ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
3/26/17 7:36 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Belize AAST fund-raiser trip
3/26/17 6:34 pm Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> Yard Bird Dreaming: Rewarded
3/26/17 7:12 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Belize AAST fund-raiser trip
3/26/17 5:40 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS
3/25/17 6:40 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> In the Ozarks
3/25/17 3:47 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Re: New field trip binoculars
3/25/17 3:29 pm Karen <ladyhawke1...> New field trip binoculars
3/25/17 2:00 pm Devin Moon <moondevg...> Logoly State Park Birding
3/25/17 1:59 pm Karen <ladyhawke1...> Bald Knob Field Trip Sarurday
3/25/17 1:35 pm Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> Subtle shiftings
3/25/17 10:44 am jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr...> Very light hawk
3/25/17 8:48 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Mockingbird bullies
3/24/17 7:07 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Does Tragedy 'count'?
3/24/17 6:33 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Broad-billed Hummingbird-Oklahoma
3/24/17 3:47 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
3/24/17 3:43 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
3/24/17 3:40 pm Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...> Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
3/24/17 3:38 pm Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
3/24/17 3:33 pm Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...> Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
3/24/17 3:18 pm laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Re: Common Loons Lake Maumelle
3/24/17 3:15 pm <lauralea1959...> <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Common Loons Lake Maumelle
3/24/17 3:11 pm Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
3/24/17 2:04 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Reception at UACCM
3/24/17 1:01 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Seeing Birds Help People Destress
3/24/17 10:44 am Karen <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Field Trip Sill On
3/24/17 7:10 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Re: Does Tragedy 'count'?
3/24/17 7:00 am Don Simons <Don.Simons...> Re: Does Tragedy 'count'?
3/24/17 5:59 am George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Does Tragedy 'count'?
3/24/17 5:48 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Migration maps
3/24/17 5:45 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> TREE SWALLOWS AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND BOXES
3/24/17 5:37 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: eBird: Black-throated Gray Warbler, Hot Springs Village
3/23/17 8:55 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Warbler Redux
3/23/17 8:45 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: Black-throated Gray Warbler, Hot Springs Village
3/23/17 7:57 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Buffalo National River an Arkansas IBA
3/23/17 4:34 pm Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Ruby-throated Hummingbird
3/23/17 3:51 pm data _null_; <datanull...> FOS female hummingbird
3/23/17 2:59 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> LOON MIGRATION AT BEAVER LAKE
3/23/17 2:57 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> FOS
3/23/17 1:04 pm Kay <mcafeekay...> DeGray Bird Count Cancelled
3/23/17 1:01 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Re: Lake Degray Bird Survey Cancelation
3/23/17 1:01 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Red thread
3/23/17 12:56 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Lake Defray Bird Survey Cancelation
3/23/17 12:26 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Please help us recruit 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls for this June's halberg Ecology Camp
3/23/17 5:55 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Re: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
3/22/17 8:49 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Mar. 22
3/22/17 6:13 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
3/22/17 4:57 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird
3/22/17 4:55 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> LOONS SPECTACULAR AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
3/22/17 3:02 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
3/22/17 2:46 pm Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> The Snipe is now Online
3/22/17 2:27 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Female hummer(s)
3/22/17 12:44 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Ruby-throated Hummingbirds
3/22/17 10:50 am J J lun <dovekie123...> Inca Dove at Feeder
3/22/17 10:09 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Enhanced Newsletter
3/22/17 9:30 am Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Fund my master's project on AR grassland birds
3/21/17 5:57 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> FOS
3/21/17 12:45 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Enhanced Newsletter
3/21/17 8:39 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Crossbills at shores lake
3/21/17 6:33 am Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> AAS Spring Meeting info url
3/20/17 6:21 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Sprague's Pipit at Bald Knob
3/20/17 6:08 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA March Field Trip
3/20/17 4:55 pm Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...> Re: AAS Meeting
3/20/17 3:55 pm Tish DePriest <tishd...> Re: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2
3/20/17 2:37 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> AAS Meeting
3/20/17 2:24 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Tree Swallow
3/20/17 2:16 pm Lea Crisp <leacrisp...> Re: Yellow-throated Warbler
3/20/17 12:41 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
3/20/17 11:53 am Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
3/20/17 9:07 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> RED CROSSBILL CALL TYPE 2 AT SHORES LAKE AREA, OZARK NF
3/20/17 6:29 am Yahoo! <000000cb59c2c1b9-dmarc-request...> Woodpeckers
3/20/17 6:25 am Yahoo! <000000cb59c2c1b9-dmarc-request...> All the woodpeckers
3/20/17 5:38 am Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Miller County, 3/19/2017
3/20/17 5:32 am Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2
3/19/17 10:13 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2
3/19/17 7:55 pm Karen <ladyhawke1...> Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure
3/19/17 7:38 pm Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> The Renderings I Cannot Do
3/19/17 5:27 pm swamp_fox <swamp_fox...> Miller County, 3/19/2017
3/19/17 5:17 pm akcmueller <akcmueller...> Yellow-throated Warbler
3/19/17 4:57 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FOS RTHU
3/19/17 1:26 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: King of the Sky
3/19/17 1:22 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Of yard birds and Roundup
3/19/17 1:16 pm Mary Ann King <office...> Re: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
3/19/17 12:37 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Hummer
3/19/17 10:27 am Barry Haas <bhaas...> Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
3/19/17 5:57 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> FOS Louisiana Waterthrush
3/18/17 7:54 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Soundings
3/18/17 7:20 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: CROSSBILLS MAY HAVE NESTED IN OZARKS
3/18/17 6:11 pm Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight...> Blue Heron Rookery
3/18/17 6:08 pm Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> Soundings
3/18/17 6:07 pm Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight...> woodcocks dancing inthe streets
3/18/17 4:30 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> CROSSBILLS MAY HAVE NESTED IN OZARKS
3/18/17 1:46 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Fw: Buffalo River--Opportunity to speak out extended to April 6
3/18/17 1:19 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Red Crossbills continue near Shores Lake, Ozark NF
3/18/17 8:36 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Northern Saw-whet
3/18/17 7:24 am Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> Northern Saw-whet
3/17/17 9:01 pm Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> Purple Martin's in El Dorado.
3/17/17 4:03 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> RED-B MERGANSER AND COMMON LOONS AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
3/17/17 12:38 pm Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> Cerulean Warblers in Northwestern Arkansas
3/17/17 11:17 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Black & White Warblers...
3/17/17 11:15 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Black & White Warblers...
3/17/17 11:03 am Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Black & White Warblers...
3/17/17 6:28 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher
3/17/17 5:11 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher
3/16/17 3:12 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Good info on the swine CAFO
3/16/17 3:04 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> SURF SCOTER AT ALMA WASTEWATER (again? still?)
3/16/17 1:24 pm Stacy Clanton <sclanton...> "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher
3/16/17 12:45 pm Thomas Pate <thpate111...>
3/16/17 11:47 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
3/16/17 11:44 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
3/16/17 11:22 am Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
3/16/17 10:31 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
3/16/17 10:11 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
3/16/17 10:11 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
3/16/17 9:51 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
3/16/17 9:20 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
3/16/17 7:00 am Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...> Yellow-headed Blackbird
3/16/17 6:04 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> FIRST SPRING SONGS BY BROWN THRASHER
3/15/17 7:02 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Zinke era
3/15/17 6:47 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Buffalo River--Opportunity to speak out DUE 17 Mar 1
3/15/17 4:37 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> GOLDEN-PLOVERS AT FROG
3/15/17 4:30 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds.
3/15/17 3:47 pm sara caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> Re: Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds.
3/15/17 2:25 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds.
3/15/17 2:22 pm Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Nesting Ospreys
3/15/17 1:58 pm Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
3/15/17 1:57 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Nesting Ospreys
3/15/17 1:45 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
3/15/17 1:06 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
3/15/17 11:48 am Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> Re: Juncos now????
3/15/17 11:10 am Debra Grim <dsgrim02...> Re: Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project Hats for Next Season
3/15/17 10:15 am Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...> Juncos now????
3/15/17 10:13 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
3/15/17 10:05 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
3/14/17 4:28 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Yard questions
3/14/17 3:55 pm Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: Yard questions
3/14/17 3:55 pm Nancy Felker <felker.nancy...> Re: Yard questions
3/14/17 12:40 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Yard questions
3/14/17 12:33 pm Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Yard questions
3/14/17 12:17 pm Mary Ann King <office...> Re: Yard questions
3/14/17 10:35 am Jim and Karen Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Yard questions
3/14/17 9:10 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Yard questions
3/14/17 2:41 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> HERMIT THRUSH, BUT NOT TAPER-TIP, AT NEW LAKE ATALANTA
3/13/17 5:45 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Yard questions
3/13/17 5:20 pm John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...> Re: Junco
3/13/17 4:58 pm Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> Re: Yard questions
3/13/17 3:33 pm Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Re: Junco
3/13/17 3:18 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Advice needed (again)
3/13/17 1:05 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Yard questions
3/13/17 12:22 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Birding Kingsland Prairie Natural Area (Henslow's Sparrows)
3/13/17 12:02 pm Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Yard questions
3/13/17 10:45 am Reames, Clark -FS <creames...> Re: Yard questions
3/13/17 10:27 am Elizabeth F. Shores <efshores...> Re: Yard questions
3/13/17 10:13 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Junco
3/13/17 10:09 am Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: Yard questions
3/13/17 8:27 am Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...> Re: Yard questions
3/13/17 8:26 am Elizabeth F. Shores <efshores...> Re: Yard questions
3/13/17 8:06 am jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> Yard questions
3/12/17 8:54 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> FOS Barn Swallows
3/12/17 6:52 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: cyclone of waxwings
3/12/17 5:26 pm Don Simons <drsimons56...> Re: cyclone of waxwings
3/12/17 4:22 pm Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight...> yellow warblers & pair of kingfishers
3/12/17 11:44 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> cyclone of waxwings
3/12/17 11:11 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Ruby-throated and Other Hummingbirds Some Things to Know
3/12/17 9:22 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Junco
3/12/17 8:53 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> hummer
3/12/17 8:44 am Robin Buff <robinbuff...> Re: Dr. Chandra Taylor Smith-speaker at AAS Meeting
3/12/17 7:13 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Fw: Dr. Chandra Taylor Smith-speaker at AAS Meeting
3/11/17 1:53 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Best Management Practices for small arms firing ranges
3/11/17 9:21 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Why seabirds ingest plastic
3/10/17 1:22 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Birding Survey Opportunity
3/10/17 8:57 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Thayer's Gull
3/9/17 12:55 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> reply from state wildlife veterinarian Fwd: CWD and scavengers
3/9/17 7:29 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Great news from Audubon Arkansas
3/8/17 5:23 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> "Oregon" Junco near Lake Fayetteville
3/8/17 2:39 pm kjdillard <kjdillard...> Sandhill Cranes
3/8/17 1:22 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> CROSSBILLS-YES. SCOTER-NO.
3/8/17 1:15 pm Delos McCauley <edelos...> White-winged Dove
3/8/17 10:57 am Tim Tyler <tylertim204...> FOS Purple martins
3/8/17 8:32 am Devin Moon <moondevg...> Henslow's Sparrow at Kingsland Prairie NA
3/8/17 6:39 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map
3/8/17 6:28 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map
3/7/17 7:51 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Art for the Birds III
3/7/17 6:41 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - March 7
3/7/17 2:21 pm Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project Hats for Next Season
3/7/17 11:48 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
3/7/17 8:10 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
3/7/17 8:08 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/7/17 8:05 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/7/17 6:52 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map
3/7/17 5:24 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> GULLS: NATURE’S FISH FINDER
3/7/17 5:05 am Mary Ann King <office...> Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
3/7/17 2:37 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
3/6/17 6:18 pm Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/6/17 6:05 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> More Euros
3/6/17 5:36 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> BW Warbler
3/6/17 2:51 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
3/6/17 2:28 pm Alan <quattro...> Mark Glenshaw, owls
3/6/17 2:11 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> SURF SCOTER AT ALMA WASTEWATER
3/6/17 1:53 pm Robert Bays <baysrr...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/6/17 1:28 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Winter Records
3/6/17 11:48 am Thomas Foti <tfoti62...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/6/17 7:43 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/6/17 7:40 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/6/17 6:59 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, March 9, AHTD’s Wildflower Programs & Pollinators and Roadsides: Managing Vegetation for Bees and Butterflies
3/5/17 6:46 pm Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...> Re: NESTING GREAT HORNED OWL THERMOREGULATING AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
3/5/17 6:35 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Cedar waxwings in west LIttle Rock
3/5/17 4:38 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Thayer's Gull
3/5/17 4:02 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> RED CROSSBILLS NEAR SHORES LAKE, OZARK NF
3/5/17 2:42 pm Chuck Bartels <cbartels...> Cedar waxwings in west LIttle Rock
3/5/17 2:29 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/5/17 1:37 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/5/17 10:06 am Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...> AM Goldfinch numbers
3/4/17 7:02 pm Karen <ladyhawke1...> Henslow's Sparrows-new site
3/4/17 5:52 pm Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/4/17 2:53 pm Gmail <butchchq8...> Migration radar site
3/4/17 2:33 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/4/17 12:39 pm Stacy Clanton <sclanton...> Re: Goldfinch counting
3/4/17 12:14 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> NESTING GREAT HORNED OWL THERMOREGULATING AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
3/4/17 10:49 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Goldfinch counting
3/4/17 8:33 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Goldfinch counting
3/4/17 8:18 am Kara K Beach <islippednfell...> Conservation and Lead
3/4/17 8:17 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Lead
3/4/17 8:15 am Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/4/17 7:32 am Than Boves <tboves...> Re: Lead
3/4/17 7:28 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Goldfinch counting
3/4/17 7:17 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: lead ammo
3/4/17 6:59 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird
3/4/17 6:13 am Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/4/17 6:10 am Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/4/17 6:09 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> lead ammo
3/4/17 5:41 am Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/4/17 4:52 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> NWAAS field trip to Shores Lake-Fern, Ozark NF, March 18
3/3/17 10:39 pm bill . <billwx...> Re: Lead
3/3/17 8:16 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 8:14 pm Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 8:09 pm Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 7:25 pm Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> Lead
3/3/17 6:43 pm Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 6:17 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 6:09 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 5:22 pm Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 2:38 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 12:53 pm jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 9:51 am Dan Scheiman <birddan...> Kansas Ornithological Society Meeting, May 5-7
3/3/17 9:51 am Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Upcoming Field Trips
3/3/17 9:16 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Does anyone know how to deal with this?
3/3/17 6:32 am Mark Glenshaw <mglenshaw...> No Sighting, Great Horned Owl Lecture, Joplin, MO, Thursday, March 9
3/2/17 4:44 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: [Non-DoD Source] Link to Pdf
3/2/17 9:59 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> posting for Karen Rowe Fwd: CWD
3/2/17 9:17 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Re: Prions in Deer and effects on vultures, eagles, humans?
3/2/17 8:35 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Prions in Deer and effects on vultures, eagles, humans?
3/2/17 8:05 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: typo
3/2/17 7:13 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> typo
3/2/17 7:08 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> CWD public meeting
3/1/17 11:45 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> W-b NUTHATCHES EXCAVATING NEST IN DEVIL’S DEN SP
2/28/17 12:15 pm <lauralea1959...> <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Red breasted nuthatch
2/28/17 8:07 am David Oakley <gdosr...> Re: Presentation in Fayetteville this weekend
2/27/17 8:13 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Leucistic Shoveler
2/27/17 7:36 pm JFR <johnfredman...> GREAT HORNED OWL WITH SHADOW
2/27/17 7:05 pm Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> Presentation in Fayetteville this weekend
2/27/17 3:12 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> For those who care about hummingbirds
2/27/17 3:11 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Re: Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
2/27/17 3:06 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: BLACK VULTURES STARTING TO NEST IN OZARKS
2/27/17 2:32 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BLACK VULTURES STARTING TO NEST IN OZARKS
2/27/17 2:26 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
2/27/17 1:50 pm Alan <quattro...> orange crowned warbler
2/27/17 1:06 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Re: Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
2/27/17 11:20 am Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> Re: Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
2/27/17 10:36 am Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> eagles
2/27/17 8:59 am Barry Haas <bhaas...> Sandhill Cranes & Fork-tailed Flycatchers
2/27/17 7:30 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
2/26/17 2:52 pm swamp_fox <swamp_fox...> Sandhill Cranes
2/26/17 2:42 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Migratory Bird Phenology in a Changing Climate
2/26/17 11:09 am Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: FISH CROW “SPRING” ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS
2/26/17 6:00 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> HARVEY’S BUTTERCUP TO AMERICAN WOODCOCK: They don’t make better Saturdays
2/25/17 2:04 pm Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> Woodcock!
2/24/17 8:59 pm Than Boves <tboves...> Shrikes building nests already in Craighead Cty
2/24/17 8:21 pm Michael <mplinz...> Re: SW Arkansas
2/24/17 8:11 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> SW Arkansas
2/24/17 2:55 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> Southeast Ariz guide -finished
2/24/17 2:11 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> Re: FISH CROW “SPRING” ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS
2/24/17 2:04 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...> "Finding Birds in Southeast Arizona" extra copy
2/24/17 1:46 pm Charles Anderson <cmanderson...> Re: Cedar Waxwings
2/24/17 11:40 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Samsung phone lost at Woolsey Wet Prairie Sanctuary
2/24/17 7:56 am Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> Re: Cedar Waxwings
2/24/17 7:30 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Summary of North American Bird Conservation Initiative meeting 8-9 Feb 17
2/24/17 6:31 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Cedar Waxwings
 
Back to top
Date: 3/26/17 7:36 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Belize AAST fund-raiser trip
That was great that your tour raised funds for such a good cause, Kannan.
If only thousands more causes for birds and wildlife conservation could
receive real funding that makes a real difference. All over the country and
around the world.
Congratulations to you and your friends!

Bill Thurman
On Mar 26, 2017 9:12 AM, "Ragupathy Kannan" <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> With an all-time high of 261 species, the March 2017 tour was a great
> success, thanks to a bunch of (almost) indefatigable birders. The tour
> raised $1,000 for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust's endowment.
>
> Highlights of the tour included great views of:
>
> 1. Agami Heron in Black Creek
> 2. Orange-breasted Falcons at nest in 1000-foot falls
> 3. a male Lovely Cotinga scoped at Mountain Pine Ridge
> 4. About 30 Jabirus in a Crooked Tree teeming with waterbirds, and,
> 5. a personal favorite, a singing Northern Schiffornis in Blue Hole.
>
> Many thanks to my wonderful group for a fantastic week in the balmy
> tropics!
> Kannan
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/26/17 6:34 pm
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Subject: Yard Bird Dreaming: Rewarded
Amazingly, I was on the front porch with my Birds of Faulkner County,
Arkansas, Third Edition, 2006 (11 years ago! JOHNSON, JOHNSON, Mueller
and Raney) looking at arrival dates and wondering when I would find a
new land or yard bird. And listening for new arrivals (I still haven't
heard a Gnatcatcher yet?) with my wife. The last new yard bird was the
Wood Thrush last fall. Rarities and habitat limited birds are mainly
what I have not seen here. And a slew of flyover ducks or flyover
shorebirds. I mean, no Pintail is going to land here in my trees or my
shallow hardwood swamp. And it is not a good time to watch for flyover
ducks.

Anyway, I was pointing out sounds to my wife (Hermit Thrush wheeets but
no singing) when I thought I heard a Killdeer flying overhead. They nest
in the fields just to the east of my mailbox. But I stepped out to see
it and something didn't sound quite right. The only thing in the sky was
a raptor, circling, and my mind said Sharp-shin which I am not sure I
have ever heard make a sound after I thought about it. My binoculars
were right there. So I grabbed them and watched a Merlin in circling
flight break and head southward. It kept making that repeated
vocalization. Bird number 149. It has been recorded for this week in
March in the county. But I had not seen one since last year. And it was
certainly not over my house.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR
 

Back to top
Date: 3/26/17 7:12 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Belize AAST fund-raiser trip
With an all-time high of 261 species, the March 2017 tour was a great success, thanks to a bunch of (almost) indefatigable birders. The tour raised $1,000 for the Arkansas Audubon Society Trust's endowment. 
Highlights of the tour included great views of:
1. Agami Heron in Black Creek2. Orange-breasted Falcons at nest in 1000-foot falls3. a male Lovely Cotinga scoped at Mountain Pine Ridge4. About 30 Jabirus in a Crooked Tree teeming with waterbirds, and, 5. a personal favorite, a singing Northern Schiffornis in Blue Hole.  
Many thanks to my wonderful group for a fantastic week in the balmy tropics!Kannan
 

Back to top
Date: 3/26/17 5:40 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVERS
American Golden-Plovers (108) were spread over a wet pasture just west of Northwest Arkansas Regional airport yesterday. Between there and the state fish hatchery in Centerton, we also saw Killdeer, Greater Yellowlegs, Lesser Yellowlegs, Pectoral Sandpiper, and Wilsons Snipe. We also picked up Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, a few other duck species, and a flock of Great-tailed Grackles (~50) at Vaughn dairy farms.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/17 6:40 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: In the Ozarks
Warblers are back in the Ozarks. Black-throated Greens were everywhere
today as we birded and shot waterfalls east of White Rock Mountain.
Yesterday it was Louisiana Waterthrush, Northern Parula, Black and White
Warbler, and Yellow-throated Warbler along Shepherd's Springs Rd in
Crawford County.

Sandy B.

 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/17 3:47 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: New field trip binoculars
Very nice!
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 25, 2017, at 5:29 PM, Karen <ladyhawke1...> wrote:
>
> I forgot to mention in my field trip report that the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas recently voted to purchase binoculars to have available on ASCA field trips for participants who don't own binoculars. A lack of binoculars has especially been a problem when college students join our trips. Thanks to ASCA's generosity and Eagle Optics providing a very nice discount, I now have four pair of excellent Eagle Optics binoculars to loan out during trips. At today's field trip, two of our participants thoroughly enjoyed the use of our new loaner bins. Thank you ASCA!
> Karen Holliday
> ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
> Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/17 3:29 pm
From: Karen <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: New field trip binoculars
I forgot to mention in my field trip report that the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas recently voted to purchase binoculars to have available on ASCA field trips for participants who don't own binoculars. A lack of binoculars has especially been a problem when college students join our trips. Thanks to ASCA's generosity and Eagle Optics providing a very nice discount, I now have four pair of excellent Eagle Optics binoculars to loan out during trips. At today's field trip, two of our participants thoroughly enjoyed the use of our new loaner bins. Thank you ASCA!
Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/17 2:00 pm
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Logoly State Park Birding
This morning, I led a birding workshop at Logoly State Park. I had 3
attendees and we found a good mixture of residents and new arrivals. We
walked our main road which is a pine-deciduous mixed forest. We all got
good looks at White-eyed Vireos. We called in a Black-and-white Warbler
and a Ruby-crowned Kinglet to get decent views of them. We got a scope on
a First of Year *Great Crested Flycatcher *(early by about 2 weeks). We
rejoiced at such a lovely bird. There was a FOY Hooded Warbler singing
from the understory. This guy didn't seem too keen on such jubilation, but
a beautiful song of "wheetee wheetee wheetee-oh" was given, nonetheless.
Near the end of our outing we started hearing more and more Blue-gray
Gnatcatchers and Yellow-throated Vireos. A Pileated Woodpecker made a
flyby, much to everyone's amazement, and male-female duet of Red-bellied
Woodpeckers circled a white oak in the parking lot.

It was a beautiful morning for birding and we tallied 26 species altogether.

Devin Moon
Logoly State Park, McNeil, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/17 1:59 pm
From: Karen <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Bald Knob Field Trip Sarurday
Twenty-six birders joined the ASCA field trip to the Bald Knob NWR Saturday morning. Cool and very windy conditions made it a bit challenging to scan for shorebirds through jiggling scopes. Everything was very muddy due to the heavy rains the night before. We were lucky the rain had ended before we got to the refuge. We had good numbers of ducks with a nice mix of Gadwalls and Shovelers, Coots, a lot of Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal, two Buffleheads, and one Pintail. Best shorebirds were the 20+ American Golden Plovers and 5 Black-necked Stilts. Other shorebirds included Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Pectoral, Least, and Solitary Sandpipers, plus a few Snipe. A Bald Eagle, 40+ American White Pelicans, and a Northern Harrier were also spotted.

It was birdy at the refuge headquarters' building. We saw or heard Field, Song, and Savannah Sparrows, Bluebirds, Brown Thrasher, Meadowlarks, Flicker, Carolina Wren, and a Cardinal.

A very hefty Cottonmouth was curled up on a leafy bush at the edge of one pond towards the end of the morning. It was very close to where we were stopped. We admired it from a respectful distance until it decided we were annoying and slid off into the water. By noon the wind had increased significantly, so most birders gave up and headed for home.

Note--The storms Friday night knocked out power to the area of the town of Bald Knob closest to the Hwy. 67/167 freeway. The McDonald's at the main Bald Knob exit was hit hardest and it's giant Golden Arches sign had blown down and had taken the big power lines down with it. Traffic on the freeway was blocked and was being re-routed around Bald Knob, creating quite a big traffic backup. We also saw significant damage to trees and buildings in the area of the main exit at Beebe when we stopped to pick up one of our group.
Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/17 1:35 pm
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Subject: Subtle shiftings
This past three days the Dogwoods have emerged into their scattered
whitenesses. This is the time of year when they are brief royalty, the
landing zones of Tigers, likely visible from passing aircraft.

The wind makes sea noises in all the trees. The creek speaks louder
after last evenings passing storms.

The Juncos out front have thinned out. And I find myself wishing them
gone, fleeting them towards Ottawa and Minnetonka. One must be careful
of urging things on too quickly, even subconsciously. And this morning
the first male Ruby-throat arrived, looking none the lesser after his
salt water crossing.

My Blue Jays have chosen a tree fork finally. A few days ago, what I
presume was the male placed a light piece of something in another fork.
In a few minutes it blew out in the wind and drifted down somewhere in
the yard like a feather. I could not find it in my leaves. I looked. But
now they are weaving oak branches in another nearby fork. I tried to
estimate how many forkings I have in just my back yard. I decided on
thousands. The male brings the female new twigs and she takes them and
inserts them in some plan she has or doesn’t have, turning about with
that white trimmed tail in the air. It is magic really and looks
fragile. I am amazed its filigreed tatters didn’t blow out in the
blusters last night.

Thinking of thrushes, I hear one across the creek. It is too early for
Swainson’s to arrive. And this one, when the wind dies down reveals
itself to be a Hermit Thrush doing its full phrasing calls. I get up and
walk down to the corner of the back fence, wanting to get as close as I
can. There is a brief time in Arkansas in April when one could
conceivably hear five different thrushes singing. I have never managed
more than three in one day. The Veery is the troublesome one, and you
must catch a Hermit in the mood to sing. I think Veery prefer richer
more isolated woods than I have. I have never heard one on my personal
patch.

I sit by my swamp at one point, just because it looked so quiet. The
water already tea colored and emergent with the first Carex rushes. I
watch Green Darners wend the water and tussle in aerial territories.
Above my red chair the Goldfinches sing their full song. The
Ruby-crowned Kinglets sing their full song. The Goldfinches appear to be
eating the new winged elm seeds. I hear also the full song of the
remaining Purple Finches over in the yard. A Red-bellied Woodpecker
reveals its nest hole in a dead sweetgum spire over the water. The
entrance is horizontally elongate. The male disappears inside
periodically making his slight coughing call. I never see the female.
But the red on the males head and nape has a sheen of reflection, a new
kind of red. I will keep an eye on him.

On and off all day I hear waxwings. And on the back deck I search for
them and finally find a good sized group west of me in the biggest
hickory I have on the land. I put the scope on them and find amazingly
that they are eating the emergent greenery of the hickory like it is
salad. The buds look mostly like they have erupted into a sexual
vegetation. A few weeks ago the waxies were mobbing the cedar berries
and the privet berries. Now this seems the king of food choices and must
be only a few days old. The group builds to over two hundred birds. And
then I go out to the drive in front of the garage and stare up into this
eighty foot hickory. The lowest buds I see are at twenty feet or so. I
get out my largest of the three free standing garage ladders and prop it
precariously upwards and get my limb trimming tool with its extended
arm. I reach with some wobbly difficulty and trim off a single twig tip
which flutters down to my leaf litter. I climb down and find that it is
indeed almost all sexual except the very tip, which is just tiny
emerging leaves. It is branching and dense, not like catkins on an oak,
but related somehow. I don’t know the official name of this structure on
a hickory. It smells slightly like broccoli and I pop some in my mouth.
It is very tender and has only a slight finishing tang of hickoriness.
It must be an extremely rich food. Steamed a bit with a little dressing,
it might be fine. In a pinch, lost in the woods in late March it might
save someone, as long as you managed to get lost with a twenty foot
ladder and a trimming tool.

The owls nesting west of the swamp let loose randomly during the recent
days with their wild discussions. I still think I hear four of them. I
can’t tell in the all the wild whoops if it is mostly joy or agitation.
Possible both: joyous agitation. My parliament of Barreds proclaiming
among themselves: “We are owls. We are together. It is spring.”

You know, just the important stuff.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR

http://www.hr-rna.com/RNA/


 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/17 10:44 am
From: jamesdixonlr <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Very light hawk


Just saw an interesting raptor flying over West Little Rock. It had dark wrist patches like a rough-legged hawk but the body was almost solid white. The tail might have had slight reddish color and I'm assuming it was a Red-tailed Hawk. But most hawks including the red-tail do not have the dark wrist patch. There was no belly band.


Jim Dixon Sent from my Samsung Galaxy S5
 

Back to top
Date: 3/25/17 8:48 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Mockingbird bullies
I have a holly tree in my yard that grows lots of red holly berries.  For the first couple of years we lived in our house, in late winter/early spring, the Cedar Waxwings would swarm the tree and eat all the berries in a few hours then fly away.  The last 3 years though, a pair of Mockingbirds have claimed the holly tree and will not allow the waxwings to come eat the berries.  Eventually the berries just rot and fall off the tree.  The mockingbirds have actually claimed my whole front yard and keep all birds chased out of all my trees and bushes.
I have a couple bird feeders in my back yard, they only have sunflower seeds in them.  The mockingbirds don't seem to care about the feeders and leave the birds alone that come to feed there.  But, the feeders are near a small oak tree, where the birds sit while waiting their turn at the feeders.  This winter, the mockingbirds have claimed the oak tree and keep the birds chased out of it.  This is a concern, because last year I planted a crab apple tree, and this year I planted a tart cherry tree.  Both were planted for the enjoyment of the birds.  But, if the mockingbirds are going to keep the rest of the birds chased away, I might as well take the trees out.
Has anybody else had this problem?  How do I convince the mocking birds to just go away?  Don't get me wrong, I really enjoy watching the mockingbirds, but I want to see other birds as well.  It is my understanding that mockingbirds are protected, so I don't think I can shoot them (not what I would really want to), and I think it is illegal too disturb a songbird's nest, so I can't knock their nests down.  Are there any solutions for bully mockingbirds?
Thanks,Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 7:07 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Does Tragedy 'count'?
So...if the vehicle is an aircraft, the "something" else is a birdstrike. If the birdstrike occurs over an airfield and the remains are collected they can be identified. If all that is left is a bloody spot--or "snarge"--then the bird can sometimes be identified to species or at least family based on the unique characteristics of the embedded feather fragements, or nowadays using DNA comparisons.

Thanks to the staff of the Smithsonian, the feather experts in various countries, diligent groundcrews and aircrews, Federal agencies, commercial airlines, and taxpayers, many hundreds of birdstrikes are identified each year. This helps fine-tune the wildlife hazard prevention efforts on our airfields and saves resources and treasure every day.

Applied biology works for us all, even Air Force One. Dance with the one that brung-ya: biology.

Jeff Short


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2017 11:53 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Does Tragedy 'count'?

So...

Say one is driving down the road when a bird flies in front of the vehicle. The driver sees the bird and can tell roughly what genus it is, but doesn't have time to make a clear identification or an adequate swerve or stop before the bird finds its way into the vehicle's grill (or windshield). After stopping, the unfortunate avian is clearly identified.

Does that "count" for one's life list? Or is it considered...something else?

I know this is a weird question but this time of year things can happen.

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co being careful with cars)
 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 6:33 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Broad-billed Hummingbird-Oklahoma
Not in Arkansas, but definitely within driving distance, especially for those in the NW corner of Arkansas.  I thought some of you might be interested in viewing this bird   A Broad-billed Hummingbird has been visiting a feeder at the Nature Center located at Eufaula State Park.  The Nature Center is open from 9-4 Tues.-Sat.  The hummingbird feeder is in front of the nature center and the park never closes, so you don't have to go while the center is open. I have a screenshot of the report with a photo of anyone wants to see it.  Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.   

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 3:47 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
Oops, sorry I meant ruby-throated hummingbird. 

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Fri, Mar 24, 2017 at 5:40 PM, Jonathan Perry<jonathanperry24...> wrote: Sorry, help me out.  What's "RTHU"?

Sent from my iPad
On Mar 24, 2017, at 5:38 PM, Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> wrote:


Dog-goned Spellcheck...RTHU!  Sorry! Take Care,Tom Harden

From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2017 5:33 PM
Subject: Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR

Who's Ruth?

Sent from my iPad
On Mar 24, 2017, at 5:11 PM, Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> wrote:


 Take Care,Tom Harden





 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 3:43 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR

Red-throated hummingbird.
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Fri, Mar 24, 2017 at 5:40 PM, Jonathan Perry<jonathanperry24...> wrote: Sorry, help me out.  What's "RTHU"?

Sent from my iPad
On Mar 24, 2017, at 5:38 PM, Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> wrote:


Dog-goned Spellcheck...RTHU!  Sorry! Take Care,Tom Harden

From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2017 5:33 PM
Subject: Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR

Who's Ruth?

Sent from my iPad
On Mar 24, 2017, at 5:11 PM, Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> wrote:


 Take Care,Tom Harden





 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 3:40 pm
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
Sorry, help me out. What's "RTHU"?

Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 24, 2017, at 5:38 PM, Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> wrote:
>
> Dog-goned Spellcheck...RTHU! Sorry!
>
> Take Care,
> Tom Harden
>
>
> From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Friday, March 24, 2017 5:33 PM
> Subject: Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
>
> Who's Ruth?
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Mar 24, 2017, at 5:11 PM, Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Take Care,
>> Tom Harden
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 3:38 pm
From: Tom Harden <ltcnukem...>
Subject: Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
Dog-goned Spellcheck...RTHU!  Sorry! Take Care,Tom Harden

From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Friday, March 24, 2017 5:33 PM
Subject: Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR

Who's Ruth?

Sent from my iPad
On Mar 24, 2017, at 5:11 PM, Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> wrote:


 Take Care,Tom Harden



 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 3:33 pm
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
Who's Ruth?

Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 24, 2017, at 5:11 PM, Tom Harden <ltcnukem...> wrote:
>
>
> Take Care,
> Tom Harden

 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 3:18 pm
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Common Loons Lake Maumelle
Got so excited to see breeding plumage I sent too quick. Coolest part was I caught pics of a male 30 feet away off Loon Point. Never saw them there except 100 miles out in the water. Wind helped.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Fri, Mar 24, 2017 at 5:15 PM, <lauralea1959...><000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Powered by Cricket Wireless

 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 3:15 pm
From: <lauralea1959...> <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Common Loons Lake Maumelle


Powered by Cricket Wireless
 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 3:11 pm
From: Tom Harden <ltcnukem...>
Subject: FOS RUTH in Benton, AR
 Take Care,Tom Harden
 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 2:04 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Reception at UACCM
The University of Arkansas Community College in Morrilton is hosting an
art exhibit in the college library inspired by endangered and threatened
species from now until some time in April. There will be a reception
for this exhibit Tuesday 28 March from 12noon until 1:30pm. Kitty
Harvill and Christoph Hrdina will be the guest speakers.

The exhibit features a number of works from the group "Artists and
Biologists United for Nature" (ABUN) which was founded by Harvill and
Hrdina to engage artists in efforts to raise awareness about endangered
species and promote efforts to protect and restore necessary habitat for
these species. As you might imagine, a number of the species featured
are birds from various parts of the world. Harvill and Hrdina live and
work in Brazil promoting sustainable agriculture and re-forestation.
They have some impressive credentials and experience and their
presentation promises to be quite interesting and enlightening.

Artists in Our Midst, a local artists group, helped organize this
exhibit. 43 works were received, 25 of which are on display at the
UACCM library. The additional 18 works are on display at the Morrilton
Area Chamber of Commerce at 112 E. Broadway in downtown Morrilton. If
you come to see the show, be sure to stop by the Chamber and view the
additional works.

Hope to see you on Tuesday!

George (n. Conway Co just me, the birds and Art)
 

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Date: 3/24/17 1:01 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Seeing Birds Help People Destress
Some insight into birds benefits to people.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

http://wildlife.org/seeing-birds-can-help-people-de-stress/

 

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Date: 3/24/17 10:44 am
From: Karen <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Field Trip Sill On
Tomorrow, Saturday, is the ASCA field trip to Bald Knob. It is still a go in spite of the rain predicted. It may still be raining when we meet at the Other Center in North Little Rock, but should be almost past us soon after we get to Bald Knob. The temperature will hover around 60 degrees and it will be breezy. Tonight, a line of storms will move through during the night, which will hopefully set the birds down and we'll get some interesting migrating shorebirds. Bring rain gear and shoes that will stay dry. Terry Butler birded Bald Knob earlier this week and reported a nice mix of ducks, shorebirds, herons, raptors, and Pelicans. See below for the field trip details.
Karen Holliday
ASCA Field Trip Coordinator

> This Saturday, March 25th is the field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA). See details below. Anyone who likes birds is welcome. You don't have to be an ASCA member. For more information about ASCA, go to our website at www.ascabird.org. If you have questions about the field trip, feel free to contact me off list.
> Karen Holliday
> ASCA Field Trip Coordinator
> Little Rock
>
> March 25, 2017
> Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge
> Bald Knob, White Co.
> Meet at 7:30 a.m. in North Little Rock on the east side of the Other Center parking lot behind McDonald’s. The Other Center is located across from McCain Mall, on McCain Blvd. Take Exit 1 West, off Hwy. 67/167. We’ll arrive at the Bald Knob NWR around 8:45 a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road. The refuge is also a National Audubon Important Bird Area (IBA). Target birds will be lingering ducks and early-arriving shorebirds, herons, egrets, and night-herons. Very little walking will be involved. If you have a scope, bring it. Bring water, snacks or lunch. There is no bathroom on-site. There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 at the Bald Knob Exit 55. Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for driving directions and more information about the refuge. GPS Coordinates: 35.260233, -91.571903
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 7:10 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Does Tragedy 'count'?
The specimen was alive when spotted.  Just because the bird is now expired doesn't negate the fact that a live specimen was spotted in that area, on that date. That is just like, if I spot a wood duck and after observing it for 20 minutes, it flies away only to be shot by a hunter a 100 yards down stream.  It doesn't do away with the fact there was a live wood duck to be reported.
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Fri, Mar 24, 2017 at 9:00 AM, Don Simons<Don.Simons...> wrote: If you follow ABA rules, no. The bird must be alive and free. Otherwise you could count passenger pigeons in a museum.

However, for data collecting purposes, I add window strikes for our records. A few species are on our checklist only through specimens found dead.

Don

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2017 11:53 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Does Tragedy 'count'?

So...

Say one is driving down the road when a bird flies in front of the vehicle.  The driver sees the bird and can tell roughly what genus it is, but doesn't have time to make a clear identification or an adequate swerve or stop before the bird finds its way into the vehicle's grill (or windshield).  After stopping, the unfortunate avian is clearly identified.

Does that "count" for one's life list?  Or is it considered...something else?

I know this is a weird question but this time of year things can happen.

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co being careful with cars)


 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 7:00 am
From: Don Simons <Don.Simons...>
Subject: Re: Does Tragedy 'count'?
If you follow ABA rules, no. The bird must be alive and free. Otherwise you could count passenger pigeons in a museum.

However, for data collecting purposes, I add window strikes for our records. A few species are on our checklist only through specimens found dead.

Don

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of George R. Hoelzeman
Sent: Thursday, March 23, 2017 11:53 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Does Tragedy 'count'?

So...

Say one is driving down the road when a bird flies in front of the vehicle. The driver sees the bird and can tell roughly what genus it is, but doesn't have time to make a clear identification or an adequate swerve or stop before the bird finds its way into the vehicle's grill (or windshield). After stopping, the unfortunate avian is clearly identified.

Does that "count" for one's life list? Or is it considered...something else?

I know this is a weird question but this time of year things can happen.

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co being careful with cars)
 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 5:59 am
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Does Tragedy 'count'?
So...

Say one is driving down the road when a bird flies in front of the
vehicle. The driver sees the bird and can tell roughly what genus it
is, but doesn't have time to make a clear identification or an adequate
swerve or stop before the bird finds its way into the vehicle's grill
(or windshield). After stopping, the unfortunate avian is clearly
identified.

Does that "count" for one's life list? Or is it considered...something
else?

I know this is a weird question but this time of year things can happen.

Thanks

George (n. Conway Co being careful with cars)
 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 5:48 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Migration maps
For those interested in such things, this animated map shows a lot of avian movement in the southeast last night as birds took advantage of the strong southern breezes. There was little to no movement behind the weather fronts. The little blue "explosions" on the map are birds taking flight picked up by radar.

Pretty amazing view.

http://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/2017-3-23/

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville
 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 5:45 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: TREE SWALLOWS AT BEAVER LAKE NURSERY POND BOXES
Tree Swallows were busily investigating nesting boxes yesterday around Beaver Lake Nursery pond east of Rogers, a warm sunny day with flying insects. At least 15 birds perched in a small leafless shrub out in the pond. Others were busy at boxes perched on top, looking into cavities, going inside, flying low and around the boxes in groups of 3-4. My estimate: 30-40 Tree Swallows.



Tree Swallows winter from our Gulf coast down through Mexico into northern Central America. We occasionally see birds in northwest Arkansas by late February and early March. They become more numerous with spring warm ups and the initial spring flush of flying insects.



All of yesterdays birds wore immaculate, intense blue-grey feathers on back, but with Tree Swallows it is difficult and often impossible to separate males and females. According to Cornells Birds of North America, Males usually arrive and defend nest cavity up to several days prior to female arrival but sexes may occasionally arrive simultaneously. It is thought that pairing begins as soon as females arrive on breeding grounds however, patterns of pair association are difficult to follow through repeated absences from vicinity of nest-boxes occasioned by unpredictably cold spring weather. Females may continue to visit other males after initial pairing for one to several days



The Nursery Pond is a joint wildlife management project involving the Corps of Engineers with fish production by Arkansas Game and Fish. Boxes around the top of the dam are maintained by Northwest Master Naturalists. Besides swallows, these boxes are used by Eastern Bluebirds and Prothonotary Warblers. Canada Geese (2), Great Blue Herons (2), Mallards (16), Wood Ducks (4), and Blue-winged Teal (6) were present yesterday. Adjacent Shortleaf Pines featured singing by Pine Warblers and Yellow-throated Warblers.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/24/17 5:37 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Black-throated Gray Warbler, Hot Springs Village
I am going to suggest a highly melanistic Black-and-White Warbler (BAWW) instead. The key being the comment "watched him for five minutes climbing on tree trunks" given by the observer. All of the sources I looked through clearly mentioned this trait for BAWW and never mention it for Black-throated Grays (BTYW). In fact, Pete Dunne in his Field Guide Companion notes that that behavior is a key difference between them as BTYW look and act like warblers as they hop and flutter on outer twigs and should not be confused with BAWW, which concentrate on the inner portion of the tree and act more similar to a nuthatch by climbing on trunks (p. 558).

Just my two cents...

