ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
11/20/17 9:46 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Female Rufous Hummingbird
11/20/17 8:16 am Sim Barrow <sbarrow...> Re: On Insects and education (directly) and birds (indirectly)
11/20/17 7:56 am Don Simons <Don.Simons...> Saw-whet owl on /mag
11/20/17 2:47 am Don Simons <drsimons56...> Saw whet owl on Mount Mag
11/19/17 8:18 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
11/19/17 7:24 pm Charles H Mills <swamp_fox...> Northern Saw-whet Owl
11/19/17 4:19 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Say's Phoebe at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
11/19/17 3:54 pm Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> Update on Search for Red Crossbills
11/19/17 12:40 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> NWAAS December meeting
11/19/17 7:26 am Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...> FOS
11/18/17 3:47 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Re: FYI
11/18/17 9:58 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> 11 binoculars headed for India!
11/18/17 9:27 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> American Woodcock
11/18/17 8:03 am jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> Bald eagle
11/18/17 4:56 am Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Cedar Waxwings
11/17/17 10:55 pm Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> Lake Maumelle
11/17/17 11:52 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> FYI
11/17/17 5:22 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Passenger Pigeon was adapted to living in big flocks
11/16/17 8:23 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Juncos
11/16/17 6:12 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Life is a circle
11/16/17 3:29 pm Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> Juncos
11/16/17 3:15 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: On Insects and education (directly) and birds (indirectly)
11/16/17 1:00 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Re: On Insects and education (directly) and birds (indirectly)
11/16/17 10:30 am Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: Bingo-Old bird bander gets a saw-whet
11/16/17 10:27 am Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> On Insects and education (directly) and birds (indirectly)
11/16/17 8:34 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip this Saturday
11/16/17 3:41 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> GOLDENEYES AND DUNLINS AT ALMA WASTEWATER
11/15/17 12:20 pm Robin Buff <robinbuff...> Re: Bingo-Old bird bander gets a saw-whet
11/15/17 12:18 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Bingo-Old bird bander gets a saw-whet
11/15/17 11:40 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> FW: Bingo-Old bird bander gets a saw-whet
11/14/17 7:23 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: Say's Phoebe, Craighead Co.
11/14/17 2:44 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: LeConte's Sparrows
11/14/17 12:43 pm Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...> Baltimore Oriole in mid November
11/13/17 7:37 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
11/13/17 6:44 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> AAS meeting Lonoke County field trip on Saturday
11/13/17 5:29 pm Gmail <butchchq8...> LeConte's Sparrows
11/13/17 4:50 pm Mary Ann King <office...> Re: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
11/13/17 3:56 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
11/13/17 2:35 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
11/13/17 5:38 am Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> Hummer still around
11/13/17 5:17 am Ann Gordon <chesterann...> Re: Woodcock in Ft. Smith
11/13/17 2:59 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> SundayHummer
11/12/17 10:24 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> AAS News of Members
11/12/17 7:39 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Pulaski County--Frazier Pike this afternoon
11/12/17 5:20 pm Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Woodcock in Ft. Smith
11/12/17 4:59 pm Ed Tiede <0000012caede6260-dmarc-request...> Re: Winter Wren
11/12/17 3:58 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Woodcock in Ft. Smith
11/12/17 3:35 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Prairie Whoville
11/12/17 6:02 am Lucy c Weberling <lucyoga...> Re: INTO THE VALE OF TEARS (Lake Fayetteville)
11/12/17 5:41 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> INTO THE VALE OF TEARS (Lake Fayetteville)
11/12/17 4:42 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: Woolsey Wet Prairie - Vesper Sparrow with a damaged eye/eye socket
11/11/17 4:16 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Woolsey Wet Prairie - Vesper Sparrow with a damaged eye/eye socket
11/11/17 2:29 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Woolsey Wet Prairie - Vesper Sparrow with a damaged eye/eye socket
11/11/17 12:58 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
11/11/17 11:29 am Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> Hummer here again
11/11/17 10:22 am Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> November 17 – Owling at ONSC with Kim Smith and Mitchell Pruitt - Adults only
11/11/17 9:37 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Rough-legged Hawk
11/11/17 9:12 am Charles H Mills <swamp_fox...> Friends return
11/11/17 8:36 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
11/11/17 8:22 am Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
11/11/17 5:39 am Ann Gordon <chesterann...> Purple Finch
11/10/17 11:17 pm Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> tonight at Hobbs
11/10/17 5:32 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: Winter Wren
11/10/17 12:58 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Winter Wren
11/10/17 12:26 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Trumpeter Swans
11/10/17 11:19 am David Prudhomme <dcprudhomme...> Bird identification help
11/10/17 11:18 am Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Waxwings return, Le Conte's continue, etc. (Washington/Benton Co's)
11/10/17 10:27 am Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> RTHU
11/10/17 9:26 am Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> saw-whet update
11/10/17 4:28 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> ALL IN FOR LOONS (TENKILLER)
11/9/17 7:57 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Hawks!
11/9/17 6:33 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Sighting Blue-headed Vireo
11/9/17 5:37 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
11/9/17 9:06 am Ann Honeycutt <annhoneycutt53...> Change of Format in 2018 Audubon Birds Gallery Page-a-Day Calendar
11/9/17 7:25 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> FOS at feeder
11/9/17 7:06 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Re: NSWO at Hobbs State Park - Rogers, AR
11/9/17 4:36 am Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Lesser Black-backed Gull
11/8/17 10:49 pm Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> NSWO at Hobbs State Park - Rogers, AR
11/8/17 7:17 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> Thrushing after the cold front
11/8/17 6:53 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Hawks!
11/8/17 6:19 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Hawks!
11/8/17 6:03 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: Number of Bluebirds fledged reported in newspaper
11/8/17 12:55 pm Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Number of Bluebirds fledged reported in newspaper
11/8/17 3:46 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> WW Scoter
11/7/17 7:27 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 7
11/7/17 2:36 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Lake Fayetteville UPDATE: White-winged Scoters (2)!
11/7/17 2:07 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> ELMER J FUDD GOES DUCK HUNTIN’ (or, RED-BREASTED MERG AND LOONS AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE)
11/7/17 11:33 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> thousands of birds, literally
11/7/17 10:11 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> A 50-year effort to raise endangered whooping cranes comes to an end
11/7/17 9:54 am Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Re: Surf Scoter, Lake Monticello
11/7/17 6:56 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Snow Geese
11/7/17 5:55 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> binoculars Himalaya bound
11/7/17 5:39 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Snow Geese still going over Fayetteville this morning
11/7/17 3:52 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Scoter
11/6/17 5:54 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> BKNWR
11/6/17 5:27 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> MORE DUCKS ON LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
11/6/17 4:37 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> Snow Geese
11/6/17 2:43 pm Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Surf Scoter, Lake Monticello
11/6/17 10:27 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wild geese flying
11/6/17 9:39 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BIG WATERFOWL MOVEMENT FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND, LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
11/6/17 8:50 am Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Frog Bayou
11/6/17 7:00 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, Nov 9, Dragonflies & Damselflies
11/5/17 3:42 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Possible Clapper Rail
11/5/17 1:57 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Possible Clapper Rail
11/5/17 1:02 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Possible Clapper Rail
11/5/17 12:06 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Doug's top 3 most spectacular birds
11/5/17 11:52 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Doug's top 3 most spectacular birds
11/5/17 9:23 am Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Common Loons- Lake Maumelle
11/5/17 6:41 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> 2-OWL NIGHT
11/5/17 5:19 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> LAKE FAYETTEVILLE WATERFOWL FIELD TRIP SATURDAY NOVEMBER 11
11/5/17 4:17 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: Possible Surf Scoter, Lake Monticello
11/4/17 5:19 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: LOONS ON BEAVER LAKE
11/4/17 3:42 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
11/4/17 2:48 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
11/4/17 1:09 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> LOONS ON BEAVER LAKE
11/4/17 12:46 pm Robin Buff <robinbuff...> Sedge Wren Woolsey Wet Prairie
11/4/17 11:56 am Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Clay-colored Sparrows still present at Woolsey Wet Prairie
11/4/17 11:16 am Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
11/4/17 10:26 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
11/4/17 10:02 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Doug James' field notebooks
11/4/17 9:51 am Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Lingering Scissor-tails
11/3/17 12:20 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Wow ! Blue - headed Vireo
11/3/17 10:05 am Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...> Wow ! Blue - headed Vireo
11/3/17 8:57 am Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
11/3/17 8:53 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
11/3/17 8:13 am Than Boves <tboves...> Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
11/3/17 8:05 am Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
11/3/17 7:14 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
11/3/17 7:13 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
11/3/17 6:06 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
11/2/17 7:54 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
11/2/17 7:28 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
11/2/17 3:41 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
11/2/17 10:08 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Hummer Question
11/2/17 9:29 am Kristina Baker <000001c932f45e32-dmarc-request...> Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
11/2/17 8:46 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Butcher Bird Event Canceled
11/2/17 7:59 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
11/2/17 6:50 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: You have new Google Doc message
11/2/17 6:39 am Richard Crawford <richardkcrawford...> Humer Question
11/2/17 6:36 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> You have new Google Doc message
11/1/17 10:13 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> south Lafayette County 10-31-17
11/1/17 5:04 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Oct. 31st
11/1/17 3:50 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Hummer Hearth at WBU
11/1/17 1:53 pm Joe Neal <joecneal...> HARRIS'S SPARROWS AT MAYSVILLE
11/1/17 8:49 am Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
10/31/17 8:06 pm Rick Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
10/31/17 6:59 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
10/31/17 6:34 pm Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...> Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
10/31/17 6:28 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
10/31/17 5:37 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
10/31/17 5:08 pm Rick Jones <jonesjay62...> RSHA as bird feeder predator
10/31/17 1:42 pm Joe Neal <joecneal...> LECONTE’S AT FROG
10/31/17 10:40 am Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> S-E Owl, more L. Longspurs (Benton Co.)
10/31/17 8:48 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> 2018 Red Slough Birding Convention
10/30/17 3:46 pm Dan Scheiman <birddan...> The Butcher Bird, Nov 4
10/30/17 3:45 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Re: Clay-colored Sparrows at Woolsey Wet Prairie
10/30/17 3:34 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Clay-colored Sparrows at Woolsey Wet Prairie
10/29/17 2:35 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Clay-colored Sparrows at Woolsey Wet Prairie
10/29/17 9:39 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
10/29/17 6:37 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
10/28/17 7:40 pm JFR <johnfredman...> LECONTE'S IN PINE BLUFF
10/28/17 7:24 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Saw-whet Owls and Great-tailed Grackles
10/28/17 12:54 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Re: Le Conte’s in the frost
10/28/17 11:58 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> CLOCK- CLOCK, BREWER’S IN THE BLACK
10/28/17 10:16 am Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Le Conte’s in the frost
10/26/17 10:02 am Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - Scissortail thread 24 Oct 2017 to 25 Oct 2017 (#2017-303)
10/26/17 9:49 am James Morgan <jlmm...> Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - Scissortail thread 24 Oct 2017 to 25 Oct 2017 (#2017-303)
10/26/17 8:13 am Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> Re: Ring Necked Pheasant - again
10/26/17 7:59 am Carol Traphagan <000000f7d4dacb61-dmarc-request...> Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 24 Oct 2017 to 25 Oct 2017 (#2017-303)
10/25/17 7:47 pm Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Le Conte's Sparrow and L. Longspur (Benton Co.)
10/25/17 6:19 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> For Endangered Animals, Fire, or Hurricanes Can Mean the End
10/25/17 1:18 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Birds in the black at Chesney
10/25/17 12:12 pm Michael <mplinz...> Re: Hummer feeding right now —not black chinned
10/25/17 11:27 am Michael <mplinz...> Re: Hummer feeding right now
10/25/17 6:55 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Hummer feeding right now
10/25/17 6:37 am Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> Hummer feeding right now
10/24/17 2:59 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> WINTER WREN SINGING ON CAVE MOUNTAIN
10/24/17 1:08 pm Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> Hummer sightings
10/23/17 8:35 pm Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
10/23/17 8:09 pm Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> stop this thread
10/23/17 7:58 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
10/23/17 7:02 pm Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
10/23/17 10:16 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA November Field Trip
10/23/17 10:04 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Snags can be dangerous
10/23/17 10:01 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
10/23/17 9:57 am Reames, Clark -FS <creames...> Re: Snags can be dangerous
10/23/17 9:50 am Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> Re: Ring Necked Pheasant - again
10/23/17 9:16 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
10/23/17 6:18 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> CAN’T BEAT A BIRD WITH BLUE LEGS
10/22/17 10:04 pm Leah M Wilcox <leahwcx...> (no subject)
10/22/17 8:57 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Birds might be evolving to eat from bird feeders, study says
10/22/17 8:49 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Re: Snags can be dangerous
10/22/17 8:47 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Ring Necked Pheasant - again
10/22/17 2:48 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Birds
10/22/17 1:14 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - migrants
10/22/17 8:48 am Robin Buff <robinbuff...> Re: Arkansas Audubon Society Fall Meeting
10/22/17 8:30 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Fw: NYTimes.com: Birds Beware: The Praying Mantis Wants Your Brain
10/22/17 8:10 am Nancy Felker <felker.nancy...> Flying above stadium
10/21/17 6:03 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Flycatchers & ducks
10/21/17 5:55 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> RTHU
10/21/17 3:57 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Birdy day including Hummingbird and Orange-crowned Warbler
10/21/17 2:10 pm Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> Re: Woodpeckers - The Right Tree Can be hard to find.
10/21/17 1:11 pm Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Re: another Ruby-throat
10/21/17 11:02 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: another Ruby-throat
10/21/17 10:40 am Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Dark ibis sp./Sora - Woolsey Wet Prairie
10/21/17 10:06 am Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...> Re: another Ruby-throat
10/21/17 8:51 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Snags can be dangerous
10/21/17 8:19 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: another Ruby-throat
10/21/17 3:37 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Re: Snags can be dangerous
 
Back to top
Date: 11/20/17 9:46 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Female Rufous Hummingbird
Today marks day 100 she has visited our feeder

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/17 8:16 am
From: Sim Barrow <sbarrow...>
Subject: Re: On Insects and education (directly) and birds (indirectly)
Hi Barry,



Thanks for the kind words! I want to reiterate the significance of the
Arkansas Audubon Society Halberg Ecology Camp in my life. Ecology Camp was a
landmark experience for me and set the course for an eventual career in
conservation. I've always had an interest in the natural world, and Ecology
Camp focused that interest and directed me to pursue it further. Now I get
to share facts that I first learned at Ecology Camp with kids through my
work with the land trust! I always encourage parents and teachers to send
their kids to camp.



Thanks to Barry, Robin, and all the camp counsellors that have dedicated
their time to inspiring the next generation of naturalists.


Sim



Sim Barrow, Communications and Development Coordinator

Northwest Arkansas Land Trust

479.966.4666 (office)

479.280.7528 (cell)

<http://www.nwalandtrust.org/> www.nwalandtrust.org



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Barry Haas
Sent: Thursday, November 16, 2017 3:01 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: On Insects and education (directly) and birds (indirectly)



Dear ARBIRDers,



I'll add to Sara Caulk's post that Sim Barrow is a "graduate" of the
Arkansas Audubon Society Halberg Ecology Camp. I learned that fact recently
when Sim was presenting a program for the Arkansas Native Plant Society.
The Halberg Ecology Camp was mentioned during the meeting prior to Sim's
program, and Sim said he had attended years ago. That's one more
testimonial regarding the impact one week at the Halberg Ecology Camp can
have on boys and girls who have just completed the 5th or 6th grade.
They're the next generation leaders to protect and preserve our natural
environment for future generations.



The Arkansas Native Plant Society as well as the Fayetteville Natural
Heritage Association are both generous donors to the Halberg Ecology Camp.
Their donations allow the Ecology Camp to offer scholarships and tuition
assistance to nature loving youth whose families could not otherwise afford
this exceptional hands-on learning opportunity.



The AAS Halberg Ecology Camp is currently receiving donations as part of our
Annual Fall Appeal. If you are interested in supporting youth nature study-
ornithology, but also aquatic biology, entomology, mammalogy, geology,
botany and last but not least herpetology- you can join with scores of
others by making your donation payable to either the Arkansas Audubon
Society or AAS Halberg Ecology Camp, and sending it to:



804 Konrad Court

Little rock, AR 72223-9201



Donations are tax deductible.



From the deep woods just west of Little Rock (where we've been enjoying
golden-crowned kinglets in back of our house this week),

Barry Haas




 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/17 7:56 am
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: Saw-whet owl on /mag

It had an uncommonly windless and moonless night on Mount Magazine and I was awake, so I decided to try and locate a Saw-whet Owl. I drove over to Cameron Bluff Drive and parked. I played the call on my ipod. Waited one minute and pushed play again. At the end of this cycle I heard a very clear "toot"ing coming up from a dense stand of cedars about 25-50 yards away. It called for about a minute. After another minute of silence I pushed play. Nothing. Play. Nothing. I tried several more stops before reaching the end of the cedar thicket at the first parking lot.

This is not far from where I heard one during daylight hours a few years ago.




Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

<don.simons...><mailto:<don.simons...>
phone: 479-963-8502
FAX: 479-963-1031


 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/17 2:47 am
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Saw whet owl on Mount Mag
Notice time stamp on this message.

Details later

Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 11/19/17 8:18 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
Randy Robinson took Zack Slavin from National Audubon out on a delta tour this morning before Zack had to go to the airport. They found a late Scissor-tail on Frazier Pike. Randy took Zack to England for the Whistling Ducks then drove on to the Humnoke area & found geese on the ground, including a Ross's Goose, a lifer for Zack.

Cindy Franklin
Little Rock
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Sent: Saturday, November 11, 2017 10:22:26 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Lingering Scissor-tails

I looked for my Scissor-tail yesterday and couldnt locate him so I guess Kenny beats me again. Maybe someone else can challenge him.

Ill keep looking.

Ed Laster




On Nov 9, 2017, at 7:37 PM, Kenny Nichols <kingbird...><mailto:<kingbird...>> wrote:

LaDonna and I had a Scissor-tail late this evening near Pottsville.





Your move, Ed. [Emoji]

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle


On Saturday, November 4, 2017, 4:48:19 PM CDT, Ed Laster <elaster523...><mailto:<elaster523...>> wrote:


And I had another on Hwy 216 near Harris Brake.

Every year I try to beat Kenny for the latest Scissor-tail. Maybe Ill beat him this year. Keep posting Kenny.

Ed Laster
Little Rock




> On Nov 4, 2017, at 11:51 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...><mailto:<0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>
> I had one in Cabot on Thursday and another in northern Conway County near Austin yesterday. I've always considered them late after 31 October.
>
> Kenny Nichols
> Dardanelle
>
> Sent from my iPhone


 

Back to top
Date: 11/19/17 7:24 pm
From: Charles H Mills <swamp_fox...>
Subject: Northern Saw-whet Owl
I made an overnight trip to NW AR to try for a Northern Saw-whet Owl and wasn’t disappointed.

http://www.pbase.com/chazmi/image/166598462/original

Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/19/17 4:19 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Say's Phoebe at Chesney Prairie Natural Area
Joe Woolbright observed a Say's Phoebe in the burn unit at Chesney Prairie Natural Area this morning. We searched for it in the afternoon without refinding it. A consolation prize was a fine Krider's Hawk and Loggerhead Shrikes (2). Near Chesney, we also picked up a flock of CLOCK CLOCK CLOCKs -- Brewer's Blackbirds. It is always great to hit the target (that would have been Say's), but seeing and hearing singing of White-crowned Sparrows is pretty good return for effort.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/19/17 3:54 pm
From: Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Subject: Update on Search for Red Crossbills
It was on Thursday that we had heard about Red Crossbills at Ninestone Land
Trust. Pooja and me were super excited and kept waiting for next
opportunity to go looking for them. With the weather clearing up today
Pooja, Vivek and I set out to search for these elusive birds. It was such a
delight meeting Judy and Don.

It was a beautiful day and we were greeted by 40 species of birds including
Belted Kingfisher, Bald Eagles, many Red-tailed hawks, Red-shouldered
hawks, Yellow-rumped warblers, Ruby-crowned and golden-crowned kinglets,
Purple finches and Pine Siskins, Great Blue Heron, Eastern bluebird and
Phoebe, Brown Creeper, Red-breasted and White-breasted Nuthatches.

All seven woodpecker species: Red-headed, Red bellied, Downy, Hairy,
Northern flicker, Pileated and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker.

Singles of Lincoln's, Field and Fox Sparrows were seen along with the more
numerous White-throated Sparrows, Dark-eyed Juncos and Song Sparrows.

2 Blue-headed Vireos were seen moving through a stand of pine trees with a
mixed flock consisting primarily of Carolina Chickadees, Tufted Titmice and
Yellow-rumped Warblers.

Spotting Red Crossbills would have made it a perfect day. We are not sure
if the Crossbills are still around or not but the search for them sure is
on.
We will keep you posted with any updates on Red Crossbills in Arkansas.

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Deptt. of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/

 

Back to top
Date: 11/19/17 12:40 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: NWAAS December meeting
The Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society December meeting will be on Saturday, December 2, 2017 at the Hobbs State Park VisitorCenter at 2 pm.  Officers will be elected.  Alyssa DeRubeis will give the following presentation: "Dickcissel nesting success in restored and remnant prairies in NW Arkansas." 

Description: Prairie birds have declined more than any other bird group in North America--they need our help. Restoring grasslands may be a solution, but it begs the question: Are restored grasslands doing their job for prairie birds? This study compares nesting success of dickcissels in restored and remnant grasslands in northwest Arkansas.
Alyssa is a Minnesota native that has been passionate about birds and other wildlife since she was three years old.  She received her Bachelors degree in Wildlife Ecology at the University of Wisconsin Stevens Point. During and since college, Alyssa has worked in surveying and educational positions in South Dakota, Iowa, Alaska, Belize, and found her calling at the Ozark Natural Science Center.  Here she met  Dr. Kim Smith, who is now her graduate advisor.
Freeand open to public.
Hope to see many of you there!Joanie

 

Back to top
Date: 11/19/17 7:26 am
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
Subject: FOS
Juncos, Chipping Sparrows, and Goldfinches all showed up on the same day.
Not many of each, but it's a good start!

--
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/17 3:47 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Re: FYI
Any idea who is in charge of these buildings?  I know some photographers
and artists who would like to go through them before they are destroyed.

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co. always looking for new places to watch birds and
create art)

On 11/17/2017 1:51 PM, Sandy Berger wrote:
> Hardison Hall and Recreation Hall, at Petit Jean SP, will be
> demolished to make way for a 11,579 square foot visitor's center.  I
> have fond memories of our AAS meetings being held there.  Hate to see
> them go.  But I understand why they need to.
>
> Sandy B.
> FS, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/17 9:58 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: 11 binoculars headed for India!
Eleven binoculars headed in a few hours with me for the Munsiyari Nature Club in the remote Himalaya of India.  
Many thanks to David Oakley, Terry Butler, Mitchell Pruitt, Janine Perlman, Jeff Short, Sally Jo Gipson, and UAFS biology department for their kind donations.  You're the best.  (My apologies if I forgot someone). 
My next appeal for used binoculars will be for the Cristo Rey school in Belize.  Stay tuned.  Kim Smith and I will be there in May.  
KannanFt. Smith   
 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/17 9:27 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: American Woodcock
With all the Wilson's Snipe sightings people have reported lately, Don and I just listened to the "whinnying" sound they make in flight. Nope.

It clarified that Don indeed had surprised an American Woodcock this morning as he ran the trail through the bluff glade. When flushed it twittered.

Note: Don't type the word "twitter" when you are searching for bird sounds.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/17 8:03 am
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Bald eagle
Mature individual flying over hwy 112 in Washington County about one mile
north of I 49.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/18/17 4:56 am
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Cedar Waxwings


I hear them from my yard in Little Rock this morning.


Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
 

Back to top
Date: 11/17/17 10:55 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Subject: Lake Maumelle
During the Friday afternoon AAS field trip to Lake Maumelle a Common Merganser was found off Vista Point as well as 4 Horned Grebes. Common Loons were spotted at every stop. Buffleheads were the most numerous bird of the day.

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and any attachment(s) is the property of the State of Arkansas and may be protected by state and federal laws governing disclosure of private information. It is intended solely for the use of the entity to which this email is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that reading, copying or distributing this transmission is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. The sender has not waived any applicable privilege by sending the accompanying transmission. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender, and then please delete and destroy all copies and attachments.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/17/17 11:52 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: FYI
Hardison Hall and Recreation Hall, at Petit Jean SP, will be demolished to
make way for a 11,579 square foot visitor's center. I have fond memories
of our AAS meetings being held there. Hate to see them go. But I
understand why they need to.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 11/17/17 5:22 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Passenger Pigeon was adapted to living in big flocks
Helen James (Doug's daughter), Smithsonian's bird curator, was interviewed in this piece. 
Why Did The Passenger Pigeon Go Extinct? The Answer Might Lie In Their Toes


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Why Did The Passenger Pigeon Go Extinct? The Answer Might Lie In Their Toes

Billions of these birds once flew over North America, but the last known passenger pigeon died in 1914. To try t...
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Back to top
Date: 11/16/17 8:23 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Juncos
We hope your health is improving.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2017, at 5:29 PM, Teresa M <ladytstarlight...> wrote:
>
> First sightings for me as I spy a flock of them pecking away at the down pine today.
> With their coal black gray shoulders, and snowy white bellies. They look so cute with their pink bills.
> What a thrill I had to see them as I counted over twenty.
> First birds I finally took noticed of on the land I swore to never live on again.
>
> A Barred Owl answered a deer hunter over the hill. Though even I heard the fake call from here.
>
> Carolina wren hopped around the rim of the rain barrel dipping in and out getting the cold crisp water it was drinking.
>
> Two silent dogs at my feet as small birds took flight as a Turkey Vulture's shadow flew over the mix.
>
> The dogs are glad they are at home again. I stare at the dying orange sky as it filters through the woodpecker trees. Pilated, Red Bellied, Downy all take flight.
>
> The last month health crises brought me back to where I left last year. I stand silent as the Titmouse chats at a squirrel. A Hermit Thrush hangs off the tree on the porch. Probably wondering what I was doing there.
>
> Winter coming as I turn to look at the Juncos again.
> For now. I just take each birdy day as it comes. As a blessing that I am still able to enjoy it. No matter where I am at. Teresa, Hector,AR
 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/17 6:12 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Life is a circle
I lived in four towns this last year yet I watched nature all around the
state as i kept moving along.
For whatever reason I found myself back where I first wrote my first bird
reports all along. Take each sighting as a blessing for you never know how
life going to hit you the next day. I spent 13 days in a room with no
outside Windows and I found myself wishing I could see just one bird, any
bird at all. So my last year ended up being a circle. One thing I do know?
You all encouraged me to write and now I write for Amazon's books about
nature. So I want to thank all that encouraged me to do so. Thanks, Teresa
,AR

 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/17 3:29 pm
From: Teresa M <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Juncos
First sightings for me as I spy a flock of them pecking away at the down
pine today.
With their coal black gray shoulders, and snowy white bellies. They look so
cute with their pink bills.
What a thrill I had to see them as I counted over twenty.
First birds I finally took noticed of on the land I swore to never live on
again.

A Barred Owl answered a deer hunter over the hill. Though even I heard the
fake call from here.

Carolina wren hopped around the rim of the rain barrel dipping in and out
getting the cold crisp water it was drinking.

Two silent dogs at my feet as small birds took flight as a Turkey Vulture's
shadow flew over the mix.

The dogs are glad they are at home again. I stare at the dying orange sky
as it filters through the woodpecker trees. Pilated, Red Bellied, Downy all
take flight.

The last month health crises brought me back to where I left last year. I
stand silent as the Titmouse chats at a squirrel. A Hermit Thrush hangs
off the tree on the porch. Probably wondering what I was doing there.

Winter coming as I turn to look at the Juncos again.
For now. I just take each birdy day as it comes. As a blessing that I am
still able to enjoy it. No matter where I am at. Teresa, Hector,AR

 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/17 3:15 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: On Insects and education (directly) and birds (indirectly)
voted! That was awesome. Jacque


> On Nov 16, 2017, at 12:26 PM, Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I don't normally post to arbird about things other than birds, but this is about birds indirectly. I'm asking you to watch a 2-minute video made by Kessler Outdoor Classroom Outreach Coordinator and teacher Sim Barrow that has placed in the Top Ten of the national Land Trust Alliance video contest, and I think you'll agree that Sim deserves your vote. VOTING ENDS TOMORROW, November 17th
>
> I ask that you read the announcement (below) that I sent out to the Fayetteville Natural Heritage Association (FNHA) membership this morning, and that
>
> You will VOTE for Sim's video. He's such an asset to our local group of Naturalist Educators. I'm sure many of you have crossed paths with him at some point and have been inspired by his knowledge about nature and his unbridled enthusiasm!
>
> If you aren't interested, please forgive the intrusion, otherwise, thanks for your vote!
>
> Sara Caulk
> Fayetteville
>
> People nationwide shared their connection to the land with the Land Trust Alliance in short (less than 2 minutes) videos, and the LTA judges selected the top 10 videos. The top 3 authors could win $500, $1,000 or $2,000 – plus the chance to designate the land trust of their choice to receive $10,000!
>
> FNHA is really pleased to pass along the news that SimBarrow <https://www.facebook.com/sim.barrow>'s locally produced short video has placed in the Final 10 "Land is My _______’” Video Contest! Your vote could help to win $10,000 for the Northwest Arkansas Land Trust.
> Please take 2 minutes to watch the “Land is My Classroom” <http://ow.ly/zTAf30g4nWf> video, and follow Sim as he explores the intricate world of insects at NWALT's Wilson Springs Preserve. THEN...
> Give it your VOTE: http://ow.ly/zTAf30g4nWf <http://ow.ly/zTAf30g4nWf>
> IT'S QUICK.
> IT'S EASY (enter an email address and a push “vote”), and
> IT WILL HELP OUR LOCAL COMMUNITY WHEN SIM WINS
> Voting ends TOMORROW, NOVEMBER 17th!
>
> Why support Sim, you ask?
> Sim who was born to teach, was brought to our attention a little over 3 years ago by our former Board member and volunteer extraordinaire, Amber Tripodi, PhD, (the Bee lady) as she was leaving Fayetteville for her new job at the USDA Bee Lab in Utah. We were so bummed to be losing Amber, but what a find Sim was! He still does some volunteer work for us, but he has found his niche as the Outreach Coordinator NWALT and spends most of his time at the office making the new Kessler Outdoor Classroom the fun and exciting learning experience that it is for Fayetteville school children especially 3rd-graders (future birders, scientists,researchers?). Outstanding teachers of this caliber deserve recognition and our thanks.
> FNHA is a proud sponsor and partner of the Kessler Outdoor Classroom which is administered by NWALT.
> Follow Sim on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/sim.barrow <https://www.facebook.com/sim.barrow>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/17 1:00 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Re: On Insects and education (directly) and birds (indirectly)
Dear ARBIRDers,

I'll add to Sara Caulk's post that Sim Barrow is a "graduate" of the Arkansas Audubon Society Halberg Ecology Camp. I learned that fact recently when Sim was presenting a program for the Arkansas Native Plant Society. The Halberg Ecology Camp was mentioned during the meeting prior to Sim's program, and Sim said he had attended years ago. That's one more testimonial regarding the impact one week at the Halberg Ecology Camp can have on boys and girls who have just completed the 5th or 6th grade. They're the next generation leaders to protect and preserve our natural environment for future generations.

