Birders
Received From Subject
9/22/19 4:26 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (22 Sep 2019) 52 Raptors
9/21/19 4:54 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (21 Sep 2019) 59 Raptors
9/20/19 4:55 pm Mag Tait <magtait1...> Fwd: [birders] Raptor at Michigan Medicine
9/20/19 4:03 pm Angela Cobas <angnix...> Re: [birders] Raptor at Michigan Medicine
9/20/19 3:58 pm 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] Raptor at Michigan Medicine
9/20/19 3:46 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (20 Sep 2019) 161 Raptors
9/20/19 3:45 pm Mag Tait <magtait1...> [birders] Raptor at Michigan Medicine
9/20/19 5:37 am Mark W <markwloch72...> Re: [birders] Saturday Lake Erie Hawk Watch
9/20/19 5:15 am Merrily Hart <merrilyhart...> Re: [birders] Saturday Lake Erie Hawk Watch
9/20/19 4:51 am Mark W <markwloch72...> Re: [birders] Saturday Lake Erie Hawk Watch
9/19/19 8:20 pm Patrick Baize <pkbaize...> [birders] Saturday Lake Erie Hawk Watch
9/19/19 3:50 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (19 Sep 2019) 157 Raptors
9/19/19 1:22 pm Beverly Wolf <Bev_Wolf...> [birders] new article on the loss of birds
9/19/19 8:24 am Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...> [birders] dead birds
9/19/19 8:02 am Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] Building strikes
9/19/19 7:55 am Angela Cobas <angnix...> [birders] Building strikes
9/18/19 4:53 pm Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> [birders] Summary of August bird banding posted to blog
9/18/19 3:17 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (18 Sep 2019) 85 Raptors
9/18/19 11:37 am NAPBirds <NAPBirds...> RE: [birders] Monday's Detroit Hawkwatch and Tuesday's weather (NE, ENE, and E winds, steady barometer)
9/18/19 4:46 am 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Tonight: Asian bird species is free Washtenaw Audubon program, Wednesday, Sep. 18, 7:30pm, Ann Arbor, all invited
9/17/19 8:35 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (17 Sep 2019) 23884 Raptors
9/17/19 5:18 pm Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...> Re: [birders] Monday's Detroit Hawkwatch and Tuesday's weather (NE, ENE, and E winds, steady barometer)
9/17/19 4:49 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (17 Sep 2019) 12970 Raptors
9/17/19 11:16 am Matthew Spoor <matthew.spoor...> Re: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
9/17/19 5:01 am William Niemczyk <billczyk...> [birders] RH Long closed
9/17/19 4:40 am William Niemczyk <billczyk...> [birders] RHLong closed
9/17/19 2:47 am Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Reminder: OAS Field Trip Wednesday September 18 - Red Oaks County Park
9/16/19 10:15 pm Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> RE: [birders] Will history repeat itself? Does Humanity have the right to consider itself good?
9/16/19 6:40 pm 'Steve Jerant' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Haehnle Sanctuary Crane Count 09/16/2019
9/16/19 6:00 pm Patrick Baize <pkbaize...> Re: [birders] Will history repeat itself?
9/16/19 5:32 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (16 Sep 2019) 34731 Raptors
9/16/19 4:51 pm Alice Elliott <alelliot...> Re: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
9/16/19 4:26 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (16 Sep 2019) 12057 Raptors
9/16/19 3:24 pm Karen Markey <ylime...> [birders] Monday's Detroit Hawkwatch and Tuesday's weather (NE, ENE, and E winds, steady barometer)
9/16/19 12:28 pm Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> RE: [birders] Will history repeat itself?
9/16/19 10:03 am Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...> Re: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
9/16/19 8:48 am 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Asian bird species is free Washtenaw Audubon program, Wednesday, Sep. 18, 7:30pm, Ann Arbor, all invited
9/16/19 7:38 am mjcapo via Birders <birders...> [birders] Nighthawks in Bloomfield Hills
9/16/19 7:18 am NAPBirds <NAPBirds...> RE: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
9/16/19 7:14 am John Farmer <ajf-jlf...> [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
9/16/19 5:06 am Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Reminder: OAS Nuthatch Open Registration Deadline September 19
9/15/19 9:12 pm Curt Hofer <curthofer...> [birders] Winger Finch Forecast
9/15/19 8:20 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (15 Sep 2019) 165 Raptors
9/15/19 3:58 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (15 Sep 2019) 171 Raptors
9/15/19 8:17 am Mag Tait <magtait1...> Re: [birders] Will history repeat itself?
9/15/19 6:11 am Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Field Trip Wednesday September 18 - Red Oaks County Park
9/15/19 4:51 am Karen Markey <ylime...> [birders] Detroit Hawkwatch and Monday's weather (N and NE winds, rising barometer)
9/14/19 7:35 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (14 Sep 2019) 104 Raptors
9/14/19 3:59 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (14 Sep 2019) 23 Raptors
9/14/19 2:57 pm Alan Ryff <alryff...> [birders] Will history repeat itself?
9/13/19 8:33 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (13 Sep 2019) 35 Raptors
9/13/19 7:49 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (12 Sep 2019) 453 Raptors
9/13/19 7:21 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (11 Sep 2019) 60 Raptors
9/13/19 5:15 pm 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Bald eagle
9/13/19 4:16 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (13 Sep 2019) 35 Raptors
9/13/19 6:41 am <juliet.berger...> [birders] Re: WAS Fall Bird Walk at the Arb in Ann Arbor, today
9/12/19 10:33 pm Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> RE: [birders] What has happened?
9/12/19 4:38 pm Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...> [birders] WAS Fall Bird Walk at the Arb in Ann Arbor, today
9/12/19 3:54 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (12 Sep 2019) 600 Raptors
9/11/19 3:13 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (11 Sep 2019) 99 Raptors
9/11/19 6:32 am 'wild4birds' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/11/19 5:17 am <parkerj15...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/10/19 6:22 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (10 Sep 2019) 144 Raptors
9/10/19 4:16 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (10 Sep 2019) 78 Raptors
9/10/19 6:51 am JOHN PARKER <parkerj15...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/10/19 3:27 am 'C Rickards' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/9/19 11:10 pm Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Reminder: Tonight, OAS Meeting/Program - Tuesday, September 10 at 7:00 PM
9/9/19 10:13 pm Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/9/19 10:08 pm Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/9/19 9:38 pm Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/9/19 8:23 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (09 Sep 2019) 160 Raptors
9/9/19 4:14 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (09 Sep 2019) 20 Raptors
9/9/19 2:03 pm lowell gastonberry <dorfdoom...> Re: [birders] New Milkweed
9/9/19 1:48 pm 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/8/19 10:11 pm Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/8/19 8:50 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (08 Sep 2019) 77 Raptors
9/8/19 8:28 pm thegarlicks <thegarlicks...> Re: [birders] New Milkweed
9/8/19 4:14 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (08 Sep 2019) 140 Raptors
9/8/19 3:52 pm 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/8/19 10:54 am Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Meeting/Program Tuesday, September 10 at 7:00 PM
9/8/19 10:52 am Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> RE: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/8/19 5:11 am Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...> Re: [birders] New Milkweed
9/8/19 5:08 am Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...> Re: [birders] New Milkweed
9/8/19 4:47 am Karen Markey <ylime...> [birders] Sharing master eBird checklists from a group field trip
9/8/19 4:34 am Karen Markey <ylime...> [birders] Re: Hudson Mills Fall Field Trip Report: Warblers and Vireos High in the Canopy
9/8/19 4:22 am 'Philip Saoud' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] New Milkweed
9/7/19 9:21 pm thegarlicks <thegarlicks...> [birders] New Milkweed
9/7/19 4:09 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (07 Sep 2019) 132 Raptors
9/7/19 12:44 pm Karen Markey <ylime...> [birders] Hudson Mills Fall Field Trip Report: Warblers and Vireos High in the Canopy
9/7/19 11:55 am Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...> Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/7/19 11:44 am Anita Blasius <ibblazin...> RE: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/7/19 10:42 am Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...> Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/7/19 10:39 am 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/7/19 9:35 am Ellen Weatherbee <eew...> [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
9/7/19 4:01 am Bruce Bowman <brucebowman99...> [birders] ADMIN - FAQ for
9/6/19 8:28 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (06 Sep 2019) 73 Raptors
9/6/19 4:59 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (06 Sep 2019) 24 Raptors
9/6/19 3:56 pm Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...> [birders] Cool article about brainy chickadees
9/6/19 2:07 am Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Reminder: OAS Field Trips Saturday Sept 7 and Sunday Sept 8 - Everyone is invited
9/5/19 7:27 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (05 Sep 2019) 75 Raptors
9/5/19 7:19 pm 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] Double-crested Cormorants - Conservancy Farm
9/5/19 6:52 pm Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...> [birders] Washtenaw Audubon's second fall walk of the season at the Arb
9/5/19 4:38 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (05 Sep 2019) 32 Raptors
9/5/19 1:14 pm Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...> [birders] Double-crested Cormorants - Conservancy Farm
9/5/19 10:56 am Alice Elliott <alelliot...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
9/5/19 9:30 am Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> RE: [birders] email update
9/4/19 7:36 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2019) 37 Raptors
9/4/19 6:41 pm The Seeker <the_seeker11...> [birders] email update
9/4/19 4:31 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2019) 38 Raptors
9/4/19 9:00 am Dan Ezekiel <dan.ezekiel24...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
9/4/19 7:47 am 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Fwd: Google Alert - Kirtland's Warbler
9/4/19 5:47 am RICHARD WOLINSKI <rawolinski...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
9/4/19 5:39 am Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Reminder: OAS Nuthatch Open Saturday September 21
9/3/19 7:23 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2019) 6 Raptors
9/3/19 4:03 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2019) 5 Raptors
9/3/19 4:01 pm Karen Markey <ylime...> [birders] Fall Migrants Field Trip to Hudson Mills Metropark, Sat., Sept. 7, 8 am sharp
9/3/19 3:37 pm Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] What has happened? #2
9/3/19 3:12 pm Alan Ryff <alryff...> [birders] What has happened?
9/3/19 2:52 pm Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
9/3/19 2:33 pm 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
9/3/19 1:48 pm Matthew Mercer <02matthew.mercer...> [birders] What has happened? #2
9/3/19 12:55 pm Sherri Smith <grackle...> [birders] April Campbell
9/3/19 12:51 pm Alan Ryff <alryff...> [birders] What has happened? #2
9/3/19 11:18 am 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
9/3/19 5:58 am Andrew Pawuk <andrewpawuk...> [birders] Kudos Detroit Audubon
9/2/19 4:26 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2019) 28 Raptors
9/2/19 2:23 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2019) 24 Raptors
9/2/19 1:52 pm thegarlicks <thegarlicks...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/2/19 1:38 pm Patrick Baize <pkbaize...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/2/19 10:28 am 'George Hammond' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/2/19 8:35 am Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Field Trips Saturday Sept 7 and Sunday Sept 8 - Everyone is invited
9/2/19 6:16 am Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/2/19 5:32 am Ann Hancock <annhancock9...> [birders] Our vanishing birds
9/2/19 4:56 am Rosann Kovalcik <rosannkovalcik...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/2/19 3:54 am Chipperatl10 <chipperatl10...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/2/19 1:44 am 'jochen roeder' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/1/19 7:28 pm G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/1/19 6:21 pm G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...> Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
9/1/19 5:45 pm Larry Nooden <ldnum...> [birders] Re: Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
9/1/19 5:22 pm Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/1/19 3:44 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2019) 6 Raptors
9/1/19 3:25 pm Neeser <neeser...> [birders] Cockatoos-in-bins
9/1/19 1:42 pm 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] What has happened?
9/1/19 1:29 pm Alan Ryff <alryff...> [birders] What has happened?
9/1/19 12:57 pm Larry Nooden <ldnum...> Re: [birders] Medical prescriptions for nature exposure
8/31/19 1:09 pm Larry Nooden <ldnum...> [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
8/31/19 11:05 am Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> RE: [birders] bat removal advice
8/31/19 9:14 am mck426 <mck426...> [birders] Robert Long Question
8/31/19 9:07 am Eric Arnold <eba...> [birders] Bat picture:
8/31/19 8:22 am Beverly Wolf <Bev_Wolf...> [birders] Solitary Sandpiper
8/30/19 10:52 am outfresh via Birders <birders...> [birders] Rabies incidence in Michigan
8/30/19 10:33 am thegarlicks <thegarlicks...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/30/19 6:51 am Jean Gramlich <jeangramlich...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 7:14 pm Jchordash <jchordash...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 6:50 pm lowell gastonberry <dorfdoom...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 3:53 pm Scott Manly <manlyrs...> Re: [birders] The bat left.
8/29/19 2:57 pm Eric Arnold <eba...> Re: [birders] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
8/29/19 2:51 pm Eric Arnold <eba...> [birders] The bat left.
8/29/19 2:21 pm Mary Alice H <mholz0226...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 2:00 pm 'Edie Britt' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 1:51 pm Neeser <neeser...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/29/19 12:41 pm Eric Arnold <eba...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice (update)
8/29/19 11:00 am Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] Medical prescriptions for nature exposure
8/29/19 9:06 am Larry Nooden <ldnum...> [birders] Medical prescriptions for nature exposure
8/29/19 8:51 am Ann Hancock <annhancock9...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/29/19 8:43 am 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/29/19 8:42 am Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 8:05 am outfresh via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 8:02 am 'Marta Manildi' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 7:46 am Tait, Mag <mtait...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 7:18 am Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 6:55 am Jean Gramlich <jeangramlich...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 6:54 am Tait, Mag <mtait...> RE: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 6:50 am Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/29/19 6:28 am Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...> [birders] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
8/28/19 8:42 pm Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/28/19 3:46 pm Eric Arnold <eba...> Re: [birders] bat removal advice
8/28/19 10:03 am Eric Arnold <eba...> [birders] bat removal advice
8/28/19 7:29 am Crystal Keller <crystal...> [birders] Re: OT Monarchs
8/27/19 1:29 pm Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/27/19 1:02 pm 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/27/19 11:45 am John Farmer <ajf-jlf...> [birders] 101 Chimney Swifts counted at Milan City Hall Aug 24
8/27/19 11:38 am Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/27/19 8:18 am 'michael wells' via Birders <birders...> Fw: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/27/19 7:29 am Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> RE: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/27/19 7:18 am Michael Parow <mlparow...> Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
8/27/19 7:12 am Sherri Smith <grackle...> [birders] OT Monarchs
8/26/19 7:33 pm Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] Count of Roosting Chimney Swifts at Milan City Hall tonight, Saturday, August 24
8/26/19 6:46 pm Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...> Re: [birders] Count of Roosting Chimney Swifts at Milan City Hall tonight, Saturday, August 24
8/26/19 2:46 pm Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> Re: [birders] American White Pelicans
8/26/19 1:09 pm Patricia Burden <tallerpat526...> [birders] American White Pelicans
8/25/19 4:57 pm Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] Count of Roosting Chimney Swifts at Milan City Hall tonight, Saturday, August 24
8/25/19 3:52 am 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Re: swift migration and towers
8/24/19 6:50 pm Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...> Re: [birders] Count of Roosting Chimney Swifts at Milan City Hall tonight, Saturday, August 24
8/24/19 1:07 pm John Farmer <ajf-jlf...> RE: [birders] Count of Roosting Chimney Swifts at Milan City Hall tonight, Saturday, August 24
8/24/19 12:52 pm 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] Count of Roosting Chimney Swifts at Milan City Hall tonight, Saturday, August 24
8/24/19 12:42 pm Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] Chimney swift roost
8/24/19 12:42 pm Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] Chimney swift roost
8/24/19 12:41 pm Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Re: [birders] Count of Roosting Chimney Swifts at Milan City Hall tonight, Saturday, August 24
8/24/19 12:39 pm lowell gastonberry <dorfdoom...> Re: [birders] Chimney swift roost
8/24/19 10:32 am Angela Cobas <angnix...> Re: [birders] Fwd: Cardinal
8/24/19 10:23 am Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...> Re: [birders] Chimney swift roost
8/24/19 10:20 am 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Chimney swift roost
8/24/19 10:12 am 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] Fwd: Cardinal
8/24/19 10:07 am John Farmer <ajf-jlf...> [birders] Count of Roosting Chimney Swifts at Milan City Hall tonight, Saturday, August 24
8/24/19 9:02 am <juliet.berger...> [birders] Found Swarovski scope lens cap at Pointe Mouillee
8/24/19 8:30 am Vicki Davinich <vdav...> Re: [birders] Fwd: Cardinal
8/24/19 7:52 am Angela Cobas <angnix...> Re: [birders] Fwd: Cardinal
8/24/19 7:49 am Vicki Davinich <vdav...> [birders] Fwd: Cardinal
8/23/19 3:56 pm Tait, Mag <mtait...> Re: [birders] Been a while
8/23/19 2:00 pm Bob Tarte <enslavedbyducks...> Re: [birders] Been a while
8/23/19 1:41 pm neeser <neeser...> [birders] Been a while
 
Back to top
Date: 9/22/19 4:26 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (22 Sep 2019) 52 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 22, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 1 156 156
Osprey 0 21 21
Bald Eagle 0 77 77
Northern Harrier 1 132 132
Sharp-shinned Hawk 26 1226 1226
Cooper's Hawk 2 39 39
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 24779 24779
Red-tailed Hawk 1 124 124
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 21 364 364
Merlin 0 40 40
Peregrine Falcon 0 7 7
Unknown Accipiter 0 2 2
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 4 4
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 52 26972 26972
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Hugh Kent, Maryse Gagne

Observers: Hugh Kent

Visitors:
As it was the last day of the Hawk Festival, we want to thank all who
visited us today, all 300 of you! Thank you for your kind words, your
support, and your amazing questions. Sorry we didn't have more hawks to
show you, but that's nature! Come back anytime to visit!


Weather:
Once again a hot and humid day on the tower, with temperatures rising to 31
degrees Celsius. Clouds came in and out all day and the wind blew from the
South-West.

Raptor Observations:
Once again, a slower day for us on the tower, with a daily count of 52
raptors. We mostly counted American Kestrels (21) and Sharp-shinned hawks
(26), yet in the last 2 minutes of our count a juvenile Northern Harrier
came for a visit.
We were also entertained by a juvenile Peregrine Falcon who chased many
Cormorants in the marsh. Unfortunately, we could not count it as a migrant
but it definitely made our day!

Non-raptor Observations:
We had a relatively slow day for non-raptor species as well, but we are
seeing more species of ducks on the marsh, such as Northern Shovelers,
Gadwalls, American Widgeons, and Northern Pintails.
We counted another wave of Tree Swallows coming through the marsh, a good
number of Northern Flickers, Cedar Waxwings, American Goldfinches, and some
dragonflies. Monarch numbers seemed to have tappered out for the time being
as we only counted 3 butterflies all day.

Tree Swallows: 136
Purple Martins: 5
Northern Flickers: 10
Cedar Waxwings: 42
American Goldfinch: 50
Black Saddlebags: 45
Common Green Darner: 10
Monarch: 3

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60035705


Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting another nice and warm day but with winds from the
West for a change. We hope this might bring us a few more kettles of
Broad-winged hawks, more Sharp-shinned Hawks and Kestrels, maybe a few more
Red-tailed Hawks. We are also waiting for the start of the Blue Jay
migration, maybe Westerly winds will start it.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/21/19 4:54 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (21 Sep 2019) 59 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 21, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 155 155
Osprey 0 21 21
Bald Eagle 0 77 77
Northern Harrier 1 131 131
Sharp-shinned Hawk 28 1200 1200
Cooper's Hawk 1 37 37
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 24779 24779
Red-tailed Hawk 0 123 123
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 27 343 343
Merlin 2 40 40
Peregrine Falcon 0 7 7
Unknown Accipiter 0 2 2
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 4 4
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 59 26920 26920
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Jeremy Hatt, Patrick Tomlinson,
Steve Wagner

Visitors:
As the first day of the hawk festival, we welcomed 280 visitors to the
tower! Thank you to everyone, big and small, who came to say hello and try
to see a hawk. We truly appreciate your support and hope to see you around
again.


Weather:
What hot day on the tower! The thermometer reached 28 degree Celsius with
very high humidity and clear blue skies. When the breeze did blow for a few
seconds it came from the South and South-West later in the day.

Raptor Observations:
Today was the first day of our Hawk Festival, and clearly the hawks did not
get the memo. With such heat and unfavourable winds, we had a daily total
of 59 raptors, most of which were Sharp-shinned Hawks (28), and Kestrels
(27). We did count one Northern Harrier and two Merlins right at the
beginning of the day. Fortunately, the raptors that did fly over were very
low to the tower and were in good view, much to the delight of our many
visitors.

Non-raptor Observations:
We are very happy to be back on the tower to count! Once again, we want to
thank Essex Regional Conservation Area (ERCA) for their hard work cleaning
up the park to get us back on the tower. Today was exciting as we counted
more species of ducks, including Gadwalls, Northern Shovelers and American
Widgeon. We also counted many American Coots and Killdeer.
Our highlight of the day came from the woodpeckers, as we counted 2
Red-headed Woodpeckers and 8 Northern Flickers.
Not many warbler flying in the tree surrounding the tower and we are still
waiting on the big movements of Blue Jays.

American Coot: 17
Killdeer: 36
Chimney Swift: 12
Northern Flicker: 8
Blue Jays: 27
Cedar Waxwing: 201
American Goldfinch: 67
Monarch: 24

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59988387

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting another beautiful and hot day on the tower. The
winds are expected to blow harder but from the South-West. We hope to see
many Sharp-shinned Hawks and Kestrel flying above us.
Join us for the Festival of Hawks tomorrow! We will be counting on the
tower but we will also have displays and live hawks from the Kingsport
Environmental Displays for you to enjoy. Come along to Holiday Beach from
9-3.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/20/19 4:55 pm
From: Mag Tait <magtait1...>
Subject: Fwd: [birders] Raptor at Michigan Medicine
Thanks, Angela! I knew someone better at hawk ID than me would come through.


> From: Angela Cobas <angnix...>
> Date: September 20, 2019 at 7:20:21 PM EDT
> To: Mag Tait <magtait1...>
> Subject: Re: [birders] Raptor at Michigan Medicine
>
> I used to work at a raptor center and a hawkwatch, I'm really good at iding raptors now.
>
> Angela Cobas
>
>> On Fri, Sep 20, 2019, 7:18 PM Mag Tait <magtait1...> wrote:
>> Thank you. You pulled more info out of that photo than I did! What I could see of the tail and shape made me think that was likely but i knew someone would help. I hate guessing.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhon
>>
>>> On Sep 20, 2019, at 7:03 PM, Angela Cobas <angnix...> wrote:
>>>
>>> It's an immature Red-tailed Hawk. The eyes are pale telling you it's immature and the belly-band IDs the species.
>>>
>>> Angela Cobas
>>> Adrian, MI
>>>
>>>> On Fri, Sep 20, 2019, 6:45 PM Mag Tait <magtait1...> wrote:
>>>> Coworker sent me this. Don’t know the size, cannot see the tail. What do you think?
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>>>> ---
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>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>>
>>>> --
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>>>> ---
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Date: 9/20/19 4:03 pm
From: Angela Cobas <angnix...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Raptor at Michigan Medicine
It's an immature Red-tailed Hawk. The eyes are pale telling you it's
immature and the belly-band IDs the species.

Angela Cobas
Adrian, MI

On Fri, Sep 20, 2019, 6:45 PM Mag Tait <magtait1...> wrote:

> Coworker sent me this. Don’t know the size, cannot see the tail. What do
> you think?
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
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> "Birders" group.
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<C54A01C2-5806-4F38-852D-3D7524DF66D5...>
> .
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> --
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> www.glc.org
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Date: 9/20/19 3:58 pm
From: 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Raptor at Michigan Medicine
Looks like a wet sharpie to me because of head.
Penny

> On Sep 20, 2019, at 6:45 PM, Mag Tait <magtait1...> wrote:
>
> Coworker sent me this. Don’t know the size, cannot see the tail. What do you think?
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
> ---
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> <IMG_3653.jpeg>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> --
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> ---
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Date: 9/20/19 3:46 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (20 Sep 2019) 161 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 20, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 18 155 155
Osprey 4 21 21
Bald Eagle 0 77 77
Northern Harrier 2 130 130
Sharp-shinned Hawk 120 1172 1172
Cooper's Hawk 0 36 36
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 5 24779 24779
Red-tailed Hawk 0 123 123
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 10 316 316
Merlin 2 38 38
Peregrine Falcon 0 7 7
Unknown Accipiter 0 2 2
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 4 4
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 161 26861 26861
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Andy Parsons, Bob Pettit, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent,
Patrick Tomlinson, Steve Wagner

Visitors:
Today we were joined by Steve Wagner, Patrick Tomlinson, Bob Pettit, Andy
Parsons, Ron Delacourt, Bob Hall-Brooks, and Rick. Thank you to all for
spotting far-away Sharp-shinned Hawks.


Weather:
Today was a hot day with once again, very little cloud cover and a good
breeze coming from the South. Not very good for a lot of raptors but nice
to be outside.

Raptor Observations:
More Sharpies! On these less favourable wind days, we are counting a good
number of Sharp-shinned Hawks at Demonstration Farms, with a daily count of
120. We also counted a few Kestrels (10), Broad-winged Hawks (5), and two
Merlins.

Non-raptor Observations:
The Blue Jays are finally starting to move. Today we had a daily count of
120 Jays, most of them travelling from tree to tree, not fully migrating,
but soon!
We also counted many Killdeers, Red-winged Blackbird, Cedar Waxwings, and
Starlings.

Blue Jays: 120
Killdeer: 23
Starlings: 77
Cedar Waxwing: 80
Goldfinch: 35
Black Saddlebags: 354
Common Green Darner: 105
Monarch: 15

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59959893

Predictions:
Tomorrow, we will be doing our counting on the tower!! However, we are
expecting winds from the South again. Hopefully the Sharp-shinned Hawks
will keep coming. We are also hoping for more Blue Jays to start moving and
for a few more good kettles of Broad-winged Hawks before the end of the
season.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/20/19 3:45 pm
From: Mag Tait <magtait1...>
Subject: [birders] Raptor at Michigan Medicine
Coworker sent me this. Don’t know the size, cannot see the tail. What do you think?

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Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 9/20/19 5:37 am
From: Mark W <markwloch72...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Saturday Lake Erie Hawk Watch
Today being the 20th fits the Broad-winged movement a little better than
tomorrow but again the forecast southerly winds would most likely push the
birds north of Lake Erie Metropark. Plus the southerly winds the past few
days do not bode well for there being birds set up along the northern
shores of Lakes Erie and Ontario waiting to cross at the south end of the
Detroit River.
Again, just my opinion.

Mark Wloch
Ludington, MI

On Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 8:15 AM Merrily Hart <merrilyhart...> wrote:

> What are Chances for a good day of movement today?
> Merrily Hart
> Ann Arbor
>
> Merrily Hart
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Sep 20, 2019, at 7:52 AM, Mark W <markwloch72...> wrote:
>
> I attached an image of Detroit River Hawk Count Broad-winged (BW) Hawk
> data from 1991-2008 that I found online ten years ago. The data shows that
> on average, the BWs push through in an extremely tight window, with 81%
> passing between September 15-20. Those numbers of course are a bit skewed
> by the massive 100k plus days that have only occurred on Sept. 17, 18 or
> 19. That being said there was a day with 30,000 that happened as late as
> September 26. So calendar-wise a really good day may not be likely but is
> still possible.
>
> Now for the weather factor. North winds push the Ontario birds down to
> the north shores of Lake Erie and Ontario, which are road blocks to the
> thermal-seeking hawks, so they follow the shoreline until they cross at the
> relatively narrow Detroit River. If weather for whole region had been
> rainy along the upstream (Ontario) migration route during the tight window
> mentioned previously, you could figure that maybe they hadn't pushed
> through yet. But the past few days have been dry with partly to mostly
> sunny skies that produced migration friendly thermals for the birds to ride
> on. Numbers at LEMP this week were good on the 16th(34k) and 17th(23k)
> when the winds had a northerly component but dropped off later in the week
> as southerly winds took over. After Tuesday the southerly winds most likely
> pushed the birds away from Lakes Erie and Ontario, so the set up for a big
> day doesn't seem to exist. And even if it did, the southwest winds in
> Saturday's forecast would most likely push them north of LEMP.
>
> Note : This is just an opinion and birds don't look at data or weather
> forecasts.
>
> Mark Wloch
> Ludington, MI
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Sep 19, 2019 at 11:20 PM Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
> wrote:
>
>>
>> I know there's no guarantee for birds but does anyone have any thoughts
>> for Saturday.
>> Pat B. Howell, Michigan
>>
>> --
>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
>> www.glc.org
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>> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<864994808.4126608.1568949617571...>
>> .
>>
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> www.glc.org
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> <https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAHOEkD%2BTtXJ6BhTqnDh3QXUW900vihhj%<3D81ahuXDe4G8e1Hmmg...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>
> <BWHawk Data1991-2008.jpg>
>
>

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Date: 9/20/19 5:15 am
From: Merrily Hart <merrilyhart...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Saturday Lake Erie Hawk Watch
What are Chances for a good day of movement today?
Merrily Hart
Ann Arbor

Merrily Hart
Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 20, 2019, at 7:52 AM, Mark W <markwloch72...> wrote:
>
> I attached an image of Detroit River Hawk Count Broad-winged (BW) Hawk data from 1991-2008 that I found online ten years ago. The data shows that on average, the BWs push through in an extremely tight window, with 81% passing between September 15-20. Those numbers of course are a bit skewed by the massive 100k plus days that have only occurred on Sept. 17, 18 or 19. That being said there was a day with 30,000 that happened as late as September 26. So calendar-wise a really good day may not be likely but is still possible.
>
> Now for the weather factor. North winds push the Ontario birds down to the north shores of Lake Erie and Ontario, which are road blocks to the thermal-seeking hawks, so they follow the shoreline until they cross at the relatively narrow Detroit River. If weather for whole region had been rainy along the upstream (Ontario) migration route during the tight window mentioned previously, you could figure that maybe they hadn't pushed through yet. But the past few days have been dry with partly to mostly sunny skies that produced migration friendly thermals for the birds to ride on. Numbers at LEMP this week were good on the 16th(34k) and 17th(23k) when the winds had a northerly component but dropped off later in the week as southerly winds took over. After Tuesday the southerly winds most likely pushed the birds away from Lakes Erie and Ontario, so the set up for a big day doesn't seem to exist. And even if it did, the southwest winds in Saturday's forecast would most likely push them north of LEMP.
>
> Note : This is just an opinion and birds don't look at data or weather forecasts.
>
> Mark Wloch
> Ludington, MI
>
>
>
>
>> On Thu, Sep 19, 2019 at 11:20 PM Patrick Baize <pkbaize...> wrote:
>>
>> I know there's no guarantee for birds but does anyone have any thoughts for Saturday.
>> Pat B. Howell, Michigan
>>
>> --
>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>> ---
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>
> --
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> ---
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> <BWHawk Data1991-2008.jpg>

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Date: 9/20/19 4:51 am
From: Mark W <markwloch72...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Saturday Lake Erie Hawk Watch
I attached an image of Detroit River Hawk Count Broad-winged (BW) Hawk
data from 1991-2008 that I found online ten years ago. The data shows that
on average, the BWs push through in an extremely tight window, with 81%
passing between September 15-20. Those numbers of course are a bit skewed
by the massive 100k plus days that have only occurred on Sept. 17, 18 or
19. That being said there was a day with 30,000 that happened as late as
September 26. So calendar-wise a really good day may not be likely but is
still possible.

Now for the weather factor. North winds push the Ontario birds down to
the north shores of Lake Erie and Ontario, which are road blocks to the
thermal-seeking hawks, so they follow the shoreline until they cross at the
relatively narrow Detroit River. If weather for whole region had been
rainy along the upstream (Ontario) migration route during the tight window
mentioned previously, you could figure that maybe they hadn't pushed
through yet. But the past few days have been dry with partly to mostly
sunny skies that produced migration friendly thermals for the birds to ride
on. Numbers at LEMP this week were good on the 16th(34k) and 17th(23k)
when the winds had a northerly component but dropped off later in the week
as southerly winds took over. After Tuesday the southerly winds most likely
pushed the birds away from Lakes Erie and Ontario, so the set up for a big
day doesn't seem to exist. And even if it did, the southwest winds in
Saturday's forecast would most likely push them north of LEMP.

Note : This is just an opinion and birds don't look at data or weather
forecasts.

Mark Wloch
Ludington, MI




On Thu, Sep 19, 2019 at 11:20 PM Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
wrote:

>
> I know there's no guarantee for birds but does anyone have any thoughts
> for Saturday.
> Pat B. Howell, Michigan
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Birders" group.
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> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<864994808.4126608.1568949617571...>
> .
>

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Date: 9/19/19 8:20 pm
From: Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
Subject: [birders] Saturday Lake Erie Hawk Watch

I know there's no guarantee for birds but does anyone have any thoughts for Saturday.
Pat B. Howell, Michigan

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Date: 9/19/19 3:50 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (19 Sep 2019) 157 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 19, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 2 137 137
Osprey 0 17 17
Bald Eagle 1 77 77
Northern Harrier 2 128 128
Sharp-shinned Hawk 97 1052 1052
Cooper's Hawk 4 36 36
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 34 24774 24774
Red-tailed Hawk 9 123 123
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 7 306 306
Merlin 0 36 36
Peregrine Falcon 1 7 7
Unknown Accipiter 0 2 2
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 4 4
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 157 26700 26700
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Cherise Charron, Patrick Tomlinson, Steve Wagner

Visitors:
It was a quiet day for us at Demonstration Farms, with quick visits from
Claude Radley and Chip Ogglesby. I also want to thank the work of Steve
Wagner and Patrick Thomlinson and Cherise Charron for spotting raptors out
of the sky.


Weather:
Today was another hot day with a clear blue sky and very little cloud
cover. The wind from the South-East gave us a nice breeze, but not too many
raptors.

Raptor Observations:
We had a slow but steady and constant stream of Sharp-shinned Hawks coming
in for most of the day. Our daily total reached 97 Sharp-shinned Hawks. We
also counted 34 Broad-winged Hawks, most of which came in two's and three's
all day.

Non-raptor Observations:
The sky was very quiet today, we did not count many species or high numbers
of birds at Demonstration Farms. We were excited to count more Blue Jays
and Crows. We did have a steady amount of dragonflies and Monarchs flying
above us all day.

Blue Jays: 27
American Crow: 17
Cedar Waxwing: 29
Killdeer: 10
Red-winged Blackbirds: 95
Black Saddlebags: 40
Common Green Darner: 100
Monarchs: 80

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59935949

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting another day with winds from the South. We are
hoping for a better cloud cover to be able to more easily spot raptors. We
are expecting more Sharp-shinned hawks, as they do not seem to be as
dependent of wind conditions. We can always count on a Sharp-shinned Hawk!
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/19/19 1:22 pm
From: Beverly Wolf <Bev_Wolf...>
Subject: [birders] new article on the loss of birds
To add to the sad discussion:
https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/u-s-canada-have-lost-3-billion-birds-sc
ientists-say-ncna1055961?cid=db_npd_nn_fb_fbbot



Bev Wolf

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Date: 9/19/19 8:24 am
From: Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...>
Subject: [birders] dead birds
Hi everyone,
If you find a dead bird that is fresh, please put it in a plastic bag with
a piece of paper that has your name, date you found the bird, and exact
location (address or GPS is great) and put in the freezer. Please contact
the Bird Division Collection Manager Brett Benz <bwbenz...> to make
arrangements for dropping it off at the Museum of Zoology, 3600 Varsity
Dr., Ann Arbor.

If rotten or partially eaten, it probably isn't worth saving, and there
aren't programs for keeping track of these at random locations. There is a
network of folks that routinely check for dead birds if you know of a
building that seems to kill a lot. You can contact Washtenaw Safe Passage
<WashtenawSafePassage...>
if you are interested in this.

Janet Hinshaw, Librarian ph: 734-764-0457
Wilson Ornithological Society fax: 734-998-0038
University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Research Museums Center
3600 Varsity Drive
Ann Arbor, MI 48108-2228 USA

https://wilsonsociety.org/ <http://www.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/birds/>

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Date: 9/19/19 8:02 am
From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Building strikes


It’s that time of year again Angela.  Maybe you can raise some F.L.A.P. awareness in your area.  Windows are always bad but WORST during migration periods.  
https://www.flap.org/who-we-are.php






From: Angela Cobas <angnix...>
Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 10:55 AM
To: <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Building strikes *Warning attachment is a dead bird pic*
I live in the high rise Riverview Terrace in Adrian and a couple weeks ago I found a dead 1st year male Rose-breasted Grosbeak. 
I come out here this morning and find a couple dead Warblers, one looks partially eaten, and the other a beautiful Blackburnian. 
Anyone recording building strikes in the area? Or would be interested?
Angela Cobas



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Date: 9/19/19 7:55 am
From: Angela Cobas <angnix...>
Subject: [birders] Building strikes
*Warning attachment is a dead bird pic*

I live in the high rise Riverview Terrace in Adrian and a couple weeks ago
I found a dead 1st year male Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

I come out here this morning and find a couple dead Warblers, one looks
partially eaten, and the other a beautiful Blackburnian.

Anyone recording building strikes in the area? Or would be interested?

Angela Cobas

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Date: 9/18/19 4:53 pm
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3...>
Subject: [birders] Summary of August bird banding posted to blog
Banders and birders,

I have posted a summary to my blog, with highlights and photos, and
detailed results from 8 days of songbird banding conducted during August at
Lake St. Clair Metropark, Macomb County, Michigan. This is the 25th year of
bird banding in this park, my 15th year of operating this station, and the
5th year at our new site in the park after our old site was flooded out in
2014.

Go to: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/

Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: <amazilia3...>
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/

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Date: 9/18/19 3:17 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (18 Sep 2019) 85 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 18, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 15 135 135
Osprey 1 17 17
Bald Eagle 2 76 76
Northern Harrier 2 126 126
Sharp-shinned Hawk 32 955 955
Cooper's Hawk 1 32 32
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 13 24740 24740
Red-tailed Hawk 8 114 114
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 4 299 299
Merlin 1 36 36
Peregrine Falcon 1 6 6
Unknown Accipiter 2 2 2
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 3 4 4
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 85 26543 26543
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Cherise Charron, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Jim McCoy,
Patrick Tomlinson, Steve Wagner

Visitors:
We only had a few visitors and observers today, but were very appreciated
for all their help spotting raptors very far into the blue sky. Thank you
to Steve Wagner, Patrick Thomlinson, Cherise, Neil, Ron, Jim McCoy, Chip
Ogglesby, Bob Hall-Brookes.


Weather:
Today was a beautiful hot day with clear blue skies and 10 km/h winds from
the East. Not a very ideal day for watching migrating hawks but a nice day
spent outside.

Raptor Observations:
Hawk migration came to a screeching halt today. Unfortunately, the wind did
not bring us a lot of hawks and the ones that did fly over traveled very
high and often disappeared in the blue sky. We observed two small groups of
Broad-winged (13), Sharp-shinned (32) , Red-tailed hawks (8) and Turkey
Vultures (15).

Non-raptor Observations:
It was also a slow day for non-raptor species, with our biggest count being
196 Red-winged blackbirds. We are seeing more Blue Jays and getting ready
for their migration.
Insects were flying, enjoying the hot weather and we counted a good number
of Common Green Darners (520), but less Monarchs than yesterday (220).
Our highlight came from seeing a Sandhill Crane flying in front of us!

Chimney Swift: 14
Blue Jays: 34
Cedar Waxwing: 65
Red-winged Blackbirds: 196
Black Saddlebags: 180
Common Green Darner: 520
Monarch: 220

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59909136

Predictions:
Tomorrow will probably be similar to today, with winds from the South-East
all day and a clear sky. Hopefully we will see more raptors, like
Sharp-shinned hawks and Northern Harriers.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/18/19 11:37 am
From: NAPBirds <NAPBirds...>
Subject: RE: [birders] Monday's Detroit Hawkwatch and Tuesday's weather (NE, ENE, and E winds, steady barometer)
23,603 Broad-winged Hawks yesterday, Tuesday, astounding!!

From: Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 8:18 PM
To: Karen Markey <ylime...>
Cc: Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Monday's Detroit Hawkwatch and Tuesday's weather (NE, ENE, and E winds, steady barometer)

Tuesday's Broad-winged Hawk flight was again spectacular. We are still waiting for the Detroit River Hawk Watch results, but reportedly, they streamed in from 9 am, until about 1:30....then took a few hours off.
I was there to witness at least 1,000 kettling and streaming in from 3:30 til about 6:00 pm.along with Red-taileds, TV's, Northern Harriers, Sharpies, Coops, and the occasional Kestrel. Monarch butterflies were also migrating in good numbers, though yesterday their numbers were estimated at over 50,000.
Magnificent!!
Juliet Berger
Washtenaw Audubon

On Mon, Sep 16, 2019 at 6:24 PM Karen Markey <ylime...><mailto:<ylime...>> wrote:
Today's Detroit Hawkwatch was spectacular with big Broad-winged Hawk kettles and streams from 11 am to after 4 pm. I had to tear myself from the Hawkwatch at 4:40 pm because many Broad-wings were still streaming. The big puffy white and grey clouds made viewing easy. Broad-wings streamed above our heads or to the near north most of the day.

