ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
3/4/21 9:02 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: My accident
3/4/21 8:47 am Dons Ipad <9waterfall9...> Re: WOODCOCKS FIELDS LAST NIGHT
3/4/21 8:33 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: My accident
3/4/21 8:17 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
3/4/21 8:13 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: WOODCOCKS IN WEDINGTON FIELDS LAST NIGHT
3/3/21 5:57 pm Lynn Risser <lynnkrisser...> Re: My accident
3/3/21 5:44 pm billy jeter jr <000000779632af60-dmarc-request...> Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
3/3/21 4:24 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Long-tailed Ducks Continue at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
3/3/21 3:56 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Spring 2021 AAS Newsletter
3/3/21 3:38 pm Lea Crisp <leacrisp...> FOS Pine Warbler
3/3/21 3:33 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> My accident
3/3/21 10:03 am Nancy Rock <nancyroc...> Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
3/3/21 10:01 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
3/3/21 8:54 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: WOODCOCKS IN WEDINGTON FIELDS LAST NIGHT
3/3/21 8:45 am Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
3/3/21 6:45 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> WOODCOCKS IN WEDINGTON FIELDS LAST NIGHT
3/3/21 6:00 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
3/2/21 8:07 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - March 2
3/2/21 6:41 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> tweet tweet
3/2/21 3:15 pm Dottie Boyles <000002f3cfbe18c8-dmarc-request...> The Snipe Newsletter
3/2/21 10:22 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
3/2/21 9:36 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
3/2/21 8:44 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
3/1/21 9:34 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
3/1/21 9:33 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
3/1/21 8:53 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
2/28/21 2:48 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
2/28/21 1:50 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> movement
2/28/21 12:50 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
2/28/21 12:35 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
2/28/21 11:16 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Unusual winter storms and bird die-offs
2/28/21 9:26 am plm108 <plm108...> Long-tailed Ducks at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
2/28/21 7:13 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> knowing your limits and abilities
2/28/21 6:04 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Migration at Beaver Lake
2/27/21 10:38 am plm108 <plm108...> Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters (Faulkner County)
2/26/21 10:29 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: [OKBIRDS] Reporting dead birds - All States Needed To Participate
2/26/21 7:39 am Jennifer Mortensen <mortejen...> Winter storm survey
2/26/21 7:19 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Where Do All the Nighthawks Go
2/25/21 4:29 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters, Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
2/25/21 12:18 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/25/21 9:28 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters, Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
2/25/21 8:52 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/25/21 8:28 am plm108 <plm108...> Lonf-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters, Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
2/25/21 7:37 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/25/21 7:34 am David Luneau <mdluneau...> Re: The Wilson in Wilson Springs Preserve
2/25/21 7:34 am John Walko <walko...> Re: The Wilson in Wilson Springs Preserve
2/25/21 7:10 am Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> Downy Woodpeckers Pairing
2/25/21 6:58 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> The Wilson in Wilson Springs Preserve
2/24/21 9:42 pm John Walko <walko...> Re: chickadees
2/24/21 8:55 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: chickadees
2/24/21 5:41 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Golden Eagles
2/24/21 3:45 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: chickadees
2/24/21 3:43 pm Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> Re: Back home at last
2/24/21 2:52 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> chickadees
2/24/21 2:31 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/24/21 12:35 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/24/21 12:32 pm robinbuff <robinbuff...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/24/21 11:19 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/24/21 9:54 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/24/21 8:56 am Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Kite
2/24/21 8:32 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/24/21 8:24 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/24/21 8:00 am Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/24/21 6:58 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: Big woodcock moon
2/24/21 6:25 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Big woodcock moon
2/24/21 5:51 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Latest News and Updates on Birding and Nature Conservation
2/24/21 5:30 am Bo Verser <bo.verser1...> Golden Eagles
2/24/21 4:20 am David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 23 (Belated Report)
2/23/21 7:19 pm Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...> Dead Birds and Surviving Winter Cold
2/23/21 6:31 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Ross' Goose at DeGray
2/23/21 4:14 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Back home at last
2/23/21 3:03 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> White-winged Scoter
2/23/21 2:10 pm Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> rare bird article in the news today
2/23/21 12:04 pm Dottie Boyles <000002f3cfbe18c8-dmarc-request...> Re: Sandy Berger had a close call
2/23/21 9:04 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Sandy Berger had a close call
2/23/21 8:46 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Robins
2/23/21 8:38 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Dead Bluebirds - Protecting Birds
2/23/21 8:25 am JANINE PERLMAN <jpandjf...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/23/21 8:12 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Protecting birds in winter
2/23/21 8:09 am Kay Hodnett <sallyportk...> Fwd: Dead Bluebirds
2/23/21 8:03 am Kay Hodnett <sallyportk...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/23/21 7:56 am plm108 <plm108...> LONG-TAILED DUCKS Continuing at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
2/23/21 7:42 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Protecting birds in winter
2/23/21 7:41 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/23/21 7:07 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/23/21 7:03 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
2/23/21 6:47 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/23/21 4:51 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/22/21 3:22 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/22/21 2:37 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/22/21 2:34 pm alexander worm <wormalexj...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/22/21 2:16 pm Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/22/21 1:57 pm Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/22/21 1:32 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Centerton adieu
2/22/21 12:46 pm Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/22/21 12:09 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Ducks on ice
2/22/21 11:17 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Reminder: BirdLR Birdathon Registration due March 15
2/22/21 11:16 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/22/21 9:45 am plm108 <plm108...> REDO: LONG-TAILED DUCKS and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS (Faulkner County)
2/22/21 9:42 am plm108 <plm108...> LONG-RAILED DUCKS and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS (Faulkner County)
2/22/21 9:38 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Dead Bluebirds
2/22/21 9:25 am Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...> Dead Bluebirds
2/21/21 3:20 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Fw: Dead Bluebirds In Nest Boxes
2/21/21 1:59 pm Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Re: Dead Bluebirds In Nest Boxes
2/21/21 1:34 pm TUMLISON, RENN <tumlison...> Re: Dead Bluebirds In Nest Boxes
2/21/21 1:26 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Dead Bluebirds In Nest Boxes
2/21/21 10:19 am K Geo <katherine.knierim...> Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 19 (Belated Report)
2/21/21 9:52 am K Geo <katherine.knierim...> NLR, diving ducks
2/21/21 8:07 am Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Fused Glass Bird Art
2/20/21 8:05 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Atkins Lake water fowl
2/20/21 7:59 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 19 (Belated Report)
2/19/21 1:30 pm Sheran Herrin <sjherrin...> Snow Week Summary and Highlights
2/19/21 10:36 am Barry Haas <bhaas...> Re: Centerton Adieu and Audubon International
2/19/21 10:19 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Sunnymede Park
2/19/21 10:09 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Centerton Adieu and Audubon International
2/19/21 8:22 am Kim Hillis <kimberlyannhillis...> Re: Bully Bird
2/19/21 8:06 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Bird ducks and waterbirds on select private lands until Feb. 28
2/19/21 6:57 am Dedra Gerard <000002df2472bba2-dmarc-request...> Re: Bully Bird
2/19/21 6:55 am Araks O <araks.ohanyan...> Re: Bully Bird
2/19/21 6:40 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Bully Bird
2/19/21 6:35 am Tom Harden <pepawharden...> Bully Bird
2/18/21 6:57 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Re: Fox sparrows an observation
2/18/21 6:35 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Job Opportunity - Manager, Conserving Marine Life in the US - The Pew Charitable Trusts
2/18/21 6:33 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Re: Fox sparrows an observation
2/18/21 6:22 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Fox sparrows an observation
2/18/21 6:06 pm Good <theoldcrow...> Re: Fox sparrows an observation
2/18/21 4:08 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Fox sparrows an observation
2/18/21 3:45 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Fox sparrows an observation
2/18/21 3:18 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Fox sparrows an observation
2/18/21 9:17 am Jim and Karen Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Unique opportunity to bird private lands for ducks and waterbirds until Feb. 28
2/18/21 9:05 am Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Fox sparrows an observation
2/18/21 7:49 am Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...> Brown Thrasher
2/18/21 6:28 am Robert Day <rhday52...> Re: Centerton adieu
2/18/21 4:13 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Fort Smith National Cemetery
2/17/21 6:24 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Sleeping bird ID?
2/17/21 6:18 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Odd winter wren behavior?
2/17/21 6:12 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: No Birds edit to lots of birds
2/17/21 6:02 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Sleeping Bird ID?
2/17/21 5:56 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Odd winter wren behavior?
2/17/21 5:52 pm John Walko <walko...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 2:22 pm JANINE PERLMAN <jpandjf...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 1:57 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 1:54 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Fox sparrows an observation
2/17/21 1:07 pm Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 1:06 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Centerton adieu
2/17/21 12:00 pm John Walko <walko...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 11:27 am Mary Ann King <office...> birds
2/17/21 11:03 am Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Fox sparrows an observation
2/17/21 10:25 am Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 9:51 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> eBird challenge
2/17/21 9:34 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Winter Birds
2/17/21 9:03 am Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 9:00 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 9:00 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Centerton adieu
2/17/21 8:44 am Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Re: Centerton adieu
2/17/21 8:42 am Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...> New Blog Post
2/17/21 8:32 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Robins
2/17/21 8:27 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Centerton adieu
2/17/21 8:26 am Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 8:09 am Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: Centerton adieu
2/17/21 8:04 am zoe caywood <zcaywood...> Re: No Birds
2/17/21 7:39 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Centerton adieu
2/17/21 7:25 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> THROUGH CHICKEN HOUSE PRAIRIES DURING SNOWMAGEDDON
2/17/21 5:12 am Michael Klun <michaelkklun...> Re: Centerton adieu
2/17/21 3:59 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Centerton adieu
2/17/21 3:09 am David Arbour <arbour...> Winter Birds
2/16/21 10:17 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> No Birds
2/16/21 10:08 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Today
2/16/21 9:17 pm Debbie Balicki <debandronb...> Bird behavior in snow
2/16/21 8:19 pm James Morgan <jlmm...> Re: Robins
2/16/21 8:08 pm Johnny Walker <johnnybacon...> Great Birding on a Cold Day
2/16/21 7:14 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Feeders
2/16/21 6:34 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Cannibalism
2/16/21 6:07 pm Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...> Junco Addendum
2/16/21 5:59 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Yard Birds
2/16/21 5:51 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> the masked grackle...
2/16/21 5:34 pm Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...> Snow Goose Evacuation and More on Junco Diversity
2/16/21 5:30 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> snow and cold
2/13/21 9:19 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Pileated feathers
2/13/21 8:17 am Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...> Re: Robins
2/13/21 8:10 am Anna Lee Hudson <000003304e46ce5a-dmarc-request...> Robins
2/13/21 6:45 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> grooming? mixed species
2/12/21 4:41 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Wisdom Hatches Chick
2/12/21 2:27 pm TODD BALLINGER <todd.ballinger...> Big Day for Northern Pintails
2/12/21 1:50 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Wisdom Hatches Chick
2/12/21 6:41 am K Geo <katherine.knierim...> Re: Great Backyard Bird Count
2/11/21 12:45 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Great Backyard Bird Count
2/11/21 12:38 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Moberly Pond
2/11/21 12:26 pm John Walko <walko...> Re: Moberly Pond
2/11/21 9:24 am Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...> Oreganus Juncos in Fayetteville
2/11/21 9:05 am Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...> First of Year
2/11/21 6:27 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Moberly Pond
2/11/21 6:18 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Fw: Prof Kannan completes one year at Zoology-UoR
2/10/21 2:13 pm Tammy <msiinc...> Common Merganser and Herring Gull
2/10/21 1:06 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Crane Frustration
2/10/21 10:37 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Re: Mississippi Kite 2-9-21
2/10/21 10:16 am Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...> Mississippi Kite 2-9-21
2/9/21 8:28 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Who goes to bed last?
2/9/21 7:01 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 9
2/9/21 2:27 pm plm108 <plm108...> Evening Grosbeak Update (Near Pangburn, Cleburne County)
2/9/21 6:15 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> WWDO
2/8/21 12:41 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Sandhill Cranes-Yes
2/8/21 7:28 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, Birding with Needle & Thread
2/7/21 5:03 pm ladyhawke1 <ladyhawke1...> Sandhill Cranes-Yes
2/7/21 10:41 am Araks O <araks.ohanyan...> Inca Doves in Scott
2/7/21 6:25 am Araks O <araks.ohanyan...> Evening grosbeaks continue
2/7/21 5:54 am Michael <mplinz...> Re: Black-chinned Hummingbird
2/6/21 1:53 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Re: Pangburn Evening Grosbeaks - NO
2/6/21 1:15 pm JFR <johnfredman...> TROPICAL KING BIRD UPDATE
2/6/21 12:42 pm Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Pangburn Evening Grosbeaks - NO
2/6/21 7:48 am Bruce Tedford <btedford...> Black-chinned Hummingbird
2/6/21 6:56 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Anna's Hummingbird in Vilonia
2/5/21 1:20 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Audubon's BirdLR Birdathon
2/5/21 9:11 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Anna's Hummingbird in Vilonia
2/5/21 8:47 am ladyhawke1 <ladyhawke1...> Long-tailed Duck
2/4/21 1:41 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> SNGO and GWFG hybrid
2/3/21 1:02 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: eBird: Evening Grosbeaks, Pangburn
2/3/21 12:00 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Black Chinned Hummingbird
2/3/21 11:48 am Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> Re: [OKBIRDS] House Sparrows?
2/3/21 7:25 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Threats to Birds and Bird Food
2/3/21 7:10 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> CONTINUING RARE BIRDS AT AND NEAR ALMA WASTEWATER
2/2/21 7:21 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 2
2/2/21 6:18 pm Bob Day <rhday52...> Re: Mammoths
2/2/21 5:52 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Re: [OKBIRDS] House Sparrows?
2/2/21 5:50 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Lawson Elementary Birds Update
2/2/21 5:05 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: [OKBIRDS] House Sparrows?
2/2/21 10:11 am Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> Re: Mammoths
2/2/21 8:22 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Rusty Blackbirds
2/2/21 6:40 am Michael <mplinz...> Evening Grosbeak Name
2/2/21 6:12 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Mammoths
 
Back to top
Date: 3/4/21 9:02 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: My accident
Oh Jack and Pam. You never did tell me that. And now that you have it
brings a smile to my face and joy to my heart. And a tear to my eye.
Feeling a little blue today. Thanks for your kind words.

I shall get my windows open here in a bit and can listen to bird song.
Isn’t it a beautiful day.

Good birding to all.

Sandy

On Thu, Mar 4, 2021 at 10:33 AM Jack and Pam <
<00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> This post is typical Sandy Berger, upbeat, thankful, and still listening
> to birds while lying, injured in the snow! I don't think we ever told
> you, Sandy, but when Pam and I moved to Arkansas, 21 years ago, you were
> president of AAS. Your enthusiasm and welcoming attitude were among the
> prime reasons we decided to join the Society.
>
> Jack and Pam Stewart, Newton County
>
> On Wednesday, March 3, 2021, 07:57:20 PM CST, Lynn Risser <
> <lynnkrisser...> wrote:
>
>
> Really nice! Thanks for including us in on the story.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 3, 2021, at 2:24 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> As you know from Kannan’s post I had a crazy accident and rescue on
> February 20. There was one aspect of the accident that’s not been told, and
> it has to do with a connection with two birders most of us know.
> After I was finally back home in Fort Smith, I got a message from Jesse
> and Kristie. Jesse helped find cell coverage, pulled David out of the snow
> at the trailhead, and helped carry me partway out. Kristie stayed with me
> the 2 1/2 hours I was on the ground and offered her coat to keep me warm.
> Jesse and Kristie’s last name...Floyd. This was Perk and Leanna Floyd’s
> grandson and his wife.
> A few years ago David and I were hiking near Fuzzy Butt falls when a
> couple of people came by on horseback. They stopped, we visited. Long story
> short, their last name was also Floyd. It was Perk’s son and
> daughter-in-law.
> To me Perk Floyd was the hummingbird man. He traveled throughout the state
> banding hummingbirds for years. Joe Neal may want to expand on the story of
> Perk and Leanna.
> I’m beyond grateful to the Floyds. There’s a special place in heaven for
> those people.
> On a side note, I only heard one White-breasted Nuthatch while laying
> there. 😁
>
> Sandy B
> Fort Smith
>
>
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Back to top
Date: 3/4/21 8:47 am
From: Dons Ipad <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: WOODCOCKS FIELDS LAST NIGHT
I stopped making a dinner frittata at that time to go out and walk all around the Woodcock dancing areas this side of the first creek crossing, but heard no "peents" and saw no flights. Even the owls were quiet. Settled for the wonderful Spring Peepers and Stars. Will try again this evening.

Heard a Barred Owl yesterday afternoon however and watched a Sharpie intensely scoping all the feeding stations in the yard from a tangle of vines. That must be the recent cause of so many dozens of yard birds suddenly flushing for cover this past week.

Brilliant Pine Warblers are now singing daily and along with Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Downies and Carolina Wrens, are eating the suet mix I made during the dread polar vortex. Heard my first Chipping Sparrow song yesterday as well.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 4, 2021, at 10:13 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> wrote:
>
> Jane and I went out to Owl Hollow last night and we saw one woodcock flying low around our fields about 6:30 p.m. No mating flights that we noticed. It was surprisingly cold once it got dark. We will keep trying on warmer nights. Glad to see one.
>
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 10:54 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: WOODCOCKS IN WEDINGTON FIELDS LAST NIGHT
>
> Thrilled to read your Woodcock email and Vivek’s list!!! I have been so sad at the absence of formerly plentiful bluebirds, and nary a trace of Woodcocks in their natural habitat. Yesterday evening I was recovering from the side effects of my second covid shot which translates into being grateful both for the shot and for a robust immune system, but which also took me to bed quite early. However this evening I will certainly be outside waiting for Woodcocks while peepers sing, owls hoot, and stars blink.
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
>
>
>> On Mar 3, 2021, at 8:45 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>>
>> The Polar Vortex had passed and snow gone evening of February 23 when a few of us tried woodcock fields at Wedington Unit of Ozark NF west of Fayetteville. Lots of moonlight, first bat and first star at 6:28 seemed good signs, but no Spring Peppers singing and no American Woodcocks.
>>
>> We did a re-run last night, on another fine evening, but with little moonlight, after Dr David Krementz warned me evenings with good moonlight are attractive for us, but not so much for finding woodcocks. Woodcocks were quite active last night; first beeps about 6:25. Most of 9 woodcocks were in the middle of 3 fields where we have traditionally held our Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society woodcock trips. Vivek Govind Kumar submitted this eBird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S82674179.
>>
>> Spring Peppers were active last night, reminding me of something Bill Beall said recently – that he never has found spring woodcocks unless peepers are singing. I think there is a metaphor about life well worth exploring here, but I’ll save it for another time. Woodcock beeping and twittering were pretty grand last night.
>>
>>
>>
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Date: 3/4/21 8:33 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: My accident
This post is typical Sandy Berger, upbeat, thankful, and still listening to birds while lying, injured in the snow!   I don't think we ever told you, Sandy, but when Pam and I moved to Arkansas, 21 years ago, you were president of AAS.  Your enthusiasm and welcoming attitude were among the prime reasons we decided to join the Society. 
Jack and Pam Stewart, Newton County 
On Wednesday, March 3, 2021, 07:57:20 PM CST, Lynn Risser <lynnkrisser...> wrote:

Really nice!  Thanks for including us in on the story.

Sent from my iPhone
On Mar 3, 2021, at 2:24 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:


As you know from Kannan’s post I had a crazy accident and rescue on February 20. There was one aspect of the accident that’s not been told, and it has to do with a connection with two birders most of us know. After I was finally back home in Fort Smith, I got a message from Jesse and Kristie. Jesse helped find cell coverage, pulled David out of the snow at the trailhead, and helped carry me partway out. Kristie stayed with me the 2 1/2 hours I was on the ground and offered her coat to keep me warm. Jesse and Kristie’s last name...Floyd. This was Perk and Leanna Floyd’s grandson and his wife. A few years ago David and I were hiking near Fuzzy Butt falls when a couple of people came by on horseback. They stopped, we visited. Long story short, their last name was also Floyd. It was Perk’s son and daughter-in-law. To me Perk Floyd was the hummingbird man. He traveled throughout the state banding hummingbirds for years. Joe Neal may want to expand on the story of Perk and Leanna. I’m beyond grateful to the Floyds. There’s a special place in heaven for those people.On a side note, I only heard one White-breasted Nuthatch while laying there. 😁
Sandy BFort Smith


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Date: 3/4/21 8:17 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.

Adding to Jerry's post - an additional thing we can do includes requesting a copy of the Arkansas Audubon Society Bird-Friendly Yard certification document.  Even if you don't plan to apply for certification, the form has valuable information on ways you can improve habitat on your property.  This information is free.  The first level is "working to become", which is a statement of intent, a statement that you care.  Again it is free!   AAS just wants to know how many people out there are aware of the problem and are taking some steps to mitigate the harm we do.
Email <bfaudubon...>.
Jack Stewart, Newton County On Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 10:44:53 AM CST, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

<!--#yiv8349561333 _filtered {} _filtered {} _filtered {} _filtered {}#yiv8349561333 #yiv8349561333 p.yiv8349561333MsoNormal, #yiv8349561333 li.yiv8349561333MsoNormal, #yiv8349561333 div.yiv8349561333MsoNormal {margin:0in;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;}#yiv8349561333 a:link, #yiv8349561333 span.yiv8349561333MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv8349561333 span.yiv8349561333separator {}#yiv8349561333 span.yiv8349561333EmailStyle19 {font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;color:#1F3864;}#yiv8349561333 .yiv8349561333MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;} _filtered {}#yiv8349561333 div.yiv8349561333WordSection1 {}-->Cornell Lab of Ornithology was able to get around to answering my questions about trying to reduce Bluebird and other bird Mortality.  Some things can be done by improving nest box construction, that all may want to consider in construction. Continue to improve your yards for native plants and eliminate non-natives and invasives. My 9 Bluebirds died in properly constructed nest boxes with suet available and 50 pounds of Yaupon berries still on the shrubs (5 of the 6 female berry producing Yaupons had been cleaned by American Robins, Cedar Waxwings, Bluebirds and others) but berries were still available. Insects were covered by ice and snow.  Assess you situation to determine what we can do better to prevent this from happening again. Also remember that migrants are arriving this month. Purple martins are already here. Hummingbirds are on the way. This freeze has killed many flowering plants and shrubs that are usually here when the Hummingbirds arrive. Many seed and insect sources are now dead and gone. You need to consider what you have left, enhance and extend your seed feeding and get your hummingbird feeders up and ready.  Plan to plant and fill in the gaps of flowering plants, fruit, insect and seed producers.  We do not need to extend this mortality crisis into the Spring and Summer and lose a whole breeding season that could further impact our birds.  Jerry Wayne DavisHot Springs, AR   From: NestWatch Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 9:51 AMTo: <JWDAVIS...> Subject: RE: "Bird Mortality" 
Hi Jerry,

 

Thanks for reaching out. Apologies, our inboxes have been a bit overwhelmed this year and our response times have been delayed longer than normal.

 

The best things you can do to protect birds in nest boxes is to follow advice on this webpage. For example, use only untreated, unpainted wood that is at least ¾” thick for proper insulation, to ensure boxes have proper drainage, and to make sure the roof is angled to shed water and snow (whether the roof itself is angled, or the box is installed at an angle so an otherwise flat roof is slightly tilted).

 

That said, there are some factors that are out of our control – particularly extreme weather. Even if boxes are properly built and installed, they may not be enough to guard against extreme temperatures, and cold or rainy weather especially can affect food availability (insects).

 

Many of the birds in your area can survive cold temperatures –for example, bluebirds live year round in the northern parts of the country - but with such a rapid, and long-lasting change in temperature, this presents similarly unusual problems for those birds. Again, cold weather reduces insect availability so main food sources are severely limited, and not every bird can find a warm place to roost at night, so these extreme and prolonged cold temperatures can be fatal.

 

In short, because this is a weather-related problem, there is not much that can be done to help prevent this from happening in the future. The best we can do is to ensure nest boxes are build properly and make backyards wildlife friendly. You can find more tips on the latter here.

 

Let us know if you have any questions,

 

Holly Grant

 

Project Assistant

NestWatch

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road

Ithaca, NY 14850

607.254.2427 (2429)

www.nestwatch.org

 

 


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Date: 3/4/21 8:13 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: WOODCOCKS IN WEDINGTON FIELDS LAST NIGHT
Jane and I went out to Owl Hollow last night and we saw one woodcock flying low around our fields about 6:30 p.m. No mating flights that we noticed. It was surprisingly cold once it got dark. We will keep trying on warmer nights. Glad to see one.




________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 3, 2021 10:54 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: WOODCOCKS IN WEDINGTON FIELDS LAST NIGHT

Thrilled to read your Woodcock email and Viveks list!!! I have been so sad at the absence of formerly plentiful bluebirds, and nary a trace of Woodcocks in their natural habitat. Yesterday evening I was recovering from the side effects of my second covid shot which translates into being grateful both for the shot and for a robust immune system, but which also took me to bed quite early. However this evening I will certainly be outside waiting for Woodcocks while peepers sing, owls hoot, and stars blink.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


On Mar 3, 2021, at 8:45 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...><mailto:<joeneal...>> wrote:


The Polar Vortex had passed and snow gone evening of February 23 when a few of us tried woodcock fields at Wedington Unit of Ozark NF west of Fayetteville. Lots of moonlight, first bat and first star at 6:28 seemed good signs, but no Spring Peppers singing and no American Woodcocks.

We did a re-run last night, on another fine evening, but with little moonlight, after Dr David Krementz warned me evenings with good moonlight are attractive for us, but not so much for finding woodcocks. Woodcocks were quite active last night; first beeps about 6:25. Most of 9 woodcocks were in the middle of 3 fields where we have traditionally held our Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society woodcock trips. Vivek Govind Kumar submitted this eBird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S82674179<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS82674179&data=04%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C13211bca7a1c4ac9830d08d8df286bae%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637504711984886103%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=CHI5zQTocTLIMHgkhMuyZXkxQCxciGAB4AytmX9Fmwg%3D&reserved=0>.

Spring Peppers were active last night, reminding me of something Bill Beall said recently that he never has found spring woodcocks unless peepers are singing. I think there is a metaphor about life well worth exploring here, but Ill save it for another time. Woodcock beeping and twittering were pretty grand last night.


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Date: 3/3/21 5:57 pm
From: Lynn Risser <lynnkrisser...>
Subject: Re: My accident
Really nice! Thanks for including us in on the story.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 3, 2021, at 2:24 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> As you know from Kannan’s post I had a crazy accident and rescue on February 20. There was one aspect of the accident that’s not been told, and it has to do with a connection with two birders most of us know.
> After I was finally back home in Fort Smith, I got a message from Jesse and Kristie. Jesse helped find cell coverage, pulled David out of the snow at the trailhead, and helped carry me partway out. Kristie stayed with me the 2 1/2 hours I was on the ground and offered her coat to keep me warm. Jesse and Kristie’s last name...Floyd. This was Perk and Leanna Floyd’s grandson and his wife.
> A few years ago David and I were hiking near Fuzzy Butt falls when a couple of people came by on horseback. They stopped, we visited. Long story short, their last name was also Floyd. It was Perk’s son and daughter-in-law.
> To me Perk Floyd was the hummingbird man. He traveled throughout the state banding hummingbirds for years. Joe Neal may want to expand on the story of Perk and Leanna.
> I’m beyond grateful to the Floyds. There’s a special place in heaven for those people.
> On a side note, I only heard one White-breasted Nuthatch while laying there. 😁
>
> Sandy B
> Fort Smith
>
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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Date: 3/3/21 5:44 pm
From: billy jeter jr <000000779632af60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
I saw two in North Jefferson County last week while exercising my bird dogs.
On Wednesday, March 3, 2021, 12:03:25 PM CST, Nancy Rock <nancyroc...> wrote:


I had some performing in my field last night, starting about 6:40.
I live in SW Missouri about 12 miles above the Carroll County, Arkansas border.


On March 3, 2021, at 8:00 AM, "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr...> wrote:

Before the great freeze of 2021 we had seen a few woodcocks fly up when we walked in the woods.  Then came the bitter cold and rather deep snow.  I wondered how the woodcocks would fare if they could not search the forest floor for worms.  

Last night I went out to watch and listen for woodcock flights in our pastures by the woods and did not hear or see any. 

I am wondering if any of you birders are seeing and hearing woodcocks lately, and if so, what time do you recommend for watching for them.  I read that they typically start flying about 20 minutes after sunset.  In years past we have seen and heard them in our pastures practicing their mating flights.

Thanks,
DonFrom: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 11:35 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology. Thank you. There has been a question about why there was one of the 6 Yaupon shrubs that still had berries. The Northern Mockingbirds defended that berry supply. However, yesterday and today 56 Cedar Waxwings are continuing to consume every last one so there is nothing wrong with the Yaupon berries, they are just now getting to them. Jerry Wayne DavisHot Springs From: Rodney HartsfieldSent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 11:24 AMTo: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology. I agree 1000%!   R.I.P. Eddie Van Halen..1/26/1955-10/06/2020   -------- Original message --------From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Date: 3/2/21 10:45 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <OKBIRDS...> Subject: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology. Cornell Lab of Ornithology was able to get around to answering my questions about trying to reduce Bluebird and other bird Mortality.  Some things can be done by improving nest box construction, that all may want to consider in construction. Continue to improve your yards for native plants and eliminate non-natives and invasives. My 9 Bluebirds died in properly constructed nest boxes with suet available and 50 pounds of Yaupon berries still on the shrubs (5 of the 6 female berry producing Yaupons had been cleaned by American Robins, Cedar Waxwings, Bluebirds and others) but berries were still available. Insects were covered by ice and snow. Assess you situation to determine what we can do better to prevent this from happening again. Also remember that migrants are arriving this month. Purple martins are already here. Hummingbirds are on the way. This freeze has killed many flowering plants and shrubs that are usually here when the Hummingbirds arrive. Many seed and insect sources are now dead and gone. You need to consider what you have left, enhance and extend your seed feeding and get your hummingbird feeders up and ready.  Plan to plant and fill in the gaps of flowering plants, fruit, insect and seed producers.  We do not need to extend this mortality crisis into the Spring and Summer and lose a whole breeding season that could further impact our birds. Jerry Wayne DavisHot Springs, AR   From: NestWatch Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 9:51 AMTo: <JWDAVIS...> Subject: RE: "Bird Mortality" 
Hi Jerry,

 

Thanks for reaching out. Apologies, our inboxes have been a bit overwhelmed this year and our response times have been delayed longer than normal.

 

The best things you can do to protect birds in nest boxes is tofollow advice on this webpage. For example, use only untreated, unpainted wood that is at least ¾” thick for proper insulation, to ensure boxes have proper drainage, and to make sure the roof is angled to shed water and snow (whether the roof itself is angled, or the box is installed at an angle so an otherwise flat roof is slightly tilted).

 

That said, there are some factors that are out of our control – particularly extreme weather. Even if boxes are properly built and installed, they may not be enough to guard against extreme temperatures, and cold or rainy weather especially can affect food availability (insects).

 

Many of the birds in your area can survive cold temperatures –for example, bluebirds live year round in the northern parts of the country - but with such a rapid, and long-lasting change in temperature, this presents similarly unusual problems for those birds. Again, cold weather reduces insect availability so main food sources are severely limited, and not every bird can find a warm place to roost at night, so these extreme and prolonged cold temperatures can be fatal.

 

In short, because this is a weather-related problem, there is not much that can be done to help prevent this from happening in the future. The best we can do is to ensure nest boxes are build properly and make backyards wildlife friendly. You can find more tips on the latter here.

 

Let us know if you have any questions,

 

Holly Grant

 

Project Assistant

NestWatch

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road

Ithaca, NY 14850

607.254.2427 (2429)

www.nestwatch.org

 

 


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Date: 3/3/21 4:24 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Long-tailed Ducks Continue at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
The 3 male Long-tailed Ducks are still present on the lake, most often seen from the public boat ramp. The 2 White-winged Scoters have not been reported since Mar 1 and we did not see them today.Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 3/2/21 12:21 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: RE: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County) The three Long-tailed Ducks continue this morning, seen feeding out from the public boat ramp. We did not find the White-winged Scoters after searching many areas of the lake. The Purple Martins continue to grow in number with the early arriving females taking over their selection of nest sites. Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway -------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 3/1/21 11:33 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: RE: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County) The 3 Long-tails and 2 Scoters continue this morning at the lake. The Long-tailed Duckss are most often seen out from the public boat ramp. The White-winged Scoters are further out today, mostly toward the southern edge of the lake but can sometimes be out from the eastern end of Goose Poop Peninsula. Also present were 7 newly arriving m/f Purple Martins (claiming their nest sites), 4 American Wigeon, an immature Herring Gull and at least a dozen Rusty Blackbirds. We found 2 active Eastern Bluebirds there yesterday, which we were so very happy to see.Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR -------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 2/28/21 11:25 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Long-tailed Ducks at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County) The three LTDUs continue this morning out from the boat launch area. We have not relocated the White-winged Scoters but there is a strange and strong glare on the water. The fishing boats tend to run them further out from the park, and it may take time and patience before they return to the area out from "Goose Poop Peninsula."Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 

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Date: 3/3/21 3:56 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Spring 2021 AAS Newsletter
The latest issue of Arkansas Birds, newsletter of the Arkansas Audubon
Society, is now available for download at
http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf .

Lyndal York
Webmaster AAS

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Date: 3/3/21 3:38 pm
From: Lea Crisp <leacrisp...>
Subject: FOS Pine Warbler
It was such a treat today to have a beautiful Pine Warbler at my feeder. He has been singing all day.

Lea Crisp
Bella Vista

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Date: 3/3/21 3:33 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: My accident
As you know from Kannan’s post I had a crazy accident and rescue on
February 20. There was one aspect of the accident that’s not been told, and
it has to do with a connection with two birders most of us know.
After I was finally back home in Fort Smith, I got a message from Jesse and
Kristie. Jesse helped find cell coverage, pulled David out of the snow at
the trailhead, and helped carry me partway out. Kristie stayed with me the
2 1/2 hours I was on the ground and offered her coat to keep me warm. Jesse
and Kristie’s last name...Floyd. This was Perk and Leanna Floyd’s grandson
and his wife.
A few years ago David and I were hiking near Fuzzy Butt falls when a couple
of people came by on horseback. They stopped, we visited. Long story short,
their last name was also Floyd. It was Perk’s son and daughter-in-law.
To me Perk Floyd was the hummingbird man. He traveled throughout the state
banding hummingbirds for years. Joe Neal may want to expand on the story of
Perk and Leanna.
I’m beyond grateful to the Floyds. There’s a special place in heaven for
those people.
On a side note, I only heard one White-breasted Nuthatch while laying
there. 😁

Sandy B
Fort Smith

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Back to top
Date: 3/3/21 10:03 am
From: Nancy Rock <nancyroc...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
I had some performing in my field last night, starting about 6:40.
I live in SW Missouri about 12 miles above the Carroll County, Arkansas border.


On March 3, 2021, at 8:00 AM, "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr...> wrote:

Before the great freeze of 2021 we had seen a few woodcocks fly up when we walked in the woods. Then came the bitter cold and rather deep snow. I wondered how the woodcocks would fare if they could not search the forest floor for worms.

Last night I went out to watch and listen for woodcock flights in our pastures by the woods and did not hear or see any.

I am wondering if any of you birders are seeing and hearing woodcocks lately, and if so, what time do you recommend for watching for them. I read that they typically start flying about 20 minutes after sunset. In years past we have seen and heard them in our pastures practicing their mating flights.

Thanks,

Don
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 11:35 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.

Thank you. There has been a question about why there was one of the 6 Yaupon shrubs that still had berries. The Northern Mockingbirds defended that berry supply. However, yesterday and today 56 Cedar Waxwings are continuing to consume every last one so there is nothing wrong with the Yaupon berries, they are just now getting to them.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Rodney Hartsfield
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 11:24 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.

I agree 1000%!



R.I.P. Eddie Van Halen..1/26/1955-10/06/2020



-------- Original message --------
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Date: 3/2/21 10:45 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology was able to get around to answering my questions about trying to reduce Bluebird and other bird Mortality. Some things can be done by improving nest box construction, that all may want to consider in construction. Continue to improve your yards for native plants and eliminate non-natives and invasives. My 9 Bluebirds died in properly constructed nest boxes with suet available and 50 pounds of Yaupon berries still on the shrubs (5 of the 6 female berry producing Yaupons had been cleaned by American Robins, Cedar Waxwings, Bluebirds and others) but berries were still available. Insects were covered by ice and snow.

Assess you situation to determine what we can do better to prevent this from happening again. Also remember that migrants are arriving this month. Purple martins are already here. Hummingbirds are on the way. This freeze has killed many flowering plants and shrubs that are usually here when the Hummingbirds arrive. Many seed and insect sources are now dead and gone. You need to consider what you have left, enhance and extend your seed feeding and get your hummingbird feeders up and ready. Plan to plant and fill in the gaps of flowering plants, fruit, insect and seed producers. We do not need to extend this mortality crisis into the Spring and Summer and lose a whole breeding season that could further impact our birds.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: NestWatch
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 9:51 AM
To: <JWDAVIS...>
Subject: RE: "Bird Mortality"


Hi Jerry,



Thanks for reaching out. Apologies, our inboxes have been a bit overwhelmed this year and our response times have been delayed longer than normal.



The best things you can do to protect birds in nest boxes is to follow advice on this webpage<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=C1D0GIaj4QWLK9NsG1EXJU518VruUyEp08l-r78F0C0&s=ivOvcPDQFZIH88BShdgChUY1VcxCtA-vSjY0BRiqa6A&e=>. For example, use only untreated, unpainted wood that is at least thick for proper insulation, to ensure boxes have proper drainage, and to make sure the roof is angled to shed water and snow (whether the roof itself is angled, or the box is installed at an angle so an otherwise flat roof is slightly tilted).



That said, there are some factors that are out of our control particularly extreme weather. Even if boxes are properly built and installed, they may not be enough to guard against extreme temperatures, and cold or rainy weather especially can affect food availability (insects).



Many of the birds in your area can survive cold temperatures for example, bluebirds live year round in the northern parts of the country - but with such a rapid, and long-lasting change in temperature, this presents similarly unusual problems for those birds. Again, cold weather reduces insect availability so main food sources are severely limited, and not every bird can find a warm place to roost at night, so these extreme and prolonged cold temperatures can be fatal.



In short, because this is a weather-related problem, there is not much that can be done to help prevent this from happening in the future. The best we can do is to ensure nest boxes are build properly and make backyards wildlife friendly. You can find more tips on the latter here<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=C1D0GIaj4QWLK9NsG1EXJU518VruUyEp08l-r78F0C0&s=7MhZMHInjCWahxAxWecqfFTpoMPTaSlV9MMU2tcxgPg&e=>.



Let us know if you have any questions,



Holly Grant



Project Assistant

NestWatch

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road

Ithaca, NY 14850

607.254.2427 (2429)

www.nestwatch.org





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Back to top
Date: 3/3/21 10:01 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
Alyson, you made all possible accommodations. I’m sorry you lost bluebirds.
Box may be used after disinfecting.

On Wed, Mar 3, 2021 at 10:45 AM Alyson Hoge <
<000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> All —
>
> I had not seen any activity at our bluebird house in the weeks leading up
> to the winter storm but decided to check it anyway yesterday evening.
> Sadly, two dead adults. I wish I could have done something to protect them.
> Was it lack of food that would have helped them generate body heat? Poor
> insulation compared to a tree cavity? Simply not equipped to deal with drop
> to minus 3 temps?
>
> Should I reuse the bluebird house? I have it open now and am disinfecting
> it.
>
> Also, an eastern phoebe that was building a nest inside the barn was found
> dead just before the worst of the storm; I suspect it flew into a closed
> outside door that’s normally open.
>
> During the storm, we had birds sheltering around straw bales propped up
> against water faucets; underneath a storage cabinet next to the house;
> under vehicles; in the carport; in plant containers under the roof of the
> front porch.
>
> The birds even sheltered under domes that were over feeders.
> White-throated sparrows, Caroline wrens and a brown thrasher stayed in the
> barn one night. Normally only phoebes come in the barn.
>
> Hundreds of birds were at our feeders every day. I saw some pecking at
> wasp nests that are under our carport.
>
> Platform feeders were placed on the front porch. Fresh heated water was
> provided.
>
> The food supply included suet and dried mealworms.
>
> I feel confident that some birds got a fighting chance to survive. We have
> brush piles and I will add to those. I also will add more nesting boxes.
>
> Alyson Hoge
> Pulaski County
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Feb 22, 2021, at 5:21 PM, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
> >
> > I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No
> dead birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their
> floor. I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!
> >
> > Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.
> >
> > Rick Jones
> >
> > On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...>
> wrote:
> > I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my
> yard. -Em
> >
> > On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <
> <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
> > I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted
> nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the
> recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead
> chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when
> I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or
> whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the
> night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than
> evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler
> >
> > On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...>
> wrote:
> > Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6
> or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips
> most of each day.
> > Jane-In Searcy
> >
> >> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> 
> >> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4
> six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There
> were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped
> up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when
> I was feeding.
> >>
> >> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> wrote:
> >> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in
> yards
> >> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
> >>
> >> Jerry
> >>
> >> -----Original Message-----
> >> From: Lenore Gifford
> >> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
> >> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> >> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
> >>
> >> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check
> his
> >> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead
> Indigo
> >> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
> >>
> >> Lenore
> >> Sent from my iPhone
> >> ############################
> >>
> >> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list:
> >> write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
> >> or click the following link:
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> >>
> >> ############################
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Date: 3/3/21 8:54 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: WOODCOCKS IN WEDINGTON FIELDS LAST NIGHT
Thrilled to read your Woodcock email and Vivek’s list!!! I have been so sad at the absence of formerly plentiful bluebirds, and nary a trace of Woodcocks in their natural habitat. Yesterday evening I was recovering from the side effects of my second covid shot which translates into being grateful both for the shot and for a robust immune system, but which also took me to bed quite early. However this evening I will certainly be outside waiting for Woodcocks while peepers sing, owls hoot, and stars blink.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


> On Mar 3, 2021, at 8:45 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> The Polar Vortex had passed and snow gone evening of February 23 when a few of us tried woodcock fields at Wedington Unit of Ozark NF west of Fayetteville. Lots of moonlight, first bat and first star at 6:28 seemed good signs, but no Spring Peppers singing and no American Woodcocks.
>
> We did a re-run last night, on another fine evening, but with little moonlight, after Dr David Krementz warned me evenings with good moonlight are attractive for us, but not so much for finding woodcocks. Woodcocks were quite active last night; first beeps about 6:25. Most of 9 woodcocks were in the middle of 3 fields where we have traditionally held our Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society woodcock trips. Vivek Govind Kumar submitted this eBird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S82674179 <https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS82674179&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7Cc2c8172e92804df559bf08d8de5309be%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637503795506219661%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=ZHtC3an%2FxfMz31ASjKeiREc3gLQZRZG0AtvE9OqLWmU%3D&reserved=0>.
>
> Spring Peppers were active last night, reminding me of something Bill Beall said recently – that he never has found spring woodcocks unless peepers are singing. I think there is a metaphor about life well worth exploring here, but I’ll save it for another time. Woodcock beeping and twittering were pretty grand last night.
>
>
>
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Back to top
Date: 3/3/21 8:45 am
From: Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
All —

I had not seen any activity at our bluebird house in the weeks leading up to the winter storm but decided to check it anyway yesterday evening. Sadly, two dead adults. I wish I could have done something to protect them. Was it lack of food that would have helped them generate body heat? Poor insulation compared to a tree cavity? Simply not equipped to deal with drop to minus 3 temps?

Should I reuse the bluebird house? I have it open now and am disinfecting it.

Also, an eastern phoebe that was building a nest inside the barn was found dead just before the worst of the storm; I suspect it flew into a closed outside door that’s normally open.

During the storm, we had birds sheltering around straw bales propped up against water faucets; underneath a storage cabinet next to the house; under vehicles; in the carport; in plant containers under the roof of the front porch.

The birds even sheltered under domes that were over feeders. White-throated sparrows, Caroline wrens and a brown thrasher stayed in the barn one night. Normally only phoebes come in the barn.

Hundreds of birds were at our feeders every day. I saw some pecking at wasp nests that are under our carport.

Platform feeders were placed on the front porch. Fresh heated water was provided.