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR


> On Mar 23, 2017, at 22:44, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
> A second state record BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER was photographed on the Magellan Beaver Dam Trail in Hot Springs Village on March 13 by Laurie Clemens. This submitted the photo under “passerine sp.” with a note about thinking it was a Black-and-white Warbler but not being sure. Some other eBird user out there flagged the photo (which sends it to my review queue) with a note that the bird is a Blackpoll Warbler. The face and flank stripes say otherwise, and I think I see the yellow lore. See for yourself.
>
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35163201
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 8:55 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Warbler Redux
On second thought I take back what I said. This is a Black-and-white
Warbler. I misjudged the viewing angle and posture of the bird and got
overly excited. I can see how the stripes match a Black-and-white Warbler,
and the pattern on the back is telling. Sorry about that.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 8:45 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Black-throated Gray Warbler, Hot Springs Village
A second state record BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER was photographed on the
Magellan Beaver Dam Trail in Hot Springs Village on March 13 by Laurie
Clemens. This submitted the photo under passerine sp. with a note about
thinking it was a Black-and-white Warbler but not being sure. Some other
eBird user out there flagged the photo (which sends it to my review queue)
with a note that the bird is a Blackpoll Warbler. The face and flank stripes
say otherwise, and I think I see the yellow lore. See for yourself.

http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35163201

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 7:57 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Buffalo National River an Arkansas IBA
Last week someone kindly posted a notice about the public comment period for the hog factory in the the Buffalo River Watershed.  They also included a request to write to the Governor asking him to do what he can to have this facility removed.
Unfortunately, the links provided for sending comment to the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality and for writing to the governor were incorrect.  The links below should work.   Thanks to Mary Ann King for writing to report the problems.
<robert.moery...>

<Water-Draft-Permit-Comment...>

Jack Stewart

 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 4:34 pm
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird
Got my first of season ruby-throat today at 6:30 PM in west Little Rock. Not my earliest but earlier than usual I think.

Jim Dixon
Little Rock
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after.” -- Thorin
 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 3:51 pm
From: data _null_; <datanull...>
Subject: FOS female hummingbird
Hopper, Montgomery Co

 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 2:59 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LOON MIGRATION AT BEAVER LAKE
Three Common Loons have been at Lake Fayetteville since at least March 17. These birds are all in some state of transition between plain winter browns to striking black-and-whites of breeding season. So I was quite pleased this morning when David Oakley and I saw at least 12 Common Loons on Beaver Lake, at the Prairie Creek boat ramp on highway 12. These birds are also all over the place from one that looks mostly winter brown, to others 98% to black-and-white, and all between. We had close views the flock began swimming towards us, enough so that David had to scramble back to the car for his camera and I was about to pass out from the excitement of loon fever. Besides these, there were a couple of Horned Grebes, including one transitioned to the mostly black of summer, with brilliant golden horns.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 2:57 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: FOS
Saw the first Northern Rough-winged Swallow today. I've been hearing them for a while but their calls were mixed with Phoebe chatter at nesting sites near bluffs, so it was good confirmation to hear and see one zooming across the yard today.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 1:04 pm
From: Kay <mcafeekay...>
Subject: DeGray Bird Count Cancelled
Due to lack of interest, the event scheduled at the Simonson Research Lab for this Saturday, March 25, has been cancelled. Please inform anyone you know who had planned to participate.

Thank you! - Kay McAfee

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 1:01 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Lake Degray Bird Survey Cancelation
I apologize for my typo in the header... Lake Degray!  My new phone likes to "correct" my spelling without my consent and Degray did not agree with it I suppose.  Donna

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Thu, Mar 23, 2017 at 2:56 PM, Donna Haynes<00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> wrote: Forwarding for those who were interested: 
Due to lack of interest, the bird inventory planned for this Saturday, March 25, at the Simonson Field Station at Lake DeGray has been cancelled. Please inform any friends who had planned to help in this project. Thank you!
Kim Roberts McAfee
Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.  

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 1:01 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Red thread
Lots of aerial, vocal Red-shouldered Hawk activity for the past couple
of weeks. Just now there were two vocal pairs in the immediate area.
One pair alighted in a tree and mated twice within a few minutes. One
bird from the other pair landed in a tree ~100 yards away. I didn't see
antagonistic behavior between the two pairs, and hope both have nests
nearby.

We've also had multiple visits from male and female hummingbirds.

This morning I had the rare (for me) treat of listening to a Purple
Finch sing just outside the kitchen door.

And it looks like there may be three pairs of Wood Ducks nesting at the
pond.

Birds with no red: Chickadees are using a newly mounted nest box, and
phoebes are rebuilding on a nest that they haven't used for at least 10
years. The place they'd moved to---on top of a hanging gourd under the
deck---proved untrustworthy and has been destroyed (by wind?) more than
once. It's good to see them back on a sturdy plank, safely tucked into
a corner.

The phoebes, at least, should be safe from two large rat snakes we've
seen this week. Life is good.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 12:56 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Lake Defray Bird Survey Cancelation
Forwarding for those who were interested: 
Due to lack of interest, the bird inventory planned for this Saturday, March 25, at the Simonson Field Station at Lake DeGray has been cancelled. Please inform any friends who had planned to help in this project. Thank you!
Kim Roberts McAfee
Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.  

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 12:26 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Please help us recruit 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls for this June's halberg Ecology Camp
Dear ARBIRDers,

We need your help! The Arkansas Audubon Society needs your help to recruit 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls for this June's Halberg Ecology Camp sessions. Campers get a sampling of seven disciplines, ornithology, mammalogy, aquatic biology, herpetology, entomology, geology and botany, during the Sunday to Friday sessions. A group of 8-10 first-year campers are taught by two instructors who work together in each class. It's intense, it's expensive and it works!

We only filled 77 of the 100 available first-year camper spots last June. That's 23 lost opportunities to teach youth about nature that we can never get back. Please be on the lookout for 11- and 12-year-old boys and girls who love nature, and who would be good applicants to attend camp this June. For families who can't afford the regular tuition we have available funds that can be used for scholarships and tuition assistance. Tuition for first-year campers is $325 versus our roughly $425 cost per camper.

The important thing is to get the families of nature loving youths to complete and submit applications.

Here's a link to a digital copy of the camp brochure you can share with others:

http://www.arbirds.org/camp16bro.pdf

And here's a digital copy of the single-page flyer used to recruit campers:



And finally, here's a digital copy of the 2017 application:



Feel free to share any of these materials with others willing to help recruit youth for this June's camp sessions. And please let me know if you have any questions about the Halberg Ecology Camp.

Barry


 

Back to top
Date: 3/23/17 5:55 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
Chan Robbins came to Fayetteville for the American Ornitholgists Union meeting in 1988. Doug James had asked me to help with meeting field trips. Chan went on my trip. If I remember correctly, he misidentified a small flycatcher -- I knew exactly what it was because I had scouted the trip beforehand. When I explained, he quickly agreed, a lesson in humility for all of us from a seminal figure in American ornithology. From that I learned to appreciate the many, many X 10 corrections I have received on field trips since that very memorable one. My motto from the AOU field trip: ALL CORRECTIONS APPRECIATED. Doug has always used Chan's Field Guide to Birds of North America in his ornithology classes because it is a fine book, but also because according to Doug it is the only one that really fits in your back pocket. Chan signed mine during the field trip.


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 8:12 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies

Thankful I met Chan Robbins at a Maryland OS meeting a few years ago. David Sibley was the keynote speaker. It was a humdinger of a meeting.

Sandy B.


On Wed, Mar 22, 2017 at 5:01 PM Jeffrey Short <bashman...><mailto:<bashman...>> wrote:
Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:<DODPIF-L...><mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 3:12 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...><mailto:<DODPIF-L...>
Subject: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies

For those of us who have been around the birding world for a few decades,
and who were lucky enough to meet Chan Robbins, news of his death brings
sadness but also a smile. In his 98 years on this earth, Chan really made
his mark in the world of ornithology... We are indebted to him for the
achievements he made.

OBITUARY
Pioneering federal ornithologist dies at 98
Dylan Brown, E&E News reporter
Published: Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Chandler Robbins
Renowned ornithologist Chandler Robbins. Photo by Barbara Dowell, courtesy
U.S. Geological Survey.

Legendary ornithologist Chandler Robbins, whose career as a federal
scientist spanned nearly eight decades and was the genesis of songbird
conservation, died Monday. He was 98.

When Robbins first arrived at the Patuxent Research Refuge just outside
Washington in 1943, studying birds usually meant shooting them. Robbins knew
a different way.

The Belmont, Mass., native was only a few years out of Harvard University,
where he had studied under Ludlow Griscom, an ornithology trailblazer who
pioneered studying birds by plumage and behavior.

Then, in 1946, Robbins was part of a team that began confronting DDT's
impact on birds. His colleague and editor, Rachel Carson, went on to use
that work in her 1962 book "Silent Spring," which helped give momentum to
the environmental movement.

The toxic pesticide was devastating songbirds, but Robbins quickly realized
that the federal government, fixated on game species, lacked any real data
on their populations, or the money to get it.

So Robbins spent the next five decades enlisting an army of amateur birders
across the country and Canada, after a bit of unsanctioned diplomacy. The
group is now known as the North American Breeding Bird Survey.

Robbins also pioneered banding birds to track them. In 1956, he banded a
Laysan albatross nicknamed Wisdom. In 2002, he replaced the band on the leg
of the world's oldest known banded bird.

Robbins remained a senior author of the "Field Guide to Birds of North
America" until his death. The National Audubon Society named him one of 100
Champions of Conservation of the 20th Century.

Jerome Ford, assistant director of the Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory
Bird Program, called Robbins the "dean" of bird conservation, whose legacy
will live on.

Robbins technically retired from the U.S. Geological Survey in 2005, but
continued to spent countless hours in his Patuxent office with a sign over
the door that read "Emeritus War Room."

Despite ornithology's progress, Robbins said, bird populations are still a
mystery in many ways. Species that are not endangered go understudied, and
habitat destruction and climate change take their toll.

"There are big changes taking place in our forests," he told E&E News in
2015 (Greenwire, Aug. 27, 2015).

Former colleague David Klinger summed up Robbins by "his worn-out old pair
of government binoculars." He called them "dented, heavy as lead and beat to
hell."

Klinger said, "I hope they go into a [FWS] museum someday. He could have
afforded the finest optics in the world, but he was comfortable with what he
had. His acuity of eye and ear exceeded the powers of mere physics."

Those eyes didn't get to see everything, even a lifetime after 11-year-old
"Chan" made his first list of birds, but Robbins just shrugged and laughed.

"I wouldn't want to burn that much gas just to see a California condor, but
if other people get to see them, I'm satisfied," he said.

Alison A. Dalsimer
Program Director
DoD Natural Resources
4800 Mark Center Drive
Suite 16G14, Box 56
Alexandria, VA 22350
Desk: 571-372-6893
<Allyn.a.dalsimer.civ...><mailto:<Allyn.a.dalsimer.civ...>
Alt: <DoDNatRes...><mailto:<DoDNatRes...>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 8:49 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Mar. 22
It was overcast, cool, and windy on the survey today. 77 species were
found. More migrants arriving every day. On my way home near Haworth I had
a FOS Scissor-tailed Flycatcher. Here is my list for today:



Wood Duck - 16

Gadwall - 27

Mallard - 3

Blue-winged Teal - 154

Northern Shoveler - 133

Green-winged Teal - 10

Ring-necked Duck - 18

Hooded Merganser - 18

Pied-billed Grebe - 8

Neotropic Cormorant - 4

Double-crested Cormorant - 72

Anhinga - 9

American Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 11

Great Egret - 9

Black Vulture - 1

Turkey Vulture - 11

Northern Harrier - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 3

King Rail - 3

Virginia Rail - 4

Common Gallinule - 5

American Coot - 420

American Golden-Plover - 1

Killdeer - 1

Greater Yellowlegs - 18

Lesser Yellowlegs - 5

Upland Sandpiper - 1

Pectoral Sandpiper - 16

Dowitcher species - 4

Wilson's Snipe - 23

Rock Pigeon - 1

Mourning Dove - 11

Belted Kingfisher - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 2

Pileated Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 4

Loggerhead Shrike - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 5

Blue Jay - 4

American Crow - 10

Fish Crow - 3

Tree Swallow - 27

Barn Swallow - 6

Carolina Chickadee - 4

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 7

Sedge Wren - 4

Marsh Wren - 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Hermit Thrush - 2

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 6

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 2

Black-and-white Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 2

Eastern Towhee - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 4

Song Sparrow - 4

Lincoln's Sparrow - 1

Swamp Sparrow - 4

White-throated Sparrow - 13

White-crowned Sparrow - 1

Northern Cardinal - 11

Red-winged Blackbird - 250

Eastern Meadowlark - 2

Meadowlark species - 17

Common Grackle - 12

Brown-headed Cowbird - 2

American Goldfinch - 1



Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Common Green Darner

Baskettail species

Common Whitetail





Herps:



American Alligator

Mississippi Mud Turtle

Spring Peepers - calling

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bullfrog



Other sightings:



Monarch butterfly







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 6:13 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
Thankful I met Chan Robbins at a Maryland OS meeting a few years ago.
David Sibley was the keynote speaker. It was a humdinger of a meeting.

Sandy B.


On Wed, Mar 22, 2017 at 5:01 PM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

> Jeff Short
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
> [mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
> ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
> Sent: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 3:12 PM
> To: <DODPIF-L...>
> Subject: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
>
> For those of us who have been around the birding world for a few decades,
> and who were lucky enough to meet Chan Robbins, news of his death brings
> sadness but also a smile. In his 98 years on this earth, Chan really made
> his mark in the world of ornithology... We are indebted to him for the
> achievements he made.
>
> OBITUARY
> Pioneering federal ornithologist dies at 98
> Dylan Brown, E&E News reporter
> Published: Wednesday, March 22, 2017
>
> Chandler Robbins
> Renowned ornithologist Chandler Robbins. Photo by Barbara Dowell, courtesy
> U.S. Geological Survey.
>
> Legendary ornithologist Chandler Robbins, whose career as a federal
> scientist spanned nearly eight decades and was the genesis of songbird
> conservation, died Monday. He was 98.
>
> When Robbins first arrived at the Patuxent Research Refuge just outside
> Washington in 1943, studying birds usually meant shooting them. Robbins
> knew
> a different way.
>
> The Belmont, Mass., native was only a few years out of Harvard University,
> where he had studied under Ludlow Griscom, an ornithology trailblazer who
> pioneered studying birds by plumage and behavior.
>
> Then, in 1946, Robbins was part of a team that began confronting DDT's
> impact on birds. His colleague and editor, Rachel Carson, went on to use
> that work in her 1962 book "Silent Spring," which helped give momentum to
> the environmental movement.
>
> The toxic pesticide was devastating songbirds, but Robbins quickly realized
> that the federal government, fixated on game species, lacked any real data
> on their populations, or the money to get it.
>
> So Robbins spent the next five decades enlisting an army of amateur birders
> across the country and Canada, after a bit of unsanctioned diplomacy. The
> group is now known as the North American Breeding Bird Survey.
>
> Robbins also pioneered banding birds to track them. In 1956, he banded a
> Laysan albatross nicknamed Wisdom. In 2002, he replaced the band on the leg
> of the world's oldest known banded bird.
>
> Robbins remained a senior author of the "Field Guide to Birds of North
> America" until his death. The National Audubon Society named him one of 100
> Champions of Conservation of the 20th Century.
>
> Jerome Ford, assistant director of the Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory
> Bird Program, called Robbins the "dean" of bird conservation, whose legacy
> will live on.
>
> Robbins technically retired from the U.S. Geological Survey in 2005, but
> continued to spent countless hours in his Patuxent office with a sign over
> the door that read "Emeritus War Room."
>
> Despite ornithology's progress, Robbins said, bird populations are still a
> mystery in many ways. Species that are not endangered go understudied, and
> habitat destruction and climate change take their toll.
>
> "There are big changes taking place in our forests," he told E&E News in
> 2015 (Greenwire, Aug. 27, 2015).
>
> Former colleague David Klinger summed up Robbins by "his worn-out old pair
> of government binoculars." He called them "dented, heavy as lead and beat
> to
> hell."
>
> Klinger said, "I hope they go into a [FWS] museum someday. He could have
> afforded the finest optics in the world, but he was comfortable with what
> he
> had. His acuity of eye and ear exceeded the powers of mere physics."
>
> Those eyes didn't get to see everything, even a lifetime after 11-year-old
> "Chan" made his first list of birds, but Robbins just shrugged and laughed.
>
> "I wouldn't want to burn that much gas just to see a California condor, but
> if other people get to see them, I'm satisfied," he said.
>
> Alison A. Dalsimer
> Program Director
> DoD Natural Resources
> 4800 Mark Center Drive
> Suite 16G14, Box 56
> Alexandria, VA 22350
> Desk: 571-372-6893
> <Allyn.a.dalsimer.civ...>
> Alt: <DoDNatRes...>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 4:57 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird
Have not seen since last Saturday morning. It was here 143 straight days.

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 4:55 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: LOONS SPECTACULAR AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
As I approached Mulhollan Blind on Lake Fayetteville today, I flushed first one, then two Hermit Thrushes. From inside the blind, I looked across the lake toward the Environmental Study Center and saw my friend Mike Mlodinow, with his binoculars and spotting scope. It looked like he was counting ducks in a raft and watching Common Loons (3) that are looking pretty spectacular same thing as me, on my side of the lake. My tally included: Wood Duck (1), Gadwall (30+), American Wigeon (2-4), Mallard (6), Northern Shoveler (5), Green-winged Teal (6), Lesser Scaup (10), and Ruddy Duck (4). I also saw American Coots (5). Two Pied-billed Grebes swam in front of the blind. Later, one of the Common Loons swam fairly close, too. Out on the lake, a swarm of Tree Swallows (50-100). I didnt see a Great Horned Owl on a nest that has been active since at least February 8.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 3:02 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies
Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight
[mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A
ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Wednesday, March 22, 2017 3:12 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: FW: Sad News: Chan Robbins dies

For those of us who have been around the birding world for a few decades,
and who were lucky enough to meet Chan Robbins, news of his death brings
sadness but also a smile. In his 98 years on this earth, Chan really made
his mark in the world of ornithology... We are indebted to him for the
achievements he made.

OBITUARY
Pioneering federal ornithologist dies at 98
Dylan Brown, E&E News reporter
Published: Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Chandler Robbins
Renowned ornithologist Chandler Robbins. Photo by Barbara Dowell, courtesy
U.S. Geological Survey.

Legendary ornithologist Chandler Robbins, whose career as a federal
scientist spanned nearly eight decades and was the genesis of songbird
conservation, died Monday. He was 98.

When Robbins first arrived at the Patuxent Research Refuge just outside
Washington in 1943, studying birds usually meant shooting them. Robbins knew
a different way.

The Belmont, Mass., native was only a few years out of Harvard University,
where he had studied under Ludlow Griscom, an ornithology trailblazer who
pioneered studying birds by plumage and behavior.

Then, in 1946, Robbins was part of a team that began confronting DDT's
impact on birds. His colleague and editor, Rachel Carson, went on to use
that work in her 1962 book "Silent Spring," which helped give momentum to
the environmental movement.

The toxic pesticide was devastating songbirds, but Robbins quickly realized
that the federal government, fixated on game species, lacked any real data
on their populations, or the money to get it.

So Robbins spent the next five decades enlisting an army of amateur birders
across the country and Canada, after a bit of unsanctioned diplomacy. The
group is now known as the North American Breeding Bird Survey.

Robbins also pioneered banding birds to track them. In 1956, he banded a
Laysan albatross nicknamed Wisdom. In 2002, he replaced the band on the leg
of the world's oldest known banded bird.

Robbins remained a senior author of the "Field Guide to Birds of North
America" until his death. The National Audubon Society named him one of 100
Champions of Conservation of the 20th Century.

Jerome Ford, assistant director of the Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory
Bird Program, called Robbins the "dean" of bird conservation, whose legacy
will live on.

Robbins technically retired from the U.S. Geological Survey in 2005, but
continued to spent countless hours in his Patuxent office with a sign over
the door that read "Emeritus War Room."

Despite ornithology's progress, Robbins said, bird populations are still a
mystery in many ways. Species that are not endangered go understudied, and
habitat destruction and climate change take their toll.

"There are big changes taking place in our forests," he told E&E News in
2015 (Greenwire, Aug. 27, 2015).

Former colleague David Klinger summed up Robbins by "his worn-out old pair
of government binoculars." He called them "dented, heavy as lead and beat to
hell."

Klinger said, "I hope they go into a [FWS] museum someday. He could have
afforded the finest optics in the world, but he was comfortable with what he
had. His acuity of eye and ear exceeded the powers of mere physics."

Those eyes didn't get to see everything, even a lifetime after 11-year-old
"Chan" made his first list of birds, but Robbins just shrugged and laughed.

"I wouldn't want to burn that much gas just to see a California condor, but
if other people get to see them, I'm satisfied," he said.

Alison A. Dalsimer
Program Director
DoD Natural Resources
4800 Mark Center Drive
Suite 16G14, Box 56
Alexandria, VA 22350
Desk: 571-372-6893
<Allyn.a.dalsimer.civ...>
Alt: <DoDNatRes...>
 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 2:46 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Subject: The Snipe is now Online
For those interested…the latest issue of The Snipe has been posted to the ASCA website at: http://wp.ascabird.org/?p=1734

Dottie Boyles
Newsletter Editor
Audubon Society of Central Arkansas
Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 2:27 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Female hummer(s)
Our neighbor, and then we, just had visits from a female
hummer---whether the same one, or two different birds, I know not. :)

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 12:44 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbirds
A male Ruby-throated hummingbird arrived at my feeders at 2:30 PM today. In looking at the migration map they are already as far north as Harrison, AR, Oklahoma City and Tulsa. I hope you have your feeders out.


http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs
 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 10:50 am
From: J J lun <dovekie123...>
Subject: Inca Dove at Feeder
Guy saw an Inca Dove at our feeder at 11am today.


Joan Luneau

Sherwood, Arkansas

 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 10:09 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Enhanced Newsletter
Enhanced is the word, Lyndal.  Thanks to you and Samantha Scheiman whose name I don' see anywhere in the document as Editor.

Jack StewartNewton County

On Tuesday, March 21, 2017 2:45 PM, Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> wrote:


The enhanced version of the AAS newsletter is now on the arbirds.org website.

Lyndal York
AAS Webmaster



 

Back to top
Date: 3/22/17 9:30 am
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Fund my master's project on AR grassland birds
Hi everyone,

I am a Master's student under Kim Smith at the University of Arkansas.
Starting next month, I will be researching nesting success of grassland
birds in restored and remnant prairies in northwest AR. Although I've
applied to nine grants and have received a few of them (including a
donation from NWAAS), the surveillance camera setups are expensive, so I'm
asking for your help.

Every donation helps! Please feel free to share with others outside of the
list-serve too. Here is the link:

https://www.gofundme.com/alyssas-grassland-bird-research-2017/.

If you're interested in volunteering for this project, stay tuned... :-)
And if you have any questions about the campaign or volunteering, don't
hesitate to ask me off the list-serve. Thanks much!

As an aside, I checked out Woolsey Prairie (Fayetteville) yesterday
morning. They did a burn about a month ago, so it felt like a shortgrass
prairie instead of a tallgrass prairie! Nothing out of the ordinary
bird-wise. Good birding--

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington County

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 5:57 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: FOS
Heard the first Yellow-throated Warbler today singing from a sycamore above a feeder creek into the Piney.
First Fish Crows "cronked" over the glade this afternoon.
And Morpheus, the bachelor Big Brown Bat, was roosting between two close deck roof rafters as he prefers when the weather is too hot for his usual daytime bed.
Serviceberry tree growing sideways from St. Peter sandstone atop the bluff is finally in bloom.
Chipping Sparrows began to sing this week.
Meanwhile... the Great Horned Owl sits brooding in the cave.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 12:45 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Enhanced Newsletter
The enhanced version of the AAS newsletter is now on the arbirds.org
website.

Lyndal York
AAS Webmaster

 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 8:39 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Crossbills at shores lake
I hope this works. My memory isn't spectacular and I don't often start
conversations so I forget if I can simply start an email and have it go
through.

I ended up taking 3 of the kids out to Shores Lake to see if we could
find these birds. We got there and found the brown gate that Joe
mentioned. We sat there... and sat there... and sat there. We managed
to find a couple of brown-headed nuthatches, another life bird for us.
Had white and red-breasted show up as well. Decent amount of pine
warbler activity. Butterflies in the mud and in the air. In fact, the
butterflies were a little frustrating at times. Nice eastern tiger
swallowtails... a few here, a few there... and they were often flying
up through the tree tops so you'd see something fly by and start looking
for a bird and it was just another butterfly. This happened quite a few
times.

We were there for a few hours and we used a little playback and we'd
think we heard certain calls off in the distance that way... or, that
way... We never were 100% sure(99% maybe) that we were hearing what we
thought and nothing ever came close in to that gate. Eventually we had
to start thinking about heading home. But, a few times I thought for
sure I heard those calls back down the road a ways. I joked with my
oldest daughter that I should walk down the road and leave her there to
watch the younger kids. She didn't approve of that idea. We finally
backed out of the spot and headed back up the road to where I thought I
heard them... started a playback and sure enough, there they were. We
literally spent 2.5 hours down by that gate... and I'm sure they heard
our calls. They just didn't want to be there? We got a few good looks
at the three including a nice view of the typical fledgling behavior
where the wings are shaking as a parent fed it. I can't say we got good
enough looks to describe the bill or anything but good enough to see
they were crossbills. Loved seeing the red in the sunlight. It's
pretty easy to know these are the same birds that everyone else has been
seeing so when it comes down to narrowing down the type, I can feel
pretty comfortable with the work and knowledge others have put into
them. :) We did get to listen to them for a while before we left.
Other than a paid app, is there a good source for comparing the call
types? The audubon field guide app has call 1, call 2, etc but those
aren't call types necessarily as they have those for every species.

If anyone else heads to that area, that brown gate may be a good
starting point especially if you have good ears but want to mention we
only got to see them when I parked on the side of the road between the
brown gate and the beginning of the road we came in on... about halfway
between those spots I'd say.

I'm also curious about shores lake in general. We drove down there to
the lake for a few minutes and there was not a lot going on. It's not a
huge lake but I expected something. No human activity and yet, no
herons, grebes, ducks, etc. seemed odd to me. Also seeming odd to me
is the lake's color. Even the creek flowing into it has this blueish
green color, some sort of silt perhaps? I'm curious as to what that may
be. You don't see a lot of lakes and creeks with that color.

We only managed about 24 species in the almost 3 hours we were there
which isn't bad but I was surprised we didn't find a few more.
Woodpeckers for instance. We heard one pileated and saw one flicker and
that's it. Though we didn't see a ton of species, the ones that were
there were quite active so that was enjoyable. Those little nuthatches
especially. All in all, worth the trip. 2 new life birds for my
daughter and myself. That's a goal for the year this year, finding new
life birds. We're up to 3 so far.

Anyway, thanks for all the reports and details for those crossbills.
Not sure when we would have ever found some around here without this
list... and without them possibly having nested there. The other year
some were reported out at Hobbs but I went out the next day and found
none. LOTS of pines in some areas and they're often just passing
through so it's a matter of hard work in searching and pure luck
sometimes. I'm glad these ones offered a better opportunity for us.


Daniel Mason


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 3/21/17 6:33 am
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: AAS Spring Meeting info url
Arbirders:

As some of you found, the url for the download of info. for the AAS spring
meeting did not work. An extra space crept in the url.

The correct url is:

http://www.arbirds.org/2017Meeting.pdf

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 6:21 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Sprague's Pipit at Bald Knob
The highlight of today's trip to Bald Knob NWR is a Sprague's Pipit.  According to eBird, one hasn't been sighted there before.  Someone asked me to post the location.  It was 35.2664 by -91.5710, I got that from Google Maps.  Here is a list of what we saw there today.
Sprague's Pipit - 1Bufflehead - 2Brown Thrasher - 1Downy Woodpecker - 1Pintail - 1Redwinged Blackbird - 40Western Meadowlark - 2Eastern Meadowlark - 12American Robin - 20Killdeer - 6American Crow - 5Red-tailed Hawk - 1Tufted Titmouse - 2Eastern Bluebird - 5Pied-billed Grebe - 4Blue Jay - 4Carolina Chickadee - 4Savannah Sparrow - 6Northern Flicker - 1Greater Yellowlegs - 18Lesser Yellowlegs - 4UI Yellowlegs - 200Wilson's Snipe - 1Northern Shoveler - 500Great Blue Heron - 9Northern Harrier - 3Yellow-rumped Warbler - 4American Coot - 40Bald Eagle - 2Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1Turkey Vulture - 3Pectoral Sandpiper - 35Northern Cardinal - 3Eastern Towhee - 1 maleAmerican Kestrel - 1Brown-headed Cowbird - 1UI Dowitcher - 11Great Egret - 11Mallard - 2Blue-winged Teal - 67American White Pelicans - 45Green-winged Teal - 26Northern Mockingbird - 1Rusty Blackbird - 1Song Sparrow - 1
Just east of Bald Knob NWR on Bennet Road we saw 50 plus Golden Plovers.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 6:08 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA March Field Trip
This Saturday, March 25th is the field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  See details below.  Anyone who likes birds is welcome.  You don't have to be an ASCA member.  For more information about ASCA, go to our website at www.ascabird.org.  If you have questions about the field trip, feel free to contact me off list.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 March 25, 2017Bald KnobNational Wildlife RefugeBald Knob, WhiteCo.Meetat 7:30 a.m. in North Little Rock on the east side of the Other Center parking lotbehind McDonald’s.  The Other Center islocated across from McCain Mall, on McCain Blvd.  Take Exit 1 West, off Hwy. 67/167.  We’ll arrive at the Bald Knob NWR around 8:45a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.  The refuge is also a National AudubonImportant Bird Area (IBA).  Target birdswill be lingering ducks and early-arriving shorebirds, herons, egrets, andnight-herons.  Very little walking willbe involved.  If you have a scope, bringit.  Bring water, snacks or lunch.  There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 atthe Bald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for drivingdirections and more information about the refuge.  GPS Coordinates:  35.260233, -91.571903  
 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 4:55 pm
From: Samantha Scheiman <samantha.scheiman...>
Subject: Re: AAS Meeting
All-

If you can wait until perhaps later tonight or tomorrow to read the
newsletter online, it will be worth your while, as the photos will be A LOT
crisper! I initially sent Lyndal a version of the newsletter that was
supposedly optimized for online viewing, but I see now that the quality of
the photos has suffered substantially, and thus, I have sent him the
newsletter in a print-PDF format to be uploaded online soon. Please hang
tight!

Thanks for your cooperation,
Samantha Scheiman
*Arkansas Birds* editor

On Mon, Mar 20, 2017 at 4:37 PM, Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> wrote:

> Arbirders:
>
> The agenda, field trip list and registration form for the spring meeting
> of the Arkansas Audubon Society meeting are now available for download at :
>
> http://www.arbirds.org/2017 Meeting .pdf
>
> The Spring 2017 issue of Arkansas Birds is also available for download at:
>
> http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf
>
> Lyndal York
> AAS Webmaster
>



--
“To those devoid of imagination a blank place on the map is a useless
waste; to others, the most valuable part.” -Aldo Leopold

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 3:55 pm
From: Tish DePriest <tishd...>
Subject: Re: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2
Great post!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 20, 2017, at 12:12 AM, Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> wrote:
>
> First of all I'd like to thank Karen Holliday not only for the nice
> write-up, but for going along with our crazy idea and doing the driving. It
> was a whirlwind trip!
>
> The adventure for Mom and I began Friday, March 17, (while Karen was at
> work) with a trip to south Arkansas to visit Arkansas Historic Preservation
> Program (AHPP) passport stamping stations in Crossett and El Dorado and of
> course state parks in the area. State Parks included Moro Bay, where the
> pine trees were dripping with singing Pine Warblers, we saw a large flock of
> Chipping Sparrows with Dark-eyed Juncos mixed in; next we ate lunch at the
> South Arkansas Arboretum while being serenaded by a Northern Mockingbird
> doing great imitations of a Brown-headed Nuthatch. After a visit to the
> Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources we headed to Logoly SP. The park was
> really quiet, not a single bird singing, but we found a very special bird-er
> --Devon Moon, who works at the park! After Logoly we raced to White Oak
> Lake SP where the park staff was nice enough to stay a few minutes late
> until we could arrive at 5:02 and buy a park patch. They were a super group
> and fun to visit with. We heard more singing Pine Warblers and a Pileated
> Woodpecker. Last stop of the day was to Poison Springs Battleground SP
> before heading home to pack our bags for the northwest Arkansas trip on Sat.
> and Sun. with Karen.
>
> Most numerous bird of the day--Turkey Vulture. I have no idea how many we
> saw altogether, but to say close to 100 would not be an exaggeration! We
> never saw a Black Vulture, just TV's.
>
> It was a fun three days. We finished the AHPP passport program by visiting
> seven stamping stations, visited 12 State Parks (Devil's Den was the only
> park that was also a stamping station), drove or rode just under 1,000
> miles, and met a lot of nice people along the way! I have now visited 46 of
> the 52 Arkansas State Parks and Mom, 42. She is catching up fast with me!
>
> Dottie
> Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 2:37 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: AAS Meeting
Arbirders:

The agenda, field trip list and registration form for the spring meeting of
the Arkansas Audubon Society meeting are now available for download at :

http://www.arbirds.org/2017 Meeting .pdf

The Spring 2017 issue of Arkansas Birds is also available for download at:

http://www.arbirds.org/Arkansas_Birds.pdf

Lyndal York
AAS Webmaster

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 2:24 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Tree Swallow
I forgot to mention that Dottie, Doris, and I had a FOY Tree Swallow at the historic train station at Ozark on Sunday.Karen HollidayMaumelle

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 2:16 pm
From: Lea Crisp <leacrisp...>
Subject: Re: Yellow-throated Warbler
I just had one on my feeder in Bella Vista.

Lea Crisp

On Sun, Mar 19, 2017 at 7:16 PM, akcmueller <akcmueller...> wrote:

>
>
> Yellow-throated Warbler and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher at Grassy Lake in
> Faulkner County today
>
> Allan Mueller
> Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 12:41 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
Thank you, Barry and Joanie!

Our challenge today is perhaps even more difficult and tenuous than it was when Rachel Carson published "Silent Spring". As Barry wrote, if we want to continue enjoying birds we must take their needs into consideration. Just some of those essential needs include: The protection of all avian habitats and the natural diversity they support. Clean water in rivers, lakes, aquifers and watersheds that must be protected by preventing the entry of waste and pollutants. Continuing to improve enforcement of emissions standards for clean air to reduce acid rain that causes environmental deterioration. And to uphold scientific research and resulting sustainability methods that support the biodiversity that allows birds to flourish.

Enjoy spring migration,
Judith

On Mar 20, 2017, at 1:48 PM, Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Thank you so much for sharing these thoughts Barry! We ARBIRDers have had the privilege of observing birds through binoculars, and we know how gorgeous and spectacular they truly are. If we, from our favored perspective, do not care enough to stand up for birds, and do all in our power to protect them, who will?
>
> Happy Birding All!
> Joanie
>
>
> From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Sunday, March 19, 2017 12:27 PM
> Subject: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
>
> Dear ARBIRDers,
>
> I know from past posts that some on this list prefer there be no "politics" posted or discussed here. This is a bird listserv, and host Kim Smith has pointed that out numerous times in the past when the discussion has gone astray.
>
> That said, we won't be able to continue enjoying birds like we do while also ignoring the diminishment of their needs including suitable habitat, sufficient food when they need it most like during breeding season, etc. The issues are inseparable.
>
> We have easy access to data showing a number of avian species are declining, some precipitously. The National Audubon Society has been doing what it could to educate the general public about the threat climate change poses to birds. We can continue to do nothing more than watch birds until the last one is gone (what I call the head in the sand approach), or we can as birders and members of the larger community do our best to be part of the solution to keep that from happening.
>
> Here's a letter by someone who thinks we must do both, enjoy birds while working to ensure they are around for future generations:
>
> http://www.arkccl.org/our-blog/bird-lovers-should-press-for-climate-policies
>
> This is just one example of an organization working on climate change that impacts whether, what kind and how many birds we can focus our binoculars on 5, 10, 20 years down the road. Is this our generation's challenge to avoid a "Silent Spring"?
>
> Those who prefer to leave the "politics" to others probably stopped reading this post after the first sentence. That's their prerogative. Those of you who are still with me are probably the very people doing everything you know how to make the planet habitable not just for birds, but for humans as well.
>
> Will we do enough in time?
>
> From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
> Barry Haas
>
> P.S. Wood duck activity on our pond and in our nest boxes this spring is somewhat confusing. We have two pairs of woodies on the pond most days, but we've not observed a female entering or leaving the nest box as often as usual. So we aren't sure if one of our boxes is being used, or not. A wood duck egg was discovered by the edge of the pond last week. Another mystery. We've seen red-breasted nuthatch, golden-crowned and ruby-crowned kinglets, sapsucker, brown creeper along with the usual suspects at this time of year. And a Cooper's hawk has spent time hunting behind the house in the woods. The Cooper's recently had a female cardinal trapped within the dense vines of a native honeysuckle. The cardinal was too smart to leave its safe haven, and the Cooper's finally moved on sans that cardinal as its next meal.
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 11:53 am
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
Thank you so much for sharing these thoughts Barry!  We ARBIRDers have had the privilege of observing birds through binoculars, and we know how gorgeous and spectacular they truly are.  If we, from our favored perspective, do not care enough to stand up for birds, and do all in our power to protect them, who will?

Happy Birding All!Joanie

From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Sunday, March 19, 2017 12:27 PM
Subject: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies

Dear ARBIRDers,

I know from past posts that some on this list prefer there be no "politics" posted or discussed here.  This is a bird listserv, and host Kim Smith has pointed that out numerous times in the past when the discussion has gone astray.

That said, we won't be able to continue enjoying birds like we do while also ignoring the diminishment of their needs including suitable habitat, sufficient food when they need it most like during breeding season, etc.  The issues are inseparable.

We have easy access to data showing a number of avian species are declining, some precipitously.  The National Audubon Society has been doing what it could to educate the general public about the threat climate change poses to birds.  We can continue to do nothing more than watch birds until the last one is gone (what I call the head in the sand approach), or we can as birders and members of the larger community do our best to be part of the solution to keep that from happening.

Here's a letter by someone who thinks we must do both, enjoy birds while working to ensure they are around for future generations:

http://www.arkccl.org/our-blog/bird-lovers-should-press-for-climate-policies

This is just one example of an organization working on climate change that impacts whether, what kind and how many birds we can focus our binoculars on 5, 10, 20 years down the road.  Is this our generation's challenge to avoid a "Silent Spring"?

Those who prefer to leave the "politics" to others probably stopped reading this post after the first sentence.  That's their prerogative.  Those of you who are still with me are probably the very people doing everything you know how to make the planet habitable not just for birds, but for humans as well.

Will we do enough in time?

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S.  Wood duck activity on our pond and in our nest boxes this spring is somewhat confusing.  We have two pairs of woodies on the pond most days, but we've not observed a female entering or leaving the nest box as often as usual.  So we aren't sure if one of our boxes is being used, or not.  A wood duck egg was discovered by the edge of the pond last week.  Another mystery.  We've seen red-breasted nuthatch, golden-crowned and ruby-crowned kinglets, sapsucker, brown creeper along with the usual suspects at this time of year.  And a Cooper's hawk has spent time hunting behind the house in the woods.  The Cooper's recently had a female cardinal trapped within the dense vines of a native honeysuckle.  The cardinal was too smart to leave its safe haven, and the Cooper's finally moved on sans that cardinal as its next meal.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/20/17 9:07 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: RED CROSSBILL CALL TYPE 2 AT SHORES LAKE AREA, OZARK NF
On March 8, UA-Fayetteville graduate students Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar collected recordings of calls from Red Crossbills currently in mature Shortleaf Pine forests near Shores Lake area of Ozark National Forest north of Mulberry. Birds first identified on March 4 by Bill Beall and Jim Nieting out scouting for Brown-headed Nuthatches. These recordings were sent for analysis to Matthew A. Young, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY. He identified them as the large-billed Type 2 Ponderosa Pine Crossbill. Young has written as follows about this crossbill call type: its core zone of occurrence, where its most closely associated with Ponderosa Pine is the Intermountain West where this conifer is most common This type has perhaps the most varied diet of the types and is the most widespread Red Crossbill call type in North America Small numbers of Type 2 can be found every year somewhere in the East Pretty interesting article on all of this: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/recrtype/
[http://ebird.org/content/ebird/wp-content/uploads/sites/55/RECR_Wood1.jpg]<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/recrtype/>

North American Red Crossbill Types: Status and Flight Call ...<http://ebird.org/content/ebird/news/recrtype/>
ebird.org
As one of the most striking differences in bird occurrence from year-to-year, finch irruptions are often exciting events. As Ron Pittaways finch forecast noted, it ...



 

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Date: 3/20/17 6:29 am
From: Yahoo! <000000cb59c2c1b9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Woodpeckers
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Forgot to identify myself--Judy
From my deck in Greers Ferry within a half hour I saw: pileated woodpecker, a pair of northern flickers, a red bellied woodpecker, at least 2 yellow bellied sapsuckers, 2 or 3 Downey woodpeckers, one hairy woodpecker, and several red headed woodpeckers. What a bonanza!
Judy Hunt

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 3/20/17 6:25 am
From: Yahoo! <000000cb59c2c1b9-dmarc-request...>
Subject: All the woodpeckers
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } From my deck in Greers Ferry within a half hour I saw: pileated woodpecker, a pair of northern flickers, a red bellied woodpecker, at least 2 yellow bellied sapsuckers, 2 or 3 Downey woodpeckers, one hairy woodpecker, and several red headed woodpeckers. What a bonanza!


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

 

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Date: 3/20/17 5:38 am
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Miller County, 3/19/2017
How many times and at how many spots have you observed them during this Sandhill season? More than anyone, ever, in SW AR? Maybe there often are lingerers and you are the first to recognize that.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 19, 2017, at 7:26 PM, swamp_fox <swamp_fox...> wrote:
>
> A brief photo outing east of Texarkana yielded a few American Golden-Plovers, my first Scissor-tailed Flycatcher of the year and one surprise. 6 Sandhill Cranes were still lingering at one of their less consistent locations from the 2016-2017 winter season. I was expecting all of them to have departed long before now.
>
> Charles Mills
> Texarkana TX 75503
 

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Date: 3/20/17 5:32 am
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2
Great reports! Thank you.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 20, 2017, at 12:12 AM, Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> wrote:
>
> First of all I'd like to thank Karen Holliday not only for the nice
> write-up, but for going along with our crazy idea and doing the driving. It
> was a whirlwind trip!
>
> The adventure for Mom and I began Friday, March 17, (while Karen was at
> work) with a trip to south Arkansas to visit Arkansas Historic Preservation
> Program (AHPP) passport stamping stations in Crossett and El Dorado and of
> course state parks in the area. State Parks included Moro Bay, where the
> pine trees were dripping with singing Pine Warblers, we saw a large flock of
> Chipping Sparrows with Dark-eyed Juncos mixed in; next we ate lunch at the
> South Arkansas Arboretum while being serenaded by a Northern Mockingbird
> doing great imitations of a Brown-headed Nuthatch. After a visit to the
> Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources we headed to Logoly SP. The park was
> really quiet, not a single bird singing, but we found a very special bird-er
> --Devon Moon, who works at the park! After Logoly we raced to White Oak
> Lake SP where the park staff was nice enough to stay a few minutes late
> until we could arrive at 5:02 and buy a park patch. They were a super group
> and fun to visit with. We heard more singing Pine Warblers and a Pileated
> Woodpecker. Last stop of the day was to Poison Springs Battleground SP
> before heading home to pack our bags for the northwest Arkansas trip on Sat.
> and Sun. with Karen.
>
> Most numerous bird of the day--Turkey Vulture. I have no idea how many we
> saw altogether, but to say close to 100 would not be an exaggeration! We
> never saw a Black Vulture, just TV's.
>
> It was a fun three days. We finished the AHPP passport program by visiting
> seven stamping stations, visited 12 State Parks (Devil's Den was the only
> park that was also a stamping station), drove or rode just under 1,000
> miles, and met a lot of nice people along the way! I have now visited 46 of
> the 52 Arkansas State Parks and Mom, 42. She is catching up fast with me!
>
> Dottie
> Little Rock
 

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Date: 3/19/17 10:13 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure-Part 2
First of all I'd like to thank Karen Holliday not only for the nice
write-up, but for going along with our crazy idea and doing the driving. It
was a whirlwind trip!