Tuesday's weather should be a carbon copy of today, NE, ENE, and E winds, partly sunny, barometer steady and high. Check the Detroit Hawkwatch for today's count at http://detroitriverhawkwatch.org/<https://linkprotect.cudasvc.com/url?a=http%3a%2f%2fdetroitriverhawkwatch.org%2f&c=E,1,SyePEfh4tHEiMQUJMdHYjboUEp3fiw7AUf0l2cTMIK0qNl05_BxPixl2mJjtuAA7pQ5r0V_ckF9d26WXbHzlZaSJTOpb4JjrH9YKgfVQpthaCY0,&typo=1> and click on "Day's Summary." The official counters were very busy, hard at work all day. They barely took breaks.

Let's hope for a repeat of today's big flight tomorrow!

Karen Markey
ylime AT umich.edu<http://umich.edu>


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Date: 9/18/19 4:46 am
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Tonight: Asian bird species is free Washtenaw Audubon program, Wednesday, Sep. 18, 7:30pm, Ann Arbor, all invited
Birders and friends,

Please join us for the following free program. You do not have to be a Washtenaw Audubon member to attend.

Wednesday, September 18, 7:30pm

Endless Forms Less Beautiful: Asian Prinia Species

Join Pamela Rasmussen for an informative talk on the birds in the Prinia genus, found in India and other Asian countries, an adaptation of a talk she gave at the most recent American Ornithological Society meeting. Dr. Rasmussen is an assistant professor of zoology at Michigan State University, an associate editor of The Ibis, the journal of the British Ornithologists’ Union, and is the primary author of Birds of South Asia: the Ripley Guide, (Smithsonian Institution/Lynx Edicions, 2012).

Come at 7:10pm for a chance to talk with fellow birders, and enjoy snacks before the program begins.

This program is free and open to the public. Membership is not required, though we would welcome your membership to help with our environmental and educational activities. Washtenaw Audubon programs are held at the U-M Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 North Dixboro Rd., Ann Arbor. In addition to the program, hear news of the latest critter sightings and field trips, and enjoy tasty snacks following the program. For more information on free Washtenaw Audubon programs and field trips, go to
www.washtenawaudubon.org

Hope to see you tonight.

Mike Sefton
Washtenaw Audubon

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Date: 9/17/19 8:35 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (17 Sep 2019) 23884 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 17, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 70 111 111
Osprey 1 22 22
Bald Eagle 9 33 33
Northern Harrier 11 96 96
Sharp-shinned Hawk 131 844 844
Cooper's Hawk 1 7 7
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 23603 58761 58761
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 20 87 87
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 36 169 169
Merlin 1 7 7
Peregrine Falcon 1 5 5
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 23884 60142 60142
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 16:30:00
Total observation time: 8.5 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Frank Kitakis, Mark Hainen, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
The early visitors got another special day of kettles and streams.
Afternoon, not so much. There was a late flow of high flying birds that
satisfied most in attendance.


Weather:
Another day of variable cloudiness that went from full cloud to scattered
by the end of the day. Winds went from NE to mostly E as the skies cleared.
Barometer stayed high with a little tail off in the last hour or so.


Raptor Observations:
Another day that would seem to favor buteo movement with the wind direction
and it delivered. 24 thousand broad-wings started early and made the trip
overhead. A slight lull in the afternoon hours but a few thousand started
up late in the proceedings. Sharp-shinneds were plentiful with 127, 36
kestrels were booked, and harriers were in double digits again. The flow of
BWHA seemed to pull others along with them and we counted 20 Red-tailed
hawks and 59 turkey vultures today. Bald eagles were seen in the streams
and we notched 9 cuts in the eagle stick.

Non-raptor Observations:
The monarchs seemed to return to a more normal flow this morning but picked
up the pace late. When we are busy with kettles of broad-wings the monarchs
take a back seat on the clicker but we estimated approximately 3000 today.
Still a very good count but nothing like the unprecedented day we had
yesterday.

Predictions:
We seem to entering a large high pressure area with high temps and winds
with a more southerly component to them for the next few days. Not usually
conducive to large flights of buteos but there should be some birds on the
move and the broad-wings are definitely trying to get out of Dodge.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/17/19 5:18 pm
From: Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Monday's Detroit Hawkwatch and Tuesday's weather (NE, ENE, and E winds, steady barometer)
Tuesday's Broad-winged Hawk flight was again spectacular. We are still
waiting for the Detroit River Hawk Watch results, but reportedly, they
streamed in from 9 am, until about 1:30....then took a few hours off.
I was there to witness at least 1,000 kettling and streaming in from 3:30
til about 6:00 pm.along with Red-taileds, TV's, Northern Harriers,
Sharpies, Coops, and the occasional Kestrel. Monarch butterflies were also
migrating in good numbers, though yesterday their numbers were estimated at
over 50,000.
Magnificent!!
Juliet Berger
Washtenaw Audubon

On Mon, Sep 16, 2019 at 6:24 PM Karen Markey <ylime...> wrote:

> Today's Detroit Hawkwatch was spectacular with big Broad-winged Hawk
> kettles and streams from 11 am to after 4 pm. I had to tear myself from the
> Hawkwatch at 4:40 pm because many Broad-wings were still streaming. The big
> puffy white and grey clouds made viewing easy. Broad-wings streamed above
> our heads or to the near north most of the day.
>
> Tuesday's weather should be a carbon copy of today, NE, ENE, and E winds,
> partly sunny, barometer steady and high. Check the Detroit Hawkwatch for
> today's count at http://detroitriverhawkwatch.org/ and click on "Day's
> Summary." The official counters were very busy, hard at work all day. They
> barely took breaks.
>
> Let's hope for a repeat of today's big flight tomorrow!
>
> Karen Markey
> ylime AT umich.edu
>
>
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> www.glc.org
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> .
>

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Date: 9/17/19 4:49 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (17 Sep 2019) 12970 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 17, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 68 120 120
Osprey 2 16 16
Bald Eagle 20 74 74
Northern Harrier 12 124 124
Sharp-shinned Hawk 204 923 923
Cooper's Hawk 4 31 31
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 12588 24727 24727
Red-tailed Hawk 28 106 106
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 39 295 295
Merlin 4 35 35
Peregrine Falcon 1 5 5
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 12970 26458 26458
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Chuck Sharbaugh, Ed Pitts, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent,
Jeremy Bensette, Larry Ludwicki, Patrick Tomlinson,
Steve Wagner

Visitors:
News of good hawks movement has spread and we welcomed many visitors and
counters. Thank you to all who came and helped to spot a kettle forming in
the sky. Thank you to Chuck Sharbough, Steve Wagner, Patrick Thomlinson, Ed
Pitts, Larry Ludwicki, Bob and Margaret Milles, Rick Andrews, Mark and
Roberta Buchanan, Kory Renaud, Noel and Juliette, Jeremy Bensette, Olga and
Roland, and Michelle.


Weather:
Another really nice day for hawk watching, starting with low clouds and a
cool mornings. The wind stayed North-East all day for the entire day. We
were thankful for the clouds in the morning as they brought the hawks
closer to us, but they dissipated in late afternoon leaving us with more
blue sky and a warm day.

Raptor Observations:
Another successful day for us the Demonstration farm with a daily total of
12,970 raptors! We started with Sharp-shinned hawks, counting 204 today and
then came the Broad-winged Hawks! Our daily total was 12,588 today!! They
came in massive kettles, very close to us because of the low clouds, so
close we could easily count them with the naked eye. We also counted many
Red-Tailed hawks 28, Turkey Vultures (689, and Kestrels (39).

Non-raptor Observations:
Not much bird action in the morning, but we did count 4 American Pitpit.
Our attention was mostly on Monarchs again as we counted 1,800 in the first
hour of counting. At the end of the day, we finished with 7,600
butterflies! At the end of the day, the Common Green Darners also came for
a visit.

American Pitpit: 4
American Goldfinch: 80
Cedar Waxwings: 118
Black Saddlebags: 115
Common Green darner: 250
Monarch: 7,600

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59885569

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting a hot and sunny day with winds from the East in
the morning, shifting to the South-East in the afternoon. We might not see
numbers as high as today's but we can still hope for a few kettles of
Broad-winged, more Sharp-shinned hawks and Kestrels.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/17/19 11:16 am
From: Matthew Spoor <matthew.spoor...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
I have been enjoying Common Nighthawks overhead in West Ann Arbor for the
past five evenings. Just one or two usually except last night at Forsythe
Middle School there were ten hawking over the fields with ring-billed
gulls. Look for the erratic flight and notice the white stripe across the
base of the primaries. This field mark is clearly visible in flight. If you
are out for a walk an hour or so before sunset, keep your eyes to the sky!


Matthew Spoor
701-610-1203
Ann Arbor, MI


On Mon, Sep 16, 2019 at 7:51 PM Alice Elliott <alelliot...> wrote:

> My local nighthawk here in Ypsi city center left about a week ago.
> Ypsi chimney swifts are still here, though! They are significantly quieter.
>
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> www.glc.org
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> <https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAErMB8V6cOsDAL6r7nh_TV9q-r_LE8uOz4O%<2BYnNqwZS-9QtLVw...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>

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Date: 9/17/19 5:01 am
From: William Niemczyk <billczyk...>
Subject: [birders] RH Long closed
Does anyone know how long RHL will be closed?

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Date: 9/17/19 4:40 am
From: William Niemczyk <billczyk...>
Subject: [birders] RHLong closed
Does anyone know how long RHL will be closed?

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Date: 9/17/19 2:47 am
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Reminder: OAS Field Trip Wednesday September 18 - Red Oaks County Park
Wednesday, September 18, 2019. 8:00am-12:00pm - Red Oaks County Park
Leader: Mike Mencotti (<mmencotti9...>)

We’ll meet in the parking lot of the nature center which can be reached on
Hales Street off Thirteen Mile Rd. in Madison Heights (30300 Hales Street,
Madison Heights, MI 48071). Fall migrants will be the target of this
venture.

Please see our website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) for details about
upcoming field trips, meetings and the Young Birder's Club. Contact the
field trip leaders if you have additional questions. You do not have to be
a member to participate. Everyone is welcome.

Thank you,
Phil Bugosh
Oakland Audubon Society

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Date: 9/16/19 10:15 pm
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...>
Subject: RE: [birders] Will history repeat itself? Does Humanity have the right to consider itself good?
Pat are you arguing that it is okay for Mankind to destroy massive amounts of natural habitats and native ecosystems and extirpate large amounts of biodiversity and species in a relatively short period of time if some living things still remain on the Earth after the consequences of Human actions? I would characterize that position as incredibly egocentric and selfish. Homo sapiens like to consider themselves as intelligent, rational, and morally good but the destructive impact of Mankind on other living things that share the Earth with us and shared our Evolution would sharply contradict this good self-species appraisal.

Roger Kuhlman

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

________________________________
From: Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
Sent: Monday, September 16, 2019 9:00:10 PM
To: 'Alan Ryff' <alryff...>; Sally K. Scheer <winerat...>
Cc: 'birders Birders' <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Will history repeat itself?


Yes history will repeat itself. What are the plans for the next Ice Age?? Exactly how many have there been? And lest not kid ourselves it will happen, not in our life time but then the "mass" extinct of every thing alive wont happen in our live time either.

Pat B. Howell, Michigan

On Monday, September 16, 2019, 3:28:35 PM EDT, Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> wrote:



The historical perspective is very valuable. Most people do not have a concept of “deep time”. Our lives are so short in comparison to the “life” of the world that being reminded of deeper time is important for all of us. Thanks for laying this out so well.



Sally Scheer





From: Alan Ryff [mailto:<alryff...>]
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2019 5:58 PM
To: Birders UM
Subject: [birders] Will history repeat itself?



https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710843100772



Will history repeat itself?

At the onset of white settlement, the Cardinal was restricted to the southern half of Ohio and unknown in Michigan. Expanding agricultural settlements with their clearing of deep woodlands during the early and mid 1800’s changed the landscape, favoring birds of grassland, coppice and forest edge, birds that can survive the exceptional snowfalls of an occasionally severe winter.

At some point during the last decades of the nineteenth century the Cardinal expanded into Michigan. By 1910 its status was that of a rather rare bird confined to the southern half of the Lower Peninsula, more likely to be encountered in the southern three tiers of counties.

But the times keep changing. Today, the Cardinal is common over the greater part of the Lower Peninsula, thanks in part to the growing number of urban municipalities with their ornamental shrubs and winter bird feeders. And the Cardinal’s range keeps expanding northward with increasing appearances in communities along the Lake Superior shoreline.

Is the Blue Grosbeak as a summer resident following the Cardinal’s northward expansion?

Consider: The first verified Ohio record of a summering Blue Grosbeak was not until 1940 in Adams County located along the Ohio River. Today, it is locally a rare to uncommon nester in at least eight southern Ohio counties. As far back as 1988 there was an unsuccessful nesting in Oak Openings, Lucas County, which shares its boundary with Monroe County, Michigan. By 2019 at least eight Michigan counties have had summering Blue Grosbeaks, all but one in the southern three tiers, the exception being Iron County which adjoins Wisconsin.

The habitat of the Blue Grosbeak and that of the Cardinal differs. The Cardinal prefers weedy areas along woodland edges and brushy thickets. But it also thrives in urban shrubbery. The Blue Grosbeak on the other hand favors open, almost barren, weedy areas having scruffy hedge rows and perhaps a tree or two or at best an isolated row of trees. It also perches and sings in cornfields as I discovered at two locations in Washtenaw County, Michigan.

Alan



Note: Photo # 7: The chestnut fringes of this male's greater coverts have worn away. Therefore this bird exhibits only one chestnut wing bar, that of the median coverts.

Note: Photo # 8: This female is tail twitching, a characteristic habit.





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Date: 9/16/19 6:40 pm
From: 'Steve Jerant' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Haehnle Sanctuary Crane Count 09/16/2019
Well, we may not have had a lot of cranes tonight but we saw lots of monarch butterflies. They continually flew into our field of vision while we were scanning the marsh with our scopes.

The habitat restoration that has been done behind the kiosk is providing a nice spot for songbirds. Most of the songbirds in the species list below were observed there.

Our blackbird count is obviously an estimate but is indicator of the massive numbers we saw tonight. We had fly bys from both sides of the overlook as well as the normal traffic from the west. Egrets continue to come in along with herons.

eBird checklist is available at: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59864620
Crane counters: Gary Siegrist, Ross Green, & Steve Jerant
Compiler: Steve Jerant
Submitted by Steve Jerant
Crane Count: 10 (63 observed in the area)
Species count: 34
15 Canada Goose
40 Wood Duck
40 Mallard
5 Mourning Dove
2 Common Nighthawk
73 Sandhill Crane -- 10 stayed in marsh
1 Killdeer
1 Wilson's Snipe
4 Great Blue Heron
7 Great Egret
12 Turkey Vulture
2 Northern Harrier
1 eagle sp. -- About one mile away. Unable to verify which type but flight profile was eagle.
1 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
1 Eastern Wood-Pewee
1 Eastern Phoebe
3 Blue Jay
2 American Crow
1 Barn Swallow
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
1 House Wren
1 Gray Catbird
200 American Robin
25 Cedar Waxwing
3 American Goldfinch
2 Field Sparrow
2 Song Sparrow
4000 Red-winged Blackbird
1 Brown-headed Cowbird
300 Common Grackle
1 Common Yellowthroat
1 Northern Cardinal
1 Indigo Bunting

Number of Taxa: 35


You can view past postings and historical crane counting data at
Haehnle site at http://www.haehnlesanctuary.org/crane-count and
JAS Blog page at http://jacksonaudubon.org/

Best Regards,
Steve Jerant


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Date: 9/16/19 6:00 pm
From: Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Will history repeat itself?

Yes history will repeat itself. What are the plans for the next Ice Age?? Exactly how many have there been? And lest not kid ourselves it will happen, not in our life time but then the "mass" extinct of every thing alive wont happen in our live time either.

Pat B. Howell, Michigan

On Monday, September 16, 2019, 3:28:35 PM EDT, Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> wrote:

#yiv6288148146 #yiv6288148146 -- _filtered #yiv6288148146 {font-family:Helvetica;panose-1:2 11 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 4;} _filtered #yiv6288148146 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv6288148146 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv6288148146 {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}#yiv6288148146 #yiv6288148146 p.yiv6288148146MsoNormal, #yiv6288148146 li.yiv6288148146MsoNormal, #yiv6288148146 div.yiv6288148146MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:New;}#yiv6288148146 a:link, #yiv6288148146 span.yiv6288148146MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv6288148146 a:visited, #yiv6288148146 span.yiv6288148146MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv6288148146 p {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:New;}#yiv6288148146 p.yiv6288148146ydp1bff2f13msonormal, #yiv6288148146 li.yiv6288148146ydp1bff2f13msonormal, #yiv6288148146 div.yiv6288148146ydp1bff2f13msonormal {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:New;}#yiv6288148146 span.yiv6288148146EmailStyle19 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv6288148146 .yiv6288148146MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv6288148146 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv6288148146 div.yiv6288148146WordSection1 {}#yiv6288148146
The historical perspective is very valuable. Most people do not have a concept of “deep time”. Our lives are so short in comparison to the “life” of the world that being reminded of deeper time is important for all of us. Thanks for laying this out so well.

 

Sally Scheer

 

 

From: Alan Ryff [mailto:<alryff...>]
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2019 5:58 PM
To: Birders UM
Subject: [birders] Will history repeat itself?

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710843100772

 

Will history repeat itself?

At the onset of white settlement, the Cardinal was restricted to the southern half of Ohio and unknown in Michigan.  Expanding agricultural settlements with their clearing of deep woodlands during the early and mid 1800’s changed the landscape, favoring birds of grassland, coppice and forest edge, birds that can survive the exceptional snowfalls of an occasionally severe winter. 

At some point during the last decades of the nineteenth century the Cardinal expanded into Michigan.    By 1910 its status was that of a rather rare bird confined to the southern half of the Lower Peninsula, more likely to be encountered in the southern three tiers of counties.

But the times keep changing.  Today, the Cardinal is common over the greater part of the Lower Peninsula, thanks in part to the growing number of urban municipalities with their ornamental shrubs and winter bird feeders.  And the Cardinal’s range keeps expanding northward with increasing appearances in communities along the Lake Superior shoreline.

Is the Blue Grosbeak as a summer resident following the Cardinal’s northward expansion?

Consider: The first verified Ohio record of a summering Blue Grosbeak was not until 1940 in Adams County located along the Ohio River.   Today, it is locally a rare to uncommon nester in at least eight southern Ohio counties.  As far back as 1988 there was an unsuccessful nesting in Oak Openings, Lucas County, which shares its boundary with Monroe County, Michigan.  By 2019 at least eight Michigan counties have had summering Blue Grosbeaks, all but one in the southern three tiers, the exception being Iron County which adjoins Wisconsin.        

The habitat of the Blue Grosbeak and that of the Cardinal differs.  The Cardinal prefers weedy areas along woodland edges and brushy thickets.  But it also thrives in urban shrubbery.  The Blue Grosbeak on the other hand favors open, almost barren, weedy areas having scruffy hedge rows and perhaps a tree or two  or at best an isolated row of trees.   It also perches and sings in cornfields as I discovered at two locations in Washtenaw County, Michigan.

Alan

 

Note: Photo # 7: The chestnut fringes of this male's greater coverts  have worn away.  Therefore this bird exhibits only one chestnut wing bar, that of the median coverts. 

Note: Photo # 8: This female is tail twitching, a characteristic habit.

 

 

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Date: 9/16/19 5:32 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (16 Sep 2019) 34731 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 16, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 31 41 41
Osprey 3 21 21
Bald Eagle 3 24 24
Northern Harrier 10 85 85
Sharp-shinned Hawk 100 713 713
Cooper's Hawk 1 6 6
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 34544 35158 35158
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 2 67 67
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 37 133 133
Merlin 0 6 6
Peregrine Falcon 0 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 34731 36258 36258
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 16:30:00
Total observation time: 8.5 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Mark Hainen, Patrick Mulawa,
Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
Visitors were plentiful today as those in the know watch for the northerly
winds during September. There were not disappointed today. I was a little
concerned that the winds might be too light but it actually worked to our
advantage as it kept the birds closer overhead than a stronger wind.
Streaming birds overhead mean that OMG! is heard in the crowd, that's the
sign of a good day.


Weather:
The barometer stayed high with light winds with a northerly component for
most of the day. Cloud cover varied from near 100% at times to
multi-colored layers of cottony cumulus interspersed with blue windows. A
nice backdrop for the spectacle that we were fortunate enough to witness.


Raptor Observations:
Wow! There are days and there are extraordinary days. This was one of the
latter. The skies were filled with flying creatures today. Nearly 35,000
broad-wingeds passed by in large kettles today. Starting around 1100 EDST
and continuing through to 1730. Sharpies kept up the pace with 95, kestrels
numbered over 30. Harriers reached double digits with 10.

Non-raptor Observations:
The other flying creature of note was the monarch butterfly. I can only
estimate that well over 30,000 passed by. The sky was truly filled with
them. We had no way to effectively count them but we estimated them at
about 100 per minute and that was only one little slice of the sky! The
raptors kept us busy but it would have taken a team to even try and come
close to an accurate estimate. Common nighthawks were also observed today
catching insects in a hatch that occupied the gulls as well.

Predictions:
The winds are from the NE going E with a high barometer. I hope that means
that we can duplicate at least some of today's movement but the old saying
applies; you should have been here yesterday. Hopefully tomorrow will put
that to rest.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/16/19 4:51 pm
From: Alice Elliott <alelliot...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
My local nighthawk here in Ypsi city center left about a week ago.
Ypsi chimney swifts are still here, though! They are significantly quieter.

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Date: 9/16/19 4:26 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (16 Sep 2019) 12057 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 16, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 21 52 52
Osprey 6 14 14
Bald Eagle 17 54 54
Northern Harrier 17 112 112
Sharp-shinned Hawk 158 719 719
Cooper's Hawk 1 27 27
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 11762 12139 12139
Red-tailed Hawk 18 78 78
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 47 256 256
Merlin 10 31 31
Peregrine Falcon 0 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 12057 13488 13488
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Carol Pitts, Ed Pitts, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Jim McCoy,
Len Jones, Patrick Tomlinson, Steve Wagner

Visitors:
We had a lot of eyes on the sky today and thank you to all who visited an
lent a hand!
Thank you to Chuck Sharbough from Michigan, George Novosel from Ohio, Jim
McCoy, Len Jones, Maureen, Ed and Carol Pitts, Steve Wagner and Patrick
Thomlinson from Ohio and Cherise for all their hard work today!
We had a visit from Nina and a gorgeous female Northern Harrier who was
adopted by Chuck.


Weather:
Today was another very hot and humid day, with very little wind. The wind
that did reach us was from the North and did brings us a lot of raptors.
Most of the day was overcast, making it easier for us to spot and count all
the hawks.

Raptor Observations:
What a day! The Broad-winged hawks came for a visit! Within two hours we
counted 11,762 Broad-wings in several massive kettles, they just kept
appearing, what an incredible sight!
We also counted over 158 Sharp-shinned Hawks, 47 Kestrels, 17 Northern
Harriers, 17 Bald Eagles 18 Red-tailed hawks, and 10 Merlins. Busy day!

Non-raptor Observations:
Today was also all about the insects. In the morning, we counted a few
thousand Monarchs, and again in the last hour of counting, we had another
eruption of Monarch migration over our heads, ending with a daily count of
8,250 Monarch butterflies. Again, in the last few hours, the dragonflies
came out to play, with swarms of darners in the sky. At the end of the day
we had counted 283 Black Saddlebags dragonflies and 2,500 Common Green
Darner Dragonflies.

Killdeer: 40
Chimney Swift: 29
Red-winged Blackbird: 311
Blue Jays: 27
Black Saddlebags: 283
Common Green Darner: 2,500
Monarch: 8,250

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59861005


Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting another hot day with winds from the North-East.
We hope for more kettles of Broad-winged hawks, let's beat today's numbers!

We will most likely be counting at the Demonstration Farm tomorrow for
those who want to come down.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/16/19 3:24 pm
From: Karen Markey <ylime...>
Subject: [birders] Monday's Detroit Hawkwatch and Tuesday's weather (NE, ENE, and E winds, steady barometer)
Today's Detroit Hawkwatch was spectacular with big Broad-winged Hawk
kettles and streams from 11 am to after 4 pm. I had to tear myself from the
Hawkwatch at 4:40 pm because many Broad-wings were still streaming. The big
puffy white and grey clouds made viewing easy. Broad-wings streamed above
our heads or to the near north most of the day.

Tuesday's weather should be a carbon copy of today, NE, ENE, and E winds,
partly sunny, barometer steady and high. Check the Detroit Hawkwatch for
today's count at http://detroitriverhawkwatch.org/ and click on "Day's
Summary." The official counters were very busy, hard at work all day. They
barely took breaks.

Let's hope for a repeat of today's big flight tomorrow!

Karen Markey
ylime AT umich.edu


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Date: 9/16/19 12:28 pm
From: Sally K. Scheer <winerat...>
Subject: RE: [birders] Will history repeat itself?
The historical perspective is very valuable. Most people do not have a concept of “deep time”. Our lives are so short in comparison to the “life” of the world that being reminded of deeper time is important for all of us. Thanks for laying this out so well.



Sally Scheer





From: Alan Ryff [mailto:<alryff...>]
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2019 5:58 PM
To: Birders UM
Subject: [birders] Will history repeat itself?



https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710843100772



Will history repeat itself?

At the onset of white settlement, the Cardinal was restricted to the southern half of Ohio and unknown in Michigan. Expanding agricultural settlements with their clearing of deep woodlands during the early and mid 1800’s changed the landscape, favoring birds of grassland, coppice and forest edge, birds that can survive the exceptional snowfalls of an occasionally severe winter.

At some point during the last decades of the nineteenth century the Cardinal expanded into Michigan. By 1910 its status was that of a rather rare bird confined to the southern half of the Lower Peninsula, more likely to be encountered in the southern three tiers of counties.

But the times keep changing. Today, the Cardinal is common over the greater part of the Lower Peninsula, thanks in part to the growing number of urban municipalities with their ornamental shrubs and winter bird feeders. And the Cardinal’s range keeps expanding northward with increasing appearances in communities along the Lake Superior shoreline.

Is the Blue Grosbeak as a summer resident following the Cardinal’s northward expansion?

Consider: The first verified Ohio record of a summering Blue Grosbeak was not until 1940 in Adams County located along the Ohio River. Today, it is locally a rare to uncommon nester in at least eight southern Ohio counties. As far back as 1988 there was an unsuccessful nesting in Oak Openings, Lucas County, which shares its boundary with Monroe County, Michigan. By 2019 at least eight Michigan counties have had summering Blue Grosbeaks, all but one in the southern three tiers, the exception being Iron County which adjoins Wisconsin.

The habitat of the Blue Grosbeak and that of the Cardinal differs. The Cardinal prefers weedy areas along woodland edges and brushy thickets. But it also thrives in urban shrubbery. The Blue Grosbeak on the other hand favors open, almost barren, weedy areas having scruffy hedge rows and perhaps a tree or two or at best an isolated row of trees. It also perches and sings in cornfields as I discovered at two locations in Washtenaw County, Michigan.

Alan



Note: Photo # 7: The chestnut fringes of this male's greater coverts have worn away. Therefore this bird exhibits only one chestnut wing bar, that of the median coverts.

Note: Photo # 8: This female is tail twitching, a characteristic habit.





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Date: 9/16/19 10:03 am
From: Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
Saturday evening, just before sunset, there were at least four Nighthawks
flying over the campsite area at LeFurge Woods.

The subsequent moonrise was beautiful.

Jack

On Mon, Sep 16, 2019 at 10:18 AM NAPBirds <NAPBirds...> wrote:

> I had a pair of Common Nighthawks fly over Vreeland Rd. Pond yesterday at
> about 6 pm. Yes, they still exist!
>
> Thanks for your report, John.
>
> Juliet Berger
>
>
>
>
>
> *Juliet Berger *| *Ornithologist* | *<NAPbirds...>
> <NAPbirds...>*
> *Ci**t*
> *y of Ann Arbor Natural Area Preservation *3875 E. Huron River Drive |
> Ann Arbor | Michigan | 48104 | 734.794.6627
> *Office *http://www.a2gov.org/NAP | http://www.facebook.com/ann.arbor.NAP
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* John Farmer <ajf-jlf...>
> *Sent:* Monday, September 16, 2019 10:14 AM
> *To:* <birders...>
> *Subject:* [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
>
>
>
> Anne and I counted roosting Chimney Swifts the past two evenings at the
> chimney on Milan, Michigan's City Hall. Counts (with estimated range of
> error +/- 5%) were: September 14 - 174 birds and September 15 - 144 birds.
>
>
>
> Last evening at about 8:00 we had a fly-over the treetops of a
> Caprimulgid. The brief view of the bird's flight pattern strongly
> suggested a Nighthawk, but the characteristic white wing spots of that
> species were not clearly visible, making me wonder if it may have been an
> even unlikelier Whippoorwill. The sky was dusky enough at that time that
> the wing spots may have been obscured. Either way it was thrilling to see
> even this lone ghost flier of fall evenings past.
>
>
>
> John Farmer
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
> <https://linkprotect.cudasvc.com/url?a=https%3a%2f%2fwww.glc.org&c=E,1,yFzTH1TyiphX8gc85kKubYpZYuhdv3mp_Z5jjxNN2rWUk0V0E87qKbPZVCUzXpcMkhDyxdUM6VTq3U6KhMK7lr0ds7hmg3ripSFW16-dRwaEI1R1pis8Tho2xQ,,&typo=1>
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> .
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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>

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Date: 9/16/19 8:48 am
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Asian bird species is free Washtenaw Audubon program, Wednesday, Sep. 18, 7:30pm, Ann Arbor, all invited
Birders and friends,

Please join us for the following free program. You do not have to be a Washtenaw Audubon member to attend.

Wednesday, September 18, 7:30pm

Endless Forms Less Beautiful: Asian Prinia Species

Join Pamela Rasmussen for an informative talk on the birds in the Prinia genus, found in India and other Asian countries, an adaptation of a talk she gave at the most recent American Ornithological Society meeting. Dr. Rasmussen is an assistant professor of zoology at Michigan State University, an associate editor of The Ibis, the journal of the British Ornithologists’ Union, and is the primary author of Birds of South Asia: the Ripley Guide, (Smithsonian Institution/Lynx Edicions, 2012).

Come at 7:10pm for a chance to talk with fellow birders, and enjoy snacks before the program begins.

This program is free and open to the public. Membership is not required, though we would welcome your membership to help with our environmental and educational activities. Washtenaw Audubon programs are held at the U-M Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 North Dixboro Rd., Ann Arbor. In addition to the program, hear news of the latest critter sightings and field trips, and enjoy tasty snacks following the program. For more information on free Washtenaw Audubon programs and field trips, go to
www.washtenawaudubon.org <http://www.washtenawaudubon.org/>

Hope to see you Wednesday evening.

Mike Sefton
Washtenaw Audubon

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Date: 9/16/19 7:38 am
From: mjcapo via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Nighthawks in Bloomfield Hills
Late August/early September we usually see small groups of 6-10 Nighthawks passing through, however, on the evening of August 27 we observed a feeding frenzy of 30+ Nighthawks with a dozen or so unidentifiable (to us) swallows plus our local 3-5 Common Swifts. It was hot and humid, a pop-up storm had just finished dumping large quantities of rain, and mowers were throwing all manner of yard waste (including newly hatched insects perhaps?) into the air. The show lasted almost an hour.

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Date: 9/16/19 7:18 am
From: NAPBirds <NAPBirds...>
Subject: RE: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
I had a pair of Common Nighthawks fly over Vreeland Rd. Pond yesterday at about 6 pm. Yes, they still exist!
Thanks for your report, John.
Juliet Berger


Juliet Berger | Ornithologist | <NAPbirds...><mailto:<NAPbirds...>
City of Ann Arbor Natural Area Preservation
3875 E. Huron River Drive | Ann Arbor | Michigan | 48104 | 734.794.6627 Office
http://www.a2gov.org/NAP | http://www.facebook.com/ann.arbor.NAP


From: John Farmer <ajf-jlf...>
Sent: Monday, September 16, 2019 10:14 AM
To: <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan

Anne and I counted roosting Chimney Swifts the past two evenings at the chimney on Milan, Michigan's City Hall. Counts (with estimated range of error +/- 5%) were: September 14 - 174 birds and September 15 - 144 birds.

Last evening at about 8:00 we had a fly-over the treetops of a Caprimulgid. The brief view of the bird's flight pattern strongly suggested a Nighthawk, but the characteristic white wing spots of that species were not clearly visible, making me wonder if it may have been an even unlikelier Whippoorwill. The sky was dusky enough at that time that the wing spots may have been obscured. Either way it was thrilling to see even this lone ghost flier of fall evenings past.

John Farmer
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Date: 9/16/19 7:14 am
From: John Farmer <ajf-jlf...>
Subject: [birders] Chimney Swifts and Nighthawk? over Milan
Anne and I counted roosting Chimney Swifts the past two evenings at the
chimney on Milan, Michigan's City Hall. Counts (with estimated range of
error +/- 5%) were: September 14 - 174 birds and September 15 - 144 birds.



Last evening at about 8:00 we had a fly-over the treetops of a Caprimulgid.
The brief view of the bird's flight pattern strongly suggested a Nighthawk,
but the characteristic white wing spots of that species were not clearly
visible, making me wonder if it may have been an even unlikelier
Whippoorwill. The sky was dusky enough at that time that the wing spots may
have been obscured. Either way it was thrilling to see even this lone ghost
flier of fall evenings past.



John Farmer

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Date: 9/16/19 5:06 am
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Reminder: OAS Nuthatch Open Registration Deadline September 19
Registration deadline September 19
Annual Nuthatch Open. Saturday, September 21, 2019, 12:00am-4:00pm
Leader: Don Burlett ( <baikalteal13...> )
Oakland Audubon’s annual fun competitive birding event. Teams find as many
species as possible anywhere in Oakland County until 4:00 PM and then meet
at Indian Springs Metropark for the awards presentations and a cookout.
Checklists need to be submitted by 4:00 PM. Teams consist of 2 to 4 members
in either the adult or youth division. An entrance fee and a Metropark pass
is required. Proceeds go to our young birders program. See our website for
a registration form. Everyone is welcome to participate.

Please see our website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) for details about
upcoming field trips, meetings and the Young Birder's Club. Contact the
field trip leaders if you have additional questions. You do not have to be
a member to participate. Everyone is welcome.

Thank you,
Phil Bugosh
Oakland Audubon Society

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Date: 9/15/19 9:12 pm
From: Curt Hofer <curthofer...>
Subject: [birders] Winger Finch Forecast
Ron Pittaway's 2019-20 winter finch forecast has been posted to Jean
Iron's website:
http://www.jeaniron.ca/2019/wff19.htm
If you enjoy a bumper cone seed crop in northern Canada then this is
your year!

Curt Hofer

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Date: 9/15/19 8:20 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (15 Sep 2019) 165 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 15, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 10 10
Osprey 1 18 18
Bald Eagle 0 21 21
Northern Harrier 4 75 75
Sharp-shinned Hawk 142 613 613
Cooper's Hawk 0 5 5
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 614 614
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 65 65
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 16 96 96
Merlin 2 6 6
Peregrine Falcon 0 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 165 1527 1527
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 16:30:00
Total observation time: 8.5 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Raburn Howland, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
A few stalwart visitors came today despite the weather not looking like
Chamber of Commerce material. We enjoyed pointing out the numerous sharpies
to them


Weather:
Despite that the word rain never entered yesterday's forecast, we did have
a period of rainus interruptus today in the middle of the day. At times, it
looked like an afternoon off on the radar with many green blobs headed our
way. However, the Lake Erie affect took hold and broke up many of the
amalgamations into smaller ineffective showers.

Raptor Observations:
This looked to be a day that favored Sharpies and it proved to be that way
despite some of the interruptions. These birds seem to like the winds
around the cells and like a switch being thrown will come as soon as the
rain stops. We had nearly 140 today, with 16 kestrels to keep them company.
Other notables being 4 Northern harriers and 2 merlins. Buteos were not
observed.

Non-raptor Observations:
The gulls seemed to enjoy their day hawking insects with plenty of swallows
and purple martins to keep them company. One lesser yellowlegs was seen
passing trying to convince us he was a falcon with his long swept back
wings.

Predictions:
A mostly cloudy day is predicted with a high barometer. There is prediction
of low winds at first but a brief period of NE winds later. None of this
will probably happen, but hope springs eternal, and perhaps we will see a
few broadwings in the afternoon.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/15/19 3:58 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (15 Sep 2019) 171 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 15, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 31 31
Osprey 1 8 8
Bald Eagle 5 37 37
Northern Harrier 1 95 95
Sharp-shinned Hawk 132 561 561
Cooper's Hawk 1 26 26
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 377 377
Red-tailed Hawk 2 60 60
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 26 209 209
Merlin 3 21 21
Peregrine Falcon 0 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 171 1431 1431
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Andy Parsons, Bob Hall-Brooks, Bob Pettit, Elizabeth Kent,
Hugh Kent, Larry Ludwicki

Visitors:
Since we changed locations and are not as obvious to find today, we did not
get any visitors.
However, we want to thank our counters today Bob Pettit, Andy Parsons,
Larry Ludwicki. and Bob Hall-Brooks. A special thank you to Bob Hall-Brooks
for bringing along a tent to keep us out of the rain.


Weather:
Today was cold and gloomy with rain on and off all day and winds coming
from the South and South-West. In the last hour, the sun came out to say
hello and brought us a few more hawks.

Raptor Observations:
Today was a day of the Sharp-shinned Hawks. Despite the rain and southerly
winds, we counted 132 Sharp-shinned hawks. We also counted 26 Kestrels,
three Merlins and two Red-tailed hawks.

Non-raptor Observations:
Being unable to access the park and the tower again today, we set up shop
just East of the park gate in a Demonstration Farm, with a very good view
of the sky and of passing raptors. However, we did not have as much success
with warblers. We counted over 20 Jays and over 600 Red-winged blackbirds!


Blue Jays: 27
Red-winged Blackbirds: 654
Tree Swallows: 347
Starlings: 220
Cedar Waxwings: 254
Goldfinch: 128
Killdeer: 38
Monarchs: 39

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59834723

Predictions:
Tomorrow, we are expecting a beautiful day with highs around 26 degrees
Celsius and winds with a Northern component. Hopefully, these will bring us
more hawks, particularly kettles of Broad-winged Hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/15/19 8:17 am
From: Mag Tait <magtait1...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Will history repeat itself?
Interesting thoughts. Time will tell, I suppose.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 14, 2019, at 5:57 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710843100772
>
> Will history repeat itself?
> At the onset of white settlement, the Cardinal was restricted to the southern half of Ohio and unknown in Michigan. Expanding agricultural settlements with their clearing of deep woodlands during the early and mid 1800’s changed the landscape, favoring birds of grassland, coppice and forest edge, birds that can survive the exceptional snowfalls of an occasionally severe winter.
>
> At some point during the last decades of the nineteenth century the Cardinal expanded into Michigan. By 1910 its status was that of a rather rare bird confined to the southern half of the Lower Peninsula, more likely to be encountered in the southern three tiers of counties.
>
> But the times keep changing. Today, the Cardinal is common over the greater part of the Lower Peninsula, thanks in part to the growing number of urban municipalities with their ornamental shrubs and winter bird feeders. And the Cardinal’s range keeps expanding northward with increasing appearances in communities along the Lake Superior shoreline.
>
> Is the Blue Grosbeak as a summer resident following the Cardinal’s northward expansion?
>
> Consider: The first verified Ohio record of a summering Blue Grosbeak was not until 1940 in Adams County located along the Ohio River. Today, it is locally a rare to uncommon nester in at least eight southern Ohio counties. As far back as 1988 there was an unsuccessful nesting in Oak Openings, Lucas County, which shares its boundary with Monroe County, Michigan. By 2019 at least eight Michigan counties have had summering Blue Grosbeaks, all but one in the southern three tiers, the exception being Iron County which adjoins Wisconsin.
>
> The habitat of the Blue Grosbeak and that of the Cardinal differs. The Cardinal prefers weedy areas along woodland edges and brushy thickets. But it also thrives in urban shrubbery. The Blue Grosbeak on the other hand favors open, almost barren, weedy areas having scruffy hedge rows and perhaps a tree or two or at best an isolated row of trees. It also perches and sings in cornfields as I discovered at two locations in Washtenaw County, Michigan.
> Alan
>
> Note: Photo # 7: The chestnut fringes of this male's greater coverts have worn away. Therefore this bird exhibits only one chestnut wing bar, that of the median coverts.
> Note: Photo # 8: This female is tail twitching, a characteristic habit.
>
>
> --
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Date: 9/15/19 6:11 am
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Field Trip Wednesday September 18 - Red Oaks County Park
Wednesday, September 18, 2019. 8:00am-12:00pm - Red Oaks County Park
Leader: Mike Mencotti (<mmencotti9...>)

We’ll meet in the parking lot of the nature center which can be reached on
Hales Street off Thirteen Mile Rd. in Madison Heights (30300 Hales Street,
Madison Heights, MI 48071). Early fall migrants will be the target of this
venture. An Oakland County parks annual or daily pass is required.

