ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
1/15/18 8:49 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Golden Eagle @ Lollie Bottoms Faulkner County
1/15/18 7:22 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Little Rock & Lonoke CBC Results
1/15/18 11:16 am Edie Calaway <00000066d9cc52d5-dmarc-request...> Black Duck
1/15/18 11:00 am Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...> Red-shouldered hawk takes bird at feeders
1/15/18 9:27 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA January Field Trip
1/15/18 8:52 am Michael <mplinz...> Golden Eagle @ Lollie Bottoms Faulkner County
1/15/18 5:51 am Vickie Becker <vhbecker...> Fwd: BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker
1/14/18 9:46 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker
1/14/18 3:42 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Stuttgart Airport
1/14/18 10:42 am Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Black Duck
1/14/18 7:46 am Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...> Fwd: Prairie Falcon in Atkins Bottoms -yes
1/14/18 7:00 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker
1/14/18 6:06 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Red-throated Loons at Tenkiller
1/14/18 5:45 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker
1/13/18 2:15 pm Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...> Re: Prairie Falcon in Atkins Bottoms -yes
1/13/18 12:23 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Rusty Blackbirds
1/13/18 12:20 pm Don Simons <Don.Simons...> TOSO pair continue
1/13/18 11:34 am Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> South Lafayette County Birds 1-12-18
1/13/18 6:31 am Kenny Nations <kennynations...> Common Merganser
1/12/18 4:03 pm DAN <birddan...> Merlin, Thibault Rd.
1/12/18 3:11 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Warbler Genes Predict Vulnerability To Climate Change
1/12/18 2:59 pm twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...> Tundra Swan
1/12/18 2:58 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Prairie Falcon in Atkins Bottoms
1/12/18 2:47 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Prairie Falcon in Atkins Bottoms
1/12/18 12:59 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> FERALS DOGS KILL CALVES AND PIGS IN NEWTON COUNTY
1/12/18 12:08 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Warbler Genes Predict Vulnerability To Climate Change
1/12/18 8:48 am Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Merlin
1/11/18 12:58 pm JFR <johnfredman...> OSPREY CONSUMING BASS IN PINE BLUFF
1/10/18 2:10 pm DAN <birddan...> Mew Gull - No
1/10/18 8:12 am Michael <mplinz...> Re: Mew Gull?
1/10/18 8:06 am DAN <birddan...> Mew Gull?
1/9/18 10:02 pm laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Re: Swans at Maumelle Country Club
1/9/18 6:35 pm Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...> Light colored hawk
1/9/18 1:47 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Mew Gull
1/9/18 11:11 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Plastics in the environment- Caution- Tragic video available
1/9/18 9:21 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Plastics in the environment- Caution- Tragic video available
1/9/18 5:27 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Townsend's Solitaire!
1/8/18 4:48 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> January and February field trips in northwest Arkansas
1/8/18 4:31 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Swans at Maumelle Country Club
1/8/18 2:55 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Swans at Maumelle Country Club
1/8/18 11:12 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Swarm of Pine Siskins
1/8/18 9:25 am Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> Update on Red Crossbills
1/8/18 6:51 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, January 11
1/7/18 8:38 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> An Unexpected & Uniquely Southern Close Encounter While Birding
1/7/18 6:38 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> How Turkeys got their name(s)
1/7/18 2:50 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Re: LOST BRIDGE SOUTH PARK, BEAVER LAKE, AND A MEDITATION
1/7/18 1:19 pm Betty Brown <bbrown1941...> Re: LOST BRIDGE SOUTH PARK, BEAVER LAKE, AND A MEDITATION
1/7/18 12:33 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> UNEXPECTED WHIRLWIND TOUR BEFORE THE RAIN
1/7/18 9:32 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FOYard
1/6/18 8:06 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Big bird and bigger beaks
1/6/18 4:14 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Birds & their weird water ways
1/6/18 4:12 pm Don Simons <drsimons56...> TOSO CONTINUES
1/6/18 2:57 pm Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Western Hills Park in Little Rock
1/6/18 2:14 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
1/6/18 12:44 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Golden Eagle
1/6/18 10:02 am twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...> Trumpeter swans
1/6/18 9:14 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: TOSO
1/6/18 8:19 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Possible Iceland (Thayers) Gull at Dardanelle Lock & Dam
1/6/18 8:11 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Possible Iceland (Thayers) Gull at Dardanelle Lock & Dam
1/6/18 7:42 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
1/6/18 7:35 am Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
1/6/18 7:16 am Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Re: Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
1/5/18 6:16 pm Don Simons <drsimons56...> TOSO
1/5/18 5:42 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> CBC goodies.
1/5/18 5:19 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
1/5/18 3:07 pm JFR <johnfredman...> TERRITORIAL AM. KESTREL'S IN PINE BLUIFF
1/5/18 2:43 pm Mary Ann King <office...> feeder birds
1/5/18 2:03 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA January & February Field Trips
1/5/18 1:27 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> LOST BRIDGE SOUTH PARK, BEAVER LAKE, AND A MEDITATION
1/5/18 8:41 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
1/5/18 6:47 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Beaverfork Lake-Conway
1/5/18 6:31 am Eilish Palmer <0000018ca1a6d960-dmarc-request...> Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
1/4/18 4:46 pm twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...> Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
1/4/18 2:56 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
1/4/18 2:27 pm Michael <mplinz...> Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
1/4/18 1:09 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> The near delta--Lonoke County
1/4/18 12:27 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Birds Beyond Our Borders
1/4/18 12:18 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
1/4/18 12:08 pm Eilish Palmer <0000018ca1a6d960-dmarc-request...> Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
1/4/18 11:50 am plm108 <plm108...> Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
1/3/18 2:56 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> flying with the birds-Oldie
1/3/18 2:39 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Snowy Owl activity picking back up
1/3/18 2:36 pm Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Frazier Pike, Pulaski Co.
1/3/18 1:38 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> ALMA WASTEWATER, OASIS IN AN ARCTIC BLAST
1/2/18 5:51 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Water !
1/2/18 4:29 pm Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...> Arkansas Birds winter newsletter - now online
1/2/18 3:46 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: Water !
1/2/18 1:47 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Re: Chestnut-collared Longspurs
1/2/18 12:50 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> First Goldfinches
1/2/18 12:28 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Chestnut-collared Longspurs
1/2/18 10:13 am plm108 <plm108...> Possible Iceland (Thayers) Gull at Dardanelle Lock & Dam
1/2/18 6:12 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Golden Eagle at Hobbs State Park, Beaver Lake, just east of Rogers
1/1/18 4:12 pm Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Golden Eagle at Hobbs State Park, Beaver Lake, just east of Rogers
1/1/18 3:26 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Water !
1/1/18 12:41 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: Water !
1/1/18 10:09 am Devin Moon <moondevg...> Inca Doves southeast Little Rock
1/1/18 8:53 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Water !
1/1/18 8:26 am Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...> Water !
1/1/18 6:18 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> OUTERMOST HOUSE IN OSAGE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA
12/31/17 9:30 am Melissa Versiga <melvcf...> Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
12/31/17 5:44 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: TOSO
12/31/17 5:34 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: The Power of eBird
12/31/17 5:13 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> The Power of eBird
12/30/17 5:49 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Re: Birding today
12/30/17 4:46 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Re: Birding today
12/30/17 4:10 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Birding today
12/30/17 6:29 am Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...> Re: ID Help on dark morph goose
12/29/17 9:05 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Strange flycatcher at Felsenthal today.
12/29/17 7:40 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> ID Help on dark morph goose
12/29/17 7:08 pm lrarkingfisher <lrarkingfisher...> Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
12/29/17 12:12 pm Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Red-breasted Nuthatch
12/28/17 9:04 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Long-tail Duck
12/28/17 8:54 am Don Simons <Don.Simons...> TOSO
12/28/17 5:15 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> HEADMISTRESS OF MAYSVILLE EAGLE SCHOOL
12/27/17 6:49 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Feathers sound alarm
12/27/17 6:41 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: No Snowy Owl
12/27/17 4:58 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> PBS tonight. NOVA and the show following it look good to me.
12/27/17 3:33 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Madison County WMA Birds, Including Red Crossbills
12/27/17 2:08 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Re: No Snowy Owl
12/27/17 1:20 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: No Snowy Owl
12/27/17 12:55 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> No Snowy Owl
12/27/17 12:25 pm Lavern Schaap <0000008e154b84e3-dmarc-request...> Magness Lake Swans
12/27/17 11:57 am Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Long-tailed Duck
12/27/17 11:32 am David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Dec. 26
12/27/17 6:38 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> WINTER LOONS YODELING
12/26/17 3:56 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Rufous Hummer Centerton.
12/26/17 10:17 am Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> Alternate roosts for Short-ears
12/26/17 10:14 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: [OKBIRDS] Prothonotary Warbler Name Origin
12/25/17 6:36 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Panama AAST fundraiser trip
12/24/17 6:56 am Alan <quattro...> Crooked Creek CBC
12/23/17 8:41 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> south Lafayette County Birds 12-22-17
12/23/17 12:48 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Snowbirds on a snowy day in the Ozarks
12/22/17 7:13 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> Shorebirds 12-22-17
12/22/17 2:09 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Weird Nuthatch
12/22/17 8:52 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Siskens
12/21/17 9:10 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Great Horned Owl nesting
12/21/17 7:49 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Lonoke CBC Sunday
12/21/17 7:19 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Frazier Pike Pulaski County
12/21/17 9:27 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Long-tailed Duck
12/20/17 10:24 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Black Duck
12/20/17 9:09 am Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Lonoke CBC
12/20/17 9:07 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Great Horned Owl Nest
12/20/17 9:04 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Great Horned Owl Nest
12/20/17 8:57 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> RFI Great Horned Owl Nests, on behalf of Blake Sasse, AGFC
12/19/17 10:48 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Re: Update on Red Crossbills
12/19/17 9:24 am Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> 44 Le Conte’s Sparrows at Woolsey!
12/19/17 8:28 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Re: Update on Red Crossbills
12/19/17 7:40 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Re: Update on Red Crossbills
12/19/17 6:00 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> CBC & eBird App
12/19/17 5:46 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: CBC Report Suggestions
12/18/17 8:38 pm Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> Update on Red Crossbills
12/18/17 4:25 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> CBC musings
12/18/17 2:29 pm David Luneau <mdluneau...> Re: CBC Report Suggestions
12/18/17 1:17 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Little Rock CBC Section 8 East LR, Airport & Sweet Home areas
12/18/17 1:07 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> CBC Report Suggestions
12/18/17 7:22 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Little Rock CBC Section 8 East LR, Airport & Sweet Home areas
12/18/17 6:11 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Little Rock CBC Section 8 East LR, Airport & Sweet Home areas
12/17/17 4:33 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> CBC Lonoke section 5
12/17/17 3:51 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Rufous Hummer 12/17/17 Centerton.
12/17/17 12:21 pm Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Re: Little Rock CBC Section 1
12/17/17 11:46 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Harris Sparrows Lonoke County
12/17/17 11:15 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Re: Little Rock CBC Section 1
12/16/17 10:13 pm Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> Update on Red Crossbills
12/16/17 8:06 pm John Walko <walko...> Sightings Report-Woolsey Wet Prairie, Dec 16, 2017
12/16/17 7:00 pm David Luneau <mdluneau...> Re: Little Rock CBC Section 1
12/16/17 4:58 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Little Rock CBC Section 1
12/16/17 4:54 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: hummer Centerton.
12/16/17 4:33 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Christmas Bird Count encounters
12/16/17 4:19 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> One way to move birds--especially longspurs--off airports
12/16/17 4:14 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Sighting: Blue-headed Vireo
12/16/17 3:36 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Rufous Hummer 12/15/17 Centerton. and Cackling Geese
12/16/17 3:30 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Smith's Longspurs in Ft. Smith airport
12/16/17 2:07 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: RED CROSSBILLS AT HOBBS STATE PARK-CONSERVATION AREA
12/16/17 1:49 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> RED CROSSBILLS AT HOBBS STATE PARK-CONSERVATION AREA
12/16/17 7:23 am Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...> FOS oops
12/16/17 5:23 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Rufous Hummer 12/15/17 Centerton. and Cackling Geese
 
Back to top
Date: 1/15/18 8:49 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Golden Eagle @ Lollie Bottoms Faulkner County
Here is a link to the ebird checklist with photos. Light was terrible but
very documentary pictures. This young Golden Eagle was wrestling with a
young Bald Eagle. I got good looks at them together but the Bald Eagle
hauled butt and the Golden took a victory lap which allowed me to get a
picture or two.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41935251

Michael Linz(now in Atlanta, GA)


On Mon, Jan 15, 2018 at 11:52 AM, Michael <mplinz...> wrote:

> I just saw what appeared to be a golden eagle flying over Lollie RD near
> the new Conway airport.
> Large eagle, white wrist on wings visible above and below, no other white
> on wings or chest, dark terminal band on tail with a white stripe on the
> tail near the rump, smallish bill,...
> I’ll check pictures later and will let you know if they prove me wrong.
> It would be a state bird for me.
>
> Michael Linz(Conway, AR...and headed east today)

 

Back to top
Date: 1/15/18 7:22 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Little Rock & Lonoke CBC Results
The Little Rock and Lonoke Christmas Bird Counts held on December 16 and 17
respectively.

For the Little Rock CBC, 27 field birders and 8 feederwatchers tallied
2,012,888 birds of 99 species over a collective 71 hours and 259 miles on a
decent winter day. The huge number of individuals is due to the continuous
stream of a guesstimated 2 million Common Grackles I watched fly into
Fourche Bottoms over Interstate Park around sunset. Collectively we tallied
new high counts for Black Vulture (by 16), Sharp-shinned Hawk (by 2),
Mourning Dove (by 41), Merlin (by 1), and Winter Wren (by 1). Unusual birds
were Greater White-fronted Goose (2nd record), American Wigeon (7th), Horned
Grebe (4th), Osprey (5th), Merlin (2nd), Blue-headed Vireo (4th), and
Bewicks Wren (36th, but of course a species that has become quite rare).

For the Lonoke CBC, 26 birders tallied 162,951 birds of a respectable 106
species over a collective 53 hours and 266 miles. It was cold but held
steady in the 40s all day, and Im thankful the rain fell overnight instead
of on top of us. We tallied a new high count for Greater White-fronted Goose
(by 6,564!), Merlin (by 1) and Black-crowned Night-Heron (by 9, a 4th CBC
record!). The last is a new winter high count for Arkansas. The Nichols saw
five adults and five immatures roosting in cypress trees over a small pond
on Anderson Road just north of Bob Long Road. Also unusual were Cackling
Goose (9th record) and Virginia Rail (8th).

Dan Scheiman, Compiler
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 1/15/18 11:16 am
From: Edie Calaway <00000066d9cc52d5-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Black Duck
The Black Duck is still at Magness Lake directly across the pond hanging out with the Mallards. He does stick out like a sore thumb !
Also there were lots of Ring-necks, some Buffleheads and 2 pairs of Mergansers, lots of Swans and one Bald Eagle.
Sent from my iPhone

Edie Calaway
Fairfield Bay
<Oxforgirlsmom...>
 

Back to top
Date: 1/15/18 11:00 am
From: Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...>
Subject: Red-shouldered hawk takes bird at feeders
To followup on an earlier discussion on this list to which I posted -

Yesterday, as the snow was slowing, we watched a Red-shouldered hawk fly in and perch near our feeders. Most birds flew, but some stayed, as relaxed outside eating as we were inside watching. Then, quickly, the hawk disappeared from view and reappeared as fast on another limb above the feeders, giving us a view of it dining on what may have been a immature or female Purple finch.

Until this encounter we were in the “don’t think so” camp but now have to agree that Red-shouldered hawks do take feeder birds, although from the mixed reaction of the feeder birds to the hawk’s presence, they are equally confused unless it is an accipiter.

Jim & Suzie Liles
southern Marion County
snowy Arkansas Ozarks
 

Back to top
Date: 1/15/18 9:27 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA January Field Trip
Below are details about the January and February field trips sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  Dan Scheiman has graciously agreed to lead the January trip because I will be out of the country on a birding trip.  You will be in great hands with Dan The Birdman!  Both trips can be very cold so dress warm!  You don't have to be an ASCA member to go on our trips.  Come join us and learn about our feathered friends and meet some friendly folks!  For more information about ASCA, its great monthly programs, and excellent newsletter, go to our newly-designed website at www.ascabird.org.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock January 27, 2018Lake Dardanelle-DelawarePark and Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge (NWR)Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the Mayflower commuter lot off I-40West at Exit 135.  We’ll carpool to DelawarePark, located on the southwest side of Lake Dardanelle.  We should arrive at the Delaware Park boatramp around 8:45 a.m. for anyone who wants to meet us there.  We’ll scan the lake for gulls, pelicans, loons,mergansers, ducks, grebes, and eagles.  Arare gull or duck is a possibility.  Thelake can be very cold and windy.  Dressin layers, including gloves and hats.   Next, we’ll caravan to the Holla Bend NWR headquarters’parking lot.  There is a $4.00 entrancefee per vehicle.  A duck stamp or a NationalParks pass will get a vehicle in for free.  Our target birds will be raptors, including nestingBald Eagles, also swans, ducks, geese, and sparrows.  At Holla Bend, there will be some walking intall grass, so boots are recommended.  Bring snacks, lunch, and plenty of water.  We’ll return to Little Rock late afternoon.  Directions from the town of Dardanelle to DelawarePark:  At the junction of Hwy. 7 and Hwy.22, go west on Hwy 22 approximately 10 miles. Turn right onto Hwy. 393, which is the first road on your right after youcross the long causeway at the west end of the lake.  Hwy. 393 dead ends at Delaware Park.  GPS coordinates:  35.295749, -93.271458.  For more information about the Holla Bend NWR,go to http://www.fws.gov/hollabend/. The headquarters is located at 10448 HollaBend Road, Dardanelle, AR 72834.  GPScoordinates: 35.163222, -93.093477. February 17, 2018Two Rivers Park, LittleRock AR Participate in the 2018 Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) byjoining ASCA’s February field trip.  Meetat 8:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Two Rivers Park Bridge (also known asthe “Little” Dam Bridge) at the start of the walking trail located at 4468River Mountain Road at the southeast end of the Two Rivers Park peninsula.  We’ll scope the river from the parking lot andbridge, then walk the dirt and paved trails as far as people wish to go.  You can turn around at any point and headback to your vehicle.  After returning toour cars, we’ll drive to the west entrance of Two Rivers Park and walk the bigfield and horse trail.  Both areas have adiverse population of sparrows and provides a great opportunity to work onidentifying those “little brown birds”. Knee-high rubber boots are recommended because of the copious sandburrs.  Bring water, snacks, and yourscope if you have one.  We should finisharound noon.  If any rare loons are beingreported, birders can continue on to Lake Maumelle.  Loons, mergansers, ducks, and grebes areeasily found on the lake this time of year.  Ifyou can’t join the field trip, participate in the GBBC by counting the birds inyour own backyard and submitting your sightings to the GBBC website at www.birdcount.org. Directions-takeExit 9 west off I-430 onto Cantrell Rd. At the first stop light, turn right (north) onto River MountainRoad.  Go to the bottom of the hill thenbear right to the main parking lot.  GPScoordinates are 34.797458,-92.383017.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/15/18 8:52 am
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Golden Eagle @ Lollie Bottoms Faulkner County
I just saw what appeared to be a golden eagle flying over Lollie RD near the new Conway airport.
Large eagle, white wrist on wings visible above and below, no other white on wings or chest, dark terminal band on tail with a white stripe on the tail near the rump, smallish bill,...
I’ll check pictures later and will let you know if they prove me wrong. It would be a state bird for me.

Michael Linz(Conway, AR...and headed east today)
 

Back to top
Date: 1/15/18 5:51 am
From: Vickie Becker <vhbecker...>
Subject: Fwd: BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker
Hear, hear. I have met Noah, birded a bit with him, and heard him speak several times. I agree with all the previous comments about him and would like to add that he comes across as a kind, funny, clever young man who loves birds and birding and birders.

Vickie H Becker
110 E Center St, #1460
Madison, SD 57042

501-508-0984 ! NOTE MY NEW PHONE NUMBER !
<Vhbecker...>


Begin forwarded message:

From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Date: January 14, 2018 at 11:45:11 PM CST
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker
Reply-To: Michael Linz <mplinz...>

I had the opportunity to bird with Noah a couple of times this past year and hear him speak about his trip and book. He is an excellent speaker as well as an excellent writer.
I was expecting the focus of his talk to be on the birds that he saw but was surprised when his focus was on the people he met and the places he saw.

After I retired and began birding more, I noticed very quickly that while I remember the birds I saw...I remember even more the people I met. It was nice to see that was what Noah remembered as well.

I bought a copy of his book after I heard him speak and if I ever learn to read I'm going to read it...or maybe I can talk Patty into reading it to me on one of our long drives.

Michael(Conway, AR)

> On Sun, Jan 14, 2018 at 7:45 AM, Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
> BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker. A well-written book that will be worth the time to read if you are interested in birds, travel, people, and how it feels to be a bright, energetic young person exploring the planet, including its human culture and its bird life, with interesting side trips concerning environmental issues, the varieties of human culture, and how we seek meaning in our lives. I read a copy that I found in the new books section at Fayetteville Public Library. Make sure there is a copy in your local library, too. When I started reading, I was all ready for the birding adventure, but I did not expect the skillful, smooth, and insightful writing. In a time in our country when we seem obsessed with borders, I recommend without qualification this good read and clear thinking.
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 1/14/18 9:46 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker
I had the opportunity to bird with Noah a couple of times this past year
and hear him speak about his trip and book. He is an excellent speaker as
well as an excellent writer.
I was expecting the focus of his talk to be on the birds that he saw but
was surprised when his focus was on the people he met and the places he
saw.

After I retired and began birding more, I noticed very quickly that while I
remember the birds I saw...I remember even more the people I met. It was
nice to see that was what Noah remembered as well.

I bought a copy of his book after I heard him speak and if I ever learn to
read I'm going to read it...or maybe I can talk Patty into reading it to me
on one of our long drives.

Michael(Conway, AR)

On Sun, Jan 14, 2018 at 7:45 AM, Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in
> the world – by Noah Strycker. A well-written book that will be worth the
> time to read if you are interested in birds, travel, people, and how it
> feels to be a bright, energetic young person exploring the planet,
> including its human culture and its bird life, with interesting side trips
> concerning environmental issues, the varieties of human culture, and how we
> seek meaning in our lives. I read a copy that I found in the new books
> section at Fayetteville Public Library. Make sure there is a copy in your
> local library, too. When I started reading, I was all ready for the birding
> adventure, but I did not expect the skillful, smooth, and insightful
> writing. In a time in our country when we seem obsessed with borders, I
> recommend without qualification this good read and clear thinking.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/14/18 3:42 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Stuttgart Airport
Samantha, Uta Meyer and I saw about 30 SMITHS LONGSPURS along the southern
end of the north-south runway, in both the mowed three-awn grass on the east
side, and the mowed and unmoved three-awn grass on the west side. We had
scope views of cooperative LeContes Sparrows, good looks at a Sedge Wren,
and saw a Short-eared Owl in flight and perched along the edge of a taxiway.
We took US-165 back and stopped in places to scan the geese and ducks. Mixed
with the Mallards and Northern Shovelers at Geridge were 6 Northern
Pintails. Just south of Keo a flock of geese had a higher proportion of
Rosss Geese than I have ever seen. They were close to the road, in good
light, giving us long looks.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 1/14/18 10:42 am
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Black Duck
American Black Duck is present today at Magness Lake in Cleburne Co. And it’s snowing
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/14/18 7:46 am
From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...>
Subject: Fwd: Prairie Falcon in Atkins Bottoms -yes


Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...>
> Date: January 14, 2018 at 9:39:37 AM CST
> To: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
> Subject: Re: Prairie Falcon in Atkins Bottoms -yes
>
> Take hwy 105 S south from Atkins about 2.5 miles. 105 & Atkins Bottom Road intersect in a " T". 105 goes right & Atkins Bottoms goes left. The house & tree are on the left side of the intersection. The bird flew all around the area over the fields. At one point flew about 15 feet in front of our car as it crosses the road. We hung out for a while & watched it hunt then come back to the tree.
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jan 13, 2018, at 4:28 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:
>>
>> Were are headed over there at Dardanelle now do you know name of road . We looked this morning and didn’t see it.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Jan 13, 2018, at 4:14 PM, Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Perching in the tallest oak just north of the small square building at the intersection. He was eating a sparrow that he caught while we were there.
>>>
>>> Betsy
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>>> On Jan 12, 2018, at 4:57 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Thank you for your thoughtfulness for all concerned, Michael.
>>>> J
>>>>
>>>>> On Jan 12, 2018, at 4:46 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> I had the opportunity to talk to the land owners where the Falcon has been seen recently. They were very nice. The lady explained to me that "bird people" had been constantly "camped out" on her road for the past week. That some were trespassing on their private roads and property including sites with buildings on them. She further explained that the presence of people camped out near her house makes her nervous. She said while she expects the the people are good people, she does not know them and it bothers her to see cars parked and/or blocking the road.
>>>>>
>>>>> I was upset that members of our birding community were trespassing.
>>>>> I told her I would publish her concerns...so that is the reason for this note.
>>>>>
>>>>> I suspect with the weekend coming more people may venture to Atkins. I would like to suggest the following. Avoid travel on the west side of McLaren Loop. If you travel on the west side of the loop do NOT STOP for any reason. The trees and field where the falcon has been seen are visible from highway 105 S. So turn right on 105 S where it intersects with Atkin Bottoms Road and scope from a 100 yds from the intersection. This will meet the needs of birders needing a view of the bird. It will not satisfy the photographers needing a close up picture. I suggest the photographers need to look for a different bird to photograph.
>>>>> It would seem to me that driving other roads that are not near this house should still be OK.
>>>>>
>>>>> It is important that we as a community keep a good reputation. Hopefully you agree with me and will give these people some relief.
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks
>>>>> Michael Linz(Conway, AR)
>>>>>
>>>>> BTW: I left loop when the lady told me her concerns without getting a positive ID on the falcon I was observing. It seemed more important to me to make her more comfortable than for me to see a bird.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/14/18 7:00 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker
I received this book for Christmas and am half way through it. I’ll echo Joe’s sentiment about the book. It’s been an enjoyable read and recommend it.

