TEXBIRDS
Received From Subject
7/22/18 10:44 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Lubbock County highlights from 15 July 2018
7/22/18 10:42 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Kent County Highlights from July 14th
7/22/18 8:09 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] An idea for a new birding record or competition
7/21/18 4:16 pm Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...> [texbirds] Re: Balmorhea Lake - 21 July 2018 (Aplomado Falcon)
7/21/18 1:55 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Balmorhea Lake - 21 July 2018 (Aplomado Falcon)
7/21/18 1:51 pm Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...> [texbirds] Birder Patrol Saturday June 28th
7/21/18 12:25 pm Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...> [texbirds] Balmorhea Lake - 21 July 2018 (Aplomado Falcon)
7/20/18 7:46 am Richard Gibbons <rgibbo3...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/19/18 7:27 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Who is banding Am. Avocets
7/19/18 5:24 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Pictures from the coast Tuesday, banded birds, youngsters and dust
7/19/18 2:21 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/19/18 1:37 pm Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/19/18 1:34 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/19/18 1:25 pm Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/19/18 1:12 pm Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/19/18 1:07 pm Susan Orwig <sueorwig...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/19/18 12:40 pm Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/19/18 12:39 pm Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/19/18 9:37 am Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/18/18 2:25 pm Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
7/18/18 12:32 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Brown Booby Search
7/18/18 4:53 am Monta Zengerle <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender zengerlem for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: texbirds Digest V7 #187
7/17/18 10:12 pm Christian Walker <christian.walker...> [texbirds] Hagerman 7/17/18 - hybrid bunting, Yellow-headed Blackbird
7/17/18 6:25 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Birding the coast today, banded birds, returning birds etc
7/15/18 8:49 pm Lora Render <lorarend...> [texbirds] Re: Last ID request from Florida contact(Raven or Crow)
7/15/18 5:24 pm Andrew M. Orgill <aorgill...> [texbirds] Re: Last ID request from Florida contact(Raven or Crow)
7/15/18 5:17 pm Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...> [texbirds] Re: Aplomado Falcon at Balmorhea Lake
7/15/18 2:20 pm Lora Render <lorarend...> [texbirds] Last ID request from Florida contact(Raven or Crow)
7/15/18 11:40 am Lora Render <lorarend...> [texbirds] Re: Sparrow ID
7/15/18 10:20 am Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...> [texbirds] Aplomado Falcon at Balmorhea Lake
7/15/18 10:13 am Lora Render <lorarend...> [texbirds] Sparrow ID
7/14/18 9:03 pm Lora Render <lorarend...> [texbirds] Re: Flycatcher
7/14/18 7:09 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Flycatcher
7/14/18 6:24 pm Andrew M. Orgill <aorgill...> [texbirds] Re: Flycatcher
7/14/18 4:48 pm Lora Render <lorarend...> [texbirds] Flycatcher
7/14/18 3:54 pm Lora Render <lorarend...> [texbirds] Re: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border
7/14/18 3:44 pm Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...> [texbirds] Re: Fwd: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border
7/14/18 3:34 pm Lora Render <lorarend...> [texbirds] Fwd: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border
7/14/18 11:30 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Re: Banded Least Tern
7/14/18 9:41 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Banded Least Tern
7/13/18 8:00 am Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson...> [texbirds] White Pelicans over Mitchell Lake /San Antonio
7/13/18 7:43 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Wednesday pictures, shorebirds and terns, its that time of year
7/12/18 12:38 pm Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson...> [texbirds] Black-capped Vireo has not returned
7/12/18 12:01 pm Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson...> [texbirds] Black-capped Vireo at Garner State Park 30 minutes ago
7/11/18 5:37 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Galveston to Anahuac today, more and more baby birds and returning migrants
7/11/18 7:58 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Wilson's Phalaropes, Black Terns, Bank Swallows and Orchard Orioles (Willacy Co.)
7/11/18 4:09 am Shelia Hargis <shelia.hargis...> [texbirds] Update on "Austin" Purple Martin Roost
7/10/18 9:52 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] The 2018 Photographic Game - June Report
7/9/18 4:14 am Shelia Hargis <shelia.hargis...> [texbirds] Purple Martin Roost in Austin - Need Information
7/7/18 8:45 pm Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for June - Longish
7/6/18 5:28 pm <bertf...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/6/18 5:51 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Yard birding this summer, hawks and stuff
7/5/18 5:27 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Monday pictures from Anahuac and Chambers county, Lily trotters, baby birds, nesting birds and more
7/5/18 4:09 pm Dennis Cooke <denniscooke...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 2:55 pm Lubbockites <lubbockites...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 2:28 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 2:19 pm Laas Harvey <hlaas...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 11:20 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 10:40 am Thomas Kihn <thomaskihn...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 9:14 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 9:06 am Brent Ortego <brentortego...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 8:49 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 7:24 am Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/5/18 7:03 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/4/18 4:05 pm Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/4/18 3:54 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/4/18 3:32 pm Devin Collins <donutposse1...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/4/18 10:47 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] The Plains I Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
7/4/18 10:34 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Circle Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
7/4/18 10:20 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Post Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
7/4/18 10:03 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Dougherty Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
7/4/18 9:53 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Floydada Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
7/4/18 8:33 am Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/4/18 7:00 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Eurasian collared dove population crash?
7/4/18 6:47 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] PIctures from last week, more babies, molting adults and returning shorebirds
7/3/18 6:19 pm Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] The 2018 Tri-County Competition - June Report
7/3/18 3:55 pm Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Highlights from BBS north of Plains (Yoakum and Cochran Counties)
7/2/18 1:19 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Liberty County today
7/2/18 8:55 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 7-2-18 Indigo Bunting @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7/2/18 5:51 am Bill <texaskingbird...> [texbirds] Birding Liberty County
7/2/18 5:49 am Bill <texaskingbird...> [texbirds] Birding Liberty County
7/2/18 5:23 am Mark Scheuerman <mark.scheuerman...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
7/1/18 2:43 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Northern Jacana Delta Lake Park in the RGV
7/1/18 8:46 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Birding Liberty County
7/1/18 5:26 am Robert Reeves <birder.reeves...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/30/18 9:53 am David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] BBS Lance Rosier Big Thicket Unit (Hardin County)
6/29/18 5:05 pm Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 6-29-18 Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
6/29/18 9:02 am Bob White <bobwhitebsacbc...> [texbirds] Re: Pahse vs, Morph
6/29/18 8:54 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Pahse vs, Morph
6/29/18 8:29 am Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> [texbirds] Re: Pahse vs, Morph
6/28/18 4:52 pm Susan Heath <sheath...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 4:37 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 3:45 pm Susan Heath <sheath...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 3:02 pm Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <KlebWoods...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 2:35 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 2:34 pm Kim Pierce <kmpier89...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl?? - phase vs. morph
6/28/18 12:48 pm <mitch...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl?? - phase vs. morph
6/28/18 12:25 pm Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 12:21 pm Joe Dorn <jbdvex...> [texbirds] Re: Fwd: great-tailed grackles
6/28/18 12:09 pm Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 11:45 am Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <KlebWoods...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 10:40 am Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...> [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 10:15 am Gary Roberts <sgricr76...> [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
6/28/18 8:47 am Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> [texbirds] Re: Fwd: great-tailed grackles
6/27/18 9:46 pm Noreen Baker <gnbaker92...> [texbirds] Fwd: great-tailed grackles
6/27/18 7:08 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] East beach to Anahuac yesterday, arriving migrants and baby birds
6/27/18 6:33 am Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...> [texbirds] Highlights from Circle (Lamb County) BBS on Sunday
6/26/18 7:12 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Southbound shorebirds
6/26/18 4:54 pm Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Re: Southbound shorebirds
6/26/18 3:59 pm Willie Sekula <williebird22...> [texbirds] Re: Southbound shorebirds
6/26/18 8:50 am Claire Curry <larksparrow...> [texbirds] Fly by moonlight! A citizen science crowdfunding campaign ending June 29 at 2:40pm CDT
6/25/18 12:40 pm David Sarkozi <david...> [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
6/25/18 11:44 am Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
6/25/18 10:39 am Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...> [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
6/25/18 10:22 am Arman Moreno <armanmoreno...> [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
6/25/18 10:00 am Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
6/25/18 8:20 am Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
6/24/18 8:59 am Warblers Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary <warblerwoods...> [texbirds] Re: [The Monitor] Brush a proud promoter of area’s natural habitat and wildlife
6/24/18 8:29 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] 6-24-18 Black-and-white Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
6/24/18 7:58 am Susan Schaezler <susan...> [texbirds] [The Monitor] Brush a proud promoter of area’s natural habitat and wildlife
6/23/18 3:34 pm Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> [texbirds] Southbound shorebirds
6/23/18 8:48 am Joe Fischer <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender fischer13 for DMARC) [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
6/23/18 7:35 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
6/23/18 7:12 am Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...> [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
6/23/18 6:24 am Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
6/23/18 6:07 am Joe and Renee Fischer <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender fischer13 for DMARC) [texbirds] Budgeriar eBird Submissions
 
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Date: 7/22/18 10:44 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Lubbock County highlights from 15 July 2018
Greetings All:

I ran a few errands in Lubbock on the 15th and came up with 2 Cackling
Geese at Whisperwood Pond, 1 Canada Goose at Whisperwood Pond, 1 male
Rufous Hummingbird in my yard, 2 Black-necked Stilts at Maxey Park, 4
American Avocets at Maxey Park, 3 Greater Yellowlegs at Maxey Park, 2
Double-crested Cormorants at Maxey Park, 1 Green Heron at Whisperwood Pond,
1 Great Egret at Maxey Park, and 2 Snowy Egrets at Maxey Park.

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/22/18 10:42 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Kent County Highlights from July 14th
Greetings All:

It has been a very busy week and I am running well behind on e-mails but
Drew Harvey, Rich Kostecke, and I visited Kent County on the 14th and got a
lot of nifty stuff so here it is: 1 Northern Shoveler at the Jayton WTP, 1
Scaled Quail (AH only) south of Spur, 1 Common Ground Dove (DH, RK only)
south of Spur, a different Common Ground Dove (AH only) south of Spur, 1
Great Egret at Jayton City Park. 5 Eastern Phoebes in Clairemont, 2 Eastern
Phoebes at the Highway 380 crossing of the Brazos River, 2 Eastern Phoebes
northwest of Clairemont, 2 Bell's Vireos north of Clairemont, 1 Bell's
Vireo northwest of Clairemont, 1 Bell's Vireo south of Spur, 2 Bell's
Vireos southwest of Jayon, 2 Bell's Vireos west of Jayton, 1 Bell's Vireo
further west of Jayton, 2 Common Ravens in Clairemont, 2 Common Ravens at
the Highway 380 crossing of the Brazos River, 1 Common Raven near
Clairemont, 4 Common Ravens southwest of Jayton, 1 Bushtit southwest of
Clairemont, 1 Eastern Bluebird northwest of Clairemont, 5 Eastern Bluebirds
at the Kent County Golf Course, 2 Eastern Bluebirds southwest of
Clairemont, 8 Eastern Bluebirds southwest of Jayton, 1 Field Sparrow north
of Clairemont, 3 Field Sparrows west of Jayton, 1 Yellow-breasted Chat
north of Clairemont, 1 Yellow-breasted Chat southwest of Jayton, 11
Yellow-headed Blackbirds at the Jayton WTP, and 1 male Summer Tanager west
of Jayton.

On the way home I had 8 Cave Swallows near Spur (Dickens County), 4 Cattle
Egrets near Crosbyton (Crosby County), and 2 Purple Martins in Crosbyton
(Crosby).

It was a pretty good day and Kent County has, as would be expected, become
the first county in my region where the expansion of Bell's Vireo into the
region has made the species not particularly noteworthy.

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/22/18 8:09 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] An idea for a new birding record or competition
Here is an idea for a new birding competition/record. How fast can you
reach 100 species? Is one hour the four minute mile of a birding century?
Here is my argument why this would be a great contest. 1) really pushes
birding skills, especially ear birding. 2) doesn't require a huge
investment in time, I think in many locals a century can be had in less
than 3 hours, certainly 4. 3) will not use up a ton of carbon because
distances will be short, I'd guess most competitive centuries will travel
less than 25 miles, my guess for really competitive ones less than 10.

I can see records being kept for each state, county, and month . Is a
century possible in every county and month in a single day? likely not, so
that leaves some Everests to climb in the challenge.


--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

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Date: 7/21/18 4:16 pm
From: Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Balmorhea Lake - 21 July 2018 (Aplomado Falcon)
The Peregine Fund abandoned the West Texas project in 2008 (I think) with
last of the hacked branded birds released in 2007. The released birds
started reproducing much quicker than the coastal project. Prior to the
unexpected disappearance of the birds that were being monitored in Jeff
Davis and Presidio Counties, it appeared that this would be a successful
project. In 2008 no birds could be located by the Peregine Fund monitors.
If some of those actually persisted and are reproducing, on a small number
of birds could have bands. It is very possible that none of the banded
birds would still be alive.

Since 2009 I know of only three documented Aplomado Falcons in the
Trans-Pecos. None have been banded and only the Balmorhea bird has been
seen more than once. I have not heard anything about the Chihuahua
population in the last three or four years, but the last I heard they were
close to disappearing.

Mar Lockwood
Alpine, Texas

On Sat, Jul 21, 2018, 6:06 PM Steve Gast <segast23...> wrote:

> No bands are on the bird in the 4 photos in Mark’s flicker site.
>
> Steve Gast
> Houston, Texas
>
> On Jul 21, 2018, at 3:53 PM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> wrote:
>
> Hi Mark,
>
> I was under the assumption that birds released by the Peregrine Fund would
> be fitted with leg bands and even hacked young would receive bands before
> fledging. Was that not the case with this experimental population? One or
> two of those hacked birds from Valentine may still persist on the Miller
> Ranch in Valentine, with regular observations by the Millers and others.
> I'm just not sure if the bird(s) they are seeing are banded or not. I will
> try to seek out that information, if known.
>
> Thanks for the report.
>
> Good birding!
> Justin Bosler
> Austin, TX
>
> On Sat, Jul 21, 2018 at 2:24 PM, Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...>
> wrote:
>
>> I spent four hours birding at Balmorhea Lake, Reeves County, this morning
>> (21 July). The diversity of birds was nice for mid-summer. The
>> Aplomado Falcon was again present and the other surprise was a Common Tern.
>> Highlights included:
>>
>>
>>
>> Cinnamon Teal – 3
>>
>> Western Grebe – 15
>>
>> Clark’s Grebe – 65
>>
>> Black-necked Stilt – 7
>>
>> Western Sandpiper – 3
>>
>> Spotted Sandpiper – 4
>>
>> Greater Yellowlegs – 3
>>
>> Wilson’s Phalarope – 23
>>
>> Black Tern – 2
>>
>> Common Tern – 1
>>
>> Forster’s Tern – 1
>>
>> Great Egret – 1
>>
>> Black-crowned Night-Heron – 1
>>
>> White-faced Ibis – 2
>>
>> Aplomado Falcon – 1
>>
>> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – 2
>>
>>
>>
>> The Aplomado Falcon seems to be visiting the lake with increased
>> frequency and may be there every afternoon. I have seen it three times in
>> the last seven days. I have not encountered it in the early mornings and
>> today it appeared about 11:00. It typically sits next to telephone poles
>> in the shade and can be easily overlooked. It favors the two poles on the
>> south side of the dam, but also uses the ones the parallel the dam.
>>
>>
>> This falcon could potentially be a natural vagrant from the dwindling
>> population in northern Chihuahua or perhaps the birds released by the
>> Peregrine Fund in the early 2000s have persisted. In the winter of
>> 2007-08 there were several of these hacked falcons present in the vicinity
>> of Valentine, Jeff Davis County, but they mysteriously disappeared late
>> that winter or in the spring not to be relocated. Perhaps they moved to
>> other areas of that large grassland and have been undetected. I tend to
>> favor the latter, but there is no way to know one way or the other.
>>
>>
>>
>> I have put another image of the Aplomado Falcon as well as a few other
>> images from this morning on my Flickr page:
>>
>>
>>
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/70194759@N05/
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Mark
>>
>>
>>
>> Mark Lockwood
>>
>> Alpine, Texas
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/18 1:55 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Balmorhea Lake - 21 July 2018 (Aplomado Falcon)
Hi Mark,

I was under the assumption that birds released by the Peregrine Fund would
be fitted with leg bands and even hacked young would receive bands before
fledging. Was that not the case with this experimental population? One or
two of those hacked birds from Valentine may still persist on the Miller
Ranch in Valentine, with regular observations by the Millers and others.
I'm just not sure if the bird(s) they are seeing are banded or not. I will
try to seek out that information, if known.

Thanks for the report.

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
Austin, TX

On Sat, Jul 21, 2018 at 2:24 PM, Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...>
wrote:

> I spent four hours birding at Balmorhea Lake, Reeves County, this morning
> (21 July). The diversity of birds was nice for mid-summer. The Aplomado
> Falcon was again present and the other surprise was a Common Tern. Highlights
> included:
>
>
>
> Cinnamon Teal – 3
>
> Western Grebe – 15
>
> Clark’s Grebe – 65
>
> Black-necked Stilt – 7
>
> Western Sandpiper – 3
>
> Spotted Sandpiper – 4
>
> Greater Yellowlegs – 3
>
> Wilson’s Phalarope – 23
>
> Black Tern – 2
>
> Common Tern – 1
>
> Forster’s Tern – 1
>
> Great Egret – 1
>
> Black-crowned Night-Heron – 1
>
> White-faced Ibis – 2
>
> Aplomado Falcon – 1
>
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – 2
>
>
>
> The Aplomado Falcon seems to be visiting the lake with increased frequency
> and may be there every afternoon. I have seen it three times in the last
> seven days. I have not encountered it in the early mornings and today it
> appeared about 11:00. It typically sits next to telephone poles in the
> shade and can be easily overlooked. It favors the two poles on the south
> side of the dam, but also uses the ones the parallel the dam.
>
>
> This falcon could potentially be a natural vagrant from the dwindling
> population in northern Chihuahua or perhaps the birds released by the
> Peregrine Fund in the early 2000s have persisted. In the winter of
> 2007-08 there were several of these hacked falcons present in the vicinity
> of Valentine, Jeff Davis County, but they mysteriously disappeared late
> that winter or in the spring not to be relocated. Perhaps they moved to
> other areas of that large grassland and have been undetected. I tend to
> favor the latter, but there is no way to know one way or the other.
>
>
>
> I have put another image of the Aplomado Falcon as well as a few other
> images from this morning on my Flickr page:
>
>
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/70194759@N05/
>
>
>
>
>
> Mark
>
>
>
> Mark Lockwood
>
> Alpine, Texas
>
>

 

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Date: 7/21/18 1:51 pm
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Birder Patrol Saturday June 28th
Hi, all!



The Birder Patrol field trip for Saturday July 28 will travel to Dan Jones
yard at Progreso, arrival time should be 7:00 am. The "Western Contingent"
may meet at the Alamo Inn apartments at 6:25. The "Eastern Contingent" may
meet by 6:15 am at the Longhorn sign parking lot just south of the AT&T
parking lot on Bass Pro Boulevard in Harlingen.



The Birder Patrol requests a $5 donation as a fund raiser for the Education
projects of the Arroyo Colorado Audubon Society. Come join us for a first
had look at the summer birds that frequent this "birdy yard" on Progreso
Lakes.



Mary Beth Stowe

Alamo, TX

www.miriameaglemon.com <http://www.miriameaglemon.com>




 

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Date: 7/21/18 12:25 pm
From: Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...>
Subject: [texbirds] Balmorhea Lake - 21 July 2018 (Aplomado Falcon)
I spent four hours birding at Balmorhea Lake, Reeves County, this morning
(21 July). The diversity of birds was nice for mid-summer. The Aplomado
Falcon was again present and the other surprise was a Common Tern. Highlights
included:



Cinnamon Teal – 3

Western Grebe – 15

Clark’s Grebe – 65

Black-necked Stilt – 7

Western Sandpiper – 3

Spotted Sandpiper – 4

Greater Yellowlegs – 3

Wilson’s Phalarope – 23

Black Tern – 2

Common Tern – 1

Forster’s Tern – 1

Great Egret – 1

Black-crowned Night-Heron – 1

White-faced Ibis – 2

Aplomado Falcon – 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – 2



The Aplomado Falcon seems to be visiting the lake with increased frequency
and may be there every afternoon. I have seen it three times in the last
seven days. I have not encountered it in the early mornings and today it
appeared about 11:00. It typically sits next to telephone poles in the
shade and can be easily overlooked. It favors the two poles on the south
side of the dam, but also uses the ones the parallel the dam.


This falcon could potentially be a natural vagrant from the dwindling
population in northern Chihuahua or perhaps the birds released by the
Peregrine Fund in the early 2000s have persisted. In the winter of 2007-08
there were several of these hacked falcons present in the vicinity of
Valentine, Jeff Davis County, but they mysteriously disappeared late that
winter or in the spring not to be relocated. Perhaps they moved to other
areas of that large grassland and have been undetected. I tend to favor
the latter, but there is no way to know one way or the other.



I have put another image of the Aplomado Falcon as well as a few other
images from this morning on my Flickr page:



https://www.flickr.com/photos/70194759@N05/





Mark



Mark Lockwood

Alpine, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/18 7:46 am
From: Richard Gibbons <rgibbo3...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
Fred, David, and Texbirders,

Here is an excerpt from Tunnell and Chapman 2000, (
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/237471888_Seabirds_of_the_Campeche_Bank_Islands_Southeastern_Gulf_of_Mexico).
If there is a report or peer-reviewed article to follow the survey, this
would be a good reference to include. Dr. Tunnell of the Harte Research
Institute at Texas A&M University- Corpus Christi passed away a few days
ago. He had the curiosity of a scientific explorer and the patience and
persistence of a great teacher.


Brown Booby (Sula leucogaster)

The Brown Booby, which often nests in association with Masked and Red-footed
boobies, may be the most common booby in the world (Nelson 1978). It breeds
pantropically and occupies habitats that are similar to those of the Masked
Booby (Dorward
1962), but the Brown Booby feeds closer to shore and can tolerate muddier
water (Murphy
1936). The breeding ecology of the species was described by Chapman (1908),
Thayer
(1 9 1 l), Dorward (1 962), Simmons (1 967) and Nelson (1 978).
Despite Lowery and Newman's (1 954) claim that the species did not breed on
islands
in the Gulf of Mexico, Brown Booby colonies were reported from three
islands on Arrecife
Alacrines. Komicker et al. (1959) listed the species as one of seven
seabirds that they
observed nesting on the Alacran islands in June, 1959, but they did not
indicate where they
saw the birds or the stage of the nesting cycle. Paynter (1 955) saw 300
birds on Isla Pajaros
in early September 1952, but the birds were not nesting at the time. Bonet
and Rzedowski
(1962) however, photographed a pair of Brown Booby on the nest sometime
during their
visits to Isla Pajaros in 1960 or 196 1. They also photographically
documented the nesting of
Brown Booby on Isla Desertora. Neither Paynter (1955) nor Boswall (1978)
saw Brown
Booby nests on Isla Desterrada, but according to the lighthouse keeper on
the island, the
boobies nested there in the spring. Our visit to Isla Desterrada predated
Lockwood's (1 989)
by almost a year, and we also found a small colony of Brown Booby.
Lockwood's account
does not mention the stage of nesting that he observed in April, but we
found that most of the
young had fledged in January and we saw no signs of nesting activity in
July. Boswall
(1978) found no signs of nesting activity when he visited Isla Desertora in
mid-September.
Although Nelson (1978) indicates that the period of heaviest laying in the
Caribbean
and Atlantic occurs from October to May and a limited amount of egg laying
may occur
during the remainder of the year, we feel that the breeding season for
Brown Booby is much
more restricted in the southern Gulf. The heaviest period of laying
probably occurs from
October to March. Some laying activity may also occur from April through
June but there
appears to be no nesting activity during the rest of the year. We found no
evidence in
historical accounts to justify the assumption by Friedmann et al. (1950)
that Brown Booby
nested on Cayos Arcas. Although the habitats on Cayo del Centro appear
suitable, we did
not find any indication that Brown Booby nested there recently. Since the
Brown Booby is
the least pelagic booby, van Halewyn and Norton (1984) suggested the
species might be
more vulnerable to oil spills. If the species nested on Cayos Arcas in the
past, contamination
from the IXTOC-I oil spill may have affected the population. Cayos Arcas is
the reef
complex that is located closest to the site of the IXTOC-I well blowout.

Richard Gibbons
Houston, TX















*_______________________Richard E. Gibbons, PhDConservation DirectorHouston
Audubon
<http://www.houstonaudubon.org/Default.aspx?AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1>440
Wilchester Boulevard, Houston, TX 77079 Research AssociateLSU Museum of
Natural Science <http://appl003.lsu.edu/natsci/lmns.nsf/index>119 Foster
Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803*

On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 11:36 AM, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<FCollins...> wrote:

> The following numbers are from:
>
>
>
> *STATUS OF SEABIRD NESTING POPULATIONS*
>
> *ON ARRECIFE ALACRANES, GULF OF MEXICO*
>
> THOR E. MORALES-VERA1, F. DANIEL RUZ-ROSADO2, ENRIQUETA VELARDE2, &
> EDWARD O. KEITH3†
>
>
>
>
>
> This is the closest breeding area to Texas. It was surveyed in 1986 and
> again in 2009
>
> Brown Booby went from 10 pair to 80 pair. Red-footed went from one pair to
> 13. Masked Booby dropped from 2536 to 1615 pairs. If the increase continued
> from 2009 through this nesting season it could account for all the birds
> appearing in Texas.
>
>
>
> I think David has a splendid idea.
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>
>
> 281
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>
> -357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Dennis Shepler
> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:24 PM
> *To:* David Sarkozi <david...>; 1 Texbirds (
> <texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
>
>
>
> Davey et al
>
> I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps,
> food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest
> habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc.
> Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of
> boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone
> has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal
> throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David,
> and others, in that effort in October.
>
> Shepler
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:
>
> Davey et al
>
> I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps,
> food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest
> habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc.
> Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of
> boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone
> has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal
> throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David,
> and others, in that effort in October.
>
> Shepler
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:
>
> interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my
> health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as
> we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I
> hope).
>
> Billy D. Dawgler
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
>
> Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the
> weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in
> Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018
> so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by
> month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records
> from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible
> on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and
> Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a
> bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I
> propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that
> weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.
>
>
>
> --
>
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 7:27 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Who is banding Am. Avocets
..
would like to know

--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 5:24 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Pictures from the coast Tuesday, banded birds, youngsters and dust
Started the day at east beach on Galveston where the sun was up a good bit
before you could even see the shape through the orange haze. There did not
seem to be much dust about but it really affected pictures I took and sort
of blurred all of the shots at a distance until later in the am. Like fog
but not as bad.

Had a total of 14 identified banded small plovers for the day with another
10 or so seen but not tied down. The piping plovers and Wilson's plovers
were out in the sargassum patches. Most were birds from the Missouri River
system with yellow flags but a couple of green flagged birds and a blue
flagged bird from the platte river were also present.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835103

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835106

A locally banded snowy plover was a new bird for me and I think is a chick

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835104

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835105

Tidal water was back in some areas that had been dry and the herons and
ibis were back too like this young yellow-crowned night heron

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835107

More plovers were over on Bolivar flats. They seemed to be walking back to
the roost area as the tide went down. Another odd tide day with the
southwest wind

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835136

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835138

There was a general shortage of shorebirds even though there was good
habitat. Short-billed dowitchers are arriving

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835140

And western sandpipers

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835141

Most of the least terns abandoned the flats and east beach after the heavy
rain and a grackle raid on the bolivar side but one pair was still doing
the win a lady with a fish bit

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835142

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835143

Lots of people going east on the beach and I was only able to find a single
American oystercatcher

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835143

and a single forster's tern

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835157

Fledged least terns were out on the sand

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835158

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835159

They did not seem to be feeding or being fed.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835173

A least tern brought a fish to his girlfriend

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835163

But he was whapped by a third tern and when he turned to object he missed
the lady indicating yes

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835164

By the time he got interested in her again she wasn't interested

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835169

Very quiet time in terndom

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835170

A single black tern was the only one for the day and is starting its molt

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835269

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835270

A little bit of feather eating combined with preening.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835273

The call is very distinctive when heard in a tern chorus

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167835274

And more pictures in

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/inbox

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 2:21 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
Keep in mind that the number of Brown Booby reports for Texas has increased to the point that the TBRC has removed the species from the Review List. Several of these reports include multiple birds.
Keith
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 19, 2018, at 3:24 PM, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> wrote:
>
> I think dispersal would be radial but given the location of the islands the majority of the birds would work around the edges of the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico so Texas would get more than its share. Of course dispersal would be much greater than just from this nearest colony. The population seems to be expanding in its more northern tiers so we have better chances of getting birds than perhaps 50 years ago.
>
> Fred
>
> From: Dennis Shepler <dawgler...>
> Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 3:12 PM
> To: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
> Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
>
> Thanks, Fred.
> Population increase but the dispersal northward seems unusual. Seems like a recent phenomenon.
>
> On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 11:36 AM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> wrote:
> The following numbers are from:
>
> STATUS OF SEABIRD NESTING POPULATIONS
> ON ARRECIFE ALACRANES, GULF OF MEXICO
> THOR E. MORALES-VERA1, F. DANIEL RUZ-ROSADO2, ENRIQUETA VELARDE2, & EDWARD O. KEITH3†
>
>
> This is the closest breeding area to Texas. It was surveyed in 1986 and again in 2009
> Brown Booby went from 10 pair to 80 pair. Red-footed went from one pair to 13. Masked Booby dropped from 2536 to 1615 pairs. If the increase continued from 2009 through this nesting season it could account for all the birds appearing in Texas.
>
> I think David has a splendid idea.
>
> Fred Collins, Director
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
> 281-357-5324
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
> Steve Radack Commissioner
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Dennis Shepler
> Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:24 PM
> To: David Sarkozi <david...>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
>
> Davey et al
> I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
> Shepler
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:
> Davey et al
> I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
> Shepler
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:
> interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I hope).
> Billy D. Dawgler
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
> Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018 so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.
>
> --
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>
>
> --
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
> --
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
> --
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
> --
> W. Dennis Shepler

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 1:37 pm
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
I think it would be a good project too and while you may not find a BB maybe your consolation prize will be a Sabine Gull or a Red Phalarope.

Fred

From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 3:33 PM
To: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Cc: Dennis Shepler <dawgler...>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

...
The TBRC record will provide an insight to the build up, up until such time they were removed from the review list. Sounds like a fun project. Folks did the same 20 years ago for Collared Doves, Cave Swallows etc.

On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 3:24 PM, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...><mailto:<FCollins...>> wrote:
I think dispersal would be radial but given the location of the islands the majority of the birds would work around the edges of the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico so Texas would get more than its share. Of course dispersal would be much greater than just from this nearest colony. The population seems to be expanding in its more northern tiers so we have better chances of getting birds than perhaps 50 years ago.

Fred

From: Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 3:12 PM
To: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...><mailto:<FCollins...>>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>) <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

Thanks, Fred.
Population increase but the dispersal northward seems unusual. Seems like a recent phenomenon.

On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 11:36 AM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...><mailto:<FCollins...>> wrote:
The following numbers are from:

STATUS OF SEABIRD NESTING POPULATIONS
ON ARRECIFE ALACRANES, GULF OF MEXICO
THOR E. MORALES-VERA1, F. DANIEL RUZ-ROSADO2, ENRIQUETA VELARDE2, & EDWARD O. KEITH3†


This is the closest breeding area to Texas. It was surveyed in 1986 and again in 2009
Brown Booby went from 10 pair to 80 pair. Red-footed went from one pair to 13. Masked Booby dropped from 2536 to 1615 pairs. If the increase continued from 2009 through this nesting season it could account for all the birds appearing in Texas.

I think David has a splendid idea.

Fred Collins, Director
Kleb Woods Nature Center
20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377<https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>
281<https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>





From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Dennis Shepler
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:24 PM
To: David Sarkozi <david...><mailto:<david...>>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>) <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler


On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler



On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I hope).
Billy D. Dawgler

On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...><mailto:<david...>> wrote:
Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018 so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler



--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas


 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 1:34 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
...
The TBRC record will provide an insight to the build up, up until such time
they were removed from the review list. Sounds like a fun project.
Folks did the same 20 years ago for Collared Doves, Cave Swallows etc.

