ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
9/21/17 7:44 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> Arizona talk in Conway, Monday September 25
9/21/17 9:57 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Rufous Hummingbird
9/21/17 8:27 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Female Rufous
9/21/17 6:31 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Crossbills After ASCA field trip Saturday
9/20/17 6:58 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Crested Caracara, Mississippi County
9/20/17 8:54 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Saturday
9/20/17 8:44 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> birds, of course
9/20/17 8:22 am Barry Haas <bhaas...> The Atlantic: The Golden Age of Animal Tracking
9/20/17 6:58 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Bill Beall's birding notes
9/20/17 5:14 am John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...> Re: Bird Tagging
9/20/17 4:45 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Bird Tagging
9/19/17 7:34 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Bill Beall's birding notes
9/19/17 7:16 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Bird Tagging
9/19/17 6:21 pm Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: Bird Tagging
9/19/17 4:12 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bird Tagging
9/19/17 1:35 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Bill Beall's birding notes
9/19/17 12:20 pm Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Bobwhite chicks, Woolsey birds (Benton and Washington Counties)
9/19/17 8:20 am Maureen McClung <maureenmcclung...> Winged creatures of the monarch variety
9/19/17 7:37 am Than Boves <tboves...> Preparing for migration on Arkansas State University campus
9/19/17 7:01 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Overflow NWR
9/18/17 4:15 pm Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Re: birding mystery series
9/18/17 4:02 pm Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: birding mystery series
9/18/17 3:54 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> birding mystery series
9/18/17 9:24 am Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> Mitchell saw-whet owl talk Tuesday - Fayetteville
9/18/17 7:37 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Tree Swallows
9/18/17 4:50 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY, BUTTERFLIES 2017
9/17/17 2:44 pm Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...> Grand Lake
9/16/17 3:35 am Don Simons <drsimons56...> Hawks
9/15/17 7:56 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> birds
9/15/17 1:59 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> CROSSBILLS AND MONARCHS NEAR SHORES LAKE, OZARK NF
9/15/17 6:10 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Birds of Prey take down Drones
9/14/17 1:50 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Bird photos
9/13/17 8:34 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Sept. 13
9/13/17 2:52 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Native Plant Sale
9/12/17 9:28 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Happy birds in the rain
9/12/17 8:38 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Happy birds in the rain
9/12/17 12:34 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob 9/12/17
9/11/17 3:53 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
9/11/17 3:01 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Bald Knob NWR,
9/11/17 12:29 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> RED CROSSBILLS NEAR SHORES LAKE, OZARK NF
9/11/17 12:20 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob NWR,
9/11/17 10:10 am Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: Snow Geese
9/11/17 9:25 am Devin Moon <moondevg...> Re: Roseate Spoonbills in Pine Bluff
9/11/17 9:16 am Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Re: Roseate Spoonbills in Pine Bluff
9/11/17 8:21 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Nature Friendly Yard Workshop, Mountain Home, Oct 21
9/11/17 7:41 am Devin Moon <moondevg...> Roseate Spoonbills in Pine Bluff
9/11/17 7:09 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> woodpecker nest raided by snake
9/11/17 6:58 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, Mel White - Far North Queensland
9/10/17 7:11 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Snow Geese
9/10/17 6:55 pm Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> strange messages
9/10/17 6:18 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Snow Geese
9/10/17 4:10 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
9/10/17 4:05 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> GOOD BIRDS AT HOBBS, BUT BOO-HOO NO CROSSBILLS (YET)
9/10/17 11:11 am Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
9/10/17 11:08 am Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
9/10/17 11:06 am Donna Crabill <drcrabill...> Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
9/10/17 10:27 am Adam Mars-Heyy Dobrin <raelitwhy...> Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
9/10/17 10:22 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Slate-throated Redstart live on webcam
9/10/17 9:18 am Adam Mars-Heyy Dobrin <raelitwhy...> 9/11, IRMA, and how to turn "simulated reality" into Heaven in six minutes flat.
9/9/17 4:39 pm Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> Re: Wood Storks & Spoonbills at Bald Knob NWR
9/8/17 9:29 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> The Snipe Newsletter
9/8/17 6:10 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Eagle optics online
9/8/17 6:06 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Eagle optics online
9/8/17 6:03 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Eagle optics online
9/8/17 2:04 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Upcomng Field Trips
9/8/17 1:34 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: BASH & Owls- Pacific Southwest Region - US Fish & Wildlife Service
9/8/17 11:08 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Red Crossbill at Lake Fayetteville (message from Mike Mlodinow)
9/8/17 10:47 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Eagle optics online
9/8/17 10:36 am Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Sabine's Gull
9/8/17 9:59 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Eagle optics online
9/8/17 9:32 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Wood Storks & Spoonbills at Bald Knob NWR
9/7/17 4:29 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Sabine's Gull
9/6/17 8:05 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Cross Lake 9-5-17 ARCTIC TERN+SABINE'S GULLS
9/6/17 7:33 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Sabine's Gull @ Delaware Rec - YES
9/6/17 2:29 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Give Consideration For Fall Migration and Winter Bird Habitat
9/6/17 10:18 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Preparing for the Upcoming Saw-whet Owl Field Season
9/6/17 6:51 am Devin Moon <moondevg...> Ouachita Co. Wood Storks
9/6/17 6:11 am Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Sabine's Gull
9/5/17 3:38 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Morning Swan Flyover
9/5/17 2:40 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> ANOTHER NEOTROPIC AT EAGLE WATCH
9/5/17 12:11 pm Rod Wittenberg <rodwittenberg...> Morning Swan Flyover
9/5/17 10:08 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Roseate Spoonbills at Bald Knob
9/5/17 8:38 am JFR <johnfredman...> BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER AT BOYD POINT
9/4/17 8:33 pm Michael <mplinz...> Re: Nighthawks
9/4/17 8:19 pm JFR <johnfredman...> ROSEATE SPOONBILLS & WOOD STORKS IN SOUTHEAST JEFFERSON CO.
9/4/17 8:08 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Bald Knob today
9/4/17 5:47 pm Gmail <butchchq8...> Nighthawks
9/4/17 5:18 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Plegadis Ibis
9/4/17 2:46 pm Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: Plegadis Ibis
9/4/17 1:50 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Plegadis Ibis
9/4/17 12:44 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Plegadis Ibis
9/4/17 12:36 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Plegadis Ibis
9/4/17 12:03 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Plegadis ibis
9/4/17 11:10 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Pine Bluff and England
9/4/17 10:56 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Roseate spoonbills Bald Knob
9/4/17 10:14 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Hawk dance in the sky
9/4/17 10:10 am Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: Hawk dance in the sky
9/4/17 10:01 am Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Hawk dance in the sky
9/4/17 9:06 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> woodcock flight?
9/4/17 8:25 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Charlie Craig
9/3/17 9:02 pm JFR <johnfredman...> WOOD STORKS IN SOUTHEAST JEFFERSON CO.
9/3/17 4:10 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Mike the Birdman October screening
9/3/17 1:47 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Mike the Birdman October screening
9/3/17 11:18 am Don Simons <Don.Simons...> Upland
9/3/17 6:30 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Finch eye disease
9/3/17 5:28 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Wilber west Rd Pine Bluff
9/3/17 5:16 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> NWAAS field trip to HOBBS STATE PARK-CONSERVATION AREA Sunday September 10
9/2/17 5:35 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Birds, Other Wildlife and Automobiles
9/2/17 5:22 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Bird noises and frogs
9/2/17 11:48 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bird noises and frogs
9/2/17 11:26 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
9/2/17 8:14 am Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> What???
9/1/17 8:01 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Trifecta of Birds & Nature
9/1/17 5:24 pm Krajcir, Kevin <KrajcirKJ...> Re: Piping Plover at Hulsey Fish Hatchery (Garland County)
9/1/17 2:28 pm plm108 <plm108...> Piping Plover at Hulsey Fish Hatchery (Garland County)
9/1/17 11:40 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Inca Dove
9/1/17 11:26 am Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> Thurs storm birding
9/1/17 5:40 am Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: AFTER BIRDS, CLOSER LOOK AT SWAMP MILKWEED
8/31/17 5:49 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Where have all the birds gone? (To Woolsey Wet Prairie)
8/31/17 4:36 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Bald Knob Open?
8/31/17 3:43 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Re: Bald Knob Open?
8/31/17 3:38 pm Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Re: Bald Knob Open?
8/31/17 3:12 pm Kay <mcafeekay...> Bald Knob Open?
8/31/17 2:39 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: AFTER BIRDS, CLOSER LOOK AT SWAMP MILKWEED
8/31/17 1:42 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> AFTER BIRDS, CLOSER LOOK AT SWAMP MILKWEED
8/31/17 11:28 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: last of August
8/31/17 11:05 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> last of August
8/31/17 9:42 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Storm
8/31/17 9:01 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> AAS Calendar Pre-orders for 2018 Calendar
8/31/17 8:04 am Maureen McClung <maureenmcclung...> Taxidermied Red-tailed Hawk
8/30/17 4:21 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: State of the Birds 2017 Special Report Released
8/30/17 4:20 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: State of the Birds 2017 Special Report Released
8/30/17 12:26 pm Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> Warblers
8/30/17 12:18 pm Stacy Clanton <sclanton...> Kites still around
8/30/17 7:59 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Birds on the U of A Campus
8/30/17 6:48 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Bird call
8/30/17 6:20 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Bird call
8/29/17 6:53 pm Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> Bird call
8/29/17 4:10 pm JFR <johnfredman...> ROSEATE SPOONBILLS IN PINE BLUFF
8/29/17 3:42 pm Michael <mplinz...> Ruddy Turnstone
8/29/17 2:17 pm Edie Calaway <00000066d9cc52d5-dmarc-request...> Red-necked Phalarope
8/29/17 10:22 am Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> World Shorebird Day and count
8/29/17 10:03 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> SEDGE WRENS AT WOOLSEY WET PRAIRIE WILDLIFE SANCTUARY
8/29/17 7:20 am Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Western Hills Park in Little Rock
8/29/17 6:22 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Night Migrants
8/29/17 5:12 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Thanks for the native plants sources
8/28/17 7:01 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Native plants for NWA
8/28/17 5:52 pm Robin Buff <robinbuff...> Re: Native plants for NWA
8/28/17 5:03 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Mississippi Kites
8/28/17 4:57 pm Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Native plants for NWA
8/28/17 3:42 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/28/17 2:47 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Native plants for NWA
8/28/17 1:52 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> AN EARLY CLAY-COLORED SPARROW AT CHESNEY
8/28/17 1:06 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> BKNWR
8/28/17 9:22 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Red-neck Phalarope
8/27/17 7:22 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> TX storm waifs
8/27/17 6:40 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Using novel-grass endophyte associations as an avian deterrent
8/27/17 2:58 pm Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> Get ready for crossbills
8/27/17 2:19 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Hurricane Harvey and Whooping Cranes - Friends of the Wild Whoopers
8/27/17 10:47 am Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Native plants for NWA
8/27/17 9:16 am Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Red necked phalarope
8/27/17 7:56 am Cody Massery <cmassery...> Red phalarope
8/27/17 7:33 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> LOON MIGRATION CRUISES ON BEAVER LAKE IN NOVEMBER
8/27/17 7:15 am James Morgan <jlmm...> Re: Native plants for NWA
8/27/17 6:26 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Native plants for NWA
8/27/17 6:10 am Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: MONARCHS MATING DURING FIELD TRIP
8/26/17 6:59 pm Gmail <butchchq8...> Native plants for NWA
8/26/17 4:56 pm Abby Gibson <balllgibson...> Roseate Spoonbills
8/26/17 4:50 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Re: ASCA field trip-Bald Knob
8/26/17 4:31 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA field trip-Bald Knob
8/26/17 3:32 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> MONARCHS MATING DURING FIELD TRIP
8/25/17 8:30 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Hummingbird Pool Party
8/25/17 6:18 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Birding Lessons
8/25/17 9:51 am Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: Birding Lessons
8/25/17 9:15 am Megan Foll <auntm13...> Birding Lessons
8/25/17 8:30 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Red Phalarope
8/24/17 4:40 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/24/17 4:29 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/24/17 3:47 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/24/17 3:14 pm Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Where have all the birds gone?
8/24/17 3:03 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Red Phalarope at Bald Knob NWR
8/24/17 2:28 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: Red Phalarope at Bald Knob NWR
8/24/17 12:45 pm Michael D. Collins <mike...> Re: access to IBWO habitats in Arkansas?
8/24/17 12:43 pm Gmail <butchchq8...> Fwd: Flight Calls #185: Rails, House Sparrows on ABA Podcast, Renew/Join Now, get 4 months FREE!
8/24/17 12:40 pm Michael D. Collins <mike...> Re: access to IBWO habitats in Arkansas?
8/24/17 12:15 pm Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> Internship Opportunity - Please Share - not about birds
8/24/17 11:52 am plm108 <plm108...> Red Phalarope at Bald Knob NWR
8/23/17 8:20 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/23/17 8:17 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Rate ADEQ
8/23/17 7:07 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - August 23
8/23/17 1:35 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Mike the birdman film
8/23/17 1:20 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds
8/23/17 12:44 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> EXTENSIVE BIRD MOVEMENT THROUGH RIVER VALLEY
8/23/17 12:10 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds
8/23/17 11:29 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/23/17 10:57 am Reames, Clark -FS <creames...> Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds
8/23/17 10:16 am David Luneau <mdluneau...> Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds
8/23/17 9:43 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> The Big Eclipse-Birds
8/23/17 9:36 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/23/17 8:20 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> the big eclipse
8/23/17 7:50 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/23/17 7:03 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/23/17 6:54 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/23/17 6:52 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Fw: Bald Knob sandpipers-ASCA field trip
8/23/17 6:51 am Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Where have all the birds gone?
8/23/17 6:49 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Eclipse Birds
8/23/17 6:23 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Where have all the birds gone?
8/22/17 8:34 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Re: Bald Knob sandpipers
8/22/17 4:41 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob sandpipers
8/22/17 2:46 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> WILSON’S SNIPE fos AT CENTERTON
8/22/17 12:41 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: link to vulture article- Some questions
8/22/17 7:56 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: HANG ‘EM HIGH RESPONSE TO VULTURES (QUICKLY, just like in the good ole days)
 
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Date: 9/21/17 7:44 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: Arizona talk in Conway, Monday September 25
Greetings all,
I'll be giving a talk about Arizona on Monday. Sorry but it will be more photos of rocks and plants, than of birds. But if you're bored, we would be thrilled to have you join us.
, Leif at Hector

Audubon Club to Meet
The Arkansas River Valley Audubon Society will meet on Monday, September 25, at 7:00 p.m., in Conway at Hendrix College, in the Donald W. Reynolds Center for Life Sciences, room 010, which is in the basement north hall of the building. Call 501-977-3899 for directions if needed.

The topic will be "Exploring Arizona -- a look at Scenery, Geology, Plants and a few Birds".
Refreshments will be served and the public is invited to attend.

--
Pat Donnell
Home (501) 727-5470
Cell (501) 977-3899
<pahdonnell...><mailto:<pahdonnell...>




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 9/21/17 9:57 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Rufous Hummingbird
Sally Jo, advised me to explain that I have a Rufous Hummingbird for 40
days today. Miss visiting with Sally Jo at the AAA Conventions.

Terry Butler

 

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Date: 9/21/17 8:27 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Female Rufous
Today marks day 40 the female Rufous has remained at my feeder.

Terry Buler
Pangburn, AR

 

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Date: 9/21/17 6:31 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Crossbills After ASCA field trip Saturday
I'm taking a carload of birders to Shores Lake after the Bona Dea trip Saturday.  It's about an hour from Russellville to Shores Lake.  We are going to try for the Crossbills.  Joe Neal has emailed me some additional information about his sightings, plus the good news that the campground at Shores Lakes has bathrooms!  We might even luck into sightings of Brown-headed and Red-breasted Nuthatches. We'll also try for the Crossbills after the Oct. 7th field trip to Frog Bayou.  Shores Lake is only 30 minutes from the Alma sewer ponds.  If you go with us to try for the Crossbills after the field trip Saturday, be aware that we won't get back to Little Rock until late in the afternoon.
Kenny Nichols will be at his cabin Saturday.  He has graciously agreed to call me if he sees anything good on the lake at Delaware Point.  He said he's only seeing Cormorants, Ring-bills, the occasional Forster's Tern, and a single Herring Gull.

See you at 7:00 a.m. Saturday at the Mayflower commuter lot for the ASCA field trip.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock


 

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Date: 9/20/17 6:58 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Crested Caracara, Mississippi County
Mark Greene and Michael Todd found a CRESTED CARACARA in the extreme
northeast corner of the state. Actually, the bird flew over Arkansas,
Tennessee AND Missouri. A three-state rarity and second record for Arkansas.

See details and photo at http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39303789.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 9/20/17 8:54 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Saturday
Just a quick reminder that this Saturday is the ASCA field trip to the Bona Dea Trails at the edge of Lake Dardanelle in Russellville.  See details below.  Anyone interested in birds is welcome to join us.  Please feel free to contact me off-list if you have any questions.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 September 23 Bona Dea Trails andSanctuary—RussellvilleMeet at 7:00 a.m. at theMayflower commuter lot off I-40 West at Exit 135.  We will arrive at the Bona Dea Trails first parkinglot around 8:15 a.m. for anyone who wants to meet us there.  Our target birds will be migrating fallwarblers.  Bona Dea Trails is 186 acresof wetlands and woodlands in the Prairie Creek floodplain.  The trails are paved and level for easywalking.  Lunch is on your own.  There are picnic tables at Bona Dea, orseveral fast food restaurants are nearby.  From Little Rock, take I-40west to Russellville.  Take Exit 81.  Turn left off the exit ramp, then left at thelight to go south on Hwy 7.  Cross overthe interstate, take a right at the second stoplight (Lakefront Drive).  The trail’s parking area will be on your leftin less than a mile.   
 

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Date: 9/20/17 8:44 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: birds, of course
5 to 7 Blue Jays were seen on a daily basis from Birdsview Solarium for the past several months. Numbers dwindled to one, then none for the past five days. This morning, 1 showed up at the bird bath squawking loudly.
Still have RTHU. Ive never seen more than 8 at one time. This season never more than five and usually just 3.
Im down to 10-12 species daily now. Limited habitat at Birdsview Solarium with 26 highest number of species at one time.
I do keep daily records.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, Boone Co., AR

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 9/20/17 8:22 am
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: The Atlantic: The Golden Age of Animal Tracking
Dear ARBIRDers,

Some of you should find this article in The Atlantic of interest.

Barry Haas

The Golden Age of Animal Tracking
The Atlantic

Scientists may soon be able to monitor whole ecosystems in real time. Read the full story


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Date: 9/20/17 6:58 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bill Beall's birding notes
A number of you have kindly sent me the link from eBird that describes how to make the conversion.  Bill already has that.  What we need is someone with the patience and skills to 1) open his Avisys files, 2) convert them into a format that can be uploaded into eBird.  Once we have the converted files, Dan Scheiman will take over and do the rest.  (He told me that we really don't need to assemble a volunteer army for that).  There are problems to overcome.  Slow internet speed in Bill's house and possibly an older version of Avisys that may not be friendly for conversion are just two of them.  So patience and skills are the two ingredients for this monumental but worthy endeavor!  If you want to play with Bill's files, contact me offline.  I can send you an attachment to get you started.  And thanks.  

On Tuesday 19 September 2017, 3:34:54 PM GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:

Bill Beall, the veteran Ar-birder and one of the doyens of Arkansas ornithology, has about 300,000 records going back six decades buried in his AviSys files.  He has been struggling to convert them to eBird format.  We are keen to help him get this done so that this treasure-trove of data can be made available for use. 
Dan the bird-man suggested that I appeal to the Ar-birders community if anyone can help open his AviSys files and export to the format needed for eBird.  
If so, please contact me off-line.  It will be good to assemble a team of volunteers (like what was done with Doug's card files) and share the labor.  
Thanks!
Kannan
 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/17 5:14 am
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Subject: Re: Bird Tagging
Glenn,

eBird has a banding protocol for lists like the NSWO question. When you submit observations, select "banding" from the pull-down menu under "other."

John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 19, 2017, at 6:08 PM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I have been to Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas. It is a great place, and I got to see some birds I have never seen before. But, I can't count that Harris Hawk or Barn Owl on eBird because the birds are being restrained while healing. If I went somewhere, such as Mitchell Pruit's catching and banding of Saw-whet Owls, could I eBird those owls? Yes, they are in captivity, for a moment, but they aren't really captive birds as they are released. And, if that is the case, can I count a Barn Owl if I am there when Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas releases it back into the wild? It is all a gray area in my mind.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/17 4:45 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bird Tagging
When observing raptors in captivity, it is important to distinguish between those captive-reared under a federal raptor propagation permit that cannot legally be released into the wild, and raptors that were/are wild birds which can be legally released back into the wild.

The USFWS requires captive-reared raptors be banded with a numbered seamless narrow brass band as nestlings. It is illegal to release these birds into the wild. These raptors are most often purchased by falconers for hunting but some are transferred to an education permit if they become injured, such as losing toes or talons when squirrel hunting or unable to fly due to snakebite. Most of the Harris Hawks in captivity are captive reared birds. These captive-reared birds should not be entered into eBird or included in an ABA list.

Wild birds in rehab are not supposed to be displayed to or observed by the public or used in education programs according to federal regulations. At the discretion of the rehabber, the public is allowed to observe the release of these birds into the wild and may be able to be entered into an ABA list once the bird resumes its normal feeding, hunting, roosting and other behaviors after release.

Non-releasable wild birds may be possessed in captivity under a federal live bird education permit and displayed to the public. Due to their permanent injuries these raptors will never be released into the wild. They cannot be included into an ABA list, and should not be entered into eBird.

Some people create their own personal lists and listing criteria outside of the ABA requirements, and include birds being released back into the wild, captive wild nonreleasable birds observed at an aviary or zoo, and captive-reared birds living in the wild as part of a federal/state experimental reintroduction program.

Karen Rowe

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 19, 2017, at 6:08 PM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I have been to Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas. It is a great place, and I got to see some birds I have never seen before. But, I can't count that Harris Hawk or Barn Owl on eBird because the birds are being restrained while healing. If I went somewhere, such as Mitchell Pruit's catching and banding of Saw-whet Owls, could I eBird those owls? Yes, they are in captivity, for a moment, but they aren't really captive birds as they are released. And, if that is the case, can I count a Barn Owl if I am there when Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas releases it back into the wild? It is all a gray area in my mind.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot

 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/17 7:34 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Bill Beall's birding notes
Kannan,
Check out this ebird article...it says you should be able to do it in one
afternoon.

http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/avisystoebird/

Michael Linz

On Tue, Sep 19, 2017 at 4:34 PM, Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Bill Beall, the veteran Ar-birder and one of the doyens of Arkansas
> ornithology, has about 300,000 records going back six decades buried in his
> AviSys files. He has been struggling to convert them to eBird format. We
> are keen to help him get this done so that this treasure-trove of data can
> be made available for use.
>
> Dan the bird-man suggested that I appeal to the Ar-birders community if
> anyone can help open his AviSys files and export to the format needed for
> eBird.
>
> If so, please contact me off-line. It will be good to assemble a team of
> volunteers (like what was done with Doug's card files) and share the
> labor.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Kannan
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/17 7:16 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Bird Tagging
eBird isnt going to tell you what you can and cant count on your life
list.

eBird's Banding count type that should be used for birds that would
otherwise be undetected if not captured in a net.
http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1385631 e.g.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S32400059

You should not enter into eBird captive birds. "You may report wild birds
you see at outdoor zoos, but do not include caged birds, pinioned waterfowl,
or birds that are part of the collection. As a general rule, birds at zoos
that are not known to be wild should not be reported.

I dont see anything among the help articles about recently released wild
birds but I see no problem with eBirding these. I eBirded a Bald Eagle
Rodney Paul released in Bayou Meto WMA.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S22221794

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 9/19/17, 6:08 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Glenn" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

I have been to Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas. It is a great place, and I
got to see some birds I have never seen before. But, I can't count that
Harris Hawk or Barn Owl on eBird because the birds are being restrained
while healing. If I went somewhere, such as Mitchell Pruit's catching and
banding of Saw-whet Owls, could I eBird those owls? Yes, they are in
captivity, for a moment, but they aren't really captive birds as they are
released. And, if that is the case, can I count a Barn Owl if I am there
when Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas releases it back into the wild? It is
all a gray area in my mind.

Thanks.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot



 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/17 6:21 pm
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Bird Tagging
This question comes up a lot among those who band birds or frequent banding stations.

Check out the ABA site for the "official" rules. Your question is answered by 3b.

http://listing.aba.org/aba-recording-rules/

Butch
Bentonville

> On Sep 19, 2017, at 18:08, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I have been to Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas. It is a great place, and I got to see some birds I have never seen before. But, I can't count that Harris Hawk or Barn Owl on eBird because the birds are being restrained while healing. If I went somewhere, such as Mitchell Pruit's catching and banding of Saw-whet Owls, could I eBird those owls? Yes, they are in captivity, for a moment, but they aren't really captive birds as they are released. And, if that is the case, can I count a Barn Owl if I am there when Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas releases it back into the wild? It is all a gray area in my mind.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot

 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/17 4:12 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bird Tagging
I have been to Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas.  It is a great place, and I got to see some birds I have never seen before.  But, I can't count that Harris Hawk or Barn Owl on eBird because the birds are being restrained while healing.  If I went somewhere, such as Mitchell Pruit's catching and banding of Saw-whet Owls, could I eBird those owls?  Yes, they are in captivity, for a moment, but they aren't really captive birds as they are released.  And, if that is the case, can I count a Barn Owl if I am there when Raptor Rehab of Central Arkansas releases it back into the wild?  It is all a gray area in my mind.

Thanks.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/17 1:35 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bill Beall's birding notes
Bill Beall, the veteran Ar-birder and one of the doyens of Arkansas ornithology, has about 300,000 records going back six decades buried in his AviSys files.  He has been struggling to convert them to eBird format.  We are keen to help him get this done so that this treasure-trove of data can be made available for use. 
Dan the bird-man suggested that I appeal to the Ar-birders community if anyone can help open his AviSys files and export to the format needed for eBird.  
If so, please contact me off-line.  It will be good to assemble a team of volunteers (like what was done with Doug's card files) and share the labor.  
Thanks!
Kannan
 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/17 12:20 pm
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Bobwhite chicks, Woolsey birds (Benton and Washington Counties)
After I finished up some transect surveys for my non-breeding prairie bird field season, I was a little baffled to flush up a female Northern Bobwhite and about eight chicks at Chesney Prairie on September 17th (Sunday). The young couldn't have been more than 5 days old, but were decent fliers, as is the case with galliform offspring. I couldn't believe that I saw NO bobwhite chicks this entire summer, and here in mid-September were young ones. It turns out that (at least in Texas) Northern Bobwhite will breed as late as October! So there you have it.

I completed my transect surveys at Woolsey Wet Prairie this morning. It was much more active than Chesney--my two highlights include an Empidonax flycatcher and a skulky sparrow. It was the right size for an Ammodramus sp., but I didn't have time to stick around. Plus there was an Eastern Phoebe Also shoutout to Joanie Patterson, who I saw from afar this morning! (Sorry I didn't greet you. I was in the middle of surveying.) Hopefully she'll chip in if she saw anything interesting.

Good fall birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.
 

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Date: 9/19/17 8:20 am
From: Maureen McClung <maureenmcclung...>
Subject: Winged creatures of the monarch variety
I'm hoping to tag monarch butterflies with my conservation biology class on
Oct. 2nd in the area surrounding Conway (within a 30-45 min drive). We have
the tags, now we just need the butterflies. Any tips on where we might find
some local milkweed and/or monarchs? Please email me at <mcclung...>

--
Maureen McClung
Conway, AR


*We shall never achieve harmony with the land, anymore than we shall
achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations
the important thing is not to achieve but to strive. -Aldo Leopold*

 

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Date: 9/19/17 7:37 am
From: Than Boves <tboves...>
Subject: Preparing for migration on Arkansas State University campus
This morning at our fall migration banding station on the campus of Arkansas State University, we recaptured a White-eyed Vireo that we previously caught 2 weeks ago. The young bird weighed 11.9 grams upon initial capture and had no fat. Today, it weighed 16.4 g (a 40% increase!) and was loaded with fat. Pretty fun to get to see this migratory preparation firsthand!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
Jonesboro, AR 72467
Office Phone: 870-972-3320
Website: http://www.boveslab.com/
Facebook: @BovesLabAState<https://www.facebook.com/BovesLabAState/>


 

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Date: 9/19/17 7:01 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Overflow NWR
I went to Overflow NWR for the first time yesterday.  It really is a wonderful marshy area.  I imagine the place can be swarming with Sora and Virginia Rails at times, though I didn't see any yesterday.  Overflow was an afterthought.  I'd just driven 43 miles down the Levee Road to the LA border, looking for good birds and saw hardly anything at all.  And found out Louisiana has a gate across the Levee Road at their border.  They must be trying to keep migrating Arkansans out.  Anyhow, since I was frustrated at not seeing any good birds I decided to try to find Overflow NWR.  Let me tell you, Overflow isn't a place you stumble into by accident.  There are no signs until you are entering the place.  I'm not even sure if I got to the right part of the reserve, but the part I saw was pretty great for birding.  The way I got there was to go south of Parkdale on 165.  Turn right on 173, then right again on 360 (both are dirt roads).  Once on 360 just keep going north until you drive into the reserve.  Once inside the road goes quite a ways and it is a pretty good road, when it hasn't been raining too much.  Is anybody else familiar with the place?  Any suggestions on where else to go within the reserve?  Any other entrances?  I got there pretty late so only drove up to where the road "Y"s, and maybe 1/2 a mile down each leg of the "Y".
I know, this is supposed to be about birds.  Well besides some Great Egrets and Little Blue Herons, I got to see 5 White-faced Ibis.  And the sun was just right behind me, so the Ibis' feathers were just glistening in the sun.  So beautiful.  And I also got to photograph a Least Bittern.  It was sitting in the reeds, watching the water.  Eventually, he struck out quickly and brought up a little fish.  I always feel extra blessed to find something like the Least Bittern.  There were also a few Least Sandpipers, a pair of Stilt Sandpipers, and a few Yellowlegs.  I didn't get there until 2:30 pm on a hot day.  It left me wondering what I might have seen if I had of been there at 7 am.
If you've never been there, it is worth checking out.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 9/18/17 4:15 pm
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: birding mystery series
Also, Christine Goff and Jan Dunlap each write series of birder murder mysteries.  You might want to check them out as well.
Nancy Young

On Monday, September 18, 2017 5:54 PM, Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:


Recently I've been reading a series about a detective who would rather bird.  Some bird species is always involved in the case, plus the hero spends a certain amount of time out looking at birds.  He lives in a town called Saltmarsh, a super place for birding.  It's fun having old world birds and rare North American birds flit across the pages.  Plus there is a short conservation note at the end of each book about the bird species highlighted.  Thought readers among our group might enjoy these too.  I got them at the Fayetteville Public Library. They are by Steve Burrows.  The first is called "A Siege of Bitterns".
Happy birding! and reading!
Joanie



 

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Date: 9/18/17 4:02 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: birding mystery series
Since I usually read about 5 books weekly, mostly mysteries, I will be adding this series to my reading list.
Thanks.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Carol Joan Patterson<mailto:<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2017 5:54 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: birding mystery series

Recently I've been reading a series about a detective who would rather bird. Some bird species is always involved in the case, plus the hero spends a certain amount of time out looking at birds. He lives in a town called Saltmarsh, a super place for birding. It's fun having old world birds and rare North American birds flit across the pages. Plus there is a short conservation note at the end of each book about the bird species highlighted. Thought readers among our group might enjoy these too. I got them at the Fayetteville Public Library. They are by Steve Burrows. The first is called "A Siege of Bitterns".

Happy birding! and reading!
Joanie


 

Back to top
Date: 9/18/17 3:54 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: birding mystery series
Recently I've been reading a series about a detective who would rather bird.  Some bird species is always involved in the case, plus the hero spends a certain amount of time out looking at birds.  He lives in a town called Saltmarsh, a super place for birding.  It's fun having old world birds and rare North American birds flit across the pages.  Plus there is a short conservation note at the end of each book about the bird species highlighted.  Thought readers among our group might enjoy these too.  I got them at the Fayetteville Public Library. They are by Steve Burrows.  The first is called "A Siege of Bitterns".
Happy birding! and reading!
Joanie

 

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Date: 9/18/17 9:24 am
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: Mitchell saw-whet owl talk Tuesday - Fayetteville
Mitchell will be making a presentation on our saw-whet owl research tomorrow night at the monthly meeting of the Highlands Chapter of the Ozark Society. Social at 6:30 with talk beginning at 7:00… First United Presbyterian Church is off of Old Wire Road, just north of Mission… the Witherspoon building is in the southwest corner of the church complex (from Old Wire, take Calvin Street west and drive around to the back of the church, take stairs up one level and go right… should be a sign for meeting)…

Talk is free and open to the public…

Cheers, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************

From: Ozark Society Highlands Chapter [mailto:<OZARKSOCIETY-HIGHLANDSCHAPTER...>] On Behalf Of Tom Perry
Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2017 5:22 PM
To: <OZARKSOCIETY-HIGHLANDSCHAPTER...>
Subject: Monthly Meeting

[Inline image]
HI All,

Our next monthly meeting will be Tuesday, September 19th at the First United Presbyterian Church, Fayetteville, in the Witherspoon bldg. activity room. Our guest speaker is Michael Pruitt, a graduate student under Kim Smith at the University of Arkansas. Refreshments are at 6:30pm, meeting will start at 7pm and usually ends between 8pm and 8:30pm. I hope to you see there.

Tom Perry
President Ozark Society-Highlands Chapter
 

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Date: 9/18/17 7:37 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Tree Swallows
Three million tree swallows reminds me of our smaller scale Purple Martin migration congregation.

//www.youtube.com/watch?annotation_id=annotation_707677&feature=iv&src_vid=VhgvfhpGJRQ&v=EiTzoS1OZD0


Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

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Date: 9/18/17 4:50 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BISON, BIRDS, BOTANY, BUTTERFLIES 2017
For anyone considering The Nature Conservancys Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in northeastern Oklahoma for the non-event Bison, Birds, Botany, and Butterflies, September 20-24, 2017: there are no fees, no scheduled events, and no registration. Totally do-it-yourself, 100% come and go as you see fit. I am staying at Hampton Inn in Bartlesville Wednesday night Sunday morning. I will be glad to meet anyone interested in the Hampton Inn parking lot around 7 am Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, for the drive into Tallgrass, with stops along the way. I will also be glad to meet anyone interested at Tallgrass Prairie Preserve headquarters at around noon on Friday and Saturday. I am providing these times and places merely as references points in case youd like to meet up with others. Otherwise, see you somewhere out there in the Tallgrass, or not.


 

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Date: 9/17/17 2:44 pm
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Grand Lake
I had a little free time mid-morning, so I ran up to Grand Lake south of Eudora, AR.  Best birds were Bald Eagle, Merlin, Spotted and Least Sandpipers, and 5 Anhingas in trees or flying near edge of lake.  I did drive the levee behind the lake hoping for wood storks, but I had no luck with those.  One pasture was filled with cattle and cattle egrets.  Links to the eBird lists are given below.Roselie Overby
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39234997

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39235233


 

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Date: 9/16/17 3:35 am
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Hawks
Hawk migration has started here at Mount Magazine. We have had only two mornings of actual watching so far and we are off to a slow start. So far, only a few broad-winged hawks have drifted by against southern winds. I expect things will get exciting with our next weather change. Check out www.mountmagazinestatepark.com for my scheduled plans, which can change with weather.

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 9/15/17 7:56 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: birds
While eating brunch on the deck last Sunday, September 3, Don & I both heard what sounded like a Louisiana Waterthrush chipping near the creek, several times. The others seem to have flown south in mid-August so we wondered if we heard a late migrant.

Curious Yellow-throated, Pine, and Parula Warblers have been sitting on top of the sunflower feeder watching the fledgling House Finches and Cardinals beg from their parents. This morning a Ruby-throated Hummingbird, apparently pumped for migration, successfully chased away Titmice and Chickadees that were attempting to eat sunflower seeds. A few drab immature Indigo Buntings remain, eating from the ground, and little flycatchers have been moving through. White-eyed Vireos call, and the Yellow-billed Cuckoo nestlings in the Japanese Maple fledged about a week ago.

There were dozens of hummingbirds just hanging around and waiting during Harvey and Irma, but as soon as the hurricanes cleared out of the gulf and the southeast, they too went on their way. For a few days following the storms I only saw one or two hummers at most but now several are coming through again to visit the sage, zinnias, and cardinal flowers below the deck, and to fight over sugar water.

Juvenile Red-headed Woodpeckers, successfully raised in snags we left standing for habitat, are now as amusing and noisy as their parents. Red-bellied and Pileated have been vocal lately too, and Downies hunt for insects inside the stems of elderberry and poke.

Still waiting to see Red Crossbills in the pines. They were here during the last irruption and I've been re-playing their songs so I'll recognize them.

Meanwhile many species of butterflies have been abundant for a couple of months, especially Skippers, Crescents, and Painted Ladies. Monarch larvae have been nourished by Swamp Milkweed and Common Milkweed I planted especially to assist in their recovery. Two are in my studio, pupating where I can observe and then release them outside.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 1:59 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: CROSSBILLS AND MONARCHS NEAR SHORES LAKE, OZARK NF
At least 4-5 Red Crossbills were present in mature Shortleaf Pine stands just south of Shores Lake in Ozark NF this morning. At least two birds were red adult males. Others were yellow-greenish adult females. This is the same area where David Oakley and I found them September 11: along highway 215, 0.3 miles south of intersection of 215 and county road 75 that goes down to Shores Lake. Big trees with heavy cone crops, just right for cone-opening crossbills.

UA-Fayetteville graduate students Pooja Panwar and Anant Deswhal obtained audio recordings of the birds today. These will be sent to Matt Young at Cornell who will identify the call types. We met up on 215 with Bill and Toka Beall. Bill has observed crossbills in this area for many years.

Other birds of interest: Brown-headed Nuthatch (3), numerous Pine Warblers, with many singing; Hooded Warblers, also singing; Red-headed Woodpeckers (3-4), Summer Tanager, Eastern Wood-Pewee; White-eyed Vireos lots of singing.

Just up 215, opposite Brewer Cemetery, we were stunned to another stop by at least 125 Monarchs visiting the flowering gold of a huge patch of Bidens aristosa, Tickseed Sunflower. Monarchs with gold flecks of pollen on their black bodies. They have just arrived, too. When David Oakley and I passed these flowers on September 11, there were a grand total of two Monarchs, and hundreds of Painted Lady butterflies.


 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/17 6:10 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Birds of Prey take down Drones
FYI

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2017 9:04 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: Birds of Prey take down Drones

The French army is using birds of prey to take down drones to protect its
air bases as well as to secure public airspace in case a drone poses a
threat.

http://www.france24.com/en/20170214-french-air-force-deploys-eagles-intercep
t-rogue-drones-military


A new BASH target approach


Where Eagles Dare: French military using winged warriors to hunt
down rogue drones. This is amazing.


A golden eagle grabs a flying drone during a military training
exercise at Mont-de-Marsan French Air Force base, Southwestern
France,February 10, 2017 REUTERS/Regis Duvignau - RTX30HM1

Following incidents of drones flying over the presidential palace
and restricted military sites - along with the deadly 2015 Paris terror
attacks - the French air force has trained four golden eagles to intercept
and destroy the rogue aircraft.

Aptly named d'Artagnan, Athos, Porthos and Aramis - an homage to
Alexandre Dumas' "The Three Musketeers" - the four birds of prey have been
honing their attack skills at the Mont-de-Marsan in southwestern France
since mid-2016.

"A drone means food for these birds," Gerald Machoukow, the military
base's falconer, told FRANCE 24
<Blockedhttp://www.france24.com/en/20170214-french-air-force-deploys-eagles-
intercept-rogue-drones-militaryBlocked> . "Now they automatically go after
them."

The use of hunting birds - normally falcons and northern goshawks -
by militaries around the globe is common practice in the fight to scare
other critters away from runways and so cut the risk of accidents during
takeoff or landing. But it wasn't until 2015 when the Dutch started using
bald eagles to intercept drones that other militaries started to see the
benefit of these winged warriors.

The French bred the four golden eagles - three males and one female
-- using artificial insemination since eagles are a protected species and
harvesting wild eggs is strictly forbidden. They chose the golden eagle
because of the birds hooked beak and sharp eyesight.

Also weighing in around 11 pounds, the birds are in a similar weight
class as the drones they're sent to destroy and clocking in at a top air
speed of 50 miles per hour, with the capability of spotting its target from
over a mile away, the eagles are deft hunters.

To protect the eagles from drone blades and any explosive device
that might be attached the them, the French military designed mittens of
leather and Kevlar, an anti-blast material, to protect the bird's talons.

A golden eagle carries a flying drone away during a military
training exercise at Mont-de-Marsan French Air Force base, Southwestern
France, February 10, 2017. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau - RTX30HNX

"I love these birds," Machoukow told Agence France-Presse
<Blockedhttp://en.rfi.fr/wire/20170220-born-killers-french-army-grooms-eagle
s-down-dronesBlocked> . "I don't want to send them to their death."

The birds are first taught to attack in a straight line before
graduating to diving from heights. Soon they'll be patrolling the skies over
the Pyrenees Mountains in southern France and could possibly be deployed at
airports and special events, such as political summits and soccer
tournaments.

While an initial progress report on the eagles' capabilities is due
in June, French officials say that the results are promising and the French
air force already expects four more eagles to join the fleet at
Mont-de-Marsan by the summer.







"The Good Thing About Science is that it is True Whether or Not You Believe
in it." Neil deGrasse Tyson


 

Back to top
Date: 9/14/17 1:50 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Bird photos
Here is a link to some great and unusual bird photos submitted to a BBC
contest.
http://www.bbc.com/news/in-pictures-41161968

Lyndal York
Little Rock

 

Back to top
Date: 9/13/17 8:34 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sept. 13
It was partly cloudy and warm today with a light breeze. 55 species were
found. Not very many Passerine migrants around today. I didn't make it
down early enough for the morning flight out of the roost on Pintail Lake.
But while I was counting gallinules on Pintail Lake, I looked up and here
came a flock of 16 Roseate Spoonbills flying NE over me. Quite a site to
see that many large pink birds in the sky at once. Also of note today was
an adult male Painted Bunting. Normally adults migrate early and are gone
from here around the end of the first week in August. This bird was about a
month late. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Wood Duck - 59

Blue-winged Teal - 18

Pied-billed Grebe - 13

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 11 (also still one active nest with small chicks.)

American Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 4

Great Egret - 9

Snowy Egret - 22

Little-blue Heron - 27

Cattle Egret - 92

Green Heron - 11

White Ibis - 23

Roseate Spoonbill - 16

Black Vulture - 6

Turkey Vulture - 25

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Cooper's Hawk - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Sora - 1

Purple Gallinule - 24 (also a couple broods of small chicks still.)