The Arkansas Native Plant Society as well as the Fayetteville Natural Heritage Association are both generous donors to the Halberg Ecology Camp. Their donations allow the Ecology Camp to offer scholarships and tuition assistance to nature loving youth whose families could not otherwise afford this exceptional hands-on learning opportunity.

The AAS Halberg Ecology Camp is currently receiving donations as part of our Annual Fall Appeal. If you are interested in supporting youth nature study- ornithology, but also aquatic biology, entomology, mammalogy, geology, botany and last but not least herpetology- you can join with scores of others by making your donation payable to either the Arkansas Audubon Society or AAS Halberg Ecology Camp, and sending it to:

804 Konrad Court
Little rock, AR 72223-9201

Donations are tax deductible.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock (where we've been enjoying golden-crowned kinglets in back of our house this week),
Barry Haas


 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/17 10:30 am
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bingo-Old bird bander gets a saw-whet
Fantastic, Bill, I'll bet Toka's eyes were as big as the owls!
Sara CaulkFayetteville

From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 1:40 PM
Subject: FW: Bingo-Old bird bander gets a saw-whet

Wow!  From Bill Beall.....
----- Forwarded message -----  
From: <billtoka...> [mailto:<billtoka...>]
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 1:13 PM 
After two previous failures because of weather and equipment problems everything clicked Sunday night (Nov 12). I set up two 40' mist nets along a Jeep trail/fire break at the south edge of our 40 A on the Mulberry River. To the north are our pine/cedar woods and to the south an old farm with a small pond, small meadow and lots of "edge". In less than 2 hours I caught a saw-whet. I have not even seen one for 60 years. As I removed it from the net I realized that solo netting at night is not a good idea! Luckily it was very docile, unlike the cardinals that really bite. I quickly turned off the recording, thankful I had not caught the screech owl or barred owl that I had heard. Took the owl back to the 4Runner to show Toka, released it, and shut down the nets. I want to thank Kim Smith and the NW Ark. saw-whet owl research team for their help and advice. Bill Email sent using Mail2Go Newroads Telecomhttp://www.newroadstelecom.com


 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/17 10:27 am
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: On Insects and education (directly) and birds (indirectly)
I don't normally post to arbird about things other than birds, but this is about birds indirectly. I'm asking you to watch a 2-minute video made by Kessler Outdoor Classroom Outreach Coordinator and teacher Sim Barrow that has placed in the Top Ten of the national Land Trust Alliance video contest, and I think you'll agree that Sim deserves your vote. VOTING ENDS TOMORROW, November 17th
I ask that you read the announcement (below) that I sent out to the Fayetteville Natural Heritage Association (FNHA) membership this morning, and that
You will VOTE for Sim's video. He's such an asset to our local group of Naturalist Educators. I'm sure many of you have crossed paths with him at some point and have been inspired by his knowledge about nature and his unbridled enthusiasm! 
If you aren't interested, please forgive the intrusion, otherwise, thanks for your vote!
Sara CaulkFayetteville
Peoplenationwide shared their connection to the land with the Land TrustAlliance in short (less than 2 minutes) videos, and the LTA judgesselected the top 10 videos. The top 3 authors could win $500, $1,000or $2,000 – plus the chance to designate the land trust of theirchoice to receive $10,000!

FNHA is really pleased to passalong the news that SimBarrow'slocally produced short video has placed in the Final10"Landis My _______’”Video Contest! Your vote could help to win $10,000for the Northwest Arkansas Land Trust. Pleasetake 2 minutes to watchthe “Landis My Classroom”video, and follow Sim as he explores the intricate world of insectsat NWALT's Wilson Springs Preserve. THEN...Giveit your VOTE:http://ow.ly/zTAf30g4nWfIT'SQUICK. IT'SEASY (enteran email address and a push “vote”),andITWILL HELP OUR LOCAL COMMUNITY WHEN SIM WINSVotingends TOMORROW, NOVEMBER 17th!
Whysupport Sim, you ask?Simwho was born to teach, was brought to our attention a little over 3years ago by our former Board member and volunteer extraordinaire,Amber Tripodi, PhD, (the Bee lady) as she was leaving Fayettevillefor her new job at the USDA Bee Lab in Utah. We were so bummed to belosing Amber, but what a find Sim was! He still does some volunteerwork for us, but he has found his niche as the Outreach CoordinatorNWALT and spends most of his time at the office making the newKesslerOutdoor Classroomthe fun and exciting learning experience that it is for Fayettevilleschool children especially 3rd-graders (future birders, scientists,researchers?). Outstanding teachers of this caliber deserverecognition and our thanks. FNHAis a proud sponsor and partner of the Kessler Outdoor Classroom whichis administered by NWALT. FollowSim on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/sim.barrow

 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/17 8:34 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip this Saturday
This Saturday, November 18 is the field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  Please see details below.  This field trip is also part of the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) fall conference and is a joint excursion for both ASCA and AAS members.  Join us and have the opportunity to meet birders from other parts of the state and get in some good birding.  For more information about the AAS fall conference go to the AAS website at  www.arbirds.org.   You don't have to be a member of ASCA or AAS to participate in the field trip or the conference.

There is a chance of rain showers Saturday morning, so bring rain gear.  The high will be only 70 degrees.  We won't do much walking and will be close to our vehicles if it starts to rain hard.  If you have any questions, please fee free to contact me off-list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator November 18DeGray Lake Resort StatePark—ArkadelphiaMeet at 7:30 a.m. in thecommuter lot at I-430/I-630 off Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll arrive around 8:45 a.m. at the park’sLodge for anyone who would like to meet us there.  Our target birds will be eagles, loons,ducks, mergansers, grebes, gulls, and nuthatches. Dress warm, the lake can be windy and cold.  Hats and gloves are recommended.  Bring scope, water, and snacks.  You can bring lunch or eat in the Lodge’srestaurant.  The annual fallconference of the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) is being held at Ferncliff inWest Little Rock Nov. 17-19.  This tripis included as one of the Saturday conference field trips, so it is a joint ASCA/AAStrip.   Addressfor the park is:  2027 State ParkEntrance Road - Bismarck, Arkansas 71929. GPS coordinates are 34.24562, -93.14840. Go to www.degray.com for more information about the park.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/17 3:41 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GOLDENEYES AND DUNLINS AT ALMA WASTEWATER
Common Goldeneyes (3) and Dunlins (2) were at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility yesterday. Both are first of season for me. It rained early, then turned cool. An influx of migrants was evident. Savannah Sparrows were everywhere.

Goldeneyes were part of 12 duck species that included Gadwall, Mallard (5), Northern Shoveler (~90), Green-winged Teal (4), Redhead (10), Ring-necked Duck (9), Greater Scaup (2), Lesser Scaup (~60), Bufflehead (6), Hooded Merganser (3), and Ruddy Duck (4).

Great Egrets (7) worked pond edges. I enjoyed close views of American Pipits. A Spotted Sandpiper was working aeration pipes over an intake pond, picking up bugs as it walked. Other birds included American White Pelican (7), Franklins Gull (1). One surprise was a Common Loon, not to be confused with more numerous Hooked-bill Loons (cormorants, 4).

The Dunlins were on an adjacent pond (privately owned). They were associated with ~50 Least Sandpipers and 15 Wilsons Snipe.


 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/17 12:20 pm
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: Re: Bingo-Old bird bander gets a saw-whet
Well done, Bill.

Robin Buff

> On Nov 15, 2017, at 2:18 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> Wonderful!
>
> On Nov 15, 2017, at 1:40 PM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>
>> Wow! From Bill Beall.....
>>
>> ----- Forwarded message -----
>>
>> From: <billtoka...> <mailto:<billtoka...> [mailto:<billtoka...> <http://mynewroads.com/>]
>> Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 1:13 PM
>>
>> After two previous failures because of weather and equipment problems everything clicked Sunday night (Nov 12). I set up two 40' mist nets along a Jeep trail/fire break at the south edge of our 40 A on the Mulberry River. To the north are our pine/cedar woods and to the south an old farm with a small pond, small meadow and lots of "edge". In less than 2 hours I caught a saw-whet. I have not even seen one for 60 years. As I removed it from the net I realized that solo netting at night is not a good idea! Luckily it was very docile, unlike the cardinals that really bite. I quickly turned off the recording, thankful I had not caught the screech owl or barred owl that I had heard. Took the owl back to the 4Runner to show Toka, released it, and shut down the nets.
>>
>> I want to thank Kim Smith and the NW Ark. saw-whet owl research team for their help and advice.
>>
>> Bill
>>
>> Email sent using Mail2Go Newroads Telecom http://www.newroadstelecom.com <http://www.newroadstelecom.com/>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/17 12:18 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Bingo-Old bird bander gets a saw-whet
Wonderful!

On Nov 15, 2017, at 1:40 PM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Wow! From Bill Beall.....
>
> ----- Forwarded message -----
>
> From: <billtoka...> [mailto:<billtoka...>]
> Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 1:13 PM
>
> After two previous failures because of weather and equipment problems everything clicked Sunday night (Nov 12). I set up two 40' mist nets along a Jeep trail/fire break at the south edge of our 40 A on the Mulberry River. To the north are our pine/cedar woods and to the south an old farm with a small pond, small meadow and lots of "edge". In less than 2 hours I caught a saw-whet. I have not even seen one for 60 years. As I removed it from the net I realized that solo netting at night is not a good idea! Luckily it was very docile, unlike the cardinals that really bite. I quickly turned off the recording, thankful I had not caught the screech owl or barred owl that I had heard. Took the owl back to the 4Runner to show Toka, released it, and shut down the nets.
>
> I want to thank Kim Smith and the NW Ark. saw-whet owl research team for their help and advice.
>
> Bill
>
> Email sent using Mail2Go Newroads Telecom http://www.newroadstelecom.com
>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/17 11:40 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FW: Bingo-Old bird bander gets a saw-whet
Wow!  From Bill Beall.....
----- Forwarded message -----  

From: <billtoka...> [mailto:<billtoka...>]
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 1:13 PM 


After two previous failures because of weather and equipment problems everything clicked Sunday night (Nov 12). I set up two 40' mist nets along a Jeep trail/fire break at the south edge of our 40 A on the Mulberry River. To the north are our pine/cedar woods and to the south an old farm with a small pond, small meadow and lots of "edge". In less than 2 hours I caught a saw-whet. I have not even seen one for 60 years. As I removed it from the net I realized that solo netting at night is not a good idea! Luckily it was very docile, unlike the cardinals that really bite. I quickly turned off the recording, thankful I had not caught the screech owl or barred owl that I had heard. Took the owl back to the 4Runner to show Toka, released it, and shut down the nets.

I want to thank Kim Smith and the NW Ark. saw-whet owl research team for their help and advice.

Bill

Email sent using Mail2Go Newroads Telecomhttp://www.newroadstelecom.com

 

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Date: 11/14/17 7:23 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Say's Phoebe, Craighead Co.
ASU grad student Jacob Wessels has photographed a Says Phoebe in Craighead
Co.

His eBird list http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40508373.

His Flickr photos: https://www.flickr.com/photos/149000533@N02/shares/Q7GNTd

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 11/14/17 2:44 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: LeConte's Sparrows
When I was birding with Mike Mlodinow we used to find LeConte’s every year in that location, but then the hatchery started mowing the tall brush on the west side of that big pond. I hope they leave that alone long enough for some folks to do some Sparrowing in the next few weeks. Jacque Brown, Centerton.


> On Nov 13, 2017, at 7:29 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:
>
> While looking for ducks at Charlie Craig Fish Hatchery this morning, I discovered that the large upper pond has become a haven for sparrows this fall. It hasn't had water in it since the early spring, so all of the growth is now nicely developed for sparrows. Lots of them around, but two LeConte's were the most notable. One sat in front of me about 30 feet away and looked as interested in me as I was in it. Nice look at it for a couple of minutes. I forget how striking they are.
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville
 

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Date: 11/14/17 12:43 pm
From: Anant Deshwal <adeshwal...>
Subject: Baltimore Oriole in mid November
Hello Everyone,

Yesterday and today morning we had one male Baltimore Oriole at our feeder.
They are rare in NW Arkansas after early October.
We are requesting you to contact us (Pooja Panwar (<ppanwar...>) and me
(<adeshwal...>)) with any information on wintering oriole in NW
Arkansas.

Thank you so much.

Regards
Anant Deshwal
Ph.D. Candidate
Deptt. of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
http://thegreenergrassblade.blogspot.com/

 

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Date: 11/13/17 7:37 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
Thank you, Mary Ann.
I know you do not use neonics and appreciate your work propagating and offering native plants.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

On Nov 13, 2017, at 6:50 PM, Mary Ann King <office...> wrote:

> We do not use neonics.
>
> When you buy plants, you need to ask if they have been treated with neonics. If they cannot unconditionally say that they have not, then do not buy the plant. Sales or NON-sales, make pressure on nurseries if you refuse to contribute to buying a plant that have been treated, then you have applied pressure against this practice.
>
> I have even seen labels that say this plant has been treated so not have aphids, spidermites etc, trying to make this look like a good thing. But we know it isnt good.
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London, AR.
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Carol Joan Patterson
> Sent: Monday, November 13, 2017 5:56 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
>
> Thanks for posting this. Neonics are a disaster for birds and also other taxa. NWAAS has additional links on its website.
> Joanie
>
>
> From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Monday, November 13, 2017 4:35 PM
> Subject: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
>
> "The so-called neonics are often applied to seeds before theyre planted in the ground. Organophosphates are applied in tiny granules."
>
> These include granules used to kill ticks and fleas in the backyard, as well as a host of other "insect pests". They are available in most garden centers or even the aisles of grocery stores. And humans are spreading them all over the earth.
>
> http://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/on-life-support-research-shows-common-pesticides-starve-disorient-birds
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
>
>


 

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Date: 11/13/17 6:44 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: AAS meeting Lonoke County field trip on Saturday
In preparation for the AAS meeting this weekend, I have spent two days over on the delta. As usual, Lonoke is perpetually ten degrees colder than the Little Rock area courtesy of the wind. If you are thinking about the AAS Lonoke trip on Saturday, keep this in mind. Day one was cloudy & damp. I wore my long underwear top and was glad I had it on. Today was sunny and I used several layers which slowly came off as the day wore on. Also remember Saturday is the first day of duck season so the fish ponds on Bob Long Road are off limits until midday. I recommend bringing some high visibility clothing.


The Joe Hogan fish hatchery doesn't seem like a good venue this year. The hatchery is revamping their fish ponds. There are many dry ponds. Those with water have spinners and streamers across the pools to discourage the egrets and herons. I have my doubts any ducks are going to seek out this area one the first day of hunting season. I did not see any there today.

However, I did make a run by the grain elevator in England this afternoon. To my surprise a flock of 51 Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were feeding in the field between the elevators and the pond.

The Anderson fish ponds had the most ducks on them. The majority were Ruddy Ducks but there was a sprinkling of other expected ducks.

A week ago there was a nice mix of ducks on the fish ponds along Bob Long. They will be in a high state of dudgeon Saturday so I can't guarantee what we will see there.

Given these facts, the field trip is likely to make a quick run to England to pick up the BBWD then go to Lonoke and loop around the Lonoke golf course before we head off to Bob Long Rd and make a run through the fields to look for Longspurs (which I did not find but I may not have been looking in the right places).


This will be an all driving trip & we will be gone most of the day. If you have any questions about the trip, email me.


Cindy



 

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Date: 11/13/17 5:29 pm
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: LeConte's Sparrows
While looking for ducks at Charlie Craig Fish Hatchery this morning, I discovered that the large upper pond has become a haven for sparrows this fall. It hasn't had water in it since the early spring, so all of the growth is now nicely developed for sparrows. Lots of them around, but two LeConte's were the most notable. One sat in front of me about 30 feet away and looked as interested in me as I was in it. Nice look at it for a couple of minutes. I forget how striking they are.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville
 

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Date: 11/13/17 4:50 pm
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
We do not use neonics.



When you buy plants, you need to ask if they have been treated with neonics. If they cannot unconditionally say that they have not, then do not buy the plant. Sales or NON-sales, make pressure on nurseries – if you refuse to contribute to buying a plant that have been treated, then you have applied pressure against this practice.



I have even seen labels that say – this plant has been treated so not have aphids, spidermites etc, trying to make this look like a good thing. But we know it isn’t good.



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London, AR.



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Carol Joan Patterson
Sent: Monday, November 13, 2017 5:56 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds



Thanks for posting this. Neonics are a disaster for birds and also other taxa. NWAAS has additional links on its website.

Joanie



_____

From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> <mailto:<9waterfall9...> >
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, November 13, 2017 4:35 PM
Subject: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds



"The so-called neonics are often applied to seeds before they’re planted in the ground. Organophosphates are applied in tiny granules."



These include granules used to kill ticks and fleas in the backyard, as well as a host of other "insect pests". They are available in most garden centers or even the aisles of grocery stores. And humans are spreading them all over the earth.



http://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/on-life-support-research-shows-common-pesticides-starve-disorient-birds



Judith

Ninestone, Carroll County




 

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Date: 11/13/17 3:56 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
Thanks for posting this.  Neonics are a disaster for birds and also other taxa.  NWAAS has additional links on its website.Joanie


From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, November 13, 2017 4:35 PM
Subject: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds

"The so-called neonics are often applied to seeds before they’re planted in the ground. Organophosphates are applied in tiny granules."

These include granules used to kill ticks and fleas in the backyard, as well as a host of other "insect pests". They are available in most garden centers or even the aisles of grocery stores. And humans are spreading them all over the earth.

http://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/on-life-support-research-shows-common-pesticides-starve-disorient-birds

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


 

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Date: 11/13/17 2:35 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: 'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds
"The so-called neonics are often applied to seeds before theyre planted in the ground. Organophosphates are applied in tiny granules."

These include granules used to kill ticks and fleas in the backyard, as well as a host of other "insect pests". They are available in most garden centers or even the aisles of grocery stores. And humans are spreading them all over the earth.

http://nationalpost.com/pmn/news-pmn/canada-news-pmn/on-life-support-research-shows-common-pesticides-starve-disorient-birds

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 11/13/17 5:38 am
From: Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Hummer still around
Feeding at the feeder Looks like a first year RTHU male
No rufous color

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/13/17 5:17 am
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann...>
Subject: Re: Woodcock in Ft. Smith
I flushed one Saturday night on my wooded driveway in northern Crawford
County.

Ann Gordon

On Sun, Nov 12, 2017 at 5:57 PM, Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I note that eBird has no November records yet of American Woodcock this
> year from Arkansas. This afternoon, had the pleasure of observing one
> walking about the mulch in a thicket at the edge of Cook School's
> playground in Fort Smith. Lots of Field and White-throated Sparrows plus
> juncos were around.
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith
>

 

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Date: 11/13/17 2:59 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: SundayHummer
I had a hummer show up at my house Sunday about 2 PM. It perched in the Cherry tree. It was backlit so I couldn’t tell what kind. I ran in to grab the camera but it was gone when I got back out.
I did not have hummer juice out. I made some really fast and put it out but did not see the hummer again.


Jacque Brown

Centerton, AR


<bluebird2...>







 

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Date: 11/12/17 10:24 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: AAS News of Members
Dear Arkansas Audubon Society Members:

Time to share your birding adventures and other tidbit information for the News of Members section for the upcoming issue of Arkansas Birds. We would love to hear about your adventures. Remember, you don't have to write a novel, just a paragraph will do.

Deadline for submissions is November 22.

Thanks
Dottie Boyles
News of Members Editor
Arkansas Birds
 

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Date: 11/12/17 7:39 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Pulaski County--Frazier Pike this afternoon
Inspired by the report of the Sandhill Cranes in SW Arkansas, I lollygagged down Frazier Pike this afternoon. We need a good rain in Pulaski County. Most of the usual wet areas are dirt cracked with dry brown vegetation rattling above it. Most of the drainage ditches haven't seen water in weeks. Only the swampy area far down Frazier retains some standing water. A steady stream of sparrows and Yellow-rumped Warblers dipped for a sip and a bath.


Best birds of the day were two Rusty Blackbirds browsing cracked shells on the pavement in search of available nut meats.


No shows:

Sandhill Cranes

Inca Doves


Cindy
Little Rock



 

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Date: 11/12/17 5:20 pm
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Woodcock in Ft. Smith
 

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Date: 11/12/17 4:59 pm
From: Ed Tiede <0000012caede6260-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Winter Wren

My first of season Winter Wren was on Nov 3. I saw another this morning. This is in Stone County. 
Cheers,Edward Tiede From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Friday, November 10, 2017 7:32 PM
Subject: Re: Winter Wren

After returning to Fayetteville yesterday from a fun and productive Loon Trip to Tenkiller in Oklahoma with Joe Neal, Bob and I saw our First of Season Winter Wren.
Also, the Surf Scoter mentioned in Joe Neal's post on ARBIRD about said Loon Trip to Tenkiller was a life bird for me. Thanks, Joe!
Sara Caulk

From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Friday, November 10, 2017 2:58 PM
Subject: Winter Wren

First of Season for me.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County





 

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Date: 11/12/17 3:58 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Woodcock in Ft. Smith
I note that eBird has no November records yet of American Woodcock this year from Arkansas.  This afternoon, had the pleasure of observing one walking about the mulch in a thicket at the edge of Cook School's playground in Fort Smith.  Lots of Field and White-throated Sparrows plus juncos were around. 
KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 11/12/17 3:35 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Prairie Whoville
Saw an old friend this morning just south of Chesney Prairie Natural Area a light morph version of what Audubon in 1831 called Black Warrior: Harlans Hawk. The world of our culture was a busy thunder going up and down highway 59, while here on a common post stood a distinguished visitor from northwest Canada and Alaska. They must cross numerous province, state and international boundaries to get here. It was along the road, but I found a safe spot to study and mainly admire.

My goal this morning was to walk the burns at Cheney and nearby Stump Prairie. I figured on American Pipits and Lapland Longspurs, but saw neither. Most numerous was Mourning Doves (~200), followed by Killdeer (30) and Savannah Sparrow (10). A wet spot at Chesney supported Wilson's Snipe (4). Northern (yellow-shafted) Flickers (3) were out in the black, too. A flock of ~250 Snow Geese flew over. At least one Western Meadowlark was singing in a pasture outside the burn units.

Inner workings of a Tallgrass Prairie are well exposed after a burn. Big native grasses are burned down close to the ground. It is easy to see that even when a prairie looks dense, there is a lot of unexpected and well-hidden open country under there. Dr Seuss would recognize it as a prairie Whoville. Today I could see the numerous chimneys and burrows of Osage Burrowing Crayfish. Pocket gophers have been busy, too, fresh excavations of light soils in sharp contrast with the general blackness after a burn.

The burn was several weeks back. Abundant energy in deep roots of Big Bluestems is stirring. Already green creeps in. There are no Bison at Chesney or Stump, but over at Tallgrass Prairie Preserve, this is exactly where you would see Bison: in the young, tender, green regrowth of a prairie busy renewing. No Bison here, but Mourning Doves find the place much to their liking.


 

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Date: 11/12/17 6:02 am
From: Lucy c Weberling <lucyoga...>
Subject: Re: INTO THE VALE OF TEARS (Lake Fayetteville)
Than you John. That was beautiful. When is the Tallgrass bird count ( asking again)

Sent from my iPhone
<Lucyoga...>
918-633-8890

> On Nov 12, 2017, at 7:40 AM, Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> Early in the week our skies were full of passing Snow Geese and Lake Fayetteville was well attended by thousands of water birds in multiple species. A huge migration and a rare bird-chaser’s paradise. Not so much yesterday.
>
>
> All things pass from this life, including migration influxes. The Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society-sponsored waterfowl trip was well-attended by people, 25-30 eventually by my estimation, but sparsely attended by ducks and other waterfowl: Canada Goose (3), Gadwall (1), Northern Shoveler (1), Green-winged Teal (1), Lesser Scaup (2), Hooded Merganser (2), Pied-billed Grebe (12), Horned Grebe (2), and American Coot (30).
>
>
> I had a youth without Walt Whitman or Robert Frost. Psalms in the Bible was our only poetry. I always thought the phrase “veil of tears” was reference to someone dying and everyone crying, like at Fort Smith when my mother’s mother Estelle Kennedy passed. Only later did I learn it was not “veil” but “vale,” and it was not place of despair, but rather a valley with water, life-giving and metaphorical. And so it was at Lake Fayetteville yesterday.
>
>
> Part of the trip to Lake Fayetteville included the short hike to Mulhollan Blind, made special because we walked with three actual Mulhollans -- Mary Bess, Donna, and Kelly – all who contributed so much to bringing the blind to life, and sharing with this community the experience of respectful viewing of a lake and its birds. On the way ran into a father and two children who had just been there. While we were there, another six people showed up to visit the blind and view the lake.
>
> Out there in the flooded vale, we picked up Belted Kingfisher and Great Blue Heron. We got better looks at Horned Grebes. A few people picked up trash that had washed up around the blind. Others stood on the blind porch and picked out land birds like Yellow-rumped Warbler, Brown Creeper, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hairy Woodpecker, and White-throated Sparrows.
>
>
> For sure, the world is truly screwed-up and there is a great deal to cry about. But we all had a few hours of bird watching fellowship, refreshing and replenishing. Then we all walked out and went home, better in my estimation, for visiting this vale of tears.
>
>

 

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Date: 11/12/17 5:41 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: INTO THE VALE OF TEARS (Lake Fayetteville)
Early in the week our skies were full of passing Snow Geese and Lake Fayetteville was well attended by thousands of water birds in multiple species. A huge migration and a rare bird-chasers paradise. Not so much yesterday.


All things pass from this life, including migration influxes. The Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society-sponsored waterfowl trip was well-attended by people, 25-30 eventually by my estimation, but sparsely attended by ducks and other waterfowl: Canada Goose (3), Gadwall (1), Northern Shoveler (1), Green-winged Teal (1), Lesser Scaup (2), Hooded Merganser (2), Pied-billed Grebe (12), Horned Grebe (2), and American Coot (30).


I had a youth without Walt Whitman or Robert Frost. Psalms in the Bible was our only poetry. I always thought the phrase veil of tears was reference to someone dying and everyone crying, like at Fort Smith when my mothers mother Estelle Kennedy passed. Only later did I learn it was not veil but vale, and it was not place of despair, but rather a valley with water, life-giving and metaphorical. And so it was at Lake Fayetteville yesterday.


Part of the trip to Lake Fayetteville included the short hike to Mulhollan Blind, made special because we walked with three actual Mulhollans -- Mary Bess, Donna, and Kelly all who contributed so much to bringing the blind to life, and sharing with this community the experience of respectful viewing of a lake and its birds. On the way ran into a father and two children who had just been there. While we were there, another six people showed up to visit the blind and view the lake.


Out there in the flooded vale, we picked up Belted Kingfisher and Great Blue Heron. We got better looks at Horned Grebes. A few people picked up trash that had washed up around the blind. Others stood on the blind porch and picked out land birds like Yellow-rumped Warbler, Brown Creeper, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hairy Woodpecker, and White-throated Sparrows.


For sure, the world is truly screwed-up and there is a great deal to cry about. But we all had a few hours of bird watching fellowship, refreshing and replenishing. Then we all walked out and went home, better in my estimation, for visiting this vale of tears.


 

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Date: 11/12/17 4:42 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Woolsey Wet Prairie - Vesper Sparrow with a damaged eye/eye socket
Back in my grad school days, we once caught a male House Wren on our study site that was caring for nestlings that only had one eye. He returned the following year and raised another successful brood.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

> On Nov 11, 2017, at 18:16, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>
> I’ve seen conjunctivitis in finches and juncos but nothing this severe. This bird is bound to get blindsided by an alert Coopers.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Nov 11, 2017, at 4:28 PM, Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> wrote:
>>
>> I was at Woolsey Wet Prairie this afternoon, where I photographed a Vesper Sparrow with a damaged eye socket. The socket had caved in and the eye in question seemed to be missing. Could a tumor have caused this? The other eye was healthy and the bird was feeding actively. I have attached 2 photographs.
>>
>> Other sparrows included LeConte's (3), Chipping (1), Field (15), Fox (2), Dark-eyed Junco (17), White-crowned (13), White-throated (8), Savannah (2), Song (38), Lincoln's (5) and Swamp (26).
>>
>> An immature Northern Harrier provided excellent views at close range, while an unfortunate Song Sparrow ended up as a Merlin's lunch.
>>
>> Other sightings of interest included 3 Wilson's Snipe, a group of 8 Northern Flickers, 1 Eastern Phoebe, 1 Palm Warbler and 1 singing Western Meadowlark.
>>
>> Vivek Govind Kumar
>> Fayetteville
>>
>>
>>
>> <Vesper-damaged eye.JPG>
>> <Vesper - normal eye.JPG>
 

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Date: 11/11/17 4:16 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Woolsey Wet Prairie - Vesper Sparrow with a damaged eye/eye socket
I’ve seen conjunctivitis in finches and juncos but nothing this severe. This bird is bound to get blindsided by an alert Coopers.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 11, 2017, at 4:28 PM, Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> wrote:
>
> I was at Woolsey Wet Prairie this afternoon, where I photographed a Vesper Sparrow with a damaged eye socket. The socket had caved in and the eye in question seemed to be missing. Could a tumor have caused this? The other eye was healthy and the bird was feeding actively. I have attached 2 photographs.
>
> Other sparrows included LeConte's (3), Chipping (1), Field (15), Fox (2), Dark-eyed Junco (17), White-crowned (13), White-throated (8), Savannah (2), Song (38), Lincoln's (5) and Swamp (26).
>
> An immature Northern Harrier provided excellent views at close range, while an unfortunate Song Sparrow ended up as a Merlin's lunch.
>
> Other sightings of interest included 3 Wilson's Snipe, a group of 8 Northern Flickers, 1 Eastern Phoebe, 1 Palm Warbler and 1 singing Western Meadowlark.
>
> Vivek Govind Kumar
> Fayetteville
>
>
>
> <Vesper-damaged eye.JPG>
> <Vesper - normal eye.JPG>
 

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Date: 11/11/17 2:29 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Woolsey Wet Prairie - Vesper Sparrow with a damaged eye/eye socket
I was at Woolsey Wet Prairie this afternoon, where I photographed a Vesper Sparrow with a damaged eye socket. The socket had caved in and the eye in question seemed to be missing. Could a tumor have caused this? The other eye was healthy and the bird was feeding actively. I have attached 2 photographs.

Other sparrows included LeConte's (3), Chipping (1), Field (15), Fox (2), Dark-eyed Junco (17), White-crowned (13), White-throated (8), Savannah (2), Song (38), Lincoln's (5) and Swamp (26).

An immature Northern Harrier provided excellent views at close range, while an unfortunate Song Sparrow ended up as a Merlin's lunch.

Other sightings of interest included 3 Wilson's Snipe, a group of 8 Northern Flickers, 1 Eastern Phoebe, 1 Palm Warbler and 1 singing Western Meadowlark.

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville




 

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Date: 11/11/17 12:58 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
Neill & Karen Hart are in for LR.

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 11, 2017, at 10:35 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...><mailto:<birddan...>> wrote:

Calling all Christmas Bird Counters,

I’m now taking sign-ups for the Little Rock (Saturday Dec 16) and Lonoke (Sunday Dec 17) Christmas Bird Counts.

Both counts have a great mix of habitats and have the potential to tally over 100 species, though Lonoke does so more consistently. Rarities found in the recent past include Rufous Hummingbird, Long-tailed Duck, Black Scoter, Glaucous Gull, Say’s Phoebe, and the state's first Ash-throated Flycatcher!

