JerseyBirds
Received From Subject
1/23/20 7:34 pm Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...> [JERSEYBI] Troy Meadows Boardwalk
1/23/20 7:18 pm Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...> [JERSEYBI] Troy meadows Boardwalk
1/23/20 6:40 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] ebird report of two Razorbill at Absecon Inlet today
1/23/20 9:15 am Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] in phila - mew gull
1/22/20 4:31 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] bald eagle - yard bird!
1/22/20 9:18 am Stuart <weluvowls...> [JERSEYBI] NJ falcons down, eagles up - News - New Jersey Herald - Newton, NJ
1/22/20 9:17 am Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...> [JERSEYBI] Mark Stackhouse, Tropical Birder - BirdCallsRadio
1/21/20 7:48 pm Linda Mack <lj.mack...> [JERSEYBI] Banded Canada Geese
1/21/20 7:43 pm Linda Mack <lj.mack...> [JERSEYBI] Canada Goose banding reports
1/21/20 7:06 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Compare YK's Atlantic Co area notes to TR's Cape May area notes
1/21/20 5:09 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] more on money island rd.
1/21/20 5:07 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Money Island Rd. - Salem - Shortie
1/21/20 1:14 pm Chris Sturm <thesturms2...> Re: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
1/21/20 12:33 pm ernest hahn <ernestphahn...> Re: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
1/21/20 12:28 pm William Dix <williamdix...> Re: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
1/21/20 12:10 pm B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> Re: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
1/21/20 11:57 am Larry Zirlin <larry-zirlin...> [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
1/21/20 8:45 am Thomas W. Reed <coturnicops...> [JERSEYBI] Recent Cape May area notes
1/21/20 7:21 am B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> [JERSEYBI] 2019 NJ Bald Eagle report
1/20/20 7:26 pm vincent N <vfn7...> [JERSEYBI] Washington Crossing Audubon Field Trip (FREE)
1/20/20 10:37 am Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1...> [JERSEYBI] Lincoln's Sparrow in Plumstead and many more!
1/20/20 10:32 am vincent N <vfn7...> [JERSEYBI] Washington Crossing Audubon: Lecture Tonight
1/19/20 3:43 pm Michael Hodanish <luv2howl...> [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes in Jackson
1/19/20 7:31 am L Larson <0000057b603ab9b2-dmarc-request...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Jerseybirds guidelines document, revised
1/19/20 5:55 am B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Jerseybirds guidelines document, revised
1/18/20 4:17 pm Marty DeAngelo <martytdx...> Re: [JERSEYBI] greenwald park - camden county
1/18/20 1:59 pm Sandra Mc <jerseyb...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Jerseybirds guidelines document, revised
1/18/20 11:02 am L Larson <00000ffe25a4beba-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Jerseybirds guidelines document, revised
1/18/20 10:38 am Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] greenwald park - camden county
1/17/20 5:49 pm Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...> [JERSEYBI] Open lakes/reservoirs
1/17/20 4:24 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Brig Golden Eagle -I did not see it
1/17/20 9:31 am L Larson <00000ffe25a4beba-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] test please ignore
1/17/20 5:25 am Scott Barnes <scott.barnes...> [JERSEYBI] NJ Audubon Barnegat Light trip canceled
1/16/20 5:21 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Jerry Lig Facebook link and more of my none sense
1/16/20 5:11 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Cumberland - gulls and Sea breeze
1/14/20 8:27 am Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...> [JERSEYBI] Richard Crossley - BirdCallsRadio
1/14/20 5:59 am Chris Sturm <thesturms2...> [JERSEYBI] Black Guillemot
1/12/20 5:53 pm Christopher Magarelli <christopher.magarelli...> [JERSEYBI] Lark Sparrow Continues in Plainsboro
1/12/20 3:46 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] lincolns sparrow - January bird!
1/12/20 10:30 am bramble <bramble...> [JERSEYBI] BCAS Chapter Meeting and Program: Dave Hall - Using the Christmas Bird Count to View Climate Change
1/12/20 9:26 am Michael Perlin <mlperlin...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Barnegat Light today
1/12/20 8:53 am B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Barnegat Light today
1/11/20 8:32 pm William Saidel <saidel...> [JERSEYBI] Barnegat Light today
1/11/20 2:49 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] My Black guillemot show from the Barney side
1/11/20 1:18 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Forsythe - Ipswich Sparrow survey
1/11/20 6:07 am Susan Treesh <sktreesh...> [JERSEYBI] Black guillemot continues at Barnegat Inlet
1/10/20 4:28 pm Walter Gura <waltg19149...> [JERSEYBI] Black Guillemot at Barnegat Inlet from concrete walkway
1/10/20 8:46 am sktreesh <sktreesh...> [JERSEYBI] Black guillemot at Barnegat
1/9/20 3:58 pm Christopher Daly <cdaly...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -
1/9/20 2:56 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Glassboro Woods - Winter Wrens and Phoebe
1/9/20 11:27 am Eric Stiles <eric.stiles...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -
1/9/20 10:40 am Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...> [JERSEYBI] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -
1/9/20 9:22 am Susan Treesh <sktreesh...> [JERSEYBI] Black guillemot continues at Barnegat inlet 1/9/2020
1/8/20 12:21 pm robert dodelson <rdodelson...> [JERSEYBI] Black guillemot-please forgive the nostalgia
1/7/20 5:57 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Wed. birding - winter wrens
1/7/20 5:42 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Black Guillemot - info
1/7/20 4:53 pm Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...> [JERSEYBI] NEWS REEL - BirdCallsRadio
1/7/20 10:38 am Richard Radis <00000f9e38b6ef3b-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Very preliminary results of the Barnegat Christmas Count
1/7/20 5:12 am Tom Johnson <tbj4...> [JERSEYBI] Black Guillemot continues 7 Jan - Barnegat Inlet
1/6/20 2:56 pm Glenn Williams <00000f984877f467-dmarc-request...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Those X's on ebird checklists
1/6/20 2:22 pm Tom Johnson <tbj4...> [JERSEYBI] Black Guilemot - Barnegat Inlet
1/6/20 1:54 pm Michael Perlin <mlperlin...> Re: [JERSEYBI] january birding - Palmyra
1/6/20 1:46 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] january birding - Palmyra
1/6/20 1:35 pm Joseph Jr. <jsalmierijr...> [JERSEYBI] Those X's on ebird checklists
1/6/20 1:26 pm Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...> [JERSEYBI] Weequahic Park Lake/Boonton Reservoir
1/5/20 6:51 pm Jon Stippick <Jonstippick...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Barnegat CBC- Holgate Section
1/5/20 6:46 pm Jon Stippick <Jonstippick...> [JERSEYBI] Barnegat CBC- Holgate Section
1/5/20 5:33 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] My Mizpah CBC area
1/5/20 4:41 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Mizpah CBC - my thoughts
1/5/20 3:49 pm robert dodelson <rdodelson...> [JERSEYBI] Bald Eagle encounter
1/5/20 10:30 am Colette Buchanan <colette7969...> [JERSEYBI] Birds and Wildlife of Australia - Monmouth County Audubon Program
1/5/20 2:45 am Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Long-eared Owl status
1/4/20 7:42 am Karen Swaine <kmswaine...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
1/4/20 7:23 am lj.mack <lj.mack...> [JERSEYBI] Long-eared Owl status
1/4/20 7:00 am Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] ebird itself in review
1/4/20 2:08 am Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Owl eBird reports
1/3/20 3:37 pm Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...> [JERSEYBI] Packanack Lake
1/3/20 3:27 pm Barry E. Blust <barryblust...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Owl eBird reports
1/3/20 12:47 pm Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...> [JERSEYBI] Owl eBird reports
1/3/20 11:35 am Neil Ellman <neilellman02...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Wallkill River WMA Sightings
1/3/20 8:54 am Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Wallkill River WMA Sightings
1/3/20 8:21 am B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
1/3/20 7:57 am Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...> [JERSEYBI] Wallkill River WMA Sightings
1/3/20 6:32 am Becky Laboy <becky.laboy...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
1/3/20 6:27 am Theodore Chase <theodore.chase...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes in Somerset County (B.G. Sloan)
1/3/20 6:05 am B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes in Somerset County
1/3/20 3:33 am Susan Treesh <sktreesh...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
1/2/20 6:52 pm Becky Laboy <Becky.laboy...> [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
1/2/20 4:49 pm Sandra Mc <jerseyb...> [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes, Somerset Co. NJ
1/2/20 4:08 pm robert dodelson <rdodelson...> [JERSEYBI] Green-winged Teal
1/2/20 10:49 am Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] monthly birding
1/1/20 8:04 am ernest hahn <ernestphahn...> Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Vs MA
1/1/20 7:08 am judson hamlin <jhhamlin...> Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Vs MA
1/1/20 5:30 am Ernest Hahn <ernestphahn...> [JERSEYBI] NJ Vs MA
12/31/19 7:04 pm Jon Stippick <Jonstippick...> [JERSEYBI] South Jersey- Razorbills, Orioles and Owls
12/31/19 2:49 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] 2019 in review - my birding
12/31/19 4:43 am Pete Quartararo <rubixcubepq...> Re: [JERSEYBI] JERSEYBI Digest - 29 Dec 2019 to 30 Dec 2019 (#2019-329)
12/30/19 5:18 pm Michael Perlin <mlperlin...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Yong Reply - Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds
12/30/19 5:00 pm Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> [JERSEYBI] Yong Reply - Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds
12/30/19 10:54 am Pat OHoro <psub...> Re: [JERSEYBI] Black and White Warbler
12/29/19 5:37 pm Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> [JERSEYBI] Cumberland cbc - my thoughts
12/29/19 7:17 am Tom Brown <tshrike19...> [JERSEYBI] 85th Long Branch CBC
12/28/19 1:13 pm Pat OHoro <psub...> [JERSEYBI] Black and White Warbler
12/28/19 1:08 pm James Petersen <jamesmnpetersen...> [JERSEYBI] Brown Pelican
12/27/19 2:38 am Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...> [JERSEYBI] ABA Rare Bird Alert FB page
12/26/19 1:40 pm Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...> [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds
 
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Date: 1/23/20 7:34 pm
From: Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Troy Meadows Boardwalk
Thursday January 23, 2020 - 11 AM
Troy Meadows, Parsippany/Whippany, Morris County
Spent 2 hours on the Boardwalk and adjacent area
Highlights:
Red-shouldered Hawk
Marsh Wren - skulker in the phrags with one brief appearance. Continual clicking
Rusty Blackbird
All lakes I looked at have refrozen. Boonton Reservoir is about 80% closed up
Hangers on:
Common and Hooded Mergansers, Ring-Necked Ducks, Belted Kingfishers

Tim Vogel
Denville

Sent from my iPad


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Date: 1/23/20 7:18 pm
From: Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Troy meadows Boardwalk
Sent from my iPad


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Date: 1/23/20 6:40 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] ebird report of two Razorbill at Absecon Inlet today
In case not everyone on JBirds follow ebird. Two Razorbills were reported today at Absecon Inlet. Ebird link below.

https://ebird.org/checklist/S63709815

I am trying to go back deep into my bird-brain memory bank to see if I had ever seen Razorbill at the Absecon Inlet. No clue. I have seen some cool winter seabirds there over the years, but I honestly can not remember if I had seen one there. Memory will never compete with ebird data and win.

Also, I have some fond memories of winter birding along the back bays of Venice Lagoon and Sunset Avenue in Atlantic City.

I am a bird chaser as well. You bet I will be heading towards Absecon Inlet after birding at Motts Creek tomorrow morning.

Yong Kong
Camden County.



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Date: 1/23/20 9:15 am
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] in phila - mew gull
Found in Phila this morning at FDR park. But its gone. Which means it could
be in Jersey somewhere! i wish I could help search, but off to work shortly.

Spent some time at Amico Island looking for Gnatcatcher. Nuttin.....
This monthly birding is tough! Only three Jan. birds. So far.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/22/20 4:31 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] bald eagle - yard bird!
i look up as I am talking with a neighbor. And Wow! Number 83 for the yard.
Barring species to still get in..... Still on 2005!

Marilyn and I hit Cumberland, no Glaucous Gull at Bivalve.....In fact not
many gulls for here. The clam plant was not in operation re processing
clams. Maybe that had something to do with the lack of gulls. Not much
waterfowl either.

Not too much else around. I was surprised at the lack of birds at
Turkey Point at dusk. Considering the great survey I had last night!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
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Date: 1/22/20 9:18 am
From: Stuart <weluvowls...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] NJ falcons down, eagles up - News - New Jersey Herald - Newton, NJ
Jerseybirders


a link below to an article of interest.


Wendy Malmid

Monroe twp, NJ



https://www.njherald.com/news/20200122/nj-falcons-down-eagles-up


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
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Date: 1/22/20 9:17 am
From: Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Mark Stackhouse, Tropical Birder - BirdCallsRadio
Birder et al,

Thought many of you would be interested in next guest Mark Stackhouse, Tropical Birder https://bit.ly/35Ur6PY

Happy Birding!

Cheers,
Mardi Dickinson


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
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Date: 1/21/20 7:48 pm
From: Linda Mack <lj.mack...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Banded Canada Geese
JerseyBirders,



Previous email: Canada Geese were all banded in Quebec.



Linda Mack,

Monmouth Beach, NJ



NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
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Date: 1/21/20 7:43 pm
From: Linda Mack <lj.mack...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Canada Goose banding reports
JerseyBirders,



The following January 2020 submitted banding stats are from Lake Como in
Monmouth County, NJ:

7/2009 - male, too young to fly

7/2013 - male, hatched 2012 or earlier

7/2013 - male, too young to fly

7/2014 - female (2), too young to fly

7/2014 - male, too young to fly

7/2017 - female, hatched 2016 or earlier

6/2018 - female, hatched 2017 or earlier

5/2019 - female, hatched 2018 or earlier

7/2019 - female, hatched 2018 or earlier



Good birding,



Linda Mack

Monmouth Beach, NJ



NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
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Date: 1/21/20 7:06 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Compare YK's Atlantic Co area notes to TR's Cape May area notes
Inspired by TR's report and his contributions to JBirds, here is a Junior
Varsity bird-watcher's attempt at best about Motts Creek's *winter* raptors.

Assuming it is the same rough-legged hawk, I have seen it three times so
far, December 7th and 22nd in 2019 and again on January 18, 2020. My best
guess is it is the same roughleg based on its behavior. All three occasions,
this bird is first observed early hours in the morning perched on top of a
shrub which I am assuming high-tide bush, or on the same Brig refuge sign
out in the middle of the marsh. Scope view of the bird from the back deck of
Motts Creek Inn is very distant and to this bird-watcher, ID is a pendulum
swing in that I go back and forth from a perched northern harrier to
red-tailed to roughleg. But always swing towards roughleg after the lengthy
scope view.

Final ID is made when the bird finally decides to take a flight. What is
interesting is this rolughleg takes its first morning flight towards the
Garden State Parkway bridge and disappear, rather than heading towards Brig
refuge. For those who may want to take a look at this roughleg, early
morning hours is the best. If it is overcast morning, one may get rewarded
by the sight of a short-eared owl or two while scanning for the roughleg.

On other note, it appears the the new boat dock at Motts Creek should be
completed soon. I was told the new paved parking lot and the dock is being
constructed by the Atlantic County, which means they must provide public
access to the waterfront as a condition of the CAFRA-Waterfront Development
Permit.

Besides the roughleg comment above, I am doing my best to find those Cape
Island birds TR has mentioned, but within Atlantic County or around my
homewoods and refusing to take that drive. Of course no luck. Is that mean I
am a *closet* anti-cape may birding ?

TR, please keep us posted on the Cape May birding scene.

Yong Kong
Camden County


-----Original Message-----
From: Thomas W. Reed
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 11:44 AM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Recent Cape May area notes

Some news and themes from the Cape May area during the first half of
January-

As tends to be the case, January birding efforts have been focused on Cape
Island, where the peninsula's microclimate is further amplified and
half-hardy landbirds tend to be a more consistent winter feature-- but even
within that context, the first half of this season has been exceptional.
Cape May Pt State Park continues to harbor a number of unseasonable
visitors, highlighted by the long-staying Western Kingbird and Ash-throated
Flycatcher (still present as of Monday afternoon). Both of these are found
in the area of the brown gate and banders' field, just east of Lighthouse
Pond and along the yellow trail. An additional Western Kingbird remained at
Hidden Valley into the first week of 2020, and another Ash-throated
Flycatcher was noted along the Middle Twp bike path in Cape May Court House
Jan 9.

The remaining list of notable lingerers at Cape May Pt State Park (as of
last week) included Eastern Phoebe, White-eyed Vireo (1-2), Blue-headed
Vireo, House Wren (3+), Baltimore Oriole (3+), Orange-crowned Warbler (4+),
Nashville Warbler (2), Common Yellowthroat, Palm Warbler, and Pine Warbler.
Remarkably, a Yellow-billed Cuckoo was reported at the park on New Year's
Day and a Northern Parula persisted there through at least Jan 8. A
White-winged Dove put in a brief appearance at the park Jan 9.
Several other Baltimore Orioles and Eastern Phoebes continue to be noted at
multiple Cape Island locations, and a Ruby-throated Hummingbird remained in
a Cape May Pt backyard as of Monday. As might be expected, numbers of Gray
Catbird, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, and Eastern Towhee also appear higher than
usual on Cape Island and along the Delaware bayshore.

It has been an excellent season for Red-headed Woodpecker, with one to
several present along most Delaware Bay access roads, particularly between
Del Haven and Goshen. The marshes along this stretch also seem particularly
bird-rich to this point in the winter, with many vocal Clapper Rails and
perhaps a few more Northern Harriers than in some recent winters. However,
the real showstopper here has been Sedge Wren, with numbers higher than
most of us have ever seen locally. A quick look at the eBird map will show
this fairly clearly, and also reveal locations that perhaps haven't been
checked yet this season. Likewise, numbers of Marsh Wren and Seaside,
Nelson's, and Saltmarsh sparrows also appear to be elevated in the bayshore
marshes this winter.

Conversely, the "deep winter" birds that are often hard to find in the Cape
May area (e.g. Am. Tree Sparrow, Rough-legged Hawk, Common Merganser) have
been predictably absent through mid-January, save for a single Common
Merganser that has taken up residence at Lily Lake, Cape May Pt. Common
Goldeneye has also been scarce, with just three reports countywide since
Jan 1. The recent colder weather could change this narrative to some
extent.

The Razorbill flight never quite materialized, at least when compared to
the amazing numbers noted in January 2019. However, observers who put in
the time have noted small numbers from the barrier beaches and Cape May Pt
on a regular basis this month; notable was one off Reed's Beach on Jan 18,
unusual so far up the bay. The "rips" off Cape May Pt were very active
during the first third of the month, with 300+ Red-throated Loons, 1000+
Gannets, several thousand scoters, and a few Bottlenose Dolphins present on
multiple days, but the onset of true winter may be putting an end to those
April-like scenes.

A few other miscellaneous highlights over the past couple weeks include
Vesper Sparrows at Higbee Beach and the Rea Farm area, Black-headed Gull at
Miami Ave/Villas (Jan 14), 1-2 Blue-winged Teal at Cape May Pt State Park,
Tricolored Heron at Two Mile Landing, and the 2 long-staying Sandhill
Cranes (through at least Jan 9) that have been frequenting both sides of
the Cape May canal.


best,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/21/20 5:09 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] more on money island rd.
Also known as Alloways creek restoration area in ebird.
The road at the very end is closed to vehicles. Can't figure
out why. Looks ok. So I parked at a parking area further up
the road. And lugged the scope in.....

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/21/20 5:07 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Money Island Rd. - Salem - Shortie
This was my area for the Winter raptor survey. It got counted today
because the weekend was weathered out!

The Shortie was to the south of the platform. That was a good area
the whole survey. Harriers were moving around a lot, But always
some there.

GHO's were seen and or heard my whole time there.

I hit areas before here. Freas Rd. was quiet. Mannington Marsh - Rt. 45
was mostly frozen. Quiet.

No January YH Blackbird! Not too many blackbird flocks around. I scanned
what I could. Maybe this is why I don't have for January yet. They just aren't
around much now. Or not and I am just missing.....

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/21/20 1:14 pm
From: Chris Sturm <thesturms2...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
Greg Prelich and I had a similar experience at Colliers a few years ago
with a carload of twenty-somethings. I see that wasn't an isolated
experience.

On Tue, Jan 21, 2020, 2:57 PM Larry Zirlin <larry-zirlin...> wrote:

> Jerseybirders:
> Perhaps some of you missed this amusing (if it isn't happening to you)
> story:
>
> https://www.phillyvoice.com/waze-borgata-casino-atlantic-city-jackson-police-new-jersey-new-york-gps/
>
> It seems the Waze app had the Borgata Casino plunked down in the middle of
> Colliers Mills and about 50 people have had to be towed out of the sugar
> sand on Success Road.
>
> I came across one of those wayward souls on Saturday, in the middle of a
> snowstorm and was able to direct her out of the WMA before she became
> victim #51, but it makes you wonder just how much faith some people have in
> technology that they would keep motoring on in an obvious forest, which
> doesn't look at all like an approach to Atlantic City, just because their
> app said to keep going.
> Larry
> http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/
>
>
> NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Date: 1/21/20 12:33 pm
From: ernest hahn <ernestphahn...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
Larry, how about the eighteen wheeler that supposedly followed his gps to the end of Great Bay Blvd 😊

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 21, 2020, at 2:57 PM, Larry Zirlin <Larry-Zirlin...> wrote:
>
> Jerseybirders:
> Perhaps some of you missed this amusing (if it isn't happening to you) story:
> https://www.phillyvoice.com/waze-borgata-casino-atlantic-city-jackson-police-new-jersey-new-york-gps/
>
> It seems the Waze app had the Borgata Casino plunked down in the middle of Colliers Mills and about 50 people have had to be towed out of the sugar sand on Success Road.
>
> I came across one of those wayward souls on Saturday, in the middle of a snowstorm and was able to direct her out of the WMA before she became victim #51, but it makes you wonder just how much faith some people have in technology that they would keep motoring on in an obvious forest, which doesn't look at all like an approach to Atlantic City, just because their app said to keep going.
> Larry
> http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/
>
>
> NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Date: 1/21/20 12:28 pm
From: William Dix <williamdix...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
A few years back, Joanne and I had just about completed our first loop around Brigantine NWR when we came across a distraught elderly couple in a disabled car, along the sand road not far from the exit with its lethal tire-puncturing spikes. They had been on their way to the Brig Visitors Center, and insisted that Siri had told them to turn left after crossing the bridge. So ignoring the large signs that said Do Not Enter and Tires Will Be Damaged, they proceeded the wrong way onto the loop drive, shredding all four tires in the process. We said we would send help, and dispatched a ranger who rescued them and arranged for a local garage to bring four new tires.

