NVBirds
Received From Subject
10/22/18 11:06 am Dennis Serdehely <birders...> Fw: Topaz Lake Loons-Followup
10/22/18 9:25 am Dennis Serdehely <birders...> Re: Topaz Lake Loons-Followup
10/21/18 9:45 pm justin streit <000000260acb25c4-dmarc-request...> ARCTIC TERN at Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve, Clark County
10/21/18 9:08 pm Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> 2018 Carson City Audubon Christmas Bird Count (CBC)
10/21/18 7:05 pm Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Topaz Lake Loons-Followup
10/21/18 3:05 pm rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Topaz Lake Loons
10/21/18 1:25 pm John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...> HBVP Bird List 10/15/2018 - 10/21/2018
10/21/18 12:46 pm Rose Strickland <rosenreno...> Harris’s Sparrow
10/21/18 12:39 pm Jeff Bleam <jcbleam...> Las Field Trip: Rancho San Rafael
10/19/18 8:26 pm Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> American Dippers-Silver Saddle Ranch
10/19/18 8:21 pm Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Gray Partridge-Santa Rosa Mountains, Thursday, Oct. 18th
10/19/18 6:38 pm justin streit <000000260acb25c4-dmarc-request...> Least Flycatcher Retraction - EMPIDS are TOUGH (and take lots of reading and careful study)!
10/19/18 4:21 pm Dennis Serdehely <birders...> White-fronted Geese in Reno
10/18/18 8:23 pm Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...> WOOD THRUSH continues at Floyd Lamb
10/18/18 10:27 am Dennis Serdehely <birders...> Re: A few odds and ends over the past couple of days including some interesting (but not rare) sparrows
10/17/18 7:53 pm Martin Meyers <Martin...> A few odds and ends over the past couple of days including some interesting (but not rare) sparrows
10/17/18 6:59 pm Martin Meyers <NevadaBirdRecords...> About Wood Thrush and Least Flycatcher
10/17/18 3:55 pm Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...> WOOD THRUSH at Floyd Lamb Park, Las Vegas
10/17/18 3:17 pm rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Lesser Black-Backed Gull, Washoe Lake
10/17/18 2:13 pm Dennis Serdehely <birders...> Re: Pyramid Lake-Surf Scoters
10/17/18 2:07 pm Neil McDonal <00000110fb120f04-dmarc-request...> Floyd Lamb Park & multiple good birds
10/16/18 8:40 pm justin streit <000000260acb25c4-dmarc-request...> Northern Saw-whet Owl and Clay-colored Sparrow top this list at Floyd Lamb Park, Clark County
10/14/18 4:34 pm Rick Fridell <rfridell...> Primm Cape May Warbler
10/14/18 3:03 pm rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Pyramid Lake-Surf Scoters
10/14/18 1:32 pm John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...> HBVP Bird List 10/8/2018 - 10/14/2018
10/13/18 7:32 am Jeff Bleam <jcbleam...> LAS Field Trip: Cottonwood Park and UNR Ag Fields
10/10/18 5:19 pm Neil McDonal <00000110fb120f04-dmarc-request...> Palm Warbler at Jean NV (lawn patch)
10/10/18 5:07 pm Karen Havlena <000000fb2f11d97c-dmarc-request...> Fwd: Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
10/10/18 2:04 pm Neil McDonal <00000110fb120f04-dmarc-request...> Re: Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
10/10/18 9:46 am Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...> Re: Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
10/10/18 9:06 am Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...> Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
10/9/18 4:38 pm Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...> Re: Primm and Jean Patch Locations
10/9/18 4:23 pm Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...> Primm and Jean Patch Locations
10/7/18 6:23 pm Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...> RED-EYED VIREO at Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve
10/7/18 12:08 pm John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...> HBVP Bird List 10/1/2018 - 10/7/2018
10/7/18 9:38 am Darlene Feener <darlenemfeener...> Cornell Lab e-Bird October Big Day!
10/6/18 9:44 pm Martin Meyers <Martin...> Greater Scaup and Golden-crowned Sparrow at Sparks Marina today
10/6/18 3:48 pm Paul Hurtado <paul.j.hurtado...> Re: Gull ID help needed
10/5/18 5:50 pm Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Pyramid Lake-Willows
10/4/18 7:34 pm Martin Meyers <martin...> Gull ID help needed
10/4/18 10:05 am Kristen Comella <rfridell...> Pahranagat NWR 10/3
10/3/18 10:12 am Karen Havlena <000000fb2f11d97c-dmarc-request...> Tonopah- Highland/Harvey Park 3 Oct ‘18
10/2/18 10:11 am Martin Meyers <martin...> Uh, slight correction. Cape May is here
10/2/18 9:50 am Martin Meyers <martin...> Primm - could not refind Cape May
10/1/18 7:37 pm Martin Meyers <martin...> Cape May still present at Primm
10/1/18 3:56 pm Dennis Serdehely <birders...> Pacific Wren in Fernley
10/1/18 11:50 am L K Rhodes <00000113d2b579e9-dmarc-request...> Re: Great Horned Owl Specimen
10/1/18 10:50 am Will Richardson <will...> Re: Great Horned Owl Specimen
10/1/18 10:40 am Corey Lange <coreyjlange...> Great Horned Owl Specimen
10/1/18 9:44 am Greg Scyphers <scyph...> Dickcissel and Northern Parula at Miller’s Rest Stop
10/1/18 9:08 am Greg Scyphers <scyph...> Broad-winged Hawk at Miller’s Rest Stop
9/30/18 4:29 pm Darlene Feener <darlenemfeener...> Discovery Park: Pahrump, Nevada in Nye County
9/30/18 2:38 pm Dennis Serdehely <birders...> Re: Mason Valley WMA Follow-Up
9/30/18 11:11 am John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...> HBVP Bird List 9/23/2018 - 9/30/2018
9/30/18 8:16 am Jeff Bleam <jcbleam...> LAS Field Trip: Washoe Lake SP WMA
9/29/18 10:05 pm Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> MAson Valley WMA Follow-Up Addendum
9/29/18 9:50 pm Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Mason Valley WMA Follow-Up
9/29/18 6:33 pm Dennis Serdehely <birders...> Re: Varied Thrush in Fernley
9/29/18 5:45 pm Paul Hurtado <paul.j.hurtado...> orange-legged shorebird @ Mason Valley
9/28/18 2:34 pm rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Primm Area Birding, Friday, Sept. 28th
9/28/18 2:15 pm rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Tonopah Area, Thursday, Sept. 27th
9/28/18 9:42 am Dennis Serdehely <birders...> Varied Thrush in Fernley
9/26/18 4:28 pm justin streit <000000260acb25c4-dmarc-request...> Primm Saga
9/26/18 3:39 pm Martin Meyers <NevadaBirdRecords...> Cape May Warbler is a review species
9/25/18 8:35 am Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...> Wow! Primm Produces: CAPE MAY, TENNESSEE, PROTHONOTARY Warbler(s) & EASTERN KINGBIRD
9/24/18 10:08 am Ben Zyla <Theloraxx365...> CAPE MAY and KENTUCKY Warbler at Primm, Clark County.
9/24/18 9:54 am Greg Scyphers <scyph...> RED-EYED VIREO at Carson River Park
9/23/18 2:51 pm rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Sanderlings-Pyramid Lake River Mouth
9/23/18 1:49 pm rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...> Semipalmated Sandpiper-Pyramid Lake Sourh End
9/23/18 1:03 pm Bob Goodman <0000005532510179-dmarc-request...> Behavior
9/23/18 12:57 pm Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...> Blackpoll Warblers at Corn Creek, DNWR, Clark
9/23/18 12:20 pm John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...> HBVP Bird List 9/17/2018 - 9/23/2018
9/22/18 5:50 pm Patrick Gaffey <pjgaffey...> Lawrence's Goldfinches at Corn Creek, Las Vegas
 
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Date: 10/22/18 11:06 am
From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
Subject: Fw: Topaz Lake Loons-Followup
Apparently my data table got corrupted when sent so hopefully this one will be correct. Thanks to Judy Phoenix for pointing it out.
Dennis Serdehely


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: JUDY PHOENIX <jpbirding...>
To: Dennis & Becca Serdehely <birders...>
Sent: Monday, October 22, 2018 9:55 AM
Subject: Re: Topaz Lake Loons-Followup

Hi DennisIs this what you meant?Date                   NV                   CA10/14/12               40                    84/5/13                 33                    39/11/13                 39/22/13                 3   10/9/13                56                   1810/20/13              112                   2611/2/13                 6                   7411/24/13                                     5

JUDY <PHOENIXjpbirding...>



On Oct 22, 2018, at 9:25 AM, Dennis Serdehely <birders...> wrote:
Topaz Lake is a magnet for loons especially in the fall. As the data below shows the numbers build until late October and then fall off in November. There seems to be another lesser peak in April. The data below comes form aquatic birds surveys that I did for GBBO several years ago. All the numbers are for Common Loons. However I had one Pacific Loon in Douglas County on October 14, 2012.
Date                    NV                    CA10/14/12              40                     84/5/13                  33                     39/11/13                  39/22/13                  3   10/9/13                56                    1810/20/13            112                    2611/2/13                  6                    74                11/24/13                                        5

DennisFernley, NV


     From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
To: <NVBIRDS...>
Sent: Sunday, October 21, 2018 7:05 PM
Subject: Topaz Lake Loons-Followup

Hello!
I ended up seeing 44 Loons on the Nevada side of Topaz Lake this afternoon.  Afterwards, I drove to the south end of the lake in California and observed 21 more Loons.  Every Loon that I saw was a Common but there were a couple far out on the lake that I left unidentified but assumed that they were Common. 
Rob LowryCarson City







 

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Date: 10/22/18 9:25 am
From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
Subject: Re: Topaz Lake Loons-Followup
Topaz Lake is a magnet for loons especially in the fall. As the data below shows the numbers build until late October and then fall off in November. There seems to be another lesser peak in April. The data below comes form aquatic birds surveys that I did for GBBO several years ago. All the numbers are for Common Loons. However I had one Pacific Loon in Douglas County on October 14, 2012.
Date                    NV                    CA10/14/12              40                     84/5/13                  33                     39/11/13                  39/22/13                  3   10/9/13                56                    1810/20/13            112                    2611/2/13                  6                    74                11/24/13                                        5

DennisFernley, NV


From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
To: <NVBIRDS...>
Sent: Sunday, October 21, 2018 7:05 PM
Subject: Topaz Lake Loons-Followup

Hello!
I ended up seeing 44 Loons on the Nevada side of Topaz Lake this afternoon.  Afterwards, I drove to the south end of the lake in California and observed 21 more Loons.  Every Loon that I saw was a Common but there were a couple far out on the lake that I left unidentified but assumed that they were Common. 
Rob LowryCarson City


 

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Date: 10/21/18 9:45 pm
From: justin streit <000000260acb25c4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: ARCTIC TERN at Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve, Clark County
This afternoon, around 1 PM, I was alerted to a tern working the south shore of Pond 5 by HBP staff. I was told that the bird had been identified as a Common Tern. I was quickly able to locate the tern working the south shore and plunge-diving regularly. I noticed a medium-sized tern with a half black cap and mostly dark upperwings, so it seemed apparent that the bird was not a Forster's. I thought Common was a fine ID for the bird since that would be the next expected species, even though I did note that the bird did not have a very obvious carpal bar. Since I was in a time crunch, I snapped some photos and moved on. When I got home, I pulled up the photos to confirm the ID and noticed one very important character; the secondaries on this bird were gleaming white, without any hint of dark on the inner trailing edge on the wing, and the secondaries were much whiter than the rest of the upperwing. The lack of an obvious carpal bar was still apparent. A few more characters that stood out and helped to eliminate Common Tern were the extensively white underwings with extensive translucent primaries, thin dark trailing edge to the outer primaries, a small rounded head with a steep forehead, and a relatively small bill. All signs points to Arctic. Thanks to Alex Harper, Martin Meyers, and Greg Scyphers for confirming my reluctant ID! Checklist and photos on ebird.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49350476

Justin Streit
Las Vegas, NV
 

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Date: 10/21/18 9:08 pm
From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: 2018 Carson City Audubon Christmas Bird Count (CBC)
Hello!