The food supply included suet and dried mealworms.

I feel confident that some birds got a fighting chance to survive. We have brush piles and I will add to those. I also will add more nesting boxes.

Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County






> On Feb 22, 2021, at 5:21 PM, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>
> I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor. I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!
>
> Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.
>
> Rick Jones
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...> wrote:
> I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
> I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:
> Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day.
> Jane-In Searcy
>
>> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.
>>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
>> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
>>
>> Jerry
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Lenore Gifford
>> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
>>
>> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
>> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
>> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
>>
>> Lenore
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ############################
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list:
>> write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
>> or click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>
>> ############################
>>
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>> write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
>> or click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>
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>>
>
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>
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Back to top
Date: 3/3/21 6:45 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: WOODCOCKS IN WEDINGTON FIELDS LAST NIGHT
The Polar Vortex had passed and snow gone evening of February 23 when a few of us tried woodcock fields at Wedington Unit of Ozark NF west of Fayetteville. Lots of moonlight, first bat and first star at 6:28 seemed good signs, but no Spring Peppers singing and no American Woodcocks.
We did a re-run last night, on another fine evening, but with little moonlight, after Dr David Krementz warned me evenings with good moonlight are attractive for us, but not so much for finding woodcocks. Woodcocks were quite active last night; first beeps about 6:25. Most of 9 woodcocks were in the middle of 3 fields where we have traditionally held our Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society woodcock trips. Vivek Govind Kumar submitted this eBird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S82674179<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS82674179&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7Cc2c8172e92804df559bf08d8de5309be%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637503795506219661%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=ZHtC3an%2FxfMz31ASjKeiREc3gLQZRZG0AtvE9OqLWmU%3D&reserved=0>.
Spring Peppers were active last night, reminding me of something Bill Beall said recently that he never has found spring woodcocks unless peepers are singing. I think there is a metaphor about life well worth exploring here, but Ill save it for another time. Woodcock beeping and twittering were pretty grand last night.


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Back to top
Date: 3/3/21 6:00 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
Before the great freeze of 2021 we had seen a few woodcocks fly up when we walked in the woods. Then came the bitter cold and rather deep snow. I wondered how the woodcocks would fare if they could not search the forest floor for worms.

Last night I went out to watch and listen for woodcock flights in our pastures by the woods and did not hear or see any.

I am wondering if any of you birders are seeing and hearing woodcocks lately, and if so, what time do you recommend for watching for them. I read that they typically start flying about 20 minutes after sunset. In years past we have seen and heard them in our pastures practicing their mating flights.

Thanks,

Don
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 11:35 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.

Thank you. There has been a question about why there was one of the 6 Yaupon shrubs that still had berries. The Northern Mockingbirds defended that berry supply. However, yesterday and today 56 Cedar Waxwings are continuing to consume every last one so there is nothing wrong with the Yaupon berries, they are just now getting to them.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Rodney Hartsfield
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 11:24 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.

I agree 1000%!



R.I.P. Eddie Van Halen..1/26/1955-10/06/2020



-------- Original message --------
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Date: 3/2/21 10:45 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology was able to get around to answering my questions about trying to reduce Bluebird and other bird Mortality. Some things can be done by improving nest box construction, that all may want to consider in construction. Continue to improve your yards for native plants and eliminate non-natives and invasives. My 9 Bluebirds died in properly constructed nest boxes with suet available and 50 pounds of Yaupon berries still on the shrubs (5 of the 6 female berry producing Yaupons had been cleaned by American Robins, Cedar Waxwings, Bluebirds and others) but berries were still available. Insects were covered by ice and snow.

Assess you situation to determine what we can do better to prevent this from happening again. Also remember that migrants are arriving this month. Purple martins are already here. Hummingbirds are on the way. This freeze has killed many flowering plants and shrubs that are usually here when the Hummingbirds arrive. Many seed and insect sources are now dead and gone. You need to consider what you have left, enhance and extend your seed feeding and get your hummingbird feeders up and ready. Plan to plant and fill in the gaps of flowering plants, fruit, insect and seed producers. We do not need to extend this mortality crisis into the Spring and Summer and lose a whole breeding season that could further impact our birds.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: NestWatch
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 9:51 AM
To: <JWDAVIS...>
Subject: RE: "Bird Mortality"


Hi Jerry,



Thanks for reaching out. Apologies, our inboxes have been a bit overwhelmed this year and our response times have been delayed longer than normal.



The best things you can do to protect birds in nest boxes is to follow advice on this webpage<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=C1D0GIaj4QWLK9NsG1EXJU518VruUyEp08l-r78F0C0&s=ivOvcPDQFZIH88BShdgChUY1VcxCtA-vSjY0BRiqa6A&e=>. For example, use only untreated, unpainted wood that is at least thick for proper insulation, to ensure boxes have proper drainage, and to make sure the roof is angled to shed water and snow (whether the roof itself is angled, or the box is installed at an angle so an otherwise flat roof is slightly tilted).



That said, there are some factors that are out of our control particularly extreme weather. Even if boxes are properly built and installed, they may not be enough to guard against extreme temperatures, and cold or rainy weather especially can affect food availability (insects).



Many of the birds in your area can survive cold temperatures for example, bluebirds live year round in the northern parts of the country - but with such a rapid, and long-lasting change in temperature, this presents similarly unusual problems for those birds. Again, cold weather reduces insect availability so main food sources are severely limited, and not every bird can find a warm place to roost at night, so these extreme and prolonged cold temperatures can be fatal.



In short, because this is a weather-related problem, there is not much that can be done to help prevent this from happening in the future. The best we can do is to ensure nest boxes are build properly and make backyards wildlife friendly. You can find more tips on the latter here<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>&d=DwMFaQ&c=qKdtBuuu6dQK9MsRUVJ2DPXW6oayO8fu4TfEHS8sGNk&r=WtcHdIgfPcd5duugjo56RvrWKXWbcpxsIgrqUhahxv0&m=C1D0GIaj4QWLK9NsG1EXJU518VruUyEp08l-r78F0C0&s=7MhZMHInjCWahxAxWecqfFTpoMPTaSlV9MMU2tcxgPg&e=>.



Let us know if you have any questions,



Holly Grant



Project Assistant

NestWatch

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road

Ithaca, NY 14850

607.254.2427 (2429)

www.nestwatch.org





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Date: 3/2/21 8:07 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - March 2
It was a beautiful, clear, warm, spring day at Red Slough today. Bird
numbers and diversity are increasing. Several species we have been missing
since the big freeze are starting to return. We still are mostly devoid of
sparrows. Highlights include Tree Swallows, a courting pair of Neotropic
Cormorants, and King Rails. Here is my list for today:





Greater White-fronted Geese - 62

Snow Geese - 8

Ross' Geese - 4

Canada Geese - 5

Wood Duck - 6

Gadwall - 86

American Wigeon - 3

Mallard - 17

Blue-winged Teal - 12

Northern Shoveler - 15

Northern Pintail - 12

Green-winged Teal - 5

Ring-necked Duck - 160

Bufflehead - 11

Common Goldeneye - 1

Hooded Merganser - 1

Ruddy Duck - 71

Pied-billed Grebe - 29

Neotropic Cormorant - 2 (a pair courting)

Double-crested Cormorant - 67

Great-blue Heron - 5

Black Vulture - 4

Turkey Vulture - 45

Northern Harrier - 4

Red-shouldered Hawk - 5

Red-tailed Hawk - 7

King Rail - 2

American Coot - 475

Wilson's Snipe - 1

Mourning Dove - 2

Barred Owl - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 3

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Northern Flicker - 9

Pileated Woodpecker - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 3

Blue Jay - 7

American Crow - 17

Fish Crow - 2

Tree Swallow - 13

Carolina Chickadee - 12

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Brown Creeper - 4

Carolina Wren - 6

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 2

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 9

Eastern Bluebird - 1

American Robin - 21

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 2

Cedar Waxwing - 3

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 33

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Song Sparrow - 2

White-throated Sparrow - 3

Northern Cardinal - 9

Red-winged Blackbird - 223

Common Grackle - 2

American Goldfinch - 1





Herps:



American Alligators

Red-eared Sliders

Prairie Kingsnake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Spring Peepers - calling

Cajun Chorus Frogs - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR








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Date: 3/2/21 6:41 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: tweet tweet
I had already been hearing cardinals and chickadees singing... then the
weird sounds of the juncos the other day...
Today I heard robins singing.
I heard a single bluebird in my neighbor's yard this morning but only
briefly and never found it. Still haven't seen or heard any at city lake
here in Siloam Springs... :(

I have to go and look at my pictures to see if I can ID the goose flock
that flew over. Also had a group of pelicans, just 8, headed north. Up
til recently, city lake held a LOT of sparrows... today I heard just a
few white-throated, just two song sparrows, and no swamp sparrows. I
think most have moved on.
Heard and saw my first fish crow of the season as well.
I wonder what will show up tomorrow.
I might have to start sitting outside for a while each morning like I
did much of last year. I'd like to build a gazebo or something for me to
sit and relax in...

Daniel Mason

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Date: 3/2/21 3:15 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <000002f3cfbe18c8-dmarc-request...>
Subject: The Snipe Newsletter

Dear ARbirders:

The latest edition of The Snipe newsletter has been
posted online and can be viewed
at:
https://wp.ascabird.org/2021/02/28/the-snipe-newsletter-march-may-2021/

Thanks,
Dottie


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Date: 3/2/21 10:22 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
The three Long-tailed Ducks continue this morning, seen feeding out from the public boat ramp. We did not find the White-winged Scoters after searching many areas of the lake. The Purple Martins continue to grow in number with the early arriving females taking over their selection of nest sites. Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway 
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 3/1/21 11:33 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: RE: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County) The 3 Long-tails and 2 Scoters continue this morning at the lake. The Long-tailed Duckss are most often seen out from the public boat ramp. The White-winged Scoters are further out today, mostly toward the southern edge of the lake but can sometimes be out from the eastern end of Goose Poop Peninsula. Also present were 7 newly arriving m/f Purple Martins (claiming their nest sites), 4 American Wigeon, an immature Herring Gull and at least a dozen Rusty Blackbirds. We found 2 active Eastern Bluebirds there yesterday, which we were so very happy to see.Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR -------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 2/28/21 11:25 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Long-tailed Ducks at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County) The three LTDUs continue this morning out from the boat launch area. We have not relocated the White-winged Scoters but there is a strange and strong glare on the water. The fishing boats tend to run them further out from the park, and it may take time and patience before they return to the area out from "Goose Poop Peninsula."Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 

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Date: 3/2/21 9:36 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
Thank you. There has been a question about why there was one of the 6 Yaupon shrubs that still had berries. The Northern Mockingbirds defended that berry supply. However, yesterday and today 56 Cedar Waxwings are continuing to consume every last one so there is nothing wrong with the Yaupon berries, they are just now getting to them.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Rodney Hartsfield
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 11:24 AM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Re: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.

I agree 1000%!



R.I.P. Eddie Van Halen..1/26/1955-10/06/2020



-------- Original message --------
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Date: 3/2/21 10:45 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.

Cornell Lab of Ornithology was able to get around to answering my questions about trying to reduce Bluebird and other bird Mortality. Some things can be done by improving nest box construction, that all may want to consider in construction. Continue to improve your yards for native plants and eliminate non-natives and invasives. My 9 Bluebirds died in properly constructed nest boxes with suet available and 50 pounds of Yaupon berries still on the shrubs (5 of the 6 female berry producing Yaupons had been cleaned by American Robins, Cedar Waxwings, Bluebirds and others) but berries were still available. Insects were covered by ice and snow.

Assess you situation to determine what we can do better to prevent this from happening again. Also remember that migrants are arriving this month. Purple martins are already here. Hummingbirds are on the way. This freeze has killed many flowering plants and shrubs that are usually here when the Hummingbirds arrive. Many seed and insect sources are now dead and gone. You need to consider what you have left, enhance and extend your seed feeding and get your hummingbird feeders up and ready. Plan to plant and fill in the gaps of flowering plants, fruit, insect and seed producers. We do not need to extend this mortality crisis into the Spring and Summer and lose a whole breeding season that could further impact our birds.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: NestWatch
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 9:51 AM
To: <JWDAVIS...>
Subject: RE: "Bird Mortality"

Hi Jerry,



Thanks for reaching out. Apologies, our inboxes have been a bit overwhelmed this year and our response times have been delayed longer than normal.



The best things you can do to protect birds in nest boxes is to follow advice on this webpage. For example, use only untreated, unpainted wood that is at least thick for proper insulation, to ensure boxes have proper drainage, and to make sure the roof is angled to shed water and snow (whether the roof itself is angled, or the box is installed at an angle so an otherwise flat roof is slightly tilted).



That said, there are some factors that are out of our control particularly extreme weather. Even if boxes are properly built and installed, they may not be enough to guard against extreme temperatures, and cold or rainy weather especially can affect food availability (insects).



Many of the birds in your area can survive cold temperatures for example, bluebirds live year round in the northern parts of the country - but with such a rapid, and long-lasting change in temperature, this presents similarly unusual problems for those birds. Again, cold weather reduces insect availability so main food sources are severely limited, and not every bird can find a warm place to roost at night, so these extreme and prolonged cold temperatures can be fatal.



In short, because this is a weather-related problem, there is not much that can be done to help prevent this from happening in the future. The best we can do is to ensure nest boxes are build properly and make backyards wildlife friendly. You can find more tips on the latter here.



Let us know if you have any questions,



Holly Grant



Project Assistant

NestWatch

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road

Ithaca, NY 14850

607.254.2427 (2429)

www.nestwatch.org





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Date: 3/2/21 8:44 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: "Bird Mortality" Answer From Cornell Lab Of Ornithology.
Cornell Lab of Ornithology was able to get around to answering my questions about trying to reduce Bluebird and other bird Mortality. Some things can be done by improving nest box construction, that all may want to consider in construction. Continue to improve your yards for native plants and eliminate non-natives and invasives. My 9 Bluebirds died in properly constructed nest boxes with suet available and 50 pounds of Yaupon berries still on the shrubs (5 of the 6 female berry producing Yaupons had been cleaned by American Robins, Cedar Waxwings, Bluebirds and others) but berries were still available. Insects were covered by ice and snow.

Assess you situation to determine what we can do better to prevent this from happening again. Also remember that migrants are arriving this month. Purple martins are already here. Hummingbirds are on the way. This freeze has killed many flowering plants and shrubs that are usually here when the Hummingbirds arrive. Many seed and insect sources are now dead and gone. You need to consider what you have left, enhance and extend your seed feeding and get your hummingbird feeders up and ready. Plan to plant and fill in the gaps of flowering plants, fruit, insect and seed producers. We do not need to extend this mortality crisis into the Spring and Summer and lose a whole breeding season that could further impact our birds.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: NestWatch
Sent: Tuesday, March 2, 2021 9:51 AM
To: <JWDAVIS...>
Subject: RE: "Bird Mortality"

Hi Jerry,



Thanks for reaching out. Apologies, our inboxes have been a bit overwhelmed this year and our response times have been delayed longer than normal.



The best things you can do to protect birds in nest boxes is to follow advice on this webpage. For example, use only untreated, unpainted wood that is at least ¾” thick for proper insulation, to ensure boxes have proper drainage, and to make sure the roof is angled to shed water and snow (whether the roof itself is angled, or the box is installed at an angle so an otherwise flat roof is slightly tilted).



That said, there are some factors that are out of our control – particularly extreme weather. Even if boxes are properly built and installed, they may not be enough to guard against extreme temperatures, and cold or rainy weather especially can affect food availability (insects).



Many of the birds in your area can survive cold temperatures –for example, bluebirds live year round in the northern parts of the country - but with such a rapid, and long-lasting change in temperature, this presents similarly unusual problems for those birds. Again, cold weather reduces insect availability so main food sources are severely limited, and not every bird can find a warm place to roost at night, so these extreme and prolonged cold temperatures can be fatal.



In short, because this is a weather-related problem, there is not much that can be done to help prevent this from happening in the future. The best we can do is to ensure nest boxes are build properly and make backyards wildlife friendly. You can find more tips on the latter here.



Let us know if you have any questions,



Holly Grant



Project Assistant

NestWatch

Cornell Lab of Ornithology

159 Sapsucker Woods Road

Ithaca, NY 14850

607.254.2427 (2429)

www.nestwatch.org





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write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
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Date: 3/1/21 9:34 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
The 3 Long-tails and 2 Scoters continue this morning at the lake. The Long-tailed Duckss are most often seen out from the public boat ramp. The White-winged Scoters are further out today, mostly toward the southern edge of the lake but can sometimes be out from the eastern end of Goose Poop Peninsula. Also present were 7 newly arriving m/f Purple Martins (claiming their nest sites), 4 American Wigeon, an immature Herring Gull and at least a dozen Rusty Blackbirds. We found 2 active Eastern Bluebirds there yesterday, which we were so very happy to see.Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 2/28/21 11:25 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Long-tailed Ducks at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County) The three LTDUs continue this morning out from the boat launch area. We have not relocated the White-winged Scoters but there is a strange and strong glare on the water. The fishing boats tend to run them further out from the park, and it may take time and patience before they return to the area out from "Goose Poop Peninsula."Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 

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Date: 3/1/21 9:33 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
Thanks for sharing your insight. Yes Nandina is toxic to birds although many people may not observe them dying at the shrubs and these invasives show up in my yard due to dispersal by birds. The alarm of such has pretty well fallen on deaf ears and blank minds. I have not been able to get Garvan Woodland Gardens not Hot Springs National Park to control this prolific invasive.

As for the fruiting, it seems that such are out of sync. My Black cherry trees have not produced fruit in possible eight years and some botanist suggest the temperature change may contribute to that. What I have found as pretty consistent are American Beautyberry, Yaupon, Carolina Buckthorn, and Greenbrier. Dogwoods have been hit hard by the drought years with significant mortality. I had 5 large Yaupon loaded with berries completely stripped by American Robins, Cedar Waxwings, Eastern Bluebirds, Northern Mockingbirds, White-throated sparrows and others. My bluebirds died in the box with one Yaupon bush supporting possibly 50 pounds of berries still on the 12 feet tall shrub.

I hope all that are concerned about our birds and their food supply will take action to improve the situation. However, data show that only one person in 100 will make an effort to do more than just take care of their creature comforts and maintain social status.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Donald C. Steinkraus
Sent: Monday, March 1, 2021 10:53 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality

Birds in winter


I have been observing what birds in winter are eating for years.
The food plants fall into two categories: native plants and invasive non-native plants.
The plants also vary by year in their productivity and we all need to work to understand why.

Joe Neal mentioned to me, and I have observed, that in general, Eastern red cedars did not produce copious berries in 2020-2021 on the female plants. Why? Is it that they are in synchrony and fruit heavily only every other year? Or did something happen that destroyed the berries this year?

Similarly, the flowering dogwoods that I watch have not produced large numbers of fruits for several years. Why? I am not sure. I have some ideas that I need to research. In years past flowering dogwoods were one of the mainstays of robins.

The most reliable native plants I know of are the hollies, especially mature American hollies. They are dioecious, like red cedars, and have male and female plants. The mature female plants (ca. 50-100 years old) are major food sources for robins and cedar waxwings. They should be planted widely and protected and encouraged. In my opinion, they should be in every yard in Arkansas. I have been planting American holly whenever I can, but they will not be producing large numbers of fruits for decades, and half the plants I put out will be males with no fruit.

Unfortunately, many birds are forced to eat non-native invasive plants like privet (they were loaded with berries this year) and bush honeysuckle, and others. This situation is bad for a number or reasons. The birds are distributing the seeds of these invasive plants far and wide, and it is unclear if these fruits are as nutritious.


Worst on the list is the ubiquitous Nandina: it is invasive, and toxic (and in my opinion, ugly). There is some dispute over the toxicity of Nandina berries. I am firmly in the camp that thinks Nandina is dangerous for birds and should be pulled up, cut down, destroyed whenever possible. The plant should be outlawed, in my opinion. Probably it is true, that a cedar waxwing or robin that eats 1-2 Nandina fruits will not be killed by the cyanide in them. But as some articles point out, hungry birds will fill their crops with dozens of fruits, and these may either make the bird sick or kill it. And a sick bird, incapacitated, in winter is in trouble.

In my opinion, bird lovers, nature lovers, must find ways to get nurseries to stop selling and promoting invasive plants, get our cities to outlaw them, and get our citizens to cut them down, and plant native plants that help the birds.

I found at least 12 robins dead on campus, several mockingbirds, and other birds, dead on campus just after the polar vortex. They were easy for me to find because they died trying to get warm near buildings. Birds that die out in the bushes, in the fields, woods, would not be easy to find and would be rapidly eaten by omnivores roaming around. Therefore, our estimates on bird deaths due to starvation and cold are greatly underestimated. Just because we don't see them, doesn't meant they didn't die.

Don

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 4:48 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality

Here's a link I found. I am posting to ARBIRD because I am certain that members will have excellent suggestions.
What native plants are good for Arkansas wildlife - UAEXwww.uaex.edu environment-nature native-plants






Native Plants for Arkansas Wildlife | What native plants are good for Ar...








On Sunday, February 28, 2021, 04:34:38 PM CST, j s <sweeney_2...> wrote:


Recommendations for books, articles, websites etc. on native vegetation to support wintering birds would be appreciated. Robins, in GREAT numbers here as well as other birds devoured holly berries, both native and non-native, near the house. Now Im interested in making suitable plantings, maybe much farther away from the house where it wont be easy to water new plantings. The primary safety feature around the house for the birds this winter was the depth of the snow. (The cats were stuck on the porch and to a trail around the house foundation which kept them away from the birds. Birds were grateful, I assume, but the cats were seriously cranky.)



Joyce

Sent from Mail for Windows 10



From: Carol Joan Patterson
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:50 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality



I have been greatly saddened by the loss of so many birds this winter. Inspired by Jerry's email, I posted the following on facebook:



Tragically, I've been hearing about large numbers of bird deaths as a result of the severe weather. Birds have not been able to obtain enough food to sustain them through the bitterly cold weather. One reason for this lack of food seems to be that widespread planting of non-native vegetation has crowded out the urgently needed native vegetation. When you landscape your property, please use native plants - these are much more beneficial to wildlife. Pretty flowers are not enough. Natives are lovely and also part of nature's design.







On Sunday, February 28, 2021, 02:35:21 PM CST, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:





Recycle Center Nest Box Survey For Bluebird Mortality

Jerry Wayne Davis

February 27, 2021

I surveyed the 8 Bluebird Nest Boxes for Bluebird Winter Event Freeze Mortality. There were no dead birds in Boxes Numbered 8, 24, 6, 7, 1, 5, or 4.

Box Number 14 - Nine Dead Bluebirds - Four (4) Males and Five (5) Females. One dead female was across the chain link fence on the Street side and two females were on the ground at the base of the box. In the box were four males and one female. In the bottom of the box was 1 Inch accumulation of Chinese Privet seeds and the birds were laying on top of these pooped seeds. The box is located across the road from a significant infestation of the invasive Chinese Privet. *

I consider the seeds of Chinese Privet, starvation food and filler not a sustainable food source. I could not find data on the Internet dealing with the nutritional value of Privet seeds. This would be a good Graduate Thesis Research project for a Graduate student to compare the food value and calories of native and non-native and invasive plant seeds, fruits and berries.

Chinese Privet was introduced in the country in 1852 by IDIOTS, as with other non-native and invasive and they wanted to use it as an ornamental hedge. Chinese Privet has now spread throughout 12 Southern States covering 3.2 Million Forest Acres and 120,000 acres in Texas and this is not counting the acres in lawns and pastures. Experts estimate that invasive plants already infest more than 100,000,000 acres of land in the United States. In the United States, about 3 million acres are lost to invasive plants each year (an area about twice the size of Delaware). Our natural habitats on public lands are being lost to invasive species at the rate of 4,600 acres a day. Already, invasive non-native organisms have contributed to the significant decline of native plants and wildlife.

Every plant and acre of invasive plants is an acre that should be occupied with native plants producing native insects, and fruits and berries for birds and other wildlife. I think this makes our birds and other wildlife more vulnerable to surviving climatic events and reduces the survival and reproductive potential. What lever of evidence and amount of data or concerns for our birds, other wildlife and native plants to get people to rise above their apathy and indifference to do more for habitat and wildlife and replacing eliminating invasive and non-native plants with native plants?

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR





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Back to top
Date: 3/1/21 8:53 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
Birds in winter

I have been observing what birds in winter are eating for years.
The food plants fall into two categories: native plants and invasive non-native plants.
The plants also vary by year in their productivity and we all need to work to understand why.

Joe Neal mentioned to me, and I have observed, that in general, Eastern red cedars did not produce copious berries in 2020-2021 on the female plants. Why? Is it that they are in synchrony and fruit heavily only every other year? Or did something happen that destroyed the berries this year?

Similarly, the flowering dogwoods that I watch have not produced large numbers of fruits for several years. Why? I am not sure. I have some ideas that I need to research. In years past flowering dogwoods were one of the mainstays of robins.

The most reliable native plants I know of are the hollies, especially mature American hollies. They are dioecious, like red cedars, and have male and female plants. The mature female plants (ca. 50-100 years old) are major food sources for robins and cedar waxwings. They should be planted widely and protected and encouraged. In my opinion, they should be in every yard in Arkansas. I have been planting American holly whenever I can, but they will not be producing large numbers of fruits for decades, and half the plants I put out will be males with no fruit.

Unfortunately, many birds are forced to eat non-native invasive plants like privet (they were loaded with berries this year) and bush honeysuckle, and others. This situation is bad for a number or reasons. The birds are distributing the seeds of these invasive plants far and wide, and it is unclear if these fruits are as nutritious.

Worst on the list is the ubiquitous Nandina: it is invasive, and toxic (and in my opinion, ugly). There is some dispute over the toxicity of Nandina berries. I am firmly in the camp that thinks Nandina is dangerous for birds and should be pulled up, cut down, destroyed whenever possible. The plant should be outlawed, in my opinion. Probably it is true, that a cedar waxwing or robin that eats 1-2 Nandina fruits will not be killed by the cyanide in them. But as some articles point out, hungry birds will fill their crops with dozens of fruits, and these may either make the bird sick or kill it. And a sick bird, incapacitated, in winter is in trouble.

In my opinion, bird lovers, nature lovers, must find ways to get nurseries to stop selling and promoting invasive plants, get our cities to outlaw them, and get our citizens to cut them down, and plant native plants that help the birds.

I found at least 12 robins dead on campus, several mockingbirds, and other birds, dead on campus just after the polar vortex. They were easy for me to find because they died trying to get warm near buildings. Birds that die out in the bushes, in the fields, woods, would not be easy to find and would be rapidly eaten by omnivores roaming around. Therefore, our estimates on bird deaths due to starvation and cold are greatly underestimated. Just because we don't see them, doesn't meant they didn't die.

Don
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 4:48 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality

Here's a link I found. I am posting to ARBIRD because I am certain that members will have excellent suggestions.
<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.uaex.edu%2Fenvironment-nature%2Fwildlife%2Fnative-plants.aspx&data=04%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C378bb85b31be43055b3508d8dcd28ebf%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637502144173954936%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=9HgzOv2Klti8%2BPapRdZcXSEL3uEGtZ38fqqhilebFGk%3D&reserved=0>
What native plants are good for Arkansas wildlife - UAEX
www.uaex.edu environment-nature native-plants

<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.uaex.edu%2Fenvironment-nature%2Fwildlife%2Fnative-plants.aspx&data=04%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C378bb85b31be43055b3508d8dcd28ebf%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637502144173954936%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=9HgzOv2Klti8%2BPapRdZcXSEL3uEGtZ38fqqhilebFGk%3D&reserved=0>
Native Plants for Arkansas Wildlife | What native plants are good for Ar...




On Sunday, February 28, 2021, 04:34:38 PM CST, j s <sweeney_2...> wrote:



Recommendations for books, articles, websites etc. on native vegetation to support wintering birds would be appreciated. Robins, in GREAT numbers here as well as other birds devoured holly berries, both native and non-native, near the house. Now Im interested in making suitable plantings, maybe much farther away from the house where it wont be easy to water new plantings. The primary safety feature around the house for the birds this winter was the depth of the snow. (The cats were stuck on the porch and to a trail around the house foundation which kept them away from the birds. Birds were grateful, I assume, but the cats were seriously cranky.)



Joyce

Sent from Mail<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgo.microsoft.com%2Ffwlink%2F%3FLinkId%3D550986&data=04%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C378bb85b31be43055b3508d8dcd28ebf%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637502144173964892%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=wlBOxxejuTweZFgoiK9vXBxddjVFniN5FrrxVjzeIn4%3D&reserved=0> for Windows 10



From: Carol Joan Patterson<mailto:<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:50 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality



I have been greatly saddened by the loss of so many birds this winter. Inspired by Jerry's email, I posted the following on facebook:



Tragically, I've been hearing about large numbers of bird deaths as a result of the severe weather. Birds have not been able to obtain enough food to sustain them through the bitterly cold weather. One reason for this lack of food seems to be that widespread planting of non-native vegetation has crowded out the urgently needed native vegetation. When you landscape your property, please use native plants - these are much more beneficial to wildlife. Pretty flowers are not enough. Natives are lovely and also part of nature's design.





On Sunday, February 28, 2021, 02:35:21 PM CST, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:





Recycle Center Nest Box Survey For Bluebird Mortality

Jerry Wayne Davis

February 27, 2021

I surveyed the 8 Bluebird Nest Boxes for Bluebird Winter Event Freeze Mortality. There were no dead birds in Boxes Numbered 8, 24, 6, 7, 1, 5, or 4.

Box Number 14 - Nine Dead Bluebirds - Four (4) Males and Five (5) Females. One dead female was across the chain link fence on the Street side and two females were on the ground at the base of the box. In the box were four males and one female. In the bottom of the box was 1 Inch accumulation of Chinese Privet seeds and the birds were laying on top of these pooped seeds. The box is located across the road from a significant infestation of the invasive Chinese Privet. *

I consider the seeds of Chinese Privet, starvation food and filler not a sustainable food source. I could not find data on the Internet dealing with the nutritional value of Privet seeds. This would be a good Graduate Thesis Research project for a Graduate student to compare the food value and calories of native and non-native and invasive plant seeds, fruits and berries.

Chinese Privet was introduced in the country in 1852 by IDIOTS, as with other non-native and invasive and they wanted to use it as an ornamental hedge. Chinese Privet has now spread throughout 12 Southern States covering 3.2 Million Forest Acres and 120,000 acres in Texas and this is not counting the acres in lawns and pastures. Experts estimate that invasive plants already infest more than 100,000,000 acres of land in the United States. In the United States, about 3 million acres are lost to invasive plants each year (an area about twice the size of Delaware). Our natural habitats on public lands are being lost to invasive species at the rate of 4,600 acres a day. Already, invasive non-native organisms have contributed to the significant decline of native plants and wildlife.

Every plant and acre of invasive plants is an acre that should be occupied with native plants producing native insects, and fruits and berries for birds and other wildlife. I think this makes our birds and other wildlife more vulnerable to surviving climatic events and reduces the survival and reproductive potential. What lever of evidence and amount of data or concerns for our birds, other wildlife and native plants to get people to rise above their apathy and indifference to do more for habitat and wildlife and replacing eliminating invasive and non-native plants with native plants?

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR



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Back to top
Date: 2/28/21 2:48 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
Here's a link I found.  I am posting to ARBIRD because I am certain that members will have excellent suggestions.  

What native plants are good for Arkansas wildlife - UAEX
www.uaex.edu › environment-nature › native-plants

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Native Plants for Arkansas Wildlife | What native plants are good for Ar...


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On Sunday, February 28, 2021, 04:34:38 PM CST, j s <sweeney_2...> wrote:


Recommendations for books, articles, websites etc. on native vegetation to support wintering birds would be appreciated. Robins, in GREAT numbers here as well as other birds devoured holly berries, both native and non-native, near the house. Now I’m interested in making suitable plantings, maybe much farther away from the house where it won’t be easy to water new plantings. The primary safety feature around the house for the birds this winter was the depth of the snow. (The cats were stuck on the porch and to a trail around the house foundation which kept them away from the birds. Birds were grateful, I assume, but the cats were seriously cranky.)

 

Joyce

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Carol Joan Patterson
Sent: Sunday, February 28, 2021 2:50 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: [ARBIRD-L] Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality

 

I have been greatly saddened by the loss of so many birds this winter.  Inspired by Jerry's email, I posted the following on facebook:

 

Tragically, I've been hearing about large numbers of bird deaths as a result of the severe weather. Birds have not been able to obtain enough food to sustain them through the bitterly cold weather. One reason for this lack of food seems to be that widespread planting of non-native vegetation has crowded out the urgently needed native vegetation. When you landscape your property, please use native plants - these are much more beneficial to wildlife. Pretty flowers are not enough. Natives are lovely and also part of nature's design.





 

On Sunday, February 28, 2021, 02:35:21 PM CST, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

 

 

Recycle Center Nest Box Survey For Bluebird Mortality

Jerry Wayne Davis

February 27, 2021

I surveyed the 8 Bluebird Nest Boxes for Bluebird Winter Event Freeze Mortality. There were no dead birds in Boxes Numbered 8, 24, 6, 7, 1, 5, or 4.

Box Number 14 -Nine Dead Bluebirds - Four (4) Males and Five (5) Females. One dead female was across the chain link fence on the Street side and two females were on the ground at the base of the box.  In the box were four males and one female. In the bottom of the box was 1 ½ Inch accumulation of Chinese Privet seeds and the birds were laying on top of these pooped seeds. The box is located across the road from a significant infestation of the invasive Chinese Privet. *

I consider the seeds of Chinese Privet, starvation food and filler not a sustainable food source. I could not find data on the Internet dealing with the nutritional value of Privet seeds. This would be a good Graduate Thesis Research project for a Graduate student to compare the food value and calories of native and non-native and invasive plant seeds, fruits and berries.

Chinese Privet was introduced in the country in 1852 by IDIOTS, as with other non-native and invasive and they wanted to use it as an ornamental hedge. Chinese Privet has now spread throughout 12 Southern States covering 3.2 MillionForest Acres and 120,000 acres in Texas and this is not counting the acres in lawns and pastures.• “Experts estimate that invasive plants already infest more than100,000,000acres of land in the United States. • In the United States, about3 million acres are lost to invasive plants each year(an area about twice the size of Delaware). • Our natural habitats on public lands are being lost to invasive species at the rate of4,600 acres a day. • Already, invasive non-native organisms have contributed to the significant decline of native plants and wildlife.”

Every plant and acre of invasive plants is an acre that should be occupied with native plants producing native insects, and fruits and berries for birds and other wildlife. I think this makes our birds and other wildlife more vulnerable to surviving climatic events and reduces the survival and reproductive potential. What lever of evidence and amount of data or concerns for our birds, other wildlife and native plants to get people to rise above their apathy and indifference to do more for habitat and wildlife and replacing eliminating invasive and non-native plants with native plants?

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR

 



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Back to top
Date: 2/28/21 1:50 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: movement
and more singing... Some of those winter birds mess with me when they
start singing and I haven't heard it in a whole year.
There's been all sorts of normal birds starting up their songs...
cardinals and chickadees both pretty active around here.

I managed to spot a ruby and a golden-crowned kinglet in the yard. I had
not seen either in a while. It helped that I was out working on my car
but, even in recent trips around here I had not seen or heard any in a
while.

Then this chatter... what a disorganized racket... and as such, I
immediately thought yellow-rumped warblers because they throw me off too
every year... I haven't seen any of those in a while but, turned out not
to be anyway...
I had to go in and get my binoculars to see anything on this gray day
and there up high in the trees is... a junco. HA.  There were several of
them singing and really bringing the yard to life. Not the most
melodious singing but a sign of things to come... some birds are
moving(someone reported a purple martin over in Oklahoma the other day)
and some are just warming up their vocal cords for all the work they'll
be putting in to impress the ladies... Spring is coming.

Which reminds me... I really need to find some VERY affordable houses to
put up real soon.
I'd like to start with something for some wrens. We have a lot that nest
in the yard already but we fixed up the hole in the side of the house
that they used last year so I feel bad. HA.
I wish I had the money and motivation to REALLY set some things up for
them this year... more nest boxes, more native plants, and that water
feature I've been wanting for some time.
One part of my brain is more ambitious than the other... I REALLY want
to do these things but, getting up to do them is another story :(
A little at a time I guess.

Daydreaming again...
Daniel Mason

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Date: 2/28/21 12:50 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
I have been greatly saddened by the loss of so many birds this winter.  Inspired by Jerry's email, I posted the following on facebook: Tragically, I've been hearing about large numbers of bird deaths as a result of the severe weather. Birds have not been able to obtain enough food to sustain them through the bitterly cold weather. One reason for this lack of food seems to be that widespread planting of non-native vegetation has crowded out the urgently needed native vegetation. When you landscape your property, please use native plants - these are much more beneficial to wildlife. Pretty flowers are not enough. Natives are lovely and also part of nature's design.


On Sunday, February 28, 2021, 02:35:21 PM CST, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:


Recycle Center Nest Box Survey For Bluebird Mortality

Jerry Wayne Davis

February 27, 2021

I surveyed the 8 Bluebird Nest Boxes for Bluebird Winter Event Freeze Mortality. There were no dead birds in Boxes Numbered 8, 24, 6, 7, 1, 5, or 4.

Box Number 14 - Nine Dead Bluebirds - Four (4) Males and Five (5) Females. One dead female was across the chain link fence on the Street side and two females were on the ground at the base of the box.  In the box were four males and one female. In the bottom of the box was 1 ½ Inch accumulation of Chinese Privet seeds and the birds were laying on top of these pooped seeds. The box is located across the road from a significant infestation of the invasive Chinese Privet. *

I consider the seeds of Chinese Privet, starvation food and filler not a sustainable food source. I could not find data on the Internet dealing with the nutritional value of Privet seeds. This would be a good Graduate Thesis Research project for a Graduate student to compare the food value and calories of native and non-native and invasive plant seeds, fruits and berries.

Chinese Privet was introduced in the country in 1852 by IDIOTS, as with other non-native and invasive and they wanted to use it as an ornamental hedge. Chinese Privet has now spread throughout 12 Southern States covering 3.2 Million Forest Acres and 120,000 acres in Texas and this is not counting the acres in lawns and pastures. • “Experts estimate that invasive plants already infest more than 100,000,000 acres of land in the United States. • In the United States, about 3 million acres are lost to invasive plants each year (an area about twice the size of Delaware). • Our natural habitats on public lands are being lost to invasive species at the rate of 4,600 acres a day. • Already, invasive non-native organisms have contributed to the significant decline of native plants and wildlife.”

Every plant and acre of invasive plants is an acre that should be occupied with native plants producing native insects, and fruits and berries for birds and other wildlife. I think this makes our birds and other wildlife more vulnerable to surviving climatic events and reduces the survival and reproductive potential. What lever of evidence and amount of data or concerns for our birds, other wildlife and native plants to get people to rise above their apathy and indifference to do more for habitat and wildlife and replacing eliminating invasive and non-native plants with native plants?

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR


To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1


############################

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Back to top
Date: 2/28/21 12:35 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Recycling Center Nest Box Bluebird Mortality
Recycle Center Nest Box Survey For Bluebird Mortality

Jerry Wayne Davis

February 27, 2021

I surveyed the 8 Bluebird Nest Boxes for Bluebird Winter Event Freeze Mortality. There were no dead birds in Boxes Numbered 8, 24, 6, 7, 1, 5, or 4.

Box Number 14 - Nine Dead Bluebirds - Four (4) Males and Five (5) Females. One dead female was across the chain link fence on the Street side and two females were on the ground at the base of the box. In the box were four males and one female. In the bottom of the box was 1 ½ Inch accumulation of Chinese Privet seeds and the birds were laying on top of these pooped seeds. The box is located across the road from a significant infestation of the invasive Chinese Privet. *

I consider the seeds of Chinese Privet, starvation food and filler not a sustainable food source. I could not find data on the Internet dealing with the nutritional value of Privet seeds. This would be a good Graduate Thesis Research project for a Graduate student to compare the food value and calories of native and non-native and invasive plant seeds, fruits and berries.

Chinese Privet was introduced in the country in 1852 by IDIOTS, as with other non-native and invasive and they wanted to use it as an ornamental hedge. Chinese Privet has now spread throughout 12 Southern States covering 3.2 Million Forest Acres and 120,000 acres in Texas and this is not counting the acres in lawns and pastures. • “Experts estimate that invasive plants already infest more than 100,000,000 acres of land in the United States. • In the United States, about 3 million acres are lost to invasive plants each year (an area about twice the size of Delaware). • Our natural habitats on public lands are being lost to invasive species at the rate of 4,600 acres a day. • Already, invasive non-native organisms have contributed to the significant decline of native plants and wildlife.”

Every plant and acre of invasive plants is an acre that should be occupied with native plants producing native insects, and fruits and berries for birds and other wildlife. I think this makes our birds and other wildlife more vulnerable to surviving climatic events and reduces the survival and reproductive potential. What lever of evidence and amount of data or concerns for our birds, other wildlife and native plants to get people to rise above their apathy and indifference to do more for habitat and wildlife and replacing eliminating invasive and non-native plants with native plants?

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR

############################

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Date: 2/28/21 11:16 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Unusual winter storms and bird die-offs
Our Dan and Joe are quoted here.....
Birds suffer die-offs in unusual winter storms


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Birds suffer die-offs in unusual winter storms

The extreme cold weather and snow were hard on the local wildlife population. Some residents reported finding de...
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Date: 2/28/21 9:26 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Long-tailed Ducks at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
The three LTDUs continue this morning out from the boat launch area. We have not relocated the White-winged Scoters but there is a strange and strong glare on the water. The fishing boats tend to run them further out from the park, and it may take time and patience before they return to the area out from "Goose Poop Peninsula."Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 

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Date: 2/28/21 7:13 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: knowing your limits and abilities
I believe I wrote about this once before. People's skill as birders
change as they get older.
I've found an interesting phenomena, that I myself was guilty of for a
short while... early on when you're just starting to pick things up,
some people feel overly confident about the ID skills even where that
confidence is not warranted. Makes for some interesting conversations
with people in person and online.

Early on, people making these mistakes are sometimes then treated as
someone you should doubt all the time.
Lots of thoughts on it but, for anyone still "new" to birding, try (and
you will) learn your limits and get comfortable asking for help with ID's.
I've been birding, well I think it's nearing 7 years now... I can pick
up a LOT of local birds by sight and sound. But I've learned to listen a
little longer when a song is faint as my ears do play tricks on me...
especially if the bird is distant. And I've learned to ask for help with
certain species that still prove difficult.
I like being certain of things so, asking when I know I need to ask has
become easy.

There's  something else that happens in the birding world... where
people might have to re-learn the humility of not always knowing...  our
eyes and ears start to go on us. I recently had some repairs done to my
house and the person doing them, some of their work was a little off...
not level, not lining up perfectly... I later noticed them putting
glasses on to read fine print. I think they needed those glasses while
doing their work.
Anyway...
Just like the "young" birders are doubted a LOT early on... sometimes
the seasoned birders are blindly trusted more than they ought to as
their senses start fading. I've seen a report of a small bird that would
have had similar looking birds be more likely... and they had no camera
or binoculars with them but because they were such a great(sincerely)
birder, it just gets accepted. Some of the more experienced birders
don't undergo the same scrutenization when they give a description of a
bird.  This isn't to say we should start doubting every report...
But, I believe that there are times when we have to allow ourselves to
not be as confident as we are, or have been. It's a humbling thing to
consider... To be an expert at something and allow yourself to not be
sure sometimes.

We've all seen stick birds... and gas hawks... our eyes fool us, as do
our ears. There are times we're certain and times we're not. It can be
tricky knowing and admitting when we're unsure sometimes.

As I started to really learn, I found it more embarrassing to be called
out on a mistake than to ask for help with an ID in the first place...
and, I've learned my limits... getting frustrated with those limits,
with the idea of having to ask for help with the same species a few
times over, has driven me to pick up on some of those key differences more.
I am sure I'll make more mistakes but I've really learned to know what
I'm sure of and what I need second opinions on.

I hope this doesn't step on any toes. I have a habit of that... talking
about things people might not like to talk about. But personally, I
think having your toes stepped on once in a while can be good. :)
I mean absolutely no disrespect to anyone. I'm "only" in my 40's but my
eyesight is going to keep getting worse and my hearing... worse in one
ear than the other so it takes me a while to find direction sometimes.
And if a bird is far enough away, I pick up on part of a song and not
the whole thing, making a bird sound like something different all
together... which can be interesting. I've learned not to trust my ears
when it's faint and distant... I have to get a little closer...

anyway, I really appreciate this group. I learn a lot from discussions,
even though I learn more in the field with other birders. Please don't
mind my ramblings. Sometimes I get thoughts in my head and have to type
them down somewhere.

