DE-BIRDS
Received From Subject
1/19/18 7:05 pm Andrew ednie <ednieap...> [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 19th, 2018
1/17/18 5:58 pm Paul Guris <paulagics.com...> [de-birds] Feb. 10 Lewes Pelagic Still Needs People to Sail
1/16/18 6:45 pm Christopher Bennett <cpb2564...> [de-birds] DOS Seawatch Saturday
1/15/18 7:18 pm sally o'byrne <salobyrne...> [de-birds] Wednesday Alapocas field trip
1/13/18 7:26 pm Christopher Bennett <cpb2564...> [de-birds] DOS Meeting Wednesday
1/13/18 11:33 am Lynn Massey <000004c2b379c595-dmarc-request...> [de-birds] Pileated Woodpeckers and red-winged blackbirds
1/13/18 3:20 am Andrew ednie <ednieap...> [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 12th, 2018
1/10/18 9:23 am Tim Freiday <tim.freiday777...> Re: [de-birds] Winter feeder birds including Red-headed Woodpeckers
1/10/18 6:46 am Rob Blye <rwblye...> [de-birds] Winter feeder birds including Red-headed Woodpeckers
1/6/18 5:44 am Andrew ednie <ednieap...> [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 5th, 2018
1/5/18 5:47 am Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request...> [de-birds] DOS Head Start Field Trip - CANCELLED
1/4/18 12:00 pm Nancy Cunningham <nancy_c8899...> [de-birds] Fwd: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
1/4/18 11:38 am Sharon Lynn <slynn001...> Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
1/3/18 11:16 pm Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502...> [de-birds] Long-tailed Duck in New Castle County
1/3/18 1:48 pm Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request...> [de-birds] DOS Head Start Field Trip
1/3/18 10:15 am Pat Valdata <pvaldata1...> [de-birds] Port Mahon Snowy Owl
1/3/18 5:40 am Michael Moore <mcmoore32...> Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
1/2/18 6:22 pm Amy White <amywwhite...> Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
12/31/17 2:12 pm Joe Sebastiani <bunker17...> [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
12/30/17 4:28 pm Ian Stewart <istew...> Re: [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, December 29th, 2017
12/30/17 7:16 am Andrew ednie <ednieap...> [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, December 29th, 2017
12/30/17 4:53 am Kar DeGeiso <kdegeiso...> [de-birds] birding in extreme cold weather
12/28/17 6:40 am Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC) <Kathleen.Sullivan...> Re: [de-birds] cold snap feeder birds including Red-headed Woodpecker
12/28/17 6:30 am Rob Blye <rwblye...> [de-birds] cold snap feeder birds including Red-headed Woodpecker
12/27/17 5:47 pm Ann Marie Dinkel <Adinkl...> [de-birds] Field guide question
12/26/17 7:22 am Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request...> [de-birds] The Boat Trip full
12/23/17 12:02 pm Lise Schools <lise...> Re: [de-birds] Cape Henlopen CBC and Boat Trip
12/23/17 10:27 am Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request...> [de-birds] Cape Henlopen CBC and Boat Trip
12/22/17 5:29 pm Andrew ednie <ednieap...> [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, December 22nd, 2017
12/22/17 1:41 pm Christopher Bennett <cpb2564...> [de-birds] Milford CBC
 
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Date: 1/19/18 7:05 pm
From: Andrew ednie <ednieap...>
Subject: [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 19th, 2018
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* January 19, 2018
* DEST1801.19

*Birds mentioned
Snow Goose
Ross's Goose
Cackling Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
TRUMPERTER SWAN
Wood Duck
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Lesser Scaup
Long-tailed Duck
COMMON EIDER
Black Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Surf Scoter
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Common Merganser
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Ring-necked Pheasant
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
RED-NECKED GREBE
Great Cormorant
Black-crowned Night Heron
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK
Sandhill Crane
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Purple Sandpiper
RED PHALAROPE
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl
Short-eared Owl
SNOWY OWL
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Pileated Woodpecker
American Kestrel
Eastern Phoebe
COMMN RAVEN
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Eastern Bluebird
American Pipit
Snow Bunting
Lapland Longspur
PAINTED BUNTING
"Ipswich-type" Savannah Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: January 19, 2018
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (<ednieap...>)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

On Friday, January 19th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware sate annual list
is now at 146 species.

New this week was a male PAINTED BUNTING seen yesterday at Bay Pointe
development near Summit Bridge. Unfortunately, this was a one-day-wonder and
not seen today. Bay Pointe is a private development with restricted access.
If any further information is obtained, stay tuned here on the Birdline! Of
interest, this is the third year in a row that a male PAINTED BUNTING has
shown up at a feeder near Newark during the winter.

There was also a report of 6 TRUMPETER SWANS in a flock of 3000 TUNDRA SWANS
in a field along Route 20 between Millsboro and Seaford. This is near the
Sussex Co. Landfill and gravel pits. The swans move around during the day
and land in the fields to roost in the evening, when you have to look for
the TRUMPETERS. TRUMPETER SWAN is a species that is now breeding on the
western end of Lake Ontario and moving east. A wing-tagged TRUMPETER SWAN is
currently being seen west of Baltimore at Lake Elkhorn, Howard Co. in
Maryland.

SNOWY OWLS continue to be seen in the state. Last weekend, a SNOWY OWL was
found at Port Mahon near Dover. The bird was originally seen on the riprap
along the docks at the boat ramps at the end of the road. Later, the SNOWY
OWL moved out into the marsh and could be seen at a distance from the
fishing pier. On Monday, 2 SNOWY OWLS were seen floating on ice flows
drifting out from the Mahon River. A SNOWY OWL was also seen Sunday from the
new bridge along the Prime Hook Beach Road, looking north into the marsh.
Another SNOWY OWL was seen on a roof top in a residential area of Lewes on
Thursday.

No SNOWY OWLS were reported this week at Fowler's Beach in Prime Hook
National Wildlife Refuge, but a peak count of 8 LAPLAND LONGSPURS along with
62 SNOW BUNTINGS were seen along Fowlers Beach. An "IPSWICH-TYPE" SAVANNAH
SPARROW was photographed along the dunes. TUNDRA SWAN, GREATER SCAUP, COMMON
GOLDENEYE, plus SURF and BLACK SCOTER were seen at Fowlers, along with a
continuing light phase ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK.

A pair of ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS, including the previously reported dark phase
ROUGH-LEG were seen at Broadkill Beach marsh in Prime Hook. A RED-NECKED
GREBE was found at Beach Plum Island, at the south end of the town of
Broadkill Beach on Saturday. A treasure trove of waterfowl was seen at Beach
Plum Island, including a raft of 95 GREATER and 5 LESSER SCAUP, plus SURF
and BLACK SCOTER, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, and RUDDY DUCK. A flock of WILD
TURKEY was seen along the Prime Hook entrance road. A dozen RUSTY BLACKBIRDS
were seen along deep branch road.

A pair of BLACK-HEADED GULLS continues to be seen at the Wolfe's Point Water
Treatment Plant near Midway, along with 3 BONAPARTE'S GULLS. There was a
peak count of 82 CANVASBACK at Silver Lake in REHOBOTH BEACH. A CACKLING
GOOSE and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL were also found at Silver Lake, along
with GADWALL, GREATER SCAUP, HOODED and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER.

There was a single report of a RED PHALAROPE on Sunday afternoon off Indian
River Inlet, seen on calm water. This report follows photographs of a RED
PHALAROPE at the inlet last week which might still be in the area. COMMON
EIDERS continue to be seen the inlet, along with good numbers of sea ducks
including LONG-TAILED DUCK, COMMON GOLDENEYE, and all three species of
SCOTER, WHITE-WINGED, SURF and BLACK. PURPLE SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONES,
and SANDERLING were seen along the jetty. GREAT CORMORANT, HORNED GREBE plus
RED-THROATED and COMMON LOONS were seen along the coast.

A pair of BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS continue to be seen at Burton's Island
causeway, behind the north marina at Indian River inlet. Waterfowl there
included BRANT, BUFFLEHEAD, GREATER and LESSER SCAUP, RED-BREASTED and
HOODED MERGANSER, HORNED GREBE, plus RED-THROATED and COMMON LOON.

A flock of 75 SNOW BUNTINGS were seen at Cape Henlopen Point, along with
BRANT, SURF and BLACK SCOTER and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER. BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH was seen at Cape Henlopen State Park. Three WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS
were seen on Wednesday.

Three MUTE SWANS were seen at Assawoman Wildlife Area near Fenwick Island.
There is only one small area of open water at Assawoman where the waterfowl
are collecting including 2 dozen AMERICAN WIGEON, NORTHERN PINTAIL, GADWALL,
HOODED MERGANSER and BUFFLEHEAD, but no EURASIAN WIGEON.

Along with all the SNOWY OWLS reported were several SHORT-EARED OWLS. Two
SHORT-EARS continue to be seen at Fowler's Beach and Port Mahon. AMERICAN
BITTERNS and AMERICAN KESTREL were also seen along the Port Mahon Road.
SHORT-EARED OWL was also seen along Lighthouse Road near Mispillion Inlet at
Slaughter's Beach. A group of 4 BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERONS were seen at the
cedar pond along Route 36 at Slaughter's Beach. SHORT-EARED OWL continues at
Shearness Pool in Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge. BARRED OWL was
reported at Finis Pool at Bombay Hook and at the water retention ponds at
the Walmart in Camden along Route 13. Another BARRED OWL was reported along
Naaman's Creek in Brandywine Hundred at Grubb Road.

A pair of SANDHILL CRANES were seen flying into Shearness Pool at Bombay
Hook on Monday, landing on the back side of the impoundment. A COMMON
GOLDENEYE with BUFFLEHEAD and HOODED MERGANSERS was seen at the south side
of Shearness in the channel. An EASTERN PHOEBE was seen by the visitor
center. Several EASTERN BLUEBIRDS were seen along the roadway to Finis Pool.
A ROSS'S GOOSE with about 500 SNOW GEESE was seen north of Smyrna on
Saturday along Massey Church Road.

Five SANDHILL CRANES were seen flying over Augustine Creek near Pole Tavern
Road near Port Penn. A female LONG-TAILED DUCK and COMMON GOLDENEYE were
found along Route 9 at the Augustine Creek causeway. AMERICAN PIPITS were
seen along Stave's Landing Road.

A big flock of 34 SNOW BUNTINGS were seen along the dike at the Port Penn
impoundments of Augustine Wildlife Area. A RING-NECKED PHEASANT and a pair
of WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS were found at the Ashton Tract. A single MUTE
SWAN, plus BUFFLEHEAD, GOLDENEYE, and RUDDY DUCK were seen on Thousand Acre
Marsh from the Ashton Tract.

COMMON RAVENS were reported this week at Middle Run Natural Area near Newark
and Flint Woods near Centerville. YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER and PILEATED
WOODPECKER were reported at Middle Run. A raft of 35 COMMON MERGANSERS were
seen on Newark Reservoir. A single REDHEAD was seen at Newark Reservoir
today.

A pair of CANVASBACK were seen on Hoopes' Reservoir on Thursday, along with
PIED-BILLED GREBE, RING-NECKED DUCK, HOODED and COMMON MERGANSER. A WOOD
DUCK was seen at Beck's Mill along the Brandywine Creek. A peak count of 95
COMMON MERGANSERS were seen along the Christiana River at the Peterson Urban
Wildlife Refuge as the thaw opened up water along the creek. There were 7
GREAT CORMORANTS on the channel marker along the Delaware River from Fox
Point State Park.

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, Bert Filemyr, Mike
Rosengarten, Keith Marley, Ken Bass, Armas Hill, Al Guarente, Nick
Pulcinella, Steve Graff, Andy McGann, Ryan Crane, Megan Kasprzak, Lauren
Morgans, Chris Bennett, Rob Blye, Dave Fees, Jim and Amy White, Chris Rowe,
Tim and Don Freiday, Jerald and Aaron Reb, Ken Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Phil
Thompson, Bill Stewart, Kim Steininger, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn,
Alissa Kegelman, Joe Russell and Joe Swertinski. Remember, the Birdline
needs your sightings. Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
<ednieap...> Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

-end transcript

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Date: 1/17/18 5:58 pm
From: Paul Guris <paulagics.com...>
Subject: [de-birds] Feb. 10 Lewes Pelagic Still Needs People to Sail
We're still pretty short on having enough people to run our annual winter
pelagic out of Lewes. We'll have to make the call on whether or not we can
sail soon. Hopefully more people will join us.
Here are the details:

Our primary targets on these trips are alcids including Puffin, Dovekie,
Razorbill, and Common Murre as well as Fulmar, Gannet, Kittiwake, other
uncommon gulls, whales, and dolphins. A recent trip out of Cape May had
Great Skua and this is always a hoped for bird.

Date: Sat, Feb 10
Time: 6:00 AM - approx 6:00 PM
Cost: $185
Boat: Thelma Dale V
Leaves: 107 Anglers Rd, Lewes, DE


Hope to see you aboard!


-PAG

--







*Paul A. GurisSee Life PaulagicsPO Box 161Green Lane, PA
18054215-234-6805www.paulagics.com <http://www.paulagics.com>paulagics.com
<http://paulagics.com>@gmail.com <http://gmail.com><info...>
<info...>*

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Date: 1/16/18 6:45 pm
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564...>
Subject: [de-birds] DOS Seawatch Saturday
Join Anthony Gonzon and Me this Saturday morning at 8 am on the south side
of Indian River Inlet - at the Southeast Day Area of Delaware Seashore
State Park - to scan the ocean and inlet for migrating and wintering sea
ducks, loons, grebes, cormorants and gulls. With luck we may spot eiders,
a Harlequin Duck, Razorbill, Black-headed or Little Gull.

You are welcome to join us for the entire four hours or just a few
minutes. Come and go as you please. There is not entry fee. The current
forecast is for lots of sun and a high temp. of 50 degrees.

I hope you will join us.

Chris Bennett
Milford, DE

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Date: 1/15/18 7:18 pm
From: sally o'byrne <salobyrne...>
Subject: [de-birds] Wednesday Alapocas field trip
Snow may be falling Tuesday night, but at present I plan to lead the Wednesday morning Alapocas walk. A fresh snow will be a great background for birding in the mature woodlands and along the Brandywine. We will meet at Blue Ball Barn at 8:30 - please dress for the weather. The hike is about 3 miles and will last about 3 hours. Last year we had several fly-bys of a Raven, but since the Bancroft Mills have been removed, I’m not hopeful for the Raven this year, but we will look for another rarity. However, we will see a variety of woodpeckers and we can look and listen for birds that are commonly found in Northern Delaware in Winter.

If you have never been to Alapocas Woods, you will be surprised by this woodland gem in the midst of suburbia and Wilmington.

Sally O'Byrne

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Date: 1/13/18 7:26 pm
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564...>
Subject: [de-birds] DOS Meeting Wednesday
Join us this Wednesday evening at 7 pm at Ashland Nature Center for the
monthly meeting of the Delmarva Ornithological Society. As usual the
meeting features a half-hour social gathering with refreshments from 7 to
7:30, the DOS business portion of the meeting from 7:30 to 8 and our
featured presentation beginning at 8 pm.

This month's featured speaker is Andrew McGann , senior application
engineer at Cellular Tracking Technologies. In his position with CTT
Andy combines
his background in ornithology with his love of technology and appreciation
for geography, in order to help wildlife researchers and organizations
around the world obtain the scientific information they need. His
presentation will discuss how lightweight, solar-powered, energy-thrifty,
and rugged, CTT devices are attached to wild animals for long-term remote
GPS tracking. Andy will discuss the evolution of the technology, the
current state-of-the-art, and paint a picture of where we are going. Over
his 15+ years of professional experience in academia, NGO’s, government
agencies, and environmental consulting firms, Andy has learned a lot about
what can go wrong when combining tech and wildlife. But the “Information
Age” has truly arrived for wildlife telemetry, and we are now entering a
golden age for movement ecology studies."

I hope you can join us.

Chris Bennett
Vice President/Program Chair

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Date: 1/13/18 11:33 am
From: Lynn Massey <000004c2b379c595-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [de-birds] Pileated Woodpeckers and red-winged blackbirds
We have had a pair of pileated woodpeckers in our holly, loblolly and oak woods near Roxana since spring. We even occasionally see them at the feeder. Biggest surprise during this last snow storm were several red-winged blackbirds.

