ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
5/22/19 4:57 pm Anna Lee Hudson <hudsonre...> Pecking order?
5/22/19 12:09 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob NWR
5/22/19 11:54 am Cody Massery <codythebirder...> Inca Dove - Yell Co.
5/22/19 11:00 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Willow Flycatcher in Benton County
5/22/19 9:38 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Question for the empid experts
5/22/19 9:27 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Re: Question for the empid experts
5/21/19 1:04 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA June, July, August Field Trips
5/21/19 8:05 am Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Re: Question for the empid experts
5/21/19 7:21 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> White-winged Dove - NO, Inca Dove - YES
5/21/19 6:37 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Question for the empid experts
5/20/19 3:26 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> White-winged Dove
5/20/19 12:52 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Bird Baseball, a scouting report from the minor leagues
5/20/19 11:30 am <market...> Yellow-breasted Chats at the Nursery
5/20/19 11:00 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> White-winged Dove - NO
5/20/19 9:22 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> stop, look, listen...
5/20/19 8:19 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Mourning Warbler - Fayetteville
5/19/19 10:42 pm Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...> Swainson's Hawk 5-19-19
5/19/19 8:26 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/19/2019
5/19/19 6:03 pm Devin Moon <moondevg...> Pulaski County White-winged Dove
5/19/19 5:00 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 5/19/2019
5/18/19 4:56 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> hotspot mapping
5/18/19 2:56 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Tomorrow
5/17/19 1:42 pm Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Re: Hummer with a golden throat???
5/17/19 11:21 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Hummer with a golden throat???
5/17/19 10:02 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> whips - chucks - swifts - Ben and Lula Coffey
5/17/19 7:57 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: WHIP-CHUCKING UNDER A MOON-FLOODED SKY May 17, 2019
5/17/19 7:32 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> WHIP-CHUCKING UNDER A MOON-FLOODED SKY May 17, 2019
5/16/19 7:28 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Whimbrel checklist
5/16/19 6:45 am Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Re: photos of hummer with odd coloring
5/16/19 5:46 am Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> photos of hummer with odd coloring
5/16/19 4:55 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> report from Bill Beall about migration in Arkansas River Valley-Kibler bottoms-etc.
5/15/19 9:34 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - May 14 (belated report)
5/15/19 8:51 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Hi
5/15/19 4:46 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 5/15/2019 - Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
5/15/19 4:34 pm JFR <johnfredman...> CASPIAN TERNS AT BOYD POINT
5/15/19 3:32 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Bobolinks
5/15/19 2:09 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Whimbrels at state fish hatchery Centerton - YES
5/15/19 1:51 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Whimbrels, YES!!!
5/15/19 1:27 pm Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> Hummer with a golden throat???
5/15/19 9:53 am Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...> Whimbrels
5/15/19 9:49 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Ozark Natural Science Center - wintering home of the Northern Saw-whet Owl, is offering a Family Camp this June
5/14/19 5:34 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Woodcock frustrations
5/14/19 2:44 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Beaver Lake Nursery Pond Today
5/14/19 2:04 pm <market...> Beaver Lake Nursery Pond Today
5/14/19 1:51 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> That time of year
5/14/19 9:16 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Why 54% of North American breeding birds NEED insects
5/14/19 8:35 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> White-faced Ibis
5/13/19 8:39 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges
5/13/19 8:25 pm Lea Crisp <leacrisp...> Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/12/2019 - Cape May Warbler
5/13/19 8:16 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges
5/13/19 6:45 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges
5/13/19 4:19 pm Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...> Black Terns
5/13/19 3:35 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: IN SUM, A VERY GOOD DAY AROUND MAYSVILLE
5/13/19 3:17 pm <herbies...> <herbies...> Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges
5/13/19 2:10 pm Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...> Black Terns
5/13/19 7:56 am Michael <mplinz...> Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/12/2019 - Cape May Warbler
5/12/19 8:26 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 5/12/2019 - Cape May Warbler
5/12/19 7:02 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Quiz question
5/12/19 3:28 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> FIELD TRIP TO SILOAM SPRINGS CITY LAKE MAY 18, 2019
5/12/19 2:09 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Cape May Warbler at Lake Fayetteville Park NOW (11:10)
5/12/19 1:31 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Bald Knob NWR
5/12/19 9:16 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Cape May Warbler at Lake Fayetteville Park NOW (11:10)
5/11/19 5:53 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> IN SUM, A VERY GOOD DAY AROUND MAYSVILLE
5/11/19 5:46 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Report
5/11/19 5:21 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Chestnut-sided Warbler
5/11/19 4:02 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: Orioles?
5/11/19 2:22 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Good news for those who want to increase insects that feed our birds
5/11/19 9:48 am Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
5/11/19 9:16 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Why 54% of North American breeding birds NEED insects
5/11/19 8:13 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> Re: Orioles?
5/11/19 7:53 am Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...> Re: Orioles?
5/11/19 7:47 am Robert Day <rhday52...> Re: Orioles?
5/11/19 7:32 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Orioles?
5/11/19 6:47 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> AAS meeting
5/11/19 3:22 am Vivek GOVIND KUMAR <vivekgk3...> Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/10/2019
5/10/19 6:45 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 5/10/2019
5/10/19 3:38 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Terns
5/10/19 2:10 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Benton County migration count
5/10/19 12:13 pm Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...> Two Willow Flycatchers and a Canada Warbler - south side of river trail near Department of Heritage building, Little Rock
5/10/19 11:29 am Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...> Re: Terns
5/10/19 10:41 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Why 54% of North American breeding birds NEED insects
5/10/19 10:13 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Why 54% of North American breeding birds NEED insects
5/10/19 9:01 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Saturday-Weather Contingency Details
5/10/19 7:36 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/9/2019
5/10/19 6:46 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Terns
5/10/19 5:40 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Killdeer brooding chicks in Centerton
5/10/19 5:15 am Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Terns
5/10/19 4:10 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Terns
5/9/19 9:57 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Boyd Point today
5/9/19 9:10 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - May 9
5/9/19 8:46 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> An eagle crashed through her living room window in Kodiak. Then she had to shoo it out of the house.
5/9/19 7:44 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Another day
5/9/19 6:00 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 5/9/2019
5/9/19 12:09 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> LAZULI BUNTING in Centerton-Vaughn Area
5/9/19 10:36 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Bob Kidd Lake?
5/9/19 9:28 am Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Birding 101, sort of
5/9/19 7:05 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> AAS News of Members
5/8/19 4:51 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> “RED-BACKED SANDPIPERS” AT CENTERTON HATCHERY
5/8/19 10:55 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Audubon's BirdLR Rescheduled
5/8/19 9:00 am David Arbour <arbour...> Re: Unknown bird call
5/8/19 7:41 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> One advantage of nesting on a power-tower
5/8/19 6:47 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA May Field Trip & BirdLR Birdathon
5/8/19 6:28 am Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Greater Roadrunners
5/7/19 3:42 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Re: Unknown bird call
5/7/19 1:39 pm Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> FOS
5/7/19 1:00 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Unknown bird call
5/6/19 4:27 pm Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Swallowtailed Kite at Prairie Creek east of Rogers on Highway 12 at 6:20 pm
5/6/19 12:36 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> FRANKLIN’S GULL AND HARRIS’S SPARROW May 6, 2019
5/6/19 11:44 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: 58 species in Sunnymede this morning
5/6/19 11:40 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Sunday, May 5, 2019
5/6/19 10:24 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> anyone in Benton county this morning?
5/6/19 7:44 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> 58 species in Sunnymede this morning
5/6/19 7:40 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Get out...
5/5/19 8:19 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: Red Phalarope, Boyd Point WTP
5/5/19 6:50 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Bobolinks, Atkins Bottoms, Conway County near Morrilton
5/5/19 6:41 pm Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> Re: Bobolinks, Atkins Bottoms, Conway County near Morrilton
5/5/19 6:25 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Bobolinks, Atkins Bottoms, Conway County near Morrilton
5/5/19 3:58 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Re: nest?
5/5/19 2:40 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Gillam Park this Saturday
5/5/19 2:18 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Fwd: MOWA sightings
5/5/19 2:18 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Centerton/Highfill area - 5/5/2019
5/5/19 1:40 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> MIGRATION SENSATION AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND
5/5/19 12:40 pm Stacy Clanton <sclanton...> Re: Singing!
5/5/19 9:35 am Araks O <araks.ohanyan...> Big Day at Audubon Center of Little Rock
5/5/19 9:32 am Mary Ann King <office...> nest?
5/5/19 9:20 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Singing!
5/5/19 7:23 am Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> Western Kingbirds Little Rock
5/5/19 6:37 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> global big day
5/4/19 5:28 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: DESIGNER SPRING MIGRATION DAY AT DEVIL’S DEN
5/4/19 2:53 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> DESIGNER SPRING MIGRATION DAY AT DEVIL’S DEN
5/4/19 1:22 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> New Arrivals
5/4/19 12:04 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Suburbia in New Jersey
5/4/19 12:00 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> NWAAS Field Trip to Ninestone, April 28, 2019
5/4/19 7:48 am Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Yellow-headed Blackbird - Calhoun County
5/3/19 6:27 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> WHITNEY MOUNTAIN AND PEA RIDGE
5/3/19 4:45 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> dowitcher question
5/3/19 12:47 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> BKNWR 3 May 2019
5/3/19 5:41 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Birding Around Jonesboro
5/2/19 9:29 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 5/2/2019 - FOS Veery/Warblers
5/2/19 2:09 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Kenn Kaufman's new book "A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration"
5/2/19 1:30 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Kenn Kaufman's new book "A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration"
5/2/19 8:45 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> ASCA field trip
5/2/19 6:48 am CAMPBELL, MARTIN <campbem...> Fwd: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant
5/2/19 6:44 am Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> Re: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant
5/2/19 4:12 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Shorebird extravaganza
5/1/19 6:52 pm Ed Tiede <0000012caede6260-dmarc-request...> Terns at Cadron Settlement Park
5/1/19 4:43 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Re: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant
5/1/19 3:42 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Used binoculars needed please
5/1/19 1:28 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Quiz question
5/1/19 12:51 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant
5/1/19 12:42 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Centerton today
5/1/19 8:39 am JFR <johnfredman...> FOS TERNS AT BOYD POINT
5/1/19 8:00 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> Pollinator Garden, birds,etc.
5/1/19 7:54 am Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch...> Request for assistance – song recordings of migrating Mourning Warblers
5/1/19 7:31 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Catastrophe diverted
5/1/19 7:31 am David Arbour <arbour...> Re: You will NOT believe this one...
4/30/19 9:39 pm plm108 <plm108...>
4/30/19 7:32 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Mailbox Birdhouse Redux
4/30/19 7:07 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Mailbox Birdhouse Redux
4/30/19 5:05 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> O BROTHER, WHO ART THOU?
4/30/19 3:08 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Woolsey Wet Prairie - 4/30/2019
4/30/19 2:32 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Wilson Hollow Road
4/30/19 12:55 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> More from our yard
4/30/19 12:51 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: hummingbird banding
4/30/19 12:32 pm Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> hummingbird banding
4/30/19 9:10 am Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> Backyard birds
4/30/19 7:21 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> You will NOT believe this one...
4/29/19 8:57 pm Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22...> first of season
4/29/19 7:12 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - FOS Common Nighthawk - 4/29/2019
4/29/19 7:08 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: God Mississippi Kite
4/29/19 6:48 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Osprey bath
4/29/19 6:02 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: God Mississippi Kite
4/29/19 5:36 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Pbs live
4/29/19 5:35 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: God Mississippi Kite
4/29/19 5:28 pm Ruth Anderson <0000029228ce55cf-dmarc-request...> Re: God Mississippi Kite
4/29/19 4:55 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> MIKI in the Heights
4/29/19 4:30 pm Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> God Mississippi Kite
4/29/19 2:49 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Rose-breasted grosbeak
4/29/19 11:19 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Two interesting observations at Erbie
4/29/19 11:07 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Two interesting observations at Erbie
4/29/19 10:13 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Two interesting observations at Erbie
4/29/19 9:15 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> bobo
4/29/19 6:54 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> DEVIL’S DEN SP FIELD TRIP SATURDAY MAY 4, 2019
4/29/19 5:30 am David Ray <cardcards...> Bobolinks at Lollie Bottoms
4/29/19 5:08 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Bobolinks at Hindsville
4/28/19 4:39 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> yard birds today, Centerton
4/28/19 1:08 pm Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...> Orioles
4/28/19 10:13 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Big Day birding around Fort Smith 27 April
4/28/19 9:51 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Blue bird box Fledgers
4/28/19 5:02 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Barn swallow deterrent
4/27/19 8:15 pm Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> Re: Barn swallow deterrent
4/27/19 8:13 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Barn swallow deterrent
4/27/19 6:49 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - White-winged Dove/Audubon's (Yellow-rumped) Warbler - 4/27/2019
4/27/19 5:59 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> FOS Centerton yard birds.
4/27/19 3:48 pm Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> finally arrived
4/27/19 3:21 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Ninestone FOS
4/27/19 2:50 pm Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Gillam Park Sunday morning
4/27/19 2:49 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Barn swallow deterrent
4/27/19 2:22 pm JFR <johnfredman...> BIRDING AT BOYD POINT TODAY
4/27/19 1:14 pm Amy Hall <00000141e1151b9c-dmarc-request...> FOS Baltimore Oriole
4/27/19 12:13 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Re: Barn swallow deterrent
4/27/19 12:09 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Golden-winged Warbler
4/27/19 11:13 am Bob Day <rhday52...> Re: Barn swallow deterrent
4/27/19 10:51 am Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> Barn swallow deterrent
4/27/19 8:00 am Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> Painted Bunting
4/27/19 5:03 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Angry Birds
4/27/19 2:00 am Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...> Re: Murray Park - Little Rock
4/26/19 9:27 pm JFR <johnfredman...> SHOREBIRDS AND GREBES AT BOYD POINT
4/26/19 4:46 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BLACK-AND-WHITE FLEDGLINGS ALREADY?
4/26/19 4:43 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Birds today FOS
4/26/19 1:18 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Birds today FOS
4/26/19 12:52 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob Area 4-26-19
4/26/19 12:21 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> Murray Park - Little Rock
4/25/19 7:17 pm Ed Tiede <0000012caede6260-dmarc-request...> FOS Painted Bunting
4/25/19 6:56 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> FOS Northern Waterthrush - Lake Fayetteville - 4/25/2019
4/25/19 5:27 pm Donna Crabill <drcrabill...> Backyard Birds today
4/25/19 4:30 pm Cody Massery <codythebirder...> Willets
4/25/19 3:53 pm Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> FOS
4/25/19 3:46 pm Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22...> FOS today
4/25/19 1:14 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> GREAT PLAINS SPRINKLES NORTHBOUND MIGRANTS AROUND CENTERTON
4/25/19 10:25 am Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...> FOS
4/25/19 10:19 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Late fruiting Mulberries this year
4/25/19 10:10 am Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: Late fruiting Mulberries this year
4/25/19 9:10 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Another update
4/25/19 8:34 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Late fruiting Mulberries this year
4/25/19 8:13 am Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Migration last night
4/25/19 6:27 am d.marie yates <maribird...> FOS summer tanager, wood thrush & E. Meadowlark.
4/24/19 7:54 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 4/24/2019
4/24/19 7:09 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> A little push
4/24/19 2:16 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> warbler experts
4/24/19 12:59 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> BKNWR Highlights
4/24/19 10:24 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Sunnymede Park
4/24/19 9:41 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> another yard bird
4/23/19 10:03 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - April 23
4/23/19 7:15 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 4/23/2019
4/23/19 6:54 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Indigo Bunting
4/23/19 6:44 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Houbara sell-out
4/23/19 4:31 pm Robert Day <rhday52...> Centerton Fishponds
4/23/19 10:07 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Birding fact
4/23/19 9:59 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Avocets
4/23/19 5:58 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Best time of the year
4/23/19 5:52 am d.marie yates <maribird...> Re: Taking a break from warbler neck...
4/22/19 7:51 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> migration dizziness...
4/22/19 7:39 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Indigo Bunting!
4/22/19 6:56 pm Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...> Birders and waterfowl hunters are natural allies
4/22/19 5:13 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Birds at feeder
4/22/19 4:49 pm Ann Gordon <chesterann...> Rose-breasted Grosbeak
4/22/19 4:23 pm Anna Lee Hudson <hudsonre...> Finally!
4/22/19 3:13 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Avocets
4/22/19 2:27 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Avocets
4/22/19 1:12 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> EARTH DAY WITH THE ODONATOR
4/22/19 12:43 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Taking a break from warbler neck...
4/22/19 12:42 pm d.marie yates <maribird...> FOS painted bunting just seen in yard; Van Buren County, 2:40 PM.
4/22/19 12:38 pm d.marie yates <maribird...> FOS painted bunting, Van Buren County in my yard.
4/22/19 12:00 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Avocets
4/22/19 11:42 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> FOS
4/22/19 9:14 am Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...> Avocets
4/22/19 7:15 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Chuck-Wills-Widow!!!
 
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Date: 5/22/19 4:57 pm
From: Anna Lee Hudson <hudsonre...>
Subject: Pecking order?
Watching my suet feeder this morning--Red-headed Woodpecker eating suet,
Hairy Woodpecker sitting on wooden holder for the suet, and Downy sitting
on top of the post. Wish I had the camera closer!

Bull Shoals
 

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Date: 5/22/19 12:09 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
LaDonna and I birdied the refuge for a short time this morning. Highlights were: Neotropic Cormorant 3X, American Avocet 5X, Black-bellied Plover, nesting Black-necked Stilts, Black Tern 50X, Bobwhite, Bells Vireo 2X, and lingering waterfowl that included Shoveler 2X, Gadwall 2X, Blue-winged Teal 20X and a single Northern Pintail.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/22/19 11:54 am
From: Cody Massery <codythebirder...>
Subject: Inca Dove - Yell Co.
A little after 12 PM I observed two Inca Doves at: 35.089607,-93.163997. They were both foraging in the driveway.

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Date: 5/22/19 11:00 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Willow Flycatcher in Benton County
A Willow Flycatcher was singing near Centerton this morning. Actual location is along SW Anglin, near the dairy farm and subdivision being excavated. This is 1.5 miles south-southeast of the hatchery. In addition, there was a fine male Painted Bunting, several Indigo Buntings, and Bells Vireo. This particular Willow Flycatcher got my attention because I found several along Ginn Road on May 13, 2017, then went back and found at least one bird singing in a thicket out in a big field nearby, June 1, 2017. Same community of other birds, too, like Bells Vireo. As Arkansas has steadily lost its nesting population of Willow Flycatchers, finding them any time is of interest, and finding them in possible nesting habitat better. I looked at a map to see the relationship between this mornings sighting and the bird or birds in 2017. Its close, only about 0.5 miles. Very little of this is accessible on public road. In my mind this raises possibility that back within this general area could be a small breeding population of Willows. It was windy this morning. Im going back soon, on a calmer day, and with someone with better hearing.


 

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Date: 5/22/19 9:38 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Question for the empid experts
Just wanted to sort of update. I might owe a few private responses as
I've gotten a few good replies already. I appreciate them. They all sort
of back how I was feeling about the whole discussion.
I tried asking them for specific direction, or sources for where they
learned these marks that can be used. The original person that shared
those thoughts did not respond but another birder that agreed with them
chimed in and simply said they learned these skills in the field. I,
quite typically, always err on the side of caution and I just don't feel
that people can rely on those things 100% and, that's the feeling I've
gotten from some very knowledgeable replies from this group here so far.
Even THE best can get those birds wrong. Yet these people seemed SO sure
of themselves.  I'll let them go on IDing birds in that manner but I'll
still with relying on vocalization when present. Perhaps I'll develop
the skill to pick up those subtle differences and get better at what I
think is still a guessing game.
Birding isn't any different than any other topic out there. It's easy
for some people to find themselves feeling far more confident than they
ought to.
Lots more thoughts(my brain is constantly going) but I'll just leave it
at this...  I think, as some have agreed, there's SOME truth to their
methods of IDing those empids but, I don't believe even the best of the
best would be correct 100% of the time based on appearances... and,
that's enough for me to remain where I've been so far. Content with
IDing based on calls and, leaving it as empidonax sp. when necessary. No
worries.

Anyway, thanks for all the replies. They were helpful.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/22/19 9:27 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Question for the empid experts
Read that forum response carefully. "More" "less" "stronger" "weaker" are relative terms. When you see a lone empid, what are you comparing it to? How much does the bird's posture, lighting and other factors Butch mentioned play a role in your apparent perception of those features? I could see a good GISS being developed by birders who live where both Willow and Alder breed so they can use voice and habitat as confirmation of the impressions. But here in AR their numbers are low; encounters brief; individuals alone, out of habitat, and often silent. Also note in that response that multiple field marks are used in conjunction, which is the rule for IDing nearly any bird. A single photo may not show enough or the right field marks, and suffers from lighting, image quality, etc. So we may never know for sure on any given bird. Even in Birding magazine's photo quiz they don't always have the answer, so they encourage discussion online. In life as in eBird, use of slash and spuh taxa may be the best you can do.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

> On May 21, 2019 at 8:37 AM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
>
> So I visit a bird ID forum semi-frequently... I use it to get ID's from
> time to time as well as help others with ID or simply watch a few
> conversations and TRY to pick up better skills. I learn better in the
> field still but, it's interesting and I try to remember what I learn.
>
> I was "taught" something today that surprised me a bit... that empids
> aren't really that difficult once you get used to them... more
> importantly that you don't need to HEAR a willow or alder to tell them
> apart. I've always read and heard that you shouldn't bother trying and
> have seen many very well experienced birders leave their sightings as
> empidonax sp if the bird doesn't vocalize. This is what I believed to be
> absolute truth so, I never bothered looking at them carefully. (One of
> these days I'll try and study the newer field guides better...)
>
> So on this forum, someone asked for flycatcher IDs and, one of the
> pics... someone just said it was a willow flycatcher. Someone agreed
> just as quickly so, I asked about that. How did they know? I looked in
> the field guides and I can see some subtle differences but, they're
> subtle. One was the eye-ring, the bird in the picture really had none
> that I could see in the photo at all. Anyway, this is the response I got.
>
> "Yes, a lot of experts and banders will tell you that they are
> completely unidentifiable but that's not fully true. Older birders tend
> to be stuck in the mindset that they are inseparable from the time they
> were one species.
>
> Typical Alder and Willow have fairly distinctive looks. Classic Willow
> here has a more crested head, more dull colored back with some brownish
> gray tones, wingbars tend to be less strong and less white, and a weak
> to no eyering.
>
> Alder typically has a flat head unlike typical Willow, more olive
> greenish overall with little to no brownish gray, stronger white
> wingbars, and a stronger, often complete eyering.
>
> GISS (general impression of shape and size) tends to be very useful with
> empids. With empid experience, you'll get a strong Willow or Alder
> impression on a bird."
>
> If this is true... if you can get such an "impression" and have it be
> reliable, well even then it will take some time for that to help me in
> the field. I mean, those things don't stay still very often. Up, down,
> left, right...  where did you go?  HA.    But if this information is
> fairly accurate, it may help me learn to ID some from photos better,
> provided I get better photos.
> For now, of course, I'll stick to hoping they make a sound I can use.
> But I wanted to get some other opinions on this information. Looking at
> a field guide the other night I can say that there did appear to be some
> visual differences between the two. I'm just kind of questioning how
> reliable that is.  So... anyone that might be "stuck in their mindset"
> or a newer learned birder(that might know this info) have any thoughts?
> I always err on the side of caution and, that's not going to change...
> but if I can learn new things, well I'll sure try.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 5/21/19 1:04 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA June, July, August Field Trips
Mark your calendars!  Below are details about the next three months of field trips sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas.  Everyone is welcome to join us for any or all trips.  It's great way to explore different parts of the state with a fun group of happy birders enjoying the outdoors.  You don't have to be an ASCA member.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me off-list.  You can go to our ASCA website at ascabird.org for more information about the organization and read issues of our quarterly newsletter the Snipe.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock, Pulaski County

June 1

Gillam Park and the Little Rock Audubon Center (LRAC)

Little Rock, Pulaski Co.

Due to weather, the May Birdathonactivities were postponed to June 1st and only 7 people showedup for the May field trip, so we’ll redo the trip as one of the BirdLR Birdathonteams, a fun, friendly competition to raise money for bird conservation inArkansas, sponsored by Audubon Arkansas.  The ASCA team’s fundraising is to collectdonations based on per species seen or a straight contribution.  You can donate to the ASCA team by going to ar.audubon.organd click on the donate button.  Click onBirdathon for more information about the planned Bird Bash activities for June1st.  It will be a great dayto be outside enjoying nature!

 Meet at 7:00 a.m. in GillamPark at the second parking lot.  Gillamhas great habitat for summering warblers and other species.  There will be moderate walking on fairlylevel, but possibly muddy trails.  Whenfinished at Gillam, we’ll drive to the LRAC and walk the wildlife observationtrail.  Last, we’ll head to IndustrialHarbor Road and Terry Lock & Dam to look for nesting Western Kingbirds andPainted Buntings.  Bring water andsnacks, the trip can last into the early afternoon.  Wear sturdy walking shoes or hikingboots. 

 Directions—GillamPark is in southeast Little Rock near the airport.  Address is 5300 Gillam Park Road, LittleRock.  Take I-30 West heading south fromLittle Rock.  Then exit onto I-440 goingtowards the airport.  Take Exit1-Springer Road.  At the bottom of theexit ramp, turn left onto Springer Road. Go approximately 1 mile to just past the LRAC.  Turn right onto Gillam Park Road.  Follow it into the park to the last parkinglot.

 July 6

Dr. Lester SitzesIII Bois D’Arc WMA

Hope, HempsteadCounty

Meetat 7:00 a.m. at the south end of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430intersection at Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll stop at the McDonalds in Hope (Exit 30off I-30) around 8:45 a.m. for those in south Arkansas who would like to joinus.  Look for Great-tailed Grackles atMcDonalds.  We should arrive at the BoisD’Arc WMA at 9:15 a.m.  Our target birdswill be Purple and Common Gallinules and their chicks, Least Bitterns, Anhingas,Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, herons, egrets, and possibly an alligator ortwo!  Very little walking will beinvolved.  Bring scopes, plenty of water,snacks, and lunch.  There are severalrestaurants in Hope if you prefer to eat lunch in town.

 Bois D‘ArcWMA is located 10 miles south of Hope. Take Exit 30 off I-30 and go east. Continue past McDonald’s, then under the railroad overpass.  At the light at the big intersection, turnright onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of amile.  At the brown sign, turn left ontoHwy. 174.  Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles tothe 3-way stop sign at Spring Hill.  Turnright onto Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4miles.  Turn right at the white woodenWMA sign just before the highway ends in the lake.  Follow the paved road, then turn left onto thefirst gravel road and go down to the lake. GPS: 33.558062, -93.694239

 August 24

Bald Knob NationalWildlife Refuge

Bald Knob, WhiteCounty

Meet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in the Other Center parking lot onthe east side behind McDonald’s.  TheOther Center is on McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall.  Take Exit 1 west off US-67/167.  We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR around 8:30a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.  This federal refuge is also a NationalAudubon Important Bird Area.  We expectto find shorebirds, herons, night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks andRoseate Spoonbills.  It will be very hotso bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If you have a scope, bring it.  Very little walking will be involved.  There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 atBald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for drivingdirections and more information about the refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903


 

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Date: 5/21/19 8:05 am
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Question for the empid experts
One of the biggest questions with identification of any organism is how do
we know we're right?

Though I do have a banding permit, I am hardly an "expert" on bird ID. But
it seems the problem stems from three basic issues.

First, as birders, we have no control group. The only way to definitively
know what it is that we are looking at is to do a DNA test on it. And
that's assuming we have a standardized DNA fingerprint of every species.
Even then, it assumes that species are immutable (they aren't) and that
they don't hybridize (they do).

Second, just looking at a bird in the field (or in a field guide) ignores
all the subtle variation in the population that exists. Birds can vary
visually because of diet, health, ectoparasite load, and any number of
other reasons. There is also regional morphological variation within all
species, and those gradations typically don't play by the rules of
boundaries.

Which leads us to the third issue...as a birder, we have no idea where the
bird we are looking at came from, which means we have no idea from which
metapopulation it originated or what it's genetic history is. Is it
passing through? Did it get blown off course? Did it engage in
long-distance juvenile dispersal (which is common) and now call Arkansas
home even though it was hatched Pennsylvania from a parent that came from
New Jersey?

All this means that even if one went into museums and looked at (and
measured) all the study skins of a species like Peter Pyle did back in the
80's and 90's to create his definite work on bird ID (Identification Guide
to North American Birds Parts 1 & 2), we still couldn't be sure we are
looking at what we think we are looking at, because now we have introduced
the variable of time. That study skin that was collected back in 1867, how
has it been stored? How many times was it handled before gloves were
required? How has time degraded the feather pigments? From what location did
that bird originate even though it was collected in Nebraska? We'll never
know.

You can see the complexity here, and all we want to do is pin a name to a
bird. Now I am not suggesting that it can't be done; new ways to identify,
age, and sex birds are always being discovered. But at the same time, I do
hope it helps us realize that it's not as easy as we often think it should
be. But it is more fascinating, because of it!

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

On Tue, May 21, 2019 at 8:37 AM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:

> So I visit a bird ID forum semi-frequently... I use it to get ID's from
> time to time as well as help others with ID or simply watch a few
> conversations and TRY to pick up better skills. I learn better in the
> field still but, it's interesting and I try to remember what I learn.
>
> I was "taught" something today that surprised me a bit... that empids
> aren't really that difficult once you get used to them... more
> importantly that you don't need to HEAR a willow or alder to tell them
> apart. I've always read and heard that you shouldn't bother trying and
> have seen many very well experienced birders leave their sightings as
> empidonax sp if the bird doesn't vocalize. This is what I believed to be
> absolute truth so, I never bothered looking at them carefully. (One of
> these days I'll try and study the newer field guides better...)
>
> So on this forum, someone asked for flycatcher IDs and, one of the
> pics... someone just said it was a willow flycatcher. Someone agreed
> just as quickly so, I asked about that. How did they know? I looked in
> the field guides and I can see some subtle differences but, they're
> subtle. One was the eye-ring, the bird in the picture really had none
> that I could see in the photo at all. Anyway, this is the response I got.
>
> "Yes, a lot of experts and banders will tell you that they are
> completely unidentifiable but that's not fully true. Older birders tend
> to be stuck in the mindset that they are inseparable from the time they
> were one species.
>
> Typical Alder and Willow have fairly distinctive looks. Classic Willow
> here has a more crested head, more dull colored back with some brownish
> gray tones, wingbars tend to be less strong and less white, and a weak
> to no eyering.
>
> Alder typically has a flat head unlike typical Willow, more olive
> greenish overall with little to no brownish gray, stronger white
> wingbars, and a stronger, often complete eyering.
>
> GISS (general impression of shape and size) tends to be very useful with
> empids. With empid experience, you'll get a strong Willow or Alder
> impression on a bird."
>
> If this is true... if you can get such an "impression" and have it be
> reliable, well even then it will take some time for that to help me in
> the field. I mean, those things don't stay still very often. Up, down,
> left, right... where did you go? HA. But if this information is
> fairly accurate, it may help me learn to ID some from photos better,
> provided I get better photos.
> For now, of course, I'll stick to hoping they make a sound I can use.
> But I wanted to get some other opinions on this information. Looking at
> a field guide the other night I can say that there did appear to be some
> visual differences between the two. I'm just kind of questioning how
> reliable that is. So... anyone that might be "stuck in their mindset"
> or a newer learned birder(that might know this info) have any thoughts?
> I always err on the side of caution and, that's not going to change...
> but if I can learn new things, well I'll sure try.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>

 

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Date: 5/21/19 7:21 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: White-winged Dove - NO, Inca Dove - YES
This morning I walked along Harper Rd. and Frazier Pike (Pulaski Co.) in search of the White-winged Dove. No luck with that, but as soon as I stepped out of the car I heard an Inca Dove calling from the trees in the lot on the northwest corner of Harper & Frazier. Later, without me seeing it, it moved across Harper to behind the houses on the southwest corner, still calling repeatedly. The one time I'm not looking for this species is when I find it without trying.


Along Harper Rd. I picked up three more species the Early Birds & The Worms could have used on our BirdLR Birdathon on Saturday - Cattle Egret, Horned Lark, and American Kestrel.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 5/21/19 6:37 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Question for the empid experts
So I visit a bird ID forum semi-frequently... I use it to get ID's from
time to time as well as help others with ID or simply watch a few
conversations and TRY to pick up better skills. I learn better in the
field still but, it's interesting and I try to remember what I learn.

I was "taught" something today that surprised me a bit... that empids
aren't really that difficult once you get used to them... more
importantly that you don't need to HEAR a willow or alder to tell them
apart. I've always read and heard that you shouldn't bother trying and
have seen many very well experienced birders leave their sightings as
empidonax sp if the bird doesn't vocalize. This is what I believed to be
absolute truth so, I never bothered looking at them carefully. (One of
these days I'll try and study the newer field guides better...)

So on this forum, someone asked for flycatcher IDs and, one of the
pics... someone just said it was a willow flycatcher. Someone agreed
just as quickly so, I asked about that. How did they know? I looked in
the field guides and I can see some subtle differences but, they're
subtle. One was the eye-ring, the bird in the picture really had none
that I could see in the photo at all. Anyway, this is the response I got.

"Yes, a lot of experts and banders will tell you that they are
completely unidentifiable but that's not fully true. Older birders tend
to be stuck in the mindset that they are inseparable from the time they
were one species.

Typical Alder and Willow have fairly distinctive looks. Classic Willow
here has a more crested head, more dull colored back with some brownish
gray tones, wingbars tend to be less strong and less white, and a weak
to no eyering.

Alder typically has a flat head unlike typical Willow, more olive
greenish overall with little to no brownish gray, stronger white
wingbars, and a stronger, often complete eyering.

GISS (general impression of shape and size) tends to be very useful with
empids. With empid experience, you'll get a strong Willow or Alder
impression on a bird."

If this is true... if you can get such an "impression" and have it be
reliable, well even then it will take some time for that to help me in
the field. I mean, those things don't stay still very often. Up, down,
left, right...  where did you go?  HA.    But if this information is
fairly accurate, it may help me learn to ID some from photos better,
provided I get better photos.
For now, of course, I'll stick to hoping they make a sound I can use.
But I wanted to get some other opinions on this information. Looking at
a field guide the other night I can say that there did appear to be some
visual differences between the two. I'm just kind of questioning how
reliable that is.  So... anyone that might be "stuck in their mindset"
or a newer learned birder(that might know this info) have any thoughts?
I always err on the side of caution and, that's not going to change...
but if I can learn new things, well I'll sure try.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/20/19 3:26 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: White-winged Dove
Speaking of White-winged Doves.

I still have my faithful bird in the yard.

I saw one bird April 1st if I remember correctly, then I had seen two in the same tree a few days later-still in the first week of April. Then only one at a time since then, as relaxed as this bird is with my coming and going on the back porch I’ll wager a guess is it the same bird.

Saturday there were two White-winged Doves on the arbor in the backyard. This is about the same time last year I started seeing two but they were not usually together, more like in earshot. My ears, so they weren’t that far away for me to hear them.

YAY!


Jacque Brown
Centerton, AR
<bluebird2...>
 

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Date: 5/20/19 12:52 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Bird Baseball, a scouting report from the minor leagues


Doug James used to call this Bird Baseball keeping various kinds of stats about birds seen in the yard, in the state, this year, over a lifetime, etc. I play a kind of Bird Baseball during spring involving How many warblers species have I seen? I consider 20 moderately respectable, sort of like hitting .200 in real baseball. So far this season, including todays Mourning Warbler, I have 27, all from Northwest Arkansas City. If like me you are retired and have more time than average, 20 should be a cake walk. I could be closing in on 30 something like batting .300 -- IF I could also include species that others have seen or heard on a field trip where I couldnt/didnt see them because I can no longer hear them. Blackburnian and Bay-breasted come to mind in that regard -- we had them for the trip, but I didn't see or hear them. Or the field trip I didnt go on Cape May. And I should already have Blue-winged, but dont. So far my list for this spring includes Tennessee, Orange-crowned, Nashville, Northern Parula, Yellow, Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, Yellow-rumped, Black-throated Green, Yellow-throated, Pine, Prairie, Palm, Blackpoll, Cerulean, Black-and-white, American Redstart, Prothonotary, Worm-eating, Ovenbird, Northern Waterthrush, Louisiana Waterthrush, Kentucky, Mourning, Common Yellowthroat, Hooded, Wilson's. For the spring season of Bird Baseball, I Im batting .270. That's respectable in the minor leagues where I play. Hopefully, enough to keep me in the league for next season.