Please see our website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) for details about
upcoming field trips, meetings and the Young Birder's Club. Contact the
field trip leaders if you have additional questions. You do not have to be
a member to participate. Everyone is welcome.

Thank you,
Phil Bugosh
Oakland Audubon Society

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Date: 9/15/19 4:51 am
From: Karen Markey <ylime...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit Hawkwatch and Monday's weather (N and NE winds, rising barometer)
Wow! Monday's weather forecast looks just right for a major movement of
Broad-winged Hawks = N and NE winds, rising barometer.

Go to http://detroitriverhawkwatch.org/ and click on "Day's Summary" to see
previous daily action. Or head to Lake Erie Metropark (LEMP), follow the
signs to the park's Boat Launch, park in the gravel lot immediately south
of the boat launch, set up your chair, lunch, and optics, and join the fun.

Karen Markey
ylime AT umich.edu

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Date: 9/14/19 7:35 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (14 Sep 2019) 104 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 14, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 7 10 10
Osprey 3 17 17
Bald Eagle 1 21 21
Northern Harrier 3 71 71
Sharp-shinned Hawk 50 471 471
Cooper's Hawk 0 5 5
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 22 614 614
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 4 65 65
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 12 80 80
Merlin 2 4 4
Peregrine Falcon 0 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 104 1362 1362
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:30:00
Total observation time: 7.5 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Kevin Georg, Patrick Mulawa,
Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
Saturday was a good day for visitors and we had pleasant interactions with
people that were new to the concept of hawk counting. It's always good to
show people just how much is happening in nature. Not just the hawks but
the other species that are in constant struggles for survival.


Weather:
A day that started with sunshine, morphed to substantial clouds for a few
hours and then back to sunshine. Throughout these transitions in the cloud
coverage a persistently fresh wind with a mostly W component blew in the
face of those brave enough to migrate today. Barometer was high most of the
day but tailed off late a little.

Raptor Observations:
"And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout; But there is
no joy in Mudville for...." It seemed like a strikeout today with no buteos
to speak of. The fifty+ sharp-shinneds, and twelve kestrels that made the
effort were buffeted by the winds changing their flight habits and making
them harder to ID. We did have twenty three broad-wings but well spread
out. Four red-tails were spotted as well. Better days are coming.

Non-raptor Observations:
Lots of gulls hawking insects today provided enough flak to be a mild
annoyance. One of the broad-winged hawks that came over solo was seen
extending talons to capture a possible dragonfly. We always wonder how they
eat during migration given the huge flocks that they sometimes travel in.
Perhaps they snack along the way.

Predictions:
Although tomorrow is forecast to look pleasant enough, the barometer and
wind direction might be challenging to migration. Barometer should be
falling throughout the day with a strong SW wind. Of course, given the fact
that almost no forecast has yet followed the script, we should be
overwhelmed with birds tomorrow:)
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/14/19 3:59 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (14 Sep 2019) 23 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 14, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 7 31 31
Osprey 1 7 7
Bald Eagle 3 32 32
Northern Harrier 1 94 94
Sharp-shinned Hawk 3 429 429
Cooper's Hawk 0 25 25
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 3 377 377
Red-tailed Hawk 3 58 58
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 1 183 183
Merlin 1 18 18
Peregrine Falcon 0 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 23 1260 1260
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Andy Parsons, Bob Pettit, Dorothy McLeer, Elizabeth Kent,
Hugh Kent, Larry Ludwicki

Visitors:
Thank you to all who stopped-by our little makeshift hawk observatory by
the baseball diamonds in Malden Center. We had Deb and Julie from Ohio, and
many other potential festival goers who stopped after seeing a group of
people on the side of the road all wearing binoculars.


Weather:
After yesterday's storm, we had a gorgeous day at Holiday Beach and Malden
Center where we continued our count (see below in observations). Winds came
from the West and South-West all day, not bringing many raptors.

Raptor Observations:
We did not see many raptors today, with unfavourable winds and a change of
location (see below). In total, we counted 23 birds, a few Red-tailed
hawks, Turkey Vultures, Bald Eagles and a Merlin to finish off the day.

Non-raptor Observations:
Unfortunately, the park suffered extensive damage and we were asked to
leave the tower after doing an hour of counting. We relocated to Malden
Center, a few kilometers North to finish counting, without the risk of
branches falling on our heads. Thank you to the Essex Region Conservation
Area (ERCA) crew for working so hard.

At the tower, we observed many warbler, notably a Northern Parula and many
Magnolia warblers. We also counted 20 Chimney Swifts.
At Malden Center, we observed 8 Horned Larks, and 128 Monarchs.

Hawk Tower: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59803746

Malden Center: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59803946


Predictions:
Tomorrow, we hope to able to count at the tower again, however we will wait
for the go-ahead from ERCA. We are expecting winds from the South-West all
day and some rain the afternoon. Hoping more Sharp-shinned hawks, Merlins
and Kestrels will decide to migrate in front of us tomorrow.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/14/19 2:57 pm
From: Alan Ryff <alryff...>
Subject: [birders] Will history repeat itself?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710843100772

Will historyrepeat itself?

At the onsetof white settlement, the Cardinal was restricted to the southern half of Ohioand unknown in Michigan.  Expanding agriculturalsettlements with their clearing of deep woodlands during the early and mid 1800’schanged the landscape, favoring birds of grassland, coppice and forest edge,birds that can survive the exceptional snowfalls of an occasionally severe winter. 

At somepoint during the last decades of the nineteenth century the Cardinal expandedinto Michigan.    By 1910 its status wasthat of a rather rare bird confined to the southern half of the LowerPeninsula, more likely to be encountered in the southern three tiers ofcounties.

But the timeskeep changing.  Today, the Cardinal iscommon over the greater part of the Lower Peninsula, thanks in part to the growingnumber of urban municipalities with their ornamental shrubs and winter birdfeeders.  And the Cardinal’s range keeps expandingnorthward with increasing appearances in communities along the Lake Superiorshoreline.

Is the BlueGrosbeak as a summer resident following the Cardinal’s northward expansion?

Consider: Thefirst verified Ohio record of a summering Blue Grosbeak was not until 1940 inAdams County located along the Ohio River.  Today, it is locally a rare to uncommon nester in at least eightsouthern Ohio counties.  As far back as1988 there was an unsuccessful nesting in Oak Openings, Lucas County, whichshares its boundary with Monroe County, Michigan.  By 2019 at least eight Michigan counties have hadsummering Blue Grosbeaks, all but one in the southern three tiers, theexception being Iron County which adjoins Wisconsin.        
The habitatof the Blue Grosbeak and that of the Cardinal differs. The Cardinal prefers weedy areas along woodland edges and brushythickets.  But it also thrives in urban shrubbery.  The Blue Grosbeak on the other hand favorsopen, almost barren, weedy areas having scruffy hedge rows and perhaps a treeor two  or at best an isolated row oftrees.   It also perches and sings incornfields as I discovered at two locations in Washtenaw County, Michigan.Alan

Note: Photo # 7: The chestnut fringes of this male's greater coverts  have worn away.  Therefore this bird exhibits only one chestnut wing bar, that of the median coverts. 
Note: Photo # 8: This female is tail twitching, a characteristic habit.

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Date: 9/13/19 8:33 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (13 Sep 2019) 35 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 13, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 3 3
Osprey 3 14 14
Bald Eagle 2 20 20
Northern Harrier 1 68 68
Sharp-shinned Hawk 23 421 421
Cooper's Hawk 0 5 5
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 1 592 592
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 61 61
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 4 68 68
Merlin 0 2 2
Peregrine Falcon 1 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 35 1258 1258
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 14:30:00
Total observation time: 6.5 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Don Sherwood, Mark Hainen, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
We did have few visitors but those hardy souls were not treated to much
activity.


Weather:
For those of you with triskaidekaphobia, you may have valid reasons for
your fears. Not our finest hour today as a barometer that fell slowly at
first but accelerated late foretold a slow day. In the end we cut it short
when thunder came as a prelude to another deluge from the heavens, light
show included.

Raptor Observations:
A few sharpies kept our faint hopes alive but they were so spaced out that
it felt like a very barren day all the way through. One juvenile
broad-winged did not get the memo and came by. We did see a handful of
American kestrels and one peregrine for good measure. Only one harrier
showed up in the morning hours.

Non-raptor Observations:
Not really much to see today as all the locals seemed to take it easy. We
did observe a couple of killdeer early trying their best to make us record
them as kestrels. Otherwise a slow day at the ranch.

Predictions:
Tomorrow shows more promise. The barometer should be rebounding during the
day and the winds are going up to double digits but from the west. Not the
ideal wind but I would think that buteos might move under those conditions.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/13/19 7:49 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (12 Sep 2019) 453 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 12, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 1 3 3
Osprey 1 11 11
Bald Eagle 1 18 18
Northern Harrier 9 67 67
Sharp-shinned Hawk 46 398 398
Cooper's Hawk 2 5 5
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 367 591 591
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 5 61 61
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 21 64 64
Merlin 0 2 2
Peregrine Falcon 0 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 453 1223 1223
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Mark Hainen, Raburn Howland

Visitors:
Sam, our new volunteer spent the morning with us. Karen Markey brought the
broad-wings with her in the afternoon.
The Birthday Fairy visited Kevin Georg, our counter. Not sure how old he is
but I guess I should as what he tells me never seems to change from year to
year.


Weather:
Misty rain to start the day with promised clearing later. Although we did
see a little blue in the afternoon the clouds returned to dampen the flight
in late afternoon. Barometer was up most of the day and winds were from a
generally northern direction so we had elements of a good day in some
respects.

Raptor Observations:
We had a few hundred broad-winged hawks today so hopefully their numbers
will be increasing soon. Sharp-shins and kestrels played a part with 44 and
19 respectively. Harriers almost made double digits with 9. It wasn't a bad
haul for a day that was hampered by a bad beginning and a slow end.

Non-raptor Observations:
Not much activity nearby today. Even our large flock of cormorants must
have gone elsewhere to hunt. There did seem to be more swallows and martins
in the air to confound us. Monarchs were plentiful for a few hours but
slowed down later. We did not get a chance to count them when the
broad-wings were sneaking across as they demand full attention.

Predictions:
Another hot day with possible afternoon thunderstorms predicted tomorrow.
Hot means winds from a southerly direction. Barometer is predicted to fall
a little which might set up a nice day for Saturday. With turbulent weather
you might get lucky but it all depends how the winds play out around you.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/13/19 7:21 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (11 Sep 2019) 60 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 11, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 1 10 10
Bald Eagle 2 17 17
Northern Harrier 3 58 58
Sharp-shinned Hawk 49 352 352
Cooper's Hawk 0 3 3
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 224 224
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 56 56
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 5 43 43
Merlin 0 2 2
Peregrine Falcon 0 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 60 770 770
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 13:00:00
Total observation time: 5 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Mark Hainen

Visitors:
Bill and Michelle dropped by. Our new volunteer Alex put in a few hours and
got to see the first sharpies of the day.


Weather:
I think I am beginning to figure it out, you merely add six or eight hours
to any forecasted weather phenomena. Far from predicted morning
thunderstorms, we had calm winds and high temps for the morning hours. It
wasn’t until the Lake Erie Doctor began to blow in off the lake that we
had any comfort in the high humidity heat. Canada disappeared in the haze
as the moisture near lake-level became visible in the form of low cloudlike
formations. On the radar a benign looking green smear became multi-colored
and virulent. As thunder was heard multiple times it was deemed prudent to
Run Away! Our day ended at 2 ESDT as a severe thunderstorm rolled through.

Raptor Observations:
Raptors were scarce again for the first couple of hours. Old reliable
Sharp-shinned Hawks came through in the middle of the day but tapered off
before the storm approached. We had 49 for the day. Five American Kestrels
made the trip along with two harriers that showed up together.
Not much wind and threatening weather seemed to dampen the flight but there
was so much haze in the sky that we may have missed a few.



Non-raptor Observations:
The real observation today was how the weather can affect the viewing at
the site. The lake is always interacting with the changes in the
atmospheric condition, be it temperature change, humidity, or wind speed
and at times it does complicate the process by impeding the view.

One other thing of note: there was an assault on the remaining Brain Tree
today. It seemed to stop well short of a total take down and it may have
been merely trimming but it had us concerned. Actually, tree growth over
time is another issue we face at the site. As the trees in front of us get
taller, the less of the sky we see. If some of those trees are removed we
probably won’t cry too long.


Predictions:
The weather is a little turbulent around us now and hard to predict.
Thunderstorms are still the order of the day as I write. The forecast shows
a possible window for birds to move with a rising barometer and winds from
the NW but it's really anybody's guess as to whether that will happen as
scheduled.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/13/19 5:15 pm
From: 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Bald eagle
Bald eagle seen today circling on Lake St. Clair and emerging with either a fish or a very small duck, taking it inland to consume.
Penny

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Date: 9/13/19 4:16 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (13 Sep 2019) 35 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 13, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 24 24
Osprey 0 6 6
Bald Eagle 0 29 29
Northern Harrier 2 93 93
Sharp-shinned Hawk 23 426 426
Cooper's Hawk 0 25 25
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 374 374
Red-tailed Hawk 0 55 55
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 5 182 182
Merlin 4 17 17
Peregrine Falcon 1 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 35 1237 1237
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Thank you Jim McCoy and two visitors from Ohio for saying hello. Also thank
you to a group of young naturalists from the Nature Learning Center for
stopping-by and being so keen on bird watching.


Weather:
Our day started hot and humid with winds from the South and South-East.
Around 3 o'clock, dark clouds accompanied by thunder rolled in. Naturally,
we left the tower and headed to the HBMO office when the thunderstorm hit
us hard. We stayed in and let the massive weather event take place. After
the worst had passed, we were left with many fallen branches, some of which
were blocking off the road and one narrowly missing the office itself.
Quite the storm, hopefully all the birds took shelter before it hit!

Raptor Observations:
A very slow day for the raptors, with only 35 raptors counted and the
majority being Sharp-shinned hawks (23). We also counted 4 Merlins, to our
surprise, travelling together and a Peregrine Falcon. We also observed our
local Osprey and Bald Eagles.

Non-raptor Observations:
In the morning we had good warbler activity, seeing many Magnolia,
Redstarts, Cape May and Black-throated Green warlbers milling around the
tower. We also observed over 600 swallows, mostly Tree Swallows feeding in
the marsh and over 150 Monarchs. Our highlight of the day was spotting an
American Bitter as it flew over the marsh.

Tree Swallows: 500
Purple Martins: 106
Barn Swallows: 60
Cedar Waxwings: 282
Monarchs: 167
Ruby-throated hummingbird: 2

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59777698

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting another hot day with highs around 24 degree
Celsius and with winds from the West.
We hope this will bring us many raptors for our Hawk Festival, notably
Sharp-shinned hawks and maybe a kettle or two of Broad-winged hawks,
fingers crossed!
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/13/19 6:41 am
From: <juliet.berger...>
Subject: [birders] Re: WAS Fall Bird Walk at the Arb in Ann Arbor, today
http://www.washtenawaudubon.org/events/eventlists/fieldtrips/eventdetail/294/fall-migration-walk-in-nichols-arboretum

It has been pointed out to me that it would be nice to have a link to info about our Arb walks. See above for further information.
Good birding
Juliet Berger

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 12, 2019, at 7:38 PM, Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...> wrote:
>
> Dear Birders and friends,
> We had another great fall bird walk at the Arb today, with 55 species and at least 30 participants. Check out our ebird checklist to see what the best birds were-- hint-- we had a 6 woodpecker and 15 warbler spp. day today!!
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59710734
> We bird together every Thursday, through the end of October. Come join us!!
> Juliet Berger
> President, Washtenaw Audubon Society

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Date: 9/12/19 10:33 pm
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...>
Subject: RE: [birders] What has happened?
The biggest problem with Human Overpopulation is not population density per se, it is the Human impacts of development on natural areas of all kinds. That is measured roughly by ecological footprint. America has 330 million in it consuming land, natural resources, and energy at very high and excessive average levels. That level of consumption and human impact is not ecologically sustainable for decades and decades on end let alone hundreds or thousands of years. Moreover this high level of average consumption can not be replicated worldwide for 7.8 billion people presently or 10 to 11 billion people in 2100. It makes absolutely no ecological sense for America to continue to grow its population rapidly by millions and millions of people by Mass Immigration and Open Borders when the Country is already in a severely environmentally challenged situation. Do people think it is a good idea for America to grow to a total human population size of 500, 600, 700 million people by 2100? That is insane!

Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

________________________________
From: 'C Rickards' via Birders <birders...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2019 6:26:56 AM
To: Birders UM <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?

The biomass collapse that we are experiencing is global.

It's also happening in countries where populations are decreasing or migrating into cities.
A fair example is Spain where urbanization has emptied the agricultural lands and mountains of humans yet biomass is still decreasing.

What has happened globally is the use of glyphosate, neonicitinioids and fibronil + lesser additives to increase crop yields.
We trust the production of these crops to the most under-educated and isolated people in society.
They cheat. They don't respect the recommended doses because they think more is better.

These crops are mostly to fed to antibiotic soaked animals for meat and dairy production.
All the waste is soaking the land, flowing in the rivers and floating in the air.
If you add massive use of plastics in all aspects of human life, huge expansion of the hydrocarbon industries for land and air transportation, 24hr noise and light pollution and, most importantly, a lack of basic education, you have the perfect storm.

Right here, where i now live in France, there is a kid that does the bird and butterfly survey. He is 24 years old.
So he was 12 when i moved here. I have seen a massive decline in all species of birds and butterflies.
He has absolutely no comparison because there are no accurate studies to compare his results to.
"Today" is the only normal he has. He thinks what he sees today is normal.
He is also a birder and He lives in a world where he could and would take a cheap flight to Norway to go see a Surf Scoter.
The new normal.

It is crazy.
It is global, It is happening.
It is unlikely it will slow down, let alone stop.

Please be very aware how lucky you are in North America.
Massive areas of your country are protected at Federal, State and City level.

Population density is insignificant in North America.
All your migrants are in the cities. They are poor and the poor have very little environmental impact.
There are plenty of rich white folk building massive air-conditioned mansions on "waste" dirt.
They don't give a crap about a nighthawk and are quite happy that there are no moths to bother them.
The new normal

FYI, It has been noted that the American Nighthawk used to be a regular autumn vagrant in Europe but has not been seen for many years. That alone suggests that something has happened to a once common bird.

Chris Rickards
Rohan, France.



On Tuesday, September 10, 2019, 7:13:57 AM GMT+2, Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> wrote:


Yes and I would point out that the political left in America is actively fostering rapid population growth in our Country through Mass Immigration because they think that is the best way for them to gain political power for themselves and massively increase the size and scope of the Federal Government. Ecologically not very cool.

Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan

________________________________
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
Sent: Sunday, September 1, 2019 10:28 PM
To: P. swanson <jumpthroughhoops...>; Alan Ryff <alryff...>; Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Cc: Birders UM <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?

What's happened is too many of us humans. Just google "population clock," and you'll see the gravity of our situation. Political leaders NEVER touch this taboo subject. People are intent on procreating. Unfettered except by natural disaster. Other species dwindle and go extinct, but the population clock keeps racing upward. While the Amazon burns, while the Bahamas flood, and while we lose species every year. Young people don't notice these things as much as humans who have been around for half a century or more. Can you just imagine the bird life 200 years ago compared to now? -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama

On Sunday, September 1, 2019, 07:22:46 PM CDT, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:


I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59. Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did not seem right.




On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders"<birders...><mailto:<birders...>> wrote:

It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,
“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,
They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.
As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.
We could all use more nature time.
Penny

On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...><mailto:<alryff...>> wrote:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days gone by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its deepest colors. And sometimes, the morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight for blocks around. Today this is no longer so. Now and then, the neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few Nighthawks at a time pass over in the evening quiet. Alas, what has happened?

Alan


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Date: 9/12/19 4:38 pm
From: Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...>
Subject: [birders] WAS Fall Bird Walk at the Arb in Ann Arbor, today
Dear Birders and friends,
We had another great fall bird walk at the Arb today, with 55 species and
at least 30 participants. Check out our ebird checklist to see what the
best birds were-- hint-- we had a 6 woodpecker and 15 warbler spp. day
today!!

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59710734
<https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59710734?fbclid=IwAR2rU5tPNArJwabgmukYnSY6R8eIbPzVp2bv007x1HdQ3BYvbKykYYWspY0>

We bird together every Thursday, through the end of October. Come join us!!
Juliet Berger
President, Washtenaw Audubon Society

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Date: 9/12/19 3:54 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (12 Sep 2019) 600 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 12, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 10 24 24
Osprey 1 6 6
Bald Eagle 4 29 29
Northern Harrier 23 91 91
Sharp-shinned Hawk 128 403 403
Cooper's Hawk 1 25 25
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 364 374 374
Red-tailed Hawk 6 55 55
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 59 177 177
Merlin 2 13 13
Peregrine Falcon 1 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 1 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 600 1202 1202
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Chip Ogglesby, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
We had many visitors today, most of which were around for the big movement
of Broad-winged hawks. Thank you to Chip, Jim, Lene, Dave and Linda, Erika
and Dave Stimac, Mark, and Kirsty Heines and Nicholas Neilsen coming all
the way from Australia. Thank you all for stopping by!


Weather:
We had a pretty gloomy at the tower, with fog and very low clouds covering
the sky the entire day. However, we did experience very favourable winds
from the North and North-West all day.

Raptor Observations:
Our biggest day so far, 600 raptors, and the Broad-winged hawks have
arrived!! We counted 364 Broad-winged from 11 to 1 o'clock, all mostly in
small kettles of about 30 hawks at a time. We also counted 128
Sharp-shinned hawks and 60 Kestrels. As usual, we observed our local Bald
Eagles, Ospreys , and a Peregrine falcon.

Non-raptor Observations:
Our highlight today was the movement of 500 Monarchs during our last hour
of counting. We also counted 700 tree swallows travelling and feeding
around the marsh before heading West. Lastly, we counted over 600 Mallards
landing on the marsh all day.

Monarchs: 500
Tree Swallows: 702
Purple martins: 53
Cedar Waxwings: 82
Mallards: 652

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59717674

Predictions:
Tomorrow ,we are once again expecting thunderstorms in the afternoon, as
well as winds from the South. Hopefully we will have big movements of hawks
in the morning, particularly Sharp-shinned hawks who don't seem to be as
dependent on wind direction.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/11/19 3:13 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (11 Sep 2019) 99 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 11, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 14 14
Osprey 0 5 5
Bald Eagle 0 25 25
Northern Harrier 4 68 68
Sharp-shinned Hawk 71 275 275
Cooper's Hawk 5 24 24
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 1 10 10
Red-tailed Hawk 2 49 49
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 14 118 118
Merlin 2 11 11
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 99 602 602
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 13:00:00
Total observation time: 6 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Thank you to Tony for the visit and his help spotting Sharp-shinned hawks
in the sky.


Weather:
Another very hot day on the tower. Temperatures rose to 31 degrees Celsius
with very high humidity and calm winds from the South. Our day was cut
short by the thunderstorm that rocked the region. As soon as we heard
thunder, we left the tower, safety first!

Raptor Observations:
Another good day considering southern winds as we counted 99 raptors, all
mostly Sharp-shinned hawks (71). We observed more variety today with 7
species.

Non-raptor Observations:
Our highlights today were a Brown Thrasher and a Gray-Cheeked Thrush. We
also observed many Chimney Swifts and Killdeer migrating over the tower. It
seems that most of the swallows passed yesterday as we only counted 14 Tree
Swallows and 6 Barn Swallows, wishing them luck on migration!

Chimney Swift: 30
Killdeer: 19
Cedar Waxwing: 155
American Goldfinch: 40
Ruby-throated hummingbird: 4
Monarchs: 66
Black Saddlebags: 40

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59695496




Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting rain for the morning and staying overcast for the
majority of the day. However, the winds are projected to have a northern
component to them all day. Hopefully raptors will take advantage of
favourable winds and average temperatures to migrate. We are expecting more
Sharp-shinned, Cooper's hawks and Harriers.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/11/19 6:32 am
From: 'wild4birds' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
Do my take away is... France is SO messed up even the American Nighthawk avoids it.  
-------- Original message --------From: <parkerj15...> Date: 9/11/19 8:17 AM (GMT-05:00) To: <birders...> Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened? Maybe "we" wouldn't have to trust agriculture to the under-educated if Your Highness would do the work Himself.Curious that you found the need to bring skin color in at the end of your diatribe.sent by John Parker, from mobile -----Original Message----- From: <birders...> To: <birders...> Sent: 2019-09-10 6:27:03 AM Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened? The biomass collapse that we are experiencing is global. It's also happening in countries where populations are decreasing or migrating into cities.A fair example is Spain where urbanization has emptied the agricultural lands and mountains of humans yet biomass is still decreasing.What has happened globally is the use of glyphosate, neonicitinioids and fibronil + lesser additives to increase crop yields.We trust the production of these crops to the most under-educated and isolated people in society.They cheat. They don't respect the recommended doses because they think more is better.These crops are mostly to fed to antibiotic soaked animals for meat and dairy production.All the waste is soaking the land, flowing in the rivers and floating in the air.If you add massive use of plastics in all aspects of human life, huge expansion of the hydrocarbon industries for land and air transportation, 24hr noise and light pollution and, most importantly, a lack of basic education, you have the perfect storm.Right here, where i now live in France, there is a kid that does the bird and butterfly survey. He is 24 years old.So he was 12 when i moved here. I have seen a massive decline in all species of birds and butterflies.He has absolutely no comparison because there are no accurate studies to compare his results to."Today" is the only normal he has. He thinks what he sees today is normal. He is also a birder and He lives in a world where he could and would take a cheap flight to Norway to go see a Surf Scoter.The new normal. It is crazy. It is global, It is happening. It is unlikely it will slow down, let alone stop. Please be very aware how lucky you are in North America. Massive areas of your country are protected at Federal, State and City level. Population density is insignificant in North America. All your migrants are in the cities. They are poor and the poor have very little environmental impact.There are plenty of rich white folk building massive air-conditioned mansions on "waste" dirt.They don't give a crap about a nighthawk and are quite happy that there are no moths to bother them.The new normal FYI, It has been noted that the American Nighthawk used to be a regular autumn vagrant in Europe but has not been seen for many years. That alone suggests that something has happened to a once common bird.Chris Rickards Rohan, France. On Tuesday, September 10, 2019, 7:13:57 AM GMT+2, Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> wrote:Yes and I would point out that the political left in America is actively fostering rapid population growth in our Country through Mass Immigration because they think that is the best way for them to gain political power for themselves and massively increase the size and scope of the Federal Government. Ecologically not very cool. Roger Kuhlman Ann Arbor, Michigan From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...> Sent: Sunday, September 1, 2019 10:28 PM To: P. swanson <jumpthroughhoops...>; Alan Ryff <alryff...>; Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>Cc: Birders UM <birders...> Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened? What's happened is too many of us humans. Just google "population clock," and you'll see the gravity of our situation. Political leaders NEVER touch this taboo subject. People are intent on procreating. Unfettered except by natural disaster. Other species dwindle and go extinct, but the population clock keeps racing upward. While the Amazon burns, while the Bahamas flood, and while we lose species every year. Young people don't notice these things as much as humans who have been around for half a century or more. Can you just imagine the bird life 200 years ago compared to now? -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, AlabamaOn Sunday, September 1, 2019, 07:22:46 PM CDT, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59. Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did not seem right.On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> (mailto:<birders...>)> wrote: It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.We could all use more nature time.PennyOn Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff < <alryff...> (mailto:<alryff...>)> wrote: https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203)In days gone by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its deepest colors. And sometimes, the morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight for blocks around. Today this is no longer so. Now and then, the neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few Nighthawks at a time pass over in the evening quiet. Alas, what has happened?Alan -- Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org (http://www.glc.org) --- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email tobirders+<unsubscribe...> (mailto:birders+<unsubscribe...>). To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<127278681.991160.1567369737515...> (https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<127278681.991160.1567369737515...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer).-- Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org --- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email tobirders+<unsubscribe...> (mailto:birders+<unsubscribe...>). To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<8CC2C419-6750-4754-A4D1-CC2312DDC19D...> (https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<8CC2C419-6750-4754-A4D1-CC2312DDC19D...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer).-- Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org --- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email tobirders+<unsubscribe...> (mailto:birders+<unsubscribe...>). To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<C3C3114294EDD93D.5AED3B9E-DA2C-4F5A-99B9-53662D7E3555...> (https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<C3C3114294EDD93D.5AED3B9E-DA2C-4F5A-99B9-53662D7E3555...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer).-- Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org --- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email tobirders+<unsubscribe...> (mailto:birders+<unsubscribe...>). To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<126503184.1024997.1567391294818...> (https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<126503184.1024997.1567391294818...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer).-- Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org --- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email tobirders+<unsubscribe...> (mailto:birders+<unsubscribe...>). To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<DM6PR14MB27778DAB1AF5E8395AD7403DC5B60...> (https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<DM6PR14MB27778DAB1AF5E8395AD7403DC5B60...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer). -- Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org --- You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group. To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email tobirders+<unsubscribe...> (mailto:birders+<unsubscribe...>). To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<485470423.3313392.1568111216336...> (https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<485470423.3313392.1568111216336...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer).-- Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. 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Back to top
Date: 9/11/19 5:17 am
From: <parkerj15...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
Maybe "we" wouldn't have to trust agriculture to the under-educated if Your
Highness would do the work Himself.
Curious that you found the need to bring skin color in at the end of your
diatribe.


sent by John Parker, from mobile


-----Original Message-----

From: <birders...>
To: <birders...>
Sent: 2019-09-10 6:27:03 AM
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?

The biomass collapse that we are experiencing is global.

It's also happening in countries where populations are decreasing or migrating
into cities.
A fair example is Spain where urbanization has emptied the agricultural lands
and mountains of humans yet biomass is still decreasing.

What has happened globally is the use of glyphosate, neonicitinioids and
fibronil + lesser additives to increase crop yields.
We trust the production of these crops to the most under-educated and isolated
people in society.
They cheat. They don't respect the recommended doses because they think more
is better.

These crops are mostly to fed to antibiotic soaked animals for meat and dairy
production.
All the waste is soaking the land, flowing in the rivers and floating in the
air.
If you add massive use of plastics in all aspects of human life, huge
expansion of the hydrocarbon industries for land and air transportation, 24hr
noise and light pollution and, most importantly, a lack of basic education, you
have the perfect storm.

Right here, where i now live in France, there is a kid that does the bird and
butterfly survey. He is 24 years old.
So he was 12 when i moved here. I have seen a massive decline in all species
of birds and butterflies.
He has absolutely no comparison because there are no accurate studies to
compare his results to.
"Today" is the only normal he has. He thinks what he sees today is normal.
He is also a birder and He lives in a world where he could and would take a
cheap flight to Norway to go see a Surf Scoter.
The new normal.

It is crazy.
It is global, It is happening.
It is unlikely it will slow down, let alone stop.

Please be very aware how lucky you are in North America.
Massive areas of your country are protected at Federal, State and City level.

Population density is insignificant in North America.
All your migrants are in the cities. They are poor and the poor have very
little environmental impact.
There are plenty of rich white folk building massive air-conditioned mansions
on "waste" dirt.
They don't give a crap about a nighthawk and are quite happy that there are no
moths to bother them.
The new normal

FYI, It has been noted that the American Nighthawk used to be a regular autumn
vagrant in Europe but has not been seen for many years. That alone suggests
that something has happened to a once common bird.

Chris Rickards
Rohan, France.



On Tuesday, September 10, 2019, 7:13:57 AM GMT+2, Roger Kuhlman
<rkuhlman...> wrote:

Yes and I would point out that the political left in America is actively
fostering rapid population growth in our Country through Mass Immigration
because they think that is the best way for them to gain political power for
themselves and massively increase the size and scope of the Federal Government.
Ecologically not very cool.
Roger Kuhlman Ann Arbor, Michigan
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
Sent: Sunday, September 1, 2019 10:28 PM
To: P. swanson <jumpthroughhoops...>; Alan Ryff <alryff...>;
Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Cc: Birders UM <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened? What's happened is too many of us
humans. Just google "population clock," and you'll see the gravity of our
situation. Political leaders NEVER touch this taboo subject. People are intent
on procreating. Unfettered except by natural disaster. Other species dwindle
and go extinct, but the population clock keeps racing upward. While the Amazon
burns, while the Bahamas flood, and while we lose species every year. Young
people don't notice these things as much as humans who have been around for
half a century or more. Can you just imagine the bird life 200 years ago
compared to now? -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama
On Sunday, September 1, 2019, 07:22:46 PM CDT, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
wrote:

I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59.
Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps
surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one
flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs,
no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did
not seem right.



On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <
<birders...> (mailto:<birders...>)> wrote:

It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St.
Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping
and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at
night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins
song,“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s
gone,They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.As Robert Redford once said,
“no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still
asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.We could all use more nature
time.Penny
On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff < <alryff...>
(mailto:<alryff...>)> wrote:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203
(https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203)

In days gone by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks,
sometimes in the hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the
sunset gives its deepest colors. And sometimes, the morning sunshine could find
a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight for blocks around. Today this
is no longer so. Now and then, the neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or
hear a single or perhaps a few Nighthawks at a time pass over in the evening
quiet. Alas, what has happened?

Alan




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Date: 9/10/19 6:22 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (10 Sep 2019) 144 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 10, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 0 9 9
Bald Eagle 0 15 15
Northern Harrier 5 55 55
Sharp-shinned Hawk 122 303 303
Cooper's Hawk 0 3 3
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 14 224 224
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 1 56 56
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 2 38 38
Merlin 0 2 2
Peregrine Falcon 0 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 144 710 710
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Frank Kitakis, Mark Hainen

Visitors:
Johannes from Ann Arbor paid an always welcome visit. We did manage to show
some sharp-shins to some visitors to the park that were not there for hawk
watching.


Weather:
A return to summerlike conditions with temps in the eighties. We were saved
from most of the discomfort by a wind blowing off the lake. Although the
weather channels were saying S, at least in our little corner of the world
it was SE and we were thankful. Disturbed weather passed well to the NW of
us but it may find us tomorrow. Barometer stayed up near 30.2 most of the
day tailing off slightly at day's end.

Raptor Observations:
I wasn't sure what to expect today but the sharp-shinned hawks came through
with over 120 birds. Not too much else was visible although the wind was
fairly strong pushing birds to the north. Even the sharpies wer crabbing
into wind. The few broad-winged hawks that we saw were well off the north
and partially obscured in the hazy conditions. We did have our first "gray
ghost" male northern harrier, one of five one the day.

Non-raptor Observations:
It was a very slow day for the first couple of hours today, including
monarch butterflies, who had a spectacular day yesterday. It was back to
normal today with 2-300 hundred.

Predictions:
A day fit for man nor beast if the forecast is correct. Story weather with
an east/west front stalling over us. Thunderstorms and rain, possibly
heavy, are predicted. If the storms are far enough apart we may get some
birds making use of the surrounding turbulence to hitch a free ride on the
winds. Mostly sharpies and harriers if that is the case.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Jessica Fletcher (<jessica_fletcher...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/10/19 4:16 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (10 Sep 2019) 78 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 10, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 14 14
Osprey 0 5 5
Bald Eagle 2 25 25
Northern Harrier 1 64 64
Sharp-shinned Hawk 57 204 204
Cooper's Hawk 0 19 19
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 9 9
Red-tailed Hawk 0 47 47
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 18 104 104
Merlin 0 9 9
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 78 503 503
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Chip Ogglesby

Visitors:
We were visited by ERCA outreach staff with two groups of young and avid
birders, thank you stopping by!
We were also visited by Chip Ogglesby and a Kestrel, and by Bob Hall-Brooks
and a Peregrine falcon!


Weather:
What a hot day on the tower! The temperature reached 31 degrees Celsius at
12 o'clock. Not much of a breeze either, with very weak winds from the
South for most of day.

Raptor Observations:
Even with southerly winds we did observe 78 raptors, most of them
Sharp-shinned hawks (57) and American Kestrels (18). We also observed local
Ospreys and a non-migrating female Peregrine falcon.

Non-raptor Observations:
Today was all about the swallows. During the first hour, we counted 3,500
swallows flying above head and heading west! The mixed species flock was
approximately 60% Tree Swallow, 30% Purple Martin, 5% Barn Swallow and 5%
Bank Swallow.
The hot temperatures seemed to affect other passerines as there was little
warbler activity around the tower.

Cedar Waxwings: 202
Ruby-throated hummingbird: 10
Chimney Swift: 14

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59670878

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting another hot day with southern winds but we may be
interrupted by thunderstorms in the afternoon. However, there's plenty of
time for hawks to visit us in the morning. Hoping for more Sharp-shinned
hawks, Kestrel and maybe a kettle of Broad-winged hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/10/19 6:51 am
From: JOHN PARKER <parkerj15...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
Mr. Archambault:

1) Too many humans? Which one of us will do the right thing and jump off Thu (sic) Earth? Draw straws? Paper-scissors-rock? Better yet, an Enlightened Government Committee should decide who lives, who dies. If that's too difficult -- or too personal -- the Committee can instead decide who breeds. That subject was handled by a politician, right on cue, last week.

2) Google "population clock" and you'll get the results as Google prioritizes them. Just Google "a" or "b" or "c", or any other letter, and see what comes to the top of the auto-fill list. Late last year, if you typed "idiot" in an image search, the Google engine populated the results with the face of one particular man. Google's Chief Executive was asked about this in a Congressional hearing. Since then, the results of the search have changed.

Mr. Kuhlman:

Seems to me I've heard that idea of the open-border power-grab, more than once. Each time, I sense my head bobbing up and down, not shaking back and forth. Whether it's ecologically cool or not cool obviously isn't the point, although ecology is often the distraction to hide the point. It's weird, how many people focus on the distraction, like cats chasing flashlight beams.

John Parker

> On September 10, 2019 at 1:13 AM Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> wrote:
>
> Yes and I would point out that the political left in America is actively fostering rapid population growth in our Country through Mass Immigration because they think that is the best way for them to gain political power for themselves and massively increase the size and scope of the Federal Government. Ecologically not very cool.
>
> Roger Kuhlman
> Ann Arbor, Michigan
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
> Sent: Sunday, September 1, 2019 10:28 PM
> To: P. swanson <jumpthroughhoops...>; Alan Ryff <alryff...>; Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
> Cc: Birders UM <birders...>
> Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
>
>
> What's happened is too many of us humans. Just google "population clock," and you'll see the gravity of our situation. Political leaders NEVER touch this taboo subject. People are intent on procreating. Unfettered except by natural disaster. Other species dwindle and go extinct, but the population clock keeps racing upward. While the Amazon burns, while the Bahamas flood, and while we lose species every year. Young people don't notice these things as much as humans who have been around for half a century or more. Can you just imagine the bird life 200 years ago compared to now? -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama
>
> On Sunday, September 1, 2019, 07:22:46 PM CDT, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>
>
>
> I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59. Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did not seem right.
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> mailto:<birders...> > wrote:
>
>
> > >
> >
> > >
> It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,
> “Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,
> They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.
> As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.
> We could all use more nature time.
> Penny
>
> On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff < <alryff...> mailto:<alryff...> > wrote:
>
>
> > > https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203
> >
> > In days gone by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its deepest colors. And sometimes, the morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight for blocks around. Today this is no longer so. Now and then, the neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few Nighthawks at a time pass over in the evening quiet. Alas, what has happened?
> >
> > Alan
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org http://www.glc.org
> > ---
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> >
> > >
>
>
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>
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Date: 9/10/19 3:27 am
From: 'C Rickards' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
The biomass collapse that we are experiencing is global.

