inland-nw-birders
Received From Subject
7/18/18 4:55 am Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> [inland-NW-birders] County Yearlist Project mid-year update available at WA Birder
7/16/18 5:10 pm Charles Swift <chaetura...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Swan Lake Weekend
7/16/18 4:25 pm EarthBourne Resources, Inc. <earthbourne...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Swan Lake Weekend
7/16/18 2:21 pm Jesse Utz <jesseutz...> [inland-NW-birders] Swan Lake Weekend
7/16/18 1:12 pm Halley Davis <mountainsnbooks...> [inland-NW-birders] Mount Spokane Black-Backed Woodpecker
7/14/18 12:13 pm Chris Loggers <loggersc...> [inland-NW-birders] Wanted: people to conduct goshawk surveys in the Wedge (between Kettle and Columbia rivers)
7/13/18 5:38 pm Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...> [inland-NW-birders] Peregrine Falcon takes Cooper's Hawk
7/12/18 6:02 pm Terry Gray <clgtlg...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Hummingbird Movement
7/12/18 8:29 am Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Hummingbird Movement
7/12/18 8:13 am Keith Carlson <kec201814...> [inland-NW-birders] Hummingbird Movement
7/11/18 6:23 pm Terry Gray <clgtlg...> [inland-NW-birders] Two Anna's Hummingbirds
7/10/18 8:47 am Terry Gray <clgtlg...> [inland-NW-birders] American Avocet - 2 at UI Dairy pond this am
7/9/18 8:42 pm Keith Carlson <kec201814...> [inland-NW-birders] Mann Lake Shorebirds Moving
7/9/18 5:48 pm Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...> [inland-NW-birders] shorebirds in Walla Walla Co.
7/9/18 11:39 am Shirley Sturts <shirley.sturts...> [inland-NW-birders] Fwd: FW: sandhill cranes
7/5/18 2:59 pm Keith Carlson <kec201814...> [inland-NW-birders] Migration/ / Movement Underway
7/5/18 10:08 am Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...> [inland-NW-birders] WWCo. 4th of July Big Day
7/4/18 12:47 pm <ml12712...> [inland-NW-birders] Newman Lake
7/3/18 3:08 pm Tim O'Brien <kertim7179...> [inland-NW-birders] Cheney-Spangle Road Semipalmated Sandpiper - Slavin status
6/25/18 1:53 pm Richard Baltierra <wolfbaltierra...> [inland-NW-birders] Rock Lake ROSS'S GOOSE, and other Whitman goodies
6/24/18 11:08 am Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...> [inland-NW-birders] Ash-throated Flycatcher - yard bird!
6/24/18 10:04 am Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...> [inland-NW-birders] Adler Flycatcher
6/22/18 1:52 pm Stuart Muller <synstistute...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Dusky/Hammonds
6/22/18 9:38 am The Catfinch <c9r0m0...> [inland-NW-birders] Stevens County Rose Breasted Grosbeak
6/22/18 5:10 am Isacoff, Jon <isacoff...> [inland-NW-birders] Dusky/Hammond's
6/21/18 1:44 pm Karl Kosciuch <kosciuch...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
6/21/18 1:38 pm Charles Swift <chaetura...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
6/21/18 1:28 pm Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
6/21/18 1:26 pm Charles Swift <chaetura...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
6/21/18 8:00 am Karl Kosciuch <kosciuch...> [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
6/20/18 10:13 pm Marlene Cashen <mjaycashen...> [inland-NW-birders] Male Lesser Goldfinch
6/20/18 1:26 pm Nancy Draznin <nancy.draznin...> [inland-NW-birders] Genesee
6/19/18 8:23 am Keith Carlson <kec201814...> [inland-NW-birders] Yellow-headed Blackbirds
6/18/18 12:07 pm Isacoff, Jon <isacoff...> Re: [inland-NW-birders] Pend Oreille Co. ALDER FLYCATCHER
6/18/18 11:49 am Isacoff, Jon <isacoff...> [inland-NW-birders] Pend Oreille Co. ALDER FLYCATCHER
 
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Date: 7/18/18 4:55 am
From: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] County Yearlist Project mid-year update available at WA Birder
Hi Tweeters & Inland NW Birders

An updated version of the 2018 County Yearlist Project is up and available at Washington Birder. We've updated all 39 counties as of the mid-way point in the year. Thanks to everyone who has contributed by sending county compilers their sightings &/or posting on eBird.

At the mid-year point, as summer gets into full swing, this is a decent time to compare totals with previous years. 21 counties have reported higher species counts this year compared with last year. 16 have lower totals this year, and 2 counties have exactly the same mid-year total as last year.

29 counties have totals within ten of last year’s total, as with previous years, a sign of some stability in figuring out what the first half of the year looks like.

Statewide, the total of 367 is five higher than this time last year, and right in the middle of the total over the past 7 years. Western Washington is running 10 above last year and Eastern Washington is 5 higher this time around.

Here’s a side-by-side comparison with mid-way totals for the past 7 years:

Year 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012
Washington State 367 362 364 369 358 369 370
Western Washington 330 320 323 334 320 325 334
Eastern Washington 304 299 302 301 299 308 299


53 species have been seen in all 39 counties by this point;. This was very similar to last year’s tally of 54 ‘39ers’ by this point - I compared lists though, and they was less overlap than I expected - about 43 of the species were shared, and each year had 9 or 10 unique 39ers.
145 species have been seen in 30 or more counties — those would be our most widespread Washington regulars —

If you'd like to take a look at where things stand, the list and many other interesting files are at the Washington Birder website:

http://www.wabirder.com/ <http://www.wabirder.com/>


A direct link to the 2018 county yearlist & the list of county compilers contact info:
http://www.wabirder.com/county_yearlist.html <http://www.wabirder.com/county_yearlist.html>


Thanks to all the compilers and all those pitching in to sketch a picture of another year's birds in WA.




Matt Bartels
Seattle, WA
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Date: 7/16/18 5:10 pm
From: Charles Swift <chaetura...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Swan Lake Weekend
Just an FYI, Swan Lake appears on the map to be in the Colville National
Forest a bit southwest of Republic.

thanks, Charles.

