ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
7/22/18 10:12 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> south Lafayette County birds 7-21-18
7/22/18 8:52 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Robins
7/22/18 8:46 am Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Re: Sighting: Crow with white markings
7/22/18 7:52 am Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> Re: Robins
7/22/18 7:48 am Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Sighting: Crow with white markings
7/22/18 7:08 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Robins
7/22/18 6:32 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> binoculars for Indian kids
7/21/18 6:37 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: New Checklist-Level Review
7/20/18 12:38 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Neotropic Cormorant continues at Eagle Watch
7/19/18 11:33 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> Glossy Ibis south Lafayette County 7-19-18
7/19/18 3:26 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Robins
7/19/18 2:44 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Robins
7/19/18 1:32 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> LOON MIGRATION BOAT TRIPS ON BEAVER LAKE THIS FALL
7/19/18 12:45 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Re: Am goldfinches
7/19/18 11:34 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> Re: Am goldfinches
7/19/18 11:15 am Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Am goldfinches
7/19/18 10:07 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Re: Am goldfinches
7/19/18 8:24 am Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Am goldfinches
7/18/18 6:36 pm Abby Gibson <000000544cf96f92-dmarc-request...> Roseate Spoonbills
7/18/18 5:22 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Robins
7/18/18 4:35 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Robins
7/18/18 4:33 pm Robin Buff <robinbuff...> Re: Robins
7/18/18 3:27 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Robins
7/18/18 1:08 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> PURPLE MARTIN PRE-MIGRATION ROOST AT CENTERTON
7/18/18 6:51 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: www.audubon.org
7/17/18 10:14 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Kim Smith memorial gathering
7/17/18 8:02 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: www.audubon.org
7/17/18 7:12 am Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> www.audubon.org
7/17/18 6:28 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> BRING BACK NATIVES IN OUR YARDS: NWAAS MEETING THIS SATURDAY IN THE COOL AT HOBBS
7/17/18 5:26 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> MORE SHOREBIRDS, PLUS OUT-OF-SEASON WATERFOWL
7/16/18 5:29 pm Abby Gibson <000000544cf96f92-dmarc-request...> Roseate spoonbill at Lake Chicot pumping plant
7/16/18 3:10 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: White-winged Doves, Centerton - update.
7/16/18 8:27 am Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...> Re: ASCA Field Trip Report
7/15/18 7:29 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Re: Bald Knob Sunday
7/15/18 5:40 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Bald Knob Sunday
7/15/18 4:57 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Report
7/15/18 1:09 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> out of season bird
7/15/18 10:10 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> New yard bird
7/14/18 4:46 pm Cynthia Patton <00000151b1cba27b-dmarc-request...> Re: A question of mockingbirds
7/14/18 4:17 pm ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...> Bird Photos.
7/14/18 4:12 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: White-winged Doves, Centerton - update.
7/14/18 3:14 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Female Great-tailed Grackle in LR
7/14/18 2:33 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> White-winged Doves, Centerton - update.
7/14/18 10:22 am Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...> White ibis
7/13/18 9:58 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: A question of mockingbirds
7/13/18 3:30 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Willets at Boyd Point
7/13/18 1:55 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob NWR
7/13/18 3:52 am Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Male Ruby-throats
7/11/18 7:12 pm Jeremy Skaggs <jeremy.skaggs...> Re: Least Terns at LRAFB
7/11/18 6:53 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Dave's Garden bird links
7/11/18 6:42 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Least Terns at LRAFB
7/11/18 10:24 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Female Great-tailed Grackle in LR
7/11/18 6:04 am David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - July 10
7/11/18 3:32 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Red-Eyed Vireos
7/10/18 5:05 pm Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> Re: Strange Duck
7/10/18 3:02 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Best of the Valley today
7/10/18 1:58 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Strange Duck
7/10/18 12:22 pm W. K. Holloway <wkholloway...> Strange Duck
7/10/18 11:30 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Saturday
7/10/18 10:26 am Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
7/10/18 8:04 am <market...> Red-Eyed Vireos
7/10/18 7:52 am Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: STOP Bill Shepherd-Joe Tucker thread; back to BIRDs
7/10/18 7:50 am Karen Konarski <karen...> BIRDS & BUGS BOOK
7/10/18 7:47 am Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: Dear Arbirders - miscommunication
7/10/18 7:42 am Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: Dear Arbirders
7/10/18 3:36 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> STOP Bill Shepherd-Joe Tucker thread; back to BIRDs
7/9/18 9:53 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Dear Arbirders - miscommunication
7/9/18 8:11 pm Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: Dear Arbirders
7/9/18 7:36 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Birds and Spiders An Important Connection
7/9/18 7:31 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: A question of mockingbirds
7/9/18 5:01 pm Jodi Morris <mjodimorris...> Bald Eagle on Little Maumelle at Sleepy Hollow
7/9/18 4:56 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SOLITARY SANDPIPER AND PURPLE MARTINS AT CENTERTON
7/9/18 3:39 pm Les Koller <0000020788963bb2-dmarc-request...> Re: A question of mockingbirds
7/9/18 3:24 pm Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Dear Arbirders
7/9/18 2:07 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Re: A question of mockingbirds
7/9/18 12:59 pm Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: A question of mockingbirds
7/9/18 8:35 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, Thursday July 12
7/9/18 7:31 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: A question of mockingbirds
7/9/18 6:49 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SWAINSON’S HAWK FOR CHESNEY FIELD TRIP
7/9/18 6:48 am Lance Runion <000000d4f8891ec6-dmarc-request...> Female Great-tailed Grackle in LR
7/9/18 6:48 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> NWAAS meeting at Hobbs State Park July 21, Dan Scheiman speaker
7/9/18 6:47 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> A question of mockingbirds
7/9/18 6:46 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> SWAINSON’S HAWK FOR CHESNEY FIELD TRIP
7/6/18 7:38 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> White-winged Doves- Centerton
7/6/18 3:42 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> eBird: Great-tailed Grackle, Little Rock
7/6/18 3:04 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Crow with an accent
7/6/18 2:31 pm JFR <johnfredman...> WESTERN SANDPIPER AT BOYD POINT
7/6/18 12:35 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Crow with an accent
7/6/18 10:01 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Australian raptors start fires to flush out prey
7/6/18 9:18 am Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Australian raptors start fires to flush out prey
7/6/18 9:05 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> The Firebird
7/6/18 7:23 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Bouquet of summer buntings
7/6/18 6:26 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> AGFC unveils new email address for reporting sick animals
7/5/18 4:45 pm Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> Re: Hummingbirds in the ground?
7/5/18 3:09 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Hummingbirds in the ground?
7/5/18 1:31 pm Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> Re: Hummingbirds in the ground?
7/5/18 12:37 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Hummingbirds in the ground?
7/5/18 8:22 am JFR <johnfredman...> SEMI-PALMATED SANDPIPER AR BOYD POINT
7/4/18 6:52 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
7/4/18 6:47 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
7/4/18 5:56 pm Les Koller <0000020788963bb2-dmarc-request...> Re: Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
7/4/18 5:52 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Here is just one clearly good way to get more people to pay attention to birds, their sounds, their food (the human granted type) and what they're attracted to. This video has gotten almost one million, 750 thousand views. Share it with some people whom y
7/4/18 3:40 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
7/4/18 3:31 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
7/4/18 5:07 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> These are obviously not birds but this sad report is a 'spot on' description of what is happening to birds, mammals and fish all over our planet. Baja California is our next door neighbor. Just one species at a time and then before you know it they're alm
7/3/18 9:03 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - July 3
7/3/18 7:48 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Mississippi Kites
7/3/18 2:34 pm Karen Konarski <karen...> Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
7/3/18 1:48 pm kjdillard <kjdillard...> Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
7/3/18 12:00 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Garden Club Speaker Request, Harrisburg
7/3/18 11:25 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Two questions
7/3/18 10:39 am Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Two questions
7/3/18 7:12 am Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
7/2/18 4:13 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
7/2/18 2:02 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> 3-TERN MORNING IN THE VALLEY
7/2/18 1:58 pm Ann Gordon <chesterann...> Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
7/2/18 12:58 pm Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...> Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
7/2/18 12:56 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
7/2/18 12:55 pm Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...> Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
7/2/18 12:49 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
7/2/18 7:01 am <market...> Re: NEOTROPIC CORMORANT AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND
7/2/18 6:04 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
7/1/18 6:37 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrens and chipmunks
7/1/18 5:10 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
7/1/18 5:06 pm Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...> Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
7/1/18 2:46 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Other Kite
7/1/18 2:20 pm Les Koller <0000020788963bb2-dmarc-request...> Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
7/1/18 2:11 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> NEOTROPIC CORMORANT AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND
7/1/18 11:11 am Cheryl Kester <ckester...> Bald Eagle East of Siloam Springs
7/1/18 9:38 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
7/1/18 8:48 am <herbies...> <herbies...> Mississippi Kite at Crystal Bridges 0730 this morning
7/1/18 5:55 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Purple Martins at Nieting place in Fort Smith know shade is good for them!
6/30/18 12:47 pm Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Swainson’s Hawk (Benton Co.)
6/30/18 6:26 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Sanibel Island
6/30/18 6:09 am Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Mississippi Kite
6/30/18 4:41 am Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: Mississippi Kite
6/30/18 2:28 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Mississippi Kite
6/29/18 11:06 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> Early Fall Migrant Shorebirds Lafayette County 6-29-18
6/29/18 1:21 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Sanibel Island
6/29/18 12:50 pm Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> NEOTROPIC CORMORANT AT EAGLE WATCH (Gentry)
6/27/18 2:09 pm Laster/Roark <elaster523...> A Ducky Day
6/26/18 9:27 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - June 26
6/26/18 1:18 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> bird attacks officer
6/26/18 6:15 am Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Prothronotary warblers nesting in fruit jar
6/26/18 5:38 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> Baker Prairie Natural Area at Harrison
6/25/18 5:04 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Sanibel Island
6/24/18 1:55 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> NYTimes Birder Article
6/24/18 4:51 am Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...> a successful ID
6/23/18 6:44 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Greenwire: Die like an eagle? New data suggest more to the story
6/23/18 6:41 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: DoD Partners in Flight 2017 Annual Report
6/23/18 6:40 am Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...> NEST BOXES STILL ACTIVE AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND
 
Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 10:12 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: south Lafayette County birds 7-21-18
AR-birders,
Yesterday (7-21-18) I made it back out to the area I regularly survey in south Lafayette County just east of the Red River, and
Jeff Trahan joined me. We both survived the experience so I can tell the tale, and temperatures climbed to 103 degrees with a
heat index over 110. We spent most of the day there, and were able to survey the entire farm which is something I rarely have
time to do. Two of the large reservoirs are now giant mud flats, and the number of waders present were impressive by inland
standards making it seem as if we were in the south Louisiana rice country south of I-10 instead. Despite it being just past the
ides of July, shorebird migration is now in full swing with large numbers starting to accumulate at this site. We could not relocate
the Glossy Ibis, but White-faced Ibis were still present, and Plegadis numbers should build as the summer leads to fall. Im pretty
sure I had a Mottled Duck in there on Thursday, but we could not relocate this bird either. Im still surprised that Fulvous Whistling-Ducks
havent made their presence here yet, but hopefully soon. Now that the rice is getting taller, I am hopeful that the King Rails will reappear
as well. The link to the eBird list with embedded photo is below.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47332566

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 8:52 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Robins
I heard that my link did not work.  Attached is a PDF of that paper.
On Sunday, 22 July, 2018, 9:52:11 AM GMT-5, Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Dumb question: Do they get worms that are at least partly visible or can they get at subsurface ones?
And do they eat only worms and caterpillars?
Alyson Hoge Pulaski County
On Jul 22, 2018, at 9:07 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:


Both. In a series of clever experiments, the following study found that robins detect worms by first listening to the slight sounds made by the worms while moving in the soil.  Then the actual strike is done visually.  The cock of the head aids both sound and sight.
file:///C:/Users/sams/Downloads/1997-M&W-AB[1].pdf

On Thursday, 19 July, 2018, 5:26:38 PM GMT-5, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:

What’s the current thinking 🤔 listening or watching?

Sent from my iPhone
On Jul 19, 2018, at 4:44 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:



I have a lot of Robins, I had 5 different nests on my property this year. Standard city yard, with lots of medium sized trees. I like watching them listen for worms. I have a lot of those too. 



Jacque Brown
Centerton, AR 72719

<bluebird2...>






On Jul 18, 2018, at 7:21 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
How Interesting!
J
On Jul 18, 2018, at 6:35 PM, Jerry Davis
<jwdavis...> wrote:


I have found when Robins congregate in yards in my neighborhood this time of year they are eating the army worms in the grass.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

-----Original Message----- From: Robin Buff
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:32 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Robins

I have had Robins in my yard continually this summer. At least 15 - 20. My yard is 5 acres of woods and pasture.

Robin Buff

Robin Buff

On Jul 18, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:

Saw first flock of robins in yard this morning about 25 .

Sent from my iPhone






 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 8:46 am
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Sighting: Crow with white markings
My son saw this crow this week too.
Nancy Young
On Sunday, July 22, 2018, 9:48:20 AM CDT, Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> wrote:

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About an hour ago, at the Kroger on Chenal in WLR, I saw a crow with symmetrical white marks on its wings.  My first ever white feathered crow. The marks were on the top side of the wings, at about the bend out from the shoulders. They were about a half inch wide and one to one and half inches long.  I was able to watch long enough to be sure they were real and not a trick of the light.  As I got out of the car, a Fish Crow flew over and squawked but I don’t that it was the same bird. In fact the Sibley’s talks about this in American Crows but does not mention it in Fish Crows.

 

 

Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after." — Thorin

 

 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 7:52 am
From: Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Robins
Dumb question: Do they get worms that are at least partly visible or can they get at subsurface ones?

And do they eat only worms and caterpillars?

Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County

> On Jul 22, 2018, at 9:07 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Both. In a series of clever experiments, the following study found that robins detect worms by first listening to the slight sounds made by the worms while moving in the soil. Then the actual strike is done visually. The cock of the head aids both sound and sight.
>
> file:///C:/Users/sams/Downloads/1997-M&W-AB[1].pdf
>
> On Thursday, 19 July, 2018, 5:26:38 PM GMT-5, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:
>
>
> What’s the current thinking 🤔 listening or watching?
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 19, 2018, at 4:44 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>>
>
> I have a lot of Robins, I had 5 different nests on my property this year. Standard city yard, with lots of medium sized trees. I like watching them listen for worms. I have a lot of those too.
>
>
>
>
> Jacque Brown
>
> Centerton, AR 72719
>
>
> <bluebird2...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Jul 18, 2018, at 7:21 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>>
>> How Interesting!
>> J
>> On Jul 18, 2018, at 6:35 PM, Jerry Davis
>> <jwdavis...> wrote:
>>
>>> I have found when Robins congregate in yards in my neighborhood this time of year they are eating the army worms in the grass.
>>>
>>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>>> Hot Springs, AR
>>>
>>> -----Original Message----- From: Robin Buff
>>> Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:32 PM
>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>>> Subject: Re: Robins
>>>
>>> I have had Robins in my yard continually this summer. At least 15 - 20. My yard is 5 acres of woods and pasture.
>>>
>>> Robin Buff
>>>
>>> Robin Buff
>>>> On Jul 18, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Saw first flock of robins in yard this morning about 25 .
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 7:48 am
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Sighting: Crow with white markings
About an hour ago, at the Kroger on Chenal in WLR, I saw a crow with
symmetrical white marks on its wings. My first ever white feathered crow.
The marks were on the top side of the wings, at about the bend out from the
shoulders. They were about a half inch wide and one to one and half inches
long. I was able to watch long enough to be sure they were real and not a
trick of the light. As I got out of the car, a Fish Crow flew over and
squawked but I don't that it was the same bird. In fact the Sibley's talks
about this in American Crows but does not mention it in Fish Crows.





Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the
something you were after." - Thorin




 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 7:08 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Robins
Both. In a series of clever experiments, the following study found that robins detect worms by first listening to the slight sounds made by the worms while moving in the soil.  Then the actual strike is done visually.  The cock of the head aids both sound and sight.
file:///C:/Users/sams/Downloads/1997-M&W-AB[1].pdf

On Thursday, 19 July, 2018, 5:26:38 PM GMT-5, Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> wrote:

What’s the current thinking 🤔 listening or watching?

Sent from my iPhone
On Jul 19, 2018, at 4:44 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:



I have a lot of Robins, I had 5 different nests on my property this year. Standard city yard, with lots of medium sized trees. I like watching them listen for worms. I have a lot of those too. 



Jacque Brown
Centerton, AR 72719

<bluebird2...>






On Jul 18, 2018, at 7:21 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
How Interesting!
J
On Jul 18, 2018, at 6:35 PM, Jerry Davis
<jwdavis...> wrote:


I have found when Robins congregate in yards in my neighborhood this time of year they are eating the army worms in the grass.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

-----Original Message----- From: Robin Buff
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:32 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Robins

I have had Robins in my yard continually this summer. At least 15 - 20. My yard is 5 acres of woods and pasture.

Robin Buff

Robin Buff

On Jul 18, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:

Saw first flock of robins in yard this morning about 25 .

Sent from my iPhone





 

Back to top
Date: 7/22/18 6:32 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: binoculars for Indian kids
Two more binoculars donated by kind Arkansans will help kids get into birding in remote parts of India.  Mr. Selvaganesh is a school teacher in a small town in the vast tea plantations of south India.  See the following article about his birding programs in his school.  If you have a pair to donate to this program, please contact me off line.  --Kannan
Student birders at Cinchona Government High School in Valparai


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Student birders at Cinchona Government High School in Valparai

Along with English, teacher K. Selvaganesh has instilled a love for birds and trees in his students at the Cinch...
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---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Selva Ganesh <selvaganesh17...>
Date: Sun, Jul 22, 2018 at 7:26 AM
Subject: Re: binoculars for Valparai

Hi Ragupathi sir, I have received the binoculars from Mr.Aravind yesterday. Both binoculars were very nice and it will be useful for my students. Thank you Ragupathi Sir, Amrit, and Aravind for taking so much effort to bring those to valparai... Thank you all once again.
Thanks and Regards- Selvaganesh K


--
Kannan
 

Back to top
Date: 7/21/18 6:37 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: New Checklist-Level Review
There are two levels of data quality review for checklists submitted to
eBird is the entire checklists information correct, and is each species
correctly identified/tallied. eBird has now separated these two levels in
the review process, plus created a new opportunity to be more open about the
review process. Here is an overview of the change
https://ebird.org/news/ebird-checklist-review-messages.

The reviewed checklists will now display public notes when checklists are
identified as having checklist-level issues, so that users can either
correct these or understand why the records do not appear. Please read and
understand checklist-level issues and how to improve your the quality of
your checklists
https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2948411-public-and-not-publi
c-checklists

Dan Scheiman
eBird Reviewer
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 7/20/18 12:38 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Neotropic Cormorant continues at Eagle Watch
A Neotropic Cormorant was first seen on SWEPCO Lake at Eagle Watch Nature Trail just west of Gentry on June 28. I saw one again today. There are also a dozen or so Double-crested Cormorants on the lake. My best views of the Netropic were from the older of the two blinds. It was perched in the snags immediately west of the blind.

Two broods of Wood Ducks included an adult female with seven full-grown young, plus a second brood that involved 4 young several days old (just past the fuzzy hatchling stage), but without accompaniment by an adult female. Other birds this morning: Great Egret (11), Little Blue Heron (1 adult), Green Heron (3), and Great Blue heron (5).


 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 11:33 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: Glossy Ibis south Lafayette County 7-19-18
AR-birders,
WellI finally found a Glossy Ibis in SW ARand it took long enough. The link to the eBird report with
embedded photos is below. Ive included a number of photos of White-faced Ibis and White Ibis as well
for comparison purposes. Shorebirds are starting to build in numbers and diversity as well.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S47303098

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 3:26 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Robins
What’s the current thinking 🤔 listening or watching?

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 19, 2018, at 4:44 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>
> I have a lot of Robins, I had 5 different nests on my property this year. Standard city yard, with lots of medium sized trees. I like watching them listen for worms. I have a lot of those too.
>
>
>
>
> Jacque Brown
>
> Centerton, AR 72719
>
>
> <bluebird2...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Jul 18, 2018, at 7:21 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>>
>> How Interesting!
>> J
>> On Jul 18, 2018, at 6:35 PM, Jerry Davis
>> <jwdavis...> wrote:
>>
>>> I have found when Robins congregate in yards in my neighborhood this time of year they are eating the army worms in the grass.
>>>
>>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>>> Hot Springs, AR
>>>
>>> -----Original Message----- From: Robin Buff
>>> Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:32 PM
>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>>> Subject: Re: Robins
>>>
>>> I have had Robins in my yard continually this summer. At least 15 - 20. My yard is 5 acres of woods and pasture.
>>>
>>> Robin Buff
>>>
>>> Robin Buff
>>>> On Jul 18, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Saw first flock of robins in yard this morning about 25 .
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 2:44 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Robins
I have a lot of Robins, I had 5 different nests on my property this year. Standard city yard, with lots of medium sized trees. I like watching them listen for worms. I have a lot of those too.




Jacque Brown

Centerton, AR 72719


<bluebird2...>






> On Jul 18, 2018, at 7:21 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> How Interesting!
> J
> On Jul 18, 2018, at 6:35 PM, Jerry Davis
> <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
>> I have found when Robins congregate in yards in my neighborhood this time of year they are eating the army worms in the grass.
>>
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> Hot Springs, AR
>>
>> -----Original Message----- From: Robin Buff
>> Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:32 PM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Robins
>>
>> I have had Robins in my yard continually this summer. At least 15 - 20. My yard is 5 acres of woods and pasture.
>>
>> Robin Buff
>>
>> Robin Buff
>>> On Jul 18, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Saw first flock of robins in yard this morning about 25 .
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone


 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 1:32 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LOON MIGRATION BOAT TRIPS ON BEAVER LAKE THIS FALL
Ahoy there yall with loon fever! With the temperature cresting up towards 100 this afternoon, I got to thinking about this fall, when loons start migrating south, and specifically the boat trips we had fall 2017 on the wonderful, stable, boat used by Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area for trips on Beaver Lake just perfect for cruising around and bird watching. Just think about that big cold air rushing south, full of migrants! Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will again partner with Hobbs for three loon migration trips this fall. Maybe waterfowl and everything else trip would be a better term, since there is a lot of bird movement at that time. This falls trips are scheduled for Saturday, October 27; Saturday, November 3; and Sunday November 11. Each trip will depart from Rocky Branch Marina at 10 am. You have to register for these trips through the park (479 789 5000) and there is a small fee (I think $10, a very good deal for a guided 2-hour or so boat trip). Experienced Auduboners and park personnel will be aboard to help with identification.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 12:45 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: Am goldfinches
Another theory about why American Goldfinches nest relatively late: by starting to nest in mid to late summer they largely avoid problems with Brown-headed cowbirds laying eggs in their nests since most of the cowbird egg-laying is completed before the goldfinches start.