Yes, as Larry says, it makes you wonder.

.................................

Bill Dix
Princeton, NJ


________________________________
From: JerseyBirds <JERSEYBI...> on behalf of Larry Zirlin <larry-zirlin...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 2:57 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...> <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills

Jerseybirders:
Perhaps some of you missed this amusing (if it isn't happening to you) story:
https://www.phillyvoice.com/waze-borgata-casino-atlantic-city-jackson-police-new-jersey-new-york-gps/

It seems the Waze app had the Borgata Casino plunked down in the middle of Colliers Mills and about 50 people have had to be towed out of the sugar sand on Success Road.

I came across one of those wayward souls on Saturday, in the middle of a snowstorm and was able to direct her out of the WMA before she became victim #51, but it makes you wonder just how much faith some people have in technology that they would keep motoring on in an obvious forest, which doesn't look at all like an approach to Atlantic City, just because their app said to keep going.
Larry
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/


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List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 1/21/20 12:10 pm
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
There was a segment on this on the WABC-TV 6:00 newscast last night. You'd
think that folks would think that, as the road conditions deteriorated,
this MIGHT not be the way to the Borgota? :-)

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Tue, Jan 21, 2020 at 2:57 PM Larry Zirlin <larry-zirlin...>
wrote:

> Jerseybirders:
> Perhaps some of you missed this amusing (if it isn't happening to you)
> story:
>
> https://www.phillyvoice.com/waze-borgata-casino-atlantic-city-jackson-police-new-jersey-new-york-gps/
>
> It seems the Waze app had the Borgata Casino plunked down in the middle of
> Colliers Mills and about 50 people have had to be towed out of the sugar
> sand on Success Road.
>
> I came across one of those wayward souls on Saturday, in the middle of a
> snowstorm and was able to direct her out of the WMA before she became
> victim #51, but it makes you wonder just how much faith some people have in
> technology that they would keep motoring on in an obvious forest, which
> doesn't look at all like an approach to Atlantic City, just because their
> app said to keep going.
> Larry
> http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/
>
>
> NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Date: 1/21/20 11:57 am
From: Larry Zirlin <larry-zirlin...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] The Borgata is NOT in Colliers Mills
Jerseybirders:
Perhaps some of you missed this amusing (if it isn't happening to you) story:
https://www.phillyvoice.com/waze-borgata-casino-atlantic-city-jackson-police-new-jersey-new-york-gps/

It seems the Waze app had the Borgata Casino plunked down in the middle of Colliers Mills and about 50 people have had to be towed out of the sugar sand on Success Road.

I came across one of those wayward souls on Saturday, in the middle of a snowstorm and was able to direct her out of the WMA before she became victim #51, but it makes you wonder just how much faith some people have in technology that they would keep motoring on in an obvious forest, which doesn't look at all like an approach to Atlantic City, just because their app said to keep going.
Larry
http://birdsandwords-larryz.blogspot.com/


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Date: 1/21/20 8:45 am
From: Thomas W. Reed <coturnicops...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Recent Cape May area notes
Some news and themes from the Cape May area during the first half of
January-

As tends to be the case, January birding efforts have been focused on Cape
Island, where the peninsula's microclimate is further amplified and
half-hardy landbirds tend to be a more consistent winter feature-- but even
within that context, the first half of this season has been exceptional.
Cape May Pt State Park continues to harbor a number of unseasonable
visitors, highlighted by the long-staying Western Kingbird and Ash-throated
Flycatcher (still present as of Monday afternoon). Both of these are found
in the area of the brown gate and banders' field, just east of Lighthouse
Pond and along the yellow trail. An additional Western Kingbird remained at
Hidden Valley into the first week of 2020, and another Ash-throated
Flycatcher was noted along the Middle Twp bike path in Cape May Court House
Jan 9.

The remaining list of notable lingerers at Cape May Pt State Park (as of
last week) included Eastern Phoebe, White-eyed Vireo (1-2), Blue-headed
Vireo, House Wren (3+), Baltimore Oriole (3+), Orange-crowned Warbler (4+),
Nashville Warbler (2), Common Yellowthroat, Palm Warbler, and Pine Warbler.
Remarkably, a Yellow-billed Cuckoo was reported at the park on New Year's
Day and a Northern Parula persisted there through at least Jan 8. A
White-winged Dove put in a brief appearance at the park Jan 9.
Several other Baltimore Orioles and Eastern Phoebes continue to be noted at
multiple Cape Island locations, and a Ruby-throated Hummingbird remained in
a Cape May Pt backyard as of Monday. As might be expected, numbers of Gray
Catbird, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, and Eastern Towhee also appear higher than
usual on Cape Island and along the Delaware bayshore.

It has been an excellent season for Red-headed Woodpecker, with one to
several present along most Delaware Bay access roads, particularly between
Del Haven and Goshen. The marshes along this stretch also seem particularly
bird-rich to this point in the winter, with many vocal Clapper Rails and
perhaps a few more Northern Harriers than in some recent winters. However,
the real showstopper here has been Sedge Wren, with numbers higher than
most of us have ever seen locally. A quick look at the eBird map will show
this fairly clearly, and also reveal locations that perhaps haven't been
checked yet this season. Likewise, numbers of Marsh Wren and Seaside,
Nelson's, and Saltmarsh sparrows also appear to be elevated in the bayshore
marshes this winter.

Conversely, the "deep winter" birds that are often hard to find in the Cape
May area (e.g. Am. Tree Sparrow, Rough-legged Hawk, Common Merganser) have
been predictably absent through mid-January, save for a single Common
Merganser that has taken up residence at Lily Lake, Cape May Pt. Common
Goldeneye has also been scarce, with just three reports countywide since
Jan 1. The recent colder weather could change this narrative to some
extent.

The Razorbill flight never quite materialized, at least when compared to
the amazing numbers noted in January 2019. However, observers who put in
the time have noted small numbers from the barrier beaches and Cape May Pt
on a regular basis this month; notable was one off Reed's Beach on Jan 18,
unusual so far up the bay. The "rips" off Cape May Pt were very active
during the first third of the month, with 300+ Red-throated Loons, 1000+
Gannets, several thousand scoters, and a few Bottlenose Dolphins present on
multiple days, but the onset of true winter may be putting an end to those
April-like scenes.

A few other miscellaneous highlights over the past couple weeks include
Vesper Sparrows at Higbee Beach and the Rea Farm area, Black-headed Gull at
Miami Ave/Villas (Jan 14), 1-2 Blue-winged Teal at Cape May Pt State Park,
Tricolored Heron at Two Mile Landing, and the 2 long-staying Sandhill
Cranes (through at least Jan 9) that have been frequenting both sides of
the Cape May canal.


best,
tr


--
Tom Reed
Reed's Beach NJ


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Date: 1/21/20 7:21 am
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] 2019 NJ Bald Eagle report
Apologies if this has been posted before. The NJ Division of Fish and
Wildlife's 2019 "Bald Eagle Project Report". Click on the link below to
view the report:

https://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/ensp/pdf/eglrpt19.pdf

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


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Date: 1/20/20 7:26 pm
From: vincent N <vfn7...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Washington Crossing Audubon Field Trip (FREE)
Birds of Shark RiverA field trip on Saturday, January 25, at 9:00 AM led by Brad Merritt. The Shark River area allows us to visit interesting habitats along the bay, ocean, and freshwater ponds. Directions: Take I-295 to I-195 to Route 35 in Belmar. Meet at Marina in Belmar. Bring lunch and beverage, dress for the weather. For more information and confirmation of trip location, contact Brad Merritt at 609-921-8964.



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Date: 1/20/20 10:37 am
From: Shawn Wainwright <shawneagleeyes1...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Lincoln's Sparrow in Plumstead and many more!
Sandy Murdoch and i found a Lincoln's Sparrow at the power line area before
the farm on Brynmore Road. If anyone is going to chase it, just phish in
that area and it will pop out for you. Also there were 6 Field Sparrows, 8
Chipping Sparrows, and 44 Eastern Bluebirds. Chipping and Bluebirds flagged
on ebird. 2 Common Ravens at the farm along with singing Horned Larks and
Killdeer. Checklist here with photos here:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S63570617

West Colliers Mills Road was great as well with a female American Kestrel
chasing 9 Eastern Meadowlarks. Checklist for that area here:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S63570012

Lake of the Lilies hosted 2 Redheads along with the usual Greater and
Lesser Scaup, Coot, etc.
And the Wood Duck was at Little Silver Lake this time!
Photos and checklist here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S63570939

Went to Manasquan Inlet to only miss the Razorbill which was right in the
inlet by minutes! Other then that, the usual birds there:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S63571303

65 species for the day and 13 year birds putting me at 89 species for the
year in Ocean County!

Good birding!
Shawn Wainwright


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Date: 1/20/20 10:32 am
From: vincent N <vfn7...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Washington Crossing Audubon: Lecture Tonight
Rick Radis: Return of the Raven

The Common Raven, Corvus corax, has the widest distribution of any of the Corvidae, the family that includes crows, jays, nutcrackers, magpies and birds such as rooks, jackdaws, and choughs. It is also the largest and heaviest of the passerines, and the smartest. The presentation will cover the historic status of the Common Raven in eastern North America from the late 1880s to the early 1900s when these birds were considered rare in New Jersey. By the 1920s the Common Raven, that totem of wild places, had disappeared as a nesting bird in most of the East. It experienced a remarkable return in the 1990s and is now a nesting species in many (often surprising) areas of NJ and the eastern states. Since the early 1980s the population and seemingly the behavioral dynamics of the eastern Common Raven has changed. Rick Radis will explore the possible reasons why the Common Ravens have lost their shyness around humans and discuss how ravens interact with the other two species of corvids in the Northeast.

Rick Radis is an editor, writer and environmental consultant who has worked on land and water preservation and as an endangered species specialist since the late 1970s. He is a past editor of NJ Birds, NJ Audubon Magazine and other conservation publications. His writing, editorials, and photography have appeared in the New York Times, The New Yorker, and other national and regional publications.

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Below: Raven in East Hanover Rick Radis
Bottom Left: Raven attacking dummy owl at Raccoon Ridge Hawk Watch on the Appalachian Trail along Kittatinny Ridge north of Sunfish Pond in Worthington State Forest in the Delaware Water Gap

<https://www.washingtoncrossingaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Radis-East-Hanover-web.jpg>
[https://www.washingtoncrossingaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Radis-East-Hanover-web.jpg]
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[https://www.washingtoncrossingaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/campus_map2018_Stainton-Hall.jpg]



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Date: 1/19/20 3:43 pm
From: Michael Hodanish <luv2howl...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes in Jackson
I observed two sandhill cranes flying over our farm about 10 minutes before
sunset today. They were coming from Plumsted Township and going toward
Colliers Mills.



A number of years back two cranes flew over the farm just before sunset for
nearly the entire winter, always coming from Plumsted and going toward
Colliers Mills. You usually heard their chortling call before you saw them.
One late afternoon I set out into the refuge in the direction the birds were
flying, and identified the exact cranberry bog the birds used to roost.



Anyway, the cranes may be back in the Plumsted area. I have yet to observe
any in their usual haunts this winter, such as the cattle farm on Inman
Road.





Michael Hodanish, President

Howling Woods Farm

Jackson, NJ

www.howlingwoods.org





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Date: 1/19/20 7:31 am
From: L Larson <0000057b603ab9b2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Jerseybirds guidelines document, revised
Bernie,

The limits are guidelines. If you feel you have something to say every day, you could limit yourself to one post, and put several topics in it. If you normally post infrequently but become active in a particular discussion, you could post a couple of times in a single day. The idea is to avoid just a few people dominating the list, and to encourage a variety of topics and viewpoints. One happy exception would be when there's a raritiy that deserves frequent updates within one day. Unhappy exceptions might be a weather emergency or a system problem requiring up to the minute updates.

But nobody is sitting around with a computer counting posts. The limits really are a holdover from a time when the list had much more traffic and people were complaining of "too much mail," which isn't so much of a problem now. We thought it was a "good practice," and decided to keep the limits as they were.

Appreciate the question, and I hope this helps understand the reasoning. Putting all this explanation into the guidelines for all topics would make them pretty unwieldy, but please ask if there is anything else you want to know.

Laurie

> On Jan 19, 2020, at 8:55 AM, B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> wrote:
>
> One of the guidelines reads "Please limit your posts to two per day or
> seven per week." Can you please clarify? It seems like if I followed the
> two-per-day limit I would violate the seven-per-week limit...
>
> Thanks,
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
>
> On Sat, Jan 18, 2020 at 2:01 PM L Larson wrote:
>
>> Jerseybirders,
>>
>> Here's a revision of the guidelines document which is sent to every
>> subscriber as a "Welcome" message. The list admins have just revised and
>> updated it and want to make a copy of the new edition available to all
>> members. We will try to post it regularly, maybe a couple of times a year.
>>
>>


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Date: 1/19/20 5:55 am
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Jerseybirds guidelines document, revised
One of the guidelines reads "Please limit your posts to two per day or
seven per week." Can you please clarify? It seems like if I followed the
two-per-day limit I would violate the seven-per-week limit...

Thanks,
Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Sat, Jan 18, 2020 at 2:01 PM L Larson <
<00000ffe25a4beba-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Jerseybirders,
>
> Here's a revision of the guidelines document which is sent to every
> subscriber as a "Welcome" message. The list admins have just revised and
> updated it and want to make a copy of the new edition available to all
> members. We will try to post it regularly, maybe a couple of times a year.
>
> We have tried to make this a useful reference. Changes include addition of
> a section on ethics, a section on use of the web interface, and a "bullet
> list" at the beginning. We tried to streamline; if we have left out
> something important please let us know. Questions and discussion are
> welcome.
>
> Good birding,
> Tyler Bell
> Laurie Larson
> Susan Treesh
>
>
> -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=--=-
>
> Welcome to JerseyBirds. This discussion list is hosted as a community
> service by Princeton University.
>
> CHARTER:
>
> The Jerseybirds listserv list is for sharing information about birds and
> birding in New Jersey.
>
> * reports and information about wild birds in New Jersey
> * places to look for birds (excepting endangered and sensitive species)
> * natural history of wild birds, including distribution, identification,
> conservation, and ecology
> * help and answers to questions about techniques of counting,
> photographing, recording, and documenting wild birds
> * news of volunteer opportunities such as bird counts
> * Discussions, questions, stories and humor are always welcome
>
> If you have questions about using Jerseybirds, please write to the
> listowners at <Jerseybi-request...>
> Please save this message for future reference.
>
>
> GUIDELINES:
>
> ** DO NOT POST INFORMATION ABOUT OWL ROOSTS OR NESTS, OR ROOST/NEST SITES
> OF ENDANGERED, THREATENED OR SENSITIVE SPECIES. **
> ** Advertising is not permitted on the list. **
> ** Please limit your posts to two per day or seven per week. **
> ** Know and follow ethical standards for birders and photographers.
> ** Please be courteous and kind. **
>
> More about the guidelines:
>
> Ethical behavior protects the species we love to watch and earns us the
> respect of others on the list and outdoors. Posting information about
> sensitive species is unethical because it harms birds; it can lead to
> abandonment of roost sites and nests, and increases risk of predation,
> stress, and starvation.
> Please read and use these documents:
> ABA Code of Ethics: http://listing.aba.org/ethics/
> Photographers Code:
> https://www.audubon.org/get-outside/audubons-guide-ethical-bird-photography
> US Endangered Species:
> https://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/us-species.html
> NJ Endangered Species: https://www.nj.gov/dep/fgw/tandespp.htm
>
> Information about sightings and bird-finding should be shared as freely as
> possible, with the exceptions above. Cross-posting information from other
> lists or social media is fine, and this is a good place to provide
> information that doesn't fit on a text alert. Discussions, questions,
> beginner questions and advice, book reviews, trip reports, are all welcome.
>
> Unfortunately our server cannot host photographs; to share your photos,
> use some other web site and post the link here.
>
> Limit messages to matters related to birds and birding within NJ, although
> information about nearby states, and general information that may interest
> New Jersey birders, are permitted, within reason. Please don't ask for help
> planning your trip to Arizona or Peru. Try the Birdchat international list
> (for information, mail <birdchat-request...>) or a list
> devoted to the area you intend to visit. Try Google.
>
> Advertising is not allowed on JerseyBirds. An offer of a product or
> service for sale or profit, is considered advertising. Local Non-profit
> organizations are welcome to post brief announcements of single events
> (e.g. field trips, lectures) which they sponsor. Please do not post a bird
> club's entire annual field trip list or foreign travel brochure. Please
> don't offer to sell optics or equipment.
>
> If possible, reply to questions _on the list_ rather than privately unless
> the poster requests otherwise. Be positive; be very reluctant to criticize
> others, including businesses and organizations. Remember online postings
> are forever.
>
> Everyone has their own interests, abilities, and special knowledge, which
> may not be the same as yours. Do not abuse or bully other members, either
> on the list or in private e-mail. Do not try to act as a listowner, or tell
> others what they should or shouldn't do. If you have a problem with list
> rules, or the messages of some other list member, write to the listowners
> rather than trying to deal directly.
>
> Sanctions: The JerseyBirds discussion list is *not* moderated and normally
> no prior review of postings takes place. If you fail to follow the rules
> and norms, you will first be e-mailed privately by the listowners and asked
> to do so. Second offense will usually result in being put on temporary
> "review," which means that your messages will be moderated and approved
> before they are distributed. Repeated violations may result in permanent
> "review." As a last resort you may be blocked from belonging to the list. A
> listserv is not a democracy, and the listowners' decisions are not
> appealable.
>
> HOW-TO:
>
> The searchable archives of the Jerseybirds list are found at
> https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=JerseyBi
>
> How to join or leave the list:
>
> Join or leave the Jerseybirds list, change options, and manage your
> subscription at the following link:
>
> https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=jerseybi&A=1
>
> You should set a a password when you first join the list. At the subscribe
> link, follow the password instructions. Do not use the same password you
> use for your e-mail. When you have a password, you can use the full
> listserv features, including searching the archives, covering nearly 20
> years of NJ birding.
>
> All messages should be signed with your name and city or location. Signing
> with your e-mail address and phone number is not required or encouraged.
>
> All subscribers can see your e-mail in the list header, but ONLY if they
> log in to the list archives. Do not type your e-mail address in the body of
> your posting. The public (including spam bots) can read the text of the
> message in the archives but they cannot see the address in the header.
>
> When you send a message to the list, everyone who subscribes to the
> listserve will receive your message. When you "Reply" to someone else's
> message, the reply is sent to ONLY the original poster by default. If you
> want it distributed to the entire list of subscribers just change the "To"
> address.
>
> How to SEND MESSAGES TO THE LIST:
> Send an email message to <jerseybi...>
>
> The most common reason for posting failure is address mismatch. For
> example, if your subscription is under <joe.birder...>, you will not
> be able to post from <joebirder...> If you write to report a
> problem with posting, please include a copy of any error reports you got
> from the Princeton listserv.
>
> OLD INSTRUCTIONS:
>
> Listserv software has been around longer than the World-wide Web. Before
> the web, you used e-mail commands to join listserv groups and those
> commands still work.
> Here are the old e-mail instructions:
>
> Send a message with no subject and no signature or attachments, containing
> only the command needed.
> Send it to <listserv...> (This is NOT the same as the list
> posting address).
> Include only the line shown; the server knows your address from the e-mail
> header.
> You will get an e-mail confirming your command.
>
> How to SUBSCRIBE:
> SUBSCRIBE JerseyBi
>
> How to UNSUBSCRIBE:
> UNSUBSCRIBE JerseyBi
>
> How to SUSPEND (temporarily stop) your Jerseybirds mail:
> SET JerseyBi NOMAIL
>
> How to RESTART your Jerseybirds mail:
> SET JerseyBi MAIL
>
> How to change your e-mail address: Log in at your old address and send:
> CHANGE JERSEYBI <old.address...> <new.address...>
> (you should get confirmations at both e-mail addresses)
>
> Related list:
>
> Jerseybirds has a "sister" listserv called NJBirds. That list is an
> announce-only rare bird alert mailing list (and Twitter feed). You are
> welcome to join either or both lists. Generally, rarity alerts are
> published to both lists. NJBIRDS has much less email since it only has
> rarity alerts.
>
> For more information about NJBirds, go to
> https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=NJBIRDS or e-mail
> <NJBIRDS-request...>
>
> LIST ADMINISTRATION:
>
> Feel free to contact the listowners through e-mail at "
> <Jerseybi-request...>".
>
> J. Tyler Bell
> Susan Treesh
> Laurie Larson
>
>
> NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/20 4:17 pm
From: Marty DeAngelo <martytdx...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] greenwald park - camden county
Pileated in Greenwald Park? How did I not know this?

On Sat, Jan 18, 2020 at 1:38 PM Sandra Keller <
<000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Very birdy! But no January Pileated..... Maybe they aren't there this year.
> Friends have been having Pileated calling back and forth in their yard for
> a week. My friends are getting an early morning visit soon.....!
> I am told between 7 and 8 the birds call.
>
> So, are we getting snow or not?!?! I planned my day around bad weather,
> but it hasn't happened.
>
> Good birding all.
>
> Sandra Keller
>
> Sent from my iPad mini
>
>
> NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/20 1:59 pm
From: Sandra Mc <jerseyb...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Jerseybirds guidelines document, revised
Thank you all for the refresher on the JerseyBird guidelines and for continuing to be involved with this great resource.

Sandy McNicol
Kingwood Township



----- Original Message -----
From: "L Larson" <00000ffe25a4beba-dmarc-request...>
To: "JERSEYBI" <JERSEYBI...>
Sent: Saturday, January 18, 2020 2:01:34 PM
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Jerseybirds guidelines document, revised

Jerseybirders,

Here's a revision of the guidelines document which is sent to every subscriber as a "Welcome" message. The list admins have just revised and updated it and want to make a copy of the new edition available to all members. We will try to post it regularly, maybe a couple of times a year.

We have tried to make this a useful reference. Changes include addition of a section on ethics, a section on use of the web interface, and a "bullet list" at the beginning. We tried to streamline; if we have left out something important please let us know. Questions and discussion are welcome.

Good birding,
Tyler Bell
Laurie Larson
Susan Treesh


-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=--=-

Welcome to JerseyBirds. This discussion list is hosted as a community service by Princeton University.