On Mon, Jul 16, 2018 at 4:25 PM EarthBourne Resources, Inc. <
<earthbourne...> wrote:

> Jesse…Please contact me off the list. I have some questions about your
> observations. Thanks!!! Becky (<earthbourne...>)
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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--
Charles Swift
Moscow, Idaho
<chaetura...>

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Date: 7/16/18 4:25 pm
From: EarthBourne Resources, Inc. <earthbourne...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Swan Lake Weekend
JessePlease contact me off the list. I have some questions about your observations. Thanks!!! Becky (<earthbourne...>)


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Date: 7/16/18 2:21 pm
From: Jesse Utz <jesseutz...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Swan Lake Weekend
While camping at Swan Lake over four days saw lots of feathery friends. I
will put list at the end but I wanted to tell you all a little story. The
camp host from South Dakota said that earlier in the week he witnessed a
Bald Eagle dive down and take one of the Common Loon Chicks, the morning we
arrived (I did not witness) a Golden Eagle got the other chick. The whole
four days we were there it was non stop calling by the male, even at night
and the female kept her head low to the water near the middle of the lake
the whole weekend. It seemed he was searching and she was in morning. Just
thought I would share. Here is my list from the four days......

20 plus Cedar Waxwings
1 Bald Eagle
1 Golden Eagle
2 Red tailed Hawks
4 Canadian Geese
2 Osprey
1 Northern Harrier (really gray)
1 female ruffed grouse
many California Quail
1 Wild Turkey
1 Lewis Woodpecker
6 Northern Flicker
3 Downy Woodpecker
1 Red Napped Woodpecker (my first)
1 Pileated Woodpecker
3 Black Chinned Humming Birds
2 Roufous Humming Birds
3 Barn Swallows
6 Western Kingbirds
14 American Robins
2 Varied Thursh
2 Black Billed Mag Pies
1 Gray Jay
7 Crows
6 Black Capped Chickadees
10 Yellow Warblers
1 Wilson Warbler
1 Yellow Rumped Warbler
8 Western Tanager
2 Fox Sparrow
31 Chipping Sparrow
6 Black Headed Gosbeak
1 Spotted Tohee

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Date: 7/16/18 1:12 pm
From: Halley Davis <mountainsnbooks...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Mount Spokane Black-Backed Woodpecker
Hi all!

So on July 11, 2018 I went hiking with a friend to Mount Spokane State
park, and then parked at the Selkirk Lodge. We then proceeded to hike on
Bear Grass trail, and about 50-60 meters in we spotted a BLACK-BACKED
WOODPECKER. It was on the right side of the trail, and did not seem to be
afraid. Just sat on the tree comfortably doing its thing with us close by.
The bird was only about 20 feet off of the trail, and its drums were what
led us to seeing it.

Here is the checklist:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47181423

While going on this loop we also saw RUFFED GROUSE with young. Please
forgive me for this coming so late, I wanted to confirm that what I saw was
a black-backed with another person as to not get hopes up.

Happy Birding!!!!!

Halley Davis

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Date: 7/14/18 12:13 pm
From: Chris Loggers <loggersc...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Wanted: people to conduct goshawk surveys in the Wedge (between Kettle and Columbia rivers)
If in your desire to explore places and find birds you want to do some off-trail hiking with a purpose and get financially and maybe aves-ially compensated, consider assisting Kelsey Retich, wildlife biologist on the west zone of the Colville NF, in conducting surveys for goshawks on the National Forest System land in the Wedge (between Kettle and Columbia rivers). The survey consists of finding a series of locations on the landscape (using a GPS unit or the Avenza PDF Maps app on your phone or tablet), broadcasting an electronic call for goshawks, and noting the results. In the known nests we're monitoring elsewhere, about 85% of the young have fledged as of 7/13, and they are vocal!

The survey is part of a larger project to survey all the best goshawk habitat and a smattering of less optimal habitat the Colville National Forest that lies west of the Columbia River, in order to refine our model of good goshawk habitat and to identify nest distribution. Last year we surveyed the habitat on each side of the Kettle Crest, and the Wedge remains for this year. Hexagons cover about 400 acres and each contains 19 calling locations. You would call twice in each location, per a protocol, then move to the next station. Stations don't have to be done in any particular order. Most people can complete a hexagon in about 5-7 hours. Pay is $150 per hexagon regardless of the number of people with whom you split it. Surveys will continue until early August. You can do as few as 3-4 or as many as you wish until each hexagon has been surveyed twice.

If you're interested, give Kelsey a call at 509-738-7727 or flip her an email <kretich...>

Feel free to pass this message to others who might be interested.

Chris Loggers (retired wildlife biologist, USFS)

Example of a 400-acre survey hexagon, showing the 19 calling stations.
Most hexagons have at least 1 road running through them that makes access easier.
[https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?ui=2&ik=fd0b2dc854&view=fimg&th=164905c29a27d7a3&attid=0.1&disp=emb&realattid=3fa7209361371d3a_0.1&attbid=ANGjdJ-Bx-35sxYK_ypPfGICDRrt_getXkLTXr_nj7q9XJ4TWfa8jy4Go4V3h5fFJVERQ-8ZrPuxcxeqQLNJW76lqGFPurHDM322wdImFduLipNylBUMuJSgwa4t29g&sz=w522-h570&ats=1531595504927&rm=164905c29a27d7a3&zw&atsh=1]

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Date: 7/13/18 5:38 pm
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Peregrine Falcon takes Cooper's Hawk
Our friend George over near Dayton WA observed this:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47175680

ML

--
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"


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Date: 7/12/18 6:02 pm
From: Terry Gray <clgtlg...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Hummingbird Movement
One more comment is that some years they have to compete with many wasps and bees for food from flowers and feeders. The wasps and bees in Moscow at our feeders are not as aggressive as many years past.



