ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
6/22/24 7:09 am Cheryl Johnson <cjbluebird...> Re: Jam for the Geese
6/22/24 2:50 am jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> Re: Jam for the Geese
6/21/24 7:10 pm Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...> Jam for the Geese
6/21/24 12:50 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Western Kingbird nest in Centerton
6/21/24 11:59 am Aster Droste <eviedroste...> Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 19 Jun 2024 to 20 Jun 2024 (#2024-175)
6/21/24 8:10 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 19 Jun 2024 to 20 Jun 2024 (#2024-175)
6/21/24 7:42 am Melissa Versiga <Melissa...> Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 19 Jun 2024 to 20 Jun 2024 (#2024-175)
6/20/24 5:58 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Rare bird report for spring
6/19/24 9:39 pm Ian MacGregor <00000489141846bd-dmarc-request...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 8:04 pm Ian MacGregor <00000489141846bd-dmarc-request...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 3:10 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Missing Birds?
6/19/24 2:47 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 2:22 pm Harriet Jansma <000007a2e0d8d68f-dmarc-request...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 12:59 pm Jodi Morris <mjodimorris...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 12:53 pm Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 12:31 pm DAVID PARHAM <000004014062b2df-dmarc-request...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 11:25 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 10:01 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 9:49 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 7:56 am Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 7:48 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: missing birds?
6/19/24 7:28 am Robert Day <rhday52...> missing birds?
6/19/24 4:57 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Asking for Some Librarians
6/18/24 8:11 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Asking for Some Librarians
6/18/24 6:44 pm <arbour...> <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - June 18
6/18/24 2:14 pm Joseph Neal <0000078cbd583d7c-dmarc-request...> Adam's Big Year
6/16/24 7:36 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Suggestions for Binoculars to buy for Borneo
6/13/24 8:30 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
6/13/24 7:51 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Downies with sweet tooth? or beak?
6/13/24 7:21 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
6/13/24 7:20 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Downies with sweet tooth? or beak?
6/13/24 7:13 am Anna Lee Hudson <hudsonre...> Downies with sweet tooth? or beak?
6/13/24 5:04 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
6/12/24 7:28 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
6/12/24 6:49 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
6/12/24 5:18 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
6/11/24 5:59 pm <arbour...> <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - June 11
6/11/24 11:44 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
6/10/24 8:04 am Ragan Sutterfield <000003499a91e99c-dmarc-request...> ASCA Meeting Thursday: Jeremy Cohen on a Changing Climate and Changing Birds
6/6/24 2:36 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Upcoming ASCA Field Trip June 8
6/6/24 9:55 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Fw: NYTimes.com: These Teens Adopted an Orphaned Oil Well. Their Goal: Shut It Down.
6/6/24 9:52 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wandering Wood Duck
6/6/24 7:34 am Dedra Gerard <000002df2472bba2-dmarc-request...> Re: Sunnymede restoration
6/6/24 7:11 am Patty McLean <plm108...> Re: The Snipe Newsletter
6/5/24 10:44 pm Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: Sunnymede restoration
6/5/24 7:07 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Distant bird on wire ID request
6/5/24 4:25 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Sunnymede restoration
6/5/24 11:58 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Re: Sunnymede restoration
6/5/24 10:56 am Dedra Gerard <000002df2472bba2-dmarc-request...> Re: Sunnymede restoration
6/5/24 10:09 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Sunnymede restoration
6/4/24 9:04 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> The Snipe Newsletter
6/4/24 8:12 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: TORNADOES AND LESSER YELLOWLEGS WITH A BUM LEG
6/4/24 7:10 pm <arbour...> <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - June 4
6/4/24 12:55 pm Betty Evans <betty_evans...> Re: TORNADOES AND LESSER YELLOWLEGS WITH A BUM LEG
6/4/24 12:45 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Hummer at Trumpet Creepers in June
6/1/24 2:54 pm Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...> Re: Todd Ballinger’s owl photo makes cover of eBird
6/1/24 4:49 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Todd Ballinger’s owl photo makes cover of eBird
5/30/24 10:56 am Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: AAST Belize fundraiser 2024
5/30/24 7:25 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> AAST Belize fundraiser 2024
5/30/24 4:14 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> TORNADOES AND LESSER YELLOWLEGS WITH A BUM LEG
5/29/24 2:08 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Upcoming ASCA Field Trips
5/27/24 8:00 pm Brian Carlson <brianrcarlson...> Mount Magazine Ovenbirds
5/25/24 5:04 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Wood Duck Fledging #3 of 2024
 
Back to top
Date: 6/22/24 7:09 am
From: Cheryl Johnson <cjbluebird...>
Subject: Re: Jam for the Geese
 

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Date: 6/22/24 2:50 am
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: Jam for the Geese
Don't you love civil disobedience when it works?

On Fri, Jun 21, 2024, 10:10 PM Anita Schnee <
<000003224553d416-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Dateline rush hour, East Fayetteville, Mission and Crossover intersection.
> Traffic significantly backed up in all directions due to civilian traffic
> controllers jumping out of cars and holding things up, so a gaggle of
> Canada geese + babies can cross the road safely. Much good humor all around.
>
>
> ~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
>
> Anita Schnee
>
> http://catself.wordpress.com
> http://afriqueaya.org
>
> <http://afriqueaya.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/afriqueaya_eplogo.jpg>
>
> ~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>

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Date: 6/21/24 7:10 pm
From: Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Jam for the Geese
Dateline rush hour, East Fayetteville, Mission and Crossover intersection. Traffic significantly backed up in all directions due to civilian traffic controllers jumping out of cars and holding things up, so a gaggle of Canada geese + babies can cross the road safely. Much good humor all around.

~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`

Anita Schnee

http://catself.wordpress.com
http://afriqueaya.org



~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`

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Date: 6/21/24 12:50 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Western Kingbird nest in Centerton
 Today I followed up on a Western Kingbird in Centerton that Robert Langston reported on ebird yesterday.  I was able to get great looks at the pair and eventually followed one of the adults as it took food to a nest with two well-grown nestlings.  Just as in Fort Smith, they were nesting at an electrical substation.  I think this is the first confirmed nesting for Benton County and the NWA metropolis in general.   Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were on yesterday's agenda for me.  They've been reported often this month from the Centerton area.  I'd tried five times for them and finally saw one fly overhead yesterday.  They are probably nesting nearby somewhere as well.  With that duck, the kingbirds, and yesterday's Horned Larks and Bell's Vireo, I am up to 178 species for Benton County this year.  All carbon neutral, leaving my house by bike or on foot.  This is already the most I've seen in Benton County in a single year.  22 more to go to get to my goal of 200.  
Adam SchafferBentonville

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Date: 6/21/24 11:59 am
From: Aster Droste <eviedroste...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 19 Jun 2024 to 20 Jun 2024 (#2024-175)
I had one that would visit my feeders regularly this winter, but I know I
was in the rare few. Project Feederwatch data (
https://data.feederwatch.org/pfw/stateReport#US-AR,PFW_2024) shows that
during most count periods last winter, only 3-5% of Arkansas participants
recorded a red breasted nuthatch, with a maximum of 10% in early December.

I'll attach a few pictures of my nuthatch. The two low quality ones are
from December 6, which I think was my first sighting of it at my feeders
(Merlin had picked it up nearby a few weeks earlier, but I can't confirm
because I didn't know the calls yet). The better picture was taken by my
sister during the big freeze.

As for the grosbeaks and orioles, I didn't get any that I know of. However,
this is my first spring feeding birds so they may have just not discovered
my feeders. I know I heard a few orioles nearby and that bright orange
feeder seems hard to miss, but oh well.


On Fri, Jun 21, 2024, 9:42 AM Melissa Versiga <Melissa...>
wrote:

> I am curious if anyone had Red-breasted Nuthatch last season? I always
> look forward to their arrival every fall but didn't even see one this year.
>
> We also didn't have any Orioles and way fewer Rose-breasted Grosbeak this
> past migration.
>
> Melissa Versiga
> Eureka Springs
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
>
> Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2024 04:39:20 +0000
> From: Ian MacGregor <ianmacg...>
> Subject: Re: missing birds?
>
> One last point. I looked up all the open country birds i oulc think of.
> All are suffering declines throughout Arkansas
>
> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 10:03 PM, Ian MacGregor <[<ianmacg...>
> ](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 10:03 PM, Ian MacGregor <<a href=)>
> wrote:
>
> > EBird has trend data and most warblers are doing quite well including
> Prothonotary which is flagged by Audubon Delta as having suffered a large
> decline. Some are declining in some areas and increasing in others Two
> which show almost universal negative trends in the state are Blue-winged
> Warbler and Common Yellowthroat.
> >
> > I was interested in Black-throatef Green. There is no data for Arkansas,
> but the bird is declining every where except the most northern part of its
> range.
> >
> > The trends are from 2012 to 2022. Things may have changed since then.
> >
> > On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <[<ianmacg...>
> ](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <<a href=)> wrote:
> >
> >> I am not seeing fewer birds this year with the possible exception of
> cuckoos. I have not recorded one in my neighborhood. However I am seeing
> Baltimore Orioles more often there.
> >> It’also seems that cowbirds are more common and widespread.
> >>
> >> I went to the Walton Preserve today. Lots of redstarts and parulas, and
> red-eyed vireos, quite a few yellow-throated vireos as well. A good number
> of Acadian Flycathers too. Merlin reported lots of Ceruleans, but I could
> hear none over thc redstarts, but male made all too brief of an appearance
> at eye level for me like life bird . I was a bit surprised that 19 red-eyes
> were not flagged, they were every where, but seven Acadians were along with
> 12 redstarts
> >>
> >> One definite female Summer Tanager was feeding a cowbird, and a
> possible Scarlet was feeding another. I also saw a Northern Parula feeding
> a cowbird last Saturday at Hobbes.
> >>
> >> Ian MacGregor Bella Vista
> >>
> >> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <[<rhday52...>
> ](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <<a href=)> wrote:
> >>
> >>> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out
> there this year?
> >>>
> >>> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel
> like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and
> Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have
> quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many
> fewer birds of these three species this year.
> >>>
> >>> RHD
> >>>
> >>> Robert H. Day
> >>> SW Bentonville,
> >>>
> >>>>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>

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Date: 6/21/24 8:10 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 19 Jun 2024 to 20 Jun 2024 (#2024-175)
I did not have Red-breasted Nuthatches this past winter here in Hot Springs. The Baltimore Orioles and Rose-breasted Grosbeaks were down by 90% and those that did stop, did not stay the two weeks as usual.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Melissa Versiga
Sent: Friday, June 21, 2024 9:42 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 19 Jun 2024 to 20 Jun 2024 (#2024-175)

I am curious if anyone had Red-breasted Nuthatch last season? I always look forward to their arrival every fall but didn't even see one this year.

We also didn't have any Orioles and way fewer Rose-breasted Grosbeak this past migration.


Melissa Versiga
Eureka Springs




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2024 04:39:20 +0000
From: Ian MacGregor <ianmacg...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?

One last point. I looked up all the open country birds i oulc think of. All are suffering declines throughout Arkansas

On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 10:03 PM, Ian MacGregor <[<ianmacg...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 10:03 PM, Ian MacGregor <<a href=)> wrote:

> EBird has trend data and most warblers are doing quite well including Prothonotary which is flagged by Audubon Delta as having suffered a large decline. Some are declining in some areas and increasing in others Two which show almost universal negative trends in the state are Blue-winged Warbler and Common Yellowthroat.
>
> I was interested in Black-throatef Green. There is no data for Arkansas, but the bird is declining every where except the most northern part of its range.
>
> The trends are from 2012 to 2022. Things may have changed since then.
>
> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <[<ianmacg...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <<a href=)> wrote:
>
>> I am not seeing fewer birds this year with the possible exception of cuckoos. I have not recorded one in my neighborhood. However I am seeing Baltimore Orioles more often there.
>> Italso seems that cowbirds are more common and widespread.
>>
>> I went to the Walton Preserve today. Lots of redstarts and parulas, and red-eyed vireos, quite a few yellow-throated vireos as well. A good number of Acadian Flycathers too. Merlin reported lots of Ceruleans, but I could hear none over thc redstarts, but male made all too brief of an appearance at eye level for me like life bird . I was a bit surprised that 19 red-eyes were not flagged, they were every where, but seven Acadians were along with 12 redstarts
>>
>> One definite female Summer Tanager was feeding a cowbird, and a possible Scarlet was feeding another. I also saw a Northern Parula feeding a cowbird last Saturday at Hobbes.
>>
>> Ian MacGregor Bella Vista
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <[<rhday52...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <<a href=)> wrote:
>>
>>> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?
>>>
>>> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.
>>>
>>> RHD
>>>
>>> Robert H. Day
>>> SW Bentonville,
>>>
>>>>




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Date: 6/21/24 7:42 am
From: Melissa Versiga <Melissa...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 19 Jun 2024 to 20 Jun 2024 (#2024-175)
I am curious if anyone had Red-breasted Nuthatch last season? I always look forward to their arrival every fall but didn't even see one this year.