Dan Scheiman, Compiler
Little Rock. AR

 

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Date: 11/11/17 11:29 am
From: Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Hummer here again
Must be male can see one very small patch of gorget feathers can’t tell color Will keep watching

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/11/17 10:22 am
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: November 17 – Owling at ONSC with Kim Smith and Mitchell Pruitt - Adults only
Hi Mitchell and I will be doing presentation on owls at the Ozark Natural Science Center this coming Friday night as part of their Adult Education Program.
We will have the nets open and hopefully will catch an owl or two for the group This event is for people 21 years or older The program starts with dinner at 5:30 and Mitchells talk will start at 6:15 and last about an hour people can stay as late as they want we typically run the nets until about midnight

Dinner and talk is $25
Dinner and talk and an owl hat or owl shirt is $40
Dinner and talk and an owl hat and owl shirt is $52

You can register on-line at http://www.onsc.us/program-field.php
Or call the ONSC at 479-202-8340

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************


 

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Date: 11/11/17 9:37 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Rough-legged Hawk
The rough-legged hawk has returned to Possum Grape. We saw it this morning, 11 Nov, about 11:15 am. Such a beautiful bird. 
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 11/11/17 9:12 am
From: Charles H Mills <swamp_fox...>
Subject: Friends return
I took a drive in eastern Miller County to photograph birds. On my way eastward, the first subject was a group of about 100 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks. Many were birds of the year. I continued on without much luck other than to get a more of a habitat shot that included a Swamp Sparrow. As I made my way home, I noticed a distant flock of birds circling in the distance. Having heard Snow Geese earlier, that was what I expected them to be once I got my binoculars on them. When I rolled down my window, I didn’t need my binoculars to know the birds were the first Sandhill Cranes to return to Miller County for the winter of 2017-2108. I could hear some of them calling even from a great distance away. That sound brought an overdue smile to my face. I’ll report an exact number to the AAS database later but there were at least 20 birds in the flock.

Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/11/17 8:36 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
Calling all Christmas Bird Counters,

Im now taking sign-ups for the Little Rock (Saturday Dec 16) and Lonoke
(Sunday Dec 17) Christmas Bird Counts.

Both counts have a great mix of habitats and have the potential to tally
over 100 species, though Lonoke does so more consistently. Rarities found in
the recent past include Rufous Hummingbird, Long-tailed Duck, Black Scoter,
Glaucous Gull, Says Phoebe, and the state's first Ash-throated Flycatcher!

Dan Scheiman, Compiler
Little Rock. AR




 

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Date: 11/11/17 8:22 am
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
I looked for my Scissor-tail yesterday and couldn’t locate him so I guess Kenny beats me again. Maybe someone else can challenge him.

I’ll keep looking.

Ed Laster




> On Nov 9, 2017, at 7:37 PM, Kenny Nichols <kingbird...> wrote:
>
> LaDonna and I had a Scissor-tail late this evening near Pottsville.
>
>
>
>
>
> Your move, Ed.
>
> Kenny Nichols
> Dardanelle
>
>
> On Saturday, November 4, 2017, 4:48:19 PM CDT, Ed Laster <elaster523...> wrote:
>
>
> And I had another on Hwy 216 near Harris Brake.
>
> Every year I try to beat Kenny for the latest Scissor-tail. Maybe I’ll beat him this year. Keep posting Kenny.
>
> Ed Laster
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>
> > On Nov 4, 2017, at 11:51 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
> >
> > I had one in Cabot on Thursday and another in northern Conway County near Austin yesterday. I've always considered them late after 31 October.
> >
> > Kenny Nichols
> > Dardanelle
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone


 

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Date: 11/11/17 5:39 am
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann...>
Subject: Purple Finch
Had a FOS female Purple Finch at my feeders in northern Crawford County on
the 9th and a male this morning.

Ann Gordon

 

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Date: 11/10/17 11:17 pm
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: tonight at Hobbs
We captured another feisty female saw-whet at Hobbs State park tonight... 4 birds in the last 3 nights.. I think that we have established that saw-whets are much more common than previously thought in northwestern Arkansas and northeastern Oklahoma...

We will be suspending the netting at Hobbs after tonight, but will be still netting at the Ozark Natural Science Center for the next several weeks... visitors welcome...

Cheers, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************


 

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Date: 11/10/17 5:32 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Winter Wren
After returning to Fayetteville yesterday from a fun and productive Loon Trip to Tenkiller in Oklahoma with Joe Neal, Bob and I saw our First of Season Winter Wren.
Also, the Surf Scoter mentioned in Joe Neal's post on ARBIRD about said Loon Trip to Tenkiller was a life bird for me. Thanks, Joe!
Sara Caulk

From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Friday, November 10, 2017 2:58 PM
Subject: Winter Wren

First of Season for me.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County



 

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Date: 11/10/17 12:58 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Winter Wren
First of Season for me.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 11/10/17 12:26 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Trumpeter Swans
Kenny Nations of Heber Springs called me this morning and reported seeing 8
swans at Magness Lake. I drove out to the Verlon Abram ponds on Hiram road
and there were 12 more there. The gates are open for your viewing, but
please be good stewards to his property and the swans. Don't feed them
bread, this is harmful to the ducks and swans.

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

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Date: 11/10/17 11:19 am
From: David Prudhomme <dcprudhomme...>
Subject: Bird identification help
Hello, can you help with ID of this guy? I know the pic is not great, but all I have; taken yesterday late morning, neighbor's roof, West Little Rock, Cooper Orbit area. Is this a color variant of one of our usuals (e.g., red-tailed, red-shouldered), or a visitor from down South (e.g., Harris's)? The beak to head geometry just looks off to me.
Thanks for your help!



DCP
Cooper Orbit, West Little Rock
 

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Date: 11/10/17 11:18 am
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Waxwings return, Le Conte's continue, etc. (Washington/Benton Co's)
While doing transects at Callie's Prairie (Lake Fayetteville) this morning,
I saw two flocks of Cedar Waxwings totaling about 40 birds. This is
first-of-the-season for me, although their "fall arrival" date varies
greatly depending on the year.

I did my surveys at Woolsey Wet Prairie (also Fayetteville) this morning,
where I found more Le Conte's Sparrows this week than I did last week. In
one area in the NW part of the park I heard 3-4 calling back-and-forth with
their sharp staccato chip notes. I spotted two singles at other locations
within Woolsey today too. Total = up to six Le Conte's Sparrows.

One of the "single" birds gave an interesting down-slurred call, and
another repeatedly flew nearly vertically about 7 feet up and fluttered
back down. Perhaps some territory defense was going on.

I either saw 1 Le Conte's twice or two unique Le Conte's at a restored
section in Chesney Prairie on Tuesday morning. In the burned area there I
was delighted to see two Rusty Blackbirds, a first-of-year for me too and a
personal favorite.

Good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.

 

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Date: 11/10/17 10:27 am
From: Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
Subject: RTHU
Just saw a female hummer at the feeder RTHU

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/10/17 9:26 am
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: saw-whet update
Good night last night... 3 saw-whets at the Ozark Natural Science Center and 2 owls at Hobbs State Park...

We will be at Hobbs again tonight... nets go up at 7:30 and first check at 8:15...

Cheers, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************


 

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Date: 11/10/17 4:28 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: ALL IN FOR LOONS (TENKILLER)
Tenkiller Ferry Lake in northeastern Oklahoma is very popular among a certain subset of the regional birding community. I use subset purposefully, because if at this time of year, and on through winter, and into the early spring IF you apparently perform your normal duties to work and family in say Fort Smith or Fayetteville or even sitting in your Forest Service office in Waldron -- but Tenkiller drifts imaginatively across secret and well-guarded places in your mind, well this may be symptomatic you are all looned up; in a fever.

A person is at least on the verge of being normal if they are also interested in the American White Pelicans, Bald Eagles, ducks, and gulls hard to miss if you are all in for loons. You can claim to be normal by claiming to be fascinated by the pelicans -- while sneaking looks at loons. Tenkiller is a sort of winter capital for loons that nested far to our north. All four species of loons Common, Pacific, Red-throated, Yellow-billed have been seen on Tenkiller in winter.

In my case, theres no longer any point in trying to hide it. Yes, I am currently looking for a Why be normal? bumper stickler.

Heres a bit of Yesterdays Tenkiller, along with a couple of friends, Bob and Sara Caulk, who are normal people by most standards and were wise enough and careful enough to focus on pelicans, and not just loons, just in case anyone was looking: Common Loon (186, seen at all stops), American White Pelican (100+, usually following the loons), Surf Scoter (1), Red-breasted Merganser (5), Horned Grebe (60). We also picked up 3 gull species: Ring-billed, Bonapartes, Franklins.

Corps of Engineer parks (Strayhorn, Snake Creek, Chicken Creek, and Cookson) were all still open.


 

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Date: 11/9/17 7:57 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Hawks!
Adult Bald Eagle today, 1015 hrs, above I-30 eastbound at MM 136. Any been
seen lately around the Audubon Center?

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Elizabeth Shores
Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2017 8:53 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Hawks!

Great report. Hawks are the best thing about interstate driving.

I hope the tests were good.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 8, 2017, at 8:19 PM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
wrote:
>
> I drove from Marion AR to Little Rock today for tests at UAMS. On I-40
between those two towns I saw a total of 45 red tailed hawks. I probably
missed several because of the big bad trucks constantly whizzing by. I saw
lots of birds, maybe a dozen or more species, but the great highlight for me
was seeing 12 or 13 different large flocks of geese and one smaller flock of
small (no ID) ducks flying around the Wheatley and Brinkley area where so
many snow geese congregate in the winter.
>
> Bill Thurman
 

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Date: 11/9/17 6:33 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Sighting Blue-headed Vireo
I saw a Blue-headed Vireo this morning when I walked my dogs at 7:00. Then,
a bit after 9:00 I photographed one at the water feature in my yard. I
thought it might be a bit late, but eBird shows a December entry in 1973.



Gail

Conway

Faulkner Co., AR


 

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Date: 11/9/17 5:37 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
LaDonna and I had a Scissor-tail late this evening near Pottsville.




Your move, Ed. 
Kenny NicholsDardanelle

On Saturday, November 4, 2017, 4:48:19 PM CDT, Ed Laster <elaster523...> wrote:

And I had another on Hwy 216 near Harris Brake.

Every year I try to beat Kenny for the latest Scissor-tail.  Maybe I’ll beat him this year.  Keep posting Kenny.

Ed Laster
Little Rock




> On Nov 4, 2017, at 11:51 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I had one in Cabot on Thursday and another in northern Conway County near Austin yesterday. I've always considered them late after 31 October.
>
> Kenny Nichols
> Dardanelle
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/9/17 9:06 am
From: Ann Honeycutt <annhoneycutt53...>
Subject: Change of Format in 2018 Audubon Birds Gallery Page-a-Day Calendar
After enjoying three years of the handsome Lucite-encased, page-a-day
calendar with glossy, gorgeous bird photos, Audubon changed the 2018
version to a flimsy yellow plastic frame, tear-off and discard pages, with
the photos printed on cheap paper. I'm so disappointed not to be adding a
fourth year to my collection.

I wonder why Audubon changed the calendar to lower production values this
year?

I plan to continue enjoying my past three years' of calendars by covering
the year with a sticky note and hope they return to the nicer format in
2019.

Ann Honeycutt
Little Rock

 

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Date: 11/9/17 7:25 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: FOS at feeder
Two Pine Siskins have shown up this morning.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, Boone Co., AR


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 11/9/17 7:06 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: NSWO at Hobbs State Park - Rogers, AR
Pretty awesome! Further in saw-whet news, the ONSC site captured 2 saw-whets last night, HY and SY females. The crew in Tahlequah, OK captured a bird as well.

Things are ramping up!

Mitchell Pruitt,
(Currently at Raptor Research Foundation meeting in Salt Lake City)


Sent from my iPhone.

> On Nov 8, 2017, at 23:49, Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> wrote:
>
> Some people have wondered about the fact that we only have been capturing saw-whet owls at the Ozark Natural Science Center… are they really here in greater numbers in the southern Ozarks? Last year, Mia Revels caught 18 saw-whets in northeastern Oklahoma, which would suggest that they are here in good numbers in the southern Ozarks… last year we tried a few nights at Hobbs State Park just east of Rogers Arkansas with no success… this year we have moved the nets to near the visitor center in an area of mixed deciduous and tall pines, maybe similar to Mia’s study area in Oklahoma… Sunday night we caught no birds, but tonight we caught a second year female at about 9:10, so they are in the park…
>
> We will be going out tomorrow night at about 7:15 with first net check at 8:15 if anyone would like to join us at Hobbs… another group will be at the Ozark Natural Science Center tomorrow night as well…
>
> Cheers, Kim
>
> ********************************
> Kimberly G. Smith
> Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
> Department of Biological Sciences
> University of Arkansas
> Fayetteville, AR 72701
> Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
> Email: <kgsmith...>
> ********************************
>

 

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Date: 11/9/17 4:36 am
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Lesser Black-backed Gull
An adult has returned to Lake Dardanelle. It was seen yesterday near the boat launch.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/8/17 10:49 pm
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: NSWO at Hobbs State Park - Rogers, AR
Some people have wondered about the fact that we only have been capturing saw-whet owls at the Ozark Natural Science Center... are they really here in greater numbers in the southern Ozarks? Last year, Mia Revels caught 18 saw-whets in northeastern Oklahoma, which would suggest that they are here in good numbers in the southern Ozarks... last year we tried a few nights at Hobbs State Park just east of Rogers Arkansas with no success... this year we have moved the nets to near the visitor center in an area of mixed deciduous and tall pines, maybe similar to Mia's study area in Oklahoma... Sunday night we caught no birds, but tonight we caught a second year female at about 9:10, so they are in the park...

We will be going out tomorrow night at about 7:15 with first net check at 8:15 if anyone would like to join us at Hobbs... another group will be at the Ozark Natural Science Center tomorrow night as well...

Cheers, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************


 

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Date: 11/8/17 7:17 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: Thrushing after the cold front
Greetings all,
Tues morning, dawned with wispy fog, patchy sunlight, and a cool, crispness in the air.
I was treated to a great chorus of ethereal sounds.
The loudest was the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker. A Winter Wren, 41 American Goldfinch, 3 Hermit Thrushes, a Veery and a Swainson's Thrush provided the chorus. Even the resident Carolina Wren seemed muted.

1 Hermit Thrush was there Sun-Monday, but everything else was new.
All were gone by Wens morning.

According to the AAS database the Swainson's might be the 2nd latest fall record. The Veery might be only the 3rd fall record.

A really great way to celebrate the dawning of a new day.

Cheers, Leif at Hector

"Thrushing" might not be a word, but maybe it should be!




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 11/8/17 6:53 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Hawks!
Great report. Hawks are the best thing about interstate driving.

I hope the tests were good.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 8, 2017, at 8:19 PM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
>
> I drove from Marion AR to Little Rock today for tests at UAMS. On I-40 between those two towns I saw a total of 45 red tailed hawks. I probably missed several because of the big bad trucks constantly whizzing by. I saw lots of birds, maybe a dozen or more species, but the great highlight for me was seeing 12 or 13 different large flocks of geese and one smaller flock of small (no ID) ducks flying around the Wheatley and Brinkley area where so many snow geese congregate in the winter.
>
> Bill Thurman
 

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Date: 11/8/17 6:19 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Hawks!
I drove from Marion AR to Little Rock today for tests at UAMS. On I-40
between those two towns I saw a total of 45 red tailed hawks. I probably
missed several because of the big bad trucks constantly whizzing by. I saw
lots of birds, maybe a dozen or more species, but the great highlight for
me was seeing 12 or 13 different large flocks of geese and one smaller
flock of small (no ID) ducks flying around the Wheatley and Brinkley area
where so many snow geese congregate in the winter.

Bill Thurman

 

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Date: 11/8/17 6:03 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Number of Bluebirds fledged reported in newspaper
That's a happy story, Butch. Thanks!
Sara CaulkFayetteville

From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 8, 2017 2:55 PM
Subject: Number of Bluebirds fledged reported in newspaper

Ok, I don't know where else in the Arkansas, or even the country, will the number of bluebirds fledged make the paper, but it does in Bella Vista.
The Weekly Vista reports on page 2B that 2,390 bluebirds fledged from boxes monitored by the Bella Vista Bluebird Society this year.  The total now stands at 45,893 since its founding in 1980.
I guess there is hope after all for environmental concerns when things like this are deemed important enough to report.  At least there is here.
Kudos to the residents of B.V.
Butch TetzlaffBentonville


 

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Date: 11/8/17 12:55 pm
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Number of Bluebirds fledged reported in newspaper
Ok, I don't know where else in the Arkansas, or even the country, will the
number of bluebirds fledged make the paper, but it does in Bella Vista.

The Weekly Vista reports on page 2B that 2,390 bluebirds fledged from boxes
monitored by the Bella Vista Bluebird Society this year. The total now
stands at 45,893 since its founding in 1980.

I guess there is hope after all for environmental concerns when things like
this are deemed important enough to report. At least there is here.

Kudos to the residents of B.V.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

 

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Date: 11/8/17 3:46 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: WW Scoter
If any of you go to Lake Fayetteville today, and find the Scoter, or not, I
would appreciate a heads up. My plate is kind of full today, but for a
life bird, I would have to try to make time to go down there. Thanks, in
advance!

Karen Garrett

 

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Date: 11/7/17 7:27 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 7
It was overcast, cool, and windy on the bird survey today. 75 species were
found. Biggest surprise of the day was a Roseate Spoonbill circling over
Pintail Lake then heading southeast. Still have Common Gallinule and
Neotropic Cormorant lingering although these species have wintered here
before. Duck numbers are way up. Here is my list for today:



Canada Goose - 2



Wood Duck - 27



Gadwall - 2055



American Wigeon - 10



Mallard - 335



Northern Shoveler - 32



Northern Pintail -3



Green-winged Teal - 350



Canvasback - 2



Ring-necked Duck - 3774



Hooded Merganser - 1



Ruddy Duck - 7



Unidentified ducks - 500 (unable to I.D. because of being in flight at a
distance against heavy overcast sky.)



Pied-billed Grebe - 18



Neotropic Cormorant - 1



Double-crested Cormorant - 4



Great-blue Heron - 10



Roseate Spoonbill - 1 (new late date.)



Turkey Vulture - 18



Bald Eagle - 1 imm.



Northern Harrier - 4



Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1



Cooper's Hawk - 2



Red-shouldered Hawk - 1



Red-tailed Hawk - 7



Common Gallinule - 1



American Coot - 850



Killdeer - 4



Greater Yellowlegs - 6



Wilson's Snipe - 33



Rock Pigeon - 1



Eurasian Collared-Dove - 5



Mourning Dove - 1



Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2



Downy Woodpecker - 4



Hairy Woodpecker - 1



Northern Flicker - 15



Pileated Woodpecker - 1



Eastern Phoebe - 25



Loggerhead Shrike - 1



Blue Jay - 4



American Crow - 130



Fish Crow - 5



Carolina Chickadee - 10



Tufted Titmouse - 2



Brown Creeper - 1



Carolina Wren - 7



Bewick's Wren - 1 (eastern; reddish-brown back.)



House Wren - 1



Sedge Wren - 5



Marsh Wren - 2



Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1



Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 7



Eastern Bluebird - 2



Hermit Thrush - 4



American Robin - 171



Brown Thrasher - 2



Orange-crowned Warbler - 3



Yellow-rumped Warbler - 36



Common Yellowthroat - 2



Eastern Towhee - 4



Field Sparrow - 2



Savannah Sparrow - 12



Le Conte's Sparrow - 2



Fox Sparrow - 2



Song Sparrow - 15



Lincoln's Sparrow - 1



Swamp Sparrow - 10



White-throated Sparrow - 11



White-crowned Sparrow - 3



Dark-eyed Junco - 2



Northern Cardinal - 11



Red-winged Blackbird - 14



Eastern Meadowlark - 10



American Goldfinch - 9





Odonates:



Familiar Bluet

Variegated Meadowhawk

Autumn Meadowhawk





Herps:



Green Treefrog









Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






 

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Date: 11/7/17 2:36 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville UPDATE: White-winged Scoters (2)!
I just had a call from Mike Mlodinow, who found White-winged Scoters (2) at Lake Fayetteville this afternoon around 4 PM. They were near the dam and loosely associated with the 5 Common Loons.


In my post from a few minutes ago, I failed to include Wood Duck in my list. I saw a flock of 23 this morning associated with the big raft.

 

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Date: 11/7/17 2:07 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: ELMER J FUDD GOES DUCK HUNTIN’ (or, RED-BREASTED MERG AND LOONS AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE)
Geese were still flying this morning, so I returned to Lake Fayetteville. Still a sizeable raft of ducks! Gulls in the air! They were mainly in the lower part of the lake, so I set up shop just off the disk golf course. Still 100% overcast, misting, and pretty mucky. A situation that reminded a friend of Elmer Fudd going duck hunting.

The duck list for today looks like this: Gadwall (25), Mallard (24), Northern Shoveler (120), Green-winged Teal (7), Canvasback (4), Redhead (11), Ring-necked Duck (25), Lesser Scaup (600-700), Bufflehead (5), Hooded Merganser (16), Red-breasted Merganser (2), Ruddy Duck (14). Others: Common Loon (5), Pied-billed Grebe (~20), Horned Grebe (1), Double-crested Cormorant (3), Franklins Gull (2), Ring-billed Gull (4).

Elmer Fudd-like in the weeds and muck, me and trusty ole spotting scope partially hidden, I had some time to just breathe the air and observe the lake. To weigh like gold actual net value of the chance to be outside and hear the overhead flights of Snow Geese, intimate chatters of ducks in a raft. It seems like a worthy goal in life to preserve this for the future, too. Preserve the chance for some unseen future to see flocks of wild ducks, fresh from the far off potholes of the northern Great Plains.

For some people an Audubon video or a backyard bird feeder may suffice. But wont there be some future child, or some Elmer J. Fudd, who needs for mental health and well-being the cries of wild geese, the sudden roar of thousands of wings lifting off as an a Bald Eagle flies in?

Who knows what the future holds. Sure all of this is worth passing on to that time, be it distant and probably different than our own.


 

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Date: 11/7/17 11:33 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: thousands of birds, literally
It was birdy this morning.

At around 9:30 am, from the crown of a pinecone laden tree near the house, I heard the "flip-flip" calls of Red Crossbills and watched a tight flock move against the starkly white overcast sky from one silhouetted treetop to another. Following their movement as best I could through the shortleaf pines, I never got a good look for the usual reasons, but also because suddenly there were birds everywhere, moving and filling the crowns of nearly every pine and oak in the yard. Multiple flocks of Robins, Goldfinches, Pine Siskins, Yellow-rumped Warblers, and Cedar Waxwings were all calling in their distinctive voices, highly agitated and moving quickly in groups. Above this mixed flock of little birds there arrived simultaneously a cacophony of Snow Geese, their variously muted grey shapes just above the lowering cloud base, and their flock stretching from east to west, grey wings appearing out of the mist and their thousands of voices drowning out the small birds. From time to time I would hear the Crossbills again, but never located them as the Waxwings and Siskins became dominant. Then another enormous flock of geese became audible, so loud I expected to see it appear overhead although it never did, perhaps hidden in cloud, and continued unbroken calling as it passed for what seemed like 10 minutes.

After the huge invisible flock of geese was no longer audible, only a few Siskins, Warblers, and Goldfinches remained, quietly investigating the damp fallen leaves. Then they too were gone. It was 10:30 am.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 11/7/17 10:11 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: A 50-year effort to raise endangered whooping cranes comes to an end
Because of budget cuts from the current administration, this program is ending. Apparently they need to place 190 birds with licensed facilities. That's not going to be so easy. It is increasingly hard to place non-releasable birds because this facility that was funded (for example) is shutting down and the ones that are not funded rely on donations (like Centre Wildlife Care). Please think of CWC when you are making your end of year donation.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/animalia/wp/2017/09/18/a-50-year-effort-to-raise-endangered-whooping-cranes-comes-to-an-end/?utm_term=.c422e5df9405

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 11/7/17 9:54 am
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Re: Surf Scoter, Lake Monticello
Surf Scoter still at Lake Monticello.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

On Mon, Nov 6, 2017 at 4:43 PM Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:

> Doc George photographed the Surf Scoter on Lake Monticello that was
> recently found by UA-Monticello grad student Ethan Massey. A Drew Co.
> first! http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40338442
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>

 

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Date: 11/7/17 6:56 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Snow Geese
Out in the country early this morning. Very foggy, a flock of about 200
Snow geese flew over about tree top high. They were in a very loose flock,
lost, flying north, east, west, south and in all directions. I saw and
heard them for over 30 minutes. Hope they landed in a large field
somewhere.

Terry Butler

 

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Date: 11/7/17 5:55 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: binoculars Himalaya bound
Six retired binoculars are going to spend the rest of their lives helping kids become naturalists in some remote village in the Himalaya.  Any others wanting to join them?  
I leave for India in 11 days.  
KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 11/7/17 5:39 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Snow Geese still going over Fayetteville this morning
Snow Geese over my house

at 7:30 AM.


Low dense clouds and mist

And promises of potentially

Another good waterfowl day

 

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Date: 11/7/17 3:52 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Scoter
Checked the sewage ponds at Fort Chaffee yesterday. One pond held a huge
flock of ducks. I just knew it had to have a Scoter. And sure enough,
after much looking, one swam away by itself. I believe it to be a
White-winged. It was very far away, and it was misting heavily. There was
no white on the wing, of course. I have very bad photos that show the
white spots on the head. None of the ducks showed any color. Everything
was grey and white.
Also present were Pintails, Ruddy Ducks, Mallards, Green-winged Teal,
Ring-neckeds, Lesser Scaup, Gadwall, and a lone Canvasback.

Hooded Mergansers and Lesser Scaup occupied another pond. And White
Pelicans and Cormorants commanded the first pond.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith

 

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Date: 11/6/17 5:54 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: BKNWR
Made a quick drive through BKNWR this afternoon. On the east side of the
refuge I saw thousands of Snow geese on the ground along with 1 Ring-billed
Gull with them and flock after flock of Snow geese in the sky and a few
White-fronted. A half dozen White Pelicans, Harrier Hawks, Kestrel, a few
Great Blue Herons, a dozen Great Egrets. Ducks, hundreds of Mallards, 100+
Green Winged Teal, several Blue-winged Teal, some Coots, some Gadwall, a
couple of Pintail, several Northern Shoveler. Also a few Pied-billed Grebes
and 2 male Hooded Merganser .Of interest, where the east west road that
runs to the north of the ponds intersects with the north south road west of
the ponds, there were hundreds of Goldfinch feeding on weed seed. The stems
were bent to the ground with the weight of the birds..Also in the middle of
the west pond were several Dunlin along with a few Least Sandpiper.
Hundreds of sparrows, I don't know, driving to fast to look. What was that?

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

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Date: 11/6/17 5:27 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: MORE DUCKS ON LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
After lunch today I went back out to Lake Fayetteville to get another look at the duck rafts. This time I went over by the disk golf course to see the dam end of the lake a little better. It was still 100% overcast and misty, so it was a bit of a wetting, but worth it. I picked up two more duck species, plus a flock of Double-crested Cormorants (28) and two gull species I didnt see in the morning (Franklins and Ring-billed). Just an amazing, huge migration energy out there today. The duck list for today looks like this: Gadwall, American Wigeon (4), Mallard, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback (3-4), Redhead, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Hooded Merganser, Ruddy Duck. By far, most abundant was Lesser Scaup; you know there must be a Greater Scaup in there, too.


 

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Date: 11/6/17 4:37 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: Snow Geese
I left work around 1:15 today heading for an appointment. Heard Snow Geese
flying overhead, but couldn't see them through the fog. Arrived home a
few hours later in time to see two different groups heading south to north.
According to ebird, this would be a new yard.

Dottie Boyles, Little Rock

Little Rock
 

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Date: 11/6/17 2:43 pm
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Surf Scoter, Lake Monticello
Doc George photographed the Surf Scoter on Lake Monticello that was recently found by UA-Monticello grad student Ethan Massey. A Drew Co. first! http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40338442

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/17 10:27 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: wild geese flying
Awakening during the night when cool air wafted through the bedroom window Don and I heard flocks of geese passing over.
I stepped outside this morning to see another flock of around 250 birds in shifting V formations move across the sky.
Later, while light drizzle fell on the dogs and on me on our morning walk, I watched from the bluff as the wedges and calls of one group faded and another became audible and a continual stream of flocks appeared in the far distance. Flock after flock of Snow Geese, both white and blue morphs, thousands in all, headed toward their next stop.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 11/6/17 9:39 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BIG WATERFOWL MOVEMENT FROM MULHOLLAN BLIND, LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
Snow Geese started flying over my place in Fayetteville just as the cold front moved in last night. When I woke this morning about the first thing I heard was Snow Geese. I went out to Mulhollan Blind in Lake Fayetteville Park and had at least 6 flocks of Snows pass over until around 9 AM.

In the light mist, Mulhollan Blind was a comfortable place to hunker down and pick through hundreds of waterfowl. In the mist and the movement I was not able to get really accurate counts, but I did study the birds long enough to make informed estimates. The bulk of the biggest raft looked mainly like scaup.
Snow Goose (~800 in 6 flocks), Canada Goose (2), Gadwall (~30), Mallard (~20), Northern Shoveler (~125), Green-winged Teal (~20), Redhead (~20), Ring-necked Duck (~50+), Lesser Scaup (~600), Bufflehead (1), Hooded Merganser (11), Ruddy Duck (~30), Common Loon (3), Pied-billed Grebe (20+), American Coot (35).

A Common Loon that swam close to the blind shared a fine yodel. A Winter Wren was calling just outside the blind.


 

Back to top
Date: 11/6/17 8:50 am
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Frog Bayou
Hats off to Joe Neal for the lovely photos in the Frog Bayou story in
today's Dem/Gaz feature section.

Lyndal York
LR

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Date: 11/6/17 7:00 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, Nov 9, Dragonflies & Damselflies
This Thursday November 9 is Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's monthly meeting starting at 7 PM at the Fletcher Library on H St. in Little Rock. This month's speaker is Devin Moon, Interpreter at Logoly State Park, presenting "Arkansas: A Land of Damsels and Dragons." Arkansas has over 140 recorded species of these fascinating insects. Come and learn about these winged works of art and explore the habitats and locales that they call home.

ASCA's meetings are free and open to the public. More info is at http://wp.ascabird.org/

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/17 3:42 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Possible Clapper Rail
Yep. Gonna have to go with King. Karen Rowe sent me some recordings from
Xeno canto. I can see why it can't be confirmed by call. King makes more
sense here in AR.

Thanks for the information.

Sandy B.

