ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
4/23/18 6:56 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Earth Day NWAAS Field Trip to Ninestone
4/22/18 5:48 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA April Field Trip Report
4/22/18 4:22 pm Bo Verser <bo.verser1...> Fwd: Weekend birds
4/22/18 2:28 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Bird greetings
4/22/18 12:50 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Northern Parula
4/22/18 12:43 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Re: Longbilled Curlew
4/22/18 12:02 pm Robin Buff <robinbuff...> Rose-breasted Grosbeak
4/22/18 10:21 am Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Sightings: Gillam Park
4/22/18 10:17 am George R Hoelzeman <vogel...> Re: Longbilled Curlew
4/22/18 9:46 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Golden plover and Harris’s Sparrow
4/22/18 9:31 am Songbird Captures <songbirdcaptures...> Broad winged Hawk, Solitary Sandpiper, Indigo Bunting
4/22/18 6:56 am Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Baltimore Orioles FOS
4/22/18 6:55 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> our mystery "bird"
4/22/18 6:47 am Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Longbilled Curlew
4/21/18 8:47 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Thanks to all that helped with ID.
4/21/18 8:06 pm jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr...> Gilliam Park Sunday
4/21/18 6:24 pm James Morgan <jlmm...> Toasting Kim Smith at 6:30 Tu 4/24
4/21/18 6:11 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Re: I'D help
4/21/18 5:39 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Arkansas River bottoms
4/21/18 5:30 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Frog Bayou/State Meeting
4/21/18 4:48 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Rose Breasted Grosbeak pair
4/21/18 4:41 pm Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> Re: Yellow-headed blackbird
4/21/18 4:33 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> I'D help
4/21/18 4:28 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: unusual owl sighting
4/21/18 4:07 pm <shalom...> <shalom...> Re: Yellow-headed blackbird
4/21/18 3:09 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> unusual owl sighting
4/21/18 2:25 pm Clarence Wilson <clarencetwilson...> Humming Birds in Searcy
4/21/18 2:08 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Long-billed Curlew
4/21/18 2:02 pm Stacy Clanton <sclanton...> Baltimore (?) Oriole
4/21/18 1:16 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Yellow-headed blackbird
4/21/18 1:13 pm Stacy Clanton <sclanton...> FOS a bit early rose-breasted Grosbeak.
4/21/18 1:05 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Yellow-headed blackbird
4/21/18 11:30 am laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Craighead Forest
4/21/18 8:30 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> arrivals so far today
4/21/18 7:19 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> another first
4/21/18 6:52 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> In other News
4/20/18 7:36 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Arkansas River Valley
4/20/18 6:34 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Large Falcon
4/20/18 12:22 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Whimbrel
4/20/18 9:57 am Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Callie's Prairie/Woolsey Wet Prairie/UARK Experimental Farm
4/20/18 9:03 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Overflow NWR closed
4/20/18 7:29 am Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...> follow-up on AMAV
4/20/18 7:24 am Anna Lee Hudson <hudsonre...> Hummingbird
4/20/18 6:00 am Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Marbled Godwit
4/20/18 4:59 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> UPLAND SANDPIPERS AND TIMELESS REALITY
4/19/18 10:24 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - April 19
4/19/18 9:39 am Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Chesney Prairie - White-faced Ibis and Hudsonian Godwit
4/19/18 8:45 am Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...> FW: eBird Report - Lake Harrison, Apr 18, 2018 (AVOCETS)
4/19/18 2:38 am Don Simons <drsimons56...> Re: A New Song (Pine Siskin?)
4/18/18 9:09 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> A New Song (Pine Siskin?)
4/18/18 4:32 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> FOS Rose-breasted Grosbeak
4/18/18 2:48 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> For those who have asked about ONSC
4/18/18 1:17 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA April Field Trip this Saturday
4/18/18 12:19 pm Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...> FOS-Prothonotary Warbler
4/18/18 12:01 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> HUDSONIAN GODWIT AT CRAIG STATE FISH HATCHERY, CENTERTON
4/18/18 11:48 am Ed Laster <elaster523...> Bufflehead Bay
4/18/18 9:58 am Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: FOS and other news
4/18/18 9:52 am Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...> FOS and other news
4/18/18 7:53 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> new arrival
4/18/18 7:32 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 7:10 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 7:09 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 7:07 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 7:07 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> FOS Great Crested Flycatcher
4/18/18 6:26 am Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 6:11 am David Luneau <mdluneau...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 6:06 am Billy Jeter <000000779632af60-dmarc-request...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 5:58 am twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 5:58 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 5:56 am Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 5:27 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Mini fallout
4/18/18 5:13 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 5:07 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: a bird mystery
4/18/18 3:26 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> a bird mystery
4/17/18 3:15 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bell Slough
4/17/18 3:13 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> FOS Dickcissel
4/17/18 12:10 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: BROAD-WINGED HAWK NESTING IN FAYETTEVILLE
4/17/18 8:58 am JFR <johnfredman...> WHITE-FACED IBIS IN PINE BLUFF
4/17/18 6:58 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> BROAD-WINGED HAWK NESTING IN FAYETTEVILLE
4/17/18 5:16 am Jacob Wessels <jacoblwessels...> Re: Atypical Chipping Sparrow vocalizations
4/17/18 5:09 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Atypical Chipping Sparrow vocalizations
4/17/18 3:29 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Atypical Chipping Sparrow vocalizations
4/16/18 5:32 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SHOREBIRDY DAY AT FROG
4/16/18 10:21 am Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> Finding out-of-state birding locations and birders.
4/16/18 7:32 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Birds
4/16/18 6:22 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Kyle Hawley
4/15/18 10:07 pm laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Re: Kyle Hawley
4/15/18 5:51 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> FOS Orchard Oriole
4/15/18 5:37 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Multiple sightings
4/15/18 4:19 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Centerton Fish hatchery today( Sunday)
4/15/18 10:05 am Alyson Hoge <alycat14...> Primary colors
4/15/18 9:14 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Kyle Hawley
4/15/18 9:08 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> turkey time in snow flurries
4/15/18 7:16 am Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Gillam Park 4/15/2018
4/15/18 6:41 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: PEREGRINE WITH A TAWNY BLUSH IN THE VALLEY
4/15/18 6:23 am Carol Meyerdirk <tennislady41...> FOS catbird and indigo bunting
4/15/18 6:17 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Nesting Mourning Dove. etc
4/15/18 5:43 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> PEREGRINE WITH A TAWNY BLUSH IN THE VALLEY
4/14/18 9:48 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: first hummingbird
4/14/18 7:53 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> American Bittern (FOS)
4/14/18 7:02 pm Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Ibis and Black-necked
4/14/18 5:16 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville- FOS Swainson's Thrush/Summer Tanager/Orchard Oriole/Warblers plus a Swallow fallout
4/14/18 12:19 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> FOS Summer Tanager, Pine Siskin & Hummingbird antics
4/14/18 10:43 am twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...> FOR Blue Grosbeak
4/14/18 9:14 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> first hummingbird
4/13/18 8:52 pm Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> Baltimore Oriole
4/13/18 5:20 pm Amy Hall <00000141e1151b9c-dmarc-request...> Indigo Buntings in Cabot
4/13/18 4:39 pm pooja panwar <ppanwar...> Chimney Swifts
4/13/18 3:29 pm Ragan Sutterfield <000001798b796cbe-dmarc-request...> Spotted Towhee
4/13/18 3:01 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Kim's obituary
4/13/18 2:47 pm Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...> Chimney Swifts
4/13/18 2:06 pm Art Weigand <aweigand13...> Good warbler morning
4/13/18 11:52 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Port of LR sunken fields
4/13/18 10:39 am Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> FOS
4/13/18 10:20 am Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...> Another error. Can't keep up with number of errors!
4/13/18 10:04 am Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...> FOS
4/13/18 8:52 am Christy Melhart Slay <christy.slay...> Kim Smith ONSC memorial contributions
4/13/18 7:14 am Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Re: Mississippi Kite
4/13/18 6:00 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> FOS Orchard Oriole
4/12/18 9:47 pm Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22...> FOS
4/12/18 6:00 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: fos
4/12/18 6:00 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> this week
4/12/18 5:58 pm Alan <quattro...> fos
4/12/18 1:41 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Hanky Panky
4/12/18 9:13 am Ann Honeycutt <annhoneycutt53...> FOS Mississippi Kites
4/11/18 5:20 pm swamp_fox <swamp_fox...> Kim Smith
4/11/18 3:58 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Memorial contributions for Kim Smith
4/11/18 2:43 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Mississippi Kite
4/11/18 1:16 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Feds Propose the Removal of Kirtland's Warbler from Endangered Species list
4/11/18 11:39 am Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...> Dr Kim Smith
4/11/18 10:46 am Vickie Becker <vhbecker...> Re: Field Trips and Great Talks - AAS Spring Meeting, Bentonville
4/11/18 9:32 am Robin Buff <robinbuff...> FOS Scissor-tail Flycatcher
4/11/18 9:08 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Earth Day field trip to Ninestone Land Trust, Sunday April 22. Y'all Come
4/11/18 8:58 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> 40th anniversary for Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society during AAS convention
4/11/18 8:13 am Don Simons <Don.Simons...> large shorebirds near Paris Bottoms
4/11/18 7:45 am Robin Buff <robinbuff...> Field Trips and Great Talks - AAS Spring Meeting, Bentonville
4/11/18 7:12 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/11/18 4:31 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Kim Smith, Red Crossbills, and the death of the adverb
4/10/18 10:29 pm pooja panwar <ppanwar...> Update on Red Crossbill (A tribute to Dr. Smith)
4/10/18 10:22 pm pooja panwar <ppanwar...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 8:57 pm Debra Hale-Shelton <dshelton...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 6:36 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Fwd:
4/10/18 6:16 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Delete me please
4/10/18 5:01 pm JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...> Delete me please
4/10/18 3:51 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> partial albino Eurasian-collared Dove and fond thoughts of Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 2:44 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 2:39 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Krider's v light morph Harlan's
4/10/18 1:46 pm zcaywood <zcaywood...> DR Kim
4/10/18 1:44 pm Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 1:28 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 1:21 pm Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 1:05 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 8:32 am Ann Gordon <chesterann...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 8:20 am Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 7:50 am James Morgan <jlmm...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 6:48 am Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...> Re: GOLDEN-PLOVERS GO FOR THE GOLD (and our Kim) April 10, 2018
4/10/18 5:09 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> GOLDEN-PLOVERS GO FOR THE GOLD (and our Kim) April 10, 2018
4/10/18 5:08 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 4:37 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/10/18 2:43 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 10:06 pm Les Birds <000001f32b245878-dmarc-request...> FOY for me
4/9/18 9:45 pm Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 4:45 pm jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 3:25 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 3:05 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 3:01 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 2:43 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 2:35 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 2:30 pm DUNN, JANE <dunnj...> Re: Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 2:23 pm Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Dr. Kim Smith
4/9/18 2:15 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Ozark Environmental Conversations
4/9/18 12:33 pm Candace Ware <songbirdcaptures...> Green Herons are back, Mayflower Dam 4-8-18
4/9/18 12:27 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA April Field Trip
4/8/18 7:04 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Atkins Bottoms Thursday April 5
4/8/18 5:43 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Golden Plovers
4/8/18 4:36 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, April 12
4/8/18 3:23 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Chesney and Stump Prairies - Cormorants galore
4/7/18 5:31 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Scarlet Tanager
4/7/18 4:16 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Upland Sandpipers in the Valley
4/7/18 6:03 am Jacob Wessels <jacoblwessels...> Re: Kite name change
4/7/18 5:25 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Kite name change
4/6/18 1:24 pm Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...> Sparrows
4/6/18 8:13 am Carol Meyerdirk <tennislady41...> Re: How exciting
4/6/18 5:39 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Swainson's Hawks, Grandview Prairie WMA
4/6/18 5:25 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: SWAINSON’S HAWKS IN THE VALLEY (NOT DUMPING DEAD DOGS)
4/6/18 5:04 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SWAINSON’S HAWKS IN THE VALLEY (NOT DUMPING DEAD DOGS)
4/6/18 4:53 am Jan Johnson <janbirder...> Painted Bunting
4/5/18 10:09 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: LOS American Treecreeper
4/5/18 8:40 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> observations
4/5/18 8:19 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> How exciting
4/5/18 6:42 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Finally! FOS
4/5/18 6:36 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Road Trip
4/5/18 4:48 pm Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> Dark Eye Juncos
4/5/18 4:23 pm DUNN, JANE <dunnj...> Re: Broad-winged Hawks—Fayetteville
4/5/18 10:46 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bell Slough
4/5/18 10:45 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Broad-winged Hawks—Fayetteville
4/5/18 10:36 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Broad-winged Hawks—Fayetteville
4/5/18 9:28 am Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> FOS White-eyed Vireo
4/5/18 6:02 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: LOS American Treecreeper
4/5/18 5:56 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> LOS American Treecreeper
4/4/18 9:12 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - April 4
4/4/18 8:38 pm Johnny Walker <johnnybacon...> FOS Eastern Kingbird and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
4/4/18 8:08 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> FOS Upland Sandpiper - Chesney Prairie
4/4/18 12:42 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> FOS Chimney Swift
4/4/18 12:33 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: birds' internal compass and earth's magnetic field
4/4/18 12:15 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> birds' internal compass and earth's magnetic field
4/4/18 11:46 am Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Re: EBird Migratioin Birdcast
4/4/18 5:31 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Lesser Black-backed Gull
4/3/18 6:34 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> ONE FOR SACRED ANNALS OF BEAVER LAKE BIRDING
4/3/18 5:42 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: I don't like them...
4/2/18 8:00 pm Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> Re: I don't like them...
4/2/18 7:47 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL ON BEAVER LAKE
4/2/18 6:31 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL ON BEAVER LAKE
4/2/18 5:14 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: I don't like them...
4/2/18 4:13 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: I don't like them...
4/2/18 2:34 pm Karen Konarski <karen...> Re: Murray Park-Little Rock
4/2/18 2:25 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> Murray Park-Little Rock
4/2/18 12:54 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> I don't like them...
4/2/18 10:01 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
4/2/18 9:36 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
4/2/18 9:29 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> FOS female RTHU
4/2/18 8:51 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
4/2/18 8:13 am Ann Gordon <chesterann...> Re: 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
4/2/18 7:58 am Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
4/1/18 8:58 pm Johnny Walker <johnnybacon...> Forster's Terns and FOS Cliff Swallows
4/1/18 4:51 pm Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> Re: SNUG WITH THE DUCKS . REPORT FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND
4/1/18 1:28 pm laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> FOS Scissortail Flycatcher
4/1/18 12:14 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: SNUG WITH THE DUCKS … REPORT FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND
4/1/18 11:59 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SNUG WITH THE DUCKS … REPORT FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND
3/31/18 4:24 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - FOS Nashville Warbler/Broad-winged Hawk
3/31/18 4:10 pm Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Early Ovenbird near Ponca
3/31/18 4:05 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Duck, Coot, Grebe
3/30/18 8:28 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Longpool Rec warblers
3/30/18 4:37 pm Amy Brantley <brantleyal...> Re: FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Cabot)
3/30/18 4:18 pm Amy Hall <00000141e1151b9c-dmarc-request...> FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Cabot)
3/30/18 4:06 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> From the Buffalo to Russellville, FOSs All the Way
3/30/18 2:50 pm Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...> Repelling squirrels from pole feeders.
3/30/18 1:20 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Slippery poles
3/30/18 10:58 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA March 24 Field Trip Report
3/30/18 8:14 am Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: Slippery poles
3/30/18 7:36 am Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Slippery poles
3/30/18 7:01 am Don Simons <Don.Simons...> Re: Slippery poles
3/30/18 5:32 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Slippery poles
3/29/18 8:22 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - March 29
3/29/18 2:54 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Yellow-throated Warbler wintered in Novia Scotia
3/29/18 1:55 pm Devin Moon <moondevg...> New arrivals at Logoly State Park, Columbia Co.
3/29/18 12:12 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> EARED GREBE AT CRAIG STATE FISH HATCHERY
3/29/18 12:01 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> ONSC Chipotle fundraiser big success!
3/28/18 6:17 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Prairie Merlin
3/28/18 4:57 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> HIGH NUMBERS OF GOLDEN-PLOVERS IN THE VALLEY
3/28/18 11:39 am Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...> Nest destruction
3/28/18 8:22 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Chipotle fundraiser for ONSC is today!
3/28/18 8:19 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Amazing new paper on Forest Wagtails in India by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan
3/28/18 4:22 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> WITH 4-INCH RAIN, EARTH ON THE MOVE
3/27/18 9:17 pm Debra Hale-Shelton <dshelton...> Re: What will happen to my birds
3/27/18 7:53 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FOS Chuck Will's Widow
3/27/18 2:18 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Phoebe nest
3/27/18 2:11 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Phoebe nest
3/27/18 11:15 am Alyson Hoge <alycat14...> First RTHU of season
3/27/18 11:12 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: What will happen to my birds
3/27/18 10:44 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Phoebe nest
3/27/18 10:40 am JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...> Re: What will happen to my birds
3/27/18 10:19 am Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...> need info
3/27/18 10:17 am Mary Ann King <office...> Phoebe nest
3/27/18 10:17 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Amazing new paper on Forest Wagtails in India by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan
3/27/18 9:56 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: bird trivia for youngsters
3/27/18 9:53 am Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> Amazing new paper on Forest Wagtails in India by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan
3/27/18 8:34 am data _null_; <datanull...> FOS RTHU
3/27/18 7:52 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> bird trivia for youngsters
3/27/18 7:05 am Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...> They're baaaaaack!
3/26/18 7:06 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: What will happen to my birds
3/26/18 6:59 pm Kay Hodnett <sallyportk...> Re: What will happen to my birds
3/26/18 6:32 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: What will happen to my birds
3/26/18 4:57 pm JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...> What will happen to my birds
3/26/18 4:56 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Red Crossbills continue at Hobbs and fabulous Horned Grebes
3/26/18 4:48 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
3/26/18 4:12 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> FOS RTHU (male)
3/26/18 11:56 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Yellow-throated Warbler wintered in Novia Scotia
3/26/18 7:14 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: [OKBIRDS] Weather Radar Loop - Evening of 3/25
3/25/18 10:09 pm Marisue Rowe <marisue.rowe...> Re: eBird app: Personal Locations vs. Hotspots
3/25/18 8:03 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird app: Personal Locations vs. Hotspots
3/25/18 7:57 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> new arrivals 3/24 - 3/25
3/25/18 7:44 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: FOS Ruby-throated Hummingbird
3/25/18 7:19 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Birds
3/25/18 6:47 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Common Redpoll Visitation
3/25/18 6:05 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FOS Ruby-throated Hummingbird
3/25/18 4:48 pm Jo-Ann Jennier <jcjennier...> FOS WPW
3/25/18 4:47 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> Nebraska/ Colorado birding
3/25/18 2:44 pm Alan <quattro...> water thrush
3/25/18 2:41 pm Alan <quattro...> Turkey vultures behavior
3/25/18 1:38 pm Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> Ruby-throated Hummingbird
3/25/18 11:26 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS ON BEAVER LAKE
3/25/18 7:34 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Male Ruby-throated Hummingbird Today in Hot Springs
3/24/18 6:40 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Ecuador AAST fundraiser tour
3/24/18 5:18 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Fw: Vermillion flycatcher
3/24/18 4:26 pm Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> Ruby-throated Hummingbird
3/24/18 3:58 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Re: Vermillion flycatcher
3/24/18 1:19 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> 5/15 - 6/15 2018 Audubon Surveys for Nuthatches or Bluebirds and Climate Watch
3/24/18 8:58 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Vermillion flycatcher
3/24/18 6:01 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Redpoll??
3/24/18 5:58 am DAN <birddan...> Re: Redpoll??
3/24/18 5:17 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Redpoll??
 
Back to top
Date: 4/23/18 6:56 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Earth Day NWAAS Field Trip to Ninestone
Today we celebrated a spectacular Earth Day 2018 at Ninestone with 19 naturalists whose ages span 70 years.

Our field trip occurred 48 years after the first Earth Day, which I attended joyfully on the lawn of the Philadelphia Art Museum. All those years ago I fully believed that humans would come to revere the environment, the ecology, the habitats, and the myriad creatures with which we share this beautiful planet. Today Don and I are deeply grateful for Joe Neal and the wonderful people he brings to Ninestone, who do find life on our blue planet sacred, and we are heartened that every person who was here today is both a teacher and a lifelong student of the Earth.


Last nights 1.5 of gentle rain refreshed the creek and waterfall, dripped from pine needles, softened the lichens and moss, and encouraged buds of trees to emerge just enough to hint at the greening to come, but not yet enough to obscure the birds. The rain stopped before we began and temperatures in the 60s with occasional patches of blue made the entire day even more pleasant.


We overlooked the singing creek from several vantage points, passed below native shortleaf pines in the savanna, and explored paths across the bluff glade where Golden Selenia and False Garlic are in bloom, and the foliage of Fame Flower, Widows Cross Sedum, and Spiderwort promise flowers soon.


Following our midday potluck that was enjoyed on the deck while we watched birds visit the feeders, several graduate students, colleagues, and friends of Dr. Kim Smith honored him by speaking about the impact he had made on their lives. Joe Neal told of their decades of work together and of Kims sense of humor. Alyssa DeRubeis, Anant Deshwal, and Pooja Panwar shared memories of Kims calm encouragement and uncanny insight into their potential; and others remembered his contributions as a beneficial force for humans and the Earth.


Then we drove across the stream to pastures, speculated about which raptors are using a large nest in the top of a pine, birded the Enchanted Valley for more warblers, and ended up at the falls where Violet Blue-eyed Mary, Ozark Trillium, and Birds-foot Violets bloom.




Judith & Don


Ninestone, Carroll County



Heres our bird list for today:


Black Vulture (bluff nesting pair)


Turkey Vulture

Osprey

Red-shouldered Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Mourning Dove

Chimney Swift * (first of season)

Ruby-throated Hummingbird

Belted Kingfisher

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Pileated Woodpecker

Eastern Phoebe

White-eyed Vireo

Blue Jay

American Crow

Fish Crow

Northern Rough-winged Swallow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Carolina Wren (fledglings too)

House Wren * (first of season, singing near a huge brush pile)

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Eastern Bluebird

Swainsons Thrush* (first of season)

Cedar Waxwing (nearly 3 dozen in one flock on one cedar)

Blue-winged Warbler (several in Enchanted Valley)

Orange-crowned Warbler (Enchanted Valley)

Northern Parula (courtship beside deck during lunch)

Yellow-rumped Warbler

Yellow-throated Warbler

Pine Warbler

Black & White Warbler

Ovenbird

Louisiana Waterthrush (in nesting territories along stream)

Kentucky Warbler * (first of season)

Hooded Warbler * (first of season Enchanted Valley)

Yellow-breasted Chat * (first of season)

Eastern Towhee

Chipping Sparrow (breeding behavior native plant garden)

Field Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow (all day chorus breeding plumage brilliant yellow lores)

Summer Tanager * (first of season)

Northern Cardinal

Rose-breasted Grosbeak (4 males, 1 female so far)

Brown-headed Cowbird

House Finch

Pine Siskin

American Goldfinch



Other findings:


Brown Snake


Ring-necked Snakes (freshly hatched)

Five-lined Skinks (youngsters with blue tails)

Ground Skink

Spring Peepers (singing from Bog Spring in Enchanted Valley)

Luna Moth (newly eclosed brilliantly colored)
































 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/18 5:48 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA April Field Trip Report
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } On Saturday, April 21 the weather was mostly sunny, mid-60's temperatures, and very little wind after the first half hour of the trip. The group of 23 birders congregated at the softball field at Craighead Forest Park in Jonesboro at 8:15 a.m.  Hats off to all the "Bird Nuts" who showed up because they left Little Rock at 6:00 a.m. to make the two-hour drive.  First birds were a soaring Broad-winged Hawk, plus 62 DC Cormorants flying overhead in a V formation. Birds on the loop around the edges of the softball field were Pine Warblers, Swainson's Thrush, Carolina Wrens, and Chipping Sparrows.
Working our way towards the lake, a group of birds kept flushing in front of us. It was a nice mix of Blue Grosbeaks, Palm Warblers,Yellow-rumped Warblers, Indigo Buntings, and Cardinals.  On the path through the wooded areas, we were very excited to see a Cerulean Warbler, life or state bird for many, two Blackburnian Warblers, and a Scarlet Tanager!  We also had more Swainson's Thrushes, a Yellow-throated Warbler, Yellow-throated Vireos, Nashville Warblers, Summer Tanagers, and a Ruby-throated Humminbird.
We then headed to the Game & Fish Commission's Crowley's Ridge Nature Center. It was almost noon so the birds had slowed down but we did get our FOS Blue-winged Warbler and Eastern Kingbird, plus several butterflies, including Monarch's, working the butterfly gardens.
On our way back to Little Rock, the group stopped at the Bald Knob NWR Refuge.  Great decision because our first bird was a White-faced Ibis in gorgeous high breeding plumage feeding only 25 feet from the road!  We then stopped at the grain bins to scan the huge blackbird flock hoping for Yellow-headed Blackbird.  Sarah Morris pulled up and said thank goodness we were birders because she was pretty positive she had just seen two.  We jumped out of our cars and sure enough there were two stunning male YHBB's!  Life and state bird for most. On the back side of the Refuge we had an adult Bald Eagle, plus a momma Hooded Merganser and her six adorable tiny babies swimming in one of the flooded ditches.  Last stop on the way out was at the marshy creek on Coal Chute Rd. near the entrance to the Refuge.  A male Wood Duck and two Green Herons were perched on the fallen logs in the creek.  In the reeds was a signing Marsh Wren.  Then, out of the reeds walked an American Bittern.  He stood still long enough for everyone to get great looks through the scope.  Life and or state bird for many.  Spectacular end to a long day!  Species total for Craighead Forest and the Nature Center was 54.  Bald Knob was 27.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator


 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/18 4:22 pm
From: Bo Verser <bo.verser1...>
Subject: Fwd: Weekend birds
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Herschel Raney <hrdragonfly1958...>
Date: Sun, Apr 22, 2018 at 6:06 PM
Subject: Weekend birds
To: Eric Haley <pondhawk...>, Bo Verser <bo.verser1...>,
Dennis Braddy <dmbraddy...>, Dennis Paulson <dennispaulson...>,
Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>, Deborah Wright <
<deblynnwright...>, <keithnewton...>, MARCIA Z <
<marciazbraga...>, <rainefox51...>, Robin <
<robintucker...>, Thomas Lewis <td_lewis...>, <susu829...>,
Charles Mills <swamp_fox...>, Cheryl Lavers <clavers...>, Devin
Moon <moondevg...>, Christina Nova <christinabnova...>


61 species of bird on or over the property this weekend. Rain off and on.
Birds were moving through east to west even in the rain. More than ten
Blue-headed Vireos and about the same number of Philadelphia Vireos, most
of them calling. I laughed a few times at how many vireos were calling at
once with White-eyes coming into the yard and Red-eyes just in the mix. I
think for the first time in my life I had a White-eyed Vireo in the same
binocular view with a Blue-headed.

More Ruby-crowned Kinglets than I remember seeing in a long while. 50 or
more and sometimes 6 or 7 in sight at a time. The first Tennessee Warblers
moving quietly through. Many Nashville. Blue-winged Warblers in waves. No
Golden-wings yet.

First movements of Swainson’s Thrush with a lovely bird ten feet in front
of me on my road pounding a large beetle into submission. No singing. At
Bell surely one of the last remaining Hermit Thrushes.

The very rare appearance of a first year Orchard Oriole in the yard, nectar
cheating my wife’s red honeysuckle blooms for a good ten minutes going from
cluster to cluster. He barked a few times. Baltimores in the trees. A swarm
of singing Orchard’s at Bell on Sunday afternoon so large I think it was a
personal record. I was amazed by them.

Singing and barking Rose-breasted Grosbeaks above the yard both mornings. I
did not see a female.

I believe I have four pair of jays nesting on my 2 acres. Front yard pair,
back yard pair, over there somewhere pair and the meadow pair. Occasionally
one of the other pair will come into the back yard where the nesting pair
are and everyone will murmur the jay murmur and point their beaks in the
sky. No real fighting, but a lot of stance taking.

Wood Ducks in the swamp every day. And I think the one female is egg laying
but I have not had the courage to lift the top to see. Males come and go.

Ran to Bell on Sunday afternoon in the between rain break and found 22
other species I had not seen on the land for an 83 species weekend. The
north side of Bell has become the superb warbler trap but it is still
early. Droves of Yellow-rumps, Nashville, Parula and scattered Kentucky
there now. It is the place to watch. Had fun chasing Green Herons and that
one north side ditch is a wild wild west of Common Yellowthroat activity
already. Last bird was a single Solitary Sandpiper in the cow pasture at
the bottom of Round Mountain.

Beauty of a weekend in the bird world.

Herschel Raney
Conway AR

 

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Date: 4/22/18 2:28 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Bird greetings
Pretty good morning of bird songs. Though my little life bird was gone.
Parula, Nashville, Tennessee, Redstart and Black and White Warblers. Rose
Breasted Grosbeaks along with normal stuff. 38 species for the day. Only
places I can go is porch steps or back window. I guess the birds that want
to see me are coming to me. Ha. But one thing I have noticed since last
week when a Hummingbird attacked me. Female Ruby. she hit me between the
eyes above my glasses than sat on my knee chattering away. In 2015,2016 I
had one female that would sit and take liquid out of my hand. Every day she
was on me from shoulder to knee. Wasn't afraid of the dogs would sit on
them too. Then I moved away in 2017. I wasn't here at all. Now there is
this female that hovers outside the screen door looking in and when I go
outside there she is again. Sitting on me or a dog talking away.

Do birds remember sad humans? I guess they do. This bird let me have a
scorning for sure . I found Leif feeder since mine got stolen. Her branch
is broken off I managed to climb up on something to hang the feeder on a
new higher branch. And she comes to sit upon us the minute we walk out the
door. I see why they are known for the symbolism of joy. She makes this
depressed soul smile with it. I know where her nest is, let see if she
brings her babies to me like before. Greeting me with their shy greetings
wondering why momma not afraid of this strange being.

The Carolina Wren came to me too and her scorning was twice as bad. How
dare I leave? I was guessing she said. It nice to be wanted by the birds of
the air.
Teresa, Hector, AR

Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
make it happen.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/18 12:50 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Northern Parula
So, about a week ago I started hearing a new bird song around the yard. 
I postulated (incorrectly) that it might be a Pine Siskin... but after
posting a description of the song Karen Garrett suggested a Northern Parula.

Well, guess what...Karen was spot on!  This makes a life bird for me
(yay) and the bird's behavior suggests its staking out our yard as a
potential nest site...although there's no Spanish Moss anywhere near here.

Thanks to Karen!

George (n. Conway County with at least one Parula)
 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/18 12:43 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Re: Longbilled Curlew
I went out with one of my daughters and we found the bird in question
about 1:30 almost exactly where Kenny Nichols had it pinned.  It was in
a field...well, actually, there are now two and they were both in a
field on the south side of Hwy 113 just east of two metal barns.  They
were initially within about 100 feet of the highway but are foraging
widely in the field.  The furthest out they ranged was close to 300 feet
from the highway.  They seemed undisturbed by our presence (we parked
along the highway, but be careful since I don't know the shoulder
conditions).

I could not positively ID their bills (we had no binoculars, scope or
camera) but they did appear to fit all the other field marks.  They
would run a bit, stop, bob their tail and occasionally head, then go for
something in the ground.  I'll admit that had they not been ID'd by more
knowledgeable individuals, I would have mistaken them for Whimbrels.

My plan is to get my optics and head back down there tomorrow morning
and see if I can get a better look.

George (n. Conway Co. pretty happy with the adventure)


On 4/22/2018 8:46 AM, Bob Harden wrote:
> Long Billed Curlew is still on the spot Kenny Nichols pinned. What a bird. Hey 113 just south of Blackwell on the right just before a metal barn
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/22/18 12:02 pm
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
My little forest has been mostly regular yard birds except for a gazillion Am. Goldfinch, several Parula Warblers, and 2 Blue-Gray Gnatcatchers. Yesterday, I had a ruby-throated Hummingbird checking out my nectar. However, today, a male Rose-breasted Grosbeak appeared at my feeder. Yahoo.

Robin Buff
Just west of Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/18 10:21 am
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Sightings: Gillam Park
The rain held off long enough for Karen Holliday and me to bird Gillam Park Sunday morning. We saw or heard a total of 33 species, what I consider the coolest are bolded below. Karen also saw a Blue-winged Warbler that I missed. Many of these are FOS, others would have been if it hadn’t been for the field trip yesterday.

Turkey Vulture 3
Red-shouldered Hawk 1
Red-tailed Hawk 1
Red-bellied Woodpecker 3
Great Crested Flycatcher 2
White-eyed Vireo 6
Yellow-throated Vireo 3
Philadelphia Vireo 1
Red-eyed Vireo 5
Blue Jay 2
American Crow 2
Carolina Chickadee 1
Tufted Titmouse 3
Carolina Wren 2
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 4
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 2
Black-and-white Warbler 1
Tennessee Warbler 2
Kentucky Warbler 2
Common Yellowthroat 2
Northern Parula 3
Bay-breasted Warbler 1
Yellow-rumped Warbler 2
Black-throated Green Warbler 2
White-throated Sparrow 15
Lincoln's Sparrow 3
Eastern Towhee 2
Summer Tanager 4
Scarlet Tanager 1
Northern Cardinal 8
Rose-breasted Grosbeak 2
Indigo Bunting 1
Brown-headed Cowbird 5


Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after." — Thorin
 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/18 10:17 am
From: George R Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Re: Longbilled Curlew
Is it visible from the road without binoculars or a spotting scope?

Any Tim of day it's most likely to be there? I'm thinking of running out there early there this afternoon..

George

George (North Conway County)

Sent from my Verizon Motorola Smartphone
On Apr 22, 2018 8:46 AM, Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> wrote:
>
> Long Billed Curlew is still on the spot Kenny Nichols pinned. What a bird. Hey 113 just south of Blackwell on the right just before a metal barn
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/22/18 9:46 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Golden plover and Harris’s Sparrow
There an American Golden Plover hanging around at the Charlie Craig Fish Hatchery this morning. Winter plumage.

And a Harris’s Sparrow still present in my suburban yard this morning.

Butch
Bentonville
 

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Date: 4/22/18 9:31 am
From: Songbird Captures <songbirdcaptures...>
Subject: Broad winged Hawk, Solitary Sandpiper, Indigo Bunting
Broad winged Hawk adult, Indigo Buntings and a Solitary Sandpiper on
4-21-18

 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/18 6:56 am
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Baltimore Orioles FOS
Two males at my orioles feeder this morning ripping into an orange half and grape preserves. A beautiful sight on this drizzly Sunday.

Lynn Foster
Northwest of Pinnacle Mountain
 

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Date: 4/22/18 6:55 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: our mystery "bird"
When I wrote about the constant chirp that we were hearing just outside our bedroom windows, you sent numerous guesses about what/who was chirping. We now think those who thought it was a tree frog were right. We aren't sure, but we're pretty sure it's not a bird or squirrel or chipmunk.


In years past, tree frogs have sometimes liked to perch on the window sills on that warm, south side of the house. So we were aware that they are around that area.


For the 5th night in a row, we heard the chirps begin at dusk. Last night, for the third night of the five, they continued without a pause all night long; and in this drizzly dark morning, they're still going. When we go near the sound, nothing flutters or seems startled, and we think we would see a bird and that a chipmunk or squirrel would scurry away. So, likely a small frog -- definitely a soprano.


We're just glad that, as soon as the oaks and hickories have bloomed out in our east woods, we can clean the pollen out of our tree house (a screened room AMONG the trees) and move out there, where we will sleep until Thanksgiving, and allow the frog to continue chirping down here as long as it likes.


Thanks for all your suggestions and guesses. Nature's mysteries can be a lot of fun even when they threaten to disturb our sleep.

Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/18 6:47 am
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Longbilled Curlew
Long Billed Curlew is still on the spot Kenny Nichols pinned. What a bird. Hey 113 just south of Blackwell on the right just before a metal barn
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/21/18 8:47 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Thanks to all that helped with ID.
Yippee! A lifebird for me! It was determined that it was a Worm-eating
Warbler. Again thanks. Teresa, Hector, AR

Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
make it happen.

 

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Date: 4/21/18 8:06 pm
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Gilliam Park Sunday


I know it will be storming Sunday morning but if the rain is over I'm going to Gillam Park. It's one of the best spots in Little Rock during migration. 
Jim Dixon 


Sent via the Samsung GALAXY S® 5, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
 

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Date: 4/21/18 6:24 pm
From: James Morgan <jlmm...>
Subject: Toasting Kim Smith at 6:30 Tu 4/24
Just a reminder for all who want to lift a glass to Kim Smith around
6:30 PM on Tu 4/24 at the Garden Room on Dickson Street in Fayetteville
Where ever you are, lift a glass or toast Kim at that time.

Peggy Smith and Kim/Peggy's daughter will attend the dinner on Tu 4/24.
Ozark Slow Food HoopLa! which celebrates local food and the use of hoop
houses to increase local food production and extend seasons.
Kim arranged the free wine, the venue at the Garden Room and selected
the Chef. for this event.
Kim had planned to be one of the servers dressing in a white shirt and
black pants.

If you wish to be part of the celebration -
Tickets at the link below. If you want Vegan/Vegetarian call Teresa at
the number below
https://www.paypal.com/webapps/shoppingcart?flowlogging_id=87677df5deddf&mfid=1524357468417_87677df5deddf#/checkout/openButton
Can also call Teresa at 479-799-7985 to reserve

I picked up whey fed bacon, 20 lbs of local cheese, chocolate etc today
at the Fayetteville Farmer's Market. I'm hungry.
The music is great local duo. The venue is perfect for talking and enjoying.

Regards
Jim
Fayetteville, AR


Don't miss out - seats are filling up fast for our local food
benefit dinner! Chef Justin presents the following Hoop-La menu
for your enjoyment:


*Middle Eastern Asian Fusion Winter Salad *
/Warm roasted butternut squash with sautéed kale, spinach, shiitake
mushroom, Japanese turnips, cilantro, feta cheese, toasted pumpkin
seeds, and miso honey lime dressing with fried sweet potato curry samosas/

*Osso Buco Italiano*
/A tender mouthwatering beef shank slow braised in an espanola sauce
with a roasted garlic, fromage blanc cheese, spinach, risotto, a carrot
tarragon puree, and roasted oyster mushroom/

*Vegetarian Entree Option*
/A goat cheese gnocchi with braised kale, spinach, toasted fennel, and a
butternut herb infused broth oyster mushrooms/
**You must reserve a vegetarian option by e-mailing <ozarkslowfood...>*

*Chocolate Strawberry Frozen Mousse Pate Choux Bomb*
/A decadent pate choux pastry filled with a Bavarian crème laced with
dark chocolate with a moist chocolate cake topped with a frozen
strawberry mousse covered in a chocolate ganache with warm blueberries/


Click Here To Buy Your Ticket Now!
<https://ozarkslowfood.us9.list-manage.com/track/click?u=7373bad3147f229f054842f56&id=6564d35b7e&e=15180457a6>

--
James Morgan
Fayetteville, Arkansas


 

Back to top
Date: 4/21/18 6:11 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Re: I'D help
Solid wings. No lines on body, wings or tail. eyeline smudge reminded me
of a kestrel . Yet this was a round headed bird. I know what kinglets look
like and this wasn't close at all. Bill was more needle thin like same
color as legs. I have been watching warblers for several days same type of
body shape. But who knows? Maybe it will stay and housemate will spot it
and id, it for me.

Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
make it happen.

On Sat, Apr 21, 2018, 6:33 PM Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:

> Just my luck, have a great looking bird land right by me, and not have my
> phone with me to snap a photo.
>
> Warbler size, about size of a walnut. Olive-Tawny Brown body and wings.
> Underparts Buffy brownish color. Very black eyeline that stretch to back
> of neck, front of it drops down like a smudge mark in front of eye. (like
> brush slipped) Another Dark line above that almost to top of head same
> length without a smudge mark next to where there is a yellow Mohawk shape
> on top of head. Spikelike thin bill. Yellowpinkish legs. Landed on a low
> hickory limb not two feet from my face. Looked at me ten seconds Then went
> into, in a medium size tree doing a long high pitch series of single chip
> notes.
>
> Of course it not going to coordinate for a phone camera now.
>
> Only book I have is a 25 yr Nat.Geog. Bird book. Can't find a photo
> like it.Lost my sibleysbook and house owner is gone.
>
> I never have seen a bird like this before. So I assume it's a passing
> warbler stopping for the rain tonight. Thanks, Teresa, Hector, AR
>
> Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
> make it happen.
>

 

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Date: 4/21/18 5:39 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Arkansas River bottoms
I took a drive this morning to Morrilton, and continued along the bottoms to Atkins Bottoms Road.  I was looking for 2 birds, the Yellow-headed Blackbird and a Swainson's Hawk.  I didn't find the blackbird.  I did see an adult Swainson's flying around, a state bird for me.  I also spotted a Long-billed Curlew.  2 Upland Sandpipers.  Several Baltimore Orioles and Orchard Orioles.  A few Dickcissels.  A bunch of American-golden Plovers.  10 American Kestrels.  A very dark Red-tailed Hawk - possible a Harlan's.  A couple hundred Cliff Swallows.  And a Solitary Sandpiper.  Oh, and my first ever Baird's Sandpiper.  What a great day for birding.  (Thanks Ronald Duvall for the tip on the Curlew!)