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Date: 1/13/18 3:20 am
From: Andrew ednie <ednieap...>
Subject: [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 12th, 2018
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* January 12, 2018
* DEST1801.12

*Birds mentioned
Greater White-fronted Goose
Snow Goose
Ross's Goose
Cackling Goose
Mute Swan
Tundra Swan
Wood Duck
American Wigeon
Northern Shoveler
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Long-tailed Duck
COMMON EIDER
Black Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Surf Scoter
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Common Merganser
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Wild Turkey
Ring-necked Pheasant
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
RED-NECKED GREBE
Great Cormorant
Black-crowned Night Heron
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered Hawk
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK
American Avocet
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Purple Sandpiper
RED PHALAROPE
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Bonaparte's Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Barn Owl
Great Horned Owl
Barred Owl
Short-eared Owl
Red-headed Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Pileated Woodpecker
Merlin
American Kestrel
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Brown Thrasher
Gray Catbird
American Pipit
Snow Bunting
Lapland Longspur
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
Pine Warbler
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: January 12, 2018
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (<ednieap...>)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

On Friday, January 12th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. The unofficial Delaware state annual list
is already up to 142 species.

Today, a RED PHALAROPE was photographed at Indian River Inlet during the
storm. There are only a handful of records for this species in Delaware
during winter. The bird was seen flying up and floating through the inlet
several times. Yesterday, a RED-NECKED GREBE was discovered at the tip of
the north jetty. There has been a ton of waterfowl at the inlet due to
freezing temperatures and ice in Indian River Bay. Two REDHEADS were seen in
the raft of diving ducks, including LONG-TAILED DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON
GOLDENEYE, and GREATER SCAUP. A peak count of 12 WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS were
seen in the inlet, along with 4 COMMON EIDERS, plus BRANT and 8 GREAT
CORMORANTS. A peak count of 60 PURPLE SANDPIPERS were seen on the jetty,
along with RUDDY TURNSTONE, DUNLIN and SANDERLING. LESSER BLACK-BACKED and
15 BONAPARTE'S GULLS were seen at the inlet. A BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON was
seen at Burton's Island causeway at the inlet's north marina, along with
BRANT and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER.

The previously reported BLACK-HEADED GULL continues to be seen at the Wolfe
Neck Water Treatment Plant near Midway (between Rehoboth Beach and Lewes).
There were 6 CANVASBACKS on Silver Lake in Rehoboth, along with a LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULL.

Another BLACK-HEADED GULL was seen on the beach at Herring Point in Cape
Henlopen State Park, along with 6 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS. HORNED GREBE,
COMMON and RED-THROATED LOON, LONG-TAILED DUCK, GREATER SCAUP, SURF and
BLACK SCOTER plus RED-BREASTED MERGANSER were seen at Herring Point. BRANT
and GREAT CORMORANT were seen at Cape Henlopen Point. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH
and CHIPPING SPARROW were seen at Ft. Miles. A PINE WARBLER was seen at the
Biden Center.

For the first time in a month, SNOWY OWLS were not reported at Fowler's
Beach, but there were still 6 SHORT-EARED OWLS. SNOW BUNTING, AMERICAN PIPIT
and EASTERN MEADOWLARK were at Fowler's. Waterfowl seen included TUNDRA
SWAN, SURF and BLACK SCOTER. An AMERICAN AVOCET and the previously reported
dark phase ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK were seen at Broadkill Beach marsh. A group of
52 WILD TURKEY were seen along Prime Hook Beach Road. A pair of WOOD DUCK
was found along Thirteen Curves Road. AMERICAN WIGEON was seen at the Cods
Road Bridge.

A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER is continuing to be seen coming to a feeder in the
Woods at Herring Creek on Angola Neck off the Camp Arrowhead Road, along
with PINE WARBLER, BROWN THRASHER and FOX SPARROW. Two RED-HEADED
WOODPECKERS and BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH were found along the Herring Creek
Trail at Angola Neck. BROWN THRASHERS were also seen at feeders in Bay Vista
near Rehoboth and in Greenwood. A YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER was seen in a
yard in Seaford.

All three species of SCOTER, BLACK, SURF and WHITE-WINGED, plus GREATER
SCAUP and COMMON LOON were seen at Big Stone Beach in Milford Neck Wildlife
Area. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH and MARSH WREN seen along the Big Stone Beach
Road. A ROSS'S GOOSE was seen in a flock of SNOW GEESE flying over
Frederica. AMERICAN PIPIT was found in a field near Frederica of Route 12,
Johnny Cake Landing Road.

A LAPLAND LONGSPUR was with HORNED LARK along the Port Mahon Road on Sunday.
AMERICAN KESTREL, AMERICAN BITTERN and 2 SHORT-EARED OWLS were reported at
Port Mahon. RING-NECKED DUCK and COMMON GOLDENEYE were seen at Little creek.
AMERICAN KESTREL was also seen at Cheswold, along with a WHITE-CROWNED
SPARROW coming to a feeder.

A pair of SHORT-EARED OWLS continues at Shearness Pool in Bombay Hook
National Wildlife Refuge. GREAT HORNED OWL was seen at Raymond Pool.
Although the refuge impoundments are all frozen, waterfowl seen include
TUNDRA SWAN, BUFFLEHEAD, and HOODED MERGANSER. Sparrows collecting along the
roadside included FOX, SAVANNAH, and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW. A RUSTY
BLACKBIRD was seen at Finis Pool. A big flock of 85 TUNDRA SWANS were seen
outside the refuge in a wheat field along Hurd Road. 30 EASTERN MEADOWLARKS
were found along Whitehall Neck Road. A BARN OWL was heard in a yard north
of Smyrna along Massey Church Road.

Three WHITE-FRONTED GEESE were photographed sitting in a field along Stave's
Land Road, off route 9 south of Odessa. NORTHERN BOBWHITE, BROWN THRASHER
and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW were seen at Cedar Swamp Wildlife Area. Raptors
reported at Cedar Swamp included a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK and MERLIN.

An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was photographed at the Ashton Tract in Augustine
Wildlife Area. A RING-NECKED PHEASANT was seen on Thursday. Landbirds along
the Sparrow Trail included GRAY CATBIRD, FOX, SAVANNAH, WHITE-CROWNED,
CHIPPING and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW. A few MUTE SWANS were seen sitting on
the ice along with 5 BALD EAGLES at Thousand Acre Marsh at the Ashton Tract.
RED-BREASTED and COMMON MERGANSER plus a pair of Dunlin were seen at
Augustine Beach near Port Penn.

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED and CACKLING GOOSE was seen at Newark Reservoir off
Paper Mill Road. Other waterfowl included 4 REDHEADS along with RING-NECKED
DUCK, COMMON GOLDENEYE, COMMON and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, and AMERICAN
COOT.

A female YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD made a brief appearance at a feeder in Pike
Creek off New Linden Road. BARRED OWL was seen along upper Pike Creek Road.
RUSTY BLACKBIRDS were found at the Tri-State Bird Rescue feeder in Middle
Run Natural Area off Possum Park Road. KILLDEER and SAVANNAH SPARROW were
seen in the fields at the University of Delaware Ag Farm. A PINE WARBLER is
coming to a feeder in Brookside near Newark for the 4th year in a row.

A raft of 4 CANVASBACK was found at Hoopes' Reservoir yesterday. COMMON
GOLDENEYE was seen at the Hillside Mill Cove on Sunday. Other waterfowl
reported included RING-NECKED DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD, RUDDY DUCK and both HOODED
and COMMON MERGANSER. A COMMON MERGANSER was seen on the Brandywine Creek at
Breck's Mill near Greenville. GREAT CORMORANT was seen on the Delaware River
at Fox Point state Park.

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, Nicole Koeltzow, Bert
Filemyr, Lisa Smith, Sally Fintel, John Hannum, Ken Rosenthal, Patrick
Carney, Steve Graff, Andy McGann, Ryan Crane, Megan Kasprzak, Matt Sarver,
Lauren Morgans, Chris Bennett, Rob Blye, Bob Edelen, Dick Plambeck, Dave
Fees, Jim and Amy White, Chris Rowe, Tim Freiday, Jerald and Aaron Reb, Ken
Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Phil Thompson, Bill Stewart, Kim Steininger, John Long,
Teddy Burke, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Alissa Kegelman, Joe
Russell and Joe Swertinski. Remember, the Birdline needs your sightings.
Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email <ednieap...>
Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

-end transcript

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Date: 1/10/18 9:23 am
From: Tim Freiday <tim.freiday777...>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Winter feeder birds including Red-headed Woodpeckers
Hey Rob,

That's really cool about all of the feeder birds! Nothing too crazy at the
feeders at middle run but I did have a couple of Rusty blackbirds on the
ground feeding with some mixed blackbirds at tri state.

Cheers,
Tim

On Jan 10, 2018 9:46 AM, "Rob Blye" <rwblye...> wrote:

We live in a wooded community on Angola Neck between Long Neck and Lewes in
southern Sussex County. The snow and cold temperatures drove a group of
birds to our feeders that I know winter here but I don't see often unless I
get out and beat the bushes.

Among the birds that we observed on or under our feeders were hermit
thrush, brown thrasher, rufous-sided towhee, fox sparrow, white-throated
sparrow, song sparrow, mourning doves, brown-headed nuthatch, dark-eyed
junco, pine warber, yellow-rumped warbler, red-bellied woodpecker, Carolina
wren and our favorites, two red-headed woodpeckers. For the two years we
have lived here, there have been several colonies in forest across the
street from us and in the Angola Neck Preserve managed by DNREC state
parks. ( restricted access - I only bird from the road).

In summer and fall we see as many as 6 or more in groups near standing dead
trees where they forage; both adults and immatures. This winter at least
two adults have stayed here picking acorns from the ground and, after the
snow, eating at our suet feeders. We see them three or four times a day at
the feeders but a walk in the woods usually yields at least one. Yesterday
we observed two in a 20 minute walk.

Since the thaw the number and diversity of birds has decreased sharply at
the feeders and now we are back to situation normal with just a few doves
and white-throated sparrows and the occasional RHWO.

Anyone interested in trying to see the red-headed woodpeckers can contact
me directly and I will show you where to park and walk.

*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

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Date: 1/10/18 6:46 am
From: Rob Blye <rwblye...>
Subject: [de-birds] Winter feeder birds including Red-headed Woodpeckers
We live in a wooded community on Angola Neck between Long Neck and Lewes in
southern Sussex County. The snow and cold temperatures drove a group of
birds to our feeders that I know winter here but I don't see often unless I
get out and beat the bushes.

Among the birds that we observed on or under our feeders were hermit
thrush, brown thrasher, rufous-sided towhee, fox sparrow, white-throated
sparrow, song sparrow, mourning doves, brown-headed nuthatch, dark-eyed
junco, pine warber, yellow-rumped warbler, red-bellied woodpecker, Carolina
wren and our favorites, two red-headed woodpeckers. For the two years we
have lived here, there have been several colonies in forest across the
street from us and in the Angola Neck Preserve managed by DNREC state
parks. ( restricted access - I only bird from the road).

In summer and fall we see as many as 6 or more in groups near standing dead
trees where they forage; both adults and immatures. This winter at least
two adults have stayed here picking acorns from the ground and, after the
snow, eating at our suet feeders. We see them three or four times a day at
the feeders but a walk in the woods usually yields at least one. Yesterday
we observed two in a 20 minute walk.

Since the thaw the number and diversity of birds has decreased sharply at
the feeders and now we are back to situation normal with just a few doves
and white-throated sparrows and the occasional RHWO.

Anyone interested in trying to see the red-headed woodpeckers can contact
me directly and I will show you where to park and walk.

*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

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Date: 1/6/18 5:44 am
From: Andrew ednie <ednieap...>
Subject: [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, January 5th, 2018
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* January 5, 2018
* DEST1801.05

*Birds mentioned
Greater White-fronted Goose
Snow Goose
Ross's Goose
Cackling Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
EURASIAN WIGEON
Northern Shoveler
Northern Pintail
Canvasback
Redhead
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
Greater Scaup
Long-tailed Duck
COMMON EIDER
Black Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Surf Scoter
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Common Merganser
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Ring-necked Pheasant
CHUCKAR
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Great Cormorant
Northern Gannet
Bald Eagle
Red-shouldered hawk
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK
Virginia Rail
American Coot
American Oystercatcher
Black-bellied Plover
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Purple Sandpiper
Wilson's Snipe
American Woodcock
Lesser Yellowlegs
Greater Yellowlegs
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Bonaparte's Gull
ICELAND GULL
Lesser Black-backed Gull
GLAUCOUS GULL
Forster's Tern
Barn Owl
Eastern Screech Owl
Great horned Owl
Barred Owl
SNOWY OWL
Short-eared Owl
RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD
RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD
Red-headed Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
Pileated Woodpecker
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Phoebe
Blue-headed Vireo
Brown-headed Nuthatch
Brown Creeper
House Wren
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Golden-crowned Kinglet
Brown Thrasher
Gray Catbird
American Pipit
Snow Bunting
Lapland Longspur
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
Common Yellowthroat
Pine Warbler
Palm Warbler
American Tree Sparrow
Chipping Sparrow
"Ipswich-type" Savannah Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Lincoln's Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark
Rusty Blackbird
Baltimore Oriole
Purple Finch
Pine Siskin

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: January 5, 2018
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (<ednieap...>)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

On Friday, January 5th, 2018, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware
Museum of Natural History in Greenville. Happy New Year's and time to start
your Big Year list! Delaware is in the grips of a big freeze with the
coldest temps in 25 years. The big snowfall on Thursday dumped 1-2 feet of
snow in eastern Sussex and southeastern Kent Co. Secondary roadways are
covered with drifting snow, and a state of emergency is still in effect.

Two birds succumbed to the weather this week. a RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD
that was found on the Rehoboth Christmas count did not survive the Thursday
storm. Neither did the RUFOUS HUMMINGBIRD at Red Mill Pond near Milton. At
least they survived long enough to be added to the bird counts!

Prior to the storm, the SNOWY OWL continues to be seen at Fowler's Beach in
Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge near Milton. The owl has been seen along
the beach and sitting on the dike fencing. For people going to see the SNOWY
OWL, the area is now being monitored by the rangers at Fish and Wildlife.
Harassment of the owl, approaching to closely, could lead to closing the
beach for everybody and possible legal action.

Another SNOWY OWL was seen on New Year's Day at The Point in Cape Henlopen
State Park. Two more SNOWY OWLS were seen this week at Port Mahon. Those
birds were seen sitting on ice flows drifting into the Delaware Bay. Also
present with the SNOWY OWL at Fowler's Beach were 7 SHORT-EARED OWLS. Two
more SHORT-EARED OWLS at Port Mahon in Little Creek Wildlife Management
Area.

Other birds at Fowler's Beach included 2 LAPLAND LONGSPURS with 13 SNOW
BUNTINGS along the beach, plus a LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. A light phase
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK continues along the marsh. Shorebirds seen included a
flyover AMERICAN WOODCOCK, BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, SANDERLING, DUNLIN and
LESSER YELLOWLEGS. Waterfowl seen included COMMON GOLDENEYE and SURF SCOTER.
A ROSS' GOOSE was seen along Cod's Road.

A dark phase ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK is still being seen at Broadkill Beach marsh
in Prime Hook, along with AMERICAN WIGEON and NORTHERN PINTAIL. Three LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULLS were seen along the beach, along with GREATER SCAUP, SURF
SCOTER, and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER.

A pair of COMMON EIDERS, an immature drake and hen, were found at Herring
Point in Cape Henlopen State Park. There was also a flyby immature GLAUCOUS
GULL on Sunday. Other waterfowl included GREATER SCAUP, LONG-TAILED DUCK,
SURF and BLACK SCOTER, RED-THROATED LOON, HORNED GREBE, NORTHERN GANNET, and
GREAT CORMORANT. A IPSWICH-type SAVANNAH SPARROW was seen along dune from
the beach at Herring Point. BRANT and a flock of 30 SNOW BUNTING were seen
at The Point. VIRGINIA RAIL and WILSON'S SNIPE were found along the salt
Marsh Spur Nature Trail. A BLUE-HEADED VIREO was found in the back of the
campground at Cape Henlopen, along with EASTERN PHOEBE, BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH, and FOX SPARROWS. An ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER and GRAY CATBIRD were
seen at the disc golf course opposite Youth Camp #3. CHIPPING SPARROWS were
seen at Ft. Miles. PINE and PALM WARBLERS were seen by the Biden Center. A
BALTIMORE ORIOLE was seen in Lewes on Sunday.