On Sun, Nov 5, 2017 at 3:57 PM Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:

> Birds of North America says for King Rail "Calls are similar to and often
> confused with those of Clapper Rail. Individual vocalizations rarely
> confirmed with sighting of calling individual, so linking behavior to the
> call is difficult. … Next most obvious call is the territorial, courtship,
> or mating call given as a harsh and loud kik-kik-kik- during day and
> occasionally at night; may vary from a series of kiks to kuks or bups .
> Similar to Clapper Rail advertising call but often louder, slower, deeper,
> and more consistent; doesn't speed up and slow down as does this call of
> the Clapper.”
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>
> On 11/5/17, 3:02 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
> Sandy Berger" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <sndbrgr...>
> wrote:
>
> Just thought I'd put this out here. I believe I had a Clapper Rail in the
> wetlands on Sharp Chapel road, near Frog Bayou WMA, yesterday. I never saw
> it, but it was making the repetitive "tick tick tick" call. The one that
> sounds like rocks being knocked together. I did a playback and it
> responded with more clicking and moved closer and closer. Gonna head back
> over in the morning and try again. It's a life bird for me. Couldn't
> chase today.
> Sorry I got this out a day late.
>
> Sandy B.
> FS, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/17 1:57 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Possible Clapper Rail
Birds of North America says for King Rail "Calls are similar to and often
confused with those of Clapper Rail. Individual vocalizations rarely
confirmed with sighting of calling individual, so linking behavior to the
call is difficult. Next most obvious call is the territorial, courtship,
or mating call given as a harsh and loud kik-kik-kik- during day and
occasionally at night; may vary from a series of kiks to kuks or bups .
Similar to Clapper Rail advertising call but often louder, slower, deeper,
and more consistent; doesn't speed up and slow down as does this call of the
Clapper.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 11/5/17, 3:02 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Sandy Berger" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <sndbrgr...>
wrote:

Just thought I'd put this out here. I believe I had a Clapper Rail in the
wetlands on Sharp Chapel road, near Frog Bayou WMA, yesterday. I never saw
it, but it was making the repetitive "tick tick tick" call. The one that
sounds like rocks being knocked together. I did a playback and it responded
with more clicking and moved closer and closer. Gonna head back over in the
morning and try again. It's a life bird for me. Couldn't chase today.
Sorry I got this out a day late.

Sandy B.
FS, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/17 1:02 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Possible Clapper Rail
Just thought I'd put this out here. I believe I had a Clapper Rail in the
wetlands on Sharp Chapel road, near Frog Bayou WMA, yesterday. I never saw
it, but it was making the repetitive "tick tick tick" call. The one that
sounds like rocks being knocked together. I did a playback and it
responded with more clicking and moved closer and closer. Gonna head back
over in the morning and try again. It's a life bird for me. Couldn't
chase today.
Sorry I got this out a day late.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

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Date: 11/5/17 12:06 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Doug's top 3 most spectacular birds
Well, one of them is sometimes seen in s. Arkansas......
On Sunday 5 November 2017, 1:52:26 PM GMT-6, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Can you guess the top 3 most spectacular birds Doug has seen?  (None are from Arkansas).  It's fun transcribing his notes into eBird......
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40323183

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/17 11:52 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Doug's top 3 most spectacular birds
Can you guess the top 3 most spectacular birds Doug has seen?  (None are from Arkansas).  It's fun transcribing his notes into eBird......
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40323183

 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/17 9:23 am
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Common Loons- Lake Maumelle
Adam and I scooped 6 Common Loons on Lake Maumelle this morning.  1 from Loon Point, 2 at Hundley Road Causeway and 3 from Vista Point.  Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.  

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/17 6:41 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: 2-OWL NIGHT
We had fun and OWLS during last nights Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society-sponsored field trip to Mitchell Pruitts Northern Saw-Whet Owl study site at Ozark Natural Science Center. Unlike most Audubon trips, this one had lots of young folks. And Mitchell delivered.

He wasted no time, starting with a red morph Eastern Screech-Owl at the first nest check (about 8:15 PM). On some kind of scale I suppose screeches may not be as charismatic as saw-whets, but it energized a room full of hopeful people. All the families with kids saw a small owl up close. They also got exposed to part of how fact-based science works. Feisty owl extracted a little bit of bloody revenge, even with Mitchells expert handling.

As field trip convener for NWAAS, I was of course considerably relieved we had an owl before bedtime, and a little one at that, but of course, no saw-whet yet.

Many of the people with little ones left when the second net check (around 9:30) didnt deliver an owl. But my old buddy Luke Collins explained we would almost certainly have one right after he left, so after the second net check he generously departed ONSC. It worked, Luke. Mitchell had a saw-whet at 10:15. The crowd, including remaining children, just went wild.

Witnessing the joy and excitement in such a thing, a person just has to believe there remains hope for the human race. Surely our better instincts can prevail. Look in the eyes of those kids. Before the saw-whet was released, there was a rather poignant moment in which Mitchell and little owl gathered with the rest of his Jonesboro family: Ken (father), Kathlene (mother) and his sister Katie, proudly holding Ms Charisma with the big yellow eyes.

Everyone who visits ONSC comes away struck by the place the facilities, the location, the idea it is worthwhile in 2017 to offer environmental learning where natural Earth predominates. Just as was the case last night, ONSC staff have been key supporters of Mitchells project. Like Mitchells owls, ONSC started with an idea and idea become flesh with a lot of effort and a lot of public support. Theres really nothing like reality-based science.

It is inescapable back in the Ozark hills around ONSC. A 2-owl night so well illustrates Earth and our role in natural order of things.


 

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Date: 11/5/17 5:19 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LAKE FAYETTEVILLE WATERFOWL FIELD TRIP SATURDAY NOVEMBER 11
Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society (NWAAS) will host a field trip to observe waterfowl migration at Lake Fayetteville on Saturday November 11, 2017, starting at 9 AM. Meet in the parking lot at the north end of the dam. Mid-November is a peak time for the migration of all kinds of ducks, including diving ducks like Surf Scoters and Common Goldeneyes, Pied-billed and Horned Grebes (sometimes Eared Grebe), Common Loons, and several gull species. We usually see Bald Eagles. We will make 3 stops. First, from the dam end of the lake, (2) drive to the Environmental Study Center and use the observation deck there, (3) then drive around to Mulhollan Blind (about a 1.3 mile walk for round trip). The stop at the dam end is very accessible for those with mobility impairments.

You do not need to be a member to participate. All ages and abilities (including disabilities) are welcome. Bring binoculars and spotting scopes if you have them. Dress warmly. This is usually finished by around noon.

UPCOMING: Annual winter NWAAS meeting (brief) followed by presentation featuring UA-Fayetteville graduate student Alyssa DeRubeis on her grassland bird research in northwest Arkansas prairies. Everyone is welcome. Visitors Center at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, Saturday Dec 2, starting 2 PM. Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count is Sunday Dec 17.


 

Back to top
Date: 11/5/17 4:17 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Possible Surf Scoter, Lake Monticello
This female Surf Scoter hit my eBird review queue.
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S40309795

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 11/4/17 5:19 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: LOONS ON BEAVER LAKE


Great trip Joe. The fall colors were really nice. Best color Ive seen in years. Birding by boat is the way to go on a big lake with nice views of the Bald Eagles, Common Loons, and Horned Grebes.
The persimmon I tried was soft but still astringent. Nothing like the ones you gave me last week. Jacque.



> On Nov 4, 2017, at 3:08 PM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area sponsored a loon cruise on Beaver Lake this morning. The well-equipped and comfortable pontoon boat was captained by Bob Ross. We were on the lake in the Rocky Branch area for 2-hours. Wind was low, water relatively flat, and flaming trees on White River bluff lines made brilliant reflections in the water. We found water birds, too.
>
> We had relatively few ducks, but we did see Gadwalls (8) and Buffleheads (2) plus a few lost in the fog. We picked up Common Loons (total of 5) in two places. They were in parts of the lake we cannot see with scopes from land. Plus, Pied-billed Grebe (2), Horned Grebe (at least 150, all across the lake near Glade), Double-crested Cormorant (48), Great Blue Heron (3), both vulture species, and Bald Eagles (3 adults, 1 in its first winter). Big misses: no gulls and no rafts of American Coots or ducks. Red-headed Woodpeckers (2) on a snag adjacent the young eagle.
>
> The worlds champion Persimmon tree is covered with fruit where we parked at Rocky Branch marina. There is so much fruit it is hard to believe this could be the effort of only a single tree. Tasty fruit, too.


 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/17 3:42 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
Adam and I saw 4 this evening out Frazier Pike in East Little Rock.  Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.  

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Sat, Nov 4, 2017 at 4:48 PM, Ed Laster<elaster523...> wrote: And I had another on Hwy 216 near Harris Brake.

Every year I try to beat Kenny for the latest Scissor-tail.  Maybe I’ll beat him this year.  Keep posting Kenny.

Ed Laster
Little Rock




> On Nov 4, 2017, at 11:51 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I had one in Cabot on Thursday and another in northern Conway County near Austin yesterday. I've always considered them late after 31 October.
>
> Kenny Nichols
> Dardanelle
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/17 2:48 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
And I had another on Hwy 216 near Harris Brake.

Every year I try to beat Kenny for the latest Scissor-tail. Maybe I’ll beat him this year. Keep posting Kenny.

Ed Laster
Little Rock




> On Nov 4, 2017, at 11:51 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I had one in Cabot on Thursday and another in northern Conway County near Austin yesterday. I've always considered them late after 31 October.
>
> Kenny Nichols
> Dardanelle
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/17 1:09 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LOONS ON BEAVER LAKE
Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area sponsored a loon cruise on Beaver Lake this morning. The well-equipped and comfortable pontoon boat was captained by Bob Ross. We were on the lake in the Rocky Branch area for 2-hours. Wind was low, water relatively flat, and flaming trees on White River bluff lines made brilliant reflections in the water. We found water birds, too.

We had relatively few ducks, but we did see Gadwalls (8) and Buffleheads (2) plus a few lost in the fog. We picked up Common Loons (total of 5) in two places. They were in parts of the lake we cannot see with scopes from land. Plus, Pied-billed Grebe (2), Horned Grebe (at least 150, all across the lake near Glade), Double-crested Cormorant (48), Great Blue Heron (3), both vulture species, and Bald Eagles (3 adults, 1 in its first winter). Big misses: no gulls and no rafts of American Coots or ducks. Red-headed Woodpeckers (2) on a snag adjacent the young eagle.

The worlds champion Persimmon tree is covered with fruit where we parked at Rocky Branch marina. There is so much fruit it is hard to believe this could be the effort of only a single tree. Tasty fruit, too.


 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/17 12:46 pm
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: Sedge Wren Woolsey Wet Prairie
Excellent viewing of a Sedge Wren while collecting native plant seeds this morning at woolsey Wet Prairie. Saw one last Tuesday, also.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/17 11:56 am
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrows still present at Woolsey Wet Prairie
I was at Woolsey Wet Prairie this morning with Pooja Panwar.

A Merlin was seen perched on a power line at Garland/North Street when we were driving there.

The Clay-colored Sparrows (2) that I found last week are still present at the same location (near the pond just northwest of the parking area). They were seen with a group of Song, Swamp and Field Sparrows. 4 LeConte's Sparrows were seen today but they were nowhere near as cooperative as last week. Song (50) and Swamp (45) Sparrows were the most numerous species by far.

Other sparrows included Chipping (2), Field (10), White-crowned (2), White-throated (15), Vesper (1), Savannah (2) and Lincoln's (5).

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/17 11:16 am
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Re: Lingering Scissor-tails
I had one this morning at Woolsey Wet Prairie (Washington County).

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/17 10:26 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
Assuming most everyone on this list is aware of the value to birds of native plants, let me skip ahead to mention the Arkansas Audubon Society "Bird Friendly Yard" certification program.  We now have over 50 certified yards across the state.  This includes fully certified yards and yards where the owners have pledged to work toward certification (Working to Become).  One more thing you can do to help birds.
For questions or to request an application form, send an email to <bfaudubon...>   To view certification criteria and see and download  the application visit www.arbirds.org/intro.htm
Jack StewartNewton County where the Hermit Thrush have arrived.





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On Friday, November 3, 2017, 10:53:26 AM CDT, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

As you imply, Than, Arkansas birds are very rapidly losing their
wintering grounds in the tropics.  It's a big part of why we're losing
Arkansas birds at the terrible rates of which Jerry often usefully
reminds us.
For those interested in how we can act every day to reduce tropical
deforestation, see
https://www.facebook.com/YearsOfLiving/videos/1532791233474596/

Janine

On 11/3/2017 10:13 AM, Than Boves wrote:
> Actually, the article implies the same thing that you just stated: "39 percent of these species steer clear of edges while 46 percent seem to gravitate toward them" and "about 57 percent of mammals decline in number as you get closer to edges, as do 41 percent of birds, 30 percent of amphibians, and 11 percent of reptiles." That implies that 59% of bird species are either unaffected or increase as you get closer to edges (amphibians and reptiles even do better). So for some species its bad (and they may be species already in trouble), but probably for more its good. In addition, conservation threats are context dependent. For example, in the United States, many forest birds in the eastern US have actually been increasing as secondary forests have regenerated over the past century following mass deforestation (pretty much every tree in the eastern US was cut down at some time between 1870-1950); expectedly grassland/early successional species have fared worse during this same time period. In the tropics, different historical story. Much more recent deforestation, many more species in total, and many more that are adapted to conditions associated with large swaths of unbroken forest.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Than J. Boves, PhD
> Assistant Professor
> Department of Biological Sciences
> Arkansas State University
> Jonesboro, AR 72467
> Office Phone: 870-972-3320
> Website: http://www.boveslab.com/
> Facebook: @BovesLabAState
>
>     
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jay Jones
> Sent: Friday, November 03, 2017 8:06 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
>
> Interesting, and alarming, article. How do I reconcile these findings with my own experience in the U.S. — that species lists and counts tend to be higher in edge habitats? How many times have I noticed that bird activity is significantly reduced in deep woods vs edge habitat?
>
> Rick Jones
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Nov 2, 2017, at 9:28 PM, Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:
>>
>> Dear ARBIRDers,
>>
>> At midnight last night I came across this article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge":
>>
>> https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/11/living-on-the-edge
>> /544658/
>>
>> in The Atlantic.  I thought many of you would enjoy the subject matter.
>>
>> The article brought back the memory of a book titled "Where Have All the Birds Gone?" by John Terborgh that was first published in 1989.  It's about forest fragmentation, and the impact on birds.  The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas bought a number of copies of the book, and sent it to elected officials- members of Congress, state constitution officers, etc.- in hopes either they or a staff member might read the book and learn something about a major threat to birds.
>>
>> So, as we often do in life, we learn forest fragmentation is not even close to a new issue.
>>
>>  From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, Barry Haas
>>
>>
>> P.S.  Re the subject of predating red-shouldered hawks- they frequently hunt in the woods around our house.  After nearly 20 years here, rather than seeing them as a major threat to feeder birds, our most unusual encounter was starkly different.  One morning many years ago I was walking across our pond levee to fill a bird feeder when I heard a commotion in the woods.  What I saw was fairly astonishing.  It was a red-shouldered hawk with its talons in one of our adult male wood ducks.  The hawk was not even close to being able to fly off with its too heavy prey.  As I got nearer to the hawk, it finally loosened its grip and flew off.  The woodie eventually made its way back onto our pond where it remained all day.  We watched it until it was too dark to see the pond.  It had not shown the ability to fly since the hawk attack.  The next morning the duck was gone.  We don't know if it wandered off into the woods and died, or what happened to it.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/17 10:02 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Doug James' field notebooks
Doug James gave me a box of about 100 of his field notebooks.  I am starting the task of uploading his bird records into eBird.  
For starters, I am going to work on his 1992 and 1993 books done while in the field with me in India.  That way I will know what the work really entails.  
Once I am done with that, I will solicit a volunteer brigade.  Stay tuned.  If you are eager to get started, email me offline.  Maybe I can give you a couple of books to work on right away.  
KannanFt. Smith
 

Back to top
Date: 11/4/17 9:51 am
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Lingering Scissor-tails
I had one in Cabot on Thursday and another in northern Conway County near Austin yesterday. I've always considered them late after 31 October.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/3/17 12:20 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Wow ! Blue - headed Vireo
I had one stop at my water feature in my yard last year, on Nov. 8, 2016. http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/image/164491002 Then one stopped this year on Oct. 25, 2017. http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/image/166463710 I guess it’s safe to say, they pass through my place.



They are awesome to see Jerry.



Gail in Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Schulz
Sent: Friday, November 03, 2017 12:05 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Wow ! Blue - headed Vireo



Just turned on the water to our 3 tier water feature because a White-throated sparrow was trying to get a drink out of a left over puddle when down flies a Blue - headed Vireo. I've never seen one before. The spectacles were clearly defined. the bird was very ' flighty ' and didn't stay because of other birds trying to drink and bathe in the running water. Quite a sight !



Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas


 

Back to top
Date: 11/3/17 10:05 am
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...>
Subject: Wow ! Blue - headed Vireo
Just turned on the water to our 3 tier water feature because a White-throated sparrow was trying to get a drink out of a left over puddle when down flies a Blue - headed Vireo. I've never seen one before. The spectacles were clearly defined. the bird was very ' flighty ' and didn't stay because of other birds trying to drink and bathe in the running water. Quite a sight !   Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas
 

Back to top
Date: 11/3/17 8:57 am
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
I've had Red-shouldered, Broad-wing and Cooper's Hawks staking out my feeders  many times in the past.  I had not posted to this thread simply because many similar observations have been posted.  However this morning I opened the curtain to find an immature Red-Tailed Hawk perched atop one of my feeder poles.  It stayed just long enough for my son to get to the window and have a look at it.  So my feeder list just gained it's 4th hawk species!  Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.  

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Fri, Nov 3, 2017 at 9:14 AM, Ragupathy Kannan<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote: From Cornell's website: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-shouldered_Hawk/lifehistory

Red-shouldered Hawks eat mostly small mammals, lizards, snakes, and amphibians. They hunt from perches below the forest canopy or at the edge of a pond, sitting silently until they sight their prey below. Then they descend swiftly, gliding and snatching a vole or chipmunk off the forest floor. They also eat toads, snakes, and crayfish. They occasionally eat birds, sometimes from bird feeders; recorded prey include sparrows, starlings, and doves.


On Thursday 2 November 2017, 5:42:06 PM GMT-5, Gail Miller <gail.miller...> wrote:

#yiv8011181973 -- filtered {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;}#yiv8011181973 filtered {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv8011181973 filtered {panose-1:2 5 6 4 5 5 5 2 2 4;}#yiv8011181973 p.yiv8011181973MsoNormal, #yiv8011181973 li.yiv8011181973MsoNormal, #yiv8011181973 div.yiv8011181973MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;}#yiv8011181973 a:link, #yiv8011181973 span.yiv8011181973MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv8011181973 a:visited, #yiv8011181973 span.yiv8011181973MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv8011181973 p.yiv8011181973msonormal0, #yiv8011181973 li.yiv8011181973msonormal0, #yiv8011181973 div.yiv8011181973msonormal0 {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:11.0pt;}#yiv8011181973 span.yiv8011181973EmailStyle19 {color:windowtext;}#yiv8011181973 .yiv8011181973MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;}#yiv8011181973 filtered {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv8011181973 div.yiv8011181973WordSection1 {}#yiv8011181973
I watched a hawk feverishly chase a Pileated Woodpecker in my woods about a year ago.  The woodpecker squawked and squawked the whole time.  They made several loops through the woods as I watched from the back porch.  Hawk didn’t catch it, thank goodness.  But, it was an interesting sight!!

 

Gail Miller   Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Kristina Baker
Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2017 11:13 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders

 

Hi,

 

Back in 2002 or 2003, I recall coming upon a Red-shouldered Hawk (RSHA) standing on the ground off to the side of the Old Military Trail at Village Creek State Park.  It was determinedly tearing into something, and it flushed as I continued to walk along the trail.  I peered over to see what it was eating, and it was a Pileated Woodpecker (PIWO)!  I was stunned to see this and did not realize it to be so uncommon at the time.  I am unsure if the RSHA dispatched the PIWO, but it was a freshly deceased bird. 

 

Kristina Mitchell

 

 

 


 

Back to top
Date: 11/3/17 8:53 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
As you imply, Than, Arkansas birds are very rapidly losing their
wintering grounds in the tropics.  It's a big part of why we're losing
Arkansas birds at the terrible rates of which Jerry often usefully
reminds us.
For those interested in how we can act every day to reduce tropical
deforestation, see
https://www.facebook.com/YearsOfLiving/videos/1532791233474596/

Janine

On 11/3/2017 10:13 AM, Than Boves wrote:
> Actually, the article implies the same thing that you just stated: "39 percent of these species steer clear of edges while 46 percent seem to gravitate toward them" and "about 57 percent of mammals decline in number as you get closer to edges, as do 41 percent of birds, 30 percent of amphibians, and 11 percent of reptiles." That implies that 59% of bird species are either unaffected or increase as you get closer to edges (amphibians and reptiles even do better). So for some species its bad (and they may be species already in trouble), but probably for more its good. In addition, conservation threats are context dependent. For example, in the United States, many forest birds in the eastern US have actually been increasing as secondary forests have regenerated over the past century following mass deforestation (pretty much every tree in the eastern US was cut down at some time between 1870-1950); expectedly grassland/early successional species have fared worse during this same time period. In the tropics, different historical story. Much more recent deforestation, many more species in total, and many more that are adapted to conditions associated with large swaths of unbroken forest.
>
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Than J. Boves, PhD
> Assistant Professor
> Department of Biological Sciences
> Arkansas State University
> Jonesboro, AR 72467
> Office Phone: 870-972-3320
> Website: http://www.boveslab.com/
> Facebook: @BovesLabAState
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jay Jones
> Sent: Friday, November 03, 2017 8:06 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
>
> Interesting, and alarming, article. How do I reconcile these findings with my own experience in the U.S. — that species lists and counts tend to be higher in edge habitats? How many times have I noticed that bird activity is significantly reduced in deep woods vs edge habitat?
>
> Rick Jones
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Nov 2, 2017, at 9:28 PM, Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:
>>
>> Dear ARBIRDers,
>>
>> At midnight last night I came across this article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge":
>>
>> https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/11/living-on-the-edge
>> /544658/
>>
>> in The Atlantic. I thought many of you would enjoy the subject matter.
>>
>> The article brought back the memory of a book titled "Where Have All the Birds Gone?" by John Terborgh that was first published in 1989. It's about forest fragmentation, and the impact on birds. The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas bought a number of copies of the book, and sent it to elected officials- members of Congress, state constitution officers, etc.- in hopes either they or a staff member might read the book and learn something about a major threat to birds.
>>
>> So, as we often do in life, we learn forest fragmentation is not even close to a new issue.
>>
>> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, Barry Haas
>>
>>
>> P.S. Re the subject of predating red-shouldered hawks- they frequently hunt in the woods around our house. After nearly 20 years here, rather than seeing them as a major threat to feeder birds, our most unusual encounter was starkly different. One morning many years ago I was walking across our pond levee to fill a bird feeder when I heard a commotion in the woods. What I saw was fairly astonishing. It was a red-shouldered hawk with its talons in one of our adult male wood ducks. The hawk was not even close to being able to fly off with its too heavy prey. As I got nearer to the hawk, it finally loosened its grip and flew off. The woodie eventually made its way back onto our pond where it remained all day. We watched it until it was too dark to see the pond. It had not shown the ability to fly since the hawk attack. The next morning the duck was gone. We don't know if it wandered off into the woods and died, or what happened to it.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/3/17 8:13 am
From: Than Boves <tboves...>
Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
Actually, the article implies the same thing that you just stated: "39 percent of these species steer clear of edges while 46 percent seem to gravitate toward them" and "about 57 percent of mammals decline in number as you get closer to edges, as do 41 percent of birds, 30 percent of amphibians, and 11 percent of reptiles." That implies that 59% of bird species are either unaffected or increase as you get closer to edges (amphibians and reptiles even do better). So for some species its bad (and they may be species already in trouble), but probably for more its good. In addition, conservation threats are context dependent. For example, in the United States, many forest birds in the eastern US have actually been increasing as secondary forests have regenerated over the past century following mass deforestation (pretty much every tree in the eastern US was cut down at some time between 1870-1950); expectedly grassland/early successional species have fared worse during this same time period. In the tropics, different historical story. Much more recent deforestation, many more species in total, and many more that are adapted to conditions associated with large swaths of unbroken forest.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
Jonesboro, AR 72467
Office Phone: 870-972-3320
Website: http://www.boveslab.com/
Facebook: @BovesLabAState



-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jay Jones
Sent: Friday, November 03, 2017 8:06 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"

Interesting, and alarming, article. How do I reconcile these findings with my own experience in the U.S. — that species lists and counts tend to be higher in edge habitats? How many times have I noticed that bird activity is significantly reduced in deep woods vs edge habitat?

Rick Jones

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 2, 2017, at 9:28 PM, Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:
>
> Dear ARBIRDers,
>
> At midnight last night I came across this article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge":
>
> https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/11/living-on-the-edge
> /544658/
>
> in The Atlantic. I thought many of you would enjoy the subject matter.
>
> The article brought back the memory of a book titled "Where Have All the Birds Gone?" by John Terborgh that was first published in 1989. It's about forest fragmentation, and the impact on birds. The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas bought a number of copies of the book, and sent it to elected officials- members of Congress, state constitution officers, etc.- in hopes either they or a staff member might read the book and learn something about a major threat to birds.
>
> So, as we often do in life, we learn forest fragmentation is not even close to a new issue.
>
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, Barry Haas
>
>
> P.S. Re the subject of predating red-shouldered hawks- they frequently hunt in the woods around our house. After nearly 20 years here, rather than seeing them as a major threat to feeder birds, our most unusual encounter was starkly different. One morning many years ago I was walking across our pond levee to fill a bird feeder when I heard a commotion in the woods. What I saw was fairly astonishing. It was a red-shouldered hawk with its talons in one of our adult male wood ducks. The hawk was not even close to being able to fly off with its too heavy prey. As I got nearer to the hawk, it finally loosened its grip and flew off. The woodie eventually made its way back onto our pond where it remained all day. We watched it until it was too dark to see the pond. It had not shown the ability to fly since the hawk attack. The next morning the duck was gone. We don't know if it wandered off into the woods and died, or what happened to it.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/3/17 8:05 am
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
Interesting that you should mention a population analysis.

I started the Bentonville Area Bird Survey a couple of years ago that uses
225 census points doing 10 minute point counts on a 15km x 15km grid
overlaid on top of Bentonville and the surrounding area. I also make a
quick visual estimate of the habitat type at the survey location. The goal
is to be able to record changes in species composition with changes in
habitat primarily due to residential and commercial development in the area.

Amazingly enough there are only a handful of such surveys being conducted
in the U.S. at such micro scales. Of course the BBS, CBC, and eBird
capture macro scales, but they do not capture habitat data.

I would encourage groups to consider doing something similar in their areas
like this. Over time, it could help inform policy makers (if they care,
anyway) about how planning and zoning changes affect wildlife, at least for
birds anyway. It could also enrich our knowledge about sensitivity to
habitat alterations.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

On Fri, Nov 3, 2017 at 9:13 AM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

> It would be interesting to perform an analysis of the avian population
> changes viz. habitat changes (based on the bird censuses and corporate,
> birder knowledge) in the West Little Rock area since I-630 was built.
>
> Jeff Short
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:ARBIRD-L@LISTSERV.
> UARK.EDU] On Behalf Of Jay Jones
> Sent: Friday, November 03, 2017 8:06 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
>
> Interesting, and alarming, article. How do I reconcile these findings with
> my own experience in the U.S. — that species lists and counts tend to be
> higher in edge habitats? How many times have I noticed that bird activity
> is significantly reduced in deep woods vs edge habitat?
>
> Rick Jones
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Nov 2, 2017, at 9:28 PM, Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:
> >
> > Dear ARBIRDers,
> >
> > At midnight last night I came across this article "Forest Animals Are
> Living on the Edge":
> >
> > https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/11/living-on-the-edge
> > /544658/
> >
> > in The Atlantic. I thought many of you would enjoy the subject matter.
> >
> > The article brought back the memory of a book titled "Where Have All the
> Birds Gone?" by John Terborgh that was first published in 1989. It's about
> forest fragmentation, and the impact on birds. The Audubon Society of
> Central Arkansas bought a number of copies of the book, and sent it to
> elected officials- members of Congress, state constitution officers, etc.-
> in hopes either they or a staff member might read the book and learn
> something about a major threat to birds.
> >
> > So, as we often do in life, we learn forest fragmentation is not even
> close to a new issue.
> >
> > From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, Barry Haas
> >
> >
> > P.S. Re the subject of predating red-shouldered hawks- they
> > frequently hunt in the woods around our house. After nearly 20 years
> here, rather than seeing them as a major threat to feeder birds, our most
> unusual encounter was starkly different. One morning many years ago I was
> walking across our pond levee to fill a bird feeder when I heard a
> commotion in the woods. What I saw was fairly astonishing. It was a
> red-shouldered hawk with its talons in one of our adult male wood ducks.
> The hawk was not even close to being able to fly off with its too heavy
> prey. As I got nearer to the hawk, it finally loosened its grip and flew
> off. The woodie eventually made its way back onto our pond where it
> remained all day. We watched it until it was too dark to see the pond. It
> had not shown the ability to fly since the hawk attack. The next morning
> the duck was gone. We don't know if it wandered off into the woods and
> died, or what happened to it.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/3/17 7:14 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
From Cornell's website: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-shouldered_Hawk/lifehistory

Red-shouldered Hawks eat mostly small mammals, lizards, snakes, and amphibians. They hunt from perches below the forest canopy or at the edge of a pond, sitting silently until they sight their prey below. Then they descend swiftly, gliding and snatching a vole or chipmunk off the forest floor. They also eat toads, snakes, and crayfish. They occasionally eat birds, sometimes from bird feeders; recorded prey include sparrows, starlings, and doves.


On Thursday 2 November 2017, 5:42:06 PM GMT-5, Gail Miller <gail.miller...> wrote:

#yiv5485621139 #yiv5485621139 -- _filtered #yiv5485621139 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv5485621139 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv5485621139 {panose-1:2 5 6 4 5 5 5 2 2 4;}#yiv5485621139 #yiv5485621139 p.yiv5485621139MsoNormal, #yiv5485621139 li.yiv5485621139MsoNormal, #yiv5485621139 div.yiv5485621139MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;}#yiv5485621139 a:link, #yiv5485621139 span.yiv5485621139MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv5485621139 a:visited, #yiv5485621139 span.yiv5485621139MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv5485621139 p.yiv5485621139msonormal0, #yiv5485621139 li.yiv5485621139msonormal0, #yiv5485621139 div.yiv5485621139msonormal0 {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:11.0pt;}#yiv5485621139 span.yiv5485621139EmailStyle19 {color:windowtext;}#yiv5485621139 .yiv5485621139MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv5485621139 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv5485621139 div.yiv5485621139WordSection1 {}#yiv5485621139
I watched a hawk feverishly chase a Pileated Woodpecker in my woods about a year ago.  The woodpecker squawked and squawked the whole time.  They made several loops through the woods as I watched from the back porch.  Hawk didn’t catch it, thank goodness.  But, it was an interesting sight!!

 

Gail Miller   Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR

 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Kristina Baker
Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2017 11:13 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders

 

Hi,

 

Back in 2002 or 2003, I recall coming upon a Red-shouldered Hawk (RSHA) standing on the ground off to the side of the Old Military Trail at Village Creek State Park.  It was determinedly tearing into something, and it flushed as I continued to walk along the trail.  I peered over to see what it was eating, and it was a Pileated Woodpecker (PIWO)!  I was stunned to see this and did not realize it to be so uncommon at the time.  I am unsure if the RSHA dispatched the PIWO, but it was a freshly deceased bird. 

 

Kristina Mitchell

 

 

 

 

Back to top
Date: 11/3/17 7:13 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
It would be interesting to perform an analysis of the avian population changes viz. habitat changes (based on the bird censuses and corporate, birder knowledge) in the West Little Rock area since I-630 was built.