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Harriet Hillis Jansma
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 1:34:07 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Am goldfinches


Earlier I sent this message to Alton (not the list), but now I send it to the list because it confirms what Bill is saying about their season:


Alton, we still have goldfinches regularly around our garden in Fayetteville, attracted to the sunflowers that have developed their seedheads. They aren't migrants. They stay here from spring until migration.
Harriet Jansma


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 12:06:57 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Am goldfinches


Because goldfinches raise their young on ripe seeds rather than on insects, they nest late. So this is their breeding season, and the adults are dressed appropriately.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 10:23 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Am goldfinches

Pair at my feeder this AM. Still in breeding plumage. In fall migration?

A D Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Faka.ms%2Fghei36&data=02%7C01%7C%7Ccaf3b707bad74139629b08d5ed8ba28b%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636676106333442433&sdata=C2cEJzr8%2BTz9Rd4RWDYWK3xXFmNCSxIrvHMXomM7HxY%3D&reserved=0>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 11:34 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: Am goldfinches
Earlier I sent this message to Alton (not the list), but now I send it to the list because it confirms what Bill is saying about their season:


Alton, we still have goldfinches regularly around our garden in Fayetteville, attracted to the sunflowers that have developed their seedheads. They aren't migrants. They stay here from spring until migration.
Harriet Jansma


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 12:06:57 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Am goldfinches


Because goldfinches raise their young on ripe seeds rather than on insects, they nest late. So this is their breeding season, and the adults are dressed appropriately.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 10:23 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Am goldfinches

Pair at my feeder this AM. Still in breeding plumage. In fall migration?

A D Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Faka.ms%2Fghei36&data=02%7C01%7C%7Ccaf3b707bad74139629b08d5ed8ba28b%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636676106333442433&sdata=C2cEJzr8%2BTz9Rd4RWDYWK3xXFmNCSxIrvHMXomM7HxY%3D&reserved=0>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 11:15 am
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Am goldfinches
It’s my understanding goldfinches are one of our latest breeding primarily feeding young seeds unlike most/all of our other songbirds. I’m sure there are others on here who would know more. I’m interested to hear from others.

Adam Schaffer

> On Jul 19, 2018, at 10:23 AM, Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> wrote:
>
> Pair at my feeder this AM. Still in breeding plumage. In fall migration?
>
> A D Patton
> Fort Smith
>
> Get Outlook for Android
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 10:07 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Re: Am goldfinches
Because goldfinches raise their young on ripe seeds rather than on insects, they nest late. So this is their breeding season, and the adults are dressed appropriately.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2018 10:23 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Am goldfinches

Pair at my feeder this AM. Still in breeding plumage. In fall migration?

A D Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Faka.ms%2Fghei36&data=02%7C01%7C%7Ccaf3b707bad74139629b08d5ed8ba28b%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636676106333442433&sdata=C2cEJzr8%2BTz9Rd4RWDYWK3xXFmNCSxIrvHMXomM7HxY%3D&reserved=0>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/19/18 8:24 am
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Am goldfinches
Pair at my feeder this AM. Still in breeding plumage. In fall migration?

A D Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 6:36 pm
From: Abby Gibson <000000544cf96f92-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbills
Two Roseate Spoonbills at the egret roost at the Lake Chicot Pumping plant tonight, one was in breeding plumage. I remembered my spotting scope this time and got crappy iPhone pics through it. Mosquitos were fierce.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 5:22 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Robins
How Interesting!
J
On Jul 18, 2018, at 6:35 PM, Jerry Davis
<jwdavis...> wrote:

> I have found when Robins congregate in yards in my neighborhood this time of year they are eating the army worms in the grass.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
> -----Original Message----- From: Robin Buff
> Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:32 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Robins
>
> I have had Robins in my yard continually this summer. At least 15 - 20. My yard is 5 acres of woods and pasture.
>
> Robin Buff
>
> Robin Buff
>> On Jul 18, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:
>>
>> Saw first flock of robins in yard this morning about 25 .
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 4:35 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Robins
I have found when Robins congregate in yards in my neighborhood this time of
year they are eating the army worms in the grass.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

-----Original Message-----
From: Robin Buff
Sent: Wednesday, July 18, 2018 6:32 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Robins

I have had Robins in my yard continually this summer. At least 15 - 20. My
yard is 5 acres of woods and pasture.

Robin Buff

Robin Buff
> On Jul 18, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:
>
> Saw first flock of robins in yard this morning about 25 .
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 4:33 pm
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: Re: Robins
I have had Robins in my yard continually this summer. At least 15 - 20. My yard is 5 acres of woods and pasture.

Robin Buff

Robin Buff
> On Jul 18, 2018, at 5:26 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:
>
> Saw first flock of robins in yard this morning about 25 .
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 3:27 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Robins
Saw first flock of robins in yard this morning about 25 .

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 1:08 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: PURPLE MARTIN PRE-MIGRATION ROOST AT CENTERTON
There are no drained fish-rearing ponds at the state fish hatchery in Centerton right now, so not much in the way of shorebird migration habitat. But when I drove in there this morning, wires were full of Purple Martins (250 in 2 spots) and another 45 on the ground on the main driveway. Numbers have been building up over the past few weeks. This is probably what could be called a pre-migration roost. Flocking like this begins as soon as young fledge, with all of the various ages of birds flocking together. Martins along the driveway were collecting little bits of gravel that ingested helps them digest the tough chitin that form insect exoskeletons. The young birds have to learn the ropes, of course. I saw some collect small gravels and swallow them, others collect too-large pebbles that of course had to be discarded. I was going to claim that with so many martins on hand, the mosquito problems at the hatchery have no doubt gone away. But, of course, contrary to once common claims, martins dont eat many mosquitoes. According to authoritative Birds of North America on line, what they are mostly catching are various kinds of flying beetles, bugs, wasps, crane flies, etc.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/18/18 6:51 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: www.audubon.org
Perhaps the editors should not include those questions with offensive and inane comments. But remember, as the F-bomb-sensitive editors retire, they will be replaced with others with different priorities. (By many accounts, our collective future will have much less wildlife for children to ask questions about!)



I was impressed about the extent of the answers to some weird questions, especially the one about how birds and airplanes (#33) don’t mix well. Also, I believe the highest recorded birdstrike was at 37,000 feet with a Griffon Vulture over Ivory Coast. Others have been reported above that altitude (e.g., 54,000 ft) but not verified.



Jeff



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Karen Garrett
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2018 10:02 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: www.audubon.org



The F-bombs are definitely offensive to this 50-something, much less young people, and totally unnecessary.







On Tue, Jul 17, 2018 at 9:12 AM Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> wrote:

When I receive emails from www.audubon.org ,not only do I read that particular article, I often end up browsing the site and reading other articles. The links and screenshot attached are for two such articles. I am absolutely ashamed of Audubon for sinking to this level. The Audubon site should not require a " PG or R rating" posted for inappropriate language but it seems that it does. As adults, we should be able to encourage young people to become interested in protecting birds without having to make sure they only see the "G rated" portions of the Audubon website. What I find particularly disturbing is that both of the articles are posted with pictures of young children! How is this acceptable? I think that Audubon chapters/members should speak up on this matter. This is only my personal opinion and perhaps I am out of touch with today's society. If, in fact, I am out touch, I prefer to stay that way.

Pam Weedman

Hot Springs







https://www.audubon.org/news/the-story-behind-foul-mouthed-effin-birds-twitter-account



https://www.audubon.org/news/buzzfeed-asked-bunch-bird-questions-and-we-answered












 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/18 10:14 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Kim Smith memorial gathering

All are welcome to acelebration of the life of

KimberlyG. Smith




Saturday, August 25th

Vesper Chapel at MountSequoyah Center

150 Skyline Drive -Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

Thegathering will begin at 2 PM with speakers who will share memories of Kim.Anyone interested in speaking will be encouraged to do so. Bring your happy remembrances to share with all aboutthe man who touched so many of our lives. Casual dress is expected and lightrefreshment will be provided. Please share this announcement with anyone youfeel may like to attend.

 

Ifyou require overnight accommodations, there are options available at MtSequoyah.org. More information about on-site lodging can be found at www.mountsequoyah.org.

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/18 8:02 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: www.audubon.org
The F-bombs are definitely offensive to this 50-something, much less young
people, and totally unnecessary.



On Tue, Jul 17, 2018 at 9:12 AM Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> wrote:

> When I receive emails from www.audubon.org ,not only do I read that
> particular article, I often end up browsing the site and reading other
> articles. The links and screenshot attached are for two such articles. I am
> absolutely ashamed of Audubon for sinking to this level. The Audubon site
> should not require a " PG or R rating" posted for inappropriate language
> but it seems that it does. As adults, we should be able to encourage young
> people to become interested in protecting birds without having to make sure
> they only see the "G rated" portions of the Audubon website. What I find
> particularly disturbing is that both of the articles are posted with
> pictures of young children! How is this acceptable? I think that Audubon
> chapters/members should speak up on this matter. This is only my personal
> opinion and perhaps I am out of touch with today's society. If, in fact, I
> am out touch, I prefer to stay that way.
> Pam Weedman
> Hot Springs
>
>
>
>
> https://www.audubon.org/news/the-story-behind-foul-mouthed-effin-birds-twitter-account
>
>
> https://www.audubon.org/news/buzzfeed-asked-bunch-bird-questions-and-we-answered
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/18 7:12 am
From: Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...>
Subject: www.audubon.org
When I receive emails from www.audubon.org ,not only do I read that
particular article, I often end up browsing the site and reading other
articles. The links and screenshot attached are for two such articles. I am
absolutely ashamed of Audubon for sinking to this level. The Audubon site
should not require a " PG or R rating" posted for inappropriate language
but it seems that it does. As adults, we should be able to encourage young
people to become interested in protecting birds without having to make sure
they only see the "G rated" portions of the Audubon website. What I find
particularly disturbing is that both of the articles are posted with
pictures of young children! How is this acceptable? I think that Audubon
chapters/members should speak up on this matter. This is only my personal
opinion and perhaps I am out of touch with today's society. If, in fact, I
am out touch, I prefer to stay that way.
Pam Weedman
Hot Springs



https://www.audubon.org/news/the-story-behind-foul-mouthed-e
ffin-birds-twitter-account

https://www.audubon.org/news/buzzfeed-asked-bunch-bird-quest
ions-and-we-answered

 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/18 6:28 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BRING BACK NATIVES IN OUR YARDS: NWAAS MEETING THIS SATURDAY IN THE COOL AT HOBBS
Friends and members of Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society meet Saturday July 21, Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area visitor center, 2 pm. Meeting is free and open to the public. Do not have to be a member to attend. Dr. Dan Scheiman, Bird Conservation Director for Audubon Arkansas, will present "Creating a Bird-Friendly Yard. Urbanization has changed a lot of once ecologically productive land into sterile lawns and other landscapes not particularly friendly to birds and other native life forms. Native plants can play an important role in providing food and cover birds need to thrive. By increasing native plants, decreasing non-native invasive plants, and making other changes, we can improve the value of our yards to birds and other wildlife adapted to life in the Ozarks. Why not take a break from the heat in the cool AC at Hobbs? Check out Dr Dans prescription for a healthier Earth.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/17/18 5:26 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: MORE SHOREBIRDS, PLUS OUT-OF-SEASON WATERFOWL
Shorebirds yesterday at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility: Killdeer (8), Solitary Sandpiper (1; farm pond across road), Spotted Sandpiper (7), Least Sandpiper (1).

Just to add to the discussion about out-of-season waterfowl: birds summering at Alma Wastewater include Greater White-fronted Goose (1), Gadwall (1), Blue-winged Teal (3), Ring-necked Duck (1), Lesser Scaup (2), Common Goldeneye (1). I was curious to see if the teal might actually be associated with local nesting attempt, but so far no. Other ducks at Alma Wastewater this summer include Black-bellied Whistling-Duck and Wood Duck, both for sure local nesting.

Number of out-of-season waterfowl is not unprecedented. There are lots of records involving many species for Arkansas. We included all we knew for the book Arkansas Birds (1986) and as recent discussion on this list illustrates, records continue. I ask a friend of mine who is an active waterfowl hunter about the birds at Alma. He said these could be birds weakened by ingestion of lead shot who could still fly, but did not have strength for migration.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/18 5:29 pm
From: Abby Gibson <000000544cf96f92-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Roseate spoonbill at Lake Chicot pumping plant
> I’m looking at one roseate spoonbill at the egret roost on the levee south of the Lake Chicot pumping plant right now. Don’t see any wood storks. Several white ibis among the great egrets. Had a storm come through earlier and the temperature is showing 80 degrees. Very nice birding.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/18 3:10 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: White-winged Doves, Centerton - update.
Sunday I saw three WWD together. I got a photo with all three in the photo. I’m trying to take photos from across the yard on a slight slope so they aren’t pretty. I’m actually still trying to sort out the ages of these three. Do the adults ever lose the blue around the eyes? Jacque.


> On Jul 14, 2018, at 4:19 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>
> 7/3/18 I photographed the two White-winged Dove together on my feeder. I hadn’t seen them together for weeks. I left the next day for Houston, TX and drove home 7/8/18 . I took off Monday to recover from the drive. I saw two White-winged Doves and took crappy photos mainly due to the lighting in the morning. I didn’t see them again until quite late in the day.
>
> I have seen two nearly everyday this week after work and again this morning. Today I took a good look at the few photos I had taken and realized there is no blue around the eyes of either Dove. I checked the photo from the 3rd. Both have the blue around the eyes. After a quick check in Sibley’s book I think I can safely say I have two Juvi White-winged Doves. I’d still like to see more than two at a time.
>
> My back yard faces East so in the morning when I’m on the back porch the light would be behind the trees they sit in. So the birds are in shadow on the side I see.
>
> The big dead tree that is on the far side of my next door neighbors yard is a favorite perch for birds. We haven’t had any significant rain to create a puddle so there is some kind of seep below that tree in the Southland ditch that runs behind my house. The birds take their morning bath in that seep and preen and dry off in the dead tree. There had to be 20 Doves in the tree this morning.
>
> The juvi Eurasian-collered Doves do not have the neck ring yet and they are close in size to the WWD, the Doves have to be facing me to tell what’s what in that tree.
>
> I’m trying to get sharp photos of these two. Hopefully when it cools off a little this evening they’ll come out and pose for me since the sun will be shining on the trees.
>
>
>
>
> Jacque Brown
>
> Centerton, AR 72719
>
> 479-224-6099
> <bluebird2...> <mailto:<bluebird2...>
>
>
>
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/16/18 8:27 am
From: Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...>
Subject: Re: ASCA Field Trip Report
What a great trip! And no one died of the heat!

On Sun, Jul 15, 2018 at 6:56 PM, Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:

> Saturday, thirteen birders headed south to Hope to look for "southern"
> birds for the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's July field trip. First
> stop was the McDonald's in Hope, a reliable spot for french-fry scavaging
> Great-tailed Grackles. The parking lot was hopping with GTGRs, including
> three juveniles begging mom to feed them more junk food. We then headed to
> Bois D'Arc Wildlife Management Area south of Hope. We got very lucky on the
> weather. In spite of the close to 100 degree weather predicted, the morning
> temps stayed around the mid-80's. Most stops had shade, and with a nice
> breeze blowing, we stayed reasonably comfortable. We were entertained by
> Purple Gallinule chicks tottering around on the Water Lotus pads, little
> balls of fluff on top of their tall spindly legs and giant feet. Different
> families had different aged chicks. One momma Common Gallinule led a line
> of five babies paddling along behind her as she wove through the lotus
> pads. Green Herons were everywhere. Also seen were lots of Cattle Egrets,
> Great Egrets, Snowy Egrets, Little Blue Herons, one Great Blue Heron,
> Double-crested Cormorants, and four Anhingas. Least Bitterns were their
> usual stubborn selves, with only one flying by all morning.
>
> We also had land birds. Red-headed Woodpeckers, Orchid Oriole, Summer
> Tanager, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Kingfisher,
> Eastern Kingbirds, lots of Red-winged Blackbirds, a soaring adult Bald
> Eagle and Red-tailed Hawk, and Indigo Buntings.
>
> We saw two alligators. The second one was really big and had found
> himself the perfect resting place. He was parked in the shade on the
> ground below the Cattle Egret rookery waiting for his feathered snacks to
> drop from above. It was obvious his strategy was working due to all the
> feathers scattered around him. In the middle of one of the rookeries, we
> found a Black-crowned Night-Heron on a nest, the second adult of the day.
> An early-arriving birder had found a juvenile BCNH before we got to the WMA.
>
> By noon the temperature was climbing quickly so we called it quits and
> headed home. The dragonfly hunters had a great time also, spotting several
> more of the elusive and uncommon Two-striped Forceptail Dragonfly. A fun
> day with great birds and great birders.
> Karen Holliday
> ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
>
>
>
>


--
*Leslie Peacock*
*Managing Editor*
*Arkansas Times*
*501-492-3981*

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 7:29 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob Sunday
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Terry just reminded me we also saw 11 Black Terns today working the water in the middle pond on Huntsman's Road.  Plus, Bob and I saw an additional 25+ Black Terns catching the huge numbers of dragonflies hovering over the rice fields further down Coal Chute Road.  The terns were even diving down into the rice to catch the dragons.Karen HollidayMaumelle

On Sunday, July 15, 2018, 7:39 PM, Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:

#yiv4111443668 blockquote, #yiv4111443668 div.yiv4111443668yahoo_quoted {margin-left:0 !important;border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important;padding-left:1ex !important;background-color:white;}To add to Terry Butler's report from our morning at the Bald Knob NWR. The biggest surprise was the Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks. Bob Harden and I first saw two BBWDs sitting at the edge of Coal Chute Road in the pond just before the turn at the grain bins.  Then something flushed the birds and up popped seven more BBWDs which flew around and around until they settled back into the rice.  If they hadn't flushed we wouldn't have known they were there.  Who knows how many other birds are hidden out of sight buried deep in the rice.Karen HollidayBirding Bald Knob NWR Sunday morning





 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 5:40 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Bald Knob Sunday
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } To add to Terry Butler's report from our morning at the Bald Knob NWR. The biggest surprise was the Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks. Bob Harden and I first saw two BBWDs sitting at the edge of Coal Chute Road in the pond just before the turn at the grain bins.  Then something flushed the birds and up popped seven more BBWDs which flew around and around until they settled back into the rice.  If they hadn't flushed we wouldn't have known they were there.  Who knows how many other birds are hidden out of sight buried deep in the rice.Karen HollidayBirding Bald Knob NWR Sunday morning


 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 4:57 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Report
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Saturday, thirteen birders headed south to Hope to look for "southern" birds for the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's July field trip.  First stop was the McDonald's in Hope, a reliable spot for french-fry scavaging Great-tailed Grackles.  The parking lot was hopping with GTGRs, including three juveniles begging mom to feed them more junk food.  We then headed to Bois D'Arc Wildlife Management Area south of Hope. We got very lucky on the weather. In spite of the close to 100 degree weather predicted, the morning temps stayed around the mid-80's. Most stops had shade, and with a nice breeze blowing, we stayed reasonably comfortable.  We were entertained by Purple Gallinule chicks tottering around on the Water Lotus pads, little balls of fluff on top of their tall spindly legs and giant feet. Different families had different aged chicks.  One momma Common Gallinule led a line of five babies paddling along behind her as she wove through the lotus pads.  Green Herons were everywhere. Also seen were lots of Cattle Egrets, Great Egrets, Snowy Egrets, Little Blue Herons, one Great Blue Heron, Double-crested Cormorants, and four Anhingas.  Least Bitterns were their usual stubborn selves, with only one flying by all morning.
We also had land birds.  Red-headed Woodpeckers, Orchid Oriole, Summer Tanager, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Kingfisher, Eastern Kingbirds, lots of Red-winged Blackbirds, a soaring adult Bald Eagle and Red-tailed Hawk, and Indigo Buntings.

We saw two alligators.  The second one was really big and had found himself the perfect resting place.  He was parked in the shade on the ground below the Cattle Egret rookery waiting for his feathered snacks to drop from above. It was obvious his strategy was working due to all the feathers scattered around him. In the middle of one of the rookeries, we found a Black-crowned Night-Heron on a nest, the second adult of the day.  An early-arriving birder had found a juvenile BCNH before we got to the WMA.
By noon the temperature was climbing quickly so we called it quits and headed home.  The dragonfly hunters had a great time also, spotting several more of the elusive and uncommon Two-striped Forceptail Dragonfly.  A fun day with great birds and great birders.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator



 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 1:09 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: out of season bird
Myself, Judy, Karen Holliday, and Bob Harden saw a female Ruddy Duck at
BKNWR today..Lots of Black-necked Stilts, Great Egrets, Little Blue and
Great Blue Herons, Mississippi Kites and White Ibis. An Avocet, Pectoral
and a couple of Yellow-crowned Night Herons. I think Karen and Bob had a
few other birds they might report later.

I also had a 2nd time yard bird yesterday, a Greater Roadrunner.

 

Back to top
Date: 7/15/18 10:10 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: New yard bird
What a surprise! A Louisiana Waterthrush showed up in my back yard this morning. Was so surprised that I only got sorry pictures, but good enough for ID. Pictures are on my Face book site.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, Boone Co., AR


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 4:46 pm
From: Cynthia Patton <00000151b1cba27b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: A question of mockingbirds
I have the Singing Life of Birds checked out from FVL public library and it does include the CD. I have unfortunately not been able to devote the time and attention to it so will be turning it back in so if anyone in NWAr is interested should be there and shelved I. A few days. Cindy

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 9, 2018, at 9:30 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>
> Wanna’ see some interesting Mockingbird interactions: let your poke salad grow to maturity. They love—and protect--the berries.
>
> Also, we were visiting the Clinton Library on one of its free days, and observed Mockingbirds picking the bugs from grills of vehicles. Definitely survivors!
>
> Jeff Short
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Glenn
> Sent: Saturday, July 07, 2018 11:59 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: A question of mockingbirds
>
> We have a lot of mockingbirds around our house, as I’m sure just about anybody who lives in Arkansas does. I enjoy listening to their singing. Most of the time their songs do not sound like any other bird I am familiar with, so I assume these are unique mockingbird songs. However, since I haven’t heard every bird in the world, I can’t vouch for that. Occasionally, the mockingbird that has been living in our holly tree for a few years will sound like a Great-crested Flycatcher. And at other times it will sound like birds I’ve heard before, even though I can’t quite place which bird. So my question, do mockingbirds really mock other birds? The way the human mind works is it tries to make sense out of randomness. For instance, we will see a human shape in the shadows, even though it is only bushes. So, is our mind telling us the mockingbird is singing like an Eastern Bluebird because his song is similar for a few short notes? Or is it really singing a bluebird song? Have there been any studies where a mockingbird has been locked up with a Kookaburra, for example, to see if it will start singing like a Kookaburra? Why does a mockingbird sing? I assume it is to attract a mate. Does a female mockingbird get turned on when a male mockingbird sings like a towhee? Or is it just the number of different sounds that get her attention? What is especially interesting to me is our local mockingbird makes sounds that sound like birds that I know have not been in our neighborhood. And I know our mockingbird is not a world traveler, it stays pretty close to our neighborhood as far as I can tell. So it makes more sense to me to think the mockingbird is singing a bunch of random noise songs, some of which sound like other birds, then it does to think they are singing songs of birds they have never heard before. That was probably more than one question.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot

 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 4:17 pm
From: ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...>
Subject: Bird Photos.
I made my annual trip to Bois D’ Arc WMA yesterday and have posted some photos to my website.