A peak count of 3 BLACK-HEADED GULLS were at the Wolfe's Point Water
Treatment Plant, along with BONAPARTE'S GULL, NORTHERN SHOVELER, and a
PEREGRINE FALCON. CANVASBACK was seen on Silver Lake in Rehoboth Beach,
along with 4 MUTE SWANS and 2 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS. A flock of 15
RING-NECKED DUCKS plus HOODED MERGANSER and RUDDY DUCK were seen at Spring
Lake along Route 1 near Dewey Beach. A flock of over 200 CANVASBACKS were
seen on Indian River Bay near Clarksville.

Three COMMON EIDERS were seen at Indian River Inlet, along with GREATER
SCAUP, COMMON GOLDENEYE, BUFFLEHEADS, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, and a raft of
over 150 LONG-TAILED DUCK plus all three species of SCOTER, SURF,
WHITE-WINGED, and BLACK. Offshore were HORNED GREBE, RED-THROATED and COMMON
LOONS, plus 4 GREAT CORMORANTS were seen at the end of the jetty. A peak
count of 10 PURPLE SANDPIPERS were seen, along with RUDDY TURNSTONE, DUNLIN
and SANDERLING. An AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER was seen flying over the cottages
at the North Marina on Saturday evening. BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, GREATER
YELLOWLEGS, and PIED-BILLED GREBE were seen at the North Marina. GADWALL,
COMMON GOLDENEYE, LESSER and GREATER SCAUP and a raft of 130 HOODED
MERGANSERS were seen at the Burton's Island Causeway. LESSER BLACK-BACKED
GULL and FORSTER'S TERNS were seen at both the inlet and the north marina.

A EURASIAN WIGEON was seen with a raft of GADWALL and PINTAILS from the
observation tower at Assawoman Wildlife Area. A COMMON YELLOWTHROAT was seen
at the observation tower, and an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was seen at
Strawberry Landing. Two HOUSE WRENS were seen at the field by the entrance
and at the Muddy Neck Tract. Four RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were found along
Long Neck last Saturday. Another RED-HEADED WOODPECKER is coming to a feeder
in The Woods at Herring Creek on Angola Neck along the Camp Arrowhead Road.
A PINE SISKIN and 2 PINE WARBLERS were coming to a feeder near Harbeson.

Birders in the Sussex County Landfill at Jones Crossing found a 1st winter
GLAUCOUS and 4 ICELAND GULLS, plus 40-50 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS on
Tuesday. Although this area is restricted access, the sand pits outside the
landfill on the Hardscrabble Road (Route 20) west of Millsboro had 14 LESSER
BLACK-BACKED GULLS plus 1700 TUNDRA SWANS and 52 RING-NECKED DUCKS. The
gulls rest on the ponds by the sandpit on Sunday when the landfill is
closed. A peak count of 4 EASTERN PHOEBES were reported in Laurel, plus 2
PALM WARBLERS on Wednesday. A LINCOLN'S SPARROW, plus 8 WHITE-CROWNED
SPARROWS were seen along Brickyard Road near Milton.

A SHORT-REARED OWL continues to be seen over Shearness Pool at Bombay Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. BARN, BARRED, SCREECH and GREAT HORNED
OWLS were heard in the pre-dawn hours at the refuge on Tuesday. Waterfowl
seen included TUNDRA SWAN, CACKLING GOOSE, BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER, and
RUDDY DUCK. Six BALD EAGLES were seen at Shearness Pool, along with a
flyover AMERICAN PIPIT and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW
was seen at a feeder in Cheswald. An EASTERN PHOEBE was eating insects out
of a spider web near Camden-Wyoming.

A female LONG-TAILED DUCK was seen Tuesday at Augustine Beach near Port
Penn. Other waterfowl reported included 2 COMMON GOLDENEYE, HORNED GREBE,
and COMMON MERGANSER. A CHUCKAR was seen along Route 9 at the Port Penn
impoundments, north of Port Penn. RING-NECKED PHEASANT was reported at the
Ashton Tract in Augustine Wildlife Area. Landbirds along the sparrow Trail
included FOX, SAVANNAH, WHITE-CROWNED, CHIPPING and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW,
along with both RUBY and GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET. A LINCOLN'S SPARROW was
seen along the north C&D Canal Zone West of Summit Bridge.

A GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was seen at Newark Reservoir off Paper Mil
Road today. CACKLING GOOSE and a raft of 12 REDHEADS were seen on Tuesday.
Also seen was WOOD DUCK, AMERICAN WIGEON, RING-NECKED DUCK, COMMON and
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, HORNED GREBE, and AMERICAN COOT. AMERICAN PIPIT was
flying over. BARRED OWL and BROWN THRASHER were found at Middle Run Natural
Area off Possum Park Road. Another BARRED OWL was found off Church Road in
Bear.

REDHEADS and a SURF SCOTER was found at Hoopes' reservoir today. CACKLING
GOOSE and a SNOW X CANADA GOOSE hybrid was seen on New Year's Day. Other
waterfowl reported included AMERICAN WIGEON, RING-NECKED DUCK, BUFFLEHEAD,
RUDDY DUCK and both HOODED and COMMON MERGANSER. Observations were made from
Hillside Mill Road, that has a very narrow pullout. A WOOD DUCK was seen on
the Brandywine Creek at Breck's Mill near Greenville.

Lots of YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKERS are being seen this year. Three SAPSUCKERS
and a BROWN CREEPER were found at Carousel Park near Newark on Monday.
SAPSUCKERS were reported this week Little Neck Wildlife Area, Prime Hook
Headquarters, Old Landing near Rehoboth, Woodland Ferry near Seaford,
Laurel, Camden-Wyoming, Dover, and upstate at Newark Reservoir, Hoopes'
Reservoir, Brandywine Creek at Thompson's Bridge, Ashland Nature Center,
Coverdale Farms and along Weldin Road in Brandywine Hundred. A female
PURPLE FINCH was photographed Coverdale Farms off Way Road. A flock of 300
SNOW GEESE was seen flying over Ashland Nature Center. Raptors seen included
COOPER'S and RED-SHOULDERED HAWKS.

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, Frank Rohrbacher,
Colin Campbell, Ken Bass, Mike Parr, Ian Gardner, Becky Meister, Joel
Martin, Jeff Climie, Brian McCaffrery, Andy McGann, Megan Kasprzak, Cameron
Cox, Clive Harris, Nathan Tea, Matt Sarver, Sally O'Byrne, Jeff Gordon,
Chris Bennett, Anthony Gonzon, Rob Blye, Bob Edelen, Dave Fees, Jim and Amy
White, Jim Lenhard, Ed Crawford, Jackie Howard, Chris Rowe, Tim Freiday,
Jerald and Aaron Reb, Ken Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Brian and Katie Henderson,
Phil Thompson, Bill Stewart, Kim Steininger, John Long, Teddy Burke, Lynn
Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn, Alissa Kegelman, Joe Russell and Joe
Swertinski. Remember, the Birdline needs your sightings. Please call your
reports into 302-792-9591 or email <ednieap...> Until next week,
this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

-end transcript

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Date: 1/5/18 5:47 am
From: Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [de-birds] DOS Head Start Field Trip - CANCELLED
Unfortunately, the weather is so poor in Sussex County that I feel that a trip there would be foolhardy on either Saturday or Sunday.  Therefore, I have decided to cancel this trip for this year.
 
Frank Rohrbacher
Wilmington, Delaware

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Date: 1/4/18 12:00 pm
From: Nancy Cunningham <nancy_c8899...>
Subject: [de-birds] Fwd: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
I’ve enjoyed all these messages. I’m going to participate. I had 71 backyard birds in 2017. My goal is to top that in 2018. My highlights in 2017 were a resident Bald Eagle, a Yellow-billed Cuckoo and the Rusty Blackbirds that came through in the last week of December

Nancy Cunningham

Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

From: Sharon Lynn <slynn001...><mailto:<slynn001...>>
Date: January 4, 2018 at 2:37:46 PM EST
To: <de-birds...><mailto:<de-birds...>>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
Reply-To: Sharon Lynn <slynn001...><mailto:<slynn001...>>

Thanks to Joe for coordinating the Yard Competition. I only won by 2 species this year. I enjoy reading about the birds others see/hear in their yards. I had some new ones this year, such as Tundra Swan, Bonaparte’s Gull, and Little Blue Heron. There were super views of a male Blackburnian Warbler and a fall migrant Cape May Warbler.
Each year more homes are being built around me, and the golf course across the street is slated for a housing development this year. I love the competition but do this to compare to prior years with the growing development. If you spend the time, you never know what you will see right in your own yard!
Sharon Lynn
Rehoboth Beach

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 3, 2018, at 8:40 AM, Michael Moore <mcmoore32...><mailto:<mcmoore32...>> wrote:

I also want to thank Joe Sebastiani for coordinating the Delaware Yard eBird Challenge and to encourage others to join the friendly competition.

I took on the challenge for the first time this year and it far exceeded my expectations. My main goal was to engage in the friendly competition, especially with my good friends Jim and Amy White.

I had little hope of competing with them since I own an acre of grass with a row of trees it the back. My previous yard record was 84 species in a year. However, the competition got me out in my yard more and fall migration was spectacular and I discovered my yard had more to offer than I thought. My original goal was 90 species for the year, so reaching 119 was mind boggling to me, even though it fell two short of the White's total ☹.

Fall migration was the unquestioned highlight for me. Previously I had had 5 species of warblers in the yard. This fall I found 19! This included multiple Tennessees, Bay-breasts, Blackburnians and Parulas. Other highlights were Cliff Swallow and Lesser Yellowlegs, both flyovers. The biggest miss was Yellow-billed Cuckoo. The first time in 9 years I have not at least heard this species in my backyard.

The competition is a lot of fun and you can always check how you are doing on eBird (my current total of 24 is 2 ahead of the Whites!). You will have fun, contribute to eBird and learn a lot about your yard's potential.

Mike Moore
Newark, DE



-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:<de-birds...>] On Behalf Of Amy White
Sent: Tuesday, January 2, 2018 9:21 PM
To: <de-birds...><mailto:<de-birds...>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017

Thanks to Joe Sebastiani for continuing to coordinate the Delaware Yard Birding Challenge.
As Joe posted a few days ago, in 2017 Jim and I observed 121 species in our "White Yard C". This was our highest year count yet. We know we are very fortunate to live on a nature preserve and have varied habitats within our defined Yard, including open field, thicket, and the edge of a mature woodlands. We've also got an expansive view from the hilltop in the corner of our Yard which is great for observing hawks and other flyovers. The only thing we lack is any nearby water.
Our best/favorite yard birds this year (in date order):
Merlin - seen numerous times in January & February -perched at the top of a neighbor's tall tree.
Black-billed Cuckoo* - great looks during a yard walk on May 10.
Laughing Gull* - a surprise flyover on August 20.
Olive-sided Flycatcher* - hawking for insects (including 2 bumblebees and a wasp!) from dead branches high in trees; August 28 and 29.
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher* - gleaning insects in oak and sassafras trees on September 1.
Common Nighthawks - we counted 68 fly over the hilltop on September 3. Very cool.
Common Raven - observed flying over twice this year: October 14 (Jim) and November 24 (Amy).
( *new in our yard this year)

We had a lot of fun birding our yard this past year. Can't wait to see what we'll find in 2018!

-Amy & Jim White
Hockessin, DE


White Yard C -year 2017 list
Species Date
1 Snow Goose January 26, 2017
2 Canada Goose January 8, 2017
3 Wood Duck June 25, 2017
4 Mallard July 5, 2017
5 Common Merganser January 9, 2017
6 Great Blue Heron March 21, 2017
7 Great Egret May 24, 2017
8 Black Vulture January 8, 2017
9 Turkey Vulture January 19, 2017
10 Osprey May 10, 2017
11 Northern Harrier April 8, 2017
12 Sharp-shinned Hawk February 6, 2017
13 Cooper's Hawk February 1, 2017
14 Bald Eagle January 19, 2017
15 Red-shouldered Hawk February 2, 2017
16 Broad-winged Hawk April 14, 2017
17 Red-tailed Hawk January 8, 2017
18 American Woodcock March 8, 2017
19 Laughing Gull August 20, 2017
20 Ring-billed Gull August 20, 2017
21 Rock Pigeon June 24, 2017
22 Mourning Dove January 2, 2017
23 Yellow-billed Cuckoo June 23, 2017
24 Black-billed Cuckoo May 10, 2017
25 Eastern Screech-Owl January 1, 2017
26 Great Horned Owl September 17, 2017
27 Barred Owl May 16, 2017
28 Common Nighthawk May 18, 2017
29 Chimney Swift April 28, 2017
30 Ruby-throated Hummingbird April 23, 2017
31 Belted Kingfisher April 17, 2017
32 Red-bellied Woodpecker January 2, 2017
33 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker February 7, 2017
34 Downy Woodpecker January 2, 2017
35 Hairy Woodpecker January 3, 2017
36 Northern Flicker April 8, 2017
37 Pileated Woodpecker January 10, 2017
38 American Kestrel March 26, 2017
39 Merlin January 19, 2017
40 Peregrine Falcon October 14, 2017
41 Olive-sided Flycatcher August 28, 2017
42 Eastern Wood-Pewee May 23, 2017
43 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher September 1, 2017
44 Willow Flycatcher May 23, 2017
45 Eastern Phoebe March 5, 2017
46 Great Crested Flycatcher May 12, 2017
47 Eastern Kingbird May 10, 2017
48 Blue-headed Vireo October 2, 2017
49 Red-eyed Vireo May 29, 2017
50 Blue Jay January 2, 2017
51 American Crow January 6, 2017
52 Fish Crow March 26, 2017
53 Common Raven October 14, 2017
54 Purple Martin August 12, 2017
55 Tree Swallow March 27, 2017
56 Barn Swallow April 8, 2017
57 Carolina Chickadee January 2, 2017
58 Black-capped Chickadee January 2, 2017
59 Tufted Titmouse January 2, 2017
60 Red-breasted Nuthatch February 3, 2017
61 White-breasted Nuthatch January 2, 2017
62 Brown Creeper December 22, 2017
63 House Wren April 19, 2017
64 Carolina Wren January 2, 2017
65 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher April 18, 2017
66 Golden-crowned Kinglet October 1, 2017
67 Ruby-crowned Kinglet September 30, 2017
68 Eastern Bluebird January 9, 2017
69 Hermit Thrush October 13, 2017
70 Wood Thrush April 28, 2017
71 American Robin January 6, 2017
72 Gray Catbird April 23, 2017
73 Brown Thrasher April 26, 2017
74 Northern Mockingbird January 8, 2017
75 European Starling January 7, 2017
76 Cedar Waxwing May 16, 2017
77 Ovenbird April 30, 2017
78 Blue-winged Warbler August 28, 2017
79 Black-and-white Warbler May 6, 2017
80 Tennessee Warbler August 25, 2017
81 Mourning Warbler August 20, 2017
82 Common Yellowthroat April 26, 2017
83 American Redstart May 17, 2017
84 Northern Parula May 10, 2017
85 Magnolia Warbler May 17, 2017
86 Blackburnian Warbler August 31, 2017
87 Yellow Warbler May 8, 2017
88 Chestnut-sided Warbler August 19, 2017
89 Blackpoll Warbler May 12, 2017
90 Black-throated Blue Warbler August 26, 2017
91 Palm Warbler March 30, 2017
92 Yellow-rumped Warbler April 16, 2017
93 Prairie Warbler August 9, 2017
94 Black-throated Green Warbler September 2, 2017
95 Canada Warbler August 23, 2017
96 American Tree Sparrow January 8, 2017
97 Chipping Sparrow April 6, 2017
98 Field Sparrow January 4, 2017
99 Dark-eyed Junco January 2, 2017
100 White-crowned Sparrow May 15, 2017
101 White-throated Sparrow January 2, 2017
102 Song Sparrow January 2, 2017
103 Lincoln's Sparrow October 11, 2017
104 Swamp Sparrow October 14, 2017
105 Eastern Towhee April 3, 2017
106 Scarlet Tanager May 10, 2017
107 Northern Cardinal January 2, 2017
108 Rose-breasted Grosbeak May 5, 2017
109 Blue Grosbeak May 8, 2017
110 Indigo Bunting May 8, 2017
111 Bobolink September 3, 2017
112 Eastern Meadowlark April 3, 2017
113 Orchard Oriole May 1, 2017
114 Baltimore Oriole May 4, 2017
115 Red-winged Blackbird January 9, 2017
116 Brown-headed Cowbird January 10, 2017
117 Rusty Blackbird November 4, 2017
118 Common Grackle January 28, 2017
119 House Finch January 2, 2017
120 Pine Siskin December 3, 2017
121 American Goldfinch January 2, 2017



----- Original Message -----

From: "Joe Sebastiani" <bunker17...><mailto:<bunker17...>>
To: <de-birds...><mailto:<de-birds...>
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 5:12:22 PM
Subject: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017

Dear Fellow Yard Birding Nerds:

Another year of yard birding has come and gone, and the old saying remains true, "Not all yards are created equal, but you never know what will fly over". The results are in for the most celebrated bird listing competition in Delaware. This elite group of yard birders excel in their stamina for standing still in the suburban landscape, gazing out the window for long periods, laying back in lawn chairs with a drink, staring at the sky watching for long-awaited but short-lived fly-bys of ducks, shorebirds, and hawks, waking early to hear the morning chorus from shrubs three doors down, and sprinting back to the yard from the party next door to make sure a new species "counts". All this while risking humiliation from neighbors, or worse, looking like the "creeper down the street" as they spend long hours in the yard, binoculars slung around their necks. As a yard birder myself, I know the thrill of finding a new bird in the yard. It is worth all of the time spent steps from t!
he!
house and overhearing the couple next door on their porch sipping morning coffee remarking, "What is he doing? I am pretty sure he is looking at birds".

