ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
7/18/19 8:20 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> New bill may mean more ability to conserve at-risk wildlife species in Arkansas
7/18/19 4:54 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> field trip to Eagle Watch Nature Trail Saturday August 3
7/17/19 5:23 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - July 17
7/17/19 4:31 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: HOW ABOUT KIBLER BOTTOMS [NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE]?
7/17/19 4:16 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Least Terns
7/17/19 3:29 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> HOW ABOUT KIBLER BOTTOMS [NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE]?
7/17/19 3:01 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Mississippi Kites
7/17/19 10:45 am <shalom...> <shalom...> ..
7/16/19 4:43 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <000002b0bc8b0106-dmarc-request...> Inca Dove
7/16/19 3:42 pm Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...> Cave Swallow
7/16/19 3:41 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Question (about Paw Paws)
7/16/19 3:30 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Question (about Paw Paws)
7/16/19 3:18 pm Bruce Tedford <btedford...> Question (about Paw Paws)
7/16/19 1:55 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Least Terns
7/16/19 11:38 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Re: Least Terns
7/16/19 11:19 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Least Terns
7/16/19 8:47 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: question
7/16/19 8:39 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: question
7/15/19 1:09 pm plm108 <plm108...> Sunday Stop at Bald Knob
7/15/19 10:02 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Any fallout yet?
7/15/19 9:19 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Maysville, flowers and birds
7/15/19 6:08 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> LOON-WATERFOWL MIGRATION BOAT TRIPS ON BEAVER LAKE THIS FALL
7/14/19 10:41 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Look for gulf coast pelagics
7/14/19 5:56 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Look for gulf coast pelagics
7/14/19 5:52 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: question
7/14/19 4:29 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: question
7/14/19 4:09 pm Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: question
7/14/19 3:51 pm James Morgan <jlmm...> Re: question
7/14/19 8:12 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> City Lake - Siloam Springs
7/14/19 7:15 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: question
7/14/19 7:04 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Hummers
7/13/19 5:54 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Lost camera wrist strap at Bois De' Arc
7/13/19 11:47 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Buy a Duck Stamp through the ABA
7/13/19 9:03 am Dgoldens3 <000000554a8a6ef2-dmarc-request...> Re: Buy a Duck Stamp through the ABA
7/13/19 7:55 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Buy a Duck Stamp through the ABA
7/13/19 7:03 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Buy a Duck Stamp through the ABA
7/12/19 4:58 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: eBird Cover Photo
7/12/19 12:03 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Re: eBird Cover Photo
7/12/19 11:51 am Araks O <araks.ohanyan...> eBird Cover Photo
7/12/19 11:36 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BIRDING THE BUTTONBUSH ISLANDS
7/11/19 7:44 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: AAST grant recipient soars high
7/11/19 7:11 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: AAST grant recipient soars high
7/11/19 6:59 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> AAST grant recipient soars high
7/10/19 2:12 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Centerton
7/10/19 1:06 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Little Blue Heron
7/10/19 11:36 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Little Blue Heron
7/10/19 5:45 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> article in Monday's ADG
7/10/19 4:54 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> note about upcoming Bison, Birds, Botany & Butterflies (September)
7/8/19 6:46 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Singing!
7/8/19 10:46 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, July 11, Urban & Suburban Meadows
7/8/19 9:50 am <herbies...> <herbies...> 5 MIKIs
7/8/19 9:45 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> question
7/8/19 8:03 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
7/8/19 7:32 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
7/8/19 7:27 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
7/7/19 5:08 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Report
7/7/19 2:20 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
7/7/19 2:11 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
7/6/19 12:56 pm Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Re: Hummers
7/6/19 12:09 pm Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...> Hummers
7/6/19 6:45 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: A change and an identity crisis in Benton County
7/5/19 6:22 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> A change and an identity crisis in Benton County
7/4/19 6:55 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Fifth Carolina Wren nest?
7/4/19 5:14 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Fifth Carolina Wren nest?
7/4/19 3:20 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Fifth Carolina Wren nest?
7/4/19 7:24 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Weird thought...
7/4/19 6:45 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Belize Trip
7/4/19 6:27 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Belize Trip
7/3/19 7:47 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Chesney this Saturday
7/3/19 7:17 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Tallgrass Prairie Preserve July 1, 2019
7/2/19 10:21 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: ASCA Saturday field trip- new meeting site
7/2/19 10:43 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Saturday field trip- new meeting site
7/2/19 7:07 am David Oakley <gdosr...> Belize Trip
7/1/19 12:42 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Turkey and quail survey
6/30/19 12:40 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA July Trip Reminder
6/30/19 10:39 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BOOTS FOR CHESNEY PRAIRIE NA FIELD TRIP SATURDAY JULY 6
6/28/19 6:03 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Not Jay Schneider
6/28/19 4:09 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Massard Prairie restoration
6/28/19 9:29 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIES September 26-29, 2019
6/28/19 7:25 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIES September 26-29, 2019
6/27/19 7:30 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Lots of dragons (Eagle Watch)
6/27/19 11:45 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Kim Smith memorials (from UARK website)
6/25/19 9:35 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> Murray Park Little Rock
6/25/19 7:48 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> WEKIs out the whazoo
6/25/19 7:01 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Canada Goose Management/ BASH
6/25/19 7:32 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: White-winged Dove, update Centerton
6/25/19 6:12 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Apparent 4th Carolina Wren clutch
6/24/19 9:54 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Least Terns
6/24/19 8:01 pm JFR <johnfredman...> BOYD POINT LEAST TERNS
6/24/19 1:09 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Avian community composition and habitat associations in an upland deciduous forest in northwestern Arkansas
6/24/19 12:10 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Apparent 4th Carolina Wren clutch
6/24/19 10:48 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Field trip to Chesney Prairie Natural Area Saturday July 6 (and Alyssa July 19)
6/24/19 8:20 am Edward Pullen <countyrarebirds...> What is a species and how do species evolve?
6/24/19 5:32 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Peter Boesman 2
6/24/19 5:32 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Peter Boesman
6/23/19 8:26 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Siloam Springs City Lake - update
6/23/19 6:56 am <market...> Least Tern at Swepco Lake
6/22/19 4:07 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Summer Tanager Serenata
6/22/19 1:30 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Hootin' Wooten
6/22/19 10:00 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> City Lake
6/22/19 9:32 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> June Hooded Mergansers
6/21/19 7:53 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Another Great-tailed Grackle
6/21/19 7:35 pm Cathy Marak <cmarak999...> Re: Another Great-tailed Grackle
6/21/19 5:58 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Another Great-tailed Grackle
6/21/19 11:26 am David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - June 19 (belated report)
6/21/19 9:54 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: Western Kingbirds
6/21/19 9:43 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Western Kingbirds
6/20/19 7:59 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Re: Lest Terns, Little Rock Port Authority
6/20/19 3:06 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> fledglings
6/20/19 2:05 pm V Prislipsky <vprislipsky...> Least Tern
6/20/19 7:55 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Lest Terns, Little Rock Port Authority
6/20/19 4:58 am Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Happy National Eagle Day!
6/19/19 7:57 pm Than Boves <tboves...> Re: Terrific new paper on the lives of Prothonotary Warblers
6/19/19 11:27 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Terrific new paper on the lives of Prothonotary Warblers
6/18/19 2:39 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> “RED BIRDS ARE VISITORS FROM HEAVEN”* June 18, 2019
6/18/19 8:58 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Kim Smith memorials (from UARK website)
 
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Date: 7/18/19 8:20 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: New bill may mean more ability to conserve at-risk wildlife species in Arkansas
https://www.agfc.com/en/news/2019/07/17/new-bill-may-mean-more-ability-to-conserve-at-risk-wildlife-species-in-arkansas/


Following the recent thread regarding duck stamps and game species dollars supporting nongame habitat, here is news of a bill in the House that would dedicate a significant amount of money to nongame species recovery. Note that AGFC recognizes that nongame habitat conservation benefits game species. Currently, the State Wildlife Grant funds nongame research and conservation projects for species listed in the Arkansas Wildlife Action Plan (https://www.wildlifearkansas.com) https://www.wildlifearkansas.com . That money is only a little over $500k, has declined over time, and has to be reauthorized every year, which has caused delays in project funding in some years. I hope HR3742 works its way up to a law.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 7/18/19 4:54 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: field trip to Eagle Watch Nature Trail Saturday August 3
Saturday August 3, 2019. Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will host a field trip to Eagle Watch Nature Trail on SWEPCO Lake 1.0-mile west of Gentry. Meet in the parking lot at 9 AM. Co-leader is Terry Stanfill, who supervises EW. There is a short 0.2-mile walk on a well-maintained trail to the viewing blinds and edge of the lake. Those with walking impairments will be able to drive in and park at the first blind. There are places to sit or stand, at several heights, and even a picnic table to sit and write field notes, or snack. Free and open to the public. We expect to see Great Egrets, plus other herons and egrets. There should be Double-crested Cormorants. In past years we have also seen Neotropic Cormorant and a few sightings of juvenile White Ibises around this time. Big focus of this field trip is native Buttonbushes. These should be in full bloom. Their flowers are very attractive to a variety of native butterflies. These should be easy to see and photograph along the trail. Some Swamp Milkweed will also be in bloom. Everyone with an interest in Arkansass wildlife heritage is welcome. Dont need to be a member to participate. It will be hot for sure, but also probably birdy. If you have a spotting scope, please bring it.

Directions and more information about Eagle Watch: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/placestobird.htm
Places to Bird in Northwest Arkansas: - NWAAS Home<http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/placestobird.htm>
www.nwarkaudubon.org
Baker Prairie Natural Area Beatie Prairie Botanical Area in August 2011 Beaver Lake from Rocky Branch to the Dam


 

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Date: 7/17/19 5:23 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 17
It was mostly clear and hot with a slight breeze on the bird survey today.
56 species were found. The heronry is still going strong with a constant
line of birds flying in and out feeding young. The usual good birds are
still being seen but as the vegetation grows thicker it is getting harder to
see the gallinules especially now since most have broods of young and tend
to stay in the cover with them. The highlight of the day was a couple
singing male Swainson's Warblers in a location that I usually don't stop at
along Red Slough Road next to unit 18. Also of note was a fairly large
gator crossing the levee road in front of me carrying something in its
mouth, possibly a nutria. Here is my list for today:





Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 6

Wood Duck - 12

Pied-billed Grebe - 13

Neotropic Cormorant - 15 (There are still 2 active nests. All the others
have fledged out their young.)

Anhinga - 144 (lots of fledglings.)

Great-blue Heron - 13

Great Egret - 59

Snowy Egret - 49

Little-blue Heron - 82

Cattle Egret - 2500

Green Heron - 7

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 3 (one on nest.)

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 6

White Ibis - 112 (4 on nests)

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 6

Mississippi Kite - 5

Purple Gallinule - 10 (also 2 broods of young.)

Common Gallinule - 21 (also 7 broods of young.)

American Coot - 2

Mourning Dove - 4

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 10

Bell's Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 3

Fish Crow - 1

Tree Swallow - 4

Barn Swallow - 22

Carolina Chickadee - 1

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 11

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Swainson's Warbler - 2 singing males

Common Yellowthroat - 14

Yellow-breasted Chat - 6

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Lark Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 15

Indigo Bunting - 15

Painted Bunting - 6

Dickcissel - 17

Red-winged Blackbird - 16

Common Grackle - 5

Great-tailed Grackle - 2 (probably the same two from last week.)

Brown-headed Cowbird - 6





Odonates:



Lilypad Forktail

Skimming Bluet

Regal Darner

Mocha Emerald

Prince Baskettail

River Cruiser species

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Common Whitetail

Eastern Amberwing

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


















 

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Date: 7/17/19 4:31 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: HOW ABOUT KIBLER BOTTOMS [NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE]?
Hi Joe!

As far as flooding and hurricanes go, ain't nobody seen nothin yet.
As far as Kibler Bottoms NWR, levees, no more unnecessary dams, and more
NWRs in AR and other states, I am in complete agreement. Mother Nature will
have the last word. ☺

Bill Thurman

On Wed, Jul 17, 2019, 5:28 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Big flooding in Arkansas River Valley in late May and June remains. South
> of Kibler, rich soils of a huge oxbow cut off from Arkansas River by
> McClellan-Kerr Navigation (1963-1971) usually host deep green soybeans now.
> However, the oxbow is still a lake some 3-miles long. You can view this
> from county roads. In the west from Westville and part of Crawford roads.
> Then from Thornhill and east where East Arnold crosses the oxbow on a low
> water bridge that is still under water from the refilled oxbow. As water
> recedes it leaves behind trapped fish and mudflats. Great Blue Herons (50),
> Great Egrets (47), and American White Pelicans (37) are having a field day.
> I also saw Snowy Egrets (3) and no Little Blue Herons. Most of the
> shorebirds were Killdeer (69+), but also Pectoral Sandpiper (3), Spotted
> Sandpiper (2), Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1). Also, Least
> Tern (2) and Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (4).
>
>
> It just a few miles more to Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility: Least
> Sandpiper (1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (5), and Least
> Tern (4).
>
>
> I have no idea how many millions of dollars are involved in balancing
> everyone’s books for the flood losses. The bean farmers are already being
> compensated associated with President Trump’s tariff war with China. From
> what I can see, many acres of soybeans are also lost due to the floods.
> Governor Hutchinson is spending millions more on the levee systems in the
> state. All of this government spending is at least a little like the
> “socialism” in such disrepute. I think government may have made a mistake
> in the beginning in building the McClellan-Kerr and not going ahead and
> turning all (rather than just a few like Holla Bend) of these former oxbows
> into national wildlife refuges, that could be allowed to flood as needed to
> relieve the levee system, in other times leased for soybeans, provide
> habitat for migratory birds, plus hunting and fish opportunities for the
> public. At a time when many climatologists think we are going to see more
> extreme events like those this spring, maybe now is time to go ahead and
> use all that “socialistic” tax money to somewhat restore the old ways
> Arkansas River did business.
>
>

 

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Date: 7/17/19 4:16 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Least Terns
I was there today (Belk at Conway Commons) and saw at least a dozen Least Terns chattering and flying over the buildings. Too hot to seek details but some appeared to be young. I certainly hope so because they need to find a cooler location during this heat wave. Don't we all!?!Patty McLean Conway Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Date: 7/16/19 3:55 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Least Terns I noticed a bunch of them there today too.  Some were carrying ‘food’ to young, I suspected. Gail MillerConway From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of DAN SCHEIMANSent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 1:38 PMTo: <ARBIRD-L...>: Re: Least Terns They are nesting on the roof of that building. They do so most years according to USFWS. Dan ScheimanLittle Rock, AROn July 16, 2019 at 1:19 PM Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> > wrote: Early this afternoon we watched 3 least terns flying around over the Belk store in Conway. Glenn WyattCabot, AR
 

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Date: 7/17/19 3:29 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: HOW ABOUT KIBLER BOTTOMS [NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE]?
Big flooding in Arkansas River Valley in late May and June remains. South of Kibler, rich soils of a huge oxbow cut off from Arkansas River by McClellan-Kerr Navigation (1963-1971) usually host deep green soybeans now. However, the oxbow is still a lake some 3-miles long. You can view this from county roads. In the west from Westville and part of Crawford roads. Then from Thornhill and east where East Arnold crosses the oxbow on a low water bridge that is still under water from the refilled oxbow. As water recedes it leaves behind trapped fish and mudflats. Great Blue Herons (50), Great Egrets (47), and American White Pelicans (37) are having a field day. I also saw Snowy Egrets (3) and no Little Blue Herons. Most of the shorebirds were Killdeer (69+), but also Pectoral Sandpiper (3), Spotted Sandpiper (2), Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Greater Yellowlegs (1). Also, Least Tern (2) and Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (4).

It just a few miles more to Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility: Least Sandpiper (1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (5), and Least Tern (4).

I have no idea how many millions of dollars are involved in balancing everyones books for the flood losses. The bean farmers are already being compensated associated with President Trumps tariff war with China. From what I can see, many acres of soybeans are also lost due to the floods. Governor Hutchinson is spending millions more on the levee systems in the state. All of this government spending is at least a little like the socialism in such disrepute. I think government may have made a mistake in the beginning in building the McClellan-Kerr and not going ahead and turning all (rather than just a few like Holla Bend) of these former oxbows into national wildlife refuges, that could be allowed to flood as needed to relieve the levee system, in other times leased for soybeans, provide habitat for migratory birds, plus hunting and fish opportunities for the public. At a time when many climatologists think we are going to see more extreme events like those this spring, maybe now is time to go ahead and use all that socialistic tax money to somewhat restore the old ways Arkansas River did business.


 

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Date: 7/17/19 3:01 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Mississippi Kites
Around 10:15 this morning Bob and I observed at least 7 Mississippi Kites soaring and circling overhead near the com tower/water tank on Skyline Drive in Fayetteville on Mt. Sequoyah. Our feeders haven't been terribly busy for the last couple days so this was particularly exciting for us.