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot

 

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Date: 4/21/18 5:30 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Frog Bayou/State Meeting
Next Saturday I will be leading a group to Frog Bayou WMA and vicinity. We
will meet at the McDonalds in Alma at I40 and 71 at 9:00.

I spent four hours in the area today and saw wonderful things. Avocets,
House Wren, 6 Bald Eagles at one time, a Northern Waterthrush, Sora,
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, a Shrike, and so on. The wet units are
perfect. Best mud I've seen in a long time.

My # is 479-629-7888 if anyone needs info.

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 4/21/18 4:48 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Rose Breasted Grosbeak pair
Must had been a fallout of birds. Now I have a pair of Rosebreasted
Grosbreaks. Unfortunately dog barked as I took the photo. Just a blurred
flight shot. Darn it.

Oops Now I see another pair.. Humm, my evening is quite exciting. Maybe I
should go back outside. Ha. Teresa, Hector, AR

Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
make it happen.

 

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Date: 4/21/18 4:41 pm
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-headed blackbird
Two were in the tree by the grain bins on coal chute road. An ibis
(white-faced?) was in the last field on the right before you get to the
grain bins.

Sarah

On Sat, Apr 21, 2018 at 6:06 PM <shalom...> <shalom...>
wrote:

> Location?
>
>
> On 4/21/2018 3:05 PM, Randy wrote:
>
> At Bald Knob right now 3:00pm
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 4/21/18 4:33 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: I'D help
Just my luck, have a great looking bird land right by me, and not have my
phone with me to snap a photo.

Warbler size, about size of a walnut. Olive-Tawny Brown body and wings.
Underparts Buffy brownish color. Very black eyeline that stretch to back
of neck, front of it drops down like a smudge mark in front of eye. (like
brush slipped) Another Dark line above that almost to top of head same
length without a smudge mark next to where there is a yellow Mohawk shape
on top of head. Spikelike thin bill. Yellowpinkish legs. Landed on a low
hickory limb not two feet from my face. Looked at me ten seconds Then went
into, in a medium size tree doing a long high pitch series of single chip
notes.

Of course it not going to coordinate for a phone camera now.

Only book I have is a 25 yr Nat.Geog. Bird book. Can't find a photo
like it.Lost my sibleysbook and house owner is gone.

I never have seen a bird like this before. So I assume it's a passing
warbler stopping for the rain tonight. Thanks, Teresa, Hector, AR

Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
make it happen.

 

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Date: 4/21/18 4:28 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: unusual owl sighting
Great report, as usual.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 21, 2018, at 5:08 PM, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:
>
> Leif put out Mealworms in platform feeder today. Last thing I expected to see is juvenile Barred Owl wheeling unbalanced on the wire that holds the feeder. It only lasted a few minutes as the crows, 5 of them found it again. Round and round the trailer they chased that poor bird squawking all the way. But such an amusing sight? Pop up Summer Tanager,and a male RedStart Warbler, 3 Black and Whites, 1 Gnatcatcher, and 3 hummingbirds. And I had to duck as one pass ruffled my hair too. Owl wasnt happy, but it made my bird list a good one. And one unusual rodent sighting was a Vole sitting under the platform wondering what was going on too. Teresa, Hector, AR
>
> Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to make it happen.
 

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Date: 4/21/18 4:07 pm
From: <shalom...> <shalom...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-headed blackbird
Location?

On 4/21/2018 3:05 PM, Randy wrote:
> At Bald Knob right now 3:00pm
> Sent from my iPhone
>


 

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Date: 4/21/18 3:09 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: unusual owl sighting
Leif put out Mealworms in platform feeder today. Last thing I expected to
see is juvenile Barred Owl wheeling unbalanced on the wire that holds the
feeder. It only lasted a few minutes as the crows, 5 of them found it
again. Round and round the trailer they chased that poor bird squawking all
the way. But such an amusing sight? Pop up Summer Tanager,and a male
RedStart Warbler, 3 Black and Whites, 1 Gnatcatcher, and 3 hummingbirds.
And I had to duck as one pass ruffled my hair too. Owl wasnt happy, but it
made my bird list a good one. And one unusual rodent sighting was a Vole
sitting under the platform wondering what was going on too. Teresa, Hector,
AR

Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
make it happen.

 

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Date: 4/21/18 2:25 pm
From: Clarence Wilson <clarencetwilson...>
Subject: Humming Birds in Searcy
Greetings everyone. I just subscribed to the listserv ARBIRD. I am new
to the birding hobby. Started last summer. I put up my humming bird
feeder this afternoon about an hour ago. I have already observed a Ruby
Throated Humming Bird at the feeder.



Clarence Searcy


 

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Date: 4/21/18 2:08 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Long-billed Curlew
Earlier, I received a call from Michael Linz that Glenn Wyatt had seen a Long-billed Curlew near Morrilton. I talked with Glenn who gave me precise directions and stated that the bird had originally been found by Ron Duvall.

As of 4:07 the bird is still present, feeding in a very small puddle on the west side of HWY 113, south of Blackwell. The exact location is noted in the link below.


Dropped Pin
near 2756-2810 AR-113, Atkins, AR 72823


Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/21/18 2:02 pm
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton...>
Subject: Baltimore (?) Oriole
Within minutes of excitedly sending off a not to the list about the Rose-Breasted Grosbeak sighting earlier today, my wife checked her list and said, "It's about time for an Oriole sighting."


Sure enough, a few minutes after that, we spotted one in the back yard. The photo in Stokes leads me to believe it's a mature male Baltimore. He's more yellow than orange (like the Orchard) and the black head is very distinct. Stokes says there are distinct white markings on the wing. I'll look when he comes back.


Stacy Clanton

Northeast corner of Magnolia
 

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Date: 4/21/18 1:16 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-headed blackbird
Location?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 21, 2018, at 3:05 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:
>
> At Bald Knob right now 3:00pm
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/21/18 1:13 pm
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton...>
Subject: FOS a bit early rose-breasted Grosbeak.
Two males and a female at the breakfast room window mealworm cake and sunflower feeders. About a week earlier than previous years. They stayed around enjoying the food for almost 15 minutes. Sadly, they usually move on after a day or so.

Stacy Clanton
Northeast corner of Magnolia

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 4/21/18 1:05 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Yellow-headed blackbird
At Bald Knob right now 3:00pm
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/21/18 11:30 am
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Craighead Forest
Blackburnian Warbler and Cerulean Warbler

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 4/21/18 8:30 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: arrivals so far today
1 - Ovenbird in the usual arrival area
4 - RB Grosbeak (3 males + 1 female) at feeder

And a Barred Owl calling this morning

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 4/21/18 7:19 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: another first
Beautiful male Rose-breasted Grosbeak this morning, same date as last year.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 4/21/18 6:52 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: In other News
In an item of news I saw, the California government has acted to prevent
the extinction of the Tri-colored Blackbird. I have nothing but praise for
that.
Other states should do the same for their rare and endangered species. But
just think about That for a moment.
I'm sorry to have no links, but if you look I believe you will find it.

Bill Thurman

 

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Date: 4/20/18 7:36 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Arkansas River Valley
LaDonna and I birded the Morrilton and Atkins Bottoms on our way to Dardanelle today. Highlights were five Yellow-headed Blackbirds here https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44754244 and eight Swainson's Hawks here https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44761243

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle



Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/20/18 6:34 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Large Falcon
A Brownish Falcon with the eye slash mark sitting on the wire by the
prarire grasslands behind Bridgestone factory in Russellville. Was whitish
underneath with brown spots not the streaking that I am used to. Very
definitely spots.. It was sitting next to a Kestrel. So it was double the
size. My first thought was it was a Juvenile Peregrine because the eye
slash mark was very dark, very noticeable.

My gut,says that what it was. I was told there isn't ducks in that area.
However just a block down the road there is a pond in the woods. It was
heavy traffic and no shoulder to pull off the street. It was farther away
from the street closer to the woods when I drove back that way thirty
minutes later.

So I not sure what it was. I saw it between 2-3pm today. My day was hectic
or I would had reported it sooner. I apologise. Teresa, Hector, AR.

Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
make it happen.

 

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Date: 4/20/18 12:22 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Whimbrel
Saul’s fish farm Whimbrel present no Godwit yet
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/20/18 9:57 am
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Callie's Prairie/Woolsey Wet Prairie/UARK Experimental Farm
I visited the following sites this morning with Alyssa DeRubeis.

Callie's Prairie (Lake Fayetteville) - Sharp-shinned Hawk (2), White-eyed Vireo (1), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (5), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (4), Magnolia Warbler (1-FOS), Pine Warbler (2), Yellow-rumped Warbler (2), Yellow-throated Warbler (1), LeConte's Sparrow (1), Eastern Towhee (1), Summer Tanager (1), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1-FOS)

Woolsey Wet Prairie - Blue-winged Teal (6), Pied-billed Grebe (1), Wilson's Snipe (6), Solitary Sandpiper (3-FOS), Greater Yellowlegs (5), Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Pileated Woodpecker (1), Warbling Vireo (1-FOS), Bank Swallow (1), Sedge Wren (1), Common Yellowthroat (3-FOS), LeConte's Sparrow (1)

University of Arkansas Experimental Farm - Pied-billed Grebe (1), Upland Sandpiper (1), Yellow Warbler (1-FOS)


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/20/18 9:03 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Overflow NWR closed
Joe Tucker and I drove 3 hours today to Overflow NWR to see if we could find the Glossy Ibis. Such a big disappointment to find all the gates closed. I don't know why, the roads as far as we could see were dry. We tried going to the visitor's center but it also was locked up tight. I have been to that visitor's center 3 different times now and it has always been closed.  Lake Village here we come. Hope the Levee Road isn't locked.
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 4/20/18 7:29 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...>
Subject: follow-up on AMAV
When I retired in June 1990, JoAnne Rife gave me a Paul S. Erikssons The Bird Finders 3-Year Notebook. In the front she noted, An investment in retirement from JoAnne. This book is out of print, so after trial and error, I came up with my own similar book that I put together using what limited computer skills I had at that time. Now 28 years later I have lots of records, hopefully better ones as time moved on. JoAnne has influenced many people who are now birders, and those are now continuing to influence a new generation, as it should be.
I just now looked back at my bird records from 1991, the first year I really started to keep records of what I saw daily. ON APRIL 24, 1991, my records show "first sighting AM. Avocet at Crooked Creek ." So that nails down the first time Avocets were recorded here, thanks to John Brown. And, now Michele Williams Freed (former student and now is a top rated carver, mostly of birds) has joined the recorded history of Harrison's American Avocets. Michele notified local birders that the Avocets were once again on Harrison Lake (dammed up Crooked Creek in downtown Harrison, Boone Co., Arkansas) after 27 years.
And here I sit, in my nest in Birdsview Solarium, remembering times past, present and those to come. So many friends made through birding. JoAnne has made my life richer by far.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, Boone, AR


 

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Date: 4/20/18 7:24 am
From: Anna Lee Hudson <hudsonre...>
Subject: Hummingbird
FOS Ruby-throat finally found my feeder on the shore of Bull Shoals Lake,
the day after Orchard Oriole found the suet.
Who will show up tomorrow????
Bull Shoals, AR
 

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Date: 4/20/18 6:00 am
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Marbled Godwit
LaDonna and I spent a short time yesterday evening searching for shorebirds in Prairie County. We only found one pond with shorebirds, but it included Marbled Godwit, American Avocet and Black-necked Stilt. Full list below.

eBird Checklist – Saul's Fish Farm--West Unit, Prairie County, Arkansas, US – Thu Apr 19, 2018 – 28 species


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eBird Checklist – Saul's Fish Farm--West Unit, Prairie County, Arkansas,...


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Kenny NicholsCabot, AR
 

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Date: 4/20/18 4:59 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: UPLAND SANDPIPERS AND TIMELESS REALITY
American Golden-Plovers and Upland Sandpipers were abundant in expansive, open, fields in Osage Hills of northeastern Oklahoma yesterday. Joe Woolbright and I drove over to The Nature Conservancys Tallgrass Prairie Preserve north of Pawhuska and spent a day birding with the Preserves founding director, photographer Harvey Payne.

The Preserve encompasses something like 40,000 acres, so call our trip an informal windshield sample of spring shorebird passage through this southern portion of the Great Plains: easily 500 golden-plovers and over 100 Upland Sandpipers, plus Killdeer and Greater Yellowlegs, all walking the short green, along with free-roaming Bison and this springs crop of golden calves.

Harvey guided us off the main county road, through a gate and fields with more Upland Sandpipers, plus American Pipits, Lark, Savannah, and Vesper Sparrows. Past fields and up a low hill to a small clearing in rugged, rocky Crosstimbers hardwood forest. Here is the sandstone cabin that was home to naturalist and writer John Joseph Mathews, among whose writings are wildlife adventures in Talking to the Moon (1945). Reviewers have called this Walden of the plains and prairies.

It really doesnt take long to settle into the spirit of the place. Upland Sandpipers much as Mathews would have seen them. Several Bewicks Wrens the richly brown form that has disappeared from most of the eastern US including Arkansas, where it is now rare singing; his dooryard wrens. We spotted nine sparrow species of which Harriss was most numerous; more timeless yard birds. Eastern Bluebirds, so brilliant in open Crosstimbers. Probably would have been no different than a sunny spring day 80 years ago.

Out again on the main road, I was thinking about Mathews and Talking to the Moon. Specifically how his life maybe is a symphony for the enterprise called Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. The practical 2018 side of the Preserve is active management of a Bison herd, range habitat, and cattle. The spiritual side includes Osages, cowboys of the old Chapman-Barnard Ranch, and a naturalist-dreamer John Joseph Mathews.

Swainsons Hawk flew low over us and later we saw it or another perched on a rock ledge out in the prairie. Northern Harriers worked the fields with tall grass from last season. Rich, yellow Fringed Puccoons were blooming in the fields, along with Prairie Anemones white and blue, and a small but handsome white flower, Wedgeleaf Draba. The first Cliff Swallows have returned for nesting under bridges. There were Wilsons Snipe and Blue-winged Teal on a pond near Preserve headquarters and an American Bittern flew up from a small marsh.

Mathews was buried in the yard adjacent his sandstone cabin. And that would seem to be the end of things, but so much of what he cared about is actively nurtured by this expansive project, The Nature Conservancys Joseph H. Williams Tallgrass Prairie Preserve. He left us books and and perhaps more important, a life celebrating Tallgrass Prairie and passage of American Golden-Plovers and Upland Sandpipers.

Timeless reality, all that. We as todays sworn witnesses.


 

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Date: 4/19/18 10:24 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - April 19
It was partly cloudy, cool, and windy on the bird survey today. 73 species
were found. Lots of new migrants are in since last count. Here my list for
today:



Canada Goose - 3

Wood Duck - 13

Gadwall - 6

Mallard - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 83

Ring-necked Duck - 10

Hooded Merganser - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 16

Neotropic Cormorant - 4

Double-crested Cormorant - 5

Anhinga - 20

American Bittern - 6

Great-blue Heron - 11

Great Egret - 37

Green Heron - 1

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 3

Snowy Egret - 1

Little-blue Heron - 6

Black Vulture - 13

Turkey Vulture - 37

Northern Harrier - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

King Rail - 1

Virginia Rail - 1

Common Gallinule - 18

American Coot - 79

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Wilson's Snipe - 1

Rock Pigeon - 1

Mourning Dove - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Hairy Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 14

Bell's Vireo - 2

Yellow-throated Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 4

Tree Swallow - 27

Bank Swallow - 6

Cliff Swallow - 40

Barn Swallow - 11

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 4

Sedge Wren - 2

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 7

Cedar Waxwing - 10

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 27

Pine Warbler - 4

Prothonotary Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 6

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Northern Waterthrush - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 2

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 6

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 1

White-throated Sparrow - 3

White-crowned Sparrow - 6

Indigo Bunting - 1

Northern Cardinal - 15

Red-winged Blackbird - 28

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 2

Brown-headed Cowbird - 2





Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Orange Bluet

Common Green Darner

Common Baskettail

Slender Baskettail

Stillwater Clubtail

Eastern Pondhawk

Painted Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Blue Corporal

Black Saddlebags







Herps:



American Alligator

Missouri River Cooter

Broad-banded Watersnake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog - calling

Bullfrog - calling







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR












 

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Date: 4/19/18 9:39 am
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Chesney Prairie - White-faced Ibis and Hudsonian Godwit
I was at Chesney and Stump Prairies this morning with Alyssa DeRubeis.

A White-faced Ibis was seen briefly at a small pond in the south-western corner of Chesney Prairie (8am), before it was flushed. It then flew east over the prairie.

A Hudsonian Godwit in breeding plumage (possibly the same bird seen by Joe Neal at Centerton??) flew up from a wet pasture (along the eastern edge of Chesney) with 3 Greater Yellowlegs. Excellent views of the rusty belly, dark underwings and white rump patch as it flew west over the prairie (around 9:15am).

We checked several small ponds in the area but were unable to locate them after the initial sightings.

At least 6 (possibly more) Upland Sandpipers were feeding in a pasture along the access road and provided excellent views at very close range. Around 30 American Golden Plovers (fairly distant) were in a field east of the prairie. Other shorebirds included Baird's Sandpiper (1), Wilson's Snipe (4), Lesser Yellowlegs (5) and Greater Yellowlegs (30).

LeConte's Sparrows are still present, with at least 3 individuals seen.

Other species observed at Chesney included Blue-winged Teal (10), Northern Bobwhite (16), Eastern Kingbird (1-FOS), Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (8), Loggerhead Shrike (1), Tree Swallow (3), Barn Swallow (8), Cliff Swallow (4), Sedge Wren (2), Brown Thrasher (5), Yellow-rumped Warbler (4), Vesper Sparrow (1) and Lincoln's Sparrow (5).

Stump Prairie - Broad-winged Hawk (1), Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (6), White-eyed Vireo (1), Barn Swallow (5), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (1), Vesper Sparrow (1), Indigo Bunting (1-FOS), Great-tailed Grackle (2).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/19/18 8:45 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...>
Subject: FW: eBird Report - Lake Harrison, Apr 18, 2018 (AVOCETS)
Click on link below to see photos. I saw Avocets in this same area over 20 years ago. John Brown had spotted them, called JoAnne Rife, then she called me. All three of us had good looks at them I'm fortunate to have seen them twice in Harrison.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

-----Original Message-----
From: <ebird-checklist...> <ebird-checklist...>
Sent: Thursday, April 19, 2018 9:56 AM
To: <sjogibson...>
Subject: eBird Report - Lake Harrison, Apr 18, 2018

Lake Harrison, Boone, Arkansas, US
Apr 18, 2018 11:15 AM - 12:00 PM
Protocol: Stationary
Comments: Notified by a friend that American Avocets were on Lake Harrison, I went to the spot and took pictures. Some are attached. Sunny day with 14 mph wind.
1 species

American Avocet 1 9 American Avocets were photographed on Lake Harrison (pictures attached). Lake Harrison is actually part of Crooked Creek that has been dammed up with a weir in downtown Harrison, Boone Co., Arkansas. It includes concrete walking trails, kids playground, etc.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44720156

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

 

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Date: 4/19/18 2:38 am
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Re: A New Song (Pine Siskin?)
I have Siskins here on Mt. Magazine now. I normally have a wave of them this time of year.

Don

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 18, 2018, at 11:08 PM, George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> wrote:
>
> For the last two days I've been hearing and briefly seeing a bird I have not been able to identify around the yard. I've yet to get a good look at the bird, but it is warbler size, shape and behavior. It likes to lurk in the top of the budding oaks around the yard, then fly off into the taller pines behind the house (this is about 3 miles south of Cleveland in Conway County). It looks brownish, but it is remarkably hard to spot except when flying to a new perch.
>
> The song is distinctive and one I've never heard. Its kind of a raspy, rising warble. I went through a bunch of calls with the Audubon bird app and the closest I came was a Pine Siskin...except that the excerpt on the app included a bunch of other notes after the buzzy bit that this bird is definitely not making. Also, it looks like Pine Siskins should be further north by now...
>
> Any ideas?
>
> Thanks
>
> George (n. Conway Co. enjoying the dawn chorus).
 

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Date: 4/18/18 9:09 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: A New Song (Pine Siskin?)
For the last two days I've been hearing and briefly seeing a bird I have
not been able to identify around the yard.  I've yet to get a good look
at the bird, but it is warbler size, shape and behavior.  It likes to
lurk in the top of the budding oaks around the yard, then fly off into
the taller pines behind the house (this is about 3 miles south of
Cleveland in Conway County).  It looks brownish, but it is remarkably
hard to spot except when flying to a new perch.

The song is distinctive and one I've never heard.  Its kind of a raspy,
rising warble.  I went through a bunch of calls with the Audubon bird
app and the closest I came was a Pine Siskin...except that the excerpt
on the app included a bunch of other notes after the buzzy bit that this
bird is definitely not making.  Also, it looks like Pine Siskins should
be further north by now...

Any ideas?

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co. enjoying the dawn chorus).
 

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Date: 4/18/18 4:32 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: FOS Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Male--a stunner, of course.  And hummingbirds in numbers more like fall
migration than spring!

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

 

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Date: 4/18/18 2:48 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: For those who have asked about ONSC
I have had questions from several ARBIRD subscribers about ONSC (the Ozark Natural Science Center) the local winter stomping ground of the Northern Saw-whet Owl.  Here is a way to learn more:

ONSC officially has a new website. Check it out! www.onsc.us

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Ozark Natural Science Center Home

ONSC is the place for learning about the NW Arkansas environment
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Happy spring birding!
Joanie


 

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Date: 4/18/18 1:17 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA April Field Trip this Saturday
This Saturday is the ASCA field trip to Craighead Forest Park.  We are chasing migrating warblers which is why we have to leave so early.  We want to get to the park while they are still active.  Below are additional details.  They are predicting the rain won't come in until Saturday night.  It will be a fairly cool day with morning temperatures in the low 50s.  We will start birding at the softball field on Access Road 6, just off Forest Park Loop Road.  At the bottom of Access Rd. 6 is a bathroom you can stop at before you start birding.  There are also bathrooms at the bottom of Access Rd. 5 at the Rotary Centennial Playground.  Please drive slowly on the Forest Loop Park Rd.  A March of Dimes Walkathon is being held that morning and a lot of people will be walking the loop road.  You are welcome to call me if you can't locate us in the park.  My cell is 501.920.3256.  We should be back to Little Rock by 4:00 p.m.
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator

April 21Craighead Forest Park & Crowley’s Ridge NatureCenterJonesboro, Craighead Co. Meet at 6:00 a.m.in North Little Rock on the east side of the Other Center parking lot behindMcDonald’s.  The Other Center is locatedacross from McCain Mall, on McCain Blvd. Take Exit 1 West, off Hwy. 67/167. We’ll arrive at Craighead Forest Park around 8:15 a.m. for those whowant to meet us there.  Experience the 200-mile Crowley’sRidge, a unique piece of North American topography.  The combination of wooded areas, a lake, andopen fields provides a variety of habitats which attract an eclectic mix ofbirds such as migrating warblers, tanagers, grosbeaks, vireos, andflycatchers.  We’ll also walk the NatureCenter’s trail and check their colorful blooming gardens, whichattract numerous butterflies and other insects.  Moderate walking will be on dirt and pavedtrails.  Bathrooms are available in the Park at Centennial RotaryPark at the end of Access Rd. #5 and also at the Nature Center.  This will be an all-day trip.  Bring water, snacks, plus lunch if you want to picnic in the park.  There are several nearby restaurants in Jonesboro.  Directions—from North Little Rock take US67/167 north 100 miles to Exit 102, then go east on Hwy. 226 for 30 miles, then4 miles east on I-49.  Exit right atChristian Valley Rd.  Go 2 miles on Lawson Rd. toCulberhouse St. and turn left.  Go 1 mileand turn right onto Forest Park Dr.  GPScoordinates for the Park are 35.774865, -90.702296.  It is a two-hour drive from North LittleRock.

 
 

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Date: 4/18/18 12:19 pm
From: Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...>
Subject: FOS-Prothonotary Warbler
I saw a prothonotary warbler today while out planting trees in a bottomland
hardwood forest near Dermott. We heard several more but didn't have time to
search.



Ethan Massey
Program Technician
School of Forestry and Natural Resources
P.O. Box 3468
University of Arkansas at Monticello
Monticello, AR 71656
Office: (870) 460-1848
Cell: (601) 618-6789
<mailto:<masseyer...> <masseyer...>






 

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Date: 4/18/18 12:01 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: HUDSONIAN GODWIT AT CRAIG STATE FISH HATCHERY, CENTERTON
The modest cool front that came in last night seems to have stalled northward migration, at least somewhat. I went up to Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton this morning. I saw an Osprey while I was driving in. There were no extensive mudflats associated with drained fish ponds, but one pond just west of the main entrance building had a pretty wide exposed muddy edge (hatchery may be draining this pond, so worth checking). Most of the shorebirds were on the edges of this pond. These included Semipalmated Plover (1), Killdeer (2), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Spotted Sandpiper (3, all on edges of other ponds), Hudsonian Godwit (1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1), Least Sandpiper (7), Bairds Sandpiper (3), Pectoral Sandpiper (2), Wilsons Snipe (3, not at this pond). One of the Canada Goose pairs had a fuzzy, recently hatched chick. Ducks included: Mallard (1), Blue-winged Teal (4), Northern Shoveler (6), Lesser Scaup (3), Red-breasted Merganser (8).


 

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Date: 4/18/18 11:48 am
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Bufflehead Bay
Two bright male Summer Tanagers, an Orchard Oriole and a Swainson’s Thrush were seen at Bufflehead Bay trail on Lake Maumelle this morning. The Swainson’s was very close to the entrance, the others farther toward the lake.

Another Swainson’s Thrush was found at Lake Sylvia as well as a beautiful Scarlet Tanager.

Ed Laster
Little Rock
 

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Date: 4/18/18 9:58 am
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: FOS and other news
I have noticed the same thing with goldfinches as you have with pine
siskins. My goldfinches are hanging around, all males have their summer
colors, and I've had numerous hummingbirds for several weeks now. Usually
there's not this much overlap.

On Wed, Apr 18, 2018 at 11:51 AM, Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
wrote:

> A beautiful Indigo Bunting showed up today! Can my Summer Tananger be far
> behind? I still have many, many Pine Siskins here, really late for them.
> This is the first time I've had finch feeders and hummer feeders up at the
> same time. Seems unusual. I also apprear to be running an avian nursery.
> I have 5 bluebird hatchlings, 5 chickadee eggs ( the most I've ever seen),
> 3 Eastern Phoebe eggs, and unknown wren eggs. I'm loving all of it! Mom
> Phoebe built her next right in front of my kitchen window, maybe 4 feet
> away. She's starting to get used to us being there but is still a bit
> skittish. Mom Chickadee scolds me something fierce whenever I'm outside!
> By the way, her nest is on the same brick column as phoebe's nest. Hope
> everyone's enjoying the birds too!
>
> --
> Dorothy Cooney
> Wickes, AR
>

 

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Date: 4/18/18 9:52 am
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
Subject: FOS and other news
A beautiful Indigo Bunting showed up today! Can my Summer Tananger be far
behind? I still have many, many Pine Siskins here, really late for them.
This is the first time I've had finch feeders and hummer feeders up at the
same time. Seems unusual. I also apprear to be running an avian nursery.
I have 5 bluebird hatchlings, 5 chickadee eggs ( the most I've ever seen),
3 Eastern Phoebe eggs, and unknown wren eggs. I'm loving all of it! Mom
Phoebe built her next right in front of my kitchen window, maybe 4 feet
away. She's starting to get used to us being there but is still a bit
skittish. Mom Chickadee scolds me something fierce whenever I'm outside!
By the way, her nest is on the same brick column as phoebe's nest. Hope
everyone's enjoying the birds too!

--
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR

 

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Date: 4/18/18 7:53 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: new arrival
The first of season Blue-winged Warbler was singing here this morning.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 4/18/18 7:32 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
Harriet,

Not sure if you received my reply.

Have you checked out recordings for Southern Flying Squirrel? We have heard them here during the night in spring. Mating season, territorial.
Chipmunks only do this in the daytime.

Try google to find a good recording and compare.

Judith
Ninestone
On Apr 18, 2018, at 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:

> Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.
>
> On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.
>
> On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.
>
> Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).
>
> If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.
>
> Harriet Jansma
> Fayetteville


 

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Date: 4/18/18 7:10 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
The odd thing is that the sound doesn't seem to indicate alarm. It's just constant.

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 7:12:45 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery

Might it be a Northern Cardinal distraught, perhaps at the loss of its mate, and calling incessantly for it?

Or I wonder if it might be a frog or toad?

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 18, 2018, at 7:07 AM, David Ray <cardcards...><mailto:<cardcards...>> wrote:

Robins and Mockingbirds are notorious for predawn singing.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 18, 2018, at 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...><mailto:<hjansma...>> wrote:


Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.


On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.


On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.


Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).


If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.


Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

 

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Date: 4/18/18 7:09 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
This is from dusk to dawn; so we thought of this and rejected it.

________________________________
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 7:07:25 AM
To: Harriet Hillis Jansma
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery

Robins and Mockingbirds are notorious for predawn singing.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 18, 2018, at 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...><mailto:<hjansma...>> wrote:


Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.


On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.


On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.


Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).


If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.


Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

 

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Date: 4/18/18 7:07 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
We do have a lot of chipmunks, and a few small frogs (tree frogs, and once in our small pool even a bullfrog!) in that area from time to time. So either is possible.


Thanks.

Harriet

________________________________
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 8:26:25 AM
To: Harriet Hillis Jansma
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery

A chipmunk?

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 18, 2018, at 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...><mailto:<hjansma...>> wrote:


Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.


On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.


On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.


Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).


If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.


Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

 

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Date: 4/18/18 7:07 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: FOS Great Crested Flycatcher
I just heard my FOS Great Crested Flycatcher at my house. Over the years,
I've realized that they arrive about the same time as the running of the
Arkansas Derby (horse race), which was this past weekend.



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR


 

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Date: 4/18/18 6:26 am
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
A chipmunk?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 18, 2018, at 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:
>
> Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.
>
> On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.
>
> On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.
>
> Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).
>
> If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.
>
> Harriet Jansma
> Fayetteville

 

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Date: 4/18/18 6:11 am
From: David Luneau <mdluneau...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
Or a Bird-voiced Treefrog:
http://arkansasfrogsandtoads.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/bird_voice.wav.



M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.

Associate Professor of Electronics

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

2801 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Mason
Sent: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 7:58 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] a bird mystery



already mentioned I believe but maybe an american toad?
http://www.herpsofarkansas.com/wiki/uploads/Frog/AnaxyrusAmericanus/DS300044
.mp3

On 4/18/2018 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma wrote:

Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but
I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and
can help.



On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a
generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never
stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it
in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight
lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had
to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we
couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.



On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our
house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville).
So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.



Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to
sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a
song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).



If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird
is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us
know.



Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville







<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campai
gn=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon>

Virus-free.
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Date: 4/18/18 6:06 am
From: Billy Jeter <000000779632af60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
Frog?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 18, 2018, at 7:12 AM, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>
> Might it be a Northern Cardinal distraught, perhaps at the loss of it’s mate, and calling incessantly for it?
>
> Or I wonder if it might be a frog or toad?
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Apr 18, 2018, at 7:07 AM, David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:
>>
>> Robins and Mockingbirds are notorious for predawn singing.
>> David Ray
>> NLR
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Apr 18, 2018, at 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.
>>>
>>> On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.
>>>
>>> On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.
>>>
>>> Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).
>>>
>>> If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.
>>>
>>> Harriet Jansma
>>> Fayetteville

 

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Date: 4/18/18 5:58 am
From: twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
Harriet, 
Try finding a playback of a Chipmunk on your computer. Possible this might be what you're hearing.
Terry Butler 


Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2
-------- Original message --------From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Date: 4/18/18 5:25 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: a bird mystery


Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.



On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to
find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight,
it stopped and presumably went away.



On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville).  So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.



Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep.  It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).



If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.



Harriet Jansma
Fayetteville



 

Back to top
Date: 4/18/18 5:58 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
already mentioned I believe but maybe an american toad?
http://www.herpsofarkansas.com/wiki/uploads/Frog/AnaxyrusAmericanus/DS300044.mp3

On 4/18/2018 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma wrote:
>
> Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us
> solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a
> similar experience and can help.
>
>
> On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping
> -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and
> monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in
> vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it
> stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for
> that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to
> sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it.
> By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.
>
>
> On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill
> (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in
> Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not
> trapped.
>
>
> Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs
> to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is
> not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).
>
>
> If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the
> bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise,
> let us know.
>
>
> Harriet Jansma
>
> Fayetteville
>



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

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Date: 4/18/18 5:56 am
From: Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
I too wonder if it’s a frog or toad, the calling behavior is a little similar.

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/

> On Apr 18, 2018, at 7:12 AM, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>
> Might it be a Northern Cardinal distraught, perhaps at the loss of it’s mate, and calling incessantly for it?
>
> Or I wonder if it might be a frog or toad?
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Apr 18, 2018, at 7:07 AM, David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:
>>
>> Robins and Mockingbirds are notorious for predawn singing.
>> David Ray
>> NLR
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Apr 18, 2018, at 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.
>>>
>>> On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.
>>>
>>> On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.
>>>
>>> Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).
>>>
>>> If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.
>>>
>>> Harriet Jansma
>>> Fayetteville

 

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Date: 4/18/18 5:27 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Mini fallout
Just now I had an Orange-crowned Warbler, House Wren, two Lincoln's
Sparrows, Swainson's Thrush, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and the regulars in my
tiny yard here in FS.
That was the best.

Sandy

 

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Date: 4/18/18 5:13 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
Might it be a Northern Cardinal distraught, perhaps at the loss of it’s mate, and calling incessantly for it?

Or I wonder if it might be a frog or toad?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 18, 2018, at 7:07 AM, David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:
>
> Robins and Mockingbirds are notorious for predawn singing.
> David Ray
> NLR
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Apr 18, 2018, at 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:
>>
>> Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.
>>
>> On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.
>>
>> On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.
>>
>> Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).
>>
>> If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.
>>
>> Harriet Jansma
>> Fayetteville

 

Back to top
Date: 4/18/18 5:07 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: a bird mystery
Robins and Mockingbirds are notorious for predawn singing.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 18, 2018, at 5:25 AM, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:
>
> Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.
>
> On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.
>
> On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.
>
> Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).
>
> If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.
>
> Harriet Jansma
> Fayetteville

 

Back to top
Date: 4/18/18 3:26 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: a bird mystery
Here's a mystery that it may be impossible for anyone to help us solve, but I'll mention it anyway in case any of you have had a similar experience and can help.


On Sat. night, just outside our bedroom window, a bird began chirping -- a generic bird chirp that was constant, high-pitched, and monotonous. It never stopped. We thought it might be trapped in vegetation and tried to find it in the dark, without success (it stopped chirping when the flashlight lighted the area, but only for that short time). It was so loud that we had to wear earplugs to sleep. At dawn, it was still going -- but still, we couldn't find it. By full daylight, it stopped and presumably went away.


On Sun. night, we heard it up behind the house, somewhere on our hill (our house lot is on a steeply sloped part of Mount Sequoyah in Fayetteville). So, we thought, the bird must be OK -- or at least not trapped.


Last night, it was back near our windows, and we had to use earplugs to sleep. It is still chirping as I write at half past 5 am. This is not a song, but a fast, high chirp (not like a call of alarm).


If you have had such an experience and can help us figure out why the bird is doing this and/or what bird might make such a constant noise, let us know.


Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

 

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Date: 4/17/18 3:15 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bell Slough
Spent some time at Bell Slough today.  The highlights for me were a Yellow Warbler and a Kentucky Warbler.  Other than that were the regular cast of birds.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 4/17/18 3:13 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOS Dickcissel
We were surprised to see our first of the season Dickcissel today, right in our very own back yard, eating sunflower seeds.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 4/17/18 12:10 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: BROAD-WINGED HAWK NESTING IN FAYETTEVILLE
Joe,
This is fantastic!!!
J

On Apr 17, 2018, at 8:56 AM, "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal...> wrote:

> A Broad-winged Hawk was in my yard on April 7, around a week after folks like Mitchell Pruitt started seeing them around town. It was perched in a Post Oak along my driveway. Broad-wings were in my yard last year, too, and since they were present all last summer, I assumed they had nested somewhere near.
>
> It hardly seems right to have a magnificent forest hawk nesting a block off College Avenue in ever-expanding Fayetteville. I am probably not the only person in the Arkansas birding community who associates Broad-winged Hawks with the big woods, like Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, Devil's Den State Park, Ozark National Forest and Buffalo National River. Thats why in 2013 I was surprised when they nested in the Caulks woodlot on Mt Sequoyah in Fayetteville. And I assumed last summers neighborhood Broad-wings was a one-time thing.
>
> Yet, there is now quite a bit of data about how some species react to North Americas increasing suburbanization. If this is of interest, I encourage you to check out John M. Marzluffs book, Welcome to subirdia (2014). Subtitle, Sharing our neighborhoods with wrens, robins, woodpeckers, and other wildlife and Broad-winged Hawks. Non-technical. You dont have to be a stats wiz to appreciate this book.
>
> When I walked up the drive this morning to get my newspaper, a small hawk flew right over my head, then up into the top of a Cottonwood, where it mounted another hawk both Broad-wings. The male flew off after copulation, so I was able to follow the female who was collecting sticks in a neighbors Post Oak and flying into a woodlot in my yard where there was a partially-completed nest on a tall Black Locust.
>
> Welcome to subirdia, indeed.
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 4/17/18 8:58 am
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: WHITE-FACED IBIS IN PINE BLUFF
This morning, Doc George and I observed and photographed 9 White-faced Ibis in fresh breeding plumage at close range. They were foraging in a water-filled section of a field alongside Wilbur West Rd. in Pine Bluff, just immediately west of the bridge that crosses Bayou Bartholomew on the west end of Wilbur West. They were oblivious to our presence, which allowed us to obtain very nice photos of this magnificent bird, until a very loud pickup truck roared by causing them to take flight, never to return. Other birds foraging with them included 3 Am. Golden Plovers, flocks of Greater and Lesser Yellow Legs and Pectoral Sandpipers.
John Redman
 

Back to top
Date: 4/17/18 6:58 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BROAD-WINGED HAWK NESTING IN FAYETTEVILLE
A Broad-winged Hawk was in my yard on April 7, around a week after folks like Mitchell Pruitt started seeing them around town. It was perched in a Post Oak along my driveway. Broad-wings were in my yard last year, too, and since they were present all last summer, I assumed they had nested somewhere near.

It hardly seems right to have a magnificent forest hawk nesting a block off College Avenue in ever-expanding Fayetteville. I am probably not the only person in the Arkansas birding community who associates Broad-winged Hawks with the big woods, like Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, Devil's Den State Park, Ozark National Forest and Buffalo National River. Thats why in 2013 I was surprised when they nested in the Caulks woodlot on Mt Sequoyah in Fayetteville. And I assumed last summers neighborhood Broad-wings was a one-time thing.

Yet, there is now quite a bit of data about how some species react to North Americas increasing suburbanization. If this is of interest, I encourage you to check out John M. Marzluffs book, Welcome to subirdia (2014). Subtitle, Sharing our neighborhoods with wrens, robins, woodpeckers, and other wildlife and Broad-winged Hawks. Non-technical. You dont have to be a stats wiz to appreciate this book.

When I walked up the drive this morning to get my newspaper, a small hawk flew right over my head, then up into the top of a Cottonwood, where it mounted another hawk both Broad-wings. The male flew off after copulation, so I was able to follow the female who was collecting sticks in a neighbors Post Oak and flying into a woodlot in my yard where there was a partially-completed nest on a tall Black Locust.

Welcome to subirdia, indeed.


 

Back to top
Date: 4/17/18 5:16 am
From: Jacob Wessels <jacoblwessels...>
Subject: Re: Atypical Chipping Sparrow vocalizations
Could it have been a Lark Sparrow? Their song alternates bubbly sections
and trills.


Jacob Wessels

On Tue, Apr 17, 2018, 7:09 AM Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:

> I’d suggest two possibilities, assuming your visual ID is correct: an
> inexperienced (1st breeding year male) or a singing female (some do in many
> species, I’m learning).
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Apr 17, 2018, at 5:29 AM, Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:
>
> I had a very unusual encounter with a Chipping Sparrow late on Saturday
> afternoon. I was busy unloading mulch out of my vehicle when I started
> hearing a bird singing an unfamiliar song, at least mostly unfamiliar. It
> was bubbly and somewhat quiet, and then would go into a short trill.
> Sometimes more of the bubbly part after the trill. The first part was
> somewhat reminiscent of a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (without any buzzy sounds)
> or a Ruby-crowned Kinglet. The trilling blended in with the other part,
> and did not immediately make me think Chipping Sparrow. Fortunately I had
> bins in the car and gave it the best glassing I could. It was about 25
> feet up in the top of a tree, and it was overcast. Bird was clear-breasted
> with a Rufous cap and dark eyeline, and almost white eyebrow. It sure
> looked every bit like a CHSP. I'm driving my cats crazy with playing every
> recording of a CHSP that I can find. Has anyone else had a similar
> experience? It was not a Tree Sparrow or a Field Sparrow, and didn't sound
> like either. I wish I had run in and grabbed a voice recorder.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, in the great Northwest
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/17/18 5:09 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Atypical Chipping Sparrow vocalizations
I’d suggest two possibilities, assuming your visual ID is correct: an inexperienced (1st breeding year male) or a singing female (some do in many species, I’m learning).

