Birders
Received From Subject
9/18/20 8:05 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (18 Sep 2020) 4803 Raptors
9/18/20 4:42 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (18 Sep 2020) 14491 Raptors
9/18/20 1:05 pm 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <birders...> [birders] How birds see us - Grosse Pointe Audubon, Monday, Sept 21
9/17/20 7:38 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (17 Sep 2020) 595 Raptors
9/17/20 4:36 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (17 Sep 2020) 17372 Raptors
9/17/20 3:09 pm 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: Manistique Hawks
9/17/20 12:25 pm April Campbell <adc14...> Re: [birders] Josh Haas's virtual raptor program
9/17/20 12:05 pm Eric Arnold <eba...> Re: [birders] OT: mushrooms (some history)
9/17/20 10:49 am Lisa Lava-Kellar <lisalk...> [birders] Josh Haas's virtual raptor program
9/17/20 4:31 am mjcapo via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] OT: mushrooms
9/16/20 7:36 pm John Farmer <ajf-jlf...> RE: [birders] OT: mushrooms
9/16/20 7:19 pm Michael Parow <mlparow...> [birders] OT: mushrooms
9/16/20 7:15 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (16 Sep 2020) 127 Raptors
9/16/20 4:41 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (16 Sep 2020) 101 Raptors
9/16/20 12:16 pm 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Migration Continues
9/16/20 2:14 am Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...> [birders] Smokey Skies
9/15/20 7:51 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (15 Sep 2020) 844 Raptors
9/15/20 5:18 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (15 Sep 2020) 726 Raptors
9/15/20 4:18 pm Beverly Wolf <Bev_Wolf...> [birders] Alarming die off of birds in New Mexico
9/15/20 1:55 pm 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Identifying Raptors is free Washtenaw Audubon virtual program, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 7:30pm, all invited
9/15/20 10:37 am Wayne Fisher <waynef...> [birders] Connecticut warbler at Sharon Hills
9/15/20 6:03 am LaHaie, Ivan <Ivan.LaHaie...> [birders] Fall Birds
9/14/20 6:32 pm 'Steve Jerant' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Haehnle Sanctuary Crane Count 09/14/2020
9/14/20 6:31 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (14 Sep 2020) 864 Raptors
9/14/20 6:01 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (14 Sep 2020) 11891 Raptors
9/13/20 9:15 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (13 Sep 2020) 1691 Raptors
9/13/20 4:11 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (13 Sep 2020) 471 Raptors
9/12/20 7:33 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (12 Sep 2020) 900 Raptors
9/12/20 4:23 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (12 Sep 2020) 264 Raptors
9/11/20 7:34 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (11 Sep 2020) 986 Raptors
9/11/20 4:36 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (11 Sep 2020) 471 Raptors
9/11/20 1:19 pm Karen <kjser...> Re: [birders] Re: Frequency and location of American White Pelicans in Michigan
9/11/20 12:56 pm Patrick Baize <pkbaize...> Re: [birders] Re: Frequency and location of American White Pelicans in Michigan
9/11/20 12:38 pm Timothy Dey <timothydey...> [birders] Re: Frequency and location of American White Pelicans in Michigan
9/11/20 8:49 am 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Birdcast Migration Alert Sept. 10-11
9/10/20 10:38 pm Beverly Wolf <bev_wolf...> [birders] Frequency and location of American White Pelicans in Michigan
9/10/20 8:26 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (10 Sep 2020) 59 Raptors
9/10/20 8:00 pm <ibblazin...> RE: [birders] Washtenaw County Question
9/10/20 7:53 pm WayneF <waynef...> Re: [birders] Washtenaw County Question
9/10/20 7:41 pm <ibblazin...> [birders] Washtenaw County Question
9/10/20 5:19 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (10 Sep 2020) 288 Raptors
9/10/20 12:01 pm 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] Male hummer
9/10/20 11:43 am ARTHUR JEFFREY <aj.jeffrey...> [birders] Male Hummingbird
9/10/20 11:18 am Mark Bradtke <mabmrmc...> Re: [birders] Male hummer
9/10/20 10:48 am Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...> Re: [birders] Male hummer
9/10/20 5:50 am Beverly Wolf <bev_wolf...> [birders] American White Pelicans
9/9/20 7:35 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (09 Sep 2020) 24 Raptors
9/9/20 4:41 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (09 Sep 2020) 76 Raptors
9/9/20 1:04 pm 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: Hurricane Birding Round-up, Becoming an Unintentional Birder, 5,000 eBird Checklists!
9/9/20 4:57 am Su Clift <coffeebeansu...> [birders] Male hummer and feeder placement
9/8/20 8:49 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (08 Sep 2020) 10 Raptors
9/8/20 6:03 pm Susan MIller <smiller179...> [birders] non-bird: proposal to discharge treated dioxane-contaminated water into Dolph/First Sister Lake
9/8/20 4:16 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (08 Sep 2020) 37 Raptors
9/7/20 7:51 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (07 Sep 2020) 12 Raptors
9/7/20 4:47 pm Penny <dorfdoom...> Re: [birders] best hummer feeders - follow-up to April discussion
9/7/20 4:13 pm Susan Horvath <shorvath...> Re: [birders] best hummer feeders - follow-up to April discussion
9/7/20 3:47 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (07 Sep 2020) 9 Raptors
9/7/20 1:12 pm Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Reminder: OAS Zoom Meeting/Program Tuesday Sept 8 and Nuthatch Open Sept 12. Everyone is invited
9/7/20 9:45 am Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> [birders] 2020 Fall Bird Banding Blog updated
9/6/20 6:15 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (06 Sep 2020) 18 Raptors
9/6/20 5:24 pm Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> Re: [birders] Male hummer
9/6/20 4:53 pm 'Barbara' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Male hummer
9/6/20 4:19 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (06 Sep 2020) 14 Raptors
9/6/20 3:11 pm 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: Global Shorebird Counts, Sep. 3 - 9, 2020
9/6/20 5:34 am Patrick Baize <pkbaize...> Re: [birders] Non-bird: Ann Arbor, MI, USA - BirdCast Alerts
9/5/20 8:28 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (05 Sep 2020) 17 Raptors
9/5/20 4:58 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (05 Sep 2020) 8 Raptors
9/5/20 4:17 pm 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: Ann Arbor, MI, USA - BirdCast Alerts
9/5/20 9:23 am Eve Wilson <evew...> [birders] 114 Monarchs in 45 minutes!
9/4/20 7:29 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2020) 7 Raptors
9/4/20 6:27 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2020) 26 Raptors
9/4/20 5:45 pm 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] Major Migration Alert
9/4/20 5:30 pm WayneF <waynef...> Re: [birders] Major Migration Alert
9/4/20 2:28 am Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Nuthatch Open September 12
9/3/20 7:24 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2020) 8 Raptors
9/3/20 4:05 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2020) 15 Raptors
9/3/20 3:56 am 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Major Migration Alert
9/2/20 7:54 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2020) 10 Raptors
9/2/20 7:51 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2020) 5 Raptors
9/2/20 7:50 pm <reports...> [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2020) 5 Raptors
9/2/20 5:29 pm Chipperatl10 <chipperatl10...> Re: [birders] Night flight - help identification
9/2/20 3:51 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2020) 10 Raptors
9/2/20 1:36 pm 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Large Mixed Warbler Flock
9/2/20 2:12 am Eve Wilson <evew...> [birders] Night flight - help identification
9/1/20 3:39 pm <reports...> [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2020) 8 Raptors
8/31/20 7:47 am 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: Bald Eagles over Toronto
8/30/20 6:12 pm <dawnk......> <dawnkswartz...> [birders] Re: green headed heron
8/28/20 4:17 pm Phil Bugosh <peb729...> [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Zoom Meeting/Program September 8, Everyone is invited
8/28/20 10:09 am 'michael wells' via Birders <birders...> Fw: [birders] YB Cuckoo
8/28/20 5:48 am 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> Re: [birders] YB Cuckoo
8/28/20 5:44 am LaHaie, Ivan <Ivan.LaHaie...> [birders] YB Cuckoo
8/27/20 5:20 pm avianscout via Birders <birders...> [birders] Nighthawks.
8/26/20 5:52 pm Catherine Carroll <songsparrow...> [birders] Common Nighthawk flight over East Dearborn neighborhood
8/26/20 12:42 pm 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: New Guide to Hawaii, A Review of Ted Floyd's Latest Book!
8/26/20 12:38 pm 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: Audubon Sues Over Arctic | Western Waters | The Fight for Forage Fish
8/26/20 6:28 am Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> Re: [birders] Honeybees at hummer feeder
8/26/20 6:10 am Su Clift <coffeebeansu...> Re: [birders] Honeybees at hummer feeder
8/26/20 6:08 am Faye Stoner <faye.stoner...> [birders] Honeybees at hummer feeder
8/25/20 11:59 am 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: Big Wins for Birds! MBTA Decision, Webinar, Survey, and More!
8/25/20 9:31 am 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: Field Ornithology is back!
8/24/20 2:15 pm 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Huron Meadows Hopping
8/24/20 11:20 am 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Fwd: You’re Invited: Tune-In to “I Saw A Bird”
8/24/20 7:50 am Beverly Wolf <Bev_Wolf...> [birders] FW: Talons Over Mackinac - August 2020 MSRW Newsletter
8/23/20 7:49 am Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...> [birders] Buff-breasted sandpiper
8/22/20 1:57 pm Patrick Baize <pkbaize...> Re: [birders] osprey nest near Brighton?
8/22/20 12:48 pm Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> Re: [birders] osprey nest near Brighton?
8/22/20 10:19 am Jeff Moore <jmo.jeffmoore...> [birders] osprey nest near Brighton?
8/22/20 10:15 am Carol Furtado <carolfurtado2...> [birders] Tawas point st park
8/21/20 5:02 pm Curt Hofer <curthofer...> Re: [birders] Sound ID
8/21/20 3:26 pm Andrew Pawuk <andrewpawuk...> [birders] Researchers find Kirtland's Warblers behave differently than thought
8/20/20 9:26 pm Vedran Radojcic <vedran.radojcic...> [birders] Sound ID
8/19/20 12:41 pm 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> [birders] Non-bird: Slow Birding, August Photo Quiz, and a Nostalgic Journey to Rural Oregon
 
Back to top
Date: 9/18/20 8:05 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (18 Sep 2020) 4803 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 18, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 82 250 250
Osprey 0 10 10
Bald Eagle 1 17 17
Northern Harrier 7 74 74
Sharp-shinned Hawk 44 711 711
Cooper's Hawk 0 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 1 1
Broad-winged Hawk 4643 9595 9595
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 7 85 85
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 16 220 220
Merlin 0 8 8
Peregrine Falcon 3 7 7
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 4803 10980 10980
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Michala Burke, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
The relentless wind out of the NE continued today, saving some energy for
the later hours as it built during the day from an already healthy start.
In the early hours, the tops of the cumulus clouds over the lake were
brightly lit and well defined indicating a less hazy atmosphere and better
viewing in that direction. The strength of the wind continued to push hard
on any soaring birds so that even with better conditions we were at the
limit of viewing for the lake bound broad-wings. The sky gradually filled
with large cotton candy clouds and at times resembled a Constable painting
although the cold biting wind dispelled any notions of Romanticism. The sky
gradually cleared towards the end of day but the sparse population of
clouds was matched by the number of raptors. The barometer ended as it had
started at 30.3”, steady as a rock.

Raptor Observations:
We had another disappointing day when all the results were tallied.
Although we could count the distant broad-wings in the early hours the
later hours were mostly empty except for a few that braved the wind to
reach us. We ended up with five thousand, one hundred and ninety three on
the day although we received reliable reports of thirteen thousand, six
hundred and four from the Pointe Mouille vantage point. We counted one bald
eagle. Seven harriers were seen winging their way through. Seven, mostly
young, red-tails were seen passing through. Kestrels numbered sixteen on
the day and filling out the falcon contingent were three peregrine falcons
seen high in the sky, as were most of the raptors today. One hundred forty
turkey vultures rocked through today. They seem to be gathering in larger
groups but no large kettles yet, just a steady flow of low numbers. Forty
four sharp-shins battled their way through the wind past our site.

Non-raptor Observations:
The blue jays continue to desert Canada in increasing numbers with flocks
numbering in the hundreds. Nearly all the other birds today were neck
stretching high including the gulls and swallows. Even the cormorants that
chose to soar were well up there. It was a hard day searching for raptors
and left little time for other observations.

Predictions:
The forecast for tomorrow looks more comfortable, as well as promising, as
the wind will have lost some of its teeth dropping to around five mph. It
will still be out of the NE quadrant in the early hours developing a more
easterly component later but more benign and possibly beneficial to our
location. Hopefully the week’s mass movement is not completed and the
broad-wings will continue to fly. There are plenty more birds out there to
be counted and fingers crossed that we can see them from our little plot of
earth. Cheers! Andrew S.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Back to top
Date: 9/18/20 4:42 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (18 Sep 2020) 14491 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 18, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 606 1022 1022
Osprey 1 2 2
Bald Eagle 1 27 27
Northern Harrier 24 125 125
Sharp-shinned Hawk 660 2052 2052
Cooper's Hawk 11 43 43
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 13042 41853 41853
Red-tailed Hawk 41 165 165
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 101 929 929
Merlin 4 48 48
Peregrine Falcon 0 9 9
Unknown Accipiter 0 1 1
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 14491 46278 46278
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Kory Renaud, Noel Herdman

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
Slightly chiller day mostly due to the strong Northern winds. Luckily these
winds did bring along many raptors which flew very high against a bright
blue sky in the morning. A decent cover of fluffy white clouds appeared
later in the morning which was very helpful to locate raptors.

Raptor Observations:
We have been blessed with Northern winds during the peak of Broad-winged
Hawk migration and it shows. Today we counted another 13,042 Broad-wings
flying over the tower. The action started quickly with the individuals that
roosted in the area overnight. After a slight lull in the early afternoon,
kettles picked up again and we finished strong with many thousands by 4
o'clock!
Broad-wings were not the only ones flying today; our next most abundant
hawk were Sharp-shinned Hawks (660), followed closely by Turkey Vultures
(606). American Kestrels were very abundant as well, with 101 individuals
zipping through on the strong winds, and we also counted 41 Red-tailed
Hawks. We are always happy to count Northern Harriers, Merlins, and today a
few more Cooper's Hawks.
We are very happy to report that so far our season total stand at 41,000
Broad-winged Hawks. Out of 41 years of counting, only 15 years have seen
more than 40,000 Broad-winged Hawks in a year, so we are very happy to be
seeing such good numbers!

Non-raptor Observations:
We did not have as much time to focus on the non-raptor species flying over
the marsh, however we did have a clicker dedicated to Blue Jays and it
recorded 9,940 individuals. Other major migrants were American Goldfinches,
and a few more Tree Swallows. We were happy to count Red-breasted
Nuthatches, Chimney Swifts, Common Nighthawks, and a few more Ruby-throated
Hummingbirds.
On the marsh, some new species of ducks are slowly appearing like six
Northern Pintails.
We were also entertained by our local Peregrine Falcon swiping at many
other migrants today!
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73755429

Predictions:
We will have a chilly start to the day as overnight temperatures are
expected to drop to 6 degree Celsius. By the time we warm up, winds are
expected to blow from the North-East all day, therefore might as well hope
for another batch of Broad-winged Hawks! Our other species of accipiters
and falcons should also be migrating tomorrow alongside a few more kettle
of Broad-winged Hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Back to top
Date: 9/18/20 1:05 pm
From: 'Bill Rapai' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] How birds see us - Grosse Pointe Audubon, Monday, Sept 21
Birders:
Grosse Pointe Audubon will hold its first meeting of the fall on Monday, Sept. 21. Our speaker that night will be Edward O'Malley, a pediatric ophthalmologist, who will give a program called, "How birds see us and how we see birds." 
The program will be given over Zoom and is open to all. I just did a dry run with our speaker and was fascinated.
I am happy to share the link with you. Just drop me an email. 
Bill RapaiPresidentGrosse Pointe Audubon
"Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson



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Back to top
Date: 9/17/20 7:38 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (17 Sep 2020) 595 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 17, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 29 168 168
Osprey 0 10 10
Bald Eagle 0 16 16
Northern Harrier 3 67 67
Sharp-shinned Hawk 42 667 667
Cooper's Hawk 0 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 1 1
Broad-winged Hawk 478 4952 4952
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 15 78 78
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 26 204 204
Merlin 1 8 8
Peregrine Falcon 1 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 595 6177 6177
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Sam Heilman

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
Our great expectations were pipped on a lee shore today by a wind from the
NE that was too robust by half. The clouds from the change of pressure
systems receded to the east as the morning progressed leaving us with a
high blue sky overhead. However, a persistent haze over the lake remained
throughout the day as absorbent as (name your favorite paper towel here)
when it came to spotting birds. Kettles of broad-wings were spotted briefly
and lost very quickly. The wind would seem to ease at times but in truth it
maintained double digit strength all day and the birds riding on that wind
were forced well to the south of us.


Raptor Observations:
A day that started with cautious optimism proved that the caution was well
deserved. The wind was an overriding factor in our numbers today. I suspect
that the Holiday Beach location and our colleagues in Ontario were the
beneficiaries of the enthusiastic blast from the NE. We did end the day
with twenty one kestrels. One merlin and one peregrine were spotted, giving
us the falcon hat trick. Red-tails were the one buteo species that did
fight their way through the wind, totaling 15 birds. A new season high, but
it was little consolation for the missed opportunity of seeing broad-wings.
Three harriers pumped their way by. The turkey vultures seem to be getting
a little more anxious to be getting underway and were seen in small kettles
staging over Canada. We counted twenty nine today. Sharp-shins were present
in modest numbers and thirty two made the clicker keys sound. Four hundred
and seventy eight broad-wings were counted out over the lake in the morning
hours with great difficulty, except for a few strays that wandered by our
site on their own. Reports from Pointe Mouille indicate that approximately
15,000 broad-wings were seen during the day.

Non-raptor Observations:
Blue jays were seen in increasing numbers and larger flocks today. At the
end of the day we saw about thirty Forster’s terns flying over the lake.
Twelve American white pelicans were seen soaring over the Brain Tree. The
gulls were plentiful in the sky today forcing to look at them to eliminate
them as raptors, a cruel task given the lack of raptors.

Predictions:
The forecast for tomorrow looks to be a mirror image of today with double
digit winds from the NE. This would seem to doom us to repeat today’s
fate. We are locked down in one spot but if you wish to see raptors in huge
numbers the solution is simple: go to the Pointe Mouille Headquarters on
Campau Rd. We sent people there today and the broad-wings were flying in
large numbers. Reports from our counter who went there after the watch
said he saw 7,000 birds and other counters there saw 8,000 before he
arrived. We could not see them from our viewpoint and for those of us that
count them for the pleasure of it, it was very frustrating. Cheers! Andrew
S.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/17/20 4:36 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (17 Sep 2020) 17372 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 17, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 253 416 416
Osprey 0 1 1
Bald Eagle 7 26 26
Northern Harrier 18 101 101
Sharp-shinned Hawk 347 1392 1392
Cooper's Hawk 8 32 32
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 16494 28811 28811
Red-tailed Hawk 43 124 124
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 194 828 828
Merlin 8 44 44
Peregrine Falcon 0 9 9
Unknown Accipiter 0 1 1
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 17372 31787 31787
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 17:00:00
Total observation time: 10 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Dave Martin, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Linda Wladarski,
Michelle Mastellotto, Olga Klekner

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Another thank you to our additional counters
stationed at the base of the tower calling our birds from below. Be safe
everyone!


Weather:
A slightly chilly start to the day as the winds blew quite strongly from
the North, but it sure did warm quickly and we stayed at very pleasant
temperatures all day. We started off with a full cloud cover that quickly
dissipated in the late morning only to leave us with a bright blue sky for
the rest of the count.

Raptor Observations:
What a day to be looking at the sky, hope your clickers were ready to go!
Today we tallied 16,494 Broad-winged Hawks! We were so fortunate to see
massive kettles forming above our heads and right off the shores of Lake
Erie. Major movements started around 11 and by the time the afternoon hit,
we were waist deep in buteos flying incredibly high in the bright blue sky.
Only in the last hour did the hawks fly lower to find a lovely place to
spend the night.
Of course Broad-winged Hawks were not the only migrants today, we counted
253 Turkey Vultures flying along side the kettles. Sharp-shinned Hawks and
American Kestrels zoomed along in the morning when the winds were stronger,
and a few Northern Harriers and Merlins made quick appearances throughout
the day.
Truly a day where the adage "Keep looking up" was in full effect!

Non-raptor Observations:
In the hours before the insanity of thousands of raptors, we did manage to
count other species including more warblers, American Goldfinches, Purple
Finches, and Cedar Waxwings. Blue Jays also chose to move in big numbers in
the morning, just to make sure our clickers were ready, and we counted
2,618 individuals.
Still seeing the same mix of waterfowl on the marsh, but we did see a
Short-billed Dowitcher flying past.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73719226

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting another day of Northern winds with very little
cloud cover once again. Why don't we try to beat today's numbers, okay
Broad-wings? We'll be ready!
We are hoping to keep seeing good number of different hawks flying by the
tower and in good numbers as well.
Tomorrow, keep looking up!
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/17/20 3:09 pm
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: Manistique Hawks
Begin forwarded message:

> From: Ronald Annelin <rannelin...>
> Date: September 17, 2020 at 5:04:55 PM EDT
> To: <birdnet...>
> Subject: Manistique
>
> It is Thursday at five pm. There are many hundreds of hawks kettleing over the lake At great height actually not visible to my naked eyes
> Ron
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
> To unsubscribe, e-mail: <birdnet-unsubscribe...>
> For additional commands, e-mail: <birdnet-help...>
>

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Date: 9/17/20 12:25 pm
From: April Campbell <adc14...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Josh Haas's virtual raptor program
It was except. I wanted to ask what Camera he used to shoot those videos.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 17, 2020, at 1:49 PM, Lisa Lava-Kellar <lisalk...> wrote:
>
> 
> Many thanks, Josh, for your informative presentation last night. I learned so much and took notes, the better to remember what you said and showed. The photos were very helpful, and I appreciated how you pointed out differences from/similarities to other raptors.
>
> Great job!
> Lisa
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
> ---
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Date: 9/17/20 12:05 pm
From: Eric Arnold <eba...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT: mushrooms (some history)
Michael,
I'm no mycologist, either, but as someone who knew Alex Smith, and his
daughter Nancy Smith Weber, from whom I had the good fortune to have as an
instructor for an extension course on mushroom hunting in the days when
such courses were offered, I fully support the identification of the
mushroom in question as an example of *amanita muscaria*, one of the few
species of *amanita* that cause confusion because there are reports of it
being edible from people who have eaten the mushroom without ill effect,
and others who parboil it before eating and claim that this eliminates the
poison. See the comments in Smith's *Mushroom Hunter's Field Guide,
revised and enlarged* (my copy is 9th printing, 1974) for his comments on
the edibility and the process for preparing them advocated by some of those
who eat them. He comments there "*Though poisonings by this species are
not usually fatal, the experience is one not soon forgotten."*
In *A Field Guide to Southern Mushrooms *by Nancy Smith Weber and Alexander
H. Smith, University of Michigan Press, 1985, in the Introduction there is
more information both on cooking and storing edible mushrooms (p.7 ff) and
descriptions of the various poisonous components known to be present in
various mushrooms. For *Amanita muscaria *it is described as *Ibotenic
acid — Muscimol poisoning. *That section ends with the statement *"Amanita
muscaria *is the best-known of these fungi."
My own attitude is one of considerable caution. I have enjoyed a number of
species of wild mushrooms that I have learned to identify with what I
consider reasonable certainty, which includes checking details about
growing environment, physical characteristics of the mushroom, a spore
print, and microscopic examination of the spores to support my
identification, and if it is an unfamiliar species for me but the
identification indicates that it is a safe one to try, which includes it
not being easily mistakable for an even marginally-poisonous one, then I
would use the approach that those experienced with collecting wild
mushrooms use when they want to determine the edibility of an
unknown-to-them species: they start with the smell, and if it passes that
test, a small taste of the flesh, that they don't swallow. If it passes
these, then determining the edibility, without the benefit of advice who
knows them better, the approach would be to sample a tiny amount, and see
if there is an adverse reaction. Since mushroom poisonings sometimes take
a long time to become apparent (e.g. several weeks in some cases, because
the effect can be on an organ such as the liver, the failure of which can
be a gradual process), this testing process is not one for the
inexperienced or faint-hearted. It is not an approach which I have taken.
If I can not feel confident about my identification, and cannot check with
someone whose experience and knowledge I can unreservedly trust, I'll skip
it.
I have known a person who collected and ate mushrooms that I was confident
were *Amanita muscaria,* without any obvious problem, but I never ate any
of the preparations she made using them. She was the wife of an
ex-brother-in-law, and was born and raised in Slovakia, where collecting
and eating wild mushrooms was something that many grew up with. She didn't
appear to suffer any bad effects from eating them as far as I knew, and I
don't know how many of my in-laws' family ate what she prepared, and that
was many years ago now, and as far as I know, she is still living. But I
had heard enough reports from Alex Smith and his daughter about poisonings
of European immigrants who had mistaken mushrooms found in North America
for the ones they were familiar with from Europe, sometimes with fatal
results, that I had no desire to participate in that experiment.
N.B. My mother attended graduate school at the University of Michigan,
intending to study with C.H. Kauffman, who unfortunately died shortly
before she arrived in the early 1930's. Alexander Smith was in the same
class that she was in, which led to a life-long friendship. I don't know
who replaced Kauffman. Kauffman was the author of "The Gilled
Mushrooms *(Agaricaceae)
*of Michigan and the Great Lakes Region" in 1918 which became a standard
reference on the subject. It was reprinted by Dover (two volumes) in
1971.
Appropriately for this discussion, Smith's *Revised and Enlarged* Field
Guide has a fine picture of an *Anamita muscaria* specimen on the front
cover.