 

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Date: 5/20/19 11:30 am
From: <market...>
Subject: Yellow-breasted Chats at the Nursery
I saw 2 yellow-breasted chats at the Beaver Lake Fish Nursery this morning. This makes the 9th new bird for the nursery since April for a total of 143. A REAL hotspot! Come on out while the weather is nice and the migration is strong. 😊



https://www.ronbird.photo/Todays-photos/i-LStcdQv/A


 

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Date: 5/20/19 11:00 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: White-winged Dove - NO
Uta Meyer and I made a quick noon-time trip to Harper Rd. and Frazier Pike outside Little Rock. We were unable to locate the White-winged Dove Devin Moon found yesterday. If the Inca Doves that used to live there are any indication it may take multiple tries.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 5/20/19 9:22 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: stop, look, listen...
I thought I'd have a unique story about a small, sad(not literally),
bird in my yard this morning. Joe Neal beat me to it.
I heard a mourning warbler on the big day a couple weeks back. Yesterday
my kids and I went exploring part of the ozark national forest(wedington
WMA), the road that goes down and dead ends where NWAAS used to have the
woodcock field trip. That road has had some major work to it(side
note/update here). There are a few hills they put in, purposely it seems
for drainage or to keep people driving slow?, where we scraped the
bottom of our van just a little on the way out. Not bad. Other than
that, 90%(ish) of that road has been cleaned up... gravel put in and
pressed with a steam roller. Trees and brush cleared way back from the
sides. Drainage ditches with big rocks put in everywhere. I'm not sure
if this is just to maintain it for drive-ability for people going to
explore(or hunt) wildlife or if they have other plans out there. We had
a decent drive down the road with a *kentucky warbler* singing, a
*scarlet tanager*, and a *yellow-breasted chat* being some of the
highlights for us. I think the road would have been even better a week
or so ago but who knows. It's a fun place to explore.
When we left and got back onto the main road that leads into that one,
there's an old bridge on the left(another decent birding place you can
access by way of 412 turning at the fireworks place) and a big cliff
opposite. Just east of that cliff is some dense woods with water. We
heard a mourning warbler out there but, of course, never got a glimpse
of it.

Today, I was hearing some weird calls that I really can't explain well.
The sound(not the pattern or anything) reminded me of a henslow's
sparrow... but it was four notes(if you call them notes)... two going
up-ish, two going down... We've had two pairs of house finches in the
yard lately and I'm feeling it could be them. But I kept hearing the
same pattern over and over a few times and never did get to see the bird
making the noise.
That leads into me calling my daughter to come listen. At which point,
that sound stops. (that's how it works right?)  So I told her she should
just sit by that window and do her schoolwork there. She said that if
she sat there it might dissuade any birds from hanging around. (in
different words though)  Then her jaw dropped a bit as she told me there
was a *mourning warbler* RIGHT outside the house. She was listing the
features out loud... "no eye-ring....."  So I snuck over and of course
the bird had dropped. Moments later it popped up where I could see it
for a moment.  A while later I did playback once or twice. Nothing.  We
went outside and looked around a bit. On the way back to the house she
saw it again in another location. It dropped down(so she says) and I
never saw it. We watched and waited and, whatever was there vanished...
managed to elude us as they sometimes seem quite good at doing. The
whole time the bird was in our yard it never made a single sound. It
could be out there right now and I wouldn't know it.  (REALLY wanted to
get a picture)

I keep thinking migration is over and I need to start planning on what I
want to find in the fall. Still lots to see though. :) Blue jays and
wrens carrying nesting material today. Lots going on. Heard some more
calls, some squeals of some sort that I couldn't describe... that
sounded like they were 10 feet in front of me at the side of my house.
Never found what it was.  Also heard a high pitched whistle that sounded
like a gray-cheeked thrush but I really couldn't be certain.

Stop, look, and listen. Sometimes when you're looking for one thing, you
find another. :)  Now to go look at pictures of some empids from
yesterday...

Daniel Mason



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Date: 5/20/19 8:19 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Mourning Warbler - Fayetteville
A Mourning Warbler is in my yard this morning in Fayetteville, just about on time based upon previous migrations. I have a lot of habitat -- an irregular shady pattern of bushes, weeds, brush piles etc that produce thick shade with scattered small openings. The songs are also in a low range that I can still hear well.

 

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Date: 5/19/19 10:42 pm
From: Candace Casey <songbirdcaptures...>
Subject: Swainson's Hawk 5-19-19
Juvenile Swainson's Hawk on Atkins Bottoms Road flying, hunting over dry
fields on the right, just pass the curve headed to Hwy 113. Photos posted
on my FB & my FB page. I submitted to ebird.org, with photos. However, I
had to add this species. I photographed 2 adults on 4-4-18 @ Rick Evans
Grandview Prairie WMA. I submitted it to ebird.org with photos also.
-Candace Casey

 

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Date: 5/19/19 8:26 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/19/2019
A fine morning it was! Thanks to all.

Rick Jones

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 19, 2019, at 6:59 PM, Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> wrote:
>
> I visited Lake Fayetteville this morning with Peter Shaffer, Rick Jones, Barry Bennett, Anjeanette Levings and Noah Carter. We started at the levee/boat dock at 6:45 am and finished near the environmental center around midday.
>
> Flocks of Cedar Waxwings were everywhere (at least 100 seen). A female Painted Bunting was seen below the levee and a male was heard singing nearby. 13 warbler species were seen/heard. 74 (+1) species observed.
>
> Warblers - Black-and-white (1), Tennessee (1), Nashville (2), Common Yellowthroat (3), American Redstart (6), Northern Parula (10), Magnolia (1), Yellow (5), Chestnut-sided (3), Blackpoll (2), Yellow-throated (2), Canada (1), Wilson's (2).
>
> Flycatchers - Eastern Wood-Pewee (4), Acadian (1), Alder/Willow (2 - no vocalizations), Least (1), Empidonax sp. (2 - probably Least but very brief views and no vocalizations), Eastern Phoebe (7), Great Crested (6), Eastern Kingbird (4), Scissor-tailed (2).
>
> Vireos - White-eyed (9), Yellow-throated (1), Blue-headed (1), Philadelphia (1), Red-eyed (12).
>
> Miscellaneous - Yellow-billed Cuckoo (1), Common Nighthawk (1), Chimney Swift (7), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (6), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Green Heron (2), Northern Flicker (1), Purple Martin (2), Tree Swallow (3), Barn Swallow (14), House Wren (3), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (9), Swainson's Thrush (1), Cedar Waxwing (100+), Chipping Sparrow (2), Eastern Towhee (1), Summer Tanager (5), Indigo Bunting (7), Painted Bunting (2).
>
>
> Vivek Govind Kumar
> Fayetteville
 

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Date: 5/19/19 6:03 pm
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Pulaski County White-winged Dove
Today (5/19), Matt Gideon and I found a White-winged Dove with 4 Mourning
Doves and Eurasian Collared-Dove on a gravel drive off of Harper Rd, which
is near the AR River in southeast Pulaski Co. This gravel drive is
approximately 0.15 miles west of Harper Rd’s junction with Frazier Pike.

Devin Moon

 

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Date: 5/19/19 5:00 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 5/19/2019
I visited Lake Fayetteville this morning with Peter Shaffer, Rick Jones, Barry Bennett, Anjeanette Levings and Noah Carter. We started at the levee/boat dock at 6:45 am and finished near the environmental center around midday.

Flocks of Cedar Waxwings were everywhere (at least 100 seen). A female Painted Bunting was seen below the levee and a male was heard singing nearby. 13 warbler species were seen/heard. 74 (+1) species observed.

Warblers - Black-and-white (1), Tennessee (1), Nashville (2), Common Yellowthroat (3), American Redstart (6), Northern Parula (10), Magnolia (1), Yellow (5), Chestnut-sided (3), Blackpoll (2), Yellow-throated (2), Canada (1), Wilson's (2).

Flycatchers - Eastern Wood-Pewee (4), Acadian (1), Alder/Willow (2 - no vocalizations), Least (1), Empidonax sp. (2 - probably Least but very brief views and no vocalizations), Eastern Phoebe (7), Great Crested (6), Eastern Kingbird (4), Scissor-tailed (2).

Vireos - White-eyed (9), Yellow-throated (1), Blue-headed (1), Philadelphia (1), Red-eyed (12).

Miscellaneous - Yellow-billed Cuckoo (1), Common Nighthawk (1), Chimney Swift (7), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (6), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Green Heron (2), Northern Flicker (1), Purple Martin (2), Tree Swallow (3), Barn Swallow (14), House Wren (3), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (9), Swainson's Thrush (1), Cedar Waxwing (100+), Chipping Sparrow (2), Eastern Towhee (1), Summer Tanager (5), Indigo Bunting (7), Painted Bunting (2).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 5/18/19 4:56 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: hotspot mapping
Call me weird if you want... (well, maybe not.)
I like things to be in order and organized to some degree. And I like
using eBird a lot. But, I like things to be accurate...
The ozark national forest near me is a good sized forest with several
good spots to bird within it. But there aren't enough hotspots dividing
it up. So someone could do an eBird list in one corner and then use the
hotspot for the WHOLE thing. That just doesn't seem right. So a couple
months ago I started trying to figure out if there was a way I could
label some more areas within. I emailed and emailed different
organizations... some forwarded my emails to other people, and other
people. I finally got some maps sent to me that have it all divided up
into compartments. It's a little helpful and I think for a few areas, it
might work. For other areas, I might want to find a different way to
label them... perhaps the roads/route numbers that dissect it.

The reason I'm emailing the group is to see if anyone else is interested
in this project, someone that's into eBird and wants to go exploring.
(Or if someone wants to take over this project, HA)
I don't have anything quite planned out yet but I think I'm going to
plan some small trips into certain areas within the forest to try and
decide a way to divide that forest up into more manageable hotspots for
eBird.  Part of me is overwhelmed by the idea of getting this done but
part of me is excited too as I will find some very interesting spots out
there. There's some thick forest out there and one year I heard a
burrowing owl calling that I didn't quite realize at the time and now
I'm kicking myself for not following the sound so I could get home in
time. HA.  Also found like 6 red-headed woodpeckers(if I remember
correctly) on just one stretch of road... A few trails that extend off
the roads... Some sort of salamander eggs were in some water filled tire
tracks one day, I think most got run over by forestry people the next
day but they were still cool to find.
I might find some hidden gems out there as far as location goes, as well
as birds. I kind of wish I started this a few weeks ago. Still don't
know when I'll start but, I should. There's one spot where my daughter
and I explored where we could hear a kentucky warbler singing and we
stumbled upon a black-billed cuckoo during migration. So much nice
habitat there, and close to where I live, so I need to really get in
there and explore and map things out for future reference as well as
better eBird data that would help other people as well.

Anyway... Just thought I'd check to see if there's any interest in
exploring some of the national forest between 412 near Siloam and Lake
Wedington. I'll have to do some planning so I don't try to do the whole
forest in a day. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/18/19 2:56 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Tomorrow
Let me dream a moment(or often...) I often say to myself, or my
daughter, if I only had the money and means, I'd put live cameras as all
my favorite hotspots. At the Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery in
Centerton, I'd probably need a dozen or more to satisfy my curiosity. I
can't help but think of what birds might be coming in with this rain.
And my wife has to work all day tomorrow. So I have til about 7:15AM
tomorrow morning to decide if I want to drive her all the way to work
and pick her back up at 8PM just so I can go look at birds. Decisions
decisions.
Anyone have any predictions? If I go do all that driving and find
nothing but the usual birds I'll feel I made a mistake and wasted gas
and time. But if I don't go and someone sees something great, I'll end
up feeling worse. What to do...

Anyway, We had a decent turnout at the NWAAS field trip to city lake in
Siloam Springs this morning. The forecast kept changing every time I
looked at it but, the rain held off til some time after the trip was
over. That worked out quite well for everyone.
We didn't have any super rare or exciting birds exactly but it was still
a very good day with over 50 species seen by several people. Even though
the red-headed woodpeckers and orioles are your average every day birds
at this location(well, not in winter of course), you never really can
get tired of them.  And we had several of each. Lots of nest building
and searching going on. Fledged bluebirds being fed by their parents.
The boardwalk that the city had put in may have been one of the
highlights for some. It allowed us to search and search and wait and
wait for glimpses of the beautiful prothonotary warblers that nest back
there. They're always worth that effort. There are some back there every
year and I've seen them using a tree cavity one year so I'm convinced
this is a regular nesting spot for them. This boardwalk just brings us
in a bit closer to their backyard, or into their backyard.
One of my favorite moments was when Joe Neal said "let us know if you
see anything interesting"(something like that) and we were like "there's
an osprey." Perfect timing.
After most of the group left I rounded out my list with a duet of barred
owls. They were calling back and forth from the woods just south of the
main parking lot.

If you're ever in NW Arkansas in May, try to make the trip. Or if you're
out this way and want to look around, the lake isn't going anywhere. And
if I'm free and have transportation I'd be glad to show people around
some time.
And let me know if you have any predictions for birds for tomorrow. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/17/19 1:42 pm
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Hummer with a golden throat???
Here's a quick webpage from All About Birds (Cornell Lab) that shows how
bird make all their wonderful colors.
<https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/how-birds-make-colorful-feathers/>
https://academy.allaboutbirds.org/how-birds-make-colorful-feathers/

The iridescence of the gorget in hummingbirds is due to structural
coloration. If I were a betting man, I'd hypothesize that the feathers of
these yellow colored hummers are due to a genetic anomaly causing a slight
mis-print (if you will) in their feather structure causing a slightly
different color to be refracted back for viewing. While feather wear may
cause the same effect to a lesser degree, it just doesn't seem likely here.

Butch
Bentonville

On Wed, May 15, 2019 at 3:27 PM Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
wrote:

> I happened to see a hummingbird out at my feeders that has a golden
> throat. The sun even hit it and it was definitely golden. I have never
> seen a hummingbird other than the red-throated so I have no idea if this is
> a coloration anomaly or if it is a hummingbird that isn’t in these parts.
> Would anyone happen to know off had. I got a few shots with my DSLR
> through the screen but haven’t downloaded them yet.
>
>
>
> Oxley/Alco area.
>
>
>
> Kara
>

 

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Date: 5/17/19 11:21 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Hummer with a golden throat???
I just ran across posts from David Sibley; this seems to be a topic of
interest and controversy among the experts! Here's the most recent
update, and it will link you to prior posts:
https://www.sibleyguides.com/2011/08/progress-on-the-orange-throated-hummingbird-mystery/

On 5/15/2019 3:22 PM, Kara K Beach wrote:
>
> I happened to see a hummingbird out at my feeders that has a golden
> throat.� The sun even hit it and it was definitely golden.� I have
> never seen a hummingbird other than the red-throated so I have no idea
> if this is a coloration anomaly or if it is a hummingbird that isn�t
> in these parts.�� Would anyone happen to know off had.� I got a few
> shots with my DSLR through the screen but haven�t downloaded them yet.
>
> Oxley/Alco area.
>
> Kara
>


 

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Date: 5/17/19 10:02 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: whips - chucks - swifts - Ben and Lula Coffey
For those of you who read my comments this morning on ARBIRD about whip-chucking, and in particular about efforts by Ben and Lula Coffey to document birds in Arkansas and elsewhere, I received the following from Rose Ann Barnhill, that amazingly, include a full PDF of Mid-South Bird Notes. Also, Rose Ann included a link that includes the fact that the Coffeys banded or suprevised others, involving more than 100,000 Chimney Swifts. As a result of these herculean efforts, we know a lot more about these swifts, and in particular, where they winter. Links Rose Ann provided open a treasure trove for those interested in our ornithological history:
https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/54255266/ben-b_-coffey<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.findagrave.com_memorial_54255266_ben-2Db-5F-2Dcoffey&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=rYbUSZzAN7UwxL12xzUx4wsgqiIXSjMfGLKZifn7EOs&s=-HOwlLUzLhxym-OsOEetxyum5P4-8n8sxFitk7XJnC4&e=>

"In addition to distributional studies, Ben has been a very active
bird bander. Between 1932 and 1959 over 106,000 Chimney Swifts were
banded at Memphis under his permit number." Can you imagine banding that many birds! I was interested in him because I listened to his bird vocalization tapes that Dora gave. They helped me tremendously while in Belize, because I had to count more often by sound then by sight. Dora worked with him over may years. Thanks for shearing Joe.

http://missbird.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/The-Mid-South-Bird-Notes-of-Ben-B.-Coffey-Jr._reduced.pdf<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=http-3A__missbird.org_wp-2Dcontent_uploads_2018_10_The-2DMid-2DSouth-2DBird-2DNotes-2Dof-2DBen-2DB.-2DCoffey-2DJr.-5Freduced.pdf&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=rYbUSZzAN7UwxL12xzUx4wsgqiIXSjMfGLKZifn7EOs&s=DJugoQwp6bRQWJlf6Rm5YaqDjdUeewiDRSnO0vcwsxM&e=>


 

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Date: 5/17/19 7:57 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: WHIP-CHUCKING UNDER A MOON-FLOODED SKY May 17, 2019
Hey, Joe! That's great that you guys found chucks and whips in the
moonlight. I haven't heard any yet this year, but I know where to find
them. As soon as I get another car to drive I will go there and experience
these birds.
Right now there's a red headed woodpecker outside my loft
apartment calling his weird call to his mate. I believe they are nesting in
one of the cavities of the leftover 25 ft stumps of pines that were topped
several years ago. RBs, downies and flickers have also been here.

Bill Thurman

On May 17, 2019 9:32 AM, "Joseph Neal" <joeneal...> wrote:

An all-but-full moon never looks more dramatic than when viewed as it rises
over a vast forested landscape like the Boston Mountains on a clear, night
in mid-May. UA-Fayetteville graduate student Vivek Govind Kumar and I were
at entrance to Devil’s Den State Park at 8:30 PM, beginning point of a
whip-chuck outing. That is, driving back roads listening and watching for
Whip-poor-wills and Chuck-will’s-widows. Summer Tanagers were giving their
last p-tucks as the moon took charge. With them, Gray Tree Frogs, American
Toad chorus, Cricket Frogs, and a last Eastern Wood-Pewee. At 8:40 we were
in the park, intersection of highways 170 and 220, where the moon-flooded
sky was full of bats: at least two sizes, at least 10-15 visible at once,
and I was trying to follow a big one in hopes of seeing big ears. Then the
first Chuck-will’s-widow. Highway 220 is now paved for its entire 17 miles
to Cedarville. We just slow drove it, never over 10 mph. We wound up with
10 chucks, all heard but none seen, and no whips. However, it was quickly
evident we couldn’t travel any faster. The road was in places was full of a
remarkable assemblage of toads. Conservative count: by time we reach bridge
over Lee Creek (about 7.5 miles), we counted 45 toads right on the road and
many more in choruses. And we weren’t the only ones to notice. Along this
same toad-stretch: at least 5 Barred Owls right along roadside. Somewhere
in here, around 9:35, we started seeing fire flies. A Luna Moth fluttered
through the head lights. At Cedarville we turned north on Highway 59. We
couldn’t do the 10 mph drive except in stretches. In the Ozark NF along 59,
roughly between Pine Tower Road and Evansville, we made casual stops and
slow drives from about 10:45 to 11:30. Result: 5 more chucks, but also 5
whips. Then back to Fayetteville.


While I was working with Doug James on the project that became Arkansas
Birds, Doug introduced me to the wide-ranging field work of Ben and Lula
Coffey, including their pioneering work on whips and chucks, and involving
roads a whole lot rougher than last night’s. Well worth reading: “The
Mid-South Bird Notes of Ben B. Coffey, Jr,” a special publication of the
Mississippi Ornithological Society (edited by Jerome Jackson 1981) captures
a lot of the excitement of mid-1950s whip chucking. In spirit of Ben and
Lula on back roads: last moon-flooded night in the Boston Mountains was a
blast.

 

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Date: 5/17/19 7:32 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: WHIP-CHUCKING UNDER A MOON-FLOODED SKY May 17, 2019
An all-but-full moon never looks more dramatic than when viewed as it rises over a vast forested landscape like the Boston Mountains on a clear, night in mid-May. UA-Fayetteville graduate student Vivek Govind Kumar and I were at entrance to Devils Den State Park at 8:30 PM, beginning point of a whip-chuck outing. That is, driving back roads listening and watching for Whip-poor-wills and Chuck-wills-widows. Summer Tanagers were giving their last p-tucks as the moon took charge. With them, Gray Tree Frogs, American Toad chorus, Cricket Frogs, and a last Eastern Wood-Pewee. At 8:40 we were in the park, intersection of highways 170 and 220, where the moon-flooded sky was full of bats: at least two sizes, at least 10-15 visible at once, and I was trying to follow a big one in hopes of seeing big ears. Then the first Chuck-wills-widow. Highway 220 is now paved for its entire 17 miles to Cedarville. We just slow drove it, never over 10 mph. We wound up with 10 chucks, all heard but none seen, and no whips. However, it was quickly evident we couldnt travel any faster. The road was in places was full of a remarkable assemblage of toads. Conservative count: by time we reach bridge over Lee Creek (about 7.5 miles), we counted 45 toads right on the road and many more in choruses. And we werent the only ones to notice. Along this same toad-stretch: at least 5 Barred Owls right along roadside. Somewhere in here, around 9:35, we started seeing fire flies. A Luna Moth fluttered through the head lights. At Cedarville we turned north on Highway 59. We couldnt do the 10 mph drive except in stretches. In the Ozark NF along 59, roughly between Pine Tower Road and Evansville, we made casual stops and slow drives from about 10:45 to 11:30. Result: 5 more chucks, but also 5 whips. Then back to Fayetteville.

While I was working with Doug James on the project that became Arkansas Birds, Doug introduced me to the wide-ranging field work of Ben and Lula Coffey, including their pioneering work on whips and chucks, and involving roads a whole lot rougher than last nights. Well worth reading: The Mid-South Bird Notes of Ben B. Coffey, Jr, a special publication of the Mississippi Ornithological Society (edited by Jerome Jackson 1981) captures a lot of the excitement of mid-1950s whip chucking. In spirit of Ben and Lula on back roads: last moon-flooded night in the Boston Mountains was a blast.


 

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Date: 5/16/19 7:28 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Whimbrel checklist
Haven't seen a single eBird(or other) report from the hatchery in
Centerton today so I'm guessing the whimbrels have moved on? They were
there for quite a while as we watched them but there were times where
they'd stretch their wings and lift off the ground just a bit as if they
were testing something. Really had me wondering if they were testing the
wind or, perhaps, their weight...  "nope, not full enough, must keep
eating, and resting"

Anyway, I'll keep it short. I finally got my checklist submitted to
eBird for the hatchery trip yesterday. Got about 8 photos and a sound
files of the whimbrels. They sure made some interesting noises. A few
sounded similar to yellowlegs calls but, we watched as they made the
sounds. The audio file is cut/edited a bit from a video(got two videos)
and caught something I somehow didn't pick up on( but my daughter did)
in the field. A weird echoey (I say echo-e sometimes but thunderbird
doesn't have a correction for it) sound that, though very different,
reminded me of the kind of echo you'd hear from a loon. Birds sure make
some funny sounds. :)

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56384504

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/16/19 6:45 am
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Re: photos of hummer with odd coloring
Coloring doesn't look odd to me. Believe it is just difference in ambient light. I've taken thousands of pictures of Male RTHU s with wide variations in gorget colors based on viewing angle and ambient light. So nothing unusual here imho.

Alton Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Sent: Thursday, May 16, 2019 7:46:22 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: photos of hummer with odd coloring

Thank you to those that replied to me off-line.

Oxley/Alco
Kara

 

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Date: 5/16/19 5:46 am
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: photos of hummer with odd coloring
Thank you to those that replied to me off-line.



Oxley/Alco

Kara


 

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Date: 5/16/19 4:55 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: report from Bill Beall about migration in Arkansas River Valley-Kibler bottoms-etc.

"This AM [Wednesday] Rick Thomas and I saw 18 MIKI, 4 SWHA & one that we couldn't determine which it was. All soaring, and also 31 YHBL in Kibler Bottoms. Arnold Rd still under water, entire oxbow is really full, probably can't drain because Ark R is so high.

About 5:30 PM Toka and I went down there. MIKI often migrate in the late PM and I thought we would find some but didn't. However 2 SWHA were in the area on Arnold Rd where the farmer had been inserting chicken offal during the AM. One was sitting on the road sign at Arnold and Thornhill and did not fly when we turned the corner, the other was about 10 feet from the edge of the road. Both immatures. Still some bobolinks.

At King Ranch we saw an immature BAEA harassing the CAGO, probably trying to catch a juicy gosling?"


 

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Date: 5/15/19 9:34 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - May 14 (belated report)
It was mostly clear and warm on the survey yesterday. 78 species were
found. Migration has definitely slowed down. The heronry is growing
bigger and bigger every day and looks to be several times larger than in
previous years spreading out further into the surrounding tree clusters from
the original 3 tree clusters. Here is my list for yesterdays (Tuesdays)
survey:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 3

Canada Goose - 3

Wood Duck - 6

Hooded Merganser - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 4

Neotropic Cormorant - 10 ( I could see a young chick in one nest.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1 imm.

Anhinga - 91

Least Bittern - 4

Great-blue Heron - 1

Great Egret - 24

Snowy Egret - 5

Little-blue Heron - 9

Cattle Egret - 800

Green Heron - 2

Black Vulture - 26

Turkey Vulture - 18

Mississippi Kite - 13

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 41

Common Gallinule - 38

American Coot - 3

Killdeer - 1

Black Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 6

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 11

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2

Yellow-bellied Flycatcher - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 2

Least Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 10

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 15

Bell's Vireo - 5

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 1

Fish Crow - 5

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 20

Barn Swallow - 8

Carolina Chickadee - 7

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 14

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 7

Eastern Bluebird - 3

Swainson's Thrush - 1

Gray Catbird - 3

Cedar Waxwing - 9

Yellow Warbler - 2

Magnolia Warbler - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Prairie Warbler - 2

Prothonotary Warbler - 7

Swainson's Warbler - 1

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 13

Wilson's Warbler - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 13

Summer Tanager - 4

Eastern Towhee - 4

Savannah Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 13

Blue Grosbeak - 2

Indigo Bunting - 14

Painted Bunting - 3

Dickcissel - 15

Red-winged Blackbird - 22

Common Grackle - 11

Brown-headed Cowbird - 13

Orchard Oriole - 4





Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Citrine Forktail

Lilypad Forktail

Orange Bluet

Southern Spreadwing

Swamp Spreadwing

Duckweed Firetail

Common Green Darner

Swamp Darner

Baskettail species

Prince Baskettail

Stillwater Clubtail

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Western Black Ratsnake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR




 

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Date: 5/15/19 8:51 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Hi
Wasn't sure what to title this.

To start with, got to see the whimbrels today, yet another exciting bird
for the year. Migration has been good in NW Arkansas this year, even
though there's a few warblers we had in our yard previous years that
we've missed this year.

If you've ever met you, I might not remember you, or I might. There's
been several occasions where I've run into someone and they said "Hi
Daniel" and I've been like "wait, who was that?" When I meet anyone,
anywhere, any time, my mind is usually somewhere else. Social situations
are "weird" for me. So I apologize if I forget people. If I run into you
enough times I'll remember.
That happened again today. At the hatchery, I THINK(had to think about,
then see eBird reports) it was Butch. Man am I bad with names. And
faces.  Anyway...

I mostly wanted to say hi and a big thanks to this listserv and the
people that report those interesting sightings. If Matt Gideon has not
posted, who knows when whimbrel would have been added to our life
lists... And I asked him to ask the birds to hang around as it was
5:48PM by the time we reached the hatchery and sure enough, they waited.
They were on the pond just north of the one Matt saw them on. This pond
was partially drained for a very short while but has this one area of
mud "islands" that the shorebirds manage to hang out at. Along with the
7 Whimbrel we saw a sanderling there that I managed to lose after a
while. A lesser yellowlegs flew in as well as a peep that I need to ID
from pictures later. They all hung out in the same area, occassionaly
bathing. It was fun to watch... except, there were 3 male and 1 female
blue-winged teal that also liked that area and the teal and the whimbrel
didn't always enjoy sharing the space. This too was interesting to watch.

Once we walked part of the upper ponds(nothing fully drained up there
right now) a couple showed up that are new-ish to birding. I didn't get
names(hey, guess it's not my fault if I don't remember those names) but
I mentioned the field trip this Saturday AND this listserv. They seemed
interested so we might have some new people in here.
As awkward as social interactions can be... I enjoy sharing birding with
others. If Someone's more experienced than I, I enjoy learning and
observing. If someone is still newer and is eager to learn, I enjoy
teaching what I can, in regards to birds and also resources and locations.
I feel like there's more to say but, it's been a long day. I'll try to
get an eBird list submitted tomorrow, with pictures of course.

I had a dentist appt and two of my kids had DR appts and THEN my wife
had to bring some papers to Rogers and there was a LOT of traffic(I
really hate cities and traffic) so it was a while before we got there.
AND we saw the aftermath of a motorcycle accident today on 412 between
Siloam Springs and Tontitown. Which reminds me...
Public service announcement.
Be careful out there. Always be mindful of bikers and, bikers, always be
mindful of your own responsible driving. It was a little stressing
seeing one biker today that was weaving and tale-gating, etc... not long
after seeing a man on the road with his bike 50 to 100 feet from him.
Then, later, I saw someone mowing the grass ONTO the street... maybe
some people don't know but that creates quite a hazard for bikers... and
even cars when the roads are wet. Don't mow onto the street. And I just
don't know what to say anymore about the people I still see STARING at
their phones while driving... texting away.
Be mindful/careful out there... always. Stay safe.
Sorry for that mini sermon of sorts. I just care about people's safety
and that includes all you birders. I've seen birders..., well I wont
preach but I think we can all use these reminders sometimes.

I appreciate having this "tool"(all of you) at my disposal so to speak.
Lots more thoughts but they're getting lost. Time to rest. :)
Hope to see some of you(even if I don't remember your names) this
Saturday at City Lake.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/15/19 4:46 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 5/15/2019 - Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
I visited Lake Fayetteville this morning with Peter Shaffer and Lea Crisp. We covered the boat dock/levee area and the disc golf course. 13 warbler species were seen/heard but numbers were low compared to last weekend. A female Bay-breasted Warbler was seen at the row of pine trees bisecting the disc golf course. We were able to find a male Blackpoll Warbler (lifer) for Lea.

5 Empidonax species were seen/heard today. A Yellow-bellied Flycatcher was seen at the disc golf course (in the glade between the pine trees and the lakeshore). Least (singing), Alder (singing) and Acadian Flycatchers were also seen in the same area, allowing us to study and compare different empids in the field. A singing Willow Flycatcher was seen at the eastern end of the disc golf course (not far from the environmental center).

Cedar Waxwings were numerous today, with at least 60 present at the disc golf course. These birds were not seen on Sunday, so an influx has probably occurred within the last two days. A female Painted Bunting was seen below the levee and a male was heard singing nearby. A male Dickcissel was perched on the fence surrounding the softball field.

Warblers - Louisiana Waterthrush (1), Tennessee (1), Nashville (2), Common Yellowthroat (4), American Redstart (3), Northern Parula (5), Magnolia (2), Bay-breasted (1), Yellow (4), Chestnut-sided (2), Blackpoll (3), Yellow-throated (1), Wilson's (4).

Flycatchers - Eastern Wood-Pewee (1), Yellow-bellied (1), Acadian (1), Alder (3), Willow (1), Least (4), Eastern Phoebe (6), Great Crested (3), Eastern Kingbird (4).

Vireos - White-eyed (5), Warbling (1), Red-eyed (4).

Miscellaneous - Yellow-billed Cuckoo (1), Common Nighthawk (1), Chimney Swift (3), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (4), Common Loon (1), Barred Owl (1), Purple Martin (1), Barn Swallow (14), House Wren (3), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (8), Gray Catbird (7), Cedar Waxwing (60), Chipping Sparrow (3), White-throated Sparrow (1), Lincoln's Sparrow (1), Summer Tanager (4), Indigo Bunting (7), Painted Bunting (2), Dickcissel (1).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 5/15/19 4:34 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: CASPIAN TERNS AT BOYD POINT
This morning, I observed and photographed 3 Caspian Terns as they rested on a revetment at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff.
John Redman
 

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Date: 5/15/19 3:32 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Bobolinks
Really good looks at Bobolinks right now on Holloway Rd in Centerton. My
first time ever seeing them when it wasn't pouring down rain.

Karen Garrett

 

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Date: 5/15/19 2:09 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Whimbrels at state fish hatchery Centerton - YES
Whimbrels (7) reported this morning at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton by Matt Gideon of Arkansas Game and Fish were still present this afternoon at 2:30. I think this is only the 7th record ever for northwest Arkansas and the first since 2002 of which I am aware.

 

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Date: 5/15/19 1:51 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Whimbrels, YES!!!
Whimbrels remain at the state fish hatchery in Centerton. They are now at
the North middle pond to the left as you enter b They are vocalizing.
Thanks, Matt!

Karen Garrett

 

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Date: 5/15/19 1:27 pm
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: Hummer with a golden throat???
I happened to see a hummingbird out at my feeders that has a golden throat.
The sun even hit it and it was definitely golden. I have never seen a
hummingbird other than the red-throated so I have no idea if this is a
coloration anomaly or if it is a hummingbird that isn't in these parts.
Would anyone happen to know off had. I got a few shots with my DSLR through
the screen but haven't downloaded them yet.



Oxley/Alco area.



Kara


 

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Date: 5/15/19 9:53 am
From: Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...>
Subject: Whimbrels
There are 6 WHIMBRELS at the Craig hatchery right now. I saw them on levee
of the southwestern most pond of the 6 large easternmost ponds. They were
on the levee where the tractor is.

 

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Date: 5/15/19 9:49 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Ozark Natural Science Center - wintering home of the Northern Saw-whet Owl, is offering a Family Camp this June

This email is about ONSC – the Ozark Natural ScienceCenter.  Some of you were there withMitchell Pruitt, searching for Saw-whet Owls. But most people know only a little bit about our amazing wildsurroundings, or the work we are doing connecting people, school children inparticular, with nature.

Well, this June a two-day family camp is being offered,‘Flying into Summer with ONSC’.  Learnabout the flyers of the Ozarks – birds, bats, bees and butterflies.  Here’s the link: https://www.onsc.us/events-1/flying-into-summer-with-onsc

I would like our state naturalists to know more aboutONSC.  Even if you are aware of us, you may not be aware of how reallyvaluable our contribution is to both conservation and education.  My wishis that some of you will take advantage of this ONSC family camp experience toreally find out about the science center. There is so much I could tell you – but how much better to see it foryourself at first hand.
Happy birding!Joanie

 

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Date: 5/14/19 5:34 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Woodcock frustrations
I have been hoping to see a Woodcock for a few years now.  Have I been trying real hard to find one?  Well, not really.  Not yet.  I’m not totally sure how to find one.  Anyhow, that isn’t important at the moment.  I was on Coal Chute Road today, heading north.  The field to the right of me was flooded.  The field to the left of me was flooded.  The road was dry, and there was tall grass/weeds on both sides of the road.  All of a sudden a bird flew up from the edge of the road.  I never saw it there.  I only got a quick glimpse.  I would say the beak was long, but it didn’t look long enough to be a Snipe, and it didn’t make the noise a Snipe usually makes when it is flushed.  Plus, that isn’t where I’d expect to see a snipe.  Perhaps a Dowitcher?  They have long beaks, but it didn’t look to be quite that long.  And again, I wouldn’t expect a Dowitcher to be on the side of the road.  It was a compact bird, so Yellowlegs are right out.  I’d say the forehead was pretty sloped back.  When it took off flying, the head was down, a little below the wings, like the head was too heavy.  Unfortunately, it flew to the passenger’s side of the car, joined 3 blackbirds in flight, and they all disappeared.  Dang it!  My first impression was it was a Woodcock.  Wishful thinking?  I don’t know, perhaps.  I’ve never seen a Woodcock in person before.  And there wasn’t time for a second impression.  Anyhow, I think that is why I love birding.  It has its share of disappointments.  A glimpse of a bird that may have been a good one is much like a fisherman that almost caught that big one.  But, someday, Lord willing, I will see that Woodcock, and excitement will ensue.  Can’t wait for my next outing, wherever that may be.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot 


 

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Date: 5/14/19 2:44 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Beaver Lake Nursery Pond Today
Dowitchers are one of those birds that I feel like the field guides just
don't give you a lot to go on. There's a few species that are like that.
I'll read an ID mark for one, then look at the picture of the other and
it looks the same to me. So I'll make notes if I can, get a photo if I
can, and maybe do some playback and see if the birds respond. So far,
every time I'll find they'll respond to one or the other, or neither...
but not both. If they're sitting still long enough I can compare some of
the features a bit but they're still difficult.