Feel free to share with me(publicly or privately) your funniest mistakes
over the years.
Mine have been birds that were inanimate objects... Looking for a
long-tailed duck at beaver lake one year, found what turned out to be a
float or something sticking up out of the water... but at a certain
distance through the binoculars, it had about the right shape and colors
in the right places. I think that was the most embarrassing, once I got
close enough. And I've had a plastic northern pintail fool me... and a
mute swan in Massachusetts... also plastic. HA.  And sticks that I
really, really tried to turn into bitterns.

Daydreaming in Siloam Springs
Daniel Mason

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Date: 2/28/21 6:04 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Migration at Beaver Lake
Ice and snow of the polar vortex have given way to early spring with sunshine and rain. Waterfowl migration seemed well underway yesterday, on the south side of Beaver Lake. Over around 3-hours, we made stops east of Rogers at Prairie Creek Park, Highway-12 boat ramp, Redneck Riveria, Coppermine, and finally Rocky Branch. Water birds were on the move everywhere. (Vivek Govind Kumar submitted a series of eBird checklists that you can take a look at if you want site-specific details.) The executive summary is Common Goldeneye (166), Bufflehead (147), Ring-billed Gull (366), Bonapartes Gull (150), and Horned Grebe (20). These are all high numbers on Beaver, except Horned Grebe. I suspect Horned Grebe numbers are deceptively low because from Rocky Branch, the lake was already too choppy to see across towards Slate Gap/Glade.


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Date: 2/27/21 10:38 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters (Faulkner County)
Continuing today at Beaverfork Lake, Conway Arkansas. Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 

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Date: 2/26/21 10:29 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: [OKBIRDS] Reporting dead birds - All States Needed To Participate
There is a link below to report dead birds and all that have found some should try to contribute data.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Sylvias Serpentine
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2021 8:18 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: [OKBIRDS] Reporting dead birds

Hi everyone,
There has been a significant number of bird deaths with the winter storm and we're still getting more reports in everyday.
If you have found or are still finding dead birds that likely perished from the extended cold please report them to Nature's Vein Wildlife Rescue and <naturesvein...>
Please include species, number, location and pictures if possible.

We are trying to build a database of the loss and are collecting all the info we can.

Report dead birds to <naturesvein...>



--

~Jessica Torres (Sylvias Serpentine)
facebook.com/Sylviasserpentinereptiles
facebook.com/Sylviasserpentineart

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Date: 2/26/21 7:39 am
From: Jennifer Mortensen <mortejen...>
Subject: Winter storm survey
Speaking of citizen science... We have an ongoing effort to centralize information on the effect of the recent storm on birds, and hope everyone here will consider contributing. We want to know if you found dead birds, if you didn't (yay!), and if you have nest boxes. This information will help us better understand nest box usage and weather-related mortality during storms. We welcome responses from all affected areas - please feel free to share this request with your other networks.

The survey is here: https://forms.gle/aX5PYqRdqMZ9rtke9

I don’t want to swamp out the listserv, so please contact us directly with any questions (<jlmorten...>). Thanks in advance for your help!

Jen Mortensen
Dept. of Biological Sciences
UofA Fayetteville

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Date: 2/26/21 7:19 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Where Do All the Nighthawks Go
All of our nighthawks are in serious decline as is the insects they feed on. This research provides some insight.


https://www.birdscanada.org/where-do-all-the-nighthawks-go/

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

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Date: 2/25/21 4:29 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters, Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
Both species continuing this evening in same area as this morning...at
least until a boater flushed them.

Michael Linz
Conway

11:28 AM plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

> Oh, hahaha. And my excuse is "they don't even have their long tails yet!"
> ;-) (Subject line corrected)
>
>
> Patty
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: plm108 <plm108...>
> Date: 2/25/21 10:27 AM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Lonf-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters, Beaverfork Lake
> (Faulkner County)
>
> 3 and 2, respectively, continuing this morning in north section of
> Beaverfork Lake, easily seen from the boat launch area.
>
> Patty McLean and Michael Linz
> The Roadrunners of Conway AR
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
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Date: 2/25/21 12:18 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter


Many interesting comments on this thread.  In fact, I'm hoping that no one will object if I quote from some of you for use in promoting the Arkansas Audubon Society " Bird Friendly Yard Certification" program and the National Audubon "Bird Friendly Communities" project. (for information email <bfaudubon...>)

Part 1 of 2 comments
 

Patty McLean mentioned the Audubon Climate Watch Citizen Science effort.  While it is true that there are a number of participants in Arkansas,  the statistics aren't as good as it seems for a number of reasons.  First, one person has been doing the lion's share of the surveys.  That person being Leif Anderson.  I recommend following this link to "Meet 8 Trailblazers Who Are Changing Climate Conversation". scroll down to the 4th person highlighted.  By-the-way, the video was done by Terra Fondriest a professional photographer from Arkansas who donated many photographs to the campaign to protect the Buffalo River. 
https://www.audubon.org/magazine/fall-2019/meet-8-trailblazers-who-are-changing-climate#leif

The second problem is that some routes have been run once without follow-up.  No one expects a lifetime commitment when someone signs up to survey a square, but it would be good if we can find another person to continue the survey in other years.  If you have any interest in taking part in the Audubon Climate Watch send me a note offline expressing your interest.  It would be best to use <fellowshipofthewings...> but this Yahoo address will do.  Be aware that it takes some effort to set up the survey, but after that it is easy.  I'm going to be retiring as state coordinator for Climate Watch so don't delay.  The next survey period is May 15 to June 15.
That's enough for this message.
Jack Stewartsent from a Bird Friendly Yard in Newton County On Thursday, February 25, 2021, 10:52:07 AM CST, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

#yiv9903720116 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}Thanks for all the responses to the subject. I have questions sent to Cornell U. Lab of Ornithology to see how they would reduce bird mortality and if they reply, I will share. The point made about the taller grasses is important to wintering birds and this is why I mentioned last September on this list that people should reframe from cutting pastures and backyards to help birds get through the winter.  Yes snags and natural cavities are better insulation than nest boxes for winter survival. There is a  cavity shortage unless you have many snags and woodpecker holes. Eighty-five species of birds, 49 species of mammals, and reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates use cavities for both primary and secondary cavity nesters.  One thing to consider about nest boxes is that with predator guards nest boxes can be more productive than natural cavities where squirrels, flying squirrels, raccoons,  and rat snakes have access to eat the eggs and young. Only 34% of nest are successful whether natural cavities or cup nests by birds like Cardinals, Robins, Warblers, etc.  Don, your efforts to restore native prairie grasses and plants are to be commended. It is difficult but there are several restoration projects going on in Arkansas by TNC, Arkansas Game and Fish, Quail Unlimited and others that can provide insight as to how to do it.  It can be more successful with prescribed fire and the timing of herbicide application to get rid of non-natives and invasives is known.  I wish you well in this effort.  Jerry   From: Donald C. Steinkraus Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2021 9:37 AMTo: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter To Patty McLean,

Thank you for your detailed interesting intelligent response.  I hope you will share more.

We have several pastures we are trying to return to something like prairies.  (It is not easy).  They all have naturally-occurring broomsedge bluestem, purpletop, and beaked panicum grasses in them.  When the deep snow and frigid cold came I made observations of sparrows foraging in these fields, on these native grasses with their tiny seeds. 

In areas where we had left the grasses tall, there were lots of sparrow tracks and I could see that they had spent time foraging, feeding on the seeds around each grass clump.  In areas where we had mowed, there were zero bird tracks.  In short, my point is, that when fields are mowed, contain no tall seeding grasses, there was nothing for the birds to fill their crops before the cold nights.  It really is important not to be too neat, to leave fallow areas, to plant and encourage native grasses and other plants that can feed these birds through the winter months. Thank you for sharing your thoughts. 

If we love birds, then we need to love and foster native plants and insects.  Otherwise, we are just fooling ourselves.  It is like saying "I love homeless people" but not helping them with food and lodging.  Love without doing something is hardly love. 

Doing anything to help the birds, plants, and insects, is better than doing nothing. Don 



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 4:30 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter  Don, I deeply appreciate your timely response to this challenge and I wish/hope someone is tracking the data. I've sent a brief summary of secondhand info to the National Audubon Society's "Climate Watch" survey team. Through this program, volunteers conduct semi-annual surveys of various species most likely affected by climate change. Eastern Bluebirds are one of their target species, and several of us Arkansas birders are participants. It's my understanding that Arkansas has produced an extensive database over the years on EABLs, one of 4 states that generate the bulk of data on this species. Surveys are conducted Jan 15-Feb 15 and May 15-June 15, with strong adherence to routes and stops. The estimates on bluebird mortality should be evident when our Spring surveys are completed and our data analyzed. Perhaps we can encourage them to share their analysis with us.  Unfortunately bluebirds were likely not the only species greatly impacted by the storms. Beyond the birds mentioned already, I suspect numerous sparrows were affected by the sub-zero temperatures and potential lack of food. Michael Linz, Randy Robinson and I birded a few areas in Central Arkansas today, where we typically find an abundance of wintering sparrows. At one location, where we might find 40-50 individuals, we only found 6 in 2 hours, with one being dead. At a second location, where we typically find nearly 100 Savannahs and 30 or more White-crowned, in 2 hours we found zero of either species and only 1 Fox, 2 White-throated, 2 Song and 2 unidentified. At a third location, we found dozens of Savannahs and a good number of Song, White-crowned and White-throated, producing a good variety of sparrows for a total close to 100 sparrows. What's most interesting about this third location is these birds were in a cut but unburned rice field with stalks 1-2 ft high. The difference in the number of species present in the rice field vs the other 2 locations with stubble was striking. Unfortunately we found zero bluebirds at any of these 3 locations.  And curiously enough, we have not seen any Rock Pigeons at any of their local hangouts.  The absence of Sparrows (and pigeons) might be somewhat related to whether they were quietly feeding in adjacent fields and were not interested in our pushing or playback. That, of course, is my wish and subsequent birding of these areas may reveal different findings.  Regardless, I feel a sense of grief and sadness over the impact that a single event such as this has caused. We need big changes to bring systemic relief. It's not just the warming climate: it's the overall result from climate change and its impact on us and our beloved natural world that is at stake. We absolutely can and should do things to help our local birds but real change means big change and that needs national and international leadership. I'm recommitting to do my part and know many others will too. Blessings to all. ;-)  Patty McLean Conway AR  Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone  -------- Original message --------From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr...> Date: 2/24/21 11:54 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter  My two cents on the recent cold spell.

As a scientist, a biologist, an entomologist, I am interested in mortality in animal populations.  While I admit it is painful and sad to learn about mortality, understanding the impact of environmental factors on bird populations is extremely important.

There was a massive mortality of birds in the Western U.S. earlier this year.  Bird populations, overall, are declining, as are freshwater fish, mussels, and insect populations.

It is essential that we discover the causes of declines in bird, insect, plant, fish, mussel populations, and work to reverse these declines.  In order to do that we need estimates of what happened during this extreme cold weather event.  What bird species were killed, how many, and why, and what we can do to mitigate such events in the future?

For that reason, I hope that people will document what birds they observed dead, species, numbers, what they think happened. 

From my observations in Fayetteville, robins and mockingbirds were hit hardest.  I have been doing a casual survey of dead birds on the Univ. AR campus.  Dead birds are rapidly eaten by crows, or other animals.

Documenting the numbers of birds and the species is a form of citizen science.

For instance, I had no idea that bluebirds would crowd into a bluebird house during a cold spell.  That tells us something.  And various people have suggested insulating bluebird houses.  I don't think this is super practical.  Perhaps more supplemental feeding of mealworms for insectivorous birds like bluebirds would be a better idea.

Others have suggested brush piles.  I think this is a good practical suggestion and I am planning on making more brush piles.  I used to burn the brush, now I plan to make piles on the edges of the woods and just leave them.

Number one in terms of importance, I think, is planting as many good native berry-producing shrubs and trees as possible, and also leaving native grasses and prairie plants tall and full of seeds instead of mowing or burning.   Just my two cents. 

If people have data on the effect of this cold spell on birds, or ideas, they can share them with me privately instead of a group email. Don Steinkraus, Professor of Entomology, Univ AR


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:32 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter  I keep thinking about the CBC’s this year. Both Bella Vista/Bentonville and Fayetteville CBC’s had very high numbers of Bluebirds this year.  Jacque Brown, Centerton


On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:24 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:  
I think I'm going to try asking around online about this sort of thing... Our yard is a jungle, and has a few brush piles.
Many of these birds would huddle where they can...  While nest boxes have helped the bluebird population tremendously, without humans they'd be nesting in tree cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking because we cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees... and because starlings take them over.
My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a nest box.
Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes out for those birds in the winter... I wonder if there is something we could do to make them more cozy if we know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker walls to the birdhouses? Or, someone could design a "winter jacket" for the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes over a bird house, blocking more wind and providing more insulation?
Something that could be done short term for those extra harsh events?
Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds survive more than just leaving them as is?

I've been pondering this a lot... I have not come across any dead birds this winter and my normal feeder birds, I had tons of them. Feeding increased... rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.
BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and realizing that I have not reported any bluebirds lately... here in my neighborhood or city lake in Siloam Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do believe they took a big hit here as well. Getting plenty of robins but they're migrating so they may not have been birds that were already here.

Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I don't have any bluebird nest boxes personally. We had a pair successfully raise young in a tree cavity in our woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give these birds a better chance...  Part of this is just nature but, like I said, we've taken away a lot of their trees and brought starlings in so those bluebirds just don't have as much "natural" places to take shelter these days.
Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes that are larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw or hay during the winter?
Just spitting out ideas...

Pondering in Siloam Springs...
Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108 wrote:

Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here:   A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.   Patty and Michael Conway AR     -------- Original message -------- From: Daniel Mason mailto:<millipede1977...> Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Protecting birds in winter  
I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that it's an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the subject line SO many times lately.
So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep on discussing it, I suggest two things.
1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter months" and then discuss anything about food and cover.
2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or ignore it. :)

That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to continue the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to talk about deceased birds for so long.


Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:

I don’t mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now. The tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward. Just my opinion. And thank you.   Sandy B.

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Date: 2/25/21 9:28 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Long-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters, Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
Oh, hahaha. And my excuse is "they don't even have their long tails yet!" ;-) (Subject line corrected)PattySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 2/25/21 10:27 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Lonf-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters, Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County) 3 and 2, respectively, continuing this morning in north section of Beaverfork Lake, easily seen from the boat launch area. Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 

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Date: 2/25/21 8:52 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
Thanks for all the responses to the subject. I have questions sent to Cornell U. Lab of Ornithology to see how they would reduce bird mortality and if they reply, I will share. The point made about the taller grasses is important to wintering birds and this is why I mentioned last September on this list that people should reframe from cutting pastures and backyards to help birds get through the winter.

Yes snags and natural cavities are better insulation than nest boxes for winter survival. There is a cavity shortage unless you have many snags and woodpecker holes. Eighty-five species of birds, 49 species of mammals, and reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates use cavities for both primary and secondary cavity nesters. One thing to consider about nest boxes is that with predator guards nest boxes can be more productive than natural cavities where squirrels, flying squirrels, raccoons, and rat snakes have access to eat the eggs and young. Only 34% of nest are successful whether natural cavities or cup nests by birds like Cardinals, Robins, Warblers, etc.

Don, your efforts to restore native prairie grasses and plants are to be commended. It is difficult but there are several restoration projects going on in Arkansas by TNC, Arkansas Game and Fish, Quail Unlimited and others that can provide insight as to how to do it. It can be more successful with prescribed fire and the timing of herbicide application to get rid of non-natives and invasives is known.

I wish you well in this effort.

Jerry

From: Donald C. Steinkraus
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2021 9:37 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter

To Patty McLean,

Thank you for your detailed interesting intelligent response. I hope you will share more.

We have several pastures we are trying to return to something like prairies. (It is not easy). They all have naturally-occurring broomsedge bluestem, purpletop, and beaked panicum grasses in them. When the deep snow and frigid cold came I made observations of sparrows foraging in these fields, on these native grasses with their tiny seeds.

In areas where we had left the grasses tall, there were lots of sparrow tracks and I could see that they had spent time foraging, feeding on the seeds around each grass clump. In areas where we had mowed, there were zero bird tracks. In short, my point is, that when fields are mowed, contain no tall seeding grasses, there was nothing for the birds to fill their crops before the cold nights. It really is important not to be too neat, to leave fallow areas, to plant and encourage native grasses and other plants that can feed these birds through the winter months.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

If we love birds, then we need to love and foster native plants and insects. Otherwise, we are just fooling ourselves. It is like saying "I love homeless people" but not helping them with food and lodging. Love without doing something is hardly love.

Doing anything to help the birds, plants, and insects, is better than doing nothing.

Don





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 4:30 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter

Don, I deeply appreciate your timely response to this challenge and I wish/hope someone is tracking the data. I've sent a brief summary of secondhand info to the National Audubon Society's "Climate Watch" survey team. Through this program, volunteers conduct semi-annual surveys of various species most likely affected by climate change. Eastern Bluebirds are one of their target species, and several of us Arkansas birders are participants. It's my understanding that Arkansas has produced an extensive database over the years on EABLs, one of 4 states that generate the bulk of data on this species. Surveys are conducted Jan 15-Feb 15 and May 15-June 15, with strong adherence to routes and stops. The estimates on bluebird mortality should be evident when our Spring surveys are completed and our data analyzed. Perhaps we can encourage them to share their analysis with us.

Unfortunately bluebirds were likely not the only species greatly impacted by the storms. Beyond the birds mentioned already, I suspect numerous sparrows were affected by the sub-zero temperatures and potential lack of food. Michael Linz, Randy Robinson and I birded a few areas in Central Arkansas today, where we typically find an abundance of wintering sparrows. At one location, where we might find 40-50 individuals, we only found 6 in 2 hours, with one being dead. At a second location, where we typically find nearly 100 Savannahs and 30 or more White-crowned, in 2 hours we found zero of either species and only 1 Fox, 2 White-throated, 2 Song and 2 unidentified. At a third location, we found dozens of Savannahs and a good number of Song, White-crowned and White-throated, producing a good variety of sparrows for a total close to 100 sparrows. What's most interesting about this third location is these birds were in a cut but unburned rice field with stalks 1-2 ft high. The difference in the number of species present in the rice field vs the other 2 locations with stubble was striking. Unfortunately we found zero bluebirds at any of these 3 locations.

And curiously enough, we have not seen any Rock Pigeons at any of their local hangouts.

The absence of Sparrows (and pigeons) might be somewhat related to whether they were quietly feeding in adjacent fields and were not interested in our pushing or playback. That, of course, is my wish and subsequent birding of these areas may reveal different findings.

Regardless, I feel a sense of grief and sadness over the impact that a single event such as this has caused. We need big changes to bring systemic relief. It's not just the warming climate: it's the overall result from climate change and its impact on us and our beloved natural world that is at stake. We absolutely can and should do things to help our local birds but real change means big change and that needs national and international leadership. I'm recommitting to do my part and know many others will too.

Blessings to all. ;-)

Patty McLean
Conway AR

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr...>
Date: 2/24/21 11:54 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter

My two cents on the recent cold spell.

As a scientist, a biologist, an entomologist, I am interested in mortality in animal populations. While I admit it is painful and sad to learn about mortality, understanding the impact of environmental factors on bird populations is extremely important.

There was a massive mortality of birds in the Western U.S. earlier this year. Bird populations, overall, are declining, as are freshwater fish, mussels, and insect populations.


It is essential that we discover the causes of declines in bird, insect, plant, fish, mussel populations, and work to reverse these declines. In order to do that we need estimates of what happened during this extreme cold weather event. What bird species were killed, how many, and why, and what we can do to mitigate such events in the future?

For that reason, I hope that people will document what birds they observed dead, species, numbers, what they think happened.

From my observations in Fayetteville, robins and mockingbirds were hit hardest. I have been doing a casual survey of dead birds on the Univ. AR campus. Dead birds are rapidly eaten by crows, or other animals.

Documenting the numbers of birds and the species is a form of citizen science.

For instance, I had no idea that bluebirds would crowd into a bluebird house during a cold spell. That tells us something. And various people have suggested insulating bluebird houses. I don't think this is super practical. Perhaps more supplemental feeding of mealworms for insectivorous birds like bluebirds would be a better idea.

Others have suggested brush piles. I think this is a good practical suggestion and I am planning on making more brush piles. I used to burn the brush, now I plan to make piles on the edges of the woods and just leave them.

Number one in terms of importance, I think, is planting as many good native berry-producing shrubs and trees as possible, and also leaving native grasses and prairie plants tall and full of seeds instead of mowing or burning.

Just my two cents.

If people have data on the effect of this cold spell on birds, or ideas, they can share them with me privately instead of a group email.

Don Steinkraus, Professor of Entomology, Univ AR




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:32 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter

I keep thinking about the CBCs this year. Both Bella Vista/Bentonville and Fayetteville CBCs had very high numbers of Bluebirds this year. Jacque Brown, Centerton



On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:24 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:

I think I'm going to try asking around online about this sort of thing... Our yard is a jungle, and has a few brush piles.
Many of these birds would huddle where they can... While nest boxes have helped the bluebird population tremendously, without humans they'd be nesting in tree cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking because we cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees... and because starlings take them over.
My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a nest box.
Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes out for those birds in the winter... I wonder if there is something we could do to make them more cozy if we know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker walls to the birdhouses? Or, someone could design a "winter jacket" for the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes over a bird house, blocking more wind and providing more insulation?
Something that could be done short term for those extra harsh events?
Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds survive more than just leaving them as is?

I've been pondering this a lot... I have not come across any dead birds this winter and my normal feeder birds, I had tons of them. Feeding increased... rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.
BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and realizing that I have not reported any bluebirds lately... here in my neighborhood or city lake in Siloam Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do believe they took a big hit here as well. Getting plenty of robins but they're migrating so they may not have been birds that were already here.

Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I don't have any bluebird nest boxes personally. We had a pair successfully raise young in a tree cavity in our woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give these birds a better chance... Part of this is just nature but, like I said, we've taken away a lot of their trees and brought starlings in so those bluebirds just don't have as much "natural" places to take shelter these days.
Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes that are larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw or hay during the winter?
Just spitting out ideas...

Pondering in Siloam Springs...
Daniel Mason


On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108 wrote:

Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here:

A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.

Patty and Michael
Conway AR


-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Mason mailto:<millipede1977...>
Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Protecting birds in winter

I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that it's an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the subject line SO many times lately.
So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep on discussing it, I suggest two things.
1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter months" and then discuss anything about food and cover.
2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or ignore it. :)

That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to continue the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to talk about deceased birds for so long.


Daniel Mason


On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:

I dont mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now. The tragedy is over and its time to move forward. Just my opinion. And thank you.

Sandy B.


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Back to top
Date: 2/25/21 8:28 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Lonf-tailed Ducks and White-winged Scoters, Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
3 and 2, respectively, continuing this morning in north section of Beaverfork Lake, easily seen from the boat launch area. Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 

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Date: 2/25/21 7:37 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
To Patty McLean,

Thank you for your detailed interesting intelligent response. I hope you will share more.

We have several pastures we are trying to return to something like prairies. (It is not easy). They all have naturally-occurring broomsedge bluestem, purpletop, and beaked panicum grasses in them. When the deep snow and frigid cold came I made observations of sparrows foraging in these fields, on these native grasses with their tiny seeds.

In areas where we had left the grasses tall, there were lots of sparrow tracks and I could see that they had spent time foraging, feeding on the seeds around each grass clump. In areas where we had mowed, there were zero bird tracks. In short, my point is, that when fields are mowed, contain no tall seeding grasses, there was nothing for the birds to fill their crops before the cold nights. It really is important not to be too neat, to leave fallow areas, to plant and encourage native grasses and other plants that can feed these birds through the winter months.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts.

If we love birds, then we need to love and foster native plants and insects. Otherwise, we are just fooling ourselves. It is like saying "I love homeless people" but not helping them with food and lodging. Love without doing something is hardly love.

Doing anything to help the birds, plants, and insects, is better than doing nothing.

Don



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 4:30 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter

Don, I deeply appreciate your timely response to this challenge and I wish/hope someone is tracking the data. I've sent a brief summary of secondhand info to the National Audubon Society's "Climate Watch" survey team. Through this program, volunteers conduct semi-annual surveys of various species most likely affected by climate change. Eastern Bluebirds are one of their target species, and several of us Arkansas birders are participants. It's my understanding that Arkansas has produced an extensive database over the years on EABLs, one of 4 states that generate the bulk of data on this species. Surveys are conducted Jan 15-Feb 15 and May 15-June 15, with strong adherence to routes and stops. The estimates on bluebird mortality should be evident when our Spring surveys are completed and our data analyzed. Perhaps we can encourage them to share their analysis with us.

Unfortunately bluebirds were likely not the only species greatly impacted by the storms. Beyond the birds mentioned already, I suspect numerous sparrows were affected by the sub-zero temperatures and potential lack of food. Michael Linz, Randy Robinson and I birded a few areas in Central Arkansas today, where we typically find an abundance of wintering sparrows. At one location, where we might find 40-50 individuals, we only found 6 in 2 hours, with one being dead. At a second location, where we typically find nearly 100 Savannahs and 30 or more White-crowned, in 2 hours we found zero of either species and only 1 Fox, 2 White-throated, 2 Song and 2 unidentified. At a third location, we found dozens of Savannahs and a good number of Song, White-crowned and White-throated, producing a good variety of sparrows for a total close to 100 sparrows. What's most interesting about this third location is these birds were in a cut but unburned rice field with stalks 1-2 ft high. The difference in the number of species present in the rice field vs the other 2 locations with stubble was striking. Unfortunately we found zero bluebirds at any of these 3 locations.

And curiously enough, we have not seen any Rock Pigeons at any of their local hangouts.

The absence of Sparrows (and pigeons) might be somewhat related to whether they were quietly feeding in adjacent fields and were not interested in our pushing or playback. That, of course, is my wish and subsequent birding of these areas may reveal different findings.

Regardless, I feel a sense of grief and sadness over the impact that a single event such as this has caused. We need big changes to bring systemic relief. It's not just the warming climate: it's the overall result from climate change and its impact on us and our beloved natural world that is at stake. We absolutely can and should do things to help our local birds but real change means big change and that needs national and international leadership. I'm recommitting to do my part and know many others will too.

Blessings to all. ;-)

Patty McLean
Conway AR

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr...>
Date: 2/24/21 11:54 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter

My two cents on the recent cold spell.

As a scientist, a biologist, an entomologist, I am interested in mortality in animal populations. While I admit it is painful and sad to learn about mortality, understanding the impact of environmental factors on bird populations is extremely important.

There was a massive mortality of birds in the Western U.S. earlier this year. Bird populations, overall, are declining, as are freshwater fish, mussels, and insect populations.

It is essential that we discover the causes of declines in bird, insect, plant, fish, mussel populations, and work to reverse these declines. In order to do that we need estimates of what happened during this extreme cold weather event. What bird species were killed, how many, and why, and what we can do to mitigate such events in the future?

For that reason, I hope that people will document what birds they observed dead, species, numbers, what they think happened.

From my observations in Fayetteville, robins and mockingbirds were hit hardest. I have been doing a casual survey of dead birds on the Univ. AR campus. Dead birds are rapidly eaten by crows, or other animals.

Documenting the numbers of birds and the species is a form of citizen science.

For instance, I had no idea that bluebirds would crowd into a bluebird house during a cold spell. That tells us something. And various people have suggested insulating bluebird houses. I don't think this is super practical. Perhaps more supplemental feeding of mealworms for insectivorous birds like bluebirds would be a better idea.

Others have suggested brush piles. I think this is a good practical suggestion and I am planning on making more brush piles. I used to burn the brush, now I plan to make piles on the edges of the woods and just leave them.

Number one in terms of importance, I think, is planting as many good native berry-producing shrubs and trees as possible, and also leaving native grasses and prairie plants tall and full of seeds instead of mowing or burning.

Just my two cents.

If people have data on the effect of this cold spell on birds, or ideas, they can share them with me privately instead of a group email.

Don Steinkraus, Professor of Entomology, Univ AR


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:32 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter

I keep thinking about the CBCs this year. Both Bella Vista/Bentonville and Fayetteville CBCs had very high numbers of Bluebirds this year. Jacque Brown, Centerton

On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:24 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...><mailto:<millipede1977...>> wrote:


I think I'm going to try asking around online about this sort of thing... Our yard is a jungle, and has a few brush piles.
Many of these birds would huddle where they can... While nest boxes have helped the bluebird population tremendously, without humans they'd be nesting in tree cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking because we cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees... and because starlings take them over.
My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a nest box.
Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes out for those birds in the winter... I wonder if there is something we could do to make them more cozy if we know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker walls to the birdhouses? Or, someone could design a "winter jacket" for the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes over a bird house, blocking more wind and providing more insulation?
Something that could be done short term for those extra harsh events?
Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds survive more than just leaving them as is?

I've been pondering this a lot... I have not come across any dead birds this winter and my normal feeder birds, I had tons of them. Feeding increased... rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.
BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and realizing that I have not reported any bluebirds lately... here in my neighborhood or city lake in Siloam Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do believe they took a big hit here as well. Getting plenty of robins but they're migrating so they may not have been birds that were already here.

Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I don't have any bluebird nest boxes personally. We had a pair successfully raise young in a tree cavity in our woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give these birds a better chance... Part of this is just nature but, like I said, we've taken away a lot of their trees and brought starlings in so those bluebirds just don't have as much "natural" places to take shelter these days.
Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes that are larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw or hay during the winter?
Just spitting out ideas...

Pondering in Siloam Springs...
Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108 wrote:
Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here:

A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.

Patty and Michael
Conway AR


-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...><mailto:<millipede1977...>
Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Protecting birds in winter


I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that it's an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the subject line SO many times lately.
So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep on discussing it, I suggest two things.
1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter months" and then discuss anything about food and cover.
2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or ignore it. :)

That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to continue the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to talk about deceased birds for so long.

Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:
I dont mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now. The tragedy is over and its time to move forward. Just my opinion. And thank you.

Sandy B.

________________________________

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Date: 2/25/21 7:34 am
From: David Luneau <mdluneau...>
Subject: Re: The Wilson in Wilson Springs Preserve
Many of you may recognize Steve's name because he was Director of the
Arkansas Game and Fish Commission for 20 years - not to be confused with
Steve "Wildman" Wilson, who also worked for AGFC.



I met Steve by way of tennis in the 1980s when we both lived in the Otter
Creek subdivision in southwest Little Rock. He was one of the original
residents of the neighborhood and told me that Mississippi Kites had nested
in the neighborhood as long as he had lived there. We would see them soaring
over the tennis courts regularly during the summer, which was a new thing
for me at the time.



I didn't know that the Wilson Springs Preserve was named for him until a
couple of days ago when I saw his obit. It's a very fitting tribute to his
memory. Thanks for sharing this with Arkansas birders.



M. David Luneau, Jr., P.E.
Associate Professor of Electronics
Department of Engineering Technology
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Little Rock, AR 72204
ETAS 227F, 501-916-5773



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Joseph Neal
Sent: Thursday, February 25, 2021 8:59 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] The Wilson in Wilson Springs Preserve



Steve N. Wilson, same Wilson in Fayetteville's Wilson Spring Preserve (owned
and managed by Northwest Arkansas Land Trust) recently died. He attended
UA-Fayetteville working on an MS and PhD. Afterwards, he worked as a
biologist at the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department in its
Environmental Division.

He was surveying the route for what is now I-49 in northwest Fayetteville
when he discovered a population of a fish quite rare in the state, Arkansas
Darter. They live in flowing springs. Wilson and others worked out a way to
protect the spring head and still allow highway construction. Additional
study by UA-Fayetteville Dr Arthur Brown and his students documented the
reality that Arkansas Darters were one part of a complex ecosystem directly
associated with the region's former mesic (wet) Tallgrass Prairies.
Eventually, City of Fayetteville allowed protection on 121 acres now
included in Wilson Spring Preserve.

The bird list for Wilson Springs Preserve is extensive for a place
surrounded by heavy urban development: at least 174 species included in
eBird. Here's a bar chart: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900
<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org
%2Fbarchart%3Fbyr%3D1900%26eyr%3D2021%26bmo%3D1%26emo%3D12%26r%3DL502921&dat
a=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7Cc369c3c534c8443e6f6808d8d99dd7a8%
7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C1%7C0%7C637498619242409251%7CUnknown%7C
TWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%
3D%7C1000&sdata=3HhjhE6%2FdmjeOtfL4jkNAR5ZcWgxetke9eLU55YlzXE%3D&reserved=0>
&eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L502921





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Date: 2/25/21 7:34 am
From: John Walko <walko...>
Subject: Re: The Wilson in Wilson Springs Preserve
Joe,
What is the status of that old Razorback Golfcourse adjacent to the southern entrance of of the Wilson Springs Preserve along Clabber Creek? I see eBird has some records for it. I remember seeing some article on it becoming a greenway park??? Is it permissible to bird??

Jay Walko
Lowell, Ark

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 25, 2021, at 8:58 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> 
> Steve N. Wilson, same Wilson in Fayetteville’s Wilson Spring Preserve (owned and managed by Northwest Arkansas Land Trust) recently died. He attended UA-Fayetteville working on an MS and PhD. Afterwards, he worked as a biologist at the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department in its Environmental Division.
>
> He was surveying the route for what is now I-49 in northwest Fayetteville when he discovered a population of a fish quite rare in the state, Arkansas Darter. They live in flowing springs. Wilson and others worked out a way to protect the spring head and still allow highway construction. Additional study by UA-Fayetteville Dr Arthur Brown and his students documented the reality that Arkansas Darters were one part of a complex ecosystem directly associated with the region’s former mesic (wet) Tallgrass Prairies. Eventually, City of Fayetteville allowed protection on 121 acres now included in Wilson Spring Preserve.
>
> The bird list for Wilson Springs Preserve is extensive for a place surrounded by heavy urban development: at least 174 species included in eBird. Here’s a bar chart: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L502921
>
>
>
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Date: 2/25/21 7:10 am
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller...>
Subject: Downy Woodpeckers Pairing
Yesterday, Feb 24, saw two Downy Woodpeckers calling to each other with
their "Queek" call which they use in pair bonding. The snow is gone and it
is time to make new birds.

--
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-339-8071

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Date: 2/25/21 6:58 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: The Wilson in Wilson Springs Preserve
Steve N. Wilson, same Wilson in Fayettevilles Wilson Spring Preserve (owned and managed by Northwest Arkansas Land Trust) recently died. He attended UA-Fayetteville working on an MS and PhD. Afterwards, he worked as a biologist at the Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department in its Environmental Division.
He was surveying the route for what is now I-49 in northwest Fayetteville when he discovered a population of a fish quite rare in the state, Arkansas Darter. They live in flowing springs. Wilson and others worked out a way to protect the spring head and still allow highway construction. Additional study by UA-Fayetteville Dr Arthur Brown and his students documented the reality that Arkansas Darters were one part of a complex ecosystem directly associated with the regions former mesic (wet) Tallgrass Prairies. Eventually, City of Fayetteville allowed protection on 121 acres now included in Wilson Spring Preserve.
The bird list for Wilson Springs Preserve is extensive for a place surrounded by heavy urban development: at least 174 species included in eBird. Heres a bar chart: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L502921<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fbarchart%3Fbyr%3D1900%26eyr%3D2021%26bmo%3D1%26emo%3D12%26r%3DL502921&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7Cc369c3c534c8443e6f6808d8d99dd7a8%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C1%7C0%7C637498619242409251%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=3HhjhE6%2FdmjeOtfL4jkNAR5ZcWgxetke9eLU55YlzXE%3D&reserved=0>


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Date: 2/24/21 9:42 pm
From: John Walko <walko...>
Subject: Re: chickadees
Here at Beaver lake (Benton County) the family group of four Titmice and at least 2 Chickadees were constant visitors on and off through the three coldest days along with the all the woodpeckers, Juncos, Sparrows, and crows that came to my feeding stations. Gulls swarmed the ice sheets that formed on the lake.
Robins moved into the area in big numbers when the temps reached back up into the 20-30’s range.
Two days ago a pair of Bluebirds were in and out inspecting the Bluebird box that was had held the five dead birds that I found.
Jay Walko
Lowell, Ark
Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:55 PM, Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> wrote:
>
> I have a pair of Each at my feeders regularly…..They were present through all the Cold…..Only had to fight with the 60 plus Common Grackles that dominated the Scene
>
>
>> On Feb 24, 2021, at 5:45 PM, Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> Chickadees and titmice were fairly absent from our feeders during the cold snap as well. I hypothesized that they were focusing on staying warm and cashing in on their cached food. If they’d but food away for an emergency, certainly this was it for them.
>>
>> Adam Schaffer
>> Bentonville
>>
>>>> On Feb 24, 2021, at 4:52 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>>>>
>>> 
>>> One species that abandoned our place during the cold weather is the Carolina Chickadees. Also, we only saw a couple of Tufted Titmouse during the event.
>>>
>>>
>>> Jeff Short
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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Date: 2/24/21 8:55 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: chickadees
I have a pair of Each at my feeders regularly…..They were present through all the Cold…..Only had to fight with the 60 plus Common Grackles that dominated the Scene


> On Feb 24, 2021, at 5:45 PM, Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Chickadees and titmice were fairly absent from our feeders during the cold snap as well. I hypothesized that they were focusing on staying warm and cashing in on their cached food. If they’d but food away for an emergency, certainly this was it for them.
>
> Adam Schaffer
> Bentonville
>
>> On Feb 24, 2021, at 4:52 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> <mailto:<bashman...>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> One species that abandoned our place during the cold weather is the Carolina Chickadees. Also, we only saw a couple of Tufted Titmouse during the event.
>>
>>
>> Jeff Short
>>
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Date: 2/24/21 5:41 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Golden Eagles
Interesting observations, particularly the one found on the ground.  Twice, in winter we've startled Golden Eagle on the ground along heavily wooded Ozark streams.  In one case the Eagle was after a Great Blue Heron which was hunting the pools along a losing stream.
Jack
Newton County On Wednesday, February 24, 2021, 07:30:25 AM CST, Bo Verser <bo.verser1...> wrote:

Yesterday Herschel Raney and I drove roads and walked along creeks in the beautiful Sylamore area of the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest and saw two Adult Golden Eagles.  The first was soaring above the valley at Barkshed Rec Area. The second was a brief but extraordinary look as we topped a hill on a very remote high road north and east of there when we flushed it off the ground where it was drinking water from a small roadside puddle 15 yards in front of us. 
Bo Verser

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Date: 2/24/21 3:45 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: chickadees
Chickadees and titmice were fairly absent from our feeders during the cold snap as well. I hypothesized that they were focusing on staying warm and cashing in on their cached food. If they’d but food away for an emergency, certainly this was it for them.

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

> On Feb 24, 2021, at 4:52 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>
> 
> One species that abandoned our place during the cold weather is the Carolina Chickadees. Also, we only saw a couple of Tufted Titmouse during the event.
>
>
> Jeff Short
>
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Date: 2/24/21 3:43 pm
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller...>
Subject: Re: Back home at last
Kannan,

Welcome back. Arkansas, and me, missed you.

Allan

On Tue, Feb 23, 2021 at 6:14 PM Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> The past year I’ve received supportive letters from many of my Arbirder
> friends while I was stranded abroad. My heartfelt thanks to the Arbirder
> community for keeping me connected (and sane). But as Joe aptly put it, I
> made lots of lemonade. Over 500 stationary eBird counts (mostly 20-minute
> counts) from my balcony in Sri Lanka, which helped add a new bird for the
> island nation. My 4-hectare yard is probably one of the most studied spots
> in South Asia.
>
> UAFS interviewed me about my experiences but decided to switch to a more
> local story. See below. It’s mostly preaching to the choir for Arbirders
> but please click on it anyway. Webmasters love the traffic.
>
> https://news.uafs.edu/news/5356
>
> Kannan
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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--
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-339-8071

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Date: 2/24/21 2:52 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: chickadees
One species that abandoned our place during the cold weather is the Carolina
Chickadees. Also, we only saw a couple of Tufted Titmouse during the event.





Jeff Short


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Date: 2/24/21 2:31 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
Don, I deeply appreciate your timely response to this challenge and I wish/hope someone is tracking the data. I've sent a brief summary of secondhand info to the National Audubon Society's "Climate Watch" survey team. Through this program, volunteers conduct semi-annual surveys of various species most likely affected by climate change. Eastern Bluebirds are one of their target species, and several of us Arkansas birders are participants. It's my understanding that Arkansas has produced an extensive database over the years on EABLs, one of 4 states that generate the bulk of data on this species. Surveys are conducted Jan 15-Feb 15 and May 15-June 15, with strong adherence to routes and stops. The estimates on bluebird mortality should be evident when our Spring surveys are completed and our data analyzed. Perhaps we can encourage them to share their analysis with us. Unfortunately bluebirds were likely not the only species greatly impacted by the storms. Beyond the birds mentioned already, I suspect numerous sparrows were affected by the sub-zero temperatures and potential lack of food. Michael Linz, Randy Robinson and I birded a few areas in Central Arkansas today, where we typically find an abundance of wintering sparrows. At one location, where we might find 40-50 individuals, we only found 6 in 2 hours, with one being dead. At a second location, where we typically find nearly 100 Savannahs and 30 or more White-crowned, in 2 hours we found zero of either species and only 1 Fox, 2 White-throated, 2 Song and 2 unidentified. At a third location, we found dozens of Savannahs and a good number of Song, White-crowned and White-throated, producing a good variety of sparrows for a total close to 100 sparrows. What's most interesting about this third location is these birds were in a cut but unburned rice field with stalks 1-2 ft high. The difference in the number of species present in the rice field vs the other 2 locations with stubble was striking. Unfortunately we found zero bluebirds at any of these 3 locations. And curiously enough, we have not seen any Rock Pigeons at any of their local hangouts. The absence of Sparrows (and pigeons) might be somewhat related to whether they were quietly feeding in adjacent fields and were not interested in our pushing or playback. That, of course, is my wish and subsequent birding of these areas may reveal different findings. Regardless, I feel a sense of grief and sadness over the impact that a single event such as this has caused. We need big changes to bring systemic relief. It's not just the warming climate: it's the overall result from climate change and its impact on us and our beloved natural world that is at stake. We absolutely can and should do things to help our local birds but real change means big change and that needs national and international leadership. I'm recommitting to do my part and know many others will too.Blessings to all. ;-) Patty McLean Conway AR Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr...> Date: 2/24/21 11:54 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter

My two cents on the recent cold spell.

As a scientist, a biologist, an entomologist, I am interested in mortality in animal populations.  While I admit it is painful and sad to learn about mortality, understanding the impact of environmental factors on bird populations is extremely important.

There was a massive mortality of birds in the Western U.S. earlier this year.  Bird populations, overall, are declining, as are freshwater fish, mussels, and insect populations.



It is essential that we discover the causes of declines in bird, insect, plant, fish, mussel populations, and work to reverse these declines.  In order to do that we need estimates of what happened during this extreme cold weather event.  What bird species
were killed, how many, and why, and what we can do to mitigate such events in the future?

For that reason, I hope that people will document what birds they observed dead, species, numbers, what they think happened.  

From my observations in Fayetteville, robins and mockingbirds were hit hardest.  I have been doing a casual survey of dead birds on the Univ. AR campus.  Dead birds are rapidly eaten by crows, or other animals.

Documenting the numbers of birds and the species is a form of citizen science. 

For instance, I had no idea that bluebirds would crowd into a bluebird house during a cold spell.  That tells us something.  And various people have suggested insulating bluebird houses.  I don't think this is super practical.  Perhaps more supplemental feeding
of mealworms for insectivorous birds like bluebirds would be a better idea.

Others have suggested brush piles.  I think this is a good practical suggestion and I am planning on making more brush piles.  I used to burn the brush, now I plan to make piles on the edges of the woods and just leave them.

Number one in terms of importance, I think, is planting as many good native berry-producing shrubs and trees as possible, and also leaving native grasses and prairie plants tall and full of seeds instead of mowing or burning.  




Just my two cents.  