It's also happening in countries where populations are decreasing or migrating into cities.
A fair example is Spain where urbanization has emptied the agricultural lands and mountains of humans yet biomass is still decreasing.

What has happened globally is the use of glyphosate, neonicitinioids and fibronil + lesser additives to increase crop yields.
We trust the production of these crops to the most under-educated and isolated people in society.
They cheat. They don't respect the recommended doses because they think more is better.

These crops are mostly to fed to antibiotic soaked animals for meat and dairy production.
All the waste is soaking the land, flowing in the rivers and floating in the air.
If you add massive use of plastics in all aspects of human life, huge expansion of the hydrocarbon industries for land and air transportation, 24hr noise and light pollution and, most importantly, a lack of basic education, you have the perfect storm.

Right here, where i now live in France, there is a kid that does the bird and butterfly survey. He is 24 years old.
So he was 12 when i moved here. I have seen a massive decline in all species of birds and butterflies.
He has absolutely no comparison because there are no accurate studies to compare his results to.
"Today" is the only normal he has. He thinks what he sees today is normal.
He is also a birder and He lives in a world where he could and would take a cheap flight to Norway to go see a Surf Scoter.
The new normal.

It is crazy.
It is global, It is happening.
It is unlikely it will slow down, let alone stop.

Please be very aware how lucky you are in North America.
Massive areas of your country are protected at Federal, State and City level.

Population density is insignificant in North America.
All your migrants are in the cities. They are poor and the poor have very little environmental impact.
There are plenty of rich white folk building massive air-conditioned mansions on "waste" dirt.
They don't give a crap about a nighthawk and are quite happy that there are no moths to bother them.
The new normal

FYI, It has been noted that the American Nighthawk used to be a regular autumn vagrant in Europe but has not been seen for many years. That alone suggests that something has happened to a once common bird.

Chris Rickards
Rohan, France.



On Tuesday, September 10, 2019, 7:13:57 AM GMT+2, Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...> wrote:

#yiv9093762792 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}Yes and I would point out that the political left in America is actively fostering rapid population growth in our Country through Mass Immigration because they think that is the best way for them to gain political power for themselves and massively increase the size and scope of the Federal Government. Ecologically not very cool.
Roger KuhlmanAnn Arbor, Michigan
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
Sent: Sunday, September 1, 2019 10:28 PM
To: P. swanson <jumpthroughhoops...>; Alan Ryff <alryff...>; Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Cc: Birders UM <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened? What's happened is too many of us humans.  Just google "population clock," and you'll see the gravity of our situation.  Political leaders NEVER touch this taboo subject.  People are intent on procreating.  Unfettered except by natural disaster.  Other species dwindle and go extinct, but the population clock keeps racing upward.  While the Amazon burns, while the Bahamas flood, and while we lose species every year.  Young people don't notice these things as much as humans who have been around for half a century or more.  Can you just imagine the bird life 200 years ago compared to now?  -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama   
On Sunday, September 1, 2019, 07:22:46 PM CDT, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:

I was at a baseball game in Utica last night.  Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59.  Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls.  No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos.  For late Summer, it did not seem right.



On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders"<birders...> wrote:



It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights.  It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.We could all use more nature time.Penny
On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days gone by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its deepest colors.  And sometimes, the morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight for blocks around.  Today this is no longer so.  Now and then, the neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few Nighthawks at a time  pass over in the evening quiet.  Alas, what has happened?

Alan 




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Date: 9/9/19 11:10 pm
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Reminder: Tonight, OAS Meeting/Program - Tuesday, September 10 at 7:00 PM
Tuesday September 10, 2019, 7:00 p.m. Join us for the Oakland Audubon
Society's monthly meeting and a program titled "Wildlife At Duck Pond"
presented by local birder and photographer Rob Weir. Rob will share with us
his beautiful photography taken at a small pond in Washington Township.
Everyone is welcome to attend this free program. Refreshments will be
served.

Meetings are held at the First United Methodist Church, 1589 West Maple
Road, Birmingham, MI 48009. Enter the building from the rear main entrance.
Please note our meeting room has been changed to the Children's Room 132.

Oakland Audubon baseball style hats are back in stock and will be available
at the meeting, field trips or by contacting me while the supply lasts.

Please see our website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) for details about
upcoming field trips, meetings, programs and the Young Birder's Club.
Additional field trips are being added so check the website or facebook
often. You do not have to be a member to participate. Everyone is welcome.

Thank you,
Phil Bugosh
Oakland Audubon Society

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Date: 9/9/19 10:13 pm
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
Yes and I would point out that the political left in America is actively fostering rapid population growth in our Country through Mass Immigration because they think that is the best way for them to gain political power for themselves and massively increase the size and scope of the Federal Government. Ecologically not very cool.

Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan

________________________________
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
Sent: Sunday, September 1, 2019 10:28 PM
To: P. swanson <jumpthroughhoops...>; Alan Ryff <alryff...>; Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Cc: Birders UM <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?

What's happened is too many of us humans. Just google "population clock," and you'll see the gravity of our situation. Political leaders NEVER touch this taboo subject. People are intent on procreating. Unfettered except by natural disaster. Other species dwindle and go extinct, but the population clock keeps racing upward. While the Amazon burns, while the Bahamas flood, and while we lose species every year. Young people don't notice these things as much as humans who have been around for half a century or more. Can you just imagine the bird life 200 years ago compared to now? -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama

On Sunday, September 1, 2019, 07:22:46 PM CDT, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:


I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59. Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did not seem right.




On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...><mailto:<birders...>> wrote:

It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,
“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,
They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.
As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.
We could all use more nature time.
Penny

On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...><mailto:<alryff...>> wrote:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days gone by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its deepest colors. And sometimes, the morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight for blocks around. Today this is no longer so. Now and then, the neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few Nighthawks at a time pass over in the evening quiet. Alas, what has happened?

Alan


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Date: 9/9/19 10:08 pm
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
I would feel most of insect biomass loss in America is due to habitat loss or severe habitat degradation. I would look at the matter of insecticide usage as contributing to habitat loss both directly and indirectly through the imposition of crop mono-cultures on large swathes of land by new GMO agricultural techniques. A soybean or corn mono-culture is not a rich habitat that supports a thriving native ecosystem and varied insect diversity. In the past such mono-cultures in agricultural fields or on their margins was not agriculturally possible and far more ecological diversity existed in them.

Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan

________________________________
From: 'jochen roeder' via Birders <birders...>
Sent: Monday, September 2, 2019 4:44 AM
To: P. swanson <jumpthroughhoops...>; Alan Ryff <alryff...>; Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Cc: Birders UM <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?

According to monitoring studies, Germany has lost around 75% of insect biomass during the last 30 years. While habitat loss certainly plays a role as well, this is though to be mostly a result of increased pesticide use. I suspect the same is true for many parts of the USA. A "classic example" that is usually given to demonstrate this: during the 1980's, it was common practice to clean the windshield of insect remains with a special sponge available at petrol stations, at least at every stop to fill up gas. It was not unusual - from personal experience - that you'd stop at a petrol station specifically to use these sponges to clean the windshield without having to buy gas at all. Nowadays, I scarcely ever clean the windshield, as you can drive for weeks without collecting a significant amount of insect stains.

Cheers,
Jochen

Am Montag, 2. September 2019, 02:23:45 MESZ hat Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Folgendes geschrieben:


I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59. Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did not seem right.




On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...><mailto:<birders...>> wrote:

It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,
“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,
They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.
As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.
We could all use more nature time.
Penny

On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...><mailto:<alryff...>> wrote:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days goneby when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in thehundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives itsdeepest colors. And sometimes, themorning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlightfor blocks around. Today this is nolonger so. Now and then, theneighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a fewNighthawks at a time pass over in theevening quiet. Alas, what has happened?

Alan


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Date: 9/9/19 9:38 pm
From: Roger Kuhlman <rkuhlman...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
Many butterflies besides Monarchs find spaces planted with masses of blooming alfalfa and pink clover to be very attractive at this time of year. It is far too bad that fewer and fewer farmer fields and almost no suburban sprawl yard lawns are being planted with alfalfa/pink clover mixes these days.

Roger Kuhlman
Ann Arbor, Michigan

________________________________
From: 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...>
Sent: Sunday, September 8, 2019 6:52 PM
To: <winerat...> <winerat...>
Cc: Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>; birders Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters

I’m with you, Sally. There’s also another problem on my side of town, too. Nobody is planting any flowers at all. It’s house after house of nothing. At most, couple pots of geraniums. But there is nothing for the pollinators, not even a clover lawn. Somewhere along the line, someone convinced people that lawns with clover are not desirable. Butterflies and bees have to go a mile or more and even then they don’t find a native flower. I try to make up for it with flowers that I know are recommended for Michigan but I still only get a few bees and butterflies. Enough complaining. I don’t believe we’ll ever go back to that

> On Sep 8, 2019, at 1:52 PM, Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> wrote:
>
> suddenly

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Date: 9/9/19 8:23 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (09 Sep 2019) 160 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 09, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 1 9 9
Bald Eagle 0 15 15
Northern Harrier 5 50 50
Sharp-shinned Hawk 41 181 181
Cooper's Hawk 0 3 3
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 103 210 210
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 2 55 55
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 8 36 36
Merlin 0 2 2
Peregrine Falcon 0 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 160 566 566
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Mark Hainen, Patrick Mulawa

Visitors:
Our visitors were fortunate to see a few small kettles of broad-wings.
Nothing too close unfortunately, as has been the case for all of this
season.


Weather:
Into each life a little unforecast rain must fall and so it was with us
today. Light rain to begin and very rough textured skies for most of the
day as we waited for the predicted clearing. It arrived at quitting time
with skies turning from purple clouds to blue skies within the last hour.
Winds turned as predicted to SSE, rising and falling throughout the day.

Raptor Observations:
An odd day with little movement for the first couple of hours but our
boredom was broken by the sight of our first broad-winged hawk kettle of 25
birds. The movement of birds continued at a moderate pace until the middle
afternoon hours when it dried up again. Over 100 broad-wings, over 40
sharpies, a double handful of kestrels and one of harriers.

Non-raptor Observations:
Today was the day the monarchs had their picnic. (with apologies to the
teddy-bears) There were so many at times it was difficult to locate birds
and mistaking monarchs for sharpies was a definite possibility. Over 1600
on the clicker but we may not have done them justice as it would have taken
many people to get an accurate count. We have had good numbers the last
couple of years but this was a standout day.

Predictions:
The temps are scheduled to rise to summer type numbers in the high eighties
tomorrow and that usually means winds from the south. Not usually our
favored winds or temps so bring the sunscreen and hope for the best.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Detroit River Hawk Watch (<jerry.jourdan...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/9/19 4:14 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (09 Sep 2019) 20 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 09, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 14 14
Osprey 0 5 5
Bald Eagle 4 23 23
Northern Harrier 6 63 63
Sharp-shinned Hawk 6 147 147
Cooper's Hawk 1 19 19
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 9 9
Red-tailed Hawk 0 47 47
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 3 86 86
Merlin 0 9 9
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 20 425 425
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Chip Ogglesby, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Thank you to our few visitors today, including Chip, Devon, Paul, and
Duncan from ERCA.


Weather:
Today started overcast, cool, and a humid 15 degrees Celsius with winds
from the North. Winds stayed steady from the North and North-West most of
the day, until a change to South-East and a spike in temperature.

Raptor Observations:
Today was a very slow day for raptors, with a daily total of 20, even with
such favourable winds. The most abundant raptors were Sharp-shinned hawks.
Even our local Ospreys and Bald Eagles were not very keen to fly around the
marsh today, though they were seen from time to time.

Non-raptor Observations:
Monday's Massive Monarch Migration!! The Monarchs were the highlight of the
day, when 3,553 butterflies migrated over the tower from 1-4 o'clock.
Common green darner and black saddlebags also got the message and joined
the party.
We also observed a good variety of warblers flying in the trees surrounding
the tower.

Monarchs: 3,553
Common Green Darners: 200
Black Saddlebags: 40
Cedar Waxwings: 205
Ruby-throated hummingbirds: 6

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59647115


Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting winds from the South and very hot temperatures.
Not very promising weather for the raptors, but we are still hoping more
sharp-shinned hawks and broad-wings will migrated nonetheless.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/9/19 2:03 pm
From: lowell gastonberry <dorfdoom...>
Subject: Re: [birders] New Milkweed
Try looking at prairienursery.com. They have photos of all the milkweeds I am aware of.
Penny

> On Sep 8, 2019, at 11:28 PM, thegarlicks <thegarlicks...> wrote:
>
> Ah, the jeopardy of common names. ;) Meanwhile, Google tells me the specific epithet is actually incarnata... Anyway, I had looked at and dismissed Swamp Milkweed, as the flowers of my unknown were nowhere near as showy, which of course only I remember. Why on earth didn't it occur to me to take pics then? Sincere apologies, all, for the oversight! (I'm hoping to sow some seeds from this one and maybe have a few more plants around next year, so with any luck I'll have pics of the flowers then!)
>
> (Butterfly Milkweed is another species I've had here, but it doesn't seem to do well; I think letting the field go--it used to be hayed, back in the day--has allowed taller vegetation to take over which has overgrown the shorter Butterfly species, alas.)
>
>
>
>
>
> From: "Jack Smiley" <jackrsmiley...>
> To: <psaoud2...>
> Cc: <thegarlicks...>, "Birders UM" <birders...>
> Sent: Sunday, September 8, 2019 8:08:28 AM
> Subject: Re: [birders] New Milkweed
>
> Asclepius incarnatus is Swamp Milkweed. Butterfly weed, also called Butterfly Milkweed, is Asclepius tuberose. It has bright orange flowers, easily identifiable.
>
>> On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 7:22 AM 'Philip Saoud' via Birders <birders...> wrote:
>> Asclepias Incarnatus, or butterfly weed. I bought some at a local nursery a few years ago and I get monarch caterpillars every year.
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>>
>> On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 12:21 AM, thegarlicks
>> <thegarlicks...> wrote:
>> Can anyone tell me what species of milkweed this is? https://www.flickr.com/photos/82741306@N03/albums/72157710746332957 It appeared in my old field this year, the first time I've ever seen it. Sadly, I didn't think to get pictures when it was in bloom; if I recall correctly the flowers were mostly white with some lavender-ish hues in the center of the Asclepias-looking inflorescences. Also, it bloomed after the Common Milkweed had already gone to seed.
>>
>> It has opposite leaves and branches coming off a single main stalk about 1.5 meters tall. A look at internet sources led me to consider "Aquatic Milkweed," Asclepias perennis, though most pages say this species doesn't occur in MI (though maps show it in Indiana). Also, A. perennis is supposed to only grow in soil that's continually moist, which isn't true of my old field, though there are marshes to the north and east of the field. I live in a rural area about half way between Kalamazoo & Battle Creek.
>>
>> Has been a banner year for Monarchs here this year (at least one larva is visible in one of the pics in the album). Hope this is an appropriate place to post this.
>>
>> --Diane Garlick, Augusta
>>
>>
>> --
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>
>
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Date: 9/9/19 1:48 pm
From: 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
Thanks for the comments, Fred. I feel that people just need to read more to educate themselves, but they have too much on their plates, not just in Macomb but everywhere.
Penny

> On Sep 9, 2019, at 1:11 AM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>
> Remember Penny that you and I are living in Macomb County which has been accurately described as a “cultural backwater”. By and large...people here just keep doing what they’ve been doing seemingly unaffected by the latest science and oblivious to their own senses. Must be related to the opioid crisis I guess. As usual, the wildlife suffers at their feet. Funny place.
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 6:52 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> wrote:
>
>> I’m with you, Sally. There’s also another problem on my side of town, too. Nobody is planting any flowers at all. It’s house after house of nothing. At most, couple pots of geraniums. But there is nothing for the pollinators, not even a clover lawn. Somewhere along the line, someone convinced people that lawns with clover are not desirable. Butterflies and bees have to go a mile or more and even then they don’t find a native flower. I try to make up for it with flowers that I know are recommended for Michigan but I still only get a few bees and butterflies. Enough complaining. I don’t believe we’ll ever go back to that
>>
>> > On Sep 8, 2019, at 1:52 PM, Sally K. Scheer wrote:
>> >
>> > suddenly
>>
>> --
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>
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Date: 9/8/19 10:11 pm
From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters



Remember Penny that you and I are living in Macomb County which has been accurately described as a “cultural backwater”.  By and large...people here just keep doing what they’ve been doing seemingly unaffected by the latest science and oblivious to their own senses.  Must be related to the opioid crisis I guess.  As usual, the wildlife suffers at their feet.  Funny place.








On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 6:52 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> wrote:










I’m with you, Sally. There’s also another problem on my side of town, too. Nobody is planting any flowers at all. It’s house after house of nothing. At most, couple pots of geraniums. But there is nothing for the pollinators, not even a clover lawn. Somewhere along the line, someone convinced people that lawns with clover are not desirable. Butterflies and bees have to go a mile or more and even then they don’t find a native flower. I try to make up for it with flowers that I know are recommended for Michigan but I still only get a few bees and butterflies. Enough complaining. I don’t believe we’ll ever go back to that

> On Sep 8, 2019, at 1:52 PM, Sally K. Scheer wrote:
>
> suddenly

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Date: 9/8/19 8:50 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (08 Sep 2019) 77 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 08, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 0 8 8
Bald Eagle 0 15 15
Northern Harrier 6 45 45
Sharp-shinned Hawk 32 140 140
Cooper's Hawk 1 3 3
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 20 107 107
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 10 53 53
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 7 28 28
Merlin 0 2 2
Peregrine Falcon 1 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 77 406 406
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Don Sherwood, Mark Hainen, Raburn Howland

Visitors:
Bill and Michelle paid us a visit. The weekends usually bring more visitors
and today was no exception. It's still a little early to reap the best
rewards but those days will be upon us soon so keep coming.


Weather:
A wolf in sheep's clothing kind of a day. Started off with partly sunny
skies and a barometer above 30" Hg all day. Winds from NW that turned to
ENE but the dark clouds that accumulated and filled the sky looked
threatening during the afternoon and the steady trickle of birds dried up.

Raptor Observations:
The calendar says we should expect these kinds of flights but we are hungry
for more. Sharpies led the way again with 30+ birds and the broad-wings
followed with 21. Harriers numbered seven birds but were outnumbered by
American kestrels at eight. Another day in which unless you had 10X vision
you might have missed the action above you. Very high flights for the most
part and mostly off the direct lane above us.

Non-raptor Observations:
A lot of gull flak today as they kettled in big numbers in our usual
observation areas. The dark juvenile birds can be especially distracting as
they soar and imitate buteos rather convincingly.

Predictions:
Barometer is predicted to peak around noon and then fall. Winds will end up
coming from SE. I would expect a similar day to today with moderate numbers
of birds.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Detroit River Hawk Watch (<jerry.jourdan...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/8/19 8:28 pm
From: thegarlicks <thegarlicks...>
Subject: Re: [birders] New Milkweed
Ah, the jeopardy of common names. ;) Meanwhile, Google tells me the specific epithet is actually incarnata ... Anyway, I had looked at and dismissed Swamp Milkweed, as the flowers of my unknown were nowhere near as showy, which of course only I remember. Why on earth didn't it occur to me to take pics then? Sincere apologies, all, for the oversight! (I'm hoping to sow some seeds from this one and maybe have a few more plants around next year, so with any luck I'll have pics of the flowers then!)

(Butterfly Milkweed is another species I've had here, but it doesn't seem to do well; I think letting the field go--it used to be hayed, back in the day--has allowed taller vegetation to take over which has overgrown the shorter Butterfly species, alas.)





----- Original Message -----

From: "Jack Smiley" <jackrsmiley...>
To: <psaoud2...>
Cc: <thegarlicks...>, "Birders UM" <birders...>
Sent: Sunday, September 8, 2019 8:08:28 AM
Subject: Re: [birders] New Milkweed

Asclepius incarnatus is Swamp Milkweed. Butterfly weed, also called Butterfly Milkweed, is Asclepius tuberose . It has bright orange flowers, easily identifiable.

On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 7:22 AM 'Philip Saoud' via Birders < <birders...> > wrote:


Asclepias Incarnatus, or butterfly weed. I bought some at a local nursery a few years ago and I get monarch caterpillars every year.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


<blockquote>

On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 12:21 AM, thegarlicks
< <thegarlicks...> > wrote:
Can anyone tell me what species of milkweed this is? https://www.flickr.com/photos/82741306@N03/albums/72157710746332957 It appeared in my old field this year, the first time I've ever seen it. Sadly, I didn't think to get pictures when it was in bloom; if I recall correctly the flowers were mostly white with some lavender-ish hues in the center of the Asclepias -looking inflorescences. Also, it bloomed after the Common Milkweed had already gone to seed.

It has opposite leaves and branches coming off a single main stalk about 1.5 meters tall. A look at internet sources led me to consider "Aquatic Milkweed," Asclepias perennis , though most pages say this species doesn't occur in MI (though maps show it in Indiana). Also, A. perennis is supposed to only grow in soil that's continually moist, which isn't true of my old field, though there are marshes to the north and east of the field. I live in a rural area about half way between Kalamazoo & Battle Creek.

Has been a banner year for Monarchs here this year (at least one larva is visible in one of the pics in the album). Hope this is an appropriate place to post this.

--Diane Garlick, Augusta




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</blockquote>


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Date: 9/8/19 4:14 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (08 Sep 2019) 140 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 08, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 7 14 14
Osprey 0 5 5
Bald Eagle 8 19 19
Northern Harrier 15 57 57
Sharp-shinned Hawk 54 141 141
Cooper's Hawk 3 18 18
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 6 9 9
Red-tailed Hawk 16 47 47
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 30 83 83
Merlin 1 9 9
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 140 405 405
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Chip Ogglesby, Cindy Isenhoff, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Thank you to our many visitors today; Cindy and Kramer, Chip and Dana,
Ralph and Mary-Jane, Leanna and Doug, James, Russ Jones and his family, and
Neil. Thank you for all your help looking at raptors.


Weather:
We had a cooler day, with constant cloud cover and temperatures only rising
to low 20 degrees Celsius. We did experience some very favourable winds
from the North for the majority of the day.

Raptor Observations:
Another very good day with a total of 140 raptors flying over the tower! We
had mostly Sharp-shinned hawks and American Kestrels. Broad-wing hawks are
slowly making their way down, coming in small groups of 2-3, with a daily
total of 6.
We were also joined by the resident Ospreys, adult and juvenile Bald
Eagles, Turkey Vultures and a juvenile Peregrine falcon.

Non-raptor Observations:
We are seeing fewer warblers passing through the tree around the tower,
except for a sudden burst at the end of the day. Many warblers are now
flying in small groups above the marsh. We are still seeing high numbers of
Cedar Waxwings and Mallards.
One of today's highlight was an American White Pelican flying high over the
marsh!

Cedar Waxwings: 274
Mallards: 188
Ruby-throated hummingbirds: 10
Monarchs: 27

Predictions:
Tomorrow morning we are expecting North and North-East winds, and changing
towards the South and South-East in the afternoon. Hopefully, the northerly
winds will bring us many more Sharp-shinned hawks, Kestrels and more
Broad-winged hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/8/19 3:52 pm
From: 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
I’m with you, Sally. There’s also another problem on my side of town, too. Nobody is planting any flowers at all. It’s house after house of nothing. At most, couple pots of geraniums. But there is nothing for the pollinators, not even a clover lawn. Somewhere along the line, someone convinced people that lawns with clover are not desirable. Butterflies and bees have to go a mile or more and even then they don’t find a native flower. I try to make up for it with flowers that I know are recommended for Michigan but I still only get a few bees and butterflies. Enough complaining. I don’t believe we’ll ever go back to that

> On Sep 8, 2019, at 1:52 PM, Sally K. Scheer <winerat...> wrote:
>
> suddenly

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Date: 9/8/19 10:54 am
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Meeting/Program Tuesday, September 10 at 7:00 PM
Tuesday September 10, 2019, 7:00 p.m. Join us for the Oakland Audubon
Society's monthly meeting and a program titled "Wildlife At Duck Pond"
presented by local birder and photographer Rob Weir. Rob will share with us
his beautiful photography taken at a small pond in Washington Township.
Everyone is welcome to attend this free program. Refreshments will be
served.

Meetings are held at the First United Methodist Church, 1589 West Maple
Road, Birmingham, MI 48009. Enter the building from the rear main entrance.
Please note our meeting room has been changed to the Children's Room.

Oakland Audubon baseball style hats are back in stock and will be available
at the meeting, field trips or by contacting me while the supply lasts.

Please see our website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) for details about
upcoming field trips, meetings, programs and the Young Birder's Club.
Additional field trips are being added so check the website or facebook
often. You do not have to be a member to participate. Everyone is welcome.

Thank you,
Phil Bugosh
Oakland Audubon Society

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Date: 9/8/19 10:52 am
From: Sally K. Scheer <winerat...>
Subject: RE: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
Writers of Weed ordinances in all areas need a little education. Seems to be OK to import foreign plants to “beautify” the yards but let some native wild plants in and suddenly you have WEEDS!! Oh horrors! It’s not just cities either. Our small town “inspectors” hounded a friend of mine about the wonderful wild things growing in her yards and fined her multiple times for them. She’s dead now and the house has been purchased and the yard is not a flat expanse of grass with nothing of interest. It breaks my heart.



Sally Scheer





From: Jack Smiley [mailto:<jackrsmiley...>]
Sent: Saturday, September 07, 2019 2:56 PM
To: Anita Blasius
Cc: birders Birders
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters



Detroit considered my few goldenrod plants to be "weeds". My Day lilies were actually more "weedy", but those were fine with the inspector.



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:44 PM Anita Blasius <ibblazin...> wrote:

Jack,

If you got fined for having goldenrod, you probably got fined for the wrong thing. Some folks are probably allergic to goldenrod but, in general, it’s ragweed that’s the problem. Goldenrod is a wildflower that is pollinated by insects while ragweed is, as the name states, a weed and the pollen is airborn. Here are a couple of articles on the subject – hope I’m not breaking listserve rules by posting them.



https://theherbalacademy.com/goldenrod-vs-ragweed-theyre-not-the-same-plant/



https://theydiffer.com/difference-between-ragweed-and-goldenrod/



In any case, enjoy the butterflies!



Anita



From: Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 1:42 PM
Cc: birders Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters



I have a good amount of goldenrod (and some asters) in my backyard which attracts quite a few butterflies and other insects. I am so glad that I am no longer in Detroit where I was fined for having only a few goldenrod plants in my yard.



Yesterday I saw four monarch butterflies at one time and also had two Giant Swallowtails flitting about. The butterflies seem to prefer the flowering Field Thistle above all else. I have one thistle that is nearly 10 feet tall.



Jack



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 12:35 PM Ellen Weatherbee <eew...> wrote:

This observation should be also true for much of Michigan. I spend quite a bit of time on Cockburn Island, Canada 🇨🇦(between Drummond Island, USA, and Manitoulin Island, Ontario. It is one of the areas where birds and butterflies land on their journey south. All summer we have had a fair number of monarchs, and this past week has shown a huge influx of them, as they fed and rested, after crossing the North Channel from the Canadian mainland.

There is very little visitation this time of year on the milkweeds, although earlier in the year, there was.

Their apparent much-preferred plants this time of year for nectar are tall goldenrod, Canada goldenrod, and flat-topped white aster. (Solidago altissima, S. canadensis, and Doellingeria umbellata.) It is fine to promote the value of milkweeds, but I would strongly suggest adding goldenrods and asters to protect and promote wherever possible. There are many acres of these plants literally covered with monarchs, on both private property and on Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) property.

Ellen.Jack.Nellie (woof woof)

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Date: 9/8/19 5:11 am
From: Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>
Subject: Re: [birders] New Milkweed
Asclepias. Darn auto-correct.

On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 8:08 AM Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...> wrote:

> *Asclepius incarnatus* is Swamp Milkweed. Butterfly weed, also called
> Butterfly Milkweed, is *Asclepius* *tuberose**. *It has bright orange
> flowers, easily identifiable.
>
> On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 7:22 AM 'Philip Saoud' via Birders <
> <birders...> wrote:
>
>> Asclepias Incarnatus, or butterfly weed. I bought some at a local
>> nursery a few years ago and I get monarch caterpillars every year.
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
>>
>> On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 12:21 AM, thegarlicks
>> <thegarlicks...> wrote:
>> Can anyone tell me what species of milkweed this is?
>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/82741306@N03/albums/72157710746332957 It
>> appeared in my old field this year, the first time I've ever seen it.
>> Sadly, I didn't think to get pictures when it was in bloom; if I recall
>> correctly the flowers were mostly white with some lavender-ish hues in the
>> center of the* Asclepias*-looking inflorescences. Also, it bloomed
>> after the Common Milkweed had already gone to seed.
>>
>> It has opposite leaves and branches coming off a single main stalk about
>> 1.5 meters tall. A look at internet sources led me to consider "Aquatic
>> Milkweed," *Asclepias perennis*, though most pages say this species
>> doesn't occur in MI (though maps show it in Indiana). Also, *A. perennis*
>> is supposed to only grow in soil that's continually moist, which isn't true
>> of my old field, though there are marshes to the north and east of the
>> field. I live in a rural area about half way between Kalamazoo & Battle
>> Creek.
>>
>> Has been a banner year for Monarchs here this year (at least one larva is
>> visible in one of the pics in the album). Hope this is an appropriate place
>> to post this.
>>
>> --Diane Garlick, Augusta
>>
>>
>> --
>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
>> www.glc.org
>> ---
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
>> "Birders" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
>> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
>> To view this discussion on the web visit
>> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<571581271.31630601.1567916489617.JavaMail.zimbra...>
>> <https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<571581271.31630601.1567916489617.JavaMail.zimbra...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
>> .
>>
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>> www.glc.org
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>> <https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<798176674.3934324.1567941716612...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
>> .
>>
>

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Date: 9/8/19 5:08 am
From: Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>
Subject: Re: [birders] New Milkweed
*Asclepius incarnatus* is Swamp Milkweed. Butterfly weed, also called
Butterfly Milkweed, is *Asclepius* *tuberose**. *It has bright orange
flowers, easily identifiable.

On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 7:22 AM 'Philip Saoud' via Birders <
<birders...> wrote:

> Asclepias Incarnatus, or butterfly weed. I bought some at a local nursery
> a few years ago and I get monarch caterpillars every year.
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
>
> On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 12:21 AM, thegarlicks
> <thegarlicks...> wrote:
> Can anyone tell me what species of milkweed this is?
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/82741306@N03/albums/72157710746332957 It
> appeared in my old field this year, the first time I've ever seen it.
> Sadly, I didn't think to get pictures when it was in bloom; if I recall
> correctly the flowers were mostly white with some lavender-ish hues in the
> center of the* Asclepias*-looking inflorescences. Also, it bloomed after
> the Common Milkweed had already gone to seed.
>
> It has opposite leaves and branches coming off a single main stalk about
> 1.5 meters tall. A look at internet sources led me to consider "Aquatic
> Milkweed," *Asclepias perennis*, though most pages say this species
> doesn't occur in MI (though maps show it in Indiana). Also, *A. perennis*
> is supposed to only grow in soil that's continually moist, which isn't true
> of my old field, though there are marshes to the north and east of the
> field. I live in a rural area about half way between Kalamazoo & Battle
> Creek.
>
> Has been a banner year for Monarchs here this year (at least one larva is
> visible in one of the pics in the album). Hope this is an appropriate place
> to post this.
>
> --Diane Garlick, Augusta
>
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Birders" group.
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> .
>
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> www.glc.org
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> .
>

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Date: 9/8/19 4:47 am
From: Karen Markey <ylime...>
Subject: [birders] Sharing master eBird checklists from a group field trip
When you ask your field trip leader to share his/her eBird checklist with
you, the leader prepares a master checklist that reflects birds seen and/or
heard by one or more members of the group. Via email, eBird sends you a
link asking you to accept a copy of the master checklist, and, presumably,
you accept such a copy. If you did NOT see and/or hear one or more birds on
your copy of the master checklist, you can edit your copy of the checklist,
REMOVING birds you did NOT see and/or hear. If you saw and/or heard one or
more birds that are NOT on the copy, you can edit your list, ADDING birds
you saw or heard. eBird then removes or adds the birds to your personal
copy of the checklist, not to the master checklist.

If you accept every bird on the master checklist, then eBird adds all the
birds to the various life-lists it creates for you. Thus, you might want to
be circumspect, reviewing the eBird checklists you accept, removing and
adding birds based on whether you heard and/or saw them.

* * * * * * * * * * * *
Karen Markey
Email: <ylime...>
Web: http://ylime.people.si.umich.edu/

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Date: 9/8/19 4:34 am
From: Karen Markey <ylime...>
Subject: [birders] Re: Hudson Mills Fall Field Trip Report: Warblers and Vireos High in the Canopy
Kudos to Mike Bowen who was on hand to photograph birds, but like the rest
of us working with binoculars, struggled to find birds in Hudson Mills'
high canopy. He did, however, snap a photo of the Golden-Winged Warbler,
and he's posted the photo to our checklist at
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59582431.

Thanks Mike for documenting this difficult-to-find, -see, and -study
warbler. Mike also illustrates many of WAS' Thursday morning field trips in
the Arb. See the latest illustrated Arb checklist at
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59535947

* * * * * * * * *
Karen Markey
ylime AT umich.edu




On Saturday, September 7, 2019 at 3:44:31 PM UTC-4, Karen Markey wrote:
>
> Our band of almost 30 birders began touring Hudson Mills in low-light and
> no-bird conditions. Struggling to find birds, I led the group to my
> favorite hotspot -- the north-south corridor of the Nature Trail to the
> immediate northwest of disc golf hole #14. We spent a solid hour there,
> peering up at the canopy and sorting through a large pack of warblers,
> vireos, and woodpeckers. In that one hotspot, we identified 14 species of
> warblers, and the stars of the show were a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER and a
> CANADA WARBLER, and all the while, we were serenaded by Yellow-Throated
> Vireo who did every possible vocalization in his repertoire. Eastern
> Wood-Pewees, Red-Eyed Vireos, and Cedar Waxwings were plentiful, some still
> feeding youngsters.
>
> Thanks to Juliet, Jessica, John, Cathy (relocating the Golden-Wing), Erin
> (finding the Canada), and others for finding, identifying, and relocating
> birds and helping others spot birds high in the canopy. Double thanks to
> Juliet for keeping the eBird checklist and sharing with others. Let's do
> this again next May!
>
> Hudson Mills Metropark, Washtenaw, Michigan, US
> Sep 7, 2019 8:00 AM - 12:16 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 3.872 mile(s)
> Comments: WAS Field Trip led by Karen Markey. Sky 2-3. North Wind 1.
> 60-67 F.
> 51 species (+1 other taxa)
>
> Canada Goose 4
> Wood Duck 2
> Mourning Dove 2
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3
> Sandhill Crane 4
> Ring-billed Gull 1
> Turkey Vulture 4
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 7
> Downy Woodpecker 5
> Hairy Woodpecker 2
> Northern Flicker 6
> Eastern Wood-Pewee 15
> Eastern Phoebe 3
> Great Crested Flycatcher 2
> Yellow-throated Vireo 9 They breed here. Careful count.
> Warbling Vireo 1
> Red-eyed Vireo 11
> Blue Jay 21
> American Crow 5
> Black-capped Chickadee 16
> Tufted Titmouse 13
> White-breasted Nuthatch 11
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
> House Wren 2
> Carolina Wren 3
> Gray Catbird 6
> Brown Thrasher 1
> Eastern Bluebird 2
> Swainson's Thrush 2
> Catharus sp. 2 Possible Veery. Better looks desired!
> American Robin 6
> Cedar Waxwing 28
> American Goldfinch 7
> Red-winged Blackbird 2
> Common Grackle 2
> Golden-winged Warbler 1 Male. Golden head and wingbars. Black mask
> and throat. Seen well by at least half the group.
> Black-and-white Warbler 4
> Tennessee Warbler 7
> Nashville Warbler 2
> Common Yellowthroat 3
> American Redstart 5
> Magnolia Warbler 3
> Bay-breasted Warbler 12
> Blackburnian Warbler 5
> Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
> Blackpoll Warbler 1
> Black-throated Blue Warbler 2
> Black-throated Green Warbler 2
> Canada Warbler 1 Found by Erin Zylstra
> Scarlet Tanager 1 Heard chip burr.
> Northern Cardinal 11
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak 2
>
> View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59582431
>
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (
> https://ebird.org/home)
>
> * * * * * * * * * * * *
> Karen Markey
> Email: <ylime...>
> Web: http://ylime.people.si.umich.edu/
>

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Date: 9/8/19 4:22 am
From: 'Philip Saoud' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] New Milkweed
Asclepias Incarnatus, or butterfly weed.  I bought some at a local nursery a few years ago and I get monarch caterpillars every year. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Sun, Sep 8, 2019 at 12:21 AM, thegarlicks<thegarlicks...> wrote: Can anyone tell me what species of milkweed this is? https://www.flickr.com/photos/82741306@N03/albums/72157710746332957 It appeared in my old field this year, the first time I've ever seen it. Sadly, I didn't think to get pictures when it was in bloom; if I recall correctly the flowers were mostly white with some lavender-ish hues in the center of the Asclepias-looking inflorescences.  Also, it bloomed after the Common Milkweed had already gone to seed. 
It has opposite leaves and branches coming off a single main stalk about 1.5 meters tall. A look at internet sources led me to consider "Aquatic Milkweed," Asclepias perennis, though most pages say this species doesn't occur in MI (though maps show it in Indiana). Also, A. perennis is supposed to only grow in soil that's continually moist, which isn't true of my old field, though there are marshes to the north and east of the field.  I live in a rural area about half way between Kalamazoo & Battle Creek.

Has been a banner year for Monarchs here this year (at least one larva is visible in one of the pics in the album). Hope this is an appropriate place to post this. 
--Diane Garlick, Augusta



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Date: 9/7/19 9:21 pm
From: thegarlicks <thegarlicks...>
Subject: [birders] New Milkweed
Can anyone tell me what species of milkweed this is? https://www.flickr.com/photos/82741306@N03/albums/72157710746332957 It appeared in my old field this year, the first time I've ever seen it. Sadly, I didn't think to get pictures when it was in bloom; if I recall correctly the flowers were mostly white with some lavender-ish hues in the center of the Asclepias -looking inflorescences. Also, it bloomed after the Common Milkweed had already gone to seed.

It has opposite leaves and branches coming off a single main stalk about 1.5 meters tall. A look at internet sources led me to consider "Aquatic Milkweed," Asclepias perennis , though most pages say this species doesn't occur in MI (though maps show it in Indiana). Also, A. perennis is supposed to only grow in soil that's continually moist, which isn't true of my old field, though there are marshes to the north and east of the field. I live in a rural area about half way between Kalamazoo & Battle Creek.

Has been a banner year for Monarchs here this year (at least one larva is visible in one of the pics in the album). Hope this is an appropriate place to post this.

--Diane Garlick, Augusta


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Date: 9/7/19 4:09 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (07 Sep 2019) 132 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 07, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 7 7
Osprey 2 5 5
Bald Eagle 3 11 11
Northern Harrier 11 42 42
Sharp-shinned Hawk 72 87 87
Cooper's Hawk 6 15 15
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 3 3
Red-tailed Hawk 5 31 31
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 31 53 53
Merlin 2 8 8
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 132 265 265
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Bob Pettit, Chip Ogglesby, Dave Martin, Linda Wladarski

Visitors:
Thank you to Neil, Brent and John Barnes for their help spotting
Sharp-shinned hawks out of the sky.


Weather:
The day started with balmy weather and some threatening clouds, but cleared
and warmed by mid-day. We also experienced very favourable winds coming
from the West and North in morning, only to change to the South by the end
of the day.

Raptor Observations:
We had our biggest raptor count so far this season! Raptors migrated
steadily throughout the morning, mostly Sharp-shinned hawks (72) and
American Kestrels (31). We also observed our resident Ospreys, Bald Eagles
and Turkey Vultures as well as a non-migrating Peregrine falcon.

Non-raptor Observations:
Today was a slower day for the passerines, not only in number of species
but also in abundance. The number of swallows over the marsh is slowly
declining. Our highest count of the day was 255 starlings.
However, we did observe many Black Saddlebag dragonflies and Monarchs.