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 17, 2018, at 5:29 AM, Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:
>
> I had a very unusual encounter with a Chipping Sparrow late on Saturday afternoon. I was busy unloading mulch out of my vehicle when I started hearing a bird singing an unfamiliar song, at least mostly unfamiliar. It was bubbly and somewhat quiet, and then would go into a short trill. Sometimes more of the bubbly part after the trill. The first part was somewhat reminiscent of a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (without any buzzy sounds) or a Ruby-crowned Kinglet. The trilling blended in with the other part, and did not immediately make me think Chipping Sparrow. Fortunately I had bins in the car and gave it the best glassing I could. It was about 25 feet up in the top of a tree, and it was overcast. Bird was clear-breasted with a Rufous cap and dark eyeline, and almost white eyebrow. It sure looked every bit like a CHSP. I'm driving my cats crazy with playing every recording of a CHSP that I can find. Has anyone else had a similar experience? It was not a Tree Sparrow or a Field Sparrow, and didn't sound like either. I wish I had run in and grabbed a voice recorder.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, in the great Northwest

 

Back to top
Date: 4/17/18 3:29 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Atypical Chipping Sparrow vocalizations
I had a very unusual encounter with a Chipping Sparrow late on Saturday
afternoon. I was busy unloading mulch out of my vehicle when I started
hearing a bird singing an unfamiliar song, at least mostly unfamiliar. It
was bubbly and somewhat quiet, and then would go into a short trill.
Sometimes more of the bubbly part after the trill. The first part was
somewhat reminiscent of a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (without any buzzy sounds)
or a Ruby-crowned Kinglet. The trilling blended in with the other part,
and did not immediately make me think Chipping Sparrow. Fortunately I had
bins in the car and gave it the best glassing I could. It was about 25
feet up in the top of a tree, and it was overcast. Bird was clear-breasted
with a Rufous cap and dark eyeline, and almost white eyebrow. It sure
looked every bit like a CHSP. I'm driving my cats crazy with playing every
recording of a CHSP that I can find. Has anyone else had a similar
experience? It was not a Tree Sparrow or a Field Sparrow, and didn't sound
like either. I wish I had run in and grabbed a voice recorder.

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the great Northwest

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 5:32 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SHOREBIRDY DAY AT FROG
If you have any time to get out birding, right now would be a good time to visit Frog Bayou WMA in the Arkansas River Valley. Frog got a good rain last Friday (2.25 inches). Arkansas Game and Fish personnel have been using a big drum chopper to improve soil conditions. The chopper is a big roller with teeth that breaks up vegetation and stirs up the soil. The result is high quality habitat that today was heavily used by shorebirds, ducks, herons and egrets.

Most of the shorebirds (500+, maybe 1000) were legs, primarily Greater Yellowlegs. Besides Lesser Yellowlegs: American Golden-Plover (41), Solitary Sandpiper (1), Least Sandpiper, Bairds Sandpiper (4), Pectoral Sandpiper (~100), Long-billed Dowitcher (9). In addition, Blue-winged Teal (at least 400), Northern Shoveler (20), a few Mallards, and American Coots (~50). I saw most of these in Unit 3, just a short walk from the parking area, but there were also lots of birds in Units 1 and 2.

For herons and egrets: Great Egret 50-100 (I was unsure about double-counting), Snowy Egret (10), Little Blue Heron (3), Cattle Egret (1).

A Peregrine Falcon was chasing shorebirds across fields along Sharp Chapel Road (near Unit 7). Later, I saw a Peregrine make a run at ducks and shorebirds in Unit 3. Also: Bald Eagle (1 adult, 1 3rd year), Northern Harrier (2).


 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 10:21 am
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: Finding out-of-state birding locations and birders.
Greetings all,
I tend to be intense when it comes to trip planning. I easily spend more time planning a trip then on the trip. I can then maximize my birding time in a new spot.

I use 3 methods for planning bird trips to other locations.

1) eBird:
www.ebird.org Then click "explore". Then choose "explore a region" "explore hotspots" "species maps" or "bar charts"
Good for finding birding hot spots and ranges of individual birds.

2) American Birding Association, listservers:
www.aba.org Then click "news & features" Then click "birding news" Then click on the place you want see.
You won't be able to post a message to the listserver but can you can see detailed, current messages from the world. So instead of wading through thousands of emails you can choose which ones interest you.

3) Birding Pals:
www.birdingpal.com A neat way of finding birders anywhere in the world.

Cheers, Leif at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 7:32 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Birds
Saw FOS Cattle Egrets yesterday in north White county. Had my first Blue
Grosbeak at my feeder this morning. Of interest to me yesterday evening
with the cold wind I was walking over a large rise in a field, on the side
away from the wind, from the ground about 15 Scissor-tailed flycatchers and
three Eastern Kingbirds flew up from a 30 foot area. Lots of flycatchers
for this early in the season.

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 4/16/18 6:22 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Kyle Hawley
eBird does not give out email addresses. When traveling it is best to
subscribe to the states listserv ahead of time to request assistance and
keep tabs on recent sightings. Or contact a local birding group. Also
familiarize yourself with the hotspots of the area youll be birding so you
know which are appropriate to use.

For Arkansas eBirders, I can pass on messages but I wont give out
addresses. It helps if you give me a link to a persons checklist so I can
easily lookup their info.

On a related note, if you merely want to indicate that a photo is
misidentified, rather than tell me about it, click on the flag icon next to
the photo and indicate your reason for flagging it with comments. That sends
it to my review queue.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 4/16/18, 12:07 AM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
laura davis" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of
<000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> wrote:


I often wonder that as well how i could connect with someone on EBIRD? To
get info on a sighting or when i travel out of state or country and need
info on a sighting. Does anyone have any tips?
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
<https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/mobile/?.src=Android>


>
>
> On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 11:14 AM, Daniel Mason
> <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Is Kyle Hawley in this group? He Ebirds the same town I do and sometimes
> I want to contact him and ask a question. Saw a report from yesterday
> of a bittern at city lake in Siloam Springs and I was debating on
> looking for it. A few good areas to look at and was hoping for some
> direction to save time. :) Saw one there last year so I'll check the
> same area. Tried to help my daughter another day last year and we didn't
> find it again... thought maybe we heard it a time or two but our ears
> may have been playing tricks on us. My daughter still wants that on her
> life list. We'll see if I can drag her out there. She's become soft when
> it comes to birding in cooler weather.
>
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>
>



 

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Date: 4/15/18 10:07 pm
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Kyle Hawley

I often wonder that as well how i could connect with someone on EBIRD? To get info on a sighting or when i travel out of state or country and need info on a sighting. Does anyone have any tips?
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 11:14 AM, Daniel Mason<millipede1977...> wrote: Is Kyle Hawley in this group? He Ebirds the same town I do and sometimes
I want to contact him and ask a question.  Saw a report from yesterday
of a bittern at city lake in Siloam Springs and I was debating on
looking for it. A few good areas to look at and was hoping for some
direction to save time. :)   Saw one there last year so I'll check the
same area. Tried to help my daughter another day last year and we didn't
find it again... thought maybe we heard it a time or two but our ears
may have been playing tricks on us.  My daughter still wants that on her
life list. We'll see if I can drag her out there. She's become soft when
it comes to birding in cooler weather.


Daniel Mason


---
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https://www.avast.com/antivirus


 

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Date: 4/15/18 5:51 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOS Orchard Oriole
We had our FOS Orchard Oriole, a first year male, visit the yard briefly today. Male Summer Tanager continued at the suet Feeders. Hummingbirds very busy int he cold, windy weather. Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 4/15/18 5:37 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Multiple sightings
Yesterday here in the river valley, at three different sites, Bill Beall,
Joe Neal, Karen McGee and I, all saw Peregrine Falcons. A wave of
shorebirds brings a wave of Peregrine Falcons. I think it's pretty neat. I
imagine the shorebirds don't share my sentiment.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 4/15/18 4:19 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Centerton Fish hatchery today( Sunday)
I went by the Centerton fish hatchery around 10 AM today and there was almost nothing there. It was still close to freezing and blustery, the ponds had whitecaps. I did not go up on the hill on the west side to check out the big pond up there. I can’t see anything when there are freezing tears in my eyes.

What I did see was about 30 Sparrows, they were up and down in the grass before I could get a proper ID, 1 Gull which I will assume was a Ring-blled, Killdeer, 1 Great Blue Heron, 3 pairs of Canada Geese one was on a nest, 1 Red-winged Blackbird, 1 Mockingbird, 10 Barn Swallows , and 2 Rough-winged swallows. The Swallows were mostly huddling on the gravel rd by the pond closest to the cattails. I don’t think they are equipped well to walk. They were fluffed up like tennis balls and hop-waddling toward one another and trying to tuck in their heads and snuggle with other birds to get out of the wind. There are currently no ponds that have been drawn down.

Last Thursday there were Blue-winged Teal, Shovelers, Ring-necked Ducks, Mallards, 1 Pied-billed Grebe, Coots, these were mostly in the ponds up the hill. Shorebirds that included 2 of both Yellowlegs,1 Spotted Sandpiper, 5 Pectoral Sandpipers, 12 Least Sandpipers, and 1 Pipit. These were in one of the smaller ponds by the front fence. It has water in it now but that could be more from the rains than from intentionally being filled. I did not find any Snipe that day which surprised me. There was also 1 Great Egret moving around.

Thursday after the hatchery I went to Lowe’s and came back in past the hatchery, this would have been more than a hour later than my previous visit. A flock of about a dozen larger shorebirds flew across the road in front of my car and landed in taller grass on the north side of the road. They reminded me of Plovers but I couldn’t see them when I turned around to try and ID them. I also saw a Great-tailed Grackle fly across Shell road that day.


Jacque Brown, Centerton



> Begin forwarded message:
>
> From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...>
> Subject: RE: Nesting Mourning Dove. etc
> Date: April 15, 2018 at 9:31:32 AM CDT
> To: 'Jacque Brown' <bluebird2...>
>
> Hi, Jacque,
> I admit that I miss going to the AAS meetings, seeing all my birding friends and the birds seen on field trips.
> One of my favorite places to visit is the Centerton fish ponds and birds that show up there. Hope y'all see lots of migrants and all the regulars, too.
> Sally Jo
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> On Behalf Of Jacque Brown
> Sent: Sunday, April 15, 2018 8:18 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Nesting Mourning Dove. etc
>
> Hi All,
>
> I’ve been doing a big home improvement job that I started in February and I’m trying to get done before the AAS meeting. I have not been out birding at all so far except one for trip to the Hatchery last Thursday. I’m planning a trip over there today.
>
> However, this has not prevented me from taking backyard bird breaks.
>
> I have three nests so far.
>
> Some folks know I built an arbor in the backyard and hang pieces of driftwood from it as feeders. Three are kind of trough shaped. One is more bowl shaped. I was going out to fill the feeders last weekend when the cold came in and noticed a Mourning Dove has built her nest in the bowl shaped piece of driftwood. To say the least I did not put any food out in the back yard, I tossed it in the front yard.
>
> She has laid low all week, except for turning her eggs and repositioning herself I haven’t seen her move much, actually I haven’t seen her do that but once. I look out there occasionally and he is just facing a different direction. I am not seeing another dove around that would be her mate although I can’t watch all day. I can’t wait for chicks hatch as I’ll be able to see them from the porch.
>
>
> Also, Brown Thrashers have taken up in the Native Honeysuckle again this year. They are both out and about the in the yard all day. Last year there were three species that used that Honeysuckle bush over the course of the Summer. Brown Thrashers, Cardinals, and Catbirds.
>
> I have a high-rise Robins nest in the Weeping Cherry in the front yard. The way the tree branches are more vertical than horizontal the nest was built between three branches and must be 6 or 8 inches from base to rim.
>
> I’m also seeing White-throated, White-crowned, and House Sparrows plus Dark-eyed Juncos, Cardinals, Blue Jays, Titmice, Chickadees, Common Grackles, Starlings, and a Red-bellied Woodpecker.
>
> I have kept Hummer food out since I had my Rufous for a few weeks last December. I haven’t seen any yet this Spring.
>
>
> I’m looking forward to meeting people at the Fish Hatchery for the AAS Field trips on the 27 th and 28 th hopefully some great birds will blow in by then.
>


 

Back to top
Date: 4/15/18 10:05 am
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14...>
Subject: Primary colors
Yesterday, at the feeders: bright yellow American goldfinches, a flock of indigo buntings and a few cardinals.

Today, a big jump in hummingbirds.

Alyson Hoge
Southern Pulaski County
 

Back to top
Date: 4/15/18 9:14 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Kyle Hawley
Is Kyle Hawley in this group? He Ebirds the same town I do and sometimes
I want to contact him and ask a question.  Saw a report from yesterday
of a bittern at city lake in Siloam Springs and I was debating on
looking for it. A few good areas to look at and was hoping for some
direction to save time. :)   Saw one there last year so I'll check the
same area. Tried to help my daughter another day last year and we didn't
find it again... thought maybe we heard it a time or two but our ears
may have been playing tricks on us.  My daughter still wants that on her
life list. We'll see if I can drag her out there. She's become soft when
it comes to birding in cooler weather.


Daniel Mason


---
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Date: 4/15/18 9:08 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: turkey time in snow flurries
Put the hummingbird feeder out again early this morning and Don saw the male Ruby-throat visit it twice. However a female Cardinal also chased the hummer from his perch in the Japanese Maple twice and we have not seen him again, because we're busy with other tasks and not constantly watching. I'm not sure what he is eating out there because the ephemerals and wild plums are just about the only things in bloom now. Perhaps there are a few tiny insects to be found.

On his run with Brli, Don saw a male turkey flash past at Turtle Rock, running very quickly downhill.

Later the female wild turkey arrived again to eat corn in the yard. Then she strolled past the shiitake logs, the native plant gardens, through the parking area, and took the path that goes into the savanna until she was out of sight. Nice to think she may have a nest hidden back in the native grasses or woods nearby.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 4/15/18 7:16 am
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Gillam Park 4/15/2018
I spent some time in Gillam Park in southeast Little Rock this morning. It was cloudy, 41 degrees with gusts up to 20 mph. The bird count was not that high but almost as soon as I walked in I saw a Swainson’s Thrush which was worth the price of admission all by itself. Deeper into the woods where it it lower you could see the water level was up. If you are familiar with the trails back there and want to walk them you’ll need to wait. On the way out I quietly bemoaned the absence of Hooded Warbler which is an early returning species when there he was, not far from where the Swainson’s Thrush had been. Also seen or heard where two or three White-eyed Vireo and a dozen species of commoners.

Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after." — Thorin
 

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Date: 4/15/18 6:41 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: PEREGRINE WITH A TAWNY BLUSH IN THE VALLEY
Karen McGee and I headed to Frog Bayou WMA after the prairie outing. We too
had a Peregrine. Karen noticed a tree full of blackbirds "acting funny".
Then I said something like, look at all those shorebirds flying around. And
there came the Peregrine.

Sandy B.

On Sun, Apr 15, 2018 at 7:43 AM Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Dr Ragupathy Kannan at UA-Fort Smith had a class field trip to the public
> prairies near Charleston yesterday. Several of us were invited along for
> prairie wildflowers -- coming along nicely! – even in yesterday’s
> cool-windy. Sandy Berger and I visited at the Flanagan Prairie Natural Area
> sign because it was such an effective wind break. Students were bundled up
> and ready to enjoy plentiful Indian Paintbrushes.
>
>
> Cool-windy didn’t seem to bother a couple of American Golden-Plovers in a
> field across from Cherokee Prairie Natural Area. Didn’t bother adult and
> juvenile Bald Eagles investigating a roadkill possum on Highway 60 (Joan
> Reynolds moved carcass off road). Didn’t bother 4 Lark Sparrows in a field
> adjacent Flanagan Prairie.
>
>
> After the morning field trip, a few of us visited other local prairies. An
> American Bittern chicken-walked across Rattlesnake Road South. When we
> stopped, it pointed straight up, thin as a rail, like a Peterson painting.
> FOS.
>
>
> West-Ark Sod in Kibler bottoms was on the agenda for our return to
> Fayetteville. Apparently the golden-plover migration is slowed, since the
> best we did was a flock of 9, down from hundreds last few weeks. But way,
> way out in one field was a Peregrine Falcon. We managed to use the car
> as a windbreak and watched until it flew. This one had a dark clearly
> demarcated “helmet,” breast dramatically tawny-reddish, dark blue wings of
> an adult.
>
>
> I got a lousy photo of an almost identical one five years ago, April 14,
> 2012, at Frog Bayou WMA. Frog isn’t that far from Sod. Checking through my
> hawk books, Wheeler (Raptors of Western North America, p. 470) describes
> the “American” Peregrine (F. p. anatum) with “Breast, belly, and lower
> belly are uniformly pale or medium tawny-rufous …” This is the bird that
> was endangered and rebounded as a result of leases. I’ve sent pictures out
> for opinions.
>
>
> Right now I am going with a Peregrine Falcon that is here among us on wild
> Earth because intelligent and caring people refused to accept extinction
> and dedicated themselves to changing what most would have thought
> impossible. And isn’t it the same with Bald Eagles in the lower 48 states?
> People cared enough to act. And yesterday, one person cared enough to move
> a dead possum from the road to reduce chances that Bald Eagles or other
> scavengers would die as a result of our high speed, gotta-get-there-quick”
> mentality.
>
>
> Kim Smith would have enjoyed the big falcon. He would also have noticed
> the misuse of an adverb in my sentence above (“Death of the adverb” in his
> words.) OK Kim: Quickly, not quick. Got-to-get-there-quickly.
>
>

 

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Date: 4/15/18 6:23 am
From: Carol Meyerdirk <tennislady41...>
Subject: FOS catbird and indigo bunting
What a nice surprise while watching 20plus goldfinches, an indigo bunting and a catbird came into view. Have seen 6 hummers so far but none today. Nice way to start the day.
WLRCAROL

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/15/18 6:17 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Nesting Mourning Dove. etc
Hi All,

I’ve been doing a big home improvement job that I started in February and I’m trying to get done before the AAS meeting. I have not been out birding at all so far except one for trip to the Hatchery last Thursday. I’m planning a trip over there today.

However, this has not prevented me from taking backyard bird breaks.

I have three nests so far.

Some folks know I built an arbor in the backyard and hang pieces of driftwood from it as feeders. Three are kind of trough shaped. One is more bowl shaped. I was going out to fill the feeders last weekend when the cold came in and noticed a Mourning Dove has built her nest in the bowl shaped piece of driftwood. To say the least I did not put any food out in the back yard, I tossed it in the front yard.

She has laid low all week, except for turning her eggs and repositioning herself I haven’t seen her move much, actually I haven’t seen her do that but once. I look out there occasionally and he is just facing a different direction. I am not seeing another dove around that would be her mate although I can’t watch all day. I can’t wait for chicks hatch as I’ll be able to see them from the porch.


Also, Brown Thrashers have taken up in the Native Honeysuckle again this year. They are both out and about the in the yard all day. Last year there were three species that used that Honeysuckle bush over the course of the Summer. Brown Thrashers, Cardinals, and Catbirds.

I have a high-rise Robins nest in the Weeping Cherry in the front yard. The way the tree branches are more vertical than horizontal the nest was built between three branches and must be 6 or 8 inches from base to rim.

I’m also seeing White-throated, White-crowned, and House Sparrows plus Dark-eyed Juncos, Cardinals, Blue Jays, Titmice, Chickadees, Common Grackles, Starlings, and a Red-bellied Woodpecker.

I have kept Hummer food out since I had my Rufous for a few weeks last December. I haven’t seen any yet this Spring.


I’m looking forward to meeting people at the Fish Hatchery for the AAS Field trips on the 27 th and 28 th hopefully some great birds will blow in by then.
 

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Date: 4/15/18 5:43 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: PEREGRINE WITH A TAWNY BLUSH IN THE VALLEY
Dr Ragupathy Kannan at UA-Fort Smith had a class field trip to the public prairies near Charleston yesterday. Several of us were invited along for prairie wildflowers -- coming along nicely! even in yesterdays cool-windy. Sandy Berger and I visited at the Flanagan Prairie Natural Area sign because it was such an effective wind break. Students were bundled up and ready to enjoy plentiful Indian Paintbrushes.

Cool-windy didnt seem to bother a couple of American Golden-Plovers in a field across from Cherokee Prairie Natural Area. Didnt bother adult and juvenile Bald Eagles investigating a roadkill possum on Highway 60 (Joan Reynolds moved carcass off road). Didnt bother 4 Lark Sparrows in a field adjacent Flanagan Prairie.

After the morning field trip, a few of us visited other local prairies. An American Bittern chicken-walked across Rattlesnake Road South. When we stopped, it pointed straight up, thin as a rail, like a Peterson painting. FOS.

West-Ark Sod in Kibler bottoms was on the agenda for our return to Fayetteville. Apparently the golden-plover migration is slowed, since the best we did was a flock of 9, down from hundreds last few weeks. But way, way out in one field was a Peregrine Falcon. We managed to use the car as a windbreak and watched until it flew. This one had a dark clearly demarcated helmet, breast dramatically tawny-reddish, dark blue wings of an adult.

I got a lousy photo of an almost identical one five years ago, April 14, 2012, at Frog Bayou WMA. Frog isnt that far from Sod. Checking through my hawk books, Wheeler (Raptors of Western North America, p. 470) describes the American Peregrine (F. p. anatum) with Breast, belly, and lower belly are uniformly pale or medium tawny-rufous This is the bird that was endangered and rebounded as a result of leases. Ive sent pictures out for opinions.

Right now I am going with a Peregrine Falcon that is here among us on wild Earth because intelligent and caring people refused to accept extinction and dedicated themselves to changing what most would have thought impossible. And isnt it the same with Bald Eagles in the lower 48 states? People cared enough to act. And yesterday, one person cared enough to move a dead possum from the road to reduce chances that Bald Eagles or other scavengers would die as a result of our high speed, gotta-get-there-quick mentality.

Kim Smith would have enjoyed the big falcon. He would also have noticed the misuse of an adverb in my sentence above (Death of the adverb in his words.) OK Kim: Quickly, not quick. Got-to-get-there-quickly.


 

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Date: 4/14/18 9:48 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: first hummingbird
Bob and I had our first (and second!) ruby-throated hummingbird today, too. We returned home from the grocery store and Bob called out, "First hummer!" There outside the window was said bird perched on a branch in the cherry birch holding on for dear life and looking huge while facing into the wind with feathers on the full fluff setting. I got my binoculars for a better look, but with the lighting, angle and fluffiness I was unable to determine whether male or female. With feathers so fluffed it was the size of a female, but isn't it a bit early for females? After a couple minutes of looking, another hummer flew in close enough for Its Fluffiness to take off in hot pursuit. I have no idea if either visited the feeders while we were away.

It wasn't too birdy at the house today. We had pine siskins, cardinals, a pair of downy woodpeckers, white-throated sparrows, house finches, and a ruby-crowned kinglet.

We also have one less squirrel in the neighborhood as it was last seen draped from the jaw of Mr. Fox as he sped across the bench below the house.

Sara
Mt. Sequoyah, Fayetteville
--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 4/14/18, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Subject: first hummingbird
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Date: Saturday, April 14, 2018, 11:14 AM

I hung the hummingbird feeder yesterday
afternoon near the budding but not yet blooming native red
"Trumpet" or "Coral" Honeysuckle [Lonicera sempervirens].
This morning a male Ruby-throated Hummingbird drank from the
feeder a few times and has not been seen since.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 4/14/18 7:53 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: American Bittern (FOS)
Saw two American Bitterns in ditch on south side of Wilbur West Road
yesterday.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 4/14/18 7:02 pm
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Ibis and Black-necked
On the Garland County AS Field trip today we could tolerate the cold and
wind long enough to see two eagle, an osprey, a white-faced ibis and 2
black-necked stilt and 29 other species at Andrew Hulsey Fish Hatchery near
Hot Springs.

Peace and Birds Jerry Butler

 

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Date: 4/14/18 5:16 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville- FOS Swainson's Thrush/Summer Tanager/Orchard Oriole/Warblers plus a Swallow fallout
A very large flock of swallows (roughly a 1000 birds) was feeding low over Lake Fayetteville this afternoon. I had excellent views of all six species that occur regularly in the area- Bank (5), Cliff (20), Northern Rough-winged (200-rough estimate), Tree (300-rough estimate), Barn (400-rough estimate), Purple Martin (30). The supporting cast consisted of 4 Chimney Swifts, 3 Ospreys (fishing actively), 1 Forster's Tern and 100 Double Crested Cormorants. Hardly any ducks on the lake today -just 4 Mallards.

Ten warbler species were observed today - Louisiana Waterthrush (1), Black-and-White (2), Prothonotary (1), Tennessee (1), Orange-crowned (2), Nashville (1), Northern Parula (4), Pine (2), Yellow-rumped (60) and Yellow-throated (3).

6 Swainson's Thrushes, 1 male Summer Tanager and 1 female Orchard Oriole were seen on the trails around the environmental center

Other passerine migrants included Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (4), White-eyed Vireo (1), House Wren (1), Winter Wren (1), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (12), Golden-crowned Kinglet (2), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (25), Hermit Thrush (2) and Pine Siskin (2).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/14/18 12:19 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOS Summer Tanager, Pine Siskin & Hummingbird antics
I had quite the surprise this morning  Off and on today I have had an adult male Summer Tanager visiting my Suet Feeder. I've had them in my yard through the summer in years past, but this is the first time for me to observe one feeding from the suet. Also after all winter with no Pine Siskins, I spied a lone Siskin feeding with the American Goldfinches at the sunflower feeders. Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are abundant in the yard enjoying the generous blooms of the Coral Honeysuckle and the sugar water in the feeders. Over the past week to 10 days, I have observed breeding activity such as the males "hummingbird dance of love" and females exhibiting possible nest building behavior. Fights at the feeders are freiquent.Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 4/14/18 10:43 am
From: twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...>
Subject: FOR Blue Grosbeak
Today at noon in Cleburne County near Pangburn.


Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2
 

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Date: 4/14/18 9:14 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: first hummingbird
I hung the hummingbird feeder yesterday afternoon near the budding but not yet blooming native red "Trumpet" or "Coral" Honeysuckle [Lonicera sempervirens]. This morning a male Ruby-throated Hummingbird drank from the feeder a few times and has not been seen since.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 4/13/18 8:52 pm
From: Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...>
Subject: Baltimore Oriole
I saw a Male Baltimore Oriole in my yard late this afternoon feeding at the grape jelly feeder.

FOS and first for my yard

 

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Date: 4/13/18 5:20 pm
From: Amy Hall <00000141e1151b9c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Indigo Buntings in Cabot
Joe and I just observed two male Indigo Buntings in our back yard in Cabot.
 

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Date: 4/13/18 4:39 pm
From: pooja panwar <ppanwar...>
Subject: Chimney Swifts
Today Anant Deshwal and I saw a group of Chimney Swifts (8) flying over the
crossing at College Ave and Rolling Hills. We also saw a group of Chimney
Swifts on 2nd April over the UofA campus. Do excuse us for delayed
information.

Regards
Pooja Panwar
Fayetteville, AR

 

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Date: 4/13/18 3:29 pm
From: Ragan Sutterfield <000001798b796cbe-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Spotted Towhee
I had a female Spotted Towhee below my feeders this afternoon.  It was scratching around in some straw mulch I have around a holly.  My feeders are in my front yard so anyone is welcome to try for the bird anytime (621 Booker Street, Little Rock) but I imagine it was just passing through.
Cheers,Ragan
 

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Date: 4/13/18 3:01 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Kim's obituary
If you click on this link, you can leave condolences for the family.http://beardsfuneralchapel.com/kimberly-gray-smith-july-19-1948april-9-2018/


Kimberly Gray Smith, July 19, 1948~April 9, 2018

Apr 13, 2018 |

Kimberly Gray Smith, 69, passed away in Fayetteville April 9, 2018. He was born July 19, 1948, in Manchester, Connecticut, to Robert H. and Janet (Simon) Smith. He was third of 5 children. He is survived by siblings Holiday Houck, Robert H. Smith, Jr., Wendelin J. Smith, Bradford S. Smith, their spouses and many nieces and nephews.

Kim and his wife Peggy J. (Jones), of the home, were married 45 years (since 1972). Their daughter, Mallory and husband Sheldon Steinert of Fayetteville are parents of Erowyn, Simon, Laura, and Kara.

Kim, as Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences at UA-Fayetteville, pursued research in various areas of terrestrial ecology. His interests ranged widely from black bears to birds to bugs. His formal education took him from Kimball Union Academy (prep school) in New Hampshire to undergraduate studies at Tufts University (B.S. 1971).  He received advanced degrees from the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville (M.S. 1975) and Utah State University (Ph.D. 1982). Kim was a post-graduate research ecologist at Bodega Marine Lab, UC Berkley (1980-1981). He also served as Research Associate at Manomet Bird Observatory (1977-1980).

Kim began his professional teaching and research career at UA-Fayetteville in fall 1981. He attained status as University Professor of Biological Sciences (2009) and Distinguished Professor (2015). During his career he was Departmental Chair of Biological Sciences (2004-2008) and a highly productive researcher and collaborator, with approximately 300 professional publications.

Kim was a committed educator and nurtured students at various stages of career preparation and development, including 8 post-doctoral research associates, 23 doctoral students, 36 masters students, and many undergraduate honors students. Kim was deeply involved in numerous professional organizations in a variety of roles: officer, editor, meeting organizer, etc. He served as Editor in Chief of The Auk (2000-2004), the primary scientific journal of what is now the American Ornithological Society.

In lieu of flowers, the family invites contributions to causes and activities valued by Kim. Specifics about contributions, as well as a celebration of Kim’s life will be announced on a future date.

Kim presented a retirement seminar in the Department of Biological Sciences on April 5, just 4 days before his death. He entertained a packed room with an often humorous summary of his life and career, “Life in the Fast Lane: My Life as a Community Ecologist.” He ended his seminar with some advice to younger colleagues: “Be curious, be creative, challenge yourself to learn new things, learn the history of things that interest you, take students on field trips, take students abroad,” and finally, “have fun doing what you do … I did …”

Cremation arrangements by Beard’s Funeral Chapel.


 

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Date: 4/13/18 2:47 pm
From: Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...>
Subject: Chimney Swifts
FOS in the downtown Little Rock area. So good to see them flying and talking overhead.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/13/18 2:06 pm
From: Art Weigand <aweigand13...>
Subject: Good warbler morning
I had 6 species. Hooded. N. Parula. Black and White. Blue-winged. Ovenbird. Pine.
Considering the high winds I that was pretty good.

Art Weigand
Wichita KS
Oak Ridge Park, Beaver Lake AR
 

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Date: 4/13/18 11:52 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Port of LR sunken fields
100-200 shorebirds, diverse species, lurking in the fields including 13 Am Golden-plovers. Should you come out, you will need a scope to identify birds.

Cindy
Pulaski County


 

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Date: 4/13/18 10:39 am
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: FOS
1 male ruby throated hummingbird



Also observed: at least 2 White Throated Sparrows, 1 Dark Eye Junco, 2
Carolina Chickadees, Tufted Titmouse, White Throated Nuthatch and a male and
female cardinal.



I am not great at identifying birds and do my best. I wouldn't mind if
someone, a couple or a small group wanted to bird on my mostly wooded, 53
acres. I am sure there are birds out there that I don't know about. I am in
the Oxley/Alco area in Searcy County.



Kara


 

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Date: 4/13/18 10:20 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...>
Subject: Another error. Can't keep up with number of errors!
Blue Grosbeak here this morning, NOT an Indigo. Photo on Facebook.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

 

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Date: 4/13/18 10:04 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...>
Subject: FOS
Finally, a male RTHU showed up this morning at 8:50 AM. Also, just took a picture of an adult non-breeding Indigo Bunting. Earliest Ive ever seen one.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

 

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Date: 4/13/18 8:52 am
From: Christy Melhart Slay <christy.slay...>
Subject: Kim Smith ONSC memorial contributions
Hi all,
As one of Kim's former students, I am president of the Board for the Ozark Natural Science Center and wanted to provide information regarding how to make a memorial contribution in honor of Dr. Kim Smith. Many of you know that Kim served on the board of ONSC for a number of years and he hosted his daughter's wedding, conducted his recent owl research with Mitchell, and was planning his retirement party at ONSC. He loved ONSC. The ONSC director has set up a fund for any donations received on Kim's behalf and we will work with Peggy and family at a later time to determine the best use of those funds to honor Kim, perhaps a scholarship to help area students attend ONSC programs, but the family will ultimately decide how these gifts should be used.
If you want to make a contribution please do so here https://www.onsc.us/donate and please use the optional note field to mark that this is for Kim Smith otherwise we will have no way to track your gift.
I will share this with the biology department and with Kim's former students.
Peace be with you at this difficult time. He meant so much to each of us.
Sincerely,
Christy Melhart Slay


 

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Date: 4/13/18 7:14 am
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite
I saw a Mississippi kite in Saline County last week.
Nancy Young
On Wednesday, April 11, 2018, 4:43:47 PM CDT, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:

Okay, it probably too early for a sighting. But as I wrote in my two birds books
just now released on Amazon.   I notice birds. I don't watch them with a passion.
So bear with me. I heard the whistling for several days. Ignore it. Since  I got side tracked from doing a elist, every day. Just  look at a bird  every now or then. Just now a shadow leaned over me as I sat on the porch  steps.Something  been frightening the birds  at the feeders for several days.
With Owls about midday  and the Red Shoulder Hawks at nest over there. Just figured that whom  was feeding off the smaller birds  each day.
But looking up at the roof above my head was the features of a Mississippi Kite flying high overhead.
I had thought that was what making that strange  pitching noise.  But my home for now, I am not considered to be knowledgeable at all here.
I saw it swoop again at new dragonflies over  head. In the turquoise sky so bright  and near. I thought, well what will it hurt if I post it anyway?
It headed north east as it flew away. I had the courage to write my bird books. I have the courage  to post  this bird here.
My sorrow at a man I never met. Whom gave us this listserv to learn about birds we might  never had known about.  May had gotten a laugh about if he has known? That my first bird  book I had  dedicated to the people that designed this list  so people like me could learn  about what make birds  tick.
And gave  us courage to spread out our own wings out to report  birds  that we, the non experts have seen too. Teresa, Hector, AR

Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to make it happen.
 

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Date: 4/13/18 6:00 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: FOS Orchard Oriole
Eating on honeysuckle
West Pulaski County
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/12/18 9:47 pm
From: Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22...>
Subject: FOS
March 30 male yellow warbler
April 1 male ruby-throated hummingbird
" 3 female RTHU
" 8 male blue-gray gnatcatcher
" 12 male summer tanager


Lovely Spring!

Meredith Hawkins
Hwy. 300 outside of Little Italy

 

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Date: 4/12/18 6:00 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: fos
Whoa! I'd better put my feeders out!
ThanksJ

On Apr 12, 2018, at 7:58 PM, Alan <quattro...> wrote:

> Had my first ruby throat hummingbird of the year today.
> Guess the south winds have brought them to the north part of the state at long last.
> Alan Gregory
> Harrison
>
>
> Virus-free. www.avast.com


 

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Date: 4/12/18 6:00 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: this week
Well the week began with one remaining Dark-eyed Junco eating chicken crumbles on Monday morning when I let the hens out.

One or two White-eyed Vireos were singing on Tuesday while TV's soared above the landscape and the pair of BV's who are nesting in their usual grotto in the bluff made circles in the sky. At last check Don found two Black Vulture eggs and by now there may be some fuzzy nestlings.

This week there have been a lot of Fish Crows following our regular American Crows at the corn and peanuts. I've seen flocks of a couple dozen Fish Crows fly over, which is new, but I don't know where their communal nesting area may be.

A couple weeks ago the Louisiana Waterthrush males and females were very upset and vocal when we passed their new nesting territories. But now the Louisiana Waterthrush males sing beautifully from their numerous territories up and downstream so I suspect nesting is well underway.

Wood Ducks float in the Otter Pond. Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Pine Warblers, Black & White, and Yellow-throated Warblers sing and forage in the trees.

White-throated Sparrows sing about Canada and Yellow-throated Warblers are also preparing to head north.

Ruby-crowned Kinglets, and flocks of Cedar Waxwings are especially prevalent right now. More Northern Parulas arrive to sing every morning.

Red-tailed and Red-shouldered Hawks sit on stick nests or soar.

And today I saw a beautiful female Wild Turkey eating corn right out back while the crows watched.

I saw my first of season Scissor-tailed Flycatcher on a barbed wire fence.

Plus I saw the first two Monarch Butterflies of the season.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 4/12/18 5:58 pm
From: Alan <quattro...>
Subject: fos
Had my first ruby throat hummingbird of the year today.
Guess the south winds have brought them to the north part of the state at long last.
Alan Gregory
Harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

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Date: 4/12/18 1:41 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Hanky Panky
There were three Inca Dove cavorting through my mulberry tree this
afternoon. I suspect some hanky panky was going on.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

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Date: 4/12/18 9:13 am
From: Ann Honeycutt <annhoneycutt53...>
Subject: FOS Mississippi Kites
First sighting yesterday of the pair of Mississippi Kites that have nested
in my West Little Rock neighborhood for the past two summers.

They rode the thermals over my house for several minutes in a sort of avian
salute, "We're back!"

I wonder if the local crows ("the townies") know the kites are back. Last
summer I witnessed soap-opera drama more than once with the crow-gang
harassing a kite who had the audacity to be on *their* property.

I love watching the kites soar in their aerial ballet. Wish I could find
their nest.

Ann

*Ann Honeycutt*
West Little Rock, AR 72211



On Wed, Apr 11, 2018 at 4:43 PM, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:

> Okay, it probably too early for a sighting. But as I wrote in my two birds
> books
> just now released on Amazon.
> I notice birds. I don't watch them with a passion.
>
> So bear with me. I heard the whistling for several days. Ignore it. Since
> I got side tracked from doing a elist, every day. Just look at a bird
> every now or then. Just now a shadow leaned over me as I sat on the porch
> steps.
> Something been frightening the birds at the feeders for several days.
>
> With Owls about midday and the Red Shoulder Hawks at nest over there.
> Just figured that whom was feeding off the smaller birds each day.
>
> But looking up at the roof above my head was the features of a Mississippi
> Kite flying high overhead.
>
> I had thought that was what making that strange pitching noise. But my
> home for now, I am not considered to be knowledgeable at all here.
>
> I saw it swoop again at new dragonflies over head. In the turquoise sky
> so bright and near. I thought, well what will it hurt if I post it anyway?
>
> It headed north east as it flew away. I had the courage to write my bird
> books. I have the courage to post this bird here.
>
> My sorrow at a man I never met. Whom gave us this listserv to learn about
> birds we might never had known about. May had gotten a laugh about if he
> has known? That my first bird book I had dedicated to the people that
> designed this list so people like me could learn about what make birds
> tick.
>
> And gave us courage to spread out our own wings out to report birds
> that we, the non experts have seen too.
> Teresa, Hector, AR
>
>
> Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
> make it happen.
>

 

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Date: 4/11/18 5:20 pm
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox...>
Subject: Kim Smith
I’ve been trying to recall when I first met or corresponded Kim Smith and, to my best recollection, it would have either been in the mid-to-late-1970’s or the very early 1980’s. I remember our first encounter had to do with shorebirds. At the time, Kim either still was associated with the Manomet Bird Observatory in Massachusetts or had been. He and other past or present colleagues there were excited about the large numbers of Buff-breasted Sandpipers I was reporting during drawdown years at Millwood Lake in southwestern Arkansas. I was never an official student of Kim’s but, over the past 40 or so years I benefitted greatly from our various interactions and collaborations just as countless other have done. The single collaboration that I am most proud of was our work together on this, the ARBirds-L listserv.

During the 1980’s, I had close friends that I visited each year they lived in Colorado. Not long before they left, a number of that state’s more active birders put together a group email list to keep one another apprised of recent bird sightings. My friend, knowing how much I loved birding in Colorado (especially on the tundra) added me to the distribution list. From that group email list, the COBirds listserv was created. Recognizing its value to promote the discussion of birds and bird related topics, I contacted Doug James about creating a something similar in Arkansas. Doug instructed me to approach Kim who, within just a few days had ARBirds-L up and running. It’s remains one of the most valuable resources available to the Arkansas birding community. Ornithology is perhaps the one branch of biology that has significantly benefitted from the contributions of amateurs of all skill levels. As well as anyone I’ve ever known in academia, Kim encouraged this cooperation between those in academia and the birding community at large. This, along with his humor and patience, is what I will always remember and appreciate about Kim. I miss him.

Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503
 

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Date: 4/11/18 3:58 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Memorial contributions for Kim Smith
See Peggy's email below.  She welcomes contributions that will go toward student scholarships.  There are several ways to do this.  For example, the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust routinely supports student research projects and it was a cause that Kim cared deeply for.  
----- Forwarded message ----- From: Peggy J. Smith <pjs004...>To: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...>Sent: Wednesday, 11 April, 2018, 5:35:40 PM GMT-5Subject: Re: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Kannan,We would welcome tribute contributions to any of these organizations/efforts. If ONSC contributions went to student scholarships, we would be delighted.  Know that Fulbright College is launching a scholarship fund in Kim's name, as well.  People who want to honor Kim can support things he cared so much about in several ways.
  Peggy

 

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Date: 4/11/18 2:43 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Mississippi Kite
Okay, it probably too early for a sighting. But as I wrote in my two birds
books
just now released on Amazon.
I notice birds. I don't watch them with a passion.

