JerseyBirds
Received From Subject
6/17/18 3:35 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Just take a Sunday chill pill and go Birding, Pomona and Brig, Atlantic County
6/17/18 11:37 am Gerald Peterson <ghpeterson...> [JERSEYBI] Nesting box report and other
6/16/18 2:02 pm Michael Britt <sootyshear...> [JERSEYBI] Newark Meadows checklist w/ map link
6/16/18 2:00 pm Michael Britt <sootyshear...> [JERSEYBI] Kearny East & Newark Meadows
6/16/18 11:13 am William Dix <WilliamDix...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Location requests
6/16/18 10:41 am William Saidel <saidel...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Location requests
6/15/18 1:36 pm B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Location requests
6/15/18 1:31 pm CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...> [JERSEYBI] Supawna Meadows NWR and surrounding area
6/15/18 8:08 am William Saidel <saidel...> [JERSEYBI] Location requests
6/15/18 6:29 am robert dodelson <rdodelson...> [JERSEYBI] Assunpink redux
6/15/18 5:13 am Marty DeAngelo <martytdx...> [JERSEYBI] OT: primitive camping sites in NJ
6/15/18 12:37 am Robert DeCandido <rdcny...> [JERSEYBI] Spotted Towhee (1952)
6/14/18 11:24 am CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...> [JERSEYBI] Help with a raptor ID
6/14/18 6:41 am robert dodelson <rdodelson...> [JERSEYBI] Assunpink this morning
6/14/18 4:40 am Beth Goldberg <goldbug310...> [JERSEYBI] Upcoming Bergen County Audubon Meeting
6/13/18 12:23 pm Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny...> [JERSEYBI] Spotted Towhee (1952)
6/13/18 9:19 am Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny...> [JERSEYBI] WSB - history (pre-dates 1952-53 at least)
6/12/18 7:16 pm CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...> [JERSEYBI] High Mountain Park, Tuesday late afternoon
6/12/18 4:12 pm Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...> [JERSEYBI] north Jersey - BC Chickadees
6/12/18 12:09 pm Susan Garretson Friedman <susan.garretsonfriedman...> [JERSEYBI] Audubon article on this year’s WSB
6/11/18 6:42 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Conclusion on the Brig Red Knot and the Dowitcher ID
6/11/18 4:13 pm Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...> [JERSEYBI] white ibis - salem county
6/10/18 7:08 pm Ann Thompson <ann46thomp...> [JERSEYBI]
6/9/18 5:25 pm Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...> [JERSEYBI] June - breeding codes and ebird
6/9/18 4:18 pm Michael Britt <sootyshear...> [JERSEYBI] Breeding Dickcissels
6/9/18 11:13 am robert dodelson <rdodelson...> [JERSEYBI] where have all the Dickcissels gone?
6/9/18 10:24 am Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Banded Red Knot and Dowitcher ID request, Brig Refuge
6/9/18 8:10 am jim wright <wrightjamesb...> [JERSEYBI] A second request (pressing my luck)
6/7/18 5:14 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Is it possible for Prothonotary Warbler (PROW) to build a nest in a blow-down tree root ball ?
6/7/18 7:06 am jim wright <wrightjamesb...> [JERSEYBI] Birding columnist wants your thoughts on best birding places at the Shore this summer
6/5/18 1:20 pm Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...> [JERSEYBI] Sheri Williamson on Hummingbirds - BirdCallsRadio
6/5/18 12:57 pm Chris Sturm <thesturms2...> [JERSEYBI] MS Kite in Manchester
6/5/18 11:17 am Michael Britt <sootyshear...> [JERSEYBI] Misc.
6/5/18 9:23 am Samuel Galick <sam.galick...> [JERSEYBI] Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks (11), Mercer County
6/4/18 8:01 am CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...> [JERSEYBI] A challenging day (long post)
6/2/18 7:48 pm Lillian Shupe <lrshupe...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Roseate Spoonbill?
6/2/18 2:53 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] My failed attempt to find Nelson’s Sparrow in Brig vicinity
6/2/18 7:46 am Aiden Dartley <adartley123...> [JERSEYBI] Roseate Spoonbill?
6/1/18 12:07 pm Lillian Shupe <lrshupe...> [JERSEYBI] Columbia Lake, Warren County to close
5/31/18 11:15 am B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> [JERSEYBI] Great Blue Heron and reflection (photo)
5/31/18 10:57 am CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...> [JERSEYBI] Fast-n-Furious / Taking My Time
5/30/18 6:39 am Susan Treesh <sktreesh...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Anhinga at Kittatinny Valley State Park (Sussex County) - just flew
5/30/18 6:34 am Susan Treesh <sktreesh...> [JERSEYBI] Anhinga at Kittatinny Valley State Park (Sussex County)
5/29/18 8:37 pm Lisa Potash <lisapotash6...> [JERSEYBI] Owl in the Box Update
5/29/18 7:39 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Yong Comment - Warbler (all time?) # day record N of NJ and another NJ E Bird funny submittal
5/29/18 1:22 pm Tom Brown <tshrike19...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Possible Bicknell's Thrush at Palmyra Cove 5/25
5/29/18 6:49 am CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...> [JERSEYBI] Mourning Warbler: ho hum?
5/29/18 6:24 am Fred Vir <avtrader...> [JERSEYBI] Warbler (all time?) # day record N of NJ and another NJ E Bird funny submittal
5/29/18 5:20 am Marty DeAngelo <martytdx...> [JERSEYBI] Possible Bicknell's Thrush at Palmyra Cove 5/25
5/27/18 12:00 pm Lillian Shupe <lrshupe...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Roseate spoonbill reported in Warren County near Columbia
5/27/18 8:37 am Susan Treesh <sktreesh...> [JERSEYBI] Roseate spoonbill reported in Warren County near Columbia
5/26/18 3:24 am Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Common on Pacific Loon reported at Cape May on May 20 and 23
5/25/18 10:29 am Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...> [JERSEYBI] Scenic trail - gloucester - migrants - no
5/25/18 8:03 am Marty DeAngelo <martytdx...> [JERSEYBI] Palmyra Cove 5/25
5/23/18 4:10 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Yong Comment - [JERSEYBI] "Barely enough" horseshoe crab eggs for arriving red knots | Breaking News | pressofatlanticcity.com
5/23/18 1:52 pm Stuart <weluvowls...> [JERSEYBI] "Barely enough" horseshoe crab eggs for arriving red knots | Breaking News | pressofatlanticcity.com
5/23/18 8:11 am David Lapuma <david.lapuma...> [JERSEYBI] "Bob's Woods" Access Restrictions
5/22/18 5:24 am Laura B. Berlik <lberlik...> Re: [JERSEYBI] JERSEYBI Digest - 20 May 2018 to 21 May 2018 (#2018-136)
5/21/18 4:48 pm James O'Brien <jphillipobrien...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Allenhurst Cave Swallows
5/21/18 4:46 pm James O'Brien <jphillipobrien...> [JERSEYBI] Allenhurst Cave Swallows
5/21/18 2:11 pm B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> [JERSEYBI] A four-Vireo-species day from my deck...
5/21/18 7:34 am CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...> [JERSEYBI] The Yin and Yang of birding
5/21/18 5:31 am Tom Reed <coturnicops...> [JERSEYBI] Brown-headed Nuthatch, Cape May Pt
5/20/18 4:10 pm Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...> [JERSEYBI] Heislerville - shorebirds and terrapins
5/20/18 2:12 pm Michael Britt <sootyshear...> [JERSEYBI] Misc. Hudson Co.
5/20/18 6:03 am L Larson <llarson2...> [JERSEYBI]
5/19/18 10:45 pm JOHN VOTTA <wadda101...> [JERSEYBI]
5/19/18 6:58 pm Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...> [JERSEYBI] radar tonight
5/19/18 5:38 pm Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...> [JERSEYBI] A flooded field search - Gloucester county
5/19/18 4:05 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Cape May birding
5/19/18 8:21 am Stuart <weluvowls...> [JERSEYBI] Birding Tomorrow
 
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Date: 6/17/18 3:35 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Just take a Sunday chill pill and go Birding, Pomona and Brig, Atlantic County
After some yard birding, I eventually drove towards Brig then the bird-light bulb went on. Why not hit the Renault winery golf course assuming the place may have gone belly-up and the fairways would have turned into to a fantastic grassland habitat. Plan was ask for permission to enter then check this new birding place out. I was so wrong and saw golfers as soon as I pulled up. Consolation prize was finding local birds attracted by a small puddle remaining along the road-side ditch bit pass the winery. Decent view of a female Blue Grosbeak looking for a drink.

Then towards Sahl’s Farm and Odessa Avenue grasslands in Pomona in search of Dickcissel. No luck there and onwards towards Brig. Viewed from the Gull Pond tower, two least bitterns flushed from the cattail stand and perched on top. Best part was passing the bittern to a young birder who was birding w/ his grandma. Also the bittern tried to fool me by mimicking the calls of Cukoo.

To take a time capsule to Sat, I was lucky to find a Wilson’s Phalarope just before the Goose Marker 4. Initial view was thru the binds but I refused to believe my eyes or the bird brain and put an ID on this bird. Photo documentation was required. As soon as the lens was extended to the max the Wilson’s flushed. Hit the button hoping I shot the Wilson’s. Managed one distant photo but the bird was gone. Besides the fact that I never got the chance to share this bird w/ fellow birders, it does not exist on my bird list for the day not that I keep one.

Near the dogleg, to my surprise I encountered that same Snowy/Little hybrid egret again. First sighting was 4-22. I felt sad for this egret. Reason ? He/She only has one long plume and has yellow lores and bit of shaggy head. For that reason, this egret draws little or no interest from the majority of bird *listing* community.

Yong Kong
Camden County



How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 6/17/18 11:37 am
From: Gerald Peterson <ghpeterson...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Nesting box report and other
I have had one Blue Bird fledge about a week ago, no count made, and one (or two?) Carolina Wren about three days ago.  I have one Tree Swallow that was still actively feeding yesterday, I have not checked today.  On the Wrens I have an interesting situation, the nest is made in my propane barbeque stove on the deck, obviously not being used.  The Carolinas used it last year, but, surprise, this year when I opened to inspect (requires opening the top and then removing the heat shield) I found two distinct nests, one with an unhatched egg.  Both appear to have been used and no more than a couple inches apart. Is it possible that two pairs of Wrens were using the stove at the same time?  Or one pair splitting eggs between two adjacent nests?
Sadly, I heard a thud yesterday while on my deck and on looking I see a Nut Hatch lying on the deck quivering.  I reached down to pick up and could feel the warmth of the body as it stopped quivering.  I place it in a safe place in case the bird was in shock and would recover.  It did not recover.  It hit a solid wood clapboard section of a wall with no glass closer than 10 feet away, the door/windows to the kitchen.  This large glass area has multi light grids and I have never found a dead bird body near the widows.  I believe the bird simply made a carless turn and hit the wall, perhaps there was a hawk in the area, I did not see or hear a hawk.
Interested if there are any views on the origin/use of the double Wren nests.
JerryClinton Township, near Echo Hill Park.


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 6/16/18 2:02 pm
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Newark Meadows checklist w/ map link
Oops...sorry.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46592615

Mike Britt
Bayonne


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 6/16/18 2:00 pm
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Kearny East & Newark Meadows
I decided to do something a little different this morning, so I paddled
Kearny East (NW impoundment) for the first time. Highlights were: 12 WOOD
DUCK, GREEN-WINGED TEAL (drake), 3 RUDDY DUCK (bluebills), LEAST BITTERN,
COMMON GALLINULE (pair w/ at least 4 young), LEAST TERN, and BLACK SKIMMER.

full eBird checklist w/ pics:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46591591

After that, I decided to explore Newark Meadows for breeders. If you've
never heard of anyone birding Newark Meadows, it's because you haven't read
about Charles Urner's excursions there years ago and because most of it has
been developed. There's only a tiny remnant left, underneath the Newark Bay
Extension. I'll paste my checklist below, not for the avian highlights but
so one can click on the map (change to satellite). Looking down from the
extension, I've often marveled at the mix of low and high saltmarsh, not to
mention the site's isolation. While I'm sure Clapper Rail is present, I
didn't encounter any, nor did I encounter any salt sparrows, which were my
real target. Just up the Hackensack River, Saltmarsh Sparrow still breeds
in the larger Riverbend Marsh and elsewhere. This spot could be promising
during migration, as its positioned at the mouth of the Passaic and
Hackensack Rivers in the Newark Bay Estuary, amid a sea of development. It
does however require some effort to access (kayak for starters). There is
an unoccupied Osprey platform (they do nest on the nearby railroad bridge)
onsite and a Barn Owl box...