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jay Jones
Sent: Friday, November 03, 2017 8:06 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"

Interesting, and alarming, article. How do I reconcile these findings with my own experience in the U.S. — that species lists and counts tend to be higher in edge habitats? How many times have I noticed that bird activity is significantly reduced in deep woods vs edge habitat?

Rick Jones

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 2, 2017, at 9:28 PM, Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:
>
> Dear ARBIRDers,
>
> At midnight last night I came across this article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge":
>
> https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/11/living-on-the-edge
> /544658/
>
> in The Atlantic. I thought many of you would enjoy the subject matter.
>
> The article brought back the memory of a book titled "Where Have All the Birds Gone?" by John Terborgh that was first published in 1989. It's about forest fragmentation, and the impact on birds. The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas bought a number of copies of the book, and sent it to elected officials- members of Congress, state constitution officers, etc.- in hopes either they or a staff member might read the book and learn something about a major threat to birds.
>
> So, as we often do in life, we learn forest fragmentation is not even close to a new issue.
>
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock, Barry Haas
>
>
> P.S. Re the subject of predating red-shouldered hawks- they
> frequently hunt in the woods around our house. After nearly 20 years here, rather than seeing them as a major threat to feeder birds, our most unusual encounter was starkly different. One morning many years ago I was walking across our pond levee to fill a bird feeder when I heard a commotion in the woods. What I saw was fairly astonishing. It was a red-shouldered hawk with its talons in one of our adult male wood ducks. The hawk was not even close to being able to fly off with its too heavy prey. As I got nearer to the hawk, it finally loosened its grip and flew off. The woodie eventually made its way back onto our pond where it remained all day. We watched it until it was too dark to see the pond. It had not shown the ability to fly since the hawk attack. The next morning the duck was gone. We don't know if it wandered off into the woods and died, or what happened to it.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/3/17 6:06 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
Interesting, and alarming, article. How do I reconcile these findings with my own experience in the U.S. — that species lists and counts tend to be higher in edge habitats? How many times have I noticed that bird activity is significantly reduced in deep woods vs edge habitat?

Rick Jones

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 2, 2017, at 9:28 PM, Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:
>
> Dear ARBIRDers,
>
> At midnight last night I came across this article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge":
>
> https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/11/living-on-the-edge/544658/
>
> in The Atlantic. I thought many of you would enjoy the subject matter.
>
> The article brought back the memory of a book titled "Where Have All the Birds Gone?" by John Terborgh that was first published in 1989. It's about forest fragmentation, and the impact on birds. The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas bought a number of copies of the book, and sent it to elected officials- members of Congress, state constitution officers, etc.- in hopes either they or a staff member might read the book and learn something about a major threat to birds.
>
> So, as we often do in life, we learn forest fragmentation is not even close to a new issue.
>
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
>
>
> P.S. Re the subject of predating red-shouldered hawks- they frequently hunt in the woods around our house. After nearly 20 years here, rather than seeing them as a major threat to feeder birds, our most unusual encounter was starkly different. One morning many years ago I was walking across our pond levee to fill a bird feeder when I heard a commotion in the woods. What I saw was fairly astonishing. It was a red-shouldered hawk with its talons in one of our adult male wood ducks. The hawk was not even close to being able to fly off with its too heavy prey. As I got nearer to the hawk, it finally loosened its grip and flew off. The woodie eventually made its way back onto our pond where it remained all day. We watched it until it was too dark to see the pond. It had not shown the ability to fly since the hawk attack. The next morning the duck was gone. We don't know if it wandered off into the woods and died, or what happened to it.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/2/17 7:54 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
Thanks for sharing the link and your insight. Again a reminder of how fast
our species are disappearing from Earth, one species every 6 minutes. For
those that do not do hectares, it is over 33,020,000 acres of forest we are
losing each year.

Jerry Wayne Davis

-----Original Message-----
From: Barry Haas
Sent: Thursday, November 2, 2017 9:28 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"

Dear ARBIRDers,

At midnight last night I came across this article "Forest Animals Are Living
on the Edge":

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/11/living-on-the-edge/544658/

in The Atlantic. I thought many of you would enjoy the subject matter.

The article brought back the memory of a book titled "Where Have All the
Birds Gone?" by John Terborgh that was first published in 1989. It's about
forest fragmentation, and the impact on birds. The Audubon Society of
Central Arkansas bought a number of copies of the book, and sent it to
elected officials- members of Congress, state constitution officers, etc.-
in hopes either they or a staff member might read the book and learn
something about a major threat to birds.

So, as we often do in life, we learn forest fragmentation is not even close
to a new issue.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas


P.S. Re the subject of predating red-shouldered hawks- they frequently hunt
in the woods around our house. After nearly 20 years here, rather than
seeing them as a major threat to feeder birds, our most unusual encounter
was starkly different. One morning many years ago I was walking across our
pond levee to fill a bird feeder when I heard a commotion in the woods.
What I saw was fairly astonishing. It was a red-shouldered hawk with its
talons in one of our adult male wood ducks. The hawk was not even close to
being able to fly off with its too heavy prey. As I got nearer to the hawk,
it finally loosened its grip and flew off. The woodie eventually made its
way back onto our pond where it remained all day. We watched it until it
was too dark to see the pond. It had not shown the ability to fly since the
hawk attack. The next morning the duck was gone. We don't know if it
wandered off into the woods and died, or what happened to it.=
 

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Date: 11/2/17 7:28 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: The Atlantic article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge"
Dear ARBIRDers,

At midnight last night I came across this article "Forest Animals Are Living on the Edge":

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/11/living-on-the-edge/544658/

in The Atlantic. I thought many of you would enjoy the subject matter.

The article brought back the memory of a book titled "Where Have All the Birds Gone?" by John Terborgh that was first published in 1989. It's about forest fragmentation, and the impact on birds. The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas bought a number of copies of the book, and sent it to elected officials- members of Congress, state constitution officers, etc.- in hopes either they or a staff member might read the book and learn something about a major threat to birds.

So, as we often do in life, we learn forest fragmentation is not even close to a new issue.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas


P.S. Re the subject of predating red-shouldered hawks- they frequently hunt in the woods around our house. After nearly 20 years here, rather than seeing them as a major threat to feeder birds, our most unusual encounter was starkly different. One morning many years ago I was walking across our pond levee to fill a bird feeder when I heard a commotion in the woods. What I saw was fairly astonishing. It was a red-shouldered hawk with its talons in one of our adult male wood ducks. The hawk was not even close to being able to fly off with its too heavy prey. As I got nearer to the hawk, it finally loosened its grip and flew off. The woodie eventually made its way back onto our pond where it remained all day. We watched it until it was too dark to see the pond. It had not shown the ability to fly since the hawk attack. The next morning the duck was gone. We don't know if it wandered off into the woods and died, or what happened to it.
 

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Date: 11/2/17 3:41 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
I watched a hawk feverishly chase a Pileated Woodpecker in my woods about a year ago. The woodpecker squawked and squawked the whole time. They made several loops through the woods as I watched from the back porch. Hawk didn’t catch it, thank goodness. But, it was an interesting sight!!



Gail Miller Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Kristina Baker
Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2017 11:13 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders



Hi,



Back in 2002 or 2003, I recall coming upon a Red-shouldered Hawk (RSHA) standing on the ground off to the side of the Old Military Trail at Village Creek State Park. It was determinedly tearing into something, and it flushed as I continued to walk along the trail. I peered over to see what it was eating, and it was a Pileated Woodpecker (PIWO)! I was stunned to see this and did not realize it to be so uncommon at the time. I am unsure if the RSHA dispatched the PIWO, but it was a freshly deceased bird.



Kristina Mitchell








 

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Date: 11/2/17 10:08 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Hummer Question
There are three great resources to answer questions about when and where species are expected in the state.

First is the official state checklist distributed by Arkansas Audubon Society available for download at http://www.arbirds.org/ partway down the right-hand column. It shows Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are expected through 11B+ meaning the second week (B) of November (11) plus a few records outside the normal range (+). Early November is getting late but it isn't what I'd call extra-seasonal.

Second is the AR Bird Records Database also maintained by AAS http://www.arbirds.org/aas_dbase.html . This has 9 November records edging beyond 11B.

Third is eBird, which has all of the Bird Records Database records and then some. Here is the species range map for the month of November across all years. http://tinyurl.com/yd8c7yq4 . Except for Fayetteville there are no November records across Arkansas's Ozarks. Thus a submission to eBird will help fill that gap.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

----- Original Message -----

From: "Richard Crawford" <richardkcrawford...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Thursday, November 2, 2017 8:39:27 AM
Subject: Humer Question



Yesterday, November 1, was an active Fall day at my feeder in Mountain Home. There were all the normal birds. But around 3:30 a lone Ruby-throated Hummingbird made multiple trips to my still hanging but empty Hummingbird feeders. Although I have been a active birder, bird bander, conducted both Christmas Bird Counts and BBS over serveral states, I have only lived in the Ozarks for about 5 yrs. I don't recall a November date in the Ozarks. Is this a late day?




Thanks!




Richard Crawford


 

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Date: 11/2/17 9:29 am
From: Kristina Baker <000001c932f45e32-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
Hi,

Back in 2002 or 2003, I recall coming upon a Red-shouldered Hawk (RSHA) standing on the ground off to the side of the Old Military Trail at Village Creek State Park.  It was determinedly tearing into something, and it flushed as I continued to walk along the trail.  I peered over to see what it was eating, and it was a Pileated Woodpecker (PIWO)!  I was stunned to see this and did not realize it to be so uncommon at the time.  I am unsure if the RSHA dispatched the PIWO, but it was a freshly deceased bird. 

Kristina Mitchell


From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Thursday, November 2, 2017 9:59 AM
Subject: Fw: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders

Chuck Hunter with the USFWS shared an observation on RSHA below. Observations from wildlife is a constant learning situation and I learn something everyday watching my birds.   Jerry Wayne DavisHot Springs, AR From: Hunter, Chuck Sent: Thursday, November 2, 2017 7:58 AMTo: Jerry Davis Subject: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders Jerry: Been awhile, hope you are well. I've been on leave this week and looking at birding news across the Southeast and noticed the discussion on Red-shouldered Hawks taking birds from around feeders.   For the first time in 25 years of watching my local Red-shoulders in my backyard in Lilburn, GA, I saw one take a titmouse off my deck near a feeder several weeks ago.  I was on my deck at the time and saw a hawk swoop in assuming it a coop or sharp-shin.  When it landed in a nearby tree, I was shocked to see it was an adult red-shoulder plucking away.  I wasn't sure it was a titmouse it had caught until it flew off and I wandered over to collect some feathers. I would agree with most that any suggestion that Red-shoulders regularly take small birds at feeders (or otherwise) is not to be expected, but apparently it occasionally occurs and I wonder if this may be something that will become more frequent in the future. Thanks and take good care, Chuck  Chuck HunterChief, Division of Strategic Resource ManagementRegional Refuge BiologistNational Wildlife Refuge SystemU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service1875 Century Boulevard, Suite 420Atlanta, GA  30345 404-679-7130 (office)770-331-4475 (cell)<chuck_hunter...>


 

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Date: 11/2/17 8:46 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Butcher Bird Event Canceled
This Saturday's Butcher Bird event at the Little Rock Audubon Center has been canceled due to insufficient sign-ups. A minimum number was needed to cover the film-maker's mileage from Memphis.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 11/2/17 7:59 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders
Chuck Hunter with the USFWS shared an observation on RSHA below. Observations from wildlife is a constant learning situation and I learn something everyday watching my birds.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Hunter, Chuck
Sent: Thursday, November 2, 2017 7:58 AM
To: Jerry Davis
Subject: Red-shouldered Hawk at feeders

Jerry:

Been awhile, hope you are well.

I've been on leave this week and looking at birding news across the Southeast and noticed the discussion on Red-shouldered Hawks taking birds from around feeders.

For the first time in 25 years of watching my local Red-shoulders in my backyard in Lilburn, GA, I saw one take a titmouse off my deck near a feeder several weeks ago. I was on my deck at the time and saw a hawk swoop in assuming it a coop or sharp-shin. When it landed in a nearby tree, I was shocked to see it was an adult red-shoulder plucking away. I wasn't sure it was a titmouse it had caught until it flew off and I wandered over to collect some feathers.

I would agree with most that any suggestion that Red-shoulders regularly take small birds at feeders (or otherwise) is not to be expected, but apparently it occasionally occurs and I wonder if this may be something that will become more frequent in the future.

Thanks and take good care,

Chuck


Chuck Hunter
Chief, Division of Strategic Resource Management
Regional Refuge Biologist
National Wildlife Refuge System
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
1875 Century Boulevard, Suite 420
Atlanta, GA 30345

404-679-7130 (office)
770-331-4475 (cell)
<chuck_hunter...>
 

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Date: 11/2/17 6:50 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: You have new Google Doc message
Bill Shepherd, I'd check your email account and probably change your
password to be safe.
Everyone else, do not open that link. Definitely not a google doc.

Daniel Mason

On 11/2/2017 8:35 AM, Bill Shepherd wrote:
> A secure document was sent to you using Google Docs. To view your
> document please follow the link below.
>
(took out link for reply)
>
>
> Thank You.(R) 2017 Google Support.
>
>
> Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964
> <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918




---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

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Date: 11/2/17 6:39 am
From: Richard Crawford <richardkcrawford...>
Subject: Humer Question
Yesterday, November 1, was an active Fall day at my feeder in Mountain Home. There were all the normal birds. But around 3:30 a lone Ruby-throated Hummingbird made multiple trips to my still hanging but empty Hummingbird feeders. Although I have been a active birder, bird bander, conducted both Christmas Bird Counts and BBS over serveral states, I have only lived in the Ozarks for about 5 yrs. I don't recall a November date in the Ozarks. Is this a late day?


Thanks!


Richard Crawford

 

Back to top
Date: 11/2/17 6:36 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: You have new Google Doc message
A secure document was sent to you using Google Docs. To view your document please follow the link below.

View your document<http://sien.msalesis.net/driss.php>


Thank You.(R) 2017 Google Support.



Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

 

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Date: 11/1/17 10:13 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: south Lafayette County 10-31-17
AR-birders,
Jeff Trahan, Rosemary Seidler and I did a short Halloween afternoon bird survey in southern Lafayette County
10-31-17. We had a four species goose day with over 3500 White-fronted Geese, 450 Snow Geese, 50 Rosss Geese,
and a single Cackling Goose being present. Over 15,000 ducks were noted as well with at least 6000 being Green-winged Teal. Ill
get the ebird report in whenever I can find time.
Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

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Date: 11/1/17 5:04 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Oct. 31st
I surveyed birds at Red Slough on October 31 and found 78 species. It was
overcast, cool, and windy. We have had a large influx of ducks over the
past few days. Some geese were migrating over today. A few of our notable
breeders are still lingering. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 11 (Family group; 2 adults and 9 adult-sized
juveniles)



Greater White-fronted Goose - 43



Snow Goose - 37



Ross' Goose - 3



Wood Duck - 54



Gadwall - 950



American Wigeon - 20



Mallard - 128



Blue-winged Teal - 5



Northern Shoveler - 85



Northern Pintail -55



Green-winged Teal - 420



Ring-necked Duck - 525



Lesser Scaup - 1



Ruddy Duck - 6



Pied-billed Grebe - 18



Neotropic Cormorant - 1



Double-crested Cormorant - 5



Anhinga - 1



American Bittern - 1 (Found by Terry Stuart while mowing levees. I rushed
over and saw it.)



Great-blue Heron - 5



Great Egret - 3



Cattle Egret - 1



Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1



White Ibis - 1



"Dark" Ibis - 1



Black Vulture - 10



Turkey Vulture - 13



Osprey - 1



Northern Harrier - 6



Sharp-shinned Hawk - 2



Cooper's Hawk - 1



Red-shouldered Hawk - 3



Red-tailed Hawk - 1



Common Gallinule - 1



American Coot - 335



Killdeer - 7



Greater Yellowlegs - 19



Least Sandpiper - 7



Wilson's Snipe - 63



Mourning Dove - 1



Great-horned Owl - 1



Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2



Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1



Downy Woodpecker - 3



Hairy Woodpecker - 1



Northern Flicker - 11



Eastern Phoebe - 11



Loggerhead Shrike - 1



American Crow - 16



Carolina Chickadee - 3



Carolina Wren - 2



House Wren - 5



Winter Wren - 2



Sedge Wren - 8



Marsh Wren - 4



Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1



Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 2



Eastern Bluebird - 7



American Robin - 87



Northern Mockingbird - 1



Brown Thrasher - 1



Yellow-rumped Warbler - 8



Eastern Towhee - 2



Chipping Sparrow - 9



Field Sparrow - 5



Vesper Sparrow - 2



Savannah Sparrow - 12



Le Conte's Sparrow - 6



Song Sparrow - 19



Lincoln's Sparrow - 1



Swamp Sparrow - 36



White-throated Sparrow - 5



White-crowned Sparrow - 1



Northern Cardinal - 3



Red-winged Blackbird - 130



Eastern Meadowlark - 1



American Goldfinch - 1









Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR




 

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Date: 11/1/17 3:50 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Hummer Hearth at WBU
For those of you who do or are interested in maintaining a winter hummingbird feeder in hopes of hosting a wintering Rufous Hummingbird or other western species, a new product is available at Wild Birds Unlimited in Little Rock. The Hummer Hearth keeps nectar from freezing in the colder winter days and nights we have in Arkansas. The following link has more information on them. Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://www.hummerhearth.com/&ved=0ahUKEwj7svuduZ7XAhUJ8mMKHe7jBW4QFggmMAA&usg=AOvVaw0LYRZ7jAoTAe--H6gVOmcn
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 11/1/17 1:53 pm
From: Joe Neal <joecneal...>
Subject: HARRIS'S SPARROWS AT MAYSVILLE
Harris’s Sparrows (2) were associated with White-crownedSparrows (6-8), a Song Sparrow, and Northern Cardinals (2) near Maysville thismorning. Most meadowlark singing in the area involved Easterns, but at leastone Western Meadowlark was singing in the field adjacent the thicket withHarris’s. One Harris’s Sparrow was a first winter juvenile. An adult with ablack face foraged on Poison Ivy berries, allowing a great view.
 

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Date: 11/1/17 8:49 am
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
My RSHA tries to grab the squirrels at my feeders but not the birds. I
also have watched him try to crack open a turtle and eat it.
Coops, Sharp Shinned and Roadrunner eat my birds.

Michael(Conway)

On Tue, Oct 31, 2017 at 7:07 PM, Rick Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:

> I'm involved in an on-line discussion with an experienced wildlife
> photographer in the NWA area. I suspect she thinks me a fool. Her position
> is that RSHAs are frequent raiders of bird feeders. Mine is that such
> predation is more likely coming from COHA or SSHA. I suggested that IF she
> has seen RSHAs in her feeder area they are more likely after the voles and
> mouses that are drawn to the spilled seed on the ground than the birds
> drawn to a feeder. She cites a Wiki that RSHA include birds as prey. She
> insists that many feeder enthusiasts support her contention and that she's
> actually witnessed a RSHA take a Cardinal from her feeder. Well, seeing is
> believing I suppose. And I'm not too old to learn something new -- but this
> strikes me as unusual. Am I wrong??
>

 

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Date: 10/31/17 8:06 pm
From: Rick Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
Thanks for your early responses, folks. I may not be the fool after all...
 

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Date: 10/31/17 6:59 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
I definitely have Sharp-shinned and Cooper's Hawks that get birds at my feeder station. Recently, a hawk hit my kitchen window so hard, while catching a Mourning Dove, that it knocked a coaster off the window sill. When I got outside the hawk was still on the ground with the dove, but flew. Evidence of feathers on the other side of the house where it flew there to eat the dove.

Gail in Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR
 

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Date: 10/31/17 6:34 pm
From: Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...>
Subject: Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
Our feeders are fairly regularly visited in winter by a sharp shinned hawk. As everyone knows, the feeder world becomes deathly still during these visits. Late last winter a Red shouldered hawk (they nest on our property) flew to a low oak tree branch right next to the feeders and perched for a long time, as uninterested in the feeder birds as they were in it. In fact, it faced away from the feeders. Life went on as normal and finally the hawk left.

Suzie Liles
southern Marion County

>


> On Oct 31, 2017, at 8:28 PM, Ed Laster <elaster523...> wrote:
>
> I have also had RSHA perch on the top of feeders and know there were chipmunks in the area. As Jerry said, the reaction from the “feeder” birds is different when the COHA or SSHA are around. I do believe the RSHA steal young Blue Jays and have seen them with being chased by screaming Jays while carrying a young bird.
>
> Ed Laster
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>> On Oct 31, 2017, at 7:07 PM, Rick Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>>
>> I'm involved in an on-line discussion with an experienced wildlife photographer in the NWA area. I suspect she thinks me a fool. Her position is that RSHAs are frequent raiders of bird feeders. Mine is that such predation is more likely coming from COHA or SSHA. I suggested that IF she has seen RSHAs in her feeder area they are more likely after the voles and mouses that are drawn to the spilled seed on the ground than the birds drawn to a feeder. She cites a Wiki that RSHA include birds as prey. She insists that many feeder enthusiasts support her contention and that she's actually witnessed a RSHA take a Cardinal from her feeder. Well, seeing is believing I suppose. And I'm not too old to learn something new -- but this strikes me as unusual. Am I wrong??
 

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Date: 10/31/17 6:28 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
I have also had RSHA perch on the top of feeders and know there were chipmunks in the area. As Jerry said, the reaction from the “feeder” birds is different when the COHA or SSHA are around. I do believe the RSHA steal young Blue Jays and have seen them with being chased by screaming Jays while carrying a young bird.

Ed Laster
Little Rock



> On Oct 31, 2017, at 7:07 PM, Rick Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>
> I'm involved in an on-line discussion with an experienced wildlife photographer in the NWA area. I suspect she thinks me a fool. Her position is that RSHAs are frequent raiders of bird feeders. Mine is that such predation is more likely coming from COHA or SSHA. I suggested that IF she has seen RSHAs in her feeder area they are more likely after the voles and mouses that are drawn to the spilled seed on the ground than the birds drawn to a feeder. She cites a Wiki that RSHA include birds as prey. She insists that many feeder enthusiasts support her contention and that she's actually witnessed a RSHA take a Cardinal from her feeder. Well, seeing is believing I suppose. And I'm not too old to learn something new -- but this strikes me as unusual. Am I wrong??
 

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Date: 10/31/17 5:37 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: RSHA as bird feeder predator
From my experience I would say that you are correct. I have had
Red-shouldered hawks nesting in my yard and adjacent yard for off and on
over 20 years and here much of these winters. I have photos of
Red-shouldered hawks perched on top of feeders and birds eating seeds
underneath on the ground or feeding at an adjacent feeder at the same time.
They are interested in crayfish, mice and chipmunks A COHA or SSHA can
appear anywhere in sight and the birds scatter. I would suggest that in the
winter the adult and immature COHO and SSHA are both frequent visitors and
it is possible for people to misidentify immature C
OHA and SSHA of these two as being a RSHA, All of this said, 18 years ago I
did see an immature RSHA flying after an American goldfinch which it had no
possibility of catching. It will be interesting to see what others have to
say about their experiences with RSHA.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

-----Original Message-----
From: Rick Jones
Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 7:07 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RSHA as bird feeder predator

I'm involved in an on-line discussion with an experienced wildlife
photographer in the NWA area. I suspect she thinks me a fool. Her position
is that RSHAs are frequent raiders of bird feeders. Mine is that such
predation is more likely coming from COHA or SSHA. I suggested that IF she
has seen RSHAs in her feeder area they are more likely after the voles and
mouses that are drawn to the spilled seed on the ground than the birds drawn
to a feeder. She cites a Wiki that RSHA include birds as prey. She insists
that many feeder enthusiasts support her contention and that she's actually
witnessed a RSHA take a Cardinal from her feeder. Well, seeing is believing
I suppose. And I'm not too old to learn something new -- but this strikes me
as unusual. Am I wrong??
 

Back to top
Date: 10/31/17 5:08 pm
From: Rick Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: RSHA as bird feeder predator
I'm involved in an on-line discussion with an experienced wildlife photographer in the NWA area. I suspect she thinks me a fool. Her position is that RSHAs are frequent raiders of bird feeders. Mine is that such predation is more likely coming from COHA or SSHA. I suggested that IF she has seen RSHAs in her feeder area they are more likely after the voles and mouses that are drawn to the spilled seed on the ground than the birds drawn to a feeder. She cites a Wiki that RSHA include birds as prey. She insists that many feeder enthusiasts support her contention and that she's actually witnessed a RSHA take a Cardinal from her feeder. Well, seeing is believing I suppose. And I'm not too old to learn something new -- but this strikes me as unusual. Am I wrong??
 

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Date: 10/31/17 1:42 pm
From: Joe Neal <joecneal...>
Subject: LECONTE’S AT FROG
LeConte’s Sparrows (6-8) were fairly numerous this morning atFrog Bayou Wildlife Management Area. David Oakley and I were looking for Nelson’sSparrows in the marshy edges along Sharp Chapel Road, part of the newlyacquired additions to Frog. Swamp and Song Sparrows were numerous. We alsopicked up both Sedge and Marsh Wrens in the same area.
We were just walking along the road, so there’s no tellinghow many LeConte’s are using the extensive, suitable habitat in the big fieldsthat stretch away in all directions. We also picked up at least 3 Northern Harriers– at least 3, because all 3 flew low over the road while we were there.
I was hoping for ducks. We saw hundreds of them, something inthe range of 500-1000, but they were out in the middle of Dyer Bay, in a longstring, with heat shimmers. Gates were open at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility. Wepicked up Least Sandpiper (5), Spotted Sandpiper (2), Dowitcher sp (1, probablyLong-billed), and Wilson’s Snipe (22). There were a few ducks, including HoodedMergansers (2 males).
We saw Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks (12) at the King ranchadjacent Alma wastewater. Over the years we have not seen them often pastmiddle of October in northwest Arkansas.
We also saw a live American White Pelican at Alma Wastewaterand then a dead one. Outside the gate, we watched a flight of pelicans (6) asthey were landing on one of the farm ponds, then noticed a dead one there, too.
I will give to David Oakley the last words here. They camethis morning, in the middle of all those LeConte’s (and especially the 0 Nelson’s).“I don’t care about any more f***ing LeConte’s,” said with an ironic laugh.Those of you who know David also know the humor.
 

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Date: 10/31/17 10:40 am
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: S-E Owl, more L. Longspurs (Benton Co.)
I was doing my transect surveys at my Siloam Springs sites this morning. At about 10:15am I flushed a Short-eared Owl at Chesney Prairie Natural Area. For the sake of the bird I will not reveal its exact location, plus they move around a bit so it’s unlikely to be in the same spot anyway. There’s lots of area to cover, so feel free to walk around on the trails. Dusk would be the best time to witness it foraging. According to the AAS database, the only other October record is Oct. 17, 1988, in Garland Co.

Lapland Longspurs have increased in numbers at Stump Prairie. I got good looks at four on the ground. There were other lone birds or pairs that I saw there too, but it’s tough to say if it wasn’t the group of four that broke off. Rattle and tleew calls were given. The AAS database shows one record in October: Oct. 28, 1990 in Chicot County. I first heard one here on Oct. 25, then Joe Neal saw and heard one a few days later at Chesney.

Given these cold fronts, it’s not entirely surprising that we’re seeing some early birds taking advantage of them.

Good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington County

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/31/17 8:48 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: 2018 Red Slough Birding Convention



From: Bastarache, Robert -FS
Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2017 7:31 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] 2018 Red Slough Birding Convention

The 10th annual Red Slough Birding Convention is set for May 5-8, 2018, in Idabel. Greg Lasley is scheduled to be our keynote speaker. We will be providing more information as we go into 2018 but wanted to get out the early word so you can put this on your calendar. Come see us in McCurtain County next May!



Robert Bastarache, District Biologist

Oklahoma Ranger District – Ouachita National Forest

111 S. State Highway 259A

Broken Bow, OK 74728

<rbastarache...>

111 S. State Highway 259A

Broken Bow, OK 74728

(580) 494-6402 x 107

Work Hours: M-F 6:30 am – 3:00 pm



 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/17 3:46 pm
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: The Butcher Bird, Nov 4
Spaces are still available for a showing of "The Butcher Bird" (a documentary made in AR) followed by a bird walk on Saturday, November 4, 8:30am-11:30am, at the Little Rock Audubon Center (4500 Springer Blvd.) Cost is $15/participant via cash/card/check. Larry McPherson, a retired photography professor at the University of Memphis, documented never-before-seen Loggerhead Shrike behaviors while filming in Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge. A screening of the short film (23 min.) will be followed by a group discussion with McPherson and me. Then we'll all go birding along Fourche Dam Pike to look for shrikes and other species.




RSVP at https://ar.audubon.org/butcherbird





Dan Scheiman Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/17 3:45 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Re: Clay-colored Sparrows at Woolsey Wet Prairie
The 12 sparrow species (including Junco and Towhee) seen were as follows:

LeConte's (8); Clay-colored (2); Field (10); Dark-eyed Junco (3); White-crowned (9); White-throated (6); Vesper (3); Savannah (7); Song (14); Lincoln's (4); Swamp (25); Eastern Towhee (1)

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 10/30/17 3:34 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Clay-colored Sparrows at Woolsey Wet Prairie
Which 12 Sparrow Species did you find? We found 7 or 8 before the wind came up. I think we found mostly Swamp and Lincoln. With Song a close 3rd. Jacque Brown


> On Oct 29, 2017, at 4:35 PM, Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> wrote:
>
> 2 Clay-colored Sparrows were present at Woolsey this afternoon, near the pond just northwest of the parking area.
>
> LeConte's Sparrows were cooperative, with at least 8 birds showing reasonably well. One particularly bold individual popped out onto the trail and provided brief but excellent views at point blank range. Song (14) and Swamp Sparrows (25) were the most numerous species (I counted 45 Song and 30 Swamp yesterday - presumably, most of these moved on last night). 12 sparrow species in total.
>
> 3 Sedge Wrens and 1 Marsh Wren still present.
>
> An immature Sharp-shinned Hawk tried unsuccessfully to catch a Starling near the wastewater plant.
>
> Vivek Govind Kumar
> Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/17 2:35 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrows at Woolsey Wet Prairie
2 Clay-colored Sparrows were present at Woolsey this afternoon, near the pond just northwest of the parking area.

LeConte's Sparrows were cooperative, with at least 8 birds showing reasonably well. One particularly bold individual popped out onto the trail and provided brief but excellent views at point blank range. Song (14) and Swamp Sparrows (25) were the most numerous species (I counted 45 Song and 30 Swamp yesterday - presumably, most of these moved on last night). 12 sparrow species in total.

3 Sedge Wrens and 1 Marsh Wren still present.

An immature Sharp-shinned Hawk tried unsuccessfully to catch a Starling near the wastewater plant.

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/17 9:39 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
The tour just got full!  Thanks especially to my alums for spreading the word!  
On Sunday 29 October 2017, 8:37:22 AM GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Eighteen on board, TWO seats left!  Please come and show your support for nonprofits on both ends, the Asa Wright Nature Centre and the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust!  This time, there will be some "seasoned" herpetologists in the tour too, to add to the excitement! :) 
Kannan
On Saturday 2 September 2017, 1:25:50 PM GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:

Hi all, I will be leading a Trinidad & Tobago nature tour May 24 - 31, 2018, to raise funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, in which I serve as a trustee.  The trust, as you know, funds research and conservation projects mostly in Arkansas.  