Butch
Bentonville

> On Jan 14, 2018, at 07:45, Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker. A well-written book that will be worth the time to read if you are interested in birds, travel, people, and how it feels to be a bright, energetic young person exploring the planet, including its human culture and its bird life, with interesting side trips concerning environmental issues, the varieties of human culture, and how we seek meaning in our lives. I read a copy that I found in the new books section at Fayetteville Public Library. Make sure there is a copy in your local library, too. When I started reading, I was all ready for the birding adventure, but I did not expect the skillful, smooth, and insightful writing. In a time in our country when we seem obsessed with borders, I recommend without qualification this good read and clear thinking.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/14/18 6:06 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Red-throated Loons at Tenkiller
Weatherwise, pretty interesting yesterday. Wind started at 10 mph from N and ended at under 5. Temperature started in low 20s and ended in low 30s. I hit several places on the end side of Tenkiller Ferry Lake, mainly looking for loons. I had 156 Common Loons, with highest numbers visible from dam site, Chicken Creek boat ramp, and Six Shooter. Red-throated Loons (3) were visible from Six Shooter. I didnt see any loons in the big shallow bay between old Standing Rock campground and Cherokee Landing State Park, but by the time I got there (3 pm), there was almost no wind and the water was like glass. Upon this bright surface were many duck species: Gadwall, Mallard, Redhead, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, and Common Goldeneyes. American White Pelicans, Bonapartes and Ring-billed Gulls at variolus stops. Amazingly, I saw maybe 2 boats on the lake all day, so I couldnt have asked for an easier day for observations.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/14/18 5:45 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world – by Noah Strycker
BIRDING WITHOUT BORDERS, an obsession, a quest, and the biggest year in the world by Noah Strycker. A well-written book that will be worth the time to read if you are interested in birds, travel, people, and how it feels to be a bright, energetic young person exploring the planet, including its human culture and its bird life, with interesting side trips concerning environmental issues, the varieties of human culture, and how we seek meaning in our lives. I read a copy that I found in the new books section at Fayetteville Public Library. Make sure there is a copy in your local library, too. When I started reading, I was all ready for the birding adventure, but I did not expect the skillful, smooth, and insightful writing. In a time in our country when we seem obsessed with borders, I recommend without qualification this good read and clear thinking.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/18 2:15 pm
From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...>
Subject: Re: Prairie Falcon in Atkins Bottoms -yes
Perching in the tallest oak just north of the small square building at the intersection. He was eating a sparrow that he caught while we were there.

Betsy

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 12, 2018, at 4:57 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> Thank you for your thoughtfulness for all concerned, Michael.
> J
>
>> On Jan 12, 2018, at 4:46 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:
>>
>> I had the opportunity to talk to the land owners where the Falcon has been seen recently. They were very nice. The lady explained to me that "bird people" had been constantly "camped out" on her road for the past week. That some were trespassing on their private roads and property including sites with buildings on them. She further explained that the presence of people camped out near her house makes her nervous. She said while she expects the the people are good people, she does not know them and it bothers her to see cars parked and/or blocking the road.
>>
>> I was upset that members of our birding community were trespassing.
>> I told her I would publish her concerns...so that is the reason for this note.
>>
>> I suspect with the weekend coming more people may venture to Atkins. I would like to suggest the following. Avoid travel on the west side of McLaren Loop. If you travel on the west side of the loop do NOT STOP for any reason. The trees and field where the falcon has been seen are visible from highway 105 S. So turn right on 105 S where it intersects with Atkin Bottoms Road and scope from a 100 yds from the intersection. This will meet the needs of birders needing a view of the bird. It will not satisfy the photographers needing a close up picture. I suggest the photographers need to look for a different bird to photograph.
>> It would seem to me that driving other roads that are not near this house should still be OK.
>>
>> It is important that we as a community keep a good reputation. Hopefully you agree with me and will give these people some relief.
>>
>> Thanks
>> Michael Linz(Conway, AR)
>>
>> BTW: I left loop when the lady told me her concerns without getting a positive ID on the falcon I was observing. It seemed more important to me to make her more comfortable than for me to see a bird.
>>
>>
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/18 12:23 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Rusty Blackbirds
I just observed two male Rusty Blackbirds feeding on the white millet and cracked corn we have spread on the ground.  Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.  

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/18 12:20 pm
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: TOSO pair continue
A pair of Townsend's solitaire are still wintering just west of cabin #5 here on Mount Magazine. I watched one eat a few winged sumac berries.

Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

<don.simons...><mailto:<don.simons...>
phone: 479-963-5333
FAX: 479-963-1031


 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/18 11:34 am
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: South Lafayette County Birds 1-12-18
AR-birders,
I did an afternoon bird survey at a couple of sites in southern Lafayette County yesterday
1-12-18. Although nothing truly unusual was uncovered, the large numbers of waterfowl
present were impressive, and seeing life as it is meant to be in wild places is always a thrill.
The links to the eBIrd list and embedded photos are below. Those inclined to do so, please pray
for my friend and great ornithologist, Dr, Jim Ingold, who is in hospice battling cancer.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41871308

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41866725

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 1/13/18 6:31 am
From: Kenny Nations <kennynations...>
Subject: Common Merganser
I found two Common Mergansers at Magness Lake yesterday. Both female or juvenile males.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/18 4:03 pm
From: DAN <birddan...>
Subject: Merlin, Thibault Rd.
Bob Harden’s post encouraged me, Uta Meyer and Jon Young to look for the Merlin on Thibault Rd., Little Rock. Found it around 4:30 in a grove of trees that borders the road north of where the bird is usually seen. We didn’t find any Inca Doves.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Sent from XFINITY Connect App

 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/18 3:11 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Warbler Genes Predict Vulnerability To Climate Change
This article was a great read, Jerry and thanks for posting it! It's like
the Yellow Warbler, a very common warbler compared to others, is the
"canary in the climate change damage" based on population genetics. It
takes high grade science just to research and measure all these populations
of birds.

Bill Thurman

On Jan 12, 2018 2:08 PM, "Jerry Davis" <jwdavis...> wrote:

Some insight into bird gene research.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



http://wildlife.org/warbler-genes-predict-vulnerabilities-to-climate-change/

 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/18 2:59 pm
From: twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Tundra Swan
Randy Rhoads found an adult today 1/12/18 in the Berlin Abram east pond on Hiram road near Pangburn.


Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/18 2:58 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Prairie Falcon in Atkins Bottoms
Thank you for your thoughtfulness for all concerned, Michael.
J

On Jan 12, 2018, at 4:46 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:

> I had the opportunity to talk to the land owners where the Falcon has been seen recently. They were very nice. The lady explained to me that "bird people" had been constantly "camped out" on her road for the past week. That some were trespassing on their private roads and property including sites with buildings on them. She further explained that the presence of people camped out near her house makes her nervous. She said while she expects the the people are good people, she does not know them and it bothers her to see cars parked and/or blocking the road.
>
> I was upset that members of our birding community were trespassing.
> I told her I would publish her concerns...so that is the reason for this note.
>
> I suspect with the weekend coming more people may venture to Atkins. I would like to suggest the following. Avoid travel on the west side of McLaren Loop. If you travel on the west side of the loop do NOT STOP for any reason. The trees and field where the falcon has been seen are visible from highway 105 S. So turn right on 105 S where it intersects with Atkin Bottoms Road and scope from a 100 yds from the intersection. This will meet the needs of birders needing a view of the bird. It will not satisfy the photographers needing a close up picture. I suggest the photographers need to look for a different bird to photograph.
> It would seem to me that driving other roads that are not near this house should still be OK.
>
> It is important that we as a community keep a good reputation. Hopefully you agree with me and will give these people some relief.
>
> Thanks
> Michael Linz(Conway, AR)
>
> BTW: I left loop when the lady told me her concerns without getting a positive ID on the falcon I was observing. It seemed more important to me to make her more comfortable than for me to see a bird.
>
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/18 2:47 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Prairie Falcon in Atkins Bottoms
I had the opportunity to talk to the land owners where the Falcon has been
seen recently. They were very nice. The lady explained to me that "bird
people" had been constantly "camped out" on her road for the past week.
That some were trespassing on their private roads and property including
sites with buildings on them. She further explained that the presence of
people camped out near her house makes her nervous. She said while she
expects the the people are good people, she does not know them and it
bothers her to see cars parked and/or blocking the road.

I was upset that members of our birding community were trespassing.
I told her I would publish her concerns...so that is the reason for this
note.

I suspect with the weekend coming more people may venture to Atkins. I
would like to suggest the following. Avoid travel on the west side of
McLaren Loop. If you travel on the west side of the loop do NOT STOP for
any reason. The trees and field where the falcon has been seen are visible
from highway 105 S. So turn right on 105 S where it intersects with Atkin
Bottoms Road and scope from a 100 yds from the intersection. This will
meet the needs of birders needing a view of the bird. It will not satisfy
the photographers needing a close up picture. I suggest the photographers
need to look for a different bird to photograph.
It would seem to me that driving other roads that are not near this house
should still be OK.

It is important that we as a community keep a good reputation. Hopefully
you agree with me and will give these people some relief.

Thanks
Michael Linz(Conway, AR)

BTW: I left loop when the lady told me her concerns without getting a
positive ID on the falcon I was observing. It seemed more important to me
to make her more comfortable than for me to see a bird.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/18 12:59 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: FERALS DOGS KILL CALVES AND PIGS IN NEWTON COUNTY
Just every once in a while something appears on television or the paper about how vultures, especially Black Vultures, are a threat to raising livestock, especially cattle, in Arkansas. It seems true enough that vulture-livestock interactions have increased in recent years. As our human populations grow, so do populations of vultures.

Vultures are scavengers and we are putting lots more food out in the environment for them to scavenge. It is our actions that are making the environment better for them.

Sometimes facts catch up with rumor. Just in this mornings paper (Arkansas Democrat Gazette, January 12, 2018, page 4B) was a headline: Livestock killed; dog pack sought. In Newton County, packs of feral dogs have been killing calves and pigs. One family has lost 31 calves, and other attacks left cattle and pigs dead. Of course, within a few days, vultures will be seen at these kills. Fortunately, some people have actually seen the dogs at work.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/18 12:08 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Warbler Genes Predict Vulnerability To Climate Change
Some insight into bird gene research.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



http://wildlife.org/warbler-genes-predict-vulnerabilities-to-climate-change/
 

Back to top
Date: 1/12/18 8:48 am
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Merlin
I just saw the Merlin on Thibault road sitting in the field across from the Merlin tree. Watched him soar over the fields on both sides of the road. Happy to have him back 10:45 Friday

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/11/18 12:58 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: OSPREY CONSUMING BASS IN PINE BLUFF
30 Dec. 2017 was a very overcast day in Pine Bluff. Despite the lack of sun, I decided to make a run through Regional Park to look for Common Loons on Lake Langhofer. As I turned back from the lake and approached the Harbor Oaks golf course, I spotted, what I first assumed was a Gull carrying a fish. Quickly, I recognized that It was an Osprey. I turned my vehicle, so that I could get a photograph, but his flight was away from me. Suddenly he turned back and flew directly in front of me, affording a few shots. He then flew to a pecan tree beside the road and lit on a branch 15 ft above the ground, but facing away from me. I slowly drove to a spot 20 ft. from the tree, where I now had a clear lateral view. The Osprey was never alarmed. As he tucked into the 8 in. Largemouth Bass, I continued my photography. I even able open my door, which never interrupted his feeding. He began at the "lips" and over a 30min. span consumed the fish totally. 1000 photographs later,on a terrible day for photography, I had documented his repast. It was an amazing experience to be that close! It validates the adage: "There ain't no deer killed in camp". I will be glad to share a "few" of the photos that tell the story, if anyone has an interest.
John Redman
 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/18 2:10 pm
From: DAN <birddan...>
Subject: Mew Gull - No
 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/18 8:12 am
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Mew Gull?
I’m at the dam with Kenny and LaDonna and we have not relocated the mew gull yet.

Michael (Conway)

> On Jan 10, 2018, at 10:06 AM, DAN <birddan...> wrote:
>
> Anybody searching for the Mew Gull now? Updates from the field, positive and negative, appreciated. Thanks.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>
> Sent from XFINITY Connect App

 

Back to top
Date: 1/10/18 8:06 am
From: DAN <birddan...>
Subject: Mew Gull?
 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/18 10:02 pm
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Swans at Maumelle Country Club
Had the same thing happen to me today with "Decoy" mute swans on a lake at golf course apartments on Boone Rd Bryant, AR. Snuck around the golf course trying to get closer. Drove into the apartments parked and went out back and got to the fence and took pics before they flew off...then noticed with bins a strange line at base of one of their necks. The one that kept his neck straight. Got a good laugh at myself over that one.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Mon, Jan 8, 2018 at 6:31 PM, Elizabeth Shores<efshores...> wrote: THANK YOU! We realized a couple of days ago they had to be fake. It took us a while because who knew anyone installs fake swans on a pond??
We are new to Maumelle and are thrilled by the variety of bird life we are seeing through our back windows. Lots of warblers, woodpeckers, bluebirds, ducks, red-tailed hawks, even a Bald Eagle. Today I enjoyed the croaking of a Great Blue while I dug holes for transplants. I also observed three gulls swooping around and over the pond. Unfortunately, I can’t see them well enough to pinpoint identification.
Elizabeth

Sent from my iPhone
On Jan 8, 2018, at 4:54 PM, Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:


The "swans" in the ponds at the Maumelle Country Club are decorative swans that faintly resemble Mute Swans.  They were placed in the golf course ponds several months ago. They drift around a slight bit but have managed to stay upright and not footless like Ed's "swans".  I have had live Mute Swans on the lake behind my house a few times over the last few years.  So, these decorative swans did give me a bit of a start when I first drove past and saw them on the golf course ponds, which are very close to my house. Had to laugh when I realized they were fake.  I guess the club owners wanted to "fancy up" the golf course.

There are a number of live Mute Swans scattered around Little Rock.  I have a couple of regulars on Foreman Lake in my Little Rock CBC territory each year.
Karen HollidayMaumelle/Little Rock



 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/18 6:35 pm
From: Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...>
Subject: Light colored hawk
I was at the visitor center of Hobbs state park around 10:45. I saw a very
light colored hawk. It was almost solid white underneath. It's back and
upper sides of wings were creamy colored. The tail had an extremely faint
rufuos tinge in the right light but the tail was banded as well. It landed
in the tops of 3 different pines over the course of about a minute and then
it was gone. Has anyone else seen this bird?

 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/18 1:47 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Mew Gull
LaDonna and I just found an adult winter-plumaged Mew Gull below Dardanelle Lock & Dam. It is currently not in view but we are trying to find it again in hopes of obtaining photos. The bird isn't that hard to pick out; the problem is there's about 20,000 Ring-bills to sort through. More later.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/18 11:11 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Plastics in the environment- Caution- Tragic video available
In America, plastic is like the 20 foot alligator in the parlor room.
Everybody knows it's there and able to wreak havoc at anytime, but nobody
dares bring it up in polite conversation or actually tries to do anything
about it. Meanwhile the destruction of life continues unabated. It appears
that there is no end to this.

Bill Thurman



On Jan 9, 2018 11:21 AM, "Jeffrey Short" <bashman...> wrote:

> https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/tragedy-of-mass-
> consumption-change-is-possible-chris-jordan-albatross_us_
> 5a4b6d4ae4b025f99e1d6caa
>
>
>
> When I visited Midway Island ~1980, on BASH (aviation safety) work about
> the Laysan Albatross “problem”, the main contamination (other than
> military facility debris) were those small, glass, vitamin containers
> favored by Japanese fishermen. Glass did not resemble any food item so the
> birds did not try to consume them.
>
>
>
> I imagine the plastic will also be moving through the food chain through
> seals and sharks which only “take” the birds that fledge and make it to
> the water. The young birds are dying on the nest so I would expect that
> the plastics’ total impact to be greater for the population.
>
>
>
> I wonder what effect the plastics have on the avifauna on Johnston Island,
> where I also spent some time, or on other seabird populations across the
> Pacific.
>
>
>
> If you see plastic in the environment, pick it up and dispose properly, or
> recycle
>
>
>
> Jeff Short
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/9/18 9:21 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Plastics in the environment- Caution- Tragic video available
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/tragedy-of-mass-consumption-change-is-possible-chris-jordan-albatross_us_5a4b6d4ae4b025f99e1d6caa



When I visited Midway Island ~1980, on BASH (aviation safety) work about the Laysan Albatross “problem”, the main contamination (other than military facility debris) were those small, glass, vitamin containers favored by Japanese fishermen. Glass did not resemble any food item so the birds did not try to consume them.



I imagine the plastic will also be moving through the food chain through seals and sharks which only “take” the birds that fledge and make it to the water. The young birds are dying on the nest so I would expect that the plastics’ total impact to be greater for the population.



I wonder what effect the plastics have on the avifauna on Johnston Island, where I also spent some time, or on other seabird populations across the Pacific.



If you see plastic in the environment, pick it up and dispose properly, or recycle



Jeff Short




 

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Date: 1/9/18 5:27 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Townsend's Solitaire!
Yesterday, the Townsend's Solitaire came out from a dense blanket of fog.  Its strange phip....phip....phip whistles first caught my attention.  It perched on a snag momentarily before darting into a fruit laden cedar tree right by Cabin 5 of Mt. Magazine State Park.  A nice lifer.  Despite the fog, saw the distinct white eye-ring and noted the rather un-thrush-like silhouette.
And it made me walk around for about 2 hours before showing up through the haze.  But I'm glad it delayed its appearance because I had good views of a Rufous-crowned Sparrow at the edge of the bluff amidst the hundreds of juncos that I kept flushing almost everywhere I went.  I kept walking back and forth, skirting the edge of bluff between the lodge and Cabin 11.  I also saw a Roadrunner through the window as I lunched at the lodge.
KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 1/8/18 4:48 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: January and February field trips in northwest Arkansas
The January field trip for Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will take place ALL DAY Saturday January 20, with most activities at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area visitor center. The event is Wonders of Winter Wildlife, an annual program organized by state park staff. It starts at 9 am with netting and banding birds. Among other activities will be Lynn Sciumbato from Morning Star Wildlife Rehabilitatiuon Center with hawks, owls, and Igor the Turkey Vulture (11 am) and my powerpoint presentation on winter birds at Hobbs and Beaver Lake (1:30). Theres LOTS more, so check out the full schedule. For more: Hobbs, 479-789-5000. All activities are free and open to the public with exception of the eagle cruise (3 pm) that requires advanced reservation and a small fee. Finally, we have found Red Crossbills near the visitor center on several recent occasions, so we will be on the lookout for them during the day. Bring your binoculars.

NWAAS will host two field trips in February. On Saturday February 3, Eagle Watch Nature Trail on SWEPCO Lake. On Saturday evening February 24, American Woodcocks in Wedington Unit, Ozark National Forest west of Fayetteville. More details will be posted closer to these dates.


 

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Date: 1/8/18 4:31 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Swans at Maumelle Country Club
THANK YOU! We realized a couple of days ago they had to be fake. It took us a while because who knew anyone installs fake swans on a pond??

We are new to Maumelle and are thrilled by the variety of bird life we are seeing through our back windows. Lots of warblers, woodpeckers, bluebirds, ducks, red-tailed hawks, even a Bald Eagle. Today I enjoyed the croaking of a Great Blue while I dug holes for transplants. I also observed three gulls swooping around and over the pond. Unfortunately, I can’t see them well enough to pinpoint identification.

Elizabeth

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 8, 2018, at 4:54 PM, Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:
>
> The "swans" in the ponds at the Maumelle Country Club are decorative swans that faintly resemble Mute Swans. They were placed in the golf course ponds several months ago. They drift around a slight bit but have managed to stay upright and not footless like Ed's "swans". I have had live Mute Swans on the lake behind my house a few times over the last few years. So, these decorative swans did give me a bit of a start when I first drove past and saw them on the golf course ponds, which are very close to my house. Had to laugh when I realized they were fake. I guess the club owners wanted to "fancy up" the golf course.
>
> There are a number of live Mute Swans scattered around Little Rock. I have a couple of regulars on Foreman Lake in my Little Rock CBC territory each year.
> Karen Holliday
> Maumelle/Little Rock
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/8/18 2:55 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Swans at Maumelle Country Club
The "swans" in the ponds at the Maumelle Country Club are decorative swans that faintly resemble Mute Swans.  They were placed in the golf course ponds several months ago. They drift around a slight bit but have managed to stay upright and not footless like Ed's "swans".  I have had live Mute Swans on the lake behind my house a few times over the last few years.  So, these decorative swans did give me a bit of a start when I first drove past and saw them on the golf course ponds, which are very close to my house. Had to laugh when I realized they were fake.  I guess the club owners wanted to "fancy up" the golf course.

There are a number of live Mute Swans scattered around Little Rock.  I have a couple of regulars on Foreman Lake in my Little Rock CBC territory each year.
Karen HollidayMaumelle/Little Rock

 

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Date: 1/8/18 11:12 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Swarm of Pine Siskins
Again today at my feeders there are 100+. Keeping a watchful eye for a
Redpoll.

Terry Butler

 

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Date: 1/8/18 9:25 am
From: Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Subject: Update on Red Crossbills
Did I ever say that Red Crossbills never cease to surprise me, well they never do! I got the report back from Matt Young from Cornell, regarding all the recordings we had been doing in Ninestone, ONSC and Hobbs State Park and the results just blew my mind away.
We have first state record for Type 4 Red Crossbills ever. Wooohooo!!! That makes it two first state records for Red Crossbills Type 1 and Type 4. Type 1 are the Appalachian Red Crossbills that have medium sized bill and Type 4 are the Douglas-fir Crossbills that have medium sized bills too. The Appalachian Crossbills are primarily from Appalachian mountains and Type 4 (Douglas fir Crossbills) are from Pacific Northwest.
With these records Arkansas now has Type 1 to Type 5 (Not observed in this irruption but in 2012-13 irruption) Red Crossbills.
Breakdown of Crossbill Type and locations:
Ninestone has Type 2 Crossbills, Ponderosa Pine Crossbills they have large bill.
ONSC has both Type 2 and Type 3 Crossbills. Type 3 are Western Hemlock Crossbills, they have small bills.
Hobbs State Park- Conservation Area at Visitor Center there are Type 2 and Type 4.
Hobbs State Park- Conservation Area at Ozark Plateau Trail there are Type 2.
Shores Lake there are Type 1.

The search and adventure in exploration of the mystery called Crossbills continues, stay tuned for more juicy updates.

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/


 

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Date: 1/8/18 6:51 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, January 11


This Thursday January 11 is Audubon Society of Central AR's monthly meeting. It is our annual business meeting, no presenter. ASCA can exist only with active participation by its members, so here is your opportunity to provide input into activities for 2018, set the budget, and help start the New Year off right for our organization! All members are urged to attend our annual business meeting at 7:00 p.m. at our regular meeting location at Fletcher Library off H St. in Little Rock.




Dan Scheiman


Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 1/7/18 8:38 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: An Unexpected & Uniquely Southern Close Encounter While Birding
I was out yesterday on the Near Delta sampling the fields across the river as I usually do this time of year. First stop was the Scott sod farm to see if the Longspurs were still around and amenable to pictures. I managed a few lousy pictures of the wrong bird. I had many more fields to check so I went back to the main road & headed toward England. Didn't get far. A tractor trailer hauling something big lost its load at the Willow Beach intersection and the main road was essentially blocked. Old Bearskin Lake Road was handy. I've driven most of the back roads in that area & knew there are always a baker's dozen worth of workarounds.


What I did observe was all the pickups and cars coming north from England driving over an agricultural field to get to Old Bearskin Lake Rd. Having grown up on a farm, I am well aware this behavior is sure to put the landowners into a fine strut. Since it looked like it would take a while to get the accident off the road, I resolved to stop at the nearest occupied house and let the neighbors know this was going on. Since everyone in semi-rural areas know each other, alerting a neighbor is as good as speaking to the owner directly. First place I stopped was deserted. The second place had a car and a truck parked outside so I stopped and went to the door.