On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 3:24 PM, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<FCollins...> wrote:

> I think dispersal would be radial but given the location of the islands
> the majority of the birds would work around the edges of the Caribbean Sea
> and the Gulf of Mexico so Texas would get more than its share. Of course
> dispersal would be much greater than just from this nearest colony. The
> population seems to be expanding in its more northern tiers so we have
> better chances of getting birds than perhaps 50 years ago.
>
>
>
> Fred
>
>
>
> *From:* Dennis Shepler <dawgler...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, July 19, 2018 3:12 PM
> *To:* Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>; 1 Texbirds
> (<texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
>
>
>
> Thanks, Fred.
>
> Population increase but the dispersal northward seems unusual. Seems like
> a recent phenomenon.
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 11:36 AM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
> <FCollins...> wrote:
>
> The following numbers are from:
>
>
>
> *STATUS OF SEABIRD NESTING POPULATIONS*
>
> *ON ARRECIFE ALACRANES, GULF OF MEXICO*
>
> THOR E. MORALES-VERA1, F. DANIEL RUZ-ROSADO2, ENRIQUETA VELARDE2, &
> EDWARD O. KEITH3†
>
>
>
>
>
> This is the closest breeding area to Texas. It was surveyed in 1986 and
> again in 2009
>
> Brown Booby went from 10 pair to 80 pair. Red-footed went from one pair to
> 13. Masked Booby dropped from 2536 to 1615 pairs. If the increase continued
> from 2009 through this nesting season it could account for all the birds
> appearing in Texas.
>
>
>
> I think David has a splendid idea.
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>
>
> 281
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>
> -357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Dennis Shepler
> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:24 PM
> *To:* David Sarkozi <david...>; 1 Texbirds (
> <texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
>
>
>
> Davey et al
>
> I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps,
> food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest
> habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc.
> Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of
> boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone
> has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal
> throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David,
> and others, in that effort in October.
>
> Shepler
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:
>
> Davey et al
>
> I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps,
> food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest
> habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc.
> Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of
> boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone
> has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal
> throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David,
> and others, in that effort in October.
>
> Shepler
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:
>
> interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my
> health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as
> we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I
> hope).
>
> Billy D. Dawgler
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
>
> Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the
> weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in
> Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018
> so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by
> month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records
> from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible
> on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and
> Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a
> bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I
> propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that
> weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.
>
>
>
> --
>
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>



--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 1:25 pm
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
I think dispersal would be radial but given the location of the islands the majority of the birds would work around the edges of the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico so Texas would get more than its share. Of course dispersal would be much greater than just from this nearest colony. The population seems to be expanding in its more northern tiers so we have better chances of getting birds than perhaps 50 years ago.

Fred

From: Dennis Shepler <dawgler...>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 3:12 PM
To: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

Thanks, Fred.
Population increase but the dispersal northward seems unusual. Seems like a recent phenomenon.

On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 11:36 AM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...><mailto:<FCollins...>> wrote:
The following numbers are from:

STATUS OF SEABIRD NESTING POPULATIONS
ON ARRECIFE ALACRANES, GULF OF MEXICO
THOR E. MORALES-VERA1, F. DANIEL RUZ-ROSADO2, ENRIQUETA VELARDE2, & EDWARD O. KEITH3†


This is the closest breeding area to Texas. It was surveyed in 1986 and again in 2009
Brown Booby went from 10 pair to 80 pair. Red-footed went from one pair to 13. Masked Booby dropped from 2536 to 1615 pairs. If the increase continued from 2009 through this nesting season it could account for all the birds appearing in Texas.

I think David has a splendid idea.

Fred Collins, Director
Kleb Woods Nature Center
20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>





From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Dennis Shepler
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:24 PM
To: David Sarkozi <david...><mailto:<david...>>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>) <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler


On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler



On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I hope).
Billy D. Dawgler

On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...><mailto:<david...>> wrote:
Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018 so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 1:12 pm
From: Dennis Shepler <dawgler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
Thanks, Fred.
Population increase but the dispersal northward seems unusual. Seems like
a recent phenomenon.

On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 11:36 AM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<FCollins...> wrote:

> The following numbers are from:
>
>
>
> *STATUS OF SEABIRD NESTING POPULATIONS*
>
> *ON ARRECIFE ALACRANES, GULF OF MEXICO*
>
> THOR E. MORALES-VERA1, F. DANIEL RUZ-ROSADO2, ENRIQUETA VELARDE2, &
> EDWARD O. KEITH3†
>
>
>
>
>
> This is the closest breeding area to Texas. It was surveyed in 1986 and
> again in 2009
>
> Brown Booby went from 10 pair to 80 pair. Red-footed went from one pair to
> 13. Masked Booby dropped from 2536 to 1615 pairs. If the increase continued
> from 2009 through this nesting season it could account for all the birds
> appearing in Texas.
>
>
>
> I think David has a splendid idea.
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Dennis Shepler
> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:24 PM
> *To:* David Sarkozi <david...>; 1 Texbirds (
> <texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
>
>
>
> Davey et al
>
> I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps,
> food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest
> habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc.
> Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of
> boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone
> has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal
> throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David,
> and others, in that effort in October.
>
> Shepler
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:
>
> Davey et al
>
> I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps,
> food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest
> habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc.
> Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of
> boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone
> has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal
> throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David,
> and others, in that effort in October.
>
> Shepler
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:
>
> interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my
> health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as
> we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I
> hope).
>
> Billy D. Dawgler
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
>
> Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the
> weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in
> Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018
> so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by
> month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records
> from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible
> on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and
> Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a
> bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I
> propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that
> weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.
>
>
>
> --
>
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> W. Dennis Shepler
>


--
W. Dennis Shepler

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 1:07 pm
From: Susan Orwig <sueorwig...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
David, texbirds,

I will be happy to look for them on Toledo Bend Reservoir and Sam Rayburn
Lake October 13-14. I have a friend that has offered to take me out on his
boat.

Sue Orwig

On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:31 PM, David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:

> Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the
> weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in
> Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018
> so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by
> month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records
> from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible
> on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and
> Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a
> bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I
> propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that
> weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.
>
> --
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 12:40 pm
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
I wish Petra would chime in about the timing of the survey.


Fred Collins, Director
Kleb Woods Nature Center
20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>




From: Tim White <timwhite1057...>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 1:39 PM
To: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Cc: <dawgler...>; David Sarkozi <david...>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

All:
In November 2017, the National Park Service reported the first record of brown boobies nesting on Santa Barbara Island in the Channel Islands off of California. Several other breeding pairs on other Channel Islands have also been discovered. They theorized that the expansion of their range coincides with shifts in oceanic conditions with warmer waters and changes in prey availability associated with El Nino events.
This population dispersal up the California coast appears to likely be emigration of a population seeking suitable habitat. If the report on the increase nesting populations on Arrecife Alacranes is indicative of the Gulf of Mexico brown boobies, this might be signaling a population dispersal up the Texas coast in the not too distant future.
However, it seems to me that the majority of reported brown boobies in Texas and elsewhere inland over the past 5 years, are sightings of individual birds. This makes me think that the occurrence may be due to some physical phenomenon, such as tropical weather fronts, dips in the jet stream or some other changing weather patterns directing the birds north from the southern Gulf. It would be interesting to see if there is a correlation to the sightings inland to atmospheric events occurring around the same time.
It could also just be an artifact of eBird itself. Does the increase usage of the software to report random sightings over the past decade make it appear that the frequency is increasing? When it fact it has remained stable but because of a lack of reporting to a centralized database it isn’t easily apparent.
Regardless of why, it is an interesting occurrence to monitor.

Tim


On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 11:36 AM, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...><mailto:<FCollins...>> wrote:
The following numbers are from:

STATUS OF SEABIRD NESTING POPULATIONS
ON ARRECIFE ALACRANES, GULF OF MEXICO
THOR E. MORALES-VERA1, F. DANIEL RUZ-ROSADO2, ENRIQUETA VELARDE2, & EDWARD O. KEITH3†


This is the closest breeding area to Texas. It was surveyed in 1986 and again in 2009
Brown Booby went from 10 pair to 80 pair. Red-footed went from one pair to 13. Masked Booby dropped from 2536 to 1615 pairs. If the increase continued from 2009 through this nesting season it could account for all the birds appearing in Texas.

I think David has a splendid idea.

Fred Collins, Director
Kleb Woods Nature Center
20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377<https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>
281<https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>





From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Dennis Shepler
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:24 PM
To: David Sarkozi <david...><mailto:<david...>>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>) <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler


On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler



On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I hope).
Billy D. Dawgler

On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...><mailto:<david...>> wrote:
Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018 so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 12:39 pm
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
In my opinion, observer bias may be responsible for the October peak. I suspect optimal dispersal north from tropical breeding grounds may actually be prior to Sep15 but birders are reticent to bird in summer, especially mid-August till cool fronts pass in October in spite of that period being a wonderful time for rare tropical dispersers and migrants.


Fred Collins, Director
Kleb Woods Nature Center
20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>




From: Tim White <timwhite1057...>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 1:39 PM
To: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Cc: <dawgler...>; David Sarkozi <david...>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

All:
In November 2017, the National Park Service reported the first record of brown boobies nesting on Santa Barbara Island in the Channel Islands off of California. Several other breeding pairs on other Channel Islands have also been discovered. They theorized that the expansion of their range coincides with shifts in oceanic conditions with warmer waters and changes in prey availability associated with El Nino events.
This population dispersal up the California coast appears to likely be emigration of a population seeking suitable habitat. If the report on the increase nesting populations on Arrecife Alacranes is indicative of the Gulf of Mexico brown boobies, this might be signaling a population dispersal up the Texas coast in the not too distant future.
However, it seems to me that the majority of reported brown boobies in Texas and elsewhere inland over the past 5 years, are sightings of individual birds. This makes me think that the occurrence may be due to some physical phenomenon, such as tropical weather fronts, dips in the jet stream or some other changing weather patterns directing the birds north from the southern Gulf. It would be interesting to see if there is a correlation to the sightings inland to atmospheric events occurring around the same time.
It could also just be an artifact of eBird itself. Does the increase usage of the software to report random sightings over the past decade make it appear that the frequency is increasing? When it fact it has remained stable but because of a lack of reporting to a centralized database it isn’t easily apparent.
Regardless of why, it is an interesting occurrence to monitor.

Tim


On Thu, Jul 19, 2018 at 11:36 AM, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...><mailto:<FCollins...>> wrote:
The following numbers are from:

STATUS OF SEABIRD NESTING POPULATIONS
ON ARRECIFE ALACRANES, GULF OF MEXICO
THOR E. MORALES-VERA1, F. DANIEL RUZ-ROSADO2, ENRIQUETA VELARDE2, & EDWARD O. KEITH3†


This is the closest breeding area to Texas. It was surveyed in 1986 and again in 2009
Brown Booby went from 10 pair to 80 pair. Red-footed went from one pair to 13. Masked Booby dropped from 2536 to 1615 pairs. If the increase continued from 2009 through this nesting season it could account for all the birds appearing in Texas.

I think David has a splendid idea.

Fred Collins, Director
Kleb Woods Nature Center
20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377<https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>
281<https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377+%0D%0A+281&entry=gmail&source=g>-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>





From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Dennis Shepler
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:24 PM
To: David Sarkozi <david...><mailto:<david...>>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>) <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler


On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler



On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I hope).
Billy D. Dawgler

On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...><mailto:<david...>> wrote:
Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018 so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 9:37 am
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
The following numbers are from:

STATUS OF SEABIRD NESTING POPULATIONS
ON ARRECIFE ALACRANES, GULF OF MEXICO
THOR E. MORALES-VERA1, F. DANIEL RUZ-ROSADO2, ENRIQUETA VELARDE2, & EDWARD O. KEITH3†


This is the closest breeding area to Texas. It was surveyed in 1986 and again in 2009
Brown Booby went from 10 pair to 80 pair. Red-footed went from one pair to 13. Masked Booby dropped from 2536 to 1615 pairs. If the increase continued from 2009 through this nesting season it could account for all the birds appearing in Texas.

I think David has a splendid idea.

Fred Collins, Director
Kleb Woods Nature Center
20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>





From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Dennis Shepler
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 4:24 PM
To: David Sarkozi <david...>; 1 Texbirds (<texbirds...>) <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search

Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler


On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps, food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc. Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David, and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler



On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...><mailto:<dawgler...>> wrote:
interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I hope).
Billy D. Dawgler

On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...><mailto:<david...>> wrote:
Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018 so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler


--
W. Dennis Shepler
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 2:25 pm
From: Dennis Shepler <dawgler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Brown Booby Search
Davey et al
I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps,
food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest
habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc.
Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of
boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone
has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal
throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David,
and others, in that effort in October.
Shepler


On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:59 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:

> Davey et al
> I would like to know what is happening to the south regarding water temps,
> food source availability/population trends, number of fledged young, nest
> habitat dynamics, amount of plastics/microplastics in feeding areas, etc.
> Boobies are here but what are the causes of the inordinate dispersal of
> boobies. From what population(s) are the birds we are finding. If anyone
> has that info, it would be nice to peruse. Determining the dispersal
> throughout Texas would be an interesting endeavor and I would join David,
> and others, in that effort in October.
> Shepler
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:48 PM Dennis Shepler <dawgler...> wrote:
>
>> interested in joining the search. my participation will be based on my
>> health conditions at the time of the census/search. I will contact you as
>> we approach the date. If you are on the 9/22 pelagic, I will there (I
>> hope).
>> Billy D. Dawgler
>>
>> On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 2:32 PM David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
>>
>>> Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the
>>> weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in
>>> Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018
>>> so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by
>>> month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records
>>> from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible
>>> on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and
>>> Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a
>>> bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I
>>> propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that
>>> weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.
>>>
>>> --
>>> David Sarkozi
>>> Houston, TX
>>> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> W. Dennis Shepler
>>
>
>
> --
> W. Dennis Shepler
>


--
W. Dennis Shepler

 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 12:32 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Brown Booby Search
Would you be interested in participating in a Brown Booby search on the
weekend of October 13-14, 2018? The explosion of Brown Booby records in
Texas fascinates me. By month I took a look at the last 5 years plus 2018
so far and found there are about 99 reports in eBird. Tallying these by
month shows the majority of records come from October (12 records). Records
from Scurry, Wise, Tarrant, and Camp county show Brown Boobies are possible
on almost any large body of water in the state. Records in Nebraska and
Iowa suggest that even Lake Meredith in the panhandle could possibly host a
bird. There are a number of lakes that get scant attention from birders. I
propose we organize a search of as many lakes and bays as possible that
weekend and see how many if any Texas birders can find.

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 4:53 am
From: Monta Zengerle <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender zengerlem for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: texbirds Digest V7 #187







Pls remove me from this list
Tnx



Get Outlook for iOS






On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 12:06 AM -0500, "FreeLists Mailing List Manager" <ecartis...> wrote:










texbirds Digest Tue, 17 Jul 2018 Volume: 07 Issue: 187

In This Issue:
[texbirds] Birding the coast today, banded birds, returning

----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: Joseph Kennedy
Date: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 20:24:11 -0500
Subject: [texbirds] Birding the coast today, banded birds, returning birds etc

Started the day at east beach on Galveston. Only a small group of royal
terns with a few least and sandwich. And laughing gulls with chicks.
A good bit of old and new sargassum weed on the beach was being used by all
the plovers and willets.

A good day for small plovers, 38 Wilson's plovers with a mix of adults and
youngsters, 12 snowy plovers with 2 hatch year birds and 10 piping plovers.
Banded birds among all of them with maybe half of the piping plovers banded.

A few sanderlings and western willets and 1 ruddy turnstone were the other
shorebirds. Heard an upland sandpipers and a solitary sandpiper overhead.
One bright plumaged arriving sanderling.

Crossed the ferry and had 2 marbled godwits at Fort Travis. On to Bolivar
Flats.

Along the beach there was a scattering of returning piping plovers with
most banded with 3 colors of flags. Not a whole lot of birds around. The
walk down was basically unbirdy except for 2 families of horned larks
eating their favorite seeds from plants out in the sand.

Missed some of the lingering shorebirds. Only 1 long-billed curlew. A dozen
marbled godwits. 20 short-billed dowitchers with most bright plumaged new
arrivals. The new birds roosting were some 75 western sandpipers. Only 50
sanderlings with all lingering birds. A mix of singles like turnstones etc.

The tide was going out and the roosting birds moved down to the new mud.
All of the piping plovers from further east also moved down that way.

Had say 20 piping, 10 semipalmated and 8 Wilson's plovers.

Instead of lots of sargassum like on east beach there was lots of spaghetti
bryozoan for the plovers to feed in and around.

Lots fewer terns than last week but more brown pelicans. One least tern did
bring a fish to a friend who said thank you but the nesting area was
basically birdless.

The surprise on the beach besides a couple of large dead redfish was what I
think was a baby river otter. Very small and not colored like an adult and
rather bedraggled. Flipper like feet.

The beach going east did not have many birds but western willets were
scattered all along among the people. Did not have any easterns for the
first time since March. A couple of least terns had recently fledged from
somewhere not near where they were.

1985 and Anahuac were quiet but I did get the lingering northern shoveler
and ring-necked duck. Lots of the young cattle egrets are out of the nest
and perched up. Not sure if that gets them fed or they are on their way to
independence. Marsh wrens, seaside sparrows and orchard orioles still
singing. Did not see a purple gallinule but a least bittern flew by.

Great sudden growth of duckweed will feed lots of ducks when the teal start
arriving in a couple of weeks.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>



------------------------------

End of texbirds Digest V7 #187
******************************







 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/18 10:12 pm
From: Christian Walker <christian.walker...>
Subject: [texbirds] Hagerman 7/17/18 - hybrid bunting, Yellow-headed Blackbird
Hello,

Went birding with the Stuebners this morning and yesterday in Grayson county. Highlights yesterday afternoon/evening included 3 different Barred Owls calling at different creek crossings.
This morning we birded Hagerman NWR and were pleased to run across the Tuesday morning census group led by Jack Chiles.
Highlights included 1 Bank Swallow, good looks at a Greater Roadrunner, and lots of waterbirds at a flooded field just n of Plover Road. Here there were plenty of herons and egrets, a large blackbird flock including 1 male Yellow-headed Blackbird, and some southbound shorebird migrants including my FOF Upland Sandpipers.
We checked for the reported Lazuli Bunting near the T just south of Martin Branch but were unable to find it. We did get good looks at an Indigo x Lazuli Bunting male in this area - 1 white wing bar, no orange on breast, and white belly. We spent a good half hour trying to get good looks at this bird as it liked to forage low in the grasses and would only intermittently come up to perches to sing for a bit.

Good birding,
Christian Walker
Irving TX

> Begin forwarded message:
>
> From: <ebird-checklist...>
> Subject: eBird Report - Hagerman NWR, Jul 17, 2018
> Date: July 18, 2018 at 12:00:29 AM CDT
> To: <christian.walker...>
>
> Hagerman NWR, Grayson, Texas, US
> Jul 17, 2018 6:32 AM - 10:05 AM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 9.953 mile(s)
> Comments: Clear 5-10 mph S wind around 70-90 degrees
> 60 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Canada Goose 6
> Wood Duck 5
> Mallard 15
> Redhead 1
> Pied-billed Grebe 1
> Neotropic Cormorant 4
> American White Pelican 1
> Great Blue Heron 12
> Great Egret 18
> Snowy Egret 17
> Little Blue Heron 10
> Cattle Egret 55
> Green Heron 3
> Black Vulture 3
> Turkey Vulture 1
> Red-shouldered Hawk 2
> Red-tailed Hawk 2
> Killdeer 8
> Upland Sandpiper 2
> Least Sandpiper 5
> Pectoral Sandpiper 4
> Spotted Sandpiper 6
> Solitary Sandpiper 3
> Lesser Yellowlegs 2
> Least Tern 3
> Forster's Tern 45
> Eurasian Collared-Dove 4
> Mourning Dove 10
> Greater Roadrunner 1
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo 2
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 6
> Downy Woodpecker 3
> Eastern Phoebe 3
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher 1
> White-eyed Vireo 2
> Red-eyed Vireo 1
> Blue Jay 1
> American Crow 4
> Purple Martin 10
> Bank Swallow 1 Slim small swallow bright white below with breast band. Brown above with slightly paler rump. Tapered rear end with narrow slightly forked tail.
> Barn Swallow 50
> Cliff Swallow 30
> Carolina Chickadee 5
> Tufted Titmouse 3
> Carolina Wren 6
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 6
> Eastern Bluebird 10
> Northern Mockingbird 4
> European Starling 5
> Common Yellowthroat 1
> Northern Cardinal 15
> Blue Grosbeak 3
> Indigo Bunting 11
> Lazuli x Indigo Bunting (hybrid) 1 Photo and recording. Male singing indigo-like phrase in quality but shorter. All blue above with bright white belly and no orange in breast. 1 narrow white wing bar on each wing. This was in the area where others have been reporting a Lazuli - just past Martin Branch almost to the T intersection on the NW side of the road.
> Painted Bunting 24
> Dickcissel 8
> Yellow-headed Blackbird 1 Male. Bright yellow head and white wing patches. Larger than RWBL
> Red-winged Blackbird 200
> Brown-headed Cowbird 2
> House Finch 1
> House Sparrow 10
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47252056
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Christian Walker
Independent Adjuster
Irving, Texas
(512) 431-2495




 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/18 6:25 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Birding the coast today, banded birds, returning birds etc
Started the day at east beach on Galveston. Only a small group of royal
terns with a few least and sandwich. And laughing gulls with chicks.

A good bit of old and new sargassum weed on the beach was being used by all
the plovers and willets.

A good day for small plovers, 38 Wilson's plovers with a mix of adults and
youngsters, 12 snowy plovers with 2 hatch year birds and 10 piping plovers.
Banded birds among all of them with maybe half of the piping plovers banded.

A few sanderlings and western willets and 1 ruddy turnstone were the other
shorebirds. Heard an upland sandpipers and a solitary sandpiper overhead.
One bright plumaged arriving sanderling.

Crossed the ferry and had 2 marbled godwits at Fort Travis. On to Bolivar
Flats.

Along the beach there was a scattering of returning piping plovers with
most banded with 3 colors of flags. Not a whole lot of birds around. The
walk down was basically unbirdy except for 2 families of horned larks
eating their favorite seeds from plants out in the sand.

Missed some of the lingering shorebirds. Only 1 long-billed curlew. A dozen
marbled godwits. 20 short-billed dowitchers with most bright plumaged new
arrivals. The new birds roosting were some 75 western sandpipers. Only 50
sanderlings with all lingering birds. A mix of singles like turnstones etc.

The tide was going out and the roosting birds moved down to the new mud.
All of the piping plovers from further east also moved down that way.

Had say 20 piping, 10 semipalmated and 8 Wilson's plovers.

Instead of lots of sargassum like on east beach there was lots of spaghetti
bryozoan for the plovers to feed in and around.

Lots fewer terns than last week but more brown pelicans. One least tern did
bring a fish to a friend who said thank you but the nesting area was
basically birdless.

The surprise on the beach besides a couple of large dead redfish was what I
think was a baby river otter. Very small and not colored like an adult and
rather bedraggled. Flipper like feet.

The beach going east did not have many birds but western willets were
scattered all along among the people. Did not have any easterns for the
first time since March. A couple of least terns had recently fledged from
somewhere not near where they were.

1985 and Anahuac were quiet but I did get the lingering northern shoveler
and ring-necked duck. Lots of the young cattle egrets are out of the nest
and perched up. Not sure if that gets them fed or they are on their way to
independence. Marsh wrens, seaside sparrows and orchard orioles still
singing. Did not see a purple gallinule but a least bittern flew by.

Great sudden growth of duckweed will feed lots of ducks when the teal start
arriving in a couple of weeks.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 8:49 pm
From: Lora Render <lorarend...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Last ID request from Florida contact(Raven or Crow)
The consensus is a Chihuahuan Raven, thank you to everyone who responded.
Lora


-----Original Message-----
>From: <mitch...>
>Sent: Jul 15, 2018 9:23 PM
>To: <lorarend...>
>Subject: Re: [texbirds] Last ID request from Florida contact(Raven or Crow)
>
>Hi Lora,
>
>Surely this is a Chihuahuan Raven.
>
>Mitch Heindel
>Utopia
>
>On 2018-07-15 14:18, Lora Render wrote:
>> Hi everyone,
>> I've attached a map of the location where the bird was photographed.
>> Thank you,
>> Lora Render
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 5:24 pm
From: Andrew M. Orgill <aorgill...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Last ID request from Florida contact(Raven or Crow)
Wedge-shaped tail and range looks good for Chihuahuan Raven

Andrew Orgill
Mustang Island

---- Lora Render <lorarend...> wrote:
> Hi everyone,
> I've attached a map of the location where the bird was photographed.
> Thank you,
> Lora Render

Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
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Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 5:17 pm
From: Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Aplomado Falcon at Balmorhea Lake
I have placed two images of the Aplomado Falcon that was at Balmorhea Lake
today, 15 July on my Flickr page for those interested.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/70194759@N05/

Mark


Mark Lockwood

Alpine, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 2:20 pm
From: Lora Render <lorarend...>
Subject: [texbirds] Last ID request from Florida contact(Raven or Crow)
Hi everyone,
I've attached a map of the location where the bird was photographed.
Thank you,
Lora Render
 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 11:40 am
From: Lora Render <lorarend...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Sparrow ID

Thank you for everyone who responded, the consensus is a Botteri's Sparrow.
Lora

-----Original Message-----
>From: Lora Render <lorarend...>
>Sent: Jul 15, 2018 12:12 PM
>To: <texbirds...>
>Subject: Sparrow ID
>
>Hi Everyone,
>I've attached a couple of Sparrow photos taken in June at Palo Alto Battlefield in S. Tx., any help with be appreciated!
>
>Thank you,
>Lora Render
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 10:20 am
From: Mark Lockwood <mwlockwood402...>
Subject: [texbirds] Aplomado Falcon at Balmorhea Lake
The Aplomado Falcon that has been seen intermittently at Balmorhea Lake,
Reeves County, is currently present (15 July). It is perched on the power
lines along the dam in the same area were all of the previous sightings to
my knowledge have been.

Mark

Mark Lockwood
Alpine, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 10:13 am
From: Lora Render <lorarend...>
Subject: [texbirds] Sparrow ID
Hi Everyone,
I've attached a couple of Sparrow photos taken in June at Palo Alto Battlefield in S. Tx., any help with be appreciated!

Thank you,
Lora Render
 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 9:03 pm
From: Lora Render <lorarend...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Flycatcher
Thank you, I will pass on the responses to Marcello.
Lora

-----Original Message-----
>From: "Andrew M. Orgill" <aorgill...>
>Sent: Jul 14, 2018 8:23 PM
>To: <texbirds...>, <lorarend...>
>Subject: Re: [texbirds] Flycatcher
>
>Why not a Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet?
>
>---
>Andrew Orgill
>Mustang Island TX
>
>---- Lora Render <lorarend...> wrote:
>> This is another ID request, Marcello is thankful for the quick responses on the Bewick Wrens ID...
>
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 7:09 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Flycatcher
..

I'm
going with Brown-crested. At this time of year they should be common in
that area.

On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 6:47 PM, Lora Render <lorarend...> wrote:

> This is another ID request, Marcello is thankful for the quick responses
> on the Bewick Wrens ID...
>
>
>
> Comments about Flycatcher from Marcello below.
>
> Quick single shot on the Flycatcher at Santa Ana. On EBird all of those
> possible flycatchers come up as “ rare”. I even checked their online list
> and it says absent in summer. I understand these are tough. What I notice
> on this one is it’s tall,black,and thick legs unlike many flycatchers I’ve
> seen.
>
> Thank you,
> Lora
> LL's IPhone
>



--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 6:24 pm
From: Andrew M. Orgill <aorgill...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Flycatcher
Why not a Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet?

---
Andrew Orgill
Mustang Island TX

---- Lora Render <lorarend...> wrote:
> This is another ID request, Marcello is thankful for the quick responses on the Bewick Wrens ID...

Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 4:48 pm
From: Lora Render <lorarend...>
Subject: [texbirds] Flycatcher
This is another ID request, Marcello is thankful for the quick responses on the Bewick Wrens ID...



Comments about Flycatcher from Marcello below.

Quick single shot on the Flycatcher at Santa Ana. On EBird all of those possible flycatchers come up as “ rare”. I even checked their online list and it says absent in summer. I understand these are tough. What I notice on this one is it’s tall,black,and thick legs unlike many flycatchers I’ve seen.

Thank you,
Lora
LL's IPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 3:54 pm
From: Lora Render <lorarend...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border
I appreciate all that responded, the consensus is in and the ID confirms a Bewicks Wren and not a Sparrow species.
Thank you,
Lora Render

> On Jul 14, 2018, at 5:33 PM, Lora Render <lorarend...> wrote:
>
> I’ve attached a recording from a fellow birder from Florida hoping someone can ID the call, the location is in the subject line, recorded in June.
> Thank you,
> Lora Render
>
>
>> Begin forwarded message:
>>
>> From: Marcello Gomes <marcellogomes41...> <mailto:<marcellogomes41...>>
>> Subject: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border
>> Date: July 14, 2018 at 5:17:56 PM CDT
>> To: Lora Render <lorarend...> <mailto:<lorarend...>>
>>
>>
>>
> <Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border.m4a>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 3:44 pm
From: Mary Beth Stowe <mbstowe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Fwd: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border
Sounds like a Bewick’s Wren; in the second sample you can hear the “inhale” that is typical of the species, no matter what the song!



Hope this helps,



MB



Mary Beth Stowe

Alamo, TX

<http://www.miriameaglemon.com> www.miriameaglemon.com



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Lora Render
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2018 5:33 PM
To: TEXBIRDS listserv <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border



I’ve attached a recording from a fellow birder from Florida hoping someone can ID the call, the location is in the subject line, recorded in June.

Thank you,

Lora Render







Begin forwarded message:



From: Marcello Gomes <marcellogomes41...> <mailto:<marcellogomes41...> >

Subject: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border

Date: July 14, 2018 at 5:17:56 PM CDT

To: Lora Render <lorarend...> <mailto:<lorarend...> >






 

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Date: 7/14/18 3:34 pm
From: Lora Render <lorarend...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border
I’ve attached a recording from a fellow birder from Florida hoping someone can ID the call, the location is in the subject line, recorded in June.
Thank you,
Lora Render


> Begin forwarded message:
>
> From: Marcello Gomes <marcellogomes41...>
> Subject: Sparrow -about 100 + Miles North From MX Border
> Date: July 14, 2018 at 5:17:56 PM CDT
> To: Lora Render <lorarend...>
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone


 

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Date: 7/14/18 11:30 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Banded Least Tern
That was banded a year ago july in 2017. Not where I expected it to be from.

On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 11:41 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
wrote:

> The least tern I photographed on June 12th on the bolivar peninsula had
> been banded as a newly hatched chick on the Arkansas River near Morrilton
> on July 3, 2018.
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>



--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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Date: 7/14/18 9:41 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Banded Least Tern
The least tern I photographed on June 12th on the bolivar peninsula had
been banded as a newly hatched chick on the Arkansas River near Morrilton
on July 3, 2018.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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Date: 7/13/18 8:00 am
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson...>
Subject: [texbirds] White Pelicans over Mitchell Lake /San Antonio
Just had 100 circling over the office at Mitchell Lake.

Shirley and Dan Wilkerson
Brysn2

 

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Date: 7/13/18 7:43 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Wednesday pictures, shorebirds and terns, its that time of year
Started the day at east beach on Galveston. A small flock of terns and
laughing gulls was in the parking lot. Royal terns were carrying fish to
the chicks but some just seemed to hold onto the food for later

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799555

Caspian terns are continue to do well and have lots of chicks again this
year. Each chick seems to be in the care of one parent although you can
find 2 parent sets

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799560

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799563

Beside the markings on the backs of the young of the year birds, the bills
are different colors with the chicks orange rather than red

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799566

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799569

Begging can be hard work like this sandwich chick

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799552

So it is easier to do while lying down

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799550

Piping plovers are back including this Missouri River bird

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799542

And the locally fledged snowy plover chicks are off on their own at least
when I was there although an adult was not far off. At least 2 pairs raised
youngsters.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799538

Magnificent frigatebirds often are seen from the ferry but have been
somewhat scarce this summer. Only had one Wednesday

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799581

A young of the year yellow-crowned night heron was on the Port Bolivar side

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799603

Marbled godwits will smile for the camera if asked

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799606

They are molting rapidly and the new feathers push the old feathers up and
away from the body about a week or so after they arrive

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799605

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799607

Western willets also do the quick molt

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799609

This long-billed curlew seems to be a regular returning to its specific
spot on Bolivar flats

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799610

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799611

The first black black terns are back. Most go offshore right away unless
there is lots of sargassum weed close in to proved shelter for the small
fish they eat.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799616

Roseate spoonbills breeding colors are fading

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799617

Royal terns did well nesting again

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799620

The begging chicks make a continual din

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799624

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799621

Royal terns not with youngsters try to steal food from parents bringing
food back or make chicks drop food already delivered. They will also charge
sandwich tern chicks

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799625

Far fewer sandwich chicks on the flats this day

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799627

Fledged snowy egrets are out there with their odd leg color

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799629

Returning short-billed dowitchers show breeding colors while the summering
birds were all plain

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799628

Same with western sandpipers

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799631

Reddish egret adults are joining the first year non-breeding birds and
young of the year. There are lots of little minnows out there

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799663

The voice of the flats and bays for the next several months. The young
continue to beg until next year. The voice really carries so you always
know they are around

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799661

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799659

The first laughing gull chicks are out and about. They do not seem to be
fed like the young terns

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799672

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799668

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799669

Everybody was panting in the noonday sun

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799673

Wilson's plover fledglings have a big headed look as the feathers sort of
form a helmet

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799675

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799674

And there are always more young terns around

royal

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799679

and sandwich

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799681

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799684

A few second year common terns are around

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799714

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799713

Note that one of the easiest field marks is the shorter legs on the common
tern with a forster's in the background

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799715

Forster's terns fledge with very distinctly marked brown plumage with the
winter plumage eye patch already apparent

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799739

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799737

Within a few days, they have already lost most of the brown feathering

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799735

When seen from behind, they have a dark back of the head pattern of the
common tern but it is not all dark

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799743

And in another few days, all the brown feathers are gone

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799733

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167799744

Lots more pictures can be browsed at

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/inbox

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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Date: 7/12/18 12:38 pm
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson...>
Subject: [texbirds] Black-capped Vireo has not returned
It has not returned as of 2:30.