Terry



From: <inland-nw-birders-bounces...> [mailto:<inland-nw-birders-bounces...>] On Behalf Of Carl Lundblad
Sent: Thursday, July 12, 2018 8:29 AM
To: Keith Carlson; inland birders
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Hummingbird Movement



Hi Keith,



Rufous, Calliope, and Black-chinned Hummingbirds all begin their southbound migration in late June (Black-chinned maybe averaging slightly later). It may seem earlier than needed, but there's not necessarily a reason to stick around once breeding in complete, and this timing is thought to take advantage of the peak flower bloom in the central and southern Rocky Mountains. Rufous and Calliope migrate north primarily along the coast and south along the Rockies and interior west.



Cheers,



Carl Lundblad

Moscow, ID



On Thu, Jul 12, 2018 at 8:13 AM, Keith Carlson <kec201814...> wrote:

Terry Gray's recent post about hummingbird observations in and around his Moscow home caused me to wonder about recent observations around our Lewiston home.

Since May, we have had a female Black-chinned Hummingbird visiting our feeders several times daily. This is the same pattern we have observed for several years.

We presume she is nesting nearby and two years ago found a nest in our neighbor's yard.

From May until late June we have seen no other hummers visit our feeders, altho she visits many tines each day.

Since the 1st of July, we have had daily visits by a male Black-chinned, a male Rufous and a female Rufous.

The female Black-chinned continues.



What causes this pre-migration movement at a time when food sources are presumably plentiful at all altitudes ?



Keith Carlson

Lewiston


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Date: 7/12/18 8:29 am
From: Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Hummingbird Movement
Hi Keith,

Rufous, Calliope, and Black-chinned Hummingbirds all begin their southbound
migration in late June (Black-chinned maybe averaging slightly later). It
may seem earlier than needed, but there's not necessarily a reason to stick
around once breeding in complete, and this timing is thought to take
advantage of the peak flower bloom in the central and southern Rocky
Mountains. Rufous and Calliope migrate north primarily along the coast and
south along the Rockies and interior west.

Cheers,

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, ID

On Thu, Jul 12, 2018 at 8:13 AM, Keith Carlson <kec201814...>
wrote:

> Terry Gray's recent post about hummingbird observations in and around his
> Moscow home caused me to wonder about recent observations around our
> Lewiston home.
> Since May, we have had a female Black-chinned Hummingbird visiting our
> feeders several times daily. This is the same pattern we have observed for
> several years.
> We presume she is nesting nearby and two years ago found a nest in our
> neighbor's yard.
> From May until late June we have seen no other hummers visit our feeders,
> altho she visits many tines each day.
> Since the 1st of July, we have had daily visits by a male Black-chinned, a
> male Rufous and a female Rufous.
> The female Black-chinned continues.
>
> What causes this pre-migration movement at a time when food sources are
> presumably plentiful at all altitudes ?
>
> Keith Carlson
> Lewiston
>
> _______________________________________________
> Inland-nw-birders mailing list
> send email to: <Inland-nw-birders...>
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> birders
>
>

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Date: 7/12/18 8:13 am
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Hummingbird Movement
Terry Gray's recent post about hummingbird observations in and around his Moscow home caused me to wonder about recent observations around our Lewiston home.Since May, we have had a female Black-chinned Hummingbird visiting our feeders several times daily. This is the same pattern we have observed for several years.We presume she is nesting nearby and two years ago found a nest in our neighbor's yard.From May until late June we have seen no other hummers visit our feeders, altho she visits many tines each day.Since the 1st of July, we have had daily visits by a male Black-chinned, a male Rufous and a female Rufous.The female Black-chinned continues. What causes this pre-migration movement at a time when food sources are presumably plentiful at all altitudes ? Keith CarlsonLewiston
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Date: 7/11/18 6:23 pm
From: Terry Gray <clgtlg...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Two Anna's Hummingbirds
Hi Birders,

On June28th observed a juvenile male Anna's. Last night observed a smaller
and different looking probable female Anna's. This morning the female was
at the feeder most of the morning and at noon the one from June 8th took
over the yard for the rest of the day. Also observed an adult male
black-chinned and a female Calliope.

At the UI Arboretum this morning observed a female Rufous at the Butterfly
garden area near the south end of the arb.

Good Birding,

Terry Gray
890 Stefany Ln
Moscow ID 83843
208-596-5212
http://www.flickr.com/photos/terryandchristine/



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Date: 7/10/18 8:47 am
From: Terry Gray <clgtlg...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] American Avocet - 2 at UI Dairy pond this am
Hi Birders,

There are two American Avocet at the UI Dairy Ponds along with the usual
species and a Ruddy Duck in eclipse also.

Good Birding,

Terry Gray
890 Stefany Ln
Moscow ID 83843
208-596-5212
http://www.flickr.com/photos/terryandchristine/



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Date: 7/9/18 8:42 pm
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Mann Lake Shorebirds Moving
Spent 45 minutes at Mann lake this early afternoon.Of note were seven Semipalmated Sandpipers traveling with eight Western Sandpipers.This is unusually early for the Semis.https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/41501540150/in/dateposted-public/ Keith E CarlsonLewiston
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Date: 7/9/18 5:48 pm
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] shorebirds in Walla Walla Co.
Hello all,

Shorebirds have really moved in the last few days - between the Millet
Pond and Simplot ponds this morning were:

Black-necked Stilts - over a dozen, 1 young

American Avocet - 3

SEMIPALMATED PLOVER - early - first of year

Killdeer - 2 dozen +

Baird's Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 10

Pectoral Sandpiper - 1

Semipal Sandpiper - 1 Saturday morning - blood pond

Western Sandpiper - 100+

Short-billed Dowitcher - 1

Long-billed Dowitcher - 4

Spotted Sandpiper - 10

Solitary Sandpiper - 1

Lesser Yellowlegs - 17

Greater Yellowlegs - 7

Wilson's Phalarope - 1

Millet Pond still has water - but drying up fast. The Dodd Rd Blood
Ponds had men and machinery all over - so no birds there.

On another note - RED CROSSBILLS have come in - been hearing them in
town and in the mountains - January - May they were absent here.

High water on the Columbia so no shorebirds. Hot and windy out there today.

Good summer birding, ML

--
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"


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Date: 7/9/18 11:39 am
From: Shirley Sturts <shirley.sturts...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Fwd: FW: sandhill cranes
This is a status change for latilong 2 on the latilong maps - to red
(confirmed breeding - see
https://idahobirds.net/distribution/maps/cranes/sandhill-crane/
Mike's ranch is in Kootenai County - along the lower CDA River.