Purple martins: 81
Tree swallows: 51
Barn swallows: 30
Starlings: 255
Ruby-throated hummingbirds: 9
Black saddlebags: 145
Monarchs: 165

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59589975

Predictions:
Tomorrow, we are expecting winds from the North in the morning and changing
to eastern winds in the afternoon. We are therefore hoping the northerly
winds will bring more Sharp-sinned hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/7/19 12:44 pm
From: Karen Markey <ylime...>
Subject: [birders] Hudson Mills Fall Field Trip Report: Warblers and Vireos High in the Canopy
Our band of almost 30 birders began touring Hudson Mills in low-light and
no-bird conditions. Struggling to find birds, I led the group to my
favorite hotspot -- the north-south corridor of the Nature Trail to the
immediate northwest of disc golf hole #14. We spent a solid hour there,
peering up at the canopy and sorting through a large pack of warblers,
vireos, and woodpeckers. In that one hotspot, we identified 14 species of
warblers, and the stars of the show were a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER and a
CANADA WARBLER, and all the while, we were serenaded by Yellow-Throated
Vireo who did every possible vocalization in his repertoire. Eastern
Wood-Pewees, Red-Eyed Vireos, and Cedar Waxwings were plentiful, some still
feeding youngsters.

Thanks to Juliet, Jessica, John, Cathy (relocating the Golden-Wing), Erin
(finding the Canada), and others for finding, identifying, and relocating
birds and helping others spot birds high in the canopy. Double thanks to
Juliet for keeping the eBird checklist and sharing with others. Let's do
this again next May!

Hudson Mills Metropark, Washtenaw, Michigan, US
Sep 7, 2019 8:00 AM - 12:16 PM
Protocol: Traveling
3.872 mile(s)
Comments: WAS Field Trip led by Karen Markey. Sky 2-3. North Wind 1.
60-67 F.
51 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose 4
Wood Duck 2
Mourning Dove 2
Ruby-throated Hummingbird 3
Sandhill Crane 4
Ring-billed Gull 1
Turkey Vulture 4
Red-bellied Woodpecker 7
Downy Woodpecker 5
Hairy Woodpecker 2
Northern Flicker 6
Eastern Wood-Pewee 15
Eastern Phoebe 3
Great Crested Flycatcher 2
Yellow-throated Vireo 9 They breed here. Careful count.
Warbling Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 11
Blue Jay 21
American Crow 5
Black-capped Chickadee 16
Tufted Titmouse 13
White-breasted Nuthatch 11
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 2
House Wren 2
Carolina Wren 3
Gray Catbird 6
Brown Thrasher 1
Eastern Bluebird 2
Swainson's Thrush 2
Catharus sp. 2 Possible Veery. Better looks desired!
American Robin 6
Cedar Waxwing 28
American Goldfinch 7
Red-winged Blackbird 2
Common Grackle 2
Golden-winged Warbler 1 Male. Golden head and wingbars. Black mask and
throat. Seen well by at least half the group.
Black-and-white Warbler 4
Tennessee Warbler 7
Nashville Warbler 2
Common Yellowthroat 3
American Redstart 5
Magnolia Warbler 3
Bay-breasted Warbler 12
Blackburnian Warbler 5
Chestnut-sided Warbler 2
Blackpoll Warbler 1
Black-throated Blue Warbler 2
Black-throated Green Warbler 2
Canada Warbler 1 Found by Erin Zylstra
Scarlet Tanager 1 Heard chip burr.
Northern Cardinal 11
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 2

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59582431

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)

* * * * * * * * * * * *
Karen Markey
Email: <ylime...>
Web: http://ylime.people.si.umich.edu/

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Date: 9/7/19 11:55 am
From: Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
Detroit considered my few goldenrod plants to be "weeds". My Day lilies
were actually more "weedy", but those were fine with the inspector.

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 2:44 PM Anita Blasius <ibblazin...> wrote:

> Jack,
>
> If you got fined for having goldenrod, you probably got fined for the
> wrong thing. Some folks are probably allergic to goldenrod but, in general,
> it’s ragweed that’s the problem. Goldenrod is a wildflower that is
> pollinated by insects while ragweed is, as the name states, a weed and the
> pollen is airborn. Here are a couple of articles on the subject – hope I’m
> not breaking listserve rules by posting them.
>
>
>
>
> https://theherbalacademy.com/goldenrod-vs-ragweed-theyre-not-the-same-plant/
>
>
>
> https://theydiffer.com/difference-between-ragweed-and-goldenrod/
>
>
>
> In any case, enjoy the butterflies!
>
>
>
> Anita
>
>
>
> *From:* Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>
> *Sent:* Saturday, September 7, 2019 1:42 PM
> *Cc:* birders Birders <birders...>
> *Subject:* Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
>
>
>
> I have a good amount of goldenrod (and some asters) in my backyard which
> attracts quite a few butterflies and other insects. I am so glad that I am
> no longer in Detroit where I was fined for having only a few goldenrod
> plants in my yard.
>
>
>
> Yesterday I saw four monarch butterflies at one time and also had two
> Giant Swallowtails flitting about. The butterflies seem to prefer the
> flowering Field Thistle above all else. I have one thistle that is nearly
> 10 feet tall.
>
>
>
> Jack
>
>
>
> On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 12:35 PM Ellen Weatherbee <eew...> wrote:
>
> This observation should be also true for much of Michigan. I spend quite a
> bit of time on Cockburn Island, Canada 🇨🇦(between Drummond Island, USA,
> and Manitoulin Island, Ontario. It is one of the areas where birds and
> butterflies land on their journey south. All summer we have had a fair
> number of monarchs, and this past week has shown a huge influx of them, as
> they fed and rested, after crossing the North Channel from the Canadian
> mainland.
>
> There is very little visitation this time of year on the milkweeds,
> although earlier in the year, there was.
>
> Their apparent much-preferred plants this time of year for nectar are tall
> goldenrod, Canada goldenrod, and flat-topped white aster. (Solidago
> altissima, S. canadensis, and Doellingeria umbellata.) It is fine to
> promote the value of milkweeds, but I would strongly suggest adding
> goldenrods and asters to protect and promote wherever possible. There are
> many acres of these plants literally covered with monarchs, on both private
> property and on Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) property.
>
> Ellen.Jack.Nellie (woof woof)
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Birders" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<AA360900-378D-4259-8A52-D9CA76C5F43A...>
> .
>
> --
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> www.glc.org
> ---
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> .
>
> --
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> www.glc.org
> ---
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>

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Date: 9/7/19 11:44 am
From: Anita Blasius <ibblazin...>
Subject: RE: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
Jack,

If you got fined for having goldenrod, you probably got fined for the wrong thing. Some folks are probably allergic to goldenrod but, in general, it’s ragweed that’s the problem. Goldenrod is a wildflower that is pollinated by insects while ragweed is, as the name states, a weed and the pollen is airborn. Here are a couple of articles on the subject – hope I’m not breaking listserve rules by posting them.



https://theherbalacademy.com/goldenrod-vs-ragweed-theyre-not-the-same-plant/



https://theydiffer.com/difference-between-ragweed-and-goldenrod/



In any case, enjoy the butterflies!



Anita



From: Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>
Sent: Saturday, September 7, 2019 1:42 PM
Cc: birders Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters



I have a good amount of goldenrod (and some asters) in my backyard which attracts quite a few butterflies and other insects. I am so glad that I am no longer in Detroit where I was fined for having only a few goldenrod plants in my yard.



Yesterday I saw four monarch butterflies at one time and also had two Giant Swallowtails flitting about. The butterflies seem to prefer the flowering Field Thistle above all else. I have one thistle that is nearly 10 feet tall.



Jack



On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 12:35 PM Ellen Weatherbee <eew...> <mailto:<eew...> > wrote:

This observation should be also true for much of Michigan. I spend quite a bit of time on Cockburn Island, Canada 🇨🇦(between Drummond Island, USA, and Manitoulin Island, Ontario. It is one of the areas where birds and butterflies land on their journey south. All summer we have had a fair number of monarchs, and this past week has shown a huge influx of them, as they fed and rested, after crossing the North Channel from the Canadian mainland.

There is very little visitation this time of year on the milkweeds, although earlier in the year, there was.

Their apparent much-preferred plants this time of year for nectar are tall goldenrod, Canada goldenrod, and flat-topped white aster. (Solidago altissima, S. canadensis, and Doellingeria umbellata.) It is fine to promote the value of milkweeds, but I would strongly suggest adding goldenrods and asters to protect and promote wherever possible. There are many acres of these plants literally covered with monarchs, on both private property and on Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) property.

Ellen.Jack.Nellie (woof woof)

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Date: 9/7/19 10:42 am
From: Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
I have a good amount of goldenrod (and some asters) in my backyard which
attracts quite a few butterflies and other insects. I am so glad that I am
no longer in Detroit where I was fined for having only a few goldenrod
plants in my yard.

Yesterday I saw four monarch butterflies at one time and also had two Giant
Swallowtails flitting about. The butterflies seem to prefer the flowering
Field Thistle above all else. I have one thistle that is nearly 10 feet
tall.

Jack

On Sat, Sep 7, 2019 at 12:35 PM Ellen Weatherbee <eew...> wrote:

> This observation should be also true for much of Michigan. I spend quite a
> bit of time on Cockburn Island, Canada 🇨🇦(between Drummond Island, USA,
> and Manitoulin Island, Ontario. It is one of the areas where birds and
> butterflies land on their journey south. All summer we have had a fair
> number of monarchs, and this past week has shown a huge influx of them, as
> they fed and rested, after crossing the North Channel from the Canadian
> mainland.
>
> There is very little visitation this time of year on the milkweeds,
> although earlier in the year, there was.
>
> Their apparent much-preferred plants this time of year for nectar are tall
> goldenrod, Canada goldenrod, and flat-topped white aster. (Solidago
> altissima, S. canadensis, and Doellingeria umbellata.) It is fine to
> promote the value of milkweeds, but I would strongly suggest adding
> goldenrods and asters to protect and promote wherever possible. There are
> many acres of these plants literally covered with monarchs, on both private
> property and on Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) property.
>
> Ellen.Jack.Nellie (woof woof)
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Birders" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit
> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<AA360900-378D-4259-8A52-D9CA76C5F43A...>
> .
>

--
Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
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Back to top
Date: 9/7/19 10:39 am
From: 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
Thanks! I will pass this info along.
Penny

> On Sep 7, 2019, at 12:35 PM, Ellen Weatherbee <eew...> wrote:
>
> This observation should be also true for much of Michigan. I spend quite a bit of time on Cockburn Island, Canada 🇨🇦(between Drummond Island, USA, and Manitoulin Island, Ontario. It is one of the areas where birds and butterflies land on their journey south. All summer we have had a fair number of monarchs, and this past week has shown a huge influx of them, as they fed and rested, after crossing the North Channel from the Canadian mainland.
>
> There is very little visitation this time of year on the milkweeds, although earlier in the year, there was.
>
> Their apparent much-preferred plants this time of year for nectar are tall goldenrod, Canada goldenrod, and flat-topped white aster. (Solidago altissima, S. canadensis, and Doellingeria umbellata.) It is fine to promote the value of milkweeds, but I would strongly suggest adding goldenrods and asters to protect and promote wherever possible. There are many acres of these plants literally covered with monarchs, on both private property and on Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) property.
>
> Ellen.Jack.Nellie (woof woof)
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<AA360900-378D-4259-8A52-D9CA76C5F43A...>

--
Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
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Back to top
Date: 9/7/19 9:35 am
From: Ellen Weatherbee <eew...>
Subject: [birders] OT (monarch food) Goldenrods & Asters
This observation should be also true for much of Michigan. I spend quite a bit of time on Cockburn Island, Canada 🇨🇦(between Drummond Island, USA, and Manitoulin Island, Ontario. It is one of the areas where birds and butterflies land on their journey south. All summer we have had a fair number of monarchs, and this past week has shown a huge influx of them, as they fed and rested, after crossing the North Channel from the Canadian mainland.

There is very little visitation this time of year on the milkweeds, although earlier in the year, there was.

Their apparent much-preferred plants this time of year for nectar are tall goldenrod, Canada goldenrod, and flat-topped white aster. (Solidago altissima, S. canadensis, and Doellingeria umbellata.) It is fine to promote the value of milkweeds, but I would strongly suggest adding goldenrods and asters to protect and promote wherever possible. There are many acres of these plants literally covered with monarchs, on both private property and on Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) property.

Ellen.Jack.Nellie (woof woof)

--
Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
---
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To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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Back to top
Date: 9/7/19 4:01 am
From: Bruce Bowman <brucebowman99...>
Subject: [birders] ADMIN - FAQ for
Birders,


For 23 years now I have been sending to the list either the current version

of the FAQ or a link to the FAQ. I do this once or twice a year. I recommend

that you save FAQ info when you see it. It might change a lot from one year

to the next, e.g., when we get a new host, or it may change little or not at

all. You don't need to read it every year, but if you have a list related

problem, look first at the FAQ for an answer. For example, YOUR EMAIL

ADDRESS HAS CHANGED. You want to continue getting birders email.

About halfway down in the FAQ (below) you will find the answer.


The whole FAQ is too large to put at the end of every post. The

information there now is not problem/solution oriented. Removing some

of that info and inserting a link to this FAQ would be a good way to go.

I will try to make those changes sometime soon. This FAQ does not

presently exist as an Internet document. The version below is March 17,

2019.


FAQ FOR YOUR GOOGLE GROUPS
SUBSCRIPTION TO

<birders...>

-----

This document has three sections. It is organized the way that it is
(PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS first) because it was originally created to
help people already subscribed to solve common problems.

1. PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS
2. PROCEDURES
3. PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION OF LIST

If you are not yet a member of <birders...> or if you have
a basic question about the list, go first to PROCEDURES (section 2)
or PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION OF LIST (section 3). If you are having
trouble of any sort with your subscription and you do not find a
solution to your problem in PROCEDURES, go to PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS
(section 1).

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Bruce Bowman FAQ-BIRDERS-Mar17_2019.TXT September7, 2019
--------------------------------------------------------------------

1. PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

Introduction

In summer 2017 the Great Lakes Commission (GLC) moved all of its
listserv email lists from its own servers to Google Groups. The reason
for this was that Sympa-Mailman was no longer available from the vendor.
Google Groups seemed to be the best alternative. To avoid losing
subscribers in the process, part of the procedure was to bring over full
subscriber lists as of at least a couple of months before the move date.
This came with some cost, however. The following list of problems affect
some subscribers. With the listed problems are instructions you can
follow to remove them. "(below)" always refers to the **PROCEDURES**
section.


Problem: AT SOME TIME IN THE PAST YOU UNSUBSCRIBED FROM BIRDERS BUT
NOW FIND THAT YOU ARE AGAIN SUBSCRIBED.

Solution: Unsubscribe from birders. See HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM A
LIST (below).

[A different problem may be disguised as this unwanted resubscription
of an unsubscribed address. It could be a consequence of forgetting
about a subscription that you set for "nomail." If this is the
situation, then you may not want to unsubscribe the address but
instead change the delivery type to No Mail. See HOW TO CHANGE
DELIVERY TYPE (below).]

-----------------------------------

Problem: YOU HAVE TRIED TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST BUT YOU
RECEIVE AN ERROR MESSAGE THAT SAYS THAT YOU ARE NOT A SUBSCRIBER
OR SOME OTHER SUCH MESSAGE.

Solution: Your unsubscribe email must be sent FROM THE EMAIL
ACCOUNT (address) WHERE YOU ARE SUBSCRIBED! Maybe you are now
using mostly <myaddress...>, for example, but your birders
email is coming from <myaddress...> Maybe you have set
mail to the old address to be forwarded to your favored address.
Double check! If you no longer have access to your old address,
contact your list manager. See HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM A LIST
(below).

-----------------------------------

Problem: YOU ARE RECEIVING MULTIPLE COPIES OF BIRDERS EMAIL.

Solution: You must be subscribed at multiple email addresses.
Unsubscribe addresses where you do not want to receive birders
emails. See HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM A LIST (below).

----------------------------------

Problem: YOU ARE NOW RECEIVING ALL BIRDERS EMAIL AS THEY ARE POSTED
(DELIVERY TYPE 'ALL EMAIL') BUT YOU WANT A DIFFERENT DELIVERY TYPE
(NO MAIL, ABRIDGED EMAIL, OR DIGEST EMAIL)

Solution: Change your delivery type. See HOW TO CHANGE DELIVERY
TYPE (below).

-----------------------------------

Problem: YOU HAVE TRIED TO CHANGE DELIVERY TYPE FOR A SUBSCRIPTION
BUT IT DOESN'T WORK.

Solution: You have probably done something wrong. Try again.
Pay careful attention to all instructions in the section HOW TO
CHANGE DELIVERY TYPE (below).

-----------------------------------

Problem: YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS HAS CHANGED

Solution: Unsubscribe your old address and then subscribe for your
new address. See HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE and HOW TO SUBSCRIBE (below).

----------------------------------

Problem: YOUR POSTS TO THE LIST DON'T REACH THE LIST

Solution: This should not happen with Google Groups, but if it
does, you might try unsubscribing and resubscribing. Remember that
if your delivery type is "No Mail" you will not receive any list
email including your own posts. If you are a new list member and
your attempted post is the first email you have written to the list
since the move to Google Groups, write your list manager and ask if
your email has been held for moderation.

--------------------------------

Problem: ONE OF THE ABOVE BUT FOR SOME OTHER LIST (SE-MI-BIRDLIST,
ENVIRO-SEMICH, JAX-BIRDS, or others for great-lakes.net)

Solution: Follow the instructions for fixing a BIRDERS problem but
substitute the other list name.

---------------------------------

2. PROCEDURES

This is a text file. It is not an html file with active links, so
to use the URLs you will have to copy and paste links into the
location field of a browser.

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO A LIST (group)

To join the BIRDERS list send an email to

BIRDERS+<subscribe...>

You must send the email from the email address where you would like
to receive the list emails. This can be ANY email address that you
own, whether a gmail.com (Google) address or not.

By default you will receive all list emails as they are posted
throughout the day. If you want to receive list emails in a
different manner, for example in a daily digest, see HOW TO CHANGE
DELIVERY TYPE below.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM A LIST (group)

To unsubscribe from the list and stop receiving emails from
it, send an email to

BIRDERS+<unsubscribe...>

The subject field and the message field can be blank. You MUST
send this email from the address where you are subscribed!! If
you no longer have access to your subscription address, contact
your list manager.


HOW TO CHANGE DELIVERY TYPE

Your options for delivery type are as follows.

** No email: receive no list email but still be allowed to post
to the list and visit to read posts of others

** Abridged Email: one summary email of new activity per day

** Digest Email: up to 25 full new messages in a single email

** All Email: all messages are delivered as they are posted
throughout the day

To change your delivery type you must have a Google Account
and password. All gmail.com addresses are part of a Google
Account, so if your list subscription address is a gmail.com
address, you are ready to change delivery type if you wish.
You do this by going here, the group membership page:

https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email#!myforums

You should see a list of your groups. For each group in the
list, there is a field (second from the right) with a pull-down
menu for your email delivery preferences. Just select the
delivery type you want.

If your subscription address is a non-gmail address, you must
associate your subscription address with a Google Account.
NOTE that this does NOT mean you will need to have or get a
gmail.com account and, again, this is irrelevant unless you
want to change your delivery type.

To associate a non-gmail address with a Google Account, go to

https://accounts.google.com/signupwithoutgmail

There you will enter your non-gmail subscription address, your
name, and some other information. You are asked to create and
confirm a password for the address. This password is for preventing
others from accessing your Google Account. It can be the same
password you use for signing into your email's ISP but it can be any
password of your choosing. (There is also an option here for creating
a gmail.com account. If your intent is to have a subscription to an
email list (Google Group) for a gmail address, you probably already
have the gmail address. You could, though, create a new gmail address
here and then subscribe that address to the list.)


TO POST TO THIS LIST

To post to BIRDERS, send email from your subscription address to
<BIRDERS...> You must be subscribed to the list if you want
to post.


TO VISIT THIS LIST

Visit BIRDERS at https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/group/BIRDERS/
Here you will find current posts to the list and old posts, too ("archives").
You can read list email here without being a subscriber.

---------------------------------

3. PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION OF LIST

PURPOSE OF LIST

Michiganders are nature lovers, and like nature lovers worldwide
they have special interest in--even fascination with--birds. It
can fairly be said that this special interest exists in both
youngsters and older people. For Michigan to remain unique among
the 50 states in its beauty and the advantages offered by its
geographic diversity, set as it is amidst four of the Great Lakes,
its citizens must continue to recognize the importance of protecting
her natural beauty and resources. New birders, young and old, are
at the same time (1) a group especially avid about birding and (2)
among those most likely to move on to something else after an initial
excitement has worn off. New retirees are looking for something to
do that is both interesting and challenging. Young people investigate
many activities, looking for ones that captivate them, but, because
there are so many things competing for their attention, will drop a
discovered activity very quickly if it does not immediately strike a
chord. The fact that the range of allowed types of postings to the
list is broad, earning it a description as a "chat" list--not being
limited to reports of uncommon birds seen in the field--is a good
thing. The BIRDERS email list contributes importantly to the goal of
culturing and maintaining interest in birding in Michigan and
appreciation of Michigan's natural wonders.

DESCRIPTION OF LIST

The types of allowed posts cover a wide range. Fundamentally, the
BIRDERS list is about birding and wild birds in Michigan. Any post
with information or questions about those central items, whether
direct or indirect, is on topic. Items that the author deems to be on
the edge of relevance to normal list items should be marked "OT" in
the subject line--OT for off- topic. Wide breadth of allowed types of
posting makes BIRDERS a "chat" list. By definition a birding chat list
is an email list that allows types of birding related posts BEYOND
LISTINGS OF BIRDS SEEN AND THEIR LOCATIONS. BIRDERS is a chat list
because list rules allow posts of all the types listed below, and more.
These are not OT topics. Actual onlist, idle dialogue or banter between
a small number of individuals that is not on topic or of conceivable
interest to the membership as a whole (real chat) is not allowed. It is
actively discouraged, usually offlist, with abusers being asked to go
offlist with their conversations. Occasional reminders of list rules
are posted by list admin.

-------------------------------------------------------------

Primary type of post
* sightings of interesting birds, with locations, dates, and
relevant circumstances

-------------------------------------------------------------

Secondary, but mostly still fully on-topic, types of posts
* forecasts of waves and fallouts in spring and fall migration
* weather forecasts
* sunblock/sunscreen
* insect repellent
* recommendation of good birdng locations in Michigan
* green birding
* window, building, and wind turbine strikes
* for rare birds discovered, detailed directions to the location and also, often, up-to-the-hour information regarding status
* trip reports
* birding guides (paid and not)
* cheap airfare to birding destinations
* annual reports of status of breeding Kirtland's Warbler in the Mio-Grayling area of Michigan
* bird identification, questions and discussion
* bird song identification, bird song CDs, and recorders
* discussion of bird behavior
* bird banding
* bird species codes
* taxonomy
* announcements of birding related meetings and events such as organized bird walks, spring count days, hawk watches, club meetings, special get-togethers
* announcements of group trips to important birding locations in the Great Lakes region (particularly in Michigan) such as Whitefish Point, Sault Ste. Marie, Magee Marsh (on Lake Erie near Toledo), Pte. Mouillee SGA (near Lake Erie Metropark), Tawas Point State Park, etc.
* hearing aids and devices
* discussion of birding optics--binoculars and spotting scopes
* bird photography -- cameras and lenses
* bird photos sent -- -subscriber's own bird photos posted as jpg or png attachments in list archives ; stored there iindefinitely
* bird photos received -- subscriber can opt for delivery of all photo attachments or none (URLize set on)
* bird art
* used birding optics offered for sale
* bird field guides, as books and as apps for smartphones and tablets, etc.;
* discussion of listing software
* referrals to rehabbers for injured birds
* bird baths / water features
* landscaping to attract birds
* bird feeding recommendations (feeders, seed, suet)
* how to deal with squirrels, raccoons, and deer at your feeders
* questions regarding any other aspects of birding and wild birds

* occasional off-topic (OT) posts, usually still related to nature if not birds ; limited discussion allowed
* rare way-off-topic (WOT) posts for trying to reach one or more persons with emergency information

*** SUBJECTS EXPRESSLY FORBIDDEN INCLUDE CATS VS. BIRDS, KILLING BIRDS,
POLITICS, AND HUMAN OVERPOPULATION

BIRDERS is a closed list. This means that to post to the list you
must be a subscriber. Incoming mail from nonsubscribers is treated
as spam, i.e., scuttled--ignored. This is nearly 100 percent
effective in blocking spam sent to the list.

Most subscribers receive list postings and themselves post to the
list on occasion. However, with a "nomail" setting a subscriber can
opt not to receive list email but still be allowed to post. Also,
anyone who wants to check list postings irregularly and has no
interest in posting to the list can go to any of several public
archive websites for the BIRDERS list.


The BIRDERS email list is maintained by Bruce M. Bowman
<bbowman99...> It has been in existence for over 25 years
with the same name but in three different forms. It is affiliated
with a family of three other lists that it spawned at umich.edu.
Thanks to the generous support of the Great Lakes Information
Network (GLIN) (June 2013), this family is still together at
Great-Lakes.net. The lists and their creation dates are birders
(1986?), se-mi-birdlist (2002), enviro-semich (2005), and jax-birds
(2007). Contact Bruce with any questions, corrections, or comments
about BIRDERS. For the other lists, contact their respective
administrators.

BIRDERS is hosted by the Great Lakes Information Network (GLIN).

__________________
Sections 1 and 2 of this document were derived from material
provided by Marty Morrice. Any errors are mine. Thanks, also, to
longtime birders member Ivan LaHaie.

Bruce Bowman
September 7, 2019

--
Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
---
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<1398840048.471401.1567854086503...>


FAQ FOR YOUR GOOGLE GROUPS
SUBSCRIPTION TO

<birders...>

-----

This document has three sections. It is organized the way that it is
(PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS first) because it was originally created to
help people already subscribed to solve common problems.

1. PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS
2. PROCEDURES
3. PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION OF LIST

If you are not yet a member of <birders...> or if you have
a basic question about the list, go first to PROCEDURES (section 2)
or PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION OF LIST (section 3). If you are having
trouble of any sort with your subscription and you do not find a
solution to your problem in PROCEDURES, go to PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS
(section 1).

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Bruce Bowman FAQ-BIRDERS-Mar17_2019.TXT March 17, 2019
--------------------------------------------------------------------

1. PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

Introduction

In summer 2017 the Great Lakes Commission (GLC) moved all of its
listserv email lists from its own servers to Google Groups. The reason
for this was that Sympa-Mailman was no longer available from the vendor.
Google Groups seemed to be the best alternative. To avoid losing
subscribers in the process, part of the procedure was to bring over full
subscriber lists as of at least a couple of months before the move date.
This came with some cost, however. The following list of problems affect
some subscribers. With the listed problems are instructions you can
follow to remove them. "(below)" always refers to the **PROCEDURES**
section.


Problem: AT SOME TIME IN THE PAST YOU UNSUBSCRIBED FROM BIRDERS BUT
NOW FIND THAT YOU ARE AGAIN SUBSCRIBED.

Solution: Unsubscribe from birders. See HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM A
LIST (below).

[A different problem may be disguised as this unwanted resubscription
of an unsubscribed address. It could be a consequence of forgetting
about a subscription that you set for "nomail." If this is the
situation, then you may not want to unsubscribe the address but
instead change the delivery type to No Mail. See HOW TO CHANGE
DELIVERY TYPE (below).]

-----------------------------------

Problem: YOU HAVE TRIED TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST BUT YOU
RECEIVE AN ERROR MESSAGE THAT SAYS THAT YOU ARE NOT A SUBSCRIBER
OR SOME OTHER SUCH MESSAGE.

Solution: Your unsubscribe email must be sent FROM THE EMAIL
ACCOUNT (address) WHERE YOU ARE SUBSCRIBED! Maybe you are now
using mostly <myaddress...>, for example, but your birders
email is coming from <myaddress...> Maybe you have set
mail to the old address to be forwarded to your favored address.
Double check! If you no longer have access to your old address,
contact your list manager. See HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM A LIST
(below).

-----------------------------------

Problem: YOU ARE RECEIVING MULTIPLE COPIES OF BIRDERS EMAIL.

Solution: You must be subscribed at multiple email addresses.
Unsubscribe addresses where you do not want to receive birders
emails. See HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM A LIST (below).

----------------------------------

Problem: YOU ARE NOW RECEIVING ALL BIRDERS EMAIL AS THEY ARE POSTED
(DELIVERY TYPE 'ALL EMAIL') BUT YOU WANT A DIFFERENT DELIVERY TYPE
(NO MAIL, ABRIDGED EMAIL, OR DIGEST EMAIL)

Solution: Change your delivery type. See HOW TO CHANGE DELIVERY
TYPE (below).

-----------------------------------

Problem: YOU HAVE TRIED TO CHANGE DELIVERY TYPE FOR A SUBSCRIPTION
BUT IT DOESN'T WORK.

Solution: You have probably done something wrong. Try again.
Pay careful attention to all instructions in the section HOW TO
CHANGE DELIVERY TYPE (below).

-----------------------------------

Problem: YOUR EMAIL ADDRESS HAS CHANGED

Solution: Unsubscribe your old address and then subscribe for your
new address. See HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE and HOW TO SUBSCRIBE (below).

----------------------------------

Problem: YOUR POSTS TO THE LIST DON'T REACH THE LIST

Solution: This should not happen with Google Groups, but if it
does, you might try unsubscribing and resubscribing. Remember that
if your delivery type is "No Mail" you will not receive any list
email including your own posts. If you are a new list member and
your attempted post is the first email you have written to the list
since the move to Google Groups, write your list manager and ask if
your email has been held for moderation.

--------------------------------

Problem: ONE OF THE ABOVE BUT FOR SOME OTHER LIST (SE-MI-BIRDLIST,
ENVIRO-SEMICH, JAX-BIRDS, or others for great-lakes.net)

Solution: Follow the instructions for fixing a BIRDERS problem but
substitute the other list name.

---------------------------------

2. PROCEDURES

This is a text file. It is not an html file with active links, so
to use the URLs you will have to copy and paste links into the
location field of a browser.

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO A LIST (group)

To join the BIRDERS list send an email to

BIRDERS+<subscribe...>

You must send the email from the email address where you would like
to receive the list emails. This can be ANY email address that you
own, whether a gmail.com (Google) address or not.

By default you will receive all list emails as they are posted
throughout the day. If you want to receive list emails in a
different manner, for example in a daily digest, see HOW TO CHANGE
DELIVERY TYPE below.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM A LIST (group)

To unsubscribe from the list and stop receiving emails from
it, send an email to

BIRDERS+<unsubscribe...>

The subject field and the message field can be blank. You MUST
send this email from the address where you are subscribed!! If
you no longer have access to your subscription address, contact
your list manager.


HOW TO CHANGE DELIVERY TYPE

Your options for delivery type are as follows.

** No email: receive no list email but still be allowed to post
to the list and visit to read posts of others

** Abridged Email: one summary email of new activity per day

** Digest Email: up to 25 full new messages in a single email

** All Email: all messages are delivered as they are posted
throughout the day

To change your delivery type you must have a Google Account
and password. All gmail.com addresses are part of a Google
Account, so if your list subscription address is a gmail.com
address, you are ready to change delivery type if you wish.
You do this by going here, the group membership page:

https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email#!myforums

You should see a list of your groups. For each group in the
list, there is a field (second from the right) with a pull-down
menu for your email delivery preferences. Just select the
delivery type you want.

If your subscription address is a non-gmail address, you must
associate your subscription address with a Google Account.
NOTE that this does NOT mean you will need to have or get a
gmail.com account and, again, this is irrelevant unless you
want to change your delivery type.

To associate a non-gmail address with a Google Account, go to

https://accounts.google.com/signupwithoutgmail

There you will enter your non-gmail subscription address, your
name, and some other information. You are asked to create and
confirm a password for the address. This password is for preventing
others from accessing your Google Account. It can be the same
password you use for signing into your email's ISP but it can be any
password of your choosing. (There is also an option here for creating
a gmail.com account. If your intent is to have a subscription to an
email list (Google Group) for a gmail address, you probably already
have the gmail address. You could, though, create a new gmail address
here and then subscribe that address to the list.)


TO POST TO THIS LIST

To post to BIRDERS, send email from your subscription address to
<BIRDERS...> You must be subscribed to the list if you want
to post.


TO VISIT THIS LIST

Visit BIRDERS at https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/group/BIRDERS/
Here you will find current posts to the list and old posts, too ("archives").
You can read list email here without being a subscriber.

---------------------------------

3. PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION OF LIST

PURPOSE OF LIST

Michiganders are nature lovers, and like nature lovers worldwide
they have special interest in--even fascination with--birds. It
can fairly be said that this special interest exists in both
youngsters and older people. For Michigan to remain unique among
the 50 states in its beauty and the advantages offered by its
geographic diversity, set as it is amidst four of the Great Lakes,
its citizens must continue to recognize the importance of protecting
her natural beauty and resources. New birders, young and old, are
at the same time (1) a group especially avid about birding and (2)
among those most likely to move on to something else after an initial
excitement has worn off. New retirees are looking for something to
do that is both interesting and challenging. Young people investigate
many activities, looking for ones that captivate them, but, because
there are so many things competing for their attention, will drop a
discovered activity very quickly if it does not immediately strike a
chord. The fact that the range of allowed types of postings to the
list is broad, earning it a description as a "chat" list--not being
limited to reports of uncommon birds seen in the field--is a good
thing. The BIRDERS email list contributes importantly to the goal of
culturing and maintaining interest in birding in Michigan and
appreciation of Michigan's natural wonders.

DESCRIPTION OF LIST

The types of allowed posts cover a wide range. Fundamentally, the
BIRDERS list is about birding and wild birds in Michigan. Any post
with information or questions about those central items, whether
direct or indirect, is on topic. Items that the author deems to be on
the edge of relevance to normal list items should be marked "OT" in
the subject line--OT for off- topic. Wide breadth of allowed types of
posting makes BIRDERS a "chat" list. By definition a birding chat list
is an email list that allows types of birding related posts BEYOND
LISTINGS OF BIRDS SEEN AND THEIR LOCATIONS. BIRDERS is a chat list
because list rules allow posts of all the types listed below, and more.
These are not OT topics. Actual onlist, idle dialogue or banter between
a small number of individuals that is not on topic or of conceivable
interest to the membership as a whole (real chat) is not allowed. It is
actively discouraged, usually offlist, with abusers being asked to go
offlist with their conversations. Occasional reminders of list rules
are posted by list admin.

-------------------------------------------------------------

Primary type of post
* sightings of interesting birds, with locations, dates, and
relevant circumstances

-------------------------------------------------------------

Secondary, but mostly still fully on-topic, types of posts
* forecasts of waves and fallouts in spring and fall migration
* weather forecasts
* sunblock/sunscreen
* insect repellent
* recommendation of good birdng locations in Michigan
* green birding
* window, building, and wind turbine strikes
* for rare birds discovered, detailed directions to the location and also, often, up-to-the-hour information regarding status
* trip reports
* birding guides (paid and not)
* cheap airfare to birding destinations
* annual reports of status of breeding Kirtland's Warbler in the Mio-Grayling area of Michigan
* bird identification, questions and discussion
* bird song identification, bird song CDs, and recorders
* discussion of bird behavior
* bird banding
* bird species codes
* taxonomy
* announcements of birding related meetings and events such as organized bird walks, spring count days, hawk watches, club meetings, special get-togethers
* announcements of group trips to important birding locations in the Great Lakes region (particularly in Michigan) such as Whitefish Point, Sault Ste. Marie, Magee Marsh (on Lake Erie near Toledo), Pte. Mouillee SGA (near Lake Erie Metropark), Tawas Point State Park, etc.
* hearing aids and devices
* discussion of birding optics--binoculars and spotting scopes
* bird photography -- cameras and lenses
* bird photos sent -- -subscriber's own bird photos posted as jpg or png attachments in list archives ; stored there iindefinitely
* bird photos received -- subscriber can opt for delivery of all photo attachments or none (URLize set on)
* bird art
* used birding optics offered for sale
* bird field guides, as books and as apps for smartphones and tablets, etc.;
* discussion of listing software
* referrals to rehabbers for injured birds
* bird baths / water features
* landscaping to attract birds
* bird feeding recommendations (feeders, seed, suet)
* how to deal with squirrels, raccoons, and deer at your feeders
* questions regarding any other aspects of birding and wild birds

* occasional off-topic (OT) posts, usually still related to nature if not birds ; limited discussion allowed
* rare way-off-topic (WOT) posts for trying to reach one or more persons with emergency information

*** SUBJECTS EXPRESSLY FORBIDDEN INCLUDE CATS VS. BIRDS, KILLING BIRDS,
POLITICS, AND HUMAN OVERPOPULATION

BIRDERS is a closed list. This means that to post to the list you
must be a subscriber. Incoming mail from nonsubscribers is treated
as spam, i.e., scuttled--ignored. This is nearly 100 percent
effective in blocking spam sent to the list.

Most subscribers receive list postings and themselves post to the
list on occasion. However, with a "nomail" setting a subscriber can
opt not to receive list email but still be allowed to post. Also,
anyone who wants to check list postings irregularly and has no
interest in posting to the list can go to any of several public
archive websites for the BIRDERS list.


The BIRDERS email list is maintained by Bruce M. Bowman
<bbowman99...> It has been in existence for over 25 years
with the same name but in three different forms. It is affiliated
with a family of three other lists that it spawned at umich.edu.
Thanks to the generous support of the Great Lakes Information
Network (GLIN) (June 2013), this family is still together at
Great-Lakes.net. The lists and their creation dates are birders
(1986?), se-mi-birdlist (2002), enviro-semich (2005), and jax-birds
(2007). Contact Bruce with any questions, corrections, or comments
about BIRDERS. For the other lists, contact their respective
administrators.

BIRDERS is hosted by the Great Lakes Information Network (GLIN).

__________________
Sections 1 and 2 of this document were derived from material
provided by Marty Morrice. Any errors are mine. Thanks, also, to
longtime birders member Ivan LaHaie.

Bruce Bowman
March 17, 2019
 

Back to top
Date: 9/6/19 8:28 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (06 Sep 2019) 73 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 06, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 4 8 8
Bald Eagle 2 15 15
Northern Harrier 13 32 32
Sharp-shinned Hawk 50 56 56
Cooper's Hawk 0 2 2
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 52 52
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 31 31
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 3 14 14
Merlin 1 2 2
Peregrine Falcon 0 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 73 215 215
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, John Elliott, Mark Hainen

Visitors:
It was a pleasure to see Miss Jessie, our biologist overlord at the watch
this morning. Otherwise, it was a slow day for visitors as the weather
looked iffy.


Weather:
Another day with many looks, falling barometer with disturbed air all
around. We were forced back to our chariots at one point by light but
persistent rain. Afterwards, a sunny fall day returned for a couple of
hours until once again the sky was darkened by cloud.

Raptor Observations:
The falling barometer forecast would seem to favor the non-buteo birds
today and so it was. We managed a half century of sharpies and double
digits of harriers. After the rain had passed the Sharp-shinned Hawks
starting moving in small groups as they are wont to do.

Non-raptor Observations:
The weather seemed to dampen the enthusiasm of most of the birds around us.
The highlight of the day was watching an osprey make repeated dives on a
bald eagle. The eagle turned upside down in defensive anticipation with
talons at the ready a few times. After about twenty dives, the eagle
finally decided that discretion was the better part of valor as he flew out
of the offended ospreys territory.No raptors were harmed during the course
of this display.


Predictions:
With a mostly rising barometer (there is a dip forecast in the middle of
the day) and winds from WNW going to NW we might expect some sightings of
buteos tomorrow. Not a perfect forecast but certainly more promising than
today.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Detroit River Hawk Watch (<jerry.jourdan...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Back to top
Date: 9/6/19 4:59 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (06 Sep 2019) 24 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 06, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 7 7
Osprey 0 3 3
Bald Eagle 0 8 8
Northern Harrier 9 31 31
Sharp-shinned Hawk 9 15 15
Cooper's Hawk 2 9 9
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 3 3
Red-tailed Hawk 1 26 26
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 0 22 22
Merlin 3 6 6
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 24 133 133
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Bob Hall-Brooks, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Thank you to Noel, Chip, Dana and Bob Hall-Brookes for their visit today
and their help sighting raptors.


Weather:
Today's weather started out warm with very calm winds from the West, but
quickly changed directions to more southerly winds for the rest of the day.
We experienced some rain mid-day, only to finish off with temperatures
rising to 28 degrees Celsius by the end of the day.

Raptor Observations:
Today was all about the Northern Harriers (9) and the Sharp-shinned hawk
(9) migration. Our day finished with two gorgeous female Merlins.
As usual, we were greeted by our local Ospreys, juvenile and adult Bald
Eagle and Turkey Vultures.