Tomorrow begins a new year of yard-listing and you too can join the fun. Set a goal for yourself and see how many species you can find. You might be surprised at what flies by or lands in your maple tree. Delmarva Ornithological Society Yard Listing rules and record keeping information can be found here: https://www.dosbirds.org/activities/delaware-backyard-birding-challenge/. To see the entire list of all 75 Yard Birders: http://ebird.org/ebird/site/yard?locInfo.regionType=subnational1&locInfo.regionCode=US-DE. You can also sort by county, all-time leaders, and look at who's-who in other states.

Congratulations to the 2017 Delaware Yard Birding Challenge Top 5

1. Sharon Lynn - 128 species (Rehoboth Beach). Most recent new species: American Kestrel
2. Aaron Reb - 126 species (Frederica). Most recent new species: Gadwall
3. Amy and Jim White - 121 species (Hockessin). Most recent new species: Brown Creeper...about time
4. Michael Moore - 119 species (Newark). Most recent new species: Horned Lark
5. Philip Thompson - 115 species (Wilmington). Most recent new species: Pine Siskin

For anyone on the list, it would be interesting to know what some of you best yard birds were for the year. Good luck in 2018, and if you haven't joined the challenge, give it a try!

Joe Sebastiani
Delmarva Ornithological Society

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...><mailto:<DE-BIRDS-request...>


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Back to top
Date: 1/4/18 11:38 am
From: Sharon Lynn <slynn001...>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
Thanks to Joe for coordinating the Yard Competition. I only won by 2 species this year. I enjoy reading about the birds others see/hear in their yards. I had some new ones this year, such as Tundra Swan, Bonaparte’s Gull, and Little Blue Heron. There were super views of a male Blackburnian Warbler and a fall migrant Cape May Warbler.
Each year more homes are being built around me, and the golf course across the street is slated for a housing development this year. I love the competition but do this to compare to prior years with the growing development. If you spend the time, you never know what you will see right in your own yard!
Sharon Lynn
Rehoboth Beach

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 3, 2018, at 8:40 AM, Michael Moore <mcmoore32...> wrote:
>
> I also want to thank Joe Sebastiani for coordinating the Delaware Yard eBird Challenge and to encourage others to join the friendly competition.
>
> I took on the challenge for the first time this year and it far exceeded my expectations. My main goal was to engage in the friendly competition, especially with my good friends Jim and Amy White.
>
> I had little hope of competing with them since I own an acre of grass with a row of trees it the back. My previous yard record was 84 species in a year. However, the competition got me out in my yard more and fall migration was spectacular and I discovered my yard had more to offer than I thought. My original goal was 90 species for the year, so reaching 119 was mind boggling to me, even though it fell two short of the White's total ☹.
>
> Fall migration was the unquestioned highlight for me. Previously I had had 5 species of warblers in the yard. This fall I found 19! This included multiple Tennessees, Bay-breasts, Blackburnians and Parulas. Other highlights were Cliff Swallow and Lesser Yellowlegs, both flyovers. The biggest miss was Yellow-billed Cuckoo. The first time in 9 years I have not at least heard this species in my backyard.
>
> The competition is a lot of fun and you can always check how you are doing on eBird (my current total of 24 is 2 ahead of the Whites!). You will have fun, contribute to eBird and learn a lot about your yard's potential.
>
> Mike Moore
> Newark, DE
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Delaware Birding [mailto:<de-birds...>] On Behalf Of Amy White
> Sent: Tuesday, January 2, 2018 9:21 PM
> To: <de-birds...>
> Subject: Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
>
> Thanks to Joe Sebastiani for continuing to coordinate the Delaware Yard Birding Challenge.
> As Joe posted a few days ago, in 2017 Jim and I observed 121 species in our "White Yard C". This was our highest year count yet. We know we are very fortunate to live on a nature preserve and have varied habitats within our defined Yard, including open field, thicket, and the edge of a mature woodlands. We've also got an expansive view from the hilltop in the corner of our Yard which is great for observing hawks and other flyovers. The only thing we lack is any nearby water.
> Our best/favorite yard birds this year (in date order):
> Merlin - seen numerous times in January & February -perched at the top of a neighbor's tall tree.
> Black-billed Cuckoo* - great looks during a yard walk on May 10.
> Laughing Gull* - a surprise flyover on August 20.
> Olive-sided Flycatcher* - hawking for insects (including 2 bumblebees and a wasp!) from dead branches high in trees; August 28 and 29.
> Yellow-bellied Flycatcher* - gleaning insects in oak and sassafras trees on September 1.
> Common Nighthawks - we counted 68 fly over the hilltop on September 3. Very cool.
> Common Raven - observed flying over twice this year: October 14 (Jim) and November 24 (Amy).
> ( *new in our yard this year)
>
> We had a lot of fun birding our yard this past year. Can't wait to see what we'll find in 2018!
>
> -Amy & Jim White
> Hockessin, DE
>
>
> White Yard C -year 2017 list
> Species Date
> 1 Snow Goose January 26, 2017
> 2 Canada Goose January 8, 2017
> 3 Wood Duck June 25, 2017
> 4 Mallard July 5, 2017
> 5 Common Merganser January 9, 2017
> 6 Great Blue Heron March 21, 2017
> 7 Great Egret May 24, 2017
> 8 Black Vulture January 8, 2017
> 9 Turkey Vulture January 19, 2017
> 10 Osprey May 10, 2017
> 11 Northern Harrier April 8, 2017
> 12 Sharp-shinned Hawk February 6, 2017
> 13 Cooper's Hawk February 1, 2017
> 14 Bald Eagle January 19, 2017
> 15 Red-shouldered Hawk February 2, 2017
> 16 Broad-winged Hawk April 14, 2017
> 17 Red-tailed Hawk January 8, 2017
> 18 American Woodcock March 8, 2017
> 19 Laughing Gull August 20, 2017
> 20 Ring-billed Gull August 20, 2017
> 21 Rock Pigeon June 24, 2017
> 22 Mourning Dove January 2, 2017
> 23 Yellow-billed Cuckoo June 23, 2017
> 24 Black-billed Cuckoo May 10, 2017
> 25 Eastern Screech-Owl January 1, 2017
> 26 Great Horned Owl September 17, 2017
> 27 Barred Owl May 16, 2017
> 28 Common Nighthawk May 18, 2017
> 29 Chimney Swift April 28, 2017
> 30 Ruby-throated Hummingbird April 23, 2017
> 31 Belted Kingfisher April 17, 2017
> 32 Red-bellied Woodpecker January 2, 2017
> 33 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker February 7, 2017
> 34 Downy Woodpecker January 2, 2017
> 35 Hairy Woodpecker January 3, 2017
> 36 Northern Flicker April 8, 2017
> 37 Pileated Woodpecker January 10, 2017
> 38 American Kestrel March 26, 2017
> 39 Merlin January 19, 2017
> 40 Peregrine Falcon October 14, 2017
> 41 Olive-sided Flycatcher August 28, 2017
> 42 Eastern Wood-Pewee May 23, 2017
> 43 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher September 1, 2017
> 44 Willow Flycatcher May 23, 2017
> 45 Eastern Phoebe March 5, 2017
> 46 Great Crested Flycatcher May 12, 2017
> 47 Eastern Kingbird May 10, 2017
> 48 Blue-headed Vireo October 2, 2017
> 49 Red-eyed Vireo May 29, 2017
> 50 Blue Jay January 2, 2017
> 51 American Crow January 6, 2017
> 52 Fish Crow March 26, 2017
> 53 Common Raven October 14, 2017
> 54 Purple Martin August 12, 2017
> 55 Tree Swallow March 27, 2017
> 56 Barn Swallow April 8, 2017
> 57 Carolina Chickadee January 2, 2017
> 58 Black-capped Chickadee January 2, 2017
> 59 Tufted Titmouse January 2, 2017
> 60 Red-breasted Nuthatch February 3, 2017
> 61 White-breasted Nuthatch January 2, 2017
> 62 Brown Creeper December 22, 2017
> 63 House Wren April 19, 2017
> 64 Carolina Wren January 2, 2017
> 65 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher April 18, 2017
> 66 Golden-crowned Kinglet October 1, 2017
> 67 Ruby-crowned Kinglet September 30, 2017
> 68 Eastern Bluebird January 9, 2017
> 69 Hermit Thrush October 13, 2017
> 70 Wood Thrush April 28, 2017
> 71 American Robin January 6, 2017
> 72 Gray Catbird April 23, 2017
> 73 Brown Thrasher April 26, 2017
> 74 Northern Mockingbird January 8, 2017
> 75 European Starling January 7, 2017
> 76 Cedar Waxwing May 16, 2017
> 77 Ovenbird April 30, 2017
> 78 Blue-winged Warbler August 28, 2017
> 79 Black-and-white Warbler May 6, 2017
> 80 Tennessee Warbler August 25, 2017
> 81 Mourning Warbler August 20, 2017
> 82 Common Yellowthroat April 26, 2017
> 83 American Redstart May 17, 2017
> 84 Northern Parula May 10, 2017
> 85 Magnolia Warbler May 17, 2017
> 86 Blackburnian Warbler August 31, 2017
> 87 Yellow Warbler May 8, 2017
> 88 Chestnut-sided Warbler August 19, 2017
> 89 Blackpoll Warbler May 12, 2017
> 90 Black-throated Blue Warbler August 26, 2017
> 91 Palm Warbler March 30, 2017
> 92 Yellow-rumped Warbler April 16, 2017
> 93 Prairie Warbler August 9, 2017
> 94 Black-throated Green Warbler September 2, 2017
> 95 Canada Warbler August 23, 2017
> 96 American Tree Sparrow January 8, 2017
> 97 Chipping Sparrow April 6, 2017
> 98 Field Sparrow January 4, 2017
> 99 Dark-eyed Junco January 2, 2017
> 100 White-crowned Sparrow May 15, 2017
> 101 White-throated Sparrow January 2, 2017
> 102 Song Sparrow January 2, 2017
> 103 Lincoln's Sparrow October 11, 2017
> 104 Swamp Sparrow October 14, 2017
> 105 Eastern Towhee April 3, 2017
> 106 Scarlet Tanager May 10, 2017
> 107 Northern Cardinal January 2, 2017
> 108 Rose-breasted Grosbeak May 5, 2017
> 109 Blue Grosbeak May 8, 2017
> 110 Indigo Bunting May 8, 2017
> 111 Bobolink September 3, 2017
> 112 Eastern Meadowlark April 3, 2017
> 113 Orchard Oriole May 1, 2017
> 114 Baltimore Oriole May 4, 2017
> 115 Red-winged Blackbird January 9, 2017
> 116 Brown-headed Cowbird January 10, 2017
> 117 Rusty Blackbird November 4, 2017
> 118 Common Grackle January 28, 2017
> 119 House Finch January 2, 2017
> 120 Pine Siskin December 3, 2017
> 121 American Goldfinch January 2, 2017
>
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
>
> From: "Joe Sebastiani" <bunker17...>
> To: <de-birds...>
> Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 5:12:22 PM
> Subject: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
>
> Dear Fellow Yard Birding Nerds:
>
> Another year of yard birding has come and gone, and the old saying remains true, "Not all yards are created equal, but you never know what will fly over". The results are in for the most celebrated bird listing competition in Delaware. This elite group of yard birders excel in their stamina for standing still in the suburban landscape, gazing out the window for long periods, laying back in lawn chairs with a drink, staring at the sky watching for long-awaited but short-lived fly-bys of ducks, shorebirds, and hawks, waking early to hear the morning chorus from shrubs three doors down, and sprinting back to the yard from the party next door to make sure a new species "counts". All this while risking humiliation from neighbors, or worse, looking like the "creeper down the street" as they spend long hours in the yard, binoculars slung around their necks. As a yard birder myself, I know the thrill of finding a new bird in the yard. It is worth all of the time spent steps from t!
he!
> house and overhearing the couple next door on their porch sipping morning coffee remarking, "What is he doing? I am pretty sure he is looking at birds".
>
> Tomorrow begins a new year of yard-listing and you too can join the fun. Set a goal for yourself and see how many species you can find. You might be surprised at what flies by or lands in your maple tree. Delmarva Ornithological Society Yard Listing rules and record keeping information can be found here: https://www.dosbirds.org/activities/delaware-backyard-birding-challenge/. To see the entire list of all 75 Yard Birders: http://ebird.org/ebird/site/yard?locInfo.regionType=subnational1&locInfo.regionCode=US-DE. You can also sort by county, all-time leaders, and look at who's-who in other states.
>
> Congratulations to the 2017 Delaware Yard Birding Challenge Top 5
>
> 1. Sharon Lynn - 128 species (Rehoboth Beach). Most recent new species: American Kestrel
> 2. Aaron Reb - 126 species (Frederica). Most recent new species: Gadwall
> 3. Amy and Jim White - 121 species (Hockessin). Most recent new species: Brown Creeper...about time
> 4. Michael Moore - 119 species (Newark). Most recent new species: Horned Lark
> 5. Philip Thompson - 115 species (Wilmington). Most recent new species: Pine Siskin
>
> For anyone on the list, it would be interesting to know what some of you best yard birds were for the year. Good luck in 2018, and if you haven't joined the challenge, give it a try!
>
> Joe Sebastiani
> Delmarva Ornithological Society
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>
>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>

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Back to top
Date: 1/3/18 11:16 pm
From: Gina Sheridan <gsherida8502...>
Subject: [de-birds] Long-tailed Duck in New Castle County
On a calm, but chilly Wednesday (01/03/18) afternoon, I arrived at the
Ashton Tract in the mid-afternoon. Hoping to build my New Castle County
list as well as my nascent year list, I took advantage of a literal calm
before the storm. BTW, is everyone ready for the "Bomb Cyclone" of the
developing winter storm "Grayson"?

Although avian activity was only modest, I did find quite a few year birds
such as AMERICAN TREE SPARROW, CHIPPING SPARROW, EASTERN TOWHEE, HERMIT
THRUSH, BROWN THRASHER, GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS, SAVANNAH SPARROW, FIELD
SPARROW, SWAMP SPARROW, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, TUNDRA SWANs (sitting
placidly on the frozen lake), EASTERN BLUEBIRD. CAROLINA WRENs seemed to be
the most vocal of the woodland denizens today. In addition, there was
noisy RING-NECKED PHEASANT and a couple of calling EASTERN SCREECH OWLs
that were vocally out competed by a pair of vociferous GREAT HORNED OWLs.
Unfortunately, I had no joy with the Orange-crowned Warbler.