Eric Arnold



On Wed, Sep 16, 2020 at 10:36 PM John Farmer <ajf-jlf...> wrote:

> Mike,
>
>
>
> I'm no mycologist, but looking no farther than the cover of my 1973
> edition of Alexander H. Smith's *The Mushroom Hunter's Field Guide -
> Revised and Enlarged*, I feel pretty confident that yours are *Amanita
> muscaria. *If so, Smith rates it as *poisonous*, so please consult
> someone who knows their mushrooms better than I!
>
>
>
> John
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Michael Parow <mlparow...>
> Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 10:19 PM
> To: BIRDERS <birders...>
> Subject: [birders] OT: mushrooms
>
>
>
> Does anyone know what these mushrooms? They about 6” high and when fully
> open are flat on top. Thanks. —mike
>
>
>
> --
>
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
>
> ---
>
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Birders" group.
>
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
>
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> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<D6621F5C-B1A7-4766-825D-E92EF165A084...>
> .
>
> --
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> www.glc.org
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Date: 9/17/20 10:49 am
From: Lisa Lava-Kellar <lisalk...>
Subject: [birders] Josh Haas's virtual raptor program
Many thanks, Josh, for your informative presentation last night. I learned
so much and took notes, the better to remember what you said and showed.
The photos were very helpful, and I appreciated how you pointed out
differences from/similarities to other raptors.

Great job!
Lisa

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Date: 9/17/20 4:31 am
From: mjcapo via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] OT: mushrooms
Michigan State University Extension has an excellent bulletin (E-2777) called "Don't Pick Poison". It's $5.00 through their store: MSU Extension.


In a message dated 9/16/2020 10:36:52 PM Eastern Standard Time, <ajf-jlf...> writes: 
Mike,

 

I'm no mycologist, but looking no farther than the cover of my 1973 edition of Alexander H. Smith's The Mushroom Hunter's Field Guide - Revised and Enlarged, I feel pretty confident that yours are Amanita muscaria.  If so, Smith rates it as poisonous, so please consult someone who knows their mushrooms better than I!

 

John

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Parow <mlparow...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 10:19 PM
To: BIRDERS <birders...>
Subject: [birders] OT: mushrooms

 

Does anyone know what these mushrooms?  They about 6” high and when fully open are flat on top.  Thanks. —mike

 

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Date: 9/16/20 7:36 pm
From: John Farmer <ajf-jlf...>
Subject: RE: [birders] OT: mushrooms
Mike,



I'm no mycologist, but looking no farther than the cover of my 1973 edition of Alexander H. Smith's The Mushroom Hunter's Field Guide - Revised and Enlarged, I feel pretty confident that yours are Amanita muscaria. If so, Smith rates it as poisonous, so please consult someone who knows their mushrooms better than I!



John



-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Parow <mlparow...>
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 10:19 PM
To: BIRDERS <birders...>
Subject: [birders] OT: mushrooms



Does anyone know what these mushrooms? They about 6” high and when fully open are flat on top. Thanks. —mike



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Date: 9/16/20 7:19 pm
From: Michael Parow <mlparow...>
Subject: [birders] OT: mushrooms
Does anyone know what these mushrooms? They about 6” high and when fully open are flat on top. Thanks. —mike

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Date: 9/16/20 7:15 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (16 Sep 2020) 127 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 16, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 10 139 139
Osprey 1 10 10
Bald Eagle 0 16 16
Northern Harrier 2 64 64
Sharp-shinned Hawk 100 625 625
Cooper's Hawk 0 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 1 1 1
Broad-winged Hawk 3 4474 4474
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 1 63 63
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 6 178 178
Merlin 3 7 7
Peregrine Falcon 0 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 127 5582 5582
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
We were greeted with a sky of smoky haze that the late, great, much beloved
Detroit weatherman, Sonny Elliot, might have described as “Smaze”. It
was a flat background for the birds to fly in and they avoided it at first.
The wind was from the SW, and though mostly unfelt in our somewhat
sheltered location, it was enough to impede the flight of those small birds
that came bouncing through. The barometer hung around 30.1” most of the
day and fell a tenth in the later hours. Although the sky blued up slightly
during the later hours it was still an empty canvas for the most part.

Raptor Observations:
We had barren bookends on each end of the flight today. It took some time
to get going for even the usual suspects in a SW winds. Surprisingly, we
ended up with 100 sharp-shins on the day, helped by a forty hour in the
middle of the day. It seemed that they were so widely spaced that we had
fewer, but the clicker does not lie. Ten turkey vultures took their sweet
time heading into an opposing wind. One osprey was noted. Only two harriers
were spotted flying together today after seeing a large number yesterday.
One juvenile red-tailed was noted in a day that was short on buteos, but
that was expected. What was not expected was that we would see our first
red-shouldered hawk today, a juvenile of the species. Only three
broad-wings were seen in a very mini kettle. Six kestrels were counted and
merlins were on the menu today with three seen racing through.

Non-raptor Observations:
We have been seeing movements of blue jays the last couple of days but not
in huge numbers. The sky was generally clear of raptor and the gulls and
swallows seemed to have moved to the wings of the stage. The pied-billed
grebes were a little closer today in their relentless search for the
slowest fish in the school. Cormorants were seen in greater numbers out in
the lake’s open waters. The gulls do seem to be a bit more aggressive
lately as we have seen them take note of passing raptors and occasionally
giving chase. This may be the younger birds playing a game of tag just to
pass the time.

Predictions:
Change is coming. The barometer should bottom out in the late night hours
and start to rebound. There is a small chance of rain as the system changes
to high pressure. The wind will have shifted to the NNE tomorrow at the
start of the watch. The clouds should be clearing at that time also. We
will have three days of high potential for broad-wing migration with winds
in a favorable direction and a high barometer. There are never any
guarantees with hawks since winds may be too strong for a particular
location or other variables may affect the flight, but fingers crossed.
Cheers! Andrew S.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/16/20 4:41 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (16 Sep 2020) 101 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 16, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 1 163 163
Osprey 0 1 1
Bald Eagle 0 19 19
Northern Harrier 5 83 83
Sharp-shinned Hawk 72 1045 1045
Cooper's Hawk 0 24 24
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 1 12317 12317
Red-tailed Hawk 0 81 81
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 17 634 634
Merlin 5 36 36
Peregrine Falcon 0 9 9
Unknown Accipiter 0 1 1
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 101 14415 14415
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
Quite the pleasant day in the tower with temperature rising to the
mid-twenty degrees Celsius by the end of the afternoon. We are still
surrounded by the smokey haze of the West Coast wildfires, but the haze
felt lighter today. Winds blew from the South-West and the South later on,
which did not bring us many birds.

Raptor Observations:
Just made it over the 100 bird mark today with 101 raptors flying over. Our
main migrant was the Sharp-shinned Hawk (72), fluttering past the tower in
small groups every hour. As usual, the American Kestrel was often close
behind but only 17 individuals passed over. We saw more Merlins (5) flying
above the marsh today, in their speedy and aggressive fashion. Five
Northern Harriers flew quietly above the tower as well as one single
Broad-winged Hawk.
As entertainment, we witnessed a lot of chasing on the marsh today. For
instance, a Bald Eagle chasing the Osprey (for it's lunch, I presume), a
Merlin chasing Kestrels (of course!), and finally a Ruby-throated
Hummingbird chasing a Sharp-shinned Hawk.

Non-raptor Observations:
Blue Jays are definitely on the move! Today we counted 901 Jays flying
silently over the marsh. We also spotted a big murmuration of Starlings,
approximately 600 birds.
Warblers were still in abundance, and we are seeing more Palm Warblers, and
plenty of Blackpoll Warblers.
Some species are dwindling in numbers like the Cedar Waxwings, Swallows,
Chimney Swifts, and some marsh dwellers like Great Egrets.
Still many Monarch Butterflies migrating over the tower, we counted 166
individuals.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73683482

Predictions:
Winds will be on our side tomorrow as they are shifting to the North
overnight. These winds should bring us more songbirds as well as hopefully
more hawks during the day. There is a possibility of left-over Broad-winged
Hawks that have not yet migrated over, as well as more of our usual
species.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/16/20 12:16 pm
From: 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Migration Continues
Didn't get a photo of the male black-throated blue on the deck, but this black-throated green hung around long enough to get a decent photo. The other warbler photo isn't good, but may be orange-crowned.




Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

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Date: 9/16/20 2:14 am
From: Fred Kaluza <fkaluza...>
Subject: [birders] Smokey Skies
For critters that migrate at night and use the Moon and stars to steer by, a clear view of the heavens is tough to find lately. This time of the year usually has the BEST weather here, in fact I look forward to it every year and that includes clear skies day and night. This has really been a bummer of a year so far in so many ways. I wonder how this dirty air will impact migrations this year.

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Date: 9/15/20 7:51 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (15 Sep 2020) 844 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 15, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 9 129 129
Osprey 0 9 9
Bald Eagle 0 16 16
Northern Harrier 21 62 62
Sharp-shinned Hawk 256 525 525
Cooper's Hawk 0 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 540 4471 4471
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 62 62
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 17 172 172
Merlin 1 4 4
Peregrine Falcon 0 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 844 5455 5455
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Sam Heilman

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
Yesterday’s weather was a very clear demonstration of the vagaries of the
wind and atmospheric conditions that affect the counts at hawk watch sites.
Our friends at Holiday Beach saw over eleven thousand broad-wings and we
only had one large kettle that numbered a few hundred. We are located a
mere eight miles apart. Today’s weather did not look too promising as
winds were predicted to grow in strength from the S during the day. The
smoke haze from California had cleared for the most part leaving us a clear
light blue sky for the best part of the day but with time there grew a
light white cover high above us by the end of the watch. The wind did
indeed grow and it seemed to impede the flight during the afternoon hours.
The barometer was predicted to fall and it did in the afternoon after the
wind had built to double digit strength. It had started at 30.35 and
dropped a couple of tenths by the end. Temperatures were comfortable fall
temps in the sixties making for a pleasant day.

Raptor Observations:
The southern winds did not bode well for the soaring birds but those that
press on regardless found the lighter winds of the morning to their liking.
Sharpies were popping over the trees like someone had left the lid off the
popcorn popper. We ended up with 256, our best day this year. We got off to
a slow start with this species so it was good to see them in these numbers.
The broad-wings were pushed far to the north and were difficult to see in a
hazy sky. We only saw them early on in the morning hours when the wind was
lighter and tallied 540. Nine turkey vultures were seen today but their
days are coming. Twenty five kestrels were counted winging their way
through. One merlin was spotted coming across the water from Celeron Island
and exhibiting unusual behavior. It seemed to dive at the water, perhaps
attacking its own reflection as feisty at they are, and then it landed on
the floating “seaweed” vegetation. It stayed for several minutes and
seemed to be taking a shallow bath as last seen. Our other record setting
bird (for the young season) was the northern harrier. They seemed to be
determined to get out of Dodge and passed over in couples, or even three
one time, totaling 21 on the day.

Non-raptor Observations:
There is little new to report on the non-raptor side of things. The Caspian
terns continue to dive bomb the minnow population. Swallows seemed to have
moved to other areas and were not a visual road block as they can sometimes
be. Even the gulls seemed to be widely spaced today. We did see some butter
butts in the alder tree close to our seats. Pied-billed grebes continued to
terrorize the fish in the neighborhood along with the insatiable cormorants
plying their trade in our end of the lake.

Predictions:
The wind will shift slightly to the SW tomorrow and increase in strength to
low double digits. The barometer will continue to fall as rain approaches
in the late night hours. Not a promising forecast but the birds that do not
pay attention to forecasts may continue to move. Sharpies, kestrels,
harriers might show up but the long winged birds that ride the winds will
probably not be seen by us in large numbers except possibly in the morning
hours when the wind is lighter. I hope I am wrong of course. Cheers! Andrew
S.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/15/20 5:18 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (15 Sep 2020) 726 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 15, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 2 162 162
Osprey 0 1 1
Bald Eagle 0 19 19
Northern Harrier 7 78 78
Sharp-shinned Hawk 181 973 973
Cooper's Hawk 1 24 24
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 471 12316 12316
Red-tailed Hawk 1 81 81
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 58 617 617
Merlin 5 31 31
Peregrine Falcon 0 9 9
Unknown Accipiter 0 1 1
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 726 14314 14314
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
A very pleasant day on the tower, with temperatures in the mid-twenties in
the afternoon. The winds blew from the South and South-West all day,
pushing most migrants North of us. Our clear sky disappeared as the
barometer dropped steadily throughout the day, and we were left with a hazy
gray sky.

Raptor Observations:
After counting 11,000 yesterday, anything lower than a 1,000 seems a little
disappointing. However, we still had a successful day counting 726 raptors!
A few kettles of Broad-winged Hawks were spotted in the morning, but all
were very far to the North of the tower, and eventually were too far to see
even with scopes. We're hoping our friends across the border managed to
catch them!
Thankfully, Sharp-shinned Hawks and American Kestrels flew in to liven our
spirits. We also counted 5 Merlins zipping across the marsh along with 7
Northern Harriers.

Non-raptor Observations:
Blue Jays have started their migration as we counted 197 individuals
sneaking silently across the marsh.
At the base of the tower, we counted 19 species of warblers, something for
everyone! We were also happy to see our first White-throated Sparrow of the
season as well as 2 Purple Finches.
Our other major migrant, with 255 individuals, was the Monarch Butterfly!
Steadily they flew across the tower and over the marsh, and we wish the
little migrants good luck on their long journey.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73647342

Predictions:
We are expecting a hot day tomorrow with winds blowing from the South-West
all day. These winds will give us a nice breeze but won't bring us too many
birds. We're hoping to see the same variety as right now; Sharp-shinned
Hawks, American Kestrels, and Northern Harriers, and still good numbers.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/15/20 4:18 pm
From: Beverly Wolf <Bev_Wolf...>
Subject: [birders] Alarming die off of birds in New Mexico


https://www.nbcnews.com/news/animal-news/birds-are-dropping-dead-new-mexico-
potentially-hundreds-thousands-n1240116?cid=db_npd_nn_fb_fbbot
<https://www.nbcnews.com/news/animal-news/birds-are-dropping-dead-new-mexico
-potentially-hundreds-thousands-n1240116?cid=db_npd_nn_fb_fbbot&fbclid=IwAR2
X5t8CoPA84vD-1faP7xlgAPFx5Rl8Zi5BRlt4DPlzscnUWuAc2LHC2vw>
&fbclid=IwAR2X5t8CoPA84vD-1faP7xlgAPFx5Rl8Zi5BRlt4DPlzscnUWuAc2LHC2vw



There is no known cause at this time, but I think the theory about the
wildfires in the west may have significance.



I'm not sure if this an appropriate posting, but I suspect it will be of
great concern for everyone.



Bev Wolf



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Date: 9/15/20 1:55 pm
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Identifying Raptors is free Washtenaw Audubon virtual program, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 7:30pm, all invited
Birders and friends,

Please join us for the online Zoom program below. You do not have to be a Washtenaw Audubon member to attend.

Washtenaw Audubon’s in-person programs at the Botanical Gardens are on hold until the University allows gatherings to take place. To view our online Zoom programs, you will need access to an internet-capable computer, phone, or similar device. An announcement of the web address to view the program will be on our web site, Facebook page, and on the Birders email list a few days before the program.
We may also add more online programs for September and the future, which will be announced on the same internet platforms.

Wednesday, September 16, 7:30pm, (an online Zoom program)

Identifying Raptors in Flight

Raptors in flight bring a sense of wonder and struggle to birders, especially when it comes to identifying them at a distance. Field marks are not enough when back-lit conditions and birds miles out lack any color. Flight ID has long been the best way to identify raptors at a distance, however books only take it so far. Join hawk watcher and photographer Josh Haas as he shares the principles of raptor ID featuring video clips from his movie “Hawks on the Wing” and explains why our local site, the Detroit River Hawk Watch, is a raptor migration mecca.

Josh Haas first developed a love for hawks working with the birds of prey at the Kalamazoo Nature Center. A hawk watching trip to Lake Erie Metropark opened his eyes to raptors in migration. Perplexed by seeing specks at a distance with an overwhelming itch to know what they were, he started learning from veteran hawk watchers and was hooked. He would end up spending seven Fall seasons working with the Detroit River Hawk Watch as a relief counter. There he honed his skills and developed a love for teaching visitors unique ways of telling the shadowy specs apart.
Join Zoom Meeting:
https://umich.zoom.us/j/99828722535
Or dial-in:
Call: +1 646 876 9923
Meeting ID: 998 2872 2535

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Date: 9/15/20 10:37 am
From: Wayne Fisher <waynef...>
Subject: [birders] Connecticut warbler at Sharon Hills
Yesterday I saw a Connecticut Warbler at the Sharon Hills preserve. This is the Legacy Land Conservancy preserve, not Sharon Short Hills.

To get to the place where I saw it, start at the parking lot, take the center trail that goes out perpendicular to the road. Follow it for less than a quarter mile until another trail branches off to the right. The bird was a few feet down the trail to the right. The trail starts out going through grassland, the side trail is at about the place where it turns more shrubby/woody.

Wayne

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Date: 9/15/20 6:03 am
From: LaHaie, Ivan <Ivan.LaHaie...>
Subject: [birders] Fall Birds
While sitting in my home office I saw a juvenile red-headed woodpecker flying among the trees in the front yard . Encouraging sign that the adults we saw earlier this year are breeding. Also had a blackpoll warbler in the shrubs alongside the house.

Ivan
Prospect Hill S. of Easudes


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Date: 9/14/20 6:32 pm
From: 'Steve Jerant' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Haehnle Sanctuary Crane Count 09/14/2020
We started our Monday crane counts at the sanctuary this evening. A Black-crowned Night Heron was spotted on the edge of the marsh. There were lots of robins moving to the west for the nightly roost. Four cranes will be spending the night in Mud Lake Marsh.

eBird checklist is available at: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73611486

Crane counters: Gary Siegrist, Ross Green, & Steve Jerant
Compiler: Steve Jerant
Submitted by Steve Jerant
Crane Count: 4
Species count: 40

You can view past postings and historical crane counting data at
Haehnle site at http://www.haehnlesanctuary.org/crane-count and
JAS Blog page at http://jacksonaudubon.org/

Best Regards,
Steve Jerant

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Date: 9/14/20 6:31 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (14 Sep 2020) 864 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 14, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 9 120 120
Osprey 0 9 9
Bald Eagle 1 16 16
Northern Harrier 7 41 41
Sharp-shinned Hawk 27 269 269
Cooper's Hawk 0 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 803 3931 3931
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 6 62 62
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 10 155 155
Merlin 1 3 3
Peregrine Falcon 0 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 864 4611 4611
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Alex Gilford, Andrew Sturgess, Sam Heilman

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
Today we had a visit from Dr. Strangehaze. An unusual haze dimmed the
morning sun leaving us to guess at its origin. The barometer was high at
30.4” which it held all day despite a seeming change in the wind
direction and a definite change in look of the sky. The wind was from the N
in the early hours and went slightly more easterly as the day progressed.
The sky held the smoky look for most of the morning but gradually larger
clouds began to fill in from the west and as we reached the late afternoon
hours petulant gray bottomed schooners were crowding each other in the
harbor.

Raptor Observations:
The day started ordinarily enough with sharpies appearing on the horizon,
twenty nine were counted today. The early morning flight was a little
misleading though as it dried up for the most part with irregular
appearances of various species. Nine turkey vultures were noted. One adult
bald eagle was seen with a flight of broad-wings. Seven harriers were
observed. Ten kestrels flew through our air space. Six red-tailed hawks
soared through. One merlin was counted. The morning hours saw some sporadic
broad-winged flight but the day was saved by the appearance of the largest
kettle that we had seen together so far. Approximately six hundred and
fifty birds passed at about 1330 but after that it was few and far between.
We ended up with seven hundred and fifty three on the day.

Non-raptor Observations:
The gulls were out in force today and at the heights usually reserved for
broad-wings. They can kettle in a similar fashion and more than once have
quickened the pulse of observers only to disappoint when their features can
be discerned. One Forster’s tern was seen working the bay along with the
Caspian terns. Pied-billed grebes seemed more plentiful today. The
cormorants continue to fly in small groups and soar at times, another dark
bird that can be mistaken for a raptor at first glance. They are present in
huge numbers at this time of year and can be seen in long lines flying just
over the water’s surface as they seek out schools of fish. Our local bald
eagles enjoyed the winds today and seemingly played tag for long periods.

Predictions:
The next couple of days show winds shifting to the southern quadrant with
increasing strength and a falling barometer. Possible rain is predicted
late Wednesday. This sets up the rebound on Thursday and Friday. Thursday
shows a lot of cloud cover but the winds should be NNE at about ten miles
per hour. Friday shows almost the same conditions with a little stronger
wind. Given the time of month and the favorable wind and barometric
conditions those may be the days. Cheers! Andrew S.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/14/20 6:01 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (14 Sep 2020) 11891 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 14, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 56 160 160
Osprey 0 1 1
Bald Eagle 2 19 19
Northern Harrier 16 71 71
Sharp-shinned Hawk 285 792 792
Cooper's Hawk 2 23 23
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 11412 11845 11845
Red-tailed Hawk 20 80 80
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 95 559 559
Merlin 2 26 26
Peregrine Falcon 1 9 9
Unknown Accipiter 0 1 1
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 11891 13588 13588
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 17:00:00
Total observation time: 10 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Noel Herdman

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
We were expecting a day of bright blue sky with no cloud cover, instead we
were met with a very hazy day, and a gray sky which made finding hawks
difficult and hard on the eyes. However, we were fortunate to have steady
Northern winds blowing all day long.

Raptor Observations:
Hello Broad-winged Hawk migration!! Today we counted 11,412 individuals
migrating over the tower, most kettles looking like specks into the sky. As
we were about to lose hope on seeing any big movements, kettles started to
form in the early afternoon. Most formed above Lake Erie and were pushed
back towards land. We decided to stay an extra hour to count as the hawks
did not stop until around 4:30 when they all suddenly disappeared.
Of course we were also joined by many Sharp-shinned Hawks, Turkey Vultures,
and American Kestrels. A few Merlins, Northern Harriers, Red-tailed Hawks,
Cooper's Hawks, and a Peregrine Falcon also made appearances in between the
frenzy of Broad-winged Hawks.


Non-raptor Observations:
Another great day for warblers as we counted 16 species including a Palm
Warbler, Cape May Warblers, and Black-throated Blue Warblers.
Whimbrels, Spotted and Solitary Sandpipers were spotted flying over the
marsh, passing the Great Egrets and the Black-crowned Night-Herons.
Today's highlight came from a Great Blue Heron deciding to come stand on
the railing at the top of the tower and watch the counter for 30 minutes
before flying off. Needless to say, many photos were taken!
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73607110

Predictions:
Tomorrow the winds are expected to turn to the South, which most likely
means our luck with Broad-winged Hawks has run out for the time being. We
may spot a few more kettles, but they will likely be for North of the
tower. We hope they haze will clear and that we will keep counting
Sharp-shinned Hawks, American Kestrels, and a few more Broad-winged Hawks


========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/13/20 9:15 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (13 Sep 2020) 1691 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 13, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 29 111 111
Osprey 2 9 9
Bald Eagle 0 15 15
Northern Harrier 5 34 34
Sharp-shinned Hawk 120 242 242
Cooper's Hawk 0 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 1481 3128 3128
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 7 56 56
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 44 145 145
Merlin 2 2 2
Peregrine Falcon 1 3 3
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 1691 3747 3747
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Sam Heilman

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
For once the weather followed the script and the line of rain and storms
cleared the area in the morning hours leaving us with a view of receding
clouds and a clear blue replacement. The wind was consistently in the west
northwest direction but grew in strength as the day progressed. Eventually
the sky filled with puffy cumulus clouds and the pattern of blue skies
replaced by bands of cumulus clouds was repeated throughout the day. The
barometer rose from slightly below 30” to above by a half a tenth and
held steady for the best part of the day.

