stay curious, my friends.

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas




--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas




 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 7:22 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 3-11-19 Harris’s, Pelicans, Nuthatch, Grasshopper @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
3-11-19 Harris’s, Pelicans, Nuthatch, Grasshopper @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Some of the fun birds the last few days—Harris’s Sparrow, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Grasshopper Sparrow, American Crow, flock of American Pelicans. Rio Brazos Audubon group came Saturday and some of these were from their 33 species and 37 species for the day. Thomas’ Meadow is having the Nuthatch and had the Harris’s Sparrow.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 7:09 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Keith we got the blasted tropicbird and now perhaps that blasted grosbeak,
iffen we get that swift, I can go peacefully :-)....nah we still need that
Cinnamon Hummer and you know that Arizona Woodpecker is only about as far
from Texas as Van Horn is from El paso....Just pondering here.

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 8:31 PM Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> wrote:

> I don’t know if the results are in, but the TBRC has a record that stands
> a good chance for acceptance.
>
> Keith
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 11, 2019, at 7:31 PM, Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
> wrote:
>
> Justin and All,
>
> Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in
> Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have
> received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the
> Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift
> sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID
> solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of
> Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.
>
> Brush Freeman, please weigh in!
>
> Best regards,
>
> Paul and Georgean Kyle
> Sanctuary Stewards
> Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
> www.TravisAudubon.org
>
> Project Directors
> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
> www.ChimneySwifts.org
>
> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> *Sent:* Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
> *To:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>
> Texbirds,
>
> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>
> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>
> Stay curious, my friends.
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 6:41 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
I would like to echo Paul's comment. There are 1000's and 1000's of
sightings, maybe 10's of thousands of interesting bird sightings that were
reported Ebird. Some of the best may have made it in..It is a frustrating
thing, but birding in the US did not begin with Ebird by a long shot....
If one has the time and patience they can explore the various archives on
S.O.R.A. for those more signifient birds prior to Ebird.....It is actually
quite eye-opening...Mark Lockwood and I poured thru almost every issue post
1973 when BLOT was published looking for significant additions. Folks like
Bert Frenz and a very few others have kept very detailed records for their
regions of interest as well and a lot the data is/was provided by them.

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 8:15 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
wrote:

> Not off hand except it was in the fall, not spring. Phil Rostron was at
> a different location at the ponds and we each independently IDed what we
> were reasonably sure was a Vaux's...As he spent so much more time with them
> in CA. he knew them better. Will let him chime in on my memoras I think he
> follows the listserv.on my memory....These are things one just has to mull
> over without the DNA or specimen...Not sure even a recording would even
> clinch it. I have had a few here I am at least comfortable with.
>
> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 8:00 PM Kenny Anderson <kennya290...>
> wrote:
>
>> I strongly feel you are correct and am glad TBRC has the highest
>> measure. Do you remember the Hornsby month, date? Love to hear about that
>> some day, maybe over a beer!
>>
>> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:52 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> There have been many reports of Vaux's in Texas and likely a lot were
>>> solid IDs, a couple of photos were even provided however it is a tough
>>> thing to document and has yet to pass TBRC muster. A good video or a
>>> specimen may be what it takes. I have seen a couple a in Texas including
>>> one at Hornsby Bend along with one of the most travelled birders on the
>>> planet. It was obvious at the time. I get to study them as they breed
>>> in my brother's Silverton, Oregon chimney....I can't recall Dates on the
>>> CHSW arrivals but have seen some early ones...I do recall one from 3/6 in
>>> Port O'Connor and some that hit a really cold, cold front once and were
>>> clinging to the sides of trees there as well (photos) but I forget the date
>>> on that.
>>>
>>> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:32 PM Paul and Georgean Kyle <
>>> <dwa...> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Justin and All,
>>>>
>>>> Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in
>>>> Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have
>>>> received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the
>>>> Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift
>>>> sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID
>>>> solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of
>>>> Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.
>>>>
>>>> Brush Freeman, please weigh in!
>>>>
>>>> Best regards,
>>>>
>>>> Paul and Georgean Kyle
>>>> Sanctuary Stewards
>>>> Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
>>>> www.TravisAudubon.org
>>>>
>>>> Project Directors
>>>> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
>>>> www.ChimneySwifts.org
>>>>
>>>> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
>>>> *Sent:* Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
>>>> *To:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
>>>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris
>>>> Co.)
>>>>
>>>> Texbirds,
>>>>
>>>> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
>>>> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
>>>> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
>>>> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
>>>> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
>>>> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
>>>> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
>>>> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
>>>> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
>>>> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
>>>> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>>>>
>>>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>>>>
>>>> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
>>>> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
>>>> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>>>>
>>>> Stay curious, my friends.
>>>>
>>>> Justin Bosler
>>>> Austin, Texas
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>>
>>> Brush Freeman
>>> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
>>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 6:31 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
I don’t know if the results are in, but the TBRC has a record that stands a good chance for acceptance.

Keith

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 11, 2019, at 7:31 PM, Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...> wrote:
>
> Justin and All,
>
> Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.
>
> Brush Freeman, please weigh in!
>
> Best regards,
>
> Paul and Georgean Kyle
> Sanctuary Stewards
> Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
> www.TravisAudubon.org
>
> Project Directors
> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
> www.ChimneySwifts.org
>
> From: Justin Bosler
> Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
> To: 4 Texbirds Maillist
> Subject: [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>
> Texbirds,
>
> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>
> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>
> Stay curious, my friends.
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 6:22 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Thanks Bert , I do recall that event though it seems like a lot longer
ago....

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 8:11 PM <bertf...> wrote:

> I have a few dates for possible Vaux’s Swift within the Oaks & Prairies
> region:
>
> Dec 1938 Bryan, Brazos Co., unsubmitted record to TBRC, fide Greg Lasley
>
> 18 Sep 1952 Waco, McLennan Co., unsubmitted record to TBRX, fide Greg
> Lasley
>
> 30 Oct 2006 Utley, Bastrop Co., Brush Freeman
>
> 18 Nov 2011 s. Austin, Travis Co., John Arvin
>
> 15 Oct 2013 Austin, Travis Co., not accepted by TBRC
>
> Bert Frenz
>
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Belize
>
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> <Bert2...>
>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:
> <texbirds-bounce...>] *On Behalf Of *Kenny Anderson
> *Sent:* Monday, March 11, 2019 8:00 PM
> *To:* Brush Freeman
> *Cc:* Paul D. and Georgean Kyle; <justin.bosler...>; 4 Texbirds
> Maillist
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris
> Co.)
>
>
>
> I strongly feel you are correct and am glad TBRC has the highest measure.
> Do you remember the Hornsby month, date? Love to hear about that some day,
> maybe over a beer!
>
>
>
> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:52 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
> wrote:
>
> There have been many reports of Vaux's in Texas and likely a lot were
> solid IDs, a couple of photos were even provided however it is a tough
> thing to document and has yet to pass TBRC muster. A good video or a
> specimen may be what it takes. I have seen a couple a in Texas including
> one at Hornsby Bend along with one of the most travelled birders on the
> planet. It was obvious at the time. I get to study them as they breed
> in my brother's Silverton, Oregon chimney....I can't recall Dates on the
> CHSW arrivals but have seen some early ones...I do recall one from 3/6 in
> Port O'Connor and some that hit a really cold, cold front once and were
> clinging to the sides of trees there as well (photos) but I forget the date
> on that.
>
>
>
> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:32 PM Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
> wrote:
>
> Justin and All,
>
>
>
> Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in
> Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have
> received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the
> Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift
> sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID
> solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of
> Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman, please weigh in!
>
>
>
> Best regards,
>
> Paul and Georgean Kyle
> Sanctuary Stewards
> Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
> www.TravisAudubon.org
>
> Project Directors
> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
> www.ChimneySwifts.org
>
>
>
> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
>
> *Sent:* Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
>
> *To:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>
>
>
> Texbirds,
>
>
>
> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>
>
>
> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>
>
>
> Stay curious, my friends.
>
>
>
> Justin Bosler
>
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 6:16 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Not off hand except it was in the fall, not spring. Phil Rostron was at a
different location at the ponds and we each independently IDed what we were
reasonably sure was a Vaux's...As he spent so much more time with them in
CA. he knew them better. Will let him chime in on my memoras I think he
follows the listserv.on my memory....These are things one just has to mull
over without the DNA or specimen...Not sure even a recording would even
clinch it. I have had a few here I am at least comfortable with.

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 8:00 PM Kenny Anderson <kennya290...> wrote:

> I strongly feel you are correct and am glad TBRC has the highest measure.
> Do you remember the Hornsby month, date? Love to hear about that some day,
> maybe over a beer!
>
> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:52 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
> wrote:
>
>> There have been many reports of Vaux's in Texas and likely a lot were
>> solid IDs, a couple of photos were even provided however it is a tough
>> thing to document and has yet to pass TBRC muster. A good video or a
>> specimen may be what it takes. I have seen a couple a in Texas including
>> one at Hornsby Bend along with one of the most travelled birders on the
>> planet. It was obvious at the time. I get to study them as they breed
>> in my brother's Silverton, Oregon chimney....I can't recall Dates on the
>> CHSW arrivals but have seen some early ones...I do recall one from 3/6 in
>> Port O'Connor and some that hit a really cold, cold front once and were
>> clinging to the sides of trees there as well (photos) but I forget the date
>> on that.
>>
>> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:32 PM Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Justin and All,
>>>
>>> Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in
>>> Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have
>>> received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the
>>> Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift
>>> sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID
>>> solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of
>>> Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.
>>>
>>> Brush Freeman, please weigh in!
>>>
>>> Best regards,
>>>
>>> Paul and Georgean Kyle
>>> Sanctuary Stewards
>>> Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
>>> www.TravisAudubon.org
>>>
>>> Project Directors
>>> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
>>> www.ChimneySwifts.org
>>>
>>> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
>>> *Sent:* Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
>>> *To:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
>>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>>>
>>> Texbirds,
>>>
>>> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
>>> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
>>> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
>>> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
>>> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
>>> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
>>> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
>>> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
>>> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
>>> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
>>> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>>>
>>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>>>
>>> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
>>> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
>>> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>>>
>>> Stay curious, my friends.
>>>
>>> Justin Bosler
>>> Austin, Texas
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 6:12 pm
From: <bertf...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
I have a few dates for possible Vaux’s Swift within the Oaks & Prairies region:

Dec 1938 Bryan, Brazos Co., unsubmitted record to TBRC, fide Greg Lasley

18 Sep 1952 Waco, McLennan Co., unsubmitted record to TBRX, fide Greg Lasley

30 Oct 2006 Utley, Bastrop Co., Brush Freeman

18 Nov 2011 s. Austin, Travis Co., John Arvin

15 Oct 2013 Austin, Travis Co., not accepted by TBRC

Bert Frenz

Oaks & Prairies of Texas

eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas

eBird reviewer, Belize

NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas

<mailto:<Bert2...> <Bert2...>

<http://www.bafrenz.com/> www.bafrenz.com





From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Kenny Anderson
Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 8:00 PM
To: Brush Freeman
Cc: Paul D. and Georgean Kyle; <justin.bosler...>; 4 Texbirds Maillist
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)



I strongly feel you are correct and am glad TBRC has the highest measure. Do you remember the Hornsby month, date? Love to hear about that some day, maybe over a beer!



On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:52 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:

There have been many reports of Vaux's in Texas and likely a lot were solid IDs, a couple of photos were even provided however it is a tough thing to document and has yet to pass TBRC muster. A good video or a specimen may be what it takes. I have seen a couple a in Texas including one at Hornsby Bend along with one of the most travelled birders on the planet. It was obvious at the time. I get to study them as they breed in my brother's Silverton, Oregon chimney....I can't recall Dates on the CHSW arrivals but have seen some early ones...I do recall one from 3/6 in Port O'Connor and some that hit a really cold, cold front once and were clinging to the sides of trees there as well (photos) but I forget the date on that.



On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:32 PM Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...> wrote:

Justin and All,



Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.



Brush Freeman, please weigh in!



Best regards,

Paul and Georgean Kyle
Sanctuary Stewards
Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
www.TravisAudubon.org

Project Directors
Chimney Swift Conservation Association
www.ChimneySwifts.org



From: Justin Bosler <mailto:<justin.bosler...>

Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM

To: 4 Texbirds Maillist <mailto:<texbirds...>

Subject: [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)



Texbirds,



As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.



https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745



Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.



Stay curious, my friends.



Justin Bosler

Austin, Texas










--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 6:03 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
PS...There is a Vaux's specimen in the TCWC my brother found dead and
provided from his chimney in Oregon should anyone wish to visit that in
College Station. I don't have the specimen number off hand.
.

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:51 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
wrote:

> There have been many reports of Vaux's in Texas and likely a lot were
> solid IDs, a couple of photos were even provided however it is a tough
> thing to document and has yet to pass TBRC muster. A good video or a
> specimen may be what it takes. I have seen a couple a in Texas including
> one at Hornsby Bend along with one of the most travelled birders on the
> planet. It was obvious at the time. I get to study them as they breed
> in my brother's Silverton, Oregon chimney....I can't recall Dates on the
> CHSW arrivals but have seen some early ones...I do recall one from 3/6 in
> Port O'Connor and some that hit a really cold, cold front once and were
> clinging to the sides of trees there as well (photos) but I forget the date
> on that.
>
> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:32 PM Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
> wrote:
>
>> Justin and All,
>>
>> Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in
>> Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have
>> received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the
>> Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift
>> sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID
>> solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of
>> Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.
>>
>> Brush Freeman, please weigh in!
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>> Paul and Georgean Kyle
>> Sanctuary Stewards
>> Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
>> www.TravisAudubon.org
>>
>> Project Directors
>> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
>> www.ChimneySwifts.org
>>
>> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
>> *Sent:* Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
>> *To:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>>
>> Texbirds,
>>
>> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
>> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
>> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
>> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
>> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
>> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
>> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
>> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
>> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
>> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
>> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>>
>> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
>> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
>> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>>
>> Stay curious, my friends.
>>
>> Justin Bosler
>> Austin, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 6:01 pm
From: Kenny Anderson <kennya290...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
I strongly feel you are correct and am glad TBRC has the highest measure.
Do you remember the Hornsby month, date? Love to hear about that some day,
maybe over a beer!

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:52 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
wrote:

> There have been many reports of Vaux's in Texas and likely a lot were
> solid IDs, a couple of photos were even provided however it is a tough
> thing to document and has yet to pass TBRC muster. A good video or a
> specimen may be what it takes. I have seen a couple a in Texas including
> one at Hornsby Bend along with one of the most travelled birders on the
> planet. It was obvious at the time. I get to study them as they breed
> in my brother's Silverton, Oregon chimney....I can't recall Dates on the
> CHSW arrivals but have seen some early ones...I do recall one from 3/6 in
> Port O'Connor and some that hit a really cold, cold front once and were
> clinging to the sides of trees there as well (photos) but I forget the date
> on that.
>
> On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:32 PM Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
> wrote:
>
>> Justin and All,
>>
>> Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in
>> Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have
>> received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the
>> Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift
>> sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID
>> solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of
>> Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.
>>
>> Brush Freeman, please weigh in!
>>
>> Best regards,
>>
>> Paul and Georgean Kyle
>> Sanctuary Stewards
>> Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
>> www.TravisAudubon.org
>>
>> Project Directors
>> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
>> www.ChimneySwifts.org
>>
>> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
>> *Sent:* Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
>> *To:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>>
>> Texbirds,
>>
>> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
>> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
>> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
>> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
>> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
>> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
>> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
>> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
>> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
>> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
>> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>>
>> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
>> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
>> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>>
>> Stay curious, my friends.
>>
>> Justin Bosler
>> Austin, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 5:52 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
There have been many reports of Vaux's in Texas and likely a lot were solid
IDs, a couple of photos were even provided however it is a tough thing to
document and has yet to pass TBRC muster. A good video or a specimen may be
what it takes. I have seen a couple a in Texas including one at Hornsby
Bend along with one of the most travelled birders on the planet. It was
obvious at the time. I get to study them as they breed in my brother's
Silverton, Oregon chimney....I can't recall Dates on the CHSW arrivals but
have seen some early ones...I do recall one from 3/6 in Port O'Connor and
some that hit a really cold, cold front once and were clinging to the sides
of trees there as well (photos) but I forget the date on that.

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 7:32 PM Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
wrote:

> Justin and All,
>
> Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in
> Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have
> received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the
> Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift
> sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID
> solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of
> Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.
>
> Brush Freeman, please weigh in!
>
> Best regards,
>
> Paul and Georgean Kyle
> Sanctuary Stewards
> Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
> www.TravisAudubon.org
>
> Project Directors
> Chimney Swift Conservation Association
> www.ChimneySwifts.org
>
> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> *Sent:* Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
> *To:* 4 Texbirds Maillist <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>
> Texbirds,
>
> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
> arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
> equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
> obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
> latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
> (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
> shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
> tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
> some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
> extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
> etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745
>
> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that
> show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior
> to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>
> Stay curious, my friends.
>
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 5:44 pm
From: Phockey <phockey...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)


Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Phockey <phockey...>
> Date: March 11, 2019 at 7:40:08 PM CDT
> To: Texbirds <texbirds...>
> Subject: Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
>
> For those who do not own the 2 tome “The Bird Life of Texas” by Oberholser I thought I would share that the arrival dates of Chimney Swift in spring are given as mid to late March which puts the sighting in question a scant 6 days earlier. However, the extreme early date for spring is given as 19 February.
>
> Petra Hockey
> Port O’Connor, TX
>
> “Subject: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
> Date: Mon Mar 11 2019 9:37 am
> From: justin.bosler AT gmail.com
>
> Texbirds,
> As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.
>
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checkli...
>
>
> Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.
>
> Stay curious, my friends.
> Justin BoslerAustin, Texas
> Sent from my iPhone”

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 5:41 pm
From: Phockey <phockey...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux’s Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
For those who do not own the 2 tome “The Bird Life of Texas” by Oberholser I thought I would share that the arrival dates of Chimney Swift in spring are given as mid to late March which puts the sighting in question a scant 6 days earlier. However, the extreme early date for spring is given as 19 February.

Petra Hockey
Port O’Connor, TX

“Subject: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Date: Mon Mar 11 2019 9:37 am
From: justin.bosler AT gmail.com

Texbirds,
As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.


https://ebird.org/view/checkli...


Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.

Stay curious, my friends.
Justin BoslerAustin, Texas
Sent from my iPhone”
 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 5:32 pm
From: Paul and Georgean Kyle <dwa...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Justin and All,

Although EBird may not have any documented Chimney Swift sightings in Texas this early (we personally do not regularly enter on EBied) , we have received several reliable reports (and some on Texbirds) of CHSWs on the Texas Gulf Coast over several decades as early as March 1st. An early swift sighting does not necessarily indicate a Vaux’s Swift – neither does ID solely by vocalization. There are currently no documented records of Vaux’s Swifts in Texas. We would love to have one.

Brush Freeman, please weigh in!

Best regards,

Paul and Georgean Kyle
Sanctuary Stewards
Chaetura Canyon - Travis Audubon
www.TravisAudubon.org

Project Directors
Chimney Swift Conservation Association
www.ChimneySwifts.org

From: Justin Bosler
Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 9:36 AM
To: 4 Texbirds Maillist
Subject: [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)

Texbirds,

As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March (15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.


https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745

Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.


Stay curious, my friends.

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas



 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 5:22 pm
From: Phockey <phockey...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Glaucous-winged Gull

Funny, how auto-correct created a vision challenged gull .

For anybody interested in this subject I recommend checking out Mary Beth Stowe’s Facebook site, entry from 9 March . The photos of the gull and a whole string of interesting discussion is posted there .

Petra Hockey
Port O’Connor, TX


“Subject: Glaucoma-winged Gull
Date: Mon Mar 11 2019 13:34 pm
From: fcndc AT juno.com

Mary Beth Stowe reported one at the Brownsville dump. Twofold nice photos. I am no Gull guy but looks correct. I know there is at least one previous Texas record but seems to me it should be more discussion and reporting of such a rare species.

Congratulations Mary Beth.

Fred Collins
Waller Texas
Sent from my iPhone”
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 4:47 pm
From: Christian Walker <christian.walker...>
Subject: [texbirds] Trip to Nolan County (Sweetwater) - Western Screech-Owl, Mountain Plovers
Hey there,

My friend has a ranch in Nolan (south of Sweetwater, in Nolan County) and I went to visit it with her and some friends. The biggest highlight was a calling Western Screech-Owl in brushy gully, as well as a flock of 25 Mountain Plovers in Runnels County found on my return to Austin. From a quick look in eBird I couldn’t find a record of either of these birds in these counties, so maybe these are first county records? My Lockwood/Freeman is up in Dallas of course.
However I had a bunch of other highlights as seen chronologically below.

Friday 3/8/19 headed out to Nolan from n Austin, birding in Lampasas, Mills, and Brown county.
Lampasas: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53613926
Birded CR 2001 from Lampasas to Lometa. Highlights were a Northern Rough-winged Swallow and a Sprague’s Pipit. I was driving along with a male harrier flying parallel by me and it flushed the pipit. I quickly stopped and was able to record its squeaky flight call as it circled in a stair-step pattern, and watched it dive back to it’s area in the classic stoop. Cool.
Mills and Brown counties didn’t really have any crazy highlights, but I added some birds to my county lists. I tried owling in Coleman county but didn’t have a thing.

Saturday 3/9/19 birding on the ranch https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53662644
In the morning I went out birding across the hilly countryside on the ranch, with lots of juniper and mesquite habitat near a shallow running creek. Highlights this morning were a flock of Western Bluebirds, just glowing in the morning sun, and a Sage Thrasher perched up. I had Mountain Bluebirds in the afternoon, and then in the evening I went back out again to go owling, hoping for poor wills (no luck). I went to a brushy draw I had seen earlier that I thought might have screech owls. Sure enough, but it was a Western Screech-Owl, not Eastern! Of course as soon as I tried to record my phone died, so I had to drive back up and get another phone and come back, and I managed to get two recordings. Also had Great Horned Owls calling here.

Sunday 3/10/19 birding on the ranch and coming home. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53671637 https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53675638
I wasn’t able to get out to go birding until 11 or so because it rained all morning. It was pretty cold, with a stiff north wind, but I had a bunch of good birds including 14 sparrow species, Wilson’s Snipe, 2 Winter Wrens (including one singing!), Brown Thrasher, Pine Siskin, and some beautiful Fox Sparrows.
I then birded Runnels, Coleman, and Brown counties on my way back to Austin. The Wingate area in Runnels county was pretty dead, but I was very surprised to find a big flock of Mountain Plovers foraging with Western Meadowlarks and Horned Larks in perfect MOPL habitat on CR 308. I had 3 Bonaparte’s Gulls at Lake Winters, also in Runnels County, and a pair each of Canvasback and Bufflehead in Coleman County.

Good birding!

Christian Walker
Independent Adjuster
Irving, Texas
(512) 431-2495




 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 2:06 pm
From: Brent Ortego <brentortego...>
Subject: [texbirds] USGS Breeding Bird Survey Volunteers Needed - 2nd request
My first request netted volunteers for 12 routes which leaves 23 yet to be filled. Most regions in the state have at least 4 vacancies. We need the help of skilled birders who can identify the birds by their song to step up. This is the main survey used in the Nation to track breeding bird population trends.


Thanks for your consideration. Brent Ortego


This is my 2nd request for volunteer sign-up to conduct roadside breeding bird surveys (BBS) in Texas during 2019. There is 1 vacancy in West Texas, 3 in the Panhandle, 4 in North Central Texas, 4 in Northeast Texas, 5 in Southeast Texas, 1 in Coastal Prairie, and 5 in South Texas. Read below for more details.

For those not familiar with the survey methodology, the BBS is the National Survey which is the primary source for breeding bird population trends in the nation. This survey has about 3000 randomly located routes across the United States. Each route is 24.5 miles long with 50 stops spaced 0.5 miles apart. At each stop during a 3 minute period, the observer tallies all birds seen within ¼ mile and all birds heard. The route lasts from 30 minutes before sunrise until you finish which is normally about 11 a.m. The route needs to be run ONCE each year during the months of May or June; exact dates vary with each route. It might require a pre-survey scouting trip just to familiarize yourself with the route, and a little paper/computer work after the route is done. The observer needs to be able to identify most of the birds along the route by call and all by sight. Along routes in agricultural areas, this might only mean about 20 species by call, but in more complex forested areas it might mean 70 species.

National and local conservation organizations regularly use BBS data (see www.stateofthebirds.org) in their analysis. They focus very strongly on breeding bird population trends generated by YOUR DATA, and also used bird density data extensively. Partners In Flight has developed models to estimate breeding density and distribution for all species they are tracking with BBS data. Other examples of products created with BBS data are:

• U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2018. Adaptive Harvest Management: 2019 Hunting Season. U.S. Department of Interior, Washington, D.C. 72 pp.

• Seamans, M. E. 2018. Band-tailed pigeon population status, 2018. U.S. DOI, Fish and Wildlife Service, Division of Migratory Bird Management, Washington, D.C.

• Kramer et al. 2018. Population trends in Vermivora warblers are linked to strong migratory connectivity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115: E3192-E3200.

• Betts et al. 2018. Old‐growth forests buffer climate‐sensitive bird populations from warming. Diversity and Distributions 24:439–447.

• Fedy et al. 2018. Distribution of priority grassland bird habitats in the Prairie Pothole Region of Canada. Avian Conservation and Ecology 13(1).

• Ruegg et al. 2018. Ecological genomics predicts climate vulnerability in an endangered southwestern songbird. Ecology Letters 21: 1085-1096.