As the sun rapidly sunk toward the horizon, I tried to follow up on
previous reports of Common Goldeneye and Horned Grebe at Augustine Beach.
Although there was large contingent of RB Gulls in the parking lot and
several GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULLs in the bay, my scan for waterfowls only
turned up a few BUFFLEHEAD and MALLARDS. However, when I made my final
stop at the boat ramp proper, I was quite delighted to have discovered my
bird of the day in the form of a female LONG-TAILED DUCK. The LTDU was
cooperative and nicely seen a close range. For good measure, a solitary
DUNLIN flew by position too.

All in all, it was successful outing, and I picked up three NCC lifers, and
plenty of other fun birds to kick off my 2018 year list.

Happy New Year DOS friends!

Gina Sheridan
Milford, DE







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Date: 1/3/18 1:48 pm
From: Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [de-birds] DOS Head Start Field Trip
The 2018 DOS Head Start Trip will be held on Saturday, January 6.  The purpose of this trip is to start our 2018 Delaware Bird Lists with as many of the rarities found during the Christmas Bird Counts and other hard to find winter birds.  This is an all day trip.  I have to be honest, the weather forecast call for extremely cold temperatures and blustery conditions so dress accordingly- sunscreen and bug spray optional.  On the bright side, the weather forecast is much better than the Thursday and Friday weather.  The trip will leave from the "Park and Ride" across the street from the Wawa on Route 299 at the Route 1 exit to Route 299 at 7:30 AM.


At this moments, the best birds on the Rehoboth CBC, the Cape Henlopen CBC at Port Mahon Road are Snowy Owl, Short-ear Owls, Rough-legged Hawk, Snow Buntings, Lapland Longspurs and Common Eider.  We should also find most of the sea ducks and puddle ducks.
 
If you have any questions, please contact me.
 
Frank Rohrbacher
Wilmington, Delaware
 

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Back to top
Date: 1/3/18 10:15 am
From: Pat Valdata <pvaldata1...>
Subject: [de-birds] Port Mahon Snowy Owl
A previously reported Sowy Owl was showing very cooperatively this morning along Port Mahon Road. It was resting on piled up chunks of ice overlooking a frozen Vista that must have made it feel right at home. Easily visible with scope, just past all the phrags where the riprap starts.

Sorry for the late report.

Pat Valdata 
Crisfield, Somerset County

Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device


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Date: 1/3/18 5:40 am
From: Michael Moore <mcmoore32...>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
I also want to thank Joe Sebastiani for coordinating the Delaware Yard eBird Challenge and to encourage others to join the friendly competition.

I took on the challenge for the first time this year and it far exceeded my expectations. My main goal was to engage in the friendly competition, especially with my good friends Jim and Amy White.

I had little hope of competing with them since I own an acre of grass with a row of trees it the back. My previous yard record was 84 species in a year. However, the competition got me out in my yard more and fall migration was spectacular and I discovered my yard had more to offer than I thought. My original goal was 90 species for the year, so reaching 119 was mind boggling to me, even though it fell two short of the White's total ☹.

Fall migration was the unquestioned highlight for me. Previously I had had 5 species of warblers in the yard. This fall I found 19! This included multiple Tennessees, Bay-breasts, Blackburnians and Parulas. Other highlights were Cliff Swallow and Lesser Yellowlegs, both flyovers. The biggest miss was Yellow-billed Cuckoo. The first time in 9 years I have not at least heard this species in my backyard.

The competition is a lot of fun and you can always check how you are doing on eBird (my current total of 24 is 2 ahead of the Whites!). You will have fun, contribute to eBird and learn a lot about your yard's potential.

Mike Moore
Newark, DE



-----Original Message-----
From: Delaware Birding [mailto:<de-birds...>] On Behalf Of Amy White
Sent: Tuesday, January 2, 2018 9:21 PM
To: <de-birds...>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017

Thanks to Joe Sebastiani for continuing to coordinate the Delaware Yard Birding Challenge.
As Joe posted a few days ago, in 2017 Jim and I observed 121 species in our "White Yard C". This was our highest year count yet. We know we are very fortunate to live on a nature preserve and have varied habitats within our defined Yard, including open field, thicket, and the edge of a mature woodlands. We've also got an expansive view from the hilltop in the corner of our Yard which is great for observing hawks and other flyovers. The only thing we lack is any nearby water.
Our best/favorite yard birds this year (in date order):
Merlin - seen numerous times in January & February -perched at the top of a neighbor's tall tree.
Black-billed Cuckoo* - great looks during a yard walk on May 10.
Laughing Gull* - a surprise flyover on August 20.
Olive-sided Flycatcher* - hawking for insects (including 2 bumblebees and a wasp!) from dead branches high in trees; August 28 and 29.
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher* - gleaning insects in oak and sassafras trees on September 1.
Common Nighthawks - we counted 68 fly over the hilltop on September 3. Very cool.
Common Raven - observed flying over twice this year: October 14 (Jim) and November 24 (Amy).
( *new in our yard this year)

We had a lot of fun birding our yard this past year. Can't wait to see what we'll find in 2018!

-Amy & Jim White
Hockessin, DE


White Yard C -year 2017 list
Species Date
1 Snow Goose January 26, 2017
2 Canada Goose January 8, 2017
3 Wood Duck June 25, 2017
4 Mallard July 5, 2017
5 Common Merganser January 9, 2017
6 Great Blue Heron March 21, 2017
7 Great Egret May 24, 2017
8 Black Vulture January 8, 2017
9 Turkey Vulture January 19, 2017
10 Osprey May 10, 2017
11 Northern Harrier April 8, 2017
12 Sharp-shinned Hawk February 6, 2017
13 Cooper's Hawk February 1, 2017
14 Bald Eagle January 19, 2017
15 Red-shouldered Hawk February 2, 2017
16 Broad-winged Hawk April 14, 2017
17 Red-tailed Hawk January 8, 2017
18 American Woodcock March 8, 2017
19 Laughing Gull August 20, 2017
20 Ring-billed Gull August 20, 2017
21 Rock Pigeon June 24, 2017
22 Mourning Dove January 2, 2017
23 Yellow-billed Cuckoo June 23, 2017
24 Black-billed Cuckoo May 10, 2017
25 Eastern Screech-Owl January 1, 2017
26 Great Horned Owl September 17, 2017
27 Barred Owl May 16, 2017
28 Common Nighthawk May 18, 2017
29 Chimney Swift April 28, 2017
30 Ruby-throated Hummingbird April 23, 2017
31 Belted Kingfisher April 17, 2017
32 Red-bellied Woodpecker January 2, 2017
33 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker February 7, 2017
34 Downy Woodpecker January 2, 2017
35 Hairy Woodpecker January 3, 2017
36 Northern Flicker April 8, 2017
37 Pileated Woodpecker January 10, 2017
38 American Kestrel March 26, 2017
39 Merlin January 19, 2017
40 Peregrine Falcon October 14, 2017
41 Olive-sided Flycatcher August 28, 2017
42 Eastern Wood-Pewee May 23, 2017
43 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher September 1, 2017
44 Willow Flycatcher May 23, 2017
45 Eastern Phoebe March 5, 2017
46 Great Crested Flycatcher May 12, 2017
47 Eastern Kingbird May 10, 2017
48 Blue-headed Vireo October 2, 2017
49 Red-eyed Vireo May 29, 2017
50 Blue Jay January 2, 2017
51 American Crow January 6, 2017
52 Fish Crow March 26, 2017
53 Common Raven October 14, 2017
54 Purple Martin August 12, 2017
55 Tree Swallow March 27, 2017
56 Barn Swallow April 8, 2017
57 Carolina Chickadee January 2, 2017
58 Black-capped Chickadee January 2, 2017
59 Tufted Titmouse January 2, 2017
60 Red-breasted Nuthatch February 3, 2017
61 White-breasted Nuthatch January 2, 2017
62 Brown Creeper December 22, 2017
63 House Wren April 19, 2017
64 Carolina Wren January 2, 2017
65 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher April 18, 2017
66 Golden-crowned Kinglet October 1, 2017
67 Ruby-crowned Kinglet September 30, 2017
68 Eastern Bluebird January 9, 2017
69 Hermit Thrush October 13, 2017
70 Wood Thrush April 28, 2017
71 American Robin January 6, 2017
72 Gray Catbird April 23, 2017
73 Brown Thrasher April 26, 2017
74 Northern Mockingbird January 8, 2017
75 European Starling January 7, 2017
76 Cedar Waxwing May 16, 2017
77 Ovenbird April 30, 2017
78 Blue-winged Warbler August 28, 2017
79 Black-and-white Warbler May 6, 2017
80 Tennessee Warbler August 25, 2017
81 Mourning Warbler August 20, 2017
82 Common Yellowthroat April 26, 2017
83 American Redstart May 17, 2017
84 Northern Parula May 10, 2017
85 Magnolia Warbler May 17, 2017
86 Blackburnian Warbler August 31, 2017
87 Yellow Warbler May 8, 2017
88 Chestnut-sided Warbler August 19, 2017
89 Blackpoll Warbler May 12, 2017
90 Black-throated Blue Warbler August 26, 2017
91 Palm Warbler March 30, 2017
92 Yellow-rumped Warbler April 16, 2017
93 Prairie Warbler August 9, 2017
94 Black-throated Green Warbler September 2, 2017
95 Canada Warbler August 23, 2017
96 American Tree Sparrow January 8, 2017
97 Chipping Sparrow April 6, 2017
98 Field Sparrow January 4, 2017
99 Dark-eyed Junco January 2, 2017
100 White-crowned Sparrow May 15, 2017
101 White-throated Sparrow January 2, 2017
102 Song Sparrow January 2, 2017
103 Lincoln's Sparrow October 11, 2017
104 Swamp Sparrow October 14, 2017
105 Eastern Towhee April 3, 2017
106 Scarlet Tanager May 10, 2017
107 Northern Cardinal January 2, 2017
108 Rose-breasted Grosbeak May 5, 2017
109 Blue Grosbeak May 8, 2017
110 Indigo Bunting May 8, 2017
111 Bobolink September 3, 2017
112 Eastern Meadowlark April 3, 2017
113 Orchard Oriole May 1, 2017
114 Baltimore Oriole May 4, 2017
115 Red-winged Blackbird January 9, 2017
116 Brown-headed Cowbird January 10, 2017
117 Rusty Blackbird November 4, 2017
118 Common Grackle January 28, 2017
119 House Finch January 2, 2017
120 Pine Siskin December 3, 2017
121 American Goldfinch January 2, 2017



----- Original Message -----

From: "Joe Sebastiani" <bunker17...>
To: <de-birds...>
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 5:12:22 PM
Subject: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017

Dear Fellow Yard Birding Nerds:

Another year of yard birding has come and gone, and the old saying remains true, "Not all yards are created equal, but you never know what will fly over". The results are in for the most celebrated bird listing competition in Delaware. This elite group of yard birders excel in their stamina for standing still in the suburban landscape, gazing out the window for long periods, laying back in lawn chairs with a drink, staring at the sky watching for long-awaited but short-lived fly-bys of ducks, shorebirds, and hawks, waking early to hear the morning chorus from shrubs three doors down, and sprinting back to the yard from the party next door to make sure a new species "counts". All this while risking humiliation from neighbors, or worse, looking like the "creeper down the street" as they spend long hours in the yard, binoculars slung around their necks. As a yard birder myself, I know the thrill of finding a new bird in the yard. It is worth all of the time spent steps from the!
house and overhearing the couple next door on their porch sipping morning coffee remarking, "What is he doing? I am pretty sure he is looking at birds".

Tomorrow begins a new year of yard-listing and you too can join the fun. Set a goal for yourself and see how many species you can find. You might be surprised at what flies by or lands in your maple tree. Delmarva Ornithological Society Yard Listing rules and record keeping information can be found here: https://www.dosbirds.org/activities/delaware-backyard-birding-challenge/. To see the entire list of all 75 Yard Birders: http://ebird.org/ebird/site/yard?locInfo.regionType=subnational1&locInfo.regionCode=US-DE. You can also sort by county, all-time leaders, and look at who's-who in other states.

Congratulations to the 2017 Delaware Yard Birding Challenge Top 5

1. Sharon Lynn - 128 species (Rehoboth Beach). Most recent new species: American Kestrel
2. Aaron Reb - 126 species (Frederica). Most recent new species: Gadwall
3. Amy and Jim White - 121 species (Hockessin). Most recent new species: Brown Creeper...about time
4. Michael Moore - 119 species (Newark). Most recent new species: Horned Lark
5. Philip Thompson - 115 species (Wilmington). Most recent new species: Pine Siskin

For anyone on the list, it would be interesting to know what some of you best yard birds were for the year. Good luck in 2018, and if you haven't joined the challenge, give it a try!

Joe Sebastiani
Delmarva Ornithological Society

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>
 

Back to top
Date: 1/2/18 6:22 pm
From: Amy White <amywwhite...>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
Thanks to Joe Sebastiani for continuing to coordinate the Delaware Yard Birding Challenge.
As Joe posted a few days ago, in 2017 Jim and I observed 121 species in our "White Yard C". This was our highest year count yet. We know we are very fortunate to live on a nature preserve and have varied habitats within our defined Yard, including open field, thicket, and the edge of a mature woodlands. We've also got an expansive view from the hilltop in the corner of our Yard which is great for observing hawks and other flyovers. The only thing we lack is any nearby water.
Our best/favorite yard birds this year (in date order):
Merlin - seen numerous times in January & February -perched at the top of a neighbor's tall tree.
Black-billed Cuckoo* - great looks during a yard walk on May 10.
Laughing Gull* - a surprise flyover on August 20.
Olive-sided Flycatcher* - hawking for insects (including 2 bumblebees and a wasp!) from dead branches high in trees; August 28 and 29.
Yellow-bellied Flycatcher* - gleaning insects in oak and sassafras trees on September 1.
Common Nighthawks - we counted 68 fly over the hilltop on September 3. Very cool.
Common Raven - observed flying over twice this year: October 14 (Jim) and November 24 (Amy).
( *new in our yard this year)

We had a lot of fun birding our yard this past year. Can't wait to see what we'll find in 2018!

