ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
2/15/19 3:40 pm d.marie yates <maribird...> Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
2/15/19 3:32 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
2/15/19 1:22 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Rare bird alert
2/15/19 1:11 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
2/15/19 12:20 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Mulhollan Blind (Lake Fayetteville)
2/15/19 11:39 am Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
2/15/19 10:03 am Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
2/15/19 9:09 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
2/14/19 7:45 pm Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
2/14/19 7:19 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> AGFC Commissioners Open House
2/14/19 5:28 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: Is anyone missing a trained raptor?
2/14/19 4:33 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Is anyone missing a trained raptor?
2/13/19 8:05 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Is anyone missing a trained raptor?
2/13/19 3:39 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Waterfowl at Alma Wastewater
2/13/19 5:58 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Birds yesterday at Bentonville airport
2/12/19 8:28 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> How to Count Birds
2/12/19 9:50 am Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Rare Bird Indeed
2/12/19 6:39 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> MORE ON CANADA GOOSE MANAGEMENT-CONTROL AND BENTONVILLE AIRPORT
2/12/19 5:33 am plm108 <plm108...> Decline of Insects
2/11/19 2:40 pm d.marie yates <maribird...> Re: Movies and Birds
2/11/19 2:31 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Movies and Birds
2/11/19 2:21 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Movies and Birds
2/11/19 1:44 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA February Field Trip
2/11/19 1:23 pm Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> Bird Consciousness & Animal Intelligence
2/11/19 6:26 am Kathie Riedel <00000270674fa8fb-dmarc-request...> Old vs New Tech
2/11/19 5:49 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Celebrate Aldo Leopold by joining habitat restoration work for birds, plants, and more at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area on March 2
2/10/19 4:25 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, Thursday Feb 14
2/10/19 3:50 pm Dan Bogler <danbogler...> Movies and Birds
2/10/19 2:24 pm Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...> Re: State meeting
2/10/19 2:19 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> State meeting
2/10/19 2:03 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> State meeting
2/10/19 12:20 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> It’s a red-tailed
2/10/19 12:08 pm Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Re: Leucistic BAEA
2/10/19 11:31 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Leucistic BAEA
2/10/19 6:35 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Canada Goose
2/10/19 6:10 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Canada Goose
2/9/19 5:20 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...> bird song apps?
2/9/19 3:33 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> GOOD BIRDS AROUND BEAVER LAKE, BUT NOTHING RARE
2/9/19 11:58 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Re: NWARA
2/8/19 4:02 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: airport geese
2/8/19 1:16 pm Jacob Wessels <jacoblwessels...> Re: TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK
2/8/19 12:25 pm Hal Mitchell <halmitchell...> Re: TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK
2/8/19 12:17 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: airport geese
2/8/19 12:16 pm Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> how to find Dickcissel nests, with stats from thesis work
2/8/19 12:01 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Re: airport geese
2/8/19 11:40 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: airport geese
2/8/19 10:50 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK
2/8/19 10:45 am Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...> It's freezing !
2/8/19 10:22 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Canvasbacks at Moberly Pond
2/8/19 8:37 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Canvasbacks at Moberly Pond
2/8/19 8:21 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK
2/8/19 7:40 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK
2/7/19 8:54 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 7
2/7/19 10:44 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Insect (bird food) decline, and what we can do; a peer-reviewed review
2/7/19 9:10 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> BirdLR Birdathon Team Registration Open
2/7/19 7:59 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: 3 way Warbler Hybrid
2/7/19 7:48 am Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> 3 way Warbler Hybrid
2/7/19 7:34 am Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> Hummer Bills
2/7/19 7:05 am Than Boves <tboves...> Re: Watch "How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change | Allan Savory" on YouTube
2/7/19 5:48 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Watch "How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change | Allan Savory" on YouTube
2/6/19 5:18 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> SHORT-EARED OWL AT CHESNEY PRAIRIE N.A.
2/6/19 12:39 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Say’s Phoebe
2/6/19 12:26 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...> Birding Colorado 4/19-4/29 We need 1 female to share a motel room with another female.
2/6/19 10:22 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Kim Smith memorial in The Auk
2/5/19 9:11 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Trail of feathers to the Neanderthal mind
2/4/19 11:30 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Say’s Phoebe Continues
2/4/19 5:55 am d.marie yates <maribird...> Killdeer fly- throughs (as goes yard) stopping next to front pond. Calling 1st time this season around 7:30.
2/3/19 10:26 pm Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...> Re: glasses
2/3/19 6:47 pm Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Worst possible weekend
2/3/19 3:09 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Field Trip to DEVIL’S DEN STATE PARK for GBBC
2/3/19 1:00 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Woolsey Wet Prairie - 02/03/2019 - Sora
2/3/19 9:09 am Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Say’s Phoebe
2/2/19 8:27 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: NW Arkansas plants, trees, etc.
2/2/19 3:45 pm plm108 <plm108...> Bald Eagles and American Coots
2/2/19 3:03 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Eagle Watch Nature Trail -- eagles
2/2/19 9:12 am Eleanor Bragg <sixteencedars...> Fox Sparrows
2/1/19 8:20 pm JFR <johnfredman...> ERRONEOUS ID OF LOON AT LAKE SARACEN
2/1/19 12:36 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Loon yodel in fog (Beaver Lake)
2/1/19 11:44 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
2/1/19 11:25 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> NW Arkansas plants, trees, etc.
2/1/19 10:46 am Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...> Horned Grebe
2/1/19 10:15 am Tammy <msiinc...> Birding Adventures
2/1/19 9:36 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
2/1/19 9:27 am Mary Ann King <office...> Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
2/1/19 8:42 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
2/1/19 7:48 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
2/1/19 6:07 am Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...> Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 31 Jan 2019 - Special issue (#2019-36)
2/1/19 6:05 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird Filters and the Great Backyard Bird Count
1/31/19 6:17 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...> Gunnison Sage-Grouse & Southern Colorado in 4/19- 4/29.... LONG
1/31/19 5:48 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
1/31/19 2:49 pm Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Fw: This listserve-original intent
1/31/19 10:12 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds
1/31/19 8:58 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> how to subscribe to the "fellowshipofwings" list serv
1/31/19 8:51 am Don Simons <Don.Simons...> TOSO Paper
1/31/19 7:54 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> bird friendly yards - YES
1/31/19 7:20 am Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
1/31/19 6:40 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: This listserve-original intent
1/31/19 6:31 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> STOP "list serve original"
1/31/19 6:25 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Mulberries and Arkansas Birds
1/31/19 5:38 am d.marie yates <maribird...> Re: Birds, pollinator garden, conservation. Etc.
1/31/19 3:59 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Birds, pollinator garden, conservation. Etc.
1/30/19 5:45 pm Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Birds, pollinator garden, conservation. Etc.
1/30/19 5:17 pm Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...> 60 Canvasbacks
1/30/19 5:05 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: This listserve-original intent
1/30/19 4:36 pm Chris Pistole <raptor1964...> Re: glasses
1/30/19 4:28 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: This listserve-original intent
1/30/19 2:45 pm Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: Birding and dogs
1/30/19 2:33 pm Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: glasses
1/30/19 1:58 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: glasses
1/30/19 1:53 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: fellowshipofwings listserve,
1/30/19 1:34 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Fwd: fellowshipofwings listserve,
1/30/19 1:31 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: This listserve-original intent
1/30/19 1:30 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> interesting winter birds (northwest Arkansas)
1/30/19 1:20 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: This listserve-original intent
1/30/19 1:19 pm Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...> Re: This listserve-original intent
1/30/19 12:47 pm Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...> Re: This listserve-original intent
1/30/19 12:23 pm d.marie yates <maribird...> Re: This listserve-original intent
1/30/19 12:03 pm Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: This listserve-original intent
1/30/19 11:18 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> This listserve-original intent
1/30/19 10:52 am d.marie yates <maribird...> Re: glasses
1/30/19 10:45 am Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...> Re: Birding and dogs
1/30/19 10:44 am Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...> Canvasbacks
1/30/19 10:43 am d.marie yates <maribird...> Re: Birding and dogs
1/30/19 10:31 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Birding and dogs
1/30/19 9:24 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> A mouthful of feathers
1/30/19 8:34 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> glasses
1/30/19 7:46 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Dr. Kimberly G. Smith memorial article
1/29/19 8:43 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 29
1/29/19 1:23 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> First it was "The Birds", now...
1/29/19 1:10 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Kim Smith, rock wall, ONSC and juncos
1/28/19 7:33 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: Preventing Window Strikes
1/28/19 7:21 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Preventing Window Strikes
1/28/19 6:32 pm JFR <johnfredman...> RED-THROATED LOON AT LAKE SARACEN
1/28/19 4:23 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: Preventing Window Strikes
1/28/19 12:25 pm Carolyn Minson <0000026be4c063cf-dmarc-request...> Preventing Window Strikes
1/28/19 12:00 pm laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> 15 common loons at jolly marina now maumelle
1/28/19 9:27 am laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Rock Wren and a Bald Eagle
1/28/19 7:52 am Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Arkansas CBC and Partial Shutdown
1/28/19 7:34 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> AAS News of Members
1/27/19 7:52 pm Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> Re: Bird Window Strikes
1/27/19 7:15 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> city lake
1/27/19 7:12 pm Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> Re: Bird Window Strikes
1/27/19 7:06 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Bird Window Strikes
1/27/19 5:55 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Bird Window Strikes
1/27/19 5:36 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Robin Eats a Snake
1/27/19 3:52 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Robin Eats a Snake
1/27/19 3:40 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Robin Eats a Snake
1/27/19 3:35 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: New Pinnacle Mountain Hotspot
1/27/19 3:31 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Robin Eats a Snake
1/27/19 3:25 pm Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> Bird Window Strikes
1/27/19 1:31 pm Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...> SAVE THE DATE: Arkansas Audubon Society spring convention, May 3-5 | Petit Jean Mountain
1/27/19 7:17 am DAN <birddan...> Rock Wren - YES
1/27/19 6:52 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Some winter birds on Kessler Mountain in Fayetteville
1/26/19 5:57 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: Rock Wren , Pinnacle Mountain SP
1/26/19 11:15 am JFR <johnfredman...> BATTLING AM. COOTS AT LAKE SARCEN
1/26/19 6:23 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: FW: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl
1/26/19 6:21 am Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...> Re: FW: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl
1/26/19 6:07 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> FW: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl
1/25/19 5:51 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> IN THE EYE OF THE STORM … FOR A LITTLE WHILE (MAYSVILLE)
1/25/19 10:22 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Harris' sparrow
1/25/19 9:45 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Harris' sparrow
1/25/19 6:56 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> How my CRS garbled RTP & Smith’s in Arkansas (a correction)
1/24/19 4:44 pm Cody Massery <codythebirder...> Rock Wren NO
1/24/19 11:00 am Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Re: Purple Finches
1/23/19 6:04 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Re: eBird app
1/23/19 5:15 pm JoAnn Drew <000001540c75b1c3-dmarc-request...> Re: STOP on shut down political discussion
1/23/19 4:21 pm Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...> Re: Purple Finches
1/23/19 3:41 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Purple Finches
1/23/19 3:22 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: eBird app
1/23/19 3:18 pm Judy Blackwell <blackwelltj...> pine siskin coloration
1/23/19 2:57 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Elegant Leaftossers
1/23/19 2:37 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Re: eBird app
1/23/19 1:51 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> GOOD READ: ROGER TORY PETERSON, “ALL THINGS RECONSIDERED”
1/23/19 1:43 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Appreciation
1/23/19 1:28 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: eBird
1/23/19 1:27 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA January Field Trip
1/23/19 12:42 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: STOP on shut down political discussion
1/23/19 12:33 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Cedar Waxwings and Yaupon
1/23/19 12:30 pm Keith de Noble <kdenoble...> Re: STOP on shut down political discussion
1/23/19 12:26 pm Keith de Noble <kdenoble...> Re: Reopen National Parks
1/23/19 12:22 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> STOP on shut down political discussion
1/23/19 12:20 pm Thomas Foti <tfoti62...> Re: Reopen National Parks
1/23/19 12:17 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Re: eBird
1/23/19 12:16 pm David Oakley <gdosr...> Re: Reopen National Parks This POLITICAL Agenda on ARBird needs to STOP... this is a BIRD List
1/23/19 12:11 pm Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Re: Reopen National Parks This POLITICAL Agenda on ARBird needs to STOP... this is a BIRD List
1/23/19 11:32 am Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: Cedar Waxwings and Yaupon
1/23/19 11:06 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Reopen National Parks
1/23/19 10:53 am <shalom...> <shalom...> Re: Reopen National Parks This POLITICAL Agenda on ARBird needs to STOP... this is a BIRD List
1/23/19 10:45 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: Reopen National Parks
1/23/19 10:20 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Reopen National Parks
1/23/19 9:42 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> eBird
1/23/19 8:33 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Cedar Waxwings and Yaupon
1/23/19 8:19 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> SSHA
1/23/19 7:06 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: time for a vest?
1/23/19 7:02 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: time for a vest?
1/23/19 12:37 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: time for a vest?
1/22/19 6:55 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: time for a vest?
1/22/19 5:55 pm dianemarie yates <maribird...> Re: time for a vest?
1/22/19 5:41 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Freeing the "sparrow"
1/22/19 5:34 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: time for a vest?
1/22/19 5:00 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> time for a vest?
1/22/19 2:26 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Here's the West (in Arkansas)
1/22/19 2:22 pm Devin Moon <moondevg...> Rock Wren at Pinnacle State Park, Pulaski Co.
1/22/19 1:37 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Freeing the "sparrow"
1/21/19 6:15 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> AAS on the radio
1/21/19 4:03 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Paragould Birder Needed
1/21/19 12:21 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Re: Birds and Bison There is a connection
1/21/19 9:27 am Chris Pistole <raptor1964...> Re: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park
1/21/19 6:34 am DesignWorks <market...> Re: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park
1/21/19 6:25 am dianemarie yates <maribird...> Re: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park
1/21/19 6:06 am dianemarie yates <maribird...> Re: How 'Rick and Morty' explains why humans keep destroying the environment - Treehugger
1/21/19 5:54 am DesignWorks <market...> Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park
1/21/19 5:28 am Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...> Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 18 Jan 2019 to 19 Jan 2019 (#2019-21)
1/20/19 11:25 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> How 'Rick and Morty' explains why humans keep destroying the environment - Treehugger
1/20/19 10:47 am dianemarie yates <maribird...> Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
1/20/19 10:36 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> A child without an education is like a bird without wings (Donna and Kelly)
1/20/19 10:11 am James Morgan <jlmm...> Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
1/20/19 9:24 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
1/20/19 6:19 am dianemarie yates <maribird...> Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
1/20/19 4:56 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Breakfast and birds
1/20/19 4:51 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Re: Breakfast and birds
1/19/19 7:38 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Breakfast and birds
1/19/19 6:01 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
1/19/19 5:03 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> quack
1/19/19 3:24 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
1/19/19 2:37 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
1/19/19 8:17 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Say No to Dicamba extension
1/19/19 6:07 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
1/18/19 5:59 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
1/18/19 3:14 pm Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Re: aww nuts
1/18/19 12:55 pm Than Boves <tboves...> Re: Banding Eastern Bluebirds
1/18/19 12:15 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
1/18/19 11:46 am Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
1/18/19 9:59 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: aww nuts
1/18/19 9:29 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> aww nuts
1/18/19 9:26 am Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Re: Banding Eastern Bluebirds
1/18/19 9:25 am Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...> Re: Banding Eastern Bluebirds
1/18/19 9:23 am Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Banding Eastern Bluebirds
1/18/19 8:39 am Robinson, Mitch <mrrobinson...> Feb. 23; Grassland Birding & Winter Sparrow Workshop
1/18/19 6:14 am Robinson, Mitch <mrrobinson...> 3/23 Grassland Birding & Winter Sparrow Workshop
1/17/19 12:20 pm Robinson, Mitch <mrrobinson...> Grassland Birding & Winter Sparrow Workshop
1/16/19 4:46 am AddThis Share Tools <email...> Jonathan Franzen's Controversial Stance on Climate Action
 
Back to top
Date: 2/15/19 3:40 pm
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
In the short term this is probably true. But Rachael Carson's efforts were not immediately rewarded either.--D'Marie.




On Feb 15, 2019, at 5:32 PM, Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...><mailto:<lfoster5211...>> wrote:

As a lawyer and former Arkansas uniform law commissioner, in my opinion, in theory this would solve the problem but in practice our current legislature would not enact. Not a chance.

Lynn Foster

On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 1:39 PM Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...><mailto:<000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
Read the story. A potential and possibly easier solution than convincing the politicians to prevent the use of Dicamba (which all of us nature lovers would prefer, of course) would be to pass a strict legal liability law that states that any farmer who uses the product will be strictly liable for triple damages to any adjacent farmer and the burden of proof would shift to the Dicamba farmer to prove his Dicamba drift didn't cause the damage. The presence of damge would be prima-fascia proof and all the offend farmer would need to make his/her case. The offending farmer would also be liable for all attorney fees and expenses. This would put the burden whee it belongs, It would give every plaintiff law firm fabulous incentive to protect the damaged farmer. Let's all write our State Senate and House Reps and suggest this as a solution. Of course, we would also want the seller, distributor and manufacturer of Dicamba to also be held liable with the same burden of proof in every action filed. Seriously folks, this would get ride of just about all Dicamba use within 3 years of enactment of such a strict liability law would be put in place. Let the lawyers have fun!

Joe


-----Original Message-----
From: Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...><mailto:<000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>>
Sent: Fri, Feb 15, 2019 12:03 pm
Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas

This story is the more frightening when you consider the fact that farmland borders some of the most biodiverse & ecologically important habitat on our national wildlife refuges & Arkansas wildlife management areas in east Arkansas. Think about what "Dicamba Drift" is now doing to the vegetation on the Dale Bumpers-White River NWR, Big Lake NWR, Dagmar WMA, St. Francis Sunken Lands WMA & the rest of our federal & state-owned lands in the Arkansas delta.

To me it looks like a complete failure of federal, state & local government to protect the the air, water & food that we & our birds depend upon for life.

Bb

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android<https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>

On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 11:09 AM, Bill Thurman
<bill.masterofmusic...><mailto:<bill.masterofmusic...>> wrote:
Thank you, Barry! This is why I won't eat one damn thing from the state of Arkansas. All the groceries I buy are usually organic and come from places like Chile, Ecuador, California and Alaska.
I feel sorry for the birds and wildlife anywhere near all this insidious poison.
They are stuck with it, especially in eastern Arkansas.
There is NO amount of money imaginable that some person or corporation could pay me to willfully eat all this poisoned crap. Arkansas used to be a beautiful natural state in many places where now it's not even close.
Thanks again, Barry. If Dicamba and all the other mega poisons are banned, I would consider it a true miracle.

Bill Thurman living in the Poisoned Land

On Thu, Feb 14, 2019, 9:45 PM Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...><mailto:<000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> wrote:

https://newrepublic.com/article/152304/murder-monsanto-chemical-herbicide-arkansas


I hope you are all able to read this very sad story about what Dicamba has brought to the farmers & people of east Arkansas.

Please read & share with your friends & neighbors before the state Plant Board meeting Feb. 20.

Barry Bennett
Fayetteville

 

Back to top
Date: 2/15/19 3:32 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
As a lawyer and former Arkansas uniform law commissioner, in my opinion, in
theory this would solve the problem but in practice our current legislature
would not enact. Not a chance.

Lynn Foster

On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 1:39 PM Joe Tucker <
<000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Read the story. A potential and possibly easier solution than convincing
> the politicians to prevent the use of Dicamba (which all of us nature
> lovers would prefer, of course) would be to pass a strict legal liability
> law that states that any farmer who uses the product will be strictly
> liable for triple damages to any adjacent farmer and the burden of proof
> would shift to the Dicamba farmer to prove his Dicamba drift didn't cause
> the damage. The presence of damge would be prima-fascia proof and all the
> offend farmer would need to make his/her case. The offending farmer would
> also be liable for all attorney fees and expenses. This would put the
> burden whee it belongs, It would give every plaintiff law firm fabulous
> incentive to protect the damaged farmer. Let's all write our State Senate
> and House Reps and suggest this as a solution. Of course, we would also
> want the seller, distributor and manufacturer of Dicamba to also be held
> liable with the same burden of proof in every action filed. Seriously
> folks, this would get ride of just about all Dicamba use within 3 years of
> enactment of such a strict liability law would be put in place. Let the
> lawyers have fun!
>
> Joe
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>
> To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Fri, Feb 15, 2019 12:03 pm
> Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
>
> This story is the more frightening when you consider the fact that
> farmland borders some of the most biodiverse & ecologically important
> habitat on our national wildlife refuges & Arkansas wildlife management
> areas in east Arkansas. Think about what "Dicamba Drift" is now doing to
> the vegetation on the Dale Bumpers-White River NWR, Big Lake NWR, Dagmar
> WMA, St. Francis Sunken Lands WMA & the rest of our federal & state-owned
> lands in the Arkansas delta.
>
> To me it looks like a complete failure of federal, state & local
> government to protect the the air, water & food that we & our birds depend
> upon for life.
>
> Bb
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
> <https://go.onelink.me/107872968?pid=InProduct&c=Global_Internal_YGrowth_AndroidEmailSig__AndroidUsers&af_wl=ym&af_sub1=Internal&af_sub2=Global_YGrowth&af_sub3=EmailSignature>
>
> On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 11:09 AM, Bill Thurman
> <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
> Thank you, Barry! This is why I won't eat one damn thing from the state of
> Arkansas. All the groceries I buy are usually organic and come from places
> like Chile, Ecuador, California and Alaska.
> I feel sorry for the birds and wildlife anywhere near all this insidious
> poison.
> They are stuck with it, especially in eastern Arkansas.
> There is NO amount of money imaginable that some person or
> corporation could pay me to willfully eat all this poisoned crap. Arkansas
> used to be a beautiful natural state in many places where now it's not even
> close.
> Thanks again, Barry. If Dicamba and all the other mega poisons are banned,
> I would consider it a true miracle.
>
> Bill Thurman living in the Poisoned Land
>
> On Thu, Feb 14, 2019, 9:45 PM Barry Bennett <
> <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> https://newrepublic.com/article/152304/murder-monsanto-chemical-herbicide-arkansas
>
>
>
> I hope you are all able to read this very sad story about what Dicamba has
> brought to the farmers & people of east Arkansas.
>
> Please read & share with your friends & neighbors before the state Plant
> Board meeting Feb. 20.
>
> Barry Bennett
> Fayetteville
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/15/19 1:22 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Rare bird alert
Anyone know why Eastern Bluebird is showing up as a rare bird in Washington
County? I get hourly alerts for rare birds in Arkansas from eBird.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

 

Back to top
Date: 2/15/19 1:11 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
It would be wonderful to see this liability law for all pesticides and not just Dicamba. Sadly with other chemicals it’s not possible to determine where the drift came from.

It is literally impossible for anyone living within 3 miles of a ricefield to grow a garden of tomatoes until farmers and aerial applicators are done spraying Facet. Facet drifts and stunts tomato plants, severely reducing yield and tomato size. I cannot plant tomatoes until the end of May. A garden center in the city of Dewitt list all their tomato plants to Facet drift and a vegetable producer a few miles outside of Dewitt who supplies several restaurants in Arkansas County with homegrown local produce, lost an entire field of tomato plants. Fortunately Facet does not appear to damage most pollinator plants.

Also, about 30 acres of emergent marsh on state property was accidentally sprayed by a crop duster killing plants and damaging others during the avian nesting season. State regulations stipulate that the crop duster be warned not to do it again.

While Dicamba has caught everyone’s attention, I believe damage to native plants by currently approved chemicals is an unrecognized problem.

Karen


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 15, 2019, at 1:39 PM, Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Read the story. A potential and possibly easier solution than convincing the politicians to prevent the use of Dicamba (which all of us nature lovers would prefer, of course) would be to pass a strict legal liability law that states that any farmer who uses the product will be strictly liable for triple damages to any adjacent farmer and the burden of proof would shift to the Dicamba farmer to prove his Dicamba drift didn't cause the damage. The presence of damge would be prima-fascia proof and all the offend farmer would need to make his/her case. The offending farmer would also be liable for all attorney fees and expenses. This would put the burden whee it belongs, It would give every plaintiff law firm fabulous incentive to protect the damaged farmer. Let's all write our State Senate and House Reps and suggest this as a solution. Of course, we would also want the seller, distributor and manufacturer of Dicamba to also be held liable with the same burden of proof in every action filed. Seriously folks, this would get ride of just about all Dicamba use within 3 years of enactment of such a strict liability law would be put in place. Let the lawyers have fun!
>
> Joe
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>
> To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Fri, Feb 15, 2019 12:03 pm
> Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
>
> This story is the more frightening when you consider the fact that farmland borders some of the most biodiverse & ecologically important habitat on our national wildlife refuges & Arkansas wildlife management areas in east Arkansas. Think about what "Dicamba Drift" is now doing to the vegetation on the Dale Bumpers-White River NWR, Big Lake NWR, Dagmar WMA, St. Francis Sunken Lands WMA & the rest of our federal & state-owned lands in the Arkansas delta.
>
> To me it looks like a complete failure of federal, state & local government to protect the the air, water & food that we & our birds depend upon for life.
>
> Bb
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
>
> On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 11:09 AM, Bill Thurman
> <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
> Thank you, Barry! This is why I won't eat one damn thing from the state of Arkansas. All the groceries I buy are usually organic and come from places like Chile, Ecuador, California and Alaska.
> I feel sorry for the birds and wildlife anywhere near all this insidious poison.
> They are stuck with it, especially in eastern Arkansas.
> There is NO amount of money imaginable that some person or corporation could pay me to willfully eat all this poisoned crap. Arkansas used to be a beautiful natural state in many places where now it's not even close.
> Thanks again, Barry. If Dicamba and all the other mega poisons are banned, I would consider it a true miracle.
>
> Bill Thurman living in the Poisoned Land
>
> On Thu, Feb 14, 2019, 9:45 PM Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> wrote:
> https://newrepublic.com/article/152304/murder-monsanto-chemical-herbicide-arkansas
>
>
> I hope you are all able to read this very sad story about what Dicamba has brought to the farmers & people of east Arkansas.
>
> Please read & share with your friends & neighbors before the state Plant Board meeting Feb. 20.
>
> Barry Bennett
> Fayetteville
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/15/19 12:20 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Mulhollan Blind (Lake Fayetteville)
Cold light rain, some sleet, modest north wind umbrella walk to Mulhollan Blind at Lake Fayetteville this morning. I appreciated gloves that have finger tips open, but can be covered by a small attached mitt. A little clunky for using binoculars, but comfortable in below freezing temps. First birds: Eastern Bluebirds (4) and a flock of 40 or so Dark-eyed Juncos, aka snowbirds or today sleet birds, and a Red-shouldered Hawk perched on the ground in the field the red of its name really stands out. Brief stop at Mary Bess Mulhollans bird feeders at botanical garden: White-throated Sparrows (10), American Goldfinch (2), Purple Finch (1, male), several House Finches, and a Downy Woodpecker. Nearby, Ruby-crowned Kinglet (1). I wouldnt say it was warm and comfy in the blind, but it is well-protected from the rain, a good thing. Out on the lake: Great Blue Heron (1), Belted Kingfisher (1), duck species, probably Gadwalls (14), and one turtle with a pointed nose just out of the water. On a gray day like this, the rosy colored branches of Swamp Dogwood stand out and in my estimation provide yet another reason why they should all be protected around Lake Fayetteville. What a great treasure they are, now, and in late May when they will be covered with white flowers and lots of pollinators. Hazelnut bushes are covered today by dangling male catkins, but no female flowers yet. Next round of warmth and sunshine guaranteed to encourage tiny reddish female flowers, sure sign of spring.


 

Back to top
Date: 2/15/19 11:39 am
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
Read the story.  A potential and possibly easier solution than convincing the politicians to prevent the use of Dicamba (which all of us nature lovers would prefer, of course) would be to pass a strict legal liability law that states  that any farmer who uses the product will be strictly liable for triple damages to any adjacent farmer and the burden of proof would shift to the Dicamba farmer to prove his Dicamba drift didn't cause the damage. The presence of damge would be prima-fascia proof and all the offend farmer would need to make his/her case.  The offending farmer would also be  liable for all attorney fees and expenses.  This would put the burden whee it belongs, It would give every plaintiff law firm fabulous incentive to protect the damaged farmer.  Let's all write our State Senate and House Reps and suggest this as a solution.   Of course, we would also want the seller, distributor and manufacturer of Dicamba to also be held liable with the same burden of proof in every action filed.  Seriously folks, this would get ride of just about all Dicamba use within 3 years of enactment of such a strict liability law would be put in place.  Let the lawyers have fun!    
Joe


-----Original Message-----
From: Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Fri, Feb 15, 2019 12:03 pm
Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas

This story is the more frightening when you consider the fact that farmland borders some of the most biodiverse & ecologically important habitat on our national wildlife refuges & Arkansas wildlife management areas in east Arkansas. Think about what "Dicamba Drift" is now doing to the vegetation on the Dale Bumpers-White River NWR, Big Lake NWR,  Dagmar WMA, St. Francis Sunken Lands WMA & the rest of our federal & state-owned lands in the Arkansas delta. 
To me it looks like a complete failure of federal, state & local government to protect the the air, water & food that we & our birds depend upon for life.
Bb

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 11:09 AM, Bill Thurman<bill.masterofmusic...> wrote: Thank you, Barry! This is why I won't eat one damn thing from the state of Arkansas. All the groceries I buy are usually organic and come from places like Chile, Ecuador, California and Alaska.I feel sorry for the birds and wildlife anywhere near all this insidious poison.They are stuck with it, especially in eastern Arkansas.        There is NO amount of money imaginable that some person or corporation could pay me to willfully eat all this poisoned crap. Arkansas used to be a beautiful natural state in many places where now it's not even close.Thanks again, Barry. If Dicamba and all the other mega poisons are banned, I would consider it a true miracle.
Bill Thurman living in the Poisoned Land
On Thu, Feb 14, 2019, 9:45 PM Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> wrote:

https://newrepublic.com/article/152304/murder-monsanto-chemical-herbicide-arkansas

I hope you are all able to read this very sad story about what Dicamba has brought to the farmers & people of east Arkansas.
Please read & share with your friends & neighbors before the state Plant Board meeting Feb. 20.
Barry BennettFayetteville



 

Back to top
Date: 2/15/19 10:03 am
From: Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
This story is the more frightening when you consider the fact that farmland borders some of the most biodiverse & ecologically important habitat on our national wildlife refuges & Arkansas wildlife management areas in east Arkansas. Think about what "Dicamba Drift" is now doing to the vegetation on the Dale Bumpers-White River NWR, Big Lake NWR,  Dagmar WMA, St. Francis Sunken Lands WMA & the rest of our federal & state-owned lands in the Arkansas delta. 
To me it looks like a complete failure of federal, state & local government to protect the the air, water & food that we & our birds depend upon for life.
Bb

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Fri, Feb 15, 2019 at 11:09 AM, Bill Thurman<bill.masterofmusic...> wrote: Thank you, Barry! This is why I won't eat one damn thing from the state of Arkansas. All the groceries I buy are usually organic and come from places like Chile, Ecuador, California and Alaska.I feel sorry for the birds and wildlife anywhere near all this insidious poison.They are stuck with it, especially in eastern Arkansas.        There is NO amount of money imaginable that some person or corporation could pay me to willfully eat all this poisoned crap. Arkansas used to be a beautiful natural state in many places where now it's not even close.Thanks again, Barry. If Dicamba and all the other mega poisons are banned, I would consider it a true miracle.
Bill Thurman living in the Poisoned Land
On Thu, Feb 14, 2019, 9:45 PM Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> wrote:

https://newrepublic.com/article/152304/murder-monsanto-chemical-herbicide-arkansas

I hope you are all able to read this very sad story about what Dicamba has brought to the farmers & people of east Arkansas.
Please read & share with your friends & neighbors before the state Plant Board meeting Feb. 20.
Barry BennettFayetteville



 

Back to top
Date: 2/15/19 9:09 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
Thank you, Barry! This is why I won't eat one damn thing from the state of
Arkansas. All the groceries I buy are usually organic and come from places
like Chile, Ecuador, California and Alaska.
I feel sorry for the birds and wildlife anywhere near all this insidious
poison.
They are stuck with it, especially in eastern Arkansas.
There is NO amount of money imaginable that some person or
corporation could pay me to willfully eat all this poisoned crap. Arkansas
used to be a beautiful natural state in many places where now it's not even
close.
Thanks again, Barry. If Dicamba and all the other mega poisons are banned,
I would consider it a true miracle.

Bill Thurman living in the Poisoned Land

On Thu, Feb 14, 2019, 9:45 PM Barry Bennett <
<000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> https://newrepublic.com/article/152304/murder-monsanto-chemical-herbicide-arkansas
>
>
>
> I hope you are all able to read this very sad story about what Dicamba has
> brought to the farmers & people of east Arkansas.
>
> Please read & share with your friends & neighbors before the state Plant
> Board meeting Feb. 20.
>
> Barry Bennett
> Fayetteville
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/14/19 7:45 pm
From: Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Tragic Dicamba Story in East Arkansas
https://newrepublic.com/article/152304/murder-monsanto-chemical-herbicide-arkansas

I hope you are all able to read this very sad story about what Dicamba has brought to the farmers & people of east Arkansas.
Please read & share with your friends & neighbors before the state Plant Board meeting Feb. 20.
Barry BennettFayetteville

 

Back to top
Date: 2/14/19 7:19 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: AGFC Commissioners Open House
Arkansas Game & Fish Commission is hosting a town-hall style meeting next Tuesday, Feb. 19 from 5:30 to 7:00 in the AGFC auditorium at 2 Natural Resources Drive in Little Rock. This is an opportunity to chat with Commissioners and AGFC staff about conservation issues.


https://www.agfc.com/en/news/2019/02/06/commissioners-schedule-open-town-hall-meeting-for-public-comment/


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 2/14/19 5:28 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Is anyone missing a trained raptor?
Thanks, I'll give this info to the fb poster.
J

On Thu, Feb 14, 2019 at 6:33 AM Karen And Jim Rowe <
<rollingrfarm...> wrote:

> I coordinate falconry for AGFC so I will contact our falconers in NW AR
> and ask them. Permitted falconers not hunt raptors with jesses (straps) on
> but this hawk could have accidentally gotten loose from a weathering perch
> or damaged news.. Many falconers hunt Harris Hawks which look dark or black
> and would not be a raptor anyone would expect to see in AR.
>
> Karen
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Feb 13, 2019, at 10:04 PM, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
> wrote:
> >
> > Someone posted this on facebook this afternoon. The sighting was near
> Walmart in Berryville.
> >
> > "SAW A BROAD HAWK looked Black. It was hunting over me while I was
> walking Angel in Berryville, S.W. of Walmart.
> > This hawk had the straps of a Falconer on his leg. If your bird is
> missing. I saw him there..really unusual hawk. He was hunting."
> >
> > Judith
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/14/19 4:33 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Is anyone missing a trained raptor?
I coordinate falconry for AGFC so I will contact our falconers in NW AR and ask them. Permitted falconers not hunt raptors with jesses (straps) on but this hawk could have accidentally gotten loose from a weathering perch or damaged news.. Many falconers hunt Harris Hawks which look dark or black and would not be a raptor anyone would expect to see in AR.

Karen

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 13, 2019, at 10:04 PM, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> Someone posted this on facebook this afternoon. The sighting was near Walmart in Berryville.
>
> "SAW A BROAD HAWK looked Black. It was hunting over me while I was walking Angel in Berryville, S.W. of Walmart.
> This hawk had the straps of a Falconer on his leg. If your bird is missing. I saw him there..really unusual hawk. He was hunting."
>
> Judith
 

Back to top
Date: 2/13/19 8:05 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Is anyone missing a trained raptor?
Someone posted this on facebook this afternoon. The sighting was near
Walmart in Berryville.

"SAW A BROAD HAWK looked Black. It was hunting over me while I was walking
Angel in Berryville, S.W. of Walmart.
This hawk had the straps of a Falconer on his leg. If your bird is missing.
I saw him there..really unusual hawk. He was hunting."

Judith

 

Back to top
Date: 2/13/19 3:39 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Waterfowl at Alma Wastewater
The expansive 30-acre pond at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility was loaded with ducks this afternoon. I counted roughly 450: Gadwall (2), Northern Shoveler (250), Canvasback (20), Redhead (1), Ring-necked Duck (45), Lesser Scaup (100), Bufflehead (5), Common Goldeneye (20), Ruddy Duck (6). Also Canada Goose (2) and White-fronted Goose (1). Across the road at King Ranch: Canada Goose (60), White-fronted Goose (5).


 

Back to top
Date: 2/13/19 5:58 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Birds yesterday at Bentonville airport
A brief stop in Lake Bentonville Park on the north end of the Bentonville airport didnt do much to support the theory, offered by the airport manager, that geese needed to be killed there, at least not yesterday. At mid-day there were Canada Geese (2), Ring-billed Gull (1), Bald Eagle (1 adult), scaup species (12; likely Lesser Scaup) and Ring-necked Duck (6). The Canada Geese flew off across a field to the north when we parked. The Ring-billed Gull perched on the runway. The Bald Eagle flew low over the end of the runway at about same height as a small airplane that was taking off. The ducks didnt seem to pay attention to the airplane.

What I did notice was the entire area immediately adjacent the airport is being built up in all kinds of businesses, including a brand spanking new fieldhouse
(https://leisurlist.com/feed/article/thaden-fieldhouse-an-insider-view-of-whats-taking-off/details?fbclid=IwAR3qmw1wB0KDqsEl2CfBcC3JjmX8HbkdEzwzeelgW_gpCmwuRUk7faPpW6Y)
built right on the northwest end of the runway. Maybe they dont want geese poop on their new lawn and beach? All the construction crowded along the runway has certainly displaced all kinds of wildlife.

It looked to me like one more step in a long process, dating at least back to the early 1990s, when human development in an area originally a mesic Tallgrass Prairie steadily crowded out all of the species native to those habitats. Earlier victims included Willow Flycatchers, that once nested northeast of the runway.


 

Back to top
Date: 2/12/19 8:28 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: How to Count Birds
In preparation for the Great Backyard Bird Count this Friday-Monday, read up
on how to count:

Birds in general https://ebird.org/news/counting-101/
Feeder birds https://ebird.org/news/counting-102/
Big Flocks https://ebird.org/news/counting-201/

More about the GBBC is here http://gbbc.birdcount.org

Remember, today starts the period Ive restricted eBirds filters for some
species.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 2/12/19 9:50 am
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Rare Bird Indeed
Attached is a link to a NYTimes story on a cardinal that is both male and
female.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/09/science/cardinal-sex-gender.html

Peace and Birds Jerry Butler

 

Back to top
Date: 2/12/19 6:39 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: MORE ON CANADA GOOSE MANAGEMENT-CONTROL AND BENTONVILLE AIRPORT
I reported to this list about a plan by Bentonville airport to kill Canada Geese. This airport was built years ago basically out in the middle of nowhere for a small community. This was well before Walmart and the rapid urban build up including highways, subdivisions, and businesses that now surround the airport. In addition, there is now a regional airport a few miles away. Canada Geese are caught in the middle of all this. Before anyone starts shooting at geese, there are a few rules and regulations that must be followed. I received the following information from Karen Rowe, biologist with Arkansas Game and Fish:

Permits for federally protected migratory birds are issued by the USFWS regional permit office after an inspection and review of the depredation issue is made by USDA-APHIS-Wildlife Services and they complete and submit a Form 37 to the USFWS recommending lethal control. A permit from AGFC is not needed but a federal permit for lethal control from the USFWS is required APHIS-WS usually recommends the landowner initiates harassment and habitat modification before they recommend a depredation permit. 50 CFR 21.49 contains the federal regulations for control of resident Giant Canada Geese at airports. https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx...<https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=83e6918917589d44617f82970cc41016&node=50%3A9.0.1.1.4.4.1.9&rgn=div8&fbclid=IwAR281plp58FfavcblBGUrwkezxMXxUBckRQKV01xf_hekwWQ4GmyWWUGybI>


 

Back to top
Date: 2/12/19 5:33 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Decline of Insects
Glad to see this is getting mainstream media attention. From CNN:The insects are dying -- and that could be bad news for all of us. A new study says insect populations are declining so fast worldwide that 40% of species could be extinct (https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/11/health/insect-decline-study-intl/index.html?utm_source=CNN+Five+Things&utm_campaign=7f38083eae-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_02_11_05_44&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_6da287d761-7f38083eae-98129453) within a few decades. And if that happens, it would likely have a "catastrophic" effect on the planet, this study says. The use of pesticides is listed as the primary culprit, as well as habitat loss and climate change. The study's authors say the only way to reverse this is to reduce the use of pesticides and replace them with "more sustainable, ecologically-based practices."Patty McLean, Conway AR
 

Back to top
Date: 2/11/19 2:40 pm
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: Movies and Birds
And then there was Dennis the menace--Mr . Wilson's red-shafted flicker somewhere supposed to be the heartland, as I recall.

Sent from my iPod

On Feb 11, 2019, at 4:31 PM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...><mailto:<bill.masterofmusic...>> wrote:

On the old Andy Griffith show they probably thought that he sounded like a Red eyed Vireo but with a slow
southern drawl.

Bill



On Mon, Feb 11, 2019, 4:21 PM Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...><mailto:<kjgarrett84...> wrote:
My biggest pet peeve is showing a Bald Eagle and playing a Red-tailed Hawk call. The History Channel puts a Belted Kingfisher rattle in many of their outdoorsy shows, and National Geographic, who should know better, plays the Wood Thrush in their Alaska shows. I don't mind that so much because I could listen to the Wood Thrush all day.

One interesting note, all of the outdoors scenes on the old Andy Griffith shows have Yellow-throated Vireo. I would love to know how they chose that, since it isn't well-known.

On Sun, Feb 10, 2019, 5:50 PM Dan Bogler <danbogler...><mailto:<danbogler...> wrote:
I always get a kick out of things I see in movies that just aren't realistic. Like the good guys always jacking a shell into a pump shotgun right before they take on the bad guy

Or the cowboys that shoot a dozen times with a 6 shot revolver without reloading

But it doesn't stop there.They have now stepped over the bounds of what is acceptable. I imagine we all have our favorite bird boo-boos in a movie. This weekend I watched "Dancing with Wolves" and there is one scene where Kevin Costner is inside of what remains of an old military post. And a Eurasian Dove lands next to him.

An Eurasian Dove in the western United States in the late 1800's'? I don't think so !
 

Back to top
Date: 2/11/19 2:31 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Movies and Birds
On the old Andy Griffith show they probably thought that he sounded like a
Red eyed Vireo but with a slow
southern drawl.

Bill



On Mon, Feb 11, 2019, 4:21 PM Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:

> My biggest pet peeve is showing a Bald Eagle and playing a Red-tailed Hawk
> call. The History Channel puts a Belted Kingfisher rattle in many of their
> outdoorsy shows, and National Geographic, who should know better, plays the
> Wood Thrush in their Alaska shows. I don't mind that so much because I
> could listen to the Wood Thrush all day.
>
> One interesting note, all of the outdoors scenes on the old Andy Griffith
> shows have Yellow-throated Vireo. I would love to know how they chose
> that, since it isn't well-known.
>
> On Sun, Feb 10, 2019, 5:50 PM Dan Bogler <danbogler...> wrote:
>
>> I always get a kick out of things I see in movies that just aren't
>> realistic. Like the good guys always jacking a shell into a pump shotgun
>> right before they take on the bad guy
>>
>> Or the cowboys that shoot a dozen times with a 6 shot revolver without
>> reloading
>>
>> But it doesn't stop there.They have now stepped over the bounds of what
>> is acceptable. I imagine we all have our favorite bird boo-boos in a movie.
>> This weekend I watched "Dancing with Wolves" and there is one scene where
>> Kevin Costner is inside of what remains of an old military post. And a
>> Eurasian Dove lands next to him.
>>
>> An Eurasian Dove in the western United States in the late 1800's'? I
>> don't think so !
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/11/19 2:21 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Movies and Birds
My biggest pet peeve is showing a Bald Eagle and playing a Red-tailed Hawk
call. The History Channel puts a Belted Kingfisher rattle in many of their
outdoorsy shows, and National Geographic, who should know better, plays the
Wood Thrush in their Alaska shows. I don't mind that so much because I
could listen to the Wood Thrush all day.

One interesting note, all of the outdoors scenes on the old Andy Griffith
shows have Yellow-throated Vireo. I would love to know how they chose
that, since it isn't well-known.

On Sun, Feb 10, 2019, 5:50 PM Dan Bogler <danbogler...> wrote:

> I always get a kick out of things I see in movies that just aren't
> realistic. Like the good guys always jacking a shell into a pump shotgun
> right before they take on the bad guy
>
> Or the cowboys that shoot a dozen times with a 6 shot revolver without
> reloading
>
> But it doesn't stop there.They have now stepped over the bounds of what
> is acceptable. I imagine we all have our favorite bird boo-boos in a movie.
> This weekend I watched "Dancing with Wolves" and there is one scene where
> Kevin Costner is inside of what remains of an old military post. And a
> Eurasian Dove lands next to him.
>
> An Eurasian Dove in the western United States in the late 1800's'? I
> don't think so !
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/11/19 1:44 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA February Field Trip
This Saturday is the February field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas.  Please see details below.  The weather looks fairly decent, mostly sunny with a high of 40 degrees, but a tad bit windy, so dress warm.  Everyone is welcome, you don't have to be a member of ASCA.

I am working on the next three months of field trips and will post them once I finalized everything.  Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock area
February 16, 2019

Two Rivers Park, LittleRock AR

 Participate in the 2019 Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) byjoining ASCA’s February field trip.  Meetat 8:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Two Rivers Park Bridge (also known asthe “Little” Dam Bridge) at the start of the walking trail located at 4468River Mountain Road at the southeast end of the Two Rivers Park peninsula.  We’ll scope the river from the parking lot andbridge, then walk the dirt and paved trails as far as people wish to go.  You can turn around at any point and headback to your vehicle.  After returning toour cars, we’ll drive to the west entrance of Two Rivers Park and walk the bigfield and horse trail.  Both areas have adiverse population of sparrows and provides a great opportunity to work onidentifying those “little brown birds”. Knee-high rubber boots are recommended because of copious sandburrs.  Bring water, snacks, and yourscope if you have one.  We should finisharound noon.  If any rare loons are beingreported, we can continue on to Lake Maumelle. Loons, mergansers, ducks, and grebes are easily found on the lake thistime of year.  If you can’t join the fieldtrip, participate in the GBBC by counting the birds in your own backyard andsubmitting your sightings to the GBBC website at www.birdcount.org.

Directions-takeExit 9 west off I-430 onto Cantrell Rd. At the first stop light, turn right (north) onto River MountainRoad.  Go to the bottom of the hill thenbear right to the main parking lot.  GPScoordinates are 34.797458,-92.383017.


 

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Date: 2/11/19 1:23 pm
From: Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bird Consciousness & Animal Intelligence
https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/03/what-the-crow-knows/580726/
Fascinating article!
 

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Date: 2/11/19 6:26 am
From: Kathie Riedel <00000270674fa8fb-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Old vs New Tech
Do not know if this has circulated on this list serve as I have just rejoined. Very interesting.
Kathie Riedel
French military using winged warriors


to hunt down rogue drones.
This is amazing.
 

 

A golden eagle grabs a flying drone during
a military training exercise at Mont-de-Marsan
French Air Force base, Southwestern France.

Following incidents of drones flying over
the presidential palace and restricted
military sites – along with the deadly
2015 Paris terror attacks – the French
Air Force has trained four golden eagles
to intercept and destroy the rogue aircraft.

Aptly named d'Artagnan, Athos, Porthos
and Aramis – an homage to Alexandre Dumas’
“The Three Musketeers” – the four birds
of prey have been honing their attack
skills at the Mont-de-Marsan in
southwestern France since mid-2016.
 


 

“A drone means food for these birds,”
Gerald Machoukow, the military base's
falconer, told FRANCE 24. “Now they
automatically go after them.”
 

The use of hunting birds – normally
falcons and northern goshawks – by
militaries around the globe is common
practice in the fight to scare other
critters away from runways and so
cut the risk of accidents during takeoff
or landing. But it wasn’t until 2015 when
the Dutch started using bald eagles to
intercept drones that other militaries
started to see the benefit of these
winged warriors.

The French bred the four golden eagles
– three males and one female -- using
artificial insemination since eagles are
a protected species and harvesting wild
eggs is strictly forbidden. They chose the
golden eagle because of the birds hooked
beak and sharp eyesight.

Also weighing in around 11 pounds, the
birds are in a similar weight class as the
drones they’re sent to destroy and clocking
in at a top air speed of 50 miles per hour,
with the capability of spotting its target
from over a mile away, the eagles are
deft hunters.
To protect the eagles from drone blades
and any explosive device that might be
attached to them, the French military
designed mittens of leather and Kevlar
(an anti-blast material), to protect the
bird’s talons.
 



A golden eagle carries a flying drone (2017).
"I love these birds," Machoukow told
Agence France-Presse.  "I don't want to
send them to their death." 
The birds are first taught to attack in a
straight line before graduating to diving
from heights. Soon they’ll be patrolling the
skies over the Pyrenees Mountains in
southern France and could possibly be
deployed at airports and special events,
such as political summits and soccer
tournaments.
The French air force already expects
four more eagles to join the fleet.

 

 

Back to top
Date: 2/11/19 5:49 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Celebrate Aldo Leopold by joining habitat restoration work for birds, plants, and more at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area on March 2
As part of its annual "Hobbs Celebrates Leopold" weekend, Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area is hosting an invasive plant removal work day at the Sinking Stream Trail.


Heres an opportunity to put your passion to work. Saturday, March 2, 2019, from 1 pm to 3 pm. Meet in the parking lot of the Van Winkle Sinking Stream trailhead on Hwy 12, East of Rogers, Arkansas, GPS: 36.296833, -93.958233.



We will be working alongside with and under the direction of Hobbs Staff. Species we are targeting for removal are Multiflora Rose, Japanese Honeysuckle, and Wintercreeper.


The Sinking Stream Trail is in a picturesque Ozark spring hollow and is the nesting habitat for many native birds including Hooded Warbler, Kentucky Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Ovenbird, Wood thrush, Scarlet Tanager, Indigo Bunting, Broad-winged Hawk, and others. Native plants along Sinking Stream trail that we will be helping by reducing invasives include Blue-eyed Mary, Three Birds Orchids, Indian Pipe, Coral Root Orchid, PawPaw, Meadow Rue, Sensitive Fern, Green Trillium, and so many more plants that our native pollinators and other wildlife depend upon.


Be sure to wear leather gloves and sturdy boots. Helping Hobbs restore our State Park is a great way to celebrate Aldo Leopold's legacy.


 

Back to top
Date: 2/10/19 4:25 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, Thursday Feb 14
This Thursday, Feb 14, is Audubon Society of Central Arkansass monthly
meeting, starting at 7 PM at the Fletcher Library off H St. in Little Rock.
This months speaker is Ryan Diener, Arkansas State Coordinator for
Pheasants Forever and Quail Forever

It is safe to say that birders love bobwhite as much as hunters do. Sadly,
quail have been in decline for the past 40 years due to a host of cultural
and environmental factors have combined and lead to the degradation and loss
of the habitat that quail need to thrive. The challenges are great, but all
is not lost for quail. Increased interest in habitat restoration on private
lands for the benefit of all wildlife, and new unique partnerships are
swinging the pendulum back to the positive for quail and associated open
woodland and grassland species. If you would love to learn more about what
is being done in Arkansas to restore the Northern Bobwhite this Valentines
Day talk is for you!

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 2/10/19 3:50 pm
From: Dan Bogler <danbogler...>
Subject: Movies and Birds
I always get a kick out of things I see in movies that just aren't
realistic. Like the good guys always jacking a shell into a pump shotgun
right before they take on the bad guy

Or the cowboys that shoot a dozen times with a 6 shot revolver without
reloading

But it doesn't stop there.They have now stepped over the bounds of what is
acceptable. I imagine we all have our favorite bird boo-boos in a movie.
This weekend I watched "Dancing with Wolves" and there is one scene where
Kevin Costner is inside of what remains of an old military post. And a
Eurasian Dove lands next to him.

An Eurasian Dove in the western United States in the late 1800's'? I don't
think so !

 

Back to top
Date: 2/10/19 2:24 pm
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...>
Subject: Re: State meeting
Hi Sandy,

The Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) spring convention will be held Friday,
May 3 through Sunday, May 5 at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute atop
Petit Jean Mountain. I sent preliminary details to the ARBIRD listserv two
weeks ago and have copied and pasted those details below my signature for
your and others' convenience. I plan to create a Facebook event for the
convention this evening to help folks on social media save-the-date more
readily. The convention program is still be finalized but will be posted on
the AAS website, www.arbirds.org, once complete.

Let me know if you have any questions at all about the convention--I'm glad
to help!

Samantha Scheiman
Arkansas Audubon Society vice president
Little Rock, Ark.

* * *

Arkansas Birders,

Please mark your calendars: the Arkansas Audubon Society's spring
convention will be held May 3-5 at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute (WRI)
atop Petit Jean Mountain.

On Friday evening, May 3, we will celebrate the life of one of our
Society's founders, Dr. Doug James, who passed away in December. Dr.
Ragupathy Kannan will give a presentation titled, "Fun, friendship, and
fine science—my 30 years with Doug James," which will be immediately
followed with an open mike session for people to share their memories.
James helped start the Arkansas Audubon Society in 1955 and the Arkansas
Audubon Society Trust in 1972 and was one of Arkansas's leading
conservationists.

On Saturday, May 4, our special guest speaker will be Benjamin Vogt, native
plant garden designer and author of the book, *A New Garden Ethic*.
Benjamin will give two talks on Saturday, May 4 on the following topics
that dovetail with the Society's Bird Friendly Yard (BFY) program:

2 p.m. - SUSTAINABLE DESIGN FOR GARDEN AND HOME
Plants aren’t just pretty decoration -- they can be thoughtfully used for a
myriad of benefits. From cooling our homes to preventing runoff into storm
drains, from cleaning the air and amending soil naturally, plants are
useful to us. We’ll explore how native plants can help us create a healthy
environment for our families and wildlife, while learning how to emulate
natural processes for less work in garden management and care.

6:30 p.m. - A NEW GARDEN ETHIC
In a time of climate change and mass extinction, how and for whom we garden
matters more than ever. This impassioned and provocative talk asks: How can
we recognize and develop empathy for other species? What role do native
plants have in opening us to the perspectives of others? What benefits
happen to our society when we advocate for the equality and freedom of a
silent majority -- pollinators, birds, spiders, and more? Through ecology,
psychology, garden design, and philosophy, we’ll explore the rich
complexity of rethinking pretty in urban and suburban landscapes.

If you would like a flyer (in PDF form) featuring Benjamin's talks to share
with your friends, email me directly. Benjamin will also be available to
sell and sign copies of his book. Additionally, the convention will feature
birding field trips, student presentations, fellowship with other wildlife
enthusiasts, a silent auction, and more! More details will follow soon.

