ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
7/24/17 9:39 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> South Lafayette County 7-21-17
7/24/17 9:23 pm Lucy c Weberling <lucyoga...> Re: Bird Baths
7/24/17 5:29 pm Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/24/17 1:55 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Bird Baths
7/24/17 12:35 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/24/17 12:26 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
7/24/17 11:53 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Re: Bird Baths
7/24/17 11:09 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Latest wood duck fledging in my records
7/24/17 10:47 am Mary Ann King <office...> Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/24/17 10:37 am Mary Ann King <office...> Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/24/17 10:36 am Barry Haas <bhaas...> Latest wood duck fledging in my records
7/24/17 10:32 am Reames, Clark -FS <creames...> Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/24/17 10:26 am Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...> Re: Bird Baths
7/24/17 10:19 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/24/17 10:14 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
7/24/17 10:01 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
7/24/17 9:45 am Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/24/17 9:40 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Bird Baths
7/24/17 9:26 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bird Baths
7/24/17 9:18 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> A Tufted Titmouse Observation
7/23/17 6:12 pm Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> Quiet Summer Things
7/23/17 5:02 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> AR River Valley Audubon Club meeting July 24 - Cindy Franklin presenting
7/23/17 4:50 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> some might be surprised by this statistic
7/22/17 9:05 am Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> OFF TOPIC: Looking for Leslie Peacock
7/21/17 3:06 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Mike Mlodinow film release -- "Mike the birdman" + Still on the Hill -- mark your calendars
7/20/17 8:54 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Redheads at Bald Knob
7/20/17 3:49 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Joe Hogan, Treadway & Saul's Minnow Ponds
7/20/17 8:15 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Purple Martin roost in Van Buren
7/20/17 4:38 am Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Joe Hogan, Treadway & Saul's Minnow Ponds
7/19/17 7:22 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Bald Knob today
7/19/17 11:54 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> raptor vs. raptor
7/19/17 9:30 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Brown Creeper Breeding
7/19/17 8:16 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird Illustrated Checklists
7/19/17 6:33 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Prothonotary Warbler 2nd brood
7/18/17 9:35 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> Southern Lafayette County birds 7-17-17
7/18/17 7:07 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - July 18
7/18/17 6:29 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Prothonotary Warbler 2nd brood
7/18/17 10:20 am JFR <johnfredman...> WILLET AT BOYD POINT, PINE BLUFF
7/18/17 7:37 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: GOOD SIGN FOR LEAST TERNS AT FROG
7/17/17 7:06 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: GOOD SIGN FOR LEAST TERNS AT FROG
7/17/17 3:28 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> GOOD SIGN FOR LEAST TERNS AT FROG
7/17/17 3:22 pm Debra Hale-Shelton <dshelton...> Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
7/17/17 3:16 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Fwd: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
7/17/17 3:13 pm Tiffany <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request...> Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
7/17/17 3:03 pm Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
7/17/17 2:48 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
7/17/17 11:32 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Report
7/17/17 7:37 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Hummingbird Facts
7/16/17 7:31 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Bald Knob NWR
7/16/17 7:10 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Brown Booby
7/16/17 1:59 pm brandon schmidt <brandonschmidt2...> Re: BLACKPOLL WARBLER IN PINE BLUFF
7/16/17 12:48 pm V Prislipsky <vprislipsky...> Brown Booby
7/16/17 8:59 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> "pop up" field trip to Eagle Watch Nature Trail Saturday August 5
7/15/17 2:42 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Job Announcement - Wildlife Biologist at Luke AFB, AZ
7/15/17 10:40 am Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> Re: strange songs from Indigo Buntings
7/15/17 8:57 am Don Simons <Don.Simons...> Re: strange songs from Indigo Buntings
7/15/17 8:44 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> strange songs from Indigo Buntings
7/15/17 8:40 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Ravens for President!
7/14/17 8:21 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Ravens for President!
7/14/17 7:42 pm V Prislipsky <vprislipsky...> Phainopepla Mystery
7/14/17 6:24 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
7/14/17 6:00 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Purple Martins
7/14/17 3:11 pm Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> The week, more rain
7/14/17 8:37 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
7/14/17 8:29 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
7/14/17 7:31 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
7/13/17 7:27 pm Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Fall migration begins--Solitary Sandpiper (Washington Co.)
7/13/17 6:58 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Red Sough is the Top Oklahoma Bird Hot Spots
7/12/17 2:28 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Bald Knob NWR
7/12/17 1:15 pm Keith Newton <keithnewton...> National Geographic Hummingbird videos, link, WOW!
7/10/17 10:38 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest
7/10/17 9:46 pm swamp_fox <swamp_fox...> Broad-billed Hummingbird
7/10/17 5:51 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest
7/10/17 4:54 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: eBird: Tips for Traveling Counts and Mobil App
7/10/17 1:08 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Protecting our birds
7/10/17 1:02 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: eBird: Tips for Traveling Counts and Mobil App
7/10/17 12:14 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Protecting our birds
7/10/17 11:26 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest
7/10/17 8:07 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest
7/10/17 6:49 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, July 13
7/10/17 6:10 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: Tips for Traveling Counts and Mobil App
7/9/17 2:40 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Birds' migration genes are conditioned by geography
7/8/17 1:38 pm cbayona <cbayona...> Re: great loggerhead shrike video
7/8/17 1:06 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: great loggerhead shrike video
7/8/17 9:30 am Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...> Shrike video link
7/7/17 6:30 pm ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...> Bird Photos BKNWR
7/7/17 6:09 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Lollie Update
7/7/17 5:51 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Lollie Update
7/7/17 5:44 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Lollie Update
7/7/17 5:39 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Lollie Update
7/7/17 4:43 pm ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...> Bird Photos
7/7/17 2:08 pm Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> Re: great loggerhead shrike video
7/7/17 11:58 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: great loggerhead shrike video
7/7/17 10:29 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Lollie Update
7/7/17 10:02 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Lollie Update
7/7/17 10:00 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Re: great loggerhead shrike video
7/7/17 8:59 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> great loggerhead shrike video
7/7/17 8:09 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Quest for Swainson's Hawk, Interesting Vulture Behavior, and Neotropic Cormorants
7/6/17 6:33 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Lollie Update
7/6/17 6:42 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Kites
7/6/17 4:09 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Kites
7/5/17 12:59 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Saturday
7/5/17 5:00 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Insomniac mockingbird
7/4/17 11:35 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> Insomniac mockingbird
7/4/17 10:06 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Peewees
7/4/17 9:55 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Western Kingbirds at Ft Smith, good nesting season
7/4/17 8:54 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - July 4
7/4/17 3:00 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Western Kingbirds at Ft Smith, good nesting season
7/4/17 2:27 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Quail Revival
7/4/17 10:20 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Canopy Lodge, Panama, for the Audubon trust
7/4/17 9:44 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: Big Day(s) donation to the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust
7/4/17 8:22 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Quail Revival
7/4/17 7:21 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Quail Revival
7/4/17 6:53 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Quail Revival
7/4/17 6:02 am Mary Ann King <office...> Re: Quail Revival
7/4/17 4:45 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Quail Revival
7/3/17 10:23 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Quail Revival
7/3/17 9:32 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Big Day(s) donation to the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust
7/3/17 3:49 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob Terns update
7/3/17 11:38 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob Terns
7/2/17 3:32 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> NWAAS July meeting: Dan Scheiman talks about the NATIVE project - restoring our prairies
7/2/17 9:52 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: FOOT TREMBLING BY KILLDEER AND A RARE PLANT AT CENTERTON
7/2/17 7:56 am Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Re: Song ID help please
7/2/17 7:38 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Song ID help please
7/2/17 6:04 am jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr...> Song ID help please
7/1/17 5:41 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Tricolored Heron on Wilbur West Road
7/1/17 4:44 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> AOU 58th Supplement Rundown
7/1/17 3:01 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> FOOT TREMBLING BY KILLDEER AND A RARE PLANT AT CENTERTON
7/1/17 2:51 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Re: Iola Rea obituary
7/1/17 2:35 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Iola Rea obituary
7/1/17 9:27 am Charles H Mills <swamp_fox...> Cave Swallows
7/1/17 8:23 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: A first for me with Martins
7/1/17 7:50 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> A first for me with Martins
6/30/17 3:39 pm Tim Tyler <tylertim204...> Re: Arkansas Post Least Bitterns
6/30/17 2:19 pm Mary Ann King <office...> Re: SPECIAL AGENT IN CHARGE OF ILLEGAL BIRD IMMIGRATION
6/30/17 2:18 pm Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request...> Arkansas Post Least Bitterns
6/30/17 12:56 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> SPECIAL AGENT IN CHARGE OF ILLEGAL BIRD IMMIGRATION
6/30/17 12:14 pm Cody Massery <cmassery...> Possible Jaeger
6/30/17 10:40 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> southbound migrants at Centerton this morning
6/29/17 7:38 pm Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> Re: FW: Ohio Air National Guard Wind Turbine Update
6/29/17 7:12 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Ohio Air National Guard Wind Turbine Update
6/29/17 6:58 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Whydahs--why not?
6/29/17 12:37 pm Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
6/29/17 12:24 pm Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
6/29/17 11:18 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
6/29/17 10:57 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
6/29/17 10:04 am Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
6/29/17 8:46 am Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
6/29/17 8:37 am Ryan Dziedzic <ryan.dziedzic...> RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
6/28/17 7:36 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Costa Rica Birding and a Blog Post
6/28/17 6:42 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: apologies on some odd words
6/28/17 5:42 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> apologies on some odd words
6/28/17 5:34 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Another birdy evening at Twin Lakes recreation at Ouachita
6/28/17 8:01 am Jerry Britten <jeraldabritten...> Red-shouldered hawk -vs- snake - photos
6/28/17 3:38 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 27
6/27/17 7:23 pm Lorraine Heartfield <000001aa89b66f66-dmarc-request...> Re: after work gift to my dogs and me
6/27/17 5:41 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: after work gift to my dogs and me
6/27/17 5:06 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> after work gift to my dogs and me
6/27/17 1:03 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Stump and Chesney Prairies, Benton County
6/25/17 2:38 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: the end of the cowbird string - maybe
6/25/17 1:32 pm Samantha SCHEIMAN <samantha.scheiman...> Arkansas Birds summer newsletter - now online
6/25/17 12:46 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Barn Swallow nests
6/25/17 12:14 pm Abby Gibson <balllgibson...> Barn Swallow nests
6/25/17 10:48 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: song help?
6/25/17 8:43 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> song help?
 
Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 9:39 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: South Lafayette County 7-21-17
AR-birders,
The birds in the list below were at the fish farm in south Lafayette County on Friday 7-21-17. Im sorry about being
a few days late with the report, but there are just not enough hours in a day. It was hot which is an understatement,
and the heat index got up to 112 degreesand I thought Louisiana was hot in the summer.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38311199

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 9:23 pm
From: Lucy c Weberling <lucyoga...>
Subject: Re: Bird Baths
I have a fountain - it keeps the water circulating at least. The fountain has an old fashioned birdbath in the center

Sent from my iPhone
<Lucyoga...>
918-633-8890

> On Jul 24, 2017, at 3:55 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> Always have water out. I replenish my baths at least three times a day. I also have a window air conditioner in a back room. I put a shallow pan under it to catch the water drops that come from it. I have birds taking baths and drinking water every day.
>
> Sandy
>
>> On Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 1:53 PM CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:
>> To my great wonderment, the wrens, chickadees, finches, house sparrows, and titmice often bath in the ant moats above my hummingbird feeders. When they aren't bathing in them, they drink from them. When you refill your hummingbird feeders, it's a good idea to empty and refill the ant moats as well.
>>
>> Cindy
>> Little Rock
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...>
>> Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 11:45 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Bird Baths
>>
>> My thinking is if birds will bathe in a puddle of water on a hot asphalt street or curbside then a hot bird bath would be welcome. Try putting it close enough to the house that a walk in the afternoon heat wouldn't kill you and fill it with a pail of water every afternoon to overflowing. Fresh water and cooler water should work just fine. Your feathered friends will love you.
>>
>> Jerry Schulz
>> Little Rock, Arkansas
>>
>>
>> On Monday, July 24, 2017 11:26 AM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I have a couple feeders in my backyard, but since it has gotten hot, I have seen almost no birds. I do not have water for them. I'm thinking about putting a bird bath out there. My yard has no shade and I'm concerned that the water in a bird bath would get too hot and hurt the birds. Do the birds know enough to not get into water that is too hot? Will a bird bath in this heat help them or hurt them? Thanks.
>>
>> Glenn Wyatt
>> Cabot
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 5:29 pm
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
True and the absent cats are as likely to have gone into the mouths of
Polistes wasps as a sneaky bird.

HR


On 7/24/2017 12:37 PM, Mary Ann King wrote:
>
> Sorry Lyndal, Monarch butterflies do not lay their eggs on Fennel or
> Dill. Apparently it was an eastern black swallowtail that you had.
>
> Monarchs only lay their eggs on milkweeds (member of the Asclepias
> genus and their very close relatives, the milkvines).
>
> MaryAnn King
>
> In the pine woods northwest of London, AR
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Lyndal York
> *Sent:* Monday, July 24, 2017 11:45 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
>
> Speaking of birds and insects, we had a dill and a nice fennel plant
> on which a monarch butterfly laid her eggs. As the eggs developed
> into about a dozen caterpillars , I carefully covered the plants with
> bird netting in hopes of keeping the Carolina Wrens from a feast. Did
> not work! Don't know how the birds got to the caterpillars, but they
> apparently did.
>
> Lyndal York
>
> Little Rock
>
> On Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 11:17 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> <mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:
>
> We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our
> window sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and
> suet feeders. Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into
> one of my Yaupon bushes viewed through our back window. It had
> something white in its beak. After hopping to several limbs it
> settled on one where it snags it on a limb it was perched on and
> proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for several
> minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with
> binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went
> out to inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk
> spider case that a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The
> titmouse had apparently harvested it from one of the spider webs
> or caches and knew how to proceed to attach it to a gnarly limb
> and continue to open and eat the contents.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
>
> Hot Springs, AR
>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 1:55 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Bird Baths
Always have water out. I replenish my baths at least three times a day. I
also have a window air conditioner in a back room. I put a shallow pan
under it to catch the water drops that come from it. I have birds taking
baths and drinking water every day.

Sandy

On Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 1:53 PM CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:

> To my great wonderment, the wrens, chickadees, finches, house sparrows,
> and titmice often bath in the ant moats above my hummingbird feeders. When
> they aren't bathing in them, they drink from them. When you refill your
> hummingbird feeders, it's a good idea to empty and refill the ant moats as
> well.
>
>
> Cindy
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> on behalf of Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...>
> *Sent:* Monday, July 24, 2017 11:45 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Bird Baths
>
> My thinking is if birds will bathe in a puddle of water on a hot asphalt
> street or curbside then a hot bird bath would be welcome. Try putting it
> close enough to the house that a walk in the afternoon heat wouldn't kill
> you and fill it with a pail of water every afternoon to overflowing. Fresh
> water and cooler water should work just fine. Your feathered friends will
> love you.
>
> Jerry Schulz
> Little Rock, Arkansas
>
>
> On Monday, July 24, 2017 11:26 AM, Glenn <
> <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>
> I have a couple feeders in my backyard, but since it has gotten hot, I
> have seen almost no birds. I do not have water for them. I'm thinking
> about putting a bird bath out there. My yard has no shade and I'm
> concerned that the water in a bird bath would get too hot and hurt the
> birds. Do the birds know enough to not get into water that is too hot?
> Will a bird bath in this heat help them or hurt them? Thanks.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 12:35 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
A few years ago, I used bird netting propped over my strawberries to keep squirrels from devouring the berries. My barrier worked somewhat for the squirrels, but I ended up catching (and releasing) a Coachwhip and Black racer on separate occasions. They start through the netting, but can’t back out; so, I had to cut them out.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 12:19 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation



Just want to add a caveat here about using bird netting....I've seen many horrific instances of snakes being caught in bird (and sod) netting, skinned alive, and strangled---for torturous hours and days---before they finally died. It's a large and significant problem everywhere that netting is used. Please be sure to keep all netting out of any possible reach of snakes!

Janine

On 7/24/2017 11:45 AM, Lyndal York wrote:

Speaking of birds and insects, we had a dill and a nice fennel plant on which a monarch butterfly laid her eggs. As the eggs developed into about a dozen caterpillars , I carefully covered the plants with bird netting in hopes of keeping the Carolina Wrens from a feast. Did not work! Don't know how the birds got to the caterpillars, but they apparently did.

Lyndal York

Little Rock



On Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 11:17 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:



We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our window sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and suet feeders. Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into one of my Yaupon bushes viewed through our back window. It had something white in its beak. After hopping to several limbs it settled on one where it snags it on a limb it was perched on and proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for several minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went out to inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk spider case that a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The titmouse had apparently harvested it from one of the spider webs or caches and knew how to proceed to attach it to a gnarly limb and continue to open and eat the contents.



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR






 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 12:26 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
Just wondering if diatomaceous earth (DE) would be too fine or would create a hazard for birds? The powdery product is used in organic gardening. to kill insects at various stages of their life-cycle. It resembles talc and is blown-on and around the plants. Inhalation exposure by humans and pets could cause silacosis (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicosis) so protective masks are required. Would birds be susceptible to this product? (Would the respiratory system of birds be compromised by this fine powder, since birds that dust are not as long-lived as mammals?)



And, as an aside, if there are cats in the neighborhood they may be attracted to the dusting box for their nefarious purposes not limited to eating the birds. I imagine an elevated dusting spot would reduce this attractiveness.



Jeff Short

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 12:01 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990



Twenty seven years ago I wrote a paper dealing with bird dusting. Every day I observe my brown thrashers, Carolina wrens, Eastern Bluebirds, rabbits, chipmunks, squirrels, and other dusting in my back yard. I thought it might be time to send out a reminder of this need for birds that some of you may not have available in your yard. For the birds, get it done.



Is There Dusting At Your House?

Is there dusting going on at your house? No, I am not checking to see what kind of house keeper you are and if you have been running around with a rag and a can of Pledge or Endust.

What I am asking is, do you have a place in your yard for the birds to do their dusting, sun bathing, and anting? We are not meeting our bird’s needs just by providing nest boxes, feeders and water. Dusting is important to help remove external parasites, dry feathers, and help realign feather barbs and barbules. And anting has been observed in over 250 species of birds and is said to rid or reduce bird external parasites and possible soothe skin irritations. You may have observed birds sun bathing by spreading their tail and wing feathers. This can also help drive out external parasites and increase body temperature.

It is insightful for me to watch various resident and migratory birds going through the dusting and sun bathing behavior. I have even had a family of eastern cottontail rabbits and several species of lizards come on an almost daily basis to stretch out in the hot sand for maybe some of the same reasons.

If you do not already have a dusting and sun bathing area for your birds, it may be time for you to consider it.

Go into that beautiful green monoculture lawn that you have worked so hard to weed, feed, water, and mow. Select an area close to your bird bath(s) and / or feeders, where the birds are already coming. Pulverize the area to about a foot deep so that it looks similar to a horseshoe pitching trap; a size 4 feet by 4 feet square is a start. If you are lucky enough to already have sandy soil that is a plus. If not, you may need to dig out the fertile soil that you have cultivated so long, and replace it with fine white sand. The smaller the sand particles and the higher the reflective value, the better it will be for dusting and sun bathing. The sand is droughty enough to discourage grass and weeds, but if you need to retard grass encroachment, you can put a border around it and put a plant barrier like plastic or tar paper under it. If you do not have a natural source of sand, you can obtain mortar sand from a ready-mix company or use the play sand sold at home supply or landscape retailers. The finer the grain size the better it will be for dusting and the whiter it is the better for sun bathing and heat radiation.

Once this is in place, sit back and enjoy the insight that you can gain from yet another element of the bird’s world and other wildlife use may be an extra bonus.

Jerry W. Davis

Certified Wildlife Biologist

June 7, 1990




 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 11:53 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Re: Bird Baths
To my great wonderment, the wrens, chickadees, finches, house sparrows, and titmice often bath in the ant moats above my hummingbird feeders. When they aren't bathing in them, they drink from them. When you refill your hummingbird feeders, it's a good idea to empty and refill the ant moats as well.


Cindy
Little Rock




________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...>
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 11:45 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Bird Baths

My thinking is if birds will bathe in a puddle of water on a hot asphalt street or curbside then a hot bird bath would be welcome. Try putting it close enough to the house that a walk in the afternoon heat wouldn't kill you and fill it with a pail of water every afternoon to overflowing. Fresh water and cooler water should work just fine. Your feathered friends will love you.

Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas


On Monday, July 24, 2017 11:26 AM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:


I have a couple feeders in my backyard, but since it has gotten hot, I have seen almost no birds. I do not have water for them. I'm thinking about putting a bird bath out there. My yard has no shade and I'm concerned that the water in a bird bath would get too hot and hurt the birds. Do the birds know enough to not get into water that is too hot? Will a bird bath in this heat help them or hurt them? Thanks.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot



 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 11:09 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Latest wood duck fledging in my records
Lovely, thanks.
J
On Jul 24, 2017, at 12:36 PM, Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:

> Dear ARBIRDers,
>
> Saturday morning just before 8:30 I was in the kitchen fixing breakfast when I happened to look out our wall-to-wall dining room windows at our east wood duck nest box. Was that a fledgling in the opening exiting the nest box? Indeed it was along with six siblings. It was just by chance I was where I was at the exact moment the adult female woodie decided to bring her charges out. We more typically see the fledglings leave the nest box closer to 10:00 a.m., but that time is clearly not set in stone.
>
> The seven fledglings were immediately taken off into the woods by the adult female. No visit, even a short one, to our nearby pond this time.
>
> I could not remember any other fledgings so late in the year so I was a bit surprised to find that on July 9, 2009 we had 10 fledglings. That was the previous late date I could find in my records. The earliest was April 3, 2005 when we had 16 fledglings.
>
> Checking the nest box after the female and fledglings were gone I found three unhatched eggs, none of which appeared viable. They were left in our woods in hopes they might provide needed nutrition for some other wildlife.
>
> With the nest box cleaned and new wood chips put in place the box is now ready for occupancy next spring.
>
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
>
> P.S. One other bird observation- my wife Susan put out a bowl of live mealworms yesterday afternoon. Almost immediately, a lurking red-bellied woodpecker flew down and proceeded to eat a few mealworms. It then loaded its beak with what looked to be seven or eight mealworms- it was interesting to observe how it managed to grab more while not losing its grip on the first few- and then flew to a nearby tree where it proceeded to feed two juvenile red-bellies.
>
> P.P.S. We have a lot of ruby-throated hummingbirds. They seem to be everywhere.
 

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Date: 7/24/17 10:47 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
I’ll never forget the time I put bird netting around a fig bush. Fortunately, I went to check the figs and found 2 black snakes ensnared in the netting. After looking the snakes over, I decided they weren’t poisonous and decided to help them out. I took a pair of scissors in one hand, and the snake in the other, and proceeded to cut the netting. It was remarkable how still the snakes laid while I was doing this. A lot of my fears of snakes vanished that day. But still, they better not sneak up on me. :)



MaryAnn King



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 12:19 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation



Just want to add a caveat here about using bird netting....I've seen many horrific instances of snakes being caught in bird (and sod) netting, skinned alive, and strangled---for torturous hours and days---before they finally died. It's a large and significant problem everywhere that netting is used. Please be sure to keep all netting out of any possible reach of snakes!

Janine

On 7/24/2017 11:45 AM, Lyndal York wrote:

Speaking of birds and insects, we had a dill and a nice fennel plant on which a monarch butterfly laid her eggs. As the eggs developed into about a dozen caterpillars , I carefully covered the plants with bird netting in hopes of keeping the Carolina Wrens from a feast. Did not work! Don't know how the birds got to the caterpillars, but they apparently did.

Lyndal York

Little Rock



On Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 11:17 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> <mailto:<jwdavis...> > wrote:



We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our window sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and suet feeders. Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into one of my Yaupon bushes viewed through our back window. It had something white in its beak. After hopping to several limbs it settled on one where it snags it on a limb it was perched on and proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for several minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went out to inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk spider case that a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The titmouse had apparently harvested it from one of the spider webs or caches and knew how to proceed to attach it to a gnarly limb and continue to open and eat the contents.



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR






 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 10:37 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
Sorry Lyndal, Monarch butterflies do not lay their eggs on Fennel or Dill. Apparently it was an eastern black swallowtail that you had.



Monarchs only lay their eggs on milkweeds (member of the Asclepias genus and their very close relatives, the milkvines).



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London, AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Lyndal York
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 11:45 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation



Speaking of birds and insects, we had a dill and a nice fennel plant on which a monarch butterfly laid her eggs. As the eggs developed into about a dozen caterpillars , I carefully covered the plants with bird netting in hopes of keeping the Carolina Wrens from a feast. Did not work! Don't know how the birds got to the caterpillars, but they apparently did.

Lyndal York

Little Rock



On Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 11:17 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> <mailto:<jwdavis...> > wrote:



We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our window sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and suet feeders. Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into one of my Yaupon bushes viewed through our back window. It had something white in its beak. After hopping to several limbs it settled on one where it snags it on a limb it was perched on and proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for several minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went out to inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk spider case that a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The titmouse had apparently harvested it from one of the spider webs or caches and knew how to proceed to attach it to a gnarly limb and continue to open and eat the contents.



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR




 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 10:36 am
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Latest wood duck fledging in my records
Dear ARBIRDers,

Saturday morning just before 8:30 I was in the kitchen fixing breakfast when I happened to look out our wall-to-wall dining room windows at our east wood duck nest box. Was that a fledgling in the opening exiting the nest box? Indeed it was along with six siblings. It was just by chance I was where I was at the exact moment the adult female woodie decided to bring her charges out. We more typically see the fledglings leave the nest box closer to 10:00 a.m., but that time is clearly not set in stone.

The seven fledglings were immediately taken off into the woods by the adult female. No visit, even a short one, to our nearby pond this time.

I could not remember any other fledgings so late in the year so I was a bit surprised to find that on July 9, 2009 we had 10 fledglings. That was the previous late date I could find in my records. The earliest was April 3, 2005 when we had 16 fledglings.

Checking the nest box after the female and fledglings were gone I found three unhatched eggs, none of which appeared viable. They were left in our woods in hopes they might provide needed nutrition for some other wildlife.