With all that said... any experts care to offer me(off board, or on for
others' benefit) some tips for IDing these birds... as in the ones in
Ron's photo. You can see a couple of them definitely have short bills.
Bill length seems to be variable. I don't know if such short bills are
possible on a long-billed but I do know short-billed can have a long
enough bill to make you think it's not a short-billed. So, the bills
aren't enough to go by most of the time. What stands out in that
picture? I'm trying to judge the throat whether it's clean or patterned
at all. Kind of hard to pick up on with some of them. Sibley's (first
edition I guess, I should go look at my daughter's 2nd ed.) doesn't show
any good differences with the in flight pictures. And, they're drawings.
And Ron's is a photo and lighting comes into play altering what you see
if even just a little.
I guess hearing them helps but, they're not always calling. I want to
get better with these.
If I'm remembering correctly, long-billed is more common here but both
are reported often enough that this wouldn't be too odd a sighting. I'm
not sure I can learn enough with a few species from field guides alone.
I learn better in the field but I also use a bird ID forum and try to
engage in discussions of other people's birds to satisfy my desire to
understand them better.
I think I need an expanded field guide with a lot more info.
Anyway, other than the bill in the photo, is there something I can look
at and be able to say "yep, that's a short-billed?
Thanks. :)
PS... one of these days (maybe) I'll get myself a better pair of
binoculars and a better scope. Those can really change how easy it is to
see some details.

Daniel Mason

On 5/14/2019 4:03 PM, <market...> wrote:
>
> Plenty of action here to today with new birds introduced to the Nursery.
>
> Short-billed dowitcher(7) New
>
> Dowitchers
>
> https://photos.smugmug.com/Todays-photos/i-9RCvCjZ/0/08ab3f23/X3/IMG_8873a-X3.jpg
>
>



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Date: 5/14/19 2:04 pm
From: <market...>
Subject: Beaver Lake Nursery Pond Today
Plenty of action here to today with new birds introduced to the Nursery.

Short-billed dowitcher(7) New

Painted Bunting (1 Female) New

Alder Flycatcher (1) New

Along with plenty of warblers Yellow, Wilsons, Black and white, Pine and
probably others.

Fish and Game just mowed the road and top of the dyke in the last couple
days. Great time to get out for the migration.



Dowitchers

https://photos.smugmug.com/Todays-photos/i-9RCvCjZ/0/08ab3f23/X3/IMG_8873a-X
3.jpg




 

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Date: 5/14/19 1:51 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: That time of year
Of course it is that time of year and, that could mean more than one thing.
I'll start with something I saw just a moment ago. We have at least 7
red-bellied woodpeckers that visit our feeders. It's rare that there's
near that many at the feeders at once but I count males and females(and
then spot, who we're not sure about but think he's a boy) and it helps
us get accurate numbers. Have seen at least 3 males at a time and the
same with females. They don't often get along.
Just a few minutes ago I looked out there. Saw a male red-bellied fly to
the feeder but he already had some suet in his bill. There was another
male there and the both chased each other but that one came right back,
still with suet... then it loaded up on some more suet before flying
off. So, my observation is that it would seem they'll feed suet to the
young. I never really thought about woodpeckers feeding nestlings. I've
watched fledged downies sit near the feeder with a parent flying back
and forth to them. So, this shouldn't have surprised me. Maybe I haven't
paid enough attention in the past? So, somewhere nearby I've got some
young woodpeckers.

Speaking of the downies... had a female chirping away and being fed by
another female in the yard yesterday. I'm assuming it's a fledgling.

We have a blue jay sitting on a nest. I don't watch them for long
periods of time but, every time I'm looking there's one ON the nest.
This seems to have been going on for a while. I hope they have a
successful hatch. It took them a few days to get that nest going as they
kept dropping twigs like crazy.

we had a cardinal nest we think got raided :(  And a chickadee nest in a
dead tree and the tree went from about a 15° angle (from upright) to
maybe a 30°. They stopped going back after that. I'm not sure if eggs or
young fell. :(

Lots of action. Another thing I was slightly puzzled by was what seemed
to be a pair of tennessee warblers. Do only the males sing? We heard two
singing today but at one time we saw what appeared to be a pair hanging
out with each other, with one of them doing that thing where there wings
are shaking a bit. I've seen fledged and begging young do that but also
adults when their pairing up, at least with other species.
My daughter and I commented about how it would be interesting if they
nested in our yard but I'm thinking the more likely scenario is they're
pairing up on their way to the breeding grounds?

Lots to see out there.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/14/19 9:16 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Why 54% of North American breeding birds NEED insects
Thanks to both Janine and Judith for these informative posts. 

On Friday, May 10, 2019, 12:41:23 PM CDT, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

Thanks so much for this post.

The number is actually far higher than 54%. 54% of species migrate south for the winter, but virtually ALL of our terrestrial N. American breeding species need insects in order to reproduce. Their nestlings absolutely require insects. There is no substitute.

So without insects to eat, nearly all our terrestrial birds will go extinct. Essentially all the rest depend on prey that eat insects, or on plants that need pollinators.
Without insects, our ecosystems collapse, and our world will be birdless. It's already happening.

Janine

On 5/10/2019 12:13 PM, Judy Griffith wrote:


For those who want to understand (and be able to explain) WHY our birds need insects to survive this is from the Doug Tallamy article linked below: "Insects and other arthropods, particularly spiders that themselves eat insects, are essential dietary components for 96 percent of North American terrestrial bird species. Insects are extraordinarily high in protein: They have up to twice as much protein, pound for pound, as does beef. Insects also have organs in their abdomens called fat bodies that are rich in high-energy lipids. Both protein and fat are the stuff of growth and thus make up the bulk of what breeding birds need to feed their nestlings. Like baby birds, adults require protein and fats for muscle tone and energy and will take an insect over seeds or fruit almost every time. Insects are so important in bird diets that when cold weather decreases insect abundance, 350 species (or 54 percent) of the birds that breed in North America undertake the most dangerous adventure of their lives, migration, to move to areas where insects remain abundant during the winter. That’s right: Nearly all of our terrestrial migrants except birds of prey migrate because they are insectivores."

https://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/bwdsite/bestofbwd2016/birds-eat-dont-really-know.php?fbclid=IwAR14NinHYdcWE3ZKYEoRT6XYO3CeYS1OThlqqHHNKaZFGG0qUq2RhdMlIFs

Judith Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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Date: 5/14/19 8:35 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: White-faced Ibis
There are 2 beautiful white-faced Ibis at Bald Knob NWR this morning. It was interesting to watch 2 black-necked stilts chase them out of their area.
Glenn WyattCabit


 

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Date: 5/13/19 8:39 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges
I’ll never forget the two Cape Mays I saw at Devil’s Den SP. Bill Beall,
Karen McGee, myself, and others saw them near campground A. Maybe back in
the 1990’s. I think it’s in ebird.

Sandy B

On Mon, May 13, 2019 at 10:16 PM Jack and Pam <
<00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I was wondering about the weather patterns as well. Though I have seen
> Cape May warblers at Cape May it was usually in the fall, and even at that
> season they are subtly beautiful. Of course, its name comes from the fact
> that it was first described (euphemism for shot) in Cape May where it
> doesn't breed.
>
> Jack Stewart
>
> On Monday, May 13, 2019, 8:45:37 PM CDT, Jeffrey Short <
> <bashman...> wrote:
>
>
> These sightings of Cape May Warblers astonish me. I didn't even see them
> at Cape May NJ, decades ago!
>
> Wonder if the weather patterns are at play here?
>
> Jeff Short
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> <ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of <herbies...>
> Sent: Monday, May 13, 2019 5:17 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges
>
> Take “Tulip Tree Shelter” trail. Less than half way to the shelter and on
> the left is a large Red Oak that splits into two trunks at 3ft from the
> ground. To the left of the oak are 4 small trees. In the largest of those
> and about 25ft up, the Cape May Warbler was spotted at 11:00am, 11:30am and
> 3:45pm. It is now 5:10pm and if it has returned, I missed it.
>
> I’m told these are pine-seeking birds. There are 4 large pines about 45ft
> from this site and to the east. Otherwise, there is a substantial pine
> grove along the Crystal Bridges entrance drive that should be worth a look.
>
> I wish anyone who seeks out this bird as much good fortune as I have had
> today.
>
> Peter Shaffer=
>

 

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Date: 5/13/19 8:25 pm
From: Lea Crisp <leacrisp...>
Subject: Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/12/2019 - Cape May Warbler
I am planning to check the Disc Golf Course Wednesday morning. I have never been there but have put the address in my GPS. I will be looking for Blackpoll Warblers. I am fairly certain I got this bird in California, but it was a new species for me and no one else to verify. If anyone else is planning to go then, especially those who are familiar with this area, I would welcome the company.

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 12, 2019, at 10:25 PM, Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> wrote:
>
> Lake Fayetteville was fantastic for spring migrants today. 94 species were observed, including 22 warblers. I had planned to do a 6 mile walk around the lake for the World Migratory Bird Day count, but the number of warblers/flycatchers etc. on the northern side of the lake put paid to that idea. Peter Shaffer joined me for the count and we started at the boat dock/levee area at 7:15 am. There were so many warblers at the disc golf course that it was hard to know where to look. As a result, it took us almost 4 hours to cover the western half of the course. When we arrived at the row of pine trees bisecting the disc golf course, a gorgeous male Cape May Warbler greeted us with his high pitched "seet-seet-seet-seet" song. We spent just over 2 hours observing this bird. Daniel and Zipporah Mason joined us around midday and got good looks at the warbler. The environmental center was our next stop - the short trail leading to the observation deck was bursting with warbler activity. Many species were observed at or just above eye-level. We finished at 4:15 pm after walking the nature trails east of the environmental center.
>
> Warblers - Worm-eating (1), Louisiana Waterthrush (1), Northern Waterthrush (1), Black-and-white (6), Tennessee (12), Nashville (12), Mourning (1-FOS), Kentucky (1), Common Yellowthroat (7), American Redstart (15), Cape May (1), Northern Parula (12), Magnolia (14), Blackburnian (2), Yellow (14), Chestnut-sided (12), Blackpoll (11), Yellow-rumped (6), Yellow-throated (3), Black-throated Green (2), Canada (1), Wilson's (13).
>
> Flycatchers - Olive-sided (1), Eastern Wood-Pewee (5), Alder (4), Least (13), Eastern Phoebe (3), Great Crested (5), Eastern Kingbird (7), Scissor-tailed (4).
>
> Vireos - White-eyed (14), Philadelphia (5), Warbling (4), Red-eyed (6).
>
> Swallows - Northern Rough-winged (5), Purple Martin (3), Tree (4), Bank (1), Barn (22).
>
> Miscellaneous - Blue-winged Teal (8), Chimney Swift (8), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (7), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Forster's Tern (4), Common Loon (1), Double-crested Cormorant (1), Bald Eagle (2), House Wren (2), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (18), Gray-cheeked Thrush (1), Swainson's Thrush (10), Gray Catbird (9), Brown Thrasher (7), Cedar Waxwing (7), Chipping Sparrow (2), White-throated Sparrow (5), Eastern Towhee (1), Baltimore Oriole (1), Summer Tanager (1), Scarlet Tanager (1), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (3), Indigo Bunting (8), Painted Bunting (1).
>
>
> Vivek Govind Kumar
> Fayetteville
 

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Date: 5/13/19 8:16 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges
I was wondering about the weather patterns as well.   Though I have seen Cape May warblers at Cape May it was usually in the fall, and even at that season they are subtly beautiful.  Of course, its name comes from the fact that it was first described (euphemism for shot) in Cape May where it doesn't breed.
Jack Stewart
On Monday, May 13, 2019, 8:45:37 PM CDT, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

These sightings of Cape May Warblers astonish me.  I didn't even see them at Cape May NJ, decades ago!

Wonder if the weather patterns are at play here?

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of <herbies...>
Sent: Monday, May 13, 2019 5:17 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges

Take “Tulip Tree Shelter” trail. Less than half way to the shelter and on the left is a large Red Oak that splits into two trunks at 3ft from the ground. To the left of the oak are 4 small trees. In the largest of those and about 25ft up, the Cape May Warbler was spotted at 11:00am, 11:30am and 3:45pm. It is now 5:10pm and if it has returned, I missed it.

I’m told these are pine-seeking birds. There are 4 large pines about 45ft from this site and to the east. Otherwise, there is a substantial pine grove along the Crystal Bridges entrance drive that should be worth a look.

I wish anyone who seeks out this bird as much good fortune as I have had today.

Peter Shaffer=
 

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Date: 5/13/19 6:45 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges
These sightings of Cape May Warblers astonish me. I didn't even see them at Cape May NJ, decades ago!

Wonder if the weather patterns are at play here?

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of <herbies...>
Sent: Monday, May 13, 2019 5:17 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges

Take “Tulip Tree Shelter” trail. Less than half way to the shelter and on the left is a large Red Oak that splits into two trunks at 3ft from the ground. To the left of the oak are 4 small trees. In the largest of those and about 25ft up, the Cape May Warbler was spotted at 11:00am, 11:30am and 3:45pm. It is now 5:10pm and if it has returned, I missed it.

I’m told these are pine-seeking birds. There are 4 large pines about 45ft from this site and to the east. Otherwise, there is a substantial pine grove along the Crystal Bridges entrance drive that should be worth a look.

I wish anyone who seeks out this bird as much good fortune as I have had today.

Peter Shaffer=
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/19 4:19 pm
From: Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...>
Subject: Black Terns
There were about 10 black terns flying over the east end of the Craig
Hatchery this afternoon. They were the first ones I've this year.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/19 3:35 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: IN SUM, A VERY GOOD DAY AROUND MAYSVILLE
I drove all over Vaughns dairy farms and headed south and west of Centerton and Vaughn in Benton Co Saturday and saw ZERO Bobolinks. Im jealous. Jacque Brown



> On May 11, 2019, at 7:53 PM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> It was cool and raining steadily with light north breeze when UA-Fayetteville Vivek Govind Kumar left Fayetteville for the hour or so drive north to former Beaty Prairie near Maysville in Benton County. This was our assigned sector for World Migratory Bird Day.
>
> We made a brief detour through Gentry to Wild Wilderness Drive Through Safari. We picked up Great-tailed Grackles. We expected them, but were surprised to find Bobolinks in the fields around Safari. (And with rain and cold, the Black Tailed Prairie Dogs were down in their holes.) We eventually found Bobolinks in 4 or 5 areas today.
>
> From Safari we continued west, on Floyd Moore Road, which crosses former Round Prairie. We picked up the first of 5 Loggerhead Shrikes. It was carrying food, and so was one of the Dickcissels. As we got near Cherokee City, we found one spot with large spreading trees and Baltimore Orioles doing a lot of singing. Good day for orioles, both species.
>
> By the time we arrived in Maysville it was 9:00. Rain had mostly stopped. We picked up a Grasshopper Sparrow singing from a fence along Highway 72 east of Maysville. Fields in this area were full of Eastern Kingbirds. We started out with 1 X 1 counts, then had to up the game. There were more than a 100 in fields along Graham Road. Also, many (15+) Savannah Sparrows. Four Horned Larks flew over, then a Swainsons Hawk.
>
> We decided we should check for Bewicks Wren near the old Beaty Cemetery, a place that Mike Mlodinow and I have found them off and on for years. There was a cooperative brown (Eastern) Bewicks Wren there today and it was carrying a butterfly when we first encountered one another. There were four Cedar Waxwings there, too.
>
> We took the long drive on Leonard Ranch Road, with its extensive hayfields. We picked up several more Loggerhead Shrikes, but no Bells Vireo. A Northern Bobwhite was singing. We began to hear Bobolinks. A bunch (19) flew over us. Then more were in flight. They were coming out of a big tree 40 more up in the crown. I was hoping to see an Ornate Box Turtle, but that didnt happen.
>
> Vivek kept close track of details and filed 14 ebird checklists for the day. It was, in sum, a very good day. Lots of data. A very good day to be alive. To enjoy how our Earth inhales and exhales. To witness and play in this reality called migration.


 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/19 3:17 pm
From: <herbies...> <herbies...>
Subject: Cape May Warbler at Crystal Bridges
Take “Tulip Tree Shelter” trail. Less than half way to the shelter and on the left is a large Red Oak that splits into two trunks at 3ft from the ground. To the left of the oak are 4 small trees. In the largest of those and about 25ft up, the Cape May Warbler was spotted at 11:00am, 11:30am and 3:45pm. It is now 5:10pm and if it has returned, I missed it.

I’m told these are pine-seeking birds. There are 4 large pines about 45ft from this site and to the east. Otherwise, there is a substantial pine grove along the Crystal Bridges entrance drive that should be worth a look.

I wish anyone who seeks out this bird as much good fortune as I have had today.

Peter Shaffer
 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/19 2:10 pm
From: Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...>
Subject: Black Terns
There were about 10 black terns flying over the east end of the Craig
Hatchery this afternoon. They were the first ones I've this year.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/13/19 7:56 am
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/12/2019 - Cape May Warbler
Lake Fayettville seems to be the place to be.

Yesterday we did the Birdathon in Pulaski County. On the road to David D. Terry Lock and Dam we had a flurry of warblers(two days in a row). At one point I saw a Cape May male briefly perched and then in flight. It disappeared into the flurry of birds and no one else on the team was able to relocate it. We tried for a while but had to move on because of the Birdathon. We mentioned it to others in the area and they did not relocate either.
So others in the area should be looking closely as that’s two Cape Mays yesterday in the state.
Michael Linz (Conway,AR)


> On May 12, 2019, at 10:25 PM, Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> wrote:
>
> Lake Fayetteville was fantastic for spring migrants today. 94 species were observed, including 22 warblers. I had planned to do a 6 mile walk around the lake for the World Migratory Bird Day count, but the number of warblers/flycatchers etc. on the northern side of the lake put paid to that idea. Peter Shaffer joined me for the count and we started at the boat dock/levee area at 7:15 am. There were so many warblers at the disc golf course that it was hard to know where to look. As a result, it took us almost 4 hours to cover the western half of the course. When we arrived at the row of pine trees bisecting the disc golf course, a gorgeous male Cape May Warbler greeted us with his high pitched "seet-seet-seet-seet" song. We spent just over 2 hours observing this bird. Daniel and Zipporah Mason joined us around midday and got good looks at the warbler. The environmental center was our next stop - the short trail leading to the observation deck was bursting with warbler activity. Many species were observed at or just above eye-level. We finished at 4:15 pm after walking the nature trails east of the environmental center.
>
> Warblers - Worm-eating (1), Louisiana Waterthrush (1), Northern Waterthrush (1), Black-and-white (6), Tennessee (12), Nashville (12), Mourning (1-FOS), Kentucky (1), Common Yellowthroat (7), American Redstart (15), Cape May (1), Northern Parula (12), Magnolia (14), Blackburnian (2), Yellow (14), Chestnut-sided (12), Blackpoll (11), Yellow-rumped (6), Yellow-throated (3), Black-throated Green (2), Canada (1), Wilson's (13).
>
> Flycatchers - Olive-sided (1), Eastern Wood-Pewee (5), Alder (4), Least (13), Eastern Phoebe (3), Great Crested (5), Eastern Kingbird (7), Scissor-tailed (4).
>
> Vireos - White-eyed (14), Philadelphia (5), Warbling (4), Red-eyed (6).
>
> Swallows - Northern Rough-winged (5), Purple Martin (3), Tree (4), Bank (1), Barn (22).
>
> Miscellaneous - Blue-winged Teal (8), Chimney Swift (8), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (7), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Forster's Tern (4), Common Loon (1), Double-crested Cormorant (1), Bald Eagle (2), House Wren (2), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (18), Gray-cheeked Thrush (1), Swainson's Thrush (10), Gray Catbird (9), Brown Thrasher (7), Cedar Waxwing (7), Chipping Sparrow (2), White-throated Sparrow (5), Eastern Towhee (1), Baltimore Oriole (1), Summer Tanager (1), Scarlet Tanager (1), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (3), Indigo Bunting (8), Painted Bunting (1).
>
>
> Vivek Govind Kumar
> Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/19 8:26 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 5/12/2019 - Cape May Warbler
Lake Fayetteville was fantastic for spring migrants today. 94 species were observed, including 22 warblers. I had planned to do a 6 mile walk around the lake for the World Migratory Bird Day count, but the number of warblers/flycatchers etc. on the northern side of the lake put paid to that idea. Peter Shaffer joined me for the count and we started at the boat dock/levee area at 7:15 am. There were so many warblers at the disc golf course that it was hard to know where to look. As a result, it took us almost 4 hours to cover the western half of the course. When we arrived at the row of pine trees bisecting the disc golf course, a gorgeous male Cape May Warbler greeted us with his high pitched "seet-seet-seet-seet" song. We spent just over 2 hours observing this bird. Daniel and Zipporah Mason joined us around midday and got good looks at the warbler. The environmental center was our next stop - the short trail leading to the observation deck was bursting with warbler activity. Many species were observed at or just above eye-level. We finished at 4:15 pm after walking the nature trails east of the environmental center.

Warblers - Worm-eating (1), Louisiana Waterthrush (1), Northern Waterthrush (1), Black-and-white (6), Tennessee (12), Nashville (12), Mourning (1-FOS), Kentucky (1), Common Yellowthroat (7), American Redstart (15), Cape May (1), Northern Parula (12), Magnolia (14), Blackburnian (2), Yellow (14), Chestnut-sided (12), Blackpoll (11), Yellow-rumped (6), Yellow-throated (3), Black-throated Green (2), Canada (1), Wilson's (13).

Flycatchers - Olive-sided (1), Eastern Wood-Pewee (5), Alder (4), Least (13), Eastern Phoebe (3), Great Crested (5), Eastern Kingbird (7), Scissor-tailed (4).

Vireos - White-eyed (14), Philadelphia (5), Warbling (4), Red-eyed (6).

Swallows - Northern Rough-winged (5), Purple Martin (3), Tree (4), Bank (1), Barn (22).

Miscellaneous - Blue-winged Teal (8), Chimney Swift (8), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (7), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Forster's Tern (4), Common Loon (1), Double-crested Cormorant (1), Bald Eagle (2), House Wren (2), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (18), Gray-cheeked Thrush (1), Swainson's Thrush (10), Gray Catbird (9), Brown Thrasher (7), Cedar Waxwing (7), Chipping Sparrow (2), White-throated Sparrow (5), Eastern Towhee (1), Baltimore Oriole (1), Summer Tanager (1), Scarlet Tanager (1), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (3), Indigo Bunting (8), Painted Bunting (1).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/19 7:02 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Quiz question
“Where the Crawdads Sing” by Delia Owens?



https://books.google.com/books?id=CGVDDwAAQBAJ <https://books.google.com/books?id=CGVDDwAAQBAJ&pg=PT93&lpg=PT93&dq=%22Uncertainty+lingered,+but+the+more+she+thought+about+it,+the+less+likely+it+seemed+the+boy+meant+her+harm.%22&source=bl&ots=lzu_Wa3x5B&sig=ACfU3U1tdf7Kj_hQF5siulmDKetsPyT0nQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjLq-yktJfiAhUCS60KHYgODx8Q6AEIFDAA#v=onepage&q=%22Uncertainty%20lingered%2C%20but%20the%20more%20she%20thought%20about%20it%2C%20the%20less%20likely%20it%20seemed%20the%20boy%20meant%20her%20harm.%22&f=false> &pg=PT93&lpg=PT93&dq=%22Uncertainty+lingered,+but+the+more+she+thought+about+it,+the+less+likely+it+seemed+the+boy+meant+her+harm.%22&source=bl&ots=lzu_Wa3x5B&sig=ACfU3U1tdf7Kj_hQF5siulmDKetsPyT0nQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjLq-yktJfiAhUCS60KHYgODx8Q6AEIFDAA#v=onepage&q=%22Uncertainty%20lingered%2C%20but%20the%20more%20she%20thought%20about%20it%2C%20the%20less%20likely%20it%20seemed%20the%20boy%20meant%20her%20harm.%22&f=false



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jack and Pam
Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2019 3:28 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Quiz question



What currently popular mystery contains the following two sentences?



"Uncertainty lingered, but the more she thought about it, the less likely it seemed the boy meant her harm. It didn't fit that anyone who liked birds would be mean."



You can send me your guess/answer off line if you prefer.



I'll post the answer by next week.



Jack Stewart

happily flood in at Erbie


 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/19 3:28 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: FIELD TRIP TO SILOAM SPRINGS CITY LAKE MAY 18, 2019
Join members and friends of Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society on Saturday May 18, 2019, for a field trip to Siloam Springs City Lake. Meet 9 AM in the parking area off Dawn Hill East Road on the lakes south side. If you use GPS: 36.222638 and -94.539529. Nesting Baltimore Orioles, Warbling Vireos, Red-headed Woodpeckers, and many other birds are likely. We will also check out the native flowers (there is a good stand of Swamp Milkweed at the lake) and some of the new developments like the blind and a bridge. Slow, easy walk to explore this approximately 60-acre lake, an impoundment of Flint Creek. Everyone is welcome. You do not have to be an experienced bird watcher to participate. The lake is within a few miles of Eagle Watch Nature Trail just west of Gentry, so it would be easy to make a bigger and more interesting day by visiting both. EVERYONE is welcome. You do not have to be a member of NWAAS to participate.


 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/19 2:09 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Cape May Warbler at Lake Fayetteville Park NOW (11:10)
For any of you Fayetteville folks, where is the row of pine trees in
relation to the parking off of Park Rd or in relation to the Environmental
Center? The disc golf course is bigger than I thought.

On Sun, May 12, 2019, 11:16 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> I just got a phone call from Vivek Govind Kumar who is birding RIGHT NOW
> at Lake Fayetteville Park today. He and Peter Schaffer are looking at a
> singing CAPE MAY WARBLER that Vivek photographed. Its in the row of pines
> at disk golf course. You can call Vivek directly if you need more info: 479
> 935 5883 (he OKed posting this number).
>

 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/19 1:31 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
Went there about an hour ago. Birds of the day were 6 White pelicans, 7
Black-necked stilts, 5 Blue-winged teal, 1 Mallard, 50+ Dickcissel, 50+
Indigo bunting,3 Painted bunting, a few Blue grosbeak, lots of Red-winged
blackbirds, 100+ Eastern kingbirds, 1 Great Horned owl, swallows (Barn and
Northern Rough-winged) and anew bird for me in BKNWR was a Western
kingbird.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/12/19 9:16 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Cape May Warbler at Lake Fayetteville Park NOW (11:10)
I just got a phone call from Vivek Govind Kumar who is birding RIGHT NOW at Lake Fayetteville Park today. He and Peter Schaffer are looking at a singing CAPE MAY WARBLER that Vivek photographed. Its in the row of pines at disk golf course. You can call Vivek directly if you need more info: 479 935 5883 (he OKed posting this number).

 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 5:53 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: IN SUM, A VERY GOOD DAY AROUND MAYSVILLE
It was cool and raining steadily with light north breeze when UA-Fayetteville Vivek Govind Kumar left Fayetteville for the hour or so drive north to former Beaty Prairie near Maysville in Benton County. This was our assigned sector for World Migratory Bird Day.

We made a brief detour through Gentry to Wild Wilderness Drive Through Safari. We picked up Great-tailed Grackles. We expected them, but were surprised to find Bobolinks in the fields around Safari. (And with rain and cold, the Black Tailed Prairie Dogs were down in their holes.) We eventually found Bobolinks in 4 or 5 areas today.

From Safari we continued west, on Floyd Moore Road, which crosses former Round Prairie. We picked up the first of 5 Loggerhead Shrikes. It was carrying food, and so was one of the Dickcissels. As we got near Cherokee City, we found one spot with large spreading trees and Baltimore Orioles doing a lot of singing. Good day for orioles, both species.

By the time we arrived in Maysville it was 9:00. Rain had mostly stopped. We picked up a Grasshopper Sparrow singing from a fence along Highway 72 east of Maysville. Fields in this area were full of Eastern Kingbirds. We started out with 1 X 1 counts, then had to up the game. There were more than a 100 in fields along Graham Road. Also, many (15+) Savannah Sparrows. Four Horned Larks flew over, then a Swainsons Hawk.

We decided we should check for Bewicks Wren near the old Beaty Cemetery, a place that Mike Mlodinow and I have found them off and on for years. There was a cooperative brown (Eastern) Bewicks Wren there today and it was carrying a butterfly when we first encountered one another. There were four Cedar Waxwings there, too.

We took the long drive on Leonard Ranch Road, with its extensive hayfields. We picked up several more Loggerhead Shrikes, but no Bells Vireo. A Northern Bobwhite was singing. We began to hear Bobolinks. A bunch (19) flew over us. Then more were in flight. They were coming out of a big tree 40 more up in the crown. I was hoping to see an Ornate Box Turtle, but that didnt happen.

Vivek kept close track of details and filed 14 ebird checklists for the day. It was, in sum, a very good day. Lots of data. A very good day to be alive. To enjoy how our Earth inhales and exhales. To witness and play in this reality called migration.


 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 5:46 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Report
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Hoping for a break in the rain this morning, Saturday, I went ahead with the field trip in case anyone wanted to sneak in some birding in between rain cells. Seven plucky birders met at the entrance to Gillam Park at 7:00 a.m. to find poor light and misting drizzle.  We had several warbler-sized birds flitting high in the trees at the first parking lot, which were almost impossible to identify in the dim light.  Thank goodness for Dan's excellent ears as we were able to see/hear Kentucky, Chestnut-sided, and Tennessee Warblers, White-eyed and Red-eyed Vireos, Summer Tanagers, and Blue and Indigo Buntings.  
With it starting to rain harder, we pulled up stakes and headed to the Little Rock Port Authority area and Fraizer Pike.  With no Western Kingbirds anywhere near Custom Metals, we crossed the railroad tracks over to the big open fields and found some good birds.  Western and Eastern Kingbirds were working the fields along with Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Cliff and Barn Swallows.  In the flooded areas we were excited to see two Black-necked Stilts and two Wilson's Phalaropes, plus Green Herons, Yellowlegs, Least Sandpipers, and Killdeer.  On our way to David D. Terry Lock and Dam the big surprise was two Black-bellied Whistling Ducks sitting in a small flooded area on Thibault Rd.  Life birds for two birders!  No Bobolinks anywhere but lots of Dickcissels. 
The hot spot of the morning was the Dam Rd. leading in to the Terry Lock and Dam park.  As soon as we turned off Frazier Pike Rd. we found several Hooded Mergansers in the flooded pit and a Pergrine Falcon in a tree nearby, plus Baltimore Orioles, and Red-headed Woodpeckers.  Eastern Kingbirds were everywhere.  As soon as we got to the wooded area, we hit the warbler jackpot!  We had several of Blackburnian, Chestnut-sided, Bay-breasted, Black-and-white, Tennessee, Magnolia, Yellow, and Kentucky Warblers, plus a fairly certain Cerulean Warbler, Scarlet and Summer Tanagers, American Redstarts, Northern Parula, Warbling, Philadelphia, White-eyed, and Red-eyed Vireos, Baltimore and Orchard Orioles, Yellow-billed Cuckoos, Great-crested Flycatchers, Cedar Waxwings, Kingfishers, Woodpeckers of all kinds, and a Ruby-throated Hummingbird.  By 11:15 a.m. the rain really set in and we weren't able to rustle up any Painted Buntings, but did have a calling Yellow-breasted Chat. At this point our little troop of plucky birders were quite damp and decided to call it a day and head home to their dry and warm roosts very pleased with netting approximately 70 species on a rainy, but certainly not dreary day!Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorPulaski County

 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 5:21 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Chestnut-sided Warbler
First one, singing merrily as it hunts in the dripping lush foliage of
trees around the yard.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 4:02 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Orioles?
Both male and female Baltimore Orioles at our house today after being absent for a couple days, and male and female Red Breasted Grosbeaks today eating the large black striped sunflower seeds. It's a dark and dreary, cold and damp day here at our house in Fayetteville, but the birds are making it quite nice!

Sara
Fayetteville



--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 5/11/19, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Subject: Orioles?
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Date: Saturday, May 11, 2019, 9:32 AM

May 10, Friday
morning the Baltimore Orioles were still eating oranges and
jelly, and hanging out among the Liriodendron (Tulip Poplar)
flowers, but we did not see them later in the afternoon or
evening and none are there this morning. Has anyone else
noticed that they've flown?
JudithNinestone, Carroll
County
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 2:22 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Good news for those who want to increase insects that feed our birds
If you have woods, extirpate invasive exotic plants, and don't worry
about replanting natives!

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190510102919.htm

 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 9:48 am
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
Subject:
I just arrrived at Bald Knob NWR. There are some black-bellied whistling
ducks in the field off of coal chute near freppon road. E-Bird is saying
they are rare so I wanted to share.

Sarah

 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 9:16 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Why 54% of North American breeding birds NEED insects
In April, 2007, while visiting Laguna Atacosta NWR in Texas, we came upon the mass kill-off of hundreds of swallows situated around-and-inside an abandoned building. They had apparently migrated too early for the weather, which was quite cold that year. There were not enough insects available after their Gulf-crossing which apparently led to a mass starvation.



Makes me wonder about the success of our breeders this year with all the rains and cooler weather.



Post-script on an earlier post re: fledging bluebirds and chickadees. As I reported earlier, 5 bluebirds; the chickadees had 5 out of six. When I looked into the box—through the Plexiglas window--and saw an adult chickadee (presumably parent) which was huddled-up, beak-first against the front corner of the bluebird box and the last juvie frantically vocalizing and agitated. I think this young one did not fledge since I found a small (ant-ridden) body when I checked the box again a couple of days later. I speculate that the adult was expecting the young one to use its back to help it to reach the hole. Anyone else see a similar behavior?



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Friday, May 10, 2019 12:41 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Why 54% of North American breeding birds NEED insects



Thanks so much for this post.

The number is actually far higher than 54%. 54% of species migrate south for the winter, but virtually ALL of our terrestrial N. American breeding species need insects in order to reproduce. Their nestlings absolutely require insects. There is no substitute.

So without insects to eat, nearly all our terrestrial birds will go extinct. Essentially all the rest depend on prey that eat insects, or on plants that need pollinators.
Without insects, our ecosystems collapse, and our world will be birdless. It's already happening.