Hard to believe that it is coming up so soon but the 2018 Carson City Christmas Bird Count (CBC) will take place on Sunday, December 16th.  We will meet at 7 AM at the Burger King at 3589 N. Carson Street across the street and a little north from the old McDonald's in northern Carson City (on the southeast corner of W. College Parkway and N. Carson Street, across N. Carson Street from Bully's) before dispersing into the count area.  The "tally rally" potluck dinner again will be at my house in east Carson City at the end of the day. 

If you know now that you plan on participating in the Carson City CBC, please e-mail me privately with your name or names of other participants. I will send out reminder e-mails the closer we get to that date.

Thanks!

Rob Lowry
Carson City
 

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Date: 10/21/18 7:05 pm
From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Topaz Lake Loons-Followup
Hello!
I ended up seeing 44 Loons on the Nevada side of Topaz Lake this afternoon.  Afterwards, I drove to the south end of the lake in California and observed 21 more Loons.  Every Loon that I saw was a Common but there were a couple far out on the lake that I left unidentified but assumed that they were Common. 
Rob LowryCarson City
 

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Date: 10/21/18 3:05 pm
From: rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Topaz Lake Loons
From one spot, have counted 33 Loons so far on the Nevada side of the lake.  All that have been identified so far have been Common Loons but there are a few farther out that have yet to be identified.  Lot of the Commons are doing their short hoot but a few have yodeled too, which is always cool.

Topaz Lake is in Douglas County about 15-20 miles south of Gardnerville.

Rob Lowry
Carson City


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 10/21/18 1:25 pm
From: John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...>
Subject: HBVP Bird List 10/15/2018 - 10/21/2018
Through November, the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve is open from 6 AM to 2 PM, with last entry 1:30.

Please wear a hat and sunscreen and have water with you on the preserve.

The property is on the north side of Galleria Dr., just west of the Animal Shelter, between Ward Dr. and Moser Dr. Phone 702 267 4180.

The following birds were seen or heard (H) and confirmed by staff during the week October 8 through October 14, 2018.



Canada Goose, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Cinnamon Teal, Northern Shoveler, Northern Pintail, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback, Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Ruddy Duck

Gambel's Quail

Pied-billed Grebe, Eared Grebe, Western Grebe

Double-crested Cormorant

Great Egret, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Black-crowned Night-Heron

White-faced Ibis

Osprey, Northern Harrier, Cooper's Hawk

Sora, Common Gallinule, American Coot

Killdeer

American Avocet, Greater Yellowlegs, Lesser Yellowlegs, Long-billed Dowitcher

Common Tern

Mourning Dove

Greater Roadrunner

Barn Owl, Great Horned Owl

Anna's Hummingbird, Costa's Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Northern Flicker

American Kestrel

Western Wood-Pewee, Gray Flycatcher, Black Phoebe, Say's Phoebe, Western Kingbird

Loggerhead Shrike

Common Raven

Tree Swallow, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Bank Swallow, Cliff Swallow, Barn Swallow

Verdin

Marsh Wren, Bewick's Wren

Black-tailed Gnatcatcher

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Crissal Thrasher

Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Townsend's Warbler

Abert's Towhee, Song Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow

Oregon Junco

Red-winged Blackbird, Great-tailed Grackle

House Finch

74

Happy Birding


John Taylor
Lead Recreation Assistant
Henderson Bird Preserve
350 E Galleria Drive
Henderson, NV 89015
(702) 267-4180
 

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Date: 10/21/18 12:46 pm
From: Rose Strickland <rosenreno...>
Subject: Harris’s Sparrow
In the middle of a fallout of Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Yellow-rumps, we found a Harris’s Sparrow @ Torrance Ranch north of Beatty. Rose

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/21/18 12:39 pm
From: Jeff Bleam <jcbleam...>
Subject: Las Field Trip: Rancho San Rafael
Six birders showed up and we were curious whether the 500 CANADA GEESE in
the grassy area would yield other geese. The answer to that was no. We
did find my First of Season (FOS) AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES as well as returning
WHITE-CROWNED and GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROWS. Along the Nature Trail we found
a GREAT HORNED OWL, a VIRGINIA RAIL calling from the cattails, a
RUBY-CROWNED and a surprise GOLDEN-CROWN KINGLET. We ended the walk with
41 species.

*Photos*
Photostream: https://www.flickr.com/photos/byjcb/
RSR Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHskzD63oL

*Cklists*
RSR: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49337930
RSR nature trail: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49338329

Jeff Bleam
Mt Rose Foothills, NV
byjcbphoto.com
 

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Date: 10/19/18 8:26 pm
From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: American Dippers-Silver Saddle Ranch
Hello again!
This evening, I observed 2 American Dippers just below the Mexican Dam at Silver Saddle Ranch in east Carson City. Nothing earth-shattering but not very common at that location this time of year nonetheless.
Rob LowryCarson City
 

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Date: 10/19/18 8:21 pm
From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Gray Partridge-Santa Rosa Mountains, Thursday, Oct. 18th
Hello!
Yesterday evening, I observed 2 flocks of Gray Partridge (one flock of 17, another flock of 24) along National Canyon Road which runs off of Rte. 95 into the west side of the Santa Rosa Mountains about 66 miles north of Winnemucca (or about 8-10 miles south of the Nevada-Oregon state line in the Nevada town of McDermitt).  Each flock stood still for quite a long time in the waning light allowing the best looks that I have ever had of this species.
A few notes to mention.  There has been active exploratory drilling for gold at the head of the canyon this year. I talked with the Safety Manager for the drilling company and she indicated that drilling will continue into late fall and also will occur next year. She also mentioned that good reserves of gold have been found and the area will very likely be mined at some point after next year's drilling program ends.  With that said, during my visit yesterday and 2 or 3 previous visits this year, there was a lot of truck traffic (pick up trucks, utility trucks, etc.) up and down National Canyon Road. So, if one drives this road, there will be some "traffic" to deal with. Also, not sure what the impact from these activities will be on the wildlife and birdlife in the future. Furthermore, this road is essentially a rutted dirt jeep trail from Rte. 95 to the mouth of the canyon, so a high-clearance sturdy vehicle is highly recommended.
Rob LowryCarson City
 

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Date: 10/19/18 6:38 pm
From: justin streit <000000260acb25c4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Least Flycatcher Retraction - EMPIDS are TOUGH (and take lots of reading and careful study)!
It is with a little disappointment, a little bit of a bruised ego, and satisfied humility that I am officially retracting any claim of a Least Flycatcher at Floyd Lamb Park this week. On Wednesday morning, Ben Zyla found a small empid with bold, broad wingbars and a small bill, and we both agreed that the bird was: 1.) on the late side for a Dusky or Hammond's and 2.) Very brightly patterned in the wings. After studying the bird and ordering every birder on the scene (which was a lot) to fire off as many shots as their cameras could take, a few things stood out about this bird. First the bill was very small, with a completely orange-ish lower mandible. Second, the wings appeared to be sharply contrasting with bold/broad, white wingbars and broad white tertial linings. And third, the bird appeared to have one fairly bold complete eye-ring (the other side of the face appeared to be undergoing molt). All of these characters are good for a Least Flycatcher and the first two, in particular, are generally not seen with Hammond's locally. One particularly troubling thing about the bird that stood out right away, though, was that the primary projection (projection of the primary wing feathers past the secondaries and tertials) seemed rather long for a Least Flycatcher. However, the projection didn't seem to be long enough to be an obvious Hammond's projection and, at certain angles and in certain pictures, could look shortish. All things considered, the bird was shaping up pretty well to be a Least and the word went out that that's what we thought we had.

Hours of studying resources and chatting with local experts and skeptics later (Carl Lundblad, Martin Meyers, Michael Hilchey, Daniel Mitev, and, of course, Greg Scyphers), and...

It seems that we may have missed a few important details. One character that I knew was important, but was very hard to see, was the shape of the bill. Least Flycatcher should have a fairly broad bill with somewhat rounded edges. Hammond's and Dusky Flycatcher should be narrow and straight. Patrick (or Cynthia) Gaffey has probably the best photo of this character and it seems to be fairly clear-cut. In most photos, the bill looks small and somewhat narrow, but it is really hard to see the shape. In Patrick's checklist here (and he was photographing this bird at the same time as everyone in the original group), the third photo clearly shows the profile of a obviously narrow and very straight edged bill. That is knock one against Least.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49263137

The second problem, and this I have learned is a big one, is the molt timing in Empids. The Peterson Field Guide to Advanced Birding (a great resource) and the 2nd edition of the large Sibley both state clearly that Hammond's is one of three species of Empid that molts it's flight feathers (includes primaries, secondaries, and tertials) BEFORE migrating south, while still on the breeding grounds. Least Flycatcher molts these same feathers while on the wintering grounds of Central and South America. The former (Hammond's), when migrating through the southern U.S. should look fresh and oh so clean. The latter (Least) will look ragged, worn-down, and rather dingy. For all of those that were there, and even for some that saw photos later, this bird appeared to be very clean, with big broad (not worn down) wingbars (greater coverts), bright colors, and fresh looking primaries. This bird had already molted its wing feathers. This is a YUGE knock against Least. See photos of general color on any checklist from the morning of October 17th (Scott Krammer and I have some decent ones).

https://ebird.org/hotspot/L139900/activity

And then there are a couple of other issues that several birders have pointed out (listed above), including the teardrop shape to the one complete eye-ring, that freaking primary projection, which is admittedly long-ish, the irregular spacing of the primaries, the bright yellow color underneath, and the ragged crest in some photos. When it comes down to it, the only real knock against the bird still is the color of the lower mandible, which can be extremely varied in Empids.