With the nest box cleaned and new wood chips put in place the box is now ready for occupancy next spring.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. One other bird observation- my wife Susan put out a bowl of live mealworms yesterday afternoon. Almost immediately, a lurking red-bellied woodpecker flew down and proceeded to eat a few mealworms. It then loaded its beak with what looked to be seven or eight mealworms- it was interesting to observe how it managed to grab more while not losing its grip on the first few- and then flew to a nearby tree where it proceeded to feed two juvenile red-bellies.

P.P.S. We have a lot of ruby-throated hummingbirds. They seem to be everywhere.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 10:32 am
From: Reames, Clark -FS <creames...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
Related to that, I observed one of our local magpies fly down off the top of our house with a nice wasp nest and proceeded to pick all the larvae out of it and then cast the paper nest aside. We still have plenty of wasp nests however, so I don't think there is any threat to the wasp population.

[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
<creames...><mailto:<creames...>

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us<http://www.fs.fed.us>
[USDA Logo]<http://usda.gov/>[Forest Service Twitter]<https://twitter.com/forestservice>[USDA Facebook]<https://www.facebook.com/pages/US-Forest-Service/1431984283714112>

Caring for the land and serving people






From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 9:18 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: A Tufted Titmouse Observation


We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our window sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and suet feeders. Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into one of my Yaupon bushes viewed through our back window. It had something white in its beak. After hopping to several limbs it settled on one where it snags it on a limb it was perched on and proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for several minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went out to inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk spider case that a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The titmouse had apparently harvested it from one of the spider webs or caches and knew how to proceed to attach it to a gnarly limb and continue to open and eat the contents.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 7/24/17 10:26 am
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...>
Subject: Re: Bird Baths
My thinking is if birds will bathe in a puddle of water on a hot asphalt street or curbside then a hot bird bath would be welcome. Try putting it close enough to the house that a walk in the afternoon heat wouldn't kill you and fill it with a pail of water every afternoon to overflowing. Fresh water and cooler water should work just fine. Your feathered friends will love you.   Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas

On Monday, July 24, 2017 11:26 AM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:


I have a couple feeders in my backyard, but since it has gotten hot, I have seen almost no birds.  I do not have water for them.  I'm thinking about putting a bird bath out there.  My yard has no shade and I'm concerned that the water in a bird bath would get too hot and hurt the birds.  Do the birds know enough to not get into water that is too hot?  Will a bird bath in this heat help them or hurt them?  Thanks.
Glenn WyattCabot



 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 10:19 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
Just want to add a caveat here about using bird netting....I've seen
many horrific instances of snakes being caught in bird (and sod)
netting, skinned alive, and strangled---for torturous hours and
days---before they finally died. It's a large and significant problem
everywhere that netting is used. /Please /be sure to keep all netting
out of any possible reach of snakes!

Janine

On 7/24/2017 11:45 AM, Lyndal York wrote:
> Speaking of birds and insects, we had a dill and a nice fennel plant
> on which a monarch butterfly laid her eggs. As the eggs developed
> into about a dozen caterpillars , I carefully covered the plants with
> bird netting in hopes of keeping the Carolina Wrens from a feast. Did
> not work! Don't know how the birds got to the caterpillars, but they
> apparently did.
>
> Lyndal York
> Little Rock
>
> On Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 11:17 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> <mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:
>
> We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our
> window sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and
> suet feeders. Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into
> one of my Yaupon bushes viewed through our back window. It had
> something white in its beak. After hopping to several limbs it
> settled on one where it snags it on a limb it was perched on and
> proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for several
> minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with
> binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went
> out to inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk
> spider case that a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The
> titmouse had apparently harvested it from one of the spider webs
> or caches and knew how to proceed to attach it to a gnarly limb
> and continue to open and eat the contents.
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 10:14 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
Thank you Jerry for sharing your article. I have observed this activity on quite a few occasions. I have a round section of a cedar tree just outside my kitchen window that serves as a feeder station and I’m seeing birds spread out their wings sunning on that.



A few years back I had a lot of fun photographing a Greater Roadrunner that spent quite a bit of the photo session dusting and sunning. Those photos can be view here, should anyone care to view them. http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/greater_roadrunner



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 12:01 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990



Twenty seven years ago I wrote a paper dealing with bird dusting. Every day I observe my brown thrashers, Carolina wrens, Eastern Bluebirds, rabbits, chipmunks, squirrels, and other dusting in my back yard. I thought it might be time to send out a reminder of this need for birds that some of you may not have available in your yard. For the birds, get it done.



Is There Dusting At Your House?

Is there dusting going on at your house? No, I am not checking to see what kind of house keeper you are and if you have been running around with a rag and a can of Pledge or Endust.

What I am asking is, do you have a place in your yard for the birds to do their dusting, sun bathing, and anting? We are not meeting our bird’s needs just by providing nest boxes, feeders and water. Dusting is important to help remove external parasites, dry feathers, and help realign feather barbs and barbules. And anting has been observed in over 250 species of birds and is said to rid or reduce bird external parasites and possible soothe skin irritations. You may have observed birds sun bathing by spreading their tail and wing feathers. This can also help drive out external parasites and increase body temperature.

It is insightful for me to watch various resident and migratory birds going through the dusting and sun bathing behavior. I have even had a family of eastern cottontail rabbits and several species of lizards come on an almost daily basis to stretch out in the hot sand for maybe some of the same reasons.

If you do not already have a dusting and sun bathing area for your birds, it may be time for you to consider it.

Go into that beautiful green monoculture lawn that you have worked so hard to weed, feed, water, and mow. Select an area close to your bird bath(s) and / or feeders, where the birds are already coming. Pulverize the area to about a foot deep so that it looks similar to a horseshoe pitching trap; a size 4 feet by 4 feet square is a start. If you are lucky enough to already have sandy soil that is a plus. If not, you may need to dig out the fertile soil that you have cultivated so long, and replace it with fine white sand. The smaller the sand particles and the higher the reflective value, the better it will be for dusting and sun bathing. The sand is droughty enough to discourage grass and weeds, but if you need to retard grass encroachment, you can put a border around it and put a plant barrier like plastic or tar paper under it. If you do not have a natural source of sand, you can obtain mortar sand from a ready-mix company or use the play sand sold at home supply or landscape retailers. The finer the grain size the better it will be for dusting and the whiter it is the better for sun bathing and heat radiation.

Once this is in place, sit back and enjoy the insight that you can gain from yet another element of the bird’s world and other wildlife use may be an extra bonus.

Jerry W. Davis

Certified Wildlife Biologist

June 7, 1990




 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 10:01 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: "Is There Dusting At Your House?" June 7, 1990
Twenty seven years ago I wrote a paper dealing with bird dusting. Every day I observe my brown thrashers, Carolina wrens, Eastern Bluebirds, rabbits, chipmunks, squirrels, and other dusting in my back yard. I thought it might be time to send out a reminder of this need for birds that some of you may not have available in your yard. For the birds, get it done.



Is There Dusting At Your House?

Is there dusting going on at your house? No, I am not checking to see what kind of house keeper you are and if you have been running around with a rag and a can of Pledge or Endust.

What I am asking is, do you have a place in your yard for the birds to do their dusting, sun bathing, and anting? We are not meeting our bird’s needs just by providing nest boxes, feeders and water. Dusting is important to help remove external parasites, dry feathers, and help realign feather barbs and barbules. And anting has been observed in over 250 species of birds and is said to rid or reduce bird external parasites and possible soothe skin irritations. You may have observed birds sun bathing by spreading their tail and wing feathers. This can also help drive out external parasites and increase body temperature.

It is insightful for me to watch various resident and migratory birds going through the dusting and sun bathing behavior. I have even had a family of eastern cottontail rabbits and several species of lizards come on an almost daily basis to stretch out in the hot sand for maybe some of the same reasons.

If you do not already have a dusting and sun bathing area for your birds, it may be time for you to consider it.

Go into that beautiful green monoculture lawn that you have worked so hard to weed, feed, water, and mow. Select an area close to your bird bath(s) and / or feeders, where the birds are already coming. Pulverize the area to about a foot deep so that it looks similar to a horseshoe pitching trap; a size 4 feet by 4 feet square is a start. If you are lucky enough to already have sandy soil that is a plus. If not, you may need to dig out the fertile soil that you have cultivated so long, and replace it with fine white sand. The smaller the sand particles and the higher the reflective value, the better it will be for dusting and sun bathing. The sand is droughty enough to discourage grass and weeds, but if you need to retard grass encroachment, you can put a border around it and put a plant barrier like plastic or tar paper under it. If you do not have a natural source of sand, you can obtain mortar sand from a ready-mix company or use the play sand sold at home supply or landscape retailers. The finer the grain size the better it will be for dusting and the whiter it is the better for sun bathing and heat radiation.

Once this is in place, sit back and enjoy the insight that you can gain from yet another element of the bird’s world and other wildlife use may be an extra bonus.

Jerry W. Davis

Certified Wildlife Biologist

June 7, 1990




 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 9:45 am
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Re: A Tufted Titmouse Observation
Speaking of birds and insects, we had a dill and a nice fennel plant on
which a monarch butterfly laid her eggs. As the eggs developed into about
a dozen caterpillars , I carefully covered the plants with bird netting in
hopes of keeping the Carolina Wrens from a feast. Did not work! Don't know
how the birds got to the caterpillars, but they apparently did.

Lyndal York
Little Rock

On Mon, Jul 24, 2017 at 11:17 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

>
> We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our window
> sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and suet feeders.
> Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into one of my Yaupon bushes
> viewed through our back window. It had something white in its beak. After
> hopping to several limbs it settled on one where it snags it on a limb it
> was perched on and proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for
> several minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with
> binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went out to
> inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk spider case that
> a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The titmouse had apparently
> harvested it from one of the spider webs or caches and knew how to proceed
> to attach it to a gnarly limb and continue to open and eat the contents.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 9:40 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Bird Baths
Birds need water every day of the year and it is regrettable that you do not have some type of shade. My birds are bathing daily even in the one of eight waters that I have that does not have shade all day. My observations are that they test the water first by using a foot or beak. The important thing is to have water available. My surveys indicated that only one birdbath out of 100 has water in it, was properly placed and the right design. The big deep bird baths are used for drinking but not bathing. For bathing, birds need water depts. about knee deep to a Robin. People need to think every time they get a drink of water, “does my bird baths have water in them?” In this hot weather the water evaporates fast.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Glenn
Sent: Monday, July 24, 2017 11:26 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Bird Baths

I have a couple feeders in my backyard, but since it has gotten hot, I have seen almost no birds. I do not have water for them. I'm thinking about putting a bird bath out there. My yard has no shade and I'm concerned that the water in a bird bath would get too hot and hurt the birds. Do the birds know enough to not get into water that is too hot? Will a bird bath in this heat help them or hurt them? Thanks.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 9:26 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bird Baths
I have a couple feeders in my backyard, but since it has gotten hot, I have seen almost no birds.  I do not have water for them.  I'm thinking about putting a bird bath out there.  My yard has no shade and I'm concerned that the water in a bird bath would get too hot and hurt the birds.  Do the birds know enough to not get into water that is too hot?  Will a bird bath in this heat help them or hurt them?  Thanks.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 7/24/17 9:18 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: A Tufted Titmouse Observation

We have at least 6 Tufted Titmice that are daily visitors to our window sills, gutters and door ways and black oil sunflower and suet feeders. Yesterday at 5:40 PM I noticed a titmouse fly into one of my Yaupon bushes viewed through our back window. It had something white in its beak. After hopping to several limbs it settled on one where it snags it on a limb it was perched on and proceeded to pull and tear at the object. I watched for several minutes but could not determine what it was doing even with binoculars from 20 feet away. When the titmouse flew away I went out to inspect the white object still on the limb. It was a silk spider case that a spider had encapsulated a caught insect. The titmouse had apparently harvested it from one of the spider webs or caches and knew how to proceed to attach it to a gnarly limb and continue to open and eat the contents.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

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Date: 7/23/17 6:12 pm
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Subject: Quiet Summer Things
In July, the birds get quiet. In the mornings it is Red-eyed Vireos, who
do not believe in this rule and also distant crows. The jays fire up
when I get close to them. As always : the chatter of the local
chickadees and titmice.

I walk over to my swamp which still has water. The Barred Owl is there.
I have three or four, I am not sure. Apparently this one just eats all
day in the shade of the swamp, eating my frogs and my crayfish. It
flutters up and gives me the open owl face, the dark eyes which always
seem to have a question in mind. Now and then, during the day, the owls
call out to each other, reassuringly.

The local raccoons are not shy about daylight either. Perhaps from the
corn I spread out front. The mother with the back leg that is wounded
from something (dog, coyote, fox, a bigger raccoon) brings her three
youngsters out front. And miraculously, the father brought three more
young yesterday for a big group of six newly minted bandits. The small
ones no bigger than my cat. They run to the hickory tree if I drum on
the window.

In the rain this afternoon the mother raccoon was back. She often plops
back on her rear like a circus bear and reaches the corn kernels into
her teeth. When it rained harder she stood on her three legs and the
youngsters tried to keep eating corn while they sheltered under the
mother’s tail, under her belly. Making one large multi-tailed monster of
fur. They make me laugh.

In the fourth week of July there are no Parula records for our county.
No Louisiana Waterthrush records. They are still here I believe but they
are very quiet. The warblers grow stealthy. Searching the trees I find
only Red-eyed Vireos, Summer Tanagers, a lone gnatcatcher. I will keep
looking in all this heat. There are always rewards in the quiet times of
the day anyway, walking in the trees, beneath the cicadas. Summer, we
know, works its magic out there, with or without us.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR


 

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Date: 7/23/17 5:02 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: AR River Valley Audubon Club meeting July 24 - Cindy Franklin presenting

The Arkansas River Valley Audubon Society will meet on Monday, July 24, at 7:00 p.m., in Conway at Hendrix College, in the Donald W. Reynolds Center for Life Sciences, room 110, which is in the basement north hall of the building.

The program will be presented by Cindy Franklin who has had a lifelong interest in gardening and bird watching that began when she was growing up on a dairy farm in Pennsylvania. She and her husband, Bill, are members of the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas and the Arkansas Audubon Society. Cindy maintains a pollinator garden in her yard as well as a seasonal hummingbird feeding station for the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds.

In February & March 2016 Bill & Cindy spent 24 days in southern Argentina and Chile on a Wings Tour sampling a variety of habitats from Iguazu Falls in northeastern Argentina to Ushuaia in Terra del Fuego to the high Andes east of Santiago, Chile. They traveled approximately 6,000 miles by air, land, and sea from Buenos Aires to Valpraiso, Chile. This presentation provides a brief overview of each area they visited and general observations about land & sea birds and animals, and some of the environmental challenges evident in selected areas.

The public is invited to attend.






--
Pat Donnell
Home (501) 727-5470
Cell (501) 977-3899
<pahdonnell...><mailto:<pahdonnell...>




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.
 

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Date: 7/23/17 4:50 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: some might be surprised by this statistic
Although this is not directly about birds, it does relate to their well-being and I thought it would be of interest to some.  There recently was a report on TV, Bonnie Erbe', To the Contrary, about the various actions one could take to help the environment and wildlife: refraining from having one more child was by far the most beneficial.

Happy birding!Joanie

 

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Date: 7/22/17 9:05 am
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: OFF TOPIC: Looking for Leslie Peacock
Leslie, if you see this please contact me off list about your solar eclipse glasses purchase.

thank you,

Jim Dixon
Little Rock
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” -- Thorin
 

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Date: 7/21/17 3:06 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Mike Mlodinow film release -- "Mike the birdman" + Still on the Hill -- mark your calendars
Many of you who read ARBIRD list know Mike Mlodinow or are familiar with his bird research in Fayetteville and northwest Arkansas. I have long thought of him as the region's consummate field ornithologist. He is also a mathematician. I have (jokingly) accused him of carefully counting each and every Least Sandpiper at Craig State Fish Hatchery, not out of love of Leasts, but because he wants to get the numbers right. He takes the numbers home, crunches them, and figures out a lot about the movements of birds. Film students at UA-Fayetteville have made a film about him. There is music in the film by the popular folk duo, Still on the Hill (Kelly and Donna Mulhollan) and they will also perform at the premiere. I received the following from film maker Paige Murphy. Y'all are invited. The event is free and open to the public:


We scheduled the premiere for Mike the Birdman for August 15th at Botanical Garden of the Ozarks. Kelly and Donna are doing a short set. Here's the facebook event page www.facebook.com/events/1705750989720209<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__www.facebook.com_events_1705750989720209&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=UICOt_kqwoWFoRpn6sXWmADJ0taN9baQyddzntmKEqk&s=Ghuk6tqMqiAD7iGUc5Xy56L_Hj19sP3k9rDvuZLAkpc&e=> and the info on our website for anyone who doesn't have facebook https://www.mikethebirdman.com/new-events/<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.mikethebirdman.com_new-2Devents_&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=UICOt_kqwoWFoRpn6sXWmADJ0taN9baQyddzntmKEqk&s=L2mqex4kQoIl2A66flBnFYUNM7tWSu9lq5bccGS26_E&e=>. We hope to see you there!





 

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Date: 7/20/17 8:54 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Redheads at Bald Knob
I was at Bald Knob Thursday afternoon.  I took some photos of the ducks, mostly Mallards.  When I got home this evening and looked at the photos I found out there were 2 Redheads hanging out with the Mallards and Double-crested Cormorants.  In the same area was one juvenile White Ibis.  There were also 2 Dowitchers in the same end of the pond.  I suspect they were Short-billed Dowitchers but don't really know how to tell for sure.  Other than that was the usual mix of herons and egrets.  Some Least Sandpipers and Pectoral Sandpipers.
Glenn WyattCabot.

 

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Date: 7/20/17 3:49 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Joe Hogan, Treadway & Saul's Minnow Ponds
Well I "bluet". I should have mentioned that the thousands of damselflies
I saw seems to be all of the same species, the Familiar Bluet.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 7/20/17 8:15 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Purple Martin roost in Van Buren
Jim Nieting has been watching a Purple Martin roost at Sparks Hospital in Van Buren. His impression is that it is larger than last year. A guard there told him the martins have been present more than 4 weeks. At his place in Fort Smith, Jims last martin nest fledged July 19. He counted it a successful year, with 21 nests and only one bird found on the ground. His expectation is that the Sparks roost will remain active until at least the third week of August.


 

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Date: 7/20/17 4:38 am
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Joe Hogan, Treadway & Saul's Minnow Ponds
Hazel and I visited the above mentioned minnow ponds yesterday afternoon,
our first visit since last winter. We saw as follows:

*Joe Hogan Minnow Ponds in Lonoke:*
Stilt Sandpiper (!)
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks (5)
Green Herons (5)
Great Blue Herons (6)
Great Egret (2)
Least Sandpipers (10)
Killdeer (20)

*Treadway Minnow Ponds:*
Great Blue Herons
Great Egrets
Little Blue Herons
Belter Kingfisher
Spotted Sandpipers
(Not much else)

*Saul's Minnow Ponds:*
We started of by seeing thousands and thousands of Bluet Damselflies mating
on the south edge of one of the first ponds we encountered. There were as
many as 40 Bluets clustered together on a single twig near the water's
edge. The whole edge of the pond was covered with Bluets. It was a sight
as I have never seen.
Birds seen were as follows:
Stilt Sandpipers (5)
Pectoral Sandpipers (6)
Least Sandpipers (60)
Semipalmated Sandpiper (1)
Great Blue Herons
Great Egrets
Little Blue Herons
Killdeers
Green Herons
Lesser Yellowlegs (2)

It was a good outing!

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 7/19/17 7:22 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Bald Knob today
If it is as hot at the end of August as it was today at Bald Knob, it will be a short outing for many people. By 10:30 sweat was running down my face & my shirt was soaked. It was a hot as a firecracker out there. Meanwhile my Subaru insisted the outside temperature was 79F. What to do when your vehicle becomes addled by the heat and starts talking crazy talk?


There were no marque birds today among all the egrets, herons, and shorebirds. I swept the fields at least twice to make sure no rogue birds slipped in while my attention was elsewhere. No Spoonbills. No Storks. No Willets. No Avocets. No Godwits. No Night-herons. No Boobies. No Ibis. Curiously the only plovers on-site today were Killdeers. A few ducks were about. I did not see the Pintail Terry reported the other day. Mississippi Kites were the only raptors in the sky beside a few Turkey Vultures. Flycatchers & swallows were under-represented.


Since I had some time to kill, I took Terry Butler's suggestion and drove along the Little Red River way down south from where we usually bird at Bald Knob. Let me tell you those woods are full of savage flies nearly as big as my thumb. They chased me for miles trying to break through the glass. Those huge and terrifying insects were pinging off my vehicle like hail stones. The tempered glass kept their glistening probosces at bay. There wasn't any bird watching worth the painful probing those monsters were promising. I feel sorry for the deer and all the other animals that have to put up with those guys.


Otherwise it was a pretty good day. Lots of shorebirds & peeps to look at.


It was hot.


Cindy
Little Rock



 

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Date: 7/19/17 11:54 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: raptor vs. raptor
Arkansas Birders:


At 6:30 this morning I was walking down a street less than a block from where I live in Little Rock. The sky was somewhat cloudy and consequently darker than usual at this hour when I thought I saw a couple of Rock Pigeons or "Euros" (Eurasian Collared-Doves) flying toward me approximately four meters above street level. When they got closer, I could hear one of the birds uttering a "cut, cut, cut, cut!" call as it flew by. This was doubtless the same one that eventually revealed the dark crown of an adult Accipiter (most likely a Cooper's Hawk) contrasting with paler cheek feathers. At the same time, the other bird, flying behind and a little above the Accipiter, peeled off and soared up to treetop level, clearly revealing the silhouette of a Mississippi Kite against the open sky.


What I'd really like to know is who started this fight and where. It doubtless involved the young of either one species or the other.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

 

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Date: 7/19/17 9:30 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Brown Creeper Breeding
Douglas Zoller with The Nature Conservancy reports seeing a Brown Creeper
feeding young at Gastons Resort in an oak between room 50 and the river.
Photo documentation of breeding would be great! If accepted by the BRC this
would be the second confirmed breeding record, and the third or fourth July
record for the state; there is a July 11 Brown Creeper sighting in my eBird
review queue from the Cotter Access on the White River that requires BRC
scrutiny.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/17 8:16 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird Illustrated Checklists
I promise Id repost once this feature became public.
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/illcheckrelease/

eBirds latest feature, Illustrated Checklists, combines bar charts, photos,
and audio files to help birders better learn a regions avifauna. Find this
tool under View and Explore Data > Explore a Region. Type your region of
interest, then Illustrated Checklist is the rightmost tab at the top. Here
is Arkansass illustrated checklist
http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-AR/media?yr=all&m=. If you want to
see your name here and help fill in the missing photos and sound recordings
then contribute to eBird.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 7/19/17 6:33 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Prothonotary Warbler 2nd brood
This is so neat. Sounds like something a Carolina Wren would do, but it's just wonderful that you have a creative Prothonotary willing to embrace new ideas.

J

On Jul 18, 2017, at 8:29 PM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> The Prothonotary Warblers that fledged 1 brood from my barn in Arkansas County are now feeding their second brood. While I've been told they like to nest in shady areas near water, I think this Prothonotary pair is being a little extreme by nesting in a equine fly mask hanging from a wash rack in a horse barn!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/18/17 9:35 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: Southern Lafayette County birds 7-17-17
AR-birders,
I managed to do a brief evening survey of the fish farm and rice farm areas in southern Lafayette County that I have access to
yesterday evening (7-17-17). The last time I was out there was on 6-21-17 and I did not see or hear any King Rails. I was afraid the
aggressive Black-necked Stilts might have pushed them out, but yesterday I heard two calling and photographed one. I dont want to
bother them until after breeding season is over, as I now suspect (again) that they will breed in the area. Ill be happy to take folks in
my vehicle if any wish to make arrangements with me. The birds are in an area off a rice levee that can be treacherous at times, and
the area is on private property. The Black-necked Stilts are now with young, and photos are embedded in one of the lists below. Shorebird
migration is starting to kick in as evidenced by the nine shorebird species I saw. The early Bank Swallow was of some minor interest, as
were a few of the lingering ducks.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38213225

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S38213643

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

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Date: 7/18/17 7:07 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 18
It was partly cloudy and hot on the bird survey today. 54 species were
found. Most birds have pretty much stopped singing for the year. Highlight
of the day for me was finding a juvenile Grasshopper Sparrow which is a
species I rarely see at Red Slough and especially in July. Here is my list
for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 8

Pied-billed Grebe - 10

American White Pelican - 1

Neotropic Cormorant - 6 (still 1 or 2 active nests in rookery; a few have
fledged already.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 64 (lots of young fledging now.)

Great-blue Heron - 2

Great Egret - 28

Snowy Egret - 14

Little-blue Heron - 13

Cattle Egret - 666

Green Heron - 7

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1

White Ibis - 8

Turkey Vulture - 17

Mississippi Kite - 10

Purple Gallinule - 15 (also 3 broods of young.)

Common Gallinule - 31 (numerous broods seen also.)

American Coot - 4

Killdeer - 1

Mourning Dove - 6

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 8

Bell's Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 2

Purple Martin - 2

Tree Swallow - 3

Barn Swallow - 8

Carolina Chickadee - 1

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Gray Catbird - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 6

Yellow-breasted Chat - 7

Grasshopper Sparrow - 1 juvenile

Eastern Towhee - 2

Northern Cardinal - 11

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 25

Painted Bunting - 8

Dickcissel - 9

Red-winged Blackbird - 24

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Orchard Oriole - 1





Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Regal Darner

Common Green Darner

Cyrano Darner

Royal River Cruiser

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Golden-winged Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Hyacinth Glider - 2

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags - 1

Red Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR












 

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Date: 7/18/17 6:29 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Prothonotary Warbler 2nd brood
The Prothonotary Warblers that fledged 1 brood from my barn in Arkansas County are now feeding their second brood. While I've been told they like to nest in shady areas near water, I think this Prothonotary pair is being a little extreme by nesting in a equine fly mask hanging from a wash rack in a horse barn!