If people have data on the effect of this cold spell on birds, or ideas, they can share them with me privately instead of a group email.




Don Steinkraus, Professor of Entomology, Univ AR





From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:32 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
 

I keep thinking about the CBC’s this year. Both Bella Vista/Bentonville and Fayetteville CBC’s had very high numbers of Bluebirds this year.  Jacque Brown, Centerton


On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:24 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:



I think I'm going to try asking around online about this sort of thing... Our yard is a jungle, and has a few brush piles.
Many of these birds would huddle where they can...  While nest boxes have helped the bluebird population tremendously, without humans they'd be nesting in tree cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking because we cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees...
and because starlings take them over.
My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a nest box.
Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes out for those birds in the winter... I wonder if there is something we could do to make them more cozy if we know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker walls to the birdhouses? Or, someone could design a
"winter jacket" for the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes over a bird house, blocking more wind and providing more insulation?
Something that could be done short term for those extra harsh events?
Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds survive more than just leaving them as is?
I've been pondering this a lot... I have not come across any dead birds this winter and my normal feeder birds, I had tons of them. Feeding increased... rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.

BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and realizing that I have not reported any bluebirds lately... here in my neighborhood or city lake in Siloam Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do believe they took a big hit here as well. Getting
plenty of robins but they're migrating so they may not have been birds that were already here.
Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I don't have any bluebird nest boxes personally. We had a pair successfully raise young in a tree cavity in our woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give these birds a better chance...  Part of this is just nature but, like I said, we've taken away a lot of their trees and brought starlings in so those bluebirds just don't have as much "natural" places
to take shelter these days.
Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes that are larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw or hay during the winter?
Just spitting out ideas...
Pondering in Siloam Springs...
Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108 wrote:


Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here: 



A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow
would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering. 


Patty and Michael 
Conway AR






-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Mason
<millipede1977...>
Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00)
To:
<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Protecting birds in winter



I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that it's an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the subject line SO many times lately.
So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep on discussing it, I suggest two things.

1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter months" and then discuss anything about food and cover.
2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or ignore it. :)


That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to continue the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to talk about deceased birds for so long.


Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:

I don’t mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now. The tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward. Just my opinion. And thank you.


Sandy B. 


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Back to top
Date: 2/24/21 12:35 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
Good observations, and I agree with your suggestions. As you know we leave our brush piles for wildlife and I often note various bird species emerging from them in the mornings.

In recent years I have relied on our many snags and tree cavities as shelter for birds and animals, so although the bluebird houses are charming, I know our resident bluebirds must also be using natural cavities.

Yesterday I checked the few remaining birdhouses and found only old nesting material from birds or flying squirrels but no dead bluebirds or other species. And it got as low as 20° below zero here during last week’s weather.

Yet although there were dozens of bluebirds and robins moving through before the polar vortex I didn’t hear a single bluebird chortling yesterday in the 76° sunshine.

Last week there was a raptor strike recorded in the snow with robin feathers in the bullseye and scattered across the surrounding frozen surface. So far I have found no bird bodies but this morning I saw freshly plucked robin feathers and freshly plucked downy woodpecker feathers. Those were discovered a few hundred feet from cedar trees with a lot of fresh whitewash but no pellets that I could find.

Carolina Wrens, who often perish under these bitter conditions, seem ok so far and may have been helped by the homemade suet I put out for whoever wanted it.

Also, until I can transport her to a licensed migratory bird rehabber, I am currently caring for an injured female Purple Finch who has a shoulder wound that was probably inflicted this morning by a hungry Cooper’s or Sharp-shinned Hawk. She is active and feisty, in a safe place with food and water where she can watch the other birds at the feeders she formerly used, but the injured wing droops.

I can record these findings but how/where do I report the casualties?

Thanks,

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

> On Feb 24, 2021, at 11:54 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> wrote:
>
> My two cents on the recent cold spell.
>
> As a scientist, a biologist, an entomologist, I am interested in mortality in animal populations. While I admit it is painful and sad to learn about mortality, understanding the impact of environmental factors on bird populations is extremely important.
>
> There was a massive mortality of birds in the Western U.S. earlier this year. Bird populations, overall, are declining, as are freshwater fish, mussels, and insect populations.
>
> It is essential that we discover the causes of declines in bird, insect, plant, fish, mussel populations, and work to reverse these declines. In order to do that we need estimates of what happened during this extreme cold weather event. What bird species were killed, how many, and why, and what we can do to mitigate such events in the future?
>
> For that reason, I hope that people will document what birds they observed dead, species, numbers, what they think happened.
>
> From my observations in Fayetteville, robins and mockingbirds were hit hardest. I have been doing a casual survey of dead birds on the Univ. AR campus. Dead birds are rapidly eaten by crows, or other animals.
>
> Documenting the numbers of birds and the species is a form of citizen science.
>
> For instance, I had no idea that bluebirds would crowd into a bluebird house during a cold spell. That tells us something. And various people have suggested insulating bluebird houses. I don't think this is super practical. Perhaps more supplemental feeding of mealworms for insectivorous birds like bluebirds would be a better idea.
>
> Others have suggested brush piles. I think this is a good practical suggestion and I am planning on making more brush piles. I used to burn the brush, now I plan to make piles on the edges of the woods and just leave them.
>
> Number one in terms of importance, I think, is planting as many good native berry-producing shrubs and trees as possible, and also leaving native grasses and prairie plants tall and full of seeds instead of mowing or burning.
>
> Just my two cents.
>
> If people have data on the effect of this cold spell on birds, or ideas, they can share them with me privately instead of a group email.
>
> Don Steinkraus, Professor of Entomology, Univ AR
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>> on behalf of Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>>
> Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:32 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>>
> Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
>
> I keep thinking about the CBC’s this year. Both Bella Vista/Bentonville and Fayetteville CBC’s had very high numbers of Bluebirds this year. Jacque Brown, Centerton
>
>> On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:24 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> <mailto:<millipede1977...>> wrote:
>>
>> I think I'm going to try asking around online about this sort of thing... Our yard is a jungle, and has a few brush piles.
>> Many of these birds would huddle where they can... While nest boxes have helped the bluebird population tremendously, without humans they'd be nesting in tree cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking because we cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees... and because starlings take them over.
>> My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a nest box.
>> Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes out for those birds in the winter... I wonder if there is something we could do to make them more cozy if we know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker walls to the birdhouses? Or, someone could design a "winter jacket" for the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes over a bird house, blocking more wind and providing more insulation?
>> Something that could be done short term for those extra harsh events?
>> Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds survive more than just leaving them as is?
>> I've been pondering this a lot... I have not come across any dead birds this winter and my normal feeder birds, I had tons of them. Feeding increased... rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.
>> BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and realizing that I have not reported any bluebirds lately... here in my neighborhood or city lake in Siloam Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do believe they took a big hit here as well. Getting plenty of robins but they're migrating so they may not have been birds that were already here.
>> Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I don't have any bluebird nest boxes personally. We had a pair successfully raise young in a tree cavity in our woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
>> I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give these birds a better chance... Part of this is just nature but, like I said, we've taken away a lot of their trees and brought starlings in so those bluebirds just don't have as much "natural" places to take shelter these days.
>> Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
>> Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes that are larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw or hay during the winter?
>> Just spitting out ideas...
>> Pondering in Siloam Springs...
>> Daniel Mason
>> On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108 wrote:
>>> Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here:
>>>
>>> A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.
>>>
>>> Patty and Michael
>>> Conway AR
>>>
>>>
>>> -------- Original message --------
>>> From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> <mailto:<millipede1977...>
>>> Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00)
>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
>>> Subject: Protecting birds in winter
>>>
>>> I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that it's an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
>>> I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the subject line SO many times lately.
>>> So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep on discussing it, I suggest two things.
>>> 1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter months" and then discuss anything about food and cover.
>>> 2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or ignore it. :)
>>>
>>> That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to continue the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to talk about deceased birds for so long.
>>> Daniel Mason
>>> On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:
>>>> I don’t mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now. The tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward. Just my opinion. And thank you.
>>>>
>>>> Sandy B.
>>>>
>>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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Back to top
Date: 2/24/21 12:32 pm
From: robinbuff <robinbuff...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
During the cold snap, for the first time ever, I had bluebirds coming to my feeder, particulary the sunflower hearts feeder. I decided to put out mealworms and peanut butter bites, which they glady ate. I have them in my yard and they come to my water features but never to my feeders. I feel that food was a real issue in my area.Robin BuffSent via the Samsung Galaxy S8+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Date: 2/24/21 1:19 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
I asked on a birding forum, about this in general as well as my
"ideas." Got three replies so far and none of them feel it was the
cold that did it. One person discussed the birds that live further
north, including bluebirds, where it gets that cold for longer
periods of time. Their suggestion was that it had more to do with
available food and water.
I haven't seen bluebirds at city lake the last few times... and
the creek feeding it never froze. So, no lack of water there. Food
however... probably not so easy to come by.
IF it is more of a shortage of available food, just how many of
these birds were found in nest boxes? And, when they don't find
food they just huddle up and wait?
I'm pretty curious about all of this.
I hope someone is collecting the data, tracking how widespread it
was, how many in each area, what was available, etc...
This is my male "I need to fix this" response I think.
I want to make sure someone is doing something... looking into
it... and...  I want to know what I, and each of us, can do around
my own home for future cold snaps.
This is not the first time this has happened and it wont be the
last.

I still like my "nest box winter jacket" idea... but, only if the
major contributing factor had to do with wind and cold. But, I
don't know if it was... 

This whole thing brings me back to me wishing I had the money to
pay someone to come landscape for me... native bird friendly
plants everywhere.
Speaking of which... this reminded me, and I had to do a quick
email search to see if I remembered correctly...
December of 2019 I had TONS of waxwings and bluebirds foraging on
hackberries... LOTS of them. My woods were active. I'm not sure
there were any left in February of 2020 so, perhaps this would not
have come into play anyway... but, I can say I did not see such
activity with the hackberry trees this winter as I did the
previous one.
So I can imagine certain food sources were more scarce. 
Which is interesting in a way because I think certain other food
sources were okay this year. We have at least one or three
red-headed woodpeckers that are still at city lake in Siloam
Springs this year... and the previous winter(if I remember
correctly) there were none to be found.
Food crops sure can be interesting...
Then again, the bluebirds were doing quite well up until that
storm and cold snap.
I'm rambling. Sorry...
I don't like mysteries such as this. I want it solved. I do hope
there are people investigating this very well.
Daniel Mason





On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:24 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:




I think I'm going to try asking around online
about this sort of thing... Our yard is a jungle, and
has a few brush piles.
Many of these birds would huddle where they can... 
While nest boxes have helped the bluebird population
tremendously, without humans they'd be nesting in tree
cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking because we
cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees... and
because starlings take them over.
My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a
nest box.
Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes
out for those birds in the winter... I wonder if there
is something we could do to make them more cozy if we
know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker walls to the
birdhouses? Or, someone could design a "winter jacket"
for the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes
over a bird house, blocking more wind and providing more
insulation?
Something that could be done short term for those extra
harsh events?
Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds
survive more than just leaving them as is?
I've been pondering this a lot... I have not
come across any dead birds this winter and my normal
feeder birds, I had tons of them. Feeding increased...
rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.
BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and
realizing that I have not reported any bluebirds
lately... here in my neighborhood or city lake in Siloam
Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do believe
they took a big hit here as well. Getting plenty of
robins but they're migrating so they may not have been
birds that were already here.
Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I
don't have any bluebird nest boxes personally. We had a
pair successfully raise young in a tree cavity in our
woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give
these birds a better chance...  Part of this is just
nature but, like I said, we've taken away a lot of their
trees and brought starlings in so those bluebirds just
don't have as much "natural" places to take shelter
these days.
Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes
that are larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw
or hay during the winter?
Just spitting out ideas...
Pondering in Siloam Springs...
Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108
wrote:



Good idea, Daniel. So I'm
reposting my last comment on this topic here: 



A pondering for
consideration. Michael and I are curious about the
impact of brush piles on the survival of birds
during snow events like we just had. We have at
least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres).
Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top
of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and
possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be
the same with ice but worth pondering. 


Patty and Michael 
Conway AR






-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>

Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>

Subject: Protecting birds in winter



I have a feeling that some people are going
to think or say that it's an important thing to
discuss... and, I'd agree.
I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead
birds" in the subject line SO many times lately.
So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people
want to keep on discussing it, I suggest two things.
1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased
birds. Let's switch the topic to "how to protect or
keep birds safe in the winter months" and then discuss
anything about food and cover.
2. As such, if someone wants to continue that
discussion, have a new subject heading such as
"protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll create a
new subject heading now and people can choose to use
it or ignore it. :)

That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand
wanting to continue the discussion but I can also
understand not wanting to talk about deceased birds
for so long.

Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy
Berger wrote:

I don’t mean to
offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now.
The tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward.
Just my opinion. And thank you.


Sandy B. 


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Back to top
Date: 2/24/21 11:19 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
I asked on a birding forum, about this in general as well as my "ideas."
Got three replies so far and none of them feel it was the cold that did
it. One person discussed the birds that live further north, including
bluebirds, where it gets that cold for longer periods of time. Their
suggestion was that it had more to do with available food and water.
I haven't seen bluebirds at city lake the last few times... and the
creek feeding it never froze. So, no lack of water there. Food
however... probably not so easy to come by.

IF it is more of a shortage of available food, just how many of these
birds were found in nest boxes? And, when they don't find food they just
huddle up and wait?
I'm pretty curious about all of this.
I hope someone is collecting the data, tracking how widespread it was,
how many in each area, what was available, etc...
This is my male "I need to fix this" response I think.
I want to make sure someone is doing something... looking into it...
and...  I want to know what I, and each of us, can do around my own home
for future cold snaps.
This is not the first time this has happened and it wont be the last.

I still like my "nest box winter jacket" idea... but, only if the major
contributing factor had to do with wind and cold. But, I don't know if
it was...

This whole thing brings me back to me wishing I had the money to pay
someone to come landscape for me... native bird friendly plants everywhere.
Speaking of which... this reminded me, and I had to do a quick email
search to see if I remembered correctly...
December of 2019 I had TONS of waxwings and bluebirds foraging on
hackberries... LOTS of them. My woods were active. I'm not sure there
were any left in February of 2020 so, perhaps this would not have come
into play anyway... but, I can say I did not see such activity with the
hackberry trees this winter as I did the previous one.
So I can imagine certain food sources were more scarce.
Which is interesting in a way because I think certain other food sources
were okay this year. We have at least one or three red-headed
woodpeckers that are still at city lake in Siloam Springs this year...
and the previous winter(if I remember correctly) there were none to be
found.
Food crops sure can be interesting...
Then again, the bluebirds were doing quite well up until that storm and
cold snap.
I'm rambling. Sorry...
I don't like mysteries such as this. I want it solved. I do hope there
are people investigating this very well.

Daniel Mason


>> On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:24 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
>> <mailto:<millipede1977...>> wrote:
>>
>> I think I'm going to try asking around online about this sort of
>> thing... Our yard is a jungle, and has a few brush piles.
>> Many of these birds would huddle where they can... While nest boxes
>> have helped the bluebird population tremendously, without humans
>> they'd be nesting in tree cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking
>> because we cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees... and
>> because starlings take them over.
>> My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a nest box.
>> Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes out for those
>> birds in the winter... I wonder if there is something we could do to
>> make them more cozy if we know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker
>> walls to the birdhouses? Or, someone could design a "winter jacket"
>> for the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes over a bird
>> house, blocking more wind and providing more insulation?
>> Something that could be done short term for those extra harsh events?
>> Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds survive more
>> than just leaving them as is?
>>
>> I've been pondering this a lot... I have not come across any dead
>> birds this winter and my normal feeder birds, I had tons of them.
>> Feeding increased... rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.
>> BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and realizing that I
>> have not reported any bluebirds lately... here in my neighborhood or
>> city lake in Siloam Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do
>> believe they took a big hit here as well. Getting plenty of robins
>> but they're migrating so they may not have been birds that were
>> already here.
>>
>> Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I don't have any bluebird
>> nest boxes personally. We had a pair successfully raise young in a
>> tree cavity in our woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
>> I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give these birds a
>> better chance...  Part of this is just nature but, like I said, we've
>> taken away a lot of their trees and brought starlings in so those
>> bluebirds just don't have as much "natural" places to take shelter
>> these days.
>> Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
>> Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes that are
>> larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw or hay during the winter?
>> Just spitting out ideas...
>>
>> Pondering in Siloam Springs...
>> Daniel Mason
>>
>> On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108 wrote:
>>> Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here:
>>>
>>> A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the
>>> impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events
>>> like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3
>>> acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the
>>> pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps.
>>> Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.
>>>
>>> Patty and Michael
>>> Conway AR
>>>
>>>
>>> -------- Original message --------
>>> From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
>>> Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00)
>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>>> Subject: Protecting birds in winter
>>>
>>> I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that
>>> it's an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
>>> I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the
>>> subject line SO many times lately.
>>> So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep
>>> on discussing it, I suggest two things.
>>> 1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch
>>> the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter
>>> months" and then discuss anything about food and cover.
>>> 2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new
>>> subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll
>>> create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or
>>> ignore it. :)
>>>
>>> That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to
>>> continue the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to
>>> talk about deceased birds for so long.
>>>
>>> Daniel Mason
>>>
>>> On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:
>>>> I don’t mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds
>>>> now. The tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward. Just my
>>>> opinion. And thank you.
>>>>
>>>> Sandy B.
>>>>
>>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>>
>>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>>>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>>> <http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1>
>>>>
>>>
>>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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>>> <http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1>
>>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
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>> <http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1>
>>
>
>
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Date: 2/24/21 9:54 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
My two cents on the recent cold spell.

As a scientist, a biologist, an entomologist, I am interested in mortality in animal populations. While I admit it is painful and sad to learn about mortality, understanding the impact of environmental factors on bird populations is extremely important.

There was a massive mortality of birds in the Western U.S. earlier this year. Bird populations, overall, are declining, as are freshwater fish, mussels, and insect populations.

It is essential that we discover the causes of declines in bird, insect, plant, fish, mussel populations, and work to reverse these declines. In order to do that we need estimates of what happened during this extreme cold weather event. What bird species were killed, how many, and why, and what we can do to mitigate such events in the future?

For that reason, I hope that people will document what birds they observed dead, species, numbers, what they think happened.

From my observations in Fayetteville, robins and mockingbirds were hit hardest. I have been doing a casual survey of dead birds on the Univ. AR campus. Dead birds are rapidly eaten by crows, or other animals.

Documenting the numbers of birds and the species is a form of citizen science.

For instance, I had no idea that bluebirds would crowd into a bluebird house during a cold spell. That tells us something. And various people have suggested insulating bluebird houses. I don't think this is super practical. Perhaps more supplemental feeding of mealworms for insectivorous birds like bluebirds would be a better idea.

Others have suggested brush piles. I think this is a good practical suggestion and I am planning on making more brush piles. I used to burn the brush, now I plan to make piles on the edges of the woods and just leave them.

Number one in terms of importance, I think, is planting as many good native berry-producing shrubs and trees as possible, and also leaving native grasses and prairie plants tall and full of seeds instead of mowing or burning.

Just my two cents.

If people have data on the effect of this cold spell on birds, or ideas, they can share them with me privately instead of a group email.

Don Steinkraus, Professor of Entomology, Univ AR


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 10:32 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter

I keep thinking about the CBCs this year. Both Bella Vista/Bentonville and Fayetteville CBCs had very high numbers of Bluebirds this year. Jacque Brown, Centerton

On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:24 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...><mailto:<millipede1977...>> wrote:


I think I'm going to try asking around online about this sort of thing... Our yard is a jungle, and has a few brush piles.
Many of these birds would huddle where they can... While nest boxes have helped the bluebird population tremendously, without humans they'd be nesting in tree cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking because we cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees... and because starlings take them over.
My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a nest box.
Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes out for those birds in the winter... I wonder if there is something we could do to make them more cozy if we know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker walls to the birdhouses? Or, someone could design a "winter jacket" for the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes over a bird house, blocking more wind and providing more insulation?
Something that could be done short term for those extra harsh events?
Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds survive more than just leaving them as is?

I've been pondering this a lot... I have not come across any dead birds this winter and my normal feeder birds, I had tons of them. Feeding increased... rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.
BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and realizing that I have not reported any bluebirds lately... here in my neighborhood or city lake in Siloam Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do believe they took a big hit here as well. Getting plenty of robins but they're migrating so they may not have been birds that were already here.

Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I don't have any bluebird nest boxes personally. We had a pair successfully raise young in a tree cavity in our woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give these birds a better chance... Part of this is just nature but, like I said, we've taken away a lot of their trees and brought starlings in so those bluebirds just don't have as much "natural" places to take shelter these days.
Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes that are larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw or hay during the winter?
Just spitting out ideas...

Pondering in Siloam Springs...
Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108 wrote:
Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here:

A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.

Patty and Michael
Conway AR


-------- Original message --------
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...><mailto:<millipede1977...>
Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Protecting birds in winter


I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that it's an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the subject line SO many times lately.
So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep on discussing it, I suggest two things.
1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter months" and then discuss anything about food and cover.
2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or ignore it. :)

That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to continue the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to talk about deceased birds for so long.

Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:
I dont mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now. The tragedy is over and its time to move forward. Just my opinion. And thank you.

Sandy B.

________________________________

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Date: 2/24/21 8:56 am
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Kite
Kite.? Mississippi ? Over War Memorial Golf course just now. Soaring & having a big time. Could only see silhouette but triangular tail. Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/24/21 8:32 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
I keep thinking about the CBC’s this year. Both Bella Vista/Bentonville and Fayetteville CBC’s had very high numbers of Bluebirds this year. Jacque Brown, Centerton

> On Feb 24, 2021, at 10:24 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> I think I'm going to try asking around online about this sort of thing... Our yard is a jungle, and has a few brush piles.
> Many of these birds would huddle where they can... While nest boxes have helped the bluebird population tremendously, without humans they'd be nesting in tree cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking because we cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees... and because starlings take them over.
> My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a nest box.
> Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes out for those birds in the winter... I wonder if there is something we could do to make them more cozy if we know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker walls to the birdhouses? Or, someone could design a "winter jacket" for the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes over a bird house, blocking more wind and providing more insulation?
> Something that could be done short term for those extra harsh events?
> Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds survive more than just leaving them as is?
>
> I've been pondering this a lot... I have not come across any dead birds this winter and my normal feeder birds, I had tons of them. Feeding increased... rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.
> BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and realizing that I have not reported any bluebirds lately... here in my neighborhood or city lake in Siloam Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do believe they took a big hit here as well. Getting plenty of robins but they're migrating so they may not have been birds that were already here.
>
> Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I don't have any bluebird nest boxes personally. We had a pair successfully raise young in a tree cavity in our woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
> I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give these birds a better chance... Part of this is just nature but, like I said, we've taken away a lot of their trees and brought starlings in so those bluebirds just don't have as much "natural" places to take shelter these days.
> Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
> Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes that are larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw or hay during the winter?
> Just spitting out ideas...
>
> Pondering in Siloam Springs...
> Daniel Mason
>
> On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108 wrote:
>> Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here:
>>
>> A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.
>>
>> Patty and Michael
>> Conway AR
>>
>>
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> <mailto:<millipede1977...>
>> Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00)
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Protecting birds in winter
>>
>> I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that it's an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
>> I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the subject line SO many times lately.
>> So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep on discussing it, I suggest two things.
>> 1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter months" and then discuss anything about food and cover.
>> 2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or ignore it. :)
>>
>> That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to continue the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to talk about deceased birds for so long.
>>
>> Daniel Mason
>>
>> On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:
>>> I don’t mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now. The tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward. Just my opinion. And thank you.
>>>
>>> Sandy B.
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1 <http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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Back to top
Date: 2/24/21 8:24 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
I think I'm going to try asking around online about this sort of
thing... Our yard is a jungle, and has a few brush piles.
Many of these birds would huddle where they can...  While nest boxes
have helped the bluebird population tremendously, without humans they'd
be nesting in tree cavities... Those tree cavities are lacking because
we cut down "unsightly"(I love them) dead trees... and because starlings
take them over.
My guess is that a tree cavity would be warmer than a nest box.
Which has me thinking... if people have a lot of boxes out for those
birds in the winter... I wonder if there is something we could do to
make them more cozy if we know such a harsh cold is coming? Thicker
walls to the birdhouses? Or, someone could design a "winter jacket" for
the bird houses... something that snaps or velcroes over a bird house,
blocking more wind and providing more insulation?
Something that could be done short term for those extra harsh events?
Any thoughts on if something like that would help birds survive more
than just leaving them as is?

I've been pondering this a lot... I have not come across any dead birds
this winter and my normal feeder birds, I had tons of them. Feeding
increased... rusty blackbirds galore... 70 cardinals one day.
BUT... I was just thinking about it this morning and realizing that I
have not reported any bluebirds lately... here in my neighborhood or
city lake in Siloam Springs where there's ALWAYS bluebirds. So I do
believe they took a big hit here as well. Getting plenty of robins but
they're migrating so they may not have been birds that were already here.

Anyway... that's what I'm thinking about. I don't have any bluebird nest
boxes personally. We had a pair successfully raise young in a tree
cavity in our woods the other year. That was pretty cool to see.
I'd love to see more thoughts on what we can do to give these birds a
better chance...  Part of this is just nature but, like I said, we've
taken away a lot of their trees and brought starlings in so those
bluebirds just don't have as much "natural" places to take shelter these
days.
Any thoughts on winterizing nest boxes?
Or even, taking down the nest boxes and putting up boxes that are
larger, thicker, and perhaps lined with straw or hay during the winter?
Just spitting out ideas...

Pondering in Siloam Springs...
Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 10:12 AM, plm108 wrote:
> Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here:
>
> A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the
> impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like
> we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres).
> Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile,
> insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't
> know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.
>
> Patty and Michael
> Conway AR
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Protecting birds in winter
>
> I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that it's
> an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
> I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the subject
> line SO many times lately.
> So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep on
> discussing it, I suggest two things.
> 1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch
> the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter months"
> and then discuss anything about food and cover.
> 2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new
> subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll
> create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or
> ignore it. :)
>
> That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to continue
> the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to talk about
> deceased birds for so long.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:
>> I don’t mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now.
>> The tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward. Just my opinion.
>> And thank you.
>>
>> Sandy B.
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>> <http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1>
>>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
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Date: 2/24/21 8:00 am
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
In addition to the sapsucker feeding on another dead sapsucker on our deck and a dead mockingbird on the trail we head a fresh cardinal kill in the snow.
All of this snow had to also drastically change hunting behavior in predators. It is an eye-opener to see how this cold and snow changed things here for us. The flip side to this polar vortex though is that places that are supposed to have snow and extreme cold did not. It was much ballyhooed that Arkansas was colder than much of Alaska last week. You’ve got to worry about the creatures who should be living under a blanket of cold snow in the winter who are instead dealing with less snow right now and indeed on average over the coming years and beyond.

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

> On Feb 23, 2021, at 10:25 AM, JANINE PERLMAN <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
> 
> Definitely worth pondering. Our brush piles were dry beneath the snow and ice---and fwiw we had no dead bluebirds (or signs of roosting) in boxes, but I did hear at least one bluebird after the snow quit.
>
> There's much to be learned from disasters like this: the excellent suggestions for mitigation---brush piles, dead trees left standing, and native plants---and hopefully increased attention to our contributions to climate change. I expect we all await bird population data for the coming year.
>
> Unfortunately, most humans need reports that hit us viscerally to motivate us to take action.
>
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
>
>
> On Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 9:41:56 AM CST, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
>
> A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.
>
> Patty and Michael
> Conway AR
>
> Patty
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> Date: 2/23/21 9:07 AM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
> Yes, you are right, this was the worst combination of factors. Our below zero temperatures, nine days of ice and snow and lack of food all contributed. Every place there is an invasive plant is where there should be a native plants producing fruits and berries. Ice covers up even the seed stashes that birds have places in bark crevices and other storage locations. People can do better to reduce the impacts of such climatic events. I am getting reports of the death of many species, even in barns, under shrubs, and ducks at frozen ponds. A tragic event. People can help by improving their yards to provide food and cover and get rid of the non-native and invasive plants.
>
> Jerry
>
> From: Donald C. Steinkraus
> Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 8:47 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
> During the coldest days we found a mockingbird so cold it could not walk or fly. We tried to save it by putting it in a box in the house, but it died.
>
> Yesterday, Feb. 22, I was on the Univ AR campus in Fayetteville and found seven dead robins clustered by a wall of Mullins Library. It looked to me like they were trying to find shelter and were huddling by the building and froze to death.
>
> I, personally, think that many freezing deaths in robins, bluebirds, and other birds is due to a lack of abundant native fruits on shrubs and trees, and also seeds from native grasses and other plants. Much of the landscape is now covered with houses, roads, factories, parking lots, lawns, and what is not covered by manmade objects is planted either in useless non-native plants such as Nandina, crepe myrtle and other "foundation" plants, or in the invasive plants humans let loose in N. America (bush honeysuckle, privet, etc.).
>
> I think large numbers of birds died from starvation and freezing last week and as others have stated we may never know because their carcasses are in places we will not see them, or they will be scavenged rapidly and disappear.
>
> Don
>
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
> Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 6:50 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
> We had no dead bluebirds in our boxes at home but found 1 dead junco, 1 dead great egret and 1 dead snow goose at Beaverfork Lake. Likely more but we were primarily birding the lake.
>
> Patty and Michael
> Conway AR
>
>
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
> Date: 2/22/21 5:22 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
> I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor. I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!
>
> Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.
>
> Rick Jones
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...> wrote:
> I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
> I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:
> Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day.
> Jane-In Searcy
>
>> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.
>>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
>> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
>>
>> Jerry
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Lenore Gifford
>> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
>>
>> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
>> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
>> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
>>
>> Lenore
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ############################
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Back to top
Date: 2/24/21 6:58 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Big woodcock moon
It has "felt like Woodcocks" out there for the past few nights, but I’ve not yet found any either.
Checked the few remaining birdhouses and there was only nesting material from birds and or flying squirrels but no dead bluebirds or other species.
However I didn’t hear a single bluebird chortling yesterday in the 70°+ sunshine.
J

> On Feb 24, 2021, at 8:25 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> Last night we had what I’d term a big woodcock moon. By that I mean it is the right time to find American Woodcocks in migration and with such a big moon, a longer time to see them at dusk. So a few of us masked-up, socially-distanced, and headed out to woodcock dancing grounds in Wedington Unit, Ozark National Forest, just west of Fayetteville.
>
> We have had woodcock field trips as a rite of spring for more than a decade, sponsored by Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society. No NWAAS field trips until the pandemic is controlled, but of course the woodcocks are still on the move. Call last evening a minor celebration of the end of the deadly polar vortex.
>
> It was a spectacular night – warm, bright with a huge woodcock moon, and lots of wildlife activity. We saw at least 75 American Robins flying to roost, plus Hermit Thrush and Cedar Waxwings, all survivors of the historically destructive polar vortex. We got first star more or less on time, around 6:28, accompanied by first bats. But no woodcocks. We heard a pair of Barred Owls. Then a pack of coyotes howled up a fine chorus. But no woodcocks.
>
> Just as a reminder: the ARBIRD list had several postings of woodcocks seen in odd places as the polar vortex barreled down upon on us. This may, or may not, explain why we had no woodcocks in Wedington fields last night. But with that said, it was an extraordinary evening to be outside. As I have aged I’ve recognized this stuff is not about an end product, but a process. Another way of saying we aren’t done with woodcocks yet.
>
> Here is Vivek Govind Kumar’s eBird submission for Wedington fields last night: https://ebird.org/checklist/S82255556 <https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS82255556&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C53832c7cbe06427ce49308d8d8d0119f%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C1%7C0%7C637497735440352759%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=Zksz5UUHNPHjvrnTpwGUyJ0KjwB1fJAhnUfVx%2FilnMU%3D&reserved=0>. Got woodcocks?
>
>
>
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Back to top
Date: 2/24/21 6:25 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Big woodcock moon
Last night we had what Id term a big woodcock moon. By that I mean it is the right time to find American Woodcocks in migration and with such a big moon, a longer time to see them at dusk. So a few of us masked-up, socially-distanced, and headed out to woodcock dancing grounds in Wedington Unit, Ozark National Forest, just west of Fayetteville.
We have had woodcock field trips as a rite of spring for more than a decade, sponsored by Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society. No NWAAS field trips until the pandemic is controlled, but of course the woodcocks are still on the move. Call last evening a minor celebration of the end of the deadly polar vortex.
It was a spectacular night warm, bright with a huge woodcock moon, and lots of wildlife activity. We saw at least 75 American Robins flying to roost, plus Hermit Thrush and Cedar Waxwings, all survivors of the historically destructive polar vortex. We got first star more or less on time, around 6:28, accompanied by first bats. But no woodcocks. We heard a pair of Barred Owls. Then a pack of coyotes howled up a fine chorus. But no woodcocks.
Just as a reminder: the ARBIRD list had several postings of woodcocks seen in odd places as the polar vortex barreled down upon on us. This may, or may not, explain why we had no woodcocks in Wedington fields last night. But with that said, it was an extraordinary evening to be outside. As I have aged Ive recognized this stuff is not about an end product, but a process. Another way of saying we arent done with woodcocks yet.
Here is Vivek Govind Kumars eBird submission for Wedington fields last night: https://ebird.org/checklist/S82255556<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS82255556&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C53832c7cbe06427ce49308d8d8d0119f%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C1%7C0%7C637497735440352759%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=Zksz5UUHNPHjvrnTpwGUyJ0KjwB1fJAhnUfVx%2FilnMU%3D&reserved=0>. Got woodcocks?


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Back to top
Date: 2/24/21 5:51 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Latest News and Updates on Birding and Nature Conservation
FYI



Jeff Short



From: Yossi Leshem List
[mailto:<TAU-LIFESCI-YOSSILESHEM-EN...>] On Behalf Of Yossi
Leshem
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2021 5:32 AM
To: <TAU-LIFESCI-YOSSILESHEM-EN...>
Subject: Latest News and Updates on Birding and Nature Conservation



Dear Friends,

Re: Latest News and Updates on Birding and Nature Conservation



1. Online cameras in raptors nests - the nesting season has begun!

The project, which started seven years ago, became an extraordinary success
in connecting the public to the importance of protecting raptors in Israel.
In 2020, following the lock downs and people being stuck in their homes,
the website viewing of the online camera doubled from about 6 million hits
to 13 million hits.

Recently the Griffon Vulture laid an egg. The male chose a new female to
replace his mate, who died last year from high-tension electrocution. The
male, who had to take care of the chick alone, received assistance in the
chick feeding by a military drone,
until the fledgling flew safely from the nest. Watch video:
https://youtu.be/ZYPbd1Zj1FA

Dr. Gilad Friedman manages the project. It is a joint venture of the Society
for the Protection of Nature in Israel, the Hoopoe Foundation, Israel
Ornithological Center (BirdLife Israel), the Nature and Park Authority, and
the Nature Defense Forces - Commanders take
Responsibility for Their Environment. See link to the camera at the Griffon
Vulture's nest: <https://www.birds.org.il/en/camera/26>
https://www.birds.org.il/en/camera/26

The Long legged buzzard female already laid three eggs. See the link to the
Long-legged buzzard nest camera: <https://www.birds.org.il/en/camera/23>
https://www.birds.org.il/en/camera/23

cid:<image001.jpg...>

15/02/2021 - the Long legged buzzard female in the nest with two eggs.
Photographed on the morning of the second laying.



In the future, we hope to broadcast footage from an Eagle owl's nest.

Thanks to Marty, Garry and Bobby Goldberg and Bob Rubinoff form Toronto,
Canada, for their significant support of the project.



This week, four cameras were installed in Barn Owl's nesting boxes, as a
joint operation of the National Project: Barn Owls as biological pest
control agents in agriculture with Mekorot (the Israeli water company), on
Mekorot sites.

The cameras were installed inside and outside of each nesting box.
Thanks to PhD student Itai Bloch, the project's monitoring coordination
manager, who is leading the activity.

The Barn Owl camera will start broadcasting next week

<https://www.birds.org.il/he/camera/27>
https://www.birds.org.il/he/camera/27


cid:<image002.png...>

cid:<image003.jpg...>

cid:<image025.jpg...>

cid:<image026.jpg...>

cid:<image027.jpg...>

cid:<image029.jpg...>

cid:<image030.png...>



Special thanks to Karyn Gellman and Ellen Buckstein who donated to this
special project in the memory of their father, David E. Buck.


cid:<image031.jpg...>

cid:<image032.jpg...>


February 2nd,2021 -Barn Owl on the nesting box and inside with three eggs.
Photos from the nesting box



2. Minister Michael Biton and the Nature Defense Forces

Michael Biton is the Minister of Civil and Social Affairs at the Ministry of
Defense. In the past, Minister Biton was the mayor of Yeruham, in the Negev.
For 7 years, he was a navigation guide at the Yeruham Field Study Center of
the Society for the Protection of Nature in Israel (SPNI)
and became a keen raptor enthusiast.

Brig. Gen. (Res.) Baruch Spiegel, who was the Golani Brigade Commander, and
Prof. Yossi Leshem, who served as CEO of SPNI, (while Minister Biton was a
guide in the SPNI scouting program), approached the Minister to help promote
the day-to-day activities of -
60 units in the project "Nature Defense Forces - Commanders take
responsibility of their environment".

The Minister asked to meet at his "private training ground", in Yeruham
Park, near Lake Yeruham, where a bird ringing station led by the KKL is
located. At the meeting, they discussed the Minister's support of the
activities of the Nature Defense Force project,
and the strengthening of the educational connection with the IDF commander
school. Col. Elran Morash, the Commander of The School for Infantry Corps
Professions and Squad Commanders, which is located nearby, joined the
meeting.

In meetings with esteemed ministers, the minister usually arrives with an
entourage of assistants and security guards. Surprisingly, this time the
minister arrived riding his bike, enjoying pedaling in the open air of the
park and learning about
bird ringing and bird migration at the ringing station.

The meeting was extremely successful and the Minister was able to exercise
his authority in promoting the amazing activities of the project.


cid:<image033.jpg...>

cid:<image034.jpg...>


Minister Biton with Brig. Gen. (Res.) Baruch Spiegel and the Commander of
the IDF The School for Infantry Corps Professions and Squad Commanders, Col.
Elran Morash

Minister Michael Biton arriving to the meeting riding his bike





3. The ATLAS research project and the Barn Owls "takeoff"

cid:<image035.jpg...>

The antenna, 59 meters high, at a military base at the top of Mount Gilboa



Doctorate student Shlomo Cain from the School of Zoology at Tel Aviv
University is studying Barn Owls movement in the Harod Valley, Beit She'an
Valley and Jordan using Atlas system. The Israeli Ministry of Regional
Cooperation and MAVA Foundation (Switzerland)
funds the same activity in Jordan. The antennas deployed by Dr. Orr Spiegel
covered part of Jordan, but deeper coverage was required. Dr. Spiegel and
Prof. Yossi Leshem are the supervisors of the Doctorate.

On February 15, 2021, an antenna of the Atlas system was installed on an
existing antenna at a military base at the Gilboa Mountain summit, 59 meters
high (!)

Special thanks to the head of the IDF Planning Directorate, Maj. Gen. Tomer
Bar, and to the Head of the Planning and Development Dep. at the Planning
Directorate, for helping to realize this vision, and thus contribute to
deepening cooperation with the Jordanians during the
Covid 19 pandemic lockdown.

During 2020 nesting season, transmitters were attached to 35 Barn Owls; five
of which crossed the border into Jordan. We hope that this year we will be
able to supply the Jordanians, led by Gen. Mansour Abu Rashid, Chairman of
ACPD,
with transmitters and will be able to collect Barn Owl movement in Jordan as
well.

Thanks to Peter and Naomi Neustadter and Larry Kornhauser for their
significant support of the Barn Owl project.



4. Getting ready for a new nesting season 2021

On February 21, a meeting was held at the Aram Naharayim Bridge, for a
preparatory talk on the 2021 Barn Owls nesting Season.

The meeting was attended by General Mansour Abu Rashid, Chairman of the
ACPD, Jordan, and Brig. Gen. (Res.) Baruch Spiegel - two partners in the
peace agreement between Israel and Jordan. Doctoral student at Tel Aviv
University (Israel), Shlomo Cain from Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu, who studies the
Barn Owl movement using the Atlas system, and Moneer Mhamed, from Ar'ara
(Israel), a doctoral student in education at Yarmouk University (Jordan),
who is building the website for the Breathing and Birds project, attended
the meeting as well. ACPD representatives in Jordan is building the website,
simultaneously with the work done in Israel. We hope to return to full
activity in Israel and Jordan, as in the past.

cid:<image036.jpg...>

Right to left: Moneer Mhamed, Gen. Mansour Abu Rashid,
Brig. Gen. (Res.) Baruch Spiegel, Shlomo Cain



5. The Black-shouldered Kite joins the Barn Owls as a biological pest
control agent

A decade ago, a single pair of Black-shouldered Kites began to nest in the
Agamon Hula Lake next to the ringing station. Since then the population has
spread amazingly throughout Israel. The common rough estimate is that there
are currently about 1000 nesting pairs (!) in Israel. It turns out that the
Black-shouldered Kites maintain 2-4 nesting cycles a year, and therefore
spread rapidly. It has been found that the Black-shouldered Kites feed
mainly on rodents, and build significant support for the Barn Owls and
Common Kestrels in the extinction of rodents in agricultural fields (without
any need for a government budget from the Ministry of Agriculture, funding
for the "Hoopoe Foundation" or construction of nesting boxes.)

Hanoch Plesser, from Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu, who was one of the pioneers of the
Barn Owl project in 1983, follows the world of Nature and often filming it.
He documented a Black-shouldered Kite feeding on a young rat.

See the video shot by Hanoch: <https://youtu.be/3-w91JPlCVY>
https://youtu.be/3-w91JPlCVY

cid:<image037.jpg...>

Black-shouldered Kite flying sequence (photo: Amir Gilad)



6. The Regional Cooperation on Barn Owl expended to Greece

After more than 500 nesting boxes for Barn Owls were installed in Cyprus as
a joint venture of the Hoopoe Foundation and the International Center for
the Study of Bird Migration of the SPNI, along with a BirdLife Cyprus
(organization similar to the SPNI),
Dr. Vasileios Bontzorlos, from Greece, joined the initiative. He erected 120
nesting boxes for Barn Owls in the province of Thessaly, in northern Greece.
Recently, he established a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) to promote
the subject of the use of Barn Owls and biological pest control agents.

Dr. Bontzorlos visited Israel twice and he is a partner in the initiative to
join the trilateral agreement signed by the Prime Minister of Israel, the
President of Greece and the President of Cyprus on the issue of gas in the
Mediterranean, security and cyber. In 2021, we hope that the trilateral
agreements of the regional cooperation will include the Barn Owls project.

Dr. Bontzorlos branded the new organization with a special designed logo,
and already produced a mug, an eco-friendly bag, an apron and other
merchandise.


cid:<image038.jpg...>

cid:<image039.jpg...>

cid:<image040.jpg...>





A story about the Barn Owl project in Greece

FROM THE REGION OF THESSALY, GREECE

"Green solution" for the treatment of rodents in the Thessalian rural
ecosystem

11 February 2021, 18:36 Thessaly Reading: 2 minutes

cid:<image041.jpg...>

The Barn owl was recruited by the Region of Thessaly for the drastic
reduction in a natural way, of the rodent population that destroys the
agricultural crops in the Thessalian rural ecosystem. The Barn Owl is a
nocturnal raptor of global distribution, which habitats, lives, feeds and
reproduces exclusively in rural ecosystems. A pair of Barn Owls feed on
3,000 to 6,000 rodents per year, with an emphasis on harmful rodents that
destroy crops.



As the Governor of Thessaly Costas Agorastos stated during the 1st
teleconference of the Region and Municipalities on the treatment of rodents
with the Barn Owl, "the season imposes combined holistic policies
corresponding to the biological risks and threats that surround us. We need
to treat nature as an ally and not as an enemy. This means that we need to
plan and implement actions "using" nature and natural processes. In this
context "added the Regional" Barn Owl can function as a completely natural
regulator of harmful rodents in the Thessalian countryside, protecting
public health, as rodents are sources of infection and contribute to the
rational management and protection of habitats. >.

cid:<image042.jpg...>

The online meeting was attended by the Mayors of Killerer Thanasis
Nasiakopoulos, Elassona Nikos Gatsas, Agias Antonis Gountaras, Farsalon
Makis Eskioglou, Riga Fereou Dimitris Nasikas and the Deputy Mayor of Rural
Development of the Municipality of Larissa R Larissa. It should be noted
that the Municipality of Larissa is the first municipality in the country to
implement this natural pest control program, having signed a memorandum of
cooperation with AMKE "Organization for the Management and Conservation of
Biodiversity in Agricultural Ecosystems - TYTO".



