ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
9/18/18 6:02 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Red Knot
9/18/18 5:50 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA field trip report
9/18/18 5:37 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Upper Buffalo, Cave Mountain
9/18/18 4:04 pm JoAnn Drew <000001540c75b1c3-dmarc-request...> Re: Leucistic Hummingbird
9/18/18 3:07 pm Donald Dunn <000002255a712e56-dmarc-request...> Leucistic Hummingbird
9/18/18 6:24 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Least Flycatcher again
9/18/18 6:03 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Two eagles, an Osprey, and 2 to 3 dozen Eurasian Collared Doves
9/17/18 6:47 pm Sara Wittenberg <sara_ress...> Re: documentary showing this week
9/17/18 6:17 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Native Plant Sale, Sept 22
9/17/18 3:47 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Underline Monitoring Research – Kauaʻi Endangered Seabird Recovery Project
9/17/18 1:28 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Fwd: AAS Call to Meeting- Fall Conference
9/17/18 10:46 am Amy Brantley <brantleyal...> Buffalo National River | Audubon Important Bird Areas
9/17/18 10:26 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Two sentences please from Arkansas Birders
9/17/18 8:18 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> documentary showing this week
9/17/18 7:06 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Pine Warblers and Indian Grass
9/17/18 5:45 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Pine Warblers and Indian Grass
9/17/18 5:00 am Monroe, Allison <MonroeAA...> New Editor!
9/16/18 1:41 pm jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> Re: Buffalo River IBA
9/16/18 1:07 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Buffalo River IBA
9/15/18 6:10 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Black-bellied whistling ducks at Joe Hogan
9/15/18 1:08 pm Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> NE LA bird report
9/15/18 11:03 am Karen Konarski <karen...> a mob of mockers
9/15/18 9:14 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Wofford tunnel photo
9/15/18 7:08 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Wofford Lake field trip
9/15/18 6:19 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Orrick Road now a designated hotspot
9/14/18 2:21 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> What is that noise?
9/14/18 11:50 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Costa Rica nature tour is full
9/14/18 11:32 am Don Simons <Don.Simons...> RCSP "new" location
9/14/18 7:26 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Tomorrow-Additional Details
9/13/18 9:23 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Bird Trip Planning
9/13/18 9:09 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Bird Trip Planning
9/13/18 9:04 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Bird Trip Planning
9/13/18 7:01 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Bird Trip Planning
9/13/18 6:36 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Bird Trip Planning
9/13/18 6:07 pm Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Re: Bird Trip Planning
9/13/18 5:30 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Bird Trip Planning
9/13/18 5:22 pm Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...> Re: Bird Trip Planning
9/13/18 4:57 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bird Trip Planning
9/13/18 3:04 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Register for eBird Webinars
9/13/18 3:03 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: Binoculars for children
9/13/18 2:11 pm JFR <johnfredman...> RUDY TURNSTONES AT BOYD POINT
9/13/18 2:01 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Summer issue of Arkansas Birds
9/13/18 11:24 am Michael <mplinz...> Warblers @ Bell North
9/13/18 4:39 am Joe Neal <joecneal...> Re: Binoculars for children
9/12/18 9:13 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Re: Fish Crows numerous in the river valley
9/12/18 5:45 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Binoculars for children
9/12/18 4:53 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Binoculars for children
9/12/18 3:10 pm Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Merlin and spoonbills
9/12/18 3:02 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Binoculars for children
9/12/18 2:26 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Fall Meeting of Arkansas Audubon Society
9/12/18 1:43 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SPOONBILLS – YES, SWALLOW-TAILED KITE – NO
9/12/18 12:48 pm Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Binoculars for children
9/12/18 10:52 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Fish Crows numerous in the river valley
9/12/18 10:45 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Fish Crows numerous in the river valley
9/12/18 5:44 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Fish Crows numerous in the river valley
9/11/18 8:09 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> eBird: Orrick Rd. Hotspot
9/11/18 7:38 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Swallow-tailed Kite - NO
9/11/18 4:16 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA September Field Trip
9/11/18 1:38 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Shorebirds at Centerton this morning
9/11/18 1:00 pm dianemarie yates <maribird...> Re: Me too on unexpected yard visitor, plus two expected ones
9/11/18 12:50 pm Stacy Clanton <sclanton...> Me too on unexpected yard visitor, plus two expected ones
9/11/18 12:00 pm Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...> Unexpected yard visitor
9/11/18 10:40 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Unexpected yard visitor
9/11/18 9:43 am Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Unexpected yard visitor
9/11/18 7:55 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Unexpected yard visitor
9/11/18 7:28 am <market...> Re: Least Flycatcher in our garden
9/11/18 5:30 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Least Flycatcher in our garden
9/10/18 7:49 pm JFR <johnfredman...> CASPIAN TERNS AT BOYD POINT
9/10/18 7:31 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Re: Leucistic Rufous Hummingbird?
9/10/18 7:14 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Fwd: owl time
9/10/18 7:11 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> owl time
9/10/18 2:57 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Leucistic Rufous Hummingbird?
9/10/18 2:13 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SWALLOW-TAILED KITE AND SPOONBILLS CONTINUE IN RIVER VALLEY
9/10/18 10:16 am laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Scarlet Tanager
9/10/18 9:57 am Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request...> Leucistic Ruby-throated Hummingbird
9/10/18 9:04 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, Sept. 13, Building Trails Together
9/10/18 7:01 am <market...> Dickcissel at the Nursery Pond plus Ar. Fish and Game helping Shorebirds again
9/10/18 6:49 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> speaking of Centerton
9/9/18 5:11 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Great Article on Bees (with a Mention of Birds)
9/9/18 4:25 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Caspian Tern at Centerton, Benton Co. on Saturday
9/9/18 2:27 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> touching a hummingbird
9/9/18 12:13 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Great Article on Bees (with a Mention of Birds)
9/9/18 12:05 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Re: Fw: Kite
9/9/18 11:01 am laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Fw: Kite
9/9/18 10:39 am laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Kite
9/9/18 7:33 am kjdillard <kjdillard...> Re: ok not really about birds.
9/8/18 7:27 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: GOT IT!!!!!
9/8/18 7:25 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: ok not really about birds.
9/8/18 3:21 pm Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...> Cave Swallow photo
9/8/18 1:24 pm JFR <johnfredman...> 3 RUDY TURNSTONES AT BOYD POINT
9/8/18 11:12 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> ok not really about birds.
9/8/18 10:37 am Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Nemesis bird
9/8/18 9:38 am Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Re: GOT IT!!!!!
9/8/18 9:22 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> GOT IT!!!!!
9/8/18 8:39 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Nemesis bird
9/8/18 8:11 am Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...> Cave Swallows
9/8/18 6:46 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Frog Friday
9/7/18 4:30 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Friday afternoon birds
9/7/18 3:14 pm Cathy Marak <cmarak999...> Roseate spoonbills
9/7/18 2:07 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> EBIRD 2018 Taxonomic changes
9/7/18 12:40 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob NWR highlights
9/7/18 11:53 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Spoonbills at Alma, yes
9/7/18 9:25 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Swallow -tailed Kite yes
9/7/18 7:02 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> White Red-shouldered Hawk
9/7/18 6:47 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Inca Dove is back
9/6/18 9:10 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 6
9/6/18 6:31 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Inca Dove is back
9/6/18 6:22 pm Lea Crisp <leacrisp...> Yellow-throated Warbler
9/6/18 5:18 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Inca Dove is back
9/6/18 12:24 pm <market...> White-eyed Verio and Yellow-thoated Warbers at the Nursery PLUS the Drain is CLOSED!
9/6/18 10:17 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Swallow-tailed Kite
9/6/18 8:16 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> The Snipe Newsletter
9/6/18 8:01 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Alma
9/6/18 5:24 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Eight Bird Species Are Confirmed Avian Extinction
9/5/18 4:34 pm Devin Moon <moondevg...> Bald Knob NWR 9-5-18
9/5/18 4:14 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Eight Bird Species Are Confirmed Avian Extinction
9/5/18 2:37 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Ruddy Turnstones
9/5/18 2:31 pm Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Fw: Re: spoonbill in pond across from Alma WWT
9/5/18 1:29 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Swallow-tailed Kite continues at Frog
9/5/18 12:26 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Ruddy Turnstone at Boyd Point
9/5/18 10:32 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Eight Bird Species Are Confirmed Avian Extinction
9/5/18 10:25 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> from The Guardian
9/5/18 7:55 am Ed Laster <elaster523...> Spoonbills
9/5/18 7:53 am Timothy Jones <00000215dcdd9f16-dmarc-request...> Clay County: Swallow-tailed Kite
9/4/18 10:21 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> south Lafayette County 9-3-18
9/4/18 7:02 pm JFR <johnfredman...> RUDDY TURNSTONE AT BOYD POINT
9/4/18 12:38 pm Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Re: spoonbill in pond across from Alma WWT
9/4/18 11:44 am Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Swallowtail Kite
9/4/18 7:44 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA September, October, and November Field Trips
9/4/18 5:25 am Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> spoonbill in pond across from Alma WWT
9/3/18 5:54 pm DeLynn Hearn <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> Re: Mississippi Kite
9/3/18 5:38 pm Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Re: Baird's SP
9/3/18 5:18 pm Laster/Roark <elaster523...> Re: Mississippi Kite
9/3/18 4:50 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Baird's SP
9/3/18 12:59 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: International Ornithological Congress - summary & presentation
9/3/18 12:34 pm Laster/Roark <elaster523...> Shorebird Ponds
9/3/18 11:48 am DeLynn Hearn <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> Re: Horsehead lake draw down
9/3/18 11:05 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Horsehead lake draw down
9/3/18 10:39 am Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Baird's SP
9/3/18 10:13 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Swallow-tailed Kite location this morning
9/2/18 8:30 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: Mississippi Kite
9/2/18 8:24 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Swallow-tailed Kite location this morning
9/2/18 5:47 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> 118th Christmas Bird Count article
9/2/18 4:38 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Swallow-tailed Kite!
9/2/18 4:32 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Swallow-tailed Kite!
9/2/18 3:23 pm Lynn Christie <christie-j...> Mississippi Kite
9/2/18 2:32 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> bird trip to Alma/Frog
9/2/18 1:34 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> photos from this morning -- kite, etc
9/2/18 12:17 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Swallow-tailed Kite location this morning
9/2/18 12:10 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Owl photography at night
9/2/18 11:44 am Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Roseate Spoonbills/shorebirds - Alma WTP/Orrick Road
9/2/18 11:12 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Fwd: Swallowtail Kite on Frog Bayou WMA near Alma, AR
9/2/18 9:20 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Swallowtail Kite on Frog Bayou WMA near Alma, AR
9/2/18 9:06 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> school girls photograph spoonbills
9/2/18 8:20 am Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Swallowtail Kite on Frog Bayou WMA near Alma, AR
9/2/18 8:19 am David Oakley <gdosr...> Swallow-tailed Kite
9/2/18 7:38 am Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Ouachita County
9/2/18 6:43 am <market...> Re: [UPDATE]Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery
9/1/18 7:43 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Owl photography at night
9/1/18 7:09 pm Hal Mitchell <halmitchell...> Re: Owl photography at night
9/1/18 7:04 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Owl photography at night
9/1/18 7:02 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> Garland County
9/1/18 6:37 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Owl photography at night
9/1/18 5:47 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Owl photography at night
9/1/18 4:39 pm Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Holland Bottoms and Anderson Minnow pond
9/1/18 3:43 pm <market...> [UPDATE]Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery
9/1/18 8:57 am Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...> Spoonbills and Black Bellied Whistling Ducks Continue in Alma
9/1/18 7:57 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Owl photography at night
9/1/18 7:04 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Owl photography at night
8/31/18 7:50 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: ornithology class sees spoonbills feeding
8/31/18 4:37 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> eBird as a teaching tool
8/31/18 3:32 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Re: SWALLOW-TAILED KITE AT FROG
8/31/18 3:32 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> ornithology class sees spoonbills feeding
8/31/18 2:56 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: SWALLOW-TAILED KITE AT FROG
8/31/18 1:41 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SWALLOW-TAILED KITE AT FROG
8/31/18 12:36 pm <market...> FW: Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery
8/31/18 10:27 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Owls and light
8/31/18 10:03 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Owls and light
8/30/18 6:40 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 30
8/30/18 4:21 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob NWR 30 Aug 2018
8/30/18 2:01 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> No phalarope or plover at Boyd today
8/30/18 1:05 pm <market...> Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery
8/30/18 12:27 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Re: Spoonbills
8/30/18 12:23 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Spoonbills
8/30/18 12:09 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Costa Rica nature tour--some seats left
8/30/18 12:00 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Re: Spoonbills
8/30/18 8:24 am Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> American Golden-Plover and Black-bellied Plover at Boyd
8/30/18 7:37 am Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...> Roseate Spoonbills near Lake Chicot
8/30/18 7:35 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: the season's last kite?
8/30/18 7:27 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Bucket list sculptures?
8/30/18 7:15 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: the season's last kite?
8/30/18 6:30 am Jeremy Chamberlain <jdchamberlai...> Wood storks
8/30/18 6:11 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: location location location...
8/29/18 10:13 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Red-neck Phalarope at Boyd Point WTP
8/29/18 9:04 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: the season's last kite?
8/29/18 8:15 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> location location location...
8/29/18 7:56 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Spoonbills
8/29/18 5:59 pm Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...> Arkansas Audubon Society fall convention, October 5-7 | Texarkana, Arkansas
8/29/18 4:48 pm Mystina Swaim <mystina.swaim...> Nikon Lens recommendations
8/29/18 3:32 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Unsubscribe
8/29/18 3:00 pm Marty Jakle <mdjakle...> Unsubscribe
8/29/18 2:23 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Spoonbills
8/29/18 1:41 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Re: Spoonbills
8/29/18 12:58 pm Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...> Re: the season's last kite?
8/29/18 12:55 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Spoonbills
8/29/18 11:59 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SWAMP MILKWEED, EXCELLENT MUD, INTERESTING SHOREBIRDS AT CENTERTON
8/29/18 10:49 am Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Spoonbills
8/29/18 9:12 am James Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Re: the season's last kite?
8/29/18 9:07 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> the season's last kite?
8/29/18 8:51 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> bird spp. found August 27, 2018
8/29/18 8:43 am Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Presentation in Little Rock Sept. 6
8/29/18 5:01 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> NWAAS field trips Sept 9 (Hobbs), Sept 15 (Wilson Springs bioblitz)
8/28/18 9:07 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: Taxonomy Update
8/28/18 5:33 pm Karen McGee <mcgeecnt...> Spoonbills yes
8/28/18 5:15 pm Karen McGee <mcgeecnt...> Re: Photos of the spoonbills in Alma
8/28/18 2:53 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Re: This Man Spent 30 Years Solving A Rare Bird’s Murder Mystery
8/28/18 1:36 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Volunteer for the Hummingbird Migration Celebration
8/28/18 1:19 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> spoonbills and two ibis species continue in valley
8/28/18 7:02 am Cheryl Johnson <cjbluebird...> Re: MCB Camp Pendleton - Least Bell's Vireo Conservation Supports the Mission
8/28/18 6:47 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: MCB Camp Pendleton - Least Bell's Vireo Conservation Supports the Mission
8/27/18 8:31 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> This Man Spent 30 Years Solving A Rare Bird’s Murder Mystery
8/27/18 5:44 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Photos of the spoonbills in Alma
8/27/18 3:44 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Today at Boyd Point
8/27/18 1:05 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> spoonbills still there in Alma
8/27/18 12:45 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Red Necked Phalarope
8/27/18 9:16 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Remarkable celebration for Kim Smith
8/27/18 9:08 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Remarkable celebration for Kim Smith
8/27/18 8:17 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Red-necked Phalarope
8/27/18 7:22 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> spoonbills continue near Alma Wastewater
8/26/18 10:15 pm jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> Song birds, bird songs, and birds and songs
8/26/18 2:21 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Roseate Spoonbills in the valley near Alma Wastewater
8/26/18 1:41 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Roseate Spoonbills in the valley near Alma Wastewater
8/26/18 1:18 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Roseate Spoonbills in the valley near Alma Wastewater
8/25/18 4:55 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Bald Knob ASCA Field Trip
8/25/18 12:08 pm Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> NAWA
8/25/18 11:26 am Robert Bays <baysrr...> Re: Teenager birds
8/25/18 6:00 am Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...> Cave Swallows
8/24/18 8:44 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Bald Knob, Saul's and Treadway
8/24/18 8:22 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Red-necked Phalarope
8/24/18 3:11 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob NWR
8/24/18 8:59 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Kim Smith memorial gathering tomorrow
8/24/18 7:23 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
8/24/18 3:44 am Gmail <butchchq8...>
8/23/18 8:45 pm Sara Wittenberg <sara_ress...>
8/23/18 5:43 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: New to Bald Knob NWR
8/23/18 3:13 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 23
8/23/18 1:59 pm Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...> Re: sounds
8/23/18 1:31 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: sounds
8/23/18 12:08 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Neotropic Cormorant
8/23/18 9:11 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: New to Bald Knob NWR
8/23/18 8:53 am Robin Buff <robinbuff...> New to Bald Knob NWR
8/23/18 8:41 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: The feather thief
8/22/18 2:11 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylchilders...> Fall 2018 Convention- Save the Date
8/22/18 1:34 pm Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...> Re: sounds
8/22/18 1:30 pm Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Re: sounds
8/22/18 1:29 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: sounds
8/22/18 1:22 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> sounds
8/22/18 8:03 am Michael <mplinz...> Re: White Ibis & a Merlin-Lincoln County east of Caney Creek State Park.
8/22/18 7:54 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: South Lafayette County 8-21-18
8/22/18 7:27 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Red-headed woodpecker
8/22/18 6:54 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Blue-winged Teal at Frog
8/22/18 5:39 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Re: South Lafayette County 8-21-18
8/21/18 10:14 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> South Lafayette County 8-21-18
8/21/18 8:07 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> KTHV "What's with all the hummingbirds?"
8/21/18 8:01 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> White Ibis & a Merlin-Lincoln County east of Caney Creek State Park.
8/21/18 7:09 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Re: Hummingbirds
8/21/18 6:10 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob NWR 21 August 2018
8/21/18 3:23 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Hummingbirds
8/21/18 12:00 am Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Sedge Wren (Benton Co.)
8/20/18 12:01 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> GREAT BIRDS, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIES AT WOOLSEY WET PRAIRIE WILDLIFE SANCTUARY
8/20/18 9:22 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Saturday-ASCA Field Trip
8/20/18 7:26 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip this Saturday
8/20/18 3:30 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: County Birding
8/19/18 9:22 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: County Birding
8/19/18 5:57 pm Abby Gibson <000000544cf96f92-dmarc-request...> ID question
8/19/18 4:31 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob NWR
8/19/18 4:13 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: The Amazing Tale of the Genius that History Forgot- Birds, Fish & Other Living Things
8/19/18 1:43 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> GNATCATCHERS GLEANING FROM BONESET FLOWERS
8/19/18 1:28 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> The Amazing Tale of the Genius that History Forgot- Birds, Fish & Other Living Things
8/19/18 11:30 am JFR <johnfredman...> A THOUGHT ABOUT THE BOYD POINT RED PHALAROPE
8/19/18 11:30 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Wood Storks
8/19/18 11:08 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Wood Storks
8/19/18 7:02 am Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Sedge Wrens (Washington Co.)
 
Back to top
Date: 9/18/18 6:02 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Red Knot
LaDonna and I had a juvenile Red Knot this afternoon at Saul's fish farms.
Photo in ebird list below.
eBird Checklist – Saul's Fish Farm--West Unit, Prairie County, Arkansas, US – Tue Sep 18, 2018 – 14 species


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eBird Checklist – Saul's Fish Farm--West Unit, Prairie County, Arkansas,...


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Kenny NicholsCabot, AR
 

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Date: 9/18/18 5:50 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA field trip report
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } The Sept. 15th field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas was an exploration of the Arkansas's Delta state parks, plus an AGFC Wildlife Management Area, and a National Historic Marker.  Our stops took us through Monroe, Phillips, and Lee Counties, areas not heavily visited by birders.
Our first stop was in Monroe County at the Louisiana Purchase State Park, Arkansas's 18th State Park.  The granite monument marking the Initial Point from which all surveys of property acquired by the Louisiana Purchase of 1803 is located at the end of an elevated boardwalk that snakes through the headwater swamp.  Not many birds were present, with the loudest bird a vocalizing Acadian Flycather.  It's a great place for Prothonotary Warblers in the spring and summer.  The stop was a fascinating window into our nation's early expansion.  Baseline Road in Little Rock is part of the initial survey line, hence the name.
Second stop was in Phillips County at the Delta Heritage Trail State Park. This rail-to-trails conversion was acquired by the Arkansas State Park system in 1993.  Twenty-one miles of the trail near Helena has been completed and is open to the public.  When finished, the trail will extend 85 miles south to the Louisiana border.  The stretch we walked is packed gravel and level walking, good for birders, walkers, and bicyclists.  We had a lovely canopy of native hardwoods that shaded us from the morning sun.  The birds also enjoyed the trees and we spent well over an hour sorting through mixed flocks of fall warblers.  One faded yellow warbler stumped everyone until photos confirmed it was a Blacburnian Warbler.  Other good birds were American Redstarts, Northern Parula, Black-throated Green, Magnolia Warbler, and Philadelphia, Red-eye, and White-eyed Vireos, all in their dull winter plumage.  Two Barred Owls put on quite a show, flying in quite close, then vocalizing several times, much to everyone's delight.
On south to Old Town Lake WMA at Lake View, an ancient oxbow lake full of Bald Cypress trees. From the boardwalk and covered fishing pier, we spotted Great Egrets, Double-crested Cormorants, and an adult Bald Eagle.The lake looks to be great habitat for ducks in the winter.
Since it was past noon, the flock demanded feeding.  We stopped at Cypress Corner BBQ, a favorite with the locals.  BBQ plates and sandwiches to go, we headed for the picnic tables at the Bear Creek Trail at the Mississippi River State Park outside of Marianna in Lee County. While eating, a Belted Kingfisher flew back and forth across the inlet, Red-headed Woodpeckers, White-breasted Nuthatches, three Eastern Kingirds, and a Yellow-billed Cuckoo worked the area.  After lunch we walked the Bear Creek Trail, which winds through the unique topography of Crowley's Ridge.  Carolina Wrens, Acadian Flycatchers, and Pileated, Red-bellied, and Downey Woodpeckers, were scattered along the trail. The Park operates through a Special Use Permit within the St. Francis National Forest. It was authorized in 1973, but it wasn't until 2009 that the State Park began its operation.  The new Visitor Center is a must see with great exhibits. The grounds around the Visitor Center are planted in native vegetation and included over 15 hummingbird feeders. Hummingbirds were diving around everywhere!
Many thanks to Park Interpreters Maggie Howard, Delta Heritage Trail SP, and Tara Gillanders, Mississippi River SP, who were so helpful, led the walks, and provided us wonderful insight into the unique features that make each park special.  The trip provided our twenty-eight participants with the opportunity to visit the Delta, explore new state parks, collect park patches, and add new birding locations and new counties to their birding lists.  A very fun and successful day.
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator Little Rock


 

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Date: 9/18/18 5:37 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Upper Buffalo, Cave Mountain
For the past decade or so, Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society has sponsored an early June field trip into the upper Buffalo National River area. It starts at Boxley Bridge over the Buffalo River and ends at top of Cave Mountain. Elevation of the road is 1100 feet at the bridge. The travel is around 2-miles to top of the mountain, elevation almost 2000 feet. This morning David Oakley and I made this trip. First stop at the bluff line, around 1900 feet and a bird I was looking for, Worm-eating Warbler, a late record for northwest Arkansas. On the slope below, Hooded Warbler. From there we went on to the top, parked, checked out a couple of singing Yellow-throated Vireos, and walked a short trail down to a very high bluffline that looks off into Upper Buffalo Wilderness. Interesting native plants grow in the sun here, including a species of Ladies-Tresses orchid. A long-legged fly was busy among puffy Hawkweed seeds.

Ashes Juniper grows along this bluff, wild contortions of stout limbs that stand up to the heat and wind, forming a sort of canopy over the edge of the bluff. Look over the edge a shear drop of 100 feet into the forest below through which flows the upper Buffalo. A little springfed creek flows from the mountain top to the edge and drops off here. The moist dense cover today was full of birds: Black-throated Green Warbler, Northern Parula, Black-and-white Warbler, Nashville Warbler, both Summer and Scarlet Tanagers, a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, and one of Petersons famous confusing fall warblers. The Scarlet Tanager was another of my targets today. They now wear the rich yellow with black wings. Pretty fantastic sight as we peered through the Ashes Junipers.

I started my trips to the Buffalo River long before there was a controversy about a hog factory farm polluting the river and also at a time when very few people drove as fast as possible over Cave Mountain in a hurry to Hawksbill Crag. I understand why they go; arent we after all so hungry to experience something of real nature? David and I made one stop on the way down, walked another short trail, and spotted a few, tiny, Autumn Coralroot orchids. These miracles contain essence of Cave Mountain and Buffalo River country. And nearby, I heard soft chips of what I think was probably an Acadian Flycatcher, but I never could get my bins of it.


 

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Date: 9/18/18 4:04 pm
From: JoAnn Drew <000001540c75b1c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Leucistic Hummingbird
I too had a leucistic hummingbird at my feeder last Thursday morning, the 13th, for just a couple of hours.  What a thrill!!!

JoAnn Drew
 
 
In a message dated 9/18/2018 5:07:13 PM Central Standard Time, <000002255a712e56-dmarc-request...> writes:

 
During the past week (Tuesday, Sep 11, thru Monday, Sep 17) a leucistic hummingbird (female RTH?) has been feeding at our place on the east side of Hot Springs Village. She fed everyday at about 5-30 minute intervals from daylight to dark, but did not show up at all today (Tuesday). We have had perhaps 50 RTHs steadily for the last couple of weeks. I have numerous photos of the leucistic bird, but do not how to incorporated them in this LISTSERV.


Coincidentally, after our local Audubon Society meeting late last week, a couple who live in the mid-Village area some 5+ miles distant showed me cell phone videos of a leucistic hummingbird feeding at their place at the same time.
 

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Date: 9/18/18 3:07 pm
From: Donald Dunn <000002255a712e56-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Leucistic Hummingbird
During the past week (Tuesday, Sep 11, thru Monday, Sep 17) a leucistic hummingbird (female RTH?) has been feeding at our place on the east side of Hot Springs Village. She fed everyday at about 5-30 minute intervals from daylight to dark, but did not show up at all today (Tuesday). We have had perhaps 50 RTHs steadily for the last couple of weeks. I have numerous photos of the leucistic bird, but do not how to incorporated them in this LISTSERV.

Coincidentally, after our local Audubon Society meeting late last week, a couple who live in the mid-Village area some 5+ miles distant showed me cell phone videos of a leucistic hummingbird feeding at their place at the same time.
 

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Date: 9/18/18 6:24 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Least Flycatcher again
Foraging actively in our mulberry tree this morning.  I explored eBird and found some nice photos of this and other species in the hand by the A-state banding group near Jonesboro (the only other September reports from our state in addition to my Ft Smith records this month).  Take a look.  
eBird Checklist – A-State Bird Observatory, Craighead County, Arkansas, US – Thu Sep 13, 2018 – 28 species


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eBird Checklist – A-State Bird Observatory, Craighead County, Arkansas, ...


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KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 9/18/18 6:03 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Two eagles, an Osprey, and 2 to 3 dozen Eurasian Collared Doves
On Monday afternoon, I visited the Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton
with my mind on dragonflies and damselflies. There was no shortage of
either, with Eastern Amberwings being the most numerous. I headed to the
lower west end, as that is a place where I often see odes. Almost from the
beginning, I started hearing an Osprey down on the east side, but even
though I looked often, I didn't locate the Osprey. I finally decided to
head that way. I didn't make it far before I noticed 2 very large birds in
a dead tree in an adjoining pasture. Osprey, right? No; two mature Bald
Eagles. After a few photos, I continued my quest for the Osprey on the
east side, but didn't find it. (There is a large pond that has been drawn
down. All I saw were Killdeer and some distant peeps.

Well, to make a short story long, the eagles took off, flew east and
disappeared. When I got make within eyeshot of that dead tree, there was
the Osprey. While I was snapping some photos of him, a huge flock of ECDO
flew up and into the same tree. found that odd. Anyway, I went back to
the dragons, but the next time I looked at the tree, it contained one Bald
Eagle, zero Ospreu, and no sign of the Collared-Doves.

There were 2 other raptors: a Red-shouldered Hawk, and a Red-tailed Hawk,
both juveniles. I also saw something that I never thought could happen. I
photographed a Viceroy Butterfly mating with a Red-spotted Purple. If
anyone would like to see the photo, let me know. I did post it on the
Arkansas Butterflies facebook page.

Good day for nature study.

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the Great Northwest

 

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Date: 9/17/18 6:47 pm
From: Sara Wittenberg <sara_ress...>
Subject: Re: documentary showing this week
Is there anyway to get access to this to watch at home?

Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> wrote:



For list subscribers in NW Arkansas: I noticed this morning an announcement on the Fayetteville Flyer (online news site) that the documentary film about Mike Mlodinov and his bird expertise and birding will be shown at 3:30 p.m. on Thurs. at the UA Global Campus Auditorium (formerly known as the Continuing Education Auditorium) -- on Center at East across from the NW corner of the downtown square. Its title (I think) is "Mike the Birdman."


Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

 

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Date: 9/17/18 6:17 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Native Plant Sale, Sept 22
Fall is a great time to add natives to your garden. Audubon Arkansass
native plant sale is this Saturday Sept. 22 from 9-1 at the Little Rock
Audubon Center, 4500 Springer Blvd.

http://ar.audubon.org/events/2018-fall-native-plant-sale-little-rock-audubon
-center

It is going to be BIG! Well have 4 vendors including Pine Ridge Garden.
Plus staff and friends like Cindy Franklin, Donna Haynes, and Don Ford are
donating plants raised at home. PLUS well have hundreds of extra plugs from
Audubons NATIVE Project (http://ar.audubon.org/conservation/native)
including Prairie Blazingstar, Rough Coneflower, and Slender Mountainmint;
proceeds from the plugs go back into the project, which is making more food
and habitat for birds and pollinators.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 9/17/18 3:47 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Underline Monitoring Research – Kauaʻi Endangered Seabird Recovery Project
An interesting approach to minimizing power line collisions by seabirds.

https://kauaiseabirdproject.org/underline-monitoring-research/
 

Back to top
Date: 9/17/18 1:28 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Fwd: AAS Call to Meeting- Fall Conference
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Date: Mon, Sep 17, 2018 at 3:23 PM
Subject: AAS Call to Meeting- Fall Conference
To: <sarah_allely...>, <leanderson...>, <willie0130...>,
Ruth Andre <randre...>, <caraoz...>, <
<steve.arnold...>, <alexandsusan...>, <
<mbbaker...>, <ar.baldwin...>, <bbbbugs...>, <
<mbangert...>, <number2x3...>, <donbarksdale...>,
<keepitsimplerose...>, <timandstephbarr...>, Sara
Cain-Bartlett <saracnbrtltt9...>, <dickbaxter100...>, <
<tkmb96...>, <billtoka...>, <alinbehm...>,
<jpbell3434...>, SANDY BERGER <fsbirdlady...>, Chiou-Guey
Liaw <chiouguey...>, <berry...>, <sharonb...>,
Melissa Bobowski <melissa.bobowski...>, Francie Bolter <
<franciebolter...>, <summitlady...>, <
<sasha.bowles...>, <ctboyles...>, <sixteencedars...>,
<pebriscoe...>, <bluebird2...>, <bbuck...>,
Bufffayar <bufffayar...>, <stacey.buff...>, <
<fairviewcna...>, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>, <
<twbutler...>, <oxfordgirlsmom...>, S. Carter <
<scarterart...>, <c52cash...>, George Ackerman <
<glackerman...>, Sydney Bates <sase626...>, <
<john.anthony...>, <prairiechick...>, <
<careychaney...>, <randelin...>, <onecathy57...>,
Teresa Belk <teresa.belk1122...>, <
<katherine.martin...>, Jamie Carter <
<jcarter...>, <jacquelbright...>, <
<oborocks...>, <bdbutler...>, Lizzie Burnham <
<lizzie.burnham...>, Don Burnham <malachin1...>, Ed Barron <
<docbarronmd...>, Beth Barham <beth.barham5...>, <
<jan-and-john...>, <jollie.berdeja...>, <
<mistybakerok...>, <hilltower12...>, <bcdale...>,
Vaughanda Bowie <vbowie59...>, Meredith Bergstrom <
<meredith.bergstrom...>, <sara_caulk...>, Kelly Chitwood <
<KellyAnnChitwood...>, <mcockrill...>, Sherry Collins <
<shercolls...>, Gordon Cox <gcox1000...>, <csue208...>,
DeLois Crawford <delois...>, Kay Creighton <kaycreighton...>, <
<peggymyles...>, <debbieculwell...>, <bj...>, Dan
Danner <dan14106...>, Bridget Davanzo <davanzo...>, <
<davies.sandy2...>, <jwdavis...>, <kdayer...>, <
<gdokes71612...>, <toto68...>, Hugh L. Donnell <
<hdonnell...>, Rob Doster <rdoster...>, <
<Elizabeth.r.drake...>, <arkdurbin...>, <davefbirds...>,
Frank Fahrlander <frank.fahrlander...>, <j-farrell...>, <
<yesmrsfish...>, <sferg1...>, <cfields81...>,
Littul Kittons <shickshinny...>, william burnham <
<wburnham...>, <efulton114...>, <sgalloway525...>,
<mrsgchem...>, <dlgibson563...>, <sjogibson...>,
Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...>, <rgillham...>, <
<guttgirl2...>, <loerchefeldman...>, Rebecca Green <
<leighandchuckgreen...>, <christie-j...>, <
<denisdean5...>, sparklies1 <ruthless...>, <
<floyd047...>, Lindi Edens <lindiedens...>, <
<rxrbackmax...>, <second2none4...>, <jsfarrell...>,
<dgoldens3...>, <zL2aL09...>, <jadillaha...>, <
<jgfite...>, <tfoti62...>, Ruth Cleghorn <ruthcleghorn...>,
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<theoldcrow...>, Melinda Gay <msgy.272...>, <
<rdowney...>, <auntm13...>, <ggrimmett...>,
Samantha Dixon <Samantha.Dixon.97...>, Ann Honeycutt <
<annhoneycutt53...>, <rgoddard...>, Ann Gordon <
<chesterann...>, <ennismorearms...>, <jeangrim...>, <
<cguerber...>, <janegulley...>, Barry Haas <
<bhaas...>, <rth.aths...>, <catherine...>, <
<joyham...>, <phardin...>, <
<rebeccabutch...>, <whizcats...>, <kdrjnest...>,
<warblingvireo...>, <mlheien...>, <sjherrin...>, <
<donald.higgins...>, <vlmhiggins...>, <
<jthiggins12...>, <Judith_hunt...>, <rlindley...>, <
<maryhogle...>, Bill Holimon <billh...>, <
<bholiman...>, <karenh...>, <
<claireholmes...>, <jhhouse603...>, <vhnvh...>,
<mdusekizaguirre...>, <djames...>, <hjansma...>, <
<lettyburton1942...>, <jennings0091...>, <
<lbj1inar...>, <larryjernigan...>, <
<amjohnson...>, Michael Johnson <michaeljohnson2222...>,
Sandra Johnson <sandrajohnson2222...>, Karen Hicks <
<karenhicks...>, <joea.hall...>, Donna Haynes <
<birdiehaynes...>, <jhyde150...>, <adamsamber8...>, <
<opela1820...>, <zhill...>, Kyle Holton <
<holtoncrew...>, <hogue_mh...>, Lesley Daly <
<dalylesley...>, walkingrock <khall627...>, <
<harveydjohnston...>, John Jones <jpjjgj...>, Amrit Kannan <
<amrit.kannan...>, <rkannan...>, <kim.halter...>,
<mark...>, Ron Kew <ronkew...>, <
<keysm...>, <kkincy...>, <tknighten...>, <
<loicelacy...>, <skycaptain2...>, Ed Laster <
<elaster523...>, Cheryl Lavers <clavers...>, <
<dlawrie...>, <margaret...>, <mplinz...>, joan
lipsmeyer <joanlipsmeyer...>, <mdluneau...>, <
<wmlynch...>, <clyon...>, Kay Malan <
<dkm11malan...>, Margaret Malek <mandms325...>, <
<wmason27...>, <pmattocks...>, <portermcafee...>, <
<jvm6...>, Delos McCauley <edelos...>, <roger0381...>,
<katmac920...>, <lmckenna...>, <mckenrbrt...>, <
<awmdem...>, <mcmillan.ar1...>, <kitty38963...>, <
<stpharmacist...>, <kdmikrut...>, <gail.miller...>,
<swamp_fox...>, <csminson...>, Kenny Nations <
<kennynations...>, <Topatneal...>, Kay Motsinger <
<kaymotsinger...>, <kang...>, <l.moore...>, <
<gregpati...>, Rita Kenney <rkenney686...>, <
<paulmc57...>, <sdelaney...>, Mike Martin <
<mmgolfer53...>, <oddballsinvites...>, <ragupathy.kannan...>,
Cindy King <cindyking2005...>, <robking999...>, <
<jim...>, <cloyd...>, Laura Reynolds <
<laurafite315...>, <mentz...>, <hoatzin1953...>, Allan
Mueller <akcmueller...>, joeneal <joeneal...>, <
<kingbird...>, <ozarksbirder...>, <nufferrm...>,
David Oakley <gdosr...>, <egosborn...>, <
<birdergirl_2000...>, <pjmbowen...>, Leslie Parker <
<flmparker...>, <gghlparker...>, <
<joanie.patterson...>, <nelton...>, <epembleton...>,
<johnperrin...>, <tpressly2...>, <vprislipsky...>,
<cprovost...>, Mitchell Pruitt <mlpruitt24...>, Tina Pryor <
<tinaslilfarm...>, David Quinn <quinnlabs...>, <
<connieohat...>, <herschel.raney...>, <anarkiegrl2...>,
Ellen Repar <blueeyes621...>, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>,
<gailrhoades...>, <rifeja...>, <vrolland...>, <
<dave...>, <bob.cathy.ross...>, <
<rollingrfarm...>, <beverly9944...>, Adam Schaffer <
<adamschaffer2...>, <bscheff45...>, <birddan...>,
Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...>, <wbsch...>,
Joyce Shedell <jhshed...>, <stoneax63...>, <
<siegrists...>, <barinahas...>, <reb_l_reb_l...>, Carla
Bell <albera...>, <kroset...>, <lindaparker...>,
<johnfredman...>, Boscoe Stuckey <bettyestuckey...>,
Nancy Reynolds <nreynolds...>, <jeffnicholas...>, Lenore
Paladino <lenorezp...>, <cldhplank...>, <
<mojorigsby...>, <shawe...>, <lancerad2000...>,
Mary Bess Mulhollan <marybess35...>, <stillonthehill...>,
Eden Price Reif <eden.price.reif...>, Holly Robertson <
<trademarkholly...>, <chelseymariesmith...>, Eilish Palmer <
<eilishpalmer...>, <rseidler...>, Tamzen Bryant <
<ttumlison...>, <wilson...>, <scott2664...>, <
<shaw...>, Don Simons <don.simons...>, <jbsimpson5...>,
<tasingleterry...>, <clintonsmithiv...>, Simon Steinert <
<kgsmith...>, <rickandchris...>, Jack Stewart <
<jampack1...>, Kathy S <tkate...>, <
<dlstrickland...>, Eric Sundell <esundell42...>, <
<imandaisrael...>, <richardtarkka...>, <raet430...>,
<cctheis...>, Sarah Thompson <sarahgrace017...>, Susan
Toone <susantoone...>, <stowns...>, <erintrip...>, <
<tumlison...>, Sharon Vander Zyl <Sharon.vanderzyl...>, <
<donaldvarner...>, Donald Verser <donald.verser...>, Bo
Verser <ozarkwildbird...>, <ncaudubonark...>, <
<lorettawest...>, <bwheeler9...>, <
<danny.white...>, <lrbobwhite...>, Jd Willson <
<jd.willson...>, <loiswildflowers...>, <pwingate...>,
Amy Wynia <amy.wynia...>, <lrbluejay...>, <
<marianne.t.young...>, <dzollner...>, Robin Starr <
<apeheart...>, <dianeandpeter...>, Scott W. <
<wahlfam...>, Carrie Wyre <wyreinspections...>, Amber WB <
<amberwoodward...>, <hildieterry...>, Phil Vogrinc <
<vogrinc...>, <cindyct...>, Don Thompson <uudon...>,
<gallinuleofpurple...>, <quencher...>, <wiewora...>,
<swcmhorn...>, Tim Tyler <tylertim204...>, <
<msiinc...>, Cindy Stewart <fila_72519...>, Gary Thomas <
<rivermountainsales...>, <songbirdharmony...>, <
<catherinecrews...>, <carlaanderson_run...>, <
<joecool920...>, James Wear <james.wear...>, Lynn Risser <
<lynnkrisser...>, PLM Birder <plm108...>, Ricky ONeill <
<oneillar...>, Chris Leonard <skip197...>


Hello Members!


Just a reminder that the fall conference is approaching quickly!


The 2018 Fall Convention of the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) will be held
October 5–7, 2018, at Holiday Inn Texarkana Arkansas Convention Center in
Texarkana, Arkansas. Each room will cost $89.00 plus tax/night and includes
free breakfast for each person staying in the room.

To reserve a room with breakfast included ($89.00 plus tax), call the
Holiday Inn Texarkana Arkansas Convention Center at 1-870-216-2000 and use
the code *Audubon Association.* The cut-off date for making reservations at
the special rate is September 24, 2018.