Here is the link if you would like to look at them.

http://www.pbase.com/rherron/boisdarc71318 <http://www.pbase.com/rherron/boisdarc71318>

Hope you enjoy.
Thanks.
Robert.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 4:12 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: White-winged Doves, Centerton - update.
I'm coming up Thursday Jacque, Might want to swing by and try to see
them if thats ok

On Sat, Jul 14, 2018 at 4:19 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:

> 7/3/18 I photographed the two White-winged Dove together on my feeder. I
> hadn’t seen them together for weeks. I left the next day for Houston, TX
> and drove home 7/8/18 . I took off Monday to recover from the drive. I saw
> two White-winged Doves and took crappy photos mainly due to the lighting in
> the morning. I didn’t see them again until quite late in the day.
>
> I have seen two nearly everyday this week after work and again this
> morning. Today I took a good look at the few photos I had taken and
> realized there is no blue around the eyes of either Dove. I checked the
> photo from the 3rd. Both have the blue around the eyes. After a quick check
> in Sibley’s book I think I can safely say I have two Juvi White-winged
> Doves. I’d still like to see more than two at a time.
>
> My back yard faces East so in the morning when I’m on the back porch the
> light would be behind the trees they sit in. So the birds are in shadow on
> the side I see.
>
> The big dead tree that is on the far side of my next door neighbors yard
> is a favorite perch for birds. We haven’t had any significant rain to
> create a puddle so there is some kind of seep below that tree in the
> Southland ditch that runs behind my house. The birds take their morning
> bath in that seep and preen and dry off in the dead tree. There had to be
> 20 Doves in the tree this morning.
>
> The juvi Eurasian-collered Doves do not have the neck ring yet and they
> are close in size to the WWD, the Doves have to be facing me to tell what’s
> what in that tree.
>
> I’m trying to get sharp photos of these two. Hopefully when it cools off a
> little this evening they’ll come out and pose for me since the sun will be
> shining on the trees.
>
>
>
>
> Jacque Brown
>
> Centerton, AR 72719
>
> 479-224-6099
> <bluebird2...>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 3:14 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Female Great-tailed Grackle in LR
Great-tailed grackle is presently across the street from the Shell station at the Valero station in the back parking lot. There is also a chicken feeding on the side of the Valero station (!?) This is at the Fourche Dam Pike exit off of 440 in Little Rock.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 7, 2018, at 3:20 PM, Lance Runion <000000d4f8891ec6-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Just now saw the female Great-tailed Grackle in the Shell parking lot at the corner of Lindsey Rd and Fourche Dam Pike in SE Little Rock. Collecting bugs around the parked rigs. No nest site found.
>
> Lance Runion
> LR, AR
>
> Sent from my iPhone. Please forgive any misspellings or punctuation errors.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 2:33 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: White-winged Doves, Centerton - update.
7/3/18 I photographed the two White-winged Dove together on my feeder. I hadn’t seen them together for weeks. I left the next day for Houston, TX and drove home 7/8/18 . I took off Monday to recover from the drive. I saw two White-winged Doves and took crappy photos mainly due to the lighting in the morning. I didn’t see them again until quite late in the day.

I have seen two nearly everyday this week after work and again this morning. Today I took a good look at the few photos I had taken and realized there is no blue around the eyes of either Dove. I checked the photo from the 3rd. Both have the blue around the eyes. After a quick check in Sibley’s book I think I can safely say I have two Juvi White-winged Doves. I’d still like to see more than two at a time.

My back yard faces East so in the morning when I’m on the back porch the light would be behind the trees they sit in. So the birds are in shadow on the side I see.

The big dead tree that is on the far side of my next door neighbors yard is a favorite perch for birds. We haven’t had any significant rain to create a puddle so there is some kind of seep below that tree in the Southland ditch that runs behind my house. The birds take their morning bath in that seep and preen and dry off in the dead tree. There had to be 20 Doves in the tree this morning.

The juvi Eurasian-collered Doves do not have the neck ring yet and they are close in size to the WWD, the Doves have to be facing me to tell what’s what in that tree.

I’m trying to get sharp photos of these two. Hopefully when it cools off a little this evening they’ll come out and pose for me since the sun will be shining on the trees.




Jacque Brown

Centerton, AR 72719

479-224-6099
<bluebird2...>







 

Back to top
Date: 7/14/18 10:22 am
From: Sarah Morris <saraha.morris1...>
Subject: White ibis
There is still a field full of white ibis at Bald Knob.

Sarah

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/18 9:58 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: A question of mockingbirds
The sweetest mockingbird song(s) we ever heard came from a mama mocker singing lullabies to her hatching chicks. Just after War Memorial Health Club was built we came out of the building to hear the softest sweetest soothing crooning coming from a low tree near the door. There was a mockingbird on her nest looking like she was singing to herself. Unlike the usual feisty response of a mockingbird whose space had been invaded, she didn’t seem particularly fazed by the people going in & out. We stood back & listened. She just kept up this sweet trilling. The next day it was obvious she had chicklets in the nest & she was murmuring again. This seemed to be her pattern until one day they were gone. Hopefully happily fledged. That was before cell phones so no recording just the sweet memory. We never witnessed that behavior again. Definitely a softer side of an often belligerent bird. Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 9, 2018, at 5:40 PM, Les Koller <0000020788963bb2-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/18 3:30 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Willets at Boyd Point
John saw one Willet at Boyd Point this morning and this afternoon I had a
flock of seven fly by. I could not find them afterwards so I’m not sure if
they are still there or not. At any rate they are closed Saturday and
Sunday.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/18 1:55 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
We made our first trip in a while to BK this afternoon. A lot of birds in the rice fields. Highlights include
1 American avocet55 white ibis, juveniles62 little blues2 cattle egret18 snowy egret120 great egret8 black-necked stilts5 green herons12 great blue herons
We saw a flock of about 20 sandpipers flying but couldn't make out what they were.
Glenn WyattCabot


Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 7/13/18 3:52 am
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Male Ruby-throats
It's been two months or more since I saw a male RTHU at my feeder until
Wednesday. Hummers practically every day, always female. Then Wednesday and
Thursday at least one male. Just an observation. I've heard that after the
4th of July fall migration starts.





Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly
usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the
something you were after." - Thorin




 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/18 7:12 pm
From: Jeremy Skaggs <jeremy.skaggs...>
Subject: Re: Least Terns at LRAFB
I observed a large flock around the rear of the BX a couple of weeks ago.
And haven't seen them since. Maybe someone else has a bigger puzzle piece.

Jeremy Skaggs

On Wed, Jul 11, 2018, 8:42 PM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

> After swimming laps at the base pool, we head to the ponds near the RV
> park for a sandwich. There, we watch the resident birds, and usually,
> Least Terns fishing in the pond and lake across the road.
>
>
>
> Last year we were seeing 5 or 6 birds. However, this year, we saw 2 birds
> earlier in the summer, but today, none. We noticed the water levels are
> lower in the pond. I was wondering why the terns have left for good.
> Anyone from LRAFB –especially the USDA wildlife expert--still monitoring
> this listserv?
>
>
>
> Jeff Short
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/18 6:53 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Dave's Garden bird links
Ran across these links today from DG. Thought I would pass them along:
https://davesgarden.com/guides/birdfiles/?utm_medium=Email
<https://davesgarden.com/guides/birdfiles/?utm_medium=Email&utm_source=Exact
Target&utm_campaign> &utm_source=ExactTarget&utm_campaign=



I haven't gone through them, so I can't vouch for their veracity.



Jeff Short


 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/18 6:42 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Least Terns at LRAFB
After swimming laps at the base pool, we head to the ponds near the RV park
for a sandwich. There, we watch the resident birds, and usually, Least
Terns fishing in the pond and lake across the road.



Last year we were seeing 5 or 6 birds. However, this year, we saw 2 birds
earlier in the summer, but today, none. We noticed the water levels are
lower in the pond. I was wondering why the terns have left for good.
Anyone from LRAFB -especially the USDA wildlife expert--still monitoring
this listserv?



Jeff Short


 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/18 10:24 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Female Great-tailed Grackle in LR
Had a chance to run by the Shell station this morning but unfortunately there were mowers, blowers and people picking up trash for the mowers, so no grackle. Maybe she will be back after it calms down.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 7, 2018, at 3:20 PM, Lance Runion <000000d4f8891ec6-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Just now saw the female Great-tailed Grackle in the Shell parking lot at the corner of Lindsey Rd and Fourche Dam Pike in SE Little Rock. Collecting bugs around the parked rigs. No nest site found.
>
> Lance Runion
> LR, AR
>
> Sent from my iPhone. Please forgive any misspellings or punctuation errors.
 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/18 6:04 am
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 10
Rob Sanders and I surveyed birds at Red Slough yesterday and found 60
species. Things are really slowing down as far as singing among the song
birds making it hard to detect such species as the warblers. The heronry on
Pintail Lake is going strong with lots of young in the nests. A lot of the
Anhinga young have left their nests and climbed higher in the trees waiting
to be fed. Many of these look on the verge of being able to fly.
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks are hanging around some of our duck boxes and
may be egg laying. Here is our list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 7

Wood Duck - 6

Gadwall - 1 male

Pied-billed Grebe - 2

Neotropic Cormorant - 10

Anhinga - 32

Great-blue Heron - 14

Great Egret - 89

Snowy Egret - 145

Little-blue Heron - 88

Cattle Egret - 425

Green Heron - 5

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 1

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 13

White Ibis - 109

Black Vulture - 8

Turkey Vulture - 19

Mississippi Kite - 29

Purple Gallinule - 15

Common Gallinule - 18 adults (also numerous broods of young.)

American Coot - 4

Killdeer - 2

Mourning Dove - 8

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 3

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 5

Bell's Vireo - 3

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 1

Fish Crow - 3

Tree Swallow - 9

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 2

Cliff Swallow - 5

Barn Swallow - 17

Carolina Chickadee - 1

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren - 10

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 7

Yellow-breasted Chat - 3

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 4

Northern Cardinal - 13

Indigo Bunting - 25

Painted Bunting - 3

Dickcissel - 14

Red-winged Blackbird - 17

Common Grackle - 1

Brown-headed Cowbird - 2

Orchard Oriole - 3





Odonates:



Regal Darner

Swamp Darner

Prince Baskettail

Four-spotted Pennant

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher

Black Saddlebags







Herps:

American Alligator

Green Treefrog

Bullfrog







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR
















 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/18 3:32 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Red-Eyed Vireos
Interestingly enough, in more western parts of Benton County, I have
noticed the same thing with both Indigo Buntings and Blue Grosbeaks. It
seems odd to me to be finding Blue Grosbeaks in every nook and cranny, but
I'm not complaining. On the other hand, I am not finding Painted Buntings
or Bell's Vireos in any of these areas this year. Those two species were
never as widespread as the two "blue birds" are this year. Oddly enough, I
have found Yellow-billed Cuckoos in several of these locations this year,
which seems like totally the wrong habitat for them.

Karen Garrett

On Tue, Jul 10, 2018, 10:04 AM <market...> wrote:

> I am seeing and hearing Red-Eyed Vireos EVERYWHERE I go east of Rogers
> including Prairie Creek Recreation Area, Hobbs State Park, and Blackburn
> Creek Nursey. There must be thousands of them around right now.
>
> Here’s a photo I got on the Pigeon Roost Trail out at Hobbs on Sunday –
>
> https://www.ronbird.photo/Pigeon-Roost-10-26-14/i-Z6ZntXz/A
>
>
>
> Ron Bird
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/18 5:05 pm
From: Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Strange Duck
W.K. —

I googled 

"brown duck with bright red beak"

and got this, which sounds exactly like your bird.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Black-bellied_Whistling-Duck/id

Besides the photos, it has descriptions, such as:

Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks roam edges of shallow ponds, golf courses, city parks, and schoolyards. They also frequent agricultural fields, particularly flooded rice fields. They seem to readily adopt human-altered habitats, and this has helped them move north into the southern U.S. in recent decades.

and then I googled

"Black-bellied Whistling-Duck not afraid of people"

and found this photo:

https://villages-news.com/76037-2/

I'd have to say these ducks are NOT afraid of people!

Alyson Hoge
Pulaski County











On Jul 10, 2018, at 02:22 PM, "W. K. Holloway" <wkholloway...> wrote:

Spotted a solitary duck I have never seen on July 7. Location: White Co., wading and foraging in a ditch on golf course. Cinnamon brown. About the size of a mallard but longer legs and neck. Very bright red bill. Narrow black streak on crown and down nape of neck. Seemed more comfortable wading than swimming. Quite docile. Was able to approach within 15 feet. Never flew off. Could this be a Black-bellied Whistling Duck? Can respond at: <wkholloway...>

 

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Date: 7/10/18 3:02 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Best of the Valley today
I made a trip this morning to the Arkansas River Valley, covering several spots between Mulberry and Alma. Here are a few highlights:

-- juvenile male Wood Duck swimming through full reflection of a Great Egret, in a still pool along Vine Prairie Road at Mulberry near the Arkansas River
-- Bank Swallow, first of the season, with Barn, Tree, Cliff, and Rough-winged Swallows all perched in an open shed, out of the sun, at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility
-- Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks: 2 adults with 2 young, 2 adults with 4 young, plus 4 other adults with no visible young, all at a stock pond on private ranch land along Orrick Road near Alma Wastewater
-- Least Sandpiper (1), Semipalmated Sandpiper (1), Spotted Sandpiper (2) at Alma Wastewater
-- Killdeer using a lily pad as a sun shade on a dried up pond near Alma


 

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Date: 7/10/18 1:58 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Strange Duck
Keep in mind that city parks and golf courses are common dumping grounds for pet ducks, and unwanted barnyard ducks that are often hybrids of several domestic and feral duck species. Tameness and lack of willingness to fly are often clues that the bird in question may not be a native wild duck species.

That being said, Black-bellied Whistling Ducks have a chestnut body, black belly, gray face, reddish (or chestnut) crown and nape. It has a white patch on the wing that looks a bit like a white stripe down its side when the bird is at rest. On land walks more upright like a goose.
Is this species not in your field guide? While the range of older guides do not show it in AR it is usually in the book
As a species found in LA and TX.

Karen Rowe

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 10, 2018, at 2:22 PM, W. K. Holloway <wkholloway...> wrote:
>
> Spotted a solitary duck I have never seen on July 7. Location: White Co., wading and foraging in a ditch on golf course. Cinnamon brown. About the size of a mallard but longer legs and neck. Very bright red bill. Narrow black streak on crown and down nape of neck. Seemed more comfortable wading than swimming. Quite docile. Was able to approach within 15 feet. Never flew off. Could this be a Black-bellied Whistling Duck? Can respond at: <wkholloway...>
 

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Date: 7/10/18 12:22 pm
From: W. K. Holloway <wkholloway...>
Subject: Strange Duck
Spotted a solitary duck I have never seen on July 7. Location: White Co., wading and foraging in a ditch on golf course. Cinnamon brown. About the size of a mallard but longer legs and neck. Very bright red bill. Narrow black streak on crown and down nape of neck. Seemed more comfortable wading than swimming. Quite docile. Was able to approach within 15 feet. Never flew off. Could this be a Black-bellied Whistling Duck? Can respond at: <wkholloway...>
 

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Date: 7/10/18 11:30 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Saturday
The July field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas is this Saturday, July 14.  Please see details below.  It will be fairly hot Saturday so come prepared.  I've also included information about the August field trip.  Anyone is welcome to join us.  You don't have to be a member of ASCA.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me off-list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 July 14Dr. Lester SitzesIII Bois D’Arc WMAHope, HempsteadCountyMeetat 7:00 a.m. at the south end of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430intersection at Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll stop at the McDonalds in Hope (Exit 30off I-30) around 8:45 a.m. for those in south Arkansas who would like to joinus.  Look for Great-tailed Grackles atMcDonalds.  We should arrive at the BoisD’Arc WMA at 9:15 a.m.  Our target birdswill be Purple and Common Gallinules and their chicks, Least Bitterns,Anhingas, Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, herons, egrets, and possibly analligator or two!  Very little walkingwill be involved.  Bring scopes, hat, sunscreen, plentyof water, snacks, and lunch.  Another lunch option is there areseveral restaurants in Hope if you prefer to eat in a restaurant.  BoisD‘Arc WMA is located 10 miles south of Hope. Take Exit 30 off I-30 and go east. Continue past McDonald’s, then under the railroad overpass.  At the light at the big intersection, turnright onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of amile.  At the brown sign, turn left ontoHwy. 174.  Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles tothe 3-way stop sign at Spring Hill.  Turnright onto Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4miles.  Turn right at the white woodenWMA sign just before the highway ends in the lake.  Follow the paved road, then turn left onto thefirst gravel road and go down to the lake. GPS: 33.558062, -93.694239 August 25Bald Knob NationalWildlife RefugeBald Knob, WhiteCountyMeet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock in the Other Center parking lot onthe east side behind McDonald’s.  TheOther Center is on McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall.  Take Exit 1 west off US-67/167.  We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR around 8:30a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.  This federal refuge is also a NationalAudubon Important Bird Area.  We expectto find shorebirds, herons, night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks andRoseate Spoonbills.  It will be very hotso bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If you have a scope, bring it.  Very little walking will be involved.  There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 atBald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for drivingdirections and more information about the refuge.  GPS: 35.260233, -91.571903  
 

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Date: 7/10/18 10:26 am
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling-Duck
Greetings all
Mon evening I saw a pair of Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks along hwy 105, in the Atkins Bottoms. (Just South of town)
In the tall grass beside the road. Both adults were on alert, so I wouldn't be surprised if they had ducklings hidden in the grass.
Cheers, Leif at Hector




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Date: 7/10/18 8:04 am
From: <market...>
Subject: Red-Eyed Vireos
I am seeing and hearing Red-Eyed Vireos EVERYWHERE I go east of Rogers
including Prairie Creek Recreation Area, Hobbs State Park, and Blackburn
Creek Nursey. There must be thousands of them around right now.

Here's a photo I got on the Pigeon Roost Trail out at Hobbs on Sunday -

https://www.ronbird.photo/Pigeon-Roost-10-26-14/i-Z6ZntXz/A



Ron Bird


 

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Date: 7/10/18 7:52 am
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: STOP Bill Shepherd-Joe Tucker thread; back to BIRDs
THANK YOU JOE NEAL!



Yes, Glenn just sent me a PM informing me that I must have insulted all you great experts! When I responded to Glenn, I had NOT seen any other response. I was simply asking for folks like you, Bill, Dan S, Will B, Karen etc to chime in. Folks who have actually studied the issue both academically and through their years of field work.


Glenn, WIll and Dan have been very kind and helpful to me and my education. I love all things natural, beautiful and all science. I have great curiosity and interests which makes it difficult to spend enough time on any one subject so I have to rely upon yours and their expertise. I appreciate all the help I can get!


I hope this clears up any miscommunication and hurt feelings.






-----Original Message-----
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Tue, Jul 10, 2018 5:36 am
Subject: STOP Bill Shepherd-Joe Tucker thread; back to BIRDs



Hi All, From ARBIRDs list Management: Please no more comments on the Joe Tucker - Bill Shepherd thread. As Daniel Mason pointed out, it is obviously a miscommunication of some sort with no intention on any side to defame. So NO MORE COMMENTS on this.


As regular ARBIRD readers know, our list owner and manager, Prof Kimberly G. Smith, passed away April 9. His colleague in UA-Fayetteville Biological Sciences, Prof J.D. Willson, agreed to take over management of the list. Professor Willson is an expert birder, ecologist, and renowned for Willson Lab and its work on reptiles and amphibians. He is in Africa part of this summer and ask me to act in his place until his return to campus.


So, let's get back to BIRDs.













 

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Date: 7/10/18 7:50 am
From: Karen Konarski <karen...>
Subject: BIRDS & BUGS BOOK
FYI   The 100 Insects of AR is at WildBIRDS Unlimited in the Heights
(Little Rock)  ....  and there is that 10% discount for Auduboners
(Audubonians??)   Karen Hart
 

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Date: 7/10/18 7:47 am
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dear Arbirders - miscommunication
THANK YOU DANIEL!



Yes, Glenn just sent me a PM informing me that I must have insulted all you great experts! When I responded to Glenn, I had NOT seen any other response. (I still have NOT seen Bill's -- so sorry Bill!) I was simply asking for folks like Mike , Bill, Dan, Will, Karen etc to chime in. Folks who have actually studied the issue both academically and through their years of field work.


Glenn, WIll B and Dan S have been very kind and helpful to me and my education. I love all things natural, beautiful and all science. I have great curiosity and interests which makes it difficult to spend enough time on any one subject so I have to rely upon yours and their expertise. I appreciate all the help I can get!


I hope this clears up any miscommunication and hurt feelings.





-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
To: Joe Tucker <jttllt...>; ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 9, 2018 11:53 pm
Subject: Re: Dear Arbirders - miscommunication


Miscommunication... I'm an expert on that myself.
Joe Tucker, you had commented on the mockingbird threat with this comment:

"GREAT questions Glenn. I hope some of the real bird experts will respond. Dan???"

My guess is that Bill had commented(possibly privately) before your comment and so to him, it looked like a comment aimed at him, suggesting his advice(which I didn't see) was not worth much.

Bill, if you're following this, I don't think Joe saw your comments and I am certain his comment was not referring to you.

I make these errors myself... and cause them as well. :(

I wonder if birds ever miscommunicate in some way. That could be interesting.

And now, back to birds... :)
Peace

Daniel Mason






Virus-free. www.avast.com






 

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Date: 7/10/18 7:42 am
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dear Arbirders
THANK YOU MICHAEL!!!


Yes, Glenn just sent me a PM informing me that I must have insulted all you great experts! When I responded to Glenn, I had NOT seen any other response. I was simply asking for folks like you, Bill, Dan, Will, Karen etc to chime in. Folks who have actually studied the issue both academically and through their years of field work.


Glenn, WIll and Dan have been very kind and helpful to me and my education. I love all things natural, beautiful and all science. I have great curiosity and interests which makes it difficult to spend enough time on any one subject so I have to rely upon yours and their expertise. I appreciate all the help I can get!


I hope this clears up any miscommunication and hurt feelings.






-----Original Message-----
From: Michael <mplinz...>
To: Joe Tucker <jttllt...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 9, 2018 10:31 pm
Subject: Re: Dear Arbirders




Joe,
None of my business...but...
I’m guessing Bill must have replied to Glen right before your comment to Glen about experts...
Bill is an expert but like all of us as we get older...we get a little cranky some days. And I suspect he took the comment to be directed to him.
He really is a good guy...and an excellent birder.
I hope you can shoot him a note off list and let him know you weren’t directing the comment to him.


Michael Linz

On Jul 9, 2018, at 11:10 PM, Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:



WHOA??? I have no idea what this about. I think Mr. Shepard may have me confused with some one else. I do not know him. I have never written to or about him. I respectfully ask that he retract this slanderous statement and refrain from referring to my name in the future.


The real Joe Tucker, Cabot, AR



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 9, 2018 5:24 pm
Subject: Dear Arbirders



Joe Tucker (whoever that may be) tells everyone on this list that I am not an expert (I wonder how he knows that) and then hides behind a screen that prevents delivery of my reply to him. Maybe he didn't intend to slight me. But, if that's the case, he should be careful about the implications of what he writes.