Shirley Wilkerson

On Jul 12, 2018 2:00 PM, "Shirley Wilkerson" <shirley.wilkerson...>
wrote:

Just had a black-capped Vireo behind the Nature Center in the birding blind
at Garner State Park about half an hour ago.

Shirley and Dan Wilkerson
Bryan Texas

 

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Date: 7/12/18 12:01 pm
From: Shirley Wilkerson <shirley.wilkerson...>
Subject: [texbirds] Black-capped Vireo at Garner State Park 30 minutes ago
Just had a black-capped Vireo behind the Nature Center in the birding blind
at Garner State Park about half an hour ago.

Shirley and Dan Wilkerson
Bryan Texas

 

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Date: 7/11/18 5:37 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Galveston to Anahuac today, more and more baby birds and returning migrants
Started the day just after sunrise at east beach on Galveston. Really great
habitat for shorebirds and the like but most of the area was like an
uber-predator had flown along the water.

Much of the time, it was close to a dead calm. Later, the wind even blew
from the north, northwest and west. At rollover the tide was blowing out on
an incoming tide. Another day with lots of sand and puddles for birds. A
good bit of sargassum on bolivar but it appeared to have been somewhere
else first. Almost none on bolivar flats but a good bit further east where
they had not cleaned the beaches.

A small flock of terns and gulls was in the parking lot with royal terns
and youngsters predominating. One sandwich and nine Caspian tern
chick/parents sets. All Caspian terns seem to only have one parent one
chick.

Horned larks were up singing but the least tern seem to have abandoned the
nesting effort after the heavy rain. Wilson's plovers had also stopped
scolding. Did have 7 Wilson's and 2 fledged birds. 5 snowy plovers were
around including 2 fledged chicks. 7 piping plovers were back from up north
including 1 with a band. 2 long-billed curlew were new since the spring.

Lots of barn swallows are starting to flock and move around.

The ferry ride had 3 laughing gulls on the boat with one young of the year
laughing gull trying to land. One frigatebird went over.

The Frenchtown road pond and others in Port Isabel were filled to the brim
and without birds. Fort Travis had one damp spot and 16 marbled godwits
already in heavy molt. Feathers sticking out all over as new feathers push
out old ones.

Driving out Retillon road there were lots of willets resting out on the wet
flats. Most seemed to be westerns but some were sleeping with the bill
hidden. Westerns were the common bird along the beach both east and west of
Retillon and a large number were sleeping way down the flats. Maybe 160
westerns total.

9 long-billed curlews on the beach and edge make up a good part of the
winter contingent. Some were quite tame and probably returnees but others
were very wary.

8 piping plovers were way down the flats along with 15 Wilson's plovers (6
young of the year). One red knot is still lingering. A few new arrivals
included western sandpipers and short-billed dowitchers in breeding plumage.

The birds of the day were royal and Caspian terns with youngsters. Very
noisy down on the large open sand area. The Caspian chicks will still be
begging loudly after the new year.

Last time I was hear more than 80% of the terns were sandwich with many
chicks. Today well more than 90% were royal terns with lots of squealing
chicks. Most of the royal terns were bringing fish into the chicks from
well to the east of the flats leading to lots of chases and other fun.

The least terns have abandoned their nesting efforts and no one cared where
I walked or dove at my head. A few fledged chicks were flying. A few adults
seemed to be pairing again and doing the fish bit. I did get a picture of a
newly fledged chick in October a couple of years ago so they may try but
almost all were elsewhere.

Going east up the peninsula found a few more tern groups and added a group
of non-breeding common and least terns. The same group had just fledged and
fledged a bit ago forster's terns as well as young royal, sandwich and
Caspian. And another young of the year Wilson's plover with its Mohawk
feathercut.

The ditches along part of Retillon had lots of water but almost no birds.
Shoveler pond had been all filled up and most birds at 1pm were dispersed
or hiding from the sun. They were doing work inside the pond near where the
ducks had been lingering and they were elsewhere. Cattle egrets and
tricolored herons are still nesting away and some cattle egrets seem to
want to get started, at least they were gathering sticks.

Almost no land birds around early or late other than grackles. Did have a
no-tailed grackle but it appeared to have been bitten off but not molted.
But the water birds made for a good day.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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Date: 7/11/18 7:58 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Wilson's Phalaropes, Black Terns, Bank Swallows and Orchard Orioles (Willacy Co.)
Dear Texbirds,

As is typical by early July, several species are already southbound in
significant numbers. Yesterday while working on a project in Willacy County
I observed 100s of Bank Swallows throughout; no fewer than 140 Wilson's
Phalaropes at the CR 1900 E playa, 62+ Black Terns, with about 60 at one
flooded section of a sorghum field on CR 397 just N of FM 498; and over a
dozen Orchard Orioles with 10 in a single tree along the irrigation canal.

The CR 1900 E playa is here:
https://goo.gl/maps/hTs99NeKh9M2

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
Austin, TX

 

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Date: 7/11/18 4:09 am
From: Shelia Hargis <shelia.hargis...>
Subject: [texbirds] Update on "Austin" Purple Martin Roost
Good morning,

Thanks to everyone who responded to my post on Monday about the unknown
location of the Austin Purple Martin roost. Thanks to some Purple Martin
landlords in the Round Rock area, the roost has been located. The birds
have moved to Round Rock, apparently the latest casualties of the
skyrocketing cost of living in Austin. They are roosting near the
Applebee's at 2700 Parker Dr, Ste A, Round Rock, Tx 78681.



Several of us were there last night to check out the situation and there
were thousands of birds swirling around. We estimated 400,000 - 500,000
birds! Travis Audubon staff will be working today to contact the management
company and get permission to hold our annual Purple Martin Parties.
Updates will be posted to https://travisaudubon.org/purple-martin-parties.


This location is wonderful for viewing the show. I hope to see you at a
party! And while you're in the area, have dinner at one of the many
restaurants in the area. Let them know you're there to see the Purple
Martins.



Thanks,
Shelia

--
Shelia Hargis
President
Texas Ornithological Society

 

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Date: 7/10/18 9:52 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] The 2018 Photographic Game - June Report
Greetings All:

Finding myself beset with the need to paint the exterior of my house and
really work the yard back into shape, I decided to see what kind of numbers
I can rack up from my central Lubbock yard this year and, accordingly, have
made photo-documenting my yard my photography game for the year.

Given the habitat available at the site, my goals are going to be pretty
modest. I am shooting for 40 butterfly species, 0 amphibian species, 2
reptile species, 80 birds species, and 4 mammal species - of which I hope
to photograph over 90%. This may not be as exciting as some of my previous
photographic games but it will certainly be hard-fought.

The results from the drought-ridden sixth month were very poor. We had a
couple of minor rains scattered through the month which brought some
flowers up but did little for critters. The coolest critter of the month
was a Brazilian Skipper which blasted into the yard, visited a Turk's-cap,
and blasted out - before I could even think of running for the camera! At
the slower end of the spectrum my Ornate Box Turtles finally emerged ...
and I did get photographs!

During May I had 16 butterfly, 2 reptile, 21 bird, and 2 mammal species
in/over/from the yard - far below what is normal for the month - putting me
at 17 butterfly, 0 amphibian, 2 reptile, 35 bird, and 2 mammal species for
the year - 40%, 100%, 50%, 43.75%, and 50% of my taxonomic goals. Of the
56 species seen thus far this year I have photographs of 49(87.5000%).

Things are still looking a bit grim both yard- and goals-wise.

The list follows (* = new, (y) = photographed):

Funereal Duskywings
Horace's Duskywings*(y)
Mournful Duskywings*(y)
Common Checkered Skipper
Sachem*(y)
Brazilian Skipper*
Cabbage White
Orange Sulphur
Southern Dogface*(y)
Sleepy Orange
Dainty Sulphur
Gray Hairstreak
Marine Blue
Reakirt's Blue
Queen*(y)
American Lady

Ornate Box Turtle*(y)
Mediterranean Gecko

Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared Dove
White-winged Dove
Mourning Dove
Chimney Swift*(y)
Black-chinned Hummingbird
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Egret
Black-crowned Night Heron
Mississippi Kite
Western Kingbird
Blue Jay
Cliff Swallow*
American Robin
Curve-billed Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
European Starling
House Sparrow
House Finch
Great-tailed Grackle
Northern Cardinal

Eastern Gray Squirrel
House Mouse

Year halfway - way below target - still trying; Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/9/18 4:14 am
From: Shelia Hargis <shelia.hargis...>
Subject: [texbirds] Purple Martin Roost in Austin - Need Information
Good morning all,
If you live in Austin, especially in Central or North Austin, we need your
help to locate the Purple Martin roost. Usually by this time of year, the
roost is very obvious and many birds are using it. But the birds are making
it very challenging this year!

In May, AJ Johnson and his son stopped by Taco Bell on Cameron Road on the
east side of Capital Plaza. AJ texted saying there were a bunch of Purple
Martins roosting there. We were shocked because we hadn't known that they
started roosting that early. Over the next month or so, we monitored the
roost occasionally. As the time for Travis Audubon's Purple Martin Parties
got closer, we started monitoring the roost more often. We found that the
birds were moving between several groups of trees on the Capital Plaza
property. One night there would be birds in the Taco Bell trees and the
next night they would be roosting in the trees near Chase Bank on the west
side of the property. Within the last few days, the roost has totally
disappeared from Capital Plaza. Our team has searched the historical roost
locations without success - Embassy Suites, Texas Land & Cattle, and
Highland Mall/ACC Highland area. I talked with Byron Stone last night and
he is seeing birds flying in from the west but maybe not as many as in
years past. So, it seems likely that they are roosting somewhere in Austin
but in smaller numbers than normal. We just haven't found that location.
Byron mentioned that the birds roosted at Walter E Long (Decker) Lake in
the past.

I asked the researcher with AeroEcology to review radar images for a roost
signature. They did not see one in Austin. I'm guessing that is because the
number of birds is too small to detect with radar.

So, if you're in Austin, please watch for martins flying over near dusk. If
you can follow them or at least note the direction they are headed, that
would be appreciated. And if you find the roost, we will sing your praises
far and wide! Email me at this address with any information you have.

If you live in another location that has a roost, I'm very interested to
hear how things are going with your roost. Is the roost active? Is it in
the normal location? Are you seeing about the same number of birds you
normally see at this time of year?

Thanks for your help.
Shelia Hargis

--
Shelia Hargis
President
Texas Ornithological Society

 

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Date: 7/7/18 8:45 pm
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Lubbock Area Birding Summary for June - Longish
Lubbock received 1.36 inches of rain during June, well below the the
average June total of 2.98 inches bringing us up to 3.70 inches for the
year, well below the year-to-date average of 8.55 inches. This left the
majority of the region in severe to extreme drought at the end of the
month; still the worst I have seen since 2011. June is our slowest month
for birding; this June crawled.

Regional summaries of eBird data can not be acquired in a timely fashion.
As a result, records submitted to eBird may not appear in this report.
Reports from the region that are submitted to the texbirds or leasbirds
listserve can be reviewed in a timely fashion and should appear.

As always, the county follows the site in ( ) and birds are mentioned by
virtue of rarity, atypical abundance, or atypical scarcity. Water
Treatment Ponds have come to feature so prominently in these reports that
they will, henceforth, be referred to as WTP.

BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING DUCK: 1 at the Himmel Farm (Crosby) on 6/15/18 (KH0
the only report - A RECENT ADDITION TO OUR AVIFAUNA; THIS MAY BE A LOW
NUMBER.

CACKLING GOOSE: 1 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) throughout the period (AH)
and 2 at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock) throughout the period (AH) the only
reports received - LOW NUMBERS.

CANADA GOOSE: 3 at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock) throughout the period (AH) and
2 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 6/26/18 (GY) the only reports - LOW NUMBERS

WOOD DUCK: 2 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) on 6/2/18 (AH) the only report
- A VERY RARE SUMMER LINGERER; TYPICAL NUMBERS.

BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 4 in Floydada (Floyd) on 6/2/18 (AH), 2 near Windmill
Farm (Floyd) on 6/2/18 (AH), and 4 at the FM 37 x FM 378 Playa (Floyd) on
6/3/18 (AH) the only reports received - VERY LOW; DROUGHT DOES EFFECT THE
DUCKS.

NORTHERN PINTAIL: 2 near Windmill Farm (Floyd) on 6/2/18 (AH) the only
report - LOW.

SCALED QUAIL: Seven reports of 1-4 birds in the region (Cochran, Garza,
Yoakum) during the period (AH, ZS) - ABOUT AVERAGE; APPROPRIATE COUNTIES
WITHIN THE REGION FINALLY SURVEYED.

RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 2 north of Floydada (Floyd) on 6/2/18 (AH), 1 near
Earth (Lamb) on 6/24/18 (AH), and 1 near Springlake (Lamb) on 6/24/18 (AH)
the only reports - LOW.

INCA DOVE: 1-7 in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) throughout the period (LM), 1 in
a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) on 6/23/18 (CR, FR), and 2 in Littlefield (Lamb)
on 6/24/18 (AH) - THE SLIGHTEST OF REBOUNDS; POSSIBLY DUE TO THE DROUGHT'S
NEGATIVE IMPACT ON LARGER DOVES IN URBAN AREAS.

YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO: Thirteen reports of 1-5 birds in the region (Floyd,
Garza, Kent, Lamb, Lubbock) during the period (JB, AH, SK) - GOOD NUMBER OF
SIGHTINGS AND NUMBERS GIVEN THE DRY CONDITIONS.

COMMON POORWILL: 1 at the White River crossing of Highway 207 (Floyd) on
6/2/18 (AH), 1 near Dougherty (Floyd) on 6/3/18 (AH), 1 at lake Alan Henry
(Garza) on 6/14/18 (SK), 2 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 6/18/18 (SK), and
1 near Fieldton (Lamb) on 6/24/18 (AH) - POOR NUMBERS BUT GOOD SCATTER.

BLACK-NECKED STILT: Five reports of 2-8 birds in the region (Crosby, Floyd,
Lubbock) during the period (JB, AH, GY) - LOW NUMBERS AND POOR SCATTER;
VERY LITTLE APPROPRIATE HABITAT FOR BREEDING IN THE REGION.

AMERICAN AVOCET: Seven reports of 2-5 birds and three reports of 12-23
birds in the region (Crosby, Floyd, Garza, Lubbock) during the period (JB,
AH, GY) - LOW NUMBERS AND POOR SCATTER; VERY LITTLE APPROPRIATE HABITAT FOR
BREEDING IN THE REGION.

SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 1 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 6/26/18 (JB, GY) -
PRESUMABLY AN EARLY SOUTHBOUND MIGRANT.

GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 3 at Buenos Playa (Garza) on 6/22/18 (JB) - FELT BY THE
OBSERVER TO BE EARLY SOUTHBOUND MIGRANTS.

NEOTROPIC CORMORANT: 2 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) throughout the period
(DH, AH, GK, JM) - LIKELY NESTING AMONGST THE DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS AND
WADERS ON THE ISLAND ROOKERY.

DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT: 18 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) throughout the
period (DH, AH, GK, JM) and 1 at McAlister Park (Lubbock) on 6/26/18 (GY) -
FORMERLY ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION IN SUMMER; NOW A BREEDER IN SUITABLE
HABITAT.

GREAT EGRET: Up to 7 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) throughout the period
(DH, AH, GK, JM), 1 at Dupree Park (Lubbock) on 6/14/18 (CR, FR) and
6/15/18 (CR, FR), and 1 at Stevens Park (Lubbock) on 6/15/18 (CR, FR) - LOW
NUMBERS AND VERY POOR SCATTER.

SNOWY EGRET: Up to 16 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) throughout the period
(DH, AH, GK, JM), 1 at Dupree Park (Lubbock) on 6/11/18 (CR, FR), 2 at
Dupree Park (Lubbock) on 6/14/18 (CR, FR), 1 at the Himmel Farm (Crosby) on
6/15/18 (KH), and 2 in Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 6/26/18 (JB) - LOW
NUMBERS AND POOR SCATTER.

LITTLE BLUE HERON: 1 in south Abernathy (Lubbock) on 6/26/18 (DK) - A TAD
EARLY FOR POST-BREEDING WANDERERS TO SHOW UP!

CATTLE EGRET: Up to 47 at Leroy Elmore Park (Lubbock) throughout the period
(DH, AH, GK, JM) and ten reports of 1-9 birds elsewhere in the region
(Crosby, Floyd, Lamb, Lubbock) during the period (JB, AH) - LOW NUMBERS AND
POOR SCATTER.

YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT HERON: 2 at MacKenzie Park (Lubbock) on 6/2/18 (AH)
the only report received - VERY LOW NUMBERS AND VERY POOR SCATTER.

WHITE-FACED IBIS: 6 in Floydada (Floyd) on 6/2/18 (AH) and 1 west of
Dougherty (Floyd) on 6/3/18 (AH) the only reports - INCREDIBLY LOW NUMBERS!

NORTHERN HARRIER: 1 at Yoakum Dunes WMA (Cochran) on 6/7/18 (ZS) - CASUAL
TO THE REGION IN SUMMER WITH NO RECENT BREEDING RECORDS.

OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER: 1 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 6/21/18 (SK) -
ACCIDENTAL TO THE REGION DURING JUNE BUT NOT UNPRECEDENTED.

EASTERN PHOEBE: 2-5 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) throughout the period (SK)
the only reports - LOW NUMBERS AND VERY POOR SCATTER.

SAY'S PHOEBE: 2 east of Allmon (Floydada) on 6/3/18 (AH), 2 northwest of
Earth (Lamb) on 6/24/18 (AH), and 2 west-northwest of Earth (Lamb) on
6/24/18 (AH) - FORMERLY QUITE SCARCE IN THE REGION AS A BREEDER; NOW ANNUAL
IN OUR NORTHERN TIER OF COUNTIES.

BELL'S VIREO: 1 at the White River crossing of Highway 207 (Floyd) on
6/2/18 and 6/3/18(AH), 1 at the White River crossing of CR 121 (Floyd) on
6/3/18 (AH), 1 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 6/6/18 (SK), 1 in Post (Garza)
on 6/16/18 (AH), and 1 at Lamb County Sandhills Historical Marker (Lamb) on
6/24/18 (AH) - THOUGH NUMBERS WERE LOW, THE SPECIES CONTINUES TO SPREAD
THROUGH THE REGION.

COMMON RAVEN: Eleven reports of 1-5 birds in the region (Floyd, Garza,
Kent) during the period (AH, SK) - ABOUT AVERAGE AND ALL ALONG THE CAPROCK
ESCARPMENT.

PURPLE MARTIN: 8-9 pairs in a Lubbock yard (Lubbock) throughout the period
(GJ, PJ), 5 in Floydada (Floyd) on 6/2/18 (AH), 4 south of Floydada (Floyd)
on 6/3/18 (AH), 16 southeast of Floydada (Floyd) on 6/3/18 (AH), 3 in Post
(Garza) on 6/16/18 (AH), 10 northeast of Post (Garza) on 6/16/18 (AH) -
GOOD NUMBERS AND SCATTER, DROUGHT BE DARNED!

NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: 2 near Post (Garza) on 6/16/18 (AH) the only
report - LOW.

CAVE SWALLOW: Eight reports of 1-4 birds in the region (Floyd, Garza)
during the period (AH) the only reports received - VERY LOW NUMBERS AND
VERY POOR SCATTER.

BLACK-CRESTED TITMOUSE: 2 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) on 6/6/18 (SK) -
FAIRLY FAR WEST FOR A REPORT IN THE REGION THESE DAYS.

VERDIN: 2 northeast of Post (Garza) on 6/16/18 (AH) the only report - ABOUT
AVERAGE FOR THIS DISAPPEARING OR VERY POORLY REPORTED SPECIES.

ROCK WREN: 1-2 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) throughout the period (SK) the
only report - LOW.

CANYON WREN: 2-4 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) throughout the period (SK), 1
at the White River crossing of Highway 207 (Floyd) on 6/3/18 (AH), and 2 at
Ransom Lake (Lubbock) on 6/26/18 (DHa) - ABOUT AVERAGE AND ALL ALONG THE
CAPROCK ESCARPMENT.

EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 1 in Yellowhouse Canyon (Lubbock) on 6/26/18 (JB) - A
NICE REPORT FROM A HISTORICAL BREEDING SITE.

CANYON TOWHEE: 1 at the Yoakum Dunes WMA (Cochran) on 6/7/18 (ZS) - RARELY
RECORDED AWAY FROM THE CAPROCK ESCARPMENT DURING THE BREEDING SEASON.

YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT: 1 singing bird at the White River crossing of FM 37
(Floyd) on 6/3/18 (AH) the only report - LOW BUT FEW VISITS WERE REPORTED
FROM SUITABLE HABITAT.

YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD: 2 west of Dougherty (Floyd) on 6/3/18 (AH) the
only report - LOW.

BRONZED COWBIRD: 1 male in Cone (Crosby) on 6/2/18 (AH), 1 male at the CR
200 x FM 602 Playa (Floyd) on 6/2/18 (AH), 1 male southeast of Floydada
(Floyd) on 6/3/18 (AH), 1 male west of Post (Garza) on 6/16/18 (AH), 1 male
northeast of Post (Garza) on 6/16/18 (AH), 1 female further northeast of
Post (Garza) on 6/16/18 (AH), a female and 1 male near Springlake (Lamb) on
6/24/18 (AH), and 1 male southwest of Lehman (Cochran) on 6/30/18 (AH) the
only reports received - ABOUT AVERAGE; IF SOUGHT IT CAN BE FOUND.

COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 1 male at the Windmill Farm Pond (Floyd) on 6/2/18
(AH) and 1 female and 1 male south of Floydada (Floyd) on 6/3/18 (AH) - LOW
NUMBERS AND POOR SCATTER; VERY LITTLE HABITAT TO BE FOUND IN THE REGION
THIS YEAR.

PYRRHULOXIA: 2-3 at Lake Alan Henry (Garza) throughout the period (SK), 2
at Lake Alan Henry (Kent) on 6/6/18 (SK), and 1 northeast of Post (Garza)
on 6/16/18 (AH) - ABOUT AVERAGE; GENERALLY RESTRICTED TO OUR SOUTHEASTERN
COUNTIES DURING SUMMER.

INDIGO BUNTING: 1 singing male near Post (Garza) on 6/16/18 (AH) the only
report - VERY LOW BUT LITTLE EFFORT REPORTED FROM FAVORABLE BREEDING
HABITAT.

OBSERVERS: JB=Justin Bosler, DHa=Danny Hancock, DH=Drew Harvey, AH=Anthony
Hewetson, KH=Kelly Himmel, GJ=George Jury, PJ=Pat Jury, SK=Stephen Kasper,
GK=Glenda Kelly, DK=Delaney Kempf, LM=Liam McGuire, JM=Jennifer Miller,
CR=Clarice Robertson, FR=Floyd Robertson, SZ=Zack Saavedra, GY=Gary Yoder,

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/18 5:28 pm
From: <bertf...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
I did an analysis of 8339 reports of Eurasian Collared-Dove from 1996 to 2017 seen in the central Oaks & Prairies (21 counties). It shows average count per sighting of 3. During those years it varies significantly from an average of 1.7 to 4.1 per sighting. However, if the reports are lumped in 5-year blocks, it shows increases until about 2011 and a slight drop-off thereafter.

Year Reports Count Average

1996 3 8 2.7

1997 2 7 3.5

1999 19 50 2.6

2000 11 29 2.6

2001 24 41 1.7 2.3

2002 47 127 2.7

2003 77 249 3.2

2004 59 171 2.9

2005 66 255 3.9

2006 119 316 2.7 3.0

2007 128 528 4.1

2008 241 868 3.6

2009 419 1552 3.7

2010 464 1671 3.6

2011 530 1603 3.0 3.5

2012 656 1876 2.9

2013 1029 2803 2.7

2014 1472 3903 2.7

2015 1124 3487 3.1

2016 947 2623 2.8 2.8

2017 902 2769 3.1

8339 24936 3.0



Bert Frenz

Oaks & Prairies of Texas

eBird reviewer, Central Brazos Valley

eBird reviewer, Belize

NAB subregional editor, north-east Texas

<mailto:<Bert2...> <Bert2...>

<http://www.bafrenz.com> www.bafrenz.com


 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/18 5:51 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Yard birding this summer, hawks and stuff
Was out walking around the property yesterday to see what the rain brought
in and had 2 just fledged cooper's hawks on a branch. They were joined by a
third and then a fourth. Had no idea there was a nest there. Saw an adult
fly there a couple of times and one kekked from the area a couple of times
but the pair from across the bayou had moved further away and had young out
hunting some time ago. The babies sounded almost exactly like
scaly-breasted munias and when smaller in the nest I put them down as
munias several days.

Red-tailed hawks across the bayou also did well. They had moved further
away due to bulldozers and a new house replacing a flooded one. First heard
a faint sound and then one youngster moved back to the trees where chicks
in the past sat and begged. A week later a second bird joined it. One of
the parents twice caught largish snakes on the bayou bank; the adult
carried them off with chicks following.

The barred owls had 2 young raised early this year. Usually they fledge
just before memorial day. The youngsters are learning to hoot with the
parents and they all get together early at night for a song fest.

Mississippi kites moved even further away and I have only seen feeding
birds well to the south and they may have nested in a residential area in
that direction.

First young of the year bird on the balcony was a white-winged dove that
did not last very long and probably fed a cooper's hawk. The king of the
white-wings still owns the place and tries to keep all others away from the
food. It works a bit until a flock comes in for a stop when he is
overwhelmed.

Mockingbirds have returned. The local parking lot birds vanished a bit
after Harvey as they food was washed away. Even out in the neighborhood
that did not flood most were gone and not there in March. Places have
filled in but I still have none right around me. Miss the song as one
inherited a roof corner and sang all night for over 30 years. Very good
mimic too and the generations inherited that trait. The new mockers do not
mock or it is not the season to mock.

Downy woodpeckers, chickadees and titmice did well with youngsters early.
Still have seen no baby red-bellied woodpeckers like last summer. The wood
duck nest apparently failed as the pair vanished without chicks or enough
time at the nest. I last saw them as she was doing egg laying.

Had my first ever fledgling green heron look in my window. No great egret
or herons chicks seen.

Several different munia groups come by but no chicks seen yet. Cardinals
have done well and the house finches are bringing lots of chicks to the
balcony where they abandon them and go off and raise more.

House sparrows vanished after Harvey. Had some groups of all males move
through in late winter. A few birds flew in from far away back in early may
but the birds that always nested up the street are still missing and the
dove feeding people have none.

Robins are still singing but not as many as the last few years and no signs
of chicks yet. Successful pairs seem to breed very late or do better with
late broods so there is hope.

Blue jays had one brood but they still are very shy. I lost most of mine to
west nile late last year so the arrival of west nile this year a month
earlier is not a good sign. The general area is one of the city hotbeds for
the virus since the first year it arrived. But then it generally vanished
for 3 year before last year and the jay numbers really went up. There are
just 2 clans that come on a regular basis and another of two or 3 singles
that probably are non-paired. When one of those birds signals that there is
lots of food and even peanuts out, often no one comes to join the feast.

Heard a warbler chip early yesterday am so they are starting to wander.
Probably a parula but it was still dark. Louisiana waterthrushes should be
moving along the bayou any day as will black and white warblers. And by the
end of the month it will be migration time.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 5:27 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Monday pictures from Anahuac and Chambers county, Lily trotters, baby birds, nesting birds and more
Instead of going to the coast Monday, I spent the morning wandering around
Anahuac Refuge, then down to Smith Point and around the east side of the
bay by way of Oak Island and Fort Anahuac Park.

Anahuac is much busier early in the morning than right after lunch. Did
several loops around shoveler pond the rookery is going great guns. Saw my
first fledged cattle egret chick and other birds were still displaying and
carrying in sticks.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766662

Displaying birds have nice red faces and good plumes

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766694

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766693

A young of the year king rail was on the boardwalk. It was all feathered
but still a lot of smudgy grays. But still lots browner than clapper rails
of the same age. One king rail was in the ditch down toward the old
windmill site but the ditch there has cattails.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766700

A lily trotter was out on the giant lily pads. I think they are lily pads
and not lotus as they float rather than stand above the water.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766696

But don't go near the edge

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766698

But it is hard to fish from the middle

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766697

Most of the white-faced ibis seemed to have left the nest and only a few
adults were still in the reeds. The chicks were standing around early but
flew out to feed. Could not see if they left on their own or joined flocks
of adults.

Lots of least bitterns out.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766702

Birds lined up along a section of the road seemed to coordinate movements
when others called. Several would walk back into the reeds as if on command.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766703

Really large dragonfly hatch, all of which seemed to be the same species.
Stopped a couple of times near tall grass and had lots of mosquitoes
attack. Large swarm of dragonflies cleaned them up but it would not be fun
after dark and the dragonflies go to bed.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766707

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766706

The little blue herons from last seasons broods are mostly blue and now the
new chicks from this year have fledged

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766709

An adult little blue was feeding on little fish and crawfish. It would get
its head close to the water, sway to help depth perception and then pounce.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766710

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766711

Got lots of goodies but all small like a crawfish

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766713

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766712

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766717

And the back of one leg was a different color than the other leg

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766715

Lots of seaside sparrows were up and singing. I have go the impression over
the years that they nest later than the other birds giving the marsh
vegetation time to grow.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766758

One bird was leaning to the side and sunbathing with fluffed feathers while
singing

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766762

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766764

But sang more normally too

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766772

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766770

The summering gadwall, shoveler and coots had moved a little. Lots of
alligators out and a larger one was where they had been sitting. It
apparently crawled over two black-necked stilt nests I have been watching
as they mounds were all gone.

A pair of blue-winged teals was still together and the male was rapidly
molting into eclipse plumage. No sign of nesting and only one brood of
mottled ducks which were fully feathered. Adults were in small groups
rather than pairs.

A few lesser yellowlegs flew by, one large flock of greater yellowlegs went
along the bay. The mud in shoveler pond had a way out there dowitcher,
pectoral sandpiper, and peep.

There were zero eastern willets in the area. Only found 2 at smith point
but the habitat was all dried up that they like.

Finally got a white-tailed hawk for the summer

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167766774

A red-tailed hawk down near smith point had the same plumage as a bird that
was there all summer and fall last year.

The frigate bird perches out in the bay at Smith Point are also known as
markers for oyster beds had a dozen frigatebirds in late morning. Will have
to get down there early am to see how many are roosting as they go out to
feed elsewhere. Three singing male painted buntings in the trees near the
hawk watch tower.

Going up the bay did not have many birds. But nice swallows at Fort Anahuac
Park. The red-headed woodpeckers there raised a couple of broods and the
two family groups were very noisy as they tried to share the same
trees/poles.

And up at the pumping station in the town of Anahuac was surprised to see 2
growing cypress trees out in the water. Way back in 1966 there was a large
cypress forest at that spot. Floods and fresh water seem to have done some
good.

And more pictures can be browsed in

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/inbox

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 4:09 pm
From: Dennis Cooke <denniscooke...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
I had gone up to Lubbock in early April 2018 for the lesser prairie chicken on a private lek (yes, successful on it-needed it for my Texas list). Arriving early the day before going to the lek, I birded on my way to town from the airport and came across a huge flock of doves in town. After realizing 99% of the birds were Eurasian collared doves, I challenged myself to find morning and whitewing doves. Not many of these found.

As Phillip Kites email just came in that he would like to share some of his population in Lubbock with us folks down here, I was finishing the count of Eurasian collared dove that I promised to do back in April on my ebird post dated April 6, 2018 in Lubbock: On my original post I wrote:
“On the way to Clapp Park from Lubbock cemetery I noticed a huge number of birds on the utility lines and on the roof of the building and on a large pile of grain on the east side of the building. I will update with numbers in a few days”

Well July 5th is far more than a few number of days gone by but after the conversation on texbirds of the collared doves I decided to do my count. I had done a count once from photos of over 1300 smith longspurs a few years ago so I knew I could do this count too. I was surprised how my photos of the doves, when zoomed in, were clear enough to distinguish the difference in the doves.

My updated ebird post and photos are here with actual counts: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44312323

My count: Eurasian collared doves- 1454, whitewing- 15, mourning dove- none

So, late in the day on April 6, 2018, one can conclude there were a lot of hungry Eurasian collared dove at the corner of Magnolia Ave and E 50th in Lubbock Texas! How that relates to the current population who knows?

Gosh, I need to go birding!


Dennis Cooke
Dickinson, Tx





Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Lubbockites
Sent: Thursday, July 5, 2018 4:55 PM
To: Texbirds
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?