Sara Caulk
Mt. Sequoyah, Fayetteville
 

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Date: 7/17/19 10:45 am
From: <shalom...> <shalom...>
Subject: ..






https://www.pplmotorhomes.com/used-rvs-for-sale/mini-motorhome/2008-leisure-travel-free-flight_rv-42629

 

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Date: 7/16/19 4:43 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <000002b0bc8b0106-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Inca Dove
Greetings all,
There is an Inca Dove at the ground feeder at the US Forest Service office in Hector.
Leif at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 7/16/19 3:42 pm
From: Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Cave Swallow
I paid a visit to Millwood Lake day before yesterday with potential storm birds on my mind but the only thing of any interest to be found was a juvie Cave Swallow perched with other swallows near the boat ramp in Beard’s Bluff Recreation Area.

Charles Mills

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/16/19 3:41 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Question (about Paw Paws)
Being valuable to wildlife, I see it as a valid question, but agree not
a valid discussion here. My opinion(if it matters) was that it was ok to
ask but people should "reply to sender" and not "reply all."
People can't help but respond sometimes, especially to topics that
interest them. (anyone able to plant a mature fruiting tree or 10 in my
yard??? I've never even tried one.)
Happy birding everyone. Stay hydrated...

Daniel Mason

On 7/16/2019 5:18 PM, Bruce Tedford wrote:
>
> No offense, but could you guys who are chatting about Paw Paws,
> possibly take this thread somewhere else?  I fail to see how it's
> about birds.
>
>
> Happy Connecting. Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S® 5 Sport
>
> Bruce Tedford, Ph.D.
> Dept. Biological Sciences
> Arkansas Tech University




---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Date: 7/16/19 3:30 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Question (about Paw Paws)
I agree. Thank you.

On Tue, Jul 16, 2019 at 5:18 PM Bruce Tedford <btedford...> wrote:

>
> No offense, but could you guys who are chatting about Paw Paws, possibly
> take this thread somewhere else? I fail to see how it's about birds.
>
>
> Happy Connecting. Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S® 5 Sport
>
> Bruce Tedford, Ph.D.
> Dept. Biological Sciences
> Arkansas Tech University
>

 

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Date: 7/16/19 3:18 pm
From: Bruce Tedford <btedford...>
Subject: Question (about Paw Paws)

No offense, but could you guys who are chatting about Paw Paws, possibly take this thread somewhere else? I fail to see how it's about birds.


Happy Connecting. Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S® 5 Sport

Bruce Tedford, Ph.D.
Dept. Biological Sciences
Arkansas Tech University
 

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Date: 7/16/19 1:55 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Least Terns
I noticed a bunch of them there today too. Some were carrying ‘food’ to young, I suspected.



Gail Miller

Conway



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of DAN SCHEIMAN
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 1:38 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Least Terns



They are nesting on the roof of that building. They do so most years according to USFWS.



Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

On July 16, 2019 at 1:19 PM Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> > wrote:


Early this afternoon we watched 3 least terns flying around over the Belk store in Conway.

Glenn WyattCabot, AR


 

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Date: 7/16/19 11:38 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Least Terns
They are nesting on the roof of that building. They do so most years according to USFWS.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

> On July 16, 2019 at 1:19 PM Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>
> Early this afternoon we watched 3 least terns flying around over the Belk store in Conway.
>
> Glenn WyattCabot, AR
>

 

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Date: 7/16/19 11:19 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Least Terns

Early this afternoon we watched 3 least terns flying around over the Belk store in Conway.
Glenn WyattCabot, AR
 

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Date: 7/16/19 8:47 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: question
Hand pollination may be required if native pollinators are not available.

Jerry

From: Jeffrey Short
Sent: Tuesday, July 16, 2019 10:38 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: question

Have planted three nursery-bought paws paw a decade ago- which have never borne any fruit and haven’t grown very much. There are naturally-occurring paw-paws on our property that are sizable and understory-dwelling and we have never had any fruit or seen any flowers. I have heard that if you hang some uncooked bacon on the branches it will attract flies that will also pollinate the flowers.



Twenty or so years ago, at our house in Southern Maryland, we had a paw-paw come up volunteer, understory, and we had one paw-paw even though the tree was small. We always picked wild paw-paw fruit at Gathland State Park, southwest of Frederick MD.



There was a grower in the Fayetteville area. I’ll try to find his card.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy Griffith
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2019 7:52 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: question



I scattered Pawpaws from the seeds of fruits that we ate in a shady spot under a drip line at the back edge of the native & shade loving wildflower fern garden. They spread by runners so new trees continue to appear. After about 12 years they began producing fruit. This summer there are over 30 fruits on the largest 5 or 6 trees.

There are also more trees coming up around the edges of the yard where I have tossed seeds.



Judith

Ninestone, Carroll County



On Sun, Jul 14, 2019 at 6:29 PM Gail Miller <gail.miller...> wrote:

I have two Paw Paw trees that I bought from Mary Ann King in London, AR (Pine Ridge Gardens). I’ve had them several years and never took them out of pots. The roots have grown out of the pots and both trees, rather close together are probably 8 feet tall now. Both have bloomed, but I have never seen any fruit. They get shade and sun.



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2019 6:09 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: question



Thanks for all the help about pawpaws, etc. I appreciate this list serve.

SJG

Sent from my iPad


On Jul 14, 2019, at 5:51 PM, James Morgan <jlmm...> wrote:

Here is a link to a local nursery in NW Arklansas that sells PawPaw plants. Planting in Spring is best and better in the shade.

Ames Orchard & Nursery uses sustainable practices, Fayetteville Mailing address but only a mile by crow flight from Elkins.

http://www.amesorchardandnursery.com/pawpaw/

Guy Ames that if you have fruit, just plant the seeds in the fall.The Ames do have a PawPaw orchard in the open and not in the shade. But for the first 2--3 years they use artificial shade. Might be able to get away with less shade and more water.

Jim Morgan

Fayetteville, AR

On 7/14/2019 9:15 AM, Jacque Brown wrote:

Sally Jo, I have two Paw Paw trees that I got at a nursery on Hudson Road in Rogers. I got them a year apart. They were about the same size at that time. One likes where it is and is now huge. The other is planted about 15’ from that and hasn’t grown much although it seems to have more Paw Paw fruit.



Last year we had those three hard freezes in a row in April and I had zero fruit. I pollinated them myself this year and have loads on both trees. Nursery bought trees are not as scraggly as wild trees so give them lots of room. Jacque Brown, Centerton





On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> wrote:



Can Pipevine and Paw Paw plants be grown successfully in a backyard pollinator garden? If so, where can I buy plants or seeds?

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR





Sent from Mail for Windows 10



 

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Date: 7/16/19 8:39 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: question
Have planted three nursery-bought paws paw a decade ago- which have never borne any fruit and haven’t grown very much. There are naturally-occurring paw-paws on our property that are sizable and understory-dwelling and we have never had any fruit or seen any flowers. I have heard that if you hang some uncooked bacon on the branches it will attract flies that will also pollinate the flowers.



Twenty or so years ago, at our house in Southern Maryland, we had a paw-paw come up volunteer, understory, and we had one paw-paw even though the tree was small. We always picked wild paw-paw fruit at Gathland State Park, southwest of Frederick MD.



There was a grower in the Fayetteville area. I’ll try to find his card.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy Griffith
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2019 7:52 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: question



I scattered Pawpaws from the seeds of fruits that we ate in a shady spot under a drip line at the back edge of the native & shade loving wildflower fern garden. They spread by runners so new trees continue to appear. After about 12 years they began producing fruit. This summer there are over 30 fruits on the largest 5 or 6 trees.

There are also more trees coming up around the edges of the yard where I have tossed seeds.



Judith

Ninestone, Carroll County



On Sun, Jul 14, 2019 at 6:29 PM Gail Miller <gail.miller...> wrote:

I have two Paw Paw trees that I bought from Mary Ann King in London, AR (Pine Ridge Gardens). I’ve had them several years and never took them out of pots. The roots have grown out of the pots and both trees, rather close together are probably 8 feet tall now. Both have bloomed, but I have never seen any fruit. They get shade and sun.



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2019 6:09 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: question



Thanks for all the help about pawpaws, etc. I appreciate this list serve.

SJG

Sent from my iPad


On Jul 14, 2019, at 5:51 PM, James Morgan <jlmm...> wrote:

Here is a link to a local nursery in NW Arklansas that sells PawPaw plants. Planting in Spring is best and better in the shade.

Ames Orchard & Nursery uses sustainable practices, Fayetteville Mailing address but only a mile by crow flight from Elkins.

http://www.amesorchardandnursery.com/pawpaw/

Guy Ames that if you have fruit, just plant the seeds in the fall.The Ames do have a PawPaw orchard in the open and not in the shade. But for the first 2--3 years they use artificial shade. Might be able to get away with less shade and more water.

Jim Morgan

Fayetteville, AR

On 7/14/2019 9:15 AM, Jacque Brown wrote:

Sally Jo, I have two Paw Paw trees that I got at a nursery on Hudson Road in Rogers. I got them a year apart. They were about the same size at that time. One likes where it is and is now huge. The other is planted about 15’ from that and hasn’t grown much although it seems to have more Paw Paw fruit.



Last year we had those three hard freezes in a row in April and I had zero fruit. I pollinated them myself this year and have loads on both trees. Nursery bought trees are not as scraggly as wild trees so give them lots of room. Jacque Brown, Centerton





On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> wrote:



Can Pipevine and Paw Paw plants be grown successfully in a backyard pollinator garden? If so, where can I buy plants or seeds?

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR





Sent from <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> Mail for Windows 10




 

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Date: 7/15/19 1:09 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Sunday Stop at Bald Knob
Michael and I returned to Arkansas after a weeklong trip across Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Missouri building our bird lists in those states. The fun part of doing this is all the different habitats we get to explore with our goal of finding 100+ species in each state. As we were planning our trip home, a confirmed report came out on Sat of a first state record Flaming0 in Tennessee. Since it wasn't relocated on Sun, we decided to stop at Bald Knob NWR on our way home to look for pink things. Barry was looming over us with flash flood watches across many of the areas we were traveling through, but the rain was light and thus perserverence prevailed, especially if there might be a nice surprise at the end of the rainbow. Well, we found nothing pink but we did find several things that were quite colorful: 12 Black Terns, 6 American Avocets and 2 Lipstick Ducks (aka Black-Bellied Whistling Ducks). Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs were plentiful and most were still in breeding plumage, and the Black-Necked Stilts appear to have successfulled reared their young bringing their total to approx 100.Got home safe and sound with lots of mud on the car and some fun memories from places near and far. Patty McLean and Michael Linz,Conway AR
 

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Date: 7/15/19 10:02 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Any fallout yet?
I'm not sure if this storm was enough to bring anything but I'm sure
going to keep watching the reports. So far only about 8 checklists on
eBird for the whole state today and none of them have anything of note.
After lunch I'm going to try(if my wife lets me) to head to Centerton to
explore the hatchery and then maybe swing by city lake in Siloam on the
way home from there. We'll see.
I can say that our yard seems a bit more active than normal so far
today. Mostly grackles and starlings, 10+ of each species which is more
than we'd hear/see on a normal day lately. Not sure if that's a weather
thing or not... young birds mixed in. An awfully brown grackle and
almost all the starlings were fairly plain and brown but were ID'd by
their overall shape(esp in flight) long bill, and a few did have some
speckles on their bellies. A could young robins  out there as well. Was
so nice and comfortable out there until the sun broke through and
started cooking me a bit. HA. I'll keep looking and listening and hoping
and dreaming. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 7/15/19 9:19 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Maysville, flowers and birds
This is a good time of year to get out and enjoy the flowers and pollinators on our native Tallgrass Prairies. One I like to visit is historic Beaty (or Beatie) Prairie in the Maysville region of extreme northwestern Benton County. A trip like this is easily combined with birding. Several years ago I wrote a tour of this area. You can see this at:
http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/Places%20to%20Bird%20PDFs/BEATIE%20PRAIRIE%20BOTANICAL%20AREA%20in%20August%202011.pdf
BEATIE PRAIRIE BOTANICAL AREA in August 2011<http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/Places%20to%20Bird%20PDFs/BEATIE%20PRAIRIE%20BOTANICAL%20AREA%20in%20August%202011.pdf>
www.nwarkaudubon.org
BEATIE PRAIRIE BOTANICAL AREA in August 2011 We always enjoy birding around Maysville, especially in winter. For example, two Prairie Falcons flew over Mike Mlodinow and I on December 26, 2006.
Yesterday I did a modified version of this trip with UA-Fayetteville graduate student Vivek Govind Kumar. We made a big loop of around 15 or so miles east and north of Maysville. The natural luxuriance or even extravagance of a Tallgrass Prairie at this time of year is mind-boggling, even if it is almost entirely confined to highway and graded county road rights-of-way. Most showy of flora: Blazing Stars, Compass Plant, Ashy Sunflower. In some spots, lots of big showy butterflies. Vivek kept the bird list, now posted to eBird. He also made a separate list with 51 species in our 3.5 hours of slow-driving and stopping. On the list: Wood Ducks, Northern Bobwhites, Red-headed Woodpeckers, Painted Buntings, Blue Grosbeaks, Loggerhead Shrikes, a Grasshopper Sparrow, Horned Larks, lots of Dickcissels but no Swainsons Hawks.


 

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Date: 7/15/19 6:08 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LOON-WATERFOWL MIGRATION BOAT TRIPS ON BEAVER LAKE THIS FALL
Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area will again offer boats trips on Beaver Lake this fall, with focus on migrating Common Loons and other waterfowl species like Horned Grebes, several duck species, a couple of gull species, Bald Eagles, many other waterbirds, and the occasional surprise bird. (These trips are in addition to the regular Bald Eagle trips). Hobbs owns a stable, roomy pontoon boat. Knowledgeable guides from Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society accompany each 2-hour trip. Departure from Rocky Branch Marina, with slow travel for about 11-12 miles in one of the lakes most open and picturesque areas. Its roughly 2-miles across to Slate Gap and Lost Bridge, and roughly 4-miles from Ventris in the east to islands in the west. Cost is $10. Trips depart at 10 am and return around noon. There is no bathroom on board, but there is usually a handican on the shoreline. This years dates are Sunday October 27, Saturday November 2, and Sunday November 10. Reservations are required; call Hobbs at 479 789 5000 (BUT, Im not sure when they will start taking reservations). This works both for experienced birders who dont own boats but want to explore and those interested in our regions largest body of water. This is the third year. Boat filled up quickly in past two years.


 

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Date: 7/14/19 10:41 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Look for gulf coast pelagics
I'll be watching reports I guess but I'm not sure how much free time I
have to be out looking. I have to wonder a couple things that Joe or
someone might have some insight with.  1. When/where is the best
opportunity to see potential fallout? Before, during, and/or after it
passes? IF I have a chance to get out looking, I'd hate to go before
something shows up or after it's gone... which would be my luck. 2.
Can't help but wonder, IF something rare dropped in on us here in NW
Arkansas, how long would it hang out?
I'd love to find something interesting but having just one vehicle
limits the possibilities of searching for me. So if anyone does find
anything interesting, please report it right away. :)

Daniel Mason

On 7/14/2019 7:55 PM, Ragupathy Kannan wrote:
> As the remnants of Hurricane/Tropical Storm Barry sweeps across the
> state, here is an article of interest for all of us, by our late Doug
> James and Kim Smith, plus Joe Neal and John Hehr.
> https://scholarworks.uark.edu/jaas/vol64/iss1/18/
>



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Date: 7/14/19 5:56 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Look for gulf coast pelagics
As the remnants of Hurricane/Tropical Storm Barry sweeps across the state, here is an article of interest for all of us, by our late Doug James and Kim Smith, plus Joe Neal and John Hehr.  https://scholarworks.uark.edu/jaas/vol64/iss1/18/


 

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Date: 7/14/19 5:52 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: question
I scattered Pawpaws from the seeds of fruits that we ate in a shady spot
under a drip line at the back edge of the native & shade loving wildflower
fern garden. They spread by runners so new trees continue to appear. After
about 12 years they began producing fruit. This summer there are over 30
fruits on the largest 5 or 6 trees.
There are also more trees coming up around the edges of the yard where I
have tossed seeds.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

On Sun, Jul 14, 2019 at 6:29 PM Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
wrote:

> I have two Paw Paw trees that I bought from Mary Ann King in London, AR
> (Pine Ridge Gardens). I’ve had them several years and never took them out
> of pots. The roots have grown out of the pots and both trees, rather close
> together are probably 8 feet tall now. Both have bloomed, but I have never
> seen any fruit. They get shade and sun.
>
>
>
> Gail Miller
>
> Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> <ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Sally Jo Gibson
> *Sent:* Sunday, July 14, 2019 6:09 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: question
>
>
>
> Thanks for all the help about pawpaws, etc. I appreciate this list serve.
>
> SJG
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
> On Jul 14, 2019, at 5:51 PM, James Morgan <jlmm...>
> <jlmm...>> wrote:
>
> Here is a link to a local nursery in NW Arklansas that sells PawPaw
> plants. Planting in Spring is best and better in the shade.
>
> Ames Orchard & Nursery uses sustainable practices, Fayetteville Mailing
> address but only a mile by crow flight from Elkins.
>
> http://www.amesorchardandnursery.com/pawpaw/
>
> Guy Ames that if you have fruit, just plant the seeds in the fall.The Ames
> do have a PawPaw orchard in the open and not in the shade. But for the
> first 2--3 years they use artificial shade. Might be able to get away with
> less shade and more water.
>
> Jim Morgan
>
> Fayetteville, AR
>
> On 7/14/2019 9:15 AM, Jacque Brown wrote:
>
> Sally Jo, I have two Paw Paw trees that I got at a nursery on Hudson Road
> in Rogers. I got them a year apart. They were about the same size at that
> time. One likes where it is and is now huge. The other is planted about
> 15’ from that and hasn’t grown much although it seems to have more Paw Paw
> fruit.
>
>
>
> Last year we had those three hard freezes in a row in April and I had zero
> fruit. I pollinated them myself this year and have loads on both trees.
> Nursery bought trees are not as scraggly as wild trees so give them lots of
> room. Jacque Brown, Centerton
>
>
>
>
>
> On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Can Pipevine and Paw Paw plants be grown successfully in a backyard
> pollinator garden? If so, where can I buy plants or seeds?
>
> Sally Jo Gibson
>
> Harrison, AR
>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
> Windows 10
>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 7/14/19 4:29 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: question
I have two Paw Paw trees that I bought from Mary Ann King in London, AR (Pine Ridge Gardens). I’ve had them several years and never took them out of pots. The roots have grown out of the pots and both trees, rather close together are probably 8 feet tall now. Both have bloomed, but I have never seen any fruit. They get shade and sun.