We all know that strangers knocking on our door, even in broad daylight, often isn't but can sometimes not be a good thing. There I am in my birding gear standing well away from the door and where the person inside can see me. First to the door is a massive brute of a dog threatening mayhem. A woman about my age opens the old timey door and asks me what I want. I explain about the accident and the cars using the farm field as a detour. She asked what was it to me and I replied I grew up on a farm and my father, if that was his field, would be having a stroke right about now. There aren't any crops in the field she tells me. Well, I said, it still isn't right people are driving across that field & I wanted to let the owner know about it. She counters with, "I don't get up in those people's business." Conversation closed.


I thanked her for her time and said I was sorry to have interrupted her afternoon. She eyed the binoculars and asked what I was doing out there. I told her one of my hobbies was bird watching and I enjoyed driving the roads out in that area looking at the winter birds. She gave me a sharp look like she was deciding if I was okay which was no problem with the Akita standing at attention by her side.


"You want to see my house," she says. It wasn't a question. She all but grabbed me by the scruff of the neck and dragged me inside and close the door. I am standing in a fixed up old plantation house from the 1800's and this lady commences to trace her family genealogy from the time the house was built in the 1830's. I get a tour of the entire rogue's gallery on the wall and hear what they did, who married whom, looked at pictures of their kids, heard about why the house was considered haunted, and so forth. She showed me the 1800's dining room with the tea service all nicely polished and ready for some party a little later in the afternoon. Given the O'Connor moment I was having, I thought it possible I might be invited to that little party or more likely put to work.


I still don't quite remember how I extricated myself from that encounter. I remember walking out the door with Akita slobber on one hand and a brochure about the house in the other. Given the unpleasant encounters we have from time to time with people who actively discourage birding in their vicinity, we also run into many more people who are genuinely warm and interested in birds. Not too many of them invite into their homes for a crash course in family history.


The rest of the afternoon was anticlimactic.


Cindy

Little Rock



 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/18 6:38 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: How Turkeys got their name(s)
https://www.economist.com/news/christmas-specials/21636598-birds-many-names-
speak-early-globalisation-and-confusion-flight


 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/18 2:50 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Re: LOST BRIDGE SOUTH PARK, BEAVER LAKE, AND A MEDITATION
well and rightly said!  Thanks


On 1/7/2018 3:19 PM, Betty Brown
wrote:
> Amen!!!
>
>> On January 5, 2018 at 3:26 PM "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal...> wrote:
>>
>> Among 43 Canada Geese yesterday there was a mallard-sized Cackling
>> Goose, only species that might qualify as a “rare bird.” Of course,
>> in the middle of winter they aren’t that unusual in a Canada flock
>> like the one in the Corps of Engineers Lost Bridge South Park on
>> Beaver Lake.
>>
>>
>> My winter birding follows a routine. Pull into the park, check the
>> deep cove on the east, then the big open water looking southeast,
>> then another cove on the west. Yesterday the east cover yielded
>> Common Goldeneye (4), Ring-necked Duck (2), and Mallard (12), plus a
>> Common Loon. While sitting there with spotting scope clamped on the
>> window, a male Pileated Woodpecker flew low over my car and perched
>> on an old cedar and commenced excavating – cedar chips flying – like
>> I wasn’t there.
>>
>>
>> The only bird in big water was a single Ring-billed Gull. East cove
>> added Hooded Merganser (2).
>>
>>
>> Elsewhere in the park: Eastern Bluebirds, Cedar Waxwings,
>> Yellow-rumped Warblers, American Robins, a Hermit Thrush, and a
>> “squealer” – Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. All from inside my car. It was
>> in the teens outside.
>>
>>
>> Beaver Lake was formed in mid-1960s by damming old White River,
>> burying family cemeteries and good bottomland farms at center of
>> pioneer-era communities. As mitigation, the Corps built high-quality
>> public recreation areas. High-quality: paved roads, camp grounds,
>> bathrooms, walking trails, boat launches, and picnic areas. First
>> class recreation for ordinary citizens. All with a fine view of
>> Beaver Lake.
>>
>>
>> The America that favored recreational facilities was the America of a
>> War on Poverty whose purpose was opportunity. Every county had an
>> Equal Opportunity Agency with multiple of services aimed a needs of
>> low income folks. It was America of a Voting Rights Act to ensure
>> every qualified American had a chance to participate. And just so we
>> don’t forget, in 1965, it was America of Medicare, providing health
>> insurance for every American 65 and older.
>>
>>
>> Where or where is that America? For some years now, we have drifted a
>> different way. Despite the fact that the population of northwest
>> Arkansas has vastly expanded, many recreational facilities built
>> around Beaver in the 1960s have been scaled back or closed because of
>> Congressional budget cuts. It’s happened all over Arkansas and all
>> over the country.
>>
>>
>> Really? The world’s wealthiest and most powerful nation can’t afford
>> parks for ordinary citizens?
>>
>>
>> The parks that remain, like Lost Bridge South, are fine places. And
>> aren’t we exceedingly fortunate to have them?
>>
>>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/18 1:19 pm
From: Betty Brown <bbrown1941...>
Subject: Re: LOST BRIDGE SOUTH PARK, BEAVER LAKE, AND A MEDITATION
Amen!!!


> On January 5, 2018 at 3:26 PM "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal...> wrote:
>
>
> Among 43 Canada Geese yesterday there was a mallard-sized Cackling Goose, only species that might qualify as a “rare bird.” Of course, in the middle of winter they aren’t that unusual in a Canada flock like the one in the Corps of Engineers Lost Bridge South Park on Beaver Lake.
>
>
> My winter birding follows a routine. Pull into the park, check the deep cove on the east, then the big open water looking southeast, then another cove on the west. Yesterday the east cover yielded Common Goldeneye (4), Ring-necked Duck (2), and Mallard (12), plus a Common Loon. While sitting there with spotting scope clamped on the window, a male Pileated Woodpecker flew low over my car and perched on an old cedar and commenced excavating – cedar chips flying – like I wasn’t there.
>
>
> The only bird in big water was a single Ring-billed Gull. East cove added Hooded Merganser (2).
>
>
> Elsewhere in the park: Eastern Bluebirds, Cedar Waxwings, Yellow-rumped Warblers, American Robins, a Hermit Thrush, and a “squealer” – Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. All from inside my car. It was in the teens outside.
>
>
> Beaver Lake was formed in mid-1960s by damming old White River, burying family cemeteries and good bottomland farms at center of pioneer-era communities. As mitigation, the Corps built high-quality public recreation areas. High-quality: paved roads, camp grounds, bathrooms, walking trails, boat launches, and picnic areas. First class recreation for ordinary citizens. All with a fine view of Beaver Lake.
>
>
> The America that favored recreational facilities was the America of a War on Poverty whose purpose was opportunity. Every county had an Equal Opportunity Agency with multiple of services aimed a needs of low income folks. It was America of a Voting Rights Act to ensure every qualified American had a chance to participate. And just so we don’t forget, in 1965, it was America of Medicare, providing health insurance for every American 65 and older.
>
>
> Where or where is that America? For some years now, we have drifted a different way. Despite the fact that the population of northwest Arkansas has vastly expanded, many recreational facilities built around Beaver in the 1960s have been scaled back or closed because of Congressional budget cuts. It’s happened all over Arkansas and all over the country.
>
>
> Really? The world’s wealthiest and most powerful nation can’t afford parks for ordinary citizens?
>
>
> The parks that remain, like Lost Bridge South, are fine places. And aren’t we exceedingly fortunate to have them?
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/18 12:33 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: UNEXPECTED WHIRLWIND TOUR BEFORE THE RAIN
Our whirlwind tour through western Benton County was unexpected. Before onset of predicted most-of-the-day rain, we planned birding at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. We made it to the hatchery before rain, but security gates were locked. Even with locked gates, walk-ins are OK, but we decided not to because of coming rain. This proved a godsend. We could see an adult Bald Eagle keeping a sharp eye on things inside.

A huge flock of blackbirds were mostly female Red-wingeds and a small number of Brown-headed Cowbirds. Wilsons Snipes (20) were working lawns across from the hatchery, perhaps because mud inside was likely frozen. A spring fed pond across the street was full of Mallards (~60), plus Green-winged Teal, (4-5), and many Song and Swamp Sparrows. Locked gates opened unexpected opportunity.

Now with time available, we started a tour south of the hatchery. Immediately had a fine Kriders Hawk, brilliant white on such a gray day. A spring fed stream that flows south from the hatchery was also full of Mallards (~40) plus a few Northern Shovelers (3). Down Holloway Road, a black black Harlans Hawk. At the dairy farm, a Harriss Sparrow with about as black a face as I have ever seen and at least 40 White-crowned Sparrows.

A few miles southeast of the hatchery theres some pretty good roadside birding attractions in the Highfill area. We hadnt planned on that, either, and it was starting to mist, so what the heck maybe thats why god gave us windshield wipers

A flock of maybe (?) Horned Larks flew across a big field not far from Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport. We got great for sure looks at Savannah Sparrows (~18) on a barbed wire fence. Then another adult Bald Eagle. A bunch of cardinals were just ahead in a roadside thicket. They really stand out on a gray winter day. There were also a few sparrows. Then Joan noticed a yellow bird.

This proved to be a Palm Warbler! We could see it well enough, even through windows, to pick out the rufous crown and brilliant yellow undertail. The mainly light-colored belly and light supercilium made us think it was one of the brown western palms. We both got photographs a little gray like the day, but useful.

Light spotty rain was starting, but we decided to make one more pass by the hatchery. Gates still closed, and maybe because of that -- and therefore time well spent elsewhere -- a remarkable winter morning of birding.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/7/18 9:32 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FOYard
Killdeer. Hopefully, they will help keep the deer away.



Jeff Short


 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/18 8:06 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Big bird and bigger beaks







<https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/when-two-different-t
ypes-of-birds-mated-a-new-species-big-bird-was-born/2018/01/05/0d33a62a-f0d8
-11e7-b390-a36dc3fa2842_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories-2_bigbird-225
pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.29ac2cce2c40>
https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/when-two-different-ty
pes-of-birds-mated-a-new-species-big-bird-was-born/2018/01/05/0d33a62a-f0d8-
11e7-b390-a36dc3fa2842_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-more-top-stories-2_bigbird-225p
m%3Ahomepage%2Fstory&utm_term=.29ac2cce2c40

[]







https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2017/10/20/birds-might-be-ev
olving-to-eat-from-bird-feeders-study-says/?tid=a_inl
<https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2017/10/20/birds-might-be-e
volving-to-eat-from-bird-feeders-study-says/?tid=a_inl&utm_term=.aeece4cea1a
3> &utm_term=.aeece4cea1a3






 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/18 4:14 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Birds & their weird water ways
With the slight thaw today some water ran out of the frozen hose onto the grass near the bird bath forming a small puddle. We drove in to see house sparrows waiting in line for their Sat afternoon bath. One at a time each would hop in, flutter & roll around then hop out to let the next one bathe. Never mind the bird bath was also melted (although some berry eaters had soiled it ). It was that little mud puddle they wanted.
A chickadee also told me off through the window that his favorite watering site (the ant guard on the hummingbird feeder) had frozen & was leaking making the water level below acceptable depth.
Next they’ll be ordering Perrier or Evian. Spoiled! 🐦
Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 6, 2018, at 4:57 PM, Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> wrote:
>
> Ruth and I did a cold weather walk through the park today. Saw two Bald Eagles circling the front lake and other areas of the park, a small flock of Wood Ducks flying fast, a Coopers Hawk, two Red Tailed Hawks, one Red Shouldered Hawk, Eastern Towhees, and a huge kettle (hundreds) of what we are sure were White Pelicans high, high overhead.
>
> Chuck Anderson
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/6/18 4:12 pm
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: TOSO CONTINUES
This afternoon I made time to check on one of our Townsend’s solitaires. It was still present and feeding just west of cabin 5.

My records suggest TOSO linger on MounT Magazine into March.

I am willing to assist anybody in finding TOSO and RCSP. Stop at the visitor center to see if I’m available.

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 1/6/18 2:57 pm
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Western Hills Park in Little Rock
Ruth and I did a cold weather walk through the park today. Saw two Bald Eagles circling the front lake and other areas of the park, a small flock of Wood Ducks flying fast, a Coopers Hawk, two Red Tailed Hawks, one Red Shouldered Hawk, Eastern Towhees, and a huge kettle (hundreds) of what we are sure were White Pelicans high, high overhead.

Chuck Anderson

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/6/18 2:14 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
The “swans” on the Caterpillar plant ponds are “decoys”. I saw them there before the LR CBC and thought they were real for a few minutes until there was no movement and then we saw that one was turned over…and had no feet. 😊

Ed Laster
Little Rock


> On Jan 6, 2018, at 9:15 AM, Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> No one has mentioned that there are a couple of swans in the pond at the Caterpillar plant on I-440. One was there on Christmas Eve and Christmas day, and there were two there yesterday afternoon. There is no place to pull over to get a good look since that is in the middle of the road construction. You just have to look as you drive by.
>
> Nancy Young
>
> On Friday, January 5, 2018, 10:41:28 AM CST, Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:
>
>
> A Conway birder just let me know she found the Trumpeter Swans on Beaverfork Lake. At the park, go down to the boat launch area at the end of drive, then go right over to where there are some small wooden boat slips. Park and look to the right into the inlet that goes up towards Hwy. 25. They are in the shallow water in the inlet. Beaverfork Lake is on the west side of Conway off Hwy. 25. From I-40 take the new Salem Road-South exit (Exit 124) and it will shoot you straight onto Hwy. 25. Go a couple of miles then turn right into tBeaverfork Park(Kinley Dr. entrance).
> Good luck!
> Karen Holliday
> Little Rock
> P.S. There is a now a Porta-Potty available near the park office that the public can use during the winter. It's actually quite clean.
>


 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/18 12:44 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Golden Eagle
I am at Holla Bend. A few moments ago I had an adult Golden Eagle fly
over. We made eye contact it was that low. There were three juvenile Bald
Eagles and an adult in the same field the golden flew from.
Right now I'm watching a bazillion blackbirds and a few hundred ducks that
are being watched by at least 17 Red-tailed Hawks. There are hawks
everywhere, looking for an easy meal. Ooops. Adult Bald Eagle just stirred
everything up.
Three Northern Harriers have flown across the road in front me as I sit
here. The afternoon has been very raptory.
Blackbirds are still pouring in. Don't they know? Someone's gonna get
eaten.
I hear pipits.

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 1/6/18 10:02 am
From: twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Trumpeter swans
I made a count this morning at Magness lake and the two Hiram road ponds and came up with 425+ Trumpeter swans. Also of interest was 1 Greater Scaup, 1 Redhead duck at west Hairm pond.
Terry Butler


Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2
 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/18 9:14 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: TOSO
When I reported this to Doug James this morning he came up with an anecdote from his vast past, as usual.  To paraphrase.....
I discovered the first Townsend's Solitaire decades ago near Beaver Lake while mapping out my CBC circle.  I went back and found the bird again with my students and they all saw it too.  I had a rifle with me at the time and badly want to collect a specimen, but gave up when I realized that it would have fallen down a cliff to a spot where I could not have retrieved it.  
On Friday 5 January 2018, 8:16:54 PM GMT-6, Don Simons <drsimons56...> wrote:

Two Townsend’s solitaires continue on Mount Magazine for the CBC.

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 1/6/18 8:19 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Possible Iceland (Thayers) Gull at Dardanelle Lock & Dam
Hi David and All. Michael and I could not confirm an Iceland so removed it from our eBird report. We also looked for the WEGR Thurs evening with no luck. Hopefully someone will relocate it. With the winter storms continuing to our north, it's a good time to be on the lookout for rare gulls, ducks etc. 
Patty McLean and Michael Linz Currently in Missouri  ;-) 


-------- Original message --------From: David Ray <cardcards...> Date: 1/6/18 10:11 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Possible Iceland (Thayers) Gull at Dardanelle Lock & Dam
Has anyone seen the Iceland gull or western grebe lately?
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 2, 2018, at 12:12 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
> Hi All and Happy New Year!
>
> On a tip from Kenny Nichols about an unusual and very uncooperative gull he and LaDonna saw at the Dardanelle Dam, Michael Linz and I decided to brave the frigid temps and go to the Lock and Dam side where there appears to be a possible second cycle Iceland Gull. The bird shows silvery brown undertones with soft brown (not black) on primaries, trailing edge of wing and terminal band. There is a pale/dull silvery window visible on the topside the wing. Whitish head and relatively smaller dark bill than that of HERG. Overall appears intermediate in size—larger than RBGU and smaller than HERG. The gull has been spending most of its time on the Pope County side of the dam, although occasionally flying across the river. So far, we've only seen it in flight. Of note, there is also a dark brown immature Herring Gull in the area.
>
> Michael has been attempting diagnostic photos and will provide his best shots in our eBird report. But for now, the gull is out of sight so we're heading to lunch.
>
> Patty McLean, visiting from Atlanta GA
> Michael Linz, Conway AR
>
 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/18 8:11 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Possible Iceland (Thayers) Gull at Dardanelle Lock & Dam
Has anyone seen the Iceland gull or western grebe lately?
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 2, 2018, at 12:12 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
> Hi All and Happy New Year!
>
> On a tip from Kenny Nichols about an unusual and very uncooperative gull he and LaDonna saw at the Dardanelle Dam, Michael Linz and I decided to brave the frigid temps and go to the Lock and Dam side where there appears to be a possible second cycle Iceland Gull. The bird shows silvery brown undertones with soft brown (not black) on primaries, trailing edge of wing and terminal band. There is a pale/dull silvery window visible on the topside the wing. Whitish head and relatively smaller dark bill than that of HERG. Overall appears intermediate in size—larger than RBGU and smaller than HERG. The gull has been spending most of its time on the Pope County side of the dam, although occasionally flying across the river. So far, we've only seen it in flight. Of note, there is also a dark brown immature Herring Gull in the area.
>
> Michael has been attempting diagnostic photos and will provide his best shots in our eBird report. But for now, the gull is out of sight so we're heading to lunch.
>
> Patty McLean, visiting from Atlanta GA
> Michael Linz, Conway AR
>

 

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Date: 1/6/18 7:42 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
The swans at Caterpillar are Mute swans.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 6, 2018, at 9:15 AM, Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> No one has mentioned that there are a couple of swans in the pond at the Caterpillar plant on I-440. One was there on Christmas Eve and Christmas day, and there were two there yesterday afternoon. There is no place to pull over to get a good look since that is in the middle of the road construction. You just have to look as you drive by.
>
> Nancy Young
>
> On Friday, January 5, 2018, 10:41:28 AM CST, Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:
>
>
> A Conway birder just let me know she found the Trumpeter Swans on Beaverfork Lake. At the park, go down to the boat launch area at the end of drive, then go right over to where there are some small wooden boat slips. Park and look to the right into the inlet that goes up towards Hwy. 25. They are in the shallow water in the inlet. Beaverfork Lake is on the west side of Conway off Hwy. 25. From I-40 take the new Salem Road-South exit (Exit 124) and it will shoot you straight onto Hwy. 25. Go a couple of miles then turn right into tBeaverfork Park(Kinley Dr. entrance).
> Good luck!
> Karen Holliday
> Little Rock
> P.S. There is a now a Porta-Potty available near the park office that the public can use during the winter. It's actually quite clean.
>

 

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Date: 1/6/18 7:35 am
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
Four swans are in a pond on the Maumelle Country Club golf course. They have not changed position in four days but two of them seem to be moving their heads a little.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 6, 2018, at 9:15 AM, Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> No one has mentioned that there are a couple of swans in the pond at the Caterpillar plant on I-440. One was there on Christmas Eve and Christmas day, and there were two there yesterday afternoon. There is no place to pull over to get a good look since that is in the middle of the road construction. You just have to look as you drive by.
>
> Nancy Young
>
> On Friday, January 5, 2018, 10:41:28 AM CST, Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:
>
>
> A Conway birder just let me know she found the Trumpeter Swans on Beaverfork Lake. At the park, go down to the boat launch area at the end of drive, then go right over to where there are some small wooden boat slips. Park and look to the right into the inlet that goes up towards Hwy. 25. They are in the shallow water in the inlet. Beaverfork Lake is on the west side of Conway off Hwy. 25. From I-40 take the new Salem Road-South exit (Exit 124) and it will shoot you straight onto Hwy. 25. Go a couple of miles then turn right into tBeaverfork Park(Kinley Dr. entrance).
> Good luck!
> Karen Holliday
> Little Rock
> P.S. There is a now a Porta-Potty available near the park office that the public can use during the winter. It's actually quite clean.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/6/18 7:16 am
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
No one has mentioned that there are a couple of swans in the pond at the Caterpillar plant on I-440.  One was there on Christmas Eve and Christmas day, and there were two there yesterday afternoon.  There is no place to pull over to get a good look since that is in the middle of the road construction.  You just have to look as you drive by.
Nancy Young
On Friday, January 5, 2018, 10:41:28 AM CST, Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:

A Conway birder just let me know she found the Trumpeter Swans on Beaverfork Lake.  At the park, go down to the boat launch area at the end of drive, then go right over to where there are some small wooden boat slips.  Park and look to the right into the inlet that goes up towards Hwy. 25.  They are in the shallow water in the inlet.  Beaverfork Lake is on the west side of Conway off  Hwy. 25.  From I-40 take the new Salem Road-South exit (Exit 124) and it will shoot you straight onto Hwy. 25.  Go a couple of miles then turn right into tBeaverfork Park(Kinley Dr. entrance). Good luck!  Karen HollidayLittle RockP.S.  There is a now a Porta-Potty available near the park office that the public can use during the winter.  It's actually quite clean.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/5/18 6:16 pm
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: TOSO
Two Townsend’s solitaires continue on Mount Magazine for the CBC.

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 1/5/18 5:42 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: CBC goodies.
Greetings all,
I finally finished my last count of 14 and it's time to start the paperwork.

At Holla Bend NWR count: I don't have all the data, but Alan & Steve had a dark phase Rough-legged and Michael & Patty had Blue-winged Teal. Both these parties also had Trumpeter Swans.

I had Red Crossbills at Hot Springs NP and two locations at Mount Magazine.
I had a dark-phase Rough-legged South of Manila, on the Big Lake NWR count.

Time to sleep! Leif at Hector





This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 1/5/18 5:19 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
Friday about 12:30 -1 Eleven Trumpeteers did a Flyover of Beaverfork but
did not light and were not in Cadron Bottoms

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On Fri, Jan 5, 2018 at 8:30 AM, Eilish Palmer <
<0000018ca1a6d960-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Checked the field and the swans are gone. Didn't see them in the lake but
> didn't look very hard as the sun was straight in my eyes.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jan 4, 2018, at 6:45 PM, twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>
> There were 350+ Trumpeter swans combined at Magness and the two Hiram road
> ponds.
>
> Terry Butler
>
>
>
> Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: plm108 <plm108...>
> Date: 1/4/18 4:55 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
>
> And now just got a call from Karen Holliday that she found eleven swans in
> the Hwy 25 agri fields aka Cadron Flats (West side of 25). The swans appear
> to be settling in for the night, forming a large white glob in the field.
> Hopefully they'll stay safe and spend the night.
>
> Patty McLean and Michael Linz
>
>

 

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Date: 1/5/18 3:07 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: TERRITORIAL AM. KESTREL'S IN PINE BLUIFF
This afternoon, I had an opportunity to observe and photograph the behavior of two territorial Am. Kestrels in Pine Bluff. The first was near the intersection of Hwy 65 and Grider Field Rd. I was photographing a male Am. Kestrel that was perched on a road sign on a blind-ending access road. Suddenly the Kestrel tipped forward and in my frame I saw another male Kestrel closeing rapidly from behind the perched bird. I continued to shoot and recorded a brief battle, which resulted in the perched Kestrel preserving his right to perch. The flashing colors of the wings and tails were stunning. 30 min. later I had turned down a short dirt farm road 600 yds. north of the Osborn Rd and Hwy 63 intersection, when I observed a beautiful dark morph Harlan's Hawk circling against a very blue sky. As I began to photograph the bird, it was attacked by a female Am.Kestrel. The Kestrel broke off the attack, as soon as the hawk moved it's circling to an area 50 yds. south. It's a great day, when one has the opportunity to photograph a Harlan's, but even a better one to be able to record an encounter with a Kestrel. After I process the photos, I will be glad to share some of them, if anyone has an interest.
John Redman
 

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Date: 1/5/18 2:43 pm
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: feeder birds
Several new birds today either at the feeders or the birdbath. Brown
creeper, Yellow bellied sapsucker, Northern Flicker, along with the usuals:
Downy woodpecker, Red bellied woodpecker, Red breasted nuthatch, white
breasted nuthatch, juncos, cardinals, white-throated sparrows, titmice,
chickadees and one or two species I forgot.



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London.