So in conclusion, the bird has some traits that still don't make it an obvious Hammond's (totally ok to disagree with that even), but has several characters, especially when considered collectively, that make it a pretty strong case against Least.

A few takeaways. Get excited. There are a ton of great birds in southern Nevada this fall. And admittedly we could have screwed up this bird a little because a freaking Wood Thrush took our attention away. It's a good thing to look for rarities. And to even be thinking that a Hammond's would be late so this bird could have been something else is ok. But don't let that blind your better judgement. Rarities are around right now. But not every bird that doesn't quite fit a mold is necessarily a bird that breeds on the east coast. It might just be a weird or slightly "off" individual. Or maybe you're just not totally educated (talking about myself here) on the intricacies of molt timing in the maddening genus that is Empidonax. That's ok. Change your checklist! Learn that it's just fine to be wrong. Get back out. And have fun.

Steven King said once about writing that you have to kill your babies. I think, strangely, that that applies to birding as well. So bye, bye little baby Least. I'll get you next time.
 

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Date: 10/19/18 4:21 pm
From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
Subject: White-fronted Geese in Reno
Today there were 4 White-fronted Geese in among the Canada's in the pond on the east side of the South East Connector (Veteran's Parkway) between Greg and  Pembroke. 
Dennis Serdehely
 

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Date: 10/18/18 8:23 pm
From: Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...>
Subject: WOOD THRUSH continues at Floyd Lamb
Hey All,

Heard from multiple Vegas birders that the Wood Thrush continued today at Floyd lamb. It had moved from the natural area to the pines near the "bowl" which is on the East side between the large and middle pond.

BZ
 

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Date: 10/18/18 10:27 am
From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
Subject: Re: A few odds and ends over the past couple of days including some interesting (but not rare) sparrows
My earliest fall records for White-throated Sparrow in Nevada were 10/10/04 and 9/29-9/30 2012 at Millers Rest Stop and 10/1/12 and 10/10/14 in Fernley.
Dennis Serdehely

From: Martin Meyers <Martin...>
To: <NVBIRDS...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 17, 2018 7:53 PM
Subject: A few odds and ends over the past couple of days including some interesting (but not rare) sparrows

Yesterday (10/16/18), I spent a few hours at the Nature Conservancy's
McCarran Ranch (Storey County portion). This is along the Truckee River
about a fifteen minute drive from Reno.  (Google McCarran Ranch Preserve
for information and directions.)

The riparian section along the river was rather unproductive, with a few
Mallards, one female Bufflehead, a Belted Kingfisher, three California
Scrub-Jays, and a few Yellow-rumped (Audubon's) Warblers.

Along the main path (which stays out of the riparian area for the most
part, going mostly through the dry, brushy section of the preserve),
there were lots of sparrows. Most were, as expected, White-crowns, with
a few Golden-crowns and Song Sparrows mixed in. But a pleasant surprise
was a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW (tan-striped.)  This is pretty much right
on time -- I have never had one in the fall in Nevada before the first
week of October, but during the first couple of weeks in October, I've
encountered them in multiple years and multiple locations. Most were
from southern Nevada -- my earliest in northern Nevada was at Pyramid
Lake on 10/10/2013.

Today (10/17/18), I hiked the North Canyon Trail to Marlette Lake
(Spooner Lake State Park).  A perfect day for hiking -- clear skies,
very little wind, the classic cool, crisp fall day.  Fall colors varied
from small groves of spectacular colors to mostly sort of pale yellow in
the aspens.  The trail was full of birds -- the usual suspects --
Mountain Chickadee, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, Northern
Flicker (Red-shafted), Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglet (the GC
Kinglets cooperated for some very nice photos), Steller's Jays, one
Hermit Thrush, a calling Townsend's Solitaire, some Common Ravens, and
lots of Dark-eyed Juncos.  Among the juncos was one "SLATE-COLORED"
JUNCO. Not unlike the White-throated Sparrow mentioned previously, this
bird was pretty much right on time.  I usually see my first ones in fall
in the first couple of weeks of October.  I've never had one in northern
Nevada before 10/5.

The one mild but pleasant surprise today on the North Canyon Trail was a
"SOOTY" FOX SPARROW.  I have observed these coastal breeders in the
Reno/Tahoe area a number of times, and they seem to almost always show
up in October, so this one was also "right on time".  In southern and
central Nevada, I've also had them as early as September at the desert
vagrant traps.

Alas, the most recent sighting of a "Sooty" Fox Sparrow for me prior to
today was just over a month ago in the middle of the Bering Sea.  Not
quite the bird Greg Scyphers and I traveled to Gambell (St. Paul Island)
in hopes of seeing. (And we saw several of them.)  Off topic, since it's
a long way from Nevada, but for anyone interested, I've put about a
hundred photos from that recent trip on my website (address below).
Click on "Photo Galleries" if you're interested.

Martin
---------------
Martin Meyers
email: Martin  (...AT...) SierraBirdbum.com
Photo website: http://SierraBirdbum.com
Truckee, CA


 

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Date: 10/17/18 7:53 pm
From: Martin Meyers <Martin...>
Subject: A few odds and ends over the past couple of days including some interesting (but not rare) sparrows
Yesterday (10/16/18), I spent a few hours at the Nature Conservancy's
McCarran Ranch (Storey County portion). This is along the Truckee River
about a fifteen minute drive from Reno. (Google McCarran Ranch Preserve
for information and directions.)

The riparian section along the river was rather unproductive, with a few
Mallards, one female Bufflehead, a Belted Kingfisher, three California
Scrub-Jays, and a few Yellow-rumped (Audubon's) Warblers.

Along the main path (which stays out of the riparian area for the most
part, going mostly through the dry, brushy section of the preserve),
there were lots of sparrows. Most were, as expected, White-crowns, with
a few Golden-crowns and Song Sparrows mixed in. But a pleasant surprise
was a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW (tan-striped.) This is pretty much right
on time -- I have never had one in the fall in Nevada before the first
week of October, but during the first couple of weeks in October, I've
encountered them in multiple years and multiple locations. Most were
from southern Nevada -- my earliest in northern Nevada was at Pyramid
Lake on 10/10/2013.

Today (10/17/18), I hiked the North Canyon Trail to Marlette Lake
(Spooner Lake State Park). A perfect day for hiking -- clear skies,
very little wind, the classic cool, crisp fall day. Fall colors varied
from small groves of spectacular colors to mostly sort of pale yellow in
the aspens. The trail was full of birds -- the usual suspects --
Mountain Chickadee, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Brown Creeper, Northern
Flicker (Red-shafted), Ruby-crowned and Golden-crowned Kinglet (the GC
Kinglets cooperated for some very nice photos), Steller's Jays, one
Hermit Thrush, a calling Townsend's Solitaire, some Common Ravens, and
lots of Dark-eyed Juncos. Among the juncos was one "SLATE-COLORED"
JUNCO. Not unlike the White-throated Sparrow mentioned previously, this
bird was pretty much right on time. I usually see my first ones in fall
in the first couple of weeks of October. I've never had one in northern
Nevada before 10/5.

The one mild but pleasant surprise today on the North Canyon Trail was a
"SOOTY" FOX SPARROW. I have observed these coastal breeders in the
Reno/Tahoe area a number of times, and they seem to almost always show
up in October, so this one was also "right on time". In southern and
central Nevada, I've also had them as early as September at the desert
vagrant traps.

Alas, the most recent sighting of a "Sooty" Fox Sparrow for me prior to
today was just over a month ago in the middle of the Bering Sea. Not
quite the bird Greg Scyphers and I traveled to Gambell (St. Paul Island)
in hopes of seeing. (And we saw several of them.) Off topic, since it's
a long way from Nevada, but for anyone interested, I've put about a
hundred photos from that recent trip on my website (address below).
Click on "Photo Galleries" if you're interested.

Martin
---------------
Martin Meyers
email: Martin (...AT...) SierraBirdbum.com
Photo website: http://SierraBirdbum.com
Truckee, CA
 

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Date: 10/17/18 6:59 pm
From: Martin Meyers <NevadaBirdRecords...>
Subject: About Wood Thrush and Least Flycatcher
Just a reminder -- Wood Thrush is a state review species, and
documentation of this great find should be sent to the NBRC. There have
been three endorsed records for observations since 2003 (plus three more
before 2003, but records preceding 2003 are not used in determining
whether a species remains on the review list.)

Least Flycatcher is no longer on the review list.  There are nine
endorsed records for observations since 2003. (There are also two
pending records which were submitted before the species was removed from
the review list.)

As pointed out in a rather lengthy email earlier this year, the
committee has revised the criteria for the review list.  Under the
revised criteria, species remain on the review list until there are five
endorsed records for observations since 2003.

Species with five or more such endorsed records can be returned to the
review list if the committee chooses to do so (the vote to return a
species to the review list requires that there be no more than one
negative vote.)  Western Gull, which has exactly five endorsed records
for observations since 2003, was removed from the review list. However,
the committee has voted to return it to the review list since there have
been only two endorsed records in the past ten years, and all committee
members felt that it would be a good idea to keep reviewing the species
for the time being.

Martin
p.s. Northern Saw-whet Owl is not on the review list.  While it is
always a great joy to encounter one, it is a known breeder in the state.

--
---------------------------------------------------------------
Martin Meyers
Secretary, Nevada Bird Records Committee (NBRC)
Website: https://www.gbbo.org/nbrc
Email: NevadaBirdRecords ***AT SIGN*** gbbo *** DOT *** org
---------------------------------------------------------------


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 10/17/18 3:55 pm
From: Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...>
Subject: WOOD THRUSH at Floyd Lamb Park, Las Vegas
Hey All,

As Neil stated already is his sum up of Floyd Lamb this morning, there was a WOOD THRUSH along the creek bed adjacent from the back group picnic area this morning near the "natural area". It was first secretive but then showed nicely on the grass for multiple Vegas birders around 0900. While in the thick veg, it gave several diagnostic calls.

There was also a Empid flycatcher that looks like a Probable LEAST. It was seen in the same area as the Wood Thrush, near the back picnic area. Many photos were taken of this bird and the conclusion is leaning towards LEFL.


Cheers,

BZ
 

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Date: 10/17/18 3:17 pm
From: rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Lesser Black-Backed Gull, Washoe Lake
Just observed the referenced bird resting offshore amongst the California and Ring-Billed Gulls at the Bellevue Road exit of Washoe Lake off of Rte. 580 just north of Carson City.