Lastly, a word about lodging: Rooms are reserved at the WRI for the
convention ($89/night for all rooms except in the President's Lodge, where
the rooms are $99/night) and will be available for booking as soon as the
convention program is finalized and on our website, arbirds.org. However,
if you'd prefer to camp at nearby Petit Jean State Park, there is still a
good number of campsites available as of today, and there are even a few
rooms in Mather Lodge--however, I suggest booking such accommodations soon
if you prefer these alternative options, as Petit Jean State Park is very
popular.

Email me directly if you have any questions at all regarding the spring
convention.

Good Birding,

Samantha Scheiman
vice president, Arkansas Audubon Society
Little Rock, Ark.

On Sun, Feb 10, 2019 at 4:03 PM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> At Petit Jean, May 4,5,6???
>
> Sandy B
>


--
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold

 

Back to top
Date: 2/10/19 2:19 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: State meeting
Got the info.

Thanks

 

Back to top
Date: 2/10/19 2:03 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: State meeting
At Petit Jean, May 4,5,6???

Sandy B

 

Back to top
Date: 2/10/19 12:20 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: It’s a red-tailed
Thanks to those who looked at pics.

Sandy

 

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Date: 2/10/19 12:08 pm
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Re: Leucistic BAEA
Are we certain it is? The bird I saw looked like a buteo species. But the images were not that clear.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 10, 2019, at 1:30 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> It appears there is an albino/leucistic Bald Eagle in the Charleston area. Pictures were posted to Facebook this morning. No location was given. Photographer didn’t want people harassing it.
>
> Sandy B
> Fort Smith
 

Back to top
Date: 2/10/19 11:31 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Leucistic BAEA
It appears there is an albino/leucistic Bald Eagle in the Charleston area.
Pictures were posted to Facebook this morning. No location was given.
Photographer didn’t want people harassing it.

Sandy B
Fort Smith

 

Back to top
Date: 2/10/19 6:35 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Canada Goose
I would have to say to say we should really rejoice and congratulate "some
of us." If it hadn't been for those few observant people, the Giant Canada
Geese never would have been rediscovered or even cared about. The alarm
bells for the Whooping Crane never would have been rung in order to save
the whoopers from the fate of extinction. It's always been a tiny fraction
of the human race that cared enough to make a difference in saving birds
and wildlife from extinction. I sincerely wish I didn't have to say this,
but I know the human animal too well.
To all the people who "made a difference" in saving the Whooping
Crane, the GCG and others, I have nothing but praise and respect for you.

Bill Thurman

PS as one nature magazine put it, instead of killing off animals considered
to be pests "why not scale back the human enterprise?"

On Sun, Feb 10, 2019, 8:09 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Recovery and expansion of Canada Goose populations in Arkansas is welcomed
> by some and a source of problems – real or perceived -- for others. On
> February 8, Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette published an article with
> details about a proposal to kill Canadas at Bentonville airport. Our
> expanding urbanism in Arkansas suits them. They like the same lakes, ponds,
> closely cut grass, golf courses and associated housing developments that we
> do. Our conversion of former prairie grasslands and wetlands to our own use
> fits them to a “T”. In 2012, Doug James wrote this column about Canadas for
> Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society Newsletter:
>
>
> GEESE EVERYWHERE by Doug James (2012)
>
>
> When pioneers reached the central US they found extensive grasslands and
> prairie wetlands, the Great Plains. This was home to big populations of
> large birds: Whooping Cranes, the largest crane, Trumpeter Swans, and the
> largest subspecies of the Canada Goose, the Giant Canada Goose. Subsequent
> conversion of the grasslands to agriculture had catastrophic adverse
> effects. Whooping Cranes were reduced to only16 before rehabilitation
> began, Trumpeter Swans disappeared except in northwestern mountains. Nine
> authors writing from 1930s to the 1960s declared the Giant Canada Goose
> extinct.
>
>
> Then Harold Hanson, my classmate in graduate school at the University of
> Illinois, after being hired by Illinois Natural History Survey, discovered
> in 1962 Giant Canada Geese occupying a city park in Minnesota. Later he
> found residual populations in the Dakotas and adjacent Canada. This led to
> restoration efforts across the US.
>
> Arkansas Game & Fish established a propagation site visible south of I-40
> west of Russellville. The first geese in northwestern Arkansas wore neck
> bands from that facility. The operation was so successful the need was
> discontinued.
>
>
> Most forms of Canada Geese migrate, but Giants stay year around. Also,
> they tolerate human disturbance more than the other subspecies. Cattle are
> grazers and so are geese, so pastures and parks are perfect. Golf courses
> provide a banquet set for geese.
>
>
> This reestablishment is truly a marvelous success story, bringing a bird
> from the brink of extinction to its present abundance everywhere. We should
> really rejoice in this accomplishment and congratulate ourselves!
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/10/19 6:10 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Canada Goose
Recovery and expansion of Canada Goose populations in Arkansas is welcomed by some and a source of problems real or perceived -- for others. On February 8, Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette published an article with details about a proposal to kill Canadas at Bentonville airport. Our expanding urbanism in Arkansas suits them. They like the same lakes, ponds, closely cut grass, golf courses and associated housing developments that we do. Our conversion of former prairie grasslands and wetlands to our own use fits them to a T. In 2012, Doug James wrote this column about Canadas for Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society Newsletter:


GEESE EVERYWHERE by Doug James (2012)


When pioneers reached the central US they found extensive grasslands and prairie wetlands, the Great Plains. This was home to big populations of large birds: Whooping Cranes, the largest crane, Trumpeter Swans, and the largest subspecies of the Canada Goose, the Giant Canada Goose. Subsequent conversion of the grasslands to agriculture had catastrophic adverse effects. Whooping Cranes were reduced to only16 before rehabilitation began, Trumpeter Swans disappeared except in northwestern mountains. Nine authors writing from 1930s to the 1960s declared the Giant Canada Goose extinct.


Then Harold Hanson, my classmate in graduate school at the University of Illinois, after being hired by Illinois Natural History Survey, discovered in 1962 Giant Canada Geese occupying a city park in Minnesota. Later he found residual populations in the Dakotas and adjacent Canada. This led to restoration efforts across the US.

Arkansas Game & Fish established a propagation site visible south of I-40 west of Russellville. The first geese in northwestern Arkansas wore neck bands from that facility. The operation was so successful the need was discontinued.


Most forms of Canada Geese migrate, but Giants stay year around. Also, they tolerate human disturbance more than the other subspecies. Cattle are grazers and so are geese, so pastures and parks are perfect. Golf courses provide a banquet set for geese.


This reestablishment is truly a marvelous success story, bringing a bird from the brink of extinction to its present abundance everywhere. We should really rejoice in this accomplishment and congratulate ourselves!


 

Back to top
Date: 2/9/19 5:20 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: bird song apps?
Greetings all, I've decided to semi-join the 21st century. I'm looking for a cell phone app of bird songs. I don't need the photos or the range maps, but as many North American bird songs, as possible.
If you have a favorite, I'd appreciate your advice. Preferably off the list server leanderson at fs.fed.us Thanks much, Leif at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

Back to top
Date: 2/9/19 3:33 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GOOD BIRDS AROUND BEAVER LAKE, BUT NOTHING RARE
Temp this morning started out at 22, but there was sunshine and not much wind, so a decent day to observe, mainly from inside the car, on south side of Beaver Lake east of Rogers. Bald Eagle (43 ad, 1 im), all in the Prairie Creek area. All of the 27 Horned Grebes were visible from Rocky Branch Park. At Twin Coves we saw 16 Pied-billed Grebes in a loose raft we often see 1 or 2 together, but not so many except during migration. We saw Common Goldeneyes and Ring-billed Gulls in several places, but biggest concentration was off Coppermine Resort gulls (80) swarming for small fish chased by diving goldeneyes (25). No Common Loons all morning, though we looked. We saw/heard Red-breasted Nuthatches in 2 places. We again found Red-headed Woodpeckers (2) in the lakeside campground at Rocky Branch. We also saw Canada Geese, and talked back and forth all morning about them, in particular the proposal to shoot them at Bentonville airport. According to yesterdays Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette: Its the least expensive and most effective method for removing the birds congregating at the north end of the runway, Chuck Chadwick, airport manager, said Theres been lots of talking. Now its time to start taking action, Chadwick said. I agree with Manager Chadwick about time to start taking action, but the first action involves Wildlife Management 1001 before pulling any triggers. Yes, as our society consumes more and more of the landscape, these are real issues that keep popping up, but real long term solutions and the learning that must accompany them, are neither quick nor simple, though ultimately, the most effective.


 

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Date: 2/9/19 11:58 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Re: NWARA
Was it trained dogs that solved a similar problem in North Little Rock's Burns Park? If so, I would think that plan would be preferable.

Bill Shepherd

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 12:21 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Canvasbacks at Moberly Pond


I just heard on the noontime news that NWARA is requesting a permit to shoot (kill) geese, presumably Canada Geese, that are creating a hazard by their presence. The other plan to relocate them was determined to be too expensive. Anyone know if the airport has tried other dispersal methods?



Jeff Short





From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Joseph Neal
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 10:37 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Canvasbacks at Moberly Pond



The big arctic front that swept into northwest Arkansas yesterday buried Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton in billowing fog. Increasingly cold wind blew across the ponds giving up their heat. A mudflat on a recently-drained pond hosted only a few Killdeer. The Bufflehead flock was absent, at least from the lower ponds where they have spent most of the winter. A flock of 12 Ring-billed Gulls suddenly materialized out of the fog, drifted over the ponds, then as suddenly, and dramatically, disappeared.



Big storm water retention pond at Moberly apartments in Bentonville was also fogged in, but fortunately for me close to street: Canvasbacks (4 males), Buffleheads (3), American Coots (12), and an odd flock of a dozen or so vaguely Mallard-related ducks, a few that must have started out as Muscovies, and one genuine male Mallard.



I parked and watched the big Canvasbacks through the car window. Every time I see them closely like this, I recall many years ago studying The Canvasback on a prairie marsh by H. Albert Hochbaum. The first edition was published in 1944 and included wonderful black-and-white drawings by the author, whod studied at Cornell and then game management in Wisconsin under Aldo Leopold. Like Leopolds Sandy County Almanac, Hochbaums book is filled with the treasures of research from the Delta Marsh and the former Delta Duck Station in Manitoba. The data supported action to save numerous duck species from potential extinction, including Canvasbacks.



That research is the proximate reason we see any Canvasbacks in Arkansas, including those on Moberly Pond. Ultimately, it is up to the rest of us to nurture in our own time the spirit that motivated The Canvasback on a prairie marsh.



 

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Date: 2/8/19 4:02 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: airport geese
First, thanks for the clarification that it is the Bentonville airport and
not NWARA.



Second, a quick Google-Maps survey shows that Lake Bentonville is situated
around the northern end of the runway. I would imagine that there are
several things that could be done to keep the birds from using this water
feature from active dispersal ( pyrotechnics or trained dogs), to passive
control with wires or floating "birdballs". Killing should be the last
option when everything else doesn't work.



Third, what does the airport's Wildlife Hazard Management Plan document as
the hazard?



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Joseph Neal
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 2:01 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: airport geese



Property on the Bentonville airport's north and east sides once supported a
nesting population of Willow Flycatchers. They disappeared as a result of
the kind of development associated with expansion of this airport. In the
summer we went birding there for Willow Flycatchers, Bell's Vireo, and
Painted Buntings - now all gone from this property, with nesting Willow
Flycatchers now functionally eliminated from Arkansas, the state where it
was first described by Audubon (1822). So while I understand wanting things
to be safe for those who operate out of this airport, are we suppose to
think it is OK to just keep damaging wildlife values more and more so that
more and more people can be crammed into and consume the surrounding
landscape? Imagine if geese ran the world and they decided there were too
many people and it would cost too much for people to go somewhere else. So
geese could authorize their "fish and wildlife service" to kill enough
people to make the air safe for flying geese. There are numerous options to
shooting the geese, but as the article points out, these other options would
cost them money. It is ridiculous in the extreme to claim that Bentonville,
with its hot and ever growing economy, with all of its Walton and Walmart
world headquarters mega-wealth, cannot "afford" non-lethal options.





_____

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on
behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 1:39 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: airport geese



Just found that on facebook. Apparently this is the tiny little airport in
Bentonville. I'm not sure if the geese are elsewhere but the pond at the end
of that runway is SMALL.
https://5newsonline.com/2019/02/08/bentonville-city-airport-seeks-permit-to-
kill-geese/



<https://5newsonline.com/2019/02/08/bentonville-city-airport-seeks-permit-to
-kill-geese/>


<https://5newsonline.com/2019/02/08/bentonville-city-airport-seeks-permit-to
-kill-geese/> Bentonville City Airport Seeks Permit To Kill Geese | Fort
Smith/Fayetteville News | 5newsonline KFSM 5NEWS

5newsonline.com

BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) - City officials in Bentonville are seeking a permit
from the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission to kill geese at the municipal
airport. Airport officials say the geese ...



I know we have an AGFC person here right? I wish I knew who to share my
thoughts with.

This reminds me of people I've known with poultry. When a raccoon gets into
their chicken house and kills, they go on a mission to go kill all the
raccoons they can find, rather than stop them from ever entering again. Like
with that situation, removing a few geese would be a never ending battle if
that was all they did.

When I was a kid growing up in Massachusetts we went to a pond in town to
feed bread to the geese(which I've since learned is bad). It was a family
thing and a lot of people enjoyed it. Apparently the people in the buildings
where the pond is located did not like it.

They took measures which included having poles and wires or something IN the
pond. To me it's sad(I mean, it's just goose poop right?) but, they were
successful and no geese visit that pond anymore.
There HAS to be other measures that wouldn't cost the city much. Would
decrease the bird activity if they employed such a tactic but it would be
safer for people and birds if they sought such options rather than the
temporary fix of shooting a few birds.
I hope the AGFC people know about the options that exist and can work
something out. :)



Daniel Mason



On 2/8/2019 12:21 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:

I just heard on the noontime news that NWARA is requesting a permit to shoot
(kill) geese, presumably Canada Geese, that are creating a hazard by their
presence. The other plan to relocate them was determined to be too
expensive. Anyone know if the airport has tried other dispersal methods?



Jeff Short









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gn=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon>

Virus-free.
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Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 1:16 pm
From: Jacob Wessels <jacoblwessels...>
Subject: Re: TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK
Coincidentally, I saw an intermediate-to-dark Western Red-tailed Hawk fly
over at Craighead Forest Park (Craighead County) this morning. Distant
photos are attached to my eBird checklist below if anyone is interested.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52491784


Jacob Wessels

On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 9:40 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> A Western Red-tailed Hawk has spent this winter in vicinity of a dairy
> south of the state fish hatchery in Centerton. Because it often perches
> near a lightly-traveled graded road, I’ve seen it regularly and have
> managed to photograph it. What makes it the Western subspecies of our
> common Red-tailed Hawk are differences in both plumage and wing length.
> Seen in good light, it exhibits a mainly dark throat. Seen at perch, the
> long wings reach near or nearly to the tip of the tail. This hawk nests all
> across the West – typically no closer to us than Colorado, but in winter
> they come east. Presumably spilled feed and large animal waste supports a
> significant population of small mammals – like Cotton Rats for example –
> that are attractive to a large winter raptor like this one.
>
>
> So why not just call them all Red-tailed Hawks, and ignore the details?
> Among numerous technical reasons why we would want to understand such
> details, how about this one: changes in their populations may indicate
> broader changes in the environment that could have direct impacts on us.
> That’s just one reason why such knowledge may be more important than we
> realize. After more than 40 years as a wildlife biologist, it is also clear
> to me the broad public generally values real knowledge about the world in
> which we all live. My personal faith is that as we acquire real knowledge
> about Earth, we have a better chance to become Earth appreciators and
> protectors. I know that is an optimistic view of a dire situation that can
> be spirit-crushing, but at least it comes as a result of more than 40 years
> study.
>
>
> This winter’s study: a Western Red-tailed Hawk on the former prairies of
> western Benton County, with a real tale about Earth and a real red tail to
> tell it with.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 12:25 pm
From: Hal Mitchell <halmitchell...>
Subject: Re: TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK
Hey Joe and ARbird,

We certainly get a lot of interesting red-tailed hawks in the winter. The challenge of identifying to subspecies is extremely difficult and often times (even with good looks) cannot be done reliably. There is too much mixing in the central Canada breeding grounds and I believe this creates a lot of intergraded birds. I suspect a lot of the darker, heavily marked, and bigger red-tails we get in the winter belong to the purported northern subspecies (B. j. abieticola). They share many similarities with the western subspecies (B. j. calurus) and can be extremely difficult to tell apart. There is some controversy among the experts on whether or not this subspecies is legitimate; additionally, the AOU hasg not released a species list that includes subspecies since the 1950s and leaves this issue hanging. There is still a ton to learn in the systematics among the red-tail subspecies and I encourage anyone who sees a weird red-tail to try and get a photo and upload to eBird. I am not sure what eBird filters are in place for AR, but a recent addition to the eBird subspecies list is calurus and abieticola complex which I think is great until more research is done to better understand where these darker and more heavily marked birds actually come from.

Here is a good article about “northern” red-tails: https://ebird.org/canada/news/identifying-northern-red-tailed-hawks/ <https://ebird.org/canada/news/identifying-northern-red-tailed-hawks/>

A few recent photos of “northern” red-tails from the Mississippi Alluvial Valley are below:

https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/123940101 <https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/123940101>
https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/125150411 <https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/125150411>
https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/136444211 <https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/136444211>
https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/125109851 <https://macaulaylibrary.org/asset/125109851>

Hope all is well,

Hal Mitchell
Southaven, MS (just on the other side of the River from AR)


> On Feb 8, 2019, at 9:40 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> A Western Red-tailed Hawk has spent this winter in vicinity of a dairy south of the state fish hatchery in Centerton. Because it often perches near a lightly-traveled graded road, I’ve seen it regularly and have managed to photograph it. What makes it the Western subspecies of our common Red-tailed Hawk are differences in both plumage and wing length. Seen in good light, it exhibits a mainly dark throat. Seen at perch, the long wings reach near or nearly to the tip of the tail. This hawk nests all across the West – typically no closer to us than Colorado, but in winter they come east. Presumably spilled feed and large animal waste supports a significant population of small mammals – like Cotton Rats for example – that are attractive to a large winter raptor like this one.
>
> So why not just call them all Red-tailed Hawks, and ignore the details? Among numerous technical reasons why we would want to understand such details, how about this one: changes in their populations may indicate broader changes in the environment that could have direct impacts on us. That’s just one reason why such knowledge may be more important than we realize. After more than 40 years as a wildlife biologist, it is also clear to me the broad public generally values real knowledge about the world in which we all live. My personal faith is that as we acquire real knowledge about Earth, we have a better chance to become Earth appreciators and protectors. I know that is an optimistic view of a dire situation that can be spirit-crushing, but at least it comes as a result of more than 40 years study.
>
> This winter’s study: a Western Red-tailed Hawk on the former prairies of western Benton County, with a real tale about Earth and a real red tail to tell it with.


 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 12:17 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: airport geese
Tall grass discourages geese and is one management tool. If they can change their mindset to live with tall grass rather than close mowing.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Joseph Neal
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 2:01 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: airport geese


Property on the Bentonville airports north and east sides once supported a nesting population of Willow Flycatchers. They disappeared as a result of the kind of development associated with expansion of this airport. In the summer we went birding there for Willow Flycatchers, Bells Vireo, and Painted Buntings now all gone from this property, with nesting Willow Flycatchers now functionally eliminated from Arkansas, the state where it was first described by Audubon (1822). So while I understand wanting things to be safe for those who operate out of this airport, are we suppose to think it is OK to just keep damaging wildlife values more and more so that more and more people can be crammed into and consume the surrounding landscape? Imagine if geese ran the world and they decided there were too many people and it would cost too much for people to go somewhere else. So geese could authorize their fish and wildlife service to kill enough people to make the air safe for flying geese. There are numerous options to shooting the geese, but as the article points out, these other options would cost them money. It is ridiculous in the extreme to claim that Bentonville, with its hot and ever growing economy, with all of its Walton and Walmart world headquarters mega-wealth, cannot afford non-lethal options.






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 1:39 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: airport geese

Just found that on facebook. Apparently this is the tiny little airport in Bentonville. I'm not sure if the geese are elsewhere but the pond at the end of that runway is SMALL. https://5newsonline.com/2019/02/08/bentonville-city-airport-seeks-permit-to-kill-geese/ Bentonville City Airport Seeks Permit To Kill Geese | Fort Smith/Fayetteville News | 5newsonline KFSM 5NEWS
5newsonline.com
BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) City officials in Bentonville are seeking a permit from the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission to kill geese at the municipal airport. Airport officials say the geese ...


I know we have an AGFC person here right? I wish I knew who to share my thoughts with.

This reminds me of people I've known with poultry. When a raccoon gets into their chicken house and kills, they go on a mission to go kill all the raccoons they can find, rather than stop them from ever entering again. Like with that situation, removing a few geese would be a never ending battle if that was all they did.

When I was a kid growing up in Massachusetts we went to a pond in town to feed bread to the geese(which I've since learned is bad). It was a family thing and a lot of people enjoyed it. Apparently the people in the buildings where the pond is located did not like it.
They took measures which included having poles and wires or something IN the pond. To me it's sad(I mean, it's just goose poop right?) but, they were successful and no geese visit that pond anymore.
There HAS to be other measures that wouldn't cost the city much. Would decrease the bird activity if they employed such a tactic but it would be safer for people and birds if they sought such options rather than the temporary fix of shooting a few birds.
I hope the AGFC people know about the options that exist and can work something out. :)

Daniel Mason


On 2/8/2019 12:21 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:

I just heard on the noontime news that NWARA is requesting a permit to shoot (kill) geese, presumably Canada Geese, that are creating a hazard by their presence. The other plan to relocate them was determined to be too expensive. Anyone know if the airport has tried other dispersal methods?



Jeff Short






Virus-free. www.avast.com

 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 12:16 pm
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: how to find Dickcissel nests, with stats from thesis work
I have been playing with data from my Master's thesis a little bit
recently, and I thought a number of you would find this fascinating:

I am creating simple pivot tables to learn how we detected the 114 nests in
2017 and 2018 in northwest Arkansas. Nesting birds are often frustratingly
sneaky around their offspring, so as researchers and birders, what should
we focus on to find nests? Watching females enter nests (majority with
eggs, not chicks) yielded 34% of all nests found. Nearly 75% of those nests
that we found by birds flying to the nest were first clued in by agitated
birds, which is basically just a female vocalizing a lot from a small area,
maybe flying around the observer at a close distance, etc. So to an
untrained ear a few chip notes may not mean much, but it helps immensely in
finding Dickcissel nests! Nest-building birds accounted for 27% of
discovered nests, and almost 25% of nests were detected via females
carrying food to chicks. Only about 9% of all nests were found "randomly,"
as in without any prior behavioral clues. Lesson: watch the birds intently.

I have thoroughly enjoyed finding all sorts of bird nests over the past ~8
years. I have learned so much about each species when I look for their
nests, and I'm excited to learn even more in the future. And of course, I
do my best to minimize stress on the parents and chicks by making nest
visits brief and infrequent.

If you haven't given nest searching an earnest effort, give it a shot this
summer! It is very rewarding and intriguing. Good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
now in Montreal, QC

 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 12:01 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: airport geese
Property on the Bentonville airports north and east sides once supported a nesting population of Willow Flycatchers. They disappeared as a result of the kind of development associated with expansion of this airport. In the summer we went birding there for Willow Flycatchers, Bells Vireo, and Painted Buntings now all gone from this property, with nesting Willow Flycatchers now functionally eliminated from Arkansas, the state where it was first described by Audubon (1822). So while I understand wanting things to be safe for those who operate out of this airport, are we suppose to think it is OK to just keep damaging wildlife values more and more so that more and more people can be crammed into and consume the surrounding landscape? Imagine if geese ran the world and they decided there were too many people and it would cost too much for people to go somewhere else. So geese could authorize their fish and wildlife service to kill enough people to make the air safe for flying geese. There are numerous options to shooting the geese, but as the article points out, these other options would cost them money. It is ridiculous in the extreme to claim that Bentonville, with its hot and ever growing economy, with all of its Walton and Walmart world headquarters mega-wealth, cannot afford non-lethal options.



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Sent: Friday, February 8, 2019 1:39 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: airport geese

Just found that on facebook. Apparently this is the tiny little airport in Bentonville. I'm not sure if the geese are elsewhere but the pond at the end of that runway is SMALL. https://5newsonline.com/2019/02/08/bentonville-city-airport-seeks-permit-to-kill-geese/
[https://localtvkfsm.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/gettyimages-458438012.jpg?quality=85&strip=all&w=250]<https://5newsonline.com/2019/02/08/bentonville-city-airport-seeks-permit-to-kill-geese/>

Bentonville City Airport Seeks Permit To Kill Geese | Fort Smith/Fayetteville News | 5newsonline KFSM 5NEWS<https://5newsonline.com/2019/02/08/bentonville-city-airport-seeks-permit-to-kill-geese/>
5newsonline.com
BENTONVILLE, Ark. (AP) City officials in Bentonville are seeking a permit from the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission to kill geese at the municipal airport. Airport officials say the geese ...


I know we have an AGFC person here right? I wish I knew who to share my thoughts with.
This reminds me of people I've known with poultry. When a raccoon gets into their chicken house and kills, they go on a mission to go kill all the raccoons they can find, rather than stop them from ever entering again. Like with that situation, removing a few geese would be a never ending battle if that was all they did.
When I was a kid growing up in Massachusetts we went to a pond in town to feed bread to the geese(which I've since learned is bad). It was a family thing and a lot of people enjoyed it. Apparently the people in the buildings where the pond is located did not like it.
They took measures which included having poles and wires or something IN the pond. To me it's sad(I mean, it's just goose poop right?) but, they were successful and no geese visit that pond anymore.
There HAS to be other measures that wouldn't cost the city much. Would decrease the bird activity if they employed such a tactic but it would be safer for people and birds if they sought such options rather than the temporary fix of shooting a few birds.
I hope the AGFC people know about the options that exist and can work something out. :)

Daniel Mason

On 2/8/2019 12:21 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:

I just heard on the noontime news that NWARA is requesting a permit to shoot (kill) geese, presumably Canada Geese, that are creating a hazard by their presence. The other plan to relocate them was determined to be too expensive. Anyone know if the airport has tried other dispersal methods?



Jeff Short





[https://ipmcdn.avast.com/images/icons/icon-envelope-tick-round-orange-animated-no-repeat-v1.gif]<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon> Virus-free. www.avast.com<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=link>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 11:40 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: airport geese
Just found that on facebook. Apparently this is the tiny little airport
in Bentonville. I'm not sure if the geese are elsewhere but the pond at
the end of that runway is SMALL.
https://5newsonline.com/2019/02/08/bentonville-city-airport-seeks-permit-to-kill-geese/
I know we have an AGFC person here right? I wish I knew who to share my
thoughts with.
This reminds me of people I've known with poultry. When a raccoon gets
into their chicken house and kills, they go on a mission to go kill all
the raccoons they can find, rather than stop them from ever entering
again. Like with that situation, removing a few geese would be a never
ending battle if that was all they did.
When I was a kid growing up in Massachusetts we went to a pond in town
to feed bread to the geese(which I've since learned is bad). It was a
family thing and a lot of people enjoyed it. Apparently the people in
the buildings where the pond is located did not like it.
They took measures which included having poles and wires or something IN
the pond. To me it's sad(I mean, it's just goose poop right?) but, they
were successful and no geese visit that pond anymore.
There HAS to be other measures that wouldn't cost the city much. Would
decrease the bird activity if they employed such a tactic but it would
be safer for people and birds if they sought such options rather than
the temporary fix of shooting a few birds.
I hope the AGFC people know about the options that exist and can work
something out. :)

Daniel Mason

On 2/8/2019 12:21 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
>
> I just heard on the noontime news that NWARA is requesting a permit to
> shoot (kill) geese, presumably Canada Geese, that are creating a
> hazard by their presence. The other plan to relocate them was
> determined to be too expensive. Anyone know if the airport has tried
> other dispersal methods?
>
> Jeff Short
>


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This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 10:50 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK

Joe, when I was running around Centerton/Vaughn last weekend I saw that Harlans Hawk on Holloway sitting in a little tree closest to the road on the north side on that fence line where we used to see the Bobolinks. It was facing away from me but I was able to get a few photos as it took off showing the dark underwings. That is the closest Ive ever seen it and couldnt believe my eyes. People who live in the area or have been on a field trip to the hatchery will know where Im talking about.

On that very foggy morning I saw the other hawk in a tree on Ginn Rd near where the creek flows under the road by the Hatchery it sat there the whole time I was stopped taking photos. Luckily it was VERY foggy and there was no traffic. It was the bird that normally is by the cemetery. Lately Ive been seeing it and another regular Red-tailed Hawk in the tree by that first house as you turn on to Holloway. Photos of both are still on my camera.

PS after I went to Beaver Lake that day I saw you and David O I went to Hobbs Visitor Center and waited about 45 minutes to get a good shot of the Gray-headed Junco. It would go to the platform feeders and then back to the larger shrubs most of the time I was there but then it perched up in front of me a time or two in a little bush right by the water, facing me. It finally turned around and sat for a while. Jacque, Centerton.



> On Feb 8, 2019, at 9:40 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> A Western Red-tailed Hawk has spent this winter in vicinity of a dairy south of the state fish hatchery in Centerton. Because it often perches near a lightly-traveled graded road, Ive seen it regularly and have managed to photograph it. What makes it the Western subspecies of our common Red-tailed Hawk are differences in both plumage and wing length. Seen in good light, it exhibits a mainly dark throat. Seen at perch, the long wings reach near or nearly to the tip of the tail. This hawk nests all across the West typically no closer to us than Colorado, but in winter they come east. Presumably spilled feed and large animal waste supports a significant population of small mammals like Cotton Rats for example that are attractive to a large winter raptor like this one.
>
> So why not just call them all Red-tailed Hawks, and ignore the details? Among numerous technical reasons why we would want to understand such details, how about this one: changes in their populations may indicate broader changes in the environment that could have direct impacts on us. Thats just one reason why such knowledge may be more important than we realize. After more than 40 years as a wildlife biologist, it is also clear to me the broad public generally values real knowledge about the world in which we all live. My personal faith is that as we acquire real knowledge about Earth, we have a better chance to become Earth appreciators and protectors. I know that is an optimistic view of a dire situation that can be spirit-crushing, but at least it comes as a result of more than 40 years study.
>
> This winters study: a Western Red-tailed Hawk on the former prairies of western Benton County, with a real tale about Earth and a real red tail to tell it with.


 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 10:45 am
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...>
Subject: It's freezing !
This morning while dressing, I heard and felt a low pitched pounding outside our upper bedroom door to the deck. I looked up and out the windows to see a big healthy male Flicker pounding away at a suet cake. I stapled a suet cage to a board and hung it on a bent piece of rebar that can be swiveled in to fill and out for the birds. They prefer it to the one out in the open yard, Burt it's attached to a deck post and vibrates into the bedroom when a woodpecker pounds on cold hard suet. It's one of those things you experience when you find yourself interacting with our avian friends. Much like the drumming on the chimney cover in spring. You get startled, your eyes open up and you think " good God, what's happening to the house ?"  Then you remember and smile. 
I also have two heated bird baths. I keep them plugged in during the winter months and turn them on when the temps drop, I'm always surprised when Robins take a bath and it's near freezing outside. Go figure !
Besides our two female Manx house cats, we have an American Singer Canary in a cage by the patio door. Sometimes I put a line or two of his left over seed on the deck for the ground feeders. It gives the cats something to think about. 
We have managed to maintain pairs of Downeys, Flickers, Redbellys, White-breasted Nuthatches, Bluebirds, Brown-headed Nuthatches and the usual YBs.  I'm always amazed, though I guess I shouldn't be, at the noticeable population drop in winter. Now I just have to figure out why they seem to eat just as much food !!!       Happy birding.

Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas
 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 10:22 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Canvasbacks at Moberly Pond
I just heard on the noontime news that NWARA is requesting a permit to shoot
(kill) geese, presumably Canada Geese, that are creating a hazard by their
presence. The other plan to relocate them was determined to be too
expensive. Anyone know if the airport has tried other dispersal methods?



Jeff Short





From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Joseph Neal
Sent: Friday, February 08, 2019 10:37 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Canvasbacks at Moberly Pond



The big arctic front that swept into northwest Arkansas yesterday buried
Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton in billowing fog. Increasingly cold
wind blew across the ponds giving up their heat. A mudflat on a
recently-drained pond hosted only a few Killdeer. The Bufflehead flock was
absent, at least from the lower ponds where they have spent most of the
winter. A flock of 12 Ring-billed Gulls suddenly materialized out of the
fog, drifted over the ponds, then as suddenly, and dramatically,
disappeared.



Big storm water retention pond at Moberly apartments in Bentonville was also
fogged in, but fortunately for me close to street: Canvasbacks (4 males),
Buffleheads (3), American Coots (12), and an odd flock of a dozen or so
vaguely Mallard-related ducks, a few that must have started out as
Muscovies, and one genuine male Mallard.



I parked and watched the big Canvasbacks through the car window. Every time
I see them closely like this, I recall many years ago studying "The
Canvasback on a prairie marsh" by H. Albert Hochbaum. The first edition was
published in 1944 and included wonderful black-and-white drawings by the
author, who'd studied at Cornell and then game management in Wisconsin under
Aldo Leopold. Like Leopold's "Sandy County Almanac," Hochbaum's book is
filled with the treasures of research from the Delta Marsh and the former
Delta Duck Station in Manitoba. The data supported action to save numerous
duck species from potential extinction, including Canvasbacks.



That research is the proximate reason we see any Canvasbacks in Arkansas,
including those on Moberly Pond. Ultimately, it is up to the rest of us to
nurture in our own time the spirit that motivated "The Canvasback on a
prairie marsh."




 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 8:37 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Canvasbacks at Moberly Pond
The big arctic front that swept into northwest Arkansas yesterday buried Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton in billowing fog. Increasingly cold wind blew across the ponds giving up their heat. A mudflat on a recently-drained pond hosted only a few Killdeer. The Bufflehead flock was absent, at least from the lower ponds where they have spent most of the winter. A flock of 12 Ring-billed Gulls suddenly materialized out of the fog, drifted over the ponds, then as suddenly, and dramatically, disappeared.

Big storm water retention pond at Moberly apartments in Bentonville was also fogged in, but fortunately for me close to street: Canvasbacks (4 males), Buffleheads (3), American Coots (12), and an odd flock of a dozen or so vaguely Mallard-related ducks, a few that must have started out as Muscovies, and one genuine male Mallard.

I parked and watched the big Canvasbacks through the car window. Every time I see them closely like this, I recall many years ago studying The Canvasback on a prairie marsh by H. Albert Hochbaum. The first edition was published in 1944 and included wonderful black-and-white drawings by the author, whod studied at Cornell and then game management in Wisconsin under Aldo Leopold. Like Leopolds Sandy County Almanac, Hochbaums book is filled with the treasures of research from the Delta Marsh and the former Delta Duck Station in Manitoba. The data supported action to save numerous duck species from potential extinction, including Canvasbacks.

That research is the proximate reason we see any Canvasbacks in Arkansas, including those on Moberly Pond. Ultimately, it is up to the rest of us to nurture in our own time the spirit that motivated The Canvasback on a prairie marsh.


 

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Date: 2/8/19 8:21 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK
Hi Joe!

I became an Eagle Scout in 1965. One of my most important merit badges
was Bird Study. I did well in that, thanks to the late great Jack Embury of
Memphis.
Little differences in feather, color or size often mean a world of
difference especially after passage of time shows that things are subtlely
changing. And some not as subtle. Thanks for bringing up the hawk.

Bill Thurman


On Fri, Feb 8, 2019, 9:40 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> A Western Red-tailed Hawk has spent this winter in vicinity of a dairy
> south of the state fish hatchery in Centerton. Because it often perches
> near a lightly-traveled graded road, I’ve seen it regularly and have
> managed to photograph it. What makes it the Western subspecies of our
> common Red-tailed Hawk are differences in both plumage and wing length.
> Seen in good light, it exhibits a mainly dark throat. Seen at perch, the
> long wings reach near or nearly to the tip of the tail. This hawk nests all
> across the West – typically no closer to us than Colorado, but in winter
> they come east. Presumably spilled feed and large animal waste supports a
> significant population of small mammals – like Cotton Rats for example –
> that are attractive to a large winter raptor like this one.
>
>
> So why not just call them all Red-tailed Hawks, and ignore the details?
> Among numerous technical reasons why we would want to understand such
> details, how about this one: changes in their populations may indicate
> broader changes in the environment that could have direct impacts on us.
> That’s just one reason why such knowledge may be more important than we
> realize. After more than 40 years as a wildlife biologist, it is also clear
> to me the broad public generally values real knowledge about the world in
> which we all live. My personal faith is that as we acquire real knowledge
> about Earth, we have a better chance to become Earth appreciators and
> protectors. I know that is an optimistic view of a dire situation that can
> be spirit-crushing, but at least it comes as a result of more than 40 years
> study.
>
>
> This winter’s study: a Western Red-tailed Hawk on the former prairies of
> western Benton County, with a real tale about Earth and a real red tail to
> tell it with.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/8/19 7:40 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: TALE OF A WESTERN RED-TAILED HAWK
A Western Red-tailed Hawk has spent this winter in vicinity of a dairy south of the state fish hatchery in Centerton. Because it often perches near a lightly-traveled graded road, Ive seen it regularly and have managed to photograph it. What makes it the Western subspecies of our common Red-tailed Hawk are differences in both plumage and wing length. Seen in good light, it exhibits a mainly dark throat. Seen at perch, the long wings reach near or nearly to the tip of the tail. This hawk nests all across the West typically no closer to us than Colorado, but in winter they come east. Presumably spilled feed and large animal waste supports a significant population of small mammals like Cotton Rats for example that are attractive to a large winter raptor like this one.

So why not just call them all Red-tailed Hawks, and ignore the details? Among numerous technical reasons why we would want to understand such details, how about this one: changes in their populations may indicate broader changes in the environment that could have direct impacts on us. Thats just one reason why such knowledge may be more important than we realize. After more than 40 years as a wildlife biologist, it is also clear to me the broad public generally values real knowledge about the world in which we all live. My personal faith is that as we acquire real knowledge about Earth, we have a better chance to become Earth appreciators and protectors. I know that is an optimistic view of a dire situation that can be spirit-crushing, but at least it comes as a result of more than 40 years study.

This winters study: a Western Red-tailed Hawk on the former prairies of western Benton County, with a real tale about Earth and a real red tail to tell it with.


 

Back to top
Date: 2/7/19 8:54 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 7
It was overcast to partly cloudy, cold, and windy on the bird survey today.
57 species were found. The moderate winds and cold temperatures made
finding birds difficult. Despite the recent cold front, it has been warm
and Sand Plum, pear, and Red Maples are blooming as well as daffodils.
Spring is just around the corner. Pied-billed Grebes were calling as were
Pine Warblers. Here is my list for today:



Wood Duck - 6

Gadwall - 105

Mallard - 591

Northern Shoveler - 2

Northern Pintail - 19

Green-winged Teal - 208

Canvasback - 14

Ring-necked Duck - 1190

Hooded Merganser - 7

Ruddy Duck - 3

Pied-billed Grebe - 3

Neotropic Cormorant - 1

Double-crested Cormorant - 4

Great-blue Heron - 7

Black Vulture - 15

Turkey Vulture - 29

Bald Eagle - 2 (1 adult & 1 imm.)

Northern Harrier - 3

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 7

American Coot - 187

Killdeer - 30

Wilson's Snipe - 16

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1

Northern Flicker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Blue Jay - 5

American Crow - 3

Fish Crow - 1

Crow species - ~60

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 1

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 2

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Hermit Thrush - 1

American Robin - 5

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 2

Pine Warbler - 4

Eastern Towhee - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 10

Fox Sparrow - 4

Song Sparrow - 23

Swamp Sparrow - 2

White-throated Sparrow - 19

White-crowned Sparrow - 15

Northern Cardinal - 26

Red-winged Blackbird -1180

Eastern Meadowlark - 3

Western Meadowlark - 5

Meadowlark species - 41

Purple Finch - 3

American Goldfinch - 5





Herps:



Cajun Chorus Frog

Spring Peeper





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






 

Back to top
Date: 2/7/19 10:44 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Insect (bird food) decline, and what we can do; a peer-reviewed review
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0006320718313636

 

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Date: 2/7/19 9:10 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: BirdLR Birdathon Team Registration Open
Registration is now open for Audubon Arkansas’s BirdLR Birdathon. http://ar.audubon.org/conservation/birdathon Birdathons all over the country engage thousands of birders in raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for bird conservation. BirdLR’s Birdathon is a competitive search for birds plus a fun way to raise money for Audubon Arkansas's bird conservation and environmental education work. Teams of 2-5 will set species and fundraising goals, then collect donations or pledges per species seen. Teams will compete for prizes for the most species seen and money raised. The Birdathon boundary is Pulaski County on May 11 from 12 AM to 6 PM. You don’t have to live in the county to form, join, or sponsor a team. All teams will convene at a Bird Bash tally rally at 6:00 for food, fellowship, and awards. You even get a BirdLR t-shirt!


Last year’s inaugural Birdathon was a success thanks to 43 birders who formed 7. All together teams tallied 137 species and raised $7,483 for Audubon Arkansas's bird conservation and environmental education programs.


Registration deadline is March 15. The sooner you register your team the sooner I will create your team’s profile page to make fundraising easier, e.g. friends and family anywhere in the world can donate online.


If you aren’t up for a fast-paced race to find birds but still want your birding to count for the cause, ASCA will be sponsoring its own monthly bird walk that day with a pledge per species seen by participants under Karen Holliday’s leadership.


While birders are doing their thing, non-birders will also be able to join in the fun through a Bird Search Scavenger Hunt. Teams will compete to find birdy things around downtown Little Rock and North Little Rock using a list of clues created by Audubon Arkansas. The $25/person registration fee also supports our work. Bird Search team registration is due May 9.


Want to support BirdLR but aren't able to join a Birdathon or Bird Search team? Then Bird Your Way by helping a Birdathon team reach their fundraising goal, donating directly to Audubon Arkansas, or sharing your sightings with us through Facebook using #BirdLR.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 2/7/19 7:59 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: 3 way Warbler Hybrid
I think it's kind of cool and inevitable that their interbreeding might
happen. This goes to show that nature is as full of surprises as humans.
The more recent modern humans and the Neanderthals interbred as has been
pointed out, quite often.

Bill Thurman

On Thu, Feb 7, 2019, 9:47 AM Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> wrote:

>
> https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-the-monday-edition-1.4901894/newbie-bird-watcher-discovers-extremely-rare-3-species-hybrid-warbler-1.4901896
>
>
> --
> Allan Mueller
> 20 Moseley Lane
> Conway, AR 72032
> 501-327-8952 home
> 501-339-8071 cell
>
>
> No one has lived the life you live.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/7/19 7:48 am
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller...>
Subject: 3 way Warbler Hybrid
https://www.cbc.ca/radio/asithappens/as-it-happens-the-monday-edition-1.4901894/newbie-bird-watcher-discovers-extremely-rare-3-species-hybrid-warbler-1.4901896


--
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


No one has lived the life you live.

 

Back to top
Date: 2/7/19 7:34 am
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller...>
Subject: Hummer Bills
Check out the violent hummers.


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/05/science/hummingbirds-science-take.html


--
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


No one has lived the life you live.

 

Back to top
Date: 2/7/19 7:05 am
From: Than Boves <tboves...>
Subject: Re: Watch "How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change | Allan Savory" on YouTube
Bill – thanks for sharing that link. Although there are some aspects of this talk that certainly have value, it is also not the panacea that he implies. So before everyone gets too excited about how meat is going to save our planet, please take some time to read rebuttals to this talk, which there are many online. Here are a few:

http://www.thewildlifenews.com/2013/03/18/alan-savory-gives-a-popular-and-very-misleading-ted-talk/

https://slate.com/human-interest/2013/04/allan-savorys-ted-talk-is-wrong-and-the-benefits-of-holistic-grazing-have-been-debunked.html

In summary, there are MANY caveats and density-dependent and context-dependent issues that will make this strategy have variable, and in some cases, the exact reverse effect on climate change.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
Office Phone: 870-972-3320
Website: www.boveslab.com<http://www.boveslab.com/>
Facebook: @BovesLabAState





From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Thurman
Sent: Thursday, February 7, 2019 7:24 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Watch "How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change | Allan Savory" on YouTube

https://youtu.be/vpTHi7O66pI<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__youtu.be_vpTHi7O66pI&d=DwMBaQ&c=QzRQJlHx0ZTYmlwGx7ptjrPEeuNmnYRxm_FN73lod7w&r=7GY_tLFKiggtwGF79-jINsYKU9T9mwO7Mj-3mSpAuok&m=giT37jD16_0xwn0R2hOYEEJ5YnTIKGWad_dUb8ckAnw&s=ften-u_i8XDXfBKzhdf70uKuVi0uSYiRsgLGWiGPbR8&e=>
 

Back to top
Date: 2/7/19 5:48 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Watch "How to green the world's deserts and reverse climate change | Allan Savory" on YouTube
https://youtu.be/vpTHi7O66pI

 

Back to top
Date: 2/6/19 5:18 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SHORT-EARED OWL AT CHESNEY PRAIRIE N.A.
A Short-eared Owl flew out of the dense grass during a prescribed burn yesterday at Chesney Prairie Natural Area. Joe Woolbright and his crew from Ozark Ecological Restoration Inc burn part of Chesneys 82 acres each year. The 20+ acres of the Couch Unit (on Chesneys southwest side) were not burned. This continues to provide excellent habitat for wintering grassland birds, including these owls.


 

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Date: 2/6/19 12:39 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Say’s Phoebe
Continuing at Atkins bottoms
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/6/19 12:26 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Birding Colorado 4/19-4/29 We need 1 female to share a motel room with another female.
Greetings all,
We have 3 folks going and will be sharing rooms to save costs.
We have 1 female that could use a female roommate to share motel costs with.
So if you want to join the fun, please let me know within the next couple days, so I can start making reservations. Thanks, Leif




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 2/6/19 10:22 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Kim Smith memorial in The Auk
Here is a more globally focused version of our memorial in The Auk.  I hope it makes our beloved Kim smile from somewhere up there. 
https://academic.oup.com/auk/article/136/1/uky006/5307199

Kannan
 

Back to top
Date: 2/5/19 9:11 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Trail of feathers to the Neanderthal mind
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00445-x

 

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Date: 2/4/19 11:30 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Say’s Phoebe Continues
Michael and I relocated the SAY'S PHOEBE that Bob and Lynn found yesterday along McLaren Loop at Atkins Bottoms. Adding to Bob's cautionary note in his post below, Michael and I had a great conversation with one of the landowners. She asked us to share the following with the birding community:Please do not stop/park or walk in front of their house nor enter any of the private land. She said this is the desire of all the landowners in the area (they talk). They've seen people with cameras and long lenses going onto their private land without permission and she said she believes these are birders. So she asked us to let the group know to bird from the public road, stay off private property and don't block farm operations. They also ask that we not stop near the large silos due to the large trucks entering and exiting and to avoid being near or blocking any operating farm equipment. This is primarily due to potential liability issues. So in good faith, we're reminding our wonderful birding community to be particularly respectful of this nice but outspoken landowner's expressed desires. Thank you.Patty McLean and Michael Linz,  Conway AR
-------- Original message --------From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Date: 2/3/19 11:08 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Say’s Phoebe Lynn Christie and I have identified a Say’s Phoebe in Atkins Bottoms area.  Seen on McClaren Loop between grain bins and house on wooden fence posts.  This is in the area of the woman’s home that was very nervous of Birders presence.  Please be considerate of their privacy Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 2/4/19 5:55 am
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Killdeer fly- throughs (as goes yard) stopping next to front pond. Calling 1st time this season around 7:30.
Sent from my iPod
 

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Date: 2/3/19 10:26 pm
From: Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: glasses
I had transitions for a while, but found that I couldn’t see very well through my binocs AT ALL. So the next time I got glasses, I went without transitions. I see colors much better now, and can see into shadows better.

Good luck!

Vickie H Becker
PMB 1593
401 E 8th St #214
Sioux Falls, SD 57103

501-508-0984
<Vhbecker...>


On Jan 30, 2019, at 7:35 PM, Chris Pistole <raptor1964...> wrote:

Daniel,

I wear transitions lenses and don't have any problems. The worst thing about them is going quickly from the bright sunlight outdoors into a dark building because of the short amount of time it takes for them to lighten. I have the newest version of Transitions, and they definitely lighten and darken quicker than the first pair I had. Also, they will never lighten up 100%, always having a slight tint to them, but I don't notice it. I know an optometrist will tell you that if you spend much time at all outdoors, you definitely need to protect your eyes with good sunglasses (or Transition lenses), especially as you get older. They are more expensive than regular lenses, but I know when I had a separate pair of prescription sunglasses it was a pain switching them all the time. And if you're a person that easily loses sunglasses, like some people I know, that is way too expensive. I'd rather keep one pair on my head and reduce the risk of losing the other (which I did in Costa Rica when I left my Rx sunglasses in a tour van!) or sitting on them and breaking them! (The tour company mysteriously couldn't find them when I checked later!)

Hope this helps.

Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Mason
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:33 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: glasses

Since this is related to birdwatching, at least a little, I figured you
all are the best people to ask.

I'm overdo for a new pair of glasses... got my prescription checked a
couple weeks back and I definitely need new glasses. I'm trying to
balance budget with comfort and needs... ordering glasses online to save
a few bucks(using Zenni)

I struggle with decisions sometimes... weighing pros and cons and making
up my mind is difficult.
I think I'm going to get one cheaper pair with the blue blocking for all
my computer use(which is too much) and then after that, I might buy
another pair or two or three... here's where I get stuck. I kind of
wonder if I need a pair just for driving and then I go back and forth
with whether a cheap pair of tinted ones would suit me fine or if some
polarized ones would be better to help with glare. I sure hate glare
while driving... so there's one decision I'm mildly stuck on.

The other is a bit more complicated and frustrating. I'm considering
some transitions. When it's bright out, I wouldn't mind something that
gets darker so I don't have to squint so much. Then I go back and forth
with that. Do I really want something that transitions ALL the time?
Would I then want yet another pair for when I don't want transitions?
How much does the darkness of transitions interfere with how normal
things look? If I'm birding and my glasses are darker because of the
sun, will that make it harder for me to see through my binoculars? This
is where you all come in. Anyone use transitions? In the past, I never
even wear sunglasses because I don't like looking at things that seem
dark. Then again, I don't like squinting in bright light. So, there's
that ping-pong match in my head...

If I get transitions, am I going to want a regular pair that doesn't
tint at all on top of that? how much would transitions alter how I see
birds in the field? I just can't make up my mind but also don't want to
end up buying like 4 pairs of glasses.

Any thoughts on this are appreciated... especially anything related to
birding. :)

Daniel Mason


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 2/3/19 6:47 pm
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Worst possible weekend
to camp at Lake DeGray and look for waterfowl.

Ruth and I started our Saturday at dawn with 127-147 (depending on who you asked) tricked out bass boats racing full speed by our campsite on their way to a big bucks fishing tournament. Some had sponsors.

Not really conducive to waterfowl watching.

Nevertheless, we managed 41 species, including common loons, beautiful male and female common goldeneyes, flocks of pine warblers, yellow rumps, gold finches, and cedar waxwings. We saw red and white breasted nuthatches, sapsuckers, and pileated woodpeckers. Ruby and golden crowned kinglets. We watched little buffleheads pop up and down and up and down and up and down. Our last bird was a FOS brown creeper, my target bird.

We slept way too close to black and turkey vultures roosting in tall pine trees near our small, old camper. They make really creepy noises in the night. Really creepy.

Nothing too spectacular. Walked more than 15 miles to get em. But wow, what a perfect bird weekend.

Chuck Anderson



Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/3/19 3:09 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Field Trip to DEVIL’S DEN STATE PARK for GBBC
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society and Devil's Den State Park will host a Great Backyard Bird Count field trip on Saturday February 16, 2019, starting 9 AM. The Den includes Lee Creek valley in the Boston Mountains near Winslow. This is an easy guided bird walk open to everyone. Much of this is on paved surfaces (for example 0.6 mile walk through campground A) so quite a bit will work for those with mobility impairments. There is no need to pre-register. You do not need to be an Audubon member or an expert birder to participate.



Enjoy birding in a beautiful spot. Plus, do something for citizen science: actual factual data gathered during this field trip about occurrence of birds at the Den will be entered into the national database for GBBC.



Meet in the parking area at the lower Devil's Den Trailhead on the south side of Lee Creek bridge on Saturday morning at 9 am. This generally lasts a couple of hours. We often see a bunch of birds. Depending upon how the day goes, we may continue to other areas of the park. As on all NWAAS field trips, please feel free to come and go as suits you.



If you need a map, Google: 11333 West AR Hwy 74 West Fork, AR 72774. You can also check out NWAAS web site for a park description: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/placestobird.htm



After Devils Den, our next field trip will be for American Woodcocks with woodcock expert Dr David Krementz. More details forthcoming.


 

Back to top
Date: 2/3/19 1:00 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Woolsey Wet Prairie - 02/03/2019 - Sora
I visited Woolsey Wet Prairie this afternoon after a 2 month hiatus.

The highlight was a Sora on the main path going north from the parking area. I heard the typical “ker-wee” call briefly. It responded to playback and was seen for a few seconds as it ran through an open patch in the wet grass.

Sparrow numbers were lower than expected for this time of year - Field (1), Dark-eyed Junco (5), White-crowned (8), White-throated (6), Song (25), Swamp (15).

Miscellaneous - Northern Harrier (1 immature), Sharp-shinned Hawk (1), Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (1), Northern Flicker (1), Brown Thrasher (1), Yellow-rumped Warbler (1).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 2/3/19 9:09 am
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Say’s Phoebe
Lynn Christie and I have identified a Say’s Phoebe in Atkins Bottoms area. Seen on McClaren Loop between grain bins and house on wooden fence posts. This is in the area of the woman’s home that was very nervous of Birders presence. Please be considerate of their privacy
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 2/2/19 8:27 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: NW Arkansas plants, trees, etc.
Today, I received the Garvan Woodland Gardens brochure for the upcoming
workshops.



One, "Landscape for Life", being taught on Wednesdays throughout May,
focuses on sustainable landscape designs to encourage wildlife, conserve
energy, prevent invasive plants, etc. The curriculum is available at
www.landscapeforlife.org.



Sounds like there may be some synergies with some existing efforts to
certify properties for bird-friendly landscapes. Anyone, locally, planning
to attend?



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: Friday, February 01, 2019 1:25 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: NW Arkansas plants, trees, etc.



OK, I got over my irritation. "Calf Rope." For those who don't know the
meaning of that, you probably are not a native of the south.

Back to birds.

In the makeover of my backyard into a true BIRD habitat, I have now added
Yaupon and Mulberry trees to my plan, thanks to Jerry Davis. (Jerry, from
memories of hanging out clothes when I was younger, planting a mulberry
really goes against the grain here! But, what the heck, I've already
hollered "calf rope.")

Also, Adam Schaffer has given me ideas about wild flowers.