Shirley Sturts
---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: mike schlepp <schleppranch...>
Date: Sun, Jul 8, 2018 at 2:59 PM
Subject: FW: sandhill cranes
To: "<shirley.sturts...>" <shirley.sturts...>




Hello,



I was able to document a pair of Sandhill Cranes that have hatched a chick
on the property. I have seen them off and on for about a week in the East
field portion of the easement.



This morning (7/8/2018) I saw the two adults in the East field food plot
area and was able to take a series of short videos (4) of the Cranes and
their baby. The chick is now about 1/3 size of the parents.



To view the videos in order:



(1) https://youtu.be/6RQADjpVVVw



(2) https://youtu.be/G9Qy-7_1A_o



(3) https://youtu.be/hyWICd_gzdI --- watch for the chick-----



(4) https://youtu.be/aAUfWZtRbTM



Please share with whomever you think might have an interest.--





enjoy,



Mike Schlepp



--





Schlepp Seed Ranch L.L.C.

26175 South Hwy. 3

Cataldo, Idaho 83810

phone# 208.689.3593

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Date: 7/5/18 2:59 pm
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Migration/ / Movement Underway
A short visit to Mann Lake this noon yielded an amazing mix.Fall migration / Summer movement - something unusual. Black-necked Stilts 6American Avocets 27 https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/42319085485/in/dateposted-public/Western Sandpiper 1 adult in beautiful breeding plumageSemipalmated Sandpiper 1 next to Western for an easy comparison- very early date for Mann Lake.Wilson's Phalarope 41 The most I have ever seen at one time https://www.flickr.com/photos/birddog/43223783061/in/dateposted-public/ Canyon Birders start our weekly trips to Mann Lake this Saturday at 0800, might be a good omen. Keith E CarlsonLewiston
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Date: 7/5/18 10:08 am
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] WWCo. 4th of July Big Day
Hello all,

Started our 4th of July Walla Walla County BIG DAY with WESTERN
SCREECH-OWL across the street as we were loading our vehicle at 3:20 am.
David Ward from Olympia joined us for the day - which was a huge help!
We ended with 147 species - our highest ever.

Headed up into the Blue Mountains - hearing many birds before dawn. Up
higher GRAY JAYS surprised us - rare in WWCo. Then out to the Millet
Pond where 14 COMMON NIGHTHAWKS were catching bugs over the trees. David
spotted a SOLITARY SANDPIPER out in the mudflats. Shorebirds were in off
Dodd Rd - including RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, LEAST, WESTERN SEMIPALMATED
AND BAIRD'S SANDPIPERS, GREATER YELLOWLEGS among the usual BLACK-NECKED
STILT, AMERICAN AVOCET, SPOTTED SANDPIPER and many Killdeer.

At the Port of Wallula were Western Grebes plus 1 CLARK'S GREBE. Down in
Wallula Gap the WHITE-THROATED SWIFTS were very vocal and visible - over
2 dozen of them. Picked up all the usual waterfowl at McNary NWR
including 1 CANVASBACK. Many BANK SWALLOWS were staging right on
Humorist Road - to the east - and a dozen were roadkilled by cars - and
this is a dead end road, so sad.

Heading back to the Blue Mountains we drove through the center of the
county where several GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were posing on fencelines. Our
surprise here was a singing BREWER'S SPARROW.

Quick stop at home for LESSER GOLDFINCH - have at least 15 every day now
- showed up in January and never left. Then up Mill Creek for DIPPER,
hummingbirds and back up into the mountains for woodpeckers and ended
the day with GREAT GRAY OWL family, calling PYGMY and SAW-WHET OWLS. Had
more swallows in the roads - in one place over 300.

Worst misses - Steller's Jay, Belted Kingfisher, Canyon Wren, Common
Merganser, Wilson's Phalarope, American Wigeon, Williamson's Sapsucker
(haven't found ANY in the county this year - had several nesting last
year), Common Loon (a few usually summer on the Columbia)

Fun day - all 19+ hours of it! Mammals included Deer, Elk, Raccoon,
Snowshoe Hare, Coyote, Big Brown Bat, Little Brown Myotis. A RUBBER BOA
was also a highlight - our first live one of the year. We were welcomed
home with a fireworks show!

Good summer birding, M&ML



--
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"


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Date: 7/4/18 12:47 pm
From: <ml12712...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Newman Lake
Just a quick message in case you are in this neck of the woods on the 4th.
In attempting to find that "colony of Bobolinks" I stopped where they have
been sited and found a male Lazuli Bunting singing and then later diving
down into the fields. It was on a support wire alongside a telephone pole -
the first one north of that green and yellow large metal shop/hangar on the
NE side of the lake. As I was driving, heard the usual W.Wood Pee Wee,
Yellow throat, Swainson's Thrush, Yellow Warblers. Good Day, Margo Wolf
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Date: 7/3/18 3:08 pm
From: Tim O'Brien <kertim7179...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Cheney-Spangle Road Semipalmated Sandpiper - Slavin status
Hi all,

Early July usually means south-bound shorebird migration starting with some of the peeps.  It has been pretty reliable the past few years to be able to pick a peep or two if you can find a muddy area with some water left.  Today, July 3, along Cheney-Spangle Road at the Jolly Rancher ponds, the set of two ponds on the south side of the road has prime conditions.  The pond closest to the road is a mix of mud and water.  Several Killdeer were present and one small sandpiper.  I put the scope up and here is a Semipalmated Sandpiper.  Good one for early July!

I did start the day at Slavin Ranch with the hopes of a plethora of shorebirds, but alas the pool is still very full and there is very little exposed mud at the far south end with no shorebirds present.  But if you like Coots and lots of challenging eclipse ducks, that's your spot.  Not to mention a few ticks - managed to find one on my dog after we got home.

I also checked the Old SR195 ponds and they are dried up.  A quick pass along Philleo Lake, yielded American White Pelican, Ring-billed Gulls, one or two California Gulls, and other expected species.