Rob Lowry
Carson City


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 10/17/18 2:13 pm
From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
Subject: Re: Pyramid Lake-Surf Scoters
I birded Pyramid Lake today and had a female Surf Scoter off shore from the Sutcliffe Marina store. I did not see any from Warrior Point.
Dennis Serdehely

From: rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
To: <NVBIRDS...>
Sent: Sunday, October 14, 2018 3:03 PM
Subject: Pyramid Lake-Surf Scoters

Currently 2 just offshore at Warrior Point.
Rob LowryCarson City


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


 

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Date: 10/17/18 2:07 pm
From: Neil McDonal <00000110fb120f04-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Floyd Lamb Park & multiple good birds
This morning, Ben Zyla accompanied by Justin Streit and others found a host of good birds. These included a probable Least Flycatcher and a definite Wood Thrush in the group picnic area and a Clay-colored Sparrow in the Pine grove south of the lower lake. The Wood Thrush was also re-seen in this area. The Northern Saw-whet Owl was unfortunately not re-seen. The White-throated Sparrow was observed again east of the lower (lowest) lake. All in all, a very exciting morning for birding in southern Nevada.


On a separate and unrelated note, the biologist at Corn Creek who hosted the bird feeder on the edge of the orchard for the last couple of years has recently moved to another job elsewhere. I recently purchased a Nyjer seed feeder and have put it up in about the same spot so we might continue the tradition of getting a few more interesting vagrants in the area. If any of you see any good birds at the feeder and want to help keep the feeder filled, I would certainly appreciate any donations toward purchasing more seed (or seed donations). If you want to give a dollar or two, just drop in the visitor center and give the volunteer your donation and say it’s for Neil’s bird feeder. And no, the donations are not tax deductible. ;)

Thanks and good birding.

Neil M
Las Vegas

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 10/16/18 8:40 pm
From: justin streit <000000260acb25c4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Northern Saw-whet Owl and Clay-colored Sparrow top this list at Floyd Lamb Park, Clark County
A truly special afternoon at Floyd Lamb today with lots of interesting things going on. Finished with (I think) my first Vegas Valley Steller's Jay, preceded by an early-ish White-throated Sparrow and a late-ish Cassin's Vireo. But the two best birds were an adult CLAY-COLORED SPARROW in a mixed flock of sparrows southeast of the second pond and a NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL in the first tree immediately west of the infamous Bench 40. Awesome to see this tiny owl in broad daylight perched just 20 feet up, standing on a rodent of some kind that it presumably caught the night before. Very cool to be truly surprised after 15 years of birding in the desert. A great day. Photos in my ebird checklist below.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49243649

Justin Streit
Las Vegas, NV
 

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Date: 10/14/18 4:34 pm
From: Rick Fridell <rfridell...>
Subject: Primm Cape May Warbler
Hello,

I just heard from Seth Topham that the Cape May Warbler is still lingering at Primm this afternoon (10/14). It’s most often observed in the acacias/mesquite trees around the parking lot between Buffalo Bill Casino and the I-15 Northbound on ramp.

Regards,

Rick Fridell
Hurricane, UT
 

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Date: 10/14/18 3:03 pm
From: rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Pyramid Lake-Surf Scoters
Currently 2 just offshore at Warrior Point.
Rob LowryCarson City


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 10/14/18 1:32 pm
From: John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...>
Subject: HBVP Bird List 10/8/2018 - 10/14/2018
Through November, the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve is open from 6 AM to 2 PM, with last entry 1:30.

Please wear a hat and sunscreen and have water with you on the preserve.

The property is on the north side of Galleria Dr., just west of the Animal Shelter, between Ward Dr. and Moser Dr. Phone 702 267 4180.

The following birds were seen or heard (H) and confirmed by staff during the week October 8 through October 14, 2018.



Canada Goose, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Cinnamon Teal, Northern Shoveler, Northern Pintail, Green-winged Teal, Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, Bufflehead, Ruddy Duck

Gambel's Quail

Pied-billed Grebe, Eared Grebe, Western Grebe

Double-crested Cormorant, Neotropic Cormorant

American Bittern, Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Black-crowned Night-Heron

White-faced Ibis

Turkey Vulture

Osprey, Northern Harrier, Sharp-shinned Hawk, Cooper's Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk

Common Gallinule, American Coot

Killdeer

American Avocet, Spotted Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs, Long-billed Dowitcher, Wilson's Snipe, Red-necked Phalarope

California Gull

Eurasian Collared-Dove, Mourning Dove

Greater Roadrunner

Great Horned Owl

Lesser Nighthawk

Vaux's Swift

Anna's Hummingbird, Costa's Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Northern Flicker

American Kestrel, Peregrine Falcon

Black Phoebe, Say's Phoebe

Loggerhead Shrike

Common Raven

Tree Swallow, Violet-green Swallow, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Bank Swallow, Cliff Swallow, Barn Swallow

Verdin

Marsh Wren, Bewick's Wren

Black-tailed Gnatcatcher

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Crissal Thrasher

American Pipit

Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated Gray Warbler

Spotted Towhee, Abert's Towhee, Chipping Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow

Red-winged Blackbird, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Great-tailed Grackle

House Finch

84

Happy Birding

John Taylor
Lead Recreation Assistant
Henderson Bird Preserve
350 E Galleria Drive
Henderson, NV 89015
(702) 267-4180
 

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Date: 10/13/18 7:32 am
From: Jeff Bleam <jcbleam...>
Subject: LAS Field Trip: Cottonwood Park and UNR Ag Fields
The cool weather is upon us but the sun was out warming us and the birds.
We started out at Cottonwood Park and found 12 species without moving.
Raptors were KESTREL chasing a MERLIN, and RED-TAIL HAWKS. The only
waterfowl were COMMON MERGANSER, MALLARDS, CANADA GEESE, and PIED-BILL
GREBE. The WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS were back in force with over 150, also
GOLDEN-CROWNED, SAVANNAH, and SONG SPARROW. With Veteran's Parkway open,
we crossed the bridge over the Truckee River where we counted 34 RED-TAIL
HAWKS, 7 KESTRELS, HARRIER, PRAIRIE FALCON, COOPER'S HAWK, and a MERLIN.
There were GREAT EGRETS, GREAT-BLUE HERON, RAVEN, over 65 CROWS, and 100+
AMERICAN PIPITS in the fields. We ended the walk with 47 species.

Photostream: https://www.flickr.com/photos/byjcb/
CP Album: https://www.flickr.com/photos/byjcb/
UNR Ag Album: https://www.flickr.com/photos/byjcb/

CP cklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49156465
UNR Ag cklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49156486

Jeff Bleam
Mt Rose Foothills, NV
byjcbphoto.com
 

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Date: 10/10/18 5:19 pm
From: Neil McDonal <00000110fb120f04-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Palm Warbler at Jean NV (lawn patch)
Today, Tom C and I went out to Jean, and on our return trip after leaving a pretty slow and in-noteworthy Primm, we refound the Palm Warbler that Ben Zyla reported yesterday at Jean. For those unfamiliar with Jean, it is about 10 miles east of Primm and just a wee bit more from the California Border. Find the 18 wheeler parking just west of the access road after leaving the off ramp road to the casino (south of I-15); Terribles Chevron is located on the north side if I-15 as a reference. The lawn patch(es) sort of string along the south side of the east bound off ramp road and follow past the last obvious patch until you hit the lawn (weed) patch very near the Jumbotron type sign for the casino. The sign is visible from a ways but the last patch isn’t until you get close to it.

Quite a bit of activity here by sparrows and multiple species of warblers.

Good birding!

Neil M

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 10/10/18 5:07 pm
From: Karen Havlena <000000fb2f11d97c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fwd: Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
> Hi NV Birders,
>
> Below are Jon Dunn’s comments agreeing with Paul Lehman - Eastern type Bell’s Vireo.
>
> Karen Havlena
> Reno, NV
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>> From: Jon Dunn
>> Date: October 10, 2018 at 4:23:02 PM PDT
>> To: Karen Havlena <jkh>
>> Subject: Re: Fw: ApparentYELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
>>
>>
>>> From: Jon Dunn <
>>> To: Karen Havlena <jkhav>
>>> Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 3:14 PM
>>> Subject: Re: Fw: Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
>>>
>>> Agreed. Looks like an Eastern Bell's. Those pale tertial edges aren't right for Yellow-green and the face pattern is Bell's. Agree that it is an eastern type.
>>>
>>> Jon
>>>
>>> On Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 2:56 PM Karen Havlena wrote:
>
>>> Hi Jon,
>>> Could you look at the photos of this bird. The bill looks very long and wide at the base. Paul leans heavily toward Eastern Bell's Vireo.
>>>
>>> The link to eBird is in the bottom-most post. Thank you,
>>> Karen
>>>
>>> ----- Forwarded Message -----
>>> From: Neil McDonal <00000110fb120f04-dmarc-request...>
>>> To: <NVBIRDS...>
>>> Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 2:04 PM
>>> Subject: Re: Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> This is certainly an interesting bird! Perhaps its species may prove to be indeterminate, particularly without additional information. Being more foolish than brave, I will wade in and say that the bill looks particularly long compared to the many western Bell’s Vireos I have seen here and particularly Arizona, but maybe the eastern race is longer billed. I would note that the second picture, the eye when blown up some does appear a little reddish. This might be an artifact of the lighting, who knows.
>>>
>>> So I agree with Carl that more pictures/data are needed and I don’t know if Vireos are prone to any hybridization, but that could certainly yield a confusing bird like this one. In some ways, this bird reminds me quite a bit of the mystery vireo we had on the Audubon trip to Oliver Ranch recently but we didn’t have any decent pictures to put together the clues.
>>>
>>> Neil M
>>> Las Vegas
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>> > On Oct 10, 2018, at 9:46 AM, Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...> wrote:
>>> > Hi All,
>>> >
>>> > I probably jumped the gun on calling this a Yellow-green (it's certainly
>>> > not a Red-eyed, either). The weak/plain facial pattern, apparent wing bar,
>>> > and other things (the description says the iris was red, but it looks dark
>>> > in the photo) suggest this is not a Yellow-green and may instead be a
>>> > Bell's Vireo. Paul Lehman, at first glance, suggested that it could be an
>>> > Eastern Bell's which is also a very interesting sighting for Nevada (if
>>> > confirm-able) and a potential future split.
>>> >
>>> > Apologies for the confusion. Still would be a nice bird for others to go
>>> > refind and gain additional documentation.
>>> > Good Birding,
>>> >
>>> > Carl Lundblad
>>> > Moscow, ID
>>> >
>>> > On Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 9:06 AM Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
>>> > wrote:
>>> >> Hi All,
>>> >>
>>> >> Debbi Senechal photographed a vireo at the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve
>>> >> on Tuesday morning which appears to be a YELLOW-GREEN VIREO. This was just
>>> >> one day after Ben Zyla found a Red-eyed at the same location, but this is
>>> >> quite clearly a different bird. Photos are in Debbi's eBird checklist (
>>> >> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49090847), but I have no other details
>>> >> at this time.
>>> >> Good Birding and Good Luck!
>>> >>
>>> >> Carl Lundblad
>>> >> Moscow, ID
>>> >>
 

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Date: 10/10/18 2:04 pm
From: Neil McDonal <00000110fb120f04-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
This is certainly an interesting bird! Perhaps its species may prove to be indeterminate, particularly without additional information. Being more foolish than brave, I will wade in and say that the bill looks particularly long compared to the many western Bell’s Vireos I have seen here and particularly Arizona, but maybe the eastern race is longer billed. I would note that the second picture, the eye when blown up some does appear a little reddish. This might be an artifact of the lighting, who knows.