• Using North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data to guide conservation in the Prairie Pothole Region (https://www.fws.gov/mountain-prairie/refuges/hapet.php<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fws.gov%2Fmountain-prairie%2Frefuges%2Fhapet.php&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594208641&sdata=7hhIcfFqr4iJhS4olO413XqXOaMH5YmMoG37JonDI9M%3D&reserved=0>)

• Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database (http://pif.birdconservancy.org/ACAD<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fpif.birdconservancy.org%2FACAD&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594218634&sdata=bXN9BJaLc2wfO%2B6g3LyBBNeR0cbF%2BcrzIgBPszfcI%2Fg%3D&reserved=0>)

• Partners in Flight Population Estimates Database (http://pif.birdconservancy.org/PopEstimates<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fpif.birdconservancy.org%2FPopEstimates&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594228644&sdata=cR0D8mOZDL94v559pM7xavSewxBo95hP4TDmpAXh5rU%3D&reserved=0>)

• US Air Force Bird Avoidance Model (http://www.usahas.com/faq.html<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usahas.com%2Ffaq.html&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594238649&sdata=Xl6MYsJbQ83JvMpkc4NjBaXkYtWfIf7tX8Nm9ZKaRUM%3D&reserved=0>)

• US Environmental Protection Agency Report on Environment (https://cfpub.epa.gov/roe/indicator.cfm?i=83<https://apc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fcfpub.epa.gov%2Froe%2Findicator.cfm%3Fi%3D83&data=02%7C01%7C%7C85fe1d75858f4f99174b08d6856a7481%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636843089594248660&sdata=8HGSO1jJUWYqhM6FCoy9nWLYES%2FQ%2FWa%2Fld0xQE23zpU%3D&reserved=0>)

Texas has 196 BBS routes and 23 vacancies. The National Office has started listing routes as vacant when they have not received data from a volunteer for two years. If you see your route listed as vacant, check your files and resubmit your data because the National Office has not received it.

This seems like a lot of routes, but it is not for a state our size. Due to the variability of the data, we are trying to run at least 14 routes per ecological area and there are 10 ecological areas in Texas. This should provide us a statistically valid sample of population trends of birds breeding near highways. We are getting close to obtaining this sample size in every bird region. We always have problems getting qualified birders to do routes in the more rural parts of the State. While there are plenty of good birders in Texas, the birders are concentrated in urban areas and the birds are spread throughout the State causing logistics problems of running routes in remote parts of the Texas. A classic example is West Texas and the Panhandle, lots of country and few birders.

When you volunteer, I will need your NAME, MAILING ADDRESS, E-MAIL, TELEPHONE NUMBER and ROUTE of interest. I can be contacted at:

<brentortego...>

Vacant routes are listed below by geographic areas. Species data for each route can be obtained at the link = https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/RouteMap/Map.cfm. Those areas with the largest numbers of vacancies are the areas needing the most help.


PANHANDLE


Route 100 Channing Hartley County

1967 – 2017; 46 years; 23-46 species; expect 40

8 species of sparrows

Route 353 Hawley Jones County

1994 – 2013; 18 years; 34-50 species; expect 45

Lots of Bobwhite

Route 375 Gruver Hansford County

1994 – 2016; 8 years; 25-31 species

Quail and Pheasant


WEST TEXAS


Route 099 Slaughter Hudspeth County

1968 – 2014; 27 years; 11-34 species, expect 30

Desert community


NORTHCENTRAL TEXAS



Route 076 Olney Young County

1969 – 2017; 43 years; 29-60 years; expect 50

Good # quail, 6 species of sparrows

Route 078 Grayback Wilbarger County

1968 – 2012; 40 years; 21-47 species; expect 40

Good # quail, 6 species of sparrows

Route 350 Willis Point Van Zandt County

1994 – 2016; 20 years; 47-67 species; expect 60

9 species of warblers

Route 359 Greenville Hunt County

1999 – 2017; 18 years; 29-54 species; expect 50

6 species of flycatchers


CENTRAL TEXAS


No Vacancies!



NORTHEAST TEXAS


Route 056 Morton Harrison County

1970 – 2012; 30 years; 40-76 species; expect mid 50’s

13 species of warblers; historic Bachman’s Sparrow site

Route 071 Dike Hopkins County

1969 – 2016; 37 years; 31-64 species, expect mid 50’s

6 species of woodpeckers and warblers

Route 159 Chandler 2 Henderson County

2005 – 2017; 13 years; 45-66 species; expect 60

9 species of warblers

Route 448 Easton 2 Gregg County

2014 – 2017; 4 years; 54 – 59 species


SOUTHEAST TEXAS


Route 032 Town Bluff Jasper County

1967 – 2015; 41 years; 33-72 species; expect 50; 6 species of woodpeckers

And 12 species of warblers

Route 033 Livingston Polk County

1969 – 2016; 47 years; 40-68 species, expect 50

Route 044 Diboll Angelina County

1968 – 2016; 47 years; 38-72 species, expect 48

14 species of warblers including Swainson’s Warbler

And Bachman’s Sparrow

Route 334 Powell Park San Augustine County

1995 – 2015; 13 years; 45-56 species, expect 48

12 species of warblers

Route 906 Neches BITH

2016; 54 years 5 species of warblers


COASTAL PRAIRIE


Route 13 Indianola Calhoun County

1967 – 2014; 40 years; 21-60 species, expect 50

Coastal mix of species.


SOUTH TEXAS


Route 98 Raymondville Willacy County

1969 – 2014; 44 years; 28-72 species, expect 50

Brush Country species.

Route 115 El Sauz Starr County

1993 – 2015; 15 years; 45-59 species; expect 50

Typical Brush Country species.

Route 308 Three Rivers Live Oak County

1994 – 2015; 18 years; 41-60 species, expect 55

Brush Country community.

Route 409 Millett 2 La Salle County

2013 – 2017; 5 years; 50-60 species, expect 55

3 species of Orioles, lots of quail

Route 410 Cavasara Creek Zapata County

1995 – 2013; 12 years; 28-56 species; expect 50

Brush Country community


https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/RouteMap/Map.cfm location of route maps

https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBS/learning/ BBS Methods

Brent Ortego

<brentortego...><mailto:<brentortego...>

Victoria, TX



 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 1:55 pm
From: Andrew Donnelly <acadonnelly...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Glaucoma-winged Gull


Typos by iPhnoe

> On Mar 11, 2019, at 2:09 PM, Dan Smith <dan...> wrote:
>
> Autocorrect strikes again.
>
>
> Dan Smith
> <dan...>
> 512-451-2632
> http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com
>
> "Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.
>
>
>
>
>> On Mar 11, 2019, at 1:53 PM, Tizard Ian <itizard...> wrote:
>>
>> Glaucoma is a nasty eye disease! Was the bird obviously blind ?
>> Ian Tizard
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Mar 11, 2019, at 1:35 PM, "<fcndc...>" <fcndc...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Mary Beth Stowe reported one at the Brownsville dump. Twofold nice photos. I am no Gull guy but looks correct. I know there is at least one previous Texas record but seems to me it should be more discussion and reporting of such a rare species.
>>>
>>> Congratulations Mary Beth.
>>>
>>> Fred Collins
>>> Waller Texas
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> ____________________________________________________________
>>> 92% Of People Can't Guess Who This Former Child Star Is
>>> pollhype.com
>>> http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/5c86aa0a2e0112a0942ebst04duc
>>> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
>>> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>>>
>>> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
>>> from the List Owner
>>>
>>>
>> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>>
>> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
>> from the List Owner
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 12:52 pm
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Glaucoma-winged Gull
Too funny!



The latest discussion on the RGV Birding Facebook page is that it probably has some Herring blood in it; in an “ideal” GW the primaries should match the rest of the body, although in looking at the pics again, the primaries DO match the shade of the underparts! At any rate, you’re right; I need to get documentation to Eric…



Mary Beth Stowe

Birding Guide/Administrative Assistant

Alamo Inn B&B Gear & Tours

Alamo, TX

<http://alamoinnbnb.com/> http://alamoinnbnb.com/

Blog: <http://www.alamoinn1.blogspot.com/> http://www.alamoinn1.blogspot.com/



From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Dan Smith
Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 2:09 PM
To: <itizard...>
Cc: <fcndc...>; Texbirds <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Glaucoma-winged Gull



Autocorrect strikes again.





Dan Smith

<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>

512-451-2632

http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com



"Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.











On Mar 11, 2019, at 1:53 PM, Tizard Ian <itizard...> <mailto:<itizard...> > wrote:



Glaucoma is a nasty eye disease! Was the bird obviously blind ?
Ian Tizard

Sent from my iPhone




On Mar 11, 2019, at 1:35 PM, "<fcndc...> <mailto:<fcndc...> " <fcndc...> <mailto:<fcndc...> > wrote:

Mary Beth Stowe reported one at the Brownsville dump. Twofold nice photos. I am no Gull guy but looks correct. I know there is at least one previous Texas record but seems to me it should be more discussion and reporting of such a rare species.

Congratulations Mary Beth.

Fred Collins
Waller Texas
Sent from my iPhone
____________________________________________________________
92% Of People Can't Guess Who This Former Child Star Is
pollhype.com <http://pollhype.com>
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/5c86aa0a2e0112a0942ebst04duc
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner



Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
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Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
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Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 12:26 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 11, 2019
Hi Mark and Joanie,

I, like many others, appreciate your regular reports from Santa Ana NWR on
Texbirds. However, might I suggest you mention a highlight species or
species group in the subject line of your reports. For example, your latest
report includes an often sought-after Tropical Parula that could entice
folks to read on, seeking more information. A lot of folks won't even
bother to read the reports if it just shows the title of an eBird hotspot
or location in the subject line. There has to be something that piques
their interest to read further.

Just my two cents.

Cheers!
Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

On Mon, Mar 11, 2019 at 12:57 PM Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
wrote:

> Good afternoon Texbirders, a great walk in the refuge was enjoyed by
> all...a family group of 6 and 5 others. A Tropical Parula was heard, seen
> and photographed at the south end of Willow Lakes # 1 and 2 near the paved
> road. Common Pauraque was flushed along the paved road between VC and
> Tower and then seen through scope. Other birds of note included Cinnamon
> Teal, Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet, and 3 male Hooded Orioles at our
> feeders. Birdwalks 8:30AM and Birding Van Tours 1:30PM daily except
> Sundays.
> Mark and Joanie Hubinger
> USFWS Volunteers
> Alamo, Texas
>
>
>
> Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
> Mar 11, 2019 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 2.0 mile(s)
> Comments: Morning bird walk to Pintail and Willow Lakes
> 71 species
>
> Blue-winged Teal 20
> Cinnamon Teal 2
> Northern Shoveler 6
> Gadwall 30
> American Wigeon 1
> Mottled Duck 12
> Green-winged Teal 4
> Plain Chachalaca 1
> Least Grebe 2
> Pied-billed Grebe 2
> Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
> Inca Dove 1
> White-tipped Dove 1
> Mourning Dove 1
> Common Pauraque 1
> Sora 2
> American Coot 2
> Black-necked Stilt 25
> American Avocet 1
> Killdeer 3
> Least Sandpiper 40
> Long-billed Dowitcher 40
> Wilson's Snipe 2
> Spotted Sandpiper 1
> Greater Yellowlegs 4
> Anhinga 1
> Neotropic Cormorant 1
> Great Blue Heron 1
> Great Egret 2
> Snowy Egret 7
> White Ibis 12
> White-faced Ibis 7
> Turkey Vulture 10
> Harris's Hawk 3
> Gray Hawk 1
> Belted Kingfisher 2
> Green Kingfisher 1
> Golden-fronted Woodpecker 10
> Ladder-backed Woodpecker 4
> Peregrine Falcon 1
> Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1
> Vermilion Flycatcher 1
> Great Kiskadee 12
> Tropical Kingbird 1
> Couch's Kingbird 3
> White-eyed Vireo 3
> Green Jay 6
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow 4
> Tree Swallow 10
> Barn Swallow 3
> Cave Swallow (Texas) 2
> Black-crested Titmouse 6
> Verdin 2
> House Wren 1
> Carolina Wren 2
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
> Long-billed Thrasher 1
> Northern Mockingbird 2
> European Starling 4
> Olive Sparrow 1
> Savannah Sparrow 1
> Lincoln's Sparrow 1
> Hooded Oriole 3 3 males at feeders at the same time
> Altamira Oriole 2
> Red-winged Blackbird 40
> Great-tailed Grackle 10
> Orange-crowned Warbler 3
> Common Yellowthroat 1
> Tropical Parula 1 Singing and seen at south end of Willow Lakes #1
> and 2, close to paved road. Photos coming
> Northern Cardinal 4
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53708149
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
> https://ebird.org/home)
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 12:10 pm
From: Dan Smith <dan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Glaucoma-winged Gull
Autocorrect strikes again.


Dan Smith
<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>
512-451-2632
http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com <http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com/>

"Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.




> On Mar 11, 2019, at 1:53 PM, Tizard Ian <itizard...> wrote:
>
> Glaucoma is a nasty eye disease! Was the bird obviously blind ?
> Ian Tizard
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Mar 11, 2019, at 1:35 PM, "<fcndc...>" <fcndc...> wrote:
>>
>> Mary Beth Stowe reported one at the Brownsville dump. Twofold nice photos. I am no Gull guy but looks correct. I know there is at least one previous Texas record but seems to me it should be more discussion and reporting of such a rare species.
>>
>> Congratulations Mary Beth.
>>
>> Fred Collins
>> Waller Texas
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ____________________________________________________________
>> 92% Of People Can't Guess Who This Former Child Star Is
>> pollhype.com
>> http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/5c86aa0a2e0112a0942ebst04duc
>> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>>
>> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
>> from the List Owner
>>
>>
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>
> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
> from the List Owner
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 11:53 am
From: Tizard Ian <itizard...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Glaucoma-winged Gull
Glaucoma is a nasty eye disease! Was the bird obviously blind ?
Ian Tizard

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 11, 2019, at 1:35 PM, "<fcndc...>" <fcndc...> wrote:
>
> Mary Beth Stowe reported one at the Brownsville dump. Twofold nice photos. I am no Gull guy but looks correct. I know there is at least one previous Texas record but seems to me it should be more discussion and reporting of such a rare species.
>
> Congratulations Mary Beth.
>
> Fred Collins
> Waller Texas
> Sent from my iPhone
> ____________________________________________________________
> 92% Of People Can't Guess Who This Former Child Star Is
> pollhype.com
> http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/5c86aa0a2e0112a0942ebst04duc
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>
> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
> from the List Owner
>
>
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

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Date: 3/11/19 11:35 am
From: <fcndc...>
Subject: [texbirds] Glaucoma-winged Gull
Mary Beth Stowe reported one at the Brownsville dump. Twofold nice photos. I am no Gull guy but looks correct. I know there is at least one previous Texas record but seems to me it should be more discussion and reporting of such a rare species.

Congratulations Mary Beth.

Fred Collins
Waller Texas
Sent from my iPhone
____________________________________________________________
92% Of People Can't Guess Who This Former Child Star Is
pollhype.com
http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/5c86aa0a2e0112a0942ebst04duc
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

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Date: 3/11/19 10:57 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 11, 2019
Good afternoon Texbirders, a great walk in the refuge was enjoyed by
all...a family group of 6 and 5 others. A Tropical Parula was heard, seen
and photographed at the south end of Willow Lakes # 1 and 2 near the paved
road. Common Pauraque was flushed along the paved road between VC and
Tower and then seen through scope. Other birds of note included Cinnamon
Teal, Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet, and 3 male Hooded Orioles at our
feeders. Birdwalks 8:30AM and Birding Van Tours 1:30PM daily except
Sundays.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas



Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 11, 2019 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk to Pintail and Willow Lakes
71 species

Blue-winged Teal 20
Cinnamon Teal 2
Northern Shoveler 6
Gadwall 30
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 12
Green-winged Teal 4
Plain Chachalaca 1
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
Inca Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 1
Mourning Dove 1
Common Pauraque 1
Sora 2
American Coot 2
Black-necked Stilt 25
American Avocet 1
Killdeer 3
Least Sandpiper 40
Long-billed Dowitcher 40
Wilson's Snipe 2
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 4
Anhinga 1
Neotropic Cormorant 1
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 2
Snowy Egret 7
White Ibis 12
White-faced Ibis 7
Turkey Vulture 10
Harris's Hawk 3
Gray Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 2
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 10
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 4
Peregrine Falcon 1
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1
Vermilion Flycatcher 1
Great Kiskadee 12
Tropical Kingbird 1
Couch's Kingbird 3
White-eyed Vireo 3
Green Jay 6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 4
Tree Swallow 10
Barn Swallow 3
Cave Swallow (Texas) 2
Black-crested Titmouse 6
Verdin 2
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Long-billed Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 2
European Starling 4
Olive Sparrow 1
Savannah Sparrow 1
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Hooded Oriole 3 3 males at feeders at the same time
Altamira Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 40
Great-tailed Grackle 10
Orange-crowned Warbler 3
Common Yellowthroat 1
Tropical Parula 1 Singing and seen at south end of Willow Lakes #1 and
2, close to paved road. Photos coming
Northern Cardinal 4

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53708149

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

 

Back to top
Date: 3/11/19 7:37 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Possible Vaux's Swift at Armand Bayou (Harris Co.)
Texbirds,

As it's still about a week until the earliest documented Chimney Swift
arrival at this latitude, this Chaetura species reported at Armand Bayou is
equally, if not more, likely to be a Vaux's Swift. Chimney Swifts, being
obligate insectivores and long-distance migrants that winter at southern
latitudes, have a rather hard and fast spring arrival, about mid-March
(15-17th) at the absolute earliest. This is a species that hasn't really
shown an earlier spring arrival trend despite earlier spring weather and
tree/ insect phenology. A record of this species nearly a week earlier than
some of the earliest documented individuals should be supported with
extensive written details noting structure, plumage, flight characteristics
etc. or preferably with photos/ audio recordings.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53653745

Baton Rouge has a small overwintering population of Vaux's Swifts that show
some wider ranging movements within that region in early March prior to
their departure. See eBird for March observations away from town.

Stay curious, my friends.

Justin Bosler
Austin, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/10/19 7:22 pm
From: Jane F Tillman <jtillman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Summer Tanager ?
I noticed the local mockingbird doing a good Summer Tanager imitation
yesterday. Interestingly a male Summer Tanager overwintered here in NW
Hills Austin close to Mopac and Far West. It is still visiting the couple’s
suet feeder, but less often now with the milder weather.
Jane Tillman
Austin

On Sunday, March 10, 2019, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:

> Anyone seen any? Our Utley White-eyed Vireos are really busy doing the
> tanagers call notes.
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/10/19 3:36 pm
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for February - Longish
Lubbock received 0.04 inches of rain during February, well below the
average February total of 0.71 inches, along with 0.00 inches of rain
during January, leaving us very much below the average year-to-date
total of 1.21 inches. Overall conditions continued mild and, though we
are very much back in the drought, there some interesting
overwintering birds and early arrivals.

Regional summaries of eBird data can not be acquired in a timely
fashion. As a result, records submitted to eBird may not appear in
this report. Reports from the region that are submitted to the
texbirds or leasbirds listservs can be reviewed in a timely fashion
and should appear.

As always, the county follows the site in ( ) and birds are mentioned
by virtue of rarity, atypical abundance, or atypical scarcity. Water
Treatment Ponds have come to feature so prominently in these reports
that they will, henceforth, be referred to as WTP.

SNOW GOOSE: 3 near Shallowater (Lubbock) on 2/8/19 (DH, BS) the only
report - INCREDIBLE LOW NUMBER OF REPORTS AND NUMBERS.

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE: 11 near Shallowater (Lubbock) on 2/8/19
(DH, BS) and 8 near Skeen Playa (Lynn) on 2/10/19 (MDL) the only
reports - INCREDIBLY LOW NUMBER OF REPORTS AND NUMBERS.

BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 8 at the Hale Center WTP (Hale) on 2/9/19 (NP) -
GOOD NUMBERS FOR A REPORT DEEP IN WINTER.

CINNAMON TEAL:3 at the Skeen Playa (Lynn) on 2/9/19 (JA, CB, IB, BH,
KHa, BL, GP, SS) - ABOUT AVERAGE FOR THIS RARE WINTER LINGERER.

CANVASBACK: 1 at the Skeen Playa (Lynn) on 2/9/19 (JA, CB, IB, BH,
KHa, BL, GP, SS) the only report - VERY LOW NUMBER OF REPORTS AND
EXTRAORDINARILY LOW NUMBERS.

REDHEAD: 7 at the Skeen Playa (Lynn) on 2/9/19 (JA, CB, IB, BH, KHa,
BL, GP, SS), 1 at the Hale Center WTP (Hale) on 2/16/19 (NP), 1 at
Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 2/20/19 (SK) and on 2/28/19 (SK) the only
reports - VERY LOW NUMBERS.

COMMON MERGANSER: 3 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 2/11/19 (EH,
photographs) the only report - ABOUT AVERAGE FOR THIS VERY RARE WINTER
VISITOR.

SCALED QUAIL:3 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 2/19/19 (DH) the
only report - LOW BUT LITTLE EFFORT REPORTED.

RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 1 at the Hale Center WTP (Hale) on 2/16/19 (NP)
the only report - LOW.

INCA DOVE: 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 2/5/19 (CR, FR) and 2 in
another Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 2/6/19 (WW) the only reports - ABOUT
AVERAGE FOR THIS SLOWLY VANISHING SPECIES.

WHOOPING CRANE: 1 near Skeen Playa (Lynn) on 2/5/19 (JBs) and on
2/10/19 (MDL) - FORMERLY ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION; NOW A CASUAL WINTER
VISITOR.

LONG-BILLED CURLEW: 4 near the Lubbock Power Plant (Lubbock) on
2/20/19 (DH) - ABOUT AVERAGE FOR THIS RARE WINTER LINGERER.

GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 9 at the Skeen Playa (Lynn) on 2/9/19 (JA, CB, IB,
BH, KHa, BL, GP, SS) - VERY LOW NUMBER OF REPORTS BUT GOOD NUMBERS.

HERRING GULL: 1 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 2/26/19 (AH) the only
report - A TAD LOW.

NEOTROPIC CORMORANT: 1 amidst the horde of Double-crested Cormorants
at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 2/21/19 (EH, photographs) - FORMERLY
ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION; BECOMING A LOW-DENSITY, PERMANENT RESIDENT.

AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 2 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) from 2/26/19 (AH)
through 2/28/19 (DH, AH, GK) - A RARE WINTER VISITOR; REPORTS ALWAYS
NOTEWORTHY.

SNOWY EGRET: 1 at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 2/26/19 (AH) the only report
- APPARENTLY THE SOLE OVERWINTERING EGRET IN THE REGION.

TURKEY VULTURE: 1 north of Dougherty (Floyd) on 2/7/19 (DS) and 1 at
Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 2/25/19 (SK) - WITH THE BIRDS NOTED IN
JANUARY, THIS IS THE FIRST YEAR THE SPECIES HAS MADE WHAT ONE MIGHT
CONSIDER AN OVERWINTERING ATTEMPT IN THE REGION!

WHITE-TAILED KITE; A pair nesting near Shallowater (Lubbock)
throughout the period (DH, BS, JCr, JM) - A RARE VISITOR TO THE REGION
WITH LITTLE IN THE WAY OF SEASONALITY; AN EVEN RARER BREEDER.

RED-SHOULDERED HAWK: 1 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) through the period
(DH), 1 at Dupree Park (Lubbock) on 2/13/19 (SK) and 2/15/19 (SK), and
1 at the Lubbock Cemetery (Lubbock) on 2/23?19 (SP, BK) - FORMERLY A
RARE MIGRANT, THE SPECIES HAS BECOME A PERMANENT RESIDENT ALBEIT AT
LOW DENSITIES.

ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK: 1 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 2/6/19 (JM) the
only report - FORMERLY A COMMON WINTER RESIDENT; THE SPECIES BECOMES
SCARCER WITH EACH PASSING WINTER.

GOLDEN EAGLE: 1 near Bledsoe (Yoakum) on 2/17/19 (DH) and 1 near the
Lubbock Power Plant (Lubbock) on 2/20/19 (DH) - ABOUT AVERAGE FOR THIS
RARE WINTER VISITOR.

GOLDEN-FRONTED WOODPECKER: 1 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) on 2/25/19 (DH) -
VERY RARE, CURRENTLY, AS AN ATOP-THE-CAPROCK SPECIES.

PEREGRINE FALCON: 1-2 at the Indiana x 50th Tower (Lubbock) throughout
the period (AH) and 1 on the TTU HSC Campus (Lubbock) throughout the
period (AH) - ABOUT AVERAGE FOR THIS RARE WINTER VISITOR.

EASTERN PHOEBE: 3 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 2/1/19 (SK), 1 at
Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 2/19/19 (DH), 1 at Lake Alan Henry
(Garza) on 2/19/19 (SK), 1 at Lake Alan Henry (Kent) on 2/25/19 (SK),
and 2 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 2/28/19 (SK) - GOOD NUMBER OF
REPORTS; AVERAGE NUMBERS.

VERMILION FLYCATCHER: 1 male continued at Tahoka (Lynn) throughout the
period (JB, MDL) - FORMERLY ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION; NOW KNOWN AS A
REGULAR VISITOR TO THE REGION, STILL WITH POORLY UNDERSTOOD
SEASONALITY.

COMMON RAVEN: Seven reports of 1-5 birds in the region (Crosby, Garza,
Kent) during the period (KH, SK) - HISTORICALLY COMMON BELOW THE
CAPROCK ESCARPMENT, MORE RECENTLY ALMOST VANISHED FROM THE REGION;
CURRENTLY IN THE PROCESS OF RE-OCCUPYING ITS FORMER RANGE AND MORE.

PURPLE MARTIN: 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 2/24/19 (JG, PJ) and 1
at Maxey Park (Lubbock) on 2/26/19 (AH) - BY RECENT YEARS' STANDARDS
THESE ARE ACTUALLY FAIRLY LATE ARRIVAL DATES.