CHARTER:

The Jerseybirds listserv list is for sharing information about birds and birding in New Jersey.

* reports and information about wild birds in New Jersey
* places to look for birds (excepting endangered and sensitive species)
* natural history of wild birds, including distribution, identification, conservation, and ecology
* help and answers to questions about techniques of counting, photographing, recording, and documenting wild birds
* news of volunteer opportunities such as bird counts
* Discussions, questions, stories and humor are always welcome

If you have questions about using Jerseybirds, please write to the listowners at <Jerseybi-request...>
Please save this message for future reference.


GUIDELINES:

** DO NOT POST INFORMATION ABOUT OWL ROOSTS OR NESTS, OR ROOST/NEST SITES OF ENDANGERED, THREATENED OR SENSITIVE SPECIES. **
** Advertising is not permitted on the list. **
** Please limit your posts to two per day or seven per week. **
** Know and follow ethical standards for birders and photographers.
** Please be courteous and kind. **

More about the guidelines:

Ethical behavior protects the species we love to watch and earns us the respect of others on the list and outdoors. Posting information about sensitive species is unethical because it harms birds; it can lead to abandonment of roost sites and nests, and increases risk of predation, stress, and starvation.
Please read and use these documents:
ABA Code of Ethics: http://listing.aba.org/ethics/
Photographers Code: https://www.audubon.org/get-outside/audubons-guide-ethical-bird-photography
US Endangered Species: https://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/us-species.html
NJ Endangered Species: https://www.nj.gov/dep/fgw/tandespp.htm

Information about sightings and bird-finding should be shared as freely as possible, with the exceptions above. Cross-posting information from other lists or social media is fine, and this is a good place to provide information that doesn't fit on a text alert. Discussions, questions, beginner questions and advice, book reviews, trip reports, are all welcome.

Unfortunately our server cannot host photographs; to share your photos, use some other web site and post the link here.

Limit messages to matters related to birds and birding within NJ, although information about nearby states, and general information that may interest New Jersey birders, are permitted, within reason. Please don't ask for help planning your trip to Arizona or Peru. Try the Birdchat international list (for information, mail <birdchat-request...>) or a list devoted to the area you intend to visit. Try Google.

Advertising is not allowed on JerseyBirds. An offer of a product or service for sale or profit, is considered advertising. Local Non-profit organizations are welcome to post brief announcements of single events (e.g. field trips, lectures) which they sponsor. Please do not post a bird club's entire annual field trip list or foreign travel brochure. Please don't offer to sell optics or equipment.

If possible, reply to questions _on the list_ rather than privately unless the poster requests otherwise. Be positive; be very reluctant to criticize others, including businesses and organizations. Remember online postings are forever.

Everyone has their own interests, abilities, and special knowledge, which may not be the same as yours. Do not abuse or bully other members, either on the list or in private e-mail. Do not try to act as a listowner, or tell others what they should or shouldn't do. If you have a problem with list rules, or the messages of some other list member, write to the listowners rather than trying to deal directly.

Sanctions: The JerseyBirds discussion list is *not* moderated and normally no prior review of postings takes place. If you fail to follow the rules and norms, you will first be e-mailed privately by the listowners and asked to do so. Second offense will usually result in being put on temporary "review," which means that your messages will be moderated and approved before they are distributed. Repeated violations may result in permanent "review." As a last resort you may be blocked from belonging to the list. A listserv is not a democracy, and the listowners' decisions are not appealable.

HOW-TO:

The searchable archives of the Jerseybirds list are found at
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=JerseyBi

How to join or leave the list:

Join or leave the Jerseybirds list, change options, and manage your subscription at the following link:

https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=jerseybi&A=1

You should set a a password when you first join the list. At the subscribe link, follow the password instructions. Do not use the same password you use for your e-mail. When you have a password, you can use the full listserv features, including searching the archives, covering nearly 20 years of NJ birding.

All messages should be signed with your name and city or location. Signing with your e-mail address and phone number is not required or encouraged.

All subscribers can see your e-mail in the list header, but ONLY if they log in to the list archives. Do not type your e-mail address in the body of your posting. The public (including spam bots) can read the text of the message in the archives but they cannot see the address in the header.

When you send a message to the list, everyone who subscribes to the listserve will receive your message. When you "Reply" to someone else's message, the reply is sent to ONLY the original poster by default. If you want it distributed to the entire list of subscribers just change the "To" address.

How to SEND MESSAGES TO THE LIST:
Send an email message to <jerseybi...>

The most common reason for posting failure is address mismatch. For example, if your subscription is under <joe.birder...>, you will not be able to post from <joebirder...> If you write to report a problem with posting, please include a copy of any error reports you got from the Princeton listserv.

OLD INSTRUCTIONS:

Listserv software has been around longer than the World-wide Web. Before the web, you used e-mail commands to join listserv groups and those commands still work.
Here are the old e-mail instructions:

Send a message with no subject and no signature or attachments, containing only the command needed.
Send it to <listserv...> (This is NOT the same as the list posting address).
Include only the line shown; the server knows your address from the e-mail header.
You will get an e-mail confirming your command.

How to SUBSCRIBE:
SUBSCRIBE JerseyBi

How to UNSUBSCRIBE:
UNSUBSCRIBE JerseyBi

How to SUSPEND (temporarily stop) your Jerseybirds mail:
SET JerseyBi NOMAIL

How to RESTART your Jerseybirds mail:
SET JerseyBi MAIL

How to change your e-mail address: Log in at your old address and send:
CHANGE JERSEYBI <old.address...> <new.address...>
(you should get confirmations at both e-mail addresses)

Related list:

Jerseybirds has a "sister" listserv called NJBirds. That list is an announce-only rare bird alert mailing list (and Twitter feed). You are welcome to join either or both lists. Generally, rarity alerts are published to both lists. NJBIRDS has much less email since it only has rarity alerts.

For more information about NJBirds, go to https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=NJBIRDS or e-mail <NJBIRDS-request...>

LIST ADMINISTRATION:

Feel free to contact the listowners through e-mail at "<Jerseybi-request...>".

J. Tyler Bell
Susan Treesh
Laurie Larson


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/20 11:02 am
From: L Larson <00000ffe25a4beba-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Jerseybirds guidelines document, revised
Jerseybirders,

Here's a revision of the guidelines document which is sent to every subscriber as a "Welcome" message. The list admins have just revised and updated it and want to make a copy of the new edition available to all members. We will try to post it regularly, maybe a couple of times a year.

We have tried to make this a useful reference. Changes include addition of a section on ethics, a section on use of the web interface, and a "bullet list" at the beginning. We tried to streamline; if we have left out something important please let us know. Questions and discussion are welcome.

Good birding,
Tyler Bell
Laurie Larson
Susan Treesh


-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=--=-

Welcome to JerseyBirds. This discussion list is hosted as a community service by Princeton University.

CHARTER:

The Jerseybirds listserv list is for sharing information about birds and birding in New Jersey.

* reports and information about wild birds in New Jersey
* places to look for birds (excepting endangered and sensitive species)
* natural history of wild birds, including distribution, identification, conservation, and ecology
* help and answers to questions about techniques of counting, photographing, recording, and documenting wild birds
* news of volunteer opportunities such as bird counts
* Discussions, questions, stories and humor are always welcome

If you have questions about using Jerseybirds, please write to the listowners at <Jerseybi-request...>
Please save this message for future reference.


GUIDELINES:

** DO NOT POST INFORMATION ABOUT OWL ROOSTS OR NESTS, OR ROOST/NEST SITES OF ENDANGERED, THREATENED OR SENSITIVE SPECIES. **
** Advertising is not permitted on the list. **
** Please limit your posts to two per day or seven per week. **
** Know and follow ethical standards for birders and photographers.
** Please be courteous and kind. **

More about the guidelines:

Ethical behavior protects the species we love to watch and earns us the respect of others on the list and outdoors. Posting information about sensitive species is unethical because it harms birds; it can lead to abandonment of roost sites and nests, and increases risk of predation, stress, and starvation.
Please read and use these documents:
ABA Code of Ethics: http://listing.aba.org/ethics/
Photographers Code: https://www.audubon.org/get-outside/audubons-guide-ethical-bird-photography
US Endangered Species: https://www.fws.gov/endangered/species/us-species.html
NJ Endangered Species: https://www.nj.gov/dep/fgw/tandespp.htm

Information about sightings and bird-finding should be shared as freely as possible, with the exceptions above. Cross-posting information from other lists or social media is fine, and this is a good place to provide information that doesn't fit on a text alert. Discussions, questions, beginner questions and advice, book reviews, trip reports, are all welcome.

Unfortunately our server cannot host photographs; to share your photos, use some other web site and post the link here.

Limit messages to matters related to birds and birding within NJ, although information about nearby states, and general information that may interest New Jersey birders, are permitted, within reason. Please don't ask for help planning your trip to Arizona or Peru. Try the Birdchat international list (for information, mail <birdchat-request...>) or a list devoted to the area you intend to visit. Try Google.

Advertising is not allowed on JerseyBirds. An offer of a product or service for sale or profit, is considered advertising. Local Non-profit organizations are welcome to post brief announcements of single events (e.g. field trips, lectures) which they sponsor. Please do not post a bird club's entire annual field trip list or foreign travel brochure. Please don't offer to sell optics or equipment.

If possible, reply to questions _on the list_ rather than privately unless the poster requests otherwise. Be positive; be very reluctant to criticize others, including businesses and organizations. Remember online postings are forever.

Everyone has their own interests, abilities, and special knowledge, which may not be the same as yours. Do not abuse or bully other members, either on the list or in private e-mail. Do not try to act as a listowner, or tell others what they should or shouldn't do. If you have a problem with list rules, or the messages of some other list member, write to the listowners rather than trying to deal directly.

Sanctions: The JerseyBirds discussion list is *not* moderated and normally no prior review of postings takes place. If you fail to follow the rules and norms, you will first be e-mailed privately by the listowners and asked to do so. Second offense will usually result in being put on temporary "review," which means that your messages will be moderated and approved before they are distributed. Repeated violations may result in permanent "review." As a last resort you may be blocked from belonging to the list. A listserv is not a democracy, and the listowners' decisions are not appealable.

HOW-TO:

The searchable archives of the Jerseybirds list are found at
https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=JerseyBi

How to join or leave the list:

Join or leave the Jerseybirds list, change options, and manage your subscription at the following link:

https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=jerseybi&A=1

You should set a a password when you first join the list. At the subscribe link, follow the password instructions. Do not use the same password you use for your e-mail. When you have a password, you can use the full listserv features, including searching the archives, covering nearly 20 years of NJ birding.

All messages should be signed with your name and city or location. Signing with your e-mail address and phone number is not required or encouraged.

All subscribers can see your e-mail in the list header, but ONLY if they log in to the list archives. Do not type your e-mail address in the body of your posting. The public (including spam bots) can read the text of the message in the archives but they cannot see the address in the header.

When you send a message to the list, everyone who subscribes to the listserve will receive your message. When you "Reply" to someone else's message, the reply is sent to ONLY the original poster by default. If you want it distributed to the entire list of subscribers just change the "To" address.

How to SEND MESSAGES TO THE LIST:
Send an email message to <jerseybi...>

The most common reason for posting failure is address mismatch. For example, if your subscription is under <joe.birder...>, you will not be able to post from <joebirder...> If you write to report a problem with posting, please include a copy of any error reports you got from the Princeton listserv.

OLD INSTRUCTIONS:

Listserv software has been around longer than the World-wide Web. Before the web, you used e-mail commands to join listserv groups and those commands still work.
Here are the old e-mail instructions:

Send a message with no subject and no signature or attachments, containing only the command needed.
Send it to <listserv...> (This is NOT the same as the list posting address).
Include only the line shown; the server knows your address from the e-mail header.
You will get an e-mail confirming your command.

How to SUBSCRIBE:
SUBSCRIBE JerseyBi

How to UNSUBSCRIBE:
UNSUBSCRIBE JerseyBi

How to SUSPEND (temporarily stop) your Jerseybirds mail:
SET JerseyBi NOMAIL

How to RESTART your Jerseybirds mail:
SET JerseyBi MAIL

How to change your e-mail address: Log in at your old address and send:
CHANGE JERSEYBI <old.address...> <new.address...>
(you should get confirmations at both e-mail addresses)

Related list:

Jerseybirds has a "sister" listserv called NJBirds. That list is an announce-only rare bird alert mailing list (and Twitter feed). You are welcome to join either or both lists. Generally, rarity alerts are published to both lists. NJBIRDS has much less email since it only has rarity alerts.

For more information about NJBirds, go to https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=NJBIRDS or e-mail <NJBIRDS-request...>

LIST ADMINISTRATION:

Feel free to contact the listowners through e-mail at "<Jerseybi-request...>".

J. Tyler Bell
Susan Treesh
Laurie Larson


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/20 10:38 am
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] greenwald park - camden county
Very birdy! But no January Pileated..... Maybe they aren't there this year.
Friends have been having Pileated calling back and forth in their yard for
a week. My friends are getting an early morning visit soon.....!
I am told between 7 and 8 the birds call.

So, are we getting snow or not?!?! I planned my day around bad weather,
but it hasn't happened.

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/17/20 5:49 pm
From: Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Open lakes/reservoirs
Visited a number of lakes today from Greenwood Lake, West Milford , west to Lake Denmark and Mt. Hope Lake, Rockaway All the lakes are ice free.
The usual suspects were observed in very low numbers: Ring-necked Duck, Bufflehead, Hooded and Common Merganser, Ruddy Duck
Highlights:
Common Loon (2) Greenwood Lake (NJ side), West Milford, Passaic County
Long-tailed Duck (1) Clinton Reservoir, West Milford, Passaic Count.

Tim Vogel
Denville

Sent from my iPad


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/17/20 4:24 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Brig Golden Eagle -I did not see it
I have a screen shot of an Atlantic City Press article that is dated winter of 1994, which featured Jerry Liguori, Clay Sutton and Brian Wheeler *?*. The article was about Motts Creek being the prime-time location in New Jersey * or mid Atlantic States, I do not recall exactly* to watch wintering golden eagles. It sure looks like Bob D is keeping that tradition going with his discovery of an adult golden eagle today at Brig.

Yours truly wanna be a bird-watcher almost had it right, What ?

With the anticipated change in the wind condition-direction and the freezing temps, even last night, I knew where I would be heading this morning. Motts Creek but I was way too late. Too busy birding the home yard first. Motts Creek and Leeds Point marsh showed no sign of eagles. Then I got severely lost doing my annual eastern red cedar island hopping in the salt marsh. By the time I read Bob D’s text about his golden eagle, it was about 40 minutes too late. I flew over to Scotts Landing and started my scope scan. You know the drill.

Now about the bird quiz song *Yes-Roundabout* that I posted on 12-30-2019. The winner is a Jbirder, S.M. Today was time to put up or shut up. Per his request, at the Brig visitor center I deposited 12 bucks into the donation box in honor of S.M, the winner of my bird quiz.

Proof of payout on my Flickr.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/56086564@N04/with/49401426227/

Yong Kong
Camden County


NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 1/17/20 9:31 am
From: L Larson <00000ffe25a4beba-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] test please ignore
NJ Bird Records Committee: www.njbrc.com
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Date: 1/17/20 5:25 am
From: Scott Barnes <scott.barnes...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] NJ Audubon Barnegat Light trip canceled
Jerseybirds,

Due to the weather forecast, tomorrow's trip to Barnegat Light is canceled. :-(

Sincerely,

Scott Barnes
All Things Birds Program Director
Assistant Director, Eco-Travel
New Jersey Audubon
<scott.barnes...>
609.427.3052

Making NJ a better place for people and wildlife since 1897.


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Date: 1/16/20 5:21 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Jerry Lig Facebook link and more of my none sense
For those who may be interested, Jerry Lig’s Facebook link below. Cool video of raptors.

https://www.facebook.com/JerryLig?__tn__=%2CdCH-R-R&eid=ARC0bVUxERkOW_oVFKynuN2gx11BfXIwt5qZf_O4quQ49fClDD8bSN3h5T3UFyTX48v7AgCiVPDeDWuy&hc_ref=ARTJSooo_-CONQ0-jjXZwyGYudEzHoBsvTb2UMmNE60dKK5LnnzDfG2KslMVkxB5drQ&fref=nf

About my none sense bird reports. I have failed miserably about joining the ebird club. I just can not do it, I tried.

Simply, cuz, I just can not id birds. So, I am going backwards. Now on, I am going with accipiter, peeps, dowitcher species, etc, when Iding these species, especially. I envy those birders who can Id beyond. Ebird does not wish to review my submission based on these kind of ID.

Especially with the recent post commenting about those birders who put down X on their bird list.

It is best I keep my nose clean on ebird and in front of expert birders out there.

Yong Kong
Camden County





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Date: 1/16/20 5:11 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Cumberland - gulls and Sea breeze
Marilyn and I hit Cumberland. I wish I could have done it another day!
That wind was something! I had wanted to see if Sedge Wren wintering
at Seabreeze. I can't say no - we didn't have any, but we hardly had
any birds! Had to be that wind.....

A nice study in Herring Gulls at the bivalve clam plant. But we couldn't
refind the Glaucous. I will hit again next time I am down there. Long tailed
Ducks are staging on the river there. Always a treat to see. Probably
Goldeneyes around, but that wind made scanning difficult. We hit the
area twice.

Good birding all. I wish for a couple windless days next week..... lots
of January birds to still look for!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/14/20 8:27 am
From: Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Richard Crossley - BirdCallsRadio
Birder et al,

Thought many of you would be interested tin today’s show with Richard Crossley, The ID Boot Camp https://bit.ly/35Ur6PY

Happy Birding!

Cheers,
Mardi Dickinson
Norwalk CT


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Date: 1/14/20 5:59 am
From: Chris Sturm <thesturms2...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black Guillemot
Saw the BG this morning, about 8:30, from Barnegat Light. Bird was near
previously mentioned area on Is. Bch. side of inlet, near the green buoy.
Nice state bird!


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Date: 1/12/20 5:53 pm
From: Christopher Magarelli <christopher.magarelli...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Lark Sparrow Continues in Plainsboro
The Lark Sparrow first found on December 31st by Louis Bizzarro continues
along the Lenape Trail in Plainsboro. We were able to locate it this
morning and it was quite cooperative. The bird is being seen on/around the
wooden planking where the paved Lenape Trail passes under the high-tension
power lines behind the Princeton Meadows shopping center.

- Chris Magarelli
Kingston, NJ


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Date: 1/12/20 3:46 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] lincolns sparrow - January bird!
Yes, I finally caught up with a January passerine! Missed Nashville, Parula,
Common Yellowthroat, Chat..... gees...... Like I said, this isn't easy! Still
time for others. Monk Parakeet, Nelson's Sparrow, Pileated, etc. etc.

The Lincoln's was at Palmyra - Burlington county. And no I didn't find it,
I chased it. Thank you for putting the area in the ebird report!

Not sure where I will hit Monday. Only have 1/2 day. If that.
I wonder how long these lingering birds will linger?!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/12/20 10:30 am
From: bramble <bramble...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] BCAS Chapter Meeting and Program: Dave Hall - Using the Christmas Bird Count to View Climate Change
Wednesday, January 15, 2020, at Teaneck Creek Conservancy - Meetings
are free and open to all and held at Teaneck Creek Conservancy, 20
Puffin Way, Teaneck. Business meeting at 7:30 PM with program at 8:00 PM.

Bergen County Audubon has conducted studies of bird populations for
70 years to monitor how birdlife is doing in our neighborhood. Much
has changed in Bergen County's land use, including dramatic habitat
losses. Many species are in long term declines. David Hall, BCAS
board member and founder of the BCAS Spring Count presents "Using the
Christmas Bird Count to View Climate Change". David Hall will explore
changes in bird migration patterns due to climate change: which
species still find our area friendly as a wintering spot, and which
ones have been lost.

- Julie McCall
Bergen Audubon
Lyndhurst, Bergen County


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Date: 1/12/20 9:26 am
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Barnegat Light today
There were three at the Trenton Marsh CBC and my recollection is that there
are always some there this time of year. Also, Carnegie lake off Mapleton
Road just north of Princeton

Best
Michael Perlin

On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 11:53 AM B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...> wrote:

> I've seen Great Blue Herons every winter I've lived here. I even have a
> photo of one with snow and ice on the Raritan River...
>
> Bernie Sloan
> Highland Park
>
> On Sat, Jan 11, 2020 at 11:31 PM William Saidel <saidel...>
> >
> wrote:
>
> > I posted a picture of 11 harlequin ducks I saw at Barnegat light today at
> > eBird. (Is that unusual? eBird said it was unexpected.) Still scanning
> my
> > pictures for other species. I can confirm great black-backed gulls and
> > non-breeding form of Herring gulls. Still have more images to sort.
> > Weather was terrific. Unfortunately, no Guillemot.
> > Last week I also saw 2 great blue herons (among hundreds of Canadian
> > geese) at a pond off of Medford-Mt Holly Rd. and a great blue heron
> flying
> > along the Cooper River in Pensauken. I thought they flew South for the
> > Winter. Obviously, I was wrong.
> >
> > Bill Saidel
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> > www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> > or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> > List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> > List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
> >
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Date: 1/12/20 8:53 am
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Barnegat Light today
I've seen Great Blue Herons every winter I've lived here. I even have a
photo of one with snow and ice on the Raritan River...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Sat, Jan 11, 2020 at 11:31 PM William Saidel <saidel...>
wrote:

> I posted a picture of 11 harlequin ducks I saw at Barnegat light today at
> eBird. (Is that unusual? eBird said it was unexpected.) Still scanning my
> pictures for other species. I can confirm great black-backed gulls and
> non-breeding form of Herring gulls. Still have more images to sort.
> Weather was terrific. Unfortunately, no Guillemot.
> Last week I also saw 2 great blue herons (among hundreds of Canadian
> geese) at a pond off of Medford-Mt Holly Rd. and a great blue heron flying
> along the Cooper River in Pensauken. I thought they flew South for the
> Winter. Obviously, I was wrong.
>
> Bill Saidel
>
>
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Date: 1/11/20 8:32 pm
From: William Saidel <saidel...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Barnegat Light today
I posted a picture of 11 harlequin ducks I saw at Barnegat light today at eBird. (Is that unusual? eBird said it was unexpected.) Still scanning my pictures for other species. I can confirm great black-backed gulls and non-breeding form of Herring gulls. Still have more images to sort. Weather was terrific. Unfortunately, no Guillemot.
Last week I also saw 2 great blue herons (among hundreds of Canadian geese) at a pond off of Medford-Mt Holly Rd. and a great blue heron flying along the Cooper River in Pensauken. I thought they flew South for the Winter. Obviously, I was wrong.