Raptor Observations:
The day seemed to start with moderate sharpie and kestrel traffic which was
expected. The direction and strength of the wind made the flight of
broad-wings not a sure thing but the rising barometer on the backside of a
low gave us hope which was eventually fulfilled. Harriers numbered five in
today’s count. Two ospreys were counted. Twenty eight turkey vultures
braved their way into an opposing wind. Seven red-tailed hawks made the
clicker. We saw one peregrine falcon that seemed to be in an angry mood, or
at least hungry. Two merlin were counted, our first of the season. Leading
the falcon contingent in numbers were American falcons with forty four. The
sharp-shins lead the runners up with a count of one hundred and twenty.
Broad-wings were confoundingly difficult to find again. In their mind the
nosebleed seats are an extravagant waste as they fly very much higher than
that. Their flight lines were not consistent and required a diligent search
of both sides of the sky. The majority of the flight took place in the mid
to late afternoon hours. We eventually tallied a total of fifteen hundred
and sixty two birds.

Non-raptor Observations:
Our lone Forster’s tern was seen on occasion. Mostly gulls were seen high
in the sky and occasionally in such dense numbers that they might be
mistaken for broad-wing kettles. They were very high in the sky and made
counting the equally high broad-wings difficult at times. Our Caspian terns
were seen but not close to us today. Large numbers of cormorants were seen
in congregations that must have exceeded several hundreds.

Predictions:
Tomorrow shows favorable barometric conditions and also a wind from a very
northern direction. This bodes well. The wind will be of moderate strength
in the single digits. The sky will be clear, which is not our favorite sky
as intermittent clouds provide a better background and give reference
points for locating raptors. Given that some raptors fly very high under
these conditions it might be a challenging day. Cheers! Andrew S.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/13/20 4:11 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (13 Sep 2020) 471 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 13, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 29 104 104
Osprey 0 1 1
Bald Eagle 3 17 17
Northern Harrier 5 55 55
Sharp-shinned Hawk 264 507 507
Cooper's Hawk 5 21 21
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 53 433 433
Red-tailed Hawk 0 60 60
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 109 464 464
Merlin 3 24 24
Peregrine Falcon 0 8 8
Unknown Accipiter 0 1 1
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 471 1697 1697
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Kory Renaud, Noel Herdman

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
Another lovely and warm day on the tower, with a strong breeze coming from
the West all day. Good visibility today, allowing us to see very far North
of the tower as well as quite high up. We had more of a mix of sun and
cloud which made spotting raptors easier on the eyes, yet some periods of
the day were spent staring at an expanse of blue sky.

Raptor Observations:
A day filled with Sharp-shinned Hawks (254), who kept popping up over the
Eastern treeline and coming straight above the tower. Of course as the day
wore on, most birds flew very high and we stared straight up to spot them
in the blue. Following closely behind were American Kestrels, a few
Cooper's Hawks and Merlins.
As the winds blew from the West we only spotted one kettle of Broad-winged
flying very high and far to the North. No doubt all migrating Broad-winged
Hawks flew too far North for us to see them but we're hoping they were
intercepted by the Detroit River Hawkwatch.

Non-raptor Observations:
Still many warblers fluttering at the base of the tower, thought not as
numerous as in the past days. We did spot our first Yellow-rumped Warbler
of the season, fall is now truly upon us. We were also fortunate to spot a
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher just at the end of day.
A few different species of shorebirds flew over the tower including
Black-bellied Plovers, Semipalmated Sandpipers, Solitary Sandpipers,
Killdeer and Lesser Yellowlegs.
Still lots of Chimney Swifts (68), Ruby-throated Hummingbirds (17), and
Monarch Butterflies flying around.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73563997

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting a warm day with Northerly winds and very little
cloud cover. We may be forced to lie on our backs on top of the tower in
order to see anything clearly and to save our necks. Tomorrow may be a good
day for Broad-winged Hawks for us, and we are hoping to see big kettles
forming overhead, fingers crossed!
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/12/20 7:33 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (12 Sep 2020) 900 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 12, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 26 82 82
Osprey 2 7 7
Bald Eagle 2 15 15
Northern Harrier 11 29 29
Sharp-shinned Hawk 83 122 122
Cooper's Hawk 0 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 737 1647 1647
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 8 49 49
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 31 101 101
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 900 2056 2056
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Don Sherwood, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
A more benign day greeted us today with warmer temps and SE winds that were
not quite as biting. A mostly blue sky with some high cirrus clouds made
for a pleasant Saturday for all concerned. The winds went round to a more
southerly direction as the day progressed and this seemed to move the
flight line more to the north. High clouds began to fill the sky in the
late afternoon as the rain approaches although we saw nothing resembling
rain clouds. The barometer was steady during the morning hours but began to
slowly fall later in the day, dropping two tenths of an inch by day’s
end.

Raptor Observations:
The day seemed to start very well with the wind direction from the SE.
Sharpies were coming early and often which was a welcome sign as we have
seen fewer than usual this season. We ended up with eighty one on the day.
American kestrels were consistent but not in as great a number as the
sharpies, twenty nine were counted. We saw two ospreys in a dedicated
flight line headed south pumping all the way. Two bald eagles were observed
flying in the same manner. The wind seemed to encourage the early adopters
among the turkey vultures with 26 tallied. Northern harriers were winging
their way to the winter grounds in the count of nine. Eight red-tailed
hawks were added to the day’s count. Last but certainly not least were
the stars of September, the broad-winged hawks. The flight started in a
very good fashion as the wind was favorable to our site in both strength
and direction. The early morning flight was lower than yesterday and right
over our heads, lower being a relative term with broad-wings of course, we
saw over 400 birds in the first hours. The flight slowed down through the
middle part of the day and we had a late blip but as the wind had shifted,
the flight line had changed to the north and was not as visible as earlier.
We ended up with six hundred and eighty seven birds.

Non-raptor Observations:
Our lone rarely seen Forster’s tern made an appearance today. I miss
these birds as they are quite athletic and nimble as they dive with utter
abandon after their prey. Caspian terns, their bigger cousins continue to
threaten the small fish population with their dives. The gulls were working
high in the sky today forming kettles on their own and making searching for
raptors more complicated. Cedar waxwings were observed in the early morning
hours. Starlings were seen in numbers today including small murmurations at
times.

Predictions:
Tomorrow’s chances will depend on when the thunderstorms and rain
actually clear the area. As predicted at this hour, the skies should clear
by 10 am. The barometer should rebound and that bodes well. Winds will be
variable but finally settle in the W and grow in strength. This may push
the birds that do move away from our site but time will tell. The winds
will eventually shift to a northerly direction but the timing of these
things is rarely certain so Monday may be a good day.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/12/20 4:23 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (12 Sep 2020) 264 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 12, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 75 75
Osprey 0 1 1
Bald Eagle 3 14 14
Northern Harrier 11 50 50
Sharp-shinned Hawk 180 243 243
Cooper's Hawk 3 16 16
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 14 380 380
Red-tailed Hawk 4 60 60
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 45 355 355
Merlin 3 21 21
Peregrine Falcon 1 8 8
Unknown Accipiter 0 1 1
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 0 1 1

Total: 264 1226 1226
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Noel Herdman

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
We had a beautiful bright and sunny day with some clouds and a gentle
breeze. The winds blew from the North for two hours in the morning only to
swivel to the East and later the South-East. A mix of sun and cloud made it
easier to spot migrating raptors who took the opportunity to fly quite high
all day.

Raptor Observations:
A splendid day for Sharp-shinned Hawks as we counted 180 individuals flying
high in the sky above the tower. These are the types of numbers we are used
to seeing in September and we were very pleased to count so many
particularly in unfavourable winds. The winds did affect our Broad-winged
Hawk count, only 14 flew in our area. American Kestrels were also plentiful
with 45 individuals and our highlight was counting 11 Northern Harriers
gliding effortlessly through the air.

Non-raptor Observations:
Still many warblers about in the park, a few species made an appearance at
the tower in the morning. We had our first sighting of a Ruby-crowned
Kinglet and will be expecting many more very soon. We also had our first
Rose-breasted Grosbeaks in the morning.
We are seeing a greater variety of woodpeckers including Downy, Northern
Flicker, Red-bellied, and Red-headed Woodpeckers.
In the afternoon we are spotting a few more Common Nighthawks snacking on
insects in the sky and additionally, we counted 50 Monarch butterflies
migrating high above the tower.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73517328

Predictions:
We are expecting a bit of rain overnight which may drag on into the
morning. Winds expected to blow from the West for most of the day. This
should keep bringing us Sharp-shinned Hawks and American Kestrels, but not
too many Broad-winged Hawks for the time being.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/11/20 7:34 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (11 Sep 2020) 986 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 11, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 37 56 56
Osprey 0 5 5
Bald Eagle 1 13 13
Northern Harrier 6 18 18
Sharp-shinned Hawk 22 39 39
Cooper's Hawk 1 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 874 910 910
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 22 41 41
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 22 70 70
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 1 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 986 1156 1156
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 17:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Michala Burke, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
On the third day of promise we were greeted by a robust wind from east of
north searching for chinks in our textile armor. It seemed that we were
going to face another day of disappointment as there was considerable cloud
cover and the wind seemed a little too strong in a direction that did not
seem beneficial to our site. Things change however, and the stars finally
aligned. The winds went round to a more easterly direction and the clouds
gradually cleared. This left us to scan the sky for that most devious of
raptors, the broad-winged hawk, perhaps the leading cause of HWN (Hawk
Watcher’s Neck), which in its most advanced form allows the sufferer to
rest the back of their head comfortably between their shoulder blades. The
bird seems at home in the mare’s tail cirrus clouds that eventually
filled the sky and with a wind that gave them plenty of impetus they
streamed by at a rapid pace. As per usual, blink and you miss them. The
high cirrus clouds and a late hour halo around the sun foretold wet weather
to come but today was a day to finally celebrate a movement that in the
afternoon hours kept us busy

Raptor Observations:
Of course, the broad-wings were the stars today. Although a moderate
movement by their standards we counted approximately 600-700 birds. (I do
not have the final tally as I write this.) There were no large kettles but
flights of 100 or less that came in the afternoon hours causing us to put
in a couple of overtime hours. The birds were high in the sky as is their
custom. Joining them in the voyage south were twenty three sharp-shins. Our
best number this season but still these birds seem to be late out of the
blocks by last year’s totals. Twenty kestrels joined the flow. The turkey
vultures were inspired by the wind and twenty eight were tallied. Although
the local bald eagles were plentiful today in the fresh wind, we only
counted one as a migrant. Six Northern harriers were seen flying higher
than usual. We counted a Cooper’s hawk today as it seemed different from
our local birds. Twenty one red-tailed hawks took advantage of a favorable
wind to start the journey south. A peregrine falcon was seen early in the
day.

Non-raptor Observations:
We had little time to observe non-raptors but searching the skies led to
frequent observations of gulls and swallows searching for insects high in
the sky. The Caspian terns occasionally squabbled with their loud abrasive
calls. The ring-billed gulls were observed diving either on or very close
to diving cormorants that had found a school of small fish. They are
frequent companions since gulls are very opportunistic feeders. A warbling
vireo was heard behind us and many Northern flickers were seen on the
ground early in the morning hours.

Predictions:
The wet weather foretold by the clouds today will arrive tomorrow evening,
or night, depending on the fudge factor. The barometer will be falling
throughout the day. Winds will shift from ENE to SE. Cloud cover will
lessen during the early afternoon hours but should be plentiful early and
late. A difficult day to predict since changing weather can affect the
flight. Some birds, like sharpies, kestrels and harriers may not be
bothered by the changes,as for the others, we will watch closely to see if
they come.

========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/11/20 4:36 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (11 Sep 2020) 471 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 11, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 68 75 75
Osprey 0 1 1
Bald Eagle 8 11 11
Northern Harrier 2 39 39
Sharp-shinned Hawk 44 63 63
Cooper's Hawk 6 13 13
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 258 366 366
Red-tailed Hawk 37 56 56
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 47 310 310
Merlin 0 18 18
Peregrine Falcon 0 7 7
Unknown Accipiter 0 1 1
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1
Swainson's Hawk 1 1 1

Total: 471 962 962
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Dave Martin, Hugh Kent, Ian Woodfield, Linda Wladarski,
Michelle Mastellotto, Noel Herdman

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
A fresh start to the day with strong winds from the North all day long.
More blue sky today and the cloud cover almost disappeared completely by
the end of the day. Of course, this made spotting raptors more difficult
but we enjoyed the warmth of the sun.

Raptor Observations:
A Swainson's Hawk was spotted today at 12:25 flying right above the tower!
This Western migrant showed off its dark slender wings and pale body to us
for a few minutes before heading off. For our head counter, who is also
from Western Canada, this sighting was very exciting and she was thrilled
to see a familiar face in the sky!
Aside from the rarity, the day was filled (471 raptors)
with many raptors like with Broad-winged Hawks (258), most of them
streaming past the tower high into the blue. We are seeing more migrating
Sharp-shinned Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Turkey Vultures, species that
had not been very active since the beginning of the count, but are now
starting to move.

Non-raptor Observations:
Today's non-raptor highlight was a Black-billed Cuckoo spotted at the base
of the tower for a brief minute!
Warblers were in abundance all over the park but did not seem to make their
way to the tower. A few were recorded in the morning but our attention
quickly returned to the sky where hawks were aplenty.
Not as many swallows flew by today, but we still counted a few Chimney
Swifts, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, and Nighthawks.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73471796

Predictions:
Tonight the winds are shifting away from the North and will stay that way
for a few days. Tomorrow we are expecting winds from the East and
South-East which may put a damper on our bigger flights. We are hoping that
despite the change in winds we will still see a good number of migrants,
particularly more Sharp-shinned Hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/11/20 1:19 pm
From: Karen <kjser...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Re: Frequency and location of American White Pelicans in Michigan

pelicans have been nesting on Little Charity Island in Lake Huron Arenac County for a number of years. There are now at least 50

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 11, 2020, at 3:56 PM, Patrick Baize <pkbaize...> wrote:
>
> 
>
> about 12-15 years ago I knew someone who lived in the Alpena area he said he would kayak out to some islands in Lake Huron and find nesting pelicans. Didn't see them my self but.......................
>
> Pat B. Howell, Michigan
>
> On Friday, September 11, 2020, 03:38:51 PM EDT, Timothy Dey <timothydey...> wrote:
>
>
> It has become a common occurrence the last few years to spot half a dozen or so white pelicans in and around Cell 1 (the northern part of the "banana") at Point Mouillee in northern Monroe County. Always a fine addition to a few hours spent watching shorebirds and related at that location.
> Good birding,
> Timothy
> Lincoln Park
>
> On Friday, September 11, 2020 at 1:38:51 AM UTC-4 <bev_......> wrote:
> My picture of the pelicans at Shiawassee brought me a few comments. From May 2018 - a dated article from the Detroit Free Press on American White Pelicans in Michigan. https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/05/26/pelican-sightings-rise-michigan-lake-erie/637363002/?fbclid=IwAR1bEeih8ZbOIQwUMz0aJlxRBtp9AdjSjv61zevYNDwEIdFYGgAGluWBYow
> I don't know if there is updated information on all of this, but I was enlightened by the article even though it's 2 years old.
>
> I think my first sighting was 8 or 9 years ago with one sighted flying south from the southern shore of Ontario about 80 miles east of the Soo Locks. It was quite exciting! Times are a-changing.
>
> Bev Wolf
> --
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> .
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Date: 9/11/20 12:56 pm
From: Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Re: Frequency and location of American White Pelicans in Michigan

about 12-15 years ago I knew someone who lived in the Alpena area he said he would kayak out to some islands in Lake Huron and find nesting pelicans. Didn't see them my self but.......................

Pat B. Howell, Michigan

On Friday, September 11, 2020, 03:38:51 PM EDT, Timothy Dey <timothydey...> wrote:

It has become a common occurrence the last few years to spot half a dozen or so white pelicans in and around Cell 1 (the northern part of the "banana") at Point Mouillee in northern Monroe County. Always a fine addition to a few hours spent watching shorebirds and related at that location.Good birding,TimothyLincoln Park

On Friday, September 11, 2020 at 1:38:51 AM UTC-4 <bev_......> wrote:

My picture of the pelicans at Shiawassee brought me a few comments.  From May 2018 - a dated article from the Detroit Free Press on American White Pelicans in Michigan.  https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/05/26/pelican-sightings-rise-michigan-lake-erie/637363002/?fbclid=IwAR1bEeih8ZbOIQwUMz0aJlxRBtp9AdjSjv61zevYNDwEIdFYGgAGluWBYow I don't know if there is updated information on all of this, but I was enlightened by the article even though it's 2 years old.
I think my first sighting was 8 or 9 years ago with one sighted flying south from the southern shore of Ontario about 80 miles east of the Soo Locks.  It was quite exciting!  Times are a-changing.
Bev Wolf 


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Date: 9/11/20 12:38 pm
From: Timothy Dey <timothydey...>
Subject: [birders] Re: Frequency and location of American White Pelicans in Michigan
It has become a common occurrence the last few years to spot half a dozen
or so white pelicans in and around Cell 1 (the northern part of the
"banana") at Point Mouillee in northern Monroe County. Always a fine
addition to a few hours spent watching shorebirds and related at that
location.
Good birding,
Timothy
Lincoln Park

On Friday, September 11, 2020 at 1:38:51 AM UTC-4 <bev_......> wrote:

> My picture of the pelicans at Shiawassee brought me a few comments. From
> May 2018 - a dated article from the Detroit Free Press on American White
> Pelicans in Michigan.
> https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/05/26/pelican-sightings-rise-michigan-lake-erie/637363002/?fbclid=IwAR1bEeih8ZbOIQwUMz0aJlxRBtp9AdjSjv61zevYNDwEIdFYGgAGluWBYow
> I don't know if there is updated information on all of this, but I was
> enlightened by the article even though it's 2 years old.
>
> I think my first sighting was 8 or 9 years ago with one sighted flying
> south from the southern shore of Ontario about 80 miles east of the Soo
> Locks. It was quite exciting! Times are a-changing.
>
> Bev Wolf
>

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Date: 9/11/20 8:49 am
From: 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Birdcast Migration Alert Sept. 10-11
I find these so informative. On a personal note, we had a gorgeous, male black-throated blue warbler on our back deck just a few minutes ago. We've seen so many great birds going to our fountain this year. We also had a Swainson's Thrush "bathing" on the cover of our fire-table earlier in the week. 

Migration Alert: high intensity migration this evening, 10-11 September 2020 - BirdCast


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Migration Alert: high intensity migration this evening, 10-11 September ...

The BirdCast forecast model is predicting high intensity migration this evening, and we estimate this migration ...
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 Melissa PappasHamburg Township, Livingston County, MI
   

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Date: 9/10/20 10:38 pm
From: Beverly Wolf <bev_wolf...>
Subject: [birders] Frequency and location of American White Pelicans in Michigan
My picture of the pelicans at Shiawassee brought me a few comments. From May 2018 - a dated article from the Detroit Free Press on American White Pelicans in Michigan. https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/05/26/pelican-sightings-rise-michigan-lake-erie/637363002/?fbclid=IwAR1bEeih8ZbOIQwUMz0aJlxRBtp9AdjSjv61zevYNDwEIdFYGgAGluWBYow
I don't know if there is updated information on all of this, but I was enlightened by the article even though it's 2 years old.

I think my first sighting was 8 or 9 years ago with one sighted flying south from the southern shore of Ontario about 80 miles east of the Soo Locks. It was quite exciting! Times are a-changing.

Bev Wolf

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Date: 9/10/20 8:26 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (10 Sep 2020) 59 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 10, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 19 19
Osprey 0 5 5
Bald Eagle 0 12 12
Northern Harrier 2 12 12
Sharp-shinned Hawk 12 17 17
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 27 36 36
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 2 19 19
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 16 48 48
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 59 170 170
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 8 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady, Sam Heilman

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
In the word’s of a wise philosopher “It’s déjà vu all over
again”. To stay in the baseball vein, “Somewhere the sun is shining”.
Not for us though, we went through the early morning hours with fog with
light drizzle and it continued to mimic yesterday’s weather with gray
overcast skies until day’s end. I thought that perhaps three days of NE
winds was too good to be true and so it was. We have greater hopes for
tomorrow as the sun will finally show its face. The wind will continue from
the NE and the barometer, which at 30.3” was as high as we have seen it
this year, will stay high. We saw the potential of these conditions today
as we had fragments of a solid flight on the edges of the darker clouds.


Raptor Observations:
I suspect Holiday Beach may have had a better day than us today as it
seemed lighter in that direction and we could see sunlight on the wind
turbines in Canada for a few minutes as we shut down for the day. We
finally had a few sharp-shins fly by, totaling twelve for the day. Our
broad-winged total zoomed up to 27, including a small kettle of seven
birds. Two red-tails were observed. Kestrels continued to move in better
numbers than the sharp-shins with 16 on the day. Two harriers were spotted
later in the day.

Non-raptor Observations:
The usual members of our entourage were at work today. Local eagles and
osprey were looking for fish in their respective ways. The Caspian terns
continued with the adult followed by the juvenile calling its plaintive
plea for a free meal. Two common loons were seen at different times. One
nighthawk was seen passing over. Swallows and swifts are still very
plentiful although their prey is hard to see. Although a warbling vireo was
heard, little was seen of the migrant warblers and other passerines

Predictions:
Well, maybe the third time is the charm. The sun will come out tomorrow,
(hmmm), at least it is predicted to at the start of the watch. The wind
will continue in low double digits from the NE quadrant and the barometer
will be north of 30”. Perhaps it will look like a high pressure day
finally. The last two days got off to dark soggy starts with dry dark
endings but hope springs eternal.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/10/20 8:00 pm
From: <ibblazin...>
Subject: RE: [birders] Washtenaw County Question
Thanks! I don’t use ebird but hoped someone on Birders would help me out. You didn’t let me down – thanks for the quick response!

Anita



From: WayneF <waynef...>
Sent: Thursday, September 10, 2020 10:54 PM
To: <ibblazin...>
Cc: birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Washtenaw County Question



ebird shows several reports of Baird’s Sandpiper along Reno Road today.



Wayne





On Sep 10, 2020, at 10:41 PM, <ibblazin...> <mailto:<ibblazin...> wrote:



Was there a bird (or birds) of particular interest on Reno road south of Pleasant Lake road in Freedom Township today (Thursday)? My grandson, who lives in the area, said he drove by a couple of times and saw several birders with scopes aimed at a field. All he could see were Canada Geese and Sandhill Cranes. Any help appreciated!

Anita in Canton

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Date: 9/10/20 7:53 pm
From: WayneF <waynef...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Washtenaw County Question
ebird shows several reports of Baird’s Sandpiper along Reno Road today.

Wayne

> On Sep 10, 2020, at 10:41 PM, <ibblazin...> wrote:
>
> 
> Was there a bird (or birds) of particular interest on Reno road south of Pleasant Lake road in Freedom Township today (Thursday)? My grandson, who lives in the area, said he drove by a couple of times and saw several birders with scopes aimed at a field. All he could see were Canada Geese and Sandhill Cranes. Any help appreciated!
> Anita in Canton
> --
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Date: 9/10/20 7:41 pm
From: <ibblazin...>
Subject: [birders] Washtenaw County Question
Was there a bird (or birds) of particular interest on Reno road south of
Pleasant Lake road in Freedom Township today (Thursday)? My grandson, who
lives in the area, said he drove by a couple of times and saw several
birders with scopes aimed at a field. All he could see were Canada Geese and
Sandhill Cranes. Any help appreciated!

Anita in Canton

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Date: 9/10/20 5:19 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (10 Sep 2020) 288 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 10, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 5 7 7
Osprey 0 1 1
Bald Eagle 2 3 3
Northern Harrier 16 37 37
Sharp-shinned Hawk 11 19 19
Cooper's Hawk 1 7 7
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 105 108 108
Red-tailed Hawk 3 19 19
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 135 263 263
Merlin 7 18 18
Peregrine Falcon 2 7 7
Unknown Accipiter 1 1 1
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1

Total: 288 491 491
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Noel Herdman

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed and has a three-person limit
reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are respecting these
precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
A very foggy morning on the tower, with the marsh itself barely visible.
The fog cleared after a few hours but we were left with a very gray sky
which made seeing raptors difficult when they didn't disappear into the low
wispy clouds. Luckily, the winds blew steadily from the North all day,
making the smaller birds bounce in the air and rocking the bigger raptors.