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: Sunday, July 14, 2019 6:09 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: question



Thanks for all the help about pawpaws, etc. I appreciate this list serve.

SJG

Sent from my iPad


On Jul 14, 2019, at 5:51 PM, James Morgan <jlmm...> <mailto:<jlmm...> > wrote:

Here is a link to a local nursery in NW Arklansas that sells PawPaw plants. Planting in Spring is best and better in the shade.

Ames Orchard & Nursery uses sustainable practices, Fayetteville Mailing address but only a mile by crow flight from Elkins.

http://www.amesorchardandnursery.com/pawpaw/

Guy Ames that if you have fruit, just plant the seeds in the fall.The Ames do have a PawPaw orchard in the open and not in the shade. But for the first 2--3 years they use artificial shade. Might be able to get away with less shade and more water.

Jim Morgan

Fayetteville, AR

On 7/14/2019 9:15 AM, Jacque Brown wrote:

Sally Jo, I have two Paw Paw trees that I got at a nursery on Hudson Road in Rogers. I got them a year apart. They were about the same size at that time. One likes where it is and is now huge. The other is planted about 15’ from that and hasn’t grown much although it seems to have more Paw Paw fruit.



Last year we had those three hard freezes in a row in April and I had zero fruit. I pollinated them myself this year and have loads on both trees. Nursery bought trees are not as scraggly as wild trees so give them lots of room. Jacque Brown, Centerton





On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> <mailto:<Sjogibson...> > wrote:



Can Pipevine and Paw Paw plants be grown successfully in a backyard pollinator garden? If so, where can I buy plants or seeds?

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR





Sent from <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> Mail for Windows 10




 

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Date: 7/14/19 4:09 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: question
Thanks for all the help about pawpaws, etc. I appreciate this list serve.
SJG

Sent from my iPad

On Jul 14, 2019, at 5:51 PM, James Morgan <jlmm...><mailto:<jlmm...>> wrote:


Here is a link to a local nursery in NW Arklansas that sells PawPaw plants. Planting in Spring is best and better in the shade.

Ames Orchard & Nursery uses sustainable practices, Fayetteville Mailing address but only a mile by crow flight from Elkins.

http://www.amesorchardandnursery.com/pawpaw/

Guy Ames that if you have fruit, just plant the seeds in the fall.The Ames do have a PawPaw orchard in the open and not in the shade. But for the first 2--3 years they use artificial shade. Might be able to get away with less shade and more water.

Jim Morgan

Fayetteville, AR

On 7/14/2019 9:15 AM, Jacque Brown wrote:
Sally Jo, I have two Paw Paw trees that I got at a nursery on Hudson Road in Rogers. I got them a year apart. They were about the same size at that time. One likes where it is and is now huge. The other is planted about 15’ from that and hasn’t grown much although it seems to have more Paw Paw fruit.

Last year we had those three hard freezes in a row in April and I had zero fruit. I pollinated them myself this year and have loads on both trees. Nursery bought trees are not as scraggly as wild trees so give them lots of room. Jacque Brown, Centerton


On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...><mailto:<Sjogibson...>> wrote:

Can Pipevine and Paw Paw plants be grown successfully in a backyard pollinator garden? If so, where can I buy plants or seeds?
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

 

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Date: 7/14/19 3:51 pm
From: James Morgan <jlmm...>
Subject: Re: question
Here is a link to a local nursery in NW Arklansas that sells PawPaw
plants. Planting in Spring is best and better in the shade.

Ames Orchard & Nursery uses sustainable practices, Fayetteville Mailing
address but only a mile by crow flight from Elkins.

http://www.amesorchardandnursery.com/pawpaw/

Guy Ames that if you have fruit, just plant the seeds in the fall.The
Ames do have a PawPaw orchard in the open and not in the shade. But for
the first 2--3 years they use artificial shade. Might be able to get
away with less shade and more water.

Jim Morgan

Fayetteville, AR

On 7/14/2019 9:15 AM, Jacque Brown wrote:
> Sally Jo, I have two Paw Paw trees that I got at a nursery on Hudson
> Road in Rogers.  I got them a year apart. They were about the same
> size at that time.  One likes where it is and is now huge.  The other
> is planted about 15’ from that and hasn’t grown much although it seems
> to have more Paw Paw fruit.
>
> Last year we had those three hard freezes in a row in April and I had
> zero fruit.  I pollinated them myself this year and have loads on both
> trees. Nursery bought trees are not as scraggly as wild trees so give
> them lots of room.  Jacque Brown, Centerton
>
>
>> On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
>> <mailto:<Sjogibson...>> wrote:
>>
>> Can Pipevine and Paw Paw plants be grown successfully in a backyard
>> pollinator garden?  If so, where can I buy plants or seeds?
>> Sally Jo Gibson
>> Harrison, AR
>> Sent fromMail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986>for
>> Windows 10
>

 

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Date: 7/14/19 8:12 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: City Lake - Siloam Springs
Did a nice little birding walk last night starting around 7:43 PM. Many
of the birds were not extremely active but still managed to find at
least 31 species. Nothing super exciting but still a nice walk. Mostly
wanted to update what's happening there. Progress on the improvements
have been slow, possibly because of the weather. They have some benches
and trash barrels in. The gate (and I'm assuming bathrooms) isn't open
yet. They have some 4x4s up over some cement that looks like it will be
for picnic tables. Just two spots. Some of the trail is washed out a bit
but now that the water has gone down some you can still walk the trail.
During the flooding a few weeks back(I lose track of time so my time
frame might be off) one of the small bridges leading to the boardwalk
was washed away.  That bridge had washed all the way down to the dam but
someone (had to have been on a boat) moved it to the boat ramp area and
tied it to a tree. I'm not sure if it's still usable but I'm guessing
someone was trying to be helpful. Hopefully they'll put a bridge back in
the place it was as you really can't do much with that big expensive
boardwalk without it. No disc golf course is in yet but they'll get to
that eventually. I wish I knew more of the parks people(I used to know
one) in charge so I could discuss their plans and suggest some nice
trees and shrubs to go between the different parts of the course. Some
little micro habitats between each hole would make the course more
interesting anyway but would encourage some species I think. We'll see
what the future holds there, eventually and slowly.
At the main parking lot there was the remains of an obvious car fire.
Seems the bulk of the car has been removed but there's still one piece
of a tire, a lightbulb, lots of blackness and scraps of metal here and
there. That car must have been burned VERY badly. Makes me curious but
I'm always curious. ha.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 7/14/19 7:15 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: question
Sally Jo, I have two Paw Paw trees that I got at a nursery on Hudson Road in Rogers. I got them a year apart. They were about the same size at that time. One likes where it is and is now huge. The other is planted about 15’ from that and hasn’t grown much although it seems to have more Paw Paw fruit.

Last year we had those three hard freezes in a row in April and I had zero fruit. I pollinated them myself this year and have loads on both trees. Nursery bought trees are not as scraggly as wild trees so give them lots of room. Jacque Brown, Centerton


> On Jul 8, 2019, at 11:45 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> wrote:
>
> Can Pipevine and Paw Paw plants be grown successfully in a backyard pollinator garden? If so, where can I buy plants or seeds?
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 7/14/19 7:04 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Hummers
My hummers are not going to the feeder. I have a large native honeysuckle, they seem to not have noticed the feeder even though at least one came and sat in my cherry tree that is close to the feeder.

I think this is actually a first. My thoughts are none have ever been to the feeder before, these is all newbies. Jacque Brown, Centerton.


> On Jul 6, 2019, at 2:55 PM, Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> wrote:
>
> I’ve heard that the males start their migration south right after the 4th of July. I have not fact checked that so it may be a bunch of hoowie.
>
>
> Jim Dixon
> Little Rock
> www.jamesdixon.us <http://www.jamesdixon.us/>
> "There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after." — Thorin
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Dorothy Cooney
> Sent: Saturday, July 06, 2019 2:08 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Hummers
>
> In the last 2 days my number of rubies has increased from maybe 3 birds to around 20! I had to put out 2 large feeders in addition to the 2 already outside, bringing the total to 4 as of now. The little jewels are zipping around everywhere!
>
> --
> Dorothy Cooney
> Wickes, AR


 

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Date: 7/13/19 5:54 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Lost camera wrist strap at Bois De' Arc
I lost a green wrist strap for my camera last Saturday at Bois De'Arc. Hoping another birder has picked it up. Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/19 11:47 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Buy a Duck Stamp through the ABA
Done! (Plus ordered a few extra items.) Thanks, Dan. PattySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Date: 7/13/19 9:03 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Buy a Duck Stamp through the ABA The American Birding Association is selling federal Duck Stamps, not to makemoney but to quantify the number of birders who also contribute to thisfederal fundraiser for wetland habitat.https://www.aba.org/store/2019-2020-duck-stamp/Dan ScheimanLittle Rock, AR
 

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Date: 7/13/19 9:03 am
From: Dgoldens3 <000000554a8a6ef2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Buy a Duck Stamp through the ABA



Thank you. I will be ordering



Dawn







>
> On Jul 13, 2019 at 9:03 AM, <Daniel Scheiman (mailto:<birddan...>)> wrote:
>
>
>
> The American Birding Association is selling federal Duck Stamps, not to make money but to quantify the number of birders who also contribute to this federal fundraiser for wetland habitat.
>
>
>
> https://www.aba.org/store/2019-2020-duck-stamp/
>
>
>
> Dan Scheiman
>
> Little Rock, AR
>
>



 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/19 7:55 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Buy a Duck Stamp through the ABA
I have bought one of these now through ABA. Thank you, Dan!

Bill Thurman

PS the shipping charge was $3.15

On Sat, Jul 13, 2019, 9:03 AM Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:

> The American Birding Association is selling federal Duck Stamps, not to
> make money but to quantify the number of birders who also contribute to
> this federal fundraiser for wetland habitat.
>
> https://www.aba.org/store/2019-2020-duck-stamp/
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/19 7:03 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Buy a Duck Stamp through the ABA
The American Birding Association is selling federal Duck Stamps, not to make
money but to quantify the number of birders who also contribute to this
federal fundraiser for wetland habitat.

https://www.aba.org/store/2019-2020-duck-stamp/

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/19 4:58 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: eBird Cover Photo
Yes, the photo was by David and it was uploaded by me for posterity!  And it was taken from a canoe.  Go David!
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57578318




On Friday, 12 July, 2019, 02:03:50 pm GMT-5, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

#yiv3441788121 #yiv3441788121 -- P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}#yiv3441788121
I saw a photo from that trip that looks exactly like this one, but it was taken by David Oakley, who was on the trip. I suspect that the photographer is David Oakley, and that the photo was uploaded by Dr Kannan on an ebird checklist from the trip.



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Araks O <araks.ohanyan...>
Sent: Friday, July 12, 2019 1:49 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: eBird Cover Photo Hello all,
Some of you may have seen it already, but a beautiful photo of an American Pygmy Kingfisher by Ragupathy Kannan is on the front page of eBird today! I was reading of their trip to Belize only a few days ago! :)
Best,RoxyRussellville
 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/19 12:03 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: eBird Cover Photo
I saw a photo from that trip that looks exactly like this one, but it was taken by David Oakley, who was on the trip. I suspect that the photographer is David Oakley, and that the photo was uploaded by Dr Kannan on an ebird checklist from the trip.


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Araks O <araks.ohanyan...>
Sent: Friday, July 12, 2019 1:49 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: eBird Cover Photo

Hello all,

Some of you may have seen it already, but a beautiful photo of an American Pygmy Kingfisher by Ragupathy Kannan is on the front page of eBird today! I was reading of their trip to Belize only a few days ago! :)

Best,
Roxy
Russellville

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/19 11:51 am
From: Araks O <araks.ohanyan...>
Subject: eBird Cover Photo
Hello all,

Some of you may have seen it already, but a beautiful photo of an American
Pygmy Kingfisher by Ragupathy Kannan is on the front page of eBird today! I
was reading of their trip to Belize only a few days ago! :)

Best,
Roxy
Russellville

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/19 11:36 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BIRDING THE BUTTONBUSH ISLANDS
This mornings birding trip was Ahoy there mate and all aboard courtesy of Flip Putthoff, Outdoors Editor for Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette. We floated down War Eagle River for around 1-mile, with a put in near historic War Eagle Mill. Flip launches from some private land near the old War Eagle Cemetery. You put $2 in an old mailbox and promise not to leave trash. You can do this, too.

First birds: Cliff Swallows. This colony is under a bluff over hang above War Eagle just across from the $2 launch. I guess around 150 nests. Around half were still active this morning, with adults flying in to feed young. All birds in several additional colonies in the vicinity are already finished and have departed south. For those that remain I suspect a renest; during high water earlier this summer first mud nests were probably washed off the cliff face.

We slow-floated past Green Herons, including one family group of 4, plus others, Great Blue Herons (6), and two families of Wood Ducks (adult female with at least 4 small chicks, another with 3 largish young). Warblers included Northern Parula, Prothonotary (at least 2), and Common Yellowthroat. Yellow-billed Cuckoos called from 4 spots. We had Red-headed Woodpeckers on snags in two places and a Black Vulture atop a tall snag that ignored us floating by. Three vireos: Red-eyed, White-eyed, and Yellow-throated. Several Orchard Orioles and Belted Kingfishers.

The trip culminated in a flooded bottomland area, AKA the swamp. The only thing standing above the water: trees and islands of Buttonbushes, now in full flower, and pollinating insects. Prothonotaries singing in the shadows. Dragonflies working the sunny surface of the War Eagle.

What an extraordinarily relaxing way to spend a mid-July morning. Oh, and almost forgot: the temp when we put in was 62 and not much more two hours later. We came back upriver the easy way: Flips canoe has a square stern where he mounts a small, quiet electric motor.

Flip is a devoted angler, but no angling this morning for him. He had binoculars. Also, his devotion to the outdoors is not just in a job title. He carried a bag for collecting trash. He also investigated limb lines along the way, checking to see if they were still in use and being tended (none were), and removing them so birds like Great Blue Herons dont get wing-wrapped and suffer death as a result. Outdoors ethics in action. Goes really well with a morning on the river.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/19 7:44 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: AAST grant recipient soars high
Thanks for posting this, Kannan! I have been interested in the Ivorybill
and its relatives for a long time. I never heard of the Magellanic
Woodpecker until around the 90's and almost nobody every talks or writes
about it. It's a shame!
Thanks again for posting this story.

Bill Thurman
On Thu, Jul 11, 2019, 9:11 AM Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

> That's Fantastic!!!
>
> J
>
> On Thu, Jul 11, 2019 at 8:59 AM Ragupathy Kannan <
> <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> Amy Wynia received several grants from the Arkansas Audubon Society
>> Trust. Now she is going places, literally and figuratively.
>>
>> Chasing the elusive Magellanic Woodpecker
>> <https://phys.org/news/2019-07-elusive-magellanic-woodpecker.html>
>>
>> Chasing the elusive Magellanic Woodpecker
>>
>> University of North Texas Ph.D. candidate, Amy Wynia, traveled more than
>> 6,000 miles to Navarino Island in south...
>> <https://phys.org/news/2019-07-elusive-magellanic-woodpecker.html>
>>
>>
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/19 7:11 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: AAST grant recipient soars high
That's Fantastic!!!