*Please note that the fall newsletter and the enclosed fall convention
insert are expected to be received by all members prior to the convention,
but those beyond central Arkansas might not receive theirs prior to the
early-bird deadlines. If you need a convention registration form mailed to
you, please email Samantha Scheiman at <samantha.scheiman...>
<samantha.scheiman...>, and she will mail you a printed registration
form, program, and field trip descriptions along with a self-addressed
stamped envelope. Alternatively, you can print convention materials
at http://arbirds.org/Fall18meeting.pdf
<https://nam02.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Farbirds.org%2FFall18meeting.pdf&data=02%7C01%7C%7C710041063064410b7d8208d619f594fe%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636724939881241540&sdata=tipoNn3PpGUSs3zUEPuiFBKht35vfmSGFWOF4woMK%2Bc%3D&reserved=0>.*



There are 10 Field Trips Planned! Including the amazing Red Slough WMA in
Oklahoma and our own Bois d' Arc WMA. Fall migrants will be expected as
well as lingering summer residents. There will be chances to see
specialties like Roseate Spoonbills and Wood Storks along with waterfowl,
raptors, and the chance to see rarities such as Cave Swallows. *A trip
leader to Millwood Lake is needed on Saturday. A volunteer would be greatly
appreciated!*




We will be hearing from two guest speakers, Kevin Morgan- "Forty Years of
the Jewels of Winter:The Louisiana Winter Hummingbird Project" and Charlie
Lyon -"Birds of the Far Southwestern Arkansas Frontier". There will be
several other interesting presentations as well.


Looking forward to good times, good people, and good birds!



Please see the attached “Call to Meeting” document for more details, or go
to our website, www.arbirds.org.



If you have any questions, feel free to contact me by responding to this
email.



Thanks and see you soon,
Cheryl Childers, Membership Chairperson

 

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Date: 9/17/18 10:46 am
From: Amy Brantley <brantleyal...>
Subject: Buffalo National River | Audubon Important Bird Areas
Not much more I can say than the National Audubon Society.
https://www.audubon.org/important-bird-areas/buffalo-national-river

Buffalo National River
Arkansas

The Buffalo National River (BNR) is our nation's first national river. It is a linear park of
approximately 148 miles and 96,203 acres that flows from the Boston Mountains near Ponca to the White River downstream
from Buffalo City. Three wilderness areas occur in the park: Upper
Wilderness, Ponca Wilderness, and Lower Wilderness. The main riparian corridor and its tributaries feature lofty dolomite-sandstone
bluffs, sizable Giant Cane colonies, and broad stretches of gravel and sand bars with the
intermittent deep pools. Terrestrial habitat types include: river forests,
mesic and dry woodlands, glade-savannahs, upland native prairie and grasslands,
karst cave systems, pastoral hayfields, warm and cool season grasses, and
beech-hardwood forests.

Ornithological Summary

In a region now experiencing rapid human population growth,
the importance of the Buffalo National River as an extensive, connected block
of habitat for maintaining Neotropical migratory songbirds and other birds
can’t be overstated. It is difficult to imagine any positive future for many
birds in the Ozarks without public lands, including the long connected corridor
of the BNR.

With the entire river corridor protected as public land, the
BNR is a critical link in a key block of public lands in the Ozarks bioregion.
BNR connects lands owned by The Nature Conservancy, Arkansas Game and Fish
Commission, and U.S. Forest Service. Taken as a whole, this public land
provides the best opportunity to manage and protect a wide range of bird
species, including many that are declining.

The BNR is an important place for birds because the avifauna
is rich and diverse. For example, Hunter et al (1979; Table 10) provided
frequencies of occurrence for summer birds of the upper Buffalo River region.
They reported 24 species of habitat specialists during summer surveys. Among
these are: Red-shouldered Hawk, American Kestrel, Great Blue Heron, Green
Heron, Killdeer, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Belted Kingfisher, Eastern
Kingbird, Eastern Phoebe, Loggerhead Shrike, Prothonotary Warbler, Worm-eating
Warbler, Blue-winged Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Cerulean Warbler, Prairie
Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Common Yellowthroat, Yellow-breasted Chat,
American Redstart, Eastern Meadowlark, Red-winged Blackbird, Blue Grosbeak,
Field Sparrow.

While this project occurred years ago, the fundamental
finding are supported in more contemporaneous projects, including Breeding Bird
Surveys, Christmas Bird Counts, e-Bird submissions, and surveys undertaken by
the Park Service. Leesia Marshall (2012) demonstrated the critical importance
of protected high-quality habitat for Louisiana Waterthrushes in three major
BNR tributaries. Her findings are easily applicable to other Neotropical
species.

According Fitzgerald and Pashley (2000), of “thirty-three
species designated as species of conservation priority for the Ozark/Ouachitas
… Fifteen have greater than 5% of their global population breeding in the
planning unit. Populations of five of those (Pileated Woodpecker, Acadian
Flycatcher, Prairie Warbler, Field Sparrow, and Orchard Oriole) declined
significantly in the physiographic area between 1966 and 1996, and three (Eastern
Wood-Pewee, Great Crested Flycatcher, and Carolina Chickadee) show strong
evidence of decline.” Priority Species documented on the BNR as nesting season
(summer) birds include: Northern Bobwhite, Eastern Whip-poor-will, Pileated
Woodpecker, Acadian Flycatcher, Great Crested Flycatcher, Brown Thrasher,
Swainson’s Warbler, Cerulean Warbler, Kentucky Warbler, Worm-eating Warbler,
Prairie Warbler, Ovenbird, Prothonotary Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Field
Sparrow, and Orchard Oriole.

Conservation Issues

The Buffalo National River was recognized by American Rivers as one of the ten most endangered rivers of 2017. Threats come from across the watershed as well as
within park boundaries. Activities on adjacent private properties such as
clearing trees, cattle grazing, a confined animal feeding operation, and illegal dumping elevate the levels of
pollutants like pesticides, E. coli, and sediments entering tributaries of the
BNR. Feral hog activity is increasing throughout the park, to the detriment of
ground-nesting birds. As the number of park
visitors continues to increase, management of natural resources, including
critical bird habitat, becomes more complicated. The river was protected for
all generations to enjoy, but more people also means more impacts to water
quality and wildlife. The balance between appeasing the crowds versus aiding
wildlife is a fine line.

Ownership

The Buffalo National River is owned by the National Park Service. The IBA boundary includes 140 acres of adjacent private property willingly included in the program.

Habitat

The river flows through a
diversity of geomorphological conditions, which in turn create a highly diverse
landscape, from lofty dolomite-sandstone bluffs to broad stretches of gravel
and sand bars. Habitat types include canebrakes, beech-hardwood forests, glades,
prairies, and karst cave systems.&nbsp;

Land Use

The park’s primary purpose is recreation: river floating,
camping, hiking, horse riding, bird watching, hunting and fishing. The resource
management division of the park monitors water quality and habitat degradation
and tries to remedy any problems that may arise. There is also a hay field
lease program on the park.

Stay abreast of Audubon
Our email newsletter shares the latest programs and initiatives.


Amy
 

Back to top
Date: 9/17/18 10:26 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Two sentences please from Arkansas Birders
I know you all get way too many email appeals, but I'm not asking for money.  Can you spare a few minutes to tell the new Superintendent of the Buffalo National River that you are a birder who cares about the park?  I need to hear from you by tonight.
Alyssa DeRubeis and Joanie Patterson have written wonderful paragraphs about the importance of the Buffalo National River for birds and our community.  These two voices will form the basis of the document I plan to hand to Superintendent Foust tomorrow.  What I need is an attachment listing one or two sentences of support, from each of you.    A simple welcome and I value the Buffalo would do it.  More isn't necessary.
I know from serving on the board of the Buffalo National River partners for 10 years that pressures on the park from all sorts of groups can be intense. Some of the activities being promoted could be very destructive to natural habitats.   The squeaky wheel gets the grease.  
O.K. not two sentences.  How about just one?
ThanksJack
 

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Date: 9/17/18 8:18 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: documentary showing this week
For list subscribers in NW Arkansas: I noticed this morning an announcement on the Fayetteville Flyer (online news site) that the documentary film about Mike Mlodinov and his bird expertise and birding will be shown at 3:30 p.m. on Thurs. at the UA Global Campus Auditorium (formerly known as the Continuing Education Auditorium) -- on Center at East across from the NW corner of the downtown square. Its title (I think) is "Mike the Birdman."


Harriet Jansma

Fayetteville

 

Back to top
Date: 9/17/18 7:06 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Pine Warblers and Indian Grass
Great description, Joe! Especially of the tall grasses and the pine
warbler activities.

Bill Thurman

On Mon, Sep 17, 2018, 07:45 Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Pine Warblers were singing “all over the place” yesterday in vicinity of
> Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area east of Rogers. The 2.5 mile drive along
> Key Road from Highway 12 to the nursery pond on Beaver Lake follows a
> series of ridges dominated by Shortleaf Pine. Pine Warblers are common
> along Key Road, but nine of them seemed a relatively high number. Number 10
> was singing in the parking area at the nursery pond.
>
>
> I have always found it difficult to discern fall movements in a bird like
> this that is present all year, but not easy to find when they aren’t
> singing. So much activity like this does suggest to me fall migration, but
> I’m unsure. In addition, other birds were also singing, including
> Yellow-throated Vireo and Summer Tanagers. Several White-eyed Vireos were
> singing in the bushes and small trees at the nursery pond. I also saw a
> Least Flycatcher and got a quick look at what was likely a House Wren, also
> likely on the move.
>
>
> Besides the singing of Pine Warblers, Key Road right now features great
> examples of native grasses, including both Indian Grass and Big Bluestem
> Grass. These appear along unpaved shoulders, under powerlines, and
> clearings in the woods. At a couple of spots there are small patches of
> Silver Plume Grass, Saccharum alopecuroides. This is a tall and always
> impressive native grass. The pretty little native wildflower, Dittany, is
> blooming in woodland shady spots.
>
>
> These are just a few examples of the natural Ozarks that occurs widely in
> our area, but sure easy to miss. No matter how much money we have in the
> bank and no matter how fancy the house in which we live, we sure live in
> desperate and usually self-imposed poverty if we don’t recognize the song
> of Pine Warblers in our native Shortleaf Pines and true elegance of a stand
> of Indian Grass.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/17/18 5:45 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Pine Warblers and Indian Grass
Pine Warblers were singing all over the place yesterday in vicinity of Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area east of Rogers. The 2.5 mile drive along Key Road from Highway 12 to the nursery pond on Beaver Lake follows a series of ridges dominated by Shortleaf Pine. Pine Warblers are common along Key Road, but nine of them seemed a relatively high number. Number 10 was singing in the parking area at the nursery pond.

I have always found it difficult to discern fall movements in a bird like this that is present all year, but not easy to find when they arent singing. So much activity like this does suggest to me fall migration, but Im unsure. In addition, other birds were also singing, including Yellow-throated Vireo and Summer Tanagers. Several White-eyed Vireos were singing in the bushes and small trees at the nursery pond. I also saw a Least Flycatcher and got a quick look at what was likely a House Wren, also likely on the move.

Besides the singing of Pine Warblers, Key Road right now features great examples of native grasses, including both Indian Grass and Big Bluestem Grass. These appear along unpaved shoulders, under powerlines, and clearings in the woods. At a couple of spots there are small patches of Silver Plume Grass, Saccharum alopecuroides. This is a tall and always impressive native grass. The pretty little native wildflower, Dittany, is blooming in woodland shady spots.

These are just a few examples of the natural Ozarks that occurs widely in our area, but sure easy to miss. No matter how much money we have in the bank and no matter how fancy the house in which we live, we sure live in desperate and usually self-imposed poverty if we dont recognize the song of Pine Warblers in our native Shortleaf Pines and true elegance of a stand of Indian Grass.


 

Back to top
Date: 9/17/18 5:00 am
From: Monroe, Allison <MonroeAA...>
Subject: New Editor!
Hello, friends!

My name is Allison Monroe, and I am a current senior at Hendrix College. I’m introducing myself to all of you because I was recently elected AAS’s newest Editor! I’m so honored and thankful to work with this group!

That being said, I wanted to extend an invitation to any/all of you to send me articles and/or pictures that you may want included in the next newsletter.

I really appreciate your time, and I look forward to hearing from you!

All the best,
Allison Monroe

------------------------
Allison Monroe
Hendrix College '19
Biology major
Campus Sustainability Fund Committee Chair '18-19
Hendrix Murphy Scholar
Arkansas Audubon Society Editor
The Locals board member
(501) 259-0195

 

Back to top
Date: 9/16/18 1:41 pm
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: Buffalo River IBA
Jack--this is a great opportunity for us to establish a presence with
Superintendent Foust. I hope you'll get LOTS of ideas to share with him.
Thanks!

Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas


On Sun, Sep 16, 2018 at 3:07 PM Jack and Pam <
<00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> On Tuesday this week (September 18) I'll be meeting with the new
> Superintendent of the Buffalo National River, Mark Foust. Although the
> topic of the meeting will deal with water quality issues on the river, this
> might be a good time for the birding community to welcome Mark and let him
> know that we visit and value the Park for its natural history -especially
> the habitats the National River provides for birds. As you probably know,
> the Buffalo National River has been designated by Audubon as an IBA
> (Important Bird Area).
>
> If you'd care to write a note to Superintendent Foust send it to me by 6
> PM this Monday (tomorrow) and I'll print them and deliver on Tuesday. You
> can be sure other groups will be advocating from a variety of viewpoints.
> Let's make it known that birders value the Buffalo.
>
> Jack Stewart
> Newton County
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/16/18 1:07 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Buffalo River IBA
On Tuesday this week (September 18) I'll be meeting with the new Superintendent of the Buffalo National River, Mark Foust.  Although the topic of the meeting will deal with water quality issues on the river, this might be a good time for the birding community to welcome Mark and let him know that we visit and value the Park for its natural history -especially the habitats the National River provides for birds.  As you probably know, the Buffalo National River has been designated by Audubon as an IBA (Important Bird Area).
If you'd care to write a note to Superintendent Foust send it to me by 6 PM this Monday (tomorrow) and I'll print them and deliver on Tuesday.  You can be sure other groups will be advocating from a variety of viewpoints. Let's make it  known that birders value the Buffalo.
Jack StewartNewton County
 

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Date: 9/15/18 6:10 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Black-bellied whistling ducks at Joe Hogan
Stopped by Joe Hogan Fish Hatchery in Lonoke on the way back from the Audubon field trip today and was rewarded with 17 black-bellied whistling ducks circling the ponds by the parking lot. The avocet is still present across the highway from the Anderson Minnow Farms office on Highway 70. Did not see the black-necked stilts but there were quite a few peeps, but it was too dark to identify them.
David Ray
NLR
 

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Date: 9/15/18 1:08 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: NE LA bird report
I just had a phone call from my brother, Tilford Watts, who lives on Roundaway Bayou road in Madison Parish, LA. (south of Tallulah).
He has been checking on the back of his farm where there is an old slough. He saw 25 Wood Storks, 8+ Roseate Spoonbills, 10 White Ibis and 30+ Great Egrets. Just as hung up the phone after talking to him, my daughter-in-law, Dorothy Gibson called. She works at Harness Boots on the Harrison square. TWO Roadrunners came up to the door of the store, pecked on it, then proceeded to run north up the sidewalk. One of the men who work there took two pictures with his phone. Shes already emailed them to me. Ill put them on facebook for those who might be interested, can see them.
For those of you who might be interested in real estate, Hard Bargain Plantation is for sale. It run from Epps, LA all the way down to Delhi. It can be had for only several million dollars! Look it up online.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 9/15/18 11:03 am
From: Karen Konarski <karen...>
Subject: a mob of mockers
Thursday evening we drove to Murray Park. Virtually nothing in the dog
park area but in the soccer field near the levee there was a mess of
Northern Mockingbirds and 2 wild rabbits all being more or less tolerant
of each other, Just past the boat ramp was a small puddle with a Brown
Thrasher bathing in the middle of it. Surrounding it, and quite
incensed, was a circle of mockingbirds who took turns rushing in and
harassing the thrasher. It almost looked like a bear-baiting mob. Big
Brown Bird held his own however and continued his bath until a passing
car scattered them. While waiting and watching we were also treated to
a pair of orchard orioles (one on each side of the boat ramp).

Down further at the pavilion area, one lone TV hunkered down atop one of
the lights. Didn't even flinch when we drove under and parked to watch
it. We noticed that 2 of the light casings on that pole were
"dead"...broken and discolored... which may explain his choice of
perch. Odd sightings for the evening. Karen & Neill Hart
 

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Date: 9/15/18 9:14 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Wofford tunnel photo
As the ornithology class studies for the first exam tomorrow, I sent them this photo to reassure them that there is light at the end of the tunnel.Thanks to Jay Jones for the photo.  Our Ar-birds friends Cheryl Childers and Kaylee Kruskopp are also in the pic. On Saturday, 15 September, 2018, 9:08:12 AM GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

I took my ornithology class to this wonderful place yesterday.  Not a lot of birds, but it was worth the hike into the cool, dark, long tunnel!  I told the class the story of how I thought I was the pioneer but was humbled by Bill Beall and Lyndal York having beaten us to it 64 years ago.  Many thanks to Jay Jones, a local property owner, for his hospitality.  This is a "gated" community.  One needs to be escorted as a guest to explore this unique place that straddles both sides of the AR-OK border. 
KannanFt. Smith
----- Forwarded message ----- From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...>To: "<arbird-l...>" <arbird-l...>Sent: Monday, 10 October, 2016, 9:50:34 AM GMT-5Subject: Re: Wofford Lake field trip
Well, Lyndal points out that he beat us to the lake over 6 decades ago!  We are not pioneers after all.  Bummer. Thanks, Lyndal! Here is his eBird list: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S25240987


On Saturday, 8 October 2016 7:54 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:


Wofford Lake is a little-known privately maintained stocked lake spanning AR and OK, just south of Bonanza, AR.  It's bordered in the south by the forested spine of Backbone Mountain.  I took my ornithology class there yesterday, thanks to the invitation of Jay Jones, a local property owner and naturalist.  (We met the genial Mr. Jones during our trip to the prairies last week).  
Apart from the wonderful habitats we covered, an added treat was exploring the 1200-feet long dark railroad tunnel built in 1886, Oklahoma's only railroad tunnel, that cuts through the Backbone.  
Wofford Lake is apparently unknown to birders.  Our records are the first in eBird (see lists below).  This may be worthy of further surveys and designation as a hotspot, what with a lake teeming with fish and nice deciduous forests all around.  Full access is possible only with invitation from local residents.  
Here is our eBird list from the Arkansas side:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31934528

And from the Oklahoma side:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31934570

Kannan


 

Back to top
Date: 9/15/18 7:08 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Wofford Lake field trip
I took my ornithology class to this wonderful place yesterday.  Not a lot of birds, but it was worth the hike into the cool, dark, long tunnel!  I told the class the story of how I thought I was the pioneer but was humbled by Bill Beall and Lyndal York having beaten us to it 64 years ago.  Many thanks to Jay Jones, a local property owner, for his hospitality.  This is a "gated" community.  One needs to be escorted as a guest to explore this unique place that straddles both sides of the AR-OK border. 
KannanFt. Smith
----- Forwarded message ----- From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...>To: "<arbird-l...>" <arbird-l...>Sent: Monday, 10 October, 2016, 9:50:34 AM GMT-5Subject: Re: Wofford Lake field trip
Well, Lyndal points out that he beat us to the lake over 6 decades ago!  We are not pioneers after all.  Bummer. Thanks, Lyndal! Here is his eBird list: http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S25240987


On Saturday, 8 October 2016 7:54 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:


Wofford Lake is a little-known privately maintained stocked lake spanning AR and OK, just south of Bonanza, AR.  It's bordered in the south by the forested spine of Backbone Mountain.  I took my ornithology class there yesterday, thanks to the invitation of Jay Jones, a local property owner and naturalist.  (We met the genial Mr. Jones during our trip to the prairies last week).  
Apart from the wonderful habitats we covered, an added treat was exploring the 1200-feet long dark railroad tunnel built in 1886, Oklahoma's only railroad tunnel, that cuts through the Backbone.  
Wofford Lake is apparently unknown to birders.  Our records are the first in eBird (see lists below).  This may be worthy of further surveys and designation as a hotspot, what with a lake teeming with fish and nice deciduous forests all around.  Full access is possible only with invitation from local residents.  
Here is our eBird list from the Arkansas side:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31934528

And from the Oklahoma side:http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S31934570

Kannan


 

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Date: 9/15/18 6:19 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Orrick Road now a designated hotspot
While exploring eBird with some students, we found some personal locations cluttered around the newly designated Orrick Road hotspot.  For the sake of clarity and future analysis, I urge folks to change their personal locations to the hotpot.  It's easy.  Just click on edit location and find the "Orrick Rd. (Crawford Co.)" hotspot on the map.  
KannanFt. Smith














 

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Date: 9/14/18 2:21 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: What is that noise?
I was at Bell Slough South near Mayflower this morning. I walked over near a ditch that is mostly covered in bushes and grasses. All of a sudden there was a rustling in the bushes, like something was leaving the premises. Then there was a screech, I watched, fully expecting a Red-shouldered Hawk to come flying out of the bushes.  But no bird ever came out. Is there some other type of critter that can make that kind of noise? It wasn't a Blue Jay.
While I was there, at the edge of the parking area I spotted several Magnolia Warblers, the highlight of my outing. I also saw red-eyed, yellow-throated, white-eyed and perhaps a Philadelphia Vireo. The Philadelphia would be a lifer.  I heard a lot of birds at Bell Slough North. Nothing sounded like a warbler though, and I only spotted chickadees and titmouses.
I got a lot of wonderful responses to my question about finding what birds are in a state befire visiting. Thanks to everybody fir those!
Glenn WyattCabot


 

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Date: 9/14/18 11:50 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Costa Rica nature tour is full
This tour is now full, but I am starting a waiting list, so please feel free to get in.  Thanks to all the ar-birders who bird for a cause, and to Dan Scheiman and others who helped me spread the word.  --Kannan
On Thursday, 30 August, 2018, 2:08:55 PM GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:

There are some seats left in this tour.  Please help me fill it up to maximize the donation to the AAST.  I just heard that Esteban Biamonte will be guiding us.  Those of you who came with Kim and me last May will recall what a wonderful guide he is.  So please come or spread the word around!
On Thursday, 16 August, 2018, 1:07:04 PM GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:

Hi all, 
I will lead a nature tour to northwestern COSTA RICA May 26-June 3, 2019, to raise funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust (AAST), in which I serve.  The tour is expected to raise $1,000 or more for the trust.  This relaxing family-friendly tour's cost is $1780 double occupancy for 20 participants.  The tour will be organized by Costa Rica Sun Tours, which has successfully done this for the AAST in the past. 
Highlights of the tour include:
- A visit to the famous bubbling pits of a volcano

- Hiking or horseback riding to two waterfalls--Las Chorreras and Victoria

- Birding in Santa Rosa National Park and Monteverde Cloud Forest

- Guided coffee tour
- Nature walks in the species-rich Solimar Ranch and northwest dry forests

- Boating and birding in the Bebedero River 

- Two nights in a tropical beach resort

- Ocean kayaking and snorkeling in Chora island

See details below.  If interested, please contact me giving your background in birding and nature tours, plus any health and dietary issues.  

R. KannanProfessor of BiologyUniversity of Arkansas--Fort Smith-----------------------------------------------------DETAILED ITINERARY
|
  May 26

 

 

 

  May 26 - 29
|
Arrival, meet and greet, and transfer from the International Daniel Oduber Airport in Liberia (not San Jose!) to your hotel in Rincon de la Vieja, approximately 1 hour transfer. 2 transfers will be provided, depending on arrival flight times. Transfers needed at different times will have to be paid additional. Tonight receive an Orientation Briefing from your guide who will go through your next days and answer any questions. Dinner tonight included at the hotel. (D)

3 nights accommodation at Hacienda Guachipelin. (Superior Rooms) 
|
|
May 27
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide.  After breakfast enjoy a private guided tour at Rincon de la Vieja National Park, entrance fee included. Visit “Las Pailas”, the famous bubbling mud pits created by the nearby volcano. Have lunch included at the hotel and in the afternoon enjoy a horseback Riding/hiking adventure to Las Chorreras and Victoria Waterfalls, where you can observe the amazing sites and take a swim at the refreshing waters. Includes private guide and entrance fee. Dinner tonight included at the hotel. (B,L,D)   
|
|
May 28
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide.  After breakfast, enjoy a guided tour of the Santa Rosa National Park, including entrance fee. Santa Rosa National Park was created in 1971 to commemorate and preserve a historical landmark where Costa Rican independence was won at the Battle of Santa Rosa. It is home to much local wildlife and amazing views of the dry forest and local beach. Lunch included at a local restaurant, and return to your hotel for an afternoon of birdwatching with your private guide along the grounds of the hotel. Dinner tonight included at a local restaurant in the town of Curubandé. (B,L,D)
|
|
May 29

 

 

 




May 29 - 01
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide.  After breakfast private transfer from Rincon de la Vieja to your hotel in Monteverde. Stop en route at the Solimar Ranch for a guided tour along the ranch and wetlands. Solimar Ranch is located just south of the mouth of the Tempisque River, it is a Mecca for naturalists interested in seeing a tremendous variety of water birds and Costa Rica’s dry northwest forest. Includes private and local guide, entrance fee and lunch. Afterwards continue your way towards your hotel in Monteverde. Dinner tonight on your own at local restaurant in town. (B,L)

3 nights accommodation at Trapp Family Lodge Monteverde. (Superior Room)
|
|
May 30
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide. After breakfast enjoy a private guided birding/nature hike at the Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve, one of the premier natural history destinations in Costa Rica. Includes entrance fee. In the afternoon enjoy an educational and cultural experience with the Finca Life Coffee Tour in Monteverde, including local guide and entrance fee. In the evening enjoy a guided night walk at Curi Cancha Reserve, including entrance fee and local guide. Curi Cancha Reserve is located in the heart of Monteverde, and protects 86 hectares (205 acres) of primary and secondary forest. Dinner on your own at the hotel or a local restaurant in town. (B) 
|
|
May 31
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide. After breakfast enjoy a guided birding/nature walk at the Selvatura Suspension Bridges, including private guide and entrance fee. The Selvatura Walkways is an easy hike on a 1.7 mile cloud forest trail and suspension bridges through and above the tree tops. In the afternoon participate in an educational Bellbird Conservation Talk at the Monteverde Institute. Dinner on your own at the hotel or a local restaurant in town. (B)
|
|
Jun 01

 

 

 

 

Jun 01 - 03
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide. After breakfast private transfer with your guide and driver from Monteverde to your hotel in Carrillo Beach, Guanacaste. En route stop for a private guided boat tour along the Bebedero River in the Tempisque River basin bordering Palo Verde National Park, a great opportunity for birding and wildlife observation. Includes private guide, entrance fee and lunch. Afterwards continue to your hotel at the beach in Guanacaste. Dinner on your own at a local restaurant in town. (B,L)

2 nights accommodation at Nammbú Beach Resort. (Deluxe Rooms)
|
|
Jun 02
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide. Today enjoy a guided Ocean Kayak and Snorkeling tour to Chora Island. Rest of the day to enjoy birding in and around your hotel grounds and the local beach. Lunch on your own at a local restaurant and tonight enjoy a group Farewell Dinner at your hotel. (B,D) 
|
|
Jun 03
|
Private Departure Transfer from your hotel in Samara to the International Airport in Liberia, approximately 2 hour transfer. Check in 3 hours prior to your scheduled flight time. (B)
|


  

|
Arkansas Audubon Society Trust Group 2019
|
|
Rates per person, based on occupancy
|
|
 
|
SGL
|
DBL
|
TPL
|
QUAD
|
|
12-13 PAX
|
 $                  2,565
|
 $                  2,055
|
 $               1,975
|
 $          1,935
|
|
14-15 PAX
|
 $                  2,485
|
 $                  1,970
|
 $               1,895
|
 $          1,850
|
|
16-17 PAX
|
 $                  2,425
|
 $                  1,910
|
 $               1,835
|
 $          1,790
|
|
18-19 PAX
|
 $                  2,380
|
 $                  1,865
|
 $               1,790
|
 $          1,745
|
|
20 PAX
|
 $                  2,290
|
 $                  1,780
|
 $               1,705
|
 $          1,660
|
| | | | | |
|
Rates are per person in US Dollars
| | | |
|


| |
|
Private Coaster Van included throughout
| | |
|
Naturalist Private Guide included throughout
| | |
|
Optional pre-breakfastbirding walks with private guide 

| | |
|
3% Credit Card Fee included
| | | |
|


| | | | |


PAYMENTS AND FEES:  A deposit of $350.00 per person (of which $250.00 is non-refundable) isrequired for confirmation before September 30, 2018.

Final payment is due in our office 60 days prior todeparture. If not received the reservation may be canceled and the depositforfeited.

CANCELLATIONS:  Allrefund requests must be received in writing by Costa Rica Sun Tours and thefollowing fees apply in addition to any supplier charges for cancellation:


Upon receipt of deposit………………. $250.00 per person


60-46 days prior to departure……….. $350.00 per person


45-31 days prior to departure ………. 50% of trip price


30-0 days prior to departure …………. no refunds


Any changes or cancellations made after departure will beat the client’s expense.


Included: Transportation andguide services as indicated; accommodations as listed based on standard roomsand double occupancy (unless indicated otherwise) including all applicabletaxes; meals as indicated where B=breakfast, L=lunch, D=dinner.


Not Included: Airfare to CostaRica; travel insurance; gratuities; any lodging, tours or meals not specifiedin the itinerary; extras in hotels (laundry, phone calls, room service, etc.);personal equipment; costs associated with changes to your itinerary for reasonsbeyond our control.


Please note:


-   All persons enteringCosta Rica must have a passport valid for 6 months past the date of entry.

-   Any changes orcancellations made to these services while in Costa Rica are at the traveler'sexpense.


-   No refunds willbe given for unused services as per our terms and conditions.

-   Costa Rica SunTours terms and conditions apply.

-   Travelers areencouraged to take out travel insurance.

                                                                                             COSTA RICA SUN TOURS

PO Box 281-1017 San Jose 2000, San Jose, Costa Rica

US mail forwarding address: SJO 1660PO Box 025331, Miami, FL 33102-5331



 

Back to top
Date: 9/14/18 11:32 am
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: RCSP "new" location
This morning, as I impatiently watched for hawks at my usual spot, the stone wall near the gazebo on Cameron Bluff Overlook Drive here in Mount Magazine State Park, I heard and saw a pair of rufous-crowned sparrows. At first, I thought it might be an indigo bunting calling with a rcsp accent. Then I heard the scolding, rapid fire "deer, deer, deer, deer, deer" which is unmistakably rcsp. This is my first experience with this species on the north side of the mountaintop.

There have been a few unconfirmed reports of rcsp on the north side. The latest was about a month ago but I don't know exactly who, when, or where.

By the way, no hawks yet. More on that later.

Don R. Simons, Park Interpreter
Certified Heritage Interpreter
Mount Magazine State Park
16878 HWY 309 South
Paris, AR 72855

<don.simons...><mailto:<don.simons...>
phone: 479-963-5333
FAX: 479-963-1031


 

Back to top
Date: 9/14/18 7:26 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Tomorrow-Additional Details
The ASCA field trip is tomorrow, Saturday Sept. 15.  See details below.  This is an all-day trip.  From Little Rock, we will head first to the Delta Heritage Trail SP.  We'll take I-40 east to Brinkley, then take Exit 216/Hwy. 49 to go to the park.  We'll make a quick stop at the Louisiana Purchase Historical Monument so people can see what's there. We should arrive at the Delta Heritage SP Visitor Center around 9:00 a.m. for those who want to meet us there.  The Visitor's Center is located directly off Hwy. 49.  We'll meet Park Interpreter Maggie Howard and walk the short trail at the Visitor Center.  We'll then drive 20 minutes south to Old Town Lake and its grand cypress trees and bird the lake area.
Next, we'll head north on Hwy. 1 towards Marianna.  We'll make a quick stop at the Cypress Corner BBQ restaurant to get sandwiches to go.  Or, you can bring your lunch.  We had hoped to stop at the famous Jones BBQ in Marianna, but I spoke with the owner and he said Saturday's are super busy and they will probably be sold out of BBQ by 10:30 a.m.  They close once they have sold out. From Cypress Corner we'll continue north to Marianna, then turn onto Hwy. 44 to get to the Mississippi River SP.  We'll meet Tara Gillanders, Park Interpreter, at the Visitor Center.  Tara recommends eating our lunch at the picnic tables at the Bear Creek Nature Trail.  We'll then walk the trail.
This will be fun and busy day with the chance to bird a part of the state that not many of us get to.  The weather looks great, sunny and just a little warm.  Fall warblers are on the move!  Bring plenty of water, sunscreen, snacks, and also lunch if you don't want BBQ.  We should get back to Little Rock by 5:00 p.m.  Please feel free to contact me off-list if you have any questions.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock September 15DeltaHeritage Trail State Park and Mississippi River State Park Meet at 7:00 a.m.at the Prothro Junction commuter lot, I-40 East, Exit 157, southeast side ofthe interstate.  Drive time from Little Rock to the Delta Heritage Trail SP is 1 hour38 minutes.  The Delta Heritage Trail is a rail-to-trailconversion that was acquired by Arkansas State Parks in 1993. Fourteen milesnear Helena have been completed in some of the most remote and scenic areasremaining in eastern Arkansas's Mississippi Delta.  This historic rail trail is easywalking and goes through multiple habitats. We’ll then travelto the Mississippi River SP.  Drive time between the two parks is 25minutes.  The Mississippi River SP is operated by the Arkansas State Parkswithin the St. Francis National Forest.  It has a Visitors Center withexhibits.  It is the newest member of the Arkansas State ParksSystem.  Bear Creek Lake Natural trail is a one-mile loop thatprovides access to the unique flora and fauna of Crowley’s Ridge. This easywalking trail winds through groves of large native trees, many which areidentified and is a great way to explore the forest.  Drive time from thePark back to Little Rock is 1 hour 35 minutes. Directions:Delta HeritageTrail SP is located at 5539 Hwy. 49, Helena-West Helena.  Phone870-572-2352. For more information go to <deltaheritagetrail...> RiverSP is located at 2955 Hwy. 44, Marianna.  Phone 870-295-4040.  Formore information go to   www.arkansasstateparks.com/parks/mississippi-river-state-park    
 

Back to top
Date: 9/13/18 9:23 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Bird Trip Planning
I second what Daniel said, for both his emails, and add that you can browse
a states listserv to see what is being seen close to your departure date
http://digest.sialia.com. I also recommend subscribing to the states
listserv ahead of time and asking the locals where to find target birds, or
even if anyone is available to go birding with you. Maine-birds Google
group: https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/maine-birds.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 9/13/18, 8:58 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Daniel Mason" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of
<millipede1977...> wrote:



Oh, one more tip for people planning on traveling. Most states have their
own Audubon groups with trips so, you might be able to find an already
planned trip, or plan your trip around one somewhere.

Daniel Mason

On 9/13/2018 6:55 PM, Glenn wrote:


>
>
> I am having a difficult time figuring out the best way to plan a bird trip.
> For instance, say I wanted to travel to Maine and bird there. Where do I
> start? What is the best way to see what birds they have there that I might be
> interested in, and when they might be there? I tried eBird. But, I went into
> explore hot spots. I told it I wanted to see the hot spots in Maine. Well,
> eBird doesn't show just the hot spots in Maine, it continues to show all hot
> spots it just zooms to Maine. Except there seem to be 20 million hot spots in
> Maine so all I see are all these spots and I can't even tell what state they
> are in. Anyhow, I zoomed in until I saw Bangor, I know Bangor is in Maine. I
> narrowed the search down to just May of this last year. I clicked on a random
> hot spot. I saw great egrets, and numerous other birds reported at this hot
> spot, but they were all birds that were common to Arkansas. So, I guess I
> could click and click and click on hot spots hoping to see some kind of bird
> that is interesting. That is a long tedious way to do it. But surely there
> is a better way. How do I find out what birds a state has so I can see what
> they have that might be new to somebody from Arkansas? Then how do I narrow
> down what time of the year those birds are there?
>
>
>
>
>
> I know a lot of you plan bird trips. How do you do it?
>
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Glenn Wyatt
>
> Cabot
>
>
>







<https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campai
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Back to top
Date: 9/13/18 9:09 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Bird Trip Planning
Here's a guide published in 2017:

https://smile.amazon.com/Birdwatching-Maine-Derek-J-Lovitch-ebook/dp/B01MXMW3V6/ref=pd_typ_k_rtpb_1_154606011_2/135-7052993-9452964?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=15RE31XVX0J9JXR5X4C5

On Thu, Sep 13, 2018 at 11:04 PM Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
wrote:

> It's not that I'm totally old school; more like I haven't been on an
> out-of-state bird trip in 18 years, BUT, I always used this series of
> books. It tells you what birds to expect in what areas, sometimes down to
> the street. I have the one to North American trips, as well as guides to
> Texas (the coast and the Rio Grande Valley), Arkansas, and Colorado. The
> second is specific to Maine only.When I could afford to travel, I used
> these extensively.
>
>
> https://smile.amazon.com/Birdfinder-Birders-Planning-American-Birdfinding/dp/1878788108/ref=sr_1_11?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1536897419&sr=1-11&keywords=ABA+birder%27s+guide
>
>
> https://smile.amazon.com/Birders-Guide-Maine-Elizabeth-Pierson-ebook/dp/B0787GH8BS/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1536897489&sr=1-1-fkmr1&keywords=ABA+birder%27s+guide+to+maine
>
> Karen Garrett
>
> On Thu, Sep 13, 2018 at 9:01 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> wrote:
>
>> Oh, one more tip for people planning on traveling. Most states have their
>> own Audubon groups with trips so, you might be able to find an already
>> planned trip, or plan your trip around one somewhere.
>>
>> Daniel Mason
>>
>> On 9/13/2018 6:55 PM, Glenn wrote:
>>
>> I am having a difficult time figuring out the best way to plan a bird
>> trip. For instance, say I wanted to travel to Maine and bird there. Where
>> do I start? What is the best way to see what birds they have there that I
>> might be interested in, and when they might be there? I tried eBird. But,
>> I went into explore hot spots. I told it I wanted to see the hot spots in
>> Maine. Well, eBird doesn't show just the hot spots in Maine, it continues
>> to show all hot spots it just zooms to Maine. Except there seem to be 20
>> million hot spots in Maine so all I see are all these spots and I can't
>> even tell what state they are in. Anyhow, I zoomed in until I saw Bangor,
>> I know Bangor is in Maine. I narrowed the search down to just May of this
>> last year. I clicked on a random hot spot. I saw great egrets, and
>> numerous other birds reported at this hot spot, but they were all birds
>> that were common to Arkansas. So, I guess I could click and click and
>> click on hot spots hoping to see some kind of bird that is interesting.
>> That is a long tedious way to do it. But surely there is a better way.
>> How do I find out what birds a state has so I can see what they have that
>> might be new to somebody from Arkansas? Then how do I narrow down what
>> time of the year those birds are there?
>>
>> I know a lot of you plan bird trips. How do you do it?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Glenn Wyatt
>> Cabot
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
>> www.avast.com
>> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=link>
>> <#m_6439465803704965222_m_-1320068279296547641_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/13/18 9:04 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Bird Trip Planning
It's not that I'm totally old school; more like I haven't been on an
out-of-state bird trip in 18 years, BUT, I always used this series of
books. It tells you what birds to expect in what areas, sometimes down to
the street. I have the one to North American trips, as well as guides to
Texas (the coast and the Rio Grande Valley), Arkansas, and Colorado. The
second is specific to Maine only.When I could afford to travel, I used
these extensively.

https://smile.amazon.com/Birdfinder-Birders-Planning-American-Birdfinding/dp/1878788108/ref=sr_1_11?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1536897419&sr=1-11&keywords=ABA+birder%27s+guide

https://smile.amazon.com/Birders-Guide-Maine-Elizabeth-Pierson-ebook/dp/B0787GH8BS/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1536897489&sr=1-1-fkmr1&keywords=ABA+birder%27s+guide+to+maine

Karen Garrett

On Thu, Sep 13, 2018 at 9:01 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:

> Oh, one more tip for people planning on traveling. Most states have their
> own Audubon groups with trips so, you might be able to find an already
> planned trip, or plan your trip around one somewhere.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> On 9/13/2018 6:55 PM, Glenn wrote:
>
> I am having a difficult time figuring out the best way to plan a bird
> trip. For instance, say I wanted to travel to Maine and bird there. Where
> do I start? What is the best way to see what birds they have there that I
> might be interested in, and when they might be there? I tried eBird. But,
> I went into explore hot spots. I told it I wanted to see the hot spots in
> Maine. Well, eBird doesn't show just the hot spots in Maine, it continues
> to show all hot spots it just zooms to Maine. Except there seem to be 20
> million hot spots in Maine so all I see are all these spots and I can't
> even tell what state they are in. Anyhow, I zoomed in until I saw Bangor,
> I know Bangor is in Maine. I narrowed the search down to just May of this
> last year. I clicked on a random hot spot. I saw great egrets, and
> numerous other birds reported at this hot spot, but they were all birds
> that were common to Arkansas. So, I guess I could click and click and
> click on hot spots hoping to see some kind of bird that is interesting.
> That is a long tedious way to do it. But surely there is a better way.
> How do I find out what birds a state has so I can see what they have that
> might be new to somebody from Arkansas? Then how do I narrow down what
> time of the year those birds are there?
>
> I know a lot of you plan bird trips. How do you do it?
>
> Thanks,
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
>
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
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> <#m_-1320068279296547641_DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/13/18 7:01 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Bird Trip Planning
Oh, one more tip for people planning on traveling. Most states have
their own Audubon groups with trips so, you might be able to find an
already planned trip, or plan your trip around one somewhere.