So I agree with Carl that more pictures/data are needed and I don’t know if Vireos are prone to any hybridization, but that could certainly yield a confusing bird like this one. In some ways, this bird reminds me quite a bit of the mystery vireo we had on the Audubon trip to Oliver Ranch recently but we didn’t have any decent pictures to put together the clues.

Neil M
Las Vegas

Sent from my iPad

> On Oct 10, 2018, at 9:46 AM, Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...> wrote:
>
> Hi All,
>
> I probably jumped the gun on calling this a Yellow-green (it's certainly
> not a Red-eyed, either). The weak/plain facial pattern, apparent wing bar,
> and other things (the description says the iris was red, but it looks dark
> in the photo) suggest this is not a Yellow-green and may instead be a
> Bell's Vireo. Paul Lehman, at first glance, suggested that it could be an
> Eastern Bell's which is also a very interesting sighting for Nevada (if
> confirm-able) and a potential future split.
>
> Apologies for the confusion. Still would be a nice bird for others to go
> refind and gain additional documentation.
>
> Good Birding,
>
> Carl Lundblad
> Moscow, ID
>
> On Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 9:06 AM Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> Debbi Senechal photographed a vireo at the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve
>> on Tuesday morning which appears to be a YELLOW-GREEN VIREO. This was just
>> one day after Ben Zyla found a Red-eyed at the same location, but this is
>> quite clearly a different bird. Photos are in Debbi's eBird checklist (
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49090847), but I have no other details
>> at this time.
>>
>> Good Birding and Good Luck!
>>
>> Carl Lundblad
>> Moscow, ID
>>
 

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Date: 10/10/18 9:46 am
From: Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
Subject: Re: Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
Hi All,

I probably jumped the gun on calling this a Yellow-green (it's certainly
not a Red-eyed, either). The weak/plain facial pattern, apparent wing bar,
and other things (the description says the iris was red, but it looks dark
in the photo) suggest this is not a Yellow-green and may instead be a
Bell's Vireo. Paul Lehman, at first glance, suggested that it could be an
Eastern Bell's which is also a very interesting sighting for Nevada (if
confirm-able) and a potential future split.

Apologies for the confusion. Still would be a nice bird for others to go
refind and gain additional documentation.

Good Birding,

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, ID

On Wed, Oct 10, 2018 at 9:06 AM Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> Debbi Senechal photographed a vireo at the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve
> on Tuesday morning which appears to be a YELLOW-GREEN VIREO. This was just
> one day after Ben Zyla found a Red-eyed at the same location, but this is
> quite clearly a different bird. Photos are in Debbi's eBird checklist (
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49090847), but I have no other details
> at this time.
>
> Good Birding and Good Luck!
>
> Carl Lundblad
> Moscow, ID
>
 

Back to top
Date: 10/10/18 9:06 am
From: Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
Subject: Apparent YELLOW-GREEN VIREO at Henderson BVP
Hi All,

Debbi Senechal photographed a vireo at the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve
on Tuesday morning which appears to be a YELLOW-GREEN VIREO. This was just
one day after Ben Zyla found a Red-eyed at the same location, but this is
quite clearly a different bird. Photos are in Debbi's eBird checklist (
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49090847), but I have no other details at
this time.

Good Birding and Good Luck!

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, ID
 

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Date: 10/9/18 4:38 pm
From: Carl Lundblad <carl.lundblad...>
Subject: Re: Primm and Jean Patch Locations
Thanks, Ben, for those details. It might be worth noting that the name
"Primm Forest Preserve" was presumably adopted as a cheeky joke and isn't
an official name or an official "preserve" (perhaps a source of
confusion). Don't go there expecting to find a conservation-oriented
project/property, but do go there expecting a lush patch of southern Nevada
urban landscaping and lots of birds (at least during migration).

Good Luck!

Carl Lundblad
Moscow, ID

On Tue, Oct 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...> wrote:

> Hey All,
>
> I was asked to give a little more detail on some of the Jean and Primm
> locations along Interstate 15 heading towards L.A.
>
> The Jean Lawn Patch are several small patches of grass between the on and
> off ramps for the exit of Jean. The main one is between the I15 Northbound
> OFF ramp and the rows of Oleander that edge the main parking lot of the
> Goldstrike Casino and Hotel. If you park on the other side of the "hedge
> rows", you can either walk around the fence or find a hole in it and walk
> out into the grass. The grass is high now and has birds foraging in it.
> It's a little shorter across the OFF ramp road and also can have birds in
> it.
>
> Primm has several spots. The "Forest Preserve" is now an eBird Hotspot and
> can be found using the eBird website: https://ebird.org/hotspot/L6303208.
> It is between the monorail, E Primm Blvd, and Primm Valley Blvd. It doesn't
> have much to it but has had many noteworthy birds.
>
> Another spot is getting labeled Primm, but it is actually the patch of
> grass and trees that are on the RIGHT side of the I15 Northbound ON ramp
> going to Vegas. There is a parking lot that you can park and walk around
> the fence to access this. It is not very big but has been very birdy
> recently.
>
> Those are the main locations that I and others check. If any other
> information is needed, please just get at me.
>
> Best,
>
> BZ
>
 

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Date: 10/9/18 4:23 pm
From: Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...>
Subject: Primm and Jean Patch Locations
Hey All,

I was asked to give a little more detail on some of the Jean and Primm locations along Interstate 15 heading towards L.A.

The Jean Lawn Patch are several small patches of grass between the on and off ramps for the exit of Jean. The main one is between the I15 Northbound OFF ramp and the rows of Oleander that edge the main parking lot of the Goldstrike Casino and Hotel. If you park on the other side of the "hedge rows", you can either walk around the fence or find a hole in it and walk out into the grass. The grass is high now and has birds foraging in it. It's a little shorter across the OFF ramp road and also can have birds in it.

Primm has several spots. The "Forest Preserve" is now an eBird Hotspot and can be found using the eBird website: https://ebird.org/hotspot/L6303208. It is between the monorail, E Primm Blvd, and Primm Valley Blvd. It doesn't have much to it but has had many noteworthy birds.

Another spot is getting labeled Primm, but it is actually the patch of grass and trees that are on the RIGHT side of the I15 Northbound ON ramp going to Vegas. There is a parking lot that you can park and walk around the fence to access this. It is not very big but has been very birdy recently.

Those are the main locations that I and others check. If any other information is needed, please just get at me.

Best,

BZ
 

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Date: 10/7/18 6:23 pm
From: Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...>
Subject: RED-EYED VIREO at Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve
Hey All,

I observed a Red-eyed Vireo at the HBVP this morning. It was foraging on both sides of the western most path, both in mesquites and Cottonwoods and remained silent the whole time.


It came in close for a few pictures: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49032484

Best,

BZ
 

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Date: 10/7/18 12:08 pm
From: John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...>
Subject: HBVP Bird List 10/1/2018 - 10/7/2018
Through November, the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve is open from 6 AM to 2 PM, with last entry 1:30.

Please wear a hat and sunscreen and have water with you on the preserve.

The property is on the north side of Galleria Dr., just west of the Animal Shelter, between Ward Dr. and Moser Dr. Phone 702 267 4180.

The following birds were seen or heard (H) and confirmed by staff during the week October 1 through October 7, 2018.



Canada Goose, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Cinnamon Teal, Northern Shoveler, Northern Pintail, Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck

Gambel's Quail

Pied-billed Grebe, Eared Grebe, Western Grebe

Neotropic Cormorant, Double-crested Cormorant

American White Pelican

Least Bittern, Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Black-crowned Night-Heron

White-faced Ibis

Turkey Vulture

Northern Harrier, Red-shouldered Hawk, Cooper's Hawk

Sora, Common Gallinule, American Coot

Killdeer

American Avocet, Greater Yellowlegs, Long-billed Dowitcher, Wilson's Snipe

Mourning Dove

Greater Roadrunner

Barn Owl, Great Horned Owl

Costa's Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Northern Flicker

American Kestrel, Peregrine Falcon

Black Phoebe, Say's Phoebe

Loggerhead Shrike

Tree Swallow, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Barn Swallow

Verdin

Marsh Wren

Black-tailed Gnatcatcher

Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated Gray Warbler

Abert's Towhee, Song Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow

Red-winged Blackbird, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Great-tailed Grackle

House Finch

64

Happy Birding


John Taylor
Lead Recreation Assistant
Henderson Bird Preserve
350 E Galleria Drive
Henderson, NV 89015
(702) 267-4180
 

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Date: 10/7/18 9:38 am
From: Darlene Feener <darlenemfeener...>
Subject: Cornell Lab e-Bird October Big Day!
About a week ago I received an e-mail from Cornell Lab e-Bird about their October 6, Big Day birding adventure. By spending time a week before this event I checked various areas in Pahrump and Amargosa Valley for different species of birds. Choosing the following places was based on that week before searching for birds on October 6th,

Artesia, Ash-Meadows, Bowman (private property), Burrowing Owl area, Discovery Park, Homestead Road, Jane, Lakeside and Lakeview held the most promise for seeing different species. The result was (67) species for the day.

A bit of rain, blowing wind and dirt made the day exciting and challenging. Some species I expected to see were not in the areas I expected them to be in and some areas had birds that were a surprise. Below is the list of species seen on October 6, 2018.

Snow Goose
Canada Goose
Blue-winged Teal
Cinnamon Teal
Northern Shoveler
American Wigeon
Mallard
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Ruddy Duck
Gambel's Quail
Pied-billed Grebe
Eared Grebe
Western Grebe
Double-crested Cormorant
Great Blue-Heron
Great Egret
Northern Harrier
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Ferruginous Hawk
American Coot
Killdeer
Red-necked Phalarope
Greater Yellowlegs
Ring-billed Gull
Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Barn Owl
Burrowing Owl
White throated-Swift
Anna's Hummingbird
Costa's Hummingbird
Belted Kingfisher
Northern Flicker
American Kestrel
Prairie Falcon
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Vermilion Flycatcher
Loggerhead Shrike
American Crow
Common Raven
Horned Lark
Cliff Swallow
Verdin
Western Bluebird
Northern Mockingbird
Phainopepla
Common Yellowthroat
Yellow Warbler
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Brewer's Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Lincoln Sparrow
Red-winged Blackbird
Western Meadowlark
Great-tailed Grackle
Brown-headed Cowbird
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch
American Goldfinch
House Sparrow

By Darlene Feener
<darlenemfeener...>
 

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Date: 10/6/18 9:44 pm
From: Martin Meyers <Martin...>
Subject: Greater Scaup and Golden-crowned Sparrow at Sparks Marina today
On a late afternoon walk around Sparks Marina today, I had one very
unusual and one sort of early sighting. The very unusual one was a male
Greater Scaup. Greater Scaup is common at Pyramid Lake, where they
typically show up about the middle of October, and on the south shore of
Lake Tahoe at Tahoe Keys. But I've only seen Greaters on two other
occasions in Reno, one at Christmas Count time in 2015, when one hung
around at the pond at Grand Sierra Resort, and probably a pair at
Virginia Lake in December 1999 (I've never felt comfortable with
identifying female Scaup, but the male was identifiable.).