Janine

On 5/10/2019 12:13 PM, Judy Griffith wrote:

For those who want to understand (and be able to explain) WHY our birds need insects to survive this is from the Doug Tallamy article linked below: "Insects and other arthropods, particularly spiders that themselves eat insects, are essential dietary components for 96 percent of North American terrestrial bird species. Insects are extraordinarily high in protein: They have up to twice as much protein, pound for pound, as does beef. Insects also have organs in their abdomens called fat bodies that are rich in high-energy lipids. Both protein and fat are the stuff of growth and thus make up the bulk of what breeding birds need to feed their nestlings. Like baby birds, adults require protein and fats for muscle tone and energy and will take an insect over seeds or fruit almost every time. Insects are so important in bird diets that when cold weather decreases insect abundance, 350 species (or 54 percent) of the birds that breed in North America undertake the most dangerous adventure of their lives, migration, to move to areas where insects remain abundant during the winter. That’s right: Nearly all of our terrestrial migrants except birds of prey migrate because they are insectivores."



https://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/bwdsite/bestofbwd2016/birds-eat-dont-really-know.php?fbclid=IwAR14NinHYdcWE3ZKYEoRT6XYO3CeYS1OThlqqHHNKaZFGG0qUq2RhdMlIFs



Judith

Ninestone, Carroll County




 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 8:13 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: Orioles?
Normally Ill have several Orchard and Baltimore Orioles. I have not seen a single Oriole this year. My Rose-breasted Grosbeaks have left. Counting birds from my nest in Birdsview Solarium this morning in the pouring down rain. 13 species since 6:45 AM.

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR



Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Saturday, May 11, 2019 9:52:54 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Orioles?

I saw 4 at Craighead Forest Park in Jonesboro this morning before the rain started.

Vickie H Becker
PMB 1593
401 E 8th St, #214
Sioux Falls, SD 57103-7049

501-508-0984
<Vhbecker...>


On May 11, 2019, at 09:32, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

May 10, Friday morning the Baltimore Orioles were still eating oranges and jelly, and hanging out among the Liriodendron (Tulip Poplar) flowers, but we did not see them later in the afternoon or evening and none are there this morning. Has anyone else noticed that they've flown?

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 7:53 am
From: Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Orioles?
I saw 4 at Craighead Forest Park in Jonesboro this morning before the rain started.

Vickie H Becker
PMB 1593
401 E 8th St, #214
Sioux Falls, SD 57103-7049

501-508-0984
<Vhbecker...>


On May 11, 2019, at 09:32, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

May 10, Friday morning the Baltimore Orioles were still eating oranges and jelly, and hanging out among the Liriodendron (Tulip Poplar) flowers, but we did not see them later in the afternoon or evening and none are there this morning. Has anyone else noticed that they've flown?

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

Back to top
Date: 5/11/19 7:47 am
From: Robert Day <rhday52...>
Subject: Re: Orioles?
My wife had one at our hummingbird feeders day before yesterday.

Bob Day
Bentonville

Robert H. Day
Sent from my iPad

> On May 11, 2019, at 9:32 AM, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> May 10, Friday morning the Baltimore Orioles were still eating oranges and jelly, and hanging out among the Liriodendron (Tulip Poplar) flowers, but we did not see them later in the afternoon or evening and none are there this morning. Has anyone else noticed that they've flown?
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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Date: 5/11/19 7:32 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Orioles?
May 10, Friday morning the Baltimore Orioles were still eating oranges and
jelly, and hanging out among the Liriodendron (Tulip Poplar) flowers, but
we did not see them later in the afternoon or evening and none are there
this morning. Has anyone else noticed that they've flown?

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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Date: 5/11/19 6:47 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: AAS meeting
Shout out to Lyndel York for leading a fun field trip last weekend at the
state meeting. I’d never birded Point Remove and the Atkins bottoms. Good
stuff.
It was also fun seeing people I’d not see in a long time.
Good luck birding today. I’m still waiting for the rain to stop. sigh

Sandy B.
FS

 

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Date: 5/11/19 3:22 am
From: Vivek GOVIND KUMAR <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/10/2019
I forgot to mention that we saw Chestnut-sided Warblers (5) as well, making
it 15 warbler species.

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville

On Fri, May 10, 2019 at 8:44 PM Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
wrote:

> I visited Lake Fayetteville again this evening with Peter Shaffer. We
> started at the levee/boat dock area and finished at the eastern end of the
> disc golf course. Birding was definitely slower than yesterday (66
> species), but we managed to find 14 warbler species at the disc golf
> course.
>
> Warblers - Black-and-white (6), Prothonotary (1), Tennessee (5),
> Orange-crowned (1), Nashville (5), Common Yellowthroat (4), American
> Redstart (7), Northern Parula (4), Magnolia (4), Yellow (7), Blackpoll (6),
> Yellow-rumped (2), Yellow-throated (1), Wilson's (1).
>
> Flycatchers - Eastern Wood-Pewee (1), Least Flycatcher (8), Eastern Phoebe
> (3), Great Crested Flycatcher (4), Eastern Kingbird (5).
>
> Swallows - Northern Rough-winged (12), Purple Martin (3), Tree (2), Barn
> (30)
>
> Miscellaneous - Chimney Swift (4), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (2), Spotted
> Sandpiper (2), Forster's Tern (3), Common Loon (2), Green Heron (2),
> Northern Flicker (1), White-eyed Vireo (3), Red-eyed Vireo (3), House Wren
> (2), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (9), Gray Catbird (3), Cedar Waxwing (3),
> White-throated Sparrow (4), Lincoln's Sparrow (1), Summer Tanager (2),
> Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1), Indigo Bunting (1).
>
>
> Vivek Govind Kumar
> Fayetteville
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 5/10/19 6:45 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 5/10/2019
I visited Lake Fayetteville again this evening with Peter Shaffer. We started at the levee/boat dock area and finished at the eastern end of the disc golf course. Birding was definitely slower than yesterday (66 species), but we managed to find 14 warbler species at the disc golf course.

Warblers - Black-and-white (6), Prothonotary (1), Tennessee (5), Orange-crowned (1), Nashville (5), Common Yellowthroat (4), American Redstart (7), Northern Parula (4), Magnolia (4), Yellow (7), Blackpoll (6), Yellow-rumped (2), Yellow-throated (1), Wilson's (1).

Flycatchers - Eastern Wood-Pewee (1), Least Flycatcher (8), Eastern Phoebe (3), Great Crested Flycatcher (4), Eastern Kingbird (5).

Swallows - Northern Rough-winged (12), Purple Martin (3), Tree (2), Barn (30)

Miscellaneous - Chimney Swift (4), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (2), Spotted Sandpiper (2), Forster's Tern (3), Common Loon (2), Green Heron (2), Northern Flicker (1), White-eyed Vireo (3), Red-eyed Vireo (3), House Wren (2), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (9), Gray Catbird (3), Cedar Waxwing (3), White-throated Sparrow (4), Lincoln's Sparrow (1), Summer Tanager (2), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1), Indigo Bunting (1).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 5/10/19 3:38 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Terns
The terns, for me, are one of several(many) fascinating and sometimes
frustrating birds. I've found terns in locations where they've stuck
around for days, some for hours, some for minutes, and some not at all.
I've seen reports on eBird of terns so I know people are seeing them. I
haven't been in the right place at the right time for many of them this
year. The only ones we saw were a group of 10 black terns that flew into
the fish hatchery in Centerton and didn't really slow down much. They
just kept going. Thankfully they passed us by close enough to get good
looks at them. I love watching them, especially when they actually stick
around a while and you can watch them hunting.
Hit or miss, you'll find them if you just keep swinging. :)

Daniel Mason

On 5/10/2019 6:10 AM, Sandy Berger wrote:
> Has anybody seen Caspian or Black Terns yet?
>
> Sandy B.



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Date: 5/10/19 2:10 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Benton County migration count
If you are going to be out counting birds for IMBD on Saturday, could you
please post any public areas that you will be visiting? I am looking for
back up plans in case the weather is too nasty to be out of the car for a
while.

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the soggy Northwest

 

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Date: 5/10/19 12:13 pm
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...>
Subject: Two Willow Flycatchers and a Canada Warbler - south side of river trail near Department of Heritage building, Little Rock
Arkansas birders:

My colleague Bill Holimon and I observed two vocalizing WILLOW FLYCATCHERS
around 12:45/1 p.m. today along the south side of the river trail near the
Department of Heritage headquarters in Little Rock. Additionally, we got
great looks at a CANADA WARBLER. The location where these species were
observed is as follows: 34.7521, -92.28015.

Good Birding,
Samantha Scheiman
Little Rock, Ark.

--
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold

 

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Date: 5/10/19 11:29 am
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: Terns
We saw a Caspian Tern while camping at Mississippi River State Park near Helena two weekends ago.

Sent from my iPad

> On May 10, 2019, at 6:10 AM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> Has anybody seen Caspian or Black Terns yet?
>
> Sandy B.
 

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Date: 5/10/19 10:41 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Why 54% of North American breeding birds NEED insects
Thanks so much for this post.

The number is actually far higher than 54%. 54% of species migrate south
for the winter, but virtually ALL of our terrestrial N. American
breeding species need insects in order to reproduce. Their nestlings
absolutely require insects. There is no substitute.

So without insects to eat, nearly all our terrestrial birds will go
extinct. Essentially all the rest depend on prey that eat insects, or on
plants that need pollinators.
Without insects, our ecosystems collapse, and our world will be
birdless. It's already happening.

Janine

On 5/10/2019 12:13 PM, Judy Griffith wrote:
> For those who want to understand (and be able to explain) WHY our
> birds need insects to survive this is from the Doug Tallamy article
> linked below: "Insects and other arthropods, particularly spiders that
> themselves eat insects, are essential dietary components for 96
> percent of North American terrestrial bird species. Insects are
> extraordinarily high in protein: They have up to twice as much
> protein, pound for pound, as does beef. Insects also have organs in
> their abdomens called fat bodies that are rich in high-energy lipids.
> Both protein and fat are the stuff of growth and thus make up the bulk
> of what breeding birds need to feed their nestlings. Like baby birds,
> adults require protein and fats for muscle tone and energy and will
> take an insect over seeds or fruit almost every time. Insects are so
> important in bird diets that when cold weather decreases insect
> abundance, 350 species (or 54 percent) of the birds that breed in
> North America undertake the most dangerous adventure of their lives,
> migration, to move to areas where insects remain abundant during the
> winter. That’s right: Nearly all of our terrestrial migrants except
> birds of prey migrate because they are insectivores."
>
> https://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/bwdsite/bestofbwd2016/birds-eat-dont-really-know.php?fbclid=IwAR14NinHYdcWE3ZKYEoRT6XYO3CeYS1OThlqqHHNKaZFGG0qUq2RhdMlIFs
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County


 

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Date: 5/10/19 10:13 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Why 54% of North American breeding birds NEED insects
For those who want to understand (and be able to explain) WHY our birds
need insects to survive this is from the Doug Tallamy article linked below:
"Insects and other arthropods, particularly spiders that themselves eat
insects, are essential dietary components for 96 percent of North American
terrestrial bird species. Insects are extraordinarily high in protein: They
have up to twice as much protein, pound for pound, as does beef. Insects
also have organs in their abdomens called fat bodies that are rich in
high-energy lipids. Both protein and fat are the stuff of growth and thus
make up the bulk of what breeding birds need to feed their nestlings. Like
baby birds, adults require protein and fats for muscle tone and energy and
will take an insect over seeds or fruit almost every time. Insects are so
important in bird diets that when cold weather decreases insect abundance,
350 species (or 54 percent) of the birds that breed in North America
undertake the most dangerous adventure of their lives, migration, to move
to areas where insects remain abundant during the winter. That’s right:
Nearly all of our terrestrial migrants except birds of prey migrate because
they are insectivores."

https://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/bwdsite/bestofbwd2016/birds-eat-dont-really-know.php?fbclid=IwAR14NinHYdcWE3ZKYEoRT6XYO3CeYS1OThlqqHHNKaZFGG0qUq2RhdMlIFs

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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Date: 5/10/19 9:01 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Saturday-Weather Contingency Details
Regarding Saturday's ASCA field trip, there may or may not be a break in the weather for a couple of hours Saturday morning.  On the off-chance there is a lull in the rain and storms, I will be at Gillam at 7:00am tomorrow morning.  If it's raining hard stay home.  If it's not bad and you venture out, bring a rain coat and hat and boots.  Gillam will be wet and muddy.  At the first sign of thunder or lightening I'm sending everyone home immediately.  The safety of my ducklings is of utmost importance.  We will cover as much territory and as fast as possible, weather and flooding permitting.  If you have questions, feel free to contact me off-list.  Trip details below.

If we are totally rained-out, I may repeat the Gillam field trip on Saturday, June 1st to coincide with the BirdLR Birdathon and Bird Bash activities planned for June 1st.  The June ASCA field trip will definitely be June 1st somewhere in Pulaski County as part of the extended Birdathon.  You can still make donations to the ASCA Birdathon team between now and June 1st.  Go to the Audubon Arkansas website at ar.audubon.org for more information about the Birdathon activities and to donate.
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator

May 11

Gillam Park and the Little Rock Audubon Center (LRAC)

Little Rock, Pulaski Co.

 Join our field trip tocelebrate World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) and experience the excitement ofspring migration.  At least four thousanddifferent species of birds are moving from their wintering sites to theirsummer nesting grounds, which adds up to about 40% of the entire avianpopulation.  It will be a great day to beoutside enjoying nature!  This bird walkdoubles as one of the BirdLR Birdathon teams, a fun, friendly competition thatraises money for bird conservation in Arkansas, sponsored by Audubon Arkansas. theASCA team’s fundraising goal is to collect donations or pledges based on perspecies seen.  You can donate to the ASCAteam by going to ar.audubon.org/birdathon/asca.

 Meet at 7:00 a.m. in GillamPark at the second parking lot.  Gillamhas great habitat for spring warblers. There will be moderate walking on fairly level, but possibly muddytrails.  When finished at Gillam, we’lldrive to the LRAC and walk the wildlife observation trail.  Last, we’ll head to Industrial Harbor Roadand Terry Lock & Dam to look for Western Kingbirds, Bobolinks, and PaintedBuntings.  Bring water and snacks, thetrip can last into the early afternoon. Wear sturdy walking shoes or hiking boots. 

 Directions—GillamPark is in southeast Little Rock near the airport.  Address is 5300 Gillam Park Road, LittleRock.  Take I-30 West heading south fromLittle Rock.  Then exit onto I-440 goingtowards the airport.  Take Exit1-Springer Road.  At the bottom of theexit ramp, turn left onto Springer Road. Go approximately 1 mile to just past the LRAC.  Turn right onto Gillam Park Road.  Follow it into the park to the last parkinglot.


 

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Date: 5/10/19 7:36 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Lake Fayetteville - 5/9/2019
The woods were silent around the same time in Ft. Smith (Sunnymede).  Now we know where the birds were, Sandy :)
On Thursday, 9 May, 2019, 9:00:12 pm GMT-4, Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> wrote:

Spring migration was in full swing at Lake Fayetteville this morning/afternoon. I started at the environmental center and finished in the woods east of Veterans Park. 85 species were observed, including 20 warblers. FOS sightings included Acadian Flycatcher and Canada Warbler. A Painted Bunting was singing near the softball field. 2 Mississippi Kites flew over the environmental center. A male Ruby-throated Hummingbird performed a courtship display at the disc golf course.

Warblers - Louisiana Waterthrush (1), Black-and-white (4), Prothonotary (1), Tennessee (12), Orange-crowned (2), Nashville (8), Kentucky (1), Common Yellowthroat (5), American Redstart (10), Northern Parula (12), Magnolia (9), Blackburnian (2), Yellow (10), Chestnut-sided (5), Blackpoll (8), Palm (1), Yellow-rumped (5), Yellow-throated (4), Canada (1), Wilson's (9).

Flycatchers - Eastern Wood-Pewee (1), Acadian (1), Alder (1), Least (10), Eastern Phoebe (1), Great Crested (7), Eastern Kingbird (6), Scissor-tailed (1).

Vireos - White-eyed (7), Philadelphia (4), Warbling (1), Red-eyed (5).

Swallows - Northern Rough-winged (40), Purple Martin (1), Tree (5), Bank (1), Barn (50).

Miscellaneous - Yellow-billed Cuckoo (1), Chimney Swift (3), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (8), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Common Loon (1), Double-crested Cormorant (1), Mississippi Kite (2), Broad-winged Hawk (1), House Wren (3), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (17), Swainson's Thrush (7), Gray Catbird (6), Brown Thrasher (5), Cedar Waxwing (5), Chipping Sparrow (3), White-throated Sparrow (5), Eastern Towhee (1), Baltimore Oriole (2), Summer Tanager (2), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1), Indigo Bunting (7), Painted Bunting (1).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 5/10/19 6:46 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Terns
Thanks.

On Fri, May 10, 2019 at 7:15 AM Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
wrote:

> Black Terns this past Saturday on Beaver Lake, Benton County.
>
> --Joan
>
> On Fri, May 10, 2019 at 6:10 AM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
>> Has anybody seen Caspian or Black Terns yet?
>>
>> Sandy B.
>>
>

 

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Date: 5/10/19 5:40 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Killdeer brooding chicks in Centerton
An adult Killdeer was brooding three recently-hatched chicks yesterday in an infrequently traveled graveled road just east of Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. When I saw the adult and chicks, I pulled over and sat in the car and watched at distance. Temp = 55, 100% overcast, light north wind; felt cool for sure. At first there were 3 chicks under the adult, then two, then one, then off they all went to a shallow pool in the adjoining pasture. According to Birds of North America online: Both parents brood. Brooding is nearly constant during hatching in cool weather; decreases with increasing ambient temperature; replaced by shading during very hot weather. Frequent between foraging bouts during first 3 d after hatching, decreasing with chick age and increased ambient temperatures. Lenington (Lenington 1980<https://0-birdsna-org.library.uark.edu/Species-Account/bna/species/killde/references#REF13257>) reported continuous brooding of young in Minnesota for first few hours after hatching.


 

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Date: 5/10/19 5:15 am
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Terns
Black Terns this past Saturday on Beaver Lake, Benton County.

--Joan

On Fri, May 10, 2019 at 6:10 AM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> Has anybody seen Caspian or Black Terns yet?
>
> Sandy B.
>

 

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Date: 5/10/19 4:10 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Terns
Has anybody seen Caspian or Black Terns yet?

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 5/9/19 9:57 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Boyd Point today
John Redman and I saw a male Red-breasted Merganser and nine Fulvous
Whistling Ducks at Boyd Point today.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 5/9/19 9:10 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - May 9
It was partly cloudy, warm, and a little windy on the bird survey today. 82
species were found. Migrant passerines were in low numbers today but I
managed to find a few warblers. The heronry on Pintail Lake is growing and
there are now Great Egrets sitting on nests mixed in with the nesting Cattle
Egrets and Anhingas and at least one pair of Snowy Egrets have a nest.
Little-blue Herons have moved in and appear to be interested in nesting too.
White Ibis have just arrived and they are checking out the heronry also.
This heronry is going to be huge this year. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 30

Canada Goose - 3

Wood Duck - 4

Gadwall - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 6

Neotropic Cormorant - 14

Anhinga - 120

Least Bittern - 3

Great-blue Heron - 3

Great Egret - 29 (many sitting on nests in the heronry.)

Snowy Egret - 8

Little-blue Heron - 26

Cattle Egret - 400

Green Heron - 4

White Ibis - 31

White-faced Ibis - 1

Black Vulture - 16

Turkey Vulture - 13

Mississippi Kite - 12

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Virginia Rail - 1

Purple Gallinule - 40

Common Gallinule - 46

American Coot - 1

Killdeer - 1

Spotted Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 4

Mourning Dove - 9

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 2

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Alder Flycatcher - 2

Least Flycatcher - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 3

Eastern Kingbird - 18

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 12

Bell's Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 3

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 2

Fish Crow - 2

Tree Swallow - 9

Cliff Swallow - 3

Barn Swallow - 16

Carolina Chickadee - 1

Tufted Titmouse - 7

Carolina Wren - 10

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 11

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Wood Thrush - 1

Gray Catbird - 3

Cedar Waxwing - 5

Tennessee Warbler - 1

Northern Parula - 2

Yellow Warbler - 4

Magnolia Warbler - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Prairie Warbler - 1

Blackpoll Warbler - 1

Black-and-White Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 7

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 13

Yellow-breasted Chat - 8

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 5

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 19

Indigo Bunting - 20

Painted Bunting - 6

Dickcissel - 30

Red-winged Blackbird - 26

Common Grackle - 28

Brown-headed Cowbird - 8

Orchard Oriole - 4

Baltimore Oriole - 2





Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Orange Bluet

Common Green Darner

Cyrano Darner

Baskettail species

Jade Clubtail

Eastern Pondhawk

Great-blue Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Broad-banded Watersnake

Broad-headed Skink

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

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Date: 5/9/19 8:46 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: An eagle crashed through her living room window in Kodiak. Then she had to shoo it out of the house.
This link is to an article about one very lucky bird given the circumstances:

https://tinyurl.com/y4v45yqa

It was a little more than 3 weeks ago that we had the double fledging of wood ducks, 15 from one nest box and 17 from the other. We still have adult woodies hanging around our pond with up to 7 at one time having been observed, almost always more males than females. There is some evidence one or both nest boxes may once again be in use. While we are not seeing daily activity at either box, we have observed adult females in or around both boxes. In past years we have had fledglings as late as mid-June so it's easily within the realm of possibility our two nest boxes may produce even more young before nesting season is over.

And after successfully fledging their five young from the nest outside our front door, our resident phoebes are working on four more. I'm always amazed at the size of their tiny white eggs.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,

Barry Haas
 

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Date: 5/9/19 7:44 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Another day
Had MAJOR dental surgery a couple days ago and it was/is REALLY hurting
today. I really should have stayed home and rested but migration was
calling and my daughter was pushing so, well we just had to. Had to go
track down those stilt sandpipers at the fish hatchery in Centerton.
Well, first, this morning I was out birding the yard and, I may have
been hearing things. I was certain I heard a connecticut warbler. But
the song was far enough off I may have been hearing part of a song. If
something is FAR away it will often sound like something else. Maybe I
was dreaming but it sure sounded like one. I wasn't about to go through
the woods and through people's yard to track down the sound so I left
that be. Mostly the regular birds in the yard with the highlight being
some good long looks at a Tennessee warbler.

After I dropped my wife off at work today I stopped at home to pick up
two of the kids. I'm glad I did things that way because I was able to
see the post from Joe Neal about the *lazuli bunting*. When we got out
there it was raining pretty good but we waited around and, we didn't
miss out. It's a good distance from the road so looks and pictures
weren't fantastic but it was still an awesome bird to see. I THOUGHT I
saw one last spring just down the road from me but it disappeared
quickly and I didn't stick around long enough to see if it would show
itself again. I waited some but, if it was indeed there last year it
stayed hidden from me after that. I just know I saw a small blue bird
that had white below. Whether it was actually a lazuli or a leucistic
indigo I might not ever know. There's was no mistaking this bird today
with the wing bars and the breast that makes you kind of think of a tiny
bluebird.
My daughter kept watching a female bird that seemed to follow it around.
Sure enough, it was following it. My scope is really only useful at 20x
but, that's better than binoculars so we put that on it. Tried to take
some pictures and I don't think it will show enough detail but I sure
saw what looked like faint wing bars. So, maybe. There might just be a
pair there.

Over at the hatchery we got some of the birds everyone else has been
seeing there lately... If my jaw wasn't hurting so much I'd elaborate
some more... but, I did have to write about another bird there. I
hesitate because it was heard only and I've reported enough interesting
birds this spring to create even more doubt I'm sure. It's been a GOOD
spring with lots of activity and I've been out in it more this year than
last I think. Seems that way anyway.
So we were at the left middle upper pond at the hatchery that's
drained... and we were scanning the shorebirds. It's the most activity
I've seen there in a while, as far as variety goes especially. It wasn't
an abundance of shorebirds but it was nice. Anyway, that is when we
heard it...  The bird I thought that MAYBE I heard in my yard earlier
that day. *Connecticut warbler*.
My daughter heard it and kind of joked that it was one... But I told
her, no, I think it actually is. It sang at least twice from one spot in
the tree line on the south side of the biggest upper pond. I wish we
hurried down there a little faster because before we got that far I
heard it sing a little further west down that tree line. We used
playback from the Merlin app and the song was identical, clear as day.
We were really really excited but then, really disappointed as we didn't
keep hearing it. Really disappointed because neither of us have ever
seen one and even more disappointed because for some of these birds I'm
going to need more than sound to have people believe me I'm afraid. This
was a perfect match to the first song on the Merlin app.
Migration, every year, excites and frustrates me about equally
sometimes. Like that kiskadee that was in my yard for just a moment and,
my daughter that was standing right next to me never saw it. Happened
too quickly. She heard it but, that's not good enough for her. I can't
blame her for a bird like that one. But migration does this to me every
year. Some birds are gone before I can get a picture... Some stick
around for a few minutes, hours, or days while others are gone even
before I can look at them. Hello... and then, okay, good bye then.  Not
a dull moment this migration. There's still a few migrants that we've
seen other years and haven't found yet this year. The black-throated
green is the most surprising. The last few springs we've seen them every
year right here in our yard. So far, well they've probably stopped by
just when we weren't looking I imagine.
My head is spinning... partially from the pain in my jaw but also from
all the birds flying around up there in my head.
EVERY single year I wonder about all the birds that fly over without
being noticed... not just by me but by anyone. LOTS of birds can pass
through the whole state without us ever knowing. Keep looking up. You're
going to miss some but the more you look, the more you'll see... that's
a promise.

Daniel Mason



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Date: 5/9/19 6:00 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 5/9/2019
Spring migration was in full swing at Lake Fayetteville this morning/afternoon. I started at the environmental center and finished in the woods east of Veterans Park. 85 species were observed, including 20 warblers. FOS sightings included Acadian Flycatcher and Canada Warbler. A Painted Bunting was singing near the softball field. 2 Mississippi Kites flew over the environmental center. A male Ruby-throated Hummingbird performed a courtship display at the disc golf course.

Warblers - Louisiana Waterthrush (1), Black-and-white (4), Prothonotary (1), Tennessee (12), Orange-crowned (2), Nashville (8), Kentucky (1), Common Yellowthroat (5), American Redstart (10), Northern Parula (12), Magnolia (9), Blackburnian (2), Yellow (10), Chestnut-sided (5), Blackpoll (8), Palm (1), Yellow-rumped (5), Yellow-throated (4), Canada (1), Wilson's (9).

Flycatchers - Eastern Wood-Pewee (1), Acadian (1), Alder (1), Least (10), Eastern Phoebe (1), Great Crested (7), Eastern Kingbird (6), Scissor-tailed (1).

Vireos - White-eyed (7), Philadelphia (4), Warbling (1), Red-eyed (5).

Swallows - Northern Rough-winged (40), Purple Martin (1), Tree (5), Bank (1), Barn (50).

Miscellaneous - Yellow-billed Cuckoo (1), Chimney Swift (3), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (8), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Common Loon (1), Double-crested Cormorant (1), Mississippi Kite (2), Broad-winged Hawk (1), House Wren (3), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (17), Swainson's Thrush (7), Gray Catbird (6), Brown Thrasher (5), Cedar Waxwing (5), Chipping Sparrow (3), White-throated Sparrow (5), Eastern Towhee (1), Baltimore Oriole (2), Summer Tanager (2), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1), Indigo Bunting (7), Painted Bunting (1).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 5/9/19 12:09 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LAZULI BUNTING in Centerton-Vaughn Area
A male Lazuli Bunting was foraging in the silage pit of the Anglin family dairy farm in the Centerton-Vaughn area this morning (east end of Anglin Road). At least 5 Indigo Buntings were also foraging, along with a Northern Waterthrush, White-crowned Sparrows (4-5), a green Painted Bunting, and at one point, also a Swainsons Thrush. Ill put some photos on my facebook page. This observation falls within our previous six or so Northwest Arkansas City records, all within the period May 2-17. My assumption is that these Lazuli occurrences involved birds occasionally arriving as part of the Indigo migration.


 

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Date: 5/9/19 10:36 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Bob Kidd Lake?
I'm driving my wife down to Lincoln in a bit so I can have the car and
bird around Centerton today. Was looking at the maps to see if there are
any good spots/hotspots down that way just in case. I don't think I'm
going to take the time to check it out today but saw Bob Kidd lake
between Lincoln and Prairie Grove. Looks like it could be a good spot
but, there are no eBird records since 2016. Does the lake have public
access still? Kind of curious why there are no more recent reports than
that.
I'm not sure if/when I'll ever check it out but I'd sure hate to go down
that far to find something I can't get to. If it's still open there it
might be a good spot for waterfowl in the winter?

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/9/19 9:28 am
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Birding 101, sort of
Hey Dottie. Here’s a submission. Edit as you need to.

Thanks for your faithful work!

Chuck Anderson

Birding 101, Sort of...

Ruth and Chuck Anderson took an 11 day trip through Texas. We birded the whole way, but especially at Lost Maples State Wildlife Area near San Antonio and the north end of Lake Buchanan near Burnet, Texas. I thought we might be able to see a hundred species, and on our last night at at Buchanan, we had 99. We left the house where we stayed to take Bluebonnet pictures, and as we pulled up to an especially radiant patch, we heard the gobble gobbles of wild turkeys, a male and two females who flew across the road in front of us. 100 species!

Later, as we sat on the patio by the lake, watching the last light fade, our FOS Green Heron glided across the water and landed on a dock support, where it performed a dramatic and comical balance beam act in the fading light of a perfect spring day. Birding 101 indeed.

Some highlights of the trip included male and female Vermilion Flycatchers, Dozens of Golden Cheeked Warblers, Black Capped Vireos, Warbling Vireos, a Hutton's Vireo, five Swainson's Hawks (one dark morph), an Olive Sparrow, a Lazuli Bunting, Crested Caracaras, lots of warbler migrants. a Golden Fronted Woodpecker, Chihuahuan Ravens, Black-throated Sparrows, and twelve Wood Duck chicks exiting a nesting box and making their way to the lake.

Not Arkansas birding, but if anyone is looking for a great trip in South Central Texas, Lost Maples is the place. Excellent resident volunteer bird hosts, tough hiking, crazy good birding.

Chuck Anderson
 

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Date: 5/9/19 7:05 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: AAS News of Members


Dear AAS members and fellow birders.

I know several of you have taken
recent birding trips out of town. Please share a short paragraph of your
adventures/sightings with your fellow Arkansas Audubon Society
members.

Please submit to me (off list) by May 19th.

Thanks,

Dottie
Arkansas Birds
News of Members Editor

 

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Date: 5/8/19 4:51 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: “RED-BACKED SANDPIPERS” AT CENTERTON HATCHERY
Old name for Dunlin = Red-backed Sandpiper. There were four this afternoon at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton, part of a flock of about 50 shorebirds. These 4 were just immaculate jet black bellies and red-red backs. Others present: Killdeer, Spotted Sandpiper, Semipalmated Sandpiper (~30), Least Sandpiper (2), White-rumped Sandpiper (10), Stilt Sandpiper (2), Wilsons Phalarope (1). This is the only drained pond as of today. Its in the upper area of the hatchery. Park in the lot, access via the walk-in gate, and hoof it up the hill.

With all the recent rain, including today, there is an extensively flooded field with more shorebirds along Kimmel Road Immediately east of the hatchery. Its just a perfect playa. This afternoon there were Pectoral Sandpipers (23), Lesser Yellowlegs (2), Wilsons Phalarope (2), Spotted Sandpiper (1), plus Blue-winged Teal (7). In the drier areas of the pasture, among cattle and other blackbird species, Yellow-headed Blackbirds (3).


 

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Date: 5/8/19 10:55 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Audubon's BirdLR Rescheduled
Due to the threat of severe weather this Saturday, Audubon Arkansas's BirdLR has been postponed to June 1, which is when the Bird Search Scavenger Hunt teams will be out, and all Scavenger Hunt and Birdathon teams will convene for the Bird Bash. I've given the Birdathon teams the flexibility to pick their own date between May 11 and June 1 so as to accommodate their own schedules and the weather. You can still show your support for a team by making a donation or pledge http://ar.audubon.org/conservation/birdathon


So now there is more time to register your own Bird Search Scavenger Hunt team if you want to join in the fun http://ar.audubon.org/conservation/bird-search-scavenger-hunt.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 5/8/19 9:00 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Re: Unknown bird call
Sounds like a Tennessee Warbler.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR





Date: Tue, 7 May 2019 19:59:51 +0000

From: Glenn <inkmei...>

Subject: Unknown bird call



I was at Cherry Bend Rec Area yesterday (6 May 2019). We saw or heard
Cerulian, Worm-eating and Black-and-white Warblers. There were a few
vireos. We heard some thrushes singing pretty. And we heard another bird,
quite a bit. I posted this call on the Facebook bird ID page and got no
replies. I used the BirdNET app to record the bird a couple times. Once it
called it a Blackpoll Warbler and the second time it called it a
Prothonotary Warbler. I don't believe it is either. Does anybody know what
this bird is? It's probably something mundane. Thanks for listening for
me.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/134431655@N06/47746504022/in/dateposted-public/

Glenn WyattCabot






 

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Date: 5/8/19 7:41 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: One advantage of nesting on a power-tower






https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=sUKoU_1557167445


 

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Date: 5/8/19 6:47 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA May Field Trip & BirdLR Birdathon
This Saturday is the 2nd Annual BirdLR Birdathon, a fun day of activities, birds, and an important fundraiser for Audubon Arkansas.  The ASCA field trip is one of the birding teams participating in the Birdathon, which encompasses all of Pulaski County.  Our spring migrants are arriving daily and the Western Kingbirds have already been spotted!  More details about the trip are below along with a link to an easy way to donate in support of our birds and local conservation efforts, plus more information about the Birdathon and planned activities.  Everyone is welcome to join the field trip, you don't have to been a member of ASCA.  Please feel free to contact me off-list if you have any questions.  Keep an eye on the weather and bring a rain jacket, there is a possibility of rain showers.  See you Saturday!
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock/Pulaski Co.

May 11

Gillam Park and the Little Rock Audubon Center (LRAC)

Little Rock, Pulaski Co.

 Join our field trip tocelebrate World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD) and experience the excitement ofspring migration.  At least four thousanddifferent species of birds are moving from their wintering sites to theirsummer nesting grounds, which adds up to about 40% of the entire avianpopulation.  It will be a great day to beoutside enjoying nature!  This bird walkdoubles as one of the BirdLR Birdathon teams, a fun, friendly competition thatraises money for bird conservation in Arkansas, sponsored by Audubon Arkansas. theASCA team’s fundraising goal is to collect donations or pledges based on perspecies seen.  You can donate to the ASCAteam by going to ar.audubon.org/birdathon/asca.

 Meet at 7:00 a.m. in GillamPark at the second parking lot.  Gillamhas great habitat for spring warblers. There will be moderate walking on fairly level, but possibly muddytrails.  When finished at Gillam, we’lldrive to the LRAC and walk the wildlife observation trail.  Last, we’ll head to Industrial Harbor Roadand Terry Lock & Dam to look for Western Kingbirds, Bobolinks, and PaintedBuntings.  Bring water and snacks, thetrip can last into the early afternoon. Wear sturdy walking shoes or hiking boots. 

 Directions—GillamPark is in southeast Little Rock near the airport.  Address is 5300 Gillam Park Road, LittleRock.  Take I-30 West heading south fromLittle Rock.  Then exit onto I-440 goingtowards the airport.  Take Exit1-Springer Road.  At the bottom of theexit ramp, turn left onto Springer Road. Go approximately 1 mile to just past the LRAC.  Turn right onto Gillam Park Road.  Follow it into the park to the last parkinglot.


 

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Date: 5/8/19 6:28 am
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Greater Roadrunners
We have had an influx of roadrunners. We have a breeding pair at our place. My daughter and I saw another about 3 miles from my home and this morning my coworker announced she too has seen one.

According to my friends who work in the oil fields and service the wells have noted seeing more than usual.