Mike Britt
Bayonne, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 6/16/18 11:13 am
From: William Dix <WilliamDix...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Location requests
Bill,


Your explanation caused me to recall watching Canada Geese drop out of formation to land in an open field for the night. I got a big kick out of their aerobatics as they lost speed and altitude, trying to find the right spot to land. They would often turn completely upside down in the process of descending.


At least one such occasion was late October, 2015. The location was an open field just off of Mountain View Road, on the left as you head north on MV, just before it tees into 518 in Blawenberg. I watched and photographed them from the east edge of Hobler Park (entrance off the Great Road), so the sun would be at my back just before sunset. As I recall, the field was cut over corn, which appealed to the geese. In subsequent years it was replanted in soybeans. I haven't been by there recently so I don't know what the crop is, or if the geese still use it. They also sometimes came down in another field on the east side of Mountain View.


It might be worth a try, although I know they move around. Good luck.


Bill Dix

Princeton

http://billdix.smugmug.com<http://billdix.smugmug.com/>



________________________________
From: JerseyBirds <JERSEYBI...> on behalf of William Saidel <saidel...>
Sent: Saturday, June 16, 2018 1:41 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Location requests

Hi Bernie and everyone else,

I am Bill, not professor. My ID card says I am an employee and that is how I consider myself.

Bernie, instead of roost (and I meant overnight roosting), should I have used rest overnight?

Now, my project is two-fold.
With respect to geese, I am trying to take videos at 60 or greater frames per second as they transition to gliding before they stall out and land. I am really curious which bird in a given V (or modified V) starts gliding first and who is 2nd, 3rd, etc. Given the dogma that each bird except the first derives an aerodynamic advantage from the birds immediately in front of and immediately behind it, I predict that which bird is first to transition to gliding is random, but the 2nd and 3rd will depend on who was first.
Being able to do this study requires predicting where to go to catch them as they are preparing to land. So where do I go?

The second project (which I will do at 60 frames per second and maybe 1000 frames per second) is to catch flocks of starlings on the ground and video them as they lift up. What is the rate of speed to account for the sequential lifting of the birds spread throughout the flock? Another way of saying this is supposing that a trigger occurs at one point (which my preliminary work shows is accurate) and then spreads at a certain velocity (my first measure was about 18 ft/second). I can argue that I am actually examining the velocity of information transfer. By determining that velocity, I will be able to compare it to the velocity of the transfer of information in a flying flock as it turns (which has already been published).
Incidentally, I was able to stimulate an entire flock at once with sound (or trigger all birds at the same time) and they all lifted together. So again, I need to be able to predict where to go and from my previous observations, the two hours before sunset is my window if I know where to go?

This project is time-consuming because nature does as it wants. I'm just trying to increase my odds of success by identifying places to search.

Thanks, Bernie, for the opportunity to expand on what I thought was a simple request. (Little did I know...)
Bill

________________________________________
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2018 4:35 PM
To: William Saidel
Cc: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Location requests

Professor Saidel,

Would you mind defining what you mean by "roosting locations" for
these two species? Staging areas prior to migration? Places where they
gather for the winter? Places where they gather for the night? Places
where they breed? Something else? It's not quite clear to me...

Thanks,

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Fri, Jun 15, 2018 at 11:07 AM, William Saidel
<saidel...> wrote:
> This is my annual request. Many of you have been NJ birding far longer than I. I am trying to find roosting locations for starlings and Canadian geese for a science project. I'll be doing video and analyzing them back in my lab. But the rule for nature as you know is that nature does what it wants, not what you or I want. To increase my chances, I appeal to all you listers for roosting locations you might know of or suspect for these two species. Then I can go earlier in the day and wait...and wait.
> So...any good locations you know of ? (My preference is Princeton and South to Cape May, but I will travel North if a good roosting area is identified.)
> Thanks in advance,
> Bill
>
> Assoc Prof Wm Saidel
> Laboratory of Neuromorphometry
> Dept of Biology
> Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
> Camden campus
>
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/<http://www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 6/16/18 10:41 am
From: William Saidel <saidel...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Location requests
Hi Bernie and everyone else,

I am Bill, not professor. My ID card says I am an employee and that is how I consider myself.

Bernie, instead of roost (and I meant overnight roosting), should I have used rest overnight?

Now, my project is two-fold.
With respect to geese, I am trying to take videos at 60 or greater frames per second as they transition to gliding before they stall out and land. I am really curious which bird in a given V (or modified V) starts gliding first and who is 2nd, 3rd, etc. Given the dogma that each bird except the first derives an aerodynamic advantage from the birds immediately in front of and immediately behind it, I predict that which bird is first to transition to gliding is random, but the 2nd and 3rd will depend on who was first.
Being able to do this study requires predicting where to go to catch them as they are preparing to land. So where do I go?

The second project (which I will do at 60 frames per second and maybe 1000 frames per second) is to catch flocks of starlings on the ground and video them as they lift up. What is the rate of speed to account for the sequential lifting of the birds spread throughout the flock? Another way of saying this is supposing that a trigger occurs at one point (which my preliminary work shows is accurate) and then spreads at a certain velocity (my first measure was about 18 ft/second). I can argue that I am actually examining the velocity of information transfer. By determining that velocity, I will be able to compare it to the velocity of the transfer of information in a flying flock as it turns (which has already been published).
Incidentally, I was able to stimulate an entire flock at once with sound (or trigger all birds at the same time) and they all lifted together. So again, I need to be able to predict where to go and from my previous observations, the two hours before sunset is my window if I know where to go?

This project is time-consuming because nature does as it wants. I'm just trying to increase my odds of success by identifying places to search.

Thanks, Bernie, for the opportunity to expand on what I thought was a simple request. (Little did I know...)
Bill

________________________________________
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2018 4:35 PM
To: William Saidel
Cc: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Location requests

Professor Saidel,

Would you mind defining what you mean by "roosting locations" for
these two species? Staging areas prior to migration? Places where they
gather for the winter? Places where they gather for the night? Places
where they breed? Something else? It's not quite clear to me...

Thanks,

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Fri, Jun 15, 2018 at 11:07 AM, William Saidel
<saidel...> wrote:
> This is my annual request. Many of you have been NJ birding far longer than I. I am trying to find roosting locations for starlings and Canadian geese for a science project. I'll be doing video and analyzing them back in my lab. But the rule for nature as you know is that nature does what it wants, not what you or I want. To increase my chances, I appeal to all you listers for roosting locations you might know of or suspect for these two species. Then I can go earlier in the day and wait...and wait.
> So...any good locations you know of ? (My preference is Princeton and South to Cape May, but I will travel North if a good roosting area is identified.)
> Thanks in advance,
> Bill
>
> Assoc Prof Wm Saidel
> Laboratory of Neuromorphometry
> Dept of Biology
> Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
> Camden campus
>
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 6/15/18 1:36 pm
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Location requests
Professor Saidel,

Would you mind defining what you mean by "roosting locations" for
these two species? Staging areas prior to migration? Places where they
gather for the winter? Places where they gather for the night? Places
where they breed? Something else? It's not quite clear to me...

Thanks,

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Fri, Jun 15, 2018 at 11:07 AM, William Saidel
<saidel...> wrote:
> This is my annual request. Many of you have been NJ birding far longer than I. I am trying to find roosting locations for starlings and Canadian geese for a science project. I'll be doing video and analyzing them back in my lab. But the rule for nature as you know is that nature does what it wants, not what you or I want. To increase my chances, I appeal to all you listers for roosting locations you might know of or suspect for these two species. Then I can go earlier in the day and wait...and wait.
> So...any good locations you know of ? (My preference is Princeton and South to Cape May, but I will travel North if a good roosting area is identified.)
> Thanks in advance,
> Bill
>
> Assoc Prof Wm Saidel
> Laboratory of Neuromorphometry
> Dept of Biology
> Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
> Camden campus
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 6/15/18 1:31 pm
From: CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Supawna Meadows NWR and surrounding area
Dear Jerseybirders,

Having only ever seen White Ibis in New Jersey one time (last year) and the two birds being immatures, I was intrigued by the more-than-once sighting of an adult White Ibis in the southwest corner of the state over the past week or so. More intriguing, the most recent photo showed them in company of Cattle Egrets, which for me has always been a once-a-year bird (twice on the course at the Avalon Golf Club during the World Series, once in front of a school much further north).

So by 7 AM this morning, I was slowly cruising the intersection of US Route 40 and Supawna Road. There were quite a few Cattle Egret...little did I know that they appear to be "drive-up" birds here (at least they were today). But though I scanned every white bird I could for a couple of hours, and even came back a couple of times after checking e-mails and doing a bit of work at the conveniently located Dunkin' Donuts nearby, I could not locate a White Ibis.

I also spent a little time at Supawna Meadows NWR. Wow! What a wonderful area! At one point, I must have walked near a Chat nest, because two Chats fairly jumped out of a tangle and uttered strange, metallic call notes, while not even hiding much in the bushes and watching me carefully. What a treat to be able to see YB Chats so close up. On my second "round" of the fields, I also came upon a male Blue Grosbeak eating seeds from a grass stalk no more than a foot off the road and no more than two feet off the ground. Regrettably, my camera was in the boot of my car. But what a beauty! And Little Blue Herons were flying overhead all morning long.

52 species for the morning. A fine day.

Good birding,

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly
(319)


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Date: 6/15/18 8:08 am
From: William Saidel <saidel...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Location requests
This is my annual request. Many of you have been NJ birding far longer than I. I am trying to find roosting locations for starlings and Canadian geese for a science project. I'll be doing video and analyzing them back in my lab. But the rule for nature as you know is that nature does what it wants, not what you or I want. To increase my chances, I appeal to all you listers for roosting locations you might know of or suspect for these two species. Then I can go earlier in the day and wait...and wait.
So...any good locations you know of ? (My preference is Princeton and South to Cape May, but I will travel North if a good roosting area is identified.)
Thanks in advance,
Bill

Assoc Prof Wm Saidel
Laboratory of Neuromorphometry
Dept of Biology
Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey
Camden campus


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Date: 6/15/18 6:29 am
From: robert dodelson <rdodelson...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Assunpink redux
This morning I was back at Assunpink in the navigation field. I heard 2
Chats in different locations. If you go be aware that you may have to wade
through some high grassy areas and this is definitely tick country.
If you park by the log cabin and walk towards the beacon turn left when you
get to the end of the tree line (a 5 to 8 minute walk without stopping).
After 5 minutes or so (again without stopping) you will get to the end of
the tree line and be facing a large open field. The first bird was heard
just near the end of the tree line on the left. The second bird was in the
trees and bushes across the field. No visuals.
Good luck if you go
Bob Dodelson
Thanks to Todd Frantz for his input


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Date: 6/15/18 5:13 am
From: Marty DeAngelo <martytdx...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] OT: primitive camping sites in NJ
Can anyone recommend some good primitive campsites in NJ (or maybe eastern
PA)? I want to take my nephew camping for a night. My first choice was
Worthington State Forest in Delaware Water Gap but they're full.

Please reply off-list

Marty DeAngelo
Haddonfield
<martytdx...>
--
Sent from my mobile. Please forgive misspellings and other errors.


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Date: 6/15/18 12:37 am
From: Robert DeCandido <rdcny...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Spotted Towhee (1952)
re-posting this - the info below made it successfully to the NJ list archives but not to the publicly viewable ABA hosted site (where I read NJ Bird info)...
----
In the previous historical article about the early days of a 24 hr count of bird species in NJ, mention is made of a Spotted Towhee collected in December 1952 by grad student in ornithology James Baird...he wrote up info on that specimen for science:

A Western Representative of the Rufous-sided Towhee Collected in New Jersey. On 23 December 1952, while on the Raritan Estuary Christmas Census, Mr. George L. Daniels and I were canvassing a swamp located near Metuchen, Middlesex County, New Jersey. In the process of counting the various birds present, my attention was drawn to an unusual towhee which hopped out of a nearby brush pile. The next day at dawn I was again at the scene and was able to collect the bird. The specimen, a female, was examined by H. C. Oberholser and Allan J. Duvall and identified as Pipilo erythrophthahus montanus. It appears that this is the first record of this subspecies east of the Mississippi River. The bird was given to the Fish and Wildlife Service and is now no. 421001 in that collection. JAMES BAIRD, Norman Bird Sanctuary, Middletown, Rhode Island, June 9, 1957.