The sort of early one was a Golden-crowned Sparrow. My earliest in Reno
was at Oxbow on 9/29/95. I usually see them in late fall and winter,
some remaining into early spring.

No unusual gulls today at Sparks Marina, but a really neat rainbow!

Here's a complete list:

Gadwall
Mallard
Greater Scaup 1
Ruddy Duck 1
Pied-billed Grebe 14
Eared Grebe 10
Rock Pigeon
American Coot
Killdeer 3
Ring-billed Gull 30
California Gull 2000
Double-crested Cormorant 13
Black-crowned Night-Heron 6
House Sparrow
Golden-crowned Sparrow 1

Martin

---------------
Martin Meyers
email: Martin (...AT...) SierraBirdbum.com
Photo website: http://SierraBirdbum.com
Truckee, CA

 

Back to top
Date: 10/6/18 3:48 pm
From: Paul Hurtado <paul.j.hurtado...>
Subject: Re: Gull ID help needed
I'm currently watching what looks like Martin's gull at the Bellvue exit at
Washoe Lake. I'm leaning towards Lesser Black-backed but I'll try and get
more photos to help with the ID.

There's also a lone Greater White-fronted Goose here.

Paul Hurtado
Reno

On Thu, Oct 4, 2018, 7:34 PM Martin Meyers <martin...> wrote:

>
>
>
> There was a gull at Sparks Marina late this afternoon that has me a bit
> confused (nothing new in that).I expect it is likely a Lesser Black-back,
> but it bothers me. The head seems unusually dark for what I assume to be
> second cycle (although I'm not sure about the age, either.) The bill seems
> quite large and thick. It doesn't seem to have a pale tip, as I'd expect
> on 2nd cycle. There's a Cal Gull next to it for size comparison.
> The legs have a dull yellowish cast, eliminating Slaty-back and Western (I
> think.)
> I have no idea how to eliminate Kelp other than by the overwhelming
> likelihood that it's not. And I don't really have any other ideas.
> Probably just another Lesser Black-back, but I'd be very interested in
> hearing opinions.
> The only photos I got before a Red-tail flew over and scattered the gulls
> are of the one pose I've put on the web. The photo is
> at:SierraBirdbum.com/Dark_Gull_10-4-18
> Martin
>
> Martin MeyersTruckee, CA Photo website: http://SierraBirdbum.com
> Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
>
 

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Date: 10/5/18 5:50 pm
From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Pyramid Lake-Willows
Hello!


Earlier this afternoon, I stopped at the Willows to see what birds may be available offshore. While nothing uncommon or rare was observed, there were 26 Common Loons in the area. The smooth, tranquil lake surface coupled with the afternoon sun at my back allowed nice viewing conditions with my scope, one of which is definitely needed to see most of the birds. I did not spend much time in the Willows proper, but the only birds observed there were Ruby-Crowned Kinglets, a Kestrel, and Yellow-Rumped Warblers. I also briefly stopped at the south end of the lake, Popcorn Rock, North and South Nets Beaches, the marina, Warrior Point Beach, and Warrior Point. No birds of note were observed at those locations.


Just an aside that fishing season started at the lake this past Monday so there are a lot of fisherman out and about. Also, a reminder that if one typically purchases an annual permit to visit the lake, the new season (and thus the need for a new permit) also started this past Monday. A tribal permit (one-time or annual) is required for any activities at the lake other than those activities conducted from the highway.


Rob Lowry
Carson City
 

Back to top
Date: 10/4/18 7:34 pm
From: Martin Meyers <martin...>
Subject: Gull ID help needed



There was a gull at Sparks Marina late this afternoon that has me a bit confused (nothing new in that).I expect it is likely a Lesser Black-back, but it bothers me.  The head seems unusually dark for what I assume to be second cycle (although I'm not sure about the age, either.)  The bill seems quite large and thick.  It doesn't seem to have a pale tip, as I'd expect on 2nd cycle.  There's a Cal Gull next to it for size comparison.
The legs have a dull yellowish cast, eliminating Slaty-back and Western (I think.)
I have no idea how to eliminate Kelp other than by the overwhelming likelihood that it's not.  And I don't really have any other ideas.  
Probably just another Lesser Black-back, but I'd be very interested in hearing opinions.
The only photos I got before a Red-tail flew over and scattered the gulls are of the one pose I've put on the web.  The photo is at:SierraBirdbum.com/Dark_Gull_10-4-18
Martin

Martin MeyersTruckee, CA       Photo website: http://SierraBirdbum.com
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
 

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Date: 10/4/18 10:05 am
From: Kristen Comella <rfridell...>
Subject: Pahranagat NWR 10/3
Hello Nevada Birders,

I visited Pahranagat NWR (Lincoln Co.) yesterday (10/3) afternoon. Overall there were great numbers of birds present and I wished I had more time / light to look around.

Highlights included:

Sandhill Cranes (~35 - Middle Marsh / Lower Lake)
Sanderling (Upper Lake)
Broad-winged Hawk (juv - Upper Lake)
Northern Waterthrush (along road into Visitor's Center)
American Redstart (ad male - Middle Marsh isolated cottonwoods)
Chestnut-sided Warbler (Upper Lake)


Both the Broad-winged Hawk and the Chestnut-sided Warbler were in the trees between the main road and the upper lake (second group of trees as you come in from the north).

Here's a photo of the Broad-winged Hawk: http://www.pbase.com/rfridell/root&view=recent
and the Chestnut-sided Warbler: http://www.pbase.com/rfridell/image/168213350

Regards,
Rick Fridell
Hurricane, UT
 

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Date: 10/3/18 10:12 am
From: Karen Havlena <000000fb2f11d97c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Tonopah- Highland/Harvey Park 3 Oct ‘18
Just had an adult Gray Catbird about 9:35-am at the SE corner of Highland / Harvey Park, Nye County. It was calling actively, as it was being hassled by small passerines. Tried to photograph, but it wasn’t easy.

Karen Havlena
Reno, NV

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/2/18 10:11 am
From: Martin Meyers <martin...>
Subject: Uh, slight correction. Cape May is here


As I was driving out of the parking lot, I saw Jake Mohlman and John Yerger looking up intensely.  I stopped (probaby illegslly) and got great looks and photos of the Cape May!Same general area. Between Buffalo Bill's and the north on ramp  Martin

Martin MeyersTruckee, CA       Photo website: http://SierraBirdbum.com
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
 

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Date: 10/2/18 9:50 am
From: Martin Meyers <martin...>
Subject: Primm - could not refind Cape May


Added Am. Redstart and Nashville Warbler, but 2.5 hours failed to turn up the Cape May.  Others are still looking.  Still lots of warblers around.
Martin


Martin MeyersTruckee, CA       Photo website: http://SierraBirdbum.com
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/1/18 7:37 pm
From: Martin Meyers <martin...>
Subject: Cape May still present at Primm



I started looking around 4:00 p.m.. I finally got a brief but identifiable look at the Cape May Warbler around 6:15.
There are LOTS of warblers in the trees between Buffalo Bill casino and the northbound entry road to I-15.  Most are Yellow-rumps, followed by Orange-crowns, then by Yellows and Wilson's.  I saw one bird that was probably a Tennessee but did not get a good enough look to be sure.
I'm staying in Primm tonight.  I expect the birding to be even better here in the morning, if the weather doesn't mess things up.
Martin
Martin MeyersTruckee, CA       Photo website: http://SierraBirdbum.com
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/1/18 3:56 pm
From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
Subject: Pacific Wren in Fernley
This morning Becca found a Pacific Wren in our backyard. After several searches I finally saw the bird this afternoon at about 3:30. A yard, county and year bird! The Varied Thrush is also still present, coming to our water feature several times a day.
Dennis Serdehely
 

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Date: 10/1/18 11:50 am
From: L K Rhodes <00000113d2b579e9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Great Horned Owl Specimen
Alan Gubanich would likely help in some way.
<renopopop...>
‭(775) 857-0191‬

Take care.
Linda

💦💧❄️

Sent from my iPhone

> On Oct 1, 2018, at 10:39, Corey Lange <coreyjlange...> wrote:
>
> Hello All,
>
> Is there anyone in the Reno Area that has the permit and is willing to take
> a Great Horned Owl that was hit along Mt. Rose Hwy? The specimen is in
> great condition.
>
> Thanks,
>
> --
> Corey Lange
> 641.344.8122
 

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Date: 10/1/18 10:50 am
From: Will Richardson <will...>
Subject: Re: Great Horned Owl Specimen
Hi Corey,
Lahontan Audubon Society is your best bet:
https://www.nevadaaudubon.org/officers--trustees.html

Otherwise, UNR, and maybe Chris Feldman: <ophis...> <mailto:<ophis...>. We receive far more horned owls in our specimen than we can possibly use, sadly.
Along those lines, I counted 5 roadkilled Barn Owls along northbound 395 through Washoe Valley on Saturday morning.
Will

____________________
T. Will Richardson, Ph.D.
Executive Director
Tahoe Institute for Natural Science
530.412.2792
www.tinsweb.org
 

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Date: 10/1/18 10:40 am
From: Corey Lange <coreyjlange...>
Subject: Great Horned Owl Specimen
Hello All,

Is there anyone in the Reno Area that has the permit and is willing to take
a Great Horned Owl that was hit along Mt. Rose Hwy? The specimen is in
great condition.

Thanks,

--
Corey Lange
641.344.8122
 

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Date: 10/1/18 9:44 am
From: Greg Scyphers <scyph...>
Subject: Dickcissel and Northern Parula at Miller’s Rest Stop
Along with the Broad- winged Hawk which may have flown towards Tonopah there was also a calling Dickcissel seen well and a Northern Parula at Miller’s Rest Stop.

Greg Scyphers
Sparks, NV

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/1/18 9:08 am
From: Greg Scyphers <scyph...>
Subject: Broad-winged Hawk at Miller’s Rest Stop
There is currently a calling and flighty light morph Broad-winged Hawk moving all around Millers Rest Stop. Really nice photos were obtained.