Raptor Observations:
A very good day on the tower with 288 raptors! Finally feeling like
migration out here. Our most numerous bird today was once again the
American Kestrel (135), but are seeing more movement from other species
including Northern Harriers (16) and Sharp-shinned Hawks (11). A good group
of Broad-winged Hawks made their first real attempt at migrating today and
we counted 105 individuals. No big kettles, only small groups of 5-8 hawks
at a time but there was a steady flow of birds all day. Additionally, we
counted a few Merlins, Peregrine Falcons, and Red-tailed Hawks.
Today's success is leaving us feeling refreshed and optimistic about the
season and we can't wait to continue counting raptors.

Non-raptor Observations:
Another great day for warblers around the tower as we identified 16
species. Northern Parulas, Cape May, Pine and Tennessee Warblers made
appearances with plenty more in tow. We also spotted a female Baltimore
Oriole and a female Scarlet Tanager in the morning.
Purple Martins are still very busy feeding in the air space above the tower
and doing a great job at pretending to be American Kestrels, just to keep
us on our toes.
Lastly, in the last hour, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds came in droves,
approximately 20 individuals coming quickly one after the other. It was as
though someone had opened a gate and let them all out at once. One
Hummingbird even actively chased a swallow out onto the marsh!
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73438222

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting a great day with winds from the North-East.
Temperatures should stay quite pleasant and we should see a mix of sun and
cloud. For birds, we are hoping everything keeps going the way it has this
week! With more sun in the forecast, there should be more opportunities for
thermals to form so we are expecting a few more Broad-winged Hawks and
Sharp-shinned Hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/10/20 12:01 pm
From: 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Male hummer
There are still two adult males visiting my salvias and feeders here. Numbers of others has definitely risen.
 Melissa PappasHamburg Township, Livingston County, MI
 

On Thursday, September 10, 2020, 01:48:27 PM EDT, Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...> wrote:

We still have one or two males today and a small assortment of females/immatures.Janet Hinshaw

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 6, 2020, at 8:24 PM, Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> wrote:



Barb,
There are still a few adult males around, although probably 90% of them have migrated already.
Allen T. ChartierInkster, MichiganEmail: <amazilia3...>: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website/Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/


On Sun, Sep 6, 2020 at 7:53 PM 'Barbara' via Birders <birders...> wrote:

I was surprised to see a male hummingbird still visiting my feeder.
BarbJ lNorthwest Livonia

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com

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Date: 9/10/20 11:43 am
From: ARTHUR JEFFREY <aj.jeffrey...>
Subject: [birders] Male Hummingbird
We had one male hummingbird yesterday afternoon in Brighton.

Art

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Date: 9/10/20 11:18 am
From: Mark Bradtke <mabmrmc...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Male hummer
Saw a Male Hummingbird on my neighbor’s Rose of Sharon bush in Saginaw this morning.

Mary

> On Sep 10, 2020, at 1:48 PM, Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...> wrote:
>
> We still have one or two males today and a small assortment of females/immatures.
> Janet Hinshaw
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 6, 2020, at 8:24 PM, Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> Barb,
>>
>> There are still a few adult males around, although probably 90% of them have migrated already.
>>
>> Allen T. Chartier
>> Inkster, Michigan
>> Email: <amazilia3...> <mailto:<amazilia3...>
>> Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/ <http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/>
>> Website/Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/ <http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Sun, Sep 6, 2020 at 7:53 PM 'Barbara' via Birders <birders...> <mailto:<birders...>> wrote:
>> I was surprised to see a male hummingbird still visiting my feeder.
>> BarbJ l
>> Northwest Livonia
>>
>> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>> Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com <http://mail.mobile.aol.com/>
>>
>> --
>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org <http://www.glc.org/>
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>>
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Date: 9/10/20 10:48 am
From: Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Male hummer
We still have one or two males today and a small assortment of females/immatures.
Janet Hinshaw

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 6, 2020, at 8:24 PM, Allen Chartier <amazilia3...> wrote:
>
> 
> Barb,
>
> There are still a few adult males around, although probably 90% of them have migrated already.
>
> Allen T. Chartier
> Inkster, Michigan
> Email: <amazilia3...>
> Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
> Website/Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/
>
>
>
>> On Sun, Sep 6, 2020 at 7:53 PM 'Barbara' via Birders <birders...> wrote:
>> I was surprised to see a male hummingbird still visiting my feeder.
>> BarbJ l
>> Northwest Livonia
>>
>> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
>> Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
>> --
>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>> ---
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>
> --
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Date: 9/10/20 5:50 am
From: Beverly Wolf <bev_wolf...>
Subject: [birders] American White Pelicans
Thought I'd share a picture of 4 of the 15 or so AWP I saw at Shiawassee Nat'l Wildlife Refuge yesterday around 5PM. I have a picture of wading bird that I'm not sure of the identity, if someone wants to give it a try, send me a private message. It is quite round, brownish on top , grayish belos with what appears to be a couple of white feathers in the wing - it was quite a distance away. Legs a yellowish greenish color. Feet large as you would expect.

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Date: 9/9/20 7:35 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (09 Sep 2020) 24 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 09, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 4 19 19
Osprey 1 5 5
Bald Eagle 0 12 12
Northern Harrier 2 10 10
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 5 5
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 3 9 9
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 5 17 17
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 9 32 32
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 24 111 111
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
A day that looked promising on paper yesterday had a wet blanket thrown
over it early today, literally. Foggy mist met us at the start of the
watch, obscuring our view of some of our prominent landmarks such as The
Stacks and Canada for example. The wind failed to build to any appreciable
level to support movement although it came from a very good direction for
the most part. The day lightened later in the morning hours and for a brief
moment small patches of blue were visible. This seemed to encourage some
movement but then another blanket was thrown on darkening the sky and day
and causing the flight to dry up. The barometer was steady at 30.2” which
normally would indicate dry blue skies but close to the front line the
rules are bent and blue skies can be low pressure and cloudy can be high.
We never saw the sun today and it was hard to even find where it was in the
sky

Raptor Observations:
We did see some interesting raptors today, just not enough of them. Two
kestrels flew out of the early fog together in the first hour, the first of
nine total of that species. Five red-tails were tallied and three single
broad-wings were observed. One high osprey was seen winging its way south.
Two harriers pumped their way through. Four turkey vultures made the count.

Non-raptor Observations:
One common loon was seen dragging his feet to the north today. A few lesser
yellowlegs were seen today including a pair that landed on the vegetation
in front of us. A spotted sandpiper was seen seeking a place to land in the
morning hours. One common nighthawk was observed later in the afternoon
when the raptor flight had dried up. We were joined by a northern flicker
and a small flock on red-winged blackbirds clearing the grass of insects.
Lots of swallows flew into our area from time to time serving as avian flak
that would have impeded our view had there been anything to see.

Predictions:
Here we go again. The winds seem to be more consistent tomorrow and
increasing from the NNE. Barometer is in the go-zone. Skies are predicted
to be cloudy. Hopefully, this will be a better day than today as the threat
of precipitation seems much less than today.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/9/20 4:41 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (09 Sep 2020) 76 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 09, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 1 1 1
Bald Eagle 0 1 1
Northern Harrier 8 21 21
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 8 8
Cooper's Hawk 1 6 6
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 2 3 3
Red-tailed Hawk 11 16 16
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 50 128 128
Merlin 2 11 11
Peregrine Falcon 1 5 5
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1

Total: 76 203 203
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
A thick fog surrounded the tower today, making it hard to see the treeline
at the other end of the marsh. The visibility remained quite poor for most
of the day as the clouds stayed very low and we stared into a gray sky to
spot birds. Winds we're quite favourable for us, blowing from the North all
day, with the exception of a few hours in the mid-afternoon when the air
became very still.

Raptor Observations:
Migration has officially begun at HBMO, thank you Northern winds! Today we
counted 76 raports, and once again the majority were American Kestrels
(50). We counted more Red-Tailed Hawks flying quite high and getting lost
into the clouds. A couple Northern Harriers, Broad-winged Hawks and Merlins
also flew over. Our last bird of the day was a Peregrine Falcon flying just
above our heads. We are noticing a lack of Sharp-shinned Hawks, and are
hoping that the last few days of Northern winds will have pushed them
closer to us and they should pass over the tower any day now.

Non-raptor Observations:
Another major push for swallows today with over 200 Purple Martins and Tree
Swallows feeding above us. Mixed in their flocks were many Chimney Swifts
and a few Nighthawks. Mingling among the swallows was a constant flow of
Monarch butterflies gracefully crossing the marsh.
We added a few species of ducks to this year's list; Gadwalls, American
Widgeon, and American Black Duck. They were spotted when a motor boat
flushed many waterfowl from their homes under the lotus leaves.
Additionally, we were fortunate to spot a Common Loon flying above the
tower.
Warblers and small passerines are still coming through thanks to Northern
overnight winds. They are a delight to count in the morning.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73394724


Predictions:
How lucky we are to have another day of Northern winds tomorrow! These last
few days have quick-started migration in the region and now we're off to
the races. We hoping to count more Sharp-shinned Hawks and continue on the
same upward trend.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/9/20 1:04 pm
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: Hurricane Birding Round-up, Becoming an Unintentional Birder, 5,000 eBird Checklists!
Begin forwarded message:

> From: American Birding Association <info...>
> Date: September 9, 2020 at 2:32:31 PM EDT
> To: Friend <mseft...>
> Subject: Flight Calls #298: Hurricane Birding Round-up, Becoming an Unintentional Birder, 5,000 eBird Checklists!
>
>
> If you're having trouble viewing this email, you may see it online
>
>
> Becoming a Birder, Unintentionally, on the American Birding Podcast
> The path to becoming a birder is as much as about coming to grips with what is happening to you as it is about finding increasing joy in birding. We all may end up in a similar place but our paths to that place are as individual as we are. Toronto writer and lecturer Julia Zarankin didn’t mean to become a birder, but 10 years on here she is. She recounts this odd journey in a new memoir, Field Notes from an Unintentional Birder, out in September in Canada and in October in the United States. She joins host Nate Swick to talk about how she came to call herself a birder.
>
> Subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Play. You can also find every episode of the American Birding Podcast on our podcast homepage.
>
>
>
> A Round-up of Hurricane Laura Waifs
>
> Weather, and its effects on birds, has long been a key point of focus for many birders. From monitoring wind speed and direction to the positioning and timing of various low pressure systems and fronts, many in our community could be thought of as amateur meteorologists. We rely on weather forecasts to inform us on how to plan each birding day during key times of the year.
>
> Laura's landfall near the Texas/Louisiana border as a major hurricane was one of the meteorological events of 2020. While incredibly destructive, the storm spread seabirds from Oklahoma to Ontario as it weakened in the middle of the continent. Nathan Goldberg shares a round-up of the birding highlights of Hurricane Laura and serves as a useful primer for hurricane birding more generally.
>
> We hope that those birders and ABA members in the path of the storm are recovering, and were able to take advantage of this literal windfall of seabirds in unexpected places.
>
>
>
>
> Audubon Face Masks - An exclusive offer from Joel Oppenheimer Gallery
>
> Our masks are custom made in England from a comfortable latex-free 3-ply quilted fabric. They are beautifully printed, durable and machine washable. Visit www.audubonart.com to see the variety of Audubon masks available. 20% Discount on Quantities of 4 or More.
>
>
>
>
> 5,000 Consecutive Days of eBird. Now What?
>
> As of today, Tues., Sept. 8, 2020, I have submitted at least one complete eBird checklist per day every single day since Mon., Jan. 1, 2007, a run of 5,000 straight days. Why? How come? What has motivated me to do this? I’m going to rattle off four explanations that don’t really answer the question, and then I’ll reveal what I think is the real answer.
>
> A Black-chinned Hummingbird highlights what, on a normal day, would be a fairly inconsequential eBird checklist. But for Birding editor Ted Floyd, it's a milestone. 5,000 consecutive days of eBirding. What does it mean? Where does he go now? Find out in his latest essay at How to Know the Birds.
>
> You can find all of Ted's essays at the How to Know the Birds hub at the ABA website.
>
>
>
>
>
> American Birding Association, Inc.
> Membership: PO Box 3070, Colorado Springs, CO 80934
> Headquarters: PO Box 744 or 93 Clinton St, Delaware City, DE 19706
> Phone: (800) 850-2473 or (302) 838-3660 | Email: <info...>
> Copyright © American Birding Association, Inc. All Rights Reserved
>
>
>
> To unsubscribe from future mailings please click here.
>

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Date: 9/9/20 4:57 am
From: Su Clift <coffeebeansu...>
Subject: [birders] Male hummer and feeder placement
A week ago I added two new hummingbird feeders to my other two that have been out all year, under branches so they’re shaded. The new ones I put out in the wide open so flyover migratory birds could possibly see them. I’ve had a male here for a few days and I have not seen another male hummingbird since June. He’s planted himself on one that’s in a flower bed right by my deck so I can see him as I move around inside the house and he’s been there reliably at least 10 times a day.

My hummingbirds have greatly increased on all of the feeders the past week. This is the first year I put my regular feeders in the shade under branches and every other year I have put them mostly out where they could be seen from above and I’ve had a lot more hummingbirds those years.

I use the Wild Birds Unlimited round flat feeders that show more red from above. I also use the clear glass egg-shaped ones with the red cover on the bottom. And those get used regularly as well but I bet the splotch of red coloring brings the new ones in.

Su in Adrian

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Date: 9/8/20 8:49 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (08 Sep 2020) 10 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 08, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 1 15 15
Osprey 1 4 4
Bald Eagle 1 12 12
Northern Harrier 0 8 8
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 5 5
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 1 6 6
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 2 12 12
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 3 23 23
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 1 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 10 87 87
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 11:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 4 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
Another day of turbulent weather as we were close to a front line which
produced strong thunderstorms in the morning and unusual wind conditions
around us most of the day. On the Windy App, Cleveland was showing as a
meeting point for both winds from the south and north coming together from
180 degrees apart. Our wind indicator was spinning around in a confused
manner till the wind finally settled on an ENE direction and increased in
strength causing the temperature to drop, blowing the humidity away as we
added another layer. The skies alternately looked benign and threatening as
more weather was coming from the west. The barometer was relatively stable
despite all the drama as the front line was to the south of Toledo holding
around 30.1”. We has a short watch today due to the morning hours being
wet and the sky threatening enough in the late afternoon hours to stop the
flight of raptors.

Raptor Observations:
The NE winds on the north side of the front line should bring us some birds
once the changeable weather clears. We did count a few today in the hours
that we had from mid day on. Leading the numbers race were three kestrels.
Two red-tails were blown by. We counted one turkey vulture, one bald eagle,
one broad-wing and one peregrine falcon. The peregrine was seen looking for
a meal in the trees.

Non-raptor Observations:
The usual suspects were seen at the site; pied-billed grebes, ring-billed
gulls and lots of swallows. We did not get a chance to see the morning
birds due to the thunderstorms passing through. One common loon was
observed winging its way along the tree line across the channel.

Predictions:
The weather tomorrow looks promising as the wind will be from the NE
quadrant for the watch hours. Barometer will be high as the high pressure
system will have pushed the low away. Another favorable thing is that the
wind will be in the single digits in regards to strength. Sometimes too
much of a good thing can shift the flight away from the site.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/8/20 6:03 pm
From: Susan MIller <smiller179...>
Subject: [birders] non-bird: proposal to discharge treated dioxane-contaminated water into Dolph/First Sister Lake
The city has released a plan for mitigating the Gellman-Pall dioxane-contaminated groundwater. The proposal has raised concern in the neighborhood around Dolph because the plan is to discharge the treated wastewater (including residual dioxane and bromide) into First Sister Lake. Concern exists about the overall impact of a large water discharge into the lake and surrounding wetlands, and more specifically about the chemical content of the wastewater. If anyone on the list has expertise related to these issues, and capacity to analyze the proposal, the neighborhood would much appreciate some scientifically-competent, unbiased input. I can send more information to anyone interested in looking at it. Thank you.

Susan Miller

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Date: 9/8/20 4:16 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (08 Sep 2020) 37 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 08, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 0 0 0
Bald Eagle 0 1 1
Northern Harrier 4 13 13
Sharp-shinned Hawk 3 8 8
Cooper's Hawk 1 5 5
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 1 1 1
Red-tailed Hawk 3 5 5
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 22 78 78
Merlin 3 9 9
Peregrine Falcon 0 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1

Total: 37 127 127
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Noel Herdman

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
Stormy start to the day, with rain coming down hard for the first 30
minutes and a few cracks of thunder. Strong winds blew from the North in
the morning, only to die down and turn to the East in the afternoon. This
shift in the winds caused a sudden stop to the flow of birds, but luckily
for the us, winds shifted back to the North for the last 2 hours of the
count.

Raptor Observations:
What a blessing it was to have Northern winds today as we counted 37
migrants! 37 does not seem like a very high number of birds, but seeing how
slow the start of the season has been, we were thankful for every raptor.
Our main flyer was the American Kestrel (22), and we even counted our first
Broad-winged Hawk. Northern Harriers, Merlins, and Sharp-shinned Hawks also
joined us, flying right above the tower. here's to hoping there's plenty
more where they came from!

Non-raptor Observations:
After the rain cleared up in the morning, swallows took full advantage of
the insects on the marsh and fed in very high numbers over the water.
Feeding among the swallows, we spotted a Nighthawk and Chimney Swifts (66).

When the winds blew from the North again, Cedar Waxwings and Goldfinches
passed in big flocks, and a few more Warblers were added to our list.
Lastly, our marsh highlights were an American Bittern and a Black-crowned
Night-Heron.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73359022


Predictions:
Overnight winds are staying put at North-East and continuing all day
tomorrow. The temperatures are expected to stay in the mid-20 degree
Celsius which should be quite pleasant. We may see a real push of
Sharp-shinned Hawks, Northern Harriers, American Kestrels, and potentially
a few more Broad-winged Hawks making their way down.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/7/20 7:51 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (07 Sep 2020) 12 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 07, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 5 14 14
Osprey 0 3 3
Bald Eagle 1 11 11
Northern Harrier 0 8 8
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 5 5
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 2 5 5
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 10 10
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 3 20 20
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 12 77 77
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
The predicted flash and bang show did pass through in the early morning
hours waking most of us that experienced it. We were greeted by the residue
at the start of day with patches of thick low cloud and then more frequent
slots of blue skies. Then it got weird. The barometer rose a tenth from
29.8 but then wavered a little as undecided which way to go. We were
between two systems in a sort of Bermuda Triangle where very few birds
would enter. The Windy App showed us at the bottom of a U-shaped wind
direction change of little enthusiasm where to the west and east the winds
were blowing with more gusto. The water level in our little neck of the
lake was growing higher while the wind on the main part of the lake should
have been blowing it all up to Buffalo. As if to emphasize our position in
no man’s land, there was a high line of delineation overhead high in the
sky as a solid blanket of high thin cloud stayed stationary for the
afternoon hours, blue on one side, white on the other as increasing numbers
of larger cumulus clouds were at a lower level.. More wet weather is
predicted for the overnight hours but better conditions are on the way.

Raptor Observations:
It was hard to find birds today but a few did pass. 5 turkey vultures
floated by, one sharp-shinned was seen as it soared and slowly passed. Two
broad-wings were hopefully signs of things to come. Three kestrels flew
through the mostly barren sky. One late near- adult bald eagle pumped
through with its beak agape.

Non-raptor Observations:
Gulls and swallows were the most common birds in the sky today. A few
hummingbirds shot by. A single yellowlegs continued to work the floating
vegetation and was sometimes upset by the wakes of the Labor Day boat
traffic. Some warblers were observed behind us including a Magnolia. Plenty
of American robins are usually seen at the start of the watch at in the
grass around the site.



Predictions:
The weather has been unsettled lately and therefore difficult for both the
pros and incompetent amateurs like me to make sense of it. Although we have
possibly rainy, low pressure weather in the early morning hours there seems
to be a trend towards a rising barometer and NE winds as the day
progresses. This trend seems to continue for more than one day which bodes
well for migration. It seems unusual to have winds predicted from
essentially the same beneficial direction for more than one day with a good
barometer reading so this could make up for the slow start to the first
week of September.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/7/20 4:47 pm
From: Penny <dorfdoom...>
Subject: Re: [birders] best hummer feeders - follow-up to April discussion
Very nice information. Thanks for sharing. Experience helps.
Penny

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 7, 2020, at 7:13 PM, Susan Horvath <shorvath...> wrote:
>
> There have been several variations to the best-hummingbird-feeder
> query this summer and several incidental photos of styles other than
> the glass tube style that I have always used. Someone recently
> described their Wild Birds Unlimited flat feeder in glowing terms. So
> here's my story:
>
> The WBU folks guaranteed that their flat feeders, especially the
> Pagoda High Perch, are completely bee/yellowjacket proof. So, I bought
> one and put it out.
>
> I usually have 3 Perky Pets: 2 on the morning-sun side of the house
> and 1 on the afternoon-sun side. All hang from the house soffits and
> have solid gray umbrella baffles directly over them for added sun &
> weather protection. So, the beginning of May, I put *only* the new WBU
> flat feeder on the sunny side. No Perky Pets anywhere. Note that
> several of my neighbors also have multiple hummingbird feeders.
> Eventually I get a male who figures it out... and he defends it from
> others... but he doesn't come very often.
>
> One of the selling points of the flat feeder is that the hummers can
> see every direction, i.e. better ability to spot danger or
> competition. No glass tube that they can't really see through. Sure
> enough, during a major June thunderstorm (photo below), he showed up
> to wait out the storm. He wasn't feeding. Just waiting... feeling safe
> & dry with our house above and behind him and a full view of the rest
> of the world around him.
>
> But the sugar-water level just wasn't going down, so I finally put the
> (older non-leaking) Perky Pets up on the other side of the house.
> Guess what: lots of business!! At this point, I've still never seen a
> female at the flat feeder, even though the male is hardly ever there.
> The females are busy incubating then hunting and feeding insects to
> their young, so maybe it's ok... but still...
>
> August comes, and eventually I notice that the flat feeder is emptying
> faster... and I'm seeing females! Finally! But the Perky Pets still
> empty much faster, even though the males are heading south.
>
> On the plus side, no sign of bees & yellowjackets. Part of the WBU
> selling point for this particular feeder is that it money-back
> guarantees that yellowjackets can't defeat it. And I believe them. The
> portholes to the sugar water in the base have 2 prongs on the under
> side. Optional "nectar guard tips" come with the feeder. They are tiny
> tiny clear soft plastic cups that fit over the prongs. The bottom of
> the cups have x-shaped cuts so that the hummer beaks easily push
> through but that bees/etc have no way of defeating. The only problem
> is that I'm a senior with a little less dexterity and vision than I
> had when I was young. Hanging onto these cups and attaching them isn't
> all that easy. Even harder is washing them w/o losing them... which is
> probably why the box includes extras. And WBU, being who they are, I'm
> sure will have free ones to hand out when I eventually lose all the
> ones that I have now.
>
> On the minus side, this feeder isn't anywhere near as popular with the
> birds as the tube feeders. But maybe I just need patience... When I
> added peanut splits to my wintertime menu, it took 2 whole years
> before I had *any* serious takers. Now, not only woodpeckers and blue
> jays, but cardinals and the little guys (chickadees, titmice,
> nuthatches) gobble them up. They also eat a lot fewer sunflower seeds.
> Maybe I was just first in the neighborhood to offer peanuts. And maybe
> I'm first in the neighborhood to have a flat hummingbird feeder. Only
> time will tell. The problem is that, as a senior, time is my enemy.
>
> And, here, I hope, is my little guy... my first customer at the new
> feeder... waiting out that big noisy thunderstorm.
>
>
>
>> On Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 9:21 PM Susan Horvath <shorvath...> wrote:
>>
>> I've been using *only* Perky Pet feeders with bee guards for many
>> years... because in late summer we also have yellowjackets. Hummers
>> seem to know that they will "lose" any confrontations with the
>> yellowjackets, so quit coming. 3-4 years ago, Perky Pet changed the
>> design of the bee guards. The nice thing is that they can now be
>> opened up and thoroughly cleaned with a toothbrush. Bad thing, though,
>> that something happened when the feeder was redesigned with the moat
>> on top. The bottom appears mostly the same, but sugar water started
>> pooling under the bee-guards. First year with that design was sorta
>> ok. Don't know what changed, but last year, the yellowjackets had a
>> field day. Obviously, the hummers did not. I got fed up enough with
>> the dripping on the concrete below, that I finally called Perky Pet
>> to complain. Turned out that they were getting lots of complaints and
>> were supposedly making some design changes. Website shows that they've
>> changed the perches below the flowers. That might mean that the
>> perches will be less likely to break when the whole feeder gets
>> knocked down (as has happened to me several times over the years), but
>> the bee-guards and the flowers look the same in the pictures as
>> before. Only time will tell if they've made some subtle change to stop
>> the pooling at the bottom of the flowers. Last year I started actively
>> searching for a different feeder. I haven't seen *any* that have a
>> prayer of a chance against my yellowjackets.
>>
>>> On Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 7:32 PM Patricia Burden <tallerpat526...> wrote:
>>>
>>> I would like to put my two cents in here. We purchased the Small High
>>> Perch Hummingbird feeder from Wild Birds Unlimited and I love it. (I
>>> have no financial interest in any WBU enterprise; I just like this
>>> feeder a LOT). They also make a regular and large size. There are no
>>> yellow flowers on these feeders. The yellow flowers have been said to
>>> attract bees. I also have another small feeder (Perky Pet, maybe?)
>>> that has yellow flowers and last year I did notice bees on that one;
>>> few to no bees on the WBU feeder. I like the small one because it only
>>> holds a cup of nectar so I am forced to clean it and refill it more
>>> often. It is very easy to clean - there are no parts you can't get to.
>>> Since at least in my yard I normally have a male standing guard over
>>> my feeder, I can put another one out of his sightline and not feel
>>> like I am wasting a lot of nectar. One hangs where I can sit beneath
>>> it on my deck and with the clear bottom, I can watch the hummingbird's
>>> tongue move in and out of the nectar. And with the high perch, it is
>>> very easy to get a clear look at any bird that perches on it. I would
>>> highly recommend it!
>>> Pat Burden
>>> Melvin & Yale, MI
>>>
>>> On Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 4:42 PM Lisa Lava-Kellar <lisalk...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> What do you suggest? One of my feeders needs to be replaced, and I'm open to your suggestions.
>>>> Thanks to each of you!
>>>> Lisa
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>>>> ---
>>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
>>>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
>>>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAKTXQU-%3DXHsp4hw-90uV7mxZe%<2BUKZ0qpatdhsDGTzKemyHtuFQ...>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
>>> ---
>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
>>> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
>>> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAD76NUGfSHMPiPxDhm87Tz-Cs6_cVtjKrCAJQxtDHc%2B%<2BkvDZTw...>
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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Back to top
Date: 9/7/20 4:13 pm
From: Susan Horvath <shorvath...>
Subject: Re: [birders] best hummer feeders - follow-up to April discussion
There have been several variations to the best-hummingbird-feeder
query this summer and several incidental photos of styles other than
the glass tube style that I have always used. Someone recently
described their Wild Birds Unlimited flat feeder in glowing terms. So
here's my story:

The WBU folks guaranteed that their flat feeders, especially the
Pagoda High Perch, are completely bee/yellowjacket proof. So, I bought
one and put it out.