 

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Date: 1/5/18 2:03 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA January & February Field Trips
The January field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA) is scheduled for Saturday, January 27th.  Please see details below.  Information about the February 17th ASCA field trip is at the bottom of this email.  Anyone who willing to brave the cold to see some really cool birds is welcome to join us.  You don't have to be an ASCA member or an expert birder.  Dress warm and in layers for both trips, it can be quite chilly, especially on the lake and the Arkansas River.  If you would like more information, please feel free to contact me off-list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 January 27, 2018Lake Dardanelle-DelawarePark and Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge (NWR)Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the Mayflower commuter lot off I-40West at Exit 135.  We’ll carpool to DelawarePark, located on the southwest side of Lake Dardanelle.  We should arrive at the Delaware Park boatramp around 8:45 a.m. for anyone who wants to meet us there.  We’ll scan the lake for gulls, pelicans, loons,mergansers, ducks, grebes, and eagles.  Arare gull or duck is a possibility.  Thelake can be very cold and windy.  Dressin layers, including gloves and hats.   Next, we’ll caravan to the Holla Bend NWR headquarters’parking lot.  There is a $4.00 entrancefee per vehicle.  A duck stamp or a NationalParks pass will get a vehicle in for free.  Our target birds will be raptors, including nestingBald Eagles, also swans, ducks, geese, and sparrows.  At Holla Bend, there will be some walking intall grass, so boots are recommended.  Bring snacks, lunch, and plenty of water.  We’ll return to Little Rock late afternoon.  Directions from the town of Dardanelle to DelawarePark:  At the junction of Hwy. 7 and Hwy.22, go west on Hwy 22 approximately 10 miles. Turn right onto Hwy. 393, which is the first road on your right after youcross the long causeway at the west end of the lake.  Hwy. 393 dead ends at Delaware Park.  GPS coordinates:  35.295749, -93.271458.  For more information about the Holla Bend NWR,go to http://www.fws.gov/hollabend/. The headquarters is located at 10448 HollaBend Road, Dardanelle, AR 72834.  GPScoordinates: 35.163222, -93.093477.  February 17, 2018Two Rivers Park, LittleRock AR Participate in the 2018 Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) byjoining ASCA’s February field trip.  Meetat 8:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Two Rivers Park Bridge (also known asthe “Little” Dam Bridge) at the start of the walking trail located at 4468River Mountain Road at the southeast end of the Two Rivers Park peninsula.  We’ll scope the river from the parking lot andbridge, then walk the dirt and paved trails as far as people wish to go.  You can turn around at any point and headback to your vehicle.  After returning toour cars, we’ll drive to the west entrance of Two Rivers Park and walk the bigfield and horse trail.  Both areas have adiverse population of sparrows and provides a great opportunity to work onidentifying those “little brown birds”. Knee-high rubber boots are recommended because of the copious sandburrs.  Bring water, snacks, and yourscope if you have one.  We should finisharound noon.  If any rare loons are beingreported, birders can continue on to Lake Maumelle.  Loons, mergansers, ducks, and grebes areeasily found on the lake this time of year.  Ifyou can’t join the field trip, participate in the GBBC by counting the birds inyour own backyard and submitting your sightings to the GBBC website at www.birdcount.org. Directions-takeExit 9 west off I-430 onto Cantrell Rd. At the first stop light, turn right (north) onto River MountainRoad.  Go to the bottom of the hill thenbear right to the main parking lot.  GPScoordinates are 34.797458,-92.383017.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/5/18 1:27 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LOST BRIDGE SOUTH PARK, BEAVER LAKE, AND A MEDITATION
Among 43 Canada Geese yesterday there was a mallard-sized Cackling Goose, only species that might qualify as a rare bird. Of course, in the middle of winter they arent that unusual in a Canada flock like the one in the Corps of Engineers Lost Bridge South Park on Beaver Lake.

My winter birding follows a routine. Pull into the park, check the deep cove on the east, then the big open water looking southeast, then another cove on the west. Yesterday the east cover yielded Common Goldeneye (4), Ring-necked Duck (2), and Mallard (12), plus a Common Loon. While sitting there with spotting scope clamped on the window, a male Pileated Woodpecker flew low over my car and perched on an old cedar and commenced excavating cedar chips flying like I wasnt there.

The only bird in big water was a single Ring-billed Gull. East cove added Hooded Merganser (2).

Elsewhere in the park: Eastern Bluebirds, Cedar Waxwings, Yellow-rumped Warblers, American Robins, a Hermit Thrush, and a squealer Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. All from inside my car. It was in the teens outside.

Beaver Lake was formed in mid-1960s by damming old White River, burying family cemeteries and good bottomland farms at center of pioneer-era communities. As mitigation, the Corps built high-quality public recreation areas. High-quality: paved roads, camp grounds, bathrooms, walking trails, boat launches, and picnic areas. First class recreation for ordinary citizens. All with a fine view of Beaver Lake.

The America that favored recreational facilities was the America of a War on Poverty whose purpose was opportunity. Every county had an Equal Opportunity Agency with multiple of services aimed a needs of low income folks. It was America of a Voting Rights Act to ensure every qualified American had a chance to participate. And just so we dont forget, in 1965, it was America of Medicare, providing health insurance for every American 65 and older.

Where or where is that America? For some years now, we have drifted a different way. Despite the fact that the population of northwest Arkansas has vastly expanded, many recreational facilities built around Beaver in the 1960s have been scaled back or closed because of Congressional budget cuts. Its happened all over Arkansas and all over the country.

Really? The worlds wealthiest and most powerful nation cant afford parks for ordinary citizens?

The parks that remain, like Lost Bridge South, are fine places. And arent we exceedingly fortunate to have them?


 

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Date: 1/5/18 8:41 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Swans at Beaverfork-Yes
A Conway birder just let me know she found the Trumpeter Swans on Beaverfork Lake.  At the park, go down to the boat launch area at the end of drive, then go right over to where there are some small wooden boat slips.  Park and look to the right into the inlet that goes up towards Hwy. 25.  They are in the shallow water in the inlet.  Beaverfork Lake is on the west side of Conway off  Hwy. 25.  From I-40 take the new Salem Road-South exit (Exit 124) and it will shoot you straight onto Hwy. 25.  Go a couple of miles then turn right into tBeaverfork Park(Kinley Dr. entrance). Good luck!  Karen HollidayLittle RockP.S.  There is a now a Porta-Potty available near the park office that the public can use during the winter.  It's actually quite clean.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/5/18 6:47 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Beaverfork Lake-Conway
Late Thursday afternoon I saw the post about the Trumpeter Swans at Beaverfork Lake.  Decided to leave work a little early and go find the swans.  Michael and Patty knew I was headed that way and called to tell me the swans had moved to a field just past the lake.  Got to the field about 4:30 p.m. and found eleven swans a'snoozing in the big field.  They really stood out against the bare, plowed field.  I appreciated the call because I would not have thought to look for them in the fields at Cadron Flats.  Michael said he's seen swans in those fields before, but never on the lake until yesterday.
I then went the Beaverfork to see what I could find before it got totally dark.  The lake was packed with birds and more kept coming in as it got later and later.  Found over 100 birds of each species of Hooded Mergansers, Buffleheads, Bonaparte Gulls, Scaup, and Gadwalls.  There were at least 1,000 Mallards, 300 Canada Geese (with 1 Cackling Goose), 25 Pied-billed Grebes, 12 Common Goldeneyes, a smattering of Ring-billed Gulls, a few DC Cormorants, and 3 Great Blue Herons.  I also spotted a very healthy looking Coyote hunting along the shoreline and flushing even more ducks from the reeds. More birds were further out, but it got so dark I could only see blobs. Since there was no ice on the lake and any water nearby was frozen, that may be why there were so many birds coming in to the spend the night.P.S.  A report this morning said the swans are not in the field.
Karen HollidayMaumelle/Little Rock


 

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Date: 1/5/18 6:31 am
From: Eilish Palmer <0000018ca1a6d960-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
Checked the field and the swans are gone. Didn't see them in the lake but didn't look very hard as the sun was straight in my eyes.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 4, 2018, at 6:45 PM, twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>
> There were 350+ Trumpeter swans combined at Magness and the two Hiram road ponds.
>
> Terry Butler
>
>
>
> Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: plm108 <plm108...>
> Date: 1/4/18 4:55 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
>
> And now just got a call from Karen Holliday that she found eleven swans in the Hwy 25 agri fields aka Cadron Flats (West side of 25). The swans appear to be settling in for the night, forming a large white glob in the field. Hopefully they'll stay safe and spend the night.
>
> Patty McLean and Michael Linz
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/18 4:46 pm
From: twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
There were 350+ Trumpeter swans combined at Magness and the two Hiram road ponds.
Terry Butler 


Sent from my Galaxy Tab® S2
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 1/4/18 4:55 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
And now just got a call from Karen Holliday that she found eleven swans in the Hwy 25 agri fields aka Cadron Flats (West side of 25). The swans appear to be settling in for the night, forming a large white glob in the field. Hopefully they'll stay safe and spend the night. 
Patty McLean and Michael Linz 
 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/18 2:56 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
And now just got a call from Karen Holliday that she found eleven swans in the Hwy 25 agri fields aka Cadron Flats (West side of 25). The swans appear to be settling in for the night, forming a large white glob in the field. Hopefully they'll stay safe and spend the night. 
Patty McLean and Michael Linz 

null
 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/18 2:27 pm
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
We just heard from Ellish Palmer that the swans are out in the agri fields on Hwy 25 just north of Beaverfork Lake off to the west/left side.

Michael Linz and Patty McLean


> On Jan 4, 2018, at 2:18 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
> Yes. A first for both of us!
>
>
>
> Patty
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Eilish Palmer <eilishpalmer...>
> Date: 1/4/18 2:08 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: plm108 <plm108...>
> Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
>
> You saw trumpeters on Beaverfork in Conway?
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jan 4, 2018, at 1:49 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
> >
> > Michael Linz and I had some nice finds this morning at Beaverfork Lake. Highlights:
> >
> > Trumpeter Swan - 9
> >
> > Snow Goose - 2
> >
> > Greater White-fronted Goose - 38
> >
> > Cackling Goose - 2
> >
> > American Wigeon - 3
> >
> > Green-winged Teal - 3
> >
> > Northern Pintail - 2
> >
> > Common Goldeneye - 5
> >
> > American White Pelican - 7
> >
> > Bonaparte's Gull - 22
> >
> > Many other things out there but distance and sun shimmers made it hard to determine if there was anything else out there beyond the expected.
> >
> > Patty McLean and Michael Linz
> > Atlanta and Conway

 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/18 1:09 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: The near delta--Lonoke County
All,


I have commenced my winter field trips into the near delta. While the lakes command attention, I prefer the solitude of the wind across near empty fields, parsing out ditch sparrows, and discovering delicious little habitats tucked in behind the tree lines that frame sprawling farm fields.


England, Arkansas. I ran down to the community fishing pond on the second to see if any Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were foolish enough to brave the freezing temps. Ice caked shores told me wind driven water sprayed up on the banks before the surface froze. No ducks but a plenitude of blackbirds swirled around the open field between the pond and the grain elevators. Many Eurasian Collared-Doves were feeding with them or huddled together for warmth along the various power & telephone lines around the elevators. More Eastern Meadowlarks than usual were inspecting the grass covered banks of the pond while keeping an eye on me and the sky. Red-tailed Hawks and American Kestrels are never far away.


The farmers near England flood some of their grain fields around January 1. Of course they were all ice locked as well, but warming temperatures will draw the ducks out of their hiding places. I asked one of my Master Gardener buddies who is tied into the farming community if the farmers over there are participating in the Mud project or some other project meant to provide temporary habitat for birds getting ready to head back north in the spring. She did not know but said she would find out. If it stays warm, the area around England will be awash in Northern Pintails in the coming weeks.


Scott, Arkansas. I know I set some hearts aflutter with my longspur misadventure two days ago. I went back yesterday to relocate the birds, but they were not in the mood to be observed or photographed. I caught the pair on the ground long enough to recognize they were longspurs. Then they and the Horned Larks were racing off across the fields. The larks eventually came back to their favorite home base near the round and brought some American Pipits with them. The longspurs flew in wide circles back and forth, rattling some as they flew by us but never settling for photos. As the sun began to fade, we made the loop around to Bearskin Lake Road and back out to Hwy 165, crossed the river, and got home about dark.


Cindy



 

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Date: 1/4/18 12:27 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Birds Beyond Our Borders
Birds Beyond Our Borders

We have birds beyond our borders with migrants visiting us during the breeding season and they winter in Central and South America. Several thousand resident species live South of our border and the only way to see these is to travel there. Dr. Ragupathy Kannan, Professor of Biology for the University of Fort Smith has been a champion of exposing birders to birds beyond our borders by leading trips to Costa Rica, Ecuador, Panama, Belize, and Trinidad and Tobago, and India to mention a few. He uses these travels to provide funds for the Arkansas Trust which provides scholarships funding for bird research.

My effort to expose birders to birds beyond our borders and support ecotourism are more modest. This has included successful trips to Costa Rica in 2016, 2017, and another is planned for April 15 – 25, 2018. The trip is limited to 10 people and I have had two cancellations due to participant health issues. There are now two vacancies. These cancellations provide you with an opportunity to go. April is the best month to bird in Costa Rica which has both resident and migrant birds at that time. This trip will have one of the best native Costa Rica guides. My 20017 April trip saw 290 species of birds. Current participants for 2018 are from Oklahoma, Arkansas and Tennessee. If you have an interest in going contact me and I will send you the trip details. Your decision timing is critically short with only two slots left.



Jerry Wayne Davis

Certified Wildlife Biologist

Hot Springs, AR 71901

<jwdavis...>

 

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Date: 1/4/18 12:18 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
Yes. A first for both of us!


Patty
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Eilish Palmer <eilishpalmer...> Date: 1/4/18 2:08 PM (GMT-06:00) To: plm108 <plm108...> Cc: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
You saw trumpeters on Beaverfork in Conway?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 4, 2018, at 1:49 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
> Michael Linz and I had some nice finds this morning at Beaverfork Lake. Highlights:
>
> Trumpeter Swan - 9
>
> Snow Goose - 2
>
> Greater White-fronted Goose - 38
>
> Cackling Goose - 2
>
> American Wigeon - 3
>
> Green-winged Teal - 3
>
> Northern Pintail - 2
>
> Common Goldeneye - 5
>
> American White Pelican - 7
>
> Bonaparte's Gull - 22
>
> Many other things out there but distance and sun shimmers made it hard to determine if there was anything else out there beyond the expected.
>
> Patty McLean and Michael Linz
> Atlanta and Conway
 

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Date: 1/4/18 12:08 pm
From: Eilish Palmer <0000018ca1a6d960-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
You saw trumpeters on Beaverfork in Conway?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 4, 2018, at 1:49 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
> Michael Linz and I had some nice finds this morning at Beaverfork Lake. Highlights:
>
> Trumpeter Swan - 9
>
> Snow Goose - 2
>
> Greater White-fronted Goose - 38
>
> Cackling Goose - 2
>
> American Wigeon - 3
>
> Green-winged Teal - 3
>
> Northern Pintail - 2
>
> Common Goldeneye - 5
>
> American White Pelican - 7
>
> Bonaparte's Gull - 22
>
> Many other things out there but distance and sun shimmers made it hard to determine if there was anything else out there beyond the expected.
>
> Patty McLean and Michael Linz
> Atlanta and Conway

 

Back to top
Date: 1/4/18 11:50 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Beaverfork Lake Bonanza
Michael Linz and I had some nice finds this morning at Beaverfork Lake. Highlights:
Trumpeter Swan - 9 
Snow Goose - 2 
Greater White-fronted Goose - 38 
Cackling Goose - 2 
American Wigeon - 3 
Green-winged Teal - 3 
Northern Pintail - 2 
Common Goldeneye - 5 
American White Pelican - 7 
Bonaparte's Gull - 22 
Many other things out there but distance and sun shimmers made it hard to determine if there was anything else out there beyond the expected. 
Patty McLean and Michael Linz Atlanta and Conway
 

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Date: 1/3/18 2:56 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: flying with the birds-Oldie


https://www.liveleak.com/view?i=571_1514852688

[]

Wonder how many guests end up with an unexpected surprise?


 

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Date: 1/3/18 2:39 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Snowy Owl activity picking back up
I suspect that some of you, like me, are following the somewhat local Snowy
Owl reports. Leading up to Christmas, there were several reports from both
Missouri and Oklahoma on most days. (For some reason, I didn't think to
start checking Kansas until a couple weeks ago.) After Christmas, the
sightings seemed to dry up in all 3 states. Finally, on Monday, several
were reported in Kansas, and again on Tuesday, with one also reported near
OKC. Strange that they can be all around Arkansas without actually being
sighted IN Arkansas. Maybe the Ozarks have something to do with that?
Anyway, a couple of the ones in Kansas are within a 3 hour drive of
Northwest Arkansas, making me think I need to take a trip to Kansas very
soon.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

 

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Date: 1/3/18 2:36 pm
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Frazier Pike, Pulaski Co.
Uta Meyer and I birded the Frazier Pike-Harper Rd.-Terry Dam area this afternoon. She saw two life birds - Northern Harrier (male and female) and Bonapate's Gulls (over 30 at the dam). No Inca Doves. No Sandhill Cranes. No Merlin.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 1/3/18 1:38 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: ALMA WASTEWATER, OASIS IN AN ARCTIC BLAST
Even in an Arctic Blast with 0 degree wind chills and the like, wastewaters gotta be treated. Thats the very good headline for winter birds, especially geese and ducks. Farms ponds are all frozen, including those bashed open by farmers for their cows, which quickly return to freezing.

At Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility, aerators necessary for cleaning up waste water keep many ponds at least partially open. This is an obvious boon to all the water birds, who can either stand on the beach of ice or jump in the water, as they please.

There were at least 160 geese, mostly Canadas, but also Snow Geese (2; one white, one blue), White-fronted Geese (5), and Cackling Geese (4). They had an ice shelf and open water at the treatment plant and when they tired of that, open fields with cows across the road.

Open water also benefited Wood Duck (one male), Gadwall (2), American Wigeon (6), Mallard (~60 in a tight clump and standing on ice), Northern Shoveler (64, in the open water and standing in sun next to it), Ring-necked Duck (~30), Greater Scaup (1 female, maybe 2 others), and Lesser Scaup (~80).

Killdeer (4), Least Sandpiper (2), and American Pipits (3) seemed to treat the ice like any old mudflat. Nobody seemed to pay any attention when an immature Bald Eagle flew over.

A thought to share for 2018: Let us not unravel the web of life that has been spun. from Still A River by Still on the Hill.


 

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Date: 1/2/18 5:51 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Water !
I noticed what I thought was a Swainson’s Thrush at my birdbath earlier today, but based on YOUR observation I will be taking a closer look at it’s ext visit. Amazing how many unusual visitors I e had to my birdbath in recent cold mornings. I feed a no mess hulled seed buffet along with suet/peanut nuggets and have the usual winter residents. But open water brings another set: Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, thrush, mocker, Eastern BluebirdYellow-rumped and Orange-crowned Warbler, etc. etc.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 2, 2018, at 5:45 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:
>
> We’ve been seeing a hermit thrush at the thawed birdbath. Not usual in Hillcrest. As I was filling the feeder this evening, it came down to the water literally 3 feet away from me and sat and drank for 5 minutes , just looking at me w that big eyed thrush look while it drank multiple times, resting in between sips as I stared directly at it. Another bird fussing behind it finally caused it to turn around but it stayed on the bath w its back to me, turning its head to reach back & drink a few times before fluttering off. Obviously I was no bother to it. Very appealing few moments. Karen Hart
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jan 1, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
>>> We see birds drinking at the creek only 100 feet away in winter so I never thought they needed something closer to the feeders. Just off the deck there is a goldfish pond with a bubbler and plants they sit upon to drink.
>>> But after reading all these posts I felt guilty and on Friday decided to set the extra heated chicken water bowl on the edge of the deck with a large flat-topped rock in the center so they could perch around the edge or sit on the rock like they do in the unheated birdbath in warm weather. I put seeds nearby. Well, it's been almost 4 days and I haven't seen a single bird drinking from the bowl yet. Squirrels of course, but no birds. So I have been pouring warm water into the unheated birdbath all afternoon. It freezes but I just pour more warm water in. The birds love it.
>>> Guess I should buy a heated birdbath.
>>
>> Judith
>> Ninestone, Carroll County
>>> On Jan 1, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Right that! We have a heated bath & keep adding water from pitcher. A robin watched as I filled it w warm water & was in immediately. Also throwing scratch seed on ground has them all hopping. I can feel them giving me the squint eye when I’m a bit late. They all look like brown tennis balls w feet.
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Jan 1, 2018, at 10:53 AM, Gail Miller <gail.miller...> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I have a floating livestock trough heater in my water feature. Don’t know how big yours is Jerry, but this morning, after a 10 degree night, my water was free of ice.
>>>>
>>>> Gail Miller
>>>> Conway, AR
>>>>
>>>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Schulz
>>>> Sent: Monday, January 01, 2018 10:26 AM
>>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>>>> Subject: Water !
>>>>
>>>> Since this cold spell started I have continued to keep my water feature flowing and the birds have flocked to it like water in a desert. The supply side line finally froze. Unfortunately, it was on the same electric box line as my two heated bird baths. This morning I had to go out and unplug the pump in order to turn on the heated baths. It will take a while for the Ice to melt but they will soon hopefully find them and have their much needed water. I hope all of you remember that putting out water on these freezing days is as important as seed and suet.
>>>>
>>>> Jerry Schulz
>>>> Little Rock, Arkansas
>>

 

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Date: 1/2/18 4:29 pm
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...>
Subject: Arkansas Birds winter newsletter - now online
Arkansas birders,

The winter issue of Arkansas Birds, the newsletter of the Arkansas Audubon
Society (AAS), is now online at the following link: http://arbirds.org/Arkan
sas_Birds.pdf

If you have trouble viewing the newsletter, try opening it in another web
browser. Enjoy, and if you like what you see and are not yet an AAS member,
please join us and support our work conserving birds and connecting people
to nature in Arkansas: http://arbirds.org/join.html

Thanks,
Samantha Scheiman
Arkansas Birds editor
Little Rock, Ark.

--
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold

 

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Date: 1/2/18 3:46 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: Water !
We’ve been seeing a hermit thrush at the thawed birdbath. Not usual in Hillcrest. As I was filling the feeder this evening, it came down to the water literally 3 feet away from me and sat and drank for 5 minutes , just looking at me w that big eyed thrush look while it drank multiple times, resting in between sips as I stared directly at it. Another bird fussing behind it finally caused it to turn around but it stayed on the bath w its back to me, turning its head to reach back & drink a few times before fluttering off. Obviously I was no bother to it. Very appealing few moments. Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 1, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...><mailto:<9waterfall9...>> wrote:

We see birds drinking at the creek only 100 feet away in winter so I never thought they needed something closer to the feeders. Just off the deck there is a goldfish pond with a bubbler and plants they sit upon to drink.
But after reading all these posts I felt guilty and on Friday decided to set the extra heated chicken water bowl on the edge of the deck with a large flat-topped rock in the center so they could perch around the edge or sit on the rock like they do in the unheated birdbath in warm weather. I put seeds nearby. Well, it's been almost 4 days and I haven't seen a single bird drinking from the bowl yet. Squirrels of course, but no birds. So I have been pouring warm water into the unheated birdbath all afternoon. It freezes but I just pour more warm water in. The birds love it.
Guess I should buy a heated birdbath.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
On Jan 1, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...><mailto:<karen...>> wrote:

Right that! We have a heated bath & keep adding water from pitcher. A robin watched as I filled it w warm water & was in immediately. Also throwing scratch seed on ground has them all hopping. I can feel them giving me the squint eye when I’m a bit late. They all look like brown tennis balls w feet.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 1, 2018, at 10:53 AM, Gail Miller <gail.miller...><mailto:<gail.miller...>> wrote:

I have a floating livestock trough heater in my water feature. Don’t know how big yours is Jerry, but this morning, after a 10 degree night, my water was free of ice.

Gail Miller
Conway, AR

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Schulz
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2018 10:26 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Water !

Since this cold spell started I have continued to keep my water feature flowing and the birds have flocked to it like water in a desert. The supply side line finally froze. Unfortunately, it was on the same electric box line as my two heated bird baths. This morning I had to go out and unplug the pump in order to turn on the heated baths. It will take a while for the Ice to melt but they will soon hopefully find them and have their much needed water. I hope all of you remember that putting out water on these freezing days is as important as seed and suet.

Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas

 

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Date: 1/2/18 1:47 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Re: Chestnut-collared Longspurs
Dan says they are Lapland. Sorry to get people's hopes up.
Cindy

________________________________
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Sent: Tuesday, January 2, 2018 2:28:36 PM
To: AR Birds
Subject: Chestnut-collared Longspurs

There are 2 Longspurs with the Horned Larks on the Scott sod field in the usual places near the closest power poles on the north side of the road. Their brown collars are clearly seen if you can find them on the field.

Cindy
Little Rock


 

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Date: 1/2/18 12:50 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: First Goldfinches
Brown leaves
Moving as I peer out the windows. Gee? Did the sparrowa call some friends
in I Wonder? Then I take a closer look at the grey brown birds flock. Wow
my first Goldfinches of me being back are now here. Tens, as I count, ended
up being up as hundreds as something outside spooked the flock. Brief
glimpses of dull yellow as they fly away to never be seen again. No doubt
some remain as the ground is still moving like a alive creature waking from
its slumber.