Kelly Chitwood
Somewhere in the country near El Dorado, Arkansas
Where the coyote doesn’t catch the roadrunner.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/7/19 3:42 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Unknown bird call
I have received replies from several people saying this is a Tennessee Warbler.  Not a mundane bird in my book.  Thanks a lot to those who have replied.  Comments were made also that it didn't sound like the whole call, so I went back to my BirdNet app and found more of the call.  The first part was very faint and I didn't originally hear that part, but it is there.  If anybody is interested here is a link to the slightly longer file, it's still only 3 seconds.  Thanks so much for all the help on this one!  I have seen the Tennessee Warbler once before and got poor photos, but I don't think I've ever eBirded it, so kind of like a new bird for my records.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/134431655@N06/47010346534/in/photostream/
Glenn WyattCabot

On Tuesday, May 7, 2019, 2:59:51 PM CDT, Glenn <inkmei...> wrote:

I was at Cherry Bend Rec Area yesterday (6 May 2019).  We saw or heard Cerulian, Worm-eating and Black-and-white Warblers.  There were a few vireos.  We heard some thrushes singing pretty.  And we heard another bird, quite a bit.  I posted this call on the Facebook bird ID page and got no replies.  I used the BirdNET app to record the bird a couple times.  Once it called it a Blackpoll Warbler and the second time it called it a Prothonotary Warbler.  I don't believe it is either.  Does anybody know what this bird is?  It's probably something mundane.  Thanks for listening for me.  http://www.flickr.com/photos/134431655@N06/47746504022/in/dateposted-public/
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 5/7/19 1:39 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: FOS
An interesting Happening at Birdsview Solarium.
A Common Yellowthroat just hopped up to my widow sill, starred at me for a few seconds and was gone! Didnt even stay long enough for me to say howdy! First Ive ever seen in my yard.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 5/7/19 1:00 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Unknown bird call
I was at Cherry Bend Rec Area yesterday (6 May 2019).  We saw or heard Cerulian, Worm-eating and Black-and-white Warblers.  There were a few vireos.  We heard some thrushes singing pretty.  And we heard another bird, quite a bit.  I posted this call on the Facebook bird ID page and got no replies.  I used the BirdNET app to record the bird a couple times.  Once it called it a Blackpoll Warbler and the second time it called it a Prothonotary Warbler.  I don't believe it is either.  Does anybody know what this bird is?  It's probably something mundane.  Thanks for listening for me.  http://www.flickr.com/photos/134431655@N06/47746504022/in/dateposted-public/
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 5/6/19 4:27 pm
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Swallowtailed Kite at Prairie Creek east of Rogers on Highway 12 at 6:20 pm
It was flying with a mixed flock of at least 28 Common Nighthawks, and 10
Mississippi Kites. I have photos.

--Joan

 

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Date: 5/6/19 12:36 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: FRANKLIN’S GULL AND HARRIS’S SPARROW May 6, 2019
Heavy rain last night into early this morning produced flooding in the former prairie areas in western Benton County, including fields south of Centerton. All kinds of fields become playas, and at this time of year, are well-attended by northbound shorebirds. Of course we have made profound changes in these critical habitats, but there's no denying nature and the birds find a way. First bird I saw was not a shorebird, but instead an immaculate Franklins Gull, standing out in a flooded field with around 300 or so shorebirds. These are all rough counts: Spotted Sandpiper (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (~200), White-rumped Sandpiper, Bairds Sandpiper (3), Pectoral Sandpiper (~50), Dunlin (1), Stilt Sandpiper (1), Buff-breasted Sandpiper (2), Long-billed Dowitcher (2), Wilsons Phalarope (12), and probably 50 or so peeps that I didnt try to identify. (Jacque Brown was there, too. Maybe she found some others). This was the best spot overall. I found shorebirds at temporary playas in 3-4 other places, including Highfill and Siloam Springs, with similar results several species but mainly Lesser Yellowlegs. A Swainsons Hawk flew over at corner of Anglin and Vaughn, just southwest of the Centerton state fish hatchery. One of the last birds of the morning was a Harriss Sparrow near Chesney Prairie Natural Area. Black head, black throat, black even around the eye an immaculate bookend with the Franklins Gull when this morning was just at beginning.


 

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Date: 5/6/19 11:44 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: 58 species in Sunnymede this morning
I too had great numbers at Sunnymede. Missed you. Went to Ruth Armstrong
first. Good stuff there too. Alas, no Golden-winged.

Ovenbirds at both locations.
Magnolias, Redstarts, Chestnut-sided, Nashville, Black and White, Yellow,
Common Yellowthroat, Philadelphia Vireo, Wilson’s, lots of Least
Flycatchers. Wish I could have stayed longer. Saw only one bobolink. It was
singing loudly from the top of a tall tree.

I also rescued two dogs. And...found the owners.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith

On Mon, May 6, 2019 at 9:44 AM Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Nice cache of 58 species this morning in Sunnymede, including
> Golden-winged Warblers and Bobolinks.
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55906612
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith
>

 

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Date: 5/6/19 11:40 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Sunday, May 5, 2019
It was wonderful to be home again from the barrens of suburbia, drinking in
Nature's exquisite diversity at Ninestone Land Trust.



Two spectacular Red-headed Woodpeckers at a time ate from the same block of
suet. They did this side-by-side throughout the day. Feeders offered views
of Yellow-throated Warblers, White-breasted and Red-breasted Nuthatches on
suet, a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Indigo Buntings, 2 males and 1
female Baltimore Oriole, and 1 female Orchard Oriole eating grape jelly out
of orange shells nearby. A male Eastern Towhee sang between the house and
the stream, later hunting at the edge of the yard, so there must be a nest
very nearby.



The falls are roaring with all the wonderful rain we have received of late.
Serviceberry Trees [Amelanchier arborea] form fruits. Fragrant native
Fringe Trees [Chionanthus virginicus] and Red Buckeyes [Aesculus pavia] are
blooming now, along with a native Coral Trumpet Honeysuckle [Lonicera
sempervirens], all visited by Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. There are usually
around 24 hummers attending the three sugar water feeders until evening
when they are mobbed by too many birds to count, easily over four dozen of
them swarming and hovering, perching and preening in the nearby Ironwood
and red Japanese Maples. Blue Star Amsonia and Echinacea blooming in the
terraces below also provide hummingbirds with nectar and tiny insects.



Warblers obvious to me on Sunday were Kentucky, Ovenbird (I also had Don's
stereo experience of these two along the trail) Yellow-throated (sang all
day long), Louisiana Waterthrush (several territories along creek),
Northern Parulas (also sang all day long), Black-and-White, Wilson's,
Blue-winged (several), and the first Yellow-breasted Chat for the season.

A mystery unseen warbler repeatedly sang, "warble-warble-warble...bzz-bzz".
Any ideas?



Up along the bluff line the mated pair of Black Vultures sunned themselves
on a graceful dead tree growing in front of their new nest grotto a few
hundred yards north of the usual home. Red-shouldered Hawks and Red-tailed
hawks soared in kettles with Turkey Vultures. Rough-winged Swallows looped
toward the bluff face and out again over fields.



Along the trails False Dandelion, sedges, and Orange Puccoon are blooming,
Barbara's Buttons, Fame Flower, Widow's Cross, and Lance-leaf Coreopsis are
just now forming flower buds, while Jack-in-the-Pulpit and Green Dragon as
well as all the Milkweed varieties are sending up leaf stalks, some wearing
Monarch eggs. Here as elsewhere this spring the Pawpaw trees are loaded
with blossoms.



The Red-eared Slider tried to sun on a log mostly submerged by the rains in
the Otter Pond and a Snapping Turtle surveyed the bank of the creek just
below the house and finally hid beneath some roots. I wondered if she was
looking for a not too steep place to lay her eggs. Many species of frogs
were singing from ponds, stream edges, trees and brush.



Butterflies emerged once the sun came out yesterday afternoon. A few of
those were Spicebush, Pipevine, Black, and Tiger Swallowtails, Comma, and
we saw one Monarch floating toward the savanna.



First-of-Season arrivals on Sunday, May 5th:

Northern Rough-winged Swallows (later than usually seen)

Yellow-breasted Chat

Orchard Oriole (female only)

Olive-sided Flycatcher (clearly repeating, "Quick, Quick, Free Beer!")





Judith

Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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Date: 5/6/19 10:24 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: anyone in Benton county this morning?
I've been watching eBird reports just to see if I NEEDED to get out
there. All those shorebirds flying over have me kind of antsy. If I had
to guess they were all greater and lesser yellowlegs but I wasn't 100%
sure and certainly couldn't rule out other birds mixed in. Oh the
anxiety migration causes sometimes. Part of me wants to go but it would
mean over an hour extra driving if I brought my wife to and from work.
And my oldest is struggling with the decision as well. They're
homeschooled and still have stuff to do. Our schedule is flexible and
all but she wants to get her work done. So, somehow she's leaning
towards being responsible and not going out today.  Maybe that's best.
It's just one of those things where I'd hate it if I did all that
driving and just found the usual birds... but would also hate it if I
didn't go and something amazing shows up. Some of the most amazing ones
often don't stay a whole day so chasing is very hit or miss after the fact.

Anyone out in the Centerton area this morning, seeing anything I need to
go find before it's gone? I have about 50 minutes to make up my mind one
way or another.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/6/19 7:44 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: 58 species in Sunnymede this morning
Nice cache of 58 species this morning in Sunnymede, including Golden-winged Warblers and Bobolinks.https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55906612

KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 5/6/19 7:40 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Get out...
Two parts... Guess I'll start with the most important...

1. Get out there... NOW. We've had a TON of birds in and over our yard
today. I get frustrated when I can't ID them because they're too high
and I either can't hear them or don't know their flight calls. I've
gotten used to the dickcissel flight call as they migrate over our yard
each spring. But others, it's just torture seeing SO many tine birds fly
over and not stopping to say hello. Almost as frustrating as the ones
that actually land in our yard, not that far from us, but disappear into
a thick green jungle and remain silent. LOTS of warblers that wish to
remain anonymous.
One bird started my day but that's part two...  For part one we mostly
had some of the usuals but my daughter and I, at different times(not the
same time as each other) heard what we were certain was a veery. It was
singing from off in the distance of my neighbor's yard. More
importantly... over the course of an hour we had *two BIG groups(40-50
each, or so) of shorebirds* fly over. Silent of course and, didn't get a
picture and I'm not good with IDing shorebirds from below. They were
headed due north which I don't think will take them to Centerton... and,
there's no northerly wind to keep anything here so they may be out of
the state already(what's flying over as I'm in the house typing this?) 
But, if I'm seeing that much movement right over my house, I'm thinking
today is a GOOD day to be out there. So if you can, get out there. I'm
not sure how much rain we got last night but we definitely had some
storms. I'm hoping there will be some flooded fields... and I REALLY
"need" a second car so I don't have to drive my wife to work(35 minutes
one way) in order to get out there this afternoon. I'm not sure if I'm
going to make it out there or not but the activity we're seeing sure has
me dreaming...

2. Almost don't want to say this as I don't want to sound like a
lunatic... again... I went outside this morning around 7:50, now I wish
I was up earlier. Moments after I stepped out I heard a black-throated
blue warbler. One time. I froze. I'm familiar with this sound because I
often compare it to the sort of pattern of a white-crowned sparrow. Not
quite the same, and my daughter sure doesn't hear it the way I do, but
that's how I remember it. So I heard this buzzy song and stopped... then
I got on the phone. Instead of playing sound files right away I called
into the house and had my daughter sent out. I never heard the bird
again. I ended up trying out all the buzzy warblers... blue-winged,
prairie, golden-winged, black-throated green, etc...  No more buzzy
sounds from the yard. :(
This is one of those things where, I'm certain of what I heard but I
know if I report it to eBird it likely wont be "confirmed" as it's just
a single song and no visual confirmation.
I end up "mad" at the birds for this sometimes. When I'm with my
daughter and this sort of thing happens I'll be saying(often) I wish all
the birds in the yard would fly to a tree in front of me and pose, then
they can go on their way.  And don't get me started on how often I'm
asking a few more friendly birds to just BE QUIET.  Like when you're
listening for something interesting and an indigoe bunting is on the
power lines DIRECTLY over your head. Thanks buddy.  HA.
Anyway... believe it or not...  most interesting sound of the day...

We got really good looks at a female blackpoll.  That was exciting. We
also have this one cardinal we call a scissor-tailed cardinal as it
looks like it has just two tail feathers and it's funny to watch...
except, it's always getting chased. we watched it getting chased for
like 20 minutes this morning. Every day, it's getting chased. Not sure
what's going on with that.

Hopefully this is just the start of a good day.

From Siloam Springs

Daniel Mason



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Date: 5/5/19 8:19 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Red Phalarope, Boyd Point WTP
Gabrielle Hargrove has photographed a Red Phalarope at Boyd Point Wastewater
Treatment Plant in Pine Bluff. This is only the second spring record for the
state. The first was by Mike Mlodinow in May 1988.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47888028

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 5/5/19 6:50 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Bobolinks, Atkins Bottoms, Conway County near Morrilton
I found one Bobolink on Frazier Pike this afternoon right before the "hump". Did not see it when I returned from down the road. David RayNLR
On Sunday, May 5, 2019, 8:41:09 PM CDT, Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> wrote:

#yiv3467001016 #yiv3467001016 --html {background-color:transparent;}#yiv3467001016 body {color:#333;line-height:150%;margin:0;}#yiv3467001016 .yiv3467001016ms-outlook-ios-reference-expand {display:block;color:#999;padding:20px 0px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv3467001016 .yiv3467001016ms-outlook-ios-availability-container {max-width:500px;margin:auto;padding:12px 15px 15px 15px;border:1px solid #C7E0F4;}#yiv3467001016 #yiv3467001016 .yiv3467001016ms-outlook-ios-availability-delete-button {width:25px;min-height:25px;}#yiv3467001016 #yiv3467001016ms-outlook-ios-main-container {margin:0 0 0 0;margin-top:120;padding:8;}#yiv3467001016 #yiv3467001016ms-outlook-ios-content-container {padding:0;padding-top:12;padding-bottom:20;}#yiv3467001016 .yiv3467001016ms-outlook-ios-mention {color:#333;background-color:#f1f1f1;padding:0 2px 0 2px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv3467001016 .yiv3467001016ms-outlook-ios-mention-external {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#fdf7e7;}#yiv3467001016 .yiv3467001016ms-outlook-ios-mention-external-clear-design {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#f1f1f1;}#yiv3467001016 I could see where that many Bobolinks would make one late for a meeting. Mom and I searched Frazier Pike and Harper Road (Little Rock) this morning and came up empty, zero, nada, none. Now I know where they all were.
On the other hand, Eastern Kingbirds, and Dickcissals were everywhere. On Harper Rd alone we counted 13 kingbirds in one spot.
Dottie Little Rock 


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Date: 5/5/19 8:25 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Bobolinks, Atkins Bottoms, Conway County near Morrilton
Atkins Bottoms from the row crop fields south of Blackwell to the feedlot outside Morrilton was hopping with birds this weekend. When Bill Burnham, Donna Haynes, & I came through on Willow Bend Rd/Cherokee Rd in the afternoon hundreds of Bobolinks were in the grassy fields & pastures. They gave us quite a show. Painted Buntings & Lark Sparrows were common.
We arrived back on Petit Mountain late because Bobolinks.
Cindy FLittle Rock

Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and any attachment(s) is the property of the State of Arkansas and may be protected by state and federal laws governing disclosure of private information. It is intended solely for the use of the entity to which this email is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that reading, copying or distributing this transmission is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. The sender has not waived any applicable privilege by sending the accompanying transmission. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender, and then please delete and destroy all copies and attachments.

 

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Date: 5/5/19 6:41 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Subject: Re: Bobolinks, Atkins Bottoms, Conway County near Morrilton
I could see where that many Bobolinks would make one late for a meeting. Mom and I searched Frazier Pike and Harper Road (Little Rock) this morning and came up empty, zero, nada, none. Now I know where they all were.

On the other hand, Eastern Kingbirds, and Dickcissals were everywhere. On Harper Rd alone we counted 13 kingbirds in one spot.

Dottie
Little Rock



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Date: 5/5/19 8:25 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Bobolinks, Atkins Bottoms, Conway County near Morrilton

Atkins Bottoms from the row crop fields south of Blackwell to the feedlot outside Morrilton was hopping with birds this weekend. When Bill Burnham, Donna Haynes, & I came through on Willow Bend Rd/Cherokee Rd in the afternoon hundreds of Bobolinks were in the grassy fields & pastures. They gave us quite a show. Painted Buntings & Lark Sparrows were common.

We arrived back on Petit Mountain late because Bobolinks.

Cindy F
Little Rock



Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and any attachment(s) is the property of the State of Arkansas and may be protected by state and federal laws governing disclosure of private information. It is intended solely for the use of the entity to which this email is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that reading, copying or distributing this transmission is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. The sender has not waived any applicable privilege by sending the accompanying transmission. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender, and then please delete and destroy all copies and attachments.

 

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Date: 5/5/19 6:25 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Bobolinks, Atkins Bottoms, Conway County near Morrilton
Atkins Bottoms from the row crop fields south of Blackwell to the feedlot outside Morrilton was hopping with birds this weekend. When Bill Burnham, Donna Haynes, & I came through on Willow Bend Rd/Cherokee Rd in the afternoon hundreds of Bobolinks were in the grassy fields & pastures. They gave us quite a show. Painted Buntings & Lark Sparrows were common.

We arrived back on Petit Mountain late because Bobolinks.

Cindy F
Little Rock


 

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Date: 5/5/19 3:58 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: nest?
LaDonna and I just checked it out. It’s an Osprey nest. That is at least three Osprey nests that I know of on the main part of the lake. I believe there is another nest across from Cabin Creek Rev Area.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone

> On May 5, 2019, at 11:05 AM, Mary Ann King <office...> wrote:
>
> I have noticed a nest on an electric transmission tower by the causeway on Lake Dardanelle just beside Hwy 64 and was wondering what it is.
>
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>

 

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Date: 5/5/19 2:40 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Gillam Park this Saturday
I would highly recommend that if you are planning on birding Gillam Park this coming Saturday with Audubon, to stop by Walmart, a sporting goods store or Amazon and pick up a net to cover your head and face from the buffalo gnats or you will be spending more time swatting gnats than watching birds.
David Ray
NLR
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/5/19 2:18 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Fwd: MOWA sightings
I received this request from Dr. Jay Pitocchelli.
Don did not record the Mourning Warbler while on his run, but some of you
may have done so.
If you do have a recording of a MOWA, please contact him.
Thanks,
Judith


On Sun, May 5, 2019 at 7:47 AM Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch...> wrote:

> Judy
>
> Was anyone able to get a recording of the Mourning Warbler? I am
> studying songs of migrants to better understand their migratory movements.
> If you hear any more or could you please spread the word, that would be
> great. A SmartPhone recording is good enough for this project.
>
>
>
> Dr. Jay Pitocchelli
>
> Professor, Biology Department
>
> Saint Anselm College
>
> Manchester, NH 03102
>
> Voice: 603 641 7397
>
> <jpitocch...>
>
>
>

 

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Date: 5/5/19 2:18 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Centerton/Highfill area - 5/5/2019
I visited a couple of locations in the Centerton area this morning/afternoon with Peter Shaffer. There weren't many shorebirds around but we still saw/heard some good birds. 88 species observed.

Highlights included a male Painted Bunting (FOS) on Holloway Road, Harris's Sparrows (2) at the silage pits on Anglin Road, a singing Bell's Vireo on Adams Road (near silage pits) and an Alder Flycatcher (FOS) at a small woodlot on Malone Road (where it intersects with Digby Road).

The Alder Flycatcher was part of a flock of warblers (10 sp.)/thrushes/flycatchers etc. that were feeding on insects at a frenetic pace. This was a very interesting spot with a flooded grove on one side of the road and a fairly dense woodlot (absolutely bursting with bird activity in the midday heat) on the other side.

Moberly Pond - Yellow Warbler (4). https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55839438

Charlie Craig Fish Hatchery - Blue-winged Teal (2), Least Sandpiper (2), Spotted Sandpiper (8), Forster's Tern (1), Least Flycatcher (1), Cliff Swallow (1), White-crowned Sparrow (3), Savannah Sparrow (6), Common Yellowthroat (4), Yellow Warbler (3), Indigo Bunting (3), Dickcissel (1). https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55845474

Kimmel Road - Blue-winged Teal (8), Pectoral Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (4), Greater Yellowlegs (2), Eastern Wood-Pewee (1), Great Crested Flycatcher (3), Warbling Vireo (1), House Wren (1), Savannah Sparrow (2), Yellow-breasted Chat (1), Tennessee Warbler (1), Common Yellowthroat (1), Yellow Warbler (2), Yellow-rumped Warbler (2), Blue Grosbeak (1). https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55845938

Daisy Road/Buckhorn Flats Road - Spotted Sandpiper (2), Eastern Wood Pewee (1), Great Crested Flycatcher (2), Warbling Vireo (1), Chipping Sparrow (1), White-crowned Sparrow (2), Baltimore Oriole (1), Common Yellowthroat (1), Yellow Warbler (4), Summer Tanager (1), Indigo Bunting (3), Dickcissel (3). https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55848271

Holloway Road - Great Crested Flycatcher (1), Warbling Vireo (1), House Wren (1), Cedar Waxwing (6), White-crowned Sparrow (1), Savannah Sparrow (2), Lincoln's Sparrow (1), Common Yellowthroat (2), Yellow Warbler (2), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1), Indigo Bunting (1), Painted Bunting (1), Dickcissel (16). https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55850647

Anglin Road/Silage Pits - Egyptian Goose (2), Spotted Sandpiper (1), Lesser Yellowlegs (1), Red-headed Woodpecker (3), Great-crested Flycatcher (1), Bell's Vireo (1), White-crowned Sparrow (14), Harris's Sparrow (2), Baltimore Oriole (1), Yellow Warbler (1), Blue Grosbeak (2), Indigo Bunting (3), Dickcissel (10). https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55853386

Woodlot at Malone/Digby Road - Wood Duck (6), Green Heron (1), Eastern Wood Pewee (1), Alder Flycatcher (1), Least Flycatcher (1), Great Crested Flycatcher (2), Warbling Vireo (1), Red-eyed Vireo (1), House Wren (2), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (3), Swainson's Thrush (3), White-crowned Sparrow (3), White-throated Sparrow (7), Lincoln's Sparrow (1), Baltimore Oriole (2), Summer Tanager (1), Indigo Bunting (6); Warblers - Black-and-white (3), Tennessee (4), Nashville (2), Common Yellowthroat (1), American Redstart (3), Northern Parula (2), Yellow (3), Chestnut-sided (1), Blackpoll (1), Yellow-rumped (3).
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55858936


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 5/5/19 1:40 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: MIGRATION SENSATION AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND
With weather bright and sunny and winds again from the south, my expectations for Sunday morning migration birding were modest. Still, always a pleasure to walk around the ~1-mile levee that encloses the nursery pond. Excellent pedestrian views of the lake and the big pond. The nursery pond is off highway 12, east of Rogers. Turn on Key Road and drive a few miles. We had windows down and counted birds along the way: Pine Warbler (6), Yellow-throated Warbler (3), Summer Tanager, Scarlet Tanager, and Swainsons Thrush. Then we picked up Red-headed Woodpeckers (2) at the top of snags and in brilliant light. Views like that is what makes people fall in love with birding. Yes, it was that good. We hadnt walked far when Joan noticed a significant aquatic insect hatch on the pond. Tree Swallows nesting around the pond were tearing em up. Along one area we noticed Tree Swallows actually flying through the bushes, then a lot of flying insects all over bushes and small trees. Mix early May with a lot of food =s migration sensation. Within about an hour or so of increasingly slow birding, we observed Least Flycatcher (1-2), White-eyed Vireo (2-3), Bells Vireo (1), Yellow-throated Vireo (1), Red-eyed Vireo (3), Marsh Wren (1), Swainsons Thrush (1), Tennessee Warbler (1), Orange-crowned Warbler (1), Northern Parula (2), Yellow Warbler (3), Magnolia Warbler (1), Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) Warbler (12), Yellow-throated Warbler (1), Palm Warbler (2-3), Blackpoll Warbler (2-3), American Redstart (1), Common Yellowthroat (1), Wilsons Warbler (1), Yellow-breasted Chat (1), a cooperative Clay-colored Sparrow that was also singing, and Orchard Orioles (4-6). Much of this was more or less at eye level (nothing is really high at the nursery pond), including the Blackpolls. The Blackpoll we saw best was a male that retains some greenish feathers in the primaries. I assume this is a normal sequence in molt involving feathers carried through fall and winter. And if this wasnt enough, when we had just about exhausted ourselves for the morning, Joan looked across the pond at a lot of turtles, Blue-winged Teal (18), Wood Duck (2), and Mallard (3), and spotted a Solitary Sandpiper, then a Sora.


 

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Date: 5/5/19 12:40 pm
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton...>
Subject: Re: Singing!
We almost always hear a wood thrush this time of year from our yard in the northeast corner of Magnolia. (There are woods of the sort Bill describes on three sides of us.). Although we heard one earlier in the spring, we haven’t heard him in the last week or two. Perhaps he despaired of finding a girlfriend and moved to some deeper woods.

Stacy Clanton

> On May 5, 2019, at 11:20 AM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
>
> Well, I know it's not Arkansas, but it's the next closest thing. I took a good walk through the southern boundary of the Overton Park jungle in midtown Memphis. Among all the cardinals and carolina wrens I heard the ethereal singing of the wood thrush. I listened to it sing for at least a couple or three minutes. It brought me a wonderful unexpected happiness. Why was it here?
> Because Overton Park is a large forest with tons of giant old trees with plenty of oaks, hickories, ash, elm, hackberries, sycamore and more.
> Forests like these are one of the main arteries of life on earth. It's only about 7 miles away from Arkansas. Hearing it sing is not an everyday thing around here. It becomes more rare with each passing day. I count myself as being really lucky. The singing of the wood thrush has saved my day.
>
> Bill Thurman living in West Memphis

 

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Date: 5/5/19 9:35 am
From: Araks O <araks.ohanyan...>
Subject: Big Day at Audubon Center of Little Rock
I spent a few hours birding along the Wildlife Observation Trail at Little
Rock Audubon yesterday. In spite of some light rain, it was a very
pleasant experience. Notable sightings included a kettle of 15 Mississippi
kites, blue grosbeak, eastern kingbirds, tons of yellow-breasted chats,
indigo buntings, four species of wrens (sedge, marsh, house, and Carolina),
Lincoln's sparrows, summer tanager, and great crested flycatchers. Birding
during migration is truly like nothing else!

Happy birding!
Roxy
Russellville, AR

 

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Date: 5/5/19 9:32 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: nest?
I have noticed a nest on an electric transmission tower by the causeway on
Lake Dardanelle just beside Hwy 64 and was wondering what it is.





MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London




 

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Date: 5/5/19 9:20 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Singing!
Well, I know it's not Arkansas, but it's the next closest thing. I took a
good walk through the southern boundary of the Overton Park jungle in
midtown Memphis. Among all the cardinals and carolina wrens I heard the
ethereal singing of the wood thrush. I listened to it sing for at least a
couple or three minutes. It brought me a wonderful unexpected happiness.
Why was it here?
Because Overton Park is a large forest with tons of giant old trees with
plenty of oaks, hickories, ash, elm, hackberries, sycamore and more.
Forests like these are one of the main arteries of life on earth.
It's only about 7 miles away from Arkansas. Hearing it sing is not an
everyday thing around here. It becomes more rare with each passing day. I
count myself as being really lucky. The singing of the wood thrush has
saved my day.

Bill Thurman living in West Memphis

 

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Date: 5/5/19 7:23 am
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Subject: Western Kingbirds Little Rock
There are 4 Western Kingbirds presently across from Custom Metals on Sloan Dr, off of Fourche Dam Pike in Little Rock

Dottie Boyles



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and any attachment(s) is the property of the State of Arkansas and may be protected by state and federal laws governing disclosure of private information. It is intended solely for the use of the entity to which this email is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that reading, copying or distributing this transmission is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. The sender has not waived any applicable privilege by sending the accompanying transmission. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender, and then please delete and destroy all copies and attachments.
 

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Date: 5/5/19 6:37 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: global big day
Long day and I'll eventually put my reports on ebird and share them
here. I was outside before 7(which is early for me, I go to bed late),
left at 7:15 to drop my wife off at work(35 minutes away) so I could
have the van. Eventually stopped at home for 20 minutes to grab some
breakfast and pick the kids up. Eventually picked up my wife and didn't
get home til after 9. I'm not awake enough for a full report yet.

I had a very good day. I'm not sure how many birds I tallied and there
are definitely some I missed and hoped to find but it was a good day.
One of the highlights was the last species we found... a *yellow-crowned
night heron*. Those things are just something else to watch. Another
bird of interest was the *sanderling* at the fish hatchery in Centerton.
Someone had reported it the day before and I had hoped we'd get it.
We've seen them on the beach in Massachusetts but never here in AR.
I think I had 6 or 7 checklists for the day.

I chose not to go on the Devil's Den trip because I looked at the eBird
report from last year and didn't see anything I "needed." But then I saw
the reports from last night and... bay breasted warblers? I'm a little
jealous. We have yet to find them. There have been times were I thought
maybe I heard the song, sometimes quite convincing... but all we ever
find is the black-and-white. Heard a bird yesterday that was even more
convincing at times but it sure didn't come in to playback AND, there
was a redstart out there making quite a variety of interesting calls so
we never could decide if that's what we were hearing.
Every year, lately, I TRY to convince myself that I don't have to see
EVERY species I've already seen... but every year, somehow, there's
still that itch. Still need to find the bay-breasted and the
blue-winged. Would love to find the prairie, golden-winged,
black-throated green, magnolia, blackburnian, and quite a few others
that I haven't seen yet this year... and time is running out on some.
But.....  I don't "need" to.  HA.   Lots of "needs" for the year but
still need the bay-breasted and blue-winged for our life lists.
Part of me wants to ask who can either point me in the right direction
for a few of those warblers that will be gone any day now... or, could
show me around in person. But I think I'd have to ask permission before
I go out today. HA.
Til I wake up I'll just watch a few from the window. Had a pair of
rose-breasted grosbeaks at the feeder(which is about 10 feet from my
face) and a read-headed woodpecker. I'm glad those are back. Saw a few
of them at city lake yesterday hanging out at trees in the open field
rather than the dead trees at the water where I'd normally see them.
Lots going on. We'll see if I can get out there today or not.

Daniel Mason



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Date: 5/4/19 5:28 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: DESIGNER SPRING MIGRATION DAY AT DEVIL’S DEN
Well Joe,
Hearing those higher bird calls/songs has been a problem for me as well. Several years ago Jeff Wilson (Ol’ Coot, now gone), wrote about his use of a hearing device that shifted the frequencies to where he could hear them once again. It was awkward to use and they no longer make that device.

But, the new class of hearing aids (HAs) can effectively do the same thing, only now they call it compression. They liken it to taking several octaves above your normal hearing and squeezing them down to 8-10 notes. You may not hear the same pitch as the bird is singing but it is shifted down into the range you can still hear with the same cadence and fluctuation. Not the same, but certainly better than not hearing them at all.

That’s where I was. I often wondered; why waste my time here, I don’t hear any bird activity. But now that I have new HAs I am very aware or the presence of birds, can detect direction and if I’m lucky recognize the call of the bird. My HAs are paired to my phone so I can adjust volume and switch to a special program the audiologist created based on my hearing loss. It emphasizes/compresses the higher frequencies and boosts the volume at the higher but not the lower frequencies.

There is technology to help us aging birders and I hope you check it out. I units I have are Phonak Marvel M90-R.

Ed Laster
Little Rock



> On May 4, 2019, at 4:52 PM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> If the good higher power had granted me just one wish to apply for spring migration 2019, it would have been today’s weather. It rained last night and after rain, a weak cool front. For today we had cloudy, with light north winds, and no rain. Vivek Govind Kumar and I left Fayetteville at 7, got to Devil’s Den State Park at 7:40, temperature 56 degrees, winds N and light, and birds singing like crazy right at the park entrance high on the mountain above Lee Creek. My first bird: an energetic singing Scarlet Tanager. With his very good hearing (that I had also 20 years ago), Vivek soon was racking up Bay-breasted and Blackburnian Warblers. Even with my now aged hearing, it was obvious the woods were full of Swainson’s Thrushes and even I could hear the Nashville and Tennessees. We worked our way down hill over the next hour or so, then met a group of about 20 or so birders near the bridge over Lee Creek in the heart of Devil’s Den State Park, for the start of an annual field trip associated with Birders Weekend. Weather held perfect. We compiled a list of 80 species for the morning, including 20 warbler species, with data provided to Terry Anderson at the park. Here’s a link to Vivek’s ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55792154 <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S55792154&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=8RxIuaJx4Uidu3Ieg1OX-8-PCa5zfyLhJKDhiUuTPnc&s=gotT9c97NgLhElDXRDjbViqCVf0ENvAzqZlfrzCjT3g&e=>
>
> <https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S55792154&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=8RxIuaJx4Uidu3Ieg1OX-8-PCa5zfyLhJKDhiUuTPnc&s=gotT9c97NgLhElDXRDjbViqCVf0ENvAzqZlfrzCjT3g&e=>
> Probably the most surprising single bird was a Peregrine Falcon that kettled for a while with a Black Vulture while we were at Mayfield looking for open field birds. A vigorously singing Blue Grosbeak was mostly brown and patchy with blue starting to show through. The way Vivek and some of the younger birders picked up on Blackpolls, Bay-breasts and other singers with high pitches reminded me of birding trips many years ago, when I was the younger birder awash in all the high pitched calls that many others on those field trips could no longer hear. There’s still plenty to see and experience, as I learned from my birder friend David Chapman, who lost much of his hearing years ago, but none of his enthusiasm for finding and enjoying birds in other ways.


 

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Date: 5/4/19 2:53 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: DESIGNER SPRING MIGRATION DAY AT DEVIL’S DEN
If the good higher power had granted me just one wish to apply for spring migration 2019, it would have been todays weather. It rained last night and after rain, a weak cool front. For today we had cloudy, with light north winds, and no rain. Vivek Govind Kumar and I left Fayetteville at 7, got to Devils Den State Park at 7:40, temperature 56 degrees, winds N and light, and birds singing like crazy right at the park entrance high on the mountain above Lee Creek. My first bird: an energetic singing Scarlet Tanager. With his very good hearing (that I had also 20 years ago), Vivek soon was racking up Bay-breasted and Blackburnian Warblers. Even with my now aged hearing, it was obvious the woods were full of Swainsons Thrushes and even I could hear the Nashville and Tennessees. We worked our way down hill over the next hour or so, then met a group of about 20 or so birders near the bridge over Lee Creek in the heart of Devils Den State Park, for the start of an annual field trip associated with Birders Weekend. Weather held perfect. We compiled a list of 80 species for the morning, including 20 warbler species, with data provided to Terry Anderson at the park. Heres a link to Viveks ebird checklist: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55792154<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S55792154&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=8RxIuaJx4Uidu3Ieg1OX-8-PCa5zfyLhJKDhiUuTPnc&s=gotT9c97NgLhElDXRDjbViqCVf0ENvAzqZlfrzCjT3g&e=>

<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S55792154&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=8RxIuaJx4Uidu3Ieg1OX-8-PCa5zfyLhJKDhiUuTPnc&s=gotT9c97NgLhElDXRDjbViqCVf0ENvAzqZlfrzCjT3g&e=>
Probably the most surprising single bird was a Peregrine Falcon that kettled for a while with a Black Vulture while we were at Mayfield looking for open field birds. A vigorously singing Blue Grosbeak was mostly brown and patchy with blue starting to show through. The way Vivek and some of the younger birders picked up on Blackpolls, Bay-breasts and other singers with high pitches reminded me of birding trips many years ago, when I was the younger birder awash in all the high pitched calls that many others on those field trips could no longer hear. Theres still plenty to see and experience, as I learned from my birder friend David Chapman, who lost much of his hearing years ago, but none of his enthusiasm for finding and enjoying birds in other ways.