I usually have 3 Perky Pets: 2 on the morning-sun side of the house
and 1 on the afternoon-sun side. All hang from the house soffits and
have solid gray umbrella baffles directly over them for added sun &
weather protection. So, the beginning of May, I put *only* the new WBU
flat feeder on the sunny side. No Perky Pets anywhere. Note that
several of my neighbors also have multiple hummingbird feeders.
Eventually I get a male who figures it out... and he defends it from
others... but he doesn't come very often.

One of the selling points of the flat feeder is that the hummers can
see every direction, i.e. better ability to spot danger or
competition. No glass tube that they can't really see through. Sure
enough, during a major June thunderstorm (photo below), he showed up
to wait out the storm. He wasn't feeding. Just waiting... feeling safe
& dry with our house above and behind him and a full view of the rest
of the world around him.

But the sugar-water level just wasn't going down, so I finally put the
(older non-leaking) Perky Pets up on the other side of the house.
Guess what: lots of business!! At this point, I've still never seen a
female at the flat feeder, even though the male is hardly ever there.
The females are busy incubating then hunting and feeding insects to
their young, so maybe it's ok... but still...

August comes, and eventually I notice that the flat feeder is emptying
faster... and I'm seeing females! Finally! But the Perky Pets still
empty much faster, even though the males are heading south.

On the plus side, no sign of bees & yellowjackets. Part of the WBU
selling point for this particular feeder is that it money-back
guarantees that yellowjackets can't defeat it. And I believe them. The
portholes to the sugar water in the base have 2 prongs on the under
side. Optional "nectar guard tips" come with the feeder. They are tiny
tiny clear soft plastic cups that fit over the prongs. The bottom of
the cups have x-shaped cuts so that the hummer beaks easily push
through but that bees/etc have no way of defeating. The only problem
is that I'm a senior with a little less dexterity and vision than I
had when I was young. Hanging onto these cups and attaching them isn't
all that easy. Even harder is washing them w/o losing them... which is
probably why the box includes extras. And WBU, being who they are, I'm
sure will have free ones to hand out when I eventually lose all the
ones that I have now.

On the minus side, this feeder isn't anywhere near as popular with the
birds as the tube feeders. But maybe I just need patience... When I
added peanut splits to my wintertime menu, it took 2 whole years
before I had *any* serious takers. Now, not only woodpeckers and blue
jays, but cardinals and the little guys (chickadees, titmice,
nuthatches) gobble them up. They also eat a lot fewer sunflower seeds.
Maybe I was just first in the neighborhood to offer peanuts. And maybe
I'm first in the neighborhood to have a flat hummingbird feeder. Only
time will tell. The problem is that, as a senior, time is my enemy.

And, here, I hope, is my little guy... my first customer at the new
feeder... waiting out that big noisy thunderstorm.



On Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 9:21 PM Susan Horvath <shorvath...> wrote:
>
> I've been using *only* Perky Pet feeders with bee guards for many
> years... because in late summer we also have yellowjackets. Hummers
> seem to know that they will "lose" any confrontations with the
> yellowjackets, so quit coming. 3-4 years ago, Perky Pet changed the
> design of the bee guards. The nice thing is that they can now be
> opened up and thoroughly cleaned with a toothbrush. Bad thing, though,
> that something happened when the feeder was redesigned with the moat
> on top. The bottom appears mostly the same, but sugar water started
> pooling under the bee-guards. First year with that design was sorta
> ok. Don't know what changed, but last year, the yellowjackets had a
> field day. Obviously, the hummers did not. I got fed up enough with
> the dripping on the concrete below, that I finally called Perky Pet
> to complain. Turned out that they were getting lots of complaints and
> were supposedly making some design changes. Website shows that they've
> changed the perches below the flowers. That might mean that the
> perches will be less likely to break when the whole feeder gets
> knocked down (as has happened to me several times over the years), but
> the bee-guards and the flowers look the same in the pictures as
> before. Only time will tell if they've made some subtle change to stop
> the pooling at the bottom of the flowers. Last year I started actively
> searching for a different feeder. I haven't seen *any* that have a
> prayer of a chance against my yellowjackets.
>
> On Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 7:32 PM Patricia Burden <tallerpat526...> wrote:
> >
> > I would like to put my two cents in here. We purchased the Small High
> > Perch Hummingbird feeder from Wild Birds Unlimited and I love it. (I
> > have no financial interest in any WBU enterprise; I just like this
> > feeder a LOT). They also make a regular and large size. There are no
> > yellow flowers on these feeders. The yellow flowers have been said to
> > attract bees. I also have another small feeder (Perky Pet, maybe?)
> > that has yellow flowers and last year I did notice bees on that one;
> > few to no bees on the WBU feeder. I like the small one because it only
> > holds a cup of nectar so I am forced to clean it and refill it more
> > often. It is very easy to clean - there are no parts you can't get to.
> > Since at least in my yard I normally have a male standing guard over
> > my feeder, I can put another one out of his sightline and not feel
> > like I am wasting a lot of nectar. One hangs where I can sit beneath
> > it on my deck and with the clear bottom, I can watch the hummingbird's
> > tongue move in and out of the nectar. And with the high perch, it is
> > very easy to get a clear look at any bird that perches on it. I would
> > highly recommend it!
> > Pat Burden
> > Melvin & Yale, MI
> >
> > On Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 4:42 PM Lisa Lava-Kellar <lisalk...> wrote:
> > >
> > > What do you suggest? One of my feeders needs to be replaced, and I'm open to your suggestions.
> > > Thanks to each of you!
> > > Lisa
> > >
> > > --
> > > Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
> > > ---
> > > You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
> > > To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
> > > To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAKTXQU-%3DXHsp4hw-90uV7mxZe%<2BUKZ0qpatdhsDGTzKemyHtuFQ...>
> >
> > --
> > Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
> > ---
> > You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
> > To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
> > To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/CAD76NUGfSHMPiPxDhm87Tz-Cs6_cVtjKrCAJQxtDHc%2B%<2BkvDZTw...>

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Date: 9/7/20 3:47 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (07 Sep 2020) 9 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 07, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 0 0 0
Bald Eagle 1 1 1
Northern Harrier 0 9 9
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 5 5
Cooper's Hawk 0 4 4
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 1 2 2
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 1 56 56
Merlin 3 6 6
Peregrine Falcon 2 4 4
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1

Total: 9 90 90
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
After quite a thunderstorm last night, our day on the tower was hot and
muggy. Thankfully, a full cloud cover kept the sun at bay most of the time.
Once again, winds blew from the South and later the South-East and provided
a cool breeze when gusts pushed through the tree barrier around the tower.


Raptor Observations:
It seems as though the hawks observed the Labour day holiday and refuse to
work today. Only 9 raptors graced us their presence, and it was an
interesting 9 raptors including; 3 Merlins, 2 Peregine Falcons, a
Red-tailed Hawk, a Sharp-shinned Hawk, a Bald Eagle, and a single American
Kestrel. To entertain us between migrants, the local Ospreys actively
called and chased each other for the better part of the day.

Non-raptor Observations:
Similarly to the hawks, many birds also decided to take the day off. What
we lacked in quantity made up with quality as we spotted another round of
warblers at the base of the tower including; Wilson's Warblers, Northern
Waterthrush, and Chestnut-sided Warblers. We also counted many Warbling and
Red-eyed Vireos, a Philadelphia, and Yellow-throated Vireo.
A few Solitary and Spotted Sandpipers flew over the marsh and we counted
our first Bonaparte's Gulls of the season. Our marsh highlight came from
the passing of a Common Loon flying to the East in the mid-morning.
Purple Martins made a strong showing today, and a dozen Chimney Swifts
could be seen mixed in the flocks of swallows.
And finally at the last minute of the count, a Common Nighthawk popped up
from behind the trees and bounced in the sky. A lovely sight to end the
day!
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73321340


Predictions:
I'm afraid that if I write this down, I will jinx it...but we are expecting
a full day of North-Eastern winds tomorrow! However, there is rain in the
forecast in the morning with the potential risk of a thunderstorm. We hope
the storm rolls in during the night and clears up by morning to give
raptors a chance to move towards the tower.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/7/20 1:12 pm
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Reminder: OAS Zoom Meeting/Program Tuesday Sept 8 and Nuthatch Open Sept 12. Everyone is invited
Tuesday, September 8, 2020 at 7:00 PM. The site will open at 6:30 PM so you
can log on early. See the Zoom invitation at the end of this email for
details to log into the program. "Preserving Michigan's Dark Sky Heritage"
will be a Zoom presentation by Sally Oey. When you step outside at night,
do you see stars? The natural darkness of night is quickly vanishing and
with it the natural nocturnal ecosystem. This has profound consequences for
flora and fauna, including for human health. Yet much of the artificial
light at night is unintended light pollution. This presentation will
explain the problem and the simple steps everyone can take to help preserve
and restore Michigan's unique dark sky resources. You do not have to be a
member to participate.

Also note: The 9th annual Nuthatch Open will take place Saturday September
12th from 12:01am - 4pm, followed by an awards ceremony at 6pm via Zoom.
See our website for details about this fun competitive birding event and a
registration form. (Entry fees have been waived and no cookout will take
place for 2020).

You are now able to watch past programs by clicking on the links available
on the Meetings Page (https://www.oaklandaudubon.org/meetings) on our
website. Future programs will be made available as well.

Please check our Website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) and/or Facebook (
http://www.facebook.com/oaklandaudubon) for updates, news, events and
information about becoming an OAS member.

Phil Bugosh

Topic: Oakland Audubon Society Program Meeting
Time: Sep 8, 2020 06:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
“Preserving Michigan’s Dark Sky Heritage” with Sally Oney
Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86917074582?pwd=TlpOMEtDd2dCSEhqVVh0Ylk3dFV1Zz09
Meeting ID: 869 1707 4582
Passcode: 408996
One tap mobile
+13017158592,,86917074582#,,,,,,0#,,408996# US (Germantown)
+13126266799,,86917074582#,,,,,,0#,,408996# US (Chicago)
Dial by your location
+1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
Meeting ID: 869 1707 4582
Passcode: 408996
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kbGqLJsg8m

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Date: 9/7/20 9:45 am
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3...>
Subject: [birders] 2020 Fall Bird Banding Blog updated
Birders and Banders,

The fall 2020 bird banding season (songbirds and hummingbirds) began in
early August, and I have updated my blog with detailed results and a few
photo highlights from the month. You can view this page using this link:

http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/p/blog-page.html

Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: <amazilia3...>
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website/Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/

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Date: 9/6/20 6:15 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (06 Sep 2020) 18 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 06, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 9 9
Osprey 1 3 3
Bald Eagle 3 10 10
Northern Harrier 4 8 8
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 4 4
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 1 3 3
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 3 10 10
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 5 17 17
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 18 65 65
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
A dull day throughout, with gray clouds taking the luster off the holiday
weekend; we watched a progression of cloud formations gradually darken the
day until we called it a little early due to rain. We had watched
impressive cumulus clouds build up over the lake and move inland as an
early SE wind seemed to push them from their normal post over the south
shore of Lake Erie. At times the sky resembled the inverted furrows of a
recently plowed field but it settled on a dark thick cloud mass that must
have been turning on a few lights controlled by photocells. The barometer
had been forecast to fall during the day but it was only by a tenth of an
inch by the time we left. The winds settled in the south and stayed there
although in our sheltered area it was not felt by the observers.

Raptor Observations:
We were seeing some fits and starts of movement today but nothing of real
substance. Harriers were the first out of the blocks, counting as our first
two birds and totaling four by day’s end. Kestrels continue to fly with
five counted. Only one sharp-shinned was noted, somehow it seems that we
should have had a few more by now, but it is still early. Three bald eagles
pumped their way through. One osprey joined them. One broad-winged hawk
made the trip acting as a scout for the thousands to hopefully come later
this month.

Non-raptor Observations:
We did observe two Forster’s terns today. We usually see these birds as
constant companions so it’s a little unusual to see them in such low
numbers. Our blue-winged teals landed in front of us today, until they
realized their mistake. An Eastern phoebe sat close by for a couple of
minutes. Plenty of martins and swallows continue to work the area although
a little further away today. Yellowlegs were seen again today. Occasional
great blue herons and great egrets continue to fly over the area.

Predictions:
The turbulent conditions that make weather predictions so difficult will
continue tomorrow with early a.m. rains predicted and a low barometer in
the morning. A lot of the predicted happenings are off by a few hours and
that can make a difference in bird movement. Most of the extreme wind and
weather conditions should occur overnight but the afternoon conditions of
rising barometer and a westerly wind moving to NW late in the evening may
provoke some movement.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/6/20 5:24 pm
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Male hummer
Barb,

There are still a few adult males around, although probably 90% of them
have migrated already.

Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: <amazilia3...>
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website/Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/



On Sun, Sep 6, 2020 at 7:53 PM 'Barbara' via Birders <
<birders...> wrote:

> I was surprised to see a male hummingbird still visiting my feeder.
> BarbJ l
> Northwest Livonia
>
> Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
> Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com
>
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> www.glc.org
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> email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
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> https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<1488390114.2935793.1599436419891...>
> <https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<1488390114.2935793.1599436419891...>?utm_medium=email&utm_source=footer>
> .
>

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Date: 9/6/20 4:53 pm
From: 'Barbara' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Male hummer
I was surprised to see a male hummingbird still visiting my feeder.
BarbJ lNorthwest Livonia

Sent from AOL Mobile Mail
Get the new AOL app: mail.mobile.aol.com

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Date: 9/6/20 4:19 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (06 Sep 2020) 14 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 06, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 0 0 0
Bald Eagle 0 0 0
Northern Harrier 0 9 9
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 4 4
Cooper's Hawk 1 4 4
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 13 55 55
Merlin 0 3 3
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1

Total: 14 81 81
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Bob Hall-Brooks, Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Noel Herdman

Visitors:
Thank you to Noel Herdman and Bob Hall-Brooks for their help counting.
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
A cooler day on the tower with a full cloud cover for most of the day.
These clouds did bring us a drizzle of rain in the afternoon only lasting
45 minutes. For the first two hours of the count, winds blew from the North
only to swing around to the East and the South by the end of the day. We
are still waiting for the days of consistent Northern winds.

Raptor Observations:
Quite the lazy Sunday on the tower with only 14 raptors flying over. For 30
minutes in the morning we had a small frenzy of 6 American Kestrels coming
quickly one after the other. After that, the rest of the Kestrels migrated
hours apart. A Cooper's Hawk was our last migrant of the day, and flew West
after a small disagreement with the local Peregrine Falcon.

Non-raptor Observations:
Though we wish for daytime Northern winds, the North winds from last night
pushed many warblers to the base of the tower. We counted 17 species of
warblers included but not limited to; Northern Waterthrush, Prothonotary
Warbler, Tennessee Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler,
Blackpoll Warbler, Pine Warbler, and Wilson's Warbler. Vireos also wandered
through including Yellow-throated vireos and Philadelphia vireos.
On the marsh we spotted a few Common Gallinules, Blue-winged Teals, and
Spotted Sandpipers.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73277184

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting a warm and muggy day with a chance of showers in
the morning. The winds are expected to blow from the South-West and West
later in the day. Given the slower start to the season, we are simply
hoping for few raptors. Maybe we'll count 20 tomorrow, fingers crossed!
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/6/20 3:11 pm
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: Global Shorebird Counts, Sep. 3 - 9, 2020
Begin forwarded message:

> From: Gyorgy Szimuly/World Shorebirds Day <shorebirdsday...>
> Date: August 22, 2020 at 4:20:26 PM EDT
> To: <mseft...>
> Subject: Global Shorebird Counts 2020
> Reply-To: <shorebirdsday...>
>
> 
> View this email in your browser
>
> The Global Shorebird Counts 2020 Covid-19 Pandemic Statement
> In the year of restrictions and losses birding communities have been facing new challenges all over the world. Bird conservation projects have been compromised and studies have been suspended in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.
>
> As life slowly returns in our everydays, we give it a try to organise a little different World Shorebirds Day and the popular Global Shorebird Counts.
>
> Organisers of the Global Shorebird Counts DO NOT encourage local organisers for large gatherings and joint birding walks, but rather encourages individual efforts. Social distancing, the frequently used term, is not followed in most places, but we have to make efforts to make it happen. The virus is still around and we have to act accordingly and responsibly to stop its spreading. If not for us, then for others, especially for the elderly birding communities.
>
>
> The Global Shorebird Counts 2020: The Kick-off
> As usual, the counts are covering a whole week to give participants a chance to visit as many different locations as possible. In 2020 the counts are carried out between 3–9 September and you can choose any of the days during the counting week.
>
> It highly recommended not to do multiple counts from the same location but explore new ones, if travels and time allow.
>
> As in previous years, our blog will provide further details as we enter the counting week. In the meantime, you can sign up to our old-fashioned email community mail list or follow our Facebook page. Last year I launched a new website as well so the information can come your way from many directions.
>
> Use our communication channels
> Subscribe to our email list:
> <shorebirdsday...>
>
> Follow our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/worldshorebirdsday
>
> Follow our Twitter feed at:https://twitter.com/ShorebirdsDay
>
> Share your World Shorebirds Day or Global Shorebird Counts related photos on Instagram using the hashtag ##worldshorebirdsday
> Visit our Insta profile is at https://www.instagram.com/worldshorebirdsday/
>
> Send us an e-mail: <shorebirdsday...>
>
> Visit our website at https://www.worldshorebirdsday.org
>
>
> Winner of last year
> In the next two weeks, we will make a draw to choose the winner of last years counts, and shortly after we set a new price for some lucky participants of this year's counts. In the meantime have look at the new contest of WHSRN.
>
> Stay tuned for more.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Copyright © 2020 World Shorebirds Day, All rights reserved.
> You are receiving this e-mail because you subscribed on the World Shorebirds Day website.
>
> Our mailing address is:
> World Shorebirds Day
> Bletchley
> Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire MK2
> United Kingdom
>
> Add us to your address book
>
>
> Want to change how you receive these emails?
> You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list.
>
>

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Date: 9/6/20 5:34 am
From: Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Non-bird: Ann Arbor, MI, USA - BirdCast Alerts

Friday and Saturday morning were pretty good at Kensington with Friday being the best.

Pat B. Howell, Michigan

On Saturday, September 5, 2020, 07:17:20 PM EDT, 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...> wrote:


https://alert.birdcast.info/birdcast?<latLng...>,-83.7430378&locName=Ann%20Arbor,%20MI,%20USA


Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 9/5/20 8:28 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (05 Sep 2020) 17 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 05, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 9 9
Osprey 0 2 2
Bald Eagle 3 7 7
Northern Harrier 4 4 4
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 3 3
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 2 2
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 6 7 7
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 3 12 12
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 1 1 1
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 17 47 47
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
A very dark gray sky met us this morning with brisk temps in the 50’s,
it was only the glint of a golden lining off in the distant east that
assured us that the sun had indeed risen two hours before. The day
progressed with alternate periods of cloud and sun requiring occasional
wardrobe adjustments as the sun played hide and seek and the clouds seemed
unable to make up their mind as to their intent: white and puffy at times,
purple and threatening at others. The barometer was steady at 30.2” until
the last hours of the watch when it dropped as the skies thickened and
darkened. The wind turbines in Canada were not stirring during the first
hours but eventually they responded to a rising breeze. Later in the day,
the winds aloft seemed to be strong and from a different direction than
those at ground level, neither seemed to match the forecast WSW very well.

Raptor Observations:
We had a better day today with birds that seemed to have migration on their
mind and nothing else, flying in straight lines in the correct direction.
The birds that came seemed to be concentrated in a couple of short time
periods. That left long periods of no birds as we have become accustomed to
this year so far. We counted three bald eagles, six red-tails, and three
kestrels. We poached four harriers, including one gray ghost, from our
friends at Holiday Beach today. They usually are located in the favored
route for that species. It was good to see them again as they are the first
we have had this year. We also had one unidentified buteo that was lost in
the haze and we could not determine whether it was a red-tail or a
broad-winged hawk. It went into a long glide that both species do, giving
us little to go on with a distant, hazy, profile shot.

Non-raptor Observations:
The gulls were plentiful today, both in kettles and “migrating” back
and forth to better feeding grounds as they are wont to do. We did see a
couple of flights of yellowlegs and at the end of the day a single pectoral
sandpiper landed on the floating vegetation joining a yellowlegs for a few
moments. I’m not sure if there was pigeon race today but we saw a few
flocks in the morning. A few hummingbirds were observed racing by. The
Caspian terns were on the other side of the channel for the most part.
Three blue-winged teal sped by in the morning. The mixed swallows, swifts
and martins continued their relentless quest to rid the skies of insects.

Predictions:
Tomorrow looks to have increasing cloudiness with steadily rising winds
from the SSE as the weather will threaten thunderstorms on Monday morning.
The barometer should fall sharply as the morning progresses. Whether any
birds choose to fly into this low pressure system is up to them but they
generally try to avoid stormy weather so it may be another long day for the
counters.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/5/20 4:58 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (05 Sep 2020) 8 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 05, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 0 0 0
Bald Eagle 0 0 0
Northern Harrier 1 9 9
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 4 4
Cooper's Hawk 0 3 3
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 7 42 42
Merlin 0 3 3
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 1 1

Total: 8 67 67
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent, Noel Herdman

Visitors:
We appreciate all the interest in the tower and the hawk watch but remind
everyone that the tower remains closed to members of the public and has a
three-person limit reserved for the Hawk Counters. Thank you to all who are
respecting these precautions. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
Cooler start to the day with dark clouds looming over the marsh for the
better part of the morning. After a few hours, breaks between the cloud let
in the sun to warm up the air. The wind played tricks with us all day,
starting off blowing from the West in the morning, switching to the
South-West, then from the South-East for an hour and back to South for the
last hour, bringing with it menacing black clouds. Thankfully none of these
dark cloud brought any rain.