Common Gallinule - 42

American Coot - 6

Killdeer - 53

Least Sandpiper - 10

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 2

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 4

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 11 (still singing)

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Warbling Vireo - 1 (singing)

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 9

Tree Swallow - 50

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 8

Barn Swallow - 2

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 6

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Yellow Warbler - 1

American Redstart - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 3

Summer Tanager - 1

Northern Cardinal - 8

Indigo Bunting - 4

Painted Bunting - 2 (including 1 adult male)

Dickcissel - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 17





Odonates:



Common Green Darner

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Hyacinth Glider - 7

Striped Saddlebags - 2

Black Saddlebags







Herps:



American Alligator

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Western Mudsnake

Southern Black Racer





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


























 

Back to top
Date: 9/13/17 2:52 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Native Plant Sale
As an update to a previous post, Ozark Native Plants will be selling native plants the next four Saturdays at Ozark Natural Foods in Fayetteville. They are promoting lobelias at their upcoming sale, including Cardinal Flower which many referenced here for attracting hummingbirds.
I'm so heartened to hear of so many efforts to plant native plants and make our spaces more friendly for birds. For more information on Arkansas Audubon Society's Bird-friendly Yard Initiative: http://arbirds.org/intro.htm

Adam Schaffer
 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 9:28 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Happy birds in the rain
We are sorry for your loss, Teresa.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 12, 2017, at 10:37 PM, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:
>
> We been dry. Bone dry. Long awaited rain drops fell from the sky today. Darkened the day, so bright with cheer this morning dear. It's semi-quiet today. 3pm Barred Owl calling,no doubt confused because it was pretty dark that time of day.
> Not one to waste water falling from the sky,handwashing my clothes in the rain. Free water!
> Squirrels chasing each other around and around a pine tree. While high above a Pine Warbler fed.
> Cedar Waxwings shivered in the sky, flock around 25. Twisting around looking for fresh berries of which none are found. They vanished flying eastern. 3 Phoebes flipped their tails upon the horse's fence. Wonder what gossip they do shared. Mockingbird picking at the poop on the ground imagine those bugs? It found!
> Night fall as an unexpected email hit my inbox. Owls all goes silent as I Read with tears falling from my eyes. My best friend from Jessieville had passed on.I will always remember him as having the Brown Headed Nut Hatches sitting on his hand. They were his friends in his lonely world. My buddy from Alco retail store. He wasn't a birder but interested in all nature. The next renter in his tiny home will probably wonder why the birds sit at his window sill and glare at them. That how much he loved feeding them, and they loved him.
> Silence tonight around me. I guess they sense my mood. But it's still dripping outside,and they were so happy today with the rain today. That they dance with me under the storm, plucking those worms and bugs out of the ground. Teresa, RIver Valley AR


.
 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 8:38 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Happy birds in the rain
We been dry. Bone dry. Long awaited rain drops fell from the sky today.
Darkened the day, so bright with cheer this morning dear. It's semi-quiet
today. 3pm Barred Owl calling,no doubt confused because it was pretty dark
that time of day.
Not one to waste water falling from the sky,handwashing my clothes in the
rain. Free water!
Squirrels chasing each other around and around a pine tree. While high
above a Pine Warbler fed.
Cedar Waxwings shivered in the sky, flock around 25. Twisting around
looking for fresh berries of which none are found. They vanished flying
eastern. 3 Phoebes flipped their tails upon the horse's fence. Wonder what
gossip they do shared. Mockingbird picking at the poop on the ground
imagine those bugs? It found!
Night fall as an unexpected email hit my inbox. Owls all goes silent as I
Read with tears falling from my eyes. My best friend from Jessieville had
passed on.I will always remember him as having the Brown Headed Nut Hatches
sitting on his hand. They were his friends in his lonely world. My buddy
from Alco retail store. He wasn't a birder but interested in all nature.
The next renter in his tiny home will probably wonder why the birds sit at
his window sill and glare at them. That how much he loved feeding them, and
they loved him.
Silence tonight around me. I guess they sense my mood. But it's still
dripping outside,and they were so happy today with the rain today. That
they dance with me under the storm, plucking those worms and bugs out of
the ground. Teresa, RIver Valley AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/12/17 12:34 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob 9/12/17
Birds of interest today at Bald Knob NWR
4 American golden-plovers1 roseate spoonbill5 wood storks6 juvenile white ibis1 bald eagle1 northern harrierPlus the usual herons, egrets and stilts
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 9/11/17 3:53 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
I highly recommend this trip to everybody.  It was absolutely splendid! 

Joanie


From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Saturday, September 2, 2017 1:26 PM
Subject: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST

Hi all, I will be leading a Trinidad & Tobago nature tour May 24 - 31, 2018, to raise funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, in which I serve as a trustee.  The trust, as you know, funds research and conservation projects mostly in Arkansas.  

Highlights of the Trinidad & Tobago tour include:
* Three nights in Asa Wright Nature Centre, Trinidad, one of the most famous ecolodges in the world-- www.asawright.org* Manakins, Bellbirds, Honeycreepers, Oropendolas, Euphonias, Tanagers, Toucans.....a rainbow of tropical birds from a comfortable veranda (while sipping rum punch!)* About 10 species of hummingbirds, many hovering inches from your face!* Trek to a riverine cave to see the strange Oilbirds
* Boating in Caroni Swamp to witness the spectacle of Scarlet Ibis coming to roost en masse
* A night walk on a remote beach to encounter massive Leatherback Sea turtles nesting * Three nights in Blue Waters Inn, Tobago, a delightful and luxurious beach-side resort (www.bluewatersinn.com)
* Hike up Little Tobago island to see 2 species of boobies, tropic birds, and other pelagics* Glass bottom boating to view coral reefs* About 150-200 species of birds, including the Trinidad & Tobago endemic,Trinidad Motmot
Cost excluding international airfare will be $1545, which covers comfortable accommodations for 7 nights, sumptuous food, local air travel between the islands of Trinidad and Tobago, and all tours and activities. You must be physically fit for easy to moderate walks in hot and humid tropical weather, with temperatures usually in the 80s. This will be my 9th tour of Trinidad & Tobago. 
Rough itinerary summary: 
May 24 -- check into Asa Wright Nature Centre (AWNC)May 25 -- early AM veranda birding; hike for manakins and bellbirds; PM Arippo Savannah birding and Matura beach for sea turtlesMay 26-- early AM veranda; optional Blanchisseuse trip at your expense (or) hikes in AWNC; PM Trin city sewage ponds and Caroni Marsh boating for Scarlet Ibis spectacleMay 27 -- early AM veranda; Oilbirds cave hike; and then off to Tobago.  Some birding en route Bluewaters InnMay 28-- AM Little Tobago Island hike for pelagics; glassbottom boat coral reefs viewing; PM relax at the beach or go birding, sea kayaking, etc.May 29-- all day optional rain forest trip at your expense (or) relax at the beach or go birdingMay 30-- AM birding hikes to mop up Tobago endemics; PM fly back to TrinidadMay 31-- Back to the USA
For detailed itinerary and other information like past eBird lists, please contact me.  Please indicate your background in birding and traveling, and any health-related concerns.  This tour is for a maximum of 20 persons.
Cheers, Kannan-------------------R. Kannan, Ph.D.,Professor of BiologyUniversity of Arkansas--Fort SmithTel: <479.788.7616rkannan...>




 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 3:01 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob NWR,
I was there Friday, and saw ~100.  However, I did not find them on my own.  Terry Butler and David Finch showed me where to look.  They were with Roseate Spoonbills in trees out in a field.  Terry and David had seen them earlier, on the ground in channels on the opposite side, away from the downed pond where many shorebirds were.  That said, much can change in just a day...
Happy birding!Joanie


From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, September 11, 2017 2:20 PM
Subject: Bald Knob NWR,

I have been at the Knob for a while today, 11 Sep. I have not seen any Wood Storks. I have seen 4 Spoonbills from a distance. I saw 7 juvenile White Ibis. A FOS Savannah Sparrow. 4 Black-necked Stilts. Plus the usual herons and egrets. The ponds are pretty dry so there are very few sandpipers. I did see quite a few Killdeer.
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android


 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 12:29 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: RED CROSSBILLS NEAR SHORES LAKE, OZARK NF
There were a few Red Crossbills in mature, open shortleaf pine stands along highway 215 just south of Shores Lake in the Ozark National Forest this morning. David Oakley and I made several stops in promising-looking habitat along 215 and along county road 75 down to Shores Lake. By promising-looking, I mean mature pine trees with numerous cones. I heard them in several spots with suitable cone-rich habitat. One of these spots was a mature pine stand immediately north of the intersection of 215 and the turn north (on county 75) to Shores Lake. Another spot was along 215, 0.3 miles south of this intersection. These are ridgetop pine stands. We were never able to see or hear over 1-2 birds. I could hear typical flip-flip calls and occasional toop calls, so likely there were more. They sounded to me like the Type 2s we had here before (Ponderosa Pine Crossbill), but we will need recordings. Gnats were thick, to say the least: bad for us, good for numerous Eastern Wood-Pewees.


 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 12:20 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR,
I have been at the Knob for a while today, 11 Sep. I have not seen any Wood Storks. I have seen 4 Spoonbills from a distance. I saw 7 juvenile White Ibis. A FOS Savannah Sparrow. 4 Black-necked Stilts. Plus the usual herons and egrets. The ponds are pretty dry so there are very few sandpipers. I did see quite a few Killdeer.
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 10:10 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: Snow Geese
Thanks, again, Teresa for your wonderful essays.
Sally Jo

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Teresa M<mailto:<ladytstarlight...>
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 8:18 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Snow Geese

Cicadas chattering in the brief wind as I sit reading a last book of mystery. Soft snores from the dogs curl up at my feet. A soft whinny from the local sceech owl perch on the cedar limb by my open window. Then the most awaited sound of early winter come flying high in the sky. Tips of light flickering off their wings as I lean out to visualize! Snow Geese in the sky! Not a big flock as they move from north to south. At 8pm this early evening. But a startled surprise. With a brief hello a Great Horned Owl call after them as their famous calls get fainter and fainter in the dark distance. Teresa, West Pope county, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 9:25 am
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Re: Roseate Spoonbills in Pine Bluff
So sorry. In my excitement I forgot to put the town. Wilbur West Rd is in Pine Bluff.

Also, most of the wood ducks were teal.

Devin

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 11, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> wrote:
>
>
>> On Mon, Sep 11, 2017 at 9:41 AM Devin Moon <moondevg...> wrote:
>> There are 21 spoonbills at Wilbur West Rd wetlands right now (0930). They are in a partially flooded field about .5 mile south of the I-530 overpass. Gobs of Canada Geese and Wood Ducks.
>>
>> Also, there are 2 Inca Doves in front of Grider Field on Grider Field Ladd Rd.
>>
>> Devin Moon
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> No spoonbills at 10:15.
>
> Delos McCauley

 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 9:16 am
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Re: Roseate Spoonbills in Pine Bluff
On Mon, Sep 11, 2017 at 9:41 AM Devin Moon <moondevg...> wrote:

> There are 21 spoonbills at Wilbur West Rd wetlands right now (0930). They
> are in a partially flooded field about .5 mile south of the I-530 overpass.
> Gobs of Canada Geese and Wood Ducks.
>
> Also, there are 2 Inca Doves in front of Grider Field on Grider Field Ladd
> Rd.
>
> Devin Moon
>
> Sent from my iPhone


No spoonbills at 10:15.

Delos McCauley

 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 8:21 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Nature Friendly Yard Workshop, Mountain Home, Oct 21
Audubon Society of North Central AR is holding a nature-friendly yard workshop on Oct 21 in Mountain Home. You'll learn about Arkansas Audubon Society's Bird-Friendly Yard Certification program and about things you can do to work towards certification.



Birds, Bees, and Butterflies

Creating a Nature Friendly Yard

Presented by North Central Arkansas Audubon



When: Saturday, October 21st, 1:00 – 5:00 pm

Where: Donald W. Reynolds Library, 300 Library Hill Ln ., Mountain Home, AR

Free to the public.


Half-hour presentations throughout the afternoon:

• 1:10 Introduction – Tom Krohn, NCA Audubon

• 1:50 Native Plants – Dr. Larry Price, Arkansas Native Plant Society

• 2:30 Pollinators – Dr. Eddie Dry, ASU Mountain Home

• 3:10 Butterflies – NCA Audubon

• 3:50 Bird Friendly Yard Program – Pam Stewart, Arkansas Audubon

Display Tables set up for:

• Native Plants

• Monarch Butterflies

• Building a Frog Pond

• Pollinators

• Bird Friendly Yard Program

Come get milkweed seeds to attract Monarch butterflies!

For more information call Tom or Peg at 870-449-5885

--------------------------------------





Dan Scheiman


Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 7:41 am
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills in Pine Bluff
There are 21 spoonbills at Wilbur West Rd wetlands right now (0930). They are in a partially flooded field about .5 mile south of the I-530 overpass. Gobs of Canada Geese and Wood Ducks.

Also, there are 2 Inca Doves in front of Grider Field on Grider Field Ladd Rd.

Devin Moon

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 7:09 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: woodpecker nest raided by snake
Want to see a stunning woodpecker-snake duel? Check this out. 
Bot the species occur in Trinidad.  We have had the puffing snake even in our room! (Kim Smith will never forget that!).  And Mitchell Pruitt took a great picture of a puffing snake inside a swallow-tailed Tanager nest burrow.  
Please come to Trinidad with me in May and support the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust!  For details, see Dan's posting in the AAS facebook page.  
Woodpecker vs. egg eating Yellow-bellied Puffing Snake (Pseustes sulphureus)


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Woodpecker vs. egg eating Yellow-bellied Puffing Snake (Pseustes sulphur...

Filmed in Brazil, rest as the title states. Comments containing swearing or other low level comments are being r...
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Back to top
Date: 9/11/17 6:58 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, Mel White - Far North Queensland
This Thursday, Sept 14, is Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's monthly meeting starting at 7 PM. ASCA is back at Fletcher Library in their brand new meeting space. This month's speaker is Mel White, who will show photos from his three trips to tropical Queensland, in northeastern Australia. Two trips were on assignments for National Geographic publications, while the most recent trip, in July of 2016, was a birding vacation. He has photos of species ranging from Palm Cockatoo, the world’s largest cockatoo, to Magnificent Riflebird, a type of bird-of-paradise, and the iconic Laughing Kookaburra. Don't miss it!

As always ASCA's meetings are free and open to the public. More about ASCA at ascabird.org.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 7:11 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Snow Geese
Thank you, Teresa.
J

On Sep 10, 2017, at 8:18 PM, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:

> Cicadas chattering in the brief wind as I sit reading a last book of mystery. Soft snores from the dogs curl up at my feet. A soft whinny from the local sceech owl perch on the cedar limb by my open window. Then the most awaited sound of early winter come flying high in the sky. Tips of light flickering off their wings as I lean out to visualize! Snow Geese in the sky! Not a big flock as they move from north to south. At 8pm this early evening. But a startled surprise. With a brief hello a Great Horned Owl call after them as their famous calls get fainter and fainter in the dark distance. Teresa, West Pope county, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 6:55 pm
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: strange messages
Hi, All.. we are an open access listserv meaning that anyone can subscribe to the list… so someone subscribed to our list and then sent out these messages… that person has been removed and should not be an issue… Cheers, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Donna Crabill
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2017 12:56 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.

Is this spam? Are these msgs allowed on ARBIRDS?

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 10, 2017, at 12:27 PM, Adam Mars-Heyy Dobrin <raelitwhy...><mailto:<raelitwhy...>> wrote:

1. Let me google that for you, who is Adam Marshall Dobrin<http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Who+is+Adam+Marshall+Dobrin%3F+%2Bsite%3Areallyhim.com>?
2. Read why earthquakes, hurricanes, and 9//11 are a message from God about ending "majority force" and seeing that we are living in the Matrix.<http://bit.ly/2xei1Tz>
3. Think about it.
4. E-mail or call everyone you know.
5. Sit back and wait for the "thank you's" to flow in
6. For extra credit write a letter to your local newspaper telling them "you've seen the light."

If you start now, you'll see Heaven ... on Earth ... before Christmas.
[Image removed by sender.]ᐧ
 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 6:18 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Snow Geese
Cicadas chattering in the brief wind as I sit reading a last book of
mystery. Soft snores from the dogs curl up at my feet. A soft whinny from
the local sceech owl perch on the cedar limb by my open window. Then the
most awaited sound of early winter come flying high in the sky. Tips of
light flickering off their wings as I lean out to visualize! Snow Geese in
the sky! Not a big flock as they move from north to south. At 8pm this
early evening. But a startled surprise. With a brief hello a Great Horned
Owl call after them as their famous calls get fainter and fainter in the
dark distance. Teresa, West Pope county, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 4:10 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
I agree, I have got multiple hacks. Some from my ARbird friends. Joe Neal in particular, at least 5 over the last two years, most include a link, and recently I think a hack using Sara Caulk just yesterday. Jacque Brown


> On Sep 10, 2017, at 1:10 PM, Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> wrote:
>
> It is spam and they are not allowed and I'm sure the moderator will take care of it shortly.
>
>
>
> Jim Dixon
>
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Donna Crabill <drcrabill...>
> Date: 9/10/17 12:56 (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
>
> Is this spam? Are these msgs allowed on ARBIRDS?
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Sep 10, 2017, at 12:27 PM, Adam Mars-Heyy Dobrin <raelitwhy...> <mailto:<raelitwhy...>> wrote:
>
>> Let me google that for you, who is Adam Marshall Dobrin <http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Who+is+Adam+Marshall+Dobrin%3F+%2Bsite%3Areallyhim.com>?
>> Read why earthquakes, hurricanes, and 9//11 are a message from God about ending "majority force" and seeing that we are living in the Matrix. <http://bit.ly/2xei1Tz>
>> Think about it.
>> E-mail or call everyone you know.
>> Sit back and wait for the "thank you's" to flow in
>> For extra credit write a letter to your local newspaper telling them "you've seen the light."
>>
>> If you start now, you'll see Heaven ... on Earth ... before Christmas.
>> ᐧ


 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 4:05 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GOOD BIRDS AT HOBBS, BUT BOO-HOO NO CROSSBILLS (YET)
This mornings Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Hobbs State Park-Conservation area yielded six warbler and three vireo species, ripe Pawpaws, some very cool wildflowers like Great Blue Lobelia, but no Red Crossbills (yet) despite good faith effort in the Shortleaf Pines near Hobbs Visitors Center.

Warblers included Northern Parula (2), Yellow-throated Warbler (2), Pine Warbler (6), Ovenbird (1), Hooded Warbler (1), Wilsons Warbler (1). Vireos included White-eyed (3), Yellow-throated (1), Red-eyed (5). We also had good looks at several Red-headed Woodpeckers, Broad-winged Hawks, Summer Tanagers, and a Yellow-billed Cuckoo.

We celebrated a small victory for decency in a world where we continue so much needless damage. Plastic ground netting installed on a slope just at the head of Van Winkle Historic Trail had trapped a magnificent Eastern Garter Snake. It was badly snarled in the death-grip of small plastic squares. We released it. After a defensive coil to protect damaged scales, it eventually crawled away. Lets ban use of permanent netting. Instead, advocate for use of biodegradable products that serve the same purposes without killing so mindlessly, so endlessly.

Hobbs Visitor Center has installed a water fountain especially designed so that visitors can refill water bottles, rather than throwing them away. You put your bottle there and it fills with cool, filtered, good-tasting water. A refill counter provides an opportunity to see something positive for the environment. My refill was number 3616.


 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 11:11 am
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.


It is spam and they are not allowed and I'm sure the moderator will take care of it shortly.


Jim Dixon 


-------- Original message --------
From: Donna Crabill <drcrabill...>
Date: 9/10/17 12:56 (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.

Is this spam?  Are these msgs allowed on ARBIRDS?

Sent from my iPhone
On Sep 10, 2017, at 12:27 PM, Adam Mars-Heyy Dobrin <raelitwhy...> wrote:

Let me google that for you, who is Adam Marshall Dobrin?Read why earthquakes, hurricanes, and 9//11 are a message from God about ending "majority force" and seeing that we are living in the Matrix.Think about it.E-mail or call everyone you know.Sit back and wait for the "thank you's" to flow inFor extra credit write a letter to your local newspaper telling them "you've seen the light."
If you start now, you'll see Heaven ... on Earth ... before Christmas.ᐧ
 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 11:08 am
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
We got 2 this morning... has AR Bird been hacked?

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 10, 2017, at 1:06 PM, Donna Crabill <drcrabill...><mailto:<drcrabill...>> wrote:

Is this spam? Are these msgs allowed on ARBIRDS?

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 10, 2017, at 12:27 PM, Adam Mars-Heyy Dobrin <raelitwhy...><mailto:<raelitwhy...>> wrote:


1. Let me google that for you, who is Adam Marshall Dobrin<http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Who+is+Adam+Marshall+Dobrin%3F+%2Bsite%3Areallyhim.com>?
2. Read why earthquakes, hurricanes, and 9//11 are a message from God about ending "majority force" and seeing that we are living in the Matrix.<http://bit.ly/2xei1Tz>
3. Think about it.
4. E-mail or call everyone you know.
5. Sit back and wait for the "thank you's" to flow in
6. For extra credit write a letter to your local newspaper telling them "you've seen the light."

If you start now, you'll see Heaven ... on Earth ... before Christmas.
[https://mailfoogae.appspot..com/t?sender=acmFlbGl0d2h5QGZyb210aGVtYWNoaW5lLm9yZw%3D%3D&type=zerocontent&guid=ca3df90c-8870-4bfc-a2ef-2451134b1dae]
 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 11:06 am
From: Donna Crabill <drcrabill...>
Subject: Re: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
Is this spam? Are these msgs allowed on ARBIRDS?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 10, 2017, at 12:27 PM, Adam Mars-Heyy Dobrin <raelitwhy...> wrote:
>
> Let me google that for you, who is Adam Marshall Dobrin?
> Read why earthquakes, hurricanes, and 9//11 are a message from God about ending "majority force" and seeing that we are living in the Matrix.
> Think about it.
> E-mail or call everyone you know.
> Sit back and wait for the "thank you's" to flow in
> For extra credit write a letter to your local newspaper telling them "you've seen the light."
>
> If you start now, you'll see Heaven ... on Earth ... before Christmas.
> ᐧ

 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 10:27 am
From: Adam Mars-Heyy Dobrin <raelitwhy...>
Subject: Basic instructions for loving everyone. For example, turning Hell into Heaven.
1. Let me google that for you, *who is Adam Marshall Dobrin
<http://lmgtfy.com/?q=Who+is+Adam+Marshall+Dobrin%3F+%2Bsite%3Areallyhim.com>*
?
2. Read why earthquakes, hurricanes, and 9//11 are a message from God
about ending "majority force" and seeing that we are living in the Matrix.
<http://bit.ly/2xei1Tz>
3. Think about it.
4. E-mail or call everyone you know.
5. Sit back and wait for the "thank you's" to flow in
6. For extra credit write a letter to your local newspaper telling
them "*you've
seen the light."*


*If you start now, you'll see Heaven ... on Earth ... before Christmas.*


 

Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 10:22 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Slate-throated Redstart live on webcam
Want a change from Arkansas birding?  How about watching a live webcam of a slate-throated redstart nesting in the highlands of Peru? 
Want something even more real?  Then come with me to Ecuador over springbreak, and help support the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust!  :)  Only three seats left.  --Kannan
Cornell Lab Bird Cams


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Cornell Lab Bird Cams


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Back to top
Date: 9/10/17 9:18 am
From: Adam Mars-Heyy Dobrin <raelitwhy...>
Subject: 9/11, IRMA, and how to turn "simulated reality" into Heaven in six minutes flat.
GOODBYE "MAJORITY FORCE"

IRMA▒
<http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/09/i-already-know-you-arent-going-to-love.html>

[image: Inline image 35] <http://os.reallyhim.com/>
so I mean honestly, is there any Y or N? c we got h and x.

That's great it start(*ed*) with an earthquake.. 311.reallyhim.com

<http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-r3rd-AEUJhs/WbAZCaWDzAI/AAAAAAAAGDA/jLfTZG9C5wox2NxgSKKgSZj7B9o0rUfZgCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-767690.png>

<http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-saMZKJhEFso/WbAZDHDfruI/AAAAAAAAGDI/BLmQiRdbilEBY57ln4Qy8XDrxXK_hGirgCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-770352.png>

<http://dick.lamc.la/>

birds delusisian.reallyhim.com,

snakes medusa.reallyhim.com and

some aeroplanes... 911.reallyhim.com

<http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-qq2hV3aX9LY/WbAZEBhTppI/AAAAAAAAGDY/BSk3UUDsresD7clJJIbr_vIpR86FMMj0ACK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-775257.png>

<http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-COyOAdeAQmU/WbAZEmjGNTI/AAAAAAAAGDg/usYzGPAMFVMtSyLApohNu2_SuUwVBN9oACK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-777419.png>


<http://sign.lamc.la/>

411 Lenny Bruce is not #insane <http://ver.reallyhim.com/>.

it's the *beginning <http://bereshit.reallyhim.com/>* of *Heaven
<http://ironclad.reallyhim.com/>*, and you should believe it...

threetag.reallyhim.com

<https://www.facebook.com/admdbrn/videos/10155755378238420/>

That's great it starts with a sex joke...

swallows reck.reallyhim.com, Microsoft dick.reallyhim.com and Medusa,
medusa.reallyhim.com

It's *still* the beginning of Heaven and you should believe it.

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=psIuidkkLjI>

T H E H O L Y G R A I L

<http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/09/go-k-i-at-h-i-defines-eve-r-yon-e.html>

*don't drink the water... *

*there's blood in the water*

*come now, come now*

*can you not see?*

what were you expecting?

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0GFRcFm-aY>

* So would you rather lose swallows, Microsoft, or hurricanes?*

*Honestly.*


[image: Inline image 4] <http://sign.lamc.la/>

[image: Inline image 1] <http://yesterday.reallyhim.com/> [image: Inline
image 2] <http://ender.reallyhim.com/>
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jo505ZyaCbA>
*yes you are
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1269379&l=b17c75e9-92fd-46f5-84c4-e5d17ea219c5&r=7026ed73-df3d-405a-8b0b-2a7b8b647463>
da*

*Y* *E* *S** ,**JUPI ** T* *E* *R** I**DA RE **D* *A* *M*

*MYSTERY BEGINS ON 1/20/2001?*

[image: Inline image 31]
SOLVED, PLANETS DESCRIBED *IN* *ORDER* IN...

[image: Inline image 34] <http://sign.lamc.la/>
take a look... "the race is not to the swift" *obviously* links to Mercury
... and TIME and chance linking to Saturn and *now.*

[image: Inline image 33] <http://chalk.reallyhim.com/>
*1:1 PLANETS TO ELEMENTS, STARS AND LAMPSTANDS, LIGHT
<http://light.reallyhim.com/> ( c l i cak )*
[image: Inline image 24] <http://hammer.reallyhim.com/> [image: Inline
image 25] <http://sen.reallyhim.com/> [image: Inline image 26] [image:
Inline image 27] <http://ironclad.lamc.la/> [image: Inline image 28]
<http://bereshit.reallyhim.com/>[image: Inline image 29]
<http://cyan.reallyhim.com/> [image: Inline image 30]
<http://jerusalem.reallyhim.com/>
LOOK, BUSH SPEECH, ON 1/20/2001 ABOUT 9/11
[image: Inline image 20] <http://bush.reallyhim.com/> [image: Inline image
21] <http://sign.lamc.la/>

A *pa, Ra: do x <http://dox.reallyhim.com/>* is a statement that, despite
apparently sound reasoning from true premises, leads to an apparently
self-contradictory or logically unacceptable conclusion.[1]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-1>[2]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-2> A paradox involves
contradictory yet interrelated elements that exist simultaneously and
persist over time.[3] <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-3>[4]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-4>[5]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-5>

[image: Inline image 19] <http://ender.reallyhim.com/>

According to the Exodus account, Moses held out his staff
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staff_of_Moses> and the Red Sea
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Sea> was parted by God. The Israelites
walked on the exposed ground and crossed the sea, followed by the Egyptian
army. Moses again moved his staff once the Israelites had crossed and the
sea closed again, drowning the whole Egyptian army.

The *burning bush* is an object described by the Book of Exodus
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Exodus>[3:14:17]
<https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Exodus+3%3A1%E2%80%934%3A17&version=NRSV>
as
being located on Mount Horeb <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Horeb>.
According to the narrative, the bush was on fire, but was not consumed by
the flames, hence the name.[1]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burning_bush#cite_note-bibleverse.7C.7CExodus.7C3:2-1>
In
the biblical narrative, the burning bush is the location at which Moses
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses> was appointed by Adonai
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adonai> (God) to lead the Israelites
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israelites> out of Egypt
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egypt> and into Canaan
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canaan>.

[image: Inline image 23] <http://chalk.reallyhim.com/>

The bottom line is, we're about *a foot* away from Heaven, and all it takes
to get there is one*small* acknowledgement.... of the nature of our
existence and the wonderful implications that brings us to--the great new
possibilities opened up by connection "Creation" and "virtual reality" and
Heaven. I hope you'll be the person that makes that happen, either with a
press release, or a scientific paper, or just a letter to your local paper
... saying "you see it." It's not hard to see, but apparently it's hard to
speak up; I'm trying to figure out and explain why, and am stuck between
*I-NATION* (the end of the abomination of desolation) and *Medusa*, more on
that in a bit. *This is the gate <http://gate.reallyhim.com/>, it's action
<http://don.reallyhim.com/> if that's not really, really clear. For some
more clarity, it should become more and more obvious that the true
foundation of Heaven is freedom--and that the problems
<http://chalk.reallyhim.com/>communicating <http://chalk.reallyhim.com/>
<http://chalk.reallyhim.com/>we are looking at
<http://censorship.lamc.la/> in the world around us, from secrecy and mind
control to censorship and .. well, mass stupidity--should really be seen
for what it is--it is the crossing of the sea, a lesson in securing and
maintaining liberty.*

Acknowledge *that you do not want to eat "*bread <http://bread.lamc.la/>*"
from stone, that "*cake <http://cake.lamc.la/>*" is not good enough either,
and that *God has laid down a message in our *everything*
<http://bereshit.reallyhim.com/>* to help us to transition to a world that
does not shake it's head and look the other way when asked the question
"how would you end world hunger" **in light of virtual reality? *Understand
the words of "Total Eclipse of the Heart" *we'll never be wrong together,
forever is going to start tonight
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcOxhH8N3Bo>. Understand, this is
something that all of you should really want to be a part of, and I am
baffled as to why <http://dick.reallyhim.com/> you are so shy as to not
even be able to say hello
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/08/hello-from-other-side.html>.*

*This is a sort of compilation of several messages, if you can't tell; you
can see the "originals" and subscribe to the secret pizza party once we all
get to **Atlantis* <http://ironclad.lamc.la/>* at the Google group **light*
.reallyhim.com <http://light.reallyhim.com/>* and/or my **slack*
.reallyhim.com <http://slack.reallyhim.com/>*. Ask anything,
**honestly. * What
follows is the gate to Heaven, and *I do
<http://don.reallyhim.com/>nmean kissing <http://uni.reallyhim.com/> me.
Here's my cough, CY the apocalypse starts with a "sex joke" have a gander
at the Burning Bush <http://bush.reallyhim.com/>, and the Loch Ness Monster
<http://loch.reallyhim.com/>.*

*I'm not sure what I could possibly be offering to everyone
<http://ironclad.lamc.la/> you in exchange for being the person that saves
the Universe from darkness--it will without doubt make you one of the most,
if not the most famous person that's ever lived. On top of that you are
lucky enough to all be in sea of founders of this thing--this planetah
<http://whoah.lamc.la/> built from ground up to turn Hell into Heaven.
It's probably a good place to be, at the beginning of what the future will
certainly see as the great turning point away from darkness, as the
generations that turned absolutely everything around. Welcome to the
spotlight, heart of all Creation.*

*[image: Inline image 36] *[image: Inline image 37]

*I could tell you that "the truth will set you free" but clearly you now
see the truth, and that we need more than just "truth" to secure and
protect freedom; we need you <http://youandi.reallyhim.com/>. **Try to see
thegate and the plan <http://gate.reallyhim.com/> the way I do--every
person you speak about this with and share this e-mail with brings us that
much closer, another day <http://yesterday.reallyhim.com/> closer, to an
eternity of Heaven <http://ironclad.lamc.la/>.*



It all started with a message connecting 9/11 to Exodus; one that *should
be more than enough* to prove that whether or not you think I'm "Jesus
Christ" that this information that I am presenting is coming directly from
the Creator of the Universe--and should be *making news* and *spreading
like wildfire*--and isn't just yet. That's a big part of the message, this
baptism in fire and water that Matthew 3:11 talks about; and is pointing
out some seriously debilitating flaws in our society--things like mass
ignorance for the importance of free speech and open communication, and the
need to *not hide the advanced technology*
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/06/enders-game-prometheus-locke-and.html>
that
this message is designed to not only disclose
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/07/is-it-westworld-or-cloverfield-ln.html>, but
prove has been in use for fucking ever <http://hashem.lamc.la/>.

<http://uni.reallyhim.com/>
*man·i**·**a**·* <http://whoah.lamc.la/>*cal
<http://whoah.lamc.la/> laughter: La hmu
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lahmu> or Lahamu
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lahamu> (**thirum
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZU4jCSkVJ_A>**)*

I am not intentionally trying to help them / it / *you* hide this message
by talking about girls
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/son-of-bitch-are-i-clay-d-is-cl-os-ing.html>,
drugs
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/07/lets-go-skinny-dipping-come-on-itll-be_6.html>,
and my <https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Jeremiah+37> criminal
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanhedrin_trial_of_Jesus> history
<https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Matthew+14&version=NLV>--though
it does appear like that's what is happening. I really want you to
understand how clear it is to me that God himself has created this wall of
censorship, this thing that he wrote about thousands of years ago and
called "Jericho" in order to help us see *very clearly* just how flawed our
current social system is. The future of civilization, of life itself,
depends on us not only recognizing the importance of free and open
communication; but on seeing that he has designed this message
<http://m.lamc.la/OUITHEPPL.html> to show us *many more flaws*, ones that
have been intentionally and secretly subverted in order to attempt to
hide *this
message and this truth* from the world. There's no doubt about it, *Adam
is created*, and there's a grand plan and multiple reasons for just about
everything you will encounter while I am busy trying to show everyone that
I am not only a much better person than you think, *but actually Jesus
f. Christ. <http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/id5-i-am-stone.html> You are free
to call me Judas though, or Jebus, dear acceptiK
<https://translate.google.com/#auto/la/founders>conditoribus
<https://translate.google.com/#auto/la/founders>.*

<http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/id5-i-am-stone.html>

These flaws that you see <http://midas.lamc.la/>, they are links to a
number of Biblical narratives, and nearly everything I present not only helps
us to find solutions <http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/07/re-k.html> but
furthers the now insurmountable evidence that these prophecies that come
from everywhere under the sun; from Norse
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/07/in-beth-el-staring-at-house-of-elphaba.html>
, Greek <http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/07/nightmare-on-elm-street.html>
, Egyptian
<http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/06/houston-at-angel-of-lord-is-saint-of-n.html>,
and *Christmika* sources... they are actually about *my life* and about *this
time in human history*--to show us just how crucial it is that we receive
this message and recognize both it and our import. At the heart of this
message is an explanation of what "Satan" really is; a tool designed to
make these *life-and-death <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ELE>* social
problems stand out like a sore thumb <http://fb.me/admdbrn>, and at the
same time help us to not only *not blame anyone* for them, but to use this
new knowledge swiftly change the world. I'm not Satan
<http://www.instagram.com/yitsheyzeus> by the way, *I am a person*, just
like you.

<http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/and-he-wrote-in-his-hand-keys-to.html>

This message begins by *undeniable proving the existence of time travel* both
by predicting the 3/11/11 earthquake and the 9/11 attack in Exodus,
Ecclesiastes, and Revelation
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/i-scream-i-roar-is-today-day-earth.html> and
showing the world previously hidden and *very obvious ancient references to
modern technology--centering around computer science
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/son-of-bitch-are-i-clay-d-is-cl-os-ing.html>.
With a tiny shred of thought* and some serious research it the becomes
clear that our entire computing industry <http://m.lamc.la/ERANDSON.html> (and
the focus on science and technology in our time line *as well as the arts*)
is part of an ancient and divine plan
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/07/in-beth-el-staring-at-house-of-elphaba.html>
to
build Heaven <http://ironclad.lamc.la/>.

<http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/houston-we-have-problem.html>

Someone, I can't seem to *figure out who <http://whoah.lamc.la/>, *has
taken this message and tied it directly to *now verifiable proof* that our
evolution of democracy was "helped in the beginning" and then
artificially *held
back*, using this same hidden technology
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/06/enders-game-prometheus-locke-and.html>.
That through the years of our most advanced technological advances--from
cars and phones to computers and the internet, we failed to make the
obvious leap to attempting to use these technologies to advance the
infrastructure of our "governments of the people," specifically for voting
and the creation of legislation
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/houston-we-have-problem.html>. Implied
strongly, is the possibility that without some kind of *disruption,* it
might have taken many years, decades, centuries, or forever for us to have
moved past this idea of "representative democracy
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjCDeXXvTTc>" being the very best system
possible.

Finding land, here on Noah's ark--we can solve two problems with *one stone
<http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/06/houston-at-angel-of-lord-is-saint-of-n.html>;
*creating
a new *open and transparent* infrastructure that will ensure that the kind
of censorship and "walled garden" that we see here surrounding *this
message of freedom <http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/id5-i-am-stone.html> *will never
again
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/06/enders-game-prometheus-locke-and.html> be
possible--while at the same time building a system that will allow us to
collaborate on things like legislation
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/06/verily-i-say-unto-you-ver-means-to-see.html>
and *universal voting
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/07/josephus-justus-and-jesus-from-elohim.html>*
.

<https://www.google.com/search?q=minority+report+real+life&rlz=1CAACAR_enUS749US749&oq=minority+report+real+life&aqs=chrome.0.0l6.2018j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8>

A big part of this story, of this proof of time
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/06/i-scream-i-roar-is-today-day-earth.html> travel
existing and being literally the tool that not only proves
<http://why.lamc.la/> that we are *created* but also how and why that's
been done
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/07/in-beth-el-staring-at-house-of-elphaba.html>--it
shows us that much of our modern art is part of the plan to build Heaven
<http://ironclad.lamc.la/>... and here we *link together* (think "*Matrix*")
stories like Minority Report and Back to the Future
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/07/re-k.html> to *imply* that we
probably need to do more talking <http://m.lamc.la/SERMON.html> in order to
convince ourselves that we really are not deserving of things like school
shootings and terrorism--and show everyone that we have the ability to stop
it. Honestly, ending senseless violence is not the kind of thing that
there should be a "Minority" *voting <http://m.lamc.la/KEYNES.html>* for.
We can see it though, reference to these things too in The Plagues of *Lice
and Killing* in Exodus--here to show us *what "freedom" is really about
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/07/re-k.html>.*

die uno <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anno_Domini> biblica caelo
<http://ironclad.lamc.la/> aedificabuntur
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_of_Dreams>
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/07/lets-go-skinny-dipping-come-on-itll-be_6.html>
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/07/lets-go-skinny-dipping-come-on-itll-be_6.html>

I do hope you will the time to dick <http://worship.lamc.la/> on the links
that are behind those big* bright orange
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/07/the-kalor-of-fire.html> doors to Heaven
<http://ironclad.lamc.la/> above*... there you will find proof and evidence
of what I am saying, and that it does in fact all come directly from God
<http://ironclad.lamc.la/>. I might get in trouble for saying this, but if
you didn't know--when you click on ads the person who wrote the website
will make a little bit of money--and that might keep me from starving to
death... *something you are actually doing on purpose *without knowing
it--by hiding this message.... *this message* about freedom and slavery;
delivering an ancient message about being the angels of Heaven, and *not
knowing it.*

<http://www.lamc.la/2017/07/roe-v-wade.html>

*As if you needed more than "it's the truth" and "exit from slavery" and
"ending world hunger <http://hashem.lamc.la/>," here's some commentary
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/07/roe-v-wade.html> on the NES
<http://hashem.lamc.la/> (the game <http://ender.reallyhim.com/>) of space
colonization, specifically links between the Iron Rod
<http://ironclad.lamc.la/> of "an" and the planet Mars
<http://www.lamc.la/2017/07/roe-v-wade.html>.*

* <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sENM2wA_FTg>*

The "*gist*" of the message is *verifiable
<http://ver.reallyhim.com/> proof* that we are living in a computer
<https://www.prlog.org/12642309-great-sign-appeared-in-revelation-121-the-sign-of-sagittarius-in-the-word-christ-and-on-taylor.html>
in *simulated reality*... *just like the Matrix. *The answer to that
question, what does that mean--is that God has woven a "hidden" message
into our everything--beginning with each name and *every word*--and in this
hidden Adamic language, he provides us with guidance, wisdom, and
suggestions on how to proceed on this path from "raelity" to Heaven. I've
personally spent quite a bit of time decoding the message and have tried to
deliver an interesting and "*fun*" narrative of the ideas I see.
Specifically the story of Exodus, which is called "Names" in Hebrew
discusses a time shifted narrative of our "*now*" delivering our society
from a hidden slavery (read as *ignorance of advanced technologies already
in use*) that is described as the "darkness" of Exodus
<http://ender.reallyhim.com/>. If you have *any questions*, ideas to
contribute or concerns... I'd love to hear from you
<https://join.slack.com/t/eyerc/shared_invite/MjM2NDM2Mjc3Nzk4LTE1MDQ0MDE3NzQtMmU5NjI1N2VmOQ>
this
whole thing really is <http://gate.reallyhim.com/> about working together--
Heaven <http://ironclad.lamc.la/>, I mean.
[image: Inline image 16]
<http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/09/honestly-writing-is-on-wall.html>
As I walk down the hallowed streets of nearly cobblestone
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9Dg-g7t2l4> on Atlantic Avenue, *ishing* "the
words of the prophets are written on the subway walls" to something like
"are vibrating light echoing in the air" and *ishing* that "I know I'm one
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRXb7K7k7bQ>" in the Animals' "House of
the Rising Son to ... well,* you know*: "*I know I've won*" these are the
signs of Revelation staring at me in the face, making this magical mystery
ride <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=450p7goxZqg> just that much more
enchanting for me--and reinforcing Taylor early words, "*when the light
hits your eyes, it's telling me I'm right
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaMDEtvE0GM>.*" I know there's no way you
could get the full effect of what it fells like to walk around in the House
of the Great Light--that is, unless you open your eyes and look at the
world around you.