Is there any absolutely necessary plant that I must add for the birds? I'm
open to suggestions. There are very large cedar trees, redbuds, etc., in my
neighbors yard. I have a very small, low to the ground, pine tree (it shows
up in some of the bird pictures I post on Facebook.), Oak trees, and dogwood
trees. I'll also incorporate potted plants.

I am not able to travel to "far-away places" (for you young'uns, that's the
name of a pop song, back in my day) to search out individual plants, as I
was once able to do. We do have a good nursery here in Harrison

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR



Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows
10




 

Back to top
Date: 2/2/19 3:45 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Bald Eagles and American Coots
Michael Linz and I went to Delaware Recreation Area on Lake Dardanelle this afternoon where we found a large mix of species including a few Herring Gull and a lone (and continuing) LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. As we were leaving, we noticed several large clumps of Coot feathers. So we walked around examining the clumps and found a major amount of whitewash on a large boulder that sits below a decent sized branch in a nearby tree. We assume the Bald Eagle we spotted in a nearby cove may have been the culprit. While I've watched eagles hunt coots (which is a treat to observe with the coots splishing and splashing and eventually tightening into a ball trying to evade the eagle), I've never seen an eagle eating one. This favored spot is at the end of the road into the park to the parking spot reserved for "Authorized Vehicles Only." Might be worth checking on approach as one enters this area.Patty McLean and Michael Linz  Conway AR
 

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Date: 2/2/19 3:03 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Eagle Watch Nature Trail -- eagles
The big Witch Hazel bush was blooming and perfuming warm air during mornings field trip sponsored by Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society to Eagle Watch Nature Trail on SWEPCO Lake west of Gentry. We had a couple of Bald Eagles fly over us on the drive there, plus a few more during the field trip. I think the big excitement for the 40 or so folks was something brand new a board walk and shelter built out from one of the viewing blinds to include excellent views of marshy areas covered with Buttonbushes. Our whole bunch was squeezed in there at one point, looking at Song sparrows in the bushes, a Ring-billed Gull that flew over, a single Double-crested Cormorant perched on a snag out in the lake, and last summers Baltimore Oriole nest hanging from a leafless limb near the blind. Terry Stanfill, who manages Eagle Watch, told us about a place where hed been seeing numerous Bald Eagles a few miles north, so off we went. In a compact area west of Decatur, we saw 20 or so eagles, plus Red-tailed Hawks, and Turkey Vultures. A flock of White-crowned Sparrows in some bushes out in a field included Harriss Sparrow. Folks in our car wound up with a count of 38 Bald Eagles for the day. Next NWAAS field trip is at Devils Den State Park on Saturday, February 16, as part of the Dens Great Backyard Bird Count effort. Everyone welcome.


 

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Date: 2/2/19 9:12 am
From: Eleanor Bragg <sixteencedars...>
Subject: Fox Sparrows
It’s probably not that unusual but I was delighted to see 2 Fox Sparrows at my feeders this morning. They were feeding on the ground with the White Throats. I love their beautiful reddish markings!

Little Rock/Ferndale area

Eleanor
 

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Date: 2/1/19 8:20 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: ERRONEOUS ID OF LOON AT LAKE SARACEN
On 28 Jan., I reported the observation of what I believed to be a Red-throated Loon on Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff. The Loon has been present everyday since, but always some distance from the shore. Yesterday it was quite close and I was able to obtain good images. The correct ID is that it is a Common Loon. Kenny Nichols agrees. Common things occur commonly and when you hear hoofbeats, don't look for zebras.
John Redman
 

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Date: 2/1/19 12:36 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Loon yodel in fog (Beaver Lake)
Good thing this was NOT Groundhog Day. It was all fog. Shadow never had a chance. David Oakley and I went around to north side of Beaver Lake heavy fog all the way. From Garfield we steadily dropped down off Whitney Mountain and finally into some moderately clear viewing. Lake calm-glassy and quiet. At Glade (along Slate Gap Road), we saw Horned Grebes (98 in a raft), heard distant yodeling of a Common Loon, and then whistling wings of whistlers AKA, Common Goldeneyes. At nearby Lost Bridge South Park, we saw a Jacque Brown with her little dog Oz. She had just seen goldeneyes at Lost Bridge North park, our next and final stop. At LB north: Common Goldeneye (21), Hooded Merganser (8), and Ring-billed Gull (6). Still a little foggy, but good views on a calm lake. Very quiet. Could hear gulls urging goldeneyes to get the small fish moving.


 

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Date: 2/1/19 11:44 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
It was the magic draw of a Mulberry tree in my backyard that got me interested in birds, buying binoculars and getting a Peterson's field guide. This was in the 80s and this huge tree was loaded with mulberries, attracting large numbers of Cedar Waxwings and other poopers including my first ever Scarlet Tanager - and no telling what else was in that tree. So I'm definitely a big fan!!Patty McLean, Conway AR Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Date: 2/1/19 11:34 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information Thanks for sharing.  At least 38 species use Red Mulberry fruit. Anyone with a fruiting tree will enjoy the birds. Jerry From: Sandy Berger Sent: Friday, February 1, 2019 10:41 AMTo: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional InformationMy mulberries have brought me great joy. Every spring, if the berries are mature, I get numerous migratory species in my little backyard near down Fort Smith. Sadly they are slowly dying. Every year I have to cut off more dead branches.Species seen include White-crowned Sparrow, Eastern Kingbird, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Baltimore Oriole, Painted and Indigo Bunting, Swainson’s Thrush, and so on.Don’t know where the male tree is. Both of my trees are fruit bearing.Sandy B.FS, AROn Fri, Feb 1, 2019 at 9:47 AM Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:  Excellent information!   J  On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 7:47 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:    I have had several birders seeking additional information about birds and red mulberries which I responded to, but thought that there may be others with similar questions that need answers.  Mature trees can produce about 10 bushels of berries and trees in the open produce 7 X those that are shaded. The female will start producing fruit at about 5 years of age but the older a tree is the more fruit produced. Berry production is basically from June to August but can be extended by watering in the summer months.  Remember that although males do not produce fruit, their leaves support over 200 species of Lepidoptera which is bird food so the existences of males is still helping birds and providing pollen for the female plant so if you have males don’t rip them out.    Those that have observed birds along the Texas coast at High Island and Sabine Woods know how important the fruit is to birds arriving from the tropics. Birds that feed on insets here use fruits as a big part of their diet in the tropics and when they arrive along the coast.     I encourage anyone that wants to improve their property for birds to consider a big part of the plants being soft mast producers like red-mulberry, American Beautyberry, Blackgum, Blackcherry, and Yaupon to list a few of the better ones. Native plants support native insects and these also support hundreds of species of Lepidoptera.     Jerry Wayne Davis    Hot Springs    From: <jwdavis...>     Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 12:10 PM    To: Ragupathy Kannan ; ARBird     Subject: Fw: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds    Thank you for getting this paper out. I hope that more birders will see the value of having mulberry trees in their yard and overcome their phobia of birds pooping on their car.  That is a small potential inconvenience for such a valuable food source for birds.  They need to remember that they need a male and female trees and it is the female that produces the fruit.      Jerry Wayne Davis    Hot Springs, AR    From: Ragupathy Kannan     Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 8:24 AM    To: <ARBIRD-L...>     Subject: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds    Hot off the press, everything you ever wanted to know about birds eating mulberries in Arkansas, and a lot more.  Full PDF attached.     Thanks to my friend Sandy Berger for giving me the tiny mulberry seedling from her yard in 2003, which led to this study 15 years later!    Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas                                                                                     Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas                      Ragupathy Kannan                      A fruiting Mulberry tree (Morus rubra) was observed for 67 hours in the spring of 2016 and 2017 in Fort Smith, A...                                            
 

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Date: 2/1/19 11:25 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: NW Arkansas plants, trees, etc.
OK, I got over my irritation. Calf Rope. For those who dont know the meaning of that, you probably are not a native of the south.
Back to birds.
In the makeover of my backyard into a true BIRD habitat, I have now added Yaupon and Mulberry trees to my plan, thanks to Jerry Davis. (Jerry, from memories of hanging out clothes when I was younger, planting a mulberry really goes against the grain here! But, what the heck, Ive already hollered calf rope.)
Also, Adam Schaffer has given me ideas about wild flowers.
Is there any absolutely necessary plant that I must add for the birds? Im open to suggestions. There are very large cedar trees, redbuds, etc., in my neighbors yard. I have a very small, low to the ground, pine tree (it shows up in some of the bird pictures I post on Facebook.), Oak trees, and dogwood trees. Ill also incorporate potted plants.
I am not able to travel to far-away places (for you younguns, thats the name of a pop song, back in my day) to search out individual plants, as I was once able to do. We do have a good nursery here in Harrison
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 2/1/19 10:46 am
From: Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...>
Subject: Horned Grebe
Going West on 10: 1 Horned Grebe on Lake Maumelle just as you go across
bridge before Farkleberry/Loon Point 12:30 pm. Will upload to ebird.org
later today. - Candace Casey

 

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Date: 2/1/19 10:15 am
From: Tammy <msiinc...>
Subject: Birding Adventures
I have had four unexpected and pretty cool adventures birding this year. 

The first was at Magness Lake.  While watching a Bald Eagle in the distance a Sharp-Shinned Hawk landed on the fence not 10 feet away from me!  I had to backup 3 times before I could get my camera to focus he was so close!  I am shocked he did not fly off as soon as I moved but he didn’t! 

The second was when I came across a Barred Owl in the early afternoon.  He was perched low in a tree as he looed for and caught crawdads in a ditch.  He caught one crawdad and flew up into a tree to eat it.  While I was photographing him, I hear before I see a large Red-Shouldered Hawk squawking at the owl from above!   The hawk was very loud and  upset with the owl.  The owl immediately swallowed the crawdad he had caught, leaves and all.  He then sat there pretending not to notice the hawk.  It wasn’t long before a 2nd Red-Shouldered Hawk appeared on the scene.  This one was a tad smaller and probably the mate to the first.

The third adventure was on the same day at Magness Lake.  Watching a Bald Eagle in the distance.   After a bit the eagle soared down to the water and grabbed what was found to be a dead and blotted armadillo!  The eagle could not lift off with his catch and swam it to shore where he drug it onto the bank and ate it.  He flew off and I believe his mate appeared.  This eagle pulled the find further onto the bank and had her fill as well. 

Last but certainly not least.  I was watching a male Goldeneye and a male hooded merganser fish along a river.  As I was taking photos a River Otter surfaced bot about 15 feet away from the Goldeneye.  I had noted the Goldeneye had gone on alert but didn’t realize I had captured an otter in the background of my photo until the otter moved in closer and attempted to catch the duck!  Both water fowl flew off and I found myself stalking the otter instead.  To my joy the otter ended up on the bank where I got to watch him sun for almost an hour.  He was like a puppy dog that couldn’t get comfortable and after digging up some leaves and relieving its self, he got back into the river and disappeared. 


Tammy

 

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Date: 2/1/19 9:36 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
Thanks for sharing. At least 38 species use Red Mulberry fruit. Anyone with a fruiting tree will enjoy the birds.

Jerry

From: Sandy Berger
Sent: Friday, February 1, 2019 10:41 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information

My mulberries have brought me great joy. Every spring, if the berries are mature, I get numerous migratory species in my little backyard near down Fort Smith. Sadly they are slowly dying. Every year I have to cut off more dead branches.
Species seen include White-crowned Sparrow, Eastern Kingbird, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Baltimore Oriole, Painted and Indigo Bunting, Swainson’s Thrush, and so on.
Don’t know where the male tree is. Both of my trees are fruit bearing.

Sandy B.
FS, AR



On Fri, Feb 1, 2019 at 9:47 AM Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Excellent information!
J

On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 7:47 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

I have had several birders seeking additional information about birds and red mulberries which I responded to, but thought that there may be others with similar questions that need answers. Mature trees can produce about 10 bushels of berries and trees in the open produce 7 X those that are shaded. The female will start producing fruit at about 5 years of age but the older a tree is the more fruit produced. Berry production is basically from June to August but can be extended by watering in the summer months. Remember that although males do not produce fruit, their leaves support over 200 species of Lepidoptera which is bird food so the existences of males is still helping birds and providing pollen for the female plant so if you have males don’t rip them out.

Those that have observed birds along the Texas coast at High Island and Sabine Woods know how important the fruit is to birds arriving from the tropics. Birds that feed on insets here use fruits as a big part of their diet in the tropics and when they arrive along the coast.

I encourage anyone that wants to improve their property for birds to consider a big part of the plants being soft mast producers like red-mulberry, American Beautyberry, Blackgum, Blackcherry, and Yaupon to list a few of the better ones. Native plants support native insects and these also support hundreds of species of Lepidoptera.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: <jwdavis...>
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 12:10 PM
To: Ragupathy Kannan ; ARBird
Subject: Fw: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds

Thank you for getting this paper out. I hope that more birders will see the value of having mulberry trees in their yard and overcome their phobia of birds pooping on their car. That is a small potential inconvenience for such a valuable food source for birds. They need to remember that they need a male and female trees and it is the female that produces the fruit.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Ragupathy Kannan
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 8:24 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds

Hot off the press, everything you ever wanted to know about birds eating mulberries in Arkansas, and a lot more. Full PDF attached.
Thanks to my friend Sandy Berger for giving me the tiny mulberry seedling from her yard in 2003, which led to this study 15 years later!

Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas





Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas
Ragupathy Kannan

A fruiting Mulberry tree (Morus rubra) was observed for 67 hours in the spring of 2016 and 2017 in Fort Smith, A...






 

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Date: 2/1/19 9:27 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
While most mulberries are dioecious (sexes on separate plants), some can be monecious, (sexes on same plant) so one or both of your mulberries could have both. If they are dying, you might want to collect some of the ripe fruits, clean the seed and put in a pot to grow some more.



MaryAnn

In the pine woods northwest of London, AR





‘New day, new blessing. Don’t let yesterday’s failures ruin the beauty of today, because each day has its own promise of love, joy, forgiveness. Good morning…..”






 

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Date: 2/1/19 8:42 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
My mulberries have brought me great joy. Every spring, if the berries are
mature, I get numerous migratory species in my little backyard near down
Fort Smith. Sadly they are slowly dying. Every year I have to cut off more
dead branches.
Species seen include White-crowned Sparrow, Eastern Kingbird, Rose-breasted
Grosbeak, Baltimore Oriole, Painted and Indigo Bunting, Swainson’s Thrush,
and so on.
Don’t know where the male tree is. Both of my trees are fruit bearing.

Sandy B.
FS, AR



On Fri, Feb 1, 2019 at 9:47 AM Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

> Excellent information!
> J
>
> On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 7:47 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
>> I have had several birders seeking additional information about birds and
>> red mulberries which I responded to, but thought that there may be others
>> with similar questions that need answers. Mature trees can produce about *10
>> bushels of berries* and trees in the open produce 7 X those that are
>> shaded. The female will start producing *fruit at about 5 years* of age
>> but the older a tree is the more fruit produced. Berry production is
>> basically from June to August but can be extended by watering in the summer
>> months. Remember that although males do not produce fruit, their leaves
>> support over 200 species of Lepidoptera which is bird food so the
>> existences of males is still helping birds and providing pollen for the
>> female plant so if you have males don’t rip them out.
>>
>> Those that have observed birds along the Texas coast at High Island and
>> Sabine Woods know how important the fruit is to birds arriving from the
>> tropics. Birds that feed on insets here use fruits as a big part of their
>> diet in the tropics and when they arrive along the coast.
>>
>> I encourage anyone that wants to improve their property for birds to
>> consider a big part of the plants being soft mast producers like
>> red-mulberry, American Beautyberry, Blackgum, Blackcherry, and Yaupon to
>> list a few of the better ones. Native plants support native insects and
>> these also support hundreds of species of Lepidoptera.
>>
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> Hot Springs
>>
>> *From:* <jwdavis...>
>> *Sent:* Thursday, January 31, 2019 12:10 PM
>> *To:* Ragupathy Kannan ; ARBird
>> *Subject:* Fw: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds
>>
>> Thank you for getting this paper out. I hope that more birders will see
>> the value of having mulberry trees in their yard and overcome their phobia
>> of birds pooping on their car. That is a small potential inconvenience for
>> such a valuable food source for birds. They need to remember that they
>> need a male and female trees and it is the female that produces the fruit.
>>
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> Hot Springs, AR
>>
>> *From:* Ragupathy Kannan
>> *Sent:* Thursday, January 31, 2019 8:24 AM
>> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
>> *Subject:* Mulberries and Arkansas Birds
>>
>> Hot off the press, everything you ever wanted to know about birds eating
>> mulberries in Arkansas, and a lot more. Full PDF attached.
>> Thanks to my friend Sandy Berger for giving me the tiny mulberry seedling
>> from her yard in 2003, which led to this study 15 years later!
>>
>> Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas
>> <https://scholarworks.uark.edu/jaas/vol72/iss1/10/>
>>
>> Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas
>>
>> Ragupathy Kannan
>>
>> A fruiting Mulberry tree (Morus rubra) was observed for 67 hours in the
>> spring of 2016 and 2017 in Fort Smith, A...
>> <https://scholarworks.uark.edu/jaas/vol72/iss1/10/>
>>
>>
>>
>

 

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Date: 2/1/19 7:48 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
Excellent information!
J

On Thu, Jan 31, 2019 at 7:47 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> I have had several birders seeking additional information about birds and
> red mulberries which I responded to, but thought that there may be others
> with similar questions that need answers. Mature trees can produce about *10
> bushels of berries* and trees in the open produce 7 X those that are
> shaded. The female will start producing *fruit at about 5 years* of age
> but the older a tree is the more fruit produced. Berry production is
> basically from June to August but can be extended by watering in the summer
> months. Remember that although males do not produce fruit, their leaves
> support over 200 species of Lepidoptera which is bird food so the
> existences of males is still helping birds and providing pollen for the
> female plant so if you have males don’t rip them out.
>
> Those that have observed birds along the Texas coast at High Island and
> Sabine Woods know how important the fruit is to birds arriving from the
> tropics. Birds that feed on insets here use fruits as a big part of their
> diet in the tropics and when they arrive along the coast.
>
> I encourage anyone that wants to improve their property for birds to
> consider a big part of the plants being soft mast producers like
> red-mulberry, American Beautyberry, Blackgum, Blackcherry, and Yaupon to
> list a few of the better ones. Native plants support native insects and
> these also support hundreds of species of Lepidoptera.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> *From:* <jwdavis...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, January 31, 2019 12:10 PM
> *To:* Ragupathy Kannan ; ARBird
> *Subject:* Fw: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds
>
> Thank you for getting this paper out. I hope that more birders will see
> the value of having mulberry trees in their yard and overcome their phobia
> of birds pooping on their car. That is a small potential inconvenience for
> such a valuable food source for birds. They need to remember that they
> need a male and female trees and it is the female that produces the fruit.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
> *From:* Ragupathy Kannan
> *Sent:* Thursday, January 31, 2019 8:24 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Mulberries and Arkansas Birds
>
> Hot off the press, everything you ever wanted to know about birds eating
> mulberries in Arkansas, and a lot more. Full PDF attached.
> Thanks to my friend Sandy Berger for giving me the tiny mulberry seedling
> from her yard in 2003, which led to this study 15 years later!
>
> Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas
> <https://scholarworks.uark.edu/jaas/vol72/iss1/10/>
>
> Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas
>
> Ragupathy Kannan
>
> A fruiting Mulberry tree (Morus rubra) was observed for 67 hours in the
> spring of 2016 and 2017 in Fort Smith, A...
> <https://scholarworks.uark.edu/jaas/vol72/iss1/10/>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 2/1/19 6:07 am
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 31 Jan 2019 - Special issue (#2019-36)
I did not see the pdf from Kannan.  I receive the digest version of ARBiRD, so that may be the reason.Roselie Overby
On ‎Thursday‎, ‎January‎ ‎31‎, ‎2019‎ ‎07‎:‎47‎:‎45‎ ‎PM‎ ‎CST, ARBIRD-L automatic digest system <LISTSERV...> wrote:

There are 2 messages totaling 27384 lines in this issue.

Topics in this special issue:

  1. Fw: This listserve-original intent
  2. Birds and Mulberries -  Additional Information

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 31 Jan 2019 22:49:10 +0000
From:    Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Fw: This listserve-original intent

It appears to me that the responsibility for holding this list to its intended purpose(s?) rests primarily with its owner.  I recall that Dr. Kimberly Smith (recently deceased) was the original owner of the list.  He certainly did jerk us back into line from time to time.  I don't know who owns this list today.  It might help clarify the situation if the current list owner would introduce himself/herself to us.  That way we'd know the difference between the voice of authority and the much more plentiful voices of opinion.

Bill Shepherd
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 6:28 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent

Here's what I could find about ARBIRD "guidelines" which perhaps needs a tad updating but does a good job of providing some basic boundaries for us. Perhaps we need more monitoring or periodic clarification or reminders. It's way too easy to go off topic. True for me and likely true for others  Thus the value of fellowshipofwings!

http://arbirds.org/arbirds_discussion.html


Patty McLean
Conway AR

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Date: 1/30/19 1:18 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: This listserve-original intent

Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this listserve
goes off on tangents? I’d like to know what the original intent of this
listserve was. I don’t want to offend. Maybe I’m thinking wrong. But, can
people at least give private responses to some of the questions put out
there.
Sorry if I’m being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need to
get off the listserve. But then there’s the rare bird reports. Please...no
angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
Thanks.
Sandy B.
FS, AR

------------------------------

Date:    Thu, 31 Jan 2019 19:47:13 -0600
From:    Jerry Davis
<jwdavis...>
Subject: Birds and Mulberries -  Additional Information

I have had several birders seeking additional information about birds and red mulberries which I responded to, but thought that there may be others with similar questions that need answers.  Mature trees can produce about 10 bushels of berries and trees in the open produce 7 X those that are shaded. The female will start producing fruit at about 5 years of age but the older a tree is the more fruit produced. Berry production is basically from June to August but can be extended by watering in the summer months.  Remember that although males do not produce fruit, their leaves support over 200 species of Lepidoptera which is bird food so the existences of males is still helping birds and providing pollen for the female plant so if you have males don’t rip them out.

Those that have observed birds along the Texas coast at High Island and Sabine Woods know how important the fruit is to birds arriving from the tropics. Birds that feed on insets here use fruits as a big part of their diet in the tropics and when they arrive along the coast.

I encourage anyone that wants to improve their property for birds to consider a big part of the plants being soft mast producers like red-mulberry, American Beautyberry, Blackgum, Blackcherry, and Yaupon to list a few of the better ones. Native plants support native insects and these also support hundreds of species of Lepidoptera.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: <jwdavis...>
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 12:10 PM
To: Ragupathy Kannan ; ARBird
Subject: Fw: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds

Thank you for getting this paper out. I hope that more birders will see the value of having mulberry trees in their yard and overcome their phobia of birds pooping on their car.  That is a small potential inconvenience for such a valuable food source for birds.  They need to remember that they need a male and female trees and it is the female that produces the fruit. 

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Ragupathy Kannan
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 8:24 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds

Hot off the press, everything you ever wanted to know about birds eating mulberries in Arkansas, and a lot more.  Full PDF attached.
Thanks to my friend Sandy Berger for giving me the tiny mulberry seedling from her yard in 2003, which led to this study 15 years later!

Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas


                       
               
         
                Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas
                  Ragupathy Kannan

                  A fruiting Mulberry tree (Morus rubra) was observed for 67 hours in the spring of 2016 and 2017 in Fort Smith, A...
               
         
   


------------------------------

End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 31 Jan 2019 - Special issue (#2019-36)
***************************************************************
 

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Date: 2/1/19 6:05 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird Filters and the Great Backyard Bird Count
February is Great Backyard Bird Count season. The GBBC attracts a lot of
first-time users to eBird. Consequently my review load increases too, in
part by trying to find possible errors that are not flagged by the system.
To try to reduce and catch some common errors Ive seen in past GBBCs Ive
adjusted the filters for certain species for the period Feb 12-22. This
covers the date range the GBBC can occur over the years so I dont have to
adjust the date range every year. Filter values have been reduced or set to
0. Im following the example set by a reviewer in another region.

The best (worst?) example is observers wanting to call any wren by their
house a House Wren, with 2 or more reported. House Wren is not a common yard
bird and they dont like to be around each other when not breeding. It is
telling that experienced observers rarely report a House Wren in their yard
during the GBBC. So House Wren is set to 0 in all 8 regional filters. If you
see a House Wren in good habitat, that is fine. Say a few words and submit
your list. Im asking that no one gets upset that their Rusty Blackbird in
White River NWR is flagged when the species is expected there. I will accept
it without question. I just want a beginner to have to think twice and make
a comment before reporting Rusty Blackbirds in their suburban yard.

This is an experiment. Well see how it goes this year, if it reduces my
workload, if it causes too much consternation for users. I appreciate your
patience.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 1/31/19 6:17 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Gunnison Sage-Grouse & Southern Colorado in 4/19- 4/29.... LONG
Greetings all,
I'm going to try to see a Gunnison Sage-Grouse and bird Southern Colorado from April 19th through April 29th 2019. You're welcome to join the insanity if you want!

Very Tentative itinerary:
19th: Leave AR before daylight, driving 14 hrs;
20th: Finish the drive and bird around Lamar. Start driving west;
21st: Bird around Pueblo, get the 4wd. owling after dark; Stay in Pueblo;
22nd - 24th: Bird the southern Mtns from Pueblo to Durango and North to Gunnison;
25th - 26th: Get the sage-grouse and bird the Gunnison area;
27th - 28th: Bird the Southwest. Return 4wd to Pueblo and start the drive home.
29th: Finish with a 14 hr drive home.

1st Priority:
Remove my semi-nemesis status from the Gunnison Sage-Grouse. I've tried 3 times without success. Either the location or the timing weren't the best so it's only a semi-nemesis. "Sisk-a-dee" (www.siskadee.org<http://www.siskadee.org>) isn't doing a festival, so will rent their viewing trailer. If I miss it on day one then I intend to keep coming back each day, using the car as a blind, for as long as it takes, to see them dancing on the only public viewing lek, in its range.

Other Priorities:
Bird the high desert/arid lands of Southwest CO.

Bird the mountains along the southern CO border. In addition to normal mountains birds and owls, will try for 3 species of Rosy-Finch. May also try for White-tailed Ptarmigan. (A mega-nemesis) This won't be the best spot in CO, but it's the only place with an April sighting within the trip exploration zone. Slumgullion Pass area at 11,361'. The probability is super-low with snow depth and road closures, playing a factor.

Look for Eastern strays, along the AR River, near Lamar.

Explore the Pueblo area, including a nighttime attempt at owls.

Explore "Canyons of the Ancients National Monument" and "Mesa Verde National Park" as a tourist.

After the first priority, the rest aren't in any order. Can be totally flexible depending on who is on the trip and what folks want to do. I have 67 CO birds & 2 lifers that I'm looking for, but if you've got a lifer's list I'll work really hard to get you as many as possible.

Logistics and issues:
Timing:
You can go for as long or short as you want. Can drive out with me or I can meet you in Albuquerque, Colorado Springs or Pueblo. You could even fly into one airport and leave from another. If you're flying, than most of your gear could drive with me.

The zone:
Generally exploring from Highway 50, South to the NM border.

Birding locations:
Curecanti Nat Recreation Area; Black Canyon of the Gunnison Nat Park; Canyons of the Ancients Nat Monument; Mesa Verde Nat Park; the Anasazi Heritage Center; Monarch, Wolf Creek, Spring Creek & Slumgullian Passes; 4-5 Nat Forests or Grasslands; Bureau of Land Management lands; a couple ski area towns; Monte Vista Nat Wildlife Refuge; John Martin Reservoir; State Parks and towns; I'm sure there are more places than there is time.

Birding, juggling the timing:
The Gunnison Sage-Grouse peak is approximately the last week of April; The Eastern passerine migration is May week 1 and western migration is May week 2. So not perfect timing for the 2 migrations, but we'll still see birds, just may have to work harder at it.

Driving:
I'll be renting a 4wd SUV with tire chains and fully expect that both will be needed. I will do most of the driving, but wouldn't mind some help, if you like driving.

Walking:
Mostly < mile walking. However, to see a Lucy's Warbler in CO, I'll will need to do a 4-6 mile round trip walk in arid/desert-like lands. You don't have to do this if you don't want.

Altitude Sickness:
Some folks aren't bothered by this, but I can get headaches. We can self-treat the illness with pre-planning. One day birding and sleeping around 6500 ft; then birding & sleeping at 7703' in Gunnison; then at 11,312' for the day at Monarch Pass then slowly descending to 7000'. You may want to research this illness, for yourself.

Gunnison Sage-Grouse Lek Rules/timing:
Probably getting up around 3am; To protect the birds these rules appear to be heavily enforced by CO Game Officers. Federal threatened species laws can be enforced; No talking or noise until the last bird leaves; No restroom for about 4hrs, until the last bird leaves; No vehicle engines running, so no heat for about 4 hrs. (Ave low temp is 15-30 degrees!) If you violate the rules in place for the species protection, then you can count on me to be the one to contact law enforcement.
Photography is allowed.... HOWEVER noise is a factor. NO flash. Distance is 0.6 to 1.0 mile. Very low light conditions. When the sun comes up it will be directly at us, creating lots of silhouetting conditions. This whole section is important and worth rereading. This morning could be the roughest portion of the trip.

Costs:
I'll pay for the vehicle, the gas, the state parks pass and the conservation stamp. Lodging, food, Sisk-a-dee fees and airlines are on our own. If you'd like to go, but cash is an issue, then holler, I might be able to absorb some of the cost.

Lodging & Food:
Quite likely that we won't always be able to find a name brand hotel. On most nights sit down food in the evening. Sit down lunch is also possible, if you really want. Breakfast is fine, but I sure don't want to give up the best birding of the day. So before daylight or on the go.

Birding with me:
This isn't a guided trip. I'll do a bunch of organizing but will need your help on your favorite birds. Everybody will need to help find and id the birds.
I've heard the words insane, intense, death-marches and driven used by folks that have birded out-of-state with me. There are probably some other words that folks use, that might be stronger language than that? I do tend to start early, bird a lot, drive a lot and sleep/eat less. A day to rest after returning to AR is a good idea.
This time I plan to be a tad more laid-back. We will still drive a lot. Surely will get 6-8 hrs sleep most nights. Because I won't know the western calls, I won't be birding as hard, as normal. If it's a lifer for you, then we'll take a lot of time on it. I can even bird early while you're sleeping in. There will be only 1 long walk, and you don't need to take it. We will acclimatize to the altitude. We can do some tourism moments, or not, your choice.
We just need to talk/compromise before the trip, so we all have the same expectations.

Planning:
I've reserved the viewing blind, but need a number of birders to tell Sisk-a-dee. If you want to go please RESPOND BY 2/6.

It's all good, so if you just need some insanity in your life, reply to me off the list. Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Cheers, Leif











This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 1/31/19 5:48 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Birds and Mulberries - Additional Information
I have had several birders seeking additional information about birds and red mulberries which I responded to, but thought that there may be others with similar questions that need answers. Mature trees can produce about 10 bushels of berries and trees in the open produce 7 X those that are shaded. The female will start producing fruit at about 5 years of age but the older a tree is the more fruit produced. Berry production is basically from June to August but can be extended by watering in the summer months. Remember that although males do not produce fruit, their leaves support over 200 species of Lepidoptera which is bird food so the existences of males is still helping birds and providing pollen for the female plant so if you have males don’t rip them out.

Those that have observed birds along the Texas coast at High Island and Sabine Woods know how important the fruit is to birds arriving from the tropics. Birds that feed on insets here use fruits as a big part of their diet in the tropics and when they arrive along the coast.

I encourage anyone that wants to improve their property for birds to consider a big part of the plants being soft mast producers like red-mulberry, American Beautyberry, Blackgum, Blackcherry, and Yaupon to list a few of the better ones. Native plants support native insects and these also support hundreds of species of Lepidoptera.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: <jwdavis...>
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 12:10 PM
To: Ragupathy Kannan ; ARBird
Subject: Fw: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds

Thank you for getting this paper out. I hope that more birders will see the value of having mulberry trees in their yard and overcome their phobia of birds pooping on their car. That is a small potential inconvenience for such a valuable food source for birds. They need to remember that they need a male and female trees and it is the female that produces the fruit.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Ragupathy Kannan
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 8:24 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds

Hot off the press, everything you ever wanted to know about birds eating mulberries in Arkansas, and a lot more. Full PDF attached.
Thanks to my friend Sandy Berger for giving me the tiny mulberry seedling from her yard in 2003, which led to this study 15 years later!

Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas





Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas
Ragupathy Kannan

A fruiting Mulberry tree (Morus rubra) was observed for 67 hours in the spring of 2016 and 2017 in Fort Smith, A...






 

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Date: 1/31/19 2:49 pm
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Fw: This listserve-original intent
It appears to me that the responsibility for holding this list to its intended purpose(s?) rests primarily with its owner. I recall that Dr. Kimberly Smith (recently deceased) was the original owner of the list. He certainly did jerk us back into line from time to time. I don't know who owns this list today. It might help clarify the situation if the current list owner would introduce himself/herself to us. That way we'd know the difference between the voice of authority and the much more plentiful voices of opinion.

Bill Shepherd
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 6:28 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent

Here's what I could find about ARBIRD "guidelines" which perhaps needs a tad updating but does a good job of providing some basic boundaries for us. Perhaps we need more monitoring or periodic clarification or reminders. It's way too easy to go off topic. True for me and likely true for others Thus the value of fellowshipofwings!

http://arbirds.org/arbirds_discussion.html


Patty McLean
Conway AR

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Date: 1/30/19 1:18 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: This listserve-original intent

Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this listserve
goes off on tangents? Id like to know what the original intent of this
listserve was. I dont want to offend. Maybe Im thinking wrong. But, can
people at least give private responses to some of the questions put out
there.
Sorry if Im being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need to
get off the listserve. But then theres the rare bird reports. Please...no
angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
Thanks.
Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

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Date: 1/31/19 10:12 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds
Thank you for getting this paper out. I hope that more birders will see the value of having mulberry trees in their yard and overcome their phobia of birds pooping on their car. That is a small potential inconvenience for such a valuable food source for birds. They need to remember that they need a male and female trees and it is the female that produces the fruit.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Ragupathy Kannan
Sent: Thursday, January 31, 2019 8:24 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds

Hot off the press, everything you ever wanted to know about birds eating mulberries in Arkansas, and a lot more. Full PDF attached.
Thanks to my friend Sandy Berger for giving me the tiny mulberry seedling from her yard in 2003, which led to this study 15 years later!

Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas





Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas
Ragupathy Kannan

A fruiting Mulberry tree (Morus rubra) was observed for 67 hours in the spring of 2016 and 2017 in Fort Smith, A...






 

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Date: 1/31/19 8:58 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: how to subscribe to the "fellowshipofwings" list serv
As has been noted, there is a list for discussion about all the ways we are impacting birds, both the good and the bad.  The intent is to share information and thoughts concerning bird conservation.  That means it is O.K. to bring up controversial subjects such as laws, regulations, behaviors, political views that relate to maintaining or improving a livable planet for birds and people.  It is not a place for rants or hate speech.  It is a place for respectful discussion with a goal toward finding solutions, sharing knowledge, and expressing wonder over the complexities of bird/human interrelationships.
At present there are only 41 subscribers, but they happen to be smart, caring people.    The list is sometimes dormant for months.   The latest topic under discussion had to do with the herbicide Dicamba.  Political action is sometimes urged, the assumption is that if you care about birds you are willing to take action to protect them.  That is the path to guilt free birding.

Send an email to:<listserv...>
In the email message box put "subscribe fellowshipofwings-L your name"

leave the "subject" box blank.
If for some reason that doesn't work, send me an email request and I'll add you manually.
Note: The name was meant to be "Fellowship of the Wings", but "the" was left off by mistake when the list was established.
Jack StewartNewton County
 

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Date: 1/31/19 8:51 am
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: TOSO Paper
Here is my article about Townsend's solitaires. It is my first published paper. I share credit with Kim Smith. This was one of the last papers he presented to the Arkansas Academy of Science. Thanks go to Gary Graves for giving the idea and encouragement and Ivan Still for his assistance.

https://scholarworks.uark.edu/jaas/vol72/iss1/28

I have not found any TOSOs this winter. There are very few cedar and sumac berries available. Maybe next year.


Don Simons
 

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Date: 1/31/19 7:54 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: bird friendly yards - YES
Efforts to make yards bird friendly are quite relevant to a list like ARBIRD. Admittedly, discovery of a bird brand new to Arkansas is thrilling, BUT there is an excellent reason why Arkansas Audubon Society and Audubon Arkansas have major initiatives to encourage use of native plants, both for all kinds of bugs including pollinators, and of course native birds. Sally Jo Gibsons post about working on her yard in Harrison is directly relevant to this effort. Several of us have worked with developers in Fayetteville to include bird friendly tactics in their projects. We have partnered with Ninestone Land Trust and Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area in glade restoration, for example, because bringing back native plants and animals, including birds, is a way to have a positive overall impact on birds. Keep up the good work, Ninestone and Sally Jo, and keep us posted on progress.


 

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Date: 1/31/19 7:20 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject:
SignoffArbird listserve

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 1/31/19 6:40 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent
There were also a few operating “rules’ ; e.g., don’t attach files since some users may still be using dial-up (is this still a factor?), links are okay.



I may still be able to locate some other examples from some old emails.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of plm108
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 6:28 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent



Here's what I could find about ARBIRD "guidelines" which perhaps needs a tad updating but does a good job of providing some basic boundaries for us. Perhaps we need more monitoring or periodic clarification or reminders. It's way too easy to go off topic. True for me and likely true for others Thus the value of fellowshipofwings!



http://arbirds.org/arbirds_discussion.html





Patty McLean

Conway AR




 

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Date: 1/31/19 6:31 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: STOP "list serve original"
On behalf of ARBIRD list management, STOP the discussion list serve original intent. Back to birds and birding.

STOP using REPLY ALL unless you have NEW information (example: a rare bird that continues at the posted location) to provide about a bird sighting or event. REPLY ALL is used ONLY when all subscribers need to receive in their inboxes your comment about a post. If you make any response to an ARBIRD post, a direct REPLY to the person making the post should be the default UNLESS your reply includes essential new information helpful to the entire list.

List owner is Dr J.D. Willson of UA-Fayetteville Department of Biological Sciences, who was Kim Smiths colleague. When Kim passed suddenly I agreed to help monitor the list if Dr Willson would be list owner.

Information about subscribing, unsubscribing, and managing your account is on Arkansas Audubon Society webpage http://arbirds.org/arbirds_discussion.html.

Kim took a broad view of what could be posted as long as it connected to birds and birding, and especially Arkansas birds and birding. His intent was to boost birds and birding. He was mainly concerned about relevance. He STOPPED discussions controversial and mainly off-topic: cats, dogs, religion, politics, most legislation, etc., personality attacks, rambling discourses.


 

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Date: 1/31/19 6:25 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Mulberries and Arkansas Birds
Hot off the press, everything you ever wanted to know about birds eating mulberries in Arkansas, and a lot more.  Full PDF attached. Thanks to my friend Sandy Berger for giving me the tiny mulberry seedling from her yard in 2003, which led to this study 15 years later!
Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas


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Avian Frugivory in a Fruiting Mulberry Tree (Morus rubra) in Arkansas

Ragupathy Kannan

A fruiting Mulberry tree (Morus rubra) was observed for 67 hours in the spring of 2016 and 2017 in Fort Smith, A...
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Date: 1/31/19 5:38 am
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: Birds, pollinator garden, conservation. Etc.
Me too!

Sent from my iPod

> On Jan 31, 2019, at 5:59 AM, Gail Miller <gail.miller...> wrote:
>
> Awesome plans, I look forward to following the progress!!
>
> Gail in Conway
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sally Jo Gibson
> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 7:45 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Birds, pollinator garden, conservation. Etc.
>
> At the advice of my son-in-law, Don Hubbell, who is the Director of the UA Research Farm at Bethesda, AR, I have instigated “procedures” to re-do my entire back yard. It has badly eroded. I’ve spent several hundred dollars adding topsoil, grass seed, etc. just in the past three years. So I’ve now hired a landscape company to completely scrape it off, add lots of topsoil and lay down sod to help stop erosion. They are people that I’ve known and dealt with since we moved to this house on Yorkshire Cove in 2001. They hope to have it completed by April. I hope so, too. In time for spring bird migration.
> In the process, I’ll be planting a Pollinator Garden using native plants. I’m looking forward to seeing the completed project. Plans are to photograph this from beginning to completion. Plants selected will be rose favored by birds.
> I’ll also have the Boone County Master Gardeners involved in my project.
> Noting that the guy who will be speaking at the spring AAS meeting has a book published on this subject, I ordered it and received it today.
> ALL OF THIS is not only being done to stop erosion, BUT, also to make better habitat for birds!
> The deer ate the six pine trees that Don planted for me last spring. My neighbors have counted as many as 12 at one time. Several 8 point bucks among them.
> I'm barely in the city limits so no projectiles of any kind are allowed.
> Also number 14 great grand expected April 14!
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
> Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 1/31/19 3:59 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Birds, pollinator garden, conservation. Etc.
Awesome plans, I look forward to following the progress!!

Gail in Conway

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 7:45 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Birds, pollinator garden, conservation. Etc.

At the advice of my son-in-law, Don Hubbell, who is the Director of the UA Research Farm at Bethesda, AR, I have instigated “procedures” to re-do my entire back yard. It has badly eroded. I’ve spent several hundred dollars adding topsoil, grass seed, etc. just in the past three years. So I’ve now hired a landscape company to completely scrape it off, add lots of topsoil and lay down sod to help stop erosion. They are people that I’ve known and dealt with since we moved to this house on Yorkshire Cove in 2001. They hope to have it completed by April. I hope so, too. In time for spring bird migration.
In the process, I’ll be planting a Pollinator Garden using native plants. I’m looking forward to seeing the completed project. Plans are to photograph this from beginning to completion. Plants selected will be rose favored by birds.
I’ll also have the Boone County Master Gardeners involved in my project.
Noting that the guy who will be speaking at the spring AAS meeting has a book published on this subject, I ordered it and received it today.
ALL OF THIS is not only being done to stop erosion, BUT, also to make better habitat for birds!
The deer ate the six pine trees that Don planted for me last spring. My neighbors have counted as many as 12 at one time. Several 8 point bucks among them.
I'm barely in the city limits so no projectiles of any kind are allowed.
Also number 14 great grand expected April 14!
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 1/30/19 5:45 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Birds, pollinator garden, conservation. Etc.
At the advice of my son-in-law, Don Hubbell, who is the Director of the UA Research Farm at Bethesda, AR, I have instigated “procedures” to re-do my entire back yard. It has badly eroded. I’ve spent several hundred dollars adding topsoil, grass seed, etc. just in the past three years. So I’ve now hired a landscape company to completely scrape it off, add lots of topsoil and lay down sod to help stop erosion. They are people that I’ve known and dealt with since we moved to this house on Yorkshire Cove in 2001. They hope to have it completed by April. I hope so, too. In time for spring bird migration.
In the process, I’ll be planting a Pollinator Garden using native plants. I’m looking forward to seeing the completed project. Plans are to photograph this from beginning to completion. Plants selected will be rose favored by birds.
I’ll also have the Boone County Master Gardeners involved in my project.
Noting that the guy who will be speaking at the spring AAS meeting has a book published on this subject, I ordered it and received it today.
ALL OF THIS is not only being done to stop erosion, BUT, also to make better habitat for birds!
The deer ate the six pine trees that Don planted for me last spring. My neighbors have counted as many as 12 at one time. Several 8 point bucks among them.
I'm barely in the city limits so no projectiles of any kind are allowed.
Also number 14 great grand expected April 14!
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 1/30/19 5:17 pm
From: Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...>
Subject: 60 Canvasbacks
Correction not 40 or 30 I looked at my bn photos. There were around 60 this
morning 1-30-19 Vista Park Point a good distance out but you can get shots
with 600 mm. -Candace Casey

 

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Date: 1/30/19 5:05 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent
I could be that one person, I think. That's only because I came into the
group late. Sometime in the last few years I think, and at that point
random discussions already happened and there was no set list of rules
anywhere that I saw.
Personally, I think some topics are "on topic" if they relate to birding
enough. But, again, I joined this group late and it's the very first
listserv I ever joined, so I have no idea how they "normally" work. I
don't think I'll be joining the other list as I'll have a hard time
wading through political discussions that come up. So I guess I'll have
to do my best to try and stick to birds only here. So is it just bird
reports? Nothing else?  What about feeder discussions? Squirrel baffles?
I need specifics so I don't feel lost.
I hope whomever is officially in charge(Joe Neal?) will spell it out
clearly so I can do my best to comply. Very sincerely, I'm not here to
upset anyone.

Kate Chapman said :
/"If someone is only interested in rare bird updates, this listserv
seems like a much less efficient way of getting that information
compared to signing up for rare bird alerts from ebird (which you can
opt to get daily from as many states/areas as you want). They're also
more helpful than notices on here, as folks often neglect to mention
what part of the state they're in."/

I totally agree with reports not mentioning enough details sometimes...
but the problem is, there are a ton of regular birders in this group
that don't use eBird so there are some birds that get brought up here
much sooner than eBird. I like being here to have more than one way to
get such reports.

Anyway, I hope this is spelled out clearly and I hope that grace is
given. I don't adapt to change easily so this might be awkward for me...
well, everything is awkward for me anyway.
There is a Facebook group called Arkansas Birders and I think some
relevant discussion is allowed there. I'm part of the Whatbird forums,
they've died down a bit since a crash they had a while back but that's
another place I can try to rely on for other discussion.
I know I'm one of(not the only) people that might go off on a tangent
that isn't completely bird report related. I hope people forgive me for
that. This always felt like a good place to have such discussions and I
didn't really know better. Never thought about it being "wrong."  Never
considered such discussions as something that would bother anyone. I get
it though. When you sign up for something and it's not what you expected
or how it's supposed to be, I totally get that.
I want to add an awkward thank you to Sandy for bringing this up in the
first place. I feel uncomfortable now being one of the offenders here
but I also know how awkward it is to speak up. If this is where the
group should be, sometimes someone has to step up and call attention to
it. I might wish the scope of the group were broader but I can respect
what is.

Peace, and birds(or are they synonymous...)
Daniel Mason

On 1/30/2019 3:20 PM, Sandy Berger wrote:
> Thank you Charles, and others,  for your responses. If people would
> reserve opinions,  and discussions, to Fellowship of the Wings, there
> wouldn’t be an issue as to how this listserve is used. In my opinion
> the listserve should be used for occurrence and distribution of birds
> only. With occasional announcements, reminders, etc. This will keep
> the opinionating, discussion, and sometimes rudeness off this site.
> Surrounding states follow very strict guidelines as to what can be
> shared. I have heard from members about Louisiana, Florida, Texas
> listserves. People can be booted for any post not following guidelines
> on those sites. I don’t want us to be that group.
> All but one person who has responded to me agrees that the listserve
> is not being used as originally intended. Some of our great state
> birders won’t post anymore. And many people delete more than they
> read.  It has been suggested that we start  a new listserve. But I
> don’t believe we need to do that. If people would use “Fellowship” for
> discussions, the listserve can get back to the original intent.
>
> Again...I don’t want to offend. I just want the site to be as it was. 
> Thanks for your responses.
>
> Sandy B.
>
> On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 2:47 PM Charles H Mills <swamp_fox...>
> <mailto:<swamp_fox...>> wrote:
>
> I proposed the formation of ARBirds years ago based on the model
> of the listserv in Colorado-COBirds whose main purpose was to
> provide a means for the discussion of the occurrence and
> distribution of birds in Colorado.  I was a charter member of that
> group and remain one to this day.  Topics rarely stray on that
> listserv.  COBirds also provided a set of posting guidelines just
> as I think ARBirds used to do in its early years.
>
> That being said, I think it’s perfectly fine to announce special
> bird-related programs/meetings, deaths of members/prominent
> birders and probably some other things on ARBirds that don’t
> immediately come to mind.  I even think *announcements* of topics
> of a general, environmental, political nature are also appropriate
> so long as the actual discussion takes place on the sister
> listserv-Fellowship of Wings or something like that.  That’s also
> the place where I think further discussion of this topic should
> take place.
>
> I’m not looking to offend or be verbally tarred and feathered
> either with this position.  Now to get to the countdown of days
> before I can start looking for nesting Cave Swallows in SW AR.
>
> Charles Mills
> Wake Village, TX
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jan 30, 2019, at 1:18 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
> <mailto:<sndbrgr...>> wrote:
> >
> > Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on
> this listserve goes off on tangents? I’d like to know what the
> original intent of this listserve was. I don’t want to offend.
> Maybe I’m thinking wrong. But, can people at least give private
> responses to some of the questions put out there.
> > Sorry if I’m being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I
> just need to get off the listserve. But then there’s the rare bird
> reports. Please...no angry responses. Privately respond to me if
> you feel the need.
> > Thanks.
> > Sandy B.
> > FS, AR
> >
>



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Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 4:36 pm
From: Chris Pistole <raptor1964...>
Subject: Re: glasses
Daniel,

I wear transitions lenses and don't have any problems. The worst thing about them is going quickly from the bright sunlight outdoors into a dark building because of the short amount of time it takes for them to lighten. I have the newest version of Transitions, and they definitely lighten and darken quicker than the first pair I had. Also, they will never lighten up 100%, always having a slight tint to them, but I don't notice it. I know an optometrist will tell you that if you spend much time at all outdoors, you definitely need to protect your eyes with good sunglasses (or Transition lenses), especially as you get older. They are more expensive than regular lenses, but I know when I had a separate pair of prescription sunglasses it was a pain switching them all the time. And if you're a person that easily loses sunglasses, like some people I know, that is way too expensive. I'd rather keep one pair on my head and reduce the risk of losing the other (which I did in Costa Rica when I left my Rx sunglasses in a tour van!) or sitting on them and breaking them! (The tour company mysteriously couldn't find them when I checked later!)

Hope this helps.

Chris

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Mason
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:33 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: glasses

Since this is related to birdwatching, at least a little, I figured you
all are the best people to ask.

I'm overdo for a new pair of glasses... got my prescription checked a
couple weeks back and I definitely need new glasses. I'm trying to
balance budget with comfort and needs... ordering glasses online to save
a few bucks(using Zenni)

I struggle with decisions sometimes... weighing pros and cons and making
up my mind is difficult.
I think I'm going to get one cheaper pair with the blue blocking for all
my computer use(which is too much) and then after that, I might buy
another pair or two or three... here's where I get stuck. I kind of
wonder if I need a pair just for driving and then I go back and forth
with whether a cheap pair of tinted ones would suit me fine or if some
polarized ones would be better to help with glare. I sure hate glare
while driving... so there's one decision I'm mildly stuck on.

The other is a bit more complicated and frustrating. I'm considering
some transitions. When it's bright out, I wouldn't mind something that
gets darker so I don't have to squint so much. Then I go back and forth
with that. Do I really want something that transitions ALL the time?
Would I then want yet another pair for when I don't want transitions?
How much does the darkness of transitions interfere with how normal
things look? If I'm birding and my glasses are darker because of the
sun, will that make it harder for me to see through my binoculars? This
is where you all come in. Anyone use transitions? In the past, I never
even wear sunglasses because I don't like looking at things that seem
dark. Then again, I don't like squinting in bright light. So, there's
that ping-pong match in my head...

If I get transitions, am I going to want a regular pair that doesn't
tint at all on top of that? how much would transitions alter how I see
birds in the field? I just can't make up my mind but also don't want to
end up buying like 4 pairs of glasses.

Any thoughts on this are appreciated... especially anything related to
birding. :)

Daniel Mason


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Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 4:28 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent
Here's what I could find about ARBIRD "guidelines" which perhaps needs a tad updating but does a good job of providing some basic boundaries for us. Perhaps we need more monitoring or periodic clarification or reminders. It's way too easy to go off topic. True for me and likely true for others  Thus the value of fellowshipofwings!
http://arbirds.org/arbirds_discussion.html

Patty McLeanConway AR 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Date: 1/30/19 1:18 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: This listserve-original intent
Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this listserve
goes off on tangents? I’d like to know what the original intent of this
listserve was. I don’t want to offend. Maybe I’m thinking wrong. But, can
people at least give private responses to some of the questions put out
there.
Sorry if I’m being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need to
get off the listserve. But then there’s the rare bird reports. Please...no
angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
Thanks.
Sandy B.
FS, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 2:45 pm
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Birding and dogs
Glenn, I know how kind hearted and morally Christian you really are.  Proud to be your friend.  You know how much I love dogs.
You have virtually no legal obligation here other than NOT intentionally trying to hurt one of them.  Morally, you will slow down as you do now and as most folks will do, in an effort not to hurt one.  If you run over one, you are under no legal obligation to stop. Morally? Well, with 8 others I would not either.  If the dog damaged your car if you were to run over it, the legal responsibility would be on the owner to fix your car. Lack of a leash law up there (you might stop at the BK City Hall and or Sheriff's office and ask)  would not protect the dog's owner from the legal liability for the damage their loose running dogs would do to you or your car.  
Me, I'll slow down for them but keep going regardless.  
We got back home early this afternoon.
Joe


-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Wed, Jan 30, 2019 12:30 pm
Subject: Birding and dogs

There is a house at the entrance to Bald Knob NWR that now has nine dogs.  Nine!  And when we try to pass by, every single one of them run at the car.  They get in front of my car where I can't see them and bark.  I want to know, what are my legal obligations here in Arkansas if I run over a dog while out birding?  This isn't the only location where I am forced to drive through a gauntlet of dogs in order to go birding.  And, if I run over a dog, I wouldn't get out of my car seeing how there would still be 8 other dogs out there barking and growling.
I try to slow down so I won't hurt any of the dogs, but I see others just speed on through.  Maybe that is what I should do.  What is the best way to handle dogs running at my car?  Should I just keep my speed, or should I slow down?
I know this just marginally has anything to do with birding, but I do encounter this problem while out birding.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 2:33 pm
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: glasses
Daniel. Two critical questions.  1. How old  are you 2.  What are your prescription numbers?   ( minus or plus what diopters for  each eye, and do you  significant astigmatism?)   Both are critical issues for you here. 
I wore glasses for 60 years (no exaggeration) for extreme myopia (nearsightedness) until I had my implants for cataracts --- and now  I am miraculously  free of having to wear glasses.  I was so extremely nearsighted, I could not wear bifocals -- line or lineless.  
Each of us are different. So much depends of so many factors.  A good ophthalmologist -- even many optometrist -- can help you know what you will really be most comfortable with.  For me, buying prescription lenses on line is not a good idea.  Every optical shop I've ever entered ( and there were many) all over the Country, were happy to adjust my frames free of charge regardless of where I bought the frames or lens.
I hated transitions.  I think most people like them.  Bob can tell you how well they work with camera view finders, binoculars or spotting scopes.  I suspect that they will cut down the light entering your eye but that is a guess on my part.    
For driving, I simply used clip on polarized sun glasses.  I had coated prescription pair but I found the clip-ons a lot more convenient than forever swapping out clear for shaded.... and especially when I would go into a store (or office) and forget to change them before getting out of the car. A real pain as far as I was concerned.  
Polarized?  I've never seen a prescription pair and if they exist, I suspect would be very expensive and I  would never recommend them for birding .... they would drive you nuts using your camera.  (your view finder and viewing screen have their own polarizing effects as  well as the view black-out you would experience if you had a polarizing filter on your lens.)
I hope this helps.  Get back with your doctor and see what he or she recommends for your specific condition(s).   