Raptor Observations:
Slow day for us on the today with only 8 raptors migrating over. Once again
the majority of raptors were American Kestrels apart from a juvenile
Northern Harrier gently flying over the marsh. Even the local Ospreys, Bald
Eagles, and Peregrine Falcons were not as active as the last few days. We
are still waiting patiently for our first Broad-winged Hawks, who seem to
have discovered the Detroit River Hawk Watch and not Holiday Beach just
yet. Guess we will have to wait a little longer, but it will be worth it!

Non-raptor Observations:
Today's highlight was... a Great Horned Owl! The gorgeous bird was spotted
in the trees to the North-East of the tower and we used our scopes to get a
clear view since it was so well camouflaged. This is 10th sighting of a GHO
at Holiday Beach during the hawk count, making it quite a special
observation.
Apart from the owl, we had a plentiful group of passerines pass through
including Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Baltimore Oriole, Prothonotary Warbler,
Tennessee Warbler, Northern Parula, Black-throated Blue and Green Warblers,
Wilson's Warbler, to name a just few.
Not as many swallows and Chimney Swifts, or Hummingbirds today. But Cedar
Waxwings and American Goldfinches are still very active.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73231744

Predictions:
Once again, overnight winds from the North tonight, which may bring us some
passerines during the day. The Northern winds may stay for a few hours in
the early morning but will quickly turn to the South-East for the rest of
the day. Apart from the wind it should be a pleasant day on the tower.
Waiting for the arrival of Sharp-shinned Hawks and of course more American
Kestrels.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/5/20 4:17 pm
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: Ann Arbor, MI, USA - BirdCast Alerts

https://alert.birdcast.info/birdcast?<latLng...>,-83.7430378&locName=Ann%20Arbor,%20MI,%20USA


Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 9/5/20 9:23 am
From: Eve Wilson <evew...>
Subject: [birders] 114 Monarchs in 45 minutes!
Sitting in the beach in East Traverse Bay in the East side, a steady stream of monarch butterflies migrated by. I counted 114 in about 45 minutes before I had to go inside. Most were over the water but not all. 3 pair of them were being very flirty, twining and playing together. It lightened my heart and my day.
Eve
Kewadin MI

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 9/4/20 7:29 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2020) 7 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 04, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 1 9 9
Osprey 0 2 2
Bald Eagle 1 4 4
Northern Harrier 0 0 0
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 3 3
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 2 2 2
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 2 9 9
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 7 30 30
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 6 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on HawkCount.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs. If you do
decide to join us in person, please help the counter and volunteers to
follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from approaching them.
Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by wearing a mask and
maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in advance for your
cooperation. Stay safe!


Weather:
There was a hint of fall in the weather that greeted us this morning. The
temperatures had dropped into the sixties and the high barometric pressure
had cleared the air of clouds and humidity. Unfortunately, the wind did not
have a sufficient amount of the northern element that we were hoping for.
It remained persistently from the west as it grew in strength through the
day, moderating towards the end of the watch into high single digits. The
sky was filling with cumulus clouds as we called an end to the day. For the
most part we had a high blue clear sky devoid of both clouds and migrating
raptors. A day that had potential in some aspects did not deliver.

Raptor Observations:
We saw plenty of local birds taking advantage of the free lift that the
wind provided. Eagles, osprey and turkey vultures took advantage soaring
where the winds took them. For most of the day, there was a blank canvas
in front of us waiting to be filled. We did count one bald eagle, one
turkey vulture, one sharp-shinned, and two kestrels. Then as if to reward
us for our diligence during the day we saw our first pair of broad-winged
hawks. The September object of our desire had finally arrived, albeit in
disappointing numbers.

Non-raptor Observations:
Caspian terns and ring-billed gulls were observed, the terns diving into
the waters, the gulls in high kettles. Pied-billed grebes were finding
plenty of small fish to fill their bellies. A flight of killdeers were seen
flying overhead. A Virginia rail was observed with a very small offspring
on the boardwalk near the watch site. Four blue-winged teal flew by at
their usual rapid pace. Perhaps our prize bird of the non-raptors, one
common nighthawk was observed in the mid-afternoon hours. Plenty of
swallows, swifts, and martins were hawking insects in the skies around us.

Predictions:
Tomorrow should visually resemble today’s final hour with sunny skies
interspersed with clouds. The winds will be more moderate with single digit
strength but moving more to the south, predicted as WSW. Although this is
not our favorite wind, perhaps the softer strength will allow the first
migrants of the season to stay closer to our site. We have not had as many
as we would have liked but patience is a virtue, or so they tell me.
Barometer will be climbing a little higher and stay in the go zone.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/4/20 6:27 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (04 Sep 2020) 26 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 04, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 0 0 0
Bald Eagle 0 0 0
Northern Harrier 4 8 8
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 4 4
Cooper's Hawk 0 3 3
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 21 35 35
Merlin 0 3 3
Peregrine Falcon 0 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 1 1 1

Total: 26 59 59
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Thank you to all the visitors who had quick conversations with counters
from the base of the tower. We thank you for your understanding of the
three-person limitation of the tower at this moment. Stay safe everyone!


Weather:
Incredibly pleasant weather on the tower today, the type that we all wish
we could have during the entire count. Winds blew from the West all day,
keeping the clouds at bay, and leaving us to work with a clear blue sky.

Raptor Observations:
The American Kestrel was our main flyer today, coming in at 21 migrants. A
few Northern Harriers made an appearance, including our first male "Gray
Ghost" of the season! As the afternoon wore on, most birds were flying very
high and getting lost in the clear blue sky, particularly non-migrating
Ospreys and Bald Eagles.
Additionally, we were entertained by two Peregrine Falcons chasing each
other and anything that flew too close to them over the marsh.

Non-raptor Observations:
Well the overnight Northern winds expected to bring in passerines did not
deliver, but we spot a few warblers including a Prothonotary Warbler, a
Wilson's Warbler, and a Black-and-White Warbler.
In the morning, continuous flocks of swallows and swifts passed over the
tower and we ended the day with 162 Chimney Swifts! Our other numerous
migrants were Cedar Waxwings (228 individuals), and American Goldfinches
(207 individuals).
The marsh is home to many Great Egrets, Great Blue Herons, Green Herons,
and today we added the Black-crowned Night-Heron to that list. We are also
counting a flocks of shorebirds, such as Killdeer and Yellowlegs passing
over the water.
Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73191503

Predictions:
Tomorrow we expecting another pleasant day on the tower, with temperature
in the mid 20 degrees Celsius and winds from the West for most of the day.
We are hoping to see more American Kestrels and maybe start to see more
Accipiters such as Sharp-shinned Hawks and Cooper's Hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/4/20 5:45 pm
From: 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Major Migration Alert
That's definitely a question for Cornell Labs. I just forwarded the info to the group. I wish I knew more.
 Melissa PappasHamburg Township, Livingston County, MI
"One can get in a car and see what man has made. One must get on a horse to see what God has made."  ~ Author Unknown     

On Friday, September 4, 2020, 08:30:19 PM EDT, WayneF <waynef...> wrote:

I have a question about the birdcast displays. It shows very heavy migration across the prairie states. I also saw that last May. What kind of  birds have that much migration across Nebraska in May? I know that waterfowl often take that route, but May seems late for them.
Birdcast showed a very strong migration from Texas straight north to Canada. What is that?
Wayne Fisher

On Sep 3, 2020, at 6:56 AM, 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> wrote:



I  know many of you probably get this, but just in case...
Migration Alert: Major Flight for 3-4 September 2020 - BirdCast


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Migration Alert: Major Flight for 3-4 September 2020 - BirdCast

More than 200 million migrants will be aloft this evening over the US. These massive movements present some uniq...
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 Melissa PappasHamburg Township, Livingston County, MI


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Date: 9/4/20 5:30 pm
From: WayneF <waynef...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Major Migration Alert
I have a question about the birdcast displays. It shows very heavy migration across the prairie states. I also saw that last May. What kind of birds have that much migration across Nebraska in May? I know that waterfowl often take that route, but May seems late for them.

Birdcast showed a very strong migration from Texas straight north to Canada. What is that?

Wayne Fisher

> On Sep 3, 2020, at 6:56 AM, 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...> wrote:
>
> 
> I know many of you probably get this, but just in case...
> Migration Alert: Major Flight for 3-4 September 2020 - BirdCast
>
> Migration Alert: Major Flight for 3-4 September 2020 - BirdCast
> More than 200 million migrants will be aloft this evening over the US. These massive movements present some uniq...
>
>
>
>
> Melissa Pappas
> Hamburg Township, Livingston County, MI
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
> ---
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Birders" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to birders+<unsubscribe...>
> To view this discussion on the web visit https://groups.google.com/a/great-lakes.net/d/msgid/birders/<1574447994.133392.1599130579313...>

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Date: 9/4/20 2:28 am
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Nuthatch Open September 12
The 9th annual Nuthatch Open will take place Saturday September 12th from
12:01am - 4pm, followed by an awards ceremony at 6pm via Zoom.
This is Oakland Audubon Society's annual fun competitive birding event.
Teams find as many species as possible anywhere in Oakland County until
4:00 PM. Teams consist of 2 to 4 members in either the adult or youth
division. See our website for details and a registration form. (Entry fees
have been waived and no cookout will take place for 2020) You do not have
to be a member to participate.

Reminder: Tuesday, September 8, 2020 at 7:00 PM. "Preserving Michigan's
Dark Sky Heritage" will be a Zoom presentation by Sally Oey.

Please check our Website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) and/or Facebook (
http://www.facebook.com/oaklandaudubon) for updates, news, events and
information about becoming an OAS member.

Phil Bugosh

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Date: 9/3/20 7:24 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2020) 8 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 03, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 8 8
Osprey 0 2 2
Bald Eagle 2 3 3
Northern Harrier 0 0 0
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 2 2
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 5 7 7
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 8 23 23
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on Hawk Count.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs.
If you do decide to join us in person, please help the counter and
volunteers to follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from
approaching them. Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by
wearing a mask and maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in
advance for your cooperation. Stay safe!



Weather:
The signs did not look good today with us sitting in the tail end of a low
pressure system passing through. There was a front coming in that looked to
pass mostly to the north of us but it caused the barometer to drop through
the day. The skies looked inviting with high cirrus at first followed by
blue skies sparsely populated with small cumulus clouds. The winds shifted
to the southwest and grew in intensity helping our comfort level if nothing
else. All in all, it was a pleasant day to look at but of little reward in
terms of migrating raptors

Raptor Observations:
The increasing winds brought out the local inhabitants to fly. Bald eagles
were seen frequently, covering miles as they soared on the fresh winds. A
number of ospreys were observed. We are not sure yet how many locals we
have but it certainly is quite a few. One was observed in a form of crazy
flying, flipping over three times in a row similar to eagle’s talon
grabbing maneuvers. Kestrels have been our most common of the small
migrants so far with five being counted today. Only one sharp-shinned made
the list today. We did count a couple of bald eagles today.

Non-raptor Observations:
Gulls, Caspian Terns and mixed swallows provided most of the entertainment
today. Of interest was a juvenile red-headed woodpecker that flew over.
There are a mix of warblers in the hedgerow behind us although our eyes are
usually pointed in another direction. Pied-billed grebes were still
observed and will probably stay for some time. Killdeer and Lesser
Yellowlegs were our shorebird reps today.

Predictions:
Tomorrow looks to be a better day. The low will have passed during the
night bringing NW winds and a rising barometer. Given that it is the early
days of the watch it will be interesting to see if the birds respond to
what might be good conditions for them to move.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/3/20 4:05 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (03 Sep 2020) 15 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 03, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 0 0 0
Bald Eagle 0 0 0
Northern Harrier 2 4 4
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 4 4
Cooper's Hawk 2 3 3
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 8 14 14
Merlin 2 3 3
Peregrine Falcon 1 2 2
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 15 33 33
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Thank you to Noel Herdman for visiting to the tower in the afternoon. We
thank Noel and others for respecting the protocols put in place to keep our
counters safe by limiting the number of people on the top floor to three at
one time ad staying distanced. Be safe everyone!


Weather:
Hot and beautiful day on the tower today. The day started with a full cloud
cover, but the clouds dissipated in the early afternoon letting the
temperature rise to 30 degrees Celsius at its highest. Winds were blowing
from the South and South-West all day and created whitecaps on Lake Erie,
but that strong winds was not felt on the tower since we are blocked by
many trees.

Raptor Observations:
We counted 15 beautiful raptors today starting off with two Northern
Harriers in the morning. After that, the day belonged to the American
Kestrels, our most numerous raptor of the day. A few Merlins, two Cooper's
Hawks, and a Peregrine also flew over. Throughout the day, a dozen Turkey
Vultures wandered lazily over the marsh, not yet ready to migrate. Our
local Peregrine made an appearance to harass the resident Bald Eagles and
Ospreys.

Non-raptor Observations:
Vireos are on the move! Today we counted many Warbling, Red-eyed, and
Philadelphia Vireos fluttering at the base of the tower. Swallows are still
moving through, the majority today being Barn and Tree Swallows, and a few
Cliff Swallows. American Goldfinches and Cedar Waxwings are coming in
consistent numbers, and we welcome Chimney Swift and Ruby-throated
Hummingbirds with great excitement.
On the marsh the Great Egrets have increased their presence, but are still
low in numbers compared to Mute Swans and Double-crested Cormorants. Marsh
highlights include an American Bittern and a Dunlin spotted flying above
the marsh.
For full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73148332

Predictions:
We are expecting winds to shift to the North-West during the night only to
go back to the West for the day. Nightly Northern winds may bring warblers
to the tower, and Western winds in the day could bring us raptors such as
American Kestrels and Sharp-shinned Hawks.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/3/20 3:56 am
From: 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Major Migration Alert
I  know many of you probably get this, but just in case...
Migration Alert: Major Flight for 3-4 September 2020 - BirdCast


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|
| | |

|

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| |
Migration Alert: Major Flight for 3-4 September 2020 - BirdCast

More than 200 million migrants will be aloft this evening over the US. These massive movements present some uniq...
|

|

|




 Melissa PappasHamburg Township, Livingston County, MI

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Date: 9/2/20 7:54 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2020) 10 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 02, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 8 8 8
Osprey 1 2 2
Bald Eagle 0 1 1
Northern Harrier 0 0 0
Sharp-shinned Hawk 0 1 1
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 1 2 2
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 10 15 15
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on Hawk Count.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs.
If you do decide to join us in person, please help the counter and
volunteers to follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from
approaching them. Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by
wearing a mask and maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in
advance for your cooperation. Stay safe!




Weather:
Our first view of the sky this morning made me question the accuracy of the
forecast, (as I have many times before). Far from being cloudy and
potentially rainy as predicted, the skies were a pleasant blue with white
puffy clouds and I was glad I had applied the sunscreen. This was soon to
change as the hue turned to a lighter shade of gray which gradually
darkened and solidified for most of the day. The darkest hour in early
afternoon brought some light rain but heavier rainfalls could be seen over
the lake. The barometer was fairly steady but in a low range. Winds were
fresh and increasing from the west and held their strength until the mid
afternoon hours. We then had a respite of sorts after the rain as high
cirrus clouds replaced the solid low ceiling for the best part of an hour.
As we wrapped up the day puffy cumulus clouds were beginning to migrate in.

Raptor Observations:
The forecast did not bode well for raptors and we got what we expected.
There were some appearances by the usual suspects in the form of local
birds using the winds to stretch their wings but migrants seemed to be few
and far between. We did have a Kestrel zoom by for the second one of the
season. A few Turkey Vultures wafted by but did not seem especially
motivated. The Bald Eagles were well represented as these high wind
conditions are to their taste. A Red-tailed Hawk was observed soaring in an
aimless pattern.

Non-raptor Observations:
The Caspian Terns were center stage again today. We did spot one lone
Forster’s Tern riding the buoys but being evicted from time to time by
the Ring-billed Gulls who claimed pecking order seniority. It may be that
musical chairs was invented by birds as the frequently bump each other from
their favored perches. A pair of Lesser Yellowlegs passed over and one was
seen feeding on the floating vegetation today. The Pied-billed Grebes seem
to be converging again as at least five were seen together today. One was
observed struggling to down its catch in front of us, film at eleven. A
Common Loon was seen in the morning hours flying to the northwest as is
their normal flight path. During the lull in the middle of the day we
watched hummingbirds feeding at the trumpet vines behind us. Monarch
butterflies are coming in moderate numbers.



Predictions:
Tomorrow’s forecast shows an increasing wind to the low teens in strength
from the SSW during the watch hours but a falling barometric pressure. This
does not look that promising but the rebound on Friday with a rising
barometer and better winds may increase avian traffic at the site.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/2/20 7:51 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2020) 5 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 01, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 0 0
Osprey 1 1 1
Bald Eagle 1 1 1
Northern Harrier 0 0 0
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 1 1
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 1 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 1 1 1
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 5 5 5
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on Hawk Count.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs.
If you do decide to join us in person, please help the counter and
volunteers to follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from
approaching them. Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by
wearing a mask and maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in
advance for your cooperation. Stay safe!



Weather:
The forecast for the day did not look promising with potential scattered
thunderstorms predicted for a late afternoon arrival. A fairly robust
southerly wind had furled the lotus leaves in the channel causing them to
show their lighter underside for most of the day. It brought with it plenty
of humidity that hung in the air like a light veil as the sky alternated
views of billowing cumulus clouds with intervals of blue. Although there
were times when the weather looked mildly threatening, the storms did not
materialize and allowed us a full day of observation. The wind had enough
of an eastern element to blow off the lake and keep us comfortable in the
heat and humidity. The barometer did not fall as much as predicted but
trended downward at the end of the day.

Raptor Observations:
Most raptors seem reluctant to fly in the face of a strong southern wind
and today was no exception. We did see local birds with ospreys frequently
flying by and a few bald eagle sightings. Three turkey vultures were lazily
soaring in the area. We did see a red-tailed hawk for a few moments. A
surprise kestrel made the crossing. A local Cooper’s hawk teased the
photographers by flying over us a couple of times but not presenting his
best side to us.

Non-raptor Observations:
The Caspian Terns and gulls kept us entertained today. No Forster’s Terns
were seen today and normally they are present. A flight of mute swans was
seen over the tip of Celeron Island. Cedar Waxwings were observed hawking
insects a few times along with indefatigable barn swallows chasing tiny
unseen morsels. Small packs of red-winged blackbirds were seen winging
their way by. A couple of single blue jays were seen as a reminder of the
thousands to come later in the season. A Lesser Yellowlegs landed on the
mats of algae and vegetation in front of us, feeding as we wondered at its
ability to stand on such a precarious surface.

Predictions:
The unsettled weather may continue into the morning hours. The wind will
shift to the west and stay fresh, climbing into double digits as the day
advances. The barometer will be relatively low with chances of rain and
cloudy weather. Given that the early days of the watch are not generally
too productive and that the weather does not seem encouraging I would not
expect a large movement tomorrow.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/2/20 7:50 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Detroit River Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2020) 5 Raptors
Detroit River Hawk Watch
Brownstown, Michigan, USA
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 01, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Black Vulture 0 0 0
Turkey Vulture 0 0 0
Osprey 1 1 1
Bald Eagle 1 1 1
Northern Harrier 0 0 0
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 1 1
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Swainson's Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 1 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 1 1 1
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 5 5 5
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 08:00:00
Observation end time: 15:00:00
Total observation time: 7 hours

Official Counter: Kevin Georg

Observers: Andrew Sturgess, Rosemary Brady

Visitors:
While Lake Erie Metropark is currently open to the public, for the safety
of our counter and volunteers we encourage visitors to follow along with
the count virtually on Hawk Count.org, or our Detroit River Hawk Watch
Facebook page. There will be daily updates and photographs.
If you do decide to join us in person, please help the counter and
volunteers to follow their mandated safety protocols by refraining from
approaching them. Please follow the recommended Covid 19 procedures by
wearing a mask and maintaining a safe social distance. Thanking you in
advance for your cooperation. Stay safe!



Weather:
The forecast for the day did not look promising with potential scattered
thunderstorms predicted for a late afternoon arrival. A fairly robust
southerly wind had furled the lotus leaves in the channel causing them to
show their lighter underside for most of the day. It brought with it plenty
of humidity that hung in the air like a light veil as the sky alternated
views of billowing cumulus clouds with intervals of blue. Although there
were times when the weather looked mildly threatening, the storms did not
materialize and allowed us a full day of observation. The wind had enough
of an eastern element to blow off the lake and keep us comfortable in the
heat and humidity. The barometer did not fall as much as predicted but
trended downward at the end of the day.

Raptor Observations:
Most raptors seem reluctant to fly in the face of a strong southern wind
and today was no exception. We did see local birds with ospreys frequently
flying by and a few bald eagle sightings. Three turkey vultures were lazily
soaring in the area. We did see a red-tailed hawk for a few moments. A
surprise kestrel made the crossing. A local Cooper’s hawk teased the
photographers by flying over us a couple of times but not presenting his
best side to us.

Non-raptor Observations:
The Caspian Terns and gulls kept us entertained today. No Forster’s Terns
were seen today and normally they are present. A flight of mute swans was
seen over the tip of Celeron Island. Cedar Waxwings were observed hawking
insects a few times along with indefatigable barn swallows chasing tiny
unseen morsels. Small packs of red-winged blackbirds were seen winging
their way by. A couple of single blue jays were seen as a reminder of the
thousands to come later in the season. A Lesser Yellowlegs landed on the
mats of algae and vegetation in front of us, feeding as we wondered at its
ability to stand on such a precarious surface.

Predictions:
The unsettled weather may continue into the morning hours. The wind will
shift to the west and stay fresh, climbing into double digits as the day
advances. The barometer will be relatively low with chances of rain and
cloudy weather. Given that the early days of the watch are not generally
too productive and that the weather does not seem encouraging I would not
expect a large movement tomorrow.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Kevin Georg (<kevin.l.georg...>)
Detroit River Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://www.detroitriverhawkwatch.org


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=285


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Date: 9/2/20 5:29 pm
From: Chipperatl10 <chipperatl10...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Night flight - help identification
I’d put forth Common Nighthawk, but they tend to be more erratic in flight. Could have been taking a straight path while it was visible to you though. I have seen one fly by me at eye level near a lake.

Gordon Green

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 2, 2020, at 5:12 AM, Eve Wilson <evew...> wrote:
>
> About 10:30 last night while taking the dog to the bathroom, about 30 minutes north of Traverse City on the East Traverse Bay in the back yard near the woods, a bird flew by about 8-10 feet off the ground so fast that for a second I inanely thought “UFO”. In the light from the porch it was a light color and flew perfectly strait and super fast. There was more of a sense of sound than an actual sound; but if it was a sound it was a faint buzz or whir.
> I am thinking owl. Not real big, but not small either. Maybe 20 inches long and wider than a falcon. Reading about them they seem to go more slowly a lot of the time. Do they ever go that fast? I would say it was fast like a Merlin when hunting which I have seen several times. But it looked like a bullet. I didn’t see wings, just a bullet shaped blur.
> Any ideas about what this was?
> Eve
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> --
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> ---
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Date: 9/2/20 3:51 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (02 Sep 2020) 10 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 02, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 0 2 2
Osprey 0 0 0
Bald Eagle 0 0 0
Northern Harrier 1 2 2
Sharp-shinned Hawk 3 4 4
Cooper's Hawk 1 1 1
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 0 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 3 6 6
Merlin 1 1 1
Peregrine Falcon 1 1 1
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 10 18 18
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Elizabeth Kent, Hugh Kent

Visitors:
Thank you to Hugh and Elizabeth Kent, our count coordinators, for their
expertise today! Also thank you to John Barns for the quick visit to the
top of the tower.


Weather:
A pleasant day on the tower with temperatures staying the mid 20 degrees
Celsius. Winds were stronger today and blowing from the South-West and
West. The sky was mostly cloudy and did bring us a small shower in the
middle of the afternoon, but after the rain, the clouds parted and we ended
the day under a beautiful blue sky.

Raptor Observations:
Migration is slowly picking up, as we made it to the double digits with 10
raptors flying over today. All three falcon species; American Kestrel,
Merlin, and Peregrine Falcon we're counted. We also spent a portion of the
afternoon excitedly observing a local Peregrine Falcon diving at the
resident Ospreys and Bald Eagles over the marsh. Also migrating through
were a Cooper's Hawks, a Northern Harrier, and a few Sharp-shinned Hawks,
the last of which flew right above our heads offering us a great look.