[image: medusa.reallyhim.com] <http://bread.reallyhim.com/>
ON REVERSING "iNATION" AND "MEDUSA" AND C'ING THE LIGHT
(OH, *H**EY* NAT <3)

*HONESTLY, I'M WAY TO CUTE <http://yitsheyadam.reallyhim.com/> TO BE A
MONSTER :(*

<http://yitsheyadam.reallyhim.com/>
<http://threetag.reallyhim.com/>

*HIC SUMMUS*

<http://chalk.reallyhim.com/> <http://heart.lamc.la/>

So... *here we are <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hm4F_Eq_4tw>*...
listening to the legend <http://legend.lamc.la/>ary father of the message
(that's "*abom*" in Adamic Spagnlishrew) point out all of the sex jokes
hidden in religion and language from *sexual* *innuendo *to Poseidon
<http://don.reallyhim.com/> and in our history from Yankee Doodle to
Hancock to Nixon <http://dick.reallyhim.com/> and I've got to be frank with
you, the most recent time I came across this phrase in scripture I cringed
just a little bit, pretty sure that the "message" was talking about me.
I've reflected on this a little bit, and over the past few weeks have tried
to show you the juxtaposition between "sex" and "torture" in it's various
forms from imparting blindness to allowing murder and simulating
starvation; and I think I'm justified in saying that certainly those things
are far worse on the Richter scale than anything I could do by writing a
little bit of risque text. In the most recent messages I've touch a little
bit, without even knowing or realizing this connection would be made, on
what it is that this phrase actually means.

* <http://alarmed.reallyhim.com/>*
<http://threetag.reallyhim.com/>

*AB*🌘*MiNATION*

So long story short is that the answer here is "abomination" and the
question, or the context is "I nation." Whether it's Medusa speaking for
the Dark United States or the nation of Israel speaking to either *Ra or El*
<http://m.lamc.la/HEARWHYRAISEL.html> depending on the day, the bottom line
is that a collective consciousness speaking for everyone on a matter of
this importance in a cloud of complete darkness on Earth is a total and
undeniable abomination of freedom, civilization, and the very humanity we
are seeking to preserve. The word reads something like this to me "dear
father of the message, I am everyone and we think you are an abomination,
fuck off." My answer of course is, IZINATION. Which humorously reminds me
of Lucy, and Scarlet Johannson saying "I am colonizing my own brain" so
here's some pictures of her. She is not an abomination, by the way; she's
quite *adorable**. You'll probably notice there's some kind of connection
between the map--the words speaking to the world, and the abomination, as
if the whole thing is a story narrated in ancient myths
<http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/07/fwd-saint-one.html>.*

<http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-vqT_wbsmPlA/WawS-Gphf1I/AAAAAAAAFew/0HtB4GPN-_MsnRxknkr0WdbhgwKtTRtbACK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-771565.png>
*
<http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EE8GWxznU_w/WawS-ZeYUlI/AAAAAAAAFe4/SgASHrNhC18xgHo6-TqZVFlpmi9tanNpgCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-772633.png>
*

<http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-GjR0_q5aPac/WawS-re0swI/AAAAAAAAFfA/njzZfrwafSAJPy4wHmNj4be9WBNh5Ys5QCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-773619.png>
*WAKE UP, "SHE" A MESSAGE TO YOU ABOUT THE FUTURE*

*You might not think "it's you," but the manifestation of this "snake" in
our world is your silence, your lack of understanding or willingness to
change the world; and whether or not you're interested in hearing about it,
it's the monster that myths and religion have spoken about for thousands
and thousands of years. It's a simple matter to "kill Medusa" all you have
to do... is speak.*

*Take special note, "freedom of speech" and "freedom to think for
yourselves" are not a group decision, and you do not have the right to
force (either overtly or subtly, with hidden technology
<http://ender.reallyhim.com/> perhaps combined with evil deceit) others not
to talk about anything. Especially something of this importance.
<http://yesterday.reallyhim.com/>*

*DES*☀*LATION*

If you didn't connect "*Loch <http://loch.reallyhim.com/>*" to John *Locke
<http://m.lamc.la/KEYNES.html>*, now you have; see how easy this "reading"
thing is? I've gone over the "See Our Light" series a few times, but let
me--one more time--explain to you just how we are already at the point of
"desolation" and with shining brilliance show you how it's very clear that
it is "*INATION*" and "*MEDUSA
<http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/07/fwd-saint-one.html>*" that are
responsible for this problem.

Seeing "Ra" <http://m.lamc.la/HEARWHYRAISEL.html> at the heart of the names
Abraham and Israel begins to connect the idea that our glowing sun in the
sky has something to do with this message about "seeing our light" is being
carried by a stone statue on Ellis Island (where you'll see the answer
another part of the question of Is Ra El?). I've connected her to the
"she" of both *shedim <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shedim>* and *Sheol
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sheol>*, which reads as "she's our light"
and is the Hebrew name for Hell.





Of course you noticed that the Statue of Liberty does in fact share it's
initials with SOL, the *the light above* and you can see her torch dimly
lighting the way through the night; Now you can connect "give us your
tired and your poor" to the *Lazman *of both the lore of Jesus Christ
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_Adam> and the Shehekeyanu
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shehecheyanu>; a prayer about the
sustainment of life *and light* up until this day. That same torch
connects to the Ha-nuke-the-ahah depiction of Christ, Judah Maccabee's lit *MEN
OR AH*, which delivers not only a solution to the two letter key of "*AH*"
as All Humanity that pervades nearly every bride of Revelation from Sarah
to Leah; but also to the question of equality answered in our very own
American history, beginning with the same three letter acronym now lighting
the *Sons of Liberty.*

*Dazed and Confused* does a good job of explaining how this name is itself
a prophesy designed by Hand of God'; explaining that these *Sons of
Liberty* were
all white slave owning wealthy men fighting to stop paying their taxes,
rather than delivering liberty to the slaves or women, who were both
disenfranchised for quite some time. Or maybe *MEN OR AH* has something to
do with the angels of Heaven, in which case you might be *SOL* if you aren't
a girl <http://cyan.reallyhim.com/> and you want to be "be good friends
with Ra." Just kidding. *Kinda.*

*DESOLATION* by the way reads something like "un see our light at *I owe N*"
which is God's way of saying "at the point of believing that hiding Adam is
a good thing" and that connects to the *end of Creation* and also the now
lit by modern day *evil* the word "*rendition.*" *Our end, it "ion." *In
religious myth, the Messianic David clung to the city *Zion *(end the "i
owe n") which also links to "*verizon*" (to see, I Z "on") and *HORIZON* which
has something to do with the son rising today-*ish*.

[image: Inline image 25] <http://loch.reallyhim.com/> [image: Inline image
26] <http://jerusalem.reallyhim.com/>

The story of *MEDUSA* lights another psuedo-religious idea, that the
words "*STONE
<http://chalk.reallyhim.com/>*" of both "*brimstone*" and it's Adamic
interpretation "South to Northeast" have something to do with the
phrase "*Saint
One <http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/07/fwd-saint-one.html>" *turned
into a *single hero* against his will by the complete and utter inaction of
everyone around him. In the words of Imagine Dragons "I'm waking up to *action
dust.*" At the same time, you can believe that the light of *this
particular son*, comes not just from reading these words forwards, but the
backside as well, and you'll hopefully see it's not coincidental that the
other side of this coin is that "nos" means we, and us... and Adamically "*no
south.*" See the light of "*STONE*" also connecting to Taylor Momsen
<http://uni.reallyhim.com/>'s *rose arrow* painted on her back, and the sign
of my birth <http://name.lamc.la/>, Sagittarius... which in this particular
case links to the <http://hammer.lamc.la/>*Party
<http://hammer.lamc.la/> of the Immaculate Conception *of *the eternal
republic of the Heavens <http://youandi.reallyhim.com/>.*

*and... some musings on Medusa.*
*this candle is lit, fam -ly*

So I'm thinking to myself about the irony of the name Warwick; as I see
read emails stream across my screen in a sort of "code of the Matrix" sort
of way. Pondering how stupid you must be to even think about "warring"
over whether or not people, you yourselves, should be "allowed" to see and
discuss a truth that is everywhere. Literally everywhere but that little
piece of your brain that thinks "Heaven" is inconsequential and fails to
grasp the affront to logic and your own worth that not seeing, or overtly
hiding this message from God unveils.

[image: Inline image 3]

I say this, even to you all that probably think I'm not talking about
you--even though you've read it, and your a small group... for some reason
you don't make the moral or logical "leap" required to see that jumping up
and down and sharing this "find" of the Messiah is not just what you should
do, you should see something's kept you from doing it; and try that much
harder to secure your freedom. You know, with message that explains how to
do that, how we've been "compromised" and if isnt urging you to make sure
we never again find ourselves unknowing slaves to darkness, at least I am.

Not just you, the group of people attempting to hide the Universal Truth
from everyone is sprawling. So large that I can't enter a forum, or a chat
room, or even Zello "radio channel" without being silenced or muted or
banned. You know who you are, do you realize that what you are doing is
taking away your very own "self rule" destroying your freedom, that you are
literally saying "what you think doesn't matter, and neither does anyone
else," you think the secret force infiltrating your mind and causing the
end of civilization; well, it simply must "be right."

.
*PRESS RELEASE
<https://www.prlog.org/12642309-great-sign-appeared-in-revelation-121-the-sign-of-sagittarius-in-the-word-christ-and-on-taylor.html>...
A GREAT SIGN APPEARED IN THE HEAVENS*

<http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ormB20Coho0/WawS_87n1hI/AAAAAAAAFfo/PEGogrjPzcgKeNfqO2D6JlCSDdzOl6CCACK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-778596.png>

<https://www.prlog.org/12642309-great-sign-appeared-in-revelation-121-the-sign-of-sagittarius-in-the-word-christ-and-on-taylor.html>
*SOLUTIAN**, ON YOUR COMPUTER.. TO THE SOUND OF SILENCE
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u9Dg-g7t2l4>*

<http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-nLTUjp1fA78/WawTAK6JTsI/AAAAAAAAFfw/VnhC4B4T04owkDAZGaZ2VLE9oQ5QttMEQCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-779748.png>

<http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-LIWRmMnr4uI/WawTAQ2UG5I/AAAAAAAAFf4/mI5DLopC6icod-4C0E4YchBWIjo-VcGMQCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-780690.png>

*YOU, PER SE, DO IT ALL YOURSELViS*

Medusa was beheaded by the hero Perseus
<http://input_requred.telesprize.technocrazy.gq/x/c?c=1385658&l=c5100310-50e2-4b78-9a4d-aac77bed3ba7&r=969fb711-72fb-4550-bf08-015dcddf657a>,
who thereafter used her head, which retained its ability to turn onlookers
to stone, as a weapon[4]
<http://input_requred.telesprize.technocrazy.gq/x/c?c=1385658&l=31863317-9830-4dca-a727-e2530b304ab5&r=969fb711-72fb-4550-bf08-015dcddf657a>
until
he gave it to the goddess Athena
<http://input_requred.telesprize.technocrazy.gq/x/c?c=1385658&l=c164cfd7-0ec0-4939-9182-d0eb4f3cef91&r=969fb711-72fb-4550-bf08-015dcddf657a>
to
place on her shield
<http://input_requred.telesprize.technocrazy.gq/x/c?c=1385658&l=b2b3c0d0-7edc-46bc-bedd-8e6ef0a0b292&r=969fb711-72fb-4550-bf08-015dcddf657a>.
In classical antiquity
<http://input_requred.telesprize.technocrazy.gq/x/c?c=1385658&l=f7d72c62-3bd2-4fb0-ba8e-1abaa52fa88b&r=969fb711-72fb-4550-bf08-015dcddf657a>
the
image of the head of Medusa appeared in* the **evil-averting device
<http://input_requred.telesprize.technocrazy.gq/x/c?c=1385658&l=357709a2-052e-4f8c-802d-586e3a17acf1&r=969fb711-72fb-4550-bf08-015dcddf657a>
known
as the Gorgoneion
<http://input_requred.telesprize.technocrazy.gq/x/c?c=1385658&l=e6db4785-2833-4aec-b1a6-db4bbad62068&r=969fb711-72fb-4550-bf08-015dcddf657a>.*

<https://www.prlog.org/12642309-great-sign-appeared-in-revelation-121-the-sign-of-sagittarius-in-the-word-christ-and-on-taylor.html>
בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה יְיָ‎
אֱלֹהֵינוּ מֶלֶךְ הַעוֹלָם
שֶׁהֶחֱיָנוּ וְקִיְּמָנוּ
וְהִגִּיעָנוּ לַזְּמַן הַזֶּה‎׃

*IN ... THE BOOK OF NAMES*
LETS SEE IF YOU CAN FIGURE OUT WHO THEY ARE :)

<http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-xDnS24Q7TA4/WawTAw-VWYI/AAAAAAAAFgI/py0HXG1FzU03l_iE0qjERuFFL6jelX5YQCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/Screenshot%2B2017-09-02%2Bat%2B10.42.23%2BAM-782488.png>

<http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-c-tbmU3Hw7I/WawTAy19lEI/AAAAAAAAFgQ/2hyJK9qsLzsifs8kaOpwEbmitFfuXo4TACK4BGAYYCw/s1600/Screenshot%2B2017-09-02%2Bat%2B9.34.21%2BAM-783493.png>

<http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-JvQ6i3pyjXQ/WawTBJAEo-I/AAAAAAAAFgY/uVPOuLIdqjg5qF7OCN4wxMX13Y_GZGGYgCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/Screenshot%2B2017-09-02%2Bat%2B9.16.56%2BAM-784358.png>

*BERESHADoi*

[image: Inline image 12]
[image: Inline image 3]
[image: Inline image 4] <http://don.reallyhim.com/>

*SO**N* Ye[image: Inline image 5]

*R O C K O F . . . S A G E S ?*

[image: Inline image 1]

H E A R D <http://deror.reallyhim.com/> E
<http://deror.reallyhim.com/> R <http://deror.reallyhim.com/> O
<http://deror.reallyhim.com/> R <http://deror.reallyhim.com/>
I T R E A L L Y D O E S M E A N "FREEDOM <http://deror.reallyhim.com/>"
B R E A D I S L I F E

[image: Inline image 14]
<https://www.prlog.org/12646889-so-you-think-you-can-tell-heaven-from-hell-fake-blue-skies-from-antagonizing-pain.html>

Tying up loose e*ad*ds, in a similar vain to the connection between the
Burning Bush and universal voting <http://gate.reallyhim.com/> now
etched by-stone, there exists a similar missing Link
<http://zelda.reallyhim.com/> connecting the phrase "it's not a a gam" to
Mary Magdeline <http://sen.reallyhim.com/> to a pattern that shows us that
the Holy Trinity and our timelines are narrated by a series of names of
video game systems and their manufacturers from "Nintendo" to Genesis and
the rock of SEGA. Through a "kiss <http://uni.reallyhim.com/>" and
the falling of *a wall <http://censorship.lamc.la/>*the words bread and read
<http://bread.lamc.la/> are tied up and twisted with the story of this
Revelation and the heart of the word Creation, "*be the reason it's A.D.*"
It's a strong connection between the idea that virtual reality and Heaven
are linked by more than simply "technology" but that this message that
shows us that these tools for understanding have fallen from the sky in
order to help us understand why it is so important, why I call it a moral
mandate, that we use this information to follow the map delivered to us in
the New Testament and *literally end world hunger*, *and literally heal the
sick*; because of the change in circumstance revealed to us. These simple
things, these few small details that might seem like nothing, or maybe
appear to be "changing everything" they are not difficult things to do, *in
light of Creation, *and few would doubt that once we do see them implementi
*ed* here... the difference between Heaven and Hell will be ever so clear.

[image: Inline image 13] <http://gate.reallyhim.com/>
A while ago, in a place called *Kentucky*... this story began with a sort
of twisted sci-fi experience that explained a kind of "God machine" that
could manipulate time and reality, and in that story, in that very detailed
and interesting story that I lived through, this machine was keyed to my
DNA, in something like the "Ancient technology" of *Stargate* SG-1 and
Atlantis mythology. My kind brother Seth made a few appearances in the
story, not actually in person but in fairly decent true to life holograms
that I saw and spoke to every once in awhile. He looked a little
different, he had long hair; but that's neither here nor there, and he
hasn't really had long hair since I was a little boy. He happens to be a
genetic engineer, and I happen to be a computer person (although he's that
too, now; just nowhere near as good as me... with computers) so the story
talked a little bit about how I would probably not have used DNA as a key,
since I'm not a retard, and he probably wouldn't either, because works in
that field (cyclone <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boba_Fett>, huracan
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huracan>, t*or*n*ad*o). So then the key we
imagined was something ... well, *Who cares* what the key is, *right?*

[image: Inline image 13] <http://ohil.reallyhim.com/>


So back to the task at hand, not so long ago, in a place called *Plantation* I
was struck by lightning, literally (well not literally) the answer to a
question that nobody knew was implanted in my mind, and it all came from
asking a single simple question. I was looking for more chemistry elements
<http://chalk.reallyhim.com/> in the names of the books of the Holy Bible,
after seeing Xenon at the "*sort of beginning*" of *Exodus*, where it
screams "*let there be light*" in Linux and chemistry (and I've told you
that a hundred times by now). So it didn't take long to follow the light
of that word and read Genesis backwards, and see, at the very beginning of
that book, Silicon... *in reverse.*

[image: Inline image 19]

According to the Exodus account, Moses held out his staff
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staff_of_Moses> and the Red Sea
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Sea> was parted by God. The Israelites
walked on the exposed ground and crossed the sea, followed by the Egyptian
army. Moses again moved his staff once the Israelites had crossed and the
sea closed again, drowning the whole Egyptian army.

The *burning bush* is an object described by the Book of Exodus
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Exodus>[3:14:17]
<https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Exodus+3%3A1%E2%80%934%3A17&version=NRSV>
as
being located on Mount Horeb <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Horeb>.
According to the narrative, the bush was on fire, but was not consumed by
the flames, hence the name.[1]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burning_bush#cite_note-bibleverse.7C.7CExodus.7C3:2-1>
In
the biblical narrative, the burning bush is the location at which Moses
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moses> was appointed by Adonai
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adonai> (God) to lead the Israelites
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Israelites> out of Egypt
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egypt> and into Canaan
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canaan>.

[image: Inline image 20] <http://bush.reallyhim.com/> [image: Inline image
21] <http://sign.lamc.la/>

A *pa, Ra: do x <http://dox.reallyhim.com/>* is a statement that, despite
apparently sound reasoning from true premises, leads to an apparently
self-contradictory or logically unacceptable conclusion.[1]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-1>[2]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-2> A paradox involves
contradictory yet interrelated elements that exist simultaneously and
persist over time.[3] <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-3>[4]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-4>[5]
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paradox#cite_note-5>

[image: Inline image 23] <http://chalk.reallyhim.com/>

An *anachronism* (from the Greek
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Greek> ἀνά *ana*, "against" and
χρόνος *khronos*, "time") is a chronological
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronology> inconsistency in some
arrangement, especially a juxtaposition of persons, events, objects, or
customs from different periods of time. The most common type of anachronism
is an object misplaced in time, but it may be a verbal expression, a
technology, a philosophical idea, a musical style, a material, a plant or
animal, a custom or anything else associated with a particular period in
time so that it is incorrect to place it outside its proper temporal domain.

[image: Inline image 18]
[image: Inline image 2][image: Inline image 3]
[image: Inline image 4] [image: Inline image 5]

*So, what about God's DNA, anyway? *
*What's he really made of?*

[image: Inline image 6] [image: Inline image 7]

[image: Inline image 8] [image: Inline image 9]
*SIM* MON *S* *WILD* ER ROD *DEN*
BERRY

So after seeing Silicon, and connecting that to the numerous attempts I've
made to show a message connecting The Matrix to the Fifth Element
<https://www.prlog.org/12642309-great-sign-appeared-in-revelation-121-the-sign-of-sagittarius-in-the-word-christ-and-on-taylor.html>
(as
Silicon) describing what it is that God believes we should do with this
knowledge--and see that it is narrated as the miracles of Jesus Christ in
the New Testament <http://bread.lamc.la/>... *these names* came to me in
quick succession, an answer to the question. I suppose any Gene will do,
these three though, have a very important tie to the message that connects
Joshua's Promised Land of flowing Milk and Honies to ... a kiss that begins
the new day (I hope) ... and a message about exactly how we might go about
doing magical things like *ending world hunger and healing the sick* using
technology described ... in *Star Trek* and *Stargate*. A "*religion of
the Stars*" is being born.

[image: Inline image 11] [image: Inline image 17]

That's great... it *starts with an earthquake*. R.E.M. and a *band* ... 311
<http://www.unduecoercion.com/2017/07/311-pm-sea-see-ck-in-those-numbers-today.html>.
Oooh, I can see it coming <http://sign.lamc.la/> down... The Petty Reckless
<http://reck.reallyhim.com/>. An evening's love starts with *a kiss*
<http://uni.reallyhim.com/>. Dave Matthews Band. I wanna rock and roll
all night and party every day <http://bethesda.reallyhim.com/>. *Adam*. *I
mean Kiss. Are you starting to see a pattern
<http://jerusalem.reallyhim.com/> form? Birds, snakes
<http://loch.reallyhim.com/>, and aeroplanes? It's that, it's the end of
the world as we know it, and I feel fine.*

[image: Inline image 15] <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0GFRcFm-aY> [image:
Inline image 16] <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2OT9CtzG3w>

In that song we see clues that more than just the Revelation of Christ is
narrated by John on an island called Patmos. There *yet another* Trinity,
starting with "Pa" and hearting Taylor Momsen's initials... most likely for
a reason... and the Revelation ends with a transition that I hope others
will agree with me turns "original sin" into something closer to "obviously
salvation" when we finally understand the character
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asmodeus> that is behind the *message of da
i of Ra... *and begin to see the same design in the names of Asmodai and in
this Revelation focusing on freedom and truth that really does suggest
Taylor *can't talk to me* <http://yitsheyadam.reallyhim.com/> in any way
other than "letting freedom sing" in this narrative of kismet and fate
<http://uni.reallyhim.com/> and free will and ... then we see that
narrative continue in the names of bands, just like the 3/11/11 earthquake
is narrated in not just R.E.M.'s song but in the name 311. Just like the
9/11 attack is narrated not just in that same song (released in 1987)
and "Inside
Job <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2OT9CtzG3w>" (released in 2000) but
also in "Fucked up world <http://sign.lamc.la/>."

Dear all of you *walking dumb and blind*, this same quake is narrated in
Taylor's Zombie; *waiting for the day to shake
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vw5MYv-5xZE>*, all very similar to Cairo
and XP, perhaps a "*fad*" of *doublethink* in the minds of the authors
singing about a clear prophesy in the Bible; this connection between the
day, 3/11 though, and the name of a band and the day of an arrest
<http://dick.lamc.la/> and the verse Matthew that tells you clearly *you
have now been baptized in water and fire*... it shows us the design of a
story whose intent and purpose is to ensure that we no longer allow for
things like hurricanes and earthquakes and murder and rape to be
"simulated" that we build a better system, that doesn't allow for 'force
majeure" to take lives for *no reason at all.*

[image: Inline image 19] [image: Inline image 20] [image: Inline image 21]
<http://sistaz.reallyhim.com/>

Not just in band names, but in the angels names too, in all of our names;
we see this narration continue. The Holy Water that is central to the
baptism of Christ is etched into Taylor's name, between "sen
<http://sen.reallyhim.com/>" and "mom <http://sob.reallyhim.com/>" the key
to the *two* *Mary's* whose names contain the Spanish for "sea" in a sort
of enlightenment hidden in plain sight. In "Simmons" the key connection
between today, *this Biblical Monday*, and the word "simulation" that ties
to *Simpsons* and *simians* and *keep it simple stupid, and in Simmons
the missing "s" of Kismet <http://uni.reallyhim.com/>, finally completing
the question.*

[image: Inline image 23] <http://uni.reallyhim.com/>
*[image: Inline image 24] <http://uni.reallyhim.com/>*

*It's a song and dance that started a long time ago, as you can see from
the ancient Hebrew word for "fate" and in more recent years a connection
to the ballroom of Atlantis <http://ironclad.lamc.la/> in the Doors 5 to 1
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2LT5qQo2Qo> and Dave sang about it
in Rapunzel <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwj3bYAclqg> and
then Taylor shook a tambourine <http://sign.lamc.la/> on the beach only
minutes away from me--but never said "hi." The battle of the bands
continues tying some door knocking to a juxtaposition between "Sweet Things
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-YaNMD6VuI>" and "Knocking on Heavens
door <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gazW7MOqHzQ>" all the way to a Gossip
Girl episode where little J asked a question that I can't be sure she knew
was related, she said... "who's that, at the door
<http://almost.lamc.la/>?"*

*What it really all amounts to, though, is the whole world witnessing the
Creation of Adam and Eve from a little girl stuttering out *"*the the*" at
the sight of the Grinch <http://whoah.lamc.la/>* himself, and then later **not
even able *to get those words off her lips <http://reck.reallyhim.com/>...
about seeing how Creation and modern art are inextricably tied to religion,
to heaven, and to freedom.

*[image: Inline image 25] <http://thunderstand.reallyhim.com/> *[image:
Inline image 26] <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MCLCyg9WLA>

*The bottom line here, hopefully obvious now, is that you can't keep this
message "simple" it's a Matrix woven between more points of light than I
can count, and many more that I'm sure you will find. It's a key to seeing
how God speaks to me, and to you; and how we are, we really are that
voice. Tay, if you don't do something just because God called it "fate"
you are significantly more enslaved than if you do--and you wanted to. "*Now
I see that you and me, were never meant, *never meant to be*
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Vzb4ExX7lY>..." she sang before I
mentioned her, and before she ever saw me... in a song she calls "Nothing
Left to Lose" and I see is not really just another word for freedom
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OTHRg_iSWzM>.

We have plenty to lose by not starting the fire
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFTLKWw542g>, not the least of which is
Heaven itself. Understand what "force majeure" really means *to you and I*
<http://youandi.reallyhim.com/>. Ha, *by the way.*

[image: Inline image 22] <http://youandi.reallyhim.com/>

*IN CASE YOU <http://youandi.reallyhim.com/>FORG
<http://youandi.reallyhim.com/>OT YESTERDA
<http://yesterday.reallyhim.com/>Y'S MESSAGE
<http://jerusalem.reallyhim.com/>*

[image: Inline image 6] <http://jerusalem.reallyhim.com/>

[image: Inline image 27] [image: Inline image 12]

"DADDY, I WANT IT *NOW*."

VERUKA <http://ver.reallyhim.com/> SALT. whose name means "to see
<http://ver.reallyhim.com/> *(if) you are* the Body of Christ
<http://ver.reallyhim.com/>" whined, in the story of Will Why Won Ka, about
nothing more or less than Heaven on Hearth, than seeing an end to needless
torture and pain. To see if you are the "Salt of the Earth" warming the
road <http://loch.reallyhim.com/> to Heaven; honestly to see if you can
break through this inane lie of "I don't understand" and realize that
breaking this story and talking about what is being presented not just by
me and you but by history and God himself is the key to the car that drives
us home. To see how Cupid you really are.

[image: Inline image 29]

*STOP NODDING, TURN AROUND AND CALL A REPORTER.*

The story of Willy Wonka ties directly to the Promised Land of Flowing Milk
and Honey <http://sen.reallyhim.com/> to me; by showing us a river of
chocolate <http://amidallah.reallyhim.com/> and a *the everlasting God
starter*, (er is it guardian of <http://sob.reallyhim.com/> B stopper
<http://thor.lamc.la/>) that opens the doors of perception about exactly
what kinds of mistake may have been made in the past in this transition to
Heaven that we are well on the way of *beginning*. Here, in the Land of
Nod, that is also Eden and also the Heart of the Ark we see warnings about
"flowing milk and honey" being akin to losing our stable ecosystem, to
losing the stuff of life itself, biology and evolution, and if we don't
understand--this is probably exactly the mistake that was made and the
cause of the story of Cain and Abel. So here we are talking about genetic
engineering and mind uploading and living forever, and hopefully seeing
that while all things are possible with God--losing the wisdom of the
message of religion is akin to losing life in the Universe and with that
any hope of eternal longevity.

With some insight into religion, you can connect the idea that without bees
our stable ecosystem might collapse, to the birds and the bees
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umyl-wWRkJ4>, and a message about
stability and having more than one way to pollinate the flowers *and* trees
and get some. Janet <http://jan.reallyhim.com/> and Nanna
<http://sen.reallyhim.com/>, by the way, both have pretty brown eyes, but
that probably comes as *no surprise*
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bswxaeyQDFI> to you.

Miss Everything <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFlHsKExcYg>, on the other
hand (I hear, does not have brown eyes), leads us to glimpse how this
message about the transition of our society might continue on in the New
Testament, and suggest that we do need to eat, and have dinner
conversation, and that a Last Supper might be a little bit more detrimental
to our future than anyone had ever thought, over and over
<http://meth.reallyhim.com/> and *over again*. To see how religion really
does make clear that this is what the message is about, to replace the
flowing milk we have a "Golden Cow" that epitomizes nothing less than "not
listening to Adam" and we have a place that believes the Hammer
<http://hammer.reallyhim.com/> of Judah Maccabee should be ... extinct. *You
are wrong.*

[image: Inline image 30] <http://sob.reallyhim.com/>

Of course the *vibrating light* here ties this Gene to another musical
piece disclosing something... "Wild Thing
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hce74cEAAaE>" I make your heart sing. You
can believe the Guitar Man is here to steal the show and deliver bread for
the hungry and for the wise <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpOjQvADLG4>*.
*Here's some, it's not just Imagine Dragons
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktvTqknDobU> telling you to *listen to the
radio <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1b8AhIsSYQ> but
Jefferson Starshiptoo, and Live.
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCYB8aHhL1k> *

*When you wake up, you can hear God "singing <http://whoah.lamc.la/>" to
you on the radio every single day; many of us already do. He's telling
<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwtdhWltSIg> you to listen to me
<http://thunderstand.reallyhim.com/>, and I do not understand why you do
not. You don't look very Cupid, if you ask me.*

[image: Inline image 31] <http://hammer.reallyhim.com/>
[image: Inline image 32] <http://thunderstand.reallyhim.com/>
[image: Inline image 33] <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKopy74weus>
*F O O T*
*T H E F T*
*O F O U R*
*CHR is *♂


[image: Inline image 14] [image: Inline image 28]

I think we all know what the Rod of Jesus Christ is by now.

[image: Inline image 35] <http://soup.reallyhim.com/>

It is a large <http://boom.lamc.la/> *glowing* testament to freedom
<http://dick.reallyhim.com/> and truth <http://dick.lamc.la/>, and a
statement about *blindness <http://dick.reallyhim.com/>* and evil that is
*unmistakable*. To say that seeing it is the gateway to Heaven would be
an understatement of it's worth, of the implication that *not seeing it* is
obvious Hell when it is linked to everything from nearly every story of the
Holy Bible from Isaac to Isaiah to "*behold he is to coming*" and if you
weren't sure if the Hand of God were in action here--it's very clear
<http://yitsheyadam.reallyhim.com/> that it is; that linking Tricky Dick
<http://dick.reallyhim.com/> and *Watergate* to *Seagate* ... really
delivering *crystal clear understanding* that the foundation of Heaven is
freedom and that you have none today because you refuse to see the truth
<http://reck.reallyhim.com/>.

It is the doorway to seeing that what has been going on in this place
hasn't been designed to hide me, but to hide a prosperous future from
you--to hide the truth about our existence and the purpose of
Creation--that all told, you are standing at the doorstep of Heaven and
stammering your feet, closing your eyes, and saying "*you don't want to
help anyone.*"

[image: Inline image 36]

*If delivering freedom, truth, and equality to you does not a den make,*
*well, you can all suck it*

... from God <http://don.reallyhim.com/>, *to you
<http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/07/fwd-saint-one.html>.*

[image: Inline image 37] <http://reck.reallyhim.com/>
[image: Inline image 6] <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQpZv2r8fb4> [image:
Inline image 5] <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIDWgqDBNXA>
BLOWING KISSES MY WAY. NOT LIKE THAT.
CANT YOU DO ANYTHING RIGHT?
[image: Inline image 13] <http://threetag.reallyhim.com/>[image: Inline
image 8] <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBNQ1DIod6M>

Between Stargate and Star Trek it's pretty easy to see a roadmap to very
quickly and easily be able to end world hunger and heal the sick without
drastically changing the way our society works, it's about as simple as a
microwave, or a new kind of medicine--except it's not so easy to see why it
is that you are so reluctant to talk about the truth that makes these
things so easy to do. You see, your lack of regard for anyone anywhere has
placed you in a position of weakness, and if you do nothing today, you will
not be OK tomorrow.

It's pretty easy to see how Roddenberry's name shows that this message
comes from God, that he's created this map that starts with an Iron Rod
throughout our history proving Creation, whose heart is a Den of Family who
care about the truth, and about freedom, and about helping each other--not
what you are--you are not that today. Today you are sick, and I'd like you
to look at the mirror <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSfVbr8rYJ0> he's
made for you, this wall that cares not for the sick, or the starving, or
even for itself... but stands for nothing but "being aligned with the
winner" and *be ashamed
<http://hadragonbreath.blogspot.com/2017/08/in-heart-of-ashamed-start-and-key.html>.
*

[image: Inline image 13]


<http://input_requred.telesprize.technocrazy.gq/x/c?c=1359249&l=6c7770a5-f084-4db8-9651-1e3af6d8a9b8&r=78b644c6-03de-42ec-a628-b3311b223290>

*Realize, realize... what you are. What you've become, just as I have...
the devil in a sweet, sweet kiss.*

*-Dave J. Matthews*

[image: Inline image 1] <http://jerusalem.reallyhim.com/>

<https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-_I1tHUxhr4M/Wan9Q5oQpBI/AAAAAAAAFXc/IRBo7MNdy6su4I6T4_vmLR3TEoctt2iXACLcBGAs/s1600/Screenshot%2B2017-08-29%2Bat%2B10.04.47%2BPM.png>


(( *𐌰**𐌼**𐌿**𐌳**𐌹**𐌼* <http://bit.ly/2uye1NE> ))
<https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-grIC1uiuoX8/WaNduRI495I/AAAAAAAAFNU/xp3oG6dvsaQUeGFAdbvKURCHOpZ8c0DcACLcBGAs/s1600/page1.jpg>

<https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-I5Serkfd3LU/WaNdwSz7n-I/AAAAAAAAFNY/yQn_wV7N11AMTZtCYdY7dORWtmtQ3njswCLcBGAs/s1600/page2.jpg>

<https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-K1dlLUBTCss/WaNdyA3__aI/AAAAAAAAFNc/qBJljPz2zBMsTedDVNAN4_edhPnxdz1xgCLcBGAs/s1600/page3.jpg>
*r* * i* *d* * i* *c* * u* *l* *o* *u* *s*
[image: Inline image 14]

on o us, *ridiculous.*

[image: Inline image 13]
for those of you that haven't been following along:

- *so b* <http://sob.reallyhim.com/>, how the book of *tobit* and Adam's
*rib* light the *apple* of da i
- *os* <http://os.reallyhim.com/>, from "*original sin*" to "*ob*viously
salvation"
- *bush*
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1372520&l=86ff5458-ae8c-40b7-ba63-2eb18a7a54b1&r=a5cf34cd-97ac-4c72-831f-2a989d97d86c>,
blindness... u *see how <http://loch.reallyhim.com/>*
- *bp <http://ohil.reallyhim.com/>, stop simulating oil spills and
car/horse crashes*
- *bereshit* <http://bereshit.reallyhim.com/>, stop simulating hunger
and sickness
- *kermitham* <http://jerusalem.reallyhim.com/>, stop simulating
earthquakes and terrorism
- *gate* <http://gate.reallyhim.com/>, stop simulating the Empire of
Star Wars, 1984, and Exodus
- take a *look <http://bit.ly/2w5JuXf>*, we're in a *book*
<http://bit.ly/2uKEliL>; reading delivers *rainwow.*


*FOR EXAMPLE, END HECK*


[image: Inline image 11]
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1372436&l=c3038f5f-786c-40d5-8974-125bd01d6a26&r=40251021-53cb-4f43-9d16-bf2fc25cf558>
[image: Inline image 12]
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1372436&l=c3038f5f-786c-40d5-8974-125bd01d6a26&r=40251021-53cb-4f43-9d16-bf2fc25cf558>

*Min to Supermax"*
<http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-C6GVnavnCqM/WYhlun2mWOI/AAAAAAAAAjY/3rbde62qu4IMNyBK8gGryU-TEUSLjrwIQCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-762350.png>

<http://bit.ly/2fm6uut>
<http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-VkQdj4MikLM/WYhlu49ViBI/AAAAAAAAAjo/-vuV0rCKcQsTLMk5MBTILrTHMHHR-gGaACK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-763351.png>

behold, I are coming...

<http://don.reallyhim.com/>

*go go gadget den.*

THE HOLY GRAiL

THESE ARE THE DROIDS YOU ARE LOOKING FOR
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=d313fd20-2144-4423-9b24-3ae84ed385fe&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>

<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=953215d6-da6c-4ec4-81e2-327f90e524aa&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>

THESE ARE PEOPLE
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=0c645e76-9f85-4ffa-83b2-1dec74d65a60&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>

<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=ddd348bc-4be2-423c-9740-227e5516daf2&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>

PERSON v. PHONE
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=299da6a9-0272-4007-927f-3dbab172f378&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>

<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=424b1153-f084-4650-96e0-eb2c72b49ade&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>

<http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-Fy0tKwCmXdA/Wa_yPMxtEPI/AAAAAAAAGAc/xJ2o240H7Fwx2-SHnx7wtaA2ZJW5MmaGgCK4BGAYYCw/s1600/image-736049.png>
*blessing
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=dfe4f565-b8f5-45b8-b4dd-1a44a2dcab37&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>
in
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=15449c9d-5521-46ba-8d16-d7882dc536d3&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>
disguise
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=fcb5e1fa-8586-4945-ae34-c78279b00e32&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>*
(*plural* *blessings in disguise
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=10df5436-a7bb-4d8e-af46-9f55a11b699f&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>*
)

1. (idiomatic
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=f5667bf7-7837-4bc0-ba9d-5c487bf8886b&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>
) A seeming misfortune
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=ee5206ed-785d-4892-9e0b-e2fa6fc84092&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>
that
turns out to be for the best.

In modern society, the proverb "*blood is thicker than water*" is used to
imply that family relationships are always more important than friends.

The equivalent proverb
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=f14e2c2b-6ae9-4127-97bf-62553185daa5&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>
in
German (originally: *Blut ist dicker als Wasser*), first appeared in a
different form in the medieval German
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=922755c8-686d-4492-a6aa-fcc082d6a15b&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>
beast epic
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=fb6dc25a-3dd9-481e-8c76-8ca80b2ed1ac&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>
*Reinhart Fuchs* (c. 1180; English: *Reynard the Fox*) by Heinrich der
Glîchezære
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=ce76595b-6287-46f9-90b5-4cd9328ec0dd&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>.
The 13th-century Heidelberg manuscript reads in part, "ouch hoer ich sagen,
das sippe blůt von wazzere niht verdirbet" (lines 265-266). In English we
read, "I also hear it said, kin-blood is not spoiled by water."

Authors Albert Jack[5]
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=84daa5da-1da5-49a0-bebf-c93f3a82c1c2&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>
and
R. Richard Pustelniak[6]
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=f17298c2-9a4f-4abf-a806-d58c47258515&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>
claim
the original meaning of the expression was that the ties between people
who've made a blood covenant were stronger than ties formed by "the water
of the womb". However, no known historical sources predating the modern era
contain the blood-covenant version of the expression.

The use of the word "blood" to refer to kin or familial relations has roots
dating back to Greek and Roman traditions.[7]
<http://meetdaeyeora.fromthemachine.org/x/c?c=1387619&l=1f7fec60-d707-4624-8000-d2d90f358df0&r=dd8bd842-6e53-4ecd-b8d2-cc32cd4edec1>.
This
 

Back to top
Date: 9/9/17 4:39 pm
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
Subject: Re: Wood Storks & Spoonbills at Bald Knob NWR
Has anyone seen them today?

On Fri, Sep 8, 2017 at 11:32 AM Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:

> Joanie Patterson reports that yesterday there were over 100 Wood Storks at
> Bald Knob NWR, plus spoonbills and 4 immature White Ibis. There was also a
> recent eBird submission from the refuge of 85 Wood Storks and 15 Roseate
> Spoonbills.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/8/17 9:29 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: The Snipe Newsletter
The Sept-Nov issue of The Snipe newsletter has been posted to the Audubon
Society of Central Arkansas website, wp.ascabird.org, under Publications
(you may have to Google it). This issue contains information on upcoming
meetings/programs, field trips, birding adventures, and photos by Bob
Harden, Charlie Lyon, Michael Linz, and others.

Please note: for those who attend ASCA meetings, the construction is
finished and we will be meeting back at the Fletcher Library for the next
several months (except December's meeting).

Dottie



 

Back to top
Date: 9/8/17 6:10 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Eagle optics online
Better move quickly. I have read that Eagle warranty will be covered by Vortex .

Ed

> On Sep 8, 2017, at 8:06 PM, Gail Miller <gail.miller...> wrote:
>
> I have three pair of Eagle Optics binoculars and I love them. Might be time to pick up another pair on sale. :-)
>
> Gail in Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Ed Laster
> Sent: Friday, September 08, 2017 8:03 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Eagle optics online
>
> Many of us have been big supporters of Eagle Optics for many years and they have been a very good supplier. I have a friend who has recently bought a lot of new optics from them. He bought Vortex, Swarovski and Leica products. The Swarovski and Leica products are very good and very expensive. In looking at and comparing these brands I can tell you that the quality of the Vortex products in their Viper HD and Razor HD models was excellent. The Viper is a moderate cost and the Razor is their top model. They are very close in performance to the top end optics and considerably less expensive.
>
> I was curious about how Vortex got into this business and was making such good optics for the price and told my friend that based on what I found, Eagle would soon close it’s business…because the owner of Vortex is the owner of Eagle Optics. Will there still be an Eagle brand product? Possibly, since Eagle recently transferred the Eagle name to Vortex. But keep in mind Vortex makes products for hunting as well as birding, so it may end up there. This is an example of a person finding a better way to provide a quality product at a very competitive price. He understands the product and the distribution business and has a warranty to back it up.
>
> Ed Laster
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Sep 8, 2017, at 11:59 AM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>>
>> Going out of business at the end of the year.
>>
>> Sandy B.
 

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Date: 9/8/17 6:06 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Eagle optics online
I have three pair of Eagle Optics binoculars and I love them. Might be time to pick up another pair on sale. :-)

Gail in Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Ed Laster
Sent: Friday, September 08, 2017 8:03 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Eagle optics online

Many of us have been big supporters of Eagle Optics for many years and they have been a very good supplier. I have a friend who has recently bought a lot of new optics from them. He bought Vortex, Swarovski and Leica products. The Swarovski and Leica products are very good and very expensive. In looking at and comparing these brands I can tell you that the quality of the Vortex products in their Viper HD and Razor HD models was excellent. The Viper is a moderate cost and the Razor is their top model. They are very close in performance to the top end optics and considerably less expensive.

I was curious about how Vortex got into this business and was making such good optics for the price and told my friend that based on what I found, Eagle would soon close it’s business…because the owner of Vortex is the owner of Eagle Optics. Will there still be an Eagle brand product? Possibly, since Eagle recently transferred the Eagle name to Vortex. But keep in mind Vortex makes products for hunting as well as birding, so it may end up there. This is an example of a person finding a better way to provide a quality product at a very competitive price. He understands the product and the distribution business and has a warranty to back it up.

Ed Laster
Little Rock







> On Sep 8, 2017, at 11:59 AM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> Going out of business at the end of the year.
>
> Sandy B.
 