The researcher Vassilis Bontzorlos, Doctor of Ecology & Wildlife and
Chairman of the Board of AMKE "TYTO" stated: "Today's meeting is a very
important principle for the implementation of a strategic plan that will
address the important problem of rodents in the Thessalian plain in a
broader context. The solutions we propose are based on the deep knowledge of
the operation of nature listen to the needs of agricultural production but
also understand the operation of the economy. I feel emotion, joy but also
honor to implement in my country the scientific program that we have been
implementing and planning for decades in countries such as Israel,
Switzerland and Cyprus. We thank from the bottom of our hearts the Region of
Thessaly for the interest and support, but also all the municipalities ".



The Barn Owl project is progressing in Cyprus as well; see an article
published few days ago:

cid:<image043.png...>

<https://cyprus-mail.com/category/cyprus/> Cyprus
<https://cyprus-mail.com/category/environment/> Environment
<https://cyprus-mail.com/category/featured/> Featured

Nesting boxes installed in Chlorakas to boost barn owl numbers

By <https://cyprus-mail.com/author/bejay-browne/> Bejay Browne February
19, 2021
<https://cyprus-mail.com/2021/02/19/nesting-boxes-installed-in-chlorakas-to-
boost-barn-owl-numbers/#disqus_thread> 11 Comments1178

installing boxes in chlorakas

Six artificial bird nests suitable for barn owls have been installed in
Chlorakas in a move welcomed by the local community leader.

The installation of the man-made nesting boxes is part of a pan-Cypriot
installation programme which aims to increase the population of owls and the
biological control of rodents to help eliminate the need to use chemicals..

"The department of agriculture and the game and fauna service in cooperation
with Chlorakas community council have placed six artificial nests suitable
for Tyto Alba, (barn owls) in the area. It is hoped that it will increase
the population, which are also a good and natural way to fight the rodent
population," community leader Nikolas Liasidis said in a statement

Pilot efforts to install artificial nests have been made in various areas of
Cyprus, which were hailed as a great success, according to the ministry of
agriculture.

Many areas, which in the past suffered from rodents, now use only the
installation of artificial nests, an action that is environmentally friendly
and respectful of human health, the ministry noted. More than 400 nests have
been installed so far and another 100 are in the works.

"Artificial nests serve two purposes. First of all they help birds find safe
and satisfying nesting areas and therefore contribute to their population
recovery. Also, they help promote the biological fight against rodents, a
method that is more economical and, more importantly, safer for human health
since it is free from chemical poisons and preparations that serve this
purpose," Liasidis said.

According to BirdLife Cyprus, which started the pilot project in 2015 to use
barn owls as pest control agents in farming as an alternative to using
rodenticides/ The project was implemented together with SPNI (BirdLife in
Israel) with funding from the Tassos Leventis Conservation Foundation.

Rodenticides are used very extensively in Cyprus. Some 300 tonnes of
bromadiolone 0.25 per cent, a potent second generation anti-coagulant
rodenticide, is used annually in the countryside. These are distributed at a
subsidised price to local communities who then distribute them to farmers to
control rodents that damage trees and crops.

The barn owl (Tyto Alba) is a nocturnal bird of prey who with its excellent
night vision, incredible hearing and silent flight, hunts and eats up to
1,000 rodents per year.
"In Cyprus, thanks to the project, nest boxes for barn owls and for kestrels
are being installed in specific areas in collaboration with farmers.
Relevant workshops also take place to provide information to farmers as well
as relevant authorities," BirdLife said.
Barn owls mainly hunt within a short 1km radius around their nest, sometimes
ranging up to 4.5km away, so it is imperative to make sure that there is no
poison use within this radius, otherwise barn owls will risk dying from
secondary poisoning.

"The crucial period is when people stop using rodenticides up until the
point when barn owls occupy the nest and start 'working' the area. During
that time, it is important for farmers to be patient and accept that the
rodents may increase temporarily."
An increase in the population of Owls aims to cover the main areas affected
by rats, which have mushroomed into large numbers in various areas of Cyprus
in recent years, noted Liasidis.

Their diet includes rodents, reptiles, amphibians, birds and small mammals.
From scientific studies that have been carried out in various areas in
Cyprus and elsewhere, over 90 per cent of the birds' diet consists of
rodents, said the ministry. Each adult bird can consume 4-6 rodents each
night and this number increases if there are young to be fed.

A pair of barn owls feed on thousands of rodents a year, Liasidis concluded.





6. Snowy Jerusalem and Har Gilo

Last week the snow covered Jerusalem and my place of residence, Har Gilo, in
a white blanket.

Watch three exciting videos from the Gazelle Valley, of the 72 gazelles
excited by the snow:

https://bit.ly/2P1LnQ0

https://bit.ly/2NtTowD

https://bit.ly/37D2rlH



And a few of photos: https://bit.ly/3upWHpb

cid:<image045.jpg...>

Running in the Gazelle Valley, Jerusalem (photo: Amir Balaban)



7. A reminder

A zoom lecture in English TODAY Wednesday, February 24th , 21:30 Israel time
(19:30 UK time). Yossi Leshem will be a guest speaker together with the
Birder and famous film producer Stephen Moss.








cid:<image046.png...>







The Anglo Israel Association is delighted to invite you to a talk:


Migrating Birds Know No Boundaries


Migrating birds do not recognize political borders, and serve as ideal
symbols of the era of peace that is dawning in the Middle East.

cid:<image047.png...>


With
<https://linkprotect.cudasvc.com/url?a=https%3a%2f%2fangloisraelassociation.
us7.list-manage.com%2ftrack%2fclick%3fu%3de3e055a9364460959a1031759%26id%3d2
e8190e7a9%26e%3de6912abca4&c=E,1,fV-4XGkyy_55vsl03EZxAadUDURL4Eoqxm6Wt9hFpmZ
8DqndBh6YXuDDdYbnEIao0_nOsCZuK7IeAaBiBdqu3HmUyojyNQZf0lvy-u3TGZba4PHAhUCxhcI
L&typo=1> Yossi Leshem, Professor Emeritus in the School of Zoology, Faculty
of Life Sciences at Tel Aviv University, and former CEO of the Society for
the Protection of Nature in Israel (SPNI)
Contributing and moderating the event:
<https://linkprotect.cudasvc.com/url?a=https%3a%2f%2fangloisraelassociation.
us7.list-manage.com%2ftrack%2fclick%3fu%3de3e055a9364460959a1031759%26id%3df
d12da5bc5%26e%3de6912abca4&c=E,1,7KufgtNkhOU81BzINa2v8OoV2x0NCE2omDC0EaYbGai
qZ6946-UA9yxpcKbHjs_BhXMy53xeDjGS-3WM1-hz6REIkUF7jlFhxhKVrZTQx1s,&typo=1>
Stephen Moss, Naturalist, Author, Broadcaster and TV Producer, Bath Spa
University

On 24th February at 7:30pm GMT


<https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_GjBDGGbDTuakzw2RyDnYqA>
Register here


After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing
information about joining the meeting.

We look forward to you joining the event.
The AIA

Enjoy your reading and keep safe!

Happy Purim cid:<image048.png...>

Prof. Yossi Leshem









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Date: 2/24/21 5:30 am
From: Bo Verser <bo.verser1...>
Subject: Golden Eagles
Yesterday Herschel Raney and I drove roads and walked along creeks in the
beautiful Sylamore area of the Ozark-St. Francis National Forest and saw
two Adult Golden Eagles.
The first was soaring above the valley at Barkshed Rec Area. The second
was a brief but extraordinary look as we topped a hill on a very remote
high road north and east of there when we flushed it off the ground where
it was drinking water from a small roadside puddle 15 yards in front of us.

Bo Verser

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Date: 2/24/21 4:20 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 23 (Belated Report)
It was a beautiful spring day with clear skies and temps in the upper 70's
on my bird survey yesterday. Winds picked up a bit in the afternoon. 49
species were found. Bird numbers and diversity are still very low;
especially with the Passerines. Only 4 sparrows of one species found today
which is extremely odd. All the snow was melted off but there was still
some ice on some of the reservoirs. Highlights included a mostly breeding
plumaged Neotropic Cormorant (they started nesting in early March last
year.) and 6 King Rails. Also the continuing (though not seen on every
survey) female Common Goldeneye was notable for us. Here is my list for
yesterday:



Canada Geese - 4

Wood Duck - 7

Gadwall - 147

American Wigeon - 9

Mallard - 195

Northern Shoveler - 8

Northern Pintail - 64

Green-winged Teal - 35

Ring-necked Duck - 205

Bufflehead - 7

Common Goldeneye - 1

Ruddy Duck - 22

Pied-billed Grebe - 6

Neotropic Cormorant - 1

Double-crested Cormorant - 4

Great-blue Heron - 6

Black Vulture - 14

Turkey Vulture - 31

Bald Eagle - 1 (sub-adult)

Northern Harrier - 5

Accipiter sp. - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 10

King Rail - 6

American Coot - 305

Killdeer - 1

Eastern Screech-Owl - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 7

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Blue Jay - 7

American Crow - 9

Fish Crow - 4

Carolina Chickadee - 11

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 5

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 1

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 5

American Robin - 9

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Orange-crowned Warbler - 3

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 6

Song Sparrow - 4

Northern Cardinal - 2

Red-winged Blackbird - 20

American Goldfinch - 1





Herps:



American Alligator

Spring Peepers - calling

Cajun Chorus Frogs - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






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Date: 2/23/21 7:19 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...>
Subject: Dead Birds and Surviving Winter Cold
All of this dead bird chatter is really interesting! Birds are hardy creatures, but as we’ve all seen this week, they do have their limits. Many folks don’t stop to think about bird behaviors that helps mitigate cold risk. It’s a very interesting part of our their ecologies, though, and everyone does heat conservation a little differently! For the most part, our diurnal birds roost for warmth at night. To do so, there are a handful of main strategies: (1) choosing a site that is well-insulated, (2) roosting communally, (3) and entering into controlled hypothermia.

The first strategy differs based on habitat, a species’ ecology, etc. To simplify things, birds typically have 2 choices for roosting sites, cavities and dense vegetation. If chosen wisely, both have similar benefits when it comes to protection from cold, precipitation, and wind—the cavity is especially handy during windy periods. However, many species seem to prefer one or the other. This plays into what Patty proposed yesterday about birds hunkering down in a bushy snow bunker. Regardless of whether or not the bush in question had leaves this time of year, it would have been a good roost site given the conditions. As the bush became covered in snow, it would create a cavity over the limbs below. Think of it as an igloo of sorts. Even better if there was a whole flock of sparrows in the bush, heating up the snow cavity. I don’t know about snow cavities, but thermal benefits of tree cavities (and densely foliated trees like conifers) have been well-documented. Not only are the cavities protected from the elements, but the birds can produce their own heat to some degree.

The second strategy can play into the first, but is not as common. I’m sure sparrows roosting in the same tree may be considered some degree of communal roosting, but what I’m talking about are clusters of birds sharing the same cavity or branch. Two of the best examples of communal roosters here in North America are Pygmy Nuthatch and Inca Dove. Pygmy Nuthatches not only roost in cavities to help them survive cold nights in the arid west, they also roost in clusters. Typically, 8-10 individuals may share a single cavity, but over 100 have been documented doing so on occasion! If you don’t believe me, check out the species account on Birds of the World (https://birdsoftheworld-org.proxy.birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/pygnut/cur/behavior <https://birdsoftheworld-org.proxy.birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/pygnut/cur/behavior>). I can picture a little stack of Pygmy Nuthatches all in the same cavity and it's pretty cute. They can also enter controlled hypothermia. Nothing like checking all the boxes for roosting behavior evolution. Inca Doves have also been documented roosting in “pyramids”, both during the day and at night, to conserve heat.

The third strategy is also less common and usually employed by smaller birds. Controlled hypothermia (torpor) reduces a bird’s core temperature, breathing, and heart rates to conserve energy. This strategy is typically used at night while roosting. Some species, like hummingbirds, even do this when it isn’t cold because of their high metabolic requirements. Other good examples are Common Poorwill and some doves.

Of course, on top of all this birds have feathers, which are fantastic insulators themselves. I’m sure feathers saved lots of lives last week!

During the cold, I observed a Northern Flicker taking shelter in a root ball beneath a tree. It would peek out occasionally, then go back in, all puffed up to keep warm. Eventually, I watched it fly to a nearby tree and enter a cavity in broad daylight. Most only think of diurnal birds roosting at night, but it’s quite clear that extreme times call for different measures.

Pretty amazing!

Here’s to the warmer weather,
Mitchell Pruitt
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Date: 2/23/21 6:31 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Ross' Goose at DeGray


Such a beautiful day with temps above 70 F today, we went cycling at Lake DeGray. On our way to the destination, we saw what we thought was a patch of snow amongst the Canada Geese that live at the golf course. On the return trip to Hwy 7, almost an hour later, we saw that the snow had morphed into a Ross’ Goose. (Since we didn’t have binocs, it could have been a Ross x Lesser Snow Goose hybrid!)



A raft of American Coot was all we saw on the waters.



Jeff Short









Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S7, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone




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Date: 2/23/21 4:14 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Back home at last
The past year I’ve received supportive letters from many of my Arbirder friends while I was stranded abroad.  My heartfelt thanks to the Arbirder community for keeping me connected (and sane).  But as Joe aptly put it, I made lots of lemonade.  Over 500 stationary eBird counts (mostly 20-minute counts) from my balcony in Sri Lanka, which helped add a new bird for the island nation. My 4-hectare yard is probably one of the most studied spots in South Asia.
UAFS interviewed me about my experiences but decided to switch to a more local story.  See below.  It’s mostly preaching to the choir for Arbirders but please click on it anyway.  Webmasters love the traffic. 
https://news.uafs.edu/news/5356

Kannan


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Date: 2/23/21 3:03 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: White-winged Scoter
Still present did not see Long-tailed Ducks

Sent from my iPhone

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Date: 2/23/21 2:10 pm
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: rare bird article in the news today
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/02/23/half-male-female-rare-cardinal-bird-photographed-erie-warren-county/4554937001/



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Date: 2/23/21 12:04 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <000002f3cfbe18c8-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Sandy Berger had a close call
Sandy was also interviewed and featured on the Weather Channel. The
segment is posted on her Facebook page.
Wishing her a speedy recovery.
Dottie

On Tue, 23 Feb 2021 17:02:13 +0000, Ragupathy Kannan
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
> Birding has its risks. Our friend Sandy Berger had a close call the
other
> day. She says the only bird she got that day was the White-breasted
> Nuthatch. Not worth what she went through. Please have her in your
> thoughts and prayers. She is fine but will be hobbling around for
> sometime.
>
> https://m.facebook.com/504711891/posts/10157837402971892/?d=n [1]
>
> -------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1 [2]

>
> Links:
> ------
> [1] https://m.facebook.com/504711891/posts/10157837402971892/?d=n
> [2] http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1

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Date: 2/23/21 9:04 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Sandy Berger had a close call
Birding has its risks.  Our friend Sandy Berger had a close call the other day.  She says the only bird she got that day was the White-breasted Nuthatch.  Not worth what she went through.  Please have her in your thoughts and prayers.  She is fine but will be hobbling around for sometime.  

https://m.facebook.com/504711891/posts/10157837402971892/?d=n

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Date: 2/23/21 8:46 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Robins
Blue skies and snow almost all gone what a relief. Temps headed to low 70s. Yet, we are left with reality of what has taken place. Big human stories like the Texas disaster are being reported and causes probed. Not so much what happened to birds. With birds it is almost all personal and anecdotal, like posts to ARBIRD.
I date our extreme weather event from about February 9, with freezing temps, to February 21, when a thaw was apparent. By the end, my front yard in Fayetteville was a huge mess. When it started, I loaded up the sunflower seed and suet feeders, and covered ground under them with a mix. When it iced and snowed first, I shoveled off an area of about 100 square feet and loaded it with seeds. When it snowed again, I shoveled it again, and reloaded seeds.
When in the middle of all this, February 14, Vivek Govind Kumar and I drove out to Lake Fayetteville Environmental Study Center, we found hundreds of American Robins, Cedar Waxwings, and a few Eastern Bluebirds foraging on invasive privet fruits. I ordinarily wouldnt think much about this, but they all depend to some extent on Eastern Red Cedar and other native fruits. Unfortunately, this winter there is almost no cedar fruit. By contrast, an abundance of privet fruits.
Can privet satisfy nutritional needs of these birds? I dont know. Maybe some of you do know.
A lot of robins at Lake Fayetteville were on the ground, huddling. My assumption is they werent getting nutrition needs met. They were huddling (again I assume) because they had run out of options.
The Audubon climate change model predicts many species will extend ranges northward as a result of warming. Climatologists explaining how this arctic blast reached so far south say this is one of the extreme events predicted in their models. Unfortunately, the robins at Lake Fayetteville were probably wintering, even without cedar berries, based upon the other part of the model that winters are getting warmer. A belly full of privet berries might not be enough.
I am curious enough about this I looked at Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count back to 1961. Are there really more bluebirds and robins here in winter than in the past? I used the birds per party hour format to control for annual changes in effort. There has certainly been a steady increase in number of Eastern Bluebirds and American Robins in the Fayetteville CBC circle.
Dense thickets formed by Eastern Red Cedars usually provide winter cover and forage for familiar species: Northern Mockingbird, Northern Cardinal, Eastern Bluebird, Eastern Towhee, White-throated Sparrow, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Hermit Thrush, American Robin, Cedar Waxwing, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, several different blackbird species, and others. Even with something like extreme cold, they can get along for a while with cover, but they still must meet nutritional requirements.
Avian mortality in bird boxes is the part we readily see. I suspect what is being posted to ARBIRD about avian morality is merely the tip of the proverbial iceberg. It is a proverb, for sure. Maybe we learn something from it.


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Date: 2/23/21 8:38 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds - Protecting Birds
Brush piles are very important to birds for cover, protection and
survival. Birds are using them regardless of the weather and they provide
snow and ice free areas for roosting and feeding. I have four large brush
piles which have been used not only for feeding but nesting wrens and
Mallards. Many do not have brush piles due to the appearance or fear of
what will the neighbors think. More attractive brush piles can be made if
such creates anxieties. Brush piles can be made with a more manicured
style for those status conscious by using landscaping timbers making a
brush core and then leaning them Teepee style and covering the outside
with limbs and pine bows. They can be stacked with alternating opening
similar to a log cabin and the inside filled with brush and birds access
through the cracks into the benefits of brush cover and protection.

As far as changing the subject there may be some merit to that but I think
it is important that birders through their observations make people aware
of the magnitude of our bird mortality like any other citizen science
effort. I do not like dead birds, but without problem recognition there
cannot be problem solutions. Let us see if we can do more to help the
birds before the next such event follows which may be in March.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact
> of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just
> had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most
> of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside
> from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the
> same with ice but worth pondering. Patty and Michael Conway ARPattySent
> from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
> -------- Original message --------From: Jerry Davis
> <jwdavis...> Date: 2/23/21 9:07 AM (GMT-06:00) To:
> <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
>
> Yes, you are right, this was the worst combination of factors. Our below
> zero temperatures, nine days of ice and snow and lack of food all
> contributed.
> Every place there is an invasive plant is where there should be a native
> plants
> producing fruits and berries. Ice covers up even the seed stashes that
> birds
> have places in bark crevices and other storage locations. People can do
> better
> to reduce the impacts of such climatic events. I am getting reports of the
> death
> of many species, even in barns, under shrubs, and ducks at frozen ponds. A
> tragic event. People can help by improving their yards to provide food and
> cover
> and get rid of the non-native and invasive plants.  
>  
> Jerry
>
>
>  
>
> From: Donald C.
> Steinkraus
> Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 8:47 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>  
>
> During
> the coldest days we found a mockingbird so cold it could not walk or fly. 
> We tried to save it by putting it in a box in the house, but it
> died.Yesterday, Feb. 22, I was on the Univ AR campus in Fayetteville and
> found seven dead robins clustered by a wall of Mullins Library.  It looked
> to me like they were trying to find shelter and were huddling by the
> building
> and froze to death.
>  
> I,
> personally, think that many freezing deaths in robins, bluebirds, and
> other
> birds is due to a lack of abundant native fruits on shrubs and trees, and
> also
> seeds from native grasses and other plants. Much of the landscape is now
> covered
> with houses, roads, factories, parking lots, lawns, and what is not
> covered by
> manmade objects is planted either in useless non-native plants such as
> Nandina,
> crepe myrtle and other "foundation" plants, or in the invasive plants
> humans let
> loose in N. America (bush honeysuckle, privet, etc.).I think large
> numbers of birds died from starvation and freezing last week and as others
> have
> stated we may never  know because their carcasses are in places we will
> not
> see them, or they will be scavenged rapidly and disappear.
>  
> Don
>  
>
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108
> <plm108...>Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 6:50
> AMTo: <ARBIRD-L...>
> <ARBIRD-L...>Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>  
>
> We had no dead bluebirds in our boxes at home but found 1 dead junco, 1
> dead great egret and 1 dead snow goose at Beaverfork Lake. Likely more but
> we
> were primarily birding the lake.
>  
>
> Patty and Michael
> Conway AR
>  
>  
>  
>  
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
> Date: 2/22/21 5:22 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>  
> I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No
> dead
> birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their
> floor. I
> suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!
>  
> Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.
>  
> Rick Jones
>
>  
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue
> <emilyrdonahue...> wrote:
>
>
> I have a dead Northern
> Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em
>  
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler
> <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
>
> I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never
> attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go
> in it
> during the recent snow.  I found a recently dead male blue bird. 
> I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow
> yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine
> if it
> had had a collision or whatever it was already gone.  A scavenger must
> have found it in the night.  So, it leads me to believe that there are
> many more dead birds than evn those we are finding.    Jerry
> Butler
>  
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora
> <janewiewora...> wrote:
>
>
> Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them
> empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms,
> suet
> and peanut chips most of each day.
> Jane-In Searcy
>
> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler
> <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>
> 
> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think
> feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird
> feeder
> saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark
> each
> day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal
> outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.
>  
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry
> Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
> I
> am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and
> in
> yards from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit
> on
> our birds.Jerry-----Original Message----- From:
> Lenore GiffordSent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AMTo:
> <ARBIRD-L...>: Dead
> BluebirdsAfter reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told
> my brother to check his box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported
> last
> week that he had two dead Indigo Buntings. Take the Indigo ID
> with
> a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.LenoreSent from my
> iPhone############################To unsubscribe from the
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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 8:25 am
From: JANINE PERLMAN <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
Definitely worth pondering. Our brush piles were dry beneath the snow and ice---and fwiw we had no dead bluebirds (or signs of roosting) in boxes, but I did hear at least one bluebird after the snow quit.

There's much to be learned from disasters like this: the excellent suggestions for mitigation---brush piles, dead trees left standing, and native plants---and hopefully increased attention to our contributions to climate change. I expect we all await bird population data for the coming year.

Unfortunately, most humans need reports that hit us viscerally to motivate us to take action.
Janine PerlmanAlexander Mt., Saline Co.


On Tuesday, February 23, 2021, 9:41:56 AM CST, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering. 
Patty and Michael Conway AR
Patty
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Date: 2/23/21 9:07 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
Yes, you are right, this was the worst combination of factors. Our below zero temperatures, nine days of ice and snow and lack of food all contributed. Every place there is an invasive plant is where there should be a native plants producing fruits and berries. Ice covers up even the seed stashes that birds have places in bark crevices and other storage locations. People can do better to reduce the impacts of such climatic events. I am getting reports of the death of many species, even in barns, under shrubs, and ducks at frozen ponds. A tragic event. People can help by improving their yards to provide food and cover and get rid of the non-native and invasive plants.    Jerry  From: Donald C. Steinkraus Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 8:47 AMTo: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds During the coldest days we found a mockingbird so cold it could not walk or fly.  We tried to save it by putting it in a box in the house, but it died.

Yesterday, Feb. 22, I was on the Univ AR campus in Fayetteville and found seven dead robins clustered by a wall of Mullins Library.  It looked to me like they were trying to find shelter and were huddling by the building and froze to death. I, personally, think that many freezing deaths in robins, bluebirds, and other birds is due to a lack of abundant native fruits on shrubs and trees, and also seeds from native grasses and other plants. Much of the landscape is now covered with houses, roads, factories, parking lots, lawns, and what is not covered by manmade objects is planted either in useless non-native plants such as Nandina, crepe myrtle and other "foundation" plants, or in the invasive plants humans let loose in N. America (bush honeysuckle, privet, etc.).

I think large numbers of birds died from starvation and freezing last week and as others have stated we may never  know because their carcasses are in places we will not see them, or they will be scavenged rapidly and disappear. Don 


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 6:50 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds  We had no dead bluebirds in our boxes at home but found 1 dead junco, 1 dead great egret and 1 dead snow goose at Beaverfork Lake. Likely more but we were primarily birding the lake.  Patty and Michael Conway AR    -------- Original message --------From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Date: 2/22/21 5:22 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds  I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor. I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year! Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either. Rick Jones On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...> wrote:

I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em   On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:

I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the recent snow.  I found a recently dead male blue bird.  I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or whatever it was already gone.  A scavenger must have found it in the night.  So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than evn those we are finding.    Jerry Butler   On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:

Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day. Jane-In Searcy

On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:



 I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.   On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.

Jerry

-----Original Message-----
From: Lenore Gifford
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Dead Bluebirds

After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 8:12 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Protecting birds in winter
Good idea, Daniel. So I'm reposting my last comment on this topic here: A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering. Patty and Michael Conway AR
-------- Original message --------From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Date: 2/23/21 9:42 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Protecting birds in winter
I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that
it's an important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the
subject line SO many times lately.
So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to
keep on discussing it, I suggest two things.
1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's
switch the topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the
winter months" and then discuss anything about food and cover.
2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a
new subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact,
I'll create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use
it or ignore it. :)

That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to
continue the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to
talk about deceased birds for so long.

Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger
wrote:



I don’t mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds
now. The tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward. Just my
opinion. And thank you.


Sandy B. 


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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 8:09 am
From: Kay Hodnett <sallyportk...>
Subject: Fwd: Dead Bluebirds

Yes, I should have entitled this “Protecting Birds.”
Kay Hodnett
Sent from my iPhone

Begin forwarded message:

> From: <sallyportk...>
> Date: February 23, 2021 at 10:03:33 AM CST
> To: plm108 <plm108...>
> Cc: "<ARBIRD-L...>" <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
> Yes, I think it’s worth pondering how best to offer protection because there will be other storms. My yard feeders were completely taken over by hordes of grackles, blackbirds, and starlings. So I turned my large covered porch into a feeding station protected to some extent from the weather. A majestic male flicker dominated one of my hanging suet cylinders. Bluebirds and robins gobbled dried mealworms sprinkled on the wooden floor. Siskins and finches went for ground up sunflower chips. White-throated sparrows and doves ate millet.
> My bluebird box contains no dead birds. But two pine siskins died on the porch, whether as victims of salmonella or the storm I don’t know.
> (It’s going to be the devil to clean that porch).
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>>> On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:41 AM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>>>
>> 
>> A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.
>>
>> Patty and Michael
>> Conway AR
>>
>> Patty
>>
>> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>>
>>
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
>> Date: 2/23/21 9:07 AM (GMT-06:00)
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>>
>> Yes, you are right, this was the worst combination of factors. Our below zero temperatures, nine days of ice and snow and lack of food all contributed. Every place there is an invasive plant is where there should be a native plants producing fruits and berries. Ice covers up even the seed stashes that birds have places in bark crevices and other storage locations. People can do better to reduce the impacts of such climatic events. I am getting reports of the death of many species, even in barns, under shrubs, and ducks at frozen ponds. A tragic event. People can help by improving their yards to provide food and cover and get rid of the non-native and invasive plants.
>>
>> Jerry
>>
>> From: Donald C. Steinkraus
>> Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 8:47 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>>
>> During the coldest days we found a mockingbird so cold it could not walk or fly. We tried to save it by putting it in a box in the house, but it died.
>>
>> Yesterday, Feb. 22, I was on the Univ AR campus in Fayetteville and found seven dead robins clustered by a wall of Mullins Library. It looked to me like they were trying to find shelter and were huddling by the building and froze to death.
>>
>> I, personally, think that many freezing deaths in robins, bluebirds, and other birds is due to a lack of abundant native fruits on shrubs and trees, and also seeds from native grasses and other plants. Much of the landscape is now covered with houses, roads, factories, parking lots, lawns, and what is not covered by manmade objects is planted either in useless non-native plants such as Nandina, crepe myrtle and other "foundation" plants, or in the invasive plants humans let loose in N. America (bush honeysuckle, privet, etc.).
>>
>> I think large numbers of birds died from starvation and freezing last week and as others have stated we may never know because their carcasses are in places we will not see them, or they will be scavenged rapidly and disappear.
>>
>> Don
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
>> Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 6:50 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>>
>> We had no dead bluebirds in our boxes at home but found 1 dead junco, 1 dead great egret and 1 dead snow goose at Beaverfork Lake. Likely more but we were primarily birding the lake.
>>
>> Patty and Michael
>> Conway AR
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
>> Date: 2/22/21 5:22 PM (GMT-06:00)
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>>
>> I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor. I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!
>>
>> Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.
>>
>> Rick Jones
>>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...> wrote:
>> I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em
>>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
>> I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler
>>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:
>> Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day.
>> Jane-In Searcy
>>
>>> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>>>
>>> 
>>> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.
>>>
>>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>>> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
>>> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
>>>
>>> Jerry
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Lenore Gifford
>>> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>>> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
>>>
>>> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
>>> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
>>> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
>>>
>>> Lenore
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> ############################
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list:
>>> write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
>>> or click the following link:
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>>>
>>> ############################
>>>
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>>
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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 8:03 am
From: Kay Hodnett <sallyportk...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
Yes, I think it’s worth pondering how best to offer protection because there will be other storms. My yard feeders were completely taken over by hordes of grackles, blackbirds, and starlings. So I turned my large covered porch into a feeding station protected to some extent from the weather. A majestic male flicker dominated one of my hanging suet cylinders. Bluebirds and robins gobbled dried mealworms sprinkled on the wooden floor. Siskins and finches went for ground up sunflower chips. White-throated sparrows and doves ate millet.
My bluebird box contains no dead birds. But two pine siskins died on the porch, whether as victims of salmonella or the storm I don’t know.
(It’s going to be the devil to clean that porch).

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 23, 2021, at 9:41 AM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
> 
> A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering.
>
> Patty and Michael
> Conway AR
>
> Patty
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> Date: 2/23/21 9:07 AM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
> Yes, you are right, this was the worst combination of factors. Our below zero temperatures, nine days of ice and snow and lack of food all contributed. Every place there is an invasive plant is where there should be a native plants producing fruits and berries. Ice covers up even the seed stashes that birds have places in bark crevices and other storage locations. People can do better to reduce the impacts of such climatic events. I am getting reports of the death of many species, even in barns, under shrubs, and ducks at frozen ponds. A tragic event. People can help by improving their yards to provide food and cover and get rid of the non-native and invasive plants.
>
> Jerry
>
> From: Donald C. Steinkraus
> Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 8:47 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
> During the coldest days we found a mockingbird so cold it could not walk or fly. We tried to save it by putting it in a box in the house, but it died.
>
> Yesterday, Feb. 22, I was on the Univ AR campus in Fayetteville and found seven dead robins clustered by a wall of Mullins Library. It looked to me like they were trying to find shelter and were huddling by the building and froze to death.
>
> I, personally, think that many freezing deaths in robins, bluebirds, and other birds is due to a lack of abundant native fruits on shrubs and trees, and also seeds from native grasses and other plants. Much of the landscape is now covered with houses, roads, factories, parking lots, lawns, and what is not covered by manmade objects is planted either in useless non-native plants such as Nandina, crepe myrtle and other "foundation" plants, or in the invasive plants humans let loose in N. America (bush honeysuckle, privet, etc.).
>
> I think large numbers of birds died from starvation and freezing last week and as others have stated we may never know because their carcasses are in places we will not see them, or they will be scavenged rapidly and disappear.
>
> Don
>
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
> Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 6:50 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
> We had no dead bluebirds in our boxes at home but found 1 dead junco, 1 dead great egret and 1 dead snow goose at Beaverfork Lake. Likely more but we were primarily birding the lake.
>
> Patty and Michael
> Conway AR
>
>
>
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
> Date: 2/22/21 5:22 PM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
>
> I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor. I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!
>
> Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.
>
> Rick Jones
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...> wrote:
> I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
> I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:
> Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day.
> Jane-In Searcy
>
>> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.
>>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
>> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
>>
>> Jerry
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Lenore Gifford
>> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
>>
>> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
>> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
>> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
>>
>> Lenore
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ############################
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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 7:56 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: LONG-TAILED DUCKS Continuing at Beaverfork Lake (Faulkner County)
The three LTDUs at Beaverfork Lake continue this morning. They are in the "bay area" on the north side of the lake, out from the boat launch, which is where we saw them yesterday. There's also an adult HERRING GULL here today but we haven't been able to relocate the White-winged Scoters. There are also hundreds of waterfowl and gulls out across the lake but sun is too bright to identify. Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 2/22/21 11:44 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...>, <plm108...> Subject: REDO: LONG-TAILED DUCKS and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS (Faulkner County) Presently there are three Long-tailed Ducks and two White-winged Scoter on Beaverfork Lake in Conway. Seen best from "Goose Poop Peninsula." Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 

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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 7:42 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Protecting birds in winter
I have a feeling that some people are going to think or say that it's an
important thing to discuss... and, I'd agree.
I'd also agree that it's gotten old seeing "dead birds" in the subject
line SO many times lately.
So I have a proposition... just my thoughts. If people want to keep on
discussing it, I suggest two things.
1. I think we've seen enough reports of deceased birds. Let's switch the
topic to "how to protect or keep birds safe in the winter months" and
then discuss anything about food and cover.
2. As such, if someone wants to continue that discussion, have a new
subject heading such as "protecting birds in winter." In fact, I'll
create a new subject heading now and people can choose to use it or
ignore it. :)

That's my 2 cents worth anyway... I can understand wanting to continue
the discussion but I can also understand not wanting to talk about
deceased birds for so long.

Daniel Mason

On 2/23/2021 9:03 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:
> I don’t mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now.
> The tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward. Just my opinion.
> And thank you.
>
> Sandy B.
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 7:41 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
A pondering for consideration. Michael and I are curious about the impact of brush piles on the survival of birds during snow events like we just had. We have at least 7 brush piles in our yard (3 acres). Supposedly most of the snow would accumulate on top of the pile, insulating the inside from winds and possibly sub zero temps. Don't know if this would be the same with ice but worth pondering. Patty and Michael Conway ARPattySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Date: 2/23/21 9:07 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds


Yes, you are right, this was the worst combination of factors. Our below
zero temperatures, nine days of ice and snow and lack of food all contributed.
Every place there is an invasive plant is where there should be a native plants
producing fruits and berries. Ice covers up even the seed stashes that birds
have places in bark crevices and other storage locations. People can do better
to reduce the impacts of such climatic events. I am getting reports of the death
of many species, even in barns, under shrubs, and ducks at frozen ponds. A
tragic event. People can help by improving their yards to provide food and cover
and get rid of the non-native and invasive plants.  
 
Jerry


 

From: Donald C.
Steinkraus
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 8:47 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
 

During
the coldest days we found a mockingbird so cold it could not walk or fly. 
We tried to save it by putting it in a box in the house, but it
died.Yesterday, Feb. 22, I was on the Univ AR campus in Fayetteville and
found seven dead robins clustered by a wall of Mullins Library.  It looked
to me like they were trying to find shelter and were huddling by the building
and froze to death.
 
I,
personally, think that many freezing deaths in robins, bluebirds, and other
birds is due to a lack of abundant native fruits on shrubs and trees, and also
seeds from native grasses and other plants. Much of the landscape is now covered
with houses, roads, factories, parking lots, lawns, and what is not covered by
manmade objects is planted either in useless non-native plants such as Nandina,
crepe myrtle and other "foundation" plants, or in the invasive plants humans let
loose in N. America (bush honeysuckle, privet, etc.).I think large
numbers of birds died from starvation and freezing last week and as others have
stated we may never  know because their carcasses are in places we will not
see them, or they will be scavenged rapidly and disappear.
 
Don
 




From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
<ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108
<plm108...>Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 6:50
AMTo: <ARBIRD-L...>
<ARBIRD-L...>Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
 

We had no dead bluebirds in our boxes at home but found 1 dead junco, 1
dead great egret and 1 dead snow goose at Beaverfork Lake. Likely more but we
were primarily birding the lake.
 

Patty and Michael
Conway AR
 
 
 
 

-------- Original message --------
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Date: 2/22/21 5:22 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
 
I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead
birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor. I
suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!
 
Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.
 
Rick Jones

 

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue
<emilyrdonahue...> wrote:


I have a dead Northern
Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em
 

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler
<jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:

I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never
attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it
during the recent snow.  I found a recently dead male blue bird. 
I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow
yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it
had had a collision or whatever it was already gone.  A scavenger must
have found it in the night.  So, it leads me to believe that there are
many more dead birds than evn those we are finding.    Jerry
Butler
 

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora
<janewiewora...> wrote:


Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them
empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet
and peanut chips most of each day.
Jane-In Searcy

On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler
<twbutler1941...> wrote:


I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think
feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder
saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each
day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal
outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.
 

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry
Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
I
am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in
yards from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on
our birds.Jerry-----Original Message----- From:
Lenore GiffordSent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AMTo:
<ARBIRD-L...>: Dead
BluebirdsAfter reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told
my brother to check his box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last
week that he had two dead Indigo Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with
a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.LenoreSent from my
iPhone############################To unsubscribe from the
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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 7:07 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
Yes, you are right, this was the worst combination of factors. Our below zero temperatures, nine days of ice and snow and lack of food all contributed. Every place there is an invasive plant is where there should be a native plants producing fruits and berries. Ice covers up even the seed stashes that birds have places in bark crevices and other storage locations. People can do better to reduce the impacts of such climatic events. I am getting reports of the death of many species, even in barns, under shrubs, and ducks at frozen ponds. A tragic event. People can help by improving their yards to provide food and cover and get rid of the non-native and invasive plants.

Jerry

From: Donald C. Steinkraus
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 8:47 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds

During the coldest days we found a mockingbird so cold it could not walk or fly. We tried to save it by putting it in a box in the house, but it died.

Yesterday, Feb. 22, I was on the Univ AR campus in Fayetteville and found seven dead robins clustered by a wall of Mullins Library. It looked to me like they were trying to find shelter and were huddling by the building and froze to death.

I, personally, think that many freezing deaths in robins, bluebirds, and other birds is due to a lack of abundant native fruits on shrubs and trees, and also seeds from native grasses and other plants. Much of the landscape is now covered with houses, roads, factories, parking lots, lawns, and what is not covered by manmade objects is planted either in useless non-native plants such as Nandina, crepe myrtle and other "foundation" plants, or in the invasive plants humans let loose in N. America (bush honeysuckle, privet, etc.).

I think large numbers of birds died from starvation and freezing last week and as others have stated we may never know because their carcasses are in places we will not see them, or they will be scavenged rapidly and disappear.

Don






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 6:50 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds

We had no dead bluebirds in our boxes at home but found 1 dead junco, 1 dead great egret and 1 dead snow goose at Beaverfork Lake. Likely more but we were primarily birding the lake.

Patty and Michael
Conway AR




-------- Original message --------
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Date: 2/22/21 5:22 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds

I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor. I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!

Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.

Rick Jones

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...> wrote:

I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:

I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:

Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day.
Jane-In Searcy


On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:



I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.

Jerry

-----Original Message-----
From: Lenore Gifford
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Dead Bluebirds

After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 7:03 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject:
I don’t mean to offend, but can we stop talking about dead birds now. The
tragedy is over and it’s time to move forward. Just my opinion. And thank
you.

Sandy B.

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Back to top
Date: 2/23/21 6:47 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
During the coldest days we found a mockingbird so cold it could not walk or fly. We tried to save it by putting it in a box in the house, but it died.

Yesterday, Feb. 22, I was on the Univ AR campus in Fayetteville and found seven dead robins clustered by a wall of Mullins Library. It looked to me like they were trying to find shelter and were huddling by the building and froze to death.

I, personally, think that many freezing deaths in robins, bluebirds, and other birds is due to a lack of abundant native fruits on shrubs and trees, and also seeds from native grasses and other plants. Much of the landscape is now covered with houses, roads, factories, parking lots, lawns, and what is not covered by manmade objects is planted either in useless non-native plants such as Nandina, crepe myrtle and other "foundation" plants, or in the invasive plants humans let loose in N. America (bush honeysuckle, privet, etc.).

I think large numbers of birds died from starvation and freezing last week and as others have stated we may never know because their carcasses are in places we will not see them, or they will be scavenged rapidly and disappear.

Don




________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 23, 2021 6:50 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds

We had no dead bluebirds in our boxes at home but found 1 dead junco, 1 dead great egret and 1 dead snow goose at Beaverfork Lake. Likely more but we were primarily birding the lake.

Patty and Michael
Conway AR




-------- Original message --------
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Date: 2/22/21 5:22 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds

I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor. I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!

Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.

Rick Jones

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...><mailto:<emilyrdonahue...>> wrote:
I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...><mailto:<jerrysharon.butler...>> wrote:
I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...><mailto:<janewiewora...>> wrote:
Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day.
Jane-In Searcy

On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...><mailto:<twbutler1941...>> wrote:


I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:
I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.

Jerry

-----Original Message-----
From: Lenore Gifford
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Dead Bluebirds

After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/23/21 4:51 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
We had no dead bluebirds in our boxes at home but found 1 dead junco, 1 dead great egret and 1 dead snow goose at Beaverfork Lake. Likely more but we were primarily birding the lake. Patty and Michael Conway AR
-------- Original message --------From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Date: 2/22/21 5:22 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor. I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.Rick JonesOn Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...> wrote:I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -EmOn Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the recent snow.  I found a recently dead male blue bird.  I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or whatever it was already gone.  A scavenger must have found it in the night.  So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than evn those we are finding.    Jerry ButlerOn Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day. Jane-In Searcy On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.

Jerry

-----Original Message-----
From: Lenore Gifford
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Dead Bluebirds

After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/22/21 3:22 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
I checked 8 birdboxes at the Botanical Gardens of the Ozarks today. No dead
birds were found, and three boxes had significant droppings on their floor.
I suspect my boxes saved some lives this year!

Jeff tells me none were found in the NWAMN boxes at Woolsey, either.

Rick Jones

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 4:16 PM Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...> wrote:

> I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my
> yard. -Em
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
> wrote:
>
>> I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted
>> nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the
>> recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead
>> chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when
>> I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or
>> whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the
>> night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than
>> evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler
>>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6
>>> or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips
>>> most of each day.
>>> Jane-In Searcy
>>>
>>> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> 
>>> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six
>>> ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were
>>> six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up
>>> peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I
>>> was feeding.
>>>
>>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in
>>>> yards
>>>> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
>>>>
>>>> Jerry
>>>>
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: Lenore Gifford
>>>> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
>>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>>>> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
>>>>
>>>> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check
>>>> his
>>>> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead
>>>> Indigo
>>>> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
>>>>
>>>> Lenore
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>> ############################
>>>>
>>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list:
>>>> write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
>>>> or click the following link:
>>>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>>>
>>>> ############################
>>>>
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>>>> or click the following link:
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>>>>
>>>
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>>>
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Date: 2/22/21 2:37 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
Thank you. Very Sad, there are dead birds being reported throughout Arkansas, Texas and Oklahoma, even dead ducks that did not make it.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Em Donahue
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 4:16 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds

I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my yard. -Em

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:

I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:

Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day.
Jane-In Searcy


On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:



I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.

Jerry

-----Original Message-----
From: Lenore Gifford
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Dead Bluebirds

After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/22/21 2:34 pm
From: alexander worm <wormalexj...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
Just checked the master garden bluebird boxes on Arkansas State’s farm and found 8 dead adults in one box.