BLACK-CRESTED TITMOUSE: 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 2/19/19
(DH) - FORMERLY EASY TO FIND AS FAR WEST AS FLOYD, LUBBOCK, AND GARZA
COUNTIES; NOW GENERALLY FURTHER OR MUCH FURTHER TO THE EAST.

ROCK WREN: 1 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 2/1/19 (SK) the only report
- LOW NUMBER OF REPORTS AND NUMBERS.

WINTER WREN: 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 2/19/19 (DH) the
only report - LOW NUMBERS.

CAROLINA WREN: 1 at the Skeen Playa (Lynn) on 2/9/19 (JA, CB, IB, BH,
KHa, BL, GP, SS) the only report - VERY LOW NUMBER OF REPORTS AND THE
ONE REPORT WAS FROM AN ODDLY WESTERN LOCATION FOR THE REGION.

BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER: 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 2/19/19
(DH) the only report - LOW.

GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET: 1 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 2/5/19 (SK)
the only report - LOW.

EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 2 at Camp Rio Blanca (Crosby) on 2/5/19 (KH) and 3
at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 2/19/19 (DH) the only reports - A
TAD LOW.

WESTERN BLUEBIRD: 1 at Camp Rio Blanca (Crosby) on 2/5/19 (KH), 1
female and 2 males at Tahoka (Lynn) on 2/17/19 (MDL), 2 near Bledsoe
(Yoakum) on 2/17/19 (DH), 1 at Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 2/19/19
(DH), 5 at the Lubbock Cemetery (Lubbock) on 2/23/19 (SP, BK), and 5
in Tahoka (Lynn) on 2/28/19 (MDL) - GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS AND GOOD
NUMBERS - THE WINTER SUCCESS STORY!

MOUNTAIN BLUEBIRD: 20+at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 2/1/19 (SK), 15+
at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 2/12/19 (SK), and 15+ at Lake Alan Henry
(Garaz) on 2/25/19 (SK) - GOOD NUMBERS BUT ODDLY LOCALIZED, ESPECIALLY
GIVEN THE GOOD SCATTER EARLIER IN THE SEASON.

HERMIT THRUSH: 1 at Clapp Park (Lubbock) throughout the period (JrC,
DH, BS) the only bird reported - LOW NUMBER OF REPORTS AND VERY LOW
NUMBERS.

GRAY CATBIRD: 1 continuing at Clapp Park (Lubbock) throughout the
period (JrC, DH, BS) - CASUAL TO THE AREA IN WINTER AND BIRDS VERY
RARELY PERSIST AT A SINGLE SITE THROUGH THE SEASON.

CEDAR WAXWING: Two reports of 4-8 birds and five reports of 12-34
birds in the region (Garza, Hale, Lubbock, Lynn) during the period
(JB, DH, SK, LM, NP) - GOOD NUMBERS BY RECENT WINTERS' STANDARDS; POOR
NUMBERS BY HISTORICAL STANDARDS.

PINE SISKIN: 4 in a Plainview yard (Hale) on 2/9/19 (NP) the only
report - VERY LOW.

LESSER GOLDFINCH: 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 2/9/19 (JoC), 1 in
another Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 2/16/19 (LM), and 7 at Yellowhouse
Canyon (Lubbock) on 2/19/19 (DH) - GOOD NUMBER OF REPORTS AND GOOD
NUMBERS FOR THIS RARE WINTER LINGERER.

CHESTNUT-COLLARED LONGSPUR: 15 near Hale Center (Hale) on 2/16/19 (NP)
the only report - LOW NUMBER OF REPORTS AND EXTRAORDINARILY LOW
NUMBERS.

MCCOWN'S LONGSPUR: 7 near Hale Center (Hale) on 2/16/19 (NP) the only
report - EXTRAORDINARILY LOW NUMBER OF REPORTS AND NUMBERS.

CHIPPING SPARROW: 25+ at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 2/5/19 (SK) - VERY
GOOD NUMBERS FOR A WINTER REPORT!

TOWNSEND'S WARBLER: 1 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 2/16/19 (LM) - A
VERY EXCITING REPORT AS THIS IS NOT ONE OF THE WARBLERS THAT, EVEN
ACCIDENTALLY, WINTERS IN OUR REGION.

OBSERVERS: JA=John Adams, CB=Carol Bailey, IB=Ira Baline, JB=Jeff
Boatright, JBs=Justin Bosler, JoC=Joe Cochran, JrC=Jordan Cochran,
JCr=Jim Crites, MDL=Manuel De Leon, BH-Bill Hardie, KHa=Karen Hardie,
DH=Drew Harvey, AH=Anthony Hewetson, EH=Ellen Hildebrandt, KH=Kelly
Himmel, GU=George Jury, PJ-Pat Jury, SK=Stephen Kasper, BK=Barry
Keith, GK=Glenda Kelly, BL=Bill Lupardus LM=Liam McGuire, JM=Jennifer
Miller, GP=Greg Palko SP=Skyler Parks, NP=Niler Pyeatt, CR=Clarice
Robertson, FR=Floyd Robertson, DS=David Sarkozi, BS=Brad Shine,
SS=Shirley Stafford, WW=Willima Wenthe

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock4
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Date: 3/10/19 1:39 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Summer Tanager ?
Anyone seen any? Our Utley White-eyed Vireos are really busy doing the
tanagers call notes.
--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

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Date: 3/9/19 11:46 am
From: Dennis Shepler <dawgler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Warblers
Howdy,
This morning I had both Hermit and Townsend’s at the bridge to the rock
cottages BBNP. Good photos of TSWA not so good of Hermit.
Dennis Shepler
Brewster County

--
W. Dennis Shepler

 

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Date: 3/9/19 10:39 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] Hawk Watch
HAWKWATCH IS COMING SOON!
Hawkwatch starts at Santa Ana on March 15, running through April 15. Come and spend a few hours watching the sky! Daily 8am to 1pm.

John and Sue Ewan, USFWS Volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge


 

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Date: 3/9/19 10:38 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 9, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
Really warm day on the refuge, and amazingly, the birds began to vocalize around 11am. Good group enjoyed the new finds.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 9, 2019 8:24 AM - 12:05 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.61 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
53 species

Blue-winged Teal 4
Northern Shoveler 4
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 6
Green-winged Teal 1
Plain Chachalaca 1
Least Grebe 1
Pied-billed Grebe 6
Common Ground-Dove 1
White-winged Dove 2
Sora 1
Sandhill Crane 1
Black-necked Stilt 20
Stilt Sandpiper 1
Least Sandpiper 15
Long-billed Dowitcher 46
Greater Yellowlegs 5
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Anhinga 1
Neotropic Cormorant 4
Double-crested Cormorant 3
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 4
Snowy Egret 4
Cattle Egret 3
White Ibis 12
White-faced Ibis 3
Turkey Vulture 8
Harris's Hawk 3
White-tailed Hawk 1
Gray Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 2
Peregrine Falcon 1
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 2 Heard only
Great Kiskadee 8
Couch's Kingbird 2
White-eyed Vireo 2
Green Jay 5
Tree Swallow 3
Barn Swallow 2
Black-crested Titmouse 1
Verdin 3 Heard only
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Savannah Sparrow 2
Hooded Oriole 1
Red-winged Blackbird 135
Great-tailed Grackle 3
Orange-crowned Warbler 2
Northern Cardinal 4

View this checklist online at https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53635584&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Ccfbac372da364321b74b08d6a4bc6069%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636877526304793517&amp;sdata=whNPoJl2TQXTgmARp4Zblfu8UkhU2%2Btbz82Wyl%2BE93k%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53635584&data=02%7C01%7C%7C3d9a83c07946415cecf608d6a4bc7488%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636877526641153424&sdata=oQFiAklQZU5kkWFFzYICJVAzgXN5nS3MSoM1gJt5LCY%3D&reserved=0>

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Date: 3/9/19 5:02 am
From: Todd McGrath <skua...>
Subject: [texbirds] Western Gull
Is present at the White Rock Lake Spilway at 635. One LBBG is also present. White Eock Lake is just east of Dallas

Todd McGrath
<Skua...>
The Woodlands, TX

 

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Date: 3/8/19 10:55 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 8, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
Great morning on the refuge! Good variety of birds on Pintail Lakes even a few Black-bellied Whistling Ducks!
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 8, 2019 8:23 AM - 12:01 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.02 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
63 species

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 2
Blue-winged Teal 25
Cinnamon Teal 6
Northern Shoveler 12
Gadwall 9
Mottled Duck 16
Plain Chachalaca 7
Least Grebe 3
Pied-billed Grebe 4
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 7
Common Ground-Dove 3
White-tipped Dove 1
Sora 2
American Coot 3
Black-necked Stilt 18
American Avocet 2
Killdeer 2
Least Sandpiper 25
Long-billed Dowitcher 18
Wilson's Snipe 1
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 5
Lesser Yellowlegs 5
Forster's Tern 1
Neotropic Cormorant 1
Double-crested Cormorant 1
American White Pelican 3
Great Egret 3
Snowy Egret 5
White Ibis 6
White-faced Ibis 4
Turkey Vulture 35
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1
Cooper's Hawk 1
Harris's Hawk 5
Gray Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 2
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 4
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
Eastern Phoebe 1
Vermilion Flycatcher 3
Great Kiskadee 17
Tropical Kingbird 2
Couch's Kingbird 6
White-eyed Vireo 3
Green Jay 9
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 10
Purple Martin 4
Tree Swallow 9
Barn Swallow 6
Cave Swallow 2
Black-crested Titmouse 1
Verdin 1 Heard only
Carolina Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Hooded Oriole 2
Altamira Oriole 1
Red-winged Blackbird 52
Great-tailed Grackle 8
Orange-crowned Warbler 5
Northern Cardinal 1
House Sparrow 5

View this checklist online at https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53602349&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Ce46742f42adc46d8bc1b08d6a3f47d14%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636876667791696493&amp;sdata=q96%2B6FjqK1YinWvq3TQJTT5PbxTHyXnhgSbZX2n5hF4%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53602349&data=02%7C01%7C%7Ccfc1ea66846f45c13b5e08d6a3f490b4%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636876668119930805&sdata=4zhOWH09Hq2ALaXsZUhrZK776URZHTdtck4Mh5DnBZ4%3D&reserved=0>

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Ce46742f42adc46d8bc1b08d6a3f47d14%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636876667791696493&amp;sdata=gQeibxyIzMYpi84waIbPkIvpu5UvLwVNm5y72Vr3XCE%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&data=02%7C01%7C%7Ccfc1ea66846f45c13b5e08d6a3f490b4%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636876668119940813&sdata=t5SEmTC9xjHgRUshMJrpKv80vXIu4tFu5F5J%2FCTuozc%3D&reserved=0>)


 

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Date: 3/7/19 11:02 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] Hawk Watch
HAWKWATCH IS COMING SOON!
Hawkwatch starts at Santa Ana on March 15, running through April 15. Come and spend a few hours watching the sky! Daily 8am to 1pm.

John & Sue Ewan, USFWS Volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge


 

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Date: 3/7/19 11:01 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 7, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
A delightful walk with 5 intrepid birders this morning. Lots of small flocks as we passed. The highlight was a Northern Parula on the road between Pintail Lakes and Old Headquarters.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.

John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX


Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 7, 2019 8:29 AM - 12:03 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.46 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
68 species (+1 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 6
Northern Shoveler 10
Gadwall 1
Mottled Duck 6
Plain Chachalaca 8
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 4
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 1
Inca Dove 2
Common Ground-Dove 2
White-tipped Dove 1
Mourning Dove 2
Sora 2
American Coot 2
Black-necked Stilt 24
Killdeer 2
Least Sandpiper 2
Long-billed Dowitcher 35
Greater Yellowlegs 3
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Anhinga 1
Neotropic Cormorant 2
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Great Egret 2
Snowy Egret 7
Cattle Egret 1
White Ibis 6
White-faced Ibis 3
Turkey Vulture 2
Northern Harrier 1
Harris's Hawk 3
Gray Hawk 1
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 5
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 4
American Kestrel 1
Peregrine Falcon 1
Eastern Phoebe 2
Vermilion Flycatcher 3
Great Kiskadee 6
Tropical/Couch's Kingbird 2
White-eyed Vireo 5
Green Jay 8
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 23
Purple Martin 1
Tree Swallow 3
Cave Swallow 2
Black-crested Titmouse 11
Verdin 2
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 17
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 5
Long-billed Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 1
European Starling 2
Savannah Sparrow 1
Lincoln's Sparrow 2
Hooded Oriole 1
Altamira Oriole 4
Red-winged Blackbird 75
Great-tailed Grackle 12
Black-and-white Warbler 2
Orange-crowned Warbler 15
Common Yellowthroat 1
Northern Parula 1
Northern Cardinal 7
House Sparrow 4

View this checklist online at https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53572729&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cf29c60720c4d41d334f808d6a32aa98c%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636875800953128241&amp;sdata=XjMotknSiOIrjvEeQsb16pSt6fTJx44mnwFh6An45mM%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53572729&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cd76c90130ef6406cb43b08d6a32ace25%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636875801568000131&sdata=rmm1z0g8QfNXLHOwWYolvoHVTeM9i83%2F6mX10gn32Lg%3D&reserved=0>

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Date: 3/7/19 10:57 am
From: <nina...>
Subject: [texbirds] TRPA at Armand Bayou, Harris County
Sandi Templeton and I were lucky to see, photograph, and record the male Tropical Parula at 11:45 this morning at Armand Bayou Nature Center in Pasadena. We saw it along the SW bend of the Karankawa trail, but it was found elsewhere by Mike Austin. Map at check-in now has three locations marked.
There are flocks of YRWA and HOFI moving throughout the park; some trails blocked with standing water. For maximum flexibility, wear wading boots.

Nina Rach
Houston

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 3/7/19 8:34 am
From: Becky Reyes <breyes...>
Subject: [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center- American Goldfinches
There are some American Goldfinches taking to our seed feeders today.

Happy Birding!

*Becky Reyes*
Naturalist Educator
Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center

<http://www.cityofedinburg.com/>
Office: (956) 381-9922
Fax: (956) 381-0715
<vguzman...>www.EdinburgWBC.org
<http://www.edinburgwbc.org/>
*<breyes...> <vguzman...>*

follow us:
<https://www.facebook.com/EdinburgWBC/> [image:
https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork]
<https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork>

 

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Date: 3/6/19 12:25 pm
From: Berner Family <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender jcazberner for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Tropical Parula Armand Bayou (Harris County) midday today
Texbirders: Mike Austin reported a Tropical Parula late morning at Armand Bayou singing a buzzy song (he saw well and got good notes). Park open until 5pm today and opens at 9 tomorrow. Park staff can help direct you. Found on Martyn Trail two benches East of wildlife observation platform. Associating with flock of yellow rumpled warblers John B


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 3/6/19 10:40 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 6, 2019
Good afternoon Texbirders, A very good walk in the refuge today with 7,
which included some gentlemen from the Netherlands and a couple from
California...many life birds seen! Birds of note included a pair of Hooded
Orioles and Gray Catbird at the feeders, great looks at Northern
Beardless-Tyrannulet in trees over blind along the Chachalaca Trail, and
many south Texas birds. We visited both Pintail and Willow Lakes.
Birdwalks 8:30am and Birding Van Tours 1:30pm daily except Sundays.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas



Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 6, 2019 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
69 species

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 1
Blue-winged Teal 25
Cinnamon Teal 6
Northern Shoveler 8
Gadwall 30
Mottled Duck 8
Green-winged Teal 6
Ring-necked Duck 1
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 3
Inca Dove 6
Common Ground-Dove 2
White-tipped Dove 4
Sora 3
American Coot 3
Black-necked Stilt 18
American Avocet 1
Killdeer 3
Stilt Sandpiper 1
Least Sandpiper 40
Long-billed Dowitcher 10
Wilson's Snipe 2
Greater Yellowlegs 6
Anhinga 2
Great Egret 2
Snowy Egret 6
Cattle Egret 1
White-faced Ibis 3
Turkey Vulture 3
Harris's Hawk 2
Gray Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 3
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 10
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 4
American Kestrel 1
Peregrine Falcon 1
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1 Seen and calling at blind on
Chachalaca Trail
Eastern Phoebe 4
Vermilion Flycatcher 4
Great Kiskadee 15
White-eyed Vireo 6
Green Jay 10
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 20
Tree Swallow 1
Black-crested Titmouse 12
Verdin 3
House Wren 4
Carolina Wren 4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 15
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Clay-colored Thrush 1
Gray Catbird 1 FOS(first of season) at feeders
Long-billed Thrasher 3
Northern Mockingbird 3
European Starling 1
Savannah Sparrow 3
Lincoln's Sparrow 2
Hooded Oriole 2 Pair at feeders
Altamira Oriole 6
Red-winged Blackbird 50
Great-tailed Grackle 2
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 8
Nashville Warbler 1
Common Yellowthroat 4
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 3
Northern Cardinal 12
House Sparrow 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53518446

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

 

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Date: 3/5/19 12:41 pm
From: Jane F Tillman <jtillman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Request for info on the Western Gull, White Rock Lake
Hi, Texbirders.
I have not seen any eBird reports of the Western Gull after this recent
bout of really cold weather, and wondered if anyone has seen it the last
couple of days. It looks like some of the other gulls like Little, were
still there as of yesterday.

Thanks.
Jane Tillman
Austin

 

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Date: 3/5/19 10:24 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 5, 2019
Good afternoon Texbirders, Again a chilly morning, but at least no rain for
our birdwalk. Birders enjoyed fantastic views of Northern
Beardless-Tyrannulet very low in the brush, several Clay-colored Thrush,
Cinnamon Teal, and again many of our south Texas birds. We walked the
Chachalaca Trail to Willow Lakes and the Tower Trail today. Birdwalks
8:30am and Birding Van Tours 1:30pm daily, except Sundays.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas



Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 5, 2019 8:40 AM - 11:40 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.5 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
56 species

Blue-winged Teal 25
Cinnamon Teal 2
Northern Shoveler 10
Gadwall 35
American Wigeon 1
Plain Chachalaca 5
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 4
Common Ground-Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 1
White-winged Dove 2
Mourning Dove 1
Sora 3
American Coot 4
Killdeer 2
Least Sandpiper 12
Long-billed Dowitcher 10
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 4
Turkey Vulture 3
Cooper's Hawk 1
Gray Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 6
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
Peregrine Falcon 1
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1
Eastern Phoebe 2
Vermilion Flycatcher 3
Great Kiskadee 6
White-eyed Vireo 4
Green Jay 6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 1
Tree Swallow 15
Black-crested Titmouse 8
Verdin 2
House Wren 4
Carolina Wren 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 8
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Clay-colored Thrush 4
Long-billed Thrasher 1
American Pipit 12
American Goldfinch 12
Olive Sparrow 4
Lincoln's Sparrow 2
Altamira Oriole 4
Red-winged Blackbird 40
Great-tailed Grackle 1
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 4
Common Yellowthroat 3
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 1
Northern Cardinal 6

 

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Date: 3/5/19 10:02 am
From: Becky Reyes <breyes...>
Subject: [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
Hi everyone,
Even in very cold and windy weather this morning, we still managed to see
some good birds. Lots of them were spotted at or around our feeders today
especially the Buff-bellied Hummingbirds. There was a lot of bird activity
at South Pond, adding many birds to the list below. Now it is time for me
to thaw out, but check out the list below.

Happy Birding!!

Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center, Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 5, 2019 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
47 species

Blue-winged Teal 17
Northern Shoveler 13
Mottled Duck 4
Plain Chachalaca 6
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 11
White-tipped Dove 3
Mourning Dove 4
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 3
American Coot 4
Black-necked Stilt 3
Anhinga 2
Neotropic Cormorant 32
American White Pelican 1
Great Blue Heron 3
Great Egret 1
Snowy Egret 5
Cattle Egret 1
Black-crowned Night-Heron 2
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron 1
Turkey Vulture 1
Osprey 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 2
Great Kiskadee 2
White-eyed Vireo 1
Purple Martin 7
Tree Swallow 3
Barn Swallow 1
Black-crested Titmouse 1
House Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 7
Clay-colored Thrush 2
Gray Catbird 1
Curve-billed Thrasher 1
Long-billed Thrasher 2
Northern Mockingbird 2
European Starling 4
Lesser Goldfinch 5
Olive Sparrow 1
Red-winged Blackbird 5
Great-tailed Grackle 2
Orange-crowned Warbler 6
Wilson's Warbler 3
Northern Cardinal 7

*Becky Reyes*
Naturalist Educator
Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center

<http://www.cityofedinburg.com/>
Office: (956) 381-9922
Fax: (956) 381-0715
<vguzman...>www.EdinburgWBC.org
<http://www.edinburgwbc.org/>
*<breyes...> <vguzman...>*

follow us:
<https://www.facebook.com/EdinburgWBC/> [image:
https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork]
<https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork>

 

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Date: 3/4/19 10:08 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] 2019 eBird Game - February Report - of Interest to TCC/eBird Folk Only
This is probably only of interest to folk who are interested in the
Texas Century Club and/or obsessed with eBird. In other words: if you
aren't interested in this sort of stuff feel free to hit the delete
button.

Though I have seen over 100 species in all 36 Oregon and all 254 Texas
Counties, I am way behind on entering my historical data into eBird
and at the beginning of February had but 14 Oregon and 71 Texas
Counties over 100 in eBird. With this in mind and with various Texas
eBird reviewers breathing down my neck, one of my ongoing 2019 games
is a concerted effort to get the data in. With 214 months worth of
un-entered data at the beginning of the year(January-April of 1992,
July 1992 through December of 1997, and January of 2000 through
December of 2011) I really had my work cut out for me and, considering
that I still work full-time, decided to set myself a pace of six
months data entered per month - making this a three year project
assuming I can keep that sort of pace.

I entered seven months in January, getting me down to 207 months.

I entered eighteen months of historical data in February (July 1992
through March 1993 and April through December of 2000) plus, of
course, February of 2019 - keeping up with current events as well)
during January, leaving me at 189 months of in-entered data, and moved
four Oregon County over the eBird century mark (Coos, Curry, Hood
River, and Marion) and four Texas Counties over the eBird century mark
(Blanco, Cameron, Hidalgo, Real), getting me up to 18 out of 36 Oregon
Counties and 75 out of 254 Texas Counties eBirded to over 100 species

March will see me through (I hope) three plus months more of 1993 and
three plus months more of 2001, and one more month of 2019 and it is
truly, almost obsessively, enjoyable to revisit the somewhat more
active days of my 'youth'. I am almost positive that eBird reviewers
must be enjoying these slugs of ancient data as much as I:)

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock
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Date: 3/4/19 9:42 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 4, 2019
Good afternoon Texbirders, We were surprised by a turnout of 6 hardy people
who went out with us for a walk in the refuge on a very chilly, wet
morning. We even saw some birds! Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet,
Clay-colored Thrush, Cinnamon Teal, Hooded Oriole, and many of the south
Texas specialties. Obviously missing were soaring hawks. We covered Willow
Lakes and the feeder stations. Birdwalks 8:30am, Birding Van Tours 1:30pm
daily except Sundays.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas



Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 4, 2019 8:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
1.0 mile(s)
Comments: Morning Bird Walk
47 species (+1 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 20
Cinnamon Teal 3
Northern Shoveler 15
Gadwall 25
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 4
Green-winged Teal 15
Plain Chachalaca 5
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Inca Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 5
Mourning Dove 2
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 1
Sora 2
Black-necked Stilt 20
Killdeer 6
Least Sandpiper 2
Long-billed Dowitcher 1
Wilson's Snipe 1
Harris's Hawk 1
hawk sp. 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 7
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
Vermilion Flycatcher 1
Great Kiskadee 6
White-eyed Vireo 4
Green Jay 6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 8
Tree Swallow 12
Black-crested Titmouse 8
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 8
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Clay-colored Thrush 4
Northern Mockingbird 1
Olive Sparrow 2
Lincoln's Sparrow 2
Hooded Oriole 1
Altamira Oriole 3
Red-winged Blackbird 50
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 3
Common Yellowthroat 3
Northern Cardinal 6
House Sparrow 10

 

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Date: 3/4/19 9:38 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] 2019 Photography Game - February Report
In hopes that we couldn't possibly have two miserably dry, birdless,
and butterflyless years in a row and in hopes of a) getting that
danged painting done and b) getting more of my historical data entered
into eBird I decided to repeat my attempt to document 40 butterfly, 0
amphibian, 2 reptile, 80 bird, and 4 mammal species - with 90% of the
species seen/heard photographed as well.

I really think I might have been wrong about this year not being
miserably dry - with all of 0.04 inches of rain during February (and
for the year so far) - but I am nothing if not stubborn so here is the
sad report from the very sad second month.

Though I missed two weekends (one chasing a rarity near Uvalde and one
to volunteer work) I did manage to locate 0 species of butterfly, 0
species of amphibian, 0 species of reptile, 15 species of bird, and 1
species of mammal during January, getting up to 0 species of
butterfly, 0 species of amphibian, 0 species of reptile, 17 species
of bird, and 1 species of mammal for the year, hitting 0%, 0%, 0%,
21.25%, and 25% of my annual goals in a positively stunning second
month - seriously, I am stunned! Of these eighteen species, I
managed to photograph twelve, putting me at 67% of my photographic
goal.

What is truly amazing is that, though I have six species of flower
blooming in my yard and we have had numerous unseasonably warm day, I
have had none of our regularly wintering butterflies. Oh well - March
has got to be better:)

The list follows coded as *=new, (y) = photographed

Cackling Goose
Canada Goose
Eurasian Collared Dove
White-winged Dove
Mourning Dove (y)
Double-crested Cormorant
Sharp-shinned Hawk*
Red-tailed Hawk
Blue Jay (y)
American Robin
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
House Sparrow
House Finch
Great-tailed Grackle

Eastern Gray Squirrel

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock
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Date: 3/3/19 9:53 am
From: Jane F Tillman <jtillman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Definitions of Short, Medium and Long Distance Migrants
HI, Texbirders.