With the change in the July forecast for cooler and wetter conditions, it may be a challenge to find a good shorebird spot.  Please share if you do!

Tim O'Brien
Spokane Valley, WA
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Date: 6/25/18 1:53 pm
From: Richard Baltierra <wolfbaltierra...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Rock Lake ROSS'S GOOSE, and other Whitman goodies
On Saturday I spent a nice afternoon around Whitman county and found some
nice additions to the yearlist. At Wawawai Park I relocated the reported
RED EYED VIREOS presumably back to breed here which is exciting. I also had
numerous Yellow Breasted Chats singing their hearts out. Steptoe Butte was
fairly productive despite another really windy day up there, many Bullock's
Orioles, many Lazuli Buntings, several Gray Catbirds, and a few flycatcher
species were nice to see. Rock Lake undoubtedly had the biggest surprise,
with a lone ROSS"S GOOSE. I scoped a small flock of Canada Geese almost as
soon as I got there and spotted this small white goose. Definitely was not
expecting to see this county lifer on a warm summer afternoon! There is one
cruddy pic on eBird which unfortunately was the best I could as the flock
quickly disappeared around the lake bend. Texas Lake is still very full and
is almost how I left it a month and a half ago. After little searching I
found all 3 teal species, and relocated one nice male TRICOLORED BLACKBIRD
(possibly more but most suspected birds were very distant). On my way back
to Pullman I flushed a LONG EARED OWL off the side of the road, right
across from a roost that held up to 4 owls earlier this year, so it is very
likely this bird is/was breeding here. A fun day, and soon I will be all
finished with another season of Idaho bird surveys!

RJ Baltierra
Pullman, WA

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Date: 6/24/18 11:08 am
From: Mike & MerryLynn <m.denny...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Ash-throated Flycatcher - yard bird!
Hello all from MerryLynn,

Up early this morning and out in the carport - couldn't believe my ears!
ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER calling from across the street in a huge walnut
tree. Started walking across the street and as usual our very raucous
crows started divebombing me - never heard or saw the flycatcher again -
these crows are really a nuisance - nesting in the neighbors tree this
year and won't shut up from dawn to dusk.

This is the 2nd record for Walla Walla County - we just heard and saw
many of these beautiful birds over in Rock Creek, Klickitat county -

Bird called several times - it was not a starling! Post-breeding wanderer -?

ML - in College Place, WA


--
Mike & MerryLynn Denny
Birding the Beautiful Walla Walla Valley
"If you haven't gone birding, you haven't lived"


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Date: 6/24/18 10:04 am
From: Russ Koppendrayer <russkope...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Adler Flycatcher
Hi Birders,

The Alder Flycatcher is still "T"ing up and singing at the North end of the
Kalispell Dike Rd in Pend Oreille Co as originally reported about a week
ago. It seems to prefer a small snag right beside the road just South of
the 90 degree turn.

Russ Koppendrayer
Longview, WA

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Date: 6/22/18 1:52 pm
From: Stuart Muller <synstistute...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Dusky/Hammonds
I'm sure I speak for more than just myself when I say how much I've enjoyed
and learnt from this empid thread.

Makes me want to suggest that we have more such threads on differentiating
cryptic species!

Thanks to the fundis for sharing their expertise.

On Fri, Jun 22, 2018 at 9:37 AM, <inland-nw-birders-request...>
wrote:

> Send Inland-nw-birders mailing list submissions to
> <inland-nw-birders...>
>
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> https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
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> <inland-nw-birders-owner...>
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of Inland-nw-birders digest..."
>
> Today's Topics:
>
> 1. Dusky/Hammond's (Isacoff, Jon)
> 2. Stevens County Rose Breasted Grosbeak (The Catfinch)
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: "Isacoff, Jon" <isacoff...>
> To: "inland-nw-birders@uidaho. edu" <inland-nw-birders...>
> Cc:
> Bcc:
> Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2018 12:09:37 +0000
> Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Dusky/Hammond's
> Hi,
>
> I agree with everything Charles and Carl said. I’d add to small points
> that might be helpful:
>
> 1. On the full 3-note song, the Dusky has an exaggerated pronounced warble
> on the middle note that is longer and significantly more warbly than
> Hammond’s. The 3 notes are also a little slower and the pause between each
> slightly longer on Dusky than on Hammond's.
>
> 2. As Carl noted, the “doo-hic” call of Dusky is distinctive, though
> Pewees do have a call that is somewhat similar. But fortunately none of
> the other empids have anything like it.
>
> 3. The “pip” call of the Hammond’s sounds like a single Pygmy Nuthatch
> note, at times surprisingly so. In some of the migrant traps in Eastern WA
> where Pygmy Nuthatch are never present they periodically get mis-reported
> by birders hearing migrant Hammond’s “pips.”
>
> Hope this helps!
>
> Jon Isacoff,
> Spokane, WA
>
>
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: The Catfinch <c9r0m0...>
> To: <inland-nw-birders...>
> Cc:
> Bcc:
> Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2018 09:37:51 -0700
> Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Stevens County Rose Breasted Grosbeak
> Hi all,
> Just this morning, I saw a beautiful male ROSE BREASTED GROSBEAK at my
> parent's house in southern Stevens County. I asked my Mom and she did
> approve of people dropping by to see the bird today, but I'm not sure how
> long he will be hanging around. Email me if you are interested.
> Here is a link to the ebird checklist with pictures: https://ebird.org/
> view/checklist/S46718533
> Happy Birding,
> Curtis
>
> _______________________________________________
> Inland-nw-birders mailing list
> <Inland-nw-birders...>
> https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
>
>

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Date: 6/22/18 9:38 am
From: The Catfinch <c9r0m0...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Stevens County Rose Breasted Grosbeak
Hi all,
Just this morning, I saw a beautiful male ROSE BREASTED GROSBEAK at my
parent's house in southern Stevens County. I asked my Mom and she did
approve of people dropping by to see the bird today, but I'm not sure how
long he will be hanging around. Email me if you are interested.
Here is a link to the ebird checklist with pictures:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46718533
Happy Birding,
Curtis

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Date: 6/22/18 5:10 am
From: Isacoff, Jon <isacoff...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Dusky/Hammond's
Hi,

I agree with everything Charles and Carl said. I’d add to small points that might be helpful:

1. On the full 3-note song, the Dusky has an exaggerated pronounced warble on the middle note that is longer and significantly more warbly than Hammond’s. The 3 notes are also a little slower and the pause between each slightly longer on Dusky than on Hammond's.