But it's a nice surprise for a person who isn't able to go see birds
elsewhere. Another to put on a list I had to redo.Since my account went
lost in the network page. Alas? The wonders of life with technology and
birds. Better than the past when ink faded on tiny notes stuck in a pocket
or two.
Let's see as I share my feeder look of today.
200 Goldfinches
50 White Throated Sparrows
10 White Crowned Sparrows
90 Juncos
2 Purple Finches.
1 Towhee
2 Fox Sparrows
3 Hermit Thrushes
2 Cardinals
2 Hairy Woodpecker
1 Red Bellied Woodpecker
2 Pine Warblers
And one Mourning Dove.
Almost a Christmas song ha.
Teresa, Hector, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 1/2/18 12:28 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Chestnut-collared Longspurs
There are 2 Longspurs with the Horned Larks on the Scott sod field in the usual places near the closest power poles on the north side of the road. Their brown collars are clearly seen if you can find them on the field.

Cindy
Little Rock


 

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Date: 1/2/18 10:13 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Possible Iceland (Thayers) Gull at Dardanelle Lock & Dam
Hi All and Happy New Year!
On a tip from Kenny Nichols about an unusual and very uncooperative gull he and LaDonna saw at the Dardanelle Dam, Michael Linz and I decided to brave the frigid temps and go to the Lock and Dam side where there appears to be a possible second cycle Iceland Gull. The bird shows silvery brown undertones with soft brown (not black) on primaries, trailing edge of wing and terminal band. There is a pale/dull silvery window visible on the topside the wing. Whitish head and relatively smaller dark bill than that of HERG. Overall appears intermediate in size—larger than RBGU and smaller than HERG. The gull has been spending most of its time on the Pope County side of the dam, although occasionally flying across the river. So far, we've only seen it in flight. Of note, there is also a dark brown immature Herring Gull in the area.
Michael has been attempting diagnostic photos and will provide his best shots in our eBird report. But for now, the gull is out of sight so we're heading to lunch.
Patty McLean, visiting from Atlanta GAMichael Linz, Conway AR
 

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Date: 1/2/18 6:12 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Golden Eagle at Hobbs State Park, Beaver Lake, just east of Rogers
Wonderful!!!

On Jan 1, 2018, at 6:12 PM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:

> Dear ARBirders,
>
> We were watching a small flock of Green-winged Teal (15) and Gadwall (2) in the Van Winkle Hollow Arm of Beaver Lake when a Golden Eagle swooped down in pursuit of the ducks. The ducks flew around and tried to come back in several times but the eagle chased them every time so eventually the ducks flew away toward the main body of the lake. The eagle perched for a bit on a snag before following them out of the hollow.
>
> --Joan
 

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Date: 1/1/18 4:12 pm
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Golden Eagle at Hobbs State Park, Beaver Lake, just east of Rogers
Dear ARBirders,

We were watching a small flock of Green-winged Teal (15) and Gadwall (2) in
the Van Winkle Hollow Arm of Beaver Lake when a Golden Eagle swooped down
in pursuit of the ducks. The ducks flew around and tried to come back in
several times but the eagle chased them every time so eventually the ducks
flew away toward the main body of the lake. The eagle perched for a bit on
a snag before following them out of the hollow.

--Joan

 

Back to top
Date: 1/1/18 3:26 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Water !
> We see birds drinking at the creek only 100 feet away in winter so I never thought they needed something closer to the feeders. Just off the deck there is a goldfish pond with a bubbler and plants they sit upon to drink.
> But after reading all these posts I felt guilty and on Friday decided to set the extra heated chicken water bowl on the edge of the deck with a large flat-topped rock in the center so they could perch around the edge or sit on the rock like they do in the unheated birdbath in warm weather. I put seeds nearby. Well, it's been almost 4 days and I haven't seen a single bird drinking from the bowl yet. Squirrels of course, but no birds. So I have been pouring warm water into the unheated birdbath all afternoon. It freezes but I just pour more warm water in. The birds love it.
> Guess I should buy a heated birdbath.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
On Jan 1, 2018, at 2:41 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:

> Right that! We have a heated bath & keep adding water from pitcher. A robin watched as I filled it w warm water & was in immediately. Also throwing scratch seed on ground has them all hopping. I can feel them giving me the squint eye when Im a bit late. They all look like brown tennis balls w feet.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jan 1, 2018, at 10:53 AM, Gail Miller <gail.miller...> wrote:
>
>> I have a floating livestock trough heater in my water feature. Dont know how big yours is Jerry, but this morning, after a 10 degree night, my water was free of ice.
>>
>> Gail Miller
>> Conway, AR
>>
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Schulz
>> Sent: Monday, January 01, 2018 10:26 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Water !
>>
>> Since this cold spell started I have continued to keep my water feature flowing and the birds have flocked to it like water in a desert. The supply side line finally froze. Unfortunately, it was on the same electric box line as my two heated bird baths. This morning I had to go out and unplug the pump in order to turn on the heated baths. It will take a while for the Ice to melt but they will soon hopefully find them and have their much needed water. I hope all of you remember that putting out water on these freezing days is as important as seed and suet.
>>
>> Jerry Schulz
>> Little Rock, Arkansas


 

Back to top
Date: 1/1/18 12:41 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: Water !
Right that! We have a heated bath & keep adding water from pitcher. A robin watched as I filled it w warm water & was in immediately. Also throwing scratch seed on ground has them all hopping. I can feel them giving me the squint eye when I’m a bit late. They all look like brown tennis balls w feet.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 1, 2018, at 10:53 AM, Gail Miller <gail.miller...><mailto:<gail.miller...>> wrote:

I have a floating livestock trough heater in my water feature. Don’t know how big yours is Jerry, but this morning, after a 10 degree night, my water was free of ice.

Gail Miller
Conway, AR

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Schulz
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2018 10:26 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Water !

Since this cold spell started I have continued to keep my water feature flowing and the birds have flocked to it like water in a desert. The supply side line finally froze. Unfortunately, it was on the same electric box line as my two heated bird baths. This morning I had to go out and unplug the pump in order to turn on the heated baths. It will take a while for the Ice to melt but they will soon hopefully find them and have their much needed water. I hope all of you remember that putting out water on these freezing days is as important as seed and suet.

Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas
 

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Date: 1/1/18 10:09 am
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Inca Doves southeast Little Rock
There were 3 Incas on Harper Rd today. They were about a 1/4-mile west of where Harper meets Frazier Pike. I found them together in a gravel driveway at 10522 Harper Rd.

Devin Moon

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 1/1/18 8:53 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Water !
I have a floating livestock trough heater in my water feature. Don’t know how big yours is Jerry, but this morning, after a 10 degree night, my water was free of ice.



Gail Miller

Conway, AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Schulz
Sent: Monday, January 01, 2018 10:26 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Water !



Since this cold spell started I have continued to keep my water feature flowing and the birds have flocked to it like water in a desert. The supply side line finally froze. Unfortunately, it was on the same electric box line as my two heated bird baths. This morning I had to go out and unplug the pump in order to turn on the heated baths. It will take a while for the Ice to melt but they will soon hopefully find them and have their much needed water. I hope all of you remember that putting out water on these freezing days is as important as seed and suet.



Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas


 

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Date: 1/1/18 8:26 am
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...>
Subject: Water !
Since this cold spell started I have continued to keep my water feature flowing and the birds have flocked to it like water in a desert. The supply side line finally froze. Unfortunately, it was on the same electric box line as my two heated bird baths. This morning I had to go out and unplug the pump in order to turn on the heated baths. It will take a while for the Ice to melt but they will soon hopefully find them and have their much needed water. I hope all of you remember that putting out water on these freezing days is as important as seed and suet. Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas
 

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Date: 1/1/18 6:18 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: OUTERMOST HOUSE IN OSAGE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA
Just back from a Christmas Bird Count trip to The Nature Conservancys Tallgrass Prairie Preserve inside the Osage Nation in northeastern Oklahoma. We spent our CBC day (December 30) birding historic ranch lands where bison roam free. Its pretty dramatic to see bison herds on a grassy horizon and to watch them in hopes they might stir Greater Prairie-Chickens.

Before we even reach the Preserve, an extensive sparrow flock suddenly flies low over the road and into sparse woodland. All bins swing onto sparrows -- only Harriss. More come over the road and perch on barbed wire. How many? 40? 60? A pure flock of Harriss Sparrows. Maybe first sign of an Arctic blast.

Our Arkansas delegation includes Rose Ann Barnhill, Jacque Brown, Bob Caulk and Sara Caulk. Count Compiler Don Wolfe from George Miksch Sutton Avian Research Center has warned us that we face bitter cold. Strong north wind and temps in low teens mean extra layers. XXX layers.

Yet, life goes on. A Harlans Hawk dives down into the grass nearby. On one pond not yet frozen, Tundra Swans (22) including brilliant white adults and grayish fledglings, and several ducks species, surprisingly including Canvasbacks (4). A big flock of over 100 Brewers Blackbirds forages near Preserve headquarters, sharing feed placed out for White-tailed Deer.

Is Arctic front performing a good turn for Tallgrass CBC? American Tree Sparrows are sparse, to say the least, in moderate weather. In daunting chill, our group finds them in three different places. It is so bone-chillingly cold and we are so layered-up we can barely walk. That makes it beyond impressive to hear tree sparrows excitedly caroling in a thicket of buttonbushes and tall native grass. Big flocks, they sound happy, and numerous, like Harriss Sparrows.

Our northwest Arkansas group bunks at remodeled and comfortable Foremans House that was part of historic Chapman-Barnard Ranch. Warm inside, and looking out into the cold, I think we have found our own version, albeit briefly, of Henry Bestons Outermost House on Cape Cod. Or maybe a taste of Henry Thoreaus cabin on Walden Pond. Also reminds me of Walter Inglis Anderson, water coloring under his boat on Horn Island, off the Mississippi coast, 1940s-early 1960s. In the cold, in the adversity, we wind up caroling like American Tree Sparrows, and maybe like Dylan Thomas: "Oh as I was young and easy in the mercy of his means, Time held me green and dying, Though I sang in my chains like the seas." During a lunch break we look out the window and see a Loggerhead Shrike, foraging.

Now we lay claim as veterans who survived the Arctic blast. Made it back to Arkansas, all toes intact. Temperature at 7 am, January 1, 2018, 3 degrees outside my house in Fayetteville. Chilly dawn of another year where we can do some good on behalf of Mother Earth.



 

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Date: 12/31/17 9:30 am
From: Melissa Versiga <melvcf...>
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
I have had a red-breasted nuthatch visiting my suet feeder every day this
week! Before this week it's been a rare sight at my house.

Melissa Versiga
Eureka Springs

On Dec 29, 2017 2:12 PM, "Jim Dixon" <jamesdixonlr...> wrote:

> I heard the toot call of a red-breasted nuthatch in my neighborhood in
> west Little Rock Friday morning. Have not seen him yet but then I have food
> out yet either.
>
>
>
> Jim Dixon
> Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
>

 

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Date: 12/31/17 5:44 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: TOSO
Enjoy these wonderful photos by Michael Linz and Bob Harden.http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41404449

On Thursday 28 December 2017, 10:55:14 AM GMT-6, Don Simons <Don.Simons...> wrote:


I found a Townsend’s solitaire just east of the lodge on Mount Magazine this morning. I will search for others later today.

 

Don R. Simons,Park Interpreter

Certified Heritage Interpreter

Mount Magazine State Park

16878 HWY 309 South

Paris, AR 72855

 

<don.simons...>

phone: 479-963-5333

FAX: 479-963-1031

 

 

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Date: 12/31/17 5:34 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: The Power of eBird
Following up on that fantastic video Dan posted, here are some tips for eBird users. 
Tips by Angus Wilson, New York
Below are seven tips that will help you prepare useful checklists and minimize the chances that you will hear from the reviewers:

Tip #1. Provide SOME WORDS OF DESCRIPTION (or attach photos) for ANY noteworthy birds. Usually these will be flagged as 'Rare' based on the local filter settings. Filters work at county level so may or may not flag very localized or habitat specific birds. A description of the bird is important for validation. Notes on what the bird(s) was doing or where it was, are of secondary importance. Simply saying ‘continuing’ or ‘seen by many’ isn’t very helpful at all.
 
Tip #2. Try to select the nearest HOT SPOT rather create a personal location. There are plenty to choose from. Checklists mapped to hot spots are used to develop occurrence data such as bar charts. If you create personal locations, please avoid general locations (e.g. a village, town or general area) unless there are reasons to not give the specific locality (e.g., sensitive species or no public access). Ideally sightings should be within a mile or two of the hotspot or personal location you've chosen and no more. For larger sites, it's helpful to include a line or two on the location of any noteworthy birds.
 
Tip #3. Avoid selecting SUBSPECIES on the basis of expectation or because they are high on a list of suggestions. Identifying subspecies adds a whole new level of enjoyment to birding so if you use this option, try to explain the basis of your choice.
 
Tip #4. Pay attention to your PROTOCOL and EFFORT data. Your checklists become more valuable when this information is accurate. While estimates are okay, give careful thought to whether you really hiked exactly 1 mile and birded for exactly 1 hour. The more precise the effort information, the better. And don't forget, for traveling checklists you should NOT be including your return mileage unless you took a different route back to your start point. Some further guidance on this topic can be viewed at:
 
http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/974012-how-to-make-your-checklists-more-valuable
 
Tip #5. Be COURTEOUS. If you are chasing a bird that has been reported by someone else, why not mention them by name? This simple act shows that you respect your fellow birders, encourages people to submit in a timely fashion, and also helps regional compilers understand who first discovered noteworthy birds.
 
Tip #6. Not every individual bird will be identified in the field; for these cases don't be afraid to enter them as a NONSPECIFIC TAXON. Examples include ‘sparrow sp.’, ‘cuckoo sp.’ etc. Be as specific as possible: if you saw some small sandpipers, consider using "peep sp." instead of the more general "shorebird sp.". To avoid clutter, many of these taxa are hidden when you enter sightings and may only shown by searching for them in the "Add species" box. Entries to the main list may automatically flagged as ‘rare’ because they haven’t been included in the filters, so don't be offended when your entry for " 1 nuthatch sp." asks for comments. A few words of description will do.
 
Tip #7. Don’t be OFFENDED if a local reviewer asks you a question. Following Tips 1-6 will minimize this considerably. Reviewers volunteer their time to maintain local data quality and are usually very knowledgeable about the birds in their coverage region. One can learn a great deal from their questions. It is easy to modify your checklists using the ‘Manage My Checklists’ option within your eBird controls. Again be courteous and send a brief reply to confirm that you received the message and that you will (presumably) modify your checklist accordingly. There's nothing more frustrating than email silence
On Sunday 31 December 2017, 7:13:27 AM GMT-6, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:

Why should you resolve to use eBird in 2018? This short video describes the big picture. 
https://youtu.be/-t-0xAjxakw
Dan ScheimanLittle Rock, AR
 

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Date: 12/31/17 5:13 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: The Power of eBird
Why should you resolve to use eBird in 2018? This short video describes the
big picture.

https://youtu.be/-t-0xAjxakw

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 12/30/17 5:49 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Birding today
Actually there were 5 Ring-necked (ring-billed LOL) Ducks with the Canvasback, also of note that I forgot to mention, one male and three female Common Goldeneye.  Yes, the Tree Swallow was quite the surprise! I kept saying "what are you doing here?" and ended the conversation with"Well, good luck..."Donna 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Sat, Dec 30, 2017 at 6:46 PM, Karen Holliday<ladyhawke1...> wrote: #yiv7545169182 blockquote, #yiv7545169182 div.yiv7545169182yahoo_quoted {margin-left:0 !important;border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important;padding-left:1ex !important;background-color:white;}Thank you Donna for reporting the very late Tree Swallow. I totally forgot to report it.  I was able to leave to leave work a little early Friday afternoon and swung by Cook's Landing on my way home.  I stopped to check the fishing pond and saw the Tree Swallow, a male in beautiful bright plumage.  It was one of those moments when you rub your eyes to make sure you aren't seeing things.  He was really working the surface of the pond trying to find something to eat.  He's going to have a hard time of it these next few days with the dreadfully cold weather coming in.  
Didn't see Donna's Canvasback at the hydraulic plant. It must have replaced the male Ring-necked Duck that was there Friday.  I think I read in a recent ABA magazine that they are considering changing its name to Ring-billed Duck.  Joke or serious?  It would be a nice change since half the time I accidentally call it a Ring-billed Duck!Karen HollidayMaumelle (bracing for the frigid temps Monday for the Lake Dardanelle CBC!)


On Saturday, December 30, 2017, 6:10 PM, Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Adam, Lincoln and I birded Cooks Landing and Burns Park in North Little Rock today.  Two birds of note were both at Cooks.  A VERY late Tree Swallow was at the fishing pond.  A Canvasback was on the river near the hydraulic plant. Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android




 

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Date: 12/30/17 4:46 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Re: Birding today
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Thank you Donna for reporting the very late Tree Swallow. I totally forgot to report it.  I was able to leave to leave work a little early Friday afternoon and swung by Cook's Landing on my way home.  I stopped to check the fishing pond and saw the Tree Swallow, a male in beautiful bright plumage.  It was one of those moments when you rub your eyes to make sure you aren't seeing things.  He was really working the surface of the pond trying to find something to eat.  He's going to have a hard time of it these next few days with the dreadfully cold weather coming in.  
Didn't see Donna's Canvasback at the hydraulic plant. It must have replaced the male Ring-necked Duck that was there Friday.  I think I read in a recent ABA magazine that they are considering changing its name to Ring-billed Duck.  Joke or serious?  It would be a nice change since half the time I accidentally call it a Ring-billed Duck!Karen HollidayMaumelle (bracing for the frigid temps Monday for the Lake Dardanelle CBC!)


On Saturday, December 30, 2017, 6:10 PM, Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Adam, Lincoln and I birded Cooks Landing and Burns Park in North Little Rock today.  Two birds of note were both at Cooks.  A VERY late Tree Swallow was at the fishing pond.  A Canvasback was on the river near the hydraulic plant. Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android



 

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Date: 12/30/17 4:10 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Birding today
Adam, Lincoln and I birded Cooks Landing and Burns Park in North Little Rock today.  Two birds of note were both at Cooks.  A VERY late Tree Swallow was at the fishing pond.  A Canvasback was on the river near the hydraulic plant. Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 12/30/17 6:29 am
From: Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...>
Subject: Re: ID Help on dark morph goose
It looks like a Rosss x snow hybrid to me as well. I often question if there is a such thing as a true blue phase Rosss goose. When a true blue Ross is reported I think it is more likely the result of a hybrid that has backcrossed and retained the blue phase genetics. So essentially an F2 or F3 generation hybrid could look almost identical to a Rosss goose while still retaining the dark morph. Thats all just my opinion though. Awesome find and great pictures!
-Ethan

Ethan Massey
Program Technician
School of Forestry and Natural Resources
P.O. Box 3468
University of Arkansas at Monticello
Monticello, AR 71656
Office: (870) 460-1848
Cell: (601) 618-6789
<masseyer...>
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Sent: Friday, December 29, 2017 9:39:57 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: ID Help on dark morph goose

Today Patty and I spotted this dark morph goose at the Alma sewer ponds. In the field we called it a dark morph Ross's Goose. When we looked at the pictures at the house we questioned that and think this is most likely a Ross's x Snow hybrid.

I would like for those that are more familiar with dark morph geese to take a look at the pictures below and offer they expert opinion on these geese.

Link to pictures:
https://goo.gl/MWUSCX

Michael Linz and Patty McLean(In Arkansas this week)

 

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Date: 12/29/17 9:05 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Strange flycatcher at Felsenthal today.
: "Greetings all,
I had a really strange flycatcher at Felsenthal today.
What I know:
It was flycatching out and back from the utility line.
It was silhouetted and not the best light, but the back and head appeared dark.
It had a crest.
It had a bunch of yellow on the underside. (much more than the
brightest winter Phoebe.
It wasn't wagging it's tail.
If it had wing bars they were not real noticeable in the lighting.
The underside of the tail was not totally dark. The outer tail
feathers appeared yellow, but they could have been a pale creamy
white.
It wasn't an Eastern Phoebe.
Once it went into the brush it didn't respond to phishing or a Screech Owl.

If you have any guesses on Id I'd love to here them at <leanderson...>

I really hope someone can get a look at it!! Head to the town of
Felsenthal. Just as you hit the dam's levee, turn Right on a gravel rd
that goes along the base of the levee. The bird was about 200' before
the WMA sign. It's better parking on the lower rd than on the levee,
but the bird could be using the entire levee.

There was also 5 species of wintering warbler and a beautiful,
cooperative Blue-headed Vireo.

Leif at Hector



--
.
Its not how we survive the storm, but how we truly can dance in the rain,
knowing that God is within Us shining through the darkness of life

 

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Date: 12/29/17 7:40 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: ID Help on dark morph goose
Today Patty and I spotted this dark morph goose at the Alma sewer ponds.
In the field we called it a dark morph Ross's Goose. When we looked at the
pictures at the house we questioned that and think this is most likely a
Ross's x Snow hybrid.

I would like for those that are more familiar with dark morph geese to take
a look at the pictures below and offer they expert opinion on these geese.

Link to pictures:
https://goo.gl/MWUSCX

Michael Linz and Patty McLean(In Arkansas this week)

 

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Date: 12/29/17 7:08 pm
From: lrarkingfisher <lrarkingfisher...>
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
We had our 1st red  breasted nuthatchvisit our feeders today in west Little Rock.
Drew PhillipsSent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S® 6.
-------- Original message --------From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Date: 12/29/17 2:12 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch
I heard the toot call of a red-breasted nuthatch in my neighborhood in west Little Rock Friday morning. Have not seen him yet but then I have food out yet either.


Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
 

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Date: 12/29/17 12:12 pm
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch
I heard the toot call of a red-breasted nuthatch in my neighborhood in west Little Rock Friday morning. Have not seen him yet but then I have food out yet either.


Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
 

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Date: 12/28/17 9:04 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Long-tail Duck
Still at Poole minnow farm 8:20 am

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/28/17 8:54 am
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: TOSO
I found a Townsend's solitaire just east of the lodge on Mount Magazine this morning. I will search for others later today.

Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

<don.simons...><mailto:<don.simons...>
phone: 479-963-5333
FAX: 479-963-1031


 

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Date: 12/28/17 5:15 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: HEADMISTRESS OF MAYSVILLE EAGLE SCHOOL
Starting back in the 1980s, Mike Mlodinow and I have been making mid-winter rounds across former Beaty Prairie in vicinity of Maysville in western Benton County. The route includes old Wet Prairie northeast of Maysville and huge open fields in Barely, Oklahoma, just west of State Line Road. We also go by and check the feeders at Carol Louxs. Her folks were so welcoming to all of us decades ago, when we were first looking for Bald Eagles.

In Maurice Louxs memory, we found plenty of eagles December 25, though nothing like the 110 he once lured into a field with a small mountain of dead chickens, several weeks worth from a nearby poultry barn, saved just for that purpose in anticipation of a eagle field trip sponsored by Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society.

For Mike and I, best eagle sighting was 4 attending a dead cow out in a field. Atop the highest cow place: an adult. On lower perches on the cow, a 3rd year and this years juv. On the ground nearby, another juv. No, I dont think the eagles, big as they are, wrestled the cow down and killed it. My speculation: it died in the field and it is just too damn cold to worry with it. It was eagle school with adult as headmistress. From the road it was obvious her students had been performing their exercises.

Mike was especially interested in checking out blackbirds. Lots of Red-winged Blackbirds and Brown-headed Cowbirds, a few Rusty Blackbirds in one place, one Common Grackle all day, and a world of European Starlings. No Brewers.

Two Bald Eagles were perched in a big tree dominating an enormous open field. Just beyond, a speck that proved a Merlin. We saw quite a few standard Red-tailed Hawks, including one black warrior and one we thought was a regular Eastern Red-tailed Hawk until we noticed the dark throat and the long wings: Western Red-tailed Hawk (B.J. calurus, light morph).

We did pretty well on Harriss Sparrows, including a flock of about 8 among many more White-crowned Sparrows. This was along Wet Prairie Road, adjacent a big harvested bean field that has sometimes been a good place to find Lapland Longspurs. No laps today, but we did hear a Western Meadowlark.

In something 35 years of driving up here, I cant say I have ever figured-out the best way to bird Maysville. Interesting roads and habitats abound. In mid-winter, theres never enough daylight to cover them with anything approaching thorough.

We stop the car to watch White-crowned Sparrows drifting out in the open. There are Savannah Sparrows among them. Overhead, white phantoms that prove to be Ring-billed Gulls (7).


 

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Date: 12/27/17 6:49 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Feathers sound alarm
https://www.economist.com/news/science-and-technology/21731111-one-species-i
ts-feathers-whistle-instead-birds-alarm-calls-do-not-always-come


 

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Date: 12/27/17 6:41 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: No Snowy Owl
Glad to hear I'm not the only one giving every mostly white object a long
hard look, which can be a little dangerous when driving.