Alex Worm
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Date: 2/22/21 2:16 pm
From: Em Donahue <emilyrdonahue...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
I have a dead Northern Mockingbird to report, found under a bush in my
yard. -Em

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 3:57 PM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
wrote:

> I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted
> nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the
> recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead
> chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when
> I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or
> whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the
> night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than
> evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...>
> wrote:
>
>> Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or
>> 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips
>> most of each day.
>> Jane-In Searcy
>>
>> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six
>> ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were
>> six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up
>> peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I
>> was feeding.
>>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in
>>> yards
>>> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
>>>
>>> Jerry
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Lenore Gifford
>>> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>>> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
>>>
>>> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check
>>> his
>>> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead
>>> Indigo
>>> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
>>>
>>> Lenore
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>> ############################
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list:
>>> write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
>>> or click the following link:
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Date: 2/22/21 1:57 pm
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
I just checked a box I have had out for years that has never attracted
nesting birds, though I saw a nut hatch and a blue bird go in it during the
recent snow. I found a recently dead male blue bird. I also saw a dead
chickadee through the widow yesterday atop the snow yesterday late and when
I went out today to see if I could determine if it had had a collision or
whatever it was already gone. A scavenger must have found it in the
night. So, it leads me to believe that there are many more dead birds than
evn those we are finding. Jerry Butler

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 2:46 PM Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:

> Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or
> 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips
> most of each day.
> Jane-In Searcy
>
> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>
> 
> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six
> ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were
> six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up
> peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I
> was feeding.
>
> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
> wrote:
>
>> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in
>> yards
>> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
>>
>> Jerry
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Lenore Gifford
>> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
>>
>> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check
>> his
>> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead
>> Indigo
>> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
>>
>> Lenore
>> Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/22/21 1:32 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
Hi All,

The fish hatchery has been trying to relocate for years but fairly recently decided to stay put and expand by developing more ponds on the west side (Upper). They also own the field across the street from the entrance on the lower ponds used for parking when they have their kids fishing event held in June. The spring pond across from the parking area by the upper ponds has not completely dried up it still flows at times and is swampy at other times and cannot be developed. The trees next to this pond were just full of migrants this year for a few days. I sat in the parking lot for hours looking at warblers. I’m surprised they haven’t closed the hatchery to drive in traffic yet but will do so at some point this year, they will still allow people to walk in. Dogs are already supposed to be leashed if you take them in there. They prefer you don’t. In reality it’s mostly birders who go in.

I chose to move to Centerton in 2008 mainly because it was so close to a lot of farmland and open spaces, and of course the hatchery. The silage pits at one of the Dairies in Vaughn that usually holds a lot of Sparrows and sometimes other treasures in Winter are no more, gone, filled in, and the nearby trees along Anglin Rd road that held so many Great-tailed Grackles at times, were ripped out to widen the road. The roads of the subdivision we called weedy acres at Anglin and Adams have been reworked, paved, and are ready for new houses to be built.

While we don’t like it people are free to sell their property and develop it. I can’t begin to tell you how many “The Links of” apartment complexes are in the area. Most people still like their European style landscaping with non native shrubs separated neatly by mulch as opposed the the native type of landscaping that encourages bugs and birds. While Walmart may be the driving force of progress and expansion in Benton County it’s not the only Monster in the closet.

Oddly enough the property next to the McDonalds that was bought by Walmart to put in a Supercenter back in about 2015 was only partially developed. The spring fed creek that ran through the property was rerouted around the property, entrance areas were put in over the creek but not paved and then Walmart decided it was not a good time to actually build the store. It’s only 4 miles from store 100 across from the home office and 1 mile from the Neighborhood Market at 102 and Greenhouse. This was also about the same time they shut down the mini stores that had been built in Gentry, Decater, and Gravette. Multiple stores and a few warehouses across the country were also closed due to there was not enough population base in those areas, which made them unprofitible. Yes, Walmart realized they had reached the point of over saturation. In one week over 10,000 people across the country lost their jobs in all of those closings. but I digress.

Instead of a store in Centerton they planted a multitude of native wildflowers and some willows sprang up along the creek. This leaves the property open for later development but in the meantime I’ve gone over there birding quite a few times.

Property all along HWY 102 is now being torn up and developed as the population expands. Nearly all the property along Holloway Rd is for sale as well and Holloway has now been mostly paved.
From Fish Hatchery Rd and S Main St (formerly Ginn Rd) to the east has now become a main drag all the way to Greenhouse Rd as a way to avoid traffic on Hwy 102.

Also there are so many walking, biking, and running trails in the Bentonville/Rogers area it’s ridiculous. These trails often go through fairly wild areas. Lake Atalanta in Rogers was torn to shreds putting in bike trails. When I lived in Bella Vista for a year I was across from a golf coarse which I went walking around every chance I got, there was a creek running through it and along the creek was very brushy and birdy.

Areas to the South, West, and North West of Centerton are still dirt roads and can be very birdy. Jacque Brown, Centerton.



> On Feb 18, 2021, at 8:28 AM, Robert Day <rhday52...> wrote:
>
> But remember, all: One part of the “tax reform” enacted in 2017 was that golf courses now get some sort of special tax breaks. Same for folks who have rental properties—they get lower taxes too, for some reason. And the same goes for folks who own private jets, who, in my opinion, already get a good deal in not having to pay landing fees at airports. I just can’t envision who these changes were meant to entice to sign the new tax law....
>
> It’s criminal, in my opinion, but explains why crap like that at Centerton occurs.
>
> RHD
>
> Robert H. Day
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Feb 17, 2021, at 10:44 AM, Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> Tell them to skip the golf course and emphasize running, walking, hiking and bicycling. Way more popular these days and maybe would help preserve some of the habitat. Ruth and I have spent time at three Arkansas state parks that emphasize these activities this fall and winter, and the birds have been good in all three places, a little harder as temps cooled, but still good: 30-40 species over a three night stay.
>>
>> Unless the development is aimed at retired people, in which case, it will be probably really hard to change the builders' assumptions about what will sell.
>>
>> So sorry to hear your decision, Joe. That's a whole lifetime of looks set on the shelf. So glad you guys kept records and notes.
>>
>> Chuck Anderson
>> Snowed in at Western Hills in Little Rock
>> Birds everywhere!
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 9:39 AM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> <mailto:<bashman...>> wrote:
>> Golf courses are losing money all across the nation. Guess it is in the green space planning to generate higher income for the residential housing…
>>
>>
>>
>> Maybe make the argument to replace the golf course by keeping an expansive natural area—if that is even feasible.
>>
>>
>>
>> I wonder how the proposed NWARA access will also destroy habitat.
>>
>>
>>
>> Jeff Short
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Michael Klun
>> Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 7:12 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
>>
>>
>>
>> One more consequence of the sprawl.
>>
>>
>>
>> Although not directly driving this project, it may be worth contacting the Walmart Sustainability Director and develop dialog to understand their awareness of negative impacts they are creating and plans to address. If I’m not mistaking, at one time they had the former Sierra Club leader on staff due to the negative attention they were getting from NGO’s.
>>
>>
>>
>> Getting local and National NGO’s attention may help as Walmart is a big and easy target for them. Media attention may be helpful and they have influence.
>>
>>
>>
>> Need the big money behind Walmart to drive awareness to prevent the smaller Rodney Dangerfield type developers from getting out of control.
>>
>>
>>
>> Meeting with City planning too may be helpful to understand their awareness and mitigation plans.
>>
>>
>>
>> It’s not necessarily one project but the awareness each of them and the cumulative negative affects.
>>
>>
>>
>> Always a big uphill battle too when we are such a conservative state and I wouldn’t expect assistance from elected leadership but developing dialog with them too may be helpful.
>>
>> Thank you for your Informative emails and leadership!
>>
>>
>>
>> Michael Klun
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Feb 17, 2021, at 5:59 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> <mailto:<joeneal...>> wrote:
>>
>> 
>>
>> Those of you who are hardened riders on dusty bird trails have probably visited Craig State Fish Hatchery. I have been going there 40 years. Since I was a young man, with a young child in a backpack. It must have been a decade ago on a trip with one of the most truly birdy of birdy people, Mike Mlodinow; he told me he had just submitted his 1000th Centerton field trip to International Shorebird Survey.
>>
>> Talk about thousands: I am just one of thousands of Centerton birders over a half-century. We kept field notes. We turned in our records to ISS, Arkansas Audubon Society Bird Records Database, and eBird. We have logged 272 species, plus an addition 45 taxa. We have fish, turtles, snakes, crayfish, minks, Swamp Milkweed, bivalves. The Centerton bird list is one of the best: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L125062 <https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fbarchart%3Fbyr%3D1900%26eyr%3D2021%26bmo%3D1%26emo%3D12%26r%3DL125062&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4d7a577ae2434ef406dc08d8d33b7305%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491599562802358%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=YuR2A9TRgXuEfvhHN8HgbTqFAJ%2FEZHL2jmanyiShHDY%3D&reserved=0>.
>>
>> I’m bringing this up now in my own ruminative way because I’m tired of being almost run over by dump trucks. I have this email from a former UA-Fayetteville bird grad student and friend, who lives at Centerton. It’s about a huge housing-entertainment complex that is about to be constructed right across the street from the hatchery:
>>
>> “I just learned that March 2nd is a City Planning Meeting where they will discuss The Links at Centerton – a 495 family/16 – three-story building apartment complex/golf course going in at the corner of Vaughn and Fish Hatchery Rd. I have emailed the mayor and the planning committee ... If you know of anything else I can do, please let me know!”
>>
>> Sadly, I don’t know anything. Every acre is monetized. The great economic engine that is Walmart has spawned a population shift like “The Links at Centerton,” 495 of them right on top of the hatchery. Centerton, once a village with a single blinking yellow caution light, rides the wave. All roads lead to Bentonville. All fields are being red-dirted that once provided habitat for migrating Upland Sandpipers. It will go down in history: loss of a varied natural world of flowing springs, native Tallgrass Prairie, songs of Eastern Meadowlarks.
>>
>> I realize this is more than a little bit of a screed. But surely this is something to be screeding about. Am I supposed to go off all faker, like I think this is “natural”?
>>
>> I didn’t make all those 1000+ trips with Mike Mlodinow, but I made a lot, and I made a lot on mine own, or with others, so I’ll bet I’m a 1000-leager too. Most of it was fun. If I am lucky enough to escape dementia, it could be in part because my brain has been stimulated trip after trip, hour after hour, bird after bird, for more than half of my entire existence. I wish it could be that way for others.
>>
>> I am too old to dodge reality. Too old to convince some people in suits there are acres, springs, and whole fields too precious to even consider monetizing.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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Back to top
Date: 2/22/21 12:46 pm
From: Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
Just checked our three boxes and was happy to find them empty. I saw 6 or 7 bluebirds daily and they fed on dried mealworms, suet and peanut chips most of each day.
Jane-In Searcy

> On Feb 22, 2021, at 1:16 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>
> 
> I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I was feeding.
>
>> On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
>> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
>>
>> Jerry
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Lenore Gifford
>> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
>>
>> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
>> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
>> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
>>
>> Lenore
>> Sent from my iPhone
>> ############################
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list:
>> write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
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>>
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Date: 2/22/21 12:09 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Ducks on ice
For many years I felt pretty sure I was pretty weird because I so much enjoyed that harshest of winter weather, when our ponds freeze up, lakes mostly freeze, and what birds that havent moved south are left to stand on the ice or swim in the tightening pools to keep them open.
Ive seen a lot of traffic on ARBIRD list and several similar sites with posts and photos of ducks on ice. Turns out there are a lot of us. That doesnt prove Im not weird, but does suggest Im a member in good standing in a select birdwatching club, of sorts.
Was thinking about this week, during the peak freeze up. Neil Nodelman got a wonderful photograph of Green-winged Teals and Northern Pintails on ice at Lake Fayetteville on February 22. On a trip to Lake Sequoyah Febraury 18, Salvador Barazza, a 16-year neighbor of birder Todd Ballenger, got a great up close photograph of a male Greater Scaup and a female Less Scaup, since most of Lake Sequoyah was then frozen. Todd sent the photos to his friend Vivek Givid Kumar and Vivek sent them to me.
Vivek and went out there on February 20. The whole lake was frozen shut, except for a small area near the spillway. Got great looks at that male Greater Scaup, plus Redheads, Canvasbacks, etc 12 duck species, including a first of the season Wood duck.
Heres Viveks eBird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S82167039<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS82167039&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C73dadba161d147f361f508d8d76dc8b8%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637496213830921915%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=UyrG%2FA7q2Mw6SXJYHic9CS0SJNMpNFQFTtUOqP0DvE4%3D&reserved=0>.


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Date: 2/22/21 11:17 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Reminder: BirdLR Birdathon Registration due March 15
This is a reminder that registration is open for Audubon Arkansas’s BirdLR Birdathon, a competitive search for birds plus a fun way to raise money for Audubon Arkansas's bird conservation and environmental education work at the Little Rock Audubon Center.

The two team categories are Group Birdathon teams, which consist of two to five participants who can bird anywhere, together or apart; and Backyard Birdathon teams, which are an individual or household who bird from the comfort of their home. All teams have a full 24 hours on Saturday May 1 to search for birds.

Registration forms are at http://ar.audubon.org/bird-lr. The deadline is March 15.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

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Back to top
Date: 2/22/21 11:16 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
I checked my boxes and had no dead Bluebirds. I think feeding them 4 six
ounce cups of mealworms per day in a Bluebird feeder saved them. There were
six Bluebirds feeding from daylight to dark each day. I also chopped up
peanuts and suet for them. It looked brutal outside! And it felt it when I
was feeding.

On Mon, Feb 22, 2021 at 11:38 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in
> yards
> from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.
>
> Jerry
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Lenore Gifford
> Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Dead Bluebirds
>
> After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check
> his
> box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead
> Indigo
> Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.
>
> Lenore
> Sent from my iPhone
> ############################
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list:
> write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
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Date: 2/22/21 9:45 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: REDO: LONG-TAILED DUCKS and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS (Faulkner County)
Presently there are three Long-tailed Ducks and two White-winged Scoter on Beaverfork Lake in Conway. Seen best from "Goose Poop Peninsula." Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 


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Date: 2/22/21 9:42 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: LONG-RAILED DUCKS and WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS (Faulkner County)
Presently there are three Long-tailed Ducks and two White-winged Scoter on Beaverfork Lake in Conway. Seen best from "Goose Poop Peninsula." Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners of Conway AR 

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Date: 2/22/21 9:38 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds
I am receiving reports of dead birds in boxes, barns, garages, and in yards
from all over Arkansas and Texas.. This is a terrible hit on our birds.

Jerry

-----Original Message-----
From: Lenore Gifford
Sent: Monday, February 22, 2021 11:25 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Dead Bluebirds

After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his
box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo
Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/22/21 9:25 am
From: Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...>
Subject: Dead Bluebirds
After reading the emails about the Bluebirds I told my brother to check his box. He had 9 dead birds. He reported last week that he had two dead Indigo Buntings. Take the Indigo ID with a grain of salt. He lives in Sheridan.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/21/21 3:20 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Fw: Dead Bluebirds In Nest Boxes
-----Original Message-----
From: Dawn Carrie
Sent: Sunday, February 21, 2021 4:27 PM
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds In Nest Boxes

We had swarms of bluebirds at our boxes every evening during the freeze. I
just went out and checked after seeing your message. No mortalities,
fortunately. But we did find dead birds in our
barns...E. Phoebe, sparrows (chipping, Lincoln's), and a bluebird. They'll
be turned over to TX A&M.s collection. Many friends were finding dead or
cold-stressed birds during the freeze.

Dawn

On Sun, Feb 21, 2021 at 3:26 PM <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
> This winter has been deadly on bluebirds and I expect many other species.
> In checking my nest boxes now that the temperatures are above freezing I
> had one male bluebird dead in one nest box and 4 male and 4 female dead in
> another nest box. Our daughter in Cabot, AR had 5 dead in one box and 6
> dead in another box. Eight days below freezing with temperatures going
> below zero and in single digits did not help survival. Extreme cold, and
> starvation could be factors. It has been suggested that they may have
> suffocated. Bluebird huddle in boxes on extreme cold weather nights and
> they usually do so in a way that would not contribute to suffocation. In
> Arizona we had as many as 32 Pygmy Nuthatches roosting in a natural cavity
> with no such mortality problem. I did not find chickadees, titmice nor
> white-breasted nuthatches dead and they also use nest boxes.
>
> I recommend that all of you check your nest boxes and remove the dead
> birds. Those that have bluebird nest box trails and on golf courses etc.
> also need to do so.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR

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Date: 2/21/21 1:59 pm
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds In Nest Boxes
I found a hermit thrush frozen to death on my back porch.
Nancy YoungGrant County
On Sunday, February 21, 2021, 03:34:47 PM CST, TUMLISON, RENN <tumlison...> wrote:

We had 2 dead in just west of Arkadelphia...
On Sun, Feb 21, 2021, 3:26 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

This winter has been deadly on bluebirds and I expect many other species. In checking my nest boxes now that the temperatures are above freezing I had one male bluebird dead in one nest box and 4 male and 4 female dead in another nest box. Our daughter in Cabot, AR had 5 dead in one box and 6 dead in another box.  Eight days below freezing with temperatures going below zero and in single digits did not help survival. Extreme cold, and starvation could be factors. It has been suggested that they may have suffocated. Bluebird huddle in boxes on extreme cold weather nights and they usually do so in a way that would not contribute to suffocation. In Arizona we had as many as 32 Pygmy Nuthatches roosting in a natural cavity with no such mortality problem.  I did not find chickadees, titmice nor white-breasted nuthatches dead and they also use nest boxes.  I recommend that all of you check your nest boxes and remove the dead birds. Those that have bluebird nest box trails and on golf courses etc. also need to do so. Jerry Wayne DavisHot Springs, AR

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Date: 2/21/21 1:34 pm
From: TUMLISON, RENN <tumlison...>
Subject: Re: Dead Bluebirds In Nest Boxes
We had 2 dead in just west of Arkadelphia...

On Sun, Feb 21, 2021, 3:26 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> *This winter has been deadly on bluebirds and I expect many other species.
> In checking my nest boxes now that the temperatures are above freezing I
> had one male bluebird dead in one nest box and 4 male and 4 female dead in
> another nest box. Our daughter in Cabot, AR had 5 dead in one box and 6
> dead in another box. Eight days below freezing with temperatures going
> below zero and in single digits did not help survival. Extreme cold, and
> starvation could be factors. It has been suggested that they may have
> suffocated. Bluebird huddle in boxes on extreme cold weather nights and
> they usually do so in a way that would not contribute to suffocation. In
> Arizona we had as many as 32 Pygmy Nuthatches roosting in a natural cavity
> with no such mortality problem. I did not find chickadees, titmice nor
> white-breasted nuthatches dead and they also use nest boxes. *
>
> *I recommend that all of you check your nest boxes and remove the dead
> birds. Those that have bluebird nest box trails and on golf courses etc.
> also need to do so.*
>
> *Jerry Wayne Davis*
> *Hot Springs, AR*
>
> ------------------------------
>
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Date: 2/21/21 1:26 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Dead Bluebirds In Nest Boxes
This winter has been deadly on bluebirds and I expect many other species. In checking my nest boxes now that the temperatures are above freezing I had one male bluebird dead in one nest box and 4 male and 4 female dead in another nest box. Our daughter in Cabot, AR had 5 dead in one box and 6 dead in another box. Eight days below freezing with temperatures going below zero and in single digits did not help survival. Extreme cold, and starvation could be factors. It has been suggested that they may have suffocated. Bluebird huddle in boxes on extreme cold weather nights and they usually do so in a way that would not contribute to suffocation. In Arizona we had as many as 32 Pygmy Nuthatches roosting in a natural cavity with no such mortality problem. I did not find chickadees, titmice nor white-breasted nuthatches dead and they also use nest boxes.

I recommend that all of you check your nest boxes and remove the dead birds. Those that have bluebird nest box trails and on golf courses etc. also need to do so.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

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Date: 2/21/21 10:19 am
From: K Geo <katherine.knierim...>
Subject: Re: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 19 (Belated Report)
Looks like your alligator photos are getting picked up in the national news!

https://www.cnn.com/2021/02/19/us/alligator-snout-freeze-icing-trnd/index.html

Very cool

Kathy

On Sat, Feb 20, 2021, 9:59 PM David Arbour <arbour...> wrote:

> It was clear and cold (30’s & 40’s) with a light wind and several inches
> of snow on the ground on the bird survey yesterday (Friday). 51 species
> were found. All the lakes and wetland units were covered in 2-3 inches of
> ice except for a large hole of open water in Lotus Lake and one in Bittern
> Lake that were being kept open by hundreds of waterfowl, coots, and
> grebes. Passerines were really scarce and hard to come by. I hope most of
> the missing birds had been smart enough to migrate further south rather
> than freezing to death. There were numerous dead coots laying around and a
> few grebe carcasses frozen in the ice. And I also found one Brown Thrasher
> laying on the ground dead. I witnessed a Northern Harrier land on a dead
> coot out on the ice and scavenge on it. I saw a Virginia Rail out walking
> on the snow on one of the levees, then it ran into the marshy ice covered
> ditch when I approached. Notable finds today included a King Rail and a
> Rusty Blackbird (very scarce this year.). I also checked on some gators
> that were in a state of brumation and in an “icing response” position with
> their noses sticking up through the ice. Here is my list from yesterday:
>
>
>
> Wood Duck - 9
>
> Gadwall – 150
>
> Mallard – 312
>
> Northern Shoveler – 25
>
> Northern Pintail - 23
>
> Green-winged Teal – 3
>
> Ring-necked Duck – 113
>
> Bufflehead – 5
>
> Hooded Merganser – 9
>
> Ruddy Duck - 24
>
> Pied-billed Grebe – 14
>
> Great-blue Heron – 4
>
> Black Vulture - 10
>
> Turkey Vulture – 25
>
> Bald Eagle – 2 (1 adult & 1 imm.)
>
> Northern Harrier – 5
>
> Cooper’s Hawk - 1
>
> Red-shouldered Hawk - 2
>
> Red-tailed Hawk – 4
>
> *King Rail* - *1*
>
> Virginia Rail – 1 (walking around on the snow.)
>
> American Coot – 365
>
> Killdeer – 5
>
> Wilson’s Snipe – 1
>
> Mourning Dove - 1
>
> Red-bellied Woodpecker – 1
>
> Downy Woodpecker – 2
>
> Hairy Woodpecker - 1
>
> Northern Flicker – 7
>
> Pileated Woodpecker - 2
>
> Blue Jay - 2
>
> American Crow – 10
>
> Fish Crow – 1
>
> Carolina Chickadee – 5
>
> Tufted Titmouse – 3
>
> Brown Creeper - 1
>
> Carolina Wren – 4
>
> Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 3
>
> American Robin - 7
>
> Northern Mockingbird – 1
>
> Brown Thrasher – 4
>
> Eastern Towhee - 1
>
> Fox Sparrow - 1
>
> Song Sparrow – 6
>
> Swamp Sparrow – 1
>
> White-throated Sparrow – 8
>
> Dark-eyed Junco - 3
>
> Northern Cardinal – 9
>
> Red-winged Blackbird – 10
>
> Meadowlark species - 3
>
> *Rusty Blackbird* – 1
>
>
>
>
>
> *Herps:*
>
>
>
> American Alligator
>
>
>
>
>
> Good birding!
>
>
>
> David Arbour
>
> De Queen, AR
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
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Date: 2/21/21 9:52 am
From: K Geo <katherine.knierim...>
Subject: NLR, diving ducks
Hello all,

The winter weather has put skim ice on Lakewood Lake #1. There are some
neat diving ducks on a couple portions of open water, closer to the dam
end.

We saw a female Canvasback (she was actually super close and right at
shoreline before she spooked). And also spotted a pair (female and male) of
Redheads. The male just looked fantastic. Also enjoyed a Bald Eagle flying
overhead and making the ducks nervous (they started clumping up on the
water).

Here's the link the the checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S82079932

The road by the lake is actually clear to about one lane wide. The walking
paths are icy but you can walk in the snow to stay off of slick spots.

Happy birding!

Kathy
North Little Rock

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Date: 2/21/21 8:07 am
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fused Glass Bird Art
I have been busy bird watching while snowed in.  Attached are some of my "sightings."  Enjoy!
Nancy YoungGrant County
Nancy's Adventures in Glass on Facebook

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Date: 2/20/21 8:05 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Atkins Lake water fowl
John Redman and I visited Atkins Lake yesterday and saw 16 species of ducks
and geese in some open water:
Duck, Wood
Mallard
Merganser, Hooded
Gadwall
Bufflehead
Redhead
Canvasback
Pintail, Northern
Goose, Greater White-fronted
Goose, Snow
Goose, Ross's
Duck, Ring-necked
Scaup, Lesser
Duck, Ruddy
Shoveler, Northern
Wigeon, American

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

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Date: 2/20/21 7:59 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Feb. 19 (Belated Report)
It was clear and cold (30's & 40's) with a light wind and several inches of
snow on the ground on the bird survey yesterday (Friday). 51 species were
found. All the lakes and wetland units were covered in 2-3 inches of ice
except for a large hole of open water in Lotus Lake and one in Bittern Lake
that were being kept open by hundreds of waterfowl, coots, and grebes.
Passerines were really scarce and hard to come by. I hope most of the
missing birds had been smart enough to migrate further south rather than
freezing to death. There were numerous dead coots laying around and a few
grebe carcasses frozen in the ice. And I also found one Brown Thrasher
laying on the ground dead. I witnessed a Northern Harrier land on a dead
coot out on the ice and scavenge on it. I saw a Virginia Rail out walking
on the snow on one of the levees, then it ran into the marshy ice covered
ditch when I approached. Notable finds today included a King Rail and a
Rusty Blackbird (very scarce this year.). I also checked on some gators
that were in a state of brumation and in an "icing response" position with
their noses sticking up through the ice. Here is my list from yesterday:



Wood Duck - 9

Gadwall - 150

Mallard - 312

Northern Shoveler - 25

Northern Pintail - 23

Green-winged Teal - 3

Ring-necked Duck - 113

Bufflehead - 5

Hooded Merganser - 9

Ruddy Duck - 24

Pied-billed Grebe - 14

Great-blue Heron - 4

Black Vulture - 10

Turkey Vulture - 25

Bald Eagle - 2 (1 adult & 1 imm.)

Northern Harrier - 5

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 4

King Rail - 1

Virginia Rail - 1 (walking around on the snow.)

American Coot - 365

Killdeer - 5

Wilson's Snipe - 1

Mourning Dove - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 7

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Brown Creeper - 1

Carolina Wren - 4

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 3

American Robin - 7

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 4

Eastern Towhee - 1

Fox Sparrow - 1

Song Sparrow - 6

Swamp Sparrow - 1

White-throated Sparrow - 8

Dark-eyed Junco - 3

Northern Cardinal - 9

Red-winged Blackbird - 10

Meadowlark species - 3

Rusty Blackbird - 1





Herps:



American Alligator





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR
















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Date: 2/19/21 1:30 pm
From: Sheran Herrin <sjherrin...>
Subject: Snow Week Summary and Highlights
Our snow week, Feb 11 - Feb 19, corresponded with the GBBC.  That is good news and bad news.  I usually try and make several trips to my favorite spots to do counts.  Not this year, no trips to BKNWR or Heber Springs.  This year all my counts are from home.  LOTS of hours spent watching for the usual and the unusual.  Total of at least 9 inches of snow.  Most since 1988.  So here are my highlights, many of them have also been documented by others here.
 Pine Siskins (25 average) in large flocks, especially in the mornings, enjoying the Niger seed socks
27 Cardinals decorating snowy trees and feeders on Monday.. 
4 flights of low flying geese ( 50 total) flying east over our front pasture.  Speculate they had spent the night on Lake Barnett or a near by farm pond.  Most were Canada, but one flight was either Snow or white fronted.
Lone Robin who attempting to dominate meal worm feeder even from the bluebirds.  (:
Fox sparrow (2) and Eastern Towhee (1) arrived with the snow on Monday.  Watched  fox sparrows dig out and defend their own small "fox holes"  several times.     Have not seen the towhee today.
2 Yellow Bellied Sapsuckers battled over a suet feeder. I have 4 suet feeders up.    Pretty brutal exchange.  Thought one might have been mortally wounded, but Iv'e seen both cautiously back since then.  
"Black birds" discovered my feeders on Tuesday.  Common grackles, Red Wing BB and a possible Rusty BB.  The Rusty would be a life bird for me!  Wednesday I added Starlings to my uninvited guest list. Even the robin is intimidated by them!   
Surprised at the number of Song Sparrows I've seen at least 4!  
After reading reports of deaths in bluebird houses, I'm concerned about my bluebirds.  Usually see 4  and sometimes 5.  Only saw 3 yesterday and 2  today.  
Also seeing all the usual suspects, blue jay, tufted titmouse, Carolina  chickadee, pine warblers, Carolina wren, downy and Red bellied woodpecker, mourning dove, both white and red breasted nuthatch, Goldfinch, and both chipping and white throat sparrows. 
 Wonderful variety without leaving my nice warm, home just north of Beebe in very white,  White County.  


.  

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Date: 2/19/21 10:36 am
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Re: Centerton Adieu and Audubon International
Dear ARBIRDers,

I’ll second Jack Stewart’s observations. Many years ago a similarly named “Audubon” group (from New York State as I recall) was under consideration by a local golf course. The purpose? Use the well-regarded Audubon name to make the golf course appear to be something of a bird sanctuary. It was all about using the Audubon name to fool people. The term Audubon can be used by anyone for a good or bad purpose.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. In addition to 14” total snow we have had numerous birds trying to survive the harsh conditions. A couple of fox sparrows jointed the crowd. Eight Eastern bluebirds, nine deer but no partridges in a pear tree (of which we have none to my knowledge). Robins in large numbers yesterday. Oddly not a single squirrel in days or chipmunks. The squirrels must be living off the fat of the land on their stored reserves, and laughing at humans who get out and think they can control their vehicles on black ice. Not going to happen.


> On Feb 19, 2021, at 12:08 PM, Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I would be very, very leery about getting Audubon International involved with this project. It has been many years since I last was up on this, but at one time National Audubon Society sued Audubon International for using the Audubon name. The case went all the way to the Supreme Court. Unfortunately, in the distant past the then "Association of Audubon Societies" failed to copyright the name "Audubon" so the case was lost. Unless there has been some kind of drastic change of heart, which I doubt, Audubon International is a whitewash effort.
>
> The above is from memory, when I have time I'll try to refresh that memory.
>
> Jack Stewart, snowed in at Erbie with plenty of food, wine, sunflower seed, suet, and, now that the sun is out, fully charged batteries.

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Date: 2/19/21 10:19 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Sunnymede Park
What a great morning to go for a walk. 19 degrees, no wind, sunny.
I had 29 species in one hour.
2 adult Bald Eagles watching a huge flock of Canada Geese that were
“chilling out“ on the frozen Arkansas River.
2 Northern Pintail, 2 Ring-necked Ducks, 3 Green-winged Teal, 50 plus
Mallards, and 8 Wilson’s Snipe were hanging out in the marshy creek area
above the falls.
Things are getting back to normal. I shall miss the snow.

Sandy B
Fort Smith

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Date: 2/19/21 10:09 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Centerton Adieu and Audubon International
I would be very, very leery about getting Audubon International involved with this project.  It has been many years since I last was up on this, but at one time National Audubon Society sued Audubon International for using the Audubon name.  The case went all the way to the Supreme Court.  Unfortunately, in the distant past the then "Association of Audubon Societies" failed to copyright the name "Audubon" so the case was lost.  Unless there has been some kind of drastic change of heart, which I doubt, Audubon International is a whitewash effort.
The above is from memory, when I have time I'll try to refresh that memory.
Jack Stewart,  snowed in at Erbie with plenty of food, wine, sunflower seed, suet, and, now that the sun is out, fully charged batteries.



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Date: 2/19/21 8:22 am
From: Kim Hillis <kimberlyannhillis...>
Subject: Re: Bully Bird
I have the same mockingbird
Issue ! The little bully chases any birds away that get close to “his” bird feeder and end of the yard. I have been watching him since the cold weather came into LR this past weekend. I am hoping when things warm up he will expand his “neighborhood”.

Kim Hillis


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 19, 2021, at 8:57 AM, Dedra Gerard <000002df2472bba2-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>  I agree with you.
>
>
> Sent from the all new Aol app for iOS
>
> On Friday, February 19, 2021, 8:35 AM, Tom Harden <pepawharden...> wrote:
>
> I have a Mockingbird that is chasing all my other birds away from my feeders. This has been going on for several days.
>
> Advice?
>
> On one hand, I feel I should let nature take its course. On the other hand, I have considered buying a sling shot.
>
>
>
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Date: 2/19/21 8:06 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bird ducks and waterbirds on select private lands until Feb. 28
Has anyone checked out the locations of these privately owned waterfowl rest areas and is anyone considering checking a few of them out, once the snow melts and roads clear?

Most farmers drain their waterfowl hunting areas at the end of January but these specific fields are required to be open for bird and wildlife watching after duck season closes and must hold water in these field until March 1.

It’s a unique opportunity to look for cool bords and gorgeous waterfowl. Who knows what you may find out there?

If you are not interested in birding these sites, is it because you are having issues locating or navigating the online maps?

Or are you not interested because you are not familiar with the sites and prefer to bird areas you have visited before?

You input will help us better plan for next years birding opportunities on these specific private land wildlife rest areas.

Let me know what you think please.

Karen Rowe


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 18, 2021, at 11:17 AM, Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm...> wrote:
>
> 
> There’s still time to enjoy one of the many private-land locations reserved throughout the state through the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s Wildlife Management Division’s Waterfowl Rice Incentive Conservation Enhancement Program, you’ll just need to switch from the shotgun to binoculars, spotting scope and camera. Until February 28, people interested in viewing wildlife on any of the WRICE program locations may do so without any special permits or permissions.
>
> Anyone interested in birdwatching or viewing other wildlife on a WRICE field can find descriptions and locations of the areas under contract with the AGFC at www.agfc.com/WRICE. (click on links)
>
> Interested birdwatchers may click here for an updated map.
>
> Parking at each location is allowed only in designated parking areas on the maps, and access is by foot.
>
> “We are asking visitors not to travel down any farmroads or turnrows that aren’t publicly maintained roads,” Luke Naylor, waterfowl program coordinator for the AGFC, said. “If the road doesn’t appear to be well maintained, the best decision is not to drive on it. These private landowners are opening their property up for the public to enjoy and we want to continue the good relationships we’ve built with this program. If you have any questions, consult the map online.”
>
> Originally designed to prevent fall tillage where rice producers would normally turn under waste rice and stubble that still has great value to migratory birds, including waterfowl, the WRICE program was expanded last year to include hunting opportunities, then expanded even further this season thanks to a Natural Resources Conservation Services Voluntary Public Access grant. While the program rightfully captured many people’s attention for the increased waterfowl hunting opportunities on private land, an element never before explored in the world’s duck-hunting capital, its primary role still is to put more valuable habitat on the ground for migratory birds.
>
> In addition to waterfowl species, many types of shorebirds and wading birds make use of flooded rice fields, including greater and lesser yellowlegs, rails, grebes, herons, egrets and sandpipers. Even in fields where waste rice grain has been depleted, decomposing rice stubble creates the perfect environment for invertebrates many avian species need for protein as well as nutrients to benefit egg production.
>
> According to the AGFC’s Wildlife Management Division, more than 1,000 unique hunters applied to hunt one of the AGFC’s Waterfowl Rice Incentive Conservation Enhancement Program fields at some point during the 2020-21 duck season. Of those applicants, more than 300 were able to draw and bring three hunting partners to enjoy the opportunity to hunt, opening hunting opportunities up to a possible 1,200 hunters last season. With the added benefit of wildlife watching throughout February, the program stands as a shining example of conservation efforts that serve many user groups as well as the resource.
>
> For more information about the WRICE program, visit www.agfc.com/WRICE.
>
> Here is a link to the article if you are having problems accessing the links to the maps and additional info for each site.
> WRICE program fields still offering benefits for waterfowl, birdwatchers and wildlife viewers - News
>
>
> If you have any questions, please feel free to email me and I'll get the answers for you.
>
> Thanks, keep warm and take care,
>
> Karen Rowe <karen.rowe...>
>
>
>
>
>
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Date: 2/19/21 6:57 am
From: Dedra Gerard <000002df2472bba2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bully Bird
I agree with you.


Sent from the all new Aol app for iOS


On Friday, February 19, 2021, 8:35 AM, Tom Harden <pepawharden...> wrote:

I have a Mockingbird that is chasing all my other birds away from my feeders.  This has been going on for several days.  
Advice?  
On one hand, I feel I should let nature take its course.  On the other hand, I have considered buying a sling shot.



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Date: 2/19/21 6:55 am
From: Araks O <araks.ohanyan...>
Subject: Re: Bully Bird
I have a robin that’s taken over my platform feeder, and it chases away every other bird, including a mockingbird (although the mocker seems less intimidated than most other birds). I put up a perch feeder nearby (which I’ve never seen a robin go to), and now the other birds can get some food while the robin is busy manning the platform feeder. :) I’m also considering changing the type of food I put out. I currently use a no-mess seed and nut mix, mealworms, and suet nuggets. However, I want to try using only unshelled sunflower seeds for a while, as this might deter the robin (and might deter mockingbirds as well). Just a thought.

Roxy
Russellville

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 19, 2021, at 08:35, Tom Harden <pepawharden...> wrote:
>
> 
> I have a Mockingbird that is chasing all my other birds away from my feeders. This has been going on for several days.
>
> Advice?
>
> On one hand, I feel I should let nature take its course. On the other hand, I have considered buying a sling shot.
>
>
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1

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Date: 2/19/21 6:40 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Bully Bird
We often find that a mockingbird decides to take over the feeders and chase away other birds.

We also find starlings are aggressive and the other birds flee when they show up.

It amazes me that flickers, red-bellied woodpeckers, robins, are intimidated by a mockingbird or starling, but they are.

It is just their nature, but bullies who hog all the food on cold days are not charming.

Don
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Tom Harden <pepawharden...>
Sent: Friday, February 19, 2021 8:35 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Bully Bird

I have a Mockingbird that is chasing all my other birds away from my feeders. This has been going on for several days.

Advice?

On one hand, I feel I should let nature take its course. On the other hand, I have considered buying a sling shot.



________________________________

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Back to top
Date: 2/19/21 6:35 am
From: Tom Harden <pepawharden...>
Subject: Bully Bird
I have a Mockingbird that is chasing all my other birds away from my
feeders. This has been going on for several days.

Advice?

On one hand, I feel I should let nature take its course. On the other
hand, I have considered buying a sling shot.

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Date: 2/18/21 6:57 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation
Never seen a Fox Sparrow that didn’t exhibit this characteristic no matter the conditions pretty sure it is a built in habit have had 6-10 since the snow

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 18, 2021, at 5:18 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>
> I’ve had two Fox Sparrows right out my front door the last three days in Centerton, Benton CO. It’s the only place where the snow was not too deep that I could scatter seed. One stays out in the snow and the other has taken over a pile of leaves. Jacque
>
>> On Feb 18, 2021, at 11:05 AM, Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> Our Fox Sparrow is back on the back of our deck this morning reclaiming the large divot in the snow he made earlier in the week. I’ve only ever seen them at our house in the snow.
>>
>> Adam Schaffer
>> Bentonville
>>
>>>> On Feb 17, 2021, at 1:03 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
>>>>
>>> 
>>> I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this snow hit. Now I have a couple coming to feed in the snow and grass beneath my feeder along with the other regulars. I have noticed a striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other birds. They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into the grass and eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. After they have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is exposed. They become very territorial about that spot and will not let the juncos or white-throats nearby. The FOSP even drove off a persistent cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though they are much larger. Have others noticed this distinction in the way fox sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?
>>>
>>> Peace and Birds Jerry Butler
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>>
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>
>
>
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Date: 2/18/21 6:35 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Job Opportunity - Manager, Conserving Marine Life in the US - The Pew Charitable Trusts
Hey folks,



I receive various employment opportunities from time-to-time from my
previous associations with planning, DoD, and others.



I used to filter these type of announcements through Dr. Kim Smith. I know
that some on the listserv are graduating graduate students and may be
interested. For others, it may be a glimpse into what is going-on-sometimes
behind the scenes.



Here is another announcement that may lead to fun, money and
self-actualization.



Please let me know if these are not appropriate for this listserv.



Jeff Short



BTW, the impact of marine conservation on birds is important



From: Alexandra Binder [mailto:<ABinder...>]
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2021 10:22 AM
To: <dodnatres...>
Subject: Job Opportunity - Manager, Conserving Marine Life in the US - The
Pew Charitable Trusts



Contact:

Joseph Gordon (he/him)
Project Director, U.S. Oceans

The Pew Charitable Trusts
w: 202-887-1347 | c: 240-672-2045 | e: <mailto:<jgordon...>
<jgordon...>


<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?<u...>
rojects_conserving-2Dmarine-2Dlife-2Din-2Dthe-2Dunited-2Dstates&d=DwMFAg&c=r
_tSStIHV2ie60z4DgB-pQ&r=dNNY3CpseNkcGCuHUMErOAnVZVpcA2jgysrElKGUp2A&m=hfYcui
hfMC8XFo-aveYvuMs1KhOURdQHHDLvtJjJjuo&s=V0lhkYLBHd7a1YvcE534hT9affM0XXK26iIQ
NDU80Z4&e=> Conserving Marine Life in the U.S.





Manager, Conserving Marine Life in the U.S.

Location US-DC-Washington

Posted Date: 2 months ago (12/3/2020 6:40 PM)



Job ID: 2020-6392



Department: Program-Environment



Company: The Pew Charitable Trusts



Overview

The Pew Charitable Trusts uses data to make a difference. For more than 70
years, we have focused on serving the public, invigorating civic life,
conducting nonpartisan research, advancing effective public policies and
practices, and achieving tangible results. Through rigorous inquiry and
knowledge sharing, we inform and engage public-spirited citizens and
organizations, linking diverse interests to pursue common cause. We are a
dedicated team of researchers, communicators, advocates, subject matter
experts, and professionals working on some of today's big challenges - and
we know we are more effective and creative collectively than we are
individually. With Philadelphia as our hometown and the majority of our
staff located in Washington, D.C., our U.S. and international staff find
working at Pew personally and professionally rewarding.



Wise stewardship of resources allows Pew employees to pursue work that
strategically furthers our mission in significant and measurable ways. We
collaborate with a diverse range of philanthropic partners, public and
private organizations, and concerned citizens who share our interest in
fact-based solutions and goal-driven initiatives to improve society. Pew
attracts top talent, people of integrity who are service-oriented and
willing to take on challenging assignments. We provide competitive pay and
benefits, a healthy work-life balance, and a respectful and inclusive
workplace. Pew employees are proud of their colleagues, proud of where they
work, and proud of the institution's reputation.



The Environmental Portfolio at The Pew Charitable Trusts

For more than 25 years, Pew has been a major force in engaging the public
and policy makers about the causes, consequences, and solutions to some of
the world's most pressing environmental challenges. Our environment work
spans all seven continents with more than 250 professionals working at the
local, national, and international levels to reduce the scope and severity
of global environmental problems, such as the erosion of large natural
ecosystems that contain a great part of the world's remaining biodiversity,
and the destruction of the marine environment.



Pew has worked in the United States and Canada since 1990 to protect vast
stretches of wilderness and more recently expanded our land conservation
efforts to Australia's Outback and Chilean Patagonia. Safeguarding these
places offers an opportunity to conserve wildlife habitat, shorelines and
landscapes for current and future generations. Our work relies on the
sciences of conservation, biology, and economics to advocate for practical
and durable solutions to the loss of biodiversity.



In the sea, reforms to how our oceans are managed are essential to address
overfishing, pollution, and loss of habitat. Pew began its oceans program in
the United States, focusing on ending overfishing and protecting fragile
marine habitat. Starting in 2005, Pew's ocean conservation program expanded
around the world and played a significant role in reforming marine fisheries
management in the European Union and on the high seas and creating marine
reserves around the world. Our work is grounded in the best available
science and pursues domestic and international conservation measures that
are long-term and provide permanent, durable protections for marine
ecosystems.