Bill Saidel




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Date: 1/11/20 2:49 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] My Black guillemot show from the Barney side
I have no issue with bragging that I am the top dod in ebird and JBird's
best armchair bird watcher that find birding vicariously through others is
such a satisfying experience. Case in point, thank you to all those birders
who posted fantastic photos of the Black Guillemot on social media. This
morning I got too greedy and decided to check out the Black Guillemot in
live action for myself.

My view from the Barney side best I can described the Guillemot is just a
distant piece of sea form in motion in response to wave action. Oh, what
about the hen King Eider ? Oil painting of a seabird on canvas.

As I was setting up the scope with my niece, Jennifer, on the the Barney
side next to many familiar faces, I too had a nostalgia moment watching
bunch of folks on the IBSP side chasing the Guillemot.

This whole Guillemot show reminded me of my last big bash I had with my
cycling club back in the days. One of my non-bike racing friend told me that
my party reminded of her old high school party days. I said what ?
She said just like her high school days, jocks in the house and the freaks
outside. Compare that to Guillemot show, my take was birders on the Barney
side with the scope, and the photographers on the IBSP with big lens.

One very historical moment, there was one more Korean birder out there in NJ
today, my niece, Jennifer. Thanks to all birders who found birds for me so
I could pass onto my niece. Watch out. In 2021 there may be one more
invasion.

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Date: 1/11/20 1:18 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Forsythe - Ipswich Sparrow survey
Zilch. Has to be the wind....
I stayed in one area - the crossdike - just scanning. I scanned wrack lines.
I pished, I made other noises...... I squeaked. Nothing....... I went around the
dikes twice. No difference for sparrows. I actually had no sparrows around
the wildlife drive. Very strange.

And no Chat along the eco trail. I had yet another Phoebe near Lilly Lake though.
Nice! But I want a new January bird!

Lots of waterfowl species in the east pool mainly at Forsythe. I wasn't scanning
everything. I was trying to find an Ipswich. Or any sparrow my second time
around.

I scanned the close Snow Geese well. No Ross's. One had to be around. Law of
averages.

I will be curious as to numbers of Ipswich when we get the final report.
Were they all concentrated somewhere maybe? Like I had 189 Hooded
Mergs just in the experimental pool that I hit after my second loop around.
Wow! That's actually not a high count for me - I have seen over 200 around
Brig before. But thats the whole refuge, not one pool!

No butterflies. Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/11/20 6:07 am
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black guillemot continues at Barnegat Inlet
For those considering a weekend trip for the black guillemot - it's
still there today, apparently in much the same location, hard up against
the rocks beneath the dunes on the Island Beach side, but viewable from
Barnegat Light.

Susan Treesh
Somerset


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Date: 1/10/20 4:28 pm
From: Walter Gura <waltg19149...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black Guillemot at Barnegat Inlet from concrete walkway
The Black Guillemont was seen today 1/10/2020 along the edge of the rocks
on the Island Beach side of the jetty in the vicinity of the green buoy.
A scope is needed for the distance and you'll need some patience since the
bird was bobbing in the waves. I would like to add that the bird could be
seen from the concrete walkway so there was no need for a rock hopping
adventure.

Good luck,
Walt Gura
<waltg19149...>
Phila., Pa.


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Date: 1/10/20 8:46 am
From: sktreesh <sktreesh...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black guillemot at Barnegat
The black guillemot is again visible in Barnegat inlet, tight against the Island Beach dunes. Distant from Barnegat side, but might be too close to rocks on IB side for easy viewingSusan Treesh Somerset Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


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Date: 1/9/20 3:58 pm
From: Christopher Daly <cdaly...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -
There is a rally Saturday morning at Liberty State Park in support of the Liberty State Park Protection Act. Details can be found on the flier here: https://twitter.com/NYNJBaykeeper/status/1214647532539850755

I'd encourage anyone who can to attend.

-Chris Daly
Piscatway
httphttps://twitte.com/NYNJBaykeeper/status/1214647https://twitter.com/NYNJBaykeeper/status/1214647532539850755?s=20532539850755?s=20s://twitter.com/NYNJBykeeper/status/1214647532539850755?s=20<https://twitter.com/NYNJBaykeeper/status/1214647532539850755?s=20>
________________________________
From: JerseyBirds <JERSEYBI...> on behalf of Eric Stiles <eric.stiles...>
Sent: Thursday, January 9, 2020 2:25 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...> <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -

As a follow-up, NJ Audubon has worked hard to support NY/NJ Baykeeper and Friends of Liberty State Park to defeat a proposed race track and new marina at Liberty in the past few years. We are continuing to work with them to oppose this latest privatization plan to take over 20 acres of this amazing park for addition to the adjacent golf course.

There is proposed legislation that would close this door once and for all being fought primarily by gold course owner. It is important to know that NJDEP denied an application for the course to take the land and the owner is trying to achieve this through bad amendments to the legislation. If folks are interested in getting more involved, feel free to shoot me an email offline.

Best,
Eric Stiles, President & CEO
New Jersey Audubon Society

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds <JERSEYBI...> On Behalf Of Andrew Baksh
Sent: Thursday, January 9, 2020 1:40 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -

Folks might be interested. Credit to Larry Tractenberg for the link - see his e-mail below to NYSbirds.

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)
> (") _ (")
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.birdingdude.blogspot.com&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cd3dda56ec4b540d8926708d79539f107%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637141948394088247&amp;sdata=UJAtOxXvVd%2F9UDz6KDQd3W2jtdBrM1c23ozMExgNxP0%3D&amp;reserved=0

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg...>
> Date: January 9, 2020 at 1:08:51 PM EST
> To: NYSBIRDS-L <NYSBIRDS-L...>
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -
> Reply-To: Larry Trachtenberg <trachtenberg...>
>
> Not much to say about this one, maybe surprising that the Club is in Jersey City not in Bedminster. Perhaps someone wants to put it up on Jersey Birds who is a member of that group.
>
> https://eur02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2020%2F01%2F09%2Fnyregion%2Fliberty-state-park-golf-course.html&amp;data=02%7C01%7C%7Cd3dda56ec4b540d8926708d79539f107%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637141948394088247&amp;sdata=bDdTXr%2Fg0Z7AKSO8%2B2l2L6qzjaMLFfb5equjMe94VzQ%3D&amp;reserved=0
>
> L. Trachtenberg
> Ossining



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or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 1/9/20 2:56 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Glassboro Woods - Winter Wrens and Phoebe
Hello,
I had wanted to hit Rancocas - one of my favorite spots for Winter Wren,
but I had 2 jobs in Gloucester County. So I hit Glassboro Woods instead!
Another good spot for Winter Wren. My high count there - whats in ebird -
is 7. I had 5 today. And that was only birding 1/4 of what I wanted! I need to
get back. I also want to get to some Cumberland spots for Winter Wren.
No Jan. Pileated at Glassboro. They are being quiet.......
I wasn't surprised with a Phoebe. Not this winter! I hit Lincoln and
Stanger for those interested. Loaded with birds!

Ways to find your high count for an area. Easiest is probably the hotspot
page if a hot spot. Just click on your totals for the hotspot. Then click on
view all for the species in question.
Or just look up all the species you have lifetime in a county. Again click
on view all for the desired species. ebird is great in the way the numbers
are right there! Very easy to find your high count.

Good birding all. A couple friends chased and saw the Guillemot this early
afternoon. I hope it sticks for others this weekend!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 1/9/20 11:27 am
From: Eric Stiles <eric.stiles...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -
As a follow-up, NJ Audubon has worked hard to support NY/NJ Baykeeper and Friends of Liberty State Park to defeat a proposed race track and new marina at Liberty in the past few years. We are continuing to work with them to oppose this latest privatization plan to take over 20 acres of this amazing park for addition to the adjacent golf course.

There is proposed legislation that would close this door once and for all being fought primarily by gold course owner. It is important to know that NJDEP denied an application for the course to take the land and the owner is trying to achieve this through bad amendments to the legislation. If folks are interested in getting more involved, feel free to shoot me an email offline.

Best,
Eric Stiles, President & CEO
New Jersey Audubon Society

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds <JERSEYBI...> On Behalf Of Andrew Baksh
Sent: Thursday, January 9, 2020 1:40 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -

Folks might be interested. Credit to Larry Tractenberg for the link - see his e-mail below to NYSbirds.

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)
> (") _ (")
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg...>
> Date: January 9, 2020 at 1:08:51 PM EST
> To: NYSBIRDS-L <NYSBIRDS-L...>
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -
> Reply-To: Larry Trachtenberg <trachtenberg...>
>
> Not much to say about this one, maybe surprising that the Club is in Jersey City not in Bedminster. Perhaps someone wants to put it up on Jersey Birds who is a member of that group.
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/09/nyregion/liberty-state-park-golf-course.html
>
> L. Trachtenberg
> Ossining
>
> --
>
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/<nysbirds-l...>/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
> 3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>


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List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


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Date: 1/9/20 10:40 am
From: Andrew Baksh <birdingdude...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Fwd: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -
Folks might be interested. Credit to Larry Tractenberg for the link - see his e-mail below to NYSbirds.

--------
"I prefer to be true to myself, even at the hazard of incurring the ridicule of others, rather than to be false, and to incur my own abhorrence." ~ Frederick Douglass

風 Swift as the wind
林 Quiet as the forest
火 Conquer like the fire
山 Steady as the mountain
Sun Tzu The Art of War

> (\__/)
> (= '.'=)
> (") _ (")
> Sent from somewhere in the field using my mobile device!

Andrew Baksh
www.birdingdude.blogspot.com

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Larry Trachtenberg <Trachtenberg...>
> Date: January 9, 2020 at 1:08:51 PM EST
> To: NYSBIRDS-L <NYSBIRDS-L...>
> Subject: [nysbirds-l] The New York Times: Golf Club for the 1 Percent Wants to Seize a Migratory Bird Habitat -
> Reply-To: Larry Trachtenberg <trachtenberg...>
>
> Not much to say about this one, maybe surprising that the Club is in Jersey City not in Bedminster. Perhaps someone wants to put it up on Jersey Birds who is a member of that group.
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/09/nyregion/liberty-state-park-golf-course.html
>
> L. Trachtenberg
> Ossining
>
> --
>
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
>
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/<nysbirds-l...>/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
> 3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01
>
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
>
> --
>


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Date: 1/9/20 9:22 am
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black guillemot continues at Barnegat inlet 1/9/2020
The BLACK GUILLEMOT at Barnegat Inlet reappeared midday after being out
of sight most of the morning.  Seems to be viewable from either side,
Island Beach or Barnegat Light.

Susan Treesh
Somerset


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Date: 1/8/20 12:21 pm
From: robert dodelson <rdodelson...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black guillemot-please forgive the nostalgia
After seeing the Black Guillemot yesterday I was searching my memory for
one I had seen at the Manasquan Inlet a while back. I couldn't remember any
details except that
I was standing alone when Fred Weber joined me and we had a Black Guillemot
and 3 other great birds.
So I called Fred today and after checking his notes he told me it was
Christmas day 2010 and he stopped off on the way to Vg. to visit with his
daughter.
The other 3 goodies were Pacific Loon, Red-necked and Eared Grebes. Not bad
at all.
Yesterday came close as there was a King Eider with the Alcid
Best
Bob Dodelson


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Date: 1/7/20 5:57 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Wed. birding - winter wrens
Well, my schedule and chores that I rearranged today will have to be
done Wed. So only a few hours for birding. I am intrigued by the
Winter Wren numbers in Burlington. The Rancocas nature center and
woods used to always be a good spot for numbers. Although with
the wind tomorrow.....

Plus I need Pileated for Jan!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/7/20 5:42 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black Guillemot - info
My timing was perfect this afternoon! I would have
enjoyed it closer....... but a January bird! I told a couple
other birders that this should stick around. That is
probably wrong! So go as soon as you can! Even
Wed. in that wind.

Loads of other foy there for me. I couldn't find the
King Eider. The flock was in the inlet, but along the
Island Beach side. Far. Maybe with my zoom lens on
the scope......

If I had stayed, I would have had killer looks at the Guillemot!
It came back over to the lighthouse! So hopefully birders
have time to wait tomorrow.

I went chasing the Ash-throated at the opposite end of the
island. In hindsight, that was really iffy with the weather closing
in. But I was there on the island! I was not going to stay at the
lighthouse anyway - wimpy me was not enjoying the wind and cold.

Some friends and I were wondering about insects still being active
and what the Flycatcher was feeding on. Well, its feeding! I had
an insect on my back window. Came from the island somewhere.

Good chasing all!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/7/20 4:53 pm
From: Mardi Dickinson <mardi1d...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] NEWS REEL - BirdCallsRadio
Birders et al,

Thought many of you would be interested in today’s show BCR News Reel https://bit.ly/35Ur6PY

Happy Birding!

Cheers,
Mardi Dickinson


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Date: 1/7/20 10:38 am
From: Richard Radis <00000f9e38b6ef3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Very preliminary results of the Barnegat Christmas Count
Dear Barnegat CC Participants,
Thank you so much for helping out on what was for many a hard day's birding.  

As of 1/7 the species total for Sunday's count stands at 111, (a number based on the wrap-up and texts and emails and phonecalls discussing only highlights, so the total will probably go up a bit).  This is quite low compared to recent years, and when I send out the complete count totals I'll explore some possible causes.  But the count had some notable highlights, including a count-first Ash-throated Flycatcher, and an Orange-crowned Warbler and Razorbills from the Holgate Party, Iceland Gull and Razorbill at Barnegat Light, plus 2 Golden Eagles, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Saw-whet Owl, Lapland Longspur, Great Egret (Count-week on 1/3),  and Black Guillemot, another count-week bird seen at Barnegat Inlet on Monday morning 1/6 (and still there today I hear; I don't think this species has ever been seen on a BCC).
Numbers of common species were strikingly low; this includes geese, ducks and other waterbirds, hawks, owls, woodpeckers, crows and jays, thrushes, parids, regulids, mimids, sparrows, and finches--and perhaps even gulls. The daylong strong winds (which kept an offshore boat party in port) were surely a factor , but some observers' impressions were that numbers of birds--particularly passerines--were simply absent.  
I will send out a spreadsheet in a week or two when I have all the totals.
Please pass this email along to party members I may have missed in this mailing.  
All the best, and thanks again,
Rick Radis


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Date: 1/7/20 5:12 am
From: Tom Johnson <tbj4...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black Guillemot continues 7 Jan - Barnegat Inlet
Jerseybirders,
I just heard from Bob Dodelson and saw a report from Amy Davis - the Black
Guillemot continues in Barnegat Inlet this morning, viewed from near the
lighthouse.
Good luck,
Tom Johnson
<tbj4...>


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Date: 1/6/20 2:56 pm
From: Glenn Williams <00000f984877f467-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Those X's on ebird checklists
For a variety of reasons, it is much better to guess/estimate and leave an actual number, even if it is only within a factor of ten.  Here is a link to eBird's help page entry for how to count birds.
https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000838845-how-to-count-birds


Glenn WilliamsMystic, CT


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Date: 1/6/20 2:22 pm
From: Tom Johnson <tbj4...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black Guilemot - Barnegat Inlet
Jerseybirders,
I just received a report from a friend with a good photo of a Black
Guillemot close to the lighthouse in Barnegat Inlet today at 4:30 PM.

Good luck,
Tom Johnson
<tbj4...>


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Date: 1/6/20 1:54 pm
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] january birding - Palmyra
Sandra, Just FYI. We had ten winter wren in the Xmas count at the Trenton
marsh, and that is most I can recall being there in many years (happy to be
corrected, but I can't recall ever being in double figures before).

All the best, and happy new year!
Michel Perlin

On Mon, Jan 6, 2020 at 4:45 PM Sandra Keller <
<000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Struck out with the lingering Common Yellowthroat. Loads of other birds
> though.
> Tues. is another local day. I will only have a few hours at most.... I'll
> pick a nice weedy
> area to explore. I want a January bird....
>
> Wed. I have all day. I will probably hit Cape May - the Nashville and
> Parula are
> still around. I already have Ash-throated for Jan......
>
> Or do I try for a Jan. Monk Parakeet and search for the California Gull on
> my
> return. Choices, choices. Love it!
>
> Had 5 Winter Wrens this afternoon. My foy. They don't seem to be around
> my usual haunts further south. But they are around up here in good numbers
> I am told. I agree!
>
> Good birding all.
>
> Sandra Keller
>
> Sent from my iPad mini
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


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Date: 1/6/20 1:46 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] january birding - Palmyra
Struck out with the lingering Common Yellowthroat. Loads of other birds though.
Tues. is another local day. I will only have a few hours at most.... I'll pick a nice weedy
area to explore. I want a January bird....

Wed. I have all day. I will probably hit Cape May - the Nashville and Parula are
still around. I already have Ash-throated for Jan......

Or do I try for a Jan. Monk Parakeet and search for the California Gull on my
return. Choices, choices. Love it!

Had 5 Winter Wrens this afternoon. My foy. They don't seem to be around
my usual haunts further south. But they are around up here in good numbers
I am told. I agree!

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/6/20 1:35 pm
From: Joseph Jr. <jsalmierijr...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Those X's on ebird checklists
Hello all, wow, this my first official post, let's hope I do this right. I
am just curious as to why sometimes I come across those dreaded X's for
counts on ebird checklists. Personally, I don't like them. They do not
contribute to science, it just shows those birds are there, not in what
numbers. In case that is too broad, basically, if you do put X's, might I
ask why? If you don't but you know why, I am curious all the same.

Joseph Salmieri Jr.
Camden County, NJ


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Date: 1/6/20 1:26 pm
From: Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Weequahic Park Lake/Boonton Reservoir
Date: 1/6/20
Time: 2pm-2:30pm
Weequahic Park Lake, Newark, Essex County
Canada Goose - 3000+ on lawns (quick scan for anything outstanding)
Wood Duck 4
Mallard +
Northern Shoveler 73 (amazing number-all at west end)
Ring-necked Duck 20
Common Goldeneye 1
Hooded Merganser 35
Common Merganser 135
Ruddy Duck 25
Double-crested Cormorant 1
Great Blue Heron 3
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Ring-billed Gull 75
Herring Gull 3
Great Black-backed Gull 1

Boonton Reservoir, Parsippany, Morris County
3pm
Bald Eagle -adult on island
Peregrine Falcon - adult on island
Minimal waterfowl

Regards
Tim Vogel
Denville

Sent from my iPad


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Date: 1/5/20 6:51 pm
From: Jon Stippick <Jonstippick...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Barnegat CBC- Holgate Section
Two other noteworthy species- 20 Tree Swallows and a Laughing Gull!


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Date: 1/5/20 6:46 pm
From: Jon Stippick <Jonstippick...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Barnegat CBC- Holgate Section
6 of us a managed 51 species (average has been 45 since I started in 2013). The howling wind, 20-35+ mph, made conditions challenging but manageable. It’s better than pouring rain or negative temperatures. We had 1,000+ Black Scoters very close to shore for the morning sea watch, clicker counted individually, plus other expected ducks. A total of 20 Razorbills were counted, some distant but some nice close scope views too.
We started the 7-8 mile round trip hike shortly after 8:00. Passerines were hard to come by! The wind was keeping them under cover. The group total for Ipswich sparrow was over 40. No Seaside or Saltmarsh Sparrow, they have been missed for a few years in a row, strange. The only owls we had were 2 Great-horned. That is surprising. I’d expect Snowy, Short-eared or Saw-whet before Great-horned. The tallest tree in the refuge is only 6ft. Maybe the NW wind pushed them over from Tuckerton and they were waiting it out. There was an impressive flock of Snow Buntings at the southern tip, at least 75. We tried picking out a longspur without luck. The trek back along the beach is brutal, 3 miles of sand and wind.
We were back at the parking lot by 2:00. Chris, Amy and I decided to try for a few more species to add to the list from the residential area that borders the refuge. We still needed Cardinal, WT Sparrow, Junco, Chickadee, etc... We split up. Chris found an Orange-crowned Warbler. He got me on it a few minutes later and Amy made her way back to us and got it too. It was calling quite a bit. While watching the Orange-crowned, a bird flew from behind us, between me and Amy. We both saw it at the same time, naked eye. We both knew what it was instantly, even though it was a lifer for me. ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER! I blurted it out as it landed within view. We got exceptional views of it several times. It was moving around a lot and was chased off by mockingbirds a few times. A Coopers Hawk was dangerously close to it for a moment also. What an exciting sighting! I wonder how long it’s been there. Exact location is on West ave and Cleveland Ave, the vacant wooded lot.
We picked up a few more common birds and called it a day. I stuck around until it was dark but didn’t add anything new. This count is a challenging one but it is always rewarding.

Jon Stippick


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Date: 1/5/20 5:33 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] My Mizpah CBC area
Keith Phillips and I did our usual Mizpah CBC area, but this year without our third teammate Dan Crum, as he had deal with last minute family obligations. Dan is our raptor finder.

We ended the day with 44 species and we tried for the 45th by looking for late day perched red-tailed hawk , fly by great blue heron against the glowing sunset sky, or a utility line perched rock pigeon at the WaWa gas station. Sadly, the Bird god would not let us have the 45th bird for the day.

My morning started on the un-feathered path when I found out I left my bins and camera in the garage when I met up with Keith at WaWa at 8AM. Whole lot of 75 MPH plus driving back home to get the bins-camera worked to perfection, But not on the way back to my Mizpah CBC circle. Pulled over for speeding, on the phone with Keith, no seat belt. Police-dude let me go with only one violation that goes with no points. Only ticket, Seat Belt for $46.

Our total target species number was set at 45 before we got started. Why not aim for high numbers for our particular Mizpah CBC circle that is most likely not attainable ? We were so close. How ?

We lucked out by surprise discovery of one very bright plumage Palm Warbler and one male Pine Warbler. Both birds were found by chance on the front lawns of residential homes, on the same street.

I am too exhausted to put my doc photos of Palm and Pine Warblers on my Flicker or even on Atlantic County ebird. So just take it or leave it as to the stories of birds I find and no proof.

Yong Kong
Camden County


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Date: 1/5/20 4:41 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Mizpah CBC - my thoughts
Windy! No getting away from that! Brian J. and I enjoyed exploring an
underbirded area in the circle. We both intend to hit some of these again
this year. Fairly quiet. Did have a Phoebe and Chippies. Not rare this
winter so far! One RH Woodpecker. Low for this area. Near Atlantic
County Park. The wind? Which was strong! Bad acorn year here?
I think a combination of both.