Non-raptor Observations:
Today's main highlight came from a Prothonotary Warbler seen at the base of
the tower fluttering close to the pond. Here's to hoping it will come back
for another visit!
Other passerines included Magnolia Warblers, Black-and-White Warblers,
Warbling Vireos, and Red-eyed Vireos.
Swallows were also in abundance, with the usual suspects being Purple
Martins and Tree Swallows, but today we also counted over a hundred Barn
Swallows and a few Cliff and Bank Swallows. Mixed among the swallows, we
counted 43 Chimney Swifts.
On the marsh, hidden between the Mute Swans you could spot a few American
Coots, Pied-billed Grebes, Hooded Mergansers.

Full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73113610

Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting another warm and sunny day with mild winds from
the South once again. Even with less favourable winds, we are hoping
raptors such as Sharp-shinned Hawks, American Kestrel, and Merlins will
keep migrating towards us and fly close to the tower.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 9/2/20 1:36 pm
From: 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Large Mixed Warbler Flock
Amazing mixed flock of migrating warblers visiting our water feature and all the buggy plants surrounding it. Blackpoll, blackburnian, chestnut-sided, Tennessee, and Nashville warblers and a Red-eyed vireo all bathing and gleaning bugs. What a sight! They're moving! 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

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Date: 9/2/20 2:12 am
From: Eve Wilson <evew...>
Subject: [birders] Night flight - help identification
About 10:30 last night while taking the dog to the bathroom, about 30 minutes north of Traverse City on the East Traverse Bay in the back yard near the woods, a bird flew by about 8-10 feet off the ground so fast that for a second I inanely thought “UFO”. In the light from the porch it was a light color and flew perfectly strait and super fast. There was more of a sense of sound than an actual sound; but if it was a sound it was a faint buzz or whir.
I am thinking owl. Not real big, but not small either. Maybe 20 inches long and wider than a falcon. Reading about them they seem to go more slowly a lot of the time. Do they ever go that fast? I would say it was fast like a Merlin when hunting which I have seen several times. But it looked like a bullet. I didn’t see wings, just a bullet shaped blur.
Any ideas about what this was?
Eve


Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 9/1/20 3:39 pm
From: <reports...>
Subject: [birders] Holiday Beach Hawk Watch (01 Sep 2020) 8 Raptors
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch
Amherstburg, Ontario, Canada
Daily Raptor Counts: Sep 01, 2020
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Species Day's Count Month Total Season Total
------------------ ----------- -------------- --------------
Turkey Vulture 2 2 2
Osprey 0 0 0
Bald Eagle 0 0 0
Northern Harrier 1 1 1
Sharp-shinned Hawk 1 1 1
Cooper's Hawk 0 0 0
Northern Goshawk 0 0 0
Red-shouldered Hawk 0 0 0
Broad-winged Hawk 0 0 0
Red-tailed Hawk 1 1 1
Rough-legged Hawk 0 0 0
Golden Eagle 0 0 0
American Kestrel 3 3 3
Merlin 0 0 0
Peregrine Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Accipiter 0 0 0
Unknown Buteo 0 0 0
Unknown Eagle 0 0 0
Unknown Falcon 0 0 0
Unknown Raptor 0 0 0

Total: 8 8 8
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Observation start time: 07:00:00
Observation end time: 16:00:00
Total observation time: 9 hours

Official Counter: Maryse Gagné

Observers: Bob Hall-Brooks, Chip Ogglesby, Paul Pratt

Visitors:
Thank you to Chip Ogglesby, Bob Hall-Brooks, John Barns, Stan Lee, Paul
Pratt, and Tim Jarrold for their staggered visits today.
This year, the top level of the tower is limited to counters and can only
accommodate three people at one time to maintain proper distancing. We
welcome visitors to the second level of the tower (provided they stay 2
meters apart), and we thank you for your understanding.


Weather:
A hot, humid, and hazy start to the 2020 count. Temperatures rose quickly
in the morning and stayed in the high 20 degrees Celsius. As the air warmed
and the wind picked up slightly, the haze that surrounded the marsh
dissipated by the afternoon, yet the visibility stayed quite low for most
of the day. Winds came in from the South and later South-West, which
unfortunately did not bring us very many birds.

Raptor Observations:
In this very different year, we can find comfort in the constant that is
fall migration. This season will have it's own challenges, but one thing's
for sure; hawks will migrate above our heads.
Our first hawk of the 2020 count was an immature Northern Harrier flying
over in the morning. Throughout the day, American Kestrels, Turkey
Vultures, a Red-tailed Hawk, and a Sharp-shinned Hawk flew over the tower
for a total of 8 raptors today.
Additionally, we are fortunate to observe resident Ospreys fishing in the
marsh, as well as resident Bald Eagles.

Non-raptor Observations:
In the morning we were greeted by a small group of passerines including
Black-White Warblers, Magnolia Warblers, American Redstarts, Chestnut-sided
Warblers, Warbling Vireos, Great-crested Flycatchers, and Blue-gray
Gnatcachers. A lovely surprise came from a few Red-breasted Nuthatches who
have been making their way down this fall. Other notable sightings include
5 Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, a Chimney Sift, and 10 Monarch Butterflies.

Flocks of Mourning Doves, Common Grackles, Cedar Waxwings, American
Goldfinches, Purple Martins, and Tree Swallows were very common in the sky
today.
Lastly, the marsh is currently home to many Mute Swans, Double-crested
Cormorants, Great Blue Herons, and Great Egrets.
For full ebird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S73079899


Predictions:
Tomorrow we are expecting another hot day, but with stronger winds from the
West. We hope these winds will bring us more raptors such as Sharp-Shinned
Hawks and American Kestrels, and that the predicated rain hold up until the
evening.
========================================================================
Report submitted by Maryse Gagné (<maryse.gagne35...>)
Holiday Beach Hawk Watch information may be found at:
http://hbmo.ca/


More site information at hawkcount.org: http://hawkcount.org/siteinfo.php?rsite=100


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Date: 8/31/20 7:47 am
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: Bald Eagles over Toronto
Begin forwarded message:

> From: Walter Fisher via birdnews <birdnews...>
> Date: August 30, 2020 at 10:16:51 PM EDT
>
> Migration has started!
>
> I apologize for this late post but hopefully it's still helpful for folks
> further along the path (as migrating raptors fly).
>
> Today, August 30th between 10:00am and 4:00pm we had scores of Bald Eagles of
> all ages fly over the Cliffcrest – Cliffside – Birchcliff area of Toronto's east
> end. Because of continuing COVID-19 pandemic issues we decided to not run our
> usual hawk watch at Rosetta McClain Gardens for this year. Instead, several of
> us are doing our own personal watches from our backyards. Here's a brief
> summary of the Bald Eagles witnessed - Near Kingston Rd & St Clair Ave 3 were
> observed. In my yard near Kingston Rd & Midland Ave I counted 17. Near
> Kingston Rd & Birchmount Rd 13 were observed. And, near Kingston Rd & Warden
> Ave 9 were counted. We were all in contact with one another via text and email
> and most of the birds were not seen/counted from one watch to the next. Almost
> all of my eagles were moving away from the lake and heading directly west over
> the city. Many other raptor species were observed across the area as well.
>
> Good hawk watching,
>
> Walter Fisher
> --
> Ontbirds and Birdnews are moderated email Listservs provided by the Ontario Field Ornithologists (OFO) as a service to all birders in Ontario.
>
> Birdnews is reserved for announcements, location summaries, first of year reports, etc. To post a message on Birdnews, send an email to: <birdnews...>
>
> If you have any questions or concerns, contact the Birdnews Moderators by email at <birdnews...> Please review posting rules and guidelines at http://ofo.ca/site/content/listserv-guidelines
>
> To edit your membership settings visit the Birdnews setup page at: http://ontbirds.ca/mailman/listinfo/birdnews_ontbirds.ca.
>
> During the COVID-19 pandemic, all Ontario birders should be taking extra precautions and following local, provincial, and federal regulations regarding physical distancing and non-essential travel.
>
> To find out more about OFO, please visit our website at ofo.ca or Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/OntarioFieldOrnithologists.

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Date: 8/30/20 6:12 pm
From: <dawnk......> <dawnkswartz...>
Subject: [birders] Re: green headed heron
What is the difference between a Green Heron and this green-headed Heron?

On Thursday, August 13, 2020 at 3:37:58 PM UTC-4 Penny S. wrote:

> Nice green-headed heron just flew in and landed on a pilon in my cove.??
> Lovely bird.
>
> Penny
>
>

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Date: 8/28/20 4:17 pm
From: Phil Bugosh <peb729...>
Subject: [birders] Oakland Audubon Society Zoom Meeting/Program September 8, Everyone is invited
Tuesday, September 8, 2020 at 7:00 PM. The site will open at 6:30 PM so you
can log on early. See the Zoom invitation at the end of this email for
details to log into the program. "Preserving Michigan's Dark Sky Heritage"
will be a Zoom presentation by Sally Oey. When you step outside at night,
do you see stars? The natural darkness of night is quickly vanishing and
with it the natural nocturnal ecosystem. This has profound consequences for
flora and fauna, including for human health. Yet much of the artificial
light at night is unintended light pollution. This presentation will
explain the problem and the simple steps everyone can take to help preserve
and restore Michigan's unique dark sky resources. Everyone is invited to
attend, you do not have to be a member to participate.

Mark your calendar for these upcoming programs. They all have a 7:00 pm
start time. More details will follow at a later date.
September 22, Birding Quiz Night with Oakland Audubon
October 13, Bats! Speaker: Ian Ableson
October 27, Bats: Basics and Benefits, Speaker: Amanda Felk
November 10, Avian and Wildlife Habitat, Speaker: John Delisle

Did you miss one of our past zoom programs or just want to watch it again?
You are now able to watch them by clicking on the links available on the
Meetings Page (https://www.oaklandaudubon.org/meetings) on our website.
Future programs will be made available as well.

Please check our Website (http://www.oaklandaudubon.org) and/or Facebook (
http://www.facebook.com/oaklandaudubon) for updates, news, events and
information about becoming an OAS member.

Phil Bugosh

Topic: Oakland Audubon Society Program Meeting
Time: Sep 8, 2020 06:30 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
“Preserving Michigan’s Dark Sky Heritage” with Sally Oney
Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86917074582?pwd=TlpOMEtDd2dCSEhqVVh0Ylk3dFV1Zz09
Meeting ID: 869 1707 4582
Passcode: 408996
One tap mobile
+13017158592,,86917074582#,,,,,,0#,,408996# US (Germantown)
+13126266799,,86917074582#,,,,,,0#,,408996# US (Chicago)
Dial by your location
+1 301 715 8592 US (Germantown)
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Meeting ID: 869 1707 4582
Passcode: 408996
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kbGqLJsg8m

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Date: 8/28/20 10:09 am
From: 'michael wells' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Fw: [birders] YB Cuckoo
Both species most years I have observed and heard at Indian Springs Metropark also. Out on the 2 mile bike/hike loop.

Best of Regards, Michael Wells, LIC
6481 Springfield Ln.
Clarkston, Mi. 48346
248-625-3089


----- Forwarded Message ----- From: 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...>To: <birders...> <birders...>; LaHaie, Ivan <ivan.lahaie...>Sent: Friday, August 28, 2020, 08:48:33 AM EDTSubject: Re: [birders] YB Cuckoo
We have both species of cuckoo in the Metropark behind our house. Lots of tent caterpillars back there.
 Melissa PappasHamburg Township, Livingston County, MI
"One can get in a car and see what man has made. One must get on a horse to see what God has made."  ~ Author Unknown     

On Friday, August 28, 2020, 08:44:43 AM EDT, LaHaie, Ivan <ivan.lahaie...> wrote:


Just a note that I’ve had at least one clucking every morning all summer long in the woods around the house.

 

Ivan

Prospect Hill S. of Easudes



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Date: 8/28/20 5:48 am
From: 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: Re: [birders] YB Cuckoo
We have both species of cuckoo in the Metropark behind our house. Lots of tent caterpillars back there.
 Melissa PappasHamburg Township, Livingston County, MI
"One can get in a car and see what man has made. One must get on a horse to see what God has made."  ~ Author Unknown     

On Friday, August 28, 2020, 08:44:43 AM EDT, LaHaie, Ivan <ivan.lahaie...> wrote:


Just a note that I’ve had at least one clucking every morning all summer long in the woods around the house.

 

Ivan

Prospect Hill S. of Easudes



Above and Beyond, Pushing the Boundaries to Help Keep our Nation SafeCentauri is a mission-first company that brings together the brightest minds in space, cyber, defense and intelligence -- to help our customers solve their most difficult security challenges.       Note: The content of this e-mail is intended solely for the individual(s) to whom it is addressed. If you believe you received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender immediately, delete the e-mail from your computer and do not copy or disclose it to anyone else.

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Date: 8/28/20 5:44 am
From: LaHaie, Ivan <Ivan.LaHaie...>
Subject: [birders] YB Cuckoo
Just a note that I've had at least one clucking every morning all summer long in the woods around the house.

Ivan
Prospect Hill S. of Easudes


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Date: 8/27/20 5:20 pm
From: avianscout via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Nighthawks.
Watching Nighthawks this eve flying over Royal Oak.

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 8/26/20 5:52 pm
From: Catherine Carroll <songsparrow...>
Subject: [birders] Common Nighthawk flight over East Dearborn neighborhood
This evening while sitting on my patio with dinner I saw a loose flock of about 13 Common Nighthawks in the sky overhead. Nighthawks are hard to count; they go high and I can't see them, they circle around and I wonder if I already counted that one, etc.

Shortly thereafter while walking dogs another loose flock of about the same number of birds over a different part of the neighborhood. And then again, in another area, about the same number of birds.

Then I began to get bothered by little midges landing on m e, my eyeglasses, and face and arms. It think very likely an outbreak of these were providing the nighthawks with a evening meal.

I never really did figure out how many there were - somewhere between 30 and 40 perhaps - but clearly seemed like a fall migratory flock all heading in a SE direction.

Cathy Carroll


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Date: 8/26/20 12:42 pm
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: New Guide to Hawaii, A Review of Ted Floyd's Latest Book!
Begin forwarded message:

> From: American Birding Association <info...>
> Date: August 26, 2020 at 2:33:48 PM EDT
> Subject: Flight Calls #296: A New Guide to Hawaii, A Review of Ted Floyd's Latest Book!
> Reply-To: American Birding Association <info...>
>
>
> If you're having trouble viewing this email, you may see it online
>
>
> A New Hawaii Field Guide on the American Birding Podcast
>
>
> Birders on the mainland of the US and Canada have no shortage of options when it comes to field guides. Our friends in Hawaii, however, have not had such luxuries despite being home to some of the world’s most spectacular birds. Now that Hawaii is included in the ABA Area, interest in the islands among birders is high and the need for a good field guide was of the essence. Helen and André Raine have created just that guide, along with photographer Jack Jeffrey, published earlier this year as part of the American Birding Association series. They join host Nate Swick to talk about it.
>
>
>
> Subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Play. You can also find every episode of the American Birding Podcast on our podcast homepage.
>
>
>
> Mississippi Kites at the End of the Longest Summer on How to Know the Birds
>
> It’s the end of August now, and school has started, but the kids are still at home. Oh, and before I proceed, I must say this: I am greatly impressed and deeply grateful for everything public school teachers and administrators have done, and are still doing, to make the best of a bad situation.
>
> The start of the 2020–2021 academic year has been a strange and surreal affair, but no matter: My daughter, a rising high school sophomore, and I were determined to get in one last day of natural history while it was still “summer” “vacation.” So we packed the car early, really early, on a smoky Sunday morning, and off we went.
>
> Birding editor Ted Floyd talks about watching Mississippi Kites at the end of what has only felt like the longest summer ever in his latest column at How to Know the Birds.
>
> You can find all of Ted's essays at the How to Know the Birds hub at the ABA website.
>
>
>
>
> Audubon Face Masks - An exclusive offer from Joel Oppenheimer Gallery
>
> Our masks are custom made in England from a comfortable latex-free 3-ply quilted fabric. They are beautifully printed, durable and machine washable. Visit www.audubonart.com to see the variety of Audubon masks available. 20% Discount on Quantities of 4 or More.
>
>
>
>
> Whem Communication Becomes Education: An Expert Birder Teaches and Inspires
>
> The word “gatekeeper” is often used these days to describe an established member of a particular subculture who determines which people are allowed to join in. With this book, Floyd emphatically proves that he is the best sort of gatekeeper—one who takes the gate right off the hinges so that everyone has equal access to the wealth of knowledge and richness of experience that lies beyond. Those who think of him mainly as, to quote his author bio, “an internationally recognized birding expert and editor” will need to add one more role to that list: teacher
>
> Caitlin Knight reviews our own Ted Floyd's How to Know The Birds in this month's issue of Birding magazine. In it, Ted Floyd explores the birding journey and the many paths a birder can take, creating "a manifesto for the modern bird lover" and the inspiration for his regular columns at the ABA website.
>
> For the entire essay and for all of the Birding's recent book reviews, please visit the ABA website.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> American Birding Association, Inc.
> Membership: PO Box 3070, Colorado Springs, CO 80934
> Headquarters: PO Box 744 or 93 Clinton St, Delaware City, DE 19706
> Phone: (800) 850-2473 or (302) 838-3660 | Email: <info...>
> Copyright © American Birding Association, Inc. All Rights Reserved
>
>
>
> To unsubscribe from future mailings please click here.
>

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Date: 8/26/20 12:38 pm
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: Audubon Sues Over Arctic | Western Waters | The Fight for Forage Fish
Begin forwarded message:

> From: National Audubon Society <audubonconnect...>
> Date: August 26, 2020 at 3:20:47 PM EDT
> Subject: Audubon Sues Over Arctic | Western Waters | The Fight for Forage Fish
> Reply-To: <audubonconnect...>
>
>
>
> NEWSLETTER | AUGUST 2020
>
> Audubon Takes the Administration to Court to Save America’s Arctic
> This month, the Department of the Interior finalized its plans to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to the sale of oil and gas leases—a disastrous move for nesting birds and other wildlife. Worse still, the Bureau of Land Management has reneged on their promise to protect large swaths of the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (or, the Reserve) which contains critical wetland habitat for millions of nesting shorebirds and migratory waterfowl from every continent. Audubon is taking action to stop them both. In the span of two days this week, we joined a coalition of conservation groups to file separate lawsuits to protect and defend the Refuge and the Reserve. Keep reading to learn more
>
> Canada Geese.
>
> Birdwatching Is a Bright Spot in a Pandemic-Stricken Economy
> As more and more people are turning to bird watching while stuck at home, sales are going through the roof for seed suppliers, birdhouse builders, and small businesses that help people connect with the nature in their backyards. Learn more about how the backyard birding industry is experiencing an uptick right now. Keep reading
>
> Northern Cardinal.
>
> A Big Day for the Little Fish that Seabirds Rely On
> Often called “the most important fish in the sea,” Atlantic menhaden play a key role in the marine food web, especially for many coastal and marine birds like Ospreys. Earlier this month, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission voted unanimously on measures to ensure that menhaden populations never drops below levels that would put birds and other wildlife at risk. Keep reading
>
> Osprey with menhaden.
> AUDUBON IN ACTION
>
> Audubon Releases Water into the Rio Grande
> In a coordinated effort with water managers and biologists, this year Audubon is releasing 530 acre-feet of secured water into the Rio Grande near Los Lunas, N.M. to help revive this drying river for the communities, farms, and birds who rely on it. Learn more about this water management strategy and what it takes for this critical region to become more resilient to future drought. Keep reading
>
> Sandhill Cranes.
>
> Oppose Drilling the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
> In response to the Department of the Interior's recent announcement, Audubon has joined with groups across the country—representing Indigenous Peoples, Alaskans, wildlife enthusiasts, conservationists, and more—asking our members to add their names to a community petition to oppose drilling in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Join us and sign the petition today
>
> Arctic Terns.
> SUPPORT AUDUBON
>
> Feeding Birds this Fall Just Got Easier
> Try our newest combination scoop-and-fill feeder. Simply scoop your seed, twist into place, and spend time enjoying your feathered friends. Plus, your purchase supports Audubon's vital mission and conservation work. Available to ship straight to your door from Lowes.com
>
> Black-headed Grosbeak.
> Photos from top: Christian Hannig/Audubon Photography Awards; blightylad-infocus/iStock; Abeselom Zerit/Audubon Photography Awards; Richard Pick/Audubon Photography Awards; Peter Mather; Morgan Heim
> Did you receive this message from a friend? Sign up for the Audubon Newsletter here→
> CONNECT WITH US
>
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> (844) 428-3826 | audubon.org
>
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>
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>
>

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Date: 8/26/20 6:28 am
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Honeybees at hummer feeder
Faye,

I had this happen a few years ago, and it did work, although the advice I
got was to put a stronger solution out for the bees (1:3 or 1:2), and to
make sure it isn't too deep as the bees might drown in it. I placed the
shallow dish about 15 feet away from my feeder, and had to use a light mist
from my hose to get them off the hummingbird feeder. There were maybe 300
or more. Most of them quickly went to the shallow dish, which allowed me to
take the hummingbird feeder down the rest of the day. The bees eventually
dispersed, but nobody in my neighborhood has hives, so I suspect this was a
sad case of Colony Collapse Disorder.

Honey Bees swarming on hummingbird feeders is a rare occurrence. The most
frequent visitors are (European) Yellowjackets, as well as wasps and
Bald-faced Hornets. Some years are worse than others. This year hasn't been
too bad from what I've seen.

Allen T. Chartier
Inkster, Michigan
Email: <amazilia3...>
Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mihummingbirdguy/collections/
Website/Blog: http://mihummingbirdguy.blogspot.com/



On Wed, Aug 26, 2020 at 9:08 AM Faye Stoner <faye.stoner...> wrote:

> Birders,
> Anyone have experience with honeybees overwhelming your hummingbird feeder?
>
> Next door neighbor has two hives, since spring 2019, and yesterday was the
> very first day the honeybees were at my hummingbird feeder. Lots of them.
> ( Bees had been coming to one of my bird watering pans for several days
> now, one that has several smallish rocks in it.)
>
> Any advice?
>
> Web had a few ideas. I am going to try putting out different ratio of
> sugar water, one in shallow dish for bees, 1 to 4 sugar content For bees,
> and fill my hummer feeder with 1 to 5 sugar content. ‘Spose to put dish on
> a ladder near the feeder and supposedly bees will go to dish, more sweet,
> and hummers will still come to less sweet water in feeder. I have some
> doubts.
>
> I was enjoying several hummers coming often to the feeder these last
> couple of weeks. I appreciate bees but don’t want them to chase away
> hummers. Last night birds tried several times to feed but too many bees.
>
> Any thoughts would be appreciated.
> Faye
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at
> www.glc.org
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> .
>

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Date: 8/26/20 6:10 am
From: Su Clift <coffeebeansu...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Honeybees at hummer feeder
Oh yes. If it gets too crazy I put out a shiny disposable pie tin with about a 1/4” of old hummingbird nectar and the bees go there instead, probably because it’s a lot easier to get at it. I put it maybe 6-8 feet from the feeder. Works so far!
Su in Adrian


> On Aug 26, 2020, at 9:08 AM, Faye Stoner <faye.stoner...> wrote:
>
> Birders,
> Anyone have experience with honeybees overwhelming your hummingbird feeder?
>
> Any thoughts would be appreciated.
> Faye
>

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Date: 8/26/20 6:08 am
From: Faye Stoner <faye.stoner...>
Subject: [birders] Honeybees at hummer feeder
Birders,
Anyone have experience with honeybees overwhelming your hummingbird feeder?

Next door neighbor has two hives, since spring 2019, and yesterday was the very first day the honeybees were at my hummingbird feeder. Lots of them. ( Bees had been coming to one of my bird watering pans for several days now, one that has several smallish rocks in it.)

Any advice?

Web had a few ideas. I am going to try putting out different ratio of sugar water, one in shallow dish for bees, 1 to 4 sugar content For bees, and fill my hummer feeder with 1 to 5 sugar content. ‘Spose to put dish on a ladder near the feeder and supposedly bees will go to dish, more sweet, and hummers will still come to less sweet water in feeder. I have some doubts.