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Date: 9/8/17 6:03 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Eagle optics online
Many of us have been big supporters of Eagle Optics for many years and they have been a very good supplier. I have a friend who has recently bought a lot of new optics from them. He bought Vortex, Swarovski and Leica products. The Swarovski and Leica products are very good and very expensive. In looking at and comparing these brands I can tell you that the quality of the Vortex products in their Viper HD and Razor HD models was excellent. The Viper is a moderate cost and the Razor is their top model. They are very close in performance to the top end optics and considerably less expensive.

I was curious about how Vortex got into this business and was making such good optics for the price and told my friend that based on what I found, Eagle would soon close it’s business…because the owner of Vortex is the owner of Eagle Optics. Will there still be an Eagle brand product? Possibly, since Eagle recently transferred the Eagle name to Vortex. But keep in mind Vortex makes products for hunting as well as birding, so it may end up there. This is an example of a person finding a better way to provide a quality product at a very competitive price. He understands the product and the distribution business and has a warranty to back it up.

Ed Laster
Little Rock







> On Sep 8, 2017, at 11:59 AM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> Going out of business at the end of the year.
>
> Sandy B.
 

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Date: 9/8/17 2:04 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Upcomng Field Trips
Mark your calendars!  The next three months of the field trips sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA) have been finalized and are listed below.  You don't have to be an ASCA member to participate in our field trips.  You just have to like birds and people.  If you have any questions about the trips, feel free to contact me off-list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 September 23 Bona Dea Trails andSanctuary—RussellvilleMeet at 7:00 a.m. at theMayflower commuter lot off I-40 West at Exit 135.  We will arrive at the Bona Dea Trails first parkinglot around 8:15 a.m. for anyone who wants to meet us there.  Our target birds will be migrating fallwarblers.  Bona Dea Trails is 186 acresof wetlands and woodlands in the Prairie Creek floodplain.  The trails are paved and level for easywalking.  Lunch is on your own.  There are picnic tables at Bona Dea, orseveral fast food restaurants are nearby.  From Little Rock, take I-40west to Russellville.  Take Exit 81.  Turn left off the exit ramp, then left at thelight to go south on Hwy 7.  Cross overthe interstate, take a right at the second stoplight (Lakefront Drive).  The trail’s parking area will be on your leftin less than a mile.    October7FrogBayou WMA—Dyer (Crawford Co.)Meet at 7:00 a.m. at the Mayflower commuterlot located at Exit 135 off I-40 West. Frog Bayou WMA is one of Arkansas’ newest AGFC wildlife managementareas, established in 2005, and has undergone recent significant improvementsmaking it more bird-friendly.  This formerfarmland is now a wetland restoration area targeting migratory waterfowl.  Secretive marsh birds like rails, Soras, andAmerican Bittern are found here.  Avariety of wading birds such as herons, egrets, ibis, night-herons, andlingering shorebirds will also be present. Walking will be on unpaved, level paths. Bring boots.  If time allows, we’llcheck the Alma Sewage Treatment ponds for Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks.  Bring water, snacks, and lunch.  We’ll return to Little Rock by lateafternoon. For those in western Arkansas who would liketo join us, meet our group at 8:45 a.m. at the Phillips 66 Kountry Xpress TruckStop located at Dyer Exit 20 on the south side of I-40.  The truck stop is on your right just beforethe Hwy. 64 intersection.  Breakfast andlunch buffets are available at the truck stop.  November 18DeGray Lake Resort StatePark—ArkadelphiaThe fallconference of the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) is being held at Ferncliff inWest Little Rock Nov. 17-19.  This tripis one of the Saturday conference field trips and will be a joint ASCA/AAStrip.  We’ll meet at 7:30 a.m. in thecommuter lot at I-430/I-630 off Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll arrive around 8:45 a.m. at the park’sLodge for anyone who would like to meet us there.  Our target birds will be eagles, loons,ducks, mergansers, grebes, and gulls. Dress warm, the lake can be windy and cold.  Hats and gloves are recommended.  Bring scope, water, and snacks.  You can bring lunch or eat in the Lodge’srestaurant. Addressfor the park is:  2027 State ParkEntrance Road - Bismarck, Arkansas 71929. GPS coordinates are 34.24562, -93.14840. Go to www.degray.com for more information about the park.

 

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Date: 9/8/17 1:34 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: BASH & Owls- Pacific Southwest Region - US Fish & Wildlife Service
FYI


Subject: BASH & Owls- Pacific Southwest Region - US Fish & Wildlife Service

Here is an excellent article on relocating Burrowing Owls away from an
airfield at NAS Lemoore, CA. Flight safety measures in action. Go Navy....

Rich

https://www.fws.gov/cno/newsroom/highlights/2017/nas_lemoore_owls/
 

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Date: 9/8/17 11:08 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Red Crossbill at Lake Fayetteville (message from Mike Mlodinow)
I received a phone call from Mike Mlodinow this morning. He was birding in the pines at Lake Fayetteville bait shop and saw a Red Crossbill, apparently a single bird.


Some of you may remember an email from crossbill expert Matthew Young at Cornell (August 27) saying crossbills were headed our way. This is the first one I have heard about.



 

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Date: 9/8/17 10:47 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Eagle optics online
This is a real shame. This, in my opinion was the best online optics store around. Great people and great service. Most scopes are already gone. A few binoculars left.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 8, 2017, at 11:59 AM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> Going out of business at the end of the year.
>
> Sandy B.
 

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Date: 9/8/17 10:36 am
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Sabine's Gull
...still present on Lake Dardanelle.

Kenny & LaDonna Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/8/17 9:59 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Eagle optics online
Going out of business at the end of the year.

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 9/8/17 9:32 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Wood Storks & Spoonbills at Bald Knob NWR
Joanie Patterson reports that yesterday there were over 100 Wood Storks at Bald Knob NWR, plus spoonbills and 4 immature White Ibis. There was also a recent eBird submission from the refuge of 85 Wood Storks and 15 Roseate Spoonbills.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 9/7/17 4:29 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Sabine's Gull
...is still present on Lake Dardanelle. It is presently circling the lake, just east of Delaware Rec Area.

Kenny & LaDonna Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/6/17 8:05 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Cross Lake 9-5-17 ARCTIC TERN+SABINE'S GULLS
AR-birders,
In Louisiana, but about 35 miles away from AR. They probably crossed Arkansas air space to get to Cross Lake.
Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Cross Lake 9-5-17 ARCTIC TERN+SABINE'S GULLS
> Date: September 6, 2017 at 9:57:26 PM CDT
> To: <LABIRD-L...>
> Reply-To: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
>
> LA-birders,
> I wanted to be very careful with my ID before sending the is out, so I am a day late. In addition to the
> two SABINES GULLS on Cross Lake yesterday 9-5-17,there was also a juvenile ARCTIC TERN. The delicate
> slender winged appearance with round delicate head and short neck projection is solid enough, but the white
> secodaries giving a Sabines Gull like appearance is a real clincher. The narrow dark primary tips on the
> underwing are noted in the multiple photos as well. The bill length is consistent with this species, and Sibley really
> over accentuates the smallness of the bill length, which is misleading. There is no significant carpal bar, and even
> with the shadowing on the sitting bird, you can see the paleness of the primaries. The updated bird report with
> embedded photos is below. If the link does not work, let me know.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39027389
>
> Charlie Lyon
> Shreveport, LA


 

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Date: 9/6/17 7:33 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Sabine's Gull @ Delaware Rec - YES
Patty McLean and I drove to Delaware Rec Area on Lake Dardanelle this
morning after seeing Kenny Nichols report of a Sabine's Gull. We scoped
the Rec Area, Riverside Road(difficult views from road as no public access)
and Veterans Park...NO gull.
Lunch and Margaritas on Main St in Dardanelle got us ready to try again.

First we tried both sides of the dam...again nothing. We then drove to the
State Park and there was nothing moving there. We worked our way up the
lake to just past London trying every spot that it looked like there might
be a view of the open water. We found very few observation locations and
zero Sabine's.

We decided that it was getting late but one more look at Delaware Rec
should be made (there was still some daylight). This time it paid off. At
round 6:00pm Patty spotted the gull flying out over the lake and quickly
disappearing. We changed our location and started scanning again. I
picked him up relatively close and we got to watch him fly northwest from
the point at Delaware until he disappeared around the bend in the river.

A long day, a lot of driving, a lot of looking but persistence paid off and
we were rewarded with great looks of this beautiful bird.

Our check list with a couple of pictures showing the wing pattern is below:

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S39040031

We once again would like to thank Kenny and LaDonna for posting their rare
findings quickly allowing other birders to try to see them.

I heard from Kenny after I got home that he saw the gull again around
7:00pm so maybe it will stay around till morning.

Michael Linz(Conway, AR)
Patty McLean(Tucker, GA)

 

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Date: 9/6/17 2:29 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Give Consideration For Fall Migration and Winter Bird Habitat
If it is not too late already, consider what will be in your yard and on your land for Fall and Winter habitat for the birds. Birds will need seeds, insects, and cover for these months. Instead of the usual mowing because you think it looks better, keep the plants and seed heads through these critical months to provide food and cover for the birds and other wildlife. If mowing is done now, it is likely that neither will be available when the need is most critical.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

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Date: 9/6/17 10:18 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Preparing for the Upcoming Saw-whet Owl Field Season
Hi Arkansas Birders!

As we gear-up for our fall field season to begin in mid-October, here is a fun opportunity to keep an eye out for. For the second year, we will be teaching an adult field school workshop at Ozark Natural Science Center on the night of November 17. ONSC’s adult field workshops are great opportunities for adults to dive deep into hands-on ecology and we are happy to get to be a part of that again this year.

Last year’s field school workshop was a hit and I think this year’s will be too! The night will begin with dinner at 5:30pm, followed by a brief program about our research. Afterwards, nets will be opened and field work will start. If you are interested in attending this event, visit http://www.onsc.us/program-field.php <http://www.onsc.us/program-field.php> for more details. You can see information on pricing and a program description here: http://onsccnt.w3webdev.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Fall-2017-Flyer-1.pdf <http://onsccnt.w3webdev.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/Fall-2017-Flyer-1.pdf>

I’ll have more information about the upcoming season soon…this crisp fall weather has me antsy a month too early!

Mitchell Pruitt
 

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Date: 9/6/17 6:51 am
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Ouachita Co. Wood Storks
Yesterday, just before 7pm, I chased a record of Wood Storks north of
Stephens. On AR-57, probably only a mile north of town, there is a
clear-cut wetland area that usually holds a good bit of standing water.
Here, I found 27 Wood Storks along with 16 Great Egrets, 1 Great Blue
Heron, 1 Little Blue Heron, 3 Killdeer, 1 Solitary Sandpiper, 1 Carolina
Wren, and a singing Common Yellowthroat. In the past, I have found decent
amounts of waders at this locale. The gravel shoulders are wide enough to
pull over on and be out of what little traffic there is. It's definitely
worth the stop for local birders or those passing through.

Devin Moon
McNeil, AR

 

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Date: 9/6/17 6:11 am
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Sabine's Gull
...juvenile just off the point at Delaware Rec Area, Lake Dardanelle.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/5/17 3:38 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Morning Swan Flyover
Unfortunately, there are several breeding pairs of Mute Swans in Benton and Washington Counties on suburban lakes and ponds. While the adults are pinioned, I have received credible reports of the pairs producing offspring that fly from the ponds and leave the area as juveniles. We are not sure where these feral nonnative Mute swans go.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 5, 2017, at 2:11 PM, Rod Wittenberg <rodwittenberg...> wrote:
>
> A large white swan flew over my head earlier this morning (approx. 7:50 AM) near the intersection of J and 28th Street in Bentonville. It did not vocalize but I assume a Trumpeter Swan would be more likely than a Tundra. It was headed southeast. If anyone passes by Moberly Pond it might be worth a look.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Dr. Rod Wittenberg
> Headmaster and Instructor of Life Sciences
> <RodWittenberg...>
>
> Haas Hall Academy
> Office: 479-268-3424 / Fax: 479-250-9292
> 2600 SE J Street, Bentonville, Arkansas 72712
> haashall.org
>
> Statement of Confidentiality: This correspondence, including attachments, may contain confidential and/or privileged information and is covered by the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (18 USC 2510-2521; 2701-2710). Information contained herein is intended solely for, delivery to and authorized use by the addressee(s) identified above. If you are not the intended recipient please take notice that any use, distribution, disclosure or copying of this communication and/or any action taken or omitted to be taken in reliance upon it, is unauthorized and may be unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please notify the sender by return e-mail and permanently delete this communication from your computer and network.

 

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Date: 9/5/17 2:40 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: ANOTHER NEOTROPIC AT EAGLE WATCH
Terry Stanfill and I saw another Neotropic Cormorant among about 20 Double-cresteds at Eagle Watch Nature Trail in Gentry this morning. I use the word another because it is obviously different than the birds (or birds) first seen this year by Mitchell Pruitt on July 6. Todays bird displayed the white V at its gape typical of the breeding season.

Terry also showed me photos on his camera of a juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Heron he saw earlier in the day at Flint Creek Nature Area. I stopped by there on my way home. Theres no hiding from a great red eye that takes in the universe, including minutia, like a bird watcher. Indeed, the star-like wedges of white on a background of slaty dark wings are very much of cosmic origin. Seeing one of these beings along an Ozark spring run is surely spun from the purest of supernatural.

Besides the night-heron, the spring run through Flint Creek Nature Area is currently under ownership of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. They are jealously guarding big patches of Jewelweed. I have no idea how many are there. When I realized trying to figure this out was spoiling the reality, I quit counting. One of the truly great natural phenomena of the Real Ozarks: hummers at big Jewelweed patches in shady a spring run. Its the daily show from now until around the third week in September.


 

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Date: 9/5/17 12:11 pm
From: Rod Wittenberg <rodwittenberg...>
Subject: Morning Swan Flyover
A large white swan flew over my head earlier this morning (approx. 7:50 AM)
near the intersection of J and 28th Street in Bentonville. It did not
vocalize but I assume a Trumpeter Swan would be more likely than a Tundra.
It was headed southeast. If anyone passes by Moberly Pond it might be worth
a look.


[image: Haas Hall Academy] <http://haashall.org/>

[image: Twitter] <https://www.twitter.com/haashallacademy> [image: Facebook]
<https://www.facebook.com/haashallacademy> [image: LinkedIn]
<http://linkedin.com/company/861737>


*Dr. Rod Wittenberg*Headmaster and Instructor of Life Sciences
<RodWittenberg...> <rodwittenberg...>

Haas Hall Academy
Office: 479-268-3424 / Fax: 479-250-9292
2600 SE J Street, Bentonville, Arkansas 72712
haashall.org

Statement of Confidentiality: This correspondence, including attachments,
may contain confidential and/or privileged information and is covered by
the Electronic Communications Privacy Act (18 USC 2510-2521; 2701-2710).
Information contained herein is intended solely for, delivery to and
authorized use by the addressee(s) identified above. If you are not the
intended recipient please take notice that any use, distribution,
disclosure or copying of this communication and/or any action taken or
omitted to be taken in reliance upon it, is unauthorized and may be
unlawful. If you have received this communication in error, please notify
the sender by return e-mail and permanently delete this communication from
your computer and network.

 

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Date: 9/5/17 10:08 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills at Bald Knob
We just saw 22 Roseate Spoonbills at Bald Knob NWR. They flew up from a field, circled for a bit, then landed back where we can't see them.  We were east of the grain silos on Huntsman Road.
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 9/5/17 8:38 am
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER AT BOYD POINT
This morning, I observed and photographed a single Buff-breasted Sandpiper at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. It is of interest that for the past 5 years, between 5 Aug. and 11 Sept., we have been visited by Buffys at Boyd Point. It is also of interest that of all of the levees, they favor only one levee. One that separates two of the large holding ponds.
John Redman
 

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Date: 9/4/17 8:33 pm
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Nighthawks
I have to agee...
We saw 12 over our hotter in Hope, AR earlier this week. I suspect more were there if we had the energy to look for more than 5 minutes.

Michael Linz

> On Sep 4, 2017, at 7:47 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:
>
> Seven nighthawks just flew over my house heading due south. Looks like they are on the move again.
>
> Butch
> Bentonville
 

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Date: 9/4/17 8:19 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: ROSEATE SPOONBILLS & WOOD STORKS IN SOUTHEAST JEFFERSON CO.
This morning I again observed and photographed large numbers of Wood Storks in the same location as the day before on private land near Cornerstone on Hwy. 88 in southeast Jefferson Co. I returned in the afternoon and saw none. However, in the afternoon, further north on private land 1/4 mi. north of the intersection of Hwy. 88 and Rob Roy Road, I observed and photographed a group of 6 Roseate Spoonbills at close range as they foraged in a large drainage ditch that runs perpendicular to Hwy 88. As I watched the Spoonbills, 2 Wood Stocks circled overhead. I am certain that there are many areas in southeast Ark. that are harboring both species, but, as frequently is the case, gaining access to these sites is problematic.
John Redman
 

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Date: 9/4/17 8:08 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Bald Knob today
It took us three tries to get to Bald Knob this weekend. Saturday I had to make a vittles run to the farmer's market as I had run out of fresh eggs. Seems like I can never get out of there without visiting with people about birds and produce. We got back to the house too late to avoid heat shimmer. Oh well, there's Sunday.


Sunday morning up and at 'em. Start loading the car & daughter's car parked behind mine does the dead battery click. It took a while to get that tended to and once again it's too late to avoid heat shimmer. Perhaps it's not meant to be. We see the post about the spoonbills in Pine Bluff & behind to debate a trip south.


Flipping the proverbial coin this morning, the coin comes up Bald Knob. The car starts so off we go with the usual McDonald bladder & egg mcmuffin pitstop off the Bald Knob exit. It's a little late by the time we head into the refuge. Yellow-billed cuckoos are clucking in the distance among the Eastern Towhees doing their one-note call and Bell's Vireos carrying on just before the headquarters building. Lots of little birds flipping back and forth by the chain link fence. We pick up a Summer Tanager and a Yellow-throated Warbler and two immature Eastern Phoebes among the House Sparrows.


Further down the gravel road, it's pretty quiet. There are a few herons and egrets crossing the fields high in the air. The rice is approaching harvest. The heavy yellow heads hang low and mucky ground is exposed. We speculate about rails but see none. The fields along Coal Chute on the right hand side are now overgrown and don't seem to have much water in them. We make the turn right onto Hutnsman and I ponder which tree the Great Horned Owl frequents. Just past the barn, the owl is perched on one of the upright disk cultivator sections and gives us a great view of its back.


A little further down Huntsman, Danny and Rhonda Townsend have their scope and camera out where the road bisects the ponds. It seems like everyone is toting a camera these days. I should talk. I have three in the car plus our phones. Danny & Rhonda report seeing a pink flash in a ditch as they were driving in a little ahead of us. There's some mud and the usual assortment of shore birds roaming around. There's a frisky little guy with black legs running around. The birds are on the jittery side this morning and don't stay still. We lose the frisky bird in the mix. But a phalarope pops into view. My first impression was Wilson's. It was too far for pictures & I didn't check my books. Tonight I'm not so sure. Danny & Rhonda mention they need a GHOW for the year. It's still sitting out in the open so they go back to the grain bin area for a better look.


At the third pond Kevin Krajcir is looking at another phalarope. It looks like the other one. I said Wilson's again but in retrospect both birds were rather white with a relatively prominent black eye stripe. What are the chances there were two non-Wilson phalaropes out there today? Sorry, Kevin, Danny, & Rhonda. If it was closer, I would go back tomorrow for a definitive id.

Over all we counted at least 6 Semipalmated Plovers. Pectoral Sandpipers, Semipalmated Sandpipers, both varieties of Yellowlegs, and a few Dowitchers on the mud. No Buff-bellied or Upland Sandpipers today. The Townsends and Bill B & I checked for Night-herons. Nope. They went off to do their loop through the fly infested woods. We drove the road along the far edge of the third pond. I was thinking the spoonbill might be lurking in the ditch on the farthest north side of the ponds. We did find it in the ditch where the road turns back between the 2nd and 3rd ponds. Pix to document.

We checked the hardwood planting south of the grain bins on Coal Chute for spoonbills and ibis. Nope as well. Per our due diligence we turned east at the grain bins (that's left if if you headed south on Coal Chute from Bald Knob). Both sides are planted in rice & I had the notion that those fields were probably being drained. They are. Just past the big ditch that's always full of water, the field on the right has a large muddy area along the ditch's east bank. And lo, that's where a large crowd of herons and egrets are loafing. And pink! I see two spoonbills immediately and directly three more fly further back. There might have been a 7th one skulking in the rice.


That's how we spent our morning today. When we got home, several of our hummingbird feeders were empty. The birds must have mobbed the feeders while we were gone. I had to fetch some sugar to restock Hummingbird Cafe. Bonus find: a monarch cat gorging on milkweed leaves. It looks ready to pupate. I've seen two fresh Monarch butterflies cozying up to the milkweed plants over the weekend. Looks like there'll be another one in a couple of weeks.


Cindy & Bill B.
Little Rock



 

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Date: 9/4/17 5:47 pm
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Nighthawks
Seven nighthawks just flew over my house heading due south. Looks like they are on the move again.

Butch
Bentonville
 

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Date: 9/4/17 5:18 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Plegadis Ibis
Yes, when I finally got around on the west side of the pond, I got close
looks at a handful, with good light, and I did see the red iris on three of
them. They were mixed in with the geese. The rest were mostly sleeping in
a fairly tight flock.

Karen

On Mon, Sep 4, 2017 at 4:46 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:

> All the birds I saw and allowed a good view (6) had the red iris. The
> others were sleeping.
>
> Seems to indicate White-faced in these.
>
> Karen, thanks for the heads up!
>
> Butch
> Bentonville
>
> On Sep 4, 2017, at 15:49, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
> Here's a brief yet informative article/overview of the distinguishing
> characteristics of both dark ibis species and how to deal with juveniles.
> Oh boy.
>
> http://ebird.org/content/mo/news/dark-ibis-identification/
>
>
> Patty McLean, visiting Arkansas from Atlanta GA
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
> Date: 9/4/17 2:35 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Plegadis Ibis
>
> I don't know how possible it is to differentiate between the Glossy and
> White-faced in the fall for someone unfamiliar. I'm taking lots of
> photos. There are now 17.
>
> Karen Garrett
> At Centerton, sweating profusely
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/17 2:46 pm
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Plegadis Ibis
All the birds I saw and allowed a good view (6) had the red iris. The others were sleeping.

Seems to indicate White-faced in these.

Karen, thanks for the heads up!

Butch
Bentonville

> On Sep 4, 2017, at 15:49, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
> Here's a brief yet informative article/overview of the distinguishing characteristics of both dark ibis species and how to deal with juveniles. Oh boy.
>
> http://ebird.org/content/mo/news/dark-ibis-identification/
>
>
> Patty McLean, visiting Arkansas from Atlanta GA
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
> Date: 9/4/17 2:35 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Plegadis Ibis
>
> I don't know how possible it is to differentiate between the Glossy and
> White-faced in the fall for someone unfamiliar. I'm taking lots of
> photos. There are now 17.
>
> Karen Garrett
> At Centerton, sweating profusely

 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/17 1:50 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Plegadis Ibis
Here's a brief yet informative article/overview of the distinguishing characteristics of both dark ibis species and how to deal with juveniles. Oh boy. 
http://ebird.org/content/mo/news/dark-ibis-identification/

Patty McLean, visiting Arkansas from Atlanta GA

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Date: 9/4/17 2:35 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Plegadis Ibis
I don't know how possible it is to differentiate between the Glossy and
White-faced in the fall for someone unfamiliar.  I'm taking lots of
photos.  There are now 17.

Karen Garrett
At Centerton, sweating profusely
 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/17 12:44 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Plegadis Ibis
My daughter seems to think the powers that be need to investigate the
two(DNA tests and such if it hasn't been done) as she thinks they're not
separate species. ha.
it isn't easy. As a general rule it's going to be white-faced around
here. Glossy is not common inland around here at all. My opinion on
that is that the larger the numbers seen here, the more unlikely(far)
that glossy would be possible. I'd call them white-faced myself. But
man are they difficult. I'd do the same thing. Take lots of pictures
and then ask around for "expert" opinions. Some people can pick up the
little differences a lot more easily than I could.
either way, it's an exciting bird to see there. I wish I was able to
drive on over. It's only 30 minutes from me but, just can't make the
time. :(

Daniel Mason

On 9/4/2017 2:35 PM, Karen Garrett wrote:
> I don't know how possible it is to differentiate between the Glossy
> and White-faced in the fall for someone unfamiliar. I'm taking lots
> of photos. There are now 17.
>
> Karen Garrett
> At Centerton, sweating profusely



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Date: 9/4/17 12:36 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Plegadis Ibis
I don't know how possible it is to differentiate between the Glossy and
White-faced in the fall for someone unfamiliar. I'm taking lots of
photos. There are now 17.

Karen Garrett
At Centerton, sweating profusely

 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/17 12:03 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Plegadis ibis
There are currently 11 plegadis ibis at The Craig Fish Hatchery in
Centerton. 2:02 pm. Northeastermost pond.

 

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Date: 9/4/17 11:10 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Pine Bluff and England
Bill Shepherd, Ragan Sutterfield and I went to Wilbur Rd. West wetlands to
see spoonbills. No luck but we did see one immature White Ibis. Then we
cruised over to Cornerstone to look for the Wood Storks but didnt see any.
Returned home via England where we stopped at the towns fishing pond. There
we saw 66 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, including ducklings, and an
American Wigeon.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/17 10:56 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Roseate spoonbills Bald Knob
At. least 6 spoonbills at the refuge today.
Cindy F
501-590-3053


 

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Date: 9/4/17 10:14 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Hawk dance in the sky
Teresa,

Thank you for sharing your wonderful observations and experiences! So beautiful.

J

On Sep 4, 2017, at 12:01 PM, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:

> Birds all twittering out there today. Everything upset from baby crowd to chittering blue jays. Hummingbirds come to sit on my shoulder to chirp in my ear. I no longer have a feeder it was lost in the move. I reach out as to pet and they allow it. Overhead the pair of Sharpies fly graceful over head in the sharp turquoise sky. I go in to fix my lunch to hear other hawk sounds. What a racket? I rush out to duck down as hawks dive toward me. Spiraling upward in a fluttering of feathers are both Sharpies followed by a pair of Red-Tailed hawks. If I had remain standing ,I would no doubt been knocked flat. They climb for freedom with in the trees. The RedTails after them, as I watch they dance around each other in a parody of flight. The smaller hawks dived back down into the cedar grove nearby in furious squawks. I looked upward and "oh wow!" I see several more. 15 Red Tailed Hawks dancing in the sky. One is black with the red tail. How awesome that is to see such a kettle like this? Moving on for the winter no doubt. AS I should be. This stop is temporary measure in my own flight for freedom. With wings of hope I hope I too will find the place I need to dance in flight to. As the birds danced into the horizon, I moved back to my lunch cooking on a hot plate. Teresa, River Valley area, AR
 

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Date: 9/4/17 10:10 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: Hawk dance in the sky
Beautiful, Teresa. Put your essays together and publish.



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S8+, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Date: 9/4/17 12:01 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Hawk dance in the sky

Birds all twittering out there today. Everything upset from baby crowd to chittering blue jays. Hummingbirds come to sit on my shoulder to chirp in my ear. I no longer have a feeder it was lost in the move. I reach out as to pet and they allow it. Overhead the pair of Sharpies fly graceful over head in the sharp turquoise sky. I go in to fix my lunch to hear other hawk sounds. What a racket? I rush out to duck down as hawks dive toward me. Spiraling upward in a fluttering of feathers are both Sharpies followed by a pair of Red-Tailed hawks. If I had remain standing ,I would no doubt been knocked flat. They climb for freedom with in the trees. The RedTails after them, as I watch they dance around each other in a parody of flight. The smaller hawks dived back down into the cedar grove nearby in furious squawks. I looked upward and "oh wow!" I see several more. 15 Red Tailed Hawks dancing in the sky. One is black with the red tail. How awesome that is to see such a kettle like this? Moving on for the winter no doubt. AS I should be. This stop is temporary measure in my own flight for freedom. With wings of hope I hope I too will find the place I need to dance in flight to. As the birds danced into the horizon, I moved back to my lunch cooking on a hot plate. Teresa, River Valley area, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/17 10:01 am
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Hawk dance in the sky
Birds all twittering out there today. Everything upset from baby crowd to
chittering blue jays. Hummingbirds come to sit on my shoulder to chirp in
my ear. I no longer have a feeder it was lost in the move. I reach out as
to pet and they allow it. Overhead the pair of Sharpies fly graceful over
head in the sharp turquoise sky. I go in to fix my lunch to hear other hawk
sounds. What a racket? I rush out to duck down as hawks dive toward me.
Spiraling upward in a fluttering of feathers are both Sharpies followed by
a pair of Red-Tailed hawks. If I had remain standing ,I would no doubt been
knocked flat. They climb for freedom with in the trees. The RedTails after
them, as I watch they dance around each other in a parody of flight. The
smaller hawks dived back down into the cedar grove nearby in furious
squawks. I looked upward and "oh wow!" I see several more. 15 Red Tailed
Hawks dancing in the sky. One is black with the red tail. How awesome that
is to see such a kettle like this? Moving on for the winter no doubt. AS I
should be. This stop is temporary measure in my own flight for freedom.
With wings of hope I hope I too will find the place I need to dance in
flight to. As the birds danced into the horizon, I moved back to my lunch
cooking on a hot plate. Teresa, River Valley area, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/17 9:06 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: woodcock flight?
This morning I heard some strange calls and, well, my memory isn't great
so unless it's common or I encounter it frequently enough, I forget a
LOT of things. :(
Anyway... somewhere around 8 or 9 this morning I was hearing some calls
and, I tried to wake my daughter to come listen but she wouldn't get
up. (we just got back from a 1500+ mile drive last night so we were all
tired)
2 or more hours later I hear it again. Call my daughter into the room
and, it stopped. Figures. I describe what I heard and she went and got
her book that plays sounds. Plays a call and says "does this sound like
it?" Yep. "you sure" yep. Woodcock flight calls. Been a while
since I heard them and... sitting in the living room hearing it out a
partially opened window, I would have guessed the sound was coming from
the bushes. But, perfect match.
So a question... why would a woodcock be flying through or over my yard
at 8 or 9 and at almost 11 AM? If I hear it again I'll try to get
outside quickly enough to see if I can see it flying over. We're walking
distance from the illinois river and some good habitat for them so, I'm
sure they're close by. This was just an odd observation for me. I'm
used to finding them after dusk during mating season.
None of you are hiding in my woods playing sounds right?

Daniel Mason


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Date: 9/4/17 8:25 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Charlie Craig
There were an array of birds at Charlie Craig Fish Hatchery this morning.

Many Great Blue Heron including one that flew off with a fish as long as its head and bill, several Green Heron, three Great Egrets, Kingfishers, scads of Scissor-tails, an Upland Sandpiper, a scraggly Great-tailed Grackle, even worse looking Cardinal, a few unidentifiable peeps (too far away), and two Egyptian Geese that flew in together.

Not much else of note. Quiet day, but nice.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville
 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/17 9:02 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: WOOD STORKS IN SOUTHEAST JEFFERSON CO.
This afternoon, I observed and photographed a large flock of 48 Wood Storks on private land near Cornerstone on Hwy. 88 in southeast Jefferson Co. The flock was resting and foraging along with a large flock of Great Egrets in a shallow bayou adjacent to a rice field.
John Redman
 

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Date: 9/3/17 4:10 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Mike the Birdman October screening
Thanks for the information Joe.  We re hoping to show the film at the AAS meeting in November.
Jack
On Sunday, September 3, 2017, 3:47:13 PM CDT, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

<!--#yiv1511178783 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}-->
For all of you who missed the recent screening of a movie about northwest Arkansas's premier birder, Mike Mlodinow, "Mike the Birdman," another public screening is now planned in Fayetteville. For those of you who saw the release at Botanical Garden August 15, problems with the sound system really detracted from the film. Subsequently, I watched the DVD at home. The film has outstanding original music from Still on the Hill (Kelly and Donna Mulhollan). The poor sound quality at the Garden also interfered with hearing Mike's subtle humor, nicely captured on film. The movie sound is excellent.





For those of you who know Mike and his sense of humor: at one point he is birding at Lake Fayetteville and spots a cardinal. Mike turns to the camera and says, "of course I'm color blind."





My understanding is that there will at some point be a streaming version available.




I just received the following from one of the film's producers, Paige Murphy:





"... Mike the Birdman is screening again on October 2 at 6 p.m. at the Pryor Center (in Fayetteville). We're showing with the two other films in our doc class and we don't know the order yet. 
Here's the facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/305325933209340/ and the website event page: https://www.mikethebirdman.com/new-events/2017/10/2/mike-the-birdman-fayetteville-screening."






 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/17 1:47 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Mike the Birdman October screening
For all of you who missed the recent screening of a movie about northwest Arkansas's premier birder, Mike Mlodinow, "Mike the Birdman," another public screening is now planned in Fayetteville. For those of you who saw the release at Botanical Garden August 15, problems with the sound system really detracted from the film. Subsequently, I watched the DVD at home. The film has outstanding original music from Still on the Hill (Kelly and Donna Mulhollan). The poor sound quality at the Garden also interfered with hearing Mike's subtle humor, nicely captured on film. The movie sound is excellent.


For those of you who know Mike and his sense of humor: at one point he is birding at Lake Fayetteville and spots a cardinal. Mike turns to the camera and says, "of course I'm color blind."


My understanding is that there will at some point be a streaming version available.


I just received the following from one of the film's producers, Paige Murphy:


"... Mike the Birdman is screening again on October 2 at 6 p.m. at the Pryor Center (in Fayetteville). We're showing with the two other films in our doc class and we don't know the order yet.

Here's the facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/305325933209340/<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_events_305325933209340_&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=lymal_1EnKYj5oSC-NmEyWfXYikcADFXe9T85zykmk4&s=B09bRmIcjA-fBrpFanBTyqWu9d4CqUY3E6Fi6a2R4OI&e=> and the website event page: https://www.mikethebirdman.com/new-events/2017/10/2/mike-the-birdman-fayetteville-screening<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.mikethebirdman.com_new-2Devents_2017_10_2_mike-2Dthe-2Dbirdman-2Dfayetteville-2Dscreening&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=lymal_1EnKYj5oSC-NmEyWfXYikcADFXe9T85zykmk4&s=QLcwMuDuvqvaH3sBbhjGTO5qoip77mrQAG2f47hMJSc&e=>."





 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/17 11:18 am
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: Upland
I never expected to see upland sandpipers this far up land, but, one was standing on a small grassy area along overlook drive here on Mount Magazine this morning shortly after sunrise.

Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

<don.simons...><mailto:<don.simons...>
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031


 

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Date: 9/3/17 6:30 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Finch eye disease
Saw a Goldfinch with conjunctivitis yesterday at my feeder. The first Goldfinch I've seen with the disease.

Has anyone else noticed this in Goldfinches? Doesn't seem as prevalent as with House Finches.

Butch
Bentonville
 

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Date: 9/3/17 5:28 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Wilber west Rd Pine Bluff
5 Rosetta Spoonbills 10 White Ibis here now Bob Harden and I are looking at .

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/3/17 5:16 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: NWAAS field trip to HOBBS STATE PARK-CONSERVATION AREA Sunday September 10
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will host a field trip at 9 AM Sunday, September 10. Meet in the parking lot for Sinking Stream and Historic Van Winkle trails in Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area east of Rogers. Meeting place GPS coordinates are 3617'48.82"N and 9357'28.76"W. From Rogers, travel east on highway 12 towards Beaver Lake. Stay on 12 all the way; the lot is approximately 11.5 miles east of Rogers and approximately 1.4 miles east of the intersection of Highway 12 and Highway 303 (that goes toward Rocky Branch on Beaver Lake). Sinking Stream Trail and Van Winkle Trail share the parking on highway 12. There are vault toilets at the parking.



Little Clifty Creek and associated springs connect these short trails. This provides one of the most accessible of Ozark hollows. The area is full of native birds and interesting native plants. Spotted Jewelweed, for example, is quite attractive to migrating Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, though flooding this year wiped-out much of this patch. Other interesting plants include Pawpaw, Great Blue Lobelia, Yellow Ironweed, White Crownbeard, an Agrimony, Leafcup (white) and Bears Foot (yellow; both in genus Polymnia), and many others.



Both walks are easy and often birdy (each about 0.5 miles). Historic Van Winkle Trail is accessible. As on all Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trips, participate as much or as little as you want. The field trip is free and open to the public.


 

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Date: 9/2/17 5:35 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Birds, Other Wildlife and Automobiles
North America, especially the USA is methodically, mechanically and
half-wittingly wiping out its birds and animals. And why? Because they
don't give a damn to the tune of 95 percent.
End of The Story, currently speaking. By 2030 or 2040 it will be far too
late to mend their ways.

Bill


On Sep 2, 2017 11:01 AM, "Jerry Davis" <jwdavis...> wrote:

*Birds, Other Wildlife and Automobiles*

Jerry Wayne Davis September 1, 2017

The first step in the scientific process is to recognize that a problem
exists. If you do not recognize it you will not see it. Motor vehicles kill
100 million birds a year. Most people do not make an effort to kill birds
but there is a YouTube video showing a driver intentionally speeding up to
take out a flock of birds. Birds are very vulnerable when adults are
frantically trying to find food for their young. These vehicle kills can
take out the adults and the young in the nests. More consideration can be
given in preventing the death of birds and other wildlife on our highways.
Between 1972 and 1985 when I was the Forest Wildlife Biologist in Arizona
my family and I identified and tallied road-kills on round-trips between
Arizona and Texas. In those years even with fewer cars we saw road-kills
every mile. In Central Texas deer kills on one side of the Interstate
tallied one per mile and kills of smaller species were more numerous.

Our 264 million cars on 4 million miles of roads are killing one million
vertebrate wildlife species per day, one every 11 seconds. We are
eliminating wildlife from millions of acres. We do not see as many
road-kills today, not because drivers are more considerate, but because we
have killed most animals that exists. Even wildlife in our National Parks
are not safe, even with slower speed limits. Motorist try to avoid large
mammals that may damage their cars but there are still significant deer,
elk, moose, bear, coyotes and antelope killed. But whoa be it for any
smaller species to dare cross a road. Some people believe they are
improving society and the world by killing every snake, turtle, armadillo,
opossum, raccoon, rabbit, squirrel, or anything else that dares to cross.
Even people opposed to hunting can be dedicated killers when they get in
the drivers seat. I have seen drivers stop to remove box turtles from the
road but too often we see the results of mindless idiots that play road
games. They try to run over box turtles by hitting the back of their shells
with their tires trying to flip them off the roads. We see their failed
senseless act too often.

The Federal and State highway departments can help by improving road design
and location. They have provided a few overpasses and underpasses for
wildlife crossing. This helped in a few major migration routes in the west
and in the Florida Everglades. This still leaves wildlife at risk with 4
million miles to cross. Some times even good intentions become major
mistakes. When I was the Forest Wildlife Biologist on the Kaibab National
Forest where wildlife water was always inadequate, wildlife had to travel
miles for water. West of Williams, Arizona there was one spring that
provided water for thousands of acres of habitat. This spring was south of
Route 66. When Interstate 40 was constructed they designed the East and
West lanes to go on both sides, leaving the spring in the middle. The
problem could have been avoided by moving the interstate alignment 200
feet. The highway department's solution was to pipe the water from the
spring under the east bound lanes to a spot south of I-40. They used cast
iron pipe which burst and was useless after the first freeze. Today
wildlife must still cross I-40 to get water and risk getting hit or die of
thirst. Deer, elk, antelope, and bear are still killed today.

Highway design and location may help but the biggest change needs to be in
the mental attitude and habits of drivers. Our 4 million miles of roads are
covering over 28 million acres of habitat with concrete. The roads we drive
are going through wildlife habitat and was habitat before it was a highway.
Areas bordering roads are the only place our birds and other wildlife have
to live. Birds cannot nest on the freeway. We are encroaching on their
homes. Some road-kills are unavoidable but most can be prevented. If
drivers are determine to kill every animal that crosses the road we will
see nothing but our concrete walls and paved highways. We will see nothing
but lifelessness. We must educate others and change their mental and
driving attitudes and give wildlife a break and a brake.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 5:22 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Bird noises and frogs
Well, while a small bird may be hard to see for us, we are probably easily
seen to them. They see this large thing coming their direction, and they
want to get away, i would imagine. Probably the same with the frogs. And
sometimes, the birds are communicating with each other, or making alarm
calls. It is kind of interesting to think of what they might be "talking"
about.

Karen Garrett

On Sat, Sep 2, 2017 at 1:47 PM, Glenn <
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> While working in my yard today, I heard a hawk squawking. Looking around,
> I finally found it way up high. Circling. It got me to thinking about
> other birds and even frog behavior that has always baffled me. Why would a
> hawk (I have heard eagles and kites do it also) make so much noise when
> flying around looking for food? Doesn't all that noise alert their prey
> that a predator is about? But it isn't just the raptors. I've noticed
> that when I walk near water, a lot of times a frog will hop from the bank
> into the water to get away from me. I never would have even known the frog
> was there if it hadn't of let out a squeak while fleeing. Me, a potential
> threat, would never have been aware of the frog's presence if it hadn't of
> made a noise to alert me. How is that a survival trait? And lots of birds
> do it as well. Who hasn't been startled by the noise of a Great Blue Heron
> taking off, one you didn't even see? With the Great Blues though, I always
> felt the noise was the Great Blue's way off letting me know he was
> annoyed. But I have seen lots of little birds, that were safely hiding in
> a tree or bush, decide to flee out the back side. I would have never seen
> them at all if their squeals didn't tell me to look in their direction.
> Why? If Darwin's theory says the fittest survive, why would alerting
> predators of their presence while they fled be a survival trait? I don't
> understand.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 11:48 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bird noises and frogs
While working in my yard today, I heard a hawk squawking.  Looking around, I finally found it way up high.  Circling.  It got me to thinking about other birds and even frog behavior that has always baffled me.  Why would a hawk (I have heard eagles and kites do it also) make so much noise when flying around looking for food?  Doesn't all that noise alert their prey that a predator is about?  But it isn't just the raptors.  I've noticed that when I walk near water, a lot of times a frog will hop from the bank into the water to get away from me.  I never would have even known the frog was there if it hadn't of let out a squeak while fleeing.  Me, a potential threat, would never have been aware of the frog's presence if it hadn't of made a noise to alert me.  How is that a survival trait?  And lots of birds do it as well.  Who hasn't been startled by the noise of a Great Blue Heron taking off, one you didn't even see?  With the Great Blues though, I always felt the noise was the Great Blue's way off letting me know he was annoyed.  But I have seen lots of little birds, that were safely hiding in a tree or bush, decide to flee out the back side.  I would have never seen them at all if their squeals didn't tell me to look in their direction.  Why?  If Darwin's theory says the fittest survive, why would alerting predators of their presence while they fled be a survival trait?  I don't understand.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 9/2/17 11:26 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
Hi all, I will be leading a Trinidad & Tobago nature tour May 24 - 31, 2018, to raise funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, in which I serve as a trustee.  The trust, as you know, funds research and conservation projects mostly in Arkansas.  