So bear with me. I heard the whistling for several days. Ignore it. Since
I got side tracked from doing a elist, every day. Just look at a bird
every now or then. Just now a shadow leaned over me as I sat on the porch
steps.
Something been frightening the birds at the feeders for several days.

With Owls about midday and the Red Shoulder Hawks at nest over there. Just
figured that whom was feeding off the smaller birds each day.

But looking up at the roof above my head was the features of a Mississippi
Kite flying high overhead.

I had thought that was what making that strange pitching noise. But my
home for now, I am not considered to be knowledgeable at all here.

I saw it swoop again at new dragonflies over head. In the turquoise sky so
bright and near. I thought, well what will it hurt if I post it anyway?

It headed north east as it flew away. I had the courage to write my bird
books. I have the courage to post this bird here.

My sorrow at a man I never met. Whom gave us this listserv to learn about
birds we might never had known about. May had gotten a laugh about if he
has known? That my first bird book I had dedicated to the people that
designed this list so people like me could learn about what make birds
tick.

And gave us courage to spread out our own wings out to report birds that
we, the non experts have seen too.
Teresa, Hector, AR


Maybe there is hope for the future. You have to Believe in your dreams to
make it happen.

 

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Date: 4/11/18 1:16 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Feds Propose the Removal of Kirtland's Warbler from Endangered Species list


https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/feds-propose-dropping-songbird-from-endangered-species-list/ar-AAvLIb9?ocid=spartandhp

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

 

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Date: 4/11/18 11:39 am
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Dr Kim Smith
I am also saddened to learn of Dr. Smith's departure from this world.  Our paths crossed at the occasional AR Audubon meeting that I have attended and I was able to become more acquainted with him and Peggy on the Trinidad/Tobago trip a few years ago.  I enjoyed reading his comments on ARBIRD.  I can tell by all the comments that he will be greatly missed.  My condolences to his family.Roselie OverbyOak Grove, LA
 

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Date: 4/11/18 10:46 am
From: Vickie Becker <vhbecker...>
Subject: Re: Field Trips and Great Talks - AAS Spring Meeting, Bentonville


Vickie H Becker
110 E Center St, #1460
Madison, SD 57042

501-508-0984
<Vhbecker...>


On Apr 11, 2018, at 7:45 AM, Robin Buff <robinbuff...> wrote:

All Arkansas Bird Watchers have a great opportunity the weekend of April 27 - 29, 2018, to do some great birding and to hear talks from Joe Neal and Joe Woolbright (Friday night) and Mitchell Pruitt (Saturday night).

I am offering a special deal for list serve participants that are not members of the Arkansas Audubon Society (Don’t tell Adam Schaffer). Mention that you heard about the meeting on this list serve and we will give you the special early bird AAS member registration rate of just $20.00. Please find attached the registration packet with the schedule of events. You can send the registration to me or register on the day of the event. The more, the merrier.

Please email me if you have any questions.

Robin Buff

VP - AAS

<2018 Call to Meeting - Registration:edit#2.pdf>
 

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Date: 4/11/18 9:32 am
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: FOS Scissor-tail Flycatcher
At 10:45 am this morning, on bypass access road in front of Wilson Springs, Fayetteville, AR. Interacting with male American Robin.

Robin Buff
Wheeler, AR
 

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Date: 4/11/18 9:08 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Earth Day field trip to Ninestone Land Trust, Sunday April 22. Y'all Come
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will gather with members, friends, and anyone else interested for a field trip to Ninestone Land Trust in Carroll County on Earth Day, Sunday, April 22. Meet at Ninestone at 9 AM. More information about Ninestone at: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/placestobird.htm including description and directions. Everyone is welcome. You do not need to be a member or an official bird watcher. We look at everything plants interesting and rare, landscape, frogs, insects, snakes, plus BIRDS. All ages welcome. It is also easy to make your own field trip, if walking with the group doesn't work. Natural beauty and habitat diversity makes Ninestone a fine place to see and hear birds, plants, springs, and natural rock formations typical of the Ozarks. It features a variety of forested habitats including perennial Piney Creek, native shortleaf pines, Ozark bluffs, and open areas including grassy fields, and waterfalls. It is a great opportunity to see a variety of migrant and resident land birds typical of the western Ozarks and rare and unusual native plants. Several glade restoration projects are underway, too, and this is a chance to see pro-active effort to bring back a natural habitat lost throughout the Ozarks. We also have a fun pot-luck style lunch, so bring some stuff to share. We have lunch and visit in front of the famous waterfalls with lots of birds in view.

Places to Bird in Northwest Arkansas: - NWAAS Home<http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/placestobird.htm>
www.nwarkaudubon.org
Add website description in this area. Baker Prairie Natural Area Beatie Prairie Botanical Area in August 2011




Directions:
1. For those coming from Berryville or north, these directions are from intersection of Hwy. 62 E &
21 S just east of Berryville: From Hwy. 62 east of Berryville, take Hwy. 21 South for 10 + miles to the site of the former Cedar Creek country store on the RIGHT. IMMEDIATELY after the store & parking lot, turn RIGHT onto a gravel road. The gravel road is CR 512, but is not well marked, so just turn RIGHT immediately after the store. Do not cross the bridge over Cedar Creek! Continue on the gravel road for 1 MILE, staying to the LEFT at any choices. You will pass 3 mailboxes on the LEFT, one is a large blue mailbox. Continue on to residence on LEFT.

2. For those coming from Fayetteville or south- directions from intersection of 412 & 21 N: From 412 take 21 North for about 7 + miles. Cross the Cedar Creek Bridge first & turn LEFT onto the gravel road (CR 512) before you get to the site of the former Cedar Creek country store on the LEFT. Continue on the gravel road for 1 MILE, staying to the LEFT at any choices. You will pass 3 mailboxes on the LEFT, one is a large blue mailbox. Continue to big pines and residence on LEFT.

 

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Date: 4/11/18 8:58 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: 40th anniversary for Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society during AAS convention
Just wanted to let any of you interested know that the spring convention of Arkansas Audubon Society is being held in Bentonville this year, April 27-29, 2018. There are numerous programs, field trips, etc associated with this meeting. If birds are your thing, heres a great chance to interact with our states growing birding community. Details and registration on the AAS website: http://www.arbirds.org/
Arkansas Audubon Society<http://www.arbirds.org/>
www.arbirds.org
Arkansas Audubon Society website, sponsor of Halberg Ecology Camp, AAS Trust funds bird research, biannual convention, workshop for adults, publishes a quarterly newsletter, collects reports of rare birds


There will be a special event on Saturday, April 28, from 5-6 PM: a reception celebrating Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society, founded 40 years ago. Please come out and join the fun. Its informal, and there will snacks and drink there. We need lots of the founding members out, if possible.
The reception and other indoors parts of the meeting at Double Tree Suites in Bentonville. Again, check out all of the details: http://www.arbirds.org/


 

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Date: 4/11/18 8:13 am
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: large shorebirds near Paris Bottoms
Yesterday, while driving north from Paris on HWY 309 I watched a flock of about 50 largish shorebirds flying high over the Paris Bottoms along the Arkansas River. They were too large to be peeps. My guess is Am. Golden plovers.

Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

<don.simons...><mailto:<don.simons...>
phone: 479-963-5333
FAX: 479-963-1031


 

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Date: 4/11/18 7:45 am
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: Field Trips and Great Talks - AAS Spring Meeting, Bentonville
All Arkansas Bird Watchers have a great opportunity the weekend of April 27 - 29, 2018, to do some great birding and to hear talks from Joe Neal and Joe Woolbright (Friday night) and Mitchell Pruitt (Saturday night).

I am offering a special deal for list serve participants that are not members of the Arkansas Audubon Society (Don’t tell Adam Schaffer). Mention that you heard about the meeting on this list serve and we will give you the special early bird AAS member registration rate of just $20.00. Please find attached the registration packet with the schedule of events. You can send the registration to me or register on the day of the event. The more, the merrier.

Please email me if you have any questions.

Robin Buff

VP - AAS


 

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Date: 4/11/18 7:12 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
I heard back from Peggy.  She was moved by our tributes and was thankful.  See part of her email below:
There is also a good deal of inquiry about arrangements. Know that we will not have a traditional funeral. Kim will be cremated and then spend some time at home with me until Mallory and I decide where he will be dispersed. I will talk with David McNabb about the possibility of a memorial gathering and celebration of Kim's life and contributions.  

Thank you for gently telling Doug and for your deep caring.
 Peggy
On Wednesday, 11 April, 2018, 12:22:51 AM GMT-5, pooja panwar <ppanwar...> wrote:

Dr. Smith was on my doctoral committee, who not only treated me like a family member but also was a strong pillar of support for me through my journey as graduate student. His calmness, passion and enthusiasm inspired me to be like him one day. Coming from an engineering background and trying to make it as an ecologist, he would very patiently guide me to find my niche and hone my skills. I just gave my comps and he said to me with his trademark smile that he really liked my answers, that just made my day. 
I took a trip with him to Belize last year and I was totally blown away by him, I became his huge fan and looked forward to taking more trips with him. Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan would infuse huge passion and energy in the course that made it life changing for me. I look up to them as my role model for my life ahead.
In his exit seminar, apart from his mesmerizing and adventurous life, he shared with us few words of advice. - Be curious- Take more field trips, it an lifetime experience- If you really love to study something, find ways to make it happen
Dr. Smith, your teachings, guidance, and memories will always be the guiding light in my life. When I close my eyes I can see his smiling face that will always encourage me to be a better researcher and a better human being.  
On Tue, Apr 10, 2018 at 10:57 PM, Debra Hale-Shelton <dshelton...> wrote:

I did not know Dr. Smith personally and never met him, but I was always impressed by his oversight of this online bird group. I am saddened by his death and extend my heartfelt sympathy to his family and friends. To love birds so much, Dr. Smith was obviously not only a knowledgeable man but also a kind one. I love the idea of the April 24 tribute.
Debra Hale-SheltonConway



 

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Date: 4/11/18 4:31 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Kim Smith, Red Crossbills, and the death of the adverb
The broad scope of Red Crossbill movement into Arkansas from November 2012 to May 2013 prompted Kim Smith, Matt Young from Cornell, and me to publish a paper summarizing the event. You can read the paper here: http://scholarworks.uark.edu/jaas/vol69/iss1/17/ I mention this now, because among his many other positives, Kim was an excellent writer. As lead author on our 2015 crossbill paper, Kim took charge of making sure a lot of field data got organized then published, so that future researchers would have access to our analysis. I am just one of a very large cast of co-authors who published with Kim. His skill was significant. He knew writing and publication was important and he knew how to get this done. He was also very much part of ongoing research about crossbill activity in Arkansas since at least March 2017. Our 2015 paper included important information about crossbill Call Types documented in Arkansas. Our more recent activity has focused specifically on identifying Call Types, with audio recordings and analysis by UA-Fayetteville graduate students Anant Deswhal and Pooja Panwar backed up by Matt Young at Cornell. Of course, Kim was also keenly interested in documenting possible crossbill nesting in the state. Since early 2017, we have managed to find three probable instances of nesting, documented with photographs and/or audio recordings. One of those came yesterday. Pooja obtained audio recordings of crossbills at Fayetteville Country Club from a group that was accompanied by a juvenile, that we photographed. This adds further evidence that crossbills have nested in Arkansas. Kim will be a coauthor on that paper, too. In publishing, we will have to be careful about our use of adverbs. Kim famously and humorously referred to what he termed "the death of the adverb" (as in "drive careful") among those of us who grew up in Arkansas (where as he appreciated, we just naturally speak English as a second language).


 

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Date: 4/10/18 10:29 pm
From: pooja panwar <ppanwar...>
Subject: Update on Red Crossbill (A tribute to Dr. Smith)
In his exit seminar on last Thursday (April 5th 2018) Dr. Smith said that
"Be Curious. If you love to study something, find ways to make it happen."

In the same spirit and as a tribute to Dr. Smith, Joe Neal and I headed out
for a birding trip. We were following up on Sara Caulk's reporting of Red
Crossbills on Mt. Sequoyah. We were unable to find them at Mt. Sequoyah, so
we decided to head out for Fayetteville Country Club and some little
birdies were waiting for us.

In most of our visits we hear the Crossbills before seeing them, however,
today we spotted a pair of crossbills foraging and silently sitting in a
pine tree. After observing the pair for 5 minutes, Joe said you know it may
be a breeding pair and at the same moment, I noticed a little birdie, the
juvenile, sitting couple of branches above the pair. It was probably a
crossbills a family. It is the first record of a breeding pair of
Crossbills in Washington County. They were dead silent and trying to stay
still to protect the streaky juvenile. After photographing them and getting
enough recordings for analysis, we moved on to find more crossbills.

Soon we saw another flock of crossbills (6) flying over us and landing on a
bare hardwood tree. To our surprise there was another pair and a juvenile
in the second flock with three other males.

Other notable species encountered today were: Red-breasted nuthatches (2),
FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (1), Sharp-shinned Hawk (1), a pair of Bald
Eagle soaring high, Chipping Sparrow and Eastern Phoebe (2) (at Mt.
Sequoyah).

Dr. Smith and Anant had predicted about the breeding behavior of Red
Crossbills we observed today. I am sure, Dr. Smith would have been very
excited on hearing this. May he Rest in Peace.

Thanks and Regards
Pooja Panwar
PhD Student
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville

 

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Date: 4/10/18 10:22 pm
From: pooja panwar <ppanwar...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Dr. Smith was on my doctoral committee, who not only treated me like a
family member but also was a strong pillar of support for me through my
journey as graduate student. His calmness, passion and enthusiasm inspired
me to be like him one day. Coming from an engineering background and trying
to make it as an ecologist, he would very patiently guide me to find my
niche and hone my skills. I just gave my comps and he said to me with his
trademark smile that he really liked my answers, that just made my day.

I took a trip with him to Belize last year and I was totally blown away by
him, I became his huge fan and looked forward to taking more trips with
him. Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan would infuse huge passion and energy in the
course that made it life changing for me. I look up to them as my role
model for my life ahead.

In his exit seminar, apart from his mesmerizing and adventurous life, he
shared with us few words of advice.
- Be curious
- Take more field trips, it an lifetime experience
- If you really love to study something, find ways to make it happen

Dr. Smith, your teachings, guidance, and memories will always be the
guiding light in my life. When I close my eyes I can see his smiling face
that will always encourage me to be a better researcher and a better human
being.

On Tue, Apr 10, 2018 at 10:57 PM, Debra Hale-Shelton <
<dshelton...> wrote:

> I did not know Dr. Smith personally and never met him, but I was always
> impressed by his oversight of this online bird group. I am saddened by his
> death and extend my heartfelt sympathy to his family and friends. To love
> birds so much, Dr. Smith was obviously not only a knowledgeable man but
> also a kind one. I love the idea of the April 24 tribute.
>
> Debra Hale-Shelton
> Conway
>
>

 

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Date: 4/10/18 8:57 pm
From: Debra Hale-Shelton <dshelton...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
I did not know Dr. Smith personally and never met him, but I was always impressed by his oversight of this online bird group. I am saddened by his death and extend my heartfelt sympathy to his family and friends. To love birds so much, Dr. Smith was obviously not only a knowledgeable man but also a kind one. I love the idea of the April 24 tribute.

Debra Hale-Shelton
Conway


 

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Date: 4/10/18 6:36 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Fwd:
My evening spent with Kim Smith and two of his sisters while capturing a
Saw-whit Owl. I will always remember when the Owl was released, it flew a
few feet to a limb and we all stood in silence for many minutes looking at
the Owl (a snapshot of time, and beauty of nature to us all). I hope this
picture is received, maybe some in his family may see the knowledge and
enjoyment he passed on to others. My time spent with Kim and his sisters
was warm.


Terry Butler


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Date: Tue, Apr 10, 2018 at 8:09 PM
Subject:
To: <twbutler1941...>







Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 4/10/18 6:16 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Delete me please
Instructions for unsubscribing to this list are found on Arkansas Audubon
Societys page about this listserv
http://www.arbirds.org/arbirds_discussion.html

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 4/10/18, 7:01 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
JimBon Todd" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <jimbontodd...>
wrote:

I'm moving out of state, please take my name off this list. Have enjoyed
this list and learned a lot. Thanks everyone.



 

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Date: 4/10/18 5:01 pm
From: JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...>
Subject: Delete me please
I'm moving out of state, please take my name off this list. Have enjoyed
this list and learned a lot. Thanks everyone.

 

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Date: 4/10/18 3:51 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: partial albino Eurasian-collared Dove and fond thoughts of Dr. Kim Smith
Greetings all,
I have an interesting Collared-Dove, here in Hector. Most parts are frosty White, except the upper wing area is a dirty Brown-White and the collar is a full Black. It's the same size as the other Collared-Doves and it's talking the right language.

Greetings Kim,
I'm going to miss your huge ornithological knowledge, but also the humor, the laughter in your eyes and your love of the outdoors. Missing you, Leif at Hector.




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 4/10/18 2:44 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
It's so sad for all of us that our state has lost one of its best bird advocates.  Kim was strongly involved in two organizations that have meant a ton to me, the Ozark Natural Science Center and the Arkansas Audubon Society.  Kim introduced so many of you to ONSC through his Saw-whet Owl work, though he'd been involved there for many moons.  He was an ardent supporter of the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, and if I'm remembering correctly both an early recipient and later trust chair.  Mostly though, I'm saddened for the many friends and colleagues of mine who've been friends, colleagues, and students of Kim Smith.  I'm so sorry for your loss.  I really feel for Kim's family and his daughter Mallory, my former high school classmate.  I hope they are glad to hear how much he meant to our birding community, though I'm sure little will make this tragic, sudden loss easier.
Adam Schaffer

On ‎Monday‎, ‎April‎ ‎9‎, ‎2018‎ ‎04‎:‎23‎:‎50‎ ‎PM‎ ‎CDT, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> wrote:

I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.

Alyssa DeRubeis
 

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Date: 4/10/18 2:39 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Krider's v light morph Harlan's
I have been trying to sort out spring departure dates for two whitish-looking Red-tailed Hawk subspecies present in winter in Arkansas: Kriders Hawk and light morph Harlans Hawk. This question is prompted by a whitish-looking buteo we saw near Charleston last Saturday. I saw what I think is same bird on Monday. I have never photographed a for-sure Kriders later than the end of February in Arkansas. My assumption is they head for the northern Great Plains around this time for nesting. Dark morph Harlans are routinely present around northwest Arkansas into early April, so I assume the light morph birds would be here until then, too. If you have photographed a Kriders or any whitish-looking buteo in Arkansas LATER than the end of February, I would like to see the photo please include date and place with the photo. Thanks. If I get any results based upon this inquiry, will share them here.


 

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Date: 4/10/18 1:46 pm
From: zcaywood <zcaywood...>
Subject: DR Kim
What a great trip we had to Costa Rica in 2017 with Kim’s eternal patience. So glad that I had an opportunity to travel with him and meet this knowledgeable gentleman who had a passion and a vision.




Zoe Caywood 479 236 4086


 

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Date: 4/10/18 1:44 pm
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
I agree, Elizabeth. I did not know Dr. Smith well, but I enjoyed the few
times we interacted in person or email. I was sad to hear of his passing.
My condolences to his family.

Sarah Morris

On Tue, Apr 10, 2018 at 3:28 PM Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
wrote:

> Anant, your message is very moving. Anyone would be deeply honored to be
> the subject of such a tribute. Dr. Smith was fortunate to have you as a
> student.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Apr 10, 2018, at 10:20 AM, Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
> wrote:
>
> Yesterday, I kept saying to myself this is a terrible nightmare and it
> will end. Words fall short when talking about Dr. Smith. I am struggling to
> process my thoughts and emotions. Dr. Smith was not only on my doctoral
> committee but also treated me like family. Back in 2014, when I was
> starting my graduate life he suggested to me to go to IOC, Japan with him.
> It was an amazing experience to travel with him. I will forever cherish the
> memories of us trying to figure out our way in Japan without knowing the
> language.
> He has been the guiding light in my life that shone brightest every time I
> was in despair or lost. I am struggling to write this email, as I feel lost
> just now and the light I desperately need is missing.
> Last year, I was with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan as a TA for the Belize
> Course. The course changed my life and I would tell everyone to take the
> course with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan, the two most amazing, enterprising
> and knowledgeable people on Earth. They had an amazing chemistry as faculty
> and energy level of the course was breathtaking. Barely a month later I was
> ready to embark on another adventure with Dr. Smith.
> He was inspiring beyond any measure and cared a lot for his students. I
> was emotionally overwhelmed when he asked me to take his place for the
> Trinidad and Tobago with Dr. Kannan. He wanted me to go explore the world.
> Yesterday, Pooja and I faced the task of breaking the news to Dr. James.
> We felt emotionally crippled and asked Joe Neal for his help. Joe most
> graciously agreed to help. Dr. James was shocked to hear the news and could
> not believe it for a moment.
> Dr. Smith, you will always be with me on all the adventures, research
> projects! I dedicate my dissertation to you!!!
>
> Regards
> Anant Deshwal
> Ph.D. Candidate
> Department of Biological Sciences
> University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
> http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/
>
> On Apr 10, 2018, at 6:36 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <
> <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Harriet, your kind words are soothing to his former and current students,
> myself including. No words can adequately express my deep sorrow on Kim's
> demise. I have been in shock since last evening.
>
> I had dinner with him Saturday night at the Arkansas Academy of Science
> banquet. He told me that he looked forward to continue teaching the Belize
> course with me in the years ahead. The study abroad program we ran was
> important to him. In his exit seminar last week for the department, he
> urged his colleagues into doing such ventures and asked "How come I am the
> only one doing a study abroad program?"
>
> The suddenness of this is hard to stomach. Just last week he was praising
> Pooja for her stellar performance in her comp exams. "One of the best--she
> wrote 38 pages", he said. He was always patient, considerate, and
> inspirational to his students. Recruiting Anant as a TA for the Belize
> course was one of his best moves for our study abroad program. He gladly
> (and magnanimously) stepped aside and let Anant take his seat for our
> Trinidad program this May.
>
> Kim and I raised about $1300 for the AAS trust last year, and I was
> looking forward to doing more with him in his retired years. So sad he
> will not be around. I cannot believe I am referring to him in the past
> tense.
>
> Kannan
>
> On Tuesday 10 April 2018, 4:43:15 AM GMT-5, Harriet Hillis Jansma <
> <hjansma...> wrote:
>
>
> For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's students
> have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his generous
> encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate concentration. Dr.
> Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of his most faithful
> colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar to do
> their graduate work here, and their reports to the list have enlivened it.
> From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis was encouraged by Kim to do her
> grad work here too. Mitchell Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious,
> since he began his bird study while still in high school in Arkansas.
>
> But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us in
> Fayetteville) our physical community. It will be sad that Kim won't be
> leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the month in
> Bentonville.
>
> Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic
> ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.
>
> Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on
> these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their
> graduate work. I send all of them my encouragement and love at this
> difficult time.
>
> Harriet Jansma
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> on behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
> *Sent:* Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Dr. Kim Smith
>
> So sad to read this news. He will be sorely missed.
>
> Drew M Phillips
>
> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
> wrote:
>
> In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the
> pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university
> students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational
> needs. I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so
> connected to her must be worthy indeed. Later on, Kim and I worked
> together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the
> university's counseling center. These were very enjoyable collaborations.
> And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as
> the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had
> strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound
> influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.
>
> I can hardly believe it. I can't believe it. My thanks to Alyssa for
> letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students. My
> condolences.
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
> wrote:
>
> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed
> away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an
> administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the
> University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of
> Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated.
> Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he
> seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was
> about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he
> was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society
> conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim,
> please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for
> the sad news.
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 1:28 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Anant, your message is very moving. Anyone would be deeply honored to be the subject of such a tribute. Dr. Smith was fortunate to have you as a student.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 10, 2018, at 10:20 AM, Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> wrote:
>
> Yesterday, I kept saying to myself this is a terrible nightmare and it will end. Words fall short when talking about Dr. Smith. I am struggling to process my thoughts and emotions. Dr. Smith was not only on my doctoral committee but also treated me like family. Back in 2014, when I was starting my graduate life he suggested to me to go to IOC, Japan with him. It was an amazing experience to travel with him. I will forever cherish the memories of us trying to figure out our way in Japan without knowing the language.
> He has been the guiding light in my life that shone brightest every time I was in despair or lost. I am struggling to write this email, as I feel lost just now and the light I desperately need is missing.
> Last year, I was with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan as a TA for the Belize Course. The course changed my life and I would tell everyone to take the course with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan, the two most amazing, enterprising and knowledgeable people on Earth. They had an amazing chemistry as faculty and energy level of the course was breathtaking. Barely a month later I was ready to embark on another adventure with Dr. Smith.
> He was inspiring beyond any measure and cared a lot for his students. I was emotionally overwhelmed when he asked me to take his place for the Trinidad and Tobago with Dr. Kannan. He wanted me to go explore the world.
> Yesterday, Pooja and I faced the task of breaking the news to Dr. James. We felt emotionally crippled and asked Joe Neal for his help. Joe most graciously agreed to help. Dr. James was shocked to hear the news and could not believe it for a moment.
> Dr. Smith, you will always be with me on all the adventures, research projects! I dedicate my dissertation to you!!!
>
> Regards
> Anant Deshwal
> Ph.D. Candidate
> Department of Biological Sciences
> University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
> http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/
>
>> On Apr 10, 2018, at 6:36 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> Harriet, your kind words are soothing to his former and current students, myself including. No words can adequately express my deep sorrow on Kim's demise. I have been in shock since last evening.
>>
>> I had dinner with him Saturday night at the Arkansas Academy of Science banquet. He told me that he looked forward to continue teaching the Belize course with me in the years ahead. The study abroad program we ran was important to him. In his exit seminar last week for the department, he urged his colleagues into doing such ventures and asked "How come I am the only one doing a study abroad program?"
>>
>> The suddenness of this is hard to stomach. Just last week he was praising Pooja for her stellar performance in her comp exams. "One of the best--she wrote 38 pages", he said. He was always patient, considerate, and inspirational to his students. Recruiting Anant as a TA for the Belize course was one of his best moves for our study abroad program. He gladly (and magnanimously) stepped aside and let Anant take his seat for our Trinidad program this May.
>>
>> Kim and I raised about $1300 for the AAS trust last year, and I was looking forward to doing more with him in his retired years. So sad he will not be around. I cannot believe I am referring to him in the past tense.
>>
>> Kannan
>>
>> On Tuesday 10 April 2018, 4:43:15 AM GMT-5, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's students have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his generous encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate concentration. Dr. Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of his most faithful colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar to do their graduate work here, and their reports to the list have enlivened it. From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis was encouraged by Kim to do her grad work here too. Mitchell Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious, since he began his bird study while still in high school in Arkansas.
>>
>> But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us in Fayetteville) our physical community. It will be sad that Kim won't be leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the month in Bentonville.
>>
>> Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.
>>
>> Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their graduate work. I send all of them my encouragement and love at this difficult time.
>>
>> Harriet Jansma
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
>> Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
>>
>> So sad to read this news. He will be sorely missed.
>>
>> Drew M Phillips
>>
>> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> wrote:
>> In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational needs. I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so connected to her must be worthy indeed. Later on, Kim and I worked together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the university's counseling center. These were very enjoyable collaborations. And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.
>>
>> I can hardly believe it. I can't believe it. My thanks to Alyssa for letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students. My condolences.
>>
>> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>> Licensed Psychologist
>> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>>
>> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> wrote:
>> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.
>>
>> Alyssa DeRubeis
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 1:21 pm
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Thank you. I hope so too.

Sent from my iPad

> On Apr 10, 2018, at 3:05 PM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I forwarded all these tributes to Peggy. Hopefully that will help her cope.
>
> On Tuesday, 10 April, 2018, 10:32:39 AM GMT-5, Ann Gordon <chesterann...> wrote:
>
>
> Reading all the heartfelt and highly personal tributes to Dr. Kim Smith I only wish that I had been able to spend more time in his company. His family, friends, colleagues and the birding community have lost a shining light.
>
> On Tue, Apr 10, 2018 at 10:20 AM, Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> wrote:
> Yesterday, I kept saying to myself this is a terrible nightmare and it will end. Words fall short when talking about Dr. Smith. I am struggling to process my thoughts and emotions. Dr. Smith was not only on my doctoral committee but also treated me like family. Back in 2014, when I was starting my graduate life he suggested to me to go to IOC, Japan with him. It was an amazing experience to travel with him. I will forever cherish the memories of us trying to figure out our way in Japan without knowing the language.
> He has been the guiding light in my life that shone brightest every time I was in despair or lost. I am struggling to write this email, as I feel lost just now and the light I desperately need is missing.
> Last year, I was with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan as a TA for the Belize Course. The course changed my life and I would tell everyone to take the course with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan, the two most amazing, enterprising and knowledgeable people on Earth. They had an amazing chemistry as faculty and energy level of the course was breathtaking. Barely a month later I was ready to embark on another adventure with Dr. Smith.
> He was inspiring beyond any measure and cared a lot for his students. I was emotionally overwhelmed when he asked me to take his place for the Trinidad and Tobago with Dr. Kannan. He wanted me to go explore the world.
> Yesterday, Pooja and I faced the task of breaking the news to Dr. James. We felt emotionally crippled and asked Joe Neal for his help. Joe most graciously agreed to help. Dr. James was shocked to hear the news and could not believe it for a moment.
> Dr. Smith, you will always be with me on all the adventures, research projects! I dedicate my dissertation to you!!!
>
> Regards
> Anant Deshwal
> Ph.D. Candidate
> Department of Biological Sciences
> University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
> http://thegreenergrassblade. blogspot.com/
>
>> On Apr 10, 2018, at 6:36 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc- <request...> wrote:
>>
>> Harriet, your kind words are soothing to his former and current students, myself including. No words can adequately express my deep sorrow on Kim's demise. I have been in shock since last evening.
>>
>> I had dinner with him Saturday night at the Arkansas Academy of Science banquet. He told me that he looked forward to continue teaching the Belize course with me in the years ahead. The study abroad program we ran was important to him. In his exit seminar last week for the department, he urged his colleagues into doing such ventures and asked "How come I am the only one doing a study abroad program?"
>>
>> The suddenness of this is hard to stomach. Just last week he was praising Pooja for her stellar performance in her comp exams. "One of the best--she wrote 38 pages", he said. He was always patient, considerate, and inspirational to his students. Recruiting Anant as a TA for the Belize course was one of his best moves for our study abroad program. He gladly (and magnanimously) stepped aside and let Anant take his seat for our Trinidad program this May.
>>
>> Kim and I raised about $1300 for the AAS trust last year, and I was looking forward to doing more with him in his retired years. So sad he will not be around. I cannot believe I am referring to him in the past tense.
>>
>> Kannan
>>
>> On Tuesday 10 April 2018, 4:43:15 AM GMT-5, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's students have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his generous encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate concentration. Dr. Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of his most faithful colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar to do their graduate work here, and their reports to the list have enlivened it. From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis was encouraged by Kim to do her grad work here too. Mitchell Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious, since he began his bird study while still in high school in Arkansas.
>>
>> But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us in Fayetteville) our physical community. It will be sad that Kim won't be leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the month in Bentonville.
>>
>> Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.
>>
>> Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their graduate work. I send all of them my encouragement and love at this difficult time.
>>
>> Harriet Jansma
>>
>>> Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
>>> To:<ARBIRD-L...>
>>>
>>>
>>> 10 Apr at 7:08 AM
>>>
>>> I can’t speak highly enough of Dr. Kim Smith and am still processing the news that I received yesterday morning, after arriving in Tucson. Half his lab, Kim, and his wonderful wife Peggy had all planned to spend the week at the AOS meeting together.
>>>
>>> Kim has been one of my biggest mentors and advocates, beginning in high school when I first visited the U of A. He treated my mom and I to lunch and we discussed possibilities for a future at the university. Many of you know that after starting out as a biology major, I switched to business. For 2 semesters I droned through the business world. Kim tried often to get me to come around. I met with him one day and he mentioned this fools-errand project he wanted to undertake and invited me along for the ride, if I’d come back to biology. The goal of the project was to document the occurrence of a mysterious and tiny owl in Arkansas. I was neck deep in my love of birds at this point, but was not really concerned with owls. I had maybe heard the name “saw-whet” spoken once.
>>>
>>> Finishing up my sophomore year, tired of business, and looking at the sweet deal Kim had to offer, the decision to embark on this journey was an easy one. Kim got his wish and I came back to the sciences. I wasn’t yet sure a career in field biology was what I wanted, so I enrolled in classes to pursue a degree in Environmental Science. In fall 2014, we got started and, well, you know the rest. Four years later, here I am almost done with my master’s in biology under Kim.
>>>
>>> Kim has been one of the greatest inspirations in my life. Without him, I certainly wouldn’t be where I am now. My relationship with Kim will have made all the difference. I think the same can be said by all of his students.
>>>
>>> It was a magnificent pleasure knowing Kim, both professionally and personally. I know I’m not the only one who will miss him greatly.
>>
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
>> Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
>>
>> So sad to read this news. He will be sorely missed.
>>
>> Drew M Phillips
>>
>> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> wrote:
>> In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational needs. I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so connected to her must be worthy indeed. Later on, Kim and I worked together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the university's counseling center. These were very enjoyable collaborations. And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.
>>
>> I can hardly believe it. I can't believe it. My thanks to Alyssa for letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students. My condolences.
>>
>> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>> Licensed Psychologist
>> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>>
>> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> > wrote:
>> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.
>>
>> Alyssa DeRubeis
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 1:05 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
I forwarded all these tributes to Peggy.  Hopefully that will help her cope.  
On Tuesday, 10 April, 2018, 10:32:39 AM GMT-5, Ann Gordon <chesterann...> wrote:

Reading all the heartfelt and highly personal tributes to Dr. Kim Smith I only wish that I had been able to spend more time in his company.  His family, friends, colleagues and the birding community have lost a shining light. 

On Tue, Apr 10, 2018 at 10:20 AM, Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> wrote:

Yesterday, I kept saying to myself this is a terrible nightmare and it will end. Words fall short when talking about Dr. Smith. I am struggling to process my thoughts and emotions. Dr. Smith was not only on my doctoral committee but also treated me like family. Back in 2014, when I was starting my graduate life he suggested to me to go to IOC, Japan with him. It was an amazing experience to travel with him. I will forever cherish the memories of us trying to figure out our way in Japan without knowing the language. He has been the guiding light in my life that shone brightest every time I was in despair or lost. I am struggling to write this email, as I feel lost just now and the light I desperately need is missing.Last year, I was with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan as a TA for the Belize Course. The course changed my life and I would tell everyone to take the course with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan, the two most amazing, enterprising and knowledgeable people on Earth. They had an amazing chemistry as faculty and energy level of the course was breathtaking. Barely a month later I was ready to embark on another adventure with Dr. Smith. He was inspiring beyond any measure and cared a lot for his students. I was emotionally overwhelmed when he asked me to take his place for the Trinidad and Tobago with Dr. Kannan. He wanted me to go explore the world.Yesterday, Pooja and I faced the task of breaking the news to Dr. James. We felt emotionally crippled and asked Joe Neal for his help. Joe most graciously agreed to help. Dr. James was shocked to hear the news and could not believe it for a moment. Dr. Smith, you will always be with me on all the adventures, research projects! I dedicate my dissertation to you!!!
Regards
Anant Deshwal 
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville 
http://thegreenergrassblade. blogspot.com/

On Apr 10, 2018, at 6:36 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc- <request...> wrote:
Harriet, your kind words are soothing to his former and current students, myself including.  No words can adequately express my deep sorrow on Kim's demise. I have been in shock since last evening.  
I had dinner with him Saturday night at the Arkansas Academy of Science banquet.  He told me that he looked forward to continue teaching the Belize course with me in the years ahead.  The study abroad program we ran was important to him.  In his exit seminar last week for the department, he urged his colleagues into doing such ventures and asked "How come I am the only one doing a study abroad program?"
The suddenness of this is hard to stomach.  Just last week he was praising Pooja for her stellar performance in her comp exams.  "One of the best--she wrote 38 pages", he said.  He was always patient, considerate, and inspirational to his students.  Recruiting Anant as a TA for the Belize course was one of his best moves for our study abroad program.  He gladly (and magnanimously) stepped aside and let Anant take his seat for our Trinidad program this May. 
Kim and I raised about $1300 for the AAS trust last year, and I was looking forward to doing more with him in his retired years.  So sad he will not be around. I cannot believe I am referring to him in the past tense.

Kannan

On Tuesday 10 April 2018, 4:43:15 AM GMT-5, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:

For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's students have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his generous encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate concentration.  Dr. Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of his most faithful colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar to do their graduate work here, and their reports to the list have enlivened it. From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis was encouraged by Kim to do her grad work here too.  Mitchell Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious, since he began his bird study while still in high school in Arkansas.
But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us in Fayetteville) our physical community.  It will be sad that Kim won't be leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the month in Bentonville.
Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.
Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their graduate work.  I send all of them my encouragement and love at this difficult time.
Harriet Jansma

Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>To:<ARBIRD-L...> Apr at 7:08 AM
I can’t speak highly enough of Dr. Kim Smith and am still processing the news that I received yesterday morning, after arriving in Tucson. Half his lab, Kim, and his wonderful wife Peggy had all planned to spend the week at the AOS meeting together.




Kim has been one of my biggest mentors and advocates, beginning in high school when I first visited the U of A. He treated my mom and I to lunch and we discussed possibilities for a future at the university. Many of you know that after starting out as a biology major, I switched to business. For 2 semesters I droned through the business world. Kim tried often to get me to come around. I met with him one day and he mentioned this fools-errand project he wanted to undertake and invited me along for the ride, if I’d come back to biology. The goal of the project was to document the occurrence of a mysterious and tiny owl in Arkansas. I was neck deep in my love of birds at this point, but was not really concerned with owls. I had maybe heard the name “saw-whet” spoken once.




Finishing up my sophomore year, tired of business, and looking at the sweet deal Kim had to offer, the decision to embark on this journey was an easy one. Kim got his wish and I came back to the sciences. I wasn’t yet sure a career in field biology was what I wanted, so I enrolled in classes to pursue a degree in Environmental Science. In fall 2014, we got started and, well, you know the rest. Four years later, here I am almost done with my master’s in biology under Kim.




Kim has been one of the greatest inspirations in my life. Without him, I certainly wouldn’t be where I am now. My relationship with Kim will have made all the difference. I think the same can be said by all of his students.




It was a magnificent pleasure knowing Kim, both professionally and personally. I know I’m not the only one who will miss him greatly.


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith So sad to read this news.  He will be sorely missed.
Drew M Phillips 
On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> wrote:

In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational needs.  I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so connected to her must be worthy indeed.  Later on, Kim and I worked together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the university's counseling center.  These were very enjoyable collaborations.  And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.
I can hardly believe it.  I can't believe it.  My thanks to Alyssa for letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students.  My condolences.
Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.Licensed PsychologistFayetteville, Arkansas
On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> > wrote:

I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.

Alyssa DeRubeis 






 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 8:32 am
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Reading all the heartfelt and highly personal tributes to Dr. Kim Smith I
only wish that I had been able to spend more time in his company. His
family, friends, colleagues and the birding community have lost a shining
light.