Misses - well, I am not sure what is usual on the CBC here. No
accipitors, no Fox Sparrows, no flyover gulls! Although for all I know,
this is the norm.

The Phoebe was early on. In a somewhat out of the wind spot.

Back to exploring river spots Monday and Tues. I want a January bird!

Good birding all. Well, no worries about the game times next weekend.
The Eagles are done.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


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Date: 1/5/20 3:49 pm
From: robert dodelson <rdodelson...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Bald Eagle encounter
Late this morning I was looking for shorebirds by the bridge in Brigantine
Island (I struck out). I was looking at the marsh and saw a big brown
blob., So I put my scope on it. It was a young Bald Eagle munching on some
unfortunate bird.I could see the feathers flying. After a couple of minutes
I looked up and about 100 feet away looking at the youngster there was an
adult Bald Eagle sitting and watching (I assume it was the birds mother
beaming with pride)
Bob Dodelson


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Date: 1/5/20 10:30 am
From: Colette Buchanan <colette7969...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Birds and Wildlife of Australia - Monmouth County Audubon Program
Hello Jerseybirders,

Birds and Wildlife of Australia will be the topic for Monmouth County
Audubon's next program on January 8, 2020 at 8:00 p.m. at the Tower Hill
Church, 255 Harding Road, Red Bank, NJ. We welcome tour leader, bird lover
and photographer Susan Phelon back to MCAS to present her program,
featuring photos from her tour. Susan will quide us through the natural
wonders of the continent "down under." Expect to see and learn about
exotic Parrots, Kookabura, Koalas and perhaps the Tasmanian Devil!
Susan Phelon began serious birding in the mid 1980's after a vacation in
the Pacific Northwest. She later led tours for Owl Haven Sanctuary, and for
her own tour company, Wrentours. Susan's journeys have taken her to over
60 countries, not always on birding tours, but always with binoculars
handy. Susan is happy to return to MCAS to entertain us with stories and
images from her latest journey. The program is free and open to the public.
For more information visit https://www.monmouthaudubon.org/programs


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Date: 1/5/20 2:45 am
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Long-eared Owl status
Hi Linda,
Thanks so much for your post. It's good to know steps are being taken to
help protect the Owls and keep them off the radar.
I had posted here earlier in the year about Snowy Owls and the responses I
got off line from some folks just made me shake my head.
I should have saved them and posted them publicly.
Some of the FB pages review each post so that should help.
If there is anything we as birders can to do fast track the eBird process
please let us know.
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven, NJ

On Sat, Jan 4, 2020 at 10:22 AM lj.mack <lj.mack...> wrote:

> Long-eared Owl is listed in NJ as a Threatened species as per NJ DEP
> Division of Fish & Wildlife.If NJ eBird reviewers prepared & submitted
> documentation to eBird staff, at the minimum, specific locations and
> individual sightings could be blurred on maps and removed from alerts. The
> disturbance at known owl roost locations has increased dramatically, in
> part, due to the use of social media. Additionally, Northern Saw-whet and
> Snowy Owls would benefit. Linda MackMonmouth Beach, NJ Sent from my
> Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/4/20 7:42 am
From: Karen Swaine <kmswaine...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
Mine is an accumulative list.

Since moving to NJ in 2000 i've kept a list of birds seen & heard from our house in highland park. I'm at 92.

Sometimes we do chase a bird, like the male Painted bunting that spent the winter in Prospect Park! So we have a book called "Birder's Journal" in which i continue to check off ALL birds we've seen in the USA results of road trips vacations, birding festivals, etc. (& I'm never up to date on that task!)

I have individual lists for other countries (UK, NL, FR in eur.; C.R. and T&T).

I suppose one new year's resolution should be to learn how to use eBird.

Good birding!
Karen

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

________________________________
From: JerseyBirds <JERSEYBI...> on behalf of B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Sent: Friday, January 3, 2020 11:20:18 AM
To: <JERSEYBI...> <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder

I keep a list of birds heard and seen from my deck and the adjacent living
room. I'm at 135 species in 7.5 years.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Thu, Jan 2, 2020 at 9:51 PM Becky Laboy <Becky.laboy...> wrote:

> Happy New Year Birders! I recently returned from a trip to San Diego with
> my NBS (NEWLY birding spouse, only took 13 years! :) ) to continue our
> 50/50 Quest (50 birds in 50 states) which I originally began (and continue)
> with my sister. State 26 for me, 11 for him. (Ive finally caught up to my
> awesome birder sister who also has 26 states ticked.) I signed up for San
> Diegos version of JerseyBirds to get the latest scoop on local birds and,
> for now, continue to receive their daily emails. I found the below thoughts
> of one San Diego birder, also a Reviewer, interesting and thought Id
> share, as the approach he offers can be applicable to Jersey, and
> everywhere. Ive found a similar kind of fun he describes below, while
> doing the 50/50, as each new state brings anticipation and excitement as we
> explore new areas, even though we find the same old birds - cardinals,
> blue jays, starlings...and an occasional unexpected Rusty Blackbird,
> Pileated WP, etc..., and !
> of course we search for rarities when possible, as we race around
> gathering our 50+ birds. Truly, I feel the excitement of January 1st on
> every trip! It offers a great thrill and I highly recommend it! Every bird
> is a good bird! However you decide to bird this year, I wish you all
> good luck and good birds!
> -Becky Laboy, Bayville, Ocean County, NJ
>
> Here is Justyns post:
>
> Birders,
>
> As the final days of 2019 pass, and January 1st looms, many organizations
> (eBird, BirdsEye, etc.) are promoting more and bigger birding in 2020,
> often with a How to Do a Big Year theme. Meanwhile, I had been
> contemplating writing an email proposing a different strategy: one
> discouraging the seemingly perpetual county year listing habit that has
> developed in San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles, and elsewhere. Granted, we all
> bird for different reasons, with different styles. However, while some
> think of Big Years as primarily exploratory (and perhaps they are in less
> populated areas), long year lists are usually comprised of large numbers of
> species found by other observers that required chasing, often with few
> rarities or unexpected birds actually found by the owner of the list. Big
> Years on any scale have increasingly become a product of how successful a
> person is at chasing birds found by other people, with little time devoted
> to exploration and a great deal of time ear!
> marked for running after reported rarities. Clearly birding with this
> approach is satisfactory for many, but there are other, potentially more
> gratifying ways to bird than just being caught in an empty, unending cycle
> of chasing year birds.
>
> Admittedly, year listing has a long tradition. However, since the
> inception of the Top 100 in eBird, the ephemeral year list has taken on a
> life of its own. Chasing rarities has always been a part of birding, but
> chasing the rarity du jour is now repeated every year by everyone
> scrambling up the Top 100 until falling back to zero on January 1st.
> (Clearly Sisyphus kept a year list.) A major downside to this is increased
> visitation to sensitive or restricted areas, with many eBird users not
> plugged into local listservs simply setting their maps app to direct them
> to the coordinates of the rarity, with no understanding of access
> restrictions. Behind the scenes, eBird reviewers are cringing, dreading
> the onslaught of all of the known winter rarities being reported again and
> again the first week of January by dozens of birders anxious to get all the
> known rarities out of the way. So, as January 1st approaches, Id ask that
> people reflect on how much Needs Alerts from eBird d!
> rive your behavior? Are they set to Hourly for Year Needs? How much time
> do you spend going to look for birds found by other people for your year
> list? Does that bring you the same satisfaction as unexpected discoveries
> or birding in new areas? Are public data displays like Top 100 your primary
> motivation?
>
> Late last year, after learning about the 5-mile radius (5MR -
> http://www.iusedtohatebirds.com/p/vancouver-5mr.html ) approach to
> birding, I encouraged many birders to try it out, and several did. (Missed
> out? Its not too late! Draw your circle with this tool:
> https://www.mapdevelopers.com/draw-circle-tool.php ) This has been a very
> successful style of birding for a lot of people, a new way for folks with
> limited time or money to stay active and engaged, and a number of new local
> hotspots have been found. Many folks have told me it has rejuvenated their
> interest in birding! The main point of this challenge was (and is) to
> encourage exploring the local nooks and crannies around your neighborhood.
> (I, for one, largely ignored Point Loma this fall as it fell outside my
> circle.) Not all circles are equal, and the competition was really just
> intended to be with yourself how many can you find, regardless of what
> others (in perhaps better locations) are finding? Where to get!
> shorebirds if youre land-locked? Checking that golf course pond
> repeatedly in hopes of a snipe or Spotted Sandpiper. Scouring small parks
> or residential streets for a rare warbler or vireo versus visiting the same
> famous hotspots every day. And so on. Exploration and discovery is major
> part of learning the status and distribution of birds in your neighborhood,
> your county, or your state. What is expected and not expected, when and
> where. Lets do it again next year. It need not be a year listing approach,
> but simply adding to your cumulative patch total. Or just throw the list
> out the window and bird with a sense of discovery and contribute to the
> ever-changing status and distribution of our local or state species. Yes,
> one is allowed to travel outside your circle, and visit famous sites, and
> chase rare birds, but I encourage you to spend more of your time exploring
> under-visited areas of the county or state.
>
> Will you consider making a detour to check a park on your return from a
> (un)successful chase across the county? Large gaps in coverage are evident
> from looking at eBird maps how much of this is being driven through
> without checking?
>
> Take a look at this map of House Finch observations in San Diego, for
> example: https://flic.kr/p/2i6ptDH
>
> This species likely occurs across nearly all of empty space on this map,
> but theyve not yet been recorded there by eBird users, almost certainly
> due to poor coverage.
>
> Lets look closer at North County: https://flic.kr/p/2i6n3uf
>
> And now the southeast corner: https://flic.kr/p/2i6qzCF
>
> The red pins in the very southeast are from Jacumba, related to searches
> for a recently found Lark Bunting. To the northwest of that, the Laguna
> Mountains, and the trail out to where Evening Grosbeaks and Red Crossbills
> delighted many. What awaits discovery between your house and Jacumba, and
> how many of you stopped somewhere else on the way to or from the Laguna
> Mountains?
>
> If the eBird coverage of something as ubiquitous as House Finches is
> incomplete, just think of what the situation is for species of local and
> conservation interest like California Gnatcatcher or Cactus Wren. And how
> many rarities are hiding out there awaiting discovery? I get it, many
> people have stated that they dont want to bird in residential areas or
> business parks. (However, many of these areas are certainly visited by
> folks when rarities are reported from there!) But what about the large
> swath of rural and undeveloped habitat in east San Diego County? Or any
> number of the more aesthetic state and county parks?
>
> Not all of these unexplored areas are public, and most of them will not
> turn up anything rare on the first visit. But they may after multiple
> visits at different times of year. More importantly, however, by simply
> birding these hinterlands, you are updating and expanding our combined
> knowledge of status and distribution. By submitting eBird checklists from
> these areas, we fill in gaps on the maps. Another Greater Pewee checklist
> from Balboa Park this winter is a drop in the bucket compared to a visit to
> Barrett Lake or Portrero County Park. (Ever been to either of these
> locations? Me neither!)
>
> Will you return to Jacumba in 2020, regardless of whats reported from
> there? Will you check other trails in the Lagunas or the Cuyamacas for
> crossbills this winter? On the way to or from these spots, will you stop
> off for a quick 5-minute stationary eBird count in the middle of nowhere?
>
> Hopefully, while youre out in the far corners (or in the nearby nooks and
> crannies) youll be using breeding codes in your checklists, when
> appropriate. See the following link for a full explanation on when and how
> to use them:
>
>
> https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000837520-ebird-breeding-and-behavior-codes
>
> Noting a bird on a nest, or one carrying nesting material increases the
> value of your efforts. A revisiting of Unitts San Diego County Bird Atlas
> (which included coverage through spring 2004) is overdue, and eBird data
> may one day be utilized as the basis for a new version, much in the way
> iNaturalist data helped drive the San Diego County Mammal Atlas.
>
> We all, well most of us at least, enjoy listing. Ill be on my way as soon
> as possible to see a new county bird, and given the distance, a state or
> life bird, but in the mean time Ill try to focus on finding one on my own,
> or trying to familiarize myself with some new part of our vast county and
> state. Hopefully, by foregoing a list driven by Year Needs Alerts from
> eBird (Unsubscribe! As noted 5MR birder Karl Marx said, You have nothing
> to lose but your chains!), youll reduce stress in your life, explore
> parts of the county or state youve never heard of or been to, and, with
> luck, build a more satisfying list of self-found species of your own
> discovery. And, yes, reduce the workload of your poor eBird reviewers! By
> all means, bird more in 2020, but bird differently!
>
> Best birding in 2020, regardless of your approach.
>
> Justyn Stahl
>
> San Clemente Island
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/<http://www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/<http://www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/20 7:23 am
From: lj.mack <lj.mack...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Long-eared Owl status
Long-eared Owl is listed in NJ as a Threatened species as per NJ DEP Division of Fish & Wildlife.If NJ eBird reviewers prepared & submitted  documentation to eBird staff, at the minimum, specific locations and individual sightings could be blurred on maps and removed from alerts.  The disturbance at known owl roost locations has increased dramatically, in part, due to the use of social media. Additionally, Northern Saw-whet and Snowy Owls would benefit.  Linda MackMonmouth Beach, NJ Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/4/20 7:00 am
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] ebird itself in review
https://ebird.org/news/ebird-2019-year-in-review <https://ebird.org/news/ebird-2019-year-in-review>

For those who don’t access ebird via the main homepage - this link has a lot of info on
ebird itself. And what they have been accomplishing these past years, etc. Worth a look!
And check out the science sections.

Sandra Keller
<sandrakeller...>

Sent from my Imac





How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/4/20 2:08 am
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Owl eBird reports
Hi Barry,
Thanks so much for your response.
Seems I have asked the wrong question.
Why are Saw-whet, and Long-eared Owls NOT considered a sensitive species
here in NJ...or any other state for that matter?
Good Birding
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven NJ

On Fri, Jan 3, 2020 at 6:17 PM Barry E. Blust <barryblust...>
wrote:

> I'm not an ebird expert but I've used it a lot and read a lot about it,
> including its handling of sensitive species. There's a lot of info in
> ebird here:
> https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000803210-sensitive-species-in-ebird
> . So below is a quick answer to your question. I invite anyone who knows
> more details to please provide them.
>
> Long-eared Owl does not appear to be a sensitive species in ebird and
> using Explore in ebird will show recent reports. Sensitive species would
> not show this way. Below is an excerpt from that page. In the case of the
> Long-eared Owl it's up to the individual birder to exercise judgement in
> reporting the bird to minimize possible disturbance by others. I hope this
> helps.
>
> ====================================
>
> Sensitive Species listings only apply to clear cases where public
> information about a species may place that species at risk. There are other
> cases where specific observations or individuals may be best to not report
> publicly on eBird either due to restricted site access concerns or because
> the bird may be harmed in some way, even if the species isn't sensitive as
> a whole. eBirders must take it upon themselves to understand the situation
> locally and to use their best judgment, as the status of a species may
> change from place to place. For example, Long-eared Owls are particularly
> vulnerable to human disturbance in their day roosts across the Northeastern
> US, but in much of the Western US and eastern Europe this is not an issue.
>
> Here are a few ways to help protect sensitive records when reporting to
> eBird:
> - Wait until the season is over and the sensitive bird(s) have left
> before reporting the birds to eBird. You can go back and ‘edit’ your
> checklists later to include sensitive records after the birds have departed.
> - Do not provide explicit coordinates or directions to sensitive
> records. For instance, you may say that birds were seen at a state park,
> instead of listing the exact location therein.
> - Delay reporting observations for 8 days or more to keep these reports
> off of eBird Alerts.
> - Hide observations in eBird after you have submitted a checklist by
> selecting that option from the “Checklist Tools” dropdown menu. This keeps
> the species off the output (e.g., maps, bar charts etc.) but does not hide
> the fact that you went birding altogether (i.e., the date and location may
> show up on the Recent Checklists feed, but no one will be able to see the
> species you saw). Once the species is safe again, we always recommend
> 'unhiding' your checklist because all sightings on hidden eBird checklists
> cannot be used for scientific analysis or by fellow birders.
>
> Barry E. Blust
> 21 Rabbit Run Lane
> Glenmoore, PA
> Upper Uwchlan Township, Chester County
> <BarryBlust...>
>
> "When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to
> everything else in the Universe."
> -- John Muir
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: JerseyBirds [mailto:<JERSEYBI...>] On Behalf Of
> Harvey Tomlinson
> Sent: Friday, January 3, 2020 3:46 PM
> To: <JERSEYBI...>
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Owl eBird reports
>
> Hi Jersey Birders,
> Today's eBird report list's Long-eared Owl from a location with specific
> directions. I would love to hear..*.Publicly.*.. from eBird ... why theses
> reports are not hidden?
> Saw-whet, Long-eared, Boreal....Maybe I just don't "get it" !
> Good Birding,
> Harvey Tomlinson
> Del Haven, NJ
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/3/20 3:37 pm
From: Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Packanack Lake
Nice sighting
9 Redheads - 3 males
Also RN Ducks, Buffleheads, Hooded Mergs
Regards
Tim Vogel
Denville, NJ

Sent from my iPad


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/3/20 3:27 pm
From: Barry E. Blust <barryblust...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Owl eBird reports
I'm not an ebird expert but I've used it a lot and read a lot about it, including its handling of sensitive species. There's a lot of info in ebird here: https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000803210-sensitive-species-in-ebird . So below is a quick answer to your question. I invite anyone who knows more details to please provide them.

Long-eared Owl does not appear to be a sensitive species in ebird and using Explore in ebird will show recent reports. Sensitive species would not show this way. Below is an excerpt from that page. In the case of the Long-eared Owl it's up to the individual birder to exercise judgement in reporting the bird to minimize possible disturbance by others. I hope this helps.

====================================

Sensitive Species listings only apply to clear cases where public information about a species may place that species at risk. There are other cases where specific observations or individuals may be best to not report publicly on eBird either due to restricted site access concerns or because the bird may be harmed in some way, even if the species isn't sensitive as a whole. eBirders must take it upon themselves to understand the situation locally and to use their best judgment, as the status of a species may change from place to place. For example, Long-eared Owls are particularly vulnerable to human disturbance in their day roosts across the Northeastern US, but in much of the Western US and eastern Europe this is not an issue.

Here are a few ways to help protect sensitive records when reporting to eBird:
- Wait until the season is over and the sensitive bird(s) have left before reporting the birds to eBird. You can go back and ‘edit’ your checklists later to include sensitive records after the birds have departed.
- Do not provide explicit coordinates or directions to sensitive records. For instance, you may say that birds were seen at a state park, instead of listing the exact location therein.
- Delay reporting observations for 8 days or more to keep these reports off of eBird Alerts.
- Hide observations in eBird after you have submitted a checklist by selecting that option from the “Checklist Tools” dropdown menu. This keeps the species off the output (e.g., maps, bar charts etc.) but does not hide the fact that you went birding altogether (i.e., the date and location may show up on the Recent Checklists feed, but no one will be able to see the species you saw). Once the species is safe again, we always recommend 'unhiding' your checklist because all sightings on hidden eBird checklists cannot be used for scientific analysis or by fellow birders.

Barry E. Blust
21 Rabbit Run Lane
Glenmoore, PA
Upper Uwchlan Township, Chester County
<BarryBlust...>

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe."
-- John Muir

-----Original Message-----
From: JerseyBirds [mailto:<JERSEYBI...>] On Behalf Of Harvey Tomlinson
Sent: Friday, January 3, 2020 3:46 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Owl eBird reports

Hi Jersey Birders,
Today's eBird report list's Long-eared Owl from a location with specific
directions. I would love to hear..*.Publicly.*.. from eBird ... why theses
reports are not hidden?
Saw-whet, Long-eared, Boreal....Maybe I just don't "get it" !
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/3/20 12:47 pm
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Owl eBird reports
Hi Jersey Birders,
Today's eBird report list's Long-eared Owl from a location with specific
directions. I would love to hear..*.Publicly.*.. from eBird ... why theses
reports are not hidden?
Saw-whet, Long-eared, Boreal....Maybe I just don't "get it" !
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven, NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/3/20 11:35 am
From: Neil Ellman <neilellman02...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Wallkill River WMA Sightings
my husband Neil, <neilellman02...> has passed away.
i don't know how to stop these bird alerts from continuing.
i would appreciate any help someone can give me.
thank you
respond to his <e.mail......neilellman02...>


On Fri, Jan 3, 2020 at 11:54 AM Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> wrote:

> Thank you for your report, Tim!!
> I was most curious on the roughleg report and numbers.
>
> I miss Mike Britt's roughleg trips up there.
> Sorry for name dropping. It seems I can never post here without offending
> someone.
> YK
> Camden County.
>
>
> Sent from Xfinity Connect Application
>
> -----Original Message-----
>
> From: <tvogel2017...>
> To: <JERSEYBI...>
> Sent: 2020-01-03 11:01:54 AM
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] Wallkill River WMA Sightings
>
> January 2, 2020 - 10am - 1pm
> Observers: Tim Vogel, Rick Radis
> Location: Lake Wallkill rd, Wantage north to Oil City Road, Pine Island, NY
> Highlights:
> Golden Eagle adult, close range , great light , at intersection of Lake
> Wallkill rd. And Bassetts Bridge rd., following Pochuk Mountain ridge line
> south
> Rough leg 1, light phase
> Red tail 5
> Harrier 2
> Kestrel 1
> Bald Eagle adults 2
> Regards
> Tim Vogel
> Denville NJ
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/3/20 8:54 am
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Wallkill River WMA Sightings
Thank you for your report, Tim!!
I was most curious on the roughleg report and numbers.

I miss Mike Britt's roughleg trips up there.
Sorry for name dropping. It seems I can never post here without offending someone.
YK
Camden County.


Sent from Xfinity Connect Application

-----Original Message-----

From: <tvogel2017...>
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Sent: 2020-01-03 11:01:54 AM
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Wallkill River WMA Sightings

January 2, 2020 - 10am - 1pm
Observers: Tim Vogel, Rick Radis
Location: Lake Wallkill rd, Wantage north to Oil City Road, Pine Island, NY
Highlights:
Golden Eagle adult, close range , great light , at intersection of Lake Wallkill rd. And Bassetts Bridge rd., following Pochuk Mountain ridge line south
Rough leg 1, light phase
Red tail 5
Harrier 2
Kestrel 1
Bald Eagle adults 2
Regards
Tim Vogel
Denville NJ



Sent from my iPad


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi

 

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Date: 1/3/20 8:21 am
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
I keep a list of birds heard and seen from my deck and the adjacent living
room. I'm at 135 species in 7.5 years.