Highlights of the Trinidad & Tobago tour include:
* Three nights in Asa Wright Nature Centre, Trinidad, one of the most famous ecolodges in the world-- www.asawright.org* Manakins, Bellbirds, Honeycreepers, Oropendolas, Euphonias, Tanagers, Toucans.....a rainbow of tropical birds from a comfortable veranda (while sipping rum punch!)* About 10 species of hummingbirds, many hovering inches from your face!* Trek to a riverine cave to see the strange Oilbirds
* Boating in Caroni Swamp to witness the spectacle of Scarlet Ibis coming to roost en masse
* A night walk on a remote beach to encounter massive Leatherback Sea turtles nesting * Three nights in Blue Waters Inn, Tobago, a delightful and luxurious beach-side resort (www.bluewatersinn.com)
* Hike up Little Tobago island to see 2 species of boobies, tropic birds, and other pelagics* Glass bottom boating to view coral reefs* About 150-200 species of birds, including the Trinidad & Tobago endemic,Trinidad Motmot
Cost excluding international airfare will be $1545, which covers comfortable accommodations for 7 nights, sumptuous food, local air travel between the islands of Trinidad and Tobago, and all tours and activities. You must be physically fit for easy to moderate walks in hot and humid tropical weather, with temperatures usually in the 80s. This will be my 9th tour of Trinidad & Tobago. 
Rough itinerary summary: 
May 24 -- check into Asa Wright Nature Centre (AWNC)May 25 -- early AM veranda birding; hike for manakins and bellbirds; PM Arippo Savannah birding and Matura beach for sea turtlesMay 26-- early AM veranda; optional Blanchisseuse trip at your expense (or) hikes in AWNC; PM Trin city sewage ponds and Caroni Marsh boating for Scarlet Ibis spectacleMay 27 -- early AM veranda; Oilbirds cave hike; and then off to Tobago.  Some birding en route Bluewaters InnMay 28-- AM Little Tobago Island hike for pelagics; glassbottom boat coral reefs viewing; PM relax at the beach or go birding, sea kayaking, etc.May 29-- all day optional rain forest trip at your expense (or) relax at the beach or go birdingMay 30-- AM birding hikes to mop up Tobago endemics; PM fly back to TrinidadMay 31-- Back to the USA
For detailed itinerary and other information like past eBird lists, please contact me.  Please indicate your background in birding and traveling, and any health-related concerns.  This tour is for a maximum of 20 persons.
Cheers, Kannan-------------------R. Kannan, Ph.D.,Professor of BiologyUniversity of Arkansas--Fort SmithTel: <479.788.7616rkannan...>


 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/17 8:14 am
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: What???
Just heard the clearest song of a white throated sparrow outside my window in Hillcrest . Never had one in our yard in town this early in the fall. Lost? Harbinger of early winter? Scared out of the park by Labor Day picnics? Or secretly attracted to the 3 French fries I tossed out last night? Hope the little guy stays to keep me audible company during my chores.
Karen Hart. Hillcrest Little Rock

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 8:01 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Trifecta of Birds & Nature
Dear ARBIRDers,

Here's a link to an article and short video (courtesy of my brother) that most of you should enjoy:
Woman Develops Bond With Over 200 Hummingbirds, Now They Complain If Shes Late To Feed Them

http://www.boredpanda.com/200-hummingbirds-complain-ucla-researcher-melanie-barboni/

Note- give the ad at the start of the video a second or two to clear, and then the video can be seen.


Second, here's a link to a segment on tonight's PBS Newshour:
A summer colony where seabirds and science nest

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/summer-colony-seabirds-science-nest/


And finally, the third leg of the trifecta is word from Arkansas Audubon Society Halberg Ecology Camp Committee Co-chair Maury Baker that the segment that was filmed during camp by Chuck Dovish is scheduled to air next Wednesday September 6 at 6:30 p.m. on "Exploring Arkansas". Keep in mind sometimes segments like this get rescheduled, but for now Wednesday it is.

Sorry for my 'document dump' so late on a Friday before a holiday weekend. :<(

From the Deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 5:24 pm
From: Krajcir, Kevin <KrajcirKJ...>
Subject: Re: Piping Plover at Hulsey Fish Hatchery (Garland County)
Wonderful! I was fairly certain it was a Piping Plover out there, but I didn’t want to cause a stir and have it misidentified. Still learning how to work with those tricky shorebirds, but seeing the plover was a treat!! I also took some poor photos (below) while holding my phone to my binoculars.

[cid:<06A7208A-B9B8-4A23-AE93-3F8D94B17EA6...>][cid:<3436E853-10C5-4BCA-97AB-FFABB125CB01...>][cid:<95A15490-CC13-4AB9-8967-6BD6A516C2CC...>]
On Sep 1, 2017, at 4:27 PM, plm108 <plm108...><mailto:<plm108...>> wrote:

Seeing Kevin Krajcir's report of a PIPING PLOVER at Andrew Hulsey State Fish Hatchery on Lake Hamilton, Michael Linz and I decided to make the trek to the hatchery today. We quickly found the Piping Plover on one of the near-empty cells shortly after entering the hatchery, and then found a single Stilt Sandpiper AND a single Buff-breasted Sandpiper, both mixed in with separate groups of Killdeer. First time for either of us to bird this area but not our first time to enjoy some delicious McCLARD'S BBQ! All in all, a good day.


Patty McLean and Michael Linz (Atlanta and Conway)

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphonea1 qq 1qq1qqQ

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 2:28 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Piping Plover at Hulsey Fish Hatchery (Garland County)
Seeing Kevin Krajcir's report of a PIPING PLOVER at Andrew Hulsey State Fish Hatchery on Lake Hamilton, Michael Linz and I decided to make the trek to the hatchery today. We quickly found the Piping Plover on one of the near-empty cells shortly after entering the hatchery, and then found a single Stilt Sandpiper AND a single Buff-breasted Sandpiper, both mixed in with separate groups of Killdeer. First time for either of us to bird this area but not our first time to enjoy some delicious McCLARD'S BBQ! All in all, a good day. 

Patty McLean and Michael Linz  (Atlanta and Conway)
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphonea1 qq 1qq1qqQ
 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 11:40 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Inca Dove
Had one calling in my neighbor's yard this morning.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 11:26 am
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: Thurs storm birding
Greetings all,
I started Thurs at dawn in a Felsenthal NWR Red-cockaded Woodpecker colony.
Then onto storm birding at Felsenthal Lock-n-Dam; Lake Georgia Pacific (North Crossett); the MS delta West of Lake Village; Lake Chicot; Grand Lake and then up the levee system. Ending at dark just below Arkansas City.
Winds & rain weren't bad. Much like a normal storm.

There were Roseate Spoonbills & Wood Storks, but not in huge storm related numbers. No large numbers of terns or cormorants.

I had 3 special moments:
Watching a Sora walking on the levee rd towards me, for over 70' before it disappeared into the grass.

I had 2 Grasshopper Sparrows at different locations teed up doing territorial singing. In the rain & afternoon! I checked "Birds of North America, online". Grasshoppers do occasionally do a split breeding season. I'll never know if these birds were doing a 2nd nesting attempt at the same location, or if these birds nested further North, migrated, and are now doing a second breeding season. Really nice watching them.

So no storm birds, but still a fun day.

, Leif at Hector.




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/17 5:40 am
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: AFTER BIRDS, CLOSER LOOK AT SWAMP MILKWEED
Joanie, The two common Skippers at BK are Fiery Skipper and probably the
one you are thinking of is Least Skippers. They do have sort of a wedge
shape.

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 4:35 PM, Carol Joan Patterson <
<joanie.patterson...> wrote:

> I found myself fascinated by the Swamp Mallow at Bald Knob. It's large
> and lovely, and the variety of colors truly amazing: white, off-white,
> peach, pink - some with dark pink circles around center.
>
> There were many butterflies about. The stumper for me was a very tiny
> mainly yellow butterfly, with delicately pointed wings. I looked it up in
> the Arkansas Butterflies id book, but couldn't find it. I couldn't find
> any butterfly picture that appeared to have that wing shape. Does anybody
> know what it could be?
>
> The wide range of shorebirds there now is probably well-known to all. I
> missed the Red Phalarope, but had great looks at the Red-necked Phalarope.
> There were Buff-breasted Sandpipers (4) in a field with other shorebirds.
> There was also a mass of swallows flying back and forth in the same area,
> dragonflies too - I guess all hunting an abundance of insects.
>
> For me it's a four hour drive to Bald Knob, but the lure is irresistible!
>
> Joanie
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, August 31, 2017 3:43 PM
> *Subject:* AFTER BIRDS, CLOSER LOOK AT SWAMP MILKWEED
>
> West-Ark Sod in the river valley was buzzing with activity this morning –
> the human kind, that pays the bills, but the place is extensive enough
> there are quiet corners even when sod biz booms: Killdeer (~61), Upland
> Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (4), Buff-breasted Sandpiper (68), Horned
> Lark (22), and a juvenile Northern Harrier (fos for me). Crawford County
> road department has made some repairs on Westville Road that should be
> helpful in the next big rain.
>
> A few miles away, the Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) patch at Alma
> Wastewater Treatment Facility is about as far south as this species goes.
> Another Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias perennis) occurs in eastern and southern
> Arkansas. As usual, there were many interesting birds at Alma Wastewater
> this morning. Killdeer (25), Solitary Sandpiper (atypically true to its
> name, 1), Spotted Sandpiper (9), and Semipalmated Sandpiper (6) – all that,
> without any sort of mudflat.
>
> After birds, I looked closer at Swamp Milkweed. In good sunlight, a person
> could hardly avoid being near blinded by so many energetic Monarchs
> flutters. Inside the patch, elegant creatures of black, white, and gold --
> Monarch caterpillars. Also fascinating, regular dramatic visits by
> Clearwing Moths. Necturing away, I could see the pink milkweed flowers
> right through their wings.
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 5:49 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Where have all the birds gone? (To Woolsey Wet Prairie)
I had a wonderful and crisp morning at Woolsey Wet Prairie in Fayetteville. I tallied 37 species…below are some notable sightings:

1. Great Egret, flyover
2. Eastern Wood-Pewee actively flycatching LOW near the barn. I watched and photographed this bird for about 15 minutes.
3. House Wren, high-ish total of 5
4. Sedge Wren, 2
5. A mixed flock of primarily Dickcissel (17), but also Blue Grosbeak (2), and Indigo Bunting (6). Loosely associated with this flock was a feeding flock, led by a chickadee, that included a Nashville Warbler, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher and the aforementioned pewee.
6. Lots of female/juvenile Common Yellowthroats
7. Yellow Warbler flocking with 3 yellowthroats
8. A juvenile Eastern Towhee that looked recently fledged and was giving his best attempt at singing.
9. Two juvenile Eastern Meadowlarks, both tailless with patchy flight feathers. They somehow managed to flutter up to the top of a snag.

It was a great morning!

Mitchell Pruitt
Fayetteville


 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 4:36 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob Open?
The refuge closes during the winter months and when there is heavy flooding.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 31, 2017, at 5:43 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>
> I am pretty sure it will be open. Sure enough, I plan to go myself tomorrow.
>
> Terry Butler
> Pangburn, AR
>
>> On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 5:11 PM, Kay <mcafeekay...> wrote:
>> We planned to visit BKNWR tomorrow (Friday). Is the refuge ever closed after strong storms/rainfall?
>>
>> -Kay McAfee
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 3:43 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob Open?
I am pretty sure it will be open. Sure enough, I plan to go myself
tomorrow.

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 5:11 PM, Kay <mcafeekay...> wrote:

> We planned to visit BKNWR tomorrow (Friday). Is the refuge ever closed
> after strong storms/rainfall?
>
> -Kay McAfee
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 3:38 pm
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob Open?
We'd like to try it also. Or maybe Saturday morning?

Chuck and Ruth Anderson

On Thu, Aug 31, 2017 at 5:11 PM, Kay <mcafeekay...> wrote:

> We planned to visit BKNWR tomorrow (Friday). Is the refuge ever closed
> after strong storms/rainfall?
>
> -Kay McAfee
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 3:12 pm
From: Kay <mcafeekay...>
Subject: Bald Knob Open?
We planned to visit BKNWR tomorrow (Friday). Is the refuge ever closed after strong storms/rainfall?

-Kay McAfee

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 2:39 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: AFTER BIRDS, CLOSER LOOK AT SWAMP MILKWEED
I found myself fascinated by the Swamp Mallow at Bald Knob.  It's large and lovely, and the variety of colors truly amazing: white, off-white, peach, pink - some with dark pink circles around center. 

There were many butterflies about.  The stumper for me was a very tiny mainly yellow butterfly, with delicately pointed wings.  I looked it up in the Arkansas Butterflies id book, but couldn't find it.  I couldn't find any butterfly picture that appeared to have that wing shape.  Does anybody know what it could be?
The wide range of shorebirds there now is probably well-known to all.  I missed the Red Phalarope, but had great looks at the Red-necked Phalarope.  There were Buff-breasted Sandpipers (4) in a field with other shorebirds.  There was also a mass of swallows flying back and forth in the same area, dragonflies too - I guess all hunting an abundance of insects. 

For me it's a four hour drive to Bald Knob, but the lure is irresistible!
Joanie


From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2017 3:43 PM
Subject: AFTER BIRDS, CLOSER LOOK AT SWAMP MILKWEED

<!--#yiv8879312252 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}-->West-Ark Sod in the river valley was buzzing with activity this morning – the human kind, that pays the bills, but the place is extensive enough there are quiet corners even when sod biz booms: Killdeer (~61), Upland Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (4), Buff-breasted Sandpiper (68), Horned Lark (22), and a juvenile Northern Harrier (fos for me). Crawford County road department has made some repairs on Westville Road that should be helpful in the next big rain.
A few miles away, the Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) patch at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility is about as far south as this species goes. Another Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias perennis) occurs in eastern and southern Arkansas. As usual, there were many interesting birds at Alma Wastewater this morning. Killdeer (25), Solitary Sandpiper (atypically true to its name, 1), Spotted Sandpiper (9), and Semipalmated Sandpiper (6) – all that, without any sort of mudflat.

After birds, I looked closer at Swamp Milkweed. In good sunlight, a person could hardly avoid being near blinded by so many energetic Monarchs flutters. Inside the patch, elegant creatures of black, white, and gold -- Monarch caterpillars. Also fascinating, regular dramatic visits by Clearwing Moths. Necturing away, I could see the pink milkweed flowers right through their wings. 



 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 1:42 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: AFTER BIRDS, CLOSER LOOK AT SWAMP MILKWEED
West-Ark Sod in the river valley was buzzing with activity this morning the human kind, that pays the bills, but the place is extensive enough there are quiet corners even when sod biz booms: Killdeer (~61), Upland Sandpiper (1), Pectoral Sandpiper (4), Buff-breasted Sandpiper (68), Horned Lark (22), and a juvenile Northern Harrier (fos for me). Crawford County road department has made some repairs on Westville Road that should be helpful in the next big rain.

A few miles away, the Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata) patch at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility is about as far south as this species goes. Another Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias perennis) occurs in eastern and southern Arkansas. As usual, there were many interesting birds at Alma Wastewater this morning. Killdeer (25), Solitary Sandpiper (atypically true to its name, 1), Spotted Sandpiper (9), and Semipalmated Sandpiper (6) all that, without any sort of mudflat.

After birds, I looked closer at Swamp Milkweed. In good sunlight, a person could hardly avoid being near blinded by so many energetic Monarchs flutters. Inside the patch, elegant creatures of black, white, and gold -- Monarch caterpillars. Also fascinating, regular dramatic visits by Clearwing Moths. Necturing away, I could see the pink milkweed flowers right through their wings.


 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 11:28 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: last of August
Thanks for sharing. Redheaded woodpeckers prefer snags with no bark on the
Ouachita NF. Is your snag barked or barkless? It seems to be a species
selection for no bark as a possibility of reducing rat snake nest predation.

Jerry

-----Original Message-----
From: Judy & Don
Sent: Thursday, August 31, 2017 1:04 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: last of August

The number of hummingbirds at flowers and feeders has diminished
considerably this past week. Throughout late July and most of August at
least 2 dozen Ruby-throats at a time attended the feeders, with sudden
afternoon and evening swarms of up to 3 dozen zooming in to re-fuel and just
as swiftly leaving.

Fortunately the insects I was missing and worrying about became plentiful
again in late July and August.

American Crows had several nests nearby this spring with staggered
hatchings, and brought new groups of noisily begging fledglings to the food
I put out for them in the morning. Surprisingly the last group of fledglings
arrived on the late date of July 31.

Through early August Louisiana Waterthrushes continued singing brightly in
places along the stream. They had clearly started leaving and the last
beautiful and uplifting song I heard was on August 12, signaling a departure
that always makes me a little sad.

Red-headed Woodpeckers took up residence in standing dead native Shortleaf
Pines last autumn. They nested in the cavities and the youngsters finally
fledged a couple weeks ago, disappeared for a little while, and have now
returned to the snags, continuing to entertain me with their chatter and
antics.

While pruning brambles I noticed a Yellow-billed Cuckoo nesting in a
Japanese maple tree I planted about 20 years ago. I heard the bird flush,
saw the dark mask through leaves, and heard Cuckoo calling from a hidden
perch. The small 5" nest of twigs is about 7 feet high in the tree. The
literature says Cuckoos are one of the birds whose nests are so flimsy that
the eggs can be seen through the sticks, and that both males and females
share the job of incubation. This pair calls to one another back and forth
across the yard every day.

Indigo buntings wearing brown, and Chipping Sparrows feed from the ground.
White-eyed Vireos, Goldfinches, House Finches, Pileated Woodpeckers, a
Red-shouldered Hawk, Blue Jays and Crows, numerous Carolina Wrens,
Hummingbirds, plus some crickets and cicadas are the few singers in this
cool and quiet end of August.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County=
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 11:05 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: last of August
The number of hummingbirds at flowers and feeders has diminished considerably this past week. Throughout late July and most of August at least 2 dozen Ruby-throats at a time attended the feeders, with sudden afternoon and evening swarms of up to 3 dozen zooming in to re-fuel and just as swiftly leaving.

Fortunately the insects I was missing and worrying about became plentiful again in late July and August.

American Crows had several nests nearby this spring with staggered hatchings, and brought new groups of noisily begging fledglings to the food I put out for them in the morning. Surprisingly the last group of fledglings arrived on the late date of July 31.

Through early August Louisiana Waterthrushes continued singing brightly in places along the stream. They had clearly started leaving and the last beautiful and uplifting song I heard was on August 12, signaling a departure that always makes me a little sad.

Red-headed Woodpeckers took up residence in standing dead native Shortleaf Pines last autumn. They nested in the cavities and the youngsters finally fledged a couple weeks ago, disappeared for a little while, and have now returned to the snags, continuing to entertain me with their chatter and antics.

While pruning brambles I noticed a Yellow-billed Cuckoo nesting in a Japanese maple tree I planted about 20 years ago. I heard the bird flush, saw the dark mask through leaves, and heard Cuckoo calling from a hidden perch. The small 5" nest of twigs is about 7 feet high in the tree. The literature says Cuckoos are one of the birds whose nests are so flimsy that the eggs can be seen through the sticks, and that both males and females share the job of incubation. This pair calls to one another back and forth across the yard every day.

Indigo buntings wearing brown, and Chipping Sparrows feed from the ground. White-eyed Vireos, Goldfinches, House Finches, Pileated Woodpeckers, a Red-shouldered Hawk, Blue Jays and Crows, numerous Carolina Wrens, Hummingbirds, plus some crickets and cicadas are the few singers in this cool and quiet end of August.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 9:42 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Storm
I hope you eastern AR people get something good from Harvey.

Sandy B.
Western AR 😕

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 9:01 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: AAS Calendar Pre-orders for 2018 Calendar
Hello ARBIRDers,
We are still accepting pre-orders for our 2018 calendar, which will feature a beautiful photo of a Black-crowned Night-Heron, by David Oakley, on its cover. Additionally, each month’s photo is sure to dazzle you throughout the year!
The calendars will be available for purchase at the fall meeting at Ferncliff Camp and Conference Center (November 17-19, 2017), with a limit of three per person. However, we are taking pre-orders NOW. By pre-ordering, you can order as many as you want. To pre-order a calendar, send me an email at <mlpruitt24...> <mailto:<mlpruitt24...>. Please send cash or checks, made payable to the Arkansas Audubon Society, to 315 S. Mobile Ln, Apt. 3, Fayetteville, AR 72701. Calendars are $20.00 each. As you know, all proceeds go to the Iola Rea Fund, which provides outstanding Halberg Ecology Campers (and a parent or guardian) the opportunity to attend a conference.
Our information page this year will feature important birding dates for 2018 and more!
Thank you again to everyone who entered this year and to those who have supported this fundraiser. Thank you also to my knowledgeable judges, Mike Martin (Cave Springs) and Charles Mills (Texarkana).
We could not have this competition without all of the supportive photographers and bird watchers in the state!
Happy birding,
Mitchell Pruitt, AAS
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/17 8:04 am
From: Maureen McClung <maureenmcclung...>
Subject: Taxidermied Red-tailed Hawk
Greetings. I have a couple colleagues doing some research on squirrel caching behavior in the presence of predators. They are in need of a taxidermied Red-tailed Hawk. Would anyone have a lead on where/how to get one? If so, please contact Matt Moran, <moran...>, or 501-450-3814.

Thanks!
Maureen McClung
Conway, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 4:21 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: State of the Birds 2017 Special Report Released
I've copied the report document at the end of this message



Jeff Short



From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Monday, August 07, 2017 10:14 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: FW: State of the Birds 2017 Special Report Released



FYSA



_____

From: Judith Scarl [<jscarl...>]
Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2017 9:11 AM
Subject: State of the Birds 2017 Special Report Released

Good morning, NABCI Community,



Very exciting news on this fine Thursday morning- NABCI released our 2017
State of the Birds report just moments ago! I've attached the PDF of the
four page report, along with a press release that your organization can use,
if interested. As always, our State of the Birds report companion website
can be accessed at Blockedhttp://www.stateofthebirds.org/2017/Blocked.



This year's State of the Birds is a bit different from past reports- our
2017 Special Report focuses on Farm Bill conservation programs and their
impacts on birds. This short, concise report is NABCI's first effort to
link State of the Birds reports with specific policies or campaigns in
support of bird conservation. Our report release is occurring just before a
Congressional recess- this will allow our partners to conduct field visits
with their representatives when these representatives are at home,
showcasing on-the-ground benefits of Farm Bill conservation programs. We
are planning additional events here in DC once Congress returns from their
break.



In an impressive turnaround, our NABCI State of the Birds team took this
product from concept to completion in less than six months. This has truly
been a team effort- five of NABCI's subcommittees were directly involved in
this report, with individuals from 17 different organizations directly
engaged in the report's production, communication, outreach, and funding.
Many thanks to Ken Rosenberg (CLO/ABC) and Tom Moorman (DU), Co-Chairs of
NABCI's State of the Birds Subcommittee and report team leads, as well as
Jennifer Cipolletti (ABC), who is leading the Communications and Outreach
team for the report. We couldn't have done this without the hard work of
all of our partners across federal and state agencies, as well as NGOs.



But the work is not done- in fact, this is just the beginning. The Farm
Bill is up for reauthorization in 2018, and this report showcases the
critical importance of this legislation for bird conservation. It is now up
to us- especially our NGO partners- to pick up the mantle and plan how each
of us can help with outreach- contacting our Congresspeople, scheduling
field trips for representatives, and helping the birding public understand
how the Farm Bill connects to bird conservation. I hope that each of you
will join NABCI in promoting this report both within and outside of our bird
conservation community, in whatever ways you are able.



Congratulations again to our State of the Birds team!



Judith



***********************************

Dr. Judith Scarl

Coordinator, North American Bird Conservation Initiative

<https://webmail.erdc.dren.mil/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>
Blockedhttp://www.nabci-us.org/Blocked

Bird Conservation Program Manager, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

1100 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002

(202) 838-3475

<https://webmail.erdc.dren.mil/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>
Blockedwww.fishwildlife.orgBlocked

[]

FARM BILL WORKS FOR LANDOWNERS AND BIRDS, NEW REPORT FINDS



State of the Birds 2017 Identifies Benefits for Agriculture, Forestry, and
Conservation



Contact: <mailto:<jhoward...> Jennifer Howard, American Bird
Conservancy, 202-888-7472, or <mailto:<mjd356...> Marc Devokaitis,

Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 607-254-2165



(Washington, D.C., August 3, 2017) Thirty-seven million. That's the increase
in the number of waterfowl in the Prairie Pothole Region over the past
quarter-century, thanks to the Farm Bill. The
<http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2017/> State of the Birds 2017 report,
released today by the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI),
documents the many benefits the Farm Bill-America's single largest source of
conservation funding for private lands-has delivered to birds, farmers, and
rural communities.



For more than three decades, the Farm Bill has been an effective tool for
wildlife conservation, sustaining essential habitat for more than 100
species. For farmers, ranchers, and forest owners, the bill provides a
safety net that helps keep working lands from being developed. As the 2018
Farm Bill is debated for reauthorization in Congress, the report calls
attention to the benefits of investing in conservation on private lands,
which make up nearly 70 percent of the land area in the contiguous United
States.



"For more than twenty years, the Farm Bill has provided widespread
conservation benefits for our nation's farmers, ranchers, sportsmen and all
who enjoy clean drinking water, flood protection and healthy wildlife
populations," said Ducks Unlimited Chief Scientist Tom Moorman. "Millions of
acres of working lands are conserved through Farm Bill conservation programs
that ensure long-term sustainability and productivity of the land that
supports waterfowl and many other species of fish and wildlife."



It's a striking record of success. Before 1990, for instance, wetland birds
and waterfowl were on the decline, trending downward by 10 percent a year.
Since wetland easements were added to the Farm Bill, those populations have
soared 51 percent.



Grasslands and forest birds have benefited as well. "There's no doubt that
the Farm Bill's conservation provisions have helped to stabilize populations
of grassland birds, which had suffered a nearly 50 percent drop before
grassland easements were introduced in 2003," said Kenneth V. Rosenberg of
the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and the report's team leader. "Since that
time, we've seen an encouraging 3 percent increase in numbers." The report
documents a similar turnaround in forest bird populations, which had dropped
19 percent before the Farm Bill's Forestry Title was introduced in 1990.



State of the Birds is a regular report published by NABCI's US Committee, a
coalition of 28 state and federal agencies, nonprofit organizations, and
bird-focused partnerships. Scientists, government agencies, and bird
conservation groups use the State of the Birds as a resource in
decision-making about conservation research, policies, and programs. Last
year, NABCI's <http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/> State of North
America's Birds Report found that more than one-third of North America's
bird species require urgent conservation action.



Farm Bill programs support many kinds of partnerships with private
landowners. As documented in the 2017 report, that approach pays off in many
ways. Here are a few examples of what the Farm Bill gets done:



. It keeps birds off the Endangered Species List. Voluntary,
incentive-based habitat-restoration projects funded by the Farm Bill made it
possible to avoid listing the Greater Sage-Grouse as endangered in 2015.



. It promotes public-private partnerships and supports restoration
vital to forest birds. In the South, Farm Bill Forestry programs have
increased longleaf pine forests by 50 percent, providing valuable habitat
and keeping forests from being converted to other uses.



. It protects vital prairie grasslands and wetlands and sustains
North American waterfowl. In the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, 34 percent of
all duck food energy comes from Farm Bill wetlands.



. It creates eco-benefits for the entire farm and delivers return on
investment in clean water and birds. Farm Bill grasslands programs improve
soil health and natural pest control, provide flood control and water
purification, and recharge groundwater supplies.



State of the Birds 2017 also identifies four top conservation priorities for
the 2018 Farm Bill, representing the unified voice of NABCI's broad
coalition:



1) Increase funding for the voluntary, incentive-based conservation
programs that support farmers and ranchers financially while also supporting
our natural infrastructure of grasslands and wetlands.

2) Improve the impact of Farm Bill conservation programs on priority
wildlife species, drawing on input from individual states.

3) Enhance Farm Bill public-private partnerships. Partner biologist
positions hold the key to matching landowners with conservation programs
that best fit the landowners' wildlife and land-use goals.

4) Support the use of science, including monitoring and evaluation of
Farm Bill conservation programs over time, to maximize the bill's
effectiveness and return on investment.



"Farm Bill conservation programs, such as the Regional Conservation
Partnership Program, get on-the-ground work done for species of greatest
concern such as Golden-winged Warbler and Northern Bobwhite," said Steve
Holmer, Vice President of Policy at American Bird Conservancy. "The 2018
Farm Bill will hopefully build on this success by fully supporting these
conservation programs."



###



<http://nabci-us.org/> The U.S. Committee of the North American Bird
Conservation Initiative (NABCI) is a coalition of 28 federal and state
agencies, non-profit organizations, and bird-focused partnerships that
advance biological, social, and scientific priorities for North American
bird conservation.






 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 4:20 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: State of the Birds 2017 Special Report Released
I've cut-'n'-pasted the report at the end of this message.

Jeff Short



From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Monday, August 07, 2017 10:14 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: FW: State of the Birds 2017 Special Report Released



FYSA



_____

From: Judith Scarl [<jscarl...>]
Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2017 9:11 AM
Subject: State of the Birds 2017 Special Report Released

Good morning, NABCI Community,



Very exciting news on this fine Thursday morning- NABCI released our 2017
State of the Birds report just moments ago! I've attached the PDF of the
four page report, along with a press release that your organization can use,
if interested. As always, our State of the Birds report companion website
can be accessed at Blockedhttp://www.stateofthebirds.org/2017/Blocked.



This year's State of the Birds is a bit different from past reports- our
2017 Special Report focuses on Farm Bill conservation programs and their
impacts on birds. This short, concise report is NABCI's first effort to
link State of the Birds reports with specific policies or campaigns in
support of bird conservation. Our report release is occurring just before a
Congressional recess- this will allow our partners to conduct field visits
with their representatives when these representatives are at home,
showcasing on-the-ground benefits of Farm Bill conservation programs. We
are planning additional events here in DC once Congress returns from their
break.



In an impressive turnaround, our NABCI State of the Birds team took this
product from concept to completion in less than six months. This has truly
been a team effort- five of NABCI's subcommittees were directly involved in
this report, with individuals from 17 different organizations directly
engaged in the report's production, communication, outreach, and funding.
Many thanks to Ken Rosenberg (CLO/ABC) and Tom Moorman (DU), Co-Chairs of
NABCI's State of the Birds Subcommittee and report team leads, as well as
Jennifer Cipolletti (ABC), who is leading the Communications and Outreach
team for the report. We couldn't have done this without the hard work of
all of our partners across federal and state agencies, as well as NGOs.



But the work is not done- in fact, this is just the beginning. The Farm
Bill is up for reauthorization in 2018, and this report showcases the
critical importance of this legislation for bird conservation. It is now up
to us- especially our NGO partners- to pick up the mantle and plan how each
of us can help with outreach- contacting our Congresspeople, scheduling
field trips for representatives, and helping the birding public understand
how the Farm Bill connects to bird conservation. I hope that each of you
will join NABCI in promoting this report both within and outside of our bird
conservation community, in whatever ways you are able.



Congratulations again to our State of the Birds team!



Judith



***********************************

Dr. Judith Scarl

Coordinator, North American Bird Conservation Initiative

<https://webmail.erdc.dren.mil/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>
Blockedhttp://www.nabci-us.org/Blocked

Bird Conservation Program Manager, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies

1100 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002

(202) 838-3475

<https://webmail.erdc.dren.mil/owa/UrlBlockedError.aspx>
Blockedwww.fishwildlife.orgBlocked

[]

FARM BILL WORKS FOR LANDOWNERS AND BIRDS, NEW REPORT FINDS



State of the Birds 2017 Identifies Benefits for Agriculture, Forestry, and
Conservation



Contact: <mailto:<jhoward...> Jennifer Howard, American Bird
Conservancy, 202-888-7472, or <mailto:<mjd356...> Marc Devokaitis,

Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 607-254-2165



(Washington, D.C., August 3, 2017) Thirty-seven million. That's the increase
in the number of waterfowl in the Prairie Pothole Region over the past
quarter-century, thanks to the Farm Bill. The
<http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2017/> State of the Birds 2017 report,
released today by the North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI),
documents the many benefits the Farm Bill-America's single largest source of
conservation funding for private lands-has delivered to birds, farmers, and
rural communities.



For more than three decades, the Farm Bill has been an effective tool for
wildlife conservation, sustaining essential habitat for more than 100
species. For farmers, ranchers, and forest owners, the bill provides a
safety net that helps keep working lands from being developed. As the 2018
Farm Bill is debated for reauthorization in Congress, the report calls
attention to the benefits of investing in conservation on private lands,
which make up nearly 70 percent of the land area in the contiguous United
States.



"For more than twenty years, the Farm Bill has provided widespread
conservation benefits for our nation's farmers, ranchers, sportsmen and all
who enjoy clean drinking water, flood protection and healthy wildlife
populations," said Ducks Unlimited Chief Scientist Tom Moorman. "Millions of
acres of working lands are conserved through Farm Bill conservation programs
that ensure long-term sustainability and productivity of the land that
supports waterfowl and many other species of fish and wildlife."



It's a striking record of success. Before 1990, for instance, wetland birds
and waterfowl were on the decline, trending downward by 10 percent a year.
Since wetland easements were added to the Farm Bill, those populations have
soared 51 percent.



Grasslands and forest birds have benefited as well. "There's no doubt that
the Farm Bill's conservation provisions have helped to stabilize populations
of grassland birds, which had suffered a nearly 50 percent drop before
grassland easements were introduced in 2003," said Kenneth V. Rosenberg of
the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and the report's team leader. "Since that
time, we've seen an encouraging 3 percent increase in numbers." The report
documents a similar turnaround in forest bird populations, which had dropped
19 percent before the Farm Bill's Forestry Title was introduced in 1990.



State of the Birds is a regular report published by NABCI's US Committee, a
coalition of 28 state and federal agencies, nonprofit organizations, and
bird-focused partnerships. Scientists, government agencies, and bird
conservation groups use the State of the Birds as a resource in
decision-making about conservation research, policies, and programs. Last
year, NABCI's <http://www.stateofthebirds.org/2016/> State of North
America's Birds Report found that more than one-third of North America's
bird species require urgent conservation action.



Farm Bill programs support many kinds of partnerships with private
landowners. As documented in the 2017 report, that approach pays off in many
ways. Here are a few examples of what the Farm Bill gets done:



. It keeps birds off the Endangered Species List. Voluntary,
incentive-based habitat-restoration projects funded by the Farm Bill made it
possible to avoid listing the Greater Sage-Grouse as endangered in 2015.



. It promotes public-private partnerships and supports restoration
vital to forest birds. In the South, Farm Bill Forestry programs have
increased longleaf pine forests by 50 percent, providing valuable habitat
and keeping forests from being converted to other uses.



. It protects vital prairie grasslands and wetlands and sustains
North American waterfowl. In the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, 34 percent of
all duck food energy comes from Farm Bill wetlands.



. It creates eco-benefits for the entire farm and delivers return on
investment in clean water and birds. Farm Bill grasslands programs improve
soil health and natural pest control, provide flood control and water
purification, and recharge groundwater supplies.



State of the Birds 2017 also identifies four top conservation priorities for
the 2018 Farm Bill, representing the unified voice of NABCI's broad
coalition:



1) Increase funding for the voluntary, incentive-based conservation
programs that support farmers and ranchers financially while also supporting
our natural infrastructure of grasslands and wetlands.

2) Improve the impact of Farm Bill conservation programs on priority
wildlife species, drawing on input from individual states.

3) Enhance Farm Bill public-private partnerships. Partner biologist
positions hold the key to matching landowners with conservation programs
that best fit the landowners' wildlife and land-use goals.

4) Support the use of science, including monitoring and evaluation of
Farm Bill conservation programs over time, to maximize the bill's
effectiveness and return on investment.



"Farm Bill conservation programs, such as the Regional Conservation
Partnership Program, get on-the-ground work done for species of greatest
concern such as Golden-winged Warbler and Northern Bobwhite," said Steve
Holmer, Vice President of Policy at American Bird Conservancy. "The 2018
Farm Bill will hopefully build on this success by fully supporting these
conservation programs."



###



<http://nabci-us.org/> The U.S. Committee of the North American Bird
Conservation Initiative (NABCI) is a coalition of 28 federal and state
agencies, non-profit organizations, and bird-focused partnerships that
advance biological, social, and scientific priorities for North American
bird conservation.






 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 12:26 pm
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Warblers
A treat at our bird bath just now. Brightly coloured Prothonotary, Blue-winged and Black and White warblers queuing up for a bath.
Cheryl and Norman Lavers,  Jonesboro

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 12:18 pm
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton...>
Subject: Kites still around
We continue to see Mississippi Kites regularly here in Magnolia, especially in our neighborhood in the NE corner of the city. The sight of one flying low in the right light is a real thrill.

Stacy Clanton

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 7:59 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Birds on the U of A Campus
A couple of interesting bird sightings on the University of Arkansas--Fayetteville campus this week include, a Northern Flicker calling on Old Main lawn yesterday and 3 Mississippi Kites soaring over the Science and Engineering building this morning.

Mitchell Pruitt
 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 6:48 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Bird call
I had a recording of a bird I didn’t recognize. I recorded it with my phone, then sent it in a message to Mitchell Pruitt and he told me it was a White-eyed Vireo. I spent days trying to figure it out myself, I knew I’d identified the sound before but couldn’t match it on Cornell’s site of other apps. Sarah, if you have a recording, I bet someone would be willing to listen to it for you. I’m not very good, obviously, or I’d offer.:)



Gail in Conway



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sarah Morris
Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2017 8:53 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Bird call



Whats the best, easiest resource for identifying bird calls that you have heard? I just recorded a bird who was pretty vocal about me taking my dog outside but I can't figure out what type of bird it was.



I only have a recording of its call. I never saw it.



Sarah M

Jonesboro


 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/17 6:20 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Bird call
I'd recommend a two-step process, and I'm willing to help where I can.

First let's compile a list of suspects , then go to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. edu website to listen to their extensive list of bird song and calls. The sounds you heard were most likely alarm and/or distress calls from a bird concerned about your presence near a nestling or recently fledged juvenile bird.

Now the list of suspects: Describe the habitat surrounding the incident and the time of day.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 29, 2017, at 6:53 PM, Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> wrote:
>
> Whats the best, easiest resource for identifying bird calls that you have heard? I just recorded a bird who was pretty vocal about me taking my dog outside but I can't figure out what type of bird it was.
>
> I only have a recording of its call. I never saw it.
>
> Sarah M
> Jonesboro
 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 6:53 pm
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
Subject: Bird call
Whats the best, easiest resource for identifying bird calls that you have
heard? I just recorded a bird who was pretty vocal about me taking my dog
outside but I can't figure out what type of bird it was.

I only have a recording of its call. I never saw it.

Sarah M
Jonesboro

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 4:10 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: ROSEATE SPOONBILLS IN PINE BLUFF
Today Delos McCauley, Doc George and I birded and photographed the wetlands on the west end of Wilbur West Road in Pine Bluff. The best finding was two beautiful pink Roseate Spoonbills. The pair stayed close together for most of the time, which gave good opportunities for photos. In addition, there were 2 Am. Avocets, 10 Black-necked Stilts, 15 Dowitchers(sp) and 50+ Wood Ducks.
John Redman
 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 3:42 pm
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Ruddy Turnstone
Patty McLean and I located two Ruddy Turnstone at the coordinates below. They are there at 5:40pm Aug 28 (now).

34°55'02.8"N 91°32'21.4"W

Michael Linz(Conway,AR)
Patty McLean(Tucker, GA)

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 2:17 pm
From: Edie Calaway <00000066d9cc52d5-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope
I could not find the Phalarope today but the Black bellied Plover was sure beautiful and at the big tree before you turn by the grain bins there was a Great Horned Owl, so nice to finally see one close up!
Edie Calaway
Fairfield Bay Arkansas
Little Red River Audubon society

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 10:22 am
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: World Shorebird Day and count
September 6th is World Shorebird Day... you can count shorebirds from 1 to 7 September and submit your counts to a world-wide date base...
https://www.manomet.org/newsletter/celebrate-world-shorebirds-day-us?utm_source=August+2017+Newsletter&utm_campaign=August+2017&utm_medium=email

your can register your shorebird count area here: https://worldshorebirdsday.wordpress.com/globalshorebirdcounting/

Maybe someone could coordinate places like Centerton and Bald Knob for the week...

Cheers, Kim

Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...>



 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 10:03 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SEDGE WRENS AT WOOLSEY WET PRAIRIE WILDLIFE SANCTUARY
Sedge Wrens (at least 2) were at Woolsey Wet Prairie Wildlife Sanctuary in Fayetteville this morning. Dickcissels (at least 17) were the most obvious birds, scattered over Woolsey. American Goldfinches (2, + a few others flying over) were harvesting Ashy Sunflower seeds. I thought I heard overhead WIT IT calls from an Upland Sandpiper. One Sora flushed from alongside the trail.

Flowers are the really big show at Woolsey. Ironweeds with their deep purples stand out. Broad, golden swaths of Bidens (or tickseed sunflower) cover some lower areas. In one spot I walked through a tunnel of Indian Grass and there perched a handsome grasshopper. Flowers mean butterflies Monarchs this morning and also the lookalike, a Viceroy perched on a Rose Mallow.

Fayetteville originally purchased around 300 acres to build the Westside Wastewater Treatment Facility, including a mitigation wetland that has become Woolsey. That only used a portion of the original purchase. Subsequently, and almost on an annual basis, there have been proposals to sell off parts or to develop green projects on this public land.

Careful research projects at Woolsey have factually proven the reality of Woolsey as a wildlife sanctuary. These facts tell no lies. There are rare plants, frogs, salamanders, snakes, insects, and wetland birds associated with its Ozark seasonal wetland ecosystems.

My mother used to say some people cant see the forest for the trees. Or in this specific case, cant see the rare seasonal wetland ecosystem for the wet, open, grassy space and associated pioneer-era woodlands.

Fayetteville, Farmington, and surrounding areas are increasingly dense developments of housing, shopping, and roads. Twenty years ago this was inconceivable. Within another 10 years, the City property, including Woolsey, will be all that remains of a biologically rich ecosystem.

The little rail I saw this morning Sora wasnt there by accident. It is a bird of wetlands. It cant use a subdivision in migration through the Ozarks. It needs a sanctuary. If we are thinking now in behalf of the future, we should be about protecting all that green space associated with Westside Wastewater Treatment Facility, not just Woolsey itself. In terms of public lands, especially seasonal wetlands, its all thats left.

Consider the profits. Those bright packages of reality called Monarchs, the flowers that fuel their migration, the spiritual and emotion service to us now and those who will follow us.


 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 7:20 am
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Western Hills Park in Little Rock
In contrast to a lack of birds, Ruth and I have been having pretty good
birding in Western Hills Park. The highlight has been a family of Great
Horned Owls--two juveniles and at least one adult. Yesterday evening we
heard a Barred Owl as well.