On Tue, Apr 10, 2018 at 10:20 AM, Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
wrote:

> Yesterday, I kept saying to myself this is a terrible nightmare and it
> will end. Words fall short when talking about Dr. Smith. I am struggling to
> process my thoughts and emotions. Dr. Smith was not only on my doctoral
> committee but also treated me like family. Back in 2014, when I was
> starting my graduate life he suggested to me to go to IOC, Japan with him.
> It was an amazing experience to travel with him. I will forever cherish the
> memories of us trying to figure out our way in Japan without knowing the
> language.
> He has been the guiding light in my life that shone brightest every time I
> was in despair or lost. I am struggling to write this email, as I feel lost
> just now and the light I desperately need is missing.
> Last year, I was with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan as a TA for the Belize
> Course. The course changed my life and I would tell everyone to take the
> course with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan, the two most amazing, enterprising
> and knowledgeable people on Earth. They had an amazing chemistry as faculty
> and energy level of the course was breathtaking. Barely a month later I was
> ready to embark on another adventure with Dr. Smith.
> He was inspiring beyond any measure and cared a lot for his students. I
> was emotionally overwhelmed when he asked me to take his place for the
> Trinidad and Tobago with Dr. Kannan. He wanted me to go explore the world.
> Yesterday, Pooja and I faced the task of breaking the news to Dr. James.
> We felt emotionally crippled and asked Joe Neal for his help. Joe most
> graciously agreed to help. Dr. James was shocked to hear the news and could
> not believe it for a moment.
> Dr. Smith, you will always be with me on all the adventures, research
> projects! I dedicate my dissertation to you!!!
>
> Regards
> Anant Deshwal
> Ph.D. Candidate
> Department of Biological Sciences
> University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
> http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/
>
> On Apr 10, 2018, at 6:36 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-
> <request...> wrote:
>
> Harriet, your kind words are soothing to his former and current students,
> myself including. No words can adequately express my deep sorrow on Kim's
> demise. I have been in shock since last evening.
>
> I had dinner with him Saturday night at the Arkansas Academy of Science
> banquet. He told me that he looked forward to continue teaching the Belize
> course with me in the years ahead. The study abroad program we ran was
> important to him. In his exit seminar last week for the department, he
> urged his colleagues into doing such ventures and asked "How come I am the
> only one doing a study abroad program?"
>
> The suddenness of this is hard to stomach. Just last week he was praising
> Pooja for her stellar performance in her comp exams. "One of the best--she
> wrote 38 pages", he said. He was always patient, considerate, and
> inspirational to his students. Recruiting Anant as a TA for the Belize
> course was one of his best moves for our study abroad program. He gladly
> (and magnanimously) stepped aside and let Anant take his seat for our
> Trinidad program this May.
>
> Kim and I raised about $1300 for the AAS trust last year, and I was
> looking forward to doing more with him in his retired years. So sad he
> will not be around. I cannot believe I am referring to him in the past
> tense.
>
> Kannan
>
> On Tuesday 10 April 2018, 4:43:15 AM GMT-5, Harriet Hillis Jansma <
> <hjansma...> wrote:
>
>
> For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's students
> have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his generous
> encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate concentration. Dr.
> Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of his most faithful
> colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar to do
> their graduate work here, and their reports to the list have enlivened it.
> From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis was encouraged by Kim to do her
> grad work here too. Mitchell Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious,
> since he began his bird study while still in high school in Arkansas.
>
> But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us in
> Fayetteville) our physical community. It will be sad that Kim won't be
> leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the month in
> Bentonville.
>
> Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic
> ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.
>
> Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on
> these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their
> graduate work. I send all of them my encouragement and love at this
> difficult time.
>
> Harriet Jansma
> ------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> on behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
> *Sent:* Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Dr. Kim Smith
>
> So sad to read this news. He will be sorely missed.
>
> Drew M Phillips
>
> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
> wrote:
>
> In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the
> pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university
> students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational
> needs. I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so
> connected to her must be worthy indeed. Later on, Kim and I worked
> together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the
> university's counseling center. These were very enjoyable collaborations.
> And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as
> the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had
> strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound
> influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.
>
> I can hardly believe it. I can't believe it. My thanks to Alyssa for
> letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students. My
> condolences.
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
> wrote:
>
> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed
> away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an
> administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the
> University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of
> Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated.
> Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he
> seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was
> about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he
> was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society
> conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim,
> please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for
> the sad news.
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 8:20 am
From: Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Yesterday, I kept saying to myself this is a terrible nightmare and it will end. Words fall short when talking about Dr. Smith. I am struggling to process my thoughts and emotions. Dr. Smith was not only on my doctoral committee but also treated me like family. Back in 2014, when I was starting my graduate life he suggested to me to go to IOC, Japan with him. It was an amazing experience to travel with him. I will forever cherish the memories of us trying to figure out our way in Japan without knowing the language.
He has been the guiding light in my life that shone brightest every time I was in despair or lost. I am struggling to write this email, as I feel lost just now and the light I desperately need is missing.
Last year, I was with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan as a TA for the Belize Course. The course changed my life and I would tell everyone to take the course with Dr. Smith and Dr. Kannan, the two most amazing, enterprising and knowledgeable people on Earth. They had an amazing chemistry as faculty and energy level of the course was breathtaking. Barely a month later I was ready to embark on another adventure with Dr. Smith.
He was inspiring beyond any measure and cared a lot for his students. I was emotionally overwhelmed when he asked me to take his place for the Trinidad and Tobago with Dr. Kannan. He wanted me to go explore the world.
Yesterday, Pooja and I faced the task of breaking the news to Dr. James. We felt emotionally crippled and asked Joe Neal for his help. Joe most graciously agreed to help. Dr. James was shocked to hear the news and could not believe it for a moment.
Dr. Smith, you will always be with me on all the adventures, research projects! I dedicate my dissertation to you!!!

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/

> On Apr 10, 2018, at 6:36 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Harriet, your kind words are soothing to his former and current students, myself including. No words can adequately express my deep sorrow on Kim's demise. I have been in shock since last evening.
>
> I had dinner with him Saturday night at the Arkansas Academy of Science banquet. He told me that he looked forward to continue teaching the Belize course with me in the years ahead. The study abroad program we ran was important to him. In his exit seminar last week for the department, he urged his colleagues into doing such ventures and asked "How come I am the only one doing a study abroad program?"
>
> The suddenness of this is hard to stomach. Just last week he was praising Pooja for her stellar performance in her comp exams. "One of the best--she wrote 38 pages", he said. He was always patient, considerate, and inspirational to his students. Recruiting Anant as a TA for the Belize course was one of his best moves for our study abroad program. He gladly (and magnanimously) stepped aside and let Anant take his seat for our Trinidad program this May.
>
> Kim and I raised about $1300 for the AAS trust last year, and I was looking forward to doing more with him in his retired years. So sad he will not be around. I cannot believe I am referring to him in the past tense.
>
> Kannan
>
> On Tuesday 10 April 2018, 4:43:15 AM GMT-5, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:
>
>
> For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's students have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his generous encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate concentration. Dr. Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of his most faithful colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar to do their graduate work here, and their reports to the list have enlivened it. From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis was encouraged by Kim to do her grad work here too. Mitchell Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious, since he began his bird study while still in high school in Arkansas.
>
> But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us in Fayetteville) our physical community. It will be sad that Kim won't be leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the month in Bentonville.
>
> Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.
>
> Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their graduate work. I send all of them my encouragement and love at this difficult time.
>
> Harriet Jansma
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
> Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
>
> So sad to read this news. He will be sorely missed.
>
> Drew M Phillips
>
> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> <mailto:<jonathanperry24...>> wrote:
> In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational needs. I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so connected to her must be worthy indeed. Later on, Kim and I worked together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the university's counseling center. These were very enjoyable collaborations. And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.
>
> I can hardly believe it. I can't believe it. My thanks to Alyssa for letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students. My condolences.
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> <mailto:<alderubeis...>> wrote:
> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis


 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 7:50 am
From: James Morgan <jlmm...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Kim served on the Ozark Slow Food board with several of us that are
interested in local, sustainable, environmentally friendly food production.
We are a having a fund raiser on April 24th that celebrates the advances
in local food production from non-heated "Hoop houses/High Tunnels".
Fore example, these hoop houses allow harvesting of local tomatoes into
December and strawberries as early as March and greens all winter. High
tunnels don't require energy/fuel for heating that greenhouses do or
long distance transportation of vegetables and berries from California
or Florida or Mexico.

The event is called "Hoop-La!" and is a celebration of local food.

For Hoop-La!, Kim had just procured two cases of donated wine from
Liquor World, arranged the chef for a 4 course dinner of locally grown
food and made the arrangements at the Garden Room where the dinner is
held. (I could go on with his efforts)

The proceeds of the dinner go toward promoting local environmentally
sound food production in the Ozarks.

On April 24th around 6:00 PM during "Hoop-La", we invite those on the
Bird list to simultaneously across the state to raise a glass of wine or
your preferred drink in Memory and Tribute to Kim. Afterwards we will
enjoy a good meal and music from Smokey and the Mirror.

Cheers
Jim Morgan
Fayetteville

On 4/10/2018 7:06 AM, Mitchell Pruitt wrote:
>
> I can’t speak highly enough of Dr. Kim Smith and am still processing
> the news that I received yesterday morning, after arriving in Tucson.
> Half his lab, Kim, and his wonderful wife Peggy had all planned to
> spend the week at the AOS meeting together.
>
>
> Kim has been one of my biggest mentors and advocates, beginning in
> high school when I first visited the U of A. He treated my mom and I
> to lunch and we discussed possibilities for a future at the
> university. Many of you know that after starting out as a biology
> major, I switched to business. For 2 semesters I droned through the
> business world. Kim tried often to get me to come around. I met with
> him one day and he mentioned this fools-errand project he wanted to
> undertake and invited me along for the ride, if I’d come back to
> biology. The goal of the project was to document the occurrence of a
> mysterious and tiny owl in Arkansas. I was neck deep in my love of
> birds at this point, but was not really concerned with owls. I had
> maybe heard the name “saw-whet” spoken once.
>
>
> Finishing up my sophomore year, tired of business, and looking at the
> sweet deal Kim had to offer, the decision to embark on this journey
> was an easy one. Kim got his wish and I came back to the sciences. I
> wasn’t yet sure a career in field biology was what I wanted, so I
> enrolled in classes to pursue a degree in Environmental Science. In
> fall 2014, we got started and, well, you know the rest. Four years
> later, here I am almost done with my master’s in biology under Kim.
>
>
> Kim has been one of the greatest inspirations in my life. Without him,
> I certainly wouldn’t be where I am now. My relationship with Kim will
> have made all the difference. I think the same can be said by all of
> his students.
>
>
> It was a magnificent pleasure knowing Kim, both professionally and
> personally. I know I’m not the only one who will miss him greatly.
>
>
> Mitchell
>
>
> image2.png
>
> Sent from my iPhone.
>
> On Apr 10, 2018, at 04:36, Ragupathy Kannan
> <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
> <mailto:<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>
>> Harriet, your kind words are soothing to his former and current
>> students, myself including.  No words can adequately express my deep
>> sorrow on Kim's demise. I have been in shock since last evening.
>>
>> I had dinner with him Saturday night at the Arkansas Academy of
>> Science banquet.  He told me that he looked forward to continue
>> teaching the Belize course with me in the years ahead.  The study
>> abroad program we ran was important to him.  In his exit seminar last
>> week for the department, he urged his colleagues into doing such
>> ventures and asked "How come I am the only one doing a study abroad
>> program?"
>>
>> The suddenness of this is hard to stomach.  Just last week he was
>> praising Pooja for her stellar performance in her comp exams.  "One
>> of the best--she wrote 38 pages", he said.  He was always patient,
>> considerate, and inspirational to his students.  Recruiting Anant as
>> a TA for the Belize course was one of his best moves for our study
>> abroad program.  He gladly (and magnanimously) stepped aside and let
>> Anant take his seat for our Trinidad program this May.
>>
>> Kim and I raised about $1300 for the AAS trust last year, and I was
>> looking forward to doing more with him in his retired years.  So sad
>> he will not be around. I cannot believe I am referring to him in the
>> past tense.
>>
>> Kannan
>>
>> On Tuesday 10 April 2018, 4:43:15 AM GMT-5, Harriet Hillis Jansma
>> <hjansma...> <mailto:<hjansma...>> wrote:
>>
>>
>> For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's
>> students have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his
>> generous encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate
>> concentration.  Dr. Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of
>> his most faithful colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal
>> and Pooja Panwar to do their graduate work here, and their reports to
>> the list have enlivened it. From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis
>> was encouraged by Kim to do her grad work here too.  Mitchell
>> Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious, since he began his bird
>> study while still in high school in Arkansas.
>>
>>
>> But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us
>> in Fayetteville) our physical community.  It will be sad that Kim
>> won't be leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the
>> month in Bentonville.
>>
>>
>> Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic
>> ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.
>>
>>
>> Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on
>> these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their
>> graduate work.  I send all of them my encouragement and love at this
>> difficult time.
>>
>>
>> Harriet Jansma
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
>> <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>> on
>> behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
>> <mailto:<lrarkingfisher...>>
>> *Sent:* Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
>> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
>> *Subject:* Re: Dr. Kim Smith
>> So sad to read this news.  He will be sorely missed.
>>
>> Drew M Phillips
>>
>> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24
>> <jonathanperry24...> <mailto:<jonathanperry24...>> wrote:
>>
>> In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had
>> the pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to
>> university students coming to the U of A with some special,
>> remedial.educational needs.  I admired her greatly, and I had to
>> believe that any man so connected to her must be worthy indeed. 
>> Later on, Kim and I worked together on a couple of projects while
>> I was the director of the university's counseling center.  These
>> were very enjoyable collaborations. And, like all of us, I was
>> blessed day in and day out by his presence as the administrator
>> of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had strayed
>> too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound
>> influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many
>> other places.
>>
>> I can hardly believe it.  I can't believe it.  My thanks to
>> Alyssa for letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for
>> his students.  My condolences.
>>
>> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>> Licensed Psychologist
>> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>>
>> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis
>> <alderubeis...> <mailto:<alderubeis...>> wrote:
>>
>> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s
>> death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In
>> addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim
>> was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas
>> in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell
>> Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already
>> graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological
>> world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity
>> he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and
>> gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was
>> supposed to travel today to attend the American
>> Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where
>> Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it
>> on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the
>> sad news.
>>
>> Alyssa DeRubeis
>>
>>

--
James Morgan
Fayetteville, Arkansas


 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 6:48 am
From: Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...>
Subject: Re: GOLDEN-PLOVERS GO FOR THE GOLD (and our Kim) April 10, 2018

Thanks, Joe, for that story about Dr. Smith. I didn't know him except through this list, but I admired the person he showed there, someone I wish I had known. I felt such sadness at the news, such a sense of loss for all of us. I am glad for the many who whose lives were enriched by him, of which I was one without ever meeting him.

> On Apr 10, 2018, at 7:09 AM, Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>

> On Apr 10, 2018, at 7:09 AM, Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
> Finally, I report this with a heavy heart and mourning for the loss of our friend Kim Smith. Kim served for several years as a Commissioner on the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. New Commissioners receive a badge, a hand gun, and a special license plate. Kim told AG & F that he had no use for the hand gun, so could he instead have a pair of binoculars? Our Kim.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 5:09 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GOLDEN-PLOVERS GO FOR THE GOLD (and our Kim) April 10, 2018
American Golden-Plovers continue in high numbers in expansive fields in the Arkansas River Valley. A flock of Upland Sandpipers we saw in a pasture near Charleston on Saturday was in the same place yesterday.

Concerning golden-plovers: my estimate was at least 250 at West-Ark Sod in Kibler bottoms. Later, during a visit to The Nature Conservancys Presson-Oglesby Preserve north of Charleston, my estimate was 120 golden-plovers. At least 70 golden-plovers were in a big field adjacent Cherokee Prairie. I saw tight flocks in the air above private pastures adjacent Presson-Oglesby, so these numbers are almost certainly conservative.

Most golden-plovers still retain winter plumage, but many are starting to molt that emphasizes light-dark contrast in the neck and head. One bird from yesterday had started the molt that produces gold a few feathers, lots of promise.

The Upland Sandpiper flock (at least 11 birds yesterday) was in a partially flooded pasture. Golden-plovers, Pectoral Sandpipers, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, and Wilsons Snipe were mainly concentrated in wettest parts of the field. Uplands were walking drier areas, with short grass and cover consisting of some prairie flowers like Golden Ragwort and especially bunches of one of the yellow flowering Wild Indigo. Uplands were gliding through it all, just like they owned the place.

A large buteo at Presson-Oglesby stumped us last Saturday. It got me again yesterday. It is some kind of Red-tailed Hawk. Looks light enough in some respects to suggest Kriders, but, well yesterday I got some very poor, distant photos in hopes of figuring this out. It may be a light morph Harlans. I think most or all Kriders Hawks should be gone by now to nesting in the Great Plains my latest photo here is late February. On the other hand, Harlans nests much further to the northwest (Alaska, etc) where I assume nesting may start later. We have dark morph Harlans routinely into early April photographed one last Saturday at Frog Bayou WMA.

Finally, I report this with a heavy heart and mourning for the loss of our friend Kim Smith. Kim served for several years as a Commissioner on the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. New Commissioners receive a badge, a hand gun, and a special license plate. Kim told AG & F that he had no use for the hand gun, so could he instead have a pair of binoculars? Our Kim.


 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 5:08 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
I can’t speak highly enough of Dr. Kim Smith and am still processing the news that I received yesterday morning, after arriving in Tucson. Half his lab, Kim, and his wonderful wife Peggy had all planned to spend the week at the AOS meeting together.

Kim has been one of my biggest mentors and advocates, beginning in high school when I first visited the U of A. He treated my mom and I to lunch and we discussed possibilities for a future at the university. Many of you know that after starting out as a biology major, I switched to business. For 2 semesters I droned through the business world. Kim tried often to get me to come around. I met with him one day and he mentioned this fools-errand project he wanted to undertake and invited me along for the ride, if I’d come back to biology. The goal of the project was to document the occurrence of a mysterious and tiny owl in Arkansas. I was neck deep in my love of birds at this point, but was not really concerned with owls. I had maybe heard the name “saw-whet” spoken once.

Finishing up my sophomore year, tired of business, and looking at the sweet deal Kim had to offer, the decision to embark on this journey was an easy one. Kim got his wish and I came back to the sciences. I wasn’t yet sure a career in field biology was what I wanted, so I enrolled in classes to pursue a degree in Environmental Science. In fall 2014, we got started and, well, you know the rest. Four years later, here I am almost done with my master’s in biology under Kim.

Kim has been one of the greatest inspirations in my life. Without him, I certainly wouldn’t be where I am now. My relationship with Kim will have made all the difference. I think the same can be said by all of his students.

It was a magnificent pleasure knowing Kim, both professionally and personally. I know I’m not the only one who will miss him greatly.

Mitchell




Sent from my iPhone.

> On Apr 10, 2018, at 04:36, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Harriet, your kind words are soothing to his former and current students, myself including. No words can adequately express my deep sorrow on Kim's demise. I have been in shock since last evening.
>
> I had dinner with him Saturday night at the Arkansas Academy of Science banquet. He told me that he looked forward to continue teaching the Belize course with me in the years ahead. The study abroad program we ran was important to him. In his exit seminar last week for the department, he urged his colleagues into doing such ventures and asked "How come I am the only one doing a study abroad program?"
>
> The suddenness of this is hard to stomach. Just last week he was praising Pooja for her stellar performance in her comp exams. "One of the best--she wrote 38 pages", he said. He was always patient, considerate, and inspirational to his students. Recruiting Anant as a TA for the Belize course was one of his best moves for our study abroad program. He gladly (and magnanimously) stepped aside and let Anant take his seat for our Trinidad program this May.
>
> Kim and I raised about $1300 for the AAS trust last year, and I was looking forward to doing more with him in his retired years. So sad he will not be around. I cannot believe I am referring to him in the past tense.
>
> Kannan
>
> On Tuesday 10 April 2018, 4:43:15 AM GMT-5, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:
>
>
> For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's students have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his generous encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate concentration. Dr. Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of his most faithful colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar to do their graduate work here, and their reports to the list have enlivened it. From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis was encouraged by Kim to do her grad work here too. Mitchell Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious, since he began his bird study while still in high school in Arkansas.
>
> But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us in Fayetteville) our physical community. It will be sad that Kim won't be leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the month in Bentonville.
>
> Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.
>
> Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their graduate work. I send all of them my encouragement and love at this difficult time.
>
> Harriet Jansma
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
> Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
>
> So sad to read this news. He will be sorely missed.
>
> Drew M Phillips
>
> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> wrote:
> In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational needs. I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so connected to her must be worthy indeed. Later on, Kim and I worked together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the university's counseling center. These were very enjoyable collaborations. And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.
>
> I can hardly believe it. I can't believe it. My thanks to Alyssa for letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students. My condolences.
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> wrote:
> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 4:37 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Harriet, your kind words are soothing to his former and current students, myself including.  No words can adequately express my deep sorrow on Kim's demise. I have been in shock since last evening. 
I had dinner with him Saturday night at the Arkansas Academy of Science banquet.  He told me that he looked forward to continue teaching the Belize course with me in the years ahead.  The study abroad program we ran was important to him.  In his exit seminar last week for the department, he urged his colleagues into doing such ventures and asked "How come I am the only one doing a study abroad program?"
The suddenness of this is hard to stomach.  Just last week he was praising Pooja for her stellar performance in her comp exams.  "One of the best--she wrote 38 pages", he said.  He was always patient, considerate, and inspirational to his students.  Recruiting Anant as a TA for the Belize course was one of his best moves for our study abroad program.  He gladly (and magnanimously) stepped aside and let Anant take his seat for our Trinidad program this May. 
Kim and I raised about $1300 for the AAS trust last year, and I was looking forward to doing more with him in his retired years.  So sad he will not be around. I cannot believe I am referring to him in the past tense.

Kannan

On Tuesday 10 April 2018, 4:43:15 AM GMT-5, Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:

#yiv5551685903 #yiv5551685903 -- P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}#yiv5551685903
For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's students have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his generous encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate concentration.  Dr. Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of his most faithful colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar to do their graduate work here, and their reports to the list have enlivened it. From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis was encouraged by Kim to do her grad work here too.  Mitchell Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious, since he began his bird study while still in high school in Arkansas.




But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us in Fayetteville) our physical community.  It will be sad that Kim won't be leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the month in Bentonville.




Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.




Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their graduate work.  I send all of them my encouragement and love at this difficult time.




Harriet Jansma

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith So sad to read this news.  He will be sorely missed.
Drew M Phillips 
On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> wrote:

In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational needs.  I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so connected to her must be worthy indeed.  Later on, Kim and I worked together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the university's counseling center.  These were very enjoyable collaborations.  And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.
I can hardly believe it.  I can't believe it.  My thanks to Alyssa for letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students.  My condolences.
Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.Licensed PsychologistFayetteville, Arkansas
On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> wrote:

I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.

Alyssa DeRubeis



 

Back to top
Date: 4/10/18 2:43 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
For some time I have been thinking of this list and the way Kim's students have enriched our world. Joanie has already mentioned his generous encouragement when she was deciding on her graduate concentration. Dr. Kannan studied with Kim and later became one of his most faithful colleagues. Together they recruited Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar to do their graduate work here, and their reports to the list have enlivened it. From the upper midwest, Alyssa DeRubeis was encouraged by Kim to do her grad work here too. Mitchell Pruitt's choice was perhaps more obvious, since he began his bird study while still in high school in Arkansas.


But here they all are now, enriching our correspondence and (for us in Fayetteville) our physical community. It will be sad that Kim won't be leading them and us to the AAS meeting at the end of the month in Bentonville.


Not long ago, Kim said to me, casually, "You should take my (basic ornithology) course." And so I did, and loved it as I loved him.


Like Jonathan, I know this loss will be hardest on Peggy, and then on these students, who will be missing his guidance as they finish their graduate work. I send all of them my encouragement and love at this difficult time.


Harriet Jansma

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 11:44:28 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith

So sad to read this news. He will be sorely missed.

Drew M Phillips

On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...><mailto:<jonathanperry24...>> wrote:
In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational needs. I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so connected to her must be worthy indeed. Later on, Kim and I worked together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the university's counseling center. These were very enjoyable collaborations. And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.

I can hardly believe it. I can't believe it. My thanks to Alyssa for letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students. My condolences.

Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...><mailto:<alderubeis...>> wrote:
I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smiths death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.

Alyssa DeRubeis


 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 10:06 pm
From: Les Birds <000001f32b245878-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOY for me
At the Hulsey Fish Hatchery in Hot Springs yesterday I saw my first of year Osprey and Great Egret...

You may remember I posted a few years back about pain in my back that kept me from going bird-watching. I had surgery on my back about 3 weeks ago and now I can walk and stand just fine, tho I still wobble from the vertigo. I cannot wait to get back into the field this May!

Leslie. Koller
 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 9:45 pm
From: Drew Phillips <lrarkingfisher...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
So sad to read this news. He will be sorely missed.

Drew M Phillips

On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 6:45 PM jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
wrote:

> In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the
> pleasure to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university
> students coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational
> needs. I admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so
> connected to her must be worthy indeed. Later on, Kim and I worked
> together on a couple of projects while I was the director of the
> university's counseling center. These were very enjoyable collaborations.
> And, like all of us, I was blessed day in and day out by his presence as
> the administrator of this listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had
> strayed too far--and as a scientist and mentor with such a profound
> influence on the avicultural community in Arkansas and so many other places.
>
> I can hardly believe it. I can't believe it. My thanks to Alyssa for
> letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students. My
> condolences.
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
> wrote:
>
>> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed
>> away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an
>> administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the
>> University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of
>> Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated.
>> Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he
>> seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was
>> about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he
>> was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society
>> conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim,
>> please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for
>> the sad news.
>>
>> Alyssa DeRubeis
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 4:45 pm
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
In a way, I first met Kim Smith through Peggy, with whom I had the pleasure
to work back in the mid 80's during her service to university students
coming to the U of A with some special, remedial.educational needs. I
admired her greatly, and I had to believe that any man so connected to her
must be worthy indeed. Later on, Kim and I worked together on a couple of
projects while I was the director of the university's counseling center.
These were very enjoyable collaborations. And, like all of us, I was
blessed day in and day out by his presence as the administrator of this
listserv--the adult who reined us in when we had strayed too far--and as a
scientist and mentor with such a profound influence on the avicultural
community in Arkansas and so many other places.

I can hardly believe it. I can't believe it. My thanks to Alyssa for
letting us all know; it must be very, very hard for his students. My
condolences.

Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
wrote:

> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed
> away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an
> administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the
> University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of
> Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated.
> Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he
> seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was
> about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he
> was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society
> conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim,
> please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for
> the sad news.
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis

 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 3:25 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
I only met Dr Kim Smith once, several years ago at the Ozark Nature Center
in NW Arkansas. It was during Saw Whet netting period. Only spoke with him
several minutes. He was a great man.

Bill Thurman

Bill Thurman

On Mon, Apr 9, 2018, 17:05 Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:

> Our circle has suffered a great loss. Love to his family and to all that
> were privileged to know him.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Apr 9, 2018, at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
> wrote:
> >
> > I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed
> away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an
> administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the
> University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of
> Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated.
> Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he
> seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was
> about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he
> was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society
> conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim,
> please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for
> the sad news.
> >
> > Alyssa DeRubeis
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 3:05 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Our circle has suffered a great loss. Love to his family and to all that were privileged to know him.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 9, 2018, at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> wrote:
>
> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis
 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 3:01 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Oh no!! We have lost a hero indeed!  This is just a tragedy. 
Kim was on my committee, and he was a wonderful advisor.  As an undergraduate at the U of A, thinking about what to pursue as a graduate student, I sought his advice.  I wanted to study birds, but I was uncertain due to my lack of experience.  His encouragement gave me the confidence to sally forth, and follow my dream.  I never forgot that talk.
He has also been a strong supporter of the Ozark Natural Science Center, and the last time I saw him was at our fundraiser and Chipotle.  I can't believe he's gone.  It is a great loss to all.
My heartfelt sympathy to his family and friends.
Joanie


On Monday, April 9, 2018, 4:43:29 PM CDT, Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:


Our wonderfully creative friend and colleague, Kim Smith, November 30, 2014, at Ozark Natural Science Center, working with his graduate student Mitchell Pruitt on their Northern Saw-whet Owl project. We are so thankful for Kim, his wife and life partner, Peggy, and their daughter Mallory and the grandkids. We wish you well on this next project, Kim.







From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 4:23:29 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Dr. Kim Smith I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.

Alyssa DeRubeis
 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 2:43 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
Our wonderfully creative friend and colleague, Kim Smith, November 30, 2014, at Ozark Natural Science Center, working with his graduate student Mitchell Pruitt on their Northern Saw-whet Owl project. We are so thankful for Kim, his wife and life partner, Peggy, and their daughter Mallory and the grandkids. We wish you well on this next project, Kim.


[cid:dff0076a-c02a-4a25-a023-0636ed07bd65]


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 4:23:29 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Dr. Kim Smith

I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smiths death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.

Alyssa DeRubeis

 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 2:35 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
I am very sorry to see this news.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 9, 2018, at 4:30 PM, DUNN, JANE <dunnj...> wrote:
>
> I only had the privilege to travel with Dr. Smith once, last year to Costa Rica. He made the trip so enjoyable and never tired of repeating information to those of us who are much newer to birding than most of you are. The night before we all returned to the states, I had an opportunity to sit and just talk with him over our farewell dinner. I hate that I will not get to know him better. This is a shock to all who love him and who have worked with him over the years. The birding population, especially of Arkansas, has lost a valuable friend and mentor. Jane Dunn
>
>> On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> wrote:
>> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.
>>
>> Alyssa DeRubeis
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 2:30 pm
From: DUNN, JANE <dunnj...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Kim Smith
I only had the privilege to travel with Dr. Smith once, last year to Costa
Rica. He made the trip so enjoyable and never tired of repeating
information to those of us who are much newer to birding than most of you
are. The night before we all returned to the states, I had an opportunity
to sit and just talk with him over our farewell dinner. I hate that I will
not get to know him better. This is a shock to all who love him and who
have worked with him over the years. The birding population, especially of
Arkansas, has lost a valuable friend and mentor. Jane Dunn

On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 4:23 PM, Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
wrote:

> I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed
> away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an
> administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the
> University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of
> Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated.
> Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he
> seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was
> about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he
> was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society
> conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim,
> please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for
> the sad news.
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis

 

Back to top
Date: 4/9/18 2:23 pm
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Dr. Kim Smith
I am very saddened to share the news of Dr. Kim Smith’s death. He passed away this morning due to a heart attack. In addition to being an administrator of this list-serve, Kim was a distinguished professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville. He was the graduate advisor of Mitchell Pruitt and me, among countless others who had already graduated. Kim has been very involved in the ornithological world, but above all, he seized any adventurous opportunity he could and was a caring person. He was about to retire and gave a phenomenal exit seminar just last week, and he was supposed to travel today to attend the American Ornithological Society conference in Tucson, AZ (where Mitchell and I are). If you have known Kim, please share it on this thread. Thank you for reading and I apologize for the sad news.

Alyssa DeRubeis
 

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Date: 4/9/18 2:15 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Ozark Environmental Conversations

I thought NWA nature-lovers would be interested in this.  The Friends of Little Sugar Creek and the Ozark Society are hosting a series of conversations on local environmental issues.  The first will be in Bentonville April 17 regarding stream restoration.  Friends of Little Sugar Creek, the Arkansas Canoe Club, Arkansas Audubon Society, and others have been working hard here to restore NWA's oft-forgotten third watershed to a free-flowing state.  The future of Little Sugar Creek will likely be discussed, but the focus will be the region-wide health of our streams.  

Adam Schaffer

Bentonville




----------------

Inaugural Ozark Environmental Conversation

The inauguralOzark Environmental Conversation on the topic of “The Benefits of Dam Removaland Stream Restoration” will be Tuesday, April 17, from 6 to 8 pm, at theArvest Conference Room, North Main Street and Legion Lane, Bentonville, AR. Organizedby The Friends of Little Sugar Creek andThe Ozark Society Sugar Creek Chapter, speakers include Serena McClain,Director of River Restoration for American Rivers, Dr. Melissa Lombardi,Endangered Species Biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, andDarrell Bowman, Director of the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission.  They will provide information about thesafety, economic and environmental benefits of removal of obsolete dams andstream restoration. A kayak will be given away. The public is welcome.    


 

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Date: 4/9/18 12:33 pm
From: Candace Ware <songbirdcaptures...>
Subject: Green Herons are back, Mayflower Dam 4-8-18
2 Green Herons viewed and photographed at Mayflower Dam 4-8-18. Love these little Herons! Lots of fisherman, as the water was really flowing. The Green Herons I saw were on the levy side as you are coming in, look to your right....but don't drive off the levy ;) When the water is down, you will find them back in the trees and fishing in the water on both sides of the dam and on the other side of the levy, not extremely shy of fishermen, photographers or birdwatchers. www.songbirdcaptures.com
 

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Date: 4/9/18 12:27 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA April Field Trip
Details for the next field trip of the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas are below.  We are going for spring warblers this trip which is why the start time is so early.  With a two-hour drive up to Craighead Forest and back, plus birding time, this will be an all-day trip.  It will be well worth it because the trees at the Park can be packed full of migrants.  As the morning progresses, the butterflies will also start to come out.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me off-list.  See you in a couple of weeks! 
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator

April 21Craighead Forest Park & Crowley’s Ridge NatureCenterJonesboro, Craighead Co. Meet at 6:00 a.m.in North Little Rock on the east side of the Other Center parking lot behindMcDonald’s.  The Other Center is locatedacross from McCain Mall, on McCain Blvd. Take Exit 1 West, off Hwy. 67/167. We’ll arrive at Craighead Forest Park around 8:15 a.m. for those whowant to meet us there.  Experience the 200-mile Crowley’sRidge, a unique piece of North American topography.  The combination of wooded areas, a lake, andopen fields provides a variety of habitats which attract an eclectic mix ofbirds such as migrating warblers, tanagers, grosbeaks, vireos, andflycatchers.  We’ll also walk the NatureCenter’s trail and check their colorful blooming gardens, whichattract numerous butterflies and other insects.  Moderate walking will be on dirt and pavedtrails.  Bathrooms are available in the Park at Centennial RotaryPark at the end of Access Rd. #5 and also at the Nature Center.  This will be an all-day trip.  Bring water, snacks and lunch.  Directions—from North Little Rock take US67/167 north 100 miles to Exit 102, then go east on Hwy. 226 for 30 miles, then4 miles east on I-49.  Exit right atChristian Valley Rd.  Go 2 miles toCulberhouse St. and turn left.  Go 1 mileand turn right onto Forest Park Dr.  GPScoordinates for the Park are 35.774865, -90.702296.  It is a two-hour drive from North LittleRock. 
 

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Date: 4/8/18 7:04 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Atkins Bottoms Thursday April 5
I while away an afternoon on a slow drive through the ag fields in Atkins Bottoms. Lots of American Golden-Plovers & a Merlin just south of Atkins. Further along I had a Lark Sparrow feeding with a flock of Yellow-rumped Warblers, some of which were getting their breeding color in place. Several Scissor-tailed Flycatchers along the river and lots of nervous Blue-winged Teal. I looked for other sandpipers and found a scattering of Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs and a handful of Pectoral Sandpipers. No herons or egrets about. It was a pleasant afternoon to contemplate nature at 5 miles per hour.


Cindy



 

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Date: 4/8/18 5:43 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Golden Plovers
There were between five and six hundred American Golden Plovers on one sod
farm field this afternoon here in the river valley. I've never seen so
many at one time. I stopped counting at 450, but there still more way
behind the ones I counted.

Sandy B
FS, AR

 

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Date: 4/8/18 4:36 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, April 12
This Thursday, April 12, is Audubon Society of Central ARs monthly meeting.
Ill be the speaker this week, presenting Ornithology Through Philately. In
another installment of my occasional, educational, ornithological, seminar
series I'll talk about what postage stamps featuring birds can teach us
about ornithology.

The meeting will be at 7 P.M. at the Fletcher Library on H Street in Little
Rock. Meetings are free and open to the public. Details are at
http://wp.ascabird.org

Remember that there will NOT be an indoor meeting on May 10. There is only
the field trip on May 12th, which doubles as ASCA's BirdLR Birdathon team. I
encourage you to support ASCAs team by joining the group and by pledging
your support at http://ar.audubon.org/birdathon/asca
<http://ar.audubon.org/conservation/birdathon/asca> .

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 4/8/18 3:23 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Chesney and Stump Prairies - Cormorants galore
I visited Chesney and Stump Prairies this morning with Alyssa DeRubeis.

At least 1000 (probably closer to 1200) Double-crested Cormorants were observed flying south-east over Chesney in several loose flocks. The average flock size was roughly 150 birds. LeConte's Sparrows are still present, with at least 4 individuals seen today. A Great Horned Owl provided brief but good views in flight. Other observations of interest included 12 Blue-winged Teal, 1 Wood Duck (female), 9 Northern Bobwhite, 1 Broad-winged Hawk, 1 Least Sandpiper, 16 Wilson's Snipe, 2 Loggerhead Shrikes (along the access road), 1 Sedge Wren, 1 American Pipit, 2 Vesper Sparrows and 1 Lincoln's Sparrow.

At Stump, a Loggerhead Shrike was observed impaling and then dismembering a small passerine (most likely a Savannah Sparrow) while perched in a thorny bush. A pair of Killdeer performed their distraction display to try and lead us away from 2 recently fledged chicks. A Brown Thrasher was seen carrying nesting material.


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/7/18 5:31 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Scarlet Tanager
I got a call from a neighbor, Kerry Hickman, telling me she was seeing a
beautiful red bird with black wings. Judy and I drove to where she was
watching the bird. A very pretty male Scarlet Tanager only about 20 feet
away, that we watched sitting and feeding in the same tree for a least
twenty minuets and still present when we left. Also saw an Eastern Kingbird
that looked hungry.

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

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Date: 4/7/18 4:16 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Upland Sandpipers in the Valley
We saw a large flock of Upland Sandpipers (at least 18) in Arkansas River Valley today. They were in a flooded pasture with cows adjacent The Nature Conservancys Presson-Oglesby Preserve a few miles north of Charleston. In the same field: American Golden-Plovers (~100), and then in another nearby field, also near cattle, another flock of at least 161 golden-plovers. In the same general area we also saw an immaculate Red-shafted Flicker associated with 3 Yellow-shafted Flickers.

The birds were really great, but the occasion for this trip was looking at some wonderful Tallgrass Prairie habitat in the process of being added to existing public prairies near Charleston. Joan Reynolds and I were invited to join Joe Woolbright of Ozark Ecological Restoration, Inc., who has been working on these prairie additions.

There was a light snow in Fayetteville when we left. No snow in the valley, but we did get pelted by little droplets of ice or sleet or something. Nevertheless, prairie flowers are blooming. Among them: Indian Paintbrush, two violets (Arrowhead and Birds-foot), yellow Wood Betony, Prairie Corydalis, Golden Ragwort, etc.

If all this wasnt enough, when we pulled into my driveway in Fayetteville, a Broad-winged Hawk flew into a post oak and took up a low perch right in front of us. It was intent on something besides us, for we leaned way out the windows for long, remarkable looks. It didnt fly until we were virtually eyeball to eyeball.


 

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Date: 4/7/18 6:03 am
From: Jacob Wessels <jacoblwessels...>
Subject: Re: Kite name change
Karen,

The Birds of North America article for White-tailed Kite indicates that
they used to be considered a subspecies of Black-shouldered Kite, which is
an Old World species.


Jacob Wessels
(sent from my mobile device)



On Sat, Apr 7, 2018, 7:25 AM Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:

> This question isn't technically about an Arkansas bird, but the bird in
> question had to get to Missouri somehow. A White-tailed Kite was reported
> in SW-ish MO a couple of days ago. The only Kite that I have ever seen,
> while it was perched, was a Black-shouldered Kite in the Rio grande Valley,
> in 1995. My guess is that this is the same species, with a name change,
> even though Google doesn't seem to know about it. (IKR? ). The eBird
> report was complete with what appeared to be digiscoped photos, but I
> couldn't positively rule out Swallow-tailed. I would imagine the observers
> could. If it hangs around, I'm thinking of going up there, so I am just
> wondering if this is a species that I have seen before, albeit 23 years ago.
>
> Thanks.
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers
>

 

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Date: 4/7/18 5:25 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Kite name change
This question isn't technically about an Arkansas bird, but the bird in
question had to get to Missouri somehow. A White-tailed Kite was reported
in SW-ish MO a couple of days ago. The only Kite that I have ever seen,
while it was perched, was a Black-shouldered Kite in the Rio grande Valley,
in 1995. My guess is that this is the same species, with a name change,
even though Google doesn't seem to know about it. (IKR? ). The eBird
report was complete with what appeared to be digiscoped photos, but I
couldn't positively rule out Swallow-tailed. I would imagine the observers
could. If it hangs around, I'm thinking of going up there, so I am just
wondering if this is a species that I have seen before, albeit 23 years ago.

Thanks.
Karen Garrett
Rogers

 

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Date: 4/6/18 1:24 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...>
Subject: Sparrows
Blessed Day! Five sparrow species at feeders today: White-throated, White-crowned, Lincolns, Swamp, and Chipping!

I left around noon today for about an hour and when I returned home there was a Tufted Titmouse in my solarium! Couldnt imagine how it got in as all doors were locked. In talking to my son (to see if he had been over in my absence he had not) we decided it had been in the garage and when I opened the door to the house it had entered without me seeing it. Gave me an uncomfortable feeling until he reasoned it out.

Expecting rain this afternoon, frost and possibly some snow. In 1980 (I think it was 1980, couldve been 1981) I went to Mexico with the Harrison choir and band. Bob Phelan, band director, had gotten hold of an English newspaper on April 8. We were all lounging around the pool in Oaxtepec when Bob read the US weather report and shouted out, Snow in Harrison, Arkansas! A brief cheer from all kids and chaperones erupted.

Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR


 

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Date: 4/6/18 8:13 am
From: Carol Meyerdirk <tennislady41...>
Subject: Re: How exciting
My sister in law visiting from CA just gets really excited upon seeing cardinals at my feeder when She visits as she doesn’t see them where she lives. She was watching Allen hummingbirds swarming her feeder when she called a few days ago.
WLR carol
Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 5, 2018, at 10:17 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> Hear me out, please. :)
>
> once in a while I see people reporting, excitedly, what one might consider "ordinary" birds. Some of the first of the seasons and even just, well every day birds. People get excited in their reports... and sometimes my first thought is "why are they reporting THAT?" I see those all the time or, they'll be here all summer.
> but I pause and think... and I am quite happy to see people so full of wonder at even the ordinary. It's not ordinary of course but, familiar, common, you know.
> The firsts of the seasons are still exciting as I try to pay attention to what I see as it comes in. First parula... first black and white warbler... they're exciting but sometimes that excitement fades for me. Especially for the year round birds. I don't leap off my chair when I see a cardinal at the feeder. Why not though? They are stunning after all.
>
> Anyway... just wanted to share some thoughts on that. Sometimes I might gloss over reports to simply see if there's anything I really "need" to hear about. But even if I'm not paying full attention to all the emails it does make me smile a bit to know that people are still, day to day, filled with wonder at ALL the birds around us. They really are worth watching. I myself get lost walking around whether at a park or in my yard...
>
> The seasonal birds are more exciting for me as I know they'll soon move on again... but they're all still just amazing to watch.
>
> My daughter often complains about the scissor-tailed flycatcher... stinks that it's not a year round resident. I told her one year that it might be a good thing or else that incredible bird might become ordinary in our eyes. She understood that idea... a cardinal at the feeder is something we see every day and it's easy to lose that excitement... but those migrators... could we become "used to" scissor tails so much that we wouldn't bat an eye if they were here year round? I don't really know. But that bit of absence does make them more special to me I believe.
>
> Anyway, I don't always read all of the reports coming in but I am very glad they're coming in. Keep on sharing your excitement. :)
>
> (don't forget to use Ebird too)
>
> (rather than jumble two topics together, got another email coming shortly...)
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 4/6/18 5:39 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Swainson's Hawks, Grandview Prairie WMA
Im posting this on behalf of Candace Ware:

2 Swainson's Hawks were flying with 2 Red-tailed Hawks at Rick Evans
Grandview Prairie on April 4 at about 2 pm, 1 and 1/2 miles up on the gravel
road that's immediately after the brown entry sign.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44273581

Candace Ware
www.songbirdcpatures.com


Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 4/6/18 5:25 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: SWAINSON’S HAWKS IN THE VALLEY (NOT DUMPING DEAD DOGS)
Well, that's "fine", Joe. :) Some people can read and understand and they
Get it.
Good that you could get greater looks at the hawks and plovers without
being hauled off to the county jail.
As for people who go round dumping dead dogs anywhere . . . let the
vultures or the devil take care of them "people"

Bill



On Fri, Apr 6, 2018, 07:04 Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Two Swainson’s Hawks were perched in a field among 180 American
> Golden-Plovers just off Thornhill Road yesterday in Kibler bottoms,
> Arkansas River Valley. There was another perched on the ground, then later
> flying, at West-Ark Sod also in Kibler bottoms. Interestingly, the sod farm
> was the other place where I found high numbers (163) of American
> Golden-Plovers. They were walking on the turf like a bunch of robins and
> easily visible from Westville Road.
>
>
> I didn’t see Swainson’s Hawks in the fields at Frog Bayou WMA, but there
> are still harriers, and lots of other interesting birds: Little Blue Heron
> (fos, and a few days early for Northwest Arkansas City) working wetlands,
> along with Lesser Yellowlegs and Pectoral Sandpipers. A flock (or perhaps 2
> flocks) of American Golden-Plovers, in numbers around 30 each. I heard
> meadowlarks singing all day. All of them were Easterns except along Sharp
> Chapel Road, with at least one Western singing and another bird or 2 giving
> chuck calls.
>
>
> Along Westville Road I was watching several thousand Common Grackles
> checking out cow pies, then harvesting small acorns under mature oaks, when
> a woman drove up alongside me with the oft-heard challenge, “Can I help
> you, sir?” When I explained my grackle interest she apparently didn’t hear,
> and continued, “We’ve been having a problem with someone dumping dead
> dogs.” She wasn’t mean or angry. When I started into details about all the
> species of blackbirds we see -- and why some are of particular interest --
> I could see a cloud developing around her eyes. She wished me “good day”
> and drove off. I did see male and female rusties in breeding plumage.
>
>
> Then along Thornhill Road, I heard, then saw an Upland Sandpiper, and much
> further away, a huge flock of American-Golden Plovers and what turned out
> to be Swainson’s Hawks. Upland was close and even gave one of those
> winding, out-of-this-world “wolf whistle” calls. The rest of the birds were
> too far away though, even with my spotting scope. Then I saw a man in a
> work truck drive out of the field. I waved him to stop and ask permission.
> “That will be fine” he said, with no further comment. Thanks to this
> generosity, I had satisfying views of the two adult, light morph
> Swainson’s, plus really great views of the golden-plovers.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/6/18 5:04 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SWAINSON’S HAWKS IN THE VALLEY (NOT DUMPING DEAD DOGS)
Two Swainsons Hawks were perched in a field among 180 American Golden-Plovers just off Thornhill Road yesterday in Kibler bottoms, Arkansas River Valley. There was another perched on the ground, then later flying, at West-Ark Sod also in Kibler bottoms. Interestingly, the sod farm was the other place where I found high numbers (163) of American Golden-Plovers. They were walking on the turf like a bunch of robins and easily visible from Westville Road.

I didnt see Swainsons Hawks in the fields at Frog Bayou WMA, but there are still harriers, and lots of other interesting birds: Little Blue Heron (fos, and a few days early for Northwest Arkansas City) working wetlands, along with Lesser Yellowlegs and Pectoral Sandpipers. A flock (or perhaps 2 flocks) of American Golden-Plovers, in numbers around 30 each. I heard meadowlarks singing all day. All of them were Easterns except along Sharp Chapel Road, with at least one Western singing and another bird or 2 giving chuck calls.

Along Westville Road I was watching several thousand Common Grackles checking out cow pies, then harvesting small acorns under mature oaks, when a woman drove up alongside me with the oft-heard challenge, Can I help you, sir? When I explained my grackle interest she apparently didnt hear, and continued, Weve been having a problem with someone dumping dead dogs. She wasnt mean or angry. When I started into details about all the species of blackbirds we see -- and why some are of particular interest -- I could see a cloud developing around her eyes. She wished me good day and drove off. I did see male and female rusties in breeding plumage.

Then along Thornhill Road, I heard, then saw an Upland Sandpiper, and much further away, a huge flock of American-Golden Plovers and what turned out to be Swainsons Hawks. Upland was close and even gave one of those winding, out-of-this-world wolf whistle calls. The rest of the birds were too far away though, even with my spotting scope. Then I saw a man in a work truck drive out of the field. I waved him to stop and ask permission. That will be fine he said, with no further comment. Thanks to this generosity, I had satisfying views of the two adult, light morph Swainsons, plus really great views of the golden-plovers.


 

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Date: 4/6/18 4:53 am
From: Jan Johnson <janbirder...>
Subject: Painted Bunting
I will be in the Hot Springs area and then to the south and west the weekend of April 13-16. Are the Painted Buntings Back yet and if so where might be a good area to search for one? Many thanks!

Jan Johnson
Nebraska
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bird-brained-quilter/
 

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Date: 4/5/18 10:09 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: LOS American Treecreeper
We had 2 brown creepers visiting on Monday. Their visits are usually solo at our house, so the pair was a lovely surprise.
SaraFayetteville
On Thursday, April 5, 2018, 8:02:14 AM CDT, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Thanks for the alternative name, Kannan!!! I have been hearing and seeing Brown Creepers lately, but I had to look up this "new bird" to find out it is one and the same! Love seeing and hearing these tiny creatures.
JudithNinestone, Carroll County
On Apr 5, 2018, at 7:53 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

There is a first time for everything, and birding hopping on and off a golf cart was a first for me.  44 species in Ben Geren park, Fort Smith, on Tuesday afternoon, thanks to Jay Randolph, the bird-loving golf course superintendent at the park who is leading a commendable effort to restore some prairie patches by controlled burns and transplantations.  A nice finding was an American Treecreeper, obviously one of the last of the year birds, given the paucity of April records in the state in eBird. 

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44230244
KannanFt. Smith



 

Back to top
Date: 4/5/18 8:40 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: observations
Not sure what the subject should be but wanted to share a few recent
observations...  :)

First one, I meant to(such a procrastinator) report this sooner with the
hopes to have someone else check on it. Last week I was at the fish
hatchery in Centerton and as I walked around the farthest upper pond,
about 20 feet or so in front of me(if that) a blue-winged teal jumped
into the water and slowly swam away. Anyone that watches those teals
know that's not quite normal behavior. They're so skittish they usually
fly by the time you're 100 feet away. They're not super comfortable with
people nearby. This one stayed on this small pond not all that far from
me and I figured it couldn't fly. Some movements of the wing made me
even more sure of that. I'm not sure if it was an injury from a predator
or worn out from migrating.  I took a couple pictures and then moved on
to trying to track down a call... was just a sparrow at the top of a
tree RIGHT above my head. My hearing is a little off in one ear and it
makes direction hard to determine sometimes. Before I finally found it,
just on the other side of the fence another teal took off... hobbling
into the grass moving away from the hatchery. I felt horrible. Obviously
couldn't fly either and here I had gone and put myself between it and
the water because I didn't see it there.  wasn't long before I lost
sight of it.  I still wonder what has become of those birds.

A few days ago I heard some ANGRY bluejays.  I knew they were up to
something and as I leaned to look out the window I noticed a few more
coming in to the same tree not far away. I knew whatever it was had to
be very close by. My daughter stood up to look and saw something on the
ground. Put the binoculars on it and found what had to be a cooper's
hawk just sitting on the ground. It was moving here and there and I
figured it had to be sitting on food. It's really fascinating how jays
will scold a hawk even when it's not there to bother them. Reminds me of
another story, will get to that.  The hawk was on the ground surrounded
by briars. It eventually took off and the moment it did, so did a
thrasher. So, it was sitting on a thrasher. The jays immediately
dispersed and things got quiet. The thrasher made it to the brush in the
woods and sat there a while. I eventually lost sight of it. Didn't hear
a thrasher in the yard for the next day but eventually, started hearing
one again... a little further from the house. can't say if it's the same
one or not..

The other year I was at the eagle watch in Gentry when a hawk flew right
up to a small tree right by me... blue jays chasing and scolding. I
walked closer, around the tree to find a red-shouldered hawk eating a
snake. I was only about 6 feet at most from the trunk and the bird
wasn't 15 feet up the tree if that... but, it sat and ate. So, I sat and
watched... literally. Sat on the ground, took a few pictures. We stayed
like that for a while. I decided that the hawk was using me. With me
sitting there, the bluejays went on their way and left him alone.

very little tops the excitement of a not supposed to be here life bird
like the vermilion flycather that visited Siloam not long ago... but
watching the odd behavior of birds and wondering "what are they up to"
adds quite a bit to this "hobby" of ours.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 4/5/18 8:19 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: How exciting
Hear me out, please. :)

once in a while I see people reporting, excitedly, what one might
consider "ordinary" birds. Some of the first of the seasons and even
just, well every day birds. People get excited in their reports... and
sometimes my first thought is "why are they reporting THAT?"  I see
those all the time or, they'll be here all summer.
but I pause and think... and I am quite happy to see people so full of
wonder at even the ordinary. It's not ordinary of course but, familiar,
common, you know.
The firsts of the seasons are still exciting as I try to pay attention
to what I see as it comes in. First parula... first black and white
warbler... they're exciting but sometimes that excitement fades for me.
Especially for the year round birds. I don't leap off my chair when I
see a cardinal at the feeder. Why not though? They are stunning after all.

Anyway...  just wanted to share some thoughts on that.  Sometimes I
might gloss over reports to simply see if there's anything I really
"need" to hear about.  But even if I'm not paying full attention to all
the emails it does make me smile a bit to know that people are still,
day to day, filled with wonder at ALL the birds around us. They really
are worth watching. I myself get lost walking around whether at a park
or in my yard...

The seasonal birds are more exciting for me as I know they'll soon move
on again...  but they're all still just amazing to watch.

My daughter often complains about the scissor-tailed flycatcher...
stinks that it's not a year round resident.  I told her one year that it
might be a good thing or else that incredible bird might become ordinary
in our eyes. She understood that idea... a cardinal at the feeder is
something we see every day and it's easy to lose that excitement... but
those migrators... could we become "used to" scissor tails so much that
we wouldn't bat an eye if they were here year round?  I don't really
know. But that bit of absence does make them more special to me I believe.

Anyway, I don't always read all of the reports coming in but I am very
glad they're coming in. Keep on sharing your excitement. :)

(don't forget to use Ebird too)

(rather than jumble two topics together, got another email coming
shortly...)

Daniel Mason


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https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 4/5/18 6:42 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Finally! FOS
Ruby throated hummingbird in Hillcrest on our feeder. A splendid male.
Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 5, 2018, at 8:36 PM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
>
> I took another cruise over to the cancer institute in Little Rock and saw quite a few birds while rolling down I-40 between W. Memphis and LR. I took the trip because I had to take it, but it was fairly interesting in observing birds.
> I saw these: lots of Common Crows
> Red Tailed Hawks several
> Turkey Vultures 12
> Mourning Doves. 5
> Red winged Blackbirds. 100+
> Flock of Geese in V formation
> Common Pigeons about 40
> Great White Egret in a swamp not
> far from where Bayou de View flows under the I-40 road.
> Had to stop and rest at a rest area (headed east) very near the White River and saw several Tufted Titmice, Cardinals, Blue Jays, and a Red Bellied Woodpecker
> Had to detour down old hwy 70 on account of bad traffic jamming on I-40.
> Saw dozens of Common Grackles
> 10 Starlings
> 1 Eastern Bluebird
> 12 American Robins
> 3 Kildeer flying into a large field
> 5 House Sparrows at ASU of the Midouth branch off College Rd near I-40 and hwy 70.
> I would have to say the Great White Egret was my trip highlight bird. They always remind me of being in Louisiana.
>
> Bill Thurman
>
> Marion Arkansas (currently)
 

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Date: 4/5/18 6:36 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Road Trip
I took another cruise over to the cancer institute in Little Rock and saw
quite a few birds while rolling down I-40 between W. Memphis and LR. I took
the trip because I had to take it, but it was fairly interesting in
observing birds.
I saw these: lots of Common Crows
Red Tailed Hawks several
Turkey Vultures 12
Mourning Doves. 5
Red winged Blackbirds. 100+
Flock of Geese in V formation
Common Pigeons about 40
Great White Egret in a swamp not
far from where Bayou de View flows under the I-40 road.
Had to stop and rest at a rest area (headed east) very near the
White River and saw several Tufted Titmice, Cardinals, Blue Jays, and a Red
Bellied Woodpecker
Had to detour down old hwy 70 on account of bad traffic jamming
on I-40.
Saw dozens of Common Grackles
10 Starlings
1 Eastern Bluebird
12 American Robins
3 Kildeer flying into a large field
5 House Sparrows at ASU of the Midouth branch off College Rd
near I-40 and hwy 70.
I would have to say the Great White Egret was my trip highlight bird. They
always remind me of being in Louisiana.

Bill Thurman

Marion Arkansas (currently)

 

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Date: 4/5/18 4:48 pm
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: Dark Eye Juncos
About a dozen Juncos are foraging under my feeders. A few crows are trying
to get at the suet. The cardinal pairs are getting brighter. Titmice and
white breasted nuthatches have been busy. I may have had a female brown
headed cowbird at one feeder, but I didn't get a great look at it.



Kara (Alco, AR)


 

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Date: 4/5/18 4:23 pm
From: DUNN, JANE <dunnj...>
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawks—Fayetteville
I have seen two in the past two days here in southern Newton County. Jane
Dunn

On Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 12:44 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

> Me too---we've been serenaded by them for long periods, yesterday and
> today. This morning two Broad-wingeds were traveling under vocal protest,
> it seemed, with a Red-tailed Hawk---fun to see the size difference between
> them!
>
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
>
>
> On 4/5/2018 12:36 PM, Mitchell Pruitt wrote:
>
> I’ve seen several soaring over town the last few days!
>
> Mitchell Pruitt
> Fayetteville
>
> Sent from my iPhone.
>
>
>

 

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Date: 4/5/18 10:46 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bell Slough
I spent some time at Bell Slough, north and south this morning.  Well, okay, I spent the entire morning, from sunrise to noon there.  Some of the highlights are a FOS Nashville Warbler, FOS Green Heron, Black-throated Green Warbler, Yellow-throated Vireo, White-eyed Vireo, and a Lincoln's Sparrow.  Plus a few more common birds.  It was a fine day for birding.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 4/5/18 10:45 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Broad-winged Hawks—Fayetteville
Me too---we've been serenaded by them for long periods, yesterday and
today.  This morning two Broad-wingeds were traveling under vocal
protest, it seemed, with a Red-tailed Hawk---fun to see the size
difference between them!

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

On 4/5/2018 12:36 PM, Mitchell Pruitt wrote:
> I’ve seen several soaring over town the last few days!
>
> Mitchell Pruitt
> Fayetteville
>
> Sent from my iPhone.


 

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Date: 4/5/18 10:36 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Broad-winged Hawks—Fayetteville
I’ve seen several soaring over town the last few days!

Mitchell Pruitt
Fayetteville

Sent from my iPhone.
 

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Date: 4/5/18 9:28 am
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: FOS White-eyed Vireo
Just saw a White-eyed Verio on Wilbur West Road in Pine Bluff.

Delos McCauley

 

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Date: 4/5/18 6:02 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: LOS American Treecreeper
Thanks for the alternative name, Kannan!!! I have been hearing and seeing Brown Creepers lately, but I had to look up this "new bird" to find out it is one and the same! Love seeing and hearing these tiny creatures.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

On Apr 5, 2018, at 7:53 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> There is a first time for everything, and birding hopping on and off a golf cart was a first for me. 44 species in Ben Geren park, Fort Smith, on Tuesday afternoon, thanks to Jay Randolph, the bird-loving golf course superintendent at the park who is leading a commendable effort to restore some prairie patches by controlled burns and transplantations. A nice finding was an American Treecreeper, obviously one of the last of the year birds, given the paucity of April records in the state in eBird.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44230244
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith


 

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Date: 4/5/18 5:56 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: LOS American Treecreeper
There is a first time for everything, and birding hopping on and off a golf cart was a first for me.  44 species in Ben Geren park, Fort Smith, on Tuesday afternoon, thanks to Jay Randolph, the bird-loving golf course superintendent at the park who is leading a commendable effort to restore some prairie patches by controlled burns and transplantations.  A nice finding was an American Treecreeper, obviously one of the last of the year birds, given the paucity of April records in the state in eBird. 

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S44230244
KannanFt. Smith

 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 9:12 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - April 4
Ford Hendershot and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 84
species. It was clear, cool, and windy. Several FOS new arrivals were
found today. Here is our list:



Snow Goose - 1

Canada Goose - 5

Wood Duck - 11

Gadwall - 23

Mallard - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 336

Northern Shoveler - 23

Northern Pintail - 1

Green-winged Teal - 24

Ring-necked Duck - 49

Hooded Merganser - 10

Pied-billed Grebe - 51

American White pelican - 47

Neotropic Cormorant - 5

Double-crested Cormorant - 11

Anhinga - 30

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 96

Snowy Egret - 7

Little-blue Heron - 7

Cattle Egret - 8

Black Vulture - 23

Turkey Vulture - 26

Northern Harrier - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

King Rail - 2

Virginia Rail - 2

Common Gallinule - 11

American Coot - 217

Greater Yellowlegs - 10

Lesser Yellowlegs - 12

Pectoral Sandpiper - 2

Wilson's Snipe - 2

Mourning Dove - 2

Belted Kingfisher - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 4

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 22

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 8

Fish Crow - 5

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 57

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 3

Cliff Swallow - 9

Barn Swallow - 16

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 9

Carolina Wren - 9

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 6

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 15

Eastern Bluebird - 3

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 3

Northern Parula - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 15

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Black-and-white Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 2

Louisiana Waterthrush - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 6

Eastern Towhee - 1

Field Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 8

Song Sparrow - 3

Lincoln's Sparrow - 3

Swamp Sparrow - 7

White-throated Sparrow - 9

White-crowned Sparrow - 2

Northern Cardinal - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 42

Common Grackle - 2

Brown-headed Cowbird - 5

American Goldfinch - 13





Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Skimming Bluet

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Baskettail species

Blue Dasher

Blue Corporal

Black Saddlebags

Red Saddlebags







Herps:



American Alligator

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Red-eared Slider

Yellow-bellied Watersnake

Graham's Crayfish Snake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog - calling

Bullfrog - calling







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR










 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 8:38 pm
From: Johnny Walker <johnnybacon...>
Subject: FOS Eastern Kingbird and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
On a stroll with my family this evening on the west side of Two Rivers
Park, I enjoyed seeing my FOS Eastern Kingbird and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (1
each). There was also an Osprey flying overhead and lots of active
Yellow-rumped Warblers in the trees. My 3 year old and 1 year old kept me
busy, but I was still able to enjoy the birds as well :)

- Johnny Walker (Little Rock)

 

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Date: 4/4/18 8:08 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: FOS Upland Sandpiper - Chesney Prairie
I visited Chesney and Stump Prairies this morning with Alyssa DeRubeis.

An Upland Sandpiper was seen/heard flying over Chesney. 4 Northern Harriers (3 immature males, 1 adult female) were flushed from a patch of tall grass where they had presumably roosted. 18 Northern Bobwhites were also flushed from different parts of the prairie. LeConte's Sparrows are still present, with at least 3 individuals observed. A few Yellowlegs (2 Greater, 12 Lesser) were in a wet pasture along the access road. Other sightings of interest included 6 Blue-winged Teal, 24 Wilson's Snipe, 2 Loggerhead Shrikes, 2 Sedge Wrens and 2 Rusty Blackbirds.

Observations at Stump included 1 Wilson's Snipe, 1 Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, 2 Loggerhead Shrikes and 2 Brewer's Blackbirds.


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/4/18 12:42 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOS Chimney Swift
...4 circling my chimney swift tower in Cabot.

Kenny Nichols

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/4/18 12:33 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: birds' internal compass and earth's magnetic field
Thanks for sharing and if something goes wrong with their protein, they can
stray off course.

Jerry

-----Original Message-----
From: Judy & Don
Sent: Wednesday, April 4, 2018 2:14 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: birds' internal compass and earth's magnetic field

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/birds-get-their-internal-compass-newly-id-eye-protein?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=r_science

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County=
 

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Date: 4/4/18 12:15 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: birds' internal compass and earth's magnetic field
https://www.sciencenews.org/article/birds-get-their-internal-compass-newly-id-eye-protein?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=r_science

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 11:46 am
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: EBird Migratioin Birdcast
Jerry, you are right...this is pretty flippin' cool!!

Thanks for sharing!
Butch

On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 12:06 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> You may get this email from Team ebird but I wanted to make sure you were
> alerted to the embedded real time radar imaging that is easier to
> understand. Those that do not do ebird to document birds are missing out
> and ebird data sources are missing your participation.
>
> It's detailed and easy to see where the birds are going. Really good
> graphic. Navigate to the specific map for the specific day (today) and
> read the easy to follow symbols that will pop up on the map to give you
> details on sunset and sunrises, direction the birds are flying and specific
> radar location. This is pretty darn cool.
>
> https://ebird.org/news/birdcast-real-time-migration-
> information?utm_source=Cornell+Lab+eNews&utm_campaign=81d077fbfc-EMAIL_
> CAMPAIGN_2018_03_08&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_47588b5758-81d077fbfc-
> 313974165
>
> I think you will find this insight useful and it should sharpen your
> appreciation to the marvels of migration that is going on.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/4/18 5:31 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Lesser Black-backed Gull
If anyone saw the LBBG at Beaver Lake on Tuesday, or sees it today, would
you please post? Thanks so much; potential life bird for me and some
others.

Many thanks!

 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 6:34 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: ONE FOR SACRED ANNALS OF BEAVER LAKE BIRDING
Spring bird migration is all about Earth on the move. In pursuit, we made a big loop around Beaver Lake yesterday in birders lingo, Full Beaver. Things were pretty slow at Prairie Creek and Rocky Branch much obscured by low clouds, light mist, bone-chilling temps. We did get close up looks at a few Horned Grebes (29 for the day, all with horns), admired Northern Rough-winged Swallows working the surface, enjoyed the AH AH chorus of talking Fish Crows. At the dam we saw an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull and 3 other gull species, all seen well when, when as though on cue, they flew to a gravel pile near us. We had close looks at some spectacular summer plumage Common Loons; 16 for the day, a good number for Beaver and at one point a lot of lusty yodeling. Also in the dam area: Red-breasted Mergansers 3 flocks, at least 12 birds. Ducks at the dam mostly Lesser Scaups (120). When we got around to the lakes north side, near old Glade and Lost Bridge, far out in the mist: an immense ribbon of ducks, literally a mile+ out there, maybe around 1,175 in fading light of a 100% overcast day. What amazing treasures lurked in those rafts, spread out all through the old White River channel buried under Beaver Lake? What wouldnt we have given for a friendly pontoon boat ride? Most seemed to be Lesser Scaups, but there were also Gadwalls, Northern Shovelers, and others, a huge tight flock of American Coots (maybe 500), and a single American White Pelican. In sacred annals of Beaver Lake birding memorable years, many good friends April 2, 2018, joins the exclusive club.


 

Back to top
Date: 4/3/18 5:42 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: I don't like them...
Hi Norman

Your last paragraph of the text you offered just about says it all.
And the first sentence more than anything. From the "terminator species"
it's going to take a lot more than just declaring World Sparrow Day or
anything like that. It will take massive efforts of protecting insects and
their ability to reproduce, planting native vegetation, eradication of
pesticides and 1000 other human spread toxins. This is probably too much to
ask from homo "sapiens". Only time will tell. There is a good video clip on
YouTube entitled, "Why Humanity Destroyed Itself." You, all of you, should
watch and listen to it. The narrator has a sort of upper crust British
accent, however his focus and the accompanying descriptive charts are
HIGHLY effective.
In short, the decline of House Sparrows and hundreds of other species of
birds is more of a Human Problem than it is anything else.

Bill Thurman

On Mon, Apr 2, 2018, 22:00 Norman Lavers <
<0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I've been hearing about steep declines in House sparrow numbers in the
> U.K. in recent years from my brother. Here is the entry on their status
> from Wikipedia. We used to see huge communal nests that they built in trees
> in the countryside in Eastern Washington, looking just like the weaver
> finch nests in Africa.
> Cheryl Lavers
>
> WIKIPEDIA:
>
> The house sparrow has an extremely large range and population, and is not
> seriously threatened by human activities, so it is assessed as least
> concern <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_concern> for conservation on
> the IUCN Red List <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IUCN_Red_List>.[1]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-IUCN2013-1>
> However, populations have been declining in many parts of the world.[196]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-196>[197]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-197>[198]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-198> These
> declines were first noticed in North America, where they were initially
> attributed to the spread of the house finch
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_finch>, but have been most severe in Western
> Europe <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Europe>.[199]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-199>[200]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-200> Declines have
> not been universal, as no serious declines have been reported from Eastern
> Europe <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_Europe>, but have even
> occurred in Australia, where the house sparrow was introduced recently.
> [201] <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-201>
>
> In Great Britain <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Britain>,
> populations peaked in the early 1970s,[202]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-202> but have
> since declined by 68% overall,[203]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-203> and about 90%
> in some regions.[204]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-McCarthy-204>[205]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-205> In London,
> the house sparrow almost disappeared from the central city.[204]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-McCarthy-204> The
> numbers of house sparrows in the Netherlands
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netherlands> have dropped in half since
> the 1980s,[94]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-Poel-94> so the
> house sparrow is even considered an endangered species
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endangered_species>.[206]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-206> This status
> came to widespread attention after a female house sparrow, referred to as
> the "Dominomus <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domino_Day_2005_sparrow>",
> was killed after knocking down dominoes arranged as part of an attempt to
> set a world record.[207]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-207> These
> declines are not unprecedented, as similar reductions in population
> occurred when the internal combustion engine replaced horses in the 1920s
> and a major source of food in the form of grain spillage was lost.[208]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-208>[209]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-209>
>
> Various causes for the dramatic decreases in population have been
> proposed, including predation, in particular by Eurasian sparrowhawks
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_sparrowhawk>;[210]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-210>[211]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-211>[212]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-McCarthy3-212>
> electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones;[213]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-213> and diseases.
> [214]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-McCarthy2-214> A
> shortage of nesting sites caused by changes in urban building design is
> probably a factor, and conservation organisations have encouraged the use
> of special nest boxes for sparrows.[214]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-McCarthy2-214>[215]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-215>[216]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-216>[217]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-217> A primary
> cause of the decline seems to be an insufficient supply of insect food for
> nestling sparrows.[214]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-McCarthy2-214>[218]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-218> Declines in
> insect populations result from an increase of monoculture crops, the heavy
> use of pesticides,[219]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-219>[220]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-220>[221]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-221> the
> replacement of native plants in cities with introduced plants and parking
> areas,[222] <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-222>
> [223] <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-223> and
> possibly the introduction of unleaded petrol
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unleaded_petrol>, which produces toxic
> compounds such as methyl nitrite
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methyl_nitrite>.[224]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-224>
>
> Protecting insect habitats on farms,[225]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-225>[226]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-226> and planting
> native plants in cities benefit the house sparrow, as does establishing
> urban green spaces.[227]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-Leylandii-227>[228]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-228> To raise
> awareness of threats to the house sparrow, World Sparrow Day
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Sparrow_Day> has been celebrated on
> 20 March across the world since 2010.[229]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-229> Over the
> recent years, the house sparrow population has been on the decline in many
> Asian countries, and this decline is quite evident in India. To promote the
> conservation of these birds, in 2012, the house sparrow was declared as the
> state bird of Delhi.[230]
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_sparrow#cite_note-230>
>
>
>
> On Monday, April 2, 2018, 7:14:15 PM CDT, Janine Perlman <
> <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
>
> Thank you for sharing this, Jerry.
>
> As humans do more damage to the natural world, there's more reason every
> day to learn from, and appreciate, the miracles of evolution---very much
> including "invasive" species.
>
> Janine
>
> On 4/2/2018 6:13 PM, Jerry Davis
> wrote:
>
> Growing up in East Texas my grandparents lived in the Country and House
> sparrows weaved their nests in the American sycamore trees on both sides of
> the house and used chicken feathers from the barnyard to “Feather Their
> Nest”. In town they used whatever cavities that were available including
> the six cavity brick tiles used to face the new bank. They are very
> innovative and although we thought the House Sparrow, Cockroach and Coyote
> would be around long after humans had destroyed themselves, House sparrows
> are on the decline as well. I admire a species that can build and fledge
> young from a nest on a speaker at Six Flags Over Texas while thousands of
> attendees filing by for hours on end in lines just 3 feet below.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> *From:* Sandy Berger
> *Sent:* Monday, April 2, 2018 2:52 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* I don't like them...
>
> ...but I saw them do something I've never seen before.
>
> I have never seen House Sparrows weave their own nests, in trees, until
> yesterday. There were three nests being built in some sort of ornamentals,
> maybe crape myrtles, at the rest area on I40 in eastern AR. I found it
> quite interesting. I've only seen house sparrows nest in cavities.
>
> I dunno. Is that uncommon?
>
> PS. I can't believe I'm emailing about HOSPs. Ugh
>
> Sandy B.
>
>
>

 

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Date: 4/2/18 8:00 pm
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: I don't like them...
I've been hearing about steep declines in House sparrow numbers in the U.K. in recent years from my brother. Here is the entry on their status from Wikipedia. We used to see huge communal nests that they built in trees in the countryside in Eastern Washington, looking just like the weaver finch nests in Africa.Cheryl Lavers
WIKIPEDIA:

The house sparrow has an extremely large range and population, and is not seriously threatened by human activities, so it is assessed as least concern for conservation on the IUCN Red List.[1] However, populations have been declining in many parts of the world.[196][197][198] These declines were first noticed in North America, where they were initially attributed to the spread of the house finch, but have been most severe in Western Europe.[199][200] Declines have not been universal, as no serious declines have been reported from Eastern Europe, but have even occurred in Australia, where the house sparrow was introduced recently.[201]

In Great Britain, populations peaked in the early 1970s,[202] but have since declined by 68% overall,[203] and about 90% in some regions.[204][205] In London, the house sparrow almost disappeared from the central city.[204] The numbers of house sparrows in the Netherlands have dropped in half since the 1980s,[94] so the house sparrow is even considered an endangered species.[206] This status came to widespread attention after a female house sparrow, referred to as the "Dominomus", was killed after knocking down dominoes arranged as part of an attempt to set a world record.[207] These declines are not unprecedented, as similar reductions in population occurred when the internal combustion engine replaced horses in the 1920s and a major source of food in the form of grain spillage was lost.[208][209]

Various causes for the dramatic decreases in population have been proposed, including predation, in particular by Eurasian sparrowhawks;[210][211][212] electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones;[213] and diseases.[214] A shortage of nesting sites caused by changes in urban building design is probably a factor, and conservation organisations have encouraged the use of special nest boxes for sparrows.[214][215][216][217] A primary cause of the decline seems to be an insufficient supply of insect food for nestling sparrows.[214][218] Declines in insect populations result from an increase of monoculture crops, the heavy use of pesticides,[219][220][221] the replacement of native plants in cities with introduced plants and parking areas,[222][223] and possibly the introduction of unleaded petrol, which produces toxic compounds such as methyl nitrite.[224]

Protecting insect habitats on farms,[225][226] and planting native plants in cities benefit the house sparrow, as does establishing urban green spaces.[227][228] To raise awareness of threats to the house sparrow, World Sparrow Day has been celebrated on 20 March across the world since 2010.[229] Over the recent years, the house sparrow population has been on the decline in many Asian countries, and this decline is quite evident in India. To promote the conservation of these birds, in 2012, the house sparrow was declared as the state bird of Delhi.[230]





On Monday, April 2, 2018, 7:14:15 PM CDT, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

Thank you for sharing this, Jerry. 

As humans do more damage to the natural world, there's more reason every day to learn from, and appreciate, the miracles of evolution---very much including "invasive" species.

Janine

On 4/2/2018 6:13 PM, Jerry Davis
wrote:

Growing up in East Texas my grandparents lived in the Country and House sparrows weaved their nests in the American sycamore trees on both sides of the house and used chicken feathers from the barnyard to “Feather Their Nest”.  In town they used whatever cavities that were available including the six cavity brick tiles used to face the new bank.  They are very innovative and although we thought the House Sparrow, Cockroach and Coyote would be around long after humans had destroyed themselves, House sparrows are on the decline as well.  I admire a species that can build and fledge young from a nest on a speaker at Six Flags Over Texas while thousands of attendees filing by for hours on end in lines just 3 feet below.   Jerry Wayne Davis Hot Springs   From: Sandy Berger Sent: Monday, April 2, 2018 2:52 PM To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: I don't like them...   ...but I saw them do something I've never seen before.   I have never seen House Sparrows weave their own nests, in trees, until yesterday.  There were three nests being built in some sort of ornamentals, maybe crape myrtles, at the rest area on I40 in eastern AR. I found it quite interesting.  I've only seen house sparrows nest in cavities.   I dunno.  Is that uncommon?   PS. I can't believe I'm emailing about HOSPs. Ugh   Sandy B.


 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 7:47 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL ON BEAVER LAKE
If anyone chases this, please keep us updated as to whether it sticks
around or not. Most of the common gulls that pass through in migration
don't seem to stick around at all... not that you can always tell one
bonaparte's from the next. But I guess I can hope. I have no way to get
out there tomorrow but Wednesday is a maybe. If it's still around then
I'll definitely chase it. We got to see the greater black-backed gulls
up in New England but this would be a first for us.

Daniel Mason

On 4/2/2018 8:30 PM, Joseph C. Neal wrote:
>
> An adult Lesser Black-backed Gull was associated with Herring Gulls
> (4) and Ring-billed Gulls (4) near Beaver Lake dam site this
> afternoon. This is a second record for northwest Arkansas. (Previous
> record March 14, 2011, also associated with Herring and Ring-billed
> Gulls.) It was way out on the lake when we first spotted it, but even
> in the 100% overcast and slight mist that jet black back was obvious.
> We went ahead and took a bunch of lousy photographs. For us it is a
> rare bird, even though it occurs annually at Dardanelle and our friend
> David Chapman, from England where this bird is more like our
> Ring-billed in terms of abundance once humorously allowed that he
> would not drive across town to see a Lesser Black-backed Gull.
> Anyway, after we took our lousy photos, the gull up and flew towards
> us, soon perched on a gravel pile, now well within camera range, and
> stood there for photos just like we had ordered it up -- along with
> the rest of the Herring Gulls (3 different ages) and the four
> Ring-billed Gulls. We are now well repaid for those times when the
> most interesting bird flew in the away direction. And while we were
> there, we had a close overflight of Bonapartes Gulls (23), most of
> them in molt, including several with spectacular black heads even in
> the overcast and mist. (There was quite a bit more migration visible
> today. I will pull that together for a separate posting.)
>
>



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 6:31 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL ON BEAVER LAKE
An adult Lesser Black-backed Gull was associated with Herring Gulls (4) and Ring-billed Gulls (4) near Beaver Lake dam site this afternoon. This is a second record for northwest Arkansas. (Previous record March 14, 2011, also associated with Herring and Ring-billed Gulls.) It was way out on the lake when we first spotted it, but even in the 100% overcast and slight mist that jet black back was obvious. We went ahead and took a bunch of lousy photographs. For us it is a rare bird, even though it occurs annually at Dardanelle and our friend David Chapman, from England where this bird is more like our Ring-billed in terms of abundance once humorously allowed that he would not drive across town to see a Lesser Black-backed Gull. Anyway, after we took our lousy photos, the gull up and flew towards us, soon perched on a gravel pile, now well within camera range, and stood there for photos just like we had ordered it up -- along with the rest of the Herring Gulls (3 different ages) and the four Ring-billed Gulls. We are now well repaid for those times when the most interesting bird flew in the away direction. And while we were there, we had a close overflight of Bonapartes Gulls (23), most of them in molt, including several with spectacular black heads even in the overcast and mist. (There was quite a bit more migration visible today. I will pull that together for a separate posting.)


 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 5:14 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: I don't like them...
Thank you for sharing this, Jerry.

As humans do more damage to the natural world, there's more reason every
day to learn from, and appreciate, the miracles of evolution---very much
including "invasive" species.

Janine

On 4/2/2018 6:13 PM, Jerry Davis
wrote:
> Growing up in East Texas my grandparents lived in the Country and
> House sparrows weaved their nests in the American sycamore trees on
> both sides of the house and used chicken feathers from the barnyard to
> “Feather Their Nest”. In town they used whatever cavities that were
> available including the six cavity brick tiles used to face the new
> bank.  They are very innovative and although we thought the House
> Sparrow, Cockroach and Coyote would be around long after humans had
> destroyed themselves, House sparrows are on the decline as well.  I
> admire a species that can build and fledge young from a nest on a
> speaker at Six Flags Over Texas while thousands of attendees filing by
> for hours on end in lines just 3 feet below.
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
> *From:* Sandy Berger
> *Sent:* Monday, April 2, 2018 2:52 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* I don't like them...
> ...but I saw them do something I've never seen before.
> I have never seen House Sparrows weave their own nests, in trees,
> until yesterday.  There were three nests being built in some sort of
> ornamentals, maybe crape myrtles, at the rest area on I40 in eastern
> AR. I found it quite interesting.  I've only seen house sparrows nest
> in cavities.
> I dunno.  Is that uncommon?
> PS. I can't believe I'm emailing about HOSPs. Ugh
> Sandy B.


 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 4:13 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: I don't like them...
Growing up in East Texas my grandparents lived in the Country and House sparrows weaved their nests in the American sycamore trees on both sides of the house and used chicken feathers from the barnyard to “Feather Their Nest”. In town they used whatever cavities that were available including the six cavity brick tiles used to face the new bank. They are very innovative and although we thought the House Sparrow, Cockroach and Coyote would be around long after humans had destroyed themselves, House sparrows are on the decline as well. I admire a species that can build and fledge young from a nest on a speaker at Six Flags Over Texas while thousands of attendees filing by for hours on end in lines just 3 feet below.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Sandy Berger
Sent: Monday, April 2, 2018 2:52 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: I don't like them...

...but I saw them do something I've never seen before.

I have never seen House Sparrows weave their own nests, in trees, until yesterday. There were three nests being built in some sort of ornamentals, maybe crape myrtles, at the rest area on I40 in eastern AR. I found it quite interesting. I've only seen house sparrows nest in cavities.

I dunno. Is that uncommon?

PS. I can't believe I'm emailing about HOSPs. Ugh

Sandy B.
 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 2:34 pm
From: Karen Konarski <karen...>
Subject: Re: Murray Park-Little Rock
we were there Saturday lunchtime and there were pelicans at the sandbar
near the dam and to the east at the point of land just past the boat
ramp.  Mockingbird had serious stakeout going on in THE Mulberry Tree. 
Neill & Karen Hart


On 4/2/2018 4:24 PM, Dottie Boyles
wrote:
> I made a run to Murray Park during my lunch hour today. Temp was 47 and windy. A nasty wind chill kept most of the birds hunkered down along the River except for swallows flying back and forth.
>
> I was hoping for a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, but no luck. I counted 19 robins scattered throughout the park, most of which congregated around the doggy park. There was a large flock of Chipping Sparrows flying from tree to tree. I stopped to scan a flock of blackbirds only to discover 22 male and female Brown-headed Cowbirds, I had spotted 3 others earlier. Whatever tries to nest along the River will have a hard time.
>
> The dead tree the Pileated Woodpeckers used last year to nest in, has been cut down. Probably because it was too close to a walking path. Their last nesting tree fell down a couple of years ago.
>
> A Northern Mockingbird seemed to be practicing guarding the western Mulberry tree even though it’s too early for blooms and berries. I counted 15 species in 45 minutes.
>
> Dottie Boyles
> Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 2:25 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: Murray Park-Little Rock

I made a run to Murray Park during my lunch hour today. Temp was 47 and
windy. A nasty wind chill kept most of the birds hunkered down along the
River except for swallows flying back and forth.

I was hoping for a
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, but no luck. I counted 19 robins scattered
throughout the park, most of which congregated around the doggy park. There
was a large flock of Chipping Sparrows flying from tree to tree. I stopped
to scan a flock of blackbirds only to discover 22 male and female
Brown-headed Cowbirds, I had spotted 3 others earlier. Whatever tries to
nest along the River will have a hard time.