Daniel Mason

On 9/13/2018 6:55 PM, Glenn wrote:
> I am having a difficult time figuring out the best way to plan a bird
> trip.  For instance, say I wanted to travel to Maine and bird there. 
> Where do I start?  What is the best way to see what birds they have
> there that I might be interested in, and when they might be there?  I
> tried eBird.  But, I went into explore hot spots.  I told it I wanted
> to see the hot spots in Maine.  Well, eBird doesn't show just the hot
> spots in Maine, it continues to show all hot spots it just zooms to
> Maine.  Except there seem to be 20 million hot spots in Maine so all I
> see are all these spots and I can't even tell what state they are in. 
> Anyhow, I zoomed in until I saw Bangor, I know Bangor is in Maine.  I
> narrowed the search down to just May of this last year.  I clicked on
> a random hot spot.  I saw great egrets, and numerous other birds
> reported at this hot spot, but they were all birds that were common to
> Arkansas. So, I guess I could click and click and click on hot spots
> hoping to see some kind of bird that is interesting.  That is a long
> tedious way to do it.  But surely there is a better way.  How do I
> find out what birds a state has so I can see what they have that might
> be new to somebody from Arkansas? Then how do I narrow down what time
> of the year those birds are there?
>
> I know a lot of you plan bird trips.  How do you do it?
>
> Thanks,
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot




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Date: 9/13/18 6:36 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Bird Trip Planning
When are you going or, thinking of going? And what part of Maine? If
you're up there the right time of year, a puffin tour is a must. :)
Here's what I've done before for a trip up there...  I went to Eird and
looked at the bar charts...
https://ebird.org/barchart?r=US-ME&yr=all&m=

Then, I pick the month that I plan to be in that area. (click on the
month at the top of the bar chart) If you want it to be a little more
accurate you can change the list so it shows the last 10 years instead
of all time. The all time list will have birds on it that will be very
unlikely. And the size of the bars help you understand if it's actually
likely that time of year or not.
You then tediously browse the list and make a note of all the species
you might want to find. You can click to look at maps and such as well.
BUT... what I did with my list one year was asked some people on the
whatbird forums. They somehow lost just about everything on their forums
and had to start over which REALLY stinks...   https://forums.whatbird.com/
but, I posted the list of what I wanted to see and a few people were
able to comment and say where I should go for the best results.
We were visiting Massachusetts but did a puffin tour to Eastern Egg Rock
Island... saw puffins, terns, eiders, etc... went and saw piping plovers
on plum island in MA one summer.

Anyway, check out the bar charts for ME for the time of year you're
thinking of going there and make a list of birds you'd like to see. If
you can't get to the whatbird forums, I could ask there... or, I could
help wade through Ebird data as somehow, I enjoy that. HA.
Side note, there's been a few summers lately where they've had a little
egret visiting. So always watch Ebird reports for rarities. :)
Daniel Mason

On 9/13/2018 6:55 PM, Glenn wrote:
> I am having a difficult time figuring out the best way to plan a bird
> trip.  For instance, say I wanted to travel to Maine and bird there. 
> Where do I start?  What is the best way to see what birds they have
> there that I might be interested in, and when they might be there?  I
> tried eBird.  But, I went into explore hot spots.  I told it I wanted
> to see the hot spots in Maine.  Well, eBird doesn't show just the hot
> spots in Maine, it continues to show all hot spots it just zooms to
> Maine.  Except there seem to be 20 million hot spots in Maine so all I
> see are all these spots and I can't even tell what state they are in. 
> Anyhow, I zoomed in until I saw Bangor, I know Bangor is in Maine.  I
> narrowed the search down to just May of this last year.  I clicked on
> a random hot spot.  I saw great egrets, and numerous other birds
> reported at this hot spot, but they were all birds that were common to
> Arkansas. So, I guess I could click and click and click on hot spots
> hoping to see some kind of bird that is interesting.  That is a long
> tedious way to do it.  But surely there is a better way.  How do I
> find out what birds a state has so I can see what they have that might
> be new to somebody from Arkansas? Then how do I narrow down what time
> of the year those birds are there?
>
> I know a lot of you plan bird trips.  How do you do it?
>
> Thanks,
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot




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Date: 9/13/18 6:07 pm
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Re: Bird Trip Planning
I get in touch with a guide or tour service. They know where the birds are and when.

A D Patton

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of plm108 <plm108...>
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2018 7:30:12 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Bird Trip Planning

Regardless of what birds you want to see in Maine, Glenn, you WILL have an awesome time and are very likely to see some amazing life birds! Here's how I would approach it (with exceptions): Ask yourself the following ...

1. What U.S. LIFE birds do I need that are in Maine and where are they? (Use eBird Target Species feature to find this info).

2. What part of Maine would I just personally love to explore - and what birds are there? (Using eBird data)

3. What OTHER Maine birds would I like to see during my trip - and where are they, particularly those that might be prevalent in my focus areas.

I typically go through this process when travelling to an unfamiliar area or state. I also monitor BirdsEye to see what needed and/or rare birds are being reported within 10 miles. Call Michael Linz for specifics.

Patty McLean

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Date: 9/13/18 6:55 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Bird Trip Planning

I am having a difficult time figuring out the best way to plan a bird trip. For instance, say I wanted to travel to Maine and bird there. Where do I start? What is the best way to see what birds they have there that I might be interested in, and when they might be there? I tried eBird. But, I went into explore hot spots. I told it I wanted to see the hot spots in Maine. Well, eBird doesn't show just the hot spots in Maine, it continues to show all hot spots it just zooms to Maine. Except there seem to be 20 million hot spots in Maine so all I see are all these spots and I can't even tell what state they are in. Anyhow, I zoomed in until I saw Bangor, I know Bangor is in Maine. I narrowed the search down to just May of this last year. I clicked on a random hot spot. I saw great egrets, and numerous other birds reported at this hot spot, but they were all birds that were common to Arkansas. So, I guess I could click and click and click on hot spots hoping to see some kind of bird that is interesting. That is a long tedious way to do it. But surely there is a better way. How do I find out what birds a state has so I can see what they have that might be new to somebody from Arkansas? Then how do I narrow down what time of the year those birds are there?

I know a lot of you plan bird trips. How do you do it?
Thanks,Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 9/13/18 5:30 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Bird Trip Planning
Regardless of what birds you want to see in Maine, Glenn, you WILL have an awesome time and are very likely to see some amazing life birds! Here's how I would approach it (with exceptions): Ask yourself the following ...
1. What U.S. LIFE birds do I need that are in Maine and where are they? (Use eBird Target Species feature to find this info).
2.  What part of Maine would I just personally love to explore - and what birds are there? (Using eBird data)
3. What OTHER Maine birds would I like to see during my trip - and where are they, particularly those that might be prevalent in my focus areas.
I typically go through this process when travelling to an unfamiliar area or state. I also monitor BirdsEye to see what needed and/or rare birds are being reported within 10 miles. Call Michael Linz for specifics. 
Patty McLean 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Date: 9/13/18 6:55 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Bird Trip Planning
I am having a difficult time figuring out the best way to plan a bird trip.  For instance, say I wanted to travel to Maine and bird there.  Where do I start?  What is the best way to see what birds they have there that I might be interested in, and when they might be there?  I tried eBird.  But, I went into explore hot spots.  I told it I wanted to see the hot spots in Maine.  Well, eBird doesn't show just the hot spots in Maine, it continues to show all hot spots it just zooms to Maine.  Except there seem to be 20 million hot spots in Maine so all I see are all these spots and I can't even tell what state they are in.  Anyhow, I zoomed in until I saw Bangor, I know Bangor is in Maine.  I narrowed the search down to just May of this last year.  I clicked on a random hot spot.  I saw great egrets, and numerous other birds reported at this hot spot, but they were all birds that were common to Arkansas.  So, I guess I could click and click and click on hot spots hoping to see some kind of bird that is interesting.  That is a long tedious way to do it.  But surely there is a better way.  How do I find out what birds a state has so I can see what they have that might be new to somebody from Arkansas?  Then how do I narrow down what time of the year those birds are there? 

I know a lot of you plan bird trips.  How do you do it?
Thanks,Glenn WyattCabot
 

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Date: 9/13/18 5:22 pm
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: Bird Trip Planning
I think you can rip off the major birding tour companies. Generally, I think they cater to birders of medium experience and abilities (me) who want a fairly comprehensive list highlighted by the local specialties, which also determines the scheduling of the tours. Go when and where they go. Their web descriptions usually include that info, since they’re come-ons. Victor Emanuel is probably the premier American company, and our tours with them (Belize and the Pantanal in Brazil) have been wholly satisfying. (If you can afford it, you might consider joining one of their tours.) WINGS is another pretty well respected company. I’m not current on this next idea, but the ABA has published lists of local birders who are willing to help out (sometimes for a fee). I have a couple more ideas which I’m not willing to embarrass myself with on the list. Feel free to contact me off list. Good luck!

Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 13, 2018, at 6:55 PM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I am having a difficult time figuring out the best way to plan a bird trip. For instance, say I wanted to travel to Maine and bird there. Where do I start? What is the best way to see what birds they have there that I might be interested in, and when they might be there? I tried eBird. But, I went into explore hot spots. I told it I wanted to see the hot spots in Maine. Well, eBird doesn't show just the hot spots in Maine, it continues to show all hot spots it just zooms to Maine. Except there seem to be 20 million hot spots in Maine so all I see are all these spots and I can't even tell what state they are in. Anyhow, I zoomed in until I saw Bangor, I know Bangor is in Maine. I narrowed the search down to just May of this last year. I clicked on a random hot spot. I saw great egrets, and numerous other birds reported at this hot spot, but they were all birds that were common to Arkansas. So, I guess I could click and click and click on hot spots hoping to see some kind of bird that is interesting. That is a long tedious way to do it. But surely there is a better way. How do I find out what birds a state has so I can see what they have that might be new to somebody from Arkansas? Then how do I narrow down what time of the year those birds are there?
>
> I know a lot of you plan bird trips. How do you do it?
>
> Thanks,
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot

 

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Date: 9/13/18 4:57 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bird Trip Planning
I am having a difficult time figuring out the best way to plan a bird trip.  For instance, say I wanted to travel to Maine and bird there.  Where do I start?  What is the best way to see what birds they have there that I might be interested in, and when they might be there?  I tried eBird.  But, I went into explore hot spots.  I told it I wanted to see the hot spots in Maine.  Well, eBird doesn't show just the hot spots in Maine, it continues to show all hot spots it just zooms to Maine.  Except there seem to be 20 million hot spots in Maine so all I see are all these spots and I can't even tell what state they are in.  Anyhow, I zoomed in until I saw Bangor, I know Bangor is in Maine.  I narrowed the search down to just May of this last year.  I clicked on a random hot spot.  I saw great egrets, and numerous other birds reported at this hot spot, but they were all birds that were common to Arkansas.  So, I guess I could click and click and click on hot spots hoping to see some kind of bird that is interesting.  That is a long tedious way to do it.  But surely there is a better way.  How do I find out what birds a state has so I can see what they have that might be new to somebody from Arkansas?  Then how do I narrow down what time of the year those birds are there? 

I know a lot of you plan bird trips.  How do you do it?
Thanks,Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 9/13/18 3:04 pm
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Register for eBird Webinars
Registration is now open for Audubon Arkansas's eBird webinars. http://ar.audubon.org/news/register-ebird-webinars


I am holding three webinars:

eBird Basics, Wednesday, September 26, 6:30pm-8:30pm

eBird Basics, Saturday, September 29, 10:00am-12:00pm *repeat of Sept. 26*

eBird Extras, Wednesday, October 3, 6:30pm-8:30pm


The last one will include topics that you want to learn about, so submit your questions when you register.


These are live, online, demonstrations with a chance to ask questions. Cost is $15 each. You will be given login details when you register. You can listen in via your phone or computer speakers.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 9/13/18 3:03 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Binoculars for children
I agree with Kannan and Joe, HOWEVER:

What I call the "squoze" factor or adjustable distance between the eye pieces on the bins or pupil to pupil on the people needs to be greater on the bins children or small adults use. If that distance can not be made closer (or squoze), as is often the case on many "starter" binoculars, it won't matter a whole lot what the field of view or exit pupil is because the big, beautiful sweet spot needed for a clear focused image will not be attainable. I learned several years ago that in their infancy binoculars were designed for men (mostly hunters) and these bins will probably fall into the IPD (interpupillary distance) range of 54-68 mm whereas because of smaller stature children and most women have an IPD of 41-55 mm. This is evident when being fitted for glasses the optometrist will measure this distance so that your glasses focus as intended! The squoze factor is especially noticeable when using binoculars with that sort of rocker arm assembly. The rocker-arm dealy prevents them from being squozed.

As Pete Dunn says, "Generally speaking if you want to FIND the bird 8x42's are great. If you want to SEE the bird, 10x42's are better."

I agree, but will add that if you can't get the focus correct for your IPD, it won't matter a great deal.

--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 9/13/18, Joe Neal <joecneal...> wrote:

Subject: Re: Binoculars for children
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Date: Thursday, September 13, 2018, 6:39 AGenM

Some
of the best reviewed ones over the years have been in the
range of 6 X 30 to 7 X30 or 40. Kids need the big field of
view to get started, not so much magnification. You can
follow up on this directly by discussing with folks who run
our Halberg Camp. Kids at Halberg are a little older, but
issues are the same. I agree with Kannan -- anything under
30 is mainly a toy. 6 or 7 on the other end is
enough.


On Wednesday,
September 12, 2018 2:48 PM, Jerry Butler
<jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:


I have an opportunity
to provide children, ages 9-10,  with binoculars to watch
birds. 
 In the past
when I have allowed children to look through my 10X50 binocs
most of them claimed they couldn't see very well.  Does
any one have experience with children that age, and could
suggest what power they need?  Brand or feature
recommendations?
I see
ads that tout binocs for kids in the 8X20 range, but I am
reluctant to take the sellers word without hearing for
others.
Peace and
Birds  Jerry Butler.





 

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Date: 9/13/18 2:11 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: RUDY TURNSTONES AT BOYD POINT
This morning there were 4 Rudy Turnstones in nonbreeding plumage at the Boyd Point Waste Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. All were foraging along the rip rap at the waters edge. There was one pair that stayed very close together and 2 separate individuals in other areas of the facility.
John Redman
 

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Date: 9/13/18 2:01 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Summer issue of Arkansas Birds
Arbirders:

The summer issue of *Arkansas Birds*, the newsletter of the Arkansas
Audubon Society, is available for downloading at:
www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf .
Lyndal York
AAS Webmaster

 

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Date: 9/13/18 11:24 am
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Warblers @ Bell North
Patty and I birded Bell Slough North in Faulkner county this morning.
Besides many “regulars,” we also had:
Blue-winged Warbler
Golden-winged Wabler
Northern Parula
Nashville Warbler
Pine Warbler
American Redstart
Philadelphia Vireo
Yellow-Throated Vireo
Red-eyed Vireo
White-eyed Vireo
Yellow-billed Cuckoo
and a single Black Vulture (noted for Allan Mueller)

Michael Linz and Patty McLean (Conway, AR)
 

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Date: 9/13/18 4:39 am
From: Joe Neal <joecneal...>
Subject: Re: Binoculars for children
Some of the best reviewed ones over the years have been in the range of 6 X 30 to 7 X30 or 40. Kids need the big field of view to get started, not so much magnification. You can follow up on this directly by discussing with folks who run our Halberg Camp. Kids at Halberg are a little older, but issues are the same. I agree with Kannan -- anything under 30 is mainly a toy. 6 or 7 on the other end is enough.

On Wednesday, September 12, 2018 2:48 PM, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:


I have an opportunity to provide children, ages 9-10,  with binoculars to watch birds. 
 In the past when I have allowed children to look through my 10X50 binocs most of them claimed they couldn't see very well.  Does any one have experience with children that age, and could suggest what power they need?  Brand or feature recommendations?
I see ads that tout binocs for kids in the 8X20 range, but I am reluctant to take the sellers word without hearing for others.
Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler.




 

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Date: 9/12/18 9:13 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Re: Fish Crows numerous in the river valley
There is an electrical substation in Alma where at least some of them
roost. I have noticed a large murder of crows there the past two evenings
around sunset. They are on the wires on either side of hwy 64 and some
around the substation. I assume they are Fish Crows queuing up for
migration but will try to confirm tomorrow.

On Wed, Sep 12, 2018, 12:52 PM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> I couldn't differentiate between the species either.
>
> Sandy
>
> On Wed, Sep 12, 2018 at 12:45 PM Carol Joan Patterson <
> <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> Donald and I were on Sharp Chapel Road yesterday - seeking and failing to
>> find the Swallow-tailed Kite. We saw a large group of crows flying over -
>> cawing like American Crows. Later we saw a larger group about the same
>> size (perhaps 70 or so) cawing like Fish Crows, but not giving the double
>> syllable call - so possibly not Fish Crows (maybe immature American?)
>> heading in the same direction. However, later a group the same size came
>> from the direction those had flown, and these were giving the distinctive
>> double caw. At this point we had counted 70 of each species, plus a group
>> in the distance of about 30 unknown as they did not caw. Still later, in
>> the afternoon, American Crows singly or in pairs began landing in the
>> field. These also seemed to be returning. Your input is like the next
>> episode of a drama -all the very fascinating. Wonder where the roost
>> is....We saw only 2 MIKI but did see the harrier. Saw a Viceroy Butterfly.
>>
>> Joanie
>>
>> On Wednesday, September 12, 2018, 7:44:40 AM CDT, Joseph C. Neal <
>> <joeneal...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> There is a largish Fish Crow roost in the area of Arkansas River Valley
>> that includes Frog Bayou WMA including Sharp Chapel Road (of recent
>> Swallow-tailed Kite fame), Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility-Orrick
>> Road-King ranch (of recent Roseate Spoonbill fame and Black-bellied
>> Whistling-Ducks). I assume this is a post-breeding roost of birds that
>> nested in the area. (Fish Crow roosts in the Fayetteville area have been
>> documented by late July and thereafter.) I first noticed this at the King
>> ranch across from Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility on August 10. They
>> were perched in trees well out in the field (50+), but quite vocal and by
>> vocalizations, unmistakably Fish Crows. There were also a few – just a few
>> – American Crows in the area. I have found high numbers of Fish Crows on
>> each subsequent trip in this area, including recent trips that included
>> Frog Bayou WMA and the Swallow-tailed Kite viewing area along Sharp Chapel
>> Road. I have had largish flocks of Fish Crows (at least 50-75) flying over
>> Sharp Chapel Road every time I have been there since August 10. Each time,
>> they have been flying near tree top from the area that includes King ranch
>> and Alma Wastewater towards the Arkansas River. There are also relatively
>> few American Crows. It would be interesting to know just how extensive this
>> Fish Crow roost is, but I’ll bet it must be in the hundreds.
>>
>>

 

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Date: 9/12/18 5:45 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Binoculars for children
Hey Jerry ... and all parents, grandparents. I decided to do an online search about bins for kids and came across this review, which applies to young people of various ages. Thought you might find something here for the youngsters in your lives. 
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.fractuslearning.com/best-kids-binoculars-outdoor-adventures/amp/

Patty McLean
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Date: 9/12/18 2:48 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Binoculars for children
I have an opportunity to provide children, ages 9-10,  with binoculars to
watch birds.

In the past when I have allowed children to look through my 10X50 binocs
most of them claimed they couldn't see very well.  Does any one have
experience with children that age, and could suggest what power they need?
Brand or feature recommendations?

I see ads that tout binocs for kids in the 8X20 range, but I am reluctant
to take the sellers word without hearing for others.

Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler.
 

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Date: 9/12/18 4:53 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Binoculars for children
I would think a wide field-of-view helps inexperienced birders acquire the target more than magnification.



Also, as we age, our pupils get smaller, so young folks would benefit more from a larger exit pupil which would provide more light to their young eyes. An 8x40 binoc would have an exit pupil of 5.0; an 8x20 would have an exit pupil of 2.5. Even 7x35 would be better (5.0).



Remind the kids never, ever look toward the sun!!!



Jeff Short







From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan
Sent: Wednesday, September 12, 2018 5:02 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Binoculars for children



Jerry, I take kids out a lot, especially in India. In my experience the best are the lighter 8 x 40s or thereabouts. I wouldn't settle for 8 x 20s (if indeed they exist--they sound like toys).



On Wednesday, 12 September, 2018, 2:48:38 PM GMT-5, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:





I have an opportunity to provide children, ages 9-10, with binoculars to watch birds.



In the past when I have allowed children to look through my 10X50 binocs most of them claimed they couldn't see very well. Does any one have experience with children that age, and could suggest what power they need? Brand or feature recommendations?



I see ads that tout binocs for kids in the 8X20 range, but I am reluctant to take the sellers word without hearing for others.



Peace and Birds Jerry Butler.






 

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Date: 9/12/18 3:10 pm
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Merlin and spoonbills
One spoonbill in pond across from Alma WWTP, another across the river at end of Sharps Chapel Road. Merlin flew by me down Sharps Chapel in fields area.

Alton Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>


 

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Date: 9/12/18 3:02 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Binoculars for children
Jerry, I take kids out a lot, especially in India.  In my experience the best are the lighter 8 x 40s or thereabouts.  I wouldn't settle for 8 x 20s (if indeed they exist--they sound like toys). 
On Wednesday, 12 September, 2018, 2:48:38 PM GMT-5, Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> wrote:

I have an opportunity to provide children, ages 9-10,  with binoculars to watch birds. 
 In the past when I have allowed children to look through my 10X50 binocs most of them claimed they couldn't see very well.  Does any one have experience with children that age, and could suggest what power they need?  Brand or feature recommendations?
I see ads that tout binocs for kids in the 8X20 range, but I am reluctant to take the sellers word without hearing for others.
Peace and Birds  Jerry Butler.


 

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Date: 9/12/18 2:26 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Fall Meeting of Arkansas Audubon Society
Arbirders:
The fall meeting of the AAS will be held in Texarkana Oct. 5-7 at the
Holiday Inn Convention Center. Details on the programs, field trips and
housing as well as the registration form can be downloaded from the
arbirds.org website ( www.arbirds.org ).

Lyndal York
AAS Webmaster

 

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Date: 9/12/18 1:43 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SPOONBILLS – YES, SWALLOW-TAILED KITE – NO
On Sharp Chapel Road in Frog Bayou WMA, I saw only two Mississippi Kites and no Swallow-tailed Kite this morning. Spoonbills continue across from Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility. In terms of Fish Crows: 79 flew over, leaving King ranch area and headed in direction of Frog and Arkansas River.


 

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Date: 9/12/18 12:48 pm
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Binoculars for children
I have an opportunity to provide children, ages 9-10, with binoculars to
watch birds.

In the past when I have allowed children to look through my 10X50 binocs
most of them claimed they couldn't see very well. Does any one have
experience with children that age, and could suggest what power they need?
Brand or feature recommendations?

I see ads that tout binocs for kids in the 8X20 range, but I am reluctant
to take the sellers word without hearing for others.

Peace and Birds Jerry Butler.

 

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Date: 9/12/18 10:52 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Fish Crows numerous in the river valley
I couldn't differentiate between the species either.

Sandy

On Wed, Sep 12, 2018 at 12:45 PM Carol Joan Patterson <
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Donald and I were on Sharp Chapel Road yesterday - seeking and failing to
> find the Swallow-tailed Kite. We saw a large group of crows flying over -
> cawing like American Crows. Later we saw a larger group about the same
> size (perhaps 70 or so) cawing like Fish Crows, but not giving the double
> syllable call - so possibly not Fish Crows (maybe immature American?)
> heading in the same direction. However, later a group the same size came
> from the direction those had flown, and these were giving the distinctive
> double caw. At this point we had counted 70 of each species, plus a group
> in the distance of about 30 unknown as they did not caw. Still later, in
> the afternoon, American Crows singly or in pairs began landing in the
> field. These also seemed to be returning. Your input is like the next
> episode of a drama -all the very fascinating. Wonder where the roost
> is....We saw only 2 MIKI but did see the harrier. Saw a Viceroy Butterfly.
>
> Joanie
>
> On Wednesday, September 12, 2018, 7:44:40 AM CDT, Joseph C. Neal <
> <joeneal...> wrote:
>
>
> There is a largish Fish Crow roost in the area of Arkansas River Valley
> that includes Frog Bayou WMA including Sharp Chapel Road (of recent
> Swallow-tailed Kite fame), Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility-Orrick
> Road-King ranch (of recent Roseate Spoonbill fame and Black-bellied
> Whistling-Ducks). I assume this is a post-breeding roost of birds that
> nested in the area. (Fish Crow roosts in the Fayetteville area have been
> documented by late July and thereafter.) I first noticed this at the King
> ranch across from Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility on August 10. They
> were perched in trees well out in the field (50+), but quite vocal and by
> vocalizations, unmistakably Fish Crows. There were also a few – just a few
> – American Crows in the area. I have found high numbers of Fish Crows on
> each subsequent trip in this area, including recent trips that included
> Frog Bayou WMA and the Swallow-tailed Kite viewing area along Sharp Chapel
> Road. I have had largish flocks of Fish Crows (at least 50-75) flying over
> Sharp Chapel Road every time I have been there since August 10. Each time,
> they have been flying near tree top from the area that includes King ranch
> and Alma Wastewater towards the Arkansas River. There are also relatively
> few American Crows. It would be interesting to know just how extensive this
> Fish Crow roost is, but I’ll bet it must be in the hundreds.
>
>

 

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Date: 9/12/18 10:45 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Fish Crows numerous in the river valley
Donald and I were on Sharp Chapel Road yesterday - seeking and failing to find the Swallow-tailed Kite.  We saw a large group of crows flying over - cawing like American Crows.  Later we saw a larger group about the same size (perhaps 70 or so) cawing like Fish Crows, but not giving the double syllable call - so possibly not Fish Crows (maybe immature American?) heading in the  same direction.  However, later a group the same size came from the direction those had flown, and these were giving the distinctive double caw. At this point we had counted 70 of each species, plus a group in the distance of about 30 unknown as they did not caw.  Still later, in the afternoon, American Crows singly or in pairs began landing in the field.  These also seemed to be returning.  Your input is like the next episode of a drama -all the very fascinating.  Wonder where the roost is....We saw only 2 MIKI but did see the harrier.  Saw a Viceroy Butterfly.

Joanie

On Wednesday, September 12, 2018, 7:44:40 AM CDT, Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:




There is a largish Fish Crow roost in the area of Arkansas River Valley that includes Frog Bayou WMA including Sharp Chapel Road (of recent Swallow-tailed Kite fame), Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility-Orrick Road-King ranch (of recent Roseate Spoonbill fame and Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks). I assume this is a post-breeding roost of birds that nested in the area. (Fish Crow roosts in the Fayetteville area have been documented by late July and thereafter.) I first noticed this at the King ranch across from Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility on August 10. They were perched in trees well out in the field (50+), but quite vocal and by vocalizations, unmistakably Fish Crows. There were also a few – just a few – American Crows in the area. I have found high numbers of Fish Crows on each subsequent trip in this area, including recent trips that included Frog Bayou WMA and the Swallow-tailed Kite viewing area along Sharp Chapel Road. I have had largish flocks of Fish Crows (at least 50-75) flying over Sharp Chapel Road every time I have been there since August 10. Each time, they have been flying near tree top from the area that includes King ranch and Alma Wastewater towards the Arkansas River. There are also relatively few American Crows. It would be interesting to know just how extensive this Fish Crow roost is, but I’ll bet it must be in the hundreds.   




 

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Date: 9/12/18 5:44 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Fish Crows numerous in the river valley
There is a largish Fish Crow roost in the area of Arkansas River Valley that includes Frog Bayou WMA including Sharp Chapel Road (of recent Swallow-tailed Kite fame), Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility-Orrick Road-King ranch (of recent Roseate Spoonbill fame and Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks). I assume this is a post-breeding roost of birds that nested in the area. (Fish Crow roosts in the Fayetteville area have been documented by late July and thereafter.) I first noticed this at the King ranch across from Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility on August 10. They were perched in trees well out in the field (50+), but quite vocal and by vocalizations, unmistakably Fish Crows. There were also a few just a few American Crows in the area. I have found high numbers of Fish Crows on each subsequent trip in this area, including recent trips that included Frog Bayou WMA and the Swallow-tailed Kite viewing area along Sharp Chapel Road. I have had largish flocks of Fish Crows (at least 50-75) flying over Sharp Chapel Road every time I have been there since August 10. Each time, they have been flying near tree top from the area that includes King ranch and Alma Wastewater towards the Arkansas River. There are also relatively few American Crows. It would be interesting to know just how extensive this Fish Crow roost is, but Ill bet it must be in the hundreds.


 

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Date: 9/11/18 8:09 pm
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Orrick Rd. Hotspot
I created an eBird hotspot for Orrick Rd. to account for birds seen along the road but outside the boundaries of Alma WTP. If you have created your own personal location for this road, here is how you merge your personal one into the new public hotspot https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1010517.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 9/11/18 7:38 pm
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite - NO
Samantha and I spent about 2 hours this afternoon at the southern end of Sharp Chapel Rd., alongside Joanie and Donald, hoping for the Swallow-tailed Kite to fly by. No luck. After J & D left Samantha and I drove to Orrick Rd. to see the Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Roseate Spoonbills, and Western Sandpiper that continue in the ponds across from Alma Wastewater Treatment Plant, all the while keeping our eyes on the sky. We drove into Frog Bayou WMA and peeked at the moist soil units, still hoping for a Swallow-tailed Kite. Oh well, we tried.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 9/11/18 4:16 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA September Field Trip
A quick reminder that the monthly field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA) is this Saturday, September 15th.  Anyone interested in birds and seeing two of our newest Arkansas State Parks is welcome to join us.  See details below. If you need additional details, please feel free to contact me off-list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 September 15DeltaHeritage Trail State Park and Mississippi River State Park Meet at 7:00 a.m.at the Prothro Junction commuter lot, I-40 East, Exit 157, southeast side ofthe interstate.  Drive time from Little Rock to the Delta Heritage Trail SP is 1 hour38 minutes.  The Delta Heritage Trail is a rail-to-trailconversion that was acquired by Arkansas State Parks in 1993. Fourteen milesnear Helena have been completed in some of the most remote and scenic areasremaining in eastern Arkansas's Mississippi Delta.  This historic rail trail is easywalking and goes through multiple habitats. We’ll then travelto the Mississippi River SP.  Drive time between the two parks is 25minutes.  The Mississippi River SP is operated by the Arkansas State Parkswithin the St. Francis National Forest.  It has a Visitors Center withexhibits.  It is the newest member of the Arkansas State ParksSystem.  Bear Creek Lake Natural trail is a one-mile loop thatprovides access to the unique flora and fauna of Crowley’s Ridge. This easywalking trail winds through groves of large native trees, many which areidentified and is a great way to explore the forest.  Drive time from thePark back to Little Rock is 1 hour 35 minutes. Directions:Delta HeritageTrail SP is located at 5539 Hwy. 49, Helena-West Helena.  Phone870-572-2352. For more information go to <deltaheritagetrail...> RiverSP is located at 2955 Hwy. 44, Marianna.  Phone 870-295-4040.  Formore information go to   www.arkansasstateparks.com/parks/mississippi-river-state-park    
 

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Date: 9/11/18 1:38 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Shorebirds at Centerton this morning
Theres an extensive pond mostly drained at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton now. Shorebirds on the mudflats this morning (and elsewhere around the hatchery) included Semipalmated Plover (3), Killdeer (30), Greater Yellowlegs (1), Spotted Sandpiper (2), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1 very handsome juvenile), Least Sandpiper (21), Pectoral Sandpiper (2), plus a brief visit by an Osprey. It also looks like the ditch line outside the east fence is in places solid with Great Blue Lobelia, a handsome native plant of our wetlands.


 

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Date: 9/11/18 1:00 pm
From: dianemarie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: Me too on unexpected yard visitor, plus two expected ones
Same here. For me it was a chestnut-sided warbler, 1st ever on property though seen on WMA 2yrs. ago. Did not stay but a few moments in front yard river birch.

Sent from my iPod

On Sep 11, 2018, at 2:50 PM, Stacy Clanton <sclanton...><mailto:<sclanton...>> wrote:

I had a similar experience with a pileated woodpecker a couple of weeks ago when I saw one flying low into a neighbor’s tree here in the northeast corner of Magnolia. I have heard them fairly frequently, but this rare sighting certainly reminded me of why they got the name “My God” (or is it “Good God”?)

Also, within the last few days, my wife and I have spotted Summer Tanagers at the feeders—mainly females (or juveniles?). In past summers, we saw males and females at the feeders quite regularly, but this summer, while we’ve heard their distinctive “thumb along the teeth of a comb” sound occasionally, this was the first time we’ve seen them. Others on the list have reported sightings.

Finally, we travel from Magnolia to Texarkana occasionally for doctors, shopping, or movies, and we always note many Grackles (boat-tailed?) in the parking lots of the big stores like Sam’s. They are such a delight with their whistling and seeming to talk to one another. They seem to be fearless. We have also seen them at the lot of a shop along I-40 near Prescott. Are they traveling north and east? Has anyone seen them in the rest of the state? The cattle egrets (who don’t seem, as far as I know, to have traveled much further east than Magnolia) to be “flocking up” for their migration back to South America (and/or Africa?).

Stacy Clanton

 

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Date: 9/11/18 12:50 pm
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton...>
Subject: Me too on unexpected yard visitor, plus two expected ones
I had a similar experience with a pileated woodpecker a couple of weeks ago when I saw one flying low into a neighbor's tree here in the northeast corner of Magnolia. I have heard them fairly frequently, but this rare sighting certainly reminded me of why they got the name "My God" (or is it "Good God"?)

Also, within the last few days, my wife and I have spotted Summer Tanagers at the feeders-mainly females (or juveniles?). In past summers, we saw males and females at the feeders quite regularly, but this summer, while we've heard their distinctive "thumb along the teeth of a comb" sound occasionally, this was the first time we've seen them. Others on the list have reported sightings.

Finally, we travel from Magnolia to Texarkana occasionally for doctors, shopping, or movies, and we always note many Grackles (boat-tailed?) in the parking lots of the big stores like Sam's. They are such a delight with their whistling and seeming to talk to one another. They seem to be fearless. We have also seen them at the lot of a shop along I-40 near Prescott. Are they traveling north and east? Has anyone seen them in the rest of the state? The cattle egrets (who don't seem, as far as I know, to have traveled much further east than Magnolia) to be "flocking up" for their migration back to South America (and/or Africa?).

Stacy Clanton


 

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Date: 9/11/18 12:00 pm
From: Jerry Schulz <jlsbird2757...>
Subject: Unexpected yard visitor
Picking up on this, yesterday I looked out the patio door and was surprised by a male Black and White Warbler working a branch above our deck. But that was topped when last Tuesday out of my peripheral vision I saw a large bird fly into the trees in the back yard. I decided to get out of my recliner and take a look. "Oh my God", a Pileated Woodpecker was checking out the base of a dead tree at the back of the yard. I hollered at Jane who managed to get a blurred photo. She posted it on FB. We live in west LR just off Hwy 10 and Cantrell Rd.  So how great was that  ?     You just never know. Jerry Schulz
Little Rock, Arkansas
 

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Date: 9/11/18 10:40 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Unexpected yard visitor
After Michael posted about the Redstartsin the yard, a young male Black-throated Green made an appearance!
Patty McLean (and Michael Linz), Conway

-------- Original message --------From: Michael Linz <mplinz...> Date: 9/11/18 11:43 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Unexpected yard visitor
My unexpected yard visitor was an American Redstart.  She was about 3 feet from me on the other side of the window.  Closest I have every seen one.  Her boy friend showed up later.
Warblers are moving through…keep an eye out for them.

Michael (Conway, AR)

> On Sep 11, 2018, at 9:54 AM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I live in a housing subdivision in Cabot. This morning I looked out our bedroom window and saw a tiny bird hopping around in our crepe myrtle bush. The lighting wasn't good, so I rushed to get my binoculars. It was a Northern Parula!  It was eating something in the crepe myrtle, then it flew down into my knockout rose bushes and spent quite a bit of time there before flying back into the crepe myrtle to eat more.  Eventually he vanished. A great way to start the day.
>
> Gkenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
 

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Date: 9/11/18 9:43 am
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Unexpected yard visitor
My unexpected yard visitor was an American Redstart. She was about 3 feet from me on the other side of the window. Closest I have every seen one. Her boy friend showed up later.
Warblers are moving through…keep an eye out for them.

Michael (Conway, AR)

> On Sep 11, 2018, at 9:54 AM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I live in a housing subdivision in Cabot. This morning I looked out our bedroom window and saw a tiny bird hopping around in our crepe myrtle bush. The lighting wasn't good, so I rushed to get my binoculars. It was a Northern Parula! It was eating something in the crepe myrtle, then it flew down into my knockout rose bushes and spent quite a bit of time there before flying back into the crepe myrtle to eat more. Eventually he vanished. A great way to start the day.
>
> Gkenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
 

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Date: 9/11/18 7:55 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Unexpected yard visitor
I live in a housing subdivision in Cabot. This morning I looked out our bedroom window and saw a tiny bird hopping around in our crepe myrtle bush. The lighting wasn't good, so I rushed to get my binoculars. It was a Northern Parula!  It was eating something in the crepe myrtle, then it flew down into my knockout rose bushes and spent quite a bit of time there before flying back into the crepe myrtle to eat more.  Eventually he vanished. A great way to start the day.
Gkenn WyattCabot


 

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Date: 9/11/18 7:28 am
From: <market...>
Subject: Re: Least Flycatcher in our garden
Kannan,

Just checked my records. We saw one at Chesney on Sept. 3 Just uploaded to ebird with pic.



Ron Bird



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> On Behalf Of Ragupathy Kannan
Sent: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 7:31 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Least Flycatcher in our garden



Yesterday there was a Least Flycatcher in our pear tree. Identified based on calls and behavior. I explored eBird. Seems to be the only September record for the state this year.



Kannan

Ft. Smith


 

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Date: 9/11/18 5:30 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Least Flycatcher in our garden
Yesterday there was a Least Flycatcher in our pear tree.  Identified based on calls and behavior.  I explored eBird.  Seems to be the only September record for the state this year.  
KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 9/10/18 7:49 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: CASPIAN TERNS AT BOYD POINT
This morning, I observed and photographed 4 Caspian Terns at the Boyd Point Waste Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. There were 3 adults in breeding plumage and 1 juvenile, which were resting in a tight formation on a gravel road atop one of the levees. They were quite approachable, allowing me to move within 20 ft. of them.
John Redman
 

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Date: 9/10/18 7:31 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Leucistic Rufous Hummingbird?
I showed the link to Kevin Morgan who is going to speak at the fall AAS Meeting next mo th on the Louisianna Winter Hummingbird project. He said the shape of the bird says Archilochus to him for sure and that the Rufous colors in this bird aren't where they typically see rufous coloration on a Rufous. Nice find and beautiful photo Doc! Donna Haynes
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Mon, Sep 10, 2018 at 4:57 PM, Delos McCauley<mccauleydelos...> wrote: Take a look at the photo of the leucistic hummingbird that Doc George just posted.  Doc pointed out to me that it appears to have a faint touch of rufous on it.  Could this be a Rufous Hummingbird?
That would be a rarity for Arkansas.
Delos McCauleyPine Bluff

 

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Date: 9/10/18 7:14 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Fwd: owl time
CorrectionScreech Owl on September 9th, GHOW that evening. Barred Owl evening of September 10th.

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
> Subject: owl time
> Date: September 10, 2018 9:11:06 PM CDT
> To: "<ARBIRD-L...> Listserv" <ARBIRD-L...>
>
> Pre-dawn on September 8th, a Screech Owl was whinnying very near an open bedroom window.
> At dusk on the evening of the same day, a Great-horned Owl was whoo-ing for several minutes in the woods adjacent to the house.
> just now, after dark on September 9th, a Barred Owl has called several times from the trees in the savanna.
>
> I'm loving this.
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County


 

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Date: 9/10/18 7:11 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: owl time
Pre-dawn on September 8th, a Screech Owl was whinnying very near an open bedroom window.
At dusk on the evening of the same day, a Great-horned Owl was whoo-ing for several minutes in the woods adjacent to the house.
just now, after dark on September 9th, a Barred Owl has called several times from the trees in the savanna.

I'm loving this.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 9/10/18 2:57 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Leucistic Rufous Hummingbird?
Take a look at the photo of the leucistic hummingbird that Doc George just
posted. Doc pointed out to me that it appears to have a faint touch of
rufous on it. Could this be a Rufous Hummingbird?

That would be a rarity for Arkansas.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 9/10/18 2:13 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SWALLOW-TAILED KITE AND SPOONBILLS CONTINUE IN RIVER VALLEY
The Swallow-tailed Kite was among a substantial number (10+) of Mississippi Kites at Frog Bayou WMA today. I saw it over the fields along Sharp Chapel Road, where it has been seen repeatedly since first observed by Bill Beall on August 31. I got best views today about 2.0 miles down Sharp Chapel, as measured from the intersection of Red Hill Road and Sharp Chapel Road. This is basically the end of Sharp Chapel. I parked in the shade and enjoyed quite a show. There are just fabulous numbers of butterflies, dragonflies, and various hoppers in the area.

The two Roseate Spoonbills were loafing at edge of one of the King ranch ponds along Orrick Road, opposite Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility. They have been in this area, using different ponds, since I first saw them August 26. Today I was parked inside the wastewater facility, on a high bank that overlooks the pond great views of amazingly birds. Turned out the man in charge needed to leave to pick up his grandkids from school, but he waited for me, offered to wait longer, and told me hed seen many cars on Orrick, drawn by the spoonbills. He once gave me a battery jump, too. I appreciate such kindness. Acts of decency and courtesy make the world turn a little easier.

Arkansas Game and Fish has been pumping water into ponds associated with Frogs units 4, 5, and 6, so I walked a loop to have a look. Overall, this walk is about 1.5 miles. The Swallow-tailed Kite has been in this area, too, so I found myself walking along, enjoying a slight north breeze, often lost in remarkable cloud formations broken only by occasional Mississippi Kites and a big flock of Fish Crows. Bird-wise, most interesting was an adult female Northern Harrier, probably just arrived. I was drifting along when I glanced down as few feet ahead and spotted a mostly black snake: Western Cottonmouth.

There was a brief moment of awkwardness while we each assessed the situation me with bins, snake with its tongue. Then we each went on about our business. Of course I cant speak for the snake, but for my part, I thereafter spent a little less time watching clouds and more time ground truthing. Any place wild enough for cottonmouths is almost certainly also an interesting place to see birds. Frog is that way, for sure.