Condor 59(6): 401-402 (November-December 1957)
==================
J. Baird did a lot of ornithological work in NJ...and up through New England. If you do a search at SORA you can find the scientific papers. He seems to have worked at Mass Audubon for many years:

"A few years before [ca. 1970], James Baird, then head of Mass Audubon’s Department of Natural History Services, had reasoned: since education-based nature programs were growing in popularity in Massachusetts, it was quite conceivable that there was a promising niche for such programs in the world of international travel. To test the concept, Jim organized a birding trip to Bermuda, which he co-led with renowned Bermudan ornithologist and conservationist David Wingate. The idea was to offer a somewhat more exotic field experience than was generally available, in the company of experts who could interpret their local ecosystems and talk knowledgeably about some of the conservation challenges they faced in their work. It was one of the earliest forays into the frontiers of “nature tours” (ecotourism was still 10 years or more in the future). And it was an immediate hit."

I'd like to nominate him for the auspicious "not famous enough NJ birder-ornithologist" award.


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Date: 6/14/18 11:24 am
From: CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Help with a raptor ID
Jerseybirders,

Yesterday afternoon, I visited the Celery Farm in Allendale for about an hour. The birding was fine, with all the expected species. It was warm, cloudy, and the air was still. Suddenly, at one point, the wind freshened and the skies lightened; there was a marked change in the feel of everything. In that moment, a raptor appeared in the sky. I watched it for at least three, perhaps four minutes until it flew out of view; I could not get to a vantage point to re-find it.

I've looked at lots of photos of raptors on Google Images (unreliable, I know), photos on All About Birds, read an article by David Allen Sibley, looked at other (older) field guides, and still cannot definitively identify the bird. Mike Britt has suggested Brian K. Wheeler's "Raptors of Eastern North America," which I'll look for in the library. In the meantime, and knowing how challenging the "ask" is, I am soliciting opinions based on the following behavior and pattern notes:


1. The initial impression I got, as the bird appeared fairly far off, was of a very large Nighthawk (!): long wings, expansive movement up and down. The bird approached head-on, and the wings lifted high from the horizontal plane during each flap. The wingbeats were strong. The bird's flight course was steady and straight.
2. As it got closer, it soared more and flapped less. The wings looked like they were buteo length in proportion to the body or tail. They seemed to come to somewhat of a point: the primaries did not splay out (like a Black Vulture's do, for example). The wings were held fairly flat; no dihedral.
3. The bird looked big. The GISS was Red-tailed Hawk or Harrier size. However, it was in a clear sky with nothing around to give context.
4. The body's shape was solid, bulky.
5. I could not get any clear view of the patterning underneath because it was mostly in silhouette. However, it did not have the general lightness that, for example again, a Red-tailed Hawk would show. I looked for wing windows (thinking Red-shouldered) and did not see any; they would have been visible given the bird's soaring behavior.
6. The tail was proportionally shorter than one might expect in a species like a Harrier (which I thought of), where the tail feathers are individually at least half as long as the body.
7. While soaring, the bird frequently dropped its legs from the tuck position and let them hang loosely for a second or two, before retracting them up under the body. I saw this behavior at least five times.
8. I never saw the bird splay its tail feathers at all; almost all the maneuvering the bird performed were based on wing movements and the aforementioned drop-leg action. The tail feathers always remained fairly tightly closed together.
9. At several points, I could see the topside of the tail and the back: the bird did not have a white rump. However, it did have white patches on the sides of the tail (projecting from the underside, but visible from the topside--tuftlike), like the whiteness one can see at the base of the tail on a Tree Swallow.
10. The bird did not have a very large head; the projection beyond the wings was less than one would expect in a buteo.

In my judgement, this bird was not a Red-tailed Hawk; it just didn't look like any Red-tailed I've ever seen. I am open to suggestions, however, and will report what I find in Wheeler once I get a copy. Offlist or on list, thanks to all who choose to respond.

Because of this mystery, yesterday was...

Good birding!

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly


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Date: 6/14/18 6:41 am
From: robert dodelson <rdodelson...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Assunpink this morning
A very beautiful morning to be out at one of central NJ most scenic spots.
The beacon field at Assunpink had lots of the usual suspects. Highlights
for me were a singing male Blue Grosbeak and numerous Meadow Fritillaries.
No Chat unfortunately but I didn't have time to hit all of its favorite
spots
Bob Dodelson


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Date: 6/14/18 4:40 am
From: Beth Goldberg <goldbug310...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Upcoming Bergen County Audubon Meeting
Join us on Weds., June 20, 2018 as we explore the "Birds of Teaneck Creek"
with Don Torino. Teaneck Creek Conservancy (TCC) is know as the “Little
Eden” of Bergen County for many reasons, one is its incredible diversity of
bird life. Don Torino, President of Bergen County Audubon Society, will
show the many wonderful photos taken at TCC by our local photographers and
discuss the amazing biodiversity of this 46 acre suburban oasis. Meetings
are free and open to the public and held at Teaneck Creek Conservancy, 20
Puffin Way, Teaneck. Business Meeting at 7:30PM followed by program at 8PM.


Beth Goldberg
Fair Lawn


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Date: 6/13/18 12:23 pm
From: Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Spotted Towhee (1952)
In the previous historical article about the early days of a 24 hr count of bird species in NJ, mention is made of a Spotted Towhee collected in December 1952 by grad student in ornithology James Baird...he wrote up info on that specimen for science:

A Western Representative of the Rufous-sided Towhee Collected in New Jersey. On 23 December 1952, while on the Raritan Estuary Christmas Census, Mr. George L. Daniels and I were canvassing a swamp located near Metuchen, Middlesex County, New Jersey. In the process of counting the various birds present, my attention was drawn to an unusual towhee which hopped out of a nearby brush pile. The next day at dawn I was again at the scene and was able to collect the bird. The specimen, a female, was examined by H. C. Oberholser and Allan J. Duvall and identified as Pipilo erythrophthahus montanus. It appears that this is the first record of this subspecies east of the Mississippi River. The bird was given to the Fish and Wildlife Service and is now no. 421001 in that collection. JAMES BAIRD, Norman Bird Sanctuary, Middletown, Rhode Island, June 9, 1957.

Condor 59(6): 401-402 (November-December 1957)
==================
J. Baird did a lot of ornithological work in NJ...and up through New England. If you do a search at SORA you can find the scientific papers. He seems to have worked at Mass Audubon for many years:

"A few years before [ca. 1970], James Baird, then head of Mass Audubon’s Department of Natural History Services, had reasoned: since education-based nature programs were growing in popularity in Massachusetts, it was quite conceivable that there was a promising niche for such programs in the world of international travel. To test the concept, Jim organized a birding trip to Bermuda, which he co-led with renowned Bermudan ornithologist and conservationist David Wingate. The idea was to offer a somewhat more exotic field experience than was generally available, in the company of experts who could interpret their local ecosystems and talk knowledgeably about some of the conservation challenges they faced in their work. It was one of the earliest forays into the frontiers of “nature tours” (ecotourism was still 10 years or more in the future). And it was an immediate hit."

I'd like to nominate him for the auspicious "not famous enough NJ birder-ornithologist" award.


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Date: 6/13/18 9:19 am
From: Robert DeCandido PhD <rdcny...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] WSB - history (pre-dates 1952-53 at least)
The idea of a 24 hr big count (now called the World Series of Birding) pre-dates 1952-53, at least - see penultimate paragraph...:

April, 1953

With the warmer spring weather, and with the northward migration of millions of birds, two of our writers are beginning to hear more questions about their favorite spare-time activity-prowling the woods and fields looking at birds, counting them, imitating their calls and studying their habits. For them it is an all-weather, year-round pastime which calls for old clothes, field glasses and an abundant knowledge of bird lore. They know, for instance, that a robin sings, not because he is happy, but because he has just staked out a claim to a clump of trees or a bride, and his song is a chirp-on-shoulder challenge to the rest of the robin community.

The two writers, longtime members of the nation's fast-growing legion of field birders, * are Gilbert Cant and George Daniels. Why do they study birds? Both are a little vague on the subject, except to say that, once they started doing it, they liked it so well that they kept at it. Cant began as a small boy in England, where he saved the illustrated cards that came in packages of cigarettes. There was one series on birds. Says he: "That got me interested, and I started hiking around the countryside and beaches of England. I got dozens of books on birds from the public library. I guess the satisfaction of birding starts with actually seeing the birds that one has read about."

Daniels' initiation was somewhat more opportunistic. He was keeping company with a girl whose father was a serious ornithologist, and who once asked Daniels if he liked birds. "Sure, I love birds," answered Daniels diplomatically. So the girl's father took him along on a birding excursion, and Daniels has been fascinated with the sport ever since. (He also married the girl, no birder herself.)

Both Cant and Daniels are members of the Urner Ornithological Club in New Jersey. Cant, who was president of the club for two years, credits the late Charles Anderson Urner, for whom the club is named, for bringing him "out of the dickey-bird stage." Cant has never totaled the birds he has seen on four continents and dozens of Pacific islands, but he was once a member of a party that sighted the only western grebe ever seen in New Jersey. Daniels has a "life list" of some 800 different species. They include about 100 he has seen in Europe and 50 more on a recent trip to Jamaica.

Cant, who is now training one of his two sons in the sport, has also organized an "area count" in the national Christmas census of bird tabulation of the numbers and kinds of birds in various areas in early winter. A similar count will be made next month. Last year Cant, Daniels and James Baird, a graduate student in ornithology at Rutgers University, set out to break the record of 173 species of birds seen in one 24-hr, period in New Jersey. They found 169, ran out of time. They tried again, and this time they ran into some zealous police in Chatham, N.J. The birding team, whistling to attract screech owls, was walking around behind a gas station, carrying flashlights and dressed for tramping through salt marshes, when the cops noticed them. For about 20 minutes the birders showed various identification papers, repeatedly swore that they were only looking for birds, and gave references. But the police were adamant; two homes in the vicinity had been broken into that night. !
Finally, when Baird produced a Government bird-collecting permit from Daniels' car, the police reluctantly released them.

The hazards of birding are not confined to such unexpected brushes with the law. Daniels and Baird once saw the only spurred towhee [Spotted Towhee Pipilo maculates] ever identified on the East Coast. To pin down the discovery, Baird got out his .410-gauge shotgun. Daniels worked around to the other side of the bird, moving it closer to Baird, but was obscured from Baird by the foliage. Finally Baird said he was going to shoot. A faithful birder to the end, Daniels covered his face with gloved hands, bravely replied: "Go ahead." Daniels was peppered with fine dust shot, but the towhee got away. The next day Baird went out with a 12-gauge shotgun, brought down the bird and sent it to the U.S. Fish and Wild Life Service. Daniels, happily, was out of range at the time.

Cordially yours,

James A. Linen
===============================
* Most field birders defer to their more scientific brethren, refuse to call themselves field ornithologists. They also feel that the more common lay term of birdwatcher is undignified and inaccurate, and would be more appropriately applied to "dickey birders," who retain the fledgling illusion that birds sing because they are happy.


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Date: 6/12/18 7:16 pm
From: CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] High Mountain Park, Tuesday late afternoon
Jerseybirders,

After I finish teaching on Tuesdays, I usually have an hour or so to go birding, and Halifax Road in Mahwah has been my go-to spot. Looking for something different today, I saw on Google Maps that High Mountain Park, adjacent to William Paterson U., is only about 10 minutes from my teaching location.

I started up the Red Trail around 6:00 and strolled a round trip distance of about 1.75 miles in the hour that I had. It's a nice woodland, and most of the birds were "heard only" because of the foliage. At one point, I tried and tried to see a softly chirping Hairy Woodpecker, but after several minutes, I could not get a bead on it (I now think it was actually IN its nesthole, which was visible). So I clapped my hands once in the hopes that it investigate the sound. The woodpecker continued its churring sound unabated, but not far in the distance, what should answer but a Barred Owl.

I gave a couple of poor imitations, and heard the owl call again, somewhat closer. By great luck, I scanned the distant trees through a "window" in the leaves and there was the bird, looking quite intently at me, just as I looked intently at it. Who knows what goes through an owl's thoughts when it sees something as unnatural as a human with strange coloration on its form and binoculars pointed right at it. This owl studied me patiently and thoroughly, never changing its gaze or moving its head, for a full five minutes. After a time, it lost interest and looked away. I moved on as well.

Only twenty species for the hour, as the leaves hide the movement of any small birds, and almost everything had gone quiet by this time of day. But a daylight encounter with a Barred Owl made the time and the experience special. I'll be back at this verdant spot early in the morning in the near future to listen to the dawn chorus.

Good birding.