My goal is to explain bird status and migration to the general public in
easy to grasp terms, so they appreciate that birds change with the seasons.
I have put them in these categories: Permanent residents, winter residents,
passage migrants (those that don't breed in Texas) and summer residents.
Do you think that captures the essence accurately without getting into the
weeds too much?
Of course in Texas we have birds that summer here, while others of the same
species are on their way to other destinations. Is there a special term for
that category?

Are there clear cut definitions for the above terms: short, medium, long
distance and passage? If so, would you share them, and your source?

In one place I looked it said Short Distance migrants are altitudinal
migrants, so in Texas I suppose birds in the Guadalupes that move down
slope in fall? But All About Birds which is a handy quick reference for the
general public sometimes uses that for what I'd call medium distance birds
like wintering sparrows.

Medium distance- unclear - one definition said birds that move a state or
two - which is pretty vague. Another source might call these temperate
migrants since they remain primarily north of the tropics.

Long distance- Neotrop-Nearctic would be this category I assume.

Your insight is much appreciated.
Thanks.
Jane Tillman
Austin

 

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Date: 3/3/19 6:59 am
From: Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...>
Subject: [texbirds] 65 species on King Ranch
Nine of us spent a little over 4 hours birding the Santa Gertrudis division
of the King Ranch, recording 65 species. Among them were Merlin and
Scissortail Flycatcher. Complete list at
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53316333

--
Jim Sinclair (TX-ESA)
TOS Life Member
Kingsville, TX

"The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of
thinking we were at when we created them." - Albert Einstein

 

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Date: 3/2/19 10:51 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 2, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
What a great day! Hawks, shorebirds and waterfowl were in abundance at both Pintail and Willow Lakes.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 2, 2019 8:27 AM - 11:51 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.71 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
62 species (+1 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 4
Cinnamon Teal 5
Northern Shoveler 7
Gadwall 7
Mottled Duck 9
Green-winged Teal 6
Plain Chachalaca 11
Least Grebe 3
Pied-billed Grebe 4
Common Ground-Dove 2
White-tipped Dove 1
White-winged Dove 1
Sora 1
American Coot 1
Black-necked Stilt 14
Killdeer 2
Least Sandpiper 26
Long-billed Dowitcher 35
Greater Yellowlegs 7
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Neotropic Cormorant 2
Great Egret 3
Snowy Egret 5
Green Heron 1
White Ibis 5
White-faced Ibis 4
Turkey Vulture 35
Northern Harrier 1
Cooper's Hawk 1
Harris's Hawk 4
Gray Hawk 2
Belted Kingfisher 3
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 7
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 1
Peregrine Falcon 1
Vermilion Flycatcher 3
Great Kiskadee 12
Tropical Kingbird 1
Couch's Kingbird 6
Tropical/Couch's Kingbird 3
White-eyed Vireo 7
Green Jay 6
Tree Swallow 3
Black-crested Titmouse 2
Verdin 4
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 1
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Northern Mockingbird 3
European Starling 1
Olive Sparrow 3
Savannah Sparrow 4
Hooded Oriole 1
Altamira Oriole 3
Red-winged Blackbird 125
Great-tailed Grackle 7
Orange-crowned Warbler 4
Nashville Warbler 1
Common Yellowthroat 1
Northern Cardinal 8
House Sparrow 3

View this checklist online at https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53287237&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C9e5edd9d8a714496c03808d69f3cc80c%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636871480727997652&amp;sdata=ScGMVGnQ2CnekK7ikd7RAGxFGrT7G2OmrlrW1VjpPWg%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53287237&data=02%7C01%7C%7C40e4ffae7e034a310af708d69f3cd6a1%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636871480972348945&sdata=STMux70b%2FHjKqu4xvDHt5dQMLqv20A%2BlsI8TgHjllyE%3D&reserved=0>

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://nam05.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C9e5edd9d8a714496c03808d69f3cc80c%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636871480727997652&amp;sdata=PH5JbzCv7xtDID1503mtxdlFe6skBRayzqL%2FBdZX3wg%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fhome&data=02%7C01%7C%7C40e4ffae7e034a310af708d69f3cd6a1%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636871480972358953&sdata=%2Bdd3kWkIPhS94Jt0AVGvscGFQBP50lhDbTjgkQjGP%2FQ%3D&reserved=0>)


 

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Date: 3/1/19 7:23 pm
From: Garett Hodne <garyhodne...>
Subject: [texbirds] Subject: The 2019 Season for Texas Pelagics gets underway early this year.
Hi Texbirders and Pelagic Fanatics,



I am pleased to announce that we are planning to run 3 trips in 2019. Reservations for these first 3 trips are now open! And if all those trips make it there is the possibility of a fourth trip in September from South Padre Island.



<http://texaspelagics.com/2019-schedule/> Schedule for 2019 Texas Pelagic Trips:

Click the above link to learn more about upcoming Texas Pelagic trips, i.e. fares, trip lengths, departure times, spaces remaining, etc.



1. Sat May 25th; 16 hours; aboard the Blue Fin from Freeport the first trip on the Upper Texas Gulf Coast since 1999.



2. Sat. July 27th; 14 hour; aboard the Kingfisher from Port Aransas;



3. Sat. August 24th, 16 hour; aboard the Kingfisher from Port Aransas;



Partly out of necessity beginning in 2016 we started running Texas Pelagic trips from Port Aransas because our usual charter boat from South Padre Island would no longer charter to us during the summer tourist season which is the prime season Gulf of Mexico pelagics. Most of the party fishing boats in Port Aransas weren’t interested in chartering to birders to upset their fisherman clientele, except for Deep Sea Headquarters. So now we’ve run two summer Texas Pelagics from Port Aransas and both were great trips with a large number of seabirds, near record numbers of seabird species and good showings of marine mammals. I personally have high hopes for continuing great trips out of Port Aransas because of the varied deep water seafloor bathymetry and the closer proximity to the Gulf's Loop Current.



NEW FOR 2019: We are planning to run one late spring Texas Pelagic from Freeport aboard the Blue Fin. The last time a Texas Pelagic trip was run from Freeport was back in 1999, so I think it’s about time we tried Freeport again. The several advantages for this pelagic trip. The Blue Fin is a FAST 48’ sport-fishing boat (but it holds only 16 passengers) so we should be able to reach the shelf edge in 4 hours or less even though it is slightly farther from Freeport that Port Aransas. Plus we will be heading farther east than all other Texas Pelagics have been since at least 1999. And this season is prime time for storm-petrels and in particular the possibility of finding another Wilson’s Storm-Petrel is on my mind. Also who knows what else we could find in waters farther east? Maybe White-tailed Tropicbird?, Red-footed Booby? Okay I can dream. With 16 hours to explore we will have probably 8 hours in deep waters to explore and find whatever may be out there. And lastly many of our seabirders from the Houston area can probably save a lot of money on hotel rooms for one or both nights.



WHY GO ON A TEXAS PELAGIC? Short answer – the seabirds, the marine mammals (whales and dolphins), the world's biggest fish and they are a lot of FUN!! If you talk to any of the Texas Pelagic leaders and regulars they'll probably tell you some of the most amazing seabird and wildlife encounters they've ever had in the state of Texas occurred on a Texas Pelagic.



Some of our trips over the last few years have encountered very high numbers of many of the regular pelagic seabirds:

Audubon’s & Cory’s Shearwaters, Leaches & Band-rumped Storm-Petrels, Magnificent Frigatebirds, Masked Booby, Brown Booby (now annually), Sooty & Bridled Terns and Pomarine Jaegers . In additional to those regular seabirds above we regularly (sometimes) encounter Red-billed Tropicbird, Great Shearwater, Sooty Shearwater, Long-tailed Jaeger and Parasitic Jaeger. We have also accumulated an impressive list of rarities: Manx Shearwater, Sabine’s Gull, Brown Noddy and South Polar Skua. We have now had two trips that were fortunate enough to have a mixed species flock that included both Brown Noddy and Brown Booby in the same binocular view!  And of course in Sept 2003 we had an incredible Yellow-nosed Albatross encounter! Prior to that there were 3 YNAB that had been found moribund or dead on Texas beaches. The first record of South Polar Skua for the Gulf of Mexico was seen in October 2004. And two other SPSK have been seen since from deep water Tuna fishing boats. Black-capped Petrel and Arctic Tern has been seen twice from Port O'Connor in May and July. BCPE has also been encountered at least once from deep water tuna fishing boats in Texas waters in the fall . It is exciting possibilities like this that keeps folks coming back for more. There are undoubtedly new discoveries still to be made offshore. White-tailed Tropicbird, Red-footed Booby and Wilson's Storm-Petrels will eventually be found on an organized pelagic birding trip as these birds have already been found by fisherman in Texas waters or in the case of the WTTR on a Texas beach. I've compiled a list of hypothetical future possibilities of pelagic seabirds that have either already been found in the Gulf of Mexico but not yet in Texas or occur off the East Coast of the US in the North Atlantic. Just FYI that list can be found here: <http://texaspelagics.com/seabird-occurrence/hypothetical/> http://texaspelagics.com/seabird-occurrence/hypothetical/ . Seabird galleries, checklists and bar-graphs can be found here: <http://texaspelagics.com/seabird-occurrence/> http://texaspelagics.com/seabird-occurrence/.



MARINE MAMMALS AND WHALE SHARKS: And of course, when there aren't great birds around, sometimes other marine life activity steals the show.  We routinely get Bottlenose Dolphins and Atlantic spotted dolphins on most trips. We have had frequent encounters with Whale Sharks, like the August 2011 trip where an absolutely monstrous Whale Shark bumped into the boat. Check out the photos of it about half-way through the slide-show from that trip at:

<http://www.texaspelagics.com/trips/20110827/index.html> http://www.texaspelagics.com/trips/20110827/index.html



In 2014 on one trip we saw 18+ Sperm Whales, some right next to the boat, and 250+ Melon-headed Whales that also circled the boat. Sperm Whales are the most common whale we encounter and have been seen on 7 trips with over 50 individual whales seen in total. Mesoplodon Beaked Whales and a number of other large dolphins and smaller whales have also been seen on Texas Pelagic trips. These are some of the amazing wildlife encounters you may experience on a Texas Pelagic.



If you've never been on a Texas Pelagic this is the year you should try one or two. If it's been a long time since you've been on a Texas Pelagic come back this year and see how much fun they can be. If you're afraid of seasickness try using the Transderm Scop patch (prescription needed) and enjoy a day at sea with our great pelagic leaders and groups. These trips are also a great way to spend a hot summer weekend out birding where it is definitely cooler offshore than it is onshore. If you're still unconvinced check out the testimonials from our participants and leaders here: <http://texaspelagics.com/testimonials/> http://texaspelagics.com/testimonials/



SIGN-UP SOON BEFORE ITS TOO LATE: The May 25th trip is fast approaching and I'll need to know if we can fill up the boat with only 16 participants by April 22nd. Deep Sea HQ in Port Aransas requires a long lead time for us to commit to running the charter, so they can free up the boat for fisherman if we back out. The deadline for the July 27th trip is May 1st, but I'll be out of the country for an extended period than so I'll need to know by April 22nd before I leave if it's likely we can fill up this boat with close to 40 people.



Unfortunately our Charter boat prices have increased significantly in the last few years over what they were a decade ago. Our leaders also pay close to full fare depending on the number of participants we can gather.



More information on these trips, logistical considerations and sign-up instructions can be found here: <http://texaspelagics.com/register-2/> http://texaspelagics.com/register-2/



CHECK OUT THE WEBSITE:

Information on Texas Pelagics in general (including photos from previous trips and what species can be expected) can be found at this informative website:

<http://www.texaspelagics.com/> http://www.texaspelagics.com/



Also there is a Facebook group for Texas Pelagics.

<https://www.facebook.com/groups/219671194850690/> https://www.facebook.com/groups/219671194850690/



Please check these out for more information as well.

I hope you'll join us.

Gary Hodne

The Woodlands, TX

<garyhodne...>



Garett ‘Gary’ Hodne



www.TexasPelagics.com <http://www.TexasPelagics.com>

281-684-5425






 

Back to top
Date: 3/1/19 10:48 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Mar 1, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
The birds were quiet this morning, though still a good concentration of shorebirds on Willow Lake #4.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Mar 1, 2019 8:22 AM - 11:49 AM
Protocol: Traveling
6.81 mile(s)
49 species (+1 other taxa)

Black-bellied Whistling-Duck 4
Blue-winged Teal 25
Cinnamon Teal 4
Northern Shoveler 9
Gadwall 8
Mallard/Mexican Duck 1 Willow lake #4, dark stripe on head, grayer head than Mottled Duck, dark center to beak
Mottled Duck 4
Green-winged Teal 5
Least Grebe 4
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Inca Dove 3
White-tipped Dove 2
Sora 3
American Coot 4
Black-necked Stilt 12
Killdeer 9
Stilt Sandpiper 1
Least Sandpiper 75
Long-billed Dowitcher 16
Greater Yellowlegs 3
Lesser Yellowlegs 1
Double-crested Cormorant 2
Great Egret 1
White-faced Ibis 1
Turkey Vulture 18
Cooper's Hawk 1
Harris's Hawk 3
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 3
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
American Kestrel 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
Great Kiskadee 5
Couch's Kingbird 1
White-eyed Vireo 5
Green Jay 4
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2
Purple Martin 1
Tree Swallow 3
Barn Swallow 3
Cave Swallow 2
Black-crested Titmouse 6
Verdin 1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Altamira Oriole 2
Red-winged Blackbird 125
Orange-crowned Warbler 1
Northern Cardinal 7
House Sparrow 5

View this checklist online at https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53252503&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cb1541b67a9fc4e26054c08d69e72cc79%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636870613217165263&amp;sdata=85yURD65UTy7T6MU%2FenSGfv0WYFvJ0C2%2FIPaZPrl1QM%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Feur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com%2F%3Furl%3Dhttps%253A%252F%252Febird.org%252Fview%252Fchecklist%252FS53252503%26data%3D02%257C01%257C%257Cb1541b67a9fc4e26054c08d69e72cc79%257C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%257C1%257C0%257C636870613217165263%26sdata%3D85yURD65UTy7T6MU%252FenSGfv0WYFvJ0C2%252FIPaZPrl1QM%253D%26reserved%3D0&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cb55c1901d86b4aefc1a908d69e72e3d6%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636870613653100043&sdata=O%2BEOAFvmzuXe2aUQcxoHWMty48eS8MXsTPVDrk7GWwE%3D&reserved=0>

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Date: 3/1/19 8:10 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Golden-crowned Sparrow, Hwy. 118 (Jeff Davis Co.)
Texbirds,

Yesterday, 28 February, Rich Kostecke discovered an immature Golden-crowned
Sparrow at a stock tank along SH 118 in Jeff Davis County. eBird checklist
and map below.

https://ebird.org/tx/view/checklist/S53238832

https://www.google.com/maps/place/30%C2%B055'53.8%22N+104%C2%B009'03.6%22W/@30.9316324,-104.2560465,11z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x0!8m2!3d30.9316088!4d-104.1509871

Good birding!

Justin Bosler
Austin, TX

 

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Date: 2/28/19 10:44 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 28, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
It was a beautiful morning on the refuge trees are beginning to leaf out and a few flowers are blooming. A wonderful group enjoyed a delightful morning together lots of spring bird song!
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Feb 28, 2019 8:22 AM - 11:57 AM
Protocol: Traveling
5.81 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
56 species (+1 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 9
Cinnamon Teal 6
Northern Shoveler 5
Gadwall 4
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 8
Green-winged Teal 5
Plain Chachalaca 2
Least Grebe 3
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Inca Dove 3
Common Ground-Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 1
Sora 4
American Coot 5
Black-necked Stilt 2
Killdeer 2
Stilt Sandpiper 1
Least Sandpiper 45
Long-billed Dowitcher 35
Greater Yellowlegs 3
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Great Blue Heron 1
Snowy Egret 4
White Ibis 4
White-faced Ibis 2
Turkey Vulture 2
White-tailed Kite 1
Cooper's Hawk 1
Harris's Hawk 7
Gray Hawk 1
Ringed Kingfisher 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 4
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
Great Kiskadee 9
Couch's Kingbird 1
Tropical/Couch's Kingbird 2
White-eyed Vireo 4
Green Jay 9
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 2
Tree Swallow 3
Cave Swallow 2
Black-crested Titmouse 4
Verdin 4
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 5
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Long-billed Thrasher 3
Northern Mockingbird 4
Olive Sparrow 1
Altamira Oriole 7
Red-winged Blackbird 75
Orange-crowned Warbler 5
Common Yellowthroat 2
Northern Cardinal 4

View this checklist online at https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53223635&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cdb6b8b153c2644482cf608d69dab455d%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636869756252812388&amp;sdata=pw3XzQJEjqNgiSkMyHMYBeZcKyNNy1apqkpybYGADLQ%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53223635&data=02%7C01%7C%7C551f5b7ba1d143a2cfc108d69dab826d%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636869757278890632&sdata=9Y7Uveu3ao5jk%2BuuwJdazmrGHlfm3cwBSlv%2B67GrYNg%3D&reserved=0>

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Date: 2/28/19 7:50 am
From: Lois Hughes <loisnjake...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
I’m torn between two birds that are regulars at Salineno Preserve where I have spent the last 10 winters as a co-host. Altamira Oriole has a strikingly cheerful song that’s instantly recognizable. The other favorite is Long billed Thrasher who has a variety of calls and a beautifully melodic song that’s uniquely it’s own plus an extensive repertoire of “borrowed “ snippets that put the Mockingbird to shame. These are my Texas sounds that I take home with me in my head and can’t wait to hear when I return.
Lois Hughes
Salineno Preserve
Salineno, TX

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 28, 2019, at 9:10 AM, Mark Welch <welch.mark3...> wrote:
>
> I'm with Harvey on all counts. (Spent a week during summer in an isolated cabin high above Telluride, CO. Just Wife and son about. Each morning before dawn, I would hear the Whoosh-- never had heard it before-- and it totally freaked me out. My being extensively experienced in the CO outdoors and never having heard that voodoo sound was a very disturbing mystery-- was it Grendel lurking nearby?
>
> Mark in Dripping
>
>> On Wed, Feb 27, 2019 at 8:44 PM Danny Set <hlaas...> wrote:
>> As usual a bit late to the party. My first bird sound memory that really made an impression was not a song, but the sound of a common nighthawk's woosh! That sparked a youngster's dream of what it would be to fly like a bird on late Summer afternoons. Watching and listening for those power dives is still a summer favorite. In addition now days it would be barred owl calls along Bessie's Creek as three or four respond to each other up and down the creek. Spring it's wild turkeys in the Hill Country. Summer it's bobwhite and winter it's white-crowned sparrows in back of the house.
>>
>> Harvey Laas
>>
>> 10 miles N of Brookshire
>>
>> Land of perpetual mud ..... until the next drought arrives
>>
>>
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/28/19 7:11 am
From: Mark Welch <welch.mark3...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
I'm with Harvey on all counts. (Spent a week during summer in an isolated
cabin high above Telluride, CO. Just Wife and son about. Each morning
before dawn, I would hear the Whoosh-- never had heard it before-- and it
totally freaked me out. My being extensively experienced in the CO outdoors
and never having heard that voodoo sound was a very disturbing mystery--
was it Grendel lurking nearby?

Mark in Dripping

On Wed, Feb 27, 2019 at 8:44 PM Danny Set <hlaas...> wrote:

> As usual a bit late to the party. My first bird sound memory that really
> made an impression was not a song, but the sound of a common nighthawk's
> woosh! That sparked a youngster's dream of what it would be to fly like a
> bird on late Summer afternoons. Watching and listening for those power
> dives is still a summer favorite. In addition now days it would be barred
> owl calls along Bessie's Creek as three or four respond to each other up
> and down the creek. Spring it's wild turkeys in the Hill Country. Summer
> it's bobwhite and winter it's white-crowned sparrows in back of the house.
>
> Harvey Laas
>
> 10 miles N of Brookshire
>
> Land of perpetual mud ..... until the next drought arrives
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/19 6:44 pm
From: Danny Set <hlaas...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song


As usual a bit late to the party. My first bird sound memory that really
made an impression was not a song, but the sound of a common nighthawk's
woosh! That sparked a youngster's dream of what it would be to fly like
a bird on late Summer afternoons. Watching and listening for those power
dives is still a summer favorite. In addition now days it would be
barred owl calls along Bessie's Creek as three or four respond to each
other up and down the creek. Spring it's wild turkeys in the Hill
Country. Summer it's bobwhite and winter it's white-crowned sparrows in
back of the house.

Harvey Laas

10 miles N of Brookshire

Land of perpetual mud ..... until the next drought arrives


 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/19 10:41 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 27, 2019
Good afternoon Texbirders, an enthusiastic group joined us, some first time
visitors, for our walk in the refuge...good looks at Hooded Oriole at
feeders, and along the Chachalaca Trail to Willow Lakes, Northern
Beardless-Tyrannulet, Verdin, Clay-colored Thrush, and for some the
Golden-crowned Kinglet.
Bird walks 8:30am and Birding Van Tours 1:30pm daily, except Sundays.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas



Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Feb 27, 2019 8:30 AM - 11:55 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
Comments: Morning Bird Walk
70 species (+1 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 25
Cinnamon Teal 3
Northern Shoveler 20
Gadwall 25
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 6
Green-winged Teal 12
Plain Chachalaca 4
Least Grebe 3
Pied-billed Grebe 3
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 3
Inca Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 3
White-winged Dove 1
Mourning Dove 2
Sora 2
American Coot 4
Black-necked Stilt 25
Killdeer 8
Least Sandpiper 50
Long-billed Dowitcher 50
Wilson's Snipe 1
Solitary Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 8
Lesser Yellowlegs 3
Neotropic Cormorant 2
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 2
Snowy Egret 4
White Ibis 2
Turkey Vulture 3
Harris's Hawk 5
Gray Hawk 2
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 6
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 4
Peregrine Falcon 1
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1
Eastern Phoebe 1
Vermilion Flycatcher 1
Great Kiskadee 12
Tropical Kingbird 1
Couch's Kingbird 3
White-eyed Vireo 5
Green Jay 8
swallow sp. 1
Black-crested Titmouse 6
Verdin 3
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4
Golden-crowned Kinglet 1 Continuing bird, seen and heard today, “see
see see” call. Black stripes in face and yellow crown stripe
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Clay-colored Thrush 1
Long-billed Thrasher 2
Northern Mockingbird 2
Olive Sparrow 1
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Western Meadowlark 4
Hooded Oriole (cucullatus/sennetti) 1
Altamira Oriole 6
Red-winged Blackbird 50
Great-tailed Grackle 2
Orange-crowned Warbler 5
Nashville Warbler 2
Common Yellowthroat 3
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 1
Northern Cardinal 6
House Sparrow

 

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Date: 2/27/19 9:48 am
From: Judy Heffner <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender judyhef for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song - ask and ye shall receive...
Carolina Wren always stops me in my tracks.
Judy HeffnerHumble

On Tuesday, February 26, 2019 2:13 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:


When I was but a lad, I had a crow named Rodan.  The back door on that house had a screen door with a spring that made a screeching sound when opened.  We did not use that door much but it came into the kitchen.   My folks would throw scraps out for the dogs and chickens so when that door opened they came running from all over.  Rodan learned to do that sound so perfectly that he jacked with the chickens and dogs and they came running in until they learned better.
On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 1:49 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> wrote:

Hi all – Just a quick update to the last sentence of my Bird Song message – the Birding Gods were listening: this morning in the rain, the Clay-colored (Robin) Thrush was calling in the mesquites in the back yard!!!  Yay!!!Tthe BackYard Mockingbird was NOT happy about it!   He was fussing…. Spring!!!!  Clay TaylorTOS Life MemberCalallen (Corpus Christi) <TXClay.taylor...>   From: Clay Taylor
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 1:07 PM
To: <brushfreeman...>
Cc: <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Bird Song. Ha!  A good topic, Brush! Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by whistling “Peter, Peter, PeeEEE” in the spring.   When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern’s raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers and American Oystercatchers.  Ok, so Texas only, eh?   When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them.  Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.  Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine, heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song, anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting without having to find it in order to confirm it.  However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and singing morning and evening.  Last June we actually saw two birds on my neighbors’ roof, facing off.  I am impatiently waiting to hear the first song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than later. Clay TaylorTOS Life MemberSwarovski Optik N.A.(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX Sent from my iPhone
On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply.  What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most.  The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.?   I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out   I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control.  Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--  Brush FreemanUtley & Cedar Park, Texas






--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas






 

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Date: 2/26/19 1:00 pm
From: <artm1966...>
Subject: [texbirds] Barn Swallows on Nest
Our Barn Swallows arrived today 02/26/2019 and started working on
their nest on my back porch.
Art MacKinnonMcKinney TX

 

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Date: 2/26/19 12:51 pm
From: <jkestner...>
Subject: [texbirds] field trip opportunity
The Audubon Outdoor Club of Corpus Christi will host a field trip to Pollywog Pond on March 2. This is the CTC birding site #077 in Corpus Christi. We'll meet at 7:30 on the east driveway, then follow with a quick trip and lunch at Hazel Bazemore County Park.

Hope you can join us!

Judy Kestner
Corpus Christi
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

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Date: 2/26/19 12:13 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song - ask and ye shall receive...
When I was but a lad, I had a crow named Rodan. The back door on that
house had a screen door with a spring that made a screeching sound when
opened. We did not use that door much but it came into the kitchen. My
folks would throw scraps out for the dogs and chickens so when that door
opened they came running from all over. Rodan learned to do that sound so
perfectly that he jacked with the chickens and dogs and they came running
in until they learned better.