 

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Date: 9/10/18 10:16 am
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Scarlet Tanager
Lorance Creek Natural Area to the right of the walkway at the swamp first bend. He was beautiful at the top of the Cypress and very vocal.
 

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Date: 9/10/18 9:57 am
From: Doc George <000000569d636a51-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Leucistic Ruby-throated Hummingbird
This morning Delos McCauley, John Redman and I photographed  a Leucistic Ruby-throated Hummingbird.  The bird was in the backyard of a friend of Delos's.  You can click on the link below to see the one decent shot I was lucky to get.


http://www.pbase.com/docg/image/168096827/original



Doc George




 

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Date: 9/10/18 9:04 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, Sept. 13, Building Trails Together
This Thursday, Sept. 13, is Audubon Society of Central AR's monthly meeting at 7 PM in the Fletcher Library off H St. in Little Rock. This month's speaker is Paul Norris, President of Central Arkansas Trail Alliance. Paul will give us an overview and history of the organization. He’ll discuss their current projects plus future plans. He’ll touch on the expected and unexpected benefits of working together.


As always, ASCA's meetings are free and open to the public. See you then.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 9/10/18 7:01 am
From: <market...>
Subject: Dickcissel at the Nursery Pond plus Ar. Fish and Game helping Shorebirds again
Yesterday morning at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery was cool, cloudy and
windy. Thus, not a lot of birding going on other than a few hundred
vultures of both kinds catching vents and roosting. One Red-tailed Hawk did
join in and was calling quite a bit. The single Osprey made a quick showing
and was then gone. THEN, as I was snapping away at a male Northern Cardinal
who was happy to pose for me, I caught a flash of yellow and a little bird
in a tree had me first think American Goldfinch (I had seen others) but then
it gave me a single Bronx cheer that really caught my attention. One male
Dickcissel. Kind of scarce here in the wooded area of Benton county. :)



Also, yesterday afternoon, Jon Stein of the Arkansas Fish and Game gave a
great talk to a couple dozen of us at the Hobbs Center about the Nursery.
Very interesting! A good thing to hear was that since Hurricane Gordon was
a bust in this area, Fish and Game will be at the Nursery early this week
and will add about an acres worth of water to the pond to help attract some
shorebirds to the area. Great to see Fish and Game taking an active role in
help the bird population in our area.



Here's a photo of the Dickcissel -
https://photos.smugmug.com/Todays-photos/i-zNrH5cc/0/51dae8a3/X3/IMG_3499-X3
.jpg



Here's a photo of 1 of 4 bucks wandering the pond floor while I was there -
https://photos.smugmug.com/Todays-photos/i-6bMHHtc/0/5a58d497/X3/IMG_3428-X3
.jpg





Ron Bird


 

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Date: 9/10/18 6:49 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: speaking of Centerton
and terns...
(tried sending this yesterday, said it failed)
Actually, I had three terns in Siloam Saturday. Got some lousy pictures
that I have to look at again...  real lousy. They seemed small-ish, not
large...  considered least and forsters...  Saw one with a little fork
to the tail, saw another with tail spread and no fork. Just not sure at
the moment...

But Centerton Sunday...  Why do some terns stick around for days and
others don't stay 5 minutes? Weeks ago(I think) at the hatchery I had
about 50 black terns fly over and not stop for a moment.

Anyway, Sunday, as soon as I pulled in there were two terns flying over
the ponds that were BIG...  very easy to say they weren't least or even
forsters based on the sheer bulk to them... good sized birds.  Got the
binoculars on them before they flew off not to return... which was
upsetting because some pictures would have been nice(even lousy ones)

I looked for the deep reddish-orange bill of a caspian only to see a
more yellowish-orange, paler...  which, if I'm not mistaken, would be
royal terns... They were gone before I could get a photo to be 100%
certain. I'm very hesitant claiming these but, they were BIG and their
bills were not the darker orange of a caspian. It's always frustrating
when I want to claim something but second guess things.

I thought that was frustrating enough... then I found a nice sized and
drained pond with sandpipers in it...  exciting at first... then, lots
of peeps that I just STINK at identifying... Went back and forth looking
at a book, the binoculars, my cheap scope, pictures from my camera as
some came close. I love the yellowish legs of a least as I can pick that
out among the black legs...  I THINK there may have been western and
semipalmated... some were VERY VERY light grayish...  Some of the
lighter ones seemed to have shorter bills than least or semipalmated... 
and, the ones I didn't get great looks at, some looked smaller than the
leasts. Got pictures of a few here and there and video of a couple
bathing.  A couple pectorals were there as well.

A bald eagle was sitting in a dead tree in a neighboring field... at one
point all the peeps and killdeer(about 20-30) started making a racket
and flying around... I looked and looked... finally saw an osprey
several ponds over. It wasn't headed this way but I guess they didn't
like it.  While looking at all the peeps and getting myself frustrated,
I heard this screaming kind of sound... what in the world was that...
after a few screams I finally got out of the van to look behind me
because I could not see where it was coming from. Never found the source
and it had stopped. It was awfully close to a royal tern sound(I played
some on my phone at that point to figure out what I was hearing) but who
knows.  Somewhere around 30 species today...

I really want a computer implanted into my brain so I can remember
things better, learn things better, and just a blink of the eyes would
take a picture of whatever I had in the binoculars. HA

Daniel Mason


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 9/9/18 5:11 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Great Article on Bees (with a Mention of Birds)
Great article, Lynn! Thanks for posting.

Bill Thurman

On Sun, Sep 9, 2018, 14:13 Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> wrote:

> This is a great article on how a city is helping to restore bee
> populations. Lots of good ideas included--one is to hollow out small spaces
> in the walls of buildings so bats and birds can live there.
>
>
> https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/bees-are-dying-alarming-rate-amsterdam-may-have-answer-n897856
>

 

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Date: 9/9/18 4:25 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Caspian Tern at Centerton, Benton Co. on Saturday
I badly wanted to go to Frog yesterday in hopes of seeing the kite.  I was afraid that the roads would be in bad shape due to rains, so instead Donald and I went to Centerton.  We saw a Caspian Tern.  We had nice looks as it hovered and dove.  It was there awhile, then disappeared.  Life bird for Donald.

I still hope I get a chance to search for the kite at Frog if it's still around.  Any recent sightings?
Joanie

 

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Date: 9/9/18 2:27 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: touching a hummingbird
Greetings all,
Nature always amazes me and I just had one of those moments.
I have the office window open and I heard a strange hummingbird chittering. I looked outside to see a hatch-year hummingbird with its head stuck between the perching rail and the feeder. The 2nd hatch year bird was the one giving the strange call and was hovering just a couple inches above the other bird. Clearly not being aggressive (yeah, yeah I shouldn't be humanizing a bird, but to me it seemed concerned.)

I rushed outside and freed the stuck bird. She lost a few feathers off her head, but flew off fine! And I got to touch a hummingbird!
This is one fine day. , Leif at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 9/9/18 12:13 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Great Article on Bees (with a Mention of Birds)
This is a great article on how a city is helping to restore bee
populations. Lots of good ideas included--one is to hollow out small spaces
in the walls of buildings so bats and birds can live there.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/bees-are-dying-alarming-rate-amsterdam-may-have-answer-n897856

 

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Date: 9/9/18 12:05 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Re: Fw: Kite
Have not heard if anyone has seen it today. Hoping it shows for you. Keep
scanning the skies along Sharp Chapel Rd. It seems to always be on the
move. I looked and waited over an hour before I saw it. I'm sure it is
working the many acres of fields in the area, but seems to always return to
Sharp Chapel. Good luck!


On Sun, Sep 9, 2018, 1:01 PM laura davis <
<000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Headed there from little rock now. Please let me know last seen location.
> My only time to go..
>
> ----- Forwarded Message -----
> *From:* laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
> *To:* "<ARBIRD-L...>" <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Sent:* Sunday, September 9, 2018, 12:39:30 PM CDT
> *Subject:* Kite
>
> Anybody got eyes on it today?
>

 

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Date: 9/9/18 11:01 am
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fw: Kite
Headed there from little rock now. Please let me know last seen location. My only time to go..
----- Forwarded Message ----- From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>To: "<ARBIRD-L...>" <ARBIRD-L...>Sent: Sunday, September 9, 2018, 12:39:30 PM CDTSubject: Kite
Anybody got eyes on it today?
 

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Date: 9/9/18 10:39 am
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Kite
Anybody got eyes on it today?
 

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Date: 9/9/18 7:33 am
From: kjdillard <kjdillard...>
Subject: Re: ok not really about birds.
I came home to twenty plus Momarch catapillars that have almost finished off a six foot butterfly weed bush question is what else will they eat. The nursery had swamp milkweed.Exciting but concerned. Karyn Dillard <Kjdillard...> 


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Date: 9/8/18 9:25 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: ok not really about birds.
I can't explain....but Monarchs crawl away to another spot to hang

On Sat, Sep 8, 2018 at 1:12 PM Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
I decided to grow canteen Gourds on my trellis this year. The summer birds actually liked looking for insects on the vines hanging from the trellis.



It’s late enough that no more gourds are setting and the ones that grew had dried vines so I cut them down. I was out ripping the plants down this afternoon, looking for Black Swallowtail chrysalis because the fennel is planted there too.



So would some butterfly person please explain to my why I found a Monarch chrysalis hanging from my gourd vine?  The milkweed is a good 50’ away.



Jacque Brown, Centerton
 

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Date: 9/8/18 7:27 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: GOT IT!!!!!
Its about time That bird has been waiting on you all along. Glad you
saw it


On Sat, Sep 8, 2018 at 11:37 AM Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
wrote:

> Yay!!!
>
> On Sat, Sep 8, 2018, 11:22 AM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
>> Bill and Toka showed up. Toka is always good luck. Nemesis no more.
>>
>> Sandy
>>
>

 

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Date: 9/8/18 7:25 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: ok not really about birds.
I can't explain....but Monarchs crawl away to another spot to hang


On Sat, Sep 8, 2018 at 1:12 PM Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:

> I decided to grow canteen Gourds on my trellis this year. The summer birds
> actually liked looking for insects on the vines hanging from the trellis.
>
> It’s late enough that no more gourds are setting and the ones that grew
> had dried vines so I cut them down. I was out ripping the plants down this
> afternoon, looking for Black Swallowtail chrysalis because the fennel is
> planted there too.
>
> So would some butterfly person please explain to my why I found a Monarch
> chrysalis hanging from my gourd vine? The milkweed is a good 50’ away.
>
> Jacque Brown, Centerton

 

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Date: 9/8/18 3:21 pm
From: Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Cave Swallow photo
One image of 2 of this morning’s Cave Swallows at Beard’s Lake Recreation Area, Millwood Lake may be seen at:

http://www.pbase.com/chazmi/image/168087100/original

Charles Mills
Wake Village TX 75501

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/8/18 1:24 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: 3 RUDY TURNSTONES AT BOYD POINT
This morning, I observed and photographed 3 Rudy Turnstones in nonbreeding plumage at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. There was one pair that stayed close together. The third Turnstone stayed a bit aloof and only occasionally ventured close to the pair. The other notable finding was a juvenile Sanderling.
John Redman
 

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Date: 9/8/18 11:12 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: ok not really about birds.
I decided to grow canteen Gourds on my trellis this year. The summer birds actually liked looking for insects on the vines hanging from the trellis.

It’s late enough that no more gourds are setting and the ones that grew had dried vines so I cut them down. I was out ripping the plants down this afternoon, looking for Black Swallowtail chrysalis because the fennel is planted there too.

So would some butterfly person please explain to my why I found a Monarch chrysalis hanging from my gourd vine? The milkweed is a good 50’ away.

Jacque Brown, Centerton
 

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Date: 9/8/18 10:37 am
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Nemesis bird
The Swallow-tailed Kite seen in Clifty several years back was along my biweekly commute. I never found it! Good luck!

Adam Schaffer

> On Sep 8, 2018, at 10:39 AM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> So here I sit. Waiting, but expecting it not to show. It's been here all week. Everyone and their mother have seen it. But last weekend I had to be in Wichita. And then work and prior engagements kept me away. Finally I got out here Wednesday late afternoon. It was a no show.
> And now, a cold front is pushing through. Birders know what that means.
> So yeah. Not expecting it...but I'll keep trying.
>
> Sandy
>
> PS. I've seen one MIKI.
 

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Date: 9/8/18 9:38 am
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Re: GOT IT!!!!!
Yay!!!

On Sat, Sep 8, 2018, 11:22 AM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> Bill and Toka showed up. Toka is always good luck. Nemesis no more.
>
> Sandy
>

 

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Date: 9/8/18 9:22 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: GOT IT!!!!!
Bill and Toka showed up. Toka is always good luck. Nemesis no more.

Sandy

 

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Date: 9/8/18 8:39 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Nemesis bird
So here I sit. Waiting, but expecting it not to show. It's been here all
week. Everyone and their mother have seen it. But last weekend I had to be
in Wichita. And then work and prior engagements kept me away. Finally I got
out here Wednesday late afternoon. It was a no show.
And now, a cold front is pushing through. Birders know what that means.
So yeah. Not expecting it...but I'll keep trying.

Sandy

PS. I've seen one MIKI.

 

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Date: 9/8/18 8:11 am
From: Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Cave Swallows
At least 6 and perhaps as many as 8 Cave Swallows were present at Beard’s Lake Campground, Millwood Lake, Hempstead County this morning between 8:30 and 9.

Charles Mills
Wake Village Texas 75501

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/8/18 6:46 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Frog Friday
Karen Garrett and I went to Frog Bayou WMA Friday. We decided to brave the possible rain.

On the way down Karen spotted the albino Hawk on the left side of the freeway about a mile north of the West Fork Exit. This is the bird that had been seen last year in the same area. There were two Hawks on the snag so we are speculating that they may have been a pair.

It was in the mid 80’s and humid with a lot of puffy clouds when we arrived on Sharp Chapel Rd at around 9:40 and were parked at the south end in a parking area.

We had walked a path back at the back of the lot to the river, there is a nice campground on the other side of the river, when we came back to the parking area we were practically buzzed by a juvi Mississippi Kite. This was just before 11.

More Kites seemed to appear out of nowhere and Karen spotted the Swallow-tailed among them. We were unfortunately looking East into the sun so my photos will need some adjusting. (where is a cloud when you need one?) They circled over the fields and back over the trees so you never really knew where they would come back into view. It was an exciting 10 minutes.

After they were gone over the trees we decided to give it another 15 minutes then go look for other birds. Just about then the Swallow-tailed Kite followed by two Mississippi Kites flew over Karen who was standing by the car, KAREN! KITE! It was at least to the West of us heading North but moving fast. I was in the road and got off a few shots. They circled their way North and West and higher up. We tried to catch up but they were to far off for photos.

We drove over to Orrick Rd, the first pond was surrounded by Cattle Egrets, we were happy to see the the Roseate Spoonbills standing on the hillock of the pond that is right across from the water treatment plant. There was also a Greater White-fronted Goose and several Snowy Egrets. After many photos we thought they were getting nervous, one was bill clapping, so we left but came back later. They were working the shallow water to the right of the hill.

After we left the first time we went looking for Whistling Ducks but never located any. After we left the second time I drove Karen around the area, and showed her the way to Frog Bayou where you can view the bay off the Ar River and then over to the sod farms. It finally looked like some decent rain was building so we left at 3:30 and headed home.

This is only the forth Swallow-tailed Kite I have seen. I lived in the Houston ,Tx area for 25 years and saw my first two when my late husband and I were on the Trinity River a couple of miles north of I-10 in a canoe. This had to be in the mid-ninety's. The beauty of this river is not only was if fairly close to the house but there are so many large snags in the water, and sandbars, that you can only take a canoe or flat bottom boat up river. The third one was the Kite seen in Madison county at Clifty a few years ago.


Jacque Brown
Centerton, AR
<bluebird2...>








 

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Date: 9/7/18 4:30 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Friday afternoon birds
LaDonna and I found 4 Willets and 8 Avocets in the pond on HWY 70 across from Anderson’s. At Bald Knob NWR, we had 4 Roseate Spoonbills (all immatures), one Black-bellied Plover, 8 immature White Ibis and one juvenile plumages Sanderling.

Kenny Nichols
Cabot

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/7/18 3:14 pm
From: Cathy Marak <cmarak999...>
Subject: Roseate spoonbills
Spoonbills still at Alma. They flew from poND across wastewater plant to
Northeast. Greater white-fronted goose still here also at 5:12

Cathy Marak

 

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Date: 9/7/18 2:07 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: EBIRD 2018 Taxonomic changes
Many changes in 2018 and anyone making bird lists will see their lists change. It seems like the only way to really keep up with this is by using ebird rather than trying to make changes in Clemons or other hard copies.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

https://ebird.org/news/2018-ebird-taxonomy-update?utm_source=Cornell+Lab+eNews&utm_campaign=cd76fdbeaf-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_09_07&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_47588b5758-cd76fdbeaf-277846765

 

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Date: 9/7/18 12:40 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR highlights
4 Roseate Spoonbills and 2 Caspian Terns were in pond 3. I couldnt find a godwit.
Glenn WyattCabot
 

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Date: 9/7/18 11:53 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Spoonbills at Alma, yes
Greater White-fronted Goose in adjacent field.

Karen and Jacque

 

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Date: 9/7/18 9:25 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Swallow -tailed Kite yes
South end of Sharp chapel Rd ay Frog

 

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Date: 9/7/18 7:02 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: White Red-shouldered Hawk
About 1 mile north of West Fork exit on I-49, on east side of highway. Was
in the top of the tree with a smaller hawk. (Female and male

Karen Garrett and Jacque Brown
Off to the Frog to see a bird, and maybe some dragons.

 

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Date: 9/7/18 6:47 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Inca Dove is back
Thanks, Terry.  I am copying this to the group too.  My students and I scour the archives often.  (In fact we are doing it for the Inca Dove and other species now, and my team needs to see this!).  So it helps to get precise locations for future researchers.  And also, it helps to send discussions to the group whenever relevant.
On Thursday, 6 September, 2018, 8:39:01 PM GMT-5, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:

Hi Kannan, It was here at my home in Pangburn, Ark.
On Thu, Sep 6, 2018 at 8:31 PM Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Where?
On Thursday, 6 September, 2018, 7:18:25 PM GMT-5, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:

I haven't seen the Inca Dove since July 28th, but today it has returned several times to ground feeder.

 

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Date: 9/6/18 9:10 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 6
It was partly cloudy and warm on the bird survey today. 55 species were
found. Wood Storks have finally arrived in numbers. Black-bellied
Whistling Ducks are flocking up, probably planning on migrating out early.
Out of 29 Purple Gallinules seen today, only 6 were adults. Most have
apparently migrated early. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 31

Wood Duck - 191

Blue-winged Teal - 56

Pied-billed Grebe - 6

Neotropic Cormorant - 4

Anhinga - 16

Great-blue Heron - 4

Great Egret - 13

Snowy Egret - 123

Little-blue Heron - 7

Tricolored Heron - 2

Cattle Egret - 1615

Green Heron - 4

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 4

White Ibis - 211

Wood Stork - 61

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 25

Mississippi Kite - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Purple Gallinule - 28 (mostly juveniles; also 1 chick.)

Common Gallinule - 25 (also 2 chicks)

American Coot - 3

Killdeer - 2

Spotted Sandpiper - 1

Solitary Sandpiper - 2

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 6

Mourning Dove - 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-headed Woodpecker - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 4

Least Flycatcher - 3 (feeding on Roughleaf Dogwood berries)

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 18 (still singing)

Bell's Vireo - 1 (still singing)

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 7

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 4

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 6

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 9

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 3

Dickcissel - 1

Red-winged Blackbird - 15





Odonates:



Lilypad Forktail

Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Wandering Glider

Striped Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Softshell Turtle sp.

Red-eared Slider

Broad-banded Watersnake

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR








 

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Date: 9/6/18 6:31 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Inca Dove is back
Where?
On Thursday, 6 September, 2018, 7:18:25 PM GMT-5, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:

I haven't seen the Inca Dove since July 28th, but today it has returned several times to ground feeder.
 

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Date: 9/6/18 6:22 pm
From: Lea Crisp <leacrisp...>
Subject: Yellow-throated Warbler
I had my first for this fall at my bird bath today.

Lea Crisp
Bella Vista
 

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Date: 9/6/18 5:18 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Inca Dove is back
I haven't seen the Inca Dove since July 28th, but today it has returned
several times to ground feeder.

 

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Date: 9/6/18 12:24 pm
From: <market...>
Subject: White-eyed Verio and Yellow-thoated Warbers at the Nursery PLUS the Drain is CLOSED!
I just got a message from Matt Gideon of the Arkansas Game and Fish
Commission that the drain on the pond at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery has
been closed ahead of the remnants tropical depression Gordon. This should
add some water to the pond and hopefully will attract some shorebirds in the
days to come. Thanks to Matt and to Game and Fish for their prompt
attention!



While there this morning, I ID'd among others a White-eyed Verio and 3
Yellow-throated Warblers.



Ron Bird


 

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Date: 9/6/18 10:17 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite
Barry Bennet and I spotted the kite about 11 am, it came in from the south. Then at 12:10, just as Barry turned around to leave, it cam back. Both times it was flying with Mississippi kites. They were flying over the fields at Frog Bayou on Sharp Chapel Road. (Barry, I sure hopeI spelled your name right.)
Glenn WyattCabot


 

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Date: 9/6/18 8:16 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: The Snipe Newsletter

Dear ARbirders,

The latest version of The Snipe, newsletter of the
Audubon Society of Central Arkansas, has been posted to the ASCA website.
Information on upcoming ASCA programs and field trips and can be found
here,
https://wp.ascabird.org/2018/09/06/the-snipe-newsletter-september-november-2018/
[1]

To view the newsletter click on the link under the picture of the
Wilson's Snipe. 2018_Snipe-Sep-Nov-v52-i4 [2]

FYI - The link under Find
an Injured Bird on page 8 has been updated. Click on the link for a current
list of Arkansas's Federally Permitted Migratory Bird
Rehabilitators.

Thanks
Dottie
The Snipe Editor



Links:
------
[1]
https://wp.ascabird.org/2018/09/06/the-snipe-newsletter-september-november-2018/
[2]
http://wp.ascabird.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/2018_Snipe-Sep-Nov-v52-i4.pdf

 

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Date: 9/6/18 8:01 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Alma
I am looking at the Roseate Spoonbills, they are both still here, but they are way out in the field. Now time to go look for the Swallowtailed Kite.
Glenn WyattCabot.

 

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Date: 9/6/18 5:24 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Eight Bird Species Are Confirmed Avian Extinction
On Wed, Sep 5, 2018, 18:13 Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

> Silent Skies mural at Vancouver IOC
>
>
>
> https://festival.artistsforconservation.org/project/silent-skies
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> <ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Jerry Davis
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 05, 2018 12:32 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Eight Bird Species Are Confirmed Avian Extinction
>
>
>
> This is the link:
>
>
> https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/sep/04/first-eight-bird-extinctions-of-the-21st-century-confirmed
>
>
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
>
> Hot Springs
>
>
>
> *From:* Harriet Hillis Jansma
>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 5, 2018 12:24 PM
>
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
>
> *Subject:* from The Guardian
>
>
>
> After it appeared yesterday, this Guardian article was the most read (I
> tried to email it in its entirety, but failed; I believe you will be able
> to find it on their site, and they allow non-subscribing readers to read a
> good many articles):
>
>
> Eight bird species are first confirmed avian extinctions this decade
>
> Most of the extinctions were caused by deforestation in South America, a
> new study of endangered birds shows
>
>
>

 

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Date: 9/5/18 4:34 pm
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR 9-5-18
I visited the refuge earlier today, looking for the previously reported
Marbled Godwit. I did find the godwit and a few other shorebirds. The
godwit was in the second unit as you turn westward on Huntsman Rd, off of
Coal Shute Rd. There was a lone Black-bellied Plover in the first unit,
the corner of Coal Shute Rd and Huntsman Rd. I probably tallied less than
80 shorebird individuals in these units. So, not too much out.

Devin Moon

 

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Date: 9/5/18 4:14 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Eight Bird Species Are Confirmed Avian Extinction
Silent Skies mural at Vancouver IOC



https://festival.artistsforconservation.org/project/silent-skies



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Wednesday, September 05, 2018 12:32 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Eight Bird Species Are Confirmed Avian Extinction



This is the link:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/sep/04/first-eight-bird-extinct
ions-of-the-21st-century-confirmed



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs



From: Harriet Hillis Jansma

Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2018 12:24 PM

To: <ARBIRD-L...>

Subject: from The Guardian



After it appeared yesterday, this Guardian article was the most read (I
tried to email it in its entirety, but failed; I believe you will be able to
find it on their site, and they allow non-subscribing readers to read a good
many articles):




Eight bird species are first confirmed avian extinctions this decade


Most of the extinctions were caused by deforestation in South America, a new
study of endangered birds shows




 

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Date: 9/5/18 2:37 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Ruddy Turnstones
There are now two Ruddy Turnstones at Boyd Point. John Redman, Doc George
and I have probably shot 1,500 photos of them foraging together.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 9/5/18 2:31 pm
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fw: Re: spoonbill in pond across from Alma WWT
Both the spoonbills and the black-bellied plovers were in the pond right before you get to the grain bins on coal chute road.
Nancy Young

----- Forwarded Message ----- From: Donna Crabill <drcrabill...>To: Nancy Young <nlyoung_ar...>Sent: Tuesday, September 4, 2018, 5:08:47 PM CDTSubject: Re: spoonbill in pond across from Alma WWT
Which pond did you find them in?

From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Tuesday, September 4, 2018 2:39 PM
Subject: Re: spoonbill in pond across from Alma WWT

There were also two spoonbills at Bald Knob NWR this morning for folks who don't want to drive over to Alma.  Also 3 black-bellied plovers.
Nancy Young On Tuesday, September 4, 2018, 7:24:49 AM CDT, Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> wrote:



Get Outlook for Android



 

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Date: 9/5/18 1:29 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite continues at Frog
There was a time, and actually it wasnt that many years ago, Practical Joe would have told himself he shouldnt travel down to Frog Bayou WMA again to see the Swallow-tailed Kite. Back in the day of Practical Joe, he would have slid off the bed, planted his feet firmly on the floor, and spent the day buying a tube of glue, mowing the yard, and repairing the weed eater ... I threw birding gear in the car, headed for Frog.

As good luck would have it, Phillip Stephenson was on a tractor heading out to mow one of the fields at Frog when I got to Sharp Chapel Road, where the kite has been repeatedly seen since discovered there by Bill Beall September 1. Phillip had just been enjoying close looks at the Swallow-tailed Kite about 1-mile east, in Frogs units 4 and 5. Then, while we were talking, here it came. At distance, Phillip looked up and saw a kite, that closer, was for sure our swallow-tailed. It promptly flew off south.

I mention all of this because a couple of hours later I saw it again, way south, and drove down there for good views. This spot is all the way at the south end of Sharp Chapel Road. It makes a sharp turn to the east. I parked there in the shade, and spent another pleasant hour watching the Swallow-tailed Kite soaring with a backdrop of enormous puffy clouds. Quite a few Mississippi Kites doing the same. It was pleasant in the shade, with a good view of the vast fields and sky, and a little breeze.

A striking bird like this, sailing the big clouds, has undeniable charisma. These moments sink into my memory, really what I was after.


 

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Date: 9/5/18 12:26 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Ruddy Turnstone at Boyd Point
The Ruddy Turnstone in non-breeding plumage was still at Boyd Point
wastewater facility today.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 9/5/18 10:32 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Eight Bird Species Are Confirmed Avian Extinction
This is the link:
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/sep/04/first-eight-bird-extinctions-of-the-21st-century-confirmed

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: Harriet Hillis Jansma
Sent: Wednesday, September 5, 2018 12:24 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: from The Guardian

After it appeared yesterday, this Guardian article was the most read (I tried to email it in its entirety, but failed; I believe you will be able to find it on their site, and they allow non-subscribing readers to read a good many articles):




Eight bird species are first confirmed avian extinctions this decade
Most of the extinctions were caused by deforestation in South America, a new study of endangered birds shows



 

Back to top
Date: 9/5/18 10:25 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: from The Guardian
After it appeared yesterday, this Guardian article was the most read (I tried to email it in its entirety, but failed; I believe you will be able to find it on their site, and they allow non-subscribing readers to read a good many articles):


Eight bird species are first confirmed avian extinctions this decade

Most of the extinctions were caused by deforestation in South America, a new study of endangered birds shows


 

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Date: 9/5/18 7:55 am
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Spoonbills
They are still at Alma WWTP this morning.
Ed Laster

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/5/18 7:53 am
From: Timothy Jones <00000215dcdd9f16-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Clay County: Swallow-tailed Kite
The bird was soaring low over a drainage ditch along Highway 90 at the intersection of Highway 141 in Clay County west of Boydsville. Ebird post has the exact location.

Tim Jones
Dunklin County MO
 

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Date: 9/4/18 10:21 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: south Lafayette County 9-3-18
Ar-birders,
Below is the link to the eBird list with embedded photos from my Labor Day (9-3-18) bird survey of the rice farm area
in south Lafayette County. I was joined by Jeff and Jean Trahan. Highlights were 18 species of shorebirds, continuing
White-faced Ibis, Roseate Spoonbills, and some late Purple Martins.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48271293

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

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Date: 9/4/18 7:02 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: RUDDY TURNSTONE AT BOYD POINT
This morning, Rob Doster and I birded the Boyd Point Waste Water Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. We observed and photographed a Rudy Turnstone in nonbreeding plumage, as it foraged along the rip rap at the waters edge. It was quite approachable allowing us to parallel its movements in our vehicle, the distance between us only being 12 feet. Because of all of the rain this summer, there have been no dried algae beds, which form de facto "mud flats" and are usually a magnet for the migrating shore birds. However, today there were approx.150 Least, 2 Pectoral , 3 Western and 10 Semipalmated Sandpipers, all of which were foraging in the grass and bitterweed that line the levees and resting on the gravel roads atop the levees and on the rip rap along the shore.
John Redman
 

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Date: 9/4/18 12:38 pm
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: spoonbill in pond across from Alma WWT
There were also two spoonbills at Bald Knob NWR this morning for folks who don't want to drive over to Alma.  Also 3 black-bellied plovers.
Nancy Young On Tuesday, September 4, 2018, 7:24:49 AM CDT, Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> wrote:



Get Outlook for Android

 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/18 11:44 am
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Swallowtail Kite
Swallowtail Kite is still hanging around in the Sharp Chapel Rd area. Seen about 12:15 and again at 1:35
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/18 7:44 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA September, October, and November Field Trips
On Saturday, September 15th you are invited to join the monthly field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  All birders of all levels are welcome to participate.  You don't have to be an ASCA member.  Our trips are a great way to meet other birders from around the state, bird new areas of the state, and have plenty of experienced birders to help you learn how to identify the birds we see on each trip.  Details are below, including information for the October and November field trips.  Go to www.ascabird.org to learn more about our organization and our activities and programs.

An added birding opportunity is the upcoming state fall convention and meeting of the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS).  It will be held the first weekend in October in Texarkana. Everyone is welcome!  Go to www.arbirds.org for more details regarding the fall conference.  AAS also holds a yearly spring convention.  Watch for those dates next February.
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock

September 15DeltaHeritage Trail State Park and Mississippi River State Park Meet at 7:00 a.m.at the Prothro Junction commuter lot, I-40 East, Exit 157, southeast side ofthe interstate.  Drive time from Little Rock to the Delta Heritage Trail SP is 1 hour38 minutes.  The Delta Heritage Trail is a rail-to-trailconversion that was acquired by Arkansas State Parks in 1993. Fourteen milesnear Helena have been completed in some of the most remote and scenic areasremaining in eastern Arkansas's Mississippi Delta.  This historic rail trail is easywalking and goes through multiple habitats. We’ll then travelto the Mississippi River SP.  Drive time between the two parks is 25minutes.  The Mississippi River SP is operated by the Arkansas State Parkswithin the St. Francis National Forest.  It has a Visitors Center withexhibits.  It is the newest member of the Arkansas State ParksSystem.  Bear Creek Lake Natural trail is a one-mile loop thatprovides access to the unique flora and fauna of Crowley’s Ridge. This easywalking trail winds through groves of large native trees, many which areidentified and is a great way to explore the forest.  Drive time from thePark back to Little Rock is 1 hour 35 minutes. Directions:Delta HeritageTrail SP is located at 5539 Hwy. 49, Helena-West Helena.  Phone870-572-2352. For more information go to <deltaheritagetrail...> RiverSP is located at 2955 Hwy. 44, Marianna.  Phone 870-295-4040.  Formore information go to   www.arkansasstateparks.com/parks/mississippi-river-state-park    October 27LonokeCountyMeet at 7:30 a.m.at the Prothro Junction commuter lot, I-40 East, Exit 157, southeast side ofthe interstate.  We’ll spend the morning exploring the Joe Hogan FishHatchery, the minnow ponds along Bob Long Rd. and the open fields east of BobLong Rd.  First stop is the Fish Hatchery, off Hwy. 70 at 23 Joe HoganLane in Lonoke.  The hatchery is the largest and one of the oldest state-ownedwarm-water pond hatcheries in the United States.  After searching thehatchery, we’ll head south on Hwy. 31 to Pettus and turn east onto Bob LongRoad.  We’ll check the numerous minnow ponds, which can be a magnet forlingering shorebirds, various duck species, a rare merganser or scoter, andearly arriving gulls.  The open fields attract flocks of Snow, GreaterWhite-fronted, and Canada Geese, raptors, and first-of-the-seasonsparrows.  The trip combines driving and stopping, with walking at the FishHatchery.  Wear sturdy shoes as we may be standing in dirt and grass insome spots.  Bring scopes, water, and snacks.  This is a morningtrip.  November 17DeGray LakeResort State Park—ArkadelphiaMeet at 7:30 a.m.in the commuter lot at I-430/I-630 off Shackleford Road in Little Rock. We’ll arrive around 8:45 a.m. at the park’s Lodge for anyone who would like tomeet us there.  Our target birds will be eagles, loons, ducks, mergansers,grebes, and gulls.  Dress warm, the lake can be windy and cold.  Hatsand gloves are recommended.  Bring scope, water, and snacks.  You canbring lunch or eat in the Lodge’s restaurant. Address for thepark is:  2027 State Park Entrance Road - Bismarck, Arkansas 71929. GPS coordinates are 34.24562, -93.14840.  Go to www.degray.com for more information about the park. 
 

Back to top
Date: 9/4/18 5:25 am
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: spoonbill in pond across from Alma WWT


Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>


 

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Date: 9/3/18 5:54 pm
From: DeLynn Hearn <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite
I live in Park Hill, N Little Rock, and I see and hear them daily!

DeLynn Hearn
My Errand Service
317 West K Ave.
N. Little Rock , AR 72116


Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 3, 2018, at 7:18 PM, Laster/Roark <elaster523...> wrote:
>
> Mississippi Kite seen on Park Hill in North Little Rock this morning.
>
> Ed Laster
>
>> On Sep 2, 2018, at 10:29 PM, Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> One Mississippi Kite soaring over the water tank by the Methodist Assembly this morning (about 12 hours ago)
>>
>> Sara
>> Fayetteville
>> --------------------------------------------
>> On Sun, 9/2/18, Lynn Christie <christie-j...> wrote:
>>
>> Subject: Mississippi Kite
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Date: Sunday, September 2, 2018, 5:23 PM
>>
>> Mississippi Kite soaring over the bottom of
>> Hillcrest, Little Rock at 5:10 pm;
>> not as rare as a Swallow-tailed Kite,
>> but still around.
>> Lynn Christie
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/18 5:38 pm
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Re: Baird's SP
I'll try again tomorrow morning. Maybe find one then. A nemesis bird for me.

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Monday, September 3, 2018 6:50:40 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Baird's SP

eBird Checklist Alma WTP, Crawford County, Arkansas, US Sun Sep 02, 2018 16 species<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS48241260&data=02%7C01%7C%7C4cc496fbb34c49ab16d408d611f814bf%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636716154520939315&sdata=Eih%2F2MaWpzDRT5IOLJG7wW%2FljyJkj83p8NfLjyHW2rY%3D&reserved=0>

<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fview%2Fchecklist%2FS48241260&data=02%7C01%7C%7C4cc496fbb34c49ab16d408d611f814bf%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636716154520939315&sdata=Eih%2F2MaWpzDRT5IOLJG7wW%2FljyJkj83p8NfLjyHW2rY%3D&reserved=0>

eBird Checklist Alma WTP, Crawford County, Arkansas, US Sun Sep 02, ...





On Monday, 3 September, 2018, 12:39:32 PM GMT-5, Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> wrote:


Has anyone seen one lately? If so where?

Alton Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Faka.ms%2Fghei36&data=02%7C01%7C%7C4cc496fbb34c49ab16d408d611f814bf%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636716154520939315&sdata=jYiKrheGjVIQqB%2B3CN9lVwY1ack1NZWf%2Bo%2BTkvUB2Z4%3D&reserved=0>


 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/18 5:18 pm
From: Laster/Roark <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite
Mississippi Kite seen on Park Hill in North Little Rock this morning.

Ed Laster

> On Sep 2, 2018, at 10:29 PM, Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> One Mississippi Kite soaring over the water tank by the Methodist Assembly this morning (about 12 hours ago)
>
> Sara
> Fayetteville
> --------------------------------------------
> On Sun, 9/2/18, Lynn Christie <christie-j...> wrote:
>
> Subject: Mississippi Kite
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Date: Sunday, September 2, 2018, 5:23 PM
>
> Mississippi Kite soaring over the bottom of
> Hillcrest, Little Rock at 5:10 pm;
> not as rare as a Swallow-tailed Kite,
> but still around.
> Lynn Christie
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/18 4:50 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Baird's SP
eBird Checklist – Alma WTP, Crawford County, Arkansas, US – Sun Sep 02, 2018 – 16 species


|
|
| |
eBird Checklist – Alma WTP, Crawford County, Arkansas, US – Sun Sep 02, ...


|

|

|



On Monday, 3 September, 2018, 12:39:32 PM GMT-5, Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> wrote:

Has anyone seen one lately? If so where?

Alton Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android

 

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Date: 9/3/18 12:59 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: International Ornithological Congress - summary & presentation


Here is a nice summary, with links, of the IOC in Vancouver last week.

[]

Jeff Short

Dear bird enthusiasts,



1. We wish you a happy Jewish New Year, a year of health and
creativity, a year of protecting birds and their habitats.



2. We are honored to send you experiences from the exciting 27th
International Ornithological Congress (IOC) held in Vancouver last month:

. Presentation: https://bit.ly/2CaQdDO.

. Congress summary - attached.

. Movie screened at the opening of our event (filmed and prepared by
Yuval Dax): <https://youtu.be/S4BJZSJR3lc> https://youtu.be/S4BJZSJR3lc.

. 4-minute movie summarizing our event (filmed and prepared by
Jocelyn Demers):
<https://drive.google.com/file/d/1D11qRKNWc4o4JjW5mCRIyRse8ztHnkw2/view?usp=
sharing>
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1D11qRKNWc4o4JjW5mCRIyRse8ztHnkw2/view?usp=s
haring



3. Special New Year offer for purchasing the beautiful album "Bringing
the Dead Sea to Life - Art and Nature at the Lowest Place on Earth" (170
artworks from the Artists for Nature seminar and background material about
the Dead Sea).
The book is 31 x 30 cm, 232 pages, with texts in three languages (Hebrew,
English and Arabic), and especially suitable as a New Year's gift. The
special price is $65 (including delivery), instead of $105. To order the
book, please send a check payable to the Society for the Protection of
Nature in Israel (SPNI), to Prof. Yossi Leshem, Department of Zoology,
Sherman Building, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel or pay with
credit card via the birding portal at www.birds.org.il.



Shana tova, yours,

Yossi Leshem and the team from the International Center for the Study of
Bird Migration and Hoopoe Foundation

**********************

Prof. Yossi Leshem
Address: Tel Aviv University, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences,
Department of Zoology
Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel.
Telefax +972-3-6406010, Tel: +972-3-6407963
Mobile phone: +972-52-3257722
E-mail 1: <mailto:<yleshem...> <yleshem...>
E-mail 2: <mailto:<yossile...> <yossile...> (both
are correct)
Skype Name: leshemyossi
Home: +972-2-9932308
Visit our web site: <http://www.birds.org.il/> www.birds.org.il




 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/18 12:34 pm
From: Laster/Roark <elaster523...>
Subject: Shorebird Ponds
I should have gone directly to the Anderson Fish Farm pond Charles Anderson reported on 9/1/18. It’s still active with a number of birds.

Blue-winged Teal
N. Shovelers
Yellow-legs G&L
Pectoral SP
A. Avocet-8
Black-necked Stilt 11
Dowitcher S&L
Black-bellied Plover-1 breeding plumage
Peeps

This pond is 3 miles East of the Hwy 70/Hwy 15 intersection, north side of the road across from the Anderson shed.

As for Treadway and Saul’s; they said they intend to keep ponds full until late September.

Ed Laster
Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 9/3/18 11:48 am
From: DeLynn Hearn <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Horsehead lake draw down
This lake was my husband’s favorite place to camp and fish. I think it’s pretty shallow. The areas is part AGFC and part federally controlled.

I’ve never thought of it as a shorebird type place. It’s surrounded by Batiinal Forest and is in a very hilly area. The thing that stands out to me most about birds in the area is how many red-headed woodpeckers there are!

DeLynn Hearn
My Errand Service
317 West K Ave.
N. Little Rock , AR 72116


Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 3, 2018, at 1:03 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> According to a post by AGFC, the lake will be brought down 3 to 5 feet starting September 4 and lasting til mid-winter. I don't know anything about this lake and I sure can't get out that way but, it had me wondering if such a draw down would increase shorebird habitat during this time... and if it would make it better for birding. Don't know if that would actually do anything but I thought I'd mention it just in case.
> https://www.facebook.com/ARGameandFish/posts/10156712982918234:0
>
> (side note: I wish I had a schedule of the draw downs for the ponds at the fish hatchery in Centerton)
>
> Also, looks like a tropic storm could impact Arkansas later this week. I wonder if that will impact birding anywhere in the state.
>
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 9/3/18 11:05 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Horsehead lake draw down
According to a post by AGFC, the lake will be brought down 3 to 5 feet
starting September 4 and lasting til mid-winter. I don't know anything
about this lake and I sure can't get out that way but, it had me
wondering if such a draw down would increase shorebird habitat during
this time... and if it would make it better for birding.  Don't know if
that would actually do anything but I thought I'd mention it just in case.
https://www.facebook.com/ARGameandFish/posts/10156712982918234:0

(side note: I wish I had a schedule of the draw downs for the ponds at
the fish hatchery in Centerton)

Also, looks like a tropic storm could impact Arkansas later this week. I
wonder if that will impact birding anywhere in the state.