We also didn't have any Orioles and way fewer Rose-breasted Grosbeak this past migration.

Melissa Versiga
Eureka Springs


________________________________


Date: Thu, 20 Jun 2024 04:39:20 +0000
From: Ian MacGregor <ianmacg...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?

One last point. I looked up all the open country birds i oulc think of. All are suffering declines throughout Arkansas

On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 10:03 PM, Ian MacGregor <[<ianmacg...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 10:03 PM, Ian MacGregor <<a href=)> wrote:

> EBird has trend data and most warblers are doing quite well including Prothonotary which is flagged by Audubon Delta as having suffered a large decline. Some are declining in some areas and increasing in others Two which show almost universal negative trends in the state are Blue-winged Warbler and Common Yellowthroat.
>
> I was interested in Black-throatef Green. There is no data for Arkansas, but the bird is declining every where except the most northern part of its range.
>
> The trends are from 2012 to 2022. Things may have changed since then.
>
> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <[<ianmacg...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <<a href=)> wrote:
>
>> I am not seeing fewer birds this year with the possible exception of cuckoos. I have not recorded one in my neighborhood. However I am seeing Baltimore Orioles more often there.
>> Italso seems that cowbirds are more common and widespread.
>>
>> I went to the Walton Preserve today. Lots of redstarts and parulas, and red-eyed vireos, quite a few yellow-throated vireos as well. A good number of Acadian Flycathers too. Merlin reported lots of Ceruleans, but I could hear none over thc redstarts, but male made all too brief of an appearance at eye level for me like life bird . I was a bit surprised that 19 red-eyes were not flagged, they were every where, but seven Acadians were along with 12 redstarts
>>
>> One definite female Summer Tanager was feeding a cowbird, and a possible Scarlet was feeding another. I also saw a Northern Parula feeding a cowbird last Saturday at Hobbes.
>>
>> Ian MacGregor Bella Vista
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <[<rhday52...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <<a href=)> wrote:
>>
>>> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?
>>>
>>> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.
>>>
>>> RHD
>>>
>>> Robert H. Day
>>> SW Bentonville,
>>>
>>>>


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Date: 6/20/24 5:58 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Rare bird report for spring
d
If you have not done so already, please go to
https://arbirds.org/Records/Report.aspx and report rare and out of season
birds you have seen from March through May.
Lyndal York, Ph.D.
Curator, Arkansas Audubon Society

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Date: 6/19/24 9:39 pm
From: Ian MacGregor <00000489141846bd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
One last point. I looked up all the open country birds i oulc think of. All are suffering declines throughout Arkansas

On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 10:03 PM, Ian MacGregor <[<ianmacg...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 10:03 PM, Ian MacGregor <<a href=)> wrote:

> EBird has trend data and most warblers are doing quite well including Prothonotary which is flagged by Audubon Delta as having suffered a large decline. Some are declining in some areas and increasing in others Two which show almost universal negative trends in the state are Blue-winged Warbler and Common Yellowthroat.
>
> I was interested in Black-throatef Green. There is no data for Arkansas, but the bird is declining every where except the most northern part of its range.
>
> The trends are from 2012 to 2022. Things may have changed since then.
>
> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <[<ianmacg...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <<a href=)> wrote:
>
>> I am not seeing fewer birds this year with the possible exception of cuckoos. I have not recorded one in my neighborhood. However I am seeing Baltimore Orioles more often there.
>> It’also seems that cowbirds are more common and widespread.
>>
>> I went to the Walton Preserve today. Lots of redstarts and parulas, and red-eyed vireos, quite a few yellow-throated vireos as well. A good number of Acadian Flycathers too. Merlin reported lots of Ceruleans, but I could hear none over thc redstarts, but male made all too brief of an appearance at eye level for me like life bird . I was a bit surprised that 19 red-eyes were not flagged, they were every where, but seven Acadians were along with 12 redstarts
>>
>> One definite female Summer Tanager was feeding a cowbird, and a possible Scarlet was feeding another. I also saw a Northern Parula feeding a cowbird last Saturday at Hobbes.
>>
>> Ian MacGregor Bella Vista
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <[<rhday52...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <<a href=)> wrote:
>>
>>> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?
>>>
>>> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.
>>>
>>> RHD
>>>
>>> Robert H. Day
>>> SW Bentonville,
>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>> ---------------------------------------------------------------
>>>
>>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1

############################

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Date: 6/19/24 8:04 pm
From: Ian MacGregor <00000489141846bd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
EBird has trend data and most warblers are doing quite well including Prothonotary which is flagged by Audubon Delta as having suffered a large decline. Some are declining in some areas and increasing in others Two which show almost universal negative trends in the state are Blue-winged Warbler and Common Yellowthroat.

I was interested in Black-throatef Green. There is no data for Arkansas, but the bird is declining every where except the most northern part of its range.

The trends are from 2012 to 2022. Things may have changed since then.

On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <[<ianmacg...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 5:50 PM, Ian MacGregor <<a href=)> wrote:

> I am not seeing fewer birds this year with the possible exception of cuckoos. I have not recorded one in my neighborhood. However I am seeing Baltimore Orioles more often there.
> It’also seems that cowbirds are more common and widespread.
>
> I went to the Walton Preserve today. Lots of redstarts and parulas, and red-eyed vireos, quite a few yellow-throated vireos as well. A good number of Acadian Flycathers too. Merlin reported lots of Ceruleans, but I could hear none over thc redstarts, but male made all too brief of an appearance at eye level for me like life bird . I was a bit surprised that 19 red-eyes were not flagged, they were every where, but seven Acadians were along with 12 redstarts
>
> One definite female Summer Tanager was feeding a cowbird, and a possible Scarlet was feeding another. I also saw a Northern Parula feeding a cowbird last Saturday at Hobbes.
>
> Ian MacGregor Bella Vista
>
> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <[<rhday52...>](mailto:On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:27 AM, Robert Day <<a href=)> wrote:
>
>> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?
>>
>> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.
>>
>> RHD
>>
>> Robert H. Day
>> SW Bentonville,
>>
>>>
>>
>> ---------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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Date: 6/19/24 3:10 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Missing Birds?
I am happy to see the insight and information you provided and anyone that cares about birds should be frustrated with the situation that is accelerating rapidly. Too many show apathy and indifference to the problem. The problem is caused by one person plus one person and will have to be solved by everyone not just the one percent that tries to do something to make changes for the better.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Jack and Pam
Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2024 4:47 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?

Warning this response to the decline in birds is written with frustration





Monitoring bird populations in our individual backyards is not a good indicator of the health of bird populations. As Joanie points out, there can be noticeable variations from year to year. What Audubon and other groups have been shouting from the roof tops for years is that we are experiencing a precipitous decline in birds. As a young birder in the early 1960’s I visited many of the migration hot spots- Cape May, Point Pelee, Rock Port Texas, Block Island. I have returned to these areas often over my lifetime and the contrast in bird numbers is impossible to describe. Today, what some birders describe as a great fall-out is pathetic compared with several decades ago. This view is not confined to me. Talk to experienced birds from Huston Audubon at their High Island Sanctuary and you will hear the same lament.



If all we do is think, “how sad” or “there is nothing I personally can do about it,” we are wrong. In this case, our backyard does matter. As Lynn and Jerry have pointed out, planting native species and window collision prevention must be standard steps every birder takes. Changing to native plants takes time so start with window protection first.



Another basic step that matters is to join both the National Audubon Society (NAS) and the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS). National has programs in ten countries besides the USA because there is little point in protecting the birds in our backyards if we don’t protect them through their entire life cycle. (If there is some reason why you are not a member of these two organizations I’d love to hear why -off line please). I’d add Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, too.



A third step we need to take is to elevate the environment when we consider who gets our vote. If we really internalize the indisputable fact that a healthy environment is critical to everything humans need to survive then immigration, the economy, and all other matters should take a step down to make room for the environment as our top issue.


North America Has Lost More Than 1 in 4 Birds in Last 50 Years, New Study Says




North America Has Lost More Than 1 in 4 Birds in Last 50 Years, New Stud...
For the first time, researchers have estimated the volume of total avian loss in the Western Hemisphere—and it’s...




'Catastrophe' as France's bird population collapses due to pesticides




'Catastrophe' as France's bird population collapses due to pesticides
Dozens of species have seen their numbers decline, in some cases by two-thirds, because insects they feed on hav...





Jack Stewart
Newton Coiunty





On Wednesday, June 19, 2024 at 09:33:22 AM CDT, Robert Day <rhday52...> wrote:


Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?

Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.

RHD


Robert H. Day
SW Bentonville,





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Back to top
Date: 6/19/24 2:47 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?

Warning this response to the decline in birds is written with frustration







Monitoring bird populations in our individual backyards is not a good indicator of the health of bird populations.  As Joanie points out, there can be noticeable variations from year to year.  What Audubon and other groups have been shouting from the roof tops for years is that we are experiencing a precipitous decline in birds. As a young birder in the early 1960’s I visited many of the migration hot spots- Cape May, Point Pelee, Rock Port Texas, Block Island.  I have returned to these areas often over my lifetime and the contrast in bird numbers is impossible to describe.  Today, what some birders describe as a great fall-out is pathetic compared with several decades ago.  This view is not confined to me.  Talk to experienced birds from  Huston Audubon at their High Island Sanctuary and you will hear the same lament.




If all we do is think, “how sad” or “there is nothing I personally can do about it,” we are wrong.  In this case, our backyard does matter.  As Lynn and Jerry have pointed out, planting native species and window collision prevention must be standard steps every birder takes.  Changing to native plants takes time so start with window protection first.




Another basic step that matters is to join both the National Audubon Society (NAS) and the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS).  National has programs in ten countries besides the USA because there is little point in protecting the birds in our backyards if we don’t protect them through their entire life cycle. (If there is some reason why you are not a member of these two organizations I’d love to hear why -off line please). I’d add Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology, too.




A third step we need to take is to elevate the environment when we consider who gets our vote. If we really internalize the indisputable fact that a healthy environment is critical to everything humans need to survive then immigration, the economy, and all other matters should take a step down to make room for the environment as our top issue.

North America Has Lost More Than 1 in 4 Birds in Last 50 Years, New Study Says

|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
North America Has Lost More Than 1 in 4 Birds in Last 50 Years, New Stud...

For the first time, researchers have estimated the volume of total avian loss in the Western Hemisphere—and it’s...
|

|

|


'Catastrophe' as France's bird population collapses due to pesticides

|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
'Catastrophe' as France's bird population collapses due to pesticides

Dozens of species have seen their numbers decline, in some cases by two-thirds, because insects they feed on hav...
|

|

|


Jack StewartNewton Coiunty




On Wednesday, June 19, 2024 at 09:33:22 AM CDT, Robert Day <rhday52...> wrote:

Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year? 
Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.
RHD

Robert H. DaySW Bentonville, 





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Date: 6/19/24 2:22 pm
From: Harriet Jansma <000007a2e0d8d68f-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
We have been observing the rich bird life just outside our windows and thought early today about how helpful it is to birds to have a messy landscape. We have a sloped stone wall right behind our house with winter jasmine and vines growing on it and leaves and debris caught among the live plants. Birds love feeding there. My spouse also loves to have vines growing up the trunks of our large trees. Some would hate that, but birds love the places among the plants that harbor food. We will hate leaving this place at the end of this month, but we'll carry rich memories, many of birds splashing in bird baths or nibbling who-knows-what from the messy stuff all around, and making the loudest noises that we hear most of the day, right here near the middle of a busy town.