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly


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Date: 6/12/18 4:12 pm
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] north Jersey - BC Chickadees
I hit Old Mine Rd. today. Think I got as far as mile 9. Botany, butterflies, and birds.
It’s always enjoyable for a south Jerseybirder to hear YT Vireos, Redstarts, Veery, Pileated, Cerulean.
Etc. But what is it with the BC Chickadees - I stopped back at the Visitor’s Center on
Rt. 80. And finally had some there. I have missed BC before up here.

Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
<sandrakeller...>

Sent from my Imac





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Date: 6/12/18 12:09 pm
From: Susan Garretson Friedman <susan.garretsonfriedman...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Audubon article on this year’s WSB
Hi all, I thought this was a nice article covering the World Series of Birding, by (National) Audubon Magazine. Of course, the fact that Mike and our Sanctuary are featured might bias me a bit but seriously, I thought it was well done.



https://www.audubon.org/news/inside-birdings-most-dramatic-24-hours



Good birding,


Susan


Susan Garretson Friedman
Welcome Center/Nature Store Manager
Scherman Hoffman Wildlife Sanctuary<http://www.njaudubon.org/SectionCenters/SectionScherman/TheSanctuary.aspx>
New Jersey Audubon
11 Hardscrabble Road
Bernardsville, New Jersey 07924

Please note my new direct phone number: 908-396-6622

And new store number: 908-396-6386



Making New Jersey a better place for people and wildlife since 1897




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Date: 6/11/18 6:42 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Conclusion on the Brig Red Knot and the Dowitcher ID
Thank you to all those birders who responded !!! That’s fake news, only 4 NJ birders responded to my post.

First, a Cape May birder indicated that the yellow banded red knot means it was banded in Canada, which made my sighting even more special. I gave this Red Knot a nick name which is JT.

Second, a NJ birder who saw the same Dowitcher wrote to me. My interpretation of his reply is that an eBird reviewer (or expert shorebird pros) will most likely reject my initial ID because long-billed would have taken a different migratory route in spring in our neck of the woods, and only way it would be acceptable is if it over-wintered in our area.

Third, a NJ birder who has had plenty of experience of calls of long-billed dows from his past residency and birding days in west coast gave me some fine tips on the shorebilled/longbilled dow’s calls

Fourth, a NJ birder gave me additional tips on how flocks of long-billed dows make distinct call notes later in the season at Brig (south bound) while they are feeding.

Now here is my take and confusion on the ID. I have spent about 24 hours during May looking at shorebirds at Brig. It was amazing how many low-energy (non-breeding plumage) Dunlins I have found. For that reason, I blew off the plumage characteristics I saw on this dow, hoping it would be ID’ed as low energy long-billed dow.

Well, I was wrong in all fronts, especially after reading my Shorebirds of N. American, Photographic Guide (by Dennis Paulson), same book was pre-owned by a birder name Nareff. She was a hawk counter at Chimmy Rock. Now I am back in the hole listening to my birding friend, Mary, who has told me countless times, which is *Dude, rare birds are rare, you fool*

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Date: 6/11/18 4:13 pm
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] white ibis - salem county
A June bird! Success! The bird found by Jeff K. a week or so ago. I think. How many adult White Ibis would be around???
I don’t know how close to us they breed. I presume this is a failed breeder wandering early.

Rt. 49 - a field right across from Supawna Rd. Birds move. The bird was not there when I checked a little earlier. I drove
down to Fort Mott and back. And scanned again - success! More Glossy’s also.

Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
<sandrakeller...>

Sent from my Imac





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Date: 6/10/18 7:08 pm
From: Ann Thompson <ann46thomp...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI]
Jim,

My favorite places, during my summer visits to NJ shore, are the nesting grounds of oystercatchers, terns and skimmers at Belmar Beach, right off the Ocean Ave at Shark River Inlet, as well as small beach along the Somers Point Longport Blvd in Longport at the Caffe Luciano Lamberti restaurant.

I can't wait to read your articles. And please share a link to the on-line version.

Ann Thompson
Toronto, CA




"Everyone,

Thank you for your suggestions for casual birders who want to go birding at
the Shore this summer.

The responses have been so great that I persuaded my editor to let me do
two columns.

The first one is about the well-known places -- Forsythe, the Wetlands
Institute, Sandy Hook, Cape May Point and South Cape May Meadows, most
likely -- and the second about the gems you have shared with me over the
past few days. (Can't wait to share them.)

If any of you could spare your expertise on visiting Forsythe, the Wetlands
Institute, Sandy Hook, Cape May Point and South Cape May Meadows in the
summer, I'm all ears. Best time of day, best spots for birds and other
attractions, what to bring, etc..

I will post the columns on line, and I thank you all in advance.

The goal is to expand the horizons of casual backyard birders ... New
Jersey has some great spots to share.

Best,
Jim W



--
Jim Wright"


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Date: 6/9/18 5:25 pm
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] June - breeding codes and ebird
Hello,
I had a couple of hours before work this noon. I took advantage! Even at mid day, birds area busy feeding young and all.
I hit Floodgates in Gloucester. Why not give the breeding codes a try? This is good info for researchers in the future. The codes
are fairly self-explanatory. Check the help file if you need clarification on a code. My usual for confirming is CF - Carrying food.
Adults are busy feeding nestlings now and are quite visible as they try and find enough food for their young ones.

Good birding all.


Sandra Keller
<sandrakeller...>

Sent from my Imac





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Date: 6/9/18 4:18 pm
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Breeding Dickcissels
Bob,

It's my understanding that when there is severe drought in Dickcissels core
breeding range to the west, New Jersey gets an influx of birds looking for
"greener pastures" to nest. Dickcissel has bred three times since 2012 at
the Ocean Terminal, Bayonne in early successional habitat. In 2012 and
2013, the birds arrived around Memorial Day. However, checking my eBird,
the first bird did not arrive until around 6/17 last year. While I do not
hold out hope for the Ocean Terminal this summer (large swaths currently
being developed), perhaps you'll find a green pasture...

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Date: 6/9/18 11:13 am
From: robert dodelson <rdodelson...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] where have all the Dickcissels gone?
It was just a short time ago that nesting Dickcissels were easily found at
Negri-Nepote and in various spots around the Burlington Fairgrounds. For
me at least not this year.
Anyone know of any breeding sites?
Bob Dodelson


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Date: 6/9/18 10:24 am
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Banded Red Knot and Dowitcher ID request, Brig Refuge
I felt so lucky to find a Red Knot and a breeding plumage dowitcher at the Goose Marker 4 at Brig this morning. These birds were very distant and only way to view was thru the scope.

I believe it is a long-billed and most likely the same dowitcher I saw on May 26 at the same location. This dowitcher towered over all other dowitchers during live view, and the long-bill is noticed.

Cape May birder HT has given me the tip on ID of Long-bills before, that is listen to the calls, Yong ! I am sure the dowitcher called when it took flight, but the call did not registered in my bird brain. ID confirmation on the Dowitcher is greatly appreciated.

Upon down load of the photos, it turned out the Red Knot has a bling. Unfortunately, I can not read the numbers on the leg band.

Poor doc photos below. For those who thinks I am shelving my poor photos down into your throat, do not click on the link.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564@N04/

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Date: 6/9/18 8:10 am
From: jim wright <wrightjamesb...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] A second request (pressing my luck)
Everyone,

Thank you for your suggestions for casual birders who want to go birding at
the Shore this summer.

The responses have been so great that I persuaded my editor to let me do
two columns.

The first one is about the well-known places -- Forsythe, the Wetlands
Institute, Sandy Hook, Cape May Point and South Cape May Meadows, most
likely -- and the second about the gems you have shared with me over the
past few days. (Can't wait to share them.)

If any of you could spare your expertise on visiting Forsythe, the Wetlands
Institute, Sandy Hook, Cape May Point and South Cape May Meadows in the
summer, I'm all ears. Best time of day, best spots for birds and other
attractions, what to bring, etc..

I will post the columns on line, and I thank you all in advance.

The goal is to expand the horizons of casual backyard birders ... New
Jersey has some great spots to share.

Best,
Jim W



--
Jim Wright


Don't miss my column "The Bird Watcher" in The Record
My nature blog: www.celeryfarm.net


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Date: 6/7/18 5:14 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Is it possible for Prothonotary Warbler (PROW) to build a nest in a blow-down tree root ball ?
I saw the most interesting ebird report on the PROW that Larry Zirlin reported on 6-6. Location is the Union Transportation Trail-Sharon Station, Monmouth County, NJ. Link is below.

Both photos show PROW perched in front of large tree that felled and exposed the entire shallow root ball. Habitat seems to fit based on the observation of surface water and the red maple dominated vegetation in the back ground. If you look at the root ball bit closely just behind the perched PROW, a cavity can be noticed in the exposed soil wall. I have seen my share of PROW cavities on snags and live trees but never in a situation like the photos show.

Over the years, a Wacky Birder here has been trying to document PROW nesting in a soil cavity formed in a exposed tree root ball in a hardwood swamp. My hunch tells me that Larry’s PROW may be doing exactly that !!

https://ebird.org/nj/view/checklist/S46357100

Yong Kong
Camden County



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Date: 6/7/18 7:06 am
From: jim wright <wrightjamesb...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Birding columnist wants your thoughts on best birding places at the Shore this summer
Greetings.

I write the Bird Watcher column for The (Bergen) Record. I want to write my
next column about the best places for my readers (casual birders) to go
birding this summer at the Shore when it's not beach weather.

A few places come to mind -- Cape May Point, Cape May Meadows, the
Wetlands Institute (especially on a rainy day), Forsythe, and Sandy Hook,
but I'd really ike to pick your brain.

I was wondering if the folks on JerseyBirds would e-mail me (on list or
off) and let me know where they'd suggest casual birders might go at the
shore, what they might look for where, and any other advice and tips (look
out for ticks, go early, wear bug spray, etc...)

Please email at this address. Thanks In advance.

If you could respond in the next week, I'll have time to go through the
replies and make my deadline. The column runs on Thursday, June 28, and I
will be sure to post a link.


Many thanks.

(I also want to thank Laurie Larson and the other listowners for letting me
post!)


Jim W.

--
Jim Wright


Don't miss my column "The Bird Watcher" in The Record
My nature blog: www.celeryfarm.net


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Date: 6/5/18 1:20 pm
From: Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Sheri Williamson on Hummingbirds - BirdCallsRadio
Birders et al,

I thought many of your would be interested in my conversation with guest Sheri Williamson on all things Hummingbirds.
A nod and acknowledgement directly to both Pete Dunne, Clay and Pat Sutton in this interview. https://bit.ly/2akUsxp <https://bit.ly/2akUsxp>

Happy birding!

Cheers,
Mardi Dickinson

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Date: 6/5/18 12:57 pm
From: Chris Sturm <thesturms2...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] MS Kite in Manchester
While sitting at our pool in Leisure Village West in Manchester, a MS Kite
flew low and close toward the east. At first glance, I thought it was some
kind of gull. Other people sitting with us thought I was nuts when I
discovered what it was. Great way to get a year bird! At just


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Date: 6/5/18 11:17 am
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Misc.
Good afternoon. I find high counts of "uncommon species" to be just as or
even more exciting than rare birds. With that in mind, I checked the
Anderson Creek Marsh flats in Secaucus after work today. Chris Takacs
alerted me to a large BLSK roost there yesterday. I tallied 53 BLACK
SKIMMERS, which according to eBird is the best count all-time in the county.

Going back to Saturday, Ed Borowik and I tallied 21 WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPERS
at Brig (a personal high but not a Pete Bacinski count!) and 25 GULL-BILLED
TERNS!

Pics of GBTE:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/60325724@N02/28649242378/in/dateposted-public/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/60325724@N02/28649235048/in/dateposted-public/

In response to Yong Kong's Nelson's Sparrow search, I'll never forget my
lifer at Black Dirt Marsh in Sussex County! In Hudson County, I've found
migrants in all kinds of marginal habitat such as taller, dead grass
patches in Liberty State Park's expansive lawn known as "The Green Park and
the Mugwort margins of the cove by the nearby Christopher Columbus
monument. In other words, saltmarsh is not the only habitat to look for
this species...

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Date: 6/5/18 9:23 am
From: Samuel Galick <sam.galick...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks (11), Mercer County
James Parris discovered 11 Black-belled Whistling Ducks at Hamilton
Veterans Park yesterday evening @ 6PM. They were last seen flying toward
Mercer County Park/Hamilton Lake.

eBird Checklist:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46308864

Good birding,

Sam


--
Sam Galick
Cape May, NJ
<sam.galick...>
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sgalick/


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Date: 6/4/18 8:01 am
From: CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] A challenging day (long post)
Jerseybirders,

Elated that I had the entire day to spend birding yesterday, my mind was filled with images of all the birds in the southern part of the state I have not yet seen this year: Saltmarsh Sparrow, Caspian Tern, maybe a Royal Tern, Brown Pelican, and the Mississippi Kites in Waretown. Plus, Daniel Irons' find of Nelson's Sparrows at Jakes Landing and occasional reports of a Cattle Egret at Forsythe Refuge offered more inducements to make the drive south.