The adventure for Mom and I began Friday, March 17, (while Karen was at
work) with a trip to south Arkansas to visit Arkansas Historic Preservation
Program (AHPP) passport stamping stations in Crossett and El Dorado and of
course state parks in the area. State Parks included Moro Bay, where the
pine trees were dripping with singing Pine Warblers, we saw a large flock of
Chipping Sparrows with Dark-eyed Juncos mixed in; next we ate lunch at the
South Arkansas Arboretum while being serenaded by a Northern Mockingbird
doing great imitations of a Brown-headed Nuthatch. After a visit to the
Arkansas Museum of Natural Resources we headed to Logoly SP. The park was
really quiet, not a single bird singing, but we found a very special bird-er
--Devon Moon, who works at the park! After Logoly we raced to White Oak
Lake SP where the park staff was nice enough to stay a few minutes late
until we could arrive at 5:02 and buy a park patch. They were a super group
and fun to visit with. We heard more singing Pine Warblers and a Pileated
Woodpecker. Last stop of the day was to Poison Springs Battleground SP
before heading home to pack our bags for the northwest Arkansas trip on Sat.
and Sun. with Karen.

Most numerous bird of the day--Turkey Vulture. I have no idea how many we
saw altogether, but to say close to 100 would not be an exaggeration! We
never saw a Black Vulture, just TV's.

It was a fun three days. We finished the AHPP passport program by visiting
seven stamping stations, visited 12 State Parks (Devil's Den was the only
park that was also a stamping station), drove or rode just under 1,000
miles, and met a lot of nice people along the way! I have now visited 46 of
the 52 Arkansas State Parks and Mom, 42. She is catching up fast with me!

Dottie
Little Rock
 

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Date: 3/19/17 7:55 pm
From: Karen <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Dottie & Doris's Grand Adventure
In May of 2016, Dottie and Doris Boyles decided to participate in the 50th Anniversary of the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program to visit all 26 historic stamping stations scattered around the state and get their "passport" stamped with each sites's unique stamp. All sites are on the National Register of Historic Places in Arkansas. Smart ladies that they are, they realized they could combine traveling to the stamping stations, add to their goal of visiting all 52 Arkansas state parks, and squeeze in birding along the way. Last July, following the ASCA field trip to Bois D'Arc WMA south of Hope, they convinced me to sign up for the program when we visited the stamping station at the Bill Clinton Birthplace Historic Site. I've been tagging along ever since on their grand adventure. Due to my work schedule, I'm several stamping stations behind the ladies.

This weekend was Dottie and Doris' big push to visit their last few stations with a big loop through Northwest Arkansas. We left Maumelle Saturday morning and headed to St. Joe to visit their historic train station and get our passport stamped. While there, we saw only a few Yellow-rumped Warblers and a Phoebe, but we enjoyed learning about the history of the train line and station. Next stop was the stamping station at the Carnegie Library in Eureka Springs. We didn't realized Saturday was their annual St. Patrick's Day Parade, which explained the huge crush of people. No birds were noticed because we were distracted by the colorfully dressed all-in-green, feather-wrapped, sequined, and tight-skirted participants--and that was just the men! We got out of town just ahead of the start of the parade!

Next stop was Hobb's State Park. Best bird at the feeders was a stunning male YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, and for we central Arkansas birders, we were excited to see a pair of PURPLE FINCHES. Last stop of the day was the Prairie Grove Battlefield State Park. We had Turkey Vultures coming into roost on the chimney tower and in the trees. At the battlefield overlook, the field was full of about FOUR HUNDRED Cowbirds, plus a smattering of Meadowlarks. In a small partially drained pond were a dozen Wilson's Snipe, four Pectoral Sandpipers, and one Least Sandpiper. We then called it a day and headed to our hotel in Fayetteville.

Sunday morning, our first stop was Devil's Den State Park. Not much bird action. Lots of Turkey Vultures riding the thermals. Fish Crows, White-breasted Nuthatches, and YS Flickers were also seen. Next stop was Lake Fort Smith State Park. The history of the building of the dam and the flooding of the lake included the loss of important farm land that was part of Frog Bayou, which included strawberry farms. Best bird on the lake was a male RED-BREASTED MERGANSER in full breeding plumage. On to the Drennen-Scott House stamping station in Van Buren. What an informative history of the port and barge traffic and again a mention of Frog Bayou! Who knew that Frog was a such big deal back then?! We saw our FOY BROAD-WINGED HAWK.

FINAL stamping station was the Ozark Area Train Depot Museum on the Arkansas River at Ozark, which at the time in the 1920's was a vital transfer port of goods for the locals and for the river traffic. We spotted a few Ring-billed Gulls and DC Cormorants. Congratulations to Dottie and Doris who at this stop had completed visiting all 26 stamping stations in less than two years!

Our final destination Sunday was Mt. Nebo, which Doris had never visited. We left Ozark going to Paris, then got on Hwy. 22 heading toward Dardanelle and Mt. Nebo. We couldn't pass by Delaware Point without stopping to check the lake. At Delaware we found two OSPREY sitting on a NEST on a platform on one of the big channel markers! Near the same channel marker, we had a LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL. We also had Scaup, Pelicans, Ring-billed and Herring Gulls, Coots, and Horned Grebes, plus an adult Bald Eagle.

We then headed up to the top of Mt. Nebo. Great views from all directions. At 1,800 feet, we were higher than the soaring Turkey Vultures! Very little bird activity so late in the day, so we headed back down the mountain and home. Great weather this weekend for a awesome adventure of historical touring and birding! Birding can be incorporated into any travel wherever you are. What a great hobby!
Karen Holliday
(Back home in Maumelle)
 

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Date: 3/19/17 7:38 pm
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Subject: The Renderings I Cannot Do
If you want to judge a bird artist, just look at his (or her) Wood Duck.
Either sex will do (artist or duck), but clearly the male image is a
daunting undertaking. A pair landed in a tall oak in my back yard this
morning, and though nervous, they stayed while I went in for the scope
and set it up. Both birds could be seen in the field of view: the yellow
rim of the female’s eye and the bright red rim of the male with the red
actual iris on the male. The female’s eye just looks dark inside its
yellow rim. Highlighted further by the white orbicular feathering that
fades back in the line towards her nape. They stayed for an hour or
more, same branch. I kept the scope on them the whole time. And I went
to get Sibley to hold next to the scope. And the Third Edition of Nat
Geo Birds.

In the scope, of course, there is no hope for an artist. Against several
million years of design, a duck made of stardust and time, I would kick
over my palette and go have a drink. And in Nat Geo, the Woodies were
done by Cynthia House. I know nothing else of her. People forget the
fine Nat Geo book has over twenty artists working on it. Sibley, on the
other hand, did them all. Every bird. Good Lord is what I say again to
this fact.

The male is a wonder of subtle color blends in the scope. And both
artists go a little too yellow on that long flank patch. Miss House
perhaps wins there though neither captures the intricate fine barring
inside the cream patch. The feathers above this are a looping row of
black and white offset, coming to delicate overlapping tips. Behind this
is that striking deep purple area with three, count them, three orange
streaks coming down to highlight this purple zone. These are poorly
rendered by Miss House. Sibley has four dashes of orange there. But they
are really fine clusters of hairs gently curving down over the purples.
Long triangles of eyelash, a fineness likely not reproducible in
ordinary art.

And the head of the male is a complete other matter. Sibley seems to
miss the yellow ring on the female’s eye. He does better with the
blending of blues and greens on the male head above those triangles of
orange and red up right and left from the beak. The stark white linings
of the neck and face are well done in both. The white streaking in that
handsome fall back tuft of erectile feathers is frankly impossible to
recreate outside the eye, outside reality. In my opinion. It is a bird
to stare at and forget again and again in all its details. And a dead
one in hand surely does not express all that this animal can be.

It inspired me after they left to go rescue my duck box. It has been on
an oak tree on the west side of my swamp for years. But this
multi-hundred year old tree cracked across its rotten heartwood in the
wind recently. And this brought the box down to head high, the remnant
tree leaning in all its previously wondrous spiring against another oak.
I took off the screws and gave it a new rook plank, cleaned its inside
and moved it to the east side, where I can see it from the road. It will
be among Barred Owls, I hope this does not make a duck family uneasy.

I heard the duck pair whistle back into the swamp at dusk this evening,
with the frog chorus starting back up and the four Barred Owls
chattering to each other with wild echoing cacks and whoops and monkey
cries, the quizzing about the cooks gone mad and frenzied. These mad
owls were feeding before the sun went down, dropping into my leaves,
fluttering up into my cedars. The owls may already have young mouths to
feed. The woodies, well, I await further word.

(All respects to House and Sibley for even making any efforts at putting
such birds on paper. )

And if you can stare at a Wood Duck in a scope anytime soon. Do it. Do
it and be amazed again.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR

(Thanks to the birdlist peoples who sent me notes this week.)


 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 5:27 pm
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox...>
Subject: Miller County, 3/19/2017
A brief photo outing east of Texarkana yielded a few American Golden-Plovers, my first Scissor-tailed Flycatcher of the year and one surprise. 6 Sandhill Cranes were still lingering at one of their less consistent locations from the 2016-2017 winter season. I was expecting all of them to have departed long before now.

Charles Mills
Texarkana TX 75503
 

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Date: 3/19/17 5:17 pm
From: akcmueller <akcmueller...>
Subject: Yellow-throated Warbler


Yellow-throated Warbler and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher at Grassy Lake in Faulkner County today

Allan Mueller
Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S™ III, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone
 

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Date: 3/19/17 4:57 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FOS RTHU
Today about 5p. Earliest at our place since we have been here (2006).



Jeff Short

Bottom loop of the backwards "S" on the continuation of the Ouachita River

(2 mi downstream of Remmel Dam)


 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 1:26 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: King of the Sky














This came from a gentleman who runs a 2,000-acre corn farm up around Barron,
WI, not far from Oshkosh He used to fly F-4Es and F-16s for the Guard and
participated in the first Gulf War.



His story:



I went out to plant corn for a bit, to finish a field before tomorrow
morning and witnessed 'The Great Battle'. A golden eagle -- big, with about
a six-foot wingspan - flew right in front of the tractor. It was being
chased by three crows that were continually dive bombing it and pecking at
it. The crows do this because the eagles rob their nests when they find
them.

Description: cid:<X.MA1.1468812593...>

Description: cid:<X.MA2.1468812593...>


Description: cid:<X.MA5.1468812593...>
At any rate, the eagle banked hard right in one evasive maneuver, then
landed in the field about 100 feet from the tractor. This eagle stood about
3 feet tall. The crows all landed too and took up positions around the
eagle at 120 degrees apart, but kept their distance at about 20 feet from
the big bird. The eagle would take a couple steps towards one of the crows
and they'd hop backwards and forward to keep their distance. Then the
reinforcement showed up. I happened to spot the eagle's mate hurtling down
out of the sky at what appeared to be approximately Mach 1.5. Just before
impact, the eagle on the ground took flight, (obviously a coordinated
tactic; probably pre-briefed) and the three crows that were watching the
grounded eagle also took flight -- thinking they were going to get in some
more pecking on the big bird.

Description: cid:<X.MA4.1468812593...>

The first crow being targeted by the diving eagle never stood a snowball's
chance. There was a mid-air explosion of black feathers, and that crow was
done.




The diving eagle then banked hard left in what had to be a 9G climbing turn,
using the energy it had accumulated in the dive, and hit crow #2 less than
two seconds later. Another crow dead.

Description: cid:<X.MA6.1468812593...>

The grounded eagle, which was now airborne and had an altitude advantage on
the remaining crow that was streaking eastward in full burner, made a short
dive, then banked hard right when the escaping crow tried to evade the hit.
It didn't work - crow #3 bit the dust at about 20 feet AGL. This aerial
battle was better than any air show I've been to, including the War Birds
show at Oshkosh The two eagles ripped the crows apart, and ate them on the
ground; and, as I got closer and closer working my way across the field, I
passed within 20 feet of one of them as it ate its catch. It stopped and
looked at me as I went by, and you could see in the look of that bird that
it knew who's Boss of the Sky. What a beautiful bird!
Description: cid:<X.MA7.1468812593...>
Not only did they kill their enemy, they ate them. One of the best Fighter
Pilot stories I've seen in a long time.





















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Date: 3/19/17 1:22 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Of yard birds and Roundup
My bird feeder is in the middle of my back yard.  Lots and lots of sunflower seeds have fallen to the ground.  Now I have a bunch of sunflowers growing in my yard.  If I spray Roundup on all the plants, will it hurt the birds?  There are a lot of uneaten sunflower seeds that have fallen on the ground and the Roundup will get on them too.  And, while I am at it, about once a month we have Top Notch Turf come by and they spray my yard to fertilize the good grass and kill all the weeds.  I'm sure that gets all under the bird feeders too.  Am I endangering my yard birds? 

Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 1:16 pm
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
Hooray Barry!!!

MaryAnn King
In the pine woods northwest of London, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 12:37 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Hummer
Just had first hummer
Randy
West Pulaski County

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/19/17 10:27 am
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Bird Lovers Should Press for Climate Policies
Dear ARBIRDers,

I know from past posts that some on this list prefer there be no "politics" posted or discussed here. This is a bird listserv, and host Kim Smith has pointed that out numerous times in the past when the discussion has gone astray.

That said, we won't be able to continue enjoying birds like we do while also ignoring the diminishment of their needs including suitable habitat, sufficient food when they need it most like during breeding season, etc. The issues are inseparable.

We have easy access to data showing a number of avian species are declining, some precipitously. The National Audubon Society has been doing what it could to educate the general public about the threat climate change poses to birds. We can continue to do nothing more than watch birds until the last one is gone (what I call the head in the sand approach), or we can as birders and members of the larger community do our best to be part of the solution to keep that from happening.

Here's a letter by someone who thinks we must do both, enjoy birds while working to ensure they are around for future generations:

http://www.arkccl.org/our-blog/bird-lovers-should-press-for-climate-policies

This is just one example of an organization working on climate change that impacts whether, what kind and how many birds we can focus our binoculars on 5, 10, 20 years down the road. Is this our generation's challenge to avoid a "Silent Spring"?

Those who prefer to leave the "politics" to others probably stopped reading this post after the first sentence. That's their prerogative. Those of you who are still with me are probably the very people doing everything you know how to make the planet habitable not just for birds, but for humans as well.

Will we do enough in time?

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas

P.S. Wood duck activity on our pond and in our nest boxes this spring is somewhat confusing. We have two pairs of woodies on the pond most days, but we've not observed a female entering or leaving the nest box as often as usual. So we aren't sure if one of our boxes is being used, or not. A wood duck egg was discovered by the edge of the pond last week. Another mystery. We've seen red-breasted nuthatch, golden-crowned and ruby-crowned kinglets, sapsucker, brown creeper along with the usual suspects at this time of year. And a Cooper's hawk has spent time hunting behind the house in the woods. The Cooper's recently had a female cardinal trapped within the dense vines of a native honeysuckle. The cardinal was too smart to leave its safe haven, and the Cooper's finally moved on sans that cardinal as its next meal.
 

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Date: 3/19/17 5:57 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: FOS Louisiana Waterthrush
I just heard the first few notes of a Louisiana Waterthrush song, brightly ringing from where the waterfall flows into the creek.

And the first male Cowbirds were at the feeder yesterday.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 3/18/17 7:54 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Soundings
Thank you for this.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 18, 2017, at 8:07 PM, Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> wrote:
>
> In the recent mornings, the first sound through the bedroom glass is the back porch Carolina Wrens. Singing and singing at first light. “Cheeseburger cheeseburger cheeseburger.” We have back porch and front porch wrens. They call all day.
>
> And thus the season is shifting. I am always glad to be present for it. I may be happier each year. I hope to be. The frog chorus now and last night was tremendous. The first Gray Treefrogs were sounding off in the warmth today, separate and elevated . Up in, well, the trees. A signal song for me. A part of my life soundtrack. What will I miss when I am gone? It is on the list.
>
> And the first Broad-winged Hawk aloft. I saw a hawk circling above my car and I slowed on Military drive. Was astounded to see the Broad-wing. And thought, surely that is early. And I found it was, back at my trusty, highly marked up Faulkner county bird book later. Usually my first Broad-wing is a whistle above the trees, a whistle that stops me doing whatever I am doing. I go and trace the hawk, the first whistling hawk. Coming from northern South America (I have seen them migrating in masses across the Panama narrows), they average 70 miles a day heading to be with us. This one launched early. This was a new week and new early date for my county. Which made me immediately miss Martha Johnson. She is not here for it now. But I would have told her about if she was. “Martha, the hawks are back.”
>
> Jays in pairs in the backyard. They nest there every year. I also think I heard the Pileated Woodpeckers hammering on the tree they nested in last year just this afternoon. The Barred Owls are calling every day in the swamp. I call back. I have never found the nest, but their ghostly goings in the day may have given me a hint this year. I will look in a few days.
>
> The first Black-and-white Warbler call. I am obsessed with finding another nest this year. I will watch and stalk. I will sit quietly in the leaves with my binoculars. Folded like a Zen student. I will be the lump, the stump with odd colors.
>
> And then this evening at dusk, which is now at 7 pm and 7:15 since the time change: two distant dogs, a Robin in full chattery repetitious song and then the sudden chipping-in of the first Louisiana Waterthrush. Another signal call for me. An orienting call. The whistle of the Broad-wing, the jumbled call of the Waterthrush: these are the things. And after the first chips, the Waterthrush called and called every six or seven seconds for a long time. It made me put down Raymond Carver. It made me put on my glasses. The Pileateds crying, the Waterthrush over and over, crows, the fading Cardinals competing in their various directions. So much happening in my world on this warm day. The Waterthrush always makes me stop and orient: the earth on its way around the sun in its ellipse and its tilted angle, the solar system tilted itself against the ply of the galaxy, the galaxy of 250 thousand million stars. The local group of forty galaxies moving together, the Laniakea stranding of galaxies like some mesh of spider web through dense dark space. It is hard to pull back farther. We are nothing.
>
> We are nothing. But this nothing has ears. And I am happy to hear the sounds of the tilt and the roar. We ride through space and the Waterthrush doesn’t give a damn. He just sings and sings. Trying to find a partner one more time in this dance. I will take his happenstance music and be grateful. And the Waterthrush, well, he will just make more Waterthrushes for me soon. And some days, just being the one who guards over the place that he does this, well, that is far more than enough for me. Far more than I should have been given.
>
> I am grateful. At the start of my 58th vernal passage, I am grateful. I am going to walk over to the frog chorus now, and bask in it.
>
> Herschel Raney
>
> Conway AR
>
> http://www.hr-rna.com/RNA/
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 7:20 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: CROSSBILLS MAY HAVE NESTED IN OZARKS
Always glad to see these reports. I was tempted to try after the first
sightings but I often go an hour or so for a bird and then never find
it. Happens more often than not with the less common ones. I don't get
to go too far too often so I don't push it for many but if they're still
down there, I may have to drag the whole family with me. :)
Crossbills would be a lifebird. So would the brown-headed nuthatch if
we can find that. I wonder if there's anything else I might look for
down there that I might not find up here in Benton county.
We're thinking about visiting late Monday morning. We've never been
down that way. Any info we can use to find our way around as far as
finding the birds? I'm hoping with a young bird still being fed they're
not going to be on the move quiet yet and we'll have luck. Any thoughts
on the nuthatches there as well? And is there anything at this park
like a playground to keep my younger kids busy? :)
Also, I'd like to hear more about crossbills in general. When it comes
to species like this that have different "types" that can be told apart
by sound I have to wonder if they're really different or, just making
different sounds. Obviously I'm not questioning other people's
knowledge on this. There has to be more to it than "they sound
different" to decide they're different types if not different species.
I just haven't read enough about them. I question everything I need to
in order to learn more. And, so many species and subspecies splitting
and joining from time to time, a person does have to wonder. Redpolls
for instance. They even look different but then, perhaps they're the
same after all. If the experts that have all the say so are still
figuring these things out, I don't think it's unreasonable for me to
wonder about these crossbills. Basically, I'm not going to be too
concerned with trying to figure out which type I might see but I'll be
quite content(and happy) to fine any crossbill at all. Unless I put it
on my list and then they decide to split it and I then don't know what I
had. that could be a problem. HA.
Anyway, thanks for the reports and that's quite interesting to hear.

On 3/18/2017 6:29 PM, Joseph Neal wrote:
>
> Several of us on the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip
> this morning saw Red Crossbills near Shores Lake in the Ozark National
> Forest. The birds were first observed by Bill Beall and Jim Nieting on
> March 4 and have been found subsequently, more or less in the same
> area, including today. We had clear looks at three birds this morning.
> Joan Reynolds and I saw 5-6 in the same area on March 5. On that date,
> we observed one crossbill feed another. A photo of the bird that was
> fed shows it is a streaky fledgling. This is supportive of the
> hypothesis that Red Crossbills nested in the Shores Lake area over
> winter 2016-2017.
>
>
> Some unfamiliar with crossbill nesting behavior are a little shocked
> about the hypothesis that crossbills may have nested here, with at
> least one fledgling on the wing by at least early March. In terms of
> Arkansas, it is pretty unusual, but then we are fortunate that Bill
> Beall has been birding the area for many years and has many other
> crossbill records. One difference this time is that we managed to
> photograph birds because they are close to the highway. Bill and Jim
> Nieting let us know right away when they observed them.
>
>
> Data for Red Crossbill in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Birds of
> North America indicates food as the most important factor influencing
> timing of nesting. Egg dates in North America from mid-Dec to early
> Sep Also, Red Crossbill's annual breeding cycle is apparently
> regulated by photoperiod, with opportunistic responses to food supply
> and social factors superimposed on this cycle.
>
>
> Shortleaf Pine forest where we are seeing these crossbills has been
> thinned. Tree stands are now open and park-like, dominated by mature
> Shortleaf Pines, with many mature trees heavy with pine cones ideal
> for crossbills. The Forest Service manages this way because it is
> suitable for natural reproduction of pines in managed forests and
> secondarily because it produces high-quality natural habitat for all
> kinds of native wildlife, both plant and animal. It may very well have
> fostered nesting by Red Crossbills in the state, too.
>
>
> Red Crossbill populations are divided by call types. These different
> call types may reflect separate species under the umbrella name Red
> Crossbill. UA-Fayetteville graduate students Anant Deshwal and Pooja
> Panwar collected sound files from these birds on March 8, edited the
> files, which were then sent to Matt Young at Cornell. Hopefully we
> have enough data that Young can identify these crossbills to call type.
>
>
> More than 20 years ago, Bill Holiman, now Chief of Research at
> Arkansas Natural heritage Commission, encouraged me to record
> crossbill call types for birds I saw and heard in the Ouachita NF. I
> didnt follow through at the time. Subsequently, I have managed to
> record birds in northwest Arkansas. With help from Matt Young, we have
> identified three call types from crossbills in Arkansas. The birds
> currently in the Ozark NF would be the first identified that may have
> nested here.
>
>



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 6:11 pm
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: Blue Heron Rookery
Is across from the visitor's center at Lake Catherine State Park on the
other side of the Lake. I found out from one of the guys today about it.
Its directly across from Cabins 15 & 16 in the woods there. We been
hearing strange noises that even I couldn't Id as a bird? But one of the
rangers said there is a big rookery in there of Blue Herons. That why there
are so many that hang around the lake. Teresa , Hot Springs, AR

--
We Must let go of the life we planned . So to accept the one that is
waiting for us. Bad or Good Life is under the bridge flowing down the river
. Here's an instant? Gone in a moment. Just let it go. Don't hang to it.
God will do the plan not you.

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 6:08 pm
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Subject: Soundings
In the recent mornings, the first sound through the bedroom glass is the
back porch Carolina Wrens. Singing and singing at first light.
“Cheeseburger cheeseburger cheeseburger.” We have back porch and front
porch wrens. They call all day.

And thus the season is shifting. I am always glad to be present for it.
I may be happier each year. I hope to be. The frog chorus now and last
night was tremendous. The first Gray Treefrogs were sounding off in the
warmth today, separate and elevated . Up in, well, the trees. A signal
song for me. A part of my life soundtrack. What will I miss when I am
gone? It is on the list.

And the first Broad-winged Hawk aloft. I saw a hawk circling above my
car and I slowed on Military drive. Was astounded to see the Broad-wing.
And thought, surely that is early. And I found it was, back at my
trusty, highly marked up Faulkner county bird book later. Usually my
first Broad-wing is a whistle above the trees, a whistle that stops me
doing whatever I am doing. I go and trace the hawk, the first whistling
hawk. Coming from northern South America (I have seen them migrating in
masses across the Panama narrows), they average 70 miles a day heading
to be with us. This one launched early. This was a new week and new
early date for my county. Which made me immediately miss Martha Johnson.
She is not here for it now. But I would have told her about if she was.
“Martha, the hawks are back.”

Jays in pairs in the backyard. They nest there every year. I also think
I heard the Pileated Woodpeckers hammering on the tree they nested in
last year just this afternoon. The Barred Owls are calling every day in
the swamp. I call back. I have never found the nest, but their ghostly
goings in the day may have given me a hint this year. I will look in a
few days.

The first Black-and-white Warbler call. I am obsessed with finding
another nest this year. I will watch and stalk. I will sit quietly in
the leaves with my binoculars. Folded like a Zen student. I will be the
lump, the stump with odd colors.

And then this evening at dusk, which is now at 7 pm and 7:15 since the
time change: two distant dogs, a Robin in full chattery repetitious song
and then the sudden chipping-in of the first Louisiana Waterthrush.
Another signal call for me. An orienting call. The whistle of the
Broad-wing, the jumbled call of the Waterthrush: these are the things.
And after the first chips, the Waterthrush called and called every six
or seven seconds for a long time. It made me put down Raymond Carver. It
made me put on my glasses. The Pileateds crying, the Waterthrush over
and over, crows, the fading Cardinals competing in their various
directions. So much happening in my world on this warm day. The
Waterthrush always makes me stop and orient: the earth on its way around
the sun in its ellipse and its tilted angle, the solar system tilted
itself against the ply of the galaxy, the galaxy of 250 thousand million
stars. The local group of forty galaxies moving together, the Laniakea
stranding of galaxies like some mesh of spider web through dense dark
space. It is hard to pull back farther. We are nothing.

We are nothing. But this nothing has ears. And I am happy to hear the
sounds of the tilt and the roar. We ride through space and the
Waterthrush doesn’t give a damn. He just sings and sings. Trying to find
a partner one more time in this dance. I will take his happenstance
music and be grateful. And the Waterthrush, well, he will just make more
Waterthrushes for me soon. And some days, just being the one who guards
over the place that he does this, well, that is far more than enough for
me. Far more than I should have been given.

I am grateful. At the start of my 58^th vernal passage, I am grateful. I
am going to walk over to the frog chorus now, and bask in it.


Herschel Raney

Conway AR

http://www.hr-rna.com/RNA/


 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 6:07 pm
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: woodcocks dancing inthe streets
of Thornton Ferry Road in Hot Springs there is woods on the left about 2.5
miles from the Harps at the jct of 227 and 270. In the early dusk before
dawn all this week been woodcocks. This morning it was a pair doing their
mating dance right there to the side as my headlights reflected off of
their merry little dance. Sort of amusing to see right close home on a
dusky street before dawn as I go to work. where they should be but I
haven't seen any yet along that drive into the state park. Teresa In Hot
Springs, AR

--
We Must let go of the life we planned . So to accept the one that is
waiting for us. Bad or Good Life is under the bridge flowing down the river
. Here's an instant? Gone in a moment. Just let it go. Don't hang to it.
God will do the plan not you.

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 4:30 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: CROSSBILLS MAY HAVE NESTED IN OZARKS
Several of us on the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip this morning saw Red Crossbills near Shores Lake in the Ozark National Forest. The birds were first observed by Bill Beall and Jim Nieting on March 4 and have been found subsequently, more or less in the same area, including today. We had clear looks at three birds this morning. Joan Reynolds and I saw 5-6 in the same area on March 5. On that date, we observed one crossbill feed another. A photo of the bird that was fed shows it is a streaky fledgling. This is supportive of the hypothesis that Red Crossbills nested in the Shores Lake area over winter 2016-2017.

Some unfamiliar with crossbill nesting behavior are a little shocked about the hypothesis that crossbills may have nested here, with at least one fledgling on the wing by at least early March. In terms of Arkansas, it is pretty unusual, but then we are fortunate that Bill Beall has been birding the area for many years and has many other crossbill records. One difference this time is that we managed to photograph birds because they are close to the highway. Bill and Jim Nieting let us know right away when they observed them.

Data for Red Crossbill in the Cornell Lab of Ornithology Birds of North America indicates food as the most important factor influencing timing of nesting. Egg dates in North America from mid-Dec to early Sep Also, Red Crossbill's annual breeding cycle is apparently regulated by photoperiod, with opportunistic responses to food supply and social factors superimposed on this cycle.

Shortleaf Pine forest where we are seeing these crossbills has been thinned. Tree stands are now open and park-like, dominated by mature Shortleaf Pines, with many mature trees heavy with pine cones ideal for crossbills. The Forest Service manages this way because it is suitable for natural reproduction of pines in managed forests and secondarily because it produces high-quality natural habitat for all kinds of native wildlife, both plant and animal. It may very well have fostered nesting by Red Crossbills in the state, too.

Red Crossbill populations are divided by call types. These different call types may reflect separate species under the umbrella name Red Crossbill. UA-Fayetteville graduate students Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar collected sound files from these birds on March 8, edited the files, which were then sent to Matt Young at Cornell. Hopefully we have enough data that Young can identify these crossbills to call type.

More than 20 years ago, Bill Holiman, now Chief of Research at Arkansas Natural heritage Commission, encouraged me to record crossbill call types for birds I saw and heard in the Ouachita NF. I didnt follow through at the time. Subsequently, I have managed to record birds in northwest Arkansas. With help from Matt Young, we have identified three call types from crossbills in Arkansas. The birds currently in the Ozark NF would be the first identified that may have nested here.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 1:46 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fw: Buffalo River--Opportunity to speak out extended to April 6
I almost missed this because the heading said 'due March 17' - so I've sent it again to arbird in case somebody else misunderstands the due date.


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Sent: Friday, March 17, 2017 3:56 PM
Subject: Re: Buffalo River--Opportunity to speak out DUE 17 Mar 1

The due date for comments has been extended to April 6.  To really be effective, send a comment to ADEQ and to the Governor's office.  If you've done that much work it would be great to let the Buffalo River Watershed Alliance know you took action. 
email to the Governor
<robert.moery...>

Comment to ADEQ
<Water-Draft-Permit-Comment...>

To let us know what action(s) you've taken
<buffalowatershed...>

Jack Stewart Newton County



On Wednesday, March 15, 2017 8:47 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:


#yiv7483275570 #yiv7483275570 -- filtered {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;}#yiv7483275570 filtered {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv7483275570 filtered {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}#yiv7483275570 p.yiv7483275570MsoNormal, #yiv7483275570 li.yiv7483275570MsoNormal, #yiv7483275570 div.yiv7483275570MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv7483275570 a:link, #yiv7483275570 span.yiv7483275570MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv7483275570 a:visited, #yiv7483275570 span.yiv7483275570MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv7483275570 span.yiv7483275570EmailStyle17 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv7483275570 .yiv7483275570MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;}#yiv7483275570 filtered {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv7483275570 div.yiv7483275570WordSection1 {}#yiv7483275570 Rec’d yesterday. This may have been sent around earlier.  )Apologies for cross-posting(.  Note due date.  Jeff Short  From: Jeffrey Short [mailto:<jjshort50...>]
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 8:37 PM
To: Jeff & Joye Short
Subject: Fwd: Buffalo River  


Subject: Buffalo River  In 2012 the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality quickly and quietly issued a permit to allow C & H Hog Farm to build a facility on the Buffalo River watershed.  This "factory farm" keeps over 6000 pigs in confined quarters.  The waste produced is sprayed over hundreds of acres along Big Creek, a Buffalo River tributary. C & H is now applying for a new state permit which would supercede a federal permit that required regular review and a five year expiration.  The state permit requires no review and no expiration and would add an additional 599 acres to the spray area.  Research has shown that Big Creek is already showing higher levels of nitrates downstream from the C & H fields than above. The Buffalo River Watershed Alliance insists the original permit was improperly and hastily approved.  For this, and the very real threat of pollution to the Buffalo, they are asking ADEQ to deny the new permit.  The period for public comment on renewing the C & H permit ends March 17.  If you would like to help protect the Buffalo River by removing this facility from its totally inappropriate location you can make comments to the ADEQ at <Water-Draft-Permit-Comment...>  and to Govenor Asa Hutchinson at the website  governor.arkansas.gov   I am sorry for the short notice.  I didn't have all the information until recently.  Please feel free to pass this on to friends.  This may be our last chance. Phyllis Anderson
 




 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 1:19 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Red Crossbills continue near Shores Lake, Ozark NF
Several of us showed up a bit early for this morning's Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to the Shores Lake area in Ozark NF north of Mulberry. A few of us soon heard, then sighted, 3 crossbills in about the same place where we have spotted them in the last couple of weeks. These birds were originally found March 4 by Bill Beall and Jim Nieting approx. 0.8 mile south of the Shores Lake day use area, in a mature stand of shortleaf pines; still in same area. This morning's crossbills were in a leafless mid-story hardwood, providing excellent looks. The bills looked larger than I had previously thought, much like the song type 2 crossbills (Ponderosa Pine Crossbill). This was my third trip for them and I feel fairly confident they must have nested in the Shores Lake pine stands.


More on that later. Anant Deshwal and Pooja Panwar obtained audio recordings of the calls that have been sent to Matt Young at Cornell for identification of song type.

 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 8:36 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Northern Saw-whet
Wow!!!
J

On Mar 18, 2017, at 9:24 AM, Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I walked out of the Conference Center at Lake DeGray State Park last night at 10:00pm, and immediately heard loud and clear a repetitive call. My first thought was, "No, it can't be." I quickly opened Cornell Labs vocalization while it persisted. When it paused, I turned on by he playback, and it answered! Went back into the lodge, got a friend, and, of course, met with silence back in the parking lot. Onc again, it answered the door playback!
>
> Northern Saw-whet at Lake DeGray State Park Lodge. I'd love for someone else to come check it out!
>
> D. DeLynn Hearn
> 317 West K Ave.
> N. Little Rock, AR 72116
> (501)472-8769
 

Back to top
Date: 3/18/17 7:24 am
From: Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Northern Saw-whet
I walked out of the Conference Center at Lake DeGray State Park last night at 10:00pm, and immediately heard loud and clear a repetitive call. My first thought was, "No, it can't be." I quickly opened Cornell Labs vocalization while it persisted. When it paused, I turned on by he playback, and it answered! Went back into the lodge, got a friend, and, of course, met with silence back in the parking lot. Onc again, it answered the door playback!

Northern Saw-whet at Lake DeGray State Park Lodge. I'd love for someone else to come check it out!

D. DeLynn Hearn
317 West K Ave.
N. Little Rock, AR 72116
(501)472-8769
 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 9:01 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Subject: Purple Martin's in El Dorado.
We saw some Purple Martin's in El Dorado this afternoon. They were in the top part of the Purple Martin house and House Sparrows in the bottom half.

Also there were lots of Pine Warblers singing in the trees at Moro Bay State Park. Chipping Sparrows and Dark-eyed Juncos too.

At the South Arkansas Arboretum a mocking bird did a perfect Brown-headed Nuthatch immatation and almost fooled me, until it switched tunes. It must hear the nuthatches a lot as it repeated the song several times during the serenade

Dottie
Little Rock





 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 4:03 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: RED-B MERGANSER AND COMMON LOONS AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
Waterfowl at Lake Fayetteville this afternoon included Wood Duck (4), Gadwall (1), Mallard (3), Blue-winged Teal (13), Green-winged Teal (7), Hooded Merganser (1), Red-breasted Merganser (1 male), Common Loon (3), Horned Grebe (1). Common Loons are in heavy molt; two of them had pretty much transitioned to summer black and whites. Great Horned Owl still sitting on its nest, visible from Mulhollan Blind. And finally, a fine chorus of Spring Peepers, even with highway traffic, even with airplanes flying over from Springdale airport.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 12:38 pm
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: Cerulean Warblers in Northwestern Arkansas
We have a grant from the ANHC to survey Washington and Benton cos. for Ceruleans this year... Please report any sightings to me (<kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>) or Jen Mortensen (<mortejen...>)<mailto:<mortejen...>)>...

We are also looking for volunteers to help with the surveys... if you would like to spend a few days looking for Ceruleans in May and June, contact Jen...

Thanks, Kim

********************************
Kimberly G. Smith
Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Phone: 479-575-6359 fax: 479-575-4010
Email: <kgsmith...><mailto:<kgsmith...>
********************************


 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 11:17 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Black & White Warblers...
Wow, this is wonderful to hear!!!
J

On Mar 17, 2017, at 1:14 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

> Here, too, this morning. :)
>
> Janine Perlman
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co,
>
> On 3/17/2017 1:03 PM, Kenny Nichols wrote:
>> ..singing in Dardanelle.
>>
>> Kenny Nichols
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 11:15 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Black & White Warblers...
Here, too, this morning. :)

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co,

On 3/17/2017 1:03 PM, Kenny Nichols wrote:
> ..singing in Dardanelle.
>
> Kenny Nichols
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 11:03 am
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Black & White Warblers...
...singing in Dardanelle.

Kenny Nichols

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 6:28 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher
Sounds probable and underscores the need to keep feeders spiffy-clean. Probably should disinfect the suet feeder in this case.



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Karen And Jim Rowe
Sent: Friday, March 17, 2017 7:11 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher



Could it be avian pox?


https://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/publications/field_manual/chapter_19.pdf



https://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/other_diseases/avian_pox.jsp





Karen Rowe



Sent from my iPhone


On Mar 16, 2017, at 3:24 PM, Stacy Clanton <sclanton...> wrote:

We have been seeing a brown thrasher with an eye problem. The right eye seems to be missing, and in its place there appears to be a growth of some kind. It at first appeared to be white, but when the bird came to a suet feeder (a strange behavior for a brown thrasher) which was near a window, I saw that the growth was (or is now) greyish brown and quite lumpy. The bird seems to get along—we often see him or her under a worm feeder, and the bird doesn’t seem to be wasting away. The bird doesn’t move as much I think of thrashers doing, however.



Any ideas what this could be?



Oh, and “Sullivan”? On a trip to Ireland this summer, we learned that the name may (or may not) mean “one-eye.”



Stacy Clanton

Northeast corner of Magnolia


 

Back to top
Date: 3/17/17 5:11 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher
Could it be avian pox?

https://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/publications/field_manual/chapter_19.pdf

https://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/disease_information/other_diseases/avian_pox.jsp


Karen Rowe

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 16, 2017, at 3:24 PM, Stacy Clanton <sclanton...> wrote:
>
> We have been seeing a brown thrasher with an eye problem. The right eye seems to be missing, and in its place there appears to be a growth of some kind. It at first appeared to be white, but when the bird came to a suet feeder (a strange behavior for a brown thrasher) which was near a window, I saw that the growth was (or is now) greyish brown and quite lumpy. The bird seems to get along—we often see him or her under a worm feeder, and the bird doesn’t seem to be wasting away. The bird doesn’t move as much I think of thrashers doing, however.
>
> Any ideas what this could be?
>
> Oh, and “Sullivan”? On a trip to Ireland this summer, we learned that the name may (or may not) mean “one-eye.”
>
> Stacy Clanton
> Northeast corner of Magnolia

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 3:12 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Good info on the swine CAFO


From: Carolyn Shearman [mailto:<tucshea...>]
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:05 PM
To: <tucshea...>
Subject: Sierra Club Meeting March 21st



[] Parts of email omitted-Jeff Short



Website:

Here is a link to the excellent Sierra Online Magazine article on the C&H
Hog Farm in the Buffalo River Watershed:
http://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/green-life/buffalo-river-hog-cafo-threatens
-america-s-first-national-river



And, please look for further announcements and outings on the website.
These links are always changing so please check them often.

sierraclub.org/arkansas <http://www.sierraclub.org/arkansas> - for the
state-wide Arkansas Chapter and all the things Glen Hooks, our Chapter
Director, is working on!!!!

sierraclub.org/arkansas/central <http://www.sierraclub.org/arkansas/central>
- for our Central Arkansas Group

sierraclub.org/arkansas/ozark <http://www.sierraclub.org/arkansas/ozark>
- for the Ozark Headwaters Group



Carolyn Shearman

Sierra Club, Central Arkansas Group

Executive Committee

<http://www.sierraclub.org/> Description: Description: Description:
Description: Description: Description: Description: Description:
Description: Description: Description: Click our logo for the Sierra Club
homepage.








 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 3:04 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SURF SCOTER AT ALMA WASTEWATER (again? still?)
A single Surf Scoter was among a diverse group of ducks at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility today. Plumage-wise, todays scoter looked similar to the bird I photographed in same place March 7 (what I interpret as a juv first winter molting into an adult female). So did the assemblage of several hundred ducks: Gadwall, American Wigeon, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback, Redhead, Ring-necked duck, Lesser Scaup, Surf Scoter, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, Ruddy Duck. Most numerous: Northern Shoveler, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, and Rudy Duck. In my excitement at refinding (? or finding?) the scoter, I left my headlights on and ran down the battery. A kind man working at the facility gave me a much-appreciated jump.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 1:24 pm
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton...>
Subject: "Sullivan" Brown Thrasher
We have been seeing a brown thrasher with an eye problem. The right eye seems to be missing, and in its place there appears to be a growth of some kind. It at first appeared to be white, but when the bird came to a suet feeder (a strange behavior for a brown thrasher) which was near a window, I saw that the growth was (or is now) greyish brown and quite lumpy. The bird seems to get along-we often see him or her under a worm feeder, and the bird doesn't seem to be wasting away. The bird doesn't move as much I think of thrashers doing, however.

Any ideas what this could be?

Oh, and "Sullivan"? On a trip to Ireland this summer, we learned that the name may (or may not) mean "one-eye."

Stacy Clanton
Northeast corner of Magnolia

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 12:45 pm
From: Thomas Pate <thpate111...>
Subject:
I have moved to Guatemala. Please remove me from the list.

 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 11:47 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
Thanks for sharing. I hope that your insight will inspire others to support spiders and insects.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Norman Lavers
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 1:22 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note

Really interesting info. Thanks.
We watch the hummers go along our cedars to pick off the little spiders. When our big Argiope spiders go missing from their webs at night (and not just to make an egg nest somewhere) we know someone, perhaps a Screech Owl, had a substantial meal.

Norman has been looking at spiders closely this last couple of years and has found well over 100 species of spiders in our never-sprayed yard of less than 1 acre. A few species we have only seen when wasps dropped them on their way to stock their mud nests, they are far better at finding them than we are. The variety of ways in which spiders make their living, the many kinds of webs, the tunnels like trap-doors and pursewebs, the way that jumping spiders respond to us with their big eyes, the ways in which some species care for their young, it is all fascinating and makes me feel very sorry for arachnophobes who are missing out on all that. Go out at night with a headlamp fixed near your eye level and look at the ground in Spring and Summer. It will sparkle like the night sky with the eyes of hundreds of (mainly) wolf spiders. Then you will get a sense of their numbers.


Cheryl Lavers





On Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:51 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:




That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment.
Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for successful propagation of our native avian species.

Janine


On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis
wrote:

This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs
USA TODAY
Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight of more than 85 million elephants.
That’s a lot of bugs.
Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of seafood, while the world’s total seabird population eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other seafood.
The study, published in the
European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global estimate of spiders’ eating habits.
Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and tundra areas.
The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland.