They are in the middle section of the park, past/behind the biggest lake by
the upper parking lot. Be careful if you try to see them--they spook
easily. Listen for the begging call of the juveniles. They will likely be
on bare limbs about midway up the tree.

We've also been seeing late season juvenile Blue Grosbeaks, Indigos, a
Kingfisher on the wing, hearing Eastern Towhees and White Eyed Vireos. Also
many, many, many Mockingbirds, scruffy young Eastern Bluebirds.

In our yard we have an occasional Red Shouldered Hawk and Pileated
Woodpecker, zillions of Cardinals and House Finches, Red Headed and Bellied
Woodpeckers and Downies, 4-6 Hummers, Mississippi Kites, Nighthawks, White
Breasted Nuthatches, Titmice, Carolina Wrens, and who knows what all.

Chuck Anderson

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 6:22 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Night Migrants
I happened to be sitting outside rather late last night, enjoying the cool evening with a friend in central Fayetteville. As we talked, my ears turned skyward upon hearing the raucous “skeow” calls of at least 3-4 Green Herons. The sounds weren’t loud, probably a bit high and lost to some of the traffic noise on College Avenue. They came in from the northeast and disappeared to the southwest, although my guess is that their southwesterly heading won’t last long with Hurricane Harvey incoming. Were they headed for winter vacation on the Gulf Coast? will they take a turn for the Caribbean? maybe Central or South America?

Meanwhile, I’ve received the first report from saw-whet owl banders in the north…a breeding season operation, that banded more juveniles than usual again this year. Several stations have also banded a bumper crop of Long-eared Owls recently. Come on October!

Mitchell Pruitt
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/17 5:12 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Thanks for the native plants sources
I want to thank everyone for their contributions to my question about native plants for the area. I knew you guys were great resources on the subject, but your willingness to assist was even more impressive.

I will confess that the question was not for my own yard, but for that of others. My wife and I recently opened a backyard bird feeding store in Bella Vista and I want to be able to evangelize the benefits of native plants to customers. While I need to earn a living with the store, that aspect will always take a back seat to environmental stewardship based on science when it comes to recommendations to customers and products offered in this store. If/when that stops happening, I'll shut it down and do something else.

I've always believed that the three sectors (govt., nonprofits, and business), if they work together, can change things for the better, so I decided it was time to put my money where my mouth is. Because there are far too many business owners willing to be good stewards, The Bluebird Shed was born.

Thanks again to everyone, and if any of you are ever up my way, stop in and say 'Hi'.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville
The Bluebird Shed / Bella Vista
 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 7:01 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA
All good advice from Adam!



Another consideration: Are deer are problem?



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Adam Schaffer
Sent: Monday, August 28, 2017 4:43 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA



Hi Butch,

The hummingbirds in my yard here in Bentonville really enjoy my native Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), Fire Pink, and Wild Columbine. I've only gotten the fire pink to last a few years though. I think they put too much into flowers. The Columbine has done better with well drained soil and the honeysuckle has done better with plenty of sun. I got the honeysuckle ordering from Pine Ridge Gardens, while the others primarily came from a spring plant sale at Compton Gardens and from Ozark Native Plants who sell at Ozark Natural Foods in Fayetteville. They seem to have had larger sales there on certain Saturdays in the spring and fall. I haven't had much luck with Royal Catchfly. I think that needs more sun than most of my yard gets. Columbine and Fire Pink are more tolerant to shade. They probably wouldn't handle full sun here. There are some ideas for you. I hope those ideas help. I'm glad you're trying to help our hummingbirds and going native while you're at it. Natives have the benefit of supporting insect populations as well. Like most birds, hummingbirds eat plenty of insects too. My honeysuckle has the added side benefit of supporting a small population of Snowberry Clearwing (Hummingbird Moth) caterpillars.



Adam Schaffer

Bentonville

·





_____

From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Sunday, August 27, 2017 12:47 PM
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA



Master Naturalists are having a mostly native plant sale this week in Fayetteville:



The Northwest Arkansas Master Naturalists Native Plant Sale

Purchase your native trees and shrubs, grasses and flowering perennials now for fall planting



September 6th, 2017, 9 am – Noon

Washington County Extension Office, East Parking Lot

2536 N. McConnell Ave, Fayetteville, AR



The cost of perennials is $6/plant, and the cost of trees/shrubs is $17/plant.

For pre-orders, please e-mail your plant selections and the number of each plant type to Rose Gergerich at <gergeric...>



Common Name Scientific Name



Ageratum/mist flower Eupatorium coelestinum



Aster, New England Aster novae-angliae



Beautyberry, American Callicarpa americana



Beebalm Monarda fistulosa



Black-eyed Susan Rudbeckia hirta



Boneset, common Eupatorium perfoliatum



Cardinal flower Lobelia cardinalis



Columbine, native Aquilegia canadensis



Coneflower, gray-headed Ratibida pinnata



Coneflower, orange Rudbeckia fulgida



Coneflower, purple Echinacea purpurea



Coneflower, yellow Echinacea paradoxa



Coreopsis, Tickseed/lance-leaved Coreopsis lanceolata



Devil’s Walking Stick Aralia spinose



Evening primrose, MO Oenethera macrocarpa



False blue indigo Baptisia australis



False white wild indigo Baptisia alba



Goldenrod, cliff Solidago drummondii



Indigo bush Amorpha fruticosa



Lead plant Amorpha canescens



Lobelia, pale spiked Lobelia spicata



Meadow beauty Rhesia virginica



Milkweed, common Asclepias syriaca



Milkweed, swamp Asclepias incarnata



Mint, slender mountain Pycnanthemum tenuifolium



Mint, clustered mountain Pycnanthemum muticum



Nodding onion Allium cernuum



Passionflower, purple Passiflora incarnata



Penstemon, Fox Glove Penstemon digitalis

Beardtongue

Penstemon, Gulf Coast Penstemon tenuis



Prairie clover, white Dalea candida



Prairie glade onion Allium stellatum



Rattlesnake master Eryngium yuccifolium



Royal catchfly Silene regia



Scarlet penstemon Penstemon murrayanus



Spiderwort, Ohio Tradescantia ohiensis



Shrubby St. John’s Wort Hypericum prolificum



Sunflower, Ox-eye Heliopsis helianthoides



Thimbleweed Anemone cylindrica



Vervain, hoary Verbena stricta



Violet, blue Viola sororia



White crownbeard – Frost flower Verbesina virginica



White snakeroot Ageratina altissima



Wild hydrangea Hydrangea arborescens



Wild petunia Ruellia humilis



Wood sage Teucrium canadense



Wreath goldenrod Solidago caesia







Grasses

Beak grain Diarrhena obovata

Big bluestem Andropogon gerardii

Bottlebrush grass Elymus hystrix

Inland sea oats Chasmanthium latifolium



Little bluestem Schizochyrium scoparium



Side oats grama Bouteloua curtipendula

Splitbeard bluestem Andropogon ternarius



Trees and Shrubs – 2017

Aromatic sumac Rhus aromatica

Black cherry Prunus serotina

Black gum Nyssa sylvatica

Black haw Viburnum prunifolium

Black walnut Juglans nigra

Buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis

Carolina buckthorn Rhamnus caroliniana

Chinkapin oak Quercus muehlenbergii

Deciduous holly Ilex decidua

Eastern wahoo Euonymus atropurpureus

False indigo Amorpha fruticosa

Gray dogwood Cornus racemosa

Ninebark Physocarpus opulifolius

Pawpaw Asimina triloba

Persimmon Diospyros virginiana

Redbud Cercis canadensis

Rough-leaved dogwood Cornus drummondii

Serviceberry Amelanchier arborea

Silky dogwood Cornus amomum

Wafer ash Ptelea trifoliata

Washington hawthorn Crataegus phaenopyrum

Wild plum Prunus sp.

Witch hazel Hamamelis vernalis



On Sat, Aug 26, 2017 at 8:59 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:



I know I've seen this question posted before for various parts of AR, but does anyone know of a list of native plants suitable for NWA and where one might be able to purchase them in our area? I am especially interested in those that attract hummingbirds, but any species good for birds in general is of interest too.

Thanks,
Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville






 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 5:52 pm
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA
I have seen hummingbirds using the anise-scented sage at the Botanical
Gardens of the Ozarks. Also, some agastache attract hummers. Red Buckeye is
an early season flower for returning hummers.

Robin Buff

On Aug 28, 2017 5:57 PM, "Joan Reynolds" <joanreynolds...> wrote:

> Coral Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) is a great native for
> hummingbirds in spring and summer. If you have a damp area, Jewelweed
> (Impatiens capensis) is an awesome attractant during the southward
> migration,.
>
>
>
> On Mon, Aug 28, 2017 at 4:43 PM, Adam Schaffer <adamschaffer2...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Butch,
>> The hummingbirds in my yard here in Bentonville really enjoy my native
>> Trumpet Honeysuckle *(Lonicera **sempervirens**), *Fire Pink, and Wild
>> Columbine. I've only gotten the fire pink to last a few years though. I
>> think they put too much into flowers. The Columbine has done better with
>> well drained soil and the honeysuckle has done better with plenty of sun.
>> I got the honeysuckle ordering from Pine Ridge Gardens, while the others
>> primarily came from a spring plant sale at Compton Gardens and from Ozark
>> Native Plants who sell at Ozark Natural Foods in Fayetteville. They seem
>> to have had larger sales there on certain Saturdays in the spring and
>> fall. I haven't had much luck with Royal Catchfly. I think that needs
>> more sun than most of my yard gets. Columbine and Fire Pink are more
>> tolerant to shade. They probably wouldn't handle full sun here. There are
>> some ideas for you. I hope those ideas help. I'm glad you're trying to
>> help our hummingbirds and going native while you're at it. Natives have
>> the benefit of supporting insect populations as well. Like most birds,
>> hummingbirds eat plenty of insects too. My honeysuckle has the added side
>> benefit of supporting a small population of Snowberry Clearwing
>> (Hummingbird Moth) caterpillars.
>>
>> Adam Schaffer
>> Bentonville
>>
>> -
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
>> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
>> *Sent:* Sunday, August 27, 2017 12:47 PM
>> *Subject:* Re: Native plants for NWA
>>
>> Master Naturalists are having a mostly native plant sale this week in
>> Fayetteville:
>>
>> *The Northwest Arkansas Master Naturalists Native Plant Sale*
>> *Purchase your native trees and shrubs, grasses and flowering perennials
>> now for fall planting*
>>
>> *September 6th, 2017, 9 am – Noon *
>> *Washington County Extension Office, East Parking Lot*
>> *2536 N. McConnell Ave, Fayetteville, AR *
>>
>> *The cost of perennials is $6/plant, and the cost of trees/shrubs is
>> $17/plant.*
>> *For pre-orders, please e-mail your plant selections and the number of
>> each plant type to Rose Gergerich at <gergeric...> <gergeric...> *
>>
>> *Common Name Scientific Name
>> *
>>
>> *Ageratum/mist flower Eupatorium coelestinum *
>>
>>
>> *Aster, New England Aster
>> novae-angliae *
>>
>> *Beautyberry, American Callicarpa americana
>> *
>>
>>
>> *Beebalm Monarda fistulosa *
>>
>> *Black-eyed Susan Rudbeckia hirta
>> *
>>
>> *Boneset, common Eupatorium perfoliatum*
>>
>> *Cardinal flower Lobelia cardinalis
>> *
>>
>> *Columbine, native Aquilegia
>> canadensis *
>>
>> *Coneflower, gray-headed Ratibida pinnata *
>>
>> *Coneflower, orange Rudbeckia fulgida *
>>
>> *Coneflower, purple Echinacea
>> purpurea *
>>
>> *Coneflower, yellow Echinacea paradoxa
>> *
>>
>> *Coreopsis, Tickseed/lance-leaved Coreopsis lanceolata *
>>
>> *Devil’s Walking Stick Aralia
>> spinose *
>>
>> *Evening primrose, MO Oenethera
>> macrocarpa *
>>
>> *False blue indigo Baptisia australis *
>>
>> *False white wild indigo Baptisia alba *
>>
>> *Goldenrod, cliff Solidago
>> drummondii *
>>
>> *Indigo bush Amorpha
>> fruticosa*
>>
>> *Lead plant Amorpha
>> canescens *
>>
>> *Lobelia, pale spiked Lobelia spicata *
>>
>> *Meadow beauty Rhesia virginica*
>>
>> *Milkweed, common Asclepias syriaca*
>>
>> *Milkweed, swamp Asclepias incarnata *
>>
>> *Mint, slender mountain Pycnanthemum tenuifolium *
>>
>> *Mint, clustered mountain Pycnanthemum muticum *
>>
>> *Nodding onion Allium
>> cernuum *
>>
>> *Passionflower, purple Passiflora incarnata *
>>
>> *Penstemon, Fox Glove Penstemon digitalis *
>> *Beardtongue
>> *
>> *Penstemon, Gulf Coast Penstemon tenuis *
>>
>> *Prairie clover, white Dalea candida*
>>
>> *Prairie glade onion Allium
>> stellatum *
>>
>>
>> *Rattlesnake master Eryngium
>> yuccifolium *
>>
>> *Royal catchfly Silene
>> regia *
>>
>> *Scarlet penstemon Penstemon
>> murrayanus *
>>
>> *Spiderwort, Ohio Tradescantia
>> ohiensis *
>>
>> *Shrubby St. John’s Wort Hypericum prolificum *
>>
>> *Sunflower, Ox-eye Heliopsis
>> helianthoides *
>>
>> *Thimbleweed Anemone cylindrica*
>>
>> *Vervain, hoary Verbena stricta
>> *
>>
>> *Violet, blue Viola sororia*
>>
>> *White crownbeard – Frost flower Verbesina virginica
>> *
>>
>> *White snakeroot Ageratina altissima *
>>
>> *Wild hydrangea Hydrangea arborescens *
>>
>> *Wild petunia Ruellia
>> humilis *
>>
>> *Wood sage Teucrium
>> canadense*
>>
>> *Wreath goldenrod Solidago
>> caesia *
>>
>>
>>
>> *Grasses *
>> *Beak grain Diarrhena
>> obovata*
>> *Big bluestem Andropogon
>> gerardii*
>> *Bottlebrush grass Elymus
>> hystrix *
>> *Inland sea oats Chasmanthium
>> latifolium *
>>
>> *Little bluestem Schizochyrium scoparium
>> *
>>
>> *Side oats grama Bouteloua curtipendula*
>> *Splitbeard bluestem Andropogon ternarius*
>>
>> *Trees and Shrubs – 2017 *
>> *Aromatic sumac Rhus aromatica*
>> *Black cherry Prunus serotina *
>> *Black gum Nyssa sylvatica *
>> *Black haw Viburnum prunifolium*
>> *Black walnut Juglans nigra *
>> *Buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis *
>> *Carolina buckthorn Rhamnus caroliniana*
>> *Chinkapin oak Quercus muehlenbergii*
>> *Deciduous holly Ilex decidua *
>> *Eastern wahoo Euonymus atropurpureus*
>> *False indigo Amorpha fruticosa*
>> *Gray dogwood Cornus racemosa*
>> *Ninebark Physocarpus opulifolius*
>> *Pawpaw Asimina triloba*
>> *Persimmon Diospyros virginiana*
>> *Redbud Cercis** canadensis *
>> *Rough-leaved dogwood Cornus drummondii *
>> *Serviceberry Amelanchier arborea *
>> *Silky dogwood Cornus amomum *
>> *Wafer ash Ptelea
>> trifoliata *
>> *Washington hawthorn Crataegus phaenopyrum*
>> *Wild plum Prunus sp. *
>> *Witch hazel Hamamelis vernalis *
>>
>> On Sat, Aug 26, 2017 at 8:59 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:
>>
>> I know I've seen this question posted before for various parts of AR, but
>> does anyone know of a list of native plants suitable for NWA and where one
>> might be able to purchase them in our area? I am especially interested in
>> those that attract hummingbirds, but any species good for birds in general
>> is of interest too.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Butch Tetzlaff
>> Bentonville
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 5:03 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Mississippi Kites
I have had two of these Kites repeatedly hanging out in the top of a medium
large tree overlooking the I-630 freeway for the last couple of months if
not longer. This is practically my "front yard." I have a great view of the
activity since I'm on the 5th floor of a residents tower. At times there
have been half a dozen soaring around the immediate area.
I won't be staying around here much longer, but it's been fun
watching them hang with this obviously urban environment. I would imagine
they've gotten plenty enough food. They must have something around here
they can live with. It's their choice . . . . for now.

Bill Thurman

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 4:57 pm
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA
Coral Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) is a great native for
hummingbirds in spring and summer. If you have a damp area, Jewelweed
(Impatiens capensis) is an awesome attractant during the southward
migration,.



On Mon, Aug 28, 2017 at 4:43 PM, Adam Schaffer <adamschaffer2...>
wrote:

> Hi Butch,
> The hummingbirds in my yard here in Bentonville really enjoy my native
> Trumpet Honeysuckle *(Lonicera **sempervirens**), *Fire Pink, and Wild
> Columbine. I've only gotten the fire pink to last a few years though. I
> think they put too much into flowers. The Columbine has done better with
> well drained soil and the honeysuckle has done better with plenty of sun.
> I got the honeysuckle ordering from Pine Ridge Gardens, while the others
> primarily came from a spring plant sale at Compton Gardens and from Ozark
> Native Plants who sell at Ozark Natural Foods in Fayetteville. They seem
> to have had larger sales there on certain Saturdays in the spring and
> fall. I haven't had much luck with Royal Catchfly. I think that needs
> more sun than most of my yard gets. Columbine and Fire Pink are more
> tolerant to shade. They probably wouldn't handle full sun here. There are
> some ideas for you. I hope those ideas help. I'm glad you're trying to
> help our hummingbirds and going native while you're at it. Natives have
> the benefit of supporting insect populations as well. Like most birds,
> hummingbirds eat plenty of insects too. My honeysuckle has the added side
> benefit of supporting a small population of Snowberry Clearwing
> (Hummingbird Moth) caterpillars.
>
> Adam Schaffer
> Bentonville
>
> -
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Sent:* Sunday, August 27, 2017 12:47 PM
> *Subject:* Re: Native plants for NWA
>
> Master Naturalists are having a mostly native plant sale this week in
> Fayetteville:
>
> *The Northwest Arkansas Master Naturalists Native Plant Sale*
> *Purchase your native trees and shrubs, grasses and flowering perennials
> now for fall planting*
>
> *September 6th, 2017, 9 am – Noon *
> *Washington County Extension Office, East Parking Lot*
> *2536 N. McConnell Ave, Fayetteville, AR *
>
> *The cost of perennials is $6/plant, and the cost of trees/shrubs is
> $17/plant.*
> *For pre-orders, please e-mail your plant selections and the number of
> each plant type to Rose Gergerich at <gergeric...> <gergeric...> *
>
> *Common Name Scientific Name
> *
>
> *Ageratum/mist flower Eupatorium coelestinum *
>
>
> *Aster, New England Aster
> novae-angliae *
>
> *Beautyberry, American Callicarpa americana
> *
>
>
> *Beebalm Monarda fistulosa *
>
> *Black-eyed Susan Rudbeckia hirta
> *
>
> *Boneset, common Eupatorium perfoliatum*
>
> *Cardinal flower Lobelia cardinalis
> *
>
> *Columbine, native Aquilegia
> canadensis *
>
> *Coneflower, gray-headed Ratibida pinnata *
>
> *Coneflower, orange Rudbeckia fulgida *
>
> *Coneflower, purple Echinacea
> purpurea *
>
> *Coneflower, yellow Echinacea paradoxa
> *
>
> *Coreopsis, Tickseed/lance-leaved Coreopsis lanceolata *
>
> *Devil’s Walking Stick Aralia
> spinose *
>
> *Evening primrose, MO Oenethera
> macrocarpa *
>
> *False blue indigo Baptisia australis *
>
> *False white wild indigo Baptisia alba *
>
> *Goldenrod, cliff Solidago
> drummondii *
>
> *Indigo bush Amorpha
> fruticosa*
>
> *Lead plant Amorpha
> canescens *
>
> *Lobelia, pale spiked Lobelia spicata *
>
> *Meadow beauty Rhesia virginica*
>
> *Milkweed, common Asclepias syriaca*
>
> *Milkweed, swamp Asclepias incarnata *
>
> *Mint, slender mountain Pycnanthemum tenuifolium *
>
> *Mint, clustered mountain Pycnanthemum muticum *
>
> *Nodding onion Allium
> cernuum *
>
> *Passionflower, purple Passiflora incarnata *
>
> *Penstemon, Fox Glove Penstemon digitalis *
> *Beardtongue
> *
> *Penstemon, Gulf Coast Penstemon tenuis *
>
> *Prairie clover, white Dalea candida*
>
> *Prairie glade onion Allium
> stellatum *
>
>
> *Rattlesnake master Eryngium
> yuccifolium *
>
> *Royal catchfly Silene
> regia *
>
> *Scarlet penstemon Penstemon
> murrayanus *
>
> *Spiderwort, Ohio Tradescantia
> ohiensis *
>
> *Shrubby St. John’s Wort Hypericum prolificum *
>
> *Sunflower, Ox-eye Heliopsis
> helianthoides *
>
> *Thimbleweed Anemone cylindrica*
>
> *Vervain, hoary Verbena stricta
> *
>
> *Violet, blue Viola sororia*
>
> *White crownbeard – Frost flower Verbesina virginica
> *
>
> *White snakeroot Ageratina altissima *
>
> *Wild hydrangea Hydrangea arborescens *
>
> *Wild petunia Ruellia
> humilis *
>
> *Wood sage Teucrium
> canadense*
>
> *Wreath goldenrod Solidago
> caesia *
>
>
>
> *Grasses *
> *Beak grain Diarrhena
> obovata*
> *Big bluestem Andropogon
> gerardii*
> *Bottlebrush grass Elymus
> hystrix *
> *Inland sea oats Chasmanthium latifolium
> *
>
> *Little bluestem Schizochyrium scoparium
> *
>
> *Side oats grama Bouteloua curtipendula*
> *Splitbeard bluestem Andropogon ternarius*
>
> *Trees and Shrubs – 2017 *
> *Aromatic sumac Rhus aromatica*
> *Black cherry Prunus serotina *
> *Black gum Nyssa sylvatica *
> *Black haw Viburnum prunifolium*
> *Black walnut Juglans nigra *
> *Buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis *
> *Carolina buckthorn Rhamnus caroliniana*
> *Chinkapin oak Quercus muehlenbergii*
> *Deciduous holly Ilex decidua *
> *Eastern wahoo Euonymus atropurpureus*
> *False indigo Amorpha fruticosa*
> *Gray dogwood Cornus racemosa*
> *Ninebark Physocarpus opulifolius*
> *Pawpaw Asimina triloba*
> *Persimmon Diospyros virginiana*
> *Redbud Cercis** canadensis *
> *Rough-leaved dogwood Cornus drummondii *
> *Serviceberry Amelanchier arborea *
> *Silky dogwood Cornus amomum *
> *Wafer ash Ptelea
> trifoliata *
> *Washington hawthorn Crataegus phaenopyrum*
> *Wild plum Prunus sp. *
> *Witch hazel Hamamelis vernalis *
>
> On Sat, Aug 26, 2017 at 8:59 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:
>
> I know I've seen this question posted before for various parts of AR, but
> does anyone know of a list of native plants suitable for NWA and where one
> might be able to purchase them in our area? I am especially interested in
> those that attract hummingbirds, but any species good for birds in general
> is of interest too.
>
> Thanks,
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 3:42 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
One of the biggest truisms I've seen when teaching kids to be better observers of nature is that the more you look the more you see. Moreover once you've started to notice something that world opens up to you. It's very easy to think you're looking and listening when you really aren't. I've talked to kids while listening to a dozen birds while the children have heard none. Teach them the Red-eyed Vireo song and all of the sudden they're everywhere. This happens to an even greater extent with us naturalist. Anytime I learn something new or teach something to a naturalist those things often suddenly become abundant when they were not noticed before. On ebird for instance, there is a large spike in Hooded Warblers at ONSC once I learned that song. It wasn't just though, that I learned it, but that I hadn't even been hearing it. It wasn't until I became proficient with a sufficient amount of the soundscape there that I was able to hear a song I didn't recognize and then eventually track it down as belonging to a Hooded Warbler.   This all works even faster in reverse. My fellow former coworkers and I have had long conversations lamenting our rapidly eroding observational skills. I'm sure we've all been with more experienced birders who've just plain observed more birds than us. I bet these folks who've stopped seeing birds just plain stopped looking as hard. You start with fewer birds and then all the sudden they're gone until all the sudden they're back. Probably there was some reason the numbers or numbers of easily observed birds declined. Then it's so easy to stop noticing. It's insidious man. You thing you're being observant but the difference between glancing out the window most of breakfast and only a small portion is easy to lose track of. The same for the difference b/t going on a walk with your eyes wide open and lost in your thoughts. When you're looking, it's there; when you're not, it's not. When it's gone, you stop looking until all the sudden "they're back".   So I place that on observational bias and lack of observational experience precipitated by a real life event. Perhaps seasonal differences, weather, putting out some bad food, bloody raccoons stealing all your bird seed, power washing your deck, changing your mowing pattern, etc. This is might explain why those of us who look for birds all the time never notice "no" birds.  Heck, I have a bird list for my wedding.  Maybe some of you can relate.  I've always wondered how to help folks along.  They've made some first steps, in that they did notice birds for a bit, but they seem to have a ways to go.  One way I've heard this explained it that they have a small awareness bubble.  The amount of the world around them they are aware of is rather small.  Of course, that's fairly normal nowadays and these people who are showing at least a passing interest in birds are further than most.  I think these are the folks who need the most encouragement.  Have you found anything to help them along?
Adam Schaffer


On Aug 23, 2017, at 9:49 AM, Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:


The question is posed to me at various times of the year. Migration doesn't explain why there would not be permanent residents like House Sparrows, chickadees and cardinals around.

Dan

Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App

------ Original Message ------

From: Jeffrey Short
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: August 23, 2017 at 8:54 AM
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?

#yiv1808004694 #yiv1808004694 _filtered #yiv1808004694 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv1808004694 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv1808004694 {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}#yiv1808004694 p.yiv1808004694MsoNormal, #yiv1808004694 li.yiv1808004694MsoNormal, #yiv1808004694 div.yiv1808004694MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv1808004694 a:link, #yiv1808004694 span.yiv1808004694MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv1808004694 a:visited, #yiv1808004694 span.yiv1808004694MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv1808004694 p {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv1808004694 span.yiv1808004694EmailStyle18 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv1808004694 .yiv1808004694MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv1808004694 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv1808004694 div.yiv1808004694WordSection1 {}#yiv1808004694 I had attributed the apparent reduction during this time (post-breeding) as the new generation leaving on a quest for different landscape in search of food and habitat.  Then, finding that there is “no niche gestalt like home”, they regroup, figuratively, for migration. If this be true, then the same phenomenon should exist worldwide, to a certain extent.  I would expect that some data to confirm/refute may be available from banding or telemetry research. Jeff Short From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Scheiman
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 8:24 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Where have all the birds gone? At Audubon Arkansas I get this question a few times a year, every year, at various times from various parts of the state. A backyard bird watcher claims that ALL the birds in their yard are gone. Usually they claim it has been a week, maybe two, maybe adding their neighbors aren’t seeing any birds either. They want to know if there is some disaster, a regional or nationwide catastrophe. Sometimes they want to blame or wonder about a particular threat like pesticide spraying or the clearing of a nearby lot for development.   Of course the decline by a million cuts that birds are experiencing is an issue, but I just can’t imagine that there is any phenomenon in Arkansas that would cause every bird in an area to disperse for an extended period. Even the recent Dicamba spraying should not influence what backyard birders in a nearby town see from one week to the next. All the highly localized reasons for why you may not see any birds in your yard at any given moment – a cat, a hawk, strong storms, empty feeders, spoiled seed, heat of a summer afternoon – should not result in all birds being gone all day and certainly not all week. I have never observed such a phenomenon in my Little Rock yard despite these various short-term dangers.  I’ve wondered about observation bias – perhaps the caller is not very good at seeing or hearing birds, or their viewing time of day is biased. But that seems unlikely to change between weeks. Maybe their yard provides very little resources so bird visitation is low to begin with, meaning any natural fluctuation results in no birds around at all? These can't be the answer for every caller. Have any of you had this experience? Presumably you are all more active observers than the average person, so a true disappearance of all birds should be noticed. Maybe you thought you noticed this early in your bird watching days but now experience has changed your perception?  P.S. I’m not talking about the disappearance of a particular species that is easily explained by predictable seasonal movements. I’m not talking about a perceived decline in birds from one period to the next, which may be explained by natural local variation or observer bias (memory cannot be trusted – keep a journal or use eBird to have hard data).   Dan ScheimanLittle Rock, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/17 2:47 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA
Hi Butch,   The hummingbirds in my yard here in Bentonville really enjoy my native Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens), Fire Pink, and Wild Columbine.  I've only gotten the fire pink to last a few years though.  I think they put too much into flowers.  The Columbine has done better with well drained soil and the honeysuckle has done better with plenty of sun.  I got the honeysuckle ordering from Pine Ridge Gardens, while the others primarily came from a spring plant sale at Compton Gardens and from Ozark Native Plants who sell at Ozark Natural Foods in Fayetteville.  They seem to have had larger sales there on certain Saturdays in the spring and fall.  I haven't had much luck with Royal Catchfly.  I think that needs more sun than most of my yard gets.  Columbine and Fire Pink are more tolerant to shade.  They probably wouldn't handle full sun here.  There are some ideas for you.  I hope those ideas help.  I'm glad you're trying to help our hummingbirds and going native while you're at it.  Natives have the benefit of supporting insect populations as well.  Like most birds, hummingbirds eat plenty of insects too.  My honeysuckle has the added side benefit of supporting a small population of Snowberry Clearwing (Hummingbird Moth) caterpillars.  
Adam SchafferBentonville
-
| |
|




From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Sunday, August 27, 2017 12:47 PM
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA

Master Naturalists are having a mostly native plant sale this week in Fayetteville:
The Northwest Arkansas Master Naturalists Native PlantSalePurchase your native trees and shrubs, grasses andflowering perennials now for fall planting September 6th, 2017, 9 am – Noon Washington County Extension Office, East Parking Lot2536 N. McConnell Ave, Fayetteville, AR   The cost of perennials is $6/plant, andthe cost of trees/shrubs is $17/plant.For pre-orders, please e-mail your plantselections and the number of each plant type to Rose Gergerich <atgergeric...>  CommonName                             Scientific Name                      Ageratum/mistflower                Eupatoriumcoelestinum                                                                                                                                                               Aster,New England                                 Aster novae-angliae                Beautyberry, American               Callicarpa americana                                                                                                                    Beebalm                                       Monarda fistulosa  Black-eyedSusan                                     Rudbeckiahirta                                               Boneset,common                                   Eupatoriumperfoliatum Cardinalflower                            Lobelia cardinalis                      Columbine,native                                   Aquilegiacanadensis               Coneflower,gray-headed                       Ratibidapinnata  Coneflower,orange                                Rudbeckiafulgida  Coneflower,purple                                 Echinaceapurpurea                 Coneflower,yellow                                 Echinaceaparadoxa                Coreopsis,Tickseed/lance-leaved          Coreopsis lanceolata   Devil’sWalking Stick                               Aralia spinose                          Eveningprimrose, MO                Oenetheramacrocarpa                       Falseblue indigo                          Baptisia australis  Falsewhite wild indigo               Baptisia alba  Goldenrod,cliff                            Solidago drummondii              Indigobush                                              Amorpha fruticosa Leadplant                                                Amorpha canescens  Lobelia,pale spiked                                 Lobelia spicata  Meadowbeauty                          Rhesiavirginica Milkweed,common                                Asclepiassyriaca Milkweed,swamp                                   Asclepiasincarnata  Mint,slender mountain              Pycnanthemum tenuifolium  Mint,clustered mountain                      Pycnanthemummuticum       Noddingonion                            Allium cernuum                       Passionflower,purple                 Passifloraincarnata    Penstemon,Fox Glove                Penstemon digitalis    Beardtongue                                                                                                                                                  Penstemon,Gulf Coast               Penstemon tenuis                    Prairieclover, white                                Daleacandida Prairieglade onion                                  Alliumstellatum                                                                                         Rattlesnakemaster                                 Eryngiumyuccifolium                         Royalcatchfly                              Silene regia                                   Scarletpenstemon                                  Penstemonmurrayanus                      Spiderwort,Ohio                                     Tradescantia ohiensis              ShrubbySt. John’s Wort                         Hypericumprolificum  Sunflower,Ox-eye                                   Heliopsishelianthoides            Thimbleweed                                          Anemone cylindrica Vervain,hoary                             Verbenastricta                                   Violet,blue                                              Viola sororia Whitecrownbeard – Frost flower         Verbesina virginica                  Whitesnakeroot                                     Ageratinaaltissima  Wildhydrangea                           Hydrangeaarborescens  Wildpetunia                                            Ruelliahumilis             Woodsage                                               Teucriumcanadense Wreathgoldenrod                                  Solidago caesia                          Grasses Beak grain                                                Diarrhena obovataBig bluestem                                            Andropogon gerardiiBottlebrush grass                                    Elymus hystrix            Inlandsea oats                             Chasmanthiumlatifolium             Littlebluestem                             Schizochyrium scoparium        Side oats grama                           Bouteloua curtipendulaSplitbeard bluestem                                Andropogonternarius Trees and Shrubs – 2017 Aromatic sumac               Rhus aromaticaBlack cherry                                 Prunusserotina Black gum                                     Nyssa sylvatica Black haw                         ViburnumprunifoliumBlack walnut                                Juglansnigra Buttonbush                                  Cephalanthusoccidentalis Carolina buckthorn                     Rhamnus carolinianaChinkapin oak                  Quercus muehlenbergiiDeciduous holly               Ilex decidua Eastern wahoo                 EuonymusatropurpureusFalse indigo                                  Amorpha fruticosaGray dogwood                 Cornus racemosaNinebark                          PhysocarpusopulifoliusPawpaw                            AsiminatrilobaPersimmon                                   DiospyrosvirginianaRedbud                             Cercis canadensis Rough-leaved dogwood             Cornusdrummondii Serviceberry                                 Amelanchierarborea Silky dogwood                 Cornus amomum Wafer ash                                     Ptelea trifoliata                      Washington hawthorn   CrataegusphaenopyrumWild plum                                    Prunus sp. Witch hazel                                  Hamamelisvernalis
On Sat, Aug 26, 2017 at 8:59 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:

I know I've seen this question posted before for various parts of AR, but does anyone know of a list of native plants suitable for NWA and where one might be able to purchase them in our area? I am especially interested in those that attract hummingbirds, but any species good for birds in general is of interest too.

Thanks,
Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville



 

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Date: 8/28/17 1:52 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: AN EARLY CLAY-COLORED SPARROW AT CHESNEY
A Clay-colored Sparrow at Chesney Prairie Natural Area this morning still had quite a bit of the clay color in the breast (photo). It perched up on some leafless branches atop a prairie mound, along with 20 or so Dickcissels. The only other August record that I know of is from Lake Fayetteville, August 30, 1998.

Some of the Dickcissels at Chesney were still feeding young out of the nest. In addition, there were sizeable flocks of Dickcissels (30-50) flying over. Early in the morning I heard pinks of Bobolinks in these flocks, though I never managed to see one. This is just about right for fall transient Bobolinks.

There were also flocks of American Goldfinches. I assume they are attracted to all of the ripening seeds, especially of Ashy Sunflowers. Some are fledglings. One working sunflowers made a short flight into a Giant Ragweed thicket. It had a short tail and still a few downy white feathers on its head. It looked like it was trying to nap in the dense ragweeds.

A few Sedge Wrens were singing in the dense Big Bluestem in the lower areas, aka, the Couch unit, purchased with help from the late Martha Milburn. Sedge Wrens are well-known for nesting far to the north early, then heading south for a second nesting. We have a number of these August records, including from Chesney (and also elsewhere in Arkansas). I never could decide how many; at least two.

There were also maybe five Empidonaxes; Least Flycatcher and ???

This is still a good time to see Tallgrass Prairie flowers. Big Bluestem grass was decked out in yellow flower parts and magnificent. A relatively rare plant, Prenanthes aspera I like its common name, prairie rattle-snake root was in bloom, a tall wand with many white flowers. Southern Prairie Asters own the place, except where there is meadow beauty and slender false foxglove, several other sunflower species, etc.

August rains that make the prairie glow also make everything grow, including the walking trails. I waded through quite a few of them today, but didnt bring home any little friends, ticks or chiggers.


 

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Date: 8/28/17 1:06 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: BKNWR
both the Red and Red-necked Phalaropes continue at Bald Knob NWR.

Kenny & LaDonna Nichols
Cabot

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/28/17 9:22 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Red-neck Phalarope
Still present at Bald Knob

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/27/17 7:22 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: TX storm waifs
Greetings all,
No reports of pelagic storm waifs on the listservers from LA, MS, OK,TN.
LA has Groove-billed Anis.
TX has Sooty Terns NW of Houston and N of San Antonio.

I guessing, from the forecasted storm track that we won't get much wind, but probably rain. The predicted storm track has shifted from OK, to Northern LA , to south central AR.
But it's several days before the storms arrival. Hard to tell if it's enough of a storm for us to get a Reddish Egret.

For now I'm at Hector, but I'm starting to think about getting happy feet toward Lake Millwood.
Cheers, Leif




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Date: 8/27/17 6:40 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Using novel-grass endophyte associations as an avian deterrent
And, if you are trying to reduce attractiveness to geese and other grazer and some seedeater birds…



https://journal.nzpps.org/index.php/nzpp/article/view/59



Jeff Short





https://journal.nzpps.org/index.php/nzpp/article/view/59














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Date: 8/27/17 2:58 pm
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: Get ready for crossbills
Message from crossbill expert Matt Young... if they do show up, it will be important to record them... Matt will identify the recordings...

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************

From: Matthew A. Young [mailto:<may6...>]
Sent: Sunday, August 27, 2017 9:58 AM
To: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>; Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: crossbills


Hope all is well Kim and Joe!



Just giving you heads-up...be on lookout for crossbills. I think it's just a matter of time before the first ones are reported in Arkansas(they'll mostly be Type 2 as usual).......could be in September or December-Jan, but an epic west to east irruption of Types 2, 3 and 4 is happening......and a Type 5 in Wisconsin last week, only 2nd record east of Mississippi. I could see you recording your first Type 4 in Arkansas ever.



best,

Matt


 

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Date: 8/27/17 2:19 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Hurricane Harvey and Whooping Cranes - Friends of the Wild Whoopers
Dear ARBIRDers,

While watching the human tragedy unfold in south Texas from Hurricane Harvey, I got to wondering about the well-being of whooping cranes that spend time in that area. I was relieved to see this:

http://friendsofthewildwhoopers.org/hurricane-harvey-whooping-cranes/

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/27/17 10:47 am
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA
Master Naturalists are having a mostly native plant sale this week in
Fayetteville:

*The Northwest Arkansas Master Naturalists Native Plant Sale*

*Purchase your native trees and shrubs, grasses and flowering perennials
now for fall planting*



*September 6th, 2017, 9 am – Noon *

*Washington County Extension Office, East Parking Lot*

*2536 N. McConnell Ave, Fayetteville, AR *



*The cost of perennials is $6/plant, and the cost of trees/shrubs is
$17/plant.*

*For pre-orders, please e-mail your plant selections and the number of each
plant type to Rose Gergerich at <gergeric...> <gergeric...> *



*Common Name Scientific Name
*



*Ageratum/mist flower Eupatorium coelestinum *




*Aster, New England Aster
novae-angliae *



*Beautyberry, American Callicarpa americana
*




*Beebalm Monarda fistulosa *



*Black-eyed Susan Rudbeckia hirta
*



*Boneset, common Eupatorium perfoliatum*



*Cardinal flower Lobelia cardinalis
*



*Columbine, native Aquilegia
canadensis *



*Coneflower, gray-headed Ratibida pinnata *



*Coneflower, orange Rudbeckia fulgida *



*Coneflower, purple Echinacea
purpurea *



*Coneflower, yellow Echinacea paradoxa
*



*Coreopsis, Tickseed/lance-leaved Coreopsis lanceolata *



*Devil’s Walking Stick Aralia
spinose *



*Evening primrose, MO Oenethera
macrocarpa *



*False blue indigo Baptisia australis *



*False white wild indigo Baptisia alba *



*Goldenrod, cliff Solidago
drummondii *



*Indigo bush Amorpha fruticosa*



*Lead plant Amorpha
canescens *



*Lobelia, pale spiked Lobelia spicata *



*Meadow beauty Rhesia virginica*



*Milkweed, common Asclepias syriaca*



*Milkweed, swamp Asclepias incarnata *



*Mint, slender mountain Pycnanthemum tenuifolium *



*Mint, clustered mountain Pycnanthemum muticum *



*Nodding onion Allium
cernuum *



*Passionflower, purple Passiflora incarnata *



*Penstemon, Fox Glove Penstemon digitalis *

*Beardtongue
*

*Penstemon, Gulf Coast Penstemon tenuis *



*Prairie clover, white Dalea candida*



*Prairie glade onion Allium
stellatum *




*Rattlesnake master Eryngium
yuccifolium *



*Royal catchfly Silene
regia *



*Scarlet penstemon Penstemon
murrayanus *



*Spiderwort, Ohio Tradescantia
ohiensis *



*Shrubby St. John’s Wort Hypericum prolificum *



*Sunflower, Ox-eye Heliopsis
helianthoides *



*Thimbleweed Anemone cylindrica*



*Vervain, hoary Verbena stricta
*



*Violet, blue Viola sororia*



*White crownbeard – Frost flower Verbesina virginica
*



*White snakeroot Ageratina altissima *



*Wild hydrangea Hydrangea arborescens *



*Wild petunia Ruellia
humilis *



*Wood sage Teucrium canadense*



*Wreath goldenrod Solidago
caesia *







*Grasses *

*Beak grain Diarrhena
obovata*

*Big bluestem Andropogon
gerardii*

*Bottlebrush grass Elymus
hystrix *

*Inland sea oats Chasmanthium latifolium *



*Little bluestem Schizochyrium scoparium *



*Side oats grama Bouteloua curtipendula*

*Splitbeard bluestem Andropogon ternarius*



*Trees and Shrubs – 2017 *

*Aromatic sumac Rhus aromatica*

*Black cherry Prunus serotina *

*Black gum Nyssa sylvatica *

*Black haw Viburnum prunifolium*

*Black walnut Juglans nigra *

*Buttonbush Cephalanthus occidentalis *

*Carolina buckthorn Rhamnus caroliniana*

*Chinkapin oak Quercus muehlenbergii*

*Deciduous holly Ilex decidua *

*Eastern wahoo Euonymus atropurpureus*

*False indigo Amorpha fruticosa*

*Gray dogwood Cornus racemosa*

*Ninebark Physocarpus opulifolius*

*Pawpaw Asimina triloba*

*Persimmon Diospyros virginiana*

*Redbud Cercis** canadensis *

*Rough-leaved dogwood Cornus drummondii *

*Serviceberry Amelanchier arborea *

*Silky dogwood Cornus amomum *

*Wafer ash Ptelea
trifoliata *

*Washington hawthorn Crataegus phaenopyrum*

*Wild plum Prunus sp. *

*Witch hazel Hamamelis vernalis *

On Sat, Aug 26, 2017 at 8:59 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:

> I know I've seen this question posted before for various parts of AR, but
> does anyone know of a list of native plants suitable for NWA and where one
> might be able to purchase them in our area? I am especially interested in
> those that attract hummingbirds, but any species good for birds in general
> is of interest too.
>
> Thanks,
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville

 

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Date: 8/27/17 9:16 am
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Red necked phalarope
There has been a Red Necked Phalarope in the SWCorner of the third(last) pond from the grain bins. Park in very corner and he has been in a puddle of water all morning. He has let several of us walk up the levee about a hundred feet within about forty ft of him with no fear of us
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/27/17 7:56 am
From: Cody Massery <cmassery...>
Subject: Red phalarope
Present at 9:50am, here is approximate location of where it was seen.