Anecdotal though my data may be, I’m convinced there are too many Eurasian Collared Doves in my Lubbock neighborhood and would be perfectly happy for any of you to come get as many as you want. :). 
Sent slowly from Phillip Kite's iPhone

On Jul 5, 2018, at 4:27 PM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
My counting is somewhat scientific. Back when the neighborhood had lots of collared doves and they were sort of new I posted numbers of displaying males here. The collareds are not neighborhood birds but nest exclusively in the oak trees planted along westheimer and voss for apts, shopping centers and the city. I have not had one at my feed 2 blocks away for years and then only 1 or 2.

None were flooded by Ike or Harvey nor did they get damaged by the wind in either storm or the nearby tornado in between. They did the drought fine as they are all sprinkled. They grew a little and some were trimmed a little away from wires but essentially no change.

Inca doves left my feeder and oak tree they roosted in about when the white-wing dove numbers escalated. They hung around across the parking lot where they were fed on a balcony. White-wings would not eat there and some mourning. My platform feeder can hold about 21 white-wings at a time and more when they stack up 2 deep eventually pushing birds on the edge over the edge. Some mourning doves dive into the scrum as do the scaly-breasted munias.

Smith Point lost trees in Ike, mainly pines but most oaks made it as it drained fairly soon. The best spot for collared where about 50 birds lived had the same sort of scattered oaks next to houses like westheimer that did not go down in Ike or the drought.

Port Bolivar where I did monthly bird counts for more than a year after Ike lost most of its larger trees but the collareds actually increased. I still did "sort of counts" as it had been one of my favorite birding areas and in some fallouts even better than High Island and less crowed especially in the fall. Habitat has improved since the year after Ike but not a whole lot but the doves made a big turn up and now down. Rock doves have greatly increased in the last two years and may out eat the collared. White-winged doves are starting to get a foothold; they were there pre-Ike but not in great numbers.

All 3 areas have lots of hawks as migrants and smith point does have a pair or so of nesting cooper's hawks. I have a pair at the house that just fledged 4 chicks today and the old standard pair is off to the west having moved with Harvey repairs across the bayou. they fledged young a few weeks ago that have stopped by to eat. Bolivar had a single harrier that lingered and went through town but I have seen no cooper's.

As mentioned, I have a feeder but no collareds before or after the population change. Smith point had 1 feeder that sometimes had food and did have a couple pairs of doves. But my favorite spot had 50 without a feeder. Port Bolivar had 2 sporadic feeders that got doves of various sorts but only had food a couple of days a week if that. An no feeders that I have found for maybe 7 or 8 years. Many of the smith point collareds seemed to migrate across the bay early in the am in August with the white-wings. However, staying late showed they were flighting across the bay to the grain elevators and returning a little before sunset as one big flock. We stopped seeing flights before I stopped seeing collareds.

We may actually have white-wings nesting in the neighborhood for the first time this summer but I have to do more walking. Always had calling males that give up in mid July but females never responded. The old soil maps showed my neighborhood as big thicket  compared to several types to the south, east and west that were loved by doves and corresponded best to some of the soil types in south texas where they came from. And a fledgling white-wing was the first young of the year bird on my balcony and did not come from miles away.


On Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 1:19 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
……

It seems to me Inca Doves are one of the easiest of our native birds for cats to catch as I have seen them drop one by one at our Wilco Co. place to feral cats  (White-wingeds too)....We went from 9-10 Incas last fall to a single bird now.  I found most of the piles of feathers....It has almost made us stop feeding birds.   Don't have this problem at the Bastrop Co. place but then feral cats are pretty rare there due to coyotes and bobcats....At least I rarely get one on any of the critter cams.
.

On Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 12:35 PM, Thomas Kihn <thomaskihn...> wrote:
I just moved from northern Grimes County on June 1.  Now I am in Baytown, so nothing to say about my new location.  However, on the ranch were I lived for 5 and a half years until last month I can say that I used to (before this summer) see 4 or 5 of these birds at or around my feeder.  But in mid-May this year the numbers jumped to 10 to 12!  Maybe just a local fluke.  
Concerning other doves,  this spring is the first time I had Mourning Doves come to the feeder.  They were always common on the ranch, but always away from the buildings.  Inca Dove completely disappeared about a year ago.  One Common Ground-Dove came to the feeder on rare occasions over the time I lived there, none in the last year.
This data is based upon casual viewing from my kitchen window but the numbers always indicate total birds seen at one time (no totals over the day of multiple visits by one bird).

Now that I am in Baytown, I hope to visit the Baytown Nature Center regularly.

Tom Kihn

On Thursday, July 5, 2018 11:14 AM, David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:

I would also caution the use of anecdotal memory as a baseline for comparison, we don't tend to remember negative observations as much as positive in my experience. As an example I was compiling the sighting board checklist for Anahuac NWR. I used the 100 most reported birds from eBird by highest percentage of reports by month, i,e, I used the month with the highest percentage of reports to rank the top 100. American Bittern did not make the cut, it's highest month was only 25%. I had a fellow volunteer differ with my analysis saying her sa the bird almost every visit in season. I asked him to count the number of visits in a row he saw the bird to prove me wrong. After 4 negative visits he conceded the point.

Our memories of how often we see a bird are often very flawed, unless we are counting we don't recall the negatives very well, just the positives. 

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.

This summer actually went and censused.

A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair and none have come by the feeder.

Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather than ticked off numbers.

Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none at some points that used to have lots

This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is not just a local event.

Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.

The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting sites but perhaps for food.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>




--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi




--

Brush Freeman
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas





--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>


 

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Date: 7/5/18 2:55 pm
From: Lubbockites <lubbockites...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
Anecdotal though my data may be, I’m convinced there are too many Eurasian Collared Doves in my Lubbock neighborhood and would be perfectly happy for any of you to come get as many as you want. :).

Sent slowly from Phillip Kite's iPhone

> On Jul 5, 2018, at 4:27 PM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
>
> My counting is somewhat scientific. Back when the neighborhood had lots of collared doves and they were sort of new I posted numbers of displaying males here. The collareds are not neighborhood birds but nest exclusively in the oak trees planted along westheimer and voss for apts, shopping centers and the city. I have not had one at my feed 2 blocks away for years and then only 1 or 2.
>
> None were flooded by Ike or Harvey nor did they get damaged by the wind in either storm or the nearby tornado in between. They did the drought fine as they are all sprinkled. They grew a little and some were trimmed a little away from wires but essentially no change.
>
> Inca doves left my feeder and oak tree they roosted in about when the white-wing dove numbers escalated. They hung around across the parking lot where they were fed on a balcony. White-wings would not eat there and some mourning. My platform feeder can hold about 21 white-wings at a time and more when they stack up 2 deep eventually pushing birds on the edge over the edge. Some mourning doves dive into the scrum as do the scaly-breasted munias.
>
> Smith Point lost trees in Ike, mainly pines but most oaks made it as it drained fairly soon. The best spot for collared where about 50 birds lived had the same sort of scattered oaks next to houses like westheimer that did not go down in Ike or the drought.
>
> Port Bolivar where I did monthly bird counts for more than a year after Ike lost most of its larger trees but the collareds actually increased. I still did "sort of counts" as it had been one of my favorite birding areas and in some fallouts even better than High Island and less crowed especially in the fall. Habitat has improved since the year after Ike but not a whole lot but the doves made a big turn up and now down. Rock doves have greatly increased in the last two years and may out eat the collared. White-winged doves are starting to get a foothold; they were there pre-Ike but not in great numbers.
>
> All 3 areas have lots of hawks as migrants and smith point does have a pair or so of nesting cooper's hawks. I have a pair at the house that just fledged 4 chicks today and the old standard pair is off to the west having moved with Harvey repairs across the bayou. they fledged young a few weeks ago that have stopped by to eat. Bolivar had a single harrier that lingered and went through town but I have seen no cooper's.
>
> As mentioned, I have a feeder but no collareds before or after the population change. Smith point had 1 feeder that sometimes had food and did have a couple pairs of doves. But my favorite spot had 50 without a feeder. Port Bolivar had 2 sporadic feeders that got doves of various sorts but only had food a couple of days a week if that. An no feeders that I have found for maybe 7 or 8 years. Many of the smith point collareds seemed to migrate across the bay early in the am in August with the white-wings. However, staying late showed they were flighting across the bay to the grain elevators and returning a little before sunset as one big flock. We stopped seeing flights before I stopped seeing collareds.
>
> We may actually have white-wings nesting in the neighborhood for the first time this summer but I have to do more walking. Always had calling males that give up in mid July but females never responded. The old soil maps showed my neighborhood as big thicket compared to several types to the south, east and west that were loved by doves and corresponded best to some of the soil types in south texas where they came from. And a fledgling white-wing was the first young of the year bird on my balcony and did not come from miles away.
>
>
>> On Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 1:19 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>> ……
>>
>> It seems to me Inca Doves are one of the easiest of our native birds for cats to catch as I have seen them drop one by one at our Wilco Co. place to feral cats (White-wingeds too)....We went from 9-10 Incas last fall to a single bird now. I found most of the piles of feathers....It has almost made us stop feeding birds. Don't have this problem at the Bastrop Co. place but then feral cats are pretty rare there due to coyotes and bobcats....At least I rarely get one on any of the critter cams.
>> .
>>
>>> On Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 12:35 PM, Thomas Kihn <thomaskihn...> wrote:
>>> I just moved from northern Grimes County on June 1. Now I am in Baytown, so nothing to say about my new location. However, on the ranch were I lived for 5 and a half years until last month I can say that I used to (before this summer) see 4 or 5 of these birds at or around my feeder. But in mid-May this year the numbers jumped to 10 to 12! Maybe just a local fluke.
>>> Concerning other doves, this spring is the first time I had Mourning Doves come to the feeder. They were always common on the ranch, but always away from the buildings. Inca Dove completely disappeared about a year ago. One Common Ground-Dove came to the feeder on rare occasions over the time I lived there, none in the last year.
>>> This data is based upon casual viewing from my kitchen window but the numbers always indicate total birds seen at one time (no totals over the day of multiple visits by one bird).
>>>
>>> Now that I am in Baytown, I hope to visit the Baytown Nature Center regularly.
>>>
>>> Tom Kihn
>>>
>>>
>>> On Thursday, July 5, 2018 11:14 AM, David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> I would also caution the use of anecdotal memory as a baseline for comparison, we don't tend to remember negative observations as much as positive in my experience. As an example I was compiling the sighting board checklist for Anahuac NWR. I used the 100 most reported birds from eBird by highest percentage of reports by month, i,e, I used the month with the highest percentage of reports to rank the top 100. American Bittern did not make the cut, it's highest month was only 25%. I had a fellow volunteer differ with my analysis saying her sa the bird almost every visit in season. I asked him to count the number of visits in a row he saw the bird to prove me wrong. After 4 negative visits he conceded the point.
>>>
>>> Our memories of how often we see a bird are often very flawed, unless we are counting we don't recall the negatives very well, just the positives.
>>>
>>> On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
>>> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>>>
>>> This summer actually went and censused.
>>>
>>> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair and none have come by the feeder.
>>>
>>> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather than ticked off numbers.
>>>
>>> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none at some points that used to have lots
>>>
>>> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is not just a local event.
>>>
>>> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>>>
>>> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting sites but perhaps for food.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> David Sarkozi
>>> Houston, TX
>>> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 2:28 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
My counting is somewhat scientific. Back when the neighborhood had lots of
collared doves and they were sort of new I posted numbers of displaying
males here. The collareds are not neighborhood birds but nest exclusively
in the oak trees planted along westheimer and voss for apts, shopping
centers and the city. I have not had one at my feed 2 blocks away for years
and then only 1 or 2.

None were flooded by Ike or Harvey nor did they get damaged by the wind in
either storm or the nearby tornado in between. They did the drought fine as
they are all sprinkled. They grew a little and some were trimmed a little
away from wires but essentially no change.

Inca doves left my feeder and oak tree they roosted in about when the
white-wing dove numbers escalated. They hung around across the parking lot
where they were fed on a balcony. White-wings would not eat there and some
mourning. My platform feeder can hold about 21 white-wings at a time and
more when they stack up 2 deep eventually pushing birds on the edge over
the edge. Some mourning doves dive into the scrum as do the scaly-breasted
munias.

Smith Point lost trees in Ike, mainly pines but most oaks made it as it
drained fairly soon. The best spot for collared where about 50 birds lived
had the same sort of scattered oaks next to houses like westheimer that did
not go down in Ike or the drought.

Port Bolivar where I did monthly bird counts for more than a year after Ike
lost most of its larger trees but the collareds actually increased. I still
did "sort of counts" as it had been one of my favorite birding areas and in
some fallouts even better than High Island and less crowed especially in
the fall. Habitat has improved since the year after Ike but not a whole lot
but the doves made a big turn up and now down. Rock doves have greatly
increased in the last two years and may out eat the collared. White-winged
doves are starting to get a foothold; they were there pre-Ike but not in
great numbers.

All 3 areas have lots of hawks as migrants and smith point does have a pair
or so of nesting cooper's hawks. I have a pair at the house that just
fledged 4 chicks today and the old standard pair is off to the west having
moved with Harvey repairs across the bayou. they fledged young a few weeks
ago that have stopped by to eat. Bolivar had a single harrier that lingered
and went through town but I have seen no cooper's.

As mentioned, I have a feeder but no collareds before or after the
population change. Smith point had 1 feeder that sometimes had food and did
have a couple pairs of doves. But my favorite spot had 50 without a feeder.
Port Bolivar had 2 sporadic feeders that got doves of various sorts but
only had food a couple of days a week if that. An no feeders that I have
found for maybe 7 or 8 years. Many of the smith point collareds seemed to
migrate across the bay early in the am in August with the white-wings.
However, staying late showed they were flighting across the bay to the
grain elevators and returning a little before sunset as one big flock. We
stopped seeing flights before I stopped seeing collareds.

We may actually have white-wings nesting in the neighborhood for the first
time this summer but I have to do more walking. Always had calling males
that give up in mid July but females never responded. The old soil maps
showed my neighborhood as big thicket compared to several types to the
south, east and west that were loved by doves and corresponded best to some
of the soil types in south texas where they came from. And a fledgling
white-wing was the first young of the year bird on my balcony and did not
come from miles away.


On Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 1:19 PM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
wrote:

> ……
>
> It seems to me Inca Doves are one of the easiest of our native birds for
> cats to catch as I have seen them drop one by one at our Wilco Co. place to
> feral cats (White-wingeds too)....We went from 9-10 Incas last fall to a
> single bird now. I found most of the piles of feathers....It has almost
> made us stop feeding birds. Don't have this problem at the Bastrop Co.
> place but then feral cats are pretty rare there due to coyotes and
> bobcats....At least I rarely get one on any of the critter cams.
> .
>
> On Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 12:35 PM, Thomas Kihn <thomaskihn...> wrote:
>
>> I just moved from northern Grimes County on June 1. Now I am in Baytown,
>> so nothing to say about my new location. However, on the ranch were I
>> lived for 5 and a half years until last month I can say that I used to
>> (before this summer) see 4 or 5 of these birds at or around my feeder. But
>> in mid-May this year the numbers jumped to 10 to 12! Maybe just a local
>> fluke.
>> Concerning other doves, this spring is the first time I had Mourning
>> Doves come to the feeder. They were always common on the ranch, but always
>> away from the buildings. Inca Dove completely disappeared about a year
>> ago. One Common Ground-Dove came to the feeder on rare occasions over the
>> time I lived there, none in the last year.
>> This data is based upon casual viewing from my kitchen window but the
>> numbers always indicate total birds seen at one time (no totals over the
>> day of multiple visits by one bird).
>>
>> Now that I am in Baytown, I hope to visit the Baytown Nature Center
>> regularly.
>>
>> Tom Kihn
>>
>>
>> On Thursday, July 5, 2018 11:14 AM, David Sarkozi <david...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I would also caution the use of anecdotal memory as a baseline for
>> comparison, we don't tend to remember negative observations as much as
>> positive in my experience. As an example I was compiling the sighting board
>> checklist for Anahuac NWR. I used the 100 most reported birds from eBird by
>> highest percentage of reports by month, i,e, I used the month with the
>> highest percentage of reports to rank the top 100. American Bittern did not
>> make the cut, it's highest month was only 25%. I had a fellow volunteer
>> differ with my analysis saying her sa the bird almost every visit in
>> season. I asked him to count the number of visits in a row he saw the bird
>> to prove me wrong. After 4 negative visits he conceded the point.
>>
>> Our memories of how often we see a bird are often very flawed, unless we
>> are counting we don't recall the negatives very well, just the positives.
>>
>> On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
>> > wrote:
>>
>> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many
>> collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the
>> bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were
>> fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other
>> spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>>
>> This summer actually went and censused.
>>
>> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight
>> over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see
>> none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair
>> and none have come by the feeder.
>>
>> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather
>> than ticked off numbers.
>>
>> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with
>> none at some points that used to have lots
>>
>> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and
>> sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is
>> not just a local event.
>>
>> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have
>> affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as
>> predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>>
>> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged
>> dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up
>> significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove
>> population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting
>> sites but perhaps for food.
>>
>> --
>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> David Sarkozi
>> Houston, TX
>> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>>
>>
>>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>


--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 2:19 pm
From: Laas Harvey <hlaas...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
Here on the ranch have only seen Eurasian collared doves sporadically ever. I have never had more than 2 around since first seeing one here 8 or 9 years ago. I have some years where I never see one on the ranch. I only put out bird seed from mid November to mid May. They are more common in other parts of Waller county either in the towns or around grain storage and some of the more dense rural housing sites. The decline in Inca doves is definitely pronounced for a number of years there were always at least two pairs around the house and I would see them sporadically elsewhere on the property. The birds around the house disappeared about 6 years ago. And since then have only seen singles somewhere on the property every few years. I saw two Inca doves in late Spring this year which were the first ones anywhere on the ranch in several years. They were in the one pasture for a couple of days haven't seen them since. Common ground doves have increased over the last ten years. Hav!
e gone from rarely seeing them to having at least a 5 to 7 pairs scattered around the ranch year round. WW doves are interesting here. Are generally common in the county, but here on the ranch are basically none existent until late June and then some years will have really large numbers (high hundreds at one time) in July and August. Then in mid August most will disappear when the corn harvest starts. I have yet to see a single one so far this year. Mourning doves have stayed pretty consistent over the years with yearly ups and downs.

Harvey Laas
10 miles N of Brookshire
4 inches of rain yesterday, so wet for July

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Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 11:20 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
……

It seems to me Inca Doves are one of the easiest of our native birds for
cats to catch as I have seen them drop one by one at our Wilco Co. place to
feral cats (White-wingeds too)....We went from 9-10 Incas last fall to a
single bird now. I found most of the piles of feathers....It has almost
made us stop feeding birds. Don't have this problem at the Bastrop Co.
place but then feral cats are pretty rare there due to coyotes and
bobcats....At least I rarely get one on any of the critter cams.
.

On Thu, Jul 5, 2018 at 12:35 PM, Thomas Kihn <thomaskihn...> wrote:

> I just moved from northern Grimes County on June 1. Now I am in Baytown,
> so nothing to say about my new location. However, on the ranch were I
> lived for 5 and a half years until last month I can say that I used to
> (before this summer) see 4 or 5 of these birds at or around my feeder. But
> in mid-May this year the numbers jumped to 10 to 12! Maybe just a local
> fluke.
> Concerning other doves, this spring is the first time I had Mourning
> Doves come to the feeder. They were always common on the ranch, but always
> away from the buildings. Inca Dove completely disappeared about a year
> ago. One Common Ground-Dove came to the feeder on rare occasions over the
> time I lived there, none in the last year.
> This data is based upon casual viewing from my kitchen window but the
> numbers always indicate total birds seen at one time (no totals over the
> day of multiple visits by one bird).
>
> Now that I am in Baytown, I hope to visit the Baytown Nature Center
> regularly.
>
> Tom Kihn
>
>
> On Thursday, July 5, 2018 11:14 AM, David Sarkozi <david...>
> wrote:
>
>
> I would also caution the use of anecdotal memory as a baseline for
> comparison, we don't tend to remember negative observations as much as
> positive in my experience. As an example I was compiling the sighting board
> checklist for Anahuac NWR. I used the 100 most reported birds from eBird by
> highest percentage of reports by month, i,e, I used the month with the
> highest percentage of reports to rank the top 100. American Bittern did not
> make the cut, it's highest month was only 25%. I had a fellow volunteer
> differ with my analysis saying her sa the bird almost every visit in
> season. I asked him to count the number of visits in a row he saw the bird
> to prove me wrong. After 4 negative visits he conceded the point.
>
> Our memories of how often we see a bird are often very flawed, unless we
> are counting we don't recall the negatives very well, just the positives.
>
> On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
> wrote:
>
> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many
> collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the
> bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were
> fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other
> spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>
> This summer actually went and censused.
>
> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight
> over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see
> none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair
> and none have come by the feeder.
>
> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather
> than ticked off numbers.
>
> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none
> at some points that used to have lots
>
> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and
> sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is
> not just a local event.
>
> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have
> affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as
> predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>
> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged
> dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up
> significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove
> population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting
> sites but perhaps for food.
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>
>
>
>
> --
> David Sarkozi
> Houston, TX
> (713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi
>
>
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 10:40 am
From: Thomas Kihn <thomaskihn...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
I just moved from northern Grimes County on June 1.  Now I am in Baytown, so nothing to say about my new location.  However, on the ranch were I lived for 5 and a half years until last month I can say that I used to (before this summer) see 4 or 5 of these birds at or around my feeder.  But in mid-May this year the numbers jumped to 10 to 12!  Maybe just a local fluke.  Concerning other doves,  this spring is the first time I had Mourning Doves come to the feeder.  They were always common on the ranch, but always away from the buildings.  Inca Dove completely disappeared about a year ago.  One Common Ground-Dove came to the feeder on rare occasions over the time I lived there, none in the last year.This data is based upon casual viewing from my kitchen window but the numbers always indicate total birds seen at one time (no totals over the day of multiple visits by one bird).
Now that I am in Baytown, I hope to visit the Baytown Nature Center regularly.
Tom Kihn

On Thursday, July 5, 2018 11:14 AM, David Sarkozi <david...> wrote:


I would also caution the use of anecdotal memory as a baseline for comparison, we don't tend to remember negative observations as much as positive in my experience. As an example I was compiling the sighting board checklist for Anahuac NWR. I used the 100 most reported birds from eBird by highest percentage of reports by month, i,e, I used the month with the highest percentage of reports to rank the top 100. American Bittern did not make the cut, it's highest month was only 25%. I had a fellow volunteer differ with my analysis saying her sa the bird almost every visit in season. I asked him to count the number of visits in a row he saw the bird to prove me wrong. After 4 negative visits he conceded the point.
Our memories of how often we see a bird are often very flawed, unless we are counting we don't recall the negatives very well, just the positives. 
On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:

A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
This summer actually went and censused.
A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair and none have come by the feeder.
Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather than ticked off numbers.
Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none at some points that used to have lots
This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is not just a local event.
Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting sites but perhaps for food.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>



--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi


 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 9:14 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
I would also caution the use of anecdotal memory as a baseline for
comparison, we don't tend to remember negative observations as much as
positive in my experience. As an example I was compiling the sighting board
checklist for Anahuac NWR. I used the 100 most reported birds from eBird by
highest percentage of reports by month, i,e, I used the month with the
highest percentage of reports to rank the top 100. American Bittern did not
make the cut, it's highest month was only 25%. I had a fellow volunteer
differ with my analysis saying her sa the bird almost every visit in
season. I asked him to count the number of visits in a row he saw the bird
to prove me wrong. After 4 negative visits he conceded the point.

Our memories of how often we see a bird are often very flawed, unless we
are counting we don't recall the negatives very well, just the positives.

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
wrote:

> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many
> collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the
> bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were
> fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other
> spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>
> This summer actually went and censused.
>
> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight
> over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see
> none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair
> and none have come by the feeder.
>
> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather
> than ticked off numbers.
>
> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none
> at some points that used to have lots
>
> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and
> sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is
> not just a local event.
>
> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have
> affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as
> predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>
> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged
> dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up
> significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove
> population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting
> sites but perhaps for food.
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>



--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 9:06 am
From: Brent Ortego <brentortego...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
In 2014, I sort of went birding for Eurasian Collared-Doves. I took a vacation to the Dakotas to see the prairie pothole region which is the major waterfowl and grassland bird production area for the U.S. I drove north by traveling on I-35 and U.S. Hwy. 281. I found EUCD in every town I passed through until I found a couple of small communities in N. Dakota that did not appear to have any, yet. Impressive mid-continent dispersion of this species.

I have been looking at dove numbers on CBCs because populations appear to be changing. With all the discussion as to what is in our back yards, lets look at the numbers we helped produce at a state-wide level on the CBCs.

For this summary I looked at the last 15 years of data and broke them into three 5-year segments. The numbers reported will be the total for each 5-year segment.

Rock Pigeon = 155,072 208,652 177,865

Eur. Collared-Dove = 19,333 37,483 42,432 Population expansion appears to have slowed during last 5 years

Inca Dove = 11,351 10,764 7,860 Population was well below average during each of the last 3 years.

Com. Ground-Dove = 4,597 4,537 2,875 Population was well below average during each of the last 3 years.

White-tipped Dove = 781 922 902

White-winged Dove = 86,232 110,169 150,858 Population is still expanding.

Mourning Dove = 172,791 174,913 166,211

Birder participation has increased most years through this period. If a population was stable, the count numbers should be experiencing a small increase in conjunction with the annual increase in birder effort.


Brent Ortego
Texas CBC Editor
________________________________
From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> on behalf of Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Sent: Thursday, July 5, 2018 9:02 AM
To: <kbarnold2...>
Cc: <donutposse1...>; <brushfreeman...>; Joseph Kennedy; 4 Texbirds Maillist
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?

All -

When I first started visiting Corpus Christi in 1999 / 2000, the only reliable spot to see them in the Calallen area was on Rt624 nor far from Hazel Bazemore Park. Joel Simon and I used the spot for Big Days, etc. If you went a mile in either direction from he spot, no ECDs.

My house is about a mile and a half from that location, and in 2018 my yard is NEVER without ECDs and WWDOs. The largest single count I had for ECDs last winter was 43 at the feeders and perched on my roof. They are doing quite well, thank you, except for the ones that get picked off by the local wintering Coopers Hawks. My neighborhood has many well-fed Coops every winter. Hey, Im feeding the birds, right?

When I am putting out seed, the dove population is roughly 40% ECD, 30% WWDO, 20% Inca Doves, and 10% MODO. Rock Pigeons almost never land in the yard, and Common Ground Doves and White-tipped Doves are sporadic.

Right now the Incas, WWDOs, and MODOs are nesting (again), but I have not yet seen an ECD nest in the yard.

Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 4, 2018, at 5:54 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...><mailto:<kbarnold2...>> wrote:

In our area(B/CS), Eurasian Collare-Doves have never been numerous, but seem to have maintained their (low) at the locations where I usually expect to encounter them.
On the other hand, White-winged Doves have increased significantly with some effect on resident Mourning Doves, but more to the point, Inca Doves have practically disappeared.
Keith Armold
Bryan/TAMU

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 4, 2018, at 5:31 PM, Devin Collins <donutposse1...><mailto:<donutposse1...>> wrote:

I started seeing Eurasian collared doves in Austin about 2-3 years ago, near pflugerville/round rock. Location is just south and west of IH-35 at SH-45 (Louis Henna). They were new to me, and interesting because I mentally went through the different dove species I had seen growing up in Houston, vs the doves I see in Austin, comparing. I havent noticed the number of collared doves either increase or decrease - its about the same at 1/10 doves I see around my office.

In Houston, in the late 80s-early 90s, we didnt have white wing doves at all, at least that me and my dad saw. I only saw WW doves for the first time after I moved to Austin in 2002. We did have mourning, inca, and rock doves (now rock pigeons). When I moved to Austin I noticed fewer mourning doves but tons of white wing doves, and about the same number of Inca doves (always one of my favorite birds to spot, in the yard or at the feeders). I mostly lived in Alief/Addicks, around Highway 6 and Alief Clodine or hwy6/westheimer area - but in 91-92 moved to Shepherd and Pinemont, farther north and west.

I remember the cattle egrets too, always in the fields or even perched up on a cow itself, just hanging out

On Jul 4, 2018, at 10:32 AM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:

.

The same thing happened with Cattle Egrets after their peak population explosion in Texas in the mid-80's

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...><mailto:<josephkennedy36...>> wrote:
A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.

This summer actually went and censused.

A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair and none have come by the feeder.

Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather than ticked off numbers.

Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none at some points that used to have lots

This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is not just a local event.

Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.

The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting sites but perhaps for food.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...><mailto:<Josephkennedy36...>



--

Brush Freeman
<https://nam04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.biospatialsevices.com&data=02%7C01%7C%7C7f41b9dd2e1f49e74b4f08d5e2800aa2%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636663961917187231&sdata=H0fcAlmbm48QO5C0W10jZ9CJIJKhfjSo9i4IO%2BmEsaU%3D&reserved=0>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas




 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 8:49 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
I would suggest that loss of nest sites would account for that, both
Bolivar and Smith point have lost a lot of trees in Ike and Harvey. In
Joe's neighborhood I'd bet older bungalows are being town down and newer
mcMansions are replacing them removing many older prime nesting trees. that
and fewer open areas to produce food crops also must have an impact.

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
wrote:

> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many
> collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the
> bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were
> fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other
> spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>
> This summer actually went and censused.
>
> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight
> over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see
> none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair
> and none have come by the feeder.
>
> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather
> than ticked off numbers.
>
> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none
> at some points that used to have lots
>
> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and
> sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is
> not just a local event.
>
> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have
> affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as
> predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>
> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged
> dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up
> significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove
> population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting
> sites but perhaps for food.
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>



--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 7:24 am
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
An interesting summary, Clay. I recently reported 16 WWDOs to eBird from my daily yard report and received a query to confirm the number as “it was an unusually large number for the time of year” - I will report 18!
I rarely have more than 1-3 MODOs since the prominence of WODOs, whereas 6-8 MODOs was not uncommon. Likewise, 2 pr 2 pairs of INDOs were regular visitors before WEDOs; hearing one calling in the distance on two occasions excited me as they were (it was?) the first in over 2 years. As for EUCDs, I don’t think I seen more than single birds more than 2-3 times.
I am amazed at the variety of experiences reported in this series dialogues.

Keith

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 5, 2018, at 9:02 AM, Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> wrote:
>
> All -
>
> When I first started visiting Corpus Christi in 1999 / 2000, the only reliable spot to see them in the Calallen area was on Rt624 nor far from Hazel Bazemore Park. Joel Simon and I used the spot for Big Days, etc. If you went a mile in either direction from he spot, no ECDs.
>
> My house is about a mile and a half from that location, and in 2018 my yard is NEVER without ECDs and WWDOs. The largest single count I had for ECDs last winter was 43 at the feeders and perched on my roof. They are doing quite well, thank you, except for the ones that get picked off by the local wintering Cooper’s Hawks. My neighborhood has many well-fed Coops every winter. Hey, I’m feeding the birds, right?
>
> When I am putting out seed, the dove population is roughly 40% ECD, 30% WWDO, 20% Inca Doves, and 10% MODO. Rock Pigeons almost never land in the yard, and Common Ground Doves and White-tipped Doves are sporadic.
>
> Right now the Incas, WWDOs, and MODOs are nesting (again), but I have not yet seen an ECD nest in the yard.
>
> Clay Taylor
> TOS Life Member
> Swarovski Optik N.A.
> (Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 4, 2018, at 5:54 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> wrote:
>
>> In our area(B/CS), Eurasian Collare-Doves have never been numerous, but seem to have maintained their (low) at the locations where I usually expect to encounter them.
>> On the other hand, White-winged Doves have increased significantly with some effect on resident Mourning Doves, but more to the point, Inca Doves have practically disappeared.
>> Keith Armold
>> Bryan/TAMU
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Jul 4, 2018, at 5:31 PM, Devin Collins <donutposse1...> wrote:
>>
>> I started seeing Eurasian collared doves in Austin about 2-3 years ago, near pflugerville/round rock. Location is just south and west of IH-35 at SH-45 (Louis Henna). They were new to me, and interesting because I mentally went through the different dove species I had seen growing up in Houston, vs the doves I see in Austin, comparing. I haven’t noticed the number of collared doves either increase or decrease - it’s about the same at 1/10 doves I see around my office.
>>
>> In Houston, in the late 80s-early 90s, we didn’t have white wing doves at all, at least that me and my dad saw. I only saw WW doves for the first time after I moved to Austin in 2002. We did have mourning, inca, and rock doves (now rock pigeons). When I moved to Austin I noticed fewer mourning doves but tons of white wing doves, and about the same number of Inca doves (always one of my favorite birds to spot, in the yard or at the feeders). I mostly lived in Alief/Addicks, around Highway 6 and Alief Clodine or hwy6/westheimer area - but in 91-92 moved to Shepherd and Pinemont, farther north and west.
>>
>> I remember the cattle egrets too, always in the fields or even perched up on a cow itself, just hanging out
>>
>> On Jul 4, 2018, at 10:32 AM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>>
>> ….
>>
>> The same thing happened with Cattle Egrets after their peak population explosion in Texas in the mid-80's
>>
>>> On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
>>> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>>>
>>> This summer actually went and censused.
>>>
>>> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair and none have come by the feeder.
>>>
>>> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather than ticked off numbers.
>>>
>>> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none at some points that used to have lots
>>>
>>> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is not just a local event.
>>>
>>> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>>>
>>> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting sites but perhaps for food.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 7:03 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
All -

When I first started visiting Corpus Christi in 1999 / 2000, the only reliable spot to see them in the Calallen area was on Rt624 nor far from Hazel Bazemore Park. Joel Simon and I used the spot for Big Days, etc. If you went a mile in either direction from he spot, no ECDs.