 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 11:44 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
Thanks to all of you for this wonderful information, and for loving spiders. I do too.
Judith

On Mar 16, 2017, at 1:22 PM, Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Really interesting info. Thanks.
> We watch the hummers go along our cedars to pick off the little spiders. When our big Argiope spiders go missing from their webs at night (and not just to make an egg nest somewhere) we know someone, perhaps a Screech Owl, had a substantial meal.
> Norman has been looking at spiders closely this last couple of years and has found well over 100 species of spiders in our never-sprayed yard of less than 1 acre. A few species we have only seen when wasps dropped them on their way to stock their mud nests, they are far better at finding them than we are. The variety of ways in which spiders make their living, the many kinds of webs, the tunnels like trap-doors and pursewebs, the way that jumping spiders respond to us with their big eyes, the ways in which some species care for their young, it is all fascinating and makes me feel very sorry for arachnophobes who are missing out on all that. Go out at night with a headlamp fixed near your eye level and look at the ground in Spring and Summer. It will sparkle like the night sky with the eyes of hundreds of (mainly) wolf spiders. Then you will get a sense of their numbers.
>
> Cheryl Lavers
>
>
>
> On Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:51 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
>
> That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment.
> Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for successful propagation of our native avian species.
>
> Janine
>
> On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis
> wrote:
>> This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.
>>
>> Jerry W. Davis
>> Hot Springs, AR
>>
>> Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs
>> USA TODAY
>> Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests each year, according to a new study. Thats equal to the weight of more than 85 million elephants.
>> Thats a lot of bugs.
>> Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of seafood, while the worlds total seabird population eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other seafood.
>> The study, published in the
>> European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global estimate of spiders eating habits.
>> Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and tundra areas.
>> The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland.
>>
>>
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 11:22 am
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
Really interesting info. Thanks.We watch the hummers go along our cedars to pick off the little spiders.  When our big Argiope spiders go missing from their webs at night (and not just to make an egg nest somewhere) we know someone, perhaps a Screech Owl, had a substantial meal.
Norman has been looking at spiders closely this last couple of years and has found well over 100 species of spiders in our never-sprayed yard of less than 1 acre. A few species we have only seen when wasps dropped them on their way to stock their mud nests, they are far better at finding them than we are.  The variety of ways in which spiders make their living, the many kinds of webs, the tunnels like trap-doors and pursewebs, the way that jumping spiders respond to us with their big eyes, the ways in which some species care for their young, it is all fascinating and makes me feel very sorry for arachnophobes who are missing out on all that. Go out at night with a headlamp fixed near your eye level and look at the ground in Spring and Summer. It will sparkle like the night sky with the eyes of hundreds of (mainly) wolf spiders. Then you will get a sense of their numbers.

Cheryl Lavers



On Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:51 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:


That's terrific information, Jerry.  Birds specifically choose spiders because their nestlings require them.  Insects are deficient in taurine, which is required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment. 
Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for successful propagation of our native avian species.

Janine

On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis
wrote:

This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.    Jerry W. Davis Hot Springs, AR   Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs USA TODAY Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight of more than 85 million elephants. That’s a lot of bugs. Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of seafood, while the world’s total seabird population eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other seafood. The study, published in the European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global estimate of spiders’ eating habits. Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and tundra areas. The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland.    




 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 10:31 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
Thanks for your insight. Research has shown that 40% of the population has a utilitarian attitude toward wildlife and natural resources and only 13% have an ecologistic attitude toward wildlife. Very few are willing to give up progress motivated by greed to support a healthy system and our natural resources.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Donald C. Steinkraus
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 12:11 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note

Spiders are indeed important in the ecology of our terrestrial ecosystems. But, all spiders are carnivores, and primarily need insects and other arthropods to eat.



It is my observation that insects are declining in numbers. I attribute this to a number of factors. Homo sapiens is have a drastic impact by our activities, particularly, so-called "development" and "progress". In NW AR we are seeing this more and more. Farmland, natural areas, are being converted into houses, malls, highways, chem lawns, exotic plants in the landscape, pesticide treated areas, asphalt, concrete, warehouses, everywhere.



A healthy ecosystem is full of native plants, free of pesticides, many insects, and the creatures that depend on them, the spiders and birds.



The question is: who will slow and stop "development", the crush of humanity upon the Earth?






--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:50:47 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note

That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment.
Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for successful propagation of our native avian species.

Janine


On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis
wrote:

This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs

USA TODAY

Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests each year, according to a new study. Thats equal to the weight of more than 85 million elephants.

Thats a lot of bugs.

Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of seafood, while the worlds total seabird population eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other seafood.

The study, published in the

European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global estimate of spiders eating habits.

Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and tundra areas.

The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland.






 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 10:11 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
Great information. there is a wealth of knowledge out there that we need to know. Thanks for sharing.

Jerry

From: Janine Perlman
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:50 AM
To: <jwdavis...> ; <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note

That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment.
Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for successful propagation of our native avian species.

Janine


On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis
wrote:

This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs

USA TODAY

Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight of more than 85 million elephants.

That’s a lot of bugs.

Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of seafood, while the world’s total seabird population eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other seafood.

The study, published in the

European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global estimate of spiders’ eating habits.

Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and tundra areas.

The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland.






 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 10:11 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
Spiders are indeed important in the ecology of our terrestrial ecosystems. But, all spiders are carnivores, and primarily need insects and other arthropods to eat.


It is my observation that insects are declining in numbers. I attribute this to a number of factors. Homo sapiens is have a drastic impact by our activities, particularly, so-called "development" and "progress". In NW AR we are seeing this more and more. Farmland, natural areas, are being converted into houses, malls, highways, chem lawns, exotic plants in the landscape, pesticide treated areas, asphalt, concrete, warehouses, everywhere.


A healthy ecosystem is full of native plants, free of pesticides, many insects, and the creatures that depend on them, the spiders and birds.


The question is: who will slow and stop "development", the crush of humanity upon the Earth?



________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2017 11:50:47 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note

That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders because their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine, which is required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment.
Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary for successful propagation of our native avian species.

Janine

On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis
wrote:
This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR


Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs

USA TODAY

Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests each year, according to a new study. Thats equal to the weight of more than 85 million elephants.

Thats a lot of bugs.

Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of seafood, while the worlds total seabird population eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other seafood.

The study, published in the

European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global estimate of spiders eating habits.

Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and tundra areas.

The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland.




 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 9:51 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
That's terrific information, Jerry. Birds specifically choose spiders
because their nestlings require them. Insects are deficient in taurine,
which is required by nestlings for normal neurodevelopment.
Spiders, on the other hand, are rich in taurine, and are thus necessary
for successful propagation of our native avian species.

Janine

On 3/16/2017 11:19 AM, Jerry Davis
wrote:
> This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which
> deals with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator
> for the habitat health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If
> there are not enough insects to support spiders or you have bathed
> your yard in pesticides to eliminate such, it is probably of little
> value to birds. If you do not see evidence of spiders by webs,
> burrows, and on your plants you do not have a healthy system to
> support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see birds
> feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get
> control of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.
> Jerry W. Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
> *Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs *
>
> USA TODAY
>
> Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other
> pests each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight
> of more than 85 million elephants.
>
> That’s a lot of bugs.
>
> Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million
> tons of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550
> million tons of seafood, while the world’s total seabird population
> eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other seafood.
>
> The study, published in the
>
> European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a
> global estimate of spiders’ eating habits.
>
> Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in
> forests, grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts,
> urban areas and tundra areas.
>
> The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests,
> especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to
> protect plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them,
> according to study lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of
> Basel in Switzerland.
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 9:20 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Birds and Spiders - Spiders eat astronomical numbers of Insects - A Note
This article brings up a point that I have not made in a while which deals with birds, native plants and native insects. A good indicator for the habitat health of your yard is whether it supports spiders. If there are not enough insects to support spiders or you have bathed your yard in pesticides to eliminate such, it is probably of little value to birds. If you do not see evidence of spiders by webs, burrows, and on your plants you do not have a healthy system to support birds. Those that observe their nest boxes will see birds feeding spiders to their young. Those with acrophobia need to get control of it and let insects and spiders thrive for the birds.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
Study: Spiders eat astronomical numbers of bugs

USA TODAY

Spiders eat about 440 million to 880 million tons of insects and other pests each year, according to a new study. That’s equal to the weight of more than 85 million elephants.

That’s a lot of bugs.

Put another way, all humans together consume an estimated 440 million tons of meat and fish annually. Whales feed on 300 million to 550 million tons of seafood, while the world’s total seabird population eats an estimated 77million tons of fish and other seafood.

The study, published in the

European journal The Science of Nature, is the first to make such a global estimate of spiders’ eating habits.

Most spiders, of which there are about 45,000 species, are found in forests, grasslands and shrub lands, followed by croplands, deserts, urban areas and tundra areas.

The ravenous appetite of spiders keeps countless insect pests, especially in forests and grassland, in check. The spiders serve to protect plants and trees by eating the bugs that would feed on them, according to study lead author Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland.




 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 7:00 am
From: Lenore Gifford <elgiffor...>
Subject: Yellow-headed Blackbird
If anyone tries for the YHBL today and sees it. Please post it. Thanks.

Lenore
Sent from my iPhone
From work in Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 3/16/17 6:04 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: FIRST SPRING SONGS BY BROWN THRASHER
Most Brown Thrashers depart from northwest Arkansas for winter. We do usually get a few on the Fayetteville CBC , but birds that nest in my yard do not winter here. So it is always a pleasure to hear them when they start singing again. My yard is in the heavily urbanized section of Fayetteville, but I have for many years managed it as wildlife habitat, taking into account needs of wild birds like thrashers. Mid-March is the usual time for their return. A thrasher is out there this morning, singing away, with Northern Cardinals, Carolina Wrens, Northern Flickers, etc.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 7:02 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Zinke era
"Living on Earth" has a segment on the new Interior Secretary and addresses
the lead bullet reversal
http://www.loe.org/shows/shows.html?programID=17-P13-00010



Jeff Short



)Apologies for cross-posting(


 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 6:47 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Buffalo River--Opportunity to speak out DUE 17 Mar 1
Rec'd yesterday. This may have been sent around earlier. )Apologies for
cross-posting(. Note due date.



Jeff Short



From: Jeffrey Short [mailto:<jjshort50...>]
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 8:37 PM
To: Jeff & Joye Short
Subject: Fwd: Buffalo River







Subject: Buffalo River



In 2012 the Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality quickly and quietly
issued a permit to allow C & H Hog Farm to build a facility on the Buffalo
River watershed. This "factory farm" keeps over 6000 pigs in confined
quarters. The waste produced is sprayed over hundreds of acres along Big
Creek, a Buffalo River tributary.



C & H is now applying for a new state permit which would supercede a federal
permit that required regular review and a five year expiration. The state
permit requires no review and no expiration and would add an additional 599
acres to the spray area. Research has shown that Big Creek is already
showing higher levels of nitrates downstream from the C & H fields than
above.



The Buffalo River Watershed Alliance insists the original permit was
improperly and hastily approved. For this, and the very real threat of
pollution to the Buffalo, they are asking ADEQ to deny the new permit. The
period for public comment on renewing the C & H permit ends March 17. If
you would like to help protect the Buffalo River by removing this facility
from its totally inappropriate location you can make comments to the ADEQ at
<Water-Draft-Permit-Comment...> and to Govenor Asa Hutchinson
at the website governor.arkansas.gov <http://governor.arkansas.gov/>



I am sorry for the short notice. I didn't have all the information until
recently. Please feel free to pass this on to friends. This may be our
last chance.



Phyllis Anderson




 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 4:37 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GOLDEN-PLOVERS AT FROG
American Golden-Plovers (28) were at Frog Bayou WMA in the Arkansas River Valley today. Other shorebirds in the valley (including a brief stop at Alma Wastewater) included Killdeer, Greater Yellowlegs, Least Sandpiper, Pectoral Sandpiper, and Wilsons Snipe.

Duck migration is going in the Valley too: Gadwall, American Wigeon, Mallard, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Canvasback, Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Hooded Merganser, and Ruddy Duck.

A flock of about 40 Rusty Blackbirds were foraging in a wet grassy field at Frog.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 4:30 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds.
Thanks Sara, My 7 PM turned to just PM, sorry people! Jacque


> On Mar 15, 2017, at 5:46 PM, sara caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Hummingbirds program is scheduled to be on tonight from 7 - 830 on AETN (PBS). It was a new program when it aired last October. Great program!
>
> On Mar 15, 2017 4:24 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>>
>> I’m not sure if I’ve seen this before but plan to watch it anyway. It’s pledge time so allow for the extra half hour. Jacque Brown, Centerton.
 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 3:47 pm
From: sara caulk <0000006993f5a594-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds.
Hummingbirds program is scheduled to be on tonight from 7 - 830 on AETN (PBS).  It was a new program when it aired last October. Great program!

On Mar 15, 2017 4:24 PM, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>
> I’m not sure if I’ve seen this before but plan to watch it anyway.  It’s pledge time so allow for the extra half hour.   Jacque Brown, Centerton.
 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 2:25 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Nature PBS & PM Hummingbirds.
I’m not sure if I’ve seen this before but plan to watch it anyway. It’s pledge time so allow for the extra half hour. Jacque Brown, Centerton.
 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 2:22 pm
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Nesting Ospreys
Search the Bird Records Database to see the nesting records. http://www.arbirds.org/searchspecies.asp

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR


----- Original Message -----

From: "Glenn" <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 3:56:54 PM
Subject: Nesting Ospreys

We found an Osprey building a nest today, near North Little Rock. I haven't heard of Ospreys nesting in Arkansas. Is this normal? Thanks.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot


 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 1:58 pm
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
I went at 1:30pm and saw everything that others have seen. No yellow-headed though either.

Hopefully, he'll stick around and be seen again.

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville



> On Mar 15, 2017, at 15:44, Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> wrote:
>
> I went to the hatchery about 12:30. I did not see the Yellow-headed Blackbird. I did see a flock of 38 Scaup and a female Canvasback, Mallards, Buffleheads, Blue-winged Teal, Canada Geese, Great-blue Heron, 1 American Pipit, 3 Savannah Sparrows, 2 Song Sparrows, a Swamp Sparrow, Meadowlarks, Starlings, 2 Rusty Blackbirds, some Red-winged Blackbirds, 2 Red-tailed Hawks, 1 Kestrel, Mockingbird, Robins, Cardinals, and a Belted Kingfisher. Also 15 Pectoral Sandpipers, 2 Wilson Snipe, Killdeer, and a Least Sandpiper.
>
> I drove around the area looking for flocks of birds that have been around for several months in open fields, Buckhorn Flats, Rainbow Farm Rd, Opal, and the dairy circuit in Vaughn. I finally found a large flock of about 3000 Brown-headed Cowbirds at one of the dairy's, a flock of about 1000 Starlings at a different dairy, scattered Red-wing Blackbirds, no Yellow-headed with any of them. Other birds were E Bluebirds, Loggerhead Shrike, Blue Jays, Juncos, White-crowned Sparrows, White-throated Sparrows.
>
> Jacque Brown, Centerton
>
>
>
>
>> On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:05 PM, Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>>
>> This good find with photo was posted to eBird today. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407
>>
>> If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location given in an eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the location name to be taken to a Google map.
>>
>> Dan Scheiman
>> Little Rock, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 1:57 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Nesting Ospreys
We found an Osprey building a nest today, near North Little Rock.  I haven't heard of Ospreys nesting in Arkansas.  Is this normal?  Thanks.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 1:45 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
I went to the hatchery about 12:30. I did not see the Yellow-headed Blackbird. I did see a flock of 38 Scaup and a female Canvasback, Mallards, Buffleheads, Blue-winged Teal, Canada Geese, Great-blue Heron, 1 American Pipit, 3 Savannah Sparrows, 2 Song Sparrows, a Swamp Sparrow, Meadowlarks, Starlings, 2 Rusty Blackbirds, some Red-winged Blackbirds, 2 Red-tailed Hawks, 1 Kestrel, Mockingbird, Robins, Cardinals, and a Belted Kingfisher. Also 15 Pectoral Sandpipers, 2 Wilson Snipe, Killdeer, and a Least Sandpiper.

I drove around the area looking for flocks of birds that have been around for several months in open fields, Buckhorn Flats, Rainbow Farm Rd, Opal, and the dairy circuit in Vaughn. I finally found a large flock of about 3000 Brown-headed Cowbirds at one of the dairy's, a flock of about 1000 Starlings at a different dairy, scattered Red-wing Blackbirds, no Yellow-headed with any of them. Other birds were E Bluebirds, Loggerhead Shrike, Blue Jays, Juncos, White-crowned Sparrows, White-throated Sparrows.

Jacque Brown, Centerton




> On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:05 PM, Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
> This good find with photo was posted to eBird today. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407>
>
> If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location given in an eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the location name to be taken to a Google map.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 1:06 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
I just happened to see the photo on ebird this morning before the list
went through. Took a couple kids out there and got there just a few
minutes before 11. No luck. Asked a guy driving b y who said they
hadn't seen it since the report. Being next to the building they were
all in, they scared it when they went to look at it. I don't know if it
moved on but we searched the area for over an hour and a half. No
luck. That bird is on my need list and every time it's reported, it's
gone before I get a chance to look. Some day.
There was a group of ducks on one of the ponds, about 35ish that looked
like a mixed group of scaups(greater and lesser) with a female
canvasback in there. Blue-winged and green-winged teal as well as
mallards and buffleheads on a few other ponds. 1 least sandpiper and 15
pectoral. Saw only 4 when we pulled in but just a while later the group
had grown. Also had a harrier fly over for a minute. Counted about 39
species in all so still a good day but still bummed about that
blackbird. Some rusties are still there. I've seen people report
brewer's there lately but I haven't had any confirmed looks at any yet.
Some of those rusties can be very dark it seems and throw me. Speaking
of rusties... been a lot lately out at city lake in Siloam as well. A
few times I've been there I've seen 50 or more at a time. I've only
been doing this a few years but this is the first winter I've seen so many.

Daniel Mason

On 3/15/2017 12:05 PM, Dan Scheiman wrote:
> This good find with photo was posted to eBird today.
> http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407
>
> If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location
> given in an eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the
> location name to be taken to a Google map.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR




---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 11:48 am
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: Re: Juncos now????
I think that is because they have been at my house all winter! The seed was getting low yesterday and I saw them eating from the suet cakes.



Kara

Timbo, AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Dorothy Cooney
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 12:16 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Juncos now????



All winter, I've been waiting for juncos to arrive. All winter, not a one. Now that it's almost spring, they're here. I don't get it! Also, the few goldfinches I had are gone. This has been a very strange year bird-wise.



--

Dorothy Cooney

Wickes, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 11:10 am
From: Debra Grim <dsgrim02...>
Subject: Re: Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project Hats for Next Season
Mitchell
Is this a ball cap? If so, I would like to order one please.
Debra Grim

On Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 5:07 PM, Mitchell Pruitt <
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> We are happy to announce that Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project hats are now
> available for pre-order! Hats will be $15.00 each and all proceeds will go
> towards funding our project during the 2017 season. Order one now to wear
> around town, out owling, or abroad!
>
> If you would like to order one, please contact me as soon as possible via
> email (<mlpruitt24...>), as there will be a limited supply! They
> should be in-hand and ready for delivery later this month.
>
> The hats are charcoal gray, with a saw-whet owl embroidered on the front
> and "Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project” embroidered on the back.
>
> We are excited to be gearing up for next season...no doubt the team will
> all be wearing their new hats!
>
> As it warms, I am still detecting 2 saw-whets with transmitters in Madison
> County! When will they move north?
>
> Best,
> Mitchell Pruitt
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 10:15 am
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
Subject: Juncos now????
All winter, I've been waiting for juncos to arrive. All winter, not a
one. Now that it's almost spring, they're here. I don't get it! Also,
the few goldfinches I had are gone. This has been a very strange year
bird-wise.

--
Dorothy Cooney
Wickes, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 10:13 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
I guess I need to head that way, thanks for the post Dan. Jacque Brown, Centerton.



> On Mar 15, 2017, at 12:05 PM, Dan Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
> This good find with photo was posted to eBird today. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407>
>
> If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location given in an eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the location name to be taken to a Google map.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 3/15/17 10:05 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird: Yellow-headed Blackbird, Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery
This good find with photo was posted to eBird today. http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S35192407

If you don't know how to get to the hatchery or any other location given in an eBird checklist, just click the Map button next to the location name to be taken to a Google map.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/17 4:28 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Sally Jo and All,

I am glad you have had good experiences and observed beneficial programs offered by the extension services. My reference was based on information I recently received from a NRCS/USDA staffer who told me they were still actively planting introduced invasives such as sericea lespedeza and fescue, but that they will not assist with efforts to eradicate the plants.
So, my apologies if I was misinformed.

Judith

On Mar 14, 2017, at 5:55 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:

> Thanks, Karen. I am a huge supporter of UAEX as my husband retired from that entity after 37 years with them. My son-in-law is director of the UA research station at Bethesda. I'm also aware of a lot of beneficial programs that take place through UA that the public is unaware of.
> I'm still birding and make/keep my yard as bird friendly as possible. And spend lots of money on bird seed and yard upkeep. (Too old to do it myself, anymore.) Ive even bought and paid someone to plant Crepe Myrtle, Euonymus (sp?) and Naninas. Then, when I discovered these plants werent for the birds, paid someone to remove them.
> There are people on this site with more than one opinion. I sometimes get the feeling that if you dont agree with certain people who post on ARBIrd, that you may suddenly find yourself one of those who the sanctified want removed.
> I'll stay off my individual soap box on here from now on.
> Sally Jo Gibson
>
>
> From: Jim and Karen Rowe [mailto:<rollingrfarm...>]
> Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
> To: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>; <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>
> I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to plant natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants for the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and weather.
>
> Karen Rowe
>
> From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>
> Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
> SJG
>
>
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>
> From: Mary Ann King
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: RE: Yard questions
>
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.
>
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
>
>
>
> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
>
>
>
> Hi all,
>
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?
>
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
>
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/17 3:55 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Thanks, Karen. I am a huge supporter of UAEX as my husband retired from that entity after 37 years with them. My son-in-law is director of the UA research station at Bethesda. I'm also aware of a lot of beneficial programs that take place through UA that the public is unaware of.
I'm still birding and make/keep my yard as bird friendly as possible. And spend lots of money on bird seed and yard upkeep. (Too old to do it myself, anymore.) I’ve even bought and paid someone to plant Crepe Myrtle, Euonymus (sp?) and Nanina’s. Then, when I discovered these plants weren’t “for the birds,” paid someone to remove them.
There are people on this site with more than one opinion. I sometimes get the feeling that if you don’t agree with certain people who post on ARBIrd, that you may suddenly find yourself one of those who the “sanctified” want removed.
I'll stay off my individual soap box on here from now on.
Sally Jo Gibson


From: Jim and Karen Rowe [mailto:<rollingrfarm...>]
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
To: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>; <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions

I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to plant natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants for the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and weather.

Karen Rowe
________________________________
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...><mailto:<sjogibson...>>
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: Yard questions

I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
SJG


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Mary Ann King<mailto:<office...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'<mailto:<SJOGibson...>; <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Yard questions

While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.

Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.

MaryAnn King
In the pine woods northwest of London




UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR




Hi all,

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas


 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/17 3:55 pm
From: Nancy Felker <felker.nancy...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Going back to Jonathan's original question, what other reference book would someone recommend besides Carl Hunter. I have done the same thing with my yard years ago stopping yard service. So much comes up that is not native such as dandelion, purple dead nettle, and clover it is hard to know what to pull out. I mow high and let whatever green grow. I do enjoy moss.
Nancy
Fayetteville

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 14, 2017, at 1:17 PM, Mary Ann King <office...> wrote:
>
> Janet Carson has done a lot in Arkansas & yes, she will only speak of natives when asked. I certainly wasn’t disparaging her knowledge. And I didn’t mean she endorsed Bradford pears – when I spoke of the Bradford pears, I was only using it as an example of the perils of planting invasive species. I’d just like to see her not suggesting using invasives at all. I don’t have a problem with her recommending most non natives –
>
> We have way too many invasive species that are being sold -
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jim and Karen Rowe
> Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>
> I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to plant natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants for the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and weather.
>
> Karen Rowe
>
> From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>
> I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
> SJG
>
>
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>
> From: Mary Ann King
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: RE: Yard questions
>
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.
>
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
>
>
>
> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
>
>
>
> Hi all,
>
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?
>
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/17 12:40 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Doug Tallamy has enlightened and inspired many (including me!):
http://www.bringingnaturehome.net/

On 3/14/2017 2:32 PM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:
>
> Birds and Insects and Plants are Interconnected
>
>
> The invasive plants, nationwide, worldwide, along with invasive
> insects, exotic plant pathogenic fungi, etc. have wreaked havoc on our
> ecosystems and will continue to do so. All one has to think of is:
> American chestnut (wiped out by exotic fungus), American elm
> (essentially decimated by exotic fungus), ash trees (under great
> threat from exotic Emerald ash borer), all our hardwoods (from exotic
> Asian longhorn beetle), etc. etc.
>
>
> I agree with Mary Ann and other writers below that for the sake of the
> birds, invasive plants be removed when in our power.
>
>
> Honestly, the horticulture industry and USDA scientists that promoted
> plants such as Callery (Bradford) pears, Sericea lespideza, multiflora
> rose, Bermuda grass, fescue, Johnson grass, ailanthus trees, privet,
> bush honeysuckle, Japanese honeysuckle, English ivy, Nandina, and so
> many other plants, have greatly harmed the abundance and diversity of
> our native moths and other insects (that feed the birds) and
> therefore, bird life.
>
>
> Like others on this listserv I am trying to walk the walk and kill and
> remove all the invasives above, but I recognize it is not in my power
> to do anything but mitigate the problem a bit.
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Mary Ann King
> <office...>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, March 14, 2017 2:17:24 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Yard questions
>
> Janet Carson has done a lot in Arkansas & yes, she will only speak of
> natives when asked. I certainly wasnt disparaging her knowledge.
> And I didnt mean she endorsed Bradford pears when I spoke of the
> Bradford pears, I was only using it as an example of the perils of
> planting invasive species. Id just like to see her not suggesting
> using invasives at all. I dont have a problem with her recommending
> most non natives
>
> We have way too many invasive species that are being sold -
>
> MaryAnn King
>
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Jim and Karen Rowe
> *Sent:* Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Yard questions
>
> I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if
> you preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you
> only want to plant natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about
> landscaping your yard for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's
> presentation on perennial plants for the garden was just after mine. I
> stayed to listen and was pleased to hear Janet promoting natives
> because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and weather.
>
> Karen Rowe
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> *From:*Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> <mailto:<sjogibson...>>
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
> *Sent:* Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
> *Subject:* Re: Yard questions
>
> Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
>
> SJG
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
> Windows 10
>
> *From: *Mary Ann King <mailto:<office...>
> *Sent: *Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> *To: *'Sally Jo Gibson' <mailto:<SJOGibson...>;
> <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject: *RE: Yard questions
>
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does
> often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I
> have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends
> for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses.
> Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and
> on & on.
>
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at
> the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for
> protein & rearing their young.
>
> MaryAnn King
>
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock
> office is an expert on yards.
>
> Sally Jo Gibson
>
> Harrison, AR
>
> Hi all,
>
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a
> neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and
> well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or
> another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of
> our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their
> lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully
> mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and
> back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice
> on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and
> benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're
> trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn
> grasses. Thoughts?
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>
> Licensed Psychologist
>
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/17 12:33 pm
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Birds and Insects and Plants are Interconnected


The invasive plants, nationwide, worldwide, along with invasive insects, exotic plant pathogenic fungi, etc. have wreaked havoc on our ecosystems and will continue to do so. All one has to think of is: American chestnut (wiped out by exotic fungus), American elm (essentially decimated by exotic fungus), ash trees (under great threat from exotic Emerald ash borer), all our hardwoods (from exotic Asian longhorn beetle), etc. etc.


I agree with Mary Ann and other writers below that for the sake of the birds, invasive plants be removed when in our power.


Honestly, the horticulture industry and USDA scientists that promoted plants such as Callery (Bradford) pears, Sericea lespideza, multiflora rose, Bermuda grass, fescue, Johnson grass, ailanthus trees, privet, bush honeysuckle, Japanese honeysuckle, English ivy, Nandina, and so many other plants, have greatly harmed the abundance and diversity of our native moths and other insects (that feed the birds) and therefore, bird life.


Like others on this listserv I am trying to walk the walk and kill and remove all the invasives above, but I recognize it is not in my power to do anything but mitigate the problem a bit.


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Mary Ann King <office...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 2:17:24 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions

Janet Carson has done a lot in Arkansas & yes, she will only speak of natives when asked. I certainly wasnt disparaging her knowledge. And I didnt mean she endorsed Bradford pears when I spoke of the Bradford pears, I was only using it as an example of the perils of planting invasive species. Id just like to see her not suggesting using invasives at all. I dont have a problem with her recommending most non natives

We have way too many invasive species that are being sold -

MaryAnn King
In the pine woods northwest of London
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jim and Karen Rowe
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions

I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to plant natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants for the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and weather.

Karen Rowe
________________________________
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...><mailto:<sjogibson...>>
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: Yard questions

Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
SJG


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Mary Ann King<mailto:<office...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'<mailto:<SJOGibson...>; <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Yard questions

While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.

Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.

MaryAnn King
In the pine woods northwest of London




UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR




Hi all,

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas



 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/17 12:17 pm
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Janet Carson has done a lot in Arkansas & yes, she will only speak of natives when asked. I certainly wasn’t disparaging her knowledge. And I didn’t mean she endorsed Bradford pears – when I spoke of the Bradford pears, I was only using it as an example of the perils of planting invasive species. I’d just like to see her not suggesting using invasives at all. I don’t have a problem with her recommending most non natives –



We have way too many invasive species that are being sold -



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jim and Karen Rowe
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 12:35 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions



I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to plant natives. I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants for the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and weather.



Karen Rowe

_____

From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> <mailto:<sjogibson...> >
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: Yard questions



I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!!

SJG





Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10



From: Mary Ann King <mailto:<office...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson' <mailto:<SJOGibson...> ; <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Yard questions



While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.



Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London









UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR









Hi all,



This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?








Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.

Licensed Psychologist

Fayetteville, Arkansas






 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/17 10:35 am
From: Jim and Karen Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
I think Sally Jo Gibson made an excellent suggestion, especially if you preface your question to Janet Carson with the comment that you only want to plant natives.  I gave a Master Garden presentation about landscaping your yard for birds using natives, and Janet Carson's presentation on perennial plants for the garden was just after mine. I stayed to listen and was pleased to hear Janet promoting natives because they were best adapted to Arkansas soil and weather.
Karen Rowe 

From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:09 PM
Subject: Re: Yard questions

<!--#yiv4905666011 _filtered #yiv4905666011 {font-family:"Cambria Math";panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv4905666011 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv4905666011 {font-family:"Comic Sans MS";panose-1:3 15 7 2 3 3 2 2 2 4;}#yiv4905666011 #yiv4905666011 p.yiv4905666011MsoNormal, #yiv4905666011 li.yiv4905666011MsoNormal, #yiv4905666011 div.yiv4905666011MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri", sans-serif;}#yiv4905666011 a:link, #yiv4905666011 span.yiv4905666011MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv4905666011 a:visited, #yiv4905666011 span.yiv4905666011MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:#954F72;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv4905666011 .yiv4905666011MsoChpDefault {} _filtered #yiv4905666011 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv4905666011 div.yiv4905666011WordSection1 {}-->I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!!SJG     Sent from Mail for Windows 10   From: Mary Ann King
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Yard questions   While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well.  I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses.  Proof?  Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.   Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds.  Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.   MaryAnn   King In the pine woods northwest of London         UA Cooperative Extension Service.  Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards. Sally Jo Gibson Harrison, AR         Hi all,   This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike.  We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned.  This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns.  The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets.  We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground.  We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants).  We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses.  Thoughts?    
Jonathan Perry, Ph.D. Licensed Psychologist Fayetteville, Arkansas  


 

Back to top
Date: 3/14/17 9:10 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Are you all aware of the Arkansas Audubon Society "Bird Friendly Yard" certification program?  The dream is to turn Arkansas into the America's largest bird sanctuary by creating a statewide network of yards and parks planted with native plants.   So far there are 17 certified yards around the state from Jonesboro to Fayetteville to Hot Springs with a concentration in Little Rock neighborhoods.  The program is just getting started.  For details contact Pam Stewart at <bfaudubon...> and/or take a look at the Arkansas Audubon website yard bird page.
   http://www.arbirds.org/Yard/yard_bird_program.htmNote: We are working on some updates to the information contained on the page. The most significant addition is a $20 dollar registration fee and a "working to become bird friendly" category.  The fee covers a useful book, a yard flag, and access to our budding mentoring program.
In addition, check out the National Audubon Society's cool new Plants for Birds site.  Put in your zip code and get a list of native plant suggestions for your location as well as a list of sources for native plants in your area.
Plants for Birds   http://www.audubon.org/plantsforbirdsNote: you need to scroll down below the stunning hummingbird picture to see the button for entering your zip code.

Finally, in spite of all the words and criteria you'll see listed on the bird friendly yard page we are still open to suggestions and help.   If you want to get involved at any level, please contact us.  Thanks
One more "finally"- On September 16, Buffalo National River Partners plan a massive stilt-grass removal at Boxley Valley (Buffalo National River), volunteers welcome. This invasive, non-native plant threatens the spectacular wildflower display along the popular Lost Valley Trail.
Jack StewartNewton Countywhere privet and Japanese Honeysuckle cringe at our approach.


On Monday, March 13, 2017 7:45 PM, Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> wrote:


I have declared for many years that at some time I will turn my life over to elimination of privet.

Sent from my iPhone
On Mar 13, 2017, at 6:57 PM, Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> wrote:



I have spent 15 years clearing privet from my 12 acres of woods. There will still be privet here when I die or when I move away. It takes several years to clear any given area with pry bar and clippers and chain saw. Every root tries to come back. Every scattering of seed from the shoot of a remnant stump makes more swaths of seedling plants. They do not die back in winter. Sure they make seeds, good-god-loads-of-them, and the birds do eat them. The Hermit Thrushes will even bother with them in the deepest cold, if I am not uprooting privet and worms and grubs from the ground. Some years Robins roost by the thousands in my cedar groves and they eat privet berry. I have watched a Blue-headed Vireo take some in the heart of winter. And waxwings of course: it is a berry. Though I swear they would rather eat anything else.  Waxies will even take Nandina, another scourge.
I cannot walk anywhere on my property without bending to stoop for another starter privet here or there. I have some beautiful sections that are entirely privet free. I have no lawn, just leaf cover and flora and tree. The deer sleep outside my bathroom window. In my high bush blueberry, cleared of priver. And the deer do eat the privet in winter when I pile the clippings on the ground. I find them the next day, sleek and leggy, staring at me, radaring me with those great deer ear cups.
The plant should be banned for sale in the US. It was a bad experiment. We should now know better. But we don't. Bell has the scourge as well. And no one is really working on it now that Kenny is long gone.
It is a great shame all around when I find woods overtaken by them. Holla Bend. Ozark river valleys. Ah, the world. I would surrender and just go do privet work every day if I could. RIght now. I still may.
Don't test me.
Herschel Raney Conway AR

On 3/13/2017 12:44 PM, Reames, Clark -FS wrote:


#yiv5131958626 #yiv5131958626 -- _filtered #yiv5131958626 {font-family:Helvetica;panose-1:2 11 6 4 2 2 2 2 2 4;} _filtered #yiv5131958626 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv5131958626 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv5131958626 {panose-1:3 15 7 2 3 3 2 2 2 4;}#yiv5131958626 #yiv5131958626 p.yiv5131958626MsoNormal, #yiv5131958626 li.yiv5131958626MsoNormal, #yiv5131958626 div.yiv5131958626MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv5131958626 a:link, #yiv5131958626 span.yiv5131958626MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv5131958626 a:visited, #yiv5131958626 span.yiv5131958626MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv5131958626 span.yiv5131958626apple-converted-space {}#yiv5131958626 span.yiv5131958626EmailStyle18 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv5131958626 .yiv5131958626MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv5131958626 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv5131958626 div.yiv5131958626WordSection1 {}#yiv5131958626 After retirement, I plan to contract a dozer to get a head start on my privet thickets in AR and try to go back native but I am also realistic in the knowledge that I will have to fight privet for the rest of my days.  If your land is privet free now,  DO NOT INTRODUCE IT.  You will regret it.  I didn’t introduce it on my place but I sure wish that somebody else didn’t many years prior…  
|
|
| <mime-attachment.png> |
| Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager |
| Forest Service Malheur National Forest |
| p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
<creames...> |
| 431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us
<mime-attachment.png><mime-attachment.png><mime-attachment.png> |
| Caring for the land and serving people |

|

|

|

    From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:27 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions   I think Janet does a good job of promoting the use of native plants. My husband and I often enjoy paraphrasing her advice on invasive Bradford pears: “Prune to ground level and repeat as necessary.”   
On Mar 13, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:   I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!! SJG     Sent from Mail for Windows 10   From: Mary Ann King
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Yard questions   While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well.  I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses.  Proof?  Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.   Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds.  Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.   MaryAnn   King In the pine woods northwest of London         UA Cooperative Extension Service.  Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards. Sally Jo Gibson Harrison, AR         Hi all,   This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike.  We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned.  This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns.  The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets.  We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground.  We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants).  We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses.  Thoughts?    
Jonathan Perry, Ph.D. Licensed Psychologist Fayetteville, Arkansas
  Elizabeth Findley Shores
4408 Sam Peck Rd.
Little Rock, AR 72223  



This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.



 

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Date: 3/14/17 2:41 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: HERMIT THRUSH, BUT NOT TAPER-TIP, AT NEW LAKE ATALANTA
Remodeled Lake Atalanta in Rogers includes an attractive kiosk with detailed information about birds. Like info in Mulhollan Blind at Lake Fayetteville Park, this is a good-faith effort to encourage the general public. Auduboners have gone birding at Lake Atalanta for several decades. We provided bird data to the City hopefully to help planning, and eventually for this kiosk.

Over the past couple of years Rogers has spent millions at Lake Atalanta building the kiosk, attractive new bathrooms, picnic areas, a complex system of paved and unpaved trails, and a boardwalk along part of the lake. Mountain bike trails wind and rewind up and down and all around hollows through which flow springs that form Prairie Creek -- that flow then to Beaver Lake.

A few years ago, some of us predicted City planners were going overboard -- too much trail impacting too much forest would be detrimental to rare and unusual wildlife, both animal and plant. But that said, yesterday I enjoyed a handsome winter resident, Hermit Thrush, along Frisco Spring run. But just beyond the Hermit Thrush, I was distressed that a significant patch of an unusual plant, Taper-tip Ginger (Asarum canadense var. acuminatum) was wiped-out by construction of a broad concrete trail.

In place of Taper-tip: trail side replanted with what appears non-native grass. Ironically, taper-tip is featured on a kiosk plaque celebrating the parks unique plant communities. I was also pleased to see White-throated Sparrows, but not at elimination of much of a Pawpaw thicket we have always enjoyed on past field trips. Some of this will hopefully come back.

Many places to enjoy wildlife remain in new Lake Atalanta, but hillside trails now impact hillside wildlife. Not surprisingly, when I walked one of those trails yesterday, a Turkey Vulture flushing from a probable nest told me no trail should ever have been built there IF we value our nesting vultures. We warned City planners about such specifically, introducing extensive, recurring disturbances into steep hillside forest communities.

REALLY BAD: dirt work in the park resulted in placement of plastic garden netting designed to reduce soil erosion. This durable stuff is a well-known animal killer: birds that get trapped under loose sections, small mammals, young turtles, snakes, salamanders. Killer plastic is now resident throughout the park, holding soil disturbed along spring runs, lake sides, and broad concrete trails.

I think this new design of an old park will please many people who like upbeat modern, with native stone rustic. But for this nature pays significant price: increasing levels of environmental damage in ecologically fragile Ozark spring hollers.

Out flying low over the lake today, just-arrived Northern Rough-winged Swallows, FOS for me. Reminded me of former Lake Atlanta.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/17 5:45 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
I have declared for many years that at some time I will turn my life over to elimination of privet.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 13, 2017, at 6:57 PM, Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...> wrote:
>
> I have spent 15 years clearing privet from my 12 acres of woods. There will still be privet here when I die or when I move away. It takes several years to clear any given area with pry bar and clippers and chain saw. Every root tries to come back. Every scattering of seed from the shoot of a remnant stump makes more swaths of seedling plants. They do not die back in winter. Sure they make seeds, good-god-loads-of-them, and the birds do eat them. The Hermit Thrushes will even bother with them in the deepest cold, if I am not uprooting privet and worms and grubs from the ground. Some years Robins roost by the thousands in my cedar groves and they eat privet berry. I have watched a Blue-headed Vireo take some in the heart of winter. And waxwings of course: it is a berry. Though I swear they would rather eat anything else. Waxies will even take Nandina, another scourge.
> I cannot walk anywhere on my property without bending to stoop for another starter privet here or there. I have some beautiful sections that are entirely privet free. I have no lawn, just leaf cover and flora and tree. The deer sleep outside my bathroom window. In my high bush blueberry, cleared of priver. And the deer do eat the privet in winter when I pile the clippings on the ground. I find them the next day, sleek and leggy, staring at me, radaring me with those great deer ear cups.
> The plant should be banned for sale in the US. It was a bad experiment. We should now know better. But we don't. Bell has the scourge as well. And no one is really working on it now that Kenny is long gone.
> It is a great shame all around when I find woods overtaken by them. Holla Bend. Ozark river valleys. Ah, the world. I would surrender and just go do privet work every day if I could. RIght now. I still may.
> Don't test me.
> Herschel Raney
>
> Conway AR
>
>> On 3/13/2017 12:44 PM, Reames, Clark -FS wrote:
>> After retirement, I plan to contract a dozer to get a head start on my privet thickets in AR and try to go back native but I am also realistic in the knowledge that I will have to fight privet for the rest of my days. If your land is privet free now, DO NOT INTRODUCE IT. You will regret it. I didn’t introduce it on my place but I sure wish that somebody else didn’t many years prior…
>>
>> <mime-attachment.png>
>> Clark Reames
>> Wildlife Program Manager
>> Forest Service
>> Malheur National Forest
>> p: 541-575-3474 x3474
>> c: 541-620-0681
>> f: 541-575-3002
>> <creames...>
>> 431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
>> John Day, OR 97845
>> www.fs.fed.us
>> <mime-attachment.png><mime-attachment.png><mime-attachment.png>
>> Caring for the land and serving people
>>
>>
>>
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores
>> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:27 AM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>>
>> I think Janet does a good job of promoting the use of native plants. My husband and I often enjoy paraphrasing her advice on invasive Bradford pears: “Prune to ground level and repeat as necessary.”
>>
>> On Mar 13, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:
>>
>> I’m so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
>> SJG
>>
>>
>> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>>
>> From: Mary Ann King
>> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
>> To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: RE: Yard questions
>>
>> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.
>>
>> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.
>>
>> MaryAnn King
>> In the pine woods northwest of London
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
>> Sally Jo Gibson
>> Harrison, AR
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?
>>
>>
>>
>> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>> Licensed Psychologist
>> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>>
>> Elizabeth Findley Shores
>> 4408 Sam Peck Rd.
>> Little Rock, AR 72223
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/17 5:20 pm
From: John Dillon <kisforkryptonite...>
Subject: Re: Junco
I don't see anything here that supports Oregon. There isn't enough contrast to show a real hood. And the color in the flanks is average for many Slate-coloreds. It fits what many brown Slates look like. Junco variability is a sliding scale at best. If you see one with a yellow eye show up, get some serious photos. Other than that, it may just be a tossup with lots of these birds.