Harriet Jansma
Mount Sequoyah (for a few more days), Fayetteville
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jodi Morris <mjodimorris...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2024 2:59 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?

I had a lull for bit, but am now seeing many immature birds - and adult birds seem to be more visible also in my backyard. Number of species and number of total birds counted on my walks and hikes in parks and on the Ouachita Trail in Pulaski County went way back up this week also.

On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:48 AM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...><mailto:<sndbrgr...>> wrote:
There are fewer birds in the world. It’s a fact. Loss of habitat, outdoor cats, fewer insects for them to feed on all contribute to fewer species. This has been going on for decades.
But also, once birds have finished nesting, they get real quiet and you don’t see them in a frenzy to feed and raise young. Summers are slow.

Sandy B
Fort Smith

On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:28 AM Robert Day <rhday52...><mailto:<rhday52...>> wrote:
Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?

Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.

RHD

Robert H. Day
SW Bentonville,



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Date: 6/19/24 12:59 pm
From: Jodi Morris <mjodimorris...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
I had a lull for bit, but am now seeing many immature birds - and adult
birds seem to be more visible also in my backyard. Number of species and
number of total birds counted on my walks and hikes in parks and on the
Ouachita Trail in Pulaski County went way back up this week also.

On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:48 AM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> There are fewer birds in the world. It’s a fact. Loss of habitat, outdoor
> cats, fewer insects for them to feed on all contribute to fewer species.
> This has been going on for decades.
> But also, once birds have finished nesting, they get real quiet and you
> don’t see them in a frenzy to feed and raise young. Summers are slow.
>
> Sandy B
> Fort Smith
>
> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:28 AM Robert Day <rhday52...> wrote:
>
>> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there
>> this year?
>>
>> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like
>> I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn
>> Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have
>> quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many
>> fewer birds of these three species this year.
>>
>> RHD
>>
>> Robert H. Day
>> SW Bentonville,
>>
>>
>>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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>

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Date: 6/19/24 12:53 pm
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
The loss of insects means the loss of birds…and bats, and amphibians, and reptiles…and life in general. For several years I have not seen the hundreds of thousands of tiny gnats that used to visit the window screens at night. There are some hatchings of Mayflies, Fishflies, and others that developed as larvae in the stream, but the clouds of them are very small by comparison to the glittering plumes that were visible in the sun’s rays 25 or 30 years ago. This spring I only saw two Maybeetles and have seen zero June Bugs, no moths larger than maybe a 50 cent piece, and no spiders or American Toads under the porch light to eat them. Even Grasshoppers and Crickets are few. This is only a tiny fraction of what insects I am aware of as missing. We don’t use poison in our gardens, but the state allows the spraying of vast agricultural areas with Dicamba, among other horrors along the highways. Our highway 21 used to rival a botanical garden, and it is where I learned many native Arkansas wildflowers, but the mowing and spraying practices of ARCOT have cultivated instead statewide strips of introduced non-natives that are not addressed and which require even more deadly pesticides to control. Plus next time you’re plant shopping, go to any garden department in any store and you will find more poisons than fertilizers.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


> On Jun 19, 2024, at 11:49 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
> The bird decline is being noticed even by those that are not birders. I have seen a decline of species diversity and numbers in my yard over the past 25 years. I have native habitat but this year even the nesting of my cavity nesting (nest boxes) birds are down. There are many reasons but with the loss of 4% of our birds per year and 40% fewer birds crossing the Gulf than crossed 10 years ago, even the most myopic people can see the difference.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
> From: Robert Day <>
> Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2024 9:27 AM
> To: <jwdavis...> <>
> Cc: ARBIRD-L <>
> Subject: missing birds?
>
> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?
>
> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.
>
> RHD
>
> Robert H. Day
> SW Bentonville,
>
>>
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1 <http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1>

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Date: 6/19/24 12:31 pm
From: DAVID PARHAM <000004014062b2df-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
I, too, noted a decrease in the number of urban warblers near my home in Little Rock. Perhaps this may partially be due to the monsoon that occurred during the peak migration season, which prevented me from birding as much; who knows. On the other hand, at my farm in Grand Junction, TN (West TN near Memphis), I likewise noted new warblers, at least to my list: Kentucky Warblers, Yellowthroats, and Hooded Warblers.

David Parham
Little Rock

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 19, 2024, at 1:33 PM, Gmail <butchchq8...> wrote:
>
> 
> Ironic, but a friend of mine who runs a MAPS station in Illinois has noticed an uptick in birds captured this year as well as record numbers of birds captured in nets that are usually unproductive. This may indicate an increase in certain local breeding populations as they seem to be nesting in what might be considered sub-optimal habitat and doing well this year. I mentioned to him that we are seeing an uptick in bluebirds at our boxes and, anecdotally, there seems to be an uptick in birds at local feeders as well as my seed sales have increased. I've assumed it has been because of a decrease in mortality due to the mild winter, but that is just a guess. It is likely that species vary with respect to that factor, and that year-round residents have enjoyed a slight increase if true. Bluebirds were especially hard hit the previous two winters. If you all recall, we were all finding dead bluebirds in boxes all over the state then. This past winter, I don't think we lost any around here (Bella Vista).
>
> Of course, none of this means anything for migrants and habitat loss is always an issue regardless. It's just an interesting observation and I am looking forward to seeing how our bird banding numbers are affected once we compile the data for this year.
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville
>
>>> On Jun 19, 2024, at 12:01, Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>>
>> 
>> I have noticed this too. We have seen much fewer individuals of warbler species, and lower diversity on trips. We have seen some new birds, and sometimes more than typical for some species (4 Yellow-crowned Night-herons). But I have felt concern in general. I have read that many species are decreasing in number, and also, some years are better than others for various groups. The more we can do to help them, the better.
>>
>> On Wednesday, June 19, 2024 at 09:33:24 AM CDT, Robert Day <rhday52...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?
>>
>> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.
>>
>> RHD
>>
>> Robert H. Day
>> SW Bentonville,
>>
>>
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>
>>
>> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
>> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>>
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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Date: 6/19/24 11:25 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
Ironic, but a friend of mine who runs a MAPS station in Illinois has noticed an uptick in birds captured this year as well as record numbers of birds captured in nets that are usually unproductive. This may indicate an increase in certain local breeding populations as they seem to be nesting in what might be considered sub-optimal habitat and doing well this year. I mentioned to him that we are seeing an uptick in bluebirds at our boxes and, anecdotally, there seems to be an uptick in birds at local feeders as well as my seed sales have increased. I've assumed it has been because of a decrease in mortality due to the mild winter, but that is just a guess. It is likely that species vary with respect to that factor, and that year-round residents have enjoyed a slight increase if true. Bluebirds were especially hard hit the previous two winters. If you all recall, we were all finding dead bluebirds in boxes all over the state then. This past winter, I don't think we lost any around here (Bella Vista).

Of course, none of this means anything for migrants and habitat loss is always an issue regardless. It's just an interesting observation and I am looking forward to seeing how our bird banding numbers are affected once we compile the data for this year.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

> On Jun 19, 2024, at 12:01, Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> 
> I have noticed this too. We have seen much fewer individuals of warbler species, and lower diversity on trips. We have seen some new birds, and sometimes more than typical for some species (4 Yellow-crowned Night-herons). But I have felt concern in general. I have read that many species are decreasing in number, and also, some years are better than others for various groups. The more we can do to help them, the better.
>
> On Wednesday, June 19, 2024 at 09:33:24 AM CDT, Robert Day <rhday52...> wrote:
>
>
> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?
>
> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.
>
> RHD
>
> Robert H. Day
> SW Bentonville,
>
>
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>
>
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Date: 6/19/24 10:01 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
I have noticed this too.  We have seen much fewer individuals of warbler species, and lower diversity on trips.   We have seen some new birds, and sometimes more than typical for some species (4 Yellow-crowned Night-herons).  But I have felt concern in general.  I have read that many species are decreasing in number, and also, some years are better than others for various groups.  The more we can do to help them, the better.
On Wednesday, June 19, 2024 at 09:33:24 AM CDT, Robert Day <rhday52...> wrote:

Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year? 
Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.
RHD

Robert H. DaySW Bentonville, 





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Date: 6/19/24 9:49 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
The bird decline is being noticed even by those that are not birders. I have seen a decline of species diversity and numbers in my yard over the past 25 years. I have native habitat but this year even the nesting of my cavity nesting (nest boxes) birds are down. There are many reasons but with the loss of 4% of our birds per year and 40% fewer birds crossing the Gulf than crossed 10 years ago, even the most myopic people can see the difference.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Robert Day
Sent: Wednesday, June 19, 2024 9:27 AM
To: <jwdavis...>
Cc: ARBIRD-L
Subject: missing birds?

Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there this year?

Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many fewer birds of these three species this year.

RHD


Robert H. Day
SW Bentonville,



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Date: 6/19/24 7:56 am
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
I've read something in the last few weeks about (and I'm wildly
paraphrasing here) we lure birds to our yards with food, and then kill them
with untreated windows and outdoor cats. Both serious causes of bird
mortality but unfortunately not the only ones.





On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:48 AM Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

> There are fewer birds in the world. It’s a fact. Loss of habitat, outdoor
> cats, fewer insects for them to feed on all contribute to fewer species.
> This has been going on for decades.
> But also, once birds have finished nesting, they get real quiet and you
> don’t see them in a frenzy to feed and raise young. Summers are slow.
>
> Sandy B
> Fort Smith
>
> On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:28 AM Robert Day <rhday52...> wrote:
>
>> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there
>> this year?
>>
>> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like
>> I am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn
>> Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have
>> quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many
>> fewer birds of these three species this year.
>>
>> RHD
>>
>> Robert H. Day
>> SW Bentonville,
>>
>>
>>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
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Date: 6/19/24 7:48 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: missing birds?
There are fewer birds in the world. It’s a fact. Loss of habitat, outdoor
cats, fewer insects for them to feed on all contribute to fewer species.
This has been going on for decades.
But also, once birds have finished nesting, they get real quiet and you
don’t see them in a frenzy to feed and raise young. Summers are slow.

Sandy B
Fort Smith

On Wed, Jun 19, 2024 at 9:28 AM Robert Day <rhday52...> wrote:

> Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there
> this year?
>
> Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I
> am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn
> Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have
> quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many
> fewer birds of these three species this year.
>
> RHD
>
> Robert H. Day
> SW Bentonville,
>
>
>>
> ------------------------------
>
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Date: 6/19/24 7:28 am
From: Robert Day <rhday52...>
Subject: missing birds?
Does anybody else in Arkansas feel like there are fewer birds out there
this year?

Both in our neighborhood and while being out and about town, I feel like I
am seeing MANY fewer Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Barn
Swallows than I have seen in the past several years. I don't have
quantitative data to prove it, but it sure seems as though I am seeing many
fewer birds of these three species this year.

RHD

Robert H. Day
SW Bentonville,


>

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Date: 6/19/24 4:57 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Asking for Some Librarians
I use a butterfly net taped onto a long pole to remove birds that get
into my garage that has extremely high ceilings.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR




On 2024-06-18 10:11 pm, Lynn Foster wrote:
> Dear Birding Community,
>
> I'm writing for the staff of the Clinton Children's Library and
> Learning Center in Little Rock. If you've ever been inside the
> library, you know that portions of it have extremely high ceilings.
> They have a recurring problem of birds getting in. They're wondering
> if you all can suggest ways to get birds out, once they are inside.
> This would entail luring them down to ground level and then capturing
> them.
>
> Please respond off-list, thanks.
>
> Lynn Foster
>
> -------------------------
>
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Date: 6/18/24 8:11 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Asking for Some Librarians
Dear Birding Community,

I'm writing for the staff of the Clinton Children's Library and Learning
Center in Little Rock. If you've ever been inside the library, you know
that portions of it have extremely high ceilings. They have a recurring
problem of birds getting in. They're wondering if you all can suggest ways
to get birds out, once they are inside. This would entail luring them down
to ground level and then capturing them.