Bill Shepherd



Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918






 

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Date: 7/10/18 3:36 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: STOP Bill Shepherd-Joe Tucker thread; back to BIRDs
Hi All, From ARBIRDs list Management: Please no more comments on the Joe Tucker - Bill Shepherd thread. As Daniel Mason pointed out, it is obviously a miscommunication of some sort with no intention on any side to defame. So NO MORE COMMENTS on this.


As regular ARBIRD readers know, our list owner and manager, Prof Kimberly G. Smith, passed away April 9. His colleague in UA-Fayetteville Biological Sciences, Prof J.D. Willson, agreed to take over management of the list. Professor Willson is an expert birder, ecologist, and renowned for Willson Lab and its work on reptiles and amphibians. He is in Africa part of this summer and ask me to act in his place until his return to campus.


So, let's get back to BIRDs.





 

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Date: 7/9/18 9:53 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Dear Arbirders - miscommunication
Miscommunication...  I'm an expert on that myself.
Joe Tucker, you had commented on the mockingbird threat with this comment:

"GREAT questions Glenn. I hope some of the real bird experts will
respond.  Dan???"

My guessis that Bill had commented(possibly privately) before your
comment and so to him, it looked like a comment aimed at him, suggesting
his advice(which I didn't see) was not worth much.

Bill, if you're following this, I don't think Joe saw your comments and
I am certain his comment was not referring to you.

I make these errors myself... and cause them as well. :(

I wonder if birds ever miscommunicate in some way.  That could be
interesting.

And now, back to birds... :)
Peace

Daniel Mason


---
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https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

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Date: 7/9/18 8:11 pm
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Dear Arbirders
WHOA??? I have no idea what this about. I think Mr. Shepard may have me confused with some one else. I do not know him. I have never written to or about him. I respectfully ask that he retract this slanderous statement and refrain from referring to my name in the future.


The real Joe Tucker, Cabot, AR



-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 9, 2018 5:24 pm
Subject: Dear Arbirders



Joe Tucker (whoever that may be) tells everyone on this list that I am not an expert (I wonder how he knows that) and then hides behind a screen that prevents delivery of my reply to him. Maybe he didn't intend to slight me. But, if that's the case, he should be careful about the implications of what he writes.


Bill Shepherd



Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918



 

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Date: 7/9/18 7:36 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders An Important Connection
I really hate running into those webs in the morning! I’ll take solace that my yard is healthy.



A recent article in The Economist noted that spiders, combined (globally) eat as much animal protein as humans. I’m sure that will change as the human population increases and the spider population decreases.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Monday, July 09, 2018 12:15 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Birds and Spiders An Important Connection



Birds and Spiders An Important Connection



One of the first birds I took pictures of on our recent trip to Alaska was at Potter’s Marsh where a pair of Common Redpoll were collecting spider webs and Dandelion down for nest building. This was a reminder and a chance to remind you of how important spiders are to birds, not only as a source of food but an important source of nest building material. Spider webs are important as a nest material to hummingbirds and other birds as well. Spiders are an important indicator as to the ecological health of your yard. If you see a spider web and not the spider, most likely a bird has already harvested it. If you have a yard where you do not see spider webs, mostly likely it is not good for native insects that feed birds nor as a healthy environment for birds, other vertebrates, invertebrates or even humans.

Many adults still fear spiders and bath their lawns in pesticides which is not good for people or other forms of life. If you are one that does such you are putting yourself, your family and other life forms at risk of low fertility, cancer and even death. If you have arachnophobia there is therapy for that. Make an effort to have a yard that is healthy for birds, spiders and native insects. Jerry Wayne Davis, July 9, 2018

Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR


 

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Date: 7/9/18 7:31 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: A question of mockingbirds
Wanna’ see some interesting Mockingbird interactions: let your poke salad grow to maturity. They love—and protect--the berries.



Also, we were visiting the Clinton Library on one of its free days, and observed Mockingbirds picking the bugs from grills of vehicles. Definitely survivors!



Jeff Short







From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Glenn
Sent: Saturday, July 07, 2018 11:59 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: A question of mockingbirds



We have a lot of mockingbirds around our house, as I’m sure just about anybody who lives in Arkansas does. I enjoy listening to their singing. Most of the time their songs do not sound like any other bird I am familiar with, so I assume these are unique mockingbird songs. However, since I haven’t heard every bird in the world, I can’t vouch for that. Occasionally, the mockingbird that has been living in our holly tree for a few years will sound like a Great-crested Flycatcher. And at other times it will sound like birds I’ve heard before, even though I can’t quite place which bird. So my question, do mockingbirds really mock other birds? The way the human mind works is it tries to make sense out of randomness. For instance, we will see a human shape in the shadows, even though it is only bushes. So, is our mind telling us the mockingbird is singing like an Eastern Bluebird because his song is similar for a few short notes? Or is it really singing a bluebird song? Have there been any studies where a mockingbird has been locked up with a Kookaburra, for example, to see if it will start singing like a Kookaburra? Why does a mockingbird sing? I assume it is to attract a mate. Does a female mockingbird get turned on when a male mockingbird sings like a towhee? Or is it just the number of different sounds that get her attention? What is especially interesting to me is our local mockingbird makes sounds that sound like birds that I know have not been in our neighborhood. And I know our mockingbird is not a world traveler, it stays pretty close to our neighborhood as far as I can tell. So it makes more sense to me to think the mockingbird is singing a bunch of random noise songs, some of which sound like other birds, then it does to think they are singing songs of birds they have never heard before. That was probably more than one question.



Glenn Wyatt

Cabot


 

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Date: 7/9/18 5:01 pm
From: Jodi Morris <mjodimorris...>
Subject: Bald Eagle on Little Maumelle at Sleepy Hollow
Had a mature bald eagle fly over while kayaking this morning from Sleepy
Hollow WMA boat launch. Just south of Hwy 10, it landed in trees on west
shore.

 

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Date: 7/9/18 4:56 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SOLITARY SANDPIPER AND PURPLE MARTINS AT CENTERTON
Craig State Fish Hatchery at Centerton was over 90 degrees this afternoon with LOTS of heat shimmers. A perfect mid-summer blazer, except fall was already in the air, in terms of birds. For one thing, just up the road I picked up my first of season Solitary Sandpiper, no doubt fresh from Canada. It was working shallows of an almost dried-up farm pond. Driving into the hatchery, I saw 50+ Purple Martins on the wires and more flying over ponds. Sure, martins nest in the area, but now is when they start forming flocks. By third week in July, small aggregations like those today will become really huge thousands of martins, roosting together, before they head south. (Example: at least 5,000 nearby in a roost at Rogers in mid-July 2017). Finally, there were strong flying young and adults of Barn and Cliff Swallows. I was surprised to see them perching in a tree, out of the sun, no doubt defense against overheating in the afternoon blaze.


 

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Date: 7/9/18 3:39 pm
From: Les Koller <0000020788963bb2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: A question of mockingbirds
How about the Yellow-breasted Chat and the Brown Thrasher...how does their repertoire compare to the Northern Mockingbird?
Still seeing Scissortail Flycatchers in downtown Benton.  Wonder where the nesting site is/was?
Sent from my LG Mobile
------ Original message------From: DAN SCHEIMANDate: Mon, Jul 9, 2018 4:07 PMTo: <ARBIRD-L...>;Cc: Subject:Re: A question of mockingbirds
The short answer is that yes, Northern Mockingbirds definitely mimic other birds' sounds, as well as other animal sounds and mechanical sounds. The size of a male's repertoire is a signal to a female of his quality. Females sing too.

The long answer from Birds of North America:

Individuals learn new sounds throughout life. Adults possess extensive vocal repertoires of acoustically distinct sounds called song types (Figure 2). In a detailed study of the repertoires of two males, Burnett (Burnett 1978) found that spring and fall song repertoires have only 1% of their song types in common. Thus, mockingbirds effectively may have two vocal repertoires. Also, a minimum of 35%–63% of song types in a given spring repertoire occur again the subsequent spring; the rest are new (Derrickson 1985, unpubl. data). Finally, spring repertoire size (the total number of distinct song types recorded from an individual as determined from analyses of extensive recordings) increases with age.

Mockingbirds are persistent mimics. Mockingbirds appear to cluster imitations from the same species more often than expected by chance, but this has not been studied in detail.
Mockingbirds have extraordinarily diverse song repertoires consisting of acoustically distinct song types (= song patterns = syllable patterns). These songs are acquired through imitating the calls, songs, and parts of songs of other avian species, vocalizations of non avian species, mechanical sounds, and sounds of other mockingbirds. The proportion of songs imitated is not known and would be extremely difficult to estimate because the entire auditory experience of an individual would need to be known to determine whether a vocalization was acquired through imitation. Geographic variation, although not studied, is likely, given that mockingbirds are relatively sedentary, acquire songs from neighbors, and imitate other species characteristic of the local avifauna.
Males begin to sing sometime during February (as early as late January in southern populations) and continue into August throughout their range. Females rarely sing during the summer, and only when their mates are off the territory (KCD). Males sing during the establishment of fall territories during mid-September through November. Females also sing during this period, but the amplitude is generally lower. Because female song is difficult to sample, no one has estimated the proportion of females that sing during the fall. Females do not sing as much as males during this period. The propensity with which females sing may be greater in northern populations because more birds establish separate winter territories and pairs do not remain together as often as they do farther south. Song by females seems less complex but this has not been studied.
Mockingbirds typically repeat one song type several times before switching to another. Songs are presented in “bouts,” with each bout consisting of repetitions of only one song type. Song types of short duration are repeated more often within a bout than are longer song types (Derrickson 1988). Mockingbirds also vary how often they return to repeat a bout of a particular song type (called “recurrence interval”). Several measures have been developed to describe the presentation of the extensive repertoire: versatility measures (see below), bout length (number of repetitions within a bout), and recurrence interval (number of intervening bouts before a song type is repeated). All measures vary among reproductive stages, behavioral situations, and individuals.
“Total versatility” is the product of song versatility and transition versatility. Singing behavior is most versatile during courtship, declines significantly during incubation, and then slowly increases during subsequent nesting stages (Derrickson 1988). Rare song types occur most commonly during the pre-female and courtship stages, and result in an increase in versatility (Derrickson 1988). Males that sing with the greatest versatility and lowest bout length are the first to attract mates and begin nesting.
The vocal repertoires of individual males have been estimated to be as low as 45 and as high as 203 song types (Wildenthal 1965, Howard 1974b, Merritt 1985, Derrickson 1987b). Song types appear to be added continuously to the vocal repertoire, suggesting that an individual bird may not have an upper limit to its repertoire.
While both intrasexual (i.e., male-male) and intersexual (male-female) functions have shaped mockingbird singing behavior, it appears that song serves mainly to attract and stimulate females. Unmated males project their song in many different directions, as if broadcasting widely for females, while mated males, although also broadcasting widely, project their song statistically more often into their territory (Breitwisch and Whitesides 1987). The preponderance of nocturnal song (see above) by unmated males also argues for a mate attraction function as does the observation that unmated males sing more than mated males. That song occurs during copulations seems to imply some intersexual function, as does such song's low amplitude, which restricts its propagation into neighboring territories. The amount of singing by mated males varies cyclically with breeding stage (maximum song output during nest building and egg laying; Logan 1983, Merritt 1985) and the versatility of song fo
llows a similar pattern (Derrickson 1988). Also, males dramatically increase song output with the experimental removal of their mates (Merritt 1985, C. Logan pers. comm., KCD). Logan et al. (Logan et al. 1990) presented experimental evidence that song may stimulate established pairs to renest in the presence of dependent young and thereby regulate the extent of clutch overlap. Repertoire size estimates are highest during courtship and nest building (Derrickson 1987b) and males with the largest repertoires tend to attract females earlier and nest earlier (Howard 1974b, but see above cautions; Derrickson 1987b). This finding, too, was based on a detailed study of only four males, a common problem in studying song in a species with such an extensive repertoire. Rare song types occurred frequently during the pre-female and courtship stages and rarely during subsequent nesting stages (Derrickson 1988).

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR
On July 7, 2018 at 11:59 AM Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

We have a lot of mockingbirds around our house, as I’m sure just about anybody who lives in Arkansas does.  I enjoy listening to their singing.  Most of the time their songs do not sound like any other bird I am familiar with, so I assume these are unique mockingbird songs.  However, since I haven’t heard every bird in the world, I can’t vouch for that.  Occasionally, the mockingbird that has been living in our holly tree for a few years will sound like a Great-crested Flycatcher.  And at other times it will sound like birds I’ve heard before, even though I can’t quite place which bird.  So my question, do mockingbirds really mock other birds?  The way the human mind works is it tries to make sense out of randomness.  For instance, we will see a human shape in the shadows, even though it is only bushes.  So, is our mind telling us the mockingbird is singing like an Eastern Bluebird because his song is similar for a few short notes?  Or is it really singing
a bluebird song?  Have there been any studies where a mockingbird has been locked up with a Kookaburra, for example, to see if it will start singing like a Kookaburra?  Why does a mockingbird sing?  I assume it is to attract a mate.  Does a female mockingbird get turned on when a male mockingbird sings like a towhee?  Or is it just the number of different sounds that get her attention?  What is especially interesting to me is our local mockingbird makes sounds that sound like birds that I know have not been in our neighborhood.  And I know our mockingbird is not a world traveler, it stays pretty close to our neighborhood as far as I can tell.  So it makes more sense to me to think the mockingbird is singing a bunch of random noise songs, some of which sound like other birds, then it does to think they are singing songs of birds they have never heard before.  That was probably more than one question.
Glenn WyattCabot

 
 

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Date: 7/9/18 3:24 pm
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Dear Arbirders
Joe Tucker (whoever that may be) tells everyone on this list that I am not an expert (I wonder how he knows that) and then hides behind a screen that prevents delivery of my reply to him. Maybe he didn't intend to slight me. But, if that's the case, he should be careful about the implications of what he writes.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

 

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Date: 7/9/18 2:07 pm
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Re: A question of mockingbirds
The short answer is that yes, Northern Mockingbirds definitely mimic other birds' sounds, as well as other animal sounds and mechanical sounds. The size of a male's repertoire is a signal to a female of his quality. Females sing too.


The long answer from Birds of North America:


Individuals learn new sounds throughout life. Adults possess extensive vocal repertoires of acoustically distinct sounds called song types (Figure 2 https://download.ams.birds.cornell.edu/api/v1/asset/25002551 ). In a detailed study of the repertoires of two males, Burnett (Burnett 1978 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF34467 ) found that spring and fall song repertoires have only 1% of their song types in common. Thus, mockingbirds effectively may have two vocal repertoires. Also, a minimum of 35%–63% of song types in a given spring repertoire occur again the subsequent spring; the rest are new (Derrickson 1985 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16155 , unpubl. data). Finally, spring repertoire size (the total number of distinct song types recorded from an individual as determined from analyses of extensive recordings) increases with age.


Mockingbirds are persistent mimics. Mockingbirds appear to cluster imitations from the same species more often than expected by chance, but this has not been studied in detail.


Mockingbirds have extraordinarily diverse song repertoires consisting of acoustically distinct song types (= song patterns = syllable patterns). These songs are acquired through imitating the calls, songs, and parts of songs of other avian species, vocalizations of non avian species, mechanical sounds, and sounds of other mockingbirds. The proportion of songs imitated is not known and would be extremely difficult to estimate because the entire auditory experience of an individual would need to be known to determine whether a vocalization was acquired through imitation. Geographic variation, although not studied, is likely, given that mockingbirds are relatively sedentary, acquire songs from neighbors, and imitate other species characteristic of the local avifauna.


Males begin to sing sometime during February (as early as late January in southern populations) and continue into August throughout their range. Females rarely sing during the summer, and only when their mates are off the territory (KCD). Males sing during the establishment of fall territories during mid-September through November. Females also sing during this period, but the amplitude is generally lower. Because female song is difficult to sample, no one has estimated the proportion of females that sing during the fall. Females do not sing as much as males during this period. The propensity with which females sing may be greater in northern populations because more birds establish separate winter territories and pairs do not remain together as often as they do farther south. Song by females seems less complex but this has not been studied.


Mockingbirds typically repeat one song type several times before switching to another. Songs are presented in “bouts,” with each bout consisting of repetitions of only one song type. Song types of short duration are repeated more often within a bout than are longer song types (Derrickson 1988 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16157 ). Mockingbirds also vary how often they return to repeat a bout of a particular song type (called “recurrence interval”). Several measures have been developed to describe the presentation of the extensive repertoire: versatility measures (see below), bout length (number of repetitions within a bout), and recurrence interval (number of intervening bouts before a song type is repeated). All measures vary among reproductive stages, behavioral situations, and individuals.


“Total versatility” is the product of song versatility and transition versatility. Singing behavior is most versatile during courtship, declines significantly during incubation, and then slowly increases during subsequent nesting stages (Derrickson 1988 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16157 ). Rare song types occur most commonly during the pre-female and courtship stages, and result in an increase in versatility (Derrickson 1988 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16157 ). Males that sing with the greatest versatility and lowest bout length are the first to attract mates and begin nesting.


The vocal repertoires of individual males have been estimated to be as low as 45 and as high as 203 song types (Wildenthal 1965 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF59784 , Howard 1974b https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF46428 , Merritt 1985 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF34473 , Derrickson 1987b https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16156 ). Song types appear to be added continuously to the vocal repertoire, suggesting that an individual bird may not have an upper limit to its repertoire.


While both intrasexual (i.e., male-male) and intersexual (male-female) functions have shaped mockingbird singing behavior, it appears that song serves mainly to attract and stimulate females. Unmated males project their song in many different directions, as if broadcasting widely for females, while mated males, although also broadcasting widely, project their song statistically more often into their territory (Breitwisch and Whitesides 1987 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF34465 ). The preponderance of nocturnal song (see above) by unmated males also argues for a mate attraction function as does the observation that unmated males sing more than mated males. That song occurs during copulations seems to imply some intersexual function, as does such song's low amplitude, which restricts its propagation into neighboring territories. The amount of singing by mated males varies cyclically with breeding stage (maximum song output during nest building and egg laying; Logan 1983 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF46433 , Merritt 1985 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF34473 ) and the versatility of song follows a similar pattern (Derrickson 1988 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16157 ). Also, males dramatically increase song output with the experimental removal of their mates (Merritt 1985 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF34473 , C. Logan pers. comm., KCD). Logan et al. (Logan et al. 1990 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16174 ) presented experimental evidence that song may stimulate established pairs to renest in the presence of dependent young and thereby regulate the extent of clutch overlap. Repertoire size estimates are highest during courtship and nest building (Derrickson 1987b https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16156 ) and males with the largest repertoires tend to attract females earlier and nest earlier (Howard 1974b https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF46428 , but see above cautions; Derrickson 1987b https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16156 ). This finding, too, was based on a detailed study of only four males, a common problem in studying song in a species with such an extensive repertoire. Rare song types occurred frequently during the pre-female and courtship stages and rarely during subsequent nesting stages (Derrickson 1988 https://birdsna.org/Species-Account/bna/species/normoc/references#REF16157 ).


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

> On July 7, 2018 at 11:59 AM Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> We have a lot of mockingbirds around our house, as I’m sure just about anybody who lives in Arkansas does. I enjoy listening to their singing. Most of the time their songs do not sound like any other bird I am familiar with, so I assume these are unique mockingbird songs. However, since I haven’t heard every bird in the world, I can’t vouch for that. Occasionally, the mockingbird that has been living in our holly tree for a few years will sound like a Great-crested Flycatcher. And at other times it will sound like birds I’ve heard before, even though I can’t quite place which bird. So my question, do mockingbirds really mock other birds? The way the human mind works is it tries to make sense out of randomness. For instance, we will see a human shape in the shadows, even though it is only bushes. So, is our mind telling us the mockingbird is singing like an Eastern Bluebird because his song is similar for a few short notes? Or is it really singing a bluebird song? Have there been any studies where a mockingbird has been locked up with a Kookaburra, for example, to see if it will start singing like a Kookaburra? Why does a mockingbird sing? I assume it is to attract a mate. Does a female mockingbird get turned on when a male mockingbird sings like a towhee? Or is it just the number of different sounds that get her attention? What is especially interesting to me is our local mockingbird makes sounds that sound like birds that I know have not been in our neighborhood. And I know our mockingbird is not a world traveler, it stays pretty close to our neighborhood as far as I can tell. So it makes more sense to me to think the mockingbird is singing a bunch of random noise songs, some of which sound like other birds, then it does to think they are singing songs of birds they have never heard before. That was probably more than one question.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>




 

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Date: 7/9/18 12:59 pm
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: A question of mockingbirds
GREAT questions Glenn. I hope some of the real bird experts will respond. Dan???



-----Original Message-----
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Mon, Jul 9, 2018 8:49 am
Subject: A question of mockingbirds



We have a lot of mockingbirds around our house, as I’m sure just about anybody who lives in Arkansas does. I enjoy listening to their singing. Most of the time their songs do not sound like any other bird I am familiar with, so I assume these are unique mockingbird songs. However, since I haven’t heard every bird in the world, I can’t vouch for that. Occasionally, the mockingbird that has been living in our holly tree for a few years will sound like a Great-crested Flycatcher. And at other times it will sound like birds I’ve heard before, even though I can’t quite place which bird. So my question, do mockingbirds really mock other birds? The way the human mind works is it tries to make sense out of randomness. For instance, we will see a human shape in the shadows, even though it is only bushes. So, is our mind telling us the mockingbird is singing like an Eastern Bluebird because his song is similar for a few short notes? Or is it really singing a bluebird song? Have there been any studies where a mockingbird has been locked up with a Kookaburra, for example, to see if it will start singing like a Kookaburra? Why does a mockingbird sing? I assume it is to attract a mate. Does a female mockingbird get turned on when a male mockingbird sings like a towhee? Or is it just the number of different sounds that get her attention? What is especially interesting to me is our local mockingbird makes sounds that sound like birds that I know have not been in our neighborhood. And I know our mockingbird is not a world traveler, it stays pretty close to our neighborhood as far as I can tell. So it makes more sense to me to think the mockingbird is singing a bunch of random noise songs, some of which sound like other birds, then it does to think they are singing songs of birds they have never heard before. That was probably more than one question.


Glenn Wyatt
Cabot




 

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Date: 7/9/18 8:35 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, Thursday July 12
This Thursday July 12 is Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's monthly meeting starting at 7 PM in the Fletcher Library off H St. in Little Rock. This month's presenter is Allison Fowler, Wildlife Diversity Program Coordinator for Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. She will talk about the Arkansas Wildlife Action Plan, which highlights needs and actions for 377 Species of Greatest Conservation Need, including many bird species. The priorities of this Plan dictate funding for on-the-ground conservation and research needs for these species.


As always, ASCA's meetings are free and open to the public. See you there!


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 7/9/18 7:31 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: A question of mockingbirds
I share your interest and fascination with a singing mocker!

To my mind the most authoritative book on birdsong is “The Singing Life of Birds: The Art and Science of Listening to Birdsong”, by Donald Kroodsma (Houghton Mifflin Co. 2005).