 

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Date: 5/4/19 1:22 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: New Arrivals
While I was gone Don kept a good long list of Ninestone birds that he
observed from the deck, in the yard, and on his runs. Plus he kept the
feeders full!
Here are the FOS and a couple of notable observations:

May 1
FEMALE Baltimore Orioles - 3 on oranges

May 2
Mourning Warbler - singing in brush between bluff glade and road
Wilson's Warbler - mid-story bluff glade

May 3
stereo event - 1 Kentucky Warbler and 2 Ovenbirds singing on both sides of
north path for clear comparison of songs

May 4
Catbird - 1 eating orange put out for orioles
Tennessee Warbler - at least 2 in yard
Acadian Flycatcher - 1 along Piney Creek
Chestnut-sided Warbler - 1 near creek
FEMALE Rose-breasted Grosbeak - 1 at feeder

 

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Date: 5/4/19 12:04 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Suburbia in New Jersey
Apologies for the delay in posting a report on the NWAAS field trip at
Ninestone. Since the NInestone field trip I've been in the suburbs of NJ
observing the frightening absence of biodiversity in native plant, bird and
insect species. What a difference is made when endless townships, ranges,
and ultimately sections, mostly consist of vast mown chem-lawns, patented
grasses, pest-free cultivars, and hybrid nursery ornamental trees and
shrubs which are considered the only acceptable plantings. In this once
abundant world of incredible natural diversity, the wild places between
genetically modified glyphosate-resistant corn and soybean fields have
become wastes of non-native invasives such as garlic mustard, multiflora
rose, Amur bush honeysuckle, Japanese barberry, autumn olive, invasive
bittersweet, and Japanese honeysuckle. Gone are most of the wildflowers of
my youth, gone are the birds, gone are the reptiles, amphibians and bats,
gone are most insects including the large beautiful moths that came to
porch lights and flapped at window screens. Although we spent a lot of time
outside the only insects I saw were one small moth trapped in a window
screen, one ant that someone immediately stepped on, and one wasp that
elicited vows to spray the entire area. There were no butterflies, there
were no bees on the abundantly flowering crabapples and weeping
cherries. Evergreens,
whether spruces, firs, hemlocks or others were called "pine trees". In
these immense stretches of suburbia the birds were limited to American
Robin (none seen on chem lawns tilting their heads at non-existent
earthworms), House Wren, Goldfinch, Chipping Sparrow, Northern Cardinal,
Blue Jay, Crow, Catbird, Starling, Bluebird, and Canada Goose. I slept with
the window open and listened to a dawn chorus of two Robins and very few
others. It was beautiful and poignant.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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Date: 5/4/19 12:00 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: NWAAS Field Trip to Ninestone, April 28, 2019
April 28, 2019, was a spectacular late April day awash with sunshine, new
leaves, birdsong, native wildflowers, gentle breezes, plenty of pollen and
pollinators, rushing water, plus 24 humans who love and respect all these
gifts of` our good green Earth.

This was our 13th NWAAS field trip with dear friend and mentor, Joe Neal,
who has helped and encouraged us in many ways.
The Bird List was compiled by Vivek Govind Kumar/U of A, and the eBird
link, with Vivek’s photos, is posted below. Later we added Belted
Kingfisher, giving us 68 bird species for the day.
Butterflies noted were Falcate orangetip, Common buckeye, Painted lady,
Zebra swallowtail, Tiger swallowtail, Spicebush swallowtail, Snowberry
clearwing, and numerous Skippers.
Native wildflowers blooming on the sandstone bluff glade and waterfall
glade, both undergoing restoration, are slow to bloom this year with mostly
Golden Selenia [Selenia aurea], Violet Blue-eyed Mary [Collinsia violacea],
Sandwort [Minuarta patula], Corn Salad [Valerianella radiata], Crow Poison
[Nothoscordum bivalve], and Hairy Scorpion-weed [Phacelia hirsuta], in
flower. Just now forming flower buds are Widow's –cross [Sedum pulchellum],
Barbara's buttons [Marshallia caespitosa], and Fame Flower [Phemeranthus
calycinus].

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55530797
<https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55530797?fbclid=IwAR2JyM_neu-6GgeP_pbuA5hzlu7yzEXGvlbjFqRoOODxvYR6SsDP98IuvZQ>

 

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Date: 5/4/19 7:48 am
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird - Calhoun County
A family member just sent me images of a Yellow-headed Blackbird that’s been hanging out on their farm in Calhoun County for the past three days.

Kelly Chitwood

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 5/3/19 6:27 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: WHITNEY MOUNTAIN AND PEA RIDGE
Whitney Mountain is on Beaver Lakes north side. Pooja Panwar, Taylor Long, and I spent most of the morning along Highway 127 on northeast side of Whitney. Most of our birding was in a mile or so between Shaffer Road and Slate Gap Road. This is very steep, rugged, forested hillside habitat. A great place for Cerulean Warblers and other neotropical migratory songbirds. We spent 3-hours or so parking carefully and birding mostly along 127, taking care for traffic. It was foggy in the morning, so we were effectively birding in a cloud forest. We saw many birds in the canopy we couldnt ID because of fog. Saw a Yellow-breasted Chat perched on a powerline over a deep hollow looked like a bird magically suspended in mid air. No cuckoos yet. We ended up at two Corps of Engineer parks on Beaver Lake where we saw 3 Common Loons. On the way back to Fayetteville, we made brief stops for grassland birds at Pea Ridge National Military Park, mainly along Highway 72 and Dodd Road. That where we saw Northern Bobwhites. Below Ive pasted ebird lists that Taylor compiled, along with the days entire list.



https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55717434

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55717458

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55717500

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55717538

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55717590

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55719335

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55719816

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55719911

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55719973



Systematic list of 80 species for the morning:



Northern Bobwhite, Mourning Dove, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Spotted Sandpiper, Common Loon, Black Vulture, Turkey Vulture, Bald Eagle, Red-headed Woodpecker, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, Pileated Woodpecker, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Least Flycatcher, Eastern Phoebe, Great Crested Flycatcher, Eastern Kingbird, Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, White-eyed Vireo, Yellow-throated Vireo, Philadelphia Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, American Crow, Fish Crow, Purple Martin, Tree Swallow, Barn Swallow, Carolina Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse , White-breasted Nuthatch, Carolina Wren, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Eastern Bluebird, Swainson's Thrush, Wood Thrush, American Robin, Gray Catbird, Brown Thrasher, Northern Mockingbird, European Starling, Cedar Waxwing, House Finch, American Goldfinch, Chipping Sparrow, Field Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, Eastern Towhee, Yellow-breasted Chat, Eastern Meadowlark, Orchard Oriole, Baltimore Oriole, Red-winged Blackbird, Brown-headed Cowbird, Common Grackle, Ovenbird, Worm-eating Warbler, Northern Waterthrush, Black-and-white Warbler, Tennessee Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Kentucky Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Hooded Warbler, American Redstart, Cerulean Warbler, Northern Parula, Yellow Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler, Yellow-throated Warbler , Prairie Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Summer Tanager, Scarlet Tanager, Northern Cardinal, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Blue Grosbeak, Indigo Bunting, Dickcissel, House Sparrow


 

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Date: 5/3/19 4:45 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: dowitcher question
Any experts on dowitchers? I put a couple photos from my trip the other
day on the whatbird forums. The dowitcher I saw on the pond on Digby in
highfill, at least one person agreed it was a long-billed. But, they
said they'd guess short-billed on the one from the hatchery in
Centerton. That guess is the best response I've gotten. A few people
replied refraining from IDing them. They are quite difficult. The one at
the hatchery responded to the long-billed playback... meaning it perked
up and looked around while it ignored the short-billed calls. It made
one single peep that the long-billed we saw earlier also made, and
matched the long-billed sound files... but, it was just one note.
I'd like to be certain before I submit it to eBird one way or the other.
Well I guess I could always do the long-billed/short-billed while reporting.
The one I'm uncertain on almost looks like it doesn't have a neck
compared to the other one we watched.

In other news... had a chestnut-sided warbler in the yard today. I keep
complaining to myself(and my daughter) that I want to see more warblers
in the yard... those migrants don't stay long and I sure enjoy them. So
this one was exciting. We think we heard a black-throated green but
never confirmed it. Trying not to be anxious about all the ones I may
end up missing til next year. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 5/3/19 12:47 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: BKNWR 3 May 2019
Highlights from Bald Knob NWR today are a pair of bobolinks, a pair of black-bellied plovers, a pair of avocets, and a painted bunting. We heard three sora and then saw one walk across the road in front of us. And finally we saw our great horned owl friend again on top of an electric pole.
Glenn and Michelle WyattCabot


 

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Date: 5/3/19 5:41 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Birding Around Jonesboro
Yesterday was another great day for migration in northeast Arkansas! In my semi-wooded backyard, a Broad-winged Hawk called from the treetops, while Warbling Vireo, Prairie Warbler, and Tennessee Warbler all sang and foraged at mid-level among the trees.

On my way to Craighead Forest Park for more birding, I observed a flock of 20 Cedar Waxwings feeding on the leftover berries of an ornamental holly tree.

Craighead Forest Park was the best I have seen it in several years! Dreary days always seem best for migration birding and the misty, dripping forest was nostalgic, reminding me of my early beginnings as birder and photographer here. Notable migrants were Eastern Wood-Pewee, Blue-headed Vireo, a lingering Red-breasted Nuthatch, a Gray-cheeked and Wood Thrush both singing from deep within the forest, Swainson’s Thrush foraging along a wet trail, Ovenbird, Kentucky Warbler, Hooded Warbler, Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Orchard Oriole, and a several large flocks of warblers. The largest of these flocks contained: several GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERS, Blue-winged Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Tennessee Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler, Pine Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, and Ruby-crowned Kinglet.

Hairy Woodpecker was also a notable for me. I don’t know what their status is at the park anymore, but in a past life they were considered not very common there. Shockingly absent (or silent), despite my best efforts, were Summer Tanager, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, and Northern Parula.

Good birding,
Mitchell Pruitt





 

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Date: 5/2/19 9:29 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 5/2/2019 - FOS Veery/Warblers
FOS sightings at Lake Fayetteville this evening included Veery, Bay-breasted Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler and Wilson's Warbler. 76 species were observed on the northern side of the lake. I started in the woods east of the environmental center and then walked through the disc golf course to the boat dock/softball field. 16 warbler species were seen but numbers were low - peak migration should hit us any day now.

4 American Crows were making a racket just east of the environmental center. I was expecting an owl/hawk to pop out of the woodwork but I was pleasantly surprised when a Red Fox appeared on the trail a few feet away from me. It paused on the trail for a few seconds and then ran into the bushes when the crows started dive-bombing it.

Warblers - Louisiana Waterthrush (2), Black-and-white (1), Tennessee (2), Nashville (5), Kentucky (1), American Redstart (1), Northern Parula (7), Bay-breasted (1), Blackburnian (1), Yellow (2), Chestnut-sided (1), Blackpoll (1), Palm (1), Yellow-rumped (3), Yellow-throated (1), Wilson's (1).

Flycatchers - Least (7), Eastern Phoebe (2), Great Crested (2), Eastern Kingbird (3), Scissor-tailed (1).

Thrushes - Veery (1), Gray-cheeked (2), Swainson's (13)

Vireos - White-eyed (5), Blue-headed (3), Warbling (2), Red-eyed (3).

Miscellaneous - Blue-winged Teal (1), Common Nighthawk (2), Chimney Swift (3), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (5), Spotted Sandpiper (4), Green Heron (3), Osprey (1), Barred Owl (1), Purple Martin (2), Tree Swallow (2), Barn Swallow (8), House Wren (2), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (16), Gray Catbird (7), Cedar Waxwing (12), Chipping Sparrow (1), White-throated Sparrow (22), Eastern Towhee (5), Baltimore Oriole (5), Summer Tanager (5), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (4), Indigo Bunting (4).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 5/2/19 2:09 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Kenn Kaufman's new book "A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration"
Thank you. It is the bird migration that caused him to move to NW Ohio and
Crane Creek. His blog covers bird migration at Magee Marsh and the
surrounding areas. The joy of bird migration and our Spring birds returning
is good for the soul.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

-----Original Message-----
From: Barry Haas
Sent: Thursday, May 2, 2019 3:29 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Kenn Kaufman's new book "A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of
Spring Migration"

Dear ARBIRDers,

Last night's NPR's Living on Earth program included an interview with Kenn
Kaufman about his new book "A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring
Migration. Here's a link to that segment:

https://loe.org/shows/segments.html?programID=19-P13-00017&segmentID=6

I thought most birders would enjoy the interview, and may have missed it.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
 

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Date: 5/2/19 1:30 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Kenn Kaufman's new book "A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration"
Dear ARBIRDers,

Last night's NPR's Living on Earth program included an interview with Kenn Kaufman about his new book "A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration. Here's a link to that segment:

https://loe.org/shows/segments.html?programID=19-P13-00017&segmentID=6

I thought most birders would enjoy the interview, and may have missed it.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
 

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Date: 5/2/19 8:45 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: ASCA field trip
Saturday, April 27, was the day for the monthly ASCA field trip. But with Karen Holliday birding out of state, someone else had to lead it. So I had volunteered.



The biggest surprise of the day was the number of birders who turned out: 38! The Arboretum parking lot was jam-packed by seven oclock.



The first species calling and catching our attention was Summer Tanager. I think (and hope) everyone managed to see at least one of these; a bright red male was especially obliging by singing high in a treetop directly overhead. Next spotted were two male Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, also high in a tree. I glimpsed a male Baltimore Oriole, also way up overhead, but am uncertain whether anyone else did.



Also heard singing from the parking lot was a single Black-and-white Warbler. Our sparse list (only 20 species!) for Saturday included a Worm-eating Warbler that was eating worms, and a Northern Parula or two. That was all the warblers we could muster. However, we heard lots of invisible treetop vireosmost of them probably Red-eyed Vireosduring the morning and even managed to see a few White-eyed Vireos. (As an excuse, I kept reminding folks that it wasnt May yet.)



After completing the Arboretum Trail, we all adjourned and headed for the Kingfisher Trail. Thats where some of the species already mentioned were seen. But we were never again all birding together. Instead we were birding in smaller groups. Frankly, it was something like herding cats.



Dottie Boyles left early but made a quick side-trip to the Visitor Information Center in hopes of seeing a male Painted Bunting that had visited a feeder there the day before. Lo and behold, she saw him. But, as far as I know, no one else did that day. It was a timely reminder that there are always more birds around than we birders can find and identify.


 

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Date: 5/2/19 6:48 am
From: CAMPBELL, MARTIN <campbem...>
Subject: Fwd: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant
I heard and then spotted a couple at the Caddo Valley Pilot Truck stop,
milepost 78, back on March 29th.

Marty
Martin J. Campbell, Ph.D.
Professor of Organic Chemistry
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Henderson State University
1100 Henderson Street
Box 7633
Arkadelphia, AR 71999

870-230-5150


---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Date: Thu, May 2, 2019 at 8:44 AM
Subject: Re: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant
To: <I u>


They do like fast food and gas stations. LOL



In 2008, a pair (originally discovered by Bill Shepherd) was spotted at
Taco Bell, Wendy’s, and McDonald’s along Broadway St. in downtown Little
Rock. The one I saw last year was at the Shell station on Lindsey Rd and
Fourche Dam Pike. It had been reported across the street at the Valero
station. The day we were there a rooster was hanging out at Valero. Guess
it was taking lessons from the Gt Grackle.



Dottie

Little Rock



*From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
*Sent:* Wednesday, May 01, 2019 6:43 PM
*Subject:* Re: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant



We returned to the area later in the afternoon and was able to locate a
female Great-tailed Grackle along with the male. They seem to be hanging
out mostly in the Burger King/Pizza Hut/Ta Molly's parking lots on
Reynold's Road just north of I 30.

They are making their way slowly to the Little Rock Fast Food/Gas Stations
via I 30.



Donna Haynes

West Pulaski Co.

Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and
any attachment(s) is the property of the State of Arkansas and may be
protected by state and federal laws governing disclosure of private
information. It is intended solely for the use of the entity to which this
email is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby
notified that reading, copying or distributing this transmission is
STRICTLY PROHIBITED. The sender has not waived any applicable privilege by
sending the accompanying transmission. If you have received this
transmission in error, please notify the sender, and then please delete and
destroy all copies and attachments.

 

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Date: 5/2/19 6:44 am
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Subject: Re: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant
They do like fast food and gas stations. LOL

In 2008, a pair (originally discovered by Bill Shepherd) was spotted at Taco Bell, Wendy’s, and McDonald’s along Broadway St. in downtown Little Rock. The one I saw last year was at the Shell station on Lindsey Rd and Fourche Dam Pike. It had been reported across the street at the Valero station. The day we were there a rooster was hanging out at Valero. Guess it was taking lessons from the Gt Grackle.

Dottie
Little Rock

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
Sent: Wednesday, May 01, 2019 6:43 PM
Subject: Re: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant

We returned to the area later in the afternoon and was able to locate a female Great-tailed Grackle along with the male. They seem to be hanging out mostly in the Burger King/Pizza Hut/Ta Molly's parking lots on Reynold's Road just north of I 30.
They are making their way slowly to the Little Rock Fast Food/Gas Stations via I 30.

Donna Haynes
West Pulaski Co.

Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and any attachment(s) is the property of the State of Arkansas and may be protected by state and federal laws governing disclosure of private information. It is intended solely for the use of the entity to which this email is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that reading, copying or distributing this transmission is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. The sender has not waived any applicable privilege by sending the accompanying transmission. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender, and then please delete and destroy all copies and attachments.
 

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Date: 5/2/19 4:12 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Shorebird extravaganza
For those who might be in NW Arkansas this weekend, you should be able to
rake in the shorebird department this weekend. After reading Daniel's
report, even though I needed to be packing for Birder's Weekend at DDSP, I
headed to the Centerton area yesterday evening. Pretty much every low spot
in several fields on SW Anglin Rd, Barron Rd, and Kimmel Rd had standing
water. Every area of water had a myriad of shorebirds of many species,
dicks, mainly BWTeal, RE Blackbirds, Eastern Kingbirds, Ronin's, and
singing Bobolinks that I could never find. The Wilson's Phalaropes were
gorgeous, as were some other birds that I won't be able to identify until I
can upload the photos.

I found it interesting that I found 6 Eastern Kingbirds in one tree on
Holloway Rd. It seems too early for it to be a family group. Any
ideas??? On a happy note, I found a Red-headed Woodpecker nest, which
makes me smile I also saw either a Downy or Hairy WP fly out of a cavity,
with another on the same snag. They were surrounded by Starlings, but
hopefully they can keep their nesting spot.

Should be good birding this weekend, between the monsoons.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

 

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Date: 5/1/19 6:52 pm
From: Ed Tiede <0000012caede6260-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Terns at Cadron Settlement Park
This evening at 5:10pm  at Cadron Settlement Park in Faulkner County; I saw 2 Caspian Terns, 3 Forster’s Terns and 1 Least Tern. There were a few other terns that I couldn’t identify to species, but they were small - medium in size. Location: take the road up the hill to the shelter overlooking the Arkansas River. The Terns were on the snags between the shore and sandbar.
Cheers,Edward Tiede
 

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Date: 5/1/19 4:43 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant
We returned to the area later in the afternoon and was able to locate a female Great-tailed Grackle along with the male. They seem to be hanging out mostly in the Burger King/Pizza Hut/Ta Molly's parking lots on Reynold's Road just north of I 30. They are making their way slowly to the Little Rock Fast Food/Gas Stations via I 30.
Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Wed, May 1, 2019 at 2:51 PM, Donna Haynes<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> wrote: While driving down Reynolds Road in Bryant, I just heard the unmistakable chatter of a Great-tailed Grackle. Thank goodness  I was in the driver's seat and was able to look over and spot a beautiful male on a power pole behind Pizza Hut! Donna HaynesWest Pulaski County

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

 

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Date: 5/1/19 3:42 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Used binoculars needed please
Attached is a photo of one pair of binoculars shared by 20 students in India.  If you have one to donate, please send it through someone to the AAS meeting this weekend.  And thank you!KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 5/1/19 1:28 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Quiz question
What currently popular mystery contains the following two sentences?
"Uncertainty lingered, but the more she thought about it, the less likely it seemed the boy meant her harm.  It didn't fit that anyone who liked birds would be mean."
You can send me your guess/answer off line if you prefer.
I'll post the answer by next week.
Jack Stewarthappily flood in at Erbie
 

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Date: 5/1/19 12:51 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Great-tailed Grackle -Bryant
While driving down Reynolds Road in Bryant, I just heard the unmistakable chatter of a Great-tailed Grackle. Thank goodness  I was in the driver's seat and was able to look over and spot a beautiful male on a power pole behind Pizza Hut! Donna HaynesWest Pulaski County

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 5/1/19 12:42 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Centerton today
Still wishing we had a second vehicle but, that rain that came through
and the thought of what could be... was just something we couldn't
resist. My oldest insisted we had to go so, I drove my wife to work,
came back to get all 5 kids, and headed out. Between the short amount of
time we were starting with and some side road distractions, we ended up
with just under an hour at the hatchery. That's not enough time but we
still had a good day.

There was a *long-billed dowitcher* at the big pond on the corner of
Digby near Highfil. There was one at the hatchery as well standing next
to two*willets*. We ran into another birder on Anglin rd that said they
saw the phalarope at the hatchery but we missed it this time. We saw one
a couple days ago so we weren't saddened by that, though they are still
fun to see and watch. Not enough mud at the hatchery to support a lot,
unfortunately. A male *northern shoveler* was a little surprising to see.
The best part of the trip was on the way in, heading East on Anglin
road. I was in a rush to scan and then get to the hatchery but the birds
had other plans for me. A little ways before the road that goes south I
saw a bird fly to the fence so I stopped, even though I wasn't that
close. It looked suspicious. My daughter got her binoculars on it and
got excited. *Western kingbird*. By the time I SLOWLY rolled a little
closer it headed to some taller plants near a big puddle just near the
corner of Anglin and that other road. I have two pictures, neither are
great but they're good enough for positive ID. This was a life bird for
both of us. I had all the kids in the vehicle but none of the others
were scanning everything... at all. So they all missed that one but they
did all get good looks at *Upland sandpipers*. There were at least a
dozen of them in different areas around that "puddle."
The fellow birder we ran into said he saw some American golden plovers
just off behind that Anglin farm pond but we were short on time so we
didn't take the time to search for them. No doubt they were there though.
On the way back to pick my wife up from work we went down Anglin again,
not so slowly this time. (we were late picking her up) We heard
*bobolinks* out in the field past where the Upland sandpipers were.
Didn't stop long enough to get a count but they are present in the area.
Forgot, on the way in at the intersection of Digby and Malone there were
over a dozen *cedar waxwings* munching on the bald cypress trees
there... at 4 male and one female *wood duck* on the woodsy pond on
opposite side, more on Malone. Heading east on Malone, right after you
reach the open fields on the left, there's a pond WAY out there... There
were some yellowlegs and likely others out there but it's too far out.
Last time we headed that way after rain there were a LOT of yellowlegs
out there. There was a gate open and I was mildly tempted to go drive
across someone's field to get a better look. That wasn't going to
happen, of course, but the temptation was there. :)  Lots to see in all
sorts of places we just don't get to.

Kind of a rushed first half of the day but a good one just the same. I
can't get out there as often as I'd like but we'll do what we can, when
we can. And my wife is starting to understand that it is migration after
all. :)



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Date: 5/1/19 8:39 am
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: FOS TERNS AT BOYD POINT
This morning, one Least Tern and two Black Terns were present at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. Parenthetically, the five Am. Avocets in breeding plumage are still present and very approachable
John Redman
 

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Date: 5/1/19 8:00 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: Pollinator Garden, birds,etc.
Two of my daughters and their husbands designed and planted a pollinator garden for me this past Friday and Saturday. It was a labor of love and a Mothers Day gift from them (I paid for the plants and the four of them did the labor more than 8 hours each -- of digging and planting 26 species of plants. Will add Mulberry trees later). My backyard has been transformed from an eroded plant-less yard into a lovely garden. Ive noticed a few birds enjoying digging around in the mulch and drinking from the fountains. (pictures on my face book page) Don and Carolyn picked up more than a pick-up load of field rocks from their farm at Bethesda and brought them to use.
Rose-breasted Grosbeaks have returned. There are Carolina Chickadees, House Wrens, Carolina Wrens and Eastern Bluebirds nesting in the back yard and a Mourning Dove on the front porch. No Orioles yet but have a few hummers. 13 bird species so far since 8:30.
It has rained so much since yesterday at about 2 PM that the sump pump under my bedroom went off every 3 to 5 minutes since midnight.
Its still raining this am.
Last month I gave a program on backyard bird to our local Womans Book Club. This morning I had a frantic call from a friend who had planned a walk among her plants and beautiful butterfly plantings. The rain has knocked out the planned venture, so Ive been asked to help with the program on pollinator gardens. (Alan Gregory is our local expert on this.) Ill do my best. People in our area are becoming more aware of the connection of pollinators and birds.
Ramblings of a happy old woman,
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 5/1/19 7:54 am
From: Jay Pitocchelli <jpitocch...>
Subject: Request for assistance – song recordings of migrating Mourning Warblers
It is year 5 of this project and I am once again writing to request your help and participate in a Citizens Science Project that involves recording migrating Mourning Warbler songs. Our lab is trying to determine what role song can play in understanding migratory connectivity in this species. We are interested in whether different song populations of the Mourning Warbler (Western, Eastern, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland) migrate together or separately to their respective breeding areas. Here is a link to a map with previous years’ results based on recordings from over 100 birders.

https://mowasongmapper.weebly.com/mapping-songs-with-google-maps.html

All you need is a smartphone with a voice recording app and some luck. Videos with recordings are also helpful. The web page link below describes the project and how to make recordings on your Smartphone in more detail. Please send song recordings to the Mourning Warbler Sound Lab (jpitocch AT anselm.edu).

https://mowasongmapper.weebly.com/

There is also a link to a recent national Audubon Society story on this research.

Audubon Society reporting
http://www.audubon.org/magazine/spring-2017/this-guy-mapping-how-warblers-migrate-just

I would really appreciate your help and contributions this year to this Citizens Science Project.

Dr. Jay Pitocchelli
Chair, Biology Department
Saint Anselm College
Manchester, NH 03102
 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/19 7:31 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Catastrophe diverted
Had the back door open enjoying the sound of the rain when all of a sudden
my backyard Blue Jays started screaming. They and there nestlings were
under attack. I immediately rain out into the rain, still in my pjs, and
scared off that old Cooper’s Hawk. I hope it didn’t take a baby with it.
Couldn’t tell. But I believe I saved the day. 💪🏼👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻

And there are Rose-breasted Grosbeaks and Swainson’s Thrushes singing now
that the rain has lightened up for a minute.

Sandy B.

 

Back to top
Date: 5/1/19 7:31 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Re: You will NOT believe this one...
We had a kiskadee show up at Red Slough in early May a few years ago and it
stayed till early September. It was very responsive to callback. Did you
try calling it in? The bird we had would frequently wander and be seen up
to a mile away but would always come back to one general area where it
roosted. Also the best way to find it was to get out at just before
daybreak and listen as it was extremely vocal just before leaving its roost
which was on an island in one of our wetlands. These birds like it near
water so check any ponds or lakes in the area.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR







Date: Tue, 30 Apr 2019 09:19:49 -0500

From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>

Subject: You will NOT believe this one...



Special attention to NW Arkansas to be on the lookout...



So this morning I was hearing the squeaks of a rose-breasted grosbeak.

My 10 year old daughter was in the room so I explained to her that's what we
were hearing. I left the room for something and when I came back, she asked
me what it meant if a rose-breasted grosbeak "screamed." I had NO idea what
she meant but didn't think much of it.



Then I went outside to bird... a little while later called my 18 year old
daughter out to assist with keeping track of sights and sounds as I can get
overwhelmed and lose track of all I'm hearing. After a little while I saw a
bird flying in from WSW, over the neighbor's yard. The lighting isn't great
out there this morning and all I saw was a lighter colored bird that kind of
reminded me of a dove or something but I said, IF that's a dove it HAS to be
a collared... But it was flying over our woods then. Then, it landed. I
hesitate to describe what I saw as I don't think anyone will believe it. It
was there for just a couple seconds. Brown back... yellow on the front...
black and white head. It sort of squealed and then flew off. I had no time
to even turn my camera on... :( I described what I saw to my daughter and
she was in disbelief. I searched the Merlin app for what I thought it was
and, also surprising, I was looking for the right bird. (I'm not always good
with birds that don't live around here) *Great Kiskadee.* I played some of
the calls from Merlin and, that is what we both heard. My oldest daughter
wont count things she doesn't get to ID by sight so she's pretty mad the
bird left before she got a look.

When I did the playback, she confirmed that's what she heard. I went into
the house and asked my 10 year old if that's what she heard and she said
yes. IF that is what she heard, that means it was hanging around our
neighborhood for a little while this morning without us knowing.

That gives a TINY bit of hope that it hasn't gone too far but, we've been
watching and waiting a while now and no luck so far.

We're on the East side of Siloam Springs and the bird took off in a ENE
direction, anywhere off towards the bentonville area perhaps? I sure
couldn't say but, anyone out birding today, keep you eyes open for this
wanderer. I hope it either comes back or someone else can find it and
photograph it so I wont have too many people thinking I'm nuts.

Makes me wonder what these storms rolling in will bring with them... and sad
that I probably can't get out and do much chasing til the weekend.



A little more FYI here, the hatchery in Centerton is raising the pond that
was lowered but has a couple smaller ones lowered as of yesterday.

I still have to confirm a few peep IDs but there was a willet there among
other birds.



Now to get back outside and continue scanning the skies til the rain comes
in...



Daniel Mason








 

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Date: 4/30/19 9:39 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject:
signoff ARBIRD-L
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/19 7:32 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Mailbox Birdhouse Redux
There are a couple of ways that makes these successful as nest sites. One is
that you can fit a wooden plate at the front entrance hole the size for the
birds of interest. This can be put on a post and you can have bluebirds,
chickadees, and titmice depending on the hole size. Metal boxes are not
ideal because they can get too hot due to the lack of insulation as wood
provides insulation on the outside may help. Another approach is to keep the
lid open or take it off and place on a wooden shelf. My shelf is attached
to the back of my shop under the overhang where it remains shaded and out of
the rain. Carolina wrens show interest in this most often. Although I have
Eastern Phoebes they have not found this attractive to them. But also
wasps, skinks, flying squirrels and frogs also need a place to stay so don't
consider it a failure should these find it appropriate. With 85 species of
birds and 49 species of mammals needing cavities to nest and roost in, there
is always a housing shortage. Snags and natural cavities are best but other
structures can help if placed correctly. You do not however want to create
a place where nest failure is likely.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

-----Original Message-----
From: George R. Hoelzeman
Sent: Tuesday, April 30, 2019 9:07 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Mailbox Birdhouse Redux

I probably asked this in times past but I cannot find the archived
responses...

I have 3 old mailboxes laying around that have long ago outlived their
intended service (they're too small). The wasp nest I discovered in one
today reminded me that there was a discussion about transforming these
things into bird houses...so, what would need to be done to accomplish
such a transformation and which species would be most interested in such
a habitat?

Any suggestions will be appreciated.

Thanks

George (N. Conway Co. wishing the Phoebes weren't so fond of the back
door handle).
 

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Date: 4/30/19 7:07 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Mailbox Birdhouse Redux
I probably asked this in times past but I cannot find the archived
responses...

I have 3 old mailboxes laying around that have long ago outlived their
intended service (they're too small).  The wasp nest I discovered in one
today reminded me that there was a discussion about transforming these
things into bird houses...so, what would need to be done to accomplish
such a transformation and which species would be most interested in such
a habitat?

Any suggestions will be appreciated.

Thanks

George (N. Conway Co. wishing the Phoebes weren't so fond of the back
door handle).
 

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Date: 4/30/19 5:05 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: O BROTHER, WHO ART THOU?
All the rain, storms, and deep black clouds were just moving into Centerton this afternoon when I observed a Clay-colored Sparrow feeding on one of the pond banks with a White-crowned Sparrow. Good little bird: it popped up on a handy eye-level limb long enough for a study and photographs. Besides that, there were Forsters Terns (5), and 11 shorebird species: Semipalmated Plover (4), Killdeer (4), Spotted Sandpiper (9), Greater Yellowlegs (3+), Lesser Yellowlegs (2), (6 unidentified legs), Semipalmated Sandpiper (4), Western Sandpiper (1), Least Sandpiper (30), White-rumped Sandpiper (4), Pectoral Sandpiper (7), Wilsons Phalarope (1). Of additional interest: basking Spiny Softshell turtles in several ponds, many more than I had ever seen there. One very big one was pulled up on a muddy bank right in path of a Spotted Sandpiper. The sandpiper was looking at the turtle and thinking, or so I imagined (and paraphrasing the movie) O brother, who art thou? Just then the emergency tornado sirens started blasting. Apparently there was rotation in the clouds. Alternate title for this report: Toto, I dont think were in Kansas anymore. Did make it back to Fayetteville.


 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/19 3:08 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Woolsey Wet Prairie - 4/30/2019
I visited Woolsey Wet Prairie for an hour this morning. Orchard Orioles (6) were conspicuous, along with Common Yellowthroats (4) and Dickcissels (6). Their vocalizations were a welcome change from the sounds of the drills/machinery that have dominated the local soundscape for the past few weeks. It remains to be seen whether the ongoing installation of solar panels in the NE/SW corners of the property will have a negative impact on breeding Dickcissels etc.

Miscellaneous - Chimney Swift (1), Eastern Kingbird (5), Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (4), Warbling Vireo (1), Tree Swallow (4), Barn Swallow (2), House Wren (2), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (1), Brown Thrasher (3), Savannah Sparrow (12), Lincoln's Sparrow (6), Swamp Sparrow (1), Baltimore Oriole (1), Yellow Warbler (4), Palm Warbler (1), Indigo Bunting (2).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/30/19 2:32 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Wilson Hollow Road
Taylor Long and I partook in some pleasant spring birding yesterday afternoon along Wilson Hollow Road, south of Fayetteville. While spring migrants were still abundant, the residents have switched into full-on territory maintenance mode. Some notables included 2 Common Yellowthroats singing along the river, good looks at 2 Kentucky Warblers (a lifer for Taylor), a Tennessee Warbler singing so hard it might pop, a mewling Gray Catbird, bespectacled Blue-headed Vireo, a Spotted Sandpiper bobbing in the river, and several lingering White-throated Sparrows and Cedar Waxwings.

The Red-shouldered Hawk nest also appears to be going strong, with one adult sitting on it. Only a tail was visible over the side of the nest that it is becoming difficult to see from the road, with the influx of new leaves.

A kind local also informed us of an active Bald Eagle nest along the river, adjacent to his property! If anyone is in the area, keep an eye out for the eagles along the first major curve in the road near the farmhouse/cow operation.

Good birding,

Mitchell Pruitt
 

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Date: 4/30/19 12:55 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: More from our yard
I came inside for lunch and then went back out. Just got in about 10
minutes ago after getting my list up to about 62 species. If I stayed
out all day I'd grow that list. I THINK I saw a swainson's hawk and my
daughter thinks she saw a broad-winged. We also heard a meadowlark that
didn't make the list because we can't always tell if it's an actual
meadowlark or a starling. They're quite convincing sometimes.
Anyway...  We have not seen or heard from that kiskadee again. I think
it's gone. I was thinking, it seemed to be headed in a sort of ENE
direction. If anyone wanted to search(who knows, right?) I think it
would be wise to look at a map and then consider the bird. I don't know
what their preferred habitat would be but if I knew more about them and
what they'd like, it might give an idea of where it might stop.
For now I don't have any other thoughts on it other than the regret of
it not sticking around long enough for me to get a picture or my
daughter to see it. :(  Still in shock though.

My highlights include:
*American redstart* FOS
*Philadelphia vireo* FOS for me and lifer for my daughter(and two other
kids that came out to see it)
*yellow-billed cuckoo* FOS (I think. Have thought I've heard a few for
days but then I wouldn't be sure)

I feel like there were more firsts than that. We have cardinals feeding
young, chickadees and blue jays on nests. We watched a chickadee chase a
red-bellied woodpecker out of its area. that was fascinating.
Rose-breasted grosbeaks are still around. Singing orioles and tanagers.
About 50 cedar waxwings flew over in a few different groups. Tennessee
warbler is still being heard here and there. A Barred owl was calling
from the woods... not long after we heard some chatter from the
chickadees and cardinals(their nests are close to each other) and not
long after that the barred owl was right above the cardinal nest. I do
not know if it was interested in that nest OR if a predator, such as a
snake, was near the nest and perhaps the owl came in after that. Wont
ever know. The owl got spooked at the sight of me(I have that effect I
guess) and I didn't approach the nests to see what was going on and
things settled back down.