My house is about a mile and a half from that location, and in 2018 my yard is NEVER without ECDs and WWDOs. The largest single count I had for ECDs last winter was 43 at the feeders and perched on my roof. They are doing quite well, thank you, except for the ones that get picked off by the local wintering Cooper's Hawks. My neighborhood has many well-fed Coops every winter. Hey, I'm feeding the birds, right?

When I am putting out seed, the dove population is roughly 40% ECD, 30% WWDO, 20% Inca Doves, and 10% MODO. Rock Pigeons almost never land in the yard, and Common Ground Doves and White-tipped Doves are sporadic.

Right now the Incas, WWDOs, and MODOs are nesting (again), but I have not yet seen an ECD nest in the yard.

Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Swarovski Optik N.A.
(Calallen) Corpus Christi, TX

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 4, 2018, at 5:54 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...><mailto:<kbarnold2...>> wrote:

In our area(B/CS), Eurasian Collare-Doves have never been numerous, but seem to have maintained their (low) at the locations where I usually expect to encounter them.
On the other hand, White-winged Doves have increased significantly with some effect on resident Mourning Doves, but more to the point, Inca Doves have practically disappeared.
Keith Armold
Bryan/TAMU

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 4, 2018, at 5:31 PM, Devin Collins <donutposse1...><mailto:<donutposse1...>> wrote:

I started seeing Eurasian collared doves in Austin about 2-3 years ago, near pflugerville/round rock. Location is just south and west of IH-35 at SH-45 (Louis Henna). They were new to me, and interesting because I mentally went through the different dove species I had seen growing up in Houston, vs the doves I see in Austin, comparing. I haven't noticed the number of collared doves either increase or decrease - it's about the same at 1/10 doves I see around my office.

In Houston, in the late 80s-early 90s, we didn't have white wing doves at all, at least that me and my dad saw. I only saw WW doves for the first time after I moved to Austin in 2002. We did have mourning, inca, and rock doves (now rock pigeons). When I moved to Austin I noticed fewer mourning doves but tons of white wing doves, and about the same number of Inca doves (always one of my favorite birds to spot, in the yard or at the feeders). I mostly lived in Alief/Addicks, around Highway 6 and Alief Clodine or hwy6/westheimer area - but in 91-92 moved to Shepherd and Pinemont, farther north and west.

I remember the cattle egrets too, always in the fields or even perched up on a cow itself, just hanging out

On Jul 4, 2018, at 10:32 AM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...><mailto:<brushfreeman...>> wrote:

....

The same thing happened with Cattle Egrets after their peak population explosion in Texas in the mid-80's

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...><mailto:<josephkennedy36...>> wrote:
A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.

This summer actually went and censused.

A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair and none have come by the feeder.

Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather than ticked off numbers.

Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none at some points that used to have lots

This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is not just a local event.

Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.

The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting sites but perhaps for food.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...><mailto:<Josephkennedy36...>



--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas




 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 4:05 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?

EUCDs (vs. ECDO) are still pretty common in Bastrop, Leander and Cedar
Park, but only in big parking lots, and other such infrastructures
...Pretty much where you find W. Kingbirds you will find EUCDs. I was
surprised as to how many I saw up in the Willamette Valley (Oregon) over
the past week plus. Even at mid-elevations near Silverton. etc. Port
O'Connor was initially hammered with them, but they starting falling in
numbers quickly after that surge... I don't know their abundance or lack
of there recently.

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 5:53 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> wrote:

> In our area(B/CS), Eurasian Collare-Doves have never been numerous, but
> seem to have maintained their (low) at the locations where I usually expect
> to encounter them.
> On the other hand, White-winged Doves have increased significantly with
> some effect on resident Mourning Doves, but more to the point, Inca Doves
> have practically disappeared.
> Keith Armold
> Bryan/TAMU
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 4, 2018, at 5:31 PM, Devin Collins <donutposse1...> wrote:
>
> I started seeing Eurasian collared doves in Austin about 2-3 years ago,
> near pflugerville/round rock. Location is just south and west of IH-35 at
> SH-45 (Louis Henna). They were new to me, and interesting because I
> mentally went through the different dove species I had seen growing up in
> Houston, vs the doves I see in Austin, comparing. I haven’t noticed the
> number of collared doves either increase or decrease - it’s about the same
> at 1/10 doves I see around my office.
>
> In Houston, in the late 80s-early 90s, we didn’t have white wing doves at
> all, at least that me and my dad saw. I only saw WW doves for the first
> time after I moved to Austin in 2002. We did have mourning, inca, and rock
> doves (now rock pigeons). When I moved to Austin I noticed fewer mourning
> doves but tons of white wing doves, and about the same number of Inca doves
> (always one of my favorite birds to spot, in the yard or at the feeders). I
> mostly lived in Alief/Addicks, around Highway 6 and Alief Clodine or
> hwy6/westheimer area - but in 91-92 moved to Shepherd and Pinemont,
> farther north and west.
>
> I remember the cattle egrets too, always in the fields or even perched up
> on a cow itself, just hanging out
>
> On Jul 4, 2018, at 10:32 AM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> ….
>
> The same thing happened with Cattle Egrets after their peak population
> explosion in Texas in the mid-80's
>
> On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
> wrote:
>
>> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many
>> collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the
>> bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were
>> fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other
>> spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>>
>> This summer actually went and censused.
>>
>> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight
>> over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see
>> none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair
>> and none have come by the feeder.
>>
>> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather
>> than ticked off numbers.
>>
>> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with
>> none at some points that used to have lots
>>
>> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and
>> sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is
>> not just a local event.
>>
>> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have
>> affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as
>> predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>>
>> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged
>> dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up
>> significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove
>> population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting
>> sites but perhaps for food.
>>
>> --
>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> <http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 3:54 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
In our area(B/CS), Eurasian Collare-Doves have never been numerous, but seem to have maintained their (low) at the locations where I usually expect to encounter them.
On the other hand, White-winged Doves have increased significantly with some effect on resident Mourning Doves, but more to the point, Inca Doves have practically disappeared.
Keith Armold
Bryan/TAMU

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 4, 2018, at 5:31 PM, Devin Collins <donutposse1...> wrote:
>
> I started seeing Eurasian collared doves in Austin about 2-3 years ago, near pflugerville/round rock. Location is just south and west of IH-35 at SH-45 (Louis Henna). They were new to me, and interesting because I mentally went through the different dove species I had seen growing up in Houston, vs the doves I see in Austin, comparing. I haven’t noticed the number of collared doves either increase or decrease - it’s about the same at 1/10 doves I see around my office.
>
> In Houston, in the late 80s-early 90s, we didn’t have white wing doves at all, at least that me and my dad saw. I only saw WW doves for the first time after I moved to Austin in 2002. We did have mourning, inca, and rock doves (now rock pigeons). When I moved to Austin I noticed fewer mourning doves but tons of white wing doves, and about the same number of Inca doves (always one of my favorite birds to spot, in the yard or at the feeders). I mostly lived in Alief/Addicks, around Highway 6 and Alief Clodine or hwy6/westheimer area - but in 91-92 moved to Shepherd and Pinemont, farther north and west.
>
> I remember the cattle egrets too, always in the fields or even perched up on a cow itself, just hanging out
>
>> On Jul 4, 2018, at 10:32 AM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>>
>> ….
>>
>> The same thing happened with Cattle Egrets after their peak population explosion in Texas in the mid-80's
>>
>>> On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
>>> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>>>
>>> This summer actually went and censused.
>>>
>>> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair and none have come by the feeder.
>>>
>>> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather than ticked off numbers.
>>>
>>> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none at some points that used to have lots
>>>
>>> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is not just a local event.
>>>
>>> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>>>
>>> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting sites but perhaps for food.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Brush Freeman
>> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>>
>>
>>

 

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Date: 7/4/18 3:32 pm
From: Devin Collins <donutposse1...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
I started seeing Eurasian collared doves in Austin about 2-3 years ago, near pflugerville/round rock. Location is just south and west of IH-35 at SH-45 (Louis Henna). They were new to me, and interesting because I mentally went through the different dove species I had seen growing up in Houston, vs the doves I see in Austin, comparing. I haven’t noticed the number of collared doves either increase or decrease - it’s about the same at 1/10 doves I see around my office.

In Houston, in the late 80s-early 90s, we didn’t have white wing doves at all, at least that me and my dad saw. I only saw WW doves for the first time after I moved to Austin in 2002. We did have mourning, inca, and rock doves (now rock pigeons). When I moved to Austin I noticed fewer mourning doves but tons of white wing doves, and about the same number of Inca doves (always one of my favorite birds to spot, in the yard or at the feeders). I mostly lived in Alief/Addicks, around Highway 6 and Alief Clodine or hwy6/westheimer area - but in 91-92 moved to Shepherd and Pinemont, farther north and west.

I remember the cattle egrets too, always in the fields or even perched up on a cow itself, just hanging out

> On Jul 4, 2018, at 10:32 AM, Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...> wrote:
>
> ….
>
> The same thing happened with Cattle Egrets after their peak population explosion in Texas in the mid-80's
>
>> On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
>> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>>
>> This summer actually went and censused.
>>
>> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair and none have come by the feeder.
>>
>> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather than ticked off numbers.
>>
>> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none at some points that used to have lots
>>
>> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is not just a local event.
>>
>> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>>
>> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting sites but perhaps for food.
>>
>> --
>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Brush Freeman
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>

 

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Date: 7/4/18 10:47 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] The Plains I Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
Greetings All:

On 6/30/18 I completed the Plains BBS - which runs from the intersection of
CR 175 and CR 100 by way of CR 100, CR 195 crossing the Yoakum/Cochran line
to become CR 65, CR 260, CR 95, FM 1585, CR 105, CR 210, CR 97, CR 160, and
CR 95 to the intersection of CR 95 x FM 125. Temperatures ranged from 66
on up to 70, sky cover ranged from mostly cloudy to overcast and then to
partly clouds, and the winds slowly ramped up from 5 to 15 mph. Things
were extremely dry - there was no standing water at all and portions of the
route are becoming non-navigable due to dune encroachment - and crittering
was slow with relatively low numbers for all the birds tallied. Without
further ado, the list (highlight in bold):

*5 Black Witches*
1 Nysa Roadside Skipper
2 Western Pygmy Blues
12 Reakirt's Blues

*1 Side-blotched Lizard*
1 Gopher Snake

12 Northern Bobwhites
*6 Scaled Quails*
7 Rock Pigeons
5 Eurasian Collared Doves
52 Mourning Doves
4 Greater Roadrunners
7 Common Nighthawks
4 Killdeers
9 Swainson's Hawks
1 Great Horned Owl
7 Burrowing Owls
2 American Kestrels
5 Ash-throated Flycatchers
66 Western Kingbirds
3 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
1 Chihuahuan Raven
10 Horned Larks
20 Barn Swallows
2 Curve-billed Thrashers
21 Northern Mockingbirds
4 European Starlings
1 House Finch
3 Cassin's Sparrows
4 Lark Sparrows
*32 Lark Buntings*
1 Grasshopper Sparrow
21 Western Meadowlarks
11 Bullock's Orioles
1 Red-winged Blackbird
*1 male Bronzed Cowbird*
2 Brown-headed Cowbird
16 Great-tailed Grackles
6 Blue Grosbeaks
1 Dickcissel

4 Black-tailed Jackrabbits
3 Desert Cottontails
12 Black-tailed Prairie Dogs
4 Spotted Ground Squirrels
1 Gray Fox
7 Pronghorns
2 Mule Deers

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/4/18 10:34 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Circle Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
Greetings All:

On 6/24/18 I completed the Circle BBS - which runs from the intersection of
FM 1842 and CR 104 by way of CR 104, CR 239, CR 94, CR 159, and CR 74 to
the intersection of CR 74 and the Lamb/Bailey County line. Temperatures
ranged from 75 on up to 84, sky cover remained clear throughout, and the
winds slowly ramped up from 8 to 16 mph. Things were extremely dry - this
route passes by well at least eight playas and no standing water was
present at all (the egrets were working the leading edge of a center pivot
and appeared to be eating small rodents)- and crittering was slow with
relatively low numbers for all the birds tallied. Without further ado, the
list (highlight in bold):

1 Common Checkered Skipper
*1 Strecker's Giant Skipper*
7 Checkered Whites
1 Orange Sulphur
1 Phaon Crescent

1 Ornate Box Turtle
3 Texas Horned Lizards
1 Checkered Garter Snake
1 Eastern Glossy Snake
1 Common Kingsnake

15 Northern Bobwhites
*2 Ring-necked Pheasants*
2 Rock Pigeons
34 Eurasian Collared Doves
2 White-winged Doves
151 Mourning Doves
1 Common Nighthawk
2 Chimney Swifts
1 Black-chinned Hummingbird
7 Killdeers
*7 Cattle Egrets*
7 Swainson's Hawks
2 Barn Owls
18 Burrowing Owls
3 American Kestrels
*4 Say's Phoebes*
169 Western Kingbirds
2 Loggerhead Shrikes
2 Blue Jays
74 Horned Larks
2 Cliff Swallows
35 Barn Swallows
14 American Robins
17 Northern Mockingbirds
13 European Starlings
78 House Sparrows
10 House Finches
9 Cassin's Sparrows
23 Lark Sparrows
20 Grasshopper Sparrows
6 Eastern Meadowlarks
58 Western Meadowlarks
9 Bullock's Orioles
44 Red-winged Blackbirds
*1 female and 1 male Bronzed Cowbirds*
85 Great-tailed Grackles
11 Blue Grosbeaks
3 Dickcissels

9 Black-tailed Jackrabbits
3 Desert Cottontails
36 Black-tailed Prairie Dogs
10 Spotted Ground Squirrels
1 Coyote

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/4/18 10:20 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Post Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
Greetings All:

On 6/16/18 I completed the Post BBS - which runs from the Terry/Garza
County line via CR 250, Highway 380, CR 105, CR 260, CR 165, Highway 380,
and FM 651 through Post and on to the Salt Fork of the Brazos River.
Temperatures ranged from 74 on up to 79, sky cover ranged from mostly
cloudy to partly cloudy, and the winds slowly ramped up from 9 to 18 mph.
Things were extremely dry - this route passes by eight playas and two lakes
and over six creeks and two rivers and the only water present was in the
two man-maintained lakes - and crittering was slow with relatively low
numbers for all the birds tallied. Without further ado, the list
(highlight in bold):

*2 Outis Skippers*
1 Common Checkered Skippers
1 Common Sootywings
2 Orange Skipperlings
1 Checkered White
1 Orange Sulphur
2 Dainty Sulphurs
1 Reakirt's Blue
1 Pearl Crescent
1 Queen

2 Red-eared Sliders
2 Yellow Mud Turtles
1 Coachwhip
1 Gopher Snake

20 Northern Bobwhites
*3 Scaled Quails*
5 Rock Pigeons
13 Eurasian Collared Doves
6 White-winged Doves
58 Mourning Doves
*2 Yellow-billed Cuckoos*
4 Common Nighthawks
2 Chimney Swifts
3 Killdeers
10 Turkey Vultures
3 Mississippi Kites
1 Swainson's Hawk
4 Golden-fronted Woodpeckers
3 Ladder-backed Woodpeckers
1 American Kestrel
3 Ash-throated Flycatchers
71 Western Kingbirds
15 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
1 Loggerhead Shrike
*1 Bell's Vireo*
2 Blue Jays
*1 Common Raven*
14 Horned Larks
*13 Purple Martins*
*2 Northern Rough-winged Swallows*
285 Cliff Swallows
*12 Cave Swallows*
24 Barn Swallows
*2 Verdins*
1 Bewick's Wren
2 American Robins
1 Curve-billed Thrasher
24 Northern Mockingbirds
12 European Starlings
20 House Sparrows
10 House Finches
1 Lesser Goldfinch
4 Cassin's Sparrows
21 Lark Sparrows
1 Grasshopper Sparrow
7 Western Meadowlarks
9 Bullock's Orioles
10 Red-winged Blackbirds
*1 female and 2 male Bronzed Cowbirds*
4 Brown-headed Cowbirds
7 Common Grackles
39 Great-tailed Grackles
2 Northern Cardinals
*1 Pyrrhuloxia*
3 Blue Grosbeaks
*1 male Indigo Bunting*
10 Painted Buntings
3 Dickcissels

7 Brazilian Free-tailed Bats
2 Silver-haired Bats
1 Black-tailed Jackrabbit
2 Eastern Cottontails
2 Desert Cottontails
1 Striped Skunk

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/4/18 10:03 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Dougherty Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
Greetings All:

On 6/3/18 I completed the Dougherty BBS - which runs from the intersection
of CR 293 x CR 290 by way of CR 290, CR 121, and CR 318 to the intersection
of CR 318 x FM 35. Temperatures ranged from 62 to 71, sky cover was partly
cloudy throughout, and the winds slowly ramped up from 0 to 10 mph. Things
were extremely dry - this route passes by well over twenty playas and the
only water present was puddles in two dig-outs - and crittering was slow
with relatively low numbers for all the birds tallied. Without further
ado, the list (highlight in bold):

1 Reakirt's Blue

2 Plains Leopard Frogs

1 Western Hog-nosed Snake

13 Northern Bobwhites
6 Eurasian Collared Doves
61 Mourning Doves
*1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo*
1 Greater Roadrunner
2 American Avocets
1 Killdeer
*1 Cattle Egret*
1 Black-crowned Night Heron
*1 White-faced Ibis*
5 Turkey Vultures
3 Swainson's Hawks
15 Burrowing Owls
2 Golden-fronted Woodpeckers
1 American Kestrel
*2 Say's Phoebes*
2 Ash-throated Flycatchers
61 Western Kingbirds
*1 Bell's Vireo*
2 Chihuahuan Ravens
*3 Common Ravens*
66 Horned Larks
*20 Purple Martins*
4 Cliff Swallows
21 Barn Swallows
1 Bewick's Wren
1 Curve-billed Thrasher
7 Northern Mockingbirds
7 House Sparrow
1 House Finch
6 Cassin's Sparrows
34 Lark Sparrows
3 Grasshopper Sparrows
*2 Yellow-headed Blackbirds*
2 Eastern Meadowlarks
29 Western Meadowlarks
2 Orchard Orioles
7 Bullock's Orioles
96 Red-winged Blackbirds
*1 male Bronzed Cowbird*
3 Brown-headed Cowbirds
1 Common Grackle
9 Great-tailed Grackles
*1 female and 1 male Common Yellowthroats*
3 Northern Cardinals
3 Blue Grosbeaks
4 Painted Buntings
4 Dickcissels

4 Black-tailed Jackrabbits
7 Desert Cottontails
24 Black-tailed Prairie Dogs
2 Spotted Ground Squirrels
1 Coyote
1 Striped Skunk
4 Mule Deers

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/4/18 9:53 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Floydada Breeding Bird Survey - Full Report
Greetings All:

On 6/2/18 I completed the Floydada BBS - which runs from the intersection
of Highway 207 x FM 786 by way of FM 786, CR 200, FM 28, and CR 232 to the
intersection of CR 232 x FM 602. Temperatures ranged from 70 on up to 82,
sky cover ranged from partly cloudy to clear, and the winds slowly ramped
up from 0 to 18 mph. Things were extremely dry - this route passes by well
over twenty playas and the only water present was a puddle in one dig-out -
and crittering was slow with relatively low numbers for all the birds
tallied. Without further ado, the list (highlight in bold):

1 Black Swallowtail
1 Dainty Sulphur
1 Variegated Fritillary
1 Pearl Crescent
1 Viceroy

1 Gopher Snake
1 Prairie Rattlesnake

2 Blue-winged Teals
29 Mallards
*2 Northern Pintails*
14 Northern Bobwhites
*2 Ring-necked Pheasants*
63 Mourning Doves
2 Common Nighthawks
*1 American Avocet*
1 Killdeer
6 Black-crowned Night Herons
4 Turkey Vultures
6 Swainson's Hawks
1 Barn Owl
3 Burrowing Owls
42 Western Kingbirds
2 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers
3 Chihuahuan Ravens
*10 Common Ravens*
84 Horned Larks
10 Cliff Swallows
*4 Cave Swallows*
23 Barn Swallows
3 Northern Mockingbirds
4 House Sparrows
2 House Finches
9 Cassin's Sparrows
30 Lark Sparrows
2 Lark Buntings
14 Grasshopper Sparrows
5 Eastern Meadowlarks
74 Western Meadowlarks
1 Bullock's Oriole
28 Red-winged Blackbirds
*1 male Bronzed Cowbird*
1 Brown-headed Cowbird
5 Common Grackles
11 Great-tailed Grackles
*1 male Common Yellowthroat*
6 Blue Grosbeaks
1 Painted Bunting
4 Dickcissels

1 Black-tailed Jackrabbit
3 Desert Cottontails
8 Black-tailed Prairie Dogs
1 Coyote
7 White-tailed Deers
1 Mule Deer

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/4/18 8:33 am
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Eurasian collared dove population crash?
….

The same thing happened with Cattle Egrets after their peak population
explosion in Texas in the mid-80's

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 8:59 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
wrote:

> A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many
> collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the
> bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were
> fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other
> spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.
>
> This summer actually went and censused.
>
> A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight
> over voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see
> none. The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair
> and none have come by the feeder.
>
> Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather
> than ticked off numbers.
>
> Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none
> at some points that used to have lots
>
> This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and
> sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is
> not just a local event.
>
> Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have
> affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as
> predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.
>
> The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged
> dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up
> significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove
> population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting
> sites but perhaps for food.
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>



--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 

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Date: 7/4/18 7:00 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Eurasian collared dove population crash?
A couple of years ago I sort of noticed that there were not as many
collared doves around the smith point area. Did not see them crossing the
bay and places that had large numbers had fewer. Last summer there were
fewer but Harvey had something to do with it but did start checking other
spots. Numbers on Bolivar were down too as well as around the house.

This summer actually went and censused.

A few years ago I could see 10-15 male doves do their courtship flight over
voss and westheimer when I stopped at the red light. This year I see none.
The several pairs at the grocery store are gone except for one pair and
none have come by the feeder.

Numbers are down maybe 90% on bolivar based on general impressions rather
than ticked off numbers.

Had trouble finding more than single pairs at smith point Monday with none
at some points that used to have lots

This population drop has occurred over 3 summers in places where I go and
sort of count birds every week or at least very often year round. So it is
not just a local event.

Has anyone noted similar trends elsewhere. Similar population drops have
affected other invasive species after an initial great spurt in numbers as
predators and parasites bring the newcomer into control.

The changes at home have not affected the mourning dove and white-winged
dove numbers; if anything they are both up. Rock pigeons numbers are up
significantly on Bolivar in the same places that I noted collared dove
population decreases. And those two species do not compete for nesting
sites but perhaps for food.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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Date: 7/4/18 6:47 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] PIctures from last week, more babies, molting adults and returning shorebirds
Started the day walking east beach. The annual coconut migration has begun.
Like the last 2 years, the nuts are short distance migrants from further
down the western gulf. Long distance migrants from the indies went up the
Atlantic again like the sargassum. Thus only a few barnacles.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751043

The local crested caracara had two chicks that fledged and are feeding or
scavenging on their own. They were annoying or more accurately being
harassed by the Wilson's plovers.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751045

Saw the local snowy plovers out on the beach with one banded bird and one
of this years fully feathered chicks.

The adult Wilson's plovers are getting very worn and in need of a molt. One
banded bird is still hiding chicks that have to be mostly grown but never
seen.

Across the way, bolivar flats had lots of interest.

Young of the year great egrets are out feeding with the reddish egrets on
the abundant minnows. Depending on the tides and wind, the heron lunch is
trapped in pools leading to lots of ownership disputes

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751047

The early fledged least terns are able to fish and feed themselves but
still want food from the parents

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751062

the protective parents will dive or poop on anyone getting too close. This
black skimmer and several others walked into the wrong part of the sand and
got bombed

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751058

Three year classes of reddish egrets are out on the beach with most still
non-breeding second year birds but young of the year and breeding adults
were here this week too

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751065

And a young of the year bird

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751076

Royal tern numbers were up and the adults are already molting into their
non-breeding plumage

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751066

My first chick royal tern of the summer

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751068

A few others were scattered around. Note that the legs on the youngsters
can be orange, black or anywhere between

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751069

My first sandwich tern chick of the summer

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751070

Most of the young birds out on the beach were sandwich terns where in past
summers the bulk of early babies were royal terns

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751078

The summering red knot numbers had doubled over recent trips with 2 birds
present but none have any reddish feathers.

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751075

All the summering peeps were western sandpipers. I have trouble with the
small billed males

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751081

The long-billed females are easy. But the westerns have semipalmated toes
like the bird of that name

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751082

Like the westerns, the summering sanderlings show no sign of breeding
plumage

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751096

Marbled godwits are back from the nesting grounds showing their orange
breeding bills that will fade within a few days of arrival

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751063

The will rapidly molt and feathers will start sticking out of the body and
wings as new feathers grow in

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751093

Drinking is not real easy with a long bill

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751094

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751095

Most of the summering short-billed dowitchers were elsewhere or napping
inland but the remaining birds got lots of worms

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751098

Like the other summering birds, western willets are in very plain plumage

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751100

But returning breeders have great plumage

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751101

Some of the fledged least terns spent time in the water and periodically
would sink down while waiting on minnows

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751104

this chick ran away from the parent who brought a minnow

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751105

And then ran from both parents

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751106

Several Wilson's plover chicks fledged this year after getting washed out
last summer by several high tides

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751116

Up at Anahuac Refuge, the summering gadwall is still summering

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751108

A young great egret was trying to get cool

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751109

The little blue herons continue getting bluer and are catching fish

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751110

Have to get it lined up properly while the fish watches the process

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751112

And down it goes

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751114

And tilt the head back to help the descent

http://www.pbase.com/joseph_kennedy_36/image/167751115

Lots of good birds out there so go birding.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

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Date: 7/3/18 6:19 pm
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] The 2018 Tri-County Competition - June Report
Greetings All:

This year the competition will feature three competitors and their counties
(Brandon Best with Hill County, Anthony Hewetson with Floyd County, and
Rich Kostecke with Lee County).

Again, we will be weighting our county totals to eBird county totals which,
at the end of 2017, stood at 225 species in Floyd County, 230 species in
Hill County, and 251 species in Lee County. Species added to the counties
during 2018 will not become a part of this weighting.

A change introduced this year - to make things fairer in terms of people's
work schedules - is that we only get two visits (to last no longer than one
day) to our counties per month.

The counties are close to each other in size and varieties of habitat
available with Hill County having the advantage of most permanent water,
Lee County having the advantage of a more southerly location, and Floyd
County having the advantage of a potentially better blend of eastern and
western species.

The results at the end of May: Anthony had a fairly solid lead with 200
species (out of 225) or 88.8889%, Rich was in second place with 202 species
(out of 251) or 80.4781%, and Brandon was in third place with 183 species
(out of 230) or 79.5652%.

June was not particularly inspiring for any of us.

Rich kicked things off with a visit to Lee County on 6/1/18, adding three
species (Northern Bobwhite, Laughing Gull, Prothonotary Warbler), bringing
him up to 205 species (81.6733%).

Anthony headed on out to Floyd County on 6/2/18, adding a whopping one
species (Common Poorwill), bringing his tally up to 201 species (89.3333%)
and then again on 6/3/18, adding one more whopping species (Yellow-breasted
Chat), bring his tally up to 202 species (89.7778%) and finishing his month
off.

Brandon put in his first visit on 6/9/18, picking up three new species
(Mississippi Kite, Bell's Vireo, Northern Bobwhite), bringing his tally up
to 186 species (80.8696%).

Mr. Best headed back out on 6/16/18, snagging one more species for his list
(Black-crowned Night Heron, bringing his Hill County list up to 187 species
for 2018 (81.3043%).

Mr. Kostecke got in his second Lee County visit on 6/17/18, also picking up
one more species (White-tailed Kite), bringing his list up to 206 species
for 2018 (82.0717%).

To sum up: after all was said and done Anthony remained in first place with
202 species in Floyd County (89.7778%), Rich held on to second place with
206 species in Lee County (82.0717%%), and Brandon remained in third place
with 187 species in Hill County (81.3043%).

We are all hoping that things kick up a bit in July ... as June was simply
brutal!

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/3/18 3:55 pm
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Highlights from BBS north of Plains (Yoakum and Cochran Counties)
Greetings All:

Though I have lost the BBS route east of Plains to a combination of
encroaching dunes, over-aggressive and armed landowners, and lack of
maintenance to some county roads I still have the route (just barely - see
below) to the north.

On Saturday, 30 June 2018, I ran the route, experiencing some difficulty
with the latter half due to encroaching dunes from the west, with very
little in the way of highlights, due to omnipresent and severe drought.

The sole highlight from the Yoakum County portion of the route (stops 1-9)
was 1 Scaled Quail north of Plains.

The highlights from the Cochran County portion of the route (stops 10-50)
were 2 Scaled Quails south-southwest of Lehman, 2 Scaled Quails southwest
of Lehman, 1 Scaled Quail west of Lehman, and 1 male Bronzed Cowbird
southwest of Lehman.

The sole highlight on the way home: 2 Cave Swallows just west of Levelland
(Hockley County).

It was a rough day:)

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

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Date: 7/2/18 1:19 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Liberty County today
I added 6 species to my Liberty County total today to reach 104 species.
Than brings me to 44 counties at 100 or more. The six I added were
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Dickcissel, Great Crested Flycatcher,
Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Great-tailed Grackle, and Laughing Gull. I also had a
calling Acadian Flycatcher and a Prothonotary Warbler in Liberty Municipal
Park

Of interest is CR486 that runs north from Mont Belvieu parallel and east of
TX146, Great-tailed Grackle and Dickcissel where common here. It runs
thought fallow and active rice fields and maybe some turf/hay farms and
should be worth checking in migration for shore birds.

For what it's worth the Champion Lake Tract of Trinity River NWR is closed
at this time due to a culvert at the entrance that was damaged in Harvey
and has further collapsed. The refuge is waiting on the engineering of the
replacement that is taking an extended time.


--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

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Date: 7/2/18 8:55 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 7-2-18 Indigo Bunting @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
7-2-18 Indigo Bunting @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Comments: Warbler Pond & Indigo Bunting which sometimes nest at Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary, with picture
Submitted from eBird for iOS, version 1.7.0 Build 18

1 Red-shouldered Hawk
3 White-winged Dove
1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
3 Ruby-throated/Black-chinned Hummingbird
1 Ladder-backed Woodpecker
7 White-eyed Vireo
1 Carolina Chickadee
7 Black-crested Titmouse
2 Carolina Wren
1 Long-billed Thrasher
1 Black-and-white Warbler
2 Summer Tanager
12 Northern Cardinal
1 Indigo Bunting -- Picture—sometimes nests here
1 Painted Bunting
6 House Finch
6 Lesser Goldfinch
Number of Taxa: 17

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

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Date: 7/2/18 5:51 am
From: Bill <texaskingbird...>
Subject: [texbirds] Birding Liberty County
I am reading this tomorrow, so it is too late to answer. But I have saw
half of these species I have seen from this list at the Trinity River NWR.
Here are the ones on the list that  I have seen and where:
Cuckoo - TRNWR
Grackle- town of Cleveland
Stork - TRNWR
Spoonbill - TRNWR
Hummingbird - TRNWR
White-winged Dove - town of Cleveland
Inca Dove - near Liberty - CR2328
Great-crested Flycatcher - Liberty Municipal Park

Bill Wright
Houston


 

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Date: 7/2/18 5:49 am
From: Bill <texaskingbird...>
Subject: [texbirds] Birding Liberty County
I am reading this tomorrow, so it is too late to answer. But I have saw
half of these species I have seen from this list at the Trinity River NWR.
Here are the ones on the list that  I have seen and where:
Cuckoo - TRNWR
Grackle- town of Cleveland
Stork - TRNWR
Spoonbill - TRNWR
Hummingbird - TRNWR
White-winged Dove - town of Cleveland
Inca Dove - near Liberty - CR2328
Great-crested Flycatcher - Liberty Municipal Park

Bill Wright
Houston


 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 5:23 am
From: Mark Scheuerman <mark.scheuerman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
I think I heard that the McCall's ssp. of West and Southern Texas does not
have a red morph? But the comments from BNA Online may contradict that.
Birds Of North America Online writes about color morphs:
"Rufous and gray color-morphs vary nonclinally. Rangewide, 36% of birds are
rufous, but populations at mid-latitudes from Arkansas east toGeorgia and,
east of Appalachian Mountains, north to coastal New York, are 56–72%
rufous. Elsewhere, < 55% of birds are rufous (see Owen 1963a), and at the
western edge of range, < 15% are rufous. No rufous morph owls are known
from San Antonio, Texas, south to the Rio Grande valley, although 5–8% of
screech-owls in central Texas are rufous. Rufous birds supposedly reoccur
(percent unknown) southward in Mexico, in a form with different
vocalizations (Marshall 1967)."