Kroodsma throughly addresses such aspects of Northern Mockingbird song as: estimating repertoire size and variety; impressing females; mimicry by; why mimic?, and others.

I recommend you find a copy especially one that includes the companion CD. If you live in NWA I will consider loaning you mine.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 7, 2018, at 11:59 AM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> We have a lot of mockingbirds around our house, as I’m sure just about anybody who lives in Arkansas does. I enjoy listening to their singing. Most of the time their songs do not sound like any other bird I am familiar with, so I assume these are unique mockingbird songs. However, since I haven’t heard every bird in the world, I can’t vouch for that. Occasionally, the mockingbird that has been living in our holly tree for a few years will sound like a Great-crested Flycatcher. And at other times it will sound like birds I’ve heard before, even though I can’t quite place which bird. So my question, do mockingbirds really mock other birds? The way the human mind works is it tries to make sense out of randomness. For instance, we will see a human shape in the shadows, even though it is only bushes. So, is our mind telling us the mockingbird is singing like an Eastern Bluebird because his song is similar for a few short notes? Or is it really singing a bluebird song? Have there been any studies where a mockingbird has been locked up with a Kookaburra, for example, to see if it will start singing like a Kookaburra? Why does a mockingbird sing? I assume it is to attract a mate. Does a female mockingbird get turned on when a male mockingbird sings like a towhee? Or is it just the number of different sounds that get her attention? What is especially interesting to me is our local mockingbird makes sounds that sound like birds that I know have not been in our neighborhood. And I know our mockingbird is not a world traveler, it stays pretty close to our neighborhood as far as I can tell. So it makes more sense to me to think the mockingbird is singing a bunch of random noise songs, some of which sound like other birds, then it does to think they are singing songs of birds they have never heard before. That was probably more than one question.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot

 

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Date: 7/9/18 6:49 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SWAINSON’S HAWK FOR CHESNEY FIELD TRIP
We had a list of hopefuls for this mornings Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Chesney Prairie Natural Area. Example: Alyssa DeRubeis reported Swainsons Hawk at Chesney for June 28. The one we saw this morning was in about the same spot: east side of the property, over adjacent fields. Most of us got at least distant views not really satisfying actually -- as the bird soared low, hovered, and perched on some posts near where hay was being mowed.

Other birds on the list for this morning included Dickcissel, Blue Grosbeak, Northern Bobwhite, Loggerhead Shrike, Painted Bunting, and Orchard Oriole. We got all of these, but did not see any Red-headed Woodpeckers.

You really have to want to go on a field trip to walk through an open field in early July. Two of the targets for that walk were outstanding residents of Tallgrass Prairies: Blazing Stars and Rattlesnake Master. We got them both, plus quite a few other flowers. Butterflies, bees, wasps, beetles, etc were abundant around the Blazing Stars. To gauge the ecological cost of so much prairie lost, a person really needs to see the interaction of the native flowers and native pollinators.

The four Great-tailed Grackles that flew over were unexpected bonus birds.

At the end of the field trip, we drove by the mowed field and saw the Swainsons Hawk on the ground, in the fresh cut hay.

Eagle Watch Nature Trail is just 10 minutes away. We may have seen the Neotropic Cormorant perched with Double-crested Cormorants, but it was a long ways off. We had better looks at Great Egrets, Green Herons, and some Wood Ducks an adult female with 4-5 young. The ducks were paddling under overhanging Buttonbushes and actively catching something associated with the lower leaves.

Our next NWAAS field trip is to Eagle Watch, on Saturday August 4, starting 9 am. If the Wood Ducks are still around, maybe we can figure that out.


 

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Date: 7/9/18 6:48 am
From: Lance Runion <000000d4f8891ec6-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Female Great-tailed Grackle in LR
Just now saw the female Great-tailed Grackle in the Shell parking lot at the corner of Lindsey Rd and Fourche Dam Pike in SE Little Rock. Collecting bugs around the parked rigs. No nest site found.

Lance Runion
LR, AR

Sent from my iPhone. Please forgive any misspellings or punctuation errors.
 

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Date: 7/9/18 6:48 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: NWAAS meeting at Hobbs State Park July 21, Dan Scheiman speaker

The Northwest Arkansas AudubonSociety July meeting will be on Saturday, July 21, 2018 at the Hobbs State ParkVisitor Center at 2 pm.  Dr. Dan Scheiman will give the followingpresentation: "Creatinga Bird-Friendly Yard”.  I hope that many of  you will come.  I believe that all of us love our birds dearly.  Our little friends are facing huge problems.  We bird-lovers are making great efforts to help birds through tough times.  I think Dan will have ideas so that we might help more.  If we are not there for our birds, they may not be there for us...

Over the past century urbanization haschanged once ecologically productive land into sterile lawns with exoticornamental plants. We have introduced walls of glass, toxic pesticides, anddomestic predators. The human dominated landscape typically does not supportfunctioning ecosystems or provide healthy places for birds. As a result manybird species are in decline. Your yard - and the kinds of plants in it -matters more than you may know. Native plants play an important role inproviding the food and cover birds need to survive and thrive in a way thatnon-native plants cannot. By increasing the number of native plants, decreasingnon-native invasive plants, and making other changes, you can greatly improvethe value of your yard to birds.

Dr.Dan Scheiman is Bird Conservation Director for Audubon Arkansas, a state officeof the National Audubon Society, based at the Little Rock Audubon Center. Danhas a B.S. from Cornell University, M.S. from Eastern Illinois University, andPh.D. from Purdue University. He and his coworkers monitor birds, restorewildlife habitat, and help Arkansans improve their local environments.  Hehas been birding for over 25 years. Since moving to Arkansas in 2005 to workfor Audubon he has seen 361 of the 419 bird species documented in the state.

Free and open to public

Joanie Patterson, Vice-president,Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society

 

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Date: 7/9/18 6:47 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: A question of mockingbirds
We have a lot of mockingbirds around our house, as I’m sure just about anybody who lives in Arkansas does.  I enjoy listening to their singing.  Most of the time their songs do not sound like any other bird I am familiar with, so I assume these are unique mockingbird songs.  However, since I haven’t heard every bird in the world, I can’t vouch for that.  Occasionally, the mockingbird that has been living in our holly tree for a few years will sound like a Great-crested Flycatcher.  And at other times it will sound like birds I’ve heard before, even though I can’t quite place which bird.  So my question, do mockingbirds really mock other birds?  The way the human mind works is it tries to make sense out of randomness.  For instance, we will see a human shape in the shadows, even though it is only bushes.  So, is our mind telling us the mockingbird is singing like an Eastern Bluebird because his song is similar for a few short notes?  Or is it really singing a bluebird song?  Have there been any studies where a mockingbird has been locked up with a Kookaburra, for example, to see if it will start singing like a Kookaburra?  Why does a mockingbird sing?  I assume it is to attract a mate.  Does a female mockingbird get turned on when a male mockingbird sings like a towhee?  Or is it just the number of different sounds that get her attention?  What is especially interesting to me is our local mockingbird makes sounds that sound like birds that I know have not been in our neighborhood.  And I know our mockingbird is not a world traveler, it stays pretty close to our neighborhood as far as I can tell.  So it makes more sense to me to think the mockingbird is singing a bunch of random noise songs, some of which sound like other birds, then it does to think they are singing songs of birds they have never heard before.  That was probably more than one question.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/18 6:46 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SWAINSON’S HAWK FOR CHESNEY FIELD TRIP
We had a list of hopefuls for this mornings Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to Chesney Prairie Natural Area. Example: Alyssa DeRubeis reported Swainsons Hawk at Chesney for June 28. The one we saw this morning was in about the same spot: east side of the property, over adjacent fields. Several of us got distant views as the bird soared low, hovered, and perched on some posts near where hay was being mowed.

Other birds on the list for this morning included Dickcissel, Blue Grosbeak, Northern Bobwhite (calling from 3 or 4 locations, but not seen), Loggerhead Shrike, Painted Bunting, and Orchard Oriole. We got all of these, but did not see any Red-headed Woodpeckers.

You really have to want to go on a field trip to walk through an open field in early July. Two of the targets for that walk were outstanding residents of Tallgrass Prairies: Blazing Stars and Rattlesnake Master. We got them both, plus quite a few other flowers. Butterflies, bees, wasps, beetles, etc were abundant around the Blazing Stars. To gauge the ecological cost of so much prairie lost, a person really needs to see the interaction of the native flowers and native pollinators.

The four Great-tailed Grackles that flew over were unexpected bonus birds.


At the end of the field trip, several drove around by the mowed field and saw the Swainsons Hawk on the ground, in the fresh cut hay. I posted a really poor flight picture on facebook.

Eagle Watch Nature Trail is just 10 minutes away. We may have seen the Neotropic Cormorant perched with Double-crested Cormorants, but it was a long ways off. We had better looks at Great Egrets, Green Herons, and some Wood Ducks an adult female with 4-5 young. The ducks were paddling under overhanging Buttonbushes and actively catching something associated with the lower leaves.

Our next NWAAS field trip is to Eagle Watch, on Saturday August 4, starting 9 am. If the Wood Ducks are still around, maybe we can figure that out.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/18 7:38 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: White-winged Doves- Centerton
I looked out the back door on July 2 nd when I got home from work and saw both WW Doves on my feeder. It was the first time had seen more than one in a few weeks. I take this as good news and hope when I get back home there will be young coming to my feeder as well.

The next day I left for Houston, Texas. The Doves I am hearing most are White-winged Doves. I’ve seen and heard Mourning Doves but not that many.

During the 25 years I lived in the Houston area I only saw Mourning Doves and an occasional Inca dove. No White Wings.


It’s not all fireworks, friends, and family, I did go birding Thursday to Brazos Bend State Park. I saw most of my favorites, Purple Gallinules with little black chicks, a Tri-colored Heron, Anhingas, a Roseate Spoonbill flyover, lots of Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, White Ibis, Great Egrets, Snowy Egrets, Little Blue Herons, Yellow-crowned Night Herons, Cattle Egrets are not my favs but they’re here, too. But it’s too early for Wood Storks.


Jacque Brown, Centerton, but temporarily in Katy Texas.
 

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Date: 7/6/18 3:42 pm
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Great-tailed Grackle, Little Rock
Following up on an eBird submission of a Great-tailed Grackle in Little Rock I was emailed a photo of a female Great-tailed Grackle. This species is rare away from the western edge of the state but slowly making its way along the I-30 corridor. The observer claims it was near its nest near the intersection of Fourche Dam Pike and Lindsey Rd. Confirmation of nesting is desirable.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 7/6/18 3:04 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Crow with an accent
Hey Lyndal

I had to see the same video on another channel online since this
wouldn't play for some reason. The Pied Crow seemed to swallow the word
"love", but it had no problem with "Y'alright" and "I'm alright." It did
seem to have a bit of Yorkshire accent. I wonder what it would think of the
Nu Yawk accent?

Bill Thurman



On Fri, Jul 6, 2018, 14:35 Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> wrote:

> Here is a link to an African crow with a Yorkshire accent.
>
>
> https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-england-leeds-44713074/pied-crow-with-yorkshire-accent-filmed-in-knaresborough
>
> Lyndal York
> Little Rock
>

 

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Date: 7/6/18 2:31 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: WESTERN SANDPIPER AT BOYD POINT
This morning, I observed and photographed a Western Sandpiper in almost full breeding plumage at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. It was foraging on the now very extensive dried algae beds. At one time, it was joined by 2 Least Sandpipers in breeding plumage. 1 Spotted Sandpiper in non breeding plumage was also seen.
John Redman
 

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Date: 7/6/18 12:35 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Crow with an accent
Here is a link to an African crow with a Yorkshire accent.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-england-leeds-44713074/
pied-crow-with-yorkshire-accent-filmed-in-knaresborough

Lyndal York
Little Rock

 

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Date: 7/6/18 10:01 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Australian raptors start fires to flush out prey
Hi Karen

Thanks for sharing this fabulous article. Number one, Australian
aboriginal people should be taken seriously about their observations and
legends. They have have witnessed more in Australia than anyone else will
ever see. As a lot of people can tell, birds are highly intelligent,
generally speaking. A type of black kite, from what I've read, are also
found in India and Pakistan where they are often scavengers. They can see
and understand behaviors and results. That's right, just like some humans.
:)
I love this kind of article or scientific report. Please keep sending
them! Thanks, Karen.

Bill Thurman

On Fri, Jul 6, 2018, 11:18 Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
wrote:

> Interesting you should be listening to The Firebird, Bill since yesterday
> the news told of an electrocuted bird on fire falling from a power line &
> starting a wildfire. Then there is this article (see below) that talks
> about Australian raptors carrying burning twigs to spread fires so they can
> nab the small fleeing rodents & lizards
> Karen Hart
>
> Worth reading:
> https://cosmosmagazine.com/biology/australian-raptors-start-fires-to-flush-out-prey
> at Cosmos Magazine.
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/18 9:18 am
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Australian raptors start fires to flush out prey
Interesting you should be listening to The Firebird, Bill since yesterday the news told of an electrocuted bird on fire falling from a power line & starting a wildfire. Then there is this article (see below) that talks about Australian raptors carrying burning twigs to spread fires so they can nab the small fleeing rodents & lizards
Karen Hart

Worth reading: https://cosmosmagazine.com/biology/australian-raptors-start-fires-to-flush-out-prey at Cosmos Magazine.


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 7/6/18 9:05 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: The Firebird
I went out and celebrated yesterday . . . possibly a day late, but for a
variety of reasons (feelings)
I bought a CD, a copy of Igor Stravinsky's, The Firebird (premiered in
1910 for the ballet of S. Diaghilev) in Paris, France. The legend of The
Firebird comes from Russian stories and old tales, but the idea of a 'bird
of fire' that dies and comes back to life comes from centuries before,
mainly from Old Persia and Old India, long before the much later Russians
got a hold of them.
The recording is by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra with Pierre Boulez
conducting. I bought it for one dollar. I hadn't owned a copy since the old
LP I had from back in the 60's. College days.
Yes, and I had plenty to celebrate about yesterday, July 5th, 2018.

Bill Thurman

 

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Date: 7/6/18 7:23 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Bouquet of summer buntings
Bunting refreshment rises from heat, blinding sun, smothering humidity. Catches me by complete surprise. On June 27, while slow-driving in Frog Bayou Wildlife Management Area, a small richly-brown bird foraging on heavy seed heads of Barnyardgrass. Its a female Indigo Bunting.

The bright sun beautifully illuminates its plumage. The light brown of its belly with modest darker streaks, a shiny gray bill, the dark eye. Soon the male shows up, too. Just too indigo for words almost. Atop a small oak, his head seems bluer than his body, though perhaps this is because of strong mid-summer light, black between the dark eye and a shiny silvery bill, and a little black showing through the blue wings.

As part of bottomland hardwoods restoration, parts of Frog have been planted in hardwood trees. The trees are mid-sized now, with lots of perches. A male Painted Bunting is singing atop one. Sunlight radiates. Where to start on a male Painted Bunting atop a small tree? Blue head and dark eye with a conspicuous ring of red feathers. Red under the chin. Broad patch of lime green on the upper back, giving way to a red rump and a different shade of green in the wings.

There are about 2.5 miles of buntings and other birds along Sharp Chapel Road. Lots of Dickcissels this morning. In a rising thermal, a few Turkey Vultures and a single Mississippi Kite. Along the road, blue patches of Vervain, a common wildflower. Yellow sulphur butterflies are visiting the flowers, along with Monarchs and Black Swallowtails. I keep seeing these large blue dragonflies shimmering and chasing along wet ditch lines. It takes me a few minutes to remember it is one that David Oakley had identified on another trip Great Blue Skimmer.

What an awesome summer bouquet. All beyond facts: birds, flowers, butterflies, dragonflies, exceeding usual bounds of my imagination. And one more summer bunting for the bouquet, too.

Sharp Chapel Road cuts through a marsh with cat tails, willows, and the occasional water snake crossing the road. In the shadows, I spot a small bird. It hops up on the tops of a grass with big heads of seeds. Same Barnyardgrass Id seen earlier, with a female Indigo Bunting. This time it is a female Painted Bunting. In a little patch of sunlight I can see the light green wash on her head and upper back, the brilliant rich deeper green on her lower back and tail.

Stunning really. Free for all. Right here in The Natural State.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/6/18 6:26 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: AGFC unveils new email address for reporting sick animals
https://www.agfc.com/en/news/2018/06/20/agfc-unveils-new-email-address-for-reporting-sick-animals/

LITTLE ROCK – Jenn Ballard, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission’s veterinarian, has introduced a new program to report sick or dead animals and fish that she hopes will help the agency stay on top of health problems affecting wildlife.

If someone encounters a sick or dead animal or fish -- anything other than a deer – the AGFC asks that it be reported via email to <agfc.health...> Those reports will be reviewed by the AGFC’s fish and wildlife health professionals and, if possible, investigated in person. If more information is needed by the investigators, the person submitting the report may be contacted.

Dr. Ballard said adding an email submission system to the AGFC’s new Fish and Wildlife Health Program has been “on my mind” since she started with the agency 18 months ago.

“It’s kind of filling a gap,” Dr. Ballard said. “If people find injured wildlife, they can still go to a licensed rehabilitator. For deer road kills, our CWD line (1-800-482-9262) is still available and is where to go for that.

“But for sick animals or dead animals that we need to investigate because of the mortality, this email system allows people to report things, attach photos, details, and a location. That’s the main thing. We may not be able to respond to every submission personally, but by having it centralized, we will be able to look for patterns and determine if they are more regional or statewide issues.”

When submissions are made, an automated response is generated that reminds people to never pick up or handle sick, injured or dead wildlife unless asked to by AGFC personnel and if aware of how to do so safely. Also, if rabies is suspected, the submitter is asked to contact the state Department of Health, the state agency that handles rabies cases.

With an injured animal that may only require rehabilitation, people can access a list of licensed rehabilitators on the agency’s website at www.agfc.com/rehab. It is unlawful for anyone to rehab wildlife in Arkansas without a state or federal rehabilitation permit. Also, deer, elk and bears may not be rehabbed due to disease transmission and safety risks.

Dr. Ballard is being assisted in the program by A.J. Riggs, recently promoted to the role of AGFC health biologist, based in Russellville; and by Kelly Winningham, a fish pathologist at the Andrew Hulsey Fish Hatchery in Hot Springs, who will handle fish issues.

We will read all the emails submitted and keep an eye out for issues that could have population-level impacts in the state,” Dr. Ballard said. “The key for the public is being safe around those situations and passing along the information.”


Dr. Ballard said that in the past, many calls about sick of dead wildlife have gone to AGFC regional offices or to the main headquarters through telephone calls, the agency’s Facebook page, the Ask AGFC email and other means. “We don’t have a way to centralize or track that information.” Dr. Ballard said. “We appreciate the public helping us keep an eye out for these issues and to be safe with these animals and not necessarily pick them up.”


Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 4:45 pm
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds in the ground?
We have had several phone calls over the years about "brown" hummingbirds which turn out to be the Snowberry Clearwing moths. Clever thought Alyson!Cheryl

On Thursday, July 5, 2018, 5:10:08 PM CDT, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Excellent idea, Alyson!
I was going in a different direction. I'm not saying it was Aliens…but.
J
On Jul 5, 2018, at 3:31 PM, Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Is it possible that someone saw a hummingbird moth?
They emerge from the ground.
https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2010/07/snowberry-clearwing-the-hummingbird-moth.html



On Jul 05, 2018, at 02:37 PM, Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> wrote:


The following message was received by Arbirds mail:  " Have you ever seen a hummingbird go into a hole in the ground? The hole looks like one a dirt dabber would make, only large enough for the hummingbird. "
Has anyone out there in Arbird land observed this behavior of hummingbirds?
Lyndal YorkLittle Rock




 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 3:09 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds in the ground?
Excellent idea, Alyson!

I was going in a different direction. I'm not saying it was Aliensbut.

J

On Jul 5, 2018, at 3:31 PM, Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Is it possible that someone saw a hummingbird moth?
>
> They emerge from the ground.
>
> https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2010/07/snowberry-clearwing-the-hummingbird-moth.html
>
>
>
>
> On Jul 05, 2018, at 02:37 PM, Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> wrote:
>
>> The following message was received by Arbirds mail: " Have you ever seen a hummingbird go into a hole in the ground? The hole looks like one a dirt dabber would make, only large enough for the hummingbird. "
>>
>> Has anyone out there in Arbird land observed this behavior of hummingbirds?
>>
>> Lyndal York
>> Little Rock


 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 1:31 pm
From: Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbirds in the ground?
Is it possible that someone saw a hummingbird moth?

They emerge from the ground.

https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2010/07/snowberry-clearwing-the-hummingbird-moth.html




On Jul 05, 2018, at 02:37 PM, Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> wrote:

The following message was received by Arbirds mail:  " Have you ever seen a hummingbird go into a hole in the ground? The hole looks like one a dirt dabber would make, only large enough for the hummingbird. "

Has anyone out there in Arbird land observed this behavior of hummingbirds?

Lyndal York
Little Rock

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 12:37 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Hummingbirds in the ground?
The following message was received by Arbirds mail: " Have you ever seen a
hummingbird go into a hole in the ground? The hole looks like one a dirt
dabber would make, only large enough for the hummingbird. "

Has anyone out there in Arbird land observed this behavior of hummingbirds?

Lyndal York
Little Rock

 

Back to top
Date: 7/5/18 8:22 am
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: SEMI-PALMATED SANDPIPER AR BOYD POINT
This morning, I observed and photographed a juvenile Semi-palmated Sandpiper at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff. The single sandpiper was foraging on a levee with a small group of Killdeer. This would be a very early date for the sighting of a "fall" migrant.
John Redman
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 6:52 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
I clicked on where it said: "you can support both bills by clicking here"
Thanks again, Jack!