Non-raptor Observations:
Today's main attraction came from 296 Monarchs. We also observed many Cedar
Waxwings, Purple Martins, Tree swallows and starlings. We also had a boost
in Ruby-throated hummingbirds. The warblers are slowly starting to migrate,
but did manage to see 5 Wilson's warblers around the tower.
The day's highlight was the sight of an otter swimming in the marsh by the
tower! After carefully looking at a few pictures snapped at the last
second, we are quite positive that what we saw was definitely an otter.
Hopefully, it will make another appearance.

Monarchs: 296
Cedear Waxwings: 180
Purple martins: 128
Tree swallows: 113
Starlings: 128
Ruby-throated humming birds: 22

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59564053


Predictions:
Tomorrow, we are expecting winds from the North in the morning, changing to
North-West later in the day. We hope that these favourable winds will bring
us a steady stream of Northern Harrier, Red-tails, Sharp-shinned and
Cooper's hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/6/19 3:56 pm
From: Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...>
Subject: [birders] Cool article about brainy chickadees

> https://www.knowablemagazine.org/article/mind/2019/chickadee-memory-food?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=ad&utm_campaign=paid-september

Janet Hinshaw
> Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 9/6/19 2:07 am
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Reminder: OAS Field Trips Saturday Sept 7 and Sunday Sept 8 - Everyone is invited
Saturday, September 7, 2019, 8:30am-11:30am. Drayton Plains
Leader: Kathleen Dougherty ( <kad8186...> )
This event is intended for Young Birders as well as adults. The Drayton
Plains Nature Center is a 138-acre natural area in Waterford along the
Clinton River. The site is a former fish hatchery. Several ponds were
constructed for the hatchery along the river. The property has an
impressive bird checklist with 176 species recorded. Director of Bird
Studies, Terri Chapdelaine will assist with the tour. Dress for the weather
and bring your binoculars. Plan to hike about 2 miles. Meet at the Nature
Center Parking Lot at 2125 Denby Road in Waterford, MI.

Sunday, September 8, 2019, 8:00am-12:00pm. Kensington Metropark
Leader: Dan Gertiser ( <dangertiser...> )
On our visit to Kensington we will look for fall migrants on the trails
around the nature center. Our emphasis will be on migrating passerines. We
will also search for early migrating waterfowl. Meet at the Nature Center
where there are modern bathroom facilities. Insects should not be a
problem. A Metropark pass is required.

Please see our website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) for details about
upcoming field trips, meetings and the Young Birder's Club. Contact the
field trip leaders if you have additional questions. You do not have to be
a member to participate. Everyone is welcome.

Thank you,
Phil Bugosh
Oakland Audubon Society

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Date: 9/5/19 7:27 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (05 Sep 2019) 75 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 05, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 2 2 2
Osprey 3 4 4
Bald Eagle 10 13 13
Northern Harrier 10 19 19
Sharp-shinned Hawk 4 6 6
Cooper's Hawk 2 2 2
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 28 52 52
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 9 31 31
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 7 11 11
Merlin 0 1 1
Peregrine Falcon 0 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 75 142 142
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Mark Hainen, Patrick Mulawa,
Raburn Howland

Visitors:
We had a couple of welcome visitors today although the traffic through the
sky was less than we would have liked to show them. It picked up after they
left....hmmm?


Weather:
High barometric pressure through most of the day but tailing off late. The
skies were constantly changing and snapshots taken at different times
during the day would convince those not present that they were not taken on
the same day. It was time to put on the big-boy pants as a cool wind off
the lake from ENE going to a more southerly direction during the day made
for a brisk early fall day.

Raptor Observations:
We are starting to see some diversity with 6 migrating species counted
today and a couple more local species noted. Although bald eagles can be a
difficult call because of the local population we did see a number of them
flying with a definite purpose in mind and following the protocol to be
counted. Broad-winged are starting to come in small flights with 23
throughout the day. Sharp-shinned hawks started to fly and kestrels joined
them. The always distinctive Northern Harriers were up to double digits as
well.

Non-raptor Observations:
ONe of the "issues" we have at this site is separating the wheat from the
chaff. At times the gulls and swallows/martins can be challenging to see
through. Avian flak makes the job a little harder as gulls like to kettle
while they hawk insects. Today the birds were fairly distant but when you
are looking for broad-winged kettles the gulls kettling at a distance
demand close attention.

Predictions:
Weather Underground predicts that the barometer will fall and the winds
will be southerly tomorrow. These are not the best conditions for our site
but when this low passes it may look up on Saturday with rising pressures
and northerly winds.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Detroit River Hawk Watch (<jerry.jourdan...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/5/19 7:19 pm
From: 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Double-crested Cormorants - Conservancy Farm
Hi, Jack.
Nice photos. I have been seeing a single adult DC cormorant on Lake St. Clair off and on the last few days. I can’t tell if there are more in the trees that I can’t see. They start out every Spring in great numbers (around 60) when the trees are bare but the adults usually go north to breeding grounds and juveniles stay here. This may be the last straggler. Unfortunately, hunting them is legal in Michigan now, so I expect their numbers to decrease.
Penny

> On Sep 5, 2019, at 4:14 PM, Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...> wrote:
>
> Two juvenile Double-crested Cormorants have been spending quite a bit of time at the small pond across the road from the Conservancy Farm.
>
> They were there at 3:45 pm today, as well as around noon. I'm told that they been seen the last couple of days as well.
>
> I wish i had a better camera, but it's relatively easy to photograph them while sitting in a car on Vreeland Road.
>
> Jack
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAJpB0PUxtChNhcxNASv985%2BYGXtkt-uHYBbSAdFF2a87-wZg%<2BA...>
> <P1020951.JPG>
> <P1020961.JPG>
> <P1020962.JPG>
> <P1020977.JPG>
> <P1020982.JPG>

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Date: 9/5/19 6:52 pm
From: Juliet Berger <juliet.berger...>
Subject: [birders] Washtenaw Audubon's second fall walk of the season at the Arb
Thanks to all who came out for the WAS Thurs. a.m. Birdwalk at the Arb
today. Kudos to the photographers, (Mike Bowen did a great job documenting
our rarities) the spotters, and all the folks who helped everyone get on
the birds. We had a first fall female Mourning Warbler at the Heathdale
Collection, thanks to Karen Markey who found and ID'd it, and an
unbelievable 3 separate Golden-winged Warblers east of the Peonies and
along the road to UM Hospital, on the river. There were a record setting 5
Olive-sided Flycatchers spotted today. We saw 14 spp. of warblers, as well.
What a treat!! We bird together every Thursday a.m. at 8 through the end of
October. Join us!! Here's the link to our eBird checklist.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59534013
<https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59534013?fbclid=IwAR2iK7EnaFMZqul_ORtOT0NPW9vG7x-9BQ_Q2Zza3IE_WntXRXMzqJD8uAw>

Good birding,
Juliet Berger
Washtenaw Audubon Society

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Date: 9/5/19 4:38 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (05 Sep 2019) 32 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 05, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 2 7 7
Osprey 0 3 3
Bald Eagle 5 8 8
Northern Harrier 5 22 22
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 6 6
Cooper's Hawk 5 7 7
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 3 3
Red-tailed Hawk 9 25 25
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 5 22 22
Merlin 1 3 3
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 32 109 109
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Thank you to Noel, Chip, Dana, Jim, John Barnes and Neil, for keeping their
eyes to the sky.

We would also like to mention the visit of Bob Hall-Brookes and a beautiful
Red-tail hawk and Tim Jarold with a gorgeous after second-year Cooper's
hawk.


Weather:
The day started out with promising winds from the North and North-East, but
quickly changed and ended with winds from the south and a temperature of 28
degrees Celsius.

Raptor Observations:
We observed a variety of species today, mostly Red-tailed hawks (9), some
Northern Harriers (5), Cooper's Hawks (5) and Kestrels (4). We are also
always joined by our resident Ospreys and Eagles (juveniles and adults)
that wander the marsh.

Non-raptor Observations:
Today's highlight was the high numbers of Mallards, Starlings, Cedar
Waxwings and Monarchs. The swallows are still high in numbers but slowly
migrating south. We only observed 8 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, and heard 2
Blue Jays, but are hoping for many more in the coming days.

Mallards: 404
Starlings: 215
Cedar Waxwings: 153
Monarchs: 145
Purple martin: 92
Tree swallows: 126
Barn swallows: 28

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59539522

Predictions:
Tomorrow, we are expecting less favorable winds (Southern and Eastern), but
are still hoping for more Blue Jays, which should signal the arrival of
Sharp-shinned hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/5/19 1:14 pm
From: Jack Smiley <jackrsmiley...>
Subject: [birders] Double-crested Cormorants - Conservancy Farm
Two juvenile Double-crested Cormorants have been spending quite a bit of
time at the small pond across the road from the Conservancy Farm.

They were there at 3:45 pm today, as well as around noon. I'm told that
they been seen the last couple of days as well.

I wish i had a better camera, but it's relatively easy to photograph them
while sitting in a car on Vreeland Road.

Jack

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Date: 9/5/19 10:56 am
From: Alice Elliott <alelliot...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
Do be careful of transporting milkweed in some areas. Stiltgrass, a new
invasive species in Scio, has seeds that can easily be moved through dirt
and soil. Thus far we have been able to contain stiltgrass to Washtenaw
County-- I would hate to see it escape to other counties because of a
well-meaning monarch supporter.

--
Alice Elliott
Coordinator, Washtenaw Stiltgrass Working Group

On Wed, Sep 4, 2019, 12:00 PM Dan Ezekiel <dan.ezekiel24...> wrote:

> Excellent point!
>
> DE
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Sep 4, 2019, at 8:47 AM, RICHARD WOLINSKI <rawolinski...>
> wrote:
>
> Support your land preservation efforts like that in Scio Township. You
> have to own it to control what happens on it.
>
> On August 29, 2019 at 11:51 AM Ann Hancock <annhancock9...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Aug 29, 2019, at 11:43 AM, 'P. swanson' via Birders <
> <birders...> wrote:
>
>
>
> There are many, many common milkweed along the expressways that have
> grass. They get cut down unfortunately with the grass. They grow back
> quickly but I haven’t seen any flower. They can be dug up in vacant lots
> and if you can get most of the roots up, they transplant well. From there
> you can collect the seeds and transplant them.
> I don’t know what we can do about Mexico.
> Penny
>
> On Aug 28, 2019, at 11:42 PM, Roger Kuhlman < <rkuhlman...>
> wrote:
>
> Monarch populations fluctuating substantially up and down over the years.
> Right now they seem to be doing fairly well in southeast Michigan but I
> would add several cautions. Because of the changes in agricultural
> practices there is almost no common Milkweed in farm field or along farm
> fields in Washtenaw County these days as compared to even 10 to 15 years
> ago when there was a lot to be found there. That fact signals a big warning
> flag for the prospects of future Monarch populations in the region. An even
> bigger long-term threat is to be found in the Mexican overwintering grounds
> for eastern Monarchs. These are relatively small areas all closely
> concentrated and are as result subject negative impacts from human
> development and deforestation and random adverse weather effects. It is
> quite possible to imagine something really bad happening at the Mexican
> wintering sites that ends forever the annual eastern Monarch migration.
>
> Roger Kuhlman
> Ann Arbor, Michigan
>
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
> ---
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>
>
>
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>
>
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>
>
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>
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> www.glc.org
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> .
>

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Date: 9/5/19 9:30 am
From: Sally K. Scheer <winerat...>
Subject: RE: [birders] email update
Unfortunately the directions for the list posted at the bottom of every message doesn’t give directions for anything but unsubscribing. Perhaps someone more in the know will take pity o all of us and give the correct directions for address changing

Sally Scheer



From: The Seeker [mailto:<the_seeker11...>]
Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2019 9:41 PM
To: <birders...>
Subject: [birders] email update



Please change my email from



<theseekermi...>



to



<the_seeker11...>



Thank you

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Date: 9/4/19 7:36 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2019) 37 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 04, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 0 0
Osprey 0 1 1
Bald Eagle 2 3 3
Northern Harrier 4 9 9
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 2 2
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 10 24 24
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 16 22 22
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 3 4 4
Merlin 1 1 1
Peregrine Falcon 0 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 37 67 67
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Don Sherwood, Mark Hainen

Visitors:
Not too many today but those we had enjoyed the day. It was not the type of
day to write home about as most of the birds were at the professional level
and not too close to our location except for the occasional eagle fly-by.


Weather:
A beautiful late Michigan summer day with alternating blue skies and at
times significant clouds. Wind was fresh out of the WNW, barometer was
rising through the early hours. It would seem to be a good day for
migrating raptors but perhaps a more northerly wind might have helped.

Raptor Observations:
Our best day so far with scattered birds throughout the day. Not any large
movements but it is only September 4th. Red-tailed hawks were the largest
mover with 17 counted, broad-winged a fairly close second at 11. We did see
our first feisty as ever merlin trying to put a dent in the swallow
population so we have the hat-trick for falcons early this year. Harriers
were also passing with 4 noted.

Non-raptor Observations:
Most of the insects must have been high today as the swallows and martins,
along with the gulls, were up in the clouds.

Predictions:
High barometric pressure with easy light winds from a more easterly
direction. This may keep the birds that are traveling over us instead of
our friends at Holiday Beach who may have had a good day today.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Detroit River Hawk Watch (<jerry.jourdan...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/4/19 6:41 pm
From: The Seeker <the_seeker11...>
Subject: [birders] email update
Please change my email from

<theseekermi...> 

to

<the_seeker11...>

Thank you

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Date: 9/4/19 4:31 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2019) 38 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 04, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 4 5 5
Osprey 0 3 3
Bald Eagle 1 3 3
Northern Harrier 9 17 17
Sharp-shinned Hawk 4 6 6
Cooper's Hawk 0 2 2
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 2 3 3
Red-tailed Hawk 7 16 16
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 8 17 17
Merlin 1 2 2
Peregrine Falcon 1 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 1 1 1

Total: 38 77 77
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
We would like to thank the welcomed help of Neil, Noel and Juliette,
Christine, Jerry Pelon, and John Barnes. We were also visited by Nina
Radley and a feisty female Cooper's hawks. Thanks for stopping by!


Weather:
Today we experienced a warm and slightly windy day with winds from the
North-West, and temperatures hovering around 20 degree Celsius.

Raptor Observations:
Raptors have finally started to migrate over the tower at Holiday Beach! We
observed many Norther Harriers, American Kestrel and Red-tailed Hawks. At
9:30 EST, a Swainson's hawk was spotted at the hawk banding blinds. We are
also surrounded by non-migrating Turkey Vultures, Ospreys, Bald Eagles,
Cooper's Hawks, Northern Harrier and one juvenile Peregrine Falcon that
enjoys chasing the Cormorants in the marsh. At the end of the day, we were
greeted by a Merlin who decided to take a few swings at the plastic owl on
the tower before migrating.

Non-raptor Observations:
Today, we are still observing high numbers of swallows feeding in the
marsh. We observed very numbers of Cedar Waxwing, Mallards, and Monarchs.
We are still waiting for Blue Jays to arrive, to also bring along
Sharp-shinned Hawks.

Purple Martins: 137
Tree Swallow: 121
Barn Swallow: 99
Cedar Waxwing: 232
Mallards: 243
Monarchs: 76

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59516848

Predictions:
Due to today's northwestern winds and the promise of northeastern winds and
warm temperatures tomorrow, we predict more migrating Northern Harriers and
American Kestrels. We also predict more Sharp-shinned Hawks and
Broad-winged Hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/4/19 9:00 am
From: Dan Ezekiel <dan.ezekiel24...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
Excellent point!

DE

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 4, 2019, at 8:47 AM, RICHARD WOLINSKI <rawolinski...> wrote:
>
> Support your land preservation efforts like that in Scio Township. You have to own it to control what happens on it.
>
>> On August 29, 2019 at 11:51 AM Ann Hancock <annhancock9...> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Aug 29, 2019, at 11:43 AM, 'P. swanson' via Birders < <birders...> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> There are many, many common milkweed along the expressways that have grass. They get cut down unfortunately with the grass. They grow back quickly but I haven’t seen any flower. They can be dug up in vacant lots and if you can get most of the roots up, they transplant well. From there you can collect the seeds and transplant them.
>>> I don’t know what we can do about Mexico.
>>> Penny
>>>
>>>> On Aug 28, 2019, at 11:42 PM, Roger Kuhlman < <rkuhlman...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Monarch populations fluctuating substantially up and down over the years. Right now they seem to be doing fairly well in southeast Michigan but I would add several cautions. Because of the changes in agricultural practices there is almost no common Milkweed in farm field or along farm fields in Washtenaw County these days as compared to even 10 to 15 years ago when there was a lot to be found there. That fact signals a big warning flag for the prospects of future Monarch populations in the region. An even bigger long-term threat is to be found in the Mexican overwintering grounds for eastern Monarchs. These are relatively small areas all closely concentrated and are as result subject negative impacts from human development and deforestation and random adverse weather effects. It is quite possible to imagine something really bad happening at the Mexican wintering sites that ends forever the annual eastern Monarch migration.
>>>>
>>>> Roger Kuhlman
>>>> Ann Arbor, Michigan
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>>>> ---
>>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
>>>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
>>>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<DM6PR14MB2777B45640CEA4C588124B08C5A20...>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>>> ---
>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
>>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
>>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<B81201E1-3F46-4EA5-A8EE-EDBE18D55172...>
>
>
>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
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>
>
>
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Date: 9/4/19 7:47 am
From: 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Fwd: Google Alert - Kirtland's Warbler
Birders:
Sending this along FYI.
Best wishes,
Bill RapaiGrosse Pointe
"Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson





-----Original Message-----
From: Google Alerts <googlealerts-noreply...>
To: brapai <brapai...>
Sent: Wed, Sep 4, 2019 12:06 am
Subject: Google Alert - Kirtland's Warbler


| | | |
| | Kirtland's Warbler As-it-happens update ⋅ September 4, 2019 | |
| | NEWS | |
| | Will Hurricane Dorian Impact Maine Birds? Wiscasset Newspaper Fortunately, it seems likely that many Kirtland's warblers may not have yet arrived in the Bahamas so that most of the population will not be impacted ...
| | | Flag as irrelevant |

| |
| See more results | Edit this alert |


| You have received this email because you have subscribed to Google Alerts. Unsubscribe | View all your alerts |
| Receive this alert as RSS feed |
| Send Feedback |



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Date: 9/4/19 5:47 am
From: RICHARD WOLINSKI <rawolinski...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
Support your land preservation efforts like that in Scio Township. You have to own it to control what happens on it.

> On August 29, 2019 at 11:51 AM Ann Hancock <annhancock9...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Aug 29, 2019, at 11:43 AM, 'P. swanson' via Birders < <birders...> mailto:<birders...> > wrote:
>
>
> > >
> >
> > There are many, many common milkweed along the expressways that have grass. They get cut down unfortunately with the grass. They grow back quickly but I haven’t seen any flower. They can be dug up in vacant lots and if you can get most of the roots up, they transplant well. From there you can collect the seeds and transplant them.
> > I don’t know what we can do about Mexico.
> > Penny
> >
> > On Aug 28, 2019, at 11:42 PM, Roger Kuhlman < <rkuhlman...> mailto:<rkuhlman...> > wrote:
> >
> >
> > > > > Monarch populations fluctuating substantially up and down over the years. Right now they seem to be doing fairly well in southeast Michigan but I would add several cautions. Because of the changes in agricultural practices there is almost no common Milkweed in farm field or along farm fields in Washtenaw County these days as compared to even 10 to 15 years ago when there was a lot to be found there. That fact signals a big warning flag for the prospects of future Monarch populations in the region. An even bigger long-term threat is to be found in the Mexican overwintering grounds for eastern Monarchs. These are relatively small areas all closely concentrated and are as result subject negative impacts from human development and deforestation and random adverse weather effects. It is quite possible to imagine something really bad happening at the Mexican wintering sites that ends forever the annual eastern Monarch migration.
> > >
> > > Roger Kuhlman
> > > Ann Arbor, Michigan
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > --
> > > Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us athttp://www.glc.org
> > > ---
> > > You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
> > > To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...> mailto:birders+<unsubscribe...> .
> > > To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<DM6PR14MB2777B45640CEA4C588124B08C5A20...> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<DM6PR14MB2777B45640CEA4C588124B08C5A20...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer .
> > >
> > > > >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us athttp://www.glc.org
> > ---
> > You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
> > To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...> mailto:birders+<unsubscribe...> .
> > To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<B81201E1-3F46-4EA5-A8EE-EDBE18D55172...> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<B81201E1-3F46-4EA5-A8EE-EDBE18D55172...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer .
> >
> > >




>
>
>
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> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
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>




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Date: 9/4/19 5:39 am
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Reminder: OAS Nuthatch Open Saturday September 21
Annual Nuthatch Open. Saturday, September 21, 2019, 12:00am-4:00pm
Leader: Don Burlett ( <baikalteal13...> )
Oakland Audubon’s annual fun competitive birding event. Teams find as many
species as possible anywhere in Oakland County until 4:00 PM and then meet
at Indian Springs Metropark for the awards presentations and a cookout.
Checklists need to be submitted by 4:00 PM. Teams consist of 2 to 4 members
in either the adult or youth division. An entrance fee and a Metropark pass
is required. Proceeds go to our young birders program. See our website for
a registration form. Everyone is welcome.

Please see our website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) for details about
upcoming field trips, meetings and the Young Birder's Club. Contact the
field trip leaders if you have additional questions. You do not have to be
a member to participate. Everyone is welcome.

Thank you,
Phil Bugosh
Oakland Audubon Society

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Date: 9/3/19 7:23 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2019) 6 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 03, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 0 0
Osprey 1 1 1
Bald Eagle 0 1 1
Northern Harrier 3 5 5
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 1 1
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 14 14
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 6 6
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 1 1 1
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 1 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 6 30 30
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Frank Kitakis

Visitors:
The visitors were thinned out today with the holiday rush over but we did
have some nice conversations with the few that showed.


Weather:
Change was in the air today as the radar looked like a multicolored lava
lamp to the west of us. Barometric pressure was dropping, although not as
much as predicted, and the winds picked up to fairly strong steady winds
from the SW. A cold front should be passing through tonight with possible
high winds and thunderstorms. Clearing is predicted after the front passes.

Raptor Observations:
"Let's fly into a strong SW wind with a dropping barometer" said no raptor
ever...except, of course, for the intrepid harrier. We did see a few today
with their resolute pumping strokes headed south. Not much else although we
did have our first American Kestrel fly over in the morning. Even the gulls
were not as much in evidence today as it made for a slow afternoon with
little to observe.

Non-raptor Observations:
Caspian tern adults continue to be pestered by their offspring begging for
food. The Forster's Tern population seemed to expand dramatically in the
afternoon as their numbers grew from less than ten to about thirty in a
flock. Our first Bonaparte's Gull was spotted, a juvenile bird. Local Bald
Eagles were enjoying the winds and the local Osprey made a couple of
appearances.

Predictions:
If all goes to plan, the day should bring a high pressure system on the
heels of the cold front. This brings the favored NE winds and should bring
some soaring birds with it. Fingers crossed!!
========================================================================
Report submitted by Detroit River Hawk Watch (<jerry.jourdan...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/3/19 4:03 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2019) 5 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 03, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 1 1 1
Osprey 0 3 3
Bald Eagle 1 2 2
Northern Harrier 2 8 8
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 2 2
Cooper's Hawk 1 2 2
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 1 1
Red-tailed Hawk 0 9 9
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 0 9 9
Merlin 0 1 1
Peregrine Falcon 0 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 5 39 39
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Paul Pratt

Visitors:
We would like to thank Chip, Noel, Jim, Len, Paul, David and Linda for
their help on the tower. We were also joined by visitors from New York
travelling through the area.


Weather:
Today was a hot and humid day with extensive cloud coverage and very
southerly winds.

Raptor Observations:
Very few migrating raptors, we observed many resident eagles, ospreys and
turkey vultures.

Non-raptor Observations:


Predictions:
We anticipate a cooler day and some northerly winds which should bring
about raptors, particularly sharp-shinned, cooper's and broad-wing hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/3/19 4:01 pm
From: Karen Markey <ylime...>
Subject: [birders] Fall Migrants Field Trip to Hudson Mills Metropark, Sat., Sept. 7, 8 am sharp
Please join me for fall migrants field trip at Hudson Mills Metropark on
Saturday, Sept. 7. We will meet at 8 am sharp at the flagpole in the front
of the Activity Center. If the entry booth is unmanned, you can purchase a
$10 daily parking permit from Metropark staff at the Activity Center.

Our target birds are migrating warblers, vireos, cuckoos, and flycatchers.
Woodpeckers are usually conspicuous at this time of year. The forecast is
perfect -- cool and dry from start to finish, from the mid 50s to low 70s,
and winds from the northwest (which might encourage more migrating birds).

Be prepared for thick dew on the lawn and heavy mosquitoes in migrant-laden
areas (where birds are feasting on the insects). Typically we do lots of
hiking, stalking, standing, and circling back over the same trails. No pets
are allowed on the nature trails. Please, no strollers.

DIRECTIONS #1: From Ann Arbor's north or east sides, head north on US-23
and take exit 49, North Territorial Road. Turn left (west) onto North
Territorial Road and drive about eight to nine miles. A few hundred feet
after passing Huron River Drive, turn left (south) into Hudson Mills
Metropark. Inside the park, take the second right into a large carpark that
ends at the big Activity Center. For info about Hudson Mills, go to
http://www.metroparks.com/ and select Hudson Mills from the "Parks"
pull-down menu. If you reach Dexter-Pinckney Road (where there's a
drive-through coffee shop), you have driven too far west on North
Territorial Road.

DIRECTIONS #2: From Ann Arbor's west side, head westbound on Dexter-Ann
Arbor Road, bearing right (northbound) onto Dexter-Pinckney Road shortly
after passing through the one-lane bridge under the railroad tracks north
of downtown Dexter. Turn right (east) onto North Territorial Road (you
should see the coffee shop on the NW side of the intersection here).
Finally take the next right (south) into the Metropark after passing the
bridge over the Huron River. Inside the park, take the second right into a
large carpark that ends at the big Activity Center.

See you on Saturday, Sept. 7, at 8 am sharp until bird activity slows down,
usually about 11 am. You can leave the group at any time. Just ask me how
to hike back to the Activity Center's carpark. If you have questions,
please message me ASAP.

* * * * * * * * * * * *
Karen Markey
Email: <ylime...>
Web: http://ylime.people.si.umich.edu/

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Date: 9/3/19 3:37 pm
From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened? #2



The first five mass extinctions were not caused by human activity.








On Tue, Sep 3, 2019 at 4:48 PM -0400, "Matthew Mercer" <02matthew.mercer...> wrote:










I believe we have disrupted the balance of nature. As humans have been on this planet for a brief moment of the planets life. And we have seen not 1..2..3..but 6 mass extinction due to our actions. I fear that when nature balances out we will suffer a great loss. I fear climate change (habitat loss) (pollution)...is not the only issue we must overcome not as many but as one.
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Date: 9/3/19 3:12 pm
From: Alan Ryff <alryff...>
Subject: [birders] What has happened?

The proverbial straw that broke the camel's back is now the proverbial spray of insecticide and herbicide plus Monsanto soybean and corn crops to feed this world, as well as China's pork industry.  Welcome to the Anthropocene age.


Alan

On Sep 1, 2019, at 8:22 PM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:



I was at a baseball game in Utica last night.  Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59.  Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls.  No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos.  For late Summer, it did not seem right.



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Date: 9/3/19 2:52 pm
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
The species I'm most worried about, other than thousands of Bahamian humans
of course, is the Bahama Nuthatch. Either a subspecies of Brown-headed
Nuthatch, or a full species, it is found only on the island of Grand
Bahama. It was feared extinct as it had not been seen in a couple years,
but a few were found in the past year in pine forests on the eastern side
of the island.

Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: <amazilia3...>
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website: www.amazilia.net
Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/




On Tue, Sep 3, 2019 at 5:33 PM 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <
<birders...> wrote:

> John:
>
> Don't forget that birds have great low-frequency hearing. They can hear a
> major storm before it arrives and seek safety elsewhere. Fingers crossed
> that both species had the wisdom and foresight to remove themselves to
> southern islands.
>
> There was significant concern about the Puerto Rican Parrot following
> Hurricanes Irma and Maria. A few individuals on the east side of the island
> survived. Fingers crossed.
>
> Bill Rapai
> Grosse Pointe
>
> "Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: John Lowry <john...>
> To: Bill Rapai <brapai...>
> Cc: birders <birders...>
> Sent: Tue, Sep 3, 2019 2:48 pm
> Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration
> (Kirtland's warblers)
>
> Good to know regarding the Kirtland’s. Very interesting that they should
> move northeast to stage.
>
> The devastatingly sad for birds seems to be the endemics. The Bahama
> Nuthatch and the Bahama Parrot may have nested for the last time for all
> eternity. I don’t know about you, but when I hear of an extinction it’s a
> deep hurt.
>
> Good birding,
>
> John
>
>
>
> On Sep 3, 2019, at 2:18 PM, 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <
> <birders...> wrote:
>
> Ken:
>
> To answer your question about potential impacts of Dorian on the
> Kirtland's Warbler population, my guess would be minimal.
>
> A few years ago, Nathan Cooper of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center
> put geotrackers on a handful of male Kirtland's. When the geotrackers were
> recovered the following year, he discovered that the data showed each of
> the birds spent the month of September and the first part of October in
> Ontario near Algonquin Provincial Park.
>
> It seems that the birds learned that they should not go back to the
> Bahamas too early to avoid potential risks.
>
> Now, the next question is, What impact did Dorian have on the winter
> habitat? My guess again would be minimal. Dorian absolutely wiped out some
> of the northern pine-dominate islands. The warblers tend to winter on the
> southern islands that are dominated by coppice habitat. If the warblers
> happen to land on Grand Bahama Island during migration they will likely
> find food but not much shelter. You will be amazed how quickly insects
> repopulate an island after a disaster like a major hurricane.
>
> Bill Rapai
> Grosse Pointe
>
> "Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson
>
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
> To: birders <birders...>; Larry Nooden <ldnum...>
> Sent: Sun, Sep 1, 2019 9:21 pm
> Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration
> (Kirtland's warblers)
>
> I found an old article about fall migration of Kirtland's Warbler based on
> a 1971 net specimen. Did not send a lot more time on it, but found another
> list of ample enough fall records to indicate this species arrives on its
> wintering grounds later than ... right now.
> With all the Hurricane Dorian news of catastrophic damage in the Bahamas,
> I bet others are also concerned about survival rates of the rare birds
> there.
>
> I'm hoping in the coming days to read something on the Tropical Audubon
> Society's Bird Board, but perhaps some experts could weigh in with their
> knowledge to help us all understand if our concerns are well-founded or if
> the birds will come through this like they have for millenia.
>
> I'm hoping that many if not the majority of Kirtland's Warblers will still
> be on the mainland at this time.
> -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama (two OLD eBird records of Kirtland's
> here in Alabama, fyi. 1908 and 1936, both spring sightings, if memory
> serves)
> On Saturday, August 31, 2019, 03:09:23 PM CDT, Larry Nooden <
> <ldnum...> wrote:
>
>
> (2017). "Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)."
> Science 355(6329): 998-999.
>
> The Kirtland's warbler travels thousands of kilometers in about 2 weeks.
> https://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6329/998
> "Fifty years ago, fewer than 400 Kirtland's warblers were left in their
> summer habitat in upper Michigan. The species, Setophaga kirtlandii, became
> one of the first beneficiaries of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Forest
> managers planted more jack pines—which the songbird needs for its summer
> nests—and the population of the species increased 10-fold. But even so,
> only about 40% of the birds survive the annual migration to the Bahamas and
> back. Researchers wanted to learn more about their round-trip route, so
> they outfitted 50 warblers with tiny geolocators weighing just 0.5 grams.
> Every 2 minutes, the geolocators record the intensity of light, a measure
> of sunrise and sunset that can be used to calculate latitude and longitude.
> In the fall, the team learned, the warblers headed east over Ontario to the
> Atlantic coast, then south to the Bahamas. For the spring leg, the warblers
> flew west and made a stop in Florida before turning north toward Michigan,
> the team reported last week in the Journal of Avian Biology. Each way, they
> travel about 4500 kilometers in about 16 days. Knowing the locations of
> those stopovers, the researchers note, is a starting point for improving
> the bird's protection."
>
> More about the use of this tool:
>
> GAP has delineated species range and predicted distribution maps for more
> than 2,000 species that occur within the continental US as well as Alaska,
> Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Our goal is to build species range maps and
> distribution models with the best available data for assessing conservation
> status, conservation planning, and research.
>
> https://www.usgs.gov/core-science-systems/science-analytics-and-synthesis/gap/science/species-data-overview
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Birders" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAE525prcGVV%<3D7-NQ_NdSXX7nETWZh-rwqLTbQZmLJdsQ779HXw...>
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> .
> --
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> www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Birders" group.
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> <https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<1199474264.1007371.1567387296807...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>
> --
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> www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<2053259109.2023514.1567534689912...>
> <https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<2053259109.2023514.1567534689912...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>
>
> --
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> www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Birders" group.
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<733614111.2142761.1567546421165...>
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>

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Date: 9/3/19 2:33 pm
From: 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
John:
Don't forget that birds have great low-frequency hearing. They can hear a major storm before it arrives and seek safety elsewhere. Fingers crossed that both species had the wisdom and foresight to remove themselves to southern islands. 
There was significant concern about the Puerto Rican Parrot following Hurricanes Irma and Maria. A few individuals on the east side of the island survived. Fingers crossed. 
Bill RapaiGrosse Pointe

"Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson





-----Original Message-----
From: John Lowry <john...>
To: Bill Rapai <brapai...>
Cc: birders <birders...>
Sent: Tue, Sep 3, 2019 2:48 pm
Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)

Good to know regarding the Kirtland’s. Very interesting that they should move northeast to stage.
The devastatingly sad for birds seems to be the endemics. The Bahama Nuthatch and the Bahama Parrot may have nested for the last time for all eternity. I don’t know about you, but when I hear of an extinction it’s a deep hurt.
Good birding,
John




On Sep 3, 2019, at 2:18 PM, 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <birders...> wrote:
Ken:
To answer your question about potential impacts of Dorian on the Kirtland's Warbler population, my guess would be minimal.
A few years ago, Nathan Cooper of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center put geotrackers on a handful of male Kirtland's. When the geotrackers were recovered the following year, he discovered that the data showed each of the birds spent the month of September and the first part of October in Ontario near Algonquin Provincial Park. 
It seems that the birds learned that they should not go back to the Bahamas too early to avoid potential risks.
Now, the next question is, What impact did Dorian have on the winter habitat? My guess again would be minimal. Dorian absolutely wiped out some of the northern pine-dominate islands. The warblers tend to winter on the southern islands that are dominated by coppice habitat. If the warblers happen to land on Grand Bahama Island during migration they will likely find food but not much shelter. You will be amazed how quickly insects repopulate an island after a disaster like a major hurricane. 
Bill RapaiGrosse Pointe

"Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson





-----Original Message-----
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
To: birders <birders...>; Larry Nooden <ldnum...>
Sent: Sun, Sep 1, 2019 9:21 pm
Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)

I found an old article about fall migration of Kirtland's Warbler based on a 1971 net specimen.  Did not send a lot more time on it, but found another list of ample enough fall records to indicate this species arrives on its wintering grounds later than ... right now.  With all the Hurricane Dorian news of catastrophic damage in the Bahamas, I bet others are also concerned about survival rates of the rare birds there.
I'm hoping in the coming days to read something on the Tropical Audubon Society's Bird Board, but perhaps some experts could weigh in with their  knowledge to help us all understand if our concerns are well-founded or if the birds will come through this like they have for millenia.  
I'm hoping that many if not the majority of Kirtland's Warblers will still be on the mainland at this time.  -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama (two OLD eBird records of Kirtland's here in Alabama, fyi.  1908 and 1936, both spring sightings, if memory serves)  On Saturday, August 31, 2019, 03:09:23 PM CDT, Larry Nooden <ldnum...> wrote:

(2017). "Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)." Science 355(6329): 998-999.

The Kirtland's warbler travels thousands of kilometers in about 2 weeks.
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6329/998
"Fifty years ago, fewer than 400 Kirtland's warblers were left in their summer habitat in upper Michigan. The species, Setophaga kirtlandii, became one of the first beneficiaries of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Forest managers planted more jack pines—which the songbird needs for its summer nests—and the population of the species increased 10-fold. But even so, only about 40% of the birds survive the annual migration to the Bahamas and back. Researchers wanted to learn more about their round-trip route, so they outfitted 50 warblers with tiny geolocators weighing just 0.5 grams. Every 2 minutes, the geolocators record the intensity of light, a measure of sunrise and sunset that can be used to calculate latitude and longitude. In the fall, the team learned, the warblers headed east over Ontario to the Atlantic coast, then south to the Bahamas. For the spring leg, the warblers flew west and made a stop in Florida before turning north toward Michigan, the team reported last week in the Journal of Avian Biology. Each way, they travel about 4500 kilometers in about 16 days. Knowing the locations of those stopovers, the researchers note, is a starting point for improving the bird's protection."
More about the use of this tool:

GAP has delineated species range and predicted distribution maps for more than 2,000 species that occur within the continental US as well as Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Our goal is to build species range maps and distribution models with the best available data for assessing conservation status, conservation planning, and research.
https://www.usgs.gov/core-science-systems/science-analytics-and-synthesis/gap/science/species-data-overview

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Date: 9/3/19 1:48 pm
From: Matthew Mercer <02matthew.mercer...>
Subject: [birders] What has happened? #2
I believe we have disrupted the balance of nature. As humans have been on this planet for a brief moment of the planets life. And we have seen not 1..2..3..but 6 mass extinction due to our actions. I fear that when nature balances out we will suffer a great loss. I fear climate change (habitat loss) (pollution)...is not the only issue we must overcome not as many but as one.
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Date: 9/3/19 12:55 pm
From: Sherri Smith <grackle...>
Subject: [birders] April Campbell
April,
I’d like to get ahold of you, please email me back.
Sherri Smith

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Date: 9/3/19 12:51 pm
From: Alan Ryff <alryff...>
Subject: [birders] What has happened? #2
Puttingaside the obvious there is a shrinking insect biomass (at least in my urbangarden)--less groceries, less birds.
  DanaHoward wrote to me, “I am a great believer in habitat.  In this case Iwould offer that the common nighthawk is a grass land nester.  It ispossible that we grew up in a time when there were more grasslands.  Withbovine hormones there are less grasslands here in the north as these dairiesare now defunct, do not pasture cattle and many farm abandoned in the 1970’sthru 1990’s are now woodland. Another possible contributing factor is thespread of the opossum further north.  Also with the end of fur the raccoonpopulation has just exploded in the last three decades.  Same with foxesand coyotes, although they seem to follow the rabbit in a predator cycle”

Dana Howard's approach to habitat makes sense.




Concerning the bird'surban environment, it has been 25 years since nighthawks have nested on theroof of the elementary school around my corner in St. Clair Shores or it hasbeen that long since I have seen a nighthawk as a June-July bird flyingabove my street.  But there has been a rat population explosion inthe far east side of Metropolitan Detroit.  Rats are bad news for nestingbirds.
 
But, what is going onwhere the birds winter?  A double whammy?

https://wildlife.org/where-do-nighthawks-spend-the-winter/#targetText=Whether%20they're%20in%20boreal,far%20cry%20from%20open%20habitat.

https://wildlife.org ›where-do-nighthawks-spend-the-winter



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Date: 9/3/19 11:18 am
From: 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
Ken:
To answer your question about potential impacts of Dorian on the Kirtland's Warbler population, my guess would be minimal.
A few years ago, Nathan Cooper of the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center put geotrackers on a handful of male Kirtland's. When the geotrackers were recovered the following year, he discovered that the data showed each of the birds spent the month of September and the first part of October in Ontario near Algonquin Provincial Park. 
It seems that the birds learned that they should not go back to the Bahamas too early to avoid potential risks.
Now, the next question is, What impact did Dorian have on the winter habitat? My guess again would be minimal. Dorian absolutely wiped out some of the northern pine-dominate islands. The warblers tend to winter on the southern islands that are dominated by coppice habitat. If the warblers happen to land on Grand Bahama Island during migration they will likely find food but not much shelter. You will be amazed how quickly insects repopulate an island after a disaster like a major hurricane. 
Bill RapaiGrosse Pointe

"Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson





-----Original Message-----
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
To: birders <birders...>; Larry Nooden <ldnum...>
Sent: Sun, Sep 1, 2019 9:21 pm
Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)

I found an old article about fall migration of Kirtland's Warbler based on a 1971 net specimen.  Did not send a lot more time on it, but found another list of ample enough fall records to indicate this species arrives on its wintering grounds later than ... right now.  With all the Hurricane Dorian news of catastrophic damage in the Bahamas, I bet others are also concerned about survival rates of the rare birds there.
I'm hoping in the coming days to read something on the Tropical Audubon Society's Bird Board, but perhaps some experts could weigh in with their  knowledge to help us all understand if our concerns are well-founded or if the birds will come through this like they have for millenia.  
I'm hoping that many if not the majority of Kirtland's Warblers will still be on the mainland at this time.  -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama (two OLD eBird records of Kirtland's here in Alabama, fyi.  1908 and 1936, both spring sightings, if memory serves)  On Saturday, August 31, 2019, 03:09:23 PM CDT, Larry Nooden <ldnum...> wrote:

(2017). "Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)." Science 355(6329): 998-999.