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 1:49 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
wrote:

> Hi all –
>
>
>
> Just a quick update to the last sentence of my Bird Song message – the
> Birding Gods were listening: this morning in the rain, the Clay-colored
> (Robin) Thrush was calling in the mesquites in the back yard!!! Yay!!!
>
> Tthe BackYard Mockingbird was NOT happy about it! He was fussing….
>
>
>
> Spring!!!!
>
>
>
>
>
> Clay Taylor
>
> TOS Life Member
>
> Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
>
> <Clay.taylor...>
>
> 401-965-9064
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Clay Taylor
> *Sent:* Sunday, February 24, 2019 1:07 PM
> *To:* <brushfreeman...>
> *Cc:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Bird Song.
>
>
>
> Ha! A good topic, Brush!
>
>
>
> Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of
> course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a
> birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested
> Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by
> whistling “Peter, Peter, PeeEEE” in the spring.
>
>
>
> When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern’s
> raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to
> this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers
> and American Oystercatchers.
>
>
>
> Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am
> usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them.
> Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser
> Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the
> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.
>
>
>
> Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine,
> heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive
> Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up
> on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song,
> anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting
> without having to find it in order to confirm it.
>
>
>
> However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored
> Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and
> singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my
> neighbors’ roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first
> song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than
> later.
>
> Clay Taylor
>
> TOS Life Member
>
> Swarovski Optik N.A.
>
> (Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/19 12:04 pm
From: Dan Smith <dan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
I have been described by more than 1 friend as a “pathological whistler,” whistling all the time after my grandmother taught me to whistle at about age 4. Once, more than 20 years ago, I had for some time been whistling the opening phrases of the Little Fugue in G Minor (Bach), when I noticed that a mockingbird in the yard was copying the first 3 notes. I kept whistling and over the next several days got him up to mimicking the first 8 notes, almost the entire opening phrase. Unfortunately, I was moving at the end of the month, so didn’t get to see how far he could have gone.

Still, I thought he was a pretty neat mockingbird.

Dan Smith
<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>
512-451-2632
http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com <http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com/>

"Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.




> On Feb 26, 2019, at 1:41 PM, John and Glennah Trochet <trochetj...> wrote:
>
> Hello TexBirders,
>
> Fred Collins's post today reminded me of something similar in my own experience. I studied lesser goldfinches in graduate school and maintained a captive flock at the Behavior Station in the hills above the U.C. Berkeley campus. On field trips throughout their U.S. range, I brought a flocklet of these captives to serve as Judas birds adjacent to mist nets, the more efficiently to capture other lesser goldfinches (their calls also readily brought in other cardueline finches). Lesser goldfinches are rightly considered extraordinarily gifted vocal mimics. During the long drives I habitually sought out classical music stations on the radio. One of the male captives, a bird I nicknamed Caruso, was in a league of his own. If the pace of the music was within certain bounds, he could hear a passage one time and be right on it the next. Having him along was a real treat.
>
> Best,
> John Trochet
> Sacramento, California
>
> On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 10:24 AM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...> <mailto:<Fred.Collins...>> wrote:
> Back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, there was a cellist with the Houston symphony that lives near E.L. Moore Nature Sanctuary in west Houston. She would sometimes come into the sanctuary on Sunday afternoons in the spring and practice. Wood Thrushes bred along Rummel Creek in the sanctuary and would respond to her music and call. I have no superlatives’ to describe the wonderful experience of listing to that. The cellist would play in response to the Thrush call and vice-versa.
>
>
>
>
>
> Fred Collins, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> Steve Radack Commissioner
>
> www.pct3.com <http://www.pct3.com/>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of <trochetj...> <mailto:<trochetj...>
> Sent: Monday, February 25, 2019 12:35 PM
> To: <brushfreeman...> <mailto:<brushfreeman...>
> Cc: <texbirds...> <mailto:<texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
>
>
>
> Greetings TexBirders,
>
>
>
> I am late to this conversation, but let me add my two cents. David Sarkozi has already mentioned my choice for favorite North American songster. Wood thrush is without equal, in my mind.
>
>
>
> When I lived in Maryland and then in Houston decades ago, I was able to make relatively short drives to hear wood thrush in song. Etherial is the right word, as David said.
>
>
>
> In June of 1996 a wood thrush spent four days at the Cosumnes River Preserve half an hour south of my home in California, where the species is a rare visitor. With my older daughter Renee and now deceased good friend Ed Greaves by my side, I recorded the song, including about five minutes of continuous singing. As an aid to helping others find the bird I played my recording. On one occasion the wood thrush countersang to this long continuous stretch of recorded song by uttering the same song element that immediately followed on the tape recording. It made me think that for wood thrush it’s not a succession of songs that vary on a theme, but one long song composed of varying elements.
>
>
>
> I still pull out that cassette tape periodically. Listening to ten-plus minutes of recorded wood thrush song transports me to wooded landscapes far from home and remote in time as well as to a wonderful preserve close by. It makes me smile every time.
>
>
>
> Best,
>
> John Trochet
>
> Sacramento, California
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 14:47, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> <mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> John Trochet
> Sacramento, California
> <trochetj...> <mailto:<trochetj...>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/19 11:50 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song - ask and ye shall receive...
Hi all -

Just a quick update to the last sentence of my Bird Song message - the Birding Gods were listening: this morning in the rain, the Clay-colored (Robin) Thrush was calling in the mesquites in the back yard!!! Yay!!!
Tthe BackYard Mockingbird was NOT happy about it! He was fussing....

Spring!!!!


Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
<Clay.taylor...><mailto:<Clay.taylor...>
401-965-9064



From: Clay Taylor
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 1:07 PM
To: <brushfreeman...>
Cc: <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Bird Song.

Ha! A good topic, Brush!

Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by whistling "Peter, Peter, PeeEEE" in the spring.

When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern's raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers and American Oystercatchers.

Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them. Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.

Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine, heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song, anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting without having to find it in order to confirm it.

However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my neighbors' roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than later.
Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:
I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas



 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/19 11:42 am
From: John and Glennah Trochet <trochetj...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Hello TexBirders,

Fred Collins's post today reminded me of something similar in my own
experience. I studied lesser goldfinches in graduate school and maintained
a captive flock at the Behavior Station in the hills above the U.C.
Berkeley campus. On field trips throughout their U.S. range, I brought a
flocklet of these captives to serve as Judas birds adjacent to mist nets,
the more efficiently to capture other lesser goldfinches (their calls also
readily brought in other cardueline finches). Lesser goldfinches are
rightly considered extraordinarily gifted vocal mimics. During the long
drives I habitually sought out classical music stations on the radio. One
of the male captives, a bird I nicknamed Caruso, was in a league of his
own. If the pace of the music was within certain bounds, he could hear a
passage one time and be right on it the next. Having him along was a real
treat.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento, California

On Tue, Feb 26, 2019 at 10:24 AM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<Fred.Collins...> wrote:

> Back in the late 1970s and early 1980s, there was a cellist with the
> Houston symphony that lives near E.L. Moore Nature Sanctuary in west
> Houston. She would sometimes come into the sanctuary on Sunday afternoons
> in the spring and practice. Wood Thrushes bred along Rummel Creek in the
> sanctuary and would respond to her music and call. I have no superlatives’
> to describe the wonderful experience of listing to that. The cellist would
> play in response to the Thrush call and vice-versa.
>
>
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *<trochetj...>
> *Sent:* Monday, February 25, 2019 12:35 PM
> *To:* <brushfreeman...>
> *Cc:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
>
>
>
> Greetings TexBirders,
>
>
>
> I am late to this conversation, but let me add my two cents. David
> Sarkozi has already mentioned my choice for favorite North American
> songster. Wood thrush is without equal, in my mind.
>
>
>
> When I lived in Maryland and then in Houston decades ago, I was able to
> make relatively short drives to hear wood thrush in song. Etherial is the
> right word, as David said.
>
>
>
> In June of 1996 a wood thrush spent four days at the Cosumnes River
> Preserve half an hour south of my home in California, where the species is
> a rare visitor. With my older daughter Renee and now deceased good friend
> Ed Greaves by my side, I recorded the song, including about five minutes of
> continuous singing. As an aid to helping others find the bird I played my
> recording. On one occasion the wood thrush countersang to this long
> continuous stretch of recorded song by uttering the same song element that
> immediately followed on the tape recording. It made me think that for wood
> thrush it’s not a succession of songs that vary on a theme, but one long
> song composed of varying elements.
>
>
>
> I still pull out that cassette tape periodically. Listening to ten-plus
> minutes of recorded wood thrush song transports me to wooded landscapes far
> from home and remote in time as well as to a wonderful preserve close by.
> It makes me smile every time.
>
>
>
> Best,
>
> John Trochet
>
> Sacramento, California
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 14:47, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

--
John Trochet
Sacramento, California
<trochetj...>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/19 10:47 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 26, 2019
Good afternoon Texbirders, an overcast sky and the threat of rain didn't
slow down the birders. See our list below. Birdwalks 8:30am and Birding Van
Tours 1:30pm daily, except Sundays. Come out and enjoy your national
wildlife refuge!
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas



Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Feb 26, 2019 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
Comments: Morning Bird Walk Armadillo Indigo snake
67 species (+1 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 30
Cinnamon Teal 2
Northern Shoveler 30
Gadwall 25
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 10
Green-winged Teal 20
Least Grebe 4
Pied-billed Grebe 5
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 2
Inca Dove 1
Common Ground-Dove 2
White-tipped Dove 1
White-winged Dove 1
Mourning Dove 1
Sora 2
American Coot 3
Black-necked Stilt 35
Killdeer 10
Least Sandpiper 40
Long-billed Dowitcher 75
Greater Yellowlegs 6
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Anhinga 1
Neotropic Cormorant 4
Great Egret 1
Snowy Egret 4
White Ibis 25
White-faced Ibis 3
Turkey Vulture 12
Harris's Hawk 5
Gray Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 4
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 3
Crested Caracara 1
Eastern Phoebe 2
Great Kiskadee 12
Tropical Kingbird 2
Couch's Kingbird 4
White-eyed Vireo 7
Green Jay 12
Barn Swallow 2
swallow sp. 3
Black-crested Titmouse 4
Verdin 3
House Wren 4
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Long-billed Thrasher 2
Northern Mockingbird 1
Olive Sparrow 2
Savannah Sparrow 1
Lincoln's Sparrow 1
Western Meadowlark 6
Hooded Oriole (cucullatus/sennetti) 2 Pair at feeders
Altamira Oriole 5
Red-winged Blackbird 40
Brown-headed Cowbird 1
Great-tailed Grackle 3
Orange-crowned Warbler 4
Nashville Warbler 1
Common Yellowthroat 7
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 2
Northern Cardinal 8
House Sparrow 8

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53163015

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/19 10:29 am
From: Becky Reyes <breyes...>
Subject: [texbirds] Edinburg World Birding Center
Hi everyone,
This morning was foggy and somewhat rainy at the start of our bird walk.
With a couple of brave souls who did not mind birding in the soft rain, we
spotted most of the birds within our grounds than the ponds. However, after
the bird walk, the weather cleared and the sun came out full force bringing
the grounds alive with louder chirps and more bird activity than earlier.
Below is this morning's (before the sun) bird list.

Happy Birding!!

Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center, Hidalgo, Texas, US
Feb 26, 2019 8:30 AM - 10:15 AM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
35 species

Plain Chachalaca 6
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 14
Inca Dove 5
White-tipped Dove 1
Mourning Dove 1
American Coot 2
Black-necked Stilt 2
Neotropic Cormorant 11
American White Pelican 4
Great Egret 1
Snowy Egret 3
Black-crowned Night-Heron 3
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron 2
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 2
Great Kiskadee 2
Tropical Kingbird 1
White-eyed Vireo 2
Blue-headed Vireo 1
Green Jay 2
Purple Martin 2
Black-crested Titmouse 1
House Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 6
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 3
Northern Mockingbird 2
Lesser Goldfinch 3
Olive Sparrow 2
Red-winged Blackbird 7
Great-tailed Grackle 4
Orange-crowned Warbler 2
Yellow-rumped Warbler 1
Wilson's Warbler 2
Northern Cardinal 5

*Becky Reyes*
Naturalist Educator
Edinburg Scenic Wetlands and World Birding Center

<http://www.cityofedinburg.com/>
Office: (956) 381-9922
Fax: (956) 381-0715
<vguzman...>www.EdinburgWBC.org
<http://www.edinburgwbc.org/>
*<breyes...> <vguzman...>*

follow us:
<https://www.facebook.com/EdinburgWBC/> [image:
https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork]
<https://www.youtube.com/user/EdinburgCableNetwork>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 7:09 pm
From: Kelly Bryan <kelly.b.bryan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Davis Mountains Property
Dear Texbirders,

This is posted with permission.

Unfortunately, Donna and I have had to make a very tough decision. The
health of my parents and other family issues have forced us to make a move
in the near future back to the central Texas area where be both grew up.
It is going to be hard to leave the mountains!

Those of you that have had the privilege to visit us know what we have up
there at 6,300' elevation. There is 30 acres and two spacious cabins at
one of the premiere songbird and hummingbird locations in the southwest.
The habitat is ponderosa pine, pinyon, juniper, silverleaf oak and
madrone. If any of you out there have any interest at all in a spectacular
piece of the Davis Mountains, please contact me privately for details and
pictures. KBB

--
Kelly B Bryan
Fort Davis, Texas

To follow the progress of my hummingbird project go to:
http://westtexashummingbirds.com/
To support this project, other bird projects and our educational outreach
in west Texas go to: http://www.westtexasavianresearch.org/

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 6:42 pm
From: Lubbockites <lubbockites...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: FW: Re: Bird Song.
The bird “song” that always brings the biggest smile to my face is the wheezy sneeze of the Mississippi Kite when it comes from a European Starling weeks before the kites return to nest.

Phillip Kite
Lubbock, TX

Sent slowly from Phillip Kite's iPhone

> On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 5:41 pm
From: Robert Reeves <birder.reeves...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: FW: Re: Bird Song.
Forgot to give my location (E. Meadowlark, Wood Thrush, Bewick's Wren):
Robert Reeves. Pflugerville, TX, Travis Co.

On Mon, Feb 25, 2019, 7:36 PM Robert Reeves <birder.reeves...> wrote:

> Childhood in Bay City, TX (Matagorda Co.): Eastern Meadowlark
> College days in Nacogdoches: Wood Thrush
> Present day in Austin/Pflugerville: Bewick's Wren
>
> On Mon, Feb 25, 2019, 3:57 PM Barrett Pierce <bpierce...> wrote:
>
>> In the northern Panhandle, the trill and whistle of Upland Sandpipers
>> always brightens the day and encourages me to continue birding or get out
>> to do some birding no matter what else is going on. I hear them most often
>> as they fly overhead during spring and fall migration, and occasionally
>> even in the summer. I have seen them in their iconic pose on a fence post
>> four or five times but have yet to photograph this myself. Someday……
>>
>>
>>
>> Barrett Pierce
>>
>> Amarillo, TX
>>
>>
>>
>> PS If Upland Sandpipers don't qualify as "native" Texas birds they
>> should be adopted.
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>
>> On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
>> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
>> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
>> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
>> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
>> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
>> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
>> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
>> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
>> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 5:37 pm
From: Robert Reeves <birder.reeves...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: FW: Re: Bird Song.
Childhood in Bay City, TX (Matagorda Co.): Eastern Meadowlark
College days in Nacogdoches: Wood Thrush
Present day in Austin/Pflugerville: Bewick's Wren

On Mon, Feb 25, 2019, 3:57 PM Barrett Pierce <bpierce...> wrote:

> In the northern Panhandle, the trill and whistle of Upland Sandpipers
> always brightens the day and encourages me to continue birding or get out
> to do some birding no matter what else is going on. I hear them most often
> as they fly overhead during spring and fall migration, and occasionally
> even in the summer. I have seen them in their iconic pose on a fence post
> four or five times but have yet to photograph this myself. Someday……
>
>
>
> Barrett Pierce
>
> Amarillo, TX
>
>
>
> PS If Upland Sandpipers don't qualify as "native" Texas birds they should
> be adopted.
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 1:57 pm
From: Barrett Pierce <bpierce...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: Re: Bird Song.
In the northern Panhandle, the trill and whistle of Upland Sandpipers always brightens the day and encourages me to continue birding or get out to do some birding no matter what else is going on. I hear them most often as they fly overhead during spring and fall migration, and occasionally even in the summer. I have seen them in their iconic pose on a fence post four or five times but have yet to photograph this myself. Someday……



Barrett Pierce

Amarillo, TX



PS If Upland Sandpipers don't qualify as "native" Texas birds they should be adopted.



Sent from my iPhone


On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:

I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas






--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas




 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 1:51 pm
From: Kenny Anderson <kennya290...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: UT Peregrine Lays First Egg of Season
Nice job Bruce, thanks for all the work you did to get the box and
subsequent camera/webcast going.

Kenny Anderson
Austin, TX

On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 3:09 PM Bruce Calder <calder.tx...> wrote:

> Texbirders:
>
> I'm pleased to report that peregrine falcon (PEFA) egg laying has
> commenced for the 4th year in a row at the Tower bldg nest box on the
> campus of the University of Texas in Austin.
>
> The first egg appeared this morning. Both adults have been present at the
> box today. This marks the earliest date that the permanent resident female
> (nicknamed "Tower Girl") has laid her first egg. PEFAs typically lay
> successive eggs every 50 hours, so if she lays her usual clutch of four,
> they will all be there by this coming Sunday. Full-time incubation in
> PEFAs does not begin until after the second or third egg.
>
> Previous years were all nest failures. No male was present, and for at
> least the first two years, examination of the eggs found them to be
> infertile. This year's male appears to be a new suitor, so we're keeping
> our fingers crossed.
>
> UT's 24/7 nest cam can be found at this link:
>
> https://biodiversity.utexas.edu/resources/falcon-cam
>
>
> Visibility of the egg is dependent on lighting. This morning it was very
> easy to see. Just now, the position of the sun makes it difficult to make
> out the egg against the pea gravel in the box.
>
> For those on Facebook, the Tower Girl also has her own FB page.
>
>
> I'm aware that the Biodiversity Center uses scarce discretionary funds to
> pay for the nest cam, so please consider helping out.
>
> Bruce Calder
> Austin, TX
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 1:11 pm
From: Mark Welch <welch.mark3...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
I've been watching the assorted responses from 20,000 Feet up before
commenting without final personal conclusion-- because it's impossible-- I
first must recognize...Thank You, Brush.

Pondering the Best Answer for my life experience, and reading the
collective, wonderful responses that have germinated here after the query &
notion you seeded, have expanded my grasp that the answer is an
imponderable one, wonderfully playful but imponderable. Not unlike
contemplating Infinity. We are so blessed here, in Texas. What a
wonderful, enchanting, expansive topic....thanks Brush! Texas is 4-5
"states" geographically (as we humans divide things up into ponderables) &
adding migrants to the mix makes it more.. well, imponderable.

All participation in these assorted threads reminds me how much non-birders
miss, undetected, from the vibrant life occurring all around them, every
day. That said, I am without words about what I have seen here... how a
bird's song triggers reminders of where readers grew up... like Mom's
baking fresh bread or Grandmom's apple pie: forgotten cues & flashbacks. I
have not sensed that before your seeding of the thread.

OK- on to business.

Everyone should enjoy birds that please them, without analysis or judgment.

I find mockingbirds to be dissonant to the ear, esp at 2AM during the
Spring, but I have made peace with them ( I do enjoy reasoning the species
they are mimicking, for those who are experienced enough & attentive, with
the added bonus no one really knows- assurance)

Grackles not so.... sound like a car wreck to me (not unlike the non-native
peacock sounds like a bus wreck, with survivors screaming). The only tools
they may employ that attract my attention are parking lots, windshields,
and shopping malls ( esp. during roosting hours). They do a very good job
on detritus from fast-food places, like buzzards on road-kill
(unappreciated).

Otherwise, everyone is spot-on in their observations.

What I have not seen mentioned:
>The eerie, haunting HooDoo coo of ground doves in the beebrush/mesquite
thickets, esp. of S.TX & west at initial daylight. (Also, Screech owls at
dusk, everywhere in C-tx & appropriately during Halloween)(Courting male
Ghorned owls' emphatic voice).
>Tom turks' Spring gobble from his roost, firing up the morning....the
Turks a sign of environs' purity, Canary-in-the-coal-mine notice that the
environs are good, clean & native, not too many humans about/encroachment.
>Purple Martins' , already launched & prowling, high above in the zenith
among the stars, at 3AM during summer.
>White-throated sparrows' melody on a frigid, AM winter morning.
>Chaparral Cock's mourning coo at blistering-heat midday, deep in the
mesquite or cedar brakes ("wounded bird dog, one described it) (Same techie
guy called a Bewick's a "modem bird").(clever)
>The sunrise & infrequent call of early-migrating yellowlegs during the
dead-everything season of Texas August, my "mystery bird" for years in
Dripping.
>The ventriloquist talents of the ordinary blue jay.
>Nightbirds, mentioned, but not enough, imo.
>Larks, meadow or otherwise.

OK, stop, Mark.
My favorite, "you're-in-the-country-now, Dorothy" song.... Mr. Bob White.

Mark in Dripping (Texas)




On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 12:35 PM <trochetj...> wrote:

> Greetings TexBirders,
>
> I am late to this conversation, but let me add my two cents. David
> Sarkozi has already mentioned my choice for favorite North American
> songster. Wood thrush is without equal, in my mind.
>
> When I lived in Maryland and then in Houston decades ago, I was able to
> make relatively short drives to hear wood thrush in song. Etherial is the
> right word, as David said.
>
> In June of 1996 a wood thrush spent four days at the Cosumnes River
> Preserve half an hour south of my home in California, where the species is
> a rare visitor. With my older daughter Renee and now deceased good friend
> Ed Greaves by my side, I recorded the song, including about five minutes of
> continuous singing. As an aid to helping others find the bird I played my
> recording. On one occasion the wood thrush countersang to this long
> continuous stretch of recorded song by uttering the same song element that
> immediately followed on the tape recording. It made me think that for wood
> thrush it’s not a succession of songs that vary on a theme, but one long
> song composed of varying elements.
>
> I still pull out that cassette tape periodically. Listening to ten-plus
> minutes of recorded wood thrush song transports me to wooded landscapes far
> from home and remote in time as well as to a wonderful preserve close by.
> It makes me smile every time.
>
> Best,
> John Trochet
> Sacramento, California
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 14:47, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 1:09 pm
From: Bruce Calder <calder.tx...>
Subject: [texbirds] UT Peregrine Lays First Egg of Season
Texbirders:

I'm pleased to report that peregrine falcon (PEFA) egg laying has commenced
for the 4th year in a row at the Tower bldg nest box on the campus of the
University of Texas in Austin.

The first egg appeared this morning. Both adults have been present at the
box today. This marks the earliest date that the permanent resident female
(nicknamed "Tower Girl") has laid her first egg. PEFAs typically lay
successive eggs every 50 hours, so if she lays her usual clutch of four,
they will all be there by this coming Sunday. Full-time incubation in PEFAs
does not begin until after the second or third egg.

Previous years were all nest failures. No male was present, and for at
least the first two years, examination of the eggs found them to be
infertile. This year's male appears to be a new suitor, so we're keeping
our fingers crossed.

UT's 24/7 nest cam can be found at this link:

https://biodiversity.utexas.edu/resources/falcon-cam


Visibility of the egg is dependent on lighting. This morning it was very
easy to see. Just now, the position of the sun makes it difficult to make
out the egg against the pea gravel in the box.

For those on Facebook, the Tower Girl also has her own FB page.


I'm aware that the Biodiversity Center uses scarce discretionary funds to
pay for the nest cam, so please consider helping out.

Bruce Calder
Austin, TX

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 12:34 pm
From: Gary Richards <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender grcolts for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Palo Alto Battlefield Birds
Birds seen 2/25/2019 at the Palo Alto Battlefield in Brownsville, TX:

Northern Bobwhite
Turkey Vulture
Northern Harrier
Harris's Hawk
White-tailed Hawk
Killdeer
Long-billed Curlew
Common Ground-Dove
Golden-fronted Woodpecker
Loggerhead Shrike
Cactus Wren
Northern Mockingbird
Botteri's Sparrow
Field Sparrow
Vesper Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Grasshopper Sparrow
E. Meadowlark

Number of Species: 18

Gary Richards
Harlingen, TX
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 11:06 am
From: Mark and Joanie Hubinger <mjhubrr...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 25, 2019
Good afternoon Texbirders, We were joined by a large group today, some new
to the valley. So lots of life birds were seen! We started on the
Chachalaca Trail to all of Willow Lakes and then split up with some staying
on the woodland trails back to the VC and some onto Pintail Lakes. Our
highlights were Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet (heard only), several mixed
flocks of songbirds, 10 species of shorebirds, and 2 Groove-billed Anis
seen from the levee on north side near red gate. Birdwalks 8:30am and
Birding Van Tours 1:30pm daily, except Sundays.
Mark and Joanie Hubinger
USFWS Volunteers
Alamo, Texas



Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Feb 25, 2019 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 mile(s)
79 species

Blue-winged Teal 30
Cinnamon Teal 3
Northern Shoveler 25
Gadwall 18
American Wigeon 1
Mottled Duck 10
Green-winged Teal 15
Plain Chachalaca 3
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 3
Inca Dove 3
Common Ground-Dove 1
White-tipped Dove 5
White-winged Dove 1
Groove-billed Ani 2 Continuing birds, all black, very long tail,
parrot shaped Bill, photos
Buff-bellied Hummingbird 1
Sora 3
American Coot 5
Black-necked Stilt 25
Killdeer 4
Stilt Sandpiper 5
Least Sandpiper 50
Long-billed Dowitcher 75
Wilson's Snipe 1
Spotted Sandpiper 1
Solitary Sandpiper 1
Greater Yellowlegs 3
Lesser Yellowlegs 1
Anhinga 1
Neotropic Cormorant 6
Great Blue Heron 1
Great Egret 1
Snowy Egret 1
White Ibis 4
Turkey Vulture 5
Harris's Hawk 2
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Belted Kingfisher 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 8
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 4
Peregrine Falcon 1
Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet 1
Least Flycatcher 1
Eastern Phoebe 3
Vermilion Flycatcher 3
Great Kiskadee 12
Tropical Kingbird 1
Couch's Kingbird 1
White-eyed Vireo 6
Green Jay 10
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 6
Purple Martin 1
Tree Swallow 12
Barn Swallow 3
Cave Swallow 4
Black-crested Titmouse 8
Verdin 3
House Wren 3
Carolina Wren 3
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 10
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 8
Clay-colored Thrush 3
Long-billed Thrasher 1
Northern Mockingbird 2
European Starling 2
Olive Sparrow 5
Lincoln's Sparrow 4
Altamira Oriole 6
Red-winged Blackbird 35
Great-tailed Grackle 1
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 10
Nashville Warbler 1
Common Yellowthroat 5
Yellow-rumped Warbler (Myrtle) 3
Northern Cardinal 12
House Sparrow 20

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53135621

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 10:35 am
From: <trochetj...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Greetings TexBirders,

I am late to this conversation, but let me add my two cents. David Sarkozi has already mentioned my choice for favorite North American songster. Wood thrush is without equal, in my mind.