I was enjoying several hummers coming often to the feeder these last couple of weeks. I appreciate bees but don’t want them to chase away hummers. Last night birds tried several times to feed but too many bees.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.
Faye

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 8/25/20 11:59 am
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: Big Wins for Birds! MBTA Decision, Webinar, Survey, and More!
Begin forwarded message:

> From: American Bird Conservancy <info...>
> Date: August 25, 2020 at 12:50:40 PM EDT
> Big Wins for Birds! MBTA Decision, Webinar, Survey, and More!
> Reply-To: American Bird Conservancy <info...>
>
> Trouble viewing this email? Click here.
>
>
>
> Court Overturns Administration Efforts to Weaken the Migratory Bird Treaty Act
> On August 11, 2020, a federal court overturned a reinterpretation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) that had upended decades of enforcement and let industry polluters off the hook for killing birds. Citing the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, U.S. District Court Judge Valerie Caproni wrote that “if the Department of the Interior has its way, many Mockingbirds and other migratory birds that delight people and support ecosystems throughout the country will be killed without legal consequence.” ABC and our partners went to court to challenge the reinterpretation. This ruling is a much-needed win for migratory birds and the millions of Americans who cherish them. The MBTA is one of our nation’s most important environmental laws. Among other things, it has spurred industry innovation to protect birds, such as screening off toxic waste pits and marking power lines to reduce collisions. This key decision to uphold the Act's strength by blocking the injurious reinterpretation comes at a key time, as we seek to restore our nation’s declining bird populations.
>
> Read Press Release!
>
>
> Join Us on September 16 for a Webinar on How to Save 1 Billion Birds from Collisions
> On July 1, the U.S. House of Representatives passed H.R. 2, which included H.R. 919 – the Bird-Safe Buildings Act. This bipartisan bill is designed to reduce bird mortality by calling for federal buildings to incorporate bird-safe building materials and design features. Congressman Mike Quigley has been the driving force behind this legislation since he first introduced it in 2009. ABC has been steadfast in our efforts to get this bill passed, and in our support for bird-safe building legislation across the country, including New York City’s groundbreaking Local Law 15. Please join us on Wednesday, September 16, when ABC collisions expert Dr. Chris Sheppard will introduce the collisions issue and discuss the importance of the Bird-Safe Buildings Act and Local Law 15.
>
> Register Here!
>
>
> First Bird-Friendly Building Ordinance in Wisconsin Passed
> On August 4, the Madison Common Council unanimously adopted the state's first bird-friendly building ordinance. Introduced by Alders Marsha Rummel and Keith Furman, drafted by city staff, and revised with input from ABC, the city-wide ordinance will require new large construction and expansion projects to use modern bird-safe strategies and materials that allow birds to see glass. The new requirements are expected to dramatically reduce bird mortalities. The ordinance goes into effect October 1, 2020. “The well-being of birds and people in Wisconsin are very intertwined, from the economic benefits of tourism and birdwatching to free services like pest control and pollination,” says Matt Reetz, Executive Director of Madison Audubon, one of the organizations that has been advocating for the ordinance.
>
> Read Press Release!
>
>
> Pesticides Are Back on the Agenda: Act Now to Protect Birds
> Earlier this month, major legislation was introduced in Congress that could transform the way pesticides are regulated in the U.S. This long-overdue reform would help counter the pernicious effects of some pesticides on people and wildlife, including declining bird populations. The Protect America’s Children from Toxic Pesticides Act would ban the most damaging pesticides, increase citizen participation in the regulation process, and provide stronger protections for farmworkers and vulnerable communities. A major study has just found that the massive loss of North American birds is due in part to the growing use of poorly regulated pesticides. And, for far too long, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has failed to ban chlorpyrifos, in spite of its known effects on children, farm workers, and wildlife. Please act now and tell your Senators and Representative to ban the most dangerous pesticides and compel the EPA to make human health and the environment its top priority.
>
> Take Action!
>
>
> Chair Grijalva Hails Passage of Great American Outdoors Act
> Chair of the House Natural Resources Committee Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.) hailed House passage of the Great American Outdoors Act, one of Congress’ most significant investments in environmental conservation in a generation. The bill fully funds the successful and popular Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) at $900 million annually, well above its yearly average funding level, and creates the National Parks and Public Land Legacy Restoration Fund, which will provide funding to the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Bureau of Indian Education to repair buildings, trails, roads, and other public infrastructure for the next five years. “This is a win for the country and for Arizona. We’re going to start seeing the benefits sooner than people think,” Chair Grijalva said. Chair Grijalva’s remarks on the House floor can be viewed here.
>
> View Remarks!
>
>
> How About a Songbird Stamp to Boost Bird Conservation?
> One of the reasons waterfowl are doing better is because of the Duck Stamp, more formally known as the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp. This federally mandated annual waterfowl hunting license has raised over $1 billion for wetlands conservation since it was established in 1934. The program has had a huge impact, leading to the acquisition of 6 million acres of habitat. If proposed and enacted, a Songbird Stamp would be similar to the Duck Stamp, featuring different migratory songbirds on a new stamp each year. Funds from Songbird Stamp sales could be used to support migratory songbird conservation and national wildlife refuges. We are requesting feedback from the conservation community to determine if there is broad support for such an initiative. Please take a moment and complete this short survey to provide your feedback.
>
> Take Survey!
>
>
> New Annual "Duck Stamp" Launched
> In late June, the new annual "Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp," or Duck Stamp, was launched by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. "This year, the stamp shows five Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks painted by Eddie LeRoy of Alabama. Similarly, its younger sibling, the Junior Duck Stamp became available for purchase at official locations and online. Funds raised from the sale of Federal Duck Stamps go toward the acquisition or lease of habitat for the National Wildlife Refuge System. Although required for waterfowl hunters as an annual license, Duck Stamps may also be voluntarily purchased by birders, outdoor enthusiasts, and other fans of national wildlife refuges who understand the value of preserving some of the most diverse and important wildlife habitats in our nation. The Duck Stamp plays a critically important role in wildlife conservation. A current Federal Duck Stamp is also good for free admission to any National Wildlife Refuge that charges for entry." U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
>
> Read More!
>
>
> Nevada Court Protects Nesting Bi-State Sage-Grouse From Off-Road Vehicles
> On July 7, 2020, ABC and other advocates for the rare Bi-State Sage-Grouse won a legal case against off-roaders who planned a 250-mile dirt bike rally in Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest — one of the last places this isolated population of Greater Sage-Grouse can breed. The Nevada District Court upheld U.S. Forest Service measures put in place to protect the birds' nesting habitat. Isolated from other sage-grouse populations, the Bi-State Sage-Grouse exists only in the Mono Basin along the California-Nevada border. With an estimated 3,305 birds, this population has fallen far below the 5,000-bird population threshold identified as necessary to maintain it well into the future.
>
> Read More!
>
> Inside Bird Conservation is produced by American Bird Conservancy for those who want a closer look at bird conservation policy and related issues. Past editions and other issue updates are available on the Bird Conservation Alliance website. Please forward to interested conservationists. To subscribe, please send a message to <sholmer...>
>
> Click here to be removed from the list.
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> Subscribe to BCA
> BCA Home
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> American Bird Conservancy
> P.O. Box 249 | The Plains, Virginia 20198
> (540) 253-5780 | <info...>
>
> Photo captions (top to bottom): Banner: Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Brian Guest, Shutterstock; Black-and-white Warbler, Laura Erickson; Rose-breasted Grosbeak, valleyboi63, Shutterstock; Streaked Horned Lark, Jim Leonard; U.S. Capitol, Oleksii Khmyz, Shutterstock; Common Yellowthroat, Greg Homel, Natural Elements Pro; Wood Duck, Owen Deutsch; Greater Sage-Grouse, Pat Gaines, Flickr
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Date: 8/25/20 9:31 am
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: Field Ornithology is back!
Begin forwarded message:

> From: "W.K. Kellogg Bird Sanctuary" <birdsanctuary...>
> Date: August 25, 2020 at 10:47:13 AM EDT
> To: <mseft...>
> Subject: Field Ornithology is back!
> Reply-To: W.K. Kellogg Bird Sanctuary <birdsanctuary...>
>
> 
> View this email in your browser
>
> Field Ornithology Course registration now open!
>
> This past spring we had to make the difficult decision to cancel our popular Field Ornithology Course. But the good news is we’ve spent this summer moving it online and registration for the fall course is now open!
>
> The Kellogg Bird Sanctuary has partnered with Josh Haas from Hawks on the Wing for the first virtual Field Ornithology Course! This combination webinar and virtual classroom course will focus on identification skills of birds by sight and sound. Josh’s dynamic teaching style will encourage students to take information shared in the classroom outside in the field! All skill levels are welcome!
>
> Although this is a virtual course, space is limited. Be sure to register for your spot.
> Registration required by Wednesday, Sept. 9. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Zoom webinar.
> Cost is $55 for current Sanctuary members and $60 for non-members. Not a member yet? Join today!
>
> Spruce Lodge now available for daily rentals
> Located in a quiet area on the grounds of the Kellogg Bird Sanctuary, Spruce Lodge is available Tuesday through Sunday to rent for small family gatherings, a daily retreat or to use as an alternative "work from home" location.
>
> The daily rental rate is $200 and includes two floors with over 1600 square feet of space, gas fireplace, large deck overlooking Wintergreen Lake, air conditioning, full kitchen, restrooms, Wi-Fi, and admission to the Bird Sanctuary's trails. Please note, Spruce Lodge is not completely barrier-free.
>
> Current COVID-19 protocols:
> - Indoor capacity is limited to 10 guests at any one time. All guests entering Spruce Lodge must wear a mask. This is to abide by MSU safety protocols and Gov. Whitmer executive order.
> - No more than 50 guests total outside.
> - Must maintain distancing of at least six feet.
> - All food must be provided by client and served by someone wearing gloves and a mask.
>
> Contact Nicole today for more details and to make your reservation.
>
> Resource Center walk-up window now open!
>
>
> Our walk-up window at the Resource Center is now open during normal business hours. Members can use the window to check in and purchase corn or other retail items from our gift shop! Auditorium restrooms near the main entrance are open.
>
> We hope to see you soon!
>
>
>
> Our trails are open for you!
> Although we've had to cancel or postpone in-person events indefinitely, the Sanctuary trails remain open Wednesday through Sunday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Please follow all signs and social distancing guidelines. Thank you!
>
> Follow all posted signs at the Sanctuary.
> Wash your hands before visiting and carry hand sanitizer.
> Do not use the trails if you have any COVID-19 symptoms.
> Wear a mask in public areas.
> Maintain a six-foot distance from all other visitors on the trails and in the parking lot.
> Bring your own water.
> Keep in mind all Sanctuary buildings except for the Auditorium restroom near the main entrance are closed.
> There are no dogs allowed at any time on Sanctuary grounds.
> Pack out any trash.
> Questions? Please email us at <birdsanctuary...>
> 12685 East C. Avenue, Augusta, MI 49012
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Copyright © 2020 W.K. Kellogg Bird Sanctuary, All rights reserved.
> You are receiving this email because you may have opted in on our website or signed up at a Bird Sanctuary event. Thank you!
>
> Our mailing address is:
> W.K. Kellogg Bird Sanctuary
> 12685 E C Ave
> Augusta, MI 49012-9707
>
> Add us to your address book
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Date: 8/24/20 2:15 pm
From: 'Melissa Pappas' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Huron Meadows Hopping
Those of you who have been to our yard know that the non-public portion of Huron Meadows Metropark is our backyard. We have been covered up late this afternoon with warblers! They're in the trees, shrubs,  and water feature. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

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Date: 8/24/20 11:20 am
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Fwd: You’re Invited: Tune-In to “I Saw A Bird”
Begin forwarded message:

> From: National Audubon Society <audubonconnect...>
> Date: August 24, 2020 at 2:10:36 PM EDT
> To: <mseft...>
> Subject: You’re Invited: Tune-In to “I Saw A Bird”
> Reply-To: <audubonconnect...>
>
> 
>
>
> Join Us This Week for I Saw A Bird!
> You’re invited to the next installment of I Saw a Bird this Wednesday at 4 pm PT / 7 pm ET on Zoom and Facebook Live.
>
> Join us this month for a very special interview with Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, the first person to have both walked in space and descend to the farthest depths of the ocean. Then, have all your fall bird migration questions answered by Kevin J. McGowan from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Bird Academy for Distance Learning and Chad Witko, Audubon’s Outreach Biologist for the Migratory Bird Initiative. Plus, a conversation with Joseph Manson, Director of Seward Park Audubon Center and Angel Poe, Education Specialist at Michell Lake Audubon Center who have tips and activities for caregivers getting ready for a back-to-school season unlike any other.
>
> Click below to RSVP for Wednesday’s show, and if you don’t already follow us on Facebook, click here to like our page. See you on the internet!
> RSVP
> Efforts to slow the spread of COVID-19 have all of us staying indoors more than we might like. So, Audubon hatched a plan to lift your spirits and keep our community united through this unusual time—a monthly show where we can connect with each other, talk about the birds we love, and the ways we can work together to protect them.
>
> Click here for recordings of previous episodes of I Saw A Bird.
> Northern Harrier. Photo: Timothy Shore/Audubon Photography Awards
> CONNECT WITH US
>
> DONATE
> ADVOCATE
> National Audubon Society
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> (844) 428-3826 | audubon.org
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> Update your email address or unsubscribe
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Date: 8/24/20 7:50 am
From: Beverly Wolf <Bev_Wolf...>
Subject: [birders] FW: Talons Over Mackinac - August 2020 MSRW Newsletter
You may all already be familiar with this group and their publications, but just in case you’re not you may find the information below interesting.



Bev Wolf

Waterford/Presque Isle





From: Mackinac Straits Raptor Watch <info...> <mailto:<info...> >
Sent: Monday, August 24, 2020 10:33 AM
Subject: Talons Over Mackinac - August 2020 MSRW Newsletter












<https://gallery.mailchimp.com/ad6de8a23d686447cdfa68caa/images/be00ae01-db60-468f-86dd-58fe25e4bf2c.png>






Talons Over Mackinac
Mackinac Straits Raptor Watch Newsletter
August 2020


In the spring of 2020, although people weren’t moving around very much, raptors certainly were, flying to reach their summer nesting areas. The Mackinac Straits Raptor Watch recorded more raptors flying through Mackinaw City than in any previous year. In addition, three species had their highest daily counts ever.

Now in its seventh year of formal counting using paid professional contractors, MSRW continues to build a valuable data collection – and to set and then break its own records.
In particular,

* 65 Bald Eagles were tallied on May 26, versus the previous high single-day count of 58.
* 20,763 Broad-winged Hawks were tallied on May 1, compared to the previous high of 17,022.
* 733 Turkey Vultures were tallied on April 3, beating the previous high of 593.

The overall 2020 total of 73,365 raptors exceeds the previous high count, just last year in 2019, of 65,561 over slightly fewer hours of observation (469 hrs. in 2020 versus 473 hrs. in 2019).

In addition, MSRW and Mackinaw City still hold the nationwide record for Red-tailed Hawks (22,420 set in 2019), and the most Golden Eagles seen east of the Mississippi (374 in 2015).

The value in our data collection is extended through our membership in an international network of hawk count sites. Through collaboration with the Hawk Migration Association of North America, we gain expert help analyzing our data, and a nationwide context for understanding its significance. A new analysis, posted below, showcases these seven-year trends.





<https://mcusercontent.com/ad6de8a23d686447cdfa68caa/images/1c15ef64-a6ae-40c9-a612-deef1106bd1c.png>


Percentage Change in Spring 2020 Raptor Count Data Compared to Previous Six Years' Spring Average












A strong increasing trend can be seen for Broad-winged Hawks and Red-shouldered Hawks. Also increasing in numbers, to a lesser extent, are Bald Eagles, Turkey Vultures, Red-tailed Hawks, and Peregrine Falcons. On the flip side, some species have decreased over the past seven years, including Ospreys, American Kestrels, and Sharp-shinned Hawks.

The general public has been thrilled at the recovery of the iconic Bald Eagle in Michigan and the Great Lakes. In the 1950s and 1960s, they nearly vanished due to the use of DDT. Ornithologists are now noticing a decline in Ospreys. Part of the reason is that these fish-eating birds must compete with increasing numbers of Bald Eagles for nest sites near good fishing lakes.

The decline of American Kestrels observed at the Mackinac Straits is consistent with their decline nationwide, and appears to result from a mix of factors. These smallest of North American falcons eat mostly insects and nest in cavities.

While trends at Mackinaw City are measurable, we still are learning what our data mean in the larger context of raptor populations and their movements. It is not clear yet how well fluctuations in our counts reflect changes in population size or if they result from other factors such as wind and weather patterns, which are known to affect migration patterns. The data analysis is complex and must simultaneously examine the data from other hawk watches across the Great Lakes and Midwest region.

What MSRW has illustrated beyond a doubt is that the Straits of Mackinac form a vital corridor for these birds. That’s why we have committed to long-term annual monitoring here. That’s why we appreciate the hundreds of people who give to support this research and the related public outreach.

The Mackinac Straits Raptor Watch is a non-profit organization that conducts scientific studies of hawks and owls migrating through this region of northern Michigan, educates the public about them, and aids in conserving them. The group appreciates support from more than 350 individual and business contributors, and from organizations, including the Mackinac Area Visitors Bureau and Petoskey Harbor Springs Area Community Foundation. To learn more, volunteer, or donate, visit <https://mackinacraptorwatch.us19.list-manage.com/track/click?u=ad6de8a23d686447cdfa68caa&id=b1c2ae0e9d&e=281deb1608> www.mackinacraptorwatch.org.





<https://mcusercontent.com/ad6de8a23d686447cdfa68caa/images/b6c89e9a-fb8c-4429-b9f3-583d75ce9acb.jpg>


Spring Hawk Watchers


















Copyright © 2020 Mackinac Straits Raptor Watch, All rights reserved.
Our email list is generated from our events and field trips, where you have signed up to receive email from us.

Our mailing address is:

Mackinac Straits Raptor Watch

P.O. Box 465

Petoskey, MI 49770


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Date: 8/23/20 7:49 am
From: Janet Hinshaw <jhinshaw...>
Subject: [birders] Buff-breasted sandpiper
A very cooperative one has been consistently seen in cell D4 at the Muskegon sewage treatment plant. Still there this morning. This photo is from yesterday.

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Janet Hinshaw
Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 8/22/20 1:57 pm
From: Patrick Baize <pkbaize...>
Subject: Re: [birders] osprey nest near Brighton?

There is or at least was an active Osprey nest in the back of the Genoa Medical Center north of Grand River next to the Woodland Heath Center on a cell phone tower.
Pat B. Howell, Michigan

On Saturday, August 22, 2020, 01:19:20 PM EDT, Jeff Moore <jmo.jeffmoore...> wrote:

Anybody know of an osprey nest near Brighton? Anything closer than Kensington? Saw one circling out back yesterday. We live just outside of town.Jeff Moore

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J.Mo
==========================================================
"Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand."
 
  Wes Westrum, The Poughkeepsie Strong Boy,
  former Giants All-Star catcher and manager,
  and on the very first Sports Illustrated cover

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Date: 8/22/20 12:48 pm
From: Allen Chartier <amazilia3...>
Subject: Re: [birders] osprey nest near Brighton?
Jeff,

For at least 2 or 3 years there has been an Osprey nest on a cell tower on
the west side of US-23 maybe a mile north of I-96.

On Sat, Aug 22, 2020, 1:19 PM Jeff Moore <jmo.jeffmoore...> wrote:

> Anybody know of an osprey nest near Brighton? Anything closer than
> Kensington? Saw one circling out back yesterday. We live just outside of
> town.
> Jeff Moore
>
> --
> J.Mo
> ==========================================================
> "Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand."
>
> Wes Westrum, The Poughkeepsie Strong Boy,
> former Giants All-Star catcher and manager,
> and on the very first Sports Illustrated cover
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Date: 8/22/20 10:19 am
From: Jeff Moore <jmo.jeffmoore...>
Subject: [birders] osprey nest near Brighton?
Anybody know of an osprey nest near Brighton? Anything closer than
Kensington? Saw one circling out back yesterday. We live just outside of
town.
Jeff Moore

--
J.Mo
==========================================================
"Baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand."

Wes Westrum, The Poughkeepsie Strong Boy,
former Giants All-Star catcher and manager,
and on the very first Sports Illustrated cover

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Date: 8/22/20 10:15 am
From: Carol Furtado <carolfurtado2...>
Subject: [birders] Tawas point st park
Hi birders
I just spent the morning at TPSP and the warblers were abundant. I couldn’t identify some in fall plumage but enjoyed trying. Yellow, red start ,prothonotary ,Kentucky, to name a few. Also low And easy to see vireos
A pair of red foxes ran by
Nice to be birding

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 8/21/20 5:02 pm
From: Curt Hofer <curthofer...>
Subject: Re: [birders] Sound ID
Possibly a western wood-pewee.

Curt Hofer


> On Aug 21, 2020, at 12:26 AM, Vedran Radojcic <vedran.radojcic...> wrote:
>
> Hi all,
> just wondering if someone could help identify the recorded bird? Of note, and apologies if I am violating group's policies, this was just recorded (9 PM) on Orcas Island in Washington State.
>
> Thanks!
> --
> Birders is a service of the Great Lakes Commission. Visit us at www.glc.org
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> <NW Washington State.m4a>

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Date: 8/21/20 3:26 pm
From: Andrew Pawuk <andrewpawuk...>
Subject: [birders] Researchers find Kirtland's Warblers behave differently than thought
Researchers find Kirtland's Warblers behave differently than thought
Michigan Radio
https://www.michiganradio.org/post/researchers-find-kirtlands-warblers-behave-differently-thought

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Date: 8/20/20 9:26 pm
From: Vedran Radojcic <vedran.radojcic...>
Subject: [birders] Sound ID
Hi all,
just wondering if someone could help identify the recorded bird? Of note,
and apologies if I am violating group's policies, this was just recorded (9
PM) on Orcas Island in Washington State.

Thanks!

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Date: 8/19/20 12:41 pm
From: 'Mike Sefton' via Birders <birders...>
Subject: [birders] Non-bird: Slow Birding, August Photo Quiz, and a Nostalgic Journey to Rural Oregon
Begin forwarded message:

> From: American Birding Association <info...>
> Date: August 19, 2020 at 2:02:52 PM EDT
> To: Friend <mseft...>
> Subject: Flight Calls #295: Slow Birding, August Photo Quiz, and a Nostalgic Journey to Rural Oregon
> Reply-To: American Birding Association <info...>
>
> 
> If you're having trouble viewing this email, you may see it online
>
>
> Secrets of Slow Birding on the American Birding Podcast
> If there’s one thing that this year has taught birders, its how to appreciate your immediate surroundings. The cancellation of festivals, international trips, and even many local bird walks and meetings has encouraged us to be more present and local. It’s something that Vermont naturalist Bridget Butler has been pushing for a long time as part of her “Slow Birding” initiative. She joins host Nate Swick to talk about how birding can create a connection to yourself and the place where you live.
>
> Subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Play. You can also find every episode of the American Birding Podcast on our podcast homepage.
>
>
>
> Audubon Face Masks - An exclusive offer from Joel Oppenheimer Gallery
>
> Our masks are custom made in England from a comfortable latex-free 3-ply quilted fabric. They are beautifully printed, durable and machine washable. Visit www.audubonart.com to see the variety of Audubon masks available. 20% Discount on Quantities of 4 or More.
>
>
> Test Your Skill with the August Photo Quiz
>
> “What’s so difficult about this quiz,” one might ask. “There are adult males in there, and adult male Surf Scoters do not exactly present an ID challenge when seen well, as in static photos.”
>
> If you thought that, you are mostly right. However, identifying moving birds, particularly flying birds, is not a challenge that all are up to, as correctly identifying flying birds is enabled by experience with the species. Even then, such identifications require the ability to see the bird as individual parts, rather than a sublime organismal example of nature in motion, until enough experience with that species is gained as to simply recognize it. Non-birders, if they see it at all, will see a bird. Beginning birders will see a bird and may see a waterbird (but no guarantees!).
>
> Think you have an idea what you're looking at? Get more clues, a larger image, and an opportunity to try your bird ID skill at the ABA website!
>
>
>
>
> A Birding Bildungsroman in Oregon's Rogue Country
>
>
> The wisdom to be gained from Browning’s story relates to a preoccupation confronted by many birders: Once we have acknowledged our love of birds and bird-study, what contribution can we make? How do we leave our mark on a world so filled with talented and dedicated individuals?
>
> Frank Izaguirre reviews M. Ralph Browning's Rogue Birder: The Making of a Modern Ornithologist in this month's issue of Birding magazine. It's a memoir detailing a life lived in the pursuit of ornithology, first in the Rogue River Valley of southwestern Oregon as a boy, later in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D. C., and finally returning to the author’s beloved Rogue Country.
>
> For the entire essay and for all of the Birding's recent book reviews, please visit the ABA website.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> American Birding Association, Inc.
> Membership: PO Box 3070, Colorado Springs, CO 80934
> Headquarters: PO Box 744 or 93 Clinton St, Delaware City, DE 19706
> Phone: (800) 850-2473 or (302) 838-3660 | Email: <info...>
> Copyright © American Birding Association, Inc. All Rights Reserved
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