Bill Thurman

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018, 20:47 Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> wrote:

> Thank you for the post. This is really, really important for birds and
> other wildlife. I've written.
>
> On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 5:28 PM, Jack and Pam <
> <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> When legislators hear about the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) or the
>> Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) being under threat they frequently
>> say, "I'm not hearing about this from my constituents."
>>
>> I just returned from Washington where I met with Arkansas legislators.
>> Now is the time to reinforce the message that we care about protecting our
>> birds and habitat.
>>
>> So here's how it goes. One old guy from Audubon (me) shows up in the
>> Senator's or Congressman's office saying that people in Arkansas care about
>> these two issues. That visit puts the MBTA and LWCF on the legislator's
>> radar. If there is no follow-up, no other word from voters, chances are
>> that's the end of it. It is a hectic world in Washington so it is
>> reasonable to listen to, pay the most attention to, the squeaky wheels.
>>
>> Here is your path to guilt free birding- spend 10 minutes today letting
>> your legislator know that the following issues matter:
>>
>> 1. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act has been vital to protecting birds for
>> 100 years (this is the anniversary year). A new interpretation of the Act
>> by the administration basically guts the protections the Act provides.
>> Legislation in Congress (HR4239) would make the administration's
>> interpretation of the Act permanent. Audubon calls it the "Bird Killer
>> Amendment" because it give industry a free pass to kill birds without
>> consequences.
>>
>> Sign-on to the Audubon Action Alert here:
>> Audubon Action Alert: Stop Industries from Getting a Free Pass to Kill
>> Birds <http://tinyurl.com/y972p8p7>
>>
>> 2. The Land and Water Conservation Fund was created over 50 years ago and
>> during that time has helped protect parks, places for recreation, areas of
>> cultural significance, and important wildlife habitat. Every state has
>> benefited. In Arkansas the LWCF has helped nearly every county protect
>> open spaces. The Land and Water Conservation Fund is set to expire on
>> September 30, of this year! There are two bills that birders need to
>> support. In the Senate (S.569) and in the House (HR502). These bills
>> would permanently renew LWCF.
>>
>> You can support both bills by clicking here:
>>
>> Audubon Action Alert: Protect America's Land and Water Conservation Legacy
>> <https://act.audubon.org/onlineactions/gZcdhrf-mU6vW8esQfZbsQ2?ms=climate-adv-web-website_nas-card-201803xx_NPS-LWCF>
>>
>>
>> If, by some extraordinary act of kindness someone on the list actually
>> takes action (sarcasm), please let me know at (
>> <fellowshipofthewings...>). Use same address or call me to request
>> more information or to report problems.
>>
>> IF you *really* want to make your message powerful, let me know and
>> I'll send you an email address for the staffer who handles these issues so
>> you can by-pass the forms on the legislator's website. Wish I had time to
>> tell you about my experience talking to our legislators. You might be
>> surprised.
>>
>> Jack Stewart
>> Newton County, AR
>> (870)715-0260
>>
>> Forgot to mention that neither MBTA nor LWCF cost tax payers anything!
>>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 6:47 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
Thank you for the post. This is really, really important for birds and
other wildlife. I've written.

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018 at 5:28 PM, Jack and Pam <
<00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> When legislators hear about the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) or the
> Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) being under threat they frequently
> say, "I'm not hearing about this from my constituents."
>
> I just returned from Washington where I met with Arkansas legislators.
> Now is the time to reinforce the message that we care about protecting our
> birds and habitat.
>
> So here's how it goes. One old guy from Audubon (me) shows up in the
> Senator's or Congressman's office saying that people in Arkansas care about
> these two issues. That visit puts the MBTA and LWCF on the legislator's
> radar. If there is no follow-up, no other word from voters, chances are
> that's the end of it. It is a hectic world in Washington so it is
> reasonable to listen to, pay the most attention to, the squeaky wheels.
>
> Here is your path to guilt free birding- spend 10 minutes today letting
> your legislator know that the following issues matter:
>
> 1. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act has been vital to protecting birds for
> 100 years (this is the anniversary year). A new interpretation of the Act
> by the administration basically guts the protections the Act provides.
> Legislation in Congress (HR4239) would make the administration's
> interpretation of the Act permanent. Audubon calls it the "Bird Killer
> Amendment" because it give industry a free pass to kill birds without
> consequences.
>
> Sign-on to the Audubon Action Alert here:
> Audubon Action Alert: Stop Industries from Getting a Free Pass to Kill
> Birds <http://tinyurl.com/y972p8p7>
>
> 2. The Land and Water Conservation Fund was created over 50 years ago and
> during that time has helped protect parks, places for recreation, areas of
> cultural significance, and important wildlife habitat. Every state has
> benefited. In Arkansas the LWCF has helped nearly every county protect
> open spaces. The Land and Water Conservation Fund is set to expire on
> September 30, of this year! There are two bills that birders need to
> support. In the Senate (S.569) and in the House (HR502). These bills
> would permanently renew LWCF.
>
> You can support both bills by clicking here:
>
> Audubon Action Alert: Protect America's Land and Water Conservation Legacy
> <https://act.audubon.org/onlineactions/gZcdhrf-mU6vW8esQfZbsQ2?ms=climate-adv-web-website_nas-card-201803xx_NPS-LWCF>
>
>
> If, by some extraordinary act of kindness someone on the list actually
> takes action (sarcasm), please let me know at (
> <fellowshipofthewings...>). Use same address or call me to request
> more information or to report problems.
>
> IF you *really* want to make your message powerful, let me know and I'll
> send you an email address for the staffer who handles these issues so you
> can by-pass the forms on the legislator's website. Wish I had time to tell
> you about my experience talking to our legislators. You might be surprised.
>
> Jack Stewart
> Newton County, AR
> (870)715-0260
>
> Forgot to mention that neither MBTA nor LWCF cost tax payers anything!
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 5:56 pm
From: Les Koller <0000020788963bb2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
Done! Thanks for the info and website!
Sent from my LG Mobile
------ Original message------From: Jack and Pam<00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>Date: Wed, Jul 4, 2018 5:31 PMTo: <ARBIRD-L...>;Cc: Subject:Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
When legislators hear about the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) or the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) being under threat they frequently say, "I'm not hearing about this from my constituents."

I just returned from Washington where I met with Arkansas legislators.  Now is the time to reinforce the message that we care about protecting our birds and habitat.
  So here's how it goes.  One old guy from Audubon (me) shows up in the Senator's or Congressman's office saying that people in Arkansas care about these two issues.  That visit puts the MBTA and LWCF on the legislator's radar.  If there is no follow-up, no other word from voters, chances are that's the end of it.  It is a hectic world in Washington so it is reasonable to listen to, pay the most attention to, the squeaky wheels.
Here is your path to guilt free birding- spend 10 minutes today letting your legislator know that the following issues matter:
1. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act has been vital to protecting birds for 100 years (this is the anniversary year).  A new interpretation of the Act by the administration basically guts the protections the Act provides.   Legislation in Congress (HR4239) would make the administration's interpretation of the  Act permanent.  Audubon calls it the "Bird Killer Amendment" because it give industry a free pass to kill birds without consequences.
Sign-on to the Audubon Action Alert here: Audubon Action Alert: Stop Industries from Getting a Free Pass to Kill Birds
2. The Land and Water Conservation Fund was created over 50 years ago and during that time has helped protect parks, places for recreation, areas of cultural significance, and important wildlife habitat.  Every state has benefited.  In Arkansas the LWCF has helped nearly every county protect open spaces.  The Land and Water Conservation Fund is set to expire on September 30, of this year!  There are two bills that birders need to support.  In the Senate (S.569)  and in the House (HR502).  These bills would permanently renew LWCF.
You can support both bills by clicking here:  
Audubon Action Alert: Protect America's Land and Water Conservation Legacy


If, by some extraordinary act of kindness someone on the list actually takes action (sarcasm),  please let me know at (<fellowshipofthewings...>).  Use same address or call me to request more information or to report problems.  IF you really want to make your message powerful, let me know and I'll send you an email address for the staffer who handles these issues so you can by-pass the forms on the legislator's website.  Wish I had time to tell you about my experience talking to our legislators.  You might be surprised.
Jack StewartNewton County, AR(870)715-0260
Forgot to mention that neither MBTA nor LWCF cost tax payers anything!
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 5:52 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Here is just one clearly good way to get more people to pay attention to birds, their sounds, their food (the human granted type) and what they're attracted to. This video has gotten almost one million, 750 thousand views. Share it with some people whom y
Identify Your Common Backyard Birds: https://youtu.be/gSiH4fAXkl4

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 3:40 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
Thank you for this great information, Jack!

Bill Thurman

On Wed, Jul 4, 2018, 17:31 Jack and Pam <
<00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> When legislators hear about the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) or the
> Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) being under threat they frequently
> say, "I'm not hearing about this from my constituents."
>
> I just returned from Washington where I met with Arkansas legislators.
> Now is the time to reinforce the message that we care about protecting our
> birds and habitat.
>
> So here's how it goes. One old guy from Audubon (me) shows up in the
> Senator's or Congressman's office saying that people in Arkansas care about
> these two issues. That visit puts the MBTA and LWCF on the legislator's
> radar. If there is no follow-up, no other word from voters, chances are
> that's the end of it. It is a hectic world in Washington so it is
> reasonable to listen to, pay the most attention to, the squeaky wheels.
>
> Here is your path to guilt free birding- spend 10 minutes today letting
> your legislator know that the following issues matter:
>
> 1. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act has been vital to protecting birds for
> 100 years (this is the anniversary year). A new interpretation of the Act
> by the administration basically guts the protections the Act provides.
> Legislation in Congress (HR4239) would make the administration's
> interpretation of the Act permanent. Audubon calls it the "Bird Killer
> Amendment" because it give industry a free pass to kill birds without
> consequences.
>
> Sign-on to the Audubon Action Alert here:
> Audubon Action Alert: Stop Industries from Getting a Free Pass to Kill
> Birds <http://tinyurl.com/y972p8p7>
>
> 2. The Land and Water Conservation Fund was created over 50 years ago and
> during that time has helped protect parks, places for recreation, areas of
> cultural significance, and important wildlife habitat. Every state has
> benefited. In Arkansas the LWCF has helped nearly every county protect
> open spaces. The Land and Water Conservation Fund is set to expire on
> September 30, of this year! There are two bills that birders need to
> support. In the Senate (S.569) and in the House (HR502). These bills
> would permanently renew LWCF.
>
> You can support both bills by clicking here:
>
> Audubon Action Alert: Protect America's Land and Water Conservation Legacy
> <https://act.audubon.org/onlineactions/gZcdhrf-mU6vW8esQfZbsQ2?ms=climate-adv-web-website_nas-card-201803xx_NPS-LWCF>
>
>
> If, by some extraordinary act of kindness someone on the list actually
> takes action (sarcasm), please let me know at (
> <fellowshipofthewings...>). Use same address or call me to request
> more information or to report problems.
>
> IF you *really* want to make your message powerful, let me know and I'll
> send you an email address for the staffer who handles these issues so you
> can by-pass the forms on the legislator's website. Wish I had time to tell
> you about my experience talking to our legislators. You might be surprised.
>
> Jack Stewart
> Newton County, AR
> (870)715-0260
>
> Forgot to mention that neither MBTA nor LWCF cost tax payers anything!
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 3:31 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Migratory Birds plus gutting a fund for habitat
When legislators hear about the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) or the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) being under threat they frequently say, "I'm not hearing about this from my constituents."

I just returned from Washington where I met with Arkansas legislators.  Now is the time to reinforce the message that we care about protecting our birds and habitat.
  So here's how it goes.  One old guy from Audubon (me) shows up in the Senator's or Congressman's office saying that people in Arkansas care about these two issues.  That visit puts the MBTA and LWCF on the legislator's radar.  If there is no follow-up, no other word from voters, chances are that's the end of it.  It is a hectic world in Washington so it is reasonable to listen to, pay the most attention to, the squeaky wheels.
Here is your path to guilt free birding- spend 10 minutes today letting your legislator know that the following issues matter:
1. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act has been vital to protecting birds for 100 years (this is the anniversary year).  A new interpretation of the Act by the administration basically guts the protections the Act provides.   Legislation in Congress (HR4239) would make the administration's interpretation of the  Act permanent.  Audubon calls it the "Bird Killer Amendment" because it give industry a free pass to kill birds without consequences.
Sign-on to the Audubon Action Alert here: Audubon Action Alert: Stop Industries from Getting a Free Pass to Kill Birds
2. The Land and Water Conservation Fund was created over 50 years ago and during that time has helped protect parks, places for recreation, areas of cultural significance, and important wildlife habitat.  Every state has benefited.  In Arkansas the LWCF has helped nearly every county protect open spaces.  The Land and Water Conservation Fund is set to expire on September 30, of this year!  There are two bills that birders need to support.  In the Senate (S.569)  and in the House (HR502).  These bills would permanently renew LWCF.
You can support both bills by clicking here:  
Audubon Action Alert: Protect America's Land and Water Conservation Legacy


If, by some extraordinary act of kindness someone on the list actually takes action (sarcasm),  please let me know at (<fellowshipofthewings...>).  Use same address or call me to request more information or to report problems.  IF you really want to make your message powerful, let me know and I'll send you an email address for the staffer who handles these issues so you can by-pass the forms on the legislator's website.  Wish I had time to tell you about my experience talking to our legislators.  You might be surprised.
Jack StewartNewton County, AR(870)715-0260
Forgot to mention that neither MBTA nor LWCF cost tax payers anything!
 

Back to top
Date: 7/4/18 5:07 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: These are obviously not birds but this sad report is a 'spot on' description of what is happening to birds, mammals and fish all over our planet. Baja California is our next door neighbor. Just one species at a time and then before you know it they're alm
https://news.mongabay.com/2018/03/only-12-vaquita-porpoises-remain-watchdog-groups-report/

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 9:03 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 3
It was mostly clear and very hot on the bird survey today. 66 species were
found. Biggest highlight today was finding a pair of King Rails with 2
black downy chicks. Always nice when King Rails show themselves and
especially when one gets to watch them for 10 minutes. Lots of gallinule
chicks out now and most nests in the heronry have young in them now. The
Neotropic Cormorants and Anhingas were very busy flying in and out of the
heronry feeding their young. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Wood Duck - 4

Gadwall - 1 male

Pied-billed Grebe - 3

Neotropic Cormorant - 11

Anhinga - 40

Great-blue Heron - 10

Great Egret - 24

Snowy Egret - 72

Little-blue Heron - 125

Cattle Egret - 400

Green Heron - 10

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 11

White Ibis - 87

Black Vulture - 14

Turkey Vulture - 15

Mississippi Kite - 12

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

King Rail - 2 adults (also 2 chicks.)

Purple Gallinule - 14 adults (also 1 brood of chicks)

Common Gallinule - 19 adults (also numerous broods of young.)

American Coot - 5

Killdeer - 1

Mourning Dove - 4

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 4

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 4

Eastern Kingbird - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 15

Bell's Vireo - 4

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

American Crow - 2

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 25

Carolina Chickadee - 4

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 8

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 8

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Wood Thrush - 1

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Pine Warbler - 2

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 2

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 14

Yellow-breasted Chat - 16

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 4

Northern Cardinal - 14

Indigo Bunting - 28

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 22

Red-winged Blackbird - 22

Common Grackle - 5

Brown-headed Cowbird - 4

Orchard Oriole - 3





Odonates:



Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald

Stillwater Clubtail

Four-spotted Pennant

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Spot-winged Glider

Black Saddlebags







Herps:



Red-eared Slider

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR














 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 7:48 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Mississippi Kites
So what's better than 1 MIKI in the neighborhood? Two Mississippi Kites in
the neighborhood.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/kgarr_83/29314523478/in/dateposted-public/

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the great Northwest

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 2:34 pm
From: Karen Konarski <karen...>
Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
I actually ordered it from Barnes & Noble...w free delivery    Karen Hart


On 7/3/2018 3:47 PM, kjdillard wrote:
> Where can one purchase the book?
> Karyn Dillard
> New in the neighborhood
> Fayetteville
> <kjdillard...>
>
>
>
> Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
>
> -------- Original message --------
> From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...>
> Date: 7/3/18 9:12 AM (GMT-06:00)
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
>
> Many thanks to you all for such kind words. It makes us so very happy
> to know that people are enjoying the book and putting it to use. Our
> hope is to get people to look more closely at insects because we have
> had (still have) so much pleasure observing and learning about them
> ourselves. All kudos for the writing and humor must go to Norman. I
> was able to supply half the photos, help a bit with editing and do the
> necessary computer stuff (I'm pretty incompetent at it but light-years
> ahead of Norman!), and I made all the p.b. sandwiches for our excursions!
> If anyone feels like doing so then a review of the book on Amazon is
> apparently very helpful. Just don't mention you know us as that
> diminishes the value of the review.
>
> Thanks again, we really appreciate hearing from you.
>
> Cheryl (and Norman)
> "Chandelle" Jeff! I am definitely going to remember that word and slip
> it into an insect description some time.
> On Monday, July 2, 2018, 3:58:18 PM CDT, Ann Gordon
> <chesterann...> wrote:
>
>
> I second everything that Janine had to say.  I absolutely love this
> book.  It is truly like taking a walk with Norman and Cheryl and I
> heard their voices as I read it.  I purchased a copy for myself and
> another for my great-granddaughter.  Highly recommend!!
>
> On Mon, Jul 2, 2018 at 2:49 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
> <mailto:<jpandjf...>> wrote:
>
> This is an overdue post in unreserved praise of a most wonderful
> book, http://www.etaliapress.com/ new-products/100-insects-of-
> arkansas-and-the-midsouth- portraits-stories
> <http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-arkansas-and-the-midsouth-portraits-stories>.
>
> The two hours it took me to savor it cover to cover were some of
> the most enjoyable and compelling reading I can recall.  For those
> who haven't yet read it, Norman and Cheryl have chosen
> representative species from nine insect orders, and offer
> "portraits and stories" of each.  The portraits are photographic
> and verbal, which, merging with the stories, are riveting
> narratives that variously include habitat, anatomy, life history,
> habits, reproduction, food, behavior, parasites, and defenses
> against predators---a glimpse of each species' niche in the larger
> ecology that is home to all of us.
>
> Better informed thanks to the book, I'm noticing with new eyes and
> more interest the insects I encounter every day.  The species
> described in "100 Insects..." are generally representative of many
> related ones also found in Arkansas, and I expect to continue to
> regularly use the book as a reference.
>
> The stories are not merely fascinating and brimming with the
> Laverses' quiet passion for their subjects; they are also peppered
> with sly, gentle, often self-effacing humor.  The reader ends up
> with much affection, gratitude and admiration, for both the
> insects and the authors.
>
> -Janine
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 1:48 pm
From: kjdillard <kjdillard...>
Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
Where can one purchase the book?Karyn DillardNew in the <neighborhoodFayettevillekjdillard...>


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> Date: 7/3/18 9:12 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book

Many thanks to you all for such kind words. It makes us so very happy to know that people are enjoying the book and putting it to use. Our hope is to get people to look more closely at insects because we have had (still have) so much pleasure observing and learning about them ourselves. All kudos for the writing and humor must go to Norman. I was able to supply half the photos, help a bit with editing and do the necessary computer stuff (I'm pretty incompetent at it but light-years ahead of Norman!), and I made all the p.b. sandwiches for our excursions!
If anyone feels like doing so then a review of the book on Amazon is apparently very helpful. Just don't mention you know us as that diminishes the value of the review.
Thanks again, we really appreciate hearing from you.
Cheryl (and Norman)"Chandelle" Jeff! I am definitely going to remember that word and slip it into an insect description some time.




On Monday, July 2, 2018, 3:58:18 PM CDT, Ann Gordon <chesterann...> wrote:





I second everything that Janine had to say.  I absolutely love this book.  It is truly like taking a walk with Norman and Cheryl and I heard their voices as I read it.  I purchased a copy for myself and another for my great-granddaughter.  Highly recommend!!

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018 at 2:49 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:






This is an overdue post in unreserved praise of a most wonderful
book,
http://www.etaliapress.com/ new-products/100-insects-of- arkansas-and-the-midsouth- portraits-stories.


The two hours it took me to savor it cover to cover were some of the
most enjoyable and compelling reading I can recall.  For those who
haven't yet read it, Norman and Cheryl have chosen representative
species from nine insect orders, and offer "portraits and stories"
of each.  The portraits are photographic and verbal, which, merging
with the stories, are riveting narratives that variously include
habitat, anatomy, life history, habits, reproduction, food,
behavior, parasites, and defenses against predators---a glimpse of
each species' niche in the larger ecology that is home to all of
us. 



Better informed thanks to the book, I'm noticing with new eyes and
more interest the insects I encounter every day.  The species
described in "100 Insects..." are generally representative of many
related ones also found in Arkansas, and I expect to continue to
regularly use the book as a reference.



The stories are not merely fascinating and brimming with the
Laverses' quiet passion for their subjects; they are also peppered
with sly, gentle, often self-effacing humor.  The reader ends up
with much affection, gratitude and admiration, for both the insects
and the authors.



-Janine










 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 12:00 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Garden Club Speaker Request, Harrisburg
Hallie Orr is looking for a speaker to talk about birds for her garden club
in Harrisburg, south of Jonesboro, in September. It is too far for me.
Anyone in NE AR willing to present? Please call her at 870-919-1549 or email
<hallie.orr123...> She needs to confirm quickly because she has a
deadline for publishing the roster of speakers.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 11:25 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Two questions
Sounds like you’ve correctly guessed the bird was a juv Common Grackle. Did you notice the bill was lighter colored than adults?

As to your second assumption, again correct! Bills agape indicate a hot bird.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 3, 2018, at 12:38 PM, Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> wrote:
>
> Dear Birders,
>
> There's a bird outside my window that looks like a grackle, except its feathers are all a completely uniform flat dark brown, with not the slightest bit of iridescence. It has black eyes. I am assuming it is a juvenile, but I've looked at pictures and it looks a little different. It appears by itself, and not with other grackles. It has a grackle-type bill and is definitely not a cowbird. Is it a juvenile grackle? It is about the same size as a grackle, maybe a tiny bit smaller.
>
> The grackles and bluejays in my yard perch for long periods of time with their mouths open, these days. Is this a cooling mechanism?
>
> Thanks in advance, and I love this listserv.
>
> Lynn Foster
> NW of Pinnacle Mtn
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 10:39 am
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Two questions
Dear Birders,

There's a bird outside my window that looks like a grackle, except its
feathers are all a completely uniform flat dark brown, with not the
slightest bit of iridescence. It has black eyes. I am assuming it is a
juvenile, but I've looked at pictures and it looks a little different. It
appears by itself, and not with other grackles. It has a grackle-type bill
and is definitely not a cowbird. Is it a juvenile grackle? It is about the
same size as a grackle, maybe a tiny bit smaller.

The grackles and bluejays in my yard perch for long periods of time with
their mouths open, these days. Is this a cooling mechanism?

Thanks in advance, and I love this listserv.

Lynn Foster
NW of Pinnacle Mtn

 

Back to top
Date: 7/3/18 7:12 am
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
Many thanks to you all for such kind words. It makes us so very happy to know that people are enjoying the book and putting it to use. Our hope is to get people to look more closely at insects because we have had (still have) so much pleasure observing and learning about them ourselves. All kudos for the writing and humor must go to Norman. I was able to supply half the photos, help a bit with editing and do the necessary computer stuff (I'm pretty incompetent at it but light-years ahead of Norman!), and I made all the p.b. sandwiches for our excursions!
If anyone feels like doing so then a review of the book on Amazon is apparently very helpful. Just don't mention you know us as that diminishes the value of the review.
Thanks again, we really appreciate hearing from you.
Cheryl (and Norman)"Chandelle" Jeff! I am definitely going to remember that word and slip it into an insect description some time.
On Monday, July 2, 2018, 3:58:18 PM CDT, Ann Gordon <chesterann...> wrote:

I second everything that Janine had to say.  I absolutely love this book.  It is truly like taking a walk with Norman and Cheryl and I heard their voices as I read it.  I purchased a copy for myself and another for my great-granddaughter.  Highly recommend!!

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018 at 2:49 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

This is an overdue post in unreserved praise of a most wonderful book,http://www.etaliapress.com/ new-products/100-insects-of- arkansas-and-the-midsouth- portraits-stories.
The two hours it took me to savor it cover to cover were some of the most enjoyable and compelling reading I can recall.  For those who haven't yet read it, Norman and Cheryl have chosen representative species from nine insect orders, and offer "portraits and stories" of each.  The portraits are photographic and verbal, which, merging with the stories, are riveting narratives that variously include habitat, anatomy, life history, habits, reproduction, food, behavior, parasites, and defenses against predators---a glimpse of each species' niche in the larger ecology that is home to all of us. 