Now I have a lot of catching up to do on checklists for eBird so I
better get to that.

Side note...  This one very random sighting, right here in my yard of
all places... just has me itching to get out more and more and more
because as crazy as a sighting like that is... I am ALWAYS wondering how
many spectacular birds pass right through the state without anyone ever
noticing. It's a big state and we're not always looking... not to
mention if my head was turned in another direction I would have never
seen that bird and my daughter and I would have just been scratching our
heads at the weird sound that happened only once. IF I had the money I'd
rebuild my house and include a screened in observation deck on the top
somewhere... along with many other blinds in the yard... perhaps
boardwalks from one to another. Oh I could dream and dream. :)

Daniel Mason



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Date: 4/30/19 12:51 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: hummingbird banding
Hi Butch,

Last I knew, Tana Beasley at Cook's Lake was the only hummer bander in
the state. She trained with Bob Sargent.
I'm sure Karen Rowe has more current info.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.


On 4/30/2019 2:32 PM, Butch Tetzlaff wrote:
> Does anyone know of anyone who bands hummers in Arkansas?
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/19 12:32 pm
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: hummingbird banding
Does anyone know of anyone who bands hummers in Arkansas?

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/19 9:10 am
From: Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Backyard birds
Couldn’t believe my eyes when inside of ten minutes I had a red headed woodpecker, a red bellied woodpecker, an indigo bunting the Baltimore Oriole, catbird and a RTHU and few minutes later a brown headed nuthatch.
There also is a pair of brown thrashers.
What a way to start the morning
WLRCarol
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/30/19 7:21 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: You will NOT believe this one...
Special attention to NW Arkansas to be on the lookout...

So this morning I was hearing the squeaks of a rose-breasted grosbeak.
My 10 year old daughter was in the room so I explained to her that's
what we were hearing. I left the room for something and when I came
back, she asked me what it meant if a rose-breasted grosbeak
"screamed."  I had NO idea what she meant but didn't think much of it.

Then I went outside to bird... a little while later called my 18 year
old daughter out to assist with keeping track of sights and sounds as I
can get overwhelmed and lose track of all I'm hearing. After a little
while I saw a bird flying in from WSW, over the neighbor's yard. The
lighting isn't great out there this morning and all I saw was a lighter
colored bird that kind of reminded me of a dove or something but I said,
IF that's a dove it HAS to be a collared...  But it was flying over our
woods then.  Then, it landed. I hesitate to describe what I saw as I
don't think anyone will believe it. It was there for just a couple
seconds. Brown back... yellow on the front... black and white head. It
sort of squealed and then flew off. I had no time to even turn my camera
on... :(
I described what I saw to my daughter and she was in disbelief. I
searched the Merlin app for what I thought it was and, also surprising,
I was looking for the right bird. (I'm not always good with birds that
don't live around here)
*Great Kiskadee.*  I played some of the calls from Merlin and, that is
what we both heard. My oldest daughter wont count things she doesn't get
to ID by sight so she's pretty mad the bird left before she got a look.
When I did the playback, she confirmed that's what she heard.  I went
into the house and asked my 10 year old if that's what she heard and she
said yes. IF that is what she heard, that means it was hanging around
our neighborhood for a little while this morning without us knowing.
That gives a TINY bit of hope that it hasn't gone too far but, we've
been watching and waiting a while now and no luck so far.
We're on the East side of Siloam Springs and the bird took off in a ENE
direction, anywhere off towards the bentonville area perhaps? I sure
couldn't say but, anyone out birding today, keep you eyes open for this
wanderer. I hope it either comes back or someone else can find it and
photograph it so I wont have too many people thinking I'm nuts.
Makes me wonder what these storms rolling in will bring with them... and
sad that I probably can't get out and do much chasing til the weekend.

A little more FYI here, the hatchery in Centerton is raising the pond
that was lowered but has a couple smaller ones lowered as of yesterday.
I still have to confirm a few peep IDs but there was a willet there
among other birds.

Now to get back outside and continue scanning the skies til the rain
comes in...

Daniel Mason



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Date: 4/29/19 8:57 pm
From: Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22...>
Subject: first of season
Yesterdays FOS:

Baltimore oriole male feeding on oranges. A friend calls them flying
pumpkins.

Scissor-tailed flycatcher.

Meredith Hawkins
south of Little Italy
Hwy. 300

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 7:12 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - FOS Common Nighthawk - 4/29/2019
FOS sightings at Lake Fayetteville this evening included a Common Nighthawk flying over the environmental center and a Wood Thrush at the disc golf course. Rose-breasted Grosbeaks, Summer Tanagers, Baltimore Orioles and Indigo Buntings were all singing together near the environmental center. 9 warbler species observed - quite similar to most of my visits last week.

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 7:08 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: God Mississippi Kite
I didn't know what he meant, so I appreciate the clarification. :)

On Mon, Apr 29, 2019, 8:02 PM Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> wrote:

> We knew what you meant.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Apr 29, 2019, at 7:35 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <
> <karen...> wrote:
> >
> > Thought the Holy Ghost had a new form !
> >
> > Sent from my iPhone
> >
> >> On Apr 29, 2019, at 7:28 PM, Ruth Anderson <
> <0000029228ce55cf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
> >>
> >> FOS. Not God. Curse you spellchecker!
> >>
> >> Chuck
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPhone
> >>
> >>> On Apr 29, 2019, at 6:30 PM, Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> In the Western Hills subdivision in Little Rock on top of a snag next
> door to my house.
> >>>
> >>> Chuck Anderson
> >>>
> >>> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 6:48 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Osprey bath








https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=jtHD_1556482495


 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 6:02 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: God Mississippi Kite
We knew what you meant.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 29, 2019, at 7:35 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:
>
> Thought the Holy Ghost had a new form !
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Apr 29, 2019, at 7:28 PM, Ruth Anderson <0000029228ce55cf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> FOS. Not God. Curse you spellchecker!
>>
>> Chuck
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Apr 29, 2019, at 6:30 PM, Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> wrote:
>>>
>>> In the Western Hills subdivision in Little Rock on top of a snag next door to my house.
>>>
>>> Chuck Anderson
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 5:36 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Pbs live
I hope everyone is getting to watch PBS Live tonight. It’s a special live
show about Spring. It’ll be on tonight thru Wednesday. Starts at 7:00. Lots
of birds, and other things, countrywide.

Sandy B.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 5:35 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: God Mississippi Kite
Thought the Holy Ghost had a new form !

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 29, 2019, at 7:28 PM, Ruth Anderson <0000029228ce55cf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> FOS. Not God. Curse you spellchecker!
>
> Chuck
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Apr 29, 2019, at 6:30 PM, Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> wrote:
>>
>> In the Western Hills subdivision in Little Rock on top of a snag next door to my house.
>>
>> Chuck Anderson
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 5:28 pm
From: Ruth Anderson <0000029228ce55cf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: God Mississippi Kite
FOS. Not God. Curse you spellchecker!

Chuck

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 29, 2019, at 6:30 PM, Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> wrote:
>
> In the Western Hills subdivision in Little Rock on top of a snag next door to my house.
>
> Chuck Anderson
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 4:55 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: MIKI in the Heights
I saw one fly over my house this afternoon.

Cindy
Little Rock


 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 4:30 pm
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: God Mississippi Kite
In the Western Hills subdivision in Little Rock on top of a snag next door to my house.

Chuck Anderson

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 2:49 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Rose-breasted grosbeak
I had 1 rose-breasted grosbeak last year. I’m looking at 4 sitting on my feeder right now.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 11:19 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Two interesting observations at Erbie
I had a male and female purple finch last week for a day and the female
was here for a second day and both now gone.

I still have 22 male and 8 female Indigo Buntings, 8 Rose-breasted
grosbeaks, 10 Baltimore Orioles and 3 Orchard Orioles joining 28 other
species. The Orioles come in to the Oriole feeder but I think the big
draw is the blossoms on the Tulip Popular tree.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



We had a male Purple Finch at our feeder yesterday. Before raising the
> binocs, I'd of course expected a House Finch, and had to take long
> careful looks to convince myself otherwise. His calm behavior was
> consistent with his markings, and he made a couple of visits.
> Congratulations on your Bobwhite!
>
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
>
> On 4/29/2019 12:13 PM, Jack and Pam wrote:
>> We have a late female Purple Finch at our feeder. ??While watching he
>> finch we heard a Bobwhite, which is exciting since we haven't heard
>> one in the area for several years.
>>
>> Jack Stewart
>> At Erbie in Newton County
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 4/29/19 11:07 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Two interesting observations at Erbie
We had a male Purple Finch at our feeder yesterday. Before raising the
binocs, I'd of course expected a House Finch, and had to take long
careful looks to convince myself otherwise. His calm behavior was
consistent with his markings, and he made a couple of visits.
Congratulations on your Bobwhite!

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

On 4/29/2019 12:13 PM, Jack and Pam wrote:
> We have a late female Purple Finch at our feeder. ??While watching he
> finch we heard a Bobwhite, which is exciting since we haven't heard
> one in the area for several years.
>
> Jack Stewart
> At Erbie in Newton County


 

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Date: 4/29/19 10:13 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Two interesting observations at Erbie
We have a late female Purple Finch at our feeder.  While watching he finch we heard a Bobwhite, which is exciting since we haven't heard one in the area for several years.
Jack StewartAt Erbie in Newton County
 

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Date: 4/29/19 9:15 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: bobo
So I'm not imagining things. Looks like they're on the move not just by
my own accounts.

Last year or the year before I learned the flight calls of dickcissels.
And last year as I'd listen for them flying over the yard I picked up
some bobolinks. We don't have enough of the right habitat for either to
be interested but, they both fly over apparently each year.
So I've been waiting for the dickcissel calls to start listening for
bobolinks. Today I had at least 9 *dickcissels* fly over so I started
paying more attention to sounds from the sky. Sure enough I eventually
heard a *bobolink*. I LOVE it that some birds will sing while flying,
rather than just chip or something as there are just TOO many birds that
all sound the same to me sometimes. Anyway, I heard so, I looked up and
there goes three SMALL blackish birds. Didn't notice any others if they
flew over. There were yellow-rumped warblers on the move again and other
small warbler that would fly in and out and we just couldn't get IDs.
That always frustrates me because 1. it could be a bird I've never seen
and 2. it might be next year before I get another chance to see whatever
it was.  Who knows what we saw, it's still a good year so far so I
embrace all the good birds we're still seeing. Several tanagers and
rose-breasted grosbeaks, and lots of others.

And...  we finally got a legit *wilson's warbler* for the year. We heard
it at first and thought, well maybe. Eventually it stopped singing but
then, there it was where we could see it quite well.  Why is it I feel
like I have to see EVERY warbler I've ever seen come through all over
again? Saw a report of a blackpoll in Centerton and now I'm wondering if
we'll have one in the yard like we did last year... or the golden-winged
warbler. Time will tell.

Now I have to decide if the bobolinks overhead was a sign that I should
head up to centerton, go somewhere else, or just stay home? Decisions
decisions.

Daniel Mason



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Date: 4/29/19 6:54 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: DEVIL’S DEN SP FIELD TRIP SATURDAY MAY 4, 2019
The 2019 Spring Convention of the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) will be held May 35, 2019, at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute on Petit Jean Mountain. There are numerous interesting field trips and speakers at this meeting. More info at http://www.arbirds.org/index.html



In case you cant make this always interesting, birdy meeting, this coming weekend is also Birder's Weekend at Devil's Den State Park along Lee Creek in the Boston Mountains near Winslow. I am leading an easy Saturday May 4 bird walk in the park. Meet in the parking area at the lower Devil's Den Trailhead by Lee Creek bridge on Saturday morning at 9 am. This generally lasts a couple of hours. We often see a bunch of birds. This walk is just one of quite a few events over the weekend. Check with the park for details. All events are free and open to the public. Everyone is welcome, beginners-experts. If you need a map, Google: 11333 West AR Hwy 74 West Fork, AR 72774. You can also check out the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society web site for a park description: http://media.tripod.lycos.com/2020453/950081.pdf



The following weekend May 11-12 we will be out collecting data for International Migratory Bird Day. As in past years, Mike Mlodinow coordinates this effort in Benton and Washington counties. This involves all day birding in specific areas in the two counties. If you want to participate, contact Mike as soon as possible: <mamlod...><mailto:<mamlod...>.


 

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Date: 4/29/19 5:30 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Bobolinks at Lollie Bottoms
Having had sporadic reports of yellow-headed blackbirds showing up, I drove through Lollie Bottoms yesterday on my way home from Missouri. No yellow-heads, but I did manage to see a small flock of bobolinks near the intersection of Lollie Road and Easterwood Point Road. Dickcissels were also present all along the road. Lollie Bottoms and Lollie Road is located in the area of the Conway airport in Faulkner County.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/29/19 5:08 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Bobolinks at Hindsville
Yesterday was annual Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Ninestone Land Trust. On the way out to Ninestone, Vivek Govind Kumar and I made a 30 minute detour through historical Hindsville prairie. This has always been a good place to observe Grasshopper Sparrows. Fortunately for speed and safety of drivers -- but unfortunately for the sparrows and other grassland birds -- highway 412 was relocated and expanded by cutting right through the middle of this prairie. This gutted the best historical grasslands. Grasshopper Sparrows persist, albeit fewer.

So on our way to Ninestone, Vivek and I turned onto highway 412B, drove to the Valley Caf, and began our informal survey by turning east onto Madison County 8500. On its way east, MC 8500 leaves the village and continues for about mile through former prairie fields; we heard and then saw our FOS Dickcissels plus Savannah Sparrows. It then junctions with 412. Continue east, cross (carefully!) 412, and theres another 1.0-mile or so of 8500. Its on this longer bit of MC8500 we found flocks of Dickcissels then a small visible flock of male Bobolinks singing on barbed wire. More Savannahs, etc., then at least one Grasshopper Sparrow. An Upland Sandpiper flew over us.

As we picked up bird after bird, Vivek kept working on the list for this segment of todays trip out to Ninestone. Link to his Hindsville list: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55502894<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__ebird.org_view_checklist_S55502894&d=DwMFaQ&c=7ypwAowFJ8v-mw8AB-SdSueVQgSDL4HiiSaLK01W8HA&r=H1hTcN0NM8wYZkkrS28mdw&m=Youq3SUmxJ8nYGGMuudeMT9qWqWz8zLWXuUoKr_vGPE&s=1lInxMbmwS5s5y1dR0jJCvWQ_h3TomNJliVD35i_FdY&e=>


 

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Date: 4/28/19 4:39 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: yard birds today, Centerton
I tripped over something this morning and smacked my toes into a chair, as a result I missed the Ninestone field trip due to my clumsiness.

So instead, at 7:30 AM I put on a coat, hat, and gloves, and braved the 44 degree temps with a pretty stiff wind at my house and sat on the back porch.

In an hour I had 19 species.

It’s 6:15 PM and I topped out at 30 species. All in one tree, or in my yard.

At about 8 AM I had the best bird of the day in my opinion.

A Blackpoll Warbler. When first seen I thought it was a Black and White, it had it’s back to me high in the tree and dropped into the leaves but about 5 minutes later I got a really good look. Yes!!! Solid. Black. Cap. And it was gone.

Complete list for the day

Warblers

Blackpoll
Yellow
Common-yellowthroat
Yellow-rumped
Tennessee

Sparrows

White-throated
White-creowned
Lincolns
Chipping

Doves

White-winged this bird is getting to be pretty consistent in the evening when I get home. Apparently it’s in the yard frequently during the day now, as well.
Mourning
Eurasian-collared

Vireos

Blue-headed
Warbling


Wrens

House
Carolina

Assorted others

Blue Jays
Common Grackles
Red-winged Blackbird

Goldfinch
House Finch

Baltimore Oriole
Brown Thrasher
Robin
Cardinal
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Gray Catbird
Chickadee

If you count the Turkey Vulture that flew over it’s 31 species for the day.

With the rain coming three days this week hopefully next Friday will be a good bird day, too



Jacque Brown, Centerton, AR.
<bluebird2...>
 

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Date: 4/28/19 1:08 pm
From: Carol Meyerdirk <0000019a25042283-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Orioles
Had a family of four orioles eating suet, as well as nectar and fresh orange.
Also a brown headed nuthatch and catbird resident. Spring is so much fun!!
WLR Carol behind Good Earth Garden Center

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/28/19 10:13 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Big Day birding around Fort Smith 27 April
Yesterday, twelve of us in a convoy of vehicles started at 530am; I burned out at 5pm and headed home but the other indefatigables headed further west to Sequoyah.  
In about 12 hours of nearly nonstop birding, we tallied 102 species.  Ebird lists below.  Thanks to Bill Beall for all the driving; and to Fillmore for putting up with my eternally hungry self.
Highway 71 and 282 https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55508569Boston Mountain Nurseries https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55509425Boston Mountain Rd./Hwy 71 https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55509714Cartwright Mtn. Rd. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55510646Artists Point https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55511012Lake Ft Smith State Park https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55511296Highway 282/I-49 bridge https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55511431Sharp Chapel Rd. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55511512Alma WTP https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55511861Highway 162  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55512009E. Arnold Rd. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55512232Trimble Lock and Dam https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55512335Kinross Drive, FSM eBird Checklist - 27 Apr 2019 - Kinross Drive, Ft. Smith - 1 species

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eBird Checklist - 27 Apr 2019 - Kinross Drive, Ft. Smith - 1 species

Submitted by Ragupathy Kannan.
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KannanFt. Smith


 

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Date: 4/28/19 9:51 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Blue bird box Fledgers
As of today: 5 Eastern Bluebirds. 6 Carolina Chickadees soon.



Jeff Short


 

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Date: 4/28/19 5:02 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Barn swallow deterrent
My sister had that problem with them wanting to nest over her front door. All they had to do was discourage them long enough to get them to move on elsewhere to build the nests. If they are building on top of the camera and it has a flat surface on top, put a rock on it.

If they don’t build on the camera , rather in the vicinity of the camera so the coming and going triggers the security system they need to check and see if they can tear down the nests under construction, before they are are finished and occupied. Most of us don’t really like to see that but at some point the birds would need to find a different location if they want to raise young. Jacque Brown, Centerton




> On Apr 27, 2019, at 10:15 PM, Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Ok, I hear what you’re saying about netting! (Kind of figured what I had in mind would be misunderstood, no matter what!) that’s why I asked about alternative ideas. When I said “netting”, maybe I should have used “screening material.” At any rate, I did not have ANY thought that the idea would be to trap birds inside or under the netting. Rather, that prior to the birds occupying the top of the security camera, some sort of screening material could be used around the camera that would allow it to function for security purposes, but would prevent access to the camera’s surface for use as a nesting area, so the security system won’t be set off constantly.
>
> Again, any ideas for what would be a feasible solution in the future? (BTW, swallow nests aren’t particularly portable). I’d like to focus on what could be done to prevent nesting in the location next year, not getting them to move or abandon the current nest.
>
> Thanks!
>
> DeLynn Hearn
> 317 West K Ave.
> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
> 501-472-8769
>
>
> On Apr 27, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> <mailto:<jpandjf...>> wrote:
>
>> Not sure what kind of netting you're thinking of, but please don't advise they use "bird netting."?? It causes horrendous, prolonged death of critters that get caught in it and can't back out, notably snakes, but others as well.?? I've seen it way too many times.
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Janine (who has netting nightmares)
>>
>>
>>
>> On 4/27/2019 12:51 PM, Warbling Vireo wrote:
>>> I just got a call from a guy wanting to discourage barn swallow nesting from certain areas. He knows he can???t destroy nests!
>>> He???s already tried a rubber snake and a plastic owl. Both worked for a while, until they figured it out.
>>> The current issue is that they???ve decided his security camera is a great spot, which is setting off constant alerts! I???m going to suggest netting around the cameras, (like the kind you???d use over fruit trees), but anyone have any other ideas?
>>>
>>> DeLynn Hearn
>>> 317 West K Ave.
>>> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
>>> 501-472-8769
>>>
>>


 

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Date: 4/27/19 8:15 pm
From: Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Barn swallow deterrent
Ok, I hear what you’re saying about netting! (Kind of figured what I had in mind would be misunderstood, no matter what!) that’s why I asked about alternative ideas. When I said “netting”, maybe I should have used “screening material.” At any rate, I did not have ANY thought that the idea would be to trap birds inside or under the netting. Rather, that prior to the birds occupying the top of the security camera, some sort of screening material could be used around the camera that would allow it to function for security purposes, but would prevent access to the camera’s surface for use as a nesting area, so the security system won’t be set off constantly.

Again, any ideas for what would be a feasible solution in the future? (BTW, swallow nests aren’t particularly portable). I’d like to focus on what could be done to prevent nesting in the location next year, not getting them to move or abandon the current nest.

Thanks!

DeLynn Hearn
317 West K Ave.
N. Little Rock, AR 72116
501-472-8769


> On Apr 27, 2019, at 4:48 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
> Not sure what kind of netting you're thinking of, but please don't advise they use "bird netting."?? It causes horrendous, prolonged death of critters that get caught in it and can't back out, notably snakes, but others as well.?? I've seen it way too many times.
>
> Thanks,
> Janine (who has netting nightmares)
>
>
>
>> On 4/27/2019 12:51 PM, Warbling Vireo wrote:
>> I just got a call from a guy wanting to discourage barn swallow nesting from certain areas. He knows he can???t destroy nests!
>> He???s already tried a rubber snake and a plastic owl. Both worked for a while, until they figured it out.
>> The current issue is that they???ve decided his security camera is a great spot, which is setting off constant alerts! I???m going to suggest netting around the cameras, (like the kind you???d use over fruit trees), but anyone have any other ideas?
>>
>> DeLynn Hearn
>> 317 West K Ave.
>> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
>> 501-472-8769
>>
>

 

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Date: 4/27/19 8:13 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Barn swallow deterrent
Netting is best at preventing access to large spaces and should be tight with no entry spaces. I stopped draping netting over my strawberries when I caught two snakes (Coluber and Masticophis) which I was able to release without harm.

Products like Tanglefoot, Stickyfoot, etc are too messy and of limited life--may be good for one season.

Nixalite spikes can work on architectural structures but the spikes work best on larger birds than swallows.
Carpet strips, those pointy metal strips along floors that hold carpets tight, may be flexible enough and could be trimmed to fit and attached--maybe hot-glued-- to the cameras.

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bob Day
Sent: Saturday, April 27, 2019 1:13 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Barn swallow deterrent

Barn Swallows are trying to nest on top of our light hanging down by our front door; it hangs by a chain. We tried an owl decoy too but realized it didn’t work when we looked out and the swallows were sitting on the owl’s head!

We have removed the owl and taped a plastic teepee above/around the light, so that they can’t land. Looks like crap but works. Not sure if your friend can do a similar jurry-rigging, but you only have to keep them out for a couple months, whereupon it’s too late for them to nest.

Bob Day
Bentonville, AR



Sent from my iPhone email thingie; please excuse the brevity.

> On Apr 27, 2019, at 12:51 PM, Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I just got a call from a guy wanting to discourage barn swallow nesting from certain areas. He knows he can’t destroy nests!
> He’s already tried a rubber snake and a plastic owl. Both worked for a while, until they figured it out.
> The current issue is that they’ve decided his security camera is a great spot, which is setting off constant alerts! I’m going to suggest netting around the cameras, (like the kind you’d use over fruit trees), but anyone have any other ideas?
>
> DeLynn Hearn
> 317 West K Ave.
> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
> 501-472-8769
 

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Date: 4/27/19 6:49 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - White-winged Dove/Audubon's (Yellow-rumped) Warbler - 4/27/2019
I did a complete circuit of Lake Fayetteville this morning/afternoon with Peter Shaffer. We started at the boat dock on the northern side at 7 am and finished there at 4 pm. 77 (+2) species observed. FOS Blue-headed Vireo, Philadelphia Vireo, Rose-breasted Grosbeak and Blue Grosbeak.

A White-winged Dove was seen briefly in flight over the boat dock area at 7:15 am. It flew towards the softball fields at the western end of the lake. We combed the area thoroughly to try and get pictures but were unable to find it again.

A male Audubon's Warbler was seen and photographed on the southern side of the lake, approximately halfway between the Botanical Garden and Veterans Park. It was with a flock of 12 Myrtle Warblers.

An Eastern Whip-poor-will/Chuck-will's-widow was seen briefly when it was flushed from the leaf litter on the main nature trail east of the environmental center. Not seen well enough to confirm identification at species level. My first observation of a nightjar sp. at Lake Fayetteville.

Warblers - Louisiana Waterthrush (4 - a pair at the inlet dividing the disc golf course and another pair at the spillway), Tennessee (1), Orange-crowned (2), Nashville (4), Kentucky (2), Common Yellowthroat (1), American Redstart (1), Northern Parula (24 - several singing), Yellow (2), Yellow-rumped (Myrtle) (63), Yellow-rumped (Audubon's) (1), Yellow-throated (1).

Vireos - White-eyed (20 - several singing), Blue-headed (1), Philadelphia (1), Warbling (1), Red-eyed (11).

Flycatchers - Eastern Phoebe (5), Eastern Kingbird (3), Scissor-tailed (4).

Hirundines - Northern Rough-winged Swallow (2), Purple Martin (2), Tree Swallow (3), Barn Swallow (15).

Sparrows - Chipping (2), White-crowned (1), White-throated (43), Lincoln's (2), Eastern Towhee (5).

Waterfowl - Blue-winged Teal (5), Pied-billed Grebe (2), Double-crested Cormorant (8).

Miscellaneous - White-winged Dove (1), Chimney Swift (1), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (7 - one female seen and photographed on nest), Spotted Sandpiper (2), Green Heron (1), Osprey (1), House Wren (4), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (38), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (3), Swainson's Thrush (9), Gray Catbird (2), Cedar Waxwing (26), American Goldfinch (22), Baltimore Oriole (1), Summer Tanager (4), Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1), Blue Grosbeak (1), Indigo Bunting (2).

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/27/19 5:59 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: FOS Centerton yard birds.
A 1st year Orchard Oriole found the jelly I put out today, a Magnolia Warbler and a female Common Yellowthroat visited the yard, too

Also had a Lincoln Sparrow and female Indigo Bunting visit along with several Yellow-rumped Warblers and 2 Yellow Warblers.


Jacque Brown
<bluebird2...>
 

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Date: 4/27/19 3:48 pm
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: finally arrived
For years, "our" summer tanagers arrived on May 1. Last year, a bit earlier. This year, I've been reading about their arrival in the area on this list, but only today did they arrive to our woods, where they are here to stay. I say "they" even though we may be hearing only one bird; and they are always so high in our oak-hickory woods that they're hard to spot.


Lots of other loudmouths around us from well before dawn to dark; some are migrating, some staying. We have fish crows nesting at the top of our tallest pine tree -- nice to have them around. A black cat, a white (non-deaf) one, and two tigers from our neighborhood explore here, and keep the chipmunks hidden among the stone walls.


Enjoying the shade as the sun strengthens on the south side of Mount Sequoyah, Fayetteville.

Harriet Jansma

 

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Date: 4/27/19 3:21 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Ninestone FOS
Today Rose Ann Barnhill and Cory Gallipeau came by to visit Don and me for
a few hours. We noted the following new arrivals on this beautiful morning
and blustery afternoon in late April.

Kentucky Warbler (across Piney Creek)
Ovenbird (at their usual entry point at bottom of Walnut Hollow)
Rose-breasted Grosbeak (male in Grandmother Maple by carport)
Spotted Sandpiper (in Piney Creek below house)
Black-throated Green Warbler (just across drive in Wildy-Wild)
Great Crested Flycatcher (in savanna)
Baltimore Oriole (put out oranges yesterday and Don saw 4 males this
afternoon)

Forgot to mention that on April 23 I watched a Lincoln's Sparrow hopping
around in the native plant terraces off the deck and on April 24 the first
Summer Tanager was singing in the savanna. Today Rose Ann photographed him
in the American Beech tree by the carport. The Red-headed Woodpeckers seem
to be setting up household in pine snags and the Red-breasted Nuthatches
are still here visiting the suet feeder!
Plus there are freshly laid Monarch eggs on some newly emerging sprouts of
Common Milkweed.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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Date: 4/27/19 2:50 pm
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Gillam Park Sunday morning
Weather permitting, I'm going to bird Gillam Park in SE Little Rock close to
Audubon Arkansas. I'll get there at 8. If you want to join me please do.
Rumor has it a Blackburnian Warbler was seen Friday. Up to you but you
might bring calf high boots in case any off-roading is required. Also if
you see a cottonmouth, it will be harder to jump out of calf high boots than
tennis shoes.





Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the
something you were after." - Thorin




 

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Date: 4/27/19 2:49 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Barn swallow deterrent
Not sure what kind of netting you're thinking of, but /please/ don't
advise they use "bird netting."?? It causes horrendous, prolonged death
of critters that get caught in it and can't back out, notably snakes,
but others as well.?? I've seen it way too many times.

Thanks,
Janine (who has netting nightmares)



On 4/27/2019 12:51 PM, Warbling Vireo wrote:
> I just got a call from a guy wanting to discourage barn swallow nesting from certain areas. He knows he can???t destroy nests!
> He???s already tried a rubber snake and a plastic owl. Both worked for a while, until they figured it out.
> The current issue is that they???ve decided his security camera is a great spot, which is setting off constant alerts! I???m going to suggest netting around the cameras, (like the kind you???d use over fruit trees), but anyone have any other ideas?
>
> DeLynn Hearn
> 317 West K Ave.
> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
> 501-472-8769
>


 

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Date: 4/27/19 2:22 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: BIRDING AT BOYD POINT TODAY
This morning was an active time of birding at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. The 5 Am. Avocets in breeding plumage and the female Ruddy Turnstone were still present and very approachable. I was able to observe and photograph at close range two beautiful Eared Grebes in full breeding plumage. Additional notables were 10 female Wilson's Phalarope in breeding plumage and a single Baird's Sandpiper, along with large numbers of Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs and Spotted Sandpipers.
John Redman
 

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Date: 4/27/19 1:14 pm
From: Amy Hall <00000141e1151b9c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOS Baltimore Oriole
A male Baltimore Oriole fed at our jelly station this afternoon.  Our mulberries are still green. Amy HallCabot, Arkansas
 

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Date: 4/27/19 12:13 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Re: Barn swallow deterrent
I would definitely NOT suggest any kind of netting. Many years ago when birds were roosting in a tree just west of the Little Rock airport terminal travelers complained about bird droppings when they used that exit to get to or from their cars. Airport management thought they were solving the problem by surrounding the tree with netting. The result? Scores of bird s trapped in the netting, and left to die. A friend who knew I was involved with the local Audubon chapter alerted me to what was going on. I may still have pictures of all the birds carcasses hanging from the netting. It was not a pretty sight.

Solution #2 by airport management when I alerted them to all the birds solution #1 had killed? Cutting down the tree.

With unenlightened management like this it's no wonder we have the much bigger environmental problems we do.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas


On Apr 27, 2019, at 12:51 PM, Warbling Vireo wrote:

> I just got a call from a guy wanting to discourage barn swallow nesting from certain areas. He knows he cant destroy nests!
> Hes already tried a rubber snake and a plastic owl. Both worked for a while, until they figured it out.
> The current issue is that theyve decided his security camera is a great spot, which is setting off constant alerts! Im going to suggest netting around the cameras, (like the kind youd use over fruit trees), but anyone have any other ideas?
>
> DeLynn Hearn
> 317 West K Ave.
> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
> 501-472-8769
 

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Date: 4/27/19 12:09 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Golden-winged Warbler
Ann Honeycutt and I saw a male and female Golden-winged Warbler at Maumelle RV Park today before noon. Couldn’t ask for better views. Turn right at the entry ranger station into the parking lot, then follow the paved path up and over the hill. Other warblers as well.

Ed Laster
Little Rock
 

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Date: 4/27/19 11:13 am
From: Bob Day <rhday52...>
Subject: Re: Barn swallow deterrent
Barn Swallows are trying to nest on top of our light hanging down by our front door; it hangs by a chain. We tried an owl decoy too but realized it didn’t work when we looked out and the swallows were sitting on the owl’s head!

We have removed the owl and taped a plastic teepee above/around the light, so that they can’t land. Looks like crap but works. Not sure if your friend can do a similar jurry-rigging, but you only have to keep them out for a couple months, whereupon it’s too late for them to nest.

Bob Day
Bentonville, AR



Sent from my iPhone email thingie; please excuse the brevity.

> On Apr 27, 2019, at 12:51 PM, Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I just got a call from a guy wanting to discourage barn swallow nesting from certain areas. He knows he can’t destroy nests!
> He’s already tried a rubber snake and a plastic owl. Both worked for a while, until they figured it out.
> The current issue is that they’ve decided his security camera is a great spot, which is setting off constant alerts! I’m going to suggest netting around the cameras, (like the kind you’d use over fruit trees), but anyone have any other ideas?
>
> DeLynn Hearn
> 317 West K Ave.
> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
> 501-472-8769
 

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Date: 4/27/19 10:51 am
From: Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Barn swallow deterrent
I just got a call from a guy wanting to discourage barn swallow nesting from certain areas. He knows he can’t destroy nests!
He’s already tried a rubber snake and a plastic owl. Both worked for a while, until they figured it out.
The current issue is that they’ve decided his security camera is a great spot, which is setting off constant alerts! I’m going to suggest netting around the cameras, (like the kind you’d use over fruit trees), but anyone have any other ideas?

DeLynn Hearn
317 West K Ave.
N. Little Rock, AR 72116
501-472-8769
 

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Date: 4/27/19 8:00 am
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Subject: Painted Bunting
Just saw the Painted Bunting along with 12 Indigo Buntings at the Pinnacle Mountain SP Visitor Center feeders.

I've waited almost an hour for it to show up.

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock



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Date: 4/27/19 5:03 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Angry Birds
I’ll try to keep this short but last weekend I was at the Centerton fish hatchery, it was kinda slow. On my way out I noticed some Starlings fly off and what seemed to be dead birds by the silo thing by the drive in gates.

The birds weren’t dead, there were two Starlings locked in battle. Now I’ve seen bird skirmishes that lasted for a few seconds before but this was an EPIC fight!


I don’t know how long it had been going on before I noticed but I watched for 20 minutes or more while the beak grabbing and talon swiping went on. About 5 minutes later they were breast to breast each had a hold of the others knees and would not let go. At that point all they could do was roll around in the grass to try to get the upper position and pin the other down. Locked together this way they were pecking at each other HARD and grabbing at each others faces by the beak. One seemed to have the advantage then the other would manage to roll on top and give a few good whacks.

I was taking photos all along, the sun was shining, the Starlings feathers were such beautiful colors, and their beaks showed that blood had been drawn by both parties. It was still going on when I left. When I went back the following day I really expected to find a mortally wounded Starling but unless something carried off a body it seems the battle was resolved.


Jacque Brown
<bluebird2...>
 

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Date: 4/27/19 2:00 am
From: Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Murray Park - Little Rock
It sounds like a great time to be birding in Arkansas! Hoping to be back in LR mid-May.

Take care,

Vickie H Becker
PMB 1593
401 E 8th St, #214
Sioux Falls, SD 57103-7049

501-508-0984
<Vhbecker...>


On Apr 26, 2019, at 21:20, Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> wrote:

It is such a pretty day I decided to go to Murray Park (Little Rock) for
lunch. Heard three Warbling Vireos singing in different locations. The
second was by the boat launch, the third was in the 2nd section where the
pavilions are located in the brush that lines the river.

I drove through the doggie playground and tried to relocate the suspected
Northern Flicker nest I found a couple of weeks ago, but someone was parked
in that spot. So I stopped in one of the other parking spots when I noticed
a Tufted Titmouse sorting through and gathering up a large amount of dog
hair someone had left on the ground, but before I could see where the
titmouse was taking it, someone drove up beside me and blocked my view. It
was obvious I was watching something with my binoculars, so they both just
looked at me and said "sorry, but we couldn't park on the other side."
Grrr. So I left.

A few pelicans and cormorants are still hanging around, saw a Forster's
Tern flying up river. Lots of mockingbirds this year and so far only 1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. No kingbirds yet.

Nice lunch break. And yes Sandy Berger it was hard to tear myself away to
return to work and responsibility.