The dead tree the Pileated
Woodpeckers used last year to nest in, has been cut down. Probably because
it was too close to a walking path. Their last nesting tree fell down a
couple of years ago.

A Northern Mockingbird seemed to be practicing
guarding the western Mulberry tree even though it's too early for blooms
and berries. I counted 15 species in 45 minutes.

Dottie Boyles
Little
Rock


 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 12:54 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: I don't like them...
...but I saw them do something I've never seen before.

I have never seen House Sparrows weave their own nests, in trees, until
yesterday. There were three nests being built in some sort of ornamentals,
maybe crape myrtles, at the rest area on I40 in eastern AR. I found it
quite interesting. I've only seen house sparrows nest in cavities.

I dunno. Is that uncommon?

PS. I can't believe I'm emailing about HOSPs. Ugh

Sandy B.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 10:01 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
I pre-ordered also! How exciting!!!
J
On Apr 2, 2018, at 11:36 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

> Congratulations, Cheryl and Norman!! I just pre-ordered, and recommend doing so, since it includes a 10% discount and free shipping. Can't wait!!
>
> Janine
>
> On 4/2/2018 9:56 AM, Norman Lavers wrote:
>> Norman and I have a book coming out from Et Alia Press in Little Rock in early May. It is called 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: their Portraits and Stories. The book is aimed at a general audience in the hopes we can get across how interesting and how and vitally important insects are . Most of the insects are common ones and others are showy and might catch a person's attention. The text tells something about each insect's life, and how it fits into the scheme of things. Since birders will know how dependent birds are on insects we hope they might find our book interesting.
>>
>> Norman and Cheryl Lavers
>>
>> More information can be found at the following link:
>>
>> 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories
>> PREORDER TODAY for 10% off with code FLY, and find your book on your doorstep via complimentary local hand-deliv...
>>
>>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 9:36 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
Congratulations, Cheryl and Norman!!  I just pre-ordered, and recommend
doing so, since it includes a 10% discount and free shipping.  Can't wait!!

Janine

On 4/2/2018 9:56 AM, Norman Lavers wrote:
> Norman and I have a book coming out from Et Alia Press in Little Rock
> in early May. It is called /100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth:
> their Portraits and Stories/. The book is aimed at a general audience
> in the hopes we can get across how interesting and how and vitally
> important insects are . Most of the insects are common ones and others
> are showy and might catch a person's attention. The text tells
> something about each insect's life, and how it fits into the scheme of
> things. Since birders will know how dependent birds are on insects we
> hope they might find our book interesting.
>
> Norman and Cheryl Lavers
>
> More information can be found at the following link:
>
> 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories
> <http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-arkansas-and-the-midsouth-their-portraits-stories>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories
>
> PREORDER TODAY for 10% off with code FLY, and find your book on your
> doorstep via complimentary local hand-deliv...
>
> <http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-arkansas-and-the-midsouth-their-portraits-stories>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 9:29 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: FOS female RTHU
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 8:51 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
Fantastic!!!
J
On Apr 2, 2018, at 10:11 AM, Ann Gordon <chesterann...> wrote:

> So glad to see this work of love finally coming to fruition! The next best thing to taking a walk with Norman and Cheryl. I'm getting one for my great-granddaughter as well as for myself. Insects are for the birds!
>
> On Mon, Apr 2, 2018 at 9:56 AM, Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> wrote:
> Norman and I have a book coming out from Et Alia Press in Little Rock in early May. It is called 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: their Portraits and Stories. The book is aimed at a general audience in the hopes we can get across how interesting and how and vitally important insects are . Most of the insects are common ones and others are showy and might catch a person's attention. The text tells something about each insect's life, and how it fits into the scheme of things. Since birders will know how dependent birds are on insects we hope they might find our book interesting.
>
> Norman and Cheryl Lavers
>
> More information can be found at the following link:
>
> 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories
>
> 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories
> PREORDER TODAY for 10% off with code FLY, and find your book on your doorstep via complimentary local hand-deliv...
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 8:13 am
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann...>
Subject: Re: 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
So glad to see this work of love finally coming to fruition! The next best
thing to taking a walk with Norman and Cheryl. I'm getting one for my
great-granddaughter as well as for myself. Insects are for the birds!

On Mon, Apr 2, 2018 at 9:56 AM, Norman Lavers <
<0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Norman and I have a book coming out from Et Alia Press in Little Rock in
> early May. It is called *100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: their
> Portraits and Stories*. The book is aimed at a general audience in the
> hopes we can get across how interesting and how and vitally important
> insects are . Most of the insects are common ones and others are showy and
> might catch a person's attention. The text tells something about each
> insect's life, and how it fits into the scheme of things. Since birders
> will know how dependent birds are on insects we hope they might find our
> book interesting.
>
> Norman and Cheryl Lavers
>
> More information can be found at the following link:
>
> 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories
> <http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-arkansas-and-the-midsouth-their-portraits-stories>
>
> 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories
>
> PREORDER TODAY for 10% off with code FLY, and find your book on your
> doorstep via complimentary local hand-deliv...
>
> <http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-arkansas-and-the-midsouth-their-portraits-stories>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/2/18 7:58 am
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...>
Subject: 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth
Norman and I have a book coming out from Et Alia Press in Little Rock in early May. It is called 100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: their Portraits and Stories. The book is aimed at a general audience in the hopes we can get across how interesting and how and vitally important insects are . Most of the insects are common ones and others are showy and might catch a person's attention. The text tells something about each insect's life, and how it fits into the scheme of things. Since birders will know how dependent birds are on insects we hope they might find our book interesting.
Norman and Cheryl Lavers

More information can be found at the following link:
100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories

|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
100 Insects of Arkansas and the Midsouth: Their Portraits & Stories

PREORDER TODAY for 10% off with code FLY, and find your book on your doorstep via complimentary local hand-deliv...
|

|

|




 

Back to top
Date: 4/1/18 8:58 pm
From: Johnny Walker <johnnybacon...>
Subject: Forster's Terns and FOS Cliff Swallows
On a walk with my wife yesterday evening across the Big Dam Bridge in
Little Rock, I was pleased to see a group of about 15 Cliff Swallows flying
around. There were also a couple of Forster's Terns, which were a first for
me and don't seem to have been reported yet for that area of the river this
year. I also enjoyed seeing all of the Pelicans around. Pleasant birding on
a pleasant evening.

- Johnny Walker (Little Rock)

 

Back to top
Date: 4/1/18 4:51 pm
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: Re: SNUG WITH THE DUCKS . REPORT FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND
I've had at least one Junco every day. I know there were still several up
until at least a few days ago. I haven't been watching much the past couple
of days.



Kara (in Alco)



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> On
Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2018 2:13 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: SNUG WITH THE DUCKS . REPORT FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND



I've seen about one Junco a day since Friday. J



On Apr 1, 2018, at 1:58 PM, "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal...>
<mailto:<joeneal...> > wrote:





Yesterday's sunny 70 and south wind has turned to today's 40, with north
wind and cold rain. Easter Sunday and that north front kept most people
inside and out of Lake Fayetteville Park. It also paused the north-bound
spring migration waterfowl freight, good if you were warmly dressed,
equipped with a spotting scope, and snug inside Mulhollan Blind.



Today's waterfowl viewed from Mulhollan Blind included: Mallard (4),
Blue-winged Teal (30), Northern Shoveler (26), Green-winged Teal (4),
Red-breasted Merganser (6), Pied-billed Grebe (44), Double-crested Cormorant
(61), and Great Blue Heron (1). The north winds encouraged swallows to
pause, too. There must have been a couple of hundred swirling low, at least
including Tree, Northern Rough-winged, and Barn, plus Purple Martins.



Purple Finches (1 male, 1 female) were among the horde of American
Goldfinches visiting Mulhollan family bird feeders at the botanical garden.
I'd given up on seeing anymore Dark-eyed Juncos - then 7 appeared near the
parking lot. They are not the last of the last, not yet, but close. We are
running out of juncos until next fall.








 

Back to top
Date: 4/1/18 1:28 pm
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOS Scissortail Flycatcher
Mabelvale on FED EX fence 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 4/1/18 12:14 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: SNUG WITH THE DUCKS … REPORT FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND
I've seen about one Junco a day since Friday. J

On Apr 1, 2018, at 1:58 PM, "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal...> wrote:

> Yesterdays sunny 70 and south wind has turned to todays 40, with north wind and cold rain. Easter Sunday and that north front kept most people inside and out of Lake Fayetteville Park. It also paused the north-bound spring migration waterfowl freight, good if you were warmly dressed, equipped with a spotting scope, and snug inside Mulhollan Blind.
>
> Todays waterfowl viewed from Mulhollan Blind included: Mallard (4), Blue-winged Teal (30), Northern Shoveler (26), Green-winged Teal (4), Red-breasted Merganser (6), Pied-billed Grebe (44), Double-crested Cormorant (61), and Great Blue Heron (1). The north winds encouraged swallows to pause, too. There must have been a couple of hundred swirling low, at least including Tree, Northern Rough-winged, and Barn, plus Purple Martins.
>
> Purple Finches (1 male, 1 female) were among the horde of American Goldfinches visiting Mulhollan family bird feeders at the botanical garden. Id given up on seeing anymore Dark-eyed Juncos then 7 appeared near the parking lot. They are not the last of the last, not yet, but close. We are running out of juncos until next fall.
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 4/1/18 11:59 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SNUG WITH THE DUCKS … REPORT FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND
Yesterdays sunny 70 and south wind has turned to todays 40, with north wind and cold rain. Easter Sunday and that north front kept most people inside and out of Lake Fayetteville Park. It also paused the north-bound spring migration waterfowl freight, good if you were warmly dressed, equipped with a spotting scope, and snug inside Mulhollan Blind.

Todays waterfowl viewed from Mulhollan Blind included: Mallard (4), Blue-winged Teal (30), Northern Shoveler (26), Green-winged Teal (4), Red-breasted Merganser (6), Pied-billed Grebe (44), Double-crested Cormorant (61), and Great Blue Heron (1). The north winds encouraged swallows to pause, too. There must have been a couple of hundred swirling low, at least including Tree, Northern Rough-winged, and Barn, plus Purple Martins.

Purple Finches (1 male, 1 female) were among the horde of American Goldfinches visiting Mulhollan family bird feeders at the botanical garden. Id given up on seeing anymore Dark-eyed Juncos then 7 appeared near the parking lot. They are not the last of the last, not yet, but close. We are running out of juncos until next fall.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/31/18 4:24 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - FOS Nashville Warbler/Broad-winged Hawk
A walk around Lake Fayetteville this afternoon produced 7 warbler species - Louisiana Waterthrush (1), Black-and-White (2), Orange-crowned (1), Nashville (1), Northern Parula (2), Pine (2), Yellow-rumped (27) and Yellow-throated (3). Blue-gray Gnatcatchers (5) and White-eyed Vireos (2) were very vocal.

A Broad-winged Hawk drifted north over the environmental center.


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 3/31/18 4:10 pm
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Early Ovenbird near Ponca
Hiking the bluff-top trail between the Ponca low water bridge and Steel
Creek Campground today saw an Ovenbird, and heard a second Ovenbird calling
ahead on the trail. The typical arrival date is mid-April or thereabouts.

At Lost Valley and along the Buffalo National River we heard and saw
Northern Parulas, Blue-Gray Gnatcatchers, Lousiana Waterthrushes, Black and
White Warblers.

Probably would have had a better bird list except for we were mostly
enjoying the wild flowers today. :)

--Joan

 

Back to top
Date: 3/31/18 4:05 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Duck, Coot, Grebe
The Eared Grebe, in breeding plumage, remains at the state fish hatchery in
Centerton, and was in the same pond as where Joe reported it .the day
before. Also present were Pied-billed Grebes, also in breeding plumage, 4
Ruddy Ducks, ~25 American Coots, ~ 40 Blue-winged Teal, several Gadwall,
and 10-12 Northern Shovelers in one of the lower ponds. The pond with the
EAGR contained all of those species (minus the RUDU), plus Ring-necked
Ducks, and some Scaup. I think they were all Lessers, but haven't studied
the photos yet. I recorded some video of singing Rusty Blackbirds there
too, but I don't think eBird is set up for video.

After leaving there, I headed south to SW Anglin Rd where there is a farm
pond, and the field is often flooded after big rain events. I was not
disappointed, as there was probably 200 ducks, all of the aforementioned
species, as well as Mallards and Green-winged Teal. I only saw 3
shorebirds, 2 Greater Yellowlegs, and one that may have been a Stilt
Sandpiper.

On an unrelated note, I went to check out the Sugar Creek Heron rookery in
Bella Vista for the first time this year, and found only 2 nests being
tended by herons. The sycamore trees were largely taken over by Black
Vultures. I at first thought that all of the herons were gone, but finally
saw the two. I also saw a couple of "amorous" Eurasian Collared Doves. It
is spring, after all.

Karen Garrett
Rogers (in the great northwest)

 

Back to top
Date: 3/30/18 8:28 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Longpool Rec warblers
Black-throated Green, Pine, Yellow-throated, Black and White, Northern
Parula.

Sandy B.

 

Back to top
Date: 3/30/18 4:37 pm
From: Amy Brantley <brantleyal...>
Subject: Re: FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Cabot)
Also had one this afternoon in Hot Springs.

Amy Brantley


> On Mar 30, 2018, at 6:18 PM, Amy Hall <00000141e1151b9c-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Joe observed it this afternoon at the Cabot Sports Complex off Highway 321.
 

Back to top
Date: 3/30/18 4:18 pm
From: Amy Hall <00000141e1151b9c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Cabot)
Joe observed it this afternoon at the Cabot Sports Complex off Highway 321.
 

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Date: 3/30/18 4:06 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: From the Buffalo to Russellville, FOSs All the Way
I spent a lovely morning hiking to Big Bluff, near Ponca, on the Buffalo River. It started out cool, but warmed up nicely. Black-and-white Warblers are back in full force, as are N. Parula, and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. The Black-and-whites were numerous, with several individuals seemingly engaged in border wars as they sorted out territories. Other FOS sightings included a singing Red-eyed Vireo and 2 Cliff Swallows wheeling around Big Bluff. Sitting on the bluff’s edge, 250+ feet above the Buffalo, I was surprised to hear the crystal clear song of a Louisiana Waterthrush. The acoustics of the bluff must have allowed it to carry!

Later, driving to Russellville, a Scissor-tailed Flycatcher sat, newly arrived, on a barbed wire perch.

Good birding,
Mitchell Pruitt


Sent from my iPhone.
 

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Date: 3/30/18 2:50 pm
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...>
Subject: Repelling squirrels from pole feeders.
I thought I saw an article on arbird that described twisting ( threading ? ) a metal slinky around the pole and ( I guess ) hooking the end on a nail or hook pushed though a hole drilled in the pole. Laughs come with it ! Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas 
 

Back to top
Date: 3/30/18 1:20 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Slippery poles
A birder asked for instructions so I’ll post them for others.

The basic design is to eliminate squirrels. You only need to locate the feeder at least 10’ away from the nearest jumping point and make the support too large in diameter for them to climb. I have found that 3” PVC pipe will accomplish this.

For the support, use 1/2” black iron pipe.

1 piece of 1/2” pipe 5’ long, threaded on one end (at least)
1 1/2” threaded coupling
1 piece of 1/2” pipe 1’ long, threaded both ends
1 1/2” threaded floor flange

Assemble the first three items. The unthreaded end of the 5’ piece of pipe is buried in the ground and stabilized with Sakrete (they make some for mailboxes that doesn’t require mixing). I usually bury the pipe about 6-8”. The coupling needs to be at least 4’ above the ground.

For the baffle, use:
1 piece of 3” dia. PVC 3’ long (cut PVC to length with a hacksaw)
Make a header from a 2x4. Measure the inside diameter of the pipe. Use a compass to draw a circle of that diameter on the 2x4. Drill a 1” hole in the center, then cut the circle from the 2x4. Pre-drill nail holes (3) in the PVC and nail the header in the pipe. The baffle can be spray painted if desired.

Attach the floor flange to the bottom of the feeder. After the Sakrete has cured, slide the baffle over the pipe support. It will rest on the coupling. Thread the feeder onto the top of the support.

I have never had a squirrel get on a feeder made like this, as long as the 10’ jumping rule is followed.

In order to keep a raccoon off the feeder additional baffles are required. Increase the diameter of the PVC to 4” or 6”. You need to make a header for the larger pipe from a 2x6” board. Use a “witches hat” baffle or a large dome (available at Farmer’s Co-Op or Tractor Supply for ~$30) or some other cone shaped baffle above the pipe baffle. The cone must rest on the top of the pipe to keep it from being tipped. Secure it with a screw hose clamp to prevent it from being pushed up. Add a short piece of 2” PVC with a wooden header to cover the iron pipe between the cone and the bottom of the feeder. A large raccoon can climb the 6” pipe and reach around the cone, but the 2” PVC is too large for him to grasp. I have never had a raccoon defeat this system.

Ed Laster




> On Mar 30, 2018, at 10:13 AM, Joe Tucker <jttllt...> wrote:
>
> Glen, Ed has the best idea. I have some sheet metal you can make a cone with and install on your pole. NOTHING that is slick will stand up to our rain and or heat in a few more days. I can help you make a better barrier if you want.
>
>
> joe
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
> To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Fri, Mar 30, 2018 9:36 am
> Subject: Re: Slippery poles
>
> This will stop squirrels and raccoons. You don’t need the cone at the top for squirrels, they can’t climb the 4” diameter pipe. Wild Birds Unlimited has similar components in a kit, or you can use 1/2” iron pipe and PVC pipe to make it yourself.
>
> Ed Laster
>
> <UNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_5036.jpeg>
>
> On Mar 30, 2018, at 9:00 AM, Don Simons <Don.Simons...> <>> wrote:
>
> Glenn,
>
> I have not found a substance slippery enough to stop determined squirrels. Vasoline, Crisco, veg. oil., and motor oil all failed. Physical barriers on the poles work best for my situation. Check Wild Birds Unlimited. Also, try a separate feeder with cheaper feed easier for squirrels to access. Or learn to enjoy squirrel stew.
>
> Don
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> <>] On Behalf Of Glenn
> Sent: Friday, March 30, 2018 7:32 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <>
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Slippery poles
>
> We have squirrels that like to climb up our bird feeder pole. It isn't a very tall pole so they really only need one grab on the pole then they are dangling from the feeder. Lately, I have put Vasoline on the appropriate spot on the pole and it frustrates the squirrels. Much to my delight though. But, Vasoline only last a couple days. I've been tempted to use axel grease, but decided that may harm the birds and the squirrels. Is there a substance that is better than Vasoline that will keep the squirrels off the pole but not poison anything? I've thought about trying Crisco.
>
> I have also been live trapping the squirrels lately and releasing them at Holland Bottoms. I have caught 8 so far. I know it is probably a futile effort, but it is satisfying none the less. What is really effective is to get the squirrels frustrated with the slippery pole, then they look around and spot the tasty pile of seeds in the trap. Caught! I decided to remove the squirrels because a couple of them decided to spend a lot of their time on our roof. I was afraid they might find away to get inside the roof, so they had to go.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android <>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/30/18 10:58 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA March 24 Field Trip Report
Dear ARBirders,Finally had a chance to write up our sightings from last Saturday's ASCA field trip. I shared our eBird list with Lori Monday at the Nature Center and received a nice note back saying she absolutely loved the group and she got some useful feedback from some of the members and have already made the changes.  She is also working on identifying the plants on site so that she is more knowledgeable the next go round. She asked that I let our group know that the tree they had difficulty identifying was a non-native Chinese Parasol Tree.  She is fairly new to the Center and very enthusiastic. She said she can’t wait to see us again, so stop in and say hello.  The parking lot, feeders, and trails at the Nature Center are very birdy during spring migration. It's worth a trip. Plus, the Soras should soon be arriving at Lake Saracen, just a stone's throw from the Nature Center.Karen HollidayField Trip Coordinator

 ASCA Field Trip Report
March 24
Saturday, members of the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas(ASCA) headed to Pine Bluff for their March 24th field trip.  38 birders gathered at the Gov. Mike HuckabeeDelta Rivers Nature Center and were treated to hot coffee and homemade muffinsprovided by the members of the Three Rivers Audubon Society.  What a lovely way to start the birding day!  Lori Monday, Education Specialist for theNature Center, gave an informative overview of the programs, exhibits,critters, and goals of the Nature Center. Lori asked if we would share our eBird list so she could post oursightings in their lobby.  It was alittle early for most spring migrants, but we did manage to spot 30 species whenwe walked the Discovery Loop trail.  Atthe feeders we saw our first Ruby-throated Hummingbird of the season.  The Nature Center has an excellent gift shopand birders lined up to purchase the new Game & Fish front car plate thatreads “Bird Arkansas”.  The group then headed to Lake Saracen to look for Soras andVirginia Rails in the reed beds.  A chillywind was blowing hard across the lake, making it difficult to hear anything.  We thought we heard something after a quickplayback of both Sora and Virginia Rail.  We listened for several minutes then didplayback again and a Virginia Rail clearly responded.  A life or state bird for many participants!  We watched an adult Bald Eagle teetering low inthe wind, fooling us into thinking it was a Turkey Vulture at first. Last stop was the wetlands at Wilbur West Road.  There was some water and mud still presentwhich held a nice mix of Gadwalls, Green-winged and Blue-winged Teal, and NorthernShovelers, plus Great Blue and Great Egrets, and FOS Little Blue Herons.  The Pectoral Sandpipers and Wilson’s Snipes werelife birds for a couple of our birders. We finished the day with 37 species. Not a high count, but a very fun day with a great group of birders, andno rain. 

 

Back to top
Date: 3/30/18 8:14 am
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Slippery poles
Glen, Ed has the best idea. I have some sheet metal you can make a cone with and install on your pole. NOTHING that is slick will stand up to our rain and or heat in a few more days. I can help you make a better barrier if you want.




joe



-----Original Message-----
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Fri, Mar 30, 2018 9:36 am
Subject: Re: Slippery poles


This will stop squirrels and raccoons. You don’t need the cone at the top for squirrels, they can’t climb the 4” diameter pipe. Wild Birds Unlimited has similar components in a kit, or you can use 1/2” iron pipe and PVC pipe to make it yourself.


Ed Laster







On Mar 30, 2018, at 9:00 AM, Don Simons <Don.Simons...> wrote:



Glenn,

I have not found a substance slippery enough to stop determined squirrels. Vasoline, Crisco, veg. oil., and motor oil all failed. Physical barriers on the poles work best for my situation. Check Wild Birds Unlimited. Also, try a separate feeder with cheaper feed easier for squirrels to access. Or learn to enjoy squirrel stew.

Don

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Glenn
Sent: Friday, March 30, 2018 7:32 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Slippery poles

We have squirrels that like to climb up our bird feeder pole. It isn't a very tall pole so they really only need one grab on the pole then they are dangling from the feeder. Lately, I have put Vasoline on the appropriate spot on the pole and it frustrates the squirrels. Much to my delight though. But, Vasoline only last a couple days. I've been tempted to use axel grease, but decided that may harm the birds and the squirrels. Is there a substance that is better than Vasoline that will keep the squirrels off the pole but not poison anything? I've thought about trying Crisco.



I have also been live trapping the squirrels lately and releasing them at Holland Bottoms. I have caught 8 so far. I know it is probably a futile effort, but it is satisfying none the less. What is really effective is to get the squirrels frustrated with the slippery pole, then they look around and spot the tasty pile of seeds in the trap. Caught! I decided to remove the squirrels because a couple of them decided to spend a lot of their time on our roof. I was afraid they might find away to get inside the roof, so they had to go.



Glenn Wyatt

Cabot



Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android








 

Back to top
Date: 3/30/18 7:36 am
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Slippery poles
This will stop squirrels and raccoons. You don’t need the cone at the top for squirrels, they can’t climb the 4” diameter pipe. Wild Birds Unlimited has similar components in a kit, or you can use 1/2” iron pipe and PVC pipe to make it yourself.

Ed Laster



> On Mar 30, 2018, at 9:00 AM, Don Simons <Don.Simons...> wrote:
>
> Glenn,
>
> I have not found a substance slippery enough to stop determined squirrels. Vasoline, Crisco, veg. oil., and motor oil all failed. Physical barriers on the poles work best for my situation. Check Wild Birds Unlimited. Also, try a separate feeder with cheaper feed easier for squirrels to access. Or learn to enjoy squirrel stew.
>
> Don
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Glenn
> Sent: Friday, March 30, 2018 7:32 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Slippery poles
>
> We have squirrels that like to climb up our bird feeder pole. It isn't a very tall pole so they really only need one grab on the pole then they are dangling from the feeder. Lately, I have put Vasoline on the appropriate spot on the pole and it frustrates the squirrels. Much to my delight though. But, Vasoline only last a couple days. I've been tempted to use axel grease, but decided that may harm the birds and the squirrels. Is there a substance that is better than Vasoline that will keep the squirrels off the pole but not poison anything? I've thought about trying Crisco.
>
> I have also been live trapping the squirrels lately and releasing them at Holland Bottoms. I have caught 8 so far. I know it is probably a futile effort, but it is satisfying none the less. What is really effective is to get the squirrels frustrated with the slippery pole, then they look around and spot the tasty pile of seeds in the trap. Caught! I decided to remove the squirrels because a couple of them decided to spend a lot of their time on our roof. I was afraid they might find away to get inside the roof, so they had to go.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android <https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/mobile/?.src=Android>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/30/18 7:01 am
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: Re: Slippery poles
Glenn,

I have not found a substance slippery enough to stop determined squirrels. Vasoline, Crisco, veg. oil., and motor oil all failed. Physical barriers on the poles work best for my situation. Check Wild Birds Unlimited. Also, try a separate feeder with cheaper feed easier for squirrels to access. Or learn to enjoy squirrel stew.

Don

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Glenn
Sent: Friday, March 30, 2018 7:32 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Slippery poles

We have squirrels that like to climb up our bird feeder pole. It isn't a very tall pole so they really only need one grab on the pole then they are dangling from the feeder. Lately, I have put Vasoline on the appropriate spot on the pole and it frustrates the squirrels. Much to my delight though. But, Vasoline only last a couple days. I've been tempted to use axel grease, but decided that may harm the birds and the squirrels. Is there a substance that is better than Vasoline that will keep the squirrels off the pole but not poison anything? I've thought about trying Crisco.

I have also been live trapping the squirrels lately and releasing them at Holland Bottoms. I have caught 8 so far. I know it is probably a futile effort, but it is satisfying none the less. What is really effective is to get the squirrels frustrated with the slippery pole, then they look around and spot the tasty pile of seeds in the trap. Caught! I decided to remove the squirrels because a couple of them decided to spend a lot of their time on our roof. I was afraid they might find away to get inside the roof, so they had to go.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android<https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/mobile/?.src=Android>
 

Back to top
Date: 3/30/18 5:32 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Slippery poles
We have squirrels that like to climb up our bird feeder pole. It isn't a very tall pole so they really only need one grab on the pole then they are dangling from the feeder. Lately, I have put Vasoline on the appropriate spot on the pole and it frustrates the squirrels. Much to my delight though. But, Vasoline only last a couple days. I've been tempted to use axel grease, but decided that may harm the birds and the squirrels.  Is there a substance that is better than Vasoline that will keep the squirrels off the pole but not poison anything? I've thought about trying Crisco.  
I have also been live trapping the squirrels lately and releasing them at Holland Bottoms. I have caught 8 so far. I know it is probably a futile effort, but it is satisfying none the less. What is really effective is to get the squirrels frustrated with the slippery pole, then they look around and spot the tasty pile of seeds in the trap. Caught!  I decided to remove the squirrels because a couple of them decided to spend a lot of their time on our roof. I was afraid they might find away to get inside the roof, so they had to go. 
Glenn WyattCabot


Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 3/29/18 8:22 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - March 29
It was partly cloudy, mild, and windy on the bird survey today. 72 species
were found. The male Cinnamon Teal in unit 47E is still present. Anhinga
and Common Gallinules numbers are increasing. And an early Nashville
Warbler showed up. Here is my list for today:



Canada Goose - 5

Wood Duck - 20

Gadwall - 58

Mallard - 8

Blue-winged Teal - 169

Cinnamon Teal - 1 male

Northern Shoveler - 40

Northern Pintail - 3

Green-winged Teal - 25

Ring-necked Duck - 178

Hooded Merganser - 11

Ruddy Duck - 4

Pied-billed Grebe - 41

Neotropic Cormorant - 2

Double-crested Cormorant - 22

Anhinga - 18 (one male was displaying in the rookery.)

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 31

Cattle Egret - 2

Black Vulture - 2

Turkey Vulture - 20

Northern Harrier - 2

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 5

Merlin - 1

King Rail - 1

Virginia Rail - 1

Common Gallinule - 9

American Coot - 495

Killdeer - 1

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Mourning Dove - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 16

Blue Jay - 4

American Crow - 12

Fish Crow - 2

Tree Swallow - 53

Cliff Swallow - 5

Barn Swallow - 15

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 8

Sedge Wren - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 3

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 13

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 5

Brown Thrasher - 1

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Nashville Warbler - 1 (new early date for RS)

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 15

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Pine Warbler - 4

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 1 (tied our early date)

Common Yellowthroat - 4 (all singing)

Eastern Towhee - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 11

Song Sparrow - 2

Swamp Sparrow - 3

White-throated Sparrow - 2

White-crowned Sparrow - 5

Northern Cardinal - 14

Red-winged Blackbird - 33

Eastern Meadowlark - 3

Common Grackle - 2

Brown-headed Cowbird - 32

American Goldfinch - 1





Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Baskettail species

Blue Corporal

Black Saddlebags

Red Saddlebags







Herps:



American Alligator

Common Snapping Turtle

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Red-eared Slider

Broad-banded Watersnake

Graham's Crayfish Snake

Western Cottonmouth

Blanchard's Cricket Frog - calling

Eastern Gray Treefrog - calling

Spring Peepers - calling

Cajun Chorus Frog - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling

Bullfrog - calling







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR








 

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Date: 3/29/18 2:54 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-throated Warbler wintered in Novia Scotia
Great story, obviously checking out future sites for climate change .  
By-the-way, had first Yellow-throated Warbler here at Erbie also on March 24.No song from him today and it looks as though the Buffalo is trying to rival the Mississippi.
JackNewton County at Erbie
On Monday, March 26, 2018, 1:56:38 PM CDT, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Heard the first "sycamore bird" at Ninestone on March 24. Just came across this article now.

Judith

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/wobbly-yellow-throated-warbler-lunenburg-county-rescue-1.4589871
 

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Date: 3/29/18 1:55 pm
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: New arrivals at Logoly State Park, Columbia Co.
This morning (3/29), a volunteer and I walked our trails to check for storm
damage. We stopped along our highline right-of-way, which features a sandy
stream and a beaver pond, and found several FOYs and several that had
arrived within the past week:

Yellow-throated Vireo 2
Red-eyed Vireo 1 (my earliest record by a day)
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 3
Louisiana Waterthrush 2
Black-and-white Warbler 2
Common Yellowthroat 2
Northern Parula 4
Black-throated Green Warbler 2

Devin Moon
Logoly State Park, McNeil, AR

 

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Date: 3/29/18 12:12 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: EARED GREBE AT CRAIG STATE FISH HATCHERY
In planting his garden at Walden Pond, Thoreau famously noted he was trying to make the earth say beans instead of grass. With a 3-day of rain on our former prairies, Earth is making pastures say playa and shorebirds, instead of city and chicken houses.

The storm has brought us many spring migrants. An interesting one today is at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton: an Eared Grebe in immaculate summer plumage, black head and red ear plumage included. We dont seem them like this very often.

I saw it this morning in the rain, in the expansive reservoir in the upper part of the hatchery. I felt pretty sure some of the Arkansas Game and Fish folks there would also enjoy seeing it, so I set off to find them. I saw one of their fish tank trucks parked, with tank running, but no one was there. Then I saw 3 vehicles parked near a fish-rearing building no one there, either. So I drove up to the education building lights on, no one home. Had AG & F personnel been abducted by space aliens? Started to worry I might be next. Then I saw lights moving through the gloom down by the fish-rearing building sure enough, AG & F, all present, accounted for, and working.

Turns out, they were huddled in another building, perfecting an innovative gizmo designed to help them successfully transfer and rear fingerling Walleyes. Of course, I told them why I was looking for them. One of the Ag & F folks, Matt Gideon, said hed seen two Eared Grebes yesterday and had posted this to eBird!

The former prairie fields just east of the hatchery (Kimmel Road) are partially flooded and loaded with migrants. Shorebirds included American Golden-Plover (one flock of 36, plus others), Killdeer (75+), Greater Yellowlegs (4), and Solitary Sandpiper (1), and Wilsons Snipe (60+). Out in the same fields, Rusty Blackbirds (~30) plus other blackbirds and starlings. Most of the golden-plovers retain the grayish non-breeding season look, but at least one was well ahead in the molt, with many black feathers coming in to the head and neck really striking, even in the rain.


 

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Date: 3/29/18 12:01 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: ONSC Chipotle fundraiser big success!
Yesterday was the ONSC fundraiser at Chipotle.  ONSC staff were out in the weather, handing out flyers.  Well, our damp hair was well rewarded.  ONSC earned $300 (half of the $600 total that Chipotle made)!  Many many thanks to all of you who participated - birders, students, teachers and all.  Among those who came were former ONSC staff.  I think ONSC must have a record for retaining the loyalty of previous teachers.  Anyway, thanks again.  The money will help schools from disadvantaged districts to come to ONSC. 
Happy birding! (I hope that all of you who helped with this event are rewarded with cool bird sightings!)Joanie

 

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Date: 3/28/18 6:17 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Prairie Merlin
We spotted a Merlin of the Prairie subspecies today near Bald Knob NWR.  It was at the intersection of Liberty Valley Road and Moody Road.  A mile or two south of there we saw a fair number of American Golden-plovers close to the road.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 3/28/18 4:57 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: HIGH NUMBERS OF GOLDEN-PLOVERS IN THE VALLEY
Big rains have made some parts of Arkansas River Valley south of Alma difficult to access. I got into Kibler bottoms this morning, using Thornhill Road, which is paved and proved no problem. Reaching West-Ark Sod nearby was mainly splash and slide.

American Golden-Plovers were numerous at least 1,381. Highest numbers in the plowed fields in vicinity of UA vegetable station and lower parts of West-Ark Sod. Otherwise, not many shorebirds and relatively few ducks. Blackbirds at sod included at least 40 Brewers. I thought I might have heard an Upland Sandpiper, but when I listened carefully nothing so this falls into the category of wishful hearing, according to Joan Reynolds.

Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility still has hundreds of Northern Shovelers and other ducks. Ruddy Ducks are looking pretty amazing. Powerlines were loaded with swallows: Tree, Northern Rough-winged, Cliff, and Barn. A Bank Swallow would have been a bit early, but I could have easily missed one. There were Great Egrets (9) around a pond at King Ranch, as well as Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks (2), and huge numbers of Savannah Sparrows.

More rain was possible this morning, but instead, it was calm and even a little sunny. Most of the meadowlarks singing were Easterns, but at the UA veg station a Western sang convincingly loud and long from a metal post along Thornhill. Horned Larks were singing in the fields. Now and then, flocks of golden-plovers would rise and fly, caroling across big open fields.


 

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Date: 3/28/18 11:39 am
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Nest destruction
I don't have the joy of having phoebes nest here in NE LA, but someone mentioned Eu Starlings as a possible culprit.  I observed Starlings stealing nesting material from an active Ca Wren nest soon after I moved here.  I discovered where they were taking the material and destroyed their nest!  Unfortunately, they killed three of the five nestlings in the wren nest before I stopped them.  On a happy note, the remaining two fledged.Roselie OverbyOak Grove, LA
 

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Date: 3/28/18 8:22 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Chipotle fundraiser for ONSC is today!

(Sorry if this is a repeat - I seem to have had some trouble with the first attempt....)




Eat out at Chipotle Mexican Grill on Dickson Street inFayetteville to help school children attend ONSC, the Ozark Natural ScienceCenter, home of the Northern Saw-whet Owl. If you have a meal at Chipotle Mexican Grill TODAY,March 28, between 4 and 8 pm, half the cost of the meal will be donated to theONSC Scholarship Fund to defray costs to schools.  This allows schools that otherwise cannotafford it to participate in the ONSC school program, hike the trails andconnect with nature.  Online purchases donot count.  Three ways to guarantee yourpurchases do count:

- Show the cashier a digital flyer prior to paying (You can access a flyer on ONSC social media.)
- Show the cashier a paper flyer prior to paying
- Flying flyer-free? Just mention the fundraiser to the cashier prior to paying

The food will cost not one penny more, so the only cost to customers isthe normal cost of eating there. 


Hope to see you there! 


 

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Date: 3/28/18 8:19 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Amazing new paper on Forest Wagtails in India by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan
Very true!

On Tuesday, March 27, 2018, 12:17:39 PM CDT, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

Thank you very much for posting this.

Science is only self-correcting if and when scientists are willing to do the hard work of obtaining accurate data!�
Congratulations, Kannan!!

-Janine

On 3/27/2018 11:53 AM, Anant Deshwal wrote:


Hot off the press is a paper by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan on Forest Wagtails in peninsular India.� Link:�http://indianbirds.in/pdfs/IB_14_2_KannanETAL_ForestWagtail.pdf
This paper very elegantly highlights two important points about way of science:�

- This paper highlights the importance of citizen science and ebird. The data entered on ebird helps in creating a picture that is easy to understand but at same time also highlights some hidden aspects of birds or ecology in general.


- Importance of doing proper science and not just doing copycat error perpetuation for the sake of citing papers or only citing papers that support idea presented by authors. This paper by Dr. Kannan highlights the importance of finding literature with contrasting claims. This paper very beautifully highlights that Science is a self correcting system. �

For long the exiting thought process was that Forest Wagtails winter in south-western India and �pass through rest of peninsular India on migration. Dr. Kannan had always suggested that Forest Wagtails were not just present during its passage migration through rest of the peninsular India in winter (Kannan 1985, 1987), the field guides and other papers continued to do copycat error perpetuation. With over 39 years of data collection on Forest Wagtails he decisively proved that the Forest Wagtails winters in all of southern part of peninsula, given suitable habitat. The temporal distribution of Forest Wagtails in Chennai (Eastern Peninsula) was similar to that in Kerala (Western Peninsula).
Regards Anant Deshwal�
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville�
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/


 

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Date: 3/28/18 4:22 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: WITH 4-INCH RAIN, EARTH ON THE MOVE
Two hundred years ago and before us, our grasslands were Tallgrass Prairies. Yesterdays 4-inch rain restored many to their historic glory. Before the rain, they were pastures and hay fields. Yesterday, they were playas, full of migrating Blue-winged Teal, fresh from winter in South America. Teal rode the big winds out of the southwest. Rain provided stop over habitat.

Yes, a 4-inch rain is a heck of an inconvenience to our built culture. Earth itself remains part of North America and her natural processes no matter what we build. Western Benton County is a great place to see the processes associated with spring migration.

I started along Anglin Road just south of Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. Hay fields were heavily flooded and running out over the road in many places. Gadwalls, Mallards, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shovelers, and Green-winged Teal were rafting in the fields. Also shorebirds: American Golden-Plover (8), Killdeer, Greater Yellowlegs, Lesser Yellowlegs, and Wilsons Snipe.

A couple of the ponds at the fish hatchery hosted duck diversity that included all the above, plus divers: Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup (~80, most numerous), Bufflehead, Hooded Merganser, and Ruddy Duck. Migration movement of American Coots and Pied-billed Grebes was evident at the hatchery, too.

At the hatchery you can park along the east fence for a view of fields across what is now called South Main. These fields were flooded, and hosted many duck and shorebird species. Shorebirds here included American Golden-Plover (15), Killdeer, Least Sandpiper, Bairds Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (30, most numerous). As I drove out, I saw my first Spotted Sandpiper of the season.

All of this as rain is coming down. And coming down. Windows up and down a lot. Getting out under an umbrella to use the spotting scope, or using the scope from a down window in the rain. Just generally getting very soaked. Hoping the cars electrical system doesnt fizz and fry.

From Centerton, on to Highfill with extensive former prairie fields, part of which are now the regional airport. More golden-plovers (in 2 places, total of 23), plus many of the same ducks as on Anglin, and a small shorebird flock with Greater (5) and Lesser (2) yellowlegs huddled and resting in the rain.

Finally I drove roads in vicinity of Chesney Prairie Natural Area. Heavy flooding in the fields. In their perfect spring finery -- and evident even in heavy rain -- Blue-winged Teal rule here, too. Rafts of ducks out in the fields as cattle look on. Ring-billed Gulls (7) standing out in the wet green of spring fields.

Here as elsewhere today, high numbers of extremely wet and seemingly indomitable Savannah Sparrows. In the rain I can hear part of the buzz of their summer song. They too must be on the move.


 

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Date: 3/27/18 9:17 pm
From: Debra Hale-Shelton <dshelton...>
Subject: Re: What will happen to my birds

I've thought about your email a lot. When I lived in a suburb of Chicago, I fed the birds daily. I fed other wildlife, too, even though I knew that was not the smartest thing to do. When we moved, I worried so much about the birds as well as the chipmunks that visited our back deck daily summer and winter, especially when the snow was deep and the temperatures low. We didn't didn't get to return to Chicago for more than a year. When we did, I drove by our former home. I even got out of the car and walked around the area. The birds and other wildlife there were still abundant.