Karen Garrett

On Wed, Dec 27, 2017 at 4:07 PM, David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:

> I call them snowy bags.
> David Ray
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Dec 27, 2017, at 3:20 PM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-
> <request...> wrote:
>
> The "Snowy Owl" that Sandy Berger and I saw in the middle of a Charleston
> prairie recently turned out to be a *&^% white cat. It's amazing how many
> "Snowy Owls" you see when you passionately look for them.
>
> Is this a lesson for IBWO searchers? Rhetorical question.
> On Wednesday 27 December 2017, 2:55:41 PM GMT-6, Glenn <
> <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>
> This is the time of year where my wife and I are always scanning the
> trees, looking for a Snowy Owl. Do I expect to find one? No. I might as
> well look for a ptarmigan while I'm at it. But, maybe we will spot a
> Kreider's Hawk while we are looking.
>
> This is the time of year when we come to realize how many white plastic
> bags are stuck in the trees. We call them Snowy Owls.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
>

 

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Date: 12/27/17 4:58 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: PBS tonight. NOVA and the show following it look good to me.

Good evening

7 pm Nature is The Story of Cats- into the America’s, last weeks were the wild ones.
8 pm NOVA is The Day the Dinosaurs Died and the ad alluded to the decendent’s being birds.
9 pm is Super nature Wild Flyers- crowded skies. This looked really good.

I like Dinosaurs too.



Jacque Brown
<bluebird2...>




 

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Date: 12/27/17 3:33 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Madison County WMA Birds, Including Red Crossbills
I spent the afternoon on a telemetry survey at the Madison County WMA, south of Eureka Springs. Three Northern Saw-whet Owls were detected, two of them usuals that were originally banded 10/30/17 and one I haven’t heard from in a while, originally banded 11/10/17.

Additionally, I happened upon a mixed foraging flock that seemed to be hanging pretty tightly together with the cold weather…the high out there was 26 today. Brrr…The flock included 4 species of woodpecker (Pileated, Red-bellied, Downy, and Northern Flicker), chickadees, titmice, Golden-crowned Kinglets, and White-breasted Nuthatch. Higher up were American Goldfinch and Pine Siskin. About 1/2 mile down the road, some jip, jips caught my attention. Turning, I saw a flock of about 10 Red Crossbills circling a group of shortleaf pines. Circling, they gained at least 25 comrades before diving down into a hollow. Most of the flying birds were of a higher-pitched call type. After the masses disappeared, one lone bird was left calling in a pine; this individual had a noticeably deeper call than the rest. All crossbills were at the intersection of Madison 1250 and Madison 1427.

Mitchell Pruitt
 

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Date: 12/27/17 2:08 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: No Snowy Owl
I call them snowy bags.
David Ray

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 27, 2017, at 3:20 PM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> The "Snowy Owl" that Sandy Berger and I saw in the middle of a Charleston prairie recently turned out to be a *&^% white cat. It's amazing how many "Snowy Owls" you see when you passionately look for them.
>
> Is this a lesson for IBWO searchers? Rhetorical question.
> On Wednesday 27 December 2017, 2:55:41 PM GMT-6, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>
> This is the time of year where my wife and I are always scanning the trees, looking for a Snowy Owl. Do I expect to find one? No. I might as well look for a ptarmigan while I'm at it. But, maybe we will spot a Kreider's Hawk while we are looking.
>
> This is the time of year when we come to realize how many white plastic bags are stuck in the trees. We call them Snowy Owls.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot

 

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Date: 12/27/17 1:20 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: No Snowy Owl
The "Snowy Owl" that Sandy Berger and I saw in the middle of a Charleston prairie recently turned out to be a *&^% white cat.  It's amazing how many "Snowy Owls" you see when you passionately look for them.  
Is this a lesson for IBWO searchers?  Rhetorical question.   On Wednesday 27 December 2017, 2:55:41 PM GMT-6, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

This is the time of year where my wife and I are always scanning the trees, looking for a Snowy Owl.  Do I expect to find one?  No.  I might as well look for a ptarmigan while I'm at it.  But, maybe we will spot a Kreider's Hawk while we are looking.
This is the time of year when we come to realize how many white plastic bags are stuck in the trees.  We call them Snowy Owls.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 12/27/17 12:55 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: No Snowy Owl
This is the time of year where my wife and I are always scanning the trees, looking for a Snowy Owl.  Do I expect to find one?  No.  I might as well look for a ptarmigan while I'm at it.  But, maybe we will spot a Kreider's Hawk while we are looking.
This is the time of year when we come to realize how many white plastic bags are stuck in the trees.  We call them Snowy Owls.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 12/27/17 12:25 pm
From: Lavern Schaap <0000008e154b84e3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Magness Lake Swans
My family went to Heber Springs yesterday. We were surprised at how few swans were on Magness Lake and one of the ponds on Hiram road.

Are the counts down this year or did we just choose a time when not so many were present? There were about 75 at the pond and 20 or so on the lake.


Lavern Schaap
<rhschaapjr...>
 

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Date: 12/27/17 11:57 am
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Long-tailed Duck
LaDonna and I had one in Prairie County yesterday. It was in the second pond on the left (after the water tower) as you're heading south to Treadway's Fish Farms.

Kenny Nichols
Cabot

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/27/17 11:32 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Dec. 26
It was cold (20's - low 40's), heavy overcast, and windy on the bird survey
yesterday. 66 species were found. Birds were scarce. Highlights were the
continuing presence of Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, although their number
was down by 3, and a second Common Ground-Dove has joined the one that is
occasionally seen along the west end of Black Land Road. Here is my list:



Black-bellied Whistling Ducks - 5 ( juveniles)

Wood Duck - 3

Gadwall - 405

American Wigeon - 3

Mallard - 848

Northern Shoveler - 94

Northern Pintail - 5

Green-winged Teal - 445

Canvasback - 10

Ring-necked Duck - 1895

Hooded Merganser - 4

Ruddy Duck - 10

Unidentified ducks - 300

Pied-billed Grebe - 7

Great-blue Heron - 5

Black Vulture - 3

Turkey Vulture - 18

Bald Eagle - 2 adults

Northern Harrier - 6

Sharp-shinned Hawk -2

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 7

Merlin - 1

Virginia Rail - 1

American Coot - 387

Killdeer - 72

Greater Yellowlegs - 1

Wilson's Snipe - 13

Rock Pigeon - 2

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 10

Mourning Dove - 14

Common Ground-Dove - 2 males

Barred Owl - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 13

Eastern Phoebe - 3

Blue Jay - 6

American Crow - 459

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Carolina Wren - 1

House Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 1

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 3

Hermit Thrush - 1

American Robin - 3

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 2

American Pipit - 4

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 3

Eastern Towhee - 5

Savannah Sparrow - 11

Fox Sparrow - 7

Song Sparrow - 6

Swamp Sparrow - 2

White-throated Sparrow - 4

White-crowned Sparrow - 2

Dark-eyed Junco - 5

Northern Cardinal - 20

Red-winged Blackbird - 1

Meadowlark species - 4

Common Grackle - 125

American Goldfinch - 1





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR




 

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Date: 12/27/17 6:38 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: WINTER LOONS YODELING
We had a productive loon trip to Tenkiller Ferry Lake in northeastern Oklahoma yesterday. Observers included Bob and Sara Caulk, Anant Deshwal and me. Tenkiller isnt that far from Fayetteville with reward in winter of many loons. These trips are best when there is low wind (below max 7-8 mph) because in big open water, you can see a lot, even at distance, with flat water. We also had benefit of very little boat traffic.

Corps of Engineer parks we visited were partially closed, but we managed to find places to observe the lake. We made stops at Strayhorn, Tenkiller State Park, Blackgum, Snake Creek, Buckhorn, Chicken Creek, 6-shooter, Cookson Bend, and Standing Rock-Cherokee Landing State Park. This is mainly whats relatively easily reached if you are coming from Arkansas. There are lots of other places to go, especially on the other side of the lake. We miss stuff for sure.

We found Common Loons in abundance (146), but no other loon species; Bald Eagles (10); American White Pelicans (100+); Horned (numerous) and Pied-billed Grebes, several ducks species, especially Mallards; and both Bonapartes and Ring-billed Gulls at every stop. The loons were well-distributed across the lake, with the most (28) visible from 6-shooter. We had three spotting scopes, so gave the lake careful looks, but did not find other loon species, though I have little doubt they must be there (as in past years).

Did we hear loons yodeling? Absolutely. When we pulled in above the marina at Strayhorn, there was something going on between two loons that resulted in extending yodels, barks, wing-flaps, apparent chases, etc. We had yodeling and barks elsewhere, too, but nothing like the displays and vocalizations off Strayhorn.

It is difficult to make a trip like this and not wonder why we mainly find loons at Beaver Lake in migration, but infrequently in winter. Why is Tenkiller such a winter loon mecca? Loons eat fish, so it must have something to do with fish?

NWA Outdoors editor and angler Flip Putthoff has an article in the Democrat Gazette (Anglers earn stripes, December 26) about Striped Bass and their preference for small threadfin shad. A striper in Beaver that grows to 40 pounds is bound to eat lots of shad. Is there some connection here, like more big stripers equals less potential forage for winter loons?

I have no idea whats going. Would be good from a conservation angle to understand what makes a good winter lake for loons and why winter loons seem to avoid some lakes.


 

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Date: 12/26/17 3:56 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Rufous Hummer Centerton.
Hi All, I was out of town for 5 days, I set a full feeder out before I left. And put the red heat lamp out. I didn’t see the Hummer Monday afternoon but I was busy around the house.

Today after work I glanced outside and the Hummer was at the feeder. it was 4:20.




Jacque Brown

Centerton, AR 72719

<bluebird2...>







 

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Date: 12/26/17 10:17 am
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: Alternate roosts for Short-ears
Greetings all,
I was out scouting for the Big Lake NWR count and found most of the traditional field/rice habitat to be partially under water. I was wondering where the Short-eared Owls had gone. Later, at twilight I was at a half mile long row of roadside pines. (Only trees within a mile.) I saw 4 Short-ears fly out of the pines. Nice to see them still in the area, despite the flooding.
Cheers, Leif at Hector




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Date: 12/26/17 10:14 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: [OKBIRDS] Prothonotary Warbler Name Origin
A post on the OKBIRDS that my be of interest to some.

Jerry

From: John Kennington
Sent: Tuesday, December 26, 2017 11:52 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Prothonotary Warbler Name Origin

Note this is not a political post, but is about the name of an Oklahoma bird, for your perusal during a break between CBCs!


I was just reading a political article about the last election in Bucks County, PA. One line read:

"Democrats won the offices of county sheriff, prothonotary, recorder of deeds, and controller"

What caught my eye was the office of "prothonotary". I have never seen that use of the word other than in reference to the warbler.

So looking up the definition of the word "prothonotary" I get "a chief clerk in some courts of law"

Huh! That's a new word to me.

So I next looked up the origin of the name "Prothonotary Warbler" and found this on All About Birds:

a.. The Prothonotary Warbler got its name from the bright yellow robes worn by papal clerks, known as prothonotaries, in the Roman Catholic church.
And the next entry describes the role a Prothonotary Warbler played in politics, bringing this little research exercise full circle back to politics:

a.. The Prothonotary Warbler had its day in court during the Cold War. In 1948 Alger Hiss, an American government official, was accused of being a Soviet spy. Part of the trial hinged on whether Hiss knew Whittaker Chambers, a former member of the U.S. Communist Party. Chambers claimed that he talked to Hiss about watching birds and reported Hiss's excitement about seeing a Prothonotary Warbler on the Potomac River. This bird sighting linked the two people and eventually led to Hiss's sentence and to the rise of Richard Nixon to political power.
I wonder if there are any prothonotaries who are also birders???

John Kennington
Bixby, OK
 

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Date: 12/25/17 6:36 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Panama AAST fundraiser trip
Despite the massive fiasco at Atlanta airport on Dec. 18th, which unfortunately forced most tour participants to miss some or all of the trip, we managed to salvage something substantial out of the tour.  It raised $1,000 for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust endowment.  
The tour was based in the luxurious Canopy Lodge near the delightful town of El Valle de Anton (made famous by Elizabeth Kolbert's Pulitzer-winning book, Sixth Extinction, which dedicates a whole chapter to the plight of the golden frogs in this valley).  
The tour tallied 183 species of mostly forest birds, including 14 species of tanagers and 13 hummingbirds.  Particularly pleasing were great sightings of the seclusive Tody Motmot and a Spectacled Owl deep inside the forest, expertly digiscoped by our guide, and a gorgeous male Rosy Thrush-tanager which was lured out of the dense tangles by voice playbacks.  A luncheon picnic stop in a remote Pacific beach yielded Blue-footed Boobies.  A male Golden-collared Manakin bathing in a road-side stream made for a picture-perfect grand finale.  
This tour helped me cross making $10,000 for the trust endowment, which has set an ambitious goal of reaching $200,000 by its 50th anniversary in 2022.  Next stop, Ecuador in March, followed by Trinidad & Tobago in May (both full).  Many thanks to all the birders, especially those who sign up for multiple tours, for channelling their birding passion to promote bird conservation and research.
KannanFt. Smith  

 

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Date: 12/24/17 6:56 am
From: Alan <quattro...>
Subject: Crooked Creek CBC

Was held yesterday with some pretty tough weather. It was cold and spitting snow. The bird feeders were some of the best places for birds. On my count the most interesting birds were 4 Wilson’s snipes and a daytime Great Horned Owl. I have also heard our Rufous hummingbird is a back again this year at the same place.
Happy birdidng,
Alan Gregory
Sent from Mail for Windows 10



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
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Date: 12/23/17 8:41 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: south Lafayette County Birds 12-22-17
AR-birders,
Below is the link to one of my eBird lists made in regards to yesterdays mystery location post concerning shorebirds. The
location was Arkansas. Sometimes it is best not to be deterred by the rain, and bird in the rain. Such was the case yesterday.
Photos are embedded.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/email?subID=S41280656

Everyone have a great Christmas and New Years.
Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

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Date: 12/23/17 12:48 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Snowbirds on a snowy day in the Ozarks
Last nights cold front came in with a light snow. Also with a fresh batch of snowbirds, aka, Dark-eyed Juncos, at least at Indian Creek Park near Beaver Lake dam. Waterfowl were sparse on the lake. The park was empty of people except for me, and full of Eastern Bluebirds, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Cedar Waxwings, and Dark-eyed Juncos. Open ground under the old cedars has a fine mat of native Poverty Grass just right for juncos. I slow-rolled into one camping spot to watch the action.

Of course they are officially Dark-eyed Juncos, but they originate from many places north of here. Their plumages reflect the time when we considered them as separate species. Several with striking black hoods and reddish backs would be a good fit for Oregon Junco. At least one bird with a pale gray hood and pink flanks must conserve genetic heritage of Pink-sided Juncos. The Slate-colored Juncos were well represented by birds whose dark hoods and flanks showed little or no separation.

I was fairly deep into junco biogeorgraphy when a flock of Cedar Waxwings swept into the cedars, then down into a pool of water for a bath. It is remarkable to see such a colorful bird flop down full body into water, then splash wildly, slinging water everywhere a whirl of the brilliant colors that makes a waxwing, especially on a snowy day full of colorful juncos.


 

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Date: 12/22/17 7:13 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: Shorebirds 12-22-17
AR-birders,
Todays shorebird list for Jeff Trahan and I:

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER 3
KILLDEER 133
GREATER YELLOWLEGS 182
LESER YELLOWLEGS 39
LEAST SANDPIPER 225
DUNLIN 42
LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER 3230
WILSONS SNIPE 16

Where were we?
Could we have been in Arkansas or were we somewhere in far southern Louisiana?

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

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Date: 12/22/17 2:09 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Weird Nuthatch
At feeder it has the standard colors, Bill and legs. However the Black
stops at the base of the neck. Head and face totally white. Other White
Breasted Nuthatches pecking at it. Cell doesn't do window shots very well.
I will try if it comes back. Teresa, Hector, AR.

 

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Date: 12/22/17 8:52 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Siskens
My goodness, Pine Siskens everywhere. 100+. Also a few Goldfinches mixed in.

Pangburn, AR North central

 

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Date: 12/21/17 9:10 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Great Horned Owl nesting
A great horned owl is sitting on its nest located on Highway 31 between
Pine Bluff and Sherrill. This is the same one that raised one baby
earlier this year.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 12/21/17 7:49 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Lonoke CBC Sunday
This is the second year I've done Section 4 which is the NW quadrant of the count circle. The territory includes the Anderson ponds north of US 70 & west of a line drawn along 70 & AR 89 extending out to the perimeter of the circle.

this section includes fish ponds, housing developments, wooded lots, and fields.


I missed the Remington Rd exit headed into Lonoke. Before picking up Vic Prislipski at McDonald's, I dropped down on 70 & ran back to Andersons to check on where the duck hunters were. Good thing we did as the fields west of Joe Hogan were covered up with acres of geese, mainly Snows. By the time we picked up Vic and returned, about 90% Snows had flown. We worked through Andersons ponds and went up the road to Petersons farms. The exciting highlight of the day came as we were stepping away from a fence row. It was that moment you realize the stick you are about to step on is a really big snake. Water. Snake. Oh ***********!!!! After equilibrium was restored, we determined the snake was one of the non-poisonous water variety and not a moccasin taking in the 40 degree temps.


After that we took a closer look along the back side of the golf course along 70. It was back there where we found the Harris Sparrow among a flock of White-Crowned Sparrows. Lots of other sparrows out there. We ended the day with 66 species. It was an interesting day.


Cindy

Little Rock


Cindy



 

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Date: 12/21/17 7:19 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Frazier Pike Pulaski County
I thought I had two cranes today in the way back meadow down at the foot
of Frazier Pike.  Some niggling doubt made me spend a fair amount of
squint time at 60x staring at a bird that wouldn't give me a profile. 
Alas, when it finally turned, it was a Great Blue Heron.  It would seem
the second bird was also a Great Blue Heron based on my completely
inadequate photos of both birds together.

In other news, the fields where we usually see the cranes have been
disked in the last week.  There's little standing vegetation in the
field.  I don't know if the cranes will hang out there this year.  I had
some daylight time so I went on down Asher Rd that runs along the
Wrightsville Unit's farm field.  I didn't go all the way to the prison
complex.  Lots of pasture and fields out there.  No cranes though.

I had 36 species on Frazier today including two Rusty Blackbirds, 17
Wood Ducks, lots of robins, lots of sparrows including Songs,
White-crowneds, & Eastern Towhees.

Cindy

Little Roc

 

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Date: 12/21/17 9:27 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Long-tailed Duck
Just found a female Long-tailed Duck on the Alma sewage ponds.
Also present were:
Ruddy Ducks
Canvasbacks
Lesser Scaup
Ring-necked Ducks
Mallards
Northern Shovelors
Gadwall

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 12/20/17 10:24 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Black Duck
Present at Magness Lake 12:24pm
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/20/17 9:09 am
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Lonoke CBC
Sunday, LaDonna and I participated in the Lonoke CBC for the 24th consecutive year. During this time, I think we've had assignments in just about every part of the circle. The last 8-10 years we've covered Section 2. This area is located in the south-central part of the circle, roughly bounded by HWY 31 on the west, Wilson Road on the north and Bob Long Road on the south and east. Highlights from our count on Sunday were: Western Meadowlark, Marsh Wren, LeConte's Sparrow (5) and Black-crowned Night-Heron (10).
Kenny & LaDonna NicholsCabot


 

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Date: 12/20/17 9:07 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Great Horned Owl Nest
I re-read the email about collecting pellets. You would need to get
permission from the Superintendent to go on the campus and you would be
required to sign in at the main switchboard each time you go, which is what
I do, even as a retiree. Not really sure the Superintendent would approve
that.



Gail



From: Gail Miller [mailto:<gail.miller...>]
Sent: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 11:04 AM
To: '<Blake.Sasse...>' <Blake.Sasse...>
Cc: '<ARBIRD-L...>' <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Great Horned Owl Nest



Hey Blake. I am retired from working at the Conway Human Development Center
(CHDC). I keep an eye out on a nest each year that has Great Horned Owls.
The owl is on the nest now.



Museum road, off Oak, runs along the CHDC property. There is a tall iron
fence along the property line. Right now, at the corner of Museum and
Andrews, there is a land for sale sign. If you sit at the intersection, on
Andrews, facing CHDC, the nest is directly across from there, inside the
iron fence. Up high in a pine tree. If you can't locate it, yell at me and
I can meet you there sometime.



That is the best view spot. I will discourage people from going inside the
iron fence, since it is State property.



Gail Miller

Conway

501-450-2535


 

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Date: 12/20/17 9:04 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Great Horned Owl Nest
Hey Blake. I am retired from working at the Conway Human Development Center
(CHDC). I keep an eye out on a nest each year that has Great Horned Owls.
The owl is on the nest now.



Museum road, off Oak, runs along the CHDC property. There is a tall iron
fence along the property line. Right now, at the corner of Museum and
Andrews, there is a land for sale sign. If you sit at the intersection, on
Andrews, facing CHDC, the nest is directly across from there, inside the
iron fence. Up high in a pine tree. If you can't locate it, yell at me and
I can meet you there sometime.



That is the best view spot. I will discourage people from going inside the
iron fence, since it is State property.



Gail Miller

Conway

501-450-2535


 

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Date: 12/20/17 8:57 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: RFI Great Horned Owl Nests, on behalf of Blake Sasse, AGFC


Please contact Blake Sasse directly if you know the location of a Great Horned Owl nest.


---------------------


If you come across any Great Horned Owl nests this winter, I’d love to hear about it. I’d like to collect pellets for use in small mammal distribution study. They are known to occasionally feed on spotted skunks, a species I’ve been spending a lot of time on lately, which is sort of driving my interest in them (though the other critters in their pellets would be great to collect as well). Thanks!



Blake Sasse
Nongame Mammal/Furbearer Program Leader, Certified Wildlife Biologist®
E: <Blake.Sasse...> | P: (501) 470-3650 ext. 1235

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
213A Highway 89 South | Mayflower, AR 72106
P: (501) 470-3650 | F: (501) 470-3399
http://www.agfc.com

---------------------




Dan Scheiman


Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 12/19/17 10:48 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: Update on Red Crossbills
As for the fear of Californians, my memory of this incidence is that the Rogers realtor had received real and serious inquiries from corporate real estate buyers in California; maybe there was some fear-mongering in his use of the phrase "California developers," but there was some reality behind it. He was as eager as many others to have the property become what it is today.


Harriet

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Sent: Tuesday, December 19, 2017 9:40:11 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Update on Red Crossbills


Anant and any who may be interested:


My recollection is that the reason for the hyphenated name of this state property is that it was such a large acquisition at the time that both State Parks and Natural Heritage had to dig into their acquisition funds to pay for it. (Also Arkansas Game & Fish Commission?)


In any case, I recall reconnoitering the property to identify elements there that were of special interest to the Natural Heritage Commission. Ellen Turner (then Ellen Neaville) and I even explored a small cave on the property.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 10:38 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Update on Red Crossbills

Following up on Joe and Joan's sighting of Red Crossbills at Hobbs State Park, Pooja, Joe and me boarded our own "HMS Beagle" to record the vocalizations of the two different types of Red Crossbills at Hobbs State Park- Conservation Area. Within an hour of reaching there, we were greeted by a flock of 18 Red Crossbills in the pine trees near the feeders at Visitor Center. After obtaining their recordings we set out to the Ozark Plateau Trail and soon we encountered another flock of 30 Red Crossbills which we guess were going for small pools left behind by the sinking creek. We have obtained audio recordings for both and will analyze them to find out the types of Red Crossbills we have at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area.
Though I have a soft spot for Red Crossbills but it is equally interesting to note that we are in midst of finch invasion. We observed around 110 Pine Siskins and 100 Goldfinches at the visitor center.
Today I found out why Hobbs State Park- Conservation Area has "Conservation Area" in the name itself. Joe informed me that Hobbs State Park unlike other State Parks is actively involved in Conservation and Education and hence it made sense to include that in its name.
Pine stands generally achieve maturity after 70-80 years and it is important to have pine trees of all ages in a forest to continuously replenishment pine trees. Young saplings offer hope for Crossbills of future generations. A managed pine stand is often a source for good pine crop production and also has enough gap in the canopy to allow shrubs and other ground vegetation to flourish. This is in turn helps in promoting small mammal populations and predators of these small mammals. The shrubs and grasses are also a suitable habitat for the sparrows and similar species.
When I am asked why are you so obsessed with the Red Crossbills, I often say that this bird is often associated with the label "difficult to study bird" and that right there captures my imagination. However, as I wrote earlier about pine stand management and how it would benefit other organisms. I believe that Red Crossbills along with Red-cockaded Woodpecker and Saw-whet Owls can be the champion species for conservation of the habitat that harbors a variety of different organisms.
I urge anyone who observes or finds Red Crossbills to try and record them and send them to either Pooja or Matt Young or me. You can record them using mobile phones with an external mic or a simple $30 recorder would also suffice. Pooja and me are more than happy to guide you on recordings or related questions.