Dottie
Little Rock
 

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Date: 4/26/19 9:27 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: SHOREBIRDS AND GREBES AT BOYD POINT
This morning, I observed and photographed 5 Am.Avocets in elegant breeding plumage at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. Other notables were 27 Greater Yellowlegs 30+ Spotted Sandpipers and 6 Black-necked Stilts. An hour later Delos McCauley observed 2 Eared Grebes in breeding plumage. I returned in the late afternoon and observed and photographed a female Ruddy Turnstone in breeding plumage.
John Redman
 

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Date: 4/26/19 4:46 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BLACK-AND-WHITE FLEDGLINGS ALREADY?
Black-and-white Warblers were the first birds I saw today at Devils Den State Park. I heard lots of excited chips. They were close. There was quite a commotion involving several birds, at least 3. As I watched it occurred to me this was a family group and fledglings were being fed out of the nest. The earliest arrival date for northwest Arkansas is a bird Bill Beall saw on March 14, 2003, near Fort Smith at Janet Huckabee Nature Center. Typically we dont see first ones until around the last 10 days or last week or so in March. While working on Arkansas Birds, I found an old nesting record for them at Russellville, where there was a nest with eggs as early as March 26. If incubation involves 10-12 days, and young leave the nest at 8-12 days, birds in that Russellville nest could have hatched around April 5-7, and been on the wing by April 18 or so. Birds that arrived at Devils Den by March 20, 2019, could be on this schedule. Maybe this mornings birds at Devils Den were early arrivals and early in nesting?


 

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Date: 4/26/19 4:43 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Birds today FOS
I forgot Gray Catbird as a FOS yard bird.



> On Apr 26, 2019, at 3:18 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>
> Today FOS birds
>
> My Yard
>
> Summer Tanager 1
> Yellow Warbler 1
>
> Centerton Fish hatchery
>
> Warbling Vireo 2
> Indigo Bunting 1
>
>
> Lake Atalanta, Rogers AR
>
> Hermit Thrush 2
>
>
>
> not FOS but biggest numbers
>
> Fish hatchery
>
> Yellow-rumped Warbler 22
> Savannah Sparrow 32
>
> Lake Atalanta
>
> Goldfinch approx 25 in one flock in one area and another 10 in another area.
>
>
>
>
>
> Jacque Brown
> <bluebird2...>
>
>
>
 

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Date: 4/26/19 1:18 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Birds today FOS
Today FOS birds

My Yard

Summer Tanager 1
Yellow Warbler 1

Centerton Fish hatchery

Warbling Vireo 2
Indigo Bunting 1


Lake Atalanta, Rogers AR

Hermit Thrush 2



not FOS but biggest numbers

Fish hatchery

Yellow-rumped Warbler 22
Savannah Sparrow 32

Lake Atalanta

Goldfinch approx 25 in one flock in one area and another 10 in another area.





Jacque Brown
<bluebird2...>
 

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Date: 4/26/19 12:52 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob Area 4-26-19
Highlights at Bald Knob NWR today were a yellow warbler, our first dickcissel of the year, at least one willet, and two Bell's vireos.
Highlights from Mingo Creek Rd include one peregrine falcon circling round and round, and one bobolink flew right past our windshield.
Glenn and  Michelle WyattCabot 


 

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Date: 4/26/19 12:21 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: Murray Park - Little Rock
It is such a pretty day I decided to go to Murray Park (Little Rock) for
lunch. Heard three Warbling Vireos singing in different locations. The
second was by the boat launch, the third was in the 2nd section where the
pavilions are located in the brush that lines the river.

I drove through the doggie playground and tried to relocate the suspected
Northern Flicker nest I found a couple of weeks ago, but someone was parked
in that spot. So I stopped in one of the other parking spots when I noticed
a Tufted Titmouse sorting through and gathering up a large amount of dog
hair someone had left on the ground, but before I could see where the
titmouse was taking it, someone drove up beside me and blocked my view. It
was obvious I was watching something with my binoculars, so they both just
looked at me and said "sorry, but we couldn't park on the other side."
Grrr. So I left.

A few pelicans and cormorants are still hanging around, saw a Forster's
Tern flying up river. Lots of mockingbirds this year and so far only 1
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. No kingbirds yet.

Nice lunch break. And yes Sandy Berger it was hard to tear myself away to
return to work and responsibility.

Dottie
Little Rock
 

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Date: 4/25/19 7:17 pm
From: Ed Tiede <0000012caede6260-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOS Painted Bunting
This afternoon I observed a male Painted Bunting at the feeders of the visitor center at Pinnacle Mountain State Park, in Pulaski County. Adult breeding plumage, all colored out. A first for me to observe a PABU in AR.
Cheers, Edward Tiede

 

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Date: 4/25/19 6:56 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: FOS Northern Waterthrush - Lake Fayetteville - 4/25/2019
I visited Lake Fayetteville for the third evening in a row, hoping that the overnight rain had brought more migrants in. However, it was relatively quiet compared to yesterday and the day before. Most species observed yesterday were still present, albeit in lower numbers. A Northern Waterthrush (1-FOS) was foraging along the lakeshore near the disc golf course. The Common Loons (2) seen yesterday were still present on the lake.

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/25/19 5:27 pm
From: Donna Crabill <drcrabill...>
Subject: Backyard Birds today
Backyard today:   Indigo bunting, Blue Grosbeaks (Male and female) and Summer tanager.
Donna CrabillSherwood
 

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Date: 4/25/19 4:30 pm
From: Cody Massery <codythebirder...>
Subject: Willets
There are currently 29 Willets on the sandbar (35.108427,-92.555075) at the Cadron Settlement Park.

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>


 

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Date: 4/25/19 3:53 pm
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: FOS
Indigo Bunting at the feeders.



In Oxley/Alco



Kara


 

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Date: 4/25/19 3:46 pm
From: Meredith Hawkins <merehawkins22...>
Subject: FOS today
Brown thrasher and great crested flycatcher.

Meredith H.
Hwy. 300 - just south of Little Italy

 

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Date: 4/25/19 1:14 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GREAT PLAINS SPRINKLES NORTHBOUND MIGRANTS AROUND CENTERTON
Rain and north winds have slowed migration through northwest Arkansas. Yesterday and today I managed a few hours on the former prairies at and around Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. Sometimes these weather patterns produce fall out. That seemed the case today, with birds coming in and out of the hatchery. Some stay a while, others only briefly. Here are highlights.

Canada Goose two family groups, with 4 and 2 recently hatched goslings, yellow and fuzzy.

Blue-winged Teal are present on farm ponds and some of the hatchery ponds. My count today was at least 25.

15 shorebird species during the two days: American Golden-Plover 1 bird remains in pasture along Anglin. Semipalmated Plover 3. Killdeer. Spotted Sandpiper at least 14 at hatchery today. Solitary Sandpiper 1 (yesterday, pond on Digby Road). Greater Yellowlegs 6. Lesser Yellowlegs 21. Semipalmated Sandpiper 5. Western Sandpiper 1. Least Sandpiper 1. Bairds Sandpiper 4. Pectoral Sandpiper 6 (yesterday, pond on Digby Road). Dunlin 1 (at hatchery today). Buff-breasted Sandpiper (1 today at hatchery). Wilsons Phalarope 1.

Besides these, yesterday a single Franklins Gull with black head and pinkish breast made a few passes over the hatchery. A Forsters Tern was also present for a while.


 

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Date: 4/25/19 10:25 am
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
Subject: FOS
Had my first Baltimore Oriole today together with 2 Rose-breasted grosbeaks.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 4/25/19 10:19 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Late fruiting Mulberries this year
Where's Murray Park?
On Thursday, 25 April, 2019, 1:09:54 pm GMT-4, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:

THE 2 mulberry trees in Murray Park are also tardy however the usual suspects are beginning to stake their claims on it.   

Sent from my iPhone
On Apr 25, 2019, at 10:34 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:


All mulberry trees I know of in Fort Smith are still green with just a pink spot or two in some fruits. 
the migrating Swainson's Thrushes and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are out of luck this year.  
In 2016 and 2017, the tree in my yard was teeming with birds by this time.  See https://scholarworks.uark.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3310&context=jaas
KannanFt. Smith

 

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Date: 4/25/19 10:10 am
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: Late fruiting Mulberries this year
THE 2 mulberry trees in Murray Park are also tardy however the usual suspects are beginning to stake their claims on it.

Sent from my iPhone

On Apr 25, 2019, at 10:34 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...><mailto:<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>> wrote:

All mulberry trees I know of in Fort Smith are still green with just a pink spot or two in some fruits.

the migrating Swainson's Thrushes and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are out of luck this year.

In 2016 and 2017, the tree in my yard was teeming with birds by this time.
See https://scholarworks.uark.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3310&context=jaas

Kannan
Ft. Smith
 

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Date: 4/25/19 9:10 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Another update
First, I'll be watching the reports today to see if it's as pressing as
I'm telling myself it is to try and get out to the fish hatchery today.
(random interjection, got a male red-bellied drumming on the feeder as I
type this, about 10 feet from where I'm sitting. We have at least 5 that
visit the feeders. I think I counted 6 or 7 one day in the winter.)

Some good rain came through last night and there were plenty of warblers
coming in late in the day yesterday so I'm already dreaming of what may
have shown up. Saw a report on eBird that was just a description of a
shorebird. I'm not entirely sure but it sounded a bit like a wilson's
phalarope. Between a pond being drained and the rain, there should be
some good mud there today. Will have to be later, if I can talk my wife
into it. :)

A few days ago I reported a *kite* flying over along with some
swainson's hawks. Well, apparently it wasn't a kite. In the field, that
was my best guess based on what I saw. I knew it wasn't a buteo or
accipiter and it gave me a kite like impression but it was flaying away
fast enough that really good looks didn't happen. Got pictures but they
were also as it was getting further away. Reviewing them later on
revealed a*peregrine falcon*. At first I was disappointed but, that was
silly of me. I've only seen them a couple times before and it will
likely be the only one I see this year. We had one over our yard last
year as well. Last year's was more exciting as it was lighter out so we
got better looks AND it was carrying(and possibly tearing into) what
appeared to be a common nighthawk.

I asked about wilson's warblers the other day. when I'm uncertain, I
pursue til I'm either satisfied or give up. Not long ago I removed the
audubon's field guide off my phone because it didn't always behave well.
Installed merlin. Pros and cons to both I think but I've been
disappointed with the sound files on merlin. Too few for some birds and
ridiculously long pauses between songs for several of them.
BUT, that's the app I was using, listening to the wilson's and nashville
warbler songs. Both of them, the last part of the song is about
identical... I mean, REALLY close. And the beginning part of the bird I
kept hearing sounded closer to the wilson's than all the nashville songs
I'm familiar with. But today we got a look at a nashville making that
confusing song right in front of us.
That's the danger and tricky part of birding by ear for some species.
There are so many variations to what some of them sing... some of them,
if you were to play the different sound files, sound like totally
different birds. And some of them just sound a LOT alike. In fact, I've
brought in a common yellowthroat playing a particular sedge wren call.
Anyway, mystery solved... not that I can prove it wasn't a wilson's I
heard the other day but between what I heard and saw today, and the fact
that this would still be a LITTLE early for wilson's, I feel more
confident calling them nashvilles at this point.
I haven't paid a lot of attention to behavior in the past but I sure
don't remember having THAT much trouble finding a wilson's when I knew
one was present so that had me questioning it as well. This bird just
didn't want to be seen yesterday.

And there's a wood thrush singing now. I LOVE these kind of gray and wet
mornings. :)  My only regret is that I can't visit all my favorite spots
every single day.

Daniel Mason



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Date: 4/25/19 8:34 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Late fruiting Mulberries this year
All mulberry trees I know of in Fort Smith are still green with just a pink spot or two in some fruits. 
the migrating Swainson's Thrushes and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are out of luck this year.  
In 2016 and 2017, the tree in my yard was teeming with birds by this time.  See https://scholarworks.uark.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=3310&context=jaas
KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 4/25/19 8:13 am
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Migration last night
Swainson's and Gray-cheeked Thrushes were migrating in force last night. I heard the flight calls of both species several times between 11 pm and 1 am. One Yellow-billed Cuckoo was heard at 12:20 am.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55389563

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55389712

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/25/19 6:27 am
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: FOS summer tanager, wood thrush & E. Meadowlark.
Today & yesterday.

Sent from my iPod
 

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Date: 4/24/19 7:54 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 4/24/2019
I visited Lake Fayetteville again this evening. FOS sightings included Common Loon (2), Baltimore Oriole (3) and Yellow-breasted Chat (1).

A very confiding Prothonotary Warbler posed for some nice photographs. This bird was quite bold and was only 2 feet from my face at one point - the best views I have ever had of this species.

Good numbers of warblers were present, with Yellow-rumped (42) being the most abundant species. Other species included Black-and-white (2), Prothonotary (2), Tennessee (4), Orange-crowned (3), Nashville (5), Common Yellowthroat (1), Northern Parula (9), Yellow (2), Yellow-throated (3).

Flycatchers - Eastern Phoebe (1), Eastern Kingbird (7), Scissor-tailed (1).

Vireos - White-eyed (3), Yellow-throated (1), Red-eyed (1).

Waterfowl - Mallard (3), Hooded Merganser (1), Ruddy Duck (1), Pied-billed Grebe (6), Double-crested Cormorant (15).

Miscellaneous - Chimney Swift (7), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (3), Osprey (2 - one bird vocalizing from perch), Northern Rough-winged Swallow (1), Purple Martin (2), Tree Swallow (4), Barn Swallow (22), Red-breasted Nuthatch (2), House Wren (4), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (14), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (5), Swainson's Thrush (3), Gray Catbird (1), Brown Thrasher (6), Cedar Waxwing (4), Chipping Sparrow (1), White-throated Sparrow (24), Lincoln's Sparrow (1), Eastern Towhee (2), Indigo Bunting (1).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/24/19 7:09 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: A little push
About 5:50 this evening I had a bird in the peach tree right next to the
house. Lots of yellow and interesting pattern and, well I knew it was
something. Got enough looks, but not for too long before it flew out of
view. Called for my oldest and she ran out there with me. we got a few
more looks before it was gone... just gone. I need to study some
photographs, rather than the drawings in sibley's, but we're both in
agreement that THE best fit was a prairie warbler. We've often wondered
why we haven't had one here before as, well we THINK our yard is good...
but, that's not how birds look at things sometimes. This year and last
we had a kentucky warbler or two check things out, singing, and then...
just gone. Not good enough apparently. But still, pretty awesome to have
birds show up if only for a day. (like other instances, always has me
wondering what I'm missing while we're not out there looking)

We waited and waited and the bird just didn't come back. But as we
waited, lots of others came in. During the next hour or so I'd say at
least 30 or more yellow-rumped warblers came in... small waves of them
over and over again. There were some clouds rolling in but the rain
stayed south of us. LOTS of little birds flying over... many were those
yellow-rumped but we believe at least a handful or more were not but,
will forever remain unidentified. That's how that goes sometimes. Still
has me dreaming of what we'll find tomorrow though.

Not only would this prairie warbler represent a new yard bird but also a
new life bird. It's one we've discussed searching for over the last
couple years... something that gets reported here and there, once in a
while, and we never managed to chase down. Along with a few other birds,
it's always something when a lifer just happens to you rather than the
result of tireless searching. We had the golden-winged in our yard last
year and now we just need that blue-winged to round things out. Maybe
that will show up next.

I hope I haven't bored too many people with my frequent reports lately
but it's just been an exciting spring so far. Can't quite hold it in I
guess. :)  Trying to stick mainly to the highlights but I guess there's
been a lot of highlights. :)

Daniel Mason


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Date: 4/24/19 2:16 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: warbler experts
Do we have any? :)
So a few days ago I was at city lake in Siloam and I heard a bird, I
think I used playback to confirm my suspicion but the bird stayed well
hidden. I saw a yellow bird a time or two but never saw the top of its
head nor did I get spectacular looks at it but by sound, I was certain
it was a wilson's warbler.

Today my daughter and I both heard one... it stayed out of view. Played
the wilson's songs on the phone and it REALLY sounded like that. I noted
how the ENDING of the nashville was very similar but, this was more
consistent all the way through and matched up better with the wilson's
than the nashville. We did have a nashville in the yard at the time but
the bird that was singing never gave us a look. The one time it was sort
of in the right spot, we weren't. It did a great job of avoiding us.
But, I was so SURE it was a wilson's.

I just went and looked at the bar charts and, they're not supposed to be
here for another week. My daughter reminded me what I already knew...
that birds don't follow charts and maps, etc... but to have seen/heard 2
at different locations a week early is causing me to be
suspicious/doubtful.
This wasn't just going by my imperfect memory but, using playback and
comparing. Was it a nashville or something else simply tricking my ears?
Early wilson's? or something else?
This is why I like birding by both ear and sight... combine the two and
you have better odds of being certain... sometimes getting birds of one
or the other is just frustrating.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 4/24/19 12:59 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: BKNWR Highlights
Today at Bald Knob NWR, we saw
2 little blue herons1 snowy egret6 willets
It was also nice to see indigo buntings and blue grosbeaks back. And the friendliest big ol' great horned owl we ever did see. Plus an assortment of the usual birds.
Glenn & Michelle WyattCabot

 

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Date: 4/24/19 10:24 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Sunnymede Park
I spent one hour at the park this morning and tallied 41 species. FOY birds
were two yellow warblers, two orange-crowned warblers, and two green heron.
There were at least 11 lincoln’s sparrows scattered around. 16
scissor-tailed flycatchers. Wished I could have stayed longer. Sadly, some
days I have to be responsible. 😁

Sandy B.
FS, AR

 

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Date: 4/24/19 9:41 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: another yard bird
Today I decided it didn't sound TOOO birdy and I NEED to get caught up
on eBird checklists... so, my plan was to stay inside. Then I heard my
first swainson's thrush of the year so I ran out there. That was kind of
a mistake, at least as far as being prodcutive goes. We heard a wilson's
warbler and saw and heard a few other good birds like nashville and
tennessee warblers. Summer tanager is sticking around and we've seen at
least 3 different baltimore orioles out there.
Right when we were going to call it quits, I headed back to the south
side of the house for one last look and flying overhead were *2 snowy
egrets*. From our yard, that's a first for us. If I ever get ALL my
checklists submitted to eBird I'll have an exact total but right now it
stands at over 140 different species that we've seen/heard from our yard.

Also saw a white-throated sparrow carrying a leaf, and another that
chased it. I could not tell if this was a "nesting material" situation
or perhaps there was a seed or bug with that leaf. Interesting sight
either way.

The more you look, the more you see... I just don't have enough time HA

Daniel Mason



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Date: 4/23/19 10:03 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - April 23
Mark Peterson and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough and found 103
species. It started off overcast and mild turning partly cloudy and a
little windy and warm in the afternoon. There were fair numbers of migrants
around. Of special note was a lingering Red-breasted Nuthatch and a couple
Yellow-headed Blackbirds. Here is our list for today:




Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 5

Canada Goose - 5

Wood Duck - 8

Gadwall - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 33

Hooded Merganser - 2

Wild Turkey - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 9

Neotropic Cormorant - 10

Double-crested Cormorant - 4

Anhinga - 84

American Bittern - 1

Least Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 6

Great Egret - 21

Snowy Egret - 26

Little-blue Heron - 17

Cattle Egret - 26

Green Heron - 6

Black Vulture - 8

Turkey Vulture - 10

Northern Harrier - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Peregrine Falcon - 1 adult

King Rail - 2

Virginia Rail - 3

Sora - 4

Purple Gallinule - 3

Common Gallinule - 21

American Coot - 31

Killdeer - 1

Greater Yellowlegs - 4

Lesser Yellowlegs - 27

Spotted Sandpiper - 2

Pectoral Sandpiper - 6

Mourning Dove - 9

Rock Pigeon - 1

Chimney Swift - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 5

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Downy Woodpecker - 4

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 3

Eastern Kingbird - 4

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 5

White-eyed Vireo - 13

Bell's Vireo - 3

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 3

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 7

Fish Crow - 4

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 24

Barn Swallow - 15

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Red-breasted Nuthatch - 1

Brown-headed Nuthatch - 1

Carolina Wren - 10

House Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 6

Marsh Wren - 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 13

Eastern Bluebird - 7

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Cedar Waxwing - 9

Tennessee Warbler - 1

Nashville Warbler - 2

Northern Parula - 1

Yellow Warbler - 5

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Pine Warbler - 3

Prairie Warbler - 1

Palm Warbler - 1

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 8

Kentucky Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 29

Yellow-breasted Chat - 8

Summer Tanager - 2

Eastern Towhee - 6

Lark Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 5

Lincoln's Sparrow - 9

Swamp Sparrow - 1

White-throated Sparrow - 3

White-crowned Sparrow - 2

Northern Cardinal - 16

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 14

Dickcissel - 2

Red-winged Blackbird - 125

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Yellow-headed Blackbird - 2 males

Common Grackle - 18

Brown-headed Cowbird - 11

Orchard Oriole - 9

American Goldfinch - 1





Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Citrine Forktail

Elegant Spreadwing

Common Green Darner

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Blue Corporal

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Red-eared Slider

Missouri River Cooter

Western Black Ratsnake

Rough Green Snake

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Broad-banded Watersnake

Western Cottonmouth

Broad-headed Skink

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Eastern Gray Treefrog

Green Treefrog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR








 

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Date: 4/23/19 7:15 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 4/23/2019
A good selection of spring migrants was present at Lake Fayetteville this evening.

Warblers - Black-and-white (1), Prothonotary (1-FOS), Tennessee (2), Orange-crowned (2), Nashville (7), Northern Parula (8), Palm (1), Yellow-rumped (16), Yellow-throated (4).

Flycatchers - Eastern Phoebe (1), Great Crested (1-FOS), Eastern Kingbird (3), Scissor-tailed (1).

Vireos - White-eyed (4), Red-eyed (2).

Miscellaneous - Pied-billed Grebe (1), Chimney Swift (4), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (4), Double-crested Cormorant (9), Green Heron (1), Osprey (1), Broad-winged Hawk (2), Purple Martin (2), Tree Swallow (2), Barn Swallow (6), House Wren (3), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (9), Ruby-crowned Kinglet (7), Swainson's Thrush (1), Gray Catbird (1), Cedar Waxwing (6), Chipping Sparrow (4), White-throated Sparrow (22), Lincoln's Sparrow (2), Eastern Towhee (2), Summer Tanager (1), Indigo Bunting (1-FOS).


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 4/23/19 6:54 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Indigo Bunting
At our feeder in Maumelle. Strangely turquoise!

Elizabeth

Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 23, 2019, at 8:44 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>
> https://www.economist.com/asia/2019/04/20/why-pakistan-lets-arab-bigwigs-set
> -falcons-on-rare-birds?cid1=cust/dailypicks/n/bl/n/20190423n/owned/n/n/daily
> picks/n/n/NA/231322/n=
 

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Date: 4/23/19 6:44 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Houbara sell-out
https://www.economist.com/asia/2019/04/20/why-pakistan-lets-arab-bigwigs-set
-falcons-on-rare-birds?cid1=cust/dailypicks/n/bl/n/20190423n/owned/n/n/daily
picks/n/n/NA/231322/n=
 

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Date: 4/23/19 4:31 pm
From: Robert Day <rhday52...>
Subject: Centerton Fishponds
I birded the Centerton fishponds today. Not a huge list, but it was neat to see some shorebirds that I am familiar with in Alaska. Looked for the Am. Avocets, but no luck on that front.

Canada Goose--4
Blue-winged teal--2 females
Great Blue Heron--6 (watched one take a catfish ~10 inches long in pond where Avocets had been seen)
Bald Eagle--1 adult
Killdeer--3 (appears to be one nesting pair; see them and a single bird whenever I go there)
Baird's Sandpiper--6 (flew in and landed on mudflats in pond where Avocets had been seen; did not stay around long; good look at dark/black legs)
Spotted Sandpiper--2
Least Sandpiper--16 (flew into the same pond later and were tough to see, but eventually came out in the open, so I could get a good look at yellowish legs and so I could get a good count)
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher--1
Barn Swallow--1 (I saw 50-75 here on 04/18)
N Rough-winged Swallow--1
Am. Robin--8
Yellow-rumped Warbler--1
Eur. Starling--7
E Meadowlark--1
Red-winged Blackbird--6
Common Grackle--9
Slider Turtle--74+ (they were hauled out in the sun everywhere; counted 38 in one pond and 24 in another)

Bob Day
Bentonville
 

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Date: 4/23/19 10:07 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Birding fact
Birding has been proven to decrease productivity. HA.
I went outside around 7:35 this morning... Just came in around 11:50 but
I'm still watching from the window. The sun was cooking me a little. I
thought I had a good day at city lake yesterday seeing around 50-51
species in under 2 hours... today took 4.5 hours so far but I'm at 51
species for our yard...

Highlights included:

mississipi kite
swainson's hawk (2)
tennessee warbler FOY
nashville warber
wood thrush FOY
baltimore oriole
summer tanager
rose-breasted grosbeak FOY
great-crested flycatcher FOY

LOTS of fun birds and almost too much action at times. Two black and
white warblers chasing each other. A blue jay nest that is still visited
but not really sat on faithfully yet... a cardinal nest that's been sat
on for a while... and two chickadees going back and forth to a cavity in
a small dead tree(not far from the cardinal nest)

Cooling off in the house before I go to a dentist appointment(yay) and
maybe swing by springdale lake(never been before) and then deciding if I
need to visit centerton at some point.

You can imagine, not a lot of productive stuff happening today. Maybe
those things can all wait til summer?

Daniel Mason


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Date: 4/23/19 9:59 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Avocets
If anyone sees any avocets(or anything else of interest) at the hatchery
today let me know. At best I can't get out there til late this afternoon
but I MIGHT go chasing if they're still around.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 4/23/19 5:58 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Best time of the year
When you open your back door and hear Swainson’s Thrushes singing. Sadly,
my mulberry trees have produced only tiny tiny fruit this year. Even the
few Cedar Waxwings I had hanging around are gone, having given up on it.

Sandy B
FS, AR

 

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Date: 4/23/19 5:52 am
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: Taking a break from warbler neck...
I'm in the process of mounting stovepipe lengths as baffles on my wooden birdhouse posts and changing out the most used sites for metal poles, also baffled. It's a daunting task but in the end it gives many more fledglings a chance at life. One needs to spray those baffles with clear lacquer to make them slick enough. It also repels squirrels.

Sent from my iPod

> On Apr 22, 2019, at 2:43 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
> ...I encountered a moderate-size black rat snake with three lumps in its stomach. Since they crush eggs after swallowing, making them individually invisible, the lumps may have been three nestlings.
>
> Our Carolina wrens fledged their second clutch last week. Snakes remind us why vulnerable birds need to be fecund!
>
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
 

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Date: 4/22/19 7:51 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: migration dizziness...
Migration is a time of year that I love and hate. The love part is
obvious. Perhaps the frustration is as well. So many of the birds are
here one moment and then gone the next... and that can mean for that
moment and then you lost it but who knows maybe you'll see it again and
also... maybe you wont. With the fish hatchery in Centerton being half
an hour from my house, and my not being able to chase EVERY bird every
single time something interesting shows up, it sometimes causes a touch
of anxiety. I want to go see everyone of them because I might not get
another chance til next year. And then I sometimes feel like I have to
choose between one location and another. I've been neglecting city lake
here in my own town to chase a few birds up in Centerton. What have I
missed all those days? I'll never know. That frustration is also part of
the excitement of birding. What's coming next? And having it be here for
a short time makes it that much more sought after, at least for me. If
they were here all the time I might have less birder anxiety but, I
might also not go looking as often. So I enjoy what I can, when I can.

I managed to visit city lake in Siloam Springs for a while today. It was
SO busy I felt rushed. 1 hr 45min was just not long enough as there were
birds everywhere. The *baltimore oriole's, warbling vireos, and
red-headed woodpeckers* are all back. There's still construction going
on for a bike trail so the parking lot by the field is still not "open."
As long as you don't block it(which people had been doing) you can park
by the gate. The boardwalk in the woods had some beautiful *prothonotary
warblers* RIGHT there... amazing views. First of season *green heron*
was walking the bank of the creek as well. I have to double check a
picture I took of one bird but if I can figure that one out it would
make 51 species for that 1hr 45m.  Not bad at all... and I know there
were a few other birds there that just didn't show themselves during
that time. Oh, a *common yellowthroat *was calling as well.

Field trip with the NWAAS is coming up in May. Anyone in the area should
try to attend as it's a nice trip.

Back at home I had a male summer tanager just a couple feet away from
the back window. Spring sure has sprung. Happy birding...


Daniel Mason



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Date: 4/22/19 7:39 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Indigo Bunting!
Forgot to mention the first-of-season Red-eyed Vireo singing in the yard on
Easter, and this evening a male Indigo Bunting came to enjoy some millet!

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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Date: 4/22/19 6:56 pm
From: Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...>
Subject: Birders and waterfowl hunters are natural allies
I thought this interesting little note from Audubon$B!G(Bs website was worth sharing to the group.

https://www.audubon.org/news/why-birders-and-waterfowl-hunters-are-natural-allies

Ethan Massey
Biologist, Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
(870)-456-2715 (c)$B("(B (870)-282-8242 (o)$B("(B <emassey...>
57 S. CC Camp Road, St. Charles, AR 72140


 

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Date: 4/22/19 5:13 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Birds at feeder
Have had a Rose-breasted grosbeak and Red-headed woodpecker present for a
couple of days. The Red-breasted nuthatch still remains. Still on the
lookout for the Oriole's.

FOS: Blue grosbeak today at BKNWR

Pangburn, Ark.

 

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Date: 4/22/19 4:49 pm
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann...>
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Male at my feeders this afternoon in northern Crawford County. He didn't
stay long but I'll take what I can get!

Ann

 

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Date: 4/22/19 4:23 pm
From: Anna Lee Hudson <hudsonre...>
Subject: Finally!
Female ruby-throat hummingbird today.
On the lake in Bull Shoals, AR

Anna Hudson
 

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Date: 4/22/19 3:13 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Avocets
They were still there after 4 PM. Yes the goose nest is on the left. I
almost didn't see it. That pond is maybe 30% full right now. There were
several Spotted Sandpipers, a handful of peeps, and a Semi-Palm Sandpiper,
as well.

On Mon, Apr 22, 2019 at 4:26 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:

> Good reminder. I don't think a lot of people drive between those ones but,
> it might be best to just stay off that section all together.
> The goose nest, when you pull in the driving part, the nest is on the
> opposite side of the pond immediately to your left.
>
> Does this mean that pond is now drained? I was there the other day and
> there really wasn't any good mud to be seen.
> Part of me wants to head over there today as there's no way to tell how
> long they'll stick around. But it's late and I need to keep my wife happy.
> Maybe later this week/weekend after the rainy days. I'll be watching this
> list as well as eBird to see if anything interesting pops up. :)
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> On 4/22/2019 1:59 PM, Karen Garrett wrote:
>
> Notice to anyone coming to view or photograph the Avocets, there is a
> Canada Goose nest, with eggs, on the levee on the west side of the pond
> with the Avocets. Please take care not to run over the nest.
>
> On Mon, Apr 22, 2019, 11:14 AM Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...>
> wrote:
>
>> There are 11 avocets at hatchery in Centerton right now. They are on the
>> north middle pond of the 6 large ponds that are on the east end of the
>> hatchery.
>
>
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
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Date: 4/22/19 2:27 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Avocets
Good reminder. I don't think a lot of people drive between those ones
but, it might be best to just stay off that section all together.
The goose nest, when you pull in the driving part, the nest is on the
opposite side of the pond immediately to your left.

Does this mean that pond is now drained? I was there the other day and
there really wasn't any good mud to be seen.
Part of me wants to head over there today as there's no way to tell how
long they'll stick around. But it's late and I need to keep my wife
happy. Maybe later this week/weekend after the rainy days. I'll be
watching this list as well as eBird to see if anything interesting pops
up. :)

Daniel Mason

On 4/22/2019 1:59 PM, Karen Garrett wrote:
> Notice to anyone coming to view or photograph the Avocets, there is a
> Canada Goose nest, with eggs, on the levee on the west side of the
> pond with the Avocets.  Please take care not to run over the nest.
>
> On Mon, Apr 22, 2019, 11:14 AM Matt Gideon
> <paulmatthewgideon...> <mailto:<paulmatthewgideon...>> wrote:
>
> There are 11 avocets at hatchery in Centerton right now. They are
> on the north middle pond of the 6 large ponds that are on the east
> end of the hatchery.
>



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Date: 4/22/19 1:12 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: EARTH DAY WITH THE ODONATOR
Buffalo Road, south of Waldron in Ouachita National Forest, is heartland of efforts to recover federally-endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Extensive suitable habitat features mature Shortleaf Pines and an open forest maintained by prescribed fire. I was down there this morning with my friend The Odonator, dragonfly expert David Oakley.

What a perfect day. Pine Warblers singing everywhere. Both Summer and Scarlet Tanagers. Yellow-breasted Chats, Prairie Warblers, Indigo Buntings, Common Yellowthroats, etc. All of the now well-documented breeding birds associated with quality RCW habitat. Last one: a Northern Bobwhite that flew over the road right in front of us.

One big surprise: Red-breasted Nuthatches in two different places. Matt Young of Cornell University suggested last year we would likely have Red-breasted Nuthatches in same area we documented nesting by Red Crossbills. On April 14, 2019, Daniel Mason reported seeing nuthatches apparently collecting nesting material at Hobbs State Park Conservation Area. Now these birds today. Maybe something interesting is up?

Our trip to Buffalo Road was not for RCWs and we sure had no plans to disturb them during nest season. David had previously documented presence along Buffalo Road of an unusual dragonfly, the Ouachita Clubtail, Gomphus ozarkensis. He knew their flight times and required minimal temp of at least 67 degrees. In case you are like me a novice to the odoes, Ozark Clubtail is a tiger with wings: extensive markings of bold black and yellow, prominent grayish eyes, abdomen that ends in a prominent swelling or club.

As we drove west on Buffalo Road, David slowed down at low water crossings, checking out the local Odonata, but kept moving in search. Drove past well-marked RCW trees. Heard more Prairie Warblers. We pulled off the road with Buffalo Creek just ahead. A Kentucky Warbler singing in the thicket and as male Common Yellowthroat flying low over the road. Then for this Earth Day, one, then several, Ozark Clubtails.


 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/19 12:43 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Taking a break from warbler neck...
...I encountered a moderate-size black rat snake with three lumps in its
stomach.  Since they crush eggs after swallowing, making them
individually invisible, the lumps may have been three nestlings.

Our Carolina wrens fledged their second clutch last week.  Snakes remind
us why vulnerable birds need to be fecund!

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/19 12:42 pm
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: FOS painted bunting just seen in yard; Van Buren County, 2:40 PM.
Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/19 12:38 pm
From: d.marie yates <maribird...>
Subject: FOS painted bunting, Van Buren County in my yard.




Sent via the Samsung Galaxy Express 3, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
 

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Date: 4/22/19 12:00 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Avocets
Notice to anyone coming to view or photograph the Avocets, there is a
Canada Goose nest, with eggs, on the levee on the west side of the pond
with the Avocets. Please take care not to run over the nest.

On Mon, Apr 22, 2019, 11:14 AM Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...>
wrote:

> There are 11 avocets at hatchery in Centerton right now. They are on the
> north middle pond of the 6 large ponds that are on the east end of the
> hatchery.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/19 11:42 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: FOS
Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  A first-FOS for me, because I was out
contracting warbler neck and saw the beautiful male in the trees rather
than at our feeder.  And FOS Great-Crested Flycatcher yesterday.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/19 9:14 am
From: Matt Gideon <paulmatthewgideon...>
Subject: Avocets
There are 11 avocets at hatchery in Centerton right now. They are on the
north middle pond of the 6 large ponds that are on the east end of the
hatchery.

 

Back to top
Date: 4/22/19 7:15 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Chuck-Wills-Widow!!!
First-of-Season Chuck-wills-widow heard through the open bedroom window
while we drifted off to sleep and throughout the night. Lovely.

Also forgot to mention the FOS Red-eyed Vireo yesterday!
And a Tiger Swallowtail.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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