Daniel Mason


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Date: 9/3/18 10:39 am
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Baird's SP
Has anyone seen one lately? If so where?

Alton Patton
Fort Smith

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Date: 9/3/18 10:13 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite location this morning
Swallow-tailed Kite continues this morning in same area as Joe's location info below. 
Patty McLean and Michael Linz Atlanta and Conway
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: "Joseph C. Neal" <joeneal...> Date: 9/2/18 2:16 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite location this morning
About location of this morning’s Swallow-tailed Kite at Frog Bayou WMA: David Oakley and I were parked on Sharp Chapel Road, on the roadside at a locked gate that is 1.0 miles south of the intersection of Red Hill Road and Sharp Chapel Road. This is adjacent extensive open fields that were until a few days ago still partially flooded. Same fields where I had been seeing White-faced Ibis and a juvenile White Ibis (field mostly dried up, no ibis today). The Swallow-tailed Kite was associated with Mississippi Kites (4). Birds came from the west, foraging over open fields and adjacent the forested strip through which flows treated wastewater from Alma Wastewater Treatment Plant. This is the same place where Bill and Toka Beall saw both kite species on August 31. The population of grasshoppers and dragonflies is impressive here. In 2009, a Swallow-tailed Kite, also with Mississippi Kites near Clifty in Madison County, was apparently in the area for several weeks (second half of August). Also huge population of grasshoppers in the area.

My advice to anyone who wants the Swallow-tailed Kite at Frog: get out there as soon as you can, but when you get there, don’t be in a rush, don’t give up, park out of the way at that gate, and keep scanning the skies. We saw it at a little after 10 am this morning. The birds foraged in the area for a few minutes, then moved on. There is a lot of food for them, so maybe we will get lucky and it will remain a while.

As a side note: one reason for this morning’s trip to Frog was to get David Oakley to identify a large, reddish-orangish dragonfly I saw, but could never identify, on August 28. It would hover right in my face, then dart away, all business. Never seemed to perch. David took care of that business – a Wandering Glider. As David pointed out, true to its name, it spends most of its time on wing … wandering.

At some point, David Oakley’s facebook page should have Roseate Spoonbills (still at King Ranch this morning), Swallow-tailed Kite, and Wandering Glider.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 8:30 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite
One Mississippi Kite soaring over the water tank by the Methodist Assembly this morning (about 12 hours ago)

Sara
Fayetteville
--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 9/2/18, Lynn Christie <christie-j...> wrote:

Subject: Mississippi Kite
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Date: Sunday, September 2, 2018, 5:23 PM

Mississippi Kite soaring over the bottom of
Hillcrest, Little Rock at 5:10 pm;
not as rare as a Swallow-tailed Kite,
but still around.
Lynn Christie


Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 8:24 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite location this morning
There seemed to be a decent crowd all around the Alma area today... cars
on Orrick, Red Hill, and Sharp Chapel. I bet I passed by at least 5 or 6
other vehicles of birders in the few hours we were out that way late
this afternoon.
I've decided that the spoonbills don't like our van... or me. When we
were there days ago, we thought we were being careful not to bother them
but every pond we approached, they didn't stay long before they'd fly to
another. That is until they found a pond further from the road that was
too difficult for me to get good photos.
Today was a similar experience.
I saw a car on red hill road and knew they had to be over there. Looked
and saw a couple pink dots near the cows over that way but, I saw cars
on Orrick so I went down Orrick to point people in the right direction.
Then, I turned around. When we first went down Orrick I didn't see any
egrets. 10 minutes later and there had to be 50 of them spread across
the field. WAY off in the distance there was a tree all specked in
white, just covered with them. The ones in the field were all cattle
egrets. They're fun to watch, especially up close.
I wanted to make a checklist for Ebird but, I also wanted to get to
Sharp Chapel road... I decided to head over to the pond where the
spoonbills were... parked on the side of the road and got the camera
out. I thought we were a good distance from the birds and, someone else
had just been there 10 minutes earlier watching them. Don't know if it
was even a minute before they flew further down red hill road to a pond
that I think might be even harder to see. They were still in the area
but, moving around... and perhaps just avoiding me or my van, I don't know.

Then we headed down to the boat ramp to find a friend we knew was
there... found him headed to sharp chapel so that's where we went. We
got there and waited a bit... looked around... no kite yet. Past the
gate, out a ways, there were about 9 great egrets and at least 6
red-shouldered hawks hanging around the same area, occasionally
interacting with each other. Squabbles? There were crows as well... I
finally found another bird... an ibis... dark one so, no white ibis for
me yet... Christopher Barnett was with me and wanted to photograph it
and try to get an ID. We walked down the gated road(says AGFC, and
doesn't have any do not enter signs, so, I considered it safe) and we
got just close enough for him to get the red at the eye for us to decide
it was indeed, what was expected, a white-faced ibis.
My son, who had stayed back at the van, came running to let us know they
saw the kite again. We were headed back anyway and sure enough, we
caught a glimpse of it. Then it was gone. That was enough to make the
trip worth it for me. But, we stuck around and it returned shortly
before another car showed up. I'm assuming this was Kannan. I'm afraid
that we were all so busy staring at the bird(and a gas hawk apparently)
that not enough introductions happened and the ones that did, I've
forgotten already. I'm HORRIBLE with names and faces, especially the
first time I meet someone... and especially when my mind is on another
topic. So, I apologize to anyone I ran into today for the next time I
see you I might not remember. I still enjoy meeting people while birding
though. :)
I was saying to someone today, the person that first reported the
spoonbills and the kite sure stirred up some traffic for Alma.

The mississippi kites were gone by the time we got there. At least they
never showed while we were there for at least an hour. This was kind of
sad and also kind of funny(to me) that my daughter got to see a
swallow-tailed kite but still doesn't have a MIKI. What's worse for her
is that a couple of her younger siblings can claim one that flew over
the yard while I was out there to ID it one day... and she was just
inside the house. That one will come and the swallow-tailed more than
made up for it.

After sharp chapel, I decided to go to the BIG portion of frog...
wondering why nobody has been reporting from over there. We walked for a
while and, I joked with my oldest that I think nobody has spent much
time out there because it's too hot for them. Not to pick on anyone. :)
Hot, cold, rain, snow... I'll tolerate what I have to tolerate to find
something...
BUT... then we didn't find much. A BIG flock of at least 50 egrets flew
in the distance. They legs looked black from where I was and I kind of
figure they were great egrets but they were far enough away that I
wasn't 100% sure. It was quiet... a few blackbirds, buntings,
green-herons, swallows, and a few fly over great egrets. Not much else.

Oh, another highlight, at least to me, at sharp chapel was a nice bald
eagle.

Now... next exciting bird(s) you report need to be a little closer to
Siloam. HA
Thanks again to everyone that reports these things. You've helped
several people(at least) get new life birds. :)

Daniel Mason

On 9/2/2018 2:16 PM, Joseph C. Neal wrote:
>
> About location of this mornings Swallow-tailed Kite at Frog Bayou
> WMA: David Oakley and I were parked on Sharp Chapel Road, on the
> roadside at a locked gate that is 1.0 miles south of the intersection
> of Red Hill Road and Sharp Chapel Road. This is adjacent extensive
> open fields that were until a few days ago still partially flooded.
> Same fields where I had been seeing White-faced Ibis and a juvenile
> White Ibis (field mostly dried up, no ibis today). The Swallow-tailed
> Kite was associated with Mississippi Kites (4). Birds came from the
> west, foraging over open fields and adjacent the forested strip
> through which flows treated wastewater from Alma Wastewater Treatment
> Plant. This is the same place where Bill and Toka Beall saw both kite
> species on August 31. The population of grasshoppers and dragonflies
> is impressive here. In 2009, a Swallow-tailed Kite, also with
> Mississippi Kites near Clifty in Madison County, was apparently in the
> area for several weeks (second half of August). Also huge population
> of grasshoppers in the area.
>
>
> My advice to anyone who wants the Swallow-tailed Kite at Frog: get out
> there as soon as you can, but when you get there, dont be in a rush,
> dont give up, park out of the way at that gate, and keep scanning the
> skies. We saw it at a little after 10 am this morning. The birds
> foraged in the area for a few minutes, then moved on. There is a lot
> of food for them, so maybe we will get lucky and it will remain a while.
>
>
> As a side note: one reason for this mornings trip to Frog was to get
> David Oakley to identify a large, reddish-orangish dragonfly I saw,
> but could never identify, on August 28. It would hover right in my
> face, then dart away, all business. Never seemed to perch. David took
> care of that business a Wandering Glider. As David pointed out, true
> to its name, it spends most of its time on wing wandering.
>
>
> At some point, David Oakleys facebook page should have Roseate
> Spoonbills (still at King Ranch this morning), Swallow-tailed Kite,
> and Wandering Glider.
>
>



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Date: 9/2/18 5:47 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: 118th Christmas Bird Count article
Greetings all,
The Christmas Bird Count article will appear later this fall on Audubon's website.
It's too large to read into this message and I don't want to send it as an attachment to the whole list.

If you'd like a copy of the article, I'd be glad to send you a copy! Just reply to me off the list and I'll send you the file.

Some highlights:
The best number of species occurred 12/19-12/24. The best number of individuals occurred 12/14-12/18.

The best number of species occurred in the Ouachita Mountains eco-region, followed by the South Central/ West Gulf Coastal Plain.
The best number of individuals occurred in the Arkansas River Valley eco-region, followed by the Grand Prairie and the Mississippi River Alluvial Plain.

Big Lake N.W.R and North Fork Illinois Bayou set new species highs of (93 and 81), respectively.

Species found only on one count included Lesser Yellowlegs, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher and Dickcissel (Arkadelphia); Grasshopper Sparrow (Bayou DeView); Gray Catbird (Conway); Rufous Hummingbird (Crooked Creek Valley); Sora Rail, White-winged Dove and Smith's Longspur (Fort Smith/ Moffett); Trumpeter Swan and Peregrine Falcon (Holla Bend N.W.R.); Black Duck (Jonesboro); Long-tailed Duck and Lesser Black-backed Gull (Lake Dardanelle); Red-cockaded Woodpecker and Spotted Towhee (Lake Georgia Pacific-Felsenthal N.W.R.); Bewick's Wren (Little Rock); Black-crowned Night-heron (Lonoke); Townsend's Solitaire (Mount Magazine); Broad-winged Hawk (North Fork Illinois Bayou); "Harlan's" Red-tailed Hawk (Pine Bluff); Anhinga, White Ibis, Inca Dove and Great-tailed Grackle (Texarkana); Louisiana Waterthrush (Village Creek S.P.); and Red-breasted Merganser (Wapanocca N.W.R.).

The bird of-the-year was a photographed Louisiana Waterthrush, at Village Creek S.P. For only the species' second Arkansas CBC appearance in 65 years.

It can never be said frequently enough: All the compilers, co-compilers and volunteers deserve a big "THANK YOU" for your hard work!

Holler, off list if you want a copy. ,Leif at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 4:38 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Swallow-tailed Kite!
So glad everyone had fun without me. 😩
Isn't that the way it goes.

Sandy

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 6:32 PM Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Thanks to Joe's precise directions, we were at the spot (near Red Hill
> Rd/Sharp Chapel Road junction close to Alma WTA) at 530pm today to see a
> whole group of people already there (Karen McGee et al.). They welcomed us
> excitedly pointing at the skies. And sure enough there was a
> Swallow-tailed Kite soaring gracefully against the clouds. It then treated
> us with a low overhead flight, and we were delighted to see that it was
> eating something off its talons.
>
> The skies were almost clear, it was nice and windy, and it was rather cool
> and pleasant with many dragonflies darting about. Karen got some decent
> shots of the bird. Hope to see/put them on eBird soon.
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 4:32 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite!
Thanks to Joe's precise directions, we were at the spot (near Red Hill Rd/Sharp Chapel Road junction close to Alma WTA) at 530pm today to see a whole group of people already there (Karen McGee et al.).  They welcomed us excitedly pointing at the skies.  And sure enough there was a Swallow-tailed Kite soaring gracefully against the clouds.  It then treated us with a low overhead flight, and we were delighted to see that it was eating something off its talons.  
The skies were almost clear, it was nice and windy, and it was rather cool and pleasant with many dragonflies darting about.  Karen got some decent shots of the bird.  Hope to see/put them on eBird soon.
KannanFt. Smith
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 3:23 pm
From: Lynn Christie <christie-j...>
Subject: Mississippi Kite
Mississippi Kite soaring over the bottom of Hillcrest, Little Rock at 5:10 pm;
not as rare as a Swallow-tailed Kite, but still around.
Lynn Christie


Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 2:32 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: bird trip to Alma/Frog
Anyone in Benton/ Washington County area up for a trip to see the rarities
on Monday or Wednesday? I can take my car, but may need help driving if I
get sleepy. Please contact me off-list.

Karen Garrett
Rogers
<kjgarrett84...>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 1:34 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: photos from this morning -- kite, etc
David Oakley's photographs of the Swallow-tailed Kite, Roseate Spoonbills, and Wandering Glider from this morning's trip to Frog Bayou WMA are now on his facebook page. All birds or dragons in flight. https://www.facebook.com/david.oakley.581?fref=ts

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 12:17 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite location this morning
About location of this mornings Swallow-tailed Kite at Frog Bayou WMA: David Oakley and I were parked on Sharp Chapel Road, on the roadside at a locked gate that is 1.0 miles south of the intersection of Red Hill Road and Sharp Chapel Road. This is adjacent extensive open fields that were until a few days ago still partially flooded. Same fields where I had been seeing White-faced Ibis and a juvenile White Ibis (field mostly dried up, no ibis today). The Swallow-tailed Kite was associated with Mississippi Kites (4). Birds came from the west, foraging over open fields and adjacent the forested strip through which flows treated wastewater from Alma Wastewater Treatment Plant. This is the same place where Bill and Toka Beall saw both kite species on August 31. The population of grasshoppers and dragonflies is impressive here. In 2009, a Swallow-tailed Kite, also with Mississippi Kites near Clifty in Madison County, was apparently in the area for several weeks (second half of August). Also huge population of grasshoppers in the area.

My advice to anyone who wants the Swallow-tailed Kite at Frog: get out there as soon as you can, but when you get there, dont be in a rush, dont give up, park out of the way at that gate, and keep scanning the skies. We saw it at a little after 10 am this morning. The birds foraged in the area for a few minutes, then moved on. There is a lot of food for them, so maybe we will get lucky and it will remain a while.

As a side note: one reason for this mornings trip to Frog was to get David Oakley to identify a large, reddish-orangish dragonfly I saw, but could never identify, on August 28. It would hover right in my face, then dart away, all business. Never seemed to perch. David took care of that business a Wandering Glider. As David pointed out, true to its name, it spends most of its time on wing wandering.

At some point, David Oakleys facebook page should have Roseate Spoonbills (still at King Ranch this morning), Swallow-tailed Kite, and Wandering Glider.


 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 12:10 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Owl photography at night
Here’s a nice (long) discussion about the MBTA (https://www.animallaw.info/article/detailed-discussion-migratory-bird-treaty-act) .



Intentional, unpermitted harassment of birds (other than eagles) does not appear to be illegal, unless it leads to the death of a protected bird—and USFWS wants to prosecute,



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Karen And Jim Rowe
Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2018 9:43 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Owl photography at night



I have never found a “harassment clause in the MBTA or any interpretation of it. That clause is, however, found in the Bald and Golden Eagle Act. Basically you can harass a non-endangered songbird but you cannot harass an eagle.



The lack of a harassment clause is what makes it legal to scare birds that may be depredating on blueberry crops, or damaging property with their droppings at a roost. As long as that harassment cannot be interpreted as an attempt to take.



So shining a light on owls at night as long as there is no evidence that the intent was to kill or “take” the owls means the act is legal.

Does it make it ethical?

Sent from my iPhone


On Sep 1, 2018, at 9:09 PM, Hal Mitchell <halmitchell...> wrote:

I’m not a lawyer but wouldn’t this sort of thing fall under the “harassment” clause of the MBTA? I would think in order for this to be legal in any situation you would need state and federal “take” permits (or state equivalent) for scientific research or some other justifiable reason. Most bird species are federally regulated so folks should keep that in mind when reviewing state regulations.



Hope all is well,



Hal Mitchell

Southaven, MS





On Sep 1, 2018, at 8:37 PM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:



AGFC regulations can be confusing and that information is not correct.





Coon hunters with dogs shine lights in trees most of the year on most AGFC WMAs and private lands, hog hunters may use lights at night to pursue hogs on private land and anyone that loses a dog or livestock may use a light at night on private to look for a lost animal. On private land there is no restriction for shining a light at night. However it is advisable that persons’ shining a light at night on private land not be in possession of a deer rifle just in case they happened to encounter a wildlife officer.





Public land regulations vary.



Karen Rowe. Dewitt AR







Sent from my iPhone


On Sep 1, 2018, at 7:47 PM, David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:

Any park ranger or Game and Fish person will ticket you for spot lighting if they see you shining any type of light in a tree for any reason.

David Ray

NLR

Sent from my iPhone


On Sep 1, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:

To me it's wrong to shine bright lights on birds or animals at night. It's unnatural, blinding and just plain wrong. Birds and animals everywhere are under enough assault, disturbance and attack as it is without carrying on yet another intrusion on their lives. If somebody accidentally flushes a bird or animal while wandering around at night, that's a different matter.



Bill Thurman



On Sat, Sep 1, 2018, 09:00 Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Just curious:



How many folks are familiar with ethics of birding and the ethics of wildlife photography?



What are your thoughts on whether shining a light on wildlife at night to get a better photo or get a look at a bird you need to add to your checklist is ethical birding or ethical photography?



https://www.naturettl.com/ethics-wildlife-photography/



http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html



http://listing.aba.org/ethics/



Sent from my iPhone




 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 11:44 am
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills/shorebirds - Alma WTP/Orrick Road
I visited the Alma area this morning with Alyssa DeRubeis.

The Roseate Spoonbills (2) were seen at the cattle ponds near the wastewater treatment plant (Orrick Road). They were accompanied by a single Black-bellied Whistling Duck, Blue-winged Teals (12), and several egrets (Snowy (20) and Great (6)).
At least 100 Cattle Egrets were foraging in the pasture adjacent to the ponds. An assortment of shorebirds was also present, including Least Sandpiper (14), Semipalmated Sandpiper (3), Western Sandpiper (1), Baird's Sandpiper (2) and Solitary Sandpiper (1).

4 female/immature-type Painted Buntings were seen in small bushes along Orrick Road (one individual was brighter than the others and was presumably an adult female; 2 of them perched briefly on Alyssa's car!).

We then looked unsuccessfully for Buff-breasted Sandpipers at Kibler Bottoms/West-Ark Sod Farm. Highlights in this area were a Great Horned Owl that flew across Thornhill Road and 55 Horned Larks (including one flock of 45 birds) on Arnold Road.

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 11:12 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Fwd: Swallowtail Kite on Frog Bayou WMA near Alma, AR
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Date: Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 12:28 PM
Subject: Re: Swallowtail Kite on Frog Bayou WMA near Alma, AR
To: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>


And here I sit in Jimmy's egg in Wichita. 🙄☹️😠 Do you know how frustrated
I am.

Sandy

On Sun, Sep 2, 2018 at 11:20 AM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:

> Apparently I forgot to hit reply ALL... Sorry Joan, meant that for
> everyone... or, David and Joe especially...
>
> Did anyone build me that teleporter yet? It would be hours before I
> could get down there. What are the chances they'll still be hanging
> around later today? If David or Joe could give a description of where on
> Sharp Chapel road to look, just in case we can get down there, it would
> be good to have a good starting point.
> I have to go disassemble a trampoline to take home before I can go out. :(
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> On 9/2/2018 10:20 AM, Joan Reynolds wrote:
> > Joe Neal and David Oakley are presently watching a Swallowtail Kite
> > and 4 Mississippi Kites on Sharp Chapel Road in Frog Bayou WMA. They
> > also report that the 2 Spoonbills are still on Orrick Road.
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 9:20 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Swallowtail Kite on Frog Bayou WMA near Alma, AR
Apparently I forgot to hit reply ALL...  Sorry Joan, meant that for
everyone... or, David and Joe especially...

Did anyone build me that teleporter yet? It would be hours before I
could get down there. What are the chances they'll still be hanging
around later today? If David or Joe could give a description of where on
Sharp Chapel road to look, just in case we can get down there, it would
be good to have a good starting point.
I have to go disassemble a trampoline to take home before I can go out. :(

Daniel Mason

On 9/2/2018 10:20 AM, Joan Reynolds wrote:
> Joe Neal and David Oakley are presently watching a Swallowtail Kite
> and 4 Mississippi Kites on Sharp Chapel Road in Frog Bayou WMA.  They
> also report that the 2 Spoonbills are still on Orrick Road.



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 9/2/18 9:06 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: school girls photograph spoonbills
This morning I took two school girls (15 and 10-yr old) and their dad to the Alma Wastewater Treatment Plant.  They got several photographs of the spoonbills much to their delight and are looking forward to seeing them on eBird eventually.  The little one is especially thrilled that she gets to have her own eBird account.
Near the plant we caught up with Vivek Govindkumar and Alyssia DeRubeis.  Vivek showed us a Baird's Sandpiper and a Western Sandpiper feeding along with other common peeps (Least and Semipalmated).  It was refreshing to see the Western's rusty shoulders and drooping bill, and the Baird's long wing projections through Alyssia's scope.
The Alma sewage ponds hotspot has now been renamed as Alma WTP. 
KannanFt. Smith
eBird Checklist – Alma WTP, Crawford County, Arkansas, US – Sun Sep 02, 2018 – 15 species


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eBird Checklist – Alma WTP, Crawford County, Arkansas, US – Sun Sep 02, ...


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Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 8:20 am
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Swallowtail Kite on Frog Bayou WMA near Alma, AR
Joe Neal and David Oakley are presently watching a Swallowtail Kite and 4
Mississippi Kites on Sharp Chapel Road in Frog Bayou WMA. They also report
that the 2 Spoonbills are still on Orrick Road.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 8:19 am
From: David Oakley <gdosr...>
Subject: Swallow-tailed Kite
Still feeding on grasshoppers over fields along Sharp Chapel Road!

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 7:38 am
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Ouachita County
I just sighted two Woodstorks circling the Ouachita River valley over highway 79.

Kelly Chitwood

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/2/18 6:43 am
From: <market...>
Subject: Re: [UPDATE]Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery
Per usual, I fouled up! That was Joan Reynolds with Joe yesterday. Joan, my apologies! I am horrible with names….

I did hear that you found the Least Flycatchers. Congrats! Here’s a photo of the same that I caught.
https://photos.smugmug.com/Todays-photos/i-PVd6KLt/0/9171773d/X3/IMG_2922a-X3.jpg





Don Palmer and I went to the Nursery again early this long weekend to confirm the Least Flycatcher which we did early with two on the northwest side of the pond catching bugs with Blue Gray Gnatcatchers (great for size comparison). We were also greeted with multiple sightings of a single Osprey that I failed to get even one decent shot. Oh well… We were happy to find an Olive-sided Flycatcher on the southwest side and was able to get a good photo. https://www.ronbird.photo/Todays-photos/i-bP5pq5Q/A Great looking bird and another first for the Nursery.



No sign of the Blue-winged Teal today.



Was happy to run into Joan Patterson, Joe Neal, and friends who helped confirm some other findings like a molting Indigo Bunting and pointing in the right direction on a blurry Eastern Phoebe shot. 😊



As we talked, American Goldfinches were visiting the native thistle in front of us. We are truly blessed here in NWA.



Ron Bird









I hit the nursery early this morning and was pleasantly surprised to find that the State guys are yet again on top of things and have mowed the road around the dyke. They have really kept the path up this year nicely. This long weekend would be a perfect time to get out for a stroll around one of our hidden jewels.



Plenty of things to see with late summer flowers, Passion flowers everywhere. Tons of Queen Anne’s Lace as well as ragweed... Lots of ordinates flying as well as butterflies everywhere of all shapes and sizes. I've seen Buckeyes, a couple Monarchs, Clouded sulphurs, white cabbage and others I can’t name over the past week.



A flock of blue-winged teal flew over Beaver to the west a couple times early I did not see them afterward. Nice to see though! On the southwest corner in a persimmon tree, a least flycatcher made an appearance and allowed me a couple photos. A new bird for me and I believe a first for the nursery. A good day.



https://www.ronbird.photo/Todays-photos/i-jdvRmMz/A



quick list (45 min)

Red -bellied woodpecker

American crow

sparrow

American goldfinch

White-breasted nuthatch

Orchard Oriole

Blue-winged Teal

Great Blue Heron

Green Heron

Belt Kingfisher

Northern Cardinal

Red-tailed Hawk

Blue-grey gnatcatcher

Eastern bluebird(juveniles)

Ruby-throated hummingbird

Least Flycatcher














 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 7:43 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Owl photography at night
I have never found a “harassment clause in the MBTA or any interpretation of it. That clause is, however, found in the Bald and Golden Eagle Act. Basically you can harass a non-endangered songbird but you cannot harass an eagle.

The lack of a harassment clause is what makes it legal to scare birds that may be depredating on blueberry crops, or damaging property with their droppings at a roost. As long as that harassment cannot be interpreted as an attempt to take.

So shining a light on owls at night as long as there is no evidence that the intent was to kill or “take” the owls means the act is legal.
Does it make it ethical?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 1, 2018, at 9:09 PM, Hal Mitchell <halmitchell...> wrote:
>
> I’m not a lawyer but wouldn’t this sort of thing fall under the “harassment” clause of the MBTA? I would think in order for this to be legal in any situation you would need state and federal “take” permits (or state equivalent) for scientific research or some other justifiable reason. Most bird species are federally regulated so folks should keep that in mind when reviewing state regulations.
>
> Hope all is well,
>
> Hal Mitchell
> Southaven, MS
>
>> On Sep 1, 2018, at 8:37 PM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> AGFC regulations can be confusing and that information is not correct.
>>
>> Coon hunters with dogs shine lights in trees most of the year on most AGFC WMAs and private lands, hog hunters may use lights at night to pursue hogs on private land and anyone that loses a dog or livestock may use a light at night on private to look for a lost animal. On private land there is no restriction for shining a light at night. However it is advisable that persons’ shining a light at night on private land not be in possession of a deer rifle just in case they happened to encounter a wildlife officer.
>>
>> Public land regulations vary.
>>
>> Karen Rowe. Dewitt AR
>>
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Sep 1, 2018, at 7:47 PM, David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Any park ranger or Game and Fish person will ticket you for spot lighting if they see you shining any type of light in a tree for any reason.
>>> David Ray
>>> NLR
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>>> On Sep 1, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> To me it's wrong to shine bright lights on birds or animals at night. It's unnatural, blinding and just plain wrong. Birds and animals everywhere are under enough assault, disturbance and attack as it is without carrying on yet another intrusion on their lives. If somebody accidentally flushes a bird or animal while wandering around at night, that's a different matter.
>>>>
>>>> Bill Thurman
>>>>
>>>>> On Sat, Sep 1, 2018, 09:00 Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>>>> Just curious:
>>>>>
>>>>> How many folks are familiar with ethics of birding and the ethics of wildlife photography?
>>>>>
>>>>> What are your thoughts on whether shining a light on wildlife at night to get a better photo or get a look at a bird you need to add to your checklist is ethical birding or ethical photography?
>>>>>
>>>>> https://www.naturettl.com/ethics-wildlife-photography/
>>>>>
>>>>> http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html
>>>>>
>>>>> http://listing.aba.org/ethics/
>>>>>
>>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 7:09 pm
From: Hal Mitchell <halmitchell...>
Subject: Re: Owl photography at night
I’m not a lawyer but wouldn’t this sort of thing fall under the “harassment” clause of the MBTA? I would think in order for this to be legal in any situation you would need state and federal “take” permits (or state equivalent) for scientific research or some other justifiable reason. Most bird species are federally regulated so folks should keep that in mind when reviewing state regulations.

Hope all is well,

Hal Mitchell
Southaven, MS

> On Sep 1, 2018, at 8:37 PM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> AGFC regulations can be confusing and that information is not correct.
>
> Coon hunters with dogs shine lights in trees most of the year on most AGFC WMAs and private lands, hog hunters may use lights at night to pursue hogs on private land and anyone that loses a dog or livestock may use a light at night on private to look for a lost animal. On private land there is no restriction for shining a light at night. However it is advisable that persons’ shining a light at night on private land not be in possession of a deer rifle just in case they happened to encounter a wildlife officer.
>
> Public land regulations vary.
>
> Karen Rowe. Dewitt AR
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Sep 1, 2018, at 7:47 PM, David Ray <cardcards...> <mailto:<cardcards...>> wrote:
>
>> Any park ranger or Game and Fish person will ticket you for spot lighting if they see you shining any type of light in a tree for any reason.
>> David Ray
>> NLR
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Sep 1, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> <mailto:<bill.masterofmusic...>> wrote:
>>
>>> To me it's wrong to shine bright lights on birds or animals at night. It's unnatural, blinding and just plain wrong. Birds and animals everywhere are under enough assault, disturbance and attack as it is without carrying on yet another intrusion on their lives. If somebody accidentally flushes a bird or animal while wandering around at night, that's a different matter.
>>>
>>> Bill Thurman
>>>
>>> On Sat, Sep 1, 2018, 09:00 Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>>> Just curious:
>>>
>>> How many folks are familiar with ethics of birding and the ethics of wildlife photography?
>>>
>>> What are your thoughts on whether shining a light on wildlife at night to get a better photo or get a look at a bird you need to add to your checklist is ethical birding or ethical photography?
>>>
>>> https://www.naturettl.com/ethics-wildlife-photography/ <https://www.naturettl.com/ethics-wildlife-photography/>
>>>
>>> http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html <http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html>
>>>
>>> http://listing.aba.org/ethics/ <http://listing.aba.org/ethics/>
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone


 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 7:04 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Owl photography at night
You are correct. I was not speaking of private land or during hunting seasons that allow spotlighting. I was speaking of state/national and some city parks if you saw my previous post.
David Ray

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 1, 2018, at 8:37 PM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> AGFC regulations can be confusing and that information is not correct.
>
> Coon hunters with dogs shine lights in trees most of the year on most AGFC WMAs and private lands, hog hunters may use lights at night to pursue hogs on private land and anyone that loses a dog or livestock may use a light at night on private to look for a lost animal. On private land there is no restriction for shining a light at night. However it is advisable that persons’ shining a light at night on private land not be in possession of a deer rifle just in case they happened to encounter a wildlife officer.
>
> Public land regulations vary.
>
> Karen Rowe. Dewitt AR
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 1, 2018, at 7:47 PM, David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:
>>
>> Any park ranger or Game and Fish person will ticket you for spot lighting if they see you shining any type of light in a tree for any reason.
>> David Ray
>> NLR
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Sep 1, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
>>>
>>> To me it's wrong to shine bright lights on birds or animals at night. It's unnatural, blinding and just plain wrong. Birds and animals everywhere are under enough assault, disturbance and attack as it is without carrying on yet another intrusion on their lives. If somebody accidentally flushes a bird or animal while wandering around at night, that's a different matter.
>>>
>>> Bill Thurman
>>>
>>>> On Sat, Sep 1, 2018, 09:00 Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>>> Just curious:
>>>>
>>>> How many folks are familiar with ethics of birding and the ethics of wildlife photography?
>>>>
>>>> What are your thoughts on whether shining a light on wildlife at night to get a better photo or get a look at a bird you need to add to your checklist is ethical birding or ethical photography?
>>>>
>>>> https://www.naturettl.com/ethics-wildlife-photography/
>>>>
>>>> http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html
>>>>
>>>> http://listing.aba.org/ethics/
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 7:02 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: Garland County
Mom and I spent most of the day exploring Garland Co. After spending the
morning running around the National Forest, we headed for Andrew Hulsey
Fish Hatchery. Gone were the shorebirds reported on ebird two days ago.
Also gone was most of the mud they like. Killdeer were quite abundant and
clustered around what little water and mud remained.

Our best bird of the day was a Barred Owl that flew in front of the car
while driving up Fish Hatchery Rd. Sweet!

Dottie Boyles
Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 6:37 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Owl photography at night
AGFC regulations can be confusing and that information is not correct.

Coon hunters with dogs shine lights in trees most of the year on most AGFC WMAs and private lands, hog hunters may use lights at night to pursue hogs on private land and anyone that loses a dog or livestock may use a light at night on private to look for a lost animal. On private land there is no restriction for shining a light at night. However it is advisable that persons’ shining a light at night on private land not be in possession of a deer rifle just in case they happened to encounter a wildlife officer.

Public land regulations vary.

Karen Rowe. Dewitt AR



Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 1, 2018, at 7:47 PM, David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:
>
> Any park ranger or Game and Fish person will ticket you for spot lighting if they see you shining any type of light in a tree for any reason.
> David Ray
> NLR
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 1, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
>>
>> To me it's wrong to shine bright lights on birds or animals at night. It's unnatural, blinding and just plain wrong. Birds and animals everywhere are under enough assault, disturbance and attack as it is without carrying on yet another intrusion on their lives. If somebody accidentally flushes a bird or animal while wandering around at night, that's a different matter.
>>
>> Bill Thurman
>>
>>> On Sat, Sep 1, 2018, 09:00 Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>> Just curious:
>>>
>>> How many folks are familiar with ethics of birding and the ethics of wildlife photography?
>>>
>>> What are your thoughts on whether shining a light on wildlife at night to get a better photo or get a look at a bird you need to add to your checklist is ethical birding or ethical photography?
>>>
>>> https://www.naturettl.com/ethics-wildlife-photography/
>>>
>>> http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html
>>>
>>> http://listing.aba.org/ethics/
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 5:47 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Owl photography at night
Any park ranger or Game and Fish person will ticket you for spot lighting if they see you shining any type of light in a tree for any reason.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 1, 2018, at 9:56 AM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:
>
> To me it's wrong to shine bright lights on birds or animals at night. It's unnatural, blinding and just plain wrong. Birds and animals everywhere are under enough assault, disturbance and attack as it is without carrying on yet another intrusion on their lives. If somebody accidentally flushes a bird or animal while wandering around at night, that's a different matter.
>
> Bill Thurman
>
>> On Sat, Sep 1, 2018, 09:00 Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>> Just curious:
>>
>> How many folks are familiar with ethics of birding and the ethics of wildlife photography?
>>
>> What are your thoughts on whether shining a light on wildlife at night to get a better photo or get a look at a bird you need to add to your checklist is ethical birding or ethical photography?
>>
>> https://www.naturettl.com/ethics-wildlife-photography/
>>
>> http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html
>>
>> http://listing.aba.org/ethics/
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 4:39 pm
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Holland Bottoms and Anderson Minnow pond
Ruth and I spent a great morning at Holland Bottoms. Started slow on the open field off the corner of the lake. Wandered around woods and roads. Highlights included Yellow Warblers, Yellow Billed Cuckoo, Summer Tananger. Best bird: Yellow Throated Warbler. 29 species total.

The first pond across the road from Anderson Minnow Farm sign on highway 70 has perfect water. It’s loaded with frustratingly hard to see shore birds. Somebody with a big scope who knows shorebirds should check it out. Highlights included Little Blue Heron, Black Neck Stilts, Blue Winged Teal, two full plumage male Bald Eagles that flew across the same piece of blur and white sky as four classic single-engine aircraft flying in perfect formation.

And me without a camera.

Somebody good ought to go get the rest of those birds.

Chuck Anderson

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 3:43 pm
From: <market...>
Subject: [UPDATE]Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery
Don Palmer and I went to the Nursery again early this long weekend to confirm the Least Flycatcher which we did early with two on the northwest side of the pond catching bugs with Blue Gray Gnatcatchers (great for size comparison). We were also greeted with multiple sightings of a single Osprey that I failed to get even one decent shot. Oh well… We were happy to find an Olive-sided Flycatcher on the southwest side and was able to get a good photo. https://www.ronbird.photo/Todays-photos/i-bP5pq5Q/A Great looking bird and another first for the Nursery.



No sign of the Blue-winged Teal today.



Was happy to run into Joan Patterson, Joe Neal, and friends who helped confirm some other findings like a molting Indigo Bunting and pointing in the right direction on a blurry Eastern Phoebe shot. 😊



As we talked, American Goldfinches were visiting the native thistle in front of us. We are truly blessed here in NWA.



Ron Bird









I hit the nursery early this morning and was pleasantly surprised to find that the State guys are yet again on top of things and have mowed the road around the dyke. They have really kept the path up this year nicely. This long weekend would be a perfect time to get out for a stroll around one of our hidden jewels.

Plenty of things to see with late summer flowers, Passion flowers everywhere. Tons of Queen Anne’s Lace as well as ragweed... Lots of ordinates flying as well as butterflies everywhere of all shapes and sizes. I've seen Buckeyes, a couple Monarchs, Clouded sulphurs, white cabbage and others I can’t name over the past week.



A flock of blue-winged teal flew over Beaver to the west a couple times early I did not see them afterward. Nice to see though! On the southwest corner in a persimmon tree, a least flycatcher made an appearance and allowed me a couple photos. A new bird for me and I believe a first for the nursery. A good day.



https://www.ronbird.photo/Todays-photos/i-jdvRmMz/A



quick list (45 min)

Red -bellied woodpecker

American crow

sparrow

American goldfinch

White-breasted nuthatch

Orchard Oriole

Blue-winged Teal

Great Blue Heron

Green Heron

Belt Kingfisher

Northern Cardinal

Red-tailed Hawk

Blue-grey gnatcatcher

Eastern bluebird(juveniles)

Ruby-throated hummingbird

Least Flycatcher














 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 8:57 am
From: Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...>
Subject: Spoonbills and Black Bellied Whistling Ducks Continue in Alma
This morning, Alex Dopp and I saw two spoonbills and nine whistling ducks
on the ponds across from the water sewage treatment plant on Orrick Road in
Alma. We also saw an assortment of peeps, most least but we saw two Western
and a solitary. There may have been more shorebirds of interest that we
missed.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 7:57 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Owl photography at night
To me it's wrong to shine bright lights on birds or animals at night. It's
unnatural, blinding and just plain wrong. Birds and animals everywhere are
under enough assault, disturbance and attack as it is without carrying on
yet another intrusion on their lives. If somebody accidentally flushes a
bird or animal while wandering around at night, that's a different matter.

Bill Thurman

On Sat, Sep 1, 2018, 09:00 Karen And Jim Rowe <
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Just curious:
>
> How many folks are familiar with ethics of birding and the ethics of
> wildlife photography?
>
> What are your thoughts on whether shining a light on wildlife at night to
> get a better photo or get a look at a bird you need to add to your
> checklist is ethical birding or ethical photography?
>
> https://www.naturettl.com/ethics-wildlife-photography/
>
> http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html
>
> http://listing.aba.org/ethics/
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/1/18 7:04 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Owl photography at night
Just curious:

How many folks are familiar with ethics of birding and the ethics of wildlife photography?

What are your thoughts on whether shining a light on wildlife at night to get a better photo or get a look at a bird you need to add to your checklist is ethical birding or ethical photography?

https://www.naturettl.com/ethics-wildlife-photography/

http://www.naturephotographers.net/ethics.html

http://listing.aba.org/ethics/

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/18 7:50 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: ornithology class sees spoonbills feeding
To the patient and determined go the just reward!! The class must’ve been thrilled!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 31, 2018, at 4:40 PM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> 18 ornithology class students stood in sweltering heat and humidity and observed the two Roseate Spoonbills feeding actively opposite Alma Sewage ponds this afternoon. The whistling ducks are also there. The sewage ponds themselves were almost devoid of birds.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48198151
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/18 4:37 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: eBird as a teaching tool
I am enjoying using eBird heavily in my ornithology lab class.  Students get to share and upload lists, photographs, behavioral notes, etc.  They were pleased to see their last week's checklists show up when I used the Explore Species Maps feature in class today. 
Check out the whistling ducks and spoonbills photographed by one of the students.  Special thanks to Cheryl Childers and Kaylee Kruskopp for inspiring the students with their passion for birding. 
KannanFt. Smith
eBird Checklist – Alma Sewage Treatment Facility, Crawford County, Arkansas, US – Fri Aug 31, 2018 – 12 species (+1 other taxa)


|
|
| |
eBird Checklist – Alma Sewage Treatment Facility, Crawford County, Arkan...


|

|

|




 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/18 3:32 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Re: SWALLOW-TAILED KITE AT FROG
Couldn't relocate the Kite. Saw some very small specks in a thermal that
could have been the birds mentioned.

Kaylee Kruskopp and I joined Dr. Kannan's Ornithology class to see the
Spoonbills. They were present from 1:45 to around 3pm when we moved from
the area. They are back on a pond across from the sewage ponds (Orrick Rd).
Also got great looks at adult and juvenile Black-bellied Whistling Ducks.
The kite would have been an amazing bird for the class! Darn.

On Fri, Aug 31, 2018, 4:27 PM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> For those interested, the Spoonbills are still in the area too. Cheryl
> Childers is looking for the kite.
>
> Sandy
>
> On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 3:41 PM Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
>> Bill and Toka Beall just (3:30 pm) observed a Swallow-tailed Kite along
>> Sharp Chapel Road, Frog Bayou WMA, in the river valley. It was associated
>> with Mississippi Kites (4) in the same area. This is in vicinity of the big
>> open field that was flooded by recent rains. The field is now mostly dried
>> up. They did not see either of the ibis species present up to a few days
>> ago. They are on their way to Orrick Road to check on presence or absence
>> of the spoonbills.
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/18 3:32 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: ornithology class sees spoonbills feeding
18 ornithology class students stood in sweltering heat and humidity and observed the two Roseate Spoonbills feeding actively opposite Alma Sewage ponds this afternoon.  The whistling ducks are also there.  The sewage ponds themselves were almost devoid of birds.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48198151

KannanFt. Smith
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/18 2:56 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: SWALLOW-TAILED KITE AT FROG
For those interested, the Spoonbills are still in the area too. Cheryl
Childers is looking for the kite.