Joe

-----Original Message-----
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Wed, Jan 30, 2019 3:58 pm
Subject: Re: glasses

Daniel,   I would just throw in that it is probably best NOT to get polarized Lenses.   They usually distort your Binocular vision.   I have a pair of dark Prescription Sunglasses that I loved when I was fishing....but I can't wear when I'm Birding

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On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 12:52 PM d.marie yates <maribird...> wrote:

Daniel, I had the self-darkening, no-line kind for years until I needed something stronger. I have budget problems too these days and went for the regular no-line bifocals. I miss my self-darkening. They weren’t as dark as a good pair of sunglasses but they did the trick and spared me having to own several pairs. As for birding, I never experienced any aberrations or color change. They costed 3 times what I paid for my current glasses, however, and I won’t know if the savings was worth it until I see how long the new ones last. Good luck finding what you need. I went to Success Vision and they’re nice and always ready to readjust the frames as needed. On that point, I switched from metal frames to plastic to rid having to replace the little nose plates when they fell off. But plastic loses its fit and you can’t bend it like you can the metal. They apply heat to do it at the store. Sent from Mail for Windows 10 From: Daniel Mason
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:34 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: glasses Since this is related to birdwatching, at least a little, I figured youall are the best people to ask. I'm overdo for a new pair of glasses... got my prescription checked acouple weeks back and I definitely need new glasses. I'm trying tobalance budget with comfort and needs... ordering glasses online to savea few bucks(using Zenni) I struggle with decisions sometimes... weighing pros and cons and makingup my mind is difficult.I think I'm going to get one cheaper pair with the blue blocking for allmy computer use(which is too much) and then after that, I might buyanother pair or two or three... here's where I get stuck.  I kind ofwonder if I need a pair just for driving and then I go back and forthwith whether a cheap pair of tinted ones would suit me fine or if somepolarized ones would be better to help with glare. I sure hate glarewhile driving...  so there's one decision I'm mildly stuck on. The other is a bit more complicated and frustrating. I'm consideringsome transitions. When it's bright out, I wouldn't mind something thatgets darker so I don't have to squint so much. Then I go back and forthwith that. Do I really want something that transitions ALL the time?Would I then want yet another pair for when I don't want transitions?How much does the darkness of transitions interfere with how normalthings look? If I'm birding and my glasses are darker because of thesun, will that make it harder for me to see through my binoculars? Thisis where you all come in.  Anyone use transitions? In the past, I nevereven wear sunglasses because I don't like looking at things that seemdark. Then again, I don't like squinting in bright light. So, there'sthat ping-pong match in my head... If I get transitions, am I going to want a regular pair that doesn'ttint at all on top of that? how much would transitions alter how I seebirds in the field? I just can't make up my mind but also don't want toend up buying like 4 pairs of glasses. Any thoughts on this are appreciated... especially anything related tobirding. :) Daniel Mason  ---This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.https://www.avast.com/antivirus


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Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 1:58 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: glasses
Daniel, I would just throw in that it is probably best NOT to get
polarized Lenses. They usually distort your Binocular vision. I have a
pair of dark Prescription Sunglasses that I loved when I was fishing....but
I can't wear when I'm Birding

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On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 12:52 PM d.marie yates <maribird...> wrote:

> Daniel, I had the self-darkening, no-line kind for years until I needed
> something stronger. I have budget problems too these days and went for the
> regular no-line bifocals. I miss my self-darkening. They weren’t as dark as
> a good pair of sunglasses but they did the trick and spared me having to
> own several pairs. As for birding, I never experienced any aberrations or
> color change. They costed 3 times what I paid for my current glasses,
> however, and I won’t know if the savings was worth it until I see how long
> the new ones last. Good luck finding what you need. I went to Success
> Vision and they’re nice and always ready to readjust the frames as needed.
> On that point, I switched from metal frames to plastic to rid having to
> replace the little nose plates when they fell off. But plastic loses its
> fit and you can’t bend it like you can the metal. They apply heat to do it
> at the store.
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
> Windows 10
>
>
>
> *From: *Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> *Sent: *Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:34 AM
> *To: *<ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject: *glasses
>
>
>
> Since this is related to birdwatching, at least a little, I figured you
>
> all are the best people to ask.
>
>
>
> I'm overdo for a new pair of glasses... got my prescription checked a
>
> couple weeks back and I definitely need new glasses. I'm trying to
>
> balance budget with comfort and needs... ordering glasses online to save
>
> a few bucks(using Zenni)
>
>
>
> I struggle with decisions sometimes... weighing pros and cons and making
>
> up my mind is difficult.
>
> I think I'm going to get one cheaper pair with the blue blocking for all
>
> my computer use(which is too much) and then after that, I might buy
>
> another pair or two or three... here's where I get stuck. I kind of
>
> wonder if I need a pair just for driving and then I go back and forth
>
> with whether a cheap pair of tinted ones would suit me fine or if some
>
> polarized ones would be better to help with glare. I sure hate glare
>
> while driving... so there's one decision I'm mildly stuck on.
>
>
>
> The other is a bit more complicated and frustrating. I'm considering
>
> some transitions. When it's bright out, I wouldn't mind something that
>
> gets darker so I don't have to squint so much. Then I go back and forth
>
> with that. Do I really want something that transitions ALL the time?
>
> Would I then want yet another pair for when I don't want transitions?
>
> How much does the darkness of transitions interfere with how normal
>
> things look? If I'm birding and my glasses are darker because of the
>
> sun, will that make it harder for me to see through my binoculars? This
>
> is where you all come in. Anyone use transitions? In the past, I never
>
> even wear sunglasses because I don't like looking at things that seem
>
> dark. Then again, I don't like squinting in bright light. So, there's
>
> that ping-pong match in my head...
>
>
>
> If I get transitions, am I going to want a regular pair that doesn't
>
> tint at all on top of that? how much would transitions alter how I see
>
> birds in the field? I just can't make up my mind but also don't want to
>
> end up buying like 4 pairs of glasses.
>
>
>
> Any thoughts on this are appreciated... especially anything related to
>
> birding. :)
>
>
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>
>
>

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Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 1:53 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: fellowshipofwings listserve,
Thank you so much Karen. This is the answer, I believe. If people have
things they’d like to discuss, could it be done on Fellowship. Most state
listserves are designed for bird sightings. Can we get back to it.

Sandy



On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 3:33 PM Karen And Jim Rowe <
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Found this in my old emails. Thank you so much, Jack and Joe!
>
> Karen
>
> *From:* Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
> *Date:* November 15, 2018 at 10:18:45 PM CST
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* *fellowshipofwings listserv*
> *Reply-To:* Jack and Pam <jackstewart_us...>
>
> The "fellowshipofwings listserv is back up and running. Thanks to the
> UofA IT Department and to Joe Neal for making this happen.
>
> There are 38 people on the list. The purpose of the list is to provide a
> place for discussion of environmental and conservation issues that impact
> birds. It was established due to complaints on this list (ArBird) when
> conversations strayed too far or too long into environmental topics. So my
> suggestions is that we continue on this Arbird list to broach subjects that
> impact birds, usually due to human activities, but switch to the
> fellowshipofwings list when some want to go more deeply into the topic.
> Anyway, that's my suggestion.
>
> If you want to be included on the fellowshipofwings ListServ follow the
> directions below:
> (if you run into difficulties signing up let me know and I can add you
> manually)
>
> From your email account:
> Open a new message and remove any text, including your signature line.
> In the *To* field, enter "<listserv...>" Leave the Subject
> line blank.
> Enter "subscribe "UARKLIST fellowshipofwings" in the body of the email.
>
> If you wish to unsubscribe, enter "signoff UARKLIST fellowshipofwings" in
> the body of the email.
>
> Send the message.
>
>
> I subscribe to this view
> "If you take care of the birds, you take care of most of the world's
> environmental problems". Thomas Lovejoy
>
> Jack Stewart
> Newton County where the endangered Buffalo River flows
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 1:34 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fwd: fellowshipofwings listserve,
Found this in my old emails. Thank you so much, Jack and Joe!

Karen

> From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
> Date: November 15, 2018 at 10:18:45 PM CST
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: fellowshipofwings listserv
> Reply-To: Jack and Pam <jackstewart_us...>
>
> The "fellowshipofwings listserv is back up and running. Thanks to the UofA IT Department and to Joe Neal for making this happen.
>
> There are 38 people on the list. The purpose of the list is to provide a place for discussion of environmental and conservation issues that impact birds. It was established due to complaints on this list (ArBird) when conversations strayed too far or too long into environmental topics. So my suggestions is that we continue on this Arbird list to broach subjects that impact birds, usually due to human activities, but switch to the fellowshipofwings list when some want to go more deeply into the topic. Anyway, that's my suggestion.
>
> If you want to be included on the fellowshipofwings ListServ follow the directions below:
> (if you run into difficulties signing up let me know and I can add you manually)
>
> From your email account:
> Open a new message and remove any text, including your signature line.
> In the To field, enter "<listserv...>" Leave the Subject line blank.
> Enter "subscribe "UARKLIST fellowshipofwings" in the body of the email.
>
> If you wish to unsubscribe, enter "signoff UARKLIST fellowshipofwings" in the body of the email.
>
> Send the message.
>
>
> I subscribe to this view
> "If you take care of the birds, you take care of most of the world's environmental problems". Thomas Lovejoy
>
> Jack Stewart
> Newton County where the endangered Buffalo River flows

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 1:31 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent
I agree with Charles.

If I recall correctly, The Fellowship of the Wings listserve was created so that members could engage in posts on conservation issues, musings about observations of and concerns about the natural world, and engage in discussions not directly and specifically related the occurrence and distribution of Arkansas birds.

I see a definite need for both groups.

If someone can post how folks here can also subscribe to Fellowship if the Wings, it would be very helpful and much appreciated.

There have been a number of posts on this listserve that would be more appropriate for FOTW.

Karen Rowe (member of FOTW)

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 30, 2019, at 2:47 PM, Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I proposed the formation of ARBirds years ago based on the model of the listserv in Colorado-COBirds whose main purpose was to provide a means for the discussion of the occurrence and distribution of birds in Colorado. I was a charter member of that group and remain one to this day. Topics rarely stray on that listserv. COBirds also provided a set of posting guidelines just as I think ARBirds used to do in its early years.
>
> That being said, I think it’s perfectly fine to announce special bird-related programs/meetings, deaths of members/prominent birders and probably some other things on ARBirds that don’t immediately come to mind. I even think *announcements* of topics of a general, environmental, political nature are also appropriate so long as the actual discussion takes place on the sister listserv-Fellowship of Wings or something like that. That’s also the place where I think further discussion of this topic should take place.
>
> I’m not looking to offend or be verbally tarred and feathered either with this position. Now to get to the countdown of days before I can start looking for nesting Cave Swallows in SW AR.
>
> Charles Mills
> Wake Village, TX
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jan 30, 2019, at 1:18 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>>
>> Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this listserve goes off on tangents? I’d like to know what the original intent of this listserve was. I don’t want to offend. Maybe I’m thinking wrong. But, can people at least give private responses to some of the questions put out there.
>> Sorry if I’m being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need to get off the listserve. But then there’s the rare bird reports. Please...no angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
>> Thanks.
>> Sandy B.
>> FS, AR
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 1:30 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: interesting winter birds (northwest Arkansas)
Lots of interesting winter birds in the dairy-cattle fields south of Centerton. Most interesting to me: Rusty Blackbirds (~40), White-crowned Sparrows (~50) with Harriss Sparrows (2), and a brilliant Kriders Red-tailed Hawk that has been along Ginn Road all winter.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 1:20 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent
Thank you Charles, and others, for your responses. If people would reserve
opinions, and discussions, to Fellowship of the Wings, there wouldn’t be
an issue as to how this listserve is used. In my opinion the listserve
should be used for occurrence and distribution of birds only. With
occasional announcements, reminders, etc. This will keep the opinionating,
discussion, and sometimes rudeness off this site.
Surrounding states follow very strict guidelines as to what can be shared.
I have heard from members about Louisiana, Florida, Texas listserves.
People can be booted for any post not following guidelines on those sites.
I don’t want us to be that group.
All but one person who has responded to me agrees that the listserve is not
being used as originally intended. Some of our great state birders won’t
post anymore. And many people delete more than they read. It has been
suggested that we start a new listserve. But I don’t believe we need to do
that. If people would use “Fellowship” for discussions, the listserve can
get back to the original intent.

Again...I don’t want to offend. I just want the site to be as it was.
Thanks for your responses.

Sandy B.

On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 2:47 PM Charles H Mills <swamp_fox...> wrote:

> I proposed the formation of ARBirds years ago based on the model of the
> listserv in Colorado-COBirds whose main purpose was to provide a means for
> the discussion of the occurrence and distribution of birds in Colorado. I
> was a charter member of that group and remain one to this day. Topics
> rarely stray on that listserv. COBirds also provided a set of posting
> guidelines just as I think ARBirds used to do in its early years.
>
> That being said, I think it’s perfectly fine to announce special
> bird-related programs/meetings, deaths of members/prominent birders and
> probably some other things on ARBirds that don’t immediately come to mind.
> I even think *announcements* of topics of a general, environmental,
> political nature are also appropriate so long as the actual discussion
> takes place on the sister listserv-Fellowship of Wings or something like
> that. That’s also the place where I think further discussion of this topic
> should take place.
>
> I’m not looking to offend or be verbally tarred and feathered either with
> this position. Now to get to the countdown of days before I can start
> looking for nesting Cave Swallows in SW AR.
>
> Charles Mills
> Wake Village, TX
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jan 30, 2019, at 1:18 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
> >
> > Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this
> listserve goes off on tangents? I’d like to know what the original intent
> of this listserve was. I don’t want to offend. Maybe I’m thinking wrong.
> But, can people at least give private responses to some of the questions
> put out there.
> > Sorry if I’m being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need
> to get off the listserve. But then there’s the rare bird reports.
> Please...no angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
> > Thanks.
> > Sandy B.
> > FS, AR
> >
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 1:19 pm
From: Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent
If someone is only interested in rare bird updates, this listserv seems
like a much less efficient way of getting that information compared to
signing up for rare bird alerts from ebird (which you can opt to get daily
from as many states/areas as you want). They're also more helpful than
notices on here, as folks often neglect to mention what part of the state
they're in.



Kate M. Chapman, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Psychological Science
235 Memorial Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Email: <kmc025...>


On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 2:48 PM Charles H Mills <
<00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I proposed the formation of ARBirds years ago based on the model of the
> listserv in Colorado-COBirds whose main purpose was to provide a means for
> the discussion of the occurrence and distribution of birds in Colorado. I
> was a charter member of that group and remain one to this day. Topics
> rarely stray on that listserv. COBirds also provided a set of posting
> guidelines just as I think ARBirds used to do in its early years.
>
> That being said, I think it’s perfectly fine to announce special
> bird-related programs/meetings, deaths of members/prominent birders and
> probably some other things on ARBirds that don’t immediately come to mind.
> I even think *announcements* of topics of a general, environmental,
> political nature are also appropriate so long as the actual discussion
> takes place on the sister listserv-Fellowship of Wings or something like
> that. That’s also the place where I think further discussion of this topic
> should take place.
>
> I’m not looking to offend or be verbally tarred and feathered either with
> this position. Now to get to the countdown of days before I can start
> looking for nesting Cave Swallows in SW AR.
>
> Charles Mills
> Wake Village, TX
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jan 30, 2019, at 1:18 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
> >
> > Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this
> listserve goes off on tangents? I’d like to know what the original intent
> of this listserve was. I don’t want to offend. Maybe I’m thinking wrong.
> But, can people at least give private responses to some of the questions
> put out there.
> > Sorry if I’m being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need
> to get off the listserve. But then there’s the rare bird reports.
> Please...no angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
> > Thanks.
> > Sandy B.
> > FS, AR
> >
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 12:47 pm
From: Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent
I proposed the formation of ARBirds years ago based on the model of the listserv in Colorado-COBirds whose main purpose was to provide a means for the discussion of the occurrence and distribution of birds in Colorado. I was a charter member of that group and remain one to this day. Topics rarely stray on that listserv. COBirds also provided a set of posting guidelines just as I think ARBirds used to do in its early years.

That being said, I think it’s perfectly fine to announce special bird-related programs/meetings, deaths of members/prominent birders and probably some other things on ARBirds that don’t immediately come to mind. I even think *announcements* of topics of a general, environmental, political nature are also appropriate so long as the actual discussion takes place on the sister listserv-Fellowship of Wings or something like that. That’s also the place where I think further discussion of this topic should take place.

I’m not looking to offend or be verbally tarred and feathered either with this position. Now to get to the countdown of days before I can start looking for nesting Cave Swallows in SW AR.

Charles Mills
Wake Village, TX

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 30, 2019, at 1:18 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this listserve goes off on tangents? I’d like to know what the original intent of this listserve was. I don’t want to offend. Maybe I’m thinking wrong. But, can people at least give private responses to some of the questions put out there.
> Sorry if I’m being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need to get off the listserve. But then there’s the rare bird reports. Please...no angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
> Thanks.
> Sandy B.
> FS, AR
>
 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 12:23 pm
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent
I replied privately as per the poster's wishes. To the rest I say simply the dog thing is real. I've run into it at birding sites a few times. The stuff about fencing is a heads-up for all among us who own them.
I remember now--the glasses issue. Probably not the place for it unless the info helps other birders wondering how polarized lenses affect viewing.
An idea: if someone has a lengthy question about ANYTHING, why not state subject in a single line & request readers to reply privately to learn the whole story. ??

Sent from my iPod

On Jan 30, 2019, at 2:04 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...><mailto:<sjogibson...>> wrote:

Perhaps some guidelines for this site could be set up. I remember that the people who got me interested in becoming a serious “bird watcher,” Joanne Rife and Martha Milburn, would become somewhat frustrated at not being allowed to discuss anything other than reporting a bird sighting. That was many years ago and perhaps the goals/wishes of those who participate in this site have changed.
Do we not have a site already set up where we report rare bird sightings? Dan, could you or Joe comment on this, and perhaps set some criteria for this particular site? I enjoy all of the comments unless they turn into political discussions.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>> on behalf of Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...><mailto:<sndbrgr...>>
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 1:18:06 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: This listserve-original intent

Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this listserve goes off on tangents? I’d like to know what the original intent of this listserve was. I don’t want to offend. Maybe I’m thinking wrong. But, can people at least give private responses to some of the questions put out there.
Sorry if I’m being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need to get off the listserve. But then there’s the rare bird reports. Please...no angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
Thanks.
Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 12:03 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: This listserve-original intent
Perhaps some guidelines for this site could be set up. I remember that the people who got me interested in becoming a serious bird watcher, Joanne Rife and Martha Milburn, would become somewhat frustrated at not being allowed to discuss anything other than reporting a bird sighting. That was many years ago and perhaps the goals/wishes of those who participate in this site have changed.
Do we not have a site already set up where we report rare bird sightings? Dan, could you or Joe comment on this, and perhaps set some criteria for this particular site? I enjoy all of the comments unless they turn into political discussions.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 1:18:06 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: This listserve-original intent

Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this listserve goes off on tangents? Id like to know what the original intent of this listserve was. I dont want to offend. Maybe Im thinking wrong. But, can people at least give private responses to some of the questions put out there.
Sorry if Im being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need to get off the listserve. But then theres the rare bird reports. Please...no angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
Thanks.
Sandy B.
FS, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 11:18 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: This listserve-original intent
Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that emails on this listserve
goes off on tangents? I’d like to know what the original intent of this
listserve was. I don’t want to offend. Maybe I’m thinking wrong. But, can
people at least give private responses to some of the questions put out
there.
Sorry if I’m being petty. Just frustrated. I keep thinking I just need to
get off the listserve. But then there’s the rare bird reports. Please...no
angry responses. Privately respond to me if you feel the need.
Thanks.
Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 10:52 am
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: glasses
Daniel, I had the self-darkening, no-line kind for years until I needed something stronger. I have budget problems too these days and went for the regular no-line bifocals. I miss my self-darkening. They weren’t as dark as a good pair of sunglasses but they did the trick and spared me having to own several pairs. As for birding, I never experienced any aberrations or color change. They costed 3 times what I paid for my current glasses, however, and I won’t know if the savings was worth it until I see how long the new ones last. Good luck finding what you need. I went to Success Vision and they’re nice and always ready to readjust the frames as needed. On that point, I switched from metal frames to plastic to rid having to replace the little nose plates when they fell off. But plastic loses its fit and you can’t bend it like you can the metal. They apply heat to do it at the store.

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Daniel Mason<mailto:<millipede1977...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 10:34 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: glasses

Since this is related to birdwatching, at least a little, I figured you
all are the best people to ask.

I'm overdo for a new pair of glasses... got my prescription checked a
couple weeks back and I definitely need new glasses. I'm trying to
balance budget with comfort and needs... ordering glasses online to save
a few bucks(using Zenni)

I struggle with decisions sometimes... weighing pros and cons and making
up my mind is difficult.
I think I'm going to get one cheaper pair with the blue blocking for all
my computer use(which is too much) and then after that, I might buy
another pair or two or three... here's where I get stuck. I kind of
wonder if I need a pair just for driving and then I go back and forth
with whether a cheap pair of tinted ones would suit me fine or if some
polarized ones would be better to help with glare. I sure hate glare
while driving... so there's one decision I'm mildly stuck on.

The other is a bit more complicated and frustrating. I'm considering
some transitions. When it's bright out, I wouldn't mind something that
gets darker so I don't have to squint so much. Then I go back and forth
with that. Do I really want something that transitions ALL the time?
Would I then want yet another pair for when I don't want transitions?
How much does the darkness of transitions interfere with how normal
things look? If I'm birding and my glasses are darker because of the
sun, will that make it harder for me to see through my binoculars? This
is where you all come in. Anyone use transitions? In the past, I never
even wear sunglasses because I don't like looking at things that seem
dark. Then again, I don't like squinting in bright light. So, there's
that ping-pong match in my head...

If I get transitions, am I going to want a regular pair that doesn't
tint at all on top of that? how much would transitions alter how I see
birds in the field? I just can't make up my mind but also don't want to
end up buying like 4 pairs of glasses.

Any thoughts on this are appreciated... especially anything related to
birding. :)

Daniel Mason


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Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 10:45 am
From: Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...>
Subject: Re: Birding and dogs
I personally would recommend slowing down, as the idea of hitting a dog
with my car by accident makes me sick just thinking about it. I think for
most dogs, going slow is best because they might lose interest. If you are
truly worried about the safety of the dogs, you could call the local police
and report them to the animal control office. There are likely leash laws
that the person is breaking. Do most people follow the rules? Not so much
in rural places, but it might be worth a call?


Kate M. Chapman, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Psychological Science
235 Memorial Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Email: <kmc025...>


On Wed, Jan 30, 2019 at 12:31 PM Glenn <
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> There is a house at the entrance to Bald Knob NWR that now has nine dogs.
> Nine! And when we try to pass by, every single one of them run at the
> car. They get in front of my car where I can't see them and bark. I want
> to know, what are my legal obligations here in Arkansas if I run over a dog
> while out birding? This isn't the only location where I am forced to drive
> through a gauntlet of dogs in order to go birding. And, if I run over a
> dog, I wouldn't get out of my car seeing how there would still be 8 other
> dogs out there barking and growling.
>
> I try to slow down so I won't hurt any of the dogs, but I see others just
> speed on through. Maybe that is what I should do. What is the best way to
> handle dogs running at my car? Should I just keep my speed, or should I
> slow down?
>
> I know this just marginally has anything to do with birding, but I do
> encounter this problem while out birding.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 10:44 am
From: Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...>
Subject: Canvasbacks
About 40 Canvasbacks together at Vista Point this morning 1-30-19,

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 10:43 am
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: Birding and dogs
I used to do like you and slow way down or stop for them. I’ve learned that dogs allowed to run become more territorial and actually consider you an intruder when you stop or slow. As hard as it is to get used to, the best thing to do is keep going—not at lightning speed or anything but just medium-slow. Most of these dogs are used to that and will move out of the way. A few of them get nailed and live to “tell” about it and to avoid chasing cars. You are not at fault for the sad few that don’t survive the lesson.

As a dog mom and dog-lover I keep my two behind a fence with a nice big back yard and there’s a fence around the front yard too, so if they get out the door when we go through (which is so rare I can only remember twice in 11 years) there is still another closed gate. When Joe and I walk them on the WMA across the road, we have them on leashes—which makes rednecks snicker but so be it. We’re looking after the rights of others and the safety of our “kids.”

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Glenn<mailto:<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2019 12:31 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Birding and dogs

There is a house at the entrance to Bald Knob NWR that now has nine dogs. Nine! And when we try to pass by, every single one of them run at the car. They get in front of my car where I can't see them and bark. I want to know, what are my legal obligations here in Arkansas if I run over a dog while out birding? This isn't the only location where I am forced to drive through a gauntlet of dogs in order to go birding. And, if I run over a dog, I wouldn't get out of my car seeing how there would still be 8 other dogs out there barking and growling.

I try to slow down so I won't hurt any of the dogs, but I see others just speed on through. Maybe that is what I should do. What is the best way to handle dogs running at my car? Should I just keep my speed, or should I slow down?

I know this just marginally has anything to do with birding, but I do encounter this problem while out birding.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 10:31 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Birding and dogs
There is a house at the entrance to Bald Knob NWR that now has nine dogs.  Nine!  And when we try to pass by, every single one of them run at the car.  They get in front of my car where I can't see them and bark.  I want to know, what are my legal obligations here in Arkansas if I run over a dog while out birding?  This isn't the only location where I am forced to drive through a gauntlet of dogs in order to go birding.  And, if I run over a dog, I wouldn't get out of my car seeing how there would still be 8 other dogs out there barking and growling.
I try to slow down so I won't hurt any of the dogs, but I see others just speed on through.  Maybe that is what I should do.  What is the best way to handle dogs running at my car?  Should I just keep my speed, or should I slow down?
I know this just marginally has anything to do with birding, but I do encounter this problem while out birding.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 9:24 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: A mouthful of feathers
Who's the meanest bird at your feeders?

We often enjoy the "conversations" birds have with each other at the
feeders. Before we changed things we had white-breasted nuthatches(all
the time) and they were often kings. We loved watching them spread their
wings wide to scare others off. I still haven't figured out why they're
avoiding the feeders most of the time. Too many goldfinches?(that are
also mean)

Our most dominating birds are the red-bellied woodpeckers. I have two
females that will chase each other throughout the yard but, at the
feeder... look out if you are in their way. The hairy woodpecker, which
we never head at our feeders before this season(another mystery to us)
is scared of them. And with good reason.

We've seen a red-bellied snap at quite a few birds... we've seen them
actually grab another bird with their bill and kind of toss them aside.
The birds usually seem unharmed but it's a weird sight to see. Pinch,
throw, back to the food. Sometimes we see feathers flying. We used to be
on the lookout for a predator like a sharpie but, nope... just a grumpy
red-bellied woodpecker. The other day we saw one shaking its bill back
and forth to get the feathers out of its mouth.

Most of the time everyone gets along well enough and it's not like any
birds are actually trying to work their way in to the same food the
woodpecker is on. Maybe they don't like the way the other bird looked at
them?

Sometimes we worry about the birds getting snapped at or tossed. But so
far everyone seems to be okay and unfazed.

It's also interesting when 50+ cardinals come in the yard and most of
them just sit in the nearby trees and brush waiting for their turn. We
have plywood out with food on it and if there are too many doves or
squirrels, the cardinals just sit and wait.

If it didn't cost so much(and we weren't poor) I'd just put out more
food and more feeders. For now, they all need to figure this out for
themselves. ha.

Daniel Mason


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Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 8:34 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: glasses
Since this is related to birdwatching, at least a little, I figured you
all are the best people to ask.

I'm overdo for a new pair of glasses... got my prescription checked a
couple weeks back and I definitely need new glasses. I'm trying to
balance budget with comfort and needs... ordering glasses online to save
a few bucks(using Zenni)

I struggle with decisions sometimes... weighing pros and cons and making
up my mind is difficult.
I think I'm going to get one cheaper pair with the blue blocking for all
my computer use(which is too much) and then after that, I might buy
another pair or two or three... here's where I get stuck.  I kind of
wonder if I need a pair just for driving and then I go back and forth
with whether a cheap pair of tinted ones would suit me fine or if some
polarized ones would be better to help with glare. I sure hate glare
while driving...  so there's one decision I'm mildly stuck on.

The other is a bit more complicated and frustrating. I'm considering
some transitions. When it's bright out, I wouldn't mind something that
gets darker so I don't have to squint so much. Then I go back and forth
with that. Do I really want something that transitions ALL the time?
Would I then want yet another pair for when I don't want transitions?
How much does the darkness of transitions interfere with how normal
things look? If I'm birding and my glasses are darker because of the
sun, will that make it harder for me to see through my binoculars? This
is where you all come in.  Anyone use transitions? In the past, I never
even wear sunglasses because I don't like looking at things that seem
dark. Then again, I don't like squinting in bright light. So, there's
that ping-pong match in my head...

If I get transitions, am I going to want a regular pair that doesn't
tint at all on top of that? how much would transitions alter how I see
birds in the field? I just can't make up my mind but also don't want to
end up buying like 4 pairs of glasses.

Any thoughts on this are appreciated... especially anything related to
birding. :)

Daniel Mason


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Back to top
Date: 1/30/19 7:46 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Dr. Kimberly G. Smith memorial article
This just appeared in the Journal of the Arkansas Academy of Science.  The full PDF is attached. 
In Memoriam: Kimberly G. Smith, 1948-2018


|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
In Memoriam: Kimberly G. Smith, 1948-2018

Ragupathy Kannan

By Ragupathy Kannan and Jeffrey Short, Published on 01/01/18
|

|

|




 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/19 8:43 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Jan. 29
It was mostly clear to partly cloudy, cool, and with some wind on the bird
survey today. It was a slow day for birds. Not really anything of note
today, but yesterday I had an Eastern Bewick's Wren by the middle parking
area. Here is my list for today:



Canada Goose - 1

Wood Duck - 9

Gadwall - 63

Mallard - 207

Northern Shoveler - 29

Northern Pintail - 36

Green-winged Teal - 2

Canvasback - 18

Ring-necked Duck - 904

Hooded Merganser - 2

Ruddy Duck - 12

Pied-billed Grebe - 8

Double-crested Cormorant - 6

Great-blue Heron - 7

Black Vulture - 3

Turkey Vulture - 8

Northern Harrier - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 2

American Coot - 292

Killdeer - 500

Belted Kingfisher - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 5

Eastern Phoebe - 9

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 3

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 3

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Hermit Thrush - 4

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 3

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 8

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 4

Field Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 1

Fox Sparrow - 1

Song Sparrow - 21

Swamp Sparrow - 13

White-throated Sparrow - 2

Northern Cardinal - 8

Red-winged Blackbird - 80

Meadowlark species - 6

American Goldfinch - 1





Also saw an Otter swimming in the water today with a carp in its mouth that
was almost as big as the Otter. And the Sand Plums are starting to bloom!







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






















 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/19 1:23 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: First it was "The Birds", now...
This actually was in my Terminix E-mail today... You never know what you're going to get. Love the last sentence. Karen Hart
Terminix Answers Film Fans’ Bird Questions

Birds have been a topic of hot discussion already in 2019 after some 45 million viewers<https://variety.com/2018/digital/news/bird-box-netflix-45-million-views-first-week-1203096379/> watched the hotly debated film, Bird Box*. The film left many viewers with questions about birds and their responses to external stimuli.

We are, of course, not qualified to weigh in on ghosts, invisible forces or other phenomenon from the film beyond birds. However, those pests constituted a major plot element in the film, as their call warned of nearby scares and shocks for the film’s characters. As a leading pest management provider, including for bird infestations that can cause structural damage and unpleasant side effects, we wanted to weigh in on the discussion for the good of viewers at home.

Q: Do some birds actually make loud noises when they sense fear?
A: Yes, nesting birds can emit loud chirps and squawks that can disturb building occupants. This issue can be compounded by species that tend to generate large flocks, such as European starlings, house sparrows and pigeons. However, when birds sense predators or other danger may be nearby, they can warn others by sounding the alarm.



Q: Could the birds really have survived that trip down the rapids?
A: We cannot say with certainty without having access to exact data related to the water temperature, bird species and exact timing of the incident. However, given the information available, it is unlikely that this journey would have been possible for a sensitive pest such as birds.



Q: Can birds sense if an individual carries a disease or otherworldly affliction?
A: Unfortunately, there is insufficient research to concretely determine whether birds have the ability to sense the presence of infections or other dangers, including the paranormal. However, some fans have theorized that the outbreak in the film might be caused by the birds themselves. This may have some basis in reality, as birds’ feces can carry a variety of pathogens and parasites that can be transmitted to humans.



Terminix technicians have seen plenty of pests that would give an average individual a serious fright – so we consider it our responsibility to share our expertise whenever pest-related scares, bird or otherwise, hit the silver screen. We cannot, however, provide any services while blindfolded.
 

Back to top
Date: 1/29/19 1:10 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Kim Smith, rock wall, ONSC and juncos
Today I worked on a rock berm for the wildflower garden at ONSC (Ozark Natural Science Center). It became harder and harder to find large rocks. I ended up below the deck, where I did find some large ones. Yikes! Carrying them up the hill was tough. I ended up stopping to rest at the bench put near the deck recently to honor Kim Smith.  Kim was one of the founding members of ONSC.  Sitting on the bench I thought of all the good he did.  I really miss him!   I sat at the bench to rest for each of those rocks. Some little Dark-eyed Juncos flitting in nearby bushes kept me company for a bit.  I think now that the wildflower garden has become part of my memories of Kim.
Happy birding!Joanie

 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/19 7:33 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: Preventing Window Strikes
I read that they should be 4" apart but that did not do it for my small
birds. Mine are 3" apart.

On Mon, Jan 28, 2019 at 9:20 PM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

> A few years ago, we went to an estate sale at HSV and I saw this
> "Zen-curtain" (OMmm) application.
>
> I decided to try it since it was relatively inexpensive and seemed to
> break=up reflections without diminishing the view from the inside. We have
> tried several techniques ("painted" Woolite stripes, decals, etc) all with
> some degree of success. Parachute cords seem to work best for us and we
> have large expanses of "picture" windows on east, west, and north sides of
> our house. I string the black or gray cords, approximately 4" apart, down
> through pre-perforated metal strips. I spray-paint the strips flat black
> to more-or-less hide them from the inside. I burn the ends of the nylon
> parachute cord. I buy my parachute cords at the military base, but they
> are also sold at the big-box hardware stores.
>
> So far, only a few small birds (White-throated Sparrows, Kentucky
> Warblers, Cardinals, Rose-breasted Grosbeaks) have struck the windows. The
> bumps occur, and those birds striking the windows are not hitting as hard;
> i.e., many more survivors. Again, as I have posted before, I think the
> bird-struckees are simply not paying attention, and are trying to escape
> predators, or attacks from other birds at our feeders which are 40-50 feet
> away. Those curtains on our north side are exposed to the HVAC blowers so
> I put some additional weights on those cords so they won't "tie-up".
>
> If you are installing large windows in a new room, then try setting-back
> the bottoms 3-5 degrees from the vertical to reduce the direct-reflectivity.
>
> Jeff Short
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> <ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Carolyn Minson
> Sent: Monday, January 28, 2019 2:25 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Preventing Window Strikes
>
> I have been experimenting with how to keep birds from killing themselves
> on my windows for at least 15 years and have tried many options. By far the
> most effective is Zen Curtains made from parachute cords. You can check out
> what they look like on my windows at this link:
> https://hsvbirds.org/attracting-birds
> Scroll down to Item #9 and clicking on reducing bird strikes. I have a
> .pdf document that provides the details of making Zen Curtains, but it will
> not be on the website for several days. If you want that document now, just
> contact me off-line.
>
> Since I have been using Zen Curtains made of parachute cords, to my
> knowledge, there have been no bird deaths from birds hitting those windows.
> I occasionally hear a bump but never that dull thud that signals a dead or
> unconscious bird. We do have members who prefer the Feather Friendly dots
> and have found those to be effective, too.
>
> Carolyn Minson
> Hot Springs Village, AR
> Garland County
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/19 7:21 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Preventing Window Strikes
A few years ago, we went to an estate sale at HSV and I saw this "Zen-curtain" (OMmm) application.

I decided to try it since it was relatively inexpensive and seemed to break=up reflections without diminishing the view from the inside. We have tried several techniques ("painted" Woolite stripes, decals, etc) all with some degree of success. Parachute cords seem to work best for us and we have large expanses of "picture" windows on east, west, and north sides of our house. I string the black or gray cords, approximately 4" apart, down through pre-perforated metal strips. I spray-paint the strips flat black to more-or-less hide them from the inside. I burn the ends of the nylon parachute cord. I buy my parachute cords at the military base, but they are also sold at the big-box hardware stores.

So far, only a few small birds (White-throated Sparrows, Kentucky Warblers, Cardinals, Rose-breasted Grosbeaks) have struck the windows. The bumps occur, and those birds striking the windows are not hitting as hard; i.e., many more survivors. Again, as I have posted before, I think the bird-struckees are simply not paying attention, and are trying to escape predators, or attacks from other birds at our feeders which are 40-50 feet away. Those curtains on our north side are exposed to the HVAC blowers so I put some additional weights on those cords so they won't "tie-up".

If you are installing large windows in a new room, then try setting-back the bottoms 3-5 degrees from the vertical to reduce the direct-reflectivity.

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Carolyn Minson
Sent: Monday, January 28, 2019 2:25 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Preventing Window Strikes

I have been experimenting with how to keep birds from killing themselves on my windows for at least 15 years and have tried many options. By far the most effective is Zen Curtains made from parachute cords. You can check out what they look like on my windows at this link: https://hsvbirds.org/attracting-birds
Scroll down to Item #9 and clicking on reducing bird strikes. I have a .pdf document that provides the details of making Zen Curtains, but it will not be on the website for several days. If you want that document now, just contact me off-line.

Since I have been using Zen Curtains made of parachute cords, to my knowledge, there have been no bird deaths from birds hitting those windows. I occasionally hear a bump but never that dull thud that signals a dead or unconscious bird. We do have members who prefer the Feather Friendly dots and have found those to be effective, too.

Carolyn Minson
Hot Springs Village, AR
Garland County
 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/19 6:32 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: RED-THROATED LOON AT LAKE SARACEN
This morning, I observed and photographed a Red-throated Loon in non-breeding plumage at Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff. It is of interest that several of us photographed a similar Loon on the 23 and 24th of November in the exact same area of the lake along the south shore. One month ago Delos McCauley briefly observed a solitary Loon sp. at a great distance in Lake Langhofer at a spot approx. 1.5 mi. from the position in Lake Saracen. Lake Langhofer is the area where we on occasion see small groups of Common Loons. My assumption is the Red-throated Loon that I observed today has overwintered in the Langhofer/Saracen Lakes area.
John Redman
 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/19 4:23 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: Preventing Window Strikes
I use the Zen Curtains, made of paracord, as well. The paracord costs about
$4, and worked for a large window. I used transparent Gorilla tape to tape
each one up. I am very pleased. I'm not sure if they would work well on a
door, though.

On Mon, Jan 28, 2019 at 2:24 PM Carolyn Minson <
<0000026be4c063cf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I have been experimenting with how to keep birds from killing themselves
> on my windows for at least 15 years and have tried many options. By far the
> most effective is Zen Curtains made from parachute cords. You can check out
> what they look like on my windows at this link:
> https://hsvbirds.org/attracting-birds
> Scroll down to Item #9 and clicking on reducing bird strikes. I have a
> .pdf document that provides the details of making Zen Curtains, but it will
> not be on the website for several days. If you want that document now, just
> contact me off-line.
>
> Since I have been using Zen Curtains made of parachute cords, to my
> knowledge, there have been no bird deaths from birds hitting those windows.
> I occasionally hear a bump but never that dull thud that signals a dead or
> unconscious bird. We do have members who prefer the Feather Friendly dots
> and have found those to be effective, too.
>
> Carolyn Minson
> Hot Springs Village, AR
> Garland County
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/19 12:25 pm
From: Carolyn Minson <0000026be4c063cf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Preventing Window Strikes
I have been experimenting with how to keep birds from killing themselves on my windows for at least 15 years and have tried many options. By far the most effective is Zen Curtains made from parachute cords. You can check out what they look like on my windows at this link: https://hsvbirds.org/attracting-birds
Scroll down to Item #9 and clicking on reducing bird strikes. I have a .pdf document that provides the details of making Zen Curtains, but it will not be on the website for several days. If you want that document now, just contact me off-line.

Since I have been using Zen Curtains made of parachute cords, to my knowledge, there have been no bird deaths from birds hitting those windows. I occasionally hear a bump but never that dull thud that signals a dead or unconscious bird. We do have members who prefer the Feather Friendly dots and have found those to be effective, too.

Carolyn Minson
Hot Springs Village, AR
Garland County
 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/19 12:00 pm
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: 15 common loons at jolly marina now maumelle

 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/19 9:27 am
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Rock Wren and a Bald Eagle
Pinnacle Mtn SP west trail. 
 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/19 7:52 am
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Arkansas CBC and Partial Shutdown
Check out the bird piece in the Style section of the Dem Gaz today (Dec.
28, 2019)

Peace and Birds Jerry Butler

 

Back to top
Date: 1/28/19 7:34 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: AAS News of Members

It has been a fast three months, but it's time for Arkansas Audubon
Society members to share their adventures and travels for the next issue of
_Arkansas Birds_, 'News of Members' section. Deadline for submissions is
February 13.

Remember you don't have to write a novel just a short
paragraph will do. So drop me a line or two and share your latest
adventures.

Thanks,
Dottie Boyles
News of Members Editor For Arkansas
Birds


 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 7:52 pm
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller...>
Subject: Re: Bird Window Strikes
The American Birding Association has good ideas to reduce bird strikes.

https://www.collidescape.org/abc-birdtape

Allan Mueller

On Sun, Jan 27, 2019 at 9:12 PM Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
wrote:

> Thank you for all the responses and information. I appreciate it! I will
> be reading the info at the links shared and think I have a handle on it.
>
>
>
> It really has only recently become a problem but I am grateful for your
> help to stop it sooner than later!
>
>
>
> Kara
>
>
>
> *From:* plm108 <plm108...>
> *Sent:* Sunday, January 27, 2019 9:06 PM
> *To:* Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>; <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Bird Window Strikes
>
>
>
> Always an uncomfortable feeling to hear that dreadful thud. Here's a good
> overall and very important article on the topic and how to reduce or
> eliminate this problem.
>
>
>
>
> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/why-birds-hit-windows-and-how-you-can-help-prevent-it/
>
>
>
>
>
> Patty McLean, Conway AR
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
>
> From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
>
> Date: 1/27/19 5:25 PM (GMT-06:00)
>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>
> Subject: Bird Window Strikes
>
>
>
> Hey everyone. Lately, we have been getting birds hitting the front door
> window. Not hard enough to do more than get stunned but I put window
> clings
> on it to prevent it from happening. It is still happening, so I'm hoping
> someone can help me figure out what else I can do to prevent it.
>
>
>
> Thanks for your time.
>
>
>
> Kara (Alco/Timbo, AR)
>


--
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


No one has lived the life you live.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 7:15 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: city lake
First a question...  how have ducks been around the state so far? Went
to the lake yesterday excited about the cold and some iced over ponds
only to find NO ducks at all. One grebe... more than I've seen lately
but normally there are quite a few grebes here in the winter. So, it's a
bit odd to me. There were more boats than I expected so that affected
the ducks a little but it doesn't explain where the grebes have been.

In Siloam, progress is still being made. Things are muddy right now but
the boardwalk through the woods and over the creek is done. I took a
video walking across it at a fairly steady pace and it took around 2
minutes or so. It's a good length.

The blind, like everything else, is pros and cons. The blind is kind of
small so during a field trip you wont get many people in there. So far,
no benches/chairs in there and I have to crouch a little to look through
the highest opening.   When I was there the other week I saw some ducks
and thought it was cool to have something to hide in. The only problem
was that you couldn't sneak up to the blind. Many of the ducks flew and
the rest stayed a little ways off. Well I was there yesterday and there
are posts up for a fence on either side. So, we will be able to sneak up
to the blind and stay hidden.  Kind of nice yet, mixed feelings. I
suppose we could walk around the fence if we want to view from the other
side. Again, in a group it will be crowded.  I'm not sure what it will
be like... and the places to look out the blind aren't that open... good
for hiding from ducks but BAD for a bigger view of the lake from that
location.

The boardwalk is really cool but once it is done there will be bicycles
zipping back and forth all the time. This place is already getting busy
and the project isn't done, the parking lot isn't done, and it's
January. I'm already seeing more dogs here than I normally see people.
It's an interesting project... the town seems to be going all out. I'm
excited about some of it yet still uneasy about how busy it will get.

There's a trail that's been cut into the wetter area, an area set aside
as butterfly habitat. I'd assume it will be for foot traffic only... I
sure hope so. It's too wet a good portion of the year for bicycles but
if they were to get in there it would disturb more birds. Unless they do
something else, I can't imagine a ton of people even wanting to use it
on foot as it can be quite wet... unless they add another boardwalk.
This trail hugs the woods(goes through it at the beginning) and leads
right to the blind.

In case this is still being read :)  anyone know if swallows would use a
bridge in the woods? I'm kind of wondering if anything would nest under
something with bicycle traffic but left alone it seems like a nice
place. I almost want to setup a hammock underneath it. :)

hopefully the increase in traffic wont bring a big increase in people
leaving messes behind. I don't have a lot of hope in that though. :(
We'll see.

There's been 2 or 3 red-shouldered hawks out in the open the last two
times I've been there. One year I witnessed a mating pair there and
there's almost always some around so I know they're nesting close by.

Hopefully at some point, someone can convince the town to rope(and buoy)
off part of the lake for oct-mar for the ducks. Joe Woolbright and
others have tried to suggest it, I believe, but we'll see what ever
comes of that.

I'll update again if there's anything worth mentioning. By the field
trip in May there's supposed to be a bathroom there. And the parking lot
at the field looks like it will stay gravel but it will be helpful for
many.

Daniel Mason


---
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https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 1/27/19 7:12 pm
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: Re: Bird Window Strikes
Thank you for all the responses and information. I appreciate it! I will be reading the info at the links shared and think I have a handle on it.



It really has only recently become a problem but I am grateful for your help to stop it sooner than later!



Kara



From: plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Sunday, January 27, 2019 9:06 PM
To: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>; <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Bird Window Strikes



Always an uncomfortable feeling to hear that dreadful thud. Here's a good overall and very important article on the topic and how to reduce or eliminate this problem.



https://www.allaboutbirds.org/why-birds-hit-windows-and-how-you-can-help-prevent-it/





Patty McLean, Conway AR







-------- Original message --------

From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> <mailto:<islippednfell...> >

Date: 1/27/19 5:25 PM (GMT-06:00)

To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>

Subject: Bird Window Strikes



Hey everyone. Lately, we have been getting birds hitting the front door
window. Not hard enough to do more than get stunned but I put window clings
on it to prevent it from happening. It is still happening, so I'm hoping
someone can help me figure out what else I can do to prevent it.



Thanks for your time.



Kara (Alco/Timbo, AR)


 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 7:06 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Bird Window Strikes
Always an uncomfortable feeling to hear that dreadful thud. Here's a good overall and very important article on the topic and how to reduce or eliminate this problem. 
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/why-birds-hit-windows-and-how-you-can-help-prevent-it/

Patty McLean, Conway AR


-------- Original message --------From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> Date: 1/27/19 5:25 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Bird Window Strikes
Hey everyone.  Lately, we have been getting birds hitting the front door
window.  Not hard enough to do more than get stunned but I put window clings
on it to prevent it from happening.  It is still happening, so I'm hoping
someone can help me figure out what else I can do to prevent it.



Thanks for your time.



Kara (Alco/Timbo, AR)

 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 5:55 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bird Window Strikes
I got a U-V dot applicator from the Portland Audubon Society when I visited there. It seems to be working though we did get a few light window strikes last week. I seem to remember that they need reapplied every so often. It’s been a few years I think. I’ll do that again this spring. We were having lots of hard strikes previously.

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

> On Jan 27, 2019, at 5:25 PM, Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> wrote:
>
> Hey everyone. Lately, we have been getting birds hitting the front door window. Not hard enough to do more than get stunned but I put window clings on it to prevent it from happening. It is still happening, so I’m hoping someone can help me figure out what else I can do to prevent it.
>
> Thanks for your time.
>
> Kara (Alco/Timbo, AR)

 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 5:36 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Robin Eats a Snake
I enjoyed watching Robins eat crawdads at the Lake Atalanta spring one cold winter morning. I feel like cedar berries are their main winter food however. I’ve seen Brown Snakes by flipping rocks in our yard in the winter before. I’ll make sure to cover them back up when I’m done. I’m just meaning to catch a quick glimpse, not feed them to the birds!

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

> On Jan 27, 2019, at 5:51 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> I have seen them do that in my yard. Brown snakes look just like earthworms.
>
> Sandy
>
>> On Sun, Jan 27, 2019 at 5:31 PM Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>> I just watched a female American Robin in my yard attack, kill, and eat a Dekay's Brownsnake (Storeria dekayi).
>>
>> As usual, Birds of North America has covered the topic. "Other unusual food items consumed include fish (Phillips 1927, Michael 1934, Kimball 1944, Bayer 1980c), small snakes (Davis 1969c, Netting 1969, Richmond 1975, Erickson 1978, Foreman 2017), shrews (Powers 1973, Penny and Knapton 1977), damselfly nymphs (Hall and Northcote 1986), frogs (Preston 2005, Leighton 2006) and skinks (Vanderhoff 2007).”
>>
>> Dan Scheiman
>> Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 3:52 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Robin Eats a Snake
I have seen them do that in my yard. Brown snakes look just like earthworms.

Sandy

On Sun, Jan 27, 2019 at 5:31 PM Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:

> I just watched a female American Robin in my yard attack, kill, and eat a
> Dekay's Brownsnake (Storeria dekayi).
>
> As usual, Birds of North America has covered the topic. "Other unusual
> food items consumed include fish (Phillips 1927, Michael 1934, Kimball
> 1944, Bayer 1980c), small snakes (Davis 1969c, Netting 1969, Richmond 1975,
> Erickson 1978, Foreman 2017), shrews (Powers 1973, Penny and Knapton 1977),
> damselfly nymphs (Hall and Northcote 1986), frogs (Preston 2005, Leighton
> 2006) and skinks (Vanderhoff 2007).”
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 3:40 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Robin Eats a Snake
Kind of sad but, cool. The other winter we had flocks of rusty
blackbirds in our yard foraging for who knows what... Got some pictures
of one eating only to look at them and see it was a small frog. Made me
a little sad but was still interesting. I wonder what else they turned
up in those leaves.

Daniel Mason

On 1/27/2019 5:31 PM, Daniel Scheiman wrote:
> I just watcheda female American Robin in my yard attack, kill, and
> eat a Dekay's Brownsnake (Storeria dekayi).
>
> As usual, Birds of North America has covered the topic. "Other unusual
> food items consumed include fish (Phillips 1927, Michael 1934, Kimball
> 1944, Bayer 1980c), small snakes (Davis 1969c, Netting 1969, Richmond
> 1975, Erickson 1978, Foreman 2017), shrews (Powers 1973, Penny and
> Knapton 1977), damselfly nymphs (Hall and Northcote 1986), frogs
> (Preston 2005, Leighton 2006) and skinks (Vanderhoff 2007).
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR



---
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Date: 1/27/19 3:35 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: New Pinnacle Mountain Hotspot
I created a new hotspot called Pinnacle Mountain SP--Pinnacle Mountain. This
is meant to cover the West Summit, East Summit, and Base Trails. Please use
this sublocation for the Rock Wren. Feel free to move older checklists to
this hotspot as appropriate.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 3:31 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Robin Eats a Snake
I just watched a female American Robin in my yard attack, kill, and eat a
Dekay's Brownsnake (Storeria dekayi).

As usual, Birds of North America has covered the topic. "Other unusual food
items consumed include fish (Phillips 1927, Michael 1934, Kimball 1944,
Bayer 1980c), small snakes (Davis 1969c, Netting 1969, Richmond 1975,
Erickson 1978, Foreman 2017), shrews (Powers 1973, Penny and Knapton 1977),
damselfly nymphs (Hall and Northcote 1986), frogs (Preston 2005, Leighton
2006) and skinks (Vanderhoff 2007).

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 3:25 pm
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: Bird Window Strikes
Hey everyone. Lately, we have been getting birds hitting the front door
window. Not hard enough to do more than get stunned but I put window clings
on it to prevent it from happening. It is still happening, so I'm hoping
someone can help me figure out what else I can do to prevent it.



Thanks for your time.



Kara (Alco/Timbo, AR)


 

Back to top
Date: 1/27/19 1:31 pm
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...>
Subject: SAVE THE DATE: Arkansas Audubon Society spring convention, May 3-5 | Petit Jean Mountain
Arkansas Birders,

Please mark your calendars: the Arkansas Audubon Society's spring
convention will be held May 3-5 at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute (WRI)
atop Petit Jean Mountain.

On Friday evening, May 3, we will celebrate the life of one of our
Society's founders, Dr. Doug James, who passed away in December. Dr.
Ragupathy Kannan will give a presentation titled, "Fun, friendship, and
fine science—my 30 years with Doug James," which will be immediately
followed with an open mike session for people to share their memories.
James helped start the Arkansas Audubon Society in 1955 and the Arkansas
Audubon Society Trust in 1972 and was one of Arkansas's leading
conservationists.

On Saturday, May 4, our special guest speaker will be Benjamin Vogt, native
plant garden designer and author of the book, *A New Garden Ethic*.
Benjamin will give two talks on Saturday, May 4 on the following topics
that dovetail with the Society's Bird Friendly Yard (BFY) program:

2 p.m. - SUSTAINABLE DESIGN FOR GARDEN AND HOME
Plants aren’t just pretty decoration -- they can be thoughtfully used for a
myriad of benefits. From cooling our homes to preventing runoff into storm
drains, from cleaning the air and amending soil naturally, plants are
useful to us. We’ll explore how native plants can help us create a healthy
environment for our families and wildlife, while learning how to emulate
natural processes for less work in garden management and care.

6:30 p.m. - A NEW GARDEN ETHIC
In a time of climate change and mass extinction, how and for whom we garden
matters more than ever. This impassioned and provocative talk asks: How can
we recognize and develop empathy for other species? What role do native
plants have in opening us to the perspectives of others? What benefits
happen to our society when we advocate for the equality and freedom of a
silent majority -- pollinators, birds, spiders, and more? Through ecology,
psychology, garden design, and philosophy, we’ll explore the rich
complexity of rethinking pretty in urban and suburban landscapes.

If you would like a flyer (in PDF form) featuring Benjamin's talks to share
with your friends, email me directly. Benjamin will also be available to
sell and sign copies of his book. Additionally, the convention will feature
birding field trips, student presentations, fellowship with other wildlife
enthusiasts, a silent auction, and more! More details will follow soon.