When I lived in Maryland and then in Houston decades ago, I was able to make relatively short drives to hear wood thrush in song. Etherial is the right word, as David said.

In June of 1996 a wood thrush spent four days at the Cosumnes River Preserve half an hour south of my home in California, where the species is a rare visitor. With my older daughter Renee and now deceased good friend Ed Greaves by my side, I recorded the song, including about five minutes of continuous singing. As an aid to helping others find the bird I played my recording. On one occasion the wood thrush countersang to this long continuous stretch of recorded song by uttering the same song element that immediately followed on the tape recording. It made me think that for wood thrush it’s not a succession of songs that vary on a theme, but one long song composed of varying elements.

I still pull out that cassette tape periodically. Listening to ten-plus minutes of recorded wood thrush song transports me to wooded landscapes far from home and remote in time as well as to a wonderful preserve close by. It makes me smile every time.

Best,
John Trochet
Sacramento, California

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 23, 2019, at 14:47, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 10:34 am
From: <jkestner...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Clay, thanks for sharing -- I had a similar experience with a White-eyed Vireo on the (I think) Starr County CBC last year. I never saw the bird itself, but after listening for five minutes or so to mixed notes from a couple or three species, the WEVI song kicked in for certain. I did not know what clever little fellows they are!

Judy Kestner
Corpus Christi

---- Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> wrote:

=============
Great choice, Brush – I had White-eyed Vireo placed in the “singing in the yard” category, but the Loggerhead Shrike just bumped it out.

My favorite WEVI story is from back in CT in the early 80’s. Back then, they were a VERY uncommon nester along the CT coast, usually in the middle of impenetrable blackberry and cat briar tangles. I was at Barn Island State Park in Stonington, CT, walking along a dirt roadway with salt marsh on my right and tangles to my left.

I heard a Gray Catbird singing up ahead of me, doing little Catbird-mews along with short “chick-brrr” phrases that were obvious mimicry of a White-eyed Vireo. I smiled, and wondered to myself where that Catbird had encountered a singing WEVI. The habitat there was pretty good for one, so maybe it was present, too.

As I crept up to where the bird was singing (of course wanting to get a photo), it continued to throw in WEVI phrases along with Catbird notes. Imagine my surprise when I spotted an ACTUAL White-eyed Vireo perched on a blackberry branch, mimicking a Gray Catbird! He spotted me, cocked his head at me like he was saying “Busted!”, and dropped deeper down in the tangle. I walked away with a big grin on my face….


Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
<Clay.taylor...><mailto:<Clay.taylor...>
401-965-9064



From: Brush Freeman [mailto:<brushfreeman...>]
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 2:01 PM
To: Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>
Cc: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>; <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.

Posting my choice though it is very hard. Summer Tanager, Chuck-will's Widow;, Painted Bunting and all mentioned before as well. Those aforementioned birds and Purple Martins along with Yellow-billed Cuckoos just cheat us by being away 8 months of the years. Sandhill Cranes and Upland Sandpipers calling overhead is magical . And hearing Black Skimmers in the dark of night feeding in the bays is very cool. Such a hard choice but mine is pretty solid. Having lived in Bastrop Co. for 30+ years, I am grateful that I have White-eyed Vireos on the place. Tough little soldiers that sing all day regardless of the heat, The vireos love it turned up...In the dead of August when birdsong trails off into the hot day there are always the vireos. But in those 30+ years there, there is one bird song that I really missed even though I could drive 25 miles to the west and hear them. Little birds that sing all year. Happy little sprites. Now I can hear them every day any season when at our
Cedar Park/Leander place so Bewick's Wren has to be my choice if only given one in this instance. I believe D.D. also had the same thought.

On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:14 PM Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...><mailto:<gontamarianne...>> wrote:
I love the Lesser Goldfinches' song. They always have SO MUCH to say in their cheerful way and seem to carry on conversations, despite my presence. I can't help but smile and then try to mimic them with whistling :)

On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:07 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...><mailto:<Clay.Taylor...>> wrote:
Ha! A good topic, Brush!

Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by whistling “Peter, Peter, PeeEEE” in the spring.

When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern’s raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers and American Oystercatchers.

Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them. Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.

Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine, heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song, anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting without having to find it in order to confirm it.

However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my neighbors’ roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than later.
Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:
I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas




--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas



Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 10:20 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] WESTERN GULL, White Rock Lake (Dallas Co.)
Texbirds,

An apparent smallish female, first-cycle WESTERN GULL was discovered over
the weekend at White Rock Lake in Dallas. Mike Cameron's series of photos
here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53102244

Reportedly continuing this morning...but additional details would
be appreciated.

About the 5th record for the state.

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
Austin, TX

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 10:14 am
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Yup – just Saturday I thought I had another Ash-throated Flycatcher and it turned out to be the tail end of a WEVI! :-/



Mary Beth Stowe

Alamo, TX

<http://www.miriameaglemon.com> www.miriameaglemon.com



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Monday, February 25, 2019 11:40 AM
To: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Cc: Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>; <Texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.



Its true...I have been fooled too many times out on the place by them, especially with Bell's Vireos, Towhees, Catbird, Brown Thrasher,Hermit Thrush (calls) House Wren and even a White-eyeds version of Chuck-will's-widow.



On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 11:13 AM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> <mailto:<Clay.Taylor...> > wrote:

Great choice, Brush – I had White-eyed Vireo placed in the “singing in the yard” category, but the Loggerhead Shrike just bumped it out.



My favorite WEVI story is from back in CT in the early 80’s. Back then, they were a VERY uncommon nester along the CT coast, usually in the middle of impenetrable blackberry and cat briar tangles. I was at Barn Island State Park in Stonington, CT, walking along a dirt roadway with salt marsh on my right and tangles to my left.



I heard a Gray Catbird singing up ahead of me, doing little Catbird-mews along with short “chick-brrr” phrases that were obvious mimicry of a White-eyed Vireo. I smiled, and wondered to myself where that Catbird had encountered a singing WEVI. The habitat there was pretty good for one, so maybe it was present, too.



As I crept up to where the bird was singing (of course wanting to get a photo), it continued to throw in WEVI phrases along with Catbird notes. Imagine my surprise when I spotted an ACTUAL White-eyed Vireo perched on a blackberry branch, mimicking a Gray Catbird! He spotted me, cocked his head at me like he was saying “Busted!”, and dropped deeper down in the tangle. I walked away with a big grin on my face….





Clay Taylor

TOS Life Member

Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX

<mailto:<Clay.taylor...> <Clay.taylor...>

401-965-9064







From: Brush Freeman [mailto:<brushfreeman...> <mailto:<brushfreeman...> ]
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 2:01 PM
To: Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...> <mailto:<gontamarianne...> >
Cc: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> <mailto:<Clay.Taylor...> >; <texbirds...> <mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.



Posting my choice though it is very hard. Summer Tanager, Chuck-will's Widow;, Painted Bunting and all mentioned before as well. Those aforementioned birds and Purple Martins along with Yellow-billed Cuckoos just cheat us by being away 8 months of the years. Sandhill Cranes and Upland Sandpipers calling overhead is magical . And hearing Black Skimmers in the dark of night feeding in the bays is very cool. Such a hard choice but mine is pretty solid. Having lived in Bastrop Co. for 30+ years, I am grateful that I have White-eyed Vireos on the place. Tough little soldiers that sing all day regardless of the heat, The vireos love it turned up...In the dead of August when birdsong trails off into the hot day there are always the vireos. But in those 30+ years there, there is one bird song that I really missed even though I could drive 25 miles to the west and hear them. Little birds that sing all year. Happy little sprites. Now I can hear them every day any season when at our Cedar Park/Leander place so Bewick's Wren has to be my choice if only given one in this instance. I believe D.D. also had the same thought.



On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:14 PM Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...> <mailto:<gontamarianne...> > wrote:

I love the Lesser Goldfinches' song. They always have SO MUCH to say in their cheerful way and seem to carry on conversations, despite my presence. I can't help but smile and then try to mimic them with whistling :)



On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:07 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> <mailto:<Clay.Taylor...> > wrote:

Ha! A good topic, Brush!



Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by whistling “Peter, Peter, PeeEEE” in the spring.



When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern’s raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers and American Oystercatchers.



Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them. Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.



Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine, heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song, anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting without having to find it in order to confirm it.



However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my neighbors’ roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than later.

Clay Taylor

TOS Life Member

Swarovski Optik N.A.

(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX



Sent from my iPhone


On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> <mailto:<brushfreeman...> > wrote:

I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas







--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas








--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 9:59 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Could be...OneMagic Ridge they imitate the Curved-billed Thrasher's wit-wit
calls

On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 11:51 AM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
wrote:

> So, it that Mimid Envy on the part of the WEVI?
>
>
>
>
>
> Clay Taylor
>
> TOS Life Member
>
> Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
>
> <Clay.taylor...>
>
> 401-965-9064
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Brush Freeman [mailto:<brushfreeman...>]
> *Sent:* Monday, February 25, 2019 11:40 AM
> *To:* Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
> *Cc:* Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>; <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
>
>
>
> Its true...I have been fooled too many times out on the place by them,
> especially with Bell's Vireos, Towhees, Catbird, Brown Thrasher,Hermit
> Thrush (calls) House Wren and even a White-eyeds version of
> Chuck-will's-widow.
>
>
>
> On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 11:13 AM Clay Taylor <
> <Clay.Taylor...> wrote:
>
> Great choice, Brush – I had White-eyed Vireo placed in the “singing in the
> yard” category, but the Loggerhead Shrike just bumped it out.
>
>
>
> My favorite WEVI story is from back in CT in the early 80’s. Back then,
> they were a VERY uncommon nester along the CT coast, usually in the middle
> of impenetrable blackberry and cat briar tangles. I was at Barn Island
> State Park in Stonington, CT, walking along a dirt roadway with salt marsh
> on my right and tangles to my left.
>
>
>
> I heard a Gray Catbird singing up ahead of me, doing little Catbird-mews
> along with short “chick-brrr” phrases that were obvious mimicry of a
> White-eyed Vireo. I smiled, and wondered to myself where that Catbird had
> encountered a singing WEVI. The habitat there was pretty good for one, so
> maybe it was present, too.
>
>
>
> As I crept up to where the bird was singing (of course wanting to get a
> photo), it continued to throw in WEVI phrases along with Catbird notes.
> Imagine my surprise when I spotted an ACTUAL White-eyed Vireo perched on a
> blackberry branch, mimicking a Gray Catbird! He spotted me, cocked his
> head at me like he was saying “Busted!”, and dropped deeper down in the
> tangle. I walked away with a big grin on my face….
>
>
>
>
>
> Clay Taylor
>
> TOS Life Member
>
> Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
>
> <Clay.taylor...>
>
> 401-965-9064
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Brush Freeman [mailto:<brushfreeman...>]
> *Sent:* Sunday, February 24, 2019 2:01 PM
> *To:* Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>
> *Cc:* Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>; <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
>
>
>
> Posting my choice though it is very hard. Summer Tanager, Chuck-will's
> Widow;, Painted Bunting and all mentioned before as well. Those
> aforementioned birds and Purple Martins along with Yellow-billed Cuckoos
> just cheat us by being away 8 months of the years. Sandhill Cranes and
> Upland Sandpipers calling overhead is magical . And hearing Black Skimmers
> in the dark of night feeding in the bays is very cool. Such a hard choice
> but mine is pretty solid. Having lived in Bastrop Co. for 30+ years, I am
> grateful that I have White-eyed Vireos on the place. Tough little soldiers
> that sing all day regardless of the heat, The vireos love it turned up...In
> the dead of August when birdsong trails off into the hot day there are
> always the vireos. But in those 30+ years there, there is one bird song
> that I really missed even though I could drive 25 miles to the west and
> hear them. Little birds that sing all year. Happy little sprites. Now I
> can hear them every day any season when at our Cedar Park/Leander place so
> Bewick's Wren has to be my choice if only given one in this instance. I
> believe D.D. also had the same thought.
>
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:14 PM Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>
> wrote:
>
> I love the Lesser Goldfinches' song. They always have SO MUCH to say in
> their cheerful way and seem to carry on conversations, despite my
> presence. I can't help but smile and then try to mimic them with whistling
> :)
>
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:07 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
> wrote:
>
> Ha! A good topic, Brush!
>
>
>
> Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of
> course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a
> birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested
> Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by
> whistling “Peter, Peter, PeeEEE” in the spring.
>
>
>
> When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern’s
> raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to
> this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers
> and American Oystercatchers.
>
>
>
> Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am
> usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them.
> Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser
> Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the
> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.
>
>
>
> Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine,
> heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive
> Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up
> on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song,
> anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting
> without having to find it in order to confirm it.
>
>
>
> However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored
> Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and
> singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my
> neighbors’ roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first
> song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than
> later.
>
> Clay Taylor
>
> TOS Life Member
>
> Swarovski Optik N.A.
>
> (Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 9:52 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
So, it that Mimid Envy on the part of the WEVI?


Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
<Clay.taylor...><mailto:<Clay.taylor...>
401-965-9064



From: Brush Freeman [mailto:<brushfreeman...>]
Sent: Monday, February 25, 2019 11:40 AM
To: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Cc: Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>; <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.

Its true...I have been fooled too many times out on the place by them, especially with Bell's Vireos, Towhees, Catbird, Brown Thrasher,Hermit Thrush (calls) House Wren and even a White-eyeds version of Chuck-will's-widow.

On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 11:13 AM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...><mailto:<Clay.Taylor...>> wrote:
Great choice, Brush – I had White-eyed Vireo placed in the “singing in the yard” category, but the Loggerhead Shrike just bumped it out.

My favorite WEVI story is from back in CT in the early 80’s. Back then, they were a VERY uncommon nester along the CT coast, usually in the middle of impenetrable blackberry and cat briar tangles. I was at Barn Island State Park in Stonington, CT, walking along a dirt roadway with salt marsh on my right and tangles to my left.

I heard a Gray Catbird singing up ahead of me, doing little Catbird-mews along with short “chick-brrr” phrases that were obvious mimicry of a White-eyed Vireo. I smiled, and wondered to myself where that Catbird had encountered a singing WEVI. The habitat there was pretty good for one, so maybe it was present, too.

As I crept up to where the bird was singing (of course wanting to get a photo), it continued to throw in WEVI phrases along with Catbird notes. Imagine my surprise when I spotted an ACTUAL White-eyed Vireo perched on a blackberry branch, mimicking a Gray Catbird! He spotted me, cocked his head at me like he was saying “Busted!”, and dropped deeper down in the tangle. I walked away with a big grin on my face….


Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
<Clay.taylor...><mailto:<Clay.taylor...>
401-965-9064



From: Brush Freeman [mailto:<brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>]
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 2:01 PM
To: Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...><mailto:<gontamarianne...>>
Cc: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...><mailto:<Clay.Taylor...>>; <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.

Posting my choice though it is very hard. Summer Tanager, Chuck-will's Widow;, Painted Bunting and all mentioned before as well. Those aforementioned birds and Purple Martins along with Yellow-billed Cuckoos just cheat us by being away 8 months of the years. Sandhill Cranes and Upland Sandpipers calling overhead is magical . And hearing Black Skimmers in the dark of night feeding in the bays is very cool. Such a hard choice but mine is pretty solid. Having lived in Bastrop Co. for 30+ years, I am grateful that I have White-eyed Vireos on the place. Tough little soldiers that sing all day regardless of the heat, The vireos love it turned up...In the dead of August when birdsong trails off into the hot day there are always the vireos. But in those 30+ years there, there is one bird song that I really missed even though I could drive 25 miles to the west and hear them. Little birds that sing all year. Happy little sprites. Now I can hear them every day any season when at our Cedar Park/Leander place so Bewick's Wren has to be my choice if only given one in this instance. I believe D.D. also had the same thought.

On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:14 PM Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...><mailto:<gontamarianne...>> wrote:
I love the Lesser Goldfinches' song. They always have SO MUCH to say in their cheerful way and seem to carry on conversations, despite my presence. I can't help but smile and then try to mimic them with whistling :)

On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:07 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...><mailto:<Clay.Taylor...>> wrote:
Ha! A good topic, Brush!

Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by whistling “Peter, Peter, PeeEEE” in the spring.

When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern’s raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers and American Oystercatchers.

Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them. Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.

Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine, heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song, anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting without having to find it in order to confirm it.

However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my neighbors’ roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than later.
Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:
I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas



--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas



--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas


 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 9:41 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Its true...I have been fooled too many times out on the place by them,
especially with Bell's Vireos, Towhees, Catbird, Brown Thrasher,Hermit
Thrush (calls) House Wren and even a White-eyeds version of
Chuck-will's-widow.

On Mon, Feb 25, 2019 at 11:13 AM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
wrote:

> Great choice, Brush – I had White-eyed Vireo placed in the “singing in the
> yard” category, but the Loggerhead Shrike just bumped it out.
>
>
>
> My favorite WEVI story is from back in CT in the early 80’s. Back then,
> they were a VERY uncommon nester along the CT coast, usually in the middle
> of impenetrable blackberry and cat briar tangles. I was at Barn Island
> State Park in Stonington, CT, walking along a dirt roadway with salt marsh
> on my right and tangles to my left.
>
>
>
> I heard a Gray Catbird singing up ahead of me, doing little Catbird-mews
> along with short “chick-brrr” phrases that were obvious mimicry of a
> White-eyed Vireo. I smiled, and wondered to myself where that Catbird had
> encountered a singing WEVI. The habitat there was pretty good for one, so
> maybe it was present, too.
>
>
>
> As I crept up to where the bird was singing (of course wanting to get a
> photo), it continued to throw in WEVI phrases along with Catbird notes.
> Imagine my surprise when I spotted an ACTUAL White-eyed Vireo perched on a
> blackberry branch, mimicking a Gray Catbird! He spotted me, cocked his
> head at me like he was saying “Busted!”, and dropped deeper down in the
> tangle. I walked away with a big grin on my face….
>
>
>
>
>
> Clay Taylor
>
> TOS Life Member
>
> Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
>
> <Clay.taylor...>
>
> 401-965-9064
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Brush Freeman [mailto:<brushfreeman...>]
> *Sent:* Sunday, February 24, 2019 2:01 PM
> *To:* Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>
> *Cc:* Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>; <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
>
>
>
> Posting my choice though it is very hard. Summer Tanager, Chuck-will's
> Widow;, Painted Bunting and all mentioned before as well. Those
> aforementioned birds and Purple Martins along with Yellow-billed Cuckoos
> just cheat us by being away 8 months of the years. Sandhill Cranes and
> Upland Sandpipers calling overhead is magical . And hearing Black Skimmers
> in the dark of night feeding in the bays is very cool. Such a hard choice
> but mine is pretty solid. Having lived in Bastrop Co. for 30+ years, I am
> grateful that I have White-eyed Vireos on the place. Tough little soldiers
> that sing all day regardless of the heat, The vireos love it turned up...In
> the dead of August when birdsong trails off into the hot day there are
> always the vireos. But in those 30+ years there, there is one bird song
> that I really missed even though I could drive 25 miles to the west and
> hear them. Little birds that sing all year. Happy little sprites. Now I
> can hear them every day any season when at our Cedar Park/Leander place so
> Bewick's Wren has to be my choice if only given one in this instance. I
> believe D.D. also had the same thought.
>
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:14 PM Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>
> wrote:
>
> I love the Lesser Goldfinches' song. They always have SO MUCH to say in
> their cheerful way and seem to carry on conversations, despite my
> presence. I can't help but smile and then try to mimic them with whistling
> :)
>
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:07 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
> wrote:
>
> Ha! A good topic, Brush!
>
>
>
> Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of
> course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a
> birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested
> Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by
> whistling “Peter, Peter, PeeEEE” in the spring.
>
>
>
> When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern’s
> raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to
> this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers
> and American Oystercatchers.
>
>
>
> Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am
> usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them.
> Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser
> Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the
> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.
>
>
>
> Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine,
> heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive
> Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up
> on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song,
> anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting
> without having to find it in order to confirm it.
>
>
>
> However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored
> Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and
> singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my
> neighbors’ roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first
> song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than
> later.
>
> Clay Taylor
>
> TOS Life Member
>
> Swarovski Optik N.A.
>
> (Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 2/25/19 9:14 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Great choice, Brush – I had White-eyed Vireo placed in the “singing in the yard” category, but the Loggerhead Shrike just bumped it out.

My favorite WEVI story is from back in CT in the early 80’s. Back then, they were a VERY uncommon nester along the CT coast, usually in the middle of impenetrable blackberry and cat briar tangles. I was at Barn Island State Park in Stonington, CT, walking along a dirt roadway with salt marsh on my right and tangles to my left.

I heard a Gray Catbird singing up ahead of me, doing little Catbird-mews along with short “chick-brrr” phrases that were obvious mimicry of a White-eyed Vireo. I smiled, and wondered to myself where that Catbird had encountered a singing WEVI. The habitat there was pretty good for one, so maybe it was present, too.

As I crept up to where the bird was singing (of course wanting to get a photo), it continued to throw in WEVI phrases along with Catbird notes. Imagine my surprise when I spotted an ACTUAL White-eyed Vireo perched on a blackberry branch, mimicking a Gray Catbird! He spotted me, cocked his head at me like he was saying “Busted!”, and dropped deeper down in the tangle. I walked away with a big grin on my face….


Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
<Clay.taylor...><mailto:<Clay.taylor...>
401-965-9064



From: Brush Freeman [mailto:<brushfreeman...>]
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 2:01 PM
To: Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>
Cc: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>; <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.

Posting my choice though it is very hard. Summer Tanager, Chuck-will's Widow;, Painted Bunting and all mentioned before as well. Those aforementioned birds and Purple Martins along with Yellow-billed Cuckoos just cheat us by being away 8 months of the years. Sandhill Cranes and Upland Sandpipers calling overhead is magical . And hearing Black Skimmers in the dark of night feeding in the bays is very cool. Such a hard choice but mine is pretty solid. Having lived in Bastrop Co. for 30+ years, I am grateful that I have White-eyed Vireos on the place. Tough little soldiers that sing all day regardless of the heat, The vireos love it turned up...In the dead of August when birdsong trails off into the hot day there are always the vireos. But in those 30+ years there, there is one bird song that I really missed even though I could drive 25 miles to the west and hear them. Little birds that sing all year. Happy little sprites. Now I can hear them every day any season when at our Cedar Park/Leander place so Bewick's Wren has to be my choice if only given one in this instance. I believe D.D. also had the same thought.

On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:14 PM Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...><mailto:<gontamarianne...>> wrote:
I love the Lesser Goldfinches' song. They always have SO MUCH to say in their cheerful way and seem to carry on conversations, despite my presence. I can't help but smile and then try to mimic them with whistling :)

On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:07 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...><mailto:<Clay.Taylor...>> wrote:
Ha! A good topic, Brush!

Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by whistling “Peter, Peter, PeeEEE” in the spring.

When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern’s raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers and American Oystercatchers.

Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them. Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.

Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine, heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song, anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting without having to find it in order to confirm it.

However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my neighbors’ roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than later.
Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:
I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas




--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas


 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 8:37 pm
From: Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Wow! What a wonderful question with so many equally wonderful answers! I’ve been thinking about it and have enjoyed remembering all of the bird songs and calls I enjoy. White-eyed vireos, Carolina Wrens, and Song Sparrows that sound as though they are bursting with song! The trumpeting of Sandhill Cranes! The “preent” of nighthawks and chatter of Chimney Swifts! Canyon and Cactus Wrens! And I have a whole new lease on Mockingbirds. What a wonderful way to view their mimicry as hearing so many species singing one after another! These and so many more are close seconds. I grew up in the northeast and southeast and did not visit the desert until well into my adult life. I fell in love with it and the bird that always brings the biggest smile to my face is a Curve-billed Thrasher! Whenever I hear the loud, clear call of “wheet wheet! wheet wheet!” and their bubbly song, I stop whatever I am doing and just enjoy.

Thanks for asking such a great question, Brush!