Better informed thanks to the book, I'm noticing with new eyes and more interest the insects I encounter every day.  The species described in "100 Insects..." are generally representative of many related ones also found in Arkansas, and I expect to continue to regularly use the book as a reference.

The stories are not merely fascinating and brimming with the Laverses' quiet passion for their subjects; they are also peppered with sly, gentle, often self-effacing humor.  The reader ends up with much affection, gratitude and admiration, for both the insects and the authors.

-Janine





 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 4:13 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
I had contacted the authors directly with my accolades. It is on our coffee table for all visitors to peruse.



I hope the sequel will include June Bugs…



Jeff Short



PS Today I watched Bumblebee-mimicking Robber Fly at close range. (Where was my camera?) When I moved to get it, the mimic turned its head and gave me a chilling stare. Then launched at me and pulling a chandelle at the last moment.







From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Leslie Peacock
Sent: Monday, July 02, 2018 2:58 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book



http://www.etaliapress.com/



On Mon, Jul 2, 2018 at 2:58 PM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> wrote:

Please tell me how much is the book and how to order it, even though I saw the original post about it being published.

Thanks, and I'll plan to get a copy.



Bill Thurman



On Mon, Jul 2, 2018, 14:49 Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

This is an overdue post in unreserved praise of a most wonderful book, http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-arkansas-and-the-midsouth-portraits-stories.
The two hours it took me to savor it cover to cover were some of the most enjoyable and compelling reading I can recall. For those who haven't yet read it, Norman and Cheryl have chosen representative species from nine insect orders, and offer "portraits and stories" of each. The portraits are photographic and verbal, which, merging with the stories, are riveting narratives that variously include habitat, anatomy, life history, habits, reproduction, food, behavior, parasites, and defenses against predators---a glimpse of each species' niche in the larger ecology that is home to all of us.

Better informed thanks to the book, I'm noticing with new eyes and more interest the insects I encounter every day. The species described in "100 Insects..." are generally representative of many related ones also found in Arkansas, and I expect to continue to regularly use the book as a reference.

The stories are not merely fascinating and brimming with the Laverses' quiet passion for their subjects; they are also peppered with sly, gentle, often self-effacing humor. The reader ends up with much affection, gratitude and admiration, for both the insects and the authors.

-Janine









--

Leslie Peacock

Managing Editor

Arkansas Times

501-492-3981


 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 2:02 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: 3-TERN MORNING IN THE VALLEY
Terns were active in the Arkansas River Valley this morning. Observing from the shoreline near the boat ramp at Frog Bayou Wildlife Management Area, I saw both Caspian (4) and Forsters (7) Terns flying around in the big wide water area informally called Dyer Bay (a cut-off oxbow from the Arkansas River). I worked my way down river on farm roads and found a spot where I could set up a spotting scope. At this point I had a distant but fairly clear view of a sandy island out in the river where Least Terns sometimes nest. Perched on the shoreline in a loose flock: Caspian Tern (9) and Forsters Tern (13). Flying around the island: Least Terns (at least 12).

Arkansas Game and Fish has an information sign at the Frog boat ramp about things we can all do to help in Least Tern recovery mainly, dont disturb them in their nesting habitat out on these sandy islands. From what I could see through my scope, it looks like information signs have now been placed on the islands, too. This gives all of us a chance to participate in inland Least Tern recovery.

Also saw two adult Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks with 2 of the impossibly cute zebra-striped chicks. This was on a farm pond across from Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility.


 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 1:58 pm
From: Ann Gordon <chesterann...>
Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
I second everything that Janine had to say. I absolutely love this book.
It is truly like taking a walk with Norman and Cheryl and I heard their
voices as I read it. I purchased a copy for myself and another for my
great-granddaughter. Highly recommend!!

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018 at 2:49 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

> This is an overdue post in unreserved praise of a most wonderful book,
> http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-
> arkansas-and-the-midsouth-portraits-stories.
> The two hours it took me to savor it cover to cover were some of the most
> enjoyable and compelling reading I can recall. For those who haven't yet
> read it, Norman and Cheryl have chosen representative species from nine
> insect orders, and offer "portraits and stories" of each. The portraits
> are photographic and verbal, which, merging with the stories, are riveting
> narratives that variously include habitat, anatomy, life history, habits,
> reproduction, food, behavior, parasites, and defenses against predators---a
> glimpse of each species' niche in the larger ecology that is home to all of
> us.
>
> Better informed thanks to the book, I'm noticing with new eyes and more
> interest the insects I encounter every day. The species described in "100
> Insects..." are generally representative of many related ones also found in
> Arkansas, and I expect to continue to regularly use the book as a reference.
>
> The stories are not merely fascinating and brimming with the Laverses'
> quiet passion for their subjects; they are also peppered with sly, gentle,
> often self-effacing humor. The reader ends up with much affection,
> gratitude and admiration, for both the insects and the authors.
>
> -Janine
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 12:58 pm
From: Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...>
Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
http://www.etaliapress.com/

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018 at 2:58 PM, Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
wrote:

> Please tell me how much is the book and how to order it, even though I saw
> the original post about it being published.
> Thanks, and I'll plan to get a copy.
>
> Bill Thurman
>
> On Mon, Jul 2, 2018, 14:49 Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
>> This is an overdue post in unreserved praise of a most wonderful book,
>> http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-
>> arkansas-and-the-midsouth-portraits-stories.
>> The two hours it took me to savor it cover to cover were some of the most
>> enjoyable and compelling reading I can recall. For those who haven't yet
>> read it, Norman and Cheryl have chosen representative species from nine
>> insect orders, and offer "portraits and stories" of each. The portraits
>> are photographic and verbal, which, merging with the stories, are riveting
>> narratives that variously include habitat, anatomy, life history, habits,
>> reproduction, food, behavior, parasites, and defenses against predators---a
>> glimpse of each species' niche in the larger ecology that is home to all of
>> us.
>>
>> Better informed thanks to the book, I'm noticing with new eyes and more
>> interest the insects I encounter every day. The species described in "100
>> Insects..." are generally representative of many related ones also found in
>> Arkansas, and I expect to continue to regularly use the book as a reference.
>>
>> The stories are not merely fascinating and brimming with the Laverses'
>> quiet passion for their subjects; they are also peppered with sly, gentle,
>> often self-effacing humor. The reader ends up with much affection,
>> gratitude and admiration, for both the insects and the authors.
>>
>> -Janine
>>
>>
>>


--
*Leslie Peacock*
*Managing Editor*
*Arkansas Times*
*501-492-3981*

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 12:56 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
Please tell me how much is the book and how to order it, even though I saw
the original post about it being published.
Thanks, and I'll plan to get a copy.

Bill Thurman

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018, 14:49 Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

> This is an overdue post in unreserved praise of a most wonderful book,
> http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-arkansas-and-the-midsouth-portraits-stories.
>
> The two hours it took me to savor it cover to cover were some of the most
> enjoyable and compelling reading I can recall. For those who haven't yet
> read it, Norman and Cheryl have chosen representative species from nine
> insect orders, and offer "portraits and stories" of each. The portraits
> are photographic and verbal, which, merging with the stories, are riveting
> narratives that variously include habitat, anatomy, life history, habits,
> reproduction, food, behavior, parasites, and defenses against predators---a
> glimpse of each species' niche in the larger ecology that is home to all of
> us.
>
> Better informed thanks to the book, I'm noticing with new eyes and more
> interest the insects I encounter every day. The species described in "100
> Insects..." are generally representative of many related ones also found in
> Arkansas, and I expect to continue to regularly use the book as a reference.
>
> The stories are not merely fascinating and brimming with the Laverses'
> quiet passion for their subjects; they are also peppered with sly, gentle,
> often self-effacing humor. The reader ends up with much affection,
> gratitude and admiration, for both the insects and the authors.
>
> -Janine
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 12:55 pm
From: Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...>
Subject: Re: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
I have been meaning to post how much I loved the Lavers' insect book. I
read it aloud to Lance over several days and enjoyed it so much! Now I find
myself taking photos of all the insects I see that I can photograph with an
iphone! Everybody needs this book. The writing is great.

On Mon, Jul 2, 2018 at 2:49 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

> This is an overdue post in unreserved praise of a most wonderful book,
> http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-
> arkansas-and-the-midsouth-portraits-stories.
> The two hours it took me to savor it cover to cover were some of the most
> enjoyable and compelling reading I can recall. For those who haven't yet
> read it, Norman and Cheryl have chosen representative species from nine
> insect orders, and offer "portraits and stories" of each. The portraits
> are photographic and verbal, which, merging with the stories, are riveting
> narratives that variously include habitat, anatomy, life history, habits,
> reproduction, food, behavior, parasites, and defenses against predators---a
> glimpse of each species' niche in the larger ecology that is home to all of
> us.
>
> Better informed thanks to the book, I'm noticing with new eyes and more
> interest the insects I encounter every day. The species described in "100
> Insects..." are generally representative of many related ones also found in
> Arkansas, and I expect to continue to regularly use the book as a reference.
>
> The stories are not merely fascinating and brimming with the Laverses'
> quiet passion for their subjects; they are also peppered with sly, gentle,
> often self-effacing humor. The reader ends up with much affection,
> gratitude and admiration, for both the insects and the authors.
>
> -Janine
>
>
>


--
*Leslie Peacock*
*Managing Editor*
*Arkansas Times*
*501-492-3981*

 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 12:49 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Cheryl and Norman Lavers' "100 Insects..." book
This is an overdue post in unreserved praise of a most wonderful book,
http://www.etaliapress.com/new-products/100-insects-of-arkansas-and-the-midsouth-portraits-stories.

The two hours it took me to savor it cover to cover were some of the
most enjoyable and compelling reading I can recall.  For those who
haven't yet read it, Norman and Cheryl have chosen representative
species from nine insect orders, and offer "portraits and stories" of
each.  The portraits are photographic and verbal, which, merging with
the stories, are riveting narratives that variously include habitat,
anatomy, life history, habits, reproduction, food, behavior, parasites,
and defenses against predators---a glimpse of each species' niche in the
larger ecology that is home to all of us.

Better informed thanks to the book, I'm noticing with new eyes and more
interest the insects I encounter every day.  The species described in
"100 Insects..." are generally representative of many related ones also
found in Arkansas, and I expect to continue to regularly use the book as
a reference.

The stories are not merely fascinating and brimming with the Laverses'
quiet passion for their subjects; they are also peppered with sly,
gentle, often self-effacing humor.  The reader ends up with much
affection, gratitude and admiration, for both the insects and the authors.

-Janine



 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 7:01 am
From: <market...>
Subject: Re: NEOTROPIC CORMORANT AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND
I was at the nursery earlier that morning and confirmed 8 green herons on
the north side hunting in the shallows as well as a cattle egret perched on
a post watching all. FYI - I first spotted the neotropic here last
Tuesday, June 26. I had no idea it was a neotropic though.



Here are a couples shot that I got of it Sunday morning -
https://photos.smugmug.com/Todays-photos/i-xXKGfgf/0/0bcf6343/X3/IMG_0295-X3
.jpg and

https://photos.smugmug.com/Todays-photos/i-LNH2Qtm/0/315a6a0a/X3/IMG_0287-X3
.jpg



No shorebird that I could see but the American and Fish Crows were taking
advantage of the low water line and fishing successfully.



I talked with Hatchery personnel about 3 weeks ago who said that the red
eared sunfish in the pond should be ready to be released about mid-July. I
imagine this is why they have let the water get this low. I visit a
couple times a week and will report when I see the release. I imagine that
will bring the some shorebirds in.



I visited last Friday and someone had a fireworks party on the dike and left
all of their trash. I took a couple Wal-Mart bags with me Sunday morning to
clean it up but someone had beat me to it. This place is one of the
cleanest always.



Lastly, the State people came through about a week ago and mowed the dike
and road sides. Now is a great time to come out and enjoy without too many
weeds to wade.



Ron Bird





From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> On
Behalf Of Joseph C. Neal
Sent: Sunday, July 1, 2018 4:11 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: NEOTROPIC CORMORANT AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND



A Neotropic Cormorant at Beaver Lake Nursery Pond this morning may have been
there since at least June 21. In terms of plumage, this bird looks quite a
bit like the Neotropic currently at SWEPCO Lake-Eagle Watch Nature Trail.
Observations for this species in the Ozarks date to 2011, all from Eagle
Watch. Today's bird adds a second location.



Other observations: edible blackberries. Tree Swallows still have active
nests around the pond. A flock of American Goldfinches were apparently
attracted to the downy-fluff of willow seeds - 8 in one tree. Orchard
Orioles are still singing. A nice mudflat is developing along the pond's
north side. We didn't see any shorebird migrants there this morning, but at
least 4 Green Herons were present. A Ruby-throated Hummingbird was probing
flowers of Germander or Wood Sage. Perched on leaves of Trumpet Creeper at
the blind: a striking yellowish-orange damselfly, maybe Orange Bluet.



Overall, this was a wonderful Sunday morning service, very much in the
spirit of poet Emily Dickinson:



"Some keep the Sabbath going to Church -
I keep it, staying at Home -
With a Bobolink for a Chorister -
And an Orchard, for a Dome -

Some keep the Sabbath in Surplice -
I, just wear my Wings -
And instead of tolling the Bell, for Church,
Our little Sexton - sings.

God preaches, a noted Clergyman -
And the sermon is never long,
So instead of getting to Heaven, at last -
I'm going, all along."



Or in our case, most of this morning, until it started to thunder,
lightning, then rain.




 

Back to top
Date: 7/2/18 6:04 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
No, no! What I was referring to was that I, too, LOCKED MY KEYS IN MY CAR leading a birding jaunt.

I wasn’t suggesting anything else...

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 2, 2018, at 7:27 AM, Les Koller <les_birds...> wrote:
>
> I understand, ok... I have misidentified several doves, killdeer, crows, and a few tricky tree limbs before :(
>
> I have had several Mississippi Kites over my apartment in Benton this year.
>
> Sent from my LG Mobile
>
> ------ Original message------
> From: Jay Jones
> Date: Sun, Jul 1, 2018 7:10 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>;
> Cc:
> Subject:Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
>
> Really, Leslie? You know, I did the same thing leading a bird trip at Bombay Hook a few years back. Wish I could claim excitement over a Swallow-tailed Kite! Very embarrassing for me...
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jul 1, 2018, at 7:05 PM, Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...> wrote:
>>
>> I saw a pair of swallow-tailed kites probably at least 20 years ago now at the White River, south of Tichenor, I believe. They swooped right overhead really low toward the water; it was thrilling. In the field west of the river were a number of Mississippi kites -- like a kettle. Great birding day. I was so happy I locked my keys in the car when I went to report to friends at Merrisach Lake.
>>
>>> On Sun, Jul 1, 2018 at 11:38 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>>> Those of you who get eBird rare bird alerts have seen the two recent Swallow-tailed Kite submissions. One at White River NWR, the other from Russellville. The first is interesting because there hasn’t been a breeding season report from the refuge for 10 years according to eBird. The other is exceptional because there are no previous breeding season reports for the central part of the state. This should not be a hard bird to mis-ID, though that doesn’t necessarily make these sightings correct. I have reached out to both observers. In any case, keep your eyes open as this species may already be on the move; could be birds trying to find their own breeding territory.
>>>
>>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46896382
>>>
>>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46687449
>>>
>>> Dan Scheiman
>>> eBird Reviewer
>>> Little Rock, AR
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Leslie Peacock
>> Managing Editor
>> Arkansas Times
>> 501-492-3981

 

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Date: 7/1/18 6:37 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: wrens and chipmunks
Carolina Wrens have a nest in a small rectangular opening around 6 feet off ground.  Only a corner of the nest is visible.  I've seen parents bring food to the nest.  Today one parent perched on a thick wire slanting from a post towards the ground.  He was about 4 feet from the nest and about 1 foot higher.  He called repeatedly a percussive chipping call.  Was he trying to entice young from the nest?  He had a winged insect, maybe a moth or a skipper, in his beak.  Eventually he flew to the nest and presumably fed the young.  I've seen both parents today, forging or calling in the vicinity. 

Under the feeders there was an interesting mammal interaction earlier in the week.  A female or half-grown rabbit, 2 squirrels and a chipmunk were eating scratch (a mix of seeds given chickens).  I went to the garden, several yards beyond the feeders and surrounded by a wire fence.  Earlier, somebody had nipped off some cantaloupe leaves.  We thought possibly a young rabbit was to blame.  This time I saw a chipmunk.  I wondered if it had been the one under the feeder.  After returning inside, from the window I saw one chipmunk eating scratch.  Another wandered closer and closer.  When it reached the first, that one suddenly attacked. They went round and round, whirling in a circle, seeming not even to touch the ground.  The intruder soon retreated.  Some time afterwords the aggressive chipmunk charged the rabbit, who had been quietly eating.  The chipmunk either nipped or bumped the rabbit who, startled, retreated a few short hops.  The chipmunk began to eat.  The rabbit approached and gently touched the chipmunk with its nose.  The chipmunk started and moved a few feet away.  I speculate, having seen similar behavior in cats, that the chipmunk, being riled, attacked an unintended by-stander.  Not much later, the second chipmunk returned and wandered close to the first, who rebuffed it.  Today I saw only one chipmunk.
There has also been a deer showing up from time to time.  It's been eating leaves of wild grape, and also drinking water from the bird baths.
Enjoy the summer!Joanie

 

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Date: 7/1/18 5:10 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
Really, Leslie? You know, I did the same thing leading a bird trip at Bombay Hook a few years back. Wish I could claim excitement over a Swallow-tailed Kite! Very embarrassing for me...

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 1, 2018, at 7:05 PM, Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...> wrote:
>
> I saw a pair of swallow-tailed kites probably at least 20 years ago now at the White River, south of Tichenor, I believe. They swooped right overhead really low toward the water; it was thrilling. In the field west of the river were a number of Mississippi kites -- like a kettle. Great birding day. I was so happy I locked my keys in the car when I went to report to friends at Merrisach Lake.
>
>> On Sun, Jul 1, 2018 at 11:38 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>> Those of you who get eBird rare bird alerts have seen the two recent Swallow-tailed Kite submissions. One at White River NWR, the other from Russellville. The first is interesting because there hasn’t been a breeding season report from the refuge for 10 years according to eBird. The other is exceptional because there are no previous breeding season reports for the central part of the state. This should not be a hard bird to mis-ID, though that doesn’t necessarily make these sightings correct. I have reached out to both observers. In any case, keep your eyes open as this species may already be on the move; could be birds trying to find their own breeding territory.
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46896382
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46687449
>>
>> Dan Scheiman
>> eBird Reviewer
>> Little Rock, AR
>
>
>
> --
> Leslie Peacock
> Managing Editor
> Arkansas Times
> 501-492-3981

 

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Date: 7/1/18 5:06 pm
From: Leslie Peacock <lesliepeacock...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
I saw a pair of swallow-tailed kites probably at least 20 years ago now at
the White River, south of Tichenor, I believe. They swooped right overhead
really low toward the water; it was thrilling. In the field west of the
river were a number of Mississippi kites -- like a kettle. Great birding
day. I was so happy I locked my keys in the car when I went to report to
friends at Merrisach Lake.

On Sun, Jul 1, 2018 at 11:38 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
wrote:

> Those of you who get eBird rare bird alerts have seen the two recent
> Swallow-tailed Kite submissions. One at White River NWR, the other from
> Russellville. The first is interesting because there hasn’t been a breeding
> season report from the refuge for 10 years according to eBird. The other is
> exceptional because there are no previous breeding season reports for the
> central part of the state. This should not be a hard bird to mis-ID, though
> that doesn’t necessarily make these sightings correct. I have reached out
> to both observers. In any case, keep your eyes open as this species may
> already be on the move; could be birds trying to find their own breeding
> territory.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46896382
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46687449
>
> Dan Scheiman
> eBird Reviewer
> Little Rock, AR
>



--
*Leslie Peacock*
*Managing Editor*
*Arkansas Times*
*501-492-3981*

 

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Date: 7/1/18 2:46 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Other Kite
Last evening at sundown saw 2 cardinals chasing & harassing a MIKI on JFK at East H. They continued the very intense chase as he circled back & forth across JFK
Never saw that particular dynamic before. Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 1, 2018, at 11:38 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...><mailto:<birddan...>> wrote:

Those of you who get eBird rare bird alerts have seen the two recent Swallow-tailed Kite submissions. One at White River NWR, the other from Russellville. The first is interesting because there hasn’t been a breeding season report from the refuge for 10 years according to eBird. The other is exceptional because there are no previous breeding season reports for the central part of the state. This should not be a hard bird to mis-ID, though that doesn’t necessarily make these sightings correct. I have reached out to both observers. In any case, keep your eyes open as this species may already be on the move; could be birds trying to find their own breeding territory.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46896382

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46687449

Dan Scheiman
eBird Reviewer
Little Rock, AR
 

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Date: 7/1/18 2:20 pm
From: Les Koller <0000020788963bb2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
This SHOULD be a hard bird to mis-id, in my experience....
Les

Sent from my LG Mobile
------ Original message------From: Daniel ScheimanDate: Sun, Jul 1, 2018 11:38 AMTo: <ARBIRD-L...>;Cc: Subject:eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
. This should not be a hard bird to mis-ID.....
Dan ScheimaneBird ReviewerLittle Rock, AR
 

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Date: 7/1/18 2:11 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: NEOTROPIC CORMORANT AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND
A Neotropic Cormorant at Beaver Lake Nursery Pond this morning may have been there since at least June 21. In terms of plumage, this bird looks quite a bit like the Neotropic currently at SWEPCO Lake-Eagle Watch Nature Trail. Observations for this species in the Ozarks date to 2011, all from Eagle Watch. Todays bird adds a second location.

Other observations: edible blackberries. Tree Swallows still have active nests around the pond. A flock of American Goldfinches were apparently attracted to the downy-fluff of willow seeds 8 in one tree. Orchard Orioles are still singing. A nice mudflat is developing along the ponds north side. We didnt see any shorebird migrants there this morning, but at least 4 Green Herons were present. A Ruby-throated Hummingbird was probing flowers of Germander or Wood Sage. Perched on leaves of Trumpet Creeper at the blind: a striking yellowish-orange damselfly, maybe Orange Bluet.

Overall, this was a wonderful Sunday morning service, very much in the spirit of poet Emily Dickinson:

Some keep the Sabbath going to Church
I keep it, staying at Home
With a Bobolink for a Chorister
And an Orchard, for a Dome

Some keep the Sabbath in Surplice
I, just wear my Wings
And instead of tolling the Bell, for Church,
Our little Sexton sings.

God preaches, a noted Clergyman
And the sermon is never long,
So instead of getting to Heaven, at last
Im going, all along.

Or in our case, most of this morning, until it started to thunder, lightning, then rain.


 

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Date: 7/1/18 11:11 am
From: Cheryl Kester <ckester...>
Subject: Bald Eagle East of Siloam Springs
Although I usually only see Bald Eagles along Hwy 16 at the Illinois River east of Siloam Springs during the winter months, there was one this morning hanging out near a stock pond. I saw him/her before 9 am and he/she was still there at 10:30 am (before the storm came through). Is this unusual, or do a few stay around every year?