Lastly, a word about lodging: Rooms are reserved at the WRI for the
convention ($89/night for all rooms except in the President's Lodge, where
the rooms are $99/night) and will be available for booking as soon as the
convention program is finalized and on our website, arbirds.org. However,
if you'd prefer to camp at nearby Petit Jean State Park, there is still a
good number of campsites available as of today, and there are even a few
rooms in Mather Lodge--however, I suggest booking such accommodations soon
if you prefer these alternative options, as Petit Jean State Park is very
popular.

Email me directly if you have any questions at all regarding the spring
convention.

Good Birding,

Samantha Scheiman
vice president, Arkansas Audubon Society
Little Rock, Ark.

--
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold

 

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Date: 1/27/19 7:17 am
From: DAN <birddan...>
Subject: Rock Wren - YES
Cody Massery and I saw the Rock Wren on the top of Pinnacle, looking down the south slope. Came within a few feet of us!

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Sent from XFINITY Connect App

 

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Date: 1/27/19 6:52 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Some winter birds on Kessler Mountain in Fayetteville
Birds seen on Kessler Mountain hike with NWA Land Trust January 26, 2019. Main purpose of this hike was the geology of Kessler. This was well-presented by UA-Fayetteville geologist Walt Manger. While Walt was making a pre-hike presentation at the smokehouse, I took off ahead of the group in order to see and hear birds. So this is my report to the group of about 40 who Walt led up into Rock City above the Sharp place on Kessler Mountain. Rock City is on private land and is not part of the park, but permission was granted to the land trust for this hike into Rock City. Several trails that begin at the smokehouse are open to the public. These go through mature hardwoods and include several places with massive sandstones, etc. I especially enjoy the mature shagbark hickories. Interesting place for a short hike in the Ozarks, right in the middle of busy-busy Northwest Arkansas City.



Turkey Vulture 2 soaring over

Sharp-shinned Hawk chasing robins

Red-tailed Hawk 2 soaring over

Red-bellied Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Northern Flicker

Pileated Woodpecker

American Crow

Carolina Chickadee

Tufted Titmouse

White-breasted Nuthatch

Golden-crowned Kinglet

Eastern Bluebird one flock of at least 7 at Sharp place

Hermit Thrush

American Robin

White-throated Sparrow

Northern Cardinal


 

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Date: 1/26/19 5:57 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Rock Wren , Pinnacle Mountain SP
The Rock Wren was photographed today along the East Summit Trail at Pinnacle
Mountain State Park

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52068838

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 1/26/19 11:15 am
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: BATTLING AM. COOTS AT LAKE SARCEN
This morning, I was photographing a beautiful male Red-breasted Merganser close to the shore of Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff, when a group of 4 Am.Coot swam into view. Suddenly two of the Coot began to fight. The battle raged for 3-5 min. with each bird thrashing each other with large clawed feet. Intermittently the action would pause with each bird leaning far away, but maintaining a firm grasp with both feet, at times with their claws imbedded in each others breast. They continued in essentially the same position, left to right, for the duration of the combat. The bird on the left, however, seemed to be the strongest and on 2 occasions assumed a superior position with its opponent on its back and almost totally submerged. Eventually the Coot on the left prevailed, chasing the loser away. I frequently observe aggressive behavior by Coots, but although the battle that I observed today has been well documented by others, it was a first for me. After I have an opportunity to process my photos, i will be happy to share them.
John Redman
 

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Date: 1/26/19 6:23 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: FW: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl
Thank you Will, I hadn’t thought of that, but it does make sense now.



Gail



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Will Britton
Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2019 9:21 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: FW: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl <daily>



Hi Gail,



Great Gray Owl is on eBird’s sensitive species list so locations of sightings are not viewable by the public.



Will



On Sat, Jan 26, 2019 at 07:07 Gail Miller <gail.miller...> <mailto:<gail.miller...> > wrote:

Hey folks: I've asked this question before. I get this daily eBird Alert on Snowy Owl sightings in the Lower 48. I want to get the same for Great Gray Owls, but can't figure out how to do that. I'm wondering if eBird quit doing this, which seems odd. Anyone out there got any tips??

Gail Miller
Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR

-----Original Message-----
From: <ebird-alert...> <mailto:<ebird-alert...> [mailto:<ebird-alert...> <mailto:<ebird-alert...> ]
Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2019 1:49 AM
Subject: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl <daily>

*** Species Summary:

Snowy Owl (1 Maine, 4 Massachusetts, 31 Michigan, 7 Minnesota, 2 New York, 2 North Dakota, 6 Washington, 6 Wisconsin)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Snowy Owl.This alert will send you an email whenever sightings of Snowy Owls (for the past week) are entered into eBird anywhere in the Lower 48. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN40647
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 13:38 by Joanne Cormier
- (47.6221,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.622074,-119.491464&ll=47.622074,-119.491464> &t=p&z=13&q=47.622074,-119.491464&ll=47.622074,-119.491464
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52015604
- Comments: "Continuing. Barred on back side. Possible immature female."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 13:38 by Mary Cormier
- (47.6221,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.622074,-119.491464&ll=47.622074,-119.491464> &t=p&z=13&q=47.622074,-119.491464&ll=47.622074,-119.491464
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52045018
- Comments: "Continuing. Barred on back side. Possible immature female."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 14:55 by Heather Ballash
- 1 Rd NE, Waterville US-WA (47.6269,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.626923,-119.49146&ll=47.626923,-119.49146> &t=p&z=13&q=47.626923,-119.49146&ll=47.626923,-119.49146
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044062
- Comments: "East of road in rock pile. Young bird with dark markings on breast. "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 14:55 by Marcus Roening
- 1 Rd NE, Waterville US-WA (47.6269,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.626923,-119.49146&ll=47.626923,-119.49146> &t=p&z=13&q=47.626923,-119.49146&ll=47.626923,-119.49146
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044061
- Comments: "East of road in rock pile. Young bird with dark markings on breast. "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:12 by Daryl Bernard
- 11000–11974 S Kinross Rd, Dafter US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=11000%E2%80%9311974+S+Kinross+Rd,+Dafter+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.3441,-84.5098), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.344137,-84.509771&ll=46.344137,-84.509771> &t=p&z=13&q=46.344137,-84.509771&ll=46.344137,-84.509771
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033117

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 07:40 by Richard Bishopp
- 1200 Brooks Avenue, Rochester, New York, US <https://maps.google.com/?q=1200+Brooks+Avenue,+Rochester,+New+York,+US&entry=gmail&source=g> (43.117, -77.675), Monroe, New York
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.1171761,-77.6753213&ll=43.1171761,-77.6753213> &t=p&z=13&q=43.1171761,-77.6753213&ll=43.1171761,-77.6753213
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023920
- Comments: "Lots of brown "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:07 by Daryl Bernard
- 16001–16999 S Tilson Rd, Rudyard US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=16001%E2%80%9316999+S+Tilson+Rd,+Rudyard+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.2631,-84.5925), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.263069,-84.592504&ll=46.263069,-84.592504> &t=p&z=13&q=46.263069,-84.592504&ll=46.263069,-84.592504
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037817

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:47 by Luke Hollander
- 17451–17499 75th Ave NW, Royalton US-MN <https://maps.google.com/?q=17499+75th+Ave+NW,+Royalton+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g> (45.8296,-94.3250), Morrison, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.829622,-94.325007&ll=45.829622,-94.325007> &t=p&z=13&q=45.829622,-94.325007&ll=45.829622,-94.325007
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52034728

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:10 by Daryl Bernard
- 18000–18456 S Tilson Rd, Rudyard US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=18000%E2%80%9318456+S+Tilson+Rd,+Rudyard+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.2444,-84.5925), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.244369,-84.592487&ll=46.244369,-84.592487> &t=p&z=13&q=46.244369,-84.592487&ll=46.244369,-84.592487
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037813

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:15 by Daryl Bernard
- 20111–20999 S Mackinac Trl, Rudyard US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=20111%E2%80%9320999+S+Mackinac+Trl,+Rudyard+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.2025,-84.5923), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.202502,-84.592251&ll=46.202502,-84.592251> &t=p&z=13&q=46.202502,-84.592251&ll=46.202502,-84.592251
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037807

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:22 by Torre Hovick
- 2420–2494 County Road 81 <https://maps.google.com/?q=2420%E2%80%932494+County+Road+81&entry=gmail&source=g> , Argusville US-ND (47.0399,-96.9237), Cass, North Dakota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.039903,-96.923666&ll=47.039903,-96.923666> &t=p&z=13&q=47.039903,-96.923666&ll=47.039903,-96.923666
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52029007

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:22 by Keith Corliss
- 2420–2494 County Road 81 <https://maps.google.com/?q=2420%E2%80%932494+County+Road+81&entry=gmail&source=g> , Argusville US-ND (47.0399,-96.9237), Cass, North Dakota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.039903,-96.923666&ll=47.039903,-96.923666> &t=p&z=13&q=47.039903,-96.923666&ll=47.039903,-96.923666
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52042888

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 09:59 by Jack Swelstad
- 300–398 Lake Rd, Plover US-WI (44.3667,-89.5684), Portage, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.366703,-89.568419&ll=44.366703,-89.568419> &t=p&z=13&q=44.366703,-89.568419&ll=44.366703,-89.568419
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037756
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 09:59 by Jan Hansen
- 300–398 Lake Rd, Plover US-WI (44.3667,-89.5684), Portage, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.366703,-89.568419&ll=44.366703,-89.568419> &t=p&z=13&q=44.366703,-89.568419&ll=44.366703,-89.568419
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52021009
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:16 by Michael Warner
- 4283 142nd Ave, Holland US <https://maps.google.com/?q=4283+142nd+Ave,+Holland+US&entry=gmail&source=g> -MI (42.7273,-85.9684), Allegan, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.727269,-85.9684&ll=42.727269,-85.9684> &t=p&z=13&q=42.727269,-85.9684&ll=42.727269,-85.9684
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52035347
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing. Stationary for extended Time atop phone pole."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:16 by Karen Warner
- 4283 142nd Ave, Holland US <https://maps.google.com/?q=4283+142nd+Ave,+Holland+US&entry=gmail&source=g> -MI (42.7273,-85.9684), Allegan, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.727269,-85.9684&ll=42.727269,-85.9684> &t=p&z=13&q=42.727269,-85.9684&ll=42.727269,-85.9684
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52043261
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing. Stationary for extended Tim atop phone pole. "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:42 by Brian Murphy
- 470–798 W 6 Mile Rd, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=470%E2%80%93798+W+6+Mile+Rd,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.4202,-84.3832), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.420228,-84.383211&ll=46.420228,-84.383211> &t=p&z=13&q=46.420228,-84.383211&ll=46.420228,-84.383211
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52036661

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:15 by Theresa Moore
- 527–899 W Commerce Dr, Grawn US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=527%E2%80%93899+W+Commerce+Dr,+Grawn+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (44.6767,-85.6636), Grand Traverse, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.676694,-85.663626&ll=44.676694,-85.663626> &t=p&z=13&q=44.676694,-85.663626&ll=44.676694,-85.663626
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52035606

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:32 by Daryl Bernard
- 5725 S Mackinac Trl, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=5725+S+Mackinac+Trl,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.4234,-84.3843), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.423378,-84.384282&ll=46.423378,-84.384282> &t=p&z=13&q=46.423378,-84.384282&ll=46.423378,-84.384282
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52027832
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:33 by gavin awerbuch
- 5732 S Mackinac Trl, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=5732+S+Mackinac+Trl,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.4238,-84.3856), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.435318,-84.38106&ll=46.435318,-84.38106> &t=p&z=13&q=46.435318,-84.38106&ll=46.435318,-84.38106
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52028141

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:34 by Katrina Moilanen
- 5732 S Mackinac Trl, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=5732+S+Mackinac+Trl,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.4239,-84.3855), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.423867,-84.385525&ll=46.423867,-84.385525> &t=p&z=13&q=46.423867,-84.385525&ll=46.423867,-84.385525
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52027826
- Comments: "On barn"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:19 by Daryl Bernard
- 9549–9999 S Midway Rd, Brimley US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=9549%E2%80%939999+S+Midway+Rd,+Brimley+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.3637,-84.5306), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.363686,-84.530604&ll=46.363686,-84.530604> &t=p&z=13&q=46.363686,-84.530604&ll=46.363686,-84.530604
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033347

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 11:44 by Katrina Moilanen
- 9606–9998 S Riverside Dr, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI <https://maps.google.com/?q=9606%E2%80%939998+S+Riverside+Dr,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g> (46.3637,-84.2801), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.363689,-84.28009&ll=46.363689,-84.28009> &t=p&z=13&q=46.363689,-84.28009&ll=46.363689,-84.28009
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52022722

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Adam Ludwig
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g> (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908> &t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52021155

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Aaron Ludwig
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g> (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908> &t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033814

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Tim Ludwig
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g> (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908> &t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52041247

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Cooper Ludwig
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g> (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908> &t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033719

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:10 by Laurie Lawler
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g> (47.0848,-92.7111), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084808,-92.711131&ll=47.084808,-92.711131> &t=p&z=13&q=47.084808,-92.711131&ll=47.084808,-92.711131
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52038778

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 02:53 by Christine Hill
- Au Gres, Arenac, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.04862,-83.69578&ll=44.04862,-83.69578> &t=p&z=13&q=44.04862,-83.69578&ll=44.04862,-83.69578
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52014164
- Comments: "I saw a snow owl fly by my kitchen window and to the top of a tall tree in my yard. It sat there on a thin branch swaying back and forth for about 4 minutes. It turned it's head a few times. It then dove down fast into another area of my yard on or near the ground. It was dark but I just moved here and have this part of my yard lit up real well to keep cayotes away. This is the 2nd time within a two week period I have seen a snow owl, the other one was a few miles down over the road. Not sure the wing span but it was big. Beautiful Bird!"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:00 by David Oliveria
- Bayswater Street Park, Suffolk, Massachusetts
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3822334,-70.9994344&ll=42.3822334,-70.9994344> &t=p&z=13&q=42.3822334,-70.9994344&ll=42.3822334,-70.9994344
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52039593

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:28 by Josh Engel
- Belknap St. railroad tracks overpass, Douglas, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.7203665,-92.1121062&ll=46.7203665,-92.1121062> &t=p&z=13&q=46.7203665,-92.1121062&ll=46.7203665,-92.1121062
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52038211
- Comments: "Sitting on a billboard along the overpass."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:10 by Jeffrey Bryant
- Boston Logan Airport, Suffolk, Massachusetts
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.361391,-70.993644&ll=42.361391,-70.993644> &t=p&z=13&q=42.361391,-70.993644&ll=42.361391,-70.993644
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52035463
- Comments: "Seen sitting along side the marsh while taxiing towards take-off for a Cape Air flight to HYA."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 07:18 by Carl Schwartz
- Buena Vista Grasslands/Marsh, Portage, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3214,-89.5895&ll=44.3214,-89.5895> &t=p&z=13&q=44.3214,-89.5895&ll=44.3214,-89.5895
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52022420

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:30 by Gerri Erickson
- Green Hill/The Crown, Grand Traverse, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.7265522,-85.6797338&ll=44.7265522,-85.6797338> &t=p&z=13&q=44.7265522,-85.6797338&ll=44.7265522,-85.6797338
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52040716
- Comments: "Flew from roof, to tree, to field, to tree."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 16:30 by Anonymous eBirder
- Hwy 73 and Aspen Ave, Waushara, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1702745,-89.3746501&ll=44.1702745,-89.3746501> &t=p&z=13&q=44.1702745,-89.3746501&ll=44.1702745,-89.3746501
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023317
- Comments: "Snowy owl spotted perched on a road sign off Hwy 73 and Aspen Ave"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 11:25 by Gary Jarvis
- Jetport Plaza Rd, Cumberland, Maine
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.6442318,-70.3201388&ll=43.6442318,-70.3201388> &t=p&z=13&q=43.6442318,-70.3201388&ll=43.6442318,-70.3201388
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52043021
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "On the opposite (north) side of the runway."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:00 by GARY STRAUS
- Jones Beach SP--Theodore Roosevelt Nature Center, Nassau, New York
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=40.5885208,-73.546552&ll=40.5885208,-73.546552> &t=p&z=13&q=40.5885208,-73.546552&ll=40.5885208,-73.546552
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52041567

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 06:50 by Knut Hansen
- Logan Airport, Suffolk, Massachusetts
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3659007,-71.0202599&ll=42.3659007,-71.0202599> &t=p&z=13&q=42.3659007,-71.0202599&ll=42.3659007,-71.0202599
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52019397
- Comments: "Both looked quite white. One a little distant."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 11:10 by Damon Haan
- MI (UP)- along Old M-28 west of Ewen, Ontonagon, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.534973,-89.337301&ll=46.534973,-89.337301> &t=p&z=13&q=46.534973,-89.337301&ll=46.534973,-89.337301
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52025228

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 15:15 by Theresa Pratt
- Merrill Rd, Merrill, Saginaw, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.4383219,-84.3304419&ll=43.4383219,-84.3304419> &t=p&z=13&q=43.4383219,-84.3304419&ll=43.4383219,-84.3304419
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52021044

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 15:00 by Theresa Pratt
- Merrill Rd, Merrill, Saginaw, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.4383219,-84.3304419&ll=43.4383219,-84.3304419> &t=p&z=13&q=43.4383219,-84.3304419&ll=43.4383219,-84.3304419
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52020836
- Comments: "Female"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 09:24 by Roger Hagerman
- Osceola-Missaukee Grasslands SGA Unit 1, Osceola, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1508659,-85.1381636&ll=44.1508659,-85.1381636> &t=p&z=13&q=44.1508659,-85.1381636&ll=44.1508659,-85.1381636
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52020217

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 14:00 by Larry Urbanski
- Pickford (Chippewa Co.), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1617941,-84.3565798&ll=46.1617941,-84.3565798> &t=p&z=13&q=46.1617941,-84.3565798&ll=46.1617941,-84.3565798
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52040882

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 14:12 by Chirpin Sher
- Pickford (Chippewa Co.), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1617941,-84.3565798&ll=46.1617941,-84.3565798> &t=p&z=13&q=46.1617941,-84.3565798&ll=46.1617941,-84.3565798
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023518

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 12:05 by Myles McNally
- Pickford (Mackinac Co.), Mackinac, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1540652,-84.3709135&ll=46.1540652,-84.3709135> &t=p&z=13&q=46.1540652,-84.3709135&ll=46.1540652,-84.3709135
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52040196

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 12:05 by Gerald Ziarno
- Pickford (Mackinac Co.), Mackinac, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1540652,-84.3709135&ll=46.1540652,-84.3709135> &t=p&z=13&q=46.1540652,-84.3709135&ll=46.1540652,-84.3709135
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044037

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:10 by Frank Nicoletti
- Richard I Bong Airport, Douglas, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.6846143,-92.0982599&ll=46.6846143,-92.0982599> &t=p&z=13&q=46.6846143,-92.0982599&ll=46.6846143,-92.0982599
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52042833

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:30 by Jerry Rogers
- Rudyard Loop--Northeast, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334> &t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037617

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 12:55 by Jacob Van Patten
- Rudyard Loop--Northeast, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334> &t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52032040

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (5)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 13:45 by Chirpin Sher
- Rudyard Loop--Northeast, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334> &t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023569

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (8)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:19 by Daryl Bernard
- S. Centerline Rd., Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2608317,-84.5718098&ll=46.2608317,-84.5718098> &t=p&z=13&q=46.2608317,-84.5718098&ll=46.2608317,-84.5718098
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037801

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 07:45 by Chirpin Sher
- Sault Ste. Marie area, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.3750435,-84.2980957&ll=46.3750435,-84.2980957> &t=p&z=13&q=46.3750435,-84.2980957&ll=46.3750435,-84.2980957
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023590
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (4)
- Reported Jan 19, 2019 10:30 by Chirpin Sher
- Sault Ste. Marie area, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.3750435,-84.2980957&ll=46.3750435,-84.2980957> &t=p&z=13&q=46.3750435,-84.2980957&ll=46.3750435,-84.2980957
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023633

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:15 by Gerri Erickson
- Secor Road, Grand Traverse, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.7169623,-85.7091522&ll=44.7169623,-85.7091522> &t=p&z=13&q=44.7169623,-85.7091522&ll=44.7169623,-85.7091522
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52041010

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 15:25 by Abby Haight
- Unknown Location - (47.622, -119.491), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.6218599,-119.4914872&ll=47.6218599,-119.4914872> &t=p&z=13&q=47.6218599,-119.4914872&ll=47.6218599,-119.4914872
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52017475
- Comments: "immature, dark streaks"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 15:25 by Stefan Schlick
- Unknown Location - (47.622, -119.491), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.6218599,-119.4914872&ll=47.6218599,-119.4914872> &t=p&z=13&q=47.6218599,-119.4914872&ll=47.6218599,-119.4914872
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044639
- Comments: "immature, dark streaks"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:40 by Deborah Edwards-Onoro
- Willow Run Airport (restricted access), Wayne, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.232688,-83.5077989&ll=42.232688,-83.5077989> &t=p&z=13&q=42.232688,-83.5077989&ll=42.232688,-83.5077989
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52036133
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Large white bird sitting next to runway on south side of airport, west of control tower. "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:30 by David Oliveria
- Winthrop Beach and Five Sisters, Suffolk, Massachusetts
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3747938,-70.9681878&ll=42.3747938,-70.9681878> &t=p&z=13&q=42.3747938,-70.9681878&ll=42.3747938,-70.9681878
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52039458
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:00 by Steve Emerson
- nature road and 75th ave, Morrison, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8 <http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.8275236,-94.3265018&ll=45.8275236,-94.3265018> &t=p&z=13&q=45.8275236,-94.3265018&ll=45.8275236,-94.3265018
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52038787
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Nice white male on top of power pole"

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Date: 1/26/19 6:21 am
From: Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: FW: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl
Hi Gail,

Great Gray Owl is on eBird’s sensitive species list so locations of
sightings are not viewable by the public.

Will

On Sat, Jan 26, 2019 at 07:07 Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
wrote:

> Hey folks: I've asked this question before. I get this daily eBird Alert
> on Snowy Owl sightings in the Lower 48. I want to get the same for Great
> Gray Owls, but can't figure out how to do that. I'm wondering if eBird
> quit doing this, which seems odd. Anyone out there got any tips??
>
> Gail Miller
> Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: <ebird-alert...> [mailto:<ebird-alert...>]
> Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2019 1:49 AM
> Subject: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl <daily>
>
> *** Species Summary:
>
> Snowy Owl (1 Maine, 4 Massachusetts, 31 Michigan, 7 Minnesota, 2 New York,
> 2 North Dakota, 6 Washington, 6 Wisconsin)
>
> ---------------------------------------------
> Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Snowy Owl.This alert will send
> you an email whenever sightings of Snowy Owls (for the past week) are
> entered into eBird anywhere in the Lower 48. View or unsubscribe to this
> alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN40647
> NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 24, 2019 13:38 by Joanne Cormier
> - (47.6221,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.622074,-119.491464&ll=47.622074,-119.491464
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52015604
> - Comments: "Continuing. Barred on back side. Possible immature female."
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 24, 2019 13:38 by Mary Cormier
> - (47.6221,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.622074,-119.491464&ll=47.622074,-119.491464
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52045018
> - Comments: "Continuing. Barred on back side. Possible immature female."
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 14:55 by Heather Ballash
> - 1 Rd NE, Waterville US-WA (47.6269,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.626923,-119.49146&ll=47.626923,-119.49146
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044062
> - Comments: "East of road in rock pile. Young bird with dark markings on
> breast. "
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 14:55 by Marcus Roening
> - 1 Rd NE, Waterville US-WA (47.6269,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.626923,-119.49146&ll=47.626923,-119.49146
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044061
> - Comments: "East of road in rock pile. Young bird with dark markings on
> breast. "
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:12 by Daryl Bernard
> - 11000–11974 S Kinross Rd, Dafter US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=11000%E2%80%9311974+S+Kinross+Rd,+Dafter+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.3441,-84.5098), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.344137,-84.509771&ll=46.344137,-84.509771
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033117
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 07:40 by Richard Bishopp
> - 1200 Brooks Avenue, Rochester, New York, US
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=1200+Brooks+Avenue,+Rochester,+New+York,+US&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (43.117, -77.675), Monroe, New York
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.1171761,-77.6753213&ll=43.1171761,-77.6753213
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023920
> - Comments: "Lots of brown "
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:07 by Daryl Bernard
> - 16001–16999 S Tilson Rd, Rudyard US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=16001%E2%80%9316999+S+Tilson+Rd,+Rudyard+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.2631,-84.5925), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.263069,-84.592504&ll=46.263069,-84.592504
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037817
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:47 by Luke Hollander
> - 17451–17499 75th Ave NW, Royalton US-MN
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=17499+75th+Ave+NW,+Royalton+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (45.8296,-94.3250), Morrison, Minnesota
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.829622,-94.325007&ll=45.829622,-94.325007
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52034728
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:10 by Daryl Bernard
> - 18000–18456 S Tilson Rd, Rudyard US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=18000%E2%80%9318456+S+Tilson+Rd,+Rudyard+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.2444,-84.5925), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.244369,-84.592487&ll=46.244369,-84.592487
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037813
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:15 by Daryl Bernard
> - 20111–20999 S Mackinac Trl, Rudyard US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=20111%E2%80%9320999+S+Mackinac+Trl,+Rudyard+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.2025,-84.5923), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.202502,-84.592251&ll=46.202502,-84.592251
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037807
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:22 by Torre Hovick
> - 2420–2494 County Road 81
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=2420%E2%80%932494+County+Road+81&entry=gmail&source=g>,
> Argusville US-ND (47.0399,-96.9237), Cass, North Dakota
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.039903,-96.923666&ll=47.039903,-96.923666
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52029007
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:22 by Keith Corliss
> - 2420–2494 County Road 81
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=2420%E2%80%932494+County+Road+81&entry=gmail&source=g>,
> Argusville US-ND (47.0399,-96.9237), Cass, North Dakota
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.039903,-96.923666&ll=47.039903,-96.923666
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52042888
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 09:59 by Jack Swelstad
> - 300–398 Lake Rd, Plover US-WI (44.3667,-89.5684), Portage, Wisconsin
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.366703,-89.568419&ll=44.366703,-89.568419
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037756
> - Media: 1 Photo
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 09:59 by Jan Hansen
> - 300–398 Lake Rd, Plover US-WI (44.3667,-89.5684), Portage, Wisconsin
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.366703,-89.568419&ll=44.366703,-89.568419
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52021009
> - Media: 1 Photo
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1) CONFIRMED
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:16 by Michael Warner
> - 4283 142nd Ave, Holland US
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=4283+142nd+Ave,+Holland+US&entry=gmail&source=g>-MI
> (42.7273,-85.9684), Allegan, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.727269,-85.9684&ll=42.727269,-85.9684
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52035347
> - Media: 4 Photos
> - Comments: "Continuing. Stationary for extended Time atop phone pole."
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1) CONFIRMED
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:16 by Karen Warner
> - 4283 142nd Ave, Holland US
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=4283+142nd+Ave,+Holland+US&entry=gmail&source=g>-MI
> (42.7273,-85.9684), Allegan, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.727269,-85.9684&ll=42.727269,-85.9684
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52043261
> - Media: 4 Photos
> - Comments: "Continuing. Stationary for extended Tim atop phone pole. "
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:42 by Brian Murphy
> - 470–798 W 6 Mile Rd, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=470%E2%80%93798+W+6+Mile+Rd,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.4202,-84.3832), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.420228,-84.383211&ll=46.420228,-84.383211
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52036661
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:15 by Theresa Moore
> - 527–899 W Commerce Dr, Grawn US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=527%E2%80%93899+W+Commerce+Dr,+Grawn+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (44.6767,-85.6636), Grand Traverse, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.676694,-85.663626&ll=44.676694,-85.663626
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52035606
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:32 by Daryl Bernard
> - 5725 S Mackinac Trl, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=5725+S+Mackinac+Trl,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.4234,-84.3843), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.423378,-84.384282&ll=46.423378,-84.384282
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52027832
> - Media: 1 Photo
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:33 by gavin awerbuch
> - 5732 S Mackinac Trl, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=5732+S+Mackinac+Trl,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.4238,-84.3856), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.435318,-84.38106&ll=46.435318,-84.38106
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52028141
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:34 by Katrina Moilanen
> - 5732 S Mackinac Trl, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=5732+S+Mackinac+Trl,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.4239,-84.3855), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.423867,-84.385525&ll=46.423867,-84.385525
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52027826
> - Comments: "On barn"
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:19 by Daryl Bernard
> - 9549–9999 S Midway Rd, Brimley US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=9549%E2%80%939999+S+Midway+Rd,+Brimley+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.3637,-84.5306), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.363686,-84.530604&ll=46.363686,-84.530604
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033347
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 11:44 by Katrina Moilanen
> - 9606–9998 S Riverside Dr, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=9606%E2%80%939998+S+Riverside+Dr,+Sault+Sainte+Marie+US-MI&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (46.3637,-84.2801), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.363689,-84.28009&ll=46.363689,-84.28009
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52022722
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Adam Ludwig
> - 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52021155
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Aaron Ludwig
> - 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033814
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Tim Ludwig
> - 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52041247
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Cooper Ludwig
> - 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033719
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:10 by Laurie Lawler
> - 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN
> <https://maps.google.com/?q=9701%E2%80%939915+Dart+Rd,+Meadowlands+US-MN&entry=gmail&source=g>
> (47.0848,-92.7111), St. Louis, Minnesota
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084808,-92.711131&ll=47.084808,-92.711131
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52038778
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 02:53 by Christine Hill
> - Au Gres, Arenac, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.04862,-83.69578&ll=44.04862,-83.69578
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52014164
> - Comments: "I saw a snow owl fly by my kitchen window and to the top of a
> tall tree in my yard. It sat there on a thin branch swaying back and forth
> for about 4 minutes. It turned it's head a few times. It then dove down
> fast into another area of my yard on or near the ground. It was dark but I
> just moved here and have this part of my yard lit up real well to keep
> cayotes away. This is the 2nd time within a two week period I have seen a
> snow owl, the other one was a few miles down over the road. Not sure the
> wing span but it was big. Beautiful Bird!"
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:00 by David Oliveria
> - Bayswater Street Park, Suffolk, Massachusetts
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3822334,-70.9994344&ll=42.3822334,-70.9994344
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52039593
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:28 by Josh Engel
> - Belknap St. railroad tracks overpass, Douglas, Wisconsin
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.7203665,-92.1121062&ll=46.7203665,-92.1121062
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52038211
> - Comments: "Sitting on a billboard along the overpass."
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:10 by Jeffrey Bryant
> - Boston Logan Airport, Suffolk, Massachusetts
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.361391,-70.993644&ll=42.361391,-70.993644
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52035463
> - Comments: "Seen sitting along side the marsh while taxiing towards
> take-off for a Cape Air flight to HYA."
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 07:18 by Carl Schwartz
> - Buena Vista Grasslands/Marsh, Portage, Wisconsin
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3214,-89.5895&ll=44.3214,-89.5895
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52022420
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:30 by Gerri Erickson
> - Green Hill/The Crown, Grand Traverse, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.7265522,-85.6797338&ll=44.7265522,-85.6797338
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52040716
> - Comments: "Flew from roof, to tree, to field, to tree."
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 24, 2019 16:30 by Anonymous eBirder
> - Hwy 73 and Aspen Ave, Waushara, Wisconsin
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1702745,-89.3746501&ll=44.1702745,-89.3746501
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023317
> - Comments: "Snowy owl spotted perched on a road sign off Hwy 73 and Aspen
> Ave"
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 11:25 by Gary Jarvis
> - Jetport Plaza Rd, Cumberland, Maine
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.6442318,-70.3201388&ll=43.6442318,-70.3201388
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52043021
> - Media: 1 Photo
> - Comments: "On the opposite (north) side of the runway."
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:00 by GARY STRAUS
> - Jones Beach SP--Theodore Roosevelt Nature Center, Nassau, New York
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=40.5885208,-73.546552&ll=40.5885208,-73.546552
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52041567
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 06:50 by Knut Hansen
> - Logan Airport, Suffolk, Massachusetts
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3659007,-71.0202599&ll=42.3659007,-71.0202599
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52019397
> - Comments: "Both looked quite white. One a little distant."
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 11:10 by Damon Haan
> - MI (UP)- along Old M-28 west of Ewen, Ontonagon, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.534973,-89.337301&ll=46.534973,-89.337301
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52025228
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 21, 2019 15:15 by Theresa Pratt
> - Merrill Rd, Merrill, Saginaw, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.4383219,-84.3304419&ll=43.4383219,-84.3304419
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52021044
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 21, 2019 15:00 by Theresa Pratt
> - Merrill Rd, Merrill, Saginaw, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.4383219,-84.3304419&ll=43.4383219,-84.3304419
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52020836
> - Comments: "Female"
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 09:24 by Roger Hagerman
> - Osceola-Missaukee Grasslands SGA Unit 1, Osceola, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1508659,-85.1381636&ll=44.1508659,-85.1381636
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52020217
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 14:00 by Larry Urbanski
> - Pickford (Chippewa Co.), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1617941,-84.3565798&ll=46.1617941,-84.3565798
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52040882
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 21, 2019 14:12 by Chirpin Sher
> - Pickford (Chippewa Co.), Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1617941,-84.3565798&ll=46.1617941,-84.3565798
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023518
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 24, 2019 12:05 by Myles McNally
> - Pickford (Mackinac Co.), Mackinac, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1540652,-84.3709135&ll=46.1540652,-84.3709135
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52040196
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 24, 2019 12:05 by Gerald Ziarno
> - Pickford (Mackinac Co.), Mackinac, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1540652,-84.3709135&ll=46.1540652,-84.3709135
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044037
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:10 by Frank Nicoletti
> - Richard I Bong Airport, Douglas, Wisconsin
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.6846143,-92.0982599&ll=46.6846143,-92.0982599
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52042833
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:30 by Jerry Rogers
> - Rudyard Loop--Northeast, Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037617
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 12:55 by Jacob Van Patten
> - Rudyard Loop--Northeast, Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52032040
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (5)
> - Reported Jan 21, 2019 13:45 by Chirpin Sher
> - Rudyard Loop--Northeast, Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023569
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (8)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:19 by Daryl Bernard
> - S. Centerline Rd., Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2608317,-84.5718098&ll=46.2608317,-84.5718098
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037801
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
> - Reported Jan 21, 2019 07:45 by Chirpin Sher
> - Sault Ste. Marie area, Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.3750435,-84.2980957&ll=46.3750435,-84.2980957
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023590
> - Media: 1 Photo
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (4)
> - Reported Jan 19, 2019 10:30 by Chirpin Sher
> - Sault Ste. Marie area, Chippewa, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.3750435,-84.2980957&ll=46.3750435,-84.2980957
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023633
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:15 by Gerri Erickson
> - Secor Road, Grand Traverse, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.7169623,-85.7091522&ll=44.7169623,-85.7091522
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52041010
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 24, 2019 15:25 by Abby Haight
> - Unknown Location - (47.622, -119.491), Douglas, Washington
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.6218599,-119.4914872&ll=47.6218599,-119.4914872
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52017475
> - Comments: "immature, dark streaks"
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 24, 2019 15:25 by Stefan Schlick
> - Unknown Location - (47.622, -119.491), Douglas, Washington
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.6218599,-119.4914872&ll=47.6218599,-119.4914872
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044639
> - Comments: "immature, dark streaks"
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1) CONFIRMED
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:40 by Deborah Edwards-Onoro
> - Willow Run Airport (restricted access), Wayne, Michigan
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.232688,-83.5077989&ll=42.232688,-83.5077989
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52036133
> - Comments: "Continuing bird. Large white bird sitting next to runway on
> south side of airport, west of control tower. "
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:30 by David Oliveria
> - Winthrop Beach and Five Sisters, Suffolk, Massachusetts
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3747938,-70.9681878&ll=42.3747938,-70.9681878
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52039458
> - Media: 1 Photo
>
> Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
> - Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:00 by Steve Emerson
> - nature road and 75th ave, Morrison, Minnesota
> - Map:
> http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.8275236,-94.3265018&ll=45.8275236,-94.3265018
> - Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52038787
> - Media: 1 Photo
> - Comments: "Nice white male on top of power pole"
>
> ***********
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Date: 1/26/19 6:07 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: FW: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl
Hey folks: I've asked this question before. I get this daily eBird Alert on Snowy Owl sightings in the Lower 48. I want to get the same for Great Gray Owls, but can't figure out how to do that. I'm wondering if eBird quit doing this, which seems odd. Anyone out there got any tips??

Gail Miller
Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR

-----Original Message-----
From: <ebird-alert...> [mailto:<ebird-alert...>]
Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2019 1:49 AM
Subject: [eBird Alert] Snowy Owl <daily>

*** Species Summary:

Snowy Owl (1 Maine, 4 Massachusetts, 31 Michigan, 7 Minnesota, 2 New York, 2 North Dakota, 6 Washington, 6 Wisconsin)

---------------------------------------------
Thank you for subscribing to the <daily> Snowy Owl.This alert will send you an email whenever sightings of Snowy Owls (for the past week) are entered into eBird anywhere in the Lower 48. View or unsubscribe to this alert at https://ebird.org/alert/summary?sid=SN40647
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 13:38 by Joanne Cormier
- (47.6221,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.622074,-119.491464&ll=47.622074,-119.491464
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52015604
- Comments: "Continuing. Barred on back side. Possible immature female."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 13:38 by Mary Cormier
- (47.6221,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.622074,-119.491464&ll=47.622074,-119.491464
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52045018
- Comments: "Continuing. Barred on back side. Possible immature female."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 14:55 by Heather Ballash
- 1 Rd NE, Waterville US-WA (47.6269,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.626923,-119.49146&ll=47.626923,-119.49146
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044062
- Comments: "East of road in rock pile. Young bird with dark markings on breast. "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 14:55 by Marcus Roening
- 1 Rd NE, Waterville US-WA (47.6269,-119.4915), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.626923,-119.49146&ll=47.626923,-119.49146
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044061
- Comments: "East of road in rock pile. Young bird with dark markings on breast. "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:12 by Daryl Bernard
- 11000–11974 S Kinross Rd, Dafter US-MI (46.3441,-84.5098), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.344137,-84.509771&ll=46.344137,-84.509771
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033117

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 07:40 by Richard Bishopp
- 1200 Brooks Avenue, Rochester, New York, US (43.117, -77.675), Monroe, New York
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.1171761,-77.6753213&ll=43.1171761,-77.6753213
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023920
- Comments: "Lots of brown "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:07 by Daryl Bernard
- 16001–16999 S Tilson Rd, Rudyard US-MI (46.2631,-84.5925), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.263069,-84.592504&ll=46.263069,-84.592504
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037817

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:47 by Luke Hollander
- 17451–17499 75th Ave NW, Royalton US-MN (45.8296,-94.3250), Morrison, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.829622,-94.325007&ll=45.829622,-94.325007
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52034728

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:10 by Daryl Bernard
- 18000–18456 S Tilson Rd, Rudyard US-MI (46.2444,-84.5925), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.244369,-84.592487&ll=46.244369,-84.592487
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037813

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:15 by Daryl Bernard
- 20111–20999 S Mackinac Trl, Rudyard US-MI (46.2025,-84.5923), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.202502,-84.592251&ll=46.202502,-84.592251
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037807

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:22 by Torre Hovick
- 2420–2494 County Road 81, Argusville US-ND (47.0399,-96.9237), Cass, North Dakota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.039903,-96.923666&ll=47.039903,-96.923666
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52029007

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:22 by Keith Corliss
- 2420–2494 County Road 81, Argusville US-ND (47.0399,-96.9237), Cass, North Dakota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.039903,-96.923666&ll=47.039903,-96.923666
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52042888

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 09:59 by Jack Swelstad
- 300–398 Lake Rd, Plover US-WI (44.3667,-89.5684), Portage, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.366703,-89.568419&ll=44.366703,-89.568419
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037756
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 09:59 by Jan Hansen
- 300–398 Lake Rd, Plover US-WI (44.3667,-89.5684), Portage, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.366703,-89.568419&ll=44.366703,-89.568419
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52021009
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:16 by Michael Warner
- 4283 142nd Ave, Holland US-MI (42.7273,-85.9684), Allegan, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.727269,-85.9684&ll=42.727269,-85.9684
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52035347
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing. Stationary for extended Time atop phone pole."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:16 by Karen Warner
- 4283 142nd Ave, Holland US-MI (42.7273,-85.9684), Allegan, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.727269,-85.9684&ll=42.727269,-85.9684
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52043261
- Media: 4 Photos
- Comments: "Continuing. Stationary for extended Tim atop phone pole. "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:42 by Brian Murphy
- 470–798 W 6 Mile Rd, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI (46.4202,-84.3832), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.420228,-84.383211&ll=46.420228,-84.383211
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52036661

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:15 by Theresa Moore
- 527–899 W Commerce Dr, Grawn US-MI (44.6767,-85.6636), Grand Traverse, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.676694,-85.663626&ll=44.676694,-85.663626
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52035606

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:32 by Daryl Bernard
- 5725 S Mackinac Trl, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI (46.4234,-84.3843), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.423378,-84.384282&ll=46.423378,-84.384282
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52027832
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:33 by gavin awerbuch
- 5732 S Mackinac Trl, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI (46.4238,-84.3856), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.435318,-84.38106&ll=46.435318,-84.38106
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52028141

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:34 by Katrina Moilanen
- 5732 S Mackinac Trl, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI (46.4239,-84.3855), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.423867,-84.385525&ll=46.423867,-84.385525
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52027826
- Comments: "On barn"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:19 by Daryl Bernard
- 9549–9999 S Midway Rd, Brimley US-MI (46.3637,-84.5306), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.363686,-84.530604&ll=46.363686,-84.530604
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033347

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 11:44 by Katrina Moilanen
- 9606–9998 S Riverside Dr, Sault Sainte Marie US-MI (46.3637,-84.2801), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.363689,-84.28009&ll=46.363689,-84.28009
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52022722

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Adam Ludwig
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52021155

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Aaron Ludwig
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033814

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Tim Ludwig
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52041247

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:04 by Cooper Ludwig
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN (47.0847,-92.7139), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084699,-92.713908&ll=47.084699,-92.713908
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52033719

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:10 by Laurie Lawler
- 9701–9915 Dart Rd, Meadowlands US-MN (47.0848,-92.7111), St. Louis, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.084808,-92.711131&ll=47.084808,-92.711131
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52038778

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 02:53 by Christine Hill
- Au Gres, Arenac, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.04862,-83.69578&ll=44.04862,-83.69578
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52014164
- Comments: "I saw a snow owl fly by my kitchen window and to the top of a tall tree in my yard. It sat there on a thin branch swaying back and forth for about 4 minutes. It turned it's head a few times. It then dove down fast into another area of my yard on or near the ground. It was dark but I just moved here and have this part of my yard lit up real well to keep cayotes away. This is the 2nd time within a two week period I have seen a snow owl, the other one was a few miles down over the road. Not sure the wing span but it was big. Beautiful Bird!"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:00 by David Oliveria
- Bayswater Street Park, Suffolk, Massachusetts
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3822334,-70.9994344&ll=42.3822334,-70.9994344
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52039593

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:28 by Josh Engel
- Belknap St. railroad tracks overpass, Douglas, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.7203665,-92.1121062&ll=46.7203665,-92.1121062
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52038211
- Comments: "Sitting on a billboard along the overpass."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:10 by Jeffrey Bryant
- Boston Logan Airport, Suffolk, Massachusetts
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.361391,-70.993644&ll=42.361391,-70.993644
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52035463
- Comments: "Seen sitting along side the marsh while taxiing towards take-off for a Cape Air flight to HYA."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 07:18 by Carl Schwartz
- Buena Vista Grasslands/Marsh, Portage, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3214,-89.5895&ll=44.3214,-89.5895
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52022420

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:30 by Gerri Erickson
- Green Hill/The Crown, Grand Traverse, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.7265522,-85.6797338&ll=44.7265522,-85.6797338
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52040716
- Comments: "Flew from roof, to tree, to field, to tree."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 16:30 by Anonymous eBirder
- Hwy 73 and Aspen Ave, Waushara, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1702745,-89.3746501&ll=44.1702745,-89.3746501
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023317
- Comments: "Snowy owl spotted perched on a road sign off Hwy 73 and Aspen Ave"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 11:25 by Gary Jarvis
- Jetport Plaza Rd, Cumberland, Maine
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.6442318,-70.3201388&ll=43.6442318,-70.3201388
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52043021
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "On the opposite (north) side of the runway."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:00 by GARY STRAUS
- Jones Beach SP--Theodore Roosevelt Nature Center, Nassau, New York
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=40.5885208,-73.546552&ll=40.5885208,-73.546552
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52041567

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 06:50 by Knut Hansen
- Logan Airport, Suffolk, Massachusetts
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3659007,-71.0202599&ll=42.3659007,-71.0202599
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52019397
- Comments: "Both looked quite white. One a little distant."

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 11:10 by Damon Haan
- MI (UP)- along Old M-28 west of Ewen, Ontonagon, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.534973,-89.337301&ll=46.534973,-89.337301
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52025228

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 15:15 by Theresa Pratt
- Merrill Rd, Merrill, Saginaw, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.4383219,-84.3304419&ll=43.4383219,-84.3304419
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52021044

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 15:00 by Theresa Pratt
- Merrill Rd, Merrill, Saginaw, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=43.4383219,-84.3304419&ll=43.4383219,-84.3304419
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52020836
- Comments: "Female"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 09:24 by Roger Hagerman
- Osceola-Missaukee Grasslands SGA Unit 1, Osceola, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.1508659,-85.1381636&ll=44.1508659,-85.1381636
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52020217

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 14:00 by Larry Urbanski
- Pickford (Chippewa Co.), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1617941,-84.3565798&ll=46.1617941,-84.3565798
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52040882

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 14:12 by Chirpin Sher
- Pickford (Chippewa Co.), Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1617941,-84.3565798&ll=46.1617941,-84.3565798
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023518

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 12:05 by Myles McNally
- Pickford (Mackinac Co.), Mackinac, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1540652,-84.3709135&ll=46.1540652,-84.3709135
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52040196

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 12:05 by Gerald Ziarno
- Pickford (Mackinac Co.), Mackinac, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.1540652,-84.3709135&ll=46.1540652,-84.3709135
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044037

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:10 by Frank Nicoletti
- Richard I Bong Airport, Douglas, Wisconsin
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.6846143,-92.0982599&ll=46.6846143,-92.0982599
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52042833

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 13:30 by Jerry Rogers
- Rudyard Loop--Northeast, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037617

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 12:55 by Jacob Van Patten
- Rudyard Loop--Northeast, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52032040

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (5)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 13:45 by Chirpin Sher
- Rudyard Loop--Northeast, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2303329,-84.5510334&ll=46.2303329,-84.5510334
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023569

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (8)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 17:19 by Daryl Bernard
- S. Centerline Rd., Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.2608317,-84.5718098&ll=46.2608317,-84.5718098
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52037801

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (2)
- Reported Jan 21, 2019 07:45 by Chirpin Sher
- Sault Ste. Marie area, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.3750435,-84.2980957&ll=46.3750435,-84.2980957
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023590
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (4)
- Reported Jan 19, 2019 10:30 by Chirpin Sher
- Sault Ste. Marie area, Chippewa, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=46.3750435,-84.2980957&ll=46.3750435,-84.2980957
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52023633

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:15 by Gerri Erickson
- Secor Road, Grand Traverse, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.7169623,-85.7091522&ll=44.7169623,-85.7091522
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52041010

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 15:25 by Abby Haight
- Unknown Location - (47.622, -119.491), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.6218599,-119.4914872&ll=47.6218599,-119.4914872
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52017475
- Comments: "immature, dark streaks"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 24, 2019 15:25 by Stefan Schlick
- Unknown Location - (47.622, -119.491), Douglas, Washington
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=47.6218599,-119.4914872&ll=47.6218599,-119.4914872
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52044639
- Comments: "immature, dark streaks"

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 16:40 by Deborah Edwards-Onoro
- Willow Run Airport (restricted access), Wayne, Michigan
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.232688,-83.5077989&ll=42.232688,-83.5077989
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52036133
- Comments: "Continuing bird. Large white bird sitting next to runway on south side of airport, west of control tower. "

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 10:30 by David Oliveria
- Winthrop Beach and Five Sisters, Suffolk, Massachusetts
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.3747938,-70.9681878&ll=42.3747938,-70.9681878
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52039458
- Media: 1 Photo

Snowy Owl (Bubo scandiacus) (1)
- Reported Jan 25, 2019 15:00 by Steve Emerson
- nature road and 75th ave, Morrison, Minnesota
- Map: http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.8275236,-94.3265018&ll=45.8275236,-94.3265018
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S52038787
- Media: 1 Photo
- Comments: "Nice white male on top of power pole"

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Date: 1/25/19 5:51 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: IN THE EYE OF THE STORM … FOR A LITTLE WHILE (MAYSVILLE)
Cold, windy, then snowy a fine January day on the former Beatie Prairie around Maysville. Briefly we were in a mini-blizzard, if such exists, with the sky all white, then it passed to merely picture postcard snow over the fields of praise. Most of the day was windshield work, with windows down only when we wanted better looks. For example, when American Pipits walked out of a field into the road. In another, pipits flew over and I think I heard Lapland Longspur rattles with them but was a little slow getting the window down. Lots of Bald Eagles near Decatur. White-crowned Sparrows, Harriss Sparrows, and Savannah Sparrows in small flocks. I was especially on the look-out for western Red-tailed Hawks wintering around northwest Arkansas. I think today was just prime saw at least 4, including a real beauty near Decatur, close enough to the road for some photos (black throat with white lateral stripes, long wings to near the tip of the red tail, which had a broad, dark band near the tip; black belly). Overall, we didnt see that many Red-tailed Hawks. Big, juicy Cotton Rats are bound to be an important winter food, so maybe we are in a low season for them.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/25/19 10:22 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Harris' sparrow
Daniel,
Generally in winter, we might typically find a single Harris's Sparrow in a flock of White-crowned Sparrows. Maybe occasionally there will be two Harris's. So what you're seeing is right on target ... and a good incentive to submit this sighting to eBird. ;-)

Patty McLean, Conway AR

-------- Original message --------From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Date: 1/25/19 12:44 PM (GMT-05:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Harris' sparrow
Are they generally a flock bird or not? I'm having  trouble trying to
remember if we've ever had a female in the yard but typically, we get a
single male every winter. Every winter, once we get a few white-crowned,
a harris' will show up. Just one. I'm trying to decide if this is normal
or, if this is the same male the past few years or, just coincidence.
Whatever it is, this bird is always a fun addition to the "normal"
ground feeders we see out there.
Speaking of ground feeders, it's fun to watch some of them up on the
feeders. Watching a young white-crowned jump like a kangaroo on our
baffle trying to get some pieces off a pine-cone feeder the kids made at
Hobbs is quite entertaining.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 1/25/19 9:45 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Harris' sparrow
Are they generally a flock bird or not? I'm having  trouble trying to
remember if we've ever had a female in the yard but typically, we get a
single male every winter. Every winter, once we get a few white-crowned,
a harris' will show up. Just one. I'm trying to decide if this is normal
or, if this is the same male the past few years or, just coincidence.
Whatever it is, this bird is always a fun addition to the "normal"
ground feeders we see out there.
Speaking of ground feeders, it's fun to watch some of them up on the
feeders. Watching a young white-crowned jump like a kangaroo on our
baffle trying to get some pieces off a pine-cone feeder the kids made at
Hobbs is quite entertaining.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 1/25/19 6:56 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: How my CRS garbled RTP & Smith’s in Arkansas (a correction)
In my recently posted commentary about Roger Tory Petersons book, All things reconsidered, I garbled up a story I had been told by Doug James about when Roger Tory Peterson came to Arkansas and checked off his first Smith's Longspurs. I mis-remembered what Doug told me. I got the place wrong it was at Little Rock's airport, in winter of 1958-59 -- and also got wrong how this came about.

The correct story is that Peterson was coming to Little Rock to present a program about birds. Bill Shepherd knew where the Smiths were at LR airport, but had come down with appendicitis, was hospitalized in Little Rock, and had his appendix removed. Of course, he wasnt going to be out walking the Aristida grasses at the airport for at least a few days. Another very active member of then recently founded Arkansas Audubon Society, Vivian Scarlett, got the info about where to look for Smithss. Voila! Peterson tallied those first Smith's Longspurs.

In having garbled up this story in my posting several days ago, I am reminded of my friend Joe Woolbright, paraphrasing Mark Twain, when he says, He knows a lot, but a lot of what he knows aint so. In my case, I heard many, many stories from Doug over 40 years, so hopefully can be forgiven the odd lapse here and there. And I appreciate very much the good memory of a certain veteran Auduboner from those days who actually knew the correct tale about Peterson and Smiths in Arkansas.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/24/19 4:44 pm
From: Cody Massery <codythebirder...>
Subject: Rock Wren NO
Hiked up pinnacle this evening to try and relocate the previously reported rock wren. We had no luck but did see a few hundred snow geese and a lone pine warbler.

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>


 

Back to top
Date: 1/24/19 11:00 am
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Re: Purple Finches
Thanks for this post, birders. Made me do some homework.

We’ve had purple finches at least for the last week in the Western Hills area of Little Rock at our feeders. We noticed the eyebrow on the females and are trying to sort out the male purples from the house finches.

Chuck Anderson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 23, 2019, at 6:21 PM, Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...> wrote:
>
> I wondered if anyone else was having this phenomenon. I count for Project FeederWatch, have for 20 years, and am amazed at this year’s Purple Finch count. I get an automatic data confirmation challenge each time I submit our list to the Cornell website.
>
> We’ve been having on average 15 at a time since the light snow in early December. Last weekend’s high count was 22 Purple Finches. I’m sure there were more behind the shrubs where I can’t see.
>
> Enjoying it while it lasts.
>
> Suzie Liles
> southern Marion County in the Ozarks
>
>> On Jan 23, 2019, at 5:41 PM, Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> wrote:
>>
>> We have had an influx of Purple Finches at our backyard feeders for at least two weeks. Today there were at least 14 among a swarm of other birds.
>>
>> Delos McCauley
>> Pine Bluff
 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 6:04 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Re: eBird app
I've been using the app and I am getting quicker with it. It does take a
little practice, but I do find it more convenient than taking notes. I like
how it can track your route and you can edit the route in case you don't
submit the checklist until you get home and it tracked all those extra
miles that weren't spent birding.

I'm sure it has been posted about before but in case anyone isn't aware,
there is a free course on their website that teaches about ebird. I've been
working on it when I can.