Interesting thread,
Mark Scheuerman
Sugar Land TX

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 12:13 PM Gary Roberts <sgricr76...> wrote:

> Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass
> door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep
> it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived
> and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!
>
> In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten
> years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E.
> Screech Owls.
>
> Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?
>
> Never Before,
>
> S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
> Austin, Texas
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/18 2:43 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Northern Jacana Delta Lake Park in the RGV
A Northern Jacana was reported via the RGV Birding Group on Facebook with a
photo yesterday at the Delta Lake Park in the RGV. The bird was still
present as of 1 pm to day (Sunday July 1, 2018).

See https://www.facebook.com/groups/RGVbirding/permalink/2026370710708035/

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

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Date: 7/1/18 8:46 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Birding Liberty County
I need 2 more species to make 100 in Liberty County. Below is my top 15
targets by eBird for July. If you were to go birding tomorrow morning in
Liberty County, where would you go?

Yellow-billed Cuckoo
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
Great-tailed Grackle
Wood Stork
Summer Tanager
Roseate Spoonbill
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Eastern Kingbird
Indigo Bunting
White-winged Dove
Common Nighthawk
Swainson's Hawk
Inca Dove
Great Crested Flycatcher


--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/18 5:26 am
From: Robert Reeves <birder.reeves...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
Interesting discussion...my daughter has a breeding pair at her house in
north Austin. One is rufous (we presume the female due to behavior) and
the other gray. They've fledged two owlets each of the last two springs
from the roost box that we got from Cliff Shackleford.

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018, 6:52 PM Susan Heath <sheath...> wrote:

> Yes that’s true. They weren’t split until 1983 but the paper only
> considered screech-owls in the eastern U.S. so I’m not sure that’s relevant.
>
>
>
> Sue
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:
> <texbirds-bounce...>] *On Behalf Of *Keith Arnold
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 28, 2018 6:36 PM
> *To:* <sheath...>
> *Cc:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>
>
>
> Susan,
>
> Denis and I overlapped as grad students and I spent a lot of time with
> Denis and his family at the George Reserve.
>
> Denis’s study was an incredible task for the time. However, unless my
> memory is faulty, at that time, the Western and Eastern Screech-Owls has
> not yet been “split”.
>
>
>
> Keith Arnold
>
> Bryan/BRTC, TAMU
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> On Jun 28, 2018, at 5:44 PM, Susan Heath <sheath...> wrote:
>
> There is a paper by D.P. Owen from 1963 which investigates the color morph
> cline in Eastern Screech-Owls. The summary at the end states that the
> relative frequency of rufous birds varies geographically in the form of a
> cline from north to south; about a quarter or less or the northern
> population is rufous, while in the South (the Gulf coast and Florida
> excepted) up to three-quarters of the population may be rufous. I
> remembered this because my ancient ornithology textbook from college has a
> map of the U.S. with screech-owl morphs mapped out that shows that the
> rufous morph is more common at the center of the range and becomes less and
> less prevalent as you get farther from the center of the range. You can
> read the whole paper here:
>
>
>
>
> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/wilson/v075n02/p0183-p0190.pdf
>
>
>
> Sue
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> [
> mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3)
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 28, 2018 1:44 PM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>
>
>
> We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box
> for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw
> downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up.
> However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the
> only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.
>
>
>
> On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel
> free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word
> “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the
> term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more
> proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I
> thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds
> of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new
> word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!
>
>
>
>
>
> Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Gary Roberts
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>
>
>
> Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass
> door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep
> it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived
> and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!
>
>
>
> In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten
> years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E.
> Screech Owls.
>
>
>
> Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?
>
>
>
> Never Before,
>
>
>
> S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
>
> Austin, Texas
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/18 9:53 am
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] BBS Lance Rosier Big Thicket Unit (Hardin County)
I ran my BBS route just in the nick of time yesterday. This route bears the
name of the Lance Rosier Unit but doesn't actually enter the unit, its
starts at the entrance sign. I had 48 species in total. 290 vehicles passed
me (5.8 per stop) all but 2 stops are on TX770 and TX326.

It got hot fast, It broke 90 degrees by 8:30 am and finished at 95. The
heat, traffic, and development made for low numbers on the last 10 stops.

Nothing terribly surprising other than I has to write in 5 species,
White-winged Dove (inevitable no doubt), Eastern Wood-Pewee, Gray Catbird
(at 3 stops), Red-winged Blackbird, and Louisiana Waterthrush. My guess is
running it at this late date accounts for the numbers of write ins.

--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/18 5:05 pm
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 6-29-18 Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
6-29-18 Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
Fun birds at one blind today!

Warbler Woods
Jun 29, 2018
8:51 AM Stationary 160 Minutes
All birds reported? Yes

2 Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
1 Red-shouldered Hawk
2 Common Ground-Dove
3 White-winged Dove
1 Yellow-billed Cuckoo
1 Chuck-will's-widow
2 Ruby-throated/Black-chinned Hummingbird
1 Ladder-backed Woodpecker
1 Downy Woodpecker
8 White-eyed Vireo
1 Blue Jay
1 Carolina Chickadee
7 Black-crested Titmouse
4 Carolina Wren
1 Summer Tanager
13 Northern Cardinal
2 Painted Bunting
7 House Finch
6 Lesser Goldfinch
Number of Taxa: 19

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/18 9:02 am
From: Bob White <bobwhitebsacbc...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pahse vs, Morph
When a red morph EASO moved into the box I put out I was told that it was unusual, as most in this area are gray. Fifteen years later, all the females (I don’t know who was the same and who was new or a descendant) that nested in that box and its replacement have been red.

Merriam-Webster includes the following:

a : a local population of a species that consists of interbreeding organisms and is distinguishable from other populations by morphology or behavior though capable of interbreeding with them b : a phenotypic variant of a species

Sounds like my screech-owl.

Bob White
Jacksonville, TX

> On Jun 29, 2018, at 10:27 AM, Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...> wrote:
>
> Hi all –
>
> When it comes to hawks, Bill Clark’s favorite saying is “the Moon has phases, your kids go through phases, but raptors have MORPHS!” That one has stuck with me.
>
> I suppose that the only really expected “morph” we see here in Texas is the white immature Little Blue Heron morphing to the all-blue adult plumage.
>
>
> Clay Taylor
> TOS Life Member
> Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
> <Clay.taylor...>
> 401-965-9064
>
>
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3)
> Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 5:02 PM
> To: <texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>
> I was under the impression that in this instance “morph” comes from “morphology”, which is the form or structure of something. I believe the “morph” you are referring to is just a shorter way of saying metamorphose, which means to change form (the “change” part coming from “meta”).
>
> I have read that “phase” was used originally and then, as you said, it was changed (mostly because people incorrectly thought “phase” implied impermanence).
>
> This is all so interesting to me, so thank you all for responding!
>
> Kendra
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Joseph Kennedy
> Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 4:35 PM
> To: Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...>
> Cc: Texbirds <texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>
> Power rangers morph. Morph defines changing. As you morph from gray to red. Peterson spoke of phases that were permanent. But the fad of the month club decided that morph is best even though it is grammatically inaccurate. It was originally used for ants and wasps to describe workers, queens and drones who can be changed by diet. A dry wood termite colony that loses a queen can get a new queen by feeding a worker specially chewed food and it morphs into a queen.
>
> Or to be grammatically accurate a red screech owl would morph to gray as it gradually replace the red feathers with gray feathers. But the color is genetically permanent based on the genes of the parent and the genes do not change nor does the color change.
>
>
> On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:24 PM, Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...> wrote:
> Interesting! I did not know about the controversy, but I prefer the term "morph", too. A very nice woman in Flower Mound north of Dallas/Ft Worth (don't want to give her name just in case) had both a gray and red morph in her backyard that she let me see a few years ago. It's the only red morph that I have ever seen.
>
> On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:08 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> wrote:
> Red morph/phases of the Eastern Screech-Owl are certainly not common, but we have a number of specimens in our collections. Fred Gehlbach once thought that this morph [my preference - I don't like the term form] occurred only in females, but we have red male specimens as well.
>
> Keith Arnold
> Bryan/BRTC,,TAMU
>
> On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 1:45 PM Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <KlebWoods...> wrote:
> We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up. However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.
>
> On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!
>
>
> Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
> 281-357-5324
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
> Steve Radack Commissioner
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Gary Roberts
> Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
> To: <texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>
> Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!
>
> In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E. Screech Owls.
>
> Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?
>
> Never Before,
>
> S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
> Austin, Texas
>
>
>
> --
> Jennifer Miller
> Lubbock, TX
>
> {o,o}
> /)_)
> " "
>
> Blog - http://foundnature.weebly.com/index.html
>
>
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/18 8:54 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pahse vs, Morph
D’oh!!! I meant to say that the LBH “phases” from white to blue. Brain not engaged to typing hands….


Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
<Clay.taylor...><mailto:<Clay.taylor...>
401-965-9064



From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Clay Taylor
Sent: Friday, June 29, 2018 10:28 AM
To: <KlebWoods...>; <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pahse vs, Morph

Hi all –

When it comes to hawks, Bill Clark’s favorite saying is “the Moon has phases, your kids go through phases, but raptors have MORPHS!” That one has stuck with me.

I suppose that the only really expected “morph” we see here in Texas is the white immature Little Blue Heron morphing to the all-blue adult plumage.


Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
<Clay.taylor...><mailto:<Clay.taylor...>
401-965-9064



From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3)
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 5:02 PM
To: <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??

I was under the impression that in this instance “morph” comes from “morphology”, which is the form or structure of something. I believe the “morph” you are referring to is just a shorter way of saying metamorphose, which means to change form (the “change” part coming from “meta”).

I have read that “phase” was used originally and then, as you said, it was changed (mostly because people incorrectly thought “phase” implied impermanence).

This is all so interesting to me, so thank you all for responding!

Kendra

From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Joseph Kennedy
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 4:35 PM
To: Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...><mailto:<foundnatureblog...>>
Cc: Texbirds <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??

Power rangers morph. Morph defines changing. As you morph from gray to red. Peterson spoke of phases that were permanent. But the fad of the month club decided that morph is best even though it is grammatically inaccurate. It was originally used for ants and wasps to describe workers, queens and drones who can be changed by diet. A dry wood termite colony that loses a queen can get a new queen by feeding a worker specially chewed food and it morphs into a queen.

Or to be grammatically accurate a red screech owl would morph to gray as it gradually replace the red feathers with gray feathers. But the color is genetically permanent based on the genes of the parent and the genes do not change nor does the color change.


On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:24 PM, Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...><mailto:<foundnatureblog...>> wrote:
Interesting! I did not know about the controversy, but I prefer the term "morph", too. A very nice woman in Flower Mound north of Dallas/Ft Worth (don't want to give her name just in case) had both a gray and red morph in her backyard that she let me see a few years ago. It's the only red morph that I have ever seen.

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:08 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...><mailto:<kbarnold2...>> wrote:
Red morph/phases of the Eastern Screech-Owl are certainly not common, but we have a number of specimens in our collections. Fred Gehlbach once thought that this morph [my preference - I don't like the term form] occurred only in females, but we have red male specimens as well.

Keith Arnold
Bryan/BRTC,,TAMU

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 1:45 PM Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <KlebWoods...><mailto:<KlebWoods...>> wrote:
We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up. However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.

On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!


Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
Kleb Woods Nature Center
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>



From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Gary Roberts
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
To: <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??

Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!

In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E. Screech Owls.

Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?

Never Before,

S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
Austin, Texas


--
Jennifer Miller
Lubbock, TX

{o,o}
/)_)
" "

Blog - http://foundnature.weebly.com/index.html



--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...><mailto:<Josephkennedy36...>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/18 8:29 am
From: Clay Taylor <Clay.Taylor...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Pahse vs, Morph
Hi all –

When it comes to hawks, Bill Clark’s favorite saying is “the Moon has phases, your kids go through phases, but raptors have MORPHS!” That one has stuck with me.

I suppose that the only really expected “morph” we see here in Texas is the white immature Little Blue Heron morphing to the all-blue adult plumage.


Clay Taylor
TOS Life Member
Calallen (Corpus Christi) TX
<Clay.taylor...><mailto:<Clay.taylor...>
401-965-9064



From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3)
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 5:02 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??

I was under the impression that in this instance “morph” comes from “morphology”, which is the form or structure of something. I believe the “morph” you are referring to is just a shorter way of saying metamorphose, which means to change form (the “change” part coming from “meta”).

I have read that “phase” was used originally and then, as you said, it was changed (mostly because people incorrectly thought “phase” implied impermanence).

This is all so interesting to me, so thank you all for responding!

Kendra

From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Joseph Kennedy
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 4:35 PM
To: Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...><mailto:<foundnatureblog...>>
Cc: Texbirds <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??

Power rangers morph. Morph defines changing. As you morph from gray to red. Peterson spoke of phases that were permanent. But the fad of the month club decided that morph is best even though it is grammatically inaccurate. It was originally used for ants and wasps to describe workers, queens and drones who can be changed by diet. A dry wood termite colony that loses a queen can get a new queen by feeding a worker specially chewed food and it morphs into a queen.

Or to be grammatically accurate a red screech owl would morph to gray as it gradually replace the red feathers with gray feathers. But the color is genetically permanent based on the genes of the parent and the genes do not change nor does the color change.


On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:24 PM, Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...><mailto:<foundnatureblog...>> wrote:
Interesting! I did not know about the controversy, but I prefer the term "morph", too. A very nice woman in Flower Mound north of Dallas/Ft Worth (don't want to give her name just in case) had both a gray and red morph in her backyard that she let me see a few years ago. It's the only red morph that I have ever seen.

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:08 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...><mailto:<kbarnold2...>> wrote:
Red morph/phases of the Eastern Screech-Owl are certainly not common, but we have a number of specimens in our collections. Fred Gehlbach once thought that this morph [my preference - I don't like the term form] occurred only in females, but we have red male specimens as well.

Keith Arnold
Bryan/BRTC,,TAMU

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 1:45 PM Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <KlebWoods...><mailto:<KlebWoods...>> wrote:
We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up. However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.

On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!


Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
Kleb Woods Nature Center
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>



From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Gary Roberts
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
To: <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??

Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!

In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E. Screech Owls.

Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?

Never Before,

S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
Austin, Texas


--
Jennifer Miller
Lubbock, TX

{o,o}
/)_)
" "

Blog - http://foundnature.weebly.com/index.html



--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...><mailto:<Josephkennedy36...>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 4:52 pm
From: Susan Heath <sheath...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
Yes that’s true. They weren’t split until 1983 but the paper only considered screech-owls in the eastern U.S. so I’m not sure that’s relevant.



Sue



From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Keith Arnold
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 6:36 PM
To: <sheath...>
Cc: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??



Susan,

Denis and I overlapped as grad students and I spent a lot of time with Denis and his family at the George Reserve.

Denis’s study was an incredible task for the time. However, unless my memory is faulty, at that time, the Western and Eastern Screech-Owls has not yet been “split”.



Keith Arnold

Bryan/BRTC, TAMU

Sent from my iPhone


On Jun 28, 2018, at 5:44 PM, Susan Heath <sheath...> wrote:

There is a paper by D.P. Owen from 1963 which investigates the color morph cline in Eastern Screech-Owls. The summary at the end states that the relative frequency of rufous birds varies geographically in the form of a cline from north to south; about a quarter or less or the northern population is rufous, while in the South (the Gulf coast and Florida excepted) up to three-quarters of the population may be rufous. I remembered this because my ancient ornithology textbook from college has a map of the U.S. with screech-owl morphs mapped out that shows that the rufous morph is more common at the center of the range and becomes less and less prevalent as you get farther from the center of the range. You can read the whole paper here:



<https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/wilson/v075n02/p0183-p0190.pdf> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/wilson/v075n02/p0183-p0190.pdf



Sue



From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3)
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 1:44 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??



We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up. However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.



On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!





Kendra Kocab, Naturalist

Kleb Woods Nature Center

281-357-5324



Harris County Precinct 3

Steve Radack Commissioner

<http://www.pct3.com/> www.pct3.com







From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Gary Roberts
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??



Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!



In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E. Screech Owls.



Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?



Never Before,



S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts

Austin, Texas


 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 4:37 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
Susan,
Denis and I overlapped as grad students and I spent a lot of time with Denis and his family at the George Reserve.
Denis’s study was an incredible task for the time. However, unless my memory is faulty, at that time, the Western and Eastern Screech-Owls has not yet been “split”.

Keith Arnold
Bryan/BRTC, TAMU

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 28, 2018, at 5:44 PM, Susan Heath <sheath...> wrote:
>
> There is a paper by D.P. Owen from 1963 which investigates the color morph cline in Eastern Screech-Owls. The summary at the end states that the relative frequency of rufous birds varies geographically in the form of a cline from north to south; about a quarter or less or the northern population is rufous, while in the South (the Gulf coast and Florida excepted) up to three-quarters of the population may be rufous. I remembered this because my ancient ornithology textbook from college has a map of the U.S. with screech-owl morphs mapped out that shows that the rufous morph is more common at the center of the range and becomes less and less prevalent as you get farther from the center of the range. You can read the whole paper here:
>
> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/wilson/v075n02/p0183-p0190.pdf
>
> Sue
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3)
> Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 1:44 PM
> To: <texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>
> We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up. However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.
>
> On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!
>
>
> Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
> 281-357-5324
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
> Steve Radack Commissioner
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
> From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Gary Roberts
> Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
> To: <texbirds...>
> Subject: [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>
> Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!
>
> In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E. Screech Owls.
>
> Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?
>
> Never Before,
>
> S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
> Austin, Texas

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 3:45 pm
From: Susan Heath <sheath...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
There is a paper by D.P. Owen from 1963 which investigates the color morph cline in Eastern Screech-Owls. The summary at the end states that the relative frequency of rufous birds varies geographically in the form of a cline from north to south; about a quarter or less or the northern population is rufous, while in the South (the Gulf coast and Florida excepted) up to three-quarters of the population may be rufous. I remembered this because my ancient ornithology textbook from college has a map of the U.S. with screech-owl morphs mapped out that shows that the rufous morph is more common at the center of the range and becomes less and less prevalent as you get farther from the center of the range. You can read the whole paper here:



<https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/wilson/v075n02/p0183-p0190.pdf> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/wilson/v075n02/p0183-p0190.pdf



Sue



From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3)
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 1:44 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??



We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up. However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.



On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!





Kendra Kocab, Naturalist

Kleb Woods Nature Center

281-357-5324



Harris County Precinct 3

Steve Radack Commissioner

<http://www.pct3.com/> www.pct3.com







From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Gary Roberts
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??



Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!



In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E. Screech Owls.



Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?



Never Before,



S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts

Austin, Texas


 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 3:02 pm
From: Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <KlebWoods...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
I was under the impression that in this instance “morph” comes from “morphology”, which is the form or structure of something. I believe the “morph” you are referring to is just a shorter way of saying metamorphose, which means to change form (the “change” part coming from “meta”).

I have read that “phase” was used originally and then, as you said, it was changed (mostly because people incorrectly thought “phase” implied impermanence).

This is all so interesting to me, so thank you all for responding!

Kendra

From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Joseph Kennedy
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 4:35 PM
To: Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...>
Cc: Texbirds <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??

Power rangers morph. Morph defines changing. As you morph from gray to red. Peterson spoke of phases that were permanent. But the fad of the month club decided that morph is best even though it is grammatically inaccurate. It was originally used for ants and wasps to describe workers, queens and drones who can be changed by diet. A dry wood termite colony that loses a queen can get a new queen by feeding a worker specially chewed food and it morphs into a queen.

Or to be grammatically accurate a red screech owl would morph to gray as it gradually replace the red feathers with gray feathers. But the color is genetically permanent based on the genes of the parent and the genes do not change nor does the color change.


On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:24 PM, Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...><mailto:<foundnatureblog...>> wrote:
Interesting! I did not know about the controversy, but I prefer the term "morph", too. A very nice woman in Flower Mound north of Dallas/Ft Worth (don't want to give her name just in case) had both a gray and red morph in her backyard that she let me see a few years ago. It's the only red morph that I have ever seen.

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:08 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...><mailto:<kbarnold2...>> wrote:
Red morph/phases of the Eastern Screech-Owl are certainly not common, but we have a number of specimens in our collections. Fred Gehlbach once thought that this morph [my preference - I don't like the term form] occurred only in females, but we have red male specimens as well.

Keith Arnold
Bryan/BRTC,,TAMU

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 1:45 PM Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <KlebWoods...><mailto:<KlebWoods...>> wrote:
We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up. However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.

On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!


Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
Kleb Woods Nature Center
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>



From: <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...><mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>> On Behalf Of Gary Roberts
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
To: <texbirds...><mailto:<texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??

Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!

In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E. Screech Owls.

Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?

Never Before,

S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
Austin, Texas



--
Jennifer Miller
Lubbock, TX

{o,o}
/)_)
" "

Blog - http://foundnature.weebly.com/index.html



--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...><mailto:<Josephkennedy36...>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 2:35 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
Power rangers morph. Morph defines changing. As you morph from gray to red.
Peterson spoke of phases that were permanent. But the fad of the month club
decided that morph is best even though it is grammatically inaccurate. It
was originally used for ants and wasps to describe workers, queens and
drones who can be changed by diet. A dry wood termite colony that loses a
queen can get a new queen by feeding a worker specially chewed food and it
morphs into a queen.

Or to be grammatically accurate a red screech owl would morph to gray as it
gradually replace the red feathers with gray feathers. But the color is
genetically permanent based on the genes of the parent and the genes do not
change nor does the color change.


On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:24 PM, Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...>
wrote:

> Interesting! I did not know about the controversy, but I prefer the term
> "morph", too. A very nice woman in Flower Mound north of Dallas/Ft Worth
> (don't want to give her name just in case) had both a gray and red morph in
> her backyard that she let me see a few years ago. It's the only red morph
> that I have ever seen.
>
> On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:08 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> wrote:
>
>> Red morph/phases of the Eastern Screech-Owl are certainly not common, but
>> we have a number of specimens in our collections. Fred Gehlbach once
>> thought that this morph [my preference - I don't like the term form]
>> occurred only in females, but we have red male specimens as well.
>>
>> Keith Arnold
>> Bryan/BRTC,,TAMU
>>
>> On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 1:45 PM Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
>> <KlebWoods...> wrote:
>>
>>> We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest
>>> box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We
>>> saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up.
>>> However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the
>>> only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel
>>> free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word
>>> “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the
>>> term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more
>>> proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I
>>> thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds
>>> of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new
>>> word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
>>>
>>> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>>>
>>> 281-357-5324
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Harris County Precinct 3
>>>
>>> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>>>
>>> www.pct3.com
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
>>> Behalf Of *Gary Roberts
>>> *Sent:* Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
>>> *To:* <texbirds...>
>>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass
>>> door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep
>>> it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived
>>> and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten
>>> years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E.
>>> Screech Owls.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Never Before,
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
>>>
>>> Austin, Texas
>>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Jennifer Miller
> Lubbock, TX
>
> {o,o}
> /)_)
> " "
>
> Blog - http://foundnature.weebly.com/index.html
>



--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 2:34 pm
From: Kim Pierce <kmpier89...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl?? - phase vs. morph
For about 8 years we had a pair nesting on our property in Fairview TX near McKinney. He was a grey and she was a red morph. One year she came back to nest and he didn't. She hung around until she got hit by a car on our road. We had another reddish/brownish morph female but she apparently didn't have a mate and moved on.

Kim Pierce
Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 28, 2018, at 2:47 PM, <mitch...> wrote:
>
>
> Hi all,
>
> Different folks have different takes on it, but the one I liked
> best was that a phase is or can be temporary, a morph is permanent.
> Is it a color phase it is going through? Or is it a permanent
> condition? Phase was (is?) for a long time the more often used
> way of describing these things. It seems less correct though.
> It is not a temporal thing. So they should be considered morphs.
>
> My 2 centavos, YMMV.
>
> Mitch Heindel
> Utopia
>
>> On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so
>> feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used
>> the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I
>> know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into
>> it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be
>> more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on
>> this?
>> Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
>
>> [1] http://www.pct3.com/
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>
> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission from the List Owner
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 12:48 pm
From: <mitch...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl?? - phase vs. morph

Hi all,

Different folks have different takes on it, but the one I liked
best was that a phase is or can be temporary, a morph is permanent.
Is it a color phase it is going through? Or is it a permanent
condition? Phase was (is?) for a long time the more often used
way of describing these things. It seems less correct though.
It is not a temporal thing. So they should be considered morphs.

My 2 centavos, YMMV.

Mitch Heindel
Utopia

> On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so
> feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used
> the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I
> know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into
> it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be
> more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on
> this?
>
> Kendra Kocab, Naturalist

> [1] http://www.pct3.com/
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 12:25 pm
From: Jennifer Miller <foundnatureblog...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
Interesting! I did not know about the controversy, but I prefer the term
"morph", too. A very nice woman in Flower Mound north of Dallas/Ft Worth
(don't want to give her name just in case) had both a gray and red morph in
her backyard that she let me see a few years ago. It's the only red morph
that I have ever seen.

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 2:08 PM, Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...> wrote:

> Red morph/phases of the Eastern Screech-Owl are certainly not common, but
> we have a number of specimens in our collections. Fred Gehlbach once
> thought that this morph [my preference - I don't like the term form]
> occurred only in females, but we have red male specimens as well.
>
> Keith Arnold
> Bryan/BRTC,,TAMU
>
> On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 1:45 PM Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
> <KlebWoods...> wrote:
>
>> We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest
>> box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We
>> saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up.
>> However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the
>> only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.
>>
>>
>>
>> On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel
>> free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word
>> “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the
>> term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more
>> proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I
>> thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds
>> of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new
>> word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
>>
>> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>>
>> 281-357-5324
>>
>>
>>
>> Harris County Precinct 3
>>
>> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>>
>> www.pct3.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
>> Behalf Of *Gary Roberts
>> *Sent:* Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
>> *To:* <texbirds...>
>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>>
>>
>>
>> Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass
>> door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep
>> it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived
>> and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!
>>
>>
>>
>> In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten
>> years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E.
>> Screech Owls.
>>
>>
>>
>> Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?
>>
>>
>>
>> Never Before,
>>
>>
>>
>> S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
>>
>> Austin, Texas
>>
>


--
Jennifer Miller
Lubbock, TX

{o,o}
/)_)
" "

Blog - http://foundnature.weebly.com/index.html

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 12:21 pm
From: Joe Dorn <jbdvex...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Fwd: great-tailed grackles
There is a very large colony in and around the Scott and White campus in Temple… 60 miles north of Austin, 100 miles from Bryan/CS…



Jbd/vex

(254) 939-5918



From: <texbirds-bounce...> [mailto:<texbirds-bounce...>] On Behalf Of Keith Arnold
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 10:47
To: <gnbaker92...>
Cc: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Fwd: great-tailed grackles



It’s a little early; family units are just now beginning to merge, but these small roosts should grow in size through your July.



Keith Armold

TAMU/ Bryan

Sent from my iPhone


On Jun 27, 2018, at 11:45 PM, Noreen Baker <gnbaker92...> <mailto:<gnbaker92...> > wrote:

Dear Texbirders,



I received the email below asking for information on any current large roosting areas for Great-tailed Grackles in the Austin area. I don't currently know of any, but if you do, please reply to me off list and I will forward the info on to Dr. Yorzinski.



Thank you in advance for your help,

Noreen Baker

Austin, TX

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jessica Yorzinski <jyorzinski...> <mailto:<jyorzinski...> >
Date: Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 12:20 PM
Subject: great-tailed grackles - large roost locations in Austin area?
To: <gnbaker92...> <mailto:<gnbaker92...>


Hi Noreen,

I was given your email from the Travis Audubon Society. I was wondering whether you happen to know any locations where great-tailed grackles are currently roosting in large numbers in the Austin area at night?

Thanks!
Jessica

--
Jessica Yorzinski, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences
208 Wildlife, Fisheries and Ecological Sciences Building
Texas A&M University
534 John Kimbrough Blvd
College Station, TX 77843-2258
Phone: 979-845-3692
Fax: 979-845-3786
Email: <jyorzinski...> <mailto:<jyorzinski...>
Website: http://people.tamu.edu/~jyorzinski




 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 12:09 pm
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
Red morph/phases of the Eastern Screech-Owl are certainly not common, but
we have a number of specimens in our collections. Fred Gehlbach once
thought that this morph [my preference - I don't like the term form]
occurred only in females, but we have red male specimens as well.

Keith Arnold
Bryan/BRTC,,TAMU

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 1:45 PM Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<KlebWoods...> wrote:

> We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box
> for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw
> downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up.
> However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the
> only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.
>
>
>
> On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel
> free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word
> “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the
> term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more
> proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I
> thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds
> of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new
> word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!
>
>
>
>
>
> Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Gary Roberts
> *Sent:* Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
>
>
>
> Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass
> door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep
> it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived
> and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!
>
>
>
> In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten
> years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E.
> Screech Owls.
>
>
>
> Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?
>
>
>
> Never Before,
>
>
>
> S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
>
> Austin, Texas
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 11:45 am
From: Kleb Woods (Commissioner Pct. 3) <KlebWoods...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
We have a rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl that has used the same nest box for the last 3+ years at Kleb Woods Nature Center in Harris County. We saw downy chicks two years but couldn’t tell what color they would end up. However, that doesn’t really speak to how common they are, as that is the only rufous morph Eastern Screech-Owl I have seen.

On a side note (and this is definitely going down a rabbit hole, so feel free to ignore if it doesn’t interest you), I have always used the word “morph” when describing these color variations, but I know many use the term “phase” or “form”. I tried looking into it to see if one was more proper or preferred, but it appears to be more controversial than I thought! Does anybody here have thoughts on this? I always find these kinds of discussions enlightening. Also, while looking into this, I learned a new word: orismology. That is definitely going to be part of my vocabulary now!


Kendra Kocab, Naturalist
Kleb Woods Nature Center
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>



From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Gary Roberts
Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2018 12:13 PM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??

Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!

In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E. Screech Owls.

Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?

Never Before,

S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
Austin, Texas
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 10:40 am
From: Jim Sinclair <jim.sinclair...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
I don't know how rare they are, but I have seen them on the Norias division
of the King Ranch.

On Thu, Jun 28, 2018 at 12:12 PM, Gary Roberts <sgricr76...> wrote:

> Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass
> door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep
> it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived
> and flew away. It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!
>
> In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten
> years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E.
> Screech Owls.
>
> Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?
>
> Never Before,
>
> S. Gary & "Gene" Roberts
> Austin, Texas
>



--
Jim Sinclair (TX-ESA)
TOS Life Member
Kingsville, TX

"The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of
thinking we were at when we created them." - Albert Einstein

 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 10:15 am
From: Gary Roberts <sgricr76...>
Subject: [texbirds] Red Phase E. Screech Owl??
Last night, while watching TV, a large bird flew into the patio glass door. It fell to the patio and I went to see if I could revive it--or keep it for a specimen for someone's lab. When I tried to pick it up, it revived and flew away.  It was a Red Phase Eastern Screech Owl!
In all the years of birding, leading tours at Bentsen Rio Grande for ten years and living here in Texas, I had never seen anything but Grey Phase E. Screech Owls. 
Is this a rare sighting only for me, or are they common?
Never Before,
S. Gary & "Gene" RobertsAustin, Texas
 

Back to top
Date: 6/28/18 8:47 am
From: Keith Arnold <kbarnold2...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Fwd: great-tailed grackles
It’s a little early; family units are just now beginning to merge, but these small roosts should grow in size through your July.

Keith Armold
TAMU/ Bryan

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 27, 2018, at 11:45 PM, Noreen Baker <gnbaker92...> wrote:
>
> Dear Texbirders,
>
> I received the email below asking for information on any current large roosting areas for Great-tailed Grackles in the Austin area. I don't currently know of any, but if you do, please reply to me off list and I will forward the info on to Dr. Yorzinski.
>
> Thank you in advance for your help,
> Noreen Baker
> Austin, TX
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Jessica Yorzinski <jyorzinski...>
> Date: Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 12:20 PM
> Subject: great-tailed grackles - large roost locations in Austin area?
> To: <gnbaker92...>
>
>
> Hi Noreen,
>
> I was given your email from the Travis Audubon Society. I was wondering whether you happen to know any locations where great-tailed grackles are currently roosting in large numbers in the Austin area at night?
>
> Thanks!
> Jessica
>
> --
> Jessica Yorzinski, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor
> Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences
> 208 Wildlife, Fisheries and Ecological Sciences Building
> Texas A&M University
> 534 John Kimbrough Blvd
> College Station, TX 77843-2258
> Phone: 979-845-3692
> Fax: 979-845-3786
> Email: <jyorzinski...>
> Website: http://people.tamu.edu/~jyorzinski
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/18 9:46 pm
From: Noreen Baker <gnbaker92...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fwd: great-tailed grackles
Dear Texbirders,

I received the email below asking for information on any current large
roosting areas for Great-tailed Grackles in the Austin area. I don't
currently know of any, but if you do, please reply to me off list and I
will forward the info on to Dr. Yorzinski.