Please respond off-list, thanks.

Lynn Foster

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Date: 6/18/24 6:44 pm
From: <arbour...> <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 18




Dan Reinking, Kendall Van Zanten, Jamie Russell, Noah Kuck, (all from the Sutton Avian Research Center) and I, surveyed birds at Red Slough today and found 71 species. The weather was warm and cloudy to partly cloudy with a light wind. The usual notable birds were seen but of special note was an American Bittern in unit 30E which was about a mile from where one was seen a couple weeks ago. Summer American Bitterns usually mean they are nesting. Unfortunately I found the bird after everyone else left. Here is our list for today:




Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 7

Wood Duck - 16

Pied-billed Grebe – 7

Neotropic Cormorant - 28 (14 active nests.)

Anhinga - 59 (Many nests with young.)

American Bittern - 1

Least Bittern - 5

Great-blue Heron - 12

Great Egret - 32

Snowy Egret - 44

Little-blue Heron - 60

Cattle Egret - 1200

Green Heron - 13

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 5

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 3

White Ibis - 69

Black Vulture - 27

Turkey Vulture – 17

Mississippi Kite - 5

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

King Rail - 3

Purple Gallinule - 96 adults (also several broods of young.)

Common Gallinule - 42 adults (also lots of broods of young.)

American Coot – 1

Mourning Dove - 19

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 5

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Chuck-wills-widow - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Wood-Pewee - 2

Acadian Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 4

Bell's Vireo - 2

Yellow-throated Vireo - 2

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

American Crow – 6

Fish Crow - 2

Purple Martin - 5

Tree Swallow - 13

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 1

Cliff Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 13

Carolina Chickadee – 2

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren – 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

European Starling - 4

Northern Parula - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 4

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 4

Yellow-breasted Chat - 6

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal – 13

Indigo Bunting - 10

Painted Bunting - 7

Dickcissel - 2

Red-winged Blackbird – 10

Common Grackle - 23

Brown-headed Cowbird - 4

Orchard Oriole - 1










Odonates:




Blue-fronted Dancer

Swamp Darner

Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Black Saddlebags









Herps:




American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Southern Black Racer

Western Ratsnake

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Green Frog

Bullfrog




Also: Bobcat and Swamp Rabbit.






Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR





Check out the Red Slough Photo Gallery: [ https://pbase.com/red_slough_wma | https://pbase.com/red_slough_wma ]



Birders Guide to the Red Slough WMA: [ https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/ouachita/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd1043423 | https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/ouachita/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd1043423 ]


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Date: 6/18/24 2:14 pm
From: Joseph Neal <0000078cbd583d7c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Adam's Big Year
Our former Arkansas Audubon Society President, Adam Schaffer, was featured in this mornings Outdoors section of Northwest Arkansas Edition of Arkansas Democrat Gazette. As many of you know, Adam is doing a Big Year exclusively in Benton County and exclusively recording birds he can find riding his bicycle. According to this mornings paper, he has tallied 176 of his 200 species goal.

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Date: 6/16/24 7:36 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Suggestions for Binoculars to buy for Borneo
Thanks to the enormous generosity of Ar-birders, I have received a check of $1931.70 to purchase new bins, plus about 15 used pairs.  
If visa formalities are completed on time, we leave for Malaysia around July 31 for the 3-month Fulbright program.  It involves promoting eBird and iNaturalist among local people. Fore more on this, click here.
With the check received, I can buy about 17 of these 8 x 42 Nikon Aculons from Amazon: https://a.co/d/b1ESnsJ

Does anyone have better suggestions? 
KannanFt Smith


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

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Date: 6/13/24 8:30 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
Great photo. Thanks!


> On Jun 13, 2024, at 7:04 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Here is Dr. Amrit Kannan’s photo of the Ridgeway’s race from our recent Belize trip. As you can see, they look very like our race. Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis) <https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/221170423>
>
>
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis)
> By Ragupathy Kannan
>
> Northern Rough-winged Swallow from Cayo District, Belize on May 23, 2024 at 12:10 PM by Ragupathy Kannan. Photo by Dr. Amrit Kannan
>
> <https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/221170423>
>
>
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad <https://mail.onelink.me/107872968?pid=nativeplacement&c=Global_Acquisition_YMktg_315_Internal_EmailSignature&af_sub1=Acquisition&af_sub2=Global_YMktg&af_sub3=&af_sub4=100000604&af_sub5=EmailSignature__Static_>
>
> On Wednesday, June 12, 2024, 9:28 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
> Note David Arbour’s Red Slough Post about the Rough-winged Swallows nesting in the Banks of the red river and coming back to Red Slough after nesting.
>
> jerry
>
> From: Judy Griffith <>
> Sent: Wednesday, June 12, 2024 8:49 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <>
> Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
>
> Wow. I know nothing of the subspecies, but suspect the ones here are not the same as the Belizean birds.
>
> Earlier in the week while I was watching them swoop around I thought I was seeing colors and got really excited that we might have Cliff Swallows nesting here! So when one came out of the nest hole far across the creek with a fecal sack I thought it was the forehead of a Cliff for a moment, but no such luck…ha. They are all pretty little NRWS’s.
>
> In afternoon when shade covers that big promontory we saw at least 6 swallows, arriving and flying around, landing on branches, clinging to the rocks, looking into the holes. I wondered what’s going on in those holes because they were ALL checking them out and what I read on Cornell says they don’t nest communally but only as individual pairs.
>
> Joe Neal wrote back to me, "My understanding is that it's not communal as such, but they do nest in numbers in same areas when the nesting availability is same area."
>
> Don Matt posted photos on fb that he took from across the creek when there were 6 adults flying about and looking into the holes. He's fixed his tripod and will try again for better shots.
>
> Thanks, J
>
>> On Jun 12, 2024, at 7:18 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> <>> wrote:
>>
>> Interesting, Judith. The Ridgeway’s subspecies of this is partial to cave entrances and proximity to waterfalls in Belize.
>> Kannan
>>
>>
>> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad <https://mail.onelink.me/107872968?pid=nativeplacement&c=Global_Acquisition_YMktg_315_Internal_EmailSignature&af_sub1=Acquisition&af_sub2=Global_YMktg&af_sub3=&af_sub4=100000604&af_sub5=EmailSignature__Static_>
>>
>> On Tuesday, June 11, 2024, 1:44 PM, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> <>> wrote:
>>
>> Every spring the Northern Rough-winged Swallows return to build nests somewhere in some of the countless stone cavities in the approximately 100 + foot high bluff overlooking Piney Creek.
>>
>> This year, for the first time, I’ve also been noticing a lot of swallow activity right in front of the waterfall. Today I finally had a chance to sit and watch. After a short wait a swallow wheeled back and forth over the creek dipping low to catch flying insects in midair then turned and flew directly to a very specific hole low in the stone promontory. Another swallow flew to a perch nearby, presumably the male, while the female entered the nesting hole. She turned right once inside, appeared to feed the nestlings that are tucked out of site, then turned and looked out her door for a moment before swooping off again.
>>
>> While observing this, the female Louisiana Waterthrush also returned and disappeared through dense greenery into her own cavity nest a few yards away.
>>
>> Don is hoping to get pictures from a respectful distance across the creek.
>>
>> Judith
>> Ninestone Land Trust, Carroll County
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Date: 6/13/24 7:51 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Downies with sweet tooth? or beak?
Yes, we have Downy Woodpeckers at our hummingbird feeders frequently.
Siloam Springs

On Thu, Jun 13, 2024, 10:20 AM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> Yes, my Downy Woodpeckers, have visited my hummer feeders for years and
> it did not take but a few days this year before the fledglings were
> using it. My Red-bellied Woodpeckers also visit my Best 1 Hummingbird
> feeders along with the Orioles, both Baltimore and Orchard Orioles. My
> feeders are also by the bay window where we dine.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
>
>
> On 2024-06-13 9:13 am, Anna Lee Hudson wrote:
> > None of my friends have ever seen this so I don't know if it is that
> > unusual. I have
> > a male and a female Downy Woodpecker visiting my hummingbird feeder.
> > The feeder is at
> > my kitchen window so I can see it clearly. The little birds land next
> > to a feeder port,
> > peck at it two or three times and then swallow. They usually stay for
> > a couple of minutes
> > each time enjoying the sugar water. At first I thought they might be
> > after ants, but I
> > have checked and there aren't ants on the feeder--they are definitely
> > going into the feeder
> > port and drinking.
> >
> > I am wondering if others have seen this.
> >
> > Anna Hudson
> > On the lake in Bull Shoals
> >
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Date: 6/13/24 7:21 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
The Ridgway's may be split into a separate species.  From Howell et al.'s Birds of Belize:
"....... differences in morphology, plumage, ecology, and voice between ridgwayi group (Mexico to Belize) and seripennis group (N America to Costa Rica)...plus local sympatry and no evidence of interbreeding indicate separate species are involved....."
On Thursday 13 June, 2024 at 07:04:54 am GMT-5, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Here is Dr. Amrit Kannan’s photo of the Ridgeway’s race from our recent Belize trip. As you can see, they look very like our race. Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis) 

|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis)

By Ragupathy Kannan

Northern Rough-winged Swallow from Cayo District, Belize on May 23, 2024 at 12:10 PM by Ragupathy Kannan. Photo by Dr. Amrit Kannan
| |

|

|





Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad


On Wednesday, June 12, 2024, 9:28 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

Note David Arbour’s Red Slough Post about the Rough-winged Swallows nesting in the Banks of the red river and coming back to Red Slough after nesting. jerry From: Judy Griffith Sent: Wednesday, June 12, 2024 8:49 AMTo: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest Wow. I know nothing of the subspecies, but suspect the ones here are not the same as the Belizean birds.  Earlier in the week while I was watching them swoop around I thought I was seeing colors and got really excited that we might have Cliff Swallows nesting here! So when one came out of the nest hole far across the creek with a fecal sack I thought it was the forehead of a Cliff for a moment, but no such luck…ha. They are all pretty little NRWS’s. In afternoon when shade covers that big promontory we saw at least 6 swallows, arriving and flying around, landing on branches, clinging to the rocks, looking into the holes. I wondered what’s going on in those holes because they were ALL checking them out and what I read on Cornell says they don’t nest communally but only as individual pairs. Joe Neal wrote back to me, "My understanding is that it's not communal as such, but they do nest in numbers in same areas when the nesting availability is same area." Don Matt posted photos on fb that he took from across the creek when there were 6 adults flying about and looking into the holes. He's fixed his tripod and will try again for better shots. Thanks, J

On Jun 12, 2024, at 7:18 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:   Interesting, Judith.  The Ridgeway’s subspecies of this is partial to cave entrances and proximity to waterfalls in Belize.  Kannan


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad


On Tuesday, June 11, 2024, 1:44 PM, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Every spring the Northern Rough-winged Swallows return to build nests somewhere in some of the countless stone cavities in the approximately 100 + foot high bluff overlooking Piney Creek.
  This year, for the first time, I’ve also been noticing a lot of swallow activity right in front of the waterfall. Today I finally had a chance to sit and watch. After a short wait a swallow wheeled back and forth over the creek dipping low to catch flying insects in midair then turned and flew directly to a very specific hole low in the stone promontory. Another swallow flew to a perch nearby, presumably the male, while the female entered the nesting hole. She turned right once inside, appeared to feed the nestlings that are tucked out of site, then turned and looked out her door for a moment before swooping off again.
  While observing this, the female Louisiana Waterthrush also returned and disappeared through dense greenery into her own cavity nest a few yards away.
  Don is hoping to get pictures from a respectful distance across the creek.
  Judith
Ninestone Land Trust, Carroll County
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Date: 6/13/24 7:20 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Downies with sweet tooth? or beak?
Yes, my Downy Woodpeckers, have visited my hummer feeders for years and
it did not take but a few days this year before the fledglings were
using it. My Red-bellied Woodpeckers also visit my Best 1 Hummingbird
feeders along with the Orioles, both Baltimore and Orchard Orioles. My
feeders are also by the bay window where we dine.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR



On 2024-06-13 9:13 am, Anna Lee Hudson wrote:
> None of my friends have ever seen this so I don't know if it is that
> unusual. I have
> a male and a female Downy Woodpecker visiting my hummingbird feeder.
> The feeder is at
> my kitchen window so I can see it clearly. The little birds land next
> to a feeder port,
> peck at it two or three times and then swallow. They usually stay for
> a couple of minutes
> each time enjoying the sugar water. At first I thought they might be
> after ants, but I
> have checked and there aren't ants on the feeder--they are definitely
> going into the feeder
> port and drinking.
>
> I am wondering if others have seen this.
>
> Anna Hudson
> On the lake in Bull Shoals
>
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Date: 6/13/24 7:13 am
From: Anna Lee Hudson <hudsonre...>
Subject: Downies with sweet tooth? or beak?
None of my friends have ever seen this so I don't know if it is that
unusual. I have
a male and a female Downy Woodpecker visiting my hummingbird feeder.
The feeder is at
my kitchen window so I can see it clearly. The little birds land next
to a feeder port,
peck at it two or three times and then swallow. They usually stay for a
couple of minutes
each time enjoying the sugar water. At first I thought they might be
after ants, but I
have checked and there aren't ants on the feeder--they are definitely
going into the feeder
port and drinking.