J

On Thu, Jul 11, 2019 at 8:59 AM Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Amy Wynia received several grants from the Arkansas Audubon Society
> Trust. Now she is going places, literally and figuratively.
>
> Chasing the elusive Magellanic Woodpecker
> <https://phys.org/news/2019-07-elusive-magellanic-woodpecker.html>
>
> Chasing the elusive Magellanic Woodpecker
>
> University of North Texas Ph.D. candidate, Amy Wynia, traveled more than
> 6,000 miles to Navarino Island in south...
> <https://phys.org/news/2019-07-elusive-magellanic-woodpecker.html>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/19 6:59 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: AAST grant recipient soars high
Amy Wynia received several grants from the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust.  Now she is going places, literally and figuratively.  
Chasing the elusive Magellanic Woodpecker

|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
Chasing the elusive Magellanic Woodpecker

University of North Texas Ph.D. candidate, Amy Wynia, traveled more than 6,000 miles to Navarino Island in south...
|

|

|





 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/19 2:12 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Centerton
The female Hooded Merganser that has been using basically the same pond at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton since early May continues. I saw just one adult Bald Eagle today, but hatchery personnel said they have been seeing 1-2, and using the same snag. Besides Killdeer (12), the only shorebird I saw was a Least Sandpiper (1). This bird is on the front end of the fall southward migration that typically peaks much later in second half of August. While driving around the hatchery I noticed a lot of Swamp Milkweed. Its not blooming yet (good time for blooming is more like second week of August into early September), but all of this summers rain may make it a good year. Hatchery maintenance takes into account need to leave some areas unmowed to allow Swamp Milkweed to flower and make seed, a significant contribution to statewide efforts in behalf of native plants and native pollinators. Lots of Monarchs are going to appreciate this. We may have a flash field trip some time during the milkweed peak. Finally, hatchery personnel are well along on the repair/remodel of the outdoor shelter used for meetings, classes, and picnics. When the shelter began to show its age, I was afraid it was just going to be torn down. But it is now looking better than ever, and will even get a new coat of paint.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/19 1:06 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Little Blue Heron
There's a lot of wet out there... perhaps it's too wet? I haven't been
birding(outside of the yard) much lately so I can't say what's around
right now. I can say that so far this year I haven't seen a little blue
heron and haven't seen any reported at the Eagle Watch in Gentry where
there's usually at least one each summer. But the water is high there
right now. Not as much shallows with muddy edges perhaps? Perhaps
they're around just somewhere else? I can't say. I'm no expert on their
behavior and specific needs. I can say that I've found quite a few
species that are quite particular and what habitat looks AWESOME to me,
certain species just ignore it. So, my speculation is all the extra
water we've seen this year has had an impact on them.

Daniel Mason

On 7/10/2019 1:35 PM, Sandy Berger wrote:
> Over the last few years I’ve noticed a decline of Little Blues in the
> Fort Smith area river valley. I haven’t seen a single one this year.
> And after researching ebird I see that only four have been seen and
> recorded between FS and Conway. That was back in April and all four
> were seen in Conway by Kenny Nichols. Continuing west into Oklahoma,
> only one was seen in April at Sequoyah NWR. Snowy Egrets are also
> rarely seen. What’s happened? Where are they? We still have wetlands.
> Plenty of places for “fishing”. Maybe there’s not reliable colonial
> nesting sites. I miss seeing them.
>
> Sandy B
> FS, AR



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/19 11:36 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Little Blue Heron
Over the last few years I’ve noticed a decline of Little Blues in the Fort
Smith area river valley. I haven’t seen a single one this year. And after
researching ebird I see that only four have been seen and recorded between
FS and Conway. That was back in April and all four were seen in Conway by
Kenny Nichols. Continuing west into Oklahoma, only one was seen in April at
Sequoyah NWR. Snowy Egrets are also rarely seen. What’s happened? Where
are they? We still have wetlands. Plenty of places for “fishing”. Maybe
there’s not reliable colonial nesting sites. I miss seeing them.

Sandy B
FS, AR

 

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Date: 7/10/19 5:45 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: article in Monday's ADG
Comment--Along with the vegetative controls, I would also suggest active control measures (shell-crackers, dogs, etc) to harass the geese. It may be necessary at some point to stretch a grid of wires across the lake to keep waterfowl from flying-in. Since the geese are grazers, it may be a good investment to replace the existing turf-grass with a distasteful variety (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/319089914_Using_novel-grass_endophyte_associations_as_an_avian_deterrent and a recent thesis suggesting there is no significant affect https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/c19a/1a67946adfbce57bf283b503f82eb8de726c.pdf).
Jeff Short

Year­long work to shut­ter park at Ben­tonville

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, USA Jul 8, 2019 3B MARY JOR­DAN
[]
BEN­TONVILLE — Lake Ben­tonville Park closes for nearly a year to­day for a ma­jor ren­o­va­tion.
“Spring 2020 is a very vague time­line, and I know it,” said David Wright, Ben­tonville Parks and Re­cre­ation direc­tor. He said the park at 210 S.W. I St. could open as early as Jan­uary or as late as June depend­ing on the weather.
A $1.85 mil­lion grant from the Wal­ton Fam­ily Foun­da­tion will pay for the project, said Luis Gon­za­lez, the foun­da­tion’s spokesman.
“We honor our roots by help­ing build op­por­tu­nity in our home re­gion be­cause these are the com­mu­ni­ties where Sam and He­len Wal­ton first found op­por­tu­nity,” he said.
The project is be­ing com­pleted in con­junc­tion with the 55-acre Osage Park preser­va­tion project to the north of Lake Ben­tonville Park be­ing spear­headed by the foun­da­tion.
The recre­ational ar­eas of Lake Ben­tonville and Osage parks flow to­gether seam­lessly, so peo­ple of­ten don’t re­al­ize they’re leav­ing one and en­ter­ing an­other, Wright said. The parks have dif­fer­ent own­ers. Ben­tonville Parks and Re­cre­ation Fund owns the land north of Lake Ben­tonville, while the city owns about 7 acres be­tween South­west I Street and Ben­tonville Mu­nic­i­pal Air­port’s run­way.
Ben­tonville Parks and Re­cre­ation Fund has P.O. 1860 listed as its ad­dress. It’s the same ad­dress as Wal­ton En­ter­prises.
The acres north of Lake Ben­tonville Park will re­main pri­vate prop­erty but will be open to the public, sim­i­lar to Comp­ton Gar­dens, the land owned by the Peel House Foun­da­tion, as pre­vi­ously re­ported.
10-YEAR PLAN
The Lake Ben­tonville Park project is part of the Parks and Re­cre­ation’s 10-year plan, adopted by the city in 2017, Wright said.
“The Play Ben­tonville Plan re­ally pointed out how 58% of our res­i­dents live west of Wal­ton Boule­vard, but at the time, only 8% of re­cre­ation space was in that part of our com­mu­nity,” Wright said.
The park ren­o­va­tion will com­ple­ment new ameni­ties at Osage Park, which he said would in­clude open green space, an am­phithe­ater for public art and an archery range.
Lake Ben­tonville Park work in­cludes adding an as­phalt park­ing lot, pav­il­ion with board­walks and fish­ing piers and mak­ing the park fully ac­ces­si­ble ac­cord­ing to the Amer­i­cans with Dis­abil­i­ties Act, Wright said. Ad­di­tional mod­i­fi­ca­tions in­clude build­ing a des­ti­na­tion play­ground, cre­at­ing ac­cess for Arkansas Game and Fish to stock the lake with fish and re­mov­ing the dam to ex­pand the 5-acre lake to dou­ble or triple its size, he said.
Re­mov­ing the dam will in­crease the recre­ational value of the prop­erty, he said.
“The body of wa­ter that is there will spill over all the way from where it is now to the bridge that is on I Street that has a very com­plex beaver dam sys­tem,” Wright said. “We’re go­ing to uti­lize the nat­u­ral beaver dams that have been built over the years to dam the wa­ter.”
Many sur­round­ing pieces of prop­erty drain into Lake Ben­tonville and use an over­flow sys­tem in which the wa­ter comes out of the lake and runs down a con­crete cul­vert, he said. Plans are to re­move the cul­vert and out­flow sys­tem.
The wa­ter will then pass through the beaver dams, which will act as a nat­u­ral fil­tra­tion sys­tem, he said, re­sult­ing in wa­ter among the clean­est within the wa­ter­shed.
The new lake will rise and shrink like a lung and will take all the wa­ter that lands in the Illi­nois River wa­ter­shed in the com­mu­nity and bring it through the prop­erty, Wright said.
“We’re fil­ter­ing out the oil and the gaso­line from the roads,” Wright said. “It’s a real sus­tain­able project that I hope our ci­ti­zens are re­ally proud of.”
BEAVERS AND GEESE
Beavers are al­ready fil­ter­ing the wa­ter through the dams, he said. The an­i­mals could aban­don the dams and the lake would dry up.
“We un­der­stand that may hap­pen, but we’ve al­ways had that risk,” he said. “That wet­land that’s out there has been there for years.”
Beavers aren’t the only an­i­mals pos­ing devel­op­ment chal­lenges, Wright said. The lake is also at­trac­tive to geese, which have proven prob­lem­atic for Ben­tonville Mu­nic­i­pal Air­port to the park’s south.
Geese spend about four months each spring at and around the air­port, of­fi­cials have said. The air­port’s board has looked at var­i­ous ideas to re­solve the mat­ter over sev­eral years be­cause of the col­li­sion risk geese pose to air­craft.
“I can tell you that we have le­git­i­mate con­cerns that the growth of the park area and lake may re­sult in in­creas­ing the haz­ards as­so­ci­ated with the bird sit­u­a­tion at Ben­tonville Mu­nic­i­pal Air­port,” Chuck Chad­wick, air­port man­ager, said in an email.
He said the city is work­ing with Eco­log­i­cal De­sign Group to cre­ate a wildlife man­age­ment plan in­cor­po­rat­ing the air­port.
Putting a veg­e­ta­tive fringe around the perime­ter of the lake will help pre­vent geese from en­ter­ing the lake, Martin Smith said, ex­plain­ing the birds pre­fer to go in and out of bod­ies of wa­ter from a man­i­cured edge.
“That’s a chal­lenge, be­cause peo­ple that fish don’t like to fish over a veg­e­ta­tive fringe,” Smith said.
Park de­sign­ers will use soft-based plant ma­te­rial that won’t eas­ily catch on lures and will cre­ate fish­ing piers out­side of the run­way pro­tec­tion zones to en­sure the best pos­si­ble fish­ing ex­pe­ri­ence for res­i­dents, he said.
Lake Ben­tonville Park will be closed through­out con­struc­tion, but fish­ing will still be be ac­ces­si­ble from the dock of Thaden Field House, Wright said.
He cau­tioned res­i­dents to re­main clear of the park un­til work is com­plete.


Sent from my iPad=
 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/19 4:54 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: note about upcoming Bison, Birds, Botany & Butterflies (September)
Any of you who last year drove over for Bison, Birds, Botany & Butterflies (BBBB) centered at The Nature Conservancys Joseph H. Williams TALLGRASS PRAIRIE PRESERVE in northeastern Oklahoma, may remember the wonderful tour of the Mathews Cabin site lead by the Conservancys Tony Brown. There is a similar tour available this year on Saturday September 28. If you want to make this trip, there is no charge, but you need to sign up through the TNC website. You can do this at: http://support.nature.org/site/Calendar/?view=RSVP&id=12470. I am not going on the tour on that Saturday, but it is a wonderful place and experience, so sign up if you are interested. If you want to link up with us later, we will still meet around noon at Tallgrass HQ as in the past. Let me know if you need more info.



Another slight change for this years trip: we will be joined by members of the Tulsa Audubon Society led by Jim Deming. I talked with Jim on the phone. We will meet in the parking lot at the Hampton Inn in Bartlesville at around 7 am on Saturday September 28. Anyone interested who cant make the 7 am meet up can easily catch up with us later, around noon, at Tallgrass HQ. The plan that morning includes stops and roadside birding at Osage Hills State Park, then more of same along CR 4220 just off Highway 99, then on to the Preserve, Eryngium leavenworthii, and a lunch break at Tallgrass HQ and a full afternoon on and about the Preserve.


 

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Date: 7/8/19 6:46 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Singing!
I spent some time late this afternoon and early evening near the Alum fork
of Saline River in Saline County. Visiting with friends in their home in
the deep woods I heard plenty of singing wood thrushes, summer tanagers, GC
flycatcher, barred owls and cardinals. No mosquitos anywhere. It was music
to ease my mind. A feast for the ears! Paradise is where you find it.

Bill Thurman

 

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Date: 7/8/19 10:46 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, July 11, Urban & Suburban Meadows
This Thursday, July 11, is Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's monthly meeting starting at 7 pm. **This month we are meeting at the Little Rock Audubon Center, 4500 Springer Blvd.**


We will watch a documentary called "Urban and Suburban Meadows" directed by Katherine Zimmerman of The Meadow Project.

“Urban and Suburban Meadows” is a film aimed at helping people just say NO to thirsty, pesticide ridden, energy consuming lawns. It is a 60 minute video that offers the tools to create living, sustainable, organic landscapes in backyards, schoolyards, churches and communities. It features landscaping and entomology experts in meadow and prairie establishment details meadow preparation, design, use of native plants, planting and maintenance. The Meadow Project’s mission is to educate and raise awareness about sustainable, native, healthy, easy and affordable land care practices that support wildlife and human life. Learn more at https://themeadowproject.com


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/19 9:50 am
From: <herbies...> <herbies...>
Subject: 5 MIKIs
Soaring over Park Spgs. Park, Bentonville at 11:40.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/19 9:45 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: question
Can Pipevine and Paw Paw plants be grown successfully in a backyard pollinator garden? If so, where can I buy plants or seeds?
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 7/8/19 8:03 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
I couldn't agree more with Sally Jo. We all have something to give, just different amounts or different things, including our precious time. The point is to share what we can share. Martha also purchased a property next to Baker Prairie Natural Area in Harrison when it appeared the property would be commercially developed with negative impact on Baker Prairie. With so much of the landscape changing so rapidly under rapid development driven by upward spiraling human population growth, the need is great to purchase and set aside increasingly extensive amounts of quality natural habitat so that those who come after us will have a chance to explore the natural world as we knew it in our times.


[cid:675e15e3-4b60-478c-8388-069f4ca06c56]



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Sent: Monday, July 8, 2019 9:32 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area


We need to realize that when we give $50.00 a year to any worthy cause, in 10 years we will have given $500. It all adds up and we are still helping. Martha was unique and I still miss her. She and JoAnne Rife were my mentors and today Im a birder, thanks to them.

Many people can give a one time very large gift, but those who give incrementally over the years sometimes end up contributing more in the long run.

Every little bit helps.

Sally Jo Gibson





Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Sent: Sunday, July 7, 2019 4:19:48 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area

That's just a great post all round! The world needs a whole lot more Marthas. People who have abundance and use it wisely.

Bill Thurman

On Sun, Jul 7, 2019, 4:10 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...><mailto:<joeneal...> wrote:

It always amazes me how many people will come to a field trip on a very hot and very humid day and then spend a couple of hours walking around in the sunshine. But its Chesney Prairie Natural Area and the occasion was the annual Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip, set to coincide with the spectacular blooming of Liatris pycnostachya -- Prairie Gay Feathers or Blazing Stars and equally spectacular Helianthus mollis, Ashy Sunflower. Lots of both for the 25 or so who braved the sun and humidity for slow-walks on the trails freshly mowed by Joe Woolbright, Chesneys long time land steward. We got about 40 bird species for the day. Here is a link to the ebird list compiled by Vivek Govind Kumar: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58006275. To this list I would add Fish Crows (over) and Northern Bobwhites calling from the south end of the Couch unit. We always wind up informally breaking up into small groups depending upon how fast you want to walk, whether interest mainly involves birds, or plants, or photography and slowest of all, you cant decide which and consequently try all. Personally, I got hung up pretty early upon seeing a spectacular tiny golden-greenish damselfly down among the grasses. These proved to be Citrine Forktail, Ischnura hastate, and since I had no idea what I was seeing, of course I wound up being about the last one walking the trails. We didnt see a few hoped for birds: Swainsons Hawk and Loggerhead Shrike come to mind but we did see many Dickcissels and some saw a Yellow-billed Cuckoo perched out in the open and both Indigo and Painted Buntings. I was only out there a couple of hours, but the pleasure of the field trip lingers. It usually requires me a couple of days to process the spectacular reality that is a native Tallgrass Prairie in its seasonal prime. One wonderful thing that slowed me up: retelling a story about Sally Jo Gibson and Martha Milburn. An opportunity to add unplowed acres of Chesney came up several years ago. I posted a note onto the ARBIRD list about the need for something like $5000 to finish the purchase. Martha was riding with Sally Jo, who got the message on her Blackberry. SJ read it to Martha, and very generous Martha said, Call them right now. I can do that. And she did.


 

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Date: 7/8/19 7:32 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
We need to realize that when we give $50.00 a year to any worthy cause, in 10 years we will have given $500. It all adds up and we are still helping. Martha was unique and I still miss her. She and JoAnne Rife were my mentors and today Im a birder, thanks to them.
Many people can give a one time very large gift, but those who give incrementally over the years sometimes end up contributing more in the long run.
Every little bit helps.
Sally Jo Gibson


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Sent: Sunday, July 7, 2019 4:19:48 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area

That's just a great post all round! The world needs a whole lot more Marthas. People who have abundance and use it wisely.