2. As Carl noted, the “doo-hic” call of Dusky is distinctive, though Pewees do have a call that is somewhat similar. But fortunately none of the other empids have anything like it.

3. The “pip” call of the Hammond’s sounds like a single Pygmy Nuthatch note, at times surprisingly so. In some of the migrant traps in Eastern WA where Pygmy Nuthatch are never present they periodically get mis-reported by birders hearing migrant Hammond’s “pips.”

Hope this helps!

Jon Isacoff,
Spokane, WA


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Date: 6/21/18 1:44 pm
From: Karl Kosciuch <kosciuch...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
Excellent information. I've heard the 2 part Hammond's call and thought it
was a Least. Good to have insight on that.

On Thu, Jun 21, 2018, 1:38 PM Charles Swift <chaetura...> wrote:

> So Carl and I differ a bit on difficulty of separating these two by voice
> but that may be partly my bias having heard good numbers of both. (At least
> we agree on habitat preferences! One place to look for Dusky around
> north-central Idaho is old clear cuts that have grown up into heavy shrub
> cover.) I will agree Hammond's/Dusky can can be trickier at a distance so
> focus on finding nearby bird to learn the voice differences (then you will
> also have a much sense of the habitat). Hammond's also often give only the
> first 2 parts of their song later in the day and this can actually sound a
> bit reminiscent (at least to me) of Least Flycatcher che-bek calls when
> given alone (I got confused by this a few times when I first moved to
> northern Idaho).
>
> Charles.
>
> On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 1:28 PM Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Karl et al.,
>>
>> In my experience, Dusky Flycatchers are far outnumbered by Hammond's in
>> most of north Idaho, although my own coverage is probably biased more
>> towards Hammond's habitat than Dusky. There is some to moderate habitat
>> overlap, but Duskies are generally found in drier more-open forest and
>> secondary growth while Hammond's select more mesic sites and mature
>> forest. On Moscow Mountain, I tend to find Duskies in the open Ponderosa,
>> Douglas Fir, Larch forest and logged areas with Hammond's dominant in Grand
>> Fir, Red Cedar, old-growth, and more-mesic microsites within the other
>> forest types.
>>
>> Contrary to conventional wisdom, I think Hammond's Vs. Dusky can be even
>> harder to identify by song than by appearance. 2 out of 3 phrases of the
>> main Dusky song are very similar to the 2-phrase song of Hammond's, but
>> Dusky songs also include a third high clear phrase unlike Hammond's. The
>> high clear note seems to be delivered infrequently, and Dusky often sing
>> 2-phrase songs like Hammond's with the high clear phrase included
>> infrequently. Call notes ("whit" vs. "pip") can be helpful. The 2 species
>> can also be easily separated with what Nathan Pieplow calls their "2-part
>> calls" (http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3953). The "2-part call" of
>> Dusky ("Du-hic") is quite distinctive and can be conspicuous, especially
>> crepuscularly. The 2-part call of Hammond's is more rarely heard and less
>> conspicuous.
>>
>> The "Western" Flycatchers (presumably Cordilleran with increasing
>> Pac.-slope introgression, through secondary contact, as one goes further
>> north) of the panhandle are most common in deciduous forest but can be
>> found in some mesic coniferous forests, as well.
>>
>> Hope that helps!
>>
>> Best and Happy Birding,
>>
>> Carl Lundblad
>> Moscow, ID
>>
>> On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 8:00 AM, Karl Kosciuch <kosciuch...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Hi all - I wanted to get a sense of identifying some of the empids in
>>> the Moscow area. I can easily identify Willow Flycatcher by call at
>>> Mountain View Park along Paradise Creek. However, the empids on Moscow
>>> Mountain are a bit more challenging for me, especially differentiating
>>> between Hammond's and Dusky. Charles Swift posted a checklist from Moscow
>>> Mountain from June 6, 2018, which had both Hammond's and Dusky. He also
>>> had Pacific Slope/Cordilleran. I know the song structure of
>>> Hammond's/Dusky, but can't distinguish...is there a habitat association
>>> that helps? And I'm pretty sure I've head call notes of a flycatcher that
>>> isn't Hammond's/Dusky. I suspect it is the Pacific Slope/Cordilleran.
>>>
>>> Best,
>>> Karl Kosciuch
>>> Moscow, ID
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Inland-nw-birders mailing list
>>> send email to: <Inland-nw-birders...>
>>> manage subscription:
>>> https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
>>>
>>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Inland-nw-birders mailing list
>> send email to: <Inland-nw-birders...>
>> manage subscription:
>> https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
>>
> --
> Charles Swift
> Moscow, Idaho
> <chaetura...>
>

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Date: 6/21/18 1:38 pm
From: Charles Swift <chaetura...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
So Carl and I differ a bit on difficulty of separating these two by voice
but that may be partly my bias having heard good numbers of both. (At least
we agree on habitat preferences! One place to look for Dusky around
north-central Idaho is old clear cuts that have grown up into heavy shrub
cover.) I will agree Hammond's/Dusky can can be trickier at a distance so
focus on finding nearby bird to learn the voice differences (then you will
also have a much sense of the habitat). Hammond's also often give only the
first 2 parts of their song later in the day and this can actually sound a
bit reminiscent (at least to me) of Least Flycatcher che-bek calls when
given alone (I got confused by this a few times when I first moved to
northern Idaho).

Charles.