I am wondering if others have seen this.

Anna Hudson
On the lake in Bull Shoals

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Date: 6/13/24 5:04 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
Here is Dr. Amrit Kannan’s photo of the Ridgeway’s race from our recent Belize trip. As you can see, they look very like our race. Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis) 

|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis)

By Ragupathy Kannan

Northern Rough-winged Swallow from Cayo District, Belize on May 23, 2024 at 12:10 PM by Ragupathy Kannan. Photo by Dr. Amrit Kannan
| |

|

|





Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad


On Wednesday, June 12, 2024, 9:28 AM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

Note David Arbour’s Red Slough Post about the Rough-winged Swallows nesting in the Banks of the red river and coming back to Red Slough after nesting. jerry From: Judy Griffith Sent: Wednesday, June 12, 2024 8:49 AMTo: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest Wow. I know nothing of the subspecies, but suspect the ones here are not the same as the Belizean birds.  Earlier in the week while I was watching them swoop around I thought I was seeing colors and got really excited that we might have Cliff Swallows nesting here! So when one came out of the nest hole far across the creek with a fecal sack I thought it was the forehead of a Cliff for a moment, but no such luck…ha. They are all pretty little NRWS’s. In afternoon when shade covers that big promontory we saw at least 6 swallows, arriving and flying around, landing on branches, clinging to the rocks, looking into the holes. I wondered what’s going on in those holes because they were ALL checking them out and what I read on Cornell says they don’t nest communally but only as individual pairs. Joe Neal wrote back to me, "My understanding is that it's not communal as such, but they do nest in numbers in same areas when the nesting availability is same area." Don Matt posted photos on fb that he took from across the creek when there were 6 adults flying about and looking into the holes. He's fixed his tripod and will try again for better shots. Thanks, J

On Jun 12, 2024, at 7:18 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:   Interesting, Judith.  The Ridgeway’s subspecies of this is partial to cave entrances and proximity to waterfalls in Belize.  Kannan


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad


On Tuesday, June 11, 2024, 1:44 PM, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Every spring the Northern Rough-winged Swallows return to build nests somewhere in some of the countless stone cavities in the approximately 100 + foot high bluff overlooking Piney Creek.
  This year, for the first time, I’ve also been noticing a lot of swallow activity right in front of the waterfall. Today I finally had a chance to sit and watch. After a short wait a swallow wheeled back and forth over the creek dipping low to catch flying insects in midair then turned and flew directly to a very specific hole low in the stone promontory. Another swallow flew to a perch nearby, presumably the male, while the female entered the nesting hole. She turned right once inside, appeared to feed the nestlings that are tucked out of site, then turned and looked out her door for a moment before swooping off again.
  While observing this, the female Louisiana Waterthrush also returned and disappeared through dense greenery into her own cavity nest a few yards away.
  Don is hoping to get pictures from a respectful distance across the creek.
  Judith
Ninestone Land Trust, Carroll County
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Date: 6/12/24 7:28 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
Note David Arbour’s Red Slough Post about the Rough-winged Swallows nesting in the Banks of the red river and coming back to Red Slough after nesting.

jerry

From: Judy Griffith
Sent: Wednesday, June 12, 2024 8:49 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest

Wow. I know nothing of the subspecies, but suspect the ones here are not the same as the Belizean birds.

Earlier in the week while I was watching them swoop around I thought I was seeing colors and got really excited that we might have Cliff Swallows nesting here! So when one came out of the nest hole far across the creek with a fecal sack I thought it was the forehead of a Cliff for a moment, but no such luck…ha. They are all pretty little NRWS’s.

In afternoon when shade covers that big promontory we saw at least 6 swallows, arriving and flying around, landing on branches, clinging to the rocks, looking into the holes. I wondered what’s going on in those holes because they were ALL checking them out and what I read on Cornell says they don’t nest communally but only as individual pairs.

Joe Neal wrote back to me, "My understanding is that it's not communal as such, but they do nest in numbers in same areas when the nesting availability is same area."

Don Matt posted photos on fb that he took from across the creek when there were 6 adults flying about and looking into the holes. He's fixed his tripod and will try again for better shots.

Thanks, J


On Jun 12, 2024, at 7:18 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:

Interesting, Judith. The Ridgeway’s subspecies of this is partial to cave entrances and proximity to waterfalls in Belize.
Kannan



Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad



On Tuesday, June 11, 2024, 1:44 PM, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Every spring the Northern Rough-winged Swallows return to build nests somewhere in some of the countless stone cavities in the approximately 100 + foot high bluff overlooking Piney Creek.


This year, for the first time, I’ve also been noticing a lot of swallow activity right in front of the waterfall. Today I finally had a chance to sit and watch. After a short wait a swallow wheeled back and forth over the creek dipping low to catch flying insects in midair then turned and flew directly to a very specific hole low in the stone promontory. Another swallow flew to a perch nearby, presumably the male, while the female entered the nesting hole. She turned right once inside, appeared to feed the nestlings that are tucked out of site, then turned and looked out her door for a moment before swooping off again.


While observing this, the female Louisiana Waterthrush also returned and disappeared through dense greenery into her own cavity nest a few yards away.


Don is hoping to get pictures from a respectful distance across the creek.


Judith

Ninestone Land Trust, Carroll County

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Date: 6/12/24 6:49 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
Wow. I know nothing of the subspecies, but suspect the ones here are not the same as the Belizean birds.

Earlier in the week while I was watching them swoop around I thought I was seeing colors and got really excited that we might have Cliff Swallows nesting here! So when one came out of the nest hole far across the creek with a fecal sack I thought it was the forehead of a Cliff for a moment, but no such luck…ha. They are all pretty little NRWS’s.

In afternoon when shade covers that big promontory we saw at least 6 swallows, arriving and flying around, landing on branches, clinging to the rocks, looking into the holes. I wondered what’s going on in those holes because they were ALL checking them out and what I read on Cornell says they don’t nest communally but only as individual pairs.

Joe Neal wrote back to me, "My understanding is that it's not communal as such, but they do nest in numbers in same areas when the nesting availability is same area."

Don Matt posted photos on fb that he took from across the creek when there were 6 adults flying about and looking into the holes. He's fixed his tripod and will try again for better shots.

Thanks, J

> On Jun 12, 2024, at 7:18 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill...> wrote:
>
> Interesting, Judith. The Ridgeway’s subspecies of this is partial to cave entrances and proximity to waterfalls in Belize.
> Kannan
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad <https://mail.onelink.me/107872968?pid=nativeplacement&c=Global_Acquisition_YMktg_315_Internal_EmailSignature&af_sub1=Acquisition&af_sub2=Global_YMktg&af_sub3=&af_sub4=100000604&af_sub5=EmailSignature__Static_>
>
> On Tuesday, June 11, 2024, 1:44 PM, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> Every spring the Northern Rough-winged Swallows return to build nests somewhere in some of the countless stone cavities in the approximately 100 + foot high bluff overlooking Piney Creek.
>
> This year, for the first time, I’ve also been noticing a lot of swallow activity right in front of the waterfall. Today I finally had a chance to sit and watch. After a short wait a swallow wheeled back and forth over the creek dipping low to catch flying insects in midair then turned and flew directly to a very specific hole low in the stone promontory. Another swallow flew to a perch nearby, presumably the male, while the female entered the nesting hole. She turned right once inside, appeared to feed the nestlings that are tucked out of site, then turned and looked out her door for a moment before swooping off again.
>
> While observing this, the female Louisiana Waterthrush also returned and disappeared through dense greenery into her own cavity nest a few yards away.
>
> Don is hoping to get pictures from a respectful distance across the creek.
>
> Judith
> Ninestone Land Trust, Carroll County
> ############################
>
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Date: 6/12/24 5:18 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
Interesting, Judith.  The Ridgeway’s subspecies of this is partial to cave entrances and proximity to waterfalls in Belize. Kannan


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad


On Tuesday, June 11, 2024, 1:44 PM, Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> wrote:

Every spring the Northern Rough-winged Swallows return to build nests somewhere in some of the countless stone cavities in the approximately 100 + foot high bluff overlooking Piney Creek.

This year, for the first time, I’ve also been noticing a lot of swallow activity right in front of the waterfall. Today I finally had a chance to sit and watch. After a short wait a swallow wheeled back and forth over the creek dipping low to catch flying insects in midair then turned and flew directly to a very specific hole low in the stone promontory. Another swallow flew to a perch nearby, presumably the male, while the female entered the nesting hole. She turned right once inside, appeared to feed the nestlings that are tucked out of site, then turned and looked out her door for a moment before swooping off again.

While observing this, the female Louisiana Waterthrush also returned and disappeared through dense greenery into her own cavity nest a few yards away.

Don is hoping to get pictures from a respectful distance across the creek.

Judith
Ninestone Land Trust, Carroll County
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Date: 6/11/24 5:59 pm
From: <arbour...> <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 11


It was partly cloudy and warm, with a light wind on the bird survey today. 62 species were found. Nothing out of the ordinary today for this time of year except for the early return of Belted Kingfisher and Northern Rough-winged Swallows back on to the area. They normally leave Red Slough to go nest in banks on the Red River since we don't have any and then start returning in July. We had an early spring and things were running about 2 weeks early so the timing of their return is about right considering. Here is my list for today:





Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 15

Wood Duck - 16

Ring-necked Duck - 1 male

Pied-billed Grebe – 8

Neotropic Cormorant - 15 (8 active nests; most with older young.)

Anhinga - 92 (Many nests with sitting birds and young.)

Least Bittern - 2

Great-blue Heron - 4

Great Egret - 77

Snowy Egret - 8

Little-blue Heron - 44

Cattle Egret - 800

Green Heron - 18

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2

White Ibis - 337

Black Vulture - 8

Turkey Vulture – 8

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

King Rail - 2

Purple Gallinule - 94

Common Gallinule - 49

American Coot – 6

Killdeer - 2

Mourning Dove - 6

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 5

Chuck-wills-widow - 2

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 5

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 4

American Crow – 6

Fish Crow - 3

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 10

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 3

Cliff Swallow - 2

Barn Swallow - 7

Carolina Chickadee – 3

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren – 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Prairie Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 6

Kentucky Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 4

Yellow-breasted Chat - 8

Summer Tanager - 3

Eastern Towhee - 2

Northern Cardinal – 16

Indigo Bunting - 13

Painted Bunting - 6

Dickcissel - 2

Red-winged Blackbird – 19

Common Grackle - 51

Brown-headed Cowbird - 6

Orchard Oriole - 1










Odonates:




Swamp Darner

Cyrano Darner

Prince Baskettail

River Cruiser species

Slaty Skimmer

Eastern Pondhawk

Blue Dasher

Black Saddlebags









Herps:




Softshell Turtle species

Red-eared Slider

Three-toed Box Turtle

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Green Frog

Bullfrog






Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR





Check out the Red Slough Photo Gallery: [ https://pbase.com/red_slough_wma | https://pbase.com/red_slough_wma ]



Birders Guide to the Red Slough WMA: [ https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/ouachita/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd1043423 | https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/ouachita/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd1043423 ]


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Date: 6/11/24 11:44 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Northern Rough-winged Swallow nest
Every spring the Northern Rough-winged Swallows return to build nests somewhere in some of the countless stone cavities in the approximately 100 + foot high bluff overlooking Piney Creek.