Conserving Marine Life in the United States

Pew's conserving marine life in the United States (CMLUS) program focuses on
protecting essential habitats found in coastal waters like oyster reefs,
seagrass meadows, kelp forests, and salt marsh that provide nursery areas,
food and refuge for a diversity of marine wildlife. This work includes
working with communities and partners to advance management measures at the
state and federal levels that conserve and restore economically and
ecologically valuable coastal habitats. Additionally, the program promotes
an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management that takes into account
the interdependent nature of ocean life. This work includes advancing
measures that protect forage fish that feed dependent marine life, protect
ocean habitat such as deep-sea corals, reduce the incidental capture and
killing of non-target species (known as bycatch), and integrate the use of
comprehensive ecosystem plans into fisheries conservation and management.



Position Overview

The manager, conserving marine life in the U.S. is responsible for
overseeing implementation of coastal habitat conservation initiatives in the
New England and mid-Atlantic states, and leading work with managers and
stakeholders to establish an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries
management in federal waters of the region. They will focus on advancing
Pew's project goals in three major areas: coastal habitat and restoration
initiatives with a focus on oyster plans and protection; efforts to advance
ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) in relevant fishery councils and
commissions; and, cross-cutting program initiatives and emerging
opportunities, such as establishing a new National Estuarine Research
Reserve and seagrass conservation efforts. They will focus on advancing
Pew's project goals primarily in Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York,
Delaware, and Virginia for coastal habitat, and at the Mid-Atlantic Fishery
Management Council (MAFMC), Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, the
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other
decision-making bodies for EBFM. The manager also oversees scoping for new
potential lines of work in New England and the mid-Atlantic, and conduct
outreach to stakeholders and decision-makers in the regions as needed to
advance Pew's coastal habitat and fisheries objectives. The manager oversees
three staff focused on program objectives in the region.



The manager reports to the project director, conserving marine life in the
U.S., and is based in Pew's Washington, D.C. office. This position is
contingent upon board approval in December 2020.



Responsibilities

. Oversee the day to day operations of initiatives to secure new
policies that advance protection of coastal habitats and ecosystem-based
fisheries management in the New England and the Mid-Atlantic.

. Manage program initiatives in the U.S. Northeast to advance
coastal habitat protection and EBFM objectives, including:

o Coastal habitat conservation and restoration initiatives in at least
five states (RI, CT, NY, NJ, DE, VA) with a focus on oyster plans and
protections.

o Efforts to advance EBFM at the mid-Atlantic fishery management council
(MAFMC) and coastwide commission (ASMFC).

o Cross-cutting initiatives including a national partnership with the
military to build coastal resilience, federal designations for estuaries in
CT), and other emerging opportunities like blue carbon.

. Identify and set measurable goals and targets; develop campaign
plans and timelines; assess the strengths and weaknesses of potential
partners; design and implement campaign strategies, tactics, and messaging,
and modify them as necessary.

. Establish, foster and manage cooperative working relationships
with a broad cross section of stakeholders, government officials,
conservation organizations, fishing interests, scientists and coastal
businesses to advance Pew's goals in the region.

. Identify and manage contractors and project partners, develop
contracts as needed, and consult with experts to ensure policy goals are
based on science and incorporate community input.

. Determine when the project is at risk of not meeting its goals,
identify the causes and, when needed, suggest appropriate steps to keep the
project on course.

. Supervise, lead and develop Pew staff working on this region. Set
clear deliverables and expectations; provide regular coaching and feedback;
collaborate with staff to establish touchpoints; and identify opportunities
for staff's professional growth and development.

. Represent Pew before print, radio and television media outlets.
Work with communications department and project director to communicate the
impact of proposed policies, plans and designations using a variety of
mediums.

. Represent Pew in key government and coalition meetings and at
conferences and events.

. Develop and maintain a broad knowledge base of regional coastal
habitat conservation and restoration efforts to inform and advance campaign
priorities. Coordinate and integrate strategies with Pew's other conserving
marine life in the U.S. campaigns, which are focused on achieving similar
goals.

. Prepare regular oral and written updates on progress; and assist
the project director with other duties and tasks as required.



Requirements

. Bachelor's degree or equivalent experience required, advanced
degree preferred.

. At least eight years of applicable experience, preferably in
policy advocacy and non-profit work, including experience with campaigning,
political engagement, lobbying and strategic campaign development.

. Minimum of two plus years of previous direct supervisory
experience required including experience managing performance management
process for direct reports and providing career development advice and
counsel.

. Prior to commencing employment with Pew, candidates for this
position who were registered to lobby in any jurisdiction must certify
termination of previous registration(s) and provide copies of termination
notices with said jurisdiction(s) to Pew.

. A broad understanding of coastal and marine environmental issues
in the United States is preferred but not required.

. Strong oral, presentation, facilitation, and written communication
skills such that complex ideas, thoughts and concepts are clearly
articulated for a general audience. Clear, effective writing style.

. Media-savvy and politically astute; able to understand the needs
and motivations of different individuals and institutions and conceptualize
win-win scenarios that satisfy multiple agendas among multiple stakeholders.
Strong understanding of how to manage by influencing others and the ability
to read nuances of meaning accurately.

. Exhibits diplomacy and cultural sensitivity. Able to work
effectively with a wide array of individuals and stakeholder groups that may
disagree with and are in competition with one another. Excellent listening
skills.

. Strong organizational, management and campaign skills. Able to
develop and move projects forward with a high degree of independence and
autonomy.

. Ability to synthesize information and to focus quickly on the
essence of an issue/problem and develop a solution. A strong commitment to
producing measurable results.

. Seasoned judgment, able to make decisions, justify
recommendations, and be responsive, clear and firm with colleagues and
partners.



Travel

Significant regional travel is expected.



Total Rewards

We offer a competitive salary and benefit program, including: comprehensive,
affordable health care through medical, dental, and vision coverage;
financial security with life and disability insurance; opportunities to save
using health savings and flexible spending accounts; retirement benefits to
help prepare for the future; and work/life benefits to maintain a good
balance.



The Pew Charitable Trusts is an equal opportunity employer, committed to a
diverse and inclusive workplace. Pew considers qualified applicants for
employment without regard to age, sex, ethnicity, religion, disability,
marital status, sexual orientation or gender identity, military/veteran
status, or any other basis prohibited by applicable law.







Alexandra J. Binder

Environmental Scientist, Stell

Direct: 484.843.4554 | Corporate: 484.892.6820 | <http://www.stellee.com/>
www.stellee.com



Galvanizing Sustainable Communities

Certified Veteran-Owned, Woman-Owned Small Business; Disadvantaged Business
Enterprise







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Back to top
Date: 2/18/21 6:33 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation
I never have Fox Sparrows at my feeders except during snow. I had a high
count of 14 throughout this last two day period. Also present were 5
Eastern Towhee. But, the most enjoyable were the 6 Bluebirds feeding on
mealworms in the mealworm feeder.

On Thu, Feb 18, 2021 at 8:22 PM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

> I’m resending a portion of my “reply” I sent yesterday to Jerry Butler
> re: FOSP behavior
>
>
>
> “We’d only had a few FOSP over the last 15 years, usually singles.
>
> Today I counted 6. I noticed that they tend to do the two-foot “scootch”;
> that is feet evenly placed underneath and then they shift backward exposing
> fresh spot, then hop forward and scootch back, again and again.
>
> We have well over a foot of snow so it is a long way to the grass.”
>
>
>
> This morning, I noticed the same FOSP behavior on our porch—to no
> avail--on the rubber insulation supporting our dog bed. (There was no
> seeds on or under it!) Are FOSP the only ones that exhibit this “scootch”
> behavior? The other sparrows and juncos just moved around normally. The
> “scootch” is pretty entertaining and I am sure it could be set to music.
>
>
>
> Jeff Short
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> <ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Good
> *Sent:* Thursday, February 18, 2021 8:06 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Fox sparrows an observation
>
>
>
> On 2/18/2021 6:08 PM, Ed Laster wrote:
>
> I almost never see fox sparrows in my yard unless there is snow on the
> ground. I started with one fox sparrow last Friday and it visited
> frequently but just fed with the other sparrows and juncos on the surface
> of the snow. Today a 2nd one came in and initially they fed on the
> surface but with my activity around the feeder compacting the 14” of snow
> and making the distance to the ground closer they started the behavior you
> described, i.e. kicking the snow to create a divot.
>
>
>
> I am curious as to why they would do this since it looked like they were
> successful eating seeds and suet dropped from the feeder on the surface of
> the snow. So why would they dig down into the snow. The other behavior
> that could play into this is the shyness they exhibit. They seldom stay in
> the open very long, coming out to grab a bit they retreating to nearby
> cover.
>
>
>
> So is this digging related to “hiding” in a bunker? Why would they wait
> until the snow was compacted to dig?
>
>
>
> Ed Laster
>
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Feb 17, 2021, at 1:03 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this snow
> hit. Now I have a couple coming to feed in the snow and grass beneath my
> feeder along with the other regulars. I have noticed a
> striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other
> birds. They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into the
> grass and eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. After they
> have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is exposed. They
> become very territorial about that spot and will not let the
> juncos or white-throats nearby. The FOSP even drove off a persistent
> cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though they are much
> larger. Have others noticed this distinction in the way fox
> sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?
>
>
>
> Peace and Birds Jerry Butler
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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>
> Yesterday (Feb.17) two FOSP came into the backyard for the first time this
> season. They along with white throats, juncos, pine warblers, siskins and
> gold finches were displaced from their normal places and the feeders by an
> outlaw version of crows and blackbirds. These birds started feeding along
> the foundation of our house, so we put out feed along along this space.
> Not there was no snow in this area for about 12-18 inches out; the remains
> of mole tunnels and ferns in this area. All of this said to say that one
> of the FOSP exhibited the same type of behavior as others have seen. He
> simply excavated a "nest" out of a mole tunnel. He used it to sit in and
> peck at bird seed on the ground and he defended it when any of the other
> birds came near it. Most of all he defended it when a brown thrasher got
> too close.
>
> I also observed the juncos and white throated sparrows doing an
> interesting thing that someone else mentioned earlier. When the tried to
> light down on the soft snow, it was like they couldn't get both feet on the
> ground so they quickly went into a wide wing spread to hold their bodies up
> on the surface (I have seen a Carolina Wren spread her wings and do this
> movement in a sand bed in the summer time).
>
> Evelyn Good
>
> Arkadelphia
>
>
>
>
>
>
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Date: 2/18/21 6:22 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation
I’m resending a portion of my “reply” I sent yesterday to Jerry Butler re: FOSP behavior



“We’d only had a few FOSP over the last 15 years, usually singles.

Today I counted 6. I noticed that they tend to do the two-foot “scootch”; that is feet evenly placed underneath and then they shift backward exposing fresh spot, then hop forward and scootch back, again and again.

We have well over a foot of snow so it is a long way to the grass.”



This morning, I noticed the same FOSP behavior on our porch—to no avail--on the rubber insulation supporting our dog bed. (There was no seeds on or under it!) Are FOSP the only ones that exhibit this “scootch” behavior? The other sparrows and juncos just moved around normally. The “scootch” is pretty entertaining and I am sure it could be set to music.



Jeff Short







From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Good
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2021 8:06 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation



On 2/18/2021 6:08 PM, Ed Laster wrote:

I almost never see fox sparrows in my yard unless there is snow on the ground. I started with one fox sparrow last Friday and it visited frequently but just fed with the other sparrows and juncos on the surface of the snow. Today a 2nd one came in and initially they fed on the surface but with my activity around the feeder compacting the 14” of snow and making the distance to the ground closer they started the behavior you described, i.e. kicking the snow to create a divot.



I am curious as to why they would do this since it looked like they were successful eating seeds and suet dropped from the feeder on the surface of the snow. So why would they dig down into the snow. The other behavior that could play into this is the shyness they exhibit. They seldom stay in the open very long, coming out to grab a bit they retreating to nearby cover.



So is this digging related to “hiding” in a bunker? Why would they wait until the snow was compacted to dig?



Ed Laster

Little Rock









On Feb 17, 2021, at 1:03 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:



I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this snow hit. Now I have a couple coming to feed in the snow and grass beneath my feeder along with the other regulars. I have noticed a striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other birds. They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into the grass and eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. After they have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is exposed. They become very territorial about that spot and will not let the juncos or white-throats nearby. The FOSP even drove off a persistent cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though they are much larger. Have others noticed this distinction in the way fox sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?



Peace and Birds Jerry Butler







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Yesterday (Feb.17) two FOSP came into the backyard for the first time this season. They along with white throats, juncos, pine warblers, siskins and gold finches were displaced from their normal places and the feeders by an outlaw version of crows and blackbirds. These birds started feeding along the foundation of our house, so we put out feed along along this space. Not there was no snow in this area for about 12-18 inches out; the remains of mole tunnels and ferns in this area. All of this said to say that one of the FOSP exhibited the same type of behavior as others have seen. He simply excavated a "nest" out of a mole tunnel. He used it to sit in and peck at bird seed on the ground and he defended it when any of the other birds came near it. Most of all he defended it when a brown thrasher got too close.

I also observed the juncos and white throated sparrows doing an interesting thing that someone else mentioned earlier. When the tried to light down on the soft snow, it was like they couldn't get both feet on the ground so they quickly went into a wide wing spread to hold their bodies up on the surface (I have seen a Carolina Wren spread her wings and do this movement in a sand bed in the summer time).

Evelyn Good

Arkadelphia






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Date: 2/18/21 6:06 pm
From: Good <theoldcrow...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation
On 2/18/2021 6:08 PM, Ed Laster wrote:
> I almost never see fox sparrows in my yard unless there is snow on the
> ground. I started with one fox sparrow last Friday and it visited
> frequently but just fed with the other sparrows and juncos on the
> surface of the snow.   Today a 2nd one came in and initially they fed
> on the surface but with my activity around the feeder compacting the
> 14” of snow and making the distance to the ground closer they started
> the behavior you described, i.e. kicking the snow to create a divot.
>
> I am curious as to why they would do this since it looked like they
> were successful eating seeds and suet dropped from the feeder on the
> surface of the snow.  So why would they dig down into the snow. The
> other behavior that could play into this is the shyness they exhibit.
> They seldom stay in the open very long, coming out to grab a bit they
> retreating to nearby cover.
>
> So is this digging related to “hiding” in a bunker?  Why would they
> wait until the snow was compacted to dig?
>
> Ed Laster
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>> On Feb 17, 2021, at 1:03 PM, Jerry Butler
>> <jerrysharon.butler...> <mailto:<jerrysharon.butler...>>
>> wrote:
>>
>> I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this
>> snow hit.  Now I have a couple coming to  feed in the snow and grass
>> beneath my feeder along with the other regulars.  I have noticed a
>> striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other
>> birds.  They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into
>> the grass and  eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. 
>> After they have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is
>> exposed.  They become very territorial about that spot and will not
>> let the juncos or white-throats nearby.  The FOSP even drove off a
>> persistent cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though
>> they are much larger. Have others noticed this distinction in the way
>> fox sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?
>>
>> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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>
Yesterday (Feb.17) two FOSP came into the backyard for the first time
this season.  They along with white throats, juncos, pine warblers,
siskins and gold finches were displaced from their normal places and the
feeders by an outlaw version of crows and blackbirds.  These birds
started feeding along the foundation of our house, so we put out feed
along along this space.  Not there was no snow in this area for about
12-18 inches out; the remains of mole tunnels and ferns in this area. 
All of this said to say that one of the  FOSP exhibited the same type of
behavior as others have seen. He simply excavated a "nest" out of a mole
tunnel. He used it to sit in and peck at bird seed on the ground and he
defended it when any of the other birds came near it.  Most of all he
defended it when a brown thrasher got too close.

I also observed the juncos and white throated sparrows doing an
interesting thing that someone else mentioned earlier.  When the tried
to light down on the soft snow, it was like they couldn't get both feet
on the ground so they quickly went into a wide wing spread to hold their
bodies up on the surface  (I have seen a Carolina Wren spread her wings
and do this movement in a sand bed in the summer time).

Evelyn Good

Arkadelphia




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Date: 2/18/21 4:08 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation
I almost never see fox sparrows in my yard unless there is snow on the ground. I started with one fox sparrow last Friday and it visited frequently but just fed with the other sparrows and juncos on the surface of the snow. Today a 2nd one came in and initially they fed on the surface but with my activity around the feeder compacting the 14” of snow and making the distance to the ground closer they started the behavior you described, i.e. kicking the snow to create a divot.

I am curious as to why they would do this since it looked like they were successful eating seeds and suet dropped from the feeder on the surface of the snow. So why would they dig down into the snow. The other behavior that could play into this is the shyness they exhibit. They seldom stay in the open very long, coming out to grab a bit they retreating to nearby cover.

So is this digging related to “hiding” in a bunker? Why would they wait until the snow was compacted to dig?

Ed Laster
Little Rock



> On Feb 17, 2021, at 1:03 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
>
> I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this snow hit. Now I have a couple coming to feed in the snow and grass beneath my feeder along with the other regulars. I have noticed a striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other birds. They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into the grass and eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. After they have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is exposed. They become very territorial about that spot and will not let the juncos or white-throats nearby. The FOSP even drove off a persistent cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though they are much larger. Have others noticed this distinction in the way fox sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?
>
> Peace and Birds Jerry Butler
>
>
>
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Date: 2/18/21 3:45 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation
The only times that I have ever had Fox Sparrows inmy yard are when we have
a decent amount of snow on the ground. The only time I've seen more than
one here was the year of the 15-20" snowstorm in NW Arkansas. I had two
that time. Kinda wonder where they hang out when there is no snow.

On Thu, Feb 18, 2021 at 5:18 PM Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:

> I’ve had two Fox Sparrows right out my front door the last three days in
> Centerton, Benton CO. It’s the only place where the snow was not too deep
> that I could scatter seed. One stays out in the snow and the other has
> taken over a pile of leaves. Jacque
>
> On Feb 18, 2021, at 11:05 AM, Adam Schaffer <
> <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Our Fox Sparrow is back on the back of our deck this morning reclaiming
> the large divot in the snow he made earlier in the week. I’ve only ever
> seen them at our house in the snow.
>
> Adam Schaffer
> Bentonville
>
> On Feb 17, 2021, at 1:03 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
> wrote:
>
> 
> I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this snow
> hit. Now I have a couple coming to feed in the snow and grass beneath my
> feeder along with the other regulars. I have noticed a
> striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other
> birds. They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into the
> grass and eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. After they
> have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is exposed. They
> become very territorial about that spot and will not let the
> juncos or white-throats nearby. The FOSP even drove off a persistent
> cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though they are much
> larger. Have others noticed this distinction in the way fox
> sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?
>
> Peace and Birds Jerry Butler
>
>
>
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Date: 2/18/21 3:18 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation
I’ve had two Fox Sparrows right out my front door the last three days in Centerton, Benton CO. It’s the only place where the snow was not too deep that I could scatter seed. One stays out in the snow and the other has taken over a pile of leaves. Jacque

> On Feb 18, 2021, at 11:05 AM, Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Our Fox Sparrow is back on the back of our deck this morning reclaiming the large divot in the snow he made earlier in the week. I’ve only ever seen them at our house in the snow.
>
> Adam Schaffer
> Bentonville
>
>> On Feb 17, 2021, at 1:03 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>> I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this snow hit. Now I have a couple coming to feed in the snow and grass beneath my feeder along with the other regulars. I have noticed a striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other birds. They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into the grass and eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. After they have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is exposed. They become very territorial about that spot and will not let the juncos or white-throats nearby. The FOSP even drove off a persistent cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though they are much larger. Have others noticed this distinction in the way fox sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?
>>
>> Peace and Birds Jerry Butler
>>
>>
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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Date: 2/18/21 9:17 am
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Unique opportunity to bird private lands for ducks and waterbirds until Feb. 28
There’s still time to enjoy one of the many private-land locations reserved throughout the state through the  Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s Wildlife Management Division’s Waterfowl Rice Incentive Conservation Enhancement Program, you’ll just need to switch from the shotgun to binoculars, spotting scope and camera. Until February 28, people interested in viewing wildlife on any of the WRICE program locations may do so without any special permits or permissions.


Anyone interested in birdwatching or viewing other wildlife on a WRICE field can find descriptions and locations of the areas under contract with the AGFC at www.agfc.com/WRICE.  (click on links)

Interested birdwatchers may click here for an updated map. 
Parking at each location is allowed only in designated parking areas on the maps, and access is by foot.

“We are asking visitors not to travel down any farmroads or turnrows that aren’t publicly maintained roads,” Luke Naylor, waterfowl program coordinator for the AGFC, said. “If the road doesn’t appear to be well maintained, the best decision is not to drive on it. These private landowners are opening their property up for the public to enjoy and we want to continue the good relationships we’ve built with this program. If you have any questions, consult the map online.”

Originally designed to prevent fall tillage where rice producers would normally turn under waste rice and stubble that still has great value to migratory birds, including waterfowl, the WRICE program was expanded last year to include hunting opportunities, then expanded even further this season thanks to a Natural Resources Conservation Services Voluntary Public Access grant. While the program rightfully captured many people’s attention for the increased waterfowl hunting opportunities on private land, an element never before explored in the world’s duck-hunting capital, its primary role still is to put more valuable habitat on the ground for migratory birds. 
In addition to waterfowl species, many types of shorebirds and wading birds make use of flooded rice fields, including greater and lesser yellowlegs, rails, grebes, herons, egrets and sandpipers. Even in fields where waste rice grain has been depleted, decomposing rice stubble creates the perfect environment for invertebrates many avian species need for protein as well as nutrients to benefit egg production.

According to the AGFC’s Wildlife Management Division, more than 1,000 unique hunters applied to hunt one of the AGFC’s Waterfowl Rice Incentive Conservation Enhancement Program fields at some point during the 2020-21 duck season. Of those applicants, more than 300 were able to draw and bring three hunting partners to enjoy the opportunity to hunt, opening hunting opportunities up to a possible 1,200 hunters last season. With the added benefit of wildlife watching throughout February, the program stands as a shining example of conservation efforts that serve many user groups as well as the resource. 
For more information about the WRICE program, visit www.agfc.com/WRICE. 
Here is a link to the article if you are having problems accessing the links to the maps and additional info for each site.WRICE program fields still offering benefits for waterfowl, birdwatchers and wildlife viewers - News


If you have any questions, please feel free to email me and I'll get the answers for you.
Thanks, keep warm and take care,
Karen Rowe <karen.rowe...>




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Date: 2/18/21 9:05 am
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation
Our Fox Sparrow is back on the back of our deck this morning reclaiming the large divot in the snow he made earlier in the week. I’ve only ever seen them at our house in the snow.

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

> On Feb 17, 2021, at 1:03 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
>
> 
> I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this snow hit. Now I have a couple coming to feed in the snow and grass beneath my feeder along with the other regulars. I have noticed a striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other birds. They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into the grass and eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. After they have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is exposed. They become very territorial about that spot and will not let the juncos or white-throats nearby. The FOSP even drove off a persistent cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though they are much larger. Have others noticed this distinction in the way fox sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?
>
> Peace and Birds Jerry Butler
>
>
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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Date: 2/18/21 7:49 am
From: Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...>
Subject: Brown Thrasher
I have had a Brown Thrasher since just before the storm. At first I thought it was a Hermit Thrush but something just wasn’t right in it’s markings. Finally it came from the fence line to the feeders. An aha moment. I’ve not seen a Thrasher during the winter months. It is hanging out at the snow covered tray feeder.

I have all the normal birds. Three varieties of blackbirds. Common Grackle, Brown-headed Cowbirds, Red-winged Blackbirds.

Still looking for a Dark-eyed Juncoe Oregon or Pinksided.

Stay safe.

Lenore
Saline County between Shannon Hills and the Sardis Community
Sent from my iPhone
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Date: 2/18/21 6:28 am
From: Robert Day <rhday52...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
But remember, all: One part of the “tax reform” enacted in 2017 was that golf courses now get some sort of special tax breaks. Same for folks who have rental properties—they get lower taxes too, for some reason. And the same goes for folks who own private jets, who, in my opinion, already get a good deal in not having to pay landing fees at airports. I just can’t envision who these changes were meant to entice to sign the new tax law....

It’s criminal, in my opinion, but explains why crap like that at Centerton occurs.

RHD

Robert H. Day
Sent from my iPad

> On Feb 17, 2021, at 10:44 AM, Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> wrote:
>
> 
> Tell them to skip the golf course and emphasize running, walking, hiking and bicycling. Way more popular these days and maybe would help preserve some of the habitat. Ruth and I have spent time at three Arkansas state parks that emphasize these activities this fall and winter, and the birds have been good in all three places, a little harder as temps cooled, but still good: 30-40 species over a three night stay.
>
> Unless the development is aimed at retired people, in which case, it will be probably really hard to change the builders' assumptions about what will sell.
>
> So sorry to hear your decision, Joe. That's a whole lifetime of looks set on the shelf. So glad you guys kept records and notes.
>
> Chuck Anderson
> Snowed in at Western Hills in Little Rock
> Birds everywhere!
>
>
>> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 9:39 AM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>> Golf courses are losing money all across the nation. Guess it is in the green space planning to generate higher income for the residential housing…
>>
>>
>>
>> Maybe make the argument to replace the golf course by keeping an expansive natural area—if that is even feasible.
>>
>>
>>
>> I wonder how the proposed NWARA access will also destroy habitat.
>>
>>
>>
>> Jeff Short
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Michael Klun
>> Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 7:12 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
>>
>>
>>
>> One more consequence of the sprawl.
>>
>>
>>
>> Although not directly driving this project, it may be worth contacting the Walmart Sustainability Director and develop dialog to understand their awareness of negative impacts they are creating and plans to address. If I’m not mistaking, at one time they had the former Sierra Club leader on staff due to the negative attention they were getting from NGO’s.
>>
>>
>>
>> Getting local and National NGO’s attention may help as Walmart is a big and easy target for them. Media attention may be helpful and they have influence.
>>
>>
>>
>> Need the big money behind Walmart to drive awareness to prevent the smaller Rodney Dangerfield type developers from getting out of control.
>>
>>
>>
>> Meeting with City planning too may be helpful to understand their awareness and mitigation plans.
>>
>>
>>
>> It’s not necessarily one project but the awareness each of them and the cumulative negative affects.
>>
>>
>>
>> Always a big uphill battle too when we are such a conservative state and I wouldn’t expect assistance from elected leadership but developing dialog with them too may be helpful.
>>
>> Thank you for your Informative emails and leadership!
>>
>>
>>
>> Michael Klun
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Feb 17, 2021, at 5:59 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>>
>> 
>>
>> Those of you who are hardened riders on dusty bird trails have probably visited Craig State Fish Hatchery. I have been going there 40 years. Since I was a young man, with a young child in a backpack. It must have been a decade ago on a trip with one of the most truly birdy of birdy people, Mike Mlodinow; he told me he had just submitted his 1000th Centerton field trip to International Shorebird Survey.
>>
>> Talk about thousands: I am just one of thousands of Centerton birders over a half-century. We kept field notes. We turned in our records to ISS, Arkansas Audubon Society Bird Records Database, and eBird. We have logged 272 species, plus an addition 45 taxa. We have fish, turtles, snakes, crayfish, minks, Swamp Milkweed, bivalves. The Centerton bird list is one of the best: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L125062.
>>
>> I’m bringing this up now in my own ruminative way because I’m tired of being almost run over by dump trucks. I have this email from a former UA-Fayetteville bird grad student and friend, who lives at Centerton. It’s about a huge housing-entertainment complex that is about to be constructed right across the street from the hatchery:
>>
>> “I just learned that March 2nd is a City Planning Meeting where they will discuss The Links at Centerton – a 495 family/16 – three-story building apartment complex/golf course going in at the corner of Vaughn and Fish Hatchery Rd. I have emailed the mayor and the planning committee ... If you know of anything else I can do, please let me know!”
>>
>> Sadly, I don’t know anything. Every acre is monetized. The great economic engine that is Walmart has spawned a population shift like “The Links at Centerton,” 495 of them right on top of the hatchery. Centerton, once a village with a single blinking yellow caution light, rides the wave. All roads lead to Bentonville. All fields are being red-dirted that once provided habitat for migrating Upland Sandpipers. It will go down in history: loss of a varied natural world of flowing springs, native Tallgrass Prairie, songs of Eastern Meadowlarks.
>>
>> I realize this is more than a little bit of a screed. But surely this is something to be screeding about. Am I supposed to go off all faker, like I think this is “natural”?
>>
>> I didn’t make all those 1000+ trips with Mike Mlodinow, but I made a lot, and I made a lot on mine own, or with others, so I’ll bet I’m a 1000-leager too. Most of it was fun. If I am lucky enough to escape dementia, it could be in part because my brain has been stimulated trip after trip, hour after hour, bird after bird, for more than half of my entire existence. I wish it could be that way for others.
>>
>> I am too old to dodge reality. Too old to convince some people in suits there are acres, springs, and whole fields too precious to even consider monetizing.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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Back to top
Date: 2/18/21 4:13 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Fort Smith National Cemetery
I went to the cemetery to take some snow pictures and noticed juncos and
white-throated sparrows trying their hardest to get to the ground at the
base of some of the headstones. So I walked around and scraped away snow
from many headstones and from the base of trees. As soon as I turned my
back and stepped away those birds were on the open ground.

I love the snow. It’s a beautiful snow this year. But I’m ready for it to
go. The extreme cold is the killer. It needs to go too. And while I’m not
the mushy type and I understand about survival of the fittest, I hate to
see our birds suffer so.

One more observation...Arbird listserve and OKbirds listserve sure are
busy the last couple of days. What else we got to do. 😉😀

Sandy B.

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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 6:24 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Sleeping bird ID?
So far it is:
Female House Finch (2)
White-throated Sparrow (1)

https://drive.google.com/file/d/13a8XCW_TDJ_C0V2t_vdF0HgVvdG2qBJE/view?usp=sharing

Delos

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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 6:18 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Odd winter wren behavior?
I had a Winter Wren roost in a hole between bricks on the back wall of my
house for three years. I live in an old neighborhood about a mile from
downtown Fort Smith.

Sandy B.

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 7:55 PM Karen And Jim Rowe <
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> My previous experience with winter wrens on the wintering grounds was
> encountering them in the higher elevations of Arkansas Delta mature
> woodlands.
>
> Yesterday I was cleaning stalls in our horse barn that is located about
> equidistantly from mature woods and warm season grasslands. While juncos
> enjoy the warmth, stacked hay and manure in the barn, they are my only
> company cleaning stalls in the winter. Until yesterday. A winter wren
> hopped/flew from stall to stall, working hard not to let me get a photo
> with my cell phone.
>
> This evening I went in our garage to get bird seed and found both a
> Carolina Wren and a Winter Wren were in our garage (door doesn’t close
> properly to the benefit of Carolina Wrens that come and go).
>
> I had previously assumed Winter Wrens were birds of quality mature
> woodlands. Has anyone had Winter Wrens move into human structures during
> winter?
>
> Karen Rowe, Possum Waller Community, SE AR County
>
> Sent from my iPhone
> ############################
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list:
> write to: mailto:<ARBIRD-L-SIGNOFF-REQUEST...>
> or click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>

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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 6:12 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: No Birds edit to lots of birds
The reports out of Oklahoma are horrendous. Dead bluebirds packed in boxes.
Collared-doves roosting in barns dying. Rescued shorebirds, ducks, grebes.
Then the meadowlarks killing and eating sparrows and Siskins. Dogs pulling
robins out of snow drifts, and on and on.
Today after the snow I had hundreds of birds of about 15 species in my tiny
Fort Smith yard. I fed them everything from bits of chicken fajita meat and
boiled eggs to grapes, apples, and bird seed. A mocker looking pretty bad
had his head tucked under its wing and just sat around. He finally perked
up after some egg and then proceeded to start his bullying act. I’m glad
he’s okay.

Sandy B.
FS, AR

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 7:52 PM John Walko <walko...> wrote:

> Don,
> No, I’m not the one who posted pictures. I was dreading checking my one
> house and found the birds today.
> From what I’ve read from others some birds just don’t make it in these
> extreme cold temps. Migration is a key factor for many birds who depend on
> certain food sources. Too cold, not enough shelter and food and water
> unavailable.
> Jay Walko
> Lowell, Ark
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Feb 17, 2021, at 3:08 PM, Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
> wrote:
>
> 
> Jay, are you the same person who shared photos on Facebook of dead
> bluebirds from a nest box? Is this common for bluebirds to seek shelter in
> nesting boxes and then freeze to death in them?
>
> I sure hope most bluebirds survived.
>
> Don
> ------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> on behalf of John Walko <walko...>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, February 17, 2021 2:00 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: No Birds
>
> I’m out here on the peninsula on the south side of the Mt Ne Branch cove
> and the Birds have been varying in numbers. We overlook the lake/Mt Ne
> Branch below have alot of trees etc. Lots of Juncos, wood peckers (3
> Pileated squaked through the trees this morning. 40 plus Robins also
> visiting sipping water from the puddles left on the driveway after I had
> cleared it of snow.
> Unfortunate news though. After reading about everyones Bluebird issues I
> decided to check our lone Bluebird house out on the fence line.
> Looks like Five Bluebirds huddled together on one of these past
> days/nights and didn’t make it through the sub teen/zero/negative
> temperature nights.
> Box cleaned out now, hopefully spring will bring in some fresh bluebirds
> to the area.
>
> Jay Walko
> Beaver Lake
> Lowell, Ark
>
> On Feb 17, 2021, at 12:25 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
> wrote:
>
> Lots of birds at the feeders in Hot Springs. Can't get my work done for
> looking at them. Peace and Birds Jerrry Butler
>
> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 11:03 AM Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
> wrote:
>
> We didn’t have as many birds yesterday it seemed, but they are back today
> with a hefty attitude and appetite! We have an orange-crowned warbler that
> refused to stop eating even after all the other birds flew away when my
> aunt went to refill the feeders. It just looked around, ate a few more
> bites then flew to a feeder it has been chased away from earlier today by
> bigger birds.
>
> Sarah,
> Little Rock
>
> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:26 AM Joe Tucker <
> <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at
> our feeders. Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just
> about everything else. Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day.
> Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
> Subject: No Birds
>
> Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today? In three plus hours, I
> have seen 11 birds in my yard. It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would
> think that the birds would need calories. I just put feeders up a week
> ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
>
> In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville)
> yesterday late afternoon. Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the
> pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were
> hanging out. In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged
> Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon. The whole pond may be iced over by now. I
> hope they survive the frigid temps.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, in the frigid Northwest
>
> ------------------------------
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>
> John "Jay" Walko
> Lowell, Arkansas
> www.pbase.com/jwalko
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>
>
>
>
>
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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 6:02 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Sleeping Bird ID?
Birders,
Rob Doster and I have been studying this bird. Click on following link to
try to identify my bird:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/13a8XCW_TDJ_C0V2t_vdF0HgVvdG2qBJE/view?usp=sharing

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 5:56 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Odd winter wren behavior?
My previous experience with winter wrens on the wintering grounds was encountering them in the higher elevations of Arkansas Delta mature woodlands.

Yesterday I was cleaning stalls in our horse barn that is located about equidistantly from mature woods and warm season grasslands. While juncos enjoy the warmth, stacked hay and manure in the barn, they are my only company cleaning stalls in the winter. Until yesterday. A winter wren hopped/flew from stall to stall, working hard not to let me get a photo with my cell phone.

This evening I went in our garage to get bird seed and found both a Carolina Wren and a Winter Wren were in our garage (door doesn’t close properly to the benefit of Carolina Wrens that come and go).

I had previously assumed Winter Wrens were birds of quality mature woodlands. Has anyone had Winter Wrens move into human structures during winter?

Karen Rowe, Possum Waller Community, SE AR County

Sent from my iPhone
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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 5:52 pm
From: John Walko <walko...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
Don,
No, I’m not the one who posted pictures. I was dreading checking my one house and found the birds today.
From what I’ve read from others some birds just don’t make it in these extreme cold temps. Migration is a key factor for many birds who depend on certain food sources. Too cold, not enough shelter and food and water unavailable.
Jay Walko
Lowell, Ark

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 17, 2021, at 3:08 PM, Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> wrote:
>
> 
> Jay, are you the same person who shared photos on Facebook of dead bluebirds from a nest box? Is this common for bluebirds to seek shelter in nesting boxes and then freeze to death in them?
>
> I sure hope most bluebirds survived.
>
> Don
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of John Walko <walko...>
> Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 2:00 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: No Birds
>
> I’m out here on the peninsula on the south side of the Mt Ne Branch cove and the Birds have been varying in numbers. We overlook the lake/Mt Ne Branch below have alot of trees etc. Lots of Juncos, wood peckers (3 Pileated squaked through the trees this morning. 40 plus Robins also visiting sipping water from the puddles left on the driveway after I had cleared it of snow.
> Unfortunate news though. After reading about everyones Bluebird issues I decided to check our lone Bluebird house out on the fence line.
> Looks like Five Bluebirds huddled together on one of these past days/nights and didn’t make it through the sub teen/zero/negative temperature nights.
> Box cleaned out now, hopefully spring will bring in some fresh bluebirds to the area.
>
> Jay Walko
> Beaver Lake
> Lowell, Ark
>
>> On Feb 17, 2021, at 12:25 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
>>
>> Lots of birds at the feeders in Hot Springs. Can't get my work done for looking at them. Peace and Birds Jerrry Butler
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 11:03 AM Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> wrote:
>> We didn’t have as many birds yesterday it seemed, but they are back today with a hefty attitude and appetite! We have an orange-crowned warbler that refused to stop eating even after all the other birds flew away when my aunt went to refill the feeders. It just looked around, ate a few more bites then flew to a feeder it has been chased away from earlier today by bigger birds.
>>
>> Sarah,
>> Little Rock
>>
>> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:26 AM Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>> We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at our feeders. Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just about everything else. Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day. Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week.
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
>> Subject: No Birds
>>
>> Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today? In three plus hours, I have seen 11 birds in my yard. It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would think that the birds would need calories. I just put feeders up a week ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
>>
>> In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville) yesterday late afternoon. Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were hanging out. In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon. The whole pond may be iced over by now. I hope they survive the frigid temps.
>>
>> Karen Garrett
>> Rogers, in the frigid Northwest
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>
>>
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>>
>>
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>>
>
> John "Jay" Walko
> Lowell, Arkansas
> www.pbase.com/jwalko
>
>
>
>
>
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Date: 2/17/21 2:22 pm
From: JANINE PERLMAN <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
I'm finding that larger birds including grackles and cardinals relish kitten kibble. Other types of kibble might also work, and if pieces are too large, a very brief spin in a food processor might do the trick.
Janine PerlmanAlexander Mt., Saline Co.

On Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 3:57:44 PM CST, Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> wrote:

I'm so glad to be on this listserv because of the good ideas with respect to feeding birds right now! I didn't have as much bird seed as I would have liked, so am rationing it to last to Saturday, when I hope I can get out. Am feeding them in addition rice (Audubon says it's ok) and tomorrow will cut up some unsweetened raw cherries and throw out there. Maybe also whole wheat grain bread crumbs tomorrow.

I have more and different birds since the snow.
Different: two robins who have always hung out in my woods are now camped near the feeding area.         I have never seen a red-winged blackbird in my yard, in 14 years. Saw 7 today, eating seed off the ground.        I am seeing different types of sparrows in addition to the white throated. Haven't had the time to sit down with a book and ID.      Have never seen a mockingbird near the feeder. Hardly ever see them here at all. One has camped out here today.

More: A pair of thrashers rather than just always one.      Way more, maybe four times as many, white throated sparrows, juncos, and pine siskins.
Lynn FosterNW of Pinnacle Mtn

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 3:07 PM Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> wrote:

Jay, are you the same person who shared photos on Facebook of dead bluebirds from a nest box?  Is this common for bluebirds to seek shelter in nesting boxes and then freeze to death in them?
I sure hope most bluebirds survived.  
DonFrom: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of John Walko <walko...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 2:00 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: No Birds I’m out here on the peninsula on the south side of the Mt Ne Branch cove and the Birds have been varying in numbers. We overlook the lake/Mt Ne Branch below have alot of trees etc. Lots of Juncos, wood peckers (3 Pileated squaked through the trees this morning. 40 plus Robins also visiting sipping water from the puddles left on the driveway after I had cleared it of snow.Unfortunate news though. After reading about everyones Bluebird issues I decided to check our lone Bluebird house out on the fence line. Looks like Five Bluebirds huddled together on one of these past days/nights and didn’t make it through the sub teen/zero/negative temperature nights. Box cleaned out now, hopefully spring will bring in some fresh bluebirds to the area.
Jay WalkoBeaver LakeLowell, Ark


On Feb 17, 2021, at 12:25 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
Lots of birds at the feeders in Hot Springs.  Can't get my work done for looking at them.  Peace and Birds Jerrry Butler
On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 11:03 AM Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> wrote:

We didn’t have as many birds yesterday it seemed, but they are back today with a hefty attitude and appetite! We have an orange-crowned warbler that refused to stop eating even after all the other birds flew away when my aunt went to refill the feeders. It just looked around, ate a few more bites then flew to a feeder it has been chased away from earlier today by bigger birds.
Sarah,Little Rock
On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:26 AM Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:

We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at our feeders.  Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just about everything else.  Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day.  Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week. 


-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
Subject: No Birds

Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today?  In three plus hours, I have seen 11 birds in my yard.  It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would think that the birds would need calories.  I just put feeders up a week ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville) yesterday late afternoon.  Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were hanging out.  In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon.  The whole pond may be iced over by now.  I hope they survive the frigid temps.
Karen GarrettRogers, in the frigid Northwest
To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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John "Jay" WalkoLowell, Arkansaswww.pbase.com/jwalko





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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 1:57 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
I'm so glad to be on this listserv because of the good ideas with respect
to feeding birds right now! I didn't have as much bird seed as I would have
liked, so am rationing it to last to Saturday, when I hope I can get out.
Am feeding them in addition rice (Audubon says it's ok) and tomorrow will
cut up some unsweetened raw cherries and throw out there. Maybe also whole
wheat grain bread crumbs tomorrow.

I have more and different birds since the snow.

Different: two robins who have always hung out in my woods are now camped
near the feeding area.
I have never seen a red-winged blackbird in my yard, in 14 years.
Saw 7 today, eating seed off the ground.
I am seeing different types of sparrows in addition to the white
throated. Haven't had the time to sit down with a book and ID.
Have never seen a mockingbird near the feeder. Hardly ever see them
here at all. One has camped out here today.

More: A pair of thrashers rather than just always one.
Way more, maybe four times as many, white throated sparrows, juncos,
and pine siskins.

Lynn Foster
NW of Pinnacle Mtn

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 3:07 PM Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
wrote:

> Jay, are you the same person who shared photos on Facebook of dead
> bluebirds from a nest box? Is this common for bluebirds to seek shelter in
> nesting boxes and then freeze to death in them?
>
> I sure hope most bluebirds survived.
>
> Don
> ------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> on behalf of John Walko <walko...>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, February 17, 2021 2:00 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: No Birds
>
> I’m out here on the peninsula on the south side of the Mt Ne Branch cove
> and the Birds have been varying in numbers. We overlook the lake/Mt Ne
> Branch below have alot of trees etc. Lots of Juncos, wood peckers (3
> Pileated squaked through the trees this morning. 40 plus Robins also
> visiting sipping water from the puddles left on the driveway after I had
> cleared it of snow.
> Unfortunate news though. After reading about everyones Bluebird issues I
> decided to check our lone Bluebird house out on the fence line.
> Looks like Five Bluebirds huddled together on one of these past
> days/nights and didn’t make it through the sub teen/zero/negative
> temperature nights.
> Box cleaned out now, hopefully spring will bring in some fresh bluebirds
> to the area.
>
> Jay Walko
> Beaver Lake
> Lowell, Ark
>
> On Feb 17, 2021, at 12:25 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
> wrote:
>
> Lots of birds at the feeders in Hot Springs. Can't get my work done for
> looking at them. Peace and Birds Jerrry Butler
>
> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 11:03 AM Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
> wrote:
>
> We didn’t have as many birds yesterday it seemed, but they are back today
> with a hefty attitude and appetite! We have an orange-crowned warbler that
> refused to stop eating even after all the other birds flew away when my
> aunt went to refill the feeders. It just looked around, ate a few more
> bites then flew to a feeder it has been chased away from earlier today by
> bigger birds.
>
> Sarah,
> Little Rock
>
> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:26 AM Joe Tucker <
> <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at
> our feeders. Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just
> about everything else. Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day.
> Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
> Subject: No Birds
>
> Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today? In three plus hours, I
> have seen 11 birds in my yard. It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would
> think that the birds would need calories. I just put feeders up a week
> ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
>
> In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville)
> yesterday late afternoon. Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the
> pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were
> hanging out. In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged
> Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon. The whole pond may be iced over by now. I
> hope they survive the frigid temps.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, in the frigid Northwest
>
> ------------------------------
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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>
> John "Jay" Walko
> Lowell, Arkansas
> www.pbase.com/jwalko
> <https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pbase.com%2Fjwalko&data=04%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cdfaba16f48d8401d47f708d8d3881691%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491928733796070%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=nvyUzVHDYHCDFTzrR5jBgW10yijBWTl9puAz42Ix8nU%3D&reserved=0>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 1:54 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Fox sparrows an observation
I was actually thinking about emailing the list about a similar
observation. We have had fox sparrows in our yard in past winters,
usually just one individual. This winter I had not seen any in our yard
until yesterday.