Dropped Pin
near Bald Knob, AR
https://goo.gl/maps/FWTY9L5ovg32
Get Outlook for iOS<https://aka.ms/o0ukef>

 

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Date: 8/27/17 7:33 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LOON MIGRATION CRUISES ON BEAVER LAKE IN NOVEMBER
During yesterdays field trip several folks ask about the sign-up for loon migration cruises on Beaver Lake this November. The cruises will Saturday Nov 4 and Saturday Nov 18, starting time 10 AM each day, from Rocky Branch Marina. They will be offered by Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, following the same format they use for their popular winter Bald Eagle cruises. There are about 20 seats on the boat. The cost is $10 per person (cash, check, or credit card at registration). These cruises are limited to adults. Hobbs provides life jackets that must be worn by all participants. Cruises will cover a broad area of the lake from Rocky Branch marina. Each cruise is about 2-hours. There will be several experienced guides (including me) on both cruises. In past years, this has been the most productive time to see the waterfowl influx, including loons (we have seen Common and Pacific), several grebes species, many ducks species, eagles, gulls, etc. The boat is a stable party barge. Official registration is October 20, but you can register now by calling the park at 479 789 5000. The trips are cancelled and refunded if the wind is too high or if there is really bad weather.


 

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Date: 8/27/17 7:15 am
From: James Morgan <jlmm...>
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA
There have been a couple of folks specializing in Native Plants at the
Fayetteville Farmer's Mkt, but only one selling now.

Susan Frey who sells at Fayetteville Farmer's Mkt only raises Native
Plants. In the past, Susan has also worked in a position at U of A as
support staff for the State Sust Agriculture Advisory Committee, so very
knowledgeable with helping you pick plants.

Susan has a Facebook called "Wild Streak Plants" that Teresa Maurer,
manager of the Farmer's Mkt says has lots of information. Susan's phone
# is 479-935-0700. Definitely check with Susan on attendance that Saturday.

Jim Morgan
Fayetteville


On 8/27/2017 8:25 AM, Daniel Scheiman wrote:
> Go to National Audubon Society¹s Plants for Birds database and enter your
> zip code to bring up a list of recommended plants and plant suppliers for
> your region. https://www.audubon.org/native-plants
>
> The main Plants for Birds page has articles about making your yard more
> bird friendly. http://www.audubon.org/plantsforbirds
>
> I also like Cornell¹s Habitat Network for their library of bird-friendly
> yard tips. Yardmap.org
>
> Once you¹re on the path to a more bird-friendly yard, apply to Arkansas
> Audubon Society¹s Bird-Friendly Yard Certification program
> http://www.arbirds.org/mycaptcha/Yard/yard_bird_program.htm. Note that the
> website and its documents will soon be revised.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>
> On 8/26/17, 8:59 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
> Gmail" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <butchchq8...> wrote:
>
>> I know I've seen this question posted before for various parts of AR, but
>> does anyone know of a list of native plants suitable for NWA and where
>> one might be able to purchase them in our area? I am especially
>> interested in those that attract hummingbirds, but any species good for
>> birds in general is of interest too.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Butch Tetzlaff
>> Bentonville
 

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Date: 8/27/17 6:26 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Native plants for NWA
Go to National Audubon Societys Plants for Birds database and enter your
zip code to bring up a list of recommended plants and plant suppliers for
your region. https://www.audubon.org/native-plants

The main Plants for Birds page has articles about making your yard more
bird friendly. http://www.audubon.org/plantsforbirds

I also like Cornells Habitat Network for their library of bird-friendly
yard tips. Yardmap.org

Once youre on the path to a more bird-friendly yard, apply to Arkansas
Audubon Societys Bird-Friendly Yard Certification program
http://www.arbirds.org/mycaptcha/Yard/yard_bird_program.htm. Note that the
website and its documents will soon be revised.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 8/26/17, 8:59 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Gmail" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <butchchq8...> wrote:

>I know I've seen this question posted before for various parts of AR, but
>does anyone know of a list of native plants suitable for NWA and where
>one might be able to purchase them in our area? I am especially
>interested in those that attract hummingbirds, but any species good for
>birds in general is of interest too.
>
>Thanks,
>Butch Tetzlaff
>Bentonville
 

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Date: 8/27/17 6:10 am
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: MONARCHS MATING DURING FIELD TRIP
Patty McLean and I had a great time birding with the NW Arkansas group.
Thanks for letting us join your group yesterday. For those that have never
attended one of these outings, they are a real treat. There are experts on
the trip that give information on insects, plants, history and birds.

We looked at the empid photo and think it is an Acadian Flycatcher but
would welcome other opinions.

Below is a link to pictures from the day (including the empid):

https://goo.gl/5f6e4J

Michael Linz(Conway, AR)
Patty McLean(Tucker, GA)


On Sat, Aug 26, 2017 at 5:31 PM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Calm winds, temps in the 60s-70s, how much better can it get? The only
> problem with today’s Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Craig
> State Fish Hatchery in Centerton was the threat that Hurricane Harvey might
> have spun off avian prizes. You keep looking at the sky. Your number is in
> the great avian lottery, just like Powerball. Every bird at distance could
> be the next big deal. You never know.
>
>
> Closer to Earth, there were a few shorebirds: Killdeer (~25), Solitary
> Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (4), Semipalmated Sandpiper (3), Western
> Sandpiper (probably), Least Sandpiper (5), Pectoral Sandpiper (4, then a
> flock of 12 right at the end), Stilt Sandpiper (4). Some very close views
> of semis and leasts made it fairly easy for some of the newer birders to
> get a feel for peep ID. Other birds included adult Bald Eagle (1), Cooper’s
> Hawk (1), Great Egret (3), and Green Heron (5). American Goldfinch male
> going for algae in the spring run.
>
>
> Patty McLean picked out a silent Empidonax with modest eye ring and
> largish bill. Silent empids are a kind of gold standard. They don’t often
> give up their secrets, no matter how many times I flip the empid pages in
> Sibley. Michael Linz got a photo. They are working on possible ID.
>
>
> Maybe best part of the trip for me was walking alongside the Swamp
> Milkweed patches set aside from mowing by hatchery personnel. These patches
> mark presence of spring fed wetlands, an increasingly rare habitat in
> northwest Arkansas. Joan Reynolds and Cathy Ross kept finding the special
> plants. Besides swamp milkweed, monkey flower, meadow beauty, southern
> prairie aster, an early flowering goldenrod, Bidens, great blue lobelia,
> plus-plus-plus; a botanical community complex and fascinating.
>
>
> Flying through and among, a small blue damselfly, some also mating.
> Monarchs were abundant on the milkweed and we saw at least 3 pairs mating.
> Making Earth great again. Golden Digger Wasps walked flowerheads, stately
> in golds, reds, and blacks. Right in the middle of a complex and
> fascinating invertebrate community, closer we looked, the more we saw.
>
>
> At some point I realized I’d stopped longing for Hurricane Harvey
> spin-offs. I’d already won the avian Powerball. A Green Heron in the ditch
> below slowly walked away from us, its head feathers erected into a sweeping
> dark green crown. That big, intent, golden eye. A story bigger than the
> mighty United States itself. World-wide really in either the form at
> Centerton today, or something much like it.
>
>
> Adam Schaffer, who lives in Bentonville, is current president of Arkansas
> Audubon Society. He rode his bike to the field trip. As things ended, he
> strapped on his helmet and pedaled home. Turns out, it is not against the
> law to not burn fossil fuels. Or for that matter, to be president of a
> conservation organization with a statewide membership and a willingness to
> speak up for a healthy future.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/17 6:59 pm
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Native plants for NWA
I know I've seen this question posted before for various parts of AR, but does anyone know of a list of native plants suitable for NWA and where one might be able to purchase them in our area? I am especially interested in those that attract hummingbirds, but any species good for birds in general is of interest too.

Thanks,
Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville
 

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Date: 8/26/17 4:56 pm
From: Abby Gibson <balllgibson...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills
I'm at the Lake Chicot pumping plant now, at the great egret roost, and
there are (in addition to a few hundred egrets) about 15 wood storks, a
dozen or so white ibis (immature and mature), and two roseate spoonbills
(one mature and one immature). Also had a flyover bald eagle a few miles
back on the levee. This is my fourth trip this month to look for them and
the first success. Of course I forgot my scope this time.

 

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Date: 8/26/17 4:50 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Re: ASCA field trip-Bald Knob
Thanks, Karen. The Red Phalarope was a US & state bird for both of us. We saw quite a few of them off the Chilean coast.

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Sent: Saturday, August 26, 2017 6:31:22 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: ASCA field trip-Bald Knob

30 people met at the Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge Saturday morning for the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas' (ASCA) field trip. We were determined to find the Red Phalarope that had been hanging out at the Refuge for the last three days. A call from an early arriving birder gave us the good news that he was looking at the Phalarope. Just before we arrived at the pond where the birder was waiting for us, a Bald Eagle strafed the pond and flushed all the shorebirds, including the Phalarope. We briefly relocated the Phalarope, which allowed a few people to see it before we lost it completely. We then spent the rest of morning sorting through the shorebirds. Best birds were 4 Buff-breasted Sandpipers, an American Golden-Plover, several Semi-palmated Plovers, 3 Wilson's Snipe, 8 Northern Pintails, 20 Bank Swallows, plus two singing Bell's Vireos and a Field Sparrow near the Refuge's headquarters building. There were lots of Black-necked Stilts, Cattle, Great, and Snowy Egrets, Great Blue and Little Blue Herons, one Green Heron, both Dowitcher species, Lesser Yellowlegs, Least, Pectoral, and Semi-palmated Sandpipers, Mallards and Shovelers, and a big flock of Canada Geese.

Unfortunately, there were no Pelicans, no Roseate Spoonbils, no Wood Storks. Even the Avocet who's been around for weeks was nowhere to be found. Around noon a rain shower moved in and most people left. A few stayed to to make a last effort to find the Phalarope. Very shortly we found it. It had settled in with a bunch of Dowitchers and Pectorals and was happily paddling around in a small pool of water. It was in the third pond to the west of the grain bins. This seems to be its favorite spot and it was in very close to where we were parked on Huntsman Road. We got great looks through scopes and binoculars. By then it was 1:30 p.m. so we called it quits. We had to work for our good birds, but were pleased with our morning's efforts. We saw a total of 38 species.
Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Leader
Little Rock

 

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Date: 8/26/17 4:31 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA field trip-Bald Knob
30 people met at the Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge Saturday morning for the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas' (ASCA) field trip.  We were determined to find the Red Phalarope that had been hanging out at the Refuge for the last three days.  A call from an early arriving birder gave us the good news that he was looking at the Phalarope.  Just before we arrived at the pond where the birder was waiting for us, a Bald Eagle strafed the pond and flushed all the shorebirds, including the Phalarope.  We briefly relocated the Phalarope, which allowed a few people to see it before we lost it completely.  We then spent the rest of morning sorting through the shorebirds.  Best birds were 4 Buff-breasted Sandpipers, an American Golden-Plover, several Semi-palmated Plovers, 3 Wilson's Snipe, 8 Northern Pintails, 20 Bank Swallows, plus two singing Bell's Vireos and a Field Sparrow near the Refuge's headquarters building.  There were lots of Black-necked Stilts, Cattle, Great, and Snowy Egrets, Great Blue and Little Blue Herons, one Green Heron, both Dowitcher species, Lesser Yellowlegs, Least, Pectoral, and Semi-palmated Sandpipers, Mallards and Shovelers, and a big flock of Canada Geese.

Unfortunately, there were no Pelicans, no Roseate Spoonbils, no Wood Storks.  Even the Avocet who's been around for weeks was nowhere to be found.  Around noon a rain shower moved in and most people left.  A few stayed to to make a last effort to find the Phalarope.  Very shortly we found it.  It had settled in with a bunch of Dowitchers and Pectorals and was happily paddling around in a small pool of water.  It was in the third pond to the west of the grain bins.  This seems to be its favorite spot and it was in very close to where we were parked on Huntsman Road.  We got great looks through scopes and binoculars.  By then it was 1:30 p.m. so we called it quits.  We had to work for our good birds, but were pleased with our morning's efforts.  We saw a total of 38 species.
Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Leader
Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/17 3:32 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: MONARCHS MATING DURING FIELD TRIP
Calm winds, temps in the 60s-70s, how much better can it get? The only problem with todays Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton was the threat that Hurricane Harvey might have spun off avian prizes. You keep looking at the sky. Your number is in the great avian lottery, just like Powerball. Every bird at distance could be the next big deal. You never know.

Closer to Earth, there were a few shorebirds: Killdeer (~25), Solitary Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (4), Semipalmated Sandpiper (3), Western Sandpiper (probably), Least Sandpiper (5), Pectoral Sandpiper (4, then a flock of 12 right at the end), Stilt Sandpiper (4). Some very close views of semis and leasts made it fairly easy for some of the newer birders to get a feel for peep ID. Other birds included adult Bald Eagle (1), Coopers Hawk (1), Great Egret (3), and Green Heron (5). American Goldfinch male going for algae in the spring run.

Patty McLean picked out a silent Empidonax with modest eye ring and largish bill. Silent empids are a kind of gold standard. They dont often give up their secrets, no matter how many times I flip the empid pages in Sibley. Michael Linz got a photo. They are working on possible ID.

Maybe best part of the trip for me was walking alongside the Swamp Milkweed patches set aside from mowing by hatchery personnel. These patches mark presence of spring fed wetlands, an increasingly rare habitat in northwest Arkansas. Joan Reynolds and Cathy Ross kept finding the special plants. Besides swamp milkweed, monkey flower, meadow beauty, southern prairie aster, an early flowering goldenrod, Bidens, great blue lobelia, plus-plus-plus; a botanical community complex and fascinating.

Flying through and among, a small blue damselfly, some also mating. Monarchs were abundant on the milkweed and we saw at least 3 pairs mating. Making Earth great again. Golden Digger Wasps walked flowerheads, stately in golds, reds, and blacks. Right in the middle of a complex and fascinating invertebrate community, closer we looked, the more we saw.

At some point I realized Id stopped longing for Hurricane Harvey spin-offs. Id already won the avian Powerball. A Green Heron in the ditch below slowly walked away from us, its head feathers erected into a sweeping dark green crown. That big, intent, golden eye. A story bigger than the mighty United States itself. World-wide really in either the form at Centerton today, or something much like it.

Adam Schaffer, who lives in Bentonville, is current president of Arkansas Audubon Society. He rode his bike to the field trip. As things ended, he strapped on his helmet and pedaled home. Turns out, it is not against the law to not burn fossil fuels. Or for that matter, to be president of a conservation organization with a statewide membership and a willingness to speak up for a healthy future.


 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/17 8:30 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Hummingbird Pool Party
Dear ARBIRDers,

For those interested in such things (courtesy of my brother):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAer4rDnA6I

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock (where we have received a whopping 8.12" of rain so far in August),
Barry Haas
 

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Date: 8/25/17 6:18 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Birding Lessons
I suggest you visit the Cornell Lab of Ornithology web site. I recall they have on-line and classroom resources that are top notch. I have patterned some elementary school birding sessions at Hobbs State Park after with their ideas.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 25, 2017, at 11:51 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:
>
> me.
 

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Date: 8/25/17 9:51 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: Birding Lessons
Hi, Megan,
My daughter, Carolyn Hubbell, teaches FACS (believe thats the acronym for it) at Batesville High School. She and her husband Don (Director of the UA Research Station at Bethesda), know of my keen interest in birds.
Ive offered to support our UA Boone County Extension Service in setting up a 4-H club birding program, but so far, no takers.
I would be happy to help you in any way that I can. Let Carolyn know and tell her what you need. She can give you my phone number if you need to contact me.
In the meantime, hopefully, you will probably hear from other birders in your area who would be willing to come to your classroom and actually give you help onsite.
Glad to know that you and your students are interested.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, Boone Co., AR

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Megan Foll<mailto:<auntm13...>
Sent: Friday, August 25, 2017 11:15 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Birding Lessons

Hi,
I'm a 9th grade teacher at Batesville AR, and we have a short period where we can do enrichment activities for a cycle of 3 weeks. I've had several students interested in a birding class and was wondering if anybody knew of some good lesson plans or resources for them.
Any help would be appreciated!
Megan Foll


 

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Date: 8/25/17 9:15 am
From: Megan Foll <auntm13...>
Subject: Birding Lessons
Hi,
I'm a 9th grade teacher at Batesville AR, and we have a short period where
we can do enrichment activities for a cycle of 3 weeks. I've had several
students interested in a birding class and was wondering if anybody knew of
some good lesson plans or resources for them.
Any help would be appreciated!
Megan Foll

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/17 8:30 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Red Phalarope
Still here walking in mud

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/24/17 4:40 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
I have my regulars. Blue Jays, Cardinals, Starlings, House Sparrows. I do
not feed birds in the summer. But they come for the water I provide. First
thing in the morning. Then I see them no more. All day.

Sandy

On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 6:29 PM Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:

> Good thoughts, Sandy. Thanks for your input. Maybe molt explains it in the
> Maumelle yard, but why don’t I see that in my own yard? Does anyone else
> notice an absence of birds in your yard during this time of molt? I see
> jays and cardinals undergoing molt now but they still visit my feeders
> everyday. A jay is vocalizing as I type even though there are no birds on
> my feeders at the moment. I did just fill my feeders about 30 min ago
> because they were empty; I’m filling my feeders about every other day right
> now. Perhaps my own observations are just biased.
>
> No doubt that a bird list in a natural area can be pretty low at this
> quiet time of year (though Bald Knob is happening), but you still did
> detect birds at Sequoyah; as an experienced observer you are tuned in to
> the birds. I think observer experience and bias play a big role while also
> interacting with local environmental factors.
>
> Dan
>
> On 8/24/17, 5:47 PM, "Sandy Berger" <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> Birds are molting. They are hanging out quietly waiting on new feathers
> to grow in. Just skulking about looking for food. No need to vocalize
> anymore.
>
> I was in Oklahoma birding today at Sequoyah NWR. I only had 35 species. If
> some birds hadn't let out a call or chip, I would have had way less. The
> most of any one species were Forsters Tern. I had 26. Migration is
> happening.
>
> I think if people were out early they'd see and hear more.
>
> Sandy B.
> FS, AR
>
> On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 5:13 PM Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
>> Again I got this question, this time from Maumelle. No birds anywhere for
>> two weeks, except hummingbirds. I questioned him about his surrounding
>> landscape (there are trees and shrubs, he is close to the AR River), about
>> keeping feeders clean and full (feeders sitting full), about cats (around,
>> but hasn't seen in his yard), about time of day when he watches birds
>> (early in the morning). Perhaps his uneaten seed has gotten moldy from the
>> rain? Otherwise I have no explanation. I told him there is nothing to worry
>> about, there is natural local variation, there is ample natural food supply
>> for birds right now, that I've got plenty of birds at my feeders, he should
>> keep his feeders clean and stocked, to keep watching and listening, and if
>> in two weeks he still isn't seeing any birds call me back.
>>
>> I'm still skeptical that a yard can be absent of all birds for more than
>> a few hours. But clearly the phenomenon seems real to some people. I'm
>> guessing there is no one answer that will fit all. But so far I can't think
>> of an answer that fits one. I'll keep saying what I've been saying,
>> providing reassurance, offering bird-friendly yard tips, and maybe one of
>> these days I'll be able to run over to a caller's house and see for myself.
>>
>> Dan Scheiman
>> Little Rock, AR
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 4:29 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
Good thoughts, Sandy. Thanks for your input. Maybe molt explains it in the
Maumelle yard, but why dont I see that in my own yard? Does anyone else
notice an absence of birds in your yard during this time of molt? I see jays
and cardinals undergoing molt now but they still visit my feeders everyday.
A jay is vocalizing as I type even though there are no birds on my feeders
at the moment. I did just fill my feeders about 30 min ago because they were
empty; Im filling my feeders about every other day right now. Perhaps my
own observations are just biased.

No doubt that a bird list in a natural area can be pretty low at this quiet
time of year (though Bald Knob is happening), but you still did detect birds
at Sequoyah; as an experienced observer you are tuned in to the birds. I
think observer experience and bias play a big role while also interacting
with local environmental factors.

Dan

On 8/24/17, 5:47 PM, "Sandy Berger" <sndbrgr...> wrote:

Birds are molting. They are hanging out quietly waiting on new feathers to
grow in. Just skulking about looking for food. No need to vocalize anymore.

I was in Oklahoma birding today at Sequoyah NWR. I only had 35 species. If
some birds hadn't let out a call or chip, I would have had way less. The
most of any one species were Forsters Tern. I had 26. Migration is
happening.

I think if people were out early they'd see and hear more.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 5:13 PM Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
> Again I got this question, this time from Maumelle. No birds anywhere for two
> weeks, except hummingbirds. I questioned him about his surrounding landscape
> (there are trees and shrubs, he is close to the AR River), about keeping
> feeders clean and full (feeders sitting full), about cats (around, but hasn't
> seen in his yard), about time of day when he watches birds (early in the
> morning). Perhaps his uneaten seed has gotten moldy from the rain? Otherwise I
> have no explanation. I told him there is nothing to worry about, there is
> natural local variation, there is ample natural food supply for birds right
> now, that I've got plenty of birds at my feeders, he should keep his feeders
> clean and stocked, to keep watching and listening, and if in two weeks he
> still isn't seeing any birds call me back.
>
> I'm still skeptical that a yard can be absent of all birds for more than a few
> hours. But clearly the phenomenon seems real to some people. I'm guessing
> there is no one answer that will fit all. But so far I can't think of an
> answer that fits one. I'll keep saying what I've been saying, providing
> reassurance, offering bird-friendly yard tips, and maybe one of these days
> I'll be able to run over to a caller's house and see for myself.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 3:47 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
Birds are molting. They are hanging out quietly waiting on new feathers to
grow in. Just skulking about looking for food. No need to vocalize anymore.

I was in Oklahoma birding today at Sequoyah NWR. I only had 35 species. If
some birds hadn't let out a call or chip, I would have had way less. The
most of any one species were Forsters Tern. I had 26. Migration is
happening.

I think if people were out early they'd see and hear more.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 5:13 PM Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:

> Again I got this question, this time from Maumelle. No birds anywhere for
> two weeks, except hummingbirds. I questioned him about his surrounding
> landscape (there are trees and shrubs, he is close to the AR River), about
> keeping feeders clean and full (feeders sitting full), about cats (around,
> but hasn't seen in his yard), about time of day when he watches birds
> (early in the morning). Perhaps his uneaten seed has gotten moldy from the
> rain? Otherwise I have no explanation. I told him there is nothing to worry
> about, there is natural local variation, there is ample natural food supply
> for birds right now, that I've got plenty of birds at my feeders, he should
> keep his feeders clean and stocked, to keep watching and listening, and if
> in two weeks he still isn't seeing any birds call me back.
>
> I'm still skeptical that a yard can be absent of all birds for more than a
> few hours. But clearly the phenomenon seems real to some people. I'm
> guessing there is no one answer that will fit all. But so far I can't think
> of an answer that fits one. I'll keep saying what I've been saying,
> providing reassurance, offering bird-friendly yard tips, and maybe one of
> these days I'll be able to run over to a caller's house and see for myself.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 3:14 pm
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Where have all the birds gone?
Again I got this question, this time from Maumelle. No birds anywhere for two weeks, except hummingbirds. I questioned him about his surrounding landscape (there are trees and shrubs, he is close to the AR River), about keeping feeders clean and full (feeders sitting full), about cats (around, but hasn't seen in his yard), about time of day when he watches birds (early in the morning). Perhaps his uneaten seed has gotten moldy from the rain? Otherwise I have no explanation. I told him there is nothing to worry about, there is natural local variation, there is ample natural food supply for birds right now, that I've got plenty of birds at my feeders, he should keep his feeders clean and stocked, to keep watching and listening, and if in two weeks he still isn't seeing any birds call me back.

I'm still skeptical that a yard can be absent of all birds for more than a few hours. But clearly the phenomenon seems real to some people. I'm guessing there is no one answer that will fit all. But so far I can't think of an answer that fits one. I'll keep saying what I've been saying, providing reassurance, offering bird-friendly yard tips, and maybe one of these days I'll be able to run over to a caller's house and see for myself.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 3:03 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Red Phalarope at Bald Knob NWR
Hahaha. Darn auto correct! A Dunlin. What does Samsung know, anyway. :-)


Patty
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Date: 8/24/17 4:28 PM (GMT-06:00) To: plm108 <plm108...> Cc: arbird-l <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Red Phalarope at Bald Knob NWR
A Dublin????

<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>
Virus-free.
www.avg.com
<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>
<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 12:28 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

> I'm at BNNWR and watching a RED PHALAROPE feeding in the SE corner of the
> flooded Pond 3. Michael Linz is getting documentary photos. There was a
> second one earlier but it flew off to the siuth somewhere. Also heard Terry
> Singleterry that a Dublin was also here, and Bob Harden said he saw a
> Virginia Rail in this same area.
>
>
> Patty McLean
>
> Visiting Arkansas from Atlanta GA
>
>
 

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Date: 8/24/17 2:28 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: Red Phalarope at Bald Knob NWR
A Dublin????

<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>
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On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 12:28 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

> I'm at BNNWR and watching a RED PHALAROPE feeding in the SE corner of the
> flooded Pond 3. Michael Linz is getting documentary photos. There was a
> second one earlier but it flew off to the siuth somewhere. Also heard Terry
> Singleterry that a Dublin was also here, and Bob Harden said he saw a
> Virginia Rail in this same area.
>
>
> Patty McLean
>
> Visiting Arkansas from Atlanta GA
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 12:45 pm
From: Michael D. Collins <mike...>
Subject: Re: access to IBWO habitats in Arkansas?
Here is the correct URL...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fHFpN1rfekU

From: Michael D. Collins <mike...>
To: "<ARBIRD-L...>" <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Thursday, August 24, 2017 1:04 PM
Subject: Re: access to IBWO habitats in Arkansas?

Thanks to everyone that replied to my request for information. I was planning to visit Arkansas during a road trip to Montana but decided to change plans after feeling some tingling in my left leg and getting concerned that such a long road trip might cause another bout of sciatica. I ended up flying out there. I didn't get to fly the drone over IBWO habitat in Arkansas, but I did use it in Wyoming to get footage of the approaching shadow of the eclipse:
https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=fHFpN1rfekU

Thanks again to those who replied and offered to show me around the area. 
Mike CollinsAlexandria, <Virginiamike...>


 

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Date: 8/24/17 12:43 pm
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Fwd: Flight Calls #185: Rails, House Sparrows on ABA Podcast, Renew/Join Now, get 4 months FREE!
Those of you who know Auriel Fournier might be interested in this...


Begin forwarded message:

> From: "American Birding Association" <info...>
> Date: August 24, 2017 at 13:00:49 CDT
> To: "Friend" <butchchq8...>
> Subject: Flight Calls #185: Rails, House Sparrows on ABA Podcast, Renew/Join Now, get 4 months FREE!
> Reply-To: <dhartley...>
>
>
>
> Rails and House Sparrows on the American Birding Podcast!
>
>
> Rails are a mysterious and enigmatic family, often requiring and rewarding effort. Researcher Auriel Fournier knows that more than most, and her work with rails in Missouri has shed some light on how these birds migrate and how they use the landscape when they do. Auriel joins host Nate Swick to talk Rallidae and STEM outreach for women.
>
> Also, Greg Neise and Birding editor Ted Floyd are back to discuss the much-maligned House Sparrow. Or, at least, to discuss their remarkable molt.
>
> Subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Play, and please leave a rating or a review if you are so inclined! We appreciate it!
>
>
>
> Join/Renew at the ABA NOW, get 4 Months FREE!
>
> Thinking of renewing your membership with the ABA? Now is a great time to do so.
>
> ABA members who renew their membership for 2 years before the end of the month will remain members in good standing through the end of 2019. That's 4 months for FREE.
>
> The offer stands for new members as well. Purchase a membership for 2 years and you won't need to renew for 28 months.
>
> Interested? Make sure you use THIS LINK.
>
> Thanks, and welcome to the ABA!
>
> From the ABA Blog
> Share your Bird-and-Eclipse Stories - Ted Floyd
>
> ABA President Jeff Gordon at the Protect Santa Ana Protest March - Nate Swick
>
> #ABArare - Common Shelduck - New Hampshire - Nate Swick
>
> 2017 Big Year Update - Three Over 700 - Nate Swick
>
> American Birding Association, Inc.
> Billing and Membership: P.O. Box 3070, Colorado Springs, CO 80934
> Headquarters: P.O. Box 744 - 93 Clinton Street, Delaware City, DE 19706
> Phone: (800) 850-2473 or (302) 838-3650 | Fax: (302) 838-3651 | Email: <lgordon...>
> Copyright © American Birding Association, Inc.. All Rights Reserved
>
> , 93 Clinton Street Suite ABA, Delaware City, DE 19706, United States
> You may unsubscribe or change your contact details at any time.
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> Powered by:
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 12:40 pm
From: Michael D. Collins <mike...>
Subject: Re: access to IBWO habitats in Arkansas?
Thanks to everyone that replied to my request for information. I was planning to visit Arkansas during a road trip to Montana but decided to change plans after feeling some tingling in my left leg and getting concerned that such a long road trip might cause another bout of sciatica. I ended up flying out there. I didn't get to fly the drone over IBWO habitat in Arkansas, but I did use it in Wyoming to get footage of the approaching shadow of the eclipse:
https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=fHFpN1rfekU

Thanks again to those who replied and offered to show me around the area. 
Mike CollinsAlexandria, <Virginiamike...>



From: Michael D. Collins <mike...>
To: "<ARBIRD-L...>" <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Tuesday, August 8, 2017 10:42 AM
Subject: access to IBWO habitats in Arkansas?

Greetings, Arkansas birders.
For about a year, I have been using a drone to obtain video footage over IBWO habitats. The DJI Phantom 3 Pro is an amazing bundle of technology with a 4K camera that captures stunning footage. It’s an effective way to get a look at habitat, and it has the potential for spotting an IBWO flying over the treetops. Some drone footage from various sites are posted at the following URL:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLarETXSiUV1MXFAmK4hDSPfPI_2Hf7dVa
I’m making plans for a visit to Arkansas the week of August 14 to obtain drone footage over areas where there have been sightings and/or where there is habitat suitable for IBWO. I’m seeking information on locations that might be good for launching the drone and directions for getting to them. I’m not averse to hiking and wading through difficult terrain. I have experience launching the drone from a motorboat, which makes it easier to reach some habitats. It would be great if anyone has a boat and would like to participate. I will post the drone footage on YouTube for the benefit of all. 
It is difficult to understand why most people seem to have written off the IBWO. Two of the most eminent ornithologists in the world are lead authors of papers that report sightings in Arkansas and Florida. John Fitzpatrick has discovered several new species of birds in the Amazon and has served as Curator of Birds at the Field Museum in Chicago and the Director of the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. Geoff Hill is a recipient of the William Brewster Memorial Award, which is given to the author of “the most meritorious body of work on birds of the Western Hemisphere published during the 10 calendar years preceding a given AOU Annual Meeting.” 
I also have strong scientific credentials and, during eight years of field work, obtained videos that contain the strongest evidence for the persistence of the IBWO. Nobody has been able to refute any of this evidence, which was published this year after a long struggle against what a prominent ornithologist referred to as “irrational opposition” in this article:
http://www.heliyon.com/article/e00230/
As stated by the Editor in the comments section, that paper was recommended for publication by ornithologists. Some of the data were published earlier in this paper:
http://fishcrow.com/JASAv129p1626.pdf
Note the comments in that paper by Bret Tobalske and Julie Zickefoose on the videos. It follows directly from Tobalske’s comments that IBWO is the only plausible explanation for the bird in the 2008 video. Besides presenting the evidence, the Heliyon paper also contains an analysis of the expected waiting time for obtaining a clear photo of an IBWO. This analysis is based on factors related to the habitat and behaviors of the IBWO. A few years ago, I received an e-mail from a prominent Arkansas birder who acknowledged that my videos definitely show IBWOs and that they contain the strongest evidence. It is unfortunate that there aren’t more birders like him and that politics, jealousy, foolishness, apathy, and other human factors have undermined an opportunity to establish a meaningful conservation effort for the IBWO. 
Any information on where to launch the drone will be highly appreciated. 
Mike CollinsAlexandria, <Virginiamike...>://fishcrow.comhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMAkh1jnjCqoboGzX6KOKsg/videos



 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 12:15 pm
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: Internship Opportunity - Please Share - not about birds
Not about birds per se but an internship in Hot Springs for the spring… pass along to anyone who might be interested…

Thanks, Kim

Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...>


From: Todd, Shelley [mailto:<shelley_todd...>]
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 3:21 PM
Subject: Internship Opportunity - Please Share

Hot Springs National Park is recruiting for a paid internship position of 20 weeks' duration (dates flexible; target start date in mid-January, 2018) within the natural resources management program. A housing allowance will be provided to the intern if the selected intern is not local. The internship application period is open now and will close on Friday, September 29.

The Geoscientists-in-Parks Internship position description and application details can be found at https://rock.geosociety.org/eo/viewJob.asp?jobID=1749<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__rock.geosociety.org_eo_viewJob.asp-3FjobID-3D1749&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=S7svLgzW2IbH5sROgFh3YQ&m=aUf9y5WPzb4BIERYMI5pW5dGUabJF9YWm_EoyTCl_Qg&s=JQ9W5fdALmE8sjcQ49gP1wyYZOVqwYw-nXFHpkyCxSE&e=>

Other benefits of the position include an AmeriCorps Education award and receipt of the Public Land Corps hiring authority upon successful completion of the internship.

Please share this opportunity with students who may be interested, particularly those graduating in December, and with anyone who may know of eligible candidates.

Thanks very much!

Always,
Shelley

Shelley Todd
Natural Resource Program Manager
Hot Springs National Park
101 Reserve Street
Hot Springs, AR 71901
(501) 620-6751 (office)
(501) 620-6778 (fax)
<shelley_todd...><mailto:<shelley_todd...>

Normal work schedule: Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/17 11:52 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Red Phalarope at Bald Knob NWR
I'm at BNNWR and watching a RED PHALAROPE feeding in the SE corner of the flooded Pond 3. Michael Linz is getting documentary photos. There was a second one earlier but it flew off to the siuth somewhere. Also heard Terry Singleterry that a Dublin was also here, and Bob Harden said he saw a Virginia Rail in this same area.

Patty McLean 
Visiting Arkansas from Atlanta GA
 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 8:20 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
Still seeing all the usual birds plus lots juveniles (red-headed and red-belly woodpeckers, cardinals,blue jays and others)

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 23, 2017, at 1:29 PM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:
>
> One thing I think casual bird watching people forget is birds make their rounds every day as well as every season. I am out working in my yard a fair amount & the local birds ebb & flow during the day. They are most active in the morning and again later in the day. At any given time I may see several regulars or none at all. When the Mourning Doves all disappear, I assume a Cooper's Hawk is close by. I don't miss the starlings and the grackles in the summertime. I know they disperse across the landscape during breeding season and return just in time to dine on the acorns ripening in overhead. There are resident birds I see once or twice a week. Sometimes it'll be a few weeks before they show back up. Robins are a good example. At certain times of the year my neighborhood is overrun with them. At other times like now I expect to see or hear a couple of birds in the trees.
>
> At this point in August I should be covered up with migrating Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds. The rascals have been lackadaisical this year. I'm running in the mid to high teens visiting each day as opposed to the expected mid 20's to 30's. Given all the rain we've had across the state, I think it's reasonable to assume they remain more widely dispersed because they are able to find eats across the landscape. In a normal year their usual food sources have shriveled in the countryside and the birds flock into human areas because that is where the flowers and feeders are.
>
>
> Those of us who are tuned into birds are rarely bereft of their company.
>
> Cindy
>
>
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Ed Laster <elaster523...>
> Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 8:40 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
>
> I’m seeing all the usual backyard birds: C. Chickadee, C. Wren, Cardinal, Blue Jay, W. B Nuthatch, Red-bellied, Pileated WP, A. Crow, Cooper’s Hawk, RT Hummingbird. And they were all unimpressed with the eclipse. Didn’t change their behavior at all.
>
> Ed Laster
> Little Rock
>
>
>> On Aug 23, 2017, at 8:23 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>>
>> At Audubon Arkansas I get this question a few times a year, every year, at various times from various parts of the state. A backyard bird watcher claims that ALL the birds in their yard are gone. Usually they claim it has been a week, maybe two, maybe adding their neighbors aren’t seeing any birds either. They want to know if there is some disaster, a regional or nationwide catastrophe. Sometimes they want to blame or wonder about a particular threat like pesticide spraying or the clearing of a nearby lot for development.
>>
>> Of course the decline by a million cuts that birds are experiencing is an issue, but I just can’t imagine that there is any phenomenon in Arkansas that would cause every bird in an area to disperse for an extended period. Even the recent Dicamba spraying should not influence what backyard birders in a nearby town see from one week to the next. All the highly localized reasons for why you may not see any birds in your yard at any given moment – a cat, a hawk, strong storms, empty feeders, spoiled seed, heat of a summer afternoon – should not result in all birds being gone all day and certainly not all week. I have never observed such a phenomenon in my Little Rock yard despite these various short-term dangers.
>>
>> I’ve wondered about observation bias – perhaps the caller is not very good at seeing or hearing birds, or their viewing time of day is biased. But that seems unlikely to change between weeks. Maybe their yard provides very little resources so bird visitation is low to begin with, meaning any natural fluctuation results in no birds around at all? These can't be the answer for every caller.
>>
>> Have any of you had this experience? Presumably you are all more active observers than the average person, so a true disappearance of all birds should be noticed. Maybe you thought you noticed this early in your bird watching days but now experience has changed your perception?
>>
>> P.S. I’m not talking about the disappearance of a particular species that is easily explained by predictable seasonal movements. I’m not talking about a perceived decline in birds from one period to the next, which may be explained by natural local variation or observer bias (memory cannot be trusted – keep a journal or use eBird to have hard data).
>>
>> Dan Scheiman
>> Little Rock, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 8:17 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Rate ADEQ
ADEQ is inviting the public to participate in a(n oddly seemingly
unpublicized) very brief survey that rates interactions with, and
performance of, the agency. There's an open-ended opportunity to
comment at the end. Survey results up to the time you've finished it
are shown after completion. It's at
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ADEQCSS
<https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.surveymonkey.com%2Fr%2FADEQCSS&h=ATOUOGXEqznei2KfQC3vpJNh0dJwFVuaIWXsr3LL5DzqUzkLDAIjMEhyjpyZwwTRrEJgGBU10sw3BQ27NvmScBBtuDR2UtBfj6VotmqUpbnbDT8dBohVjujFJsU3K_ZpQjq1Vk64djshVP9BEjb_KyTTd9PMjRO6wag2PcRP_hNZSyItxkz54KRCJisrqIoWzPJKaYl70A03jM-tUewcRrpm8WpTXwz7NidHSaG4gfXgt2-dPHpvIRsQyYAu0V69b364OPvQi2L14cs8uLAMelEALjonIGXgMT5uHMhY3abZYYhAyU0VXS8XHaw8vg>


 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 7:07 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - August 23
It was storming when I arrived at Red Slough this morning in the dark.
After a couple hours of rain it turned mostly cloudy and milder for the rest
of the day. 56 species were found. I counted the waders leaving the
rookery/roost on Pintail in the rain looking through my front windshield
with the wipers going. As a result my counts were not accurate because the
visibility was poor and the birds leaving the backside of the roost I was
unable to count. I got to see the Cattle Egrets mobbing an alligator again.
After the storm passed there were a few shorebirds and terns flying around
over the reservoirs but they soon disappeared. Passerines were very scarce
and very few birds were still singing. I found most of my Passerines by
working the Rough-leaved Dogwood thickets that were full of berries on the
north levee of Bittern Lake. Several small flocks of Eastern Kingbirds were
seen migrating over, headed south. We received 3.65 inches of rain over
night giving us a total of almost 25 inches of rain since the first week of
July. Now we are facing a possible hurricane/tropical storm early next
week. Might get interesting birdwise. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 5

Wood Duck - 37

Blue-winged Teal - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 17 (also two broods of young.)

Neotropic Cormorant - 5

Anhinga - 25

Least Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 2

Great Egret - 67

Snowy Egret - 25

Little-blue Heron - 46

Tricolored Heron - 1

Cattle Egret - ~2000

Green Heron - 8

White Ibis - 18

Black Vulture - 33

Turkey Vulture - 35

Mississippi Kite - 9

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 21

Common Gallinule - 40

American Coot - 3

Semipalmated Plover - 1

Spotted Sandpiper - 2

Upland Sandpiper - 2

Pectoral Sandpiper - 1

Black Tern - 8

Mourning Dove - 2

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 5

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 5

Least Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 19

White-eyed Vireo - 7 (still singing)

Bell's Vireo - 1 (still singing)

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 5

American Crow - 5

Purple Martin - 1

Cliff Swallow - 2

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 13

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Yellow-breasted Chat - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2 (Still singing)

Northern Cardinal - 10

Indigo Bunting - 32

Painted Bunting - 1 juv.

Dickcissel - 3

Red-winged Blackbird - 131



Odonates:



Common Green Darner

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Widow Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Hyacinth Glider - 14

Wandering Glider

Striped Saddlebags - 2

Black Saddlebags







Herps:



American Alligator

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Western Cottonmouth

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Southern Black Racer

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad - calling

Green Treefrog - calling

Cope's Gray Treefrog - calling

Blanchard's Cricket Frog - calling

Southern Leopard Frog - calling

Bronze Frog - calling

Bullfrog - calling



Also:



Mink

Swamp Rabbit

Eastern Cottontail

Gray Squirrel







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






















 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 1:35 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Mike the birdman film
We are hoping to present the film Saturday afternoon during the November 18, Arkansas Audubon Society meeting!
Jack

On Thursday, August 17, 2017, 10:20:02 AM CDT, Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...> wrote:

Wish we could see the film down here in the flatlands! Great post.

On Wed, Aug 16, 2017 at 4:22 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:




Premier for “Mike the birdman” film about Mike Mlodinow was last night out at one of his favorite birding places, Lake Fayetteville. Actual screening was hosted by Botanical Garden of the Ozarks. Every seat, and every extra folding chair, was full. Walls were lined, standing room only. He got cheers and a standing ovation when he arrived. He slowly made his way to the back, standing.