John Dillon
Athens, LA

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 13, 2017, at 5:32 PM, Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Here is an interesting one.
>
> Nancy Young
>
>
> On Monday, March 13, 2017 12:13 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
>
> I was hoping to see some replies to this. I'm not so good with the variations of these birds(or a lot of birds) but find them fascinating. Dan Scheiman is not always correct but he typically does question the right things for the right reasons. These photos seem hard to judge for me. Did the bird appear these colors in the binoculars? Looking at the twigs in the background I'm picking up orange here and there as well which has me thinking there was some low sunlight shining in. That would affect the appearance enough to throw me off for sure. It is both interesting and frustrating how birds can look so different in different lighting and even naked eye vs binoculars vs camera. I'll see birds real well in my binoculars and then take a picture and find different colors show that I didn't see. Looking at your pictures and comparing to the few on all about birds... Parts of the wings and the back in your first picture seem way too dark for oregon, enough that I wouldn't call it one. Also, I'm looking at Sibley's 1st edition at the moment and it seems the oregon's head should be more well defined looking like it has a hood. And over on the slate section it shows a "brown adult" as well as some that are found in Canada that look VERY oregon like. I do believe, despite my comments on lighting, that at least some of that is not lighting. The area by the shoulder I would definitely not attribute to the sun and is not typical slate but, there's so much variation among the slates... and even though I don't think the sun caused that color I think if it was shining on the bird it may have magnified it. that brown adult could look like this bird.
> I think this is one of the reasons why I haven't tried too hard to learn beyond "yep, that's a junco." So many variations in some of these birds and I'm still learning individual species. HA.
> Sorry for the rambling. I think currently I'm inclined to agree with Mr Scheiman and say this is a brownish slate, perhaps has some oregon in it? I'd be frustrated too. I have a long list of birds and photos that I could never be certain of.
> Did anyone else have thoughts? Did Joe ever get back to you? Talking these things out and discussions and looking at actual photos teach me more than simply looking in a book. Hope you don't mind that jumble of thoughts.
>
> Daniel Mason
>
>> On 3/12/2017 11:20 AM, Karen Garrett wrote:
>> Hi, Joe. Would you look at these pictures of a junco and tell me if you think this is an Oregon Junco or just a Slate-colored? It looks like an Oregon to me, with the orangey-brown on the back and flanks. Dan Scheiman doesn't seem to think much of my ID skills. He says Slate-colored. I have never seen 9a Slate-colored with all of this orange/rust on it, not even the females. The females brown is more of a grayish brown. He said I should let you see the photos and see what you think. I won't be offended if you think I'm wrong. My frustration is more with Mr Scheiman. The color of this bird was orangish enough that I actually briefly thought Towhee before the bird's shape and size knocked me closer to reality.
>>
>> Thanks, Joe
>>
>> Karen Garrett
>
>
>
> Virus-free. www.avast.com
>
>
> <IMG_6731.JPG>
> <IMG_6725.JPG>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/17 4:58 pm
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
I have spent 15 years clearing privet from my 12 acres of woods. There
will still be privet here when I die or when I move away. It takes
several years to clear any given area with pry bar and clippers and
chain saw. Every root tries to come back. Every scattering of seed from
the shoot of a remnant stump makes more swaths of seedling plants. They
do not die back in winter. Sure they make seeds, good-god-loads-of-them,
and the birds do eat them. The Hermit Thrushes will even bother with
them in the deepest cold, if I am not uprooting privet and worms and
grubs from the ground. Some years Robins roost by the thousands in my
cedar groves and they eat privet berry. I have watched a Blue-headed
Vireo take some in the heart of winter. And waxwings of course: it is a
berry. Though I swear they would rather eat anything else. Waxies will
even take Nandina, another scourge.

I cannot walk anywhere on my property without bending to stoop for
another starter privet here or there. I have some beautiful sections
that are entirely privet free. I have no lawn, just leaf cover and flora
and tree. The deer sleep outside my bathroom window. In my high bush
blueberry, cleared of priver. And the deer do eat the privet in winter
when I pile the clippings on the ground. I find them the next day, sleek
and leggy, staring at me, radaring me with those great deer ear cups.

The plant should be banned for sale in the US. It was a bad experiment.
We should now know better. But we don't. Bell has the scourge as well.
And no one is really working on it now that Kenny is long gone.

It is a great shame all around when I find woods overtaken by them.
Holla Bend. Ozark river valleys. Ah, the world. I would surrender and
just go do privet work every day if I could. RIght now. I still may.

Don't test me.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR


On 3/13/2017 12:44 PM, Reames, Clark -FS wrote:
>
> After retirement, I plan to contract a dozer to get a head start on my
> privet thickets in AR and try to go back native but I am also
> realistic in the knowledge that I will have to fight privet for the
> rest of my days. If your land is privet free now, DO NOT INTRODUCE
> IT. You will regret it. I didnt introduce it on my place but I sure
> wish that somebody else didnt many years prior
>
> Forest Service Shield
>
>
>
> *Clark Reames
> Wildlife Program Manager*
>
> *Forest Service *
>
> *Malheur National Forest*
>
> *p: 541-575-3474 x3474
> c: 541-620-0681
> f: 541-575-3002
> <creames...> <mailto:<creames...>*
>
> 431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
> John Day, OR 97845
> www.fs.fed.us <http://www.fs.fed.us>
> USDA Logo <http://usda.gov/>Forest Service Twitter
> <https://twitter.com/forestservice>USDA Facebook
> <https://www.facebook.com/pages/US-Forest-Service/1431984283714112>
>
> *Caring for the land and serving people*
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Elizabeth F. Shores
> *Sent:* Monday, March 13, 2017 10:27 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Yard questions
>
> I think Janet does a good job of promoting the use of native plants.
> My husband and I often enjoy paraphrasing her advice on invasive
> Bradford pears: Prune to ground level and repeat as necessary.
>
> On Mar 13, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
> <mailto:<sjogibson...>> wrote:
>
> Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
>
> SJG
>
> Sent fromMail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986>for
> Windows 10
>
> *From:*Mary Ann King <mailto:<office...>
> *Sent:*Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> *To:*'Sally Jo Gibson'
> <mailto:<SJOGibson...>;<ARBIRD-L...>
> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:*RE: Yard questions
>
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does
> often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as
> well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she
> recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees,
> shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese
> honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.
>
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks
> are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat
> for protein & rearing their young.
>
> MaryAnn King
>
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock
> office is an expert on yards.
>
> Sally Jo Gibson
>
> Harrison, AR
>
> Hi all,
>
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in
> a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and
> well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one
> or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as
> many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on
> their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and
> carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our
> front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would
> like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively
> low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals
> (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as
> an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
>
> Licensed Psychologist
>
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
> Elizabeth Findley Shores
> 4408 Sam Peck Rd.
> Little Rock, AR 72223
>
>
>
>
>
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA
> solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of
> this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains
> may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal
> penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error,
> please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/17 3:33 pm
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Junco
Here is an interesting one.
Nancy Young

On Monday, March 13, 2017 12:13 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:


I was hoping to see some replies to this.  I'm not so good with the variations of these birds(or a lot of birds) but find them fascinating.  Dan Scheiman is not always correct but he typically does question the right things for the right reasons.  These photos seem hard to judge for me.  Did the bird appear these colors in the binoculars?  Looking at the twigs in the background I'm picking up orange here and there as well which has me thinking there was some low sunlight shining in.  That would affect the appearance enough to throw me off for sure.  It is both interesting and frustrating how birds can look so different in different lighting and even naked eye vs binoculars vs camera.  I'll see birds real well in my binoculars and then take a picture and find different colors show that I didn't see.  Looking at your pictures and comparing to the few on all about birds... Parts of the wings and the back in your first picture seem way too dark for oregon, enough that I wouldn't call it one.  Also, I'm looking at Sibley's 1st edition at the moment and it seems the oregon's head should be more well defined looking like it has a hood.  And over on the slate section it shows a "brown adult" as well as some that are found in Canada that look VERY oregon like.  I do believe, despite my comments on lighting, that at least some of that is not lighting.  The area by the shoulder I would definitely not attribute to the sun and is not typical slate but, there's so much variation among the slates... and even though I don't think the sun caused that color I think if it was shining on the bird it may have magnified it.   that brown adult could look like this bird.
I think this is one of the reasons why I haven't tried too hard to learn beyond "yep, that's a junco."  So many variations in some of these birds and I'm still learning individual species. HA. 
Sorry for the rambling.  I think currently I'm inclined to agree with Mr Scheiman and say this is a brownish slate, perhaps has some oregon in it?  I'd be frustrated too.  I have a long list of birds and photos that I could never be certain of.
Did anyone else have thoughts?  Did Joe ever get back to you?  Talking these things out and discussions and looking at actual photos teach me more than simply looking in a book.  Hope you don't mind that jumble of thoughts. 

Daniel Mason

On 3/12/2017 11:20 AM, Karen Garrett wrote:

Hi, Joe.  Would you look at these pictures of a junco and tell me if you think this is an Oregon Junco or just a Slate-colored?  It looks like an Oregon to me, with the orangey-brown on the back and flanks.  Dan Scheiman doesn't seem to think much of my ID skills.  He says Slate-colored.  I have never seen 9a Slate-colored with all of this orange/rust on it, not even the females.  The females brown is more of a grayish brown.  He said I should let you see the photos and see what you think.  I won't be offended if you think I'm wrong.  My frustration is more with Mr Scheiman.  The color of this bird was orangish enough that I actually briefly thought Towhee before the bird's shape and size knocked me closer to reality.
Thanks, Joe
Karen Garrett



| | Virus-free. www.avast.com |




 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/17 3:18 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again)
I caught a couple of simple suggestions on a PBS program as to how we public can improve our democracy and protect our birds- the first was to call our congressmen every week to comment of issues of concern to us; the second was to be proactive in selecting our representatives (rather than letting them be chosen by the major parties).  I think both are good ideas.
(Incidentally, while not precisely about birds, I do plan to call my Representative and ask that he vote NO on HR 610 - which begins to demolish public education.  I include this as an example of a call.  There are MANY.)


From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Sent: Wednesday, March 8, 2017 10:48 PM
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again)

For many people picking up the phone and calling a legislator is outright scary.  -much easier to get people to write than phone.
I've had this half formed idea for a mini drama skit in which a student must make a call to his or her legislator the next morning.  This might be part of a project or some injustice the child has observed.   Being very nervous the student falls asleep and has a nightmare about the process.  The receptionist at the legislator's office is incredible rude, etc.  
In the morning full of fear the phone call is made and of course, it turns out to be a very pleasant experience.Even thought it might be possible for a real legislative office to role play with it. Or the whole thing could be ad lib with details written by different drama groups.  The efforts could be filmed and sent in and/or there could be a contest with the winning group(s) presenting for the fall AAS Saturday afternoon workshop.  I'm thinking kids might add some humor take some of the fear out of it for adults.   -probably will never get around to doing this.
Jack

On Tuesday, March 7, 2017 6:28 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:


#yiv8428503880 -- filtered {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {panose-1:2 5 6 4 5 5 5 2 2 4;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {font-family:helveticaneue;}#yiv8428503880 filtered {}#yiv8428503880 p.yiv8428503880MsoNormal, #yiv8428503880 li.yiv8428503880MsoNormal, #yiv8428503880 div.yiv8428503880MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv8428503880 a:link, #yiv8428503880 span.yiv8428503880MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv8428503880 a:visited, #yiv8428503880 span.yiv8428503880MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv8428503880 p {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv8428503880 p.yiv8428503880MsoAcetate, #yiv8428503880 li.yiv8428503880MsoAcetate, #yiv8428503880 div.yiv8428503880MsoAcetate {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:8.0pt;}#yiv8428503880 span.yiv8428503880BalloonTextChar {}#yiv8428503880 span.yiv8428503880EmailStyle20 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv8428503880 .yiv8428503880MsoChpDefault {}#yiv8428503880 filtered {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv8428503880 div.yiv8428503880WordSection1 {}#yiv8428503880 Agreed.  I think the NRA has a “hot-line” that sends money whenever they call.  Jeff  From: Mitigating Human Harm on Bird Populations [mailto:<FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>] On Behalf Of Allan Mueller
Sent: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 6:05 PM
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Subject: Fwd: Advice needed (again)  The NRA has had great success by phoning their elected officials.  This may be a better tool than even an original letter.Allan Mueller---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Date: Tue, Mar 7, 2017 at 5:59 PM
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again)
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>

When I use prepared email responses like some of those ghost-written by NGOs, I make substantial changes to the text-- to make it my own—while preserving the key points and data.  I typically ask some questions and can follow-up if they are not answered or addressed. Jeff Short From: Mitigating Human Harm on Bird Populations [mailto:<FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>] On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 3:55 PM
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) There's a timely article in this week's New Yorker about which communication modes are effective (and which not), when contacting federal legislators.

Online petitions, and emails from advocacy group websites, are singled out for not being paid attention to by congressional staff, and thus for being notably ineffective. 
:-/

On 3/6/2017 6:56 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
Absolutely---"all of the above."  My suggested new M.O. would be in addition to Audubon's current activities, including petitions. 

But in the present situation, past approaches aren't likely to be nearly as effective as they once may have been.  If necessary, I would curtail business as usual, in order to fund new, more aggressive action.  We can hope, though, that Audubon is experiencing a big uptick in support, so curtailing could be minimized?

JanineOn 3/6/2017 6:19 PM, Carol Joan Patterson wrote:
Impressive response!  But I do feel it is urgent for all of us to sign Audubon's and others petitions.Joanie From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Sent: Monday, March 6, 2017 6:10 PM
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) Hi Jack and all,

I confess to feeling fairly curmudgeonly about Yarnold's missive.  I do respond to virtually every Audubon call to action, but we all---I, you, Yarnold, many others---seem to agree that the new administration is sui generis. 

I'd like Audubon to do much different/more than it's done in the past, i.e., lobby legislators for funding, and "engage with this administration as we have with 28 that preceded it."

I'd like it to make a big change in priorities, and commit to joining other orgs in immediate, vigorous, and numerous legal challenges to EOs, and lawsuits against retro-regulations.  I'd like to know specifically (in the near-term) and strategically (in the longer term) Audubon's plans to aggressively take on and try to block every possible egregious act of this illegitimate administration---perhaps starting with protecting streams from mine waste and going from there.

Thanks as always,
JanineOn 3/5/2017 3:44 PM, Jack and Pam wrote:
Remember the Fellowship of the Wings list serve?  It has been some time since anything has been posted on this discussion list which is dedicated to conservation topics that are verboten on ARBird.  While posting is open to anyone on the list, discussions have often been initiated by me.  Your responses to these posts have been particularly useful during my term serving on the National Audubon Society Board and have been used to make points at board meetings. During the January NAS board meeting considerable time was devoted to the topic of how Audubon should respond to the current political situation and especially to the Trump Presidency.  The result of those discussions is, in part, reflected in the message below written by David Yarnold.  Your thoughts and reactions on this piece, as well as any comments on the comments generated here, would be invaluable to me. Given the makeup of its membership and current national trends, is Audubon on the right track here?  Note that Audubon has already come out strongly against the misogyny, racism, and general lack of respect for differences that have been expressed in the recent national discourse. So can you help me with your reactions?  Thank you in advance. Jack 
|
|
|
|
| If your in-box looks like mine, you’ve received  a lot of email about the administration’s first draft of a budget outline. There’s a lot of bold-faced or bright red type on those emails and they make it sound like the proposed budget cuts are a done deal. Audubon thinks you deserve a more thoughtful response. Those emails would also lead you to believe that an executive order to begin the long process of undoing the Clean Power Plan is the end of the line. In fact, the administration’s budget proposal was designed to generate headlines about living up to campaign promises, but it also divided Americans on core values like clean air and clean water. The executive orders are just the beginning of a years-long process that will test the Audubon network’s commitment to science, community and fairness.

Keep in mind a president’s budget proposal is just that: an opening bid. More details will emerge in the coming weeks. Those details will be debated for months in Congress. As we’ve seen in recent weeks on issues ranging from privatizing public lands to health care, you have a chance as constituents to influence how that budget gets shaped. As the voice of birds, Audubon will be by your side. We’ve worked to protect funding for the places birds need for 111 years—with Democrat and Republican presidents and across party lines in Congress. And in the coming weeks and months, we will work harder than ever with our elected representatives on both sides of the political aisle to make sure we continue to protect the clean air, clean water, and stable climate birds and people need to thrive.

It’s clear that this administration, left unchecked, will fundamentally step back from all of those protections in the name of reducing the role of government. While it’s the nature of bureaucracies to need an occasional pruning, other agendas are at work, serving special interests like big oil and coal as well as the super-wealthy.
 
Audubon’s leadership chooses to engage with this administration as we have with 28 that preceded it. We simply won’t stand aside while the future of the Arctic Wilderness or Endangered Species Act gets decided. But we’re under no illusions about how hard the fight will be in the face of many in the administration who equate caring conservation with economic hardship. That cynical and, some would say, blasphemous world view is a complete distortion of the values that drove Republicans from Teddy Roosevelt to Richard Nixon to create national parks and bedrock environmental protections.
 
At every step of the budget process, Audubon—with your continued help and support—will fight to protect funding that’s critical to advancing our conservation work.
 
How can we do it? We’re a credible voice for commonsense conservation, and that transcends party or politics. The Atlantic magazine recently  described Audubon as “one of the oldest and most centrist of conservation-minded groups” in the country. In a polarized political climate, Audubon’s membership is unique, with members and donors from across the political spectrum,including Democrats, Republicans and independents. We are community builders, not community dividers because birds create common ground. When I meet with chapters, I see committed conservationists and I can’t readily tell R’s from I’s or D’s.
 
You, our diverse members, make us an effective organization—in the communities we call home and in Washington D.C. Your representatives need to hear why funding conservation work is so important to you and to Audubon’s efforts across the country. You can be confident that  in the coming weeks and months we will offer you opportunities to raise  your powerful voice at the crucial points when it matters most.
 
Remember, now more than ever, you’re what hope looks like to a bird. Get involved and take action today. |

|

|

|

|

 
|
|
|
|
| Sincerely, |

|

|

|

|

 
|
|
|
|
|
| |

|

|

 
|
|
| |

 
| David Yarnold |

 
| CEO and President
National Audubon Society |

|

|

|

|

|


  
 
 


-- Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


"I ain't never did no wrong."
Elvis Presley in "One Night"




 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/17 1:05 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Jonathan,

Yours is a very good question and I thank you for being aware of the toxicity of the products used by most "lawn services". They are intended to fertilize the non-native grasses, and kill "weeds" and "insect pests" but those same chemicals kill not only beneficial insects, invertebrates, and amphibians, but also many birds.

I know you are asking what TO plant but I am going to add to Don Steinkraus' and Mary Ann King's suggestions of what NOT to plant. They offer excellent advice. I agree with their warnings regarding the listed invasive plants. To the invasives I would add Privet, Ailanthus trees (Tree of Heaven), Paulownia trees (Princess Tree), Chinese Bittersweet, Buddleia (Butterfly Bush), Japanese Knotweed, invasive non-clumping bamboo species, and Nandina (Heavenly Bamboo) which is deadly to cats, dogs, and especially to birds who are attracted to and eat the berries.

I have found that the extension services in most Arkansas counties are geared toward agricultural practices, originally intended for livestock and wildlife, but are still being followed several decades after it has been confirmed they are actually harmful to native plants, insects, birds, and other wildlife. Do NOT plant Lespedeza cuneata (Sericea Lespedeza), fescue grass, or other non-native grasses in your yard.

At Ninestone we are still shrinking the size of the original lawns and allowing the small native wildflowers and non-invasive wildflowers that occur in the lawn to go to bloom to support pollinators. So our native plantings are not lawn species, but mostly native prairie grasses, forbs, shrubs and tree species.

I hope these folks don't mind that I mention their names but I know they are dedicated to this topic. Michael Weatherford of the Arkansas Native Plant Society has had success in allowing his lawn to go native, so he may be able to give you suggestions. Joe Neal has also had experience allowing his lawn to go native.
I would also suggest talking to Mary Ann King at Pine Ridge Gardens in London, AR; Susan Frey at Wild Streak Native Plants in Winslow, AR (and facebook); and Ozark Ecological Restoration, Inc. (OERI) in Siloam Springs, AR for their thoughts on what to plant in your yard. OERI might especially have some ideas for grasses for your lawn.

And sorry but I have no idea what micro clover is.

Thanks again for being aware of this issue.

Judith
Ninestone


On Mar 13, 2017, at 2:02 PM, "Donald C. Steinkraus" <steinkr...> wrote:

> We have been battling invasive plants for years in Fayetteville. The standard bad plants: bush and Japanese honeysuckle, Bradford pears, Ailanthus trees, privet, Euonymus, English ivy, Bermuda grass, Johnson grass, Asian lespedeza, multiflora rose. There are several major problems. First, is these plants are very prolific fruit or seed producers. Second, in many cases the seeds can remain viable in the soil for decades. Third, birds eat the fruits of many of the above and transport them widely. So, we have some rural land about 10 miles south of Fayetteville, and baby bush honeysuckles are coming up everywhere in our forest. Most people are not pulling these up. If we stopped pulling them up, walking every foot of the forest, in 5 years it will be wall to wall bush honeysuckle or privet, and goodbye to all the trout lilies, trillium, and other wild flowers.
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Reames, Clark -FS <creames...>
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:44:58 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>
> After retirement, I plan to contract a dozer to get a head start on my privet thickets in AR and try to go back native but I am also realistic in the knowledge that I will have to fight privet for the rest of my days. If your land is privet free now, DO NOT INTRODUCE IT. You will regret it. I didnt introduce it on my place but I sure wish that somebody else didnt many years prior
>
> <image001.png>
> Clark Reames
> Wildlife Program Manager
> Forest Service
> Malheur National Forest
> p: 541-575-3474 x3474
> c: 541-620-0681
> f: 541-575-3002
> <creames...>
> 431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
> John Day, OR 97845
> www.fs.fed.us
> <image002.png><image003.png><image004.png>
> Caring for the land and serving people
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:27 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Yard questions
>
> I think Janet does a good job of promoting the use of native plants. My husband and I often enjoy paraphrasing her advice on invasive Bradford pears: Prune to ground level and repeat as necessary.
>
> On Mar 13, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:
>
> Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
> SJG
>
>
> Sent from Mail for Windows 10
>
> From: Mary Ann King
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'; <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: RE: Yard questions
>
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.
>
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
>
>
>
> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
>
>
>
> Hi all,
>
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?
>
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas
>
> Elizabeth Findley Shores
> 4408 Sam Peck Rd.
> Little Rock, AR 72223
>
>
>
>
>
>
> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.


 

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Date: 3/13/17 12:22 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Birding Kingsland Prairie Natural Area (Henslow's Sparrows)
David Oakley, Jacque Brown, and I left the northwest corner of the state to spend time at Kingsland Prairie, in Cleveland County, yesterday. The goal, of course, was Henslow’s Sparrow. It didn’t take long to flush 3 (on the left side of the gate), which we pursued for about 45 minutes, finding a 4th and 5th during that time. One eventually decided to give us shaded views after landing among the needles of a short pine, before moving to the sunny leaves of an ever-brown post oak nearby. Later, to the right of the gate, we flushed a 6th Henslow’s; this one landing in a sparse, young pine providing GREAT views and photographic opportunities.

Other notables were Brown-headed Nuthatches, Pine Warblers, and a Common Yellowthroat. Thanks to those who came before us for setting us up for success at Kingsland Prairie! Until yesterday, I had only seen one Henslow’s Sparrow ever; a bird that a group of us happened upon at Woolsey Wet Prairie in October of 2011.

For photos of the sparrow, visit: https://mitchell-pruitt.squarespace.com/localbirds <https://mitchell-pruitt.squarespace.com/localbirds>

Stay tuned for more photos from yesterday...

Enjoy!
Mitchell Pruitt
 

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Date: 3/13/17 12:02 pm
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
We have been battling invasive plants for years in Fayetteville. The standard bad plants: bush and Japanese honeysuckle, Bradford pears, Ailanthus trees, privet, Euonymus, English ivy, Bermuda grass, Johnson grass, Asian lespedeza, multiflora rose. There are several major problems. First, is these plants are very prolific fruit or seed producers. Second, in many cases the seeds can remain viable in the soil for decades. Third, birds eat the fruits of many of the above and transport them widely. So, we have some rural land about 10 miles south of Fayetteville, and baby bush honeysuckles are coming up everywhere in our forest. Most people are not pulling these up. If we stopped pulling them up, walking every foot of the forest, in 5 years it will be wall to wall bush honeysuckle or privet, and goodbye to all the trout lilies, trillium, and other wild flowers.

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Reames, Clark -FS <creames...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:44:58 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions

After retirement, I plan to contract a dozer to get a head start on my privet thickets in AR and try to go back native but I am also realistic in the knowledge that I will have to fight privet for the rest of my days. If your land is privet free now, DO NOT INTRODUCE IT. You will regret it. I didnt introduce it on my place but I sure wish that somebody else didnt many years prior

[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
<creames...><mailto:<creames...>

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us<http://www.fs.fed.us>
[USDA Logo]<http://usda.gov/>[Forest Service Twitter]<https://twitter.com/forestservice>[USDA Facebook]<https://www.facebook.com/pages/US-Forest-Service/1431984283714112>

Caring for the land and serving people






From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:27 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions

I think Janet does a good job of promoting the use of native plants. My husband and I often enjoy paraphrasing her advice on invasive Bradford pears: Prune to ground level and repeat as necessary.

On Mar 13, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...><mailto:<sjogibson...>> wrote:

Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
SJG


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Mary Ann King<mailto:<office...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'<mailto:<SJOGibson...>; <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Yard questions

While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.

Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.

MaryAnn King
In the pine woods northwest of London




UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR




Hi all,

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

Elizabeth Findley Shores
4408 Sam Peck Rd.
Little Rock, AR 72223





This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 3/13/17 10:45 am
From: Reames, Clark -FS <creames...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
After retirement, I plan to contract a dozer to get a head start on my privet thickets in AR and try to go back native but I am also realistic in the knowledge that I will have to fight privet for the rest of my days. If your land is privet free now, DO NOT INTRODUCE IT. You will regret it. I didn't introduce it on my place but I sure wish that somebody else didn't many years prior...

[Forest Service Shield]

Clark Reames
Wildlife Program Manager

Forest Service
Malheur National Forest

p: 541-575-3474 x3474
c: 541-620-0681
f: 541-575-3002
<creames...><mailto:<creames...>

431 Patterson Bridge Rd. P.O. Box 909
John Day, OR 97845
www.fs.fed.us<http://www.fs.fed.us>
[USDA Logo]<http://usda.gov/>[Forest Service Twitter]<https://twitter.com/forestservice>[USDA Facebook]<https://www.facebook.com/pages/US-Forest-Service/1431984283714112>

Caring for the land and serving people






From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Elizabeth F. Shores
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:27 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions

I think Janet does a good job of promoting the use of native plants. My husband and I often enjoy paraphrasing her advice on invasive Bradford pears: "Prune to ground level and repeat as necessary."

On Mar 13, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...><mailto:<sjogibson...>> wrote:

I'm so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
SJG


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Mary Ann King<mailto:<office...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'<mailto:<SJOGibson...>; <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Yard questions

While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.

Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.

MaryAnn King
In the pine woods northwest of London




UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR




Hi all,

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

Elizabeth Findley Shores
4408 Sam Peck Rd.
Little Rock, AR 72223





This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 3/13/17 10:27 am
From: Elizabeth F. Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
I think Janet does a good job of promoting the use of native plants. My husband and I often enjoy paraphrasing her advice on invasive Bradford pears: Prune to ground level and repeat as necessary.

> On Mar 13, 2017, at 12:09 PM, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:
>
> Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
> SJG
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10
>
> From: Mary Ann King <mailto:<office...>
> Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
> To: 'Sally Jo Gibson' <mailto:<SJOGibson...>; <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: RE: Yard questions
>
> While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on. <>
>
> Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.
>
> MaryAnn King
> In the pine woods northwest of London
>
>
>
>
> UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
>
>
>
> Hi all,
>
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?
>
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas

Elizabeth Findley Shores
4408 Sam Peck Rd.
Little Rock, AR 72223



 

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Date: 3/13/17 10:13 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Junco
I was hoping to see some replies to this. I'm not so good with the
variations of these birds(or a lot of birds) but find them fascinating.
Dan Scheiman is not always correct but he typically does question the
right things for the right reasons. These photos seem hard to judge for
me. Did the bird appear these colors in the binoculars? Looking at the
twigs in the background I'm picking up orange here and there as well
which has me thinking there was some low sunlight shining in. That would
affect the appearance enough to throw me off for sure. It is both
interesting and frustrating how birds can look so different in different
lighting and even naked eye vs binoculars vs camera. I'll see birds
real well in my binoculars and then take a picture and find different
colors show that I didn't see. Looking at your pictures and comparing to
the few on all about birds... Parts of the wings and the back in your
first picture seem way too dark for oregon, enough that I wouldn't call
it one. Also, I'm looking at Sibley's 1st edition at the moment and it
seems the oregon's head should be more well defined looking like it has
a hood. And over on the slate section it shows a "brown adult" as well
as some that are found in Canada that look VERY oregon like. I do
believe, despite my comments on lighting, that at least some of that is
not lighting. The area by the shoulder I would definitely not attribute
to the sun and is not typical slate but, there's so much variation among
the slates... and even though I don't think the sun caused that color I
think if it was shining on the bird it may have magnified it. that
brown adult could look like this bird.
I think this is one of the reasons why I haven't tried too hard to learn
beyond "yep, that's a junco." So many variations in some of these birds
and I'm still learning individual species. HA.
Sorry for the rambling. I think currently I'm inclined to agree with Mr
Scheiman and say this is a brownish slate, perhaps has some oregon in
it? I'd be frustrated too. I have a long list of birds and photos that
I could never be certain of.
Did anyone else have thoughts? Did Joe ever get back to you? Talking
these things out and discussions and looking at actual photos teach me
more than simply looking in a book. Hope you don't mind that jumble of
thoughts.

Daniel Mason

On 3/12/2017 11:20 AM, Karen Garrett wrote:
> Hi, Joe. Would you look at these pictures of a junco and tell me if
> you think this is an Oregon Junco or just a Slate-colored? It looks
> like an Oregon to me, with the orangey-brown on the back and flanks.
> Dan Scheiman doesn't seem to think much of my ID skills. He says
> Slate-colored. I have never seen 9a Slate-colored with all of this
> orange/rust on it, not even the females. The females brown is more of
> a grayish brown. He said I should let you see the photos and see what
> you think. I won't be offended if you think I'm wrong. My
> frustration is more with Mr Scheiman. The color of this bird was
> orangish enough that I actually briefly thought Towhee before the
> bird's shape and size knocked me closer to reality.
>
> Thanks, Joe
>
> Karen Garrett




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Date: 3/13/17 10:09 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
Im so very sorry for making this recommendation!!
SJG


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

From: Mary Ann King<mailto:<office...>
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 12:00 PM
To: 'Sally Jo Gibson'<mailto:<SJOGibson...>; <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Yard questions

While Janet Carson is undoubtedly an expert in her field, she does often recommend species that are not native & are invasive as well. I have been fighting Winter honeysuckle for years which she recommends for bees. Invasive species crowd out native trees, shrubs & grasses. Proof? Look at Callery pear, Japanese honeysuckle, privet, Kudzu and on & on.

Native species are best to use if you want to feed birds. Oaks are at the top of the list for having caterpillars which birds eat for protein & rearing their young.

MaryAnn King
In the pine woods northwest of London




UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR




Hi all,

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas


 

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Date: 3/13/17 8:27 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <SJOGibson...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
UA Cooperative Extension Service. Janet Carson in the Little Rock office is an expert on yards.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR


From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of jonathanperry24
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2017 10:07 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Yard questions

Hi all,

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas
 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/17 8:26 am
From: Elizabeth F. Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Yard questions
It is a very good question. I have experimented for several years with Southern Indica azaleas as an evergreen filler beneath the oaks and hickories that surround our house. The azaleas are not food sources for many species of wildlife (bumblebees, maybe) but they do provide cover and are not invasive. Plus, they are culturally appropriate for a Southern yard! I was careful to select Indicas with single, not double, blossoms so pollinators can use them. Most of mine are G. G. Gerbing. I feed them after the spring bloom to offset the alkaline conditions and give them a small but regular watering in the summer but otherwise do nothing to maintain them. We left plenty of room around the azaleas for a wide variety of native trees, shrubs, and perennials, all of them deciduous or ephemeral, but thanks to the azaleas our property doesn’t look bare and neglected in the winter.


> On Mar 13, 2017, at 10:06 AM, jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...> wrote:
>
> Hi all,
>
> This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned. This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted, with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals (and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?
>
>
>
> Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
> Licensed Psychologist
> Fayetteville, Arkansas

Elizabeth Findley Shores
4408 Sam Peck Rd.
Little Rock, AR 72223
 

Back to top
Date: 3/13/17 8:06 am
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Yard questions
Hi all,

This is for bird-ers, plant-ers, and animal-ers alike. We live in a
neighborhood in eastern Fayetteville which is well-treed and well-lawned.
This time of year, we frequently see trucks from one or another of the
various lawn maintenance companies, as well as many of our DIY neighbors
fertilizing and spreading other stuff on their lawns. The result in the
summer is a lot of very green and carefully mowed carpets. We've resisted,
with the result that our front and back yards are largely pretty bare
ground. We would like some advice on "in-between" choices which are
relatively low-maintenance and benign/supportive of birds and other animals
(and plants). We're trying to find out more about micro-clover as an
alternative to lawn grasses. Thoughts?



Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

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Date: 3/12/17 8:54 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FOS Barn Swallows
I saw my FOS Barn Swallow pair on a favorite perching site near the nesting site (known from previous years inhabitants) in West Pulaski County today.  Donna Haynes West Pulaski County
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 3/12/17 6:52 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: cyclone of waxwings
At least it wasn’t like the shrike that we tossed a piece of burger bun to, who dropped it & looked at us like “where’s the BEEF?” Karen Hart [Image result for shrike]

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Don Simons
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2017 7:26 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: cyclone of waxwings

Wait just a minute! I would have never believed that. Bill Shepherd eats at Burger King? Will wonders never end?

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 12, 2017, at 1:44 PM, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...><mailto:<stoneax63...>> wrote:

At 9:55 this morning I was in the Burger King eatery located immediately west of the intersection of Markham and Cedar in Little Rock when what was possibly the largest flock of waxwings I've ever seen zoomed in to attack the berries that decorate ornamental hollies planted on the property. Being inside, I never could see all the birds at once, but there were at least 500 waxwings and maybe more than a thousand.



I was in a rush and didn't have time to look at every bird; but, as far as I could tell, none of them had a gray breast and a catbird-like orange patch under the tail.



But I'll keep looking whenever I get a chance. The chance of finding a Bohemian Waxwing in a flock increases proportionally with the size of the flock.



Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...><mailto:<Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918
 

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Date: 3/12/17 5:26 pm
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Re: cyclone of waxwings
Wait just a minute! I would have never believed that. Bill Shepherd eats at Burger King? Will wonders never end?

Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 12, 2017, at 1:44 PM, Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...> wrote:
>
> At 9:55 this morning I was in the Burger King eatery located immediately west of the intersection of Markham and Cedar in Little Rock when what was possibly the largest flock of waxwings I've ever seen zoomed in to attack the berries that decorate ornamental hollies planted on the property. Being inside, I never could see all the birds at once, but there were at least 500 waxwings and maybe more than a thousand.
>
>
> I was in a rush and didn't have time to look at every bird; but, as far as I could tell, none of them had a gray breast and a catbird-like orange patch under the tail.
>
>
> But I'll keep looking whenever I get a chance. The chance of finding a Bohemian Waxwing in a flock increases proportionally with the size of the flock.
>
>
> Bill Shepherd
>
> Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

 

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Date: 3/12/17 4:22 pm
From: Teresa Mathews <ladytstarlight...>
Subject: yellow warblers & pair of kingfishers
There is a fall out of Yellow Warblers literally hundreds of them just
below the housekeeping building in the woods and around what they
call Picnic Hill, this evening as I was leaving. Plus earlier today
behind cabins 6-9 were a pair of Kingfishers fishing from tree to lake. I
had no time to watch anything else, too busy. At Lake Catherine State
Park. Teresa , Hot Springs, AR.

--

 

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Date: 3/12/17 11:44 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: cyclone of waxwings
At 9:55 this morning I was in the Burger King eatery located immediately west of the intersection of Markham and Cedar in Little Rock when what was possibly the largest flock of waxwings I've ever seen zoomed in to attack the berries that decorate ornamental hollies planted on the property. Being inside, I never could see all the birds at once, but there were at least 500 waxwings and maybe more than a thousand.


I was in a rush and didn't have time to look at every bird; but, as far as I could tell, none of them had a gray breast and a catbird-like orange patch under the tail.


But I'll keep looking whenever I get a chance. The chance of finding a Bohemian Waxwing in a flock increases proportionally with the size of the flock.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918

 

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Date: 3/12/17 11:11 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Ruby-throated and Other Hummingbirds Some Things to Know
The Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are in North Louisiana. Some information that might help:

Hummingbirds are attracted to red and can see it 3/4 miles away. If your feeders are hidden, you can put out red plastic plates where they can be seen and when they come in to inspect, they can find your feeders.

A hummer visits 1000 flowers a day for insects and nectar. You need to have clusters of flowers in place for Spring and Summer blooming. You can use clusters of Bee Balm, Blazing Star, Cardinal Flowers, Columbine, Coral Bells, Penstemon, Phlox, Salvia, Verbena, Zinnia, Coral Honeysuckle Trumpet Vine, and others to cover all the seasons. Plant in groups and not just a few scattered throughout the yard and use native plants as much as possible to support nectar and insects. Do not expect just putting a hummingbird feeder out is enough and you have met your responsibility. Change the food about every 3 days or when it is no longer clear. Hummers will fly in about every 15 minutes and when you see them fly away from the feeder without using it, that is a good indication that it may be sour.

Put out 3 feeders at least 10 feet apart and where hummers at one feeder cannot see hummers at the other feeders. Hummers will defend their food source from other hummers.

Work to prevent them from being trapped in the garage or barn. They are attracted to the car tail lights and windows. An insect net on a extension pole works good at safely removing hummers from inside.

Keep your cat indoors. You know that they lay in the flower beds in wait and catch hummingbirds.

Be a good wildlife landlord not a wildlife slumlord.


http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs
 

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Date: 3/12/17 9:22 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Junco
Hi, Joe. Would you look at these pictures of a junco and tell me if you
think this is an Oregon Junco or just a Slate-colored? It looks like an
Oregon to me, with the orangey-brown on the back and flanks. Dan Scheiman
doesn't seem to think much of my ID skills. He says Slate-colored. I have
never seen 9a Slate-colored with all of this orange/rust on it, not even
the females. The females brown is more of a grayish brown. He said I
should let you see the photos and see what you think. I won't be offended
if you think I'm wrong. My frustration is more with Mr Scheiman. The
color of this bird was orangish enough that I actually briefly thought
Towhee before the bird's shape and size knocked me closer to reality.

Thanks, Joe

Karen Garrett

 

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Date: 3/12/17 8:53 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: hummer
One inch of snow here in Pangburn. It is very strange to watch the Rufous
hummingbird feeding with snow on the ground, buildings and timber. It seems
to not be bothered by the snow or cold.

Terry Butler

 

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Date: 3/12/17 8:44 am
From: Robin Buff <robinbuff...>
Subject: Re: Dr. Chandra Taylor Smith-speaker at AAS Meeting
This means she was diagnosed before she spoke at our meeting. I enjoyed talking to hear and appreciated her energy and passion. Very sad. Thank you for letting us know.
> On Mar 12, 2017, at 9:12 AM, Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I was shocked and saddened to hear this from Dottie. She was a fine woman and great speaker.
>
>
> On Saturday, 11 March 2017 11:18 PM, Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> <mailto:<ctboyles...>> wrote:
>
>
> Subject: Dr. Chandra Taylor Smith-speaker at AAS Meeting
>
> For those who attended the AAS meeting at the Delta Resort and Spa, you may remember Dr Chandra Taylor Smith who spoke Saturday night on Audubon diversity. While searching for another article, I accidently found an article, “In memory of Dr. Chandra Taylor Smith.” Apparently she was diagnosed with stage 4 liver cancer in August and passed away Feb 14, 2017. I was totally shocked as I hadn’t heard anything. How very sad. She was 55.
> Dottie
>
>


 

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Date: 3/12/17 7:13 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fw: Dr. Chandra Taylor Smith-speaker at AAS Meeting
I was shocked and saddened to hear this from Dottie.  She was a fine woman and great speaker.  

On Saturday, 11 March 2017 11:18 PM, Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> wrote:


Subject: Dr. Chandra Taylor Smith-speaker at AAS Meeting  For those who attended the AAS meeting at the Delta Resort and Spa, you may remember Dr Chandra Taylor Smith who spoke Saturday night on Audubon diversity. While searching for another article, I accidently found an article, “In memory of Dr. Chandra Taylor Smith.” Apparently she was diagnosed with stage 4 liver cancer in August and passed away Feb 14, 2017. I was totally shocked as I hadn’t heard anything. How very sad. She was 55.Dottie

#yiv1393335919 #yiv1393335919 -- _filtered #yiv1393335919 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv1393335919 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv1393335919 {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}#yiv1393335919 #yiv1393335919 p.yiv1393335919MsoNormal, #yiv1393335919 li.yiv1393335919MsoNormal, #yiv1393335919 div.yiv1393335919MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv1393335919 a:link, #yiv1393335919 span.yiv1393335919MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv1393335919 a:visited, #yiv1393335919 span.yiv1393335919MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv1393335919 span.yiv1393335919EmailStyle17 {color:blue;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;}#yiv1393335919 span.yiv1393335919EmailStyle18 {color:blue;font-weight:normal;font-style:normal;}#yiv1393335919 .yiv1393335919MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv1393335919 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv1393335919 div.yiv1393335919WordSection1 {}#yiv1393335919
 

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Date: 3/11/17 1:53 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Best Management Practices for small arms firing ranges
I ran across a couple of documents from the Interstate Technology Regulatory
Council relating to our discussions a week or so ago on lead ammo.
Wildlife exposure to a variety of contaminants-especially lead-is a concern.



http://www.itrcweb.org/Guidance/ListDocuments?TopicID=26
<http://www.itrcweb.org/Guidance/ListDocuments?TopicID=26&SubTopicID=25>
&SubTopicID=25



Please note that these best management practices relate to ranges that will
accumulate large amounts of lead and other contaminants associated with
shooting at targets. The levels across the landscape during roaming-hunting
will not be as concentrated as at a firing ranges. (For what it's worth,
the remote firing ranges I have used in Arkansas would probably have high
environmental contaminant levels of concern and I have not observed any BMPs
at those sites.)



Remediation of firing ranges can be a costly affair. Using ammo that does
not create unnecessary contamination is a more cost-effective alternative.



Apologies for cross-posting to members of all three listservs.



Jeff Short








 

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Date: 3/11/17 9:21 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Why seabirds ingest plastic
http://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/cen-09445-notw5




 

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Date: 3/10/17 1:22 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Birding Survey Opportunity
Forwarding from a posting by Kim Roberts McAfee on the Arkansas Birders FB Page:Henderson State University's Simonson Biological Field Station invites interested birders to a bird survey on its property at Lake DeGray to assist with implementation of a planned wildlife management on the 184 acre property in Bismarck, AR. According to Dr Troy Bray, chair of the HSU Biology Department, the research center is partnering with the Army Corps of Engineers to specifically develop habitat for Bobwhite Quail.  Date: Saturday, March 25. Time: Station opens at 6 am. Orientation at 6:30 am. Birding from 7 am to 2 pm. Continental breakfast and lunch provided. For directions, access the HSU website to link to Academics-departments-Biology and go to Simonson Field Station for the map. Or for more information, contact Dr. James Engman, HSU Biology Department. <engmanj...> or 870-230-5314.

Donna HaynesWest Pulaski Co.
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 3/10/17 8:57 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Thayer's Gull
Still present on sandbar also adult Herring Gull best seen from Dardanelle side .