Here's the link:

https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/product/ebird-essentials/

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019, 5:22 PM plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

> Great tips, Dan! And even I learned a new (and fantastic) short shortcut!!
>
>
> Patty
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
> Date: 1/23/19 5:37 PM (GMT-05:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: eBird app
>
> Daniel,
>
>
> There is no need to scroll up and down in a long list of birds. Here are a
> few tips to make data entry faster in the app.
>
>
> 1) Enter the tally, touch the space bar, and then start typing a few
> letters of a species name (e.g. "car" will bring up Northern Cardinal,
> Carolina Chickadee, and Carolina Wren), or use the 4-letter alpha code
> (e.g. MODO for Mourning Dove) and the species will appear. Tap the name and
> your tally will be added to the checklist.
>
>
> 2) Touch the number next to a bird and the tally will increase by 1. You
> see 5 more cardinals, touch the cardinal tally 5 times to add five birds.
> No need to type "5 card."
>
>
> 3) After adding a species or two, flick the screen down quickly and a
> bottom menu bar will appear. Touch the check-mark with the number on it and
> the list of all possible species will change to the list of only species
> you've seen so far. This makes it easy to add more individuals of the
> species you've seen. You can still enter new species using the search bar
> at the top. No need to scroll up and down a long list.
>
>
> 4) You realize the flock of 142 scaup sp. you carefully counted were in
> fact Lesser Scaup. Well, just type "-142 scau" and your tally of scaup sp.
> will be reduced by 142. No need to do math in your head to fix the tally.
>
>
> Read more about quick entry here
> https://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2002690-ebird-mobile-quick-entry
> .
>
>
> I'd also suggest changing your phone's sleep interval to the maximum so it
> doesn't go dark on you so much.
>
>
> Also, once you get that birding vest you'll have the phone close at hand
> for quick entry. I keep my phone in my hand most of the time rather than
> constantly getting it from a pocket.
>
>
> Like many things, it take a little practice, but the overall time savings
> provided by the app make it well worth it.
>
>
> Dan Scheiman
>
> Little Rock, AR
>
>
> > On January 23, 2019 at 3:28 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> wrote:
> >
> > Dan Scheiman repeated the suggestion shortly after yours. :) I've
> tried it. I've heard a few people say they can use the app faster in the
> field than a notebook but, I can't. The time it takes to take my phone out
> of my pocket, hit a button to get the screen on(never mind the pattern
> security thing I do), start finding the bird I need to add a number to, or
> find a new species... I would have had several tally marks in my notebook
> by then. It's just what works best for me. I've used the app when they've
> had eBird challenges involving its use but I never really enjoyed it. The
> submission process sure is convenient, more than a notebook... but in the
> field, eh... maybe I just don't like cell phones. HA.
> > Great suggestion though. I'm hoping the app will encourage more
> people to use eBird as most people are on the phones all the time already.
> :)
> >
> > Daniel Mason
> >
> >
> > On 1/23/2019 2:16 PM, Donna Haynes wrote:
> >
> > > > Daniel, I don't know if anyone has already suggested this to
> you or not. Ebird has a mobile app for iphone and android users alike. It
> is extremely easy to use in the field if you use a smartphone. It's free to
> download, will keep track of length of time birding and even log your route
> if a traveling count. Just a thought to help make your ebirding easier.
> Donna Haynes
> > >
> > > >
> >
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon
> >
> > Virus-free. www.avast.com
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=link
> >
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 5:15 pm
From: JoAnn Drew <000001540c75b1c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: STOP on shut down political discussion
AMEN!

In a message dated 1/23/2019 2:42:20 PM Central Standard Time, <sndbrgr...> writes:
Thank you Joe. Yes, please. Let’s get back to Arkansas birds.

Sandy Berger
On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 2:22 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

On behalf of ARBIRD discussion list management, STOP this thread on the politics of the government shut down. Yes, we all have thoughts about this on various sides of this political issue, but ARBIRDS list is not the place for that discussion. Back to birds of Arkansas, please.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 4:21 pm
From: Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...>
Subject: Re: Purple Finches
I wondered if anyone else was having this phenomenon. I count for Project FeederWatch, have for 20 years, and am amazed at this year’s Purple Finch count. I get an automatic data confirmation challenge each time I submit our list to the Cornell website.

We’ve been having on average 15 at a time since the light snow in early December. Last weekend’s high count was 22 Purple Finches. I’m sure there were more behind the shrubs where I can’t see.

Enjoying it while it lasts.

Suzie Liles
southern Marion County in the Ozarks

> On Jan 23, 2019, at 5:41 PM, Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> wrote:
>
> We have had an influx of Purple Finches at our backyard feeders for at least two weeks. Today there were at least 14 among a swarm of other birds.
>
> Delos McCauley
> Pine Bluff
 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 3:41 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Purple Finches
We have had an influx of Purple Finches at our backyard feeders for at
least two weeks. Today there were at least 14 among a swarm of other birds.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 3:22 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: eBird app
Great tips, Dan! And even I learned a new (and fantastic) short shortcut!!

Patty
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Date: 1/23/19 5:37 PM (GMT-05:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: eBird app
Daniel,


There is no need to scroll up and down in a long list of birds. Here are a few tips to make data entry faster in the app.


1) Enter the tally, touch the space bar, and then start typing a few letters of a species name (e.g. "car" will bring up Northern Cardinal, Carolina Chickadee, and Carolina Wren), or use the 4-letter alpha code (e.g. MODO for Mourning Dove) and the species will appear. Tap the name and your tally will be added to the checklist.


2) Touch the number next to a bird and the tally will increase by 1. You see 5 more cardinals, touch the cardinal tally 5 times to add five birds. No need to type "5 card."


3) After adding a species or two, flick the screen down quickly and a bottom menu bar will appear. Touch the check-mark with the number on it and the list of all possible species will change to the list of only species you've seen so far.  This makes it easy to add more individuals of the species you've seen. You can still enter new species using the search bar at the top. No need to scroll up and down a long list.


4) You realize the flock of 142 scaup sp. you carefully counted were in fact Lesser Scaup. Well, just type "-142 scau" and your tally of scaup sp. will be reduced by 142. No need to do math in your head to fix the tally.


Read more about quick entry here https://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2002690-ebird-mobile-quick-entry.


I'd also suggest changing your phone's sleep interval to the maximum so it doesn't go dark on you so much.


Also, once you get that birding vest you'll have the phone close at hand for quick entry. I keep my phone in my hand most of the time rather than constantly getting it from a pocket.


Like many things, it take a little practice, but the overall time savings provided by the app make it well worth it.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR


> On January 23, 2019 at 3:28 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
>     Dan Scheiman repeated the suggestion shortly after yours. :)  I've tried it. I've heard a few people say they can use the app faster in the field than a notebook but, I can't. The time it takes to take my phone out of my pocket, hit a button to get the screen on(never mind the pattern security thing I do), start finding the bird I need to add a number to, or find a new species... I would have had several tally marks in my notebook by then. It's just what works best for me. I've used the app when they've had eBird challenges involving its use but I never really enjoyed it. The submission process sure is convenient, more than a notebook... but in the field, eh... maybe I just don't like cell phones. HA.
>     Great suggestion though. I'm hoping the app will encourage more people to use eBird as most people are on the phones all the time already. :)
>
>     Daniel Mason
>
>
>     On 1/23/2019 2:16 PM, Donna Haynes wrote:
>
>         > > Daniel, I don't know if anyone has already suggested this to you or not. Ebird has a mobile app for iphone and android users alike. It is extremely easy to use in the field if you use a smartphone. It's free to download, will keep track of length of time birding and even log your route if a traveling count. Just a thought to help make your ebirding easier. Donna Haynes
> >
> >     >
>      https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon
>
>     Virus-free. www.avast.com https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=link
>



 

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Date: 1/23/19 3:18 pm
From: Judy Blackwell <blackwelltj...>
Subject: pine siskin coloration
Please don't correct me for not using the scientific names for bird parts!  We have been seeing quite a few pine siskins with much more yellow than normal on their wings. Where most have white or cream stripes these have a brilliant yellow.  We think they are adult males, but we have not seen them so bright before.  Is this coloration common in the adult males? Both the siskin  and finch populations are healthy in our backyard.
Oh, yes. We have had two red-headed woodpeckers for three years. They visit  the feeders on our deck, then fly to the top of an abandoned nearby utility pole. In late fall, we saw three, so we hope it was a family.
This year, we have one female and two male  towhees which are very comfortable on our deck. Usually very shy, this is the first year they have been so close. They scratch in and around several  big pots of dried zinnia and verbena that I didn't get around to cleaning in the fall.  I have also left a few oak leaves from nearby trees around them. I know it sounds messy, but who am I to argue with these beautiful birds. Besides, it's too cold and rainy to clean up now!
Judy BBenton
 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 2:57 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Elegant Leaftossers
AKA the American Robin. They have descended by the hundreds in my and my
neighbor’s yard this afternoon. They look very dapper with their red
breasts glowing in the afternoon sun.
We didn’t get all of our backyard leaves raked yet. And our neighbors never
rake theirs. So these robins have found an all-you-can-eat buffet. They
toss the leaves looking for insects and worms, a real meal in the winter
chill. Love to watch them. Always glad to see them.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith

 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 2:37 pm
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Re: eBird app
Daniel,


There is no need to scroll up and down in a long list of birds. Here are a few tips to make data entry faster in the app.


1) Enter the tally, touch the space bar, and then start typing a few letters of a species name (e.g. "car" will bring up Northern Cardinal, Carolina Chickadee, and Carolina Wren), or use the 4-letter alpha code (e.g. MODO for Mourning Dove) and the species will appear. Tap the name and your tally will be added to the checklist.


2) Touch the number next to a bird and the tally will increase by 1. You see 5 more cardinals, touch the cardinal tally 5 times to add five birds. No need to type "5 card."


3) After adding a species or two, flick the screen down quickly and a bottom menu bar will appear. Touch the check-mark with the number on it and the list of all possible species will change to the list of only species you've seen so far. This makes it easy to add more individuals of the species you've seen. You can still enter new species using the search bar at the top. No need to scroll up and down a long list.


4) You realize the flock of 142 scaup sp. you carefully counted were in fact Lesser Scaup. Well, just type "-142 scau" and your tally of scaup sp. will be reduced by 142. No need to do math in your head to fix the tally.


Read more about quick entry here https://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/2002690-ebird-mobile-quick-entry.


I'd also suggest changing your phone's sleep interval to the maximum so it doesn't go dark on you so much.


Also, once you get that birding vest you'll have the phone close at hand for quick entry. I keep my phone in my hand most of the time rather than constantly getting it from a pocket.


Like many things, it take a little practice, but the overall time savings provided by the app make it well worth it.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR


> On January 23, 2019 at 3:28 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> Dan Scheiman repeated the suggestion shortly after yours. :) I've tried it. I've heard a few people say they can use the app faster in the field than a notebook but, I can't. The time it takes to take my phone out of my pocket, hit a button to get the screen on(never mind the pattern security thing I do), start finding the bird I need to add a number to, or find a new species... I would have had several tally marks in my notebook by then. It's just what works best for me. I've used the app when they've had eBird challenges involving its use but I never really enjoyed it. The submission process sure is convenient, more than a notebook... but in the field, eh... maybe I just don't like cell phones. HA.
> Great suggestion though. I'm hoping the app will encourage more people to use eBird as most people are on the phones all the time already. :)
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> On 1/23/2019 2:16 PM, Donna Haynes wrote:
>
> > > Daniel, I don't know if anyone has already suggested this to you or not. Ebird has a mobile app for iphone and android users alike. It is extremely easy to use in the field if you use a smartphone. It's free to download, will keep track of length of time birding and even log your route if a traveling count. Just a thought to help make your ebirding easier. Donna Haynes
> >
> > >
> https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon
>
> Virus-free. www.avast.com https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=link
>




 

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Date: 1/23/19 1:51 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GOOD READ: ROGER TORY PETERSON, “ALL THINGS RECONSIDERED”
Petersons All Things Reconsidered is a compilation of his writings and reflections, published in 2007. These are short pieces, filled with birds and adventure. Maybe its in your local library, but if not, used copies are available online for $2-3. And well worth it. I view books like this as a booster shot. When political winds blow Sour, I take my Peterson. He writes LOTS about trips all over the world to see birds. He covers recalls various past bird conservation efforts. His narration shows how very far we have come. He subtlety encourages us to keep going.

By no means is everything in Petersons career covered in these 354 pages. For example, in one of his big years, Peterson came to Arkansas and went birding with our own Doug James, who took him to Fort Smith airport and showed him his FIRST Smiths Longspurs! And Peterson came to Fayetteville for an AOU meeting and floated the mighty Buffalo, part of the ultimately successful effort to stop the construction of dams. Petersons fame added to that effort. Plus everyone who floated had bragging rights that they had birded with the finest bird artist of his time.

The whole of All things reconsidered is worthwhile, but I would encourage a close reading of the chapter Long after Columbus. He reviews bird conservation efforts back 500 years. Human beings, the ultimate primates, are the only check on themselves. There is no higher predator to keep us under control When we go hog wild with the exploitation of our domain and ominous signs appear, we can look for no outside help. We seem to sober up at the eleventh hour, so we establish laws, game regulations, soil conservation practices, national forests, national parks, sanctuaries, and wildlife refuges. It is our better self trying to rebuild, to safeguard for our heirs what is left.

Gray January got you down? Go for Peterson and reconsider with him the work we have done. And as a community of birders in Arkansas, the useful work we have before us.


 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 1:43 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Appreciation
I hope to meet more of you in person some day. Unless you know me well,
I'm a lot more shy in person. I sure hope I haven't made too many people
sick of me.
I don't remember if I've said this before but it's worth repeating if I
have.
I appreciate this group and all the members, a lot. The passion for
wildlife... the sharing of knowledge and bird reports. This is a very
valuable tool that I believe we all benefit from. I think that's where
some of my passion comes from, in my ramblings about anything divisive.
Because this is such a wonderful tool and I think we can all benefit
from it, I don't want to see people get chased away. I think because of
my own feelings, I'm quite sympathetic towards anyone that might feel
left out.

Anyway, I think my brain works too hard as I get going sometimes. I
don't know where all the thoughts come from. They're just there. I could
go on here but in all sincerity, this email is simply about how much I
appreciate this group. In the past year alone this list helped my kids
and I pick up some really cool life birds, learned new things about
birds both individual species as well as birds as a whole, kept up with
when field trips and other events were, discussed lots of ideas
involving feeders as well as plants, and more.
While it's not easy, I've found it best to focus on what's good in life
and be thankful for things even in hard times. And despite some
frustration now and then, how can I NOT be thankful for this group? So I
just want to say that I appreciate it and all of you. You are all a part
of what makes this group what it is.
Peace...

Daniel Mason


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Date: 1/23/19 1:28 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: eBird
Dan Scheiman repeated the suggestion shortly after yours. :)  I've tried
it. I've heard a few people say they can use the app faster in the field
than a notebook but, I can't. The time it takes to take my phone out of
my pocket, hit a button to get the screen on(never mind the pattern
security thing I do), start finding the bird I need to add a number to,
or find a new species... I would have had several tally marks in my
notebook by then. It's just what works best for me. I've used the app
when they've had eBird challenges involving its use but I never really
enjoyed it. The submission process sure is convenient, more than a
notebook... but in the field, eh... maybe I just don't like cell phones.
HA.
Great suggestion though. I'm hoping the app will encourage more people
to use eBird as most people are on the phones all the time already. :)

Daniel Mason


On 1/23/2019 2:16 PM, Donna Haynes wrote:
> Daniel, I don't know if anyone has already suggested this to you or
> not. Ebird has a mobile app for iphone and android users alike. It is
> extremely easy to use in the field if you use a smartphone. It's free
> to download, will keep track of length of time birding and even log
> your route if a traveling count. Just a thought to help make your
> ebirding easier.
> Donna Haynes



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Date: 1/23/19 1:27 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA January Field Trip
This Saturday, January 27th is the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's (ASCA) field trip to Lake Dardanelle and Holla Bend NWR.  Please see details below. The Refuge is open but I'm not sure the bathrooms will be open.  There is a PortaPotty at Delaware Park.  Temperatures are predicted to be in the low to mid-30s so it will be cold.  Dress warm.  All birders are welcome to join us.  Mark you calendars for the February field trip. Date and details below.  Please feel free to contact me off-list if you have any questions.
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator

January 27, 2018

Lake Dardanelle-DelawarePark and Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge (NWR)

Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the Mayflower commuter lot off I-40West at Exit 135.  We’ll carpool to DelawarePark, located on the southwest side of Lake Dardanelle.  We should arrive at the Delaware Park boatramp around 8:45 a.m. for anyone who wants to meet us there.  We’ll scan the lake for gulls, pelicans, loons,mergansers, ducks, grebes, and eagles.  Arare gull or duck is a possibility.  Thelake can be very cold and windy.  Dressin layers, including gloves and hats. 

Next, we’ll caravan to the Holla Bend NWR headquarters’parking lot.  There is a $4.00 entrancefee per vehicle.  A duck stamp or a NationalParks pass will get a vehicle in for free.  Our target birds will be raptors, including nestingBald Eagles, also swans, ducks, geese, and sparrows.  At Holla Bend, there will be some walking intall grass, so boots are recommended.  Bring snacks, lunch, and plenty of water.  We’ll return to Little Rock late afternoon.

Directions from the town of Dardanelle to DelawarePark:  At the junction of Hwy. 7 and Hwy.22, go west on Hwy 22 approximately 10 miles. Turn right onto Hwy. 393, which is the first road on your right after youcross the long causeway at the west end of the lake.  Hwy. 393 dead ends at Delaware Park.  GPS coordinates:  35.295749, -93.271458.  For more information about the Holla Bend NWR,go to http://www.fws.gov/hollabend/. The headquarters is located at 10448 HollaBend Road, Dardanelle, AR 72834.  GPScoordinates: 35.163269, -93.093490.

 

February 17, 2018

Two Rivers Park, LittleRock AR

 Participate in the 2018 Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) byjoining ASCA’s February field trip.  Meetat 8:00 a.m. in the parking lot of the Two Rivers Park Bridge (also known asthe “Little” Dam Bridge) at the start of the walking trail located at 4468River Mountain Road at the southeast end of the Two Rivers Park peninsula.  We’ll scope the river from the parking lot andbridge, then walk the dirt and paved trails as far as people wish to go.  You can turn around at any point and headback to your vehicle.  After returning toour cars, we’ll drive to the west entrance of Two Rivers Park and walk the bigfield and horse trail.  Both areas have adiverse population of sparrows and provides a great opportunity to work onidentifying those “little brown birds”. Knee-high rubber boots are recommended because of the copious sandburrs.  Bring water, snacks, and yourscope if you have one.  We should finisharound noon.  If any rare loons are beingreported, birders can continue on to Lake Maumelle.  Loons, mergansers, ducks, and grebes areeasily found on the lake this time of year.  Ifyou can’t join the field trip, participate in the GBBC by counting the birds inyour own backyard and submitting your sightings to the GBBC website at www.birdcount.org.

Directions-takeExit 9 west off I-430 onto Cantrell Rd. At the first stop light, turn right (north) onto River MountainRoad.  Go to the bottom of the hill thenbear right to the main parking lot.  GPScoordinates are 34.797458,-92.383017.



 


 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 12:42 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: STOP on shut down political discussion
Thank you Joe. Yes, please. Let’s get back to Arkansas birds.

Sandy Berger

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 2:22 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> On behalf of ARBIRD discussion list management, STOP this thread on the
> politics of the government shut down. Yes, we all have thoughts about this
> on various sides of this political issue, but ARBIRDS list is not the place
> for that discussion. Back to birds of Arkansas, please.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 12:33 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings and Yaupon
Maybe so and if so I am thankful there is a bird left to do that. Whether it is yaupon berries or Red Mulberries, I do not support getting rid of all the berries or the birds to that anyone has a clean car.

Jerry

From: Karen Konarski-Hart
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 1:32 PM
To: <jwdavis...>
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings and Yaupon

So you are responsible for the recent baptism of our car w blood-colored berries?


Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 23, 2019, at 10:33 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:


The last three days my four Yaupon’s full of berries are being hit by Cedar waxwings. The Yaupons are 15 – 20 feet tall and have thousands of berries each year. The mockingbirds guard their food supply all year trying to chase off the bluebirds, cardinals, white-throated sparrows and 5 other species that feed on them. The Waxwings stage in leafless trees close to the source and conduct raids on the supply. Yesterday between assaults on the yaupons I counted 92 waxwings. Today two bushes have been cleaned of berries and two left. In December, waxwings were seen a half mile away but they numbered less than 30. I recommend yaupon and American holly for berries for all species that depend on fruits during the winter months. Remember that these plant species require both male and female trees for pollination.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs
 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 12:30 pm
From: Keith de Noble <kdenoble...>
Subject: Re: STOP on shut down political discussion
Amen

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 2:22 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> On behalf of ARBIRD discussion list management, STOP this thread on the
> politics of the government shut down. Yes, we all have thoughts about this
> on various sides of this political issue, but ARBIRDS list is not the place
> for that discussion. Back to birds of Arkansas, please.
>


--
*Keith de Noble*

 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 12:26 pm
From: Keith de Noble <kdenoble...>
Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks
Good job Daniel. Work of advice to all - knock the chip off your shoulder,
be prepared to compromise, and focus on the true intent of this group.

Keith de Noble

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 2:19 PM Thomas Foti <tfoti62...> wrote:

> Good post, Daniel! We are not liberals here, we are birders. Let's focus
> on that. Tom
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, January 23, 2019 1:05 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Reopen National Parks
>
> This isn't going to be directed at anyone here but, I am going to say
> something. I don't want to upset anyone and, I don't want to get chased
> out of here but, this must be said. Almost every time political stuff
> comes up where the liberals in this group slander the conservatives of
> this country, people start leaving the list. Maybe you're okay with that
> but, you shouldn't be. Divided as we are, this country is doomed. EVERY
> cause you're fighting for, as long as you're fighting you'll never get
> through to another human.
>
> When obama shut down the government, who did you blame? The republicans.
> When trump does the same exact thing, who do you blame? The republicans.
> It's always the other party's fault.
> I can't tell you how to feel, what to think, or how to vote... but, I'm
> quite tired of the ATTITUDE that often gets a free pass on here. The
> condescension and judgment.
> There are indeed some great topics that are important to discuss that
> get political. It cannot be avoided. I get that. And when your "party"
> sees things one way and the other another, I get that too. I get that
> frustration very much.
> But, we have to be careful how we treat each other. Because, as far as
> this list goes we all share a common interest and passion. And again,
> when attitudes are shared, people leave this group... almost every
> single time. I don't want to see that. I don't want to see anyone feel
> they're not welcome here. Not only have I felt that, I've been told
> that. The time that lead ammo was brought up, it was said that
> conservatives were more likely to get lead person(an ignorant and
> hateful comment) and when I tried to peacefully say how I was offended,
> being a conservative, I was straight out told to "enjoy your lead
> poisoning."
>
> I've asked before if this group is meant for just liberals and I've been
> told by people of authority that it is not... but time and time again,
> that is the feel that many people get. I've had many people email me
> privately to agree and tell me how they didn't feel welcome here. This
> saddens me.
> The anger bubbles up, people say things, people join in and agree,
> people feel alienated. After a few posts someone says "okay, time to
> stop" and we continue on like nothing happened. But it keeps happening.
> And I cannot remain silent, no matter the consequences. I'll defend
> myself and the other people in this group.
>
> I don't look down on any of you. I don't want the liberals to leave this
> group or anything silly like that. I just want people to TRY to remember
> that there are people of different beliefs here and, they are people
> too. You and I, we all LOVE birds and care about them. We need to focus
> on that common thread and find a way to do so without hurting others
> that happen to care about the same thing.
>
> I apologize for this rambling. I've had some suggest that I just don't
> read, scroll past. Like I said, many people leave this group, this is
> not just me. And I shouldn't have to gloss over some things that are
> just not okay.
> I think the political climate over the past 10 years or more has gotten
> worse and it's difficult for people to talk about these issues without
> hurting others. I think we need to find a way to try to work together a
> bit better. To discuss ideas without pointing fingers and hurling
> insults. I see too much of this every day and this is just not somewhere
> I want to see it. I shouldn't have to see it.
>
> If me defending "the other side" isn't okay I'll gladly move on. I don't
> really want that but, I NEED to feel welcome here. Other people NEED to
> feel welcome here. This is what I'm standing up for. And until our
> country can learn to work together despite our differences, we're all
> doomed.
> Okay, I'm done. Got to get out and bird a little today if I have the time.
> Sincere wishes of peace to EVERYONE.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> On 1/23/2019 12:19 PM, Bill Thurman wrote:
> > I called the office of John Boozman, US Senator of Arkansas and told
> > his secretary to tell all the other Republican senators to get off
> > their asses, do their jobs and reopen the National Parks and put an
> > end to the longest government shutdown in US history.
> > So what does this have to do with birds and wildlife, one
> > might ask?
> > National Parks? Wildlife Refuges? It has 10,000 things to do with
> > birds and wildlife. It would be seriously cool if you called and asked
> > for an end to this cruel joke as well.
> > This has been a PSA on behalf of birds, wildlife AND people. Thanks!
> >
> > Bill Thurman
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>


--
*Keith de Noble*

 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 12:22 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: STOP on shut down political discussion
On behalf of ARBIRD discussion list management, STOP this thread on the politics of the government shut down. Yes, we all have thoughts about this on various sides of this political issue, but ARBIRDS list is not the place for that discussion. Back to birds of Arkansas, please.

 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 12:20 pm
From: Thomas Foti <tfoti62...>
Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks
Good post, Daniel! We are not liberals here, we are birders. Let's focus on that. Tom

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 1:05 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks

This isn't going to be directed at anyone here but, I am going to say
something. I don't want to upset anyone and, I don't want to get chased
out of here but, this must be said. Almost every time political stuff
comes up where the liberals in this group slander the conservatives of
this country, people start leaving the list. Maybe you're okay with that
but, you shouldn't be. Divided as we are, this country is doomed. EVERY
cause you're fighting for, as long as you're fighting you'll never get
through to another human.

When obama shut down the government, who did you blame? The republicans.
When trump does the same exact thing, who do you blame? The republicans.
It's always the other party's fault.
I can't tell you how to feel, what to think, or how to vote... but, I'm
quite tired of the ATTITUDE that often gets a free pass on here. The
condescension and judgment.
There are indeed some great topics that are important to discuss that
get political. It cannot be avoided. I get that. And when your "party"
sees things one way and the other another, I get that too. I get that
frustration very much.
But, we have to be careful how we treat each other. Because, as far as
this list goes we all share a common interest and passion. And again,
when attitudes are shared, people leave this group... almost every
single time. I don't want to see that. I don't want to see anyone feel
they're not welcome here. Not only have I felt that, I've been told
that. The time that lead ammo was brought up, it was said that
conservatives were more likely to get lead person(an ignorant and
hateful comment) and when I tried to peacefully say how I was offended,
being a conservative, I was straight out told to "enjoy your lead
poisoning."

I've asked before if this group is meant for just liberals and I've been
told by people of authority that it is not... but time and time again,
that is the feel that many people get. I've had many people email me
privately to agree and tell me how they didn't feel welcome here. This
saddens me.
The anger bubbles up, people say things, people join in and agree,
people feel alienated. After a few posts someone says "okay, time to
stop" and we continue on like nothing happened. But it keeps happening.
And I cannot remain silent, no matter the consequences. I'll defend
myself and the other people in this group.

I don't look down on any of you. I don't want the liberals to leave this
group or anything silly like that. I just want people to TRY to remember
that there are people of different beliefs here and, they are people
too. You and I, we all LOVE birds and care about them. We need to focus
on that common thread and find a way to do so without hurting others
that happen to care about the same thing.

I apologize for this rambling. I've had some suggest that I just don't
read, scroll past. Like I said, many people leave this group, this is
not just me. And I shouldn't have to gloss over some things that are
just not okay.
I think the political climate over the past 10 years or more has gotten
worse and it's difficult for people to talk about these issues without
hurting others. I think we need to find a way to try to work together a
bit better. To discuss ideas without pointing fingers and hurling
insults. I see too much of this every day and this is just not somewhere
I want to see it. I shouldn't have to see it.

If me defending "the other side" isn't okay I'll gladly move on. I don't
really want that but, I NEED to feel welcome here. Other people NEED to
feel welcome here. This is what I'm standing up for. And until our
country can learn to work together despite our differences, we're all
doomed.
Okay, I'm done. Got to get out and bird a little today if I have the time.
Sincere wishes of peace to EVERYONE.

Daniel Mason


On 1/23/2019 12:19 PM, Bill Thurman wrote:
> I called the office of John Boozman, US Senator of Arkansas and told
> his secretary to tell all the other Republican senators to get off
> their asses, do their jobs and reopen the National Parks and put an
> end to the longest government shutdown in US history.
> So what does this have to do with birds and wildlife, one
> might ask?
> National Parks? Wildlife Refuges? It has 10,000 things to do with
> birds and wildlife. It would be seriously cool if you called and asked
> for an end to this cruel joke as well.
> This has been a PSA on behalf of birds, wildlife AND people. Thanks!
>
> Bill Thurman



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Date: 1/23/19 12:17 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: eBird
Daniel, I don't know if anyone has already suggested this to you or not. Ebird has a mobile app for iphone and android users alike. It is extremely easy to use in the field if you use a smartphone. It's free to download, will keep track of length of time birding and even log your route if a traveling count. Just a thought to help make your ebirding easier. Donna Haynes 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 11:43 AM, Daniel Mason<millipede1977...> wrote: What I wrote about looking for a vest was brought up because several of
my checklists were ruined. This is really only a problem for me because
I use eBird and I like to submit checklists. BUT, I also procrastinate a
LOT and get to those lists sometimes years later. :(
One more reason this is not good... I'm submitting a checklist from the
hatchery, in Centerton, from back in November and I came across what
looks like Lesp. That's LeConte's Sparrow. But, I don't really remember
seeing one there. Did I? I just don't know anymore. Based on where it is
on my list, it isn't likely that's what I was meaning to put down. Maybe
I meant lisp(liconln's sparrow) or lesa(least sandpiper)

Sadly, I don't think this is going to be a "lesson" that changes my
procrastination, though I am trying harder to get my old lists up... but
it sure is frustrating. I didn't get pictures of the now mystery bird. I
can speculate what it was but may never know now. Have I mentioned how
much I don't like puzzles and mysteries I can't solve? :(  HA.

This was shared partially for the fun of it but also as a reminder... if
you do make lists and ever consider adding to eBird data, don't put it
off too long. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 1/23/19 12:16 pm
From: David Oakley <gdosr...>
Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks This POLITICAL Agenda on ARBird needs to STOP... this is a BIRD List
Where is the station master?



_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

David Oakley
4779 Cedar Ridge Drive
Springdale, AR 72764
479/422-6588

“Beer for my men, whiskey for my horses"



> On Jan 23, 2019, at 2:10 PM, Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> wrote:
>
> This kind of stuff is why I don't belong to the Audubon Society. Birding yes politics no.
>
> Get Outlook for Android <https://aka.ms/ghei36>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <shalom...> <shalom...>
> Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 12:53:06 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks This POLITICAL Agenda on ARBird needs to STOP... this is a BIRD List
>
>
>
> On 1/23/2019 12:19 PM, Bill Thurman wrote:
>> I called the office of John Boozman, US Senator of Arkansas and told his secretary to tell all the other Republican senators to get off their asses, do their jobs and reopen the National Parks and put an end to the longest government shutdown in US history.
>> So what does this have to do with birds and wildlife, one might ask?
>> National Parks? Wildlife Refuges? It has 10,000 things to do with birds and wildlife. It would be seriously cool if you called and asked for an end to this cruel joke as well.
>> This has been a PSA on behalf of birds, wildlife AND people. Thanks!
>>
>> Bill Thurman
>


 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 12:11 pm
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks This POLITICAL Agenda on ARBird needs to STOP... this is a BIRD List
This kind of stuff is why I don't belong to the Audubon Society. Birding yes politics no.

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <shalom...> <shalom...>
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 12:53:06 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks This POLITICAL Agenda on ARBird needs to STOP... this is a BIRD List



On 1/23/2019 12:19 PM, Bill Thurman wrote:
I called the office of John Boozman, US Senator of Arkansas and told his secretary to tell all the other Republican senators to get off their asses, do their jobs and reopen the National Parks and put an end to the longest government shutdown in US history.
So what does this have to do with birds and wildlife, one might ask?
National Parks? Wildlife Refuges? It has 10,000 things to do with birds and wildlife. It would be seriously cool if you called and asked for an end to this cruel joke as well.
This has been a PSA on behalf of birds, wildlife AND people. Thanks!

Bill Thurman


 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 11:32 am
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings and Yaupon
So you are responsible for the recent baptism of our car w blood-colored berries?

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 23, 2019, at 10:33 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:

The last three days my four Yaupon’s full of berries are being hit by Cedar waxwings. The Yaupons are 15 – 20 feet tall and have thousands of berries each year. The mockingbirds guard their food supply all year trying to chase off the bluebirds, cardinals, white-throated sparrows and 5 other species that feed on them. The Waxwings stage in leafless trees close to the source and conduct raids on the supply. Yesterday between assaults on the yaupons I counted 92 waxwings. Today two bushes have been cleaned of berries and two left. In December, waxwings were seen a half mile away but they numbered less than 30. I recommend yaupon and American holly for berries for all species that depend on fruits during the winter months. Remember that these plant species require both male and female trees for pollination.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs
 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 11:06 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks
This isn't going to be directed at anyone here but, I am going to say
something. I don't want to upset anyone and, I don't want to get chased
out of here but, this must be said. Almost every time political stuff
comes up where the liberals in this group slander the conservatives of
this country, people start leaving the list. Maybe you're okay with that
but, you shouldn't be. Divided as we are, this country is doomed. EVERY
cause you're fighting for, as long as you're fighting you'll never get
through to another human.

When obama shut down the government, who did you blame? The republicans.
When trump does the same exact thing, who do you blame? The republicans.
It's always the other party's fault.
I can't tell you how to feel, what to think, or how to vote... but, I'm
quite tired of the ATTITUDE that often gets a free pass on here. The
condescension and judgment.
There are indeed some great topics that are important to discuss that
get political. It cannot be avoided. I get that. And when your "party"
sees things one way and the other another, I get that too. I get that
frustration very much.
But, we have to be careful how we treat each other. Because, as far as
this list goes we all share a common interest and passion. And again,
when attitudes are shared, people leave this group... almost every
single time. I don't want to see that. I don't want to see anyone feel
they're not welcome here. Not only have I felt that, I've been told
that. The time that lead ammo was brought up, it was said that
conservatives were more likely to get lead person(an ignorant and
hateful comment) and when I tried to peacefully say how I was offended,
being a conservative, I was straight out told to "enjoy your lead
poisoning."

I've asked before if this group is meant for just liberals and I've been
told by people of authority that it is not... but time and time again,
that is the feel that many people get. I've had many people email me
privately to agree and tell me how they didn't feel welcome here. This
saddens me.
The anger bubbles up, people say things, people join in and agree,
people feel alienated. After a few posts someone says "okay, time to
stop" and we continue on like nothing happened. But it keeps happening.
And I cannot remain silent, no matter the consequences. I'll defend
myself and the other people in this group.

I don't look down on any of you. I don't want the liberals to leave this
group or anything silly like that. I just want people to TRY to remember
that there are people of different beliefs here and, they are people
too. You and I, we all LOVE birds and care about them. We need to focus
on that common thread and find a way to do so without hurting others
that happen to care about the same thing.

I apologize for this rambling. I've had some suggest that I just don't
read, scroll past. Like I said, many people leave this group, this is
not just me. And I shouldn't have to gloss over some things that are
just not okay.
I think the political climate over the past 10 years or more has gotten
worse and it's difficult for people to talk about these issues without
hurting others. I think we need to find a way to try to work together a
bit better. To discuss ideas without pointing fingers and hurling
insults. I see too much of this every day and this is just not somewhere
I want to see it. I shouldn't have to see it.

If me defending "the other side" isn't okay I'll gladly move on. I don't
really want that but, I NEED to feel welcome here. Other people NEED to
feel welcome here. This is what I'm standing up for. And until our
country can learn to work together despite our differences, we're all
doomed.
Okay, I'm done. Got to get out and bird a little today if I have the time.
Sincere wishes of peace to EVERYONE.

Daniel Mason


On 1/23/2019 12:19 PM, Bill Thurman wrote:
> I called the office of John Boozman, US Senator of Arkansas and told
> his secretary to tell all the other Republican senators to get off
> their asses, do their jobs and reopen the National Parks and put an
> end to the longest government shutdown in US history.
>         So what does this have to do with birds and wildlife, one
> might ask?
> National Parks? Wildlife Refuges? It has 10,000 things to do with
> birds and wildlife. It would be seriously cool if you called and asked
> for an end to this cruel joke as well.
> This has been a PSA on behalf of birds, wildlife AND people. Thanks!
>
> Bill Thurman



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Date: 1/23/19 10:53 am
From: <shalom...> <shalom...>
Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks This POLITICAL Agenda on ARBird needs to STOP... this is a BIRD List


On 1/23/2019 12:19 PM, Bill Thurman wrote:
> I called the office of John Boozman, US Senator of Arkansas and told
> his secretary to tell all the other Republican senators to get off
> their asses, do their jobs and reopen the National Parks and put an
> end to the longest government shutdown in US history.
>         So what does this have to do with birds and wildlife, one
> might ask?
> National Parks? Wildlife Refuges? It has 10,000 things to do with
> birds and wildlife. It would be seriously cool if you called and asked
> for an end to this cruel joke as well.
> This has been a PSA on behalf of birds, wildlife AND people. Thanks!
>
> Bill Thurman


 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 10:45 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Reopen National Parks
Thanks, Bill!!! I called my senators and my congressman also, for the very
same reason.
Open the government and do not hold the American people hostage over a wall
that will be a disaster for wildlife yet will not prevent entry via air,
sea, tunnels, or our northern border. Allow government employees to resume
their work to protect our National Parks and Wildlife Refuges.

Judith



On Wed, Jan 23, 2019 at 12:20 PM Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
wrote:

> I called the office of John Boozman, US Senator of Arkansas and told his
> secretary to tell all the other Republican senators to get off their asses,
> do their jobs and reopen the National Parks and put an end to the longest
> government shutdown in US history.
> So what does this have to do with birds and wildlife, one might
> ask?
> National Parks? Wildlife Refuges? It has 10,000 things to do with birds
> and wildlife. It would be seriously cool if you called and asked for an end
> to this cruel joke as well.
> This has been a PSA on behalf of birds, wildlife AND people. Thanks!
>
> Bill Thurman
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 10:20 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Reopen National Parks
I called the office of John Boozman, US Senator of Arkansas and told his
secretary to tell all the other Republican senators to get off their asses,
do their jobs and reopen the National Parks and put an end to the longest
government shutdown in US history.
So what does this have to do with birds and wildlife, one might ask?
National Parks? Wildlife Refuges? It has 10,000 things to do with birds and
wildlife. It would be seriously cool if you called and asked for an end to
this cruel joke as well.
This has been a PSA on behalf of birds, wildlife AND people. Thanks!

Bill Thurman

 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 9:42 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: eBird
What I wrote about looking for a vest was brought up because several of
my checklists were ruined. This is really only a problem for me because
I use eBird and I like to submit checklists. BUT, I also procrastinate a
LOT and get to those lists sometimes years later. :(
One more reason this is not good... I'm submitting a checklist from the
hatchery, in Centerton, from back in November and I came across what
looks like Lesp. That's LeConte's Sparrow. But, I don't really remember
seeing one there. Did I? I just don't know anymore. Based on where it is
on my list, it isn't likely that's what I was meaning to put down. Maybe
I meant lisp(liconln's sparrow) or lesa(least sandpiper)

Sadly, I don't think this is going to be a "lesson" that changes my
procrastination, though I am trying harder to get my old lists up... but
it sure is frustrating. I didn't get pictures of the now mystery bird. I
can speculate what it was but may never know now. Have I mentioned how
much I don't like puzzles and mysteries I can't solve? :(  HA.

This was shared partially for the fun of it but also as a reminder... if
you do make lists and ever consider adding to eBird data, don't put it
off too long. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 1/23/19 8:33 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Cedar Waxwings and Yaupon
The last three days my four Yaupon’s full of berries are being hit by Cedar waxwings. The Yaupons are 15 – 20 feet tall and have thousands of berries each year. The mockingbirds guard their food supply all year trying to chase off the bluebirds, cardinals, white-throated sparrows and 5 other species that feed on them. The Waxwings stage in leafless trees close to the source and conduct raids on the supply. Yesterday between assaults on the yaupons I counted 92 waxwings. Today two bushes have been cleaned of berries and two left. In December, waxwings were seen a half mile away but they numbered less than 30. I recommend yaupon and American holly for berries for all species that depend on fruits during the winter months. Remember that these plant species require both male and female trees for pollination.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs
 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 8:19 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: SSHA
Interesting morning so far, watching the feeders. Not long after topping
the feeders off it got awfully birdy. The cardinals were multiplying,
then the doves... then EVERYTHING took off. What was it? Never saw but
started guessing. Some birds came back, then everything flew including
stuff from further out in the yard... I knew something was out there.
Then I saw what I thought was a small(very small) bird of prey zip
through... 20 feet from the house but so fast I didn't get a good look.
That sure would explain things.  I went outside to look around and
didn't find anything. Back in, some birds came back. Then stuff flew
again. This here was the interesting part to me. I looked out and saw a
completely motionless red-bellied woodpecker hanging on the underside of
a branch in our peach tree. I don't often see them hanging upside down
like that but paused for so long, I just knew it was hiding. Then I
noticed we had a downy on the back side of one of the feeders, also
motionless. My daughter said "that means they can still see it." So I
went outside yet again... this time I looked up in a big hickory tree
and there it was... a smallish hawk, blotchy breast, a head that looked
too small for its body... then it was gone. There's been waves of birds
in and out since then but none of them were too bad so I don't think it
has been back. I think at one point after all that we had 70 to 80 or
more cardinals. Where on earth are they coming from Sure is fascinating
to watch though.
That's just some of the excitement so far today. Looks like some of them
are settling back in real good so, back to watching. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 1/23/19 7:06 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: time for a vest?
Yes and you need your camera and voice recorder to add the calls and photos
to ebird and get a pack mule to carry all the stuff.

Jerry

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeffrey Short
Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2019 9:02 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: time for a vest?

Don't forget compass, map, matches, whistle, water, snack, pepper spray,
medical kit, emergency cover, etc.

Might as well get a pack that you can throw and distract the bear.

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of dianemarie yates
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 7:55 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: time for a vest?

I made my own, using another best as pattern to cut around. My local Audubon
group's patch went on it, with plans to add others but surgeries and work
got in the way. You want to include pockets for phone ( if in a live zone,
which I'm not,) your bird list & pen unless it's electronic, room for snacks
& maybe a dog treat if canine birding buddies share your trails. And yes, I
keep her on leash--even if it makes redneck friends chuckle. Which is
nothing compared to the looks I get when I wear my bino into the local
minimart.

Sent from my iPod

> On Jan 22, 2019, at 7:00 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> Odd topic, perhaps. and no, not a bullet proof vest. (I wonder if there's
a bullet proof birding vest. HA)
> I think it's time I get myself a birding vest for the summer months. Why?
A couple reasons. I (still procrastinating apparently) have plans to do the
wings over Arkansas and get some pins to wear. :) I might also attempt to
participate in another AGFC program that gives patches and one of them is
for watchable wildlife. That could be fun.
>
> The most important reason is my checklists' safety. Last May I spent quite
a few hours at the NWAAS field trip at city lake in Siloam Springs. After
everyone was gone, my daughter and I explored some more. I often wear pocket
T-shirts and carry a notebook to keep track. Apparently it was warm enough
in May that I sweat quite a bit and a few of the lists at the beginning of
my notebook got damaged. I lost a few birds off a few lists. Some I can tell
what they said, others are just GONE. I don't remember what I saw,
specifically, last May and they're checklists that I didn't get put into
eBird yet. :(
> So between now and Spring, I better find something to wear so I can still
carry a notebook in a shirt pocket and hopefully not be so prone to damage
from sweat.
>
> I'm guessing most don't wear birding vests for that specific reason but I
know a few of you do wear such gear. Any favorite places to find such
things? Was thinking I could just check Amazon... doesn't have to be a
birding vest specifically. Sometimes I wonder if companies can charge more
money by making something more specific. hmmm... Any favorite brands or
styles? Other thoughts? I could always buy/make a pocket protector as well,
or something. But a vest would have the benefit of a place to put patches
and pins AND have other pockets for other things. We'll see.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 7:02 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: time for a vest?
Don't forget compass, map, matches, whistle, water, snack, pepper spray,
medical kit, emergency cover, etc.

Might as well get a pack that you can throw and distract the bear.

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of dianemarie yates
Sent: Tuesday, January 22, 2019 7:55 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: time for a vest?

I made my own, using another best as pattern to cut around. My local Audubon
group's patch went on it, with plans to add others but surgeries and work
got in the way. You want to include pockets for phone ( if in a live zone,
which I'm not,) your bird list & pen unless it's electronic, room for snacks
& maybe a dog treat if canine birding buddies share your trails. And yes, I
keep her on leash--even if it makes redneck friends chuckle. Which is
nothing compared to the looks I get when I wear my bino into the local
minimart.

Sent from my iPod

> On Jan 22, 2019, at 7:00 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> Odd topic, perhaps. and no, not a bullet proof vest. (I wonder if there's
a bullet proof birding vest. HA)
> I think it's time I get myself a birding vest for the summer months. Why?
A couple reasons. I (still procrastinating apparently) have plans to do the
wings over Arkansas and get some pins to wear. :) I might also attempt to
participate in another AGFC program that gives patches and one of them is
for watchable wildlife. That could be fun.
>
> The most important reason is my checklists' safety. Last May I spent quite
a few hours at the NWAAS field trip at city lake in Siloam Springs. After
everyone was gone, my daughter and I explored some more. I often wear pocket
T-shirts and carry a notebook to keep track. Apparently it was warm enough
in May that I sweat quite a bit and a few of the lists at the beginning of
my notebook got damaged. I lost a few birds off a few lists. Some I can tell
what they said, others are just GONE. I don't remember what I saw,
specifically, last May and they're checklists that I didn't get put into
eBird yet. :(
> So between now and Spring, I better find something to wear so I can still
carry a notebook in a shirt pocket and hopefully not be so prone to damage
from sweat.
>
> I'm guessing most don't wear birding vests for that specific reason but I
know a few of you do wear such gear. Any favorite places to find such
things? Was thinking I could just check Amazon... doesn't have to be a
birding vest specifically. Sometimes I wonder if companies can charge more
money by making something more specific. hmmm... Any favorite brands or
styles? Other thoughts? I could always buy/make a pocket protector as well,
or something. But a vest would have the benefit of a place to put patches
and pins AND have other pockets for other things. We'll see.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 1/23/19 12:37 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: time for a vest?
I use this one for warmish weather.
https://smile.amazon.com/Humvee-Nylon-Combat-Safety-Zipper/dp/B001P4H3D2/ref=pd_sbs_468_8?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00UV5CUI4&pd_rd_r=637d687d-1ece-11e9-a880-ad66db3478f5&pd_rd_w=90FVF&pd_rd_wg=wbAma&pf_rd_p=7d5d9c3c-5e01-44ac-97fd-261afd40b865&pf_rd_r=TZTQRPZ0SKEZ7AQ995VP&refRID=TZTQRPZ0SKEZ7AQ995VP&th=1&psc=1

On Tue, Jan 22, 2019 at 8:55 PM Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:

> Earth color, light and a bit oversized (may be worn as outer layer), fiber
> mustn’t “zip..zip..zip” while walking when arms brush against sides. Many
> camera lens/accessories vests work, too.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Jan 22, 2019, at 7:34 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <
> <karen...> wrote:
> >
> > Check photo or fishing vests. Usually lighter weight w lots of
> pockets. Also. Saw online ad for Big Pockets vest w 12 pockets that field
> guides & binoc can fit in. Expensive tho. Karen Hart
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Jan 22, 2019, at 7:00 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Odd topic, perhaps. and no, not a bullet proof vest. (I wonder if
> there's a bullet proof birding vest. HA)
> >> I think it's time I get myself a birding vest for the summer months.
> Why? A couple reasons. I (still procrastinating apparently) have plans to
> do the wings over Arkansas and get some pins to wear. :) I might also
> attempt to participate in another AGFC program that gives patches and one
> of them is for watchable wildlife. That could be fun.
> >>
> >> The most important reason is my checklists' safety. Last May I spent
> quite a few hours at the NWAAS field trip at city lake in Siloam Springs.
> After everyone was gone, my daughter and I explored some more. I often wear
> pocket T-shirts and carry a notebook to keep track. Apparently it was warm
> enough in May that I sweat quite a bit and a few of the lists at the
> beginning of my notebook got damaged. I lost a few birds off a few lists.
> Some I can tell what they said, others are just GONE. I don't remember what
> I saw, specifically, last May and they're checklists that I didn't get put
> into eBird yet. :(
> >> So between now and Spring, I better find something to wear so I can
> still carry a notebook in a shirt pocket and hopefully not be so prone to
> damage from sweat.
> >>
> >> I'm guessing most don't wear birding vests for that specific reason but
> I know a few of you do wear such gear. Any favorite places to find such
> things? Was thinking I could just check Amazon... doesn't have to be a
> birding vest specifically. Sometimes I wonder if companies can charge more
> money by making something more specific. hmmm... Any favorite brands or
> styles? Other thoughts? I could always buy/make a pocket protector as
> well, or something. But a vest would have the benefit of a place to put
> patches and pins AND have other pockets for other things. We'll see.
> >>
> >> Daniel Mason
> >>
> >>
> >> ---
> >> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> >> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/19 6:55 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: time for a vest?
Earth color, light and a bit oversized (may be worn as outer layer), fiber mustn’t “zip..zip..zip” while walking when arms brush against sides. Many camera lens/accessories vests work, too.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 22, 2019, at 7:34 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:
>
> Check photo or fishing vests. Usually lighter weight w lots of pockets. Also. Saw online ad for Big Pockets vest w 12 pockets that field guides & binoc can fit in. Expensive tho. Karen Hart
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jan 22, 2019, at 7:00 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>>
>> Odd topic, perhaps. and no, not a bullet proof vest. (I wonder if there's a bullet proof birding vest. HA)
>> I think it's time I get myself a birding vest for the summer months. Why? A couple reasons. I (still procrastinating apparently) have plans to do the wings over Arkansas and get some pins to wear. :) I might also attempt to participate in another AGFC program that gives patches and one of them is for watchable wildlife. That could be fun.
>>
>> The most important reason is my checklists' safety. Last May I spent quite a few hours at the NWAAS field trip at city lake in Siloam Springs. After everyone was gone, my daughter and I explored some more. I often wear pocket T-shirts and carry a notebook to keep track. Apparently it was warm enough in May that I sweat quite a bit and a few of the lists at the beginning of my notebook got damaged. I lost a few birds off a few lists. Some I can tell what they said, others are just GONE. I don't remember what I saw, specifically, last May and they're checklists that I didn't get put into eBird yet. :(
>> So between now and Spring, I better find something to wear so I can still carry a notebook in a shirt pocket and hopefully not be so prone to damage from sweat.
>>
>> I'm guessing most don't wear birding vests for that specific reason but I know a few of you do wear such gear. Any favorite places to find such things? Was thinking I could just check Amazon... doesn't have to be a birding vest specifically. Sometimes I wonder if companies can charge more money by making something more specific. hmmm... Any favorite brands or styles? Other thoughts? I could always buy/make a pocket protector as well, or something. But a vest would have the benefit of a place to put patches and pins AND have other pockets for other things. We'll see.
>>
>> Daniel Mason
>>
>>
>> ---
>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/19 5:55 pm
From: dianemarie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: time for a vest?
I made my own, using another best as pattern to cut around. My local Audubon group's patch went on it, with plans to add others but surgeries and work got in the way. You want to include pockets for phone ( if in a live zone, which I'm not,) your bird list & pen unless it's electronic, room for snacks & maybe a dog treat if canine birding buddies share your trails. And yes, I keep her on leash--even if it makes redneck friends chuckle. Which is nothing compared to the looks I get when I wear my bino into the local minimart.

Sent from my iPod

> On Jan 22, 2019, at 7:00 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> Odd topic, perhaps. and no, not a bullet proof vest. (I wonder if there's a bullet proof birding vest. HA)
> I think it's time I get myself a birding vest for the summer months. Why? A couple reasons. I (still procrastinating apparently) have plans to do the wings over Arkansas and get some pins to wear. :) I might also attempt to participate in another AGFC program that gives patches and one of them is for watchable wildlife. That could be fun.
>
> The most important reason is my checklists' safety. Last May I spent quite a few hours at the NWAAS field trip at city lake in Siloam Springs. After everyone was gone, my daughter and I explored some more. I often wear pocket T-shirts and carry a notebook to keep track. Apparently it was warm enough in May that I sweat quite a bit and a few of the lists at the beginning of my notebook got damaged. I lost a few birds off a few lists. Some I can tell what they said, others are just GONE. I don't remember what I saw, specifically, last May and they're checklists that I didn't get put into eBird yet. :(
> So between now and Spring, I better find something to wear so I can still carry a notebook in a shirt pocket and hopefully not be so prone to damage from sweat.
>
> I'm guessing most don't wear birding vests for that specific reason but I know a few of you do wear such gear. Any favorite places to find such things? Was thinking I could just check Amazon... doesn't have to be a birding vest specifically. Sometimes I wonder if companies can charge more money by making something more specific. hmmm... Any favorite brands or styles? Other thoughts? I could always buy/make a pocket protector as well, or something. But a vest would have the benefit of a place to put patches and pins AND have other pockets for other things. We'll see.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/19 5:41 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Freeing the "sparrow"
I'm glad the fellow used his head and helped free the little bird. At least
some people have a heart and a soul. He did!

Bill Thurman

On Tue, Jan 22, 2019, 3:37 PM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

>
>
> https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=b78_1483833387
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/19 5:34 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: time for a vest?
Check photo or fishing vests. Usually lighter weight w lots of pockets. Also. Saw online ad for Big Pockets vest w 12 pockets that field guides & binoc can fit in. Expensive tho. Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 22, 2019, at 7:00 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> Odd topic, perhaps. and no, not a bullet proof vest. (I wonder if there's a bullet proof birding vest. HA)
> I think it's time I get myself a birding vest for the summer months. Why? A couple reasons. I (still procrastinating apparently) have plans to do the wings over Arkansas and get some pins to wear. :) I might also attempt to participate in another AGFC program that gives patches and one of them is for watchable wildlife. That could be fun.
>
> The most important reason is my checklists' safety. Last May I spent quite a few hours at the NWAAS field trip at city lake in Siloam Springs. After everyone was gone, my daughter and I explored some more. I often wear pocket T-shirts and carry a notebook to keep track. Apparently it was warm enough in May that I sweat quite a bit and a few of the lists at the beginning of my notebook got damaged. I lost a few birds off a few lists. Some I can tell what they said, others are just GONE. I don't remember what I saw, specifically, last May and they're checklists that I didn't get put into eBird yet. :(
> So between now and Spring, I better find something to wear so I can still carry a notebook in a shirt pocket and hopefully not be so prone to damage from sweat.
>
> I'm guessing most don't wear birding vests for that specific reason but I know a few of you do wear such gear. Any favorite places to find such things? Was thinking I could just check Amazon... doesn't have to be a birding vest specifically. Sometimes I wonder if companies can charge more money by making something more specific. hmmm... Any favorite brands or styles? Other thoughts? I could always buy/make a pocket protector as well, or something. But a vest would have the benefit of a place to put patches and pins AND have other pockets for other things. We'll see.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/19 5:00 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: time for a vest?
Odd topic, perhaps. and no, not a bullet proof vest. (I wonder if
there's a bullet proof birding vest. HA)
I think it's time I get myself a birding vest for the summer months.
Why? A couple reasons. I (still procrastinating apparently) have plans
to do the wings over Arkansas and get some pins to wear. :)  I might
also attempt to participate in another AGFC program that gives patches
and one of them is for watchable wildlife. That could be fun.