The Kirtland's warbler travels thousands of kilometers in about 2 weeks.
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6329/998
"Fifty years ago, fewer than 400 Kirtland's warblers were left in their summer habitat in upper Michigan. The species, Setophaga kirtlandii, became one of the first beneficiaries of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Forest managers planted more jack pines—which the songbird needs for its summer nests—and the population of the species increased 10-fold. But even so, only about 40% of the birds survive the annual migration to the Bahamas and back. Researchers wanted to learn more about their round-trip route, so they outfitted 50 warblers with tiny geolocators weighing just 0.5 grams. Every 2 minutes, the geolocators record the intensity of light, a measure of sunrise and sunset that can be used to calculate latitude and longitude. In the fall, the team learned, the warblers headed east over Ontario to the Atlantic coast, then south to the Bahamas. For the spring leg, the warblers flew west and made a stop in Florida before turning north toward Michigan, the team reported last week in the Journal of Avian Biology. Each way, they travel about 4500 kilometers in about 16 days. Knowing the locations of those stopovers, the researchers note, is a starting point for improving the bird's protection."
More about the use of this tool:

GAP has delineated species range and predicted distribution maps for more than 2,000 species that occur within the continental US as well as Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Our goal is to build species range maps and distribution models with the best available data for assessing conservation status, conservation planning, and research.
https://www.usgs.gov/core-science-systems/science-analytics-and-synthesis/gap/science/species-data-overview

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Date: 9/3/19 5:58 am
From: Andrew Pawuk <andrewpawuk...>
Subject: [birders] Kudos Detroit Audubon
https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2019/09/03/detroit-audubon-east-side-park-native-grassland/2134471001/

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Date: 9/2/19 4:26 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2019) 28 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 02, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 0 0
Osprey 1 3 3
Bald Eagle 1 1 1
Northern Harrier 5 6 6
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 2 2
Cooper's Hawk 1 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 1 1 1
Red-tailed Hawk 9 9 9
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 9 9 9
Merlin 0 1 1
Peregrine Falcon 1 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 28 34 34
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
We would like to thank the welcomed help of Chip, Paul, Noel, and Bob and
to our many photographers Carmen, Gary and Justin Labonte.


Weather:
It was hot on the tower today, with the mercury reaching 29 degrees
Celsius, and blue skies all around us.

Raptor Observations:
More migrating raptors were observed today. In addition, many non-migrating
(resident) raptors flew by including two Peregrine falcons, 5 Ospreys, 20
Turkey Vultures and a juvenile and adult Bald Eagle.

Non-raptor Observations:


Predictions:
We hope for good weather that will bring Sharp-Shinned hawks, Broad-Wing
hawks and more American Kestrels.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/2/19 2:23 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2019) 24 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 02, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 0 0
Osprey 0 0 0
Bald Eagle 1 1 1
Northern Harrier 2 2 2
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 1 1
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 14 14 14
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 6 6 6
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 0 0 0
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 24 24 24
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Don Sherwood, Mark Hainen, Patrick Mulawa

Visitors:
We had some enthusiastic visitors today, some new to the craft and enjoying
learning. It was a pleasure to teach some of the things we have learned to
such a receptive audience.


Weather:
After getting rained out the first day, the weather was late summer-like
with clear skies on a high barometer in the morning with clouds filling in
and barometer slowly starting to fall in the afternoon hours. Winds tailed
off during the day leaving humid weather with threatening looking clouds
beginning to form. Change is on the way.

Raptor Observations:
We saw our first Broad-winged hawks today including a youngster that flew
close by as the first of the season. A few Red-tailed hawks were seen.
Eagles were seen all day but were deemed to be local birds as none of them
flew with a purpose. Local osprey was noted too.
Most of the migrating birds were seen relatively early and the late
afternoon hours were left to the local birds.

Non-raptor Observations:
Labor Day brings out the boats and we were treated to quite the variety at
the boat launch were we toil away. One vessel had twelve hundred HP hung on
the transom and earned the respect of the gearheads in the crowd.
In the sky, many gulls, swallows, and cormorants needed IDing to make sure
they weren't raptors sneaking through.

Predictions:
Change is in the forecast tomorrow with late afternoon T-Storms and a
plunging barometer. This sets up what looks to be a much better Wednesday
with rising pressure and NE winds.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Detroit River Hawk Watch (<jerry.jourdan...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/2/19 1:52 pm
From: thegarlicks <thegarlicks...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
Nighthawk decline has been noted for years; it's easy to find articles about it such as this one-- https://www.nwf.org/Magazines/National-Wildlife/2009/Insect-eating-birds-decline Recently of course there's been quite a bit of publicity about the paucity of many insect species. Perhaps climate change is bringing all the other relevant variables--industrial agriculture, loss of wildlands, pesticides, human encroachment--to a critical mass. I almost miss the mosquitoes!

--Diane G.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Patrick Baize" <pkbaize...>
To: "Chipperatl10" <chipperatl10...>, "Rosann Kovalcik" <rosannkovalcik...>
Cc: "Fred Kaluza" <fkaluza...>, "P. swanson" <jumpthroughhoops...>, "Alan Ryff" <alryff...>, "Birders UM" <birders...>
Sent: Monday, September 2, 2019 4:38:48 PM
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?


I grew up in West Dearborn at Michigan and Brady in the late 60's early 70's and at night the sky was full of bugs and birds with the lights of the car dealership below.
Pat B. Howell, Michigan

On Monday, September 2, 2019, 7:56:46 AM EDT, Rosann Kovalcik <rosannkovalcik...> wrote:


Lack of habitat due to increased amount of human habitat. The world needs less humans. Lack of native plants that produce native insects.

Rosann

On Sep 2, 2019, at 6:54 AM, Chipperatl10 < <chipperatl10...> > wrote:







The lighting isn’t the same as “back in the day”. It uses LED lighting https://ballparkdigest.com/2016/02/01/ballpark-preview-jimmy-johns-field/ . It is less “buggy” than traditional lights. This is another contributing factor along with the cooler weather. Moth diversity and quantity has rapidly decreased the past couple of weeks.

Gordon Green

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 1, 2019, at 8:22 PM, Fred Kaluza < <fkaluza...> > wrote:


<blockquote>


</blockquote>

I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59. Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did not seem right.




On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" < <birders...> > wrote:


<blockquote>


</blockquote>

It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,
“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,
They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.
As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.
We could all use more nature time.
Penny

On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff < <alryff...> > wrote:


<blockquote>

https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days goneby when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in thehundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives itsdeepest colors. And sometimes, themorning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlightfor blocks around. Today this is nolonger so. Now and then, theneighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a fewNighthawks at a time pass over in theevening quiet. Alas, what has happened?


Alan



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</blockquote>


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Date: 9/2/19 1:38 pm
From: Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?

I grew up in West Dearborn at Michigan and Brady in the late 60's early 70's and at night the sky was full of bugs and birds with the lights of the car dealership below.
Pat B. Howell, Michigan

On Monday, September 2, 2019, 7:56:46 AM EDT, Rosann Kovalcik <rosannkovalcik...> wrote:

Lack of habitat due to increased amount of human habitat. The world needs less humans. Lack of native plants that produce native insects.  
Rosann 
On Sep 2, 2019, at 6:54 AM, Chipperatl10 <chipperatl10...> wrote:



The lighting isn’t the same as “back in the day”.  It uses LED lighting https://ballparkdigest.com/2016/02/01/ballpark-preview-jimmy-johns-field/.  It is less “buggy” than traditional lights.   This is another contributing factor along with the cooler weather.  Moth diversity and quantity has rapidly decreased the past couple of weeks.  

Gordon Green
Sent from my iPhone
On Sep 1, 2019, at 8:22 PM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:



I was at a baseball game in Utica last night.  Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59.  Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls.  No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos.  For late Summer, it did not seem right.



On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> wrote:



It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights.  It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.We could all use more nature time.Penny
On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days goneby when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in thehundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives itsdeepest colors.  And sometimes, themorning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlightfor blocks around.  Today this is nolonger so.  Now and then, theneighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a fewNighthawks at a time  pass over in theevening quiet.  Alas, what has happened?

Alan 




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Date: 9/2/19 10:28 am
From: 'George Hammond' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
On Sep 1, 2019, at 8:22 PM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>
> I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59. Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did not seem right.

It wasn’t just slightly cool Saturday night. it was clear and the temp was dropping fast, from 70 at 6 pm to 63 at 8, and by 11 it was down to 53. This after a day that only got to 71 after a night that got down to 49. I think the weather that day all by itself could explain the absence of insects. Sure, lots of insects can fly in cooler temps than that in the spring and fall when they are adapted to it, but not so much in late summer. If it had been sunny and warmer in the afternoon, then you probably would have seen more flying in evening too.

George

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Date: 9/2/19 8:35 am
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Field Trips Saturday Sept 7 and Sunday Sept 8 - Everyone is invited
Saturday, September 7, 2019, 8:30am-11:30am. Drayton Plains
Leader: Kathleen Dougherty ( <kad8186...> )
This event is intended for Young Birders as well as adults. The Drayton
Plains Nature Center is a 138-acre natural area in Waterford along the
Clinton River. The site is a former fish hatchery. Several ponds were
constructed for the hatchery along the river. The property has an
impressive bird checklist with 176 species recorded. Director of Bird
Studies, Terri Chapdelaine will assist with the tour. Dress for the weather
and bring your binoculars. Plan to hike about 2 miles. Meet at the Nature
Center Parking Lot at 2125 Denby Road in Waterford, MI.

Sunday, September 8, 2019, 8:00am-12:00pm. Kensington Metropark
Leader: Dan Gertiser ( <dangertiser...> )
On our visit to Kensington we will look for fall migrants on the trails
around the nature center. Our emphasis will be on migrating passerines. We
will also search for early migrating waterfowl. Meet at the Nature Center
where there are modern bathroom facilities. Insects should not be a
problem. A Metropark pass is required.

Please see our website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) for details about
upcoming field trips, meetings and the Young Birder's Club. Contact the
field trip leaders if you have additional questions. You do not have to be
a member to participate. Everyone is welcome.

Thank you,
Phil Bugosh
Oakland Audubon Society

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Date: 9/2/19 6:16 am
From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?



I’ll give you that Gordon, that’s certainly part of the answer and although I dislike light pollution, I’m happier knowing that LED lighting seems to be less attractive to insects in general.  Still not as good as plain old darkness however.








On Mon, Sep 2, 2019 at 6:54 AM -0400, "Chipperatl10" <chipperatl10...> wrote:










The lighting isn’t the same as “back in the day”.  It uses LED lighting https://ballparkdigest.com/2016/02/01/ballpark-preview-jimmy-johns-field/.  It is less “buggy” than traditional lights.   This is another contributing factor along with the cooler weather.  Moth diversity and quantity has rapidly decreased the past couple of weeks.  

Gordon Green
Sent from my iPhone
On Sep 1, 2019, at 8:22 PM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:




I was at a baseball game in Utica last night.  Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59.  Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls.  No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos.  For late Summer, it did not seem right.








On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> wrote:










It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights.  It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.We could all use more nature time.Penny
On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days gone
by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the
hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its
deepest colors.  And sometimes, the
morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight
for blocks around.  Today this is no
longer so.  Now and then, the
neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few
Nighthawks at a time  pass over in the
evening quiet.  Alas, what has happened?




Alan 







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Date: 9/2/19 5:32 am
From: Ann Hancock <annhancock9...>
Subject: [birders] Our vanishing birds
Here’s a great (though melancholy) reflection on our vanishing birds. There are definitely far too many of us for successful coexistence with the natural world.

https://downeast.com/ordinary-birds/

Ann H
Maine

Shared via the Google app


Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 9/2/19 4:56 am
From: Rosann Kovalcik <rosannkovalcik...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
Lack of habitat due to increased amount of human habitat. The world needs less humans. Lack of native plants that produce native insects.

Rosann

> On Sep 2, 2019, at 6:54 AM, Chipperatl10 <chipperatl10...> wrote:
>
> The lighting isn’t the same as “back in the day”. It uses LED lighting https://ballparkdigest.com/2016/02/01/ballpark-preview-jimmy-johns-field/. It is less “buggy” than traditional lights. This is another contributing factor along with the cooler weather. Moth diversity and quantity has rapidly decreased the past couple of weeks.
>
> Gordon Green
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 1, 2019, at 8:22 PM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>>
>> I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59. Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did not seem right.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> wrote:
>>
>>> It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,
>>> “Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,
>>> They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.
>>> As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.
>>> We could all use more nature time.
>>> Penny
>>>
>>>> On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203
>>>>
>>>> In days gone by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its deepest colors. And sometimes, the morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight for blocks around. Today this is no longer so. Now and then, the neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few Nighthawks at a time pass over in the evening quiet. Alas, what has happened?
>>>> Alan
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>>>> ---
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>>>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<127278681.991160.1567369737515...>
>>> --
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>>> ---
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>>
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Date: 9/2/19 3:54 am
From: Chipperatl10 <chipperatl10...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
The lighting isn’t the same as “back in the day”. It uses LED lighting https://ballparkdigest.com/2016/02/01/ballpark-preview-jimmy-johns-field/. It is less “buggy” than traditional lights. This is another contributing factor along with the cooler weather. Moth diversity and quantity has rapidly decreased the past couple of weeks.

Gordon Green

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 1, 2019, at 8:22 PM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>
> I was at a baseball game in Utica last night. Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59. Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls. No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos. For late Summer, it did not seem right.
>
>
>
>
> On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> wrote:
>
>> It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,
>> “Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,
>> They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.
>> As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.
>> We could all use more nature time.
>> Penny
>>
>>> On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:
>>>
>>> https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203
>>>
>>> In days gone by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its deepest colors. And sometimes, the morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight for blocks around. Today this is no longer so. Now and then, the neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few Nighthawks at a time pass over in the evening quiet. Alas, what has happened?
>>> Alan
>>>
>>>
>>> --
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>>> ---
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>> --
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>
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Date: 9/2/19 1:44 am
From: 'jochen roeder' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
According to monitoring studies, Germany has lost around 75% of insect biomass during the last 30 years. While habitat loss certainly plays a role as well, this is though to be mostly a result of increased pesticide use. I suspect the same is true for many parts of the USA. A "classic example" that is usually given to demonstrate this: during the 1980's, it was common practice to clean the windshield of insect remains with a special sponge available at petrol stations, at least at every stop to fill up gas. It was not unusual - from personal experience - that you'd stop at a petrol station specifically to use these sponges to clean the windshield without having to buy gas at all. Nowadays, I scarcely ever clean the windshield, as you can drive for weeks without collecting a significant amount of insect stains.

Cheers,
Jochen

Am Montag, 2. September 2019, 02:23:45 MESZ hat Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> Folgendes geschrieben:

#yiv3159690620 html {background-color:transparent !important;}#yiv3159690620 body {background-color:transparent !important;color:#333;line-height:150%;margin:0;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-reference-expand {display:block;color:#999;padding:20px 0px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-availability-container {max-width:500px;margin:auto;padding:12px 15px 15px 15px;border:1px solid #C7E0F4;border-radius:4px;}#yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-availability-delete-button {width:25px;min-height:25px;background-size:25px 25px;background-position:center;}#yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-main-container {margin:0 0 0 0;margin-top:120;padding:8;}#yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-content-container {padding:0;padding-top:12;padding-bottom:20;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-mention {color:#333;background-color:#f1f1f1;border-radius:4px;padding:0 2px 0 2px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-mention-external {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#fdf7e7;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-mention-external-clear-design {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#f1f1f1;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode {color:#E1E1E1 !important;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-reference-expand {color:#777777 !important;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode a:not {color:#0086F0;}#yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 {color:#E1E1E1 !important;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-availability-container {border-color:#303030 !important;}#yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 td:nth-child {color:#0086F0;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-availability-container .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-availability-timeslot-container {background-color:#0086F0 !important;color:#000000 !important;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-availability-container .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-availability-border {border-top:1px solid #0086F0 !important;}#yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-availability-delete-button {}#yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 #yiv3159690620 a {color:#0086F0 !important;}#yiv3159690620 .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv3159690620ms-outlook-ios-mention {color:#ACACAC !important;background-color:#292929 !important;} I was at a baseball game in Utica last night.  Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59.  Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls.  No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos.  For late Summer, it did not seem right.



On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> wrote:



It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights.  It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.We could all use more nature time.Penny
On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days goneby when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in thehundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives itsdeepest colors.  And sometimes, themorning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlightfor blocks around.  Today this is nolonger so.  Now and then, theneighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a fewNighthawks at a time  pass over in theevening quiet.  Alas, what has happened?

Alan 




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Date: 9/1/19 7:28 pm
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
What's happened is too many of us humans.  Just google "population clock," and you'll see the gravity of our situation.  Political leaders NEVER touch this taboo subject.  People are intent on procreating.  Unfettered except by natural disaster.  Other species dwindle and go extinct, but the population clock keeps racing upward.  While the Amazon burns, while the Bahamas flood, and while we lose species every year.  Young people don't notice these things as much as humans who have been around for half a century or more.  Can you just imagine the bird life 200 years ago compared to now?  -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama   
On Sunday, September 1, 2019, 07:22:46 PM CDT, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:

#yiv8214975178 html {background-color:transparent !important;}#yiv8214975178 body {background-color:transparent !important;color:#333;line-height:150%;margin:0;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-reference-expand {display:block;color:#999;padding:20px 0px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-availability-container {max-width:500px;margin:auto;padding:12px 15px 15px 15px;border:1px solid #C7E0F4;border-radius:4px;}#yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-availability-delete-button {width:25px;min-height:25px;background-size:25px 25px;background-position:center;}#yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-main-container {margin:0 0 0 0;margin-top:120;padding:8;}#yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-content-container {padding:0;padding-top:12;padding-bottom:20;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-mention {color:#333;background-color:#f1f1f1;border-radius:4px;padding:0 2px 0 2px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-mention-external {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#fdf7e7;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-mention-external-clear-design {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#f1f1f1;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode {color:#E1E1E1 !important;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-reference-expand {color:#777777 !important;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode a:not {color:#0086F0;}#yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 {color:#E1E1E1 !important;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-availability-container {border-color:#303030 !important;}#yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 td:nth-child {color:#0086F0;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-availability-container .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-availability-timeslot-container {background-color:#0086F0 !important;color:#000000 !important;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-availability-container .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-availability-border {border-top:1px solid #0086F0 !important;}#yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-availability-delete-button {}#yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 #yiv8214975178 a {color:#0086F0 !important;}#yiv8214975178 .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv8214975178ms-outlook-ios-mention {color:#ACACAC !important;background-color:#292929 !important;} I was at a baseball game in Utica last night.  Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59.  Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls.  No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos.  For late Summer, it did not seem right.



On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> wrote:



It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights.  It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.We could all use more nature time.Penny
On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days goneby when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in thehundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives itsdeepest colors.  And sometimes, themorning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlightfor blocks around.  Today this is nolonger so.  Now and then, theneighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a fewNighthawks at a time  pass over in theevening quiet.  Alas, what has happened?

Alan 




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Date: 9/1/19 6:21 pm
From: G M ARCHAMBAULT <gm72125...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
I found an old article about fall migration of Kirtland's Warbler based on a 1971 net specimen.  Did not send a lot more time on it, but found another list of ample enough fall records to indicate this species arrives on its wintering grounds later than ... right now.  With all the Hurricane Dorian news of catastrophic damage in the Bahamas, I bet others are also concerned about survival rates of the rare birds there.
I'm hoping in the coming days to read something on the Tropical Audubon Society's Bird Board, but perhaps some experts could weigh in with their  knowledge to help us all understand if our concerns are well-founded or if the birds will come through this like they have for millenia.  
I'm hoping that many if not the majority of Kirtland's Warblers will still be on the mainland at this time.  -Ken Archambault, Birmingham, Alabama (two OLD eBird records of Kirtland's here in Alabama, fyi.  1908 and 1936, both spring sightings, if memory serves)  On Saturday, August 31, 2019, 03:09:23 PM CDT, Larry Nooden <ldnum...> wrote:

(2017). "Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)." Science 355(6329): 998-999.

The Kirtland's warbler travels thousands of kilometers in about 2 weeks.
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6329/998
"Fifty years ago, fewer than 400 Kirtland's warblers were left in their summer habitat in upper Michigan. The species, Setophaga kirtlandii, became one of the first beneficiaries of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Forest managers planted more jack pines—which the songbird needs for its summer nests—and the population of the species increased 10-fold. But even so, only about 40% of the birds survive the annual migration to the Bahamas and back. Researchers wanted to learn more about their round-trip route, so they outfitted 50 warblers with tiny geolocators weighing just 0.5 grams. Every 2 minutes, the geolocators record the intensity of light, a measure of sunrise and sunset that can be used to calculate latitude and longitude. In the fall, the team learned, the warblers headed east over Ontario to the Atlantic coast, then south to the Bahamas. For the spring leg, the warblers flew west and made a stop in Florida before turning north toward Michigan, the team reported last week in the Journal of Avian Biology. Each way, they travel about 4500 kilometers in about 16 days. Knowing the locations of those stopovers, the researchers note, is a starting point for improving the bird's protection."
More about the use of this tool:

GAP has delineated species range and predicted distribution maps for more than 2,000 species that occur within the continental US as well as Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Our goal is to build species range maps and distribution models with the best available data for assessing conservation status, conservation planning, and research.
https://www.usgs.gov/core-science-systems/science-analytics-and-synthesis/gap/science/species-data-overview



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Date: 9/1/19 5:45 pm
From: Larry Nooden <ldnum...>
Subject: [birders] Re: Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
The 2nd link (USGS) should br open (free) access, but the first link
(Science) is not. That is why I copied the summary into the message. It
could accessed in the UM Library or many local libraries or college
libraries. The details are in the USGS article, so the Science article is
not needed.

Sorry, maybe a warning about limited access is needed.

On Sat, Aug 31, 2019 at 4:09 PM Larry Nooden <ldnum...> wrote:

> (2017). "Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)."
> Science 355(6329): 998-999.
>
> The Kirtland's warbler travels thousands of kilometers in about 2 weeks.
> https://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6329/998
> "Fifty years ago, fewer than 400 Kirtland's warblers were left in their
> summer habitat in upper Michigan. The species, Setophaga kirtlandii, became
> one of the first beneficiaries of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Forest
> managers planted more jack pines—which the songbird needs for its summer
> nests—and the population of the species increased 10-fold. But even so,
> only about 40% of the birds survive the annual migration to the Bahamas and
> back. Researchers wanted to learn more about their round-trip route, so
> they outfitted 50 warblers with tiny geolocators weighing just 0.5 grams.
> Every 2 minutes, the geolocators record the intensity of light, a measure
> of sunrise and sunset that can be used to calculate latitude and longitude.
> In the fall, the team learned, the warblers headed east over Ontario to the
> Atlantic coast, then south to the Bahamas. For the spring leg, the warblers
> flew west and made a stop in Florida before turning north toward Michigan,
> the team reported last week in the Journal of Avian Biology. Each way, they
> travel about 4500 kilometers in about 16 days. Knowing the locations of
> those stopovers, the researchers note, is a starting point for improving
> the bird's protection."
>
> More about the use of this tool:
>
> GAP has delineated species range and predicted distribution maps for more
> than 2,000 species that occur within the continental US as well as Alaska,
> Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Our goal is to build species range maps and
> distribution models with the best available data for assessing conservation
> status, conservation planning, and research.
>
> https://www.usgs.gov/core-science-systems/science-analytics-and-synthesis/gap/science/species-data-overview
>
>

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Date: 9/1/19 5:22 pm
From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?



I was at a baseball game in Utica last night.  Jimmy John’s Stadium on M-59.  Granted, the evening was a little cool but...with all the high intensity lamps surrounding the stadium and field, during the entire game, we noticed one flying Mantid some House Sparrows and a couple Gulls.  No moths, no June Bugs, no Mayflies, no Katydids no Cicadas and no Mosquitos.  For late Summer, it did not seem right.








On Sun, Sep 1, 2019 at 4:42 PM -0400, "'P. swanson' via Birders" <birders...> wrote:










It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights.  It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.We could all use more nature time.Penny
On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days gone
by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the
hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its
deepest colors.  And sometimes, the
morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight
for blocks around.  Today this is no
longer so.  Now and then, the
neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few
Nighthawks at a time  pass over in the
evening quiet.  Alas, what has happened?




Alan 







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Date: 9/1/19 3:44 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2019) 6 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 01, 2019
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 0 0
Osprey 2 2 2
Bald Eagle 0 0 0
Northern Harrier 1 1 1
Sharp-shinned Hawk 2 2 2
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 0 0
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 0 0 0
Merlin 1 1 1
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 6 6 6
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagne

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Mike, Bob, Neil, Chip, Noel and Juliette all visited and their help was
much appreciated.
Several other visitors came to enjoy the view for a few moments between the
rain.


Weather:
The day started out fine, but increasing amounts of rain later in the day.

Raptor Observations:
We observed few raptors but a reasonable variety, including residents of
the marsh; two osprey, two juvenile and one adult bald eagle, and one
turkey vulture.

Non-raptor Observations:
A significant number of purple martins migrating, over 700 birds. We also
observed many swallows feeding over the marsh, including over 300 tree
swallows. Many warblers were seen around the tower, including over 20
Blackburnian warblers.
12 Monarch butterflies were observed.

Predictions:
We hope for less rain, and northerly winds to bring more raptors. We look
forward to sharp-shinned and Cooper's hawks in the coming weeks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagne (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/1/19 3:25 pm
From: Neeser <neeser...>
Subject: [birders] Cockatoos-in-bins
A friend from Australia sent me this link.

<https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2019-09-01/cockatoos-in-bins-animal-culture-off-track/11439076>https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2019-09-01/cockatoos-in-bins-animal-culture-off-track/11439076
Denise

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Date: 9/1/19 1:42 pm
From: 'P. swanson' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] What has happened?
It wasn’t that many years ago that I used to walk my dogs at night by St. Michael’s Church in Grosse Pointe and both see and hear the nighthawks swooping and diving for insects, not to mention the same at the old Tiger Stadium at night games under the lights. It reminds me of that old Judy Collins song,
“Don’t it always seem to go that you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone,
They paved paradise to put up a parking lot”.
As Robert Redford once said, “no one cares.” Sad but I’m afraid true. Just look at all the folks still asking for plastic bags at the grocery store.
We could all use more nature time.
Penny

> On Sep 1, 2019, at 4:28 PM, Alan Ryff <alryff...> wrote:
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203
>
> In days gone by when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in the hundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives its deepest colors. And sometimes, the morning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlight for blocks around. Today this is no longer so. Now and then, the neighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a few Nighthawks at a time pass over in the evening quiet. Alas, what has happened?
> Alan
>
>
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Date: 9/1/19 1:29 pm
From: Alan Ryff <alryff...>
Subject: [birders] What has happened?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/snow-shadow/albums/72157710643678203

In days goneby when today’s old men were children, ribbons of Nighthawks, sometimes in thehundreds, would stream south just above the rooftops as the sunset gives itsdeepest colors.  And sometimes, themorning sunshine could find a sleeping Nighthawk on nearly every streetlightfor blocks around.  Today this is nolonger so.  Now and then, theneighborhoods along Lake Saint Clair see or hear a single or perhaps a fewNighthawks at a time  pass over in theevening quiet.  Alas, what has happened?

Alan 


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Date: 9/1/19 12:57 pm
From: Larry Nooden <ldnum...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Medical prescriptions for nature exposure
Fred has raised an interesting question about the data on the pyscho-social
effects of our environment, and I think that most on this list can realize
that the answer is complex, interdisciplinary and highly political, because
there are many facets and approaches to the question.

Even before President Trump, this became a partisan issue with one side
favoring maximal short-term profits dismissing other aspects as
nonquantitative/nonmonetary, but I think that those who are are interested
in the data/facts will see that there are measurable short-term as well as
long-term costs/gains in addition to subjective quality of life
components. This partisan divide did not exist in the times of Eisenhower
and Nixon.

In some ways, present day birds and endangered species are measures of what
is being done to our habitat much like the canaries once did in the coal
mines. Are the lessons for coal-mine canaries or the bald eagle-DDT
episode being utilized? Although environmental degradation by chemical
pollution is important, there can be psycho-social problems, and the gains
from dealing with them are for the greater good. Are we witnessing another
facet of human habitat destruction?

Below is a scattering of diverse reports from a very large scientific
literature. *For those only interested in the key points, some key phrases
marked in bold*. The abstracts provide glimpses of the methods used and
the data obtained. I have also listed links to the original sources for
several reports. Some of these are open-access; others would to be
accessed through a special source such as the UM Library system.

I have included some local pioneers, i.e.. Cimprich and the Kaplans.

Cimprich, B. and D. L. Ronis (2003). "*An environmental intervention to
restore attention in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer*." Cancer
Nurs 26(4): 284-292; quiz 293-284.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12886119
*Earlier research indicated that attentional fatigue with reduced capacity
to direct attention in women treated for breast cancer may be ameliorated
by a theoretically based intervention involving regular exposure to the
natural environment.* This study tested the efficacy of a natural
environment intervention aimed at restoring attention in 157 women with
newly diagnosed breast cancer. Capacity to direct attention was assessed
with a brief battery of objective measures at two time points:
approximately 17 days before surgery (time 1) and 19 days after surgery
(time 2). A randomly assigned intervention protocol was initiated after the
first assessment and before any treatment. The intervention comprised a
home-based program involving 120 minutes of exposure to the natural
environment per week. The intervention group (n = 83) showed greater
recovery of capacity to direct attention from the pretreatment (time 1) to
the preadjuvant therapy period (time 2), as compared with the
nonintervention group (n = 74). *A significant effect of the natural
environment intervention was observed* even after control was used for the
effects of age, education, attention scores at time 1, other health
problems, symptom distress, and extent of surgery. The findings suggest
therapeutic benefits for capacity to direct attention from early
intervention aimed at restoring attention in women with newly diagnosed
breast cancer.

Cimprich, B., et al. (2005). "Assessing cognitive function in women with
and without breast cancer using functional magnetic resonance imaging
(fMRI)." Oncology Nursing Forum 32(1): 180-181.

Kim, G. W., et al. (2010). "*Functional neuroanatomy associated with
natural and urban scenic views in the human brain: 3.0T functional MR
imaging*." Korean J Radiol 11(5): 507-513.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20808693
OBJECTIVE: *By using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
technique we assessed brain activation patterns while subjects were viewing
the living environments representing natural and urban scenery. *MATERIALS
AND METHODS: A total of 28 healthy right-handed subjects underwent an fMRI
on a 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner. The stimulation paradigm consisted of three
times the rest condition and two times the activation condition, each of
which lasted for 30 and 120 seconds, respectively. During the activation
period, each subject viewed natural and urban scenery, respectively.
RESULTS: The predominant brain activation areas observed following exposure
to natural scenic views in contrast with urban views included the superior
and middle frontal gyri, superior parietal gyrus, precuneus, basal ganglia,
superior occipital gyrus, anterior cingulate gyrus, superior temporal
gyrus, and insula. On the other hand, t
CONCLUSION: Our findings support the idea that the differential functional
neuroanatomies for each scenic view are presumably related with subjects'
emotional responses to the natural and urban environment, and thus the
*differential
functional neuroanatomy can be utilized as a neural index for the
evaluation of friendliness in ecological housing*.

Berman, M. G., et al. (2008). "*The cognitive benefits of interacting with
nature*." Psychol Sci 19(12): 1207-1212.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19121124
We *compare the restorative effects on cognitive functioning of
interactions with natural versus urban environment*s. Attention restoration
theory (ART) provides an analysis of the kinds of environments that lead to
improvements in directed-attention abilities. Nature, which is filled with
intriguing stimuli, modestly grabs attention in a bottom-up fashion,
allowing top-down directed-attention abilities a chance to replenish.
Unlike natural environments, urban environments are filled with stimulation
that captures attention dramatically and additionally requires directed
attention (e.g., to avoid being hit by a car), making them less
restorative. We present two experiments that show that *walking in nature
or viewing pictures of nature can improve directed-attention abilities as
measured with* a backwards digit-span task and the Attention Network Task,
thus validating attention restoration theory.

Kaplan, R. and S. Kaplan (2008). "Bringing out the best in people: A
psychological perspective." Conservation Biology 22(4): 826-829.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18786098

Kondo, M. C., et al. (2018). "Does spending time outdoors reduce stress? A
review of real-time stress response to outdoor environments." Health &
Place 51: 136-150.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29604546
*Everyday environmental conditions impact human health. One mechanism
underlying this relationship is the experience of stress. Through
systematic review of published literature, we explore how stress has been
measured in real-time non-laboratory studies of stress responses to
deliberate exposure to outdoor environments*. The types of exposures
evaluated in this review include: nature viewing, outdoor walks, outdoor
exercise and gardening. We characterize study design, modalities of stress
measurements, and statistical estimates of effect and significance. *Heart
rate, blood pressure, and self-report measures provide the most convincing
evidence that spending time in outdoor environments, particularly those
with green space, may reduce the experience of stress, and ultimately
improve health.* More work is needed to understand effects of in situ
modifications to outdoor environments on residents' stress response.

South, E. C., et al. (2018). "*Effect of Greening Vacant Land on Mental
Health of Community-Dwelling Adults: A Cluster Randomized Trial Effect of
Greening Vacant Land on Mental Health Among Urban ResidentsEffect of
Greening Vacant Land on Mental Health Among Urban Residents*." JAMA Network
Open 1(3): e180298-e180298.
https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.0298
Neighborhood physical conditions have been associated with mental illness
and may partially explain persistent socioeconomic disparities in the
prevalence of poor mental health.To evaluate whether interventions to green
vacant urban land can improve self-reported mental health.*This citywide
cluster randomized trial examined 442 community-dwelling sampled adults
living in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, within 110 vacant lot clusters
randomly assigned to 3 study groups. Participants were followed up for 18
months preintervention and postintervention.* This trial was conducted from
October 1, 2011, to November 30, 2014. Data were analyzed from July 1,
2015, to April 16, 2017.The greening intervention involved removing trash,
grading the land, planting new grass and a small number of trees,
installing a low wooden perimeter fence, and performing regular monthly
maintenance. The trash cleanup intervention involved removal of trash,
limited grass mowing where possible, and regular monthly maintenance. The
control group received no intervention.Self-reported mental health measured
by the Kessler-6 Psychological Distress Scale and the components of this
scale.A total of 110 clusters containing 541 vacant lots were enrolled in
the trial and randomly allocated to the following 1 of 3 study groups: the
greening intervention (37 clusters [33.6%]), the trash cleanup intervention
(36 clusters [32.7%]), or no intervention (37 clusters [33.6%]). Of the 442
participants, the mean (SD) age was 44.6 (15.1) years, 264 (59.7%) were
female, and 194 (43.9%) had a family income less than $25 000. A total of
342 participants (77.4%) had follow-up data and were included in the
analysis. Of these, 117 (34.2%) received the greening intervention, 107
(31.3%) the trash cleanup intervention, and 118 (34.5%) no intervention.
Intention-to-treat analysis of the greening intervention compared with no
intervention demonstrated a significant decrease in participants who were
feeling depressed (−41.5%; 95% CI, −63.6% to −5.9%; P = .03) and worthless
(−50.9%; 95% CI, −74.7% to −4.7%; P = .04), as well as a nonsignificant
reduction in overall self-reported poor mental health (−62.8%; 95% CI,
−86.2% to 0.4%; P = .051). For participants living in neighborhoods below
the poverty line, the greening intervention demonstrated a significant
decrease in feeling depressed (−68.7%; 95% CI, −86.5% to −27.5%; P = .007).
Intention-to-treat analysis of those living near the trash cleanup
intervention compared with no intervention showed no significant changes in
self-reported poor mental health.*Among community-dwelling adults,
self-reported feelings of depression and worthlessness were significantly
decreased*, and self-reported poor mental health was nonsignificantly
reduced *for those living near greened vacant land*. The treatment of
blighted physical environments, particularly in resource-limited urban
settings, can be an important treatment for mental health problems
alongside other patient-level treatments.isrctn.org Identifier:
ISRCTN92582209




On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 2:00 PM Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:

> If anyone here has access to any associated statistics, I’d love to see
> survey results for area physicians in terms of how many local doctors do
> this, how often they do it and where they are sending people locally to
> “get their fix” of nature.
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 12:06 PM -0400, "Larry Nooden" <ldnum...>
> wrote:
>
> These prescriptions apply to birding, botanizing and just enjoying the
>> peace/aesthetics (e.g., forest bathing).
>> Most of you already know this intuitively, but I think that it is nice to
>> see it being recognized scientifically and being utilized in health
>> treatments.
>>
>> Why doctors are increasingly prescribing nature | PBS NewsHour
>>
>> https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/why-doctors-are-increasingly-prescribing-nature
>> - As rates of chronic disease among children have skyrocketed over the
>> past few decades, pediatricians have increasingly looked for solutions
>> beyond the clinic. ... Special correspondent Cat Wise reports from Oakland
>> on the medical evidence that indicates escaping modern urban life ...
>> UK doctors are prescribing nature to patients - CNN - CNN.com
>> https://www.cnn.com › health › nature-prescriptions-shetland-intl
>> Oct 5, 2018 - Doctors in Scotland's Shetland Islands are now *prescribing
>> nature* ... Now all 10 of the Shetland Islands' *public* surgeries will
>> now have a calendar and leaflet listing walks and activities. ... can hand
>> out to patients, according to an RSPB *news* release. .... Turner
>> *Broadcasting* System, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
>> A dose of nature: doctors prescribe a day in the park for anxiety
>>
>> https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/dose-nature-doctors-prescribe-day-park-anxiety-n823421
>>
>> --
>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
>> www.glc.org
>> ---
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>> "Birders" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
>> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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>> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAE525poSq60iiLuf%<2BY7F33LJ2_GN-fGinW2S_JHkSpGFsypG5Q...>
>> <https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAE525poSq60iiLuf%<2BY7F33LJ2_GN-fGinW2S_JHkSpGFsypG5Q...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
>> .
>>
>

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Date: 8/31/19 1:09 pm
From: Larry Nooden <ldnum...>
Subject: [birders] Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)
(2017). "Microtracker maps a rare bird's migration (Kirtland's warblers)."
Science 355(6329): 998-999.

The Kirtland's warbler travels thousands of kilometers in about 2 weeks.
https://science.sciencemag.org/content/355/6329/998
"Fifty years ago, fewer than 400 Kirtland's warblers were left in their
summer habitat in upper Michigan. The species, Setophaga kirtlandii, became
one of the first beneficiaries of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Forest
managers planted more jack pines—which the songbird needs for its summer
nests—and the population of the species increased 10-fold. But even so,
only about 40% of the birds survive the annual migration to the Bahamas and
back. Researchers wanted to learn more about their round-trip route, so
they outfitted 50 warblers with tiny geolocators weighing just 0.5 grams.
Every 2 minutes, the geolocators record the intensity of light, a measure
of sunrise and sunset that can be used to calculate latitude and longitude.
In the fall, the team learned, the warblers headed east over Ontario to the
Atlantic coast, then south to the Bahamas. For the spring leg, the warblers
flew west and made a stop in Florida before turning north toward Michigan,
the team reported last week in the Journal of Avian Biology. Each way, they
travel about 4500 kilometers in about 16 days. Knowing the locations of
those stopovers, the researchers note, is a starting point for improving
the bird's protection."

More about the use of this tool:

GAP has delineated species range and predicted distribution maps for more
than 2,000 species that occur within the continental US as well as Alaska,
Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Our goal is to build species range maps and
distribution models with the best available data for assessing conservation
status, conservation planning, and research.
https://www.usgs.gov/core-science-systems/science-analytics-and-synthesis/gap/science/species-data-overview

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Date: 8/31/19 11:05 am
From: Sally K. Scheer <winerat...>
Subject: RE: [birders] bat removal advice
Ai used a tennis racket to knock down bats in my old house which was infested with bats in the attic. I reached the end of my rope on them when my younger son put on his bathrobe one morning and a bat was in the sleeve!!