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park

On Thu, Jan 2, 2020 at 9:51 PM Becky Laboy <Becky.laboy...> wrote:

> Happy New Year Birders! I recently returned from a trip to San Diego with
> my NBS (NEWLY birding spouse, only took 13 years! :) ) to continue our
> 50/50 Quest (50 birds in 50 states) which I originally began (and continue)
> with my sister. State 26 for me, 11 for him. (I’ve finally caught up to my
> awesome birder sister who also has 26 states ticked.) I signed up for San
> Diego’s version of JerseyBirds to get the latest scoop on local birds and,
> for now, continue to receive their daily emails. I found the below thoughts
> of one San Diego birder, also a Reviewer, interesting and thought I’d
> share, as the approach he offers can be applicable to Jersey, and
> everywhere. I’ve found a similar kind of “fun” he describes below, while
> doing the 50/50, as each new state brings anticipation and excitement as we
> explore new areas, even though we find “the same old birds” - cardinals,
> blue jays, starlings...and an occasional unexpected Rusty Blackbird,
> Pileated WP, etc..., and !
> of course we search for rarities when possible, as we race around
> gathering our 50+ birds. Truly, I feel the excitement of January 1st on
> every trip! It offers a great thrill and I highly recommend it! Every bird
> is a “good bird”! However you decide “to bird” this year, I wish you all
> good luck and “good birds”!
> -Becky Laboy, Bayville, Ocean County, NJ
>
> Here is Justyn’s post:
>
> “ Birders,
>
> As the final days of 2019 pass, and January 1st looms, many organizations
> (eBird, BirdsEye, etc.) are promoting more and bigger birding in 2020,
> often with a “How to Do a Big Year” theme. Meanwhile, I had been
> contemplating writing an email proposing a different strategy: one
> discouraging the seemingly perpetual county year listing habit that has
> developed in San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles, and elsewhere. Granted, we all
> bird for different reasons, with different styles. However, while some
> think of Big Years as primarily exploratory (and perhaps they are in less
> populated areas), long year lists are usually comprised of large numbers of
> species found by other observers that required chasing, often with few
> rarities or unexpected birds actually found by the owner of the list. Big
> Years on any scale have increasingly become a product of how successful a
> person is at chasing birds found by other people, with little time devoted
> to exploration and a great deal of time ear!
> marked for running after reported rarities. Clearly birding with this
> approach is satisfactory for many, but there are other, potentially more
> gratifying ways to bird than just being caught in an empty, unending cycle
> of chasing year birds.
>
> Admittedly, year listing has a long tradition. However, since the
> inception of the Top 100 in eBird, the ephemeral year list has taken on a
> life of its own. Chasing rarities has always been a part of birding, but
> chasing the rarity du jour is now repeated every year by everyone
> scrambling up the Top 100 until falling back to zero on January 1st.
> (Clearly Sisyphus kept a year list.) A major downside to this is increased
> visitation to sensitive or restricted areas, with many eBird users not
> plugged into local listservs simply setting their maps app to direct them
> to the coordinates of the rarity, with no understanding of access
> restrictions. Behind the scenes, eBird reviewers are cringing, dreading
> the onslaught of all of the known winter rarities being reported again and
> again the first week of January by dozens of birders anxious to get all the
> known rarities out of the way. So, as January 1st approaches, I’d ask that
> people reflect on how much Needs Alerts from eBird d!
> rive your behavior? Are they set to Hourly for Year Needs? How much time
> do you spend going to look for birds found by other people for your year
> list? Does that bring you the same satisfaction as unexpected discoveries
> or birding in new areas? Are public data displays like Top 100 your primary
> motivation?
>
> Late last year, after learning about the 5-mile radius (5MR -
> http://www.iusedtohatebirds.com/p/vancouver-5mr.html ) approach to
> birding, I encouraged many birders to try it out, and several did. (Missed
> out? It’s not too late! Draw your circle with this tool:
> https://www.mapdevelopers.com/draw-circle-tool.php ) This has been a very
> successful style of birding for a lot of people, a new way for folks with
> limited time or money to stay active and engaged, and a number of new local
> hotspots have been found. Many folks have told me it has rejuvenated their
> interest in birding! The main point of this challenge was (and is) to
> encourage exploring the local nooks and crannies around your neighborhood.
> (I, for one, largely ignored Point Loma this fall as it fell outside my
> circle.) Not all circles are equal, and the competition was really just
> intended to be with yourself – how many can you find, regardless of what
> others (in perhaps better locations) are finding? Where to get!
> shorebirds if you’re land-locked? Checking that golf course pond
> repeatedly in hopes of a snipe or Spotted Sandpiper. Scouring small parks
> or residential streets for a rare warbler or vireo versus visiting the same
> famous hotspots every day. And so on. Exploration and discovery is major
> part of learning the status and distribution of birds in your neighborhood,
> your county, or your state. What is expected and not expected, when and
> where. Let’s do it again next year. It need not be a year listing approach,
> but simply adding to your cumulative patch total. Or – just throw the list
> out the window and bird with a sense of discovery and contribute to the
> ever-changing status and distribution of our local or state species. Yes,
> one is allowed to travel outside your circle, and visit famous sites, and
> chase rare birds, but I encourage you to spend more of your time exploring
> under-visited areas of the county or state.
>
> Will you consider making a detour to check a park on your return from a
> (un)successful chase across the county? Large gaps in coverage are evident
> from looking at eBird maps – how much of this is being driven through
> without checking?
>
> Take a look at this map of House Finch observations in San Diego, for
> example: https://flic.kr/p/2i6ptDH
>
> This species likely occurs across nearly all of empty space on this map,
> but they’ve not yet been recorded there by eBird users, almost certainly
> due to poor coverage.
>
> Let’s look closer at North County: https://flic.kr/p/2i6n3uf
>
> And now the southeast corner: https://flic.kr/p/2i6qzCF
>
> The red pins in the very southeast are from Jacumba, related to searches
> for a recently found Lark Bunting. To the northwest of that, the Laguna
> Mountains, and the trail out to where Evening Grosbeaks and Red Crossbills
> delighted many. What awaits discovery between your house and Jacumba, and
> how many of you stopped somewhere else on the way to or from the Laguna
> Mountains?
>
> If the eBird coverage of something as ubiquitous as House Finches is
> incomplete, just think of what the situation is for species of local and
> conservation interest like California Gnatcatcher or Cactus Wren. And how
> many rarities are hiding out there awaiting discovery? I get it, many
> people have stated that they don’t want to bird in residential areas or
> business parks. (However, many of these areas are certainly visited by
> folks when rarities are reported from there!) But what about the large
> swath of rural and undeveloped habitat in east San Diego County? Or any
> number of the more aesthetic state and county parks?
>
> Not all of these unexplored areas are public, and most of them will not
> turn up anything “rare” on the first visit. But they may after multiple
> visits at different times of year. More importantly, however, by simply
> birding these hinterlands, you are updating and expanding our combined
> knowledge of status and distribution. By submitting eBird checklists from
> these areas, we fill in gaps on the maps. Another Greater Pewee checklist
> from Balboa Park this winter is a drop in the bucket compared to a visit to
> Barrett Lake or Portrero County Park. (Ever been to either of these
> locations? Me neither!)
>
> Will you return to Jacumba in 2020, regardless of what’s reported from
> there? Will you check other trails in the Lagunas or the Cuyamacas for
> crossbills this winter? On the way to or from these spots, will you stop
> off for a quick 5-minute stationary eBird count in the middle of nowhere?
>
> Hopefully, while you’re out in the far corners (or in the nearby nooks and
> crannies) you’ll be using breeding codes in your checklists, when
> appropriate. See the following link for a full explanation on when and how
> to use them:
>
>
> https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000837520-ebird-breeding-and-behavior-codes
>
> Noting a bird on a nest, or one carrying nesting material increases the
> value of your efforts. A revisiting of Unitt’s San Diego County Bird Atlas
> (which included coverage through spring 2004) is overdue, and eBird data
> may one day be utilized as the basis for a new version, much in the way
> iNaturalist data helped drive the San Diego County Mammal Atlas.
>
> We all, well most of us at least, enjoy listing. I’ll be on my way as soon
> as possible to see a new county bird, and given the distance, a state or
> life bird, but in the mean time I’ll try to focus on finding one on my own,
> or trying to familiarize myself with some new part of our vast county and
> state. Hopefully, by foregoing a list driven by Year Needs Alerts from
> eBird (Unsubscribe! As noted 5MR birder Karl Marx said, “You have nothing
> to lose but your chains!”), you’ll reduce stress in your life, explore
> parts of the county or state you’ve never heard of or been to, and, with
> luck, build a more satisfying list of “self-found” species of your own
> discovery. And, yes, reduce the workload of your poor eBird reviewers! By
> all means, bird more in 2020, but bird differently!
>
> Best birding in 2020, regardless of your approach.
>
> Justyn Stahl
>
> San Clemente Island
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/3/20 7:57 am
From: Timmy Vogel <tvogel2017...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Wallkill River WMA Sightings
January 2, 2020 - 10am - 1pm
Observers: Tim Vogel, Rick Radis
Location: Lake Wallkill rd, Wantage north to Oil City Road, Pine Island, NY
Highlights:
Golden Eagle adult, close range , great light , at intersection of Lake Wallkill rd. And Bassetts Bridge rd., following Pochuk Mountain ridge line south
Rough leg 1, light phase
Red tail 5
Harrier 2
Kestrel 1
Bald Eagle adults 2
Regards
Tim Vogel
Denville NJ



Sent from my iPad


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 1/3/20 6:32 am
From: Becky Laboy <becky.laboy...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
Hi Susan,
Thank you for your response. I agree, Justyn’s post offers many interesting approaches to birding. You make many great points, too. When I visit a new state, I often focus on Hot Spots, as I feel it will give me the most likely chances of seeing birds, and I get an idea of what to expect to see in order to round out my list and reach 50 different species. I’ve noticed, however, that some states (based on ebird) have more Hot Spots than other states, and therefore, I assume, more birders than other states. West Virginia, for example, had large swaths of areas containing zero Hot Spots, however these large swaths of forested mountains surely have birds! Also, I’ve found that Hot Spot pins are often dropped in strange places, such as in the middle of a lake. Unless you are a local and know “how to bird the Hot Spot”, access can be confusing. One of the many reasons I like eBird is that it is taking a scientific approach towards bird conservation. By ebirding my checklists I feel like I am contributing towards a good cause - helping bird conservation efforts. As Justyn pointed out with his House Finch example, birding underbirded areas can go a long way towards scientific efforts to help birds. With that in mind, I’m going to try this approach in 2020, and explore new places. But, I’m sure I’ll find myself chasing someone else’s rare bird, or two, as well! Enjoy the new year, Susan!
-Becky


> On Jan 3, 2020, at 6:32 AM, Susan Treesh <sktreesh...> wrote:
>
> 
> Thank you, Betsy, for throwing the out topic of the multiple ways to go birding for discussion. The growth in popularity of birding has been to me both gratifying and somewhat unexpected, and I believe that ebird has played a role in its expansion. I use it, and I chase birds, at least when they are somewhat reliable, and I admire those with greater spontaneity. The still-expanding number of tools it provides makes birding much more interactive, yet, as the author points out, funnels birders into a narrower channel that produces one type of results.
>
> Listing and chasing birds clearly have a long history, are enjoyable, and are easier now than ever - particularly in a state like New Jersey, where you really can see all (most) of the birds. Many of the best birders do list. But even so, we all have our own parameters as to what and when and where we chase. Other serious birders have other approaches. New birders need to be aware of hotspot birding, less-visited areas birding, patch birding (I think of that black-throated gray warbler found on the scrubby edges of a Rutgers parking lot.) They should be aware that some top birders concentrate more on certain bird families as opposed to total species numbers. And some eschew ebird altogether. And all these ways of birding are valuable.
>
> As yet we don't yet have comparable tools to ebird to help us engage with others in these other ways to go birding. I first heard earlier this year about the 5 mile radius challenge described below, and even hunted around for a compass I thought I had lying around the house somewhere (without success). I knew there must be an online tool for this purpose! There are bird clubs for talking with others about birding. There is Jerseybirds for writing and contextualizing birding experiences. There is Facebook for birding photographs (and maybe bird photography is as powerful a tool as ebird, but it is more decentralized). Let's widen the chute and experiment in asking different questions from, "did you see the ..."
>
> Susan Treesh
> Somerset
>
>> On 1/2/2020 9:51 PM, Becky Laboy wrote:
>> Happy New Year Birders! I recently returned from a trip to San Diego with my NBS (NEWLY birding spouse, only took 13 years! :) ) to continue our 50/50 Quest (50 birds in 50 states) which I originally began (and continue) with my sister. State 26 for me, 11 for him. (I’ve finally caught up to my awesome birder sister who also has 26 states ticked.) I signed up for San Diego’s version of JerseyBirds to get the latest scoop on local birds and, for now, continue to receive their daily emails. I found the below thoughts of one San Diego birder, also a Reviewer, interesting and thought I’d share, as the approach he offers can be applicable to Jersey, and everywhere. I’ve found a similar kind of “fun” he describes below, while doing the 50/50, as each new state brings anticipation and excitement as we explore new areas, even though we find “the same old birds” - cardinals, blue jays, starlings...and an occasional unexpected Rusty Blackbird, Pileated WP, etc..., and !
>> of course we search for rarities when possible, as we race around gathering our 50+ birds. Truly, I feel the excitement of January 1st on every trip! It offers a great thrill and I highly recommend it! Every bird is a “good bird”! However you decide “to bird” this year, I wish you all good luck and “good birds”!
>> -Becky Laboy, Bayville, Ocean County, NJ
>>
>> Here is Justyn’s post:
>>
>> “ Birders,
>>
>> As the final days of 2019 pass, and January 1st looms, many organizations (eBird, BirdsEye, etc.) are promoting more and bigger birding in 2020, often with a “How to Do a Big Year” theme. Meanwhile, I had been contemplating writing an email proposing a different strategy: one discouraging the seemingly perpetual county year listing habit that has developed in San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles, and elsewhere. Granted, we all bird for different reasons, with different styles. However, while some think of Big Years as primarily exploratory (and perhaps they are in less populated areas), long year lists are usually comprised of large numbers of species found by other observers that required chasing, often with few rarities or unexpected birds actually found by the owner of the list. Big Years on any scale have increasingly become a product of how successful a person is at chasing birds found by other people, with little time devoted to exploration and a great deal of time ear!
>> marked for running after reported rarities. Clearly birding with this approach is satisfactory for many, but there are other, potentially more gratifying ways to bird than just being caught in an empty, unending cycle of chasing year birds.
>>
>> Admittedly, year listing has a long tradition. However, since the inception of the Top 100 in eBird, the ephemeral year list has taken on a life of its own. Chasing rarities has always been a part of birding, but chasing the rarity du jour is now repeated every year by everyone scrambling up the Top 100 until falling back to zero on January 1st. (Clearly Sisyphus kept a year list.) A major downside to this is increased visitation to sensitive or restricted areas, with many eBird users not plugged into local listservs simply setting their maps app to direct them to the coordinates of the rarity, with no understanding of access restrictions. Behind the scenes, eBird reviewers are cringing, dreading the onslaught of all of the known winter rarities being reported again and again the first week of January by dozens of birders anxious to get all the known rarities out of the way. So, as January 1st approaches, I’d ask that people reflect on how much Needs Alerts from eBird d!
>> rive your behavior? Are they set to Hourly for Year Needs? How much time do you spend going to look for birds found by other people for your year list? Does that bring you the same satisfaction as unexpected discoveries or birding in new areas? Are public data displays like Top 100 your primary motivation?
>>
>> Late last year, after learning about the 5-mile radius (5MR - http://www.iusedtohatebirds.com/p/vancouver-5mr.html ) approach to birding, I encouraged many birders to try it out, and several did. (Missed out? It’s not too late! Draw your circle with this tool: https://www.mapdevelopers.com/draw-circle-tool.php ) This has been a very successful style of birding for a lot of people, a new way for folks with limited time or money to stay active and engaged, and a number of new local hotspots have been found. Many folks have told me it has rejuvenated their interest in birding! The main point of this challenge was (and is) to encourage exploring the local nooks and crannies around your neighborhood. (I, for one, largely ignored Point Loma this fall as it fell outside my circle.) Not all circles are equal, and the competition was really just intended to be with yourself – how many can you find, regardless of what others (in perhaps better locations) are finding? Where to get!
>> shorebirds if you’re land-locked? Checking that golf course pond repeatedly in hopes of a snipe or Spotted Sandpiper. Scouring small parks or residential streets for a rare warbler or vireo versus visiting the same famous hotspots every day. And so on. Exploration and discovery is major part of learning the status and distribution of birds in your neighborhood, your county, or your state. What is expected and not expected, when and where. Let’s do it again next year. It need not be a year listing approach, but simply adding to your cumulative patch total. Or – just throw the list out the window and bird with a sense of discovery and contribute to the ever-changing status and distribution of our local or state species. Yes, one is allowed to travel outside your circle, and visit famous sites, and chase rare birds, but I encourage you to spend more of your time exploring under-visited areas of the county or state.
>>
>> Will you consider making a detour to check a park on your return from a (un)successful chase across the county? Large gaps in coverage are evident from looking at eBird maps – how much of this is being driven through without checking?
>>
>> Take a look at this map of House Finch observations in San Diego, for example: https://flic.kr/p/2i6ptDH
>>
>> This species likely occurs across nearly all of empty space on this map, but they’ve not yet been recorded there by eBird users, almost certainly due to poor coverage.
>>
>> Let’s look closer at North County: https://flic.kr/p/2i6n3uf
>>
>> And now the southeast corner: https://flic.kr/p/2i6qzCF
>>
>> The red pins in the very southeast are from Jacumba, related to searches for a recently found Lark Bunting. To the northwest of that, the Laguna Mountains, and the trail out to where Evening Grosbeaks and Red Crossbills delighted many. What awaits discovery between your house and Jacumba, and how many of you stopped somewhere else on the way to or from the Laguna Mountains?
>>
>> If the eBird coverage of something as ubiquitous as House Finches is incomplete, just think of what the situation is for species of local and conservation interest like California Gnatcatcher or Cactus Wren. And how many rarities are hiding out there awaiting discovery? I get it, many people have stated that they don’t want to bird in residential areas or business parks. (However, many of these areas are certainly visited by folks when rarities are reported from there!) But what about the large swath of rural and undeveloped habitat in east San Diego County? Or any number of the more aesthetic state and county parks?
>>
>> Not all of these unexplored areas are public, and most of them will not turn up anything “rare” on the first visit. But they may after multiple visits at different times of year. More importantly, however, by simply birding these hinterlands, you are updating and expanding our combined knowledge of status and distribution. By submitting eBird checklists from these areas, we fill in gaps on the maps. Another Greater Pewee checklist from Balboa Park this winter is a drop in the bucket compared to a visit to Barrett Lake or Portrero County Park. (Ever been to either of these locations? Me neither!)
>>
>> Will you return to Jacumba in 2020, regardless of what’s reported from there? Will you check other trails in the Lagunas or the Cuyamacas for crossbills this winter? On the way to or from these spots, will you stop off for a quick 5-minute stationary eBird count in the middle of nowhere?
>>
>> Hopefully, while you’re out in the far corners (or in the nearby nooks and crannies) you’ll be using breeding codes in your checklists, when appropriate. See the following link for a full explanation on when and how to use them:
>>
>> https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000837520-ebird-breeding-and-behavior-codes
>>
>> Noting a bird on a nest, or one carrying nesting material increases the value of your efforts. A revisiting of Unitt’s San Diego County Bird Atlas (which included coverage through spring 2004) is overdue, and eBird data may one day be utilized as the basis for a new version, much in the way iNaturalist data helped drive the San Diego County Mammal Atlas.
>>
>> We all, well most of us at least, enjoy listing. I’ll be on my way as soon as possible to see a new county bird, and given the distance, a state or life bird, but in the mean time I’ll try to focus on finding one on my own, or trying to familiarize myself with some new part of our vast county and state. Hopefully, by foregoing a list driven by Year Needs Alerts from eBird (Unsubscribe! As noted 5MR birder Karl Marx said, “You have nothing to lose but your chains!”), you’ll reduce stress in your life, explore parts of the county or state you’ve never heard of or been to, and, with luck, build a more satisfying list of “self-found” species of your own discovery. And, yes, reduce the workload of your poor eBird reviewers! By all means, bird more in 2020, but bird differently!
>>
>> Best birding in 2020, regardless of your approach.
>>
>> Justyn Stahl
>>
>> San Clemente Island
>>
>>
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
>> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
>> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/3/20 6:27 am
From: Theodore Chase <theodore.chase...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes in Somerset County (B.G. Sloan)
I'm glad to hear that they are back - and 20 is a good count! Must have been a good breeding year. That field is now the principal place to find them, and it belongs to Somerset County Parks - long may they keep it in corn. The field where they were originally found on Randolph Rd, more than 10 years ago, is now sprouting an Amazon warehouse.
Ted Chase



________________________________
From: JerseyBirds <JERSEYBI...> on behalf of B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Sent: Friday, January 3, 2020 9:04 AM
To: <JERSEYBI...> <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes in Somerset County

Saw approximately 20 Sandhill Cranes yesterday (1/2/20) in Somerset County.
Most were WAY back in a large cornfield. Wouldn't have noticed them if I
hadn't known to look for them. To see them, go to the intersection of
Mettlers and Weston Roads in Somerset County. They tend to hang out in the
cornfield at the southeast(?) corner of that intersection. Not a lot of
good parking there. And if you drive on Weston Road (where I saw three
cranes close to the road) be aware that it is VERY narrow with no
shoulders...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.njbrc.com%2Findex.php%2Freporting-rare-birds%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Ctheodore.chase...>%7C9bc25e1411894b3beaf008d79055f593%7Cb92d2b234d35447093ff69aca6632ffe%7C1%7C0%7C637136571178438483&amp;sdata=e1gdaJuwaVkN9y6pl6c1o6oYNCOsIgY72hWDegHtq7Q%3D&amp;reserved=0>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Flists.princeton.edu%2Fcgi-bin%2Fwa%3FA0%3Djerseybi&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Ctheodore.chase...>%7C9bc25e1411894b3beaf008d79055f593%7Cb92d2b234d35447093ff69aca6632ffe%7C1%7C0%7C637136571178448473&amp;sdata=GrbgUW72%2Bcy9iZSdTHYdYOAxrBAYq80FYF59efP%2B1FY%3D&amp;reserved=0


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/3/20 6:05 am
From: B.G. Sloan <bgsloan3...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes in Somerset County
Saw approximately 20 Sandhill Cranes yesterday (1/2/20) in Somerset County.
Most were WAY back in a large cornfield. Wouldn't have noticed them if I
hadn't known to look for them. To see them, go to the intersection of
Mettlers and Weston Roads in Somerset County. They tend to hang out in the
cornfield at the southeast(?) corner of that intersection. Not a lot of
good parking there. And if you drive on Weston Road (where I saw three
cranes close to the road) be aware that it is VERY narrow with no
shoulders...