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/18/17 10:20 am
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: WILLET AT BOYD POINT, PINE BLUFF
This morning, Delos McCauley and I observed and photographed a Willet at close range, as it foraged along the water's edge at the Boyd Point Waste Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. The bird still retained much of it's breeding plumage along the neck and flanks. Inflight shots really showed the Willet's true beauty.
John Redman
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/17 7:37 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: GOOD SIGN FOR LEAST TERNS AT FROG
Thanks, always, for your positive and hopeful attitude, Joe.
J
On Jul 17, 2017, at 5:27 PM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> A calm, hot, clear day seemed just perfect for a trip to the valley. I made it to Frog Bayou Wildlife Management Area bright and early, when it was still cool. A few of the highlights: a Yellow-crowned Night-Heron flew down river at the boat ramp. A male Painted Bunting walking with his tail cocked in the road, soon joined by a female doing the wing-quivvering display. Then they flew off. Lots of Bells Vireo singing. There seemed to be a family group in bushes near the ramp.
>
> Trumpet-Creepers are climbing some of the smaller trees. And with a clear blue morning sky behind, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were busy probing trumpets. Its mid-July, and these could very well be migrants, on their way to the tropics.
>
> Almost as stunning as a hummer probing an orange trumpet: big fleshy Rose Mallows, their enormous white petals joined at center by royal purple. Those heart-shaped leaves. That elongate, pendulous pistil casting shadow on the petals. Lots of curious bumblebees. What an amazing world in which we live.
>
> A new, attractive sign about protecting Least Terns has been replaced at the Frog boat launch. These signs are cooperative efforts involving Arkansas Game and Fish, US Fish and Wildlife, and Army Corps of Engineers. Sure, a lot of people will ignore these signs. Some will vandalize, too. But there are others who will appreciate the educational spirit. There will be a kid in one of the fishing boats launched at Frog whose life is changed by an encounter with Least Terns. We believe in this potential.
>
> Finally, as I was headed out, a Louisiana Waterthrush on one of swampy creeks at Frog was a real surprise. I first heard the loud chink and thought waterthrush, but was assuming it must be an early Northern. But Louisiana for sure it was big thick white eyestripe, plain white throat and all. So like the hummers, it is also a migrant, headed south.
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/17 7:06 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: GOOD SIGN FOR LEAST TERNS AT FROG
Still seeing Least Terns at the RV park at LRAFB twice a week; though, their
numbers are dwindling.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Joseph Neal
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 5:28 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: GOOD SIGN FOR LEAST TERNS AT FROG



A calm, hot, clear day seemed just perfect for a trip to the valley. I made
it to Frog Bayou Wildlife Management Area bright and early, when it was
still cool. A few of the highlights: a Yellow-crowned Night-Heron flew down
river at the boat ramp. A male Painted Bunting walking with his tail cocked
in the road, soon joined by a female doing the wing-quivvering display. Then
they flew off. Lots of Bell's Vireo singing. There seemed to be a family
group in bushes near the ramp.



Trumpet-Creepers are climbing some of the smaller trees. And with a clear
blue morning sky behind, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were busy probing
trumpets. It's mid-July, and these could very well be migrants, on their way
to the tropics.



Almost as stunning as a hummer probing an orange trumpet: big fleshy Rose
Mallows, their enormous white petals joined at center by royal purple. Those
heart-shaped leaves. That elongate, pendulous pistil casting shadow on the
petals. Lots of curious bumblebees. What an amazing world in which we live.



A new, attractive sign about protecting Least Terns has been replaced at the
Frog boat launch. These signs are cooperative efforts involving Arkansas
Game and Fish, US Fish and Wildlife, and Army Corps of Engineers. Sure, a
lot of people will ignore these signs. Some will vandalize, too. But there
are others who will appreciate the educational spirit. There will be a kid
in one of the fishing boats launched at Frog whose life is changed by an
encounter with Least Terns. We believe in this potential.



Finally, as I was headed out, a Louisiana Waterthrush on one of swampy
creeks at Frog was a real surprise. I first heard the loud chink and thought
waterthrush, but was assuming it must be an early Northern. But Louisiana
for sure it was - big thick white eyestripe, plain white throat and all. So
like the hummers, it is also a migrant, headed south.




 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/17 3:28 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GOOD SIGN FOR LEAST TERNS AT FROG
A calm, hot, clear day seemed just perfect for a trip to the valley. I made it to Frog Bayou Wildlife Management Area bright and early, when it was still cool. A few of the highlights: a Yellow-crowned Night-Heron flew down river at the boat ramp. A male Painted Bunting walking with his tail cocked in the road, soon joined by a female doing the wing-quivvering display. Then they flew off. Lots of Bells Vireo singing. There seemed to be a family group in bushes near the ramp.

Trumpet-Creepers are climbing some of the smaller trees. And with a clear blue morning sky behind, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were busy probing trumpets. Its mid-July, and these could very well be migrants, on their way to the tropics.

Almost as stunning as a hummer probing an orange trumpet: big fleshy Rose Mallows, their enormous white petals joined at center by royal purple. Those heart-shaped leaves. That elongate, pendulous pistil casting shadow on the petals. Lots of curious bumblebees. What an amazing world in which we live.

A new, attractive sign about protecting Least Terns has been replaced at the Frog boat launch. These signs are cooperative efforts involving Arkansas Game and Fish, US Fish and Wildlife, and Army Corps of Engineers. Sure, a lot of people will ignore these signs. Some will vandalize, too. But there are others who will appreciate the educational spirit. There will be a kid in one of the fishing boats launched at Frog whose life is changed by an encounter with Least Terns. We believe in this potential.

Finally, as I was headed out, a Louisiana Waterthrush on one of swampy creeks at Frog was a real surprise. I first heard the loud chink and thought waterthrush, but was assuming it must be an early Northern. But Louisiana for sure it was big thick white eyestripe, plain white throat and all. So like the hummers, it is also a migrant, headed south.


 

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Date: 7/17/17 3:22 pm
From: Debra Hale-Shelton <dshelton...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
When my cousin was in an Illinois nursing home for a few years before her death, her mother put a bird feeder outside her window for Mary to enjoy. My aunt, not the home, took care of the feeder. Except for seeing family, it was one of Mary's few joys during that time.

Debra, Conway



From: "Tiffany" <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 5:13:43 PM
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?



May I humbly make a few suggestions? Having worked in a nursing home, I can tell you that bird feeders outside are usually welcomed & encouraged. However, in the grand scheme of things, the staff is usually too busy taking care of the residents to pay attention to them, and there is no $$ for the seed, so the ideal situation is for someone (volunteer, family member) to purchase the seed & be responsible for feeding and upkeep of the feeder. They can provide hours of entertainment to what can be a very lonely existence.



Tiffany



Sent from Mail for Windows 10




From: Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 5:03 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?




There has been a captive aviary in one of the Harrison Nursing homes. I’m not in favor of these birds being in captivity. Martha Milburn, long-time Arkansas birder, now deceased, would make negative comments when she would pass the thing. When she was in the nursing home, her family put up a feeder outside the window of her room so that she could enjoy the wild birds when they came to the feeder. This would be my choice also. Another factor to consider in feeding birds inside a nursing home is allergies of the residents. I wouldn’t be able to tolerate a bird in my home due to allergies. I love them outside, however, and feed them year round.

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR







Sent from Mail for Windows 10




From: Jeffrey Short
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 4:48 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?




My mom had a feeder outside her window, at Lakewood, and enjoyed seeing the birds throughout the year. Lakewood also has a well-maintained aviary inside, with various manikins, parakeets, etc. However, I seldom saw residents pay any attention to the captive birds.



Some nursing homes have a non-profit status (501 (c )(3) ) so donations to supply the bird feed, for example, would be tax deductible.



Jeff Short




From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 3:06 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Nursing Homes For The Birds?





In 1989 I provided bird feeder information to the Galaxy Manor Nursing Center in Cleveland, TX At that time I was a Wildlife Biologist for the Sam Houston National Forest. When I transferred to Hot Springs in 1990, the Garland County Audubon supported such an idea for nursing homes in Hot Springs.





Many people in Nursing homes are birders that are deprived of the opportunity to enjoy and watch birds and the highlight of the day is looking forward to the next meal. The placement of bird feeders where they can watch birds and those still capable enough to fill the feeders, feed birds, adds interest, excitement, and purpose to their daily lives. Adding a bird field guide for their reference also provide interest and develops new bird enthusiast.





This was not a new concept but one that had been used in Missouri and Connecticut in the early 1980’s as part of their wildlife program. The unfortunate people in nursing homes are still alive and birds and bird feeders could add interest, purpose, and something to look forward to and talk about. Some of you with the opportunity and interest might help to expand and implement this idea to enhance life where your friends and family are staying..





Jerry Wayne Davis


Hot Springs, AR






 

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Date: 7/17/17 3:16 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fwd: Nursing Homes For The Birds?

>
> While I think feeders outside of nursing home windows is a great idea for residents, keep in mind that at most nursing homes residents are not allowed outdoors unless escorted by family or sometimes with a nurses aide, depending on the facility. Many if not most facilities will not allow residents out to refill bird feeders.
>
> A nursing home employee will need to assume responsibility for refilling feeders, periodically disinfecting them and will need a rodent and raccoon proof container to store feed in.
>
> Sounds like a good project for a scout troop or civic club or Audubon chapter!
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 17, 2017, at 5:03 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:
>>
>> There has been a captive aviary in one of the Harrison Nursing homes. I’m not in favor of these birds being in captivity. Martha Milburn, long-time Arkansas birder, now deceased, would make negative comments when she would pass the thing. When she was in the nursing home, her family put up a feeder outside the window of her room so that she could enjoy the wild birds when they came to the feeder. This would be my choice also. Another factor to consider in feeding birds inside a nursing home is allergies of the residents. I wouldn’t be able to tolerate a bird in my home due to allergies. I love them outside, however, and feed them year round.
>> Sally Jo Gibson
>> Harrison, AR
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>>
>> From: Jeffrey Short
>> Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 4:48 PM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
>>
>> My mom had a feeder outside her window, at Lakewood, and enjoyed seeing the birds throughout the year. Lakewood also has a well-maintained aviary inside, with various manikins, parakeets, etc. However, I seldom saw residents pay any attention to the captive birds.
>>
>> Some nursing homes have a non-profit status (501 (c )(3) ) so donations to supply the bird feed, for example, would be tax deductible.
>>
>> Jeff Short
>>
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
>> Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 3:06 PM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
>>
>> In 1989 I provided bird feeder information to the Galaxy Manor Nursing Center in Cleveland, TX At that time I was a Wildlife Biologist for the Sam Houston National Forest. When I transferred to Hot Springs in 1990, the Garland County Audubon supported such an idea for nursing homes in Hot Springs.
>>
>> Many people in Nursing homes are birders that are deprived of the opportunity to enjoy and watch birds and the highlight of the day is looking forward to the next meal. The placement of bird feeders where they can watch birds and those still capable enough to fill the feeders, feed birds, adds interest, excitement, and purpose to their daily lives. Adding a bird field guide for their reference also provide interest and develops new bird enthusiast.
>>
>> This was not a new concept but one that had been used in Missouri and Connecticut in the early 1980’s as part of their wildlife program. The unfortunate people in nursing homes are still alive and birds and bird feeders could add interest, purpose, and something to look forward to and talk about. Some of you with the opportunity and interest might help to expand and implement this idea to enhance life where your friends and family are staying..
>>
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> Hot Springs, AR
>>

 

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Date: 7/17/17 3:13 pm
From: Tiffany <000000ff30a90ad9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
May I humbly make a few suggestions? Having worked in a nursing home, I can tell you that bird feeders outside are usually welcomed & encouraged. However, in the grand scheme of things, the staff is usually too busy taking care of the residents to pay attention to them, and there is no $$ for the seed, so the ideal situation is for someone (volunteer, family member) to purchase the seed & be responsible for feeding and upkeep of the feeder. They can provide hours of entertainment to what can be a very lonely existence.

Tiffany

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Sally Jo Gibson
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 5:03 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?

There has been a captive aviary in one of the Harrison Nursing homes.  I’m not in favor of these birds being in captivity.  Martha Milburn, long-time Arkansas birder, now deceased, would make negative comments when she would pass the thing.  When she was in the nursing home, her family put up a feeder outside the window of her room so that she could enjoy the wild birds when they came to the feeder.  This would be my choice also.  Another factor to consider in feeding birds inside a nursing home is allergies of the residents.  I wouldn’t be able to tolerate a bird in my home due to allergies.  I love them outside, however, and feed them year round.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR



Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Jeffrey Short
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 4:48 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?

My mom had a feeder outside her window, at Lakewood,  and enjoyed seeing the birds throughout the year.  Lakewood also has a well-maintained aviary inside, with various manikins, parakeets, etc.   However, I seldom saw residents pay any attention to the captive birds.

Some nursing homes have a non-profit status (501 (c )(3) ) so donations to supply the bird feed, for example, would be tax deductible.

Jeff Short

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 3:06 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Nursing Homes For The Birds?

In 1989 I provided bird feeder information to the Galaxy Manor Nursing Center in Cleveland, TX At that time I was a Wildlife Biologist for the Sam Houston National Forest.  When I transferred to Hot Springs in 1990, the Garland County Audubon supported such an idea for nursing homes in Hot Springs. 
 
Many people in Nursing homes are birders that are deprived of the opportunity to enjoy and watch birds and the highlight of the day is looking forward to the next meal. The placement of bird feeders where they can watch birds and those still capable enough to fill the feeders, feed birds, adds interest, excitement, and purpose to their daily lives. Adding a bird field guide for their reference also provide interest and develops new bird enthusiast. 
 
This was not a new concept but one that had been used in Missouri and Connecticut in the early 1980’s as part of their wildlife program.  The unfortunate people in nursing homes are still alive and birds and bird feeders could add interest, purpose, and something to look forward to and talk about. Some of you with the opportunity and interest might help to expand and implement this idea to enhance life where your friends and family are staying..
 
Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR



 

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Date: 7/17/17 3:03 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
There has been a captive aviary in one of the Harrison Nursing homes. Im not in favor of these birds being in captivity. Martha Milburn, long-time Arkansas birder, now deceased, would make negative comments when she would pass the thing. When she was in the nursing home, her family put up a feeder outside the window of her room so that she could enjoy the wild birds when they came to the feeder. This would be my choice also. Another factor to consider in feeding birds inside a nursing home is allergies of the residents. I wouldnt be able to tolerate a bird in my home due to allergies. I love them outside, however, and feed them year round.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR



Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Jeffrey Short<mailto:<bashman...>
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 4:48 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?

My mom had a feeder outside her window, at Lakewood, and enjoyed seeing the birds throughout the year. Lakewood also has a well-maintained aviary inside, with various manikins, parakeets, etc. However, I seldom saw residents pay any attention to the captive birds.

Some nursing homes have a non-profit status (501 (c )(3) ) so donations to supply the bird feed, for example, would be tax deductible.

Jeff Short

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 3:06 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Nursing Homes For The Birds?

In 1989 I provided bird feeder information to the Galaxy Manor Nursing Center in Cleveland, TX At that time I was a Wildlife Biologist for the Sam Houston National Forest. When I transferred to Hot Springs in 1990, the Garland County Audubon supported such an idea for nursing homes in Hot Springs.

Many people in Nursing homes are birders that are deprived of the opportunity to enjoy and watch birds and the highlight of the day is looking forward to the next meal. The placement of bird feeders where they can watch birds and those still capable enough to fill the feeders, feed birds, adds interest, excitement, and purpose to their daily lives. Adding a bird field guide for their reference also provide interest and develops new bird enthusiast.

This was not a new concept but one that had been used in Missouri and Connecticut in the early 1980s as part of their wildlife program. The unfortunate people in nursing homes are still alive and birds and bird feeders could add interest, purpose, and something to look forward to and talk about. Some of you with the opportunity and interest might help to expand and implement this idea to enhance life where your friends and family are staying..

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR


 

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Date: 7/17/17 2:48 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Nursing Homes For The Birds?
My mom had a feeder outside her window, at Lakewood, and enjoyed seeing the birds throughout the year. Lakewood also has a well-maintained aviary inside, with various manikins, parakeets, etc. However, I seldom saw residents pay any attention to the captive birds.



Some nursing homes have a non-profit status (501 (c )(3) ) so donations to supply the bird feed, for example, would be tax deductible.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 17, 2017 3:06 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Nursing Homes For The Birds?



In 1989 I provided bird feeder information to the Galaxy Manor Nursing Center in Cleveland, TX At that time I was a Wildlife Biologist for the Sam Houston National Forest. When I transferred to Hot Springs in 1990, the Garland County Audubon supported such an idea for nursing homes in Hot Springs.



Many people in Nursing homes are birders that are deprived of the opportunity to enjoy and watch birds and the highlight of the day is looking forward to the next meal. The placement of bird feeders where they can watch birds and those still capable enough to fill the feeders, feed birds, adds interest, excitement, and purpose to their daily lives. Adding a bird field guide for their reference also provide interest and develops new bird enthusiast.



This was not a new concept but one that had been used in Missouri and Connecticut in the early 1980’s as part of their wildlife program. The unfortunate people in nursing homes are still alive and birds and bird feeders could add interest, purpose, and something to look forward to and talk about. Some of you with the opportunity and interest might help to expand and implement this idea to enhance life where your friends and family are staying..



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR


 

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Date: 7/17/17 11:32 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Report
Please accept my apologies for not posting this sooner.  I've been super busy and totally forgot.  Better late than never!  This is always a fun trip with lots of great birds and terrific birding buddies!Karen Holliday

ASCA Field TripJuly 8, 2017Dr. Lester Sitzes, III Bois D’Arc Lake WMAHope, AR Saturday, July 8th a caravan of birders leftLittle Rock and headed south to the Bois D’Arc Wildlife Management Area.  A quick stop at the McDonald’s in Hope nettedus additional birders and a tree full of noisy Great-tailed Grackles.  At the WMA, we found more birders, for atotal of twenty-two participants.  Wewere very excited to have Drew and Sherry Phillips join us.  Drew is a former president of ASCA.  Now that both are retired, they plan to startbirding again.   Native Water Lotus plants thrive in Bois D’Arc Lake.  Colorful Purple Gallinules and their fluffytan-colored chicks were busily running across the large saucer-shaped leaves pickingup seeds and catching bugs.  The lesscolorful Common Gallinules spent their time swimming between the lotus leaves,making them harder to spot.  One family includedmom, dad, and eight tiny adorable black chicks with their orange-red heads andbills.  A Least Bitterns was heard, butrefused to show itself.  The lake is alsoa favorite for numerous Anhingas, Snowy, Green, Great, Great Blue, and LittleBlue Herons, plus several Cattle Egret rookeries containing several hundredCAEG and their young.  Mixed in were atotal of four Black-crowned Night-Herons, both adult and juvenile. Tree, Cliff, and Barn Swallows perched on many of the deadtrees in the lake.  A Least Tern flewover as it made its way around the lake. We had both adult and immature Bald Eagles.  Woods birds included Orchard Orioles,Prothonotary, Pine, and Yellow-Throated Warblers, Downey, Red-headed,Red-bellied, and Pileated Woodpeckers. A very small alligator was the only gator we spotted.  An adult Purple Gallinule was very upsetabout the gator.  It ran around on thelotus leaves looking down into the water at the gator while continuallyscreaming an alarm call at the top of its lungs.  The gator finally got the message and left.  Toward the end of the morning, Charles Millsfound and photographed a very rare Two-Striped Forceptail Dragonfly.  It has been documented in only six Arkansascounties! Several of us ended the trip by stopping at Tailgater’s BurgerCompany in Hope for lunch.   The owner was making the rounds of the tables,visiting with his customers, and we told him we eat at his restaurant after ourbirding trips to Hope.  He was veryappreciative and said birdwatchers are always welcome.  Total bird count for the day was 48 species.   Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 
 

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Date: 7/17/17 7:37 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Hummingbird Facts
I think that even the most savvy birder can learn something from this video.

https://biggeekdad.com/2017/07/hummingbird-facts/

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



 

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Date: 7/16/17 7:31 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
The new birds today were a Northern Pintail and Ring-necked duck, 9 Stilt
sandpipers, and a larger number of Least and Pectoral sandpipers.

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

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Date: 7/16/17 7:10 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Brown Booby
It seems Brown Boobies like Arkansas. There have been quite a few in the
last few years.

Sandy B.

On Sun, Jul 16, 2017 at 2:48 PM V Prislipsky <vprislipsky...> wrote:

> Hot Springs Village Audubon received a call from a first time visitor to
> the area who was boating at Lake Hamilton earlier in the week. She had
> phone pictures of an "odd" bird that they saw in the lake near Garvan
> Gardens. She is not a birder. A friend who is thought it might be a Booby
> or a Gannett. She sent the pics on to us and it does appear to be an
> immature Brown Booby.
>

 

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Date: 7/16/17 1:59 pm
From: brandon schmidt <brandonschmidt2...>
Subject: Re: BLACKPOLL WARBLER IN PINE BLUFF
On May 2, 2017 4:25 PM, "JFR" <johnfredman...> wrote:

> For the past two mornings I have been able to observe and photograph a
> male Blackpoll Warbler in breeding plumage on Wilbur West Road in Pine
> Bluff. This handsome bird is a new one for me. He has been foraging in a
> thick belt of mature willows and ash trees along the west end of the road.
> Yesterday, he foraged high in the branches, but today was low and in great
> light, which afforded an opportunity for clear photos. It is of interest
> that exactly one year ago i was able to photograph a male and female
> Blackburnian Warbler in the same low location. If anyone is interested, I
> will be glad to share the photos of the Blackpoll.
> John Redman

 

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Date: 7/16/17 12:48 pm
From: V Prislipsky <vprislipsky...>
Subject: Brown Booby
Hot Springs Village Audubon received a call from a first time visitor to the area who was boating at Lake Hamilton earlier in the week. She had phone pictures of an "odd" bird that they saw in the lake near Garvan Gardens. She is not a birder. A friend who is thought it might be a Booby or a Gannett. She sent the pics on to us and it does appear to be an immature Brown Booby.
 

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Date: 7/16/17 8:59 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: "pop up" field trip to Eagle Watch Nature Trail Saturday August 5
Saturday August 5, 2017. Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will host a field trip to Eagle Watch Nature Trail on SWEPCO Lake just west of Gentry. Meet in the parking lot at 9 AM. Co-leader is Terry Stanfill, who supervises EW. There is a short walk on the trail to the new viewing blind. Those with walking impairments will be able to drive and park at the blind. There are places to sit or stand, at several heights, and even a picnic table to sit and write field notes, or snack. Free and open to the public. Right now there are quite a few Great Egrets, plus other herons and egrets. There are Double-crested Cormorants and recently one rare in Arkansas Neotropic Cormorant. In past years there have been a few sightings of juvenile White Ibises around this time. Mudflats are starting to develop and these always attract shorebird migrants. Recently there has been a Wood Duck family in view. Everyone with an interest in Arkansass wildlife heritage is welcome. Dont need to be a member to participate. It will be hot for sure, but also probably birdy. If you have a spotting scope, please bring it.

Directions and more information about Eagle Watch: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/placestobird.htm
Places to Bird in Northwest Arkansas: - NWAAS Home<http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/placestobird.htm>
www.nwarkaudubon.org
Baker Prairie Natural Area Beatie Prairie Botanical Area in August 2011 Beaver Lake from Rocky Branch to the Dam



 

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Date: 7/15/17 2:42 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Job Announcement - Wildlife Biologist at Luke AFB, AZ
Cool job. (Well, when you're indoors, anyway...)

Jeff Short




Subject: Job Announcement - Wildlife Biologist at Luke AFB

Hi All,
Please help me spread the word that Luke AFB has a job announcement for a
Wildlife Biologist.
Thanks,
Aaron

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/474177700
 

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Date: 7/15/17 10:40 am
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: Re: strange songs from Indigo Buntings
Robert Payne did considerable research on song learning in Indigo Buntings... for example:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0003347283712960

First year males arrive on the breeding ground and have to learn what song they should be singing by copying adult males, what Payne called intraspecific mimicry:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.2307/1938958/full

If they move around during the first year, they continually change their song to match the adult males they are with... eventually they sing the final first-year song for the rest of their life...

It is conceivable that these first-year males might pick up the song of another species...
When INBUs occur with Lazuli and Painted Buntings, the INBU males tend to sing a similar song as the other bunting species...
It is thought to function in interspecific territoriality and aggression... laboratory experiments have shown that the females can sort out which male they should breed with, although Lazulis have been known to hybridize with Indigos...

Cheers, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd
Sent: Saturday, July 15, 2017 10:44 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: strange songs from Indigo Buntings


Fellow-birders:



Early Thursday morning (July 13) I took a bird walk from the Pointe West Motel & Suites on Highway 187 in Carroll County, AR. This location is approximately one mile south of Beaver Lake Dam and more like half-a-mile south of the big water-filtration plant.



Near the motel I heard, I think, three Indigo Buntings singing. I didn't actually see any of them, but it certainly did look like good habitat for Indigo Buntings, and the tonal quality/timbre of the songs also fitted Indigo Buntings. Not far from there I also heard a Blue Grosbeak singing. Furthermore, I didn't notice any glades, much less any large ones, in the vicinity.



But the songs I heard Thursday were far from typical for Indigo Buntings. Instead, THEY SOUNDED MORE LIKE RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROWS!



Forty-plus years ago I recall hearing (and maybe recording) similar songs from Indigo Buntings that lived cheek-by-jowl with Rufous-crowned Sparrows on the south-facing slope of Magazine Mtn. It was easy then to theorize that infant male buntings had heard lots of Rufous-crowned Sparrow song from their nests and that that experience influenced how they sang when they became adult.



But my experience Thursday morning now makes me strongly question my previous interpretation of what I heard on Magazine way back when. Unfortunately, I didn't have with me any equipment for recording the songs that I heard Thursday morning. Do the Indigo Buntings on Magazine still sing like RCSs? Do they, Don?



Thoughts?



Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...><mailto:<Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

 

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Date: 7/15/17 8:57 am
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: Re: strange songs from Indigo Buntings
Sometimes I hear indigos sounding very similar to rcsp. But only those sharing habitat with the sparrows. Maybe there is a bit of a mimic gene in indigos.

On a side note, we seldom see mockingbirds up here on the mountaintop. A few weeks ago I listened to one west of the lodge. He did excellent mimics of eastern bluebird, northern cardinal, and the "Deer, deer, deer,..." scolding call of a rufous-crowned sparrow.