This year, for the first time, I’ve also been noticing a lot of swallow activity right in front of the waterfall. Today I finally had a chance to sit and watch. After a short wait a swallow wheeled back and forth over the creek dipping low to catch flying insects in midair then turned and flew directly to a very specific hole low in the stone promontory. Another swallow flew to a perch nearby, presumably the male, while the female entered the nesting hole. She turned right once inside, appeared to feed the nestlings that are tucked out of site, then turned and looked out her door for a moment before swooping off again.

While observing this, the female Louisiana Waterthrush also returned and disappeared through dense greenery into her own cavity nest a few yards away.

Don is hoping to get pictures from a respectful distance across the creek.

Judith
Ninestone Land Trust, Carroll County
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Date: 6/10/24 8:04 am
From: Ragan Sutterfield <000003499a91e99c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting Thursday: Jeremy Cohen on a Changing Climate and Changing Birds
Friends,

This Thursday at 7 p.m. online we're in for a great Audubon Society of Central Arkansas meeting with Dr. Jeremy Cohen. Jeremy Cohen is an Associate Research Scientist in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University. His research connects global change biology and avian ecology, using big environmental and ecological datasets (including eBird data) and statistical modeling techniques to understand how birds are responding to extreme and unusual weather events, which have increased greatly in frequency and intensity over the past several decades. In his presentation, he will discuss how eastern North American birds have reacted to heat waves, droughts and a polar vortex and how these responses are predictable based on species' life history traits. All are welcome, but registration for the Zoom meeting is required:
https://audubon.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIqcuqrrzwvGtAx4KrzDZ4Sej4xeHLOrXue#/registration

Best,
Ragan

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Date: 6/6/24 2:36 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Upcoming ASCA Field Trip June 8

  Listed below are the next three months of field trips sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  This Saturday, June 8 is our upcoming trip.  Details below.  You don't have to be a member of ASCA to participate. All levels of birders are welcome. We love meeting new birders!  Please feel free to contact me off-list if you have any questions. Karen Holliday  ASCA Field Trip Coordinator ASCA Field Trips  June, July, August 2024June 8Willow Beach Park and Campground Scott, Pulaski Co.   Meet at 8:00 a.m. at the Willow Beach Campground near Scott, AR. The picnic/campground area is easy walking on level, paved, and grassy areas bordering the Arkansas River.     It offers a mix of habitats, from large cottonwood trees full of Baltimore and Orchard Orioles, Warbling Vireos, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Yellow-billed Cuckoos, and Prothonotary Warblers.    Multiple swallow species skim the grassy areas.  River species include gulls, terns, and cormorants.  Egrets and herons lurk in the marshy areas.   A nearby neighborhood is a gathering spot for Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks and Great-tailed Grackles.  A recent birding trip to the park netted 48 species.  This will be a morning trip.From Little Rock, take I-440 east past the airport, then take U.S. Highway 165 east for 2.5 miles. Turn right onto Colonel Manard Road and continue for three miles. Turn right again onto Blue Heron Parkway and follow signs to Willow Beach.  GPS:  34.695944, -92.136181.July 20Dr. Lester Sitzes III Bois D’Arc WMAHope, Hempstead Co.  Meet at 7:00 a.m. at the south end of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430 intersection at Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll stop at the McDonalds in Hope (Exit 30 off I-30) around 8:45 a.m. for those in south Arkansas who would like to join us.      Look for Great-tailed Grackles at McDonalds.  We should arrive at the Bois D’Arc WMA at 9:15 a.m.  Our target birds will be Purple and Common Gallinules and their chicks, Anhingas, Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, Least Bitterns, herons, egrets, and possibly an alligator or two! Very little walking will be involved.       Bring scopes, plenty of water,  snacks, and lunch.  There are several restaurants in Hope if you prefer to eat lunch in town.  This is a full day trip.   Bois D‘Arc WMA is located 10 miles south of Hope.  Take Exit 30 off I-30 and go east.  Continue past McDonald’s, then under the railroad overpass.  At the light at the big intersection, turn right onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of a mile.  At the brown sign, turn left onto Hwy. 174.  Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles to the 3-way stop sign at Spring Hill.  Turn right onto Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4 miles.  Turn right at the white wooden WMA sign just before the highway ends at the lake.  Follow the paved road, then turn left onto the first gravel road and go down to the lake. GPS: 33.558062, -93.694239August 10Bald Knob National Wildlife RefugeBald Knob, White Co.   Meet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock on the east side of the Other Center, in the parking lot below McDonald’s. The Other Center is on McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall.  Take Exit 1 west off US-67/167.   We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR headquarters building around 8:30 a.m. for those who want to meet us there.  If running late, look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.     This federal refuge is also a National Audubon Important Bird Area.  We expect to see shorebirds, herons, night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills.     It will be very hot so bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If you have a scope, bring it. Very little walking will be involved.  You can come and go at any time.    There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 at Bald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for driving directions and more information about the refuge.  GPS:  35.260233, -91.571903 

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Date: 6/6/24 9:55 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fw: NYTimes.com: These Teens Adopted an Orphaned Oil Well. Their Goal: Shut It Down.
Several of us have been making plans to help with various aspects of bird conservation.  Coincidentally, my sister sent me this article.  I found it encouraging to see what a difference a few could make.
Explore this gift article from The New York Times. You can read it for free without a subscription.

These Teens Adopted an Orphaned Oil Well. Their Goal: Shut It Down.

Students, nonprofit groups and others are fund-raising to cap highly polluting oil and gas wells abandoned by industry.

https://www.nytimes.com/2024/05/24/climate/orphan-wells-capping-methane-leaks.html?<unlocked_article_code...>&smid=em-share

Cathy Patterson


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Date: 6/6/24 9:52 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: wandering Wood Duck
Yesterday we had some great interns for Walton at ONSC.  They are students at U of A, Pine Bluff, some from Africa.  One young man from Zimbabwe told me about a friend of his who has been trying and trying, with not great success, to get him interested in birding.  During a short birding walk yesterday morning, i was lucky enough to call in a Hooded Warbler.  Everybody, as you can imagine, was excited to see it.  This former non-birder loved this experience - and now plans to use ebird, and is much more interested in his friend's birding.  Anyway, he told me about a rare bird his friend was very excited to see - a never-before-seen bird from USA.  He showed me a picture his friend had taken - a handsome male Wood Duck.

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Date: 6/6/24 7:34 am
From: Dedra Gerard <000002df2472bba2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Sunnymede restoration
Agree!!!!!


Sent from the all new AOL app for iOS


On Wednesday, June 5, 2024, 2:58 PM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

As I have always said, they should rename the park Sandy Berger Park. 
On Wednesday 5 June, 2024 at 12:09:28 pm GMT-5, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

I’m excited. Finally the rain stopped and I was able to get a walk in at Sunnymede. When I got to the backside of the trail I spotted a sign. It read, “NATIVE GRASSES RESTORATION PROJECT”.  Three years ago I spoke with the City of Fort Smith and the AGFC to see if it was a possibility to restore the park. They thought it was great idea. So it looks like they’re actually going to do it. Sitting on the sign were two juvenile Eastern Bluebirds. Perfect. 
Sandy B.Fort Smith

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Date: 6/6/24 7:11 am
From: Patty McLean <plm108...>
Subject: Re: The Snipe Newsletter
A big shout out to Jim Dixon for his montage of the 2024 Solar Eclipse. It took a lot of planning, securing the right equipment and attention to detail. Excellent, Bravo and Attaboy! Patty McLean and Michael Linz The Roadrunners
-------- Original message --------From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> Date: 6/5/24 9:20 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: The Snipe Newsletter
The latest edition of The Snipe, newsletter of the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas has been posted online.
 
In this edition you'll hear reports about bird observations during the April 2024 Eclipse, Global Big Day results for AR, and details of upcoming programs and field trips for June, July, and August.
 
Here is the link: https://wp.ascabird.org/2024/06/04/snipe-newsletter/
 
Thank you,
Dottie Boyles
ASCA Newsletter Editor





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Date: 6/5/24 10:44 pm
From: Sara Caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Sunnymede restoration
Way to go, Sandy. It seems that seed you planted took root. Great job! Thanks for sharing this happy news.Sara CaulkFayetteville
On Wednesday, June 5, 2024 at 12:09:28 PM CDT, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

I’m excited. Finally the rain stopped and I was able to get a walk in at Sunnymede. When I got to the backside of the trail I spotted a sign. It read, “NATIVE GRASSES RESTORATION PROJECT”.  Three years ago I spoke with the City of Fort Smith and the AGFC to see if it was a possibility to restore the park. They thought it was great idea. So it looks like they’re actually going to do it. Sitting on the sign were two juvenile Eastern Bluebirds. Perfect. 
Sandy B.Fort Smith

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Date: 6/5/24 7:07 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Distant bird on wire ID request
When our local librarian showed me a picture of a bird she had taken with her phone after we discussed behavior, my initial thought was "unidentifiable."  But I have a soft spot for librarians,  especially now that libraries and librarians are under threat.
So, if anyone would be willing to give an opinion on the photograph, I'll send it to you.  Contact me off list with your email.
ThanksJack StewartNewton County

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Date: 6/5/24 4:25 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Sunnymede restoration
Yay!  Perfect indeed!  I thank you, and all the birds would thank you if they understood.
On Wednesday, June 5, 2024 at 12:09:30 PM CDT, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

I’m excited. Finally the rain stopped and I was able to get a walk in at Sunnymede. When I got to the backside of the trail I spotted a sign. It read, “NATIVE GRASSES RESTORATION PROJECT”.  Three years ago I spoke with the City of Fort Smith and the AGFC to see if it was a possibility to restore the park. They thought it was great idea. So it looks like they’re actually going to do it. Sitting on the sign were two juvenile Eastern Bluebirds. Perfect. 
Sandy B.Fort Smith

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Date: 6/5/24 11:58 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Sunnymede restoration
As I have always said, they should rename the park Sandy Berger Park. 
On Wednesday 5 June, 2024 at 12:09:28 pm GMT-5, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

I’m excited. Finally the rain stopped and I was able to get a walk in at Sunnymede. When I got to the backside of the trail I spotted a sign. It read, “NATIVE GRASSES RESTORATION PROJECT”.  Three years ago I spoke with the City of Fort Smith and the AGFC to see if it was a possibility to restore the park. They thought it was great idea. So it looks like they’re actually going to do it. Sitting on the sign were two juvenile Eastern Bluebirds. Perfect. 
Sandy B.Fort Smith

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Date: 6/5/24 10:56 am
From: Dedra Gerard <000002df2472bba2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Sunnymede restoration
Thank you. That is great news! 