Sandy

On Fri, Aug 31, 2018 at 3:41 PM Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Bill and Toka Beall just (3:30 pm) observed a Swallow-tailed Kite along
> Sharp Chapel Road, Frog Bayou WMA, in the river valley. It was associated
> with Mississippi Kites (4) in the same area. This is in vicinity of the big
> open field that was flooded by recent rains. The field is now mostly dried
> up. They did not see either of the ibis species present up to a few days
> ago. They are on their way to Orrick Road to check on presence or absence
> of the spoonbills.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/18 1:41 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SWALLOW-TAILED KITE AT FROG
Bill and Toka Beall just (3:30 pm) observed a Swallow-tailed Kite along Sharp Chapel Road, Frog Bayou WMA, in the river valley. It was associated with Mississippi Kites (4) in the same area. This is in vicinity of the big open field that was flooded by recent rains. The field is now mostly dried up. They did not see either of the ibis species present up to a few days ago. They are on their way to Orrick Road to check on presence or absence of the spoonbills.


 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/18 12:36 pm
From: <market...>
Subject: FW: Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery
Sorry about that! This is Ron Bird up in Rogers.



Here is a link to the Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery also known as the Beaver
Lake Nursery Pond

https://goo.gl/S4Uphb



Thanks,

Ron



From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Sent: Friday, August 31, 2018 11:59 AM
To: <market...>
Subject: Re: Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish
Nursery



Who submitted the report below?

Bill Shepherd



_____

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
<mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> > on behalf of <market...>
<mailto:<market...> <market...> <mailto:<market...> >
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2018 3:04 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish
Nursery



I hit the nursery early this morning and was pleasantly surprised to find
that the State guys are yet again on top of things and have mowed the road
around the dyke. They have really kept the path up this year nicely. This
long weekend would be a perfect time to get out for a stroll around one of
our hidden jewels.



Plenty of things to see with late summer flowers, Passion flowers
everywhere. Tons of Queen Anne's Lace as well as ragweed... Lots of
ordinates flying as well as butterflies everywhere of all shapes and sizes.
I've seen Buckeyes, a couple Monarchs, Clouded sulphurs, white cabbage and
others I can't name over the past week.



A flock of blue-winged teal flew over Beaver to the west a couple times
early I did not see them afterward. Nice to see though! On the southwest
corner in a persimmon tree, a least flycatcher made an appearance and
allowed me a couple photos. A new bird for me and I believe a first for the
nursery. A good day.



https://www.ronbird.photo/Todays-photos/i-jdvRmMz/A
<https://eur04.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ronbi
rd.photo%2FTodays-photos%2Fi-jdvRmMz%2FA&data=02%7C01%7C%7Ca1a607e95f8446356
ca108d60eb3e47d%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636712563118998
924&sdata=0zTlcXyHXVQFtJzxfYy%2B9YNRcLhQLTP9KDtTAboOI1U%3D&reserved=0>



quick list (45 min)

Red -bellied woodpecker

American crow

sparrow

American goldfinch

White-breasted nuthatch

Orchard Oriole

Blue-winged Teal

Great Blue Heron

Green Heron

Belt Kingfisher

Northern Cardinal

Red-tailed Hawk

Blue-grey gnatcatcher

Eastern bluebird(juveniles)

Ruby-throated hummingbird

Least Flycatcher


 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/18 10:27 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Owls and light
From what I understand, it is illegal in all state and national parks and some city parks as well (Burns Park in North Little Rock, for an example) to spotlight owls for any reason. I don’t know how this actually works when I‘ve seen “owl prowl” outings listed on this site before. Maybe some of our photographer friends could add some insight into this.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 31, 2018, at 12:01 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> How do people typically photograph owls at night? Do people ever use any kinds of spotlights? Or would that be considered harassment?
>
> I'm wondering because I know where a pair of barn owls are that we went and saw earlier in the year. First time seeing them, that was all that mattered. Got a few pictures but, they didn't come out of their hole til after it was pretty dark so, my pictures are all a bit lousy.
> The person I know that lives next door to the pair had a picture that looked like they had a light on them. So, without thinking much, I commented that I ought to bring some sort of light to try and get better pictures when I get a chance to go see them. They said that they weren't sure if that was "legal" or not to do that. I hadn't really thought much about it.
> I'd LOVE to get a halfway decent photo but if it's something that will really bother them, and bother other birders to know, I wont do it.
>
> I don't think my camera is good at taking photos at night. It has an auto setting for fireworks that works REALLY well... But, other than that it's a pain. There's no manual focus that I can find which is frustrating to say the least. So trying to focus on something in the dark that it struggles to auto-focus on is just frustrating.
> Some day... no time soon but some day, hopefully, I'll get a better camera. Til then... are there any "for dummies" books on photography? My camera has SOME manual settings(no focus) that I just don't know enough about. I'm not a photographer... learning can be difficult for me if something doesn't GRAB my attention(which, sadly, is most things). I wouldn't mind learning how to use even this point and shoot better... if I don't break it in frustration first. It has a mind of its own and when moving settings or browsing photos, left, right, up, down... it takes off and goes in various directions you didn't tell it to... sometimes resets completely and I have to change all the settings all over again. Sometimes acts like I just changed the settings on the top wheel when I didn't... interrupting what I was trying to get a photo of.
> Wow, sorry... Went from wondering about owls at night and ended up rambling about my camera. My mind has a mind of its own too sometimes. :p
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>
> PS... if anyone gets down to Alma, keep my updated on the spoonbills. I have a friend that was thinking of heading down there late today.
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 8/31/18 10:03 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Owls and light
How do people typically photograph owls at night? Do people ever use any
kinds of spotlights? Or would that be considered harassment?

I'm wondering because I know where a pair of barn owls are that we went
and saw earlier in the year. First time seeing them, that was all that
mattered. Got a few pictures but, they didn't come out of their hole til
after it was pretty dark so, my pictures are all a bit lousy.
The person I know that lives next door to the pair had a picture that
looked like they had a light on them. So, without thinking much, I
commented that I ought to bring some sort of light to try and get better
pictures when I get a chance to go see them. They said that they weren't
sure if that was "legal" or not to do that.  I hadn't really thought
much about it.
I'd LOVE to get a halfway decent photo but if it's something that will
really bother them, and bother other birders to know, I wont do it.

I don't think my camera is good at taking photos at night. It has an
auto setting for fireworks that works REALLY well...  But, other than
that it's a pain. There's no manual focus that I can find which is
frustrating to say the least. So trying to focus on something in the
dark that it struggles to auto-focus on is just frustrating.
Some day... no time soon but some day, hopefully, I'll get a better
camera. Til then... are there any "for dummies" books on photography? My
camera has SOME manual settings(no focus) that I just don't know enough
about. I'm not a photographer... learning can be difficult for me if
something doesn't GRAB my attention(which, sadly, is most things).  I
wouldn't mind learning how to use even this point and shoot better... if
I don't break it in frustration first. It has a mind of its own and when
moving settings or browsing photos, left, right, up, down...  it takes
off and goes in various directions you didn't tell it to... sometimes
resets completely and I have to change all the settings all over again.
Sometimes acts like I just changed the settings on the top wheel when I
didn't... interrupting what I was trying to get a photo of.
Wow, sorry... Went from wondering about owls at night and ended up
rambling about my camera.  My mind has a mind of its own too sometimes.  :p

Daniel Mason


PS... if anyone gets down to Alma, keep my updated on the spoonbills. I
have a friend that was thinking of heading down there late today.


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 6:40 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 30
It was partly cloudy and very hot on the bird survey today. 64 species were
found. Very few birds still singing. Was a pretty slow day. Here is my
list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 1

Wood Duck - 74

Gadwall - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 42

Green-winged Teal - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 6

Neotropic Cormorant - 3

Anhinga - 21

Great-blue Heron - 4

Great Egret - 15

Snowy Egret - 82

Little-blue Heron - 14

Cattle Egret - 155

Green Heron - 6

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1

White Ibis - 23

Black Vulture - 5

Turkey Vulture - 11

Mississippi Kite - 5

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 19 (mostly juveniles; adults seem to be leaving early
this year.)

Common Gallinule - 37

American Coot - 5

Killdeer - 2

Spotted Sandpiper - 3

Solitary Sandpiper - 2

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 1

Least Sandpiper - 7

Mourning Dove - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 4

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Alder Flycatcher - 3 (feeding on Roughleaf Dogwood berries)

Least Flycatcher - 2 (feeding on Roughleaf Dogwood berries)

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 7

White-eyed Vireo - 14

Bell's Vireo - 1 (still singing)

Warbling Vireo - 1 (feeding on Roughleaf Dogwood berries)

Red-eyed Vireo - 2 (feeding on Roughleaf Dogwood berries)

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 6

Purple Martin - 2

Tree Swallow - 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 4

Cliff Swallow - 9

Barn Swallow - 3

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 10

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Gray Catbird - 2

Pine Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 2 (still singing)

Northern Cardinal - 4

Indigo Bunting - 5

Dickcissel - 2

Red-winged Blackbird - 21





Odonates:



Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Four-spotted Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Hyacinth Glider

Wandering Glider

Spot-winged Glider

Striped Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags





Herps:



American Alligator

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 4:21 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR 30 Aug 2018
Highlights of our day at BKNWR were 1 Upland Sandpiper, 1 Wilson's Phalarope, and 2 Willets in pond 3.  In pond 1 several Semipalmated Plovers and 2 Wilson's Snipes.  Elsewhere we saw a tree loaded with Cattle Egret and one juvenile White Ibis sitting on top, like the angel on a Christmas tree.  We also got to watch as an American Kestrel kept chasing the Least Sandpipers in pond 1.  As we were coming into the Refuge we got to see 2 Wood Ducks.  Overall, a very nice day.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 2:01 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: No phalarope or plover at Boyd today
I could not find either a phalarope or plover at Boyd Point today. Only
birds of note were about five black terns.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 1:05 pm
From: <market...>
Subject: Least Flycatcher and Blue-winged Teal at Blackburn Creek Fish Nursery
I hit the nursery early this morning and was pleasantly surprised to find
that the State guys are yet again on top of things and have mowed the road
around the dyke. They have really kept the path up this year nicely. This
long weekend would be a perfect time to get out for a stroll around one of
our hidden jewels.



Plenty of things to see with late summer flowers, Passion flowers
everywhere. Tons of Queen Anne's Lace as well as ragweed... Lots of
ordinates flying as well as butterflies everywhere of all shapes and sizes.
I've seen Buckeyes, a couple Monarchs, Clouded sulphurs, white cabbage and
others I can't name over the past week.



A flock of blue-winged teal flew over Beaver to the west a couple times
early I did not see them afterward. Nice to see though! On the southwest
corner in a persimmon tree, a least flycatcher made an appearance and
allowed me a couple photos. A new bird for me and I believe a first for the
nursery. A good day.



https://www.ronbird.photo/Todays-photos/i-jdvRmMz/A



quick list (45 min)

Red -bellied woodpecker

American crow

sparrow

American goldfinch

White-breasted nuthatch

Orchard Oriole

Blue-winged Teal

Great Blue Heron

Green Heron

Belt Kingfisher

Northern Cardinal

Red-tailed Hawk

Blue-grey gnatcatcher

Eastern bluebird(juveniles)

Ruby-throated hummingbird

Least Flycatcher


 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 12:27 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
There are some farm ponds going west on Red Hill Rd from Orrick Rd. Not far
at all from the ones they have been hanging out on.

On Thu, Aug 30, 2018, 2:23 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:

> Even though I've been down that way a time or two, I don't know the area
> well. Where is the Kings Ranch pond, from Orrick? I have a friend that
> might try to get down there tomorrow if they're still around and I'd like
> to be able to explain where to look. :)
>
> Hopefully the increased movement from pond to pond isn't a sign that
> they're leaving really soon. Then again, they need to move on when they're
> ready to I suppose.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> On 8/30/2018 2:00 PM, Cheryl Childers wrote:
>
> Still present, but have moved to the Kings Ranch pond on Red Hill Rd as of
> 1:15pm today.
>
> On Wed, Aug 29, 2018, 12:48 PM Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
> wrote:
>
>> Still at the Orrick Rd Pond today at 12:30
>>
>
>
>
> <https://www.avast.com/sig-email?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=emailclient&utm_term=icon> Virus-free.
> www.avast.com
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>

 

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Date: 8/30/18 12:23 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
Even though I've been down that way a time or two, I don't know the area
well. Where is the Kings Ranch pond, from Orrick? I have a friend that
might try to get down there tomorrow if they're still around and I'd
like to be able to explain where to look. :)

Hopefully the increased movement from pond to pond isn't a sign that
they're leaving really soon. Then again, they need to move on when
they're ready to I suppose.

Daniel Mason

On 8/30/2018 2:00 PM, Cheryl Childers wrote:
> Still present, but have moved to the Kings Ranch pond on Red Hill Rd
> as of 1:15pm today.
>
> On Wed, Aug 29, 2018, 12:48 PM Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
> <mailto:<cherylness...>> wrote:
>
> Still at the Orrick Rd Pond today at 12:30
>



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Date: 8/30/18 12:09 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Costa Rica nature tour--some seats left
There are some seats left in this tour.  Please help me fill it up to maximize the donation to the AAST.  I just heard that Esteban Biamonte will be guiding us.  Those of you who came with Kim and me last May will recall what a wonderful guide he is.  So please come or spread the word around!
On Thursday, 16 August, 2018, 1:07:04 PM GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:

Hi all, 
I will lead a nature tour to northwestern COSTA RICA May 26-June 3, 2019, to raise funds for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust (AAST), in which I serve.  The tour is expected to raise $1,000 or more for the trust.  This relaxing family-friendly tour's cost is $1780 double occupancy for 20 participants.  The tour will be organized by Costa Rica Sun Tours, which has successfully done this for the AAST in the past. 
Highlights of the tour include:
- A visit to the famous bubbling pits of a volcano

- Hiking or horseback riding to two waterfalls--Las Chorreras and Victoria

- Birding in Santa Rosa National Park and Monteverde Cloud Forest

- Guided coffee tour
- Nature walks in the species-rich Solimar Ranch and northwest dry forests

- Boating and birding in the Bebedero River 

- Two nights in a tropical beach resort

- Ocean kayaking and snorkeling in Chora island

See details below.  If interested, please contact me giving your background in birding and nature tours, plus any health and dietary issues.  

R. KannanProfessor of BiologyUniversity of Arkansas--Fort Smith-----------------------------------------------------DETAILED ITINERARY
|
  May 26

 

 

 

  May 26 - 29
|
Arrival, meet and greet, and transfer from the International Daniel Oduber Airport in Liberia (not San Jose!) to your hotel in Rincon de la Vieja, approximately 1 hour transfer. 2 transfers will be provided, depending on arrival flight times. Transfers needed at different times will have to be paid additional. Tonight receive an Orientation Briefing from your guide who will go through your next days and answer any questions. Dinner tonight included at the hotel. (D)

3 nights accommodation at Hacienda Guachipelin. (Superior Rooms) 
|
|
May 27
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide.  After breakfast enjoy a private guided tour at Rincon de la Vieja National Park, entrance fee included. Visit “Las Pailas”, the famous bubbling mud pits created by the nearby volcano. Have lunch included at the hotel and in the afternoon enjoy a horseback Riding/hiking adventure to Las Chorreras and Victoria Waterfalls, where you can observe the amazing sites and take a swim at the refreshing waters. Includes private guide and entrance fee. Dinner tonight included at the hotel. (B,L,D)   
|
|
May 28
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide.  After breakfast, enjoy a guided tour of the Santa Rosa National Park, including entrance fee. Santa Rosa National Park was created in 1971 to commemorate and preserve a historical landmark where Costa Rican independence was won at the Battle of Santa Rosa. It is home to much local wildlife and amazing views of the dry forest and local beach. Lunch included at a local restaurant, and return to your hotel for an afternoon of birdwatching with your private guide along the grounds of the hotel. Dinner tonight included at a local restaurant in the town of Curubandé. (B,L,D)
|
|
May 29

 

 

 




May 29 - 01
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide.  After breakfast private transfer from Rincon de la Vieja to your hotel in Monteverde. Stop en route at the Solimar Ranch for a guided tour along the ranch and wetlands. Solimar Ranch is located just south of the mouth of the Tempisque River, it is a Mecca for naturalists interested in seeing a tremendous variety of water birds and Costa Rica’s dry northwest forest. Includes private and local guide, entrance fee and lunch. Afterwards continue your way towards your hotel in Monteverde. Dinner tonight on your own at local restaurant in town. (B,L)

3 nights accommodation at Trapp Family Lodge Monteverde. (Superior Room)
|
|
May 30
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide. After breakfast enjoy a private guided birding/nature hike at the Monteverde Cloud Forest Reserve, one of the premier natural history destinations in Costa Rica. Includes entrance fee. In the afternoon enjoy an educational and cultural experience with the Finca Life Coffee Tour in Monteverde, including local guide and entrance fee. In the evening enjoy a guided night walk at Curi Cancha Reserve, including entrance fee and local guide. Curi Cancha Reserve is located in the heart of Monteverde, and protects 86 hectares (205 acres) of primary and secondary forest. Dinner on your own at the hotel or a local restaurant in town. (B) 
|
|
May 31
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide. After breakfast enjoy a guided birding/nature walk at the Selvatura Suspension Bridges, including private guide and entrance fee. The Selvatura Walkways is an easy hike on a 1.7 mile cloud forest trail and suspension bridges through and above the tree tops. In the afternoon participate in an educational Bellbird Conservation Talk at the Monteverde Institute. Dinner on your own at the hotel or a local restaurant in town. (B)
|
|
Jun 01

 

 

 

 

Jun 01 - 03
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide. After breakfast private transfer with your guide and driver from Monteverde to your hotel in Carrillo Beach, Guanacaste. En route stop for a private guided boat tour along the Bebedero River in the Tempisque River basin bordering Palo Verde National Park, a great opportunity for birding and wildlife observation. Includes private guide, entrance fee and lunch. Afterwards continue to your hotel at the beach in Guanacaste. Dinner on your own at a local restaurant in town. (B,L)

2 nights accommodation at Nammbú Beach Resort. (Deluxe Rooms)
|
|
Jun 02
|
Pre-breakfast birding walk with private guide. Today enjoy a guided Ocean Kayak and Snorkeling tour to Chora Island. Rest of the day to enjoy birding in and around your hotel grounds and the local beach. Lunch on your own at a local restaurant and tonight enjoy a group Farewell Dinner at your hotel. (B,D) 
|
|
Jun 03
|
Private Departure Transfer from your hotel in Samara to the International Airport in Liberia, approximately 2 hour transfer. Check in 3 hours prior to your scheduled flight time. (B)
|


  

|
Arkansas Audubon Society Trust Group 2019
|
|
Rates per person, based on occupancy
|
|
 
|
SGL
|
DBL
|
TPL
|
QUAD
|
|
12-13 PAX
|
 $                  2,565
|
 $                  2,055
|
 $               1,975
|
 $          1,935
|
|
14-15 PAX
|
 $                  2,485
|
 $                  1,970
|
 $               1,895
|
 $          1,850
|
|
16-17 PAX
|
 $                  2,425
|
 $                  1,910
|
 $               1,835
|
 $          1,790
|
|
18-19 PAX
|
 $                  2,380
|
 $                  1,865
|
 $               1,790
|
 $          1,745
|
|
20 PAX
|
 $                  2,290
|
 $                  1,780
|
 $               1,705
|
 $          1,660
|
| | | | | |
|
Rates are per person in US Dollars
| | | |
|


| |
|
Private Coaster Van included throughout
| | |
|
Naturalist Private Guide included throughout
| | |
|
Optional pre-breakfastbirding walks with private guide 

| | |
|
3% Credit Card Fee included
| | | |
|


| | | | |


PAYMENTS AND FEES:  A deposit of $350.00 per person (of which $250.00 is non-refundable) isrequired for confirmation before September 30, 2018.

Final payment is due in our office 60 days prior todeparture. If not received the reservation may be canceled and the depositforfeited.

CANCELLATIONS:  Allrefund requests must be received in writing by Costa Rica Sun Tours and thefollowing fees apply in addition to any supplier charges for cancellation:


Upon receipt of deposit………………. $250.00 per person


60-46 days prior to departure……….. $350.00 per person


45-31 days prior to departure ………. 50% of trip price


30-0 days prior to departure …………. no refunds


Any changes or cancellations made after departure will beat the client’s expense.


Included: Transportation andguide services as indicated; accommodations as listed based on standard roomsand double occupancy (unless indicated otherwise) including all applicabletaxes; meals as indicated where B=breakfast, L=lunch, D=dinner.


Not Included: Airfare to CostaRica; travel insurance; gratuities; any lodging, tours or meals not specifiedin the itinerary; extras in hotels (laundry, phone calls, room service, etc.);personal equipment; costs associated with changes to your itinerary for reasonsbeyond our control.


Please note:


-   All persons enteringCosta Rica must have a passport valid for 6 months past the date of entry.

-   Any changes orcancellations made to these services while in Costa Rica are at the traveler'sexpense.


-   No refunds willbe given for unused services as per our terms and conditions.

-   Costa Rica SunTours terms and conditions apply.

-   Travelers areencouraged to take out travel insurance.

                                                                                             COSTA RICA SUN TOURS

PO Box 281-1017 San Jose 2000, San Jose, Costa Rica

US mail forwarding address: SJO 1660PO Box 025331, Miami, FL 33102-5331



 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 12:00 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
Still present, but have moved to the Kings Ranch pond on Red Hill Rd as of
1:15pm today.

On Wed, Aug 29, 2018, 12:48 PM Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> wrote:

> Still at the Orrick Rd Pond today at 12:30
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 8:24 am
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: American Golden-Plover and Black-bellied Plover at Boyd
I thought Michael must have been mistaken with his Id of a Black-bellied
Plover at Boyd Point yesterday, but I looked more closely at a photo I took
yesterday and found that indeed it was a Black-bellied Plover. Two days
earlier I saw an American Golden-Plover at the same spot and assumed the
one yesterday was the same. I have photos of each and they definitely are
different plovers, American Golden-Plover and Black-bellied Plover.
Thanks to Michael for his posting.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 7:37 am
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills near Lake Chicot
I did see 3 Roseate Spoonbills in the big roost just south of the pumping station last Friday.  I sent Bill a photo--couldn't get much color, but you can see the bill shape.  I did not see any Wood Storks.  Roselie OverbyOak Grove, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 7:35 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: the season's last kite?
We saw a lone juvenile MIKI on a tree in Michael Linz's yard in Conway this morning (Aug 30), calling and looking around for other family members. An adult was present yesterday and may have been nearby but not visible or audible this morning. 
Patty McLeanAtlanta GA
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Date: 8/30/18 9:14 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: the season's last kite?
During Kim Smith's memorial last Saturday, a MIKI was soaring overhead and
to the west of the Mt. Sequoyah Cross.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2018 11:07 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: the season's last kite?



At 1:35 yesterday afternoon I got a good look at a Mississippi Kite soaring
near 15th and Main in Little Rock.



Bill Shephere

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 7:27 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Bucket list sculptures?




https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/great-auk-sculpture?utm_source=Atlas+Obscura+Daily+Newsletter <https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/great-auk-sculpture?utm_source=Atlas+Obscura+Daily+Newsletter&utm_campaign=dead8dad47-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_08_29&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f36db9c480-dead8dad47-67327425&ct=t(EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_8_29_2018)&mc_cid=dead8dad47&mc_eid=c066da7965> &utm_campaign=dead8dad47-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_08_29&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f36db9c480-dead8dad47-67327425&ct=t(EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_8_29_2018)&mc_cid=dead8dad47&mc_eid=c066da7965


 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 7:15 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: the season's last kite?
During Kim Smith's memorial last Saturday, a MIKI was soaring overhead and
to the west of the Mt. Sequoyah Cross.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Bill Shepherd
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2018 11:07 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: the season's last kite?



At 1:35 yesterday afternoon I got a good look at a Mississippi Kite soaring
near 15th and Main in Little Rock.



Bill Shephere


 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 6:30 am
From: Jeremy Chamberlain <jdchamberlai...>
Subject: Wood storks
There were 2 wood storks on the Bland fish farm in Taylor, Arkansas last
night while I was out sampling. There were 2 or 3 night herons but I
couldn't tell which species. Also, last week I came across a pond on my way
out to Texarkana that had 30 or 40 black-bellied whistling ducks. Most of
them were females with their young.

On a different note, I have been finding that the SAU campus regularly has
groups of white-winged doves.

Jeremy Chamberlain, PhD
Assistant Professor of Biology
Southern Arkansas University
<jchamberlain...>
952-451-7265
www.jchamberlain.net

 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/18 6:11 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: location location location...
When I bought my land in Conway, I originally bought 6-1/2 acres. Then I bought 5-1/2 more, then 5 more, for a total now of 17 acres. I've lived here nearly 41 years. I don't use poison, I don't kill weeds, I have a good chunk of woods. I planted trees in a pasture that only had Eastern Red Cedar. I planted oaks, gums, poplar, maple and dogwood. White ash and wild cherry began to come up voluntarily. The woods are full of hickory, oak and buckeye. I now seem to keep my tree company quite busy but they are great to put up a Wood Duck box when they are here with their bucket truck and they put the top on my Chimney Swift tower (still waiting for Chimney Swifts). I have several large brush piles. I built bird houses and I feed the birds. Many of you know that about 6 years ago, I had a water feature built in my yard. I've observed 73 different species of birds come to the feature and I've photographed all but 5 of them. It's been amazing, the warblers; I never dreamed I'd see so many different ones; 15 so far, I think. Seeing and getting a photo of a Greater Roadrunner come to the feature was one of my biggest joys. Check it out if you like: http://www.pbase.com/gnmimiller/water_feature_in_my_yard

Would I love to have 20000 acres like Daniel described, you betcha! But, you CAN start small and make a huge impact and then just sit back and let the amazement begin!!

Gail Miller
Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Mason
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2018 10:14 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: location location location...

<SNIP>

Now... what can I do to my yard to get such an exciting bird to think it looks like a nice place to stop and rest? I can't help but dream... if only... if only I had the money, I'd build the "perfect" birding spot...
but up 20 to 20000 acres...(ha) a place with a creak, ponds, forest, hills, etc etc etc... Then, put out a big welcome mat.


<SNIP>

Daniel Mason


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Date: 8/29/18 10:13 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Red-neck Phalarope at Boyd Point WTP
Patty and I relocated the Red-neck Phalarope at Boyd Point WTP in Pine
Bluff on Tuesday 08/29/18. We did not find any of the other Phalaropes.
There was also a Black-bellied Plover on one of the levees and a good
number of Western Sandpipers.

Checklist with pictures below:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48155932

Michael Linz and Patty McLean (Conway, AR)

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 9:04 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: the season's last kite?
Bob and I saw one soaring over the Mt. Sequoyah cross this morning at around 10.


Subject: Re: the season's last kite?
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Date: Wednesday, August 29, 2018, 2:58 PM

I saw one at
about 8:45 this morning soaring over the East Oaks
neighborhood in eastern Bob and I sa.

from my iPad
On Aug 29,
2018, at 11:07 AM, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
wrote:




At 1:35
yesterday afternoon I got a good look at a Mississippi Kite
soaring near 15th and Main in Little Rock.



Bill
Shephere






 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 8:15 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: location location location...
I've written and spoken about this with people before... wondering what
certain species like. When I look at two habitats that look the same,
the birds love one over the other. Grasshopper sparrows, I've written
about before, are one. I've never done a ton of searching for them or
studied them but, I've only found them in one place in NW Arkansas and,
that habitat is gone. Of all the possible fields and prairies I've
explored, to find them consistently at one specific location... and,
just where that location is... or was...
It is now a subdivision... but before that, it was just the paved roads
that would become the subdivision... people will have small yards in
there and that space, what I saw as small... the space between the roads
was perfect... meadowlarks and scissor-tails all over... and, I think,
two summers in a row... grasshopper sparrows. same spot each summer,
checked multiple times during the summer. I believe it's possible they
were nesting in what I would have figured a poor location.
But there must have been something there... some specific food...

I started thinking about this again with the spoonbills. Such
magnificent birds and, with some awesome habitat in that whole area,
with frog bayou practically next door... why these small farm ponds?
What makes birds choose one bird over another? One pond over another.
I know... I understand that food is a big part of it and, I'm sure the
birds know what they're doing.  But my silly human brain still looks at
this location and...  well I scratch my head.  HA.  I'm not sure what
they liked about it but, I'll just be happy that they were there, seen,
and reported so others could go see them.
Someone tell them about the hatchery in Centerton please. :)

Now... what can I do to my yard to get such an exciting bird to think it
looks like a nice place to stop and rest?  I can't help but dream... if
only... if only I had the money, I'd build the "perfect" birding spot...
but up 20 to 20000 acres...(ha) a place with a creak, ponds, forest,
hills, etc etc etc... Then, put out a big welcome mat.

There's a lot more I'd like to learn about all these birds to understand
them better and predict them better. But, I still have a lot of learning
to do with IDs.

You know, it's kind of funny... I had a goal to purposely look for new
species this year... It was supposed to be target species like the
prairie warbler that are known to be around... blue-winged as well. I
did manage to get a good handful of life birds but they were all
unexpected ones. I didn't bird a good chunk of the summer, sadly, but
it's still been a good year. While some birds have been stumbled
upon(vermilion flycatcher) other life birds this year were a result of
reported sightings from others. Both here and on Ebird...
So, a big thank you to those that make that effort to report what they see.

Daniel Mason


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Date: 8/29/18 7:56 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
Just got back...  Excited and yet, mildly frustrated. First pond we came
up on had a black-bellied whistling duck... not a lifer but always great
to see. Actually, we saw the spoonbills before we even got near the
ponds. Kind of hard to miss out there. They were at one of the first
ponds, out in the open... great looks. While looking at the whistling
duck and the spoonbills I watched a lark sparrow on the fence.  My
frustration came in my daughter telling me to STOP...  This is close
enough, we don't want to scare them... So, I stopped. But, I was looking
at an angle, through the windshield and, not getting pictures yet. It
wasn't too too long before they took off. a mild grrrrr...  We waited,
then we followed... They continued to move down the road a bit every
time we got a little closer. We were being really cautious, driving
slow, etc... I'm not quite sure why they were moving... were we really
bothering them? We never approached that close and never made a lot of
noise... so I don't know. They finally settled on a pond down near the
end of the road but far enough from the road... and behind a little hill
so you had to go back a ways to get the angle.
All that to say if you go look, take your time and check all the ponds.
I'm REALLY bummed I didn't get decent pictures... :( Sometimes, for some
reason, it's difficult to just be content that we saw them. I love
having pictures of birds I see and, I'm picky... a perfectionist. So,
it's often a frustration.
On the one hand... a BIG   Big   YES!!!  life bird and a very cool one
at that. On the other hand, I probably can't talk my wife into letting
me get down there over the weekend(if they're still there) to try for
better pictures. Just didn't have much time before dark tonight. I think
we were on Orrick rd from 6:20 to 7:20 PM... spoonbills were present on
one pond or another the whole time.
saw at least 14 great egrets, 13 of them flying in a flock. Just around
the corner at the end of the road were 2 snowy egrets.
On one of those first ponds there were several shorebirds but I'm not
good at IDing them in the field. Some spotted sandpipers, killdeer(of
course) some peeps that my daughter thinks looked like western but,
she's not better at peeps than I am, some pectoral sandpipers, and what
I think was a lesser yellowlegs.

Not a bad evening. Not the prettiest smells along that road... ha...
Good luck and keep updating anyone that sees them.

Daniel Mason

On 8/29/2018 4:22 PM, Karen Garrett wrote:
> If you see those Spoonbills, ask them to stick around a little longer,
> until I can make it down there. Wouldn't be a life bird, as I saw them
> on the Texas coast many years ago, although at great distance.  A new
> state bird and a closer look would be awesome.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers
>
> On Aug 29, 2018 3:41 PM, "Cheryl Childers" <cherylness...>
> <mailto:<cherylness...>> wrote:
>
> Daniel, we looked for the Ibis but didn't find it. Good luck and
> hope you see them!
>
> On Wed, Aug 29, 2018, 2:55 PM Daniel Mason
> <millipede1977...> <mailto:<millipede1977...>> wrote:
>
> Thanks you everyone for updating the last few days on these
> birds. My
> wife had to work later today, not really working the whole
> time but
> driving someone to a doctor's appointment that, of course,
> took longer
> than expected. I expect her back within the hour(I hope) and
> then, as
> long as she doesn't have any other plans I don't know about,
> I'm headed
> south... about 90 minutes(ish) I believe. So I'll just hang on
> to hope
> that they'll continue to stick around today and that the
> weather doesn't
> convince them otherwise.
> I better get my directions in order, and make sure my memory
> card is IN
> the camera.
> Last day I saw that vermilion flycatcher we got within 20 feet
> of it I
> believe... was really exciting til I realized the memory card
> was in my
> computer at home. Always awesome just to see those exciting
> birds but,
> photos are quite a bonus for the rarer ones.
> I wonder if there's still a white ibis hanging around frog...
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> On 8/29/2018 12:48 PM, Cheryl Childers wrote:
> > Still at the Orrick Rd Pond today at 12:30
>
>
>
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>
>



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Date: 8/29/18 5:59 pm
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...>
Subject: Arkansas Audubon Society fall convention, October 5-7 | Texarkana, Arkansas
Greetings, Arkansas Birders,

I am pleased to announce that the Arkansas Audubon Society's fall
convention will be held October 5-7 in Texarkana, Arkansas at the Holiday
Inn Texarkana Arkansas Convention Center! The convention registration form,
agenda, and field trip descriptions are available on the Arkansas Audubon
Society's website: http://arbirds.org/Fall18meeting.pdf

The weekend will boast outstanding, diverse birding field trips in
southwestern Arkansas and nearby Texas and Oklahoma with target birds being
migrating shorebirds, lingering waders including possible Wood Storks and
Roseate Spoonbills, rails, early returning waterfowl, raptors, and perhaps
even Cave Swallows! Evening presentations will focus on the Louisiana
Winter Hummingbird Project and the excellent birding to be enjoyed in
southwestern Arkansas. This convention offers a perfect opportunity to
experience one of Arkansas's most intriguing birding areas that
consistently produces rarities--don't miss it! If you have any questions
about the convention, please don't hesitate to reach out to me.

Cheers and good birding,

Samantha Scheiman
vice president, Arkansas Audubon Society
Little Rock, Ark.

--
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 4:48 pm
From: Mystina Swaim <mystina.swaim...>
Subject: Nikon Lens recommendations
I'm looking for recommendations for a good birding lens for my Nikon D3100 camera. Please share your advice, thoughts, and recommendations. I also might be interested in a used lens in good condition if you have one for sale. The more "compact" and lightweight the better. I will be traveling overseas with this camera/lens and going on birding hikes in a rainforest.
Thanks,
Mystina

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 3:32 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Unsubscribe
Instructions for unsubscribing yourself from the listserv are posted on
Arkansas Audubon Society's website at the bottom of the right-hand box.
http://www.arbirds.org/arbirds_discussion.html

Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR


On 8/29/18, 4:59 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Marty Jakle" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <mdjakle...>
wrote:

Im not sure of the mechanism, but Id like to unsubscribe to this listserv.
If I need to do it differently, please let me know how.

Thanks


Marty Jakle
<mdjakle...>

The good thing about science is it doesnt have to be believed to be true.




 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 3:00 pm
From: Marty Jakle <mdjakle...>
Subject: Unsubscribe
I’m not sure of the mechanism, but I’d like to unsubscribe to this listserv. If I need to do it differently, please let me know how.

Thanks


Marty Jakle
<mdjakle...>

The good thing about science is it doesn’t have to be believed to be true.


 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 2:23 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
If you see those Spoonbills, ask them to stick around a little longer,
until I can make it down there. Wouldn't be a life bird, as I saw them on
the Texas coast many years ago, although at great distance. A new state
bird and a closer look would be awesome.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

On Aug 29, 2018 3:41 PM, "Cheryl Childers" <cherylness...> wrote:

Daniel, we looked for the Ibis but didn't find it. Good luck and hope you
see them!

On Wed, Aug 29, 2018, 2:55 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:

> Thanks you everyone for updating the last few days on these birds. My
> wife had to work later today, not really working the whole time but
> driving someone to a doctor's appointment that, of course, took longer
> than expected. I expect her back within the hour(I hope) and then, as
> long as she doesn't have any other plans I don't know about, I'm headed
> south... about 90 minutes(ish) I believe. So I'll just hang on to hope
> that they'll continue to stick around today and that the weather doesn't
> convince them otherwise.
> I better get my directions in order, and make sure my memory card is IN
> the camera.
> Last day I saw that vermilion flycatcher we got within 20 feet of it I
> believe... was really exciting til I realized the memory card was in my
> computer at home. Always awesome just to see those exciting birds but,
> photos are quite a bonus for the rarer ones.
> I wonder if there's still a white ibis hanging around frog...
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> On 8/29/2018 12:48 PM, Cheryl Childers wrote:
> > Still at the Orrick Rd Pond today at 12:30
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 1:41 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
Daniel, we looked for the Ibis but didn't find it. Good luck and hope you
see them!

On Wed, Aug 29, 2018, 2:55 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:

> Thanks you everyone for updating the last few days on these birds. My
> wife had to work later today, not really working the whole time but
> driving someone to a doctor's appointment that, of course, took longer
> than expected. I expect her back within the hour(I hope) and then, as
> long as she doesn't have any other plans I don't know about, I'm headed
> south... about 90 minutes(ish) I believe. So I'll just hang on to hope
> that they'll continue to stick around today and that the weather doesn't
> convince them otherwise.
> I better get my directions in order, and make sure my memory card is IN
> the camera.
> Last day I saw that vermilion flycatcher we got within 20 feet of it I
> believe... was really exciting til I realized the memory card was in my
> computer at home. Always awesome just to see those exciting birds but,
> photos are quite a bonus for the rarer ones.
> I wonder if there's still a white ibis hanging around frog...
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> On 8/29/2018 12:48 PM, Cheryl Childers wrote:
> > Still at the Orrick Rd Pond today at 12:30
>
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 12:58 pm
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: the season's last kite?
I saw one at about 8:45 this morning soaring over the East Oaks neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville.

Sent from my iPad

> On Aug 29, 2018, at 11:07 AM, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> wrote:
>
> At 1:35 yesterday afternoon I got a good look at a Mississippi Kite soaring near 15th and Main in Little Rock.
>
> Bill Shephere

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 12:55 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Spoonbills
Thanks you everyone for updating the last few days on these birds. My
wife had to work later today, not really working the whole time but
driving someone to a doctor's appointment that, of course, took longer
than expected. I expect her back within the hour(I hope) and then, as
long as she doesn't have any other plans I don't know about, I'm headed
south... about 90 minutes(ish) I believe. So I'll just hang on to hope
that they'll continue to stick around today and that the weather doesn't
convince them otherwise.
I better get my directions in order, and make sure my memory card is IN
the camera.
Last day I saw that vermilion flycatcher we got within 20 feet of it I
believe... was really exciting til I realized the memory card was in my
computer at home. Always awesome just to see those exciting birds but,
photos are quite a bonus for the rarer ones.
I wonder if there's still a white ibis hanging around frog...

Daniel Mason

On 8/29/2018 12:48 PM, Cheryl Childers wrote:
> Still at the Orrick Rd Pond today at 12:30



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 11:59 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SWAMP MILKWEED, EXCELLENT MUD, INTERESTING SHOREBIRDS AT CENTERTON
One of the larger fish rearing ponds was partially drained this morning at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. The Mud Of Our Dreams: soft and gooey, covered with hatched out aquatic flies and doubtless good aquatic insect larvae in the goo. And shorebirds: Killdeer (27), Lesser Yellowlegs (2), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Semipalmated Sandpiper (2), Least Sandpiper (6), Bairds Sandpiper (4), Pectoral Sandpiper (1, with an injured leg), Stilt Sandpiper (1). Also, Blue-winged Teal (12). An adult Bald Eagle was perched in the same snag it has used for months.

And the Swamp Milkweed is spectacular! Several years ago, we worked with hatchery folks to protect a substantial population of Swamp Milkweed, a plant of very limited distribution in Arkansas that is important to numerous pollinating insects, including Monarchs. Protection required the hatchery to partially reduce mowing, resulting in some areas looking neglected. They struck a compromise on this. The hatchery really looks professionally maintained except for these areas with Swamp Milkweed and other native plants limited to seasonal wetland habitat. It all looked just splendid today. My hat is off to their willingness to undertake good habitat management and at risk of criticism from those who dont understand why it is important.


 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 10:49 am
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Spoonbills
Still at the Orrick Rd Pond today at 12:30

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 9:12 am
From: James Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Re: the season's last kite?
I heard one this morning out Highway 10 near Chenal.

On Wed, Aug 29, 2018 at 11:07 AM Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
wrote:

> At 1:35 yesterday afternoon I got a good look at a Mississippi Kite
> soaring near 15th and Main in Little Rock.
>
>
> Bill Shephere
>


--

Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You
certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite
the something you were after." — Thorin

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 9:07 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: the season's last kite?
At 1:35 yesterday afternoon I got a good look at a Mississippi Kite soaring near 15th and Main in Little Rock.


Bill Shephere

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 8:51 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: bird spp. found August 27, 2018
Monday, August 27, Dr. Marcia Hixson and I searched along levees of the Mississippi River in Desha and Chicot counties of Arkansas for Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills but found neither. (The spoonbills apparently had used a bad map and ended up in Crawford County!)


But we had good luck with White Ibises. Near Yellow Bend in Desha County we saw both an adult White Ibis and a young one in flight together. And in southernmost Chicot County we watched three adult White Ibis forage. Single Anhingas in two locations also captured Dr. Hixson's attention.