Don
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd
Sent: Saturday, July 15, 2017 10:44 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] strange songs from Indigo Buntings


Fellow-birders:



Early Thursday morning (July 13) I took a bird walk from the Pointe West Motel & Suites on Highway 187 in Carroll County, AR. This location is approximately one mile south of Beaver Lake Dam and more like half-a-mile south of the big water-filtration plant.



Near the motel I heard, I think, three Indigo Buntings singing. I didn't actually see any of them, but it certainly did look like good habitat for Indigo Buntings, and the tonal quality/timbre of the songs also fitted Indigo Buntings. Not far from there I also heard a Blue Grosbeak singing. Furthermore, I didn't notice any glades, much less any large ones, in the vicinity.



But the songs I heard Thursday were far from typical for Indigo Buntings. Instead, THEY SOUNDED MORE LIKE RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROWS!



Forty-plus years ago I recall hearing (and maybe recording) similar songs from Indigo Buntings that lived cheek-by-jowl with Rufous-crowned Sparrows on the south-facing slope of Magazine Mtn. It was easy then to theorize that infant male buntings had heard lots of Rufous-crowned Sparrow song from their nests and that that experience influenced how they sang when they became adult.



But my experience Thursday morning now makes me strongly question my previous interpretation of what I heard on Magazine way back when. Unfortunately, I didn't have with me any equipment for recording the songs that I heard Thursday morning. Do the Indigo Buntings on Magazine still sing like RCSs? Do they, Don?



Thoughts?



Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...><mailto:<Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

 

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Date: 7/15/17 8:44 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: strange songs from Indigo Buntings
Fellow-birders:


Early Thursday morning (July 13) I took a bird walk from the Pointe West Motel & Suites on Highway 187 in Carroll County, AR. This location is approximately one mile south of Beaver Lake Dam and more like half-a-mile south of the big water-filtration plant.


Near the motel I heard, I think, three Indigo Buntings singing. I didn't actually see any of them, but it certainly did look like good habitat for Indigo Buntings, and the tonal quality/timbre of the songs also fitted Indigo Buntings. Not far from there I also heard a Blue Grosbeak singing. Furthermore, I didn't notice any glades, much less any large ones, in the vicinity.


But the songs I heard Thursday were far from typical for Indigo Buntings. Instead, THEY SOUNDED MORE LIKE RUFOUS-CROWNED SPARROWS!


Forty-plus years ago I recall hearing (and maybe recording) similar songs from Indigo Buntings that lived cheek-by-jowl with Rufous-crowned Sparrows on the south-facing slope of Magazine Mtn. It was easy then to theorize that infant male buntings had heard lots of Rufous-crowned Sparrow song from their nests and that that experience influenced how they sang when they became adult.


But my experience Thursday morning now makes me strongly question my previous interpretation of what I heard on Magazine way back when. Unfortunately, I didn't have with me any equipment for recording the songs that I heard Thursday morning. Do the Indigo Buntings on Magazine still sing like RCSs? Do they, Don?


Thoughts?


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

 

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Date: 7/15/17 8:40 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Ravens for President!
Thanks for sharing this, Jeffrey. Ravens shall inherit the earth! :)

Bill Thurman

On Fri, Jul 14, 2017 at 10:21 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
wrote:

>
>
>
>
> http://gizmodo.com/more-evidence-that-ravens-are-ridiculously-intelligent-
> 1796882085
>
>
>

 

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Date: 7/14/17 8:21 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Ravens for President!




http://gizmodo.com/more-evidence-that-ravens-are-ridiculously-intelligent-1796882085




 

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Date: 7/14/17 7:42 pm
From: V Prislipsky <vprislipsky...>
Subject: Phainopepla Mystery
This evening Hot Springs Village Audubon held our annual potluck celebration for our Halberg scholarship campers. It's always a good time and we're glad we can do a tiny part to maybe influence our planet's future. One of our members keeps a collection of window/car strike birds in her freezer for this occasion. It provides a somewhat macabre but interesting activity before the more serious activity of eating begins. Occasionally we've had a bird ID contest but lately it has been just an opportunity to look at the specimens. Either way, the kids enjoy it. We don't have a system for whom or when the birds were donated. Our historians, M/M Baker are quite sure these are all HSV donations with the exception of one larger bird that was donated by a Hot Springs (City) birder but could be found in the Village. Anyway, I looked at the birds again. As usual I'm amazed at how small most of them are. One bird stood out because I didn't remember seeing it before. It took a couple of us to figure it out. Phainopeplas are not Village birds. If my search of the rare bird data base is correct there has never been one seen in AR. Why would someone bring a dead bird from the deep southwest just to donate to the HSV Audubon freezer collection?
 

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Date: 7/14/17 6:24 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
Upon studying the photos I took this morning, I have to walk back the Western Kingbird ID at Joe Hogan from earlier today. The photo evidence supports an ID of a family of juvenile Scissor-tailed Flycatchers sitting on the wire. In the harsh light of late morning, Bill & I lost the finer details in the glare.


Cindy




________________________________
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Sent: Friday, July 14, 2017 10:37 AM
To: AR Birds
Subject: Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks

My humble apologies. I knew where I was. I blame the humidity.

Joe Hogan hatchery in Lonoke. We also found a family of Western Kingbirds on Rappich Rd that forms the eastern boundary of Joe Hogan. Shorebirds-many Least Sandpipers, 2 Lesser Yellowlegs, 1 Pectoral Sandpiper, & Kildeer. Staff says they've been seeing small terns & Black-necked Stilts are around. We did not see the terns or stilts.
Please remember Joe Hogan is walk-in only these days.

We had a long chat with the manager. He said the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper last year really made an impression. He said he is looking at maybe increasing the mud & shallow pools available to waders as they raise & lower pond levels. I mentioned several folks he might talk to about this.

CindY
Lonoke today
________________________________
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Sent: Friday, July 14, 2017 9:30:58 AM
To: AR Birds
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks

9 BBWD on 3rd pond in on right from the parking lot on the west side of property. Fishery manager says there are 15-20 here in afternoons. Manager says they have not seen any juveniles this year. They had one brood last year.
Cindy
Little Rock


 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 6:00 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Purple Martins
I live near the Rzorback Greenway in Rogers, but near the Bentonville Sam's
Club. I couldn't help but notice, just now, that the air was filled with
the song of Purple Martins, and saw at least 3 or 4 hundred on the guide
wires on the nearby communications tower. This seems a bit early to me,
but maybe I just need my memory jogged a little bit.

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the Great Northwest

 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 3:11 pm
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Subject: The week, more rain
Rainstorm suddenly this afternoon. Red-eyed Vireos seem to be the voice
of the aftermath, the deluge.

Riding early down off the mountain, I enter Blue Grosbeak territory,
Painted Buntings, Field Sparrows. There is a Mockingbird near my
mailbox, where I change shoes and start my ride, that favors the
tow-heeee note. Making me think I have towhees over there every time.
Towhees are a rare pleasure on my land. I wait the sounds out though.
And it always trails off into wrens and scissor-tails.

The raccoon mother I have been watching for several weeks, the one with
visible teats, who comes to the corn I spread on the ground out front,
she arrived with her children this week. She had triplets, though I
expected more from the look of the mother. They all learned the taste of
corn: how to pick it up in your dexterous fingers and chew it on the
back teeth. The most remarkable moment, watching the triplets, the
extremely fuzzy raccoonlets out front though, was when I saw one of the
youngsters look up and follow a hummingbird in flight at my feeder above
them. Surely, this was this newly minted mammal’s first sight of such a
thing. A flying thing. It may not have even sorted out birds in the
world. Let alone the humming type. Oh, to know what the raccoon brain
thought at that moment.

This morning the mother raccoon was out front, she has a bad left back
leg. From a fight I presume: a dog, a fox, another raccoon. Who knows?
The world comes at you fast out there. And I saw her and a cottontail
and a gray squirrel out the window and thought ‘oh there is no corn for
anyone’. I grabbed the feed bag and went out the door just as the
triplets were romping over towards mom from the woods out front into the
yard. At the sight of me, they turned and panicked back across the road
and into the trees. One grabbing the big oak in the yard and shuttling
up it, stopping still like some raccoon shaped lump. Mom just went over
towards her resting bench and came right back to dine on corn kernels. I
watched and watched until I had to leave for work on my bike, and the
triplets remained in panic mode for all that time—never coming down.

I am ashamed of how frightening I actually am.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR


 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 8:37 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
My humble apologies. I knew where I was. I blame the humidity.

Joe Hogan hatchery in Lonoke. We also found a family of Western Kingbirds on Rappich Rd that forms the eastern boundary of Joe Hogan. Shorebirds-many Least Sandpipers, 2 Lesser Yellowlegs, 1 Pectoral Sandpiper, & Kildeer. Staff says they've been seeing small terns & Black-necked Stilts are around. We did not see the terns or stilts.
Please remember Joe Hogan is walk-in only these days.

We had a long chat with the manager. He said the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper last year really made an impression. He said he is looking at maybe increasing the mud & shallow pools available to waders as they raise & lower pond levels. I mentioned several folks he might talk to about this.

CindY
Lonoke today
________________________________
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Sent: Friday, July 14, 2017 9:30:58 AM
To: AR Birds
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks

9 BBWD on 3rd pond in on right from the parking lot on the west side of property. Fishery manager says there are 15-20 here in afternoons. Manager says they have not seen any juveniles this year. They had one brood last year.
Cindy
Little Rock


 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 8:29 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
Where?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 14, 2017, at 9:30 AM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:
>
> 9 BBWD on 3rd pond in on right from the parking lot on the west side of property. Fishery manager says there are 15-20 here in afternoons. Manager says they have not seen any juveniles this year. They had one brood last year.
> Cindy
> Little Rock
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/17 7:31 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks
9 BBWD on 3rd pond in on right from the parking lot on the west side of property. Fishery manager says there are 15-20 here in afternoons. Manager says they have not seen any juveniles this year. They had one brood last year.
Cindy
Little Rock


 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/17 7:27 pm
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Fall migration begins--Solitary Sandpiper (Washington Co.)
As I departed Woolsey Wet Prairie in Fayetteville this evening, the
all-too-familiar "tweet-tweet" call came from a Solitary Sandpiper in
flight. So begins the fall shorebird migration.

No other birds of note at my other sites, although I did have a female
Hooded Merganser at Woolsey today too. First time I've seen one here in the
summer.

Today I found my 39th Dickcissel nest as part of my masters project.
Fingers crossed that I find more!

Good birding--

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/17 6:58 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Red Sough is the Top Oklahoma Bird Hot Spots
Red Slough is the number one bird hot spot in the state of Oklahoma. This is documented by data collection and support by David Arbour and Robert Bastarache and funded by the Ouachita National Forest. The data collected are entered into the National ebird database by Dr. Dan Scheiman with Audubon Arkansas. Dan sees the significance of these data being in the ebird database.

For many that are not birders nor care about the documentation of bird habitat use by birds, this might go unnoticed. This however is significant and a highlight to the important work going on at the Red Slough Wildlife Management on the Ouachita National Forest and its significance to birds. Red Slough is also the site of the Red Slough Birding Festival that gets National attention and is attended by people from all over the United States and some Foreign countries.

Our birds are declining by four percent (4%) per year and 40% fewer birds are crossing the Gulf of Mexico than crossed just 10 years ago. Most people are either unaware or indifferent to this significant decline and the fact that our birds are fading out of existence. Those that watch and care about birds see this happening.

This needs to be a priority for a news release and get this information out to at least the Arkansas and Oklahoma newspapers. Red Slough is important and well known to people in almost all of the states and many foreign countries. Idabel and Broken Bow OK would be remiss if they do not see the value of this site to birds and their communities.

The link attached shows the ebird Hot Spot sites for Oklahoma and by clicking on Red Slough you can see these data that are entered there as well.


http://ebird.org/ebird/subnational1/US-OK/hotspots?yr=all&m=

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 2:28 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
Went birding at the refuge today. There are beginning to be more
shorebirds. Last Saturday there were maybe a dozen Least sandpipers and a
dozen White pelicans, also the most Black-necked stilts I've seen at one
time (150+). Today there were 3 Foster's terns, maybe a dozen Black-necked
stilts, 300+ White pelicans, 100+ Least sandpipers, 1 Semipalamated
sandpiper, 1 Pectoral, a dozen or so Yelllowlegs, and the usual Herons and
Egrets. Also a Northern Shoveler, a few Mallards, a female Hooded
Merganser, a few Mississippi Kites, and a good look at a Barred owl and
Black-crowned night heron. I have seen very few Indigo Buntings, and
Dickcissel's on the refuge this entire season. They are lower in great
numbers. Maybe too much water in the spring at nesting time.

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 7/12/17 1:15 pm
From: Keith Newton <keithnewton...>
Subject: National Geographic Hummingbird videos, link, WOW!
I haven't been feeding hummers very long, and sometimes find myself a little irritated by some of their behavior. I realize though that I'm guilty of Anthropomorphizing their interactions, and really wish I knew what was going on in their tiny brains at, if not the speed of light, then the speed of darkness. Ha

I wonder if what I've been taking as bullying isn't a fun sport or maybe fitness training for them.

These high-res slow-mo video shorts just hit my inbox, and are too good not to share with other bird lovers.


http://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2017/06/hummingbirds-slow-motion-flight-videos/?utm_source=NatGeocom&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=wildscience_20170712&utm_campaign=Content&utm_rd=17292245195 <http://www.nationalgeographic.com/photography/proof/2017/06/hummingbirds-slow-motion-flight-videos/?utm_source=NatGeocom&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=wildscience_20170712&utm_campaign=Content&utm_rd=17292245195>

Please note my new email address:
<keithnewton...>




 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 10:38 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest
Hi Kannan
This could explain the very fresh, headless little Northern Parula I found on our patio a few days ago. I thought that maybe it had fallen out of the nest, and the neighbor's cat had beheaded the little guy.  I thought it rather strange tho, because my understanding is that cats are in the habit of presenting their prizes to receive praise from their person. The little bird showed no harm elsewhere. I was quite bummed out.  
Sarain Fayetteville
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, July 10, 2017 7:51 PM
Subject: Re: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest

Bill, the squirrels seem even more wasteful than monkeys.  This afternoon I examined the house sparrow chick carcass (that the squirrel had discarded).  The squirrel had just nibbled around the edges.  There were lacerations in the chick's torso and some around the head, but no deep gashes--the chick appears uncrushed.  What a waste.  
Kannan

On Monday, July 10, 2017, 10:18:39 AM CDT, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> wrote:

Kannan:

Our squirrels are just monkeys.  Every bit as mean and equally resourceful.
Bill

Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Monday, July 10, 2017 10:07 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest Every summer I face the unpleasant task of having to discourage House Sparrows from nesting in my property.  They usurp Barn Swallow and House Finch nests.  This summer, they usurped a Robin's nest.  Before I could shoo them away, I had to travel back-to-back for several weeks.  By the time I returned on June 29th, the sparrows had babies in the nest.  So I let them be. 
This morning, I heard a commotion outside.  Several of the sparrows, a thrasher, and a mockingbird were mobbing a Fox Squirrel right inside the nest.  The squirrel grabbed a chick, and, totally unperturbed by the mobbers, ate the chick perched on a branch a few feet from the nest.  And it went back to the nest, and this time ate something, possibly an egg.  
The nest is empty now.  
KannanFt. Smith


 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 9:46 pm
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox...>
Subject: Broad-billed Hummingbird
Early last Saturday evening, I was notified via email that a male Broad-billed Hummingbird had been photographed in Arkadelphia by Glenn and Evelyn Good. The email included a diagnostic photo. Due to health reasons and a family event at the home where the bird frequented a feeder July 7-9, 2017, it was not possible to announce its short stay before now. The bird was last seen about 10:00 a.m. Sunday, July 9th. A photo of the bird taken and contributed by the Good’s may be seen at:

http://www.pbase.com/image/165810579 <http://www.pbase.com/image/165810579>

Also, I have posted the image to the Arkansas Rare and Unusual Bird Reports page on Facebook.

Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75501
 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 5:51 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest
Bill, the squirrels seem even more wasteful than monkeys.  This afternoon I examined the house sparrow chick carcass (that the squirrel had discarded).  The squirrel had just nibbled around the edges.  There were lacerations in the chick's torso and some around the head, but no deep gashes--the chick appears uncrushed.  What a waste.  
Kannan

On Monday, July 10, 2017, 10:18:39 AM CDT, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> wrote:


Kannan:

Our squirrels are just monkeys.  Every bit as mean and equally resourceful.




Bill




Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Monday, July 10, 2017 10:07 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest Every summer I face the unpleasant task of having to discourage House Sparrows from nesting in my property.  They usurp Barn Swallow and House Finch nests.  This summer, they usurped a Robin's nest.  Before I could shoo them away, I had to travel back-to-back for several weeks.  By the time I returned on June 29th, the sparrows had babies in the nest.  So I let them be. 
This morning, I heard a commotion outside.  Several of the sparrows, a thrasher, and a mockingbird were mobbing a Fox Squirrel right inside the nest.  The squirrel grabbed a chick, and, totally unperturbed by the mobbers, ate the chick perched on a branch a few feet from the nest.  And it went back to the nest, and this time ate something, possibly an egg.  
The nest is empty now.  
KannanFt. Smith
 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 4:54 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Tips for Traveling Counts and Mobil App
eBirders,

When birding in a hotspot use the hotspot as your location. Never create a
personal location that means the same thing as a hotspot. Even when there
are multiple habitats in a hotspot it is understood that the waterfowl are
on the water and the warblers are in the woods. Some hotspots are big enough
to require sublocations. eBirds hotspot naming convention is Primary
Location--Sublocation (note the two hyphens). For example, Millwood Lake is
a primary location with multiple sublocations, e.g. Millwood Lake--Okay
Levee, Millwood Lake--Saratoga Landing, Millwood Lake--Dam. Create a
separate list for each sublocation. Millwood is also large enough to span
multiple counties. The county is the smallest-scale geopolitical boundary
that eBird uses for list building (and Bird Records Committees use for
record keeping), thus it has significance for hotspot creation and use, e.g.
Millwood Lake (Hempstead Co.), Millwood Lake (Howard Co.), as well as for
birding outside of hotspots.

Whether a primary location needs sublocations and how those sublocations are
delineated and named is something of an art, and it depends a lot on how a
place is birded, as well as whether a user decides to create a new
sublocation and suggest it as a hotspot, and whether a hotspot reviewer
accepts such a suggestion. For Millwood Lake it makes sense that when you
have to stop and restart birding (and hence checklist building) to get from
one access point to another, each access point is a sublocation. For Bald
Knob NWR, the birding Ive done goes continuously from entrance road to
moist soil units to silos to woodlands. It'd be unduly burdensome to expect
birders to keep separate lists by habitat, e.g. Bald Knob NWR--Moist Soil
Units, Bald Knob NWR--Woodland to North of Moist Soil Unit, Bald Knob
NWR--Rice Field (maybe rice field this year, then mudflat next year). If you
want to create small personal locations by habitat or something, you may,
but then lists under those personal locations will not contribute to the bar
chart and other public output for the Bald Knob NWR hotspot. Someday eBird
will build a polygon tool that rolls up hotspots and personal locations in
the area you draw, or lets you delineate exactly the area you birded
regardless of management and habitat boundaries, or draw the route you took.
For now we have the point system that must suffice to represent polygons and
paths. So accurate and consistent naming helps other users understand what
the dot represents so they also properly place their checklists in the same
shared hotspot.

For personal locations, you can use your own naming convention. But if you
suggest as a hotspot a personal location called Arkansas, Lonoke Co.,
Cypress Bayou Wildlife Management Area Im going to accept it but rename it
Cypress Bayou WMA (Lonoke Co.) (this WMA spans Lonoke and White Cos.).

Dan Scheiman
Arkansas eBird Reviewer
Little Rock, AR

On 7/10/17, 3:01 PM, "Michael Linz" <mplinz...> wrote:

Dan,
This is good information, thanks for sharing.

A question:
I am wondering what we need to do in areas in Arkansas where a hot spot
covers a large area and/or multiple habitats. An example would be Bald
Knob. There is only one hot spot but a large area and multiple habitats.
When you are near the front you have mud flats and flooded fields. As you
move toward the back you are in a wooded area for a mile or so. I saw
someone posted on the article and suggested that you not use hot spots when
this is true but instead set up two personal locations. What is your
recommendation?

A comment:
If possible I use a hot spot. If I have to create a personal location I
have somewhat standardized the names I use for traveling locations. I use
the city, state, location. Where location is the name of the road or place.
It helps me remember where those locations were. While my standard may not
work for everyone, I suggest that you develop your own standard.

Michael Linz(Conway, AR


On Mon, Jul 10, 2017 at 8:08 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
wrote:
> This is a blog post from a fellow eBird reviewer regarding traveling counts.
> http://cowyebird.blogspot.com/2016/03/ebird-checklists-and-miles-traveled.html
> . Elevation changes in Arkansas are not as critical as out west, but habitat
> boundaries can be important for habitat specialists, and hotspot and political
> boundaries apply everywhere.
>
> He links to the eBird mobile app tips and tricks page, which are also good to
> review
> http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/1101733-ebird-mobile-data-en
> try-app-best-practices.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR




 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 1:08 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Protecting our birds
Thanks for sharing. They are also working on rolling back the 2015 Clean Water Act and rules that are critical to birds and all wildlife. We have already lost over 50% of our wetlands and water quality standard enforcement is deteriorating.

Jerry Wayne Davis

From: Carol Joan Patterson
Sent: Monday, July 10, 2017 2:14 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Protecting our birds

The following are issues that as a bird-lover matter to me very much. I thought that they might matter to many ARBIRD participants too, so I thought I would share this, and give all a chance to sign the petitions or call their congressmen. Sorry if you've already seen this email.



The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act


The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) is a successful matching-grant program for migratory birds that results in crucial progress for birds like the Canada Warbler and to reverse declines of species such as the Cerulean Warbler, Long-billed Curlew, and Red Knot. This month, Sen. Ben Cardin and Reps. Ron Kind and Rob Wittman will introduce legislation to reauthorize the NMBCA in both the House and Senate. Please ask your elected officials to cosponsor the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act.

The Federal Bird-Safe Building Act, H.R. 2542

Collisions with glass claim the lives of hundreds of millions of birds in the United States each year. Birds that have successfully flown thousands of miles on migration can then die in seconds when they collide with a pane of glass. Luckily, we have bird-friendly design strategies and technology that can make a difference now. Reps. Mike Quigley and Morgan Griffith have introduced the bipartisan Federal Bird-Safe Buildings Act to help prevent the deaths of millions of birds by including bird-safe building materials and design features in federal buildings. We anticipate similar legislation to be introduced in the U.S. Senate soon. Please ask your elected officials to cosponsor the Federal Bird-Safe Buildings Act.

Saving America’s Pollinators Act, H.R. 3040

Reps. John Conyers and Earl Blumenauer have introduced the Saving America’s Pollinators Act of 2017, H.R. 3040, which directs the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to suspend registration of a toxic group of pesticides called neonicotinoids that are causing serious damage to birds, bees, and aquatic life. ABC and a coalition of conservation organizations, beekeepers, scientists, and business leaders support this bill to require the EPA to suspend the four most toxic neonicotinoids until a comprehensive study of their effects on wildlife and people is completed. Please ask your Representative to cosponsor H.R. 3040, and ask your Senator to support introduction of a similar bill in the U.S. Senate.

Albatross and Petrels Conservation Act

The Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) is a multilateral agreement that seeks to conserve albatrosses and petrels by coordinating international activity to mitigate known threats to their populations. The U.S. is a world leader in reducing accidental bycatch, and our participation in the agreement can encourage other nations to make similar progress. Rep. Alan Lowenthal is expected to soon reintroduce the Albatross and Petrels Conservation Act needed to implement ACAP. We anticipate a similar effort in the U.S. Senate. Please ask your elected officials to cosponsor the Albatross and Petrels Conservation Act.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 1:02 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Tips for Traveling Counts and Mobil App
Dan,
This is good information, thanks for sharing.

A question:
I am wondering what we need to do in areas in Arkansas where a hot spot
covers a large area and/or multiple habitats. An example would be Bald
Knob. There is only one hot spot but a large area and multiple habitats.
When you are near the front you have mud flats and flooded fields. As you
move toward the back you are in a wooded area for a mile or so. I saw
someone posted on the article and suggested that you not use hot spots when
this is true but instead set up two personal locations. What is your
recommendation?

A comment:
If possible I use a hot spot. If I have to create a personal location I
have somewhat standardized the names I use for traveling locations. I use
the city, state, location. Where location is the name of the road or
place. It helps me remember where those locations were. While my standard
may not work for everyone, I suggest that you develop your own standard.

Michael Linz(Conway, AR


On Mon, Jul 10, 2017 at 8:08 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
wrote:

> This is a blog post from a fellow eBird reviewer regarding traveling
> counts. http://cowyebird.blogspot.com/2016/03/ebird-checklists-and-
> miles-traveled.html. Elevation changes in Arkansas are not as critical as
> out west, but habitat boundaries can be important for habitat specialists,
> and hotspot and political boundaries apply everywhere.
>
> He links to the eBird mobile app tips and tricks page, which are also good
> to review http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/
> 1101733-ebird-mobile-data-entry-app-best-practices.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 12:14 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Protecting our birds
The following are issues that as a bird-lover matter to me very much.  I thought that they might matter to many ARBIRD participants too, so I thought I would share this, and give all a chance to sign the petitions or call their congressmen.  Sorry if you've already seen this email.