Bernie Sloan
Highland Park


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/3/20 3:33 am
From: Susan Treesh <sktreesh...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
Thank you, Betsy, for throwing the out topic of the multiple ways to go
birding for discussion.  The growth in popularity of birding has been to
me both gratifying and somewhat unexpected, and I believe that ebird has
played a role in its expansion.  I use it, and I chase birds, at least
when they are somewhat reliable, and I admire those with greater
spontaneity.  The still-expanding number of tools it provides makes
birding much more interactive, yet, as the author points out, funnels
birders into a narrower channel that produces one type of results.

Listing and chasing birds clearly have a long history, are enjoyable,
and are easier now than ever - particularly in a state like New Jersey,
where you really /can/ see all (most) of the birds.  Many of the best
birders do list.  But even so, we all have our own parameters as to what
and when and where we chase. Other serious birders have other
approaches.  New birders need to be aware of hotspot birding,
less-visited areas birding, patch birding (I think of that
black-throated gray warbler found on the scrubby edges of a Rutgers
parking lot.)  They should be aware that some top birders concentrate
more on certain bird families as opposed to total species numbers.  And
some eschew ebird altogether.  And all these ways of birding are valuable.

As yet we don't yet have comparable tools to ebird to help us engage
with others in these other ways to go birding.  I first heard earlier
this year about the 5 mile radius challenge described below, and even
hunted around for a compass I thought I had lying around the house
somewhere (without success).  I knew there must be an online tool for
this purpose!  There are bird clubs for talking with others about
birding.  There is Jerseybirds for writing and contextualizing birding
experiences.  There is Facebook for birding photographs (and maybe bird
photography is as powerful a tool as ebird, but it is more
decentralized).  Let's widen the chute and experiment in asking
different questions from, "did you see the ..."

Susan Treesh
Somerset

On 1/2/2020 9:51 PM, Becky Laboy wrote:
> Happy New Year Birders! I recently returned from a trip to San Diego with my NBS (NEWLY birding spouse, only took 13 years! :) ) to continue our 50/50 Quest (50 birds in 50 states) which I originally began (and continue) with my sister. State 26 for me, 11 for him. (I’ve finally caught up to my awesome birder sister who also has 26 states ticked.) I signed up for San Diego’s version of JerseyBirds to get the latest scoop on local birds and, for now, continue to receive their daily emails. I found the below thoughts of one San Diego birder, also a Reviewer, interesting and thought I’d share, as the approach he offers can be applicable to Jersey, and everywhere. I’ve found a similar kind of “fun” he describes below, while doing the 50/50, as each new state brings anticipation and excitement as we explore new areas, even though we find “the same old birds” - cardinals, blue jays, starlings...and an occasional unexpected Rusty Blackbird, Pileated WP, etc..., and !
> of course we search for rarities when possible, as we race around gathering our 50+ birds. Truly, I feel the excitement of January 1st on every trip! It offers a great thrill and I highly recommend it! Every bird is a “good bird”! However you decide “to bird” this year, I wish you all good luck and “good birds”!
> -Becky Laboy, Bayville, Ocean County, NJ
>
> Here is Justyn’s post:
>
> “ Birders,
>
> As the final days of 2019 pass, and January 1st looms, many organizations (eBird, BirdsEye, etc.) are promoting more and bigger birding in 2020, often with a “How to Do a Big Year” theme. Meanwhile, I had been contemplating writing an email proposing a different strategy: one discouraging the seemingly perpetual county year listing habit that has developed in San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles, and elsewhere. Granted, we all bird for different reasons, with different styles. However, while some think of Big Years as primarily exploratory (and perhaps they are in less populated areas), long year lists are usually comprised of large numbers of species found by other observers that required chasing, often with few rarities or unexpected birds actually found by the owner of the list. Big Years on any scale have increasingly become a product of how successful a person is at chasing birds found by other people, with little time devoted to exploration and a great deal of time ear!
> marked for running after reported rarities. Clearly birding with this approach is satisfactory for many, but there are other, potentially more gratifying ways to bird than just being caught in an empty, unending cycle of chasing year birds.
>
> Admittedly, year listing has a long tradition. However, since the inception of the Top 100 in eBird, the ephemeral year list has taken on a life of its own. Chasing rarities has always been a part of birding, but chasing the rarity du jour is now repeated every year by everyone scrambling up the Top 100 until falling back to zero on January 1st. (Clearly Sisyphus kept a year list.) A major downside to this is increased visitation to sensitive or restricted areas, with many eBird users not plugged into local listservs simply setting their maps app to direct them to the coordinates of the rarity, with no understanding of access restrictions. Behind the scenes, eBird reviewers are cringing, dreading the onslaught of all of the known winter rarities being reported again and again the first week of January by dozens of birders anxious to get all the known rarities out of the way. So, as January 1st approaches, I’d ask that people reflect on how much Needs Alerts from eBird d!
> rive your behavior? Are they set to Hourly for Year Needs? How much time do you spend going to look for birds found by other people for your year list? Does that bring you the same satisfaction as unexpected discoveries or birding in new areas? Are public data displays like Top 100 your primary motivation?
>
> Late last year, after learning about the 5-mile radius (5MR - http://www.iusedtohatebirds.com/p/vancouver-5mr.html ) approach to birding, I encouraged many birders to try it out, and several did. (Missed out? It’s not too late! Draw your circle with this tool: https://www.mapdevelopers.com/draw-circle-tool.php ) This has been a very successful style of birding for a lot of people, a new way for folks with limited time or money to stay active and engaged, and a number of new local hotspots have been found. Many folks have told me it has rejuvenated their interest in birding! The main point of this challenge was (and is) to encourage exploring the local nooks and crannies around your neighborhood. (I, for one, largely ignored Point Loma this fall as it fell outside my circle.) Not all circles are equal, and the competition was really just intended to be with yourself – how many can you find, regardless of what others (in perhaps better locations) are finding? Where to get!
> shorebirds if you’re land-locked? Checking that golf course pond repeatedly in hopes of a snipe or Spotted Sandpiper. Scouring small parks or residential streets for a rare warbler or vireo versus visiting the same famous hotspots every day. And so on. Exploration and discovery is major part of learning the status and distribution of birds in your neighborhood, your county, or your state. What is expected and not expected, when and where. Let’s do it again next year. It need not be a year listing approach, but simply adding to your cumulative patch total. Or – just throw the list out the window and bird with a sense of discovery and contribute to the ever-changing status and distribution of our local or state species. Yes, one is allowed to travel outside your circle, and visit famous sites, and chase rare birds, but I encourage you to spend more of your time exploring under-visited areas of the county or state.
>
> Will you consider making a detour to check a park on your return from a (un)successful chase across the county? Large gaps in coverage are evident from looking at eBird maps – how much of this is being driven through without checking?
>
> Take a look at this map of House Finch observations in San Diego, for example: https://flic.kr/p/2i6ptDH
>
> This species likely occurs across nearly all of empty space on this map, but they’ve not yet been recorded there by eBird users, almost certainly due to poor coverage.
>
> Let’s look closer at North County: https://flic.kr/p/2i6n3uf
>
> And now the southeast corner: https://flic.kr/p/2i6qzCF
>
> The red pins in the very southeast are from Jacumba, related to searches for a recently found Lark Bunting. To the northwest of that, the Laguna Mountains, and the trail out to where Evening Grosbeaks and Red Crossbills delighted many. What awaits discovery between your house and Jacumba, and how many of you stopped somewhere else on the way to or from the Laguna Mountains?
>
> If the eBird coverage of something as ubiquitous as House Finches is incomplete, just think of what the situation is for species of local and conservation interest like California Gnatcatcher or Cactus Wren. And how many rarities are hiding out there awaiting discovery? I get it, many people have stated that they don’t want to bird in residential areas or business parks. (However, many of these areas are certainly visited by folks when rarities are reported from there!) But what about the large swath of rural and undeveloped habitat in east San Diego County? Or any number of the more aesthetic state and county parks?
>
> Not all of these unexplored areas are public, and most of them will not turn up anything “rare” on the first visit. But they may after multiple visits at different times of year. More importantly, however, by simply birding these hinterlands, you are updating and expanding our combined knowledge of status and distribution. By submitting eBird checklists from these areas, we fill in gaps on the maps. Another Greater Pewee checklist from Balboa Park this winter is a drop in the bucket compared to a visit to Barrett Lake or Portrero County Park. (Ever been to either of these locations? Me neither!)
>
> Will you return to Jacumba in 2020, regardless of what’s reported from there? Will you check other trails in the Lagunas or the Cuyamacas for crossbills this winter? On the way to or from these spots, will you stop off for a quick 5-minute stationary eBird count in the middle of nowhere?
>
> Hopefully, while you’re out in the far corners (or in the nearby nooks and crannies) you’ll be using breeding codes in your checklists, when appropriate. See the following link for a full explanation on when and how to use them:
>
> https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000837520-ebird-breeding-and-behavior-codes
>
> Noting a bird on a nest, or one carrying nesting material increases the value of your efforts. A revisiting of Unitt’s San Diego County Bird Atlas (which included coverage through spring 2004) is overdue, and eBird data may one day be utilized as the basis for a new version, much in the way iNaturalist data helped drive the San Diego County Mammal Atlas.
>
> We all, well most of us at least, enjoy listing. I’ll be on my way as soon as possible to see a new county bird, and given the distance, a state or life bird, but in the mean time I’ll try to focus on finding one on my own, or trying to familiarize myself with some new part of our vast county and state. Hopefully, by foregoing a list driven by Year Needs Alerts from eBird (Unsubscribe! As noted 5MR birder Karl Marx said, “You have nothing to lose but your chains!”), you’ll reduce stress in your life, explore parts of the county or state you’ve never heard of or been to, and, with luck, build a more satisfying list of “self-found” species of your own discovery. And, yes, reduce the workload of your poor eBird reviewers! By all means, bird more in 2020, but bird differently!
>
> Best birding in 2020, regardless of your approach.
>
> Justyn Stahl
>
> San Clemente Island
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/2/20 6:52 pm
From: Becky Laboy <Becky.laboy...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Interesting Perspective from a San Diego Birder
Happy New Year Birders! I recently returned from a trip to San Diego with my NBS (NEWLY birding spouse, only took 13 years! :) ) to continue our 50/50 Quest (50 birds in 50 states) which I originally began (and continue) with my sister. State 26 for me, 11 for him. (I’ve finally caught up to my awesome birder sister who also has 26 states ticked.) I signed up for San Diego’s version of JerseyBirds to get the latest scoop on local birds and, for now, continue to receive their daily emails. I found the below thoughts of one San Diego birder, also a Reviewer, interesting and thought I’d share, as the approach he offers can be applicable to Jersey, and everywhere. I’ve found a similar kind of “fun” he describes below, while doing the 50/50, as each new state brings anticipation and excitement as we explore new areas, even though we find “the same old birds” - cardinals, blue jays, starlings...and an occasional unexpected Rusty Blackbird, Pileated WP, etc..., and !
of course we search for rarities when possible, as we race around gathering our 50+ birds. Truly, I feel the excitement of January 1st on every trip! It offers a great thrill and I highly recommend it! Every bird is a “good bird”! However you decide “to bird” this year, I wish you all good luck and “good birds”!
-Becky Laboy, Bayville, Ocean County, NJ

Here is Justyn’s post:

“ Birders,

As the final days of 2019 pass, and January 1st looms, many organizations (eBird, BirdsEye, etc.) are promoting more and bigger birding in 2020, often with a “How to Do a Big Year” theme. Meanwhile, I had been contemplating writing an email proposing a different strategy: one discouraging the seemingly perpetual county year listing habit that has developed in San Diego, Orange, Los Angeles, and elsewhere. Granted, we all bird for different reasons, with different styles. However, while some think of Big Years as primarily exploratory (and perhaps they are in less populated areas), long year lists are usually comprised of large numbers of species found by other observers that required chasing, often with few rarities or unexpected birds actually found by the owner of the list. Big Years on any scale have increasingly become a product of how successful a person is at chasing birds found by other people, with little time devoted to exploration and a great deal of time ear!
marked for running after reported rarities. Clearly birding with this approach is satisfactory for many, but there are other, potentially more gratifying ways to bird than just being caught in an empty, unending cycle of chasing year birds.

Admittedly, year listing has a long tradition. However, since the inception of the Top 100 in eBird, the ephemeral year list has taken on a life of its own. Chasing rarities has always been a part of birding, but chasing the rarity du jour is now repeated every year by everyone scrambling up the Top 100 until falling back to zero on January 1st. (Clearly Sisyphus kept a year list.) A major downside to this is increased visitation to sensitive or restricted areas, with many eBird users not plugged into local listservs simply setting their maps app to direct them to the coordinates of the rarity, with no understanding of access restrictions. Behind the scenes, eBird reviewers are cringing, dreading the onslaught of all of the known winter rarities being reported again and again the first week of January by dozens of birders anxious to get all the known rarities out of the way. So, as January 1st approaches, I’d ask that people reflect on how much Needs Alerts from eBird d!
rive your behavior? Are they set to Hourly for Year Needs? How much time do you spend going to look for birds found by other people for your year list? Does that bring you the same satisfaction as unexpected discoveries or birding in new areas? Are public data displays like Top 100 your primary motivation?

Late last year, after learning about the 5-mile radius (5MR - http://www.iusedtohatebirds.com/p/vancouver-5mr.html ) approach to birding, I encouraged many birders to try it out, and several did. (Missed out? It’s not too late! Draw your circle with this tool: https://www.mapdevelopers.com/draw-circle-tool.php ) This has been a very successful style of birding for a lot of people, a new way for folks with limited time or money to stay active and engaged, and a number of new local hotspots have been found. Many folks have told me it has rejuvenated their interest in birding! The main point of this challenge was (and is) to encourage exploring the local nooks and crannies around your neighborhood. (I, for one, largely ignored Point Loma this fall as it fell outside my circle.) Not all circles are equal, and the competition was really just intended to be with yourself – how many can you find, regardless of what others (in perhaps better locations) are finding? Where to get!
shorebirds if you’re land-locked? Checking that golf course pond repeatedly in hopes of a snipe or Spotted Sandpiper. Scouring small parks or residential streets for a rare warbler or vireo versus visiting the same famous hotspots every day. And so on. Exploration and discovery is major part of learning the status and distribution of birds in your neighborhood, your county, or your state. What is expected and not expected, when and where. Let’s do it again next year. It need not be a year listing approach, but simply adding to your cumulative patch total. Or – just throw the list out the window and bird with a sense of discovery and contribute to the ever-changing status and distribution of our local or state species. Yes, one is allowed to travel outside your circle, and visit famous sites, and chase rare birds, but I encourage you to spend more of your time exploring under-visited areas of the county or state.

Will you consider making a detour to check a park on your return from a (un)successful chase across the county? Large gaps in coverage are evident from looking at eBird maps – how much of this is being driven through without checking?

Take a look at this map of House Finch observations in San Diego, for example: https://flic.kr/p/2i6ptDH

This species likely occurs across nearly all of empty space on this map, but they’ve not yet been recorded there by eBird users, almost certainly due to poor coverage.

Let’s look closer at North County: https://flic.kr/p/2i6n3uf

And now the southeast corner: https://flic.kr/p/2i6qzCF

The red pins in the very southeast are from Jacumba, related to searches for a recently found Lark Bunting. To the northwest of that, the Laguna Mountains, and the trail out to where Evening Grosbeaks and Red Crossbills delighted many. What awaits discovery between your house and Jacumba, and how many of you stopped somewhere else on the way to or from the Laguna Mountains?

If the eBird coverage of something as ubiquitous as House Finches is incomplete, just think of what the situation is for species of local and conservation interest like California Gnatcatcher or Cactus Wren. And how many rarities are hiding out there awaiting discovery? I get it, many people have stated that they don’t want to bird in residential areas or business parks. (However, many of these areas are certainly visited by folks when rarities are reported from there!) But what about the large swath of rural and undeveloped habitat in east San Diego County? Or any number of the more aesthetic state and county parks?

Not all of these unexplored areas are public, and most of them will not turn up anything “rare” on the first visit. But they may after multiple visits at different times of year. More importantly, however, by simply birding these hinterlands, you are updating and expanding our combined knowledge of status and distribution. By submitting eBird checklists from these areas, we fill in gaps on the maps. Another Greater Pewee checklist from Balboa Park this winter is a drop in the bucket compared to a visit to Barrett Lake or Portrero County Park. (Ever been to either of these locations? Me neither!)

Will you return to Jacumba in 2020, regardless of what’s reported from there? Will you check other trails in the Lagunas or the Cuyamacas for crossbills this winter? On the way to or from these spots, will you stop off for a quick 5-minute stationary eBird count in the middle of nowhere?

Hopefully, while you’re out in the far corners (or in the nearby nooks and crannies) you’ll be using breeding codes in your checklists, when appropriate. See the following link for a full explanation on when and how to use them:

https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48000837520-ebird-breeding-and-behavior-codes

Noting a bird on a nest, or one carrying nesting material increases the value of your efforts. A revisiting of Unitt’s San Diego County Bird Atlas (which included coverage through spring 2004) is overdue, and eBird data may one day be utilized as the basis for a new version, much in the way iNaturalist data helped drive the San Diego County Mammal Atlas.

We all, well most of us at least, enjoy listing. I’ll be on my way as soon as possible to see a new county bird, and given the distance, a state or life bird, but in the mean time I’ll try to focus on finding one on my own, or trying to familiarize myself with some new part of our vast county and state. Hopefully, by foregoing a list driven by Year Needs Alerts from eBird (Unsubscribe! As noted 5MR birder Karl Marx said, “You have nothing to lose but your chains!”), you’ll reduce stress in your life, explore parts of the county or state you’ve never heard of or been to, and, with luck, build a more satisfying list of “self-found” species of your own discovery. And, yes, reduce the workload of your poor eBird reviewers! By all means, bird more in 2020, but bird differently!

Best birding in 2020, regardless of your approach.

Justyn Stahl

San Clemente Island


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/2/20 4:49 pm
From: Sandra Mc <jerseyb...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Sandhill Cranes, Somerset Co. NJ
Hi Jersey Birders:

Since we were in the area, we decided to try for the Sandhill Cranes. Did not make it to this area last year and I made an error with road name taking us down Weston Canal Road instead of Weston Road which is closer to Colonial Park. Once I figured out my error, we turned onto Randolph Road to make our way to the correct road which for many years had corn fields with a low rise here and there which is where the cranes were often seen. To my dismay, but expected due to the ever encroaching development in the area, the entire block up to Schoolhouse Rd is being developed. A manmouth warehouse now dominates the fields with the natural contours gone.

We did see the Cranes in the location indicated by others and they are just beautiful. While the food sources right in that immediate area are dwindling, much of Somerset County to the west still has lots of open land with corn stubble. While I believe the birds like the use of the Raritan and Millstone Rivers for protection and roosting as I have seen them in the water there, my hope is that we will continue to visit each winter and make use of other food sources nearby. My guess is that it will become difficult for us to see them easily in the future.

Good NJ birding.

Sandy McNicol
Kingwood Township




How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/2/20 4:08 pm
From: robert dodelson <rdodelson...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Green-winged Teal
I don't know if others have had the same experience but I have noticed a
dramatic decline in the numbers of Green-winged Teal in the places I bird
in central Jersey particularly with reference to Assunpink and the Jersey
Shore north ponds and lakes.
Bob Dodelson


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/2/20 10:49 am
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] monthly birding
Is starting off slow for me. This isn't easy this time of year!
Missed Nashville and Parula in Cape May yesterday. Don't get me
wrong, it was a great day down there! Loads of birds! Had nice
looks of the Western Kingbird, Orange-crowned Warblers around, etc.
I will get back down there my next full free day. Which might not
be until Wed.

Hit a couple Gloucester county spots this mid day. Slow. Was bush wacking
a lot. Still slow.... Morning is always busy, but I was tied up.

My last CBC sunday! I love to explore! I just hope that wind forecast
changes.

Good birding all!

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/1/20 8:04 am
From: ernest hahn <ernestphahn...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Vs MA
One of my favorite aspects of birding is never knowing what you may find on a given day. I decided to explore a seldom birded section of Plainsboro today as a nice relaxing way to end my Middlesex “big year”. I started at Mill Pond Park and walked east along a concrete path known as Lenape Trail. In addition to the usual suspects, a female Northern Shoveler was present on the pond. This is usually one of the trickier ducks to get in Middlesex County (only my second sighting of one this year), so I was already pleased with my decision to come.

As I continued along the trail, I was tallying more squirrels than land birds before I reached a power line cut that seemed to have some reasonable sparrow activity. Juncos, White-throats, Songs, Fields—wait, what was that? A Lark Sparrow! My first for Middlesex County and the first known sighting in four years. The bird gave exceptional views and eventually put on a terrific show for multiple birders later in the afternoon.

This surprise find gave me 245 species on the year for Middlesex County, an eBird record. I’d like to thank all of my Middlesex/Central NJ birding cohorts for any of their finds that helped me reach this milestone (Patrick Belardo, Steven Albert, Dan Brill, Eric Gehring, John Beetham, Ernest Hahn, Timothy A Brown, and others). It’s been a fun year of local birding. Here’s to another! 🦅🦉🦆

Photo courtesy of Fairfax Hutter

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 1, 2020, at 10:07 AM, judson hamlin <jhhamlin...> wrote:
>
> Where in the county? That's a great find.
>
> Judson Hamlin
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jan 1, 2020, at 8:30 AM, Ernest Hahn <ernestphahn...> wrote:
>>
>> Harvey, one more to add to your NJ list for outstanding birds in Jersey for 2019. Yesterday Louis Bizzarro found and documented a Lark Sparrow in Middlesex County. Well done Louis
>>
>> Ernie Hahn (totally frustrated by not being able to bird in the field for 4 months 🤬)
>>
>>
>> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
>> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
>> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
>> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/1/20 7:08 am
From: judson hamlin <jhhamlin...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Vs MA
Where in the county? That's a great find.