On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 1:28 PM Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
wrote:

> Hi Karl et al.,
>
> In my experience, Dusky Flycatchers are far outnumbered by Hammond's in
> most of north Idaho, although my own coverage is probably biased more
> towards Hammond's habitat than Dusky. There is some to moderate habitat
> overlap, but Duskies are generally found in drier more-open forest and
> secondary growth while Hammond's select more mesic sites and mature
> forest. On Moscow Mountain, I tend to find Duskies in the open Ponderosa,
> Douglas Fir, Larch forest and logged areas with Hammond's dominant in Grand
> Fir, Red Cedar, old-growth, and more-mesic microsites within the other
> forest types.
>
> Contrary to conventional wisdom, I think Hammond's Vs. Dusky can be even
> harder to identify by song than by appearance. 2 out of 3 phrases of the
> main Dusky song are very similar to the 2-phrase song of Hammond's, but
> Dusky songs also include a third high clear phrase unlike Hammond's. The
> high clear note seems to be delivered infrequently, and Dusky often sing
> 2-phrase songs like Hammond's with the high clear phrase included
> infrequently. Call notes ("whit" vs. "pip") can be helpful. The 2 species
> can also be easily separated with what Nathan Pieplow calls their "2-part
> calls" (http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3953). The "2-part call" of
> Dusky ("Du-hic") is quite distinctive and can be conspicuous, especially
> crepuscularly. The 2-part call of Hammond's is more rarely heard and less
> conspicuous.
>
> The "Western" Flycatchers (presumably Cordilleran with increasing
> Pac.-slope introgression, through secondary contact, as one goes further
> north) of the panhandle are most common in deciduous forest but can be
> found in some mesic coniferous forests, as well.
>
> Hope that helps!
>
> Best and Happy Birding,
>
> Carl Lundblad
> Moscow, ID
>
> On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 8:00 AM, Karl Kosciuch <kosciuch...> wrote:
>
>> Hi all - I wanted to get a sense of identifying some of the empids in the
>> Moscow area. I can easily identify Willow Flycatcher by call at Mountain
>> View Park along Paradise Creek. However, the empids on Moscow Mountain are
>> a bit more challenging for me, especially differentiating between Hammond's
>> and Dusky. Charles Swift posted a checklist from Moscow Mountain from June
>> 6, 2018, which had both Hammond's and Dusky. He also had Pacific
>> Slope/Cordilleran. I know the song structure of Hammond's/Dusky, but can't
>> distinguish...is there a habitat association that helps? And I'm pretty
>> sure I've head call notes of a flycatcher that isn't Hammond's/Dusky. I
>> suspect it is the Pacific Slope/Cordilleran.
>>
>> Best,
>> Karl Kosciuch
>> Moscow, ID
>>
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Inland-nw-birders mailing list
>> send email to: <Inland-nw-birders...>
>> manage subscription:
>> https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
>>
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Inland-nw-birders mailing list
> send email to: <Inland-nw-birders...>
> manage subscription:
> https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-birders
>
--
Charles Swift
Moscow, Idaho
<chaetura...>

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Date: 6/21/18 1:28 pm
From: Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
Hi Karl et al.,

In my experience, Dusky Flycatchers are far outnumbered by Hammond's in
most of north Idaho, although my own coverage is probably biased more
towards Hammond's habitat than Dusky. There is some to moderate habitat
overlap, but Duskies are generally found in drier more-open forest and
secondary growth while Hammond's select more mesic sites and mature
forest. On Moscow Mountain, I tend to find Duskies in the open Ponderosa,
Douglas Fir, Larch forest and logged areas with Hammond's dominant in Grand
Fir, Red Cedar, old-growth, and more-mesic microsites within the other
forest types.

Contrary to conventional wisdom, I think Hammond's Vs. Dusky can be even
harder to identify by song than by appearance. 2 out of 3 phrases of the
main Dusky song are very similar to the 2-phrase song of Hammond's, but
Dusky songs also include a third high clear phrase unlike Hammond's. The
high clear note seems to be delivered infrequently, and Dusky often sing
2-phrase songs like Hammond's with the high clear phrase included
infrequently. Call notes ("whit" vs. "pip") can be helpful. The 2 species
can also be easily separated with what Nathan Pieplow calls their "2-part
calls" (http://earbirding.com/blog/archives/3953). The "2-part call" of
Dusky ("Du-hic") is quite distinctive and can be conspicuous, especially
crepuscularly. The 2-part call of Hammond's is more rarely heard and less
conspicuous.

The "Western" Flycatchers (presumably Cordilleran with increasing
Pac.-slope introgression, through secondary contact, as one goes further
north) of the panhandle are most common in deciduous forest but can be
found in some mesic coniferous forests, as well.

Hope that helps!

Best and Happy Birding,

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, ID

On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 8:00 AM, Karl Kosciuch <kosciuch...> wrote:

> Hi all - I wanted to get a sense of identifying some of the empids in the
> Moscow area. I can easily identify Willow Flycatcher by call at Mountain
> View Park along Paradise Creek. However, the empids on Moscow Mountain are
> a bit more challenging for me, especially differentiating between Hammond's
> and Dusky. Charles Swift posted a checklist from Moscow Mountain from June
> 6, 2018, which had both Hammond's and Dusky. He also had Pacific
> Slope/Cordilleran. I know the song structure of Hammond's/Dusky, but can't
> distinguish...is there a habitat association that helps? And I'm pretty
> sure I've head call notes of a flycatcher that isn't Hammond's/Dusky. I
> suspect it is the Pacific Slope/Cordilleran.
>
> Best,
> Karl Kosciuch
> Moscow, ID
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Inland-nw-birders mailing list
> send email to: <Inland-nw-birders...>
> manage subscription: https://lists.uidaho.edu/mailman/listinfo/inland-nw-
> birders
>
>

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Date: 6/21/18 1:26 pm
From: Charles Swift <chaetura...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
Karl & All,

Not much time to respond right now but you can separate Hammond's and Dusky
fairly easily with some practice. Get one of the smart phone apps (Audubon
or Sibley) or listen to song differences on all about birds web site. The
Hammond's song has harsher notes overall than Dusky and is more emphatic
sounding, Dusky is sweeter, clearer, and a bit thinner. They are both on
Moscow Mountain as you noted. Dusky prefers more open forest with extensive
shrub cover and Hammond's more mature forest patches with taller and more
closed canopy. There are call note differences as well but trickier (you
can find examples online). Western Flycatcher (i.e.
Pacific-slope/Cordilleran and intermediates) have much more distinctive
song and (more often heard) call notes, again check examples online but
they are much more easily separated from Hammond's/Dusky. Western is also
an emphatic song/call note, they mostly just sing their full song close to
dawn but give the pweet call note throughout the day. They are more often
near houses on the fringe of Moscow Mountain (typically nesting in and
around out buildings) but also nest right in Moscow so if you hear an empid
in town (at this time) it is almost certainly that. Nice to find the Willow
FC at Mountainview Park, they are more often a bit out of town.

thanks, Charles.