Bill Thurman

On Sun, Jul 7, 2019, 4:10 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...><mailto:<joeneal...> wrote:
It always amazes me how many people will come to a field trip on a very hot and very humid day and then spend a couple of hours walking around in the sunshine. But its Chesney Prairie Natural Area and the occasion was the annual Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip, set to coincide with the spectacular blooming of Liatris pycnostachya -- Prairie Gay Feathers or Blazing Stars and equally spectacular Helianthus mollis, Ashy Sunflower. Lots of both for the 25 or so who braved the sun and humidity for slow-walks on the trails freshly mowed by Joe Woolbright, Chesneys long time land steward. We got about 40 bird species for the day. Here is a link to the ebird list compiled by Vivek Govind Kumar: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58006275. To this list I would add Fish Crows (over) and Northern Bobwhites calling from the south end of the Couch unit. We always wind up informally breaking up into small groups depending upon how fast you want to walk, whether interest mainly involves birds, or plants, or photography and slowest of all, you cant decide which and consequently try all. Personally, I got hung up pretty early upon seeing a spectacular tiny golden-greenish damselfly down among the grasses. These proved to be Citrine Forktail, Ischnura hastate, and since I had no idea what I was seeing, of course I wound up being about the last one walking the trails. We didnt see a few hoped for birds: Swainsons Hawk and Loggerhead Shrike come to mind but we did see many Dickcissels and some saw a Yellow-billed Cuckoo perched out in the open and both Indigo and Painted Buntings. I was only out there a couple of hours, but the pleasure of the field trip lingers. It usually requires me a couple of days to process the spectacular reality that is a native Tallgrass Prairie in its seasonal prime. One wonderful thing that slowed me up: retelling a story about Sally Jo Gibson and Martha Milburn. An opportunity to add unplowed acres of Chesney came up several years ago. I posted a note onto the ARBIRD list about the need for something like $5000 to finish the purchase. Martha was riding with Sally Jo, who got the message on her Blackberry. SJ read it to Martha, and very generous Martha said, Call them right now. I can do that. And she did.


 

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Date: 7/8/19 7:27 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
Hear! Hear!
On Sunday, 7 July, 2019, 04:20:38 pm GMT-5, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:

That's just a great post all round! The world needs a whole lot more Marthas. People who have abundance and use it wisely.
Bill Thurman 
On Sun, Jul 7, 2019, 4:10 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:




It always amazes me how many people will come to a field trip on a very hot and very humid day and then spend a couple of hours walking around in the sunshine. But it’s Chesney Prairie Natural Area and the occasion was the annual Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip, set to coincide with the spectacular blooming of Liatris pycnostachya -- Prairie Gay Feathers or Blazing Stars – and equally spectacular Helianthus mollis, Ashy Sunflower. Lots of both for the 25 or so who braved the sun and humidity for slow-walks on the trails freshly mowed by Joe Woolbright, Chesney’s long time land steward. We got about 40 bird species for the day. Here is a link to the ebird list compiled by Vivek Govind Kumar:https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58006275. To this list I would add Fish Crows (over) and Northern Bobwhites calling from the south end of the Couch unit. We always wind up informally breaking up into small groups depending upon how fast you want to walk, whether interest mainly involves birds, or plants, or photography – and slowest of all, you can’t decide which and consequently try all. Personally, I got hung up pretty early upon seeing a spectacular tiny golden-greenish damselfly down among the grasses. These proved to be Citrine Forktail, Ischnura hastate, and since I had no idea what I was seeing, of course I wound up being about the last one walking the trails. We didn’t see a few hoped for birds: Swainson’s Hawk and Loggerhead Shrike come to mind – but we did see many Dickcissels and some saw a Yellow-billed Cuckoo perched out in the open and both Indigo and Painted Buntings. I was only out there a couple of hours, but the pleasure of the field trip lingers. It usually requires me a couple of days to processthe spectacular reality that is a native Tallgrass Prairie in its seasonal prime. One wonderful thing that slowed me up: retelling a story about Sally Jo Gibson and Martha Milburn. An opportunity to add unplowed acres of Chesney came up several years ago. I posted a note onto the ARBIRD list about the need for something like $5000 to finish the purchase. Martha was riding with Sally Jo, who got the message on her Blackberry. SJ read it to Martha, and very generous Martha said, “Call them right now. I can do that.” And she did.





 

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Date: 7/7/19 5:08 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Report
Below is the trip report for Saturday's ASCA field trip.  We had a great day!Karen

ASCA Field Trip

July 6, 2019

Dr. Lester Sitzes III, Bois d’ Arc AGFC WMA

Hope, AR

 

Fourteenbirders braved the hot, steamy July temperatures to spend the day at the AGFC Boisd’Arc WMA in south Arkansas searching for Gallinule babies, elusiveNight-Herons, Least Bitterns, and alligators. A quick stop at the McDonald’s in Hope netted the expected flock ofGreat-tailed Grackles.  The juveniles arequite adept at dodging cars and people to gobble up their daily ration of junkfood.  Arriving at the WMA, the lake wasteaming with activity.  Purple and CommonGallinules and their chicks dodged, swam, and scampered over the Water Lotus pads. Great, Snowy, and Cattle Egrets, plusLittle Blue and Green Herons were flying and squawking everywhere.  We spotted several White Ibis, but saw only acouple of Anhingas.  Tree and NorthernRoughed-winged Swallows were the most prevalent swallows.  One adult Bald Eagle did a slow fly-over thenperched for a while on one of the snags in the lake.  At the two Cattle Egret rookeries, we foundadult and juvenile Black-crowned Night-Herons.

 

Thebest woods birds were two Swainson’s Warblers, which had been located earlierin the week by two birders.  The warblerswere very cooperative.  One came quite closeto the road, singing, perching, and flitting about at eye level.  Life bird for several!  At the back side of the lake the ProthonotaryWarbler family of five put on quite a show. They dashed around the small slough among the reeds and hanging branches,quite excited to check out our group.  Twomale Painted Buntings fought each other in the undergrowth at another spotwhile a female watched from above.

 

Atotal of three alligators of varying sizes were spotted floating motionless in inletsin different locations as we circled the lake trying to find a LeastBittern.  All the usual locations were a bust,so our last resort was to drive to the far back side of the lake.  Finally, a Least Bittern responded from thereeds, but took his time to come fully out for a brief look before plungingback into the reeds not to be seen again. Cheers and high fives by the small group of birders who had persevered inthe heat well past 1:00 p.m. to be rewarded with a nice look at this handsomebird.  Approximately 50 species was ourtrip total.  A very successful excursionto the southern region of our state to visit its diverse habitats and flora andfauna.

 

KarenHolliday

ASCAField Trip Coordinator

LittleRock/Pulaski County

 


 

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Date: 7/7/19 2:20 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
That's just a great post all round! The world needs a whole lot more
Marthas. People who have abundance and use it wisely.

Bill Thurman

On Sun, Jul 7, 2019, 4:10 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> It always amazes me how many people will come to a field trip on a very
> hot and very humid day and then spend a couple of hours walking around in
> the sunshine. But it’s Chesney Prairie Natural Area and the occasion was
> the annual Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip, set to coincide
> with the spectacular blooming of Liatris pycnostachya -- Prairie Gay
> Feathers or Blazing Stars – and equally spectacular Helianthus mollis, Ashy
> Sunflower. Lots of both for the 25 or so who braved the sun and humidity
> for slow-walks on the trails freshly mowed by Joe Woolbright, Chesney’s
> long time land steward. We got about 40 bird species for the day. Here is a
> link to the ebird list compiled by Vivek Govind Kumar:
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58006275. To this list I would add Fish
> Crows (over) and Northern Bobwhites calling from the south end of the Couch
> unit. We always wind up informally breaking up into small groups depending
> upon how fast you want to walk, whether interest mainly involves birds, or
> plants, or photography – and slowest of all, you can’t decide which and
> consequently try all. Personally, I got hung up pretty early upon seeing a
> spectacular tiny golden-greenish damselfly down among the grasses. These
> proved to be *Citrine Forktail, Ischnura hastate, and since I had no idea
> what I was seeing, of course I wound up being about the last one walking
> the trails. We didn’t see a few hoped for birds: Swainson’s Hawk and
> Loggerhead Shrike come to mind – but we did see many Dickcissels and some
> saw a Yellow-billed Cuckoo perched out in the open and both Indigo and
> Painted Buntings. I was only out there a couple of hours, but the pleasure
> of the field trip lingers. It usually requires me a couple of days to
> process* the spectacular reality that is a native Tallgrass Prairie in
> its seasonal prime. One wonderful thing that slowed me up: retelling a
> story about Sally Jo Gibson and Martha Milburn. An opportunity to add
> unplowed acres of Chesney came up several years ago. I posted a note onto
> the ARBIRD list about the need for something like $5000 to finish the
> purchase. Martha was riding with Sally Jo, who got the message on her
> Blackberry. SJ read it to Martha, and very generous Martha said, “Call them
> right now. I can do that.” And she did.
>
>

 

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Date: 7/7/19 2:11 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: A few dramatic moments (past and present) at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
It always amazes me how many people will come to a field trip on a very hot and very humid day and then spend a couple of hours walking around in the sunshine. But its Chesney Prairie Natural Area and the occasion was the annual Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip, set to coincide with the spectacular blooming of Liatris pycnostachya -- Prairie Gay Feathers or Blazing Stars and equally spectacular Helianthus mollis, Ashy Sunflower. Lots of both for the 25 or so who braved the sun and humidity for slow-walks on the trails freshly mowed by Joe Woolbright, Chesneys long time land steward. We got about 40 bird species for the day. Here is a link to the ebird list compiled by Vivek Govind Kumar: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S58006275. To this list I would add Fish Crows (over) and Northern Bobwhites calling from the south end of the Couch unit. We always wind up informally breaking up into small groups depending upon how fast you want to walk, whether interest mainly involves birds, or plants, or photography and slowest of all, you cant decide which and consequently try all. Personally, I got hung up pretty early upon seeing a spectacular tiny golden-greenish damselfly down among the grasses. These proved to be Citrine Forktail, Ischnura hastate, and since I had no idea what I was seeing, of course I wound up being about the last one walking the trails. We didnt see a few hoped for birds: Swainsons Hawk and Loggerhead Shrike come to mind but we did see many Dickcissels and some saw a Yellow-billed Cuckoo perched out in the open and both Indigo and Painted Buntings. I was only out there a couple of hours, but the pleasure of the field trip lingers. It usually requires me a couple of days to process the spectacular reality that is a native Tallgrass Prairie in its seasonal prime. One wonderful thing that slowed me up: retelling a story about Sally Jo Gibson and Martha Milburn. An opportunity to add unplowed acres of Chesney came up several years ago. I posted a note onto the ARBIRD list about the need for something like $5000 to finish the purchase. Martha was riding with Sally Jo, who got the message on her Blackberry. SJ read it to Martha, and very generous Martha said, Call them right now. I can do that. And she did.


 

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Date: 7/6/19 12:56 pm
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Re: Hummers
I’ve heard that the males start their migration south right after the 4th of July. I have not fact checked that so it may be a bunch of hoowie.





Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after." — Thorin



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Dorothy Cooney
Sent: Saturday, July 06, 2019 2:08 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Hummers



In the last 2 days my number of rubies has increased from maybe 3 birds to around 20! I had to put out 2 large feeders in addition to the 2 already outside, bringing the total to 4 as of now. The little jewels are zipping around everywhere!



--

Dorothy Cooney

Wickes, AR


 

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Date: 7/6/19 12:09 pm
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
Subject: Hummers
In the last 2 days my number of rubies has increased from maybe 3 birds to
around 20! I had to put out 2 large feeders in addition to the 2 already
outside, bringing the total to 4 as of now. The little jewels are zipping
around everywhere!

--
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR

 

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Date: 7/6/19 6:45 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: A change and an identity crisis in Benton County
Thats too bad Karen. I’ve asked before when the weather was cold and the wind blowing and always was told OK. But I asked every time I wanted to drive up there and did not go if there was no one to ask.

There has been a sign posted by the marshy area for a long time but I haven’t been over lately to see any new signs. Recently I’ve found the gates closed more often than not. Jacque Brown



> On Jul 5, 2019, at 8:21 PM, Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:
>
> First on the menu: For anyone that birds the fish hatchery in Centerton, no one is allowed to drive up by the upper ponds, not even those of us with mobility impairments. Several tears ago, anyone could drive up there, and for the last several years, only people with mobility issues were allowed to drive up there, but the other day, the manager (?) contacted me up there and said that he was making a change in that regard. He had put up a sign, near the spring, but I missed it, as I was looking out the window for dragonflies. That stinks for me, but I am glad that they let us drive around the lower ponds, so I can't complain, I guess. I gathered that perhaps he has seen someone coming down the hill at such a speed as to pose a threat to anyone walking up.
>
> Secondly, I was at Hobbs today, and observed a Red-headed Wood pecker doing some fly-catching. I saw him make about ten sorties, and I know he was successful at least once. I got a photo of him flying back in to his chosen pine tree with an insect in his bill. I don't recall witnessing this before. Is this normal behavior? I wish he would have caught a few of the flies that were tormenting me out there.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, where we swat flies and shoot dragons


 

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Date: 7/5/19 6:22 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: A change and an identity crisis in Benton County
First on the menu: For anyone that birds the fish hatchery in Centerton,
no one is allowed to drive up by the upper ponds, not even those of us with
mobility impairments. Several tears ago, anyone could drive up there, and
for the last several years, only people with mobility issues were allowed
to drive up there, but the other day, the manager (?) contacted me up there
and said that he was making a change in that regard. He had put up a sign,
near the spring, but I missed it, as I was looking out the window for
dragonflies. That stinks for me, but I am glad that they let us drive
around the lower ponds, so I can't complain, I guess. I gathered that
perhaps he has seen someone coming down the hill at such a speed as to pose
a threat to anyone walking up.

Secondly, I was at Hobbs today, and observed a Red-headed Wood pecker doing
some fly-catching. I saw him make about ten sorties, and I know he was
successful at least once. I got a photo of him flying back in to his
chosen pine tree with an insect in his bill. I don't recall witnessing
this before. Is this normal behavior? I wish he would have caught a few
of the flies that were tormenting me out there.

Karen Garrett
Rogers, where we swat flies and shoot dragons

 

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Date: 7/4/19 6:55 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Fifth Carolina Wren nest?
A happy and hopeful analysis! Thanks, Kannan.

-Janine

On 7/4/2019 7:13 PM, Ragupathy Kannan wrote:
> Janine, here in Ft Smith too there is this frenzy of breeding
> activity.?? We've never had barn swallows come back and raise another
> brood in our porch; and 20 feet away house finches are nesting too.
>
> I think the bountiful rains have ushered in a flush of insects and
> hence all this reproduction investment.
>
> Kannan
>
> On Thursday, 4 July, 2019, 05:21:00 pm GMT-5, Janine Perlman
> <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
>
> Assuming the BNA species account for Carolina Wrens' territories
> applies to those around our house, the resident pair, which recently
> fledged their fourth clutch, is now building a fifth nest under the
> overhead baffle of a feeder.
>
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.


 

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Date: 7/4/19 5:14 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Fifth Carolina Wren nest?
Janine, here in Ft Smith too there is this frenzy of breeding activity.  We've never had barn swallows come back and raise another brood in our porch; and 20 feet away house finches are nesting too. 
I think the bountiful rains have ushered in a flush of insects and hence all this reproduction investment. 
Kannan
On Thursday, 4 July, 2019, 05:21:00 pm GMT-5, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

Assuming the BNA species account for Carolina Wrens' territories applies to those around our house, the resident pair, which recently fledged their fourth clutch, is now building a fifth nest under the overhead baffle of a feeder.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

 

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Date: 7/4/19 3:20 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Fifth Carolina Wren nest?
Assuming the BNA species account for Carolina Wrens' territories applies
to those around our house, the resident pair, which recently fledged
their fourth clutch, is now building a fifth nest under the overhead
baffle of a feeder.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

 

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Date: 7/4/19 7:24 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Weird thought...
I'm bad about keeping up with my emails, reading them, deleting them,
etc... once in a while I'll go to some old ones so I can delete them.
Today I was looking at some whooping crane conversations from a couple
years ago and it gave me an idea... an odd idea...
Perhaps if there's ever such a rare bird in the state that some are
uncertain about sharing a location...  we could get a big van or bus and
load up a bunch of birders that REALLY want to see it, and put bags over
their heads so they can't see where they're going.
This idea is half serious and half just making me chuckle a bit as I try
to picture it... and picture the faces of passers by as they see a
vehicle of people with bags on their heads going down the road.
Maybe it's too early in the morning for me or I just have a weird sense
of humor but the thought made me laugh. And in all honesty, I'd wear a
bag over my head to be transported to see a rare bird. :)

Not much birding happening here lately... between the wife not wanting
me out too often and the hot sunburning sun I've just been at home more
often... We do have a wren nest with young.