Greg Scyphers
Sparks, NV

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/30/18 4:29 pm
From: Darlene Feener <darlenemfeener...>
Subject: Discovery Park: Pahrump, Nevada in Nye County
A beautiful morning to be birding. (51) species seen @ Discovery Park and three species at other areas in Pahrump. The Red-tailed Hawk was seen @ Calvada Eye Park, the Bewick's Wren and Black-throated Gray Warbler was seen at Shadowlane Christian Church off Red-Butte. Total of (54) species seen this morning. A Northern Waterthrush was seen between 8:39 a.m. to 8:54 a.m. at the newly created Red-Butte pond on Discovery Park.

Discovery Park:

Snow Goose
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Gadwall
American Wigeon
Mallard
Ring-necked Duck
Gambel's Quail
Pied-billed Grebe
Eared Grebe
Great Blue Heron
Sharp-shinned Hawk
Cooper's Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
American Coot
Killdeer
Spotted Sandpiper
Rock Pigeon
Eurasian-Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Greater Roadrunner
Anna's Hummingbird
Northern Flicker (Red-shafted)
American Kestrel
Black Phoebe
Say's Phoebe
Vermilion Flycatcher
Western Kingbird
Common Raven
Cliff Swallow
Verdin
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
American Robin
Sage Thrasher
European Starling
Northern Waterthrush
Orange-crowned Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Yellow rumped Warbler (Audubon's)
Wilson's Warbler
Chipping Sparrow
Brewer's Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
Lazuli Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird
Great-tailed Grackle
House Finch
Lesser Goldfinch
House Sparrow

Calvada Eye Park:

Red-tailed Hawk

Shadowlane Church parking lot:

Bewick's Wren
Black-throated Gray Warbler


Darlene Feener
 

Back to top
Date: 9/30/18 2:38 pm
From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
Subject: Re: Mason Valley WMA Follow-Up
Becca and I went to the Mason Valley WMA today to see if we could find the mysterious "orange-legged " sandpiper. We had no luck. In fact there were very few shorebirds present. At North Pond there were only 1 Killdeer, 1 Greater Yellowlegs and 2 avocets. There was in fact a lack of birds in general through out the refuge. We did however have one intriguing sighting. In a grove of cottonwoods and Russian olives near the rest rooms at the north end of the Wetlands Loop we had 2-3 scrub jays. They seemed wary and not very vocal but I did not get a good enough look to see a distinct collar or any other detail. Becca did think they had grayish under parts. Looking at the Delorme Atlas Mason Valley WMA looks like it is about 40 miles due east of the Pine Nut hydrid zone, so it maybe possible that it could be either species. However judging by under parts observed by Becca and these birds behavior I am leaning toward Woodhouse Scrub-Jay instead of California Scrub-Jay. Anybody birding this area may want to keep an eye out for these birds. By the way, the only scrub-jays I have seen in Lyon County were a lone California that spent the winter of 2014-2015 in our Fernley yard and a Woodhouse's Scrub-Jay seen along SR 338 near Sweetwater Summit in south Lyon County.
Dennis SerdehelyFernley, NV

From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
To: <NVBIRDS...>
Sent: Saturday, September 29, 2018 9:50 PM
Subject: Mason Valley WMA Follow-Up

Many "Thanks" to Paul Hurtado for getting the initial word out on the odd bird that I observed this afternoon at the North Pond of Mason Valley WMA. The water level in the North Pond is as low as I have seen it in years. Therefore, there are numerous islands and clumps of trees that are above-water in the southwestern section of the pond. When I first arrived at the North Pond and drove up the west side along the dirt path, I saw several birds resting on an island in the pond. These birds included Canada Geese, a few Pelicans and Egrets, some Killdeer, about 9 Dowitchers, and 20+ Yellowlegs. As I scoped the birds, I noticed one shorebird that appeared to have neon-orange legs that really were lit up by the sun at my back. I watched this bird for several minutes as it meticulously walked along the island shore. I decided to try to get a better vantage point so I moved south a little but when I looked for the bird, I noticed that it and all of the shorebirds weren't along that island anymore. Eventually I was able to relocate the odd bird, the Yellowlegs, and the Dowitchers feeding even farther out in the pond. There were over 20 Greater Yellowlegs that were frenetically pacing back and forth in the water as they fed. The odd bird was observed meticulously feeding near the Dowitchers and a couple of Yellowlegs. The bird was too far away to get a photo (I tried, nothing remotely turned out). I watched it for several minutes trying to note the various details of it, before it moved out of view and I never saw it again over the next hour or so.


Here are the characteristics that I observed:


1.    Long spindly obvious bright orange legs.
2.    Smaller than the Yellowlegs but bigger than the Dowitchers.
3.    The throat/chest area was light tan with what appeared to be a sharp demarcation between the tan and the white belly (much like a Pectoral Sandpiper).
4.    A straight bill that was obviously shorter in length than the Greater Yellowlegs but appeared to be similar in length to a Lesser Yellowlegs.
5.    The back and wings appeared to be solid smooth brown in color, much like an immature Solitary Sandpiper.
6.    It walked slower and more meticulous.
7.    I never did see it spread or open it's wings, nor did I see it fly.
8.    When looked at from behind, there was a white area on the top of the rump, which appeared to be visible because the wings weren't completely folded back to cover the rump top.


Any input would be appreciated. Hopefully, it will stay around long enough for others to find it and hopefully positively identify it.


Rob Lowry
Carson City


 

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Date: 9/30/18 11:11 am
From: John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...>
Subject: HBVP Bird List 9/23/2018 - 9/30/2018
From September through November, the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve is open from 6 AM to 2 PM, with last entry 1:30.

Please wear a hat and sunscreen and have water with you on the preserve.

The property is on the north side of Galleria Dr., just west of the Animal Shelter, between Ward Dr. and Moser Dr. Phone 702 267 4180.

The following birds were seen or heard (H) and confirmed by staff during the week September 24 Through September 30, 2018.



Greater White-fronted Goose, Canada Goose, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Cinnamon Teal, Northern Shoveler, Northern Pintail, Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck

Gambel's Quail

Pied-billed Grebe, Horned Grebe (leucistic), Eared Grebe, Western Grebe

Neotropic Cormorant, Double-crested Cormorant

Great Egret, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Black-crowned Night-Heron

White-faced Ibis

Turkey Vulture

Osprey, Northern Harrier, Cooper's Hawk

Sora, Common Gallinule, American Coot

Killdeer

Black-necked Stilt, American Avocet

Spotted Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs, Lesser Yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper, Long-billed Dowitcher

Eurasian Collared Dove, Mourning Dove

Greater Roadrunner

Black-chinned Hummingbird, Anna's Hummingbird, Costa's Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Northern Flicker

Western Wood-Pewee, Black Phoebe, Say's Phoebe

Loggerhead Shrike

Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Barn Swallow

Verdin

Marsh Wren

Black-tailed Gnatcatcher

Orange-crowned Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler

Abert's Towhee, White-crowned Sparrow

Red-winged Blackbird, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Great-tailed Grackle

House Finch

64

Happy Birding


John Taylor
Lead Recreation Assistant
Henderson Bird Preserve
350 E Galleria Drive
Henderson, NV 89015
(702) 267-4180
 

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Date: 9/30/18 8:16 am
From: Jeff Bleam <jcbleam...>
Subject: LAS Field Trip: Washoe Lake SP WMA
Hi everyone,

While we were gathering we saw a BALD EAGLE, HARRIERS, and a flyover of an
OSPREY. There were a few ducks but they flew off when we go within 100m of
them. There were MALLARDS, WIGEON, SHOVELER, RUDDY DUCKS and GREEN-WINGED
TEAL. Some of my favorites were COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, RED-NECKED PHALAROPE,
KINGFISHER, and a very cooperative VIRGINIA RAIL. We ended the walk with
46 species.

Photostream: https://www.flickr.com/photos/byjcb/
WLSP Album: https://flic.kr/s/aHsk5bLEte

ebird cklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48823022

Jeff Bleam
Mt Rose Foothills, NV
byjcbphoto.com
 

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Date: 9/29/18 10:05 pm
From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: MAson Valley WMA Follow-Up Addendum
I forgot to add another detail, it appeared that the odd bird had a faint thin white eyebrow that did not extend back beyond the eye that far.


Also, if anyone is interested in looking for this bird and needs more detail on where it was at and how to get there, just let me know.


Rob Lowry
Carson City
 

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Date: 9/29/18 9:50 pm
From: Rob Lowry <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Mason Valley WMA Follow-Up
Many "Thanks" to Paul Hurtado for getting the initial word out on the odd bird that I observed this afternoon at the North Pond of Mason Valley WMA. The water level in the North Pond is as low as I have seen it in years. Therefore, there are numerous islands and clumps of trees that are above-water in the southwestern section of the pond. When I first arrived at the North Pond and drove up the west side along the dirt path, I saw several birds resting on an island in the pond. These birds included Canada Geese, a few Pelicans and Egrets, some Killdeer, about 9 Dowitchers, and 20+ Yellowlegs. As I scoped the birds, I noticed one shorebird that appeared to have neon-orange legs that really were lit up by the sun at my back. I watched this bird for several minutes as it meticulously walked along the island shore. I decided to try to get a better vantage point so I moved south a little but when I looked for the bird, I noticed that it and all of the shorebirds weren't along that island anymore. Eventually I was able to relocate the odd bird, the Yellowlegs, and the Dowitchers feeding even farther out in the pond. There were over 20 Greater Yellowlegs that were frenetically pacing back and forth in the water as they fed. The odd bird was observed meticulously feeding near the Dowitchers and a couple of Yellowlegs. The bird was too far away to get a photo (I tried, nothing remotely turned out). I watched it for several minutes trying to note the various details of it, before it moved out of view and I never saw it again over the next hour or so.


Here are the characteristics that I observed:


1. Long spindly obvious bright orange legs.
2. Smaller than the Yellowlegs but bigger than the Dowitchers.
3. The throat/chest area was light tan with what appeared to be a sharp demarcation between the tan and the white belly (much like a Pectoral Sandpiper).
4. A straight bill that was obviously shorter in length than the Greater Yellowlegs but appeared to be similar in length to a Lesser Yellowlegs.
5. The back and wings appeared to be solid smooth brown in color, much like an immature Solitary Sandpiper.
6. It walked slower and more meticulous.
7. I never did see it spread or open it's wings, nor did I see it fly.
8. When looked at from behind, there was a white area on the top of the rump, which appeared to be visible because the wings weren't completely folded back to cover the rump top.


Any input would be appreciated. Hopefully, it will stay around long enough for others to find it and hopefully positively identify it.