Highlights of the Trinidad & Tobago tour include:
* Three nights in Asa Wright Nature Centre, Trinidad, one of the most famous ecolodges in the world-- www.asawright.org* Manakins, Bellbirds, Honeycreepers, Oropendolas, Euphonias, Tanagers, Toucans.....a rainbow of tropical birds from a comfortable veranda (while sipping rum punch!)* About 10 species of hummingbirds, many hovering inches from your face!* Trek to a riverine cave to see the strange Oilbirds
* Boating in Caroni Swamp to witness the spectacle of Scarlet Ibis coming to roost en masse
* A night walk on a remote beach to encounter massive Leatherback Sea turtles nesting * Three nights in Blue Waters Inn, Tobago, a delightful and luxurious beach-side resort (www.bluewatersinn.com)
* Hike up Little Tobago island to see 2 species of boobies, tropic birds, and other pelagics* Glass bottom boating to view coral reefs* About 150-200 species of birds, including the Trinidad & Tobago endemic,Trinidad Motmot
Cost excluding international airfare will be $1545, which covers comfortable accommodations for 7 nights, sumptuous food, local air travel between the islands of Trinidad and Tobago, and all tours and activities. You must be physically fit for easy to moderate walks in hot and humid tropical weather, with temperatures usually in the 80s. This will be my 9th tour of Trinidad & Tobago. 
Rough itinerary summary: 
May 24 -- check into Asa Wright Nature Centre (AWNC)May 25 -- early AM veranda birding; hike for manakins and bellbirds; PM Arippo Savannah birding and Matura beach for sea turtlesMay 26-- early AM veranda; optional Blanchisseuse trip at your expense (or) hikes in AWNC; PM Trin city sewage ponds and Caroni Marsh boating for Scarlet Ibis spectacleMay 27 -- early AM veranda; Oilbirds cave hike; and then off to Tobago.  Some birding en route Bluewaters InnMay 28-- AM Little Tobago Island hike for pelagics; glassbottom boat coral reefs viewing; PM relax at the beach or go birding, sea kayaking, etc.May 29-- all day optional rain forest trip at your expense (or) relax at the beach or go birdingMay 30-- AM birding hikes to mop up Tobago endemics; PM fly back to TrinidadMay 31-- Back to the USA
For detailed itinerary and other information like past eBird lists, please contact me.  Please indicate your background in birding and traveling, and any health-related concerns.  This tour is for a maximum of 20 persons.
Cheers, Kannan-------------------R. Kannan, Ph.D.,Professor of BiologyUniversity of Arkansas--Fort SmithTel: <479.788.7616rkannan...>


 

Back to top
Date: 10/29/17 6:37 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Trinidad & Tobago May 2018 for the AAST
Eighteen on board, TWO seats left!  Please come and show your support for nonprofits on both ends, the Asa Wright Nature Centre and the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust!  This time, there will be some "seasoned" herpetologists in the tour too, to add to the excitement! :) 
Kannan
On Saturday 2 September 2017, 1:25:50 PM GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:

Hi all, I will be leading a Trinidad & Tobago nature tour May 24 - 31, 2018, to raise funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, in which I serve as a trustee.  The trust, as you know, funds research and conservation projects mostly in Arkansas.  

Highlights of the Trinidad & Tobago tour include:
* Three nights in Asa Wright Nature Centre, Trinidad, one of the most famous ecolodges in the world-- www.asawright.org* Manakins, Bellbirds, Honeycreepers, Oropendolas, Euphonias, Tanagers, Toucans.....a rainbow of tropical birds from a comfortable veranda (while sipping rum punch!)* About 10 species of hummingbirds, many hovering inches from your face!* Trek to a riverine cave to see the strange Oilbirds
* Boating in Caroni Swamp to witness the spectacle of Scarlet Ibis coming to roost en masse
* A night walk on a remote beach to encounter massive Leatherback Sea turtles nesting * Three nights in Blue Waters Inn, Tobago, a delightful and luxurious beach-side resort (www.bluewatersinn.com)
* Hike up Little Tobago island to see 2 species of boobies, tropic birds, and other pelagics* Glass bottom boating to view coral reefs* About 150-200 species of birds, including the Trinidad & Tobago endemic,Trinidad Motmot
Cost excluding international airfare will be $1545, which covers comfortable accommodations for 7 nights, sumptuous food, local air travel between the islands of Trinidad and Tobago, and all tours and activities. You must be physically fit for easy to moderate walks in hot and humid tropical weather, with temperatures usually in the 80s. This will be my 9th tour of Trinidad & Tobago. 
Rough itinerary summary: 
May 24 -- check into Asa Wright Nature Centre (AWNC)May 25 -- early AM veranda birding; hike for manakins and bellbirds; PM Arippo Savannah birding and Matura beach for sea turtlesMay 26-- early AM veranda; optional Blanchisseuse trip at your expense (or) hikes in AWNC; PM Trin city sewage ponds and Caroni Marsh boating for Scarlet Ibis spectacleMay 27 -- early AM veranda; Oilbirds cave hike; and then off to Tobago.  Some birding en route Bluewaters InnMay 28-- AM Little Tobago Island hike for pelagics; glassbottom boat coral reefs viewing; PM relax at the beach or go birding, sea kayaking, etc.May 29-- all day optional rain forest trip at your expense (or) relax at the beach or go birdingMay 30-- AM birding hikes to mop up Tobago endemics; PM fly back to TrinidadMay 31-- Back to the USA
For detailed itinerary and other information like past eBird lists, please contact me.  Please indicate your background in birding and traveling, and any health-related concerns.  This tour is for a maximum of 20 persons.
Cheers, Kannan-------------------R. Kannan, Ph.D.,Professor of BiologyUniversity of Arkansas--Fort SmithTel: <479.788.7616rkannan...>


 

Back to top
Date: 10/28/17 7:40 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: LECONTE'S IN PINE BLUFF
This morning Doc George and I observed and photographed Leconte's Sparrows along Wilbur West Road in Pine Bluff. The location was approx. 800 yds. east of the interstate bridge and opposite of the small lake. Incidentally we observed a flock of 20 Am. Avocets intermittently foraging in and circling the lake, which is 300 yds. north of the road.
John
 

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Date: 10/28/17 7:24 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Saw-whet Owls and Great-tailed Grackles
Last night, we captured our second saw-whet of the season (second-year female), after a bit of a dry spell. It is still very early in the season for us and the floodgates have not yet opened. The cold front we experienced last night and will continue to experience for several nights should be really good!

On another note, I spent the afternoon at a local pumpkin patch on Parsons Road in Springdale. Their cattle pasture had 80-100 Great-tailed Grackles. Cool!

Stay tuned for more saw-whets soon!

Mitchell Pruitt
 

Back to top
Date: 10/28/17 12:54 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Re: Le Conte’s in the frost
I was at Woolsey today from 11 am to 2 pm.

11 sparrow species including LeConte's (5), Vesper (4) and Fox (2). Also 4 Sedge Wrens, 2 American Pipits and 4 Yellow-rumped Warblers.

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 10/28/17 11:58 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: CLOCK- CLOCK, BREWER’S IN THE BLACK
My plan was to walk the two burned prairies recently burned Stump and Chesney early, before wind got up. One of the first birds adjacent Stump Prairie was a subadult Kriders (red-tailed) Hawk, perched along a fence on highway 59. This is a premier hawk of the northern Great Plains.

Out on Stump my plan was to walk flocks of American Pipits, looking for the Lapland Longspur observed by UA-Fayetteville graduate student Alyssa DeRubeis October 25. Her longspur is an early date for northwest Arkansas and one of only a few here before November. I didnt find her lap (however see below), but there were plenty of American Pipits (~45) and Killdeer (~60). Then with loud CLOCK CLOCK calls, the consolation prize, a male Brewers Blackbird, my first of the season.

Did I mention it was in the upper 20s and that all that burned grass on Stump had a frosty top? No problem for Savannah Sparrows (~20) exploring the seed bounty released in the burn.

After an hour at Stump, I headed over to the burned acres at Chesney Prairie Natural Area. As pipits flew over me I heard what sounded like longspur rattles promising. So I slowed way down and started walking pipits. Finally, among at least 38 pipits, a handsome Lapland Longspur.

The temp was headed to low 40s. There was lots of meadowlark singing and calling, almost all Eastern. But in addition, one Western Meadowlark was chucking in the burn. I heard 1-2 others in adjacent fields singing. As I listened for meadowlarks, I heard more CLOCK-CLOCK and watched a flock of 12 Brewers. They flew over me, stopping briefly in the burned field, among European Starlings and Red-winged Blackbirds.

Lots of sparrows in the unburned areas of Chesney. Most prominent ones are Savannahs. I especially enjoyed seeing 5 perched up in a tall poke plant.


 

Back to top
Date: 10/28/17 10:16 am
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Le Conte’s in the frost
I conducted my transect surveys at Woolsey Wet Prairie (Wedington, Washington Co.) this morning in the frost. I observed a minimum of 7 Le Conte’s Sparrows throughput the site. Most were being curious/cooperative and were in good lighting. I’m happy to send a map of the specific spots to whoever wants one.

I couldn’t confirm any Nelson’s Sparrows, alas. The only other birds of note were a pair of Vesper Sparrows. The rest were “standard fare sparrows.” Three Sedge Wrens remain.

Good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.
 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/17 10:02 am
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - Scissortail thread 24 Oct 2017 to 25 Oct 2017 (#2017-303)
From Birds of North America online about Scissor-tails....

*Forms large premigratory roosts in late summer composed of juveniles and
adults of both sexes. Roosting flocks often contain >100 individuals, and
flocks of 1,000 birds have been recorded. Molt occurs during period of
communal roosting, but also reported as occurring on wintering grounds.
Preferred roost sites are open stands of medium to large deciduous trees
that lack appreciable understory. May exhibit some tendency to favor sites
near towns for roosting, perhaps because of availability of suitable
roosting sites in parks, orchards, and other residential plantings. Often
uses same roosting sites year after year.*

*Each morning, birds disperse from roost and forage independently. Roosting
aggregations re-form in late afternoon; most birds return to roost by
sundown. Single roosting tree may serve area up to 5 km in diameter. Roosts
often host smaller numbers of other species, including Eastern and Western
kingbirds, Brown Thrashers (Toxostoma rufum), American Robins (Turdus
migratorius), European Starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), and House Sparrows .
Roosts gradually shrink in size as birds depart for wintering grounds.*

Hope this helps...

Butch Tetzlaff

Bentonville



On Thu, Oct 26, 2017 at 11:49 AM, James Morgan <jlmm...> wrote:

> A couple of years back in the fall I counted 95 Scissortails on wires and
> in trees within a 100 yards to the south and a quarter mile to the west of
> the intersection of AR 16 & AR 74 in Elkins. Aggregation appears to
> happen. I gave up counting.
>
> Jim Morgan
> Fayetteville
>
> On 10/26/2017 9:58 AM, Carol Traphagan wrote:
>
> On the 4th as I drove home from work about 6pm, I saw 3 scissor tails in
> the air and watched them fly down and land on the on the 'telephone' wires
> at the Garland / Drake intersection stoplight. On 3 or 4 wires and a
> pole, there were MORE THAN 20 scissor tails gathered, fairly close
> together. Recklessly, I pulled over snapped a phone pic for proof for my
> husband (didn't bother including due to poor quality but verifiable!).
>
> Were they gathering to depart together??? Is that usual behavior I have
> not been lucky enough to see to date? Pretty heady stuff going home from
> work!! Thoughts??
>
> Carol Traphagan
> Fayetteville
>
>
> On Oct 26, 2017, at 12:00 AM, ARBIRD-L automatic digest system <
> <LISTSERV...> wrote:
>
> There are 7 messages totaling 304 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Hummer feeding right now (3)
> 2. Hummer feeding right now —not black chinned
> 3. Birds in the black at Chesney
> 4. For Endangered Animals, Fire, or Hurricanes Can Mean the End
> 5. Le Conte's Sparrow and L. Longspur (Benton Co.)
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:36:47 -0500
> From: Carol Meyerdirk <cmeyerdirk41...>
> Subject: Hummer feeding right now
>
> Hummer at feeder not a female
> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
> WLRCarol
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:55:30 -0500
> From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
> Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now
>
> Wow! It is below 30° here this morning.
> Sorry I don't remember what is your location?
>
> J
>
> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-
> <request...> wrote:
>
> Hummer at feeder not a female
>
> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>
> WLRCarol
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 13:27:12 -0500
> From: Michael <mplinz...>
> Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now
>
> The young male hummingbird is a probable young black chinned hummingbird.
> I only get dark on the throat with a hint of purple but not captured in a
> photo. The tail is longer than the wings, back is a gray/green, dark black
> line from bill to eye, white spot behind eye, outer tail feathers black
> tipped in white...
> I have not gotten good looks at the female.
>
> I will post real pictures later and see what the experts say...
>
> This bird is at a private residence, so please contact Carol off list
> should you be interested in seeing it.
>
> Michael Linz
>
> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-
> <request...> wrote:
>
>
> Hummer at feeder not a female
>
> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>
> WLRCarol
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 14:12:03 -0500
> From: Michael <mplinz...>
> Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now —not black chinned
>
> Retraction....
>
> I just saw the throat color and it was not purple. So not a black chinned.
>
>
> On Oct 25, 2017, at 1:27 PM, Michael <mplinz...> wrote:
>
>
> The young male hummingbird is a probable young black chinned hummingbird.
> I only get dark on the throat with a hint of purple but not captured in a
> photo. The tail is longer than the wings, back is a gray/green, dark black
> line from bill to eye, white spot behind eye, outer tail feathers black
> tipped in white...
>
> I have not gotten good looks at the female.
>
>
> I will post real pictures later and see what the experts say...
>
>
> This bird is at a private residence, so please contact Carol off list
> should you be interested in seeing it.
>
>
> Michael Linz
>
>
> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-
> <request...> wrote:
>
>
> Hummer at feeder not a female
>
> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>
> WLRCarol
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 20:18:14 +0000
> From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
> Subject: Birds in the black at Chesney
>
> Around 20 or so acres of the lower section of Chesney Prairie Natural Area
> was burned last week. Post-burn and voila: the business end of a
> functioning prairie is revealed. The tops of all that Big Bluestem and
> Indian Grass are gone. What’s left are chimneys of Osage Burrowing Crayfish
> and soil excavations of Plains Pocket Gophers. No doubt the home workings
> of other native creatures, too. After the burn comes a fantastic moonscape
> of reality.
>
> In terms of birds, we go from dense grass-lovers Sedge Wrens and Swamp
> Sparrows to the moonscapers. For example, there’s nothing a winter flock of
> Killdeers like better than bare mineral soil out in the open country. Today
> there were 55 or more, mainly in a tight flock. In the same area, another
> bare soiler: American Pipit. There were at least 65 in a more or less
> compact flock. A few other species were in the black, though in much lower
> numbers: Yellow-shafted Flicker and Wilson’s Snipe. Most of the meadowlark
> singing involved Easterns, but there were also 1-2 Westerns in the same
> area. I also heard peepings from Northern Bobwhites along the edge, but
> never spotted the birds.
>
> Most of Chesney is not burned, and there are many birds and lots of native
> grass. This morning I had at least Savannah Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow,
> Lincoln’s Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Field Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Sedge
> Wren.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 20:19:01 -0500
> From: Jerry Davis
> <jwdavis...>
> Subject: For Endangered Animals, Fire, or Hurricanes Can Mean the End
>
> These catastrophic events can eliminate endangered species. These loses
> do not make the National News
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/25/climate/fires-
> hurricanes-endangered-animals.html?nytapp=true
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 21:47:31 -0500
> From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
> Subject: Le Conte's Sparrow and L. Longspur (Benton Co.)
>
> I saw Joe Neal at Chesney Prairie Natural Area this morning in Siloam
> Springs, but I was busy conducting surveys. It looks like we saw similar
> stuff, although I missed the Field Sparrow and Western Meadowlark. To add,
> I also saw a young male Northern Harrier and a Sharp-shinned Hawk.
>
> A Le Conte's Sparrow perched up in some forbs on the edge of one of the
> trails. It's the first trail that goes north after you've taken the main
> trail west.
>
> All of Stump Prairie was burned last Thursday, along with the Couch's Unit
> in Chesney as Joe mentioned. There were a lot more birds in the burned unit
> here compared to Couch's Unit, including at least one Lapland Longspur,
> which is a first-of-the-season bird for me.
>
> Good birding!
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis
> Fayetteville, Washington Co.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 24 Oct 2017 to 25 Oct 2017 (#2017-303)
> ***************************************************************
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/17 9:49 am
From: James Morgan <jlmm...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - Scissortail thread 24 Oct 2017 to 25 Oct 2017 (#2017-303)
A couple of years back in the fall I counted 95 Scissortails on wires
and in trees within a 100 yards to the south and a quarter mile to the
west of the intersection of AR 16 & AR 74 in Elkins.  Aggregation
appears to happen. I gave up counting.

Jim Morgan
Fayetteville

On 10/26/2017 9:58 AM, Carol Traphagan wrote:
> On the 4th as I drove home from work about 6pm
> <x-apple-data-detectors://0>, I saw 3 scissor tails in the air and
> watched them fly down and land on the on the 'telephone' wires at the
>  Garland / Drake  intersection stoplight.  On 3 or 4 wires and a pole,
> there were  MORE THAN 20 scissor tails gathered, fairly close
> together. Recklessly, I pulled over snapped a phone pic for proof for
> my husband (didn't bother including due to poor quality but verifiable!).
>
> Were they gathering to depart together???  Is that usual behavior I
> have not been lucky enough to see to date?  Pretty heady stuff going
> home from work!!  Thoughts??
>
> Carol Traphagan
> Fayetteville
>
>
> On Oct 26, 2017, at 12:00 AM, ARBIRD-L automatic digest system
> <LISTSERV...> <mailto:<LISTSERV...>> wrote:
>
>> There are 7 messages totaling 304 lines in this issue.
>>
>> Topics of the day:
>>
>>  1. Hummer feeding right now (3)
>>  2. Hummer feeding right now —not black chinned
>>  3. Birds in the black at Chesney
>>  4. For Endangered Animals, Fire, or Hurricanes Can Mean the End
>>  5. Le Conte's Sparrow and L. Longspur (Benton Co.)
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:36:47 -0500
>> From:    Carol Meyerdirk <cmeyerdirk41...>
>> <mailto:<cmeyerdirk41...>>
>> Subject: Hummer feeding right now
>>
>> Hummer at feeder not a female
>> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>> WLRCarol
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:55:30 -0500
>> From:    Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
>> <mailto:<9waterfall9...>>
>> Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now
>>
>> Wow! It is below 30° here this morning.
>> Sorry I don't remember what is your location?
>>
>> J
>>
>> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk
>> <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
>> <mailto:<0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>>
>>> Hummer at feeder not a female
>>> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>>> WLRCarol
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Wed, 25 Oct 2017 13:27:12 -0500
>> From:    Michael <mplinz...> <mailto:<mplinz...>>
>> Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now
>>
>> The young male hummingbird is a probable young black chinned
>> hummingbird.  I only get dark on the throat with a hint of purple but
>> not captured in a photo.  The tail is longer than the wings, back is
>> a gray/green, dark black line from bill to eye, white spot behind
>> eye, outer tail feathers black tipped in white...
>> I have not gotten good looks at the female.
>>
>> I will post real pictures later and see what the experts say...
>>
>> This bird is at a private residence, so please contact Carol off list
>> should you be interested in seeing it.
>>
>> Michael Linz
>>
>>> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk
>>> <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
>>> <mailto:<0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hummer at feeder not a female
>>> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>>> WLRCarol
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Wed, 25 Oct 2017 14:12:03 -0500
>> From:    Michael <mplinz...> <mailto:<mplinz...>>
>> Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now —not black chinned
>>
>> Retraction....
>>
>> I just saw the throat color and it was not purple.  So not a black
>> chinned.
>>
>>
>>> On Oct 25, 2017, at 1:27 PM, Michael <mplinz...>
>>> <mailto:<mplinz...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> The young male hummingbird is a probable young black chinned
>>> hummingbird.  I only get dark on the throat with a hint of purple
>>> but not captured in a photo.  The tail is longer than the wings,
>>> back is a gray/green, dark black line from bill to eye, white spot
>>> behind eye, outer tail feathers black tipped in white...
>>> I have not gotten good looks at the female.
>>>
>>> I will post real pictures later and see what the experts say...
>>>
>>> This bird is at a private residence, so please contact Carol off
>>> list should you be interested in seeing it.
>>>
>>> Michael Linz
>>>
>>>> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk
>>>> <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
>>>> <mailto:<0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Hummer at feeder not a female
>>>> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>>>> WLRCarol
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Wed, 25 Oct 2017 20:18:14 +0000
>> From:    Joseph Neal <joeneal...> <mailto:<joeneal...>>
>> Subject: Birds in the black at Chesney
>>
>> Around 20 or so acres of the lower section of Chesney Prairie Natural
>> Area was burned last week. Post-burn and voila: the business end of a
>> functioning prairie is revealed. The tops of all that Big Bluestem
>> and Indian Grass are gone. What’s left are chimneys of Osage
>> Burrowing Crayfish and soil excavations of Plains Pocket Gophers. No
>> doubt the home workings of other native creatures, too. After the
>> burn comes a fantastic moonscape of reality.
>>
>> In terms of birds, we go from dense grass-lovers Sedge Wrens and
>> Swamp Sparrows to the moonscapers. For example, there’s nothing a
>> winter flock of Killdeers like better than bare mineral soil out in
>> the open country. Today there were 55 or more, mainly in a tight
>> flock. In the same area, another bare soiler: American Pipit. There
>> were at least 65 in a more or less compact flock. A few other species
>> were in the black, though in much lower numbers: Yellow-shafted
>> Flicker and Wilson’s Snipe. Most of the meadowlark singing involved
>> Easterns, but there were also 1-2 Westerns in the same area. I also
>> heard peepings from Northern Bobwhites along the edge, but never
>> spotted the birds.
>>
>> Most of Chesney is not burned, and there are many birds and lots of
>> native grass. This morning I had at least Savannah Sparrow,
>> White-crowned Sparrow, Lincoln’s Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Field
>> Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Sedge Wren.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Wed, 25 Oct 2017 20:19:01 -0500
>> From:    Jerry Davis
>> <jwdavis...> <mailto:<jwdavis...>>
>> Subject: For Endangered Animals, Fire, or Hurricanes Can Mean the End
>>
>> These catastrophic events can eliminate endangered species.  These
>> loses do not make the National News
>>
>> https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/25/climate/fires-hurricanes-endangered-animals.html?nytapp=true
>>
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> Hot Springs
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Date:    Wed, 25 Oct 2017 21:47:31 -0500
>> From:    Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
>> <mailto:<alderubeis...>>
>> Subject: Le Conte's Sparrow and L. Longspur (Benton Co.)
>>
>> I saw Joe Neal at Chesney Prairie Natural Area this morning in Siloam
>> Springs, but I was busy conducting surveys. It looks like we saw similar
>> stuff, although I missed the Field Sparrow and Western Meadowlark. To
>> add,
>> I also saw a young male Northern Harrier and a Sharp-shinned Hawk.
>>
>> A Le Conte's Sparrow perched up in some forbs on the edge of one of the
>> trails. It's the first trail that goes north after you've taken the main
>> trail west.
>>
>> All of Stump Prairie was burned last Thursday, along with the Couch's
>> Unit
>> in Chesney as Joe mentioned. There were a lot more birds in the
>> burned unit
>> here compared to Couch's Unit, including at least one Lapland Longspur,
>> which is a first-of-the-season bird for me.
>>
>> Good birding!
>>
>> Alyssa DeRubeis
>> Fayetteville, Washington Co.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 24 Oct 2017 to 25 Oct 2017 (#2017-303)
>> ***************************************************************


 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/17 8:13 am
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Subject: Re: Ring Necked Pheasant - again
The first RN Pheasant I ever saw was crossing Rodney Parham Rd in Little Rock, during 5:00 pm rush hour traffic several years ago. Amazingly the bird was quite street savvy and knew just how to keep from getting run over, including pulling its neck back in the nick of time. By the time the poor thing had managed to cross all five lanes, it must have been terrible stressed. I watched as it stepped in the grass and went about 3 feet before collapsing. After a few minutes it got up and continued its journey north. Where ever it was headed.

I made a few calls and Craig and Dale Provost was able to get there in time to get a couple of photos of it. It didn't have a long tail either, which in this case was a good thing. It had a hard enough time getting across a busy street without dragging a long tail behind it.

I added the bird to my state/life list. :-) (Under "odd stuff," birds seen but not countable, i.e. Traill's Flycatcher, etc.) I finally did get to see a countable pheasant while in PA a few years ago.

Dottie
Little Rock

********************************

-----Original Message-----
From: George R. Hoelzeman
Sent: Sunday, October 22, 2017 10:47 PM
Subject: Ring Necked Pheasant - again

Back in around 2005 I spotted a Ring Necked Pheasant in our pasture just south of Cleveland in north Conway Co.  Impressive, and I have no idea where it came from (we're a couple miles from pavement and none of the deer camp denizens mess with game-birds).  But I was the only one to see it so...there it is.

Today, however, my daughter was with me when we spotted a Ring Necked Pheasant on Hwy 95 where it crosses Point Remove Creek just south of Pigeon Roost Mtn (locals call it Possum Trot - seriously).  This is about 7 miles north of Morrilton.

The bird in question was on the shoulder near the bridge and the time was 10:05am.  We decided to turn around and see if we could get a photo
- sure enough, the bird was still there.  I just about had my phone ready to take a photo when oncoming traffic (and probably me being parked about 30ft away) spooked it.  It flew across the highway in front of us, down the embankment and into thick cover in a fence-row.

A notable field mark was that it lacked the long, elegant tail feathers of the adult male, although it still had the distinctive dark green crested head and white neck ring.  My initial thought was that this was a young bird, perhaps first year - but if they don't breed in Arkansas, is that even possible?

Either way, we were pretty excited to spot this thing.  I'm not sure where it could have come from - if it was a released or lost captive, he was still a long way from anyone who would have an interest in such a bird.

George (n. Conway Co. pondering pheasants)

Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and any attachment(s) is the property of the State of Arkansas and may be protected by state and federal laws governing disclosure of private information. It is intended solely for the use of the entity to which this email is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that reading, copying or distributing this transmission is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. The sender has not waived any applicable privilege by sending the accompanying transmission. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender, and then please delete and destroy all copies and attachments.
 

Back to top
Date: 10/26/17 7:59 am
From: Carol Traphagan <000000f7d4dacb61-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 24 Oct 2017 to 25 Oct 2017 (#2017-303)
On the 4th as I drove home from work about 6pm, I saw 3 scissor tails in the air and watched them fly down and land on the on the 'telephone' wires at the Garland / Drake intersection stoplight. On 3 or 4 wires and a pole, there were MORE THAN 20 scissor tails gathered, fairly close together. Recklessly, I pulled over snapped a phone pic for proof for my husband (didn't bother including due to poor quality but verifiable!).

Were they gathering to depart together??? Is that usual behavior I have not been lucky enough to see to date? Pretty heady stuff going home from work!! Thoughts??

Carol Traphagan
Fayetteville


> On Oct 26, 2017, at 12:00 AM, ARBIRD-L automatic digest system <LISTSERV...> wrote:
>
> There are 7 messages totaling 304 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
> 1. Hummer feeding right now (3)
> 2. Hummer feeding right now —not black chinned
> 3. Birds in the black at Chesney
> 4. For Endangered Animals, Fire, or Hurricanes Can Mean the End
> 5. Le Conte's Sparrow and L. Longspur (Benton Co.)
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:36:47 -0500
> From: Carol Meyerdirk <cmeyerdirk41...>
> Subject: Hummer feeding right now
>
> Hummer at feeder not a female
> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
> WLRCarol
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 08:55:30 -0500
> From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
> Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now
>
> Wow! It is below 30° here this morning.
> Sorry I don't remember what is your location?
>
> J
>
>> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> Hummer at feeder not a female
>> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>> WLRCarol
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 13:27:12 -0500
> From: Michael <mplinz...>
> Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now
>
> The young male hummingbird is a probable young black chinned hummingbird. I only get dark on the throat with a hint of purple but not captured in a photo. The tail is longer than the wings, back is a gray/green, dark black line from bill to eye, white spot behind eye, outer tail feathers black tipped in white...
> I have not gotten good looks at the female.
>
> I will post real pictures later and see what the experts say...
>
> This bird is at a private residence, so please contact Carol off list should you be interested in seeing it.
>
> Michael Linz
>
>> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> Hummer at feeder not a female
>> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>> WLRCarol
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 14:12:03 -0500
> From: Michael <mplinz...>
> Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now —not black chinned
>
> Retraction....
>
> I just saw the throat color and it was not purple. So not a black chinned.
>
>
>> On Oct 25, 2017, at 1:27 PM, Michael <mplinz...> wrote:
>>
>> The young male hummingbird is a probable young black chinned hummingbird. I only get dark on the throat with a hint of purple but not captured in a photo. The tail is longer than the wings, back is a gray/green, dark black line from bill to eye, white spot behind eye, outer tail feathers black tipped in white...
>> I have not gotten good looks at the female.
>>
>> I will post real pictures later and see what the experts say...
>>
>> This bird is at a private residence, so please contact Carol off list should you be interested in seeing it.
>>
>> Michael Linz
>>
>>> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Hummer at feeder not a female
>>> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>>> WLRCarol
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 20:18:14 +0000
> From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
> Subject: Birds in the black at Chesney
>
> Around 20 or so acres of the lower section of Chesney Prairie Natural Area was burned last week. Post-burn and voila: the business end of a functioning prairie is revealed. The tops of all that Big Bluestem and Indian Grass are gone. What’s left are chimneys of Osage Burrowing Crayfish and soil excavations of Plains Pocket Gophers. No doubt the home workings of other native creatures, too. After the burn comes a fantastic moonscape of reality.
>
> In terms of birds, we go from dense grass-lovers Sedge Wrens and Swamp Sparrows to the moonscapers. For example, there’s nothing a winter flock of Killdeers like better than bare mineral soil out in the open country. Today there were 55 or more, mainly in a tight flock. In the same area, another bare soiler: American Pipit. There were at least 65 in a more or less compact flock. A few other species were in the black, though in much lower numbers: Yellow-shafted Flicker and Wilson’s Snipe. Most of the meadowlark singing involved Easterns, but there were also 1-2 Westerns in the same area. I also heard peepings from Northern Bobwhites along the edge, but never spotted the birds.
>
> Most of Chesney is not burned, and there are many birds and lots of native grass. This morning I had at least Savannah Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, Lincoln’s Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Field Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Sedge Wren.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 20:19:01 -0500
> From: Jerry Davis
> <jwdavis...>
> Subject: For Endangered Animals, Fire, or Hurricanes Can Mean the End
>
> These catastrophic events can eliminate endangered species. These loses do not make the National News
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/25/climate/fires-hurricanes-endangered-animals.html?nytapp=true
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2017 21:47:31 -0500
> From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
> Subject: Le Conte's Sparrow and L. Longspur (Benton Co.)
>
> I saw Joe Neal at Chesney Prairie Natural Area this morning in Siloam
> Springs, but I was busy conducting surveys. It looks like we saw similar
> stuff, although I missed the Field Sparrow and Western Meadowlark. To add,
> I also saw a young male Northern Harrier and a Sharp-shinned Hawk.
>
> A Le Conte's Sparrow perched up in some forbs on the edge of one of the
> trails. It's the first trail that goes north after you've taken the main
> trail west.
>
> All of Stump Prairie was burned last Thursday, along with the Couch's Unit
> in Chesney as Joe mentioned. There were a lot more birds in the burned unit
> here compared to Couch's Unit, including at least one Lapland Longspur,
> which is a first-of-the-season bird for me.
>
> Good birding!
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis
> Fayetteville, Washington Co.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 24 Oct 2017 to 25 Oct 2017 (#2017-303)
> ***************************************************************

 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/17 7:47 pm
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Le Conte's Sparrow and L. Longspur (Benton Co.)
I saw Joe Neal at Chesney Prairie Natural Area this morning in Siloam
Springs, but I was busy conducting surveys. It looks like we saw similar
stuff, although I missed the Field Sparrow and Western Meadowlark. To add,
I also saw a young male Northern Harrier and a Sharp-shinned Hawk.