Today it is out front digging a hole in the snow...  I need to get more
seed out there. Some of the birds have given up for now, others just
poke around to see what they can find...but that one fox sparrow just
scratches and scratches, sinking slowly down. It's been interesting to
watch.

Daniel Mason

On 2/17/2021 1:03 PM, Jerry Butler wrote:
> I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this
> snow hit.  Now I have a couple coming to  feed in the snow and grass
> beneath my feeder along with the other regulars.  I have noticed a
> striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other
> birds.  They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into
> the grass and  eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. 
> After they have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is
> exposed.  They become very territorial about that spot and will not
> let the juncos or white-throats nearby.  The FOSP even drove off a
> persistent cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though
> they are much larger.  Have others noticed this distinction in the way
> fox sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?
>
> Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
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Date: 2/17/21 1:07 pm
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
Jay, are you the same person who shared photos on Facebook of dead bluebirds from a nest box? Is this common for bluebirds to seek shelter in nesting boxes and then freeze to death in them?

I sure hope most bluebirds survived.

Don
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of John Walko <walko...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 2:00 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: No Birds

Im out here on the peninsula on the south side of the Mt Ne Branch cove and the Birds have been varying in numbers. We overlook the lake/Mt Ne Branch below have alot of trees etc. Lots of Juncos, wood peckers (3 Pileated squaked through the trees this morning. 40 plus Robins also visiting sipping water from the puddles left on the driveway after I had cleared it of snow.
Unfortunate news though. After reading about everyones Bluebird issues I decided to check our lone Bluebird house out on the fence line.
Looks like Five Bluebirds huddled together on one of these past days/nights and didnt make it through the sub teen/zero/negative temperature nights.
Box cleaned out now, hopefully spring will bring in some fresh bluebirds to the area.

Jay Walko
Beaver Lake
Lowell, Ark

On Feb 17, 2021, at 12:25 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...><mailto:<jerrysharon.butler...>> wrote:

Lots of birds at the feeders in Hot Springs. Can't get my work done for looking at them. Peace and Birds Jerrry Butler

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 11:03 AM Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...><mailto:<saraha.morris1...>> wrote:
We didnt have as many birds yesterday it seemed, but they are back today with a hefty attitude and appetite! We have an orange-crowned warbler that refused to stop eating even after all the other birds flew away when my aunt went to refill the feeders. It just looked around, ate a few more bites then flew to a feeder it has been chased away from earlier today by bigger birds.

Sarah,
Little Rock

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:26 AM Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...><mailto:<000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at our feeders. Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just about everything else. Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day. Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week.


-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...><mailto:<kjgarrett84...>>
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
Subject: No Birds

Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today? In three plus hours, I have seen 11 birds in my yard. It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would think that the birds would need calories. I just put feeders up a week ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.

In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville) yesterday late afternoon. Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were hanging out. In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon. The whole pond may be iced over by now. I hope they survive the frigid temps.

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the frigid Northwest

________________________________
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John "Jay" Walko
Lowell, Arkansas
www.pbase.com/jwalko<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.pbase.com%2Fjwalko&data=04%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cdfaba16f48d8401d47f708d8d3881691%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491928733796070%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=nvyUzVHDYHCDFTzrR5jBgW10yijBWTl9puAz42Ix8nU%3D&reserved=0>





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Date: 2/17/21 1:06 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
This suggestion also fits well with Alice Walton’s latest endeavor: World Health Institute.



Jeff Short



From: Charles Anderson [mailto:<cmanderson...>]
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 10:45 AM
To: Jeffrey Short
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu



Tell them to skip the golf course and emphasize running, walking, hiking and bicycling. Way more popular these days and maybe would help preserve some of the habitat. Ruth and I have spent time at three Arkansas state parks that emphasize these activities this fall and winter, and the birds have been good in all three places, a little harder as temps cooled, but still good: 30-40 species over a three night stay.



Unless the development is aimed at retired people, in which case, it will be probably really hard to change the builders' assumptions about what will sell.



So sorry to hear your decision, Joe. That's a whole lifetime of looks set on the shelf. So glad you guys kept records and notes.



Chuck Anderson

Snowed in at Western Hills in Little Rock

Birds everywhere!





On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 9:39 AM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

Golf courses are losing money all across the nation. Guess it is in the green space planning to generate higher income for the residential housing…



Maybe make the argument to replace the golf course by keeping an expansive natural area—if that is even feasible.



I wonder how the proposed NWARA access will also destroy habitat.



Jeff Short







From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Michael Klun
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 7:12 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu



One more consequence of the sprawl.



Although not directly driving this project, it may be worth contacting the Walmart Sustainability Director and develop dialog to understand their awareness of negative impacts they are creating and plans to address. If I’m not mistaking, at one time they had the former Sierra Club leader on staff due to the negative attention they were getting from NGO’s.



Getting local and National NGO’s attention may help as Walmart is a big and easy target for them. Media attention may be helpful and they have influence.



Need the big money behind Walmart to drive awareness to prevent the smaller Rodney Dangerfield type developers from getting out of control.



Meeting with City planning too may be helpful to understand their awareness and mitigation plans.



It’s not necessarily one project but the awareness each of them and the cumulative negative affects.



Always a big uphill battle too when we are such a conservative state and I wouldn’t expect assistance from elected leadership but developing dialog with them too may be helpful.

Thank you for your Informative emails and leadership!



Michael Klun

Sent from my iPhone



On Feb 17, 2021, at 5:59 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:



Those of you who are hardened riders on dusty bird trails have probably visited Craig State Fish Hatchery. I have been going there 40 years. Since I was a young man, with a young child in a backpack. It must have been a decade ago on a trip with one of the most truly birdy of birdy people, Mike Mlodinow; he told me he had just submitted his 1000th Centerton field trip to International Shorebird Survey.

Talk about thousands: I am just one of thousands of Centerton birders over a half-century. We kept field notes. We turned in our records to ISS, Arkansas Audubon Society Bird Records Database, and eBird. We have logged 272 species, plus an addition 45 taxa. We have fish, turtles, snakes, crayfish, minks, Swamp Milkweed, bivalves. The Centerton bird list is one of the best: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900 <https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fbarchart%3Fbyr%3D1900%26eyr%3D2021%26bmo%3D1%26emo%3D12%26r%3DL125062&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4d7a577ae2434ef406dc08d8d33b7305%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491599562802358%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=YuR2A9TRgXuEfvhHN8HgbTqFAJ%2FEZHL2jmanyiShHDY%3D&reserved=0> &eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L125062.

I’m bringing this up now in my own ruminative way because I’m tired of being almost run over by dump trucks. I have this email from a former UA-Fayetteville bird grad student and friend, who lives at Centerton. It’s about a huge housing-entertainment complex that is about to be constructed right across the street from the hatchery:

“I just learned that March 2nd is a City Planning Meeting where they will discuss The Links at Centerton – a 495 family/16 – three-story building apartment complex/golf course going in at the corner of Vaughn and Fish Hatchery Rd. I have emailed the mayor and the planning committee ... If you know of anything else I can do, please let me know!”

Sadly, I don’t know anything. Every acre is monetized. The great economic engine that is Walmart has spawned a population shift like “The Links at Centerton,” 495 of them right on top of the hatchery. Centerton, once a village with a single blinking yellow caution light, rides the wave. All roads lead to Bentonville. All fields are being red-dirted that once provided habitat for migrating Upland Sandpipers. It will go down in history: loss of a varied natural world of flowing springs, native Tallgrass Prairie, songs of Eastern Meadowlarks.

I realize this is more than a little bit of a screed. But surely this is something to be screeding about. Am I supposed to go off all faker, like I think this is “natural”?

I didn’t make all those 1000+ trips with Mike Mlodinow, but I made a lot, and I made a lot on mine own, or with others, so I’ll bet I’m a 1000-leager too. Most of it was fun. If I am lucky enough to escape dementia, it could be in part because my brain has been stimulated trip after trip, hour after hour, bird after bird, for more than half of my entire existence. I wish it could be that way for others.

I am too old to dodge reality. Too old to convince some people in suits there are acres, springs, and whole fields too precious to even consider monetizing.





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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 12:00 pm
From: John Walko <walko...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
I’m out here on the peninsula on the south side of the Mt Ne Branch cove and the Birds have been varying in numbers. We overlook the lake/Mt Ne Branch below have alot of trees etc. Lots of Juncos, wood peckers (3 Pileated squaked through the trees this morning. 40 plus Robins also visiting sipping water from the puddles left on the driveway after I had cleared it of snow.
Unfortunate news though. After reading about everyones Bluebird issues I decided to check our lone Bluebird house out on the fence line.
Looks like Five Bluebirds huddled together on one of these past days/nights and didn’t make it through the sub teen/zero/negative temperature nights.
Box cleaned out now, hopefully spring will bring in some fresh bluebirds to the area.

Jay Walko
Beaver Lake
Lowell, Ark

> On Feb 17, 2021, at 12:25 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:
>
> Lots of birds at the feeders in Hot Springs. Can't get my work done for looking at them. Peace and Birds Jerrry Butler
>
> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 11:03 AM Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> <mailto:<saraha.morris1...>> wrote:
> We didn’t have as many birds yesterday it seemed, but they are back today with a hefty attitude and appetite! We have an orange-crowned warbler that refused to stop eating even after all the other birds flew away when my aunt went to refill the feeders. It just looked around, ate a few more bites then flew to a feeder it has been chased away from earlier today by bigger birds.
>
> Sarah,
> Little Rock
>
> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:26 AM Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
> We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at our feeders. Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just about everything else. Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day. Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> <mailto:<kjgarrett84...>>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
> Subject: No Birds
>
> Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today? In three plus hours, I have seen 11 birds in my yard. It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would think that the birds would need calories. I just put feeders up a week ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
>
> In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville) yesterday late afternoon. Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were hanging out. In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon. The whole pond may be iced over by now. I hope they survive the frigid temps.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, in the frigid Northwest
>
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John "Jay" Walko
Lowell, Arkansas
www.pbase.com/jwalko





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Date: 2/17/21 11:27 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: birds
Pine siskins and goldfinch make up the majority of the birds on the deck.
Somewhere between 30 & 40. There is also a birdbath on the deck with a
heater so I've gotten lots of birds that just come in for a drink. A few
Cardinals, juncos, white-throated sparrows, a Hermit thrush, chickadees,
nuthatches and sapsucker are partaking of sunflower chips, mealworms & suet.
Also a few pine warblers.



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London,




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Date: 2/17/21 11:03 am
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Fox sparrows an observation
I have not seen or recorded fox sparrows on my yard list until this snow
hit. Now I have a couple coming to feed in the snow and grass beneath my
feeder along with the other regulars. I have noticed a
striking difference in the way they behave in the snow than the other
birds. They scratch about in the snow a bit to try to get down into the
grass and eat the seeds that have fallen there as they dig. After they
have a little nest, as it were were, the icey grass is exposed. They
become very territorial about that spot and will not let the
juncos or white-throats nearby. The FOSP even drove off a persistent
cardinal and morning dove from his little snow fort though they are much
larger. Have others noticed this distinction in the way fox
sparrows feed?.Have you seen other types of sparrows do this?

Peace and Birds Jerry Butler

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Date: 2/17/21 10:25 am
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
Lots of birds at the feeders in Hot Springs. Can't get my work done for
looking at them. Peace and Birds Jerrry Butler

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 11:03 AM Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
wrote:

> We didn’t have as many birds yesterday it seemed, but they are back today
> with a hefty attitude and appetite! We have an orange-crowned warbler that
> refused to stop eating even after all the other birds flew away when my
> aunt went to refill the feeders. It just looked around, ate a few more
> bites then flew to a feeder it has been chased away from earlier today by
> bigger birds.
>
> Sarah,
> Little Rock
>
> On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:26 AM Joe Tucker <
> <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at
>> our feeders. Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just
>> about everything else. Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day.
>> Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week.
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
>> Subject: No Birds
>>
>> Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today? In three plus hours,
>> I have seen 11 birds in my yard. It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I
>> would think that the birds would need calories. I just put feeders up a
>> week ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
>>
>> In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville)
>> yesterday late afternoon. Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the
>> pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were
>> hanging out. In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged
>> Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon. The whole pond may be iced over by now. I
>> hope they survive the frigid temps.
>>
>> Karen Garrett
>> Rogers, in the frigid Northwest
>>
>> ------------------------------
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
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>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
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Date: 2/17/21 9:51 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: eBird challenge
I posed this challenge in the past and I'm not sure if anyone took me up
on it. So, I'm here again...
On Facebook, I have a list of all the counties in Arkansas with links to
the eBird hotspots for each one.
https://www.facebook.com/notes/birding-arkansas/birding-hotspots/1005045796555861/

It was almost an entire year ago that I made that list. I noted that
Dallas County has NO eBird hotspots. This is still the case. But, I have
noticed that people do eBird there some so while this challenge is for
anyone in the state, in any area of the state, it's especially for the
birders in and near Dallas County... Search the maps or just drive
around(anywhere in the state) and find cool places to bird... make your
lists... submit them to eBird. When on eBird, if it's a GOOD spot for
birding and there is no hotspot there, suggest one.

I was just looking at google maps for Dallas county to see what might be
there... and found the following...
https://www.google.com/maps/place/33%C2%B057'44.7%22N+92%C2%B027'26.1%22W/@33.96242,-92.4594357,714m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m14!1m7!3m6!1s0x86329046822f798f:0xf41cb1484f0bc892!2sDallas+County,+AR!3b1!8m2!3d34.0346533!4d-92.6983868!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d33.9624195!4d-92.4572471

Multiple ponds... hatchery? water treatment? Anyone know? Anyone near
there that could check it out and see if it's accessible? I bet there
are some good birds there.

There seems to be a lake or pond in Sparkman, I can't tell what it is
but it looks promising as well.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/33%C2%B055'14.1%22N+92%C2%B051'28.4%22W/@33.920594,-92.8589953,357m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m14!1m7!3m6!1s0x86329046822f798f:0xf41cb1484f0bc892!2sDallas+County,+AR!3b1!8m2!3d34.0346533!4d-92.6983868!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d33.9205939!4d-92.8579007

In Fordyce there seems to be what looks like a water treatment place...
images show it's gated but it might have open hours where people could
visit? A nearby cemetery as well.
https://www.google.com/maps/place/33%C2%B049'22.2%22N+92%C2%B023'56.4%22W/@33.822829,-92.4000863,358m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m14!1m7!3m6!1s0x86329046822f798f:0xf41cb1484f0bc892!2sDallas+County,+AR!3b1!8m2!3d34.0346533!4d-92.6983868!3m5!1s0x0:0x0!7e2!8m2!3d33.8228287!4d-92.3989917

If you explore the maps you can find some other things that look
interesting... so, I'd suspect there's more hotspot potential there.
Though with a 2010 census showing just over 8k people in the entire
county, there may not be enough developed for people to pinpoint? That's
sort of bad from a hotspot perspective but at the same time, potentially
good from a general wildlife perspective.

Any other counties needing some new hotspots added? Check out your
county on eBird and see if you know any locations that should be added.

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Date: 2/17/21 9:34 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Winter Birds
Good points for winter. Robins (49) and Cedar Waxwings (28) cleaned out two yaupon shrubs of berries in a short time and the Mockingbirds tried but could not defend their fruit supply. The blueberries is a good idea. I am having to use the eves of my house and a leaning wheel barrow to shield seeds against snow build up. I do have 180 + Red-winged blackbirds coming in the past 3 days and they compete with other birds bullying them away. Mealworms are a good addition to your food mix. Thanks for sharing.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: David Arbour
Sent: Tuesday, February 16, 2021 8:41 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Winter Birds

I normally don’t feed birds in winter due to the expense of bird seed but I recognized the need for it the past few days so started feeding them this past weekend. They found the food almost immediately. White-throated Sparrows, Fox Sparrows, Juncos, Cardinals, Towhees, Jays, Brown Thrashers, and Robins so far. We go 6 ¾ inches of snow Sunday night and anywhere there were places the snow didn’t cover the birds were working this area. We have a large trampoline in the side yard and I am throwing bird seed under it on the snow free ground and it has become a big hit with the birds. I noticed what few robins we have are working the edges of my house were the eaves prevented the snow to land. And they were acting very tame and I almost stepped on them a couple times while walking around the house. I got to worrying about them finding food as all the wild berries on my property were wiped out by them and waxwings a week ago. So I found some blueberries in the frig and took them out to the robins. I walked up about 5 feet from one robin and tossed a blueberry beside it. It grabbed and ate it immediately. I repeated this several times with this bird. Then I spread blueberries around the edges of the house and this has been a big hit with the robins. The Brown Thrashers liked the blueberries also. I saw some freeze-dried mealworms at Walmart last week so I think I will get some of them for them. Don’t forget to provide water for the birds so they don’t have to eat snow.



David Arbour

De Queen



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Date: 2/17/21 9:03 am
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
We didn’t have as many birds yesterday it seemed, but they are back today
with a hefty attitude and appetite! We have an orange-crowned warbler that
refused to stop eating even after all the other birds flew away when my
aunt went to refill the feeders. It just looked around, ate a few more
bites then flew to a feeder it has been chased away from earlier today by
bigger birds.

Sarah,
Little Rock

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 10:26 AM Joe Tucker <
<000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at
> our feeders. Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just
> about everything else. Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day.
> Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
> Subject: No Birds
>
> Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today? In three plus hours, I
> have seen 11 birds in my yard. It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would
> think that the birds would need calories. I just put feeders up a week
> ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
>
> In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville)
> yesterday late afternoon. Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the
> pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were
> hanging out. In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged
> Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon. The whole pond may be iced over by now. I
> hope they survive the frigid temps.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, in the frigid Northwest
>
> ------------------------------
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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>
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Date: 2/17/21 9:00 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
This message was actually sent on Sunday, but I guess it didn't go
through. I kept getting error messages. I have quite a few today, but saw
very few on Sunday. Thank for responding though.

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021, 10:26 AM Joe Tucker <jttllt...> wrote:

> We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at
> our feeders. Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just
> about everything else. Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day.
> Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
> Subject: No Birds
>
> Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today? In three plus hours, I
> have seen 11 birds in my yard. It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would
> think that the birds would need calories. I just put feeders up a week
> ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
>
> In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville)
> yesterday late afternoon. Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the
> pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were
> hanging out. In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged
> Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon. The whole pond may be iced over by now. I
> hope they survive the frigid temps.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, in the frigid Northwest
>
> ------------------------------
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
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Date: 2/17/21 9:00 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
There seems to be construction on every block in that area. Between the
brand new high school, the huge apartments on the corner of vaughn road,
and several projects between the hatchery and Anglin road...
I get a sad sort of chuckle in my head every time I'm driving up
279(Vaughn rd) and see the sign that says something about that area
being the Bentonville conservation district, or something to that effect.
I'd be interested to learn about what they're actually conserving in
that area as it seems to be quite the opposite.


I've often mused to myself that I wish I had the money to create housing
and apartment developments... where I could setup larger areas of land
for fewer people, with certain habitat being created, restored, or
preserved. Imagine a housing complex specifically designed for nature
lovers...
I'm not sure how people survive in those HUGE and tight apartment
complexes... or housing developments where you can't spit 6 feet without
hitting your neighbor's house.
Then again, maybe it's good for the environment to cram everyone
together and not take up as much space?
Is NW Arkansas really growing as quickly as houses and apartments are
being built? Seems excessive.
I used to have a specific location to find grasshopper sparrows every
summer but they finished that housing development and wow is it
crowded...and a specific place to find a handful of horned larks,
guaranteed each year... til a new church and big parking lot was put in.
Now I'll have to learn how to find those birds better or simply get
lucky and find a new spot.


My guess is that the fish hatchery will remain untouched for a long time
to come. But the more growth in that immediate area will deter some
birds and on top of that, attract more people walking(with and without
dogs) through the hatchery property... scaring birds.
If I had the money, I'd buy up some of that land and develop it, in a
different way. But as it is, I couldn't afford to buy .1 acres...

How about a 100 acres housing edition with either a couple apartment
buildings or up to 10 houses, either spread out or centralized... and an
18 hole mini golf course that tours natural areas? Eh... I can dream of
things. ha.


Daniel Mason


On 2/17/2021 5:59 AM, Joseph Neal wrote:
>
> Those of you who are hardened riders on dusty bird trails have
> probably visited Craig State Fish Hatchery. I have been going there 40
> years. Since I was a young man, with a young child in a backpack. It
> must have been a decade ago on a trip with one of the most truly birdy
> of birdy people, Mike Mlodinow; he told me he had just submitted his
> 1000^th Centerton field trip to International Shorebird Survey.
>
> Talk about thousands: I am just one of thousands of Centerton birders
> over a half-century. We kept field notes. We turned in our records to
> ISS, Arkansas Audubon Society Bird Records Database, and eBird. We
> have logged 272 species, plus an addition 45 taxa. We have fish,
> turtles, snakes, crayfish, minks, Swamp Milkweed, bivalves. The
> Centerton bird list is one of the best:
> https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L125062
> <https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fbarchart%3Fbyr%3D1900%26eyr%3D2021%26bmo%3D1%26emo%3D12%26r%3DL125062&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4d7a577ae2434ef406dc08d8d33b7305%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491599562802358%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=YuR2A9TRgXuEfvhHN8HgbTqFAJ%2FEZHL2jmanyiShHDY%3D&reserved=0>.
>
> Im bringing this up now in my own ruminative way because Im tired of
> being almost run over by dump trucks. I have this email from a former
> UA-Fayetteville bird grad student and friend, who lives at Centerton.
> Its about a huge housing-entertainment complex that is about to be
> constructed right across the street from the hatchery:
>
> I just learned that March 2^nd is a City Planning Meeting where they
> will discuss The Links at Centerton a 495 family/16 three-story
> building apartment complex/golf course going in at the corner of
> Vaughn and Fish Hatchery Rd. I have emailed the mayor and the
> planning committee ... If you know of anything else I can do, please
> let me know!
>
> Sadly, I dont know anything. Every acre is monetized. The great
> economic engine that is Walmart has spawned a population shift like
> The Links at Centerton, 495 of them right on top of the hatchery.
> Centerton, once a village with a single blinking yellow caution light,
> rides the wave. All roads lead to Bentonville. All fields are being
> red-dirted that once provided habitat for migrating Upland Sandpipers.
> It will go down in history: loss of a varied natural world of flowing
> springs, native Tallgrass Prairie, songs of Eastern Meadowlarks.
>
> I realize this is more than a little bit of a screed. But surely this
> is something to be screeding about. Am I supposed to go off all faker,
> like I think this is natural?
>
> I didnt make all those 1000+ trips with Mike Mlodinow, but I made a
> lot, and I made a lot on mine own, or with others, so Ill bet Im a
> 1000-leager too. Most of it was fun. If I am lucky enough to escape
> dementia, it could be in part because my brain has been stimulated
> trip after trip, hour after hour, bird after bird, for more than half
> of my entire existence. I wish it could be that way for others.
>
> I am too old to dodge reality. Too old to convince some people in
> suits there are acres, springs, and whole fields too precious to even
> consider monetizing.
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
> <http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1>
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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 8:44 am
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
Tell them to skip the golf course and emphasize running, walking, hiking
and bicycling. Way more popular these days and maybe would help preserve
some of the habitat. Ruth and I have spent time at three Arkansas state
parks that emphasize these activities this fall and winter, and the birds
have been good in all three places, a little harder as temps cooled, but
still good: 30-40 species over a three night stay.

Unless the development is aimed at retired people, in which case, it will
be probably really hard to change the builders' assumptions about what will
sell.

So sorry to hear your decision, Joe. That's a whole lifetime of looks set
on the shelf. So glad you guys kept records and notes.

Chuck Anderson
Snowed in at Western Hills in Little Rock
Birds everywhere!


On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 9:39 AM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

> Golf courses are losing money all across the nation. Guess it is in the
> green space planning to generate higher income for the residential housing…
>
>
>
> Maybe make the argument to replace the golf course by keeping an expansive
> natural area—if that is even feasible.
>
>
>
> I wonder how the proposed NWARA access will also destroy habitat.
>
>
>
> Jeff Short
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> <ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Michael Klun
> *Sent:* Wednesday, February 17, 2021 7:12 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Centerton adieu
>
>
>
> One more consequence of the sprawl.
>
>
>
> Although not directly driving this project, it may be worth contacting the
> Walmart Sustainability Director and develop dialog to understand their
> awareness of negative impacts they are creating and plans to address. If
> I’m not mistaking, at one time they had the former Sierra Club leader on
> staff due to the negative attention they were getting from NGO’s.
>
>
>
> Getting local and National NGO’s attention may help as Walmart is a big
> and easy target for them. Media attention may be helpful and they have
> influence.
>
>
>
> Need the big money behind Walmart to drive awareness to prevent the
> smaller Rodney Dangerfield type developers from getting out of control.
>
>
>
> Meeting with City planning too may be helpful to understand their
> awareness and mitigation plans.
>
>
>
> It’s not necessarily one project but the awareness each of them and the
> cumulative negative affects.
>
>
>
> Always a big uphill battle too when we are such a conservative state and I
> wouldn’t expect assistance from elected leadership but developing dialog
> with them too may be helpful.
>
> Thank you for your Informative emails and leadership!
>
>
>
> Michael Klun
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
>
> On Feb 17, 2021, at 5:59 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> 
>
> Those of you who are hardened riders on dusty bird trails have probably
> visited Craig State Fish Hatchery. I have been going there 40 years. Since
> I was a young man, with a young child in a backpack. It must have been a
> decade ago on a trip with one of the most truly birdy of birdy people, Mike
> Mlodinow; he told me he had just submitted his 1000th Centerton field
> trip to International Shorebird Survey.
>
> Talk about thousands: I am just one of thousands of Centerton birders over
> a half-century. We kept field notes. We turned in our records to ISS,
> Arkansas Audubon Society Bird Records Database, and eBird. We have logged
> 272 species, plus an addition 45 taxa. We have fish, turtles, snakes,
> crayfish, minks, Swamp Milkweed, bivalves. The Centerton bird list is one
> of the best:
> https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L125062
> <https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fbarchart%3Fbyr%3D1900%26eyr%3D2021%26bmo%3D1%26emo%3D12%26r%3DL125062&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4d7a577ae2434ef406dc08d8d33b7305%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491599562802358%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=YuR2A9TRgXuEfvhHN8HgbTqFAJ%2FEZHL2jmanyiShHDY%3D&reserved=0>
> .
>
> I’m bringing this up now in my own ruminative way because I’m tired of
> being almost run over by dump trucks. I have this email from a former
> UA-Fayetteville bird grad student and friend, who lives at Centerton. It’s
> about a huge housing-entertainment complex that is about to be constructed
> right across the street from the hatchery:
>
> “I just learned that March 2nd is a City Planning Meeting where they will
> discuss The Links at Centerton – a 495 family/16 – three-story building
> apartment complex/golf course going in at the corner of Vaughn and Fish
> Hatchery Rd. I have emailed the mayor and the planning committee ... If
> you know of anything else I can do, please let me know!”
>
> Sadly, I don’t know anything. Every acre is monetized. The great economic
> engine that is Walmart has spawned a population shift like “The Links at
> Centerton,” 495 of them right on top of the hatchery. Centerton, once a
> village with a single blinking yellow caution light, rides the wave. All
> roads lead to Bentonville. All fields are being red-dirted that once
> provided habitat for migrating Upland Sandpipers. It will go down in
> history: loss of a varied natural world of flowing springs, native
> Tallgrass Prairie, songs of Eastern Meadowlarks.
>
> I realize this is more than a little bit of a screed. But surely this is
> something to be screeding about. Am I supposed to go off all faker, like I
> think this is “natural”?
>
> I didn’t make all those 1000+ trips with Mike Mlodinow, but I made a lot,
> and I made a lot on mine own, or with others, so I’ll bet I’m a 1000-leager
> too. Most of it was fun. If I am lucky enough to escape dementia, it could
> be in part because my brain has been stimulated trip after trip, hour after
> hour, bird after bird, for more than half of my entire existence. I wish it
> could be that way for others.
>
> I am too old to dodge reality. Too old to convince some people in suits
> there are acres, springs, and whole fields too precious to even consider
> monetizing.
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>
> ------------------------------
>
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Back to top
Date: 2/17/21 8:42 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...>
Subject: New Blog Post
For those who can’t get enough of the junco frenzy, I’ve just published a new blog post that might be of interest. Included is a revised “key”, as well as lots of photos and synopses of likely-to-be-seen subspecies in our region. Enjoy!

https://www.mitchellpruitt.com/post/snowbirds-a-guide-to-identification-and-appreciation <https://www.mitchellpruitt.com/post/snowbirds-a-guide-to-identification-and-appreciation>

I promise, this is the last you’ll hear about my juncos this week,
Mitchell Pruitt



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Date: 2/17/21 8:32 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Robins
Before the ice/snow/cold storm hit, I saw many robins in our pasture, perhaps 1,000. Our pasture is hayed so the grass is short. There are no shrubs or other plants in it. The robins were definitely finding food. I am not sure what. Worms? Seems unlikely at this time of year. Insects? I really don't know. Perhaps white grubs (scarabs such as Japanese beetle larvae)?

Often I have seen robins gorging on dogwood berries, holly berries, and sadly, Bradford pear fruits. I tend to think of the overwintering robins as fruit eaters.

I am interested in what people think various overwintering birds are eating.

We have been planting American hollies on our land. It will be years before they bear fruit, but at least we are preparing for future birds.

Don
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of James Morgan <jlmm...>
Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 8:46 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Robins

Saw lots of Robins earlier this weeek and it stated me thinking about
what they were eating and what was causing them to aggreagte.

-----------

I haven't read up on what causes large Robin flocks in winter. Must be
some insect or earthworm. Though they are omnivores and could be a plant

Several years ago on the Fayetteville CBC saw about 5-10K at Drake
airfield. Wish I had been better at estimating #s but not trained for
that. . So was conservative on estimate of # of Robins.

----------------

Early this week was seeing several (20-30) in two sheep pastures and
was trying to figure out out what they were foraging on since air
temperature was sub zero but ground was still warmer than without

Then saw 200 plus on an acre of one of the sheep pastures. This was 2-3
days ago before it really was cold. After the ground froze I saw a
handful of Robins, but none for two days. er the ground f

Has to be be a food item to bring them in. Icterids such as grackles or
blackbirds will forage in a livestock pasture if farmer is feeding grain
since a percentage of the grain is less digested is in the feces. But I
don't feed grain. So the Robins were foraging on something, but it was
so cold I can't see it being an insect and earthworms had to be down a
few inches or more below surface. I don't cons-eider Robins to be
copraphagic - though they could be. Ruminants such as sheep or cattle
are not that efficient at extracting calories so canids hogs and
chickens can survie moderately well on sheep or cattle feces.

Maybe Robins are a red-breasted chicken and are copraphagic (I didn't
have my binoculars )? : )

On 2/13/2021 10:17 AM, Vickie Becker wrote:
> I counted 78 robins visible at one time around my home this morning.
>
> Vickie H Becker
> 14300 Chenal Parkway
> Apt 7618
> Little Rock, AR 72211
>
> 501-508-0984
> <Vhbecker...>
>
>
> On Feb 13, 2021, at 10:10 AM, Anna Lee Hudson <000003304e46ce5a-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> We see Robins as a sign of Spring, but the large flock between Mountain
> Home and Midway yesterday may
> be a bit early. With all the frigid temperatures and snow/ice in the
> forecast, it certainly doesn't seem like Spring
> will be here anytime soon.
>
> Staying in and watching the feeders.
>
> Anna Hudson, Bull Shoals
>
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Date: 2/17/21 8:27 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
Tragic is the word. For the birds, for the birders, for nature.
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 10:09 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu

Audubon International (no connection with our state Audubon associations) works with golf courses to support natural habitat. Might be worth bringing to Walmart's attention.

https://auduboninternational.org/acsp-for-golf/<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fauduboninternational.org%2Facsp-for-golf%2F&data=04%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C7e4fbfea5e78438e65d808d8d360da11%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491760207656726%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=sMnrPmHRh98LpVLkcF%2Bdvkux1Dh7%2FbTcIuTm8VeyWA8%3D&reserved=0>

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 5:59 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...><mailto:<joeneal...>> wrote:

Those of you who are hardened riders on dusty bird trails have probably visited Craig State Fish Hatchery. I have been going there 40 years. Since I was a young man, with a young child in a backpack. It must have been a decade ago on a trip with one of the most truly birdy of birdy people, Mike Mlodinow; he told me he had just submitted his 1000th Centerton field trip to International Shorebird Survey.

Talk about thousands: I am just one of thousands of Centerton birders over a half-century. We kept field notes. We turned in our records to ISS, Arkansas Audubon Society Bird Records Database, and eBird. We have logged 272 species, plus an addition 45 taxa. We have fish, turtles, snakes, crayfish, minks, Swamp Milkweed, bivalves. The Centerton bird list is one of the best: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L125062<https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fbarchart%3Fbyr%3D1900%26eyr%3D2021%26bmo%3D1%26emo%3D12%26r%3DL125062&data=04%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C7e4fbfea5e78438e65d808d8d360da11%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491760207656726%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=2KBjhsUF6LoM1NDD0l40bAz1AR0uLzYFvNjIfge921Y%3D&reserved=0>.

Im bringing this up now in my own ruminative way because Im tired of being almost run over by dump trucks. I have this email from a former UA-Fayetteville bird grad student and friend, who lives at Centerton. Its about a huge housing-entertainment complex that is about to be constructed right across the street from the hatchery:

I just learned that March 2nd is a City Planning Meeting where they will discuss The Links at Centerton a 495 family/16 three-story building apartment complex/golf course going in at the corner of Vaughn and Fish Hatchery Rd. I have emailed the mayor and the planning committee ... If you know of anything else I can do, please let me know!

Sadly, I dont know anything. Every acre is monetized. The great economic engine that is Walmart has spawned a population shift like The Links at Centerton, 495 of them right on top of the hatchery. Centerton, once a village with a single blinking yellow caution light, rides the wave. All roads lead to Bentonville. All fields are being red-dirted that once provided habitat for migrating Upland Sandpipers. It will go down in history: loss of a varied natural world of flowing springs, native Tallgrass Prairie, songs of Eastern Meadowlarks.

I realize this is more than a little bit of a screed. But surely this is something to be screeding about. Am I supposed to go off all faker, like I think this is natural?

I didnt make all those 1000+ trips with Mike Mlodinow, but I made a lot, and I made a lot on mine own, or with others, so Ill bet Im a 1000-leager too. Most of it was fun. If I am lucky enough to escape dementia, it could be in part because my brain has been stimulated trip after trip, hour after hour, bird after bird, for more than half of my entire existence. I wish it could be that way for others.

I am too old to dodge reality. Too old to convince some people in suits there are acres, springs, and whole fields too precious to even consider monetizing.


________________________________

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Date: 2/17/21 8:26 am
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
We live in Cabot .... 6 miles SE of town and we have HUNDREDS of birds at our feeders.  Majority are Finches and Sparrows, but a good variety of just about everything else.  Ripping though seed at up to 10lbs a day.  Fortunately I bought over a hundred pounds last week. 


-----Original Message-----
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Sun, Feb 14, 2021 2:25 pm
Subject: No Birds

Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today?  In three plus hours, I have seen 11 birds in my yard.  It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would think that the birds would need calories.  I just put feeders up a week ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville) yesterday late afternoon.  Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were hanging out.  In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon.  The whole pond may be iced over by now.  I hope they survive the frigid temps.
Karen GarrettRogers, in the frigid Northwest
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Date: 2/17/21 8:09 am
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
Audubon International (no connection with our state Audubon associations)
works with golf courses to support natural habitat. Might be worth bringing
to Walmart's attention.

https://auduboninternational.org/acsp-for-golf/

On Wed, Feb 17, 2021 at 5:59 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Those of you who are hardened riders on dusty bird trails have probably
> visited Craig State Fish Hatchery. I have been going there 40 years. Since
> I was a young man, with a young child in a backpack. It must have been a
> decade ago on a trip with one of the most truly birdy of birdy people, Mike
> Mlodinow; he told me he had just submitted his 1000th Centerton field
> trip to International Shorebird Survey.
>
> Talk about thousands: I am just one of thousands of Centerton birders over
> a half-century. We kept field notes. We turned in our records to ISS,
> Arkansas Audubon Society Bird Records Database, and eBird. We have logged
> 272 species, plus an addition 45 taxa. We have fish, turtles, snakes,
> crayfish, minks, Swamp Milkweed, bivalves. The Centerton bird list is one
> of the best:
> https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L125062
> <https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fbarchart%3Fbyr%3D1900%26eyr%3D2021%26bmo%3D1%26emo%3D12%26r%3DL125062&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4d7a577ae2434ef406dc08d8d33b7305%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491599562802358%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=YuR2A9TRgXuEfvhHN8HgbTqFAJ%2FEZHL2jmanyiShHDY%3D&reserved=0>
> .
>
> I’m bringing this up now in my own ruminative way because I’m tired of
> being almost run over by dump trucks. I have this email from a former
> UA-Fayetteville bird grad student and friend, who lives at Centerton. It’s
> about a huge housing-entertainment complex that is about to be constructed
> right across the street from the hatchery:
>
> “I just learned that March 2nd is a City Planning Meeting where they will
> discuss The Links at Centerton – a 495 family/16 – three-story building
> apartment complex/golf course going in at the corner of Vaughn and Fish
> Hatchery Rd. I have emailed the mayor and the planning committee ... If
> you know of anything else I can do, please let me know!”
>
> Sadly, I don’t know anything. Every acre is monetized. The great economic
> engine that is Walmart has spawned a population shift like “The Links at
> Centerton,” 495 of them right on top of the hatchery. Centerton, once a
> village with a single blinking yellow caution light, rides the wave. All
> roads lead to Bentonville. All fields are being red-dirted that once
> provided habitat for migrating Upland Sandpipers. It will go down in
> history: loss of a varied natural world of flowing springs, native
> Tallgrass Prairie, songs of Eastern Meadowlarks.
>
> I realize this is more than a little bit of a screed. But surely this is
> something to be screeding about. Am I supposed to go off all faker, like I
> think this is “natural”?
>
> I didn’t make all those 1000+ trips with Mike Mlodinow, but I made a
> lot, and I made a lot on mine own, or with others, so I’ll bet I’m a
> 1000-leager too. Most of it was fun. If I am lucky enough to escape
> dementia, it could be in part because my brain has been stimulated trip
> after trip, hour after hour, bird after bird, for more than half of my
> entire existence. I wish it could be that way for others.
>
> I am too old to dodge reality. Too old to convince some people in suits
> there are acres, springs, and whole fields too precious to even consider
> monetizing.
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>

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Date: 2/17/21 8:04 am
From: zoe caywood <zcaywood...>
Subject: Re: No Birds
I, too, had only 10% of the birds on Tuesday as I did on Monday. Whereas, there was a feeding frenzy of at least 150 birds on Monday and the days before yesterday only about 15. I was very concerned about a winter kill due to extreme temperatures, but today there’s lots of active, still not as many as Monday. I am greatly relieved

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 17, 2021, at 12:17 AM, Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:
>
> 
> Anyone else having a lack of backyard birds today? In three plus hours, I have seen 11 birds in my yard. It is windy, and only 6 or 7'F, but I would think that the birds would need calories. I just put feeders up a week ago, but I was seeing a good number of birds earlier in the week.
>
> In other news, I spent about 25 minutes at Moberly Pond (Bentonville) yesterday late afternoon. Ice covered all but a section east-middle of the pond, and the far me corner, which is where most of the waterfowl were hanging out. In addition to the usual species, there were 7 Green-winged Teal, and a few Am. Wigeon. The whole pond may be iced over by now. I hope they survive the frigid temps.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, in the frigid Northwest
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1

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Date: 2/17/21 7:39 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu
Golf courses are losing money all across the nation. Guess it is in the green space planning to generate higher income for the residential housing…



Maybe make the argument to replace the golf course by keeping an expansive natural area—if that is even feasible.



I wonder how the proposed NWARA access will also destroy habitat.



Jeff Short







From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Michael Klun
Sent: Wednesday, February 17, 2021 7:12 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Centerton adieu



One more consequence of the sprawl.



Although not directly driving this project, it may be worth contacting the Walmart Sustainability Director and develop dialog to understand their awareness of negative impacts they are creating and plans to address. If I’m not mistaking, at one time they had the former Sierra Club leader on staff due to the negative attention they were getting from NGO’s.



Getting local and National NGO’s attention may help as Walmart is a big and easy target for them. Media attention may be helpful and they have influence.



Need the big money behind Walmart to drive awareness to prevent the smaller Rodney Dangerfield type developers from getting out of control.



Meeting with City planning too may be helpful to understand their awareness and mitigation plans.



It’s not necessarily one project but the awareness each of them and the cumulative negative affects.



Always a big uphill battle too when we are such a conservative state and I wouldn’t expect assistance from elected leadership but developing dialog with them too may be helpful.

Thank you for your Informative emails and leadership!



Michael Klun

Sent from my iPhone





On Feb 17, 2021, at 5:59 AM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:



Those of you who are hardened riders on dusty bird trails have probably visited Craig State Fish Hatchery. I have been going there 40 years. Since I was a young man, with a young child in a backpack. It must have been a decade ago on a trip with one of the most truly birdy of birdy people, Mike Mlodinow; he told me he had just submitted his 1000th Centerton field trip to International Shorebird Survey.

Talk about thousands: I am just one of thousands of Centerton birders over a half-century. We kept field notes. We turned in our records to ISS, Arkansas Audubon Society Bird Records Database, and eBird. We have logged 272 species, plus an addition 45 taxa. We have fish, turtles, snakes, crayfish, minks, Swamp Milkweed, bivalves. The Centerton bird list is one of the best: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900 <https://nam11.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fbarchart%3Fbyr%3D1900%26eyr%3D2021%26bmo%3D1%26emo%3D12%26r%3DL125062&data=04%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4d7a577ae2434ef406dc08d8d33b7305%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637491599562802358%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&sdata=YuR2A9TRgXuEfvhHN8HgbTqFAJ%2FEZHL2jmanyiShHDY%3D&reserved=0> &eyr=2021&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L125062.

I’m bringing this up now in my own ruminative way because I’m tired of being almost run over by dump trucks. I have this email from a former UA-Fayetteville bird grad student and friend, who lives at Centerton. It’s about a huge housing-entertainment complex that is about to be constructed right across the street from the hatchery:

“I just learned that March 2nd is a City Planning Meeting where they will discuss The Links at Centerton – a 495 family/16 – three-story building apartment complex/golf course going in at the corner of Vaughn and Fish Hatchery Rd. I have emailed the mayor and the planning committee ... If you know of anything else I can do, please let me know!”

Sadly, I don’t know anything. Every acre is monetized. The great economic engine that is Walmart has spawned a population shift like “The Links at Centerton,” 495 of them right on top of the hatchery. Centerton, once a village with a single blinking yellow caution light, rides the wave. All roads lead to Bentonville. All fields are being red-dirted that once provided habitat for migrating Upland Sandpipers. It will go down in history: loss of a varied natural world of flowing springs, native Tallgrass Prairie, songs of Eastern Meadowlarks.

I realize this is more than a little bit of a screed. But surely this is something to be screeding about. Am I supposed to go off all faker, like I think this is “natural”?

I didn’t make all those 1000+ trips with Mike Mlodinow, but I made a lot, and I made a lot on mine own, or with others, so I’ll bet I’m a 1000-leager too. Most of it was fun. If I am lucky enough to escape dementia, it could be in part because my brain has been stimulated trip after trip, hour after hour, bird after bird, for more than half of my entire existence. I wish it could be that way for others.

I am too old to dodge reality. Too old to convince some people in suits there are acres, springs, and whole fields too precious to even consider monetizing.





_____

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