I went with two friends and we started off at 4:15 from our meeting point. The camaraderie turned out to be the best part of the day. Winds were ferocious, as anyone who was outside will attest, and the temperature was cool. We made stops at Jakes Landing, Langley Road, the roads of Belleplain, Stone Harbor Point, Forsythe, and Great Bay Boulevard in Tuckerton. At every location, the wind made birding exceedingly difficult: the sound kept birdsong from being heard, and the force of it made using even binoculars a challenge (I now know why some birders remove the objective lens eyecups from their binocs; mine kept whapping around in the 30 mph winds, the motion of which made stabilization impossible!).

At Jakes Landing, we did see some Seaside Sparrows stubbornly defending territory by clinging to exposed stalks and uttering their "cher-winnnng" song. A small flock of Least Terns braved the wind to forage at the outlet of a creek. Later, we surprised a Broad-winged Hawk standing on Hands Mill Road with prey in its talons, being swooped on by two very angry Gnatcatchers. By stopping, we heard a Prothonotary Warbler singing and eventually managed to find it. We also found some nice passerines in the relative shelter of the woods around Belleplain, including a very cooperative Acadian Flycatcher, which perched on a limb out over the middle of the road. The two dueling Worm-eating Warblers were not nearly as helpful, though brief views were obtained.

We opted not to drive down to Cape Island (in hindsight, a mistake, since the Black-necked Stilt at Pond Creek Marsh, which had not been reported anywhere...on WhatsApp or on e-Bird...for three days, was re-found), but went to Stone Harbor Point, thinking that we might scan the ocean for blown-in birds. Instead, the sand whipped up by the wind gave new meaning to the term "facial scrub." We could barely walk, and gave up about halfway out. At Forsythe, a very fine sand carried by the winds from a long distance away got into the car, our binoculars, our clothes, our eyes and ears. Ugh. Andres found a brightly-colored Western Sandpiper between goose marker 4 and 5, huddling with a few Semipalmated Sandpipers on the rocks on the bay side (the same bird found by Yong Kong two weeks ago?). The water was so high due to the wind pushing it inland that the entire bay side was nearly underwater. By contrast, the water was so shallow on the inside of the North Dike that the "mudflat" went out at least a couple hundred feet, and was thoroughly covered with feeding Semipalmated Sandpipers, Dunlin, and at least one White-rumped, though I suspect there were many more. Once again, one our loop, we failed to find a Caspian Tern, despite at least one being reported nearly daily for several weeks now.

At Tuckerton, it was difficult to scan across the inlet to look at Holgate's or Brigantine Island's sandbars, because it started to rain...hard. I tried anyway; several efforts, involving holding the scope with one hand and the "guide handle" with the other to try to steady the device, did not yield a loafing Pelican (no surprise!). We managed a poor view of a Saltmarsh Sparrow in the reeds and found a Little Blue Heron out in the marsh. At that point, we gave up and headed north. We made a desultory stop in Waretown, but it was pouring, and no soggy Kite was to be seen roosting in any nearby trees. As we got closer to the Driscoll Bridge an hour later, the rain stopped and the winds subsided; by that time, however, our day was done.

We eked out 84 species for our efforts, but other than a few poor looks at scuttering Saltmarsh Sparrows, we missed every other species I'd been thinking about. Sometimes, one has those days. Today's beautiful morning and many singing birds at Great Swamp were rejuvenating and I look forward to another swing south in the near future. One of these times, I'll be the last birder to finally observe a Caspian Tern at Forsythe!

Good birding!

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly
(768)


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Date: 6/2/18 7:48 pm
From: Lillian Shupe <lrshupe...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Roseate Spoonbill?
I drove through the area yesterday afternoon but saw no sign of it

Lillian Shupe
LMBT, Pa.

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:<JERSEYBI...>] On Behalf Of Aiden Dartley
Sent: Saturday, June 2, 2018 10:45 AM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Roseate Spoonbill?

Has anybody seen the Roseate Spoonbill today? Many thanks.


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Date: 6/2/18 2:53 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] My failed attempt to find Nelson’s Sparrow in Brig vicinity
Prime time for Nelson’s Sparrow migration ? Last time I checked the Google Earth, Jakes Landing is not the only place that have extensive salt marsh spartina habitat along NJ’s coast so that place was not an option. Then where do I go try to find a Nelson’s Sparrow in habitats to my liking ?

I arrived around 11 AM at the Motts Creek Inn. Since it was Newfound time, grabbed a Fat Tire and set up the scope at the rear deck. Sparrow birding at the Motts Creek deck is the same as short-eared owl search, in that keep the scope moving in search of all moving sparrows while ears are open. Fantastic light condition and no swamp gas rising, even the very-very distant sparrows can be noticed. My bet is an expert sparrow birder would have counted over 20 or more Seaside/Saltmarsh sparrows in one single scan.

The dirt road at the end of the Oyster Creek Road was also excellent for viewing Seaside/Saltmarsh sparrows.

Then I hit Brig which was kind of uneventful, except I had to pull over more than once for a quick shut-eye, as I was lacking some serious sleep. At the dogleg I was lucky to find one low-energy dunlin with disheveled tail feathers that showed bit of white that got my bird brain pumping.

Highlight of the Brig trip was meeting a Bayonne birder via Mike B. who call him Bayonne Ed. He was a very humble birder with a cool license plate. I felt so small because of birding stories Mike has told in the past about Ed an.d his birding knowledge.

I did say I sucked at finding Nelson’s ?

Yong Kong
Camden County






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Date: 6/2/18 7:46 am
From: Aiden Dartley <adartley123...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Roseate Spoonbill?
Has anybody seen the Roseate Spoonbill today? Many thanks.


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Date: 6/1/18 12:07 pm
From: Lillian Shupe <lrshupe...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Columbia Lake, Warren County to close
I was there yesterday, they were doing some preparations.

FYI - from the state:

On or about Monday, June 4, DEP's Division of Fish and Wildlife will begin
the drawdown of Columbia Lake, located within the
<http://www.njfishandwildlife.com/news/2018/wmaland.htm#columbia> Columbia
Wildlife Management Area. The drawdown will be at the rate of approximately
one foot per day throughout the week. At that time the portion of the
management area in the vicinity of the lake will be closed to the public.

The Columbia Lake dam is located 1/4 mile upstream of the Paulins Kill
River's confluence with the Delaware River in Knowlton Township, Warren
County. The dam impounds a 43-acre lake that stretches more than 1.5 miles
upstream of the dam. The dam and the lake (sold by NJ Power & Light Co. in
1955) is owned and managed by the NJ DEP Division of Fish and Wildlife as
part of the 1,098 acre Columbia WMA.

Since the construction of the dam in 1909 by Warren County Power Co., the
18-foot high, 330-foot long dam has served as a barrier to fish passage,
severing New Jersey's third largest tributary to the Delaware River from its
watershed. This obstruction blocks American Shad access to their historic
spawning grounds, and impedes the movement of American Eel. The proposed
removal of the dam will restore fish passage to over 10 miles of river,
restore natural flow regime, and reclaim 1.5 miles of stream habitat.

The dam removal project is just one aspect of a larger initiative led by
<http://nature.org/wherewework/northamerica/states/newjersey/> The Nature
Conservancy with the goals of improving riparian and in-stream habitat
throughout the Paulins Kill watershed.



Lillian Shupe,

LMBT, Pa.





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Date: 5/31/18 11:15 am
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Great Blue Heron and reflection (photo)
I'm really liking this photo I took on Memorial Day. Great Blue Heron, Raritan
River, Donaldson Park, Middlesex County

https://www.flickr.com/photos/14463444@N07/42427994972/

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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Date: 5/31/18 10:57 am
From: CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Fast-n-Furious / Taking My Time
Jerseybirders,

Yesterday, I visited the Meadowlands for a targeted "fast-n-furious" search for a recurring Least Bittern which had been found initially some days earlier by Chris Takacs on the Marsh Discovery Trail. I met Kevin Watson at approximately the area where Chris said he'd observed these quiet and furtive marsh denizens. Kevin lifted his binoculars and, within seconds, said, "There's one right now." We watched the bittern move quietly among the reeds, holding on with amazingly long toes, and stretching out its neck to try to spear its prey much farther than one would imagine the vertebrae would allow.

A most interesting bird was a young swallow perched above the bittern. It had a buffy "searchlight" on its forehead, and an equally buffy throat separated from a bright white breast and belly by tiny black feathers in almost a necklace. We were looking at the bird's front, but could see the underside of the tail and its shape: it did not have the deep fork of a Barn Swallow. However, the tail looked kind of ragged; it was difficult to ascertain whether the tail was truly straight across and missing R1 (or perhaps it was damaged), or whether it was actually notched. I would've called it a Cliff Swallow, except the colors were very washed out and we never could get a look at the back/rump. I called it "swallow sp." on my e-Bird tally. Chris T, who had joined us, said that he'd seen birds of this pattern and color before at the Meadowlands. Other opinions are welcome if you happen to espy one of these swallows.

Today, I went for the first time to "P-8," one of the parking lots of the Pequannock Watershed in Passaic County. P-8 is at the end of Stephens Road, a dead end off of Union Valley on the eastern side of the watershed. Louis Bizzarro had written eloquently about this place last year, enough that I wanted to see it for myself. It's a beautiful forest, with mixed conifers and deciduous trees, at the top of which is a pleasant tarn out of which protrude many dead snags. I took a leisurely two-hour round-trip walk up to this lake and back. It was cloudy with occasional rain, which I imagine kept the birdsong down, but I still enjoyed many woodland species: GC Flycatchers and Wood-Pewees, RE and YT Vireos, Louisiana Waterthrushes, a singing Blackburnian Warbler, a Worm-eating Warbler, even a singing Brown Creeper! I had gone up there hoping to hear a Black-billed Cuckoo, but came away empty-eared on that regard, though a Yellow-billed "kowp-kowped" loudly several times. (Remember: you must have a permit displayed on your car window to park in any of the lots in the watershed.)

42 species at that location, and I added a beautiful, singing Prairie Warbler and a few other species by just sitting roadside at the powerline cut further south. All in all, a peaceful and enjoyable morning.

Good birding!

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly
(500)


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Date: 5/30/18 6:39 am
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Anhinga at Kittatinny Valley State Park (Sussex County) - just flew
And, sent one minute too soon. Just reported as flying off, circling,
and gaining altitude.

Susan Treesh


On 5/30/2018 9:34 AM, Susan Treesh wrote:
> Relaying a message from Alan Boyd on the North NJ Bird rarity group:
>
> "Anhinga at Twin Lakes, Kittatinny Valley State Park.  Park at the lot
> on Goodale Rd. Bird is in a tree in the NW corner of the lake."
>
> New Jersey is the new Florida, apparently.
>
> Susan Treesh
> Somerset



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Date: 5/30/18 6:34 am
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Anhinga at Kittatinny Valley State Park (Sussex County)
Relaying a message from Alan Boyd on the North NJ Bird rarity group:

"Anhinga at Twin Lakes, Kittatinny Valley State Park.  Park at the lot
on Goodale Rd. Bird is in a tree in the NW corner of the lake."

New Jersey is the new Florida, apparently.

Susan Treesh
Somerset


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Date: 5/29/18 8:37 pm
From: Lisa Potash <lisapotash6...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Owl in the Box Update
Hi Jerseybirders,

I thought things were going to be totally quiet, since Grey owl's last day in the yard (box) was on April 16th, and her mate - bigRed's last day was on May 1st.

Lo and behold I noticed an owl in the backyard box late morning on Sunday/25th. It was Grey Screech. The owl showed a few times, for no more than a couple minutes each time, before going back inside. What had happened? Did she abandon her eggs? Predation by a racoon, opossoum, or black rat snake? Did the tree/snag/get damaged in a storm?

Then, just after 7 pm I saw a Red Screech Owl in the front yard box. This owl is easy to distinguish - it was bigRed. The male trilled a few times before his exit (didn't watch since, to concentrate on the female's activity). Grey departed in the most common "U" flight pattern and landed about 30 yds into the low, scrub bushes that border the edges of the lawn and wood line. I stayed on the porch and didn't see or hear anything else, but the front box was empty also.