-Amy & Jim White
Hockessin, DE


White Yard C -year 2017 list
Species Date
1 Snow Goose January 26, 2017
2 Canada Goose January 8, 2017
3 Wood Duck June 25, 2017
4 Mallard July 5, 2017
5 Common Merganser January 9, 2017
6 Great Blue Heron March 21, 2017
7 Great Egret May 24, 2017
8 Black Vulture January 8, 2017
9 Turkey Vulture January 19, 2017
10 Osprey May 10, 2017
11 Northern Harrier April 8, 2017
12 Sharp-shinned Hawk February 6, 2017
13 Cooper's Hawk February 1, 2017
14 Bald Eagle January 19, 2017
15 Red-shouldered Hawk February 2, 2017
16 Broad-winged Hawk April 14, 2017
17 Red-tailed Hawk January 8, 2017
18 American Woodcock March 8, 2017
19 Laughing Gull August 20, 2017
20 Ring-billed Gull August 20, 2017
21 Rock Pigeon June 24, 2017
22 Mourning Dove January 2, 2017
23 Yellow-billed Cuckoo June 23, 2017
24 Black-billed Cuckoo May 10, 2017
25 Eastern Screech-Owl January 1, 2017
26 Great Horned Owl September 17, 2017
27 Barred Owl May 16, 2017
28 Common Nighthawk May 18, 2017
29 Chimney Swift April 28, 2017
30 Ruby-throated Hummingbird April 23, 2017
31 Belted Kingfisher April 17, 2017
32 Red-bellied Woodpecker January 2, 2017
33 Yellow-bellied Sapsucker February 7, 2017
34 Downy Woodpecker January 2, 2017
35 Hairy Woodpecker January 3, 2017
36 Northern Flicker April 8, 2017
37 Pileated Woodpecker January 10, 2017
38 American Kestrel March 26, 2017
39 Merlin January 19, 2017
40 Peregrine Falcon October 14, 2017
41 Olive-sided Flycatcher August 28, 2017
42 Eastern Wood-Pewee May 23, 2017
43 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher September 1, 2017
44 Willow Flycatcher May 23, 2017
45 Eastern Phoebe March 5, 2017
46 Great Crested Flycatcher May 12, 2017
47 Eastern Kingbird May 10, 2017
48 Blue-headed Vireo October 2, 2017
49 Red-eyed Vireo May 29, 2017
50 Blue Jay January 2, 2017
51 American Crow January 6, 2017
52 Fish Crow March 26, 2017
53 Common Raven October 14, 2017
54 Purple Martin August 12, 2017
55 Tree Swallow March 27, 2017
56 Barn Swallow April 8, 2017
57 Carolina Chickadee January 2, 2017
58 Black-capped Chickadee January 2, 2017
59 Tufted Titmouse January 2, 2017
60 Red-breasted Nuthatch February 3, 2017
61 White-breasted Nuthatch January 2, 2017
62 Brown Creeper December 22, 2017
63 House Wren April 19, 2017
64 Carolina Wren January 2, 2017
65 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher April 18, 2017
66 Golden-crowned Kinglet October 1, 2017
67 Ruby-crowned Kinglet September 30, 2017
68 Eastern Bluebird January 9, 2017
69 Hermit Thrush October 13, 2017
70 Wood Thrush April 28, 2017
71 American Robin January 6, 2017
72 Gray Catbird April 23, 2017
73 Brown Thrasher April 26, 2017
74 Northern Mockingbird January 8, 2017
75 European Starling January 7, 2017
76 Cedar Waxwing May 16, 2017
77 Ovenbird April 30, 2017
78 Blue-winged Warbler August 28, 2017
79 Black-and-white Warbler May 6, 2017
80 Tennessee Warbler August 25, 2017
81 Mourning Warbler August 20, 2017
82 Common Yellowthroat April 26, 2017
83 American Redstart May 17, 2017
84 Northern Parula May 10, 2017
85 Magnolia Warbler May 17, 2017
86 Blackburnian Warbler August 31, 2017
87 Yellow Warbler May 8, 2017
88 Chestnut-sided Warbler August 19, 2017
89 Blackpoll Warbler May 12, 2017
90 Black-throated Blue Warbler August 26, 2017
91 Palm Warbler March 30, 2017
92 Yellow-rumped Warbler April 16, 2017
93 Prairie Warbler August 9, 2017
94 Black-throated Green Warbler September 2, 2017
95 Canada Warbler August 23, 2017
96 American Tree Sparrow January 8, 2017
97 Chipping Sparrow April 6, 2017
98 Field Sparrow January 4, 2017
99 Dark-eyed Junco January 2, 2017
100 White-crowned Sparrow May 15, 2017
101 White-throated Sparrow January 2, 2017
102 Song Sparrow January 2, 2017
103 Lincoln's Sparrow October 11, 2017
104 Swamp Sparrow October 14, 2017
105 Eastern Towhee April 3, 2017
106 Scarlet Tanager May 10, 2017
107 Northern Cardinal January 2, 2017
108 Rose-breasted Grosbeak May 5, 2017
109 Blue Grosbeak May 8, 2017
110 Indigo Bunting May 8, 2017
111 Bobolink September 3, 2017
112 Eastern Meadowlark April 3, 2017
113 Orchard Oriole May 1, 2017
114 Baltimore Oriole May 4, 2017
115 Red-winged Blackbird January 9, 2017
116 Brown-headed Cowbird January 10, 2017
117 Rusty Blackbird November 4, 2017
118 Common Grackle January 28, 2017
119 House Finch January 2, 2017
120 Pine Siskin December 3, 2017
121 American Goldfinch January 2, 2017



----- Original Message -----

From: "Joe Sebastiani" <bunker17...>
To: <de-birds...>
Sent: Sunday, December 31, 2017 5:12:22 PM
Subject: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017

Dear Fellow Yard Birding Nerds:

Another year of yard birding has come and gone, and the old saying remains true, "Not all yards are created equal, but you never know what will fly over". The results are in for the most celebrated bird listing competition in Delaware. This elite group of yard birders excel in their stamina for standing still in the suburban landscape, gazing out the window for long periods, laying back in lawn chairs with a drink, staring at the sky watching for long-awaited but short-lived fly-bys of ducks, shorebirds, and hawks, waking early to hear the morning chorus from shrubs three doors down, and sprinting back to the yard from the party next door to make sure a new species "counts". All this while risking humiliation from neighbors, or worse, looking like the "creeper down the street" as they spend long hours in the yard, binoculars slung around their necks. As a yard birder myself, I know the thrill of finding a new bird in the yard. It is worth all of the time spent steps from the house and overhearing the couple next door on their porch sipping morning coffee remarking, "What is he doing? I am pretty sure he is looking at birds".

Tomorrow begins a new year of yard-listing and you too can join the fun. Set a goal for yourself and see how many species you can find. You might be surprised at what flies by or lands in your maple tree. Delmarva Ornithological Society Yard Listing rules and record keeping information can be found here: https://www.dosbirds.org/activities/delaware-backyard-birding-challenge/. To see the entire list of all 75 Yard Birders: http://ebird.org/ebird/site/yard?locInfo.regionType=subnational1&locInfo.regionCode=US-DE. You can also sort by county, all-time leaders, and look at who's-who in other states.

Congratulations to the 2017 Delaware Yard Birding Challenge Top 5

1. Sharon Lynn - 128 species (Rehoboth Beach). Most recent new species: American Kestrel
2. Aaron Reb - 126 species (Frederica). Most recent new species: Gadwall
3. Amy and Jim White - 121 species (Hockessin). Most recent new species: Brown Creeper...about time
4. Michael Moore - 119 species (Newark). Most recent new species: Horned Lark
5. Philip Thompson - 115 species (Wilmington). Most recent new species: Pine Siskin

For anyone on the list, it would be interesting to know what some of you best yard birds were for the year. Good luck in 2018, and if you haven't joined the challenge, give it a try!

Joe Sebastiani
Delmarva Ornithological Society

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>


List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>
 

Back to top
Date: 12/31/17 2:12 pm
From: Joe Sebastiani <bunker17...>
Subject: [de-birds] Delaware Yard Birding Challenge 2017
Dear Fellow Yard Birding Nerds:

Another year of yard birding has come and gone, and the old saying remains true, "Not all yards are created equal, but you never know what will fly over". The results are in for the most celebrated bird listing competition in Delaware. This elite group of yard birders excel in their stamina for standing still in the suburban landscape, gazing out the window for long periods, laying back in lawn chairs with a drink, staring at the sky watching for long-awaited but short-lived fly-bys of ducks, shorebirds, and hawks, waking early to hear the morning chorus from shrubs three doors down, and sprinting back to the yard from the party next door to make sure a new species "counts". All this while risking humiliation from neighbors, or worse, looking like the "creeper down the street" as they spend long hours in the yard, binoculars slung around their necks. As a yard birder myself, I know the thrill of finding a new bird in the yard. It is worth all of the time spent steps from the house and overhearing the couple next door on their porch sipping morning coffee remarking, "What is he doing? I am pretty sure he is looking at birds".

Tomorrow begins a new year of yard-listing and you too can join the fun. Set a goal for yourself and see how many species you can find. You might be surprised at what flies by or lands in your maple tree. Delmarva Ornithological Society Yard Listing rules and record keeping information can be found here: https://www.dosbirds.org/activities/delaware-backyard-birding-challenge/. To see the entire list of all 75 Yard Birders: http://ebird.org/ebird/site/yard?locInfo.regionType=subnational1&locInfo.regionCode=US-DE. You can also sort by county, all-time leaders, and look at who's-who in other states.

Congratulations to the 2017 Delaware Yard Birding Challenge Top 5

1. Sharon Lynn - 128 species (Rehoboth Beach). Most recent new species: American Kestrel
2. Aaron Reb - 126 species (Frederica). Most recent new species: Gadwall
3. Amy and Jim White - 121 species (Hockessin). Most recent new species: Brown Creeper...about time
4. Michael Moore - 119 species (Newark). Most recent new species: Horned Lark
5. Philip Thompson - 115 species (Wilmington). Most recent new species: Pine Siskin

For anyone on the list, it would be interesting to know what some of you best yard birds were for the year. Good luck in 2018, and if you haven't joined the challenge, give it a try!

Joe Sebastiani
Delmarva Ornithological Society

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>
 

Back to top
Date: 12/30/17 4:28 pm
From: Ian Stewart <istew...>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, December 29th, 2017
Thanks Andy for all your hard work compiling these weekly reports! We all
look forward to reading them.

335 was an awesome species total for such a small state and looking back,
2017 was an excellent year all-round. Spring and fall migration were both
very active with several unusual migrants being spotted, there was a
scattering of rarities throughout the year including the typically quiet
summer months, and we're ending on a high with snowy owls.

Happy New Year everyone and let's hope 2018 is even better!

Ian Stewart



On Sat, Dec 30, 2017 at 10:16 AM, Andrew ednie <ednieap...> wrote:

> RBA
> * Delaware
> * Statewide
> * December 29, 2017
> * DEST1712.29
>
> *Birds mentioned
> Greater White-fronted Goose
> Snow Goose
> Ross's Goose
> Brant
> Cackling Goose
> Tundra Swan
> Mute Swan
> Gadwall
> Green-winged Teal
> Canvasback
> Ring-necked Duck
> Greater Scaup
> Long-tailed Duck
> COMMON EIDER
> Black Scoter
> Surf Scoter
> Bufflehead
> Common Goldeneye
> Common Merganser
> Hooded Merganser
> Red-breasted Merganser
> Ruddy Duck
> Ring-necked Pheasant
> Red-throated Loon
> Common Loon
> Pied-billed Grebe
> Horned Grebe
> Great Cormorant
> Northern Gannet
> American Bittern
> Great Egret
> CATTLE EGRET
> Bald Eagle
> ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK
> Virginia Rail
> Clapper Rail
> American Coot
> Black-bellied Plover
> Ruddy Turnstone
> Sanderling
> Dunlin
> Least Sandpiper
> Pectoral Sandpiper
> Purple Sandpiper
> Lesser Yellowlegs
> Greater Yellowlegs
> Bonaparte's Gull
> BLACK-HEADED GULL
> Iceland Gull
> Lesser Black-backed Gull
> Forster's Tern
> Barred Owl
> SNOWY OWL
> Short-eared Owl
> Long-eared Owl
> Saw-whet Owl
> Red-headed Woodpecker
> Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
> American Kestrel
> Merlin
> Peregrine Falcon
> Eastern Phoebe
> Brown-headed Nuthatch
> SEDGE WREN
> Marsh Wren
> Gray Catbird
> Brown Thrasher
> Lapland Longspur
> Snow Bunting
> American Pipit
> Orange-Crowned Warbler
> BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER
> Pine Warbler
> American Tree Sparrow
> Savannah Sparrow
> Fox Sparrow
> White-crowned Sparrow
> Eastern Meadowlark
>
> Hotline: Birdline Delaware
> Date: December 29, 2017
> To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
> Compiler: Andy Ednie (<ednieap...>)
> Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
> New Jersey, Maryland
>
> On Friday, December 29th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware
> Museum
> of Natural History in Greenville. Happy New Years everybody! The unofficial
> Delaware year list remains at 335 species.
>
> The SNOWY OWL continues to be seen at Fowler's Beach in Prime Hook National
> Wildlife Refuge. It even made the front page of the local newspaper, The
> Delaware State News. The SNOWY OWL has been seen daily sitting on the beach
> or the dune fencing. However, there is growing concerns about this bird
> being harassed and chased along the beach. The refuge staff is monitoring
> the situation and if illegal activity persists may close beach access.
> Another SNOWY OWL has been seen at Slaughter's Beach. That bird can be seen
> sitting on the roof of the Cedar Creek Marina. You can also see the SNOWY
> OWL from the boat ramp on Cedar Creek along Lighthouse Road.
>
> Along with the SNOWY OWL at Fowler's Beach, there has been a multitude of
> SHORT-EARED OWLS seen from the parking lot. A peak count of 6 SHORT-EARED
> OWLS was reported this week. A light phase Rough-legged Hawk was also seen,
> along with American Kestrel and Peregrine Falcon. Along the beach has been
> a
> flock of Snow buntings that contained 4 Lapland Longspurs. Waterfowl seen
> included TUNDRA SWAN, CANVASBACK, GREATER SCAUP, LONG-TAILED DUCK, HOODED
> MERGANSER, and HORNED GREBE. BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, SANDERLING and dunlin
> were seen along the shoreline. AMERICAN BITTERN and GREAT EGRET were seen
> in
> the marsh. A flock of a dozen EASTERN MEADOWLARKS was seen along Fowler's
> Beach Road.
>
> Three ROSS'S GEESE were found in the huge flock of SNOW GEESE along Draper
> Road. GREATER SCAUP, SURF SCOTER, and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER were seen at
> Broadkill Beach. A pair of ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS were reported along Broadkill
> Beach Road, including the previously reported dark phase bird. An
> ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was reported along the Boardwalk Trail at Prime Hook
> Headquarters, along with EASTERN PHOEBE and both RUBY-CROWNED and
> GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS.
>
> An adult, winter plumaged BLACK-HEADED GULL was seen at the Wolfe's Neck
> Sewage Treatment Plant near Midway. This is along Route 1, between Lewes
> and
> Rehoboth Beach. The sewage treatment plant is private property, but you can
> look over the fence. NORTHERN SHOVELER and flyover PEREGRINE FALCON were
> also seen.
>
> The recent cold snap has produced some unusual sightings. A BLACK AND WHITE
> WARBLER was found in brush behind the Duncan Donuts on Route 113 in
> Millsboro on Thursday. A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER came into a feeder at the
> Woods along Herring Creek on Angola Neck off the Camp Arrowhead Road. A
> PINE
> WARBLER was seen coming to a feeder in Harbeson. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES
> were seen at Cape Henlopen State Park, Bethany Beach and Ocean View.
>
> Three COMMON EIDERS, an immature drake and 2 hens, has been seen all week
> at
> Indian River Inlet. The eiders were seen with the flock of 90 LONG-TAILED
> DUCKS, along with BRANT, BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, and RED-BREASTED
> MERGANSER. GREAT CORMORANT, NORTHERN GANNET, COMMON and RED-THROATED LOON
> were seen at the inlet, along with PURPLE SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and
> SANDERLING. FORSTER'S TERN, BONAPARTE'S and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL were
> seen feeding along the waterway.
>
> Another pair of COMMON EIDER was seen at the Henlopen Acres Beach Club,
> north of Rehoboth Beach. A flock of 100 CANVASBACK was seen at the Spring
> Lake Condominiums along Route 1 between Rehoboth and Dewey Beach. A peak
> count of 180 CANVASBACKS were seen on Silver Lake in Rehoboth, along with
> RUDDY DUCK plus HOODED and a single RED-BREASTED MERGANSER.
>
> CANVASBACK was also seen on the Delaware Bay at South Slaughter's Beach. An
> ICELAND GULL was seen sitting on the jetty at Mispillion Inlet from the
> DuPont Nature Center. GREATER SCAUP, LONG-TAILED DUCK, and RED-BREASTED
> MERGANSER plus SURF and BLACK SCOTER were seen at Big Stone Beach, along
> with FORSTER'S TERN and NORTHERN GANNET.
>
> Interesting shorebirds at Milford Neck Wildlife Area included BLACK-BELLIED
> PLOVER, WILSON'S SNIPE, plus PECTORAL and LEAST SANDPIPER. VIRGINIA RAIL,
> YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH, and MARSH WREN were found
> along Big Stone Beach Road. A BROWN THRASHER, GRAY CATBIRD, SEDGE WREN and
> CLAPPER RAIL were found at the Dog Training Area along the Mispillion
> River.
>
>
> A CATTLE EGRET continues to be seen feeding along Route 1 south of the
> Dover
> Air Force Base. Keep an eye out if you're driving through this area. A
> ROSS'S GOOSE was seen among the large flock of SNOW GEESE at Cartanza Road
> near Little Creek.
>
> A COMMON GOLDENEYE was reported opposite Raymond Pool in Bombay Hook
> National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. Other waterfowl included TUNDRA SWAN,
> BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER, and RUDDY DUCK. A few puddle ducks seen on
> the
> ice, including GADWALL, NORTHERN SHOVELER, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL.
>
> A pair of GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE were found in the large flock of SNOW
> GEESE along Route 13 south of St. Georges below the C&D Canal. MUTE SWAN
> and
> NORTHERN PINTAIL were seen at the Ashton Tract at Augustine Wildlife Area
> near Port Penn. Sparrows seen at the Ashton Tract included SAVANNAH, FOX,
> WHITE-CROWNED and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW. Other highlights included WINTER
> WREN, GRAY CATBIRD, AMERICAN PIPIT and a flyover PEREGRINE FALCON. Six BALD
> EAGLES were seen at Thousand Acre Marsh along with a HOODED MERGANSER. A
> RING-NECKED PHEASANT was seen at the Port Penn impoundments along Route 9.
>
> RED-THROATED LOON, COMMON GOLDENEYE, and BUFFLEHEAD were seen at Augustine
> Beach, south of Port Penn. A single BONAPARTE'S GULL was seen there on
> Tuesday. COMMON GOLDENEYE and HOODED MERGANSER were seen at the Augustine
> Creek causeway along Route 9. A peak count of 48 TUNDRA SWANS were reported
> at hangman's Creek near Stave's Landing Road. RING-NECKED DUCKS and a
> single
> MUTE SWAN were seen on the pond from Route 1 north of Smyrna at the
> crossover with Black Diamond Road.
>
> A TUNDRA SWAN was seen on Newark Reservoir on Sunday. COMMON MERGANSER and
> American Coot were reported there this week. Hoope's Reservoir is still
> mostly unfrozen and had 40 RING-NECKED DUCK, 75 COMMON and 8 HOODED
> MERGANSERS, plus a PIED-BILLED GREBE. A CACKLING GOOSE was reported at
> Bellevue State park in Brandywine Hundred. A YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER was
> seen in a yard in Fairfax. A MERLIN was seen at Auburn Heights near
> Yorklyn.
>
>
> Owl reports included a BARRED OWL along Naaman's Creek off Grubb Road in
> Brandywine Hundred. SHORT-EARED OWLS were seen off Lighthouse Road and
> Bennett's Pier near Milford. A SAW-WHET and LONG-EARED OWL were reported
> along the Bennett's Pier Road on the Milford Christmas Count.
>
> Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, George Armstead, Ned
> Brinkley, Philip Mitchell, Alex Lamoreaux, John Skilbicki, Lauren Merlo,
> James DeHadaway, Gina Sheridan, Mike Smith, Katie Bird, Ellen and Jake
> Jacobson, Madelyne Ray, Linda Lorenz, John and Andy Dunn, Chris Bennett,
> Anthony Gonzon, Rob Blye, Bob Edelen, Dave Fees, Jim and Amy White, Chris
> Rowe, Kelley Nunn, Hannah Greenberg, Tim Freiday, Jerald and Aaron Reb, Ken
> Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Phil Thompson, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Joe Russell and
> Joe Swertinski. Remember, the Birdline needs your sightings. Please call
> your reports into 302-792-9591 or email <ednieap...> Until next
> year, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!
>
> -end transcript
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>
>