On Thu, Jun 21, 2018 at 8:01 AM Karl Kosciuch <kosciuch...> wrote:

> Hi all - I wanted to get a sense of identifying some of the empids in the
> Moscow area. I can easily identify Willow Flycatcher by call at Mountain
> View Park along Paradise Creek. However, the empids on Moscow Mountain are
> a bit more challenging for me, especially differentiating between Hammond's
> and Dusky. Charles Swift posted a checklist from Moscow Mountain from June
> 6, 2018, which had both Hammond's and Dusky. He also had Pacific
> Slope/Cordilleran. I know the song structure of Hammond's/Dusky, but can't
> distinguish...is there a habitat association that helps? And I'm pretty
> sure I've head call notes of a flycatcher that isn't Hammond's/Dusky. I
> suspect it is the Pacific Slope/Cordilleran.
>
> Best,
> Karl Kosciuch
> Moscow, ID
>
>
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--
Charles Swift
Moscow, Idaho
<chaetura...>

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Date: 6/21/18 8:00 am
From: Karl Kosciuch <kosciuch...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Moscow area Empindonax
Hi all - I wanted to get a sense of identifying some of the empids in the
Moscow area. I can easily identify Willow Flycatcher by call at Mountain
View Park along Paradise Creek. However, the empids on Moscow Mountain are
a bit more challenging for me, especially differentiating between Hammond's
and Dusky. Charles Swift posted a checklist from Moscow Mountain from June
6, 2018, which had both Hammond's and Dusky. He also had Pacific
Slope/Cordilleran. I know the song structure of Hammond's/Dusky, but can't
distinguish...is there a habitat association that helps? And I'm pretty
sure I've head call notes of a flycatcher that isn't Hammond's/Dusky. I
suspect it is the Pacific Slope/Cordilleran.

Best,
Karl Kosciuch
Moscow, ID

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Date: 6/20/18 10:13 pm
From: Marlene Cashen <mjaycashen...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Male Lesser Goldfinch

At 12:19 p.m. Wednesday, 6/20, I saw a male Lesser Goldfinch in a feeder in our back yard in Veradale, WA (Spokane Valley). We watched as he came to feed off and on during the day. Later we sat out in the yard and watched five American Goldfinches feeding in a spruce tree in the yard where we throw hulled sunflower seeds as a treat for the birds. The Lesser finally came to feed in the spruce and we were able to get a lot of pictures as confirmation of the sighting.

I know Terry Little had a Lesser Goldfinch in his Spokane County church yard several months ago, which I believe was a first for Spokane County. I don't know if there have been any other sightings. I submitted a report to ebird.

Marlene & Bob Cashen

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Date: 6/20/18 1:26 pm
From: Nancy Draznin <nancy.draznin...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Genesee
Just now there was a turkey vulture dining on a skunk carcass on the side of the main road coming in from the highway, something I have never seen here before. Yesterday at the sewage lagoon, birds of note were an American avocet and two Wilson's phalaropes.

Nancy Draznin, LM, CPM
208-310-3252
motherwisemidwifery.com
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Date: 6/19/18 8:23 am
From: Keith Carlson <kec201814...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Yellow-headed Blackbirds
body {height: 100%; color:#000000; font-size:12pt; font-family:arial, helvetica, sans-serif;}This Am (0730) found six Yellow-headed Blackbirds in an unusual location.
The birds were in a large dead tree along the Lewiston Levee trail on the Snake River at the mouth of Tammany Creek about 50 yards North of the Hells Gate State Park boundary All six were in female/first year plumage. Keith E CarlsonLewiston
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Date: 6/18/18 12:07 pm
From: Isacoff, Jon <isacoff...>
Subject: Re: [inland-NW-birders] Pend Oreille Co. ALDER FLYCATCHER
Apologies — location is 2 miles North of the Tribal HQ and 4 miles North of the Usk bridge.



> On Jun 18, 2018, at 11:49 AM, Isacoff, Jon <isacoff...> wrote:
>
> Adding to a nice regional trend I located a singing ALDER FLYCATCHER in Pend Oreille Co. this morning. The location is on the Dike Rd., 4 miles North of Calispell Tribal headquarters in Usk. The bird is at the North corner (90 degree turn South) of the road. This location is tribal property so please be respectful for any seeking to chase the bird. If accepted by the WBRC this would be the 5th record for WA and the 2nd for Pend Oreille Co., where the last bird was found in 2014.
>
> Also in the area was a LARK SPARROW singing along Westside Calispell Rd. Approximately 2/10 mile South of the intersection with Middle Fork Rd. (Lark Sparrow’s are rare in Pend Oreille Co.).
>
> The eBird checklist with audio files is here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46637902
>
> Good birding,
> Jon Isacoff, Spokane
>

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Date: 6/18/18 11:49 am
From: Isacoff, Jon <isacoff...>
Subject: [inland-NW-birders] Pend Oreille Co. ALDER FLYCATCHER
Adding to a nice regional trend I located a singing ALDER FLYCATCHER in Pend Oreille Co. this morning. The location is on the Dike Rd., 4 miles North of Calispell Tribal headquarters in Usk. The bird is at the North corner (90 degree turn South) of the road. This location is tribal property so please be respectful for any seeking to chase the bird. If accepted by the WBRC this would be the 5th record for WA and the 2nd for Pend Oreille Co., where the last bird was found in 2014.

Also in the area was a LARK SPARROW singing along Westside Calispell Rd. Approximately 2/10 mile South of the intersection with Middle Fork Rd. (Lark Sparrow’s are rare in Pend Oreille Co.).

The eBird checklist with audio files is here: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46637902

Good birding,
Jon Isacoff, Spokane

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