Daniel Mason


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 7/4/19 6:45 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Belize Trip
Fantastic photo! Bill Thurman

On Thu, Jul 4, 2019, 8:27 AM Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Getting David Oakley and Allan Mueller on board is one of the best
> decisions I made for my Belize course. And it raised some money for the
> Arkansas Audubon Society Trust too. Students learned a lot and were
> inspired by these two seasoned naturalists.
> Only David can take pictures like this from a rocking canoe. Check out
> the manakin, the pygmy kingfisher, and the tiger heron. Absolute stunners.
> I told my students that photos like this exist mostly in slick brochures
> and in the pages of the National Geographic! Students were also told that
> the beard of this manakin is erected only for a brief moment during
> courtship. Note how David caught the right instant to snap the photo.
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57578318
>
> On Tuesday, 2 July, 2019, 09:08:02 am GMT-5, David Oakley <gdosr...>
> wrote:
>
>
> I am just back from a wonderful seven days in Belize. I tagged along with
> Dr. Kannon and his student group that make the trip as three hour credit
> course each summer. This was my fifth trip with Kannan and may well have
> been the best! The official bird list totaled 190 species, ending with a
> Sandwich Tern observed in Belize City as we boarded the van headed to catch
> our flight home. I have just started post-processing images and my number
> of lifers is still unknown, but it is safe to say that it will surpass my
> expectation! It was a pleasure to interact with the students and observe
> their eagerness to learn. One of the more noteworthy experiences was
> witnessing Dr. Kannan stand firm in his report of our sighting of fifteen
> Yellow-green Vireos on one occasion when the Belize ebird reviewer
> challenged the number. When all was said and done, the reviewer actually
> changed the filter from 10 to 15. Pretty unusual and most probably due to
> Kannan's reputation in Belize! If you ever get a chance to join the student
> group to Belize I highly recommend it - no matter how many trips you have
> made to the tropics!
>
>
> _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
>
> David Oakley
> 4779 Cedar Ridge Drive
> Springdale, AR 72764
> 479/422-6588
>
> “Beer for my men, whiskey for my horses"
>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 7/4/19 6:27 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Belize Trip
Getting David Oakley and Allan Mueller on board is one of the best decisions I made for my Belize course.  And it raised some money for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust too.  Students learned a lot and were inspired by these two seasoned naturalists.Only David can take pictures like this from a rocking canoe.  Check out the manakin, the pygmy kingfisher, and the tiger heron.  Absolute stunners. I told my students that photos like this exist mostly in slick brochures and in the pages of the National Geographic!  Students were also told that the beard of this manakin is erected only for a brief moment during courtship.  Note how David caught the right instant to snap the photo.https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57578318

On Tuesday, 2 July, 2019, 09:08:02 am GMT-5, David Oakley <gdosr...> wrote:

I am just back from a wonderful seven days in Belize.  I tagged along with Dr. Kannon and his student group that make the trip as three hour credit course each summer. This was my fifth trip with Kannan and may well have been the best!  The official bird list totaled 190 species, ending with a Sandwich Tern observed in Belize City as we boarded the van headed to catch our flight home. I have just started post-processing images and my number of lifers is still unknown, but it is safe to say that it will surpass my expectation!  It was a pleasure to interact with the students and observe their eagerness to learn.  One of the more noteworthy experiences was witnessing Dr. Kannan stand firm in his report of our sighting of fifteen Yellow-green Vireos on one occasion when the Belize ebird reviewer challenged the number. When all was said and done, the reviewer actually changed the filter from 10 to 15. Pretty unusual and most probably due to Kannan's reputation in Belize! If you ever get a chance to join the student group to Belize I highly recommend it - no matter how many trips you have made to the tropics!


_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
David Oakley4779 Cedar Ridge DriveSpringdale, AR 72764479/422-6588
“Beer for my men, whiskey for my horses"



 

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Date: 7/3/19 7:47 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Chesney this Saturday
I'll be picking a child up from camp that morning so I wont be making
it. This hotspot is 5 to 10 minutes from my house though so I can go
anytime. :)
I just wanted to mention, in case I didn't before, that Bill Young road
is closed on one end.
Joe Neal's directions he gave for people coming from the east say to go
to hwy 59 and then up to Bill Young Road.  That is probably the easiest.
There's another way, if when heading into Siloam, as soon as hwy 412
goes from divided to not, you turn right onto airport road, travel to
the end and turn right, then take your first left on that unmarked road.
(seriously, would be nice if there was a sign there somewhere for people
that don't know what's at the end of that long gravel road.)

For people that might know this area and be traveling from that
direction, a more direct route is to go up Fairmount road and turn left
onto Bill Young. Just in case someone knew that shorter route and didn't
know about the road, as of yesterday it's still wiped out at that end.
We saw some construction equipment there but it really didn't look like
they have done anything yet. It's going to be a major repair job. 
Anyway, just an FYI to anyone that might have considered going that
way.  I really don't think it will be fixed before the trip this Saturday.

Can't wait to read the reports. Find something good for me. :)

Daniel Mason


---
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Date: 7/3/19 7:17 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Tallgrass Prairie Preserve July 1, 2019
Don Nelms and I met at his Sunrise Guitars business at 6:30 Monday morning (July 1), drove to Siloam Springs and picked up Joe Woolbright, then off to Pawhuska, Oklahoma, to meet Harvey Payne, photographer and founding director of Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. We invested our day in a highly profitable slow-drive loop of about 22-miles that included The Bison Loop on the Preserve and graded Osage County roads through private ranchlands both west and north of the Preserve. We were 6.5 miles south of the Kansas state line at intersection of county roads 4070 and 4201. Working ranch country, a grassland extravaganza. The dominant bird for sure: Dickcissel. One of the most interesting: Upland Sandpiper a family group close to the road. Singing in one of the Crosstimbers woodlands: Bewicks Wren, still a common bird here. At least 100 Cliff Swallows jockeyed for best perches along one fence line. An adult Red-tailed Hawk perched up on a cross arm basically paid no attention to us a sign to me they have not been much harassed. The heavier metal pipes forming corrals provided perches for roosting Common Nighthawks. There were two young in a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher nest on a powerpole. Sandstone ledges standout from surrounding grasslands along the prairie creeks. Eastern Collared Lizards were sunning on exposed ledges. Prairie flora is coming along nicely, especially in light of more than usual amounts of rainfall. Lots of eye-candy stuff, but one of the common ones in full bloom was Wavy-leaf Thistle, attended by a fantastic insect community. Later at home, looking at my photographs, I noticed a small crab spider waiting its chance. It reminded me of myself, out there in a big world of the Great Plains, with my binoculars and my digital camera, awaiting inspiration. We didnt make it back to Fayetteville until after 7 PM, a fantastic day, for sure.


 

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Date: 7/2/19 10:21 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: ASCA Saturday field trip- new meeting site
Patty McLean and I did a "scouting trip" to Bois D'Arc on Monday.

The Great-tailed Grackles were at the McDonalds every time we went by there.
Highlights at the lake for us were:
Least Bittern (seen and heard)
Common and Purple Gallinule with babies
Swainson's Warbler (seen and heard)

The attached checklist contains a complete list of the 51 species seen and
some pictures and sounds.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57853589

Michael Linz and Patty McLean


On Tue, Jul 2, 2019 at 12:43 PM Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:

> Regarding Saturday's ASCA field trip to Hope--A birder informed me that
> the commuter lot in Little Rock at Shakleford is closed. Another birder
> recommended that we meet in the Eagle Bank parking lot that is across the
> street. He said it has a large parking lot and rarely has very many cars
> in it. So the new meeting site for Saturday's trip will be the Eagle Bank
> parking lot across Shakleford from the commuter lot. Meeting time is 7:00
> a.m.
> Karen Holliday
> ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
> Little Rock
>

 

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Date: 7/2/19 10:43 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Saturday field trip- new meeting site
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Regarding Saturday's ASCA field trip to Hope--A birder informed me that the commuter lot in Little Rock at Shakleford is closed.  Another birder recommended that we meet in the Eagle Bank parking lot that is across the street.  He said it has a large parking lot and rarely has very many cars in it. So the new meeting site for Saturday's trip will be the Eagle Bank parking lot across Shakleford from the commuter lot.  Meeting time is 7:00 a.m.Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 

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Date: 7/2/19 7:07 am
From: David Oakley <gdosr...>
Subject: Belize Trip
I am just back from a wonderful seven days in Belize. I tagged along with Dr. Kannon and his student group that make the trip as three hour credit course each summer. This was my fifth trip with Kannan and may well have been the best! The official bird list totaled 190 species, ending with a Sandwich Tern observed in Belize City as we boarded the van headed to catch our flight home. I have just started post-processing images and my number of lifers is still unknown, but it is safe to say that it will surpass my expectation! It was a pleasure to interact with the students and observe their eagerness to learn. One of the more noteworthy experiences was witnessing Dr. Kannan stand firm in his report of our sighting of fifteen Yellow-green Vireos on one occasion when the Belize ebird reviewer challenged the number. When all was said and done, the reviewer actually changed the filter from 10 to 15. Pretty unusual and most probably due to Kannan's reputation in Belize! If you ever get a chance to join the student group to Belize I highly recommend it - no matter how many trips you have made to the tropics!


_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

David Oakley
4779 Cedar Ridge Drive
Springdale, AR 72764
479/422-6588

“Beer for my men, whiskey for my horses"




 

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Date: 7/1/19 12:42 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Turkey and quail survey
Arbirders:
The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission is seeking citizen scientists to
participate in surveys of turkey and quail broods from June 1 - August 31,
2019. DETAILS:
https://www.agfc.com/en/news/2019/06/07/join-arkansass-annual-turkey-and-quail-brood-survey-effort/

Those interested in participating in the survey and wish to report their
results should visit www.agfc.com/turkeysurveys and choose between entering
their results online through the new survey software or downloading a file
to print and mail back to the AGFC.

Lyndal York
Curator, Arkansas Audubon Society

 

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Date: 6/30/19 12:40 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA July Trip Reminder
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Details for the July and August field trips sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA) are listed below.  Come join us!  You don't have to be an ASCA member.  It can be fairly hot for both trips, so be prepared with plenty of water, hat for shade, and sunblock.  Please feel free to contact me off-list if you have any questions.  For more information about ASCA, go to the ASCA website at ascabird.org to see our upcoming programs, our excellent newsletter, and other info.

Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock/Pulaski County

July 6

Dr. Lester SitzesIII Bois D’Arc WMA

Hope, HempsteadCounty

Meetat 7:00 a.m. at the south end of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430intersection at Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll stop at the McDonalds in Hope (Exit 30off I-30) around 8:45 a.m. for those in south Arkansas who would like to joinus.  Look for Great-tailed Grackles atMcDonalds.  We should arrive at the BoisD’Arc WMA at 9:15 a.m.  Our target birdswill be Purple and Common Gallinules and their chicks, Least Bitterns, Anhingas,Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, herons, egrets, and possibly an alligator ortwo!  Very little walking will beinvolved.  Bring scopes, plenty of water,snacks, and lunch.  There are severalrestaurants in Hope if you prefer to eat lunch in town.

 Bois D‘ArcWMA is located 10 miles south of Hope. Take Exit 30 off I-30 and go east. Continue past McDonald’s, then under the railroad overpass.  At the light at the big intersection, turnright onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of amile.  At the brown sign, turn left ontoHwy. 174.  Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles tothe 3-way stop sign at Spring Hill.  Turnright onto Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4miles.  Turn right at the white woodenWMA sign just before the highway ends in the lake.  Follow the paved road, then turn left onto thefirst gravel road and go down to the lake. GPS: 33.558062, -93.694239

 August 24

Bald Knob NationalWildlife Refuge

Bald Knob, WhiteCounty

Meet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in the Other Center parking lot onthe east side behind McDonald’s.  TheOther Center is on McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall.  Take Exit 1 west off US-67/167.  We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR around 8:30a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.  This federal refuge is also a NationalAudubon Important Bird Area.  We expectto find shorebirds, herons, night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks andRoseate Spoonbills.  It will be very hotso bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If you have a scope, bring it.  Very little walking will be involved.  There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 atBald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for drivingdirections and more information about the refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903





 

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Date: 6/30/19 10:39 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BOOTS FOR CHESNEY PRAIRIE NA FIELD TRIP SATURDAY JULY 6
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will host a field trip to Chesney Prairie Natural Area on Saturday July 6, starting 9 am. Trails have been mowed this year, but weve had a lot of rain. Things are still pretty wet. I would recommend boots on this field trip. The trail is walkable for sure, but there has also been a lot of regrowth, especially along some sections. I scouted it today. I stayed on the trails. My muck boots worked fine. I sprayed a little on lower part of my legs. No ticks and no chiggers. Lots of flowers and birds. Bobwhites calling. Dickcissels feeding young out of the nest. Blazing Stars purpling up. Ashy Sunflowers opening.


 

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Date: 6/28/19 6:03 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Not Jay Schneider
It’s Jay Randolph who is the groundskeeper at Ben Geren. Silly me.
Apparently I’m better at bird names than people names.

Sandy

 

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Date: 6/28/19 4:09 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Massard Prairie restoration
Spent the morning with Jay Schneider, head groundskeeper at Ben Geren golf
course, Lori Spencer, butterfly expert, author, and wife of our Don Simons,
and a few Fort Smith master naturalists. Jay has done an incredible job
restoring Massard Prairie at the course. I was blown away by what I
experienced.
All the birds that should be on an Arkansas prairie were there. Painted
Bunting, Bell’s Vireo, Dickcissel, Purple Martins, Bobwhite, and so on. The
wildflowers and butterflies were grand. My gosh! The color and diversity!
We even had two male Diana Fritillaries.
Visit if you can. I’m
Going to post a few photos on Facebook.

Sandy B
FS

PS. I’d love to see the effort acknowledged by AAS if possible.

 

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Date: 6/28/19 9:29 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIES September 26-29, 2019
I am really going to try to get well enough to come visit and get around
with you guys in Bison + BBB. I've been wanting to do this for quite a
while. I know undoubtedly that I will see and learn a lot. I would feel
lucky to have made the trip. Thanks for posting this again, Joe!

Bill Thurman

On Fri, Jun 28, 2019, 9:25 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Mark your calendars for the unofficial, non-event, non-conference: Bison,
> Birds, Botany & Butterflies (BBBB) centered at The Nature Conservancy’s
> Joseph H. Williams TALLGRASS PRAIRIE PRESERVE in northeastern Oklahoma,
> Thursday-Sunday, *September 26-29, 2019.* We will informally observe and
> enjoy free-ranging bison, typical birds of the Osage Hills flint hills
> prairies and associated Cross Timbers woodlands, and the remarkably diverse
> native flora, plus southward migration of Monarch Butterflies. We will also
> check out ALL other interesting stuff encountered: Eastern
> Collared-Lizards, moths, Ornate Box Turtles, Wild Plums, Great Plains
> Chorus Frogs, etc. Of course, come and go as you see fit. One or part of a
> day is enough for some. No fees, no registration, nothing whatsoever
> official. You don’t need to contact me. However, more information provided
> if needed. I wrote an extended account, with photos, of last year’s trip in
> case you want to know more about what to expect:
>
>
>
> https://northwestarkansasaudubonsociety.wordpress.com/
>
>

 

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Date: 6/28/19 7:25 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIES September 26-29, 2019
Mark your calendars for the unofficial, non-event, non-conference: Bison, Birds, Botany & Butterflies (BBBB) centered at The Nature Conservancys Joseph H. Williams TALLGRASS PRAIRIE PRESERVE in northeastern Oklahoma, Thursday-Sunday, September 26-29, 2019. We will informally observe and enjoy free-ranging bison, typical birds of the Osage Hills flint hills prairies and associated Cross Timbers woodlands, and the remarkably diverse native flora, plus southward migration of Monarch Butterflies. We will also check out ALL other interesting stuff encountered: Eastern Collared-Lizards, moths, Ornate Box Turtles, Wild Plums, Great Plains Chorus Frogs, etc. Of course, come and go as you see fit. One or part of a day is enough for some. No fees, no registration, nothing whatsoever official. You dont need to contact me. However, more information provided if needed. I wrote an extended account, with photos, of last years trip in case you want to know more about what to expect:



https://northwestarkansasaudubonsociety.wordpress.com/


 

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Date: 6/27/19 7:30 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Lots of dragons (Eagle Watch)
Maybe it should be called Dragonfly Watch. Or Pollinator Watch. Or Red-headed Woodpecker Watch. Ill explain. When I got to Eagle Watch Nature Trail (just east of Gentry) today I had good fortune to park in black shade with a view of the pollinator garden. This is a cooperative effort involving manager Terry Stanfill, employees from the SWEPCO plant, and local student groups. A robust Swamp Milkweed is blooming first of the season.

With all the rain, the little creek that flows into the lake is now flooded up into lower fields. A Warbling Vireo was singing up in one of the trees. I heard a Green Heron squawk, but never saw it. Dragonflies were perched on duckweed in the shallows.

When I got down to the lake, first thing was a Red-headed Woodpecker performing long, artful sallies from snags out in the water, an avian ballet. These were long sallies. Back on the snag, it would work on the bug, then soon out on another sally. Behind it, in the woods up on the ridge, a Summer Tanager was singing constantly. A second, at distance, also singing. Then a Yellow-billed Cuckoo.

By this time Id reached the first viewing blind. A light breeze was blowing. I sat in the shade, set up my spotting scope, and scanned for cormorants. I wound up seeing 5; 3 were close enough I was sure they were Double-crested, but since we also have seen Neotropics at Eagle Watch with at least some regularity starting in late summer (earliest arrival June 28, 2018), I was disappointed the other 2 were too far out to tell the species.