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Deptt. of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/<https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7C%7C9eb1d613d12740d61dbb08d5469a5bc9%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636492551129369101&sdata=kexHuQMNL9F47jMiONntFZOgXdI4xlPO7ezO%2B5picbc%3D&reserved=0>

 

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Date: 12/19/17 9:24 am
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: 44 Le Conte’s Sparrows at Woolsey!
Our Christmas Bird Count in Fayetteville took place on Sunday. We had a fantastic morning at Woolsey Wet Prairie, and we tried hard to turn up as many Le Conte’s Sparrows as possible. Our end count ended being 44! This number is unprecedented for the CBC, in fact, some years 0 Le Conte’s are found. Other highlights from Woolsey include a Palm Warbler and 11 Sedge Wrens.

Hopefully Joe Neal will follow up with other highlights from other folks in the CBC.

I have taken videos of a few of the sparrows, and I know all the locations, so if anyone is interested let me know.

Good CBCing!

Alyssa DeRubeis
visiting Golden Valley, Minnesota for the holidays

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/19/17 8:28 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: Update on Red Crossbills
Also for those interested in the history of this property, some of my memories (I was working as a part-time aide to Morriss Henry of Fayetteville, then a member of the Arkansas Senate):

1. Ernie Deane wrote to Morriss about the property and the fear of dense development on it on Christmas Day!
2. Morriss got interested and mentioned the property to Kanester Hodges, who had been appointed by Governor David Pryor to serve in the former U.S. Senate seat of John McClelland.
3. Kaneaster mentioned the possible purchase to Ted Kennedy, who became a help to him as he sought support from The Nature Conservancy, which owned the property temporarily (after Bill and Ellen found evidence of its value to them) until legislative approval allowed state purchase of the property.
4. The only opposition I remember to the effort to seek state approval for the purchase was not truly opposition: it was a remark from Jodie Mahony of El Dorado, who said that there were a lot of beautiful natural areas in NW Arkansas and not so many in SE Arkansas. His remark (I think) prompted a fresh look at opportunities in the SE.
5. My role was minor, but I do remember writing, in local newspaper columns for Morriss, the phrase "California developers," since the realtor who listed the property (but didn't want to see it become a densely inhabited area) mentioned this possibility. The process was a wonderful confluence of public and private concern.

Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Sent: Tuesday, December 19, 2017 9:40:11 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Update on Red Crossbills


Anant and any who may be interested:


My recollection is that the reason for the hyphenated name of this state property is that it was such a large acquisition at the time that both State Parks and Natural Heritage had to dig into their acquisition funds to pay for it. (Also Arkansas Game & Fish Commission?)


In any case, I recall reconnoitering the property to identify elements there that were of special interest to the Natural Heritage Commission. Ellen Turner (then Ellen Neaville) and I even explored a small cave on the property.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 10:38 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Update on Red Crossbills

Following up on Joe and Joan's sighting of Red Crossbills at Hobbs State Park, Pooja, Joe and me boarded our own "HMS Beagle" to record the vocalizations of the two different types of Red Crossbills at Hobbs State Park- Conservation Area. Within an hour of reaching there, we were greeted by a flock of 18 Red Crossbills in the pine trees near the feeders at Visitor Center. After obtaining their recordings we set out to the Ozark Plateau Trail and soon we encountered another flock of 30 Red Crossbills which we guess were going for small pools left behind by the sinking creek. We have obtained audio recordings for both and will analyze them to find out the types of Red Crossbills we have at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area.
Though I have a soft spot for Red Crossbills but it is equally interesting to note that we are in midst of finch invasion. We observed around 110 Pine Siskins and 100 Goldfinches at the visitor center.
Today I found out why Hobbs State Park- Conservation Area has "Conservation Area" in the name itself. Joe informed me that Hobbs State Park unlike other State Parks is actively involved in Conservation and Education and hence it made sense to include that in its name.
Pine stands generally achieve maturity after 70-80 years and it is important to have pine trees of all ages in a forest to continuously replenishment pine trees. Young saplings offer hope for Crossbills of future generations. A managed pine stand is often a source for good pine crop production and also has enough gap in the canopy to allow shrubs and other ground vegetation to flourish. This is in turn helps in promoting small mammal populations and predators of these small mammals. The shrubs and grasses are also a suitable habitat for the sparrows and similar species.
When I am asked why are you so obsessed with the Red Crossbills, I often say that this bird is often associated with the label "difficult to study bird" and that right there captures my imagination. However, as I wrote earlier about pine stand management and how it would benefit other organisms. I believe that Red Crossbills along with Red-cockaded Woodpecker and Saw-whet Owls can be the champion species for conservation of the habitat that harbors a variety of different organisms.
I urge anyone who observes or finds Red Crossbills to try and record them and send them to either Pooja or Matt Young or me. You can record them using mobile phones with an external mic or a simple $30 recorder would also suffice. Pooja and me are more than happy to guide you on recordings or related questions.

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Deptt. of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/<https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7C%7C9eb1d613d12740d61dbb08d5469a5bc9%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636492551129369101&sdata=kexHuQMNL9F47jMiONntFZOgXdI4xlPO7ezO%2B5picbc%3D&reserved=0>

 

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Date: 12/19/17 7:40 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Re: Update on Red Crossbills
Anant and any who may be interested:


My recollection is that the reason for the hyphenated name of this state property is that it was such a large acquisition at the time that both State Parks and Natural Heritage had to dig into their acquisition funds to pay for it. (Also Arkansas Game & Fish Commission?)


In any case, I recall reconnoitering the property to identify elements there that were of special interest to the Natural Heritage Commission. Ellen Turner (then Ellen Neaville) and I even explored a small cave on the property.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 10:38 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Update on Red Crossbills

Following up on Joe and Joan's sighting of Red Crossbills at Hobbs State Park, Pooja, Joe and me boarded our own "HMS Beagle" to record the vocalizations of the two different types of Red Crossbills at Hobbs State Park- Conservation Area. Within an hour of reaching there, we were greeted by a flock of 18 Red Crossbills in the pine trees near the feeders at Visitor Center. After obtaining their recordings we set out to the Ozark Plateau Trail and soon we encountered another flock of 30 Red Crossbills which we guess were going for small pools left behind by the sinking creek. We have obtained audio recordings for both and will analyze them to find out the types of Red Crossbills we have at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area.
Though I have a soft spot for Red Crossbills but it is equally interesting to note that we are in midst of finch invasion. We observed around 110 Pine Siskins and 100 Goldfinches at the visitor center.
Today I found out why Hobbs State Park- Conservation Area has "Conservation Area" in the name itself. Joe informed me that Hobbs State Park unlike other State Parks is actively involved in Conservation and Education and hence it made sense to include that in its name.
Pine stands generally achieve maturity after 70-80 years and it is important to have pine trees of all ages in a forest to continuously replenishment pine trees. Young saplings offer hope for Crossbills of future generations. A managed pine stand is often a source for good pine crop production and also has enough gap in the canopy to allow shrubs and other ground vegetation to flourish. This is in turn helps in promoting small mammal populations and predators of these small mammals. The shrubs and grasses are also a suitable habitat for the sparrows and similar species.
When I am asked why are you so obsessed with the Red Crossbills, I often say that this bird is often associated with the label "difficult to study bird" and that right there captures my imagination. However, as I wrote earlier about pine stand management and how it would benefit other organisms. I believe that Red Crossbills along with Red-cockaded Woodpecker and Saw-whet Owls can be the champion species for conservation of the habitat that harbors a variety of different organisms.
I urge anyone who observes or finds Red Crossbills to try and record them and send them to either Pooja or Matt Young or me. You can record them using mobile phones with an external mic or a simple $30 recorder would also suffice. Pooja and me are more than happy to guide you on recordings or related questions.

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Deptt. of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/<https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com%2F&data=02%7C01%7C%7C9eb1d613d12740d61dbb08d5469a5bc9%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636492551129369101&sdata=kexHuQMNL9F47jMiONntFZOgXdI4xlPO7ezO%2B5picbc%3D&reserved=0>

 

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Date: 12/19/17 6:00 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: CBC & eBird App
I put eBirds app to the test the last three days. For the Little Rock and
Lonoke CBCs it was easy because my various subsections of my territories
(roads, parks, reservoirs, etc.) are there to be selected using Choose a
Nearby Personal Location (public hotspots Ive used are listed too).

For the Hot Springs Village CBC West Section I helped with yesterday I had
no prior experience with the sublocations. eBirds app made it quick and
easy to Choose a Location from a Map and in seconds give it a real name like
Warren Watson Rd. instead of the clunky default location name with
coordinates. The app tracks duration and distance. It makes tallying easy.
As we transitioned from one sublocation to the next Id stop and submit one
list, start the next with maybe 30 seconds lost in between. If we were not
birding (e.g lunch) there was no time and mileage recorded so no need to
mentally subtract that later. At home on my laptop and at eBird.org I used
Manage My Locations to move the markers to the center of the places they
represent (rather than the end of a road when I started a list). Using the
instructions I previously posted about compiling a day list, in minutes I
had my teams tallies for Little Rock, Lonoke, and Hot Springs Village. The
only math I had to do was go through each checklist and mentally allocate
time and mileage to foot vs. car, then add them up.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 12/19/17 5:46 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: CBC Report Suggestions
You could insert a column of sequential numbers next to the taxonomic
list. That way after sorting alphabetically you can sort by the numbers to
return it to taxonomic order. In any case, I appreciate the feedback,
didnt know there was a desire for an alphabetic list, but that is
something I can provide next year.

Using the eBird app doesnt require knowing taxonomy. It makes tallying
easy. And compiling later is easy too.

Dan


On 12/18/17, 4:28 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
David Luneau" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <mdluneau...>
wrote:

>Ed and others,
>
>I've been listing birds alphabetically for many years now after I figured
>out that I was never going to find birds as quickly in taxonomical order
>as in alphabetical order. I learned the alphabet song a long time ago,
>but I've never heard a taxonomic song. And, if anyone ever wrote one,
>they would have to change it every few years.
>
>It takes just a few minutes to transcribe from a field list to the CBC
>list, so for me it's well worth the few minutes of transcribing for all
>the time and frustration it saves in the field.
>
>HINT: I keep my version of the CBC list saved in Excel in taxonomic
>order. Before printing, I sort it alphabetically, then exit without
>saving. That leaves the list in taxonomic order in case I ever need it
>that way.
>
>M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
>Associate Professor of Electronics
>University of Arkansas at Little Rock
>2801 S. University Ave.
>Little Rock, AR 72204
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
>[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Ed Laster
>Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 3:07 PM
>To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>Subject: [ARBIRD-L] CBC Report Suggestions
>
>To those who are reporting your CBC results to Dan, here is a suggestion
>I found to speed up the process.
>
>I am slow at finding a species on the taxonomy list so I make an
>alphabetical list for use in the field, using the common terms we all
>use. This speeds up marking the counts but when its time to report them
>to Dan, I have to go through the slow process of finding and recording on
>the taxonomy order report form.
>
>Since Dan wants us to also report to eBird, I thought why not do that one
>first using the quick find search box in eBird, which puts them in the
>order Dan wants. Just print it out and use it to quickly fill out Dans
>form.
>
>Im sure some of you, maybe all of you, already do this but it only
>occurred to me and I thought Id pass it along.
>
>Ed Laster
>Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/17 8:38 pm
From: Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Subject: Update on Red Crossbills
Following up on Joe and Joan's sighting of Red Crossbills at Hobbs State
Park, Pooja, Joe and me boarded our own "HMS Beagle" to record the
vocalizations of the two different types of Red Crossbills at Hobbs State
Park- Conservation Area. Within an hour of reaching there, we were greeted
by a flock of 18 Red Crossbills in the pine trees near the feeders at
Visitor Center. After obtaining their recordings we set out to the Ozark
Plateau Trail and soon we encountered another flock of 30 Red Crossbills
which we guess were going for small pools left behind by the sinking creek.
We have obtained audio recordings for both and will analyze them to find
out the types of Red Crossbills we have at Hobbs State Park-Conservation
Area.
Though I have a soft spot for Red Crossbills but it is equally interesting
to note that we are in midst of finch invasion. We observed around 110 Pine
Siskins and 100 Goldfinches at the visitor center.
Today I found out why Hobbs State Park- Conservation Area has "Conservation
Area" in the name itself. Joe informed me that Hobbs State Park unlike
other State Parks is actively involved in Conservation and Education and
hence it made sense to include that in its name.
Pine stands generally achieve maturity after 70-80 years and it is
important to have pine trees of all ages in a forest to continuously
replenishment pine trees. Young saplings offer hope for Crossbills of
future generations. A managed pine stand is often a source for good pine
crop production and also has enough gap in the canopy to allow shrubs and
other ground vegetation to flourish. This is in turn helps in promoting
small mammal populations and predators of these small mammals. The shrubs
and grasses are also a suitable habitat for the sparrows and similar
species.
When I am asked why are you so obsessed with the Red Crossbills, I often
say that this bird is often associated with the label "difficult to study
bird" and that right there captures my imagination. However, as I wrote
earlier about pine stand management and how it would benefit other
organisms. I believe that Red Crossbills along with Red-cockaded Woodpecker
and Saw-whet Owls can be the champion species for conservation of the
habitat that harbors a variety of different organisms.
I urge anyone who observes or finds Red Crossbills to try and record them
and send them to either Pooja or Matt Young or me. You can record them
using mobile phones with an external mic or a simple $30 recorder would
also suffice. Pooja and me are more than happy to guide you on recordings
or related questions.

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Deptt. of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/

 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/17 4:25 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: CBC musings
Greetings all,
Sat at Arkadelphia I had a Blue-headed Vireo and a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.

Sun at Conway I got to experience a call I had never heard before. We were birding a dry grassland when Sarah Martin found a Sedge Wren. We got within 10' of it. It wasn't giving its normal wren-like call. To me it sounded like a very forgettable, grunting insect! After hearing the call we heard several more from 25-35' away. At dinner Allan Mueller checked his phone and indeed Sedge Wren has 2 calls. Super cool to hear a new call, but I'm not sure how much I'll remember it.

Today at Illinois Bayou (Mostly forested, North of Hector) I had an adult Golden Eagle, another Blue-headed Vireo, a Brown-headed Nuthatch, (5-10 miles North of its normal range) and 2 flights of Red Crossbills. These didn't sound like type 2s, but I'm not sure what type they were.

Cheers, Leif at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 12/18/17 2:29 pm
From: David Luneau <mdluneau...>
Subject: Re: CBC Report Suggestions
Ed and others,

I've been listing birds alphabetically for many years now after I figured out that I was never going to find birds as quickly in taxonomical order as in alphabetical order. I learned the alphabet song a long time ago, but I've never heard a taxonomic song. And, if anyone ever wrote one, they would have to change it every few years.

It takes just a few minutes to transcribe from a field list to the CBC list, so for me it's well worth the few minutes of transcribing for all the time and frustration it saves in the field.

HINT: I keep my version of the CBC list saved in Excel in taxonomic order. Before printing, I sort it alphabetically, then exit without saving. That leaves the list in taxonomic order in case I ever need it that way.

M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
Associate Professor of Electronics
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
2801 S. University Ave.
Little Rock, AR 72204

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Ed Laster
Sent: Monday, December 18, 2017 3:07 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] CBC Report Suggestions

To those who are reporting your CBC results to Dan, here is a suggestion I found to speed up the process.

I am slow at finding a species on the taxonomy list so I make an alphabetical list for use in the field, using the common terms we all use. This speeds up marking the counts but when it’s time to report them to Dan, I have to go through the slow process of finding and recording on the taxonomy order report form.

Since Dan wants us to also report to eBird, I thought why not do that one first using the quick find search box in eBird, which puts them in the order Dan wants. Just print it out and use it to quickly fill out Dan’s form.

I’m sure some of you, maybe all of you, already do this but it only occurred to me and I thought I’d pass it along.

Ed Laster
Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/17 1:17 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Little Rock CBC Section 8 East LR, Airport & Sweet Home areas
I thought “Dan will think were nuts” if we only report one Red-winged Blackbird on the LR count. But that all we saw.

So thanks, Cindy.

Ed Laster
Little Rock

> On Dec 18, 2017, at 8:10 AM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:
>
> You know it's going to be one of those days when Rusty Blackbirds are the only blackbirds seen before noon. It was bird quiet east of Interstate 30 Saturday. Usually the Bill Clark wetlands, the Clinton library/Heifer International area is a reliably birdy area yielding up sparrows,Yellow-rumped Warblers, woodpeckers, Killdeer, and a handful of water birds. I'm afraid this change may be permanent as the hand of man lies even more heavy on the landscape. If you haven't been down there, large scale redevelopement of old buildings & abandoned properties is the new face of that area. Brushy fences, century old trees, and overgrown weedy areas have been scraped bare in preparation for grand new projects: businesses, condos, apartments, parking lots, and roads. Acre by acre the natural world along the river is being plowed under or hauled away. It isn't pretty. Over in the port area, Wellspun has begun filling in the two sunken fields to store huge piles of green pipe destined for some future pipeline somewhere else. Over on Thibault Road scene of many Merlin sightings all those fields are being marketed as great industrial locations with easy transportation access. As Joe Neal has lamented many times, there is no room for nature in man's world these days.
>
> Many common species were absent or greatly diminished in numbers. Bill B. & I ended the day with 50 species, many of those just a single bird. We ended the day tallying 1,800 birds, far lower than in previous counts.
>
> At the very end of the day we came across our only Red-winged Blackbird of the count. The Rusty Blackbird total-16.
>
> Cindy
>
> PS The Lonoke Count yesterday was much better. More on that later.


 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/17 1:07 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: CBC Report Suggestions
To those who are reporting your CBC results to Dan, here is a suggestion I found to speed up the process.

I am slow at finding a species on the taxonomy list so I make an alphabetical list for use in the field, using the common terms we all use. This speeds up marking the counts but when it’s time to report them to Dan, I have to go through the slow process of finding and recording on the taxonomy order report form.

Since Dan wants us to also report to eBird, I thought why not do that one first using the quick find search box in eBird, which puts them in the order Dan wants. Just print it out and use it to quickly fill out Dan’s form.

I’m sure some of you, maybe all of you, already do this but it only occurred to me and I thought I’d pass it along.

Ed Laster
Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/17 7:22 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Little Rock CBC Section 8 East LR, Airport & Sweet Home areas
All I can say to this report is that it's a sickening scenario for the
human race and even Worse for birds and wildlife. Guerillas for science,
nature protection and habitat restoration, Carry On!

Bill Thurman

On Dec 18, 2017 8:11 AM, "CK Franklin" <meshoppen...> wrote:

> You know it's going to be one of those days when Rusty Blackbirds are the
> only blackbirds seen before noon. It was bird quiet east of Interstate 30
> Saturday. Usually the Bill Clark wetlands, the Clinton library/Heifer
> International area is a reliably birdy area yielding up
> sparrows,Yellow-rumped Warblers, woodpeckers, Killdeer, and a handful of
> water birds. I'm afraid this change may be permanent as the hand of man
> lies even more heavy on the landscape. If you haven't been down there,
> large scale redevelopement of old buildings & abandoned properties is the
> new face of that area. Brushy fences, century old trees, and overgrown
> weedy areas have been scraped bare in preparation for grand new projects:
> businesses, condos, apartments, parking lots, and roads. Acre by acre the
> natural world along the river is being plowed under or hauled away. It
> isn't pretty. Over in the port area, Wellspun has begun filling in the two
> sunken fields to store huge piles of green pipe destined for some future
> pipeline somewhere else. Over on Thibault Road scene of many Merlin
> sightings all those fields are being marketed as great industrial locations
> with easy transportation access. As Joe Neal has lamented many times, there
> is no room for nature in man's world these days.
>
>
> Many common species were absent or greatly diminished in numbers. Bill B.
> & I ended the day with 50 species, many of those just a single bird. We
> ended the day tallying 1,800 birds, far lower than in previous counts.
>
>
> At the very end of the day we came across our only Red-winged Blackbird of
> the count. The Rusty Blackbird total-16.
>
>
> Cindy
>
> PS The Lonoke Count yesterday was much better. More on that later.
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/18/17 6:11 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Little Rock CBC Section 8 East LR, Airport & Sweet Home areas
You know it's going to be one of those days when Rusty Blackbirds are the only blackbirds seen before noon. It was bird quiet east of Interstate 30 Saturday. Usually the Bill Clark wetlands, the Clinton library/Heifer International area is a reliably birdy area yielding up sparrows,Yellow-rumped Warblers, woodpeckers, Killdeer, and a handful of water birds. I'm afraid this change may be permanent as the hand of man lies even more heavy on the landscape. If you haven't been down there, large scale redevelopement of old buildings & abandoned properties is the new face of that area. Brushy fences, century old trees, and overgrown weedy areas have been scraped bare in preparation for grand new projects: businesses, condos, apartments, parking lots, and roads. Acre by acre the natural world along the river is being plowed under or hauled away. It isn't pretty. Over in the port area, Wellspun has begun filling in the two sunken fields to store huge piles of green pipe destined for some future pipeline somewhere else. Over on Thibault Road scene of many Merlin sightings all those fields are being marketed as great industrial locations with easy transportation access. As Joe Neal has lamented many times, there is no room for nature in man's world these days.


Many common species were absent or greatly diminished in numbers. Bill B. & I ended the day with 50 species, many of those just a single bird. We ended the day tallying 1,800 birds, far lower than in previous counts.


At the very end of the day we came across our only Red-winged Blackbird of the count. The Rusty Blackbird total-16.


Cindy

PS The Lonoke Count yesterday was much better. More on that later.



 

Back to top
Date: 12/17/17 4:33 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: CBC Lonoke section 5
Best birds were Short-eared Owl found by Drew and Sherry Phillips before we met at 7:00 others Merlin , LeConte’s and Virginia Rail total of 71 birds . Great day of birding.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/17/17 3:51 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Rufous Hummer 12/17/17 Centerton.
I was home for all of 45 minutes today between 12:30 t0 1:15. I was doing the Fayetteville CBC in the morning and a family Christmas gig in the afternoon.

At high noon I glanced out back and the Rufous Hummingbird was at the feeder. This time she went and perched in the little Cherry Tree that most spring and fall hummers like.


Jacque Brown
<bluebird2...>



> On Dec 16, 2017, at 5:36 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>
> Today I was able to watch off and on in the morning. And constantly from 1:30 to 5 pm The hummer showed at 3:30 and 4:25. Jacque Brown
>
>
>> On Dec 16, 2017, at 7:23 AM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>> wrote:
>>
>> I don’t know what is up with this hummer but after returning from errands Friday at 1:30 the hummer was at the feeder. it visited every 10 minutes. 1:30, 1:40, 1:50, then skipped an hour, 2:57 then it was another hour. last seen was at 3:50. I’m not going anywhere today so I plan to stake out the door and see what happens. I must only have Friday visitation.
>>
>> I’m now convinced there is someone else around here that has a feeder out. When she takes off even for the short times it has always been to the east and goes past the houses on the street behind my house.
>>
>> I also went the the Centerton fish hatchery yesterday for about a two hours, 11:30 to 1:15
>>
>> of note were 116 Canada Geese with two Cackling Geese among them. I got photos but need to have time to crop them up a bit. One seemed to be a little larger than the other, but still had a very small bill and had a little bit of a white ring at the base of the neck.
>>
>>
>> Jacque Brown
>> <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Dec 8, 2017, at 1:33 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>> wrote
>>>
>>> it’s official, I have a Rufous Hummer coming to a feeder. It’s visited about every 20 minutes or so since I got food out. I’ll wait to post photos until I get a good one, I got crappy through the glass photos where you can see the tail. I’ll be here today, gone most of the day Saturday, and be home Sunday but will have company. You can come this afternoon if you want and try your luck. please call first.
>>>
>>> If It’s still here tomorrow afternoon I’ll post and someone can try to come and see it if they want. And maybe Sunday.
>>>
>>>
>>> I saw this hummer last weekend and it was only seen once.
>>>
>>>
>>> Jacque Brown
>>> 240 Township Dr
>>> Centerton, AR 72719
>>>
>>> 479-224-6099 home phone
>>>
>>> <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> On Dec 8, 2017, at 11:34 AM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> The hummer was here again, just now. I got a few photos. My hummer fluid froze after I put it out this morning, I took it in and was going to put more out when the hummer showed up. fresh, thawed, food is out again.
>>>
>>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 12/17/17 12:21 pm
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Re: Little Rock CBC Section 1
Ditto for me. We had such a great long look at the second vireo that I was tempted to write a masters thesis about it!