Memorial Day, both owls were present with Grey/backyard and bigRed/front yard box. Like the previous day, the female showed a few times, but didn't spend a lot of time at the entrance hole. I didn't watch her departure, but when i checked things from the porch, I heard 3 soft trilling calls from bigRed.

So, what happened? I would venture to guess that during the time away, they failed in their first nesting attempt. If Grey laid eggs fairly soon after her initial yard departure of April 16th and brooded the clutch for 30 days, the young would probably have started hatching over a week ago.

Today, I was convinced that the pair had "re-grouped" and moved on, but that wasn't so. At 2:28 pm i got my first look at an owl in the backyard box. It was Grey. The bird was looking "different" with ear tufts flat against the head, very large round eyes/tiny pupils and with gular fluttering: the owl opening its beak and "fluttering" its neck muscles - basically panting. It was already close to 90 degrees, and although the box was under shade, it must have been awfully hot inside. Grey went to the entrance hole a few times and I noticed she was "careful" when dropping back inside.

Then at 2:53 pm i noticed an owl again through my iphone digiscope. I was shocked to see it was bigRed! He also looked hot, and exhibited the gular fluttering to cool off. The owls traded off every so often, and now i could see why with the temperature reading 90.

Why would they roost together on such a warm day? Both owls looked like they were ready to fly out of the box, but hadn't. To re-establish courting/mating behavior inside the box? I was not up early enough to see what might have transpired pre-dawn, when I assume both entered.

An hour passed, with both taking turns at the entrance trying to cool off. 4 pm bigRed was getting nudged from below, and on the second time he did exit. Down right, low and into those convenient weed/brambly/bushes. Only about 10 yards away from the owl box. I managed to find him with my bins, and then scope. Twenty minutes later, I had him jumping to the next branch (difficult to make out with all the little leaves) and then he flew a little farther, and slightly down the slope. Was he hunting? i don't know.

Once the male left the box, I didn't see Grey any more today. I may very well have missed her departure, but it is possible that she didn't leave at dusk tonight. I also didn't hear any trilling, although the frogs down below by the pond were especially loud.

I took out the owl bible - aka Gelbach's, The Eastern Screech Owl,Life, History, Ecology, and Behavior in the Suburbs and Countryside, (2008). I have been re-reading chapters these past couple of days. Gelbach's studies were conducted in Central Texas, and based on 25 years of study. Here's some interesting information taken from the book:

p. 84. If E. Screech Owls lose their first clutches, they are replaced, usually only once....and in a different cavity.

p. 94. Perhaps insufficient time remains in the nesting season, so screech owls are obliged to replace losses as quickly as possible, even if a sacrifice in energy investment is necessary. This may be why incubation usually begins immediately, lost chicks are seldom replaced, second broods are not attempted, and no renests are tried after the first week of June. Any other nest, if successful, would put newly independent owlets into October environments...because each egg plus chick requires about 4-5 months of parental care from the start of incubation to fledgling dispersal.

p. 100. 4 is the average clutch size, 3 eggs typical replacement clutch.

p. 107. Normally, brooding females take a recess of 18.4 (+_) 7.6 minutes from the nest cavity at dusk and occasionally also near dawn, like their 17.8 minute average absence during incubation. Also, on hot afternoon females sit beside nestlings, peer from cavities, or even exit completely. Brooding averages a week shorter in replacement nests than first nests, perhaps because the later broods are smaller and the weather warmer...

I don't have know what will happen, but i am hopeful that this pair can have success somewhere. I know this female is (at the least) into her third Spring, and Gelbach writes that the experienced females are more successful.

I did take numerous photos and video, but have not yet sifted through to add to my Flickr', but will post those when i can.

Good birding,
Lisa Potash
Oakland







How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 5/29/18 7:39 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Yong Comment - Warbler (all time?) # day record N of NJ and another NJ E Bird funny submittal
Before FV's post, part time Cape May based PA birder sent me the ebird link,
and I too was in all WOW. Thank You LW !!

After reading the report, I went straight to Google Earth to pin point the
sighting location, which is about 650 miles south of Labrador Sea. Also
Hudson Bay is to the west and Atlantic Ocean to the east. Bird trap
location like the Cape May during the fall ? My biggest question is where do
these 721,620 birds go/went eventually, continue fly across the Labrador Sea
and onto Greenland or Iceland ? Or they stay put in the northern peninsula
from the sighting location to breed ?

Or they would do the reverse migration or bail on the northern direction and
instead continue their migration towards west once encountering Labrador Sea
?

On other note, unlike those 6 lucky Canadian birders, I have been striking
out on my fast-n-furious sod farm birding during lunch. Today was no
different until I decided to hit Jefferson Road, near Combs Sod Farm, Salem
County, before heading back to work. Bird god gave me about 50 black-bellied
plovers feeding in fresh plowed and planted field with corn. I had no more
hope left in trying to find shorebirds in that vicinity during this time of
the year.

For some odd reason, I wish I had not discovered those plovers. Reason ? So
I could bail on birding at bird-free-zone locations or stop the marginal
habitat birding once for all.

Yong Kong
Camden County





-----Original Message-----
From: Fred Vir
Sent: Tuesday, May 29, 2018 9:23 AM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Warbler (all time?) # day record N of NJ and another NJ
E Bird funny submittal

Ah! Well N of us on the N shore of the St Lawrence River in Canada an
incredible day produced almost one million birds by one group of birders.

Talk about a Big Day! Their observations and comments are solid. It
verifies species' timing for migration and behavioral responses of birds
to varying conditions (see list and pics below).

The funny or probably funny submittals to ebird continue with a signing,
heard only Black-throated Blue Warbler in east Ocean County, NJ with no
habitat or evident effort to see the bird, which can sound quite similar
to a mated Black-throated Green in late May in NJ. Black-throated
Greens breed in many areas of Ocean Cty while Blues breed only ~ in NW NJ.

Singing Bt Greens have at least 2 call types switching from zoo zee zoo
zoo zee to establish and defend a nesting territory to a, later in the
season, BT Blue-like, zee zee zee zoo zee when communicating with a
mate. In hotter temperatures I have found that the Greens call more
softly and slower to me, making it sound even more like a Blue. Late May
Ocean County NJ (and some other Ctys.) singing Blues are almost always
actually Greens.


*** 5/28 Species Summary:

Red-throated Loon (1 Monmouth)
Horned Grebe (1 Warren)
Roseate Spoonbill (1 Warren)
Merlin (1 Ocean)
Common Raven (1 Ocean)
Prothonotary Warbler (1 Monmouth)
Swainson's Warbler (1 Cape May)
Black-throated Blue Warbler (1 Ocean)
Savannah Sparrow (1 Cape May)

Close to a million birds were seen migrating over the St. Lawrence River
on 5/28.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46117992
<https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46117992>


good birding all,

Fred virrazzi
secaucus nj




How to report NJ bird sightings: see
<www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Date: 5/29/18 1:22 pm
From: Tom Brown <tshrike19...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Possible Bicknell's Thrush at Palmyra Cove 5/25
Spot arrangement and color are not enough in separating bith from gcth, in
fact it is impossible to distinguish a bicknell’s from gray-cheeked by
plumage by observation alone, INCLUDING the appearance of a rusty tail.
Many gcth, especially second year birds (birds still retaining some
juvenile feathers), will often show a hint of rust , or at least a contrast
between tail and body feathers. I would even argue that vocalizations ,
especially call notes (both diurnal and nocturnal) will not help in
separating gcth from bith (the main reason for splitting gcth into the gray
cheek-bicknell’s complex is based on what now seems to be a dubious study
on call notes). With proper lighting, or if in hand, there are a few
things to look for in bith: more than 1/2 the lower bill (mouth lining of
a bird in hand is yellow-orange) , legs are purplish ,often (but not
always) darker than upper parts of feet, overall body plumage is brown,
lacking the olive tones of gcth. In hand there are many measurements to
make, bith will have a wing chord less than 96mm (there is over lap with
gcth though), measurements and visual observation of outer primaries
(especially p8 through p6) is essential as gcth has longer wing projection
than the shorter-rounder winged bith. There are many out there who are not
in favor of the splitting of gcth (mostly based on the primary study that
led to the split). Personally, if it weren’t for the disjunct wintering
range of bith and gcth I would argue there is no difference. Most gcth I
band have wing chords outside the overlap region but there are some birds
that are impossible to distinguish to species, even with multiple in hand
measurements, these birds are called gcbt (gray-cheeked/bicknell’s thrush).

Cheers

Tom Brown

On Tue, May 29, 2018 at 8:20 AM Marty DeAngelo <martytdx...> wrote:

> I finally got around to processing my pictures from Friday, and the main
> reason I was eager was this bird. In the field I heard a call that was
> obviously a thrush call but unlike the nearby Swainson's Thrush calls. This
> bird popped up - I can't say if it was the bird calling but it was in the
> right direction.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/martytdx/41527511005/
>
> It struck me immediately the darkness of the spotting and the fact that it
> extended down the flank. There is a lack of distinct eye ring. My first
> thought was GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH and a played the song once to see if it
> responded. It was curious but did NOT respond. There was also no
> tail-bobbing beyond the occasional flick as it moved/turned.
>
> I asked my friend Joe from D.O.S. and this was his reply:
>
> I am doing the Yellowstone trip with Forrest Rowland. He said visually, it
> > checks all the boxes for Bicknells. Rusty tail, wing pattern and facial
> > pattern look correct. Most ebird editors don't accept this bird
> > without a audio clip though. Bicknells was my first thought too.
>
>
> I obviously don't have an audio clip so I probably won't know for sure but
> wanted to see what others thought. Sorry for the color, it was about 2
> minutes before the skies opened up and it was a quick shot in the (literal)
> dark.
>
> Others on Facebook are leaning toward Veery but the color wasn't right and
> I think that the spots on the throat and upper chest are too dark.
>
> Love to see other's opinions.
>
> Marty DeAngelo
> Haddonfield, NJ
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 5/29/18 6:49 am
From: CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Mourning Warbler: ho hum?
Jerseybirders,

Readers of my posts will recall that, over the years, I've bemoaned the fact that Mourning Warbler has always been a difficult species for me to observe. Indeed, from 1972, when I started birding in earnest, until 2014, I had seen or heard exactly one. Of course, had I ever been up to northern Vermont or the Adirondacks, that would have been a different story, but such was the case. Between 2014 and this year, I'd seen or heard only two more.

This year has been just the opposite. Just this month, and before this morning, I have seen two singing males and heard another one. Nevertheless, as I walked through the "wet end" of Garret Mountain Park this morning (unsuccessfully looking for certain late-Spring migrants which have eluded my binoculars this year), my heart skipped a beat for a moment when I heard "Chirry-chirry, chorry-chorry" close by as I was looking at a Red-eyed Vireo.

Some birds seem to be able to "cast" their songs long distances; I think of Grasshopper Sparrows, which invariably are singing in a small bush hundreds of feet away while I am incorrectly scanning the grasses within twenty feet. This Mourning Warbler did just the opposite: its voice resonated in such a way to make the listener think it was far away, when in fact it was very close.

I espied movement in a barberry tangle no more than six feet from me! With a few minutes' patience, I was rewarded with perfect views of the bird, and listened to it sing, as well as mutter a series of querulous chips, gurgles, and twitters, almost like a Ruby-crowned Kinglet! It flew to a nearby barberry where I was eventually able to find it again, and again watch it forage in the tangles, on the ground, and back in the tangles, singing quietly to itself (it seemed entirely too soft for any possible female nearby to hear), as it explored. The needs of my employer called me away, so I left the bird to its designs, happy to have ended my Garret morning with this precious experience.

Good birding,

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 5/29/18 6:24 am
From: Fred Vir <avtrader...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Warbler (all time?) # day record N of NJ and another NJ E Bird funny submittal
Ah! Well N of us on the N shore of the St Lawrence River in Canada an
incredible day produced almost one million birds by one group of birders.

Talk about a Big Day!  Their observations and comments are solid.   It
verifies species' timing for migration and behavioral responses of birds
to varying conditions (see list and pics below).

The funny or probably funny submittals to ebird continue with a signing,
heard only Black-throated Blue Warbler in east Ocean County, NJ with no
habitat or evident effort to see the bird, which can sound quite similar
to a mated Black-throated Green in late May in NJ.  Black-throated
Greens breed in many areas of Ocean Cty while Blues breed only ~ in NW NJ.

Singing Bt Greens have at least 2 call types switching from zoo zee zoo
zoo zee to establish and defend a nesting territory to a, later in the
season, BT Blue-like, zee zee zee zoo zee when communicating with a
mate.  In hotter temperatures I have found that the Greens call more 
softly and slower to me, making it sound even more like a Blue. Late May
Ocean County NJ (and some other Ctys.) singing Blues are almost always
actually Greens.