Jewels of dragonflies were darting around the low heavens readily visible from my seat. Lots of dragons! Halloween Pennants (orange). Slaty Skimmer (bold blue). A male Widow Skimmer (black and white). I kept trying to leave, then Id spot another. On the same log with perching dragons: a couple of young Red-eared Sliders.

This is a lot to enjoy in the shade, from a bench with a great view of whatever is happening at Eagle Watch. I keep trying to leave, then theres something else.


 

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Date: 6/27/19 11:45 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Kim Smith memorials (from UARK website)
Kannan, 
Thanks for posting this!  I work at ONSC and did not even know about it.
Joanie
On Tuesday, June 18, 2019, 10:58:11 AM CDT, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:


Dr. Kimberly G. Smith Memorial Funds Information and Links:

Ozark Natural Science Center


Donations to ONSC can be made online at  https://www.onsc.us/donate. Please use the optional note field to mark that this is for Dr. Kim Smith otherwise there we not be a way for them to track your gift.


Kimberly G. Smith Memorial Scholarship in Ecology

Donations to the Kimberly G. Smith Memorial Scholarship in Ecology can be made online at https://onlinegiving.uark.edu/. In the designation section, select “other department, program or fund” and enter "Kimberly G Smith Scholarship in Ecology".  If you would like to send a check, please make it out to the U of A Foundation with the name of the scholarship in the memo line and mail it to:

Office of Development and External Relations

1 University of Arkansas

525 Old Main

Fayetteville, AR 72701

 


 

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Date: 6/25/19 9:35 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: Murray Park Little Rock
I stopped by Murray Park on the way home from work today. The City of
Little Rock has been busy cleaning up sand and debris. Sadly both mulberry
trees were badly damaged with the swift current. The tree by the boat ramp
is pretty much gone. However, Eastern Kingbirds were taking advantage of
the dead limbs and "fishing" for bugs over the water.

The once green vegetation along the bank is now brown. Didn't see any
Canada Geese, but at least one mockingbird was back in its spot by the
picnic tables.

I wondered where the two Warbling Vireos went after their nesting site was
flooded.

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock
 

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Date: 6/25/19 7:48 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: WEKIs out the whazoo
Today, in a three by sixteen block area, in downtown Fort Smith, I had at
least 12 sites with Western Kingbirds. I’ve recorded nine sites so far on
ebird. I found nests at most sites with either nestlings or recently
fledged kiddos. Had a fun evening shooting fledglings and their parents.

Sandy B.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/19 7:01 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Canada Goose Management/ BASH
FYI



“Resident” is not a sub-species, but I imagine are those CGs breeding around areas of concern: airports, golf courses, etc.



Jeff Short



From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight [mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Tuesday, June 25, 2019 5:27 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: Canada Goose Management/ BASH



The Fish and Wildlife Service has issued a final rule that amends the depredation and control orders for resident Canada geese to allow destruction of resident Canada goose nests and eggs at any time of year. In title 50 of the CFR, destruction of resident Canada goose nests and eggs is currently authorized under special Canada goose permits (§ 21.26), a control order for airports and military airfields (§ 21.49), a depredation order specific to nests and eggs (§ 21.50), a depredation order for agricultural facilities (§ 21.51), and a public health control order (§ 21.52). Each of these regulations prescribes the dates during which nests and eggs of resident Canada goose may be destroyed. This rule removes those date restrictions and allows destruction of Canada goose nests and eggs, as otherwise authorized under these regulations, at any time of year.
Unknown command - "THE". Try HELP.

The final rule is effective 07/22/2019.







 

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Date: 6/25/19 7:32 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: White-winged Dove, update Centerton
Still seeing 2-3 White-winged Doves but not on any kind of schedule.

I tend to see one adult with a juvenile or one adult and two juveniles, yesterday I saw both juveniles and no adult, I was surprised to see both adults one day but I still have not seen all four together. Jacque Brown, Centerton.




> On Jun 2, 2019, at 7:50 PM, <ctboyles...> wrote:
>
> Wow! 3 or 4 is neat.
>
> On Sun, 2 Jun 2019 16:50:11 -0500, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>> The White-winged Doves showed up a month earlier this year during the
> 1st
>> week of April I saw two adults that week, compared to last year during
> the
>> 1st week of May, I saw one adult that week and the second during the
>> following week or so.
>>
>>
>> This year, after the 1st week of April there was one adult off and on
>> until May 24th. I saw two adults again that Friday before the long
> weekend.
>> Then nothing for 4 days.
>>
>> I don’t know where they have been but they have been busy.
>>
>> Friday an adult brought a young-un with it to the yard and this morning
>> there were three White-winged Doves in my tree but only one was the
> adult
>> with red eyes and the blue skin around the eyes. The other two had no
> blue
>> and the eyes are brownish. The cheeks on their faces are a little more
>> whitish than gray as well. I wasn’t seeing the young until the July 4th
>> weekend last year so this is also a month earlier than last year.
>>
>> I also have Brown Thrashers nesting in my mock orange shrub. I found the
>> nest when I went to cut back the shrub, sorry mama bird!
>> And in the yard next door there is a Baltimore Oriole nest in the large
>> Maple.
>>
>> My Montmorancy Cherry tree is loaded again this year and the Robins,
> Gray
>> Catbirds, and Brown Thrashers have been raiding it. There are usually
> Cedar
>> Waxwings as well but I haven’t seen any yet. The cherries are bright red
>> and very tart. Like cherry pie cherries, there are usually none left on
> the
>> tree by the middle of June.
>>
>> Jacque Brown
>>
>>
>>> On May 20, 2019, at 5:26 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Speaking of White-winged Doves.
>>>
>>> I still have my faithful bird in the yard.
>>>
>>> I saw one bird April 1st if I remember correctly, then I had seen two
> in
>>> the same tree a few days later-still in the first week of April. Then
>>> only one at a time since then, as relaxed as this bird is with my
> coming
>>> and going on the back porch I’ll wager a guess is it the same bird.
>>>
>>> Saturday there were two White-winged Doves on the arbor in the
> backyard.
>>> This is about the same time last year I started seeing two but they
>>> were not usually together, more like in earshot. My ears, so they
>>> weren’t that far away for me to hear them.
>>>
>>> YAY!
>>>
>>>
>>> Jacque Brown
>>> Centerton, AR
>>> <bluebird2...>
>>>
>>>
>>>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/19 6:12 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Apparent 4th Carolina Wren clutch
We’ve had at least two clutches in various spots.



The latest was in our rain gutter, just above the downspout. That might seem to be a poor choice, especially with the heavy rain this year, but the four hatchlings apparently fledged since they aren’t there anymore. Neither is the nest, since I removed it after they fledged and hopefully made the site unattractive for future attempts.



Bluebirds are on track for another four to fledge which will make 8 so far this year. Crows have been pilfering the mealworm suet I had up for the bluebirds. The crow would jump on the suet cage to dislodge the mealworms and then drop down to pick them off the ground.



Phoebes have the worst luck when it comes to fledging. Two babies so far from a good, safe location with ample nest. Looks like the spot above a window did not have enough support and they fell out.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Monday, June 24, 2019 2:10 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Apparent 4th Carolina Wren clutch



Yesterday a new clutch of CAWR fledglings appeared, the fourth of the year. The first one fledged in March. There should be only one breeding pair in the area---ours is a nearly constant presence---and the clutches have been spaced in plausible intervals. The BNA account says 3 clutches may be produced in the South, so this pair seems to have exceeded expectations.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.


 

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Date: 6/24/19 9:54 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Least Terns
I spotted two Least Terns cruising along the river at Fort Smith river park
near the railroad bridge. There’s plenty of sand and gravel there. Plenty
of that everywhere now.
But there’s also a lot of people. Hopefully we’ll have some successful
nests this year.

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 6/24/19 8:01 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: BOYD POINT LEAST TERNS
This morning, I visited the Boyd point Waste Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff, which just became accessible by car one week ago due to flooding. There were nine Least Terns of which two pair were engaged in the courtship ritual of minnow feeding. This is good news, if the Ark. River in Pine Bluff, which again will be above flood stage beginning Wed. night, will crest and recede rapidly.
John Redman
 

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Date: 6/24/19 1:09 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Avian community composition and habitat associations in an upland deciduous forest in northwestern Arkansas
Family members of a birding friend from the early 1980s are visiting UA-Fayetteville from South Carolina. Charlie Wooten wrote a dead serious masters thesis, Avian community composition and habitat associations in an upland deciduous forest in northwestern Arkansas, finished in August 1982. Sounds pretty dry, I know, but he was trying to understand how to accurately census birds, a lively and relevant topic worldwide in increasingly stressed ecosystems. Now many years after he finished -- and as his relatives visit where he studied -- Ive been looking through his thesis. He spent summers of 1980 and 1981 in Ozark National Forest at Wedington, a few miles west of Fayetteville. He and others walked transects 0.6 miles in length, counting birds and eventually also identifying plants and later, statistically examining how counting and identifying bird communities were impacted by many variables, including plant species. Several of us volunteered when he needed help, either walking the transects or identifying plants. Charlies major professor was the late Doug James. I borrowed a copy of his thesis from Dougs wife, Elizabeth Adam. As I am myself aging, the approval page is a little chilling: everyone on Charlies committee has passed away: Doug James, Duncan Martin, John Sealander, and Kim Smith. Yet, the Ozark NF remains. Charlies study sites and the birds and plants he so greatly enjoyed remain. Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, that gave him a travel grant, is still doing the same thing for students today. The questions he asked are relevant. It is in the nature of science that a budding scientist like Charlie Wooten would take up so basic a question. It was a loss to us all he wasnt able to continue. I went out to Wedington with him several times because it was such a great place to see and hear Yellow-billed Cuckoos, Wood Thrushes, and Acadian and Great Crested Flycatchers. Also along with his science, Charlie had a sense of humor. I have a bumper sticker like the one on his pickup It takes a study to build a house. I asked my daughter Ariel, who has lived for a year in Portland, Oregon, if the bumper sticker is so politically incorrect I shouldnt mention it. She laughed, said it was probably a bit sexist, but maybe not all that bad, considering. It is, after all, a piece of history. Charlie, who was so attune to the natural homes of birds and plants, did come from a family of home builders and came to the UA to study birds, with their blessing.


 

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Date: 6/24/19 12:10 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Apparent 4th Carolina Wren clutch
Yesterday a new clutch of CAWR fledglings appeared, the fourth of the
year. The first one fledged in March. There should be only one breeding
pair in the area---ours is a nearly constant presence---and the clutches
have been spaced in plausible intervals. The BNA account says 3 clutches
may be produced in the South, so this pair seems to have exceeded
expectations.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

 

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Date: 6/24/19 10:48 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Field trip to Chesney Prairie Natural Area Saturday July 6 (and Alyssa July 19)
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will host a field trip to CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA near Siloam Springs Saturday July 6, starting 9 am. Everyone is welcome -- free and open to the public.

Chesney -- where that wonderful native songster, Northern Mockingbird, proudly covers the songs and calls of Loggerhead Shrikes and Northern Bobwhites. And for very good reason. While they have declined and disappeared in many places, there are still Loggerhead Shrikes and Northern Bobwhites around Chesney.

As the day warms and sun burns over this colorful and lively patch of a once much more extensive Tallgrass Prairie, the mocker climbs atop a bush and makes like a shrike, then a bobwhite, thrasher, dickcissel, meadowlark, and a red-tailed hawk. Flowers of yellow, white, deep red, blue attract all kinds of pollinators, from butterflies to small bright bugs with long horns. And thats just a start. It is staggering to look closely at all of this. With so much of life so readily evident along a winding path, what else was there when this was 20 square miles? When the entire central region of North America, maybe 200 million acres, was something like these 82 acres?

Meet at the entrance to Chesney at 9 AM (you can arrive earlier or later, too -- not hard to see the group in open grasslands). This is an opportunity to see native prairie, including American Goldfinches, Dickcissels, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, bumblebees. Painted Buntings and Red-headed Woodpeckers are also possible. Chesney will feature a good showing of native flowers, especially several sunflower species and dramatic purple gay feathers (Liatris species) and attending butterflies. Good opportunity for photography, for novice and pro alike.

The trip will consist of an easy loop walk of about 1.1 miles on mowed trails. A longer trail is available; you can walk as much or as little as you wish and of course you dont need to stick with the group. Water, sunscreen, and hat are recommended. You do not have to be a member of the NWAAS to participate. All ages and skill levels are welcome. Joe Woolbright and his staff at Ozark Ecological Restoration, Inc mow paths at Chesney to make it easier. Chiggers, ticks, and other irritations are minimal along the paths.

How to get there: From Fayetteville-Springdale-Rogers, take highway 412 W to near Siloam Springs city limits. At the intersection of 412 & 59, turn N onto 59. You pass the Siloam Springs airport. Approximately 1 mile past the airport, note an intersection: the road west is Chesney and the road east is Bill Young. Take Bill Young Road east approximately 0.8 miles. At this point there is a gravel road going north. Go approximately 0.5 miles north on this road to the chicken houses at the dead end and entrance to Chesney.

Also, mark your calendars. UA-Fayetteville graduate student Alyssa DeRubeis did part of her grassland bird research at Chesney. She will be back in Fayetteville to defend her thesis on Friday July 19. More on this when we have time and place.


 

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Date: 6/24/19 8:20 am
From: Edward Pullen <countyrarebirds...>
Subject: What is a species and how do species evolve?
If you wonder how specied evolve, why is one individual more fit than
another or why hybrids tend not to flourish you may enjoy and learn from
hearing from Dr. Geoffrey Hill talk about the Mitonuclear Compatability
Theory of Species on The Bird Banter Podcast.
You can hear it on Apple Podcasts at
https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-bird-banter-podcast-episode-21-with-dr-geoffrey-hill/id1450449001?i=1000442534884
or by clicking on either of the links below. Thanks

--
Ed Pullen
Follow The Bird Banter Podcast on iTunes
<https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bird-banter/id1450449001> or the podcast
feed of your choice <http://birdbanter.com>.

 

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Date: 6/24/19 5:32 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Peter Boesman 2


 

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Date: 6/24/19 5:32 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Peter Boesman
Many of you will rememember Peter Boesman. He was a guest speaker at one of
the AAS state meetings many years ago. The meeting was in Mena. Can’t
remember the year. Peter was an engineer at Bekaert Steel in Van Buren. I
was fortunate to have met him while birding at Sequoyah NWR in OK. Here’s
one of the things he’s been up to. Pretty exciting.

 

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Date: 6/23/19 8:26 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Siloam Springs City Lake - update
I decided I just had to get out again today, so I did. This might be of
special note to anyone that might bird out towards Chesney over the
coming days. I drove up Fairmount road(right around the corner from me)
and headed up to Bill Young Road. The plan was to cut across Bill Young
to 59 and head towards city lake that way. Well, there was some water on
fairmount which was expected but not as much as there could have been.
There was a backhoe working on some of the ditches.
Anyway, Bill Young was blocked. I pulled over to see and not far up the
road, well the road wasn't there. BIG gap so there's no passing that
way. Water is not a force to mess with. We drove up to shady grove then
over to graves and back down to bill young closer to chesney.

After this we made it out to city lake with some water on dawn hill road
in the usual spots. I found some people fishing, as usual, and then a
few young girls lighting fireworks. I guess I was the grumpy old guy
today as I decided to just stick my head out the window and said "take
it somewhere else."  Surprisingly, it worked. HA.  The most interesting
thing of the day was one of the bridges that lead to the boardwalk. For
anyone that's been down there and knows what I'm talking about...
there's a hill that goes down into the woods and then there are two
short bridges that lead to the boardwalk. The first bridge was partially
underwater with part of the railings missing(I think)  The most
interesting was the second short bridge... railings and all... it was
down near the levy/waterfall where the water leaves the lake. Complete
opposite side of the lake... and in an upright position with the
railings still on it. As soon as I saw it there I knew where it came
from but I had to go down and see for myself. We got our feet wet just
trying to get there. We eventually drove around the other side and
walked the whole boardwalk which, thankfully, is still intact. For
anyone that remembers the boardwalk, there was no dry land anywhere
under it. Moving water below the whole thing.
Very wet out there. Our power went out twice today. The birds didn't
seem to notice much. I think I had about 45 species today, pretty much
the same ones I'd expect with nothing surprising. Still a good day
though. I got out there just as the rain was ending but still had mostly
cloudy skies so the weather was perfect to me.

Oh, there was one bird I was uncertain of that didn't cooperate for a
photo. It flew out of the grass nearby in an area where there had been a
yellowthroat family recently so I was hoping/expecting to see one... I
had about 2 seconds to look at this little brownish bird that landed and
noted what looked like a faint eye-ring and a single faint wingbar. It
disappeared before I could pick up better details. Plainish birds
sometimes frustrate... I've looked at a few pictures of yellowthroats
and indigo buntings, birds I'd expect there and will be plain
brownish... Didn't really look like either to me. I'm going to leave
that as an unknown. I don't like unknowns... ha.  but it just had to be
a usual bird.
Had my favorite "regular" birds there as well today... red-headed
woodpeckers and at least one prothonotary warbler. These are birds I
expect to see just about every time I look in the right places there but
I'll never grow tired of them.