The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act

The Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act (NMBCA) is a successful matching-grant program for migratory birds that results in crucial progress for birds like the Canada Warbler and to reverse declines of species such as the Cerulean Warbler, Long-billed Curlew, and Red Knot. This month, Sen. Ben Cardin and Reps. Ron Kind and Rob Wittman will introduce legislation to reauthorize the NMBCA in both the House and Senate. Please ask your elected officials to cosponsor the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act. The Federal Bird-Safe Building Act, H.R. 2542 Collisions with glass claim the lives ofhundreds of millions of birds in the United States each year.  Birds that have successfully flown thousands of miles on migration can then die in seconds when they collide with a pane of glass. Luckily, we have bird-friendly design strategies and technology that can make a difference now. Reps. Mike Quigley and Morgan Griffith have introduced the bipartisanFederal Bird-Safe Buildings Act to help prevent the deaths of millions of birds by including bird-safe building materials and design features in federal buildings. We anticipate similar legislation to be introduced in the U.S. Senate soon. Please ask your elected officials to cosponsor the Federal Bird-Safe Buildings Act. Saving America’s Pollinators Act, H.R. 3040 Reps. John Conyers and Earl Blumenauer have introduced the Saving America’s Pollinators Act of 2017, H.R. 3040, which  directs the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to suspend registration of a toxic group of pesticides called neonicotinoids that are causing serious damage to birds, bees, and aquatic life. ABC and a coalition of conservation organizations, beekeepers, scientists, and business leaderssupport this bill to require the EPA to suspend the four most toxic neonicotinoids until a comprehensive study of their effects on wildlife and people is completed.Please ask your Representative to cosponsor H.R. 3040, and ask your Senator to support introduction of a similar bill in the U.S. Senate. Albatross and Petrels Conservation Act The Agreement on the Conservation of Albatrosses and Petrels (ACAP) is a multilateral agreement that seeks to conserve albatrosses and petrels by coordinating international activity to mitigate known threats to their populations. The U.S. is a world leader in reducing accidental bycatch, and our participation in the agreement can encourage other nations to make similar progress. Rep. Alan Lowenthal is expected to soon reintroduce the Albatross and Petrels Conservation Act needed to implement ACAP. We anticipate a similar effort in the U.S. Senate.Please ask your elected officials to cosponsor the Albatross and Petrels Conservation Act.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 11:26 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest
I found the remains of a house sparrow in my birdbath a few years ago. The
skull had been gnawed into. I assumed a squirrel had done it.

Sandy B.

On Mon, Jul 10, 2017 at 10:07 AM Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Every summer I face the unpleasant task of having to discourage House
> Sparrows from nesting in my property. They usurp Barn Swallow and House
> Finch nests. This summer, they usurped a Robin's nest. Before I could
> shoo them away, I had to travel back-to-back for several weeks. By the
> time I returned on June 29th, the sparrows had babies in the nest. So I
> let them be.
>
> This morning, I heard a commotion outside. Several of the sparrows, a
> thrasher, and a mockingbird were mobbing a Fox Squirrel right inside the
> nest. The squirrel grabbed a chick, and, totally unperturbed by the
> mobbers, ate the chick perched on a branch a few feet from the nest. And
> it went back to the nest, and this time ate something, possibly an egg.
>
> The nest is empty now.
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 8:07 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fox Squirrel raids House Sparrow nest
Every summer I face the unpleasant task of having to discourage House Sparrows from nesting in my property.  They usurp Barn Swallow and House Finch nests.  This summer, they usurped a Robin's nest.  Before I could shoo them away, I had to travel back-to-back for several weeks.  By the time I returned on June 29th, the sparrows had babies in the nest.  So I let them be. 
This morning, I heard a commotion outside.  Several of the sparrows, a thrasher, and a mockingbird were mobbing a Fox Squirrel right inside the nest.  The squirrel grabbed a chick, and, totally unperturbed by the mobbers, ate the chick perched on a branch a few feet from the nest.  And it went back to the nest, and this time ate something, possibly an egg.  
The nest is empty now.  
KannanFt. Smith
 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 6:49 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, July 13


This Thursday, July 13, is Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's monthly meeting. This month ASCA meets at the Little Rock Audubon Center (4500 Springer Blvd.) at 7 PM because Fletcher Library is undergoing renovations. Our speaker is Erika Droke, Environmental Program Coordinator for ADEQ. She'll talk about water reuse and conservation for the home.

As always our meetings are free and open to the public. Details are at http://wp.ascabird.org .

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/17 6:10 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Tips for Traveling Counts and Mobil App
This is a blog post from a fellow eBird reviewer regarding traveling counts.
http://cowyebird.blogspot.com/2016/03/ebird-checklists-and-miles-traveled.ht
ml. Elevation changes in Arkansas are not as critical as out west, but
habitat boundaries can be important for habitat specialists, and hotspot and
political boundaries apply everywhere.

He links to the eBird mobile app tips and tricks page, which are also good
to review
http://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/1101733-ebird-mobile-data-
entry-app-best-practices.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/17 2:40 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Birds' migration genes are conditioned by geography
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170706072536.htm


 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/17 1:38 pm
From: cbayona <cbayona...>
Subject: Re: great loggerhead shrike video
A very nice and well done video, I posted a link on my Facebook page.


On 7/8/2017 3:05 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
>
> Wonderful! I forwarded it to a non-birder friend and he said his cat
> was pawing at the screen.
>
> I like the way (at ~ 11 mins) the adult catches the fecal sac from the
> just (over)fed young to remove it from the nest site.
>
> Jeff Short
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Ragupathy Kannan
> *Sent:* Friday, July 07, 2017 10:59 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* great loggerhead shrike video
>
> This is a phenomenal video of the Loggerhead Shrike, taken right here
> in Arkansas (near Marion) by Larry McPherson. Includes some
> apparently never filmed behaviors, like the bird removing the gut of a
> grasshopper before eating, to avoid noxious chemicals. Also includes
> wonderful footage of young practicing their impaling skills with
> leaves. Our own Than Boves is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
>
> THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE <https://vimeo.com/205715193>
>
>
> Text Box:
>
>
>
>
> THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE
>
> "Larry McPherson's beautifully executed film on the activities and
> vocalizations of a nesting pair of Loggerhead...
>
> Kannan
>
> Ft. Smith
>

--
Cecil - k5nwa http://thepartsplace.k5nwa.com/

--
Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
http://thepartsplace.k5nwa.com/
 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/17 1:06 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: great loggerhead shrike video
Wonderful! I forwarded it to a non-birder friend and he said his cat was pawing at the screen.



I like the way (at ~ 11 mins) the adult catches the fecal sac from the just (over)fed young to remove it from the nest site.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan
Sent: Friday, July 07, 2017 10:59 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: great loggerhead shrike video



This is a phenomenal video of the Loggerhead Shrike, taken right here in Arkansas (near Marion) by Larry McPherson. Includes some apparently never filmed behaviors, like the bird removing the gut of a grasshopper before eating, to avoid noxious chemicals. Also includes wonderful footage of young practicing their impaling skills with leaves. Our own Than Boves is mentioned in the acknowledgments.



THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE <https://vimeo.com/205715193>









Text Box:




<https://s.yimg.com/nq/storm/assets/enhancrV2/23/logos/vimeo.png>


THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE


"Larry McPherson's beautifully executed film on the activities and vocalizations of a nesting pair of Loggerhead...



Kannan

Ft. Smith




 

Back to top
Date: 7/8/17 9:30 am
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Shrike video link
I'm not sure if the problem is that I receive a once-a-day digest of ARBIRD-L, but there was no link to the video in my email.  Can I get more info to search for it?Roselie Overby
 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 6:30 pm
From: ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...>
Subject: Bird Photos BKNWR
I just posted my photos I took today at BKNWR to my website.
Here is the link if you would like to see them.

http://www.pbase.com/rherron/bknwr7717 <http://www.pbase.com/rherron/bknwr7717>

Hope you enjoy.
Thanks.
Robert.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 6:09 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Lollie Update
Living organisms are made of basically the same molecular structure and what kills insects can kill birds if the level is high enough. There are others on this list that are more knowledgeable about pesticide impacts.

Jerry Wayne Davis

From: Ed Laster
Sent: Friday, July 7, 2017 7:51 PM
To: <jwdavis...>
Cc: Arbird
Subject: Re: Lollie Update

I just wonder what it may have done to the birds that ate some of the poisoned insects.

Ed Laster


On Jul 7, 2017, at 7:43 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

That is often the case where one agency is destroying the efforts of others and without coordination. Whether spaying or mowing, neither is doing pollinators or butterflies any good and is counter productive. They need to be made aware of this.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Ed Laster
Sent: Friday, July 7, 2017 7:39 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Lollie Update

I will comment on the use of mosquito spray by Pulaski County. A friend who has several acres in west Little Rock watched the county spray the road they live on. She is very active in promoting planting of milkweed for Monarch butterflies and had a large number of many kinds of butterflies before the spraying. Virtually none have been seen on their property since then and she found a number of them dead, close to the road.

Very disturbing.

Ed Laster
Little Rock



On Jul 7, 2017, at 12:02 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Michael,

Maybe this is obvious but someone sprayed herbicide on the Johnson Grass and whatever plants are in the last photo. It splashed the corn leaves next to the mowed area.
Without knowing what chemical was used it is impossible to predict how long the poison will remain effective. Some break down within 24 -36 hours. Some last for over a year and will kill any seeds that germinate the following year. There are some seriously bad herbicides out there in every farm supply, garden supply, landscape center, etc.

Here is a very helpful reference for anyone who is concerned about the environment and the birds, wildlife, aquatics, and humans who live in the environment. It will reveal which are considered PAN Bad Actors that are carcinogens or endocrine disruptors (not just in humans), and it lists alternatives to commercial chemicals:
http://www.pesticideinfo.org/

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


On Jul 6, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:


I birded Lollie Bottoms today and it was pretty slow. I'm not sure what happened to all the birds but I took some pictures in hopes that some of the smart people on this listserv could figure out what happened. And maybe they can figure out if something can or should be done to fix the problem.


https://goo.gl/nVCaA9


BTW: The soybeans look great!

Michael Linz(wondering if anybody cares)



 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 5:51 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Lollie Update
I just wonder what it may have done to the birds that ate some of the poisoned insects.

Ed Laster


> On Jul 7, 2017, at 7:43 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
> That is often the case where one agency is destroying the efforts of others and without coordination. Whether spaying or mowing, neither is doing pollinators or butterflies any good and is counter productive. They need to be made aware of this.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> From: Ed Laster <>
> Sent: Friday, July 7, 2017 7:39 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <>
> Subject: Re: Lollie Update
>
> I will comment on the use of mosquito spray by Pulaski County. A friend who has several acres in west Little Rock watched the county spray the road they live on. She is very active in promoting planting of milkweed for Monarch butterflies and had a large number of many kinds of butterflies before the spraying. Virtually none have been seen on their property since then and she found a number of them dead, close to the road.
>
> Very disturbing.
>
> Ed Laster
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>> On Jul 7, 2017, at 12:02 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> <>> wrote:
>>
>> Michael,
>>
>> Maybe this is obvious but someone sprayed herbicide on the Johnson Grass and whatever plants are in the last photo. It splashed the corn leaves next to the mowed area.
>> Without knowing what chemical was used it is impossible to predict how long the poison will remain effective. Some break down within 24 -36 hours. Some last for over a year and will kill any seeds that germinate the following year. There are some seriously bad herbicides out there in every farm supply, garden supply, landscape center, etc.
>>
>> Here is a very helpful reference for anyone who is concerned about the environment and the birds, wildlife, aquatics, and humans who live in the environment. It will reveal which are considered PAN Bad Actors that are carcinogens or endocrine disruptors (not just in humans), and it lists alternatives to commercial chemicals:
>> http://www.pesticideinfo.org/ <http://www.pesticideinfo.org/>
>>
>> Judith
>> Ninestone, Carroll County
>>
>>
>> On Jul 6, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> <>> wrote:
>>
>>> I birded Lollie Bottoms today and it was pretty slow. I'm not sure what happened to all the birds but I took some pictures in hopes that some of the smart people on this listserv could figure out what happened. And maybe they can figure out if something can or should be done to fix the problem.
>>>
>>> https://goo.gl/nVCaA9 <https://goo.gl/nVCaA9>
>>>
>>> BTW: The soybeans look great!
>>>
>>> Michael Linz(wondering if anybody cares)
>>
>>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 5:44 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Lollie Update
That is often the case where one agency is destroying the efforts of others and without coordination. Whether spaying or mowing, neither is doing pollinators or butterflies any good and is counter productive. They need to be made aware of this.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Ed Laster
Sent: Friday, July 7, 2017 7:39 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Lollie Update

I will comment on the use of mosquito spray by Pulaski County. A friend who has several acres in west Little Rock watched the county spray the road they live on. She is very active in promoting planting of milkweed for Monarch butterflies and had a large number of many kinds of butterflies before the spraying. Virtually none have been seen on their property since then and she found a number of them dead, close to the road.

Very disturbing.

Ed Laster
Little Rock



On Jul 7, 2017, at 12:02 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Michael,

Maybe this is obvious but someone sprayed herbicide on the Johnson Grass and whatever plants are in the last photo. It splashed the corn leaves next to the mowed area.
Without knowing what chemical was used it is impossible to predict how long the poison will remain effective. Some break down within 24 -36 hours. Some last for over a year and will kill any seeds that germinate the following year. There are some seriously bad herbicides out there in every farm supply, garden supply, landscape center, etc.

Here is a very helpful reference for anyone who is concerned about the environment and the birds, wildlife, aquatics, and humans who live in the environment. It will reveal which are considered PAN Bad Actors that are carcinogens or endocrine disruptors (not just in humans), and it lists alternatives to commercial chemicals:
http://www.pesticideinfo.org/

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


On Jul 6, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:


I birded Lollie Bottoms today and it was pretty slow. I'm not sure what happened to all the birds but I took some pictures in hopes that some of the smart people on this listserv could figure out what happened. And maybe they can figure out if something can or should be done to fix the problem.


https://goo.gl/nVCaA9


BTW: The soybeans look great!

Michael Linz(wondering if anybody cares)


 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 5:39 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Lollie Update
I will comment on the use of mosquito spray by Pulaski County. A friend who has several acres in west Little Rock watched the county spray the road they live on. She is very active in promoting planting of milkweed for Monarch butterflies and had a large number of many kinds of butterflies before the spraying. Virtually none have been seen on their property since then and she found a number of them dead, close to the road.

Very disturbing.

Ed Laster
Little Rock



> On Jul 7, 2017, at 12:02 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> Michael,
>
> Maybe this is obvious but someone sprayed herbicide on the Johnson Grass and whatever plants are in the last photo. It splashed the corn leaves next to the mowed area.
> Without knowing what chemical was used it is impossible to predict how long the poison will remain effective. Some break down within 24 -36 hours. Some last for over a year and will kill any seeds that germinate the following year. There are some seriously bad herbicides out there in every farm supply, garden supply, landscape center, etc.
>
> Here is a very helpful reference for anyone who is concerned about the environment and the birds, wildlife, aquatics, and humans who live in the environment. It will reveal which are considered PAN Bad Actors that are carcinogens or endocrine disruptors (not just in humans), and it lists alternatives to commercial chemicals:
> http://www.pesticideinfo.org/ <http://www.pesticideinfo.org/>
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
>
>
> On Jul 6, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> <mailto:<mplinz...>> wrote:
>
>> I birded Lollie Bottoms today and it was pretty slow. I'm not sure what happened to all the birds but I took some pictures in hopes that some of the smart people on this listserv could figure out what happened. And maybe they can figure out if something can or should be done to fix the problem.
>>
>> https://goo.gl/nVCaA9 <https://goo.gl/nVCaA9>
>>
>> BTW: The soybeans look great!
>>
>> Michael Linz(wondering if anybody cares)
>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 4:43 pm
From: ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...>
Subject: Bird Photos
I just posted my bird photos I took yesterday at Bois D’ Arc WMA to my website.

Here is the link if you would like to see them.

http://www.pbase.com/rherron/_boisdarc <http://www.pbase.com/rherron/_boisdarc>

Hope you like them.
Thanks.
Robert.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 2:08 pm
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: great loggerhead shrike video
Thank you for posting this.  A very nice video with such interesting behaviours.
We used to get shrikes coming to our yard on the edge of Jonesboro and they would take bits of meat off the fence in the winter. One either killed or more probably took advantage of a window collision Cardinal. We are seeing fewer these last few years.
Cheryl Lavers


On Friday, July 7, 2017 10:59 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:


This is a phenomenal video of the Loggerhead Shrike, taken right here in Arkansas (near Marion) by Larry McPherson.  Includes some apparently never filmed behaviors, like the bird removing the gut of a grasshopper before eating, to avoid noxious chemicals.  Also includes wonderful footage of young practicing their impaling skills with leaves.  Our own Than Boves is mentioned in the acknowledgments.  
THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE


|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE
"Larry McPherson's beautifully executed film on the activities and vocalizations of a nesting pair of Loggerhead... |

|

|


KannanFt. Smith



 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 11:58 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: great loggerhead shrike video
Masterfully done! An informative and entertaining video work.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 7, 2017, at 11:58 AM, Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
> Audubon Arkansas is talking with the videographer about hosting a screening of his film along with a bird walk to look for shrikes in the area this fall.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>
> Sent from XFINITY Connect Mobile App
>
> ------ Original Message ------
>
> From: Ragupathy Kannan
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: July 7, 2017 at 11:01 AM
> Subject: great loggerhead shrike video
> This is a phenomenal video of the Loggerhead Shrike, taken right here in Arkansas (near Marion) by Larry McPherson. Includes some apparently never filmed behaviors, like the bird removing the gut of a grasshopper before eating, to avoid noxious chemicals. Also includes wonderful footage of young practicing their impaling skills with leaves. Our own Than Boves is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
>
> THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE
>
>
> THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE
> "Larry McPherson's beautifully executed film on the activities and vocalizations of a nesting pair of Loggerhead...
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 10:29 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Lollie Update
I was wondering what types of birds you are referring to. My thought was that it's July and birding would be naturally slow.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 7, 2017, at 12:02 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> Michael,
>
> Maybe this is obvious but someone sprayed herbicide on the Johnson Grass and whatever plants are in the last photo. It splashed the corn leaves next to the mowed area.
> Without knowing what chemical was used it is impossible to predict how long the poison will remain effective. Some break down within 24 -36 hours. Some last for over a year and will kill any seeds that germinate the following year. There are some seriously bad herbicides out there in every farm supply, garden supply, landscape center, etc.
>
> Here is a very helpful reference for anyone who is concerned about the environment and the birds, wildlife, aquatics, and humans who live in the environment. It will reveal which are considered PAN Bad Actors that are carcinogens or endocrine disruptors (not just in humans), and it lists alternatives to commercial chemicals:
> http://www.pesticideinfo.org/
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
>
>
>> On Jul 6, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:
>>
>> I birded Lollie Bottoms today and it was pretty slow. I'm not sure what happened to all the birds but I took some pictures in hopes that some of the smart people on this listserv could figure out what happened. And maybe they can figure out if something can or should be done to fix the problem.
>>
>> https://goo.gl/nVCaA9
>>
>> BTW: The soybeans look great!
>>
>> Michael Linz(wondering if anybody cares)
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 10:02 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Lollie Update
Michael,

Maybe this is obvious but someone sprayed herbicide on the Johnson Grass and whatever plants are in the last photo. It splashed the corn leaves next to the mowed area.
Without knowing what chemical was used it is impossible to predict how long the poison will remain effective. Some break down within 24 -36 hours. Some last for over a year and will kill any seeds that germinate the following year. There are some seriously bad herbicides out there in every farm supply, garden supply, landscape center, etc.

Here is a very helpful reference for anyone who is concerned about the environment and the birds, wildlife, aquatics, and humans who live in the environment. It will reveal which are considered PAN Bad Actors that are carcinogens or endocrine disruptors (not just in humans), and it lists alternatives to commercial chemicals:
http://www.pesticideinfo.org/

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


On Jul 6, 2017, at 8:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:

> I birded Lollie Bottoms today and it was pretty slow. I'm not sure what happened to all the birds but I took some pictures in hopes that some of the smart people on this listserv could figure out what happened. And maybe they can figure out if something can or should be done to fix the problem.
>
> https://goo.gl/nVCaA9
>
> BTW: The soybeans look great!
>
> Michael Linz(wondering if anybody cares)


 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 10:00 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: great loggerhead shrike video
 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 8:59 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: great loggerhead shrike video
This is a phenomenal video of the Loggerhead Shrike, taken right here in Arkansas (near Marion) by Larry McPherson.  Includes some apparently never filmed behaviors, like the bird removing the gut of a grasshopper before eating, to avoid noxious chemicals.  Also includes wonderful footage of young practicing their impaling skills with leaves.  Our own Than Boves is mentioned in the acknowledgments.  
THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE


|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
THE LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE

"Larry McPherson's beautifully executed film on the activities and vocalizations of a nesting pair of Loggerhead...
|

|

|


KannanFt. Smith

 

Back to top
Date: 7/7/17 8:09 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Quest for Swainson's Hawk, Interesting Vulture Behavior, and Neotropic Cormorants
I headed up to Benton County yesterday morning, in search of Swainson’s Hawks. No luck in that department, despite having checked area where they have been present, and presumably nesting, all summer. I had one very hooded, western Red-tailed Hawk that had me going until it flew, flashing the brilliant rufous tail. Plenty of Turkey Vultures were out and about and a couple of Black Vultures. I witnessed an interesting behavior by the less-sensible Black Vultures, known to follow TUVUs around due to their lack of smell in equal proportion to their cousins. There is little sound data on TUVU foraging behavior, but they are thought to compartmentalize themselves across the environment. When one bird senses carrion, it will begin to go down, which attracts other Turkey Vultures. I witnessed this yesterday and a little higher than the Turkeys were two Black Vultures that began spiraling downward too, no doubt thanks to cues given by the TUVUs.

At the end of the outing, we stopped for lunch at the pavilion overlooking SWEPCO Lake at Eagle Watch Nature Trail. There were at least 3 Neotropic Cormorants sunning themselves a little ways out in the water.

Good birding,
Mitchell
 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 6:33 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Lollie Update
I birded Lollie Bottoms today and it was pretty slow. I'm not sure what
happened to all the birds but I took some pictures in hopes that some of
the smart people on this listserv could figure out what happened. And
maybe they can figure out if something can or should be done to fix the
problem.

https://goo.gl/nVCaA9

BTW: The soybeans look great!

Michael Linz(wondering if anybody cares)

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 6:42 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Kites
I went to the newly opened Sam's Club in Springdale earlier this week.
There were Scissor-tails everywhere. Makes me wonder where they hung out
before.

Karen Garrett

On Thu, Jul 6, 2017 at 6:08 AM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> While common east, west, and south of us, Mississippi Kites arrived in
> Fort Smith just a few years ago. It still thrills me to see them flying
> about in town or just perched on a dead branch in Oak Cemetery.
> Last night I went for a walk in my neighborhood. All of a sudden 15 MIKIs
> took off from a clump of trees in a yard, and were flying just over the
> tops of the trees and houses. It was a sight to see.
> Even my husband was impressed.
> A lot of birds species are in peril because of loss of habitat. Thankfully
> some, like MIKIs and Scissortails, can adapt and do quite well in urban
> settings.
>
> Sandy B.
> FS, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/17 4:09 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Kites
While common east, west, and south of us, Mississippi Kites arrived in Fort
Smith just a few years ago. It still thrills me to see them flying about
in town or just perched on a dead branch in Oak Cemetery.
Last night I went for a walk in my neighborhood. All of a sudden 15 MIKIs
took off from a clump of trees in a yard, and were flying just over the
tops of the trees and houses. It was a sight to see.
Even my husband was impressed.
A lot of birds species are in peril because of loss of habitat. Thankfully
some, like MIKIs and Scissortails, can adapt and do quite well in urban
settings.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/17 12:59 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Saturday
This Saturday, June 8th, is the field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  See details below.  Everyone is welcome, you don't have to be an ASCA member.  It will be fairly hot so bring plenty of water.  If you have any questions, please feel free to email me off-list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 July 8Dr. Lester SitzesIII Bois D’Arc WMAHope, ARMeetat 7:00 a.m. at the south end of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430intersection at Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll stop at the McDonald's in Hope (Exit 30off I-30) around 8:45 a.m. for those in south Arkansas who would like to joinus.  Look for  Great-tailed Grackles at McDonald's.  We should arrive at the Bois D’Arc WMA at9:15 a.m.  Our target birds will bePurple and Common Gallinules and their chicks, Least Bitterns, Anhingas,Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, herons, egrets, and possibly an alligator ortwo!  Very little walking will beinvolved.  Bring scopes, plenty of water,snacks, and lunch.  There are severalrestaurants in Hope if you prefer to eat lunch in town.  BoisD‘Arc WMA is located 10 miles south of Hope. Take Exit 30 off I-30 and go east. Continue past McDonald’s, then under the railroad overpass.  At the light at the big intersection, turnright onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of amile.  At the brown sign, turn left ontoHwy. 174.  Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles tothe stop sign at Spring Hill.  Turn rightonto Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4 miles.  Turn right at the white wooden WMA sign justbefore the highway ends in the lake. Follow the paved road, then turn left onto the first gravel road and godown to the lake.  GPS: 33.558062,-93.694239 
 

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Date: 7/5/17 5:00 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Insomniac mockingbird
I suspect it's an unattached individual, more likely a juvenile ... hope springs eternal! Best wishes for the mocker AND for your future nights of rest!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 5, 2017, at 1:35 AM, Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> wrote:
>
> It's 1:30 AM and there is a mockingbird singing to the top of his lungs
> every song it knows. Been going at it for at least 30 minutes.
>
> Dottie Boyles
> Little Rock
 

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Date: 7/4/17 11:35 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: Insomniac mockingbird
It's 1:30 AM and there is a mockingbird singing to the top of his lungs
every song it knows. Been going at it for at least 30 minutes.

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock
 

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Date: 7/4/17 10:06 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Peewees
Sweet peewee family. Parents & 2 fledglings. The parents have been present for awhile but decided to bring out the kids for an Independence Day picnic. They are consistently on the twisted wire "fence" on the right hand side of the road at the Murray Park dog park drive around just as you emerge from the woods. The wire "fence" separates the road from the soccer field. The peewees are really tame ... you can pull up next to them. Soccer games & fireworks getting set up in the soccer field didnt phase them. Hungry little buggers kept the parents hopping. 4 on the 4th!
Karen & Neill Hart Little Rock.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/4/17 9:55 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Western Kingbirds at Ft Smith, good nesting season
It seems to me that we are seeing Kingbirds at a lot more places in
Arkansas. Below are some pictures from a site Kenny and LaDonna report in
Searcy.