The most important reason is my checklists' safety. Last May I spent
quite a few hours at the NWAAS field trip at city lake in Siloam
Springs. After everyone was gone, my daughter and I explored some more.
I often wear pocket T-shirts and carry a notebook to keep track.
Apparently it was warm enough in May that I sweat quite a bit and a few
of the lists at the beginning of my notebook got damaged. I lost a few
birds off a few lists. Some I can tell what they said, others are just
GONE. I don't remember what I saw, specifically, last May and they're
checklists that I didn't get put into eBird yet. :(
So between now and Spring, I better find something to wear so I can
still carry a notebook in a shirt pocket and hopefully not be so prone
to damage from sweat.

I'm guessing most don't wear birding vests for that specific reason but
I know a few of you do wear such gear. Any favorite places to find such
things? Was thinking I could just check Amazon... doesn't have to be a
birding vest specifically. Sometimes I wonder if companies can charge
more money by making something more specific. hmmm...   Any favorite
brands or styles? Other thoughts?  I could always buy/make a pocket
protector as well, or something. But a vest would have the benefit of a
place to put patches and pins AND have other pockets for other things.
We'll see.

Daniel Mason


---
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https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 1/22/19 2:26 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Here's the West (in Arkansas)
When one of the big mostly brownish-black hawks with white splotches and white showing in the tail Harlans Hawk is perched in a leafless tree far out in the pasture heres the West. Alaska for sure. This winter Ive spent more time looking at some fairly regular looking Red-tailed Hawks. We have the eastern Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis jamaicensis) nesting around northwest Arkansas. But in winter, we also have the western Red-tailed Hawks (B. j. calurus). Some of these calurus visitors are obvious -- basically jet black with a red tail (black warriors), but others look a lot like B. j. jamaicensis. Out birding, Ive managed to turn sideways in open country roads for better study. That study and lots of thumbing through Brian Wheelers field guide, "BIRDS of prey of the east" (Princeton 2018) have helped me realize we actually have a lot of these light morph calurus hawks in winter. I saw one this morning near Centerton. Two things that help a lot with the proper identification: tips of the primary flight feathers almost reach the end of the tail. By contrast, they reach only about half way with B. j. jamaicensis. In the light morph calurus, the throat is primarily dark or maybe with a few white stripes (primarily white in B. j. jamaicensis). To make studies like this, I have to get off roads with a lot of traffic. It also helps to get a decent photo to study wing lengths and throat coloring. I posted a photo of this mornings bird on my facebook page. It was 100% overcast, so the photo lacks a lot in terms of quality, but the key elements are obvious. The tip of the right wing is obscured by the tail, but you can see the tip of the left wing in direct comparison to the tail length. Even in bad light, the mainly dark throat is apparent. I know some of you will not like the religion and politics on my facebook page. I invite you to skip what offends and get right down to the hawk (you dont have to friend me): https://www.facebook.com/joe.neal.7902?ref=tn_tnmn


 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/19 2:22 pm
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Rock Wren at Pinnacle State Park, Pulaski Co.
On 1/17, a Rock Wren was photographed on top of Pinnacle Mountain. Emily
Roberts, the observer said she saw it while hiking the West Summit Trail
and that the bird was surprisingly approachable.

Devin Moon

 

Back to top
Date: 1/22/19 1:37 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Freeing the "sparrow"


https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=b78_1483833387


 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/19 6:15 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: AAS on the radio
AAS ON "WILDMAN" STEVE WILSON RADIO PROGRAM. On January 2 Arkansas
Audubon Society Officers Samantha Scheiman and Lyndal York were interviewed
about birds, birding and AAS on the "Call of the Wild " radio program over
the Arkansas Radio Network. If you missed the program, you can download
<http://www.arbirds.org/COTW.zip> and listen to it. This is a zip file
that you save on your computer and then extract the 3 program segments.

If the blue "download" button above does not work, you can go the the
website www.arbirds.org for the url.

Lyndal York
AAS Webmaster

<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=icon>
Virus-free.
www.avast.com
<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail&utm_term=link>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/19 4:03 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Paragould Birder Needed
Are there any Paragould residents, or really anyone living in the Paragould
Daily Presss circulation range, who would be willing to write a letter to
the editor expressing concern about the herbicide dicamba? I can provide all
the needed details. Please contact me off-list. Thanks.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/19 12:21 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Bison There is a connection
There is a recently published book on The Nature Conservancy's Tallgrass Prairie Preserve: "Visions of the Tallgrass" with prairie photographs by Harvey Payne and essays by James P Ronda. This Preserve is a remarkable effort with wide positive impacts across the entire biota -- plants, butterflies, birds, small mammals, herps -- really the whole thing. The Bison herd is being managed to restore its unique genetic heritage. I am pleased that Preserve headquarters of this remarkable patch of Earth is 3-hours of interesting travel from my front porch. Close enough to be truly inspiring, far enough to always be high adventure when going, and as I learn and understand it more, brings improvement to understanding my usual haunts around Northwest Arkansas City.


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Monday, January 21, 2019 12:39 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Birds and Bison There is a connection

The value of bison as a keystone species for birds and other wildlife is increasingly being documented. Joe Neal's annual Birds and Bison trip to the Flint hills in September is a place mentioned in this article.

https://theconversation.com/bison-are-back-and-that-benefits-many-other-species-on-the-great-plains-107588
[https://images.theconversation.com/files/248145/original/file-20181130-194928-1wuh6f8.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&rect=0%2C203%2C1430%2C715&q=45&auto=format&w=250&h=140&fit=crop]<https://theconversation.com/bison-are-back-and-that-benefits-many-other-species-on-the-great-plains-107588>

Bison are back, and that benefits many other species on the Great Plains<https://theconversation.com/bison-are-back-and-that-benefits-many-other-species-on-the-great-plains-107588>
theconversation.com
Disclosure statement. Matthew Moran is Professor of Biology at Hendrix College in Conway, AR. He has received research funding from the National Science Foundation, the Arkansas Game and Fish ...


Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/19 9:27 am
From: Chris Pistole <raptor1964...>
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park
Here is a link to a web site dedicated to restoring the RHWO, mainly in MN. http://www.redheadrecovery.org/

To add to the discussion, I would emphasize the importance of open forests and savannas, like once existed in much of the Ozarks, in addition to the snags or wildlife trees. The lack of proper forest management on private property, meaning little or no thinning of stands and prescribed fire and the resulting dense growth of trees, has played a large role in their decline nationwide. MN has been successful in increasing the RHWO population in key study areas through restoring savannas. Where do we have the closest thing to savannas now? In our urban parks and golf courses. By working with the managers of these properties to allow snags to remain when not a threat to the public, we could perhaps increase the population. With the oak die-off leaving lots of dead trees in natural forests, I would say it is likely the density of trees that is more harmful in those areas. Also consider all the folks buying their 5-10 acre “ranchettes” as they’re often called, who want the trees but don’t do any kind of timber management including thinning and prescribed fire to open the forest up. Adding in the problem of invasive species like Japanese honeysuckle, winter creeper, and others in these areas, often makes for a dense “jungle” of vegetation that RHWO won’t use. We have to be firewise as people build homes in forested areas, but doing nothing is a recipe for disaster all around.



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of DesignWorks
Sent: Monday, January 21, 2019 8:34 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park



To Clarify on the location, we were at the Prairie Creek Campground and Marina on Beaver Lake just east of Rogers –

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Prairie+Creek+Campground/@36.35295,-94.0555878,15z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x5956a17e94a096e4!8m2!3d36.35295!4d-94.0555878



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> On Behalf Of dianemarie yates
Sent: Monday, January 21, 2019 8:25 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park



My husband would like to add excessive logging to the list of reasons for RHWO decline as well as that of other riparian species. But we know loggers need to work, same as the rest of us, and would we suggest they find other jobs, given their area of expertise in this techno-nightmare we've forced on ourselves, they might find employment dispatching errant computers--those who still use chainsaws!



But more seriously, while I understand dead slash creates a tinder-rich environment for unwanted fires and makes controlled burns nearly impossible, I don't see why forest management can't leave a fair share of dead and dying trees, especially those isolated from dense growth, as homes and food storage for our struggling woodpeckers.

Sent from my iPod


On Jan 21, 2019, at 7:54 AM, DesignWorks <market...> wrote:

After reading the thread this weekend on the Red-headed Woodpecker decline, Don Palmer and I took it to task to visit our favorite honey hole for woodpeckers in our area Sunday afternoon. With that, a trip to Prairie Creek State Park made for a memorable day with us seeing 4 RHWOs and hearing more in the distance. The old forest growth with a good mix of Oak and Pine tend to make this a haven for many birds that are hard to find these days. Other Woodpeckers there were at least 20 Red-bellied woodpeckers, 2 Northern Flickers, and 1 pileated heard in the distance. Plenty of Juncos, Bluebirds, Cardinals and White-throated Sparrows as well. As a bonus, there was also a Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 1 mature Bald Eagle flying VERY high with a group of ring-billed gulls, and 6 Common Goldeneyes flying over the lake.



Glad to see that there is still habitat for these and hope our future returns even more. There are too few of these places left.



Ron Bird








 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/19 6:34 am
From: DesignWorks <market...>
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park
To Clarify on the location, we were at the Prairie Creek Campground and Marina on Beaver Lake just east of Rogers –

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Prairie+Creek+Campground/@36.35295,-94.0555878,15z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x5956a17e94a096e4!8m2!3d36.35295!4d-94.0555878



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> On Behalf Of dianemarie yates
Sent: Monday, January 21, 2019 8:25 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park



My husband would like to add excessive logging to the list of reasons for RHWO decline as well as that of other riparian species. But we know loggers need to work, same as the rest of us, and would we suggest they find other jobs, given their area of expertise in this techno-nightmare we've forced on ourselves, they might find employment dispatching errant computers--those who still use chainsaws!



But more seriously, while I understand dead slash creates a tinder-rich environment for unwanted fires and makes controlled burns nearly impossible, I don't see why forest management can't leave a fair share of dead and dying trees, especially those isolated from dense growth, as homes and food storage for our struggling woodpeckers.

Sent from my iPod


On Jan 21, 2019, at 7:54 AM, DesignWorks <market...> <mailto:<market...> > wrote:

After reading the thread this weekend on the Red-headed Woodpecker decline, Don Palmer and I took it to task to visit our favorite honey hole for woodpeckers in our area Sunday afternoon. With that, a trip to Prairie Creek State Park made for a memorable day with us seeing 4 RHWOs and hearing more in the distance. The old forest growth with a good mix of Oak and Pine tend to make this a haven for many birds that are hard to find these days. Other Woodpeckers there were at least 20 Red-bellied woodpeckers, 2 Northern Flickers, and 1 pileated heard in the distance. Plenty of Juncos, Bluebirds, Cardinals and White-throated Sparrows as well. As a bonus, there was also a Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 1 mature Bald Eagle flying VERY high with a group of ring-billed gulls, and 6 Common Goldeneyes flying over the lake.



Glad to see that there is still habitat for these and hope our future returns even more. There are too few of these places left.



Ron Bird








 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/19 6:25 am
From: dianemarie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park
My husband would like to add excessive logging to the list of reasons for RHWO decline as well as that of other riparian species. But we know loggers need to work, same as the rest of us, and would we suggest they find other jobs, given their area of expertise in this techno-nightmare we've forced on ourselves, they might find employment dispatching errant computers--those who still use chainsaws!

But more seriously, while I understand dead slash creates a tinder-rich environment for unwanted fires and makes controlled burns nearly impossible, I don't see why forest management can't leave a fair share of dead and dying trees, especially those isolated from dense growth, as homes and food storage for our struggling woodpeckers.

Sent from my iPod

On Jan 21, 2019, at 7:54 AM, DesignWorks <market...><mailto:<market...>> wrote:

After reading the thread this weekend on the Red-headed Woodpecker decline, Don Palmer and I took it to task to visit our favorite honey hole for woodpeckers in our area Sunday afternoon. With that, a trip to Prairie Creek State Park made for a memorable day with us seeing 4 RHWOs and hearing more in the distance. The old forest growth with a good mix of Oak and Pine tend to make this a haven for many birds that are hard to find these days. Other Woodpeckers there were at least 20 Red-bellied woodpeckers, 2 Northern Flickers, and 1 pileated heard in the distance. Plenty of Juncos, Bluebirds, Cardinals and White-throated Sparrows as well. As a bonus, there was also a Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 1 mature Bald Eagle flying VERY high with a group of ring-billed gulls, and 6 Common Goldeneyes flying over the lake.

Glad to see that there is still habitat for these and hope our future returns even more. There are too few of these places left.

Ron Bird



 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/19 6:06 am
From: dianemarie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: How 'Rick and Morty' explains why humans keep destroying the environment - Treehugger
I haven't read the link but you were right last week, Bill. There are just too many of us. It's true we're self-serving and short-sighted but mostly it's the multiplication factor. Since I'm no Hitlerian and I'm sure none of us are, l recommend we focus on the solutions rather than the problem. Plant foods for birds and other wildlife, work toward a pesticide- and herbicide-free environment and live as green as possible. I'd like to say Save A Bird, Use A Corncob! (But it would make me a hypocrite since I love those double pillow-soft rolls.)

As go birds, I have 12 cardinals, 4 blue jays, 3 white-throated sparrows, 2 juncos and a titmouse on the peanut feeder right now. The downy woodpecker we've missed for so long is back.

I bring the peanut and suet feeders in at night to disappoint coons and bears but have to hang them from the ceiling, out of reach of our Great Pyrenees who is a canine vacuum cleaner. Unlike our little Siberian husky who eats her kibble one pebble at a time and I suspect in her last life was a rose-breasted grosbeak.
Sent from my iPod

On Jan 20, 2019, at 1:25 PM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...><mailto:<bill.masterofmusic...>> wrote:

How 'Rick and Morty' explains why humans keep destroying the environment

https://www.treehugger.com/economics/how-rick-and-morty-explains-why-humans-keep-destroying-environment.html
 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/19 5:54 am
From: DesignWorks <market...>
Subject: Red-headed Woodpeckers at Prairie Creek State Park
After reading the thread this weekend on the Red-headed Woodpecker decline,
Don Palmer and I took it to task to visit our favorite honey hole for
woodpeckers in our area Sunday afternoon. With that, a trip to Prairie
Creek State Park made for a memorable day with us seeing 4 RHWOs and hearing
more in the distance. The old forest growth with a good mix of Oak and Pine
tend to make this a haven for many birds that are hard to find these days.
Other Woodpeckers there were at least 20 Red-bellied woodpeckers, 2 Northern
Flickers, and 1 pileated heard in the distance. Plenty of Juncos,
Bluebirds, Cardinals and White-throated Sparrows as well. As a bonus, there
was also a Ruby-crowned Kinglet, 1 mature Bald Eagle flying VERY high with a
group of ring-billed gulls, and 6 Common Goldeneyes flying over the lake.



Glad to see that there is still habitat for these and hope our future
returns even more. There are too few of these places left.



Ron Bird








 

Back to top
Date: 1/21/19 5:28 am
From: Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 18 Jan 2019 to 19 Jan 2019 (#2019-21)
Red Headed Woodpeckers. I love these beauties and photograph them every
chance I get. It's really unfortunate they are not thriving statewide.
We've got to do better. They seem to be thriving well in Central Arkansas.
I see at least 2-5 every time I go to Maumelle Park, along the Arkansas
River. I've seen them mating and of all ages there. They're very well
adapted to people in that RV park. Also, Lake Willastein park in the City
of Maumelle has a gr population. Boyle Park in Little Rock has no shortage
either. You have a good chance of seeing them near water in Central
Arkansas and in the back yard.

On Sun, Jan 20, 2019, 12:00 AM ARBIRD-L automatic digest system <
<LISTSERV...> wrote:

> There are 7 messages totaling 1617 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest
> Arkansas Ozarks (4)
> 2. Say No to Dicamba extension
> 3. quack
> 4. Breakfast and birds
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2019 14:07:32 +0000
> From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
> Subject: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in
> northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
> <
> https://0-birdsna-org.library.uark.edu/Species-Account/bna/species/rehwoo/introduction
> >
> Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall. We saw
> zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding at Rocky Branch
> Park on Beaver Lake – only one all winter.
>
> We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the Ozarks
> due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith. Kim was one of
> the coauthors for the species account in Birds of North America online.
>
> Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature trees
> (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags preferred by
> Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline of Beaver Lake, a
> result of tree deaths caused by rising and falling water levels. The big
> snags provide woodpecker roost and nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens and
> woodlots with mature trees are still good place to find these birds in both
> the river valley and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in
> adjoining mature woodlands.
>
> Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least
> migration-like movements associated with winter acorn availability.
> Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at times quite evident in
> mid-September to early October and in late April. At Beaver Lake Nursery
> Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area on September 21, 2014.
>
> This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of Scott
> County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found red-heads in stands of
> mature trees maintained in an open condition by fire and managed for
> endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy stocking
> of both Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous
> large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags are common.
>
> Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations. They are
> common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some years: 54 (1961),
> 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on this count have declined
> since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate students demonstrated that in the
> Ozarks, numbers of wintering red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter
> food resource, are positively related to hard mast production. In past
> decades, acorn crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in
> some winters, rare in others.
>
> One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the Fayetteville
> CBC is local habitat loss related to human population growth within the
> count circle. Tall standing dead trees are routinely removed in urban
> areas. Oak barrens dating to the pioneer period have been cleared or
> greatly reduced throughout western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat
> for red-heads is reduced.
>
> During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed juveniles. The
> transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the end of winter. Birds in
> October, November, and December show red feathers emerging.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2019 10:17:24 -0600
> From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
> Subject: Say No to Dicamba extension
>
> With a friendly reminder from Dan Scheiman and a suggestion for whom I
> could send an email, I typed out an email to the Evening Times, a
> publication of Crittenden Co. AR.
> I mainly stuck to the scientific facts and points, but also pointed
> out why extension of Dicamba spray beyond the older April 15th cutoff is
> Wrong on a dozen different levels. I hope that my email won't fall upon
> deaf ears.
> I mentioned that more information about this issue could be found at
> ar.audubon.org/dicamba
> Whatever Arkansas county you live in, I urge you to write to a local
> publication or find an Ark. Plant Board member in your area and urge them
> to just Vote No regarding the extension of dicamba spray beyond April 15th.
> This poison is already deadly enough as it is.
> Thanks!
>
> Bill Thurman. currently in Crittenden Co
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2019 16:36:52 -0600
> From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
> Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in
> northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
> I think it would be a reasonable thing to say that there are still RH
> Woodpeckers throughout Arkansas, but nowhere near as many as there once
> were.
> I saw one here in W. Memphis last October. It was investigating one
> of the dead pine tree stubs near my apt. where it looked like the top half
> of the tree had been knocked off. There wasn't much here and it obviously
> didn't stick around.
> I used to love seeing them in the Arboretum near Pinnacle Mtn. where
> they had plenty of their kind of dead trees very near the Little Maumelle
> Rv.
> I saw half a dozen one day. Now that I'm walking pretty strongly again I'll
> have to go back over there later in a few weeks and look around some more.
>
> Bill Thurman
>
> On Sat, Jan 19, 2019, 8:07 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> >
> > <
> https://0-birdsna-org.library.uark.edu/Species-Account/bna/species/rehwoo/introduction
> >
> >
> > Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall. We saw
> > zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding at Rocky
> Branch
> > Park on Beaver Lake – only one all winter.
> >
> >
> > We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the Ozarks
> > due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith. Kim was one of
> > the coauthors for the species account in Birds of North America online.
> >
> >
> > Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature trees
> > (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags preferred by
> > Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline of Beaver Lake, a
> > result of tree deaths caused by rising and falling water levels. The big
> > snags provide woodpecker roost and nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens
> and
> > woodlots with mature trees are still good place to find these birds in
> both
> > the river valley and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in
> > adjoining mature woodlands.
> >
> >
> > Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least
> > migration-like movements associated with winter acorn availability.
> > Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at times quite evident in
> > mid-September to early October and in late April. At Beaver Lake Nursery
> > Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area on September 21, 2014.
> >
> >
> > This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of Scott
> > County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found red-heads in stands
> of
> > mature trees maintained in an open condition by fire and managed for
> > endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy
> stocking
> > of both Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous
> > large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags are
> > common.
> >
> >
> > Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations. They are
> > common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some years: 54 (1961),
> > 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on this count have declined
> > since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate students demonstrated that in
> the
> > Ozarks, numbers of wintering red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter
> > food resource, are positively related to hard mast production. In past
> > decades, acorn crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in
> > some winters, rare in others.
> >
> >
> > One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the Fayetteville
> > CBC is local habitat loss related to human population growth within the
> > count circle. Tall standing dead trees are routinely removed in urban
> > areas. Oak barrens dating to the pioneer period have been cleared or
> > greatly reduced throughout western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat
> > for red-heads is reduced.
> >
> >
> > During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed juveniles.
> The
> > transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the end of winter. Birds in
> > October, November, and December show red feathers emerging.
> >
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2019 17:24:30 -0600
> From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
> Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in
> northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
> I worked in Conway at the Conway Human Development Center (CHDC) for
> nearly 40 years. I’ve been retired for almost 5-1/2 years. I still go out
> to the campus for the Faulkner Co. Christmas Bird Count. The campus, as
> well as adjacent Curtis Walker Park was always home to the Red-headed
> Woodpeckers. Curtis Walker replaced all of their wooden night light post
> (that the woodpeckers nested in) with metal poles. CHDC has numerous pine
> trees and I still see some woodpecker holes in wooden night light posts and
> dead pine limbe that remain along the campus boundary.. but, I don’t think
> I’ve counted a Red-headed Woodpecker there in the past several years. I
> used to go over the Curtis Walker Park and just walk around and photograph
> them. Additionally, I photographed a nest at CHDC, in a pine in 2009 and
> 2010. Granted, I’m not driving through the campus every day, like I did
> when I worked there, but I’m there often enough to believe that the
> population of Red-headed Woodpeckers has drastically declined there!
>
>
>
> Gail Miller
>
> Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> <ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Thurman
> Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 4:37 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in
> northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
>
>
> I think it would be a reasonable thing to say that there are still RH
> Woodpeckers throughout Arkansas, but nowhere near as many as there once
> were.
>
> I saw one here in W. Memphis last October. It was investigating one
> of the dead pine tree stubs near my apt. where it looked like the top half
> of the tree had been knocked off. There wasn't much here and it obviously
> didn't stick around.
>
> I used to love seeing them in the Arboretum near Pinnacle Mtn.
> where they had plenty of their kind of dead trees very near the Little
> Maumelle Rv.
>
> I saw half a dozen one day. Now that I'm walking pretty strongly again
> I'll have to go back over there later in a few weeks and look around some
> more.
>
>
>
> Bill Thurman
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jan 19, 2019, 8:07 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> <mailto:
> <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall. We saw
> zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding at Rocky Branch
> Park on Beaver Lake – only one all winter.
>
>
>
> We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the Ozarks
> due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith. Kim was one of
> the coauthors for the species account in Birds of North America online.
>
>
>
> Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature trees
> (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags preferred by
> Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline of Beaver Lake, a
> result of tree deaths caused by rising and falling water levels. The big
> snags provide woodpecker roost and nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens and
> woodlots with mature trees are still good place to find these birds in both
> the river valley and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in
> adjoining mature woodlands.
>
>
>
> Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least
> migration-like movements associated with winter acorn availability.
> Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at times quite evident in
> mid-September to early October and in late April. At Beaver Lake Nursery
> Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area on September 21, 2014.
>
>
>
> This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of Scott
> County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found red-heads in stands of
> mature trees maintained in an open condition by fire and managed for
> endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy stocking
> of both Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous
> large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags are
> common.
>
>
>
> Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations. They are
> common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some years: 54 (1961),
> 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on this count have declined
> since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate students demonstrated that in the
> Ozarks, numbers of wintering red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter
> food resource, are positively related to hard mast production. In past
> decades, acorn crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in
> some winters, rare in others.
>
>
>
> One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the Fayetteville
> CBC is local habitat loss related to human population growth within the
> count circle. Tall standing dead trees are routinely removed in urban
> areas. Oak barrens dating to the pioneer period have been cleared or
> greatly reduced throughout western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat
> for red-heads is reduced.
>
>
>
> During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed juveniles. The
> transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the end of winter. Birds in
> October, November, and December show red feathers emerging.
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2019 19:02:35 -0600
> From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> Subject: quack
>
> Busy day birding in this wonderful weather. I could say a lot but before
> I go sit and relax on the couch for a while I just had to share one
> short story from Anglin Road up in Centerton.
> After walking the fish hatchery in this weather, we drove down Anglin
> road as we often do just to see what's around.
>
> We stopped just after the Anglin's house(I assume that's their name,
> based on the road and the sign). I didn't see anything on the pond on
> the left as I normally would so I moved on just a few more feet so I
> could try and view a duck I saw in a pond out in the field on the right
> side. Pintail... kind of exciting. Then my daughter takes my binoculars
> and looks and asks "Are you sure that's real?" It was bobbing around,
> left and right but otherwise, it wasn't moving. No head turns... just
> there. After a while it was pretty easy to determine this was not a real
> bird. It didn't look perfect, the pattern on the neck, but from that
> distance it was still pretty convincing. I was let down. Then my
> daughter asked about the duck back on the other side of the road. That
> little pond on the left, just past it in some other water(puddles?)
> there were about 8 ducks and among them was a pair of pintails.
> This was just too funny to us at the time. There's a fake one... then,
> there just happens to be a live pair on the other side of the road. Now
> I'm glad we looked at the fake one long enough to check back and find
> the real ones.
> Scan and scan some more as you never know what you might find. :)
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2019 20:00:30 -0600
> From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in
> northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
> Power poles make the perfect nesting snag for Red-headed woodpeckers since
> most of the bark-less snags have been removed and trees are to young and
> small to make new ones. In 1983 I held a Snag Habitat Management Symposium
> in Flagstaff, AZ where papers were presented on the value on snags for
> wildlife. I gave a paper called “Snags Are For Wildlife”. In my
> presentation I used a story of when I was growing up in East Texas my dad
> had a farm. The red-headed woodpeckers used the power poles for nesting
> snags. My dad called these woodpeckers his “fence builders” because the
> RHWO would build a nest in a power pole and eventually the power company
> would replace the pole giving my dad the opportunity to buy the damaged
> poles to use as corner fence post. Red-headed woodpeckers did well at the
> expense of other species when the Army CE was building lakes and flooding
> hundreds of thousands of acres of forest. As mentioned by Joe, the flooded
> timbers with no bark and surrounded by water made many available nest sites
> for not only woodpeckers but other cavity nesting birds. Bark-less snags
> in an open type stand as found in parks and communities are the perfect
> nest sites but are in places few people have tolerance to let them stand.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> From: Gail Miller
> Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 5:24 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in
> northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
> I worked in Conway at the Conway Human Development Center (CHDC) for
> nearly 40 years. I’ve been retired for almost 5-1/2 years. I still go out
> to the campus for the Faulkner Co. Christmas Bird Count. The campus, as
> well as adjacent Curtis Walker Park was always home to the Red-headed
> Woodpeckers. Curtis Walker replaced all of their wooden night light post
> (that the woodpeckers nested in) with metal poles. CHDC has numerous pine
> trees and I still see some woodpecker holes in wooden night light posts and
> dead pine limbe that remain along the campus boundary.. but, I don’t think
> I’ve counted a Red-headed Woodpecker there in the past several years. I
> used to go over the Curtis Walker Park and just walk around and photograph
> them. Additionally, I photographed a nest at CHDC, in a pine in 2009 and
> 2010. Granted, I’m not driving through the campus every day, like I did
> when I worked there, but I’m there often enough to believe that the
> population of Red-headed Woodpeckers has drastically declined there!
>
>
>
> Gail Miller
>
> Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> <ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Thurman
> Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 4:37 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in
> northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
>
>
> I think it would be a reasonable thing to say that there are still RH
> Woodpeckers throughout Arkansas, but nowhere near as many as there once
> were.
>
> I saw one here in W. Memphis last October. It was investigating one
> of the dead pine tree stubs near my apt. where it looked like the top half
> of the tree had been knocked off. There wasn't much here and it obviously
> didn't stick around.
>
> I used to love seeing them in the Arboretum near Pinnacle Mtn.
> where they had plenty of their kind of dead trees very near the Little
> Maumelle Rv.
>
> I saw half a dozen one day. Now that I'm walking pretty strongly again
> I'll have to go back over there later in a few weeks and look around some
> more.
>
>
>
> Bill Thurman
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jan 19, 2019, 8:07 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall. We
> saw zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding at Rocky
> Branch Park on Beaver Lake – only one all winter.
>
>
>
> We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the Ozarks
> due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith. Kim was one of
> the coauthors for the species account in Birds of North America online.
>
>
>
> Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature trees
> (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags preferred by
> Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline of Beaver Lake, a
> result of tree deaths caused by rising and falling water levels. The big
> snags provide woodpecker roost and nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens and
> woodlots with mature trees are still good place to find these birds in both
> the river valley and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in
> adjoining mature woodlands.
>
>
>
> Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least
> migration-like movements associated with winter acorn availability.
> Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at times quite evident in
> mid-September to early October and in late April. At Beaver Lake Nursery
> Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area on September 21, 2014.
>
>
>
> This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of Scott
> County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found red-heads in stands of
> mature trees maintained in an open condition by fire and managed for
> endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy stocking
> of both Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous
> large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags are
> common.
>
>
>
> Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations. They are
> common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some years: 54 (1961),
> 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on this count have declined
> since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate students demonstrated that in the
> Ozarks, numbers of wintering red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter
> food resource, are positively related to hard mast production. In past
> decades, acorn crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in
> some winters, rare in others.
>
>
>
> One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the Fayetteville
> CBC is local habitat loss related to human population growth within the
> count circle. Tall standing dead trees are routinely removed in urban
> areas. Oak barrens dating to the pioneer period have been cleared or
> greatly reduced throughout western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat
> for red-heads is reduced.
>
>
>
> During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed juveniles.
> The transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the end of winter. Birds
> in October, November, and December show red feathers emerging.
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 19 Jan 2019 21:37:47 -0600
> From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> Subject: Breakfast and birds
>
> Bird report towards the end...
>
> This morning I took my wife and 5 children up to Hobbs State park for
> the Birds and Breakfast event. As some of you know, the weather wasn't
> what most would consider wonderful. Personally the beauty of snow makes
> up for the difficulties it can sometimes provide.
>
> Anyway, we called on the way to Hobbs to find out the main events had
> been cancelled. We were all dressed and out the door and I knew there'd
> be enough fun stuff to do AND my kids would all enjoy a free doughnut(or
> I guess 4 in my son's case) so we continued on.
>
> The event started at 9 but as we walked in we felt quite alone as far as
> visitors go. We were the only ones there even though it was already
> about 9;20. Didn't take long to find the room with the snacks and
> drinks. (as the day went on, more people showed up)
> We found out that the netting of birds wasn't going to be done, mostly
> out of caution for the birds health. The idea that a bird might be in
> the net for a while in that cold and not as able to regulate its heat,
> and perhaps if the snow was too wet, the slightest possibility of a bird
> drowning while hanging there. I'm guessing that's more likely to happen
> in the rain rather than the snow but these potential dangers were enough
> to call it off for the day. Made perfect sense to be cautious when it
> comes to their safety.
>
> We all found out that the lady from Morningstar was not going to make
> it. It's a long drive to Hobbs from there and with the roads being what
> they were and the cold and the stress on the birds that would have been
> brought, it made sense that she was not there. These opportunities
> repeat themselves so we were not too bothered by missing out on a few
> things today.
>
> My kids had a lot of fun. I spent a long time by the window searching
> for more species of bird and when it was lunch time, I kept expecting
> people to be waiting on me to leave. Sometime after 1 I had to finally
> get them all going as they were all enjoying the place.
>
> There was a presentation on the 8 ates... sounds weird but, what I heard
> out of it was interesting. Seemed to keep all but my 4 year old's
> attention. Ates as in hibernate, excavate, etc.
>
> The kids got to see some rubber impressions of animal tracks, make a
> mask, make a pine cone bird feeder... they also had a three toed box
> turtle out for everyone to see and learn about.
>
> My wife let the kids buy some things from the gift shop. I'm cheap and
> poor(technically) so gift shops often cause me pain(ha) but the kids had
> a blast and my wife was happy knowing she was supporting the park. :)
> My 17 year old bought a stuffed animal, a big one... a turkey vulture.
> She perched it on her arm and said she was there to take Lynn's
> place(from morningstar.) I got a kick out of that.
>
> The roads were quite slick in some places and even the walkway out of
> Hobbs was quite slippery by the time we left. But most people on the
> road were driving very cautiously so we all survived the trip. I hope
> everyone else was careful and safe today.
>
> A white board was brought out to make a list of birds seen during the
> event. I was told I could add some and I pulled out my notebook that was
> already collecting a list. It was kind of fun. The highlight for me
> wasn't just the birds I watched but seeing other people show up JUST to
> come find the gray-headed, dark-eyed junco. And that one was always
> found in the same spot throughout the day but would disappear for a
> while so it took some looking for at times. But we found it off and on
> throughout the day as well as the people that came to see it. Somehow
> helping someone else look for something they're searching for can be
> more exciting than the bird itself.
>
> I don't have it submitted to eBird yet(hopefully tonight) but the list
> for the 4 hours we were there included:
>
> *30+ dark-eyed juncos**
> **1 gray-headed dark-eyed junco**
> **25+ american goldfinches**
> **6 purple finches - 4 males, 2 female**
> **10+ white-throated sparrows**
> **2 tufted titmice(at least)**
> **4+ northern cardinals**
> **2 fox sparrows**
> **3 blue jays (someone else counted more I think)**
> **2 red-breasted nuthatches**
> **2 white-breasted nuthatches**
> **2 pine siskins**
> **1 House finch - male**
> **2 red-bellied woodpeckers - 1m, 1f**
> **3 carolina chickadees**
> **4 american crows**
> **1 downy woodpecker - female**
> **2 morning doves**
> **1 song sparrow**
> **1 pileated woodpecker - female*
>
> At the species level, that's 19. I searched and searched for the 20th.
> Had some potential grackles fly over but I only saw them through an
> upper window for half a second. And another visitor says they saw a
> eurasian collared dove while I was there but I never saw it. I'm
> unfairly skeptical of people sometimes wondering if that's what they saw
> but I can say they also saw more morning doves than I did and the doves
> I did see seemed to be there one second and then gone the next. Somehow
> I never saw where they went or where they came from. There were just too
> many birds to watch, and feeders on the left and right. I think after a
> few hours my arms were getting tired of lifting the binoculars up
> repeatedly. I can call that exercise right? :)
>
> We all enjoyed different things I think but this family of 7 had a good
> time today. My only regret about visiting Hobbs(ever) is that it's about
> an hour away from here. Still waiting for a teleporter to travel a bit
> more quickly some day. :)
> Thanks goes out to all the wonderful people that work/volunteer at
> Hobbs. They all help make it the special place that it is. We sure
> appreciate the people that make it their work to help educate visitors.
> The conversation is always appreciated...
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 18 Jan 2019 to 19 Jan 2019 (#2019-21)
> **************************************************************
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/19 11:25 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: How 'Rick and Morty' explains why humans keep destroying the environment - Treehugger
How 'Rick and Morty' explains why humans keep destroying the environment

https://www.treehugger.com/economics/how-rick-and-morty-explains-why-humans-keep-destroying-environment.html

 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/19 10:47 am
From: dianemarie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
Right on, Jerry, about the jeans. And a point well made about landscape timbers. Even I have a hard time with the used tires, but Joe and I recycled rocks from clearing for landscaping, outlining beds with these and it works very well. Only thing I'd do over would be to dig a trench first and line it with hardware cloth or 1" mesh poultry wire--to discourage the armadillos.

Sent from my iPod

On Jan 18, 2019, at 2:15 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:

Thanks for your post. I do hope you can terrace or someway keep things from going to the street. People of Costa Rica and Ecuador have solutions for such problems. They use discarded automobile and tractor tires filled with soil to provide a safe place for plants without erosion. People in this country are psychologically and status handicapped about “what will the neighbors think if I have tires in my yard with flowers or vegetables growing in them”? Instead we go to Lowe’s, Home Depot, or other sources and spend hundreds of dollars on landscaping timbers to have raised beds and terracing to accomplish the same thing. I know that here, our habits and lack of recycling and using solutions from products we are paying to discard will not change. Other countries use what is available, economical, and practical to solve erosion control and facilitate gardening vegetables and flowers on slopes. Our pride will not permit us to do that. Maybe someday having such can become a ecological status symbol like the $200 jeans that people buy already worn out and have holes in them instead and wearing jeans and working their butts off and accomplish the same thing.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 1:46 PM
To: <jwdavis...> ; <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: aww nuts + bird friendly yard


I have plans to completely do-over my back yard sometime in March. So, I read all of Jerry’s posts. My suburban yard is on a hill and it seems that every time I add dirt, plant seeds, etc., it all ends up going down the street when it rains. This will be a major project both physically (for which I’ll have to hire a professional), and monetarily. So, that being said, I’m reading all posts on ARbird, UA ext service, etc. This make over will be with birds in mind and as a pollinator garden. I don’t plan on removing the 19 bird feeders (plus hummingbird feeders in the spring), but will be adding dirt, sod, and native plants. I’ve been relying mostly on potted plants to maintain my green certified bird friendly yard up to now. Our local Master Gardener group, hopefully, will be assisting me with these plans. Looking forward to this coming spring and summer, and more birds!

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR





Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>>
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:58:14 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts

I think that you will find most on this list serve do not read or respond to
long post regardless of how valuable the information or questions are. Many
birds other than Acorn or Red-bellied woodpeckers stash food and at my
feeders, Carolina Chickadees and Tufted Titmice take black oil sunflower
seeds and place in cracks and under bark for future retrievals. They get in
serious trouble when there is an ice storm that encases the limbs and bark
so they cannot retrieve food items and can only last a few hours before
starvation if feeder food is not available. Food availability is the reason
birds migrate and there has to be more food in an area than just feeders -
snags, logs, brush piles, soft mast which is being sought right now with
insect in short supply are important. My birds are not only eating the
sunflower, mixed seeds and suet now but the yaupon berries I have on female
yaupons. With insects in short supply other foods are critical. Feeders
alone will not keep birds in a yard, only about 26% of the food comes from
feeders even when feeders are available. Have a yard with food items that
cover the spectrum of species types and availability. Bird survival depends
on it. As for diversity, I have about 20+ species of birds in my yard daily,
resident birds, plus gold finches, house finches, purple finches, pine
siskins, red-breasted nuthatches joining the white-breasted nuthatches,
Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy woodpeckers, Northern flickers and Yellow-bellied
sapsuckers to mention a few.

This post is already too long for most to read.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs.

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Mason
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:28 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: aww nuts

So, I've been proposing thoughts/questions on wild food in the area and
whether it may be down. Partly because some people have been seeing
fewer birds this winter and partly because I've been seeing more birds
at the feeders this winter compared to previous ones. We've also had
squirrels at our feeders(mostly on the ground thankfully) way more this
winter than previous ones combined I'd say.

Nobody seems to have had any educated thoughts on if there's been any
difference in wild food production this year. I'm not sure if I should
ask the AGFC or the Arkansas native plant society or someone... I think
I might try that to satisfy my curiosity.

BUT... I'm bringing this up again as I made another observation. Just
now I saw a facebook post about red-headed woodpeckers and how they,
apparently, are like the acorn woodpecker and store up acorns.
I have not seen any red-headed woodpeckers in a few months now around
here. While I haven't birded city lake a LOT, the past few months I've
seen none there and we haven't heard or seen any in our neighborhood either.

I know they migrate some but I can remember other winters where I was
still finding them at city lake. I don't have all my checklists
submitted to ebird(probably a few hundred at least) so I don't have much
data to look at quickly for last winter but looking at my reports from
the 2016/17 winter, there were definitely a few red-headeds that stuck
around all winter long at city lake. Combine that with the idea they
store acorns and the squirrel activity I've seen here... it makes me
think there was a shortage of acorns in this area this past fall.

And if I'm right about that, it keeps bringing me back to my wondering
about other native wild foods and how they did this past fall.
I don't think anyone here has the answer to those questions but these
are my thoughts/observations so far. I am wondering if areas seeing
fewer birds if perhaps more birds moved on than other years because of
food.

It's kind of funny to think about in a way... that, IF some birds are
leaving here this winter compared to others... at the same time because
of a different food shortage further north, everyone down here is seeing
red-breasted nuthatches this year. Seeing fewer of some species and more
of another. Almost sounds contradictory but different foods support
different birds.
I'm getting close to rambling so I'll quit for now. :)

Daniel Mason


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/19 10:36 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: A child without an education is like a bird without wings (Donna and Kelly)
Two of the valuable staff of Arkansas Audubon Society's Halberg Ecology Camp are featured in the Profiles section of this morning's Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette. Donna and Kelly Mulhollan, the duo performing as Still on the Hill. The story covers a great deal more than their latest CD "Cane Hill." Listening to "Cane Hill," I am much taken by words in "The Charm," :


"A child without an education is like a bird without wings/and knowledge without wisdom is a song that never sings."


https://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2019/jan/20/donna-and-kelly-mulhollan-20190120/?features-profiles

[https://media.arkansasonline.com/img/photos/2019/01/20/190859574_0106-AN-PF-Still-004-smaller_t600.jpg?4326734cdb8e39baa3579048ef63ad7b451e7676]<https://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2019/jan/20/donna-and-kelly-mulhollan-20190120/?features-profiles>

Donna and Kelly Mulhollan - arkansasonline.com<https://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2019/jan/20/donna-and-kelly-mulhollan-20190120/?features-profiles>
www.arkansasonline.com
There are few people that appreciate the lush landscapes, quirky history and eccentric characters of the Ozarks more than Kelly and Donna Mulhollan.



 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/19 10:11 am
From: James Morgan <jlmm...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
Jeff

Just an observation. The sheathing showed up as Ozarks Electric
Cooperative started replacing poles and pulling fiber optic cable for
high speed internet to rural residences and communities. It was a a free
installation so must have been part of a rural internet grant passed by
congress several years ago.

It is definitely on all poles that fiber optic is distributed from the
line to feed fiber optics to a residence.  Also where the fiber optic
spits from a trunk to feed several houses.

They replaced poles -increased height of the poles.  Every pole I
noticed being replaced had the sheathing added.

I had also considered that the sheathing may help with preventing static
electricity or maybe a ground wire/lighting rod wire attached to it. If
a critter guard, why not on every pole? Unless the poles with sheathing
have extra components that need to "guard" ing from critters.

Good question as to the purpose of the sheathing

I was watching a lot since one of the subcontractors, buried electric
fence, broke fences and attempted to hide it, left a 5 foot deep hole
that a lamb fell into and suffocated and died, left deep enough ruts
that I was tripping and almost twisting ankles if walking in a pasture
at night. The rest of the contractors had great service and it is very
nice to have fiber optics. : )

Jim Morgan, Fayetteville (and 2 miles from 16E)


On 1/20/2019 11:23 AM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
>
> Speaking of power poles, does anyone know what the black (sometimes
> red), metal sheathing I see attached below the crossmembers.  I assume
> it helps keep climbing critters off the lines, though, it is not on
> all poles.
>
> I first saw it in NW Arkansas, on Hwy 16 E from Fayetteville, and have
> started seeing it in other areas in central AR.
>
> Jeff Short
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Jerry Davis
> *Sent:* Saturday, January 19, 2019 8:01 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter
> in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
> Power poles make the perfect nesting snag for Red-headed woodpeckers
> since most of the bark-less snags have been removed and trees are to
> young and small to make new ones. In 1983 I held a Snag Habitat
> Management Symposium in Flagstaff, AZ where papers were presented on
> the value on snags for wildlife. I gave a paper called “Snags Are For
> Wildlife”. In my presentation I used a story of when I was growing up
> in East Texas my dad had a farm. The red-headed woodpeckers used the
> power poles for nesting snags. My dad called these woodpeckers his
> “fence builders” because the RHWO would build a nest in a power pole
> and eventually the power company would replace the pole giving my dad
> the opportunity to buy the damaged poles to use as corner fence post.
> Red-headed woodpeckers did well at the expense of other species when
> the Army CE was building lakes and flooding hundreds of thousands of
> acres of forest.  As mentioned by Joe, the flooded timbers with no
> bark and surrounded by water made many available nest sites for not
> only woodpeckers but other cavity nesting birds. Bark-less snags in an
> open type stand as found in parks and communities are the perfect nest
> sites but are in places few people have tolerance to let them stand.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
>
> Hot Springs
>
> *From:*Gail Miller
>
> *Sent:*Saturday, January 19, 2019 5:24 PM
>
> *To:*<ARBIRD-L...>
>
> *Subject:*Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter
> in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
> I worked in Conway at the Conway Human Development Center (CHDC) for
> nearly 40 years.  I’ve been retired for almost 5-1/2 years.  I still
> go out to the campus for the Faulkner Co. Christmas Bird Count.  The
> campus, as well as adjacent Curtis Walker Park was always home to the
> Red-headed Woodpeckers.  Curtis Walker replaced all of their wooden
> night light post (that the woodpeckers nested in) with metal poles.
> CHDC has numerous pine trees and I still see some woodpecker holes in
> wooden night light posts and dead pine limbe that remain along the
> campus boundary.. but, I don’t think I’ve counted a Red-headed
> Woodpecker there in the past several years.  I used to go over the
> Curtis Walker Park and just walk around and photograph them. 
> Additionally, I photographed a nest at CHDC, in a pine in 2009 and
> 2010.   Granted, I’m not driving through the campus every day, like I
> did when I worked there, but I’m there often enough to believe that
> the population of Red-headed Woodpeckers has drastically declined there!
>
> Gail Miller
>
> Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Bill Thurman
> *Sent:* Saturday, January 19, 2019 4:37 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter
> in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
>
> I think it would be a reasonable thing to say that there are still RH
> Woodpeckers throughout Arkansas, but nowhere near as many as there
> once were.
>
>        I saw one here in W. Memphis last October. It was investigating
> one of the dead pine tree stubs near my apt. where it looked like the
> top half of the tree had been knocked off. There wasn't much here and
> it obviously didn't stick around.
>
>        I used to love seeing them in the Arboretum near Pinnacle Mtn.
> where they had plenty of their kind of dead trees very near the Little
> Maumelle Rv.
>
> I saw half a dozen one day. Now that I'm walking pretty strongly again
> I'll have to go back over there later in a few weeks and look around
> some more.
>
> Bill Thurman
>
> On Sat, Jan 19, 2019, 8:07 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall.
> We saw zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding
> at Rocky Branch Park on Beaver Lake – only one all winter.
>
> We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the
> Ozarks due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith.
> Kim was one of the coauthors for the species account in Birds of
> North America online.
>
> Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature
> trees (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags
> preferred by Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline
> of Beaver Lake, a result of tree deaths caused by rising and
> falling water levels. The big snags provide woodpecker roost and
> nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens and woodlots with mature trees
> are still good place to find these birds in both the river valley
> and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in adjoining
> mature woodlands.
>
> Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least
> migration-like movements associated with winter acorn
> availability. Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at
> times quite evident in mid-September to early October and in late
> April. At Beaver Lake Nursery Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area
> on September 21, 2014.
>
> This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of
> Scott County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found
> red-heads in stands of mature trees maintained in an open
> condition by fire and managed for endangered Red-cockaded
> Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy stocking of both
> Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous
> large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags
> are common.
>
> Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations.
> They are common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some
> years: 54 (1961), 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on
> this count have declined since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate
> students demonstrated that in the Ozarks, numbers of wintering
> red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter food resource, are
> positively related to hard mast production. In past decades, acorn
> crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in some
> winters, rare in others.
>
> One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the
> Fayetteville CBC is local habitat loss related to human population
> growth within the count circle. Tall standing dead trees are
> routinely removed in urban areas. Oak barrens dating to the
> pioneer period have been cleared or greatly reduced throughout
> western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat for red-heads is
> reduced.
>
> During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed
> juveniles. The transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the
> end of winter. Birds in October, November, and December show red
> feathers emerging.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/19 9:24 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
Speaking of power poles, does anyone know what the black (sometimes red), metal sheathing I see attached below the crossmembers. I assume it helps keep climbing critters off the lines, though, it is not on all poles.



I first saw it in NW Arkansas, on Hwy 16 E from Fayetteville, and have started seeing it in other areas in central AR.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 8:01 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks



Power poles make the perfect nesting snag for Red-headed woodpeckers since most of the bark-less snags have been removed and trees are to young and small to make new ones. In 1983 I held a Snag Habitat Management Symposium in Flagstaff, AZ where papers were presented on the value on snags for wildlife. I gave a paper called “Snags Are For Wildlife”. In my presentation I used a story of when I was growing up in East Texas my dad had a farm. The red-headed woodpeckers used the power poles for nesting snags. My dad called these woodpeckers his “fence builders” because the RHWO would build a nest in a power pole and eventually the power company would replace the pole giving my dad the opportunity to buy the damaged poles to use as corner fence post. Red-headed woodpeckers did well at the expense of other species when the Army CE was building lakes and flooding hundreds of thousands of acres of forest. As mentioned by Joe, the flooded timbers with no bark and surrounded by water made many available nest sites for not only woodpeckers but other cavity nesting birds. Bark-less snags in an open type stand as found in parks and communities are the perfect nest sites but are in places few people have tolerance to let them stand.



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs



From: Gail Miller

Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 5:24 PM

To: <ARBIRD-L...>

Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks



I worked in Conway at the Conway Human Development Center (CHDC) for nearly 40 years. I’ve been retired for almost 5-1/2 years. I still go out to the campus for the Faulkner Co. Christmas Bird Count. The campus, as well as adjacent Curtis Walker Park was always home to the Red-headed Woodpeckers. Curtis Walker replaced all of their wooden night light post (that the woodpeckers nested in) with metal poles. CHDC has numerous pine trees and I still see some woodpecker holes in wooden night light posts and dead pine limbe that remain along the campus boundary.. but, I don’t think I’ve counted a Red-headed Woodpecker there in the past several years. I used to go over the Curtis Walker Park and just walk around and photograph them. Additionally, I photographed a nest at CHDC, in a pine in 2009 and 2010. Granted, I’m not driving through the campus every day, like I did when I worked there, but I’m there often enough to believe that the population of Red-headed Woodpeckers has drastically declined there!



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Thurman
Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 4:37 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks



I think it would be a reasonable thing to say that there are still RH Woodpeckers throughout Arkansas, but nowhere near as many as there once were.

I saw one here in W. Memphis last October. It was investigating one of the dead pine tree stubs near my apt. where it looked like the top half of the tree had been knocked off. There wasn't much here and it obviously didn't stick around.

I used to love seeing them in the Arboretum near Pinnacle Mtn. where they had plenty of their kind of dead trees very near the Little Maumelle Rv.

I saw half a dozen one day. Now that I'm walking pretty strongly again I'll have to go back over there later in a few weeks and look around some more.



Bill Thurman



On Sat, Jan 19, 2019, 8:07 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall. We saw zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding at Rocky Branch Park on Beaver Lake – only one all winter.



We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the Ozarks due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith. Kim was one of the coauthors for the species account in Birds of North America online.



Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature trees (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags preferred by Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline of Beaver Lake, a result of tree deaths caused by rising and falling water levels. The big snags provide woodpecker roost and nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens and woodlots with mature trees are still good place to find these birds in both the river valley and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in adjoining mature woodlands.



Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least migration-like movements associated with winter acorn availability. Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at times quite evident in mid-September to early October and in late April. At Beaver Lake Nursery Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area on September 21, 2014.



This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of Scott County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found red-heads in stands of mature trees maintained in an open condition by fire and managed for endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy stocking of both Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags are common.



Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations. They are common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some years: 54 (1961), 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on this count have declined since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate students demonstrated that in the Ozarks, numbers of wintering red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter food resource, are positively related to hard mast production. In past decades, acorn crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in some winters, rare in others.



One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the Fayetteville CBC is local habitat loss related to human population growth within the count circle. Tall standing dead trees are routinely removed in urban areas. Oak barrens dating to the pioneer period have been cleared or greatly reduced throughout western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat for red-heads is reduced.



During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed juveniles. The transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the end of winter. Birds in October, November, and December show red feathers emerging.




 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/19 6:19 am
From: dianemarie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
Don't feel bad, I've been hassled for lengthy posts before too. I think most now read ARBird on phones while driving or on work break, so they lose patience. You should have a blog so those of us with more time can read you like a morning paper without all the crime, corruption and political go-around.

I've been wondering about new plant choices too. It seems as soon as I get the soil fit for even the pickiest of guests the earthworms show up in large numbers. Which is wonderful--until the armadillos find them. Goodbye roots! And what they don't destroy, the squirrels, chipmunks and ground hogs make a meal of. And forget the chili powder advice, as Arkansas squirrels have been hanky-pankying with relations south of the border and have acquired not only a taste but a love for habaneros!

We saw a dozen wild turkeys yesterday feeding along the roadside and I was wondering what was the source. If anybody knows of some flowering perennials and berry-producing shrubs the critters won't eat but the birds will, please advise.

Did I fail to mention? A rat decided the leaves on my evergreen hollies make good nesting material, and stripped all five of them in late fall. I'm wondering if they'll be able to survive to refoliate.

Sent from my iPod

On Jan 18, 2019, at 7:59 PM, Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...><mailto:<000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>> wrote:

Sally Jo,
I was having trouble with my seeds washing away too so instead of planting on bare dirt I covered a weedy patch with black tarp for a full growing season and then lifted the tarp and sowed seeds on the thatch and intact soil in late fall. This was monetarily much more feasible for a larger area than my prepared native beds of plants rather than seed mixes. I do suggest a mix of seeds as some species just aren’t likely to take. Coreopsis, purple coneflower, susans, gray-headed coneflower, and leaffcup silphium have all worked well for me though each yard is different. You probably don’t want to delay your plans but I thought others in here might find that useful.

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

On Jan 18, 2019, at 1:46 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...><mailto:<sjogibson...>> wrote:


I have plans to completely do-over my back yard sometime in March. So, I read all of Jerry’s posts. My suburban yard is on a hill and it seems that every time I add dirt, plant seeds, etc., it all ends up going down the street when it rains. This will be a major project both physically (for which I’ll have to hire a professional), and monetarily. So, that being said, I’m reading all posts on ARbird, UA ext service, etc. This make over will be with birds in mind and as a pollinator garden. I don’t plan on removing the 19 bird feeders (plus hummingbird feeders in the spring), but will be adding dirt, sod, and native plants. I’ve been relying mostly on potted plants to maintain my green certified bird friendly yard up to now. Our local Master Gardener group, hopefully, will be assisting me with these plans. Looking forward to this coming spring and summer, and more birds!