Jennifer

Jennifer Miller
Lubbock, TX

(o,o)
/)_)
" "
Email: <FoundNatureBlog...>

Blog: https://foundnature.weebly.com/index.html

> On Feb 24, 2019, at 5:46 PM, PJS <pjsmolen...> wrote:
>
> Marsh Wren at Anahuac and LaFittes Cove and Wood Thrushes are the sound of spring. Chimney Swifts and Common Nighthawks are the sound of summer. Sandhill Cranes are the sound of winter.
>
> It’s a difficult choice 😉
>
> Pam
>
>> On Feb 24, 2019, at 10:44 AM, David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
>>
>> For me, Marsh Wren, you can drive the Shoveler Pond loop at Anahuac and it sounds like one continuous wren. I guess after that Hermit or Wood Thrush, the ethereal quality of their song is magic in a quiet forest.
>>
>>> On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 4:48 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>>> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
>>> --
>>>
>>> Brush Freeman
>>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>> --
>> David Sarkozi
>> Houston, TX
>> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 3:47 pm
From: PJS <pjsmolen...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Marsh Wren at Anahuac and LaFittes Cove and Wood Thrushes are the sound of spring. Chimney Swifts and Common Nighthawks are the sound of summer. Sandhill Cranes are the sound of winter.

It’s a difficult choice 😉

Pam

> On Feb 24, 2019, at 10:44 AM, David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
>
> For me, Marsh Wren, you can drive the Shoveler Pond loop at Anahuac and it sounds like one continuous wren. I guess after that Hermit or Wood Thrush, the ethereal quality of their song is magic in a quiet forest.
>
>> On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 4:48 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 1:47 pm
From: Dan Smith <dan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Grackles using tools
Why flap your wings when you know it’s only a 10-minute ride. Maybe one day the broad wings will figure out they don’t have to go all the way around to take I-10 to get around the bay on their way south. :-)

Dan Smith
<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>
512-451-2632
http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com <http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com/>

"Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.




> On Feb 24, 2019, at 3:36 PM, David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
>
> Its not tool use, but watch the grackles in the Bolivar Ferry some time, they fly on as the boat departs, hang out on deck and then fly off when it makes the landing on the other side. It sure does seem like they are "commuting" using the ferry.
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 3:04 PM Dan Smith <dan...> <mailto:<dan...>> wrote:
> There is merit to that suggestion. And grackles are endlessly interesting, with fascinating mating behavior and an obvious intelligence. It wouldn’t surprise me if one day someone observes them using tools.
>
> Dan Smith
> <dan...> <mailto:<dan...>
> 512-451-2632
> http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com <http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com/>
>
> "Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.
>
>
>
>
>> On Feb 24, 2019, at 2:24 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> <mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:
>>
>> So true! I worked up in NY just long enough to go thru two winters there. I would fly home once a month for 4-5 days, mostly in winter, to the old Austin airport step out of terminal and hear the grackles...It is the national bird of Austin and should be for Texas :-)
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 2:10 PM L Markoff <canyoneagle...> <mailto:<canyoneagle...>> wrote:
>> Sometimes when I was “commuting” between Virginia and Texas I was accompanied by one of my sons who is a fellow birder. We would get into Texas and start hearing and seeing Great-tailed Grackles lined up on the wires. We would turn to each other, smile, and say, “Now we know we are in Texas for real!” Happy memories.
>>
>>
>>
>> Lori Markoff
>>
>> Eugene, OR
>>
>>
>>
>> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
>> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 11:21 AM
>> To: <dmarc-noreply...> <mailto:<dmarc-noreply...>
>> Cc: TEXBIRDS
>> Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
>>
>>
>>
>> Yes I don't think I would want to live where there are no Great-tailed Grackles either.
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 12:09 PM Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...> <mailto:<dmarc-noreply...>> wrote:
>>
>> As for me and my family, we all have move around a lot since first arriving in Houston in 1985. In and out of Houston, all 4 of us. But one sound that always reminds all of us that we are back home is the Great-tailed Grackle. My children heard it continuously while growing up, parking lots, schools, and during our many many visits to Herman Park zoo and natural history and science museum. They and my wife are not particularly attuned to bird sounds, but for all of us, the Great-tailed Grackle reminds us that we are home, no matter where we have been.
>>
>> Steve Gast
>>
>> Houston, Texas
>>
>>
>> On Feb 24, 2019, at 11:23 AM, Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...> <mailto:<calidris.bairdii...>> wrote:
>>
>> Count one more with a very special affection for the song of Sandhill Cranes, wherever or whenever! For me and, I imagine, for many others it is one of the most wondrously evocative of avian voices. Because this species' voice carries well it also often means that simply by looking up and about one can be thrilled by the sight of their crossing the sky, their powerful, lilting chorus seeming virtually to propel them across the sky. Late in the day, as sunset approaches, what more could one wish?!
>>
>>
>>
>> I, like David, greatly appreciate several of the thrush species' songs, with perhaps a special affection for that of Veery. Also enjoyable and fascinating is the strongly ventriloquial qualty of some of their utterances. Alas, South Texas does not seem the place to be for such pleasures.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com/>Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
> --
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi


 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 1:37 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Grackles using tools
Its not tool use, but watch the grackles in the Bolivar Ferry some time,
they fly on as the boat departs, hang out on deck and then fly off when it
makes the landing on the other side. It sure does seem like they are
"commuting" using the ferry.


On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 3:04 PM Dan Smith <dan...> wrote:

> There is merit to that suggestion. And grackles are endlessly interesting,
> with fascinating mating behavior and an obvious intelligence. It wouldn’t
> surprise me if one day someone observes them using tools.
>
> Dan Smith
> <dan...>
> 512-451-2632
> http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com
>
> "Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not
> constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their
> gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.
>
>
>
>
> On Feb 24, 2019, at 2:24 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> So true! I worked up in NY just long enough to go thru two winters there.
> I would fly home once a month for 4-5 days, mostly in winter, to the old
> Austin airport step out of terminal and hear the grackles...It is the
> national bird of Austin and should be for Texas :-)
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 2:10 PM L Markoff <canyoneagle...> wrote:
>
>> Sometimes when I was “commuting” between Virginia and Texas I was
>> accompanied by one of my sons who is a fellow birder. We would get into
>> Texas and start hearing and seeing Great-tailed Grackles lined up on the
>> wires. We would turn to each other, smile, and say, “Now we know we are in
>> Texas for real!” Happy memories.
>>
>>
>>
>> Lori Markoff
>>
>> Eugene, OR
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:
>> <texbirds-bounce...>] *On Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
>> *Sent:* Sunday, February 24, 2019 11:21 AM
>> *To:* <dmarc-noreply...>
>> *Cc:* TEXBIRDS
>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
>>
>>
>>
>> Yes I don't think I would want to live where there are no Great-tailed
>> Grackles either.
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 12:09 PM Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> As for me and my family, we all have move around a lot since first
>> arriving in Houston in 1985. In and out of Houston, all 4 of us. But one
>> sound that always reminds all of us that we are back home is the
>> Great-tailed Grackle. My children heard it continuously while growing up,
>> parking lots, schools, and during our many many visits to Herman Park zoo
>> and natural history and science museum. They and my wife are not
>> particularly attuned to bird sounds, but for all of us, the Great-tailed
>> Grackle reminds us that we are home, no matter where we have been.
>>
>> Steve Gast
>>
>> Houston, Texas
>>
>>
>> On Feb 24, 2019, at 11:23 AM, Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> Count one more with a very special affection for the song of Sandhill
>> Cranes, wherever or whenever! For me and, I imagine, for many others it is
>> one of the most wondrously evocative of avian voices. Because this species'
>> voice carries well it also often means that simply by looking up and about
>> one can be thrilled by the sight of their crossing the sky, their powerful,
>> lilting chorus seeming virtually to propel them across the sky. Late in
>> the day, as sunset approaches, what more could one wish?!
>>
>>
>>
>> I, like David, greatly appreciate several of the thrush species' songs,
>> with perhaps a special affection for that of Veery. Also enjoyable and
>> fascinating is the strongly ventriloquial qualty of some of their
>> utterances. Alas, South Texas does not seem the place to be for such
>> pleasures.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com/>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
>

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 1:04 pm
From: Dan Smith <dan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
There is merit to that suggestion. And grackles are endlessly interesting, with fascinating mating behavior and an obvious intelligence. It wouldn’t surprise me if one day someone observes them using tools.

Dan Smith
<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>
512-451-2632
http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com <http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com/>

"Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.




> On Feb 24, 2019, at 2:24 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> So true! I worked up in NY just long enough to go thru two winters there. I would fly home once a month for 4-5 days, mostly in winter, to the old Austin airport step out of terminal and hear the grackles...It is the national bird of Austin and should be for Texas :-)
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 2:10 PM L Markoff <canyoneagle...> <mailto:<canyoneagle...>> wrote:
> Sometimes when I was “commuting” between Virginia and Texas I was accompanied by one of my sons who is a fellow birder. We would get into Texas and start hearing and seeing Great-tailed Grackles lined up on the wires. We would turn to each other, smile, and say, “Now we know we are in Texas for real!” Happy memories.
>
>
>
> Lori Markoff
>
> Eugene, OR
>
>
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
> Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 11:21 AM
> To: <dmarc-noreply...> <mailto:<dmarc-noreply...>
> Cc: TEXBIRDS
> Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
>
>
>
> Yes I don't think I would want to live where there are no Great-tailed Grackles either.
>
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 12:09 PM Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...> <mailto:<dmarc-noreply...>> wrote:
>
> As for me and my family, we all have move around a lot since first arriving in Houston in 1985. In and out of Houston, all 4 of us. But one sound that always reminds all of us that we are back home is the Great-tailed Grackle. My children heard it continuously while growing up, parking lots, schools, and during our many many visits to Herman Park zoo and natural history and science museum. They and my wife are not particularly attuned to bird sounds, but for all of us, the Great-tailed Grackle reminds us that we are home, no matter where we have been.
>
> Steve Gast
>
> Houston, Texas
>
>
> On Feb 24, 2019, at 11:23 AM, Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...> <mailto:<calidris.bairdii...>> wrote:
>
> Count one more with a very special affection for the song of Sandhill Cranes, wherever or whenever! For me and, I imagine, for many others it is one of the most wondrously evocative of avian voices. Because this species' voice carries well it also often means that simply by looking up and about one can be thrilled by the sight of their crossing the sky, their powerful, lilting chorus seeming virtually to propel them across the sky. Late in the day, as sunset approaches, what more could one wish?!
>
>
>
> I, like David, greatly appreciate several of the thrush species' songs, with perhaps a special affection for that of Veery. Also enjoyable and fascinating is the strongly ventriloquial qualty of some of their utterances. Alas, South Texas does not seem the place to be for such pleasures.
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com/>Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 12:31 pm
From: Ralph <rreed1049...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
My favorite bird song is the Cactus Wren. It is a "home" sound for me as
several nest very close by. It is a harsh bird sound that I hear
often in TV commercials and movies when the sound man is trying to
convey desert and desolation. And, the older I get, the more I sound
like a Cactus Wren.
Ralph ReedAlpine
Sent from my Verizon Motorola SmartphoneOn Feb 23, 2019 4:47 PM, Brush
Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:

I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard
before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you
appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark,
happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for
years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth,
it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I
have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll
share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on
FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control.
Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at
least fairly regularly. ..
--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 12:25 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
So true! I worked up in NY just long enough to go thru two winters there.
I would fly home once a month for 4-5 days, mostly in winter, to the old
Austin airport step out of terminal and hear the grackles...It is the
national bird of Austin and should be for Texas :-)


On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 2:10 PM L Markoff <canyoneagle...> wrote:

> Sometimes when I was “commuting” between Virginia and Texas I was
> accompanied by one of my sons who is a fellow birder. We would get into
> Texas and start hearing and seeing Great-tailed Grackles lined up on the
> wires. We would turn to each other, smile, and say, “Now we know we are in
> Texas for real!” Happy memories.
>
>
>
> Lori Markoff
>
> Eugene, OR
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:
> <texbirds-bounce...>] *On Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Sunday, February 24, 2019 11:21 AM
> *To:* <dmarc-noreply...>
> *Cc:* TEXBIRDS
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
>
>
>
> Yes I don't think I would want to live where there are no Great-tailed
> Grackles either.
>
>
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 12:09 PM Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...>
> wrote:
>
> As for me and my family, we all have move around a lot since first
> arriving in Houston in 1985. In and out of Houston, all 4 of us. But one
> sound that always reminds all of us that we are back home is the
> Great-tailed Grackle. My children heard it continuously while growing up,
> parking lots, schools, and during our many many visits to Herman Park zoo
> and natural history and science museum. They and my wife are not
> particularly attuned to bird sounds, but for all of us, the Great-tailed
> Grackle reminds us that we are home, no matter where we have been.
>
> Steve Gast
>
> Houston, Texas
>
>
> On Feb 24, 2019, at 11:23 AM, Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...>
> wrote:
>
> Count one more with a very special affection for the song of Sandhill
> Cranes, wherever or whenever! For me and, I imagine, for many others it is
> one of the most wondrously evocative of avian voices. Because this species'
> voice carries well it also often means that simply by looking up and about
> one can be thrilled by the sight of their crossing the sky, their powerful,
> lilting chorus seeming virtually to propel them across the sky. Late in
> the day, as sunset approaches, what more could one wish?!
>
>
>
> I, like David, greatly appreciate several of the thrush species' songs,
> with perhaps a special affection for that of Veery. Also enjoyable and
> fascinating is the strongly ventriloquial qualty of some of their
> utterances. Alas, South Texas does not seem the place to be for such
> pleasures.
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 12:21 pm
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Oh, well, if we're gonna start talking about messin' with birds (e.g.,
calling in the plovers), my favorite game is drawing in a Roadrunner by
cooing at him! :)



Mary Beth Stowe

Alamo, TX

<http://www.miriameaglemon.com> www.miriameaglemon.com



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On
Behalf Of Clay Taylor
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 1:07 PM
To: <brushfreeman...>
Cc: <Texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.



Ha! A good topic, Brush!



Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of course
I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a birder:
Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested Flycatcher
(Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by whistling
"Peter, Peter, PeeEEE" in the spring.



When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern's raucous
call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to this day
it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers and
American Oystercatchers.



Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am
usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them.
Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser Goldfinches,
Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the Black-bellied
Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.



Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine,
heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive
Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up on
the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song,
anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting
without having to find it in order to confirm it.



However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored
Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and
singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my
neighbors' roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first
song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than
later.

Clay Taylor

TOS Life Member

Swarovski Optik N.A.

(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX



Sent from my iPhone


On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
<mailto:<brushfreeman...> > wrote:

I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 12:16 pm
From: WD Williams <wdwt1938...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
Northern Cardinal

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 24, 2019, at 1:54 PM, Jane F Tillman <jtillman...> wrote:
>
> Canyon Wren would have to be my favorite if I had to pick just one. I was so surprised and delighted when I moved to Austin years ago, and found out I did not need to go all the way to Big Bend to hear one. Then we moved into this NW Hills neighborhood and they are a backyard bird.
> I love their beautiful liquid song, but do think the ending is a little harsh - but it let's us know they are wrens after all.
>
> But who cannot feel enchanted inside when they hear Sandhill Cranes?
> Or the four or five note song of the chickadee?
> Or the chittering of the Chimney Swifts?
>
> If you have not read any of Mary Oliver's poems that mention bird song, check these out:
> She was a Pulitzer Prize winning poet who recently passed away.
>
> Her book, A Thousand Mornings, mentions a wren drenched in enthusiasm. http://www.homesongblog.com/spring/i-happened-to-be-standing-a-poem-about-prayer-by-mary-oliver/
>
> and an ethereal thrush https://www.pinterest.com/pin/375276581420786948/?lp=true
>
> Not sure what anthology this is in, but love the image:
> Two mockingbirds tossing their songs in the air.
> https://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/unbound/poetry/atlpoets/oliv9402.htm
>
> Jane Tillman
> Austin
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 12:11 pm
From: L Markoff <canyoneagle...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
Sometimes when I was “commuting” between Virginia and Texas I was accompanied by one of my sons who is a fellow birder. We would get into Texas and start hearing and seeing Great-tailed Grackles lined up on the wires. We would turn to each other, smile, and say, “Now we know we are in Texas for real!” Happy memories.



Lori Markoff

Eugene, OR



From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 11:21 AM
To: <dmarc-noreply...>
Cc: TEXBIRDS
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song



Yes I don't think I would want to live where there are no Great-tailed Grackles either.



On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 12:09 PM Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:

As for me and my family, we all have move around a lot since first arriving in Houston in 1985. In and out of Houston, all 4 of us. But one sound that always reminds all of us that we are back home is the Great-tailed Grackle. My children heard it continuously while growing up, parking lots, schools, and during our many many visits to Herman Park zoo and natural history and science museum. They and my wife are not particularly attuned to bird sounds, but for all of us, the Great-tailed Grackle reminds us that we are home, no matter where we have been.

Steve Gast

Houston, Texas


On Feb 24, 2019, at 11:23 AM, Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...> wrote:

Count one more with a very special affection for the song of Sandhill Cranes, wherever or whenever! For me and, I imagine, for many others it is one of the most wondrously evocative of avian voices. Because this species' voice carries well it also often means that simply by looking up and about one can be thrilled by the sight of their crossing the sky, their powerful, lilting chorus seeming virtually to propel them across the sky. Late in the day, as sunset approaches, what more could one wish?!



I, like David, greatly appreciate several of the thrush species' songs, with perhaps a special affection for that of Veery. Also enjoyable and fascinating is the strongly ventriloquial qualty of some of their utterances. Alas, South Texas does not seem the place to be for such pleasures.






--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 12:02 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Posting my choice though it is very hard. Summer Tanager, Chuck-will's
Widow;, Painted Bunting and all mentioned before as well. Those
aforementioned birds and Purple Martins along with Yellow-billed Cuckoos
just cheat us by being away 8 months of the years. Sandhill Cranes and
Upland Sandpipers calling overhead is magical . And hearing Black Skimmers
in the dark of night feeding in the bays is very cool. Such a hard choice
but mine is pretty solid. Having lived in Bastrop Co. for 30+ years, I am
grateful that I have White-eyed Vireos on the place. Tough little soldiers
that sing all day regardless of the heat, The vireos love it turned up...In
the dead of August when birdsong trails off into the hot day there are
always the vireos. But in those 30+ years there, there is one bird song
that I really missed even though I could drive 25 miles to the west and
hear them. Little birds that sing all year. Happy little sprites. Now I
can hear them every day any season when at our Cedar Park/Leander place so
Bewick's Wren has to be my choice if only given one in this instance. I
believe D.D. also had the same thought.

On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:14 PM Marianne Gonta <gontamarianne...>
wrote:

> I love the Lesser Goldfinches' song. They always have SO MUCH to say in
> their cheerful way and seem to carry on conversations, despite my
> presence. I can't help but smile and then try to mimic them with whistling
> :)
>
> On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:07 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
> wrote:
>
>> Ha! A good topic, Brush!
>>
>> Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of
>> course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a
>> birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested
>> Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by
>> whistling “Peter, Peter, PeeEEE” in the spring.
>>
>> When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern’s
>> raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to
>> this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers
>> and American Oystercatchers.
>>
>> Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am
>> usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them.
>> Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser
>> Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the
>> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.
>>
>> Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine,
>> heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive
>> Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up
>> on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song,
>> anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting
>> without having to find it in order to confirm it.
>>
>> However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored
>> Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and
>> singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my
>> neighbors’ roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first
>> song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than
>> later.
>>
>> Clay Taylor
>> TOS Life Member
>> Swarovski Optik N.A.
>> (Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
>> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
>> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
>> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
>> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
>> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
>> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
>> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
>> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
>> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 12:01 pm
From: Charles Backus <backus829...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Having lived for a few years on a Vermont hillside, near a lake, up what we
euphemistically called a gravel road, my wife and I frequently had the
pleasure of hearing several species of thrush echoing through our woods.
Whose song there could be called the favorite? Wood Thrush? Veery? Or must
the honor go to the wails, yodels, and tremolos of the Common Loon on the
myriad lakes all over New England and Upstate New York, where we also lived
and vacationed for a while.


In the years since moving to Texas, though I have seen all three of those
species, I don't think I have ever heard their respective songs here. Even
still though, the occasional visual reminders of those birds always seem to
call up internal sounds that remain very real to me.

Charles Backus
Spring, Texas


On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 1:51 PM Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
wrote:

> Homesick? The song that I absolutely took for granted in CT but would
> lose my mind over if I ever hear it in my Corpus Christi Yard is the Song
> Sparrow!
>
> Clay Taylor
> TOS Life Member
> Swarovski Optik N.A.
> (Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Feb 24, 2019, at 6:46 AM, Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
> wrote:
>
> Okay, I’ll probably get razzed for this J but I grew up in Michigan,
> spent 30 years in San Diego (California), and now live in the Valley; the
> one sound I hear when going up to the Hill Country (or most anywhere north
> of us in Texas) that always makes me homesick is the Blue Jay!
>
>
>
> Mary Beth Stowe
>
> Alamo, TX
>
> www.miriameaglemon.com
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Dell Little
> *Sent:* Sunday, February 24, 2019 6:02 AM
> *To:* <kbarnold2...>
> *Cc:* <bertf...>; <brushfreeman...>; <Texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
>
>
>
> I remember when I was eight and I got to go on a Dallas Audubon field trip
> to the Old Fish Hatchery with my Dad, Terry my brother, and remembering Ada
> Henderson introducing me to the song of an Eastern Wood-Pewee. Hearing the
> call now always takes me back to that day.
>
>
>
> On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 9:41 PM Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> wrote:
>
> I vote for Carolina Wren. The field guide description of the song does not
> do it justice; there’s a lot of individual variation.
>
> Keith Arnold
>
> P.S. It also was the subject of my first scientific publication!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 6:11 PM, <bertf...> <bertf...>
> wrote:
>
> Certainly not our most colorful native species, but is hard to beat for
> the its song. Decades ago, I recall lying in bed in early morning with the
> bedroom door open to its screen. I thought there must be a dozen species
> outside singing from my wooded yard. In my mind, nothing beats the
> multi-versed songs of our Mockingbird.
>
> Bert Frenz
>
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Belize
>
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> <Bert2...>
>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> [
> mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Saturday, February 23, 2019 4:47 PM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Bird Song.
>
>
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 11:55 am
From: Jane F Tillman <jtillman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song
Canyon Wren would have to be my favorite if I had to pick just one. I was
so surprised and delighted when I moved to Austin years ago, and found out
I did not need to go all the way to Big Bend to hear one. Then we moved
into this NW Hills neighborhood and they are a backyard bird.

I love their beautiful liquid song, but do think the ending is a little
harsh - but it let's us know they are wrens after all.



But who cannot feel enchanted inside when they hear Sandhill Cranes?

Or the four or five note song of the chickadee?

Or the chittering of the Chimney Swifts?



If you have not read any of Mary Oliver's poems that mention bird song,
check these out:

She was a Pulitzer Prize winning poet who recently passed away.



Her book, *A Thousand Mornings*, mentions a wren drenched in enthusiasm.
http://www.homesongblog.com/spring/i-happened-to-be-standing-a-poem-about-prayer-by-mary-oliver/


and an ethereal thrush
*https://www.pinterest.com/pin/375276581420786948/?lp=true
<https://www.pinterest.com/pin/375276581420786948/?lp=true>*



Not sure what anthology this is in, but love the image:

Two mockingbirds tossing their songs in the air.

https://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/unbound/poetry/atlpoets/oliv9402.htm


Jane Tillman

Austin

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 11:54 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Fwd: Re: Mustang Island Aplomados - update
They were perched together there this morning, basking in the beautiful sunlight! A nice change from all of the gloom and fog of the past few days.

Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 23, 2019, at 8:21 PM, Donna Silvers <dmarc-noreply...><mailto:<dmarc-noreply...>> wrote:

The Aplamado Falcon was there in the late afternoon today. Got some great photos. Thanks Clay. Dean and Donna Silvers, Jamaica Beach, Texas

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

From: <jkestner...><mailto:<jkestner...>>
Date: February 23, 2019 at 12:08:00 PM CST
To: "<texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>" <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>, <Clay.Taylor...><mailto:<Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Mustang Island Aplomados - update
Reply-To: <jkestner...><mailto:<jkestner...>

These birds are quite reliably seen every day. You may have to wait a bit for them to return after a foray out for food, but they are very faithful to this platform.

Judy Kestner
Corpus christi

---- Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...><mailto:<Clay.Taylor...>> wrote:

=============
Hi all -

Here is my photo (heavily cropped) from Friday afternoon. How crazy is that size difference between the female and the male?


Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner



 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 11:51 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Homesick? The song that I absolutely took for granted in CT but would lose my mind over if I ever hear it in my Corpus Christi Yard is the Song Sparrow!

Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 24, 2019, at 6:46 AM, Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...><mailto:<mbstowe...>> wrote:

Okay, I'll probably get razzed for this :) but I grew up in Michigan, spent 30 years in San Diego (California), and now live in the Valley; the one sound I hear when going up to the Hill Country (or most anywhere north of us in Texas) that always makes me homesick is the Blue Jay!

Mary Beth Stowe
Alamo, TX
www.miriameaglemon.com<http://www.miriameaglemon.com>

From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Dell Little
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 6:02 AM
To: <kbarnold2...><mailto:<kbarnold2...>
Cc: <bertf...><mailto:<bertf...>; <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>; <Texbirds...><mailto:<Texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.

I remember when I was eight and I got to go on a Dallas Audubon field trip to the Old Fish Hatchery with my Dad, Terry my brother, and remembering Ada Henderson introducing me to the song of an Eastern Wood-Pewee. Hearing the call now always takes me back to that day.

On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 9:41 PM Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...><mailto:<kbarnold2...>> wrote:
I vote for Carolina Wren. The field guide description of the song does not do it justice; there's a lot of individual variation.
Keith Arnold
P.S. It also was the subject of my first scientific publication!
Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 23, 2019, at 6:11 PM, <bertf...><mailto:<bertf...>> <bertf...><mailto:<bertf...>> wrote:
Certainly not our most colorful native species, but is hard to beat for the its song. Decades ago, I recall lying in bed in early morning with the bedroom door open to its screen. I thought there must be a dozen species outside singing from my wooded yard. In my mind, nothing beats the multi-versed songs of our Mockingbird.
Bert Frenz
Oaks & Prairies of Texas
eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
eBird reviewer, Belize
NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
<Bert2...><mailto:<Bert2...>
www.bafrenz.com<http://www.bafrenz.com/>



From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2019 4:47 PM
To: <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song.