Better luck next week? Who knows!


Bill Shepherd

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 8:43 am
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Presentation in Little Rock Sept. 6
Dear Birders,

I wanted to alert you to a presentation I'll be making at the Fletcher
Branch of the Little Rock Public Library on Sept. 6 from 6 to 7. The event
is posted here <https://www.facebook.com/events/262011957912978/> on
Facebook.

I'm an Arkansas Master Naturalist, and I'll be talking about nature sites
in Arkansas, the Master Naturalists, citizen science, and how we can help
nature in our yards (based on Doug Tallamy's book), specifically
pollinators and birds.

If you're interested in any of these topics, I welcome you to attend!

Lynn Foster

 

Back to top
Date: 8/29/18 5:01 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: NWAAS field trips Sept 9 (Hobbs), Sept 15 (Wilson Springs bioblitz)
TWO UPCOMING NWAAS FIELD TRIPS



Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area Sunday September 9, 2018



Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will host a field trip at 9 AM Sunday, September 9. Meet in the parking lot for Sinking Stream and Historic Van Winkle trails in Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area east of Rogers. Meeting place GPS coordinates are 3617'48.82"N and 9357'28.76"W. From Rogers, travel east on highway 12 towards Beaver Lake. Stay on 12 all the way; the lot is approximately 11.5 miles east of Rogers and approximately 1.4 miles east of the intersection of Highway 12 and Highway 303 (that goes toward Rocky Branch on Beaver Lake). Sinking Stream and Historic Van Winkle share the parking on highway 12. There are vault toilets at the parking.



Little Clifty Creek and associated springs connect these short trails. This provides one of the most accessible of Ozark hollows. The area is full of native birds and interesting native plants. Spotted Jewelweed, for example, is quite attractive to migrating Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, though flooding this year wiped-out much of this patch. Other interesting plants include Pawpaw, Great Blue Lobelia, Yellow Ironweed, White Crownbeard, an Agrimony, Leafcup (white) and Bears Foot (yellow; both in genus Polymnia), and many others.



Both walks are easy and often birdy (each about 0.5 miles). Historic Van Winkle is accessible. As on all Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trips, participate as much or as little as you want. The field trip is free and open to the public.

Bioblitz at Wilson Springs Preserve Saturday September 15

Northwest Arkansas Land Trust is sponsoring a bioblitz at Wilson Springs Preserve in Fayetteville on Saturday September 15. As in past events for Wilson Springs, parking is behind the business at 2783 N. Shiloh Drive Fayetteville. Long pants and boots are a good idea for this event. Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will host a field trip to Wilson Springs in association with the bioblitz. Our meeting time is 9 AM and we will probably observe birds and collect data until around noon. The bioblitz is scheduled for a 12-hour period, 7 am to 7 pm, so if you cant make the NWAAS field trip, but still want to participate, you could go on your own schedule and turn in the information independently.

According to the Land Trust: The Wilson Springs Preserve is a unique wet prairie located in the Clabber Creek bottomlands, near Sams Club in Fayetteville, Arkansas. The 121-acre preserve is owned and managed by the Northwest Arkansas Land Trust. It is the largest wetland remnant in Fayetteville, AR and one of the last tall grass prairie remnants in the region. Wilson Springs provides habitat for a wide variety of rare and sensitive plant and animal species, including the Arkansas darter, one of Arkansas rarest fish species. Restoration efforts by the land trust have been underway since 2015.

More info about bioblitz and land trust: https://www.nwalandtrust.org/blog/2018/07/wilson-springs-bioblitz-saturday-september-15-7-a-m-7-p-m/
Wilson Springs Bioblitz Saturday, September 15, 7 a.m ...<https://www.nwalandtrust.org/blog/2018/07/wilson-springs-bioblitz-saturday-september-15-7-a-m-7-p-m/>
www.nwalandtrust.org
Were hosting a Bioblitz at Wilson Springs Preserve, Fayettevilles largest wet-prairie remnant. All are welcome to join us for this effort to document as many living things as possible during the 12-hour period.



 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/18 9:07 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Taxonomy Update
It is time to check your life list in eBird because the annual taxonomic
update is pretty much done and there have been many splits and lumps around
the world, including Mexican Duck split from Mallard.
https://ebird.org/news/2018-ebird-taxonomy-update

I gained 4 armchair lifers - Knobbilled Duck, Andean Duck, Peruvian
Tyrannulet, and Amazonian Grosbeak. A few other splits didnt affect my
total.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/18 5:33 pm
From: Karen McGee <mcgeecnt...>
Subject: Spoonbills yes
Spoonbills and whistling ducks were still on the Orrick Road pond in Alma
at 6pm today
Karen McGee

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/18 5:15 pm
From: Karen McGee <mcgeecnt...>
Subject: Re: Photos of the spoonbills in Alma
Spoonbills on Orrick road pond in Alma at 6pm today
Karen McGee

On Aug 27, 2018 7:44 PM, "Ragupathy Kannan" <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> David Oakley's photos of the Roseate Spoonbills in Alma, taken this
> morning. Thanks, David!
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith
>
> eBird Checklist – Orrick Road pond, Crawford County, Arkansas, US – Mon
> Aug 27, 2018 – 5 species (+1 other taxa)
> <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48113055>
>
> eBird Checklist – Orrick Road pond, Crawford County, Arkansas, US – Mon ...
>
> <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S48113055>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/18 2:53 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: This Man Spent 30 Years Solving A Rare Bird’s Murder Mystery
As part of the Attwater recovery effort, they are being reared in captivity for release at the George M. Sutton Avian Research Center near Bartlesville, Oklahoma. This is really an impressive place and the effort has great promise, along with those described in the article Barry posted:


https://www.suttoncenter.org/conservation/saving-species/attwaters-prairie-chicken/

Attwater's Prairie Chicken Sutton Center<https://www.suttoncenter.org/conservation/saving-species/attwaters-prairie-chicken/>
www.suttoncenter.org
Attwaters Prairie-Chicken Captive Breeding Facility. An Endangered Species Recovery Effort in Oklahoma by Sutton Avian Research Center. The Sutton Center has taken on a significant new conservation project breeding the Attwaters prairie-chicken for release!



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2018 10:30:55 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: This Man Spent 30 Years Solving A Rare Birds Murder Mystery

Dear ARBIRDers,

Some of you may have already seen this National Geographic article:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/08/news-attwater-prairie-chicken-murder-mystery-endangered-species/

Seems to almost be an endorsement of sound science even though I know science is in disfavor in some circles these days.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/18 1:36 pm
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Volunteer for the Hummingbird Migration Celebration
If you are planning on attending the Hummingbird Migration & Nature Celebration at the Strawberry Plains Audubon Center and also want free food and a free t-shirt, my colleagues are looking for volunteers.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: LAST CALL: Volunteer at Hummingbird Celebration


Greetings Folks,


This is a last request for volunteers at this year’s Hummingbird Migration & Nature Celebration, which is next weekend, September 7th-9th.

We've made our volunteer process easier than ever! Simply click the links below, fill out the form online and click submit; it's that simple!

Adult Volunteer Form https://www.cognitoforms.com/StrawberryPlainsAudubon/STRAWBERRYPLAINSAUDUBONCENTERADULTVOLUNTEER
Child Volunteer Form https://www.cognitoforms.com/StrawberryPlainsAudubon/STRAWBERRYPLAINSAUDUBONCENTERchildVOLUNTEER (Must be 14 years of age or older)

We request all volunteers complete their paperwork prior to the event. As in the past, volunteers will receive meal ticket(s) and refreshments throughout your shift(s), as well as a complimentary Festival t-shirt (we will have plenty of sizes and styles to choose from).

Please share this event and opportunity with your friends and family.
If you have any questions about volunteering, contact Mitch at <SPACvolunteers...> mailto:<SPACvolunteers...>

Cheers,

Mitch

Mitchell Robinson
Conservation Education Manager
285 Plains Road, Holly Springs, MS 38635 https://maps.google.com/?q=285+Plains+Road,+Holly+Springs,+MS+38635&entry=gmail&source=g
<mrrobinson...> mailto:<mrrobinson...>
662-252-1155 tel:662-252-1155

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/18 1:19 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: spoonbills and two ibis species continue in valley
I was birding in the Arkansas River Valley in the Alma-Frog Bayou WMA this morning. Two Roseate Spoonbills continue at the same farm pond along Orrick Road near Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility as reported August 26. There were 19 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks and a Western Sandpiper at same pond.


A White-faced Ibis and a White Ibis juvenile continue foraging in an extensive partially flooded field along Sharp Chapel Road at Frog Bayou WMA. 4 Upland Sandpipers flew over while I was there this morning. Another thing of interest: 14 juvenile Red-shouldered Hawks (I think they are all Red-s) foraging on the ground in the field. I know the ibises are catching crayfish.

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/18 7:02 am
From: Cheryl Johnson <cjbluebird...>
Subject: Re: MCB Camp Pendleton - Least Bell's Vireo Conservation Supports the Mission
Love the both/and nature of this

Sent from cjbluebird

> On Aug 28, 2018, at 8:46 AM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>
> FYI
>
> From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight [mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
> Sent: Monday, August 27, 2018 9:40 PM
> To: <DODPIF-L...>
> Subject: MCB Camp Pendleton - Least Bell's Vireo Conservation Supports the Mission
>
> Please take a look at this short but excellent video from Colin Lee (MCBCP) showcasing the LBVI conservation program at MCB Camp Pendleton.
>
>
> https://www.defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/Videos/?videoid=608877
>
>
> https://www.defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/Videos/?videoid=608877
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ****
> Richard,
> Here's another piece of DOD bird publicity from an interview I was asked to
> do by our Combat Camera division. Thought you'd be interested since you've
> been involved with LBVI on Camp Pendleton:
> https://www.defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/Videos/?videoid=608877
>
> Regards,
>
> Colin Lee
> Wildlife Biologist, MCB Camp Pendleton
> Office: 760-763-8540; <colin.lee1...>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/28/18 6:47 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: MCB Camp Pendleton - Least Bell's Vireo Conservation Supports the Mission
FYI



From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Monday, August 27, 2018 9:40 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: MCB Camp Pendleton - Least Bell's Vireo Conservation Supports the
Mission



Please take a look at this short but excellent video from Colin Lee (MCBCP)
showcasing the LBVI conservation program at MCB Camp Pendleton.





https://www.defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/Videos/?videoid=608877





https://www.defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/Videos/?videoid=608877













****

Richard,
Here's another piece of DOD bird publicity from an interview I was asked to
do by our Combat Camera division. Thought you'd be interested since you've
been involved with LBVI on Camp Pendleton:
https://www.defense.gov/News/Special-Reports/Videos/?videoid=608877

Regards,

Colin Lee
Wildlife Biologist, MCB Camp Pendleton
Office: 760-763-8540; <colin.lee1...>


 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/18 8:31 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: This Man Spent 30 Years Solving A Rare Bird’s Murder Mystery
Dear ARBIRDers,

Some of you may have already seen this National Geographic article:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2018/08/news-attwater-prairie-chicken-murder-mystery-endangered-species/

Seems to almost be an endorsement of sound science even though I know science is in disfavor in some circles these days.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/18 5:44 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Photos of the spoonbills in Alma
David Oakley's photos of the Roseate Spoonbills in Alma, taken this morning. Thanks, David!KannanFt. Smith
eBird Checklist – Orrick Road pond, Crawford County, Arkansas, US – Mon Aug 27, 2018 – 5 species (+1 other taxa)


|
|
| |
eBird Checklist – Orrick Road pond, Crawford County, Arkansas, US – Mon ...


|

|

|




 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/18 3:44 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Today at Boyd Point
Following are some of my sightings at Boyd today:

*Phalarope, Red-necked*

*Plover, American Golden-*

Sandpiper, Pectoral

Sandpiper, Spotted

Sandpiper, Buff-breasted

Sandpiper, Least

Sandpiper, Semipalmated

Sandpiper, Western

Heron, Green


Within this past week, we have seen all three species of the Phalarope.


Delos McCauley

Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/18 1:05 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: spoonbills still there in Alma
At 230pm today they were still there along with 11 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, a Killdeer, a small peep, and about 30 Canada Geese. There were two spoonbills actively feeding with their characteristic swaying movements.  There were also 11 Cattle Egrets at a nearby pond.  I hope the spoonbills continue to be there at least till Friday afternoon for my ornithology lab class. 
Many thanks to Joe Neal for the email alerts.  Joe is always kind to copy my gmail address too since he knows I check my yahoo email less often.  
KannanFt. Smith

 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/18 12:45 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Red Necked Phalarope
The Red Necked Phalarope is still present at Boyd Point in Pine Bluff along with several other shorebirds. Buff Breasted,Western, Least Sandpipers and an American Golden Plover
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/18 9:16 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Remarkable celebration for Kim Smith
So well said, Joe.  I too was intimidated by Kim the first half of our long acquaintance, that only later morphed into a friendship.  That's because Kim was such a no-nonsense type.  It took me several years of rooming with him (and putting up with his snoring) in various far-flung places to appreciate his deep warmth of personality and his incredibly sharp mind.  On Monday, 27 August, 2018, 11:08:11 AM GMT-5, Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

<!--#yiv4979035140 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}-->


Kimberly G. Smith: husband, father, grandfather, distinguished professor, editor, raconteur, Arkansas Game and Fish commissioner, department chairman, friend, Auduboner, Periodical Cicada researcher. And I haven’t even gotten to graduate students, hundreds of publications or his dedication to “slow food.” So with a life touching so many, it is no surprise that even in August heat, an appreciative crowd assembled on the grounds of Mt Sequoyah, overlooking the campus and the community to which he contributed his life.




I first met Kim in 1981, when he came to UA-Fayetteville to fill in for the year Doug James was overseas on a Fulbright. It was Kim’s first academic appointment. He was 33 years old and had attended excellent schools in New England. I was in Doug’s lab writing drafts of the book that would become Arkansas Birds (1986). Doug invited me to help because I wrote features for a local weekly, the Grapevine. I was making minimum wage (or no wage) and had no science degree.




So my first confession: I was totally taken in by the twinkle in Kim’s eyes, his robust sense of humor, and his knowledge about birds. And by Kim’s beautiful, well-educated wife Peggy, like Kim, confident and professional. Actually, intimidated. He was ready with a quip and didn’t miss a beat in stepping into Doug’s academic shoes. I couldn’t help but laugh when he poked fun at local lingo as in “drive careful,” an example of what he called “the death of the adverb.” (For those of you who grew up like me, should be “drive carefully.”)





Before the UA, Kim was a Research Associate at Manomet Bird Observatory. He came from a part of the country with solid support for education and now worked in Arkansas where we seem proud of having fought to protect slavery in the Confederacy and that we have many guns. (Of course we don’t bring up that by percentage The Land of Opportunity has one of the country’s highest rates of gun deaths.)





Kim came to teach in an Arkansas that is almost always near the unfortunate top of national lists for teen pregnancy, drug addiction, and near the bottom in support for public education. But, How ‘bout them Hogs! It took many years for me to realize Kim wasn’t purposefully intimidating. Rather, Kim was confident and well-education, very capable. By comparison, this ole Arkansas boy – me -- felt inadequate and envious. As I have gotten older, I realize how widespread is this sense of inadequacy.





To summarize: I felt inadequate in Kim’s presence, but not because of anything he intended. Just was. I figured this out, finally, about 10 years ago. Any of the rest of you out there know what I’m talkin’ ‘bout? We had time to write a few papers and share some laughs, once I realized Kim was a regular human being.




 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/18 9:08 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Remarkable celebration for Kim Smith
Kimberly G. Smith: husband, father, grandfather, distinguished professor, editor, raconteur, Arkansas Game and Fish commissioner, department chairman, friend, Auduboner, Periodical Cicada researcher. And I havent even gotten to graduate students, hundreds of publications or his dedication to slow food. So with a life touching so many, it is no surprise that even in August heat, an appreciative crowd assembled on the grounds of Mt Sequoyah, overlooking the campus and the community to which he contributed his life.

I first met Kim in 1981, when he came to UA-Fayetteville to fill in for the year Doug James was overseas on a Fulbright. It was Kims first academic appointment. He was 33 years old and had attended excellent schools in New England. I was in Dougs lab writing drafts of the book that would become Arkansas Birds (1986). Doug invited me to help because I wrote features for a local weekly, the Grapevine. I was making minimum wage (or no wage) and had no science degree.

So my first confession: I was totally taken in by the twinkle in Kims eyes, his robust sense of humor, and his knowledge about birds. And by Kims beautiful, well-educated wife Peggy, like Kim, confident and professional. Actually, intimidated. He was ready with a quip and didnt miss a beat in stepping into Dougs academic shoes. I couldnt help but laugh when he poked fun at local lingo as in drive careful, an example of what he called the death of the adverb. (For those of you who grew up like me, should be drive carefully.)

Before the UA, Kim was a Research Associate at Manomet Bird Observatory. He came from a part of the country with solid support for education and now worked in Arkansas where we seem proud of having fought to protect slavery in the Confederacy and that we have many guns. (Of course we dont bring up that by percentage The Land of Opportunity has one of the countrys highest rates of gun deaths.)

Kim came to teach in an Arkansas that is almost always near the unfortunate top of national lists for teen pregnancy, drug addiction, and near the bottom in support for public education. But, How bout them Hogs! It took many years for me to realize Kim wasnt purposefully intimidating. Rather, Kim was confident and well-education, very capable. By comparison, this ole Arkansas boy me -- felt inadequate and envious. As I have gotten older, I realize how widespread is this sense of inadequacy.

To summarize: I felt inadequate in Kims presence, but not because of anything he intended. Just was. I figured this out, finally, about 10 years ago. Any of the rest of you out there know what Im talkin bout? We had time to write a few papers and share some laughs, once I realized Kim was a regular human being.


 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/18 8:17 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope
Still present Boyd Point Wastewater ,Pine Bluff 8/27/18
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/27/18 7:22 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: spoonbills continue near Alma Wastewater
I just heard from David Oakley who is looking at the two Roseate Spoonbills at a pond on private land (king) near Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility. This is along Orrick Road around 0.3 miles south of the intersection of Red Hill Rd and Orrick (there are several ponds along here). If you drive a little further you will be at Alma Wastewater. David had to move when a big truck came up the road the spoonbills flushed up into the top of a snag near the pond, but still quite visible.The birds are visible from the car, so can be used as an effective blind.


 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/18 10:15 pm
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Song birds, bird songs, and birds and songs
Hi fellow birders,

We all know that bird vocalizations have been interpreted by us humans for
millennia to be "songs" and "singing". I'm not sure who is being
complimented by whom for what in this metaphor, but I've wholeheartedly
participated in it over the years and still do. So let me propose a little
game we can play with each other, a game I hope won't be considered outside
the world of "Arkansas Birds". How about we share with each other our
favorite human songs that reference birds? I'll let Paul McCarthy fans get
in on this one as quickly as they can: the countdown will last mere
minutes. But let me set the "tone" (ahem, pun intended) for how to play
this game:

Song. Composer. Specific referring element (lyrics, sound mimicry, etc.).
BRIEF commentary. YouTube video link, if any. So here goes: two not so
obvious examples:

The first song in the great song cycle *Dichterliebe *("Poet's Love"), by
Robert Schumann, poems by Heinrich Heine. Here are the German text and an
English translation by Celia Sgroi (available online):

*Im wundershoenen Monat Mai, *
*Als alle Knospen sprangen,*
*Da ist in meinen Herzen*
*Die Liebe aufgegangen.*

*[In the glorious month of May,*
*As all the buds were breaking,*
*Then in my heart*
*Loved bloomed.]*

*Im wundershoenen Monat Mai,*
*Als alle Voegel sangen,*
*Da hab' ich ihr gestanden*
*Mein Sehnen und verlangen.*

*[In the glorious month of May,*
*As all the birds were singing,*
*Then I revealed to her*
*My longing and desire.]*

I've sung this many times, always in the vain hope that for a moment I
might sound like the greatest German lyric tenor of the 20th century, Fritz
Wunderlich:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2UyE1CWjXew&t=261s

By the way, the next song in the cycle mentions the nightingale
("nachtigall"), definitely not an Arkansas bird.

Next, a song by the great Sandy Denny, "Who Knows Where the Time Goes":

*Across the evening sky, all the birds are leaving*
*But how can they know it's time for them to go?*
*Before the winter fire, I shall still be dreaming*
*I do not count the time*
*For who knows where the time goes?*
*Who knows where the time goes?*

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5oBMDcLf6WA

The second line poses a perfectly sensible technical/scientific question.

I actually prefer this version to her much more famous one with Fairport
Convention, though that one was voted by the Brits as the greatest
folk-rock recording of all time. (Many will be familiar with Judy
Collins's version, also on YouTube.) Interestingly, though I started out
as a folkie, I never learned this song before I left for the world of
classical vocal music. Sad for me.

Enjoy. And I wish to dedicate this little game to the memory of the great
Kim Smith.

Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/18 2:21 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Roseate Spoonbills in the valley near Alma Wastewater
On the one hand, I want to (and should) say awesome find and
congratulations... But at the moment I'm wresting with jealousy... ha
That drive is doable but, my wife just went out and it's getting late.
To make it more frustrating, we only have the one vehicle and if I'm
lucky, Wednesday afternoon is the next time I'd have any free time
because of that. These are the days I wish we had more than one vehicle.
Earlier in the day I might, just might have been able to chase it... (or
them)
What are the chances of them still being around Wednesday afternoon? and
my wife not getting called in to work... Or the birds deciding to also
fly up to Siloam or Centerton? ha.
The white ibis would be a lifer as well but spoonbills would just be
awesome.
If anyone is out there Wednesday and they're still around, please let me
know. I've explored Frog Bayou once or twice but, not the other areas
around it.
Anyway, can't wait to see pictures. I'm jealous of all the traveling you
do but, I'm also grateful that people get out there and report in. I,
very often, think about all the land that goes unnoticed from day today.
We're often wowed when something shows up where it shouldn't but, how
often does that happen when nobody is looking?
Nobody built the birder's teleporter yet did they?

Daniel Mason

On 8/26/2018 3:18 PM, Joseph C. Neal wrote:
>
> I saw a Roseate Spoonbill south of Alma, in one of the farm ponds
> along Orrick Road, just east of the Alma Wastewater Treatment Plant
> this morning. Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks in same pond. Easily seen
> from the car. I called Bill and Toka Beall. They drove over after
> church and saw TWO. Bill mentioned he had never seen one in the
> western part of the Arkansas River Valley (in other places, but not
> here), so today's sermon seemed relatively long with a spoonbill
> waiting after divine services. There were no previous records for the
> Ozark portion of northwest Arkansas, either. In addition, I saw a
> White Ibis juvenile and a White-faced Ibis, in a flooded field at Frog
> Bayou WMA, along Sharp Chapel Road. There were at least 23
> Buff-breasted Sandpipers at West-Ark Sod. I'll post pictures of most
> of this on facebook this afternoon.
>



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/18 1:41 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Roseate Spoonbills in the valley near Alma Wastewater
Cheryl Childers and I just got back from seeing the two Spoonbills. Thanks
for calling Bill, Joe, who called me, and I called Cheryl.

Sandy

On Sun, Aug 26, 2018 at 3:18 PM Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> I saw a Roseate Spoonbill south of Alma, in one of the farm ponds along
> Orrick Road, just east of the Alma Wastewater Treatment Plant this morning.
> Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks in same pond. Easily seen from the car. I
> called Bill and Toka Beall. They drove over after church and saw TWO. Bill
> mentioned he had never seen one in the western part of the Arkansas River
> Valley (in other places, but not here), so today's sermon seemed relatively
> long with a spoonbill waiting after divine services. There were no previous
> records for the Ozark portion of northwest Arkansas, either. In addition, I
> saw a White Ibis juvenile and a White-faced Ibis, in a flooded field at
> Frog Bayou WMA, along Sharp Chapel Road. There were at least 23
> Buff-breasted Sandpipers at West-Ark Sod. I'll post pictures of most of
> this on facebook this afternoon.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/26/18 1:18 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills in the valley near Alma Wastewater
I saw a Roseate Spoonbill south of Alma, in one of the farm ponds along Orrick Road, just east of the Alma Wastewater Treatment Plant this morning. Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks in same pond. Easily seen from the car. I called Bill and Toka Beall. They drove over after church and saw TWO. Bill mentioned he had never seen one in the western part of the Arkansas River Valley (in other places, but not here), so today's sermon seemed relatively long with a spoonbill waiting after divine services. There were no previous records for the Ozark portion of northwest Arkansas, either. In addition, I saw a White Ibis juvenile and a White-faced Ibis, in a flooded field at Frog Bayou WMA, along Sharp Chapel Road. There were at least 23 Buff-breasted Sandpipers at West-Ark Sod. I'll post pictures of most of this on facebook this afternoon.

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/18 4:55 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Bald Knob ASCA Field Trip
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } A very large group of birders (too many to count) spent Saturday morning scattered around the edges of the drained ponds and rice fields at the Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge, also an Audubon Important Bird Area (IBA). The middle pond on Huntsman Road is all mud and full of shorebirds, egrets, herons, and some ducks.  No Spoonbills or Wood Storks were seen. Best birds were juvenile White Ibises, an American Golden-Plover, several Wilson's Snipe, Semipalmated Plovers and Sandpipers, Black-necked Stilts, a juvenile Yellow-crowned Night-Heron, and Blue-winged Teal. We weren't able to identify the two dark Ibis that circled the pond then disappeared into the rice field.  We tried really hard to convince ourselves we had a Reeve (female Ruff).  Final consensus was a Lesser Yellowlegs sporting a colorful pair of orange legs. The Vultures have done an efficient job of eating most of the dead fish and the area was much less odiferous compared to last weekend.  100+ Great Egrets were mobing the southeast corner of the pond, which still held some water and lots of tiny fish, entailing lots of pushing and shoving by the egrets to snatch a wiggling morsel.
At the end of the morning, we checked the first pond, which is bordered by Coal Chute Rd. and Huntsman Rd. It is a combination of bare mud, some grassy mud, and water.  It contained one sleeping White Pelican, 4 Willets, and a mix of egrets and herons and some Malllards. By noon the temperature had topped 90 degrees with humidity and full sun, so most of the group called it a day.
The Neotropic Cormorant seen by a birder early that morning was a no-show later in the day. On the way back to Little Rock, we made a quick stop at the Friendly Acres lake at the Judsonia city park. The Black-bellied Whistling Duck numbers have increased to 22, plus two Muscovy Ducks and several Canada Geese.  Approximate species count for the day was 40+ with many of the distant shorebirds too far to identify.  It was a fun day with the added bonus of connecting with new birders from around the state, plus birders we hadn't seen in a while.
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/18 12:08 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: NAWA
A Nashville Warbler showed up around noon today. Didnt wait for me to grab my camera, so am hoping it will return and, pose for picture!
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/18 11:26 am
From: Robert Bays <baysrr...>
Subject: Re: Teenager birds


Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 15, 2018, at 3:33 PM, Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> wrote:
>
> Greetings all,
> My work computer faces the Forest Service bird feeder. For the last 3 days there has only been 1 adult bird – a Cardinal.
> Everybody else is a youngster: 3 House Finches, 2 Indigo Buntings, 2 Carolina Chickadees, 3 Tufted Titmouse, 1 Mourning Dove and 3 Grosbeaks….
>
> When the first Grosbeak showed it looked more like an Adult non-breeding female Black-headed or a 1st winter male Rose-breasted, than a Blue. I couldn’t totally id it. “The Sibley Guide to Birds” shows these 3 Grosbeaks in transition in Aug or Sept. The next day 3 Grosbeaks showed up. All in transition and all different from each other. One had a hint of Blue, so a Blue Grosbeak.
> It was a neat bird puzzle while it lasted.
> Cheers, Leif @ Hector
>
>
>
>
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

Back to top
Date: 8/25/18 6:00 am
From: Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Cave Swallows
At least 7 Cave Swallows are now present on the wires across Beard’s Lake in Beard’s Lake Recreation Area, Millwood Lake, Hempstead County.

Charles Mills
Wake Village TX 75501

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/18 8:44 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Bald Knob, Saul's and Treadway
Hazel and I, along with a friend, Frances Taylor, birded Bald Knob, Saul's
Minnow Ponds and Treadway Minnow Ponds yesterday. At Bald Knob, among all
the egrets, Least sandpipers and Pectoral sandpipers, we saw a Least
Bittern. At Saul's we saw 7 avocets, a Black-bellied Whistling Duck, a
Red-shouldered hawk and Blue-winged Teals. There were thousands of Bank
Swallows lined up on the electrical wires at Treadway. Saul had some
drained ponds with mud, so they had many more shore birds.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/18 8:22 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Red-necked Phalarope
John Redman and I viewed a Red-necked Phalarope today at the Boyd Point
Wastewater Treatment Facility. This completes the cycle for phalaropes
here for this past week. We had the Red and Wilson's earlier.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/18 3:11 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
LaDonna and I birded BKNWR this afternoon. Two of the shorebird ponds are drained down. The west pond held few if any shorebirds, but several egrets and herons. The middle pond held nearly a thousand egrets and herons and about as many shorebirds. Pectoral and Least Sandpipers were the most numerous shorebirds by far.
The adult Neotropic Cormorant found yesterday by Glenn Wyatt was still present off Mingo Creek Road. Mingo Creek Road is just east of BKNWR off Liberty Valley Road and about a mile south of the Bald Knob sewer ponds. About 3/4 mile down Mingo Creek Road there are reservoirs on both sides of the road. The cormorant, along with two Double-crested Cormorants, was on a snag in the southeast corner of the south reservoir.
Good birding!
Kenny NicholsCabot, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/18 8:59 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Kim Smith memorial gathering tomorrow

All are welcome to acelebration of the life of

KimberlyG. Smith

Saturday, August 25th


Vesper Chapel at MountSequoyah Center

150 Skyline Drive -Fayetteville, Arkansas

Thegathering will begin at 2 PM with speakers who will share memories of Kim.Anyone interested in speaking will be encouraged to do so. Bring your happy remembrances to share with all aboutthe man who touched so many of our lives. Casual dress is expected and lightrefreshment will be provided. Please share this announcement with anyone youfeel may like to attend.

 


 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/18 7:23 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject:
At this point the bird must be transferred to federally permitted rehabber Lynn Sciumbato for evaluation by Lynn and her veterinarian. Lynn can be contacted at 479-795-1515. Not only is this legally required, it will get the bird into the hands of individuals and veterinarians skilled in the unique veterinary requirements of migratory birds. Raising nestlings or wild birds of any age should only be done by permitted professionals unless there are unique extenuating circumstances which delay delivering birds to permittees or veterinarians.


Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 23, 2018, at 10:45 PM, Sara Wittenberg <sara_ress...> wrote:
>
> A high school student in Bentonville AR found a bird that had fallen from a nest with a severe neck injury some weeks ago, and has done an admiral job raising it. She did some research and has been feeding it a diet including (but not limited to – this is 3rd hand knowledge) egg yolk, dog food, and pin crickets. She has hand fed it, coaxing it to eat the crickets even when it is reluctant by wrapping them in a paste of the food slurry she makes. It is clear to me she has put considerable effort into this bird, and while it has shown improvement and is growing, this neck injury has persisted and clearly impairs the bird (from photos I have seen). I feel the humane thing to do is euthanize the bird; however, as I once would have done the same and been heartbroken with an end like that, which I’m sure will seem incomprehensible to her – I wonder if there may not be a vet in NWA that does deal with wild passerines, and I could at least refer her so she can feel like she did all she could for this bird? Thank you.
>
> Sara Wittenberg
>
> "Life doesn't have to be perfect to be wonderful."
> ~Annette Funicello
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/24/18 3:44 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject:
While the student’s efforts are admirable, the only licensed federally permitted avian rehabilitator in the area (as far as I know) is Lynn Sciumbato. Veterinarians (and the public) typically do not have the permits to handle or care for wild birds. I believe she is in Gravette.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville


> On Aug 23, 2018, at 22:45, Sara Wittenberg <sara_ress...> wrote:
>
> A high school student in Bentonville AR found a bird that had fallen from a nest with a severe neck injury some weeks ago, and has done an admiral job raising it. She did some research and has been feeding it a diet including (but not limited to – this is 3rd hand knowledge) egg yolk, dog food, and pin crickets. She has hand fed it, coaxing it to eat the crickets even when it is reluctant by wrapping them in a paste of the food slurry she makes. It is clear to me she has put considerable effort into this bird, and while it has shown improvement and is growing, this neck injury has persisted and clearly impairs the bird (from photos I have seen). I feel the humane thing to do is euthanize the bird; however, as I once would have done the same and been heartbroken with an end like that, which I’m sure will seem incomprehensible to her – I wonder if there may not be a vet in NWA that does deal with wild passerines, and I could at least refer her so she can feel like she did all she could for this bird? Thank you.
>
> Sara Wittenberg
>
> "Life doesn't have to be perfect to be wonderful."
> ~Annette Funicello
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/18 8:45 pm
From: Sara Wittenberg <sara_ress...>
Subject:
A high school student in Bentonville AR found a bird that had fallen from a nest with a severe neck injury some weeks ago, and has done an admiral job raising it. She did some research and has been feeding it a diet including (but not limited to this is 3rd hand knowledge) egg yolk, dog food, and pin crickets. She has hand fed it, coaxing it to eat the crickets even when it is reluctant by wrapping them in a paste of the food slurry she makes. It is clear to me she has put considerable effort into this bird, and while it has shown improvement and is growing, this neck injury has persisted and clearly impairs the bird (from photos I have seen). I feel the humane thing to do is euthanize the bird; however, as I once would have done the same and been heartbroken with an end like that, which Im sure will seem incomprehensible to her I wonder if there may not be a vet in NWA that does deal with wild passerines, and I could at least refer her so she can feel like she did all she could for this bird? Thank you.

Sara Wittenberg

"Life doesn't have to be perfect to be wonderful."
~Annette Funicello


 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/18 5:43 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: New to Bald Knob NWR
Hi Robin I will give you two suggestions First Saturday will be the
monthly Audobon Field trip and it is at Bald Knob Anyone is welcome.
Come as late as you want leave anytime you want.....Here is a link with
more info. www.ascabird.org. otherwise Shorebirds are the most seen
birds right now. As you come from Bald Knob on Coal Chute Rd you will
pass the headquarters building Continue on and you will see "The Grain
Bins" ahead as you approach them you will see a flooded field on your
right. Look in it , but turn in front of the Grain Bins Right on
Huntsman Rd There will be several ponds on right that are supposed to be
freshly drained. Search those...Binoculars are important and a scope will
really help. If you do not have these join in with the group and Everyone
shares. You will prob see them out and around. If not just start cruising
around and just see the place. You should have phone service. You might
not always know exactly where you are but you can't really get lost
either. Everything mostly comes back toward the Grain Bins. Good Birding
Bob Harden


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 11:11 AM David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:

> I don’t think hunting has started yet. Off limit areas will have gates or
> some other obstruction blocking your access. Do not drive on any levees
> without gravel. Park so any work vehicles can pass by.
>
> David Ray
> NLR
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> > On Aug 23, 2018, at 10:53 AM, Robin Buff <robinbuff...> wrote:
> >
> > I am thinking about going to Bald Knob NWR this weekend. Any
> suggestions, hints, etc. on how to approach this area for birding, where to
> visit in the refuge, any hunting, any off-limit areas?
> >
> > Thank you
> >
> > Robin Buff
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/18 3:13 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 23
It was mostly clear and very hot on the bird survey today. 63 species were
found. Best highlights were a juvenile Roseate Spoonbill and a juvenile
Cave Swallow. Not much singing now. Interestingly for the first time ever
I saw a pair of Purple Gallinules with 2 age class broods all feeding
together. There were 3 adult-sized tan juveniles and one downy black chick,
all feeding together. I knew that Common Gallinules often produced two
broods but I thought Purple Gallinules only produced one brood a year.
Common Gallinule juveniles will hang around and help feed the chicks of the
2nd brood but these Purple Gallinule juveniles didn't seem to be doing that.
Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 15

Wood Duck - 94

Gadwall - 1

Mallard - 1

Blue-winged Teal - 25

Pied-billed Grebe - 13

Neotropic Cormorant - 10

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 48

Least Bittern - 2 female/juv. types

Great-blue Heron - 4

Great Egret - 16

Snowy Egret - 200

Little-blue Heron - 81

Tricolored Heron - 2 juv.

Cattle Egret - 3500

Green Heron - 8

White Ibis - 235

Roseate Spoonbill - 1 juv.

Black Vulture - 3

Turkey Vulture - 8

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 33

Common Gallinule - 25

American Coot - 3

Killdeer - 8

Spotted Sandpiper - 3

Solitary Sandpiper - 3

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 2

Least Sandpiper - 63

Mourning Dove - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 7 (feeding on Roughleaf Dogwood berries)

Least Flycatcher - 4 (feeding on Roughleaf Dogwood berries)

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 12

Bell's Vireo - 4 (still singing)

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 3

Fish Crow - 1

Tree Swallow - 2

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 6

Cliff Swallow - 1

Cave Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 7

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 4

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 4

Indigo Bunting - 7

Red-winged Blackbird - 20



Odonates:



Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags



Herps:



American Alligator

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog



Also: Bobcat





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR




 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/18 1:59 pm
From: Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...>
Subject: Re: sounds
Not feeling picked on! No worries!

On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 3:30 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:

> I recently got hearing aids and as a result have only recently started
> paying attention to bird sounds. Being the analytic that I am I quickly
> latched on to sonograms. It is kind of like taking a picture to verify
> what you that you saw in the woods except it helps to verify what you heard
> in the woods. Basically it shows a pattern of the sound that is the same
> whether the sound is loud or soft. For a given species it looks really
> close from one individual to another. The easy part to look at is the
> patter and the frequency. So if you look compare an online sonogram of the
> bird in question, it will either support your ID or help you decide your ID
> is not correct. I have used this several time over the past few months and
> am amazed at what you can figure out (I found I ID several incorrectly).
>
> So if we take the bird song in question and compare our tentative ID of
> Willow Flycatcher....
> Bird in question:
> https://www.xeno-canto.org/431790
>
> Willow Flycatcher from library:
> https://search.macaulaylibrary.org/catalog?taxonCode=wilfly&mediaType=a&
> sort=rating_rank_desc&__hstc=75100365.372d03bf753cb57143fdc0614a1871
> 3d.1535055034956.1535055034956.1535055034956.1&__hssc=75100365.1.
> 1535055034956&__hsfp=1438573455#_ga=2.254557323.207185059.1535055034-
> 1733296813.1535055034
>
> You can see that the pattern of the two calls are different.
> As well you can see that the frequency of the bird in question is around
> the 5K HZ and the Willow Flycatcher is around 10K HZ. So using this method
> it would rule out the Willow Flycatcher.
>
> You can then go through the sonograms of other birds that sound similar
> and see if you can find a match. Sometimes it works and sometimes it
> doesn't...just like looking at the pictures in a field guide.
>
> I thought some of you might find this interesting....
> BTW: Not picking on you Leslie...you were just the only one I saw make a
> suggestion.
>
> Michael Linz (Conway, AR sometimes but not frequently)
>
>
>
> On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 4:34 PM Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...>
> wrote:
>
>> sounds like a willow flycatcher! from a loooong way off!
>>
>> On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 3:21 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> I will say, I hear birds I can't identify often enough to drive me nuts
>>> sometimes. HA... heard one in the yard just yesterday that sounded a bit
>>> like a henslow's sparrow(this is not good habitat that I know of) but,
>>> longer song... very twittery... not sure how to describe it but, I was
>>> confused by it. I hear confusing sounds all the time. One time, last year I
>>> think, I heard some warblingish twittery songs that I was really stumped
>>> on... took a while to find a cardinal above me making the sounds.
>>> So with that, there are LOTS of birds that can confuse... and I dare
>>> say, even the experts... and boy does that frustrate me, not being anything
>>> close to an expert. The birds themselves are confused sometimes. I have
>>> lured in a common yellowthroat playing one of the calls of the sedge wren.
>>> Now every time I think I hear a sedge wren, I have to be careful and it is
>>> often enough a yellowthroat. Those calls can be tricky, for lots of birds.
>>>
>>> This often has me wanting to be skeptical(honestly, I'm always skeptical
>>> anyway) when one of the "experts" Id's a bird by a call that, to me, sounds
>>> like something else. This frustration can extend to mammals as well I
>>> believe. I remember someone, I wont mention names, ID'ing a certain mammal
>>> heard in the woods that, I knew didn't live in the woods. Since we were
>>> birding I just didn't challenge it... didn't matter much.
>>> I've heard some odd whistles that later turned out to be blackbirds...
>>> Oh so many things have confused me... But, that makes things interesting.
>>>
>>> Anyway, I typed this up after seeing and hearing a mystery bird on
>>> Facebook. I'm in a group of "Christian Birdwatchers", one more place for me
>>> to get to see interesting birds. :) But someone shared a sound file that
>>> they were suprised has gone unidentified for so long. It peaked my
>>> curiosity to I had to go look, and listen...
>>> The file is from 2 years ago up in the Vancouver area. Actually it says
>>> they had previously posted a longer version but it went without ID so they
>>> posted this shorter version. You can hear the distinct whistle enough I
>>> think. If a bird isn't common around here, if I haven't been exposed to it
>>> enough, I forget a LOT of sights and sounds... brain just doesn't retain
>>> info all the time. ha. But, this sounds familiar and not familiar at the
>>> same time.
>>> I figured I'd share it with all of you in case anyone needed something
>>> to do.
>>> https://www.xeno-canto.org/431790
>>>
>>> Daniel Mason
>>>
>>> PS... after seeing someone on Arkansas Birders(on FB) with a "Bird
>>> Arkansas" license plate from the AGFF, we just had to get one too and it's
>>> already gotten my wife into a nice discussion about birds.
>>>
>>>
>>> ---
>>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>>> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> *Leslie Peacock*
>> *Managing Editor*
>> *Arkansas Times*
>> *501-492-3981*
>>
>


--
*Leslie Peacock*
*Managing Editor*
*Arkansas Times*
*501-492-3981*

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/18 1:31 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: sounds
I recently got hearing aids and as a result have only recently started
paying attention to bird sounds. Being the analytic that I am I quickly
latched on to sonograms. It is kind of like taking a picture to verify
what you that you saw in the woods except it helps to verify what you heard
in the woods. Basically it shows a pattern of the sound that is the same
whether the sound is loud or soft. For a given species it looks really
close from one individual to another. The easy part to look at is the
patter and the frequency. So if you look compare an online sonogram of the
bird in question, it will either support your ID or help you decide your ID
is not correct. I have used this several time over the past few months and
am amazed at what you can figure out (I found I ID several incorrectly).