One day we stopped and knocked on the door of the condo where we had lived. The new owner invited us in. Before we left a short time later, she told us of a sweet chipmunk who had made its home in a big flower pot on her back deck. I smiled. Your birds will miss you, as you will miss them. But they will find other sources of food, and other bird lovers. Most likely, they already have several sources of food in addition to yours. Take care, and God bless you and your birds. I'll say a prayer for you and them.

Debra
Conway, east side


From: "JimBon Todd" <jimbontodd...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, March 26, 2018 6:57:42 PM
Subject: What will happen to my birds

I've been feeding birds and hummingbirds for the past 30 years at my homeplace. I've had many, many to feed in my forrested home. Hummingbirds were so numerous and much sugar was used.
Now I'm moving after all these years because of my age, I just can't keep up my place. I'm so worried about the birds and hummers. The new owners can't afford to feed them. The hummers are starting to come now. I've taken all the feeders away and no sugar water is out.

Will my birds starve? I cry when I see my birds looking for the feeders and nothing is there.


 

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Date: 3/27/18 7:53 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FOS Chuck Will's Widow
And fireflies.



Jeff Short

Eastern Hot Spring Co.


 

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Date: 3/27/18 2:18 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe nest
Thanks for sharing that, Gail.� I've had some overlapping experiences.

Last year our phoebe nest was destroyed by some creature that, given the
nest location, could _only_ have flown to it.� But I couldn't think of a
bird species that would have wreaked the havoc I found.� Your note just
made me wonder---flying squirrels?!� We have a lot of them around.

Janine

On 3/27/2018 4:10 PM, Gail Miller wrote:
>
> Several years ago I had some exposed wood trim on my house covered
> with aluminum so I wouldn�t have to paint it.� I had the guy add two
> nest shelves at the corners of the porch.� He looked at me like I was
> nuts J� For a few years, the phoebes did not use them.� I decided they
> were too slick, so I attached pieces of cedar lumber to them and now
> the phoebes like them.� Last year, they built on one shelf, then built
> a second nest on the other shelf for two broods.� They have a nest
> started now.�� I had an arbor near the end of the porch that was
> overgrown, mainly with Virginia Creeper.� I observed a large Black Rat
> Snake last year traveling from the arbor to the porch, very near the
> phoebe�s nest.� I discouraged the snake on that trip, then tore the
> arbor down and the nest was successful.
>
> I first thought starlings might tear your nest down. Squirrels do
> frequent my porch, but I�ve never seen one up near the nest shelves.
>
> Gail Miller
>
> Conway
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Judy & Don
> *Sent:* Tuesday, March 27, 2018 12:43 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Phoebe nest
>
> A phoebe nest attached to porch roof rafters that has been successful
> in some years and destroyed in others, was once again destroyed last
> week.
>
> I am wondering what is doing this and why. Not able to observe the
> area often but I guess a squirrel could climb up there to investigate
> a possible food source.
>
> Judith
>
> Ninestone, Carroll County
>
> On Mar 27, 2018, at 12:17 PM, Mary Ann King
> <office...> <mailto:<office...>> wrote:
>
>
>
> A phoebe has nested for years at a vent in a building I have.�
> Yesterday, I found the nest lying on the ground � totally detached
> from where it had been. No eggs were in it. It was in a protected
> area so I doubt it was wind.� Any ideas?
>
> MaryAnn King
>
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
> �*/New day, new blessing. Don�t let yesterday�s failures ruin the
> beauty of today, because each day has its own promise of love,
> joy, forgiveness.� Good morning�..�/*
>


 

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Date: 3/27/18 2:11 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe nest
Several years ago I had some exposed wood trim on my house covered with
aluminum so I wouldn't have to paint it. I had the guy add two nest shelves
at the corners of the porch. He looked at me like I was nuts :) For a few
years, the phoebes did not use them. I decided they were too slick, so I
attached pieces of cedar lumber to them and now the phoebes like them. Last
year, they built on one shelf, then built a second nest on the other shelf
for two broods. They have a nest started now. I had an arbor near the end
of the porch that was overgrown, mainly with Virginia Creeper. I observed a
large Black Rat Snake last year traveling from the arbor to the porch, very
near the phoebe's nest. I discouraged the snake on that trip, then tore the
arbor down and the nest was successful.



I first thought starlings might tear your nest down. Squirrels do frequent
my porch, but I've never seen one up near the nest shelves.



Gail Miller

Conway



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2018 12:43 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe nest



A phoebe nest attached to porch roof rafters that has been successful in
some years and destroyed in others, was once again destroyed last week.

I am wondering what is doing this and why. Not able to observe the area
often but I guess a squirrel could climb up there to investigate a possible
food source.



Judith

Ninestone, Carroll County



On Mar 27, 2018, at 12:17 PM, Mary Ann King <office...>
<mailto:<office...> > wrote:





A phoebe has nested for years at a vent in a building I have. Yesterday, I
found the nest lying on the ground - totally detached from where it had
been. No eggs were in it. It was in a protected area so I doubt it was wind.
Any ideas?



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London



'New day, new blessing. Don't let yesterday's failures ruin the beauty of
today, because each day has its own promise of love, joy, forgiveness. Good
morning..."






 

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Date: 3/27/18 11:15 am
From: Alyson Hoge <alycat14...>
Subject: First RTHU of season
All —

All —

This year's first male ruby-throat was two days earlier than last year's year's arrival, which showed up March 29. In 2016, the first arrival was April 1.

Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County


 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 11:12 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: What will happen to my birds
“Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them.”
‭‭Matthew‬ ‭6:26‬ ‭ESV‬‬


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 27, 2018, at 12:40 PM, JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...> wrote:
>
> I surely appreciate all your comments. It's still breaking my heart, and I pray my birds, especially all the cardinals and finches will survive.
>
>> On Mon, Mar 26, 2018 at 9:06 PM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
>> Greatest of luck to you on your new journey in your new place. You can still help and admire hummers and other birds.
>>
>> Bill Thurman
>>
>>> On Mon, Mar 26, 2018, 20:59 Kay Hodnett <sallyportk...> wrote:
>>> Oh, I can imagine how hard it is to leave them without their customary feeding places. But they will adjust. It would be different if you stopped feeding in the middle of a winter blizzard. In that situation some might die before finding new sources of food. It’s just wonderful that you have helped so many birds over so many years. I count that as a significant life achievement snd contribution. Kay Hodnett
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> > On Mar 26, 2018, at 9:32 PM, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>>> >
>>> > Thirty years ago fewer people were interested in birds. Sixty years ago nobody I knew gave a hang about birds — only my best friend knew I was a bird watcher, and he swore to keep my secret, lest I kill him.
>>> >
>>> > If you are unable to continue feeding know that scores of others have taken it up since you began years ago. The birds will be fine.
>>> >
>>> > Reinvent yourself. Enjoy a new direction. Maybe plant native nectar plants that require little attention at your new place. Hummers will find them and there you’ll be!
>>> >
>>> > Sent from my iPhone
>>> >
>>> >> On Mar 26, 2018, at 6:57 PM, JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...> wrote:
>>> >>
>>> >> I've been feeding birds and hummingbirds for the past 30 years at my homeplace. I've had many, many to feed in my forrested home. Hummingbirds were so numerous and much sugar was used.
>>> >> Now I'm moving after all these years because of my age, I just can't keep up my place. I'm so worried about the birds and hummers. The new owners can't afford to feed them. The hummers are starting to come now. I've taken all the feeders away and no sugar water is out.
>>> >>
>>> >> Will my birds starve? I cry when I see my birds looking for the feeders and nothing is there.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 10:44 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Phoebe nest
A phoebe nest attached to porch roof rafters that has been successful in some years and destroyed in others, was once again destroyed last week.
I am wondering what is doing this and why. Not able to observe the area often but I guess a squirrel could climb up there to investigate a possible food source.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

On Mar 27, 2018, at 12:17 PM, Mary Ann King <office...> wrote:

> A phoebe has nested for years at a vent in a building I have. Yesterday, I found the nest lying on the ground totally detached from where it had been. No eggs were in it. It was in a protected area so I doubt it was wind. Any ideas?
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
> New day, new blessing. Dont let yesterdays failures ruin the beauty of today, because each day has its own promise of love, joy, forgiveness. Good morning..
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 10:40 am
From: JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...>
Subject: Re: What will happen to my birds
I surely appreciate all your comments. It's still breaking my heart, and I
pray my birds, especially all the cardinals and finches will survive.

On Mon, Mar 26, 2018 at 9:06 PM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
wrote:

> Greatest of luck to you on your new journey in your new place. You can
> still help and admire hummers and other birds.
>
> Bill Thurman
>
> On Mon, Mar 26, 2018, 20:59 Kay Hodnett <sallyportk...> wrote:
>
>> Oh, I can imagine how hard it is to leave them without their customary
>> feeding places. But they will adjust. It would be different if you
>> stopped feeding in the middle of a winter blizzard. In that situation some
>> might die before finding new sources of food. It’s just wonderful that you
>> have helped so many birds over so many years. I count that as a
>> significant life achievement snd contribution. Kay Hodnett
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> > On Mar 26, 2018, at 9:32 PM, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>> >
>> > Thirty years ago fewer people were interested in birds. Sixty years ago
>> nobody I knew gave a hang about birds — only my best friend knew I was a
>> bird watcher, and he swore to keep my secret, lest I kill him.
>> >
>> > If you are unable to continue feeding know that scores of others have
>> taken it up since you began years ago. The birds will be fine.
>> >
>> > Reinvent yourself. Enjoy a new direction. Maybe plant native nectar
>> plants that require little attention at your new place. Hummers will find
>> them and there you’ll be!
>> >
>> > Sent from my iPhone
>> >
>> >> On Mar 26, 2018, at 6:57 PM, JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...> wrote:
>> >>
>> >> I've been feeding birds and hummingbirds for the past 30 years at my
>> homeplace. I've had many, many to feed in my forrested home. Hummingbirds
>> were so numerous and much sugar was used.
>> >> Now I'm moving after all these years because of my age, I just can't
>> keep up my place. I'm so worried about the birds and hummers. The new
>> owners can't afford to feed them. The hummers are starting to come now.
>> I've taken all the feeders away and no sugar water is out.
>> >>
>> >> Will my birds starve? I cry when I see my birds looking for the
>> feeders and nothing is there.
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 10:19 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...>
Subject: need info
For Dan Schieman.

Dan, I MAY have a lesser goldfinch. Want to send you pictures. Ive lost your email address. Please send it.
I want Dan to ID this bird before I get too excited.

Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR


 

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Date: 3/27/18 10:17 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Phoebe nest
A phoebe has nested for years at a vent in a building I have. Yesterday, I
found the nest lying on the ground - totally detached from where it had
been. No eggs were in it. It was in a protected area so I doubt it was wind.
Any ideas?



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London



'New day, new blessing. Don't let yesterday's failures ruin the beauty of
today, because each day has its own promise of love, joy, forgiveness. Good
morning..."




 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 10:17 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Amazing new paper on Forest Wagtails in India by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan
Thank you very much for posting this.

Science is only self-correcting if and when scientists are willing to do
the hard work of obtaining accurate data!
Congratulations, Kannan!!

-Janine

On 3/27/2018 11:53 AM, Anant Deshwal wrote:
> Hot off the press is a paper by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan on Forest
> Wagtails in peninsular India.
> Link: http://indianbirds.in/pdfs/IB_14_2_KannanETAL_ForestWagtail.pdf
>
> This paper very elegantly highlights two important points about way of
> science:
>
> * This paper highlights the importance of citizen science and ebird.
> The data entered on ebird helps in creating a picture that is easy
> to understand but at same time also highlights some hidden aspects
> of birds or ecology in general.
>
> * Importance of doing proper science and not just doing copycat
> error perpetuation for the sake of citing papers or only citing
> papers that support idea presented by authors. This paper by Dr.
> Kannan highlights the importance of finding literature with
> contrasting claims. This paper very beautifully highlights that
> Science is a self correcting system.
>
>
> For long the exiting thought process was that Forest Wagtails winter
> in south-western India and �pass through rest of peninsular India on
> migration. Dr. Kannan had always suggested that Forest Wagtails were
> not just present during its passage migration through rest of the
> peninsular India in winter (Kannan 1985, 1987), the field guides and
> other papers continued to do copycat error perpetuation. With over 39
> years of data collection on Forest Wagtails he decisively proved that
> the Forest Wagtails winters in all of southern part of peninsula,
> given suitable habitat. The temporal distribution of Forest Wagtails
> in Chennai (Eastern Peninsula) was similar to that in Kerala (Western
> Peninsula).
>
> Regards
> Anant Deshwal
> Ph.D. Candidate
> Department of Biological Sciences
> University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
> http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 9:56 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: bird trivia for youngsters
Cornell’s “The Birdwatching Answer Book” , Laura Erickson (Stormy Publishing, 2009). Might be handy to the task. It’s well indexed and timely.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 27, 2018, at 9:52 AM, Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:
>
> Greetings, all. Every year, I help Devil's Den with their Birder's Weekend in early May. This year, I am trying to come up with a bird trivia quiz with questions for all age groups. Even though I am a former teacher (middle school), I am finding it hard to come up with questions for younger children. If anyone knows of a resource, or has an idea for a question or two, please contact me off-list. Thanks so much.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers
> <kjgarrett84...>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 9:53 am
From: Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Subject: Amazing new paper on Forest Wagtails in India by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan
Hot off the press is a paper by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan on Forest Wagtails in peninsular India.
Link: http://indianbirds.in/pdfs/IB_14_2_KannanETAL_ForestWagtail.pdf <http://indianbirds.in/pdfs/IB_14_2_KannanETAL_ForestWagtail.pdf>

This paper very elegantly highlights two important points about way of science:

This paper highlights the importance of citizen science and ebird. The data entered on ebird helps in creating a picture that is easy to understand but at same time also highlights some hidden aspects of birds or ecology in general.

Importance of doing proper science and not just doing copycat error perpetuation for the sake of citing papers or only citing papers that support idea presented by authors. This paper by Dr. Kannan highlights the importance of finding literature with contrasting claims. This paper very beautifully highlights that Science is a self correcting system.

For long the exiting thought process was that Forest Wagtails winter in south-western India and pass through rest of peninsular India on migration. Dr. Kannan had always suggested that Forest Wagtails were not just present during its passage migration through rest of the peninsular India in winter (Kannan 1985, 1987), the field guides and other papers continued to do copycat error perpetuation. With over 39 years of data collection on Forest Wagtails he decisively proved that the Forest Wagtails winters in all of southern part of peninsula, given suitable habitat. The temporal distribution of Forest Wagtails in Chennai (Eastern Peninsula) was similar to that in Kerala (Western Peninsula).

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/


 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 8:34 am
From: data _null_; <datanull...>
Subject: FOS RTHU
Just now. Heard the chatter first.
GPS: 34.357573, -93.670390

 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 7:52 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: bird trivia for youngsters
Greetings, all. Every year, I help Devil's Den with their Birder's Weekend
in early May. This year, I am trying to come up with a bird trivia quiz
with questions for all age groups. Even though I am a former teacher
(middle school), I am finding it hard to come up with questions for younger
children. If anyone knows of a resource, or has an idea for a question or
two, please contact me off-list. Thanks so much.

Karen Garrett
Rogers
<kjgarrett84...>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/27/18 7:05 am
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
Subject: They're baaaaaack!
Had my FOS ruby-throated hummer yesterday! A beautiful male stopped at the
feeder I just put out and had a long drink. Made my day!

--
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 3/26/18 7:06 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: What will happen to my birds
Greatest of luck to you on your new journey in your new place. You can
still help and admire hummers and other birds.

Bill Thurman

On Mon, Mar 26, 2018, 20:59 Kay Hodnett <sallyportk...> wrote:

> Oh, I can imagine how hard it is to leave them without their customary
> feeding places. But they will adjust. It would be different if you
> stopped feeding in the middle of a winter blizzard. In that situation some
> might die before finding new sources of food. It’s just wonderful that you
> have helped so many birds over so many years. I count that as a
> significant life achievement snd contribution. Kay Hodnett
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Mar 26, 2018, at 9:32 PM, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
> >
> > Thirty years ago fewer people were interested in birds. Sixty years ago
> nobody I knew gave a hang about birds — only my best friend knew I was a
> bird watcher, and he swore to keep my secret, lest I kill him.
> >
> > If you are unable to continue feeding know that scores of others have
> taken it up since you began years ago. The birds will be fine.
> >
> > Reinvent yourself. Enjoy a new direction. Maybe plant native nectar
> plants that require little attention at your new place. Hummers will find
> them and there you’ll be!
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Mar 26, 2018, at 6:57 PM, JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...> wrote:
> >>
> >> I've been feeding birds and hummingbirds for the past 30 years at my
> homeplace. I've had many, many to feed in my forrested home. Hummingbirds
> were so numerous and much sugar was used.
> >> Now I'm moving after all these years because of my age, I just can't
> keep up my place. I'm so worried about the birds and hummers. The new
> owners can't afford to feed them. The hummers are starting to come now.
> I've taken all the feeders away and no sugar water is out.
> >>
> >> Will my birds starve? I cry when I see my birds looking for the
> feeders and nothing is there.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/26/18 6:59 pm
From: Kay Hodnett <sallyportk...>
Subject: Re: What will happen to my birds
Oh, I can imagine how hard it is to leave them without their customary feeding places. But they will adjust. It would be different if you stopped feeding in the middle of a winter blizzard. In that situation some might die before finding new sources of food. It’s just wonderful that you have helped so many birds over so many years. I count that as a significant life achievement snd contribution. Kay Hodnett

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 26, 2018, at 9:32 PM, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>
> Thirty years ago fewer people were interested in birds. Sixty years ago nobody I knew gave a hang about birds — only my best friend knew I was a bird watcher, and he swore to keep my secret, lest I kill him.
>
> If you are unable to continue feeding know that scores of others have taken it up since you began years ago. The birds will be fine.
>
> Reinvent yourself. Enjoy a new direction. Maybe plant native nectar plants that require little attention at your new place. Hummers will find them and there you’ll be!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Mar 26, 2018, at 6:57 PM, JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...> wrote:
>>
>> I've been feeding birds and hummingbirds for the past 30 years at my homeplace. I've had many, many to feed in my forrested home. Hummingbirds were so numerous and much sugar was used.
>> Now I'm moving after all these years because of my age, I just can't keep up my place. I'm so worried about the birds and hummers. The new owners can't afford to feed them. The hummers are starting to come now. I've taken all the feeders away and no sugar water is out.
>>
>> Will my birds starve? I cry when I see my birds looking for the feeders and nothing is there.
 

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Date: 3/26/18 6:32 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: What will happen to my birds
Thirty years ago fewer people were interested in birds. Sixty years ago nobody I knew gave a hang about birds — only my best friend knew I was a bird watcher, and he swore to keep my secret, lest I kill him.

If you are unable to continue feeding know that scores of others have taken it up since you began years ago. The birds will be fine.

Reinvent yourself. Enjoy a new direction. Maybe plant native nectar plants that require little attention at your new place. Hummers will find them and there you’ll be!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 26, 2018, at 6:57 PM, JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...> wrote:
>
> I've been feeding birds and hummingbirds for the past 30 years at my homeplace. I've had many, many to feed in my forrested home. Hummingbirds were so numerous and much sugar was used.
> Now I'm moving after all these years because of my age, I just can't keep up my place. I'm so worried about the birds and hummers. The new owners can't afford to feed them. The hummers are starting to come now. I've taken all the feeders away and no sugar water is out.
>
> Will my birds starve? I cry when I see my birds looking for the feeders and nothing is there.
 

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Date: 3/26/18 4:57 pm
From: JimBon Todd <jimbontodd...>
Subject: What will happen to my birds
I've been feeding birds and hummingbirds for the past 30 years at my
homeplace. I've had many, many to feed in my forrested home. Hummingbirds
were so numerous and much sugar was used.
Now I'm moving after all these years because of my age, I just can't keep
up my place. I'm so worried about the birds and hummers. The new owners
can't afford to feed them. The hummers are starting to come now. I've
taken all the feeders away and no sugar water is out.

Will my birds starve? I cry when I see my birds looking for the feeders
and nothing is there.

 

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Date: 3/26/18 4:56 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Red Crossbills continue at Hobbs and fabulous Horned Grebes
We heard and saw Red Crossbills at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area this morning. This was along the Sinking Stream Trail where the birds have been present at least a couple of weeks in the same general area. Sinking Stream Trail is in a hollow former by Little Clifty Creek. Above the hollow are ridges with mature Short-leaf Pines. The birds are in the pines and are probably coming down into the hollow for water and for buds on flowering deciduous trees. Crossbills fly over with their trademark CHIP CHIP, but of course, that's also a little like American Goldfinches, also flying over. You can separate these calls with a little practice. I made an audio recording this morning and converted it in to an MP3 file, which I can send anyone who'd like to hear what crossbill CHIP CHIPs sounded like this morning. The MP3 file is a little under 1 MB. Email me off the list if you'd like to hear it. It is a little rough -- very windy this morning, occasional traffic on Highway 12, me blundering a bit with the microphone. I got UA-Fayetteville PhD candidate Anant Deshwal to listen to the file -- he says these are mainly Call Type 2 Ponderosa Pine Crossbills. I'm using the word "mainly" to be conservative, since we have heard other call types this season.


On the way out to Hobbs this morning, I made a brief stop at the Beaver Lake boat launch ramp on Highway 12 east of Rogers. There were 10 Horned Grebes, all with fabulous black heads and golden "horns."

 

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Date: 3/26/18 4:48 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Seen on the back side of the Little Rock Airport.

Ed Laster
Little Rock
 

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Date: 3/26/18 4:12 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: FOS RTHU (male)
Jerry's hummingbird of yesterday---or one very similar---just arrived here.
:)

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

 

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Date: 3/26/18 11:56 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Yellow-throated Warbler wintered in Novia Scotia
Heard the first "sycamore bird" at Ninestone on March 24. Just came across this article now.

Judith

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/wobbly-yellow-throated-warbler-lunenburg-county-rescue-1.4589871
 

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Date: 3/26/18 7:14 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: [OKBIRDS] Weather Radar Loop - Evening of 3/25
Shared on the OKBird List. I think you will find it interesting.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: NATHAN KUHNERT
Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2018 10:17 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Weather Radar Loop - Evening of 3/25

Good evening.

Appears to be a strong northbound migration happing this evening especially in east Texas!
https://radar.weather.gov/Conus/full_loop.php


We might see some new spring arrivals tomorrow morning!

Nathan K.

 

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Date: 3/25/18 10:09 pm
From: Marisue Rowe <marisue.rowe...>
Subject: Re: eBird app: Personal Locations vs. Hotspots
Please remove me from this emailing list.
Thank you

> On Mar 25, 2018, at 10:02 PM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
> I posted this in 2016 but it needs repeating. The eBird mobile app has made it much easier to create checklists when in the field. It has also lead to a proliferation of personal locations that mean the same thing as an existing hotspot. Always use an existing hotspot instead of creating a personal location that means the same thing. That way your data are compiled with everyone else's, making output (bar charts, etc.) for that hotspot more accurate and useful for all birders. Here is guidance for what to do in the field and at home.
>
> In the field with the app:
> If you’ve recently been to the hotspot and created an app checklist, the location will appear under Choose a Recent Location. Fastest and easiest choice.
> If you are not sure what hotspot is nearby, use Choose Location From Map, and touch the markers to reveal the names. Hit NEXT when you’ve found the best match.
> If you know which hotspot you are in, use Choose a Nearby Hotspot, which brings up a text list, which loads faster than the map. The closest hotspot is at the top of the list.
> If you did create a personal location in the field, then when you are home on your computer:
> Merge your personal location into the hotspot http://tinyurl.com/oagd8yh or
> Edit the location of the checklist http://tinyurl.com/jzwnt2g
> Lastly, if you legitimately create a personal location, I recommend changing the name to something that conforms to eBird hotspot naming convention rather than using the clunky default name given by the app. You can change the name at home if it is not convenient to do so in the field.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Arkansas eBird Reviewer

 

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Date: 3/25/18 8:03 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird app: Personal Locations vs. Hotspots
I posted this in 2016 but it needs repeating. The eBird mobile app has made
it much easier to create checklists when in the field. It has also lead to a
proliferation of personal locations that mean the same thing as an existing
hotspot. Always use an existing hotspot instead of creating a personal
location that means the same thing. That way your data are compiled with
everyone else's, making output (bar charts, etc.) for that hotspot more
accurate and useful for all birders. Here is guidance for what to do in the
field and at home.

In the field with the app:
1. If youve recently been to the hotspot and created an app checklist, the
location will appear under Choose a Recent Location. Fastest and easiest
choice.
2. If you are not sure what hotspot is nearby, use Choose Location From Map,
and touch the markers to reveal the names. Hit NEXT when youve found the
best match.
3. If you know which hotspot you are in, use Choose a Nearby Hotspot, which
brings up a text list, which loads faster than the map. The closest hotspot
is at the top of the list.
If you did create a personal location in the field, then when you are home
on your computer:
1. Merge your personal location into the hotspot http://tinyurl.com/oagd8yh
or
2. Edit the location of the checklist http://tinyurl.com/jzwnt2g
Lastly, if you legitimately create a personal location, I recommend changing
the name to something that conforms to eBird hotspot naming convention
rather than using the clunky default name given by the app. You can change
the name at home if it is not convenient to do so in the field.

Dan Scheiman
Arkansas eBird Reviewer



 

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Date: 3/25/18 7:57 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: new arrivals 3/24 - 3/25
3/24
FOS Yellow-throated Warbler in Sycamore
FOS Northern Rough-winged Swallows looping over the creek and across the face of the bluff
with Louisiana Waterthrushes singing up and down the stream, Chipping Sparrows and Pine Warblers trilling throughout the yard

3/25
FOS Black & White Warbler

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 3/25/18 7:44 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: FOS Ruby-throated Hummingbird
The woods behind my house have a lot of Red Buckeye and I feel the same way
... when the buckeye's bloom, I'll see my first hummingbird. Mine aren't
blooming yet, but they are close!

Gail Miller
Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Short
Sent: Sunday, March 25, 2018 8:05 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: FOS Ruby-throated Hummingbird

First seen tonight. (May have been around earlier, but we've been gone.)

Still coincides with the Red Buckeye beginning to bloom in our area.

Jeff Short
At the backwards "S" on the continuance of the Ouachita River
 

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Date: 3/25/18 7:19 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Birds
Thanks for sharing, Jerry even though this is awful sickening news. Just
goes to show you what we're up against.

Bill Thurman

On Sun, Mar 25, 2018, 16:51 Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

>
> https://www.revealnews.org/article/egged-on-by-industry-lobbyists-interior-dept-weakens-bird-protections/
>
> For those that care about what is happening to birds, the mortality table
> in the text may provide insight.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>

 

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Date: 3/25/18 6:47 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Common Redpoll Visitation
Steve Weems says the two apparent Common Redpolls have returned for a third
day in a row to his feeders in Carroll Co. He has not been able to get a
good photo. Visitors are welcome to help document this record. If you are
interested please contact me off-list and I will connect you.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S43886952

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 3/25/18 6:05 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FOS Ruby-throated Hummingbird
First seen tonight. (May have been around earlier, but we've been gone.)

Still coincides with the Red Buckeye beginning to bloom in our area.

Jeff Short
At the backwards "S" on the continuance of the Ouachita River
 

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Date: 3/25/18 4:48 pm
From: Jo-Ann Jennier <jcjennier...>
Subject: FOS WPW
About 6:30 this morning the Whip-poor-will was calling as he traveled
around our property. Pretty regular arrival time here in SW Montgomery
county!
Jo-Ann

 

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Date: 3/25/18 4:47 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: Nebraska/ Colorado birding
Greetings all,
I've done tons of citizen science counting, but not much birding, in over a year. I'm feeling the need for speed. I plan to do some serious state total-tick birding....
I plan to leave 5/10.
Spend 3 days in Central & South-Western Nebraska: in the Rainwater Basin, The Platte River system, Lake C.W. McConaughy, Crescent Lake & North Platte NWRs and Scottsbluff. Targeting breeding waterfowl, shorebirds, longspurs and western specialties.
Then 3 days in Eastern Colorado: Starting at the NE corner of CO and working south to the OK border, taking in the eastern third of CO. Visiting all the migration hot spots and some Black Rail breeding spots. Won't be getting into the Rocky Mtns, or the higher elevations.
Then 2 days on field trips with the CO Field Ornithologist, from Colorado Springs up the front range to the Fort Collins area. Including an owl field trip.
Then 2 days on field trips with the Nebraska Ornithologist Union at Fort Robinson (30 miles to SD or WY). Targeting the western species.
Then back in AR on the 5/22.

Full disclosure of the logistics:
The driving days (to/from) could be 14+ hr days.
Very little walking, probably only a couple miles each day.
There will be opportunities for exploring historic sites, Parks and museums, usually in the afternoon.
There will be time for sit-down eating, especially regional foods (like cabbage burgers in SW NE.) But most food will be while driving.
Motels will in short supply, so may not be high quality places and some spots may want to camp to catch the dawn chorus.
Birds: Expect 100-175 species overall, in each state. With 50-100 in a given day.
Expect to spend 350+ miles in the car, each day. Probably 4-5,000 miles total.
Expect to be working from before the dawn chorus to after dark.
You will be safe and not have to worry about birding alone.
If you're a woman, this trip is about birding. You don't have to worry about me misbehaving.
It will be a bunch of fun, maybe in a weird way.
Being crazy for exploring the natural world through birds isn't required, but certainly is helpful.

This trip won't be leisurely and not tourist birding.

The positive: You'll see birds! I'll do most of the driving. I'll pay for the gas. I'll have planned-out all the birding hot spots and target species.

You could easily do either half of the trip and still see both states. I will be flexible on where to meet you, and if you have special spots you really want to see, then I'll make that a priority.

So if you're feeling the need for speed, want to see some new country, gather up your happy feet and give me a holler! , Leif at Hector







This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 3/25/18 2:44 pm
From: Alan <quattro...>
Subject: water thrush

Forgot Lousiana Waterthrush. Hopping around and singing.!
Alan Gregory


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Date: 3/25/18 2:41 pm
From: Alan <quattro...>
Subject: Turkey vultures behavior

I saw turkey vultures mating on a bluff along the river today. May not be too interesting to everyone , but in 30 years of birding I have never actually seen this. At first I wondered what was going on up there. Pretty awesome bird behavior. Also , had Black and white warblers by the score, parulas , nashviles, and American redstarts. First wild turkeys too.
You just can see more from the back of a horse.!
Alan Gregory
Harrison, birding the upper buffalo.


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Date: 3/25/18 1:38 pm
From: Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird
FOS RTHU yesterday at feeder in my yard-Saturday, March 24

Jane- in Searcy
 

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Date: 3/25/18 11:26 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS ON BEAVER LAKE
Red-breasted Mergansers (5) were on Beaver Lake, off old Glade (Slate Gap Road) this morning. The one closest had a truly extraordinary wispy crest, visible even on a gray, 100% overcast day. In the same area, Horned Grebes (31), many now molted to black head and golden horns. One Common Loon with extensive white checkering of summer, but head still mainly winter gray. There were also Northern Shovelers (12), Lesser Scaups (~30), Buffleheads (2), a fly-over of Double-crested Cormorants (15), and a few Ring-billed Gulls. This has been a wonderful, interesting waterfowl winter, now rapidly passing, as demonstrated by the immaculate plumages exhibited by many of todays birds.


 

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Date: 3/25/18 7:34 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Male Ruby-throated Hummingbird Today in Hot Springs
First of season for me. I reported it on the RTHU 2018 migration map.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR


 

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Date: 3/24/18 6:40 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Ecuador AAST fundraiser tour
Twelve intrepid and seasoned Auduboners braved altitude sickness and mopped up a lot of the birds of the Choco-Andean corridor of Ecuador.  The trip netted 232 species including about 25 gaudy tanagers and 32 hummingbird species. 
Highlights of the trip included:
1. Great sightings of Sword-billed Hummingbirds in the Polylepis woodlands of the high Andes 2. A chance encounter with the uncommon and secretive Wattled Guan while on one of the long windy drives3. A morning spent in a blind observing Andean Cock-of-the-Rocks in their lek in flamboyant display
4. Three species of elusive antpittas lured out of dense thickets by earthworms offered by a local guide ("the antpitta whisperer"), and,
5. Observing the pranks of an absolutely delightful Torrent Duck in the turbulent and raging Rio Nalimbo. 
The tour raised over $1,000 for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust endowment.  Many thanks to all wonderful participants, who are already egging me to take them back to Ecuador!
Kannan


 

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Date: 3/24/18 5:18 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Fw: Vermillion flycatcher
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Economically speaking, birders share the love.  Chasing birds on Friday and Saturday, I drove 604 miles, necessitating a tank and a half of gas, two mornings stops at McDonald's for breakfast to go, lunch for three in Tonitown on Friday, miscellaneous sodas and snacks during bathroom stops on the 12 and 1/2 hour trip on Friday, dinner ordered from local restaurants Friday and Saturday evening because I was too tired to cook, plus a run through the car wash after Saturday's field trip. That's only two days and only a couple of birders. That doesn't include all the other Arkansas birders and photographers who chased the Vermillion Flycatcher, plus the couple from the far side of Tulsa we met who came to see the VEFL on Friday and also missed it. These are totals from just two days of birding.  Many of us are out birding all year long, both locally and statewide.  That's a lot of birdiers' dollars going into our Arkansas merchants' cash registers.  Birders all over the U.S. probably help reduce the national debt every day!  :-)  I'll stack up our birding cash outlays against hunters and fishermen any day!Karen HollidayMaumelle/Little Rock

On Saturday, March 24, 2018, 5:58 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:

Thanks for all the updates and info you have provided (map was great) probably won’t be able to return up there any time soon we drove 447 miles chasing birds that Friday.
Thanks
Randy

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 24, 2018, at 10:57 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> I was at city lake from 6:15 til about 7:30 last night. It was windy and cloudy, not giving very good light but, no luck.  Can't say yet if I just missed it or if it has moved on. Not sure if I can get out there today or not. I have the time, technically, but can't abandon the wife too many days in one week. :)  (by the way, how do you get your spouse interested in birding? haven't figured that out yet.)
> Did see a bald eagle and a female hooded merganser among the 31 species I counted. Was hoping to get some more looks at the flycatcher after having exceptional views of it the day before(and better lighting) only to discover my memory card was at home. :(
> It's called a memory card yet, how often is it forgotten?
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>> On 3/23/2018 12:52 PM, Randy wrote:
>> Karen Holiday, Allen Muller and l looked from 11:00 to12:15 today without any luck .
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>



 

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Date: 3/24/18 4:26 pm
From: Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird
FOS RTHU at our house in Searcy (White County).
 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/18 3:58 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Re: Vermillion flycatcher
Thanks for all the updates and info you have provided (map was great) probably won’t be able to return up there any time soon we drove 447 miles chasing birds that Friday.
Thanks
Randy

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 24, 2018, at 10:57 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> I was at city lake from 6:15 til about 7:30 last night. It was windy and cloudy, not giving very good light but, no luck. Can't say yet if I just missed it or if it has moved on. Not sure if I can get out there today or not. I have the time, technically, but can't abandon the wife too many days in one week. :) (by the way, how do you get your spouse interested in birding? haven't figured that out yet.)
> Did see a bald eagle and a female hooded merganser among the 31 species I counted. Was hoping to get some more looks at the flycatcher after having exceptional views of it the day before(and better lighting) only to discover my memory card was at home. :(
> It's called a memory card yet, how often is it forgotten?
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>> On 3/23/2018 12:52 PM, Randy wrote:
>> Karen Holiday, Allen Muller and l looked from 11:00 to12:15 today without any luck .
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>
 

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Date: 3/24/18 1:19 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: 5/15 - 6/15 2018 Audubon Surveys for Nuthatches or Bluebirds and Climate Watch
Greetings all,
Here is an exciting opportunity to help Bird & Climate Science.
In 2014 Audubon released the "Birds and Climate Report". The report created a species response to climate, with > 50% of North American bird species expected to lose > 50% of their climatic range. You can go to www.climate.audubon.org<http://www.climate.audubon.org> to see the maps, the report and FAQs.

Since 2014 Audubon's scientists have added habitat to the climate model.
Now it's our turn to help birds, by counting birds to validate and refine the Bird Climate Models.
You can get more info about these surveys at: www.audubon.org/news/climate-watch-program<http://www.audubon.org/news/climate-watch-program>

Summary of the winter 2018 surveys:
AR did 520 point surveys. A big thank you to the approx. 20 volunteers from Hot Springs Village Audubon chapter, the AR River Valley Audubon chapter and from the Arkansas Audubon Society!! AR continues to out-produce, several states with more territory and more birders. This happened with 20 volunteers. Please imagine what we can accomplish with other Audubon chapters, bird clubs and individuals, counting across the state!

About the next surveys:
May 15 - June 15 2018;
A block has 12 points and each point is exactly 5 minutes;
They take 2-5 hrs to complete, with 3 hrs being normal;
A block needs to be done in one day, before noon;
You have to be able to identify your target species (either Eastern Bluebird or the nuthatches), but not all other species. (Though if you know others, that is great.);
You can listen/look at all the target species on the website;
1-3 observers are allowed per point;
You can do as many blocks as you want, but even doing 1 block would be great.
One morning of your time can make a difference for the birds.
The only data to record is your number of observers; your point start time and the birds seen.


HOW CAN YOU HELP IN THIS SUMMER SEASON?
Other chapters:
I'd love to work with you to get your chapter surveying. I'll be willing to give a talk, and/or help you design the plots.

If you want to count within the River Valley's Chapter boundaries:
The surveys have already been designed, with detailed stop descriptions and directions. All you have to do is have fun counting birds.
The chapter boundary roughly goes from Camp Robinson WMA; West to Danville, Russellville and Fort Douglas; South to Lake Maumelle's North shore & Ola; and North to Deer, Ben Hur, Witts Springs.

Within 50 miles of the River Valley Chapter:
Audubon has set a 50 mile radius from a chapters surveyed blocks, to keep the statistics strong. If your chapter isn't counting, no worries! You as an individual can make a difference for Birds and the Climate. Just contact me and I'll help you get started. Even one block would be a huge help.
The 50 mile circle for the AR River Valley chapter:
East: Buffalo City-Mountain View-Heber Springs-Cabot-Galloway-Higgins.
South: Bryant-Malvern-Bismark-Norman.
West: Waldron-Mansfield-Greenwood-Alma-Mountainburg.
North: Elkins-Huntsville-Berryville-Burlington-Lead Hill-Yellville.

Anywhere in AR:
I can get on the computer, working with you to design a block near you.

AN IMPORTANT CAVAET:
I'd love to get you started on Climate Watch Surveys, BUT I'll be loaded up with surveys for migration, Nightjars, BBS, Climate Watch and for the US Forest Service from 4/25 till late June. So please, please, if you want my help, contact me before 4/25!

I pre-thank you for all the help you're giving to birds & climate! Cheers, Leif at Hector







This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 3/24/18 8:58 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Vermillion flycatcher
I was at city lake from 6:15 til about 7:30 last night. It was windy and
cloudy, not giving very good light but, no luck.  Can't say yet if I
just missed it or if it has moved on. Not sure if I can get out there
today or not. I have the time, technically, but can't abandon the wife
too many days in one week. :)  (by the way, how do you get your spouse
interested in birding? haven't figured that out yet.)
Did see a bald eagle and a female hooded merganser among the 31 species
I counted. Was hoping to get some more looks at the flycatcher after
having exceptional views of it the day before(and better lighting) only
to discover my memory card was at home. :(
It's called a memory card yet, how often is it forgotten?

Daniel Mason

On 3/23/2018 12:52 PM, Randy wrote:
> Karen Holiday, Allen Muller and l looked from 11:00 to12:15 today without any luck .
>
> Sent from my iPhone



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Date: 3/24/18 6:01 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Redpoll??
Thanks!

On Sat, Mar 24, 2018, 7:57 AM DAN <birddan...> wrote:

> The observer’s response to my query for details is a bit lacking, and no
> response to my question about letting others visit. When a good and
> accessible rare bird is confirmed in eBird I will post to ARBIRD.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>
> Sent from XFINITY Connect App
>
>
>
> ------ Original Message ------
>
> From: Karen Garrett
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: March 24, 2018 at 7:16 AM
> Subject: Redpoll??
>
> Has anyone verified the report of a Redpoll in Carroll County? By the
> map, it's just east of Eureka Springs. I have no idea if the reported
> locale is on private property or not. That would be a sweet little gem to
> see.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers
>

 

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Date: 3/24/18 5:58 am
From: DAN <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Redpoll??
The observer’s response to my query for details is a bit lacking, and no response to my question about letting others visit. When a good and accessible rare bird is confirmed in eBird I will post to ARBIRD.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Sent from XFINITY Connect App



------ Original Message ------

From: Karen Garrett
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: March 24, 2018 at 7:16 AM
Subject: Redpoll??

Has anyone verified the report of a Redpoll in Carroll County?By the map, it's just east of Eureka Springs.I have no idea if the reported locale is on private property or not.That would be a sweet little gem to see.

Karen Garrett
Rogers


 

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Date: 3/24/18 5:17 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Redpoll??
Has anyone verified the report of a Redpoll in Carroll County? By the map,
it's just east of Eureka Springs. I have no idea if the reported locale is
on private property or not. That would be a sweet little gem to see.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

 

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