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 3/9/17 12:55 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: reply from state wildlife veterinarian Fwd: CWD and scavengers


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
> Subject: Re: CWD and scavengers
> Date: March 9, 2017 1:06:03 PM CST
> To: Judith Griffith <9waterfall9...>
>
> Judith,
>
> You may want to share this on ARBIRD for the benefit of those folks who followed this thread there, and who don't subscribe to the Fellowship of Wings listserv.
>
> Thanks for sharing this.
>
> Barry
>
>
> On Mar 9, 2017, at 12:32 PM, Judy & Don wrote:
>
>> Thank you, Dr. Ballard. I will share this with <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...> so other birders can read your information.
>> In the future we will contact a field agent regarding probable CWD deer to collect samples.
>>
>> Judith
>> Ninestone, Carroll County
>>
>> On Mar 9, 2017, at 12:15 PM, "Ballard, Jenn" <Jennifer.Ballard...> wrote:
>>
>>> Ms. Griffith,
>>> Thank you for contacting me regarding this issue. I apologize for the delayed response, I have been working in the field. I do not believe there is any evidence to suggest that birds would become infected or develop disease from the CWD prion. Prions can pass through the GI tract of birds, but it would be virtually impossible for us to try to prevent scavenging of deer carcasses by these species. If sick or recently dead deer are observed, please notify our agency so that CWD samples can be collected.
>>> Sincerely,
>>> Jennifer Ballard
>>>
>>> Jennifer R. Ballard, DVM, PhD
>>> State Wildlife Veterinarian
>>> Arkansas Game and Fish Commission
>>> #2 Natural Resources Drive
>>> Little Rock, Arkansas 72205
>>> Office 501-223-6366
>>> Cell 501-291-8926
>>>
>>> From: Judy & Don [mailto:<9waterfall9...>]
>>> Sent: Thursday, March 2, 2017 11:09 AM
>>> To: Ballard, Jenn <Jennifer.Ballard...>
>>> Subject: Fwd: CWD and scavengers
>>>
>>> Hi, Dr. Ballard.
>>>
>>> I posted to ARBIRD earlier this week about bald eagles consuming a deer that had possibly died of CWD. Many questions arise from the transmission of prions in droppings, to transmission of the disease itself in birds and animals that are not cervids.
>>>
>>> Thanks for sharing your knowledge of the situation.
>>>
>>> Judith Ann Griffith
>>> Ninestone Land Trust
>>> Carroll County, AR
>>>
>>> Begin forwarded message:
>>>
>>>
>>> From: Karen And Jim Rowe <rollingrfarm...>
>>> Subject: Re: CWD and scavengers
>>> Date: March 2, 2017 10:32:23 AM CST
>>> To: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>, Barry Haas <bhaas...>
>>>
>>> AGFC has recently hired a veterinarian with experience with CWD as well as birds of prey. I suggest you contact Dr. Jenn Ballard with your question about disease transmission between avian scavengers and cervids. Her email is <Jennifer.Ballard...>
>>>
>>> Karen Rowe AGFC
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>>
>>> On Mar 2, 2017, at 9:07 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Following my post about eagles consuming the carcass of a deer that possibly died of CWD - and there are many unobserved cases of this scavenging behavior based on the number of CWD deaths in NW Arkansas alone - Barry Haas asked about disease transmission to eagles and vultures, etc. The most recent understanding I had been given by an AGFC agent was that the disease was only transmissible to other corvids. So this week I inquired about the latest findings on CWD and scavengers, specifically raptors and other avians, as well as other non-cervid animals. I received this info from the manager of the Elk Center in Ponca. Whatever is shared in this upcoming meeting should soon be available on the AGFC website.
>>>
>>> Judith
>>> Ninestone, Carroll County
>>>
>>>
>>> The public meeting will be at 6pm on March 14th at the Carroll Electric building in Jasper. I sent an email to Little Rock asking if a video will be available on the website, or even live streamed, but haven't had a response yet. Will let you know.
>>>
>>>
>>
>


 

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Date: 3/9/17 7:29 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Great news from Audubon Arkansas
Wins like this don't happen overnight!  Great for birds and people and some positive environmental news for a change.
Big Win in the Fight for Improved Renewable Energy Policy


|
|
|
| | |

|

|
|
| |
Big Win in the Fight for Improved Renewable Energy Policy
Audubon Arkansas Plays Key Role in Advancing Solar Policy | |

|

|



Jack   (This message comes to via solar power)
 

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Date: 3/8/17 5:23 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: "Oregon" Junco near Lake Fayetteville
Saw a male Oregon Junco near Lake Fayetteville today. It was between the
parking area south of the Botanical Gardens, and the area where you head
into the woods to go to the Mulhollan blind. There was one cormorant and a
couple of ducks on the lake. A Bald Eagle buzzed them and the ducks flew
off before I got a positive ID. They were dabblers, probably Gadwall. I
saw 2 swallows flying around, but didn't see anything but a silhouette.
They were not Barn Swallows.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

 

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Date: 3/8/17 2:39 pm
From: kjdillard <kjdillard...>
Subject: Sandhill Cranes


Does anyone know if the Sandhill Cranes are still in the Texarkana area?
Thanks for the feedback.
Karyn Dillard near Lake Nixon WLR <Kjdillard...> 


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 

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Date: 3/8/17 1:22 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: CROSSBILLS-YES. SCOTER-NO.
Red Crossbills were still present in the Ozark NF near Shoes Lake. Bill Beall and Jim Nieting found 4 there on Saturday. Joan Reynolds and I saw 5-6 on Sunday. I was out there today again with two UA-Fayetteville graduate students, Pooja Panwar and Anant Deswhal, both with field bird song recording experience. They collected sound files that will be analyzed by Matthew Young at Cornell for determination of song types. (More on that to come).

We were joined by Charlie Lyons and Nancy Young. What an incredibly beautiful morning to visit magnificent Shortleaf Pine stands in the Ozarks. So lovely it wasnt easy to keep looking up into the pine canopy for foraging crossbills but we did. We also got the nuthatch trifecta (White-breasted, Red-breasted, Brown-headed).

On the way back, we stopped at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility for the Surf Scoter present yesterday. Lots of ducks, good diversity, fine views of male shovelers in all their glory -- but no scoter.


 

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Date: 3/8/17 1:15 pm
From: Delos McCauley <edelos...>
Subject: White-winged Dove
For the past four days we have been having a White-winged Dove visit our
feeder in our backyard. It sometimes comes in the morning but more often in
the afternoon, after 4:00. If you care to camp out at our dining room
window for a chanced sighting, you are welcome. Just give us a call.



Delos McCauley

Phone 870 550 7861 (cell)

1405 Silver Fox Lane

Pine Bluff, AR 71603


 

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Date: 3/8/17 10:57 am
From: Tim Tyler <tylertim204...>
Subject: FOS Purple martins
Three Purple martins just arrived to check out the Martin house. Almyra, Ar

 

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Date: 3/8/17 8:32 am
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Henslow's Sparrow at Kingsland Prairie NA
Randy Robinson and I birded Kingsland Prairie Natural Area yesterday (3/7),
searching for the Henslow's Sparrow. This locale is just east of Kingsland
(Cleveland Co.), southwest of Pine Bluff. We found a single Henslow's
Sparrow, with help, just to the right of the sign and gate. This was a
lifer for both of us. We got some great views pictures of it as it perched
about 10 ft away from us in a sapling pine. We walked around for 2 hours
and found about 6 Eastern Towhees and probably just as many Brown-headed
Nuthatches. Also, there were several Variegated Fritillaries about, which
were first of the year for us.

After Kingsland, we went to Lake Saracen in Pine Bluff. We found a lone,
male Red-breasted Merganser and a very fidgety wren among several Swamp and
Song Sparrows in the reeds. We came away with no ID but had an inkling
that this was our target, the Marsh Wren.

We continued from Lake Saracen to another known hotbed of Marsh Wrens,
Wilbur West Rd. Wetlands. We found gobs of ducks, mostly Green-winged
Teals, and several Red-winged Blackbirds were singing around the wetland
area. A Cooper's Hawk and Red-tailed Hawk were seen flying overhead.
Nearly at the end of our search, we came upon a stand of reeds and rushes
that were rattling away. We did a little playback to get glimpses of one
Marsh Wren and we could hear the song of a second nearby.

Devin Moon
East End, AR

 

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Date: 3/8/17 6:39 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map
One of the points on the link is that people can check the maps from previous years to see when Hummingbirds arrived from 1996 – 2016. Get them out before you see a hummer hovering in a spot where the feeder was last year and wondering where it is.

Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs

From: Jeffrey Short
Sent: Wednesday, March 8, 2017 8:28 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map

I have heard reports about how our warmer winter have been the highest ever, but were surpassed by the temperatures in 2012.

Checking the 2012 hummingbird map shows arrivals in central Arkansas by 15 Mar.

Suppose it is time to get our feeders ready. (Dang; missed the Senior Discount Day at Kroger to buy some sugar!)



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 8:52 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map



The Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are arriving along our coast. It is time to get your feeders cleaned and ready to be put out. Follow the progress on the link below. Other species in the west may have a similar arrival.



http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html





Jerry W. Davis

Hot Springs

 

Back to top
Date: 3/8/17 6:28 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map
I have heard reports about how our warmer winter have been the highest ever,
but were surpassed by the temperatures in 2012.

Checking the 2012 hummingbird map shows arrivals in central Arkansas by 15
Mar.

Suppose it is time to get our feeders ready. (Dang; missed the Senior
Discount Day at Kroger to buy some sugar!)



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jerry Davis
Sent: Tuesday, March 07, 2017 8:52 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map



The Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are arriving along our coast. It is time to
get your feeders cleaned and ready to be put out. Follow the progress on the
link below. Other species in the west may have a similar arrival.



http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html





Jerry W. Davis

Hot Springs


 

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Date: 3/7/17 7:51 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Art for the Birds III
Art for the Birds III, an exhibit of bird themed works in any media,
will be held at the Rialto Gallery in Morrilton from April 28 through
May 8. I will then move the works to various other venues around
Morrilton so that they get maximum exposure without risk of damage from
renters at the Rialto.

We are going to try to organize some prizes for Best of Show, 1st, 2nd,
and 3rd place. If we get enough sponsors we'll even include the Vox
Populi award ('voice of the people', meaning you get to vote at the
reception).

The reception for this exhibit is being planned for Saturday evening 6
May at 6:00-8:00pm. We are planning to have live music, food, a
presentation and awards.

To help raise money for the reception we will actually need to charge an
entry fee for this competition. $10 for the first entry and $5/entry
for the next two with a maximum of 3 entries per artist. Anyone who is
willing to 'sit' the Gallery during the week so it can be open to the
public for a few hours will have their fee waived.

Also, in order to try to organize a little better, I have an entry form
that I'd like to use for this one.

We can hang around 50 works in the Rialto Gallery, so we're encouraging
everyone to enter this exhibit. PM me with an e-mail address to get the
entry form.

Thanks!

George (n. Conway County doing the exhibit at least one more time!)

 

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Date: 3/7/17 6:41 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - March 7
It started off overcast and cool then turned windy, warm, and clear on the
bird survey today. 74 species were found. The Purple Martins finally
showed up as well as Barn Swallows. Pied-billed Grebes are starting to
yodel. A few geese were moving today also. Here is my list for today:



Greater White-fronted Geese - 12

Snow Geese - 5

Ross' Goose - 1

Canada Geese - 4

Wood Duck - 7

Gadwall - 113

American Wigeon - 1

Mallard - 52

Blue-winged Teal - 34

Northern Shoveler - 180

Northern Pintail - 3

Green-winged Teal - 17

Ring-necked Duck - 135

Hooded Merganser - 10

Pied-billed Grebe - 18

Double-crested Cormorant - 10

Anhinga - 1

Great-blue Heron - 12

Great Egret - 2

Black Vulture - 11

Turkey Vulture - 60

Northern Harrier - 5

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 6

King Rail - 3

Virginia Rail - 6

American Coot - 562

Greater Yellowlegs - 3

Wilson's Snipe - 51

Rock Pigeon - 4

Mourning Dove - 7

Great-horned Owl - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 9

Eastern Phoebe - 8

Blue Jay - 3

American Crow - 70

Fish Crow - 1

Purple Martin - 3

Tree Swallow - 51

Barn Swallow - 7

Carolina Chickadee - 6

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Brown Creeper - 1

Carolina Wren - 3

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 2

Marsh Wren - 4

Golden-crowned Kinglet - 4

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Hermit Thrush - 3

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Brown Thrasher - 5

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 33

Pine Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Field Sparrow - 1

Savannah Sparrow - 21

Le Conte's Sparrow - 2

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 9

Swamp Sparrow - 5

White-throated Sparrow - 21

White-crowned Sparrow - 13

Northern Cardinal - 21

Red-winged Blackbird - 23

Eastern Meadowlark - 5

Rusty Blackbird - 2

Common Grackle - 2



Odonates:



Common Green Darners

Baskettail species

Damselfly species





Herps:



American Alligator

Red-eared Slider

Cajun Chorus Frogs - calling

Spring Peepers - calling

Southern Leopard Frogs - calling







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






 

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Date: 3/7/17 2:21 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project Hats for Next Season
We are happy to announce that Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project hats are now available for pre-order! Hats will be $15.00 each and all proceeds will go towards funding our project during the 2017 season. Order one now to wear around town, out owling, or abroad!

If you would like to order one, please contact me as soon as possible via email (<mlpruitt24...> <mailto:<mlpruitt24...>), as there will be a limited supply! They should be in-hand and ready for delivery later this month.

The hats are charcoal gray, with a saw-whet owl embroidered on the front and "Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project” embroidered on the back.

We are excited to be gearing up for next season...no doubt the team will all be wearing their new hats!

As it warms, I am still detecting 2 saw-whets with transmitters in Madison County! When will they move north?

Best,
Mitchell Pruitt
 

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Date: 3/7/17 11:48 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
Thank you Joanie,  I'll be passing this on to David Yarnold.  He specifically asked board members for feedback. 
I told him about the little fellowshipofwings discussion group back when we were sharing thoughts on the Audubon  conservation ranching program and you all had varying responses. Of course, Audubon does sophisticated audience research, but I think such efforts sometimes miss things.  In the conservation ranching case our collective responses mirrored other research results.
Thanks again
Jack

On Monday, March 6, 2017 4:51 PM, Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:


Jack and all, I sign many petitions, and I believe those posted by the National Audubon Society are particularly relevant.   The way to deal with the lead issue, and many many other threats to our birds is to unite.  If you haven't already, please take the time to read the message by David Yarnold.  I was heartened by these words.
Joanie


From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 3:44 PM
Subject: Advice needed (again)

Remember the Fellowship of the Wings list serve?  It has been some time since anything has been posted on this discussion list which is dedicated to conservation topics that are verboten on ARBird.  While posting is open to anyone on the list, discussions have often been initiated by me.  Your responses to these posts have been particularly useful during my term serving on the National Audubon Society Board and have been used to make points at board meetings.
During the January NAS board meeting considerable time was devoted to the topic of how Audubon should respond to the current political situation and especially to the Trump Presidency.  The result of those discussions is, in part, reflected in the message below written by David Yarnold.  Your thoughts and reactions on this piece, as well as any comments on the comments generated here, would be invaluable to me. Given the makeup of its membership and current national trends, is Audubon on the right track here?  Note that Audubon has already come out strongly against the misogyny, racism, and general lack of respect for differences that have been expressed in the recent national discourse.
So can you help me with your reactions?  Thank you in advance.
Jack

|
|
|
|
| If your in-box looks like mine, you’ve received  a lot of email about the administration’s first draft of a budget outline. There’s a lot of bold-faced or bright red type on those emails and they make it sound like the proposed budget cuts are a done deal. Audubon thinks you deserve a more thoughtful response. Those emails would also lead you to believe that an executive order to begin the long process of undoing the Clean Power Plan is the end of the line. In fact, the administration’s budget proposal was designed to generate headlines about living up to campaign promises, but it also divided Americans on core values like clean air and clean water. The executive orders are just the beginning of a years-long process that will test the Audubon network’s commitment to science, community and fairness.

Keep in mind a president’s budget proposal is just that: an opening bid. More details will emerge in the coming weeks. Those details will be debated for months in Congress. As we’ve seen in recent weeks on issues ranging from privatizing public lands to health care, you have a chance as constituents to influence how that budget gets shaped. As the voice of birds, Audubon will be by your side. We’ve worked to protect funding for the places birds need for 111 years—with Democrat and Republican presidents and across party lines in Congress. And in the coming weeks and months, we will work harder than ever with our elected representatives on both sides of the political aisle to make sure we continue to protect the clean air, clean water, and stable climate birds and people need to thrive.

It’s clear that this administration, left unchecked, will fundamentally step back from all of those protections in the name of reducing the role of government. While it’s the nature of bureaucracies to need an occasional pruning, other agendas are at work, serving special interests like big oil and coal as well as the super-wealthy.
 
Audubon’s leadership chooses to engage with this administration as we have with 28 that preceded it. We simply won’t stand aside while the future of the Arctic Wilderness or Endangered Species Act gets decided. But we’re under no illusions about how hard the fight will be in the face of many in the administration who equate caring conservation with economic hardship. That cynical and, some would say, blasphemous world view is a complete distortion of the values that drove Republicans from Teddy Roosevelt to Richard Nixon to create national parks and bedrock environmental protections.
 
At every step of the budget process, Audubon—with your continued help and support—will fight to protect funding that’s critical to advancing our conservation work.
 
How can we do it? We’re a credible voice for commonsense conservation, and that transcends party or politics. The Atlantic magazine recently  described Audubon as “one of the oldest and most centrist of conservation-minded groups” in the country. In a polarized political climate, Audubon’s membership is unique, with members and donors from across the political spectrum,including Democrats, Republicans and independents. We are community builders, not community dividers because birds create common ground. When I meet with chapters, I see committed conservationists and I can’t readily tell R’s from I’s or D’s.
 
You, our diverse members, make us an effective organization—in the communities we call home and in Washington D.C. Your representatives need to hear why funding conservation work is so important to you and to Audubon’s efforts across the country. You can be confident that  in the coming weeks and months we will offer you opportunities to raise  your powerful voice at the crucial points when it matters most.
 
Remember, now more than ever, you’re what hope looks like to a bird. Get involved and take action today. |

|

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|


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|
| Sincerely, |

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|


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| David Yarnold |


| CEO and President
National Audubon Society |

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Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 8:10 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
Karen:

Excellent point you made with your question about hearing a Wood Thrush sing. That resonates.


Bill


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Sent: Tuesday, March 7, 2017 4:36 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?

I also sign some of these petitions/letters, etc. I urge anyone who send some of these "form letters" to our congressmen to add at least a couple of sentences on why this is important to you, or at least try to make it personal to these folks. In one letter a year or so ago, I asked Senators Boozman and Cotton if they had ever heard a Wood Thrush sing, and what a shame it would be if our grandchildren, their grandchildren never got to hear one for themselves. Of course I am now on their e-mail, but that's okay. Interestingly enough, Senator Cotton's e-mails go straight to my "spam" folder. Some of you may find that amusing, as I do. Even those that like him would probably find that to be funny. Senator Boozman's e-mails do not go to that file. Go figure.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

On Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 4:40 PM, Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...><mailto:<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
Jack and all, I sign many petitions, and I believe those posted by the National Audubon Society are particularly relevant. The way to deal with the lead issue, and many many other threats to our birds is to unite. If you haven't already, please take the time to read the message by David Yarnold. I was heartened by these words.

Joanie


________________________________
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...><mailto:<00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>>
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...><mailto:<FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 3:44 PM
Subject: Advice needed (again)

Remember the Fellowship of the Wings list serve? It has been some time since anything has been posted on this discussion list which is dedicated to conservation topics that are verboten on ARBird. While posting is open to anyone on the list, discussions have often been initiated by me. Your responses to these posts have been particularly useful during my term serving on the National Audubon Society Board and have been used to make points at board meetings.

During the January NAS board meeting considerable time was devoted to the topic of how Audubon should respond to the current political situation and especially to the Trump Presidency. The result of those discussions is, in part, reflected in the message below written by David Yarnold. Your thoughts and reactions on this piece, as well as any comments on the comments generated here, would be invaluable to me. Given the makeup of its membership and current national trends, is Audubon on the right track here? Note that Audubon has already come out strongly against the misogyny, racism, and general lack of respect for differences that have been expressed in the recent national discourse.

So can you help me with your reactions? Thank you in advance.

Jack

If your in-box looks like mine, youve received a lot of email about the administrations first draft of a budget outline. Theres a lot of bold-faced or bright red type on those emails and they make it sound like the proposed budget cuts are a done deal. Audubon thinks you deserve a more thoughtful response. Those emails would also lead you to believe that an executive order to begin the long process of undoing the Clean Power Plan is the end of the line. In fact, the administrations budget proposal was designed to generate headlines about living up to campaign promises, but it also divided Americans on core values like clean air and clean water. The executive orders are just the beginning of a years-long process that will test the Audubon networks commitment to science, community and fairness.

Keep in mind a presidents budget proposal is just that: an opening bid. More details will emerge in the coming weeks. Those details will be debated for months in Congress. As weve seen in recent weeks on issues ranging from privatizing public lands to health care, you have a chance as constituents to influence how that budget gets shaped. As the voice of birds, Audubon will be by your side. Weve worked to protect funding for the places birds need for 111 yearswith Democrat and Republican presidents and across party lines in Congress. And in the coming weeks and months, we will work harder than ever with our elected representatives on both sides of the political aisle to make sure we continue to protect the clean air, clean water, and stable climate birds and people need to thrive.

Its clear that this administration, left unchecked, will fundamentally step back from all of those protections in the name of reducing the role of government. While its the nature of bureaucracies to need an occasional pruning, other agendas are at work, serving special interests like big oil and coal as well as the super-wealthy.

Audubons leadership chooses to engage with this administration as we have with 28 that preceded it. We simply wont stand aside while the future of the Arctic Wilderness or Endangered Species Act gets decided. But were under no illusions about how hard the fight will be in the face of many in the administration who equate caring conservation with economic hardship. That cynical and, some would say, blasphemous world view is a complete distortion of the values that drove Republicans from Teddy Roosevelt to Richard Nixon to create national parks and bedrock environmental protections.

At every step of the budget process, Audubonwith your continued help and supportwill fight to protect funding thats critical to advancing our conservation work.

How can we do it? Were a credible voice for commonsense conservation, and that transcends party or politics. The Atlantic magazine recently described Audubon<https://click.everyaction.com/h/111022/1234668?nvep=ew0KICAiVGVuYW50VXJpIjogIm5ncHZhbjovL3Zhbi9UU00vVFNNQVUvMS81NjQ5MCIsDQogICJEaXN0cmlidXRpb25JZCI6IG51bGwsDQogICJEaXN0cmlidXRpb25VbmlxdWVJZCI6ICIwZjBhNjc2MC1jNTAxLWU3MTEtODBjMy0wMDBkM2ExMDQ2ZDIiLA0KICAiRW1haWxNZXNzYWdlSWQiOiAiN2E5ZGQ3Y2MtNjBmZi1lNjExLTgwYzMtMDAwZDNhMTA0NmQyIiwNCiAgIkVtYWlsTWVzc2FnZUNvbnRlbnRJZCI6ICIwZTBhNjc2MC1jNTAxLWU3MTEtODBjMy0wMDBkM2ExMDQ2ZDIiLA0KICAiRW1haWxBZGRyZXNzIjogImphbXBhY2sxQG1hYy5jb20iLA0KICAiRGlzdHJpYnV0aW9uVHJhY2thYmxlSXRlbUlkIjogMA0KfQ%3D%3D&hmac=UM_v6nWC0o5RPyxQ6iZJm6Aihd3JdabjAhmRgPPX-sI=> as one of the oldest and most centrist of conservation-minded groups in the country. In a polarized political climate, Audubons membership is unique, with members and donors from across the political spectrum,including Democrats, Republicans and independents. We are community builders, not community dividers because birds create common ground. When I meet with chapters, I see committed conservationists and I cant readily tell Rs from Is or Ds.

You, our diverse members, make us an effective organizationin the communities we call home and in Washington D.C. Your representatives need to hear why funding conservation work is so important to you and to Audubons efforts across the country. You can be confident that in the coming weeks and months we will offer you opportunities to raise your powerful voice at the crucial points when it matters most.

Remember, now more than ever, youre what hope looks like to a bird. Get involved and take action today.<https://click.everyaction.com/h/111023/1234669?nvep=ew0KICAiVGVuYW50VXJpIjogIm5ncHZhbjovL3Zhbi9UU00vVFNNQVUvMS81NjQ5MCIsDQogICJEaXN0cmlidXRpb25JZCI6IG51bGwsDQogICJEaXN0cmlidXRpb25VbmlxdWVJZCI6ICIwZjBhNjc2MC1jNTAxLWU3MTEtODBjMy0wMDBkM2ExMDQ2ZDIiLA0KICAiRW1haWxNZXNzYWdlSWQiOiAiN2E5ZGQ3Y2MtNjBmZi1lNjExLTgwYzMtMDAwZDNhMTA0NmQyIiwNCiAgIkVtYWlsTWVzc2FnZUNvbnRlbnRJZCI6ICIwZTBhNjc2MC1jNTAxLWU3MTEtODBjMy0wMDBkM2ExMDQ2ZDIiLA0KICAiRW1haWxBZGRyZXNzIjogImphbXBhY2sxQG1hYy5jb20iLA0KICAiRGlzdHJpYnV0aW9uVHJhY2thYmxlSXRlbUlkIjogMA0KfQ%3D%3D&hmac=UM_v6nWC0o5RPyxQ6iZJm6Aihd3JdabjAhmRgPPX-sI=&ms=digital-eng-email-ea-x-20170305_budget-email_medium&utm_source=ea&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20170305_budget-email&utm_content=medium>




Sincerely,




[http://audubon.stagecoachdigital.com/sites/default/files/2017-03/appeal-headshot-220608300-220608300.jpg]


[http://audubon.stagecoachdigital.com/sites/default/files/2017-03/appeal-signature-79692352-79692352.png]
David Yarnold
CEO and President
National Audubon Society









 

Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 8:08 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?

But if "the duck hunters get it" then why did Ducks Unlimited support this order as it appears in the article Suzie Liles sent?
http://www.ducks.org/press-room/news-releases/secretary-zinke-shows-support-for-sportsmen-on-first-day-in-office?poe=pressRoom

Judith

On Mar 6, 2017, at 8:17 PM, Ed Laster <elaster523...> wrote:

> Karen is right. Education is the key. Most who hunt and fish dont want to damage the environment, but they may not understand why a .22 bullet in a squirrel that gets away could be fatal to a Red-tail. The story of why lead is bad needs to be told.
>
> The duck hunters get it. The problem was well defined and communicated and it has been accepted. The problems with gun barrels, chokes and shotshells have been addressed and hunters understand the change. We can do the same thing with bullets and fishing weights, but we need to address the need for education as Karen pointed out.
>
> Rifle bullets are a challenge and from what I can find, several manufacturers are making good progress in matching ballistics with their non-lead alternatives. Smaller bullets seem to be more of a challenge and the .22 rimfire, which makes up a large amount of the ammo consumed, doesnt seem to have the accuracy in tin (one of the options) as lead. Lots of technical reasons for that but they continue to work on it and Im convinced they will find a better solution.
>
> Most of the major ammo manufacturers are working to solve this problem. If you want to know who and how, do what Karen said, Google it.
>
> Ed Laster
> Little Rock
>
>
>
>
>
>> On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:43 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> My apologies for typos and grammar error - my fat fingers hit something on my phone that sent the message while I was retreading it for errors. I hope the information makes sense despite these sentence structure mistakes.
>>
>> Karen Rowe
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>>> A better approach would be similar to the one used to prohibit the use of lead for waterfowl hunting.
>>>
>>> The USFWS needs to work with its state, federal and NGO partners and get their assistance and support,ask the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies to draft proposed regulations while the USFWS gathers current data and studies and identifies any questions and research needs that need to be answered before a law is enacted. All involvedboth hunters and no hunters educate themselves on all aspects of the issue, and ammunition and fishing tackle companies need to provide data on nontoxic alternatives and prepare to increase production. All this will be published in the Federal Register, comments will be gathered on several alternative (preferred alternative will be identified) and based on comments a final notice will be published and the proposal becomes law.
>>>
>>> As with the lead ban for waterfowl hunting, there must be a large educational campaign, especially to groups that view this as an attack on the second amendment. Education on everything from the presence of lead in deer burger, how lead bullets fragment and where these fragments travel in a deer or game animal, how much lead does an eagle have to ingest for it to be lethal, the numbers of species and numbers of each species that die annually from lead poisoning, and the quality of performance of nontoxic bullets and fishing tackle as compared to lead alternatives.
>>>
>>> The Act signed by now ex-Director Ashe was a huge surprise to states and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies that, with the exception of this vetoed lead Act, always work closely with the USFWS on regulation development. Ashe's Act was a huge surprise to most USFWS personnel as well.
>>>
>>> A nontoxic fishing tackle and ammunition regulation cannot be enacted without support if hunters and fishermen, and their support cannot be gained without a massive education campaign.
>>>
>>> Do you know how big of a piece of lead can be toxic to eagles? Do you know what bird species are susceptible to lead poisoning? Do you know if hog control by USDA-APHIS-wildlife services and AGFC used lead or nontoxic ammo? Are nontoxic .22 caliber ammo is available in non -toxic form?
>>>
>>> All of this information is available on the internet thanks to our pal Google. If each one of us becomes educated on the topic, we can talk to hunters, landowners, sporting good stores about the issue. Education and then communication is how we can begin a change.
>>>
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Mar 5, 2017, at 3:36 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>>>
>>>> When I was working with Dr. Frank Bellrose (Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North Amerca) in the late 70s, I thought the changeover from lead shot was imminent. He had provided much data and support for the replacement.
>>>>
>>>> Since hunting regulations are set by the state, couldnt AGFC ban the use of lead shot/bullets/sinkers if they wanted to? Wouldnt the main sellers (e.g., Walmart) support that decision?
>>>>
>>>> Jeff Short
>>>>
>>>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
>>>> Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:33 PM
>>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>>>> Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
>>>>
>>>> Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets.
>>>> Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested.
>>>> Thanks,
>>>> J
>>>>
>>>> On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.
>>>>
>>>> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>>> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes..knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.
>>>>
>>>> Kenny
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>>
>>>> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>>>>
>>>> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 8:05 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
But if "the duck hunters get it" then why did Ducks Unlimited support this order as it appears in the article Suzie Liles sent?
http://www.ducks.org/press-room/news-releases/secretary-zinke-shows-support-for-sportsmen-on-first-day-in-office?poe=pressRoom

Judith

On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:43 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> My apologies for typos and grammar error - my fat fingers hit something on my phone that sent the message while I was retreading it for errors. I hope the information makes sense despite these sentence structure mistakes.
>
> Karen Rowe
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> A better approach would be similar to the one used to prohibit the use of lead for waterfowl hunting.
>>
>> The USFWS needs to work with its state, federal and NGO partners and get their assistance and support,ask the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies to draft proposed regulations while the USFWS gathers current data and studies and identifies any questions and research needs that need to be answered before a law is enacted. All involvedboth hunters and no hunters educate themselves on all aspects of the issue, and ammunition and fishing tackle companies need to provide data on nontoxic alternatives and prepare to increase production. All this will be published in the Federal Register, comments will be gathered on several alternative (preferred alternative will be identified) and based on comments a final notice will be published and the proposal becomes law.
>>
>> As with the lead ban for waterfowl hunting, there must be a large educational campaign, especially to groups that view this as an attack on the second amendment. Education on everything from the presence of lead in deer burger, how lead bullets fragment and where these fragments travel in a deer or game animal, how much lead does an eagle have to ingest for it to be lethal, the numbers of species and numbers of each species that die annually from lead poisoning, and the quality of performance of nontoxic bullets and fishing tackle as compared to lead alternatives.
>>
>> The Act signed by now ex-Director Ashe was a huge surprise to states and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies that, with the exception of this vetoed lead Act, always work closely with the USFWS on regulation development. Ashe's Act was a huge surprise to most USFWS personnel as well.
>>
>> A nontoxic fishing tackle and ammunition regulation cannot be enacted without support if hunters and fishermen, and their support cannot be gained without a massive education campaign.
>>
>> Do you know how big of a piece of lead can be toxic to eagles? Do you know what bird species are susceptible to lead poisoning? Do you know if hog control by USDA-APHIS-wildlife services and AGFC used lead or nontoxic ammo? Are nontoxic .22 caliber ammo is available in non -toxic form?
>>
>> All of this information is available on the internet thanks to our pal Google. If each one of us becomes educated on the topic, we can talk to hunters, landowners, sporting good stores about the issue. Education and then communication is how we can begin a change.
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Mar 5, 2017, at 3:36 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>>
>>> When I was working with Dr. Frank Bellrose (Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North Amerca) in the late 70s, I thought the changeover from lead shot was imminent. He had provided much data and support for the replacement.
>>>
>>> Since hunting regulations are set by the state, couldnt AGFC ban the use of lead shot/bullets/sinkers if they wanted to? Wouldnt the main sellers (e.g., Walmart) support that decision?
>>>
>>> Jeff Short
>>>
>>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
>>> Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:33 PM
>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>>> Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
>>>
>>> Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets.
>>> Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested.
>>> Thanks,
>>> J
>>>
>>> On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.
>>>
>>> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.
>>>
>>> Kenny
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>>>
>>> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>>>
>>>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 6:52 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird Migration Map
The Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are arriving along our coast. It is time to get your feeders cleaned and ready to be put out. Follow the progress on the link below. Other species in the west may have a similar arrival.

http://www.hummingbirds.net/map.html


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs
 

Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 5:24 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: GULLS: NATURE’S FISH FINDER
Thats the title of a story by Flip Putthoff in this mornings NWA Outdoors (section E) of the Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette. Flip explores the link between small fish like Threadfin Shad and some of the most sought after fish on Beaver Lake, Striped Bass. He and a buddy hauled in a few big stripers (and others) as part of the research for this story. Its an interesting fishing trip on Beaver that I think most who enjoy birds will appreciate and learn from.

If you do get to this story, also check out New look for wildlife trail, also by Flip. Somewhere, between research on gulls and fishing, he went over to Eagle Watch Nature Trail for a tour guided by Terry Stanfill. From reading this, I learned 19,000 people have filled out visitors slips during visits to the viewing stands. From my experience at Eagle Watch, Id say 19,000 represents around 200,000 visits since the project commenced in 1999.

In terms of environmental education accomplished, Id rank Terrys efforts at Eagle Watch second to none in northwest Arkansas. Eagle Watch is listed by Audubon Arkansas as an Important Bird Area and for very good reason. Its also an Important Education Area. And for retirees like me, its also an Important Relaxation Area. Entrance to Eagle Watch is free and open to the public. Incredible value for a truly one-of-a-kind experience.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 5:05 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
Karen & all

You know, Tom Cotton’s email goes to my junk folder also. :) Senator Boozeman’s doesn’t.



A customer of mine told me that she tried to talk to Senator Cotton about the Monarch butterfly and he told her he had more important things to worry about than a butterfly.



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods northwest of London



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Karen Garrett
Sent: Tuesday, March 7, 2017 4:36 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?



I also sign some of these petitions/letters, etc. I urge anyone who send some of these "form letters" to our congressmen to add at least a couple of sentences on why this is important to you, or at least try to make it personal to these folks. In one letter a year or so ago, I asked Senators Boozman and Cotton if they had ever heard a Wood Thrush sing, and what a shame it would be if our grandchildren, their grandchildren never got to hear one for themselves. Of course I am now on their e-mail, but that's okay. Interestingly enough, Senator Cotton's e-mails go straight to my "spam" folder. Some of you may find that amusing, as I do. Even those that like him would probably find that to be funny. Senator Boozman's e-mails do not go to that file. Go figure.



Karen Garrett

Rogers



On Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 4:40 PM, Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> > wrote:

Jack and all, I sign many petitions, and I believe those posted by the National Audubon Society are particularly relevant. The way to deal with the lead issue, and many many other threats to our birds is to unite. If you haven't already, please take the time to read the message by David Yarnold. I was heartened by these words.



Joanie




_____


From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> >
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...> <mailto:<FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 3:44 PM
Subject: Advice needed (again)



Remember the Fellowship of the Wings list serve? It has been some time since anything has been posted on this discussion list which is dedicated to conservation topics that are verboten on ARBird. While posting is open to anyone on the list, discussions have often been initiated by me. Your responses to these posts have been particularly useful during my term serving on the National Audubon Society Board and have been used to make points at board meetings.



During the January NAS board meeting considerable time was devoted to the topic of how Audubon should respond to the current political situation and especially to the Trump Presidency. The result of those discussions is, in part, reflected in the message below written by David Yarnold. Your thoughts and reactions on this piece, as well as any comments on the comments generated here, would be invaluable to me. Given the makeup of its membership and current national trends, is Audubon on the right track here? Note that Audubon has already come out strongly against the misogyny, racism, and general lack of respect for differences that have been expressed in the recent national discourse.



So can you help me with your reactions? Thank you in advance.



Jack








If your in-box looks like mine, you’ve received a lot of email about the administration’s first draft of a budget outline. There’s a lot of bold-faced or bright red type on those emails and they make it sound like the proposed budget cuts are a done deal. Audubon thinks you deserve a more thoughtful response. Those emails would also lead you to believe that an executive order to begin the long process of undoing the Clean Power Plan is the end of the line. In fact, the administration’s budget proposal was designed to generate headlines about living up to campaign promises, but it also divided Americans on core values like clean air and clean water. The executive orders are just the beginning of a years-long process that will test the Audubon network’s commitment to science, community and fairness.

Keep in mind a president’s budget proposal is just that: an opening bid. More details will emerge in the coming weeks. Those details will be debated for months in Congress. As we’ve seen in recent weeks on issues ranging from privatizing public lands to health care, you have a chance as constituents to influence how that budget gets shaped. As the voice of birds, Audubon will be by your side. We’ve worked to protect funding for the places birds need for 111 years—with Democrat and Republican presidents and across party lines in Congress. And in the coming weeks and months, we will work harder than ever with our elected representatives on both sides of the political aisle to make sure we continue to protect the clean air, clean water, and stable climate birds and people need to thrive.

It’s clear that this administration, left unchecked, will fundamentally step back from all of those protections in the name of reducing the role of government. While it’s the nature of bureaucracies to need an occasional pruning, other agendas are at work, serving special interests like big oil and coal as well as the super-wealthy.

Audubon’s leadership chooses to engage with this administration as we have with 28 that preceded it. We simply won’t stand aside while the future of the Arctic Wilderness or Endangered Species Act gets decided. But we’re under no illusions about how hard the fight will be in the face of many in the administration who equate caring conservation with economic hardship. That cynical and, some would say, blasphemous world view is a complete distortion of the values that drove Republicans from Teddy Roosevelt to Richard Nixon to create national parks and bedrock environmental protections.

At every step of the budget process, Audubon—with your continued help and support—will fight to protect funding that’s critical to advancing our conservation work.

How can we do it? We’re a credible voice for commonsense conservation, and that transcends party or politics. The Atlantic magazine recently described Audubon as “one of the oldest and most centrist of conservation-minded groups” in the country. In a polarized political climate, Audubon’s membership is unique, with members and donors from across the political spectrum,including Democrats, Republicans and independents. We are community builders, not community dividers because birds create common ground. When I meet with chapters, I see committed conservationists and I can’t readily tell R’s from I’s or D’s.

You, our diverse members, make us an effective organization—in the communities we call home and in Washington D.C. Your representatives need to hear why funding conservation work is so important to you and to Audubon’s efforts across the country. You can be confident that in the coming weeks and months we will offer you opportunities to raise your powerful voice at the crucial points when it matters most.

Remember, now more than ever, you’re what hope looks like to a bird. Get involved and take action today.








Sincerely,









<http://audubon.stagecoachdigital.com/sites/default/files/2017-03/appeal-headshot-220608300-220608300.jpg>






<http://audubon.stagecoachdigital.com/sites/default/files/2017-03/appeal-signature-79692352-79692352.png>




David Yarnold




CEO and President
National Audubon Society






 

Back to top
Date: 3/7/17 2:37 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
I also sign some of these petitions/letters, etc. I urge anyone who send
some of these "form letters" to our congressmen to add at least a couple of
sentences on why this is important to you, or at least try to make it
personal to these folks. In one letter a year or so ago, I asked Senators
Boozman and Cotton if they had ever heard a Wood Thrush sing, and what a
shame it would be if our grandchildren, their grandchildren never got to
hear one for themselves. Of course I am now on their e-mail, but that's
okay. Interestingly enough, Senator Cotton's e-mails go straight to my
"spam" folder. Some of you may find that amusing, as I do. Even those
that like him would probably find that to be funny. Senator Boozman's
e-mails do not go to that file. Go figure.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

On Mon, Mar 6, 2017 at 4:40 PM, Carol Joan Patterson <
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Jack and all, I sign many petitions, and I believe those posted by the
> National Audubon Society are particularly relevant. The way to deal with
> the lead issue, and many many other threats to our birds is to unite. If
> you haven't already, please take the time to read the message by David
> Yarnold. I was heartened by these words.
>
> Joanie
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
> *To:* <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
> *Sent:* Sunday, March 5, 2017 3:44 PM
> *Subject:* Advice needed (again)
>
> Remember the Fellowship of the Wings list serve? It has been some time
> since anything has been posted on this discussion list which is dedicated
> to conservation topics that are verboten on ARBird. While posting is open
> to anyone on the list, discussions have often been initiated by me. Your
> responses to these posts have been particularly useful during my term
> serving on the National Audubon Society Board and have been used to make
> points at board meetings.
>
> During the January NAS board meeting considerable time was devoted to the
> topic of how Audubon should respond to the current political situation and
> especially to the Trump Presidency. The result of those discussions is, in
> part, reflected in the message below written by David Yarnold. Your
> thoughts and reactions on this piece, as well as any comments on the
> comments generated here, would be invaluable to me. Given the makeup of its
> membership and current national trends, is Audubon on the right track
> here? Note that Audubon has already come out strongly against the
> misogyny, racism, and general lack of respect for differences that have
> been expressed in the recent national discourse.
>
> So can you help me with your reactions? Thank you in advance.
>
> Jack
>
> If your in-box looks like mine, you’ve received a lot of email about the
> administration’s first draft of a budget outline. There’s a lot of
> bold-faced or bright red type on those emails and they make it sound like
> the proposed budget cuts are a done deal. Audubon thinks you deserve a more
> thoughtful response. Those emails would also lead you to believe that an
> executive order to begin the long process of undoing the Clean Power Plan
> is the end of the line. In fact, the administration’s budget proposal was
> designed to generate headlines about living up to campaign promises, but it
> also divided Americans on core values like clean air and clean water. The
> executive orders are just the beginning of a years-long process that will
> test the Audubon network’s commitment to science, community and fairness.
>
> Keep in mind a president’s budget proposal is just that: an opening bid.
> More details will emerge in the coming weeks. Those details will be debated
> for months in Congress. As we’ve seen in recent weeks on issues ranging
> from privatizing public lands to health care, you have a chance as
> constituents to influence how that budget gets shaped. As the voice of
> birds, Audubon will be by your side. We’ve worked to protect funding for
> the places birds need for 111 years—with Democrat and Republican presidents
> and across party lines in Congress. And in the coming weeks and months, we
> will work harder than ever with our elected representatives on both sides
> of the political aisle to make sure we continue to protect the clean air,
> clean water, and stable climate birds and people need to thrive.
>
> It’s clear that this administration, left unchecked, will fundamentally
> step back from all of those protections in the name of reducing the role of
> government. While it’s the nature of bureaucracies to need an occasional
> pruning, other agendas are at work, serving special interests like big oil
> and coal as well as the super-wealthy.
>
> Audubon’s leadership chooses to engage with this administration as we have
> with 28 that preceded it. We simply won’t stand aside while the future of
> the Arctic Wilderness or Endangered Species Act gets decided. But we’re
> under no illusions about how hard the fight will be in the face of many in
> the administration who equate caring conservation with economic hardship.
> That cynical and, some would say, blasphemous world view is a complete
> distortion of the values that drove Republicans from Teddy Roosevelt to
> Richard Nixon to create national parks and bedrock
> environmental protections.
>
> At every step of the budget process, Audubon—with your continued help and
> support—will fight to protect funding that’s critical to advancing our
> conservation work.
>
> How can we do it? We’re a credible voice for commonsense conservation, and
> that transcends party or politics. *The Atlantic* magazine recently *described
> Audubon*
> <https://click.everyaction.com/h/111022/1234668?nvep=ew0KICAiVGVuYW50VXJpIjogIm5ncHZhbjovL3Zhbi9UU00vVFNNQVUvMS81NjQ5MCIsDQogICJEaXN0cmlidXRpb25JZCI6IG51bGwsDQogICJEaXN0cmlidXRpb25VbmlxdWVJZCI6ICIwZjBhNjc2MC1jNTAxLWU3MTEtODBjMy0wMDBkM2ExMDQ2ZDIiLA0KICAiRW1haWxNZXNzYWdlSWQiOiAiN2E5ZGQ3Y2MtNjBmZi1lNjExLTgwYzMtMDAwZDNhMTA0NmQyIiwNCiAgIkVtYWlsTWVzc2FnZUNvbnRlbnRJZCI6ICIwZTBhNjc2MC1jNTAxLWU3MTEtODBjMy0wMDBkM2ExMDQ2ZDIiLA0KICAiRW1haWxBZGRyZXNzIjogImphbXBhY2sxQG1hYy5jb20iLA0KICAiRGlzdHJpYnV0aW9uVHJhY2thYmxlSXRlbUlkIjogMA0KfQ%3D%3D&hmac=UM_v6nWC0o5RPyxQ6iZJm6Aihd3JdabjAhmRgPPX-sI=> as
> “one of the oldest and most centrist of conservation-minded groups” in the
> country. In a polarized political climate, Audubon’s membership is unique,
> with members and donors from across the political spectrum,including
> Democrats, Republicans and independents. We are community builders, not
> community dividers because birds create common ground. When I meet with
> chapters, I see committed conservationists and I can’t readily tell R’s
> from I’s or D’s.
>
> You, our diverse members, make us an effective organization—in the
> communities we call home and in Washington D.C. Your representatives need
> to hear why funding conservation work is so important to you and to
> Audubon’s efforts across the country. You can be confident that in the
> coming weeks and months we will offer you opportunities to raise your
> powerful voice at the crucial points when it matters most.
>
> Remember, now more than ever, you’re what hope looks like to a bird. *Get
> involved and take action today.*
> <https://click.everyaction.com/h/111023/1234669?nvep=ew0KICAiVGVuYW50VXJpIjogIm5ncHZhbjovL3Zhbi9UU00vVFNNQVUvMS81NjQ5MCIsDQogICJEaXN0cmlidXRpb25JZCI6IG51bGwsDQogICJEaXN0cmlidXRpb25VbmlxdWVJZCI6ICIwZjBhNjc2MC1jNTAxLWU3MTEtODBjMy0wMDBkM2ExMDQ2ZDIiLA0KICAiRW1haWxNZXNzYWdlSWQiOiAiN2E5ZGQ3Y2MtNjBmZi1lNjExLTgwYzMtMDAwZDNhMTA0NmQyIiwNCiAgIkVtYWlsTWVzc2FnZUNvbnRlbnRJZCI6ICIwZTBhNjc2MC1jNTAxLWU3MTEtODBjMy0wMDBkM2ExMDQ2ZDIiLA0KICAiRW1haWxBZGRyZXNzIjogImphbXBhY2sxQG1hYy5jb20iLA0KICAiRGlzdHJpYnV0aW9uVHJhY2thYmxlSXRlbUlkIjogMA0KfQ%3D%3D&hmac=UM_v6nWC0o5RPyxQ6iZJm6Aihd3JdabjAhmRgPPX-sI=&ms=digital-eng-email-ea-x-20170305_budget-email_medium&utm_source=ea&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20170305_budget-email&utm_content=medium>
> Sincerely,
> David Yarnold
> CEO and President
> National Audubon Society
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 6:18 pm
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Karen is right. Education is the key. Most who hunt and fish don’t want to damage the environment, but they may not understand why a .22 bullet in a squirrel that gets away could be fatal to a Red-tail. The story of “why lead is bad” needs to be told.