*** 5/28 Species Summary:

Red-throated Loon (1 Monmouth)
Horned Grebe (1 Warren)
Roseate Spoonbill (1 Warren)
Merlin (1 Ocean)
Common Raven (1 Ocean)
Prothonotary Warbler (1 Monmouth)
Swainson's Warbler (1 Cape May)
Black-throated Blue Warbler (1 Ocean)
Savannah Sparrow (1 Cape May)

Close to a million birds were seen migrating over the St. Lawrence River
on 5/28.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46117992
<https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46117992>


good birding all,

Fred virrazzi
secaucus nj




How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 5/29/18 5:20 am
From: Marty DeAngelo <martytdx...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Possible Bicknell's Thrush at Palmyra Cove 5/25
I finally got around to processing my pictures from Friday, and the main
reason I was eager was this bird. In the field I heard a call that was
obviously a thrush call but unlike the nearby Swainson's Thrush calls. This
bird popped up - I can't say if it was the bird calling but it was in the
right direction.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/martytdx/41527511005/

It struck me immediately the darkness of the spotting and the fact that it
extended down the flank. There is a lack of distinct eye ring. My first
thought was GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH and a played the song once to see if it
responded. It was curious but did NOT respond. There was also no
tail-bobbing beyond the occasional flick as it moved/turned.

I asked my friend Joe from D.O.S. and this was his reply:

I am doing the Yellowstone trip with Forrest Rowland. He said visually, it
> checks all the boxes for Bicknells. Rusty tail, wing pattern and facial
> pattern look correct. Most ebird editors don't accept this bird
> without a audio clip though. Bicknells was my first thought too.


I obviously don't have an audio clip so I probably won't know for sure but
wanted to see what others thought. Sorry for the color, it was about 2
minutes before the skies opened up and it was a quick shot in the (literal)
dark.

Others on Facebook are leaning toward Veery but the color wasn't right and
I think that the spots on the throat and upper chest are too dark.

Love to see other's opinions.

Marty DeAngelo
Haddonfield, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 5/27/18 12:00 pm
From: Lillian Shupe <lrshupe...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Roseate spoonbill reported in Warren County near Columbia
I was there at about 12:30, it's at a business that has long had trouble with drainage but it wasn't in the nice big puddle on the lawn. It was way in the back of the property but I still got an OK photo. It was raining so I did not stay long (digital cameras don't like rain). Roads were OK though.

Several cars were lined up on the shoulder which is not very wide. You don't want to get too far off the road, it's soggy and it drops off. Be careful crossing the road. People were at least slowing down.

Afterward I went by Columbia Lake but the entrance was blocked due to a downed tree that destroyed a detached garage next door. They had some heavy equipment removing it. Near the bridge there were several eastern kingbirds making a lot of noise. I was there yesterday but there was not much in the way of bird action. I did see an osprey and lots of Red Winged Blackbirds. There was a bunch of butterflies congregating on a dead bird. Plus there were big fish fighting in the water.

Lillian Shupe
Lower Mt Bethel, Pa.

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:<JERSEYBI...>] On Behalf Of Susan Treesh
Sent: Sunday, May 27, 2018 11:36 AM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Roseate spoonbill reported in Warren County near Columbia

Jerseybirders, the North NJ Rarities text alert is reporting ROSEATE SPOONBILL near 575-565 NJ-94, between Warrington Rd and Brugle Rd.40.936919, -75..077892. Multiple observers confirming with pictures.
Last update at 11:22.

Watch out for flooding on roads!

Susan Treesh

Somerset



How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 5/27/18 8:37 am
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Roseate spoonbill reported in Warren County near Columbia
Jerseybirders, the North NJ Rarities text alert is reporting ROSEATE
SPOONBILL near 575-565  NJ-94, between Warrington Rd and Brugle
Rd.40.936919, -75..077892.  Multiple observers confirming with pictures.
Last update at 11:22.

Watch out for flooding on roads!

Susan Treesh

Somerset



How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 5/26/18 3:24 am
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Common on Pacific Loon reported at Cape May on May 20 and 23
I was in a process of writing a loon ID novel in an attempt to collaborate with others that have reported the Pacific to ebird on May 20 and 23, and this sighting should be accepted. But of course Tom Reed does not need my input to back up his sighting. Then, a few minutes ago reviewing the ebird again I noticed the sightings have been accepted already.

So what do I do now, just bail ? I decided to finish what I started and will collaborate with others anyway, and share my experience on the previously reported Pacific Loon. As Marc Chelemer stated on his prior posting we also saw the Pacific on the 19th. We were at Coral Avenue dune crossing and for about two hours during pouring rain with no shelter to seek cover. I had a full length rain coat with hood and my cap on (and knee high rain boots). And another rain jacket over my scope and over my head, and I was under it in order to keep my scope from getting pelted by rain, like the old school picture taker from the late 1800’s.

We saw the Pacific riding the waves as it as it floating with a COLO, ultra close to each other for a great comparison. It was viewed with the scope and as soon as I saw the bird, I yelled-out.......*Holy *** It’s a Pacific !*. I could have reached that chin strap for photo documentation with 83x zoom, but just did not want to take the chance on possible water damage to the camera. As Marc should have done and he did, which was trying to rule out RTLO 100% before considering the Pacific.

Also, that day, Tom R. and Doug Gochfeld were at the Concrete Ship and sending-out text for some great storm-birds onto our way. With all that CMBO Text excitement going-on and not knowing which birds TR and DG would send to our way next, I simply moved onto other birds.

Reason ? Simple. When a lazy birder who does not do ebird or keep a list or have minimum interest if a Pacific sighted in May in New Jersey should be reported to NJBRC, looking for just other storm-birds seemed so much more exciting at the time. Another reason why I did not bother trying to convince Marc that the loon was the Pacific and I shut down the ID discussion.

Yong Kong
Camden County


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
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Date: 5/25/18 10:29 am
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Scenic trail - gloucester - migrants - no
A nice migrant push last night. But nothing to put them down in
south Jersey! I had one Redstart. Which could be a breeder.
The breeders were quite vocal and visible. I even had a Brown
Thrasher CF. Those skulkers....

I was there for botany - interesting to see the changes from 2 to 3 weeks
ago. I have decided this will be a two year project. Theres just so much
involved. And i have to relearn stuff before moving on to a lot of new species.

Have a nice holiday weekend everyone!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
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Date: 5/25/18 8:03 am
From: Marty DeAngelo <martytdx...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Palmyra Cove 5/25
Went out this morning before work hoping to get some of those migrants from
the radar. But Palmyra was pretty quiet - lots of breeders (yellow
warblers, Baltimore orioles, common yellowthroat).

Only highlights were a single Alder Flycatcher calling near the dredge
pond, an ovenbird on the drive out and a bevy of Great Egrets all around
the dredge pond. I wonder if they're thinking of nesting there (since there
were a bunch in the trees).

Marty DeAngelo
Haddonfield, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 5/23/18 4:10 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Yong Comment - [JERSEYBI] "Barely enough" horseshoe crab eggs for arriving red knots | Breaking News | pressofatlanticcity.com
I hope I am not stepping anyone's toes and/or crossing boundaries where I do
not belong by commenting here.

As a habitat curiosity freak-birder that I am (i.e, so often I much rather
see the habitat/landscape/vegetation community than the rare bird that has
been reported at the location). One example would be Bob's Woods. Thanks so
much to David LaPuma !!!

I find the article so interesting and who does not love red knots, no one.
Is B95, nicknamed Moonbird still alive ? Please comment on the status on B95
as I an dying to know.

With that said, when I was visiting Bob's Woods last week, a very nice
birder gave me a tip where I could take a detour from Norwood birding and to
check out red knots. I was stunned as most birders usually look the other
way and walk away from me when I am out birding.

I asked her how many red knots she saw and she said over 30. I then asked
her how many laughing gulls she saw during her visit when she counted those
30 red knots. She said about 5,000. As a follow up question, I was going to
ask her how may dog walkers she saw or how many loose dogs she saw. But I
know when to stop asking my usual wacky birding relating questions to fellow
birders so I did not.

Back in the days, early 90's, I did check out red knots more than I do now.
I do hope for best survival of Delaware Bay stop-over red knots and each one
of them make it to their breeding grounds.

Yong Kong
Camden County.


-----Original Message-----
From: Stuart
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2018 4:51 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] "Barely enough" horseshoe crab eggs for arriving red
knots | Breaking News | pressofatlanticcity.com

Jerseybirders

A link below to an article of interest.

Good Birding,

Wendy Malmid
Monroe Twp,NJ



http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/news/breaking/barely-enough-horseshoe-crab-eggs-for-arriving-red-knots/article_ebc1040e-39be-5df7-83ae-318b196cf5c1.html


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
<www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
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List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 5/23/18 1:52 pm
From: Stuart <weluvowls...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] "Barely enough" horseshoe crab eggs for arriving red knots | Breaking News | pressofatlanticcity.com
Jerseybirders

A link below to an article of interest.

Good Birding,

Wendy Malmid
Monroe Twp,NJ



http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com/news/breaking/barely-enough-horseshoe-crab-eggs-for-arriving-red-knots/article_ebc1040e-39be-5df7-83ae-318b196cf5c1.html


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Date: 5/23/18 8:11 am
From: David Lapuma <david.lapuma...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] "Bob's Woods" Access Restrictions
Dear Birders,



First of all, I would like to again thank the superintendent of Cape May Point State Park, Lorraine McCay, for providing temporary public access to the area known as “Bob’s Woods”, over the last three weeks. Many birders visiting Cape May leading up to, during and following the World Series of Birding and Cape May Spring Festival were treated to some excellent birds because of this access (including, but not limited to, the Swainson’s Warbler!). Thank you also to the many birders who visited the woods and were not only respectful of the neighbors, but especially the birds and the habitat; always staying on trails and being mindful of noise levels.



After speaking with Lorraine today she agreed that it is time to return the area to being no-public-access. The reasons for this are several, but primarily because a) this is not a publicly maintained trail by the state park, b) the area is the site of a long-term research project which would be compromised with public access and c) the area is very close to private property and despite all of our efforts, regular traffic would lead to eventual conflict.



Thank you again for being great birding ambassadors and thank you for respecting the State Park’s decision. Going forward, birds being heard from within Bob’s Woods should be reported from the nearest public listening location, such as “heard from along Lighthouse Avenue”, or from “north of Lighthouse Pond East”.



Again, thank you, and Good Birding,





David


________________________
David A. La Puma, PhD
Director, Cape May Bird Observatory
New Jersey Audubon
600 Route 47 North
Cape May Court House, NJ 08210
P (CRE): 609.400.3833 (internal use: ext 922)
P (Northwood): 609.400.3834 (internal use: ext 714)
c: 732.447.4894
f: 609.861.1651

w: http://birdcapemay.org<http://birdcapemay.org/>
w: http://www.njaudubon.org<http://www.njaudubon.org/>
Making New Jersey a Better Place for People and Wildlife Since 1897

“Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn’t be done.” - Amelia Earhart



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Date: 5/22/18 5:24 am
From: Laura B. Berlik <lberlik...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] JERSEYBI Digest - 20 May 2018 to 21 May 2018 (#2018-136)
How unusual is a white headed house finch in NJ? A friend had one at her feeder here in Princeton all last summer and it has returned. I caught sight of it yesterday but my iPhone wasn’t up to documenting it. She says she can provide pictures. This one has a really striking solid white head.
Laura Berlik
Princeton

On May 22, 2018, at 12:00 AM, JERSEYBI automatic digest system <listserv...> wrote:

There are 5 messages totaling 174 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Brown-headed Nuthatch, Cape May Pt
2. The Yin and Yang of birding
3. A four-Vireo-species day from my deck...
4. Allenhurst Cave Swallows (2)


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----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 21 May 2018 08:30:35 -0400
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops...>
Subject: Brown-headed Nuthatch, Cape May Pt

A Brown-headed Nuthatch flew east past the Coral Ave dune crossover (Cape May Pt) at 8:10am. Folks are out looking for it now along Harvard Ave.

best,
tr


Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
Sent from my iPhone


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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 21 May 2018 14:33:08 +0000
From: "CHELEMER, MARC J" <mc2496...>
Subject: The Yin and Yang of birding

Jerseybirders,

I had all day for birding on Saturday. Tom D'amico's find of a White Ibis the previous evening dictated my starting point, and my own birding ethos of striving as much as possible to get eyes on a bird instead of settling for just hearing it meant that I wanted to visit the woods at Jakes Landing to try to observe a Yellow-throated Warbler, and also go to Bob's Woods on Cape Island to try to see the long-visiting Swainson's Warbler. Other than those three targets, I was open to whatever occurred.