Thank you in advance for your help,
Noreen Baker
Austin, TX
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jessica Yorzinski <jyorzinski...>
Date: Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 12:20 PM
Subject: great-tailed grackles - large roost locations in Austin area?
To: <gnbaker92...>


Hi Noreen,

I was given your email from the Travis Audubon Society. I was wondering
whether you happen to know any locations where great-tailed grackles are
currently roosting in large numbers in the Austin area at night?

Thanks!
Jessica

--
Jessica Yorzinski, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences
208 Wildlife, Fisheries and Ecological Sciences Building
Texas A&M University
534 John Kimbrough Blvd
College Station, TX 77843-2258
Phone: 979-845-3692
Fax: 979-845-3786
Email: <jyorzinski...>
Website: http://people.tamu.edu/~jyorzinski

 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/18 7:08 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] East beach to Anahuac yesterday, arriving migrants and baby birds
Started the day at sunrise at Galveston's east beach. Horned larks were up
singing about having another brood. A locally banded snowy plover was out
by the jetty with a fully feathered chick from this year. A couple of
feathered Wilson's plover chicks further down the ship channel.

Tides during the previous week had been high and combined with the heavy
rain over many days ended the nesting of the small number of least terns
nesting. One fledged least tern flew by.

Two crested caracara chicks were out with the Wilson's plovers but it would
be more accurate to say that the plovers were harassing the caracaras.

Two pairs of Caspian terns had brought their chicks down behind the
barricade.

The summering semipalmated plover flock totaled 26 birds and there were a
few sanderling.

One good way of censusing willets in an area is to have a caracara fly
over. This showed that most of the east beach, bob road and yacht basin
road eastern willets were not on territory. I did not find large numbers
assembled but did not go out the bolivar jetty. They will leave soon and
last year most were gone by July 15th and almost all by the following week.

The annual coconut migration has started. The first sightings were likely
from Mexico as the nuts only had a few small barnacles. Later migrants will
be heavily encrusted with large barnacles.

The Frenchtown road pond and the tidal ponds by Fort Travis were full. Most
areas that depend on rain were still dry but some were damp and held no
shorebirds.

The drive out Retillon Road was very interesting for its singing birds.
They included 1 gray catbird, 2 black rails, at least 3 horned larks and 2
gull-billed terns. Not the usual mix of species at any season.

Drove the beaches east and west from Retillon and only had a couple of
summering western willets and 4 sanderling. A tent was located where the
terns like to gather.

One black tern made was the first in a couple of weeks. Migrants will be
arriving soon and many fly/feed in the daytime. Most continue offshore to
feed in large flocks but some return to the coast to roost at night. There
will be a steady stream of birds going by Anahuac and along 1985.

Baby tern chicks were on the beach in numbers. Most were sandwich terns
with a relatively small number of royal terns. Usually, royal chicks are
first as the royals leave the beaches for the nesting islands a good bit
before the sandwich terns. Some local least tern chicks have fledged and
are feeding themselves but still take food.

Watched one chick getting fed. However it did not want to be fed. Parent
one came in with a fish and the chick moved off about 10 yards. Parent
followed and the chick ran further. Other parent arrived with a fish and
the chick ran from both. I left with the 3 birds about 10 yards apart and
the parents still holding their fish.

The high tides had taken out a good deal of the tern barricade and it was
being replaced. Quite a few nests of least terns had been outside the
barrier. Most of the piles of hyacinth roots from Harvey were finally sent
elsewhere except for one small area where some had been moved to.

Good mix of shorebirds. 2 red knots and 2 short-billed dowitchers. Western
sandpipers. Heard the white-rump when a caracara caused a panic. Had a
total of 65 semipalmated plovers but that probably included the east beach
birds that fly across when the beach goers arrive on Galveston.

Only arriving shorebirds were a dozen marbled godwits with their orange
bills and still suffering from nesting territoriality. Also a few western
willets.

Not much seen going east to high island. The largest number of birds for
the day was at 1985 and Pear Orchard Road where the crawfish farm was in
the final stages of draining. Maybe a thousand herons and ibis and a couple
of thousand laughing gulls. A good part was dry but the area just back of
the 1985 levee still had water with most at the southeast corner where it
is hard to stop and limited visibility due to vegetation. How did the
laughing gulls know to come here instead of the bay/beaches for food.

Anahuac was very hot and still dryish although water levels in shoveler
pond were up a some. Rookery going great. Gadwall getting rattier but will
molt soon into its eclipse plumage. All the landbirds were keeping out of
the sun as were most of the waterbirds. Lotus is blooming good but filling
in much of the open water areas.

One really needs to check areas like Anahuac or Tyrell marsh as a masked
duck just flew over them over the weekend to arrive in Louisiana yesterday.
Water level changes in Louisiana could also move the limpkins here to any
areas that have apple snails.

--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/18 6:33 am
From: Anthony Hewetson <fattonybirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Highlights from Circle (Lamb County) BBS on Sunday
Greetings All:

On Sunday, I finished off the Circle BBS in Lamb County. With ongoing
drought, heat, and wind there was not much in the way of highlights but ...

On the way out I noted a Common Poorwill along FM 1072 just north of
Fieldton. This is fairly close to a quarrying operation - which may be
just enough of the right habitat.

Along the route itself I had 1 Ring-necked Pheasant in Earth, 1 Ring-necked
Pheasant southeast of Springlake, 7 Cattle Egrets northwest of Earth, 2
Say's Phoebes northwest of Earth, 2 Say's Phoebes west-northwest of Earth,
and 1 female and 1 male Bronzed Cowbird southwest of Springlake.

On the way back through Lamb County I noted 2 Inca Doves in Littlefield, 2
Yellow-billed Cuckoos at Lamb County Sandhills Historical Marker (LCSHM), 4
Cattle Egrets at LCSHM, 2 Cattle Egrets in Littlefield, 1 Cattle Egret in
Springlake, and 1 Bell's Vireo at LCSHM.

Anthony Hewetson; Lubbock

 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/18 7:12 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Southbound shorebirds
Willie,

I would posit that your Long-billed Dowitcher likely never left for the
summer as opposed to it being an unprecedentedly early S-bound migrant. The
thing about LBDO is that they undergo a prebasic molt at a molt-migration
stopover site well north of Texas in the fall before arriving here, so when
they do reach Texas they are in full basic plumage. They are usually one of
the latest arriving species in the fall. I'm probably preaching to the
choir here but others may not know this about the species.

On a side note, Lesser Yellowlegs have arrived in the South Plains this
week.

Good (shore)birding!
Justin Bosler
currently in Lubbock, TX

On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 5:59 PM, Willie Sekula <williebird22...>
wrote:

> Justin et al,
> I had a breeding plumaged Long-billed Dowitcher at the Calallen Sod Farm
> this past Sunday [June 29th].
>
> Willie Sekula
> Falls City
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jun 23, 2018, at 5:33 PM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> wrote:
> >
> > Texbirds,
> >
> > By early June, we had Long-billed Curlews returning to the coast, then
> earlier this week, the first adult Western Willets were noted at various
> locations across Central Texas, and now we have Greater Yellowlegs in the
> South Plains. Yesterday, I noted 3 at a playa near Southland in Garza
> County. I am now more convinced that the 3 I had in Pecos County last week
> were, indeed, S-bound migrants as opposed to summering. Before long, Least
> Sandpipers will be back.
> >
> > Good birding!
> > Justin Bosler
> > currently in the air between Dallas and Austin
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/18 4:54 pm
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Southbound shorebirds
Looked at shorebirds today for migrants. East beach Galveston had none as
the snowy plovers wore local breeding bird bands and no piping plover
anywhere. But soon.

Over on Bolivar flats, had a dozen returning marbled godwits with orange
bills. One already dropping feathers. Several western willets joining the
summering non-breeding plumaged birds. Found no other migrants.

The cool godwit was a 2014 locally banded bird (November 2014) that used to
have a radio but has apparently shed it. I had it on June 30, 2016 and
subsequent weeks but missed it since then. The Audubon people had it last
winter. So it arrived right on time. With my trips about a week apart it is
effectively the same arrival time. It did not have an orange bill in 2016
so may not have bred that year.

Did have 26 semipalmated plovers on east beach but that number has been
summering and roosting. Had about 65 on bolivar flats but half that number
have been summering and if beach people got out on Galveston, the birds
there fly across to Bolivar.

2 gray knots, 2 short-billed dowitchers and other non-breeding shorebirds
made a good list. Lots of baby terns of many local species


On Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 5:59 PM, Willie Sekula <williebird22...>
wrote:

> Justin et al,
> I had a breeding plumaged Long-billed Dowitcher at the Calallen Sod Farm
> this past Sunday [June 29th].
>
> Willie Sekula
> Falls City
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jun 23, 2018, at 5:33 PM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> wrote:
> >
> > Texbirds,
> >
> > By early June, we had Long-billed Curlews returning to the coast, then
> earlier this week, the first adult Western Willets were noted at various
> locations across Central Texas, and now we have Greater Yellowlegs in the
> South Plains. Yesterday, I noted 3 at a playa near Southland in Garza
> County. I am now more convinced that the 3 I had in Pecos County last week
> were, indeed, S-bound migrants as opposed to summering. Before long, Least
> Sandpipers will be back.
> >
> > Good birding!
> > Justin Bosler
> > currently in the air between Dallas and Austin
> Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
> http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds
>
> Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking
> permission
> from the List Owner
>
>
>


--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/18 3:59 pm
From: Willie Sekula <williebird22...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Southbound shorebirds
Justin et al,
I had a breeding plumaged Long-billed Dowitcher at the Calallen Sod Farm this past Sunday [June 29th].

Willie Sekula
Falls City


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 23, 2018, at 5:33 PM, Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...> wrote:
>
> Texbirds,
>
> By early June, we had Long-billed Curlews returning to the coast, then earlier this week, the first adult Western Willets were noted at various locations across Central Texas, and now we have Greater Yellowlegs in the South Plains. Yesterday, I noted 3 at a playa near Southland in Garza County. I am now more convinced that the 3 I had in Pecos County last week were, indeed, S-bound migrants as opposed to summering. Before long, Least Sandpipers will be back.
>
> Good birding!
> Justin Bosler
> currently in the air between Dallas and Austin
Edit your Freelists account settings for TEXBIRDS at
http://www.freelists.org/list/texbirds

Reposting of traffic from TEXBIRDS is prohibited without seeking permission
from the List Owner


 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/18 8:50 am
From: Claire Curry <larksparrow...>
Subject: [texbirds] Fly by moonlight! A citizen science crowdfunding campaign ending June 29 at 2:40pm CDT
This post has been approved by the listowner/admin.

*Fly by moonlight, ending June 29.**
**Presenting LunAero: An automated lunar bird tracker*

The University of Oklahoma's Biologging group needs your help. Wes and
Eli have designed an automated instrument to track the moon with a
spotting scope that counts migratory birds passing in front of the
moon.  Please visit our website
<https://thousandsstrong.ou.edu/project/10280>
(https://thousandsstrong.ou.edu/project/10280) to read more and see our
videos about how this technology works.

Help by sharing us with your friends, family, and colleagues on Facebook
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Back to top
Date: 6/25/18 12:40 pm
From: David Sarkozi <david...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
It is completely feasible to build a portal using the eBird API to generate
a user's ABA countable number. I have suggested it to Jeff Gordon at the
ABA (and some others). A big part of the ABA's relevancy is they are the
keepers of the list, but because they are out of sink with eBird they are
loosing that relevancy because increasingly folks only look at the eBird
totals because I feel no one who has not set up an ABA listing central
account can not see the totals. eBird looses data because users don't want
to pollute their list, and ABA looses because well no one cares what's in
Listing Central anymore.

It would be a little tedious to set up the rules for everyone because you
would have to look at things like did this birder see Egyptian Goose after
Nov 2014 in Flordia? Did this birder record Greater Prairie-Chicken in
Colorado County after Nov 2014 so it can be counted in Texas? Once the
rules are set up it would be simple to see the totals though

I see a portal where one enters your eBird credentials and once that's done
anyone who cares can go see your ABA total for Texas, ABA, area, Central
America, etc.

I've been tempted to do it myself, but its beyond my atrophied coding
ability. Any coders out there want to give it a go? Would be a good TOS
project for TOS members perhaps?

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 12:21 PM, Arman Moreno <armanmoreno...>
wrote:

> On the other end of the spectrum, I would be happy to include exotics on
> my checklists if they didn't count towards my life/state list totals on
> eBird. I wind up leaving them off because I personally don't like to
> inflate my totals with uncountable (by ABA standards) species. I certainly
> see the merit in submitting a checklist that includes these species so
> researches can track the spread of the population. Perhaps there is already
> a way to track them without counting that I'm not aware of but if not,
> seems like an easy fix to gain such data from users with similar
> preferences. Just my two cents.
>
> Arman Moreno
> Austin, TX
>
> On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 12:00 PM, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
> <FCollins...> wrote:
>
>> Steve et al,
>>
>>
>>
>> I agree with you about all these escapees. Except domesticated birds of
>> which there are very few. That’s when eBird has brought up the special
>> designation Domesticated.
>>
>>
>>
>> As for the escapee Budgie, Eric mentioned none had been validated. I
>> think that is because of the listing issue. Most reviewers don’t like an
>> obvious domestic bird on “their” county list which would occur if they
>> validated them.
>>
>>
>>
>> While researching exotic birds in Texas I have talked with several
>> eBirders who have been completely turned off of eBird because their
>> sightings of an exotic species does not show up on the species map.
>> Although it is on their list it doesn’t show up on the species map so they
>> figure what is the use of posting it. All understandable but unfortunate as
>> well.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *Fred Collins*, Director
>>
>> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>>
>> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
>> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377&entry=gmail&source=g>
>>
>> 281-357-5324
>>
>>
>>
>> Harris County Precinct 3
>>
>> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>>
>> www.pct3.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* Stephen Gast <segast23...>
>> *Sent:* Monday, June 25, 2018 11:44 AM
>> *To:* <texbirds...>; Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
>> <FCollins...>
>> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
>>
>>
>>
>> Seems to me that it is only the phenotype, i.e. what the observed traits
>> are, that rules here. And not whether you have knowledge or suspect that
>> they are introduced. Thus we enter munias/manakins, bishops, bulbuls,
>> Egyptian geese etc. here in Texas without consideration of origins, knowing
>> full well or strongly suspecting that they are all recent escapees. (the
>> questions being how long - and maybe from where or how)
>>
>>
>>
>> Apparently, the only distinction being asked for by eBird is have these
>> birds been bred for specific observable characteristics, and in this case
>> plumage only - since this is the only obvious thing we as eBirders can
>> normally observe.
>>
>>
>>
>> So the determination as to whether these are 'countable' is an ABA
>> 'sporting' thing and not something that really concerns eBird
>> scientifically, which is simply to document the distributions of birds
>> living in the wild. And nominally, birds that have some likelihood of
>> retaining their native innate characteristics.
>>
>>
>>
>> As for recording observations: I suspect that commenting in the comment
>> field that, for example: " these Ringed Teal are likely offspring of the
>> pinioned pair known to exist 5 miles to the east at farmer John's waterfowl
>> collection" would be a good thing to enter along with your record into
>> eBird.
>>
>>
>>
>> As for the Muscovy Duck/Rock Pigeon exceptions - here are two obvious
>> (readily observed) human-bred phenotypes (apparently the only ones in the
>> world) that have now become an accepted self-sustaining wild population no
>> longer relying on "stale bread crumbs" to survive.
>>
>>
>>
>> (As for the 'purity' of anyone's eBird list - I think the best thing is
>> to try and go see all the introduced birds in the USA in their original
>> native countries and then one doesn't have to worry about it.) [image:
>> Image removed by sender. Emoji] (smiley winking emoji)
>>
>>
>>
>> Steve Gast
>>
>> Houston, Texas
>>
>> <segast23...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Monday, June 25, 2018, 10:20:39 AM CDT, Collins, Fred (Commissioner
>> Pct. 3) <FCollins...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Thank you Joe and Joseph,
>>
>>
>>
>> I was not aware of the eBird definition. Unfortunately it has me a bit
>> confused when it comes to both Budgerigar and Peacock. There is no
>> doubt that both species populations that occur in the United states are a
>> result of domestic birds that escaped or maintained in some sort of
>> at-liberty situation.
>>
>>
>>
>> The domestic lineage of the highly domesticated Budgerigar undoubtedly
>> has contributed to this birds failure to establish itself as did the Monk
>> Parakeet that descended all from recently imported wild birds. Regardless
>> of what a free flying Budgie looks like it’s heritage is from long
>> domesticated stock.
>>
>>
>>
>> The Peacock is a bit different. Most birds observed show little or no
>> influence of their domestic heritage. Peacocks are not all that
>> domesticated and many bird keepers prefer the normal peacock to a white or
>> pied one. Peacocks have been subjected to little selective breeding beyond
>> calmness and perhaps low dispersal attributes. They are far less numerous
>> and have a longer generation period which slows their domestication.
>>
>>
>>
>> Yet, if I use eBird’s definitions as I understand it, even though we know
>> these birds to be domestic in origin, just like the rock pigeon, if they
>> exhibit the plumage of the native form they should *not* be reported as
>> domestic.
>>
>>
>>
>> BELOW is the quote from EBird
>>
>>
>>
>> This option *should not* be used to report birds that are identical to
>> wild birds but that you presume to be escapees. Importantly, our "domestic
>> type" is a distinct lineage for these birds and not a value judgment of
>> whether you believe it recently escaped from a cage or pen. This is often
>> mis-used in eBird, so please try to understand this distinction before
>> reporting domestic types in eBird. domestics are generally not counted on
>> eBird lists, but there are two exceptions. Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) is
>> used to represent the wild, free-flying pigeons that occur in cities
>> worldwide, and it distinct from Rock Pigeon (Wild type), which is much
>> rarer and of conservation status in many regions (read more here
>> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/rock-pigeon/>). Muscovy Duck
>> (Established Feral) is to be used for feral type birds (white, or blotchy,
>> often with oversized red warty protuberances on the face) that are
>> considered established parts of the avifauna in areas such as Florida; the
>> Muscovy Duck is unusual since it also has an option for Muscovy Duck
>> (Domestic type) which does not count on lists but is phenotypically
>> identical.
>>
>>
>>
>> A confused Aggie,
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *Fred Collins*, Director
>>
>> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>>
>> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
>> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377&entry=gmail&source=g>
>>
>> 281-357-5324
>>
>>
>>
>> Harris County Precinct 3
>>
>> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>>
>> www.pct3.com
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
>> Behalf Of *Joe Fischer
>> *Sent:* Saturday, June 23, 2018 10:47 AM
>> *To:* <texbirds...>
>> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks for the info. We learn something everyday. There was clearly some
>> info sent out the Indian Peafowl a couple of years ago, but basis this
>> definition it probably did not warrant flagging them as domestic.
>>
>>
>>
>> Glad to see that Ron is elated to have added to his eBird list.
>>
>> Joe Fischer
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>
>> On Jun 23, 2018, at 9:35 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
>> wrote:
>>
>> All of my nesting birds were the green phenotype? identical to the wild
>> Australian birds as were the colony on the florida west coast. I have had
>> both the yellow and blue variants at my feeders. Once a blue bird tried to
>> join the nesting birds but was driven off.
>>
>>
>>
>> Petco was the source of all the budgies back then. They were kept in an
>> open pen out on the floor near the door so kids could reach in and have a
>> bird sit on their finger. They all could fly and could get out of the cage
>> and then out the door. Health code concerns had them caged and then no new
>> escapees.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 9:11 AM, Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...> wrote:
>>
>> Joe,
>>
>>
>>
>> This is a confusing topic for lots of folks. The use of "domestic" in
>> the eBird taxonomy is tied to distinctive phenotypes, and not necessarily
>> birds that aren't actually wild. There is a whole paragraph (search for
>> "Domestics") on the following eBird webpage that goes over this:
>>
>>
>>
>> https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1006825-
>> the-ebird-taxonomy
>>
>>
>>
>> I'm sure many/most (all?) Budgerigars that are in pet stores are
>> phenotypically different than wild ones but I can also imagine that there
>> could be a couple here and there that look pretty close plumage/color-wise
>> to wild birds where "Budgerigar" is the correct choice over
>>
>>
>>
>> The main part of that is just education, for both reviewers and eBird
>> users, in knowing/remembering that 1) there is a "(Domestic type)" option
>> for a given species and 2) that this only to be used for birds that are
>> phenotypically distinct. I can't say its a huge problem though. In 2018
>> for Texas, there have been 51 submissions for "Budgerigar (Domestic type)"
>> and 6 for "Budgerigar", and none of the non-domestic types have been
>> validated.
>>
>>
>>
>> --Eric
>>
>>
>>
>> Eric Carpenter
>>
>> Austin, TX
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:07 AM Joe and Renee Fischer <
>> <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>>
>> Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is
>> a Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these
>> are wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not
>> corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen.
>> However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be
>> the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple
>> of years back.
>>
>>
>>
>> Joe Fischer
>>
>> Friendswood, TX
>>
>> http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Eric Carpenter
>> Austin
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>>
>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>>
>>
>


--
David Sarkozi
Houston, TX
(713) 412-4409 twitter ID dsarkozi

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/18 11:44 am
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
​Fred, Joe, Steve, Arman, Eric and Texbirds,

This is a much appreciated and warranted discussion to be hashed out in a
public forum. While I agree with eBird that we should not be making broad
value judgments regarding the wild or captive origin of certain exotic
species, there can and should be exceptions to the rule. This is why
written descriptions and photos are extremely important to include in your
species comments, especially IF you are deviating from the standardized
reporting protocol for certain exotics.

First, I feel the same way about non-countable exotics as Arman does: I
don't want them inflating my ABA countable totals in eBird. However, I
choose to report them in eBird in order to track their distribution and
population trends. I just have to remember to subtract several species when
reporting to ABA Listing Central, etc. We are patiently waiting for this
fix from eBird. In the near future, an algorithm will treat every
non-countable exotic species the same way it treats "Domestic-type"
submissions now (=no count or zero).

*Exceptions:*

*Waterfowl*--although it may appear phenotypically pure that Swan Goose or
Greylag Goose on someone's private pond would be best reported as Domestic
type as opposed to wild type. ​Sometimes it might not be so easy to
visually assess whether it has domestic lineage or not with limited (to
zero) field experience with the wild forms in their native range or with no
side-by-side comparison. I feel the same can be said regarding
Northern-type Mallards in urban and suburban areas in the nonbreeding
season where the species has no historical context as a breeder. There
should be an "Established feral" designation for Mallard like there is for
Muscovy Duck, which could be used in such cases.

This brings me to Muscovy Duck. Based on eBird's Reporting Practices for
Muscovy Duck (https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2259953), any
seemingly muddled free-flying Muscovy Duck away from the western Lower Rio
Grande Valley *should* be reported as Domestic type. However, what if you
do find a solo or pair of wild-type Muscovy Ducks n0t far from their
expected range, not associating with other feral or domestic fowl and in a
natural setting at a time of year they may be wandering? Case in point:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42072546

I feel like eBird may in fact be suppressing potentially valid records of
wild birds with this general practice. With enough provided documentation,
eBird reviewers should be assessing these submissions on a case-by-case
basis as opposed to applying a one-size-fits-all approach.

We need a solution on Canada Goose. Small localized, resident populations
in Central, East and South Texas really should be designated as "Feral" or
"Established feral." Why hasn't this been implemented yet? A lot of these
areas may never see a truly wild Canada Goose. In fact, to our east, wild
Canada Geese are deemed to be so rare that they warrant inclusion on the
Official Review List (
http://www.losbird.org/lbrc/LBRC%20Review%20List%202016.pdf).

Regarding the highly-sought-after, lone Budgerigar in Harris County, its
obvious that that bird is of the Domestic variety simply due to its
blue-white plumage. The wild-type plumage (phenotype) is the green-yellow
variety. Case closed. If you see a green-yellow one, obtain photos and
submit it as Budgerigar.

Happy listing!
Justin Bosler
Austin, TX

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 10:19 AM, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<FCollins...> wrote:

> Thank you Joe and Joseph,
>
>
>
> I was not aware of the eBird definition. Unfortunately it has me a bit
> confused when it comes to both Budgerigar and Peacock. There is no doubt
> that both species populations that occur in the United states are a result
> of domestic birds that escaped or maintained in some sort of at-liberty
> situation.
>
>
>
> The domestic lineage of the highly domesticated Budgerigar undoubtedly has
> contributed to this birds failure to establish itself as did the Monk
> Parakeet that descended all from recently imported wild birds. Regardless
> of what a free flying Budgie looks like it’s heritage is from long
> domesticated stock.
>
>
>
> The Peacock is a bit different. Most birds observed show little or no
> influence of their domestic heritage. Peacocks are not all that
> domesticated and many bird keepers prefer the normal peacock to a white or
> pied one. Peacocks have been subjected to little selective breeding beyond
> calmness and perhaps low dispersal attributes. They are far less numerous
> and have a longer generation period which slows their domestication.
>
>
>
> Yet, if I use eBird’s definitions as I understand it, even though we know
> these birds to be domestic in origin, just like the rock pigeon, if they
> exhibit the plumage of the native form they should *not* be reported as
> domestic.
>
>
>
> BELOW is the quote from EBird
>
>
>
> This option *should not* be used to report birds that are identical to
> wild birds but that you presume to be escapees. Importantly, our "domestic
> type" is a distinct lineage for these birds and not a value judgment of
> whether you believe it recently escaped from a cage or pen. This is often
> mis-used in eBird, so please try to understand this distinction before
> reporting domestic types in eBird. domestics are generally not counted on
> eBird lists, but there are two exceptions. Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) is
> used to represent the wild, free-flying pigeons that occur in cities
> worldwide, and it distinct from Rock Pigeon (Wild type), which is much
> rarer and of conservation status in many regions (read more here
> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/rock-pigeon/>). Muscovy Duck
> (Established Feral) is to be used for feral type birds (white, or blotchy,
> often with oversized red warty protuberances on the face) that are
> considered established parts of the avifauna in areas such as Florida; the
> Muscovy Duck is unusual since it also has an option for Muscovy Duck
> (Domestic type) which does not count on lists but is phenotypically
> identical.
>
>
>
> A confused Aggie,
>
>
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377&entry=gmail&source=g>
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Joe Fischer
> *Sent:* Saturday, June 23, 2018 10:47 AM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
>
>
>
> Thanks for the info. We learn something everyday. There was clearly some
> info sent out the Indian Peafowl a couple of years ago, but basis this
> definition it probably did not warrant flagging them as domestic.
>
>
>
> Glad to see that Ron is elated to have added to his eBird list.
>
> Joe Fischer
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> On Jun 23, 2018, at 9:35 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
> wrote:
>
> All of my nesting birds were the green phenotype? identical to the wild
> Australian birds as were the colony on the florida west coast. I have had
> both the yellow and blue variants at my feeders. Once a blue bird tried to
> join the nesting birds but was driven off.
>
>
>
> Petco was the source of all the budgies back then. They were kept in an
> open pen out on the floor near the door so kids could reach in and have a
> bird sit on their finger. They all could fly and could get out of the cage
> and then out the door. Health code concerns had them caged and then no new
> escapees.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 9:11 AM, Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...> wrote:
>
> Joe,
>
>
>
> This is a confusing topic for lots of folks. The use of "domestic" in the
> eBird taxonomy is tied to distinctive phenotypes, and not necessarily birds
> that aren't actually wild. There is a whole paragraph (search for
> "Domestics") on the following eBird webpage that goes over this:
>
>
>
> https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1006825-
> the-ebird-taxonomy
>
>
>
> I'm sure many/most (all?) Budgerigars that are in pet stores are
> phenotypically different than wild ones but I can also imagine that there
> could be a couple here and there that look pretty close plumage/color-wise
> to wild birds where "Budgerigar" is the correct choice over
>
>
>
> The main part of that is just education, for both reviewers and eBird
> users, in knowing/remembering that 1) there is a "(Domestic type)" option
> for a given species and 2) that this only to be used for birds that are
> phenotypically distinct. I can't say its a huge problem though. In 2018
> for Texas, there have been 51 submissions for "Budgerigar (Domestic type)"
> and 6 for "Budgerigar", and none of the non-domestic types have been
> validated.
>
>
>
> --Eric
>
>
>
> Eric Carpenter
>
> Austin, TX
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:07 AM Joe and Renee Fischer <
> <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>
> Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is a
> Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these are
> wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not
> corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen.
> However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be
> the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple
> of years back.
>
>
>
> Joe Fischer
>
> Friendswood, TX
>
> http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Eric Carpenter
> Austin
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/18 10:39 am
From: Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
It's a shame that folks are turned off of eBird because of their policy of
escaped/exotics. Cornell has recognized that they do yet have a perfect
solution so there could be a change to how such birds show up in the future
(on maps, etc). Invalidated records are still in the database and we can
always go back to them if/when the policy/designation changes on these.

Despite what Fred hints at, pretty much none of what reviewers should be
validating/invalidating is driven by a particular's reviewers desire to
have something on or not on his/her list. Cornell has published guidelines
for reviewers on most species, including domestics and exotics, though
there is some leeway with some exotics at a local-level. Cornell has
changed their policy over the years but for (Domestic) or (Domestic type)
birds, for the most part these *should* be validated if there is the
general idea that they are free-flying or very likely to be free-flying.
This is sometimes a tough determination to make as you can guess,
especially given what is usually not any lengthy notes from the observer.

Going back to Budgies not being validated, I suspect there are several
"Budgerigar (Domestic type)" that could be validated as some are probably
arguably "free-flying", at least for the couple of days/week that they
remain alive. However, I still don't think that "Budgerigar" should be
validated without at least a good photo. In looking at the TX "Budgerigar"
entries that have photos, every single one that I have seen is clearly of a
domestic phenotype and should be entered as "Budgerigar (Domestic type)".
Once changed to the proper designation, some of these very well could be
validated. Again, this is mostly an education thing, and one based on
eBird's definition of what the "domestic" tag means, not what you or I
might think or want it to mean.

Exotics are a different topic than Domestic-tagged entries. Cornell has
set some guidelines for this and they have gotten input from Texas folks
regarding the state of some exotics. This is why you may see different
areas where exotics are established or quasi-established and thus those
records are being validated (they show up on maps). For exotics where
there is no guidance, this is left up to the reviewer(s) to decide and that
decision is usually based on how often/how many such birds/populations are
being seen. This of course is ever-changing and if 5 years from now exotic
species X becomes a candidate to watch for local establishment, it may move
to the validate-it list and old records (if entered) would likely be
validated as well.