A Le Conte's Sparrow perched up in some forbs on the edge of one of the
trails. It's the first trail that goes north after you've taken the main
trail west.

All of Stump Prairie was burned last Thursday, along with the Couch's Unit
in Chesney as Joe mentioned. There were a lot more birds in the burned unit
here compared to Couch's Unit, including at least one Lapland Longspur,
which is a first-of-the-season bird for me.

Good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.

 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/17 6:19 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: For Endangered Animals, Fire, or Hurricanes Can Mean the End
These catastrophic events can eliminate endangered species. These loses do not make the National News

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/25/climate/fires-hurricanes-endangered-animals.html?nytapp=true

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/17 1:18 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Birds in the black at Chesney
Around 20 or so acres of the lower section of Chesney Prairie Natural Area was burned last week. Post-burn and voila: the business end of a functioning prairie is revealed. The tops of all that Big Bluestem and Indian Grass are gone. Whats left are chimneys of Osage Burrowing Crayfish and soil excavations of Plains Pocket Gophers. No doubt the home workings of other native creatures, too. After the burn comes a fantastic moonscape of reality.

In terms of birds, we go from dense grass-lovers Sedge Wrens and Swamp Sparrows to the moonscapers. For example, theres nothing a winter flock of Killdeers like better than bare mineral soil out in the open country. Today there were 55 or more, mainly in a tight flock. In the same area, another bare soiler: American Pipit. There were at least 65 in a more or less compact flock. A few other species were in the black, though in much lower numbers: Yellow-shafted Flicker and Wilsons Snipe. Most of the meadowlark singing involved Easterns, but there were also 1-2 Westerns in the same area. I also heard peepings from Northern Bobwhites along the edge, but never spotted the birds.

Most of Chesney is not burned, and there are many birds and lots of native grass. This morning I had at least Savannah Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, Lincolns Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Field Sparrow, Song Sparrow, and Sedge Wren.


 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/17 12:12 pm
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now —not black chinned
Retraction....

I just saw the throat color and it was not purple. So not a black chinned.


> On Oct 25, 2017, at 1:27 PM, Michael <mplinz...> wrote:
>
> The young male hummingbird is a probable young black chinned hummingbird. I only get dark on the throat with a hint of purple but not captured in a photo. The tail is longer than the wings, back is a gray/green, dark black line from bill to eye, white spot behind eye, outer tail feathers black tipped in white...
> I have not gotten good looks at the female.
>
> I will post real pictures later and see what the experts say...
>
> This bird is at a private residence, so please contact Carol off list should you be interested in seeing it.
>
> Michael Linz
>
>> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> Hummer at feeder not a female
>> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
>> WLRCarol
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/17 11:27 am
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now
The young male hummingbird is a probable young black chinned hummingbird. I only get dark on the throat with a hint of purple but not captured in a photo. The tail is longer than the wings, back is a gray/green, dark black line from bill to eye, white spot behind eye, outer tail feathers black tipped in white...
I have not gotten good looks at the female.

I will post real pictures later and see what the experts say...

This bird is at a private residence, so please contact Carol off list should you be interested in seeing it.

Michael Linz

> On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Hummer at feeder not a female
> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
> WLRCarol
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/17 6:55 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Hummer feeding right now
Wow! It is below 30 here this morning.
Sorry I don't remember what is your location?

J

On Oct 25, 2017, at 8:36 AM, Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Hummer at feeder not a female
> Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
> WLRCarol
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/25/17 6:37 am
From: Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Hummer feeding right now
Hummer at feeder not a female
Had beginnings of gorget feathers like a collar
WLRCarol

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/24/17 2:59 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: WINTER WREN SINGING ON CAVE MOUNTAIN
Blue skies and north winds today kept most birds pretty much out of sight. However, the south side of Cave Mountain in the upper Buffalo National River was modestly calm. In that calm, the singing of a Winter Wren, something Ive not often heard here.

Splashing and foraging in springfed Clark Creek, Lost Valley: American Goldfinch, Yellow-rumped Warblers, and an American Robin. A huge boulder along the creek was green with moss and covered with an elegant liverwort. This particular one branches like a tree, hugging the sandstone above the spring flow.

At Boxley Bridge, the Buffalo was all sinking stream, lost under cobbles. No Wood Ducks on Boxley mill pond, but we did see the Trumpeter Swan.

While Fall color was modest today, there were highlights. I especially liked walking under a Virginia Creeper that has climbed high in a Beech tree. Green leaves now crimson with light carefully illuminating the intricacies of leaf structure, a stained glass effect.

One of my favorite wildflowers Dittany, has gone to seed. Flowers in early September were tiny blue jewels. Now fluffy white seeds have formed. To see these requires taking the kneel, to use words current in todays political discourse. Todays knee was required for a closer inspection of Dittanys plans for next season. It appears that Dittany is 100% patriotic, ready to emerge and spread, making Cave Mountain and by implication, Earth Herself --a better place.

Handsome striped leaves of Adam-and-Eve orchid have pushed up through the browns and yellows of oaks and beeches on Cave Mountain. Seeing them closely required more of taking the knee. Like Dittany, they are ready for next season.


 

Back to top
Date: 10/24/17 1:08 pm
From: Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Hummer sightings
Last evening and then just now while I was filling other feeders I saw a hummer feeding from the feeder😊. Wow they had better get a move on with this wind to help them on their way.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 10/23/17 8:35 pm
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
Human population growth involves complex issues and is quite possibly unsolvable.


I don't think anyone is upset by an individual having five children. In my comments I was just observing that most of the people in my baby boomer generation had 0-3 children (based on the people I know). But, in the aggregate, as an entire species, Homo sapiens is literally destroying many other species, including glamorous large species like rhinoceros, elephants, and giraffes. This is not imaginary, the numbers on losses are there. Maybe it does not matter if planet Earth no longer has such creatures.


However, I agree with some of the Native Americans who said that mankind is going to be mighty lonely when the great and small beasts are gone, when all that remains is humans in their billions, surrounded by their concrete highways, eating their GMO plants, playing with their computers.


No one wants to discuss population growth by reproduction and immigration because it has become politically incorrect. Paul Ehrlich in 1968 published a book called "The Population Bomb". I recall he had an interesting statement about the population of duck weed on a pond. He said (in effect), "if duckweed doubles its population every 24 hours, and today the pond is half covered with duckweed, when will the pond be 100% covered?" And the answer was, in 24 hours.


The human population of the United States in 1950 was 152 million. In 2016 it was 324 million. Our population has more than doubled in 67 years. Just for comparison, the population of India in 1950 was 359 million. And in 1950 people considered India to be incredibly densely crowded. Now India has 1.3 billion people. So, now, in 2017, the United States has roughly the same population that India had in 1950 when people thought India was ridiculously overcrowded.


Each human makes a giant footprint on the Earth, and Americans have some of the biggest most devastating footprints.


There may be no answer. One of these days, the pond will be 100% covered.


Just food for thought.


D. Steinkraus



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Sent: Monday, October 23, 2017 9:57:35 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing

I have to wonder if this seemingly bitter comment is directed at a specific demographic. I also have to wonder if there's a set number of children you have in mind that parents should be allowed to have. Who decides that?
Side note, if it weren't for immigration, the population of the US would not actually be growing. Some studies have shown the birth rate(as an average) here in the US has fallen below sustainable percentages.
I'm not saying that people here need to have tons and tons of kids... just saying that actual population growth (and overgrowth) is not a problem that is caused here in the US.
I have 5 kids and I'm wondering if I'm supposed to take offense. Am I ignorant and an offender? I'm irresponsible because I didn't stop at 2? I apologize for any attitude that may seem present in these comments as it's not my intention. I just hope people aren't walking around mad at the big families that do exist in Arkansas. Without immigration our population wouldn't be growing here so the responsibility for population growth does not sit upon their shoulders.
I do hope people understand that it's not all that simple and pointing fingers carries its own ignorance.

Truly, human overpopulation is the elephant in the room as well as the killer on the planet. Irresponsible Americans preaching quiverfuls and choosing to have many children are the worst offenders. That kind of ignorance in this day and age is indefensible.


On Mon, Oct 23, 2017 at 12:00 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:
"and are losing one species of life on Earth every 6 minutes. "

The above statement is not quite true. Please don't take me wrong, I'm not criticizing the seriousness of what's happening to the planet. These numbers are just not supported and they're not based on hard facts. Read any legit study on how many species we lose each day and the numbers vary from one study to the next... and, they all admit that the numbers are based on what they know as well as what they don't know. Meaning, lots of assumption. Scientists assume there's a certain number of species out there that we still have not discovered and they(admittedly) factor in the organisms that die without us ever knowing they existed. There's just no way to come up with such a number with any certainty. They literally sit there and say "well, some species just died that we weren't aware of." And they literally choose a number to represent that unknown.

I'm oversimplifying things perhaps? I don't know. What I do know is that we do have problems in this world and it often seems we spend more time arguing about them and pointing fingers than actually doing anything.

I'm often told that I should just keep scrolling when I see things that offend me. Unfortunately it happens too often in these discussions(we're supposed to be talking birds and birds alone I thought). Angry words show up in this group from time to time and people quit the group. Those that speak up get insulted and criticized. It saddens me sometimes and unfortunately.. I do not always know when to bite my tongue. I'm working on that.
I mean no one here any ill will. And no matter how bad things are getting... keep looking up.

Daniel Mason

[https://ipmcdn.avast.com/images/icons/icon-envelope-tick-round-orange-animated-no-repeat-v1.gif]<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon> Virus-free. www.avast.com<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=link>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/23/17 8:09 pm
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: stop this thread
Let’s just nip this in the bud…

Thanks, The Management

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Mason
Sent: Monday, October 23, 2017 9:58 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing

I have to wonder if this seemingly bitter comment is directed at a specific demographic. I also have to wonder if there's a set number of children you have in mind that parents should be allowed to have. Who decides that?
Side note, if it weren't for immigration, the population of the US would not actually be growing. Some studies have shown the birth rate(as an average) here in the US has fallen below sustainable percentages.
I'm not saying that people here need to have tons and tons of kids... just saying that actual population growth (and overgrowth) is not a problem that is caused here in the US.
I have 5 kids and I'm wondering if I'm supposed to take offense. Am I ignorant and an offender? I'm irresponsible because I didn't stop at 2? I apologize for any attitude that may seem present in these comments as it's not my intention. I just hope people aren't walking around mad at the big families that do exist in Arkansas. Without immigration our population wouldn't be growing here so the responsibility for population growth does not sit upon their shoulders.
I do hope people understand that it's not all that simple and pointing fingers carries its own ignorance.
Truly, human overpopulation is the elephant in the room as well as the killer on the planet. Irresponsible Americans preaching quiverfuls and choosing to have many children are the worst offenders. That kind of ignorance in this day and age is indefensible.



On Mon, Oct 23, 2017 at 12:00 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:
"and are losing one species of life on Earth every 6 minutes. "

The above statement is not quite true. Please don't take me wrong, I'm not criticizing the seriousness of what's happening to the planet. These numbers are just not supported and they're not based on hard facts. Read any legit study on how many species we lose each day and the numbers vary from one study to the next... and, they all admit that the numbers are based on what they know as well as what they don't know. Meaning, lots of assumption. Scientists assume there's a certain number of species out there that we still have not discovered and they(admittedly) factor in the organisms that die without us ever knowing they existed. There's just no way to come up with such a number with any certainty. They literally sit there and say "well, some species just died that we weren't aware of." And they literally choose a number to represent that unknown.

I'm oversimplifying things perhaps? I don't know. What I do know is that we do have problems in this world and it often seems we spend more time arguing about them and pointing fingers than actually doing anything.

I'm often told that I should just keep scrolling when I see things that offend me. Unfortunately it happens too often in these discussions(we're supposed to be talking birds and birds alone I thought). Angry words show up in this group from time to time and people quit the group. Those that speak up get insulted and criticized. It saddens me sometimes and unfortunately.. I do not always know when to bite my tongue. I'm working on that.
I mean no one here any ill will. And no matter how bad things are getting... keep looking up.

Daniel Mason

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Date: 10/23/17 7:58 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
I have to wonder if this seemingly bitter comment is directed at a
specific demographic.  I also have to wonder if there's a set number of
children you have in mind that parents should be allowed to have.  Who
decides that?
Side note, if it weren't for immigration, the population of the US would
not actually be growing.  Some studies have shown the birth rate(as an
average) here in the US has fallen below sustainable percentages.
I'm not saying that people here need to have tons and tons of kids...
just saying that actual population growth (and overgrowth) is not a
problem that is caused here in the US.
I have 5 kids and I'm wondering if I'm supposed to take offense. Am I
ignorant and an offender?  I'm irresponsible because I didn't stop at
2?  I apologize for any attitude that may seem present in these comments
as it's not my intention.  I just hope people aren't walking around mad
at the big families that do exist in Arkansas.  Without immigration our
population wouldn't be growing here so the responsibility for population
growth does not sit upon their shoulders.
I do hope people understand that it's not all that simple and pointing
fingers carries its own ignorance.

> Truly, human overpopulation is the elephant in the room as well as the
> killer on the planet. _*Irresponsible Americans preaching quiverfuls
> and choosing to have many children are the worst offenders. *_That
> kind of ignorance in this day and age is indefensible.
>

> On Mon, Oct 23, 2017 at 12:00 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> <mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:
>
> _*"and are losing one species of life on Earth every 6 minutes. "*_
>
The above statement is not quite true.  Please don't take me wrong, I'm
not criticizing the seriousness of what's happening to the planet. 
These numbers are just not supported and they're not based on hard
facts.  Read any legit study on how many species we lose each day and
the numbers vary from one study to the next...  and, they all admit that
the numbers are based on what they know as well as what they don't
know.  Meaning, lots of assumption.  Scientists assume there's a certain
number of species out there that we still have not discovered and
they(admittedly) factor in the organisms that die without us ever
knowing they existed.  There's just no way to come up with such a number
with any certainty.  They literally sit there and say "well, some
species just died that we weren't aware of." And they literally choose a
number to represent that unknown.

I'm oversimplifying things perhaps?  I don't know.  What I do know is
that we do have problems in this world and it often seems we spend more
time arguing about them and pointing fingers than actually doing anything.

I'm often told that I should just keep scrolling when I see things that
offend me.  Unfortunately it happens too often in these
discussions(we're supposed to be talking birds and birds alone I
thought).  Angry words show up in this group from time to time and
people quit the group.  Those that speak up get insulted and
criticized.  It saddens me sometimes and unfortunately.. I do not always
know when to bite my tongue.  I'm working on that.
I mean no one here any ill will. And no matter how bad things are
getting... keep looking up.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 10/23/17 7:02 pm
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
Truly, human overpopulation is the elephant in the room as well as the
killer on the planet. Irresponsible Americans preaching quiverfuls and
choosing to have many children are the worst offenders. That kind of
ignorance in this day and age is indefensible.

On Mon, Oct 23, 2017 at 12:00 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> I appreciate your efforts and sometimes all we can do is make a difference
> in what we have control over. The problem is created one person at a time
> and will have to be corrected that way. If a person is not doing their part
> the job is not getting done. We have control over our plants on our
> property, the stopping of pesticide use and not having GMO and non-native
> plants. You are right about the population situation. We have now
> eliminated 52% of the world species and are losing one species of life on
> Earth every 6 minutes. We have also destroyed 60% of our ecological support
> systems. What is most tragic is the indifference by those that are suppose
> to care and know better.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> *From:* Donald C. Steinkraus
> *Sent:* Monday, October 23, 2017 11:16 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
>
>
> Small steps are all most of us can make. I have been trying to educate
> people about the dangers of exotic invasive plants, and their effect on
> insect populations, and thus bird populations, for years. I have a small
> farm and I have been removing invasive plants to the best of my ability and
> planting as many different kinds of native trees, shrubs, wildflowers, as I
> can. I try to rescue turtles from the road. I put up bird boxes.
>
>
>
> The tragedy is there are too many humans on the planet and there is little
> we can do about this. It seemed like most of my generation in the U.S. did
> limit family size to 2-3 children, and that is true in Japan, Italy,
> France, and other countries, but vast areas of the world are still
> increasing population rapidly.
>
>
>
> So . . I try to plant and disperse native plants as much as I can.
> ------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, October 19, 2017 9:58:40 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
>
> That's a good challenge. With other environmental topics, I see so many
> people get all fired up in word and word alone. People get angry about
> pollution. They "report" trash here and there yet, do nothing. Many
> people sit back and wait on the government to change things. We can be
> proactive in that area but what about in our daily lives?
> It's a challenge for me and one I've often been tempted to put out there
> for others. How can people talk about pollution and still drive all over
> the state(and country) just to look at birds? I know it's not that simple
> and that's probably hitting below the belt for some but it's something we
> can all think about, in my opinion.
> What can we do? Both in actions to shape the world around us and in our
> own little worlds as well.
> We don't use pesticides and the like here... nothing. And we have power
> lines that go across our property that we have to occasionally remind
> Carrol Electric not to spray herbicides under. They're good about not
> doing that as long as you fill out a form every so often.
> I can assure you... there's no shortage of bugs in my yard... I think our
> 5 acres could completely support all tick research (if anyone is doing
> that) in the state... and possible beyond. HA.
> Our landscaping methods(ha) have been what would probably come across as
> laziness. Let things grow til they're in the way... then clear what
> "needs" to be. The bugs and birds LOVE it. I'm not fond of the ticks and
> chiggers(blech) but it is a joy to see the wildlife in the yard. We're
> going to do a little more actual landscaping in the near future including a
> butterfly garden my oldest child wants right outside her window. I may be
> messaging you outside the group about the nursery as I've wanted to check
> it out for quite a few years. Some day. It's a bit of a drive from
> Siloam. Time to start making plans. :)
>
> How do we reach the masses with the message of how important things like
> bugs can be? Not an easy question with an easy solution. Sometimes I
> think it's a one person at a time thing... and perhaps, one of these
> individuals will find a way to bridge that gap effectively. I think too
> often, people that are passionate about a cause come across as angry and
> bitter and in that, reach no one.
> This has me thinking about Steve Irwin of all people. I miss that guy.
> Many people thought he was nuts for what he did but the absolute passion he
> had for nature was contagious and inspiring.. We need more of that.
> Sorry for the rambling. There's a fascinating world out there that so
> many are blind to. I think for many people, the only way to "educate" them
> to the situation we're in is to open their eyes to the wonders that we all
> see. We need to simply create more nature lovers.
>
> Daniel Mason
> On 10/19/2017 7:06 PM, Mary Ann King wrote:
>
> All comments I certainly understand. But are we just going to talk about
> it? We need to step out of our cozy little boxes and try to start doing
> something about it. I’m beginning to see younger people coming to the
> nursery – In fact, a few weeks back, a young man (13 I think) who had been
> to the Audubon Camp, came to buy native plants. He had worked at some jobs
> to earn the money to buy them. J
>
>
>
> Many of the schools are putting in Butterfly and pollinator gardens. WE
> need to support these actions – perhaps volunteer to help keep them weeded
> – or maybe watered in the summertime. How are people going to learn if
> they are not taught?
>
>
>
> I certainly don’t have the answers, but neither do I wish to stand by and
> do nothing.
>
>
>
> MaryAnn King
>
> In the pine woods northwest of London.
>
>
>
> .
>
>
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
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>

 

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Date: 10/23/17 10:16 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA November Field Trip
Saturday, November 18 is the date of the field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  Please see details below.  Join us and have the opportunity to meet birders from other parts of the state and get in some good birding.  This field trip is also part of the fall conference of the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) and is a joint excursion for both ASCA and AAS members.  For more information about the AAS fall conference go to the AAS website at  www.arbirds.org.   You don't have to be a member of ASCA or AAS to participate in the field trip or the conference.
If you have any questions, please fee free to contact me off-list.
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorAAS Past PresidentLittle Rock
 November 18DeGray Lake Resort StatePark—ArkadelphiaMeet at 7:30 a.m. in thecommuter lot at I-430/I-630 off Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll arrive around 8:45 a.m. at the park’sLodge for anyone who would like to meet us there.  Our target birds will be eagles, loons,ducks, mergansers, grebes, gulls, and nuthatches. Dress warm, the lake can be windy and cold.  Hats and gloves are recommended.  Bring scope, water, and snacks.  You can bring lunch or eat in the Lodge’srestaurant.  The annual fallconference of the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) is being held at Ferncliff inWest Little Rock Nov. 17-19.  This tripis included as one of the Saturday conference field trips, so it is a joint ASCA/AAStrip.   Addressfor the park is:  2027 State ParkEntrance Road - Bismarck, Arkansas 71929. GPS coordinates are 34.24562, -93.14840. Go to www.degray.com for more information about the park.

 

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Date: 10/23/17 10:04 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous
Thanks for your efforts to retain snags and reduce salvage cutting. I look forward to you sharing the research results when you get it.

Jerry

From: Reames, Clark -FS
Sent: Monday, October 23, 2017 11:57 AM
To: <jwdavis...> ; <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Snags can be dangerous

Snag retention has long been a priority on this forest since before I got here (2011). We have done little to no salvage of burned timber with the exception of road side hazard trees. I believe with the annual fires that we have been having of late that we are on an increasing trend for snags here on the Malheur. With the commercial interest (and pressure) in post burn timber salvage, we have a 5 year research project going on with the Rocky Mtn Research Station to look at effects of different levels of timber salvage on 3 species (White headed woodpecker, Lewis’s woodpecker, and black backed woodpecker). We will be starting the 3rd year of data collection next season and we have control plots along with some salvage plots for comparison. It is pretty interesting to see how these different species respond after a fire and how they quickly take advantage of the nesting and feeding opportunities post burn..




Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service

Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
<creames...>

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us


Caring for the land and serving people









From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2017 8:51 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous



Thanks for sharing your note and you are right peoples first response to a snag is cut it down. When I arrived on the Kaibab National Forest in Arizona it was a policy throughout the west to cut all snags because they were perceived as lightning rods and started forest fires. It was required in timber sale contracts that the contractor cut all snags and for the most part they were 300 year old ponderosa pines that had 3 centuries in developing into snags. We had 64 wildlife species dependent upon snags and needed a minimum of 3 snags per acre and there were less than that on a section of land. Research had shown that more fires were caused by lightning strikes on live trees than dead. I started the process to retain snags but some of the public would ask why we kept dead trees in the Forest. Today the Forest management is more aware of the value of snag retention but education is a continuous process. Old Growth Research natural areas have 17 snags per acre but today’s forest on shorter harvest rotations do not permit many trees to get old enough and large enough to produce snags.



Snags in Oregon for example are considered a safety hazard to the Forest Product industry and they have them cut. Snag habitat is a continuous education process. We will never have enough snags to meet wildlife needs and people can help by keeping what snags they have and supplementing with nest boxes. Snags can also be creating by girdling live trees in place. Another technique is to use a chainsaw on a standing snag to cut out a section of wood and put a wooden faceplate over the cutout with the diameter hole for the target species.



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR



From: Harriet Hillis Jansma

Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2017 5:36 AM

To: <ARBIRD-L...> ; <jwdavis...>

Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous



A truism, and likely the truth, is that the only species that doesn't like a dead tree is Homo sapiens. Dead tree trunks can at times be propped against other trees, or wired so that when they fall, they don't damage anything.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 9:18:47 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous



That can help and even topping them by cutting the tops out at 20 feet or so leaves a lot of opportunities.



jerry



From: Elizabeth Shores

Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 8:54 PM

To: <ARBIRD-L...>

Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous



For safe snags, we have the limbs removed and leave the trunks.

Sent from my iPhone


On Oct 20, 2017, at 8:38 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

All snags are not created equal. Our place has old-growth, 100ft+ trees and when they die they become dangerous for many years. I keep an eye on them—and other widow-makers—and don’t venture underneath especially when we have winds.



Don’t get me wrong, I retain snags for birds and other wildlife, but I have respect for what can happen to my head, other people, and my pets when snags de-branch or fall on their own.

True, most of my near-misses have come from living trees, but I keep a close watch on the stability of snags around the operational areas in the yard.

When snags become unstable, I bring them down for the beetles.



Take care, and check 12 o’clock high,



Jeff Short

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Michael Linz
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 1:13 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Woodpeckers - The Right Tree Can be hard to find.



I leave all of the dead trees in my yard, including an 80+ ft oak that died a couple of years ago. I see Mississippi Kites there during the summer. Today I have seen Red-bellied, Downy, and Pileated Woodpeckers, as well as Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers and Norther Flickers in that tree. There were also Eastern Bluebirds going in and out of some holes in the tree.



So dead trees can be a good thing.



Michael Linz(Conway, AR for a week or two)





On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 1:06 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Thanks for sharing this, Jerry. After the ice storm and droughts many trees here died, but we left the the snags and they have provided wonderful habitat for all the life you mention.



Judith

Ninestone



On Oct 20, 2017, at 12:56 PM, Jerry Davis

<jwdavis...> wrote:



Also along another study if you want to increase bird diversity in your yard, provide snags to be used by woodpeckers and other cavity dependent species. Eighty five species of birds and 49 species of mammals put hundreds of reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates need cavities that snag can provide.





http://wildlife.org/for-woodpeckers-the-right-tree-can-be-hard-to-find/



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs









This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.
 

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Date: 10/23/17 10:01 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
I appreciate your efforts and sometimes all we can do is make a difference in what we have control over. The problem is created one person at a time and will have to be corrected that way. If a person is not doing their part the job is not getting done. We have control over our plants on our property, the stopping of pesticide use and not having GMO and non-native plants. You are right about the population situation. We have now eliminated 52% of the world species and are losing one species of life on Earth every 6 minutes. We have also destroyed 60% of our ecological support systems. What is most tragic is the indifference by those that are suppose to care and know better.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Donald C. Steinkraus
Sent: Monday, October 23, 2017 11:16 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing

Small steps are all most of us can make. I have been trying to educate people about the dangers of exotic invasive plants, and their effect on insect populations, and thus bird populations, for years. I have a small farm and I have been removing invasive plants to the best of my ability and planting as many different kinds of native trees, shrubs, wildflowers, as I can. I try to rescue turtles from the road. I put up bird boxes.



The tragedy is there are too many humans on the planet and there is little we can do about this. It seemed like most of my generation in the U.S. did limit family size to 2-3 children, and that is true in Japan, Italy, France, and other countries, but vast areas of the world are still increasing population rapidly.



So . . I try to plant and disperse native plants as much as I can.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Sent: Thursday, October 19, 2017 9:58:40 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing

That's a good challenge. With other environmental topics, I see so many people get all fired up in word and word alone. People get angry about pollution. They "report" trash here and there yet, do nothing. Many people sit back and wait on the government to change things. We can be proactive in that area but what about in our daily lives?
It's a challenge for me and one I've often been tempted to put out there for others. How can people talk about pollution and still drive all over the state(and country) just to look at birds? I know it's not that simple and that's probably hitting below the belt for some but it's something we can all think about, in my opinion.
What can we do? Both in actions to shape the world around us and in our own little worlds as well.
We don't use pesticides and the like here... nothing. And we have power lines that go across our property that we have to occasionally remind Carrol Electric not to spray herbicides under. They're good about not doing that as long as you fill out a form every so often.
I can assure you... there's no shortage of bugs in my yard... I think our 5 acres could completely support all tick research (if anyone is doing that) in the state... and possible beyond. HA.
Our landscaping methods(ha) have been what would probably come across as laziness. Let things grow til they're in the way... then clear what "needs" to be. The bugs and birds LOVE it. I'm not fond of the ticks and chiggers(blech) but it is a joy to see the wildlife in the yard. We're going to do a little more actual landscaping in the near future including a butterfly garden my oldest child wants right outside her window. I may be messaging you outside the group about the nursery as I've wanted to check it out for quite a few years. Some day. It's a bit of a drive from Siloam. Time to start making plans. :)

How do we reach the masses with the message of how important things like bugs can be? Not an easy question with an easy solution. Sometimes I think it's a one person at a time thing... and perhaps, one of these individuals will find a way to bridge that gap effectively. I think too often, people that are passionate about a cause come across as angry and bitter and in that, reach no one.
This has me thinking about Steve Irwin of all people. I miss that guy. Many people thought he was nuts for what he did but the absolute passion he had for nature was contagious and inspiring.. We need more of that.
Sorry for the rambling. There's a fascinating world out there that so many are blind to. I think for many people, the only way to "educate" them to the situation we're in is to open their eyes to the wonders that we all see. We need to simply create more nature lovers.

Daniel Mason
On 10/19/2017 7:06 PM, Mary Ann King wrote:

All comments I certainly understand. But are we just going to talk about it? We need to step out of our cozy little boxes and try to start doing something about it. Im beginning to see younger people coming to the nursery In fact, a few weeks back, a young man (13 I think) who had been to the Audubon Camp, came to buy native plants. He had worked at some jobs to earn the money to buy them. J



Many of the schools are putting in Butterfly and pollinator gardens. WE need to support these actions perhaps volunteer to help keep them weeded or maybe watered in the summertime. How are people going to learn if they are not taught?



I certainly dont have the answers, but neither do I wish to stand by and do nothing.



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London.



.




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Date: 10/23/17 9:57 am
From: Reames, Clark -FS <creames...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous
Snag retention has long been a priority on this forest since before I got here (2011). We have done little to no salvage of burned timber with the exception of road side hazard trees. I believe with the annual fires that we have been having of late that we are on an increasing trend for snags here on the Malheur. With the commercial interest (and pressure) in post burn timber salvage, we have a 5 year research project going on with the Rocky Mtn Research Station to look at effects of different levels of timber salvage on 3 species (White headed woodpecker, Lewis's woodpecker, and black backed woodpecker). We will be starting the 3rd year of data collection next season and we have control plots along with some salvage plots for comparison. It is pretty interesting to see how these different species respond after a fire and how they quickly take advantage of the nesting and feeding opportunities post burn..

[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
<creames...><mailto:<creames...>

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us<http://www.fs.fed.us>
[USDA Logo]<http://usda.gov/>[Forest Service Twitter]<https://twitter.com/forestservice>[USDA Facebook]<https://www.facebook.com/pages/US-Forest-Service/1431984283714112>

Caring for the land and serving people






From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2017 8:51 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous

Thanks for sharing your note and you are right peoples first response to a snag is cut it down. When I arrived on the Kaibab National Forest in Arizona it was a policy throughout the west to cut all snags because they were perceived as lightning rods and started forest fires. It was required in timber sale contracts that the contractor cut all snags and for the most part they were 300 year old ponderosa pines that had 3 centuries in developing into snags. We had 64 wildlife species dependent upon snags and needed a minimum of 3 snags per acre and there were less than that on a section of land. Research had shown that more fires were caused by lightning strikes on live trees than dead. I started the process to retain snags but some of the public would ask why we kept dead trees in the Forest. Today the Forest management is more aware of the value of snag retention but education is a continuous process. Old Growth Research natural areas have 17 snags per acre but today's forest on shorter harvest rotations do not permit many trees to get old enough and large enough to produce snags.

