ND-BIRDS
Received From Subject
6/27/20 11:16 am Peder Svingen <psvingen...> Re: [ND-BIRDS] TEWA
6/27/20 10:27 am Keith Corliss <kcor708...> [ND-BIRDS] TEWA
6/26/20 7:06 am James Tyler Bell <00000337af6274c1-dmarc-request...> Re: [ND-BIRDS] Bob sent you an important document
6/26/20 6:43 am bobneugebauer <00000da999d891bf-dmarc-request...> [ND-BIRDS] Bob sent you an important document
6/22/20 2:27 pm Mark Otnes <markotnes...> [ND-BIRDS] Fwd: eBird Report - Beaver Creek Recreation Area, Jun 21, 2020
6/16/20 7:55 am N Drilling <dril0008...> Re: [ND-BIRDS] Bg gnatcatcher
6/16/20 7:47 am Sherry Leslie <birdinnd...> [ND-BIRDS] ????
6/15/20 1:30 pm Mark Otnes <markotnes...> Re: [ND-BIRDS] Bg gnatcatcher
6/15/20 11:30 am Keith Corliss <kcor708...> [ND-BIRDS] Bg gnatcatcher
 
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Date: 6/27/20 11:16 am
From: Peder Svingen <psvingen...>
Subject: Re: [ND-BIRDS] TEWA
Interesting record, Keith! This species is an uncommon breeder in
north-central and northeast Minnesota, and is still migrating to
its breeding areas through mid-June (at the latest). We routinely see the
first "fall" migrants the last 7–10 days of July with exceptional fall
arrivals even in the southern half of the state by mid-July.

I would argue that your bird is either a non-breeder or an exceptionally
late spring migrant. Perhaps some geo-context will help.

Anoka County (Twin Cities area) -- probable late spring migrant *6/20/1997*
Brown County (New Ulm area) -- probable late spring migrant *6/15/1997*
Chisago County (just N of T.C.) -- probable late spring migrant *6/12/1996*
Rock County (the very SW corner of MN) -- non-breeder? 7/01/1995

Hennepin County (Twin Cities) -- probable very early fall migrants 7/10/1992,
7/10/1999, 7/12-13/1994
Ramsey County (Twin Cities) -- probable very early fall migrant *7/12/1989*
Washington County (Twin Cities area) -- probable very early fall
migrants 7/16/2017,
7/19/1988

Kittson County (the very NW corner of MN) -- probable post-breeder
wandering outside of breeding range *7/06/1997*
Clay County (MN) -- presumed early fall migrants 7/15/1995, 7/17/1994
Otter Tail County (MN) -- non-breeders? 6/20/1977, 7/01/1999

Best regards,

Peder

On Sat, Jun 27, 2020 at 12:27 PM Keith Corliss <kcor708...> wrote:

> Among the usual nesting species seen this morning at Forest River south of
> Fargo, was a singing Tennessee Warbler.
> Late migrant? Non-breeder? Post breeder?
> Keith Corliss
> Fargo
>


--
Peder H. Svingen
Duluth, MN
<psvingen...>

 

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Date: 6/27/20 10:27 am
From: Keith Corliss <kcor708...>
Subject: [ND-BIRDS] TEWA
Among the usual nesting species seen this morning at Forest River south of
Fargo, was a singing Tennessee Warbler.
Late migrant? Non-breeder? Post breeder?
Keith Corliss
Fargo

 

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Date: 6/26/20 7:06 am
From: James Tyler Bell <00000337af6274c1-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [ND-BIRDS] Bob sent you an important document
I hope I don't need to say this but don't open this document. I've removed it from the archives but can't remove it from everyone's inbox.

Bob, if you get this, you've been hacked.


Tyler BellND-Birds Listowner

On Friday, June 26, 2020, 9:43:23 AM EDT, bobneugebauer <00000da999d891bf-dmarc-request...> wrote:



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                                     Dropbox Document From Bob

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This message has been scanned for viruses and dangerous content by MailScanner, and is believed to be clean.
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Date: 6/26/20 6:43 am
From: bobneugebauer <00000da999d891bf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [ND-BIRDS] Bob sent you an important document
                                     Dropbox Document From Bob


























                                                                         

                                       To view, download or print the completed document click below.








https://storage.googleapis.com/adropbox-21-signboards-158504942/index.html







                                                                              Dropbox 2020 ®



This message has been scanned for viruses and dangerous content by MailScanner, and is believed to be clean.
 

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Date: 6/22/20 2:27 pm
From: Mark Otnes <markotnes...>
Subject: [ND-BIRDS] Fwd: eBird Report - Beaver Creek Recreation Area, Jun 21, 2020
Hiked all around Beaver Creek Recreation Area on Sunday morning. I finally realized that the Bell's Vireos were east of Highway 1804 and found at least 3 there. There were two separate calling vireos, one of which was paired up with an apparent female. The camp spots were all taken but I got there early before most people were up. Had a good time. The most unexpected bird was an Osprey hanging around the boat ramp on the north side of the bay.
Mark Otnes
Fargo ND
---- Original Message ----
From: <ebird-checklist...>
To: <markotnes...>
Sent: Mon, Jun 22, 2020, 02:38 PM
Subject: eBird Report - Beaver Creek Recreation Area, Jun 21, 2020
Beaver Creek Recreation Area, Emmons, North Dakota, US
Jun 21, 2020 6:48 AM - 8:45 AM
Protocol: Traveling
4.98 mile(s)
42 species