--Eric

Eric Carpenter
Texas state-wise eBird reviewer
<ecarpe...>



On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 12:00 PM Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<FCollins...> wrote:

> Steve et al,
>
>
>
> I agree with you about all these escapees. Except domesticated birds of
> which there are very few. That’s when eBird has brought up the special
> designation Domesticated.
>
>
>
> As for the escapee Budgie, Eric mentioned none had been validated. I think
> that is because of the listing issue. Most reviewers don’t like an obvious
> domestic bird on “their” county list which would occur if they validated
> them.
>
>
>
> While researching exotic birds in Texas I have talked with several
> eBirders who have been completely turned off of eBird because their
> sightings of an exotic species does not show up on the species map.
> Although it is on their list it doesn’t show up on the species map so they
> figure what is the use of posting it. All understandable but unfortunate as
> well.
>
>
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Stephen Gast <segast23...>
> *Sent:* Monday, June 25, 2018 11:44 AM
> *To:* <texbirds...>; Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
> <FCollins...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
>
>
>
> Seems to me that it is only the phenotype, i.e. what the observed traits
> are, that rules here. And not whether you have knowledge or suspect that
> they are introduced. Thus we enter munias/manakins, bishops, bulbuls,
> Egyptian geese etc. here in Texas without consideration of origins, knowing
> full well or strongly suspecting that they are all recent escapees. (the
> questions being how long - and maybe from where or how)
>
>
>
> Apparently, the only distinction being asked for by eBird is have these
> birds been bred for specific observable characteristics, and in this case
> plumage only - since this is the only obvious thing we as eBirders can
> normally observe.
>
>
>
> So the determination as to whether these are 'countable' is an ABA
> 'sporting' thing and not something that really concerns eBird
> scientifically, which is simply to document the distributions of birds
> living in the wild. And nominally, birds that have some likelihood of
> retaining their native innate characteristics.
>
>
>
> As for recording observations: I suspect that commenting in the comment
> field that, for example: " these Ringed Teal are likely offspring of the
> pinioned pair known to exist 5 miles to the east at farmer John's waterfowl
> collection" would be a good thing to enter along with your record into
> eBird.
>
>
>
> As for the Muscovy Duck/Rock Pigeon exceptions - here are two obvious
> (readily observed) human-bred phenotypes (apparently the only ones in the
> world) that have now become an accepted self-sustaining wild population no
> longer relying on "stale bread crumbs" to survive.
>
>
>
> (As for the 'purity' of anyone's eBird list - I think the best thing is
> to try and go see all the introduced birds in the USA in their original
> native countries and then one doesn't have to worry about it.) [image:
> Image removed by sender. Emoji] (smiley winking emoji)
>
>
>
> Steve Gast
>
> Houston, Texas
>
> <segast23...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Monday, June 25, 2018, 10:20:39 AM CDT, Collins, Fred (Commissioner
> Pct. 3) <FCollins...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> Thank you Joe and Joseph,
>
>
>
> I was not aware of the eBird definition. Unfortunately it has me a bit
> confused when it comes to both Budgerigar and Peacock. There is no doubt
> that both species populations that occur in the United states are a result
> of domestic birds that escaped or maintained in some sort of at-liberty
> situation.
>
>
>
> The domestic lineage of the highly domesticated Budgerigar undoubtedly has
> contributed to this birds failure to establish itself as did the Monk
> Parakeet that descended all from recently imported wild birds. Regardless
> of what a free flying Budgie looks like it’s heritage is from long
> domesticated stock.
>
>
>
> The Peacock is a bit different. Most birds observed show little or no
> influence of their domestic heritage. Peacocks are not all that
> domesticated and many bird keepers prefer the normal peacock to a white or
> pied one. Peacocks have been subjected to little selective breeding beyond
> calmness and perhaps low dispersal attributes. They are far less numerous
> and have a longer generation period which slows their domestication.
>
>
>
> Yet, if I use eBird’s definitions as I understand it, even though we know
> these birds to be domestic in origin, just like the rock pigeon, if they
> exhibit the plumage of the native form they should *not* be reported as
> domestic.
>
>
>
> BELOW is the quote from EBird
>
>
>
> This option *should not* be used to report birds that are identical to
> wild birds but that you presume to be escapees. Importantly, our "domestic
> type" is a distinct lineage for these birds and not a value judgment of
> whether you believe it recently escaped from a cage or pen. This is often
> mis-used in eBird, so please try to understand this distinction before
> reporting domestic types in eBird. domestics are generally not counted on
> eBird lists, but there are two exceptions. Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) is
> used to represent the wild, free-flying pigeons that occur in cities
> worldwide, and it distinct from Rock Pigeon (Wild type), which is much
> rarer and of conservation status in many regions (read more here
> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/rock-pigeon/>). Muscovy Duck
> (Established Feral) is to be used for feral type birds (white, or blotchy,
> often with oversized red warty protuberances on the face) that are
> considered established parts of the avifauna in areas such as Florida; the
> Muscovy Duck is unusual since it also has an option for Muscovy Duck
> (Domestic type) which does not count on lists but is phenotypically
> identical.
>
>
>
> A confused Aggie,
>
>
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Joe Fischer
> *Sent:* Saturday, June 23, 2018 10:47 AM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
>
>
>
> Thanks for the info. We learn something everyday. There was clearly some
> info sent out the Indian Peafowl a couple of years ago, but basis this
> definition it probably did not warrant flagging them as domestic.
>
>
>
> Glad to see that Ron is elated to have added to his eBird list.
>
> Joe Fischer
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> On Jun 23, 2018, at 9:35 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
> wrote:
>
> All of my nesting birds were the green phenotype? identical to the wild
> Australian birds as were the colony on the florida west coast. I have had
> both the yellow and blue variants at my feeders. Once a blue bird tried to
> join the nesting birds but was driven off.
>
>
>
> Petco was the source of all the budgies back then. They were kept in an
> open pen out on the floor near the door so kids could reach in and have a
> bird sit on their finger. They all could fly and could get out of the cage
> and then out the door. Health code concerns had them caged and then no new
> escapees.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 9:11 AM, Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...> wrote:
>
> Joe,
>
>
>
> This is a confusing topic for lots of folks. The use of "domestic" in the
> eBird taxonomy is tied to distinctive phenotypes, and not necessarily birds
> that aren't actually wild. There is a whole paragraph (search for
> "Domestics") on the following eBird webpage that goes over this:
>
>
>
>
> https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1006825-the-ebird-taxonomy
>
>
>
> I'm sure many/most (all?) Budgerigars that are in pet stores are
> phenotypically different than wild ones but I can also imagine that there
> could be a couple here and there that look pretty close plumage/color-wise
> to wild birds where "Budgerigar" is the correct choice over
>
>
>
> The main part of that is just education, for both reviewers and eBird
> users, in knowing/remembering that 1) there is a "(Domestic type)" option
> for a given species and 2) that this only to be used for birds that are
> phenotypically distinct. I can't say its a huge problem though. In 2018
> for Texas, there have been 51 submissions for "Budgerigar (Domestic type)"
> and 6 for "Budgerigar", and none of the non-domestic types have been
> validated.
>
>
>
> --Eric
>
>
>
> Eric Carpenter
>
> Austin, TX
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:07 AM Joe and Renee Fischer <
> <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>
> Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is a
> Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these are
> wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not
> corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen.
> However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be
> the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple
> of years back.
>
>
>
> Joe Fischer
>
> Friendswood, TX
>
> http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Eric Carpenter
> Austin
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>
>

--
Eric Carpenter
Austin

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/18 10:22 am
From: Arman Moreno <armanmoreno...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
On the other end of the spectrum, I would be happy to include exotics on my
checklists if they didn't count towards my life/state list totals on eBird.
I wind up leaving them off because I personally don't like to inflate my
totals with uncountable (by ABA standards) species. I certainly see the
merit in submitting a checklist that includes these species so researches
can track the spread of the population. Perhaps there is already a way to
track them without counting that I'm not aware of but if not, seems like an
easy fix to gain such data from users with similar preferences. Just my two
cents.

Arman Moreno
Austin, TX

On Mon, Jun 25, 2018 at 12:00 PM, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
<FCollins...> wrote:

> Steve et al,
>
>
>
> I agree with you about all these escapees. Except domesticated birds of
> which there are very few. That’s when eBird has brought up the special
> designation Domesticated.
>
>
>
> As for the escapee Budgie, Eric mentioned none had been validated. I think
> that is because of the listing issue. Most reviewers don’t like an obvious
> domestic bird on “their” county list which would occur if they validated
> them.
>
>
>
> While researching exotic birds in Texas I have talked with several
> eBirders who have been completely turned off of eBird because their
> sightings of an exotic species does not show up on the species map.
> Although it is on their list it doesn’t show up on the species map so they
> figure what is the use of posting it. All understandable but unfortunate as
> well.
>
>
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377&entry=gmail&source=g>
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Stephen Gast <segast23...>
> *Sent:* Monday, June 25, 2018 11:44 AM
> *To:* <texbirds...>; Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
> <FCollins...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
>
>
>
> Seems to me that it is only the phenotype, i.e. what the observed traits
> are, that rules here. And not whether you have knowledge or suspect that
> they are introduced. Thus we enter munias/manakins, bishops, bulbuls,
> Egyptian geese etc. here in Texas without consideration of origins, knowing
> full well or strongly suspecting that they are all recent escapees. (the
> questions being how long - and maybe from where or how)
>
>
>
> Apparently, the only distinction being asked for by eBird is have these
> birds been bred for specific observable characteristics, and in this case
> plumage only - since this is the only obvious thing we as eBirders can
> normally observe.
>
>
>
> So the determination as to whether these are 'countable' is an ABA
> 'sporting' thing and not something that really concerns eBird
> scientifically, which is simply to document the distributions of birds
> living in the wild. And nominally, birds that have some likelihood of
> retaining their native innate characteristics.
>
>
>
> As for recording observations: I suspect that commenting in the comment
> field that, for example: " these Ringed Teal are likely offspring of the
> pinioned pair known to exist 5 miles to the east at farmer John's waterfowl
> collection" would be a good thing to enter along with your record into
> eBird.
>
>
>
> As for the Muscovy Duck/Rock Pigeon exceptions - here are two obvious
> (readily observed) human-bred phenotypes (apparently the only ones in the
> world) that have now become an accepted self-sustaining wild population no
> longer relying on "stale bread crumbs" to survive.
>
>
>
> (As for the 'purity' of anyone's eBird list - I think the best thing is
> to try and go see all the introduced birds in the USA in their original
> native countries and then one doesn't have to worry about it.) [image:
> Image removed by sender. Emoji] (smiley winking emoji)
>
>
>
> Steve Gast
>
> Houston, Texas
>
> <segast23...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Monday, June 25, 2018, 10:20:39 AM CDT, Collins, Fred (Commissioner
> Pct. 3) <FCollins...> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> Thank you Joe and Joseph,
>
>
>
> I was not aware of the eBird definition. Unfortunately it has me a bit
> confused when it comes to both Budgerigar and Peacock. There is no doubt
> that both species populations that occur in the United states are a result
> of domestic birds that escaped or maintained in some sort of at-liberty
> situation.
>
>
>
> The domestic lineage of the highly domesticated Budgerigar undoubtedly has
> contributed to this birds failure to establish itself as did the Monk
> Parakeet that descended all from recently imported wild birds. Regardless
> of what a free flying Budgie looks like it’s heritage is from long
> domesticated stock.
>
>
>
> The Peacock is a bit different. Most birds observed show little or no
> influence of their domestic heritage. Peacocks are not all that
> domesticated and many bird keepers prefer the normal peacock to a white or
> pied one. Peacocks have been subjected to little selective breeding beyond
> calmness and perhaps low dispersal attributes. They are far less numerous
> and have a longer generation period which slows their domestication.
>
>
>
> Yet, if I use eBird’s definitions as I understand it, even though we know
> these birds to be domestic in origin, just like the rock pigeon, if they
> exhibit the plumage of the native form they should *not* be reported as
> domestic.
>
>
>
> BELOW is the quote from EBird
>
>
>
> This option *should not* be used to report birds that are identical to
> wild birds but that you presume to be escapees. Importantly, our "domestic
> type" is a distinct lineage for these birds and not a value judgment of
> whether you believe it recently escaped from a cage or pen. This is often
> mis-used in eBird, so please try to understand this distinction before
> reporting domestic types in eBird. domestics are generally not counted on
> eBird lists, but there are two exceptions. Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) is
> used to represent the wild, free-flying pigeons that occur in cities
> worldwide, and it distinct from Rock Pigeon (Wild type), which is much
> rarer and of conservation status in many regions (read more here
> <http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/rock-pigeon/>). Muscovy Duck
> (Established Feral) is to be used for feral type birds (white, or blotchy,
> often with oversized red warty protuberances on the face) that are
> considered established parts of the avifauna in areas such as Florida; the
> Muscovy Duck is unusual since it also has an option for Muscovy Duck
> (Domestic type) which does not count on lists but is phenotypically
> identical.
>
>
>
> A confused Aggie,
>
>
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*, Director
>
> Kleb Woods Nature Center
>
> 20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20303+Draper+Road,Tomball+TX+77377&entry=gmail&source=g>
>
> 281-357-5324
>
>
>
> Harris County Precinct 3
>
> *Steve Radack Commissioner*
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Joe Fischer
> *Sent:* Saturday, June 23, 2018 10:47 AM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
>
>
>
> Thanks for the info. We learn something everyday. There was clearly some
> info sent out the Indian Peafowl a couple of years ago, but basis this
> definition it probably did not warrant flagging them as domestic.
>
>
>
> Glad to see that Ron is elated to have added to his eBird list.
>
> Joe Fischer
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> On Jun 23, 2018, at 9:35 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
> wrote:
>
> All of my nesting birds were the green phenotype? identical to the wild
> Australian birds as were the colony on the florida west coast. I have had
> both the yellow and blue variants at my feeders. Once a blue bird tried to
> join the nesting birds but was driven off.
>
>
>
> Petco was the source of all the budgies back then. They were kept in an
> open pen out on the floor near the door so kids could reach in and have a
> bird sit on their finger. They all could fly and could get out of the cage
> and then out the door. Health code concerns had them caged and then no new
> escapees.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 9:11 AM, Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...> wrote:
>
> Joe,
>
>
>
> This is a confusing topic for lots of folks. The use of "domestic" in the
> eBird taxonomy is tied to distinctive phenotypes, and not necessarily birds
> that aren't actually wild. There is a whole paragraph (search for
> "Domestics") on the following eBird webpage that goes over this:
>
>
>
> https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/
> 1006825-the-ebird-taxonomy
>
>
>
> I'm sure many/most (all?) Budgerigars that are in pet stores are
> phenotypically different than wild ones but I can also imagine that there
> could be a couple here and there that look pretty close plumage/color-wise
> to wild birds where "Budgerigar" is the correct choice over
>
>
>
> The main part of that is just education, for both reviewers and eBird
> users, in knowing/remembering that 1) there is a "(Domestic type)" option
> for a given species and 2) that this only to be used for birds that are
> phenotypically distinct. I can't say its a huge problem though. In 2018
> for Texas, there have been 51 submissions for "Budgerigar (Domestic type)"
> and 6 for "Budgerigar", and none of the non-domestic types have been
> validated.
>
>
>
> --Eric
>
>
>
> Eric Carpenter
>
> Austin, TX
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:07 AM Joe and Renee Fischer <
> <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>
> Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is a
> Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these are
> wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not
> corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen.
> However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be
> the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple
> of years back.
>
>
>
> Joe Fischer
>
> Friendswood, TX
>
> http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Eric Carpenter
> Austin
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/18 10:00 am
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
Steve et al,

I agree with you about all these escapees. Except domesticated birds of which there are very few. That’s when eBird has brought up the special designation Domesticated.

As for the escapee Budgie, Eric mentioned none had been validated. I think that is because of the listing issue. Most reviewers don’t like an obvious domestic bird on “their” county list which would occur if they validated them.

While researching exotic birds in Texas I have talked with several eBirders who have been completely turned off of eBird because their sightings of an exotic species does not show up on the species map. Although it is on their list it doesn’t show up on the species map so they figure what is the use of posting it. All understandable but unfortunate as well.


Fred Collins, Director
Kleb Woods Nature Center
20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>




From: Stephen Gast <segast23...>
Sent: Monday, June 25, 2018 11:44 AM
To: <texbirds...>; Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Subject: Re: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions

Seems to me that it is only the phenotype, i.e. what the observed traits are, that rules here. And not whether you have knowledge or suspect that they are introduced. Thus we enter munias/manakins, bishops, bulbuls, Egyptian geese etc. here in Texas without consideration of origins, knowing full well or strongly suspecting that they are all recent escapees. (the questions being how long - and maybe from where or how)

Apparently, the only distinction being asked for by eBird is have these birds been bred for specific observable characteristics, and in this case plumage only - since this is the only obvious thing we as eBirders can normally observe.

So the determination as to whether these are 'countable' is an ABA 'sporting' thing and not something that really concerns eBird scientifically, which is simply to document the distributions of birds living in the wild. And nominally, birds that have some likelihood of retaining their native innate characteristics.

As for recording observations: I suspect that commenting in the comment field that, for example: " these Ringed Teal are likely offspring of the pinioned pair known to exist 5 miles to the east at farmer John's waterfowl collection" would be a good thing to enter along with your record into eBird.

As for the Muscovy Duck/Rock Pigeon exceptions - here are two obvious (readily observed) human-bred phenotypes (apparently the only ones in the world) that have now become an accepted self-sustaining wild population no longer relying on "stale bread crumbs" to survive.

(As for the 'purity' of anyone's eBird list - I think the best thing is to try and go see all the introduced birds in the USA in their original native countries and then one doesn't have to worry about it.) [Image removed by sender. Emoji] (smiley winking emoji)

Steve Gast
Houston, Texas
<segast23...><mailto:<segast23...>



On Monday, June 25, 2018, 10:20:39 AM CDT, Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...> wrote:



Thank you Joe and Joseph,



I was not aware of the eBird definition. Unfortunately it has me a bit confused when it comes to both Budgerigar and Peacock. There is no doubt that both species populations that occur in the United states are a result of domestic birds that escaped or maintained in some sort of at-liberty situation.



The domestic lineage of the highly domesticated Budgerigar undoubtedly has contributed to this birds failure to establish itself as did the Monk Parakeet that descended all from recently imported wild birds. Regardless of what a free flying Budgie looks like it’s heritage is from long domesticated stock.



The Peacock is a bit different. Most birds observed show little or no influence of their domestic heritage. Peacocks are not all that domesticated and many bird keepers prefer the normal peacock to a white or pied one. Peacocks have been subjected to little selective breeding beyond calmness and perhaps low dispersal attributes. They are far less numerous and have a longer generation period which slows their domestication.



Yet, if I use eBird’s definitions as I understand it, even though we know these birds to be domestic in origin, just like the rock pigeon, if they exhibit the plumage of the native form they should not be reported as domestic.



BELOW is the quote from EBird



This option *should not* be used to report birds that are identical to wild birds but that you presume to be escapees. Importantly, our "domestic type" is a distinct lineage for these birds and not a value judgment of whether you believe it recently escaped from a cage or pen. This is often mis-used in eBird, so please try to understand this distinction before reporting domestic types in eBird. domestics are generally not counted on eBird lists, but there are two exceptions. Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) is used to represent the wild, free-flying pigeons that occur in cities worldwide, and it distinct from Rock Pigeon (Wild type), which is much rarer and of conservation status in many regions (read more here<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/rock-pigeon/>). Muscovy Duck (Established Feral) is to be used for feral type birds (white, or blotchy, often with oversized red warty protuberances on the face) that are considered established parts of the avifauna in areas such as Florida; the Muscovy Duck is unusual since it also has an option for Muscovy Duck (Domestic type) which does not count on lists but is phenotypically identical.



A confused Aggie,





Fred Collins, Director

Kleb Woods Nature Center

20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377

281-357-5324



Harris County Precinct 3

Steve Radack Commissioner

www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>









From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Joe Fischer
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 10:47 AM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions



Thanks for the info. We learn something everyday. There was clearly some info sent out the Indian Peafowl a couple of years ago, but basis this definition it probably did not warrant flagging them as domestic.



Glad to see that Ron is elated to have added to his eBird list.

Joe Fischer

Sent from my iPad

On Jun 23, 2018, at 9:35 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...><mailto:<josephkennedy36...>> wrote:

All of my nesting birds were the green phenotype? identical to the wild Australian birds as were the colony on the florida west coast. I have had both the yellow and blue variants at my feeders. Once a blue bird tried to join the nesting birds but was driven off.



Petco was the source of all the budgies back then. They were kept in an open pen out on the floor near the door so kids could reach in and have a bird sit on their finger. They all could fly and could get out of the cage and then out the door. Health code concerns had them caged and then no new escapees.





On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 9:11 AM, Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...><mailto:<ecarpe...>> wrote:

Joe,



This is a confusing topic for lots of folks. The use of "domestic" in the eBird taxonomy is tied to distinctive phenotypes, and not necessarily birds that aren't actually wild. There is a whole paragraph (search for "Domestics") on the following eBird webpage that goes over this:



https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1006825-the-ebird-taxonomy



I'm sure many/most (all?) Budgerigars that are in pet stores are phenotypically different than wild ones but I can also imagine that there could be a couple here and there that look pretty close plumage/color-wise to wild birds where "Budgerigar" is the correct choice over



The main part of that is just education, for both reviewers and eBird users, in knowing/remembering that 1) there is a "(Domestic type)" option for a given species and 2) that this only to be used for birds that are phenotypically distinct. I can't say its a huge problem though. In 2018 for Texas, there have been 51 submissions for "Budgerigar (Domestic type)" and 6 for "Budgerigar", and none of the non-domestic types have been validated.



--Eric



Eric Carpenter

Austin, TX











On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:07 AM Joe and Renee Fischer <dmarc-noreply...><mailto:<dmarc-noreply...>> wrote:

Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is a Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these are wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen. However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple of years back.



Joe Fischer

Friendswood, TX

http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer




--

Eric Carpenter
Austin



--

Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...><mailto:<Josephkennedy36...>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/18 8:20 am
From: Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <FCollins...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgerigar eBird Submissions
Thank you Joe and Joseph,

I was not aware of the eBird definition. Unfortunately it has me a bit confused when it comes to both Budgerigar and Peacock. There is no doubt that both species populations that occur in the United states are a result of domestic birds that escaped or maintained in some sort of at-liberty situation.

The domestic lineage of the highly domesticated Budgerigar undoubtedly has contributed to this birds failure to establish itself as did the Monk Parakeet that descended all from recently imported wild birds. Regardless of what a free flying Budgie looks like it’s heritage is from long domesticated stock.

The Peacock is a bit different. Most birds observed show little or no influence of their domestic heritage. Peacocks are not all that domesticated and many bird keepers prefer the normal peacock to a white or pied one. Peacocks have been subjected to little selective breeding beyond calmness and perhaps low dispersal attributes. They are far less numerous and have a longer generation period which slows their domestication.

Yet, if I use eBird’s definitions as I understand it, even though we know these birds to be domestic in origin, just like the rock pigeon, if they exhibit the plumage of the native form they should not be reported as domestic.

BELOW is the quote from EBird

This option *should not* be used to report birds that are identical to wild birds but that you presume to be escapees. Importantly, our "domestic type" is a distinct lineage for these birds and not a value judgment of whether you believe it recently escaped from a cage or pen. This is often mis-used in eBird, so please try to understand this distinction before reporting domestic types in eBird. domestics are generally not counted on eBird lists, but there are two exceptions. Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) is used to represent the wild, free-flying pigeons that occur in cities worldwide, and it distinct from Rock Pigeon (Wild type), which is much rarer and of conservation status in many regions (read more here<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/rock-pigeon/>). Muscovy Duck (Established Feral) is to be used for feral type birds (white, or blotchy, often with oversized red warty protuberances on the face) that are considered established parts of the avifauna in areas such as Florida; the Muscovy Duck is unusual since it also has an option for Muscovy Duck (Domestic type) which does not count on lists but is phenotypically identical.

A confused Aggie,


Fred Collins, Director
Kleb Woods Nature Center
20303 Draper Road,Tomball TX 77377
281-357-5324

Harris County Precinct 3
Steve Radack Commissioner
www.pct3.com<http://www.pct3.com/>




From: <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> On Behalf Of Joe Fischer
Sent: Saturday, June 23, 2018 10:47 AM
To: <texbirds...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions

Thanks for the info. We learn something everyday. There was clearly some info sent out the Indian Peafowl a couple of years ago, but basis this definition it probably did not warrant flagging them as domestic.

Glad to see that Ron is elated to have added to his eBird list.
Joe Fischer
Sent from my iPad

On Jun 23, 2018, at 9:35 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...><mailto:<josephkennedy36...>> wrote:
All of my nesting birds were the green phenotype? identical to the wild Australian birds as were the colony on the florida west coast. I have had both the yellow and blue variants at my feeders. Once a blue bird tried to join the nesting birds but was driven off.

Petco was the source of all the budgies back then. They were kept in an open pen out on the floor near the door so kids could reach in and have a bird sit on their finger. They all could fly and could get out of the cage and then out the door. Health code concerns had them caged and then no new escapees.


On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 9:11 AM, Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...><mailto:<ecarpe...>> wrote:
Joe,

This is a confusing topic for lots of folks. The use of "domestic" in the eBird taxonomy is tied to distinctive phenotypes, and not necessarily birds that aren't actually wild. There is a whole paragraph (search for "Domestics") on the following eBird webpage that goes over this:

https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1006825-the-ebird-taxonomy

I'm sure many/most (all?) Budgerigars that are in pet stores are phenotypically different than wild ones but I can also imagine that there could be a couple here and there that look pretty close plumage/color-wise to wild birds where "Budgerigar" is the correct choice over

The main part of that is just education, for both reviewers and eBird users, in knowing/remembering that 1) there is a "(Domestic type)" option for a given species and 2) that this only to be used for birds that are phenotypically distinct. I can't say its a huge problem though. In 2018 for Texas, there have been 51 submissions for "Budgerigar (Domestic type)" and 6 for "Budgerigar", and none of the non-domestic types have been validated.

--Eric

Eric Carpenter
Austin, TX





On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:07 AM Joe and Renee Fischer <dmarc-noreply...><mailto:<dmarc-noreply...>> wrote:
Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is a Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these are wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen. However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple of years back.

Joe Fischer
Friendswood, TX
http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer


--
Eric Carpenter
Austin



--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...><mailto:<Josephkennedy36...>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/18 8:59 am
From: Warblers Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary <warblerwoods...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: [The Monitor] Brush a proud promoter of area’s natural habitat and wildlife
Correction—John Brush—sorry, birding at the time of posting!

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

> On Jun 24, 2018, at 9:57 AM, Susan Schaezler <susan...> wrote:
>
> Nice article on Tim Brush
>
> https://www.themonitor.com/life/vidasunday/article_57eb912a-7664-11e8-a1ea-2775043fa378.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=email&utm_campaign=user-share
>
>
> Susan Schaezler
> WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
> 501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
> Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
> Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS

 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/18 8:29 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] 6-24-18 Black-and-white Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary
6-24-18 Black-and-white Warbler @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary

Black-and-white Warbler with pictures, female @ Warbler Woods Bird Sanctuary yesterday & today—one was seen last week too. They leave to nest on the Escarpment each year and return about this time. We also had Hutton’s Vireo calling Thursday.

Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 6/24/18 7:58 am
From: Susan Schaezler <susan...>
Subject: [texbirds] [The Monitor] Brush a proud promoter of area’s natural habitat and wildlife
Nice article on Tim Brush

https://www.themonitor.com/life/vidasunday/article_57eb912a-7664-11e8-a1ea-2775043fa378.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=email&utm_campaign=user-share


Susan Schaezler
WarblerWoods.org, http://ebird.org/ebird/hotspot/L213585?yr=cur
501(c)(3) Cibolo/Schertz/Guadalupe County
Lone Star Land Steward Winner 2011. GCBO Site Partner
Life member TOS, SAAS, TAS
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 3:34 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Southbound shorebirds
Texbirds,

By early June, we had Long-billed Curlews returning to the coast, then
earlier this week, the first adult Western Willets were noted at various
locations across Central Texas, and now we have Greater Yellowlegs in the
South Plains. Yesterday, I noted 3 at a playa near Southland in Garza
County. I am now more convinced that the 3 I had in Pecos County last week
were, indeed, S-bound migrants as opposed to summering. Before long, Least
Sandpipers will be back.

Good birding!
Justin Bosler
currently in the air between Dallas and Austin

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 8:48 am
From: Joe Fischer <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender fischer13 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
Thanks for the info. We learn something everyday. There was clearly some info sent out the Indian Peafowl a couple of years ago, but basis this definition it probably did not warrant flagging them as domestic.

Glad to see that Ron is elated to have added to his eBird list.

Joe Fischer
Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 23, 2018, at 9:35 AM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
>
> All of my nesting birds were the green phenotype? identical to the wild Australian birds as were the colony on the florida west coast. I have had both the yellow and blue variants at my feeders. Once a blue bird tried to join the nesting birds but was driven off.
>
> Petco was the source of all the budgies back then. They were kept in an open pen out on the floor near the door so kids could reach in and have a bird sit on their finger. They all could fly and could get out of the cage and then out the door. Health code concerns had them caged and then no new escapees.
>
>
>> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 9:11 AM, Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...> wrote:
>> Joe,
>>
>> This is a confusing topic for lots of folks. The use of "domestic" in the eBird taxonomy is tied to distinctive phenotypes, and not necessarily birds that aren't actually wild. There is a whole paragraph (search for "Domestics") on the following eBird webpage that goes over this:
>>
>> https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1006825-the-ebird-taxonomy
>>
>> I'm sure many/most (all?) Budgerigars that are in pet stores are phenotypically different than wild ones but I can also imagine that there could be a couple here and there that look pretty close plumage/color-wise to wild birds where "Budgerigar" is the correct choice over "Budgerigar (Domestic type)".
>>
>> The main part of that is just education, for both reviewers and eBird users, in knowing/remembering that 1) there is a "(Domestic type)" option for a given species and 2) that this only to be used for birds that are phenotypically distinct. I can't say its a huge problem though. In 2018 for Texas, there have been 51 submissions for "Budgerigar (Domestic type)" and 6 for "Budgerigar", and none of the non-domestic types have been validated.
>>
>> --Eric
>>
>> Eric Carpenter
>> Austin, TX
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:07 AM Joe and Renee Fischer <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>>> Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is a Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these are wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen. However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple of years back.
>>>
>>> Joe Fischer
>>> Friendswood, TX
>>> http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer
>>
>>
>> --
>> Eric Carpenter
>> Austin
>
>
>
> --
> Joseph C. Kennedy
> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
> <Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 7:35 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
All of my nesting birds were the green phenotype? identical to the wild
Australian birds as were the colony on the florida west coast. I have had
both the yellow and blue variants at my feeders. Once a blue bird tried to
join the nesting birds but was driven off.

Petco was the source of all the budgies back then. They were kept in an
open pen out on the floor near the door so kids could reach in and have a
bird sit on their finger. They all could fly and could get out of the cage
and then out the door. Health code concerns had them caged and then no new
escapees.


On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 9:11 AM, Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...> wrote:

> Joe,
>
> This is a confusing topic for lots of folks. The use of "domestic" in the
> eBird taxonomy is tied to distinctive phenotypes, and not necessarily birds
> that aren't actually wild. There is a whole paragraph (search for
> "Domestics") on the following eBird webpage that goes over this:
>
> https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/
> 1006825-the-ebird-taxonomy
>
> I'm sure many/most (all?) Budgerigars that are in pet stores are
> phenotypically different than wild ones but I can also imagine that there
> could be a couple here and there that look pretty close plumage/color-wise
> to wild birds where "Budgerigar" is the correct choice over "Budgerigar
> (Domestic type)".
>
> The main part of that is just education, for both reviewers and eBird
> users, in knowing/remembering that 1) there is a "(Domestic type)" option
> for a given species and 2) that this only to be used for birds that are
> phenotypically distinct. I can't say its a huge problem though. In 2018
> for Texas, there have been 51 submissions for "Budgerigar (Domestic type)"
> and 6 for "Budgerigar", and none of the non-domestic types have been
> validated.
>
> --Eric
>
> Eric Carpenter
> Austin, TX
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:07 AM Joe and Renee Fischer <
> <dmarc-noreply...> wrote:
>
>> Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is
>> a Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these
>> are wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not
>> corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen.
>> However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be
>> the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple
>> of years back.
>>
>> Joe Fischer
>> Friendswood, TX
>> http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer
>>
>
>
> --
> Eric Carpenter
> Austin
>



--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 7:12 am
From: Eric Carpenter <ecarpe...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
Joe,

This is a confusing topic for lots of folks. The use of "domestic" in the
eBird taxonomy is tied to distinctive phenotypes, and not necessarily birds
that aren't actually wild. There is a whole paragraph (search for
"Domestics") on the following eBird webpage that goes over this:


https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1006825-the-ebird-taxonomy

I'm sure many/most (all?) Budgerigars that are in pet stores are
phenotypically different than wild ones but I can also imagine that there
could be a couple here and there that look pretty close plumage/color-wise
to wild birds where "Budgerigar" is the correct choice over "Budgerigar
(Domestic type)".

The main part of that is just education, for both reviewers and eBird
users, in knowing/remembering that 1) there is a "(Domestic type)" option
for a given species and 2) that this only to be used for birds that are
phenotypically distinct. I can't say its a huge problem though. In 2018
for Texas, there have been 51 submissions for "Budgerigar (Domestic type)"
and 6 for "Budgerigar", and none of the non-domestic types have been
validated.

--Eric

Eric Carpenter
Austin, TX





On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:07 AM Joe and Renee Fischer <
<dmarc-noreply...> wrote:

> Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is a
> Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these are
> wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not
> corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen.
> However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be
> the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple
> of years back.
>
> Joe Fischer
> Friendswood, TX
> http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer
>


--
Eric Carpenter
Austin

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 6:24 am
From: Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Budgeriar eBird Submissions
There are also relatively wild budgerigars in Texas that nest out there
year after year and successfully raise young. My walking route had nests
for many years until they expanded and nested over the apartment office
door and sit and poop over the doorstep and prospective tenants. After the
young were gone they sealed the area and the birds moved to another area
where they fed a cooper's hawk for about 3 more years.

It is important to track new species as after starting real slow the
species can suddenly proliferate. Budgies did this on the west coast of
florida and there were really large numbers expanding in all directions.
Then expansion stopped, the range edges retracted until there were only a
few in one town and then basically none. No one has the slightest idea as
to why and how they adapted and then unadapted as no one ever really
studied them as they were on the evil list by the NIB listers. Crested Myna
is another species that did well and then vanished.

the tame ebird designation should mean that you know it is a domestic bird
by knowing that particular bird escaped and has not been adapted to the
wild. Has not bred and has not happily lived for several years, found
cousins etc.

The Houston area is a great budgie habitat with lots of artificial and
natural nest sites. Many of the pet shop birds are inbred and not well
adapted to outdoors or even inside a house but others are raised to
maintain the wild genetic stock and colors.

On Sat, Jun 23, 2018 at 8:06 AM, Joe and Renee Fischer <
<dmarc-noreply...> wrote:

> Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is a
> Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird? Certainly no one believes these are
> wild at this point. A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not
> corrected. I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen.
> However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be
> the correct option. We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple
> of years back.
>
> Joe Fischer
> Friendswood, TX
> http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer
>



--
Joseph C. Kennedy
on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
<Josephkennedy36...>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 6:07 am
From: Joe and Renee Fischer <dmarc-noreply...> (Redacted sender fischer13 for DMARC)
Subject: [texbirds] Budgeriar eBird Submissions
Why do Texas birders continue to submit Budgeriar to eBird when there is a Budgeriar (Domestic) option in eBird?  Certainly no one believes these are wild at this point.  A bit surprised that the eBird reviewers have not corrected.  I am certainly in favor of submitting everything that is seen.  However, some species do have a domestic option and that would appear to be the correct option.  We went through this with the Indian Peafowl a couple of years back. Joe FischerFriendswood, TX
http://www.pbase.com/joe_e_fischer

 

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