Adult Kingbird
https://goo.gl/Ffasy8

Adult Kingbird at a nest removing "diapers"
https://goo.gl/TEU4kN

Michael (Conway, AR)


On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 4:59 PM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Bill and Toka Beall performed their annual survey of Western Kingbirds at
> Fort Smith today. I made the morning part. Excellent results: 49 adults, 14
> fledglings, 17 currently active nests. We also saw a White-winged Dove
> carrying nesting material into an ornamental shrub. Two Common Nighthawks
> were perched on powerlines -- one lined up, the other sort of sideways.
> This survey dates to 2002, around when Western Kingbirds arrived.
>
>
> I grew up in Fort Smith and remember 60 years ago. As the city grew and
> spread-out, old downtown with its industrial and warehouse district
> suffered steep decline. Lots of effort has gone into reversing this trend.
> Western Kingbirds and their interesting lives are now part of the revival.
> As Bill put it today, “They are bringing the West with them.”
>
>
> It was fascinating to see how thoroughly Western Kingbirds have made old
> Fort Smith their own. And between sightings, there are numerous old homes,
> warehouses, hotels, offices, fancy brickwork of a bygone era, finished
> sandstone from an ever earlier time, and huge chimneys that have lots of
> possibility swift-wise.
>
>
>

 

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Date: 7/4/17 8:54 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 4
Joanna Kelly (OK), Cynthia Woodsong (NC), and Sean Skaggs (CA), and I
surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 70 species. It started off
overcast and mild, turning partly cloudy and hot by noon. A bad storm
earlier this morning caused flooding around the area including Blackland
Road with water over it in several places. The rain gauge showed a total of
3.2 inches since last Thursday. The two nesting rookeries on Pintail Lake
are full of near fledging young Anhingas and Neotropic Cormorants.
Interestingly, some Cattle Egrets have started nesting in one of the
rookeries. I also saw a recently fledged Green Heron hanging out at one of
the rookeries. The Green Herons have their own rookery in another clump of
trees further back on the lake that is well hidden but their presence has
been very noticeable as they fly in and out of this area for the past few
weeks. Here is our list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 6

Wood Duck - 17

Pied-billed Grebe - 10

American White Pelican - 2

Neotropic Cormorant - 10

Anhinga - 32

Least Bittern - 2

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 24

Snowy Egret - 12

Little-blue Heron - 18

Cattle Egret - 200

Green Heron - 7

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1

White Ibis - 55

Black Vulture - 17

Turkey Vulture - 13

Mississippi Kite - 15

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 3

Purple Gallinule - 30 (also a couple broods seen.)

Common Gallinule - 29 (a couple broods also.)

American Coot - 4

Killdeer - 3 (One with a nest in the middle of Blackland Rd.)

Mourning Dove - 5

Rock Pigeon - 1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 11

Bell's Vireo - 3

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 4

American Crow - 2

Tree Swallow - 24

Cliff Swallow - 3

Cave Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 26

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 5

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 3

Northern Parula - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 3

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 5

Yellow-breasted Chat - 9

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2

Northern Cardinal - 29

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 35

Painted Bunting - 13

Dickcissel - 21

Red-winged Blackbird - 18

Eastern Meadowlark - 2

Common Grackle - 2

Brown-headed Cowbird - 3

Orchard Oriole - 2

House Sparrow - 1





Odonates:





Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Common Green Darner

Cyrano Darner

Royal River Cruiser

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Hyacinth Glider - 5

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Red Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Red-eared Slider

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR








 

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Date: 7/4/17 3:00 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Western Kingbirds at Ft Smith, good nesting season
Bill and Toka Beall performed their annual survey of Western Kingbirds at Fort Smith today. I made the morning part. Excellent results: 49 adults, 14 fledglings, 17 currently active nests. We also saw a White-winged Dove carrying nesting material into an ornamental shrub. Two Common Nighthawks were perched on powerlines -- one lined up, the other sort of sideways. This survey dates to 2002, around when Western Kingbirds arrived.


I grew up in Fort Smith and remember 60 years ago. As the city grew and spread-out, old downtown with its industrial and warehouse district suffered steep decline. Lots of effort has gone into reversing this trend. Western Kingbirds and their interesting lives are now part of the revival. As Bill put it today, They are bringing the West with them.


It was fascinating to see how thoroughly Western Kingbirds have made old Fort Smith their own. And between sightings, there are numerous old homes, warehouses, hotels, offices, fancy brickwork of a bygone era, finished sandstone from an ever earlier time, and huge chimneys that have lots of possibility swift-wise.


 

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Date: 7/4/17 2:27 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Quail Revival
Same park this morning...four bob-whites. It's very thrilling to hear them.

Sandy B.
Ft. Smith


On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 10:22 AM Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:

> In the Fayetteville area, quail can be frequently heard (and with
> patience, seen) in two prairie habitats: Woolsey Wet Prairie, adjacent to
> the West Fayetteville waste treatment facility, and Chesney Tall Grass
> Natural area, north of Siloam Springs.
>
> I am leading a Wild Birds Unlimited sponsored bird walk at Chesney on July
> 12. You may join us at the store location on Joyce Ave, Fayetteville, at
> 6AM, or meet us on site about 7:45AM. Bring water, a sun hat, and insect
> repellant. Not suitable for pets or children under 10.
>
> Jay ("Rick") Jones
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Jul 4, 2017, at 8:02 AM, Mary Ann King <office...>
> wrote:
>
> That is wonderful to hear that the park is only mowed twice a year! A
> gold star for the park director.
>
>
>
> MaryAnn King
>
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [
> mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Sandy Berger
> *Sent:* Tuesday, July 4, 2017 6:45 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Quail Revival
>
>
>
> Yesterday I heard one calling in one of our city parks. The grass in this
> park has been allowed to grow. It's quite "wild" and has native wildflowers
> in it. I've been in contact with the director of the park. He said he gets
> calls from people who want to see the park mowed. But he tells them there
> are enough parks like that already. This one is going to stay natural.
> They will mow it twice a year, and after nesting.
>
>
>
> Across the border in Moffett, a pair flew across the road in front of me,
> from a cornfield, just on the edge of town. It was a very nice thing to
> see.
>
>
>
> Sandy B.
>
> Fort Smith
>
>
>
> On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 12:23 AM George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
> wrote:
>
> This summer, for the first time in almost ten years, we're hearing
> Northern Bobwhites here just south of Cleveland. I'm not sure what has
> caused this years uptick in the quail population, but we would like to
> foster it...
>
> Remind me who the contact person is at the AGFC who helps manage
> quail..? I know I had it recorded somewhere, but its long since gotten
> lost in the ether.
>
> Thanks
>
> George
>
>

 

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Date: 7/4/17 10:20 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Canopy Lodge, Panama, for the Audubon trust
Stoked by the wonderful birding from my Belize and Costa Rica AAST fund-raiser tours this year (which netted $2300 for the trust), I am eagerly awaiting the December 2017 Panama tour!  I aim for at least a $1,000 more for the trust.   I have just ONE seat open, for a female.  Please spread the word and recruit that lucky person.  
Note that I have switched from Canopy Tower to the far more luxurious (and equally birdy) Canopy Lodge, acting on several requests from my esteemed alums :)  See video on the lodge and detailed itinerary below, and contact me if interested. 
Canopy Lodge Panama


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Canopy Lodge Panama
The Canopy Lodge is a beautiful ecolodge set in the foothills of El Valle de Anton, Panama. Surrounded by lush c... | |

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Cheers,Kannan
Day 1 - December 17 Fly into Panama City and stay overnight at the Crowne Plaza hotel (not included)
Day 2 – December 18Transfer to Canopy Lodge, Orientation, Canopy Lodge Grounds/FeederAfter breakfast, our driver will transfer you to the Canopy Lodge, located in mountains El Valle de Antón, nestled against the cloud forests of Cerro Gaital Natural Monument. At 2,400-feet in elevation, you will immediately appreciate the noticeably cooler temperatures here!  A member of our staff will greet you as you arrive at the Lodge, and you will be provided with an orientation on the use of the facilities.  At this time we will answer any questions you may have.  As your luggage is being ferried to your room, or after you get settled in, you may visit the dining area and enjoy a refreshing drink and snack.  You will immediately want to scan the bird feeders and grounds!  Dinner at CANOPY LODGE.Day 3 – December 19AM: Las Minas Trail (20 min. from Canopy Lodge)After breakfast, we head to Las Minas, an excellent place to get a wide variety of birds.  The road follows the ridge line, with sweeping vistas of forested mountains, speckled with grasslands and small fincas.  The views from here are fantastic, as on a clear day near the summit, both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans can be seen!  We get back in time for lunch at the CANOPY LODGE.PM: Cara iguana (15 min. from Canopy Lodge)With a full stomach and some rest, we head to Cara Iguana Trail, where we enjoy outstanding foothill birding in some of the last remaining examples of quality Dry Pacific Forest.  Dinner at CANOPY LODGE.Day 4 – December 20
AM: La Mesa Road (15 min. from Canopy Lodge)After breakfast, we continue our quest for more lifers with a trip to La Mesa Road.  This area, which is a visually pleasing blend of secondary forest, scrubby pastures, overgrown fincas and grassy borders, is home to many of the area’s specialties.  Lunch at CANOPY LODGE.PM: Water Cress Trail (15 min. from Canopy Lodge)After lunch we are off to water cress trail, named after the herb which is commercially grown in the terraced creek near the entrance.  This easy trail traverses through good secondary forest, which is framed by picturesque forested mountains of Cerro Gaital Natural Monument.  We will also listen for Purplish-backed Quail-Dove.  Dinner at CANOPY LODGE.Day 5 – December 21
Pacific Dry Forest & Santa Clara Beach (45 min. from Canopy Lodge) FULL DAYAfter breakfast we are off for a full day of birding in the Pacific Dry Forest and its wonderful suite of birds!  We enjoy a picnic lunch at a popular beach at Santa Clara where we hope to spot Sapphire-throated Hummingbird working the coastal shrubbery.  You may want to bring your bathing suits to take a dip in the warm waters of the Pacific Ocean (83F/28C).  Dinner at CANOPY LODGE.Day 6 – December 22
AM: Cerro Gaital (20 min. from Canopy Lodge)Today after breakfast, we proceed to Cerro Gaital, a steep, forested, mist-shrouded mountain that you see from the lodge!  Cerro Gaital (3,500’) is the namesake of Cerro Gaital Natural Monument, which protects more than 335 hectares of mature cloud forest.  Back for lunch at the CANOPY LODGE.PM: Valle Chiquito (20 min. from Canopy Lodge)After lunch we are off to Valle Chiquito!  This valley is accessible by a newly paved road and passes through nicely forested woodlands crossed by two rivers.  Dinner at CANOPY LODGE.Day 7 – December 23
Departure to Airport (about 3 hrs. from Canopy Lodge)Leave for Panama airport (PTY) very early for flight to USFor more complete description of the facilities and the comprehensive list of bird species please visit canopy Tower web page at www.canopytower.com and http://www.canopytower.com/ species-list For non-birders who may be interested in this tour or who are accompanying the birding enthusiast on this tour feel free to look at some of the other points of interest on offer athttp://www.canopytower.com/ activities-for-everyone Double room or single room:  $2,139.00 per personCorner rooms:  US$2,289.00 per person Includes:  Airport transfers, lodging in double occupancy, all meals, bilingual professional guides, all tours mentioned in the itinerary, natural fruit juices, sodas, wine at dinner time, all taxes, WIFI, entrance fees to national parks as mentioned in the itinerary, snacks and beverages during all outings.  Please check with our reservations office for the times of our scheduled airport transfers to coordinate your arrival and departure times.
Not included: Hotel stay the first night at Panama City; international airfare.Deposit:  US$300.00 per person, non-refundable.
 

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Date: 7/4/17 9:44 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Big Day(s) donation to the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust
Barry,

Thank you for mentioning this. And thank you Leif for contributing!

My own donation went to Kim Smith's grad student's research funds to help Mitchell and Alyssa fund their projects.

Since the announcement of the Big Day Challenge, I went ahead and purchased BigDayChallenge .com and .org hoping that someone might eventually step up and help create a website that will facilitate these donations. Maybe one day, eh?

Thanks again to everyone who found this to be a worthwhile activity and cause. I am already looking forward to next year!

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

> On Jul 3, 2017, at 23:32, Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:
>
> Dear ARBIRDers,
>
> It was a pleasant surprise to receive a pledged donation from Leif Anderson to the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust for his Big Day. Actually, Leif did four Big Days totaling 535 species with a high of 145 species in one county. I think it was Butch Tetzlaff who suggested a challenge whereby birders would pledge to donate a set amount to a bird-related organization for each species ID'd on their Big Day.
>
> Leif went above and beyond with his four days of Big Day birding. His pledge of $0.20/species, which he originally estimated would come to about $75, penciled out to $107 when all was said and done. Leif's donation was added to the Trust's Endowment-Memorial Fund which has a goal of $200,000 by the Trust's 50th anniversary in 2022. Leif's donation brings the Endowment-Memorial Fund total to $157,993.93.
>
> The purpose of the Trust is "for charitable, scientific, public safety, literary, or educational purposes, or for the preservation and conservation of the wildlife, plant life,
> forests, wetlands, and all natural resources, within the United States or any of its possessions." Recent research grants have funded some fascinating work on a variety of mostly avian species. Some of the grant recipients have given presentations at Arkansas Audubon Society meetings that have been both fascinating and informative.
>
> Thanks for your continued avian-related efforts, Leif, and your generous donation to the Trust.
>
> Anybody else make a pledge and follow through on it? I'd be interested to know.
>
> Sincerely,
> Barry Haas
> AAS Trust Treasurer

 

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Date: 7/4/17 8:22 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Quail Revival
In the Fayetteville area, quail can be frequently heard (and with patience, seen) in two prairie habitats: Woolsey Wet Prairie, adjacent to the West Fayetteville waste treatment facility, and Chesney Tall Grass Natural area, north of Siloam Springs.

I am leading a Wild Birds Unlimited sponsored bird walk at Chesney on July 12. You may join us at the store location on Joyce Ave, Fayetteville, at 6AM, or meet us on site about 7:45AM. Bring water, a sun hat, and insect repellant. Not suitable for pets or children under 10.

Jay ("Rick") Jones

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 4, 2017, at 8:02 AM, Mary Ann King <office...> wrote:
>
> That is wonderful to hear that the park is only mowed twice a year! A gold star for the park director.
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
> Sent: Tuesday, July 4, 2017 6:45 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Quail Revival
>
> Yesterday I heard one calling in one of our city parks. The grass in this park has been allowed to grow. It's quite "wild" and has native wildflowers in it. I've been in contact with the director of the park. He said he gets calls from people who want to see the park mowed. But he tells them there are enough parks like that already. This one is going to stay natural. They will mow it twice a year, and after nesting.
>
> Across the border in Moffett, a pair flew across the road in front of me, from a cornfield, just on the edge of town. It was a very nice thing to see.
>
> Sandy B.
> Fort Smith
>
> On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 12:23 AM George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> wrote:
> This summer, for the first time in almost ten years, we're hearing
> Northern Bobwhites here just south of Cleveland. I'm not sure what has
> caused this years uptick in the quail population, but we would like to
> foster it...
>
> Remind me who the contact person is at the AGFC who helps manage
> quail..? I know I had it recorded somewhere, but its long since gotten
> lost in the ether.
>
> Thanks
>
> George

 

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Date: 7/4/17 7:21 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Quail Revival
Amen on the cottontails; hope the qwazy rabbits stay out of our garden.

The relatively cool, wet conditions are yielding lots of early chanterelles
as well as late dog-tooth violets. We had early (late Feb) "May-apples",
too.

I haven't heard a bobwhite hereabouts since 2012. Maybe we'll get lucky
this year.

Jeff Short
At the bottom loop on the continuation of the Ouachita River



-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Karen And Jim Rowe
Sent: Tuesday, July 04, 2017 8:53 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Quail Revival

Marcus Asher is AGFC's quail biologist.

I am not only seeing and hearing more quail than in years past, I am also
seeing significantly more cottontails everywhere I go. I have to stop our
Boston Terrors from following us up to the barn where for the first time in
years, I have seen several adult and a number of young bunnies.

Are birders seeing or hearing more early successional or early-mid
successional habitat species than usual? More Grasshopper Sparrows, Prairie
Warblers, Blue-winged Warblers, Bell's Vireos, Bachman's Sparrows etc. than
in previous years?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 4, 2017, at 12:22 AM, George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
wrote:
>
> This summer, for the first time in almost ten years, we're hearing
Northern Bobwhites here just south of Cleveland. I'm not sure what has
caused this years uptick in the quail population, but we would like to
foster it...
>
> Remind me who the contact person is at the AGFC who helps manage quail..?
I know I had it recorded somewhere, but its long since gotten lost in the
ether.
>
> Thanks
>
> George
 

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Date: 7/4/17 6:53 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Quail Revival
Marcus Asher is AGFC's quail biologist.

I am not only seeing and hearing more quail than in years past, I am also seeing significantly more cottontails everywhere I go. I have to stop our Boston Terrors from following us up to the barn where for the first time in years, I have seen several adult and a number of young bunnies.

Are birders seeing or hearing more early successional or early-mid successional habitat species than usual? More Grasshopper Sparrows, Prairie Warblers, Blue-winged Warblers, Bell's Vireos, Bachman's Sparrows etc. than in previous years?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 4, 2017, at 12:22 AM, George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> wrote:
>
> This summer, for the first time in almost ten years, we're hearing Northern Bobwhites here just south of Cleveland. I'm not sure what has caused this years uptick in the quail population, but we would like to foster it...
>
> Remind me who the contact person is at the AGFC who helps manage quail..? I know I had it recorded somewhere, but its long since gotten lost in the ether.
>
> Thanks
>
> George
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/17 6:02 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: Quail Revival
That is wonderful to hear that the park is only mowed twice a year! A gold star for the park director.



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
Sent: Tuesday, July 4, 2017 6:45 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Quail Revival



Yesterday I heard one calling in one of our city parks. The grass in this park has been allowed to grow. It's quite "wild" and has native wildflowers in it. I've been in contact with the director of the park. He said he gets calls from people who want to see the park mowed. But he tells them there are enough parks like that already. This one is going to stay natural. They will mow it twice a year, and after nesting.



Across the border in Moffett, a pair flew across the road in front of me, from a cornfield, just on the edge of town. It was a very nice thing to see.



Sandy B.

Fort Smith



On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 12:23 AM George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> <mailto:<vogel...> > wrote:

This summer, for the first time in almost ten years, we're hearing
Northern Bobwhites here just south of Cleveland. I'm not sure what has
caused this years uptick in the quail population, but we would like to
foster it...

Remind me who the contact person is at the AGFC who helps manage
quail..? I know I had it recorded somewhere, but its long since gotten
lost in the ether.

Thanks

George


 

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Date: 7/4/17 4:45 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Quail Revival
Yesterday I heard one calling in one of our city parks. The grass in this
park has been allowed to grow. It's quite "wild" and has native wildflowers
in it. I've been in contact with the director of the park. He said he gets
calls from people who want to see the park mowed. But he tells them there
are enough parks like that already. This one is going to stay natural.
They will mow it twice a year, and after nesting.

Across the border in Moffett, a pair flew across the road in front of me,
from a cornfield, just on the edge of town. It was a very nice thing to
see.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith

On Tue, Jul 4, 2017 at 12:23 AM George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
wrote:

> This summer, for the first time in almost ten years, we're hearing
> Northern Bobwhites here just south of Cleveland. I'm not sure what has
> caused this years uptick in the quail population, but we would like to
> foster it...
>
> Remind me who the contact person is at the AGFC who helps manage
> quail..? I know I had it recorded somewhere, but its long since gotten
> lost in the ether.
>
> Thanks
>
> George
>

 

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Date: 7/3/17 10:23 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Quail Revival
This summer, for the first time in almost ten years, we're hearing
Northern Bobwhites here just south of Cleveland. I'm not sure what has
caused this years uptick in the quail population, but we would like to
foster it...

Remind me who the contact person is at the AGFC who helps manage
quail..? I know I had it recorded somewhere, but its long since gotten
lost in the ether.

Thanks

George
 

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Date: 7/3/17 9:32 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Big Day(s) donation to the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust
Dear ARBIRDers,

It was a pleasant surprise to receive a pledged donation from Leif Anderson to the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust for his Big Day. Actually, Leif did four Big Days totaling 535 species with a high of 145 species in one county. I think it was Butch Tetzlaff who suggested a challenge whereby birders would pledge to donate a set amount to a bird-related organization for each species ID'd on their Big Day.

Leif went above and beyond with his four days of Big Day birding. His pledge of $0.20/species, which he originally estimated would come to about $75, penciled out to $107 when all was said and done. Leif's donation was added to the Trust's Endowment-Memorial Fund which has a goal of $200,000 by the Trust's 50th anniversary in 2022. Leif's donation brings the Endowment-Memorial Fund total to $157,993.93.

The purpose of the Trust is "for charitable, scientific, public safety, literary, or educational purposes, or for the preservation and conservation of the wildlife, plant life,
forests, wetlands, and all natural resources, within the United States or any of its possessions." Recent research grants have funded some fascinating work on a variety of mostly avian species. Some of the grant recipients have given presentations at Arkansas Audubon Society meetings that have been both fascinating and informative.

Thanks for your continued avian-related efforts, Leif, and your generous donation to the Trust.

Anybody else make a pledge and follow through on it? I'd be interested to know.

Sincerely,
Barry Haas
AAS Trust Treasurer
 

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Date: 7/3/17 3:49 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob Terns update
I finally got home to look at the photos of the terns and get a better identification.  There were 2 Caspian Terns, 1 Black Tern already starting to lose its black coloring, and 1 Forster's Tern in winter coloring.
We also saw at least 12 juvenile White Ibis.  All of them were in their brown coloring, we didn't see any adults.
Besides those birds we saw the usual cast of Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets, Great Blue Herons, Little Blue Herons, Green Herons.  Plus other common birds.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 7/3/17 11:38 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob Terns
We saw 4 terns at BKNWR about noon today. They were all standing in a group. Two of them were Caspian Terns. 1 was a Black Tern. And the 4th I'm not totally sure about. It looked like a Least Tern but it was a little bit larger than the Black Tern. 
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 7/2/17 3:32 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: NWAAS July meeting: Dan Scheiman talks about the NATIVE project - restoring our prairies
The Northwest Arkansas AudubonSociety July meeting will be on Saturday, July 22, 2017 at the Hobbs State ParkVisitor Center at 2 pm.  Dan Scheiman will give the followingpresentation: "TheNATIVE Project: Growing the future of Arkansas’s prairies".    Audubon Arkansas’s  Native  Agriculture  to  InVigorate Ecosystems (NATIVE)  project  is  focused  on training  underserved  farmers in  to  grow local  genotype  native  warm  season grasses andwildflowers for seed production. This bird-friendly crop is critical to therestoration of tallgrass prairie habitat in Arkansas’s fourprairie regions.  Dan will talk about the project’ssuccesses and challenges, as well as how this project will help birds on alandscape-scale.Dr.Dan Scheiman is Bird Conservation Director for Audubon Arkansas, a state officeof the National Audubon Society.  Dan has a B.S. from Cornell University,M.S. from Eastern Illinois University, and Ph.D. from Purdue University. He and his staff monitor birds and other wildlife, restore wildlife habitat,and help Arkansans improve their local environments.  He has been birdingfor over 25 years.  In the 12 years he has lived in Arkansas he has seen360 of the 418 bird species documented in the state.Free and open to public
 

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Date: 7/2/17 9:52 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: FOOT TREMBLING BY KILLDEER AND A RARE PLANT AT CENTERTON

Joe, foot-trembling has been reported in Catharid thrushes too.  Here is a video of a Hermit thrush employing that tactic: Amazing foraging behaviour by a Hermit Thrush; and here is a paper describing it in Swainsons Thrushes: http://sites.usm.edu/migratory-bird-research/materials/p0542-p0545.pdf

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Amazing foraging behaviour by a Hermit Thrush

I noticed this Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus) on my lawn in southern Haliburton County, Ontario and at first ...
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On Saturday, July 1, 2017, 5:01:50 PM CDT, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

<!--#yiv3189449314 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}-->


Killdeer were the only shorebirds we saw at Craig state fish hatchery in Centerton this morning. There are still 2 good ponds with mudflats, and lots of aquatic insects available. One Killdeer was steadily feeding in the soft mud employing a technique often called foot trembling. It extended one foot and vibrated it in the very shallow water/wet mud. This stirring presumably brings aquatic invertebrates up from just below the surface. It was alternating feet as it moved along the soft mud.




In previous years, we’ve seen Piping and Semipalmated Plovers employing this same “fishing” technique at the hatchery. Perhaps this is part of the skill set that makes a plover a plover.




The hatchery dates to the 1940s because of big artesian springs that facilitated raising fish. These springs also nurture a relatively rare natural feature for the Ozarks: wetland. The wetlands around Centerton have been greatly altered, but an interesting community of native plants remains. In recognition of this, hatchery personnel have altered their mowing in several areas to protect these plants.




While we up there today, Joan Reynolds surveyed a couple of these unmowed strips. She found plants that are interesting or unusual, and one that was a real surprise: a tall (some up to 2 feet) white orchid in the genus Spiranthes. Collectively, these are called ladies’-tresses. Atlas of the Vascular Plants of Arkansas (2013) lists 11 species in this genus for Arkansas, including 7 that are known from northern Arkansas. This could be one of these 7, or something else. Like I said, wetland habitats in the Ozarks are rare, and they contain botanical gems. Joan took many photos. She will confer with botanists at Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission.




I’ve made birding trips to the hatchery since early 1980s. It amazes me that after so many years, and after so many rare and interesting birds, these trips continue to fascinate. Just as we were leaving, Joan spotted a Yellowbelly Water Snake, Nerodia erythrogaster. The subspecies in the Centerton area is N. e. transversa.