So if we take the bird song in question and compare our tentative ID of
Willow Flycatcher....
Bird in question:
https://www.xeno-canto.org/431790

Willow Flycatcher from library:
https://search.macaulaylibrary.org/catalog?taxonCode=wilfly&mediaType=a&sort=rating_rank_desc&__hstc=75100365.372d03bf753cb57143fdc0614a18713d.1535055034956.1535055034956.1535055034956.1&__hssc=75100365.1.1535055034956&__hsfp=1438573455#_ga=2.254557323.207185059.1535055034-1733296813.1535055034

You can see that the pattern of the two calls are different.
As well you can see that the frequency of the bird in question is around
the 5K HZ and the Willow Flycatcher is around 10K HZ. So using this method
it would rule out the Willow Flycatcher.

You can then go through the sonograms of other birds that sound similar and
see if you can find a match. Sometimes it works and sometimes it
doesn't...just like looking at the pictures in a field guide.

I thought some of you might find this interesting....
BTW: Not picking on you Leslie...you were just the only one I saw make a
suggestion.

Michael Linz (Conway, AR sometimes but not frequently)



On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 4:34 PM Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...>
wrote:

> sounds like a willow flycatcher! from a loooong way off!
>
> On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 3:21 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
> wrote:
>
>> I will say, I hear birds I can't identify often enough to drive me nuts
>> sometimes. HA... heard one in the yard just yesterday that sounded a bit
>> like a henslow's sparrow(this is not good habitat that I know of) but,
>> longer song... very twittery... not sure how to describe it but, I was
>> confused by it. I hear confusing sounds all the time. One time, last year I
>> think, I heard some warblingish twittery songs that I was really stumped
>> on... took a while to find a cardinal above me making the sounds.
>> So with that, there are LOTS of birds that can confuse... and I dare say,
>> even the experts... and boy does that frustrate me, not being anything
>> close to an expert. The birds themselves are confused sometimes. I have
>> lured in a common yellowthroat playing one of the calls of the sedge wren.
>> Now every time I think I hear a sedge wren, I have to be careful and it is
>> often enough a yellowthroat. Those calls can be tricky, for lots of birds.
>>
>> This often has me wanting to be skeptical(honestly, I'm always skeptical
>> anyway) when one of the "experts" Id's a bird by a call that, to me, sounds
>> like something else. This frustration can extend to mammals as well I
>> believe. I remember someone, I wont mention names, ID'ing a certain mammal
>> heard in the woods that, I knew didn't live in the woods. Since we were
>> birding I just didn't challenge it... didn't matter much.
>> I've heard some odd whistles that later turned out to be blackbirds...
>> Oh so many things have confused me... But, that makes things interesting.
>>
>> Anyway, I typed this up after seeing and hearing a mystery bird on
>> Facebook. I'm in a group of "Christian Birdwatchers", one more place for me
>> to get to see interesting birds. :) But someone shared a sound file that
>> they were suprised has gone unidentified for so long. It peaked my
>> curiosity to I had to go look, and listen...
>> The file is from 2 years ago up in the Vancouver area. Actually it says
>> they had previously posted a longer version but it went without ID so they
>> posted this shorter version. You can hear the distinct whistle enough I
>> think. If a bird isn't common around here, if I haven't been exposed to it
>> enough, I forget a LOT of sights and sounds... brain just doesn't retain
>> info all the time. ha. But, this sounds familiar and not familiar at the
>> same time.
>> I figured I'd share it with all of you in case anyone needed something to
>> do.
>> https://www.xeno-canto.org/431790
>>
>> Daniel Mason
>>
>> PS... after seeing someone on Arkansas Birders(on FB) with a "Bird
>> Arkansas" license plate from the AGFF, we just had to get one too and it's
>> already gotten my wife into a nice discussion about birds.
>>
>>
>> ---
>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>>
>
>
>
> --
> *Leslie Peacock*
> *Managing Editor*
> *Arkansas Times*
> *501-492-3981*
>

 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/18 12:08 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Neotropic Cormorant
There is a neotropic cormorant off Mingo Creek Road near Bald Knob.
Glenn WyattCabot
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/18 9:11 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: New to Bald Knob NWR
I don’t think hunting has started yet. Off limit areas will have gates or some other obstruction blocking your access. Do not drive on any levees without gravel. Park so any work vehicles can pass by.

David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 23, 2018, at 10:53 AM, Robin Buff <robinbuff...> wrote:
>
> I am thinking about going to Bald Knob NWR this weekend. Any suggestions, hints, etc. on how to approach this area for birding, where to visit in the refuge, any hunting, any off-limit areas?
>
> Thank you
>
> Robin Buff
 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/18 8:53 am
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: New to Bald Knob NWR
I am thinking about going to Bald Knob NWR this weekend. Any suggestions, hints, etc. on how to approach this area for birding, where to visit in the refuge, any hunting, any off-limit areas?

Thank you

Robin Buff
 

Back to top
Date: 8/23/18 8:41 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: The feather thief
Following up on my earlier posting on the subject:  Here is a book review from a recent The AUK.  Some notable sentences: 
1. This excellent book will provoke pain in ornithologists.
2. Rist did not view himself as a thief. He'd better hope that he never meets an ornithologist in a dark alley.--------------------------



| http://americanornithologypubs.org/doi/full/10.1642/AUK-18-8.1

Article Citation:Ellen Paul (2018) The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century. The Auk: April 2018, Vol. 135, No. 2, pp. 380-381.BOOK REVIEW


The Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the CenturyThe Feather Thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Centuryby Kirk Wallace Johnson. 2018. Viking Press, New York, NY, USA. 320 pp. $27.00 (hardcover). ISBN 978-1101981610.Reviewed by Ellen Paul


Bethesda, Maryland, USA
<ellen.paul...>



Book Review Editor: Jay Mager, <j-mager...>
© 2018 American Ornithological Society.
Darwin proposed sexual selection as a driver of evolution in On the Origin of Species(1859) and expanded on the idea in The Descent of Man (1871). Nothing makes sense except in the light of evolution, so the paradisiacal panoply of feather coloration makes sense only if birds have color vision. So, too, with fish—they must have color vision, whether for beauty's sake alone or as an indicator of fitness, if sexual selection drives the evolution of coloration.
It's a damn shame for birds that fish have color vision—not that anyone knew that in 1842, when angler and tackle-seller William Blacker published his Art of Angling, exhorting fly-tyers to use feathers from species such as cocks-of-the-rock (Rupicola spp.), macaws, the Resplendent Quetzal (Pharomachrus mocinno), several of the blue Cotingidae, and the birds-of-paradise (Paradisaeidae). When George Mortimer Kelson published The Salmon Fly in 1895, the theory of evolution was still roiling Victorian society. Anglers were not likely to know, much less accept, the notion that fish coloration evidenced color vision in fish. Not that the invertebrate prey of salmon were so brilliantly colored as the feathers of these birds. So why the notion that brightly colored flies would make better lures? As author Kirk Wallace Johnson explains in The Feather Thief, salmon flies are not meant to resemble prey. They are meant to provoke the salmon to protect their freshly spawned eggs from potential predators. Any object on a hook might do. Victorian England happened to be flooded with enormous shipments of exotic feathers for the millinery trade, so commerce may have motivated the emergence of ornate ties garnished with vibrant, lustrous feathers. Although Kelson claimed scientific rigor, he admitted that there was no basis for recommending any particular fly and even acknowledged that “at times a salmon will take anything…even a thing it were an outrage to call a Salmon fly.” Nevertheless, he persisted in promoting his book and in exhorting the use of avian finery for salmon lures.



| |



Johnson draws a straight line from the Victorian obsession with exotic bird feathers for salmon flies to the 2009 theft from the Tring Museum of many bird specimens collected during that era. Edwin Rist, an American in England to further his studies as a flutist, climbed a back wall of the museum, broke a window, climbed in, stuffed 299 specimens into a suitcase, returned home, removed the tags, pulled the bright feathers and discarded the rest, and then set about selling his loot on the Internet, ostensibly to raise money to buy a new flute. The theft was discovered a month later, but by then the damage was done. Of the 174 skins seized from Rist, 72 were missing tags. Other specimen thefts from museums had prompted the formation of an online community of curators to share information about the constant black-market demand for their treasures. Yet, Johnson asserts, the Tring staff had no idea that the fly-tying world was so enamored of the feathers of species now protected by law and so rare that any one skin could be worth thousands of dollars, putting their holdings at risk.

Even readers who already know about this execrable atrocity will agonize at reading that among the 299 skins taken were five King Bird-of-paradise (Cicinnurus regius) specimens collected by Alfred Russel Wallace himself. Readers who have actually seen the King Bird-of-paradise, or any of the other species taken by Rist, will rage at learning that he served no prison time and paid only a small fraction of an absurdly inadequate $205,000 fine. This excellent book will provoke pain in ornithologists.

Every chapter of the book is compelling despite the enormity of the story told, and all the more so because Johnson himself is part of the story. A severe case of PTSD resulting from his work with Iraqi refugees necessitated a period of recovery, which led to an interest in fly-fishing. Seeing a brightly colored salmon fly in the tackle box of his guide, Johnson stumbled onto the story of the Tring theft. To research the story, he dove deeply into Wallace's explorations of the biota of the Malay Archipelago. Johnson's telling is rich in detail, including Wallace's ire with an inept preparator: “If he puts up a bird, the head is on one side, there is a great lump of cotton one side of the neck like a wen, the feet are twisted soles uppermost, or something else.” Much more is told of Wallace than is necessary for the story of the theft, but this is all to the good. This book deserves an audience much wider than the puddle of biologists, and they will benefit from understanding the importance of these specimens. The recounting of Wallace's explorations ends with the deposit of his King Birds-of-paradise in the British Museum. From there, the specimens traveled to Tring for safekeeping during World War II. The chapter on Lord Rothschild and his private museum at Tring is shorter but just as engaging. Better still is the subsequent chapter, tracing the feather trade from fashion icon Marie Antoinette to the 1860s, when ornithologist Frank Chapman, over two afternoons on the New York streets, counted 700 feathered hats. The next chapter details how societal pressure, legislation, and World War I ended the feather trade. Ornithologists know this story, no doubt, though details such as the prohibition on the import of ornamental plumage imposed by the Tariff Act of 1922 may be new. Of course, poaching and smuggling followed the bans, but wildlife conservation efforts turned to other taxa. Meanwhile, below the radar, fly-tyers continued their fevered pursuit of feathers. Into this world, now facilitated by the Internet, populated with fly-tying forums and online feather purveyors, stepped Rist, who soon met prominent fly-tyers around the world and learned of the avian riches held by the Tring. Once in England, he visited the collection under false pretenses, posing as a photographer helping a friend who was writing a dissertation on the birds-of-paradise. For ornithologists, these chapters are a tough read, particularly when it becomes clear that the police and the British courts simply do not understand or appreciate the value of the stolen skins.

Johnson reenters the story after the theft, when he becomes obsessed with finding the remaining stolen birds. He meets with fly-tyers around the world, including a student in Norway who idolized Rist and helped sell the stolen goods. He visits Rick Prum at Yale and finds that Prum had compiled screenshots of Rist's website and online offerings before they disappeared; Prum laments that feather trade is ongoing, rampant, and overlooked by law enforcement.

Johnson eventually met and interviewed Rist. If Johnson hoped for an ounce of remorse, he was disappointed. Rist said that if he'd known that Wallace had collected some of the birds, he might have treated them with a little more respect. He opined that the specimens were going to waste because the scientific data had already been extracted and the skins were just collecting dust. He suggested that the Tring's count of missing birds was inaccurate and that others might have stolen some of the missing skins before his own misdeed. Rist did not view himself as a thief. He'd better hope that he never meets an ornithologist in a dark alley.


| LITERATURE CITED |


| | Blacker, W. (1842). W. Blacker's Art of Angling, and Complete System of Fly Making, and Dying of Colours. Published by the author, London, UK. [Google Scholar] |
| | Darwin, C. (1859). On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or, the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. John Murray, London, UK. [Google Scholar] |
| | Darwin, C. (1871). The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex. John Murray, London, UK. [Google Scholar] |
| | Kelson, G. M. (1895). The Salmon Fly: How to Dress It and How to Use It. Published by the author, London, UK. [Google Scholar] |

|
Volume 135, Issue 2 
(April 2018)
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Auk Journal Information
Online ISSN: 1938-4254
Print ISSN: 0004-8038
Frequency: Online weekly, printed quarterly
Impact Factor: 2.096
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| Auk | |   | | Condor |

|

 
On Saturday, 11 August, 2018, 8:59:15 AM GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:

Amazing story this morning on NPR on how a flute player broke into British Museum and stole 299 of Alfred Russell Wallace's bird specimens to sell to Salmon-Fly makers.  It took 35 days for the museum to even realize they were missing, by then it was too late for most of the specimens.
https://www.thisamericanlife.org/654/the-feather-heist

 

Back to top
Date: 8/22/18 2:11 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylchilders...>
Subject: Fall 2018 Convention- Save the Date
Fyi AAS members:

The fall meeting of the Arkansas Audubon Society will be held October 5-7, 2018 in Texarkana.

More info to come. Check ARBIRDS.ORG for updates!

PS:
Please email me off list if there are any changes to your email, mailing address, etc so I can update our member list.

Thanks!
Cheryl Childers
Membership Chairperson


 

Back to top
Date: 8/22/18 1:34 pm
From: Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...>
Subject: Re: sounds
sounds like a willow flycatcher! from a loooong way off!

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 3:21 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:

> I will say, I hear birds I can't identify often enough to drive me nuts
> sometimes. HA... heard one in the yard just yesterday that sounded a bit
> like a henslow's sparrow(this is not good habitat that I know of) but,
> longer song... very twittery... not sure how to describe it but, I was
> confused by it. I hear confusing sounds all the time. One time, last year I
> think, I heard some warblingish twittery songs that I was really stumped
> on... took a while to find a cardinal above me making the sounds.
> So with that, there are LOTS of birds that can confuse... and I dare say,
> even the experts... and boy does that frustrate me, not being anything
> close to an expert. The birds themselves are confused sometimes. I have
> lured in a common yellowthroat playing one of the calls of the sedge wren.
> Now every time I think I hear a sedge wren, I have to be careful and it is
> often enough a yellowthroat. Those calls can be tricky, for lots of birds.
>
> This often has me wanting to be skeptical(honestly, I'm always skeptical
> anyway) when one of the "experts" Id's a bird by a call that, to me, sounds
> like something else. This frustration can extend to mammals as well I
> believe. I remember someone, I wont mention names, ID'ing a certain mammal
> heard in the woods that, I knew didn't live in the woods. Since we were
> birding I just didn't challenge it... didn't matter much.
> I've heard some odd whistles that later turned out to be blackbirds... Oh
> so many things have confused me... But, that makes things interesting.
>
> Anyway, I typed this up after seeing and hearing a mystery bird on
> Facebook. I'm in a group of "Christian Birdwatchers", one more place for me
> to get to see interesting birds. :) But someone shared a sound file that
> they were suprised has gone unidentified for so long. It peaked my
> curiosity to I had to go look, and listen...
> The file is from 2 years ago up in the Vancouver area. Actually it says
> they had previously posted a longer version but it went without ID so they
> posted this shorter version. You can hear the distinct whistle enough I
> think. If a bird isn't common around here, if I haven't been exposed to it
> enough, I forget a LOT of sights and sounds... brain just doesn't retain
> info all the time. ha. But, this sounds familiar and not familiar at the
> same time.
> I figured I'd share it with all of you in case anyone needed something to
> do.
> https://www.xeno-canto.org/431790
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> PS... after seeing someone on Arkansas Birders(on FB) with a "Bird
> Arkansas" license plate from the AGFF, we just had to get one too and it's
> already gotten my wife into a nice discussion about birds.
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>



--
*Leslie Peacock*
*Managing Editor*
*Arkansas Times*
*501-492-3981*

 

Back to top
Date: 8/22/18 1:30 pm
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: sounds
Daniel,

You bring up a very good issue that exists for bird identification,
especially since 90% of all bird ID's on surveys are done via sound alone.

I did some research on the research of that topic a number of years ago,
and it turns out that novices are prone to false negatives (not identifying
a bird that is actually present), while experts are very prone to false
positives (indicating that a bird was present when, in fact, it was not).
It was a rather ironic result.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 3:22 PM Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:

> I will say, I hear birds I can't identify often enough to drive me nuts
> sometimes. HA... heard one in the yard just yesterday that sounded a bit
> like a henslow's sparrow(this is not good habitat that I know of) but,
> longer song... very twittery... not sure how to describe it but, I was
> confused by it. I hear confusing sounds all the time. One time, last
> year I think, I heard some warblingish twittery songs that I was really
> stumped on... took a while to find a cardinal above me making the sounds.
> So with that, there are LOTS of birds that can confuse... and I dare
> say, even the experts... and boy does that frustrate me, not being
> anything close to an expert. The birds themselves are confused
> sometimes. I have lured in a common yellowthroat playing one of the
> calls of the sedge wren. Now every time I think I hear a sedge wren, I
> have to be careful and it is often enough a yellowthroat. Those calls
> can be tricky, for lots of birds.
>
> This often has me wanting to be skeptical(honestly, I'm always skeptical
> anyway) when one of the "experts" Id's a bird by a call that, to me,
> sounds like something else. This frustration can extend to mammals as
> well I believe. I remember someone, I wont mention names, ID'ing a
> certain mammal heard in the woods that, I knew didn't live in the woods.
> Since we were birding I just didn't challenge it... didn't matter much.
> I've heard some odd whistles that later turned out to be blackbirds...
> Oh so many things have confused me... But, that makes things interesting.
>
> Anyway, I typed this up after seeing and hearing a mystery bird on
> Facebook. I'm in a group of "Christian Birdwatchers", one more place for
> me to get to see interesting birds. :) But someone shared a sound file
> that they were suprised has gone unidentified for so long. It peaked my
> curiosity to I had to go look, and listen...
> The file is from 2 years ago up in the Vancouver area. Actually it says
> they had previously posted a longer version but it went without ID so
> they posted this shorter version. You can hear the distinct whistle
> enough I think. If a bird isn't common around here, if I haven't been
> exposed to it enough, I forget a LOT of sights and sounds... brain just
> doesn't retain info all the time. ha. But, this sounds familiar and not
> familiar at the same time.
> I figured I'd share it with all of you in case anyone needed something
> to do.
> https://www.xeno-canto.org/431790
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> PS... after seeing someone on Arkansas Birders(on FB) with a "Bird
> Arkansas" license plate from the AGFF, we just had to get one too and
> it's already gotten my wife into a nice discussion about birds.
>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
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Date: 8/22/18 1:29 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: sounds
You’re a good read...enjoyed this one too.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 22, 2018, at 3:21 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> I will say, I hear birds I can't identify often enough to drive me nuts sometimes. HA... heard one in the yard just yesterday that sounded a bit like a henslow's sparrow(this is not good habitat that I know of) but, longer song... very twittery... not sure how to describe it but, I was confused by it. I hear confusing sounds all the time. One time, last year I think, I heard some warblingish twittery songs that I was really stumped on... took a while to find a cardinal above me making the sounds.
> So with that, there are LOTS of birds that can confuse... and I dare say, even the experts... and boy does that frustrate me, not being anything close to an expert. The birds themselves are confused sometimes. I have lured in a common yellowthroat playing one of the calls of the sedge wren. Now every time I think I hear a sedge wren, I have to be careful and it is often enough a yellowthroat. Those calls can be tricky, for lots of birds.
>
> This often has me wanting to be skeptical(honestly, I'm always skeptical anyway) when one of the "experts" Id's a bird by a call that, to me, sounds like something else. This frustration can extend to mammals as well I believe. I remember someone, I wont mention names, ID'ing a certain mammal heard in the woods that, I knew didn't live in the woods. Since we were birding I just didn't challenge it... didn't matter much.
> I've heard some odd whistles that later turned out to be blackbirds... Oh so many things have confused me... But, that makes things interesting.
>
> Anyway, I typed this up after seeing and hearing a mystery bird on Facebook. I'm in a group of "Christian Birdwatchers", one more place for me to get to see interesting birds. :) But someone shared a sound file that they were suprised has gone unidentified for so long. It peaked my curiosity to I had to go look, and listen...
> The file is from 2 years ago up in the Vancouver area. Actually it says they had previously posted a longer version but it went without ID so they posted this shorter version. You can hear the distinct whistle enough I think. If a bird isn't common around here, if I haven't been exposed to it enough, I forget a LOT of sights and sounds... brain just doesn't retain info all the time. ha. But, this sounds familiar and not familiar at the same time.
> I figured I'd share it with all of you in case anyone needed something to do.
> https://www.xeno-canto.org/431790
>
> Daniel Mason
>
> PS... after seeing someone on Arkansas Birders(on FB) with a "Bird Arkansas" license plate from the AGFF, we just had to get one too and it's already gotten my wife into a nice discussion about birds.
>
>
> ---
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Date: 8/22/18 1:22 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: sounds
I will say, I hear birds I can't identify often enough to drive me nuts
sometimes. HA... heard one in the yard just yesterday that sounded a bit
like a henslow's sparrow(this is not good habitat that I know of) but,
longer song... very twittery... not sure how to describe it but, I was
confused by it. I hear confusing sounds all the time. One time, last
year I think, I heard some warblingish twittery songs that I was really
stumped on... took a while to find a cardinal above me making the sounds.
So with that, there are LOTS of birds that can confuse... and I dare
say, even the experts... and boy does that frustrate me, not being
anything close to an expert.  The birds themselves are confused
sometimes. I have lured in a common yellowthroat playing one of the
calls of the sedge wren. Now every time I think I hear a sedge wren, I
have to be careful and it is often enough a yellowthroat. Those calls
can be tricky, for lots of birds.

This often has me wanting to be skeptical(honestly, I'm always skeptical
anyway) when one of the "experts" Id's a bird by a call that, to me,
sounds like something else. This frustration can extend to mammals as
well I believe. I remember someone, I wont mention names, ID'ing a
certain mammal heard in the woods that, I knew didn't live in the woods.
Since we were birding I just didn't challenge it... didn't matter much.
I've heard some odd whistles that later turned out to be blackbirds... 
Oh so many things have confused me... But, that makes things interesting.

Anyway, I typed this up after seeing and hearing a mystery bird on
Facebook. I'm in a group of "Christian Birdwatchers", one more place for
me to get to see interesting birds. :)  But someone shared a sound file
that they were suprised has gone unidentified for so long. It peaked my
curiosity to I had to go look, and listen...
The file is from 2 years ago up in the Vancouver area. Actually it says
they had previously posted a longer version but it went without ID so
they posted this shorter version. You can hear the distinct whistle
enough I think.  If a bird isn't common around here, if I haven't been
exposed to it enough, I forget a LOT of sights and sounds... brain just
doesn't retain info all the time. ha.  But, this sounds familiar and not
familiar at the same time.
I figured I'd share it with all of you in case anyone needed something
to do.
https://www.xeno-canto.org/431790

Daniel Mason

PS...  after seeing someone on Arkansas Birders(on FB) with a "Bird
Arkansas" license plate from the AGFF, we just had to get one too and
it's already gotten my wife into a nice discussion about birds.


---
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Date: 8/22/18 8:03 am
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: White Ibis & a Merlin-Lincoln County east of Caney Creek State Park.
Another great way to see our state...
If you don’t want to do “count”ies then go bird our State Parks.

Michael

> On Aug 21, 2018, at 11:01 PM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:
>
> Dottie & Doris Boyles enlisted me in a day of state parks & birds across south central & south east Arkansas today. Our best birds were a field full of adult & juvenile White Ibis & a Merlin that was doing its best to scour the same field of all shorebirds.
> The landowner across the road from the field said the ibis had been foraging in the field for about a week.
>
> Cindy

 

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Date: 8/22/18 7:54 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: South Lafayette County 8-21-18
What I really like about Charlie's posts is knowing this type of habitat exists to support large numbers of shorebirds and waders. These types of places are becoming fewer and fewer.  Arkansas has tremendous opportunity to provide excellent stopover locations for migrants and wintering birds, and I'd like to see the Nature Conservancy and other groups actively involved in helping interested landowners/managers use a portion of their land for these purposes. Land trust education, establishment of shorebird habitat, etc. BKNWR and Hogan State Fish Hatchery are two prime examples of managers who express interest in providing adequate habitat and i can only assume they would be open to professional, skilled guidance. Any thoughts?
Patty McLean Atlanta GA

-------- Original message --------From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> Date: 8/22/18 1:14 AM (GMT-05:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: South Lafayette County 8-21-18
AR-birders,
In south Lafayette County Tuesday 8-21-18, I had 18 species of shorebirds, and was finally able to find a Ruddy Turnstone.
The link to the eBird list and embedded photos is below.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47991431

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

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Date: 8/22/18 7:27 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Red-headed woodpecker
Saw a Red-headed Woodpecker eating a dragonfly would liked to have seen him catching it . It was a immature one at that .
Randy Robinson
West Pulaski County

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/22/18 6:54 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Blue-winged Teal at Frog
Most of the big southward migration visible August 16 in the Arkansas River Valley around Frog Bayou WMA and adjacent Kibler bottoms seems now to have passed. Yesterday, David Oakley and I covered most of this again. There is still a shallowly flooded field along Sharp Chapel Road in Frog Bayou WMA. Still present: some of the more common shorebird migrants and about 180 Blue-winged Teal. In terms of their southward migration schedule, arrival of teal like this in second half of August is about right.

Most striking for me yesterday: not a single Upland Sandpiper heard overhead or seen on the ground and ditto for Buff-breasted Sandpipers at West-Ark Sod. Based upon past records, the southward migration peak for both species has passed, but some should still be moving south at least for the next few weeks.

On Saturday morning there is a Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Woolsey Wet Prairie Wildlife Sanctuary in Fayetteville, starting 9 am and everyone welcome. Starting 2 pm that afternoon, a celebration of the life of Kimberly G. Smith, at the Mt Sequoyah Assembly in Fayetteville. Everyone is welcome to that, too. I heard from Peggy Smith who reminded me that dress for Kim is informal she said what we wear on the field trip would be a good tribute to Kim.

In terms of Kim, I am reminded that Audubon groups like our own local NWAAS, National Audubon, and Arkansas Audubon Society help to nurture the young person who became our Kim. We cant do anything about his untimely passing, but the scientific entrepreneur ism that marked his career here continues. It is from among his young women and men students, graduates and undergraduates, that we will see his resourceful spirit motivate the future.


 

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Date: 8/22/18 5:39 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: South Lafayette County 8-21-18
This has to be included among the best 5-hours of birding in Arkansas ever. The numbers involved, the counts, the amazing photos. Of course, this makes a huge impression on me, not only because it is so bird-rich, but because I don't have access to places like Bald Knob NWR (Kenny and LaDonna Nichols posted a list like this recently from BNNWR). In the northwest 1/4 of Arkansas, we generally have little access to anything approaching what Charlie is reporting, except formerly in the Moffett bottoms adjacent Fort Smith and to some extent now in the area that includes Frog Bayou WMA and the Kibler bottoms near Alma. Anyway, I looked at the ebird check-list with all of the photos -- wonderful tour.


I recently heard from current Arkansas Audubon Society president Robin Buff who told me that Charlie will lead a field trip during the AAS fall meeting October 5-7, 2018 in Texarkana. If I heard her correctly, he will also be making a presentation at the meeting.



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Sent: Wednesday, August 22, 2018 12:14 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: South Lafayette County 8-21-18

AR-birders,
In south Lafayette County Tuesday 8-21-18, I had 18 species of shorebirds, and was finally able to find a Ruddy Turnstone.
The link to the eBird list and embedded photos is below.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47991431

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA

 

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Date: 8/21/18 10:14 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: South Lafayette County 8-21-18
AR-birders,
In south Lafayette County Tuesday 8-21-18, I had 18 species of shorebirds, and was finally able to find a Ruddy Turnstone.
The link to the eBird list and embedded photos is below.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47991431

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

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Date: 8/21/18 8:07 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: KTHV "What's with all the hummingbirds?"
Dear ARBIRDers,

Here's a link to KTHV's video "What's with all the hummingbirds?":

https://www.thv11.com/video/news/local/animal/whats-with-all-the-hummingbirds-digital-original/91-8227101

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Nothing super birdy at our house, but we do have at last count 9 Monarch chrysalises with several more hopefully to form in the next day or two.
 

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Date: 8/21/18 8:01 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: White Ibis & a Merlin-Lincoln County east of Caney Creek State Park.
Dottie & Doris Boyles enlisted me in a day of state parks & birds across south central & south east Arkansas today. Our best birds were a field full of adult & juvenile White Ibis & a Merlin that was doing its best to scour the same field of all shorebirds.
The landowner across the road from the field said the ibis had been foraging in the field for about a week.

Cindy

 

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Date: 8/21/18 7:09 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds
If there was video, some of it was done in my yard.

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Sent: Tuesday, August 21, 2018 5:16:10 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Hummingbirds

Well, Dan Scheiman, a clip of your hummer story made our local news here in Fort Smith. But they misspelled Audubon. 🙄

Sandy B.
 

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Date: 8/21/18 6:10 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR 21 August 2018
Michelle and I were at Bald Knob NWR this afternoon/evening.  Pond 3, where the mud and all the little shore birds were is now full of water.  No mud.  No Roseate Spoonbill.  And dozens of dead carp laying around in the water.  The refuge people were draining the water.  By the time we left there was a little bit of mud in the southwest corner and a few Least Sandpipers had come back.  We did see a few dowitchers, Black-necked Stilts and the usual Egrets and Herons.  Maybe tomorrow will be better.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 8/21/18 3:23 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Hummingbirds
Well, Dan Scheiman, a clip of your hummer story made our local news here in
Fort Smith. But they misspelled Audubon. 🙄

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 8/21/18 12:00 am
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Sedge Wren (Benton Co.)
While wrapping up some summer field work this/yesterday evening, I heard at least one, possibly two singing Sedge Wrens at Chesney Prairie Natural Area (Siloam Springs). Looks like they’re back, so check your local grassy patches...

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.
 

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Date: 8/20/18 12:01 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GREAT BIRDS, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIES AT WOOLSEY WET PRAIRIE WILDLIFE SANCTUARY
UA-Fayetteville graduate student Alyssa DeRubeis found singing Sedge Wrens at Woolsey Wet Prairie Wildlife Sanctuary (Fayetteville) yesterday. I was out there this morning following up on Alyssas report. There seemed be at least 4-5 birds. We had great looks at one bird as it sang from atop a cattail. Other birds included quite a few Dickcissels, a few Indigo Buntings, American Goldfinches, several Ruby-throated Hummingbirds including one that chased a Sedge Wren -- Common Yellowthroats, an interesting Empidonax flycatcher that may have been Alder Flycatcher, a few Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, etc.

Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will host a field trip to Woolsey this Saturday, starting at 9 AM. Everyone is welcome, including beginners. There are recently mowed and easily-walked paths throughout the area. No boots required.

Its not a particularly widely appreciated fact that Woolsey has about the highest native plant species diversity of any property of similar size in all of Arkansas. Botanically-speaking, Woolsey has been well surveyed by top notch botanists from the beginning. The Woolsey plant list provides solid evidence of the genuine biological riches of places like this. I was out there this morning with botanist Joan Reynolds who was identifying one interesting plant after another. The plant diversity mirrors similar diversity along birds, insects, frogs, toads, snakes, and salamanders. Woolsey is a mighty rich place, though it not always as obvious as it is right now in terms of flowers.

For example, ALL of the native Tallgrass Prairie grasses are in their full glory: Indiangrass, Big Bluestem, etc. More blooms: several species of goldenrods, Ashy Sunflower, huge patches on boneset, Missouri Ironweed, Slender Mountain Mint, Love Grass, Camphorweed, Great Blue Lobelia, Green Milkweed, etc. And of course, accompanying all of the flowers: lots of butterflies, including numerous Monarchs. In one spot there were 3 Monarchs and in another 5 Monarchs, in close proximity, around the big patches of boneset and ironweed.

Whats going on at Woolsey right now is right at the heart of nature in The Natural State. Saturdays field trip is free and open to the public. We will be out there for a few hours. Some of us will be headed to Mt Sequoyah in the afternoon for the celebration memorial for our friend and colleague Kimberly G. Smith.


 

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Date: 8/20/18 9:22 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Saturday-ASCA Field Trip
My previous post said the field trip is Friday-Wrong.  It is this SATURDAY, August 25.  Come join us in the search for migrating shorebirds!Details below.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator-----------------------------------
This Saturday, August 25 is the monthly field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  See below for details.  Everyone is welcome, you don't have to be an ASCA member.  The Refuge manager plans to drain ponds this week so there will be more mud habitat for shorebirds.  Some ponds have water because they are trying to kill the grass before draining them.  You can come and go as your schedule permits on Saturday.  We usually have a big crowd, all with shorebird fever!  If you have any questions about the trip, please contact me off-list.  For more information about ASCA and to read our excellent quarterly newsletter, go to www.ascabird.org.
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 August 25Bald Knob NationalWildlife RefugeBald Knob, WhiteCountyMeet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in the Other Center parking lot onthe east side behind McDonald’s.  TheOther Center is on McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall.  Take Exit 1 west off US-67/167.  We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR around 8:30a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.  This federal refuge is also a NationalAudubon Important Bird Area.  We expectto find shorebirds, herons, night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks andRoseate Spoonbills.  It will be very hotso bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, bug spray, and a hat.  If you have a scope, bring it.  Very little walking will be involved.  There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 atBald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for drivingdirections and more information about the refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903   


 

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Date: 8/20/18 7:26 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip this Saturday
This Friday, August 25 is the monthly field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  See below for details.  Everyone is welcome, you don't have to be an ASCA member.  The Refuge manager plans to drain ponds this week so there will be more mud habitat for shorebirds.  Some ponds have water because they are trying to kill the grass before draining them.  You can come and go as your schedule permits on Saturday.  We usually have a big crowd, all with shorebird fever!  If you have any questions about the trip, please contact me off-list.  For more information about ASCA and to read our excellent quarterly newsletter, go to www.ascabird.org.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 August 25Bald Knob NationalWildlife RefugeBald Knob, WhiteCountyMeet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in the Other Center parking lot onthe east side behind McDonald’s.  TheOther Center is on McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall.  Take Exit 1 west off US-67/167.  We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR around 8:30a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.  This federal refuge is also a NationalAudubon Important Bird Area.  We expectto find shorebirds, herons, night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks andRoseate Spoonbills.  It will be very hotso bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, bug spray, and a hat.  If you have a scope, bring it.  Very little walking will be involved.  There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 atBald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for drivingdirections and more information about the refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903   
 

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Date: 8/20/18 3:30 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: County Birding
If you are county listing and using eBird please keep these things in mind.
1. eBird prefers location specificity, i.e. a separate checklist for each
park, lake, and stretch of road. Use hotspots when appropriate. Do not lump
lists across multiple hotspots with the location set as one of those
hotspots.
2. If you are truly birding continuously all over a county then enter your
list at the county level using the "Select an entire city, county, state, or
country option at the first step of entering a checklist through eBird.org.
Unfortunately the eBird app does not allow you to select an entire county,
so either keep a paper list or create a personal location but later on at
home edit the checklists location. Do not create a personal location and
call it the name of the county (unless you will edit the location later).
3. County-level checklists will update your various lists but do not show up
on eBird species maps for data quality reasons. Do not create a personal
location and call it the name of the county to get around this.
4. Keep a checklist within a county. When you cross a county boundary, end
the checklist, begin a new one.
5. If you are birding along a county boundary, here is how to handle it
https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2238491.
6. Noting birds while cruising at highway speed is an Incidental count.
Driving slowly with the windows down is a Traveling count.
https://help.ebird.org/customer/en/portal/articles/974012-how-to-make-your-c
hecklists-more-valuable
Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 8/20/18, 12:21 AM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Michael Linz" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <mplinz...>
wrote:

For those interested in county birding, I would recommend the following
tools.

Hotspot app - it provides a list of hotspots by county (list or map). It
also shows you what county you are in.
BirdsEye - shows you a list of birds that are near by or at a particular
hotspot.
Mob-rule.com - provides an overlay of the county lines on a google map (not
pretty but better than not having the county lines).

And a quote from Mob-rule...
Why do you think they call them "COUNT"ies?

It's a great excuse to get out and see all of the different parts of
Arkansas (or any other state). By doing the exploring you will find lots of
new and interesting places to bird. And eBird will gain more citizen
science data about our great state to help understand the status of the
birds in our state.

Michael Linz (creating more county list with Patty in every state we visit)



On Sat, Aug 18, 2018 at 1:48 AM Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
wrote:
> I just realized I left a word out in the message I sent earlier about
> county birding in AR. I've been having eye issues this week and just missed
> it. Sorry
>
> I meant to say, just out of curiosity, has anyone else birded in all 75
> Arkansas counties besides Michael and Patty??
>
> Please respond off list.
> Thanks
> Dottie
> Little Rock



 

Back to top
Date: 8/19/18 9:22 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: County Birding
For those interested in county birding, I would recommend the following
tools.

Hotspot app - it provides a list of hotspots by county (list or map). It
also shows you what county you are in.
BirdsEye - shows you a list of birds that are near by or at a particular
hotspot.
Mob-rule.com - provides an overlay of the county lines on a google map (not
pretty but better than not having the county lines).

And a quote from Mob-rule...
Why do you think they call them "COUNT"ies?

It's a great excuse to get out and see all of the different parts of
Arkansas (or any other state). By doing the exploring you will find lots
of new and interesting places to bird. And eBird will gain more citizen
science data about our great state to help understand the status of the
birds in our state.

Michael Linz (creating more county list with Patty in every state we visit)



On Sat, Aug 18, 2018 at 1:48 AM Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
wrote:

> I just realized I left a word out in the message I sent earlier about
> county birding in AR. I've been having eye issues this week and just missed
> it. Sorry
>
> I meant to say, just out of curiosity, has anyone else birded in all 75
> Arkansas counties besides Michael and Patty??
>
> Please respond off list.
> Thanks
> Dottie
> Little Rock
>

 

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Date: 8/19/18 5:57 pm
From: Abby Gibson <000000544cf96f92-dmarc-request...>
Subject: ID question
Would any one be willing to look at a terrible cellphone-through-a-spotting-scope picture of what I think are juvenile common gallinules and confirm for me?

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/19/18 4:31 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
LaDonna and I birded the refuge again this afternoon. The immature Roseate Spoonbill and at least one Sanderling continue. Most unexpected to us was an adult Lesser Black-backed Gull that flew over very low and close just as we arrived. Looking through the database, this would be the earliest fall occurrence by nearly two weeks.
Kenny NicholsCabot, AR
 

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Date: 8/19/18 4:13 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: The Amazing Tale of the Genius that History Forgot- Birds, Fish & Other Living Things
Interesting indeed! Thanks for sharing it.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Aug 19, 2018, at 3:28 PM, Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:
>
> Dear ARBIRDers,
>
> Here's an interesting read from National Geographic, perhaps under the heading The Evolution of Science:
>
> https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2018/08/genius-naturalist-willughby-evolution/
>
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
>
> Barry Haas
 

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Date: 8/19/18 1:43 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GNATCATCHERS GLEANING FROM BONESET FLOWERS
A prominent flower in bloom today at Beaver Lake Nursery Pond was one of the native bonesets, probably Tall Boneset (Eupatorium altissimum). A dense line of plants covered with fresh white flowers formed an almost solid ring around parts of the earthen levee. Flowers like this are attractive to a diverse bunch of pollinators including flies, bees, beetles, butterflies, etc. Currently there are many Blue-gray Gnatcatchers in the low, shrubby vegetation. Gnatcatchers were making elegant runs right over tops of these flowers, stopping suddenly, switching back, and generally engaging in all sorts of maneuvers. Like they were small versions of Mississippi Kites, working dragonflies. After a few runs, the gnatcatchers would perch on the branches just below flowers, then go at it again.

A Forsters Tern was visible nearby from highway 12 boat ramp. It finally perched on one of the buoys, allowing a closer scope look.


 

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Date: 8/19/18 1:28 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: The Amazing Tale of the Genius that History Forgot- Birds, Fish & Other Living Things
Dear ARBIRDers,

Here's an interesting read from National Geographic, perhaps under the heading The Evolution of Science:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2018/08/genius-naturalist-willughby-evolution/

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,

Barry Haas
 

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Date: 8/19/18 11:30 am
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: A THOUGHT ABOUT THE BOYD POINT RED PHALAROPE
As has been reported, a molting Red Phalarope has been observed for several days at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. Exactly 4 years ago, I photographed a Red Phalarope in similar molting plumage in the exact same pond at the treatment plant. Since the Red Phalarope is almost always pelagic, with the exception of its actual breeding time, it is very remarkable that this species would be sighted in central land locked Arkansas. Considering that the average longevity of this bird is five years, is it possible this could be the same bird?
John Redman
 

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Date: 8/19/18 11:30 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Wood Storks
Karen Holiday, Bob Harden and I saw 6 fly over Bald Knob NWR at 1:15
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Date: 8/19/18 11:08 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Wood Storks
6 Wood Storks flew over .
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Date: 8/19/18 7:02 am
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Sedge Wrens (Washington Co.)
Yesterday evening a friend and I were treated to two singing Sedge Wrens at Woolsey Wet Prairie (Fayetteville). We got good looks at one, and it was a lifer for her.

Other birds of note included a Field Sparrow (absent from the main area of Woolsey in the summer) and a few Dickcissels feeding their teenagers. The only birds that sang were the wrens and an Indigo Bunting. Summer is over!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.
 

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