--
Ian Stewart
Avondale PA 19311

List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>
 

Back to top
Date: 12/30/17 7:16 am
From: Andrew ednie <ednieap...>
Subject: [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, December 29th, 2017
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* December 29, 2017
* DEST1712.29

*Birds mentioned
Greater White-fronted Goose
Snow Goose
Ross's Goose
Brant
Cackling Goose
Tundra Swan
Mute Swan
Gadwall
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Ring-necked Duck
Greater Scaup
Long-tailed Duck
COMMON EIDER
Black Scoter
Surf Scoter
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Common Merganser
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Ring-necked Pheasant
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
Great Cormorant
Northern Gannet
American Bittern
Great Egret
CATTLE EGRET
Bald Eagle
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK
Virginia Rail
Clapper Rail
American Coot
Black-bellied Plover
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Least Sandpiper
Pectoral Sandpiper
Purple Sandpiper
Lesser Yellowlegs
Greater Yellowlegs
Bonaparte's Gull
BLACK-HEADED GULL
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Forster's Tern
Barred Owl
SNOWY OWL
Short-eared Owl
Long-eared Owl
Saw-whet Owl
Red-headed Woodpecker
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Phoebe
Brown-headed Nuthatch
SEDGE WREN
Marsh Wren
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Lapland Longspur
Snow Bunting
American Pipit
Orange-Crowned Warbler
BLACK AND WHITE WARBLER
Pine Warbler
American Tree Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
White-crowned Sparrow
Eastern Meadowlark

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: December 29, 2017
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (<ednieap...>)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

On Friday, December 29th, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. Happy New Years everybody! The unofficial
Delaware year list remains at 335 species.

The SNOWY OWL continues to be seen at Fowler's Beach in Prime Hook National
Wildlife Refuge. It even made the front page of the local newspaper, The
Delaware State News. The SNOWY OWL has been seen daily sitting on the beach
or the dune fencing. However, there is growing concerns about this bird
being harassed and chased along the beach. The refuge staff is monitoring
the situation and if illegal activity persists may close beach access.
Another SNOWY OWL has been seen at Slaughter's Beach. That bird can be seen
sitting on the roof of the Cedar Creek Marina. You can also see the SNOWY
OWL from the boat ramp on Cedar Creek along Lighthouse Road.

Along with the SNOWY OWL at Fowler's Beach, there has been a multitude of
SHORT-EARED OWLS seen from the parking lot. A peak count of 6 SHORT-EARED
OWLS was reported this week. A light phase Rough-legged Hawk was also seen,
along with American Kestrel and Peregrine Falcon. Along the beach has been a
flock of Snow buntings that contained 4 Lapland Longspurs. Waterfowl seen
included TUNDRA SWAN, CANVASBACK, GREATER SCAUP, LONG-TAILED DUCK, HOODED
MERGANSER, and HORNED GREBE. BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, SANDERLING and dunlin
were seen along the shoreline. AMERICAN BITTERN and GREAT EGRET were seen in
the marsh. A flock of a dozen EASTERN MEADOWLARKS was seen along Fowler's
Beach Road.

Three ROSS'S GEESE were found in the huge flock of SNOW GEESE along Draper
Road. GREATER SCAUP, SURF SCOTER, and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER were seen at
Broadkill Beach. A pair of ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS were reported along Broadkill
Beach Road, including the previously reported dark phase bird. An
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was reported along the Boardwalk Trail at Prime Hook
Headquarters, along with EASTERN PHOEBE and both RUBY-CROWNED and
GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLETS.

An adult, winter plumaged BLACK-HEADED GULL was seen at the Wolfe's Neck
Sewage Treatment Plant near Midway. This is along Route 1, between Lewes and
Rehoboth Beach. The sewage treatment plant is private property, but you can
look over the fence. NORTHERN SHOVELER and flyover PEREGRINE FALCON were
also seen.

The recent cold snap has produced some unusual sightings. A BLACK AND WHITE
WARBLER was found in brush behind the Duncan Donuts on Route 113 in
Millsboro on Thursday. A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER came into a feeder at the
Woods along Herring Creek on Angola Neck off the Camp Arrowhead Road. A PINE
WARBLER was seen coming to a feeder in Harbeson. BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCHES
were seen at Cape Henlopen State Park, Bethany Beach and Ocean View.

Three COMMON EIDERS, an immature drake and 2 hens, has been seen all week at
Indian River Inlet. The eiders were seen with the flock of 90 LONG-TAILED
DUCKS, along with BRANT, BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, and RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER. GREAT CORMORANT, NORTHERN GANNET, COMMON and RED-THROATED LOON
were seen at the inlet, along with PURPLE SANDPIPER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, and
SANDERLING. FORSTER'S TERN, BONAPARTE'S and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL were
seen feeding along the waterway.

Another pair of COMMON EIDER was seen at the Henlopen Acres Beach Club,
north of Rehoboth Beach. A flock of 100 CANVASBACK was seen at the Spring
Lake Condominiums along Route 1 between Rehoboth and Dewey Beach. A peak
count of 180 CANVASBACKS were seen on Silver Lake in Rehoboth, along with
RUDDY DUCK plus HOODED and a single RED-BREASTED MERGANSER.

CANVASBACK was also seen on the Delaware Bay at South Slaughter's Beach. An
ICELAND GULL was seen sitting on the jetty at Mispillion Inlet from the
DuPont Nature Center. GREATER SCAUP, LONG-TAILED DUCK, and RED-BREASTED
MERGANSER plus SURF and BLACK SCOTER were seen at Big Stone Beach, along
with FORSTER'S TERN and NORTHERN GANNET.

Interesting shorebirds at Milford Neck Wildlife Area included BLACK-BELLIED
PLOVER, WILSON'S SNIPE, plus PECTORAL and LEAST SANDPIPER. VIRGINIA RAIL,
YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, BROWN-HEADED NUTHATCH, and MARSH WREN were found
along Big Stone Beach Road. A BROWN THRASHER, GRAY CATBIRD, SEDGE WREN and
CLAPPER RAIL were found at the Dog Training Area along the Mispillion River.


A CATTLE EGRET continues to be seen feeding along Route 1 south of the Dover
Air Force Base. Keep an eye out if you're driving through this area. A
ROSS'S GOOSE was seen among the large flock of SNOW GEESE at Cartanza Road
near Little Creek.

A COMMON GOLDENEYE was reported opposite Raymond Pool in Bombay Hook
National Wildlife Refuge near Smyrna. Other waterfowl included TUNDRA SWAN,
BUFFLEHEAD, HOODED MERGANSER, and RUDDY DUCK. A few puddle ducks seen on the
ice, including GADWALL, NORTHERN SHOVELER, and GREEN-WINGED TEAL.

A pair of GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE were found in the large flock of SNOW
GEESE along Route 13 south of St. Georges below the C&D Canal. MUTE SWAN and
NORTHERN PINTAIL were seen at the Ashton Tract at Augustine Wildlife Area
near Port Penn. Sparrows seen at the Ashton Tract included SAVANNAH, FOX,
WHITE-CROWNED and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW. Other highlights included WINTER
WREN, GRAY CATBIRD, AMERICAN PIPIT and a flyover PEREGRINE FALCON. Six BALD
EAGLES were seen at Thousand Acre Marsh along with a HOODED MERGANSER. A
RING-NECKED PHEASANT was seen at the Port Penn impoundments along Route 9.

RED-THROATED LOON, COMMON GOLDENEYE, and BUFFLEHEAD were seen at Augustine
Beach, south of Port Penn. A single BONAPARTE'S GULL was seen there on
Tuesday. COMMON GOLDENEYE and HOODED MERGANSER were seen at the Augustine
Creek causeway along Route 9. A peak count of 48 TUNDRA SWANS were reported
at hangman's Creek near Stave's Landing Road. RING-NECKED DUCKS and a single
MUTE SWAN were seen on the pond from Route 1 north of Smyrna at the
crossover with Black Diamond Road.

A TUNDRA SWAN was seen on Newark Reservoir on Sunday. COMMON MERGANSER and
American Coot were reported there this week. Hoope's Reservoir is still
mostly unfrozen and had 40 RING-NECKED DUCK, 75 COMMON and 8 HOODED
MERGANSERS, plus a PIED-BILLED GREBE. A CACKLING GOOSE was reported at
Bellevue State park in Brandywine Hundred. A YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER was
seen in a yard in Fairfax. A MERLIN was seen at Auburn Heights near Yorklyn.


Owl reports included a BARRED OWL along Naaman's Creek off Grubb Road in
Brandywine Hundred. SHORT-EARED OWLS were seen off Lighthouse Road and
Bennett's Pier near Milford. A SAW-WHET and LONG-EARED OWL were reported
along the Bennett's Pier Road on the Milford Christmas Count.

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, George Armstead, Ned
Brinkley, Philip Mitchell, Alex Lamoreaux, John Skilbicki, Lauren Merlo,
James DeHadaway, Gina Sheridan, Mike Smith, Katie Bird, Ellen and Jake
Jacobson, Madelyne Ray, Linda Lorenz, John and Andy Dunn, Chris Bennett,
Anthony Gonzon, Rob Blye, Bob Edelen, Dave Fees, Jim and Amy White, Chris
Rowe, Kelley Nunn, Hannah Greenberg, Tim Freiday, Jerald and Aaron Reb, Ken
Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Phil Thompson, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Joe Russell and
Joe Swertinski. Remember, the Birdline needs your sightings. Please call
your reports into 302-792-9591 or email <ednieap...> Until next
year, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good birding!

-end transcript

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Date: 12/30/17 4:53 am
From: Kar DeGeiso <kdegeiso...>
Subject: [de-birds] birding in extreme cold weather
It's going to be extremely cold. Please be careful out there. I use footwarmers, but are very hard to find. I found them on Amazon.com. They are full length for bottom of foot and adhere to your socks. They last for 9 hours. I have been using them for the last few years, and have helped in keeping me birding for longer periods. Check them out.

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Date: 12/28/17 6:40 am
From: Sullivan, Kathleen N. (DNREC) <Kathleen.Sullivan...>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] cold snap feeder birds including Red-headed Woodpecker
We had a flock of bluebirds at our feeder yesterdayfor suet mostly.
Never seen more than 1 at feeder and even that is rare.
Keeping our feeders full over the next few weeks.
Kathleen
________________________________
From: Delaware Birding <de-birds...> on behalf of Rob Blye <rwblye...>
Sent: Thursday, December 28, 2017 9:30:33 AM
To: <de-birds...>
Subject: [de-birds] cold snap feeder birds including Red-headed Woodpecker

The cold weather seemingly drove some birds to our yard and feeders
including one red-headed woodpecker and one brown headed nuthatch.

We are in the Rehobeth CBC count circle if that is of interest but the RHWO
is not a regular at the feeders and has been hard to find in the woods,
too. We last saw one about two weeks ago. We have not seen the Angola Neck
Preserve RHWOs for well over a month.


*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

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Date: 12/28/17 6:30 am
From: Rob Blye <rwblye...>
Subject: [de-birds] cold snap feeder birds including Red-headed Woodpecker
The cold weather seemingly drove some birds to our yard and feeders
including one red-headed woodpecker and one brown headed nuthatch.

We are in the Rehobeth CBC count circle if that is of interest but the RHWO
is not a regular at the feeders and has been hard to find in the woods,
too. We last saw one about two weeks ago. We have not seen the Angola Neck
Preserve RHWOs for well over a month.


*Rob*

Robert W. Blye
34603 Doe Run
Lewes DE 19958-3332
302 945-8618
610 213-2413 mobile

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Date: 12/27/17 5:47 pm
From: Ann Marie Dinkel <Adinkl...>
Subject: [de-birds] Field guide question
Greetings all,



I am traveling to Punta Cana in February, and am looking for suggestions for
the best field guide for my trip. I'm not "focusing" on birding, but will
have my bins with me at all times in hopes of finding new birds. I have a
Peterson's West Indies guide, Sibley, National Geographic, Kaufmann's and an
assortment of Belize, Costa Rica and Mexico books. Any guidance is
appreciated.



Thanks in advance,



Ann Dinkel

Lewes, DE



---
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Date: 12/26/17 7:22 am
From: Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [de-birds] The Boat Trip full
Hi all 


 
The boat for the Cape Henlopen CBC on 31 December is full.
 
Frank

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Date: 12/23/17 12:02 pm
From: Lise Schools <lise...>
Subject: Re: [de-birds] Cape Henlopen CBC and Boat Trip
My husband, Ed, and I want to participate and would like to take the boat if space is still available. Thanks for organizing.