 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/17 7:56 am
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Re: Song ID help please
That might be. I don’t have the Sibley app, I have IBird Pro and the Audubon Birds app. The latter also has a “nasal call #1” and it is close to what I heard. A little more nasal than what I heard but close. I had ruled out Eastern Towhee because the sound was “cleaner” that the towhee but maybe I was too quick to rule it out. thanks

Jim Dixon
Little Rock
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” -- Thorin

From: Jay Jones
Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2017 9:37 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Song ID help please

Given the season and brevity of this bird sound you described, I would venture that it was a call, rather than song. If you have access to the Sibley iPhone app, I'd suggest you listen to "nasal call #1" for the Eastern Towhee.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 2, 2017, at 8:04 AM, jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr...> wrote:


I just walked in the Arboretum Trail at Pinnacle Mountain State Park. I was greeted with a "tuWee!" not a "towHee". It took about 1 second to sing with a stress on the second syllable. I'm usually pretty good with bird song but I don't recognize this one. If you have ideas I will listen to their songs and see if that was it . Thank you



Jim Dixon
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/17 7:38 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Song ID help please
Given the season and brevity of this bird sound you described, I would venture that it was a call, rather than song. If you have access to the Sibley iPhone app, I'd suggest you listen to "nasal call #1" for the Eastern Towhee.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 2, 2017, at 8:04 AM, jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr...> wrote:
>
> I just walked in the Arboretum Trail at Pinnacle Mountain State Park. I was greeted with a "tuWee!" not a "towHee". It took about 1 second to sing with a stress on the second syllable. I'm usually pretty good with bird song but I don't recognize this one. If you have ideas I will listen to their songs and see if that was it . Thank you
>
>
>
> Jim Dixon
> Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/17 6:04 am
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Song ID help please


I just walked in the Arboretum Trail at Pinnacle Mountain State Park. I was greeted with a "tuWee!" not a "towHee". It took about 1 second to sing with a stress on the second syllable. I'm usually pretty good with bird song but I don't recognize this one. If you have ideas  I will listen to their songs and see  if that was it . Thank you


Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 5:41 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Tricolored Heron on Wilbur West Road
This afternoon I observed the following birds on the flooded field at
Wilbur West Road:

Great Egret (103)
Snowy Egret (5)
Great Blue Heron (5)
Little Blue Heron (36)
*Tricolored Heron* (1)
White Ibis (4)
Black-necked Stilt (15)
Pied-billed Grebe (5)
Ruddy Duck (2)
Wood Duck (8) plus a mother & 8 babies

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 4:44 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: AOU 58th Supplement Rundown
Alas, we've lost Thayer's Gull, sorry Kenny and LaDonna...nice work all these years though.

But, it looks like the Yellow-breasted Chat is now in its very own family; makes more sense to me.

North America has also gained a crossbill. Don't think it's any we would see here, however.

See for yourself:

http://birdaz.com/blog/2017/07/01/the-fifty-eighth-supplement-to-the-aou-check-list/

Mitchell Pruitt

Sent from my iPhone.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 3:01 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: FOOT TREMBLING BY KILLDEER AND A RARE PLANT AT CENTERTON
Killdeer were the only shorebirds we saw at Craig state fish hatchery in Centerton this morning. There are still 2 good ponds with mudflats, and lots of aquatic insects available. One Killdeer was steadily feeding in the soft mud employing a technique often called foot trembling. It extended one foot and vibrated it in the very shallow water/wet mud. This stirring presumably brings aquatic invertebrates up from just below the surface. It was alternating feet as it moved along the soft mud.

In previous years, weve seen Piping and Semipalmated Plovers employing this same fishing technique at the hatchery. Perhaps this is part of the skill set that makes a plover a plover.

The hatchery dates to the 1940s because of big artesian springs that facilitated raising fish. These springs also nurture a relatively rare natural feature for the Ozarks: wetland. The wetlands around Centerton have been greatly altered, but an interesting community of native plants remains. In recognition of this, hatchery personnel have altered their mowing in several areas to protect these plants.

While we up there today, Joan Reynolds surveyed a couple of these unmowed strips. She found plants that are interesting or unusual, and one that was a real surprise: a tall (some up to 2 feet) white orchid in the genus Spiranthes. Collectively, these are called ladies-tresses. Atlas of the Vascular Plants of Arkansas (2013) lists 11 species in this genus for Arkansas, including 7 that are known from northern Arkansas. This could be one of these 7, or something else. Like I said, wetland habitats in the Ozarks are rare, and they contain botanical gems. Joan took many photos. She will confer with botanists at Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission.

Ive made birding trips to the hatchery since early 1980s. It amazes me that after so many years, and after so many rare and interesting birds, these trips continue to fascinate. Just as we were leaving, Joan spotted a Yellowbelly Water Snake, Nerodia erythrogaster. The subspecies in the Centerton area is N. e. transversa.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 2:51 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Re: Iola Rea obituary
Will email a copy later. Will put revised info on the website.

On July 1, 2017, at 4:36 PM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:

<!-- P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;} -->

Does anyone have copies of the AAS newsletters from early 1977?  I am looking for Iola Rea's obituary/remembrances int he newsletters.  She died on 14 Feb 1977.

Cindy
Little Rock


 

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Date: 7/1/17 2:35 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Iola Rea obituary
Does anyone have copies of the AAS newsletters from early 1977? I am looking for Iola Rea's obituary/remembrances int he newsletters. She died on 14 Feb 1977.

Cindy
Little Rock



 

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Date: 7/1/17 9:27 am
From: Charles H Mills <swamp_fox...>
Subject: Cave Swallows
A total of 6 Cave Swallows were found at Millwood this morning. 1 juvie was found at River Run West. The other 5 (1 ad, 4 juvies) were found at Beard's Lake Campground. My highest counts were between 8:30 and 9:30 but I'm still seeing one at nearly 11:30.

Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/17 8:23 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: A first for me with Martins
Fascinating observation. Thanks!
J
On Jul 1, 2017, at 9:49 AM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:

> I have watched the Martins in my colony for well over 40 years. Yesterday I watched as an adult kept hovering around two of my boxes for over 10 minutes. It looked like it had a bloody head. I got my bins and saw it had caught, looked to be a Red Admiral butterfly. The wings had its sight blocked and it couldn't find the correct nest. It would land at the wrong level, then hover again. This went on for over 20 minutes, then finally the correct nest, in it went and out without a butterfly.
>
> My first, I have never seen a martin feeding a butterfly.
>
> Second, Martins can see through Dragonfly wings, but not butterfly.
>
> Third, I think Martins can find its way to its colony by coordinates, but it finds it's nest location by sight.
>
> Terry Butler
> Pangburn, AR
 

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Date: 7/1/17 7:50 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: A first for me with Martins
I have watched the Martins in my colony for well over 40 years. Yesterday I
watched as an adult kept hovering around two of my boxes for over 10
minutes. It looked like it had a bloody head. I got my bins and saw it had
caught, looked to be a Red Admiral butterfly. The wings had its sight
blocked and it couldn't find the correct nest. It would land at the wrong
level, then hover again. This went on for over 20 minutes, then finally the
correct nest, in it went and out without a butterfly.

My first, I have never seen a martin feeding a butterfly.

Second, Martins can see through Dragonfly wings, but not butterfly.

Third, I think Martins can find its way to its colony by coordinates, but
it finds it's nest location by sight.

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/17 3:39 pm
From: Tim Tyler <tylertim204...>
Subject: Re: Arkansas Post Least Bitterns
I was visiting there a few days ago and noticed that there is a kiosk in
the primary office to key in your bird list. I did see Bitterns listed but
the location of the sightings for Bitterns was blank. Shucks.

On Fri, Jun 30, 2017 at 4:17 PM, Doc George <
<000000569d636a51-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Yesterday my wife and I photographed Least Bitterns at Arkansas Post
> National Memorial. Today Delos McCauley and I returned to the Post and
> again had a pretty good session photographing the Least Bitterns. I've got
> a few bittern photos posted at the following link for anyone interested in
> taking a look.
>
> Doc George
>
>
> http://www.pbase.com/docg/least_bittern
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/17 2:19 pm
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: SPECIAL AGENT IN CHARGE OF ILLEGAL BIRD IMMIGRATION
I hope you turn a blind eye. :)



MaryAnn King

Pine Ridge Gardens

<http://www.pineridgegardens.com/> www.pineridgegardens.com



We do not get email on our phone. If you cannot keep an appointment at the
scheduled time, please call 479-293-4359.



An acknowledgement that you have received our email would be appreciated.



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Joseph Neal
Sent: Friday, June 30, 2017 2:56 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: SPECIAL AGENT IN CHARGE OF ILLEGAL BIRD IMMIGRATION



I received several messages this afternoon from some of you who know me and
were shocked to hear that at my ripe old age I now have a job. My apologies.
I probably should have provided some more information in my post about
migrants at Centerton than just bragging that I had taken two hours off from
work to go bird watching. I know everyone wants that job.



Actually my comments were what are now called fake news. Maybe alternative
facts. My 2 hours were actually ON the job.



So my job is pretty cool. I have been hired as Special Agent In Charge of
Illegal Bird Immigration, Northwest Arkansas City office. I screen all
incoming birds, just like I have for years, but now the pay is really great.
Making Bird Watching Great Again. Just at the time in life when it was all
seeming dull, I have bird watching with the mission to protect Northwest
Arkansas City!



I do not have to be concerned about white birds, like this morning's Great
Egret and not overly much about the mostly white ones like Forster's Tern.
Other birds, especially the darker ones - like this morning's Least
Sandpiper - I have to keep an eye out for them and require they present all
relevant documents.



The word has just come down from headquarters: Keep a sharp eye out for
birds that are black, gray, yellow, or red! No grandparents! No cousins!




 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/17 2:18 pm
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Arkansas Post Least Bitterns
Yesterday my wife and I photographedLeast Bitterns at Arkansas Post National Memorial. Today DelosMcCauley and I returned to the Post and again had a pretty goodsession photographing the Least Bitterns. I've got a few bitternphotos posted at the following link for anyone interested intaking a look.
Doc George

http://www.pbase.com/docg/least_bittern



 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/17 12:56 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SPECIAL AGENT IN CHARGE OF ILLEGAL BIRD IMMIGRATION
I received several messages this afternoon from some of you who know me and were shocked to hear that at my ripe old age I now have a job. My apologies. I probably should have provided some more information in my post about migrants at Centerton than just bragging that I had taken two hours off from work to go bird watching. I know everyone wants that job.

Actually my comments were what are now called fake news. Maybe alternative facts. My 2 hours were actually ON the job.

So my job is pretty cool. I have been hired as Special Agent In Charge of Illegal Bird Immigration, Northwest Arkansas City office. I screen all incoming birds, just like I have for years, but now the pay is really great. Making Bird Watching Great Again. Just at the time in life when it was all seeming dull, I have bird watching with the mission to protect Northwest Arkansas City!

I do not have to be concerned about white birds, like this mornings Great Egret and not overly much about the mostly white ones like Forsters Tern. Other birds, especially the darker ones like this mornings Least Sandpiper I have to keep an eye out for them and require they present all relevant documents.

The word has just come down from headquarters: Keep a sharp eye out for birds that are black, gray, yellow, or red! No grandparents! No cousins!


 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/17 12:14 pm
From: Cody Massery <cmassery...>
Subject: Possible Jaeger
Earlier this morning an Arkansas Tech graduate student observed a jaeger spp., they believe it was a long-tailed jaeger but are not 100% confident. It was observed chasing least terns around two sand bars. As soon as I was relayed the information I went after the bird. I stopped at two different locations, first Charlie's Hidden Harbor. I did not have any luck there since vegetation blocked most of the viewing areas. So I went down to Paw Paw Road which is located right at the base of Petit Jean mountain on the Oppelo side. After about thirty minutes of scanning the river I found what I believe was the jaeger. You could see a white breast and black head but that was about all you could make out from the distance it was at. I sat there and waited for it to fly but it never did and eventually I had to leave. I have attached a image of a map to this email with the location of where I was at when I observed the bird and as well as where I saw it. Hopefully someone will have better luck than me and get a much better look!


Here are also the coordinates of the Observation Location: 35.127120, -92.831562


Cody Massery

501-358-9928

 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/17 10:40 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: southbound migrants at Centerton this morning
We are having a cool, rainy morning in Northwest Arkansas City. I took off 2 hours from work and made a quick pass through Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton: Forsters Tern (1), Least Sandpiper (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (6), and Great Egret (1). There are 2 pretty good drained ponds, both with lots of emerging aquatic insects. Fun to watch the Great Blue Herons and Green Herons, too.


 

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Date: 6/29/17 7:38 pm
From: Barry Bennett <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: FW: Ohio Air National Guard Wind Turbine Update
Finally! Some good environmental news!
--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 6/29/17, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

Subject: FW: Ohio Air National Guard Wind Turbine Update
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Date: Thursday, June 29, 2017, 9:11 PM

FYI

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for
Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:<DODPIF-L...>]
On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:40 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: Ohio Air National Guard Wind
Turbine Update

For those of you following this
story....

The Ohio Air National Guard announced
this morning that it has halted plans
to install a large turbine at its Camp
Perry facility near Lake Erie.  Many
local, regional, and national groups
actively opposed this wind turbine
installation, citing significant
threats to migratory birds, including
endangered species such as Kirtland's
Warbler. 

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/17 7:12 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Ohio Air National Guard Wind Turbine Update
FYI

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2017 3:40 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: Ohio Air National Guard Wind Turbine Update

For those of you following this story....

The Ohio Air National Guard announced this morning that it has halted plans
to install a large turbine at its Camp Perry facility near Lake Erie. Many
local, regional, and national groups actively opposed this wind turbine
installation, citing significant threats to migratory birds, including
endangered species such as Kirtland's Warbler.
 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/17 6:58 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Whydahs--why not?


This Beautiful Parasitic Bird Could Soon Turn Up in Your Yard <https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/29/science/pin-tailed-whydahs.html?module=WatchingPortal&region=c-column-middle-span-region&pgType=Homepage&action=click&mediaId=thumb_square&state=standard&contentPlacement=2&version=internal&contentCollection=www.nytimes.com&contentId=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nytimes.com%2F2017%2F06%2F29%2Fscience%2Fpin-tailed-whydahs.html&eventName=Watching-article-click>









Text Box:




<https://s.yimg.com/nq/storm/assets/enhancrV2/23/logos/nytimes.png>


This Beautiful Parasitic Bird Could Soon Turn Up in Your Yard


By JoAnna Klein

Scientists developed a model to predict the spread of pin-tailed whydahs, and found they could strain native bir...






 

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Date: 6/29/17 12:37 pm
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
If you do go to Magazine Mtn., be sure to see the Rufous-crowned Sparrow right there on the mountain. When you get there, try to enlist Park Interpreter Don Simons's assistance in finding the species. If you can't find Don, just head for the hang-glider launch site in early morning and listen for the sparrow.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2017 1:18 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas

You would probably like Mt. Magazine and the surrounding areas. That's definitely worth the visit.

Bill Thurman

On Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 12:57 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...><mailto:<millipede1977...>> wrote:
Ebird CAN be an awesome tool and has helped me find birds I might not have found otherwise... but, how useful it is depends greatly on how many people actually use it. There's a TON of good birders here in Arkansas that simply don't report to lists like Ebird. :( And, some areas just aren't birded so frequently. I still try to use it for some birds looking at hotspots and range maps. I can't be of help outside of that but I can dig through a little data and see what comes up. Let people know how far you're willing to travel from that area as well, as that might yield some different results.
I'll post anything that MIGHT be helpful on the list below... if it helps it helps, if it doesn't, it doesn't. :)
On 6/29/2017 10:27 AM, Ryan Dziedzic wrote:
If anyone could provide information on potential locations/habitats for the following birds, I would be very appreciative (eBird is only so helpful in this regard).
WISH LIST:
Northern Bobwhite - lots of older reports in that area. My guess is you can find some if you explore anywhere prairie-ish in that area. Only recent report in that area seems to be near a road and not much of an actual birding spot but, reports are very recent and multiple days so it may be a good spot. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37846617
Mississippi Kite - Not much for reports on this one. This bird is not an easy one to find... I've only seen a couple and it's been luck. They're more common here during migration. I doubt you'll find one unless someone knows of a reliable spot in the area.
Greater Roadrunner - This bird, I want to say you have a chance of finding one on just about any dirt/farmish road in the area. They're quick and not always out in the open so a reliable spot is hard to find. We have a family of them in our neighborhood(Siloam Springs, a bit too far) that you could definitely find IF you are lucky or just patient. With all that said, there was one reported at the same spot as the bobwhite recently so it may be a good area. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37867754
Chuck-will's-widow - This is still on my needs list. Seems that this bird was also seen(likely heard actually) at the same spot as the roadrunner and bobwhite so again, might be a good spot. Someone also recently reported one down in flippin. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37316440
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - don't even need to list locations for this one. Any back road with fields and fences and such, you'll definitely find this bird. :)
White-eyed Vireo - No recent reports in that area but it's a common enough bird. If you're in the right habitat and you know their song, I think there's a good chance for this one.
Bell's Vireo - My experience with these is limited and, limited to Benton county. They seem less abundant and more habitat specific. No reports in that general area but someone might know a good spot for one. I think it will either be traveling or luck for this bird. Adam mentioned Baker prairie in Harrison and it seems there are a few recent sightings there so, definitely worth a look if you can get that way. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37356668
Worm-eating Warbler - another bird I'd call habitat specific... or, picky. Seems to prefer areas with steep hills and dense forest. There may be habitat like that in that immediate area but there are no good reports right there. Reliable reports(not too recent) all along the buffalo river that was mentioned by Adam already.
Swainson's Warbler - Doubtful on this one. Migration through here is in the Spring... May perhaps. Kind of late now and even then, not very common.
Kentucky Warbler - Another habitat specific like the worm eating but, far less picky or, more common. Anywhere along the buffalo you're likely to find them. No recent reports but they have been reported at bull shoals... Cindy Franklin reported one a few years back at the dam. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S14365102 I think if you're in the right spot, you should find this one. :)
Prairie Warbler - I haven't had much luck with this species but they are around. I think Baker prairie that was mentioned will be your best bet but none have been reported toooooo recently. Hopefully someone has some more reliable reports than recent ebird sightings for this one.
Yellow-breasted Chat - Baker prairie again. Recent report of two there. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37356668 A closer location that looks like it could be a good spot... http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S11255299 looks under ebirded... but, being a resort, it might not be a general public area to bird. Can't say. Looks like Dan Scheiman has been there years back so maybe he or someone else knows something of the location. It's close to bull shoals and, even though there's no data this year, looks like it has good bird.
Lark Sparrow - no recent reports in that area but you may get lucky on some back roads if you're paying attention.
Summer Tanager - one of many recent sightings http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37831124 I don't think it will be difficult for you to find these. Listen for their call... they're a common bird down here in the summer.
Blue Grosbeak - seems there's a recent sighting at the dam http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37449155 and, that location that had the bobwhite and other birds, first link I posted... These are common but not always seen everywhere. Looks like a good area for them though.
Painted Bunting - these have been reported here and there but the most recent(this month) and reliable has been baker prairie.



I know you can only do so much with Ebird but sometimes it pays off. Hopefully we have some birders knowledgeable of that area even better that have other suggestions to go with.
And, good luck. I've never been to that area but, it's a pretty area.

[https://ipmcdn.avast.com/images/icons/icon-envelope-tick-round-orange-animated-no-repeat-v1.gif]<https://www.avast.com/lp-safe-emailing-3177-b?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=oa-3177-b> Virus-free. www.avast.com<https://www.avast.com/lp-safe-emailing-3177-b?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=oa-3177-b>


 

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Date: 6/29/17 12:24 pm
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
To start with, Ryan, I believe there are still some Swainson's Warblers along the Buffalo River, where the old state park used to be. If not there, I suspect you would have to travel a long way south in Arkansas to get to the next breeding site. The last ones I encountered were in--I think--Grant Co.


And, if the Swainson's Warblers aren't singing, you have zero chance of encountering one. Are they still singing now? I don't know.


Good luck!


Bill Shepherd


P.S.


If the Swainson's Warblers are singing, you can hear them from 1/4 mile away.


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
Sent: Thursday, June 29, 2017 10:46 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas

Could you post the responses to Ryan Dziedzic here too? I wouldn't mind seeing the list of potential places to go as well.

Sarah Morris
Jonesboro

On Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:37 AM Ryan Dziedzic <ryan.dziedzic...><mailto:<ryan.dziedzic...>> wrote:
Dear Arkansas birders,

I am a Michigan birder who be in the northwest/north central Arkansas (Bull Shoals area) during the coming week (July 3-7) and would enjoy exploring the area looking for 'southern' birds.

If anyone could provide information on potential locations/habitats for the following birds, I would be very appreciative (eBird is only so helpful in this regard). As well, if anyone is able, I would be happy to meet you and bird. Please e-mail me privately if you are able to provide information.

Thank you in advance,

Ryan Dziedzic
Mount Pleasant, Michigan

WISH LIST:
Northern Bobwhite
Mississippi Kite
Greater Roadrunner
Chuck-will's-widow
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
White-eyed Vireo
Bell's Vireo
Worm-eating Warbler
Swainson's Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Lark Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Blue Grosbeak
Painted Bunting



 

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Date: 6/29/17 11:18 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
You would probably like Mt. Magazine and the surrounding areas. That's
definitely worth the visit.

Bill Thurman

On Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 12:57 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:

> Ebird CAN be an awesome tool and has helped me find birds I might not have
> found otherwise... but, how useful it is depends greatly on how many people
> actually use it. There's a TON of good birders here in Arkansas that
> simply don't report to lists like Ebird. :( And, some areas just aren't
> birded so frequently. I still try to use it for some birds looking at
> hotspots and range maps. I can't be of help outside of that but I can dig
> through a little data and see what comes up. Let people know how far
> you're willing to travel from that area as well, as that might yield some
> different results.
> I'll post anything that MIGHT be helpful on the list below... if it helps
> it helps, if it doesn't, it doesn't. :)
> On 6/29/2017 10:27 AM, Ryan Dziedzic wrote:
>
> If anyone could provide information on potential locations/habitats for
> the following birds, I would be very appreciative (eBird is only so helpful
> in this regard).
> *WISH LIST:*
> *Northern Bobwhite* - lots of older reports in that area. My guess is
> you can find some if you explore anywhere prairie-ish in that area. Only
> recent report in that area seems to be near a road and not much of an
> actual birding spot but, reports are very recent and multiple days so it
> may be a good spot. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37846617
> *Mississippi Kite* - Not much for reports on this one. This bird is not
> an easy one to find... I've only seen a couple and it's been luck.
> They're more common here during migration. I doubt you'll find one unless
> someone knows of a reliable spot in the area.
> *Greater Roadrunner* - This bird, I want to say you have a chance of
> finding one on just about any dirt/farmish road in the area. They're quick
> and not always out in the open so a reliable spot is hard to find. We have
> a family of them in our neighborhood(Siloam Springs, a bit too far) that
> you could definitely find IF you are lucky or just patient. With all that
> said, there was one reported at the same spot as the bobwhite recently so
> it may be a good area. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37867754
> *Chuck-will's-widow* - This is still on my needs list. Seems that this
> bird was also seen(likely heard actually) at the same spot as the
> roadrunner and bobwhite so again, might be a good spot. Someone also
> recently reported one down in flippin. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/
> checklist/S37316440
> *Scissor-tailed Flycatcher* - don't even need to list locations for this
> one. Any back road with fields and fences and such, you'll definitely find
> this bird. :)
> *White-eyed Vireo* - No recent reports in that area but it's a common
> enough bird. If you're in the right habitat and you know their song, I
> think there's a good chance for this one.
> *Bell's Vireo* - My experience with these is limited and, limited to
> Benton county. They seem less abundant and more habitat specific. No
> reports in that general area but someone might know a good spot for one. I
> think it will either be traveling or luck for this bird. Adam mentioned
> Baker prairie in Harrison and it seems there are a few recent sightings
> there so, definitely worth a look if you can get that way.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37356668
> *Worm-eating Warbler* - another bird I'd call habitat specific... or,
> picky. Seems to prefer areas with steep hills and dense forest. There may
> be habitat like that in that immediate area but there are no good reports
> right there. Reliable reports(not too recent) all along the buffalo river
> that was mentioned by Adam already.
> *Swainson's Warbler* - Doubtful on this one. Migration through here is
> in the Spring... May perhaps. Kind of late now and even then, not very
> common.
> *Kentucky Warbler* - Another habitat specific like the worm eating but,
> far less picky or, more common. Anywhere along the buffalo you're likely
> to find them. No recent reports but they have been reported at bull
> shoals... Cindy Franklin reported one a few years back at the dam.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S14365102 I think if you're in
> the right spot, you should find this one. :)
> *Prairie Warbler* - I haven't had much luck with this species but they
> are around. I think Baker prairie that was mentioned will be your best bet
> but none have been reported toooooo recently. Hopefully someone has some
> more reliable reports than recent ebird sightings for this one.
> *Yellow-breasted Chat* - Baker prairie again. Recent report of two
> there. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37356668 A closer
> location that looks like it could be a good spot...
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S11255299 looks under ebirded...
> but, being a resort, it might not be a general public area to bird. Can't
> say. Looks like Dan Scheiman has been there years back so maybe he or
> someone else knows something of the location. It's close to bull shoals
> and, even though there's no data this year, looks like it has good bird.
> *Lark Sparrow* - no recent reports in that area but you may get lucky on
> some back roads if you're paying attention.
> *S**ummer Tanager* - one of many recent sightings
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37831124 I don't think it will
> be difficult for you to find these. Listen for their call... they're a
> common bird down here in the summer.
> *Blue Grosbeak* - seems there's a recent sighting at the dam
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37449155 and, that location that
> had the bobwhite and other birds, first link I posted... These are common
> but not always seen everywhere. Looks like a good area for them though.
> *Painted Bunting* - these have been reported here and there but the most
> recent(this month) and reliable has been baker prairie.
>
>
> I know you can only do so much with Ebird but sometimes it pays off.
> Hopefully we have some birders knowledgeable of that area even better that
> have other suggestions to go with.
> And, good luck. I've never been to that area but, it's a pretty area.
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/lp-safe-emailing-3177-b?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=oa-3177-b> Virus-free.
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>

 

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Date: 6/29/17 10:57 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
Ebird CAN be an awesome tool and has helped me find birds I might not
have found otherwise... but, how useful it is depends greatly on how
many people actually use it. There's a TON of good birders here in
Arkansas that simply don't report to lists like Ebird. :( And, some
areas just aren't birded so frequently. I still try to use it for some
birds looking at hotspots and range maps. I can't be of help outside
of that but I can dig through a little data and see what comes up. Let
people know how far you're willing to travel from that area as well, as
that might yield some different results.
I'll post anything that MIGHT be helpful on the list below... if it
helps it helps, if it doesn't, it doesn't. :)
On 6/29/2017 10:27 AM, Ryan Dziedzic wrote:
> If anyone could provide information on potential locations/habitats
> for the following birds, I would be very appreciative (eBird is only
> so helpful in this regard).
> *_WISH LIST:_*
> *_Northern Bobwhit_e* - lots of older reports in that area. My guess
> is you can find some if you explore anywhere prairie-ish in that
> area. Only recent report in that area seems to be near a road and not
> much of an actual birding spot but, reports are very recent and
> multiple days so it may be a good spot.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37846617
> _*Mississippi Kite*_ - Not much for reports on this one. This bird is
> not an easy one to find... I've only seen a couple and it's been
> luck. They're more common here during migration. I doubt you'll find
> one unless someone knows of a reliable spot in the area.
> _*Greater Roadrunner*_ - This bird, I want to say you have a chance of
> finding one on just about any dirt/farmish road in the area. They're
> quick and not always out in the open so a reliable spot is hard to
> find. We have a family of them in our neighborhood(Siloam Springs, a
> bit too far) that you could definitely find IF you are lucky or just
> patient. With all that said, there was one reported at the same spot
> as the bobwhite recently so it may be a good area.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37867754
> _*Chuck-will's-widow*_ - This is still on my needs list. Seems that
> this bird was also seen(likely heard actually) at the same spot as the
> roadrunner and bobwhite so again, might be a good spot. Someone also
> recently reported one down in flippin.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37316440
> _*Scissor-tailed Flycatcher*_ - don't even need to list locations for
> this one. Any back road with fields and fences and such, you'll
> definitely find this bird. :)
> _*White-eyed Vireo*_ - No recent reports in that area but it's a
> common enough bird. If you're in the right habitat and you know their
> song, I think there's a good chance for this one.
> _*Bell's Vireo*_ - My experience with these is limited and, limited to
> Benton county. They seem less abundant and more habitat specific. No
> reports in that general area but someone might know a good spot for
> one. I think it will either be traveling or luck for this bird. Adam
> mentioned Baker prairie in Harrison and it seems there are a few
> recent sightings there so, definitely worth a look if you can get that
> way. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37356668
> _*Worm-eating Warbler*_ - another bird I'd call habitat specific...
> or, picky. Seems to prefer areas with steep hills and dense forest.
> There may be habitat like that in that immediate area but there are no
> good reports right there. Reliable reports(not too recent) all along
> the buffalo river that was mentioned by Adam already.
> _*Swainson's Warbler*_ - Doubtful on this one. Migration through here
> is in the Spring... May perhaps. Kind of late now and even then, not
> very common.
> _*Kentucky Warbler*_ - Another habitat specific like the worm eating
> but, far less picky or, more common. Anywhere along the buffalo you're
> likely to find them. No recent reports but they have been reported at
> bull shoals... Cindy Franklin reported one a few years back at the
> dam. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S14365102 I think if
> you're in the right spot, you should find this one. :)
> _*Prairie Warbler*_ - I haven't had much luck with this species but
> they are around. I think Baker prairie that was mentioned will be
> your best bet but none have been reported toooooo recently. Hopefully
> someone has some more reliable reports than recent ebird sightings for
> this one.
> _*Yellow-breasted Chat*_ - Baker prairie again. Recent report of two
> there. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37356668 A closer
> location that looks like it could be a good spot...
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S11255299 looks under
> ebirded... but, being a resort, it might not be a general public area
> to bird. Can't say. Looks like Dan Scheiman has been there years
> back so maybe he or someone else knows something of the location.
> It's close to bull shoals and, even though there's no data this year,
> looks like it has good bird.
> _*Lark Sparrow*_ - no recent reports in that area but you may get
> lucky on some back roads if you're paying attention.
> _*S*__*ummer Tanager*_ - one of many recent sightings
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37831124 I don't think it
> will be difficult for you to find these. Listen for their call...
> they're a common bird down here in the summer.
> _*Blue Grosbeak*_ - seems there's a recent sighting at the dam
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37449155 and, that location
> that had the bobwhite and other birds, first link I posted... These
> are common but not always seen everywhere. Looks like a good area for
> them though.
> _*Painted Bunting*_ - these have been reported here and there but the
> most recent(this month) and reliable has been baker prairie.
>
>
I know you can only do so much with Ebird but sometimes it pays off.
Hopefully we have some birders knowledgeable of that area even better
that have other suggestions to go with.
And, good luck. I've never been to that area but, it's a pretty area.