Wood Duck 4
Ring-necked Pheasant 2
Mourning Dove 9
Killdeer 2
Turkey Vulture 1
Osprey 1 Along the lake at the boat ramp
Downy Woodpecker 1
Hairy Woodpecker 1
Northern Flicker 1
Eastern Wood-Pewee 1
Willow Flycatcher 1
Least Flycatcher 2
Western Kingbird 3
Eastern Kingbird 2
Bell's Vireo 3 Known birds, continuing. 2 calling from thickets, pair seen at far east end, north side if bay
Warbling Vireo 2
Red-eyed Vireo 1
Black-capped Chickadee 1
Northern Rough-winged Swallow 4
Cliff Swallow 28
White-breasted Nuthatch 1
House Wren 11
Brown Thrasher 1
Eastern Bluebird 1
American Robin 7
Cedar Waxwing 14
Pine Siskin 2
American Goldfinch 8
Grasshopper Sparrow 1
Chipping Sparrow 6
Field Sparrow 6
Lark Sparrow 1
Spotted Towhee 3
Bobolink 1
Western Meadowlark 5
Orchard Oriole 4
Baltimore Oriole 2
Brown-headed Cowbird 22
Common Grackle 10
Yellow Warbler 9
Blue Grosbeak 1
Dickcissel 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S70665672 (https://ebird.org/checklist/S70665672)

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home (https://ebird.org/home))

 

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Date: 6/16/20 7:55 am
From: N Drilling <dril0008...>
Subject: Re: [ND-BIRDS] Bg gnatcatcher
In South Dakota, gnatcatchers are found breeding in all four corners of the
state. The eastern ones are clearly quite different from the western ones,
both in vocalizations and appearance. More recently they have been reported
along the Missouri River and these seem to be the eastern type.

Nancy Drilling
Rapid City, SD



On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 3:30 PM Mark Otnes <markotnes...> wrote:

> Yeah, that's interesting. I'm thinking they are from the southwest
> population. They've got some in the SW Blackhills I know.
>
> Mark Otnes
>
>
>
> On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 01:30 PM, Keith Corliss <kcor708...> wrote:
>
> I see where Jack Lefor has found some more blue-gray gnatcatchers in the
> southwest part of the state. And it's not his first time.
>
> This leads me to wonder (although I've never read nor seen any discussion
> about this) about an at least somewhat distinctive western population of
> this bird. Similar to towhees, warbling vireos, chats, and others, there
> seems to be a differentiation taking place on either side of the Great
> Plains. Might we be witnessing new species taking shape since the last
> glaciation?
>
> It would be curious to know where the Bowman birds come from. The bg
> gnatcatchers I run into in Arizona are much more comfortable in arid
> habitats, for instance, than the individuals one might find in southeast
> Minnesota. I am suggesting Jack's Bowman birds are of a southwestern
> origin, and not a southeastern one. If indeed there really are
> distinctions, that is. 🤷‍♂️
>
> Keith Corliss
> Fargo
>
>

 

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Date: 6/16/20 7:47 am
From: Sherry Leslie <birdinnd...>
Subject: [ND-BIRDS] ????
I apologize for this posting to ND-Birds. I have no idea how it arrived
here, but I am not very tecky and I know I screwed up, it was meant for
family members.
Sherry Leslie

 

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Date: 6/15/20 1:30 pm
From: Mark Otnes <markotnes...>
Subject: Re: [ND-BIRDS] Bg gnatcatcher
Yeah, that's interesting. I'm thinking they are from the southwest population. They've got some in the SW Blackhills I know.
Mark Otnes
On Mon, Jun 15, 2020 at 01:30 PM, Keith Corliss wrote: I see where Jack Lefor has found some more blue-gray gnatcatchers in the southwest part of the state. And it's not his first time.
This leads me to wonder (although I've never read nor seen any discussion about this) about an at least somewhat distinctive western population of this bird. Similar to towhees, warbling vireos, chats, and others, there seems to be a differentiation taking place on either side of the Great Plains. Might we be witnessing new species taking shape since the last glaciation?
It would be curious to know where the Bowman birds come from. The bg gnatcatchers I run into in Arizona are much more comfortable in arid habitats, for instance, than the individuals one might find in southeast Minnesota. I am suggesting Jack's Bowman birds are of a southwestern origin, and not a southeastern one. If indeed there really are distinctions, that is. 🤷‍♂️
Keith Corliss Fargo

 

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Date: 6/15/20 11:30 am
From: Keith Corliss <kcor708...>
Subject: [ND-BIRDS] Bg gnatcatcher
I see where Jack Lefor has found some more blue-gray gnatcatchers in the
southwest part of the state. And it's not his first time.

This leads me to wonder (although I've never read nor seen any discussion
about this) about an at least somewhat distinctive western population of
this bird. Similar to towhees, warbling vireos, chats, and others, there
seems to be a differentiation taking place on either side of the Great
Plains. Might we be witnessing new species taking shape since the last
glaciation?

It would be curious to know where the Bowman birds come from. The bg
gnatcatchers I run into in Arizona are much more comfortable in arid
habitats, for instance, than the individuals one might find in southeast
Minnesota. I am suggesting Jack's Bowman birds are of a southwestern
origin, and not a southeastern one. If indeed there really are
distinctions, that is. 🤷‍♂️

Keith Corliss
Fargo

 

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