Ed and Lise Schools

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 23, 2017, at 1:27 PM, Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> The Cape Henlopen-Prime Hook Christmas Bird Count will be held on Sunday December 31, 2017. I have scheduled the boat trip to the ice breakers and jetties in Lewes Harbor. In the past, participants have had great looks at Common Eiders, King Eiders, Harlequin Ducks, all three scoters, Great Comorants, Purple Sandpipers, Long-tailed Ducks, Purple Sandpipers, Lesser Black-backed Gulls, Iceland Gulls, Glaucous Gulls and Razorbills as well as Gray and Harbor Seals. The boat, which will be aboard the 'Kadydid', leaves at noon and returns at 2:00 PM from the Angler's Marina in Lewes. It costs $30 which will be collected on the boat. The boat is small and can hold only 14 people.
>
> The Cape Henlopen CBC could use a lot more participants. Anyone interested in helping is welcome to join me at the entrance gate at Prime Hook NWR, which is off Broadkill Beach Road, at 6:30 AM. If you never participated in a count before, this is an excellent opportunity to check it out - spend a few hours or an entire day.
>
> If you are interested in either the boat trip and/or joining me at the headquarters, please e-mail me.
>
> Thank you.
>
> Frank Rohrbacher
> Coordinator CHCBC
>
>
>
>
> List archives: https://lists.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A0=DE-BIRDS
> List help: <DE-BIRDS-request...>

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Date: 12/23/17 10:27 am
From: Frank Rohrbacher <0000007c6769d2e2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: [de-birds] Cape Henlopen CBC and Boat Trip
The Cape Henlopen-Prime Hook Christmas Bird Count will be held on Sunday December 31, 2017.  I have scheduled the boat trip to the ice breakers and jetties in Lewes Harbor.  In the past, participants have had great looks at Common Eiders, King Eiders, Harlequin Ducks, all three scoters, Great Comorants, Purple Sandpipers, Long-tailed Ducks, Purple Sandpipers, Lesser Black-backed Gulls, Iceland Gulls, Glaucous Gulls and Razorbills as well as Gray and Harbor Seals.  The boat, which will be aboard the 'Kadydid', leaves at noon and returns at 2:00 PM from the Angler's Marina in Lewes.  It costs $30 which will be collected on the boat.  The boat is small and can hold only 14 people.
 
The Cape Henlopen CBC could use a lot more participants.  Anyone interested in helping is welcome to join me at the entrance gate at Prime Hook NWR, which is off Broadkill Beach Road, at 6:30 AM.  If you never participated in a count before, this is an excellent opportunity to check it out - spend a few hours or an entire day.
 
If you are interested in either the boat trip and/or joining me at the headquarters, please e-mail me.
 
Thank you.
 
Frank Rohrbacher
Coordinator CHCBC
 
 
 

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Date: 12/22/17 5:29 pm
From: Andrew ednie <ednieap...>
Subject: [de-birds] RBA: Birdline Delaware, December 22nd, 2017
RBA
* Delaware
* Statewide
* December 22, 2017
* DEST1712.22

*Birds mentioned
Greater White-fronted Goose
Snow Goose
Ross's Goose
Brant
Cackling Goose
Wood Duck
Gadwall
American Wigeon
EURASIAN WIGEON
Green-winged Teal
Canvasback
Ring-necked Duck
Lesser Scaup
Long-tailed Duck
Black Scoter
White-winged Scoter
Surf Scoter
Bufflehead
Common Goldeneye
Common Merganser
Hooded Merganser
Red-breasted Merganser
Ruddy Duck
Northern Bobwhite
Ring-necked Pheasant
Wild Turkey
Red-throated Loon
Common Loon
Pied-billed Grebe
Horned Grebe
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN
Great Cormorant
Double-crested Cormorant
Northern Gannet
American Bittern
Great Egret
Bald Eagle
ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK
Virginia Rail
Sora
American Coot
American Oystercatcher
American Avocet
Black-bellied Plover
Ruddy Turnstone
Sanderling
Dunlin
Purple Sandpiper
Lesser Yellowlegs
Willet
Greater Yellowlegs
Bonaparte's Gull
Laughing Gull
Iceland Gull
Lesser Black-backed Gull
Glaucous Gull
Forster's Tern
Barn Owl
Eastern Screech Owl
Barred Owl
SNOWY OWL
Short-eared Owl
SAW-WHET OWL
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
American Kestrel
Merlin
Peregrine Falcon
Eastern Phoebe
WHITE-EYED VIREO
BLUE-HEADED VIREO
Common Raven
Brown-headed Nuthatch
SEDGE WREN
Marsh Wren
BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER
Gray Catbird
Lapland Longspur
Snow Bunting
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER
Common Yellowthroat
Palm Warbler
WILSON'S WARBLER
American Tree Sparrow
Sharp-tailed "type" Sparrow
Fox Sparrow
LINCOLN'S SPARROW
White-crowned Sparrow
Rusty Blackbird
YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRD
Boat-tailed Grackle

Hotline: Birdline Delaware
Date: December 22, 2017
To Report: Andy Ednie 302-792-9591 (VOICE)
Compiler: Andy Ednie (<ednieap...>)
Coverage: Delaware, Delmarva Peninsula, nearby Delaware Valley, Southern
New Jersey, Maryland

On Friday, December 22nd, this is Birdline Delaware from the Delaware Museum
of Natural History in Greenville. Happy Holidays everybody! The unofficial
Delaware year list remains at 335 species.

Again, a SNOWY OWL is still present at Fowler's Beach in Prime Hook National
Wildlife Refuge near Milton. The owl has been seen along the beach and
sitting on the dike fencing. Possibly the same SNOWY OWL was seen further
north at Cedar Creek marina near Slaughter's Beach and at Port Mahon.

A single AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN is being seen in the impoundment at Fowler's
Beach. Along with the SNOWY OWL, at least 3 SHORT-EARED OWLS are being seen.
Along the beach, both SNOW BUNTING and LAPLAND LONGSPUR were seen with
HORNED LARK. A ROSS'S GOOSE was seen among the SNOW GEESE. Offshore was
RED-THROATED LOONS, HORNED GREBE, COMMON GOLDENEYE, BLACK and SURF SCOTER,
plus RED-BREASTED and HOODED MERGANSER. Shorebirds reported included
BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, RUDDY TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, DUNLIN, plus GREATER and
LESSER YELLOWLEGS. An AMERICAN BITTERN was photographed in the marsh. A
light-phased ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK continues to be seen at Fowler's. Both light
and a dark phase ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS were seen at Broadkill Beach, along with
a flock of 65 AMERICAN AVOCETS.

A EURASIAN WIGEON was seen at Assawoman Wildlife Area, among 200 AMERICAN
WIGEON, plus GADWALL, NORTHERN PINTAIL, BUFFLEHEAD, RING-NECKED DUCK and
HOODED MERGANSER. A raft of 80 CANVASBACK was seen on Silver Lake in
Rehoboth Beach, along with LESSER SCAUP and HOODED MERGANSER. BROWN-HEADED
NUTHATCH was reported along the Gordon's Pond Trail in Cape Henlopen State
Park.

An AMERICAN OYSTERCATCHER was sitting on the north jetty at Indian River
Inlet yesterday. Other shorebirds included PURPLE SANDPIPER, RUDDY
TURNSTONE, SANDERLING, and DUNLIN. GREAT CORMORANT continues to be seen on
the light stand at the inlet. FORSTER'S TERNS and BONAPARTE'S GULLS were
seen feeding in the inlet. LONG-TAILED DUCK, RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, SURF
and BLACK SCOTER were seen feeding off the jetty. NORTHERN GANNETS were seen
offshore with both COMMON and RED-THROATED LOON.

It was a successful wild goose chase in Kent Co. on Sunday. A GREATER
WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE was seen at Silver Lake in Dover, along with a flyover
ROSS'S GOOSE with SNOW GEESE. A flock of 24 BRANT were seen off Woodland
Beach. Four more GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE were seen off Raymond Neck Road
outside of Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge. In the refuge, 3 ROSS'S
GEESE and 2 CACKLING GEESE were seen opposite Shearness Pool.

Also at Bombay Hook, two female YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRDS and a flock of 120
RUSTY BLACKBIRDS were seen at Raymond Neck Road behind Finis Pool. Five SNOW
BUNTINGS were seen off Whitehall Neck Road along with ORANGE-CROWNED
WARBLER, WHITE-CROWNED and FOX SPARROW. These later birds were in the brush
by the entrance gate. Another ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER was found at the Fisher
Tract in Bombay Hook, along with NORTHERN BOBWHITE.

The Bombay Hook impoundments were mostly frozen over this weekend. A 1st
winter ICELAND GULL and 3 LESSER BACK-BACKED GULLS (2 adults and a 3rd year
bird) were seen off Shearness Pool. Waterfowl seen at Bombay Hook included
MUTE and TUNDRA SWAN, BUFFLEHEAD, COMMON GOLDENEYE, plus COMMON,
RED-BREASTED, and HOODED MERGANSER. All three species of falcon, AMERICAN
KESTREL, MERLIN and PEREGRINE FALCON were seen on Sunday. Landbirds
included LINCOLN'S SPARROW by Finis Pool, AMERICAN TREE SPARROW at the
Boardwalk trail and EASTERN PHOEBE by the Swimming Hole near Finis Pool.

A WHITE-EYED VIREO with an ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER in the same tree were seen
in Dover at Hunn Nature Preserve at Lebanon Landing off Sorghum Mill Road in
Dover. Three PALM WARBLERS were found in west Dover and a single PALM was
seen near Frederica. Three PIED-BILLED GREBES and WOOD DUCK were seen at the
Tilcon ponds south of Dover. A late SORA and BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER were seen
Monday on a private hunting preserve by Kitts Hummock. HORNED GREBE,
RED-THROATED LOON and RUDDY DUCK was seen on the Delaware Bay off Kitts
Hummock. An immature COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, plus SHARP-TAILED "type" SPARROW
and MARSH WREN were seen at Big Stone Beach in Milford Neck Wildlife Area.

VIRGINIA RAIL, SEDGE and 10 MARSH WRENS were found along the Pickering Beach
Road. VIRGINIA RAIL, 3 AMERICAN BITTERNS and 3 GREAT EGRETS were seen at
Little Creek Wildlife Management Area. Another SEDGE WREN was found along
the Port Mahon Road, along with BOAT-TAILED GRACKLE. CANVASBACK, SURF and a
WHITE-WINGED SCOTER were seen offshore.

Three SHORT-EARED and a BARN OWL were seen along the Port Mahon Road. More
SHORT-EARED OWLS were seen at Pickering Beach and Shearness Dike in Bombay
Hook. Three BARRED OWLS were calling at Finis Pool and a BARN OWL was heard
screeching from the refuge visitor center parking lot at first light. Five
BARN OWLS were found along the Woodland Beach Road. A highlight of owling on
Sunday morning was a calling SAW-WHET OWL in the holly woods along Texas
Lane south of Leipsic.

Lots of RED-THROATED LOONS were seen along the Delaware River. Five were
seen off Woodland Beach. Four RED-THROATED LOONS were seen of Augustine
Beach. More loons were seen off Reedy Point, Ft. DuPont near Delaware City
and near Battery Park in New Castle. COMMON LOON and DOUBLE-CRESTED
CORMORANT were also reported at Reedy Point. A LONG-TAILED DUCK was seen of
Ft. DuPont. LESSER SCAUP and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER was seen in New Castle.

A flock of 7 MUTE SWAN was found at Dragon Run near Delaware City, along
with 20 RING-NECKED DUCKS, NORTHERN SHOVELER, GADWALL, AMERICAN WIGEON and
HOODED MERGANSER. Fifteen MUTE SWANS, plus GADWALL, PINTAIL and GREEN-WINGED
TEAL were seen at Ashton Tract in Augustine Wildlife Area.

GREAT EGRET and RING-NECKED PHEASANT was seen the Port Penn Impoundments.
Also reported was yet another ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER! A late BLUE-HEADED
VIREO was found at the Canal Pond opposite Dragon Run along Cox Neck Road
near Delaware City. WHITE-CROWNED and AMERICAN TREE SPARROW were seen at
Stave's Landing Road. In northern Delaware, a WILSON'S WARBLER was
photographed coming to a bird bath after the snowstorm in Hockessin on
private property.

More wild geese included 3 GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GEESE at Newark Reservoir,
plus a CACKLING GOOSE. Other waterfowl include PINTAIL, RING-NECKED DUCK,
BUFFLEHEAD and COMMON MERGANSER. COMMON RAVEN was reported at Newark
Reservoir and Middle Run Natural Area off Possum Park Road. BARRED OWL was
seen along the creek at Middle Run. Thirteen EASTERN SCREECH OWLS were
counted in the predawn hours in White Clay Creek State Park. Other
highlights include YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, GRAY CATBIRD and FOX SPARROW.

A CACKLING GOOSE was also seen at Hoopes' Reservoir, along with 80
RING-NECKED DUCKS, 45 COMMON and 25 HOODED MERGANSERS, plus PIED-BILLED
GREBE. AMERICAN WIGEON and HORNED GREBE were seen at the reservoir on
Wednesday. A COMMON LOON was seen flying over Granogue estate along the
Brandywine Creek. GADWALL, SHOVELER, GREEN-WINGED TEAL, AMERICAN COOT,
HOODED and COMMON MERGANSER were seen at Harry's Pond in Brandywine Town
Center. RUDDY DUCK was seen along the Christiana River at the Peterson Urban
Wildlife Refuge. A single CHIPPING SPARROW was seen at Brandywine Creek
State Park, and 14 CHIPPING SPARROWS were also seen at Coverdale Farms
today.

Birders at the Cherry Island Landfill found an immature LAUGHING GULL on
Saturday, plus 4 immature ICELAND GULLS, 17 LESSER BLACK-BACKS, and a 2nd
winter GLAUCOUS GULL. ICELAND and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were also found
at the nearby Veolia sewage treatment plants. Hugh numbers of waterfowl were
seen at Veolia including 900 SHOVELERS, 200 GADWALLS, 200 RING-NECKED DUCKS,
60 LESSER SCAUP, 150 BUFFLEHEADS, and 260 RUDDY DUCKS, plus HOODED MERGANSER
and PIED-BILLED GREBE. Unfortunately, both of these sites are private
property with restricted access. In nearby Edgemoor, a pair of BALD EAGLES
are already setting up breeding territory on the cell phone tower along
Governor Printz Blvd.

Thanks to those that contributed this week, including, Jean Woods, Andy
Urquhart, Armas Hill, Jeff Buler, Katie Bird, Lily Calderon, Hugh McGinness,
Kevin Bennett, Andy Fayer, Judy Montgomery, Andrew Homsey, Pete Zeigler,
John and Andy Dunn, David Brown, Kitt Heckscher, Colin Campbell, Brian
McCaffrery, Ryan Crane, Mike Moore, Curt Davis, Matt Sarver, Sally O'Byrne,
Chris Bennett, Anthony Gonzon, Rob Blye, Bob Edelen, Dave Fees, Harry
Tiebut, Kris Brugger, Gina Sheridan, Liz Porter, Jim and Amy White, Chris
Rowe, Ian Stewart, Kelley Nunn, Hannah Greenberg, Tim Freiday, Jerald and
Aaron Reb, Ken Wat, Joe Sebastiani, Phil Thompson, Bill Stewart, Kim
Steininger, John Long, Teddy Burke, Lynn Smith, Sue Gruver, Sharon Lynn,
Alissa Kegelman, Joe Russell and Joe Swertinski. Remember, the Birdline
needs your sightings. Please call your reports into 302-792-9591 or email
<ednieap...> Have a Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukah, and a Festive
Kwanzaa to all! Until next week, this is Andy Ednie wishing you good
birding!

-end transcript

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Date: 12/22/17 1:41 pm
From: Christopher Bennett <cpb2564...>
Subject: [de-birds] Milford CBC
WANTED!!

One or more Dedicated, Experienced identifier, by sight and sound, of the
winter avifauna of southern Kent County Delaware. Applicant MUST also be
1.) proficient in counting birds in a variety of natural and man-made
habitats, 2.) willing to work long hours (pre-dawn to dusk preferred), 3.)
able to thrive in a wide-range of meteorological conditions and able to
work well alone and/or with others.

One or more volunteers are needed to cover a section of the Milford
Christmas Bird Count to be held on Thursday, December 28. The section in
need of coverage inlcudes great birding sites like Killens Pond State Park,
Browns Branch County Park, Courseys and McColleys Ponds and acres and miles
of roads through acres and acres of agricultural fields. Total species for
this area of the count has ranged from the mid-30s to the low-70s.

Interested? Serious applicants should contact me via email.

I look forward to having YOU participate in this year's count.

Sincerely,
Chris Bennett, Count Compiler
MiIford, DE

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