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

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Date: 6/29/17 10:04 am
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
I've been to Tyler Bend along the Buffalo National River every year around this time. We see most of those birds there. The lower portion of the Riverview Trail leaving from the Visiter Center is good for the Worm-eating/Kentucky/Hooded Warbler menagerie. I've heard bobwhite, chats, and Painted Buntings from the Visitor Center and in adjacent fields. The roads to and from are great for roadrunners and we hear chuck-will's when we camp at night. At any rate, I think the Buffalo is our gift to the country. It's worth a visit. You might try Baker Prairie in Harrison as well. Enjoy,

Adam Schaffer

> On Jun 29, 2017, at 10:46 AM, Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> wrote:
>
> Could you post the responses to Ryan Dziedzic here too? I wouldn't mind seeing the list of potential places to go as well.
>
> Sarah Morris
> Jonesboro
>
>> On Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:37 AM Ryan Dziedzic <ryan.dziedzic...> wrote:
>> Dear Arkansas birders,
>>
>> I am a Michigan birder who be in the northwest/north central Arkansas (Bull Shoals area) during the coming week (July 3-7) and would enjoy exploring the area looking for 'southern' birds.
>>
>> If anyone could provide information on potential locations/habitats for the following birds, I would be very appreciative (eBird is only so helpful in this regard). As well, if anyone is able, I would be happy to meet you and bird. Please e-mail me privately if you are able to provide information.
>>
>> Thank you in advance,
>>
>> Ryan Dziedzic
>> Mount Pleasant, Michigan
>>
>> WISH LIST:
>> Northern Bobwhite
>> Mississippi Kite
>> Greater Roadrunner
>> Chuck-will's-widow
>> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
>> White-eyed Vireo
>> Bell's Vireo
>> Worm-eating Warbler
>> Swainson's Warbler
>> Kentucky Warbler
>> Prairie Warbler
>> Yellow-breasted Chat
>> Lark Sparrow
>> Summer Tanager
>> Blue Grosbeak
>> Painted Bunting
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/17 8:46 am
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
Subject: Re: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
Could you post the responses to Ryan Dziedzic here too? I wouldn't mind
seeing the list of potential places to go as well.

Sarah Morris
Jonesboro

On Thu, Jun 29, 2017 at 10:37 AM Ryan Dziedzic <ryan.dziedzic...>
wrote:

> Dear Arkansas birders,
>
> I am a Michigan birder who be in the northwest/north central Arkansas
> (Bull Shoals area) during the coming week (July 3-7) and would enjoy
> exploring the area looking for 'southern' birds.
>
> If anyone could provide information on potential locations/habitats for
> the following birds, I would be very appreciative (eBird is only so helpful
> in this regard). As well, if anyone is able, I would be happy to meet you
> and bird. Please e-mail me privately if you are able to provide
> information.
>
> Thank you in advance,
>
> Ryan Dziedzic
> Mount Pleasant, Michigan
>
> *WISH LIST:*
> Northern Bobwhite
> Mississippi Kite
> Greater Roadrunner
> Chuck-will's-widow
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
> White-eyed Vireo
> Bell's Vireo
> Worm-eating Warbler
> Swainson's Warbler
> Kentucky Warbler
> Prairie Warbler
> Yellow-breasted Chat
> Lark Sparrow
> Summer Tanager
> Blue Grosbeak
> Painted Bunting
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/17 8:37 am
From: Ryan Dziedzic <ryan.dziedzic...>
Subject: RFI -- Birding Northwest and North Central Arkansas
Dear Arkansas birders,

I am a Michigan birder who be in the northwest/north central Arkansas
(Bull Shoals area) during the coming week (July 3-7) and would enjoy
exploring the area looking for 'southern' birds.

If anyone could provide information on potential locations/habitats for the
following birds, I would be very appreciative (eBird is only so helpful in
this regard). As well, if anyone is able, I would be happy to meet you and
bird. Please e-mail me privately if you are able to provide information.

Thank you in advance,

Ryan Dziedzic
Mount Pleasant, Michigan

*WISH LIST:*
Northern Bobwhite
Mississippi Kite
Greater Roadrunner
Chuck-will's-widow
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
White-eyed Vireo
Bell's Vireo
Worm-eating Warbler
Swainson's Warbler
Kentucky Warbler
Prairie Warbler
Yellow-breasted Chat
Lark Sparrow
Summer Tanager
Blue Grosbeak
Painted Bunting

 

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Date: 6/28/17 7:36 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Costa Rica Birding and a Blog Post
For those who are interested, here’s my most recent blog post. This should provide some reading material for the hottest part of the day tomorrow. The idea is to do a series of 3 blog posts on my trip to Costa Rica (with Kim Smith and Kannan) at the end of May. I decided to start with a post especially dear to my heart, it’s entitled "Costa Rica: Creatures of the Night" and is about owls seen and photographed on the trip. I also give a shoutout to some of the country’s famous herps. Check it out:

https://mitchell-pruitt.squarespace.com/the-great-outdoorsman/2017/6/27/costa-rica-creatures-of-the-night <https://mitchell-pruitt.squarespace.com/the-great-outdoorsman/2017/6/27/costa-rica-creatures-of-the-night>

This trip was amazing, with over 300 species tallied. I was able to get around 130 life birds, including 7 owls, all of which were photographed. Not surprisingly, my favorite bird of the whole trip was the Unspotted Saw-whet Owl, seen with David Oakley and Mia Revels. We hired a special guide for this night excursion in the high-elevation Savegre Region.

Enjoy and good birding!

Mitchell Pruitt



 

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Date: 6/28/17 6:42 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: apologies on some odd words
I enjoyed your post errors and all. I find I need to edit my stuff pretty closely before posting it...I HATE the computer assuming it knows what I want to say! Irritating!!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 28, 2017, at 7:42 PM, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:
>
> I no longer have a computer but a (wrong) editor smartphone. so my critter was supposed to be chitter and there are other words that it changed on me too.Appears that this phone knows nothing about bird descriptions. We need a birder to design a smartphone with bird terms. Ha! apologies from Teresa, AR.
 

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Date: 6/28/17 5:42 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: apologies on some odd words
I no longer have a computer but a (wrong) editor smartphone. so my critter
was supposed to be chitter and there are other words that it changed on me
too.Appears that this phone knows nothing about bird descriptions. We need
a birder to design a smartphone with bird terms. Ha! apologies from
Teresa, AR.

 

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Date: 6/28/17 5:34 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Another birdy evening at Twin Lakes recreation at Ouachita
Fishing was nothing with a huge snapper turtle out there. ( I should know,
my pretty little brass hook ended up as a straight pin) 12 Canada Geese in
the shallows swam around in our cove area. 2 scissor-tails chasing a crow
across the sky. 13 Rough-wing swallows were out but protesters tonight,with
one lonely Tree swallow following behind. The waves reached up to touch
the underbelly of a low flying Great Blue Heron. My guess the turtle ruined
his fishing too. The critter of a hummingbird as it flew by my head. No
idea what it was. A kingfisher landed nearby his crest and white markings
shine so brightly in the lower sunlight. Star loves the mid between her
toes as she went deeper out to snatch my cork with delight. (lucky the hook
didn't get her as I scorned her big time.) Silver likes a rocky footing so
I went by the ramp to fish a bit in the shade. Now both kids are happily up
to their bellies in the cool water. Crows still talking one by one.

Our trip out got us a slow flying down the lane Cooper's Hawk not in a
hurry either we matched his speed. Till he put on a spurt of gas and flew
in front of us crossing the street. At home we were met by a Carolina Wren
in our screened porch. Dogs were delighted. Bird was not. Getting the dogs
inward got it outward in relief. The delight at the lake and I got my
phone out to take the shot. Was this pink and white dragon float being
towed by big brother we assume? In his little raft as he towed his two tiny
sisters to the other side where the swimming beach was. Not a bird but that
was a laughing sight to see! Makes me to want a dragon too.
Now we got two does put here with a Barred Owl pair talking away!
Teresa , MT Ida, AR

 

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Date: 6/28/17 8:01 am
From: Jerry Britten <jeraldabritten...>
Subject: Red-shouldered hawk -vs- snake - photos
Hi All,
back in late April I posted an observation about an encounter between this
hawk and a snake that I mis-identified at the time but what turned out to
be a black racer. Anyway, I finally remembered to post photos to an ebird
report, link below, for those interested.
Jerry Britten
Clayton CA and Flippin AR.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S37841661

 

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Date: 6/28/17 3:38 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 27
Impressive work!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 27, 2017, at 10:02 PM, David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:
>
>
> Rob Sanders (OK) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 65 species. It was partly cloudy and warm. Here is our list for today:
>
> Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 5
> Wood Duck – 13
> Mallard – 3
> Pied-billed Grebe – 3
> American White Pelican – 1
> Neotropic Cormorant – 14
> Anhinga – 34
> Great-blue Heron – 9
> Great Egret – 25
> Snowy Egret – 46
> Little-blue Heron – 28
> Cattle Egret – 144
> Green Heron – 14
> White Ibis – 36
> Black Vulture – 105
> Turkey Vulture – 24
> Mississippi Kite – 10
> Red-tailed Hawk - 3
> Purple Gallinule – 20 (also one on a nest & a brood of 3 chicks)
> Common Gallinule – 29 (a couple broods of chicks also.)
> American Coot – 6
> Least Tern - 2
> Mourning Dove – 9
> Yellow-billed Cuckoo – 6
> Barred Owl – 1
> Chimney Swift – 1
> Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1
> Red-bellied Woodpecker – 2
> Downy Woodpecker – 2
> Acadian Flycatcher – 2
> Eastern Phoebe - 3
> Eastern Kingbird – 2
> Scissor-tailed Flycatcher – 2
> White-eyed Vireo – 12
> Bell’s Vireo – 1
> Yellow-throated Vireo - 1
> Red-eyed Vireo – 3
> American Crow – 1
> Fish Crow – 6
> Tree Swallow – 16
> Cliff Swallow – 6
> Barn Swallow – 55
> Carolina Chickadee - 6
> Tufted Titmouse – 2
> Carolina Wren – 14
> Blue-gray Gnatcatcher – 6
> Eastern Bluebird - 3
> Northern Mockingbird – 2
> Yellow-throated Warbler - 1
> Pine Warbler – 1
> Black-and-white Warbler - 1
> Prothonotary Warbler – 6
> Common Yellowthroat – 16
> Yellow-breasted Chat – 11
> Summer Tanager – 3
> Eastern Towhee – 3
> Northern Cardinal – 25
> Blue Grosbeak - 1
> Indigo Bunting – 32
> Painted Bunting – 13
> Dickcissel – 17
> Red-winged Blackbird – 28
> Common Grackle – 4
> Brown-headed Cowbird – 4
> Orchard Oriole – 6
>
>
> Odonates:
>
>
> Fragile Forktail
> Swamp Darner
> Regal Darner
> Prince Baskettail
> Stillwater Clubtail
> Halloween Pennant
> Four-spotted Pennant
> Eastern Pondhawk
> Slaty Skimmer
> Golden-winged Skimmer
> Widow Skimmer
> Common Whitetail
> Eastern Amberwing
> Blue Dasher
> Wandering Glider
> Spot-winged Glider
> Black Saddlebags
>
>
> Herps:
>
> American Alligator
> Broad-banded Watersnake
> Blanchard’s Cricket Frog
> Southern Leopard Frog
> Bronze Frog
> Bullfrog
>
>
>
> Good birding!
>
> David Arbour
> De Queen, AR
>
>

 

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Date: 6/27/17 7:23 pm
From: Lorraine Heartfield <000001aa89b66f66-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: after work gift to my dogs and me
Yes, wonderful. Thank you


From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Tuesday, June 27, 2017 7:41 PM
Subject: Re: after work gift to my dogs and me

Wonderful report. Thank you!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 27, 2017, at 7:06 PM, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:
>
> My job is cruel to my mind.  Abuse because I speak slow. I got off early and looking at my bleak one room rental. I told my dogkids let go find some fish and bird fun!
> Boy did we. Fish catching of tiny bream small enough for Star to chase in the shallows after I turn them off the hook. This old doggie  (12)knows how to dive into the lake and catch them too. Silver watched the silent Great Blue Heron sit on the bush next to us. I finally decided that the state contest was a tie between the two.  A flock of Tree Swallows swoop around us, I counted them to the number 9. Beautiful in glide and form as they enjoyed the afternoon evening skies. Turning around I saw Fly-Catchers many of them freeing the air around us of bugs. 2 Pheobes, 4 Kingbirds, and a Scissor-tail too. Nice visit with the park ranger as she was checking to see if the dogs were leashed. Which Star was in the water enjoying life and Silver  on land (no water for her)wanted to bark at the ranger,that leash was stretch between them like a 8 foot fishing line,
>  Ha!  Fishing Crows talking away, as the great majestic Turkey  Vulture glides in to see if anyone left a dead fish around. For the dragonflies  fans I don't know the kinds. But there was a satin green and blue one,and a red and yellow looking one zipping around Silver's head.
> It's peaceful out there no nasty co-workers to ruin my evening. Just silent free wheeling birds to remind me that each are different but we are all birds of the same feather no matter whom we are.
>  Even poop out doggies that can't get into the jeep now because they played in the water too long. So with a heaveho one old heavy dog got lifted in. The other one eager to get away from the water sailed in without an problem. The mile home net a Barred Owl early in the trees along 270 east south of where we were. Twin Creek Recreation Park in Lake Ouachita outside of MT Ida, AR. Teresa.


 

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Date: 6/27/17 5:41 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: after work gift to my dogs and me
Wonderful report. Thank you!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 27, 2017, at 7:06 PM, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:
>
> My job is cruel to my mind. Abuse because I speak slow. I got off early and looking at my bleak one room rental. I told my dogkids let go find some fish and bird fun!
> Boy did we. Fish catching of tiny bream small enough for Star to chase in the shallows after I turn them off the hook. This old doggie (12)knows how to dive into the lake and catch them too. Silver watched the silent Great Blue Heron sit on the bush next to us. I finally decided that the state contest was a tie between the two. A flock of Tree Swallows swoop around us, I counted them to the number 9. Beautiful in glide and form as they enjoyed the afternoon evening skies. Turning around I saw Fly-Catchers many of them freeing the air around us of bugs. 2 Pheobes, 4 Kingbirds, and a Scissor-tail too. Nice visit with the park ranger as she was checking to see if the dogs were leashed. Which Star was in the water enjoying life and Silver on land (no water for her)wanted to bark at the ranger,that leash was stretch between them like a 8 foot fishing line,
> Ha! Fishing Crows talking away, as the great majestic Turkey Vulture glides in to see if anyone left a dead fish around. For the dragonflies fans I don't know the kinds. But there was a satin green and blue one,and a red and yellow looking one zipping around Silver's head.
> It's peaceful out there no nasty co-workers to ruin my evening. Just silent free wheeling birds to remind me that each are different but we are all birds of the same feather no matter whom we are.
> Even poop out doggies that can't get into the jeep now because they played in the water too long. So with a heaveho one old heavy dog got lifted in. The other one eager to get away from the water sailed in without an problem. The mile home net a Barred Owl early in the trees along 270 east south of where we were. Twin Creek Recreation Park in Lake Ouachita outside of MT Ida, AR. Teresa.
 

Back to top
Date: 6/27/17 5:06 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: after work gift to my dogs and me
My job is cruel to my mind. Abuse because I speak slow. I got off early
and looking at my bleak one room rental. I told my dogkids let go find some
fish and bird fun!
Boy did we. Fish catching of tiny bream small enough for Star to chase in
the shallows after I turn them off the hook. This old doggie (12)knows how
to dive into the lake and catch them too. Silver watched the silent Great
Blue Heron sit on the bush next to us. I finally decided that the state
contest was a tie between the two. A flock of Tree Swallows swoop around
us, I counted them to the number 9. Beautiful in glide and form as they
enjoyed the afternoon evening skies. Turning around I saw Fly-Catchers many
of them freeing the air around us of bugs. 2 Pheobes, 4 Kingbirds, and a
Scissor-tail too. Nice visit with the park ranger as she was checking to
see if the dogs were leashed. Which Star was in the water enjoying life and
Silver on land (no water for her)wanted to bark at the ranger,that leash
was stretch between them like a 8 foot fishing line,
Ha! Fishing Crows talking away, as the great majestic Turkey Vulture
glides in to see if anyone left a dead fish around. For the dragonflies
fans I don't know the kinds. But there was a satin green and blue one,and
a red and yellow looking one zipping around Silver's head.
It's peaceful out there no nasty co-workers to ruin my evening. Just silent
free wheeling birds to remind me that each are different but we are all
birds of the same feather no matter whom we are.
Even poop out doggies that can't get into the jeep now because they played
in the water too long. So with a heaveho one old heavy dog got lifted in.
The other one eager to get away from the water sailed in without an
problem. The mile home net a Barred Owl early in the trees along 270 east
south of where we were. Twin Creek Recreation Park in Lake Ouachita outside
of MT Ida, AR. Teresa.

 

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Date: 6/27/17 1:03 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Stump and Chesney Prairies, Benton County
I spent the morning helping fellow grad student (of Kim Smith), Alyssa DeRubeis with her grassland bird research today. Primary objectives were vegetation surveys, but she managed to find 3 new Dickcissel nests as well.

Notables from the day include 2 Bell's Vireo singing around Stump Prairie and several Painted Bunting at both sites.

Alyssa is doing excellent work and has managed to fill some big knowledge gaps in regards to late-spring, early summer birds here in just one season so far! Some of her recent rarities include Nelson's Sparrow and female Bobolink in Benton County, and a King Rail at Woolsey Wet Prairie in Fayetteville. Alyssa is an asset to Arkansas birding and is quite a well-known member of both Wisconsin and Minnesota birding circuits, where she has become familiar with grassland birds.

Good birding and stay tuned for photos and a blog post from my recent Costa Rica trip,

Mitchell Pruitt

Sent from my iPhone.
 

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Date: 6/25/17 2:38 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: the end of the cowbird string - maybe
OOPS!!  Now I'm adding my little bit (can't resist):  One human activity that can encourage cowbirds is building more trails or roads that allow cowbirds access to areas they would otherwise not frequent - such as forests, where many bird species, having not normally been exposed to cowbird predation, are acceptors.


From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2017 9:56 PM
Subject: the end of the cowbird string - maybe

<!--#yiv5957584828 _filtered #yiv5957584828 {font-family:Wingdings;panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0;} _filtered #yiv5957584828 {font-family:"Cambria Math";panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv5957584828 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv5957584828 #yiv5957584828 p.yiv5957584828MsoNormal, #yiv5957584828 li.yiv5957584828MsoNormal, #yiv5957584828 div.yiv5957584828MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman", serif;}#yiv5957584828 a:link, #yiv5957584828 span.yiv5957584828MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv5957584828 a:visited, #yiv5957584828 span.yiv5957584828MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv5957584828 p {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman", serif;}#yiv5957584828 span.yiv5957584828EmailStyle18 {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;color:#1F497D;}#yiv5957584828 .yiv5957584828MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv5957584828 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv5957584828 div.yiv5957584828WordSection1 {}-->I am  attempting to stop this string, but by offering more information, I may allow it to continue…J   Species are either acceptors or rejecters…  this has been known for many years due to the pioneering work of Herbert Friedmann, who published “Host relations of the parasitic cowbirds” in 1963… https://archive.org/details/hostrelationsofp00frie   Of course, his publication predates the release and expansion of House Finches in the eastern US but they appear to be acceptors based on his information…   Acceptors do not recognize cowbird eggs as different from their own… rejecters do and either eject the cowbird eggs, abandon the nest, or build a new nest on top of the nest with cowbird eggs (e.g. Yellow Warblers)   Re habitat change:  Cowbirds have to have somewhere to feed…  their preferred feeding areas are associated with livestock, preferably horses but cattle feedlots will do…  for example, there is almost no cowbird parasitism in the forests of the Ozarks… every study we have done on nesting success has had no effect by cowbirds…  but apparently they are finding feeding areas in urban environments…   The best study of this is by Jared Verner who documented the colonization of the Sierra Nevadas by cowbirds as the horse tourism trade expanded into that area… I can supply references if you are interested   So habitat change per se is not the issue, it is habitat changes that allow cowbirds to find feeding areas…        Cheers, Kim   ******************************** Kimberly G. Smith Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences Department of Biological Sciences University of Arkansas Fayetteville, AR 72701 Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010 Email: <kgsmith...> ********************************


 

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Date: 6/25/17 1:32 pm
From: Samantha SCHEIMAN <samantha.scheiman...>
Subject: Arkansas Birds summer newsletter - now online
Arkansas birders,

The summer issue of Arkansas Birds, the newsletter of the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS), is now online at the following link: http://arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf

If you have trouble viewing the newsletter, try opening it in another web browser. Enjoy, and if you like what you see and are not yet an AAS member, please consider joining us and supporting our conservation work: http://arbirds.org/join.html

Thanks,
Samantha Scheiman
Arkansas Birds editor
Little Rock, Ark.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 6/25/17 12:46 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Barn Swallow nests
Hi Abby,

According to the BNA species account, the birds are likely to use the
nests for their second broods, which may be initiated all the way
through early August.

Thank you for caring!

Janine

On 6/25/2017 2:13 PM, Abby Gibson wrote:
> We are about to start adding a ceiling to our garage, which currently
> has three barn swallow nests in the rafters. Since the babies have
> fledged is it safe to assume these nests are done and we can clean
> them up and start on the ceiling? Thanks.
 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/17 12:14 pm
From: Abby Gibson <balllgibson...>
Subject: Barn Swallow nests
We are about to start adding a ceiling to our garage, which currently has
three barn swallow nests in the rafters. Since the babies have fledged is
it safe to assume these nests are done and we can clean them up and start
on the ceiling? Thanks.

 

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Date: 6/25/17 10:48 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: song help?
Many thanks to John Dillon for educating me; Pine Warblers sometimes
sing two notes!

Gratefully,
Janine

On 6/25/2017 10:42 AM, Janine Perlman wrote:
> Just heard a two-note trill, each note steady and maybe 0.75 sec
> duration (so ~1.5 sec for entire song); pitch moderate; sequence
> higher to lower; ~5-10 sec between renditions.
>
> Possibilities, please?
>
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
 

Back to top
Date: 6/25/17 8:43 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: song help?
Just heard a two-note trill, each note steady and maybe 0.75 sec
duration (so ~1.5 sec for entire song); pitch moderate; sequence higher
to lower; ~5-10 sec between renditions.

Possibilities, please?

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
 

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