Chuck Anderson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 17, 2017, at 1:15 PM, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> wrote:
>
> Everyone:
>
> I think I can speak for the rest of the party in expressing our appreciation to David for compiling our outstanding list from yesterday.
>
> I'd like to add that the Blue-headed Vireos were beautiful beyond belief. The one I saw looked like a brightly colored spring migrant dropped into a winter landscape. Sort of like a male Pine Warbler, except more so.
>
> Bill
>
> Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of David Luneau <mdluneau...>
> Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 9:00 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Little Rock CBC Section 1
>
> Our section of the LR CBC is the southwest part of the circle (Hindman Park, Western Hills Park, Roselawn Cemetery, etc). We had 66 species today – the previous high I know of for this section was 60 in 2003. We usually get somewhere in the low 50s.
>
>
>
> Highlights were two (2!) BLUE-HEADED VIREOS, an AMERICAN WOODCOCK, and 7 PINE SISKINS.
>
>
>
> Some big numbers were 83 WOOD DUCKS, 40 BLACK VULTURES, and 8 BROWN CREEPERS. I doubt those are records – they just struck me as higher than we usually get in our area.
>
>
>
> Nothing else spectacular – we just got most of the species we would expect in our area.
>
>
>
> Those responsible are Ragan Sutterfield, Bill Shepherd, Chuck and Ruth Anderson, Blake Kennedy, and myself.
>
>
>
> M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
>
> Associate Professor of Electronics
>
> University of Arkansas at Little Rock
>
> 2801 S. University Ave.
>
> Little Rock, AR 72204
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Scheiman
> Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 6:58 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Little Rock CBC Section 1
>
>
>
> It was a birdy day for me, Uta Meyer, Jeremy Chamberlain, and Brandy Dyer on the southeast side of town during the Little Rock Christmas Bird Count. The day started off with a blast, literally, when we heard gunshots coming from Gillam Park. We birded our way to the oxbow lake to find three people illegally hunting ducks on Audubon Arkansas’s property. By the time the police arrived the perps were gone because they saw us and knew they had been discovered.
>
>
>
> On Audubon’s wildlife observation trail "Bird Dog” Jeremy flushed an American Woodcock from the grass. Russenberger Rd. not only reliably produced a bevy of Brown-headed Nuthatches yet again, but also a BEWICK’S WREN. Near Little Fourche Creek at 65th St. “Eagle-eyed” Uta spotted an adult Bald Eagle soaring overhead. An OSPREY flew over Benny Craig Park where we met up with two local 4-H kids who wanted to help with the CBC for a little bit (followed by trash pick up). Borrow ponds in Fourche Bottoms held a nice assortment of ducks – Mallard, Gadwall, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck, and Hooded Merganser; trying to escape duck hunters no doubt. On the edge of the pond 40 RUSTRY BLACKBIRDS were flipping wet leaves.
>
>
>
> Towards dusk I alone stopped at Interstate Park where I found two more Rusty Blackbirds and watched a continuous stream of Common Grackles pour into Fourche Bottoms. I have long known there is a massive roost in there but had not been in just the right place long enough to get a feel for just how many. Well, I still really don’t know considering they were streaming when I arrived with waves continuing when I left at 5. I guesstimated 2 million birds while I watched. Not an unprecedented number for this CBC and far from a high count.
>
>
>
> We tallied 63 species for the day.
>
>
>
> Dan Scheiman

 

Back to top
Date: 12/17/17 11:46 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Harris Sparrows Lonoke County
Two Harris Sparrows in Lonoke today. Karen had one in her territory at the same time my team found one.

Cindy


 

Back to top
Date: 12/17/17 11:15 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Re: Little Rock CBC Section 1
Everyone:


I think I can speak for the rest of the party in expressing our appreciation to David for compiling our outstanding list from yesterday.


I'd like to add that the Blue-headed Vireos were beautiful beyond belief. The one I saw looked like a brightly colored spring migrant dropped into a winter landscape. Sort of like a male Pine Warbler, except more so.


Bill


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of David Luneau <mdluneau...>
Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 9:00 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Little Rock CBC Section 1


Our section of the LR CBC is the southwest part of the circle (Hindman Park, Western Hills Park, Roselawn Cemetery, etc). We had 66 species today the previous high I know of for this section was 60 in 2003. We usually get somewhere in the low 50s.



Highlights were two (2!) BLUE-HEADED VIREOS, an AMERICAN WOODCOCK, and 7 PINE SISKINS.



Some big numbers were 83 WOOD DUCKS, 40 BLACK VULTURES, and 8 BROWN CREEPERS. I doubt those are records they just struck me as higher than we usually get in our area.



Nothing else spectacular we just got most of the species we would expect in our area.



Those responsible are Ragan Sutterfield, Bill Shepherd, Chuck and Ruth Anderson, Blake Kennedy, and myself.



M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.

Associate Professor of Electronics

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

2801 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Scheiman
Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 6:58 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Little Rock CBC Section 1



It was a birdy day for me, Uta Meyer, Jeremy Chamberlain, and Brandy Dyer on the southeast side of town during the Little Rock Christmas Bird Count. The day started off with a blast, literally, when we heard gunshots coming from Gillam Park. We birded our way to the oxbow lake to find three people illegally hunting ducks on Audubon Arkansass property. By the time the police arrived the perps were gone because they saw us and knew they had been discovered.



On Audubons wildlife observation trail "Bird Dog Jeremy flushed an American Woodcock from the grass. Russenberger Rd. not only reliably produced a bevy of Brown-headed Nuthatches yet again, but also a BEWICKS WREN. Near Little Fourche Creek at 65th St. Eagle-eyed Uta spotted an adult Bald Eagle soaring overhead. An OSPREY flew over Benny Craig Park where we met up with two local 4-H kids who wanted to help with the CBC for a little bit (followed by trash pick up). Borrow ponds in Fourche Bottoms held a nice assortment of ducks Mallard, Gadwall, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck, and Hooded Merganser; trying to escape duck hunters no doubt. On the edge of the pond 40 RUSTRY BLACKBIRDS were flipping wet leaves.



Towards dusk I alone stopped at Interstate Park where I found two more Rusty Blackbirds and watched a continuous stream of Common Grackles pour into Fourche Bottoms. I have long known there is a massive roost in there but had not been in just the right place long enough to get a feel for just how many. Well, I still really dont know considering they were streaming when I arrived with waves continuing when I left at 5. I guesstimated 2 million birds while I watched. Not an unprecedented number for this CBC and far from a high count.



We tallied 63 species for the day.



Dan Scheiman

 

Back to top
Date: 12/16/17 10:13 pm
From: Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Subject: Update on Red Crossbills
Do excuse me for being delayed in posting about our recent trip to
Fayetteville Country Club searching for Red Crossbills. Pooja, Joe and me
had headed out to Fayetteville Country Club on Friday morning, where we ran
into Jackie and Meredith. Though we could not get recordings of Red
Crossbills we surely heard a couple of Red Crossbills jip-jip calls.
We were also beautifully surprised to see a Snow Goose hanging out with a
flock of Canada Geese. Other notable species were Belted Kingfisher,
Red-breasted and White-breasted Nuthatches, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker,
Red-bellied Woodpecker, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Pine Siskin and
White-throated Sparrow.
It was amazing to see Cedar Waxwings, Northern Flicker and Starlings feed
together on the cedar berries.
It was great to hear that Red Crossbills have been spotted in Hobbs State
Park and again at Ninestone Land Trust. It is turning out to be a
breathtaking Red Crossbill irruption year. I would request anyone who spots
Red Crossbills to please inform me or Pooja about them. This year we have
chance to fill the information gaps that are there in Red Crossbill's
natural history in Arkansas. It will be great if we also have Red
Crossbills sightings near Little Rock region and other places rich in pine
stands.

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Deptt. of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/

 

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Date: 12/16/17 8:06 pm
From: John Walko <walko...>
Subject: Sightings Report-Woolsey Wet Prairie, Dec 16, 2017
Sightings Report - Woolsey Wet Prairie, Dec 16, 2017

2 hour afternoon walk through the Wet Prarie, ok so not so Wet Prarie as dry conditions prevailed. Really had to look for some signs of water this hike. Wind was kicking it a bit at 5-15 mph the entire hike and the birding was a bit off, not for the lack of birds, but for the birds being blown down and away as soon as they flushed. "Little Brown Job's" were plentiful but not willing to stay up above the high grass much long enough to put the bino's on them. Therefore exact ID counts we're not inline with the the number of birds actually flushed/seen.
Once I finished the hike I sat in the car and watched the birds come into the brush and trees around me. A Great Bl Heron did a surprise flyover while I was about to leave to push my count to 23 species.

> Woolsey Wet Prairie, Washington, Arkansas, US
> Dec 16, 2017 1:15 PM - 3:30 PM
> Protocol: Traveling
> 1.25 mile(s)
> Comments: Sunny, 57 degs 5-15 mph wind out of the S-SW, fading to partially cloudy skies.
> 23 species
>
> Great Blue Heron 1 Flyover at parking area
> Black Vulture 4
> Turkey Vulture 9
> Red-tailed Hawk 2
> Killdeer 1 Wet area behind barn.
> Mourning Dove 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker 1 Parking area
> Downy Woodpecker 1 Parking area
> American Crow 44 As it was getting later I was sitting in car and crows were flying in good groups to the south
> Eastern Bluebird 5
> American Robin 8
> Northern Mockingbird 4
> Cedar Waxwing 7
> LeConte's Sparrow 1
> Dark-eyed Junco 7
> White-crowned Sparrow 5
> White-throated Sparrow 7
> Savannah Sparrow 3
> Song Sparrow 4
> Swamp Sparrow 2
> Northern Cardinal 3
> Eastern Meadowlark 2
> House Finch 1
>
> View this checklist online at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41134432
> This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (http://ebird.org)

Jay Walko
Collierville, TN


 

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Date: 12/16/17 7:00 pm
From: David Luneau <mdluneau...>
Subject: Re: Little Rock CBC Section 1
Our section of the LR CBC is the southwest part of the circle (Hindman Park,
Western Hills Park, Roselawn Cemetery, etc). We had 66 species today - the
previous high I know of for this section was 60 in 2003. We usually get
somewhere in the low 50s.



Highlights were two (2!) BLUE-HEADED VIREOS, an AMERICAN WOODCOCK, and 7
PINE SISKINS.



Some big numbers were 83 WOOD DUCKS, 40 BLACK VULTURES, and 8 BROWN
CREEPERS. I doubt those are records - they just struck me as higher than we
usually get in our area.



Nothing else spectacular - we just got most of the species we would expect
in our area.



Those responsible are Ragan Sutterfield, Bill Shepherd, Chuck and Ruth
Anderson, Blake Kennedy, and myself.



M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.

Associate Professor of Electronics

University of Arkansas at Little Rock

2801 S. University Ave.

Little Rock, AR 72204



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Scheiman
Sent: Saturday, December 16, 2017 6:58 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Little Rock CBC Section 1



It was a birdy day for me, Uta Meyer, Jeremy Chamberlain, and Brandy Dyer on
the southeast side of town during the Little Rock Christmas Bird Count. The
day started off with a blast, literally, when we heard gunshots coming from
Gillam Park. We birded our way to the oxbow lake to find three people
illegally hunting ducks on Audubon Arkansas's property. By the time the
police arrived the perps were gone because they saw us and knew they had
been discovered.



On Audubon's wildlife observation trail "Bird Dog" Jeremy flushed an
American Woodcock from the grass. Russenberger Rd. not only reliably
produced a bevy of Brown-headed Nuthatches yet again, but also a BEWICK'S
WREN. Near Little Fourche Creek at 65th St. "Eagle-eyed" Uta spotted an
adult Bald Eagle soaring overhead. An OSPREY flew over Benny Craig Park
where we met up with two local 4-H kids who wanted to help with the CBC for
a little bit (followed by trash pick up). Borrow ponds in Fourche Bottoms
held a nice assortment of ducks - Mallard, Gadwall, Northern Shoveler,
Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck, and Hooded Merganser; trying to escape
duck hunters no doubt. On the edge of the pond 40 RUSTRY BLACKBIRDS were
flipping wet leaves.



Towards dusk I alone stopped at Interstate Park where I found two more Rusty
Blackbirds and watched a continuous stream of Common Grackles pour into
Fourche Bottoms. I have long known there is a massive roost in there but had
not been in just the right place long enough to get a feel for just how
many. Well, I still really don't know considering they were streaming when I
arrived with waves continuing when I left at 5. I guesstimated 2 million
birds while I watched. Not an unprecedented number for this CBC and far from
a high count.



We tallied 63 species for the day.



Dan Scheiman


 

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Date: 12/16/17 4:58 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Little Rock CBC Section 1
It was a birdy day for me, Uta Meyer, Jeremy Chamberlain, and Brandy Dyer on
the southeast side of town during the Little Rock Christmas Bird Count. The
day started off with a blast, literally, when we heard gunshots coming from
Gillam Park. We birded our way to the oxbow lake to find three people
illegally hunting ducks on Audubon Arkansass property. By the time the
police arrived the perps were gone because they saw us and knew they had
been discovered.

On Audubons wildlife observation trail "Bird Dog Jeremy flushed an
American Woodcock from the grass. Russenberger Rd. not only reliably
produced a bevy of Brown-headed Nuthatches yet again, but also a BEWICKS
WREN. Near Little Fourche Creek at 65th St. Eagle-eyed Uta spotted an
adult Bald Eagle soaring overhead. An OSPREY flew over Benny Craig Park
where we met up with two local 4-H kids who wanted to help with the CBC for
a little bit (followed by trash pick up). Borrow ponds in Fourche Bottoms
held a nice assortment of ducks Mallard, Gadwall, Northern Shoveler,
Green-winged Teal, Ring-necked Duck, and Hooded Merganser; trying to escape
duck hunters no doubt. On the edge of the pond 40 RUSTRY BLACKBIRDS were
flipping wet leaves.

Towards dusk I alone stopped at Interstate Park where I found two more Rusty
Blackbirds and watched a continuous stream of Common Grackles pour into
Fourche Bottoms. I have long known there is a massive roost in there but had
not been in just the right place long enough to get a feel for just how
many. Well, I still really dont know considering they were streaming when I
arrived with waves continuing when I left at 5. I guesstimated 2 million
birds while I watched. Not an unprecedented number for this CBC and far from
a high count.

We tallied 63 species for the day.

Dan Scheiman



 

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Date: 12/16/17 4:54 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: hummer Centerton.
I've got a question on rufous hummingbirds here. Seems some people leave
feeders out in case they show up, which is great. I can't do that as I
put things off and fear I'd be bad at maintaining a steady supply and
cleaning things out as often as they need to be. I'd rather not risk
that for the birds' sake. But this has me wondering about these birds
and what they'd do if nobody had feeders up.  I mean, feeders aren't
exactly a natural occurrence. Are there other foods they find on their
way through Arkansas? Or would they otherwise simply keep moving on?
Sometimes I wonder if there's anything that I could plant that would
benefit such birds this time of year.
I often dream of what I could plant and where and what I could attract.
But just like fixing up issues with the house, the dreaming gets away
from me to a point where it's WAY bigger than our bank account. HA

Daniel Mason

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 12/16/17 4:33 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Christmas Bird Count encounters
For people participating in the Conway count, the Great Horned Owl is again
nesting, where they nested last year, on the Conway Human Development Center
(CHDC) campus. Nest is on Museum Road. You do not have to get on CHDC
property to see it. I sign in, as a visitor, at the main switchboard now
when I go on campus (I am retired from working there). There is a 'Land For
Sale Sign' on the corner of Museum and Andrews and the nest is directly
across from that point, on the campus, behind the iron fence. Up pretty
high in a pine tree.



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Anderson, Leif E -FS
Sent: Friday, December 15, 2017 3:35 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Christmas Bird Count encounters



Greetings all,

If you have a good bird or an interesting experience on the CBC, then you
might want to share it with the listserver. Many folks might like to hear
about it.



I did MS River SP count yesterday. It was a bit warm and bird activity was
slow in the afternoon, but I had 2 highlights..

Any day experiencing the unique ecology of lower Crowley's Ridge, is a great
day.



Dense, extensive stands of horsetail, surrounding a pond, continue to
produce Sedge Wrens and Common Yellowthroats.



Hope you have a fun CBC season.



Leif at Hector





This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely
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or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law
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Date: 12/16/17 4:19 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: One way to move birds--especially longspurs--off airports




https://www.democraticunderground.com/1017471088






 

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Date: 12/16/17 4:14 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Sighting: Blue-headed Vireo
I've seen the Blue-headed Vireo at my house on 12/12, 12/13 (photos taken),
12/14, 12/15 and 12/16. Christmas bird count is tomorrow . it better show
up tomorrow!!! Usually shows up between 1:30 and 2:30.



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR


 

Back to top
Date: 12/16/17 3:36 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Rufous Hummer 12/15/17 Centerton. and Cackling Geese
Today I was able to watch off and on in the morning. And constantly from 1:30 to 5 pm The hummer showed at 3:30 and 4:25. Jacque Brown


> On Dec 16, 2017, at 7:23 AM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>
> I don’t know what is up with this hummer but after returning from errands Friday at 1:30 the hummer was at the feeder. it visited every 10 minutes. 1:30, 1:40, 1:50, then skipped an hour, 2:57 then it was another hour. last seen was at 3:50. I’m not going anywhere today so I plan to stake out the door and see what happens. I must only have Friday visitation.
>
> I’m now convinced there is someone else around here that has a feeder out. When she takes off even for the short times it has always been to the east and goes past the houses on the street behind my house.
>
> I also went the the Centerton fish hatchery yesterday for about a two hours, 11:30 to 1:15
>
> of note were 116 Canada Geese with two Cackling Geese among them. I got photos but need to have time to crop them up a bit. One seemed to be a little larger than the other, but still had a very small bill and had a little bit of a white ring at the base of the neck.
>
>
> Jacque Brown
> <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>
>
>
>
>> On Dec 8, 2017, at 1:33 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>> wrote
>>
>> it’s official, I have a Rufous Hummer coming to a feeder. It’s visited about every 20 minutes or so since I got food out. I’ll wait to post photos until I get a good one, I got crappy through the glass photos where you can see the tail. I’ll be here today, gone most of the day Saturday, and be home Sunday but will have company. You can come this afternoon if you want and try your luck. please call first.
>>
>> If It’s still here tomorrow afternoon I’ll post and someone can try to come and see it if they want. And maybe Sunday.
>>
>>
>> I saw this hummer last weekend and it was only seen once.
>>
>>
>> Jacque Brown
>> 240 Township Dr
>> Centerton, AR 72719
>>
>> 479-224-6099 home phone
>>
>> <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On Dec 8, 2017, at 11:34 AM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> The hummer was here again, just now. I got a few photos. My hummer fluid froze after I put it out this morning, I took it in and was going to put more out when the hummer showed up. fresh, thawed, food is out again.
>>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 12/16/17 3:30 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Smith's Longspurs in Ft. Smith airport
An unexpected treat while exercising in S. 66th. St. by runway 25 of Fort Smith airport this afternoon.  Twenty-one Smith's Longspurs flying above the grassy open area by the runway, uttering their characteristic rattling calls.  They flew round and round several times before settling down by the runway and vanishing completely. 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S41134892

Incidentally, long time ago Doug James showed this bird to Roger Tory Peterson at the Little Rock airport.  It was a lifer for Peterson.  Those days people could walk around runways freely.  Today's sighting was through the chain-link fence.  I've had airport maintenance personnel call the cops on me here before.  
KannanFt. Smith

 

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Date: 12/16/17 2:07 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: RED CROSSBILLS AT HOBBS STATE PARK-CONSERVATION AREA
Crossbills at Ninestone again today too.
J

On Dec 16, 2017, at 3:49 PM, "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal...> wrote:

> We found Red Crossbills in two places at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area today. Interestingly, we had different call types in each spot.
>
> First crossbills were just off Ozark Plateau Trail adjacent the visitor center. This is a short, paved ridgetop trail dominated by mature native Shortleaf Pines, with a very heavy cone crop. Joan Reynolds and I heard crossbills vocalizing just east of the trail. We headed toward the sound. Joan spotted 5 crossbills on the ground at a small pool in the hollow below the trail. When the birds flew, the count was at least 9.
>
> We sat on the hillside and waited. When the crossbills flew over, we both had the impression of more than 9 birds. These crossbills sounded like call type 2s, Ponderosa Pine Crossbill.
>
> That would seem to be it, crossbill-wise, but when we got back to the visitor center, Joan spotted a red bird, then a second, in a small leafless tree more or less in front of the car, and adjacent to the southwest corner of the parking lot. These proved to be male Red Crossbills. When they flew, we saw 4, and they did not call like type 2s, but more like the type 3s that were at Ninestone Land Trust at least January-February 2013. If this is correct, these were Western Hemlock Crossbills. These have relatively small bills and a scratchy call, something like chit-chit. These are from northern coastal area of the western US.
>
> Hobbs is probably a crossbill jackpot, since ridges all over the park are dominated by native Shortleaf Pine and this is a good cone year. I assume they could be anywhere in the park.
>
> We for sure had crossbills in two places near the Hobbs visitor center, but assigning vocalizations to specific call types is best done with recordings, so well go back for that asap. If you want to learn more about the whole fascinating crossbill call type business, check this out:
>
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/crossbills-of-north-america-species-and-red-crossbill-call-types/
>
> Crossbills of North America: Species and Red Crossbill ...
> ebird.org
> Red Crossbills are predicted to move south in significant numbers this yearcheck out this article to learn fun facts and ID tips for these enigmatic birds.
> Ill post a couple of photos of the parking lot crossbills on my facebook page.
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 12/16/17 1:49 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: RED CROSSBILLS AT HOBBS STATE PARK-CONSERVATION AREA
We found Red Crossbills in two places at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area today. Interestingly, we had different call types in each spot.

First crossbills were just off Ozark Plateau Trail adjacent the visitor center. This is a short, paved ridgetop trail dominated by mature native Shortleaf Pines, with a very heavy cone crop. Joan Reynolds and I heard crossbills vocalizing just east of the trail. We headed toward the sound. Joan spotted 5 crossbills on the ground at a small pool in the hollow below the trail. When the birds flew, the count was at least 9.

We sat on the hillside and waited. When the crossbills flew over, we both had the impression of more than 9 birds. These crossbills sounded like call type 2s, Ponderosa Pine Crossbill.

That would seem to be it, crossbill-wise, but when we got back to the visitor center, Joan spotted a red bird, then a second, in a small leafless tree more or less in front of the car, and adjacent to the southwest corner of the parking lot. These proved to be male Red Crossbills. When they flew, we saw 4, and they did not call like type 2s, but more like the type 3s that were at Ninestone Land Trust at least January-February 2013. If this is correct, these were Western Hemlock Crossbills. These have relatively small bills and a scratchy call, something like chit-chit. These are from northern coastal area of the western US.

Hobbs is probably a crossbill jackpot, since ridges all over the park are dominated by native Shortleaf Pine and this is a good cone year. I assume they could be anywhere in the park.

We for sure had crossbills in two places near the Hobbs visitor center, but assigning vocalizations to specific call types is best done with recordings, so well go back for that asap. If you want to learn more about the whole fascinating crossbill call type business, check this out:

http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/crossbills-of-north-america-species-and-red-crossbill-call-types/
[http://ebird.org/content/ebird/wp-content/uploads/sites/55/logo-zeiss.png]<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/crossbills-of-north-america-species-and-red-crossbill-call-types/>

Crossbills of North America: Species and Red Crossbill ...<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/crossbills-of-north-america-species-and-red-crossbill-call-types/>
ebird.org
Red Crossbills are predicted to move south in significant numbers this yearcheck out this article to learn fun facts and ID tips for these enigmatic birds.

Ill post a couple of photos of the parking lot crossbills on my facebook page.


 

Back to top
Date: 12/16/17 7:23 am
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
Subject: FOS oops
The other day I posted that House Finches arrived at my place. I meant to
say Purple Finches. Obviously, my brain was disconnected from my fingers
that day.

--
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 12/16/17 5:23 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Rufous Hummer 12/15/17 Centerton. and Cackling Geese
I don’t know what is up with this hummer but after returning from errands Friday at 1:30 the hummer was at the feeder. it visited every 10 minutes. 1:30, 1:40, 1:50, then skipped an hour, 2:57 then it was another hour. last seen was at 3:50. I’m not going anywhere today so I plan to stake out the door and see what happens. I must only have Friday visitation.

I’m now convinced there is someone else around here that has a feeder out. When she takes off even for the short times it has always been to the east and goes past the houses on the street behind my house.

I also went the the Centerton fish hatchery yesterday for about a two hours, 11:30 to 1:15

of note were 116 Canada Geese with two Cackling Geese among them. I got photos but need to have time to crop them up a bit. One seemed to be a little larger than the other, but still had a very small bill and had a little bit of a white ring at the base of the neck.


Jacque Brown
<bluebird2...>



> On Dec 8, 2017, at 1:33 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote
>
> it’s official, I have a Rufous Hummer coming to a feeder. It’s visited about every 20 minutes or so since I got food out. I’ll wait to post photos until I get a good one, I got crappy through the glass photos where you can see the tail. I’ll be here today, gone most of the day Saturday, and be home Sunday but will have company. You can come this afternoon if you want and try your luck. please call first.
>
> If It’s still here tomorrow afternoon I’ll post and someone can try to come and see it if they want. And maybe Sunday.
>
>
> I saw this hummer last weekend and it was only seen once.
>
>
> Jacque Brown
> 240 Township Dr
> Centerton, AR 72719
>
> 479-224-6099 home phone
>
> <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Dec 8, 2017, at 11:34 AM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>> wrote:
>>
>> The hummer was here again, just now. I got a few photos. My hummer fluid froze after I put it out this morning, I took it in and was going to put more out when the hummer showed up. fresh, thawed, food is out again.
>


 

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