I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas


 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 11:22 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
Yes I don't think I would want to live where there are no Great-tailed
Grackles either.

On Sun, Feb 24, 2019 at 12:09 PM Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...>
wrote:

> As for me and my family, we all have move around a lot since first
> arriving in Houston in 1985. In and out of Houston, all 4 of us. But one
> sound that always reminds all of us that we are back home is the
> Great-tailed Grackle. My children heard it continuously while growing up,
> parking lots, schools, and during our many many visits to Herman Park zoo
> and natural history and science museum. They and my wife are not
> particularly attuned to bird sounds, but for all of us, the Great-tailed
> Grackle reminds us that we are home, no matter where we have been.
>
> Steve Gast
> Houston, Texas
>
> On Feb 24, 2019, at 11:23 AM, Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...>
> wrote:
>
> Count one more with a very special affection for the song of Sandhill
> Cranes, wherever or whenever! For me and, I imagine, for many others it is
> one of the most wondrously evocative of avian voices. Because this species'
> voice carries well it also often means that simply by looking up and about
> one can be thrilled by the sight of their crossing the sky, their powerful,
> lilting chorus seeming virtually to propel them across the sky. Late in
> the day, as sunset approaches, what more could one wish?!
>
> I, like David, greatly appreciate several of the thrush species' songs,
> with perhaps a special affection for that of Veery. Also enjoyable and
> fascinating is the strongly ventriloquial qualty of some of their
> utterances. Alas, South Texas does not seem the place to be for such
> pleasures.
>
>

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 11:07 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Ha! A good topic, Brush!

Growing up in Connecticut and starting Birding there in the 1970s, of course I have some real favorites that carry over from my early days as a birder: Black-throated Green Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Great-crested Flycatcher (Reeeep!), and of course driving the Tufted Titmice crazy by whistling "Peter, Peter, PeeEEE" in the spring.

When I finally started traveling, I really liked the Caspian Tern's raucous call, was flabbergasted by the notes of the Varied Thrush, and to this day it is fun to whistle at and draw in passing Black-bellied Plovers and American Oystercatchers.

Ok, so Texas only, eh? When I am puttering around in my backyard, I am usually listening to the birds more intently than I am watching for them. Voices from the sky that make me smile: Sandhill Cranes, Lesser Goldfinches, Purple Martins on the wing in the dark at 4am, and the Black-bellied Whistling Ducks that visit the nearby pond.

Voices from the yard: hearing the Green Jays approaching from the ravine, heading toward the feeders; hearing both the Long-billed Thrasher and Olive Sparrow singing in the thicket this spring; the Loggerhead Shrike teed-up on the mesquite and singing his brains out (well, what passes for a song, anyway); and my elation at nailing the ID of a singing Painted Bunting without having to find it in order to confirm it.

However, I guess the one that satisfies me the most is the Clay-colored Thrush (aka Robin) that has been visiting the yard the last two springs and singing morning and evening. Last June we actually saw two birds on my neighbors' roof, facing off. I am impatiently waiting to hear the first song of 2019, and am hoping that we get a nesting pair sooner rather than later.

Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 23, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:

I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas




 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 10:53 am
From: Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...>
Subject: [texbirds] query: Mountain Plover in Hidalgo or Cameron this winter?
Has anyone seen or learned about the presence of Mountain Plover in Hidalgo
and/or Cameron counties in late fall through winter thus far? I have
neither seen nor heard any news in that regard at a time when at least a
few usually may be found in one or both of those counties. Any insights on
that species' presence or absence in those counties this fall/winter would
be much appreciated.

Rex Stanford (Weslaco).

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 10:15 am
From: Andrew Donnelly <acadonnelly...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
So many choices, but I always love hearing Sandhill Cranes, and looking up and around to try and find the flock. It reminds me a bit of growing up in the northeast, when we would hear the geese overhead and we would scramble to see who could spot them first.

Andy Donnelly
Austin, TX

Typos by iPhnoe

> On Feb 24, 2019, at 11:44 AM, David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
>
> For me, Marsh Wren, you can drive the Shoveler Pond loop at Anahuac and it sounds like one continuous wren. I guess after that Hermit or Wood Thrush, the ethereal quality of their song is magic in a quiet forest.
>
>> On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 4:48 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 10:09 am
From: Steve Gast <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender segast23 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song
As for me and my family, we all have move around a lot since first arriving in Houston in 1985. In and out of Houston, all 4 of us. But one sound that always reminds all of us that we are back home is the Great-tailed Grackle. My children heard it continuously while growing up, parking lots, schools, and during our many many visits to Herman Park zoo and natural history and science museum. They and my wife are not particularly attuned to bird sounds, but for all of us, the Great-tailed Grackle reminds us that we are home, no matter where we have been.

Steve Gast
Houston, Texas

> On Feb 24, 2019, at 11:23 AM, Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...> wrote:
>
> Count one more with a very special affection for the song of Sandhill Cranes, wherever or whenever! For me and, I imagine, for many others it is one of the most wondrously evocative of avian voices. Because this species' voice carries well it also often means that simply by looking up and about one can be thrilled by the sight of their crossing the sky, their powerful, lilting chorus seeming virtually to propel them across the sky. Late in the day, as sunset approaches, what more could one wish?!
>
> I, like David, greatly appreciate several of the thrush species' songs, with perhaps a special affection for that of Veery. Also enjoyable and fascinating is the strongly ventriloquial qualty of some of their utterances. Alas, South Texas does not seem the place to be for such pleasures.

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 9:24 am
From: Rex Stanford <calidris.bairdii...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song
Count one more with a very special affection for the song of Sandhill
Cranes, wherever or whenever! For me and, I imagine, for many others it is
one of the most wondrously evocative of avian voices. Because this species'
voice carries well it also often means that simply by looking up and about
one can be thrilled by the sight of their crossing the sky, their powerful,
lilting chorus seeming virtually to propel them across the sky. Late in
the day, as sunset approaches, what more could one wish?!

I, like David, greatly appreciate several of the thrush species' songs,
with perhaps a special affection for that of Veery. Also enjoyable and
fascinating is the strongly ventriloquial qualty of some of their
utterances. Alas, South Texas does not seem the place to be for such
pleasures.

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 8:45 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
For me, Marsh Wren, you can drive the Shoveler Pond loop at Anahuac and it
sounds like one continuous wren. I guess after that Hermit or Wood Thrush,
the ethereal quality of their song is magic in a quiet forest.

On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 4:48 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
wrote:

> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 6:17 am
From: Brent Ortego <brentortego...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
It used to be Snow Goose during winter and Northern Bobwhite during summer. I hear them so seldom now. So, I have switched to Sandhills Cranes

Brent Ortego
Victoria, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 23, 2019, at 9:40 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...><mailto:<kbarnold2...>> wrote:

I vote for Carolina Wren. The field guide description of the song does not do it justice; there’s a lot of individual variation.
Keith Arnold
P.S. It also was the subject of my first scientific publication!

Sent from my iPhone

On Feb 23, 2019, at 6:11 PM, <bertf...><mailto:<bertf...>> <bertf...><mailto:<bertf...>> wrote:

Certainly not our most colorful native species, but is hard to beat for the its song. Decades ago, I recall lying in bed in early morning with the bedroom door open to its screen. I thought there must be a dozen species outside singing from my wooded yard. In my mind, nothing beats the multi-versed songs of our Mockingbird.
Bert Frenz
Oaks & Prairies of Texas
eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
eBird reviewer, Belize
NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
<Bert2...><mailto:<Bert2...>
www.bafrenz.com<https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.bafrenz.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7C%7Ca26334dd55224d1219e808d69a0a01f6%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636865765100097747&sdata=H6OFwspitIqEuRgOsvxskl%2BCTW7xhF4gM3IE2YUZrbQ%3D&reserved=0>



From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2019 4:47 PM
To: <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song.

I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas


 

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Date: 2/24/19 5:24 am
From: Bob White <bobwhitebsacbc...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
I’m going with Chimney Swifts also. For the 17 years that we lived in our last home in Spring the one bird song I could always count on hearing April through September was the Chimney Swift. Whether relaxing by the pool, doing yard work or grilling, they were always flitting and soaring overhead, doing their constant chittering.

Second place might be Eastern Screech-owl. They nested in our yard and I could often hear them when taking the dogs out for their last break before bed. I’d sometimes hear them from inside, especially if I slept in the spare bedroom in the back of the house.

I don’t hear either of them where I live now, but maybe the next time you ask I’ll say White-breasted Nuthatch, Yellow-billed Cuckoo or Summer Tanager. I hear them all summer.

Bob White
Jacksonville, TX


> On Feb 23, 2019, at 7:16 PM, Erik Breden <erik.breden...> wrote:
>
> Brush,
>
> This may sound a bit weird, but Chimney Swifts have always brightened my day. Sometimes it seems like they dive down just to say "Hello!"...
>
> Erik Breden
> Weslaco, Texas
>
>> On 2/23/2019 4:47 PM, Brush Freeman wrote:
>> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 4:46 am
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Okay, I’ll probably get razzed for this :) but I grew up in Michigan, spent 30 years in San Diego (California), and now live in the Valley; the one sound I hear when going up to the Hill Country (or most anywhere north of us in Texas) that always makes me homesick is the Blue Jay!



Mary Beth Stowe

Alamo, TX

<http://www.miriameaglemon.com> www.miriameaglemon.com



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Dell Little
Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2019 6:02 AM
To: <kbarnold2...>
Cc: <bertf...>; <brushfreeman...>; <Texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.



I remember when I was eight and I got to go on a Dallas Audubon field trip to the Old Fish Hatchery with my Dad, Terry my brother, and remembering Ada Henderson introducing me to the song of an Eastern Wood-Pewee. Hearing the call now always takes me back to that day.



On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 9:41 PM Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> <mailto:<kbarnold2...> > wrote:

I vote for Carolina Wren. The field guide description of the song does not do it justice; there’s a lot of individual variation.

Keith Arnold

P.S. It also was the subject of my first scientific publication!

Sent from my iPhone


On Feb 23, 2019, at 6:11 PM, <bertf...> <mailto:<bertf...> > <bertf...> <mailto:<bertf...> > wrote:

Certainly not our most colorful native species, but is hard to beat for the its song. Decades ago, I recall lying in bed in early morning with the bedroom door open to its screen. I thought there must be a dozen species outside singing from my wooded yard. In my mind, nothing beats the multi-versed songs of our Mockingbird.

Bert Frenz

Oaks & Prairies of Texas

eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas

eBird reviewer, Belize

NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas

<Bert2...> <mailto:<Bert2...>

www.bafrenz.com <http://www.bafrenz.com/>







From: <texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2019 4:47 PM
To: <texbirds...> <mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song.



I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas




 

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Date: 2/24/19 4:40 am
From: D D Currie <ddbirder...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Every yard I've had since I started birding has had Bewick's Wrens (except
the house near Athens which we sold). That call sounds like home to me.
Dell and I decided we can only live where there are Bewick's Wrens.

On Sat, Feb 23, 2019, 4:48 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:

> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 4:15 am
From: Dan Smith <dan...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Carolina Wrens are a very close second to mockingbirds for me.

Dan Smith
<dan...> <mailto:<dan...>
512-451-2632
http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com <http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com/>

"Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.




> On Feb 24, 2019, at 6:02 AM, Dell Little <dellel1119...> wrote:
>
> I remember when I was eight and I got to go on a Dallas Audubon field trip to the Old Fish Hatchery with my Dad, Terry my brother, and remembering Ada Henderson introducing me to the song of an Eastern Wood-Pewee. Hearing the call now always takes me back to that day.
>
> On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 9:41 PM Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> <mailto:<kbarnold2...>> wrote:
> I vote for Carolina Wren. The field guide description of the song does not do it justice; there’s a lot of individual variation.
> Keith Arnold
> P.S. It also was the subject of my first scientific publication!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 6:11 PM, <bertf...> <mailto:<bertf...>> <bertf...> <mailto:<bertf...>> wrote:
>
>> Certainly not our most colorful native species, but is hard to beat for the its song. Decades ago, I recall lying in bed in early morning with the bedroom door open to its screen. I thought there must be a dozen species outside singing from my wooded yard. In my mind, nothing beats the multi-versed songs of our Mockingbird.
>>
>> Bert Frenz
>>
>> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>
>> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>>
>> eBird reviewer, Belize
>>
>> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>>
>> <Bert2...> <mailto:<Bert2...>
>> www.bafrenz.com <http://www.bafrenz.com/>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>   <>
>> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
>> Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2019 4:47 PM
>> To: <texbirds...> <mailto:<texbirds...>
>> Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song.
>>
>>
>>
>> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
>> --
>>
>>
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>>
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>


 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/19 4:03 am
From: Dell Little <dellel1119...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
I remember when I was eight and I got to go on a Dallas Audubon field trip
to the Old Fish Hatchery with my Dad, Terry my brother, and remembering Ada
Henderson introducing me to the song of an Eastern Wood-Pewee. Hearing the
call now always takes me back to that day.

On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 9:41 PM Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> wrote:

> I vote for Carolina Wren. The field guide description of the song does not
> do it justice; there’s a lot of individual variation.
> Keith Arnold
> P.S. It also was the subject of my first scientific publication!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Feb 23, 2019, at 6:11 PM, <bertf...> <bertf...>
> wrote:
>
> Certainly not our most colorful native species, but is hard to beat for
> the its song. Decades ago, I recall lying in bed in early morning with the
> bedroom door open to its screen. I thought there must be a dozen species
> outside singing from my wooded yard. In my mind, nothing beats the
> multi-versed songs of our Mockingbird.
>
> Bert Frenz
>
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Belize
>
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> <Bert2...>
>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> [
> mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Saturday, February 23, 2019 4:47 PM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Bird Song.
>
>
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
> reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
> most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
> pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
> forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
> yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
> regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
> later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
> to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
> species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/23/19 7:41 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
I vote for Carolina Wren. The field guide description of the song does not do it justice; there’s a lot of individual variation.
Keith Arnold
P.S. It also was the subject of my first scientific publication!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 23, 2019, at 6:11 PM, <bertf...> <bertf...> wrote:
>
> Certainly not our most colorful native species, but is hard to beat for the its song. Decades ago, I recall lying in bed in early morning with the bedroom door open to its screen. I thought there must be a dozen species outside singing from my wooded yard. In my mind, nothing beats the multi-versed songs of our Mockingbird.
> Bert Frenz
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
> eBird reviewer, Belize
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
> <Bert2...>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
> Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2019 4:47 PM
> To: <texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song.
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/23/19 6:21 pm
From: Donna Silvers <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender silvers713 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: Re: Mustang Island Aplomados - update
The Aplamado Falcon was there in the late afternoon today. Got some great photos. Thanks Clay. Dean and Donna Silvers, Jamaica Beach, Texas

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: <jkestner...>
> Date: February 23, 2019 at 12:08:00 PM CST
> To: "<texbirds...>" <texbirds...>, <Clay.Taylor...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Re: Mustang Island Aplomados - update
> Reply-To: <jkestner...>
>
> These birds are quite reliably seen every day. You may have to wait a bit for them to return after a foray out for food, but they are very faithful to this platform.
>
> Judy Kestner
> Corpus christi
>
> ---- Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> wrote:
>
> =============
> Hi all -
>
> Here is my photo (heavily cropped) from Friday afternoon. How crazy is that size difference between the female and the male?
>
>
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>
> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
> from the List Owner
>
>

 

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Date: 2/23/19 5:24 pm
From: L Markoff <canyoneagle...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
For me, Carolina Wren is life over-flowing, jubilation, and impish personality wrapped up in a small brown bundle. I dare you not to smile while listening to a cranked up Carolina Wren! Having lived with it all my life both in the east and in Texas, it is the bird I miss most living in Oregon. I have Bewick’s Wren and Pacific Wren in my yard here and I appreciate them, but living without Carolina Wren leaves a big hole in my happiness factor. Carolina Wren alone is enough to make me travel back to Texas!



Lori Markoff

Eugene, OR



From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2019 2:47 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song.



I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





 

Back to top
Date: 2/23/19 5:17 pm
From: Phockey <phockey...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
That’s an easy decision for me and just today I got reaffirmed in it when on this foggy, drippy morning a whole flock of Purple Martins arrived at our colony and moved into their homes for the summer. The cheerful gurgling song in a chorus of many is music to my ears. It is the first song I hear in the morning as they start burbling inside their gourds well before dawn.

Petra Hockey
Port O’Connor

Sent from my iPhone
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

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Date: 2/23/19 5:17 pm
From: Erik Breden <erik.breden...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Brush,

This may sound a bit weird, but Chimney Swifts have always brightened my
day. Sometimes it seems like they dive down just to say "Hello!"...

Erik Breden
Weslaco, Texas

On 2/23/2019 4:47 PM, Brush Freeman wrote:
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before
> you reply.  What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or
> like the most.  The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day,
> memories.?   I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so
> many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard
> choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out   I've
> decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on
> where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here
> because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of
> control.  Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in
> Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 2/23/19 4:12 pm
From: <bertf...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
Certainly not our most colorful native species, but is hard to beat for the its song. Decades ago, I recall lying in bed in early morning with the bedroom door open to its screen. I thought there must be a dozen species outside singing from my wooded yard. In my mind, nothing beats the multi-versed songs of our Mockingbird.

Bert Frenz

Oaks & Prairies of Texas

eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas

eBird reviewer, Belize

NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas

<mailto:<Bert2...> <Bert2...>

<http://www.bafrenz.com/> www.bafrenz.com







From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Brush Freeman
Sent: Saturday, February 23, 2019 4:47 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song.



I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--



Brush Freeman

Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





 

Back to top
Date: 2/23/19 4:04 pm
From: Jason Leifester <jasonleifester...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Bird Song.
When I first started birding as a kid, my parents and I lived in
Eldorado, but our extended family owned land along the North Llano
River between Junction and Sonora. As a world of birds I'd never
noticed suddenly became apparent to me, the first bird song I recall
hearing was from the Canyon Wrens on that property. It remains one of
my favorite Texas bird songs to this day.

Jason Leifester
Elgin, TX

On Sat, Feb 23, 2019 at 4:48 PM Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

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Date: 2/23/19 2:48 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Bird Song.
I suppose this is a bit silly but just curious and think hard before you
reply. What native Texas bird song is the one you appreciated or like the
most. The one brings you spark, happiness on a dark day, memories.? I've
pondered this for years as there are just so, so many, and I swing back and
forth, it is a hard question and a hard choice if you are honest with
yourself and have thought it out I've decided on one that I have somewhat
regular exposure to depending on where I am. ..I'll share that choice
later...Am only posting here because if put on FB it would be just to much
to handle and get out of control. Remember this is for a native bird
species that occurs in Texas at least fairly regularly. ..
--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 2/23/19 10:32 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 23, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
Lots of singing going on at the Refuge! Olive Sparrow, Verdin, Sora and White-eyed Vireo all shared their songs multiple times as we walked around Willow Lakes. A Hooded Oriole was present with 4 Altamira Orioles at the Visitors Center feeders a true delight.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Feb 23, 2019 8:15 AM - 11:38 AM
Protocol: Traveling
4.18 mile(s)
52 species (+1 other taxa)

Blue-winged Teal 25
Cinnamon Teal 6
Northern Shoveler 16
Gadwall 8
Mottled Duck 8
Green-winged Teal 4
Least Grebe 2
Pied-billed Grebe 2
Inca Dove 3
White-tipped Dove 2
Sora 2
American Coot 5
Black-necked Stilt 18
Killdeer 2
Stilt Sandpiper 2
Least Sandpiper 25
Long-billed Dowitcher 35
Greater Yellowlegs 8
Lesser Yellowlegs 5
Snowy Egret 4
Turkey Vulture 37
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1
Harris's Hawk 3
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Green Kingfisher 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 6
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 1 Heard only
Eastern Phoebe 1
Vermilion Flycatcher 2
Great Kiskadee 10
Tropical/Couch's Kingbird 1
White-eyed Vireo 6
Green Jay 8
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 3
Tree Swallow 6
Black-crested Titmouse 8
Verdin 3 1 Heard only
House Wren 1
Carolina Wren 4
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 5
Clay-colored Thrush 2
Long-billed Thrasher 5
Northern Mockingbird 1
Olive Sparrow 3 Heard only
Hooded Oriole 1
Altamira Oriole 4
Red-winged Blackbird 125
Great-tailed Grackle 2
Orange-crowned Warbler 2
Common Yellowthroat 2
Northern Cardinal 7
House Sparrow 4

View this checklist online at https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53054917&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7C0a95f9dd5f5143321ffc08d699b7d19d%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636865412098007338&amp;sdata=24IP%2FM%2By1vS6wBDM98TCgOpr4Cr9UaVK0150%2BO3dAB8%3D&amp;reserved=0<https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS53054917&data=02%7C01%7C%7C5bdf498fccea476ae67708d699b85af3%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636865414404224531&sdata=MN9lmcSbEKMS6YRdyFvU1X%2BjHP1iWmdeebmxWc0iBXc%3D&reserved=0>

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Date: 2/23/19 10:08 am
From: <jkestner...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Mustang Island Aplomados - update
These birds are quite reliably seen every day. You may have to wait a bit for them to return after a foray out for food, but they are very faithful to this platform.

Judy Kestner
Corpus christi

---- Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> wrote:

=============
Hi all -

Here is my photo (heavily cropped) from Friday afternoon. How crazy is that size difference between the female and the male?


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Date: 2/23/19 8:33 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Mustang Island Aplomados - update
Hi all -

Here is my photo (heavily cropped) from Friday afternoon. How crazy is that size difference between the female and the male?




This morning (Saturday) it was so foggy I could barely see the Platform from the highway, but there appeared to be a dark “bump” in the middle of the platform - hopefully the female?

It is still VERY foggy on the Island, BTW.

Good Birding,

Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/22/19 7:13 pm
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Aplomado Falcons - Mustang Island
Hi all -

This afternoon, while heading south from Port Aransas on TX 361, I stopped to scope out a bird perched at one of the falcon hacking platforms. To my great pleasure, there were TWO adult Aplomado Falcons sitting side-by-side! It was very foggy, so the seeing was pretty bad, but through the spotting scope the birds were unmistakeable. The female looked MUCH bigger than the male - we might need to come up with a better descriptor than “tiercel” for this guy....here’s hoping that they are planning on raising a family.

The platform is on the west side of the highway, about 1.5 miles north of the main entrance to Mustang Island State Park (where the concrete “crooked L” is), so if you are coming south from Port A, put the State Park into your GPS and when you are less than 2 miles away, look to the right. It is pretty obvious.

Good luck!

Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/22/19 4:33 pm
From: Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...>
Subject: [texbirds] 78 species in five hours on Santa Gertrudis division of King Ranch
Three of us spent 5 hours birding Santa Gertrudis, recording 78 species.
Among them were Green and Ringed Kingfishers.

We then spent 3 hours on the Laureles division, where, among others, we saw
Sprague's Pipit, White-tailed Hawk, Burrowing Owl, and Merlin

A complete checklist for Santa Gertrudis is at
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S53034466.
--
Jim Sinclair (TX-ESA)
TOS Life Member
Kingsville, TX

"The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of
thinking we were at when we created them." - Albert Einstein

 

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Date: 2/22/19 10:21 am
From: Sue Ewan <ewans...>
Subject: [texbirds] FW: eBird Report - Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Feb 22, 2019
Good morning, Texbirders,
In the midst of the drizzle, four hearty folks joined us for the morning walk. Several varieties of swallows winged their way around us, even close enough for identification, as we enjoyed Willow Lakes.
Come join the fun! Bird walks are conducted daily (except Sunday) beginning at 8:30am, with bird van tours daily (except Sunday) leaving the Visitors center at 1:30pm. Reservations are recommended for the van tour.
John and Sue Ewan, USFWS volunteers
Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge
Alamo, TX

Santa Ana NWR (LTC 059), Hidalgo, Texas, US
Feb 22, 2019 8:25 AM - 10:44 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.16 mile(s)
Comments: Morning bird walk
43 species

Blue-winged Teal 12
Cinnamon Teal 5
Northern Shoveler 4
Gadwall 6
Mottled Duck 4
Green-winged Teal 6
Plain Chachalaca 2
Least Grebe 4
Pied-billed Grebe 1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 4
White-tipped Dove 3
Mourning Dove 1
Sora 2
American Coot 4
Black-necked Stilt 18
Killdeer 4
Least Sandpiper 5
Long-billed Dowitcher 38
Greater Yellowlegs 2
Lesser Yellowlegs 2
Great Blue Heron 1
Osprey 1
Cooper's Hawk 1
Harris's Hawk 1
Golden-fronted Woodpecker 2
Ladder-backed Woodpecker 2
Great Kiskadee 3
White-eyed Vireo 3
Green Jay 6
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 3
Purple Martin 2
Tree Swallow 9
Barn Swallow 1
Cave Swallow 2
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1
Long-billed Thrasher 2
Olive Sparrow 3
Altamira Oriole 5
Red-winged Blackbird 125
Great-tailed Grackle 1
Orange-crowned Warbler 3
Common Yellowthroat 4
Northern Cardinal 1

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Date: 2/22/19 9:22 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: What do you think is going on with this Blue-winged Teal?
I sent the photo to some Fish and Wildlife Service folks and they sent it
one some experts and the consensus is its actually an old Blue-winged Teal!
the amount of white on the head is apparently related to the age of the
duck. No hybrid, just an old duck!

On Wed, Feb 20, 2019 at 2:30 PM David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:

> Check out this Blue-winged Teal I photoed today at Brazos Bend State Park,
> note the face and crown markings, I've never seen one like this before.
>
> [image: IMG_3436-Edit.JPG]
>
> --
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>


--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

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