Rob Lowry
Carson City
 

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Date: 9/29/18 6:33 pm
From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
Subject: Re: Varied Thrush in Fernley
The male Varied Thrush returned to our yard this evening and was drinking at our water feature. A Nashville Warbler was also present in our yard today.
Dennis SerdehelyFernley, NV

From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
To: Nvbirds <nvbirds...>
Sent: Friday, September 28, 2018 9:42 AM
Subject: Varied Thrush in Fernley

We had a Varied Thrush in our yard this morning. We also had our first Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Spotted Towees of the fall and one Yellow Warbler.
Dennis Serdehely




 

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Date: 9/29/18 5:45 pm
From: Paul Hurtado <paul.j.hurtado...>
Subject: orange-legged shorebird @ Mason Valley
Rob Lowry found (and is currently watching) a shorebird at the North Pond
at Mason Valley, best viewed from the west side with sun at back. Orange
legs, slightly smaller than Greater Yellowlegs and a little darker on the
underparts.

Options range from an aberrant Yellowlegs to a Ruff or one of the
Redshanks. Structurally Rob says it doesn't seem right for Ruff, and so far
no views of the upperwing and rump... it was loosely associating with LB
Dowitchers and G. Yellowlegs.

I'm stuck in Reno and passing this along in case anyone is in the area
and/or looking for an excuse to bird Mason Valley tomorrow morning.

Paul Hurtado
Reno
 

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Date: 9/28/18 2:34 pm
From: rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Primm Area Birding, Friday, Sept. 28th
Hello again!
This morning from about 6:30 AM to about 11 AM, Tarl and Carrie Norman and I birded the Forest Preserve and the trees/lawn in the west end of Buffalo Bill's parking lot and the adjacent I-15 northbound on-ramp. There weren't many birds in the Preserve but the other area was rockin' with birds.  Most of the birds were Yellow-Rumped Warblers, followed by White-Crowned Sparrows with several Orange-Crowned Warblers, many Ruby-Crowned Kinglets, and a few Wilson's Warblers and Common Yellowthroats. Sparrows included Chipping, Lincoln's, House, one Brewer's, and one Lark. At times, there were as many as 25-30 birds in a mesquite tree. I did see an adult male American Redstart in the drainage culvert at the Preserve, whereas Tarl and Carrie (and another gentleman) saw the Tennessee Warbler. No one saw the previously-reported Cape May Warbler. We also saw a Peregrine Falcon fly over and perch on top of one of Buffalo Bill's buildings.

After checking out of the hotel, I returned to the Preserve at about 11:50 AM by myself and within minutes, saw a Clay-Colored Sparrow and a female Lawrence's Goldfinch.  Unfortunately, both birds flew before I could raise the big one-eyed monster to attempt a photo. The Goldfinch was "tink-tink-tinking" as it flew off. I walked around both areas for another 30 minutes or so before trying to relocate both birds or any other rarities before I decided to leave.
Rob Lowry
Carson City


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 9/28/18 2:15 pm
From: rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Tonopah Area, Thursday, Sept. 27th
Late yesterday afternoon, I stopped at Miller's Rest Stop outside of Tonopah where there were numerous birds feeding in the freshly-mowed lawn.  The highlights were a Palm Warbler and a Northern Waterthrush. Sparrows included White-Crowned, Golden-Crowned, Lincoln's, Song, and Savannah. Warblers included many Yellow-Rumped, Common Yellowthroat, Wilson's, and the aforementioned Palm and Waterthrush. The cemetery and Harvey Park were fairly dead with a Chat at Harvey and a couple of Fox Sparrows at both places.
Rob Lowry
Carson City


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 9/28/18 9:42 am
From: Dennis Serdehely <birders...>
Subject: Varied Thrush in Fernley
We had a Varied Thrush in our yard this morning. We also had our first Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Spotted Towees of the fall and one Yellow Warbler.
Dennis Serdehely
 

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Date: 9/26/18 4:28 pm
From: justin streit <000000260acb25c4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Primm Saga
The story continued today with lots of birders looking for the aforementioned rarities near the I-15 northbound on-ramp in Primm. The CAPE MAY showed itself almost immediately and was seen by all and often as it frequently went down to the ground near the fence. At least one, and possibly a second (based on pics from different checklists) TENNESSEE WARBLER was in the same area, but harder to find and staying relatively high in the acacia trees. No signs of the other rarities, but an adult American Redstart under the rollercoaster track was a nice treat for many. Will be curious to see how this spots keeps it up. Not much going in the Preserve itself, but the cats were out and about, which could have kept the birds away.

https://ebird.org/hotspot/L6303208

https://ebird.org/hotspot/L6862418

Justin Streit
Las Vegas, NV
 

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Date: 9/26/18 3:39 pm
From: Martin Meyers <NevadaBirdRecords...>
Subject: Cape May Warbler is a review species
I see that a number of southern NV birders got to see the Cape May.  The
NBRC would appreciate documentation.  (I'd also appreciate it if someone
would tie it to the fence until I can get down there -- probably Monday
or Tuesday!  I have yet to see one in the state.)

Martin

--
---------------------------------------------------------------
Martin Meyers
Secretary, Nevada Bird Records Committee (NBRC)
Website: https://www.gbbo.org/nbrc
Email: NevadaBirdRecords ***AT SIGN*** gbbo *** DOT *** org
---------------------------------------------------------------


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 9/25/18 8:35 am
From: Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...>
Subject: Wow! Primm Produces: CAPE MAY, TENNESSEE, PROTHONOTARY Warbler(s) & EASTERN KINGBIRD
Hey All,

All mentioned birds were seen along fence on parking lot side of Northbound ONramp. The Cape May (continuing from yesterday), Tennessee, and Prothonotary Warblers were seen on ground along fence giving good looks. The Eastern Kingbird was seen high in trees.

It was very birdy at the mentioned spot with good numbers of Warblers and Sparrows. I am pretty sure there is something else good in amongst the flocks.

Best,

BZ
 

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Date: 9/24/18 10:08 am
From: Ben Zyla <Theloraxx365...>
Subject: CAPE MAY and KENTUCKY Warbler at Primm, Clark County.
Morning,

A quick check this morning in Primm was quite birdy and productive.

Brandon Miller observed a KENTUCKY WABLER near the monorail track near the "Forest Preserve".

I observed a CAPE MAY WARBLER in the trees near the northbound on ramp parking lot. I presumed this to be a Male
due to a reddish/orange and gray cheek patch and yellow in breast with black streaks. That is, it looks like a Cape May and is not in dull Fall plumage (which can make I.d. A bit harder)

Primm produces again!

Best,

Bz
 

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Date: 9/24/18 9:54 am
From: Greg Scyphers <scyph...>
Subject: RED-EYED VIREO at Carson River Park
I just found and photographed a RED-EYED VIREO at Carson River Park on the way up river towards the Mexican Dam. The bird is silently feeding in the cottonwoods along the trail before you get to the clearing before the small bridge. I scratched a large arrow through the trail. Location is 39 degrees 8’2” N x 119 degrees 42’5” W.

Greg Scyphers
Sparks, NV

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/23/18 2:51 pm
From: rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Sanderlings-Pyramid Lake River Mouth
Currently 7-8  being observed.  A scope is definitely needed.
Rob LowryCarson City


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 9/23/18 1:49 pm
From: rlowry517 <00000002625e15f9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Semipalmated Sandpiper-Pyramid Lake Sourh End
Currently being observed
Rob LowryCarson City


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 9/23/18 1:03 pm
From: Bob Goodman <0000005532510179-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Behavior
Passing the west shores of Pyramid Lake yesterday (Saturday) on the way to Smoke Creek, I noticed the surface waters were sort of churning. I suspect it was a school of Tui Chub in shallow water. I was not alone in noticing. Between 30 and 40 Double-crested Cormorants were participating in a feeding frenzy, dipping, but apparently not needing to dive, for the fish. A large number of gulls, too far away for proper ID, were flying above, flying in and out of the cormorants, and snatching stuff from the surface of the lake. This was a long-lasting process.

About two miles below the Smoke Creek Ranch, an immature Golden Eagle was flying along the creek itself, and never landed while in my sight.

Cheers, Bob Goodman
 

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Date: 9/23/18 12:57 pm
From: Ben Zyla <theloraxx365...>
Subject: Blackpoll Warblers at Corn Creek, DNWR, Clark
Hey All,

This morning, Jeanne Tinsman and I had two separate Blackpoll Warblers at the Corn Creek Visitor Center.

One was on the lawn in amongst several Yellow-rumped Warblers. The second one was along the Birdsong Trail on the east side within a flock of Orange-crowned(s).

Good Birding,

Ben
 

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Date: 9/23/18 12:20 pm
From: John Taylor <00000102d141b353-dmarc-request...>
Subject: HBVP Bird List 9/17/2018 - 9/23/2018
From September through November, the Henderson Bird Viewing Preserve is open from 6 AM to 2 PM, with last entry 1:30.

Please wear a hat and sunscreen and have water with you on the preserve.

The property is on the north side of Galleria Dr., just west of the Animal Shelter, between Ward Dr. and Moser Dr. Phone 702 267 4180.

The following birds were seen or heard (H) and confirmed by staff during the week September 17 Through September 23, 2018.



Canada Goose, Gadwall, Mallard, Cinnamon Teal, Northern Shoveler, Redhead, Ruddy Duck

Gambel's Quail

Pied-billed Grebe, Horned Grebe (leucistic), Eared Grebe, Western Grebe

Neotropic Cormorant, Double-crested Cormorant

American White Pelican

Great Egret, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Black-crowned Night-Heron

White-faced Ibis

Turkey Vulture

Sharp-shinned Hawk, Red-Shouldered Hawk

Sora, Common Gallinule, American Coot

Killdeer

Black-necked Stilt, American Avocet

Spotted Sandpiper, Least Sandpiper, Pectoral Sandpiper, Long-billed Dowitcher

Eurasian Collared Dove, Mourning Dove

Greater Roadrunner

Black-chinned Hummingbird, Anna's Hummingbird, Costa's Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

American Kestrel, Peregrine Falcon

Black Phoebe, Say's Phoebe

Loggerhead Shrike

Common Raven

Tree Swallow, Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Cliff Swallow, Barn Swallow

Verdin

Marsh Wren

Black-tailed Gnatcatcher

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Northern Mockingbird, Crissal Thrasher

Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Wilson's Warbler

Abert's Towhee, Brewer's Sparrow, Song Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow

Western Tanager

Red-winged Blackbird, Yellow-headed Blackbird, Great-tailed Grackle

House Finch

71

Happy Birding


John Taylor
Lead Recreation Assistant
Henderson Bird Preserve
350 E Galleria Drive
Henderson, NV 89015
(702) 267-4180
 

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Date: 9/22/18 5:50 pm
From: Patrick Gaffey <pjgaffey...>
Subject: Lawrence's Goldfinches at Corn Creek, Las Vegas
Two Lawrence’s Goldfinches this morning on the lawn. Photos on ebird.
 

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