Anyway, that was my day today.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 6/23/19 6:56 am
From: <market...>
Subject: Least Tern at Swepco Lake
Cloudy and windy conditions kept most birds at bay but we did see a Least
Tern yesterday June 22.



https://www.ronbird.photo/Todays-photos/i-TTk2gsk/A




 

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Date: 6/22/19 4:07 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Summer Tanager Serenata
I drove back east on I-40 from the Winthrop Rockefeller CI in Little Rock
after getting a minor surgery in the morning. I didn't feel to dizzy from
anything so I figured I could make it. However, a terrible wave
of fatigue fell over me just several miles in front of the rest area just
before crossing White River. I pulled in, parked and walked to a picnic
table 60 yards or so from the parking space, put my face in my hands and
lay forward on the table.
Fortunately a gentle cool breeze was blowing through this open pine
and oak like area making things a little easier to take. The breezy
whistling of several summer tanagers picked up and one landed on a thin
open branch only about 16 feet away, merrily continuing with its cheerful
song. At least 2 or 3 minutes worth, as if like a beautiful breeze.
This bird was unusual, a creamy orange cast all over the facial and
breast areas. It seemed striking to me considering the usual harder reds
and more contrast. I guess it inspired me enough to finally come to, drag
myself to the car then slug it out a few more miles back to West Memphis. A
few little moments of heaven from a cheerful summer tanager.

Bill Thurman

 

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Date: 6/22/19 1:30 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Hootin' Wooten
Charlie Wooten, a hardcore birder if there ever was one, died of cancer on December 21, 1986, at Columbia, South Carolina. His cancer had been misdiagnosed as an ulcer. By the time cancer was recognized, it had also spread. He was 33, survived by his wife Ruth Ann and a then toddler, Ellen. His family lived in Elgin, SC, where he was teaching school.

Charlie came to UA-Fayetteville in 1979 from his home in the SC Sandhills. He grew up fishing and enjoying the outdoors, with his father Lem as a major influence. He received his BS from Clemson and then came to UA-Fayetteville for a Masters. He was a tremendous help, always enthusiastic about chasing birds and bird records, during the first years I worked with Doug James on the book published as Arkansas Birds.

He had long red hair, freckles to match, and a strong southern accent. And although well-educated and sharp as a tack, he hid this behind the facade of just another good ole boy. Hank Jr come to UA-Fayetteville graduate school.

Our friendship was formed through birding. If he didnt absolutely have to be working on his degree, he was off in his pickup Betty Sue. Her drove to the state fish hatchery at Centerton for migrating shorebirds often enough Doug quietly wondered if he was going to get his thesis written. We made many trips to Devils Den State Park. In winter wed drive the open country of former prairies in search of hawks.

Being one of Doug James students, Charlie always took good field notes. He kept track of what he saw and wrote details as needed for rarities. He would later supply 6-pages of key records when I began working on a book about birds in northwest Arkansas. Youll find many of his records in the Arkansas Audubon Society database and subsequently imported to eBird.

There werent many people who could out-hoot Charlie when it came to Barred Owls. Ill wager he could have taught some owls Who Cooks For You or in Charlies case You Aw. His hooting was so hot he once set a record for number of Barred Owls recorded on Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count. After that CBC, we were sitting around in Doug James living room. The assembled crowd, comprised mostly his fellow graduate students, demanded he perform a hooting demo. He did, attended by our rousing cheers. Henceforth, he was Hootin Wooten.

Charlie was well-known for his sense of humor. He organized and printed a little magazine, The Arkansas Naturalist, a spoof on various aspects of science, especially as practiced by various professors in the old UA Department of Zoology. He had good enough sense not to distribute the magazine until after he graduated.

His Masters research was a comparative study of bird census techniques. He did this on several sites in the Ozark National Forest at Wedinton, a few miles west of Fayetteville. He counted and identified birds day after day during the summer. He also performed detailed study of vegetation associated with these birds. Charlie loved his native Carolina Sandhills, but he also came to love birds in the Ozarks, too.

You see, this was all more than three decades ago. But as you can also see, memories of relevant things may take flight on their own, like birds in fact, and in this respect, attain a sort of immortality.


 

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Date: 6/22/19 10:00 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: City Lake
About a week ago I was at city lake birding as usual... Lots of fun
stuff to see. Had 49 species of bird. One of my favorite highlights was
watching a red-headed woodpecker not that far off repeatedly go back to
a short tree in the field and hunt from it. Sometimes flying up to a
slightly taller tree seeming to fly catch and sometimes dropping down to
the ground. I saw it carry some of the food back past me over towards
the dead trees where I assume it has a nest. Previous years, I don't
know if I ever witnessed this behavior of them out in the open more,
rather I normally just observed them at the dead trees.

I posted an album in a local nature group I have with photos of some of
the birds as well as butterflies and other things. In case anyone is on
FB and is interested...
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=oa.2813451755392641&type=3

For those that attended the field trip in May, another thing to note is
the two SMALL bridges that lead to the boardwalk now have railings on them.

And if anyone is interested in just the birds, here's the checklist:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S57588551

Maybe I can get out there sometime later today as I just haven't been
out birding as much as I'd like lately.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 6/22/19 9:32 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: June Hooded Mergansers
Three Hooded Mergansers and one White-rumped Sandpiper made for an interesting few hours at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton on June 19. June Hooded Mergansers arent that unusual almost anywhere in Arkansas; occasionally theres a family group. We have seen June birds in most of the usual waterfowl spots around northwest Arkansas. The three birds at Centerton June 19 were in one of the upper ponds where shad are being reared. So whats going on? According to Birds of North America (on line version): From early accounts it seems almost certain this species nested throughout the e. U.S. where suitable habitat existed However, habitat alterations occurred so long ago in many parts of the east and northeast, the birds already were scarce or eliminated as breeders by Audubon's time eastern populations [possibly] fell precipitously in the forty years prior to 1925, primarily due to logging of old forests which eliminated nesting cavities, and the birds unwary nature around hunters. Today breeding birds occur throughout most of their ancestral range, though populations are reduced and localized So maybe as forest habitat in the East recovers, Hooded Mergansers are returning to their ancestral landscape? Its an intriguing thought. Anyone else seeing Hooded Mergansers this summer?


 

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Date: 6/21/19 7:53 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Another Great-tailed Grackle
I.D. confirmed! After nine innings they finally threw up a montage for him on the big screen.

Adam Schaffer

> On Jun 21, 2019, at 9:34 PM, Cathy Marak <cmarak999...> wrote:
>
> I have seen him shopping at the Walmart on Elm Springs Road (due north of where you are (were)), lol.
>
> Cathy Marak
>
>> On 6/21/2019 7:58 PM, Adam Schaffer wrote:
>> Binoculars sure would help, but I’m fairly certain the NWA Naturals have a Great-tailed Grackle as a fourth outfielder right now.
>>
>> Adam Schaffer
>> Springdale
 

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Date: 6/21/19 7:35 pm
From: Cathy Marak <cmarak999...>
Subject: Re: Another Great-tailed Grackle
I have seen him shopping at the Walmart on Elm Springs Road (due north
of where you are (were)), lol.

Cathy Marak

On 6/21/2019 7:58 PM, Adam Schaffer wrote:
> Binoculars sure would help, but I’m fairly certain the NWA Naturals have a Great-tailed Grackle as a fourth outfielder right now.
>
> Adam Schaffer
> Springdale
 

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Date: 6/21/19 5:58 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Another Great-tailed Grackle
Binoculars sure would help, but I’m fairly certain the NWA Naturals have a Great-tailed Grackle as a fourth outfielder right now.

Adam Schaffer
Springdale
 

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Date: 6/21/19 11:26 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 19 (belated report)
It was partly cloudy, warm, and windy on the bird survey Wednesday (June
19). 57 species were found. The heronry is still going strong with lots of
young in the nests now and a constant flight of birds coming and going,
feeding the young. One of the Neotropic Cormorant nests has fledged out
young and another is getting close to it. There are several Anhinga young
that have left their nests and have climbed up higher in the trees waiting
to be fed. They will be flying soon. The number of Little-blue Heron nests
are really increasing daily it seems with possibly as many as 25-30 nests
now, maybe more. White Ibis are hanging around in the rookery in pairs
picking at sticks and limbs and acting like they will soon be nesting.
Numerous broods of gallinules (both species) are out now. Here is my list
for that day:



Wood Duck - 8

Pied-billed Grebe - 5

Neotropic Cormorant - 12

Anhinga - 59

Least Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 13

Great Egret - 103

Snowy Egret - 26

Little-blue Heron - 134

Cattle Egret - 2100

Green Heron - 9

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 3

White Ibis - 157

Black Vulture - 85

Turkey Vulture - 19

Mississippi Kite - 6

King Rail - 1

Purple Gallinule - 34 (also 2 broods of young and 4 nests.)

Common Gallinule - 25 (also 7 broods of young.)

American Coot - 1

Mourning Dove - 9

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Chimney Swift - 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 10

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

American Crow - 3

Fish Crow - 2

Tree Swallow - 26

Barn Swallow - 17

Carolina Chickadee - 1

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 5

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 4

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 6

Yellow-breasted Chat - 4

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2

Northern Cardinal - 17

Indigo Bunting - 17

Painted Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 12

Red-winged Blackbird - 43

Common Grackle - 10

Brown-headed Cowbird - 3

Orchard Oriole - 1





Odonates:



Orange Bluets

Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



Red-eared Slider

Musk Turtle

Missouri River Cooter

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR














 

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Date: 6/21/19 9:54 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Western Kingbirds
I, too, have seen a Western Kingbird. It was up here in in Centerton just three days ago along Seba road.

Butch
Bentonville

> On Jun 21, 2019, at 11:43, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> So last evening I caught a pair of Western Kingbirds copulating on a wire in front of the Fort Smith visitor center. In case you didn’t know, the name of the visitor center is Miss Laura’s, and it was once a house of ill-repute. Irony of ironies. 😉
>
> Sandy B
 

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Date: 6/21/19 9:43 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Western Kingbirds
So last evening I caught a pair of Western Kingbirds copulating on a wire
in front of the Fort Smith visitor center. In case you didn’t know, the
name of the visitor center is Miss Laura’s, and it was once a house of
ill-repute. Irony of ironies. 😉

Sandy B

 

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Date: 6/20/19 7:59 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Lest Terns, Little Rock Port Authority
LaDonna and I heard and saw Least Terns late this afternoon. I suspect they were either nesting or looking for potential nest sites in what was once farmland in the devastated area where the levee broke south of Dardanelle a few weeks ago.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 20, 2019, at 9:54 AM, DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> wrote:
>
> The Least Tern colony at the Little Rock Port Authority that Karen Holliday discovered on May 11 is still there, though most birds have moved to an adjacent gravel lot due to flooding and mammalian disturbance. The new location is behind a locked gate so cars can't drive in, plus the entryway is underwater anyway. The Port Authority folks are aware and will keep vehicles out. US Fish & Wildlife Service posted signs and researchers from ATU are conducting weekly monitoring.
>
>
>
> Dan Scheiman
>
> Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 6/20/19 3:06 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: fledglings
Lots of them around these days. We've had downy and red-bellied
woodpeckers carrying food for a while now and lately we'll see the young
once in a while. Today a young blue jay showed up at our feeder station.
There's no blue on the head at all... DARK line up the side of the
head... it's interesting. The feeder is about 10 feet from where I'm
sitting at my computer desk. The young jay is just sitting on top of the
baffle eating up some suet crumbs. It's figuring out the feeder already.
Suet seems to have been the food for young this spring. Every day I'd
watch woodpeckers come in and snack... then start collecting a beak full
before flying off with it.
Always something to look at out there... even when I can't leave the
house. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 6/20/19 2:05 pm
From: V Prislipsky <vprislipsky...>
Subject: Least Tern
We had a report and picture of a Least Tern on Lake Balboa last week. Although it was not a rare sighting for ebird it was a first for Hot Springs Village.
 

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Date: 6/20/19 7:55 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Lest Terns, Little Rock Port Authority
The Least Tern colony at the Little Rock Port Authority that Karen Holliday discovered on May 11 is still there, though most birds have moved to an adjacent gravel lot due to flooding and mammalian disturbance. The new location is behind a locked gate so cars can't drive in, plus the entryway is underwater anyway. The Port Authority folks are aware and will keep vehicles out. US Fish & Wildlife Service posted signs and researchers from ATU are conducting weekly monitoring.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 6/20/19 4:58 am
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Happy National Eagle Day!
That’s all. Karen & Neill Hart

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 6/19/19 7:57 pm
From: Than Boves <tboves...>
Subject: Re: Terrific new paper on the lives of Prothonotary Warblers
Thanks Janine!

Here are two pieces, in WaPo and on Audubon's website about the work.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/newsletter/science/2019/06/19/where-warbler-winters/

https://www.audubon.org/news/saving-colombias-forests-crucial-protect-prothonotary-warblers

And it should be noted that this work was funded in part by grants from the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust!

--------------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
870-972-3320
Website: www.boveslab.com<http://%20www.boveslab.com>




On Wed, Jun 19, 2019 at 12:27 PM -0600, "Janine Perlman" <jpandjf...><mailto:<jpandjf...>> wrote:

As noted in the Washington Post, a fascinating and important new article describing how/where Prothonotary Warblers (in alarming decline) migrate and overwinter. It makes clear the importance of identifying and protecting all avian habitats.

And...drum roll....the authors include Than J. Boves and several of his students.

https://academic.oup.com/condor/advance-article/doi/10.1093/condor/duz019/5520718<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__academic.oup.com_condor_advance-2Darticle_doi_10.1093_condor_duz019_5520718&d=DwMCaQ&c=QzRQJlHx0ZTYmlwGx7ptjrPEeuNmnYRxm_FN73lod7w&r=7GY_tLFKiggtwGF79-jINsYKU9T9mwO7Mj-3mSpAuok&m=K0sKX6h9HNmh1KRQvH4415SUBvzklBZR3KlAjXUpu7g&s=92oryHwNzx76FYezlFNJAKfbtDAqonFA7dL2XI5dpgI&e=>
 

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Date: 6/19/19 11:27 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Terrific new paper on the lives of Prothonotary Warblers
As noted in the Washington Post, a fascinating and important new article
describing how/where Prothonotary Warblers (in alarming decline) migrate
and overwinter. It makes clear the importance of identifying and
protecting all avian habitats.

And...drum roll....the authors include Than J. Boves and several of his
students.

https://academic.oup.com/condor/advance-article/doi/10.1093/condor/duz019/5520718

 

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Date: 6/18/19 2:39 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: “RED BIRDS ARE VISITORS FROM HEAVEN”* June 18, 2019
Red birds are visitors from heaven said a friendly cook at the Kibler Quik Stop, where I was making a quick stop after visiting Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility, then on to Arkansas River bottoms south of Kibler. Shes right, too, though she was talking about cardinals. Most of the red birds* I saw today were Painted Bunting males. There were males singing from powerlines (2), singing in a thicket and I didnt look for them (3), male flying across the road (1), and on ground along the road with a green female. Surely this area is one of the best in the state for Painted Buntings.

At Alma Wastewater: Canada Goose (65), Snowy Egret (4), Cattle Egret (40 flying over), Great Egret (4), and a truly awesome number of dragonflies. The dragons have surely had a very good year. I would up getting distracted by so many, and so much brilliant color. Im not sure what I might have missed, bird-wise, but I did see a great many Blue Dasher dragons, males and females in their gaudy attire of blues, yellow stripes, black tips, green eyes, etc. I was trying for the perfect photo just need to ease up a few more inches oops almost drove into the pond Alma Wastewater looks like it is fully back in business after the great flood.

One Black-bellied Whistling-Duck flew over. Down the road, on some private property near Highway 162, there were at least 11 lounging near a wet ditch that had been heavily sprayed with herbicide.

Roads looked OK for a quick trip over to Kibler bottoms, including West-Ark Sod. A huge oxbow associated with Arkansas River that is now bisected by Thornhill road south of Kibler was full of the recent flood, essentially a giant lake, drowning the bean and wheat fields around it. On one side of Thornhill: Great Egrets (8); on the other side, Great Blue Herons (20). Overhead, Mississippi Kites (2). Two male Blue-winged Teal were a surprise.


 

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Date: 6/18/19 8:58 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Kim Smith memorials (from UARK website)

Dr. Kimberly G. Smith Memorial Funds Information and Links:

Ozark Natural Science Center


Donations to ONSC can be made online at  https://www.onsc.us/donate. Please use the optional note field to mark that this is for Dr. Kim Smith otherwise there we not be a way for them to track your gift.


Kimberly G. Smith Memorial Scholarship in Ecology

Donations to the Kimberly G. Smith Memorial Scholarship in Ecology can be made online at https://onlinegiving.uark.edu/. In the designation section, select “other department, program or fund” and enter "Kimberly G Smith Scholarship in Ecology".  If you would like to send a check, please make it out to the U of A Foundation with the name of the scholarship in the memo line and mail it to:

Office of Development and External Relations

1 University of Arkansas

525 Old Main

Fayetteville, AR 72701

 


 

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