The tennis racket didn’t kill the bat, just knocked them down so I could scoop them up and take them outside for release. Never found a dead one so it must have been just a stun.



We finally sent them off to roost in the barn instead by finding the entrance hole near the chimney and sealing it up AFTER the bats had left for their nightly cruise for insects. Took several tries as the bats can get in very small places and we didn’t find all of them right away. They have been gone for several years now.



Sally Scheer



From: Eric Arnold [mailto:<eba...>]
Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2019 1:03 PM
To: <birders...>
Subject: [birders] bat removal advice



A friend of mine has reported to me that she believes she has a bat in her house. She doesn't know how it got in, but has it isolated where she found it, in a small upstairs bathroom.



I have not had much experience with bat encounters, having removed one from my house many years ago, and would like to have suggestions on appropriate removal strategies.

Ideas I have would be to capture it with something like a fish net for netting a fish before removing a hook, or containing it with a colander or large sieve placed over it, and then sliding that over a sheet of metal (e.g. a cookie sheet without a turned-up edge, cardboard, or thin plywood or some such material to enclose it so it could be removed without injuring it or getting bitten or scratched, or possibly by removing the screen from the window and leaving that open, possibly at night, in the hope that it would find leaving preferable to staying in this confined space, but with the difficulty of it not being easy to check on its activity or that other bats might find it intriguing.

Other ideas? Good people to contact for assistance?

My friend's house is on the west side of Ann Arbor, on Dexter Ave. between Huron and Maple.



Eric Arnold





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Date: 8/31/19 9:14 am
From: mck426 <mck426...>
Subject: [birders] Robert Long Question
Greetings... looking to walk the path at Robert Long, need to know its conditions, is it pretty flat, wide, etc.?  Thanks!MarySent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S10.

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Date: 8/31/19 9:07 am
From: Eric Arnold <eba...>
Subject: [birders] Bat picture:
I see it's actually hanging onto the edges of the wallpaper, not an
irregularity in the plaster.
[image: Bat 8-28-2019 LR.jpg]
For a sense of size, I estimate that the curved moulding strip at the peak
of the ceiling is approximately 2" wide.

I think it might be difficult for it to get through an opening much less
than an inch or so, if that.

Eric

>
>

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Date: 8/31/19 8:22 am
From: Beverly Wolf <Bev_Wolf...>
Subject: [birders] Solitary Sandpiper
We have a new home in Presque Isle (lower peninsula) and are there part
time. Enjoying the lovely harbor this morning, I spotted a Solitary
Sandpiper flitting over the water, up and down and to the shore and back for
about 5 minutes. It even landed about 5 feet away from me for about 15
seconds. When it continued its flight pattern, I went in to get my camera.
When I returned, it was no longer in sight, but it was my first Solitary
Sandpiper and I will keep a picture in my memory. The area, although on the
southern edge of the harbor, is also on the northern edge of a fen and not
too far from a stream and a pond - so it had lots of habitats to explore.



Bev Wolf

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Date: 8/30/19 10:52 am
From: outfresh via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Rabies incidence in Michigan
 See below for the current number of positive cases of rabies in 2019 in Michigan. You'll note 3 positive bats in Washtenaw so far this year. Keeping them out of your home is key, as you have no way of knowing if they've bitten you. If you have to cap a chimney, you might consider putting up a bat house nearby that they can roost in. We all know bats are generally good to have around, as they are active while we are sleeping and eat tons of insects. Although sometimes we see the "Cujo" type rabid animal that is aggressive, more frequently we see the "dumb form" for rabies where they are just sick and dying....and falling into our homes from attics or soffits.
Ten years ago, in my fenced backyard in Ann Arbor, my dog cornered a skunk in the middle of the day. I found it odd that the skunk didn't spray and was actively attacking the dog. Ultimately, the dog killed it, and, out of an abundance of caution, I submitted it for rabies testing. It was positive, and so where 6 other skunks in A2 that summer. Please take bats in the house and wildlife behaving strangely seriously.
https://www.michigan.gov/documents/emergingdiseases/Current_MI_Rabies_Map_643595_7.pdf

Cathy Theisen, DVM
www.cathythevet.net734-864-2381please "like" Veterinary House Calls Ann Arbor on facebook, and feel free to post favorite photos or stories....we love our pets!
You are what your deep, driving desire is. As your desire is, so is your will. As your will is, so is your deed. As your deed is, so is your destiny.....Brihadaranyaka Upanishad


-----Original Message-----
From: thegarlicks <thegarlicks...>
To: Jean Gramlich <jeangramlich...>
Cc: fkaluza <fkaluza...>; outfresh <outfresh...>; mtait <mtait...>; birders <birders...>; Edie Britt <wovenwoman...>; eba <eba...>
Sent: Fri, Aug 30, 2019 1:32 pm
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice

Thanks for posting this, Jean. The way some viruses can alter behavior is mind-blowing (so to speak!). My heart is with the poor bats, too, but rabies is just such a terrifying disease. I found this book a fascinating read:  https://www.amazon.com/Rabid-Cultural-History-Worlds-Diabolical/dp/0143123572  
This WaPo article has some stats, and the sidebar adds additional perspective: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/metro/urban-jungle/pages/130507.html 
Several years ago we had a roost in our chimney--one night I counted 64 bats leaving the chimney at dusk! I actually hated to disturb them, but all the science and other factors made it clear this was not something a sane person would encourage... We waited till they migrated in the fall, then had everything cleaned out and the chimney re-capped...
Diane Garlick, Augusta

From: "Jean Gramlich" <jeangramlich...>
To: <fkaluza...>, <outfresh...>, <mtait...>, <birders...>, "Edie Britt" <wovenwoman...>
Cc: <eba...>
Sent: Friday, August 30, 2019 9:51:30 AM
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice

#yiv6314910499 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}Unfortunately, rabies is disease which affects the brain and causes the infected animal to risk its own life to bite another animal in order to spread the disease. I heard a horrendous story some years ago on NPR in which a woman was pursued and bitten by a rabid raccoon. But please be kind to bats which just strayed into the wrong place!

From: 'Edie Britt' via Birders <birders...>
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 5:00 PM
To: <fkaluza...> <fkaluza...>; <outfresh...> <outfresh...>; <mtait...> <mtait...>; <birders...> <birders...>
Cc: <eba...> <eba...>; <birders...> <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice Thank you Fred, That was great,  i haven't laughed like that in a while.
Edie.

On Thursday, August 29, 2019 Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:

So how does this work?  I’m assuming it would be a real rarity for an insect-eating bat here in Michigan to go out of its way to bite an unconscious human who is simply sleeping and minding their own business.  Or...are there confirmed cases where a trapped and stressed bat uses infra-Red detection to snuggle up against a large warm body who inadvertently rolls over or changes position thereby inviting a retaliatory nip?  What’s the driver or impetus that causes bats to bite people?  Has the rabies infection caused the bat to just lose it’s mind and start biting and chewing anything that moves (or snores)?



On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 11:05 AM -0400, "outfresh via Birders"<birders...> wrote:


Mag is right. If anyone was asleep in the house, and therefore unaware if they were bitten, the bat needs to be submitted for rabies testing. It might seem like overkill, but rabies is fatal in humans. Call Wash County Public Health Dept. Cathy Theisen, DVM

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On Thursday, August 29, 2019, Tait, Mag <mtait...> wrote:

They will evaluate the case and let you know if it’s needed.  It was in a bedroom.  If it’s an empty bedroom, not an issue.  If a child sleeps in it, it may be.  I am not an expert!

Sent from my iPhone
On Aug 29, 2019, at 10:18 AM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:



External Email - Use Caution

Testing it implies killing it and why would you want to do any testing unless it’s bitten someone?



On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0400, "Tait, Mag"<mtait...> wrote:



I hate bringing this up, but it’s worth contacting Washtenaw County’s Health Dept for advice on whether there is a need to have the bat tested for rabies…..  From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 9:50 AM
To: Eric Arnold <eba...>;<birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice 
External Email - Use Caution
How about cutting a three inch hole in one side of a (maybe) 10 inch square box, securing the box to a pole “like a paint roller extension pole”, with packing tape and bringing the box “hole face first” up against the bat.  Seeing the darkness inside the box, do you think it might go in?  Maybe score some lines into the inside of the corrugated paper first to give it some purchase?  From there , you may be able to walk the whole thing outside or just push the pole/box out a window and leave it dangling until the bat decides to fly out and away later this evening? 

On Wed, Aug 28, 2019 at 1:03 PM -0400, "Eric Arnold" <eba...> wrote:
A friend of mine has reported to me that she believes she has a bat in her house.  She doesn't know how it got in, but has it isolated where she found it, in a small upstairs bathroom. I have not had much experience with bat encounters, having removed one from my house many years ago, and would like to have suggestions on appropriate removal strategies. Ideas I have would be to capture it with something like a fish net for netting a fish before removing a hook, or containing it with a colander or large sieve placed over it, and then sliding that over a sheet of metal (e.g. a cookie sheet without a turned-up edge, cardboard, or thin plywood or some such material to enclose it so it could be removed without injuring it or getting bitten or scratched, or possibly by removing the screen from the window and leaving that open, possibly at night, in the hope that it would find leaving preferable to staying in this confined space, but with the difficulty of it not being easy to check on its activity or that other bats might find it intriguing.Other ideas?  Good people to contact for assistance?My friend's house is on the west side of Ann Arbor, on Dexter Ave. between Huron and Maple. Eric Arnold  --
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Date: 8/30/19 10:33 am
From: thegarlicks <thegarlicks...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice
Thanks for posting this, Jean. The way some viruses can alter behavior is mind-blowing (so to speak!). My heart is with the poor bats, too, but rabies is just such a terrifying disease. I found this book a fascinating read: https://www.amazon.com/Rabid-Cultural-History-Worlds-Diabolical/dp/0143123572

This WaPo article has some stats, and the sidebar adds additional perspective: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/metro/urban-jungle/pages/130507.html

Several years ago we had a roost in our chimney--one night I counted 64 bats leaving the chimney at dusk! I actually hated to disturb them, but all the science and other factors made it clear this was not something a sane person would encourage... We waited till they migrated in the fall, then had everything cleaned out and the chimney re-capped...

Diane Garlick, Augusta


----- Original Message -----

From: "Jean Gramlich" <jeangramlich...>
To: <fkaluza...>, <outfresh...>, <mtait...>, <birders...>, "Edie Britt" <wovenwoman...>
Cc: <eba...>
Sent: Friday, August 30, 2019 9:51:30 AM
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice

Unfortunately, rabies is disease which affects the brain and causes the infected animal to risk its own life to bite another animal in order to spread the disease. I heard a horrendous story some years ago on NPR in which a woman was pursued and bitten by a rabid raccoon. But please be kind to bats which just strayed into the wrong place!


From: 'Edie Britt' via Birders <birders...>
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 5:00 PM
To: <fkaluza...> <fkaluza...>; <outfresh...> <outfresh...>; <mtait...> <mtait...>; <birders...> <birders...>
Cc: <eba...> <eba...>; <birders...> <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice


Thank you Fred, That was great, i haven't laughed like that in a while.
Edie.


On Thursday, August 29, 2019 Fred Kaluza < <fkaluza...> > wrote:

So how does this work? I’m assuming it would be a real rarity for an insect-eating bat here in Michigan to go out of its way to bite an unconscious human who is simply sleeping and minding their own business. Or...are there confirmed cases where a trapped and stressed bat uses infra-Red detection to snuggle up against a large warm body who inadvertently rolls over or changes position thereby inviting a retaliatory nip? What’s the driver or impetus that causes bats to bite people? Has the rabies infection caused the bat to just lose it’s mind and start biting and chewing anything that moves (or snores)?




On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 11:05 AM -0400, "outfresh via Birders" < <birders...> > wrote:




Mag is right. If anyone was asleep in the house, and therefore unaware if they were bitten, the bat needs to be submitted for rabies testing. It might seem like overkill, but rabies is fatal in humans. Call Wash County Public Health Dept.
Cathy Theisen, DVM

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Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com

On Thursday, August 29, 2019, Tait, Mag <mtait...> wrote:


<blockquote>

They will evaluate the case and let you know if it’s needed. It was in a bedroom. If it’s an empty bedroom, not an issue. If a child sleeps in it, it may be. I am not an expert!

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 29, 2019, at 10:18 AM, Fred Kaluza < <fkaluza...> > wrote:


<blockquote>

External Email - Use Caution



Testing it implies killing it and why would you want to do any testing unless it’s bitten someone?




On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0400, "Tait, Mag" < <mtait...> > wrote:


<blockquote>


</blockquote>



I hate bringing this up, but it’s worth contacting Washtenaw County’s Health Dept for advice on whether there is a need to have the bat tested for rabies…..






From: Fred Kaluza < <fkaluza...> >
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 9:50 AM
To: Eric Arnold < <eba...> >; <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice


External Email - Use Caution


How about cutting a three inch hole in one side of a (maybe) 10 inch square box, securing the box to a pole “like a paint roller extension pole”, with packing tape and bringing the box “hole face first” up against the bat. Seeing the darkness inside the box, do you think it might go in? Maybe score some lines into the inside of the corrugated paper first to give it some purchase? From there , you may be able to walk the whole thing outside or just push the pole/box out a window and leave it dangling until the bat decides to fly out and away later this evening?









On Wed, Aug 28, 2019 at 1:03 PM -0400, "Eric Arnold" < <eba...> > wrote:
<blockquote>



A friend of mine has reported to me that she believes she has a bat in her house. She doesn't know how it got in, but has it isolated where she found it, in a small upstairs bathroom.





I have not had much experience with bat encounters, having removed one from my house many years ago, and would like to have suggestions on appropriate removal strategies.


Ideas I have would be to capture it with something like a fish net for netting a fish before removing a hook, or containing it with a colander or large sieve placed over it, and then sliding that over a sheet of metal (e.g. a cookie sheet without a turned-up edge, cardboard, or thin plywood or some such material to enclose it so it could be removed without injuring it or getting bitten or scratched, or possibly by removing the screen from the window and leaving that open, possibly at night, in the hope that it would find leaving preferable to staying in this confined space, but with the difficulty of it not being easy to check on its activity or that other bats might find it intriguing.


Other ideas? Good people to contact for assistance?


My friend's house is on the west side of Ann Arbor, on Dexter Ave. between Huron and Maple.





Eric Arnold








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</blockquote>



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.

</blockquote>



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</blockquote>



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Date: 8/30/19 6:51 am
From: Jean Gramlich <jeangramlich...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice
Unfortunately, rabies is disease which affects the brain and causes the infected animal to risk its own life to bite another animal in order to spread the disease. I heard a horrendous story some years ago on NPR in which a woman was pursued and bitten by a rabid raccoon. But please be kind to bats which just strayed into the wrong place!

________________________________
From: 'Edie Britt' via Birders <birders...>
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 5:00 PM
To: <fkaluza...> <fkaluza...>; <outfresh...> <outfresh...>; <mtait...> <mtait...>; <birders...> <birders...>
Cc: <eba...> <eba...>; <birders...> <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice


Thank you Fred, That was great, i haven't laughed like that in a while.
Edie.


________________________________
On Thursday, August 29, 2019 Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:

So how does this work? I’m assuming it would be a real rarity for an insect-eating bat here in Michigan to go out of its way to bite an unconscious human who is simply sleeping and minding their own business. Or...are there confirmed cases where a trapped and stressed bat uses infra-Red detection to snuggle up against a large warm body who inadvertently rolls over or changes position thereby inviting a retaliatory nip? What’s the driver or impetus that causes bats to bite people? Has the rabies infection caused the bat to just lose it’s mind and start biting and chewing anything that moves (or snores)?




On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 11:05 AM -0400, "outfresh via Birders" <birders...><mailto:<birders...>> wrote:

Mag is right. If anyone was asleep in the house, and therefore unaware if they were bitten, the bat needs to be submitted for rabies testing. It might seem like overkill, but rabies is fatal in humans. Call Wash County Public Health Dept.
Cathy Theisen, DVM

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
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On Thursday, August 29, 2019, Tait, Mag <mtait...> wrote:

They will evaluate the case and let you know if it’s needed. It was in a bedroom. If it’s an empty bedroom, not an issue. If a child sleeps in it, it may be. I am not an expert!

Sent from my iPhone

On Aug 29, 2019, at 10:18 AM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...><mailto:<fkaluza...>> wrote:

External Email - Use Caution
Testing it implies killing it and why would you want to do any testing unless it’s bitten someone?




On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0400, "Tait, Mag" <mtait...><mailto:<mtait...>> wrote:


I hate bringing this up, but it’s worth contacting Washtenaw County’s Health Dept for advice on whether there is a need to have the bat tested for rabies…..





From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...><mailto:<fkaluza...>>
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 9:50 AM
To: Eric Arnold <eba...><mailto:<eba...>>; <birders...><mailto:<birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice



External Email - Use Caution

How about cutting a three inch hole in one side of a (maybe) 10 inch square box, securing the box to a pole “like a paint roller extension pole”, with packing tape and bringing the box “hole face first” up against the bat. Seeing the darkness inside the box, do you think it might go in? Maybe score some lines into the inside of the corrugated paper first to give it some purchase? From there , you may be able to walk the whole thing outside or just push the pole/box out a window and leave it dangling until the bat decides to fly out and away later this evening?





On Wed, Aug 28, 2019 at 1:03 PM -0400, "Eric Arnold" <eba...><mailto:<eba...>> wrote:

A friend of mine has reported to me that she believes she has a bat in her house. She doesn't know how it got in, but has it isolated where she found it, in a small upstairs bathroom.



I have not had much experience with bat encounters, having removed one from my house many years ago, and would like to have suggestions on appropriate removal strategies.

Ideas I have would be to capture it with something like a fish net for netting a fish before removing a hook, or containing it with a colander or large sieve placed over it, and then sliding that over a sheet of metal (e.g. a cookie sheet without a turned-up edge, cardboard, or thin plywood or some such material to enclose it so it could be removed without injuring it or getting bitten or scratched, or possibly by removing the screen from the window and leaving that open, possibly at night, in the hope that it would find leaving preferable to staying in this confined space, but with the difficulty of it not being easy to check on its activity or that other bats might find it intriguing.

Other ideas? Good people to contact for assistance?

My friend's house is on the west side of Ann Arbor, on Dexter Ave. between Huron and Maple.



Eric Arnold





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Date: 8/29/19 7:14 pm
From: Jchordash <jchordash...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice
I also had several birds, one bat and a squirrel in my basement. Found out they were falling down the chimney and getting into the basement via the exhaust pipe from the hot water heater. It only happened early fall. My guess they found a warm place on the chimney and passed out from Carbon monoxide fell down the came to. The hot water tank pipe was the easiest escape.



Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 29, 2019, at 9:49 PM, lowell gastonberry <dorfdoom...> wrote:
>
> I used to get birds in my basement in warm seasons at a previous house and I finally figured out that they were coming down the furnace chimney. Possibility for the
> bat ‘s entrance.
> Penny
>
>> On Aug 29, 2019, at 5:20 PM, Mary Alice H <mholz0226...> wrote:
>>
>> I too got a chuckle, Fred and I don’t know the answer to your question. I do know my daughter was bitten in the night by a bat in her bedroom. She did feel the bite. I don’t know what prompted the bat to bite. Maybe in the darkness her pinky looked like a tasty insect. I do know the bat escaped and she ended with a very painful & expensive round of anti rabies injections. And Barry Eaton Health Department told her “If you wake with a bat in your bedroom, assume you have been bitten.” There’s that troubling word “assume”😉
>> All’s well that ends so they say🤭
>> Mary A
>>
>>> On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 5:00 PM 'Edie Britt' via Birders <birders...> wrote:
>>> Thank you Fred, That was great, i haven't laughed like that in a while.
>>> Edie.
>>>
>>> On Thursday, August 29, 2019 Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>>> So how does this work? I’m assuming it would be a real rarity for an insect-eating bat here in Michigan to go out of its way to bite an unconscious human who is simply sleeping and minding their own business. Or...are there confirmed cases where a trapped and stressed bat uses infra-Red detection to snuggle up against a large warm body who inadvertently rolls over or changes position thereby inviting a retaliatory nip? What’s the driver or impetus that causes bats to bite people? Has the rabies infection caused the bat to just lose it’s mind and start biting and chewing anything that moves (or snores)?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 11:05 AM -0400, "outfresh via Birders" <birders...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Mag is right. If anyone was asleep in the house, and therefore unaware if they were bitten, the bat needs to be submitted for rabies testing. It might seem like overkill, but rabies is fatal in humans. Call Wash County Public Health Dept.
>>> Cathy Theisen, DVM
>>>
>>> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>>> Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
>>>
>>> On Thursday, August 29, 2019, Tait, Mag <mtait...> wrote:
>>>
>>> They will evaluate the case and let you know if it’s needed. It was in a bedroom. If it’s an empty bedroom, not an issue. If a child sleeps in it, it may be. I am not an expert!
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Aug 29, 2019, at 10:18 AM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>>>
>>>> External Email - Use Caution
>>>>
>>>
>>> Testing it implies killing it and why would you want to do any testing unless it’s bitten someone?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0400, "Tait, Mag" <mtait...> wrote:
>>>
>>> I hate bringing this up, but it’s worth contacting Washtenaw County’s Health Dept for advice on whether there is a need to have the bat tested for rabies…..
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
>>> Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 9:50 AM
>>> To: Eric Arnold <eba...>; <birders...>
>>> Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> External Email - Use Caution
>>>
>>> How about cutting a three inch hole in one side of a (maybe) 10 inch square box, securing the box to a pole “like a paint roller extension pole”, with packing tape and bringing the box “hole face first” up against the bat. Seeing the darkness inside the box, do you think it might go in? Maybe score some lines into the inside of the corrugated paper first to give it some purchase? From there , you may be able to walk the whole thing outside or just push the pole/box out a window and leave it dangling until the bat decides to fly out and away later this evening?
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Wed, Aug 28, 2019 at 1:03 PM -0400, "Eric Arnold" <eba...> wrote:
>>>
>>> A friend of mine has reported to me that she believes she has a bat in her house. She doesn't know how it got in, but has it isolated where she found it, in a small upstairs bathroom.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> I have not had much experience with bat encounters, having removed one from my house many years ago, and would like to have suggestions on appropriate removal strategies.
>>>
>>> Ideas I have would be to capture it with something like a fish net for netting a fish before removing a hook, or containing it with a colander or large sieve placed over it, and then sliding that over a sheet of metal (e.g. a cookie sheet without a turned-up edge, cardboard, or thin plywood or some such material to enclose it so it could be removed without injuring it or getting bitten or scratched, or possibly by removing the screen from the window and leaving that open, possibly at night, in the hope that it would find leaving preferable to staying in this confined space, but with the difficulty of it not being easy to check on its activity or that other bats might find it intriguing.
>>>
>>> Other ideas? Good people to contact for assistance?
>>>
>>> My friend's house is on the west side of Ann Arbor, on Dexter Ave. between Huron and Maple.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Eric Arnold
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>>> ---
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>>>
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>>> ---
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>>>
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>>>
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>>> .
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>>
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Date: 8/29/19 6:50 pm
From: lowell gastonberry <dorfdoom...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice
I used to get birds in my basement in warm seasons at a previous house and I finally figured out that they were coming down the furnace chimney. Possibility for the
bat ‘s entrance.
Penny

> On Aug 29, 2019, at 5:20 PM, Mary Alice H <mholz0226...> wrote:
>
> I too got a chuckle, Fred and I don’t know the answer to your question. I do know my daughter was bitten in the night by a bat in her bedroom. She did feel the bite. I don’t know what prompted the bat to bite. Maybe in the darkness her pinky looked like a tasty insect. I do know the bat escaped and she ended with a very painful & expensive round of anti rabies injections. And Barry Eaton Health Department told her “If you wake with a bat in your bedroom, assume you have been bitten.” There’s that troubling word “assume”😉
> All’s well that ends so they say🤭
> Mary A
>
>> On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 5:00 PM 'Edie Britt' via Birders <birders...> wrote:
>> Thank you Fred, That was great, i haven't laughed like that in a while.
>> Edie.
>>
>> On Thursday, August 29, 2019 Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>> So how does this work? I’m assuming it would be a real rarity for an insect-eating bat here in Michigan to go out of its way to bite an unconscious human who is simply sleeping and minding their own business. Or...are there confirmed cases where a trapped and stressed bat uses infra-Red detection to snuggle up against a large warm body who inadvertently rolls over or changes position thereby inviting a retaliatory nip? What’s the driver or impetus that causes bats to bite people? Has the rabies infection caused the bat to just lose it’s mind and start biting and chewing anything that moves (or snores)?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 11:05 AM -0400, "outfresh via Birders" <birders...> wrote:
>>
>> Mag is right. If anyone was asleep in the house, and therefore unaware if they were bitten, the bat needs to be submitted for rabies testing. It might seem like overkill, but rabies is fatal in humans. Call Wash County Public Health Dept.
>> Cathy Theisen, DVM
>>
>> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>> Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
>>
>> On Thursday, August 29, 2019, Tait, Mag <mtait...> wrote:
>>
>> They will evaluate the case and let you know if it’s needed. It was in a bedroom. If it’s an empty bedroom, not an issue. If a child sleeps in it, it may be. I am not an expert!
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Aug 29, 2019, at 10:18 AM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>>
>>> External Email - Use Caution
>>>
>>
>> Testing it implies killing it and why would you want to do any testing unless it’s bitten someone?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0400, "Tait, Mag" <mtait...> wrote:
>>
>> I hate bringing this up, but it’s worth contacting Washtenaw County’s Health Dept for advice on whether there is a need to have the bat tested for rabies…..
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
>> Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 9:50 AM
>> To: Eric Arnold <eba...>; <birders...>
>> Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice
>>
>>
>>
>> External Email - Use Caution
>>
>> How about cutting a three inch hole in one side of a (maybe) 10 inch square box, securing the box to a pole “like a paint roller extension pole”, with packing tape and bringing the box “hole face first” up against the bat. Seeing the darkness inside the box, do you think it might go in? Maybe score some lines into the inside of the corrugated paper first to give it some purchase? From there , you may be able to walk the whole thing outside or just push the pole/box out a window and leave it dangling until the bat decides to fly out and away later this evening?
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Aug 28, 2019 at 1:03 PM -0400, "Eric Arnold" <eba...> wrote:
>>
>> A friend of mine has reported to me that she believes she has a bat in her house. She doesn't know how it got in, but has it isolated where she found it, in a small upstairs bathroom.
>>
>>
>>
>> I have not had much experience with bat encounters, having removed one from my house many years ago, and would like to have suggestions on appropriate removal strategies.
>>
>> Ideas I have would be to capture it with something like a fish net for netting a fish before removing a hook, or containing it with a colander or large sieve placed over it, and then sliding that over a sheet of metal (e.g. a cookie sheet without a turned-up edge, cardboard, or thin plywood or some such material to enclose it so it could be removed without injuring it or getting bitten or scratched, or possibly by removing the screen from the window and leaving that open, possibly at night, in the hope that it would find leaving preferable to staying in this confined space, but with the difficulty of it not being easy to check on its activity or that other bats might find it intriguing.
>>
>> Other ideas? Good people to contact for assistance?
>>
>> My friend's house is on the west side of Ann Arbor, on Dexter Ave. between Huron and Maple.
>>
>>
>>
>> Eric Arnold
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>> ---
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CABv5-TUuxDa57yKckrCMY9JoHHvXP_0knTWJD9hV0mFGAV%<2BW-w...>
>>
>> --
>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>> ---
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<C3C3114294EDD93D.6DB8B2E8-68E0-4EE9-A93A-40B15FB9D65A...>
>>
>> **********************************************************
>> Electronic Mail is not secure, may not be read every day, and should not be used for urgent or sensitive issues
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Date: 8/29/19 3:53 pm
From: Scott Manly <manlyrs...>
Subject: Re: [birders] The bat left.
You would be surprised. We watched a 2-2.5" long bat (perhaps a little brown bat) climb back up the post of an outdoor pavillion this summer. In Washington state. The bat seemed to settled into a corner beside the 4x4" post and we got pics of it. Then someone present watched it slide into the 1/4" crevice between the post and the wood behind it. Looking at the crag, it seemed impossible for the bat to fit in there, but they watched him.do it.

Scott Manly
Shellbrook, SK Canada

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

________________________________
From: Eric Arnold <eba...>
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 3:51:43 PM
To: <birders...> <birders...>
Subject: [birders] The bat left.

No one was bitten, the departure was voluntary, and at this point, figuring out how it might have entered is the most pressing question. We'll be looking for possibilities. There aren't any answers that seem particularly probable at this point.

It appears to be a random intrusion at this point. I do not know of any previous history of bat intrusions from the present owner, who has lived in the house for several decades. There haven't been recent changes to the structure that I'm aware of that would make it more likely. We'll certainly be on the watch for openings we haven't noticed before.

Eric





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Date: 8/29/19 2:57 pm
From: Eric Arnold <eba...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
Nice photos! Thanks for sharing.
Eric


On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 9:28 AM Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...> wrote:

> This last week we have loved seeing the Rose-breasted Grosbeaks bringing
> their young to our feeders. Each parent brings two. From the pink under
> wing coverts you can see these two are young males. The babies are
> constantly begging with a very quiet pee-you call that sounds a lot like a
> bluebird. Sibley has a recording on his app.
>
> We have also had pewees and yellow-throated vireos singing recently.
>
> [image: JGH_9245-Grosbeak-small copy.jpg]
>
> [image: JGH_9247-small.jpg]
>
> [image: JGH_9267-Grosbeak-small copy.jpg]
>
> Janet Hinshaw, Librarian
> Wilson Ornithological Society
> University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
> Research Museums Center
> 3600 Varsity Drive
> Ann Arbor, MI 48108-2228 USA
>
> https://wilsonsociety.org/ <http://www.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/birds/>
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
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> "Birders" group.
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> <https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CANydU4AKhuKz62OS3UjdRjT%3DExET7iGm8PB_Z03czZXzy%<3D1g4g...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
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Date: 8/29/19 2:51 pm
From: Eric Arnold <eba...>
Subject: [birders] The bat left.
No one was bitten, the departure was voluntary, and at this point, figuring
out how it might have entered is the most pressing question. We'll be
looking for possibilities. There aren't any answers that seem particularly
probable at this point.

It appears to be a random intrusion at this point. I do not know of any
previous history of bat intrusions from the present owner, who has lived in
the house for several decades. There haven't been recent changes to the
structure that I'm aware of that would make it more likely. We'll
certainly be on the watch for openings we haven't noticed before.

Eric

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Date: 8/29/19 2:21 pm
From: Mary Alice H <mholz0226...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice
I too got a chuckle, Fred and I don’t know the answer to your question. I
do know my daughter was bitten in the night by a bat in her bedroom. She
did feel the bite. I don’t know what prompted the bat to bite. Maybe in the
darkness her pinky looked like a tasty insect. I do know the bat escaped
and she ended with a very painful & expensive round of anti rabies
injections. And Barry Eaton Health Department told her “If you wake with a
bat in your bedroom, assume you have been bitten.” There’s that troubling
word “assume”😉
All’s well that ends so they say🤭
Mary A

On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 5:00 PM 'Edie Britt' via Birders <
<birders...> wrote:

> Thank you Fred, That was great, i haven't laughed like that in a while.
> Edie.
> ------------------------------
> On Thursday, August 29, 2019 Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
> So how does this work? I’m assuming it would be a real rarity for an
> insect-eating bat here in Michigan to go out of its way to bite an
> unconscious human who is simply sleeping and minding their own business.
> Or...are there confirmed cases where a trapped and stressed bat uses
> infra-Red detection to snuggle up against a large warm body who
> inadvertently rolls over or changes position thereby inviting a retaliatory
> nip? What’s the driver or impetus that causes bats to bite people? Has
> the rabies infection caused the bat to just lose it’s mind and start biting
> and chewing anything that moves (or snores)?
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 11:05 AM -0400, "outfresh via Birders" <
> <birders...> wrote:
>
> Mag is right. If anyone was asleep in the house, and therefore unaware if
> they were bitten, the bat needs to be submitted for rabies testing. It
> might seem like overkill, but rabies is fatal in humans. Call Wash County
> Public Health Dept.
> Cathy Theisen, DVM
>
> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
> Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
>
> On Thursday, August 29, 2019, Tait, Mag <mtait...> wrote:
>
> They will evaluate the case and let you know if it’s needed. It was in a
> bedroom. If it’s an empty bedroom, not an issue. If a child sleeps in it,
> it may be. I am not an expert!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Aug 29, 2019, at 10:18 AM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
>
> *External Email - Use Caution*
>
> Testing it implies killing it and why would you want to do any testing
> unless it’s bitten someone?
>
>
>
>
> On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0400, "Tait, Mag" <mtait...>
> wrote:
>
> I hate bringing this up, but it’s worth contacting Washtenaw County’s
> Health Dept for advice on whether there is a need to have the bat tested
> for rabies…..
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, August 29, 2019 9:50 AM
> *To:* Eric Arnold <eba...>; <birders...>
> *Subject:* Re: [birders] bat removal advice
>
>
> *External Email - Use Caution*
>
> How about cutting a three inch hole in one side of a (maybe) 10 inch
> square box, securing the box to a pole “like a paint roller extension
> pole”, with packing tape and bringing the box “hole face first” up against
> the bat. Seeing the darkness inside the box, do you think it might go in?
> Maybe score some lines into the inside of the corrugated paper first to
> give it some purchase? From there , you may be able to walk the whole
> thing outside or just push the pole/box out a window and leave it dangling
> until the bat decides to fly out and away later this evening?
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Aug 28, 2019 at 1:03 PM -0400, "Eric Arnold" <eba...>
> wrote:
>
> A friend of mine has reported to me that she believes she has a bat in her
> house. She doesn't know how it got in, but has it isolated where she found
> it, in a small upstairs bathroom.
>
>
>
> I have not had much experience with bat encounters, having removed one
> from my house many years ago, and would like to have suggestions on
> appropriate removal strategies.
>
> Ideas I have would be to capture it with something like a fish net for
> netting a fish before removing a hook, or containing it with a colander or
> large sieve placed over it, and then sliding that over a sheet of metal
> (e.g. a cookie sheet without a turned-up edge, cardboard, or thin plywood
> or some such material to enclose it so it could be removed without injuring
> it or getting bitten or scratched, or possibly by removing the screen from
> the window and leaving that open, possibly at night, in the hope that it
> would find leaving preferable to staying in this confined space, but with
> the difficulty of it not being easy to check on its activity or that other
> bats might find it intriguing.
>
> Other ideas? Good people to contact for assistance?
>
> My friend's house is on the west side of Ann Arbor, on Dexter Ave. between
> Huron and Maple.
>
>
>
> Eric Arnold
>
>
>
>
>
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Date: 8/29/19 2:00 pm
From: 'Edie Britt' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice

Thank you Fred, That was great,  i haven't laughed like that in a while.
Edie.
On Thursday, August 29, 2019 Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:
#yiv0486157594 html {background-color:transparent !important;}#yiv0486157594 body {background-color:transparent !important;color:#333;line-height:150%;margin:0;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-reference-expand {display:block;color:#999;padding:20px 0px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-availability-container {max-width:500px;margin:auto;padding:12px 15px 15px 15px;border:1px solid #C7E0F4;border-radius:4px;}#yiv0486157594 #yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-availability-delete-button {width:25px;min-height:25px;background-size:25px 25px;background-position:center;}#yiv0486157594 #yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-main-container {margin:0 0 0 0;margin-top:120;padding:8;}#yiv0486157594 #yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-content-container {padding:0;padding-top:12;padding-bottom:20;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-mention {color:#333;background-color:#f1f1f1;border-radius:4px;padding:0 2px 0 2px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-mention-external {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#fdf7e7;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-mention-external-clear-design {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#f1f1f1;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode {color:#E1E1E1 !important;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-reference-expand {color:#777777 !important;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode a:not {color:#0086F0;}#yiv0486157594 #yiv0486157594 #yiv0486157594 {color:#E1E1E1 !important;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-availability-container {border-color:#0086F0 !important;}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-availability-container .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-availability-timeslot-container {}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-availability-container .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-availability-border {border-top:1px solid #0086F0 !important;}#yiv0486157594 #yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-availability-delete-button {}#yiv0486157594 .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-dark-mode .yiv0486157594ms-outlook-ios-mention {color:#A8A8AC !important;background-color:#292929 !important;} So how does this work?  I’m assuming it would be a real rarity for an insect-eating bat here in Michigan to go out of its way to bite an unconscious human who is simply sleeping and minding their own business.  Or...are there confirmed cases where a trapped and stressed bat uses infra-Red detection to snuggle up against a large warm body who inadvertently rolls over or changes position thereby inviting a retaliatory nip?  What’s the driver or impetus that causes bats to bite people?  Has the rabies infection caused the bat to just lose it’s mind and start biting and chewing anything that moves (or snores)?



On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 11:05 AM -0400, "outfresh via Birders" <birders...> wrote:


Mag is right. If anyone was asleep in the house, and therefore unaware if they were bitten, the bat needs to be submitted for rabies testing. It might seem like overkill, but rabies is fatal in humans. Call Wash County Public Health Dept. Cathy Theisen, DVM

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
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On Thursday, August 29, 2019, Tait, Mag <mtait...> wrote:

They will evaluate the case and let you know if it’s needed.  It was in a bedroom.  If it’s an empty bedroom, not an issue.  If a child sleeps in it, it may be.  I am not an expert!

Sent from my iPhone
On Aug 29, 2019, at 10:18 AM, Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> wrote:



External Email - Use Caution
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Testing it implies killing it and why would you want to do any testing unless it’s bitten someone?



On Thu, Aug 29, 2019 at 9:54 AM -0400, "Tait, Mag" <mtait...> wrote:



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I hate bringing this up, but it’s worth contacting Washtenaw County’s Health Dept for advice on whether there is a need to have the bat tested for rabies…..

 

 

From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2019 9:50 AM
To: Eric Arnold <eba...>; <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] bat removal advice

 

External Email - Use Caution

How about cutting a three inch hole in one side of a (maybe) 10 inch square box, securing the box to a pole “like a paint roller extension pole”, with packing tape and bringing the box “hole face first” up against the bat.  Seeing the darkness inside the box, do you think it might go in?  Maybe score some lines into the inside of the corrugated paper first to give it some purchase?  From there , you may be able to walk the whole thing outside or just push the pole/box out a window and leave it dangling until the bat decides to fly out and away later this evening?

 





On Wed, Aug 28, 2019 at 1:03 PM -0400, "Eric Arnold" <eba...> wrote:


A friend of mine has reported to me that she believes she has a bat in her house.  She doesn't know how it got in, but has it isolated where she found it, in a small upstairs bathroom.

 

I have not had much experience with bat encounters, having removed one from my house many years ago, and would like to have suggestions on appropriate removal strategies. 

Ideas I have would be to capture it with something like a fish net for netting a fish before removing a hook, or containing it with a colander or large sieve placed over it, and then sliding that over a sheet of metal (e.g. a cookie sheet without a turned-up edge, cardboard, or thin plywood or some such material to enclose it so it could be removed without injuring it or getting bitten or scratched, or possibly by removing the screen from the window and leaving that open, possibly at night, in the hope that it would find leaving preferable to staying in this confined space, but with the difficulty of it not being easy to check on its activity or that other bats might find it intriguing.

Other ideas?  Good people to contact for assistance?

My friend's house is on the west side of Ann Arbor, on Dexter Ave. between Huron and Maple.

 

Eric Arnold

 

 

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Back to top
Date: 8/29/19 1:51 pm
From: Neeser <neeser...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT Monarchs
The milkweed that I planted a few years ago is
finally coming into fruition. I haven't seen
that many Monarchs visiting the plants however I
did capture one that I believe was laying
eggs. I inspected the leaves every day but no
caterpillars. I am getting one milkweed seed pod
this year which is a first. Hopefully, next year will be more fruitful?
Denise


At 04:02 PM 8/27/2019, 'P. swanson' via Birders wrote:
>My daughter (adult) raises them from the single
>egg they lay on the underside of milkweed
>leaves, and she grows milkweed to feed them. She
>takes the eggs inside (on the leaf) to keep them
>from being eaten. More seem to make it to
>caterpillars this way. She feeds them till they
>form a chrysalis, and then releases them when
>they hatch. She has a few aquariums or
>small-animal cages with screened tops where they
>can attach themselves when it’s time. She
>hatches a lot of them and they get released often during the summer.
>I think more people are doing this now. It
>really gives you a feeling of accomplishment.
>Penny
>
>On Aug 27, 2019, at 2:38 PM, Fred Kaluza
><<