As we all know, Mike goes birding all day, walking mile after mile, which is why his tall frame isn’t laden with lard, as in the case of some of us, who also go mile upon mile, but in the car. It surely says something about our town when the house is full on a muggy Tuesday night for a student-made film about a local bird watcher.




Before the screening, we were treated to a mini-concert by Still on the Hill. They played and sang their songs about birds. Those of you who have been to Arkansas Audubon Society’s Halberg Camp know that Kelly and Donna Mulhollan have taught there for 15 years. They have lots of bird songs.




We have Mike as a citizen of our town because the Nazis did not have time to kill his parents. At the start of WW 2, Nazi Germany invaded Poland and wound up killing most of its Jewish population. Mike’s parents were young and among the luckywho survived internment at Auschwitz. They married after the war and immigrated to the US and had 3 boys, all of them productive and creative like Mike.





Later at home, I thought how very fortunate I am to live in a community with people like John Erwin, Paige Murphy, and Ninette Sosa, who made this film. Thankful for a person who has dedicated his adult life to careful study of birds in northwest Arkansas. The binoculars and spotting scope we see Mike using in the film were gifts to him from Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society. Part of last night’s crowd included former presidents of both Arkansas Audubon Society and Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society.





The ornithological founding father for us all, Doug James was there, too. He also appears in the film.




The film is full of humor. In one spot we meet his friend Steve Erwin, retired postal worker and bee-keeper, who is a big Cardinals fan. As an aside, Mike reminds us that he is a Cubs fan. The film makers acquired a now infamous 911 call in which someone told the police a man in cammo was walking toward Lake Fayetteville with an AR-15. Of course this was Mike, just off the bus, in his usual tan birding attire, carrying his spotting scope.





One of his brothers from Los Angles flew out with his son for the premier. After, I got to stand around in the limelight and hear how the Mlodinow boys started birding. Also, how to properly say the name: Muh lod duh noff.





 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 1:20 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds
I was in Kansas, north of Manhattan near the NE state line with some old friends. We got there at 10:30 and left at 1:30.


I heard Goldfinches in a stand of sunflowers nearby. When the light started to dim at 5 min. till 1 pm a flock of 50 or so Starlings flew over and circled then flew into the nearby treetops. Totality was at 1:06 It did not get all that dark even though we were in the path of totality 2 min 21 sec. There were thin to thick clouds all around.

Birds were forgotten during totality.


Jacque Brown

Centerton, AR 72719

<bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>






> On Aug 23, 2017, at 11:43 AM, Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> <mailto:<ctboyles...>> wrote:
>
> Bill Shepherd's post got me thinking about eclipse birds. So, for those
> who watched the eclipse, in state or out-of-state, did you notice any
> difference in bird behavior?
>
> I only saw a fast flying Mourning Dove right after the eclipse ended and
> the 'work' crew cleared off the balcony to return to their desks. It was
> headed for a nearby tree.
>
> Dottie
>
> On Wed, 23 Aug 2017 15:19:31 +0000, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> <mailto:<stoneax63...>>
> wrote:
>
> I made only one eclipse-related bird observation at St. Clair, MO, Monday
> in a crowd of a few hundred people. About five minutes after totality
> ended, I noticed a single Common Nighthawk headed back into the stand of
> mature post oaks that had kept me from getting sunburned while I waited for
> the eclipse to start.
>
> I speculated that my bird had scarcely begun to forage in the mid-day
> crepuscule when the sun reappeared suddenly and ruined his lunch.
>
> Bill Shepherd


 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 12:44 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: EXTENSIVE BIRD MOVEMENT THROUGH RIVER VALLEY
We had another cold front moving through northwest Arkansas last night, with predicted rain. David Oakley and I made it to the Arkansas River Valley at 7 am. We started in Kibler bottoms, along Thornhill Road adjacent the UA Vegetable Research Station. There was shallow, playa-like flooding in open fields, and LOTs of birds. Highest numbers for Blue-winged Teal, plus Pectoral and Least Sandpipers.

From Thornhill we took Crawford Road east to West-Arkansas Sod. The lower area at sod (visible from Crawford Road) was one big grassy field of shorebirds. Perfect day for grasspipers. Later, we made a stop at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility.

First sign that something was up: flocks of Blue-winged Teal. Approximately 250 in the cut-off oxbow visible from Thornhill, another 100 at the sod farm, and smaller flocks overhead and out in odd corners of fields. This is the first big teal movement of the season for me.

Shorebirds widespread, with highest numbers overall in lower areas of the sod farm. Shorebird list for the day: Semipalmated Plover (3), Killdeer, Greater Yellowlegs (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (90), Solitary Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (9), Willet (15, at sod), Upland Sandpiper (29+, mainly at sod), Semipalmated Sandpiper (4 seen closely), Least Sandpiper (175), Pectoral Sandpiper (280), Stilt Sandpiper (18), Buff-breasted Sandpiper (14), dowitcher species (1). There was also a Plegadis ibis at sod.

Most interesting at Alma Wastewater: Least Tern (13, including 5 fledglings), Black Tern (1), Pied-billed Grebe (16, an early flock for fall migration).


 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 12:10 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds
Donald Ouellette and I were at Woolsey.  We had planned to monitor bird activity from 11:15 until 3:15, basically from half hour before until half hour after the whole deal.  Well, because of unplanned urgent chores, we got there almost an hour late, at 12:10.  We had not been able to find eclipse glasses so Donald was constructing an eclipse viewer while I began monitoring bird activity.  It was very very sparse.  We saw about half dozen Mourning Doves on a wire as we drove in, and I saw one Scissortailed Flycatcher sitting on a fence and occasionally flying towards the lawn to forage.  Saw or heard nothing else!  I was thinking I would have been better off just at home.  The eclipse was a little in progress by the time Donald finished his construction.  Still no bird activity until after the peak was passed.  Then, at 1:17 we heard a brief call of a Northern Bobwhite.  At 1:25 Dickcissels began chipping, and we saw one calling.  I also about 5 minutes later saw a non-adult male Indigo Bunting, and some of the chips in the field might have been this species.  At 1:35 an American Goldfinch flew over calling.  At 1:35 there was a female Red-winged Blackbird also calling.  A fairly large group of European Starlings flew up from a distant tree around 1:40.  We saw 23 Mourning Doves in flight at 1:40.  An Eastern Meadowlark flew to a tree at 1:55.  We saw 2 American Kestrels at 2:00 and a Turkey Vulture in fight at 2:10.  A Carolina Wren called at 2:37.  There were 2 Eastern Phoebes about at 2:45.  We saw a couple of Eastern Bluebirds at 3:10.  I wish I had gotten there when planned, to see what the behavior was before the eclipse commenced.  I think it's interesting that the area seemed just about abandoned until after the peak, when suddenly we noticed much more activity.  I will be interested to hear the results of compiling all the ebird data. 

i didn't discern any change in behavior in insects.  Cicadas called throughout - perhaps they were louder when most of the sun was covered, but I can't be sure.  Butterflies foraged on flowers, especially Little White Heath Aster and Ironweed.  There were Monarchs, Red Admirals, Pearly Crescentspots, Tiger Swallowtails, Red-spotted Purple,  Sulfurs including Cloudless Sulfurs and a species I could not identify, even after looking in an Arkansas id book, Checkered White, many skippers, mainly a mosty bright yellowish ones that might have been Delaware Skippers.  They flew about and foraged, seemingly unaffected.  Same with dragonflies (Donald and I each saw a (different) pair copulating, and other insects.

It definitely grew colder and calmer during the eclipse, and became hotter and breezier as the sun reappeared.  I noticed that the horizon appeared purplish during the eclipse, and the pale brownish of smog afterwards.
What an exciting experience!Joanie

From: "Reames, Clark -FS" <creames...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 12:57 PM
Subject: Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds

We had totality here in Oregon for approx. 2 minutes.  I cant say that I observed much difference in the way of behavior.  My little flock of chickens didn’t appear to revise their behavior at all.  As we approached totality, we got buzzed by a collared dove and then shortly thereafter a small falcon that I am almost certain had to be a merlin.  It went by so quick that all I got was a brief naked eye view.  We have lots of kestrels but it appeared different from a kestrel and was too small to be a Prairie so I suspect a merlin.  As we moved away from totality, 2 turkey vultures came over at low altitude and in single file.  All bird behaviors that I saw appeared to be normal but then again, I cant read what they were thinking.

That was my first total eclipse and it was impressive.  We monitored the temperature and it dropped 11 deg before starting to rise again.  My daughter said that it felt creepy to her as it got darker.  My son was really into it and kept us up to date on the phases and temp changes..  We suffered some grid lock for awhile as all the CA, WA, and OR people were trying to head home...


Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager
Forest Service
Malheur National Forest
p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
<creames...>
431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us

Caring for the land and serving people






-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of David Luneau
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 10:16 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds

We were in Kentucky on the centerline of the totality. Shortly before totality we heard a cardinal sing a few times, a Brown Thrasher call, and some crickets start to chirp. Those all seemed unusual for a hot August midday. Before the eclipse started, there were a few cardinal and Red-winged Blackbird calls, but nothing was singing.

M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
Associate Professor of Electronics
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
2801 S. University Ave.
Little Rock, AR 72204

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Dottie Boyles
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 11:44 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] The Big Eclipse-Birds

Bill Shepherd's post got me thinking about eclipse birds. So, for those who watched the eclipse, in state or out-of-state, did you notice any difference in bird behavior?

I only saw a fast flying Mourning Dove right after the eclipse ended and the 'work' crew cleared off the balcony to return to their desks. It was headed for a nearby tree.

Dottie

On Wed, 23 Aug 2017 15:19:31 +0000, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
wrote:

I made only one eclipse-related bird observation at St. Clair, MO, Monday in a crowd of a few hundred people. About five minutes after totality ended, I noticed a single Common Nighthawk headed back into the stand of mature post oaks that had kept me from getting sunburned while I waited for the eclipse to start.

I speculated that my bird had scarcely begun to forage in the mid-day crepuscule when the sun reappeared suddenly and ruined his lunch.

Bill Shepherd




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.



 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 11:29 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
One thing I think casual bird watching people forget is birds make their rounds every day as well as every season. I am out working in my yard a fair amount & the local birds ebb & flow during the day. They are most active in the morning and again later in the day. At any given time I may see several regulars or none at all. When the Mourning Doves all disappear, I assume a Cooper's Hawk is close by. I don't miss the starlings and the grackles in the summertime. I know they disperse across the landscape during breeding season and return just in time to dine on the acorns ripening in overhead. There are resident birds I see once or twice a week. Sometimes it'll be a few weeks before they show back up. Robins are a good example. At certain times of the year my neighborhood is overrun with them. At other times like now I expect to see or hear a couple of birds in the trees.


At this point in August I should be covered up with migrating Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds. The rascals have been lackadaisical this year. I'm running in the mid to high teens visiting each day as opposed to the expected mid 20's to 30's. Given all the rain we've had across the state, I think it's reasonable to assume they remain more widely dispersed because they are able to find eats across the landscape. In a normal year their usual food sources have shriveled in the countryside and the birds flock into human areas because that is where the flowers and feeders are.


Those of us who are tuned into birds are rarely bereft of their company.


Cindy




________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 8:40 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?

Im seeing all the usual backyard birds: C. Chickadee, C. Wren, Cardinal, Blue Jay, W. B Nuthatch, Red-bellied, Pileated WP, A. Crow, Coopers Hawk, RT Hummingbird. And they were all unimpressed with the eclipse. Didnt change their behavior at all.

Ed Laster
Little Rock


On Aug 23, 2017, at 8:23 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...><mailto:<birddan...>> wrote:

At Audubon Arkansas I get this question a few times a year, every year, at various times from various parts of the state. A backyard bird watcher claims that ALL the birds in their yard are gone. Usually they claim it has been a week, maybe two, maybe adding their neighbors arent seeing any birds either. They want to know if there is some disaster, a regional or nationwide catastrophe. Sometimes they want to blame or wonder about a particular threat like pesticide spraying or the clearing of a nearby lot for development.



Of course the decline by a million cuts that birds are experiencing is an issue, but I just cant imagine that there is any phenomenon in Arkansas that would cause every bird in an area to disperse for an extended period. Even the recent Dicamba spraying should not influence what backyard birders in a nearby town see from one week to the next. All the highly localized reasons for why you may not see any birds in your yard at any given moment a cat, a hawk, strong storms, empty feeders, spoiled seed, heat of a summer afternoon should not result in all birds being gone all day and certainly not all week. I have never observed such a phenomenon in my Little Rock yard despite these various short-term dangers.



Ive wondered about observation bias perhaps the caller is not very good at seeing or hearing birds, or their viewing time of day is biased. But that seems unlikely to change between weeks. Maybe their yard provides very little resources so bird visitation is low to begin with, meaning any natural fluctuation results in no birds around at all? These can't be the answer for every caller.



Have any of you had this experience? Presumably you are all more active observers than the average person, so a true disappearance of all birds should be noticed. Maybe you thought you noticed this early in your bird watching days but now experience has changed your perception?

P.S. Im not talking about the disappearance of a particular species that is easily explained by predictable seasonal movements. Im not talking about a perceived decline in birds from one period to the next, which may be explained by natural local variation or observer bias (memory cannot be trusted keep a journal or use eBird to have hard data).

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 10:57 am
From: Reames, Clark -FS <creames...>
Subject: Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds
We had totality here in Oregon for approx. 2 minutes. I cant say that I observed much difference in the way of behavior. My little flock of chickens didn’t appear to revise their behavior at all. As we approached totality, we got buzzed by a collared dove and then shortly thereafter a small falcon that I am almost certain had to be a merlin. It went by so quick that all I got was a brief naked eye view. We have lots of kestrels but it appeared different from a kestrel and was too small to be a Prairie so I suspect a merlin. As we moved away from totality, 2 turkey vultures came over at low altitude and in single file. All bird behaviors that I saw appeared to be normal but then again, I cant read what they were thinking.

That was my first total eclipse and it was impressive. We monitored the temperature and it dropped 11 deg before starting to rise again. My daughter said that it felt creepy to her as it got darker. My son was really into it and kept us up to date on the phases and temp changes.. We suffered some grid lock for awhile as all the CA, WA, and OR people were trying to head home...


Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager
Forest Service
Malheur National Forest
p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
<creames...>
431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us

Caring for the land and serving people






-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of David Luneau
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 10:16 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds

We were in Kentucky on the centerline of the totality. Shortly before totality we heard a cardinal sing a few times, a Brown Thrasher call, and some crickets start to chirp. Those all seemed unusual for a hot August midday. Before the eclipse started, there were a few cardinal and Red-winged Blackbird calls, but nothing was singing.

M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
Associate Professor of Electronics
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
2801 S. University Ave.
Little Rock, AR 72204

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Dottie Boyles
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 11:44 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] The Big Eclipse-Birds

Bill Shepherd's post got me thinking about eclipse birds. So, for those who watched the eclipse, in state or out-of-state, did you notice any difference in bird behavior?

I only saw a fast flying Mourning Dove right after the eclipse ended and the 'work' crew cleared off the balcony to return to their desks. It was headed for a nearby tree.

Dottie

On Wed, 23 Aug 2017 15:19:31 +0000, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
wrote:

I made only one eclipse-related bird observation at St. Clair, MO, Monday in a crowd of a few hundred people. About five minutes after totality ended, I noticed a single Common Nighthawk headed back into the stand of mature post oaks that had kept me from getting sunburned while I waited for the eclipse to start.

I speculated that my bird had scarcely begun to forage in the mid-day crepuscule when the sun reappeared suddenly and ruined his lunch.

Bill Shepherd




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.
 

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Date: 8/23/17 10:16 am
From: David Luneau <mdluneau...>
Subject: Re: The Big Eclipse-Birds
We were in Kentucky on the centerline of the totality. Shortly before totality we heard a cardinal sing a few times, a Brown Thrasher call, and some crickets start to chirp. Those all seemed unusual for a hot August midday. Before the eclipse started, there were a few cardinal and Red-winged Blackbird calls, but nothing was singing.

M. David Luneau, Jr. P.E.
Associate Professor of Electronics
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
2801 S. University Ave.
Little Rock, AR 72204

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Dottie Boyles
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 11:44 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] The Big Eclipse-Birds

Bill Shepherd's post got me thinking about eclipse birds. So, for those who watched the eclipse, in state or out-of-state, did you notice any difference in bird behavior?

I only saw a fast flying Mourning Dove right after the eclipse ended and the 'work' crew cleared off the balcony to return to their desks. It was headed for a nearby tree.

Dottie

On Wed, 23 Aug 2017 15:19:31 +0000, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
wrote:

I made only one eclipse-related bird observation at St. Clair, MO, Monday in a crowd of a few hundred people. About five minutes after totality ended, I noticed a single Common Nighthawk headed back into the stand of mature post oaks that had kept me from getting sunburned while I waited for the eclipse to start.

I speculated that my bird had scarcely begun to forage in the mid-day crepuscule when the sun reappeared suddenly and ruined his lunch.

Bill Shepherd
 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 9:43 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: The Big Eclipse-Birds
Bill Shepherd's post got me thinking about eclipse birds. So, for those
who watched the eclipse, in state or out-of-state, did you notice any
difference in bird behavior?

I only saw a fast flying Mourning Dove right after the eclipse ended and
the 'work' crew cleared off the balcony to return to their desks. It was
headed for a nearby tree.

Dottie

On Wed, 23 Aug 2017 15:19:31 +0000, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
wrote:

I made only one eclipse-related bird observation at St. Clair, MO, Monday
in a crowd of a few hundred people. About five minutes after totality
ended, I noticed a single Common Nighthawk headed back into the stand of
mature post oaks that had kept me from getting sunburned while I waited for
the eclipse to start.

I speculated that my bird had scarcely begun to forage in the mid-day
crepuscule when the sun reappeared suddenly and ruined his lunch.

Bill Shepherd
 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 9:36 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
We have a lot of backyard (or oak/hickory forest) birds (on the south side of Mount Sequoyah, Fayetteville), and they did grow very quiet in the darkest eclipse period. And like Mitchell, we observed a turkey vulture that had lost its thermals: it came down over the house roof and then flapped down above our garden and went round and round for awhile, then settled in a big pine tree until the light and breezes returned.


Harriet Jansma

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 8:40:13 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?

Im seeing all the usual backyard birds: C. Chickadee, C. Wren, Cardinal, Blue Jay, W. B Nuthatch, Red-bellied, Pileated WP, A. Crow, Coopers Hawk, RT Hummingbird. And they were all unimpressed with the eclipse. Didnt change their behavior at all.

Ed Laster
Little Rock


On Aug 23, 2017, at 8:23 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...><mailto:<birddan...>> wrote:

At Audubon Arkansas I get this question a few times a year, every year, at various times from various parts of the state. A backyard bird watcher claims that ALL the birds in their yard are gone. Usually they claim it has been a week, maybe two, maybe adding their neighbors arent seeing any birds either. They want to know if there is some disaster, a regional or nationwide catastrophe. Sometimes they want to blame or wonder about a particular threat like pesticide spraying or the clearing of a nearby lot for development.



Of course the decline by a million cuts that birds are experiencing is an issue, but I just cant imagine that there is any phenomenon in Arkansas that would cause every bird in an area to disperse for an extended period. Even the recent Dicamba spraying should not influence what backyard birders in a nearby town see from one week to the next. All the highly localized reasons for why you may not see any birds in your yard at any given moment a cat, a hawk, strong storms, empty feeders, spoiled seed, heat of a summer afternoon should not result in all birds being gone all day and certainly not all week. I have never observed such a phenomenon in my Little Rock yard despite these various short-term dangers.



Ive wondered about observation bias perhaps the caller is not very good at seeing or hearing birds, or their viewing time of day is biased. But that seems unlikely to change between weeks. Maybe their yard provides very little resources so bird visitation is low to begin with, meaning any natural fluctuation results in no birds around at all? These can't be the answer for every caller.



Have any of you had this experience? Presumably you are all more active observers than the average person, so a true disappearance of all birds should be noticed. Maybe you thought you noticed this early in your bird watching days but now experience has changed your perception?

P.S. Im not talking about the disappearance of a particular species that is easily explained by predictable seasonal movements. Im not talking about a perceived decline in birds from one period to the next, which may be explained by natural local variation or observer bias (memory cannot be trusted keep a journal or use eBird to have hard data).

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 8:20 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: the big eclipse
I made only one eclipse-related bird observation at St. Clair, MO, Monday in a crowd of a few hundred people. About five minutes after totality ended, I noticed a single Common Nighthawk headed back into the stand of mature post oaks that had kept me from getting sunburned while I waited for the eclipse to start.


I speculated that my bird had scarcely begun to forage in the mid-day crepuscule when the sun reappeared suddenly and ruined his lunch.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 7:50 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 7:03 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
Dan,

I have heard these same questions and have anecdotally experienced it too.

When someone asks me this, it usually ends up being that the birds they like to watch haven't been around in a while. I am sure observer bias is a big part of it.

I have kept a record of of birds and species in our yard every weekend for the past three years now (we did Project Feeder Watch and just kept going year round), and I can definitely say there are periods of lesser activity than at other times of the year. September slows down with a October and November sparse. May, of course, is a big month at feeders.

But that isn't your question.

Personally, I have experienced it birding at different times too. I don't have any data but have always thought that it might be tied to the natural flow of annual cycles. Birds as a whole are going to be on similar cycles, but each species will be on slightly different schedules. As an example, right now, some will be molting, some will be in early migration, some will be just finishing nesting, etc. With the ebb and flow, I always assumed that just by random chance the summation of those cycles will hit a peak or a valley at different times. If one happens to be out at one of those times, then it may appear that birds are everywhere or no where depending on the cycle and habitat. It usually seems I hit one in April and again September when birding. Or it could be just be my own bad luck that day.

One form of observer bias is the concept of "least noticeable difference". The notion that we never really see our hair grow every day, but one day we look in the mirror and say, "Gees, I could use a haircut." I am sure this probably plays a role too in bird observation, too.

My wife and I just open a backyard bird feeding store called The Bluebird Shed up in Bella Vista, and it has been interesting to hear the comments of customers along those same lines. Most have said that the Goldfinches are finally back now. I plan to keep my ears open for this kind of ebb and flow in the discussions.

Glad you asked the question, because I have always wondered if the dead times birding were just my imagination. Maybe it still is.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

> On Aug 23, 2017, at 08:23, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
> At Audubon Arkansas I get this question a few times a year, every year, at various times from various parts of the state. A backyard bird watcher claims that ALL the birds in their yard are gone. Usually they claim it has been a week, maybe two, maybe adding their neighbors aren’t seeing any birds either. They want to know if there is some disaster, a regional or nationwide catastrophe. Sometimes they want to blame or wonder about a particular threat like pesticide spraying or the clearing of a nearby lot for development.
>
> Of course the decline by a million cuts that birds are experiencing is an issue, but I just can’t imagine that there is any phenomenon in Arkansas that would cause every bird in an area to disperse for an extended period. Even the recent Dicamba spraying should not influence what backyard birders in a nearby town see from one week to the next. All the highly localized reasons for why you may not see any birds in your yard at any given moment – a cat, a hawk, strong storms, empty feeders, spoiled seed, heat of a summer afternoon – should not result in all birds being gone all day and certainly not all week. I have never observed such a phenomenon in my Little Rock yard despite these various short-term dangers.
>
> I’ve wondered about observation bias – perhaps the caller is not very good at seeing or hearing birds, or their viewing time of day is biased. But that seems unlikely to change between weeks. Maybe their yard provides very little resources so bird visitation is low to begin with, meaning any natural fluctuation results in no birds around at all? These can't be the answer for every caller.
>
> Have any of you had this experience? Presumably you are all more active observers than the average person, so a true disappearance of all birds should be noticed. Maybe you thought you noticed this early in your bird watching days but now experience has changed your perception?
>
> P.S. I’m not talking about the disappearance of a particular species that is easily explained by predictable seasonal movements. I’m not talking about a perceived decline in birds from one period to the next, which may be explained by natural local variation or observer bias (memory cannot be trusted – keep a journal or use eBird to have hard data).
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 6:54 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
I had attributed the apparent reduction during this time (post-breeding) as
the new generation leaving on a quest for different landscape in search of
food and habitat. Then, finding that there is "no niche gestalt like home",
they regroup, figuratively, for migration.



If this be true, then the same phenomenon should exist worldwide, to a
certain extent. I would expect that some data to confirm/refute may be
available from banding or telemetry research.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Scheiman
Sent: Wednesday, August 23, 2017 8:24 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Where have all the birds gone?



At Audubon Arkansas I get this question a few times a year, every year, at
various times from various parts of the state. A backyard bird watcher
claims that ALL the birds in their yard are gone. Usually they claim it has
been a week, maybe two, maybe adding their neighbors aren't seeing any birds
either. They want to know if there is some disaster, a regional or
nationwide catastrophe. Sometimes they want to blame or wonder about a
particular threat like pesticide spraying or the clearing of a nearby lot
for development.



Of course the decline by a million cuts that birds are experiencing is an
issue, but I just can't imagine that there is any phenomenon in Arkansas
that would cause every bird in an area to disperse for an extended period.
Even the recent Dicamba spraying should not influence what backyard birders
in a nearby town see from one week to the next. All the highly localized
reasons for why you may not see any birds in your yard at any given moment -
a cat, a hawk, strong storms, empty feeders, spoiled seed, heat of a summer
afternoon - should not result in all birds being gone all day and certainly
not all week. I have never observed such a phenomenon in my Little Rock yard
despite these various short-term dangers.



I've wondered about observation bias - perhaps the caller is not very good
at seeing or hearing birds, or their viewing time of day is biased. But that
seems unlikely to change between weeks. Maybe their yard provides very
little resources so bird visitation is low to begin with, meaning any
natural fluctuation results in no birds around at all? These can't be the
answer for every caller.



Have any of you had this experience? Presumably you are all more active
observers than the average person, so a true disappearance of all birds
should be noticed. Maybe you thought you noticed this early in your bird
watching days but now experience has changed your perception?



P.S. I'm not talking about the disappearance of a particular species that is
easily explained by predictable seasonal movements. I'm not talking about a
perceived decline in birds from one period to the next, which may be
explained by natural local variation or observer bias (memory cannot be
trusted - keep a journal or use eBird to have hard data).



Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/17 6:52 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Fw: Bald Knob sandpipers-ASCA field trip
Following the good news from Kenny & LaDonna and Glen about all the shorebirds at Bald Knob, I want to remind everyone that the ASCA field trip to Bald Knob is this weekend.  See details below.  Fingers crossed that the shorebirds continue to hang around until we get there Saturday!Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator Saturday-August 26Bald Knob NationalWildlife RefugeBald Knob, ARMeet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in the Other Center parking lot,on the east side behind McDonald’s.  TakeExit 1 west off US-67/167.  The OtherCenter is on McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall.  We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR around 8:30a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.  The federal refuge is also a National AudubonImportant Bird Area.  We expect to seeshorebirds, herons, night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks and RoseateSpoonbills.  It will be very hot so bringplenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat. If you have a scope, bring it. Very little walking will be involved. There is no bathroom on-site. There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 at Bald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/for driving directions and more information about the refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903

On Tuesday, August 22, 2017 10:34 PM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:


LaDonna and I visited BKNWR late this afternoon and I want to echo what Glenn said: there are a LOT of shorebirds at the refuge -maybe 5000.  Most numerous, by far, were Pectoral  and Least Sandpipers. Also seen were: Stilt, Western, Semipalmated, Spotted and Solitary Sandpipers, Semipalmated Plovers, Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs, American Avocet, maybe 200 Black-necked Stilts, both dowitchers, Wilson's Snipe, Wilsons Phalarope and one adult Sanderling.   
Kenny & LaDonna NicholsCabot

Sent from my iPhone
On Aug 22, 2017, at 6:41 PM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:


I was at Bald Knob NWR today.  When you come in on Coal Chute Road and turn left (west) onto Huntsman Road in front of the grain elevators, you pass 3 fields on the right.  After those 3 fields is a large flooded field to the north, I have been told that large pond is called Smoky Pump Pond.  Just to the north of that pond is another pond, I have been calling it Pelican Pond because the pelicans have been there all summer long.  Well, Pelican Pond had no water today.  The entire huge field was nothing but mud and puddles.  And the field had hundreds and hundreds of sandpipers.  I don't have a scope so can't really tell what all is in there.  I did see dowitchers and black-necked stilts and least sandpipers, and yellowlegs and stilt sandpipers and pectoral sandpipers.  No telling what else may be wandering around all those sandpipers.  If it doesn't rain much tonight it might be a good spot to investigate with a scope.
Glenn WyattCabot, AR




 

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Date: 8/23/17 6:51 am
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Where have all the birds gone?
I’m seeing all the usual backyard birds: C. Chickadee, C. Wren, Cardinal, Blue Jay, W. B Nuthatch, Red-bellied, Pileated WP, A. Crow, Cooper’s Hawk, RT Hummingbird. And they were all unimpressed with the eclipse. Didn’t change their behavior at all.

Ed Laster
Little Rock


> On Aug 23, 2017, at 8:23 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
> At Audubon Arkansas I get this question a few times a year, every year, at various times from various parts of the state. A backyard bird watcher claims that ALL the birds in their yard are gone. Usually they claim it has been a week, maybe two, maybe adding their neighbors aren’t seeing any birds either. They want to know if there is some disaster, a regional or nationwide catastrophe. Sometimes they want to blame or wonder about a particular threat like pesticide spraying or the clearing of a nearby lot for development.
>
> Of course the decline by a million cuts that birds are experiencing is an issue, but I just can’t imagine that there is any phenomenon in Arkansas that would cause every bird in an area to disperse for an extended period. Even the recent Dicamba spraying should not influence what backyard birders in a nearby town see from one week to the next. All the highly localized reasons for why you may not see any birds in your yard at any given moment – a cat, a hawk, strong storms, empty feeders, spoiled seed, heat of a summer afternoon – should not result in all birds being gone all day and certainly not all week. I have never observed such a phenomenon in my Little Rock yard despite these various short-term dangers.
>
> I’ve wondered about observation bias – perhaps the caller is not very good at seeing or hearing birds, or their viewing time of day is biased. But that seems unlikely to change between weeks. Maybe their yard provides very little resources so bird visitation is low to begin with, meaning any natural fluctuation results in no birds around at all? These can't be the answer for every caller.
>
> Have any of you had this experience? Presumably you are all more active observers than the average person, so a true disappearance of all birds should be noticed. Maybe you thought you noticed this early in your bird watching days but now experience has changed your perception?
>
> P.S. I’m not talking about the disappearance of a particular species that is easily explained by predictable seasonal movements. I’m not talking about a perceived decline in birds from one period to the next, which may be explained by natural local variation or observer bias (memory cannot be trusted – keep a journal or use eBird to have hard data).
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR


 

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Date: 8/23/17 6:49 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Eclipse Birds
I didn’t make the traverse into totality, but did drive outside Fayetteville for better views of the eclipse with fewer people. Three of us ended up just west of Lake Wedington, west of Fayetteville. The habitat is mostly open pasture with forested lots here and there, approaching a section of the Ozark National Forest nearby. Maximum (97%) in NW Arkansas was at ~1:13pm. By 12:55pm, birds had ceased to sing and the mid-day breeze died down to stillness. At this point, I noticed Turkey Vultures that had been soaring out over the open fields were caught in a situation that led them to have to flap A LOT, as they headed for roosts in surrounding patches of forest. I guess a combination of the breeze dying down and the slight temperature drop killed the thermals and updrafts they had been soaring on, leaving them stranded over the open country. I noticed this with a single bird first and didn’t think much of it, but after the 10th Turkey Vulture flapping wildly to get to the trees, I determined there must have been some sort of a pattern. I also observed over 100 Killdeer, in groups of 4-10, flying south over the road and into the center of a field as if going to roost.

It was pretty interesting, although I found myself wishing I had gone to totality.

Mitchell Pruitt
 

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Date: 8/23/17 6:23 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Where have all the birds gone?
At Audubon Arkansas I get this question a few times a year, every year, at
various times from various parts of the state. A backyard bird watcher
claims that ALL the birds in their yard are gone. Usually they claim it has
been a week, maybe two, maybe adding their neighbors arent seeing any birds
either. They want to know if there is some disaster, a regional or
nationwide catastrophe. Sometimes they want to blame or wonder about a
particular threat like pesticide spraying or the clearing of a nearby lot
for development.



Of course the decline by a million cuts that birds are experiencing is an
issue, but I just cant imagine that there is any phenomenon in Arkansas
that would cause every bird in an area to disperse for an extended period.
Even the recent Dicamba spraying should not influence what backyard birders
in a nearby town see from one week to the next. All the highly localized
reasons for why you may not see any birds in your yard at any given moment
a cat, a hawk, strong storms, empty feeders, spoiled seed, heat of a summer
afternoon should not result in all birds being gone all day and certainly
not all week. I have never observed such a phenomenon in my Little Rock yard
despite these various short-term dangers.



Ive wondered about observation bias perhaps the caller is not very good
at seeing or hearing birds, or their viewing time of day is biased. But that
seems unlikely to change between weeks. Maybe their yard provides very
little resources so bird visitation is low to begin with, meaning any
natural fluctuation results in no birds around at all? These can't be the
answer for every caller.



Have any of you had this experience? Presumably you are all more active
observers than the average person, so a true disappearance of all birds
should be noticed. Maybe you thought you noticed this early in your bird
watching days but now experience has changed your perception?



P.S. Im not talking about the disappearance of a particular species that is
easily explained by predictable seasonal movements. Im not talking about a
perceived decline in birds from one period to the next, which may be
explained by natural local variation or observer bias (memory cannot be
trusted keep a journal or use eBird to have hard data).



Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 8/22/17 8:34 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob sandpipers
LaDonna and I visited BKNWR late this afternoon and I want to echo what Glenn said: there are a LOT of shorebirds at the refuge -maybe 5000. Most numerous, by far, were Pectoral and Least Sandpipers. Also seen were: Stilt, Western, Semipalmated, Spotted and Solitary Sandpipers, Semipalmated Plovers, Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs, American Avocet, maybe 200 Black-necked Stilts, both dowitchers, Wilson's Snipe, Wilsons Phalarope and one adult Sanderling.

Kenny & LaDonna Nichols
Cabot

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 22, 2017, at 6:41 PM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I was at Bald Knob NWR today. When you come in on Coal Chute Road and turn left (west) onto Huntsman Road in front of the grain elevators, you pass 3 fields on the right. After those 3 fields is a large flooded field to the north, I have been told that large pond is called Smoky Pump Pond. Just to the north of that pond is another pond, I have been calling it Pelican Pond because the pelicans have been there all summer long. Well, Pelican Pond had no water today. The entire huge field was nothing but mud and puddles. And the field had hundreds and hundreds of sandpipers. I don't have a scope so can't really tell what all is in there. I did see dowitchers and black-necked stilts and least sandpipers, and yellowlegs and stilt sandpipers and pectoral sandpipers. No telling what else may be wandering around all those sandpipers. If it doesn't rain much tonight it might be a good spot to investigate with a scope.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot, AR

 

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Date: 8/22/17 4:41 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob sandpipers
I was at Bald Knob NWR today.  When you come in on Coal Chute Road and turn left (west) onto Huntsman Road in front of the grain elevators, you pass 3 fields on the right.  After those 3 fields is a large flooded field to the north, I have been told that large pond is called Smoky Pump Pond.  Just to the north of that pond is another pond, I have been calling it Pelican Pond because the pelicans have been there all summer long.  Well, Pelican Pond had no water today.  The entire huge field was nothing but mud and puddles.  And the field had hundreds and hundreds of sandpipers.  I don't have a scope so can't really tell what all is in there.  I did see dowitchers and black-necked stilts and least sandpipers, and yellowlegs and stilt sandpipers and pectoral sandpipers.  No telling what else may be wandering around all those sandpipers.  If it doesn't rain much tonight it might be a good spot to investigate with a scope.
Glenn WyattCabot, AR

 

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Date: 8/22/17 2:46 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: WILSON’S SNIPE fos AT CENTERTON
There is currently some shorebird mudflat at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. Shorebirds there this afternoon included: Killdeer (36), Solitary Sandpiper (2), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Semipalmated Sandpiper (9), Western Sandpiper (2), Least Sandpiper (12), Pectoral Sandpiper (2), Wilsons Snipe (1- first of season). In addition: Black Tern (1).

For you peepophiles: Least Sandpipers look really red in the back, whereas the Semipalmated Sandpipers have this stark contrast of pure white and tan. But then there are also Westerns, with a little red in the back.

The Swamp Milkweed around the hatchery is spectacular. LOTs of butterflies, including numerous Monarchs.

Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to the hatchery is this Saturday, August 26. Meeting time 9 AM.


 

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Date: 8/22/17 12:41 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: link to vulture article- Some questions
Interesting.



What's next? How about $50 for a permit to kill a "chicken hawk"? Do I
hear $10 for a permit to kill woodpeckers a-drumming on my house?



Is this a legal way to expedite "circum-violation" of the MBTA?



Will the USFWS use its full police powers to prosecute those that "take"
vultures without the proper paperwork (and application fee)?



Any NGOs challenging this approach in the courts? I'd donate $100 dedicated
for that purpose.



Jeff Short







From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Joseph Neal
Sent: Sunday, August 20, 2017 8:32 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: link to vulture article



http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2017/aug/19/a-vulture-solution-20170819/



<http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2017/aug/19/a-vulture-solution-20170819/
>


<http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2017/aug/19/a-vulture-solution-20170819/
> A vulture solution

www.arkansasonline.com

To our Arkansas cattle ranchers concerned about black vultures killing your
youngest livestock: I hear you, and we can help. &#8203;




 

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Date: 8/22/17 7:56 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: HANG ‘EM HIGH RESPONSE TO VULTURES (QUICKLY, just like in the good ole days)
I would imagine the permit would require actions at some point to remove the vulture carcasses and dispose of them appropriately. Anyone have a copy of the permit that could be shared with stakeholders or will we require a FOIA request?



I would expect that each “takings” permit has potential value to help steer future actions and should be accompanied by data collection of the problem, approach, and results for stakeholder review and benefit. Too much trouble? Maybe this is a situation where “citizen science” can help build a database for the future.





Note to the point about research-- A couple of decades ago, the USAF and USDA was researching the variation in body density of some (previousl y frozen!) birds using CT- and MRI scans. We were hoping to use the density “slice” data in computer models of the body mass distributions for some representative (problem) species—which can be quite different as the birds pass through a jet engine in various orientations. [Engineering testing was typically done with chickens--which are very dense (and delicious) and sometimes starlings—shot from a pneumatic cannon at an operating engine or aircraft component.] Anyway, a key part of the months-long, research permit, approval process was our plan to dispose of the carcasses after they had been thawed and scanned. USDA didn’t want them back so they were buried securely.





Jeff Short





From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Gmail
Sent: Monday, August 21, 2017 1:02 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: HANG ‘EM HIGH RESPONSE TO VULTURES (QUICKLY, just like in the good ole days)



Joe,



It doesn't appear that anyone took you up on commenting about your post, so I think I'll add a few words.



I thought it might interest our readers that if you wanted a permit to capture and handle birds for scientific purposes, it can take a couple of years to gain the necessary experience under a mentor as well as secure the three signatures attesting to your bird handling ability. Furthermore, you have to have a legitimate scientific proposal that is reviewed by a committee. At that point, it may take up to three months before you have your permit in hand allowing you to capture, mark, and release migratory birds. Of course, the irony is that this process is the same for Black Vultures. But if you want to kill one, it seems all you have to do is complain and plunk $100 down, and you can have a permit in a month, no special training. I am sure there are more than a few scientists fuming about this right now.



While were talking about ironies, I'll share another one about birds and the odd mentality that exists.



A few blocks from my house in Bentonville there used to be a old, abandoned farm pond. We pass by the spot while walking our dog on the weekends. The pond used to be the focal point for a variety of birds including both Green and Blue Herons, Scissor-tails, Peewees, Phoebes, Bluebirds, Indigo Buntings, a plethora of woodpeckers, frogs, probably snakes, and who knows what else living in the benthos, muddy shore, and among the see weed and algae. A full 87 species of birds have been spotted on our dog walks over the past three years, taking the same route each Sunday.



Unfortunately, last year the pond got plowed under and buried. Yesterday, I noticed there was a sign now erected on the same location as former pond: Creekside Elementary School.



Yes, we knew the elementary and middle school was going there, but I found it ironic that an institution that should have welcomed a living classroom right on it's own grounds would literally just bury the habitat and erect a sign right on top of it.



No more herons, no more phoebes, not much of anything there now. Just a bunch of kids learning from their parents that if you don't like nature as it is, you can just get rid of it.



After all of these years, you'd think we'd have learned how to be better stewards.



Well, enough of the ironies in our world. It's time to go check on the eclipse...



Butch Tetzlaff

Bentonville




On Aug 20, 2017, at 07:23, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

The Arkansas Democrat-Gazette published an opinion piece by Cindy Dohner, director of the US Fish and Wildlife Service in the southeast about Black Vulture problems. It is in the paper for August 19.



Subtitle of the article is, “Agency wants to help ranchers.” Think about that for a minute. Other subtitle, in a different age, might have been “Agency will scientifically assess.” The agency is ready for business, quickly.



Dohner wrote, “At the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service we want to be a good neighbor and a good business partner, which is why we think we've come up with a solution that will help make your problems fly away... literally.” An up and coming vendor making a product pitch to Walmart couldn’t ask for more.



Dohner is a professional biologist with years on the job. Here are some facts she included: “Ronnie McGhee, president of Greenlawn Farms in Decatur … applied for a permit to take black vultures. Once he got it, McGhee took three. He hung their carcasses from a tree. The vultures quickly got the message. And as McGhee said, "We didn't see any more after that." Last fall, the family-owned operation produced about 350 calves; this spring, the farm greeted 150 more.”



I did not make this up. Regional director for the US Fish and Wildlife Service with a masters degree in natural sciences flew in here from Atalanta with that message.



Did your local conservation, Audubon, watershed alliance, wildlife, or other fact-based group get an invitation to the June 2017 meeting she chaired in Little Rock to assess Black Vulture problems? Surely she invited Central Arkansas Audubon with hundreds of members, tens of thousands of hours observing Black Vultures?



Unfortunately, y’all out there who watch and study are not “stakeholders.”



According to Director Dohner, “We met with local stakeholders including the Cattlemen's Association, Farm Bureau, Livestock and Poultry Commission, governor's office, and others to listen to their concerns and see what we could do about it. Our takeaway? Folks need help, and quickly. Note that last word, "quickly."



When it comes to the fate of Black Vultures in the Natural State, the stakeholders are members of the Farm Bureau. “Quickly” is the requirement since the cattle industry in The Natural State is on the point of collapse. That’s why it keeps expanding.



But back here on Planet Earth, back-and-forth discussions on the ARBIRDs list have yielded more actual facts from farmers and field observers.



“Stakeholder” is a word that means political actors whose phone calls are taken by U.S. Rep. Rick Crawford. Stakeholder does not include you or your knowledge of Black Vultures. Stakeholders are folks whose preferred solution to problems involving the exploitation of nature is “hang ‘em high.”




 

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