Judson Hamlin

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 1, 2020, at 8:30 AM, Ernest Hahn <ernestphahn...> wrote:
>
> Harvey, one more to add to your NJ list for outstanding birds in Jersey for 2019. Yesterday Louis Bizzarro found and documented a Lark Sparrow in Middlesex County. Well done Louis
>
> Ernie Hahn (totally frustrated by not being able to bird in the field for 4 months 🤬)
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 1/1/20 5:30 am
From: Ernest Hahn <ernestphahn...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] NJ Vs MA
Harvey, one more to add to your NJ list for outstanding birds in Jersey for 2019. Yesterday Louis Bizzarro found and documented a Lark Sparrow in Middlesex County. Well done Louis

Ernie Hahn (totally frustrated by not being able to bird in the field for 4 months 🤬)


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 12/31/19 7:04 pm
From: Jon Stippick <Jonstippick...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] South Jersey- Razorbills, Orioles and Owls
I was in need of some seawatching practice for the Barnegat CBC this weekend so I chose to spend the morning in Cape May at the Two Mile Unit NWR. It’s a 1 mile walk from the parking area to the jetty and I really wanted to be on the jetty with my scope setup before sunrise. That didn’t happen but I did walk through the dune trail and half way down the beach before dawn. I wasn’t surprised to hear a woodcock flyover, or another peenting but I did not expect to hear their flight displays. At least 3 individuals were making displays. I’ve only heard that in February and March.
About 30 minutes after getting set up on the jetty I saw a distant group of 6-8 (very likely) Razorbills, visibility was poor and I wasn’t 100% sure they were RAZO. At 7:40am I had a RAZO fly nice and close with a clear scope view as it crossed the inlet heading NE. 2 minutes later a flock of 5 flew by on the same flight path with 3 Long-tailed Ducks. For an amateur sea watcher, seeing live action comparison of Razorbills and Long-tailed Ducks is priceless, similar coloration but distinctly different shape. Another group of 8 flew by relatively close a few minutes later and the seabird movement seemed to slow down. There were about 1,000 scoters and 100+ RT Loons and Gannets.
I was home(Franklin Township, Gloucester Co.) before noon. I walked passed the kitchen window around 12:30 and saw 3 Baltimore Orioles! My 6 year old, Jack, saw me dash for the camera and exclaimed “what is it!?!?”, when I told him it was 3 orioles, he was not impressed. I managed a few pictures through the window before they flew off. (See eBird)
I convinced Susie and Jack that a great way to end the year/decade would be to watch the sunset and (hopefully) see Short-eared Owls at Jakes Landing. We arrived 30 minutes before sunset and enjoyed Meadowlarks and Northern Harries. 2 other birders had the same idea and we all managed to pick out 4 Short-eared Owls after sunset. We were lucky to have 2 fly right over us. There was also a Sedge Wren calling just after sunset. I was happy to have a wonderful day of birding to end the year and just wanted to share.

Happy New Year,

Jon Stippick
Franklin Township, Gloucester County


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 12/31/19 2:49 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] 2019 in review - my birding
Hello,
Happy New Year and 2020 and new decade everyone! A bit cold and windy to start but I will be down in Cape May to work
on my monthly birds. It’s passerines I could use for Jan. And I will be working on monthly birding in 2020. I find it very interesting.
What can I see in off months! Or hear. I will do my best to document if I find. But this is me…. a horrible pic taker…. blasted
birds move too quick…..
It won’t just be the bayshore and cape may point. Birds linger at sewage ponds, feeders, etc. But finding these will be difficult.
Gee - I may have to chase! I usually prefer to find my own. I have all waterfowl species for Jan. Cinnamon Teal would be nice for
January…… I never say never!
It’s the passerines I need. I need Nelson’s Sparrow for January. Shouldn’t be hard. Parula would be nice also! That’s why
I am heading to Cape May - I wonder if it is still around?? Etc. Etc. I have Common Yellowthroat for Dec. I haven’t finished this
account - looking what months I have in. Do I need for Jan? I will know tonight when I look at BirdBrain data again.
Botany! I will be doing a lot of botany. As I am in different counties for botany, I will check ebird to see if I need any species.
Etc. I would like to get Mercer County up to 200. No other county goals except county birds. And state birds. I do not have YH Blackbird
for January. Hmmmm…… I might try a different county. Mix it up a bit.

Year birds - Missed…. - YH Blackbird, Lincoln’s Sparrow, Cape May Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Clay-colored Sparrow….. etc.
I don’t chase too much. Like I said, I like to find my own! Twice chased the Golden-winged in Palmyra. Two different birds. And missed
both times….
The only reason I hit over 300 for the state (303) - a goal in 2020 also - was the pelagic and the state birds! Seven. Wow! Has to be
more birders out looking and the weather patterns. Love it! I want a Lark Bunting in 2020. I have chased that a few times in the state.
And missed.
Mountain Bluebird, Pacific-slope Fly, Wilson’s Plover, Black-headed Grosbeak, Boreal Chickadee, Gyr - finally! I kept missing in
north Jersey! And the Black Phoebe. Wow! Can 7 state birds be repeated in 2020? I never say never….. Plus I need some common
pelagic species - I think common - I intend to be on 2 or 3 pelagics.

Happy 2020 birding all!

Sandra Keller
<sandrakeller...>

Sent from my Imac





How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
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Date: 12/31/19 4:43 am
From: Pete Quartararo <rubixcubepq...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] JERSEYBI Digest - 29 Dec 2019 to 30 Dec 2019 (#2019-329)
To Mr Kong. The answer to the YES song lyric...
“ The eagle searching down on the land”
EAGLE

Pete Quartararo
<Pquart59...>



Sent from my PQ iPhone.
iAppologize for any iPhone iTypos.

On Dec 31, 2019, at 12:01 AM, JERSEYBI automatic digest system <LISTSERV...> wrote:

There are 3 messages totaling 213 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Black and White Warbler
2. Yong Reply - Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds (2)


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 2019 12:54:05 -0600
From: Pat OHoro <psub...>
Subject: Re: Black and White Warbler

Location might help:
Manasquan Reservoir
Bird Blind Area

Pat

Quoting Pat OHoro <psub...>:

Hi All,
I saw (and photographed) a Black and White Warbler this morning.
Ebird flagged this as a seasonal rarity.

Pictures on ebird:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S62706890

Cheers,

Pat


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
<www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 2019 20:00:20 -0500
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: Yong Reply - Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds

What a fantastic list and great effort, Harvey !!!

Perhaps, one of these days at a Cape May watering hole, will you do a power
point presentation of your own rare bird photos *in live action and
discussion amongst the NJ birders *in terms of bird ID, such as very-very
potential * if not should be confirmed ID* for stints and little egrets you
have found over the years ? I have seen several of those photos of yours.
Perhaps, many JBird members may be interested as I am.

Five stars to Bob Dodelson for Top 100 NJ eBird, once again !! Already
looking forward to following your list in 2020.

3.5 stars to Jason Denesevich for busting my arse for not taking part on
eBird. I simply hate counting birds and looking for birds just for sake of
ebird listing, but I am working on it thanks to JD.

Finally, here is YK's end of the year bird ID quiz for bragging rights. Name
that bird which is mentioned in the *Yes* song Roundabout. First NJ birder
to respond, I will purchase a 2020 Brig pass for the winner.

Happy New Year !!

Yong Kong
Camden County


-----Original Message-----
From: Harvey Tomlinson
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 4:39 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds

If I've missed something shoot me an email....

Wanted to get Bragging Rights for New Jersey as we have had a superb Fall
Season...I am not posting photos but all the birds listed are review birds
here in NJ. The NJRBC is going to be very busy vetting...but almost all the
birds were photographed and seen by many...In no particular order: 1
Bohemian Waxwing in Sept. 2 Rufous Hummingbirds at the end of August.
Followed by 2 Black-chinned Hummingbirds and another Rufous later in the
season. A White-winged Dove at a homeowners feeder.Golden-crowned Sparrow,
Harris's Sparrow in the Magic Field.One day NJ we had 7 Ash-throated
Flycatchers recorded on one day. We hosted 2 Western Flycatchers. One
Pacific-Slope ( position note recorded ) and another in Cape May ( DNA
collected and we are awaiting results ). Mountain Bluebird ( sadly feathers
were found confirming it's passing). 4 Brown Booby sightings along with
about 4 Western Kingbirds. A Cassin's Kingbird was photographed for a First
State record. Vermillion Flycatcher, Bell's Vireo, and Townsend's Warbler
from Sandy Hook. Woodstork..which also died and made it's way to the
Academy in Pa for research. Brewers Blackbird. A California Gull...the
second this year! 2 Barnacle Geese...and just recently a Western Tanager.
It's been a Great Fall season even though Hawk numbers were the second
worse ever recorded, and only a few good passerine flights. Good Birding
and Happy New Year


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
<www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 2019 20:17:54 -0500
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin...>
Subject: Re: Yong Reply - Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds

Buzz! Eagle!

Michael Perlin

Who will write an article someday about all the birds in Bob Dylan lyrics

On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 8:00 PM Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> wrote:

What a fantastic list and great effort, Harvey !!!

Perhaps, one of these days at a Cape May watering hole, will you do a
power
point presentation of your own rare bird photos *in live action and
discussion amongst the NJ birders *in terms of bird ID, such as very-very
potential * if not should be confirmed ID* for stints and little egrets
you
have found over the years ? I have seen several of those photos of yours.
Perhaps, many JBird members may be interested as I am.

Five stars to Bob Dodelson for Top 100 NJ eBird, once again !! Already
looking forward to following your list in 2020.

3.5 stars to Jason Denesevich for busting my arse for not taking part on
eBird. I simply hate counting birds and looking for birds just for sake
of
ebird listing, but I am working on it thanks to JD.

Finally, here is YK's end of the year bird ID quiz for bragging rights.
Name
that bird which is mentioned in the *Yes* song Roundabout. First NJ birder
to respond, I will purchase a 2020 Brig pass for the winner.

Happy New Year !!

Yong Kong
Camden County


-----Original Message-----
From: Harvey Tomlinson
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 4:39 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds

If I've missed something shoot me an email....

Wanted to get Bragging Rights for New Jersey as we have had a superb Fall
Season...I am not posting photos but all the birds listed are review birds
here in NJ. The NJRBC is going to be very busy vetting...but almost all the
birds were photographed and seen by many...In no particular order: 1
Bohemian Waxwing in Sept. 2 Rufous Hummingbirds at the end of August.
Followed by 2 Black-chinned Hummingbirds and another Rufous later in the
season. A White-winged Dove at a homeowners feeder.Golden-crowned Sparrow,
Harris's Sparrow in the Magic Field.One day NJ we had 7 Ash-throated
Flycatchers recorded on one day. We hosted 2 Western Flycatchers. One
Pacific-Slope ( position note recorded ) and another in Cape May ( DNA
collected and we are awaiting results ). Mountain Bluebird ( sadly feathers
were found confirming it's passing). 4 Brown Booby sightings along with
about 4 Western Kingbirds. A Cassin's Kingbird was photographed for a First
State record. Vermillion Flycatcher, Bell's Vireo, and Townsend's Warbler
from Sandy Hook. Woodstork..which also died and made it's way to the
Academy in Pa for research. Brewers Blackbird. A California Gull...the
second this year! 2 Barnacle Geese...and just recently a Western Tanager.
It's been a Great Fall season even though Hawk numbers were the second
worse ever recorded, and only a few good passerine flights. Good Birding
and Happy New Year


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
<www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi



How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi

------------------------------

End of JERSEYBI Digest - 29 Dec 2019 to 30 Dec 2019 (#2019-329)
***************************************************************


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 12/30/19 5:18 pm
From: Michael Perlin <mlperlin...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Yong Reply - Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds
Buzz! Eagle!

Michael Perlin

Who will write an article someday about all the birds in Bob Dylan lyrics

On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 8:00 PM Yong Kong <yklitespeed...> wrote:

> What a fantastic list and great effort, Harvey !!!
>
> Perhaps, one of these days at a Cape May watering hole, will you do a
> power
> point presentation of your own rare bird photos *in live action and
> discussion amongst the NJ birders *in terms of bird ID, such as very-very
> potential * if not should be confirmed ID* for stints and little egrets
> you
> have found over the years ? I have seen several of those photos of yours.
> Perhaps, many JBird members may be interested as I am.
>
> Five stars to Bob Dodelson for Top 100 NJ eBird, once again !! Already
> looking forward to following your list in 2020.
>
> 3.5 stars to Jason Denesevich for busting my arse for not taking part on
> eBird. I simply hate counting birds and looking for birds just for sake
> of
> ebird listing, but I am working on it thanks to JD.
>
> Finally, here is YK's end of the year bird ID quiz for bragging rights.
> Name
> that bird which is mentioned in the *Yes* song Roundabout. First NJ birder
> to respond, I will purchase a 2020 Brig pass for the winner.
>
> Happy New Year !!
>
> Yong Kong
> Camden County
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Harvey Tomlinson
> Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 4:39 PM
> To: <JERSEYBI...>
> Subject: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds
>
> If I've missed something shoot me an email....
>
> Wanted to get Bragging Rights for New Jersey as we have had a superb Fall
> Season...I am not posting photos but all the birds listed are review birds
> here in NJ. The NJRBC is going to be very busy vetting...but almost all the
> birds were photographed and seen by many...In no particular order: 1
> Bohemian Waxwing in Sept. 2 Rufous Hummingbirds at the end of August.
> Followed by 2 Black-chinned Hummingbirds and another Rufous later in the
> season. A White-winged Dove at a homeowners feeder.Golden-crowned Sparrow,
> Harris's Sparrow in the Magic Field.One day NJ we had 7 Ash-throated
> Flycatchers recorded on one day. We hosted 2 Western Flycatchers. One
> Pacific-Slope ( position note recorded ) and another in Cape May ( DNA
> collected and we are awaiting results ). Mountain Bluebird ( sadly feathers
> were found confirming it's passing). 4 Brown Booby sightings along with
> about 4 Western Kingbirds. A Cassin's Kingbird was photographed for a First
> State record. Vermillion Flycatcher, Bell's Vireo, and Townsend's Warbler
> from Sandy Hook. Woodstork..which also died and made it's way to the
> Academy in Pa for research. Brewers Blackbird. A California Gull...the
> second this year! 2 Barnacle Geese...and just recently a Western Tanager.
> It's been a Great Fall season even though Hawk numbers were the second
> worse ever recorded, and only a few good passerine flights. Good Birding
> and Happy New Year
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see
> <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see <
> www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
>


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 12/30/19 5:00 pm
From: Yong Kong <yklitespeed...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Yong Reply - Re: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds
What a fantastic list and great effort, Harvey !!!

Perhaps, one of these days at a Cape May watering hole, will you do a power
point presentation of your own rare bird photos *in live action and
discussion amongst the NJ birders *in terms of bird ID, such as very-very
potential * if not should be confirmed ID* for stints and little egrets you
have found over the years ? I have seen several of those photos of yours.
Perhaps, many JBird members may be interested as I am.

Five stars to Bob Dodelson for Top 100 NJ eBird, once again !! Already
looking forward to following your list in 2020.

3.5 stars to Jason Denesevich for busting my arse for not taking part on
eBird. I simply hate counting birds and looking for birds just for sake of
ebird listing, but I am working on it thanks to JD.

Finally, here is YK's end of the year bird ID quiz for bragging rights. Name
that bird which is mentioned in the *Yes* song Roundabout. First NJ birder
to respond, I will purchase a 2020 Brig pass for the winner.

Happy New Year !!

Yong Kong
Camden County


-----Original Message-----
From: Harvey Tomlinson
Sent: Thursday, December 26, 2019 4:39 PM
To: <JERSEYBI...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds

If I've missed something shoot me an email....

Wanted to get Bragging Rights for New Jersey as we have had a superb Fall
Season...I am not posting photos but all the birds listed are review birds
here in NJ. The NJRBC is going to be very busy vetting...but almost all the
birds were photographed and seen by many...In no particular order: 1
Bohemian Waxwing in Sept. 2 Rufous Hummingbirds at the end of August.
Followed by 2 Black-chinned Hummingbirds and another Rufous later in the
season. A White-winged Dove at a homeowners feeder.Golden-crowned Sparrow,
Harris's Sparrow in the Magic Field.One day NJ we had 7 Ash-throated
Flycatchers recorded on one day. We hosted 2 Western Flycatchers. One
Pacific-Slope ( position note recorded ) and another in Cape May ( DNA
collected and we are awaiting results ). Mountain Bluebird ( sadly feathers
were found confirming it's passing). 4 Brown Booby sightings along with
about 4 Western Kingbirds. A Cassin's Kingbird was photographed for a First
State record. Vermillion Flycatcher, Bell's Vireo, and Townsend's Warbler
from Sandy Hook. Woodstork..which also died and made it's way to the
Academy in Pa for research. Brewers Blackbird. A California Gull...the
second this year! 2 Barnacle Geese...and just recently a Western Tanager.
It's been a Great Fall season even though Hawk numbers were the second
worse ever recorded, and only a few good passerine flights. Good Birding
and Happy New Year


How to report NJ bird sightings: see
<www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 12/30/19 10:54 am
From: Pat OHoro <psub...>
Subject: Re: [JERSEYBI] Black and White Warbler
Location might help:
Manasquan Reservoir
Bird Blind Area

Pat

Quoting Pat OHoro <psub...>:

> Hi All,
> I saw (and photographed) a Black and White Warbler this morning.
> Ebird flagged this as a seasonal rarity.
>
> Pictures on ebird:
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S62706890
>
> Cheers,
>
> Pat
>
>
> How to report NJ bird sightings: see
> <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
> or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
> List help: <jerseybi-request...>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 12/29/19 5:37 pm
From: Sandra Keller <000006b65d80f212-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Cumberland cbc - my thoughts
Terry Lodge joined me for an interesting day! Thankfully the rain held off
to the early afternoon. It was slow numbers wise. But how about 68 Meadowlarks
in one small field! The Millville airport. WOW! Shattered the filter. Probably
a personal high count for me also. Big miss - no Winter Wrens.? Bluebird numbers
low. Etc. Not the Grackle numbers I was expecting. I presume they are wintering
elsewhere.

We only hit the highlight areas in my usual section. I have other spots i usually
hit, but they are usually very unbirdy. Covered half of another area. That was
fun! That Cohansy wma is a spot I have been meaning to bird. Finally got
to it today. i will be back! Nothing out of the ordinary for us. except for some
species and numbers. We had one flock of 32 Chippies in this other area we hit
for example. It had started a steady rain by now though. Difficult birding but we
did some car birding. I was surprised at the lack of stuff flying. I presume the
weather affected that.

I'll be curious to read the full numbers once they are all compiled. Been a good
year for Chippies, but Meadowlarks?

Good birding all.

Sandra Keller

Sent from my iPad mini


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 12/29/19 7:17 am
From: Tom Brown <tshrike19...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] 85th Long Branch CBC
The 85th Long Branch Christmas Bird Count was held yesterday, 12/28/2019.
As of now there were 113 species and 1 count week bird. Here are some
highlights, once all numbers are compiled I’ll supply a more thorough
report. There were two count firsts with Lincoln’s Sparrow and a Henslow’s
Sparrow being added as new species. New Jersey’s run of Ash-throated
flycatcher continued with another found on the count, the 3rd ever (last
was 2011), Northern Saw-whet owl (a good find in a poor flight year),
Cackling Goose, Eurasian Wigeon, orange-crowned warbler, pine warbler, and
a count week eastern Phoebe round out the list of highlights.

Cheers and Happy New Year

Tom Brown


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

Back to top
Date: 12/28/19 1:13 pm
From: Pat OHoro <psub...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Black and White Warbler
Hi All,
I saw (and photographed) a Black and White Warbler this morning.
Ebird flagged this as a seasonal rarity.

Pictures on ebird:
https://ebird.org/checklist/S62706890

Cheers,

Pat


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 12/28/19 1:08 pm
From: James Petersen <jamesmnpetersen...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] Brown Pelican
Spotted a Brown Pelican flying west this afternoon (12/ 28) along Elizabeth
waterfront while birding Marciante-Jackson-Millet park. Unfortunately no
photos.

James Petersen


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 12/27/19 2:38 am
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] ABA Rare Bird Alert FB page
Hi Jersey Birders,
Yeah...I missed a bunch of NJRBC records...Kinda knew I would...
I sent the New Jersey Birders FB post to the ABA Rare Bird Alert FB page
and they didn't post it.
Well, We NJ Birders know we kicked bird and took numbers!!!!
Good Birding,
Harvey Tomlinson
Del Haven NJ


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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Date: 12/26/19 1:40 pm
From: Harvey Tomlinson <oddbirdsin...>
Subject: [JERSEYBI] NJ Birds
If I've missed something shoot me an email....

Wanted to get Bragging Rights for New Jersey as we have had a superb Fall
Season...I am not posting photos but all the birds listed are review birds
here in NJ. The NJRBC is going to be very busy vetting...but almost all the
birds were photographed and seen by many...In no particular order: 1
Bohemian Waxwing in Sept. 2 Rufous Hummingbirds at the end of August.
Followed by 2 Black-chinned Hummingbirds and another Rufous later in the
season. A White-winged Dove at a homeowners feeder.Golden-crowned Sparrow,
Harris's Sparrow in the Magic Field.One day NJ we had 7 Ash-throated
Flycatchers recorded on one day. We hosted 2 Western Flycatchers. One
Pacific-Slope ( position note recorded ) and another in Cape May ( DNA
collected and we are awaiting results ). Mountain Bluebird ( sadly feathers
were found confirming it's passing). 4 Brown Booby sightings along with
about 4 Western Kingbirds. A Cassin's Kingbird was photographed for a First
State record. Vermillion Flycatcher, Bell's Vireo, and Townsend's Warbler
from Sandy Hook. Woodstork..which also died and made it's way to the
Academy in Pa for research. Brewers Blackbird. A California Gull...the
second this year! 2 Barnacle Geese...and just recently a Western Tanager.
It's been a Great Fall season even though Hawk numbers were the second
worse ever recorded, and only a few good passerine flights. Good Birding
and Happy New Year


How to report NJ bird sightings: see <www.njbrc.com/index.php/reporting-rare-birds/>
or e-mail to <njbrcreport...>
List help: <jerseybi-request...>
List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=jerseybi
 

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