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR





Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>>
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:58:14 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts

I think that you will find most on this list serve do not read or respond to
long post regardless of how valuable the information or questions are. Many
birds other than Acorn or Red-bellied woodpeckers stash food and at my
feeders, Carolina Chickadees and Tufted Titmice take black oil sunflower
seeds and place in cracks and under bark for future retrievals. They get in
serious trouble when there is an ice storm that encases the limbs and bark
so they cannot retrieve food items and can only last a few hours before
starvation if feeder food is not available. Food availability is the reason
birds migrate and there has to be more food in an area than just feeders -
snags, logs, brush piles, soft mast which is being sought right now with
insect in short supply are important. My birds are not only eating the
sunflower, mixed seeds and suet now but the yaupon berries I have on female
yaupons. With insects in short supply other foods are critical. Feeders
alone will not keep birds in a yard, only about 26% of the food comes from
feeders even when feeders are available. Have a yard with food items that
cover the spectrum of species types and availability. Bird survival depends
on it. As for diversity, I have about 20+ species of birds in my yard daily,
resident birds, plus gold finches, house finches, purple finches, pine
siskins, red-breasted nuthatches joining the white-breasted nuthatches,
Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy woodpeckers, Northern flickers and Yellow-bellied
sapsuckers to mention a few.

This post is already too long for most to read.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs.

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Mason
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:28 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: aww nuts

So, I've been proposing thoughts/questions on wild food in the area and
whether it may be down. Partly because some people have been seeing
fewer birds this winter and partly because I've been seeing more birds
at the feeders this winter compared to previous ones. We've also had
squirrels at our feeders(mostly on the ground thankfully) way more this
winter than previous ones combined I'd say.

Nobody seems to have had any educated thoughts on if there's been any
difference in wild food production this year. I'm not sure if I should
ask the AGFC or the Arkansas native plant society or someone... I think
I might try that to satisfy my curiosity.

BUT... I'm bringing this up again as I made another observation. Just
now I saw a facebook post about red-headed woodpeckers and how they,
apparently, are like the acorn woodpecker and store up acorns.
I have not seen any red-headed woodpeckers in a few months now around
here. While I haven't birded city lake a LOT, the past few months I've
seen none there and we haven't heard or seen any in our neighborhood either.

I know they migrate some but I can remember other winters where I was
still finding them at city lake. I don't have all my checklists
submitted to ebird(probably a few hundred at least) so I don't have much
data to look at quickly for last winter but looking at my reports from
the 2016/17 winter, there were definitely a few red-headeds that stuck
around all winter long at city lake. Combine that with the idea they
store acorns and the squirrel activity I've seen here... it makes me
think there was a shortage of acorns in this area this past fall.

And if I'm right about that, it keeps bringing me back to my wondering
about other native wild foods and how they did this past fall.
I don't think anyone here has the answer to those questions but these
are my thoughts/observations so far. I am wondering if areas seeing
fewer birds if perhaps more birds moved on than other years because of
food.

It's kind of funny to think about in a way... that, IF some birds are
leaving here this winter compared to others... at the same time because
of a different food shortage further north, everyone down here is seeing
red-breasted nuthatches this year. Seeing fewer of some species and more
of another. Almost sounds contradictory but different foods support
different birds.
I'm getting close to rambling so I'll quit for now. :)

Daniel Mason


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/19 4:56 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Breakfast and birds
I enjoyed meeting Daniel and his family! My drive from Fayetteville took about an hour, too. But the roads were passable.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jan 20, 2019, at 6:51 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> I appreciated Daniel's cue about where the bird list was in this long post. I have spent a lot of time standing at that window in Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area VC and seen basically same birds this winter. Glad that Gray-headed Junco was cooperative. I enjoyed all of this post. Daniel is one of the few with a big family who post to ARBIRDs about family outings. I was glad to learn that even though severe weather reduced the planned programs, Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area VC stiull had a lot to offer Daniel & family who made the long drive there.
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 9:37 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Breakfast and birds
>
> Bird report towards the end...
>
> This morning I took my wife and 5 children up to Hobbs State park for the Birds and Breakfast event. As some of you know, the weather wasn't what most would consider wonderful. Personally the beauty of snow makes up for the difficulties it can sometimes provide.
>
> Anyway, we called on the way to Hobbs to find out the main events had been cancelled. We were all dressed and out the door and I knew there'd be enough fun stuff to do AND my kids would all enjoy a free doughnut(or I guess 4 in my son's case) so we continued on.
>
> The event started at 9 but as we walked in we felt quite alone as far as visitors go. We were the only ones there even though it was already about 9;20. Didn't take long to find the room with the snacks and drinks. (as the day went on, more people showed up)
> We found out that the netting of birds wasn't going to be done, mostly out of caution for the birds health. The idea that a bird might be in the net for a while in that cold and not as able to regulate its heat, and perhaps if the snow was too wet, the slightest possibility of a bird drowning while hanging there. I'm guessing that's more likely to happen in the rain rather than the snow but these potential dangers were enough to call it off for the day. Made perfect sense to be cautious when it comes to their safety.
>
> We all found out that the lady from Morningstar was not going to make it. It's a long drive to Hobbs from there and with the roads being what they were and the cold and the stress on the birds that would have been brought, it made sense that she was not there. These opportunities repeat themselves so we were not too bothered by missing out on a few things today.
>
> My kids had a lot of fun. I spent a long time by the window searching for more species of bird and when it was lunch time, I kept expecting people to be waiting on me to leave. Sometime after 1 I had to finally get them all going as they were all enjoying the place.
>
> There was a presentation on the 8 ates... sounds weird but, what I heard out of it was interesting. Seemed to keep all but my 4 year old's attention. Ates as in hibernate, excavate, etc.
>
> The kids got to see some rubber impressions of animal tracks, make a mask, make a pine cone bird feeder... they also had a three toed box turtle out for everyone to see and learn about.
>
> My wife let the kids buy some things from the gift shop. I'm cheap and poor(technically) so gift shops often cause me pain(ha) but the kids had a blast and my wife was happy knowing she was supporting the park. :) My 17 year old bought a stuffed animal, a big one... a turkey vulture. She perched it on her arm and said she was there to take Lynn's place(from morningstar.) I got a kick out of that.
>
> The roads were quite slick in some places and even the walkway out of Hobbs was quite slippery by the time we left. But most people on the road were driving very cautiously so we all survived the trip. I hope everyone else was careful and safe today.
>
> A white board was brought out to make a list of birds seen during the event. I was told I could add some and I pulled out my notebook that was already collecting a list. It was kind of fun. The highlight for me wasn't just the birds I watched but seeing other people show up JUST to come find the gray-headed, dark-eyed junco. And that one was always found in the same spot throughout the day but would disappear for a while so it took some looking for at times. But we found it off and on throughout the day as well as the people that came to see it. Somehow helping someone else look for something they're searching for can be more exciting than the bird itself.
>
> I don't have it submitted to eBird yet(hopefully tonight) but the list for the 4 hours we were there included:
>
> 30+ dark-eyed juncos
> 1 gray-headed dark-eyed junco
> 25+ american goldfinches
> 6 purple finches - 4 males, 2 female
> 10+ white-throated sparrows
> 2 tufted titmice(at least)
> 4+ northern cardinals
> 2 fox sparrows
> 3 blue jays (someone else counted more I think)
> 2 red-breasted nuthatches
> 2 white-breasted nuthatches
> 2 pine siskins
> 1 House finch - male
> 2 red-bellied woodpeckers - 1m, 1f
> 3 carolina chickadees
> 4 american crows
> 1 downy woodpecker - female
> 2 morning doves
> 1 song sparrow
> 1 pileated woodpecker - female
>
> At the species level, that's 19. I searched and searched for the 20th. Had some potential grackles fly over but I only saw them through an upper window for half a second. And another visitor says they saw a eurasian collared dove while I was there but I never saw it. I'm unfairly skeptical of people sometimes wondering if that's what they saw but I can say they also saw more morning doves than I did and the doves I did see seemed to be there one second and then gone the next. Somehow I never saw where they went or where they came from. There were just too many birds to watch, and feeders on the left and right. I think after a few hours my arms were getting tired of lifting the binoculars up repeatedly. I can call that exercise right? :)
>
> We all enjoyed different things I think but this family of 7 had a good time today. My only regret about visiting Hobbs(ever) is that it's about an hour away from here. Still waiting for a teleporter to travel a bit more quickly some day. :)
> Thanks goes out to all the wonderful people that work/volunteer at Hobbs. They all help make it the special place that it is. We sure appreciate the people that make it their work to help educate visitors. The conversation is always appreciated...
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> Virus-free. www.avast.com

 

Back to top
Date: 1/20/19 4:51 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: Breakfast and birds
I appreciated Daniel's cue about where the bird list was in this long post. I have spent a lot of time standing at that window in Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area VC and seen basically same birds this winter. Glad that Gray-headed Junco was cooperative. I enjoyed all of this post. Daniel is one of the few with a big family who post to ARBIRDs about family outings. I was glad to learn that even though severe weather reduced the planned programs, Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area VC stiull had a lot to offer Daniel & family who made the long drive there.


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 9:37 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Breakfast and birds


Bird report towards the end...

This morning I took my wife and 5 children up to Hobbs State park for the Birds and Breakfast event. As some of you know, the weather wasn't what most would consider wonderful. Personally the beauty of snow makes up for the difficulties it can sometimes provide.

Anyway, we called on the way to Hobbs to find out the main events had been cancelled. We were all dressed and out the door and I knew there'd be enough fun stuff to do AND my kids would all enjoy a free doughnut(or I guess 4 in my son's case) so we continued on.

The event started at 9 but as we walked in we felt quite alone as far as visitors go. We were the only ones there even though it was already about 9;20. Didn't take long to find the room with the snacks and drinks. (as the day went on, more people showed up)
We found out that the netting of birds wasn't going to be done, mostly out of caution for the birds health. The idea that a bird might be in the net for a while in that cold and not as able to regulate its heat, and perhaps if the snow was too wet, the slightest possibility of a bird drowning while hanging there. I'm guessing that's more likely to happen in the rain rather than the snow but these potential dangers were enough to call it off for the day. Made perfect sense to be cautious when it comes to their safety.

We all found out that the lady from Morningstar was not going to make it. It's a long drive to Hobbs from there and with the roads being what they were and the cold and the stress on the birds that would have been brought, it made sense that she was not there. These opportunities repeat themselves so we were not too bothered by missing out on a few things today.

My kids had a lot of fun. I spent a long time by the window searching for more species of bird and when it was lunch time, I kept expecting people to be waiting on me to leave. Sometime after 1 I had to finally get them all going as they were all enjoying the place.

There was a presentation on the 8 ates... sounds weird but, what I heard out of it was interesting. Seemed to keep all but my 4 year old's attention. Ates as in hibernate, excavate, etc.

The kids got to see some rubber impressions of animal tracks, make a mask, make a pine cone bird feeder... they also had a three toed box turtle out for everyone to see and learn about.

My wife let the kids buy some things from the gift shop. I'm cheap and poor(technically) so gift shops often cause me pain(ha) but the kids had a blast and my wife was happy knowing she was supporting the park. :) My 17 year old bought a stuffed animal, a big one... a turkey vulture. She perched it on her arm and said she was there to take Lynn's place(from morningstar.) I got a kick out of that.

The roads were quite slick in some places and even the walkway out of Hobbs was quite slippery by the time we left. But most people on the road were driving very cautiously so we all survived the trip. I hope everyone else was careful and safe today.

A white board was brought out to make a list of birds seen during the event. I was told I could add some and I pulled out my notebook that was already collecting a list. It was kind of fun. The highlight for me wasn't just the birds I watched but seeing other people show up JUST to come find the gray-headed, dark-eyed junco. And that one was always found in the same spot throughout the day but would disappear for a while so it took some looking for at times. But we found it off and on throughout the day as well as the people that came to see it. Somehow helping someone else look for something they're searching for can be more exciting than the bird itself.

I don't have it submitted to eBird yet(hopefully tonight) but the list for the 4 hours we were there included:

30+ dark-eyed juncos
1 gray-headed dark-eyed junco
25+ american goldfinches
6 purple finches - 4 males, 2 female
10+ white-throated sparrows
2 tufted titmice(at least)
4+ northern cardinals
2 fox sparrows
3 blue jays (someone else counted more I think)
2 red-breasted nuthatches
2 white-breasted nuthatches
2 pine siskins
1 House finch - male
2 red-bellied woodpeckers - 1m, 1f
3 carolina chickadees
4 american crows
1 downy woodpecker - female
2 morning doves
1 song sparrow
1 pileated woodpecker - female

At the species level, that's 19. I searched and searched for the 20th. Had some potential grackles fly over but I only saw them through an upper window for half a second. And another visitor says they saw a eurasian collared dove while I was there but I never saw it. I'm unfairly skeptical of people sometimes wondering if that's what they saw but I can say they also saw more morning doves than I did and the doves I did see seemed to be there one second and then gone the next. Somehow I never saw where they went or where they came from. There were just too many birds to watch, and feeders on the left and right. I think after a few hours my arms were getting tired of lifting the binoculars up repeatedly. I can call that exercise right? :)

We all enjoyed different things I think but this family of 7 had a good time today. My only regret about visiting Hobbs(ever) is that it's about an hour away from here. Still waiting for a teleporter to travel a bit more quickly some day. :)
Thanks goes out to all the wonderful people that work/volunteer at Hobbs. They all help make it the special place that it is. We sure appreciate the people that make it their work to help educate visitors. The conversation is always appreciated...

Daniel Mason

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Date: 1/19/19 7:38 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Breakfast and birds
Bird report towards the end...

This morning I took my wife and 5 children up to Hobbs State park for
the Birds and Breakfast event. As some of you know, the weather wasn't
what most would consider wonderful. Personally the beauty of snow makes
up for the difficulties it can sometimes provide.

Anyway, we called on the way to Hobbs to find out the main events had
been cancelled. We were all dressed and out the door and I knew there'd
be enough fun stuff to do AND my kids would all enjoy a free doughnut(or
I guess 4 in my son's case) so we continued on.

The event started at 9 but as we walked in we felt quite alone as far as
visitors go. We were the only ones there even though it was already
about 9;20. Didn't take long to find the room with the snacks and
drinks. (as the day went on, more people showed up)
We found out that the netting of birds wasn't going to be done, mostly
out of caution for the birds health. The idea that a bird might be in
the net for a while in that cold and not as able to regulate its heat,
and perhaps if the snow was too wet, the slightest possibility of a bird
drowning while hanging there. I'm guessing that's more likely to happen
in the rain rather than the snow but these potential dangers were enough
to call it off for the day. Made perfect sense to be cautious when it
comes to their safety.

We all found out that the lady from Morningstar was not going to make
it. It's a long drive to Hobbs from there and with the roads being what
they were and the cold and the stress on the birds that would have been
brought, it made sense that she was not there. These opportunities
repeat themselves so we were not too bothered by missing out on a few
things today.

My kids had a lot of fun. I spent a long time by the window searching
for more species of bird and when it was lunch time, I kept expecting
people to be waiting on me to leave. Sometime after 1 I had to finally
get them all going as they were all enjoying the place.

There was a presentation on the 8 ates... sounds weird but, what I heard
out of it was interesting. Seemed to keep all but my 4 year old's
attention. Ates as in hibernate, excavate, etc.

The kids got to see some rubber impressions of animal tracks, make a
mask, make a pine cone bird feeder... they also had a three toed box
turtle out for everyone to see and learn about.

My wife let the kids buy some things from the gift shop. I'm cheap and
poor(technically) so gift shops often cause me pain(ha) but the kids had
a blast and my wife was happy knowing she was supporting the park. :) 
My 17 year old bought a stuffed animal, a big one... a turkey vulture.
She perched it on her arm and said she was there to take Lynn's
place(from morningstar.)  I got a kick out of that.

The roads were quite slick in some places and even the walkway out of
Hobbs was quite slippery by the time we left. But most people on the
road were driving very cautiously so we all survived the trip. I hope
everyone else was careful and safe today.

A white board was brought out to make a list of birds seen during the
event. I was told I could add some and I pulled out my notebook that was
already collecting a list. It was kind of fun. The highlight for me
wasn't just the birds I watched but seeing other people show up JUST to
come find the gray-headed, dark-eyed junco. And that one was always
found in the same spot throughout the day but would disappear for a
while so it took some looking for at times. But we found it off and on
throughout the day as well as the people that came to see it. Somehow
helping someone else look for something they're searching for can be
more exciting than the bird itself.

I don't have it submitted to eBird yet(hopefully tonight) but the list
for the 4 hours we were there included:

*30+ dark-eyed juncos**
**1 gray-headed dark-eyed junco**
**25+ american goldfinches**
**6 purple finches - 4 males, 2 female**
**10+ white-throated sparrows**
**2 tufted titmice(at least)**
**4+ northern cardinals**
**2 fox sparrows**
**3 blue jays (someone else counted more I think)**
**2 red-breasted nuthatches**
**2 white-breasted nuthatches**
**2 pine siskins**
**1 House finch - male**
**2 red-bellied woodpeckers - 1m, 1f**
**3 carolina chickadees**
**4 american crows**
**1 downy woodpecker - female**
**2 morning doves**
**1 song sparrow**
**1 pileated woodpecker - female*

At the species level, that's 19. I searched and searched for the 20th.
Had some potential grackles fly over but I only saw them through an
upper window for half a second. And another visitor says they saw a
eurasian collared dove while I was there but I never saw it. I'm
unfairly skeptical of people sometimes wondering if that's what they saw
but I can say they also saw more morning doves than I did and the doves
I did see seemed to be there one second and then gone the next. Somehow
I never saw where they went or where they came from. There were just too
many birds to watch, and feeders on the left and right. I think after a
few hours my arms were getting tired of lifting the binoculars up
repeatedly. I can call that exercise right? :)

We all enjoyed different things I think but this family of 7 had a good
time today. My only regret about visiting Hobbs(ever) is that it's about
an hour away from here. Still waiting for a teleporter to travel a bit
more quickly some day. :)
Thanks goes out to all the wonderful people that work/volunteer at
Hobbs. They all help make it the special place that it is. We sure
appreciate the people that make it their work to help educate visitors. 
The conversation is always appreciated...

Daniel Mason



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Date: 1/19/19 6:01 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
Power poles make the perfect nesting snag for Red-headed woodpeckers since most of the bark-less snags have been removed and trees are to young and small to make new ones. In 1983 I held a Snag Habitat Management Symposium in Flagstaff, AZ where papers were presented on the value on snags for wildlife. I gave a paper called “Snags Are For Wildlife”. In my presentation I used a story of when I was growing up in East Texas my dad had a farm. The red-headed woodpeckers used the power poles for nesting snags. My dad called these woodpeckers his “fence builders” because the RHWO would build a nest in a power pole and eventually the power company would replace the pole giving my dad the opportunity to buy the damaged poles to use as corner fence post. Red-headed woodpeckers did well at the expense of other species when the Army CE was building lakes and flooding hundreds of thousands of acres of forest. As mentioned by Joe, the flooded timbers with no bark and surrounded by water made many available nest sites for not only woodpeckers but other cavity nesting birds. Bark-less snags in an open type stand as found in parks and communities are the perfect nest sites but are in places few people have tolerance to let them stand.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Gail Miller
Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 5:24 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks

I worked in Conway at the Conway Human Development Center (CHDC) for nearly 40 years. I’ve been retired for almost 5-1/2 years. I still go out to the campus for the Faulkner Co. Christmas Bird Count. The campus, as well as adjacent Curtis Walker Park was always home to the Red-headed Woodpeckers. Curtis Walker replaced all of their wooden night light post (that the woodpeckers nested in) with metal poles. CHDC has numerous pine trees and I still see some woodpecker holes in wooden night light posts and dead pine limbe that remain along the campus boundary.. but, I don’t think I’ve counted a Red-headed Woodpecker there in the past several years. I used to go over the Curtis Walker Park and just walk around and photograph them. Additionally, I photographed a nest at CHDC, in a pine in 2009 and 2010. Granted, I’m not driving through the campus every day, like I did when I worked there, but I’m there often enough to believe that the population of Red-headed Woodpeckers has drastically declined there!



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Thurman
Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 4:37 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks



I think it would be a reasonable thing to say that there are still RH Woodpeckers throughout Arkansas, but nowhere near as many as there once were.

I saw one here in W. Memphis last October. It was investigating one of the dead pine tree stubs near my apt. where it looked like the top half of the tree had been knocked off. There wasn't much here and it obviously didn't stick around.

I used to love seeing them in the Arboretum near Pinnacle Mtn. where they had plenty of their kind of dead trees very near the Little Maumelle Rv.

I saw half a dozen one day. Now that I'm walking pretty strongly again I'll have to go back over there later in a few weeks and look around some more.



Bill Thurman



On Sat, Jan 19, 2019, 8:07 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall. We saw zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding at Rocky Branch Park on Beaver Lake – only one all winter.



We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the Ozarks due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith. Kim was one of the coauthors for the species account in Birds of North America online.



Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature trees (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags preferred by Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline of Beaver Lake, a result of tree deaths caused by rising and falling water levels. The big snags provide woodpecker roost and nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens and woodlots with mature trees are still good place to find these birds in both the river valley and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in adjoining mature woodlands.



Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least migration-like movements associated with winter acorn availability. Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at times quite evident in mid-September to early October and in late April. At Beaver Lake Nursery Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area on September 21, 2014.



This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of Scott County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found red-heads in stands of mature trees maintained in an open condition by fire and managed for endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy stocking of both Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags are common.



Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations. They are common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some years: 54 (1961), 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on this count have declined since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate students demonstrated that in the Ozarks, numbers of wintering red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter food resource, are positively related to hard mast production. In past decades, acorn crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in some winters, rare in others.



One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the Fayetteville CBC is local habitat loss related to human population growth within the count circle. Tall standing dead trees are routinely removed in urban areas. Oak barrens dating to the pioneer period have been cleared or greatly reduced throughout western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat for red-heads is reduced.



During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed juveniles. The transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the end of winter. Birds in October, November, and December show red feathers emerging.



 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/19 5:03 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: quack
Busy day birding in this wonderful weather. I could say a lot but before
I go sit and relax on the couch for a while I just had to share one
short story from Anglin Road up in Centerton.
After walking the fish hatchery in this weather, we drove down Anglin
road as we often do just to see what's around.

We stopped just after the Anglin's house(I assume that's their name,
based on the road and the sign). I didn't see anything on the pond on
the left as I normally would so I moved on just a few more feet so I
could try and view a duck I saw in a  pond out in the field on the right
side. Pintail... kind of exciting. Then my daughter takes my binoculars
and looks and asks "Are you sure that's real?" It was bobbing around,
left and right but otherwise, it wasn't moving. No head turns... just
there. After a while it was pretty easy to determine this was not a real
bird. It didn't look perfect, the pattern on the neck, but from that
distance it was still pretty convincing. I was let down. Then my
daughter asked about the duck back on the other side of the road. That
little pond on the left, just past it in some other water(puddles?)
there were about 8 ducks and among them was a pair of pintails.
This was just too funny to us at the time. There's a fake one... then,
there just happens to be a live pair on the other side of the road. Now
I'm glad we looked at the fake one long enough to check back and find
the real ones.
Scan and scan some more as you never know what you might find. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 1/19/19 3:24 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
I worked in Conway at the Conway Human Development Center (CHDC) for nearly 40 years. I’ve been retired for almost 5-1/2 years. I still go out to the campus for the Faulkner Co. Christmas Bird Count. The campus, as well as adjacent Curtis Walker Park was always home to the Red-headed Woodpeckers. Curtis Walker replaced all of their wooden night light post (that the woodpeckers nested in) with metal poles. CHDC has numerous pine trees and I still see some woodpecker holes in wooden night light posts and dead pine limbe that remain along the campus boundary.. but, I don’t think I’ve counted a Red-headed Woodpecker there in the past several years. I used to go over the Curtis Walker Park and just walk around and photograph them. Additionally, I photographed a nest at CHDC, in a pine in 2009 and 2010. Granted, I’m not driving through the campus every day, like I did when I worked there, but I’m there often enough to believe that the population of Red-headed Woodpeckers has drastically declined there!



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Thurman
Sent: Saturday, January 19, 2019 4:37 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks



I think it would be a reasonable thing to say that there are still RH Woodpeckers throughout Arkansas, but nowhere near as many as there once were.

I saw one here in W. Memphis last October. It was investigating one of the dead pine tree stubs near my apt. where it looked like the top half of the tree had been knocked off. There wasn't much here and it obviously didn't stick around.

I used to love seeing them in the Arboretum near Pinnacle Mtn. where they had plenty of their kind of dead trees very near the Little Maumelle Rv.

I saw half a dozen one day. Now that I'm walking pretty strongly again I'll have to go back over there later in a few weeks and look around some more.



Bill Thurman



On Sat, Jan 19, 2019, 8:07 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> <mailto:<joeneal...> wrote:

Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall. We saw zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding at Rocky Branch Park on Beaver Lake – only one all winter.



We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the Ozarks due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith. Kim was one of the coauthors for the species account in Birds of North America online.



Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature trees (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags preferred by Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline of Beaver Lake, a result of tree deaths caused by rising and falling water levels. The big snags provide woodpecker roost and nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens and woodlots with mature trees are still good place to find these birds in both the river valley and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in adjoining mature woodlands.



Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least migration-like movements associated with winter acorn availability. Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at times quite evident in mid-September to early October and in late April. At Beaver Lake Nursery Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area on September 21, 2014.



This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of Scott County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found red-heads in stands of mature trees maintained in an open condition by fire and managed for endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy stocking of both Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags are common.



Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations. They are common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some years: 54 (1961), 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on this count have declined since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate students demonstrated that in the Ozarks, numbers of wintering red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter food resource, are positively related to hard mast production. In past decades, acorn crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in some winters, rare in others.



One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the Fayetteville CBC is local habitat loss related to human population growth within the count circle. Tall standing dead trees are routinely removed in urban areas. Oak barrens dating to the pioneer period have been cleared or greatly reduced throughout western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat for red-heads is reduced.



During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed juveniles. The transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the end of winter. Birds in October, November, and December show red feathers emerging.




 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/19 2:37 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
I think it would be a reasonable thing to say that there are still RH
Woodpeckers throughout Arkansas, but nowhere near as many as there once
were.
I saw one here in W. Memphis last October. It was investigating one
of the dead pine tree stubs near my apt. where it looked like the top half
of the tree had been knocked off. There wasn't much here and it obviously
didn't stick around.
I used to love seeing them in the Arboretum near Pinnacle Mtn. where
they had plenty of their kind of dead trees very near the Little Maumelle
Rv.
I saw half a dozen one day. Now that I'm walking pretty strongly again I'll
have to go back over there later in a few weeks and look around some more.

Bill Thurman

On Sat, Jan 19, 2019, 8:07 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

>
> <https://0-birdsna-org.library.uark.edu/Species-Account/bna/species/rehwoo/introduction>
>
> Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall. We saw
> zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding at Rocky Branch
> Park on Beaver Lake – only one all winter.
>
>
> We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the Ozarks
> due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith. Kim was one of
> the coauthors for the species account in Birds of North America online.
>
>
> Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature trees
> (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags preferred by
> Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline of Beaver Lake, a
> result of tree deaths caused by rising and falling water levels. The big
> snags provide woodpecker roost and nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens and
> woodlots with mature trees are still good place to find these birds in both
> the river valley and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in
> adjoining mature woodlands.
>
>
> Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least
> migration-like movements associated with winter acorn availability.
> Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at times quite evident in
> mid-September to early October and in late April. At Beaver Lake Nursery
> Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area on September 21, 2014.
>
>
> This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of Scott
> County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found red-heads in stands of
> mature trees maintained in an open condition by fire and managed for
> endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy stocking
> of both Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous
> large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags are
> common.
>
>
> Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations. They are
> common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some years: 54 (1961),
> 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on this count have declined
> since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate students demonstrated that in the
> Ozarks, numbers of wintering red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter
> food resource, are positively related to hard mast production. In past
> decades, acorn crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in
> some winters, rare in others.
>
>
> One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the Fayetteville
> CBC is local habitat loss related to human population growth within the
> count circle. Tall standing dead trees are routinely removed in urban
> areas. Oak barrens dating to the pioneer period have been cleared or
> greatly reduced throughout western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat
> for red-heads is reduced.
>
>
> During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed juveniles. The
> transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the end of winter. Birds in
> October, November, and December show red feathers emerging.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 1/19/19 8:17 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Say No to Dicamba extension
With a friendly reminder from Dan Scheiman and a suggestion for whom I
could send an email, I typed out an email to the Evening Times, a
publication of Crittenden Co. AR.
I mainly stuck to the scientific facts and points, but also pointed
out why extension of Dicamba spray beyond the older April 15th cutoff is
Wrong on a dozen different levels. I hope that my email won't fall upon
deaf ears.
I mentioned that more information about this issue could be found at
ar.audubon.org/dicamba
Whatever Arkansas county you live in, I urge you to write to a local
publication or find an Ark. Plant Board member in your area and urge them
to just Vote No regarding the extension of dicamba spray beyond April 15th.
This poison is already deadly enough as it is.
Thanks!

Bill Thurman. currently in Crittenden Co

 

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Date: 1/19/19 6:07 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: zero or almost zero Red-headed Woodpeckers this winter in northwest Arkansas Ozarks
<https://0-birdsna-org.library.uark.edu/Species-Account/bna/species/rehwoo/introduction>
Red-headed Woodpeckers mostly cleared out of the Ozarks last fall. We saw zero on Fayetteville CBC. We saw one while recently birding at Rocky Branch Park on Beaver Lake only one all winter.

We know a fair amount about Red-headed Woodpecker numbers in the Ozarks due to lifelong interest by our own Dr Kimberly G. Smith. Kim was one of the coauthors for the species account in Birds of North America online.

Quality habitat includes mature trees, and dead, barkless, mature trees (snags), in open forest or forest edge. Mature tree snags preferred by Red-headed Woodpeckers are common along the shoreline of Beaver Lake, a result of tree deaths caused by rising and falling water levels. The big snags provide woodpecker roost and nest sites. Relict hardwood barrens and woodlots with mature trees are still good place to find these birds in both the river valley and Ozarks. They forage for acorns and other mast in adjoining mature woodlands.

Numbers also fluctuate as a result of migration, or at least migration-like movements associated with winter acorn availability. Overhead migration of Red-headed Woodpeckers is at times quite evident in mid-September to early October and in late April. At Beaver Lake Nursery Pond, we found 10-12 in a small area on September 21, 2014.

This habitat has an analogue in the Ouachita National Forest of Scott County. There, during the period 1990-2008, I found red-heads in stands of mature trees maintained in an open condition by fire and managed for endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Such habitat contains a heavy stocking of both Shortleaf Pine and mixed hardwood species, and numerous large-diameter standing pine snags. The forest is open and snags are common.

Kim Smith and others described marked population fluctuations. They are common on Fort Smith-Moffett CBC, but abundant in some years: 54 (1961), 130 (1971), 72 (1973), 85 (1979). The numbers on this count have declined since the mid-1990s. Kim and his graduate students demonstrated that in the Ozarks, numbers of wintering red-heads, dependent upon acorns as a winter food resource, are positively related to hard mast production. In past decades, acorn crop fluctuation probably explains why they are common in some winters, rare in others.

One obvious contributing factor to declines evident on the Fayetteville CBC is local habitat loss related to human population growth within the count circle. Tall standing dead trees are routinely removed in urban areas. Oak barrens dating to the pioneer period have been cleared or greatly reduced throughout western Arkansas. As a result, quality habitat for red-heads is reduced.

During fall we see some adults and quite a few brown-headed juveniles. The transition to adult plumage occurs mainly by the end of winter. Birds in October, November, and December show red feathers emerging.


 

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Date: 1/18/19 5:59 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
Sally Jo,
I was having trouble with my seeds washing away too so instead of planting on bare dirt I covered a weedy patch with black tarp for a full growing season and then lifted the tarp and sowed seeds on the thatch and intact soil in late fall. This was monetarily much more feasible for a larger area than my prepared native beds of plants rather than seed mixes. I do suggest a mix of seeds as some species just aren’t likely to take. Coreopsis, purple coneflower, susans, gray-headed coneflower, and leaffcup silphium have all worked well for me though each yard is different. You probably don’t want to delay your plans but I thought others in here might find that useful.

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

> On Jan 18, 2019, at 1:46 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:
>
> I have plans to completely do-over my back yard sometime in March. So, I read all of Jerry’s posts. My suburban yard is on a hill and it seems that every time I add dirt, plant seeds, etc., it all ends up going down the street when it rains. This will be a major project both physically (for which I’ll have to hire a professional), and monetarily. So, that being said, I’m reading all posts on ARbird, UA ext service, etc. This make over will be with birds in mind and as a pollinator garden. I don’t plan on removing the 19 bird feeders (plus hummingbird feeders in the spring), but will be adding dirt, sod, and native plants. I’ve been relying mostly on potted plants to maintain my green certified bird friendly yard up to now. Our local Master Gardener group, hopefully, will be assisting me with these plans. Looking forward to this coming spring and summer, and more birds!
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
>
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:58:14 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: aww nuts
>
> I think that you will find most on this list serve do not read or respond to
> long post regardless of how valuable the information or questions are. Many
> birds other than Acorn or Red-bellied woodpeckers stash food and at my
> feeders, Carolina Chickadees and Tufted Titmice take black oil sunflower
> seeds and place in cracks and under bark for future retrievals. They get in
> serious trouble when there is an ice storm that encases the limbs and bark
> so they cannot retrieve food items and can only last a few hours before
> starvation if feeder food is not available. Food availability is the reason
> birds migrate and there has to be more food in an area than just feeders -
> snags, logs, brush piles, soft mast which is being sought right now with
> insect in short supply are important. My birds are not only eating the
> sunflower, mixed seeds and suet now but the yaupon berries I have on female
> yaupons. With insects in short supply other foods are critical. Feeders
> alone will not keep birds in a yard, only about 26% of the food comes from
> feeders even when feeders are available. Have a yard with food items that
> cover the spectrum of species types and availability. Bird survival depends
> on it. As for diversity, I have about 20+ species of birds in my yard daily,
> resident birds, plus gold finches, house finches, purple finches, pine
> siskins, red-breasted nuthatches joining the white-breasted nuthatches,
> Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy woodpeckers, Northern flickers and Yellow-bellied
> sapsuckers to mention a few.
>
> This post is already too long for most to read.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Daniel Mason
> Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:28 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: aww nuts
>
> So, I've been proposing thoughts/questions on wild food in the area and
> whether it may be down. Partly because some people have been seeing
> fewer birds this winter and partly because I've been seeing more birds
> at the feeders this winter compared to previous ones. We've also had
> squirrels at our feeders(mostly on the ground thankfully) way more this
> winter than previous ones combined I'd say.
>
> Nobody seems to have had any educated thoughts on if there's been any
> difference in wild food production this year. I'm not sure if I should
> ask the AGFC or the Arkansas native plant society or someone... I think
> I might try that to satisfy my curiosity.
>
> BUT... I'm bringing this up again as I made another observation. Just
> now I saw a facebook post about red-headed woodpeckers and how they,
> apparently, are like the acorn woodpecker and store up acorns.
> I have not seen any red-headed woodpeckers in a few months now around
> here. While I haven't birded city lake a LOT, the past few months I've
> seen none there and we haven't heard or seen any in our neighborhood either.
>
> I know they migrate some but I can remember other winters where I was
> still finding them at city lake. I don't have all my checklists
> submitted to ebird(probably a few hundred at least) so I don't have much
> data to look at quickly for last winter but looking at my reports from
> the 2016/17 winter, there were definitely a few red-headeds that stuck
> around all winter long at city lake. Combine that with the idea they
> store acorns and the squirrel activity I've seen here... it makes me
> think there was a shortage of acorns in this area this past fall.
>
> And if I'm right about that, it keeps bringing me back to my wondering
> about other native wild foods and how they did this past fall.
> I don't think anyone here has the answer to those questions but these
> are my thoughts/observations so far. I am wondering if areas seeing
> fewer birds if perhaps more birds moved on than other years because of
> food.
>
> It's kind of funny to think about in a way... that, IF some birds are
> leaving here this winter compared to others... at the same time because
> of a different food shortage further north, everyone down here is seeing
> red-breasted nuthatches this year. Seeing fewer of some species and more
> of another. Almost sounds contradictory but different foods support
> different birds.
> I'm getting close to rambling so I'll quit for now. :)
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/19 3:14 pm
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts
My hunter husband tells me that there was a pretty bad acorn failure this year.
Nancy Young
On Friday, January 18, 2019, 11:59:01 AM CST, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

I think that you will find most on this list serve do not read or respond to
long post regardless of how valuable the information or questions are.  Many
birds other than Acorn or Red-bellied woodpeckers stash food and at my
feeders, Carolina Chickadees and Tufted Titmice take black oil sunflower
seeds and place in cracks and under bark for future retrievals.  They get in
serious trouble when there is an ice storm that encases the limbs and bark
so they cannot retrieve food items and can only last a few hours before
starvation if feeder food is not available.  Food availability is the reason
birds migrate and there has to be more food in an area than just feeders -
snags, logs, brush piles, soft mast which is being sought right now with
insect in short supply are important.  My birds are not only eating the
sunflower, mixed seeds and suet now but the yaupon berries I have on female
yaupons.  With insects in short supply other foods are critical. Feeders
alone will not keep birds in a yard, only about 26% of the food comes from
feeders even when feeders are available.  Have a yard with food items that
cover the spectrum of species types and availability. Bird survival depends
on it. As for diversity, I have about 20+ species of birds in my yard daily,
resident birds, plus gold finches, house finches, purple finches, pine
siskins, red-breasted nuthatches joining the white-breasted nuthatches,
Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy woodpeckers, Northern flickers and Yellow-bellied
sapsuckers to mention a few.

This post is already too long for most to read.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs.

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Mason
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:28 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: aww nuts

So, I've been proposing thoughts/questions on wild food in the area and
whether it may be down. Partly because some people have been seeing
fewer birds this winter and partly because I've been seeing more birds
at the feeders this winter compared to previous ones. We've also had
squirrels at our feeders(mostly on the ground thankfully) way more this
winter than previous ones combined I'd say.

Nobody seems to have had any educated thoughts on if there's been any
difference in wild food production this year. I'm not sure if I should
ask the AGFC or the Arkansas native plant society or someone... I think
I might try that to satisfy my curiosity.

BUT... I'm bringing this up again as I made another observation. Just
now I saw a facebook post about red-headed woodpeckers and how they,
apparently, are like the acorn woodpecker and store up acorns.
I have not seen any red-headed woodpeckers in a few months now around
here. While I haven't birded city lake a LOT, the past few months I've
seen none there and we haven't heard or seen any in our neighborhood either.

I know they migrate some but I can remember other winters where I was
still finding them at city lake. I don't have all my checklists
submitted to ebird(probably a few hundred at least) so I don't have much
data to look at quickly for last winter but looking at my reports from
the 2016/17 winter, there were definitely a few red-headeds that stuck
around all winter long at city lake.  Combine that with the idea they
store acorns and the squirrel activity I've seen here... it makes me
think there was a shortage of acorns in this area this past fall.

And if I'm right about that, it keeps bringing me back to my wondering
about other native wild foods and how they did this past fall.
I don't think anyone here has the answer to those questions but these
are my thoughts/observations so far. I am wondering if areas seeing
fewer birds if perhaps more birds moved on than other years because of
food.

It's kind of funny to think about in a way... that, IF some birds are
leaving here this winter compared to others... at the same time because
of a different food shortage further north, everyone down here is seeing
red-breasted nuthatches this year. Seeing fewer of some species and more
of another. Almost sounds contradictory but different foods support
different birds.
I'm getting close to rambling so I'll quit for now. :)

Daniel Mason


---
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Date: 1/18/19 12:55 pm
From: Than Boves <tboves...>
Subject: Re: Banding Eastern Bluebirds
Virginie Rolland and her students at Arkansas State bands 100s of bluebirds each year.

--------------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
870-972-3320
Website: www.boveslab.com<http://%20www.boveslab.com>




On Fri, Jan 18, 2019 at 11:23 AM -0600, "Butch Tetzlaff" <butchchq8...><mailto:<butchchq8...>> wrote:

All,

Does anyone know of someone banding bluebirds in Arkansas?

Butch Tetzlaff
 

Back to top
Date: 1/18/19 12:15 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
Thanks for your post. I do hope you can terrace or someway keep things from going to the street. People of Costa Rica and Ecuador have solutions for such problems. They use discarded automobile and tractor tires filled with soil to provide a safe place for plants without erosion. People in this country are psychologically and status handicapped about what will the neighbors think if I have tires in my yard with flowers or vegetables growing in them? Instead we go to Lowes, Home Depot, or other sources and spend hundreds of dollars on landscaping timbers to have raised beds and terracing to accomplish the same thing. I know that here, our habits and lack of recycling and using solutions from products we are paying to discard will not change. Other countries use what is available, economical, and practical to solve erosion control and facilitate gardening vegetables and flowers on slopes. Our pride will not permit us to do that. Maybe someday having such can become a ecological status symbol like the $200 jeans that people buy already worn out and have holes in them instead and wearing jeans and working their butts off and accomplish the same thing.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 1:46 PM
To: <jwdavis...> ; <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: aww nuts + bird friendly yard

I have plans to completely do-over my back yard sometime in March. So, I read all of Jerrys posts. My suburban yard is on a hill and it seems that every time I add dirt, plant seeds, etc., it all ends up going down the street when it rains. This will be a major project both physically (for which Ill have to hire a professional), and monetarily. So, that being said, Im reading all posts on ARbird, UA ext service, etc. This make over will be with birds in mind and as a pollinator garden. I dont plan on removing the 19 bird feeders (plus hummingbird feeders in the spring), but will be adding dirt, sod, and native plants. Ive been relying mostly on potted plants to maintain my green certified bird friendly yard up to now. Our local Master Gardener group, hopefully, will be assisting me with these plans. Looking forward to this coming spring and summer, and more birds!

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR





Sent from Mail for Windows 10




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:58:14 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts

I think that you will find most on this list serve do not read or respond to
long post regardless of how valuable the information or questions are. Many
birds other than Acorn or Red-bellied woodpeckers stash food and at my
feeders, Carolina Chickadees and Tufted Titmice take black oil sunflower
seeds and place in cracks and under bark for future retrievals. They get in
serious trouble when there is an ice storm that encases the limbs and bark
so they cannot retrieve food items and can only last a few hours before
starvation if feeder food is not available. Food availability is the reason
birds migrate and there has to be more food in an area than just feeders -
snags, logs, brush piles, soft mast which is being sought right now with
insect in short supply are important. My birds are not only eating the
sunflower, mixed seeds and suet now but the yaupon berries I have on female
yaupons. With insects in short supply other foods are critical. Feeders
alone will not keep birds in a yard, only about 26% of the food comes from
feeders even when feeders are available. Have a yard with food items that
cover the spectrum of species types and availability. Bird survival depends
on it. As for diversity, I have about 20+ species of birds in my yard daily,
resident birds, plus gold finches, house finches, purple finches, pine
siskins, red-breasted nuthatches joining the white-breasted nuthatches,
Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy woodpeckers, Northern flickers and Yellow-bellied
sapsuckers to mention a few.

This post is already too long for most to read.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs.

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Mason
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:28 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: aww nuts

So, I've been proposing thoughts/questions on wild food in the area and
whether it may be down. Partly because some people have been seeing
fewer birds this winter and partly because I've been seeing more birds
at the feeders this winter compared to previous ones. We've also had
squirrels at our feeders(mostly on the ground thankfully) way more this
winter than previous ones combined I'd say.

Nobody seems to have had any educated thoughts on if there's been any
difference in wild food production this year. I'm not sure if I should
ask the AGFC or the Arkansas native plant society or someone... I think
I might try that to satisfy my curiosity.

BUT... I'm bringing this up again as I made another observation. Just
now I saw a facebook post about red-headed woodpeckers and how they,
apparently, are like the acorn woodpecker and store up acorns.
I have not seen any red-headed woodpeckers in a few months now around
here. While I haven't birded city lake a LOT, the past few months I've
seen none there and we haven't heard or seen any in our neighborhood either.

I know they migrate some but I can remember other winters where I was
still finding them at city lake. I don't have all my checklists
submitted to ebird(probably a few hundred at least) so I don't have much
data to look at quickly for last winter but looking at my reports from
the 2016/17 winter, there were definitely a few red-headeds that stuck
around all winter long at city lake. Combine that with the idea they
store acorns and the squirrel activity I've seen here... it makes me
think there was a shortage of acorns in this area this past fall.

And if I'm right about that, it keeps bringing me back to my wondering
about other native wild foods and how they did this past fall.
I don't think anyone here has the answer to those questions but these
are my thoughts/observations so far. I am wondering if areas seeing
fewer birds if perhaps more birds moved on than other years because of
food.

It's kind of funny to think about in a way... that, IF some birds are
leaving here this winter compared to others... at the same time because
of a different food shortage further north, everyone down here is seeing
red-breasted nuthatches this year. Seeing fewer of some species and more
of another. Almost sounds contradictory but different foods support
different birds.
I'm getting close to rambling so I'll quit for now. :)

Daniel Mason


---
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Date: 1/18/19 11:46 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts + bird friendly yard
I have plans to completely do-over my back yard sometime in March. So, I read all of Jerrys posts. My suburban yard is on a hill and it seems that every time I add dirt, plant seeds, etc., it all ends up going down the street when it rains. This will be a major project both physically (for which Ill have to hire a professional), and monetarily. So, that being said, Im reading all posts on ARbird, UA ext service, etc. This make over will be with birds in mind and as a pollinator garden. I dont plan on removing the 19 bird feeders (plus hummingbird feeders in the spring), but will be adding dirt, sod, and native plants. Ive been relying mostly on potted plants to maintain my green certified bird friendly yard up to now. Our local Master Gardener group, hopefully, will be assisting me with these plans. Looking forward to this coming spring and summer, and more birds!

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR





Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:58:14 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts

I think that you will find most on this list serve do not read or respond to
long post regardless of how valuable the information or questions are. Many
birds other than Acorn or Red-bellied woodpeckers stash food and at my
feeders, Carolina Chickadees and Tufted Titmice take black oil sunflower
seeds and place in cracks and under bark for future retrievals. They get in
serious trouble when there is an ice storm that encases the limbs and bark
so they cannot retrieve food items and can only last a few hours before
starvation if feeder food is not available. Food availability is the reason
birds migrate and there has to be more food in an area than just feeders -
snags, logs, brush piles, soft mast which is being sought right now with
insect in short supply are important. My birds are not only eating the
sunflower, mixed seeds and suet now but the yaupon berries I have on female
yaupons. With insects in short supply other foods are critical. Feeders
alone will not keep birds in a yard, only about 26% of the food comes from
feeders even when feeders are available. Have a yard with food items that
cover the spectrum of species types and availability. Bird survival depends
on it. As for diversity, I have about 20+ species of birds in my yard daily,
resident birds, plus gold finches, house finches, purple finches, pine
siskins, red-breasted nuthatches joining the white-breasted nuthatches,
Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy woodpeckers, Northern flickers and Yellow-bellied
sapsuckers to mention a few.

This post is already too long for most to read.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs.

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Mason
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:28 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: aww nuts

So, I've been proposing thoughts/questions on wild food in the area and
whether it may be down. Partly because some people have been seeing
fewer birds this winter and partly because I've been seeing more birds
at the feeders this winter compared to previous ones. We've also had
squirrels at our feeders(mostly on the ground thankfully) way more this
winter than previous ones combined I'd say.

Nobody seems to have had any educated thoughts on if there's been any
difference in wild food production this year. I'm not sure if I should
ask the AGFC or the Arkansas native plant society or someone... I think
I might try that to satisfy my curiosity.

BUT... I'm bringing this up again as I made another observation. Just
now I saw a facebook post about red-headed woodpeckers and how they,
apparently, are like the acorn woodpecker and store up acorns.
I have not seen any red-headed woodpeckers in a few months now around
here. While I haven't birded city lake a LOT, the past few months I've
seen none there and we haven't heard or seen any in our neighborhood either.

I know they migrate some but I can remember other winters where I was
still finding them at city lake. I don't have all my checklists
submitted to ebird(probably a few hundred at least) so I don't have much
data to look at quickly for last winter but looking at my reports from
the 2016/17 winter, there were definitely a few red-headeds that stuck
around all winter long at city lake. Combine that with the idea they
store acorns and the squirrel activity I've seen here... it makes me
think there was a shortage of acorns in this area this past fall.

And if I'm right about that, it keeps bringing me back to my wondering
about other native wild foods and how they did this past fall.
I don't think anyone here has the answer to those questions but these
are my thoughts/observations so far. I am wondering if areas seeing
fewer birds if perhaps more birds moved on than other years because of
food.

It's kind of funny to think about in a way... that, IF some birds are
leaving here this winter compared to others... at the same time because
of a different food shortage further north, everyone down here is seeing
red-breasted nuthatches this year. Seeing fewer of some species and more
of another. Almost sounds contradictory but different foods support
different birds.
I'm getting close to rambling so I'll quit for now. :)

Daniel Mason


---
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Date: 1/18/19 9:59 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: aww nuts
I think that you will find most on this list serve do not read or respond to
long post regardless of how valuable the information or questions are. Many
birds other than Acorn or Red-bellied woodpeckers stash food and at my
feeders, Carolina Chickadees and Tufted Titmice take black oil sunflower
seeds and place in cracks and under bark for future retrievals. They get in
serious trouble when there is an ice storm that encases the limbs and bark
so they cannot retrieve food items and can only last a few hours before
starvation if feeder food is not available. Food availability is the reason
birds migrate and there has to be more food in an area than just feeders -
snags, logs, brush piles, soft mast which is being sought right now with
insect in short supply are important. My birds are not only eating the
sunflower, mixed seeds and suet now but the yaupon berries I have on female
yaupons. With insects in short supply other foods are critical. Feeders
alone will not keep birds in a yard, only about 26% of the food comes from
feeders even when feeders are available. Have a yard with food items that
cover the spectrum of species types and availability. Bird survival depends
on it. As for diversity, I have about 20+ species of birds in my yard daily,
resident birds, plus gold finches, house finches, purple finches, pine
siskins, red-breasted nuthatches joining the white-breasted nuthatches,
Red-bellied, Downy, Hairy woodpeckers, Northern flickers and Yellow-bellied
sapsuckers to mention a few.

This post is already too long for most to read.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs.

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Mason
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:28 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: aww nuts

So, I've been proposing thoughts/questions on wild food in the area and
whether it may be down. Partly because some people have been seeing
fewer birds this winter and partly because I've been seeing more birds
at the feeders this winter compared to previous ones. We've also had
squirrels at our feeders(mostly on the ground thankfully) way more this
winter than previous ones combined I'd say.

Nobody seems to have had any educated thoughts on if there's been any
difference in wild food production this year. I'm not sure if I should
ask the AGFC or the Arkansas native plant society or someone... I think
I might try that to satisfy my curiosity.

BUT... I'm bringing this up again as I made another observation. Just
now I saw a facebook post about red-headed woodpeckers and how they,
apparently, are like the acorn woodpecker and store up acorns.
I have not seen any red-headed woodpeckers in a few months now around
here. While I haven't birded city lake a LOT, the past few months I've
seen none there and we haven't heard or seen any in our neighborhood either.

I know they migrate some but I can remember other winters where I was
still finding them at city lake. I don't have all my checklists
submitted to ebird(probably a few hundred at least) so I don't have much
data to look at quickly for last winter but looking at my reports from
the 2016/17 winter, there were definitely a few red-headeds that stuck
around all winter long at city lake. Combine that with the idea they
store acorns and the squirrel activity I've seen here... it makes me
think there was a shortage of acorns in this area this past fall.

And if I'm right about that, it keeps bringing me back to my wondering
about other native wild foods and how they did this past fall.
I don't think anyone here has the answer to those questions but these
are my thoughts/observations so far. I am wondering if areas seeing
fewer birds if perhaps more birds moved on than other years because of
food.

It's kind of funny to think about in a way... that, IF some birds are
leaving here this winter compared to others... at the same time because
of a different food shortage further north, everyone down here is seeing
red-breasted nuthatches this year. Seeing fewer of some species and more
of another. Almost sounds contradictory but different foods support
different birds.
I'm getting close to rambling so I'll quit for now. :)

Daniel Mason


---
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Date: 1/18/19 9:29 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: aww nuts
So, I've been proposing thoughts/questions on wild food in the area and
whether it may be down. Partly because some people have been seeing
fewer birds this winter and partly because I've been seeing more birds
at the feeders this winter compared to previous ones. We've also had
squirrels at our feeders(mostly on the ground thankfully) way more this
winter than previous ones combined I'd say.

Nobody seems to have had any educated thoughts on if there's been any
difference in wild food production this year. I'm not sure if I should
ask the AGFC or the Arkansas native plant society or someone... I think
I might try that to satisfy my curiosity.

BUT... I'm bringing this up again as I made another observation. Just
now I saw a facebook post about red-headed woodpeckers and how they,
apparently, are like the acorn woodpecker and store up acorns.
I have not seen any red-headed woodpeckers in a few months now around
here. While I haven't birded city lake a LOT, the past few months I've
seen none there and we haven't heard or seen any in our neighborhood either.

I know they migrate some but I can remember other winters where I was
still finding them at city lake. I don't have all my checklists
submitted to ebird(probably a few hundred at least) so I don't have much
data to look at quickly for last winter but looking at my reports from
the 2016/17 winter, there were definitely a few red-headeds that stuck
around all winter long at city lake.  Combine that with the idea they
store acorns and the squirrel activity I've seen here... it makes me
think there was a shortage of acorns in this area this past fall.

And if I'm right about that, it keeps bringing me back to my wondering
about other native wild foods and how they did this past fall.
I don't think anyone here has the answer to those questions but these
are my thoughts/observations so far. I am wondering if areas seeing
fewer birds if perhaps more birds moved on than other years because of
food.

It's kind of funny to think about in a way... that, IF some birds are
leaving here this winter compared to others... at the same time because
of a different food shortage further north, everyone down here is seeing
red-breasted nuthatches this year. Seeing fewer of some species and more
of another. Almost sounds contradictory but different foods support
different birds.
I'm getting close to rambling so I'll quit for now. :)

Daniel Mason


---
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Date: 1/18/19 9:26 am
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Banding Eastern Bluebirds
Sorry, I hit send too quickly!

My question is does anyone know of someone banding bluebirds in Arkansas?
According to the USGS records someone has been doing so for several years.
I am interested in contacting them to find out what their research is all
about.

Any help would be appreciated.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR
USGS Master Banding Permit Holder
VP Inland Bird Banding Assoc.

On Fri, Jan 18, 2019 at 11:23 AM Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> wrote:

> All,
>
> Does anyone know of someone banding bluebirds in Arkansas?
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
>

 

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Date: 1/18/19 9:25 am
From: Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...>
Subject: Re: Banding Eastern Bluebirds
Dr. Doug Osborne at the University of Arkansas at Monticello has banded some on UAM campus in the past.



Ethan Massey

Biologist, Ducks Unlimited, Inc.

(870)-456-2715 (c)│ (870)-282-8242 (o) │ <mailto:<emassey...> <emassey...>

57 S. CC Camp Road, St. Charles, AR 72140





From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> On Behalf Of Butch Tetzlaff
Sent: Friday, January 18, 2019 11:23 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Banding Eastern Bluebirds



All,



Does anyone know of someone banding bluebirds in Arkansas?



Butch Tetzlaff