Snags in Oregon for example are considered a safety hazard to the Forest Product industry and they have them cut. Snag habitat is a continuous education process. We will never have enough snags to meet wildlife needs and people can help by keeping what snags they have and supplementing with nest boxes. Snags can also be creating by girdling live trees in place. Another technique is to use a chainsaw on a standing snag to cut out a section of wood and put a wooden faceplate over the cutout with the diameter hole for the target species.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Harriet Hillis Jansma
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2017 5:36 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> ; <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous


A truism, and likely the truth, is that the only species that doesn't like a dead tree is Homo sapiens. Dead tree trunks can at times be propped against other trees, or wired so that when they fall, they don't damage anything.

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>>
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 9:18:47 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous

That can help and even topping them by cutting the tops out at 20 feet or so leaves a lot of opportunities.

jerry

From: Elizabeth Shores
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 8:54 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous

For safe snags, we have the limbs removed and leave the trunks.

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 20, 2017, at 8:38 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...><mailto:<bashman...>> wrote:
All snags are not created equal. Our place has old-growth, 100ft+ trees and when they die they become dangerous for many years. I keep an eye on them-and other widow-makers-and don't venture underneath especially when we have winds.

Don't get me wrong, I retain snags for birds and other wildlife, but I have respect for what can happen to my head, other people, and my pets when snags de-branch or fall on their own.
True, most of my near-misses have come from living trees, but I keep a close watch on the stability of snags around the operational areas in the yard.
When snags become unstable, I bring them down for the beetles.

Take care, and check 12 o'clock high,

Jeff Short
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Michael Linz
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 1:13 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Woodpeckers - The Right Tree Can be hard to find.

I leave all of the dead trees in my yard, including an 80+ ft oak that died a couple of years ago. I see Mississippi Kites there during the summer. Today I have seen Red-bellied, Downy, and Pileated Woodpeckers, as well as Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers and Norther Flickers in that tree. There were also Eastern Bluebirds going in and out of some holes in the tree.

So dead trees can be a good thing.

Michael Linz(Conway, AR for a week or two)


On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 1:06 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...><mailto:<9waterfall9...>> wrote:
Thanks for sharing this, Jerry. After the ice storm and droughts many trees here died, but we left the the snags and they have provided wonderful habitat for all the life you mention.

Judith
Ninestone

On Oct 20, 2017, at 12:56 PM, Jerry Davis
<jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:

Also along another study if you want to increase bird diversity in your yard, provide snags to be used by woodpeckers and other cavity dependent species. Eighty five species of birds and 49 species of mammals put hundreds of reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates need cavities that snag can provide.


http://wildlife.org/for-woodpeckers-the-right-tree-can-be-hard-to-find/

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs






This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 10/23/17 9:50 am
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: Re: Ring Necked Pheasant - again
There are at least a dozen places in Arkansas where you can pay to "hunt" released pheasants...

The AGFC attempted to introduce pheasants several times within the last 100 years... the last attempt in the early 1980s in Arkansas County... I was told that the summers are too hot for pheasants... they failed to reproduce....

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...>
********************************

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman
Sent: Sunday, October 22, 2017 10:47 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Ring Necked Pheasant - again

Back in around 2005 I spotted a Ring Necked Pheasant in our pasture just south of Cleveland in north Conway Co.  Impressive, and I have no idea where it came from (we're a couple miles from pavement and none of the deer camp denizens mess with game-birds).  But I was the only one to see it so...there it is.

Today, however, my daughter was with me when we spotted a Ring Necked Pheasant on Hwy 95 where it crosses Point Remove Creek just south of Pigeon Roost Mtn (locals call it Possum Trot - seriously).  This is about 7 miles north of Morrilton.

The bird in question was on the shoulder near the bridge and the time was 10:05am.  We decided to turn around and see if we could get a photo
- sure enough, the bird was still there.  I just about had my phone ready to take a photo when oncoming traffic (and probably me being parked about 30ft away) spooked it.  It flew across the highway in front of us, down the embankment and into thick cover in a fence-row.

A notable field mark was that it lacked the long, elegant tail feathers of the adult male, although it still had the distinctive dark green crested head and white neck ring.  My initial thought was that this was a young bird, perhaps first year - but if they don't breed in Arkansas, is that even possible?

Either way, we were pretty excited to spot this thing.  I'm not sure where it could have come from - if it was a released or lost captive, he was still a long way from anyone who would have an interest in such a bird.

George (n. Conway Co. pondering pheasants)
 

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Date: 10/23/17 9:16 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing
Small steps are all most of us can make. I have been trying to educate people about the dangers of exotic invasive plants, and their effect on insect populations, and thus bird populations, for years. I have a small farm and I have been removing invasive plants to the best of my ability and planting as many different kinds of native trees, shrubs, wildflowers, as I can. I try to rescue turtles from the road. I put up bird boxes.


The tragedy is there are too many humans on the planet and there is little we can do about this. It seemed like most of my generation in the U.S. did limit family size to 2-3 children, and that is true in Japan, Italy, France, and other countries, but vast areas of the world are still increasing population rapidly.


So . . I try to plant and disperse native plants as much as I can.

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Sent: Thursday, October 19, 2017 9:58:40 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Flying insect populations decreasing

That's a good challenge. With other environmental topics, I see so many people get all fired up in word and word alone. People get angry about pollution. They "report" trash here and there yet, do nothing. Many people sit back and wait on the government to change things. We can be proactive in that area but what about in our daily lives?
It's a challenge for me and one I've often been tempted to put out there for others. How can people talk about pollution and still drive all over the state(and country) just to look at birds? I know it's not that simple and that's probably hitting below the belt for some but it's something we can all think about, in my opinion.
What can we do? Both in actions to shape the world around us and in our own little worlds as well.
We don't use pesticides and the like here... nothing. And we have power lines that go across our property that we have to occasionally remind Carrol Electric not to spray herbicides under. They're good about not doing that as long as you fill out a form every so often.
I can assure you... there's no shortage of bugs in my yard... I think our 5 acres could completely support all tick research (if anyone is doing that) in the state... and possible beyond. HA.
Our landscaping methods(ha) have been what would probably come across as laziness. Let things grow til they're in the way... then clear what "needs" to be. The bugs and birds LOVE it. I'm not fond of the ticks and chiggers(blech) but it is a joy to see the wildlife in the yard. We're going to do a little more actual landscaping in the near future including a butterfly garden my oldest child wants right outside her window. I may be messaging you outside the group about the nursery as I've wanted to check it out for quite a few years. Some day. It's a bit of a drive from Siloam. Time to start making plans. :)

How do we reach the masses with the message of how important things like bugs can be? Not an easy question with an easy solution. Sometimes I think it's a one person at a time thing... and perhaps, one of these individuals will find a way to bridge that gap effectively. I think too often, people that are passionate about a cause come across as angry and bitter and in that, reach no one.
This has me thinking about Steve Irwin of all people. I miss that guy. Many people thought he was nuts for what he did but the absolute passion he had for nature was contagious and inspiring.. We need more of that.
Sorry for the rambling. There's a fascinating world out there that so many are blind to. I think for many people, the only way to "educate" them to the situation we're in is to open their eyes to the wonders that we all see. We need to simply create more nature lovers.

Daniel Mason
On 10/19/2017 7:06 PM, Mary Ann King wrote:
All comments I certainly understand. But are we just going to talk about it? We need to step out of our cozy little boxes and try to start doing something about it. Im beginning to see younger people coming to the nursery In fact, a few weeks back, a young man (13 I think) who had been to the Audubon Camp, came to buy native plants. He had worked at some jobs to earn the money to buy them. :)

Many of the schools are putting in Butterfly and pollinator gardens. WE need to support these actions perhaps volunteer to help keep them weeded or maybe watered in the summertime. How are people going to learn if they are not taught?

I certainly dont have the answers, but neither do I wish to stand by and do nothing.

MaryAnn King
In the pine woods northwest of London.

.


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Date: 10/23/17 6:18 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: CAN’T BEAT A BIRD WITH BLUE LEGS
The cold front swept in with thunder, lightning, heavy clouds, and rain that hung around all of yesterday morning as occasional mist. A pond had been partially drained at Craig State Fish Hatchery and on the margins: Killdeer, Greater Yellowlegs (3), Western Sandpiper (1), Least Sandpiper (7), Long-billed Dowitcher (10-12), and Wilsons Snipe (8).

The Western Sandpiper was not a Semipalmated Sandpiper for the following reasons: bill longish and slightly drooped, the breast white. Dowitchers identified by keek calls as they flew.

A wet but still inspiring Bald Eagle perched on one of the tall metal powerpoles. It obviously wasnt a full adult, what with a few dark feathers in its head and some white feathers poking through dark in its breast. At home, with a photo, I decided it was a 4th year bird, so it is a different eagle than the adults we have been seeing on previous trips.

After all the birds suddenly flew off, we drove Holloway Road, immediately south of the hatchery. A male Blue-winged Teal (non-breeding plumage) was well-hidden in smartweeds. A few White-crowned Sparrows were foraging along the road. Even on a cool misty fall morning, they couldnt resist a chorus, their voices our true wealth. Then I heard another chorus and it was like Earth's stock market had gained 1000 points! Can't beat an investment like that ... or so I thought ...

A weed patch was improved by a flock of 6-8 Savannah Sparrows. Hard to beat that.

Back on October 9, two American Avocets were working a prairie pond along Digby Road at Highfill. One was still there yesterday. Even on a heavily-overcast day, the avocets striking blue legs were remarkable. So how can you possibly beat a bird with blue legs?



 

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Date: 10/22/17 10:04 pm
From: Leah M Wilcox <leahwcx...>
Subject: (no subject)
"signoff ARBIRD-L"
 

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Date: 10/22/17 8:57 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Birds might be evolving to eat from bird feeders, study says
Dear ARBIRDers,

My brother sent this Washington Post article titled "Birds might be evolving to eat from bird feeders, study says:

http://tinyurl.com/yculkywr

It's an interesting read.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
 

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Date: 10/22/17 8:49 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous
Interesting topic and one I've wondered about frequently.  Snags near
the house make me nervous for obvious reasons (mostly they're pines). 
But if they aren't in range of anything important, I leave them.

George (n. Conway Co. snaggy here and there)


On 10/20/2017 8:38 PM, Jeffrey Short wrote:
>
> All snags are not created equal.  Our place has old-growth, 100ft+
> trees and when they die they become dangerous for many years.  I keep
> an eye on them—and other widow-makers—and don’t venture underneath
> especially when we have winds.
>
> Don’t get me wrong, I retain snags for birds and other wildlife, but I
> have respect for what can happen to my head, other people, and my pets
> when snags de-branch or fall on their own.
>
> True, most of my near-misses have come from living trees, but I keep a
> close watch on the stability of snags around the operational areas in
> the yard.
>
> When snags become unstable, I bring them down for the beetles.
>
> Take care, and check 12 o’clock high,
>
> Jeff Short
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Michael Linz
> *Sent:* Friday, October 20, 2017 1:13 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Woodpeckers - The Right Tree Can be hard to find.
>
> I leave all of the dead trees in my yard, including an 80+ ft oak that
> died a couple of years ago.  I see Mississippi Kites there during the
> summer.  Today I have seen Red-bellied, Downy, and Pileated
> Woodpeckers, as well as Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers and Norther Flickers
> in that tree.  There were also Eastern Bluebirds going in and out of
> some holes in the tree.
>
> So dead trees can be a good thing.
>
> Michael Linz(Conway, AR for a week or two)
>
> On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 1:06 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
> <mailto:<9waterfall9...>> wrote:
>
> Thanks for sharing this, Jerry. After the ice storm and droughts many
> trees here died, but we left the the snags and they have provided
> wonderful habitat for all the life you mention.
>
> Judith
>
> Ninestone
>
> On Oct 20, 2017, at 12:56 PM, Jerry Davis
>
>  <jwdavis...> <mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:
>
>
>
> Also along another study if you want to increase bird diversity in
> your yard, provide snags to be used by woodpeckers and other cavity
> dependent species. Eighty five species of birds and 49 species of
> mammals put hundreds of reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates need
> cavities that snag can provide.
>
> http://wildlife.org/for-woodpeckers-the-right-tree-can-be-hard-to-find/
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
>
> Hot Springs
>


 

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Date: 10/22/17 8:47 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Ring Necked Pheasant - again
Back in around 2005 I spotted a Ring Necked Pheasant in our pasture just
south of Cleveland in north Conway Co.  Impressive, and I have no idea
where it came from (we're a couple miles from pavement and none of the
deer camp denizens mess with game-birds).  But I was the only one to see
it so...there it is.

Today, however, my daughter was with me when we spotted a Ring Necked
Pheasant on Hwy 95 where it crosses Point Remove Creek just south of
Pigeon Roost Mtn (locals call it Possum Trot - seriously).  This is
about 7 miles north of Morrilton.

The bird in question was on the shoulder near the bridge and the time
was 10:05am.  We decided to turn around and see if we could get a photo
- sure enough, the bird was still there.  I just about had my phone
ready to take a photo when oncoming traffic (and probably me being
parked about 30ft away) spooked it.  It flew across the highway in front
of us, down the embankment and into thick cover in a fence-row.

A notable field mark was that it lacked the long, elegant tail feathers
of the adult male, although it still had the distinctive dark green
crested head and white neck ring.  My initial thought was that this was
a young bird, perhaps first year - but if they don't breed in Arkansas,
is that even possible?

Either way, we were pretty excited to spot this thing.  I'm not sure
where it could have come from - if it was a released or lost captive, he
was still a long way from anyone who would have an interest in such a bird.

George (n. Conway Co. pondering pheasants)
 

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Date: 10/22/17 2:48 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Birds
3 Scissortails off I40 in Conway. 7 Pelicans on Lake Conway. No...I'm not
texting and driving.

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 10/22/17 1:14 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - migrants
The trails around Lake Fayetteville environmental center were very good for migrants this morning. A large mixed flock of warblers and kinglets was moving through the trees behind the center. Yellow-rumped Warbler was the most numerous species.

Some waterfowl were present on the lake. An adult Bald Eagle tried unsuccessfully to catch an American Coot. 56 species observed in total.

Waterfowl- Greater Whitefront (45 flew south over the lake), Northern Shoveler (6), Gadwall (10), American Wigeon (2), Mallard (3), Pied-billed Grebe (4), Horned Grebe (1), Double-crested Cormorant (3), American Coot (9)

Warblers - Orange-crowned (5), Nashville (2), Palm (1), Pine (2), Yellow-rumped (40), Black-throated Green (2)

Sparrows - Chipping (2), Fox (1), Dark-eyed Junco (4), White-crowned (2), White-throated (15)

Miscellaneous -Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (2), Northern Flicker (3), Eastern Phoebe (1), Blue-headed Vireo (1), Tree Swallow (1), Red-breasted Nuthatch (1), Winter Wren (1), Golden-crowned Kinglet (10), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (15), Hermit Thrush (2), Cedar Waxwing (2), Purple Finch (1), Pine Siskin (2).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 10/22/17 8:48 am
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: Re: Arkansas Audubon Society Fall Meeting
Thank you, Lyndal, for posting this.

I just want to tel people that the Early Bird registration deadline is October 27th. If you would like more information, feel free to contact me.

Robin Buff
VP - AAS
479-466-5600

> On Oct 3, 2017, at 3:47 PM, Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> wrote:
>
> Arbirders,
>
> Information on the fall meeting of the AAS is available for download from the AAS website (arbirds.org <http://arbirds.org/>) or http://www.arbirds.org/2017 <http://www.arbirds.org/2017> Fall Meeting.pdf . The meeting is at the Ferncliff Conference Center in Ferndale, AR, Nov. 17-19, 2017.
>
> Lyndal York
> Webmaster, AAS


 

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Date: 10/22/17 8:30 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Fw: NYTimes.com: Birds Beware: The Praying Mantis Wants Your Brain
At first I asked the Times web site to forward this link directly to the entire ARbird list. I haven't received it and suspect that either the Times won't forward to a listserv or the listserv won't accept such sendings.


However, if you received this that way, I apologize that this MAY be a duplicate. I thought it was worth sending this way to be sure you receive it.


This article reports some surprising behavior of mantises: eating hummingbird brains, and preying on them at hummingbird feeders. They turn nature backward: going up the food chain.


Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville


________________________________
From: <emailthis...> <emailthis...> on behalf of hjansma <emailthis...>
Sent: Sunday, October 22, 2017 9:32 AM
To: Harriet Hillis Jansma
Subject: NYTimes.com: Birds Beware: The Praying Mantis Wants Your Brain



Sent by <hjansma...>: [http://i1.nyt.com/images/misc/nytlogo194x27.gif]
[https://static01.nyt.com/images/2017/09/23/science/26SCI-MANTIS-promo/26SCI-MANTIS-promo-thumbStandard.jpg]
Basics
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By NATALIE ANGIER

Scientists have developed a healthy respect for mantises, acrobatic hunters with 3-D vision and voracious appetites.



Or, copy and paste this URL into your browser: https://nyti.ms/2yhCPXA <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__p.nytimes.com_email_re-3Flocation-3DpMJKdIFVI6og8d-2BofNlzG3fL8MiQzVx_-26user-5Fid-3D2e7a96d3fb60e5f01e2ebef6b3cab7d0-26email-5Ftype-3Deta-26task-5Fid-3D1508682741575107-26regi-5Fid-3D0&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=qtNC1GTeZF9Hw7tX50Nwiw&m=iqXaOBAp_ZJ0_TK1DZbHklTsUfbZUZ053s48KbO6I5U&s=qFuWyeIGFrRlYESflH6ZFvZoEDdwdFDYQC1FCe8oTKs&e=>



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Date: 10/22/17 8:10 am
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy...>
Subject: Flying above stadium
Question for anyone that was at the razorback game yesterday. What was flying over the west side of the stadium?
Nancy

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 10/21/17 6:03 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Flycatchers & ducks
Bill B & I stopped at Joe Hogan Fish Hatchery on our way into town. Notable birds: 19 Scissor-tailed Flycatchers diving off power lines to catch their dinner & 2 adult Black-bellied Whistling Ducks shepherding 10 almost grown ducklings along the levees near the main road.

Cindy F
Little Rock


 

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Date: 10/21/17 5:55 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: RTHU
Got home tonight. Saw hummer at feeder a few minutes later.
Cindy
Little Rock


 

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Date: 10/21/17 3:57 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Birdy day including Hummingbird and Orange-crowned Warbler
First thing this morning (as mentioned) the female Ruby-throated Hummingbird came to the feeder again. Or, as Bill Shepherd suggested, was it possibly a Black-chinned? This is the third day in a row for likely the same bird who also drinks from zinnia, sage, and lantana flowers, so has not kept regular hours at the feeder.

Close to the house the Red-headed Woodpecker family was making an animated ruckus at their nest cavity high up in a pine snag after having been gone for almost a month. I guess they came back to see if there were any acorns yet, but sadly no, not this year. Trees were full of noisy Pileated, Red-bellied, Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers, and Northern Flickers (all yellow-shafted) were everywhere in fields and in trees. Flocks of Pine Siskins once again filled the Shortleaf Pines, feasting on seeds tucked in the cones. Numerous unidentified Sparrows flew up and then disappeared into the tall grasses as I walked by.

On this breezy and dry pre-rain afternoon, the birdbath drew the regular Cardinals, Titmice, Chickadees, and Carolina Wrens, and a mixed flock of Yellow-rumped Warblers, a Golden-crowned Kinglet fully displaying that stunningly brilliant crown, a curious Ruby-crowned Kinglet exploring the edges, and one Orange-crowned Warbler. At first I wondered if the Orange-crowned might be a Pine Warbler as it continued to hide, appear, and hide again in a Fothergilla shrub until it built up the courage to compete with the butter-butts. Fortunately Sibley and Peterson assisted me with the split eye-ring, olive/citron coloring stronger under the tail and on the rump, no wing-bars, and once all wet and aflutter, the rusty orange crown was visible!

Seems the flocks have moved on ahead of the rain, but the Pileated Woodpeckers are still laughing out there.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 10/21/17 2:10 pm
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: Re: Woodpeckers - The Right Tree Can be hard to find.
We also have numerous snags and see several species of woodpeckers,
including Pileated. We had a mama Wood Duck bring her nestlings to our pond
for their first swim. I presume they nested in a snag nearby as they
haven't bothered with any of our man made boxes. I keep hoping to have a
pair make our pond (or nearby area) their permanent home.



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 1:21 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Woodpeckers - The Right Tree Can be hard to find.



Thanks for sharing. We had wood ducks use a red-cockaded woodpecker hole
that had been enlarged by Pileated woodpeckers. For cavity nesters there is
always a housing shortage.



Jerry



From: Janine Perlman

Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 1:16 PM

To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>

Subject: Re: Woodpeckers - The Right Tree Can be hard to find.



Thanks to snags, we reliably have Pileated Woodpeckers here; they breed and
roost in favorite dead trees year after year. And Wood Ducks appear to use
some of their old nest holes.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

On 10/20/2017 1:06 PM, Judy & Don wrote:

Thanks for sharing this, Jerry. After the ice storm and droughts many trees
here died, but we left the the snags and they have provided wonderful
habitat for all the life you mention.



Judith

Ninestone



On Oct 20, 2017, at 12:56 PM, Jerry Davis

<jwdavis...> <mailto:<jwdavis...> > wrote:





Also along another study if you want to increase bird diversity in your
yard, provide snags to be used by woodpeckers and other cavity dependent
species. Eighty five species of birds and 49 species of mammals put hundreds
of reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates need cavities that snag can
provide.





http://wildlife.org/for-woodpeckers-the-right-tree-can-be-hard-to-find/



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs






 

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Date: 10/21/17 1:11 pm
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Re: another Ruby-throat
Beware, Suzy. After a certain (unknown) fall date, a female/immature Archilochus hummingbird in Arkansas is more likely to be a Black-chinned than a Ruby-throated. And the two species (aside from adult males) are very difficult to tell apart.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...>
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2017 12:06 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: another Ruby-throat

Interesting article in Nov/Dec BirdWatchers Digest about increase in wintering hummingbirds. Mentions Bob Sargent s work.

Suzie Liles

> On Oct 21, 2017, at 10:19 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
> Envious here!
>
> One year when there were a fair number of RTHU sightings well into October, I asked Bob Sargent about his fall dates. He said probably after Nov. 1 is a better bet for unusual species.
>
> With a warming climate on top of who knows what other variables, the date may keep moving back...
>
> Janine
>
>> On 10/20/2017 9:46 PM, Judy & Don wrote:
>> She visited the feeder at about 6pm this evening.
>>
>> Judith
>> Ninestone, Carroll County
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/17 11:02 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: another Ruby-throat
She was back at the feeder again this morning around 7am. I've been busy gathering and planting native seeds since then so haven't had much time to watch for her. The other day I saw her nectaring on zinnias, sage, tithonia and lantana so she may still be using those and isn't very regular at the feeder.

I have observed fairly closely to determine if this could be a different species, but she is all iridescent green on the back and tail, and all white on the throat and belly with no buffy or rufous coloration, and the tail has the shape and white spots of a female Ruby-throated.
The other possibility could be Anna's but the bird I've seen has a contrasting dark mask around her eye and no white stripe above the eye.
The other-other possibility could be Black-chinned but I did not notice any tail pumping.

Am I looking for all the right field marks?

Thanks for the suggestion, Terry. I hope to see her again and be ever vigilant in my observations. DisclaimerI don't see as well as I used to see.
Judith

On Oct 21, 2017, at 12:35 PM, twbutler1941 <twbutler1941...> wrote:

> I would look closely for a female Rufous. They fill up each night just before nightfall as well as thirty minute intervals throughout the day.
>
> Terry Butler
>
>
>
> Sent from my Galaxy Tab S2
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
> Date: 10/20/17 9:46 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: another Ruby-throat
>
> She visited the feeder at about 6pm this evening.
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll Country


 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/17 10:40 am
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Dark ibis sp./Sora - Woolsey Wet Prairie
I had 2 dark ibis sp. flying over Woolsey Wet Prairie at 11 this morning. They came in from the north and continued south over the
wastewater plant.

A Sora was heard briefly near the small pond northwest of the parking area. I was unable to locate the bird.

9 sparrow species present today, including 1 LeConte's and 1 Vesper. Other migrants included Gadwall (2 at the pond across the road),
Eastern Phoebe (3), Sedge Wren (2), Common Yellowthroat (3) and Yellow-rumped Warbler (1).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/17 10:06 am
From: Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...>
Subject: Re: another Ruby-throat
Interesting article in Nov/Dec BirdWatchers Digest about increase in wintering hummingbirds. Mentions Bob Sargent ‘s work.

Suzie Liles

> On Oct 21, 2017, at 10:19 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
> Envious here!
>
> One year when there were a fair number of RTHU sightings well into October, I asked Bob Sargent about his fall dates. He said probably after Nov. 1 is a better bet for unusual species.
>
> With a warming climate on top of who knows what other variables, the date may keep moving back...
>
> Janine
>
>> On 10/20/2017 9:46 PM, Judy & Don wrote:
>> She visited the feeder at about 6pm this evening.
>>
>> Judith
>> Ninestone, Carroll County
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/17 8:51 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous
Thanks for sharing your note and you are right peoples first response to a snag is cut it down. When I arrived on the Kaibab National Forest in Arizona it was a policy throughout the west to cut all snags because they were perceived as lightning rods and started forest fires. It was required in timber sale contracts that the contractor cut all snags and for the most part they were 300 year old ponderosa pines that had 3 centuries in developing into snags. We had 64 wildlife species dependent upon snags and needed a minimum of 3 snags per acre and there were less than that on a section of land. Research had shown that more fires were caused by lightning strikes on live trees than dead. I started the process to retain snags but some of the public would ask why we kept dead trees in the Forest. Today the Forest management is more aware of the value of snag retention but education is a continuous process. Old Growth Research natural areas have 17 snags per acre but todays forest on shorter harvest rotations do not permit many trees to get old enough and large enough to produce snags.

Snags in Oregon for example are considered a safety hazard to the Forest Product industry and they have them cut. Snag habitat is a continuous education process. We will never have enough snags to meet wildlife needs and people can help by keeping what snags they have and supplementing with nest boxes. Snags can also be creating by girdling live trees in place. Another technique is to use a chainsaw on a standing snag to cut out a section of wood and put a wooden faceplate over the cutout with the diameter hole for the target species.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Harriet Hillis Jansma
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2017 5:36 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> ; <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous

A truism, and likely the truth, is that the only species that doesn't like a dead tree is Homo sapiens. Dead tree trunks can at times be propped against other trees, or wired so that when they fall, they don't damage anything.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 9:18:47 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous

That can help and even topping them by cutting the tops out at 20 feet or so leaves a lot of opportunities.

jerry

From: Elizabeth Shores
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 8:54 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous

For safe snags, we have the limbs removed and leave the trunks.

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 20, 2017, at 8:38 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:


All snags are not created equal. Our place has old-growth, 100ft+ trees and when they die they become dangerous for many years. I keep an eye on themand other widow-makersand dont venture underneath especially when we have winds.



Dont get me wrong, I retain snags for birds and other wildlife, but I have respect for what can happen to my head, other people, and my pets when snags de-branch or fall on their own.

True, most of my near-misses have come from living trees, but I keep a close watch on the stability of snags around the operational areas in the yard.

When snags become unstable, I bring them down for the beetles.



Take care, and check 12 oclock high,



Jeff Short

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Michael Linz
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 1:13 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Woodpeckers - The Right Tree Can be hard to find.



I leave all of the dead trees in my yard, including an 80+ ft oak that died a couple of years ago. I see Mississippi Kites there during the summer. Today I have seen Red-bellied, Downy, and Pileated Woodpeckers, as well as Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers and Norther Flickers in that tree. There were also Eastern Bluebirds going in and out of some holes in the tree.



So dead trees can be a good thing.



Michael Linz(Conway, AR for a week or two)





On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 1:06 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Thanks for sharing this, Jerry. After the ice storm and droughts many trees here died, but we left the the snags and they have provided wonderful habitat for all the life you mention.



Judith

Ninestone



On Oct 20, 2017, at 12:56 PM, Jerry Davis

<jwdavis...> wrote:





Also along another study if you want to increase bird diversity in your yard, provide snags to be used by woodpeckers and other cavity dependent species. Eighty five species of birds and 49 species of mammals put hundreds of reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates need cavities that snag can provide.





http://wildlife.org/for-woodpeckers-the-right-tree-can-be-hard-to-find/



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs





 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/17 8:19 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: another Ruby-throat
Envious here!

One year when there were a fair number of RTHU sightings well into
October, I asked Bob Sargent about his fall dates.  He said probably
after Nov. 1 is a better bet for unusual species.

With a warming climate on top of who knows what other variables, the
date may keep moving back...

Janine

On 10/20/2017 9:46 PM, Judy & Don wrote:
> She visited the feeder at about 6pm this evening.
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
>
 

Back to top
Date: 10/21/17 3:37 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous
A truism, and likely the truth, is that the only species that doesn't like a dead tree is Homo sapiens. Dead tree trunks can at times be propped against other trees, or wired so that when they fall, they don't damage anything.

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 9:18:47 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous

That can help and even topping them by cutting the tops out at 20 feet or so leaves a lot of opportunities.

jerry

From: Elizabeth Shores
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 8:54 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Snags can be dangerous

For safe snags, we have the limbs removed and leave the trunks.

Sent from my iPhone

On Oct 20, 2017, at 8:38 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

All snags are not created equal. Our place has old-growth, 100ft+ trees and when they die they become dangerous for many years. I keep an eye on themand other widow-makersand dont venture underneath especially when we have winds.

Dont get me wrong, I retain snags for birds and other wildlife, but I have respect for what can happen to my head, other people, and my pets when snags de-branch or fall on their own.
True, most of my near-misses have come from living trees, but I keep a close watch on the stability of snags around the operational areas in the yard.
When snags become unstable, I bring them down for the beetles.

Take care, and check 12 oclock high,

Jeff Short
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Michael Linz
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2017 1:13 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Woodpeckers - The Right Tree Can be hard to find.

I leave all of the dead trees in my yard, including an 80+ ft oak that died a couple of years ago. I see Mississippi Kites there during the summer. Today I have seen Red-bellied, Downy, and Pileated Woodpeckers, as well as Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers and Norther Flickers in that tree. There were also Eastern Bluebirds going in and out of some holes in the tree.

So dead trees can be a good thing.

Michael Linz(Conway, AR for a week or two)


On Fri, Oct 20, 2017 at 1:06 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
Thanks for sharing this, Jerry. After the ice storm and droughts many trees here died, but we left the the snags and they have provided wonderful habitat for all the life you mention.

Judith
Ninestone

On Oct 20, 2017, at 12:56 PM, Jerry Davis
<jwdavis...> wrote:


Also along another study if you want to increase bird diversity in your yard, provide snags to be used by woodpeckers and other cavity dependent species. Eighty five species of birds and 49 species of mammals put hundreds of reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates need cavities that snag can provide.


http://wildlife.org/for-woodpeckers-the-right-tree-can-be-hard-to-find/

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



 

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