Yong Kong generously agreed to meet me for what turned out to be 10-1/2 hours of birding. We dipped on the White Ibis. Shortly thereafter, we found singing Bobolinks at Jakes after successfully finding a YT Warbler in the woods. Down on Cape Island, we eventually had a long and satisfactory view of the Swainson's Warbler singing away while perched on an exposed branch; Yong got some good shots. (2 for 3 of my daily goals) We hopped back and forth between there and Northwoods in response to reports of a female Golden-winged Warbler; were we successful at viewing that lovely sprite, but as Yong wrote elsewhere, the camaraderie and other birds were fantastic (female Hooded Warbler on the ground!, female Bay-breasted in a close tree, Magnolias everywhere, etc.).

That spastic style of birding ("quick, let's go over to that other spot!") got us lots of species, but sometimes what's required is just the opposite. During our first visit to Bob's Woods, the rain started to pelt us, and passerines went quiet. What to do when it's pouring? Go to an exposed platform with no cover, of course. We went to the Coral Avenue dune crossing and for two hours and fifteen minutes in driving rain, we didn't move, just scanning the ocean from under an umbrella or an old rain slicker. Sure enough, that patience and diligence yielded a Wilson's Storm-Petrel flying out to sea, a hard-flying Parasitic Jaeger heading in the same direction, and a Pacific Loon in winter plumage*, swimming right alongside a Common Loon for comparison. Yong found all three of those birds despite the inclemency of conditions. Bravo!

Later, we did a quick round at Forsythe, finding more than 20 WR Sandpipers in among the peep, and one continuing Stilt Sandpiper at the dogleg.

All in all, a tremendous day: great looks at lots of birds, some unusual oceanic species despite driving hard rain, and excellent companionship and conviviality. 113 species in all.

Good birding!

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly

*We did not report it at the time, because I thought it was a Red-throated. It bothered us; upon further review, we now agree it was a Pacific...Yong got a view of the chinstrap.


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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 21 May 2018 17:10:36 -0400
From: "B.G. Sloan" <bgsloan3...>
Subject: A four-Vireo-species day from my deck...

I keep forgetting to mention that I heard four Vireo species singing while
sitting out on my deck one day earlier last week. Warbling, White-eyed,
Red-eyed and Blue-headed. Red-eyed and Blue-headed were still hanging
around yesterday. Blue-headed is my favorite song...kinda like Red-eyed,
but "sweeter". :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 21 May 2018 23:45:23 +0000
From: James O'Brien <jphillipobrien...>
Subject: Allenhurst Cave Swallows

Seems to be a decent sized group of a dozen or so cave swallows nesting underneath the bridge connecting Allenhurst to West Allenhurst. Here they are collecting mud at the play ground. Very beautiful birds indeed!
https://flic.kr/p/26ibSQA

James
Asbury Park


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------------------------------

Date: Mon, 21 May 2018 23:47:17 +0000
From: James O'Brien <jphillipobrien...>
Subject: Re: Allenhurst Cave Swallows

On second thought, maybe they are cliff swallows. Im sure you will all
tell me!

On 5/21/18, 7:45 PM, "JerseyBirds on behalf of James O'Brien"
<JERSEYBI...> on behalf of <jphillipobrien...>
wrote:

> Seems to be a decent sized group of a dozen or so cave swallows nesting
> underneath the bridge connecting Allenhurst to West Allenhurst. Here
> they are collecting mud at the play ground. Very beautiful birds indeed!
> https://flic.kr/p/26ibSQA
>
> James
> Asbury Park
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see
> <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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------------------------------

End of JERSEYBI Digest - 20 May 2018 to 21 May 2018 (#2018-136)
***************************************************************


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Date: 5/21/18 4:48 pm
From: James O'Brien <jphillipobrien...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Allenhurst Cave Swallows
On second thought, maybe they are cliff swallows. Im sure you will all
tell me!

On 5/21/18, 7:45 PM, "JerseyBirds on behalf of James O'Brien"
<JERSEYBI...> on behalf of <jphillipobrien...>
wrote:

>Seems to be a decent sized group of a dozen or so cave swallows nesting
>underneath the bridge connecting Allenhurst to West Allenhurst. Here
>they are collecting mud at the play ground. Very beautiful birds indeed!
>https://flic.kr/p/26ibSQA
>
>James
>Asbury Park
>
>
>How to report NJ bird sightings: see
><www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
>or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
>List help: <jerseybi-request...>
>List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Date: 5/21/18 4:46 pm
From: James O'Brien <jphillipobrien...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Allenhurst Cave Swallows
Seems to be a decent sized group of a dozen or so cave swallows nesting underneath the bridge connecting Allenhurst to West Allenhurst. Here they are collecting mud at the play ground. Very beautiful birds indeed!
https://flic.kr/p/26ibSQA

James
Asbury Park


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Date: 5/21/18 2:11 pm
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] A four-Vireo-species day from my deck...
I keep forgetting to mention that I heard four Vireo species singing while
sitting out on my deck one day earlier last week. Warbling, White-eyed,
Red-eyed and Blue-headed. Red-eyed and Blue-headed were still hanging
around yesterday. Blue-headed is my favorite song...kinda like Red-eyed,
but "sweeter". :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 5/21/18 7:34 am
From: CHELEMER, MARC J <mc2496...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] The Yin and Yang of birding
Jerseybirders,

I had all day for birding on Saturday. Tom D'amico's find of a White Ibis the previous evening dictated my starting point, and my own birding ethos of striving as much as possible to get eyes on a bird instead of settling for just hearing it meant that I wanted to visit the woods at Jakes Landing to try to observe a Yellow-throated Warbler, and also go to Bob's Woods on Cape Island to try to see the long-visiting Swainson's Warbler. Other than those three targets, I was open to whatever occurred.

Yong Kong generously agreed to meet me for what turned out to be 10-1/2 hours of birding. We dipped on the White Ibis. Shortly thereafter, we found singing Bobolinks at Jakes after successfully finding a YT Warbler in the woods. Down on Cape Island, we eventually had a long and satisfactory view of the Swainson's Warbler singing away while perched on an exposed branch; Yong got some good shots. (2 for 3 of my daily goals) We hopped back and forth between there and Northwoods in response to reports of a female Golden-winged Warbler; were we successful at viewing that lovely sprite, but as Yong wrote elsewhere, the camaraderie and other birds were fantastic (female Hooded Warbler on the ground!, female Bay-breasted in a close tree, Magnolias everywhere, etc.).

That spastic style of birding ("quick, let's go over to that other spot!") got us lots of species, but sometimes what's required is just the opposite. During our first visit to Bob's Woods, the rain started to pelt us, and passerines went quiet. What to do when it's pouring? Go to an exposed platform with no cover, of course. We went to the Coral Avenue dune crossing and for two hours and fifteen minutes in driving rain, we didn't move, just scanning the ocean from under an umbrella or an old rain slicker. Sure enough, that patience and diligence yielded a Wilson's Storm-Petrel flying out to sea, a hard-flying Parasitic Jaeger heading in the same direction, and a Pacific Loon in winter plumage*, swimming right alongside a Common Loon for comparison. Yong found all three of those birds despite the inclemency of conditions. Bravo!

Later, we did a quick round at Forsythe, finding more than 20 WR Sandpipers in among the peep, and one continuing Stilt Sandpiper at the dogleg.

All in all, a tremendous day: great looks at lots of birds, some unusual oceanic species despite driving hard rain, and excellent companionship and conviviality. 113 species in all.

Good birding!

Marc Chelemer
Tenafly

*We did not report it at the time, because I thought it was a Red-throated. It bothered us; upon further review, we now agree it was a Pacific...Yong got a view of the chinstrap.


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Date: 5/21/18 5:31 am
From: Tom Reed <coturnicops...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Brown-headed Nuthatch, Cape May Pt
A Brown-headed Nuthatch flew east past the Coral Ave dune crossover (Cape May Pt) at 8:10am. Folks are out looking for it now along Harvard Ave.

best,
tr


Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ
Sent from my iPhone


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Date: 5/20/18 4:10 pm
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Heislerville - shorebirds and terrapins
Had some migration this morning at Amico island in
Burlington. N Waterthrush, Parula, BT Blue, Maggie, Black and White,
Blackpoll, plus breeders. 2 lingering WT Sparrows.

Seems like more stuff out than in.

Heislerville at dead high tide was uncountable. Masses of shorebirds.
Lots of numbers were an estimate. A lot of the shorebirds started leaving
soon though. Still high tide in the cove, but they were probably heading
out to the beaches for the horseshoe crab eggs.

Best sighting - 390 Diamondback Terrapin heads close in to shore.
Wow! Heislerville cove.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 5/20/18 2:12 pm
From: Michael Britt <sootyshear...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Misc. Hudson Co.
I observed a SALTMARSH SPARROW in the weedy margins (Mugwort) of the
westernmost peninsula (overgrown pier really), on the south end of LSP this
morning. This is actually my first spring migrant in the county, though a
targeted effort during the last third of May would no doubt produce. A
second bird was in the Spartina along the Ocean Terminal seawall this
afternoon.

Believe it or not, SANDERLING (#282 all-time) was a "county bird" for me
this morning. While this species is expected along the coast, north of
South Amboy it's a hard to get migrant, with the window of mid-May to early
June (Horseshoe Crab spawning) probably the best. A single bird flew out of
Caven Cove towards the river. Perhaps it was feeding on the backside of the
jetty?

I suspect WILLET is attempting to nest at Caven Point. That would be a
first in my tenure here.

Mike Britt
Bayonne


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Date: 5/20/18 6:03 am
From: L Larson <llarson2...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI]
I think most list members know this, but just in case, since this hasn’t happened for a while.

The link posted under John Votta’s address is apparently the result of a scam that has hijacked his password and his address book with the intent of spreading further, by way of emailing infected links.

Please DO NOT click the link.

The victim has been contacted and asked to change his passwords and check for viruses. And the infected link has been removed from the list archives.

There is no way for the list managers to remove the infected message from your inbox, so please just delete it right now without clicking the link.

Sorry for the interruption; please return to birding!

Laurie

> On May 20, 2018, at 1:44 AM, JOHN VOTTA <wadda101...> wrote:
>
> http://location.....
(Link truncated for safety)


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Date: 5/19/18 10:45 pm
From: JOHN VOTTA <wadda101...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI]
http://location.obdru.com

John Votta



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Date: 5/19/18 6:58 pm
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] radar tonight
Birds moving. Empty spots. And a line of rain coming. What shall
this bring tomorrow? I am in Burlington county tomorrow.

Happy migration all!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 5/19/18 5:38 pm
From: Sandra Keller <sandrakeller...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] A flooded field search - Gloucester county
Slow. Greater Yellowlegs, Solitary Sandpiper, and Least Sandpiper. it was medium to high tide in the area.
All the shorebirds must be in Cape may and Cumberland! Dream Park was the best.

I did have a nice passerine show along Floodgates Rd. The birds were active and singing. Nothing out of the
ordinary though.

Will birds be moving tonight???

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller
<sandrakeller...>

Sent from my Imac





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Date: 5/19/18 4:05 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Cape May birding
Today, I checked off three birding-related items that are not typical in my birding bible.

1. I was up 4:15 AM to go birding (with 2018 WSB win team member, Marc Chelemer)
2. Went to Cape May Point to go birding (no offence to Cape May birding community but $9 buck toll and petro $ needed are the main barrier for lack of my visit)
3. Did some hard-bird-chasing and find birds at all cause (Wow-Crazy !! but it was fun doing it with Marc Chelemer)

High light was the warbler action at the CMBO Norwood Center and saying hello to Brett E, Tom R, David La Puma of CMBO. I really need to find a way to get down there more often. I was blown out by the warbler action as I do not get out much to find warblers. I do that at home yard/woods and strike out most of the time.

One has to be on his/her toes when birding with MC. We were at Coral Avenue Spring Watch during pouring rain for over an hour or more? I was beginning to get concerned if inside of bins and scope will be full of fog and waterlogged when I get home.

I may be the last NJ birder that found out that there are some fantastic birding going on down at Cape May during spring. Don’t be like me, head down there ASAP and ask those CMBO staff to show you some birds.

Yong Kong
Camden County



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Date: 5/19/18 8:21 am
From: Stuart <weluvowls...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Birding Tomorrow
In response to the e-mails from Mike Hiotis and Christopher Magarelli
does anyone know the status of Clinton road and the roads in Stokes and
High Point? Please respond on or off line depending on how you wish to
respond.


Stuart Malmid
Monroe Twp


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