Sent from the all new AOL app for iOS


On Wednesday, June 5, 2024, 1:09 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:

I’m excited. Finally the rain stopped and I was able to get a walk in at Sunnymede. When I got to the backside of the trail I spotted a sign. It read, “NATIVE GRASSES RESTORATION PROJECT”.  Three years ago I spoke with the City of Fort Smith and the AGFC to see if it was a possibility to restore the park. They thought it was great idea. So it looks like they’re actually going to do it. Sitting on the sign were two juvenile Eastern Bluebirds. Perfect. 
Sandy B.Fort Smith

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Date: 6/5/24 10:09 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Sunnymede restoration
I’m excited. Finally the rain stopped and I was able to get a walk in at
Sunnymede. When I got to the backside of the trail I spotted a sign. It
read, “NATIVE GRASSES RESTORATION PROJECT”. Three years ago I spoke with
the City of Fort Smith and the AGFC to see if it was a possibility to
restore the park. They thought it was great idea. So it looks like they’re
actually going to do it.
Sitting on the sign were two juvenile Eastern Bluebirds. Perfect.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith

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Date: 6/4/24 9:04 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: The Snipe Newsletter
The latest edition of _The Snipe_, newsletter of the Audubon Society of
Central Arkansas has been posted online.

In this edition you'll hear reports about bird observations during the
April 2024 Eclipse, Global Big Day results for AR, and details of
upcoming programs and field trips for June, July, and August.

Here is the link: https://wp.ascabird.org/2024/06/04/snipe-newsletter/

Thank you,
Dottie Boyles
ASCA Newsletter Editor

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Date: 6/4/24 8:12 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: TORNADOES AND LESSER YELLOWLEGS WITH A BUM LEG
My mother's neighborhood, just west of mine has/had a lot of old-growth
trees. Not many are still intact. I fear that many nests with eggs or young
were lost, just in my neighborhood, and we didn't get nearly as much damage
as some.

On Tue, Jun 4, 2024, 2:55 PM Betty Evans <betty_evans...> wrote:

> I am one who lost many 100+ year old post and blackjack oak trees from my
> yard and neighborhood in Rogers. I was seeing/hearing Summer Tanagers and
> Great Crested Flycatchers daily before the tornado and maybe a day or two
> after. Now they are not here anymore.
>
> I am going to create a new personal location on ebird so I can compare the
> bar charts before and after the storm. I will have a completely different
> ecosystem. My current yard list has 106 species all but 2 have been seen
> since I started seriously birding in 2021.
>
> Betty Evans
>
>
> On 05/30/2024 6:14 AM CDT Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
>
> Very early on Sunday May 26, 2024, tornadoes and powerful “straight line”
> winds whirled their deadly magic across Northwest Arkansas City west to
> east – Decatur to Centerton to Rogers to Beaver Lake to Ninestone Land
> Trust in Carroll County. Several people killed, others injured. A huge
> amount of damage to homes, trees, all kinds of buildings.
> Hundreds of broken utility poles. Privacy fences no longer private. Boats
> once afloat upside down.
> In past years I’ve called this sort of thing “tinning of the trees” since
> old chicken houses and other older structures with tin roofs really take a
> beating. Long sheets of tin go whirling through wild skies, wrapping around
> fences and bent among the limbs of trees. Pastures fill up with insulation
> from blasted poultry barns.
> Many trees in Rogers in the 100+ year range are uprooted or atop homes.
> One old Tallgrass Prairie barren once full of mature Post Oaks – most now
> on the ground. This storm has raged its way through the peak avian nesting
> season. Mature woodlands are prime nesting habitat for Summer Tanagers,
> Great Crested Flycatchers, Red-headed Woodpeckers, American Kestrels, and
> others.
> Wonder what has become of them? And so many others? A dead Mourning Dove
> outside Academy Sports – was it suddenly awakened, then slammed into the
> building?
> Birding in western Benton County yesterday, just north of Decatur’s
> massive tornadoes, I saw the tail end of shorebird migration. This included
> a single Lesser Yellowlegs with a bum, partially swollen left leg. It could
> fly, but for foraging hopped instead of walked. Did the storm slam it into
> a tree or fence? And since they are usually in flocks, how about the rest
> of the yellowlegs?
> I had a message from a friend who saw 8-10 Mississippi Kites on Monday
> after the storm, apparently trying to build nests in Fayetteville’s Kessler
> Mountain Regional Park. Maybe they are survivors of what what happened in
> Decatur and Rogers? They should already have nests. Maybe the kites were
> blasted in the middle of the night, now on the run before time runs out for
> successful nesting?
> This is all speculation, of course. But you don’t have to see too many
> century-old oaks uprooted to wonder about fates of birds swept up in a 135
> mile per hour tornado tsunami. How many injured? How many died? What of
> their futures?
> “Toto, I have a feeling were not in Kansas anymore.” – Dorothy in Wizard
> of Oz.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
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>
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Date: 6/4/24 7:10 pm
From: <arbour...> <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 4



Todd Ballinger (AR) and I surveyed birds today at Red Slough (RS) and found 69 species. The weather was cool, windy, and overcast and started off with a thunderstorm that lasted a couple hours causing us to be confined inside the vehicle for the first part of the survey. But it turned out to be a good bird day with some notable finds. Of special note was one Crested Caracara on Highway 87 a mile south of RS and outside my count area and one American Bittern which to be present this late probably means it is nesting here. Also, Least Bittern numbers are a lot higher than they have been in several years with 5 birds being seen by me and and a couple others I missed being seen by Todd. A pair of King Rails were involved in courtship and put on a show at close range for us. We have received a lot of rain over the past few days with the area heavily flooded. The farm fields around RS are covered in water and are full of White Ibis, herons, egrets, and Black-bellied Whistling Ducks. Black Land and Sand Roads are largely covered in water and the north and south parking lots are under water. Our heronry has been shrinking in numbers of birds the past few weeks and I finally discovered why. There is a huge Heronry on Ward Lake that is apparently stealing our birds away. At least they are still in the area and will feed on Red Slough as the wetlands dry up over the Summer. These birds on Ward Lake are nesting in very large Button Bushes. Here is our list for today:




Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 12

Wood Duck - 21

Northern Shoveler - 1 male

Pied-billed Grebe – 6

Neotropic Cormorant - 12 (9 active nests; most with older young.)

Anhinga - 73 (Many nests with sitting birds and young.)

American Bittern - 1 (Almost certainly a nesting bird to be present so late.)

Least Bittern - 5

Great-blue Heron - 4

Great Egret - 7

Snowy Egret - 31

Little-blue Heron - 48

Cattle Egret - 500

Green Heron - 11

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 4

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1

White Ibis - 85

Black Vulture - 16

Turkey Vulture – 8

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

King Rail - 3 ( We had a pair together that put on a show for us at close range, collecting nesting material and passing it back and forth to each other.)

Purple Gallinule - 97 (Also had one new brood of tiny downy young still in the nest being fed by adults. Another bird was seen sitting on a nest.)

Common Gallinule - 82 (several broods of young also seen.)

American Coot – 9

Killdeer - 2

Franklin's Gull - 1

Black Terns - 3

Mourning Dove - 16

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 8

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Chuck-wills-widow - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Acadian Flycatcher - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 4

White-eyed Vireo - 9

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 3

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow – 7

Fish Crow - 4

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 22

Cliff Swallow - 9

Barn Swallow - 11

Carolina Chickadee – 1

Tufted Titmouse - 3

Carolina Wren – 7

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 5

Wood Thrush - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Northern Parula - 1

Prairie Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 6

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 6

Yellow-breasted Chat - 5

Summer Tanager - 1

Northern Cardinal – 12

Blue Grosbeak - 3

Indigo Bunting - 16

Painted Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 1

Red-winged Blackbird – 8

Common Grackle - 40

Brown-headed Cowbird - 7




Also one Crested Caracara on Highway 87 about a mile south of Red Slough and outside my count area.










Odonates:




Swamp Darner

Mocha Emerald

Common Whitetail

Eastern Pondhawk

Black Saddlebags









Herps:




Common Musk Turtle

Red-eared Slider

Broad-banded Water Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Green Frog

Bullfrog






Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR





Check out the Red Slough Photo Gallery: [ https://pbase.com/red_slough_wma | https://pbase.com/red_slough_wma ]



Birders Guide to the Red Slough WMA: [ https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/ouachita/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd1043423 | https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/ouachita/landmanagement/resourcemanagement/?cid=fseprd1043423 ]


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Date: 6/4/24 12:55 pm
From: Betty Evans <betty_evans...>
Subject: Re: TORNADOES AND LESSER YELLOWLEGS WITH A BUM LEG
I am one who lost many 100+ year old post and blackjack oak trees from my yard and neighborhood in Rogers. I was seeing/hearing Summer Tanagers and Great Crested Flycatchers daily before the tornado and maybe a day or two after. Now they are not here anymore.

I am going to create a new personal location on ebird so I can compare the bar charts before and after the storm. I will have a completely different ecosystem. My current yard list has 106 species all but 2 have been seen since I started seriously birding in 2021.

Betty Evans


> On 05/30/2024 6:14 AM CDT Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>
>
> Very early on Sunday May 26, 2024, tornadoes and powerful “straight line” winds whirled their deadly magic across Northwest Arkansas City west to east – Decatur to Centerton to Rogers to Beaver Lake to Ninestone Land Trust in Carroll County. Several people killed, others injured. A huge amount of damage to homes, trees, all kinds of buildings.
>
> Hundreds of broken utility poles. Privacy fences no longer private. Boats once afloat upside down.
>
> In past years I’ve called this sort of thing “tinning of the trees” since old chicken houses and other older structures with tin roofs really take a beating. Long sheets of tin go whirling through wild skies, wrapping around fences and bent among the limbs of trees. Pastures fill up with insulation from blasted poultry barns.
>
> Many trees in Rogers in the 100+ year range are uprooted or atop homes. One old Tallgrass Prairie barren once full of mature Post Oaks – most now on the ground. This storm has raged its way through the peak avian nesting season. Mature woodlands are prime nesting habitat for Summer Tanagers, Great Crested Flycatchers, Red-headed Woodpeckers, American Kestrels, and others.
>
> Wonder what has become of them? And so many others? A dead Mourning Dove outside Academy Sports – was it suddenly awakened, then slammed into the building?
>
> Birding in western Benton County yesterday, just north of Decatur’s massive tornadoes, I saw the tail end of shorebird migration. This included a single Lesser Yellowlegs with a bum, partially swollen left leg. It could fly, but for foraging hopped instead of walked. Did the storm slam it into a tree or fence? And since they are usually in flocks, how about the rest of the yellowlegs?
>
> I had a message from a friend who saw 8-10 Mississippi Kites on Monday after the storm, apparently trying to build nests in Fayetteville’s Kessler Mountain Regional Park. Maybe they are survivors of what what happened in Decatur and Rogers? They should already have nests. Maybe the kites were blasted in the middle of the night, now on the run before time runs out for successful nesting?
>
> This is all speculation, of course. But you don’t have to see too many century-old oaks uprooted to wonder about fates of birds swept up in a 135 mile per hour tornado tsunami. How many injured? How many died? What of their futures?
>
> “Toto, I have a feeling were not in Kansas anymore.” – Dorothy in Wizard of Oz.
>
>
>
> ---------------------------------------------
>
> To unsubscribe from the ARBIRD-L list, click the following link:
> http://listserv.uark.edu/scripts/wa-UARKEDU.exe?SUBED1=ARBIRD-L&A=1
>

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Date: 6/4/24 12:45 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Hummer at Trumpet Creepers in June
Hummers migrate through my yard in April, often visiting the numerous red flowers on my Red Buckeye (a native shrub). They are all gone by summer. Except now. I first noticed a RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD in my yard starting in late May.
I live in an older part of central Fayetteville. A century ago it was probably a remnant Tallgrass Prairie with scattered Post Oaks. Now it is all suburbanized, my yard included. It probably is a reasonably good example of what John Marzluff terms subbirdia.
I have a long fence with a dense growth of Trumpet Creeper vines, now with many large reddish flowers. I often see hummers in late summer in their fall migration visiting these flowers at various places around Northwest Arkansas City. But this is the first time I have seen one in my yard during typical hummer nesting season. So I have started dragging my chair out into some shade to watch.
The hummer I have managed to photograph so far looks like a female, but a female with a distinctive white patch on her head. Upon looking closer at a decent photo, I think this white patch consists of pollen shes collecting in her flower visits. (I got a clue about this after a quick internet search.)
My neighbor JB across the street has some pretty nice native flower beds. He told me this morning he has also recently been seeing a hummer.
Ill come back to this subject a little later, when I have more observations.