The duck hunters “get it”. The problem was well defined and communicated and it has been accepted. The “problems” with gun barrels, chokes and shotshells have been addressed and hunters understand the change. We can do the same thing with bullets and fishing weights, but we need to address the need for education as Karen pointed out.

Rifle bullets are a challenge and from what I can find, several manufacturers are making good progress in matching ballistics with their non-lead alternatives. Smaller bullets seem to be more of a challenge and the .22 rimfire, which makes up a large amount of the ammo consumed, doesn’t seem to have the accuracy in tin (one of the options) as lead. Lots of technical reasons for that but they continue to work on it and I’m convinced they will find a better solution.

Most of the major ammo manufacturers are working to solve this problem. If you want to know who and how, do what Karen said, Google it.

Ed Laster
Little Rock





> On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:43 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> My apologies for typos and grammar error - my fat fingers hit something on my phone that sent the message while I was retreading it for errors. I hope the information makes sense despite these sentence structure mistakes.
>
> Karen Rowe
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>
>> A better approach would be similar to the one used to prohibit the use of lead for waterfowl hunting.
>>
>> The USFWS needs to work with its state, federal and NGO partners and get their assistance and support,ask the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies to draft proposed regulations while the USFWS gathers current data and studies and identifies any questions and research needs that need to be answered before a law is enacted. All involvedboth hunters and no hunters educate themselves on all aspects of the issue, and ammunition and fishing tackle companies need to provide data on nontoxic alternatives and prepare to increase production. All this will be published in the Federal Register, comments will be gathered on several alternative (preferred alternative will be identified) and based on comments a final notice will be published and the proposal becomes law.
>>
>> As with the lead ban for waterfowl hunting, there must be a large educational campaign, especially to groups that view this as an attack on the second amendment. Education on everything from the presence of lead in deer burger, how lead bullets fragment and where these fragments travel in a deer or game animal, how much lead does an eagle have to ingest for it to be lethal, the numbers of species and numbers of each species that die annually from lead poisoning, and the quality of performance of nontoxic bullets and fishing tackle as compared to lead alternatives.
>>
>> The Act signed by now ex-Director Ashe was a huge surprise to states and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies that, with the exception of this vetoed lead Act, always work closely with the USFWS on regulation development. Ashe's Act was a huge surprise to most USFWS personnel as well.
>>
>> A nontoxic fishing tackle and ammunition regulation cannot be enacted without support if hunters and fishermen, and their support cannot be gained without a massive education campaign.
>>
>> Do you know how big of a piece of lead can be toxic to eagles? Do you know what bird species are susceptible to lead poisoning? Do you know if hog control by USDA-APHIS-wildlife services and AGFC used lead or nontoxic ammo? Are nontoxic .22 caliber ammo is available in non -toxic form?
>>
>> All of this information is available on the internet thanks to our pal Google. If each one of us becomes educated on the topic, we can talk to hunters, landowners, sporting good stores about the issue. Education and then communication is how we can begin a change.
>>
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Mar 5, 2017, at 3:36 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> <mailto:<bashman...>> wrote:
>>
>>> When I was working with Dr. Frank Bellrose (Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North Amerca) in the late ‘70s, I thought the changeover from lead shot was imminent. He had provided much data and support for the replacement.
>>>
>>> Since hunting regulations are set by the state, couldn’t AGFC ban the use of lead shot/bullets/sinkers if they wanted to? Wouldn’t the main sellers (e.g., Walmart) support that decision?
>>>
>>> Jeff Short
>>>
>>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
>>> Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:33 PM
>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
>>> Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
>>>
>>> Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets.
>>> Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested.
>>> Thanks,
>>> J
>>>
>>> On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> <mailto:<joanreynolds...>> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.
>>>
>>> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>>> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes..knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.
>>>
>>> Kenny
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> <mailto:<9waterfall9...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>>>
>>> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition <http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 6:05 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: More Euros
Euro-collared doves making whoopee (& hopefully more doves) in our yard
Karen Hart. Hillcrest. Little Rock AR

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 5:36 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: BW Warbler
Spotted my FOS Black&White Warbler at UACCM in Morrilton earlier today.
We were hanging art in the college library and the bird landed in a tree
outside the window about 5' from me. It was pretty cool!

George (n. Conway Co. waiting on another verse of Stormy Weather)
 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 2:51 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Advice needed (again) and also Re: What can we do about this?
Jack and all, I sign many petitions, and I believe those posted by the National Audubon Society are particularly relevant.   The way to deal with the lead issue, and many many other threats to our birds is to unite.  If you haven't already, please take the time to read the message by David Yarnold.  I was heartened by these words.
Joanie


From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
To: <FELLOWSHIPOFWINGS...>
Sent: Sunday, March 5, 2017 3:44 PM
Subject: Advice needed (again)

Remember the Fellowship of the Wings list serve?  It has been some time since anything has been posted on this discussion list which is dedicated to conservation topics that are verboten on ARBird.  While posting is open to anyone on the list, discussions have often been initiated by me.  Your responses to these posts have been particularly useful during my term serving on the National Audubon Society Board and have been used to make points at board meetings.
During the January NAS board meeting considerable time was devoted to the topic of how Audubon should respond to the current political situation and especially to the Trump Presidency.  The result of those discussions is, in part, reflected in the message below written by David Yarnold.  Your thoughts and reactions on this piece, as well as any comments on the comments generated here, would be invaluable to me. Given the makeup of its membership and current national trends, is Audubon on the right track here?  Note that Audubon has already come out strongly against the misogyny, racism, and general lack of respect for differences that have been expressed in the recent national discourse.
So can you help me with your reactions?  Thank you in advance.
Jack

|
|
|
|
| If your in-box looks like mine, you’ve received  a lot of email about the administration’s first draft of a budget outline. There’s a lot of bold-faced or bright red type on those emails and they make it sound like the proposed budget cuts are a done deal. Audubon thinks you deserve a more thoughtful response. Those emails would also lead you to believe that an executive order to begin the long process of undoing the Clean Power Plan is the end of the line. In fact, the administration’s budget proposal was designed to generate headlines about living up to campaign promises, but it also divided Americans on core values like clean air and clean water. The executive orders are just the beginning of a years-long process that will test the Audubon network’s commitment to science, community and fairness.

Keep in mind a president’s budget proposal is just that: an opening bid. More details will emerge in the coming weeks. Those details will be debated for months in Congress. As we’ve seen in recent weeks on issues ranging from privatizing public lands to health care, you have a chance as constituents to influence how that budget gets shaped. As the voice of birds, Audubon will be by your side. We’ve worked to protect funding for the places birds need for 111 years—with Democrat and Republican presidents and across party lines in Congress. And in the coming weeks and months, we will work harder than ever with our elected representatives on both sides of the political aisle to make sure we continue to protect the clean air, clean water, and stable climate birds and people need to thrive.

It’s clear that this administration, left unchecked, will fundamentally step back from all of those protections in the name of reducing the role of government. While it’s the nature of bureaucracies to need an occasional pruning, other agendas are at work, serving special interests like big oil and coal as well as the super-wealthy.
 
Audubon’s leadership chooses to engage with this administration as we have with 28 that preceded it. We simply won’t stand aside while the future of the Arctic Wilderness or Endangered Species Act gets decided. But we’re under no illusions about how hard the fight will be in the face of many in the administration who equate caring conservation with economic hardship. That cynical and, some would say, blasphemous world view is a complete distortion of the values that drove Republicans from Teddy Roosevelt to Richard Nixon to create national parks and bedrock environmental protections.
 
At every step of the budget process, Audubon—with your continued help and support—will fight to protect funding that’s critical to advancing our conservation work.
 
How can we do it? We’re a credible voice for commonsense conservation, and that transcends party or politics. The Atlantic magazine recently  described Audubon as “one of the oldest and most centrist of conservation-minded groups” in the country. In a polarized political climate, Audubon’s membership is unique, with members and donors from across the political spectrum,including Democrats, Republicans and independents. We are community builders, not community dividers because birds create common ground. When I meet with chapters, I see committed conservationists and I can’t readily tell R’s from I’s or D’s.
 
You, our diverse members, make us an effective organization—in the communities we call home and in Washington D.C. Your representatives need to hear why funding conservation work is so important to you and to Audubon’s efforts across the country. You can be confident that  in the coming weeks and months we will offer you opportunities to raise  your powerful voice at the crucial points when it matters most.
 
Remember, now more than ever, you’re what hope looks like to a bird. Get involved and take action today. |

|

|

|

|


|
|
|
|
| Sincerely, |

|

|

|

|


|
|
|
|
|
| |

|

|


|
|
| |


| David Yarnold |


| CEO and President
National Audubon Society |

|

|

|

|

|




 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 2:28 pm
From: Alan <quattro...>
Subject: Mark Glenshaw, owls
Sorry to do this in this manner but I wonder if Mark Glenshaw with the st.
Louis owls could contact me off-line about presenting his program .

Alan gregory

Harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 2:11 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SURF SCOTER AT ALMA WASTEWATER
A Surf Scoter was associated with a mixed species raft of ducks at Alma Waster Treatment Facility today. This appears to be a female just starting molt into first spring plumage. Other waterfowl species included: Gadwall (2), Blue-winged Teal (5), Northern Shov eler (75), Northern Pintail (1), Green-winged Teal (1), Canvasback (3), Ring-necked Duck (35), Lesser Scaup (28), and Ruddy Duck (5). It was a pretty calm scene until an adult Bald Eagle flew over.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 1:53 pm
From: Robert Bays <baysrr...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
N

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 3, 2017, at 4:38 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>
> Maybe the enviro NGOs could collect some widespread, baseline lead data on refuge lands and waters to track degradation or biological uptake over time. (Similar to what should have happened to areas around the Turk plant for mercury; just sayin’!)
>
> Jeff Short
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
> Sent: Friday, March 03, 2017 11:15 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
>
> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>
> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition

 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 1:28 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Winter Records
Arbirders:

If you have not done so, it is time to report your rare and out of season
bird records for the winter season (Dec. through Feb.). Just go to
http://www.arbirds.org/rbreports.html and fill in the blanks. All
formatting requirements for the form fields , such as spelling numbers,
have been removed.

Lyndal York
Curator, Arkansas Audubon Society

 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 11:48 am
From: Thomas Foti <tfoti62...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Karen, thank you for this thoughtful and informed email. I for one am willing to shift to steel shot for all my shotgun hunting - I think this will lead to (eventually) demonstrable reductions of lead poisoning of tertiary consumers, and I know and have experience with the costs involved and think they are reasonable. Similarly, I think small lead fishing sinkers could be phased out with little adverse impacts on fisherfolk. As to larger lead sinkers and lead bullets, I think we need more information - in particular, large sinkers and many bullets are likely too large to be ingested by most wildlife and concentrated in tissues. Very high-velocity bullets are more likely to fragment on impact and be small enough to be a problem. As you imply, we need to develop protective approaches based on data and knowledge. tom foti


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on blarge ehalf of Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Monday, March 6, 2017 9:43 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?

My apologies for typos and grammar error - my fat fingers hit something on my phone that sent the message while I was retreading it for errors. I hope the information makes sense despite these sentence structure mistakes.

Karen Rowe

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...><mailto:<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>> wrote:

A better approach would be similar to the one used to prohibit the use of lead for waterfowl hunting.

The USFWS needs to work with its state, federal and NGO partners and get their assistance and support,ask the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies to draft proposed regulations while the USFWS gathers current data and studies and identifies any questions and research needs that need to be answered before a law is enacted. All involvedboth hunters and no hunters educate themselves on all aspects of the issue, and ammunition and fishing tackle companies need to provide data on nontoxic alternatives and prepare to increase production. All this will be published in the Federal Register, comments will be gathered on several alternative (preferred alternative will be identified) and based on comments a final notice will be published and the proposal becomes law.

As with the lead ban for waterfowl hunting, there must be a large educational campaign, especially to groups that view this as an attack on the second amendment. Education on everything from the presence of lead in deer burger, how lead bullets fragment and where these fragments travel in a deer or game animal, how much lead does an eagle have to ingest for it to be lethal, the numbers of species and numbers of each species that die annually from lead poisoning, and the quality of performance of nontoxic bullets and fishing tackle as compared to lead alternatives.

The Act signed by now ex-Director Ashe was a huge surprise to states and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies that, with the exception of this vetoed lead Act, always work closely with the USFWS on regulation development. Ashe's Act was a huge surprise to most USFWS personnel as well.

A nontoxic fishing tackle and ammunition regulation cannot be enacted without support if hunters and fishermen, and their support cannot be gained without a massive education campaign.

Do you know how big of a piece of lead can be toxic to eagles? Do you know what bird species are susceptible to lead poisoning? Do you know if hog control by USDA-APHIS-wildlife services and AGFC used lead or nontoxic ammo? Are nontoxic .22 caliber ammo is available in non -toxic form?

All of this information is available on the internet thanks to our pal Google. If each one of us becomes educated on the topic, we can talk to hunters, landowners, sporting good stores about the issue. Education and then communication is how we can begin a change.


Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 5, 2017, at 3:36 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...><mailto:<bashman...>> wrote:

When I was working with Dr. Frank Bellrose (Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North Amerca) in the late 70s, I thought the changeover from lead shot was imminent. He had provided much data and support for the replacement.

Since hunting regulations are set by the state, couldnt AGFC ban the use of lead shot/bullets/sinkers if they wanted to? Wouldnt the main sellers (e.g., Walmart) support that decision?

Jeff Short

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:33 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?

Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets.
Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested.
Thanks,
J

On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...><mailto:<joanreynolds...>> wrote:


Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.

On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...><mailto:<0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.

Kenny

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...><mailto:<9waterfall9...>> wrote:
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition



 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 7:43 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
My apologies for typos and grammar error - my fat fingers hit something on my phone that sent the message while I was retreading it for errors. I hope the information makes sense despite these sentence structure mistakes.

Karen Rowe

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 6, 2017, at 9:39 AM, Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> A better approach would be similar to the one used to prohibit the use of lead for waterfowl hunting.
>
> The USFWS needs to work with its state, federal and NGO partners and get their assistance and support,ask the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies to draft proposed regulations while the USFWS gathers current data and studies and identifies any questions and research needs that need to be answered before a law is enacted. All involvedboth hunters and no hunters educate themselves on all aspects of the issue, and ammunition and fishing tackle companies need to provide data on nontoxic alternatives and prepare to increase production. All this will be published in the Federal Register, comments will be gathered on several alternative (preferred alternative will be identified) and based on comments a final notice will be published and the proposal becomes law.
>
> As with the lead ban for waterfowl hunting, there must be a large educational campaign, especially to groups that view this as an attack on the second amendment. Education on everything from the presence of lead in deer burger, how lead bullets fragment and where these fragments travel in a deer or game animal, how much lead does an eagle have to ingest for it to be lethal, the numbers of species and numbers of each species that die annually from lead poisoning, and the quality of performance of nontoxic bullets and fishing tackle as compared to lead alternatives.
>
> The Act signed by now ex-Director Ashe was a huge surprise to states and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies that, with the exception of this vetoed lead Act, always work closely with the USFWS on regulation development. Ashe's Act was a huge surprise to most USFWS personnel as well.
>
> A nontoxic fishing tackle and ammunition regulation cannot be enacted without support if hunters and fishermen, and their support cannot be gained without a massive education campaign.
>
> Do you know how big of a piece of lead can be toxic to eagles? Do you know what bird species are susceptible to lead poisoning? Do you know if hog control by USDA-APHIS-wildlife services and AGFC used lead or nontoxic ammo? Are nontoxic .22 caliber ammo is available in non -toxic form?
>
> All of this information is available on the internet thanks to our pal Google. If each one of us becomes educated on the topic, we can talk to hunters, landowners, sporting good stores about the issue. Education and then communication is how we can begin a change.
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Mar 5, 2017, at 3:36 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>>
>> When I was working with Dr. Frank Bellrose (Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North Amerca) in the late ‘70s, I thought the changeover from lead shot was imminent. He had provided much data and support for the replacement.
>>
>> Since hunting regulations are set by the state, couldn’t AGFC ban the use of lead shot/bullets/sinkers if they wanted to? Wouldn’t the main sellers (e.g., Walmart) support that decision?
>>
>> Jeff Short
>>
>> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
>> Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:33 PM
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
>>
>> Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets.
>> Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested.
>> Thanks,
>> J
>>
>> On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.
>>
>> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.
>>
>> Kenny
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>>
>> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>>
>> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 7:40 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
A better approach would be similar to the one used to prohibit the use of lead for waterfowl hunting.

The USFWS needs to work with its state, federal and NGO partners and get their assistance and support,ask the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies to draft proposed regulations while the USFWS gathers current data and studies and identifies any questions and research needs that need to be answered before a law is enacted. All involvedboth hunters and no hunters educate themselves on all aspects of the issue, and ammunition and fishing tackle companies need to provide data on nontoxic alternatives and prepare to increase production. All this will be published in the Federal Register, comments will be gathered on several alternative (preferred alternative will be identified) and based on comments a final notice will be published and the proposal becomes law.

As with the lead ban for waterfowl hunting, there must be a large educational campaign, especially to groups that view this as an attack on the second amendment. Education on everything from the presence of lead in deer burger, how lead bullets fragment and where these fragments travel in a deer or game animal, how much lead does an eagle have to ingest for it to be lethal, the numbers of species and numbers of each species that die annually from lead poisoning, and the quality of performance of nontoxic bullets and fishing tackle as compared to lead alternatives.

The Act signed by now ex-Director Ashe was a huge surprise to states and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies that, with the exception of this vetoed lead Act, always work closely with the USFWS on regulation development. Ashe's Act was a huge surprise to most USFWS personnel as well.

A nontoxic fishing tackle and ammunition regulation cannot be enacted without support if hunters and fishermen, and their support cannot be gained without a massive education campaign.

Do you know how big of a piece of lead can be toxic to eagles? Do you know what bird species are susceptible to lead poisoning? Do you know if hog control by USDA-APHIS-wildlife services and AGFC used lead or nontoxic ammo? Are nontoxic .22 caliber ammo is available in non -toxic form?

All of this information is available on the internet thanks to our pal Google. If each one of us becomes educated on the topic, we can talk to hunters, landowners, sporting good stores about the issue. Education and then communication is how we can begin a change.


Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 5, 2017, at 3:36 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>
> When I was working with Dr. Frank Bellrose (Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North Amerca) in the late ‘70s, I thought the changeover from lead shot was imminent. He had provided much data and support for the replacement.
>
> Since hunting regulations are set by the state, couldn’t AGFC ban the use of lead shot/bullets/sinkers if they wanted to? Wouldn’t the main sellers (e.g., Walmart) support that decision?
>
> Jeff Short
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
> Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:33 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
>
> Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets.
> Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested.
> Thanks,
> J
>
> On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>
>
> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.
>
> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.
>
> Kenny
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>
> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/6/17 6:59 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, March 9, AHTD’s Wildflower Programs & Pollinators and Roadsides: Managing Vegetation for Bees and Butterflies


This Thursday, March 9, is Audubon Society of Central Arkansas's monthly meeting at Fletcher Library on H St. in Little Rock, starting at 7 PM. Meetings are free and open to the public.





This month's speaker is Kayti Ewing with Arkansas Highway and Transportation Department, who will talk about how AHTD uses native wildflowers to help beautify highway roadsides while also createing pollinator habitat. Not incidentally, she is AHTD's rep on the MonARch Conservation Partnership, a coalition of organizations (including Audubon Arkansas) that are working on a state conservation plan for Monarchs and pollinators.





More info is at www.ascabird.org .





Dan Scheiman


Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 6:46 pm
From: Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...>
Subject: Re: NESTING GREAT HORNED OWL THERMOREGULATING AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
Hi All,

The great horned owl was still on the nest this evening at 6 PM.

Oh and just to clarify the location...if you go out looking for the nest,
don't be silly like me and misinterpret Joe's description and walk east of
the blind looking for the nest in the trees in that part of the trail.
Instead, stand in the blind and look through the right two sets of windows,
pointing your binos or scope east, as Joe mentioned. The nest is in a tall
tree in a clump of slightly shorter trees on the other side of the lake
from the blind.

Happy Owling!

Kate M. Chapman, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor
Department of Psychological Science
235 Memorial Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Email: <kmc025...>

On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 2:14 PM, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Great Horned Owl just east of Mulhollan Blind at Lake Fayetteville Park
> was still on the nest this morning. With temperatures rising, the bird had
> noticeably lifted breast feathers in direction of sun and south wind, in a
> manner much like sunning Greater Roadrunners. I’ll post photos to my facebook
> page.
>
> Overall, I picked up 32 species on an approximately 1.3 mile loop starting
> at parking on Crossover Road, including an extended stop at Mulhollan
> Blind. Waterfowl visible from the blind: Lesser Scaup (2) and Horned
> Grebe (1). While I was walking back, an adult Bald Eagle flushed Gadwall
> (8) and Green-winged Teal (3) from an arm of the lake not visible from the
> blind. A Winter Wren at the blind could be one we have picked up off and on
> since fall arrival. In a big elm, American Goldfinches and Dark-eyed Juncos
> foraging among flowers.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 6:35 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Cedar waxwings in west LIttle Rock
I saw a lovely flock on hollies at the Cypress Plaza office building Rodney Parham and Hinson on Friday.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 5, 2017, at 4:42 PM, Chuck Bartels <cbartels...> wrote:
>
> First sighting of the season. They gather each spring to feast on new leaves from our big ash tree ... and leave behind a memorable mess.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 4:38 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Thayer's Gull
LaDonna and I had a third-winter Thayer's Gull below Dardanelle Lock & Dam this afternoon. It was on the large island, below the dam, with a large group of Ring-billed Gulls and two Herring Gulls.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 4:02 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: RED CROSSBILLS NEAR SHORES LAKE, OZARK NF
Bill Beall and Jim Nieting found Red-crossbills (4) near Shores Lake in the Ozark National Forest yesterday. The area is approximately 0.8 mile south of the parking lot for Shores Lake day use. They were scouting for the Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society sponsored field trip March 18. They also found 3 nuthatch species in the immediate area (Brown-headed, Red-breasted, White-breasted), plus Pine Warblers and Golden-crowned Kinglets. This is an area where the Forest Service has thinned Shortleaf Pines, leaving a canopy of mature trees with open understory.

I followed up on this today and relocated the crossbills in the same place. There were at least 5, and probably 6. In one instance, a bird was being fed by another. I heard basic chip-chip calls, and some toop calls as they forged up in the cones. In the birds today there were at least 2 reddish males, at least 1 yellowish female, at least one heavily streaked juvenile. However, with 100% overcast and occasional rain, viewing conditions were poor. I never did see heavy bills I associate with Type 2 birds. We will look for crossbills during the field trip March 18.

Bill and Jim did not find Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks yesterday in the usual places, nor did I today. The re-configured moist soil units at Frog Bayou WMA seem to be working as intended. One big one, along Red Hill Road, held a flock of about 55 Blue-winged Teal, plus other duck species, American Coots, and Pied-billed Grebes. For those interested after Shores Lake area, we will visit Frog on March 18.



 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 2:42 pm
From: Chuck Bartels <cbartels...>
Subject: Cedar waxwings in west LIttle Rock
First sighting of the season. They gather each spring to feast on new leaves from our big ash tree ... and leave behind a memorable mess.

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 2:29 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Just read through the 15 or so messages on this topic, but didn't see the part that Daniel refers to. 
A reminder that there is a spin off listserv for discussions of a bird conservation nature and where political ramifications are discussed.  The iron clad rule on that list is no insults and no ad hominem attacks.
I can never remember how to sign-up for the list (called Fellowship of Wings) but if you want to subscribe just send your email, first and last name to me and I'll get you on the list.
Most of the time the list is dormant, but now and then comes roaring back to life spewing intelligent and thoughtful ideas.
Jack

On Friday, March 3, 2017 4:38 PM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:


#yiv9376648284 #yiv9376648284 -- _filtered #yiv9376648284 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv9376648284 {font-family:Calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv9376648284 {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}#yiv9376648284 #yiv9376648284 p.yiv9376648284MsoNormal, #yiv9376648284 li.yiv9376648284MsoNormal, #yiv9376648284 div.yiv9376648284MsoNormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;}#yiv9376648284 h1 {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:24.0pt;}#yiv9376648284 a:link, #yiv9376648284 span.yiv9376648284MsoHyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv9376648284 a:visited, #yiv9376648284 span.yiv9376648284MsoHyperlinkFollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv9376648284 span.yiv9376648284Heading1Char {color:#365F91;font-weight:bold;}#yiv9376648284 span.yiv9376648284EmailStyle18 {color:#1F497D;}#yiv9376648284 .yiv9376648284MsoChpDefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv9376648284 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv9376648284 div.yiv9376648284WordSection1 {}#yiv9376648284 Maybe the enviro NGOs could collect some widespread, baseline lead data on refuge lands and waters to track degradation or biological uptake over time.  (Similar to what should have happened to areas around the Turk plant for mercury; just sayin’!)  Jeff Short  From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2017 11:15 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Does anyone know how to deal with this?  
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition


 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 1:37 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
When I was working with Dr. Frank Bellrose (Ducks, Geese, and Swans of North
Amerca) in the late '70s, I thought the changeover from lead shot was
imminent. He had provided much data and support for the replacement.



Since hunting regulations are set by the state, couldn't AGFC ban the use of
lead shot/bullets/sinkers if they wanted to? Wouldn't the main sellers
(e.g., Walmart) support that decision?



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 4:33 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?



Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking about
this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl lead
had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered using
steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had
stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets.

Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested.

Thanks,

J



On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:





Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning
lead was important, he would have done it sooner.



On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols
<0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:

I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years
(and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words,
Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under
Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I
believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was
done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming
administration would most likely overturn the order.



Kenny

Sent from my iPhone


On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:


Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on
using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.


http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repea
ls-ban-on-lead-ammunition






 

Back to top
Date: 3/5/17 10:06 am
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: AM Goldfinch numbers
Glenn, ARBIRD,  When I lived in the Houston area, the late John Tveten banded AMGOs which we were fortunate to have in large numbers back in the 1990s.  He would band 50 or more in his yard in one day and then band the same number the next day, etc. I think he rarely caught any banded ones from the previous day.  If your birds are like the ones in TX, they move around a lot. 
  Interestingly, there have been very few AMGOs down here in NE LA.  I have not seen nor heard one in over a week.  On my Feeder Watch counts, I think 3 may have been a high number.  The Purple Finch invasion made up for their absence, but those have departed now.
Roselie OverbyOak Grove, LA just south of AR
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 7:02 pm
From: Karen <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Henslow's Sparrows-new site
Bill Shepherd, Bob Harden, and I headed to south central Arkansas to bird the Kingsland Prairie Natural Area to look for Henslow's Sparrows. This property is owned by the Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission. Bill worked for the ANHC for many years and knew this site was good for HESPs. We found the sign for the Prairie NA at the end of a spur off Prairie Road, a gravel road back in the pine woods. We parked at the gate and walked in. Knee boots are a must. It's wet in places and the grass is tall with some thorny vines. Within 5 minutes of walking, we flushed a Henslow. It teed-up in a small pine sapling and sat for at least 5 minutes in the sunlight, giving us incredibly great looks from less than 25 feet. Views through my scope highlighted the pink legs and bill, the delicate streaking on the breastband and sides, the olive-green nape and face, the dark lateral throat stripes, and rufous wings. Best look I've ever had of a Henslow's. Bob, the photographer of the group, was in heaven. He snapped 300 hundred digital shots of the bird. Understandable because this was a life bird for Bob and it doesn't get any better than that for a first look! We walked a couple of fields for about 2 hours and flushed at least 6 Henslow's that teed-up, plus at least 4 to 5 more that didn't tee-up but were probable HESPs. We kinda of lost count, which is a fun problem to have. What was interesting is that we flushed the Henslow's out of really tall grass. Last weekend Allan Mueller, Michael Linz, and I birded Warren Prairie looking for Henslow's. After almost three hours of walking, we flushed only one Henslow out of fairly short grass. Short grass habitat is more typical for Henslow's at Warren Prairie, which is what I'm used to. The Henslow's at Kingsland seem to like tall grass.

Kingsland was a totally new site for Bob and me and has a lot of promise for a future ASCA field trip. The Kingsland site is located east and north of Fordyce off Hwy. 79 in Cleveland County. It's fairly isolated and not well-marked. For directions, go to the ANHC website at www.naturalheritage.com. Go to the bottom of the page and click on "Natural Areas". Expand the map to find the Kingsland marker, then tap on it to open, then tap again. It provides written directions and Google Maps/GPS info.

After a quick tailgate lunch at the Prairie, we headed to Pine Bluff and the wetlands at Ohio St./Wilbur West Rd. on the south side of Pine Bluff. We found two very responsive Marsh Wrens. Also seen were Ring-necked Ducks, Gadwalls, Shovelers, a few Mallards, lots of Coots, Great Egrets, an adult Bald Eagle, a decent number of Pectoral Sandpipers and Killdeers, plus an incredible 380 Green-winged Teal! We also had a VERY light-morphed female Northern Harrier, a very odd looking bird.

We then called Delos McCauley for directions to the owl nests. Since the Razorback game had ended, he graciously offered to meet us at Wilbur West Rd. It was a good thing he came to help because we were looking at the wrong tree at the wrong bridge for the Barred Owl nest. Delos showed us the right tree and we could glimpse the rufous feathers of the female Barred Owl who was ensconced in the nest cavity. We then headed to south of Sherill on Hwy. 31 for the Great-horned Owl nest. The one GHOW Owlet was dozing in the sun. It's big with lots of down still, but with some adult feathers coming in, especially around the face. We thanked Delos, then headed back to Little Rock. We made a quick stop at the town of Tucker to check two big flocks of blackbirds. They contained a mix of Rusties, Brown-headed Cowbirds, Grackles, and Red-winged Blackbirds. Today was a super day with great birding buddies and a chance to bird a new site!
Karen Holliday
Maumelle/Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 5:52 pm
From: Suzie Liles <suzie.liles...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Quite a few organizations attended the signing, such as Ducks Unlimited, as their press release below shows. Their article mentions the 1991 ban for waterfowl, as Don remembers.

Obviously more back story here about the two secretarial orders. I sure would like more of an explanation from these organizations about why they supported these actions.

Suzie Liles


http://www.ducks.org/press-room/news-releases/secretary-zinke-shows-support-for-sportsmen-on-first-day-in-office?poe=pressRoom

> On Mar 4, 2017, at 4:33 PM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets.
> Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested.
> Thanks,
> J
>
>> On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>>
>> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.
>>
>>> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.
>>>
>>> Kenny
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>>> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>>>>
>>>> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 2:53 pm
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Migration radar site
For those of you who might like to monitor migration movement this spring, I finally just relocated this website that is incredibly handy.

http://www.pauljhurtado.com/US_Composite_Radar/

As an example, select March 3 and watch the explosions of blue that moves from northern Texas to eastern Arkansas.

A classic example is Oct 14. As dusk approaches, birds take flight along the east coast. The explosions of blue are birds in other locations doing the same thing at dusk arrives in each successive location from east to west. It's pretty spectacular. Of course, weather patterns also show up, which also helps in telling birds from storm patterns. Lastly, the static green dots are ground clutter, notably wind turbines in locations such as northern Texas, south western Kansas, and central Illinois, among others.

When combined with the website below that shows wind direction in graphical form, they can be very useful tools to help predict "very birdy" days.

http://hint.fm/wind/

Enjoy!

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 2:33 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Someone out there will know the answer to this. Don and I were talking about this at lunch and he recalled that when he was a teen hunting waterfowl lead had already been banned for ducks and other game birds. He remembered using steel instead. That was my memory also from decades ago, that hunters had stopped using lead. This may have been lead shot, not lead bullets.
Anyway that's why we didn't call as Joan suggested.
Thanks,
J

On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:

> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.
>
> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.
>
> Kenny
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
>> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>>
>> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 12:39 pm
From: Stacy Clanton <sclanton...>
Subject: Re: Goldfinch counting
Same story here in SW Arkansas. In previous tears, we've had to take our a second mortgage to pay the seed bills. 😉

Stacy Clanton
NE corner of Magnolia.

Sent from my iPad, so excuse unnoticed typos.

On Mar 4, 2017, at 12:49 PM, David Ray <cardcards...><mailto:<cardcards...>> wrote:

I have had regular and thistle feeders out and haven't had any goldfinches.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

On Mar 4, 2017, at 10:33 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...><mailto:<birddan...>> wrote:

Glenn,

To estimate how many birds are in an area requires standardized survey protocols such as mark-recapture or point counts so statistics can be used to extrapolate based on the sample.

That is why for basic stationary counts submitted to eBird, whether in your yard or in a natural area, whether during the GBBC or any time of year, your tally for a species is the maximum number observed at one time in one field of view during your watch period. It is the minimum, conservative estimate – you know at least that many birds are around. For birds that are moving through in one direction, e.g. Common Grackle flocks going overhead on their way to an evening roost, you can add up each wave with little chance of double-counting.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 3/4/17, 9:27 AM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of Glenn" <ARBIRD-L...><mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...><mailto:<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>> wrote:

This is the time of year where I start thinking about taking my bird feeders down. Why? Because we get so many American Goldfinches, they empty my feeders in a day. And I just can't afford to keep buying that many sunflower seeds.
Plus, the grackles have found my feeders. Anyhow, to my question. From sunup until about 1 PM, I can usually spot 20-30 goldfinches out feeding. Do the same 30 birds stay there and feed for 6 hours straight? Or are there many more goldfinches and they just come and go? What is the best way to get an estimate on how many of these pretty yellow birds I'm actually feeding? They don't stay put, they will eat for a few minutes, then something will scare them and they all fly away, then in a couple minutes they either come back, or another group comes in. Thanks.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android<https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/mobile/?.src=Android>
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 12:14 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: NESTING GREAT HORNED OWL THERMOREGULATING AT LAKE FAYETTEVILLE
Great Horned Owl just east of Mulhollan Blind at Lake Fayetteville Park was still on the nest this morning. With temperatures rising, the bird had noticeably lifted breast feathers in direction of sun and south wind, in a manner much like sunning Greater Roadrunners. Ill post photos to my facebook page.
Overall, I picked up 32 species on an approximately 1.3 mile loop starting at parking on Crossover Road, including an extended stop at Mulhollan Blind. Waterfowl visible from the blind: Lesser Scaup (2) and Horned Grebe (1). While I was walking back, an adult Bald Eagle flushed Gadwall (8) and Green-winged Teal (3) from an arm of the lake not visible from the blind. A Winter Wren at the blind could be one we have picked up off and on since fall arrival. In a big elm, American Goldfinches and Dark-eyed Juncos foraging among flowers.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 10:49 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Goldfinch counting
I have had regular and thistle feeders out and haven't had any goldfinches.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 4, 2017, at 10:33 AM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
> Glenn,
>
> To estimate how many birds are in an area requires standardized survey protocols such as mark-recapture or point counts so statistics can be used to extrapolate based on the sample.
>
> That is why for basic stationary counts submitted to eBird, whether in your yard or in a natural area, whether during the GBBC or any time of year, your tally for a species is the maximum number observed at one time in one field of view during your watch period. It is the minimum, conservative estimate – you know at least that many birds are around. For birds that are moving through in one direction, e.g. Common Grackle flocks going overhead on their way to an evening roost, you can add up each wave with little chance of double-counting.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>
> On 3/4/17, 9:27 AM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of Glenn" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> This is the time of year where I start thinking about taking my bird feeders down. Why? Because we get so many American Goldfinches, they empty my feeders in a day. And I just can't afford to keep buying that many sunflower seeds.
> Plus, the grackles have found my feeders. Anyhow, to my question. From sunup until about 1 PM, I can usually spot 20-30 goldfinches out feeding. Do the same 30 birds stay there and feed for 6 hours straight? Or are there many more goldfinches and they just come and go? What is the best way to get an estimate on how many of these pretty yellow birds I'm actually feeding? They don't stay put, they will eat for a few minutes, then something will scare them and they all fly away, then in a couple minutes they either come back, or another group comes in. Thanks.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
> Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 8:33 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Goldfinch counting
Glenn,

To estimate how many birds are in an area requires standardized survey
protocols such as mark-recapture or point counts so statistics can be used
to extrapolate based on the sample.

That is why for basic stationary counts submitted to eBird, whether in your
yard or in a natural area, whether during the GBBC or any time of year, your
tally for a species is the maximum number observed at one time in one field
of view during your watch period. It is the minimum, conservative estimate
you know at least that many birds are around. For birds that are moving
through in one direction, e.g. Common Grackle flocks going overhead on their
way to an evening roost, you can add up each wave with little chance of
double-counting.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 3/4/17, 9:27 AM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Glenn" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

This is the time of year where I start thinking about taking my bird feeders
down. Why? Because we get so many American Goldfinches, they empty my
feeders in a day. And I just can't afford to keep buying that many sunflower
seeds.
Plus, the grackles have found my feeders. Anyhow, to my question. From
sunup until about 1 PM, I can usually spot 20-30 goldfinches out feeding. Do
the same 30 birds stay there and feed for 6 hours straight? Or are there
many more goldfinches and they just come and go? What is the best way to get
an estimate on how many of these pretty yellow birds I'm actually feeding?
They don't stay put, they will eat for a few minutes, then something will
scare them and they all fly away, then in a couple minutes they either come
back, or another group comes in. Thanks.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
<https://overview.mail.yahoo.com/mobile/?.src=Android>



 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 8:18 am
From: Kara K Beach <islippednfell...>
Subject: Conservation and Lead
All,



I couldn't agree more with the points being made about switching from lead
ammo to steel. We could sit around and gripe and moan about it or we can
actually do something to make a difference. Certainly if we don't take
action to conserve and hopefully restore a variety of habitats the birds we
all love to observe and photograph will rapidly decline in number and face
eventual extinction. It takes action on our part. People that have no
interest in birds are not going to step up, it is up to us.



One way that you can impact conservation is to join and/or support
conservation groups. The same habitat that supports waterfowl, also
supports the birds we enjoy watching, such as purple martin, fly catchers
and other insect eating birds. The same habitat that support quail, also
support other birds that rely on natural grasses and forbs, such as the
Loggerhead Shrike as well as numerous other species. Speaking of quail and
grasslands that support quail and other grassland birds, even the AGFC has a
major focus on habitat restoration. They even now have a State Quail
Coordinator, who is working on removing the Red Cedar project in Stone
County.



Quail Forever is such a group but each chapter has the unique ability and
responsibility of determining how 100% of their locally raised conservation
funds will be spent. Although your first reaction might be that it is a
hunting group, it is a diversified group that include hunters, farmers,
ranchers, landowners, conservation enthusiasts and wildlife officials.
Anyone wanting to make a difference for wildlife by creating new habitat,
protecting prairies, managing forests and restoring wetlands would be a
fantastic fit. It is more about focusing on habitat than it is about
hunting.



As it so happens, I am with the Ozark Mountain chapter, in Harrison, AR. We
are hosting a banquet on the 25th to raise funds specifically to restore
habitat and get youth outdoors and interested in conservation. You could
easily take action with as little effort at attending a banquet or more
actively by joining our chapter and attend meetings and participating in
restoration projects. Like I said, numerous other birds that you enjoy
observing and photographing rely on the very same habitat that the Norther
Bobwhite require.



The banquet will be catered by a local caterer, have raffles, live and
silent auctions and promises to be a great time. Please consider being part
of the solution because it isn't going to correct itself on its own. You
can get more info about the banquet or coming to a meeting, please contact
Stephen Brown @ 870-214-0258 or check out the links below.



How easy is taking action? For a $60.00 couples ticket, you get 1
membership ($35.00 value), two dinners and a great time. There will be a
youth table and a ladies table, so bring the kids or grandkids and help get
them interested in the environment that will surely decline rapidly without
taking action.



https://www.pheasantsforeverevents.org/event/2467



https://www.facebook.com/ozarkmountainQF/



https://www.quailforever.org/



I hope to see you there and would more than welcome new active members to
help decide where our funds should be directed to achieve restoration of
grassland habitat.



Thank you for reading this far and your time.



Kara



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of bill .
Sent: Saturday, March 4, 2017 12:39 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Lead



As usual your points are spot on! It disturbs me that this law was changed
and the direction environmental protection seems to be going at the federal
level. That said, whatever the laws on the books, there will always be some
who will break them. There are others who will try to do the right thing
whether the law requires it or not. I'd like to believe there are more of
the latter. I'd also like to think most waterfowl hunters are aware of lead
poisoning and would, at the very least, like their sport to remain viable.
For those not aware of the dangers, maybe a little one-on-one education of
hunting friends and neighbors would go farther than arguing politics.

peace

-bill

enid garfield ok



_____

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
<mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> > on behalf of Herschel Raney
<herschel.raney...> <mailto:<herschel.raney...> >
Sent: Friday, March 3, 2017 9:12 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Lead



People seem to be getting lost in the politics here. This is a bird group.
And lead poisoning is a proven risk to many birds. Swans, Ducks, Geese.
Hawks and Eagles. This was not just a Senator, but the new Secretary of the
Interior. So it is an in-your-face-act to just reverse the lead laws for use
specifically in NWRs. NWRs are a precious and separate resource from all the
other lands that we are preserving or destroying. It is a statement.