=================
Cheryl L. Kester
Fayetteville, AR
<ckester...>
 

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Date: 7/1/18 9:38 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Swallow-tailed Kites
Those of you who get eBird rare bird alerts have seen the two recent
Swallow-tailed Kite submissions. One at White River NWR, the other from
Russellville. The first is interesting because there hasnt been a breeding
season report from the refuge for 10 years according to eBird. The other is
exceptional because there are no previous breeding season reports for the
central part of the state. This should not be a hard bird to mis-ID, though
that doesnt necessarily make these sightings correct. I have reached out to
both observers. In any case, keep your eyes open as this species may already
be on the move; could be birds trying to find their own breeding territory.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46896382

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46687449

Dan Scheiman
eBird Reviewer
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 7/1/18 8:48 am
From: <herbies...> <herbies...>
Subject: Mississippi Kite at Crystal Bridges 0730 this morning





This Mississippi Kite was spotted at the top of a Red Oak on the North Forest Trail just across from the dining area of “High South on a Roll”. Dave and Debbie Shallenberg of Rogers, who had been viewing and photographing a doe and her two fawns, kindly provided this image.

The Kite seemed comfortable with our presence. A Blue-gray Gnatcatcher paid a brief, non-confrontational visit. After making a few excursions from its perch, the Kite took a short flight to denser cover.
 

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Date: 7/1/18 5:55 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Purple Martins at Nieting place in Fort Smith know shade is good for them!
Following is summarized from an email:

Purple Martins at Jim Nieting place in Fort Smith seems to have had a pretty decent year, though overall fewer birds than last year and a lot of small broods. 12 of the 16 gourds had nests and all of them fledged. There were 14 nests (of 24 possible) in metal house; 6 to finish fledgling as of June 29. In the late morning many of the young move out onto the porch to escape the heat. They work their way around the house as the day goes on to stay in the shade. As the parents approach they seem to be able to pick each other out for a feeding and all seem to get to their respective nest for alerts or in the evening.


 

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Date: 6/30/18 12:47 pm
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Swainson’s Hawk (Benton Co.)
Around 10:15am on June 28 (Thursday) I observed a low-flying Swainson’s Hawk at Chesney Prairie in Siloam Springs. It was on the east end of the property, just north of the parking lot, headed south.

I’ve been visiting the site almost daily, and this is the first one I’ve observed since mid May. Pooja Panwar saw one earlier in June.

We are at 58 Dickcissel nests between Chesney, Stump, and Woolsey Prairies. Painted Buntings are still singing at the Siloam Springs prairies. An added bonus was encountering an Ornate Box Turtle in Siloam Springs, an intricately designed yet declining prairie obligate. It makes all the chigger bites worthwhile.

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.
 

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Date: 6/30/18 6:26 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Sanibel Island
David, i meant to suggest the muddy beach just before the bridge to Sanibel. I haven't been there in 10 years but it was certainly a birdy area. Have fun!
Patty
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: David Ray <cardcards...> Date: 6/29/18 3:20 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Sanibel Island
Thanks to all who responded to my query about Sanibel Island. Thanks for the tips and hints (including the places to eat)! I have a much better idea of what to do and where to do it. If I did not respond to you individually, please forgive me, we've had the grandkids all week which left little computer time. Again, thanks!
David Ray
NLR
 

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Date: 6/30/18 6:09 am
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite
I saw a pair in downtown Bentonville this week. It seems their recolonization of Arkansas is complete. The adults sure are beautiful birds.

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

> On Jun 30, 2018, at 6:40 AM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:
>
> Absolutely agree...they look like an Egyptian carving w that sleek pearl grey head, kohl rimmed ruby eyes & ivory beak. Please post the photo link when you get it. Karen Hart
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Jun 30, 2018, at 4:28 AM, Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:
>>
>> I finally got an up close and personal view of a MIKI yesterday afternoon, just a block away from my house. That was one gorgeous bird. I was so happy when I realized that I had my camera in the car, when he landed in a tree, not 15 feet away. Problem was, I had taken the memory card into the house to upload photos, and had forgotten to put it back in the camera. Maybe he lives nearby.
>>
>> Karen Garrett
>> Rogers
 

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Date: 6/30/18 4:41 am
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: Mississippi Kite
Absolutely agree...they look like an Egyptian carving w that sleek pearl grey head, kohl rimmed ruby eyes & ivory beak. Please post the photo link when you get it. Karen Hart

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 30, 2018, at 4:28 AM, Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:
>
> I finally got an up close and personal view of a MIKI yesterday afternoon, just a block away from my house. That was one gorgeous bird. I was so happy when I realized that I had my camera in the car, when he landed in a tree, not 15 feet away. Problem was, I had taken the memory card into the house to upload photos, and had forgotten to put it back in the camera. Maybe he lives nearby.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers
 

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Date: 6/30/18 2:28 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Mississippi Kite
I finally got an up close and personal view of a MIKI yesterday afternoon,
just a block away from my house. That was one gorgeous bird. I was so
happy when I realized that I had my camera in the car, when he landed in a
tree, not 15 feet away. Problem was, I had taken the memory card into the
house to upload photos, and had forgotten to put it back in the camera.
Maybe he lives nearby.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

 

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Date: 6/29/18 11:06 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: Early Fall Migrant Shorebirds Lafayette County 6-29-18
AR-birders,
Fall is in the air. Early migrant shorebirds are starting to arrive, and large flocks of waders
are starting to build. Refer to the link of the eBird report from Bundrick Farms in south
Lafayette County this evening 6-29-18.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/email?subID=S46884276

Weve got a Masked Duck in Shreveport a few miles from my home right now. Its on private land,
but the landowner is allowing visitors in groups on a scheduled basis. There was one in OK last
year, so you all should be next.The link to my eBird list including the Masked Duck is below.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S46846776

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

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Date: 6/29/18 1:21 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Sanibel Island
Thanks to all who responded to my query about Sanibel Island. Thanks for the tips and hints (including the places to eat)! I have a much better idea of what to do and where to do it. If I did not respond to you individually, please forgive me, we've had the grandkids all week which left little computer time. Again, thanks!
David Ray
NLR
 

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Date: 6/29/18 12:50 pm
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: NEOTROPIC CORMORANT AT EAGLE WATCH (Gentry)
A Neotropic Cormorant at Eagle Watch Nature Trail this morning was a few days earlier than our previous local record (July 5). There were also Double-crested Cormorants (4), including one in the same snag with the Neotropic, providing handy comparison. This adult Neotropic retains the white V at gape typical of breeding season birds. Other observers this morning included Eagle Watch founder and manager Terry Stanfill and Peter Shaffer from Bentonville. Best views were from the older blind. On a hot day, we sat in the shade with a cooling breeze from the south. A Prothonotary Warbler was also near the blind, singing at the edge of the water.


 

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Date: 6/27/18 2:09 pm
From: Laster/Roark <elaster523...>
Subject: A Ducky Day
After helping a friend find a horned lark for his life list today, we ended up in England, AR. We stopped at the grain storage bins on the north side of town (west side of Hwy. 165) and went to their public use pond to see what might be there.

We were surprised to see 45-50 Black-bellied Whistling-ducks around the pond. Certainly the largest gathering of this species I’ve ever seen.

Ed Laster
Little Rock
 

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Date: 6/26/18 9:27 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 26
It was partly cloudy and windy on the survey today. 66 species were found.
Best highlight was a Tricolored Heron in unit 27B. Lots of young
everywhere. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 7

Wood Duck - 13

Gadwall - 1 male

Hooded Merganser - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 8 (also 6 broods of young.)

Neotropic Cormorant - 5 (all 3 nests with young now.)

Anhinga - 67 adults (Lots of young in nests now.)

Great-blue Heron - 3

Great Egret - 46

Snowy Egret - 63

Little-blue Heron - 88

Tricolored Heron - 1

Cattle Egret - 550

Green Heron - 14

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 2

White Ibis - 113

Black Vulture - 10

Turkey Vulture - 14

Mississippi Kite - 8

Purple Gallinule - 25 (also 2 broods of young.)

Common Gallinule - 36 (also numerous broods of young.)

American Coot - 5

Mourning Dove - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 7

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 1

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Eastern Kingbird - 6

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 14

Bell's Vireo - 4

Red-eyed Vireo - 3

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 3

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 2

Tree Swallow - 5

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 19

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 7

Carolina Wren - 6

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 2

Pine Warbler - 3

Prothonotary Warbler - 5

Common Yellowthroat - 10

Yellow-breasted Chat - 11

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 5

Northern Cardinal - 14

Indigo Bunting - 30

Painted Bunting - 9

Dickcissel - 16

Red-winged Blackbird - 36

Common Grackle - 6

Brown-headed Cowbird - 7





Odonates:



Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Mocha Emerald

Jade Clubtail

Four-spotted Pennant

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Widow Skimmer

Eastern Amberwing

Blue Dasher

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags







Herps:



Red-eared Slider

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR












 

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Date: 6/26/18 1:18 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: bird attacks officer


https://www.liveleak.com/view?t=u9Mqu_1530025085




 

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Date: 6/26/18 6:15 am
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Prothronotary warblers nesting in fruit jar
Yesterday Gary Felker and I saw prothronotary warblers nesting in a fruit jar in a boathouse on a small private lake near Fort Smith. The owner had found the nest only because he saw an adult bird fly to it. The four babies, we took a quick look before returning the jar to its place on a shelf, are feathering up and will soon be leaving the nest. They will have to be strong enough to hop up an inch or so to get out of the jar.

Pictures on bestbirdpictures.com

Alton D Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>


 

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Date: 6/26/18 5:38 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Baker Prairie Natural Area at Harrison
Before I jump directly into the birds yesterday at Baker Prairie Natural Area in Harrison, heres a little poem from by Emily Dickinson:

To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee,
One clover, and a bee.
And revery.
The revery alone will do,
If bees are few.

In all respect, I would add that to make a northwest Arkansas prairie, you also need Dickcissels. Yesterday, at Baker, Dickcissels had plenty of tall perches. Compass Plants were up and covered with brilliant yellow flowers, providing something in the way of an ideal perch a few feet above and therefore with a commanding view of the surrounding grasslands. Tall wands with Dickcissels whipped back and forth in the wind.

We walked both mowed trails through Baker. Between walks, enjoyed the shade in the attractive shelter built by Friends of Baker Prairie.

First birds: Scissor-tailed Flycatchers along the powerlines. Then, Mourning Doves (8) that flushed out of the shelter when we walked up. We also saw Eastern Meadowlarks (2), an American Kestrel (1), heard Common Yellowthroats (2), Indigo Bunting (1), Blue Grosbeak (1), Red-winged Blackbirds (6), Yellow-breasted Chat (2), Northern Cardinal (1), and Killdeer (2).

Even though Compass Plants are fairly common across the region of Tallgrass Prairies, we have lost most of our prairies in Arkansas, and seeing Compass Plants in an unmowed (or these days, un-herbicided) roadside ditch is not the same as native, natural Id almost say supra-natural Compass Plant skyscrapers starting with their huge, ornately-sculpted basal leaves -- rising above a prairie landscape. They were spreading grace all over Baker Prairie NA.

We were looking out over the green mass of native grasses and there is this startling presence, masses of red trumpets long green tubes and five deliriously fire engine red petals. My oh my. One of yesterdays best finds: cardinal red, flowering, Royal Catchfly (Silene regia). I saw one being visited by an equally brilliantly green tiny green bee, crawling right down into the fire of pollen.

One indicator of a prairies quality is presence of a very, very strange flower called Rattlesnake Master, Eryngium yuccifolium. The Master was flowering in the many thousands, covering the entire landscape. Between, thousands of flowering Winecups rich and colorful as the name suggests and a lot of fun too -- an entire prairie-scape of them and a great wonder to walk through it all.

Im pretty sure I missed a few things because I was also hoping for Willow Flycatcher and Bells Vireo. I used playback in three likely spots for the little flycatchers, but no luck. This was a disappointment, but on the other hand, the prairie flora was so absolutely eye-popping that I was very, very happy Id made the long drive from Fayetteville on this particular day.


 

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Date: 6/25/18 5:04 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Sanibel Island
I'm getting to go to Sanibel Island off the Florida coast on vacation this summer. I know it is not the "birdiest" time of year to go, but I would appreciate any tips, ideas, do's or don'ts from anyone that has visited there in the past. This is my first opportunity to go there. Please reply offline please. (Hit reply, not reply all.)
Thanks,
David Ray NLR
 

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Date: 6/24/18 1:55 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: NYTimes Birder Article
Birders,

There's a great article
<https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/23/style/birds-are-cool.html?hp&action=click&pgtype=Homepage&clickSource=story-heading&module=second-column-region&region=top-news&WT.nav=top-news>
in today's NYTimes about young urban birders. In case you don't identify
with the "young" or "urban" the article also has links to other info and
writings
like the 7 pleasures of birding
<http://mariewinnnaturenews.blogspot.com/2006/04/seven-pleasures-of-birding.html>and
My Bird Problem
<https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2005/08/08/my-bird-problem>.

Happy Sunday!

Lynn Foster
NW of Pinnacle

 

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Date: 6/24/18 4:51 am
From: Harriet Hillis Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: a successful ID
Thanks to Joe Neal, who sat with us in our near side yard yesterday morning, we have identified our resident "warbler." It turns out to be a pair, not of warblers, but of White-eyed Vireos.


I had asked Joe and Mike Mlodinov for help after using Sibley and the Cornell site to try to identify a constant singer in the big oak beside our house. We are low-tech birders, without good spotting tools and without a smart phone to play a call. One close look at the bird, looking toward bright light, wasn't helpful, though it proved accurate.

The song was clear and frequent. So, using the maps to narrow the warbler possibilities, I listened to calls many times. No match.


As Joe sat, we saw a small bird in a yew nearby, and he immediately identified a White-eyed Vireo. How lucky you are to have this Vireo hanging around so close, he remarked. Then he played the song -- and lured the mate! Not only that: the song was what we had been hearing all along. Mystery solved.


While he sat, Joe heard a Northern Parula in our lower garden lot, and also a House Wren (the Carolina Wren is our loudest and steadiest singer). He noted that our varied vegetation provides good habitat for many species -- not always rare, but always welcome.


Harriet Jansma

south side of Mount Sequoyah, Fayetteville


 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 6:44 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Greenwire: Die like an eagle? New data suggest more to the story
FYI

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2018 11:54 AM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: FW: Greenwire: Die like an eagle? New data suggest more to the
story

WIND

Die like an eagle? New data suggest more to the story

Michael Doyle <Blockedhttps://www.eenews.net/staff/Michael_DoyleBlocked> ,
E&E News reporter

Published: Wednesday, June 20, 2018

The Fish and Wildlife Service said today it has better data to predict
golden and bald eagle fatalities caused by wind turbines, potentially
helping officials refine future permitting for wind facilities.

In a technical-sounding but consequential move
<Blockedhttps://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2018-
13358.pdfBlocked> , the agency is asking for public suggestions on how the
new information can best be used.

"The permitting system is all about how to reduce harm to eagles," spokesman
Gavin Shire said in an interview, adding that "improved data will enable us
to be more accurate" in permitting.

Current estimates
<Blockedhttps://www.fws.gov/migratorybirds/pdf/management/EagleRuleRevisions
-StatusReport.pdfBlocked> peg the U.S. bald eagle population at about
143,000 and rising. The golden eagle population is estimated to be about
40,000.



Neither bird is listed under the Endangered Species Act, but they are
covered under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and, to an extent,
the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. The Trump administration's controversial
interpretation of the latter excludes the "incidental take" such as might
occur when a bird collides with a wind turbine (E&E News PM
<Blockedhttps://www.eenews.net/eenewspm/stories/1060069811/Blocked> , Dec.
22, 2017).

Several hundred eagles die annually in wind turbine collisions, officials
have estimated, though firm numbers are elusive.

"It is significant," Dan Ashe, a former director of FWS, said of the
agency's new data and its potential permitting application. "It is the key
modeling instrument that the FWS uses to predict the impact of a wind power
project: How many eagles will potentially be killed?"

Ashe, now president and CEO of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, added,
"It is also an update that we committed to do during the Obama
administration."

Nationwide, there are more than 52,000 utility-scale wind turbines,
according to the American Wind Energy Association.

The FWS uses a "collision risk model" to predict the number of golden and
bald eagles that may be killed at new wind facilities. The model combines
existing knowledge of eagle use areas around a proposed facility and the
probability of an eagle colliding with an operating turbine.

The former is called exposure data, and the latter is called collision data.

When FWS last updated the risk model in 2016, officials lacked certain data
specific to bald eagles, so they plugged in golden eagle data as a
substitute.

Since then, the agency reviewed data sets for 419 wind energy facilities.
Although not all of the information proved usable, officials said they could
draw certain conclusions.

For both the golden and bald eagles, officials now believe the exposure to
potential danger is lower than previously thought. The updated collision
data are also "slightly lower" for golden eagles, FWS says.

For bald eagles, the updated collision data are a bit more complicated.

"Where bald eagles are abundant, they engage in social behaviors and
intraspecific interactions that may make them more vulnerable than golden
eagles to collisions," the FWS noted. "Thus, the implication that bald
eagles are at high risk at a few wind facilities, while their risk is much
lower at many others, is tenable."

At the same time, FWS acknowledged "that the bald eagle collision
[information] is based on data from relatively few sites that do not span
the range of bald eagle density conditions that exist across the country,
and therefore may not be representative of all locations."

The agency is floating several options for incorporating the bald eagle
information into the collision risk model. One would "adopt a risk-tolerant
policy for bald eagles." Another "would use higher fatality estimates for
bald eagles than for golden eagles," and a third would seek more
information.

"It's too early to tell, but it's an important and welcome effort," said
Lisa Hardaway, vice president for communications with the National Audubon
Society. "We know that we can have both eagle conservation and wind energy
and will keep working toward that goal."

Twitter: @MichaelDoyle10 <Blockedhttps://twitter.com/MichaelDoyle10Blocked>
Email: <mdoyle...> <mailto:<mdoyle...>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 6:41 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: DoD Partners in Flight 2017 Annual Report
I extracted the Executive Summary. Please contact me off-line to receive the entire document.

Jeff Short


The primary goal of DOD Natural Resource Management Programs is to help ensure
optimal access to and utilization of our ranges and training areas to support military
readiness. The Migratory Bird Treaty Act, Executive Order 13186 (Responsibilities of
Federal Agencies to Protect Migratory Birds), and the National Environmental Policy Act,
require analysis of impacts of military activities on migratory birds. While sound natural
resource management often directly supports both the goal and requirement, balancing
the conservation of sensitive and protected resources, such as migratory birds with
military testing, training and operations can present challenges.
DoD lands represent a critical network of habitats for migratory birds and natural
ecosystems, and are managed through the preparation and implementation of
Integrated Natural Resource Management Plans (INRMPs). INRMPs guide the
implementation of an installation’s natural resource management activities in ways
that ensure consistency with military mission objectives and that support “no net loss”
of mission capability, while also providing for conservation, rehabilitation, and sustained
multipurpose use of installation lands.
DoD Partners in Flight facilitates actions to conserve and enhance these
valuable habitats and public lands in support of the military testing, training, and
operational objectives. This network of DoD natural resource professionals work as
DoD Partners in Flight Representatives to support and communicate with installation
resource managers, state and regional Partners in Flight working groups, nongovernment
organizations, academic researchers, and natural resource consultants to
collectively promote and coordinate bird conservation across DoD lands

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
DoD PIF Accomplishments
 Provided technical guidance to DoD leadership and resource managers on the implementation
of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and related Executive Orders. Ensured activities and relevant
issues were properly communicated to Military Service and OSD Natural Resources leadership.
 Supported DoD’s engagement with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on policy, guidance, and
other issues relevant to management and monitoring of migratory birds on military lands.
 Helped develop the Addressing Migratory Bird Management in Integrated Natural Resources
Management Plans – Guidance.
 Instructed on the Migratory Bird Treaty Act at two U.S. Naval Civil Engineer Corps Officers
School (CECOS) courses and other DoD training workshops.
 Identified the most hazardous species to a safe military flight environment, and initiated studies
to decrease the threat from these hazardous species.
 Worked with NGO, and federal and state agency partners to establish an Avian Knowledge
Network federal node to support required NEPA and impact analysis of DoD activities on
migratory birds.
DOD PIF Priorities
 Provide technical assistance to installation biologists to support overall management of migratory
bird populations in support of federal statutes to enhance mission requirements and ensure
migratory birds are sufficiently addressed in INRMPs.
 Coordinate and finalize the DoD list of Mission-Sensitive species, which are at-risk species that,
if listed, would have the greatest impact to mission implementation. The list helps installations
prioritize monitoring programs and NEPA documents, and guides the development and
prioritization of conservation actions.
 Improve communication, coordination, and cooperation between Air Operations and Natural
Resource programs including the integration of Bird Aircraft Strike Hazard (BASH) plans into
INRMPs to mitigate strike hazards.
 Identify emerging issues related to migratory bird management and mission requirements.

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight [mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2018 11:08 AM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: DoD Partners in Flight 2017 Annual Report

Attached is the 2017 DoD Partners in Flight Annual Report for 2017, along with a separate Executive Summary.

Please let me know if you have any questions, and as always, how DoD PIF can help support you.

Rich

Richard A. Fischer, Ph.D., CWB
US Army Engineer R&D Center
Environmental Laboratory
Vicksburg, MS 39180
502-454-4658
National Coordinator, DoD Bird Conservation Lead, USACE Threatened and Endangered Species Team
 

Back to top
Date: 6/23/18 6:40 am
From: Joseph C. Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: NEST BOXES STILL ACTIVE AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND
The bird boxes around Beaver Lake Nursery Pond are checked and maintained by volunteers from Northwest Arkansas Master Naturalists. When I was there on June 21, I had the pleasure to meet two of these volunteers at work: Glenna Pickens and Hal Johnson. Tree Swallows and Eastern Bluebirds are the main occupants of these boxes, but also at times Prothonotary Warblers. The walk on the pond levee is around 1-mile.

My bird list for a couple of easy hours included Wood Duck (3), Double-crested Cormorant (1; unusual here at this time), Great Blue Heron (4), Green Heron (1), Black Vulture, Turkey Vulture, Killdeer, Mourning Dove, Yellow-billed Cuckoo (3), Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Red-headed Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, Acadian Flycatcher, Eastern Wood-Pewee, White-eyed Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo, Blue Jay, Fish Crow, Tree Swallow (active nests), Northern Rough-winged Swallow (6, including at least 2 fledglings), Tufted Titmouse, Eastern Bluebird (adults and fledglings), Northern Parula, Yellow-throated Warbler, Pine Warbler, Summer Tanager, Chipping Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Indigo Bunting, Red-winged Blackbird, Common Grackle, Orchard Oriole, American Goldfinch. The Orchard Orioles included both the year-old males that look like Bullock's Oriole and regular brick red and black males.

The nursery pond is free and open to the public. Foot traffic only.

I chose June 21 for this trip because on June 21, 1990, I saw 20 Willets at the pond, early migrants for sure. None on this trip, but Ill check today again.


 

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