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Date: 6/1/24 2:54 pm
From: Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Todd Ballinger’s owl photo makes cover of eBird
 

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Date: 6/1/24 4:49 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Todd Ballinger’s owl photo makes cover of eBird
Wooo hoooo. Way to go Todd!ML619036755 - Eastern Screech-Owl - Macaulay Library 

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ML619036755 - Eastern Screech-Owl - Macaulay Library

Macaulay Library ML619036755; © Todd Ballinger; Washington, Arkansas, United States
| |

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|





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Date: 5/30/24 10:56 am
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: AAST Belize fundraiser 2024
Wonderful news, Kannan! Thank you for helping the Trust!

Lynn Foster

On Thu, May 30, 2024 at 9:25 AM Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Fourteen UAFS students, two NSU graduate students, and 8 naturalists
> joined Prof. Ragupathy Kannan's 17th study abroad course to Belize May
> 21-29, 2024.
>
> Highlights of the tour included a bizarre observation of a Yucatan Jay
> plucking and dragging a Yucatan Jay chick out of a nest, taking it to the
> ground, and pecking it to death; sightings of all three Yucatan endemics
> (Jay, Squirrel, and Banded Gecko named after the peninsula); over 210
> species of birds; and over 1000 observations of various taxa uploaded in
> the iNaturalist UAFS Belize Biodiversity Blitz 2024 project (
> https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/uafs-belize-biodiversity-blitz-2024).
>
>
> The tour raised $2000 for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, thanks to
> the participation of the naturalists from Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, and
> Michigan.
>
> See full trip report here: https://ebird.org/tripreport/246075
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith
>
>
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad
> <https://mail.onelink.me/107872968?pid=nativeplacement&c=Global_Acquisition_YMktg_315_Internal_EmailSignature&af_sub1=Acquisition&af_sub2=Global_YMktg&af_sub3=&af_sub4=100000604&af_sub5=EmailSignature__Static_>
>
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Date: 5/30/24 7:25 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: AAST Belize fundraiser 2024
Fourteen UAFS students, two NSU graduate students, and 8 naturalists joined Prof. Ragupathy Kannan's 17th study abroad course to Belize May 21-29, 2024. 
Highlights of the tour included a bizarre observation of a Yucatan Jay plucking and dragging a Yucatan Jay chick out of a nest, taking it to the ground, and pecking it to death; sightings of all three Yucatan endemics (Jay, Squirrel, and Banded Gecko named after the peninsula); over 210 species of birds; and over 1000 observations of various taxa uploaded in the iNaturalist UAFS Belize Biodiversity Blitz 2024 project (https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/uafs-belize-biodiversity-blitz-2024).
The tour raised $2000 for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust, thanks to the participation of the naturalists from Mississippi, Texas, Arkansas, and Michigan.
See full trip report here: https://ebird.org/tripreport/246075
KannanFt. Smith



Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

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Date: 5/30/24 4:14 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: TORNADOES AND LESSER YELLOWLEGS WITH A BUM LEG
Very early on Sunday May 26, 2024, tornadoes and powerful straight line winds whirled their deadly magic across Northwest Arkansas City west to east Decatur to Centerton to Rogers to Beaver Lake to Ninestone Land Trust in Carroll County. Several people killed, others injured. A huge amount of damage to homes, trees, all kinds of buildings.
Hundreds of broken utility poles. Privacy fences no longer private. Boats once afloat upside down.
In past years Ive called this sort of thing tinning of the trees since old chicken houses and other older structures with tin roofs really take a beating. Long sheets of tin go whirling through wild skies, wrapping around fences and bent among the limbs of trees. Pastures fill up with insulation from blasted poultry barns.
Many trees in Rogers in the 100+ year range are uprooted or atop homes. One old Tallgrass Prairie barren once full of mature Post Oaks most now on the ground. This storm has raged its way through the peak avian nesting season. Mature woodlands are prime nesting habitat for Summer Tanagers, Great Crested Flycatchers, Red-headed Woodpeckers, American Kestrels, and others.
Wonder what has become of them? And so many others? A dead Mourning Dove outside Academy Sports was it suddenly awakened, then slammed into the building?
Birding in western Benton County yesterday, just north of Decaturs massive tornadoes, I saw the tail end of shorebird migration. This included a single Lesser Yellowlegs with a bum, partially swollen left leg. It could fly, but for foraging hopped instead of walked. Did the storm slam it into a tree or fence? And since they are usually in flocks, how about the rest of the yellowlegs?
I had a message from a friend who saw 8-10 Mississippi Kites on Monday after the storm, apparently trying to build nests in Fayettevilles Kessler Mountain Regional Park. Maybe they are survivors of what what happened in Decatur and Rogers? They should already have nests. Maybe the kites were blasted in the middle of the night, now on the run before time runs out for successful nesting?
This is all speculation, of course. But you dont have to see too many century-old oaks uprooted to wonder about fates of birds swept up in a 135 mile per hour tornado tsunami. How many injured? How many died? What of their futures?
Toto, I have a feeling were not in Kansas anymore. Dorothy in Wizard of Oz.

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Date: 5/29/24 2:08 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Upcoming ASCA Field Trips
   Listed below are the next three months of field trips sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  You don't have to be a member of ASCA to participate. All levels of birders are welcome. We love meeting new birders!  Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions. Karen Holliday  ASCA Field Trip Coordinator ASCA Field Trips  June, July, August 2024June 8Willow Beach Park and Campground Scott, Pulaski Co.   Meet at 8:00 a.m. at the Willow Beach Campground near Scott, AR. The picnic/campground area is easy walking on level, paved and grassy areas bordering the Arkansas River.  It offers a mix of habitats, from large cottonwood trees full of Baltimore and Orchard Orioles, Warbling Vireos, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, Yellow-billed Cuckoos, and Prothonotary Warblers.    Multiple swallow species skim the grassy areas.  River species include gulls, terns, and cormorants.  Egrets and herons lurk in the marshy areas.   A nearby neighborhood is a gathering spot for Black-bellied Whistling Ducks and Great-tailed Grackles.  A recent birding trip to the park netted 48 species.  This will be a morning trip.From Little Rock, take I-440 east past the airport, then take U.S. Highway 165 east for 2.5 miles. Turn right onto Colonel Manard Road and continue for three miles. Turn right again onto Blue Heron Parkway and follow signs to Willow Beach.  GPS:  34.695944, -92.136181.July 20Dr. Lester Sitzes III Bois D’Arc WMAHope, Hempstead Co.  Meet at 7:00 a.m. at the south end of the commuter parking lot at the I-630/I-430 intersection at Shackleford Road in Little Rock.  We’ll stop at the McDonalds in Hope (Exit 30 off I-30) around 8:45 a.m. for those in south Arkansas who would like to join us.      Look for Great-tailed Grackles at McDonalds.  We should arrive at the Bois D’Arc WMA at 9:15 a.m.  Our target birds will be Purple and Common Gallinules and their chicks, Anhingas, Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Least Bitterns, herons, egrets, and possibly an alligator or two! Very little walking will be involved.       Bring scopes, plenty of water, snacks, and lunch.  There are several restaurants in Hope if you prefer to eat lunch in town.    Bois D‘Arc WMA is located 10 miles south of Hope.  Take Exit 30 off I-30 and go east.  Continue past McDonald’s, then under the railroad overpass.  At the light at the big intersection, turn right onto Hwy. 67.  Go 1/3 of a mile.  At the brown sign, turn left onto Hwy. 174.  Take Hwy. 174 south 6 miles to the 3-way stop sign at Spring Hill.  Turn right onto Hwy. 355.  Go west for 4 miles.  Turn right at the white wooden WMA sign just before the highway ends in the lake.  Follow the paved road, then turn left onto the first gravel road and go down to the lake.  GPS: 33.558062, -93.694239August 10Bald Knob National Wildlife RefugeBald Knob, White Co.   Meet at 7:00 a.m. in North Little Rock on the east side of the Other Center, in the parking lot below McDonald’s. The Other Center is on McCain Blvd. across from McCain Mall.  Take Exit 1 west off US-67/167.   We’ll arrive at Bald Knob NWR headquarters building around 8:30 a.m. for those who want to meet us there.  If running late, look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.     This federal refuge is also a National Audubon Important Bird Area.  We expect to see shorebirds, herons, night-herons, egrets, and possibly Wood Storks and Roseate Spoonbills.     It will be very hot so bring plenty of water, snacks, sunscreen, and a hat.  If you have a scope, bring it.  Very little walking will be involved. There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 at Bald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for driving directions and more information about the refuge.  GPS:  35.260233, -91.571903 

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Date: 5/27/24 8:00 pm
From: Brian Carlson <brianrcarlson...>
Subject: Mount Magazine Ovenbirds
My wife and I headed up to Mount Magazine this morning, hoping it would be a bit cooler up there. We walked and birded at the Benefield picnic area. I was surprised at how many Ovenbirds were there.

I hope you all are safe and have avoided the recent devastating storms. Brian

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Date: 5/25/24 5:04 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Wood Duck Fledging #3 of 2024
Dear ARBIRDers,

Yesterday morning about 9:30 a.m. I headed to the Audubon All Chapters meeting at the Audubon Delta center in Little Rock. Before I even got there, my wife Susan Hardin texted a video of our third wood duck fledging event of the year. The video includes a separate pair of woodies along with another adult female being closely followed by her 10 fledglings. I didn’t get home from the meeting until close to 5:00 p.m. in a driving rainstorm. Susan lost sight of the fledglings shortly thereafter when they and the adult female disappeared into a large patch of irises along the inner pond bank.

Today mid-afternoon I cleaned out the box the fledglings had exited from in case some other female wood duck wants to start laying eggs in that box. The box contained two unhatched eggs of normal size along with one egg that was only about an inch long, well smaller than wood duck eggs. I don’t know if it was a “dud” wood duck egg that was deposited well before it reached normal size, or if some other bird species deposited a single egg before realizing the wood duck nest box was not suitable for its needs. This is the first time I can recall where we had such a small egg left after a fledging from one of our wood duck nest boxes. Finally, I put fresh wood chips in the newly emptied box.

Late this afternoon at 5:50 p.m. a female woodie that had been standing atop that just refreshed nest box trying to peek into the entry hole- “Hello, anybody home here?"- entered the box for about five minutes, the typical interval when female woodies lay an egg. That took place less than three hours after I had cleaned out the box and gotten it ready for another possible occupant this year.

Those of you who have followed my wood duck fledging posts in recent years may wonder how I knew for sure which of our two nest boxes the fledglings came out of yesterday morning since we didn’t see them until they had already left the nest box. Back on March 27 I posted our first of the year fledging event with eight fledglings. They came out of our west box. I knew that because I happened to be watching an adult female woodie in that box opening before she hopped to the ground below, and calling out her fledglings. Fast forward to May 7 when our second fledging event was noted. That smaller batch of six fledglings was also observed emerging from our east box, and posted on ARBIRD one week later. Given that yesterday we had 10 fledglings and the typical incubation period is 30 days on average (a range of 25-37 days incubation), there was no way yesterday’s fledging could have been from our east box. It had only been 20 days since that box was emptied and fresh wood chips put in it. It had been 58 days since our west box had fledged our first group of eight this year. Ten eggs/fledglings plus 30 days incubation pushed the start of that sequence back in time 40 total days to about April 13 for its start, give or take a few days.

Recently we have had a male woodie hanging out with two females, or vice versa. Several days ago one of the females flattened her body on the surface of our small pond, her sign she was ready to mate. The male accepted her invitation. I don’t know if the female that entered our newly vacant west nest box is that female or not. Some things I’m not smart enough to suss out.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. This afternoon a loud chorus of what I believe are eastern narrow-mouthed toads, which is actually a species of terrestrial frog, was vocalizing loudly along the inside of our pond levee. Nearby was a small broad-banded snake which didn’t appear to pose much danger, but among the toads in the pond bank foliage was a full sized plain-bellied watersnake fully capable of snacking on one or more of the toads. Here is its call:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5U8Wok7ic8E
Eastern narrowmouth toad call
youtube.com

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