I just went on Gunbroker. I am a registered user of Gunbroker. I have
purchased ammo there. I have purchased guns there. I own guns. I have shot
ducks, geese, quail, turkeys, Ruffed Grouse in my lifetime. And once I
understood the risks I would only ever use steel shot in aquatic hunting
zones. It just makes ecologic sense. No political motives involved. Unless
your problem is that you just don't like anyone telling you that you have to
do something. But the cost difference? About 15 to 20 cents per shotgun
shell.

So for the privilege of hunting on a NWR I would have to pay about that much
per shell to avoid adding my lead load to the water sources. It is not about
anything else.

No one needs to discuss Trump or the Interior Secretary or conservatism. If
you appreciate birdlife and you are a hunter. It does not make sense to not
choose ammo other than lead. For duck hunting especially, the costs to go
and do it anyway are impressive: boats, dogs, guns, waders, camo, decoys. If
you fired your gun twenty times on a fine duck hunt. Then the extra cost is
4 dollars to not use lead.

People pay that much for a coffee before the hunt. I don't hate this
horseman from Montana. I don't know him. But his reversal does not make
ecologic or economic sense. Whatever side of the political discussion I am
on.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR


 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 8:17 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Lead
In my opinion, virtually all issues pertaining to wildlife and the
environment are tragedies of the common.

What, indeed, _are_ we to do about the relative few who would dirty our
air, pollute our water, and destroy habitat, in Arkansas and elsewhere,
at great cost to the many (including the birds of Arkansas)? To say
it's not political is to avoid speaking of the elephant in the room.

We can as individuals make small contributions to change---by donating
to organizations, writing/calling/visiting with our elected officials,
using less and renewable energy, eating plant-based diets, and more.
People of conscience should assuredly do all those things. But the only
way to effect real change---change that makes a clear difference---is to
elect officials who will enact laws that*, *yes, *regulate* activities
that affect us all.

Conservatives used to be conservationists. Some still are. Conservative
vs. liberal may not be useful labels, and they're inflammatory these
days. But political activism is very useful; and electing people who
represent our real interests is our only real hope.

It's hard to imagine anyone making the argument that our current state
and federal administrations prioritize the protecting/improving the
environment, for wildlife or humans.

Janine Perlman
Alexander

On 3/4/2017 9:32 AM, Than Boves wrote:
> Too bad there isn't a constitutional amendment that states that wildlife and the environment (and humans) have the right to bear no lead (and an ideological lobbying group that supports this amendment with religious fervor).
>
>
> --------------------------------------------
> Than J. Boves
> Assistant Professor
> Department of Biological Sciences
> Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR
> Website: http://boveslab.weebly.com
> ________________________________
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of bill . <billwx...>
> Sent: Saturday, March 4, 2017 12:39 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Lead
>
>
> As usual your points are spot on! It disturbs me that this law was changed and the direction environmental protection seems to be going at the federal level. That said, whatever the laws on the books, there will always be some who will break them. There are others who will try to do the right thing whether the law requires it or not. I'd like to believe there are more of the latter. I'd also like to think most waterfowl hunters are aware of lead poisoning and would, at the very least, like their sport to remain viable. For those not aware of the dangers, maybe a little one-on-one education of hunting friends and neighbors would go farther than arguing politics.
>
> peace
>
> -bill
>
> enid garfield ok
>
>
> ________________________________
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
> Sent: Friday, March 3, 2017 9:12 PM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Lead
>
> People seem to be getting lost in the politics here. This is a bird group. And lead poisoning is a proven risk to many birds. Swans, Ducks, Geese. Hawks and Eagles. This was not just a Senator, but the new Secretary of the Interior. So it is an in-your-face-act to just reverse the lead laws for use specifically in NWRs. NWRs are a precious and separate resource from all the other lands that we are preserving or destroying. It is a statement.
> I just went on Gunbroker. I am a registered user of Gunbroker. I have purchased ammo there. I have purchased guns there. I own guns. I have shot ducks, geese, quail, turkeys, Ruffed Grouse in my lifetime. And once I understood the risks I would only ever use steel shot in aquatic hunting zones. It just makes ecologic sense. No political motives involved. Unless your problem is that you just don't like anyone telling you that you have to do something. But the cost difference? About 15 to 20 cents per shotgun shell.
> So for the privilege of hunting on a NWR I would have to pay about that much per shell to avoid adding my lead load to the water sources. It is not about anything else.
> No one needs to discuss Trump or the Interior Secretary or conservatism. If you appreciate birdlife and you are a hunter. It does not make sense to not choose ammo other than lead. For duck hunting especially, the costs to go and do it anyway are impressive: boats, dogs, guns, waders, camo, decoys. If you fired your gun twenty times on a fine duck hunt. Then the extra cost is 4 dollars to not use lead.
> People pay that much for a coffee before the hunt. I don't hate this horseman from Montana. I don't know him. But his reversal does not make ecologic or economic sense. Whatever side of the political discussion I am on.
> Herschel Raney
> Conway AR
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 8:15 am
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
I hate it that politics has creeped into this listserv! By all means, continue, but if we want to achieve a common goal we are going to have the work together.

Hunters aren't going to stop using lead because it's cheaper and ammunition is expensive. Blame whomever you need to blame for that... I'm sure it's always the "other guy".


Kelly C.



Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 4, 2017, at 8:12 AM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>
> Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.
>
>> On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.
>>
>> Kenny
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>>>
>>> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>>>
>>> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 7:32 am
From: Than Boves <tboves...>
Subject: Re: Lead
Too bad there isn't a constitutional amendment that states that wildlife and the environment (and humans) have the right to bear no lead (and an ideological lobbying group that supports this amendment with religious fervor).


--------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves
Assistant Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR
Website: http://boveslab.weebly.com
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of bill . <billwx...>
Sent: Saturday, March 4, 2017 12:39 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Lead


As usual your points are spot on! It disturbs me that this law was changed and the direction environmental protection seems to be going at the federal level. That said, whatever the laws on the books, there will always be some who will break them. There are others who will try to do the right thing whether the law requires it or not. I'd like to believe there are more of the latter. I'd also like to think most waterfowl hunters are aware of lead poisoning and would, at the very least, like their sport to remain viable. For those not aware of the dangers, maybe a little one-on-one education of hunting friends and neighbors would go farther than arguing politics.

peace

-bill

enid garfield ok


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Sent: Friday, March 3, 2017 9:12 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Lead

People seem to be getting lost in the politics here. This is a bird group. And lead poisoning is a proven risk to many birds. Swans, Ducks, Geese. Hawks and Eagles. This was not just a Senator, but the new Secretary of the Interior. So it is an in-your-face-act to just reverse the lead laws for use specifically in NWRs. NWRs are a precious and separate resource from all the other lands that we are preserving or destroying. It is a statement.
I just went on Gunbroker. I am a registered user of Gunbroker. I have purchased ammo there. I have purchased guns there. I own guns. I have shot ducks, geese, quail, turkeys, Ruffed Grouse in my lifetime. And once I understood the risks I would only ever use steel shot in aquatic hunting zones. It just makes ecologic sense. No political motives involved. Unless your problem is that you just don't like anyone telling you that you have to do something. But the cost difference? About 15 to 20 cents per shotgun shell.
So for the privilege of hunting on a NWR I would have to pay about that much per shell to avoid adding my lead load to the water sources. It is not about anything else.
No one needs to discuss Trump or the Interior Secretary or conservatism. If you appreciate birdlife and you are a hunter. It does not make sense to not choose ammo other than lead. For duck hunting especially, the costs to go and do it anyway are impressive: boats, dogs, guns, waders, camo, decoys. If you fired your gun twenty times on a fine duck hunt. Then the extra cost is 4 dollars to not use lead.
People pay that much for a coffee before the hunt. I don't hate this horseman from Montana. I don't know him. But his reversal does not make ecologic or economic sense. Whatever side of the political discussion I am on.
Herschel Raney
Conway AR
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 7:28 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Goldfinch counting
This is the time of year where I start thinking about taking my bird feeders down. Why? Because we get so many American Goldfinches, they empty my feeders in a day. And I just can't afford to keep buying that many sunflower seeds. 
Plus, the grackles have found my feeders.  Anyhow, to my question. From sunup until about 1 PM, I can usually spot 20-30 goldfinches out feeding. Do the same 30 birds stay there and feed for 6 hours straight? Or are there many more goldfinches and they just come and go? What is the best way to get an estimate on how many of these pretty yellow birds I'm actually feeding? They don't stay put, they will eat for a few minutes, then something will scare them and they all fly away, then in a couple minutes they either come back, or another group comes in. Thanks.
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 7:17 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: lead ammo
DoD and other Federal agencies have taken steps to deal with lead at firing
ranges where the substrate gets contaminated and must be safely disposed.
This is a costly endeavor which requires excavation and all the associated
expenses of packing, tracking, transportation and burial. Some research into
different facilities to reduce the volume of substrate and thus the costs
associated with disposing of the lead particles from the bullets/shot.

So there are known hazards associated with lead ammo that must be managed in
facilities where biologicals won't encounter it. Why not manage the problem
in the environment where biologicals will encounter it? As I mentioned
before, bismuth ammo has similar training and knock-down capabilities as
lead ammo. So the costs may be more upfront than having to clean up the
mess afterwards, which always costs more both in terms of resources and
treasure. This treasure is not necessarily human life, but environmental
health.

The dialogue from the industry reminds me of the fight against removing
tetraethyl lead from gasoline which was shown to be widely dispersed in the
environment and was shown to affect human children and their health. Same
story with the smoking lobby, and on, and on.

"When will they (we) ever learn..."

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Saturday, March 04, 2017 8:09 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: lead ammo

I call our senators and reps several times a week and most of the staffers
know me by now and are very nice. I didn't realize I could also call about
this "order" that was signed by Secretary of the Interior Zinke. But I will.


Judith
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 6:59 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Rufous/Allen's Hummingbird
Today makes 130 days I have had this bird coming to my feeder. I know
nature is calling. In the last couple of weeks I have been watching
reverse migration. The hummingbird is eating more and gaining in weight
for her trip west and north.

Terry Butler
Pangburn, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 6:13 am
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Perhaps had more of us contacted Obama directly and let him know why
banning lead was important, he would have done it sooner.

On Sat, Mar 4, 2017 at 8:09 AM, Kenny Nichols <
<0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years
> (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other
> words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks
> under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and
> I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was
> done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming
> administration would most likely overturn the order.
>
> Kenny
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
> <9waterfall9...>> wrote:
>
> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban
> on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-
> interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 6:10 am
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
I'm no fan of lead ammo, but why did the Obama administration wait 8 years (and their last full day in office) to implement this order? In other words, Zinke overturned a ban that was in effect for less than two weeks under Trump and less than a day under Obama. If it was that important (and I believe it was), this should have been done 8 years ago. Sadly, this was done on the last day purely for political purposes...knowing the incoming administration would most likely overturn the order.

Kenny

Sent from my iPhone

> On Mar 3, 2017, at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:
>
> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>
> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition

 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 6:09 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: lead ammo
I call our senators and reps several times a week and most of the staffers know me by now and are very nice. I didn't realize I could also call about this "order" that was signed by Secretary of the Interior Zinke. But I will.

Judith
 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 5:41 am
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
I am an equal opportunity policy critic. I have been outspoken about
bonehead decisions made by the last administration as well. The best way
to deal with such things is to directly contact the person(s) proposing the
bad policy as well as to your own representatives and legislators and
anyone else pushing the bad policy. Most of these people have webpages
that allow you to email them or otherwise leave a message for them.
Emails, postcards, phone calls. Tell them why it is a bad idea.

On Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 10:15 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:

> I appreciate all the thoughts public and private. Always feels good to
> not feel alone. And even hearing other thoughts can be great when people
> do more than just mean well.
>
> Joan, that's a good question and one I think we can all ask ourselves.
> Looking at people on any side of any topic, I see so many people sit at
> their computer screens complaining and not doing a whole lot themselves.
> For me, to start with, I don't hunt or fish. Used to LOVE
> fishing(childhood memories with my dad) but today birding gives me greater
> thrills as well as relaxation.
> I share on facebook stories about lead poisoning from time to time. I
> share with lots of people my enthusiasm for nature in general and try
> really hard to get other people to simply be interested in birds. I'm
> really struggling with that one sometimes. Nature is SO amazing and I wish
> more people could just look at it with awe. I ask people on facebook if
> they ever want to go birding with me. Nobody has taken me up on the offer
> so far.
> And I discuss the topic with people any time it comes up.
> And this brings me back to the starting question. Does anyone know how to
> deal with this? I'd LOVE to hear more thoughts on what we could do as a
> whole or even just as individuals. People are stubborn on all sides. How
> do you breach that? If you find someone you know that hunts and they have
> never considered or cared about what ammo they use... how do you bring that
> up to them in a productive way? I think about my neighbors where I live.
> They all have guns around here... I've found my No Trespassing signs shot
> down... found shot up beer cans in the woods. Have a neighbor that smokes
> and I one single time asked if anyone had ever suggested they not smoke.
> I'm sure I could have been more tactful than I was... but my dad died in
> his 60's from complications, years after quitting but, from smoking so
> much. It pains me to see people do that to themselves. Anyway, this
> person got VERY defensive very fast. This is the way most of us work
> sometimes.
> I try anywhere I can to draw people's attention to the importance of
> nature. Oh how many people I've tried to correct in their "only good snake
> is a dead snake" way of thinking. But, people get set in their ways and
> it's hard to teach an old dog new tricks I guess.
> Outside of the ways I try to reach people on my own... I'd love to hear
> more from others. It's easy to look at someone that wants to ignore the
> truths we might know and just be mad and think they're dumb. Hey, even
> brilliant people can have some wrong ideas in life and we need to remember
> that... But how do we overcome another person's ignorance, and our own
> sometimes?
> I have a few friends and neighbors that hunt and this has me feeling a
> little more determined to attempt to start up a conversation on the
> matter. I can already feel the resistance I'll get from my neighbor...
> but, other people I feel a bit more hopeful about.
> Small scale, what can we do person to person? And large scale? One of the
> problems is as someone privately hinted at. People telling others what to
> do. Nobody likes that. Like my neighbor and their smoking. "NOBODY can
> tell ME what to do." We all feel that in one way or another. On a large
> scale when things become political, this is how we end up looking at them.
> We start talking about "rights" and there's always some amount of truth to
> these things. I believe, in our search for a way to deal with these
> things, we need to find ways that aren't simply one side vs another. Big
> picture, I have no idea what that looks like. Simple answer is education,
> even if that means one person at a time. It may catch on.
> And I meet a lot of people that are passionate about the environment but
> some of them, their passion is limited to sitting back and waiting for the
> government to fix it. "Hey, this local park is a mess... do something
> about it" rather than getting out there and doing something ourselves. How
> many of us have been guilty of that?
> This topic has given me lots to think about. Has me a little fired up
> about others I try to talk to other people about sometimes as well... like
> balloon releases. sigh.
> We wont ever all see eye to eye on anything in life. I'm just trying to
> do the best I can in understanding and dealing with that.
> Always looking up... and down... and side to side...
>
> Daniel
>
> On 3/3/2017 8:23 PM, Joan Reynolds wrote:
>
>> Daniel,
>>
>> How are you going to stand up against lead poisoning?
>>
>>
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/4/17 4:52 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: NWAAS field trip to Shores Lake-Fern, Ozark NF, March 18
Next Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip is Saturday March 18, 2017. Were birding in mature shortleaf pine habitat in the Shores Lake area of Ozark National Forest and adjacent Fern community. Meet at 9 AM at the Shores Lake picnic area, entrance on the west side of the lake. Trip leader Bill Beall has studied birds in western Arkansas for six decades. With our recent past president Doug James, Bill is our most experienced observer. We will be especially on the look-out for Brown-headed Nuthatches and other birds typical of pine forests.



We expect many singing Pine Warblers and hopefully some of the early spring migrants and wildflowers. You can show up earlier if you wish. We will car pool or caravan from Fayetteville if anyone is interested. For more information, 479-521-1858.



We will probably wrap up this part of the day by noon. For those interested, after Shores Lake-Fern, well head down to the Arkansas River Valley, including Frog Bayou WMA including a hunt for Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks near Alma sewer ponds (it may be a little early for this one, but ).



If in the unlikely event of very heavy rain predicted for Saturday, a cancellation notice will be posted by Friday evening on the NWAAS facebook page. Please feel free to call me Friday night if needed.



Shores Lake is just north of Mulberry. More information and directions for Shores Lake-Fern is available on the NWAAS website. Try this page: http://www.nwarkaudubon.org/placestobird.htm and check out the Shores Lake guide. There is also a guide for Frog. As is the case on all of our field trips, you are welcome to come for as much or as little as you want.


Only thing on the "ballot" for NWAAS field trip is birding. I certainly have strong feelings about what's right and what's wrong in terms of politics, and express my thoughts openly and hopefully respectfully -- but birding for me, and life generally-speaking, is not Conservative or Liberal, Left or Right, Democrat or Republican. It is birds. I voted many years ago for (1) birds, (2) bird conservation, and (3) recognition that Earth belongs to all creatures, not just people. These beliefs provide vital compass for me, not how anyone votes. Everyone is welcome.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 10:39 pm
From: bill . <billwx...>
Subject: Re: Lead
As usual your points are spot on! It disturbs me that this law was changed and the direction environmental protection seems to be going at the federal level. That said, whatever the laws on the books, there will always be some who will break them. There are others who will try to do the right thing whether the law requires it or not. I'd like to believe there are more of the latter. I'd also like to think most waterfowl hunters are aware of lead poisoning and would, at the very least, like their sport to remain viable. For those not aware of the dangers, maybe a little one-on-one education of hunting friends and neighbors would go farther than arguing politics.

peace

-bill

enid garfield ok


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Sent: Friday, March 3, 2017 9:12 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] Lead

People seem to be getting lost in the politics here. This is a bird group. And lead poisoning is a proven risk to many birds. Swans, Ducks, Geese. Hawks and Eagles. This was not just a Senator, but the new Secretary of the Interior. So it is an in-your-face-act to just reverse the lead laws for use specifically in NWRs. NWRs are a precious and separate resource from all the other lands that we are preserving or destroying. It is a statement.
I just went on Gunbroker. I am a registered user of Gunbroker. I have purchased ammo there. I have purchased guns there. I own guns. I have shot ducks, geese, quail, turkeys, Ruffed Grouse in my lifetime. And once I understood the risks I would only ever use steel shot in aquatic hunting zones. It just makes ecologic sense. No political motives involved. Unless your problem is that you just dont like anyone telling you that you have to do something. But the cost difference? About 15 to 20 cents per shotgun shell.
So for the privilege of hunting on a NWR I would have to pay about that much per shell to avoid adding my lead load to the water sources. It is not about anything else.
No one needs to discuss Trump or the Interior Secretary or conservatism. If you appreciate birdlife and you are a hunter. It does not make sense to not choose ammo other than lead. For duck hunting especially, the costs to go and do it anyway are impressive: boats, dogs, guns, waders, camo, decoys. If you fired your gun twenty times on a fine duck hunt. Then the extra cost is 4 dollars to not use lead.
People pay that much for a coffee before the hunt. I dont hate this horseman from Montana. I dont know him. But his reversal does not make ecologic or economic sense. Whatever side of the political discussion I am on.
Herschel Raney
Conway AR

 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 8:16 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
I appreciate all the thoughts public and private. Always feels good to
not feel alone. And even hearing other thoughts can be great when
people do more than just mean well.

Joan, that's a good question and one I think we can all ask ourselves.
Looking at people on any side of any topic, I see so many people sit at
their computer screens complaining and not doing a whole lot
themselves. For me, to start with, I don't hunt or fish. Used to LOVE
fishing(childhood memories with my dad) but today birding gives me
greater thrills as well as relaxation.
I share on facebook stories about lead poisoning from time to time. I
share with lots of people my enthusiasm for nature in general and try
really hard to get other people to simply be interested in birds. I'm
really struggling with that one sometimes. Nature is SO amazing and I
wish more people could just look at it with awe. I ask people on
facebook if they ever want to go birding with me. Nobody has taken me
up on the offer so far.
And I discuss the topic with people any time it comes up.
And this brings me back to the starting question. Does anyone know how
to deal with this? I'd LOVE to hear more thoughts on what we could do
as a whole or even just as individuals. People are stubborn on all
sides. How do you breach that? If you find someone you know that hunts
and they have never considered or cared about what ammo they use... how
do you bring that up to them in a productive way? I think about my
neighbors where I live. They all have guns around here... I've found my
No Trespassing signs shot down... found shot up beer cans in the
woods. Have a neighbor that smokes and I one single time asked if
anyone had ever suggested they not smoke. I'm sure I could have been
more tactful than I was... but my dad died in his 60's from
complications, years after quitting but, from smoking so much. It pains
me to see people do that to themselves. Anyway, this person got VERY
defensive very fast. This is the way most of us work sometimes.
I try anywhere I can to draw people's attention to the importance of
nature. Oh how many people I've tried to correct in their "only good
snake is a dead snake" way of thinking. But, people get set in their
ways and it's hard to teach an old dog new tricks I guess.
Outside of the ways I try to reach people on my own... I'd love to hear
more from others. It's easy to look at someone that wants to ignore the
truths we might know and just be mad and think they're dumb. Hey, even
brilliant people can have some wrong ideas in life and we need to
remember that... But how do we overcome another person's ignorance, and
our own sometimes?
I have a few friends and neighbors that hunt and this has me feeling a
little more determined to attempt to start up a conversation on the
matter. I can already feel the resistance I'll get from my neighbor...
but, other people I feel a bit more hopeful about.
Small scale, what can we do person to person? And large scale? One of
the problems is as someone privately hinted at. People telling others
what to do. Nobody likes that. Like my neighbor and their smoking.
"NOBODY can tell ME what to do." We all feel that in one way or
another. On a large scale when things become political, this is how we
end up looking at them. We start talking about "rights" and there's
always some amount of truth to these things. I believe, in our search
for a way to deal with these things, we need to find ways that aren't
simply one side vs another. Big picture, I have no idea what that looks
like. Simple answer is education, even if that means one person at a
time. It may catch on.
And I meet a lot of people that are passionate about the environment but
some of them, their passion is limited to sitting back and waiting for
the government to fix it. "Hey, this local park is a mess... do
something about it" rather than getting out there and doing something
ourselves. How many of us have been guilty of that?
This topic has given me lots to think about. Has me a little fired up
about others I try to talk to other people about sometimes as well...
like balloon releases. sigh.
We wont ever all see eye to eye on anything in life. I'm just trying to
do the best I can in understanding and dealing with that.
Always looking up... and down... and side to side...

Daniel

On 3/3/2017 8:23 PM, Joan Reynolds wrote:
> Daniel,
>
> How are you going to stand up against lead poisoning?
>


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 8:14 pm
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Daniel--This has been painful and frustrating for me. If you're still willing to hang with us, I'm a very, very liberal birder who would be happy to hit the field with you. I live in Fayetteville and am mostly retired (5 day weekends). You wanna set things up, let's go. We'll see if we can keep from slugging it out. Okay?

Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 3, 2017, at 8:13 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> I thank this group for proving my point. I feel sorry for all of you that choose hatred and bitterness as your path in life.
> I know many don't understand me but did I deserve this?
>
> "Happy lead poisoning, Daniel!"
> How old are you?
> I am sorry but if this is what the people of this group embrace, this is just sad. YOU are sabotaging your own goals with such nasty attitudes.
> Pat yourself on your back for treating me like dirt. Congratulations.
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 8:09 pm
From: Jonathan Perry <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?


Sent from my iPad

> On Mar 3, 2017, at 8:23 PM, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>
> Daniel,
>
> How are you going to stand up against lead poisoning?
>
>
>> On Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 8:13 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>> I thank this group for proving my point. I feel sorry for all of you that choose hatred and bitterness as your path in life.
>> I know many don't understand me but did I deserve this?
>>
>> "Happy lead poisoning, Daniel!"
>> How old are you?
>> I am sorry but if this is what the people of this group embrace, this is just sad. YOU are sabotaging your own goals with such nasty attitudes.
>> Pat yourself on your back for treating me like dirt. Congratulations.
>>
>> ---
>> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
>> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 7:25 pm
From: Herschel Raney <herschel.raney...>
Subject: Lead
People seem to be getting lost in the politics here. This is a bird
group. And lead poisoning is a proven risk to many birds. Swans, Ducks,
Geese.Hawks and Eagles. This was not just a Senator, but the new
Secretary of the Interior. So it is an in-your-face-act to just reverse
the lead laws for use specifically in NWRs. NWRs are a precious and
separate resource from all the other lands that we are preserving or
destroying. It is a statement.

I just went on Gunbroker. I am a registered user of Gunbroker. I have
purchased ammo there. I have purchased guns there. I own guns. I have
shot ducks, geese, quail, turkeys, Ruffed Grouse in my lifetime. And
once I understood the risks I would only ever use steel shot in aquatic
hunting zones. It just makes ecologic sense. No political motives
involved. Unless your problem is that you just don’t like anyone telling
you that you have to do something. But the cost difference? About 15 to
20 cents per shotgun shell.

So for the privilege of hunting on a NWR I would have to pay about that
much per shell to avoid adding my lead load to the water sources. It is
not about anything else.

No one needs to discuss Trump or the Interior Secretary or conservatism.
If you appreciate birdlife and you are a hunter. It does not make sense
to not choose ammo other than lead. For duck hunting especially, the
costs to go and do it anyway are impressive: boats, dogs, guns, waders,
camo, decoys. If you fired your gun twenty times on a fine duck hunt.
Then the extra cost is 4 dollars to not use lead.

People pay that much for a coffee before the hunt. I don’t hate this
horseman from Montana. I don’t know him. But his reversal does not make
ecologic or economic sense. Whatever side of the political discussion I
am on.

Herschel Raney

Conway AR


 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 6:43 pm
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Daniel,

How are you going to stand up against lead poisoning?


On Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 8:13 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
wrote:

> I thank this group for proving my point. I feel sorry for all of you that
> choose hatred and bitterness as your path in life.
> I know many don't understand me but did I deserve this?
>
> "Happy lead poisoning, Daniel!"
> How old are you?
> I am sorry but if this is what the people of this group embrace, this is
> just sad. YOU are sabotaging your own goals with such nasty attitudes.
> Pat yourself on your back for treating me like dirt. Congratulations.
>
> ---
> This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
> https://www.avast.com/antivirus
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 6:17 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
I thank this group for proving my point. I feel sorry for all of you
that choose hatred and bitterness as your path in life.
I know many don't understand me but did I deserve this?

"Happy lead poisoning, Daniel!"
How old are you?
I am sorry but if this is what the people of this group embrace, this is
just sad. YOU are sabotaging your own goals with such nasty attitudes.
Pat yourself on your back for treating me like dirt. Congratulations.

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 6:09 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Pardon me while I try really hard to say this as politely and tactfully
as possible.
1. Trump didn't sign an order... Some senator did.
2. Politics are tricky and ugly and EVERYONE(bold for emphasis, not
shouting) sees things from a distorted/skewed and biased perspective
because of their political affiliations and per-conceived beliefs. It's
never, ever as simple as blanket generalizations that almost everyone
uses today. "guess trump doesn't care..." opinion.
3. This NEEDS to be said. Many, and I mean many in this group need to
awaken to the idea that there is such a thing as a conservative birder.
Many people in this group are conservatives... some you know quite well
but are not aware of this fact. But people speak loosely in such a way
that it sounds like they assume everyone is on the same page. Some of
you can be quite rude in your comments at times and no matter how you
feel, this is not okay. You want things to be better? You want birders
to unite? Act like it. Pointing fingers and such is just ugly and has
NO place in such a forum as this. MANY people have quit this list
because of how people act and what they say. Some of you are pushing
people out of this group and you should very, very much care about
that. I understand how passionate you are about wildlife and your
political and environmental beliefs... but there's a real danger in
letting that passion turn into something greater... or, lesser I guess.
People with lead poisoning tend to vote conservative? what a hateful
and ignorant thing to say. I'm sorry but if you can say things like
that, I sure have the right to call it out for what it is. I'm a
conservative and quite offended by this. Am I not welcome here? That's
how some of you make people feel here. And I am begging you all to
think about this.
Some of you remember I interjected into a conversation before... some of
you were quite mean to me... quite mean. And as I attempted to explain
myself better, some got meaner... yet, many reached out to me privately
to tell me how this group has made them feel as well. Yes, I'm not
familiar with most. Yes, I'm an outsider. Yes, I'm not a liberal. But
you NEED to understand that many that join here are not like you... and
you NEED to treat them with respect. Unless you really want this to be
just for some small clique. Do you want to scare away and shun people
that think differently than you? Shouldn't we try to focus on what we
have in common? A love of birds. Again, I get that your love of birds
makes you passionate about these other things but those STRONG feelings
that you want more people to "wake up to," you're not going to get
ANYONE to hear you when you look at other people and treat other people
like this.
I bird frequently... I have things to offer such a group as this... so
do many others that have been shamed into silence here. There's
something wrong with that. I hope I'm being heard here. I imagine some
of what I'm saying sounds harsh... or "where's he coming from." And, I
imagine much of that is because many of you don't really know me. But I
still pray you'll take my words to heart. Some of you have scared
people right out of this group. I'd like to think that's not on your to
do list.

4. Rather than focusing on "well these people must be stupid if they
don't understand this truth..." Find a way to bridge that gap... to
reach people in a positive way. There are things that all of you
believe that are false in life. Would you be willing to listen to any
reasoning and truth if someone approached you with such a negative tone?
Serious question here. Do you want more people to understand the truth
about the dangers of lead? Do you want people to hear you, understand,
accept, and change? Doesn't that sound like a good thing? That's not a
goal you'll ever see come to be with condemnation.
Seek truth... spread truth. Don't spread hatred.

5. I apologize for the rambling here. Sincerely. I sit back and watch
these harsh tones pop up from time to time... and I watch people leave
the group each time. Literally. I don't like seeing people being
hurt. I don't like people feeling unwelcome. Because I don't like
feeling those things. Also, I share these thoughts with all of you
because I care about you all and I want more for you. You could do more
with this group with a little less political bitterness... as a
whole... and as individuals... I study people a bit and I can see how
these things consume people at times... it changes how you SEE things
and how you act and how you treat people. Allowing such feelings to
exist long enough perpetuates them. Seriously, it's not healthy to live
in such a way.

This conversation started with a very good question. "Does anyone know
how to deal with this?" Would it not be more beneficial to actually
address the question? It's a very good question in general. How do you
solve so many issues like this? On topic, the only way to change
another person's view is to get them to see truth. That's not always
easy and in these situations, quite tricky I imagine. One person at a
time, one on one, visual aids, etc... very personal(and caring) is the
only way to "get through" to another person with things like this. The
people in power need to either be influenced by enough people
pushing(productively) or, they need to personally be shown the truth.
Sadly with politicians(and many people), it's hard to get them outside
of their own little worlds.
I believe that we all need each other here. I hope my words are heard
as something meant to unite. That's my goal.
Anyone ever wants to try a conversation in person I'm in Siloam Springs
and get out birding at least once or twice a week. Would be glad to
bird with you. :) Or we could forget the conversation and just enjoy
the birds.
Peace and happy birding to you all.
Daniel Mason

> Lead poisons people, too. I guess Trump doesn't care about the
> hunters, fisherman and their families since he would WANT them to
> consume more lead-tainted meats. People with lead poisoning tend to
> vote conservative.
>
> On Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
> <mailto:<9waterfall9...>> wrote:
>
>
> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday
> overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
>
> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
> <http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition>
>
>



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 5:22 pm
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Lead poisons people, too. I guess Trump doesn't care about the hunters,
fisherman and their families since he would WANT them to consume more
lead-tainted meats. People with lead poisoning tend to vote conservative.

On Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban
> on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-
> interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 2:38 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Maybe the enviro NGOs could collect some widespread, baseline lead data on
refuge lands and waters to track degradation or biological uptake over time.
(Similar to what should have happened to areas around the Turk plant for
mercury; just sayin'!)



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Friday, March 03, 2017 11:15 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Does anyone know how to deal with this?




Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on
using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.


http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repea
ls-ban-on-lead-ammunition


 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 12:53 pm
From: jonathanperry24 <jonathanperry24...>
Subject: Re: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Weep.

The *Democrat-Gazette* ran a shorter but informationally consistent article
on page 3A this morning. It's interesting to note the groups which lobbied
against the ban and for its repeal.

To quote Forest Gump, "And that's all I'm going to say about that."

Jonathan Perry, Ph.D.
Licensed Psychologist
Fayetteville, Arkansas

On Fri, Mar 3, 2017 at 11:15 AM, Judy & Don <9waterfall9...> wrote:

> Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban
> on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.
> http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-
> interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 9:51 am
From: Dan Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Kansas Ornithological Society Meeting, May 5-7
The Kansas Ornithological Society's spring meeting will be in southeast, KS, just across the border from Joplin, MO, so not too far for some Arkansans. Registration is open now.

http://ksbirds.org/kos/Spring2017/2017_KOS_Spring.htm

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 9:51 am
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Upcoming Field Trips
Please find below information about the next three months of field trips sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  If you like birds, come join us!  You don't have to be an ASCA member.  We also have great monthly meetings with interesting and informative speakers.  The monthly meetings are held on the second Thursday of every month at 7:00 p.m. at the Fletcher Library in Little Rock.  For more information about our Audubon Chapter, go to our website at www.ascabird.org. 
Spring is coming, so get ready to start chasing those migrating shorebirds and warblers!Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock
 March 25, 2017Bald KnobNational Wildlife RefugeBald Knob, WhiteCo.Meetat 7:30 a.m. in North Little Rock on the east side of the Other Center parking lotbehind McDonald’s.  The Other Center islocated across from McCain Mall, on McCain Blvd.  Take Exit 1 West, off Hwy. 67/167.  We’ll arrive at the Bald Knob NWR around 8:45a.m. for those who want to meet us there. Look for the line of cars parked on Coal Chute Road.  The refuge is also a National AudubonImportant Bird Area (IBA).  Target birdswill be lingering ducks and early-arriving shorebirds, herons, egrets, andnight-herons.  Very little walking willbe involved.  If you have a scope, bringit.  Bring water, snacks or lunch.  There is no bathroom on-site.  There is a McDonald’s just off Hwy. 67/167 atthe Bald Knob Exit 55.  Go to www.fws.gov/baldknob/ for drivingdirections and more information about the refuge.  GPS Coordinates:  35.260233, -91.571903 April 29, 2017 Bell SloughSouth AGFC Wildlife Management AreaMayflower,Faulkner Co.Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the main entrance to theBell Slough Wildlife Management Area (WMA) off Hwy. 365.  Our target birds will be spring migrants.  Bell Slough is a mixof ecosystems consisting of 2,040 acres of woodlands and wetlands situatedbetween Little Rock and the Mayflower/Conway region.  Thereare 117 species of birds documented for the area, including the adjacentwaterfowl resting habitat. The Bell Slough Kenny Vernon Nature Trailconsists of three connecting trails, each ranging in length from about ahalf-mile to 2 1/4 miles.  The WMA alsohas a nice mix wildflowers that attract numerous butterflies.  Wear study walking shoes.  This will be a morning trip.   From Little Rock, go west on I-40.  Exit I-40 at Mayflower (Exit 135) and turneast (right) at the light onto Hwy. 89. Then turn south (right) just past the commuter parking lot onto theservice road.  Follow the service roadparalleling I-40, then veer right at the fork. Follow this road until you cross the Palarm Creek bridge.  Turn left into the WMA parking lot.  May 6, 2017Gillam Park andthe Little Rock Audubon Center (LRAC)Little Rock,Pulaski Co.Celebratethe migration of birds moving from their winter non-breeding grounds in LatinAmerica, Mexico, and the Caribbean to their summer nesting grounds in NorthAmerica.  It will be a great day to beoutside in nature!  Meet at 7:30 a.m. inGillam Park at the last parking lot past the swimming pool.  Gillam has great habitat for spring warblersand other migrants.  There will bemoderate walking on fairly level, but possibly muddy trails.  When finished at Gillam, we’ll drive to theAudubon Center and walk the wildlife observation trail.  Last, we’ll head to Industrial Harbor Roadand Terry Lock & Dam to look for Western Kingbirds and Painted Buntings.  This is a morning trip.  Bring water and snacks.  Wear sturdy walking shoes or hiking boots. Directions—GillamPark is in southeast Little Rock near the airport.  Address is 5300 Gillam Park Road, LittleRock.  Take I-30 West heading south fromLittle Rock.  Then exit onto I-440 goingtowards the airport.  Take Exit1-Springer Road.  At the bottom of theexit ramp, turn left onto Springer Road. Go approximately 1 mile to just past the LRAC.  Turn right onto Gillam Park Road.  Follow it into the park to the last parkinglot past the swimming pool. Alsoin May is the International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD) on May 13.  Count the birds you see and enter yoursightings into eBird.  May 13 is also thethird annual eBird Global Big Day.  Tolearn more about the eBird Global Big Day go to http://eBird.org/globalbigday   
 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 9:16 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Does anyone know how to deal with this?
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed an order Thursday overturning a ban on using lead ammunition on wildlife refuges.

http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/322058-interior-secretary-repeals-ban-on-lead-ammunition
 

Back to top
Date: 3/3/17 6:32 am
From: Mark Glenshaw <mglenshaw...>
Subject: No Sighting, Great Horned Owl Lecture, Joplin, MO, Thursday, March 9
Morning, all.

Next Thursday, March 9 I am returning to the Ozark Gateway Audubon Society
in Joplin, MO to present a free, all-ages, open to the public lecture about
the Great Horned Owls I have studied since 2005 in Forest Park in St.
Louis, MO.

This talk, "Forest Park Owls: Mating, Nesting and Owlets", will share what
I have been able to observe and document including: mating, nest selection,
feeding of the owlets, fledging and gradual maturation of owlets, and the
dispersal of the owlets with photos and videos to illustrate these
behaviors.

Here are the details:

"Forest Park Owls: Mating, Nesting and Owlets"
Thursday, March 9, 2017, 7:00pm
Ozark Gateway Audubon Society
Wildcat Glades Conservation & Audubon Center
201 W. Riviera Drive
Joplin, MO 64804
(417) 782-6287

I hope to see you there-thank you!

Sincerely,
Mark

Mark H.X. Glenshaw
Forest Park Owls
http://forestparkowls.blogspot.com/
<mglenshaw...>
@forestparkowls <https://twitter.com/forestparkowls>

 

Back to top
Date: 3/2/17 4:44 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: [Non-DoD Source] Link to Pdf
All,

Below is a link to the Winter newsletter from the DoD Natural Resources
program. It highlights recent conservation awards for the US military
facilities. Take a gander...and feel free to distribute widely.

Jeff Short

http://www.dodnaturalresources.net/Natural_Selections_Winter_2017_Environmen
tal_Awards.pdf
 

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Date: 3/2/17 9:59 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: posting for Karen Rowe Fwd: CWD


Begin forwarded message:

> From: Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm...>
> Subject: Re: CWD
> Date: March 2, 2017 10:37:35 AM CST
> To: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>, Barry Haas <bhaas...>
> Reply-To: Jim and Karen Rowe <rollingrfarm...>
>
> Could avian scavengers translocate infectious prions to disease-free areas initiating new foci of chronic wasting disease?
>
> Deer Carcass Decomposition and Potential Scavenger Exposure to Chronic Wasting Disease
>
>
> Deer Carcass Decomposition and Potential Scavenger Exposure to Chronic Wast...
> By Christopher S. Jennelle
> Christopher S. Jennelle, Michael D. Samuel, Cherrie A. Nolden, and Elizabeth A. Berkley (2009) Deer Carcass Deco...
>
>
> Could avian scavengers translocate infectious prions to disease-free areas ...
> Mechanisms for the spread of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy diseases, including chronic wasting disease...
>
> From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Thursday, March 2, 2017 9:07 AM
> Subject: CWD public meeting
>
> Following my post about eagles consuming the carcass of a deer that possibly died of CWD - and there are many unobserved cases of this scavenging behavior based on the number of CWD deaths in NW Arkansas alone - Barry Haas asked about disease transmission to eagles and vultures, etc. The most recent understanding I had been given by an AGFC agent was that the disease was only transmissible to other corvids. So this week I inquired about the latest findings on CWD and scavengers, specifically raptors and other avians, as well as other non-cervid animals. I received this info from the manager of the Elk Center in Ponca. Whatever is shared in this upcoming meeting should soon be available on the AGFC website.
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
>
> > The public meeting will be at 6pm on March 14th at the Carroll Electric building in Jasper. I sent an email to Little Rock asking if a video will be available on the website, or even live streamed, but haven't had a response yet. Will let you know.
>


 

Back to top
Date: 3/2/17 9:17 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Prions in Deer and effects on vultures, eagles, humans?
Thanks, Don. This all makes sense to me.

When I first started hearing about this Chronic Wasting Disease affecting deer and elk several years ago, after all the stories and speculation about mad cow and Jakob Creutzfeldt Disease, I thought about all the virtually indestructible prions that must be all over the place by now.

J
On Mar 2, 2017, at 10:35 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> wrote:

> Prions are frightening for a variety of reasons. For one thing, when scientists or medical or veterinary researchers report their findings critical reading of the papers often reveal either experimental weaknesses or reveal how little is really known.
>
> So, when I read that these prions from deer only infect deer and their close relatives, I take this with a grain of salt. How was this proven or tested? For one thing, all people (or birds or animals) react somewhat differently to everything.
>
> An true first hand example of this: A friend of mine had high blood pressure. He was prescribed a blood pressure medication that millions of people take. But his body could not tolerate this medication. It was killing his liver and he would have died from the effects of this medication on his body. Luckily he realized something was drastically wrong, went to his doctor, they figured it out, and he stopped taking the "drug/medication". This happens all the time.
>
> So, perhaps, out of 1,000 people, or vultures, or eagles, or crows, that ingest dead deer meat from an animal that died from prions, maybe 99% will not become infected or damaged themselves, but maybe 1% will be susceptible and die from it. That would result in 10 people, or 10 vultures, etc. being harmed by prions from the deer.
>
> Has anyone tested prions from deer for their infectivity to humans, vultures, eagles, crows? I am certain the answer is "no". To do the experiment properly a scientist would have to test at least 1,000 people or crows, or whatever, feed them prions, and have a control group of 1000. Then they would have to watch the two groups, monitor their health, for a decade or more. This has not been done and will not be done.
>
> Just my two cents as a person who has been a scientist for 40 years, who has conducted a hundred or more experiments resulting in peer reviewed journal articles.
>
> I always ask myself "Where is the evidence?!" "Who proved it?!" "Does their experimental design, sample size, justify their conclusions?"
>
> Don Steinkraus
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
> Sent: Thursday, March 2, 2017 10:05 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: typo
>
> Since prions related to CWD can persist in the environment for a long time, can they be spread in the carrion-feeder droppings from feeding on infected cervids?
>
> Jeff Short
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
> Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2017 9:13 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: typo
>
> Should read "cervids" not corvids. I was worried about crows. J
>
> Following my post about eagles consuming the carcass of a deer that possibly died of CWD - and there are many unobserved cases of this scavenging behavior based on the number of CWD deaths in NW Arkansas alone - Barry Haas asked about disease transmission to eagles and vultures, etc. The most recent understanding I had been given by an AGFC agent was that the disease was only transmissible to other cervids. So this week I inquired about the latest findings on CWD and scavengers, specifically raptors and other avians, as well as other non-cervid animals. I received this info from the manager of the Elk Center in Ponca. Whatever is shared in this upcoming meeting should soon be available on the AGFC website.
>
> Judith
> Ninestone, Carroll County
>
>
> The public meeting will be at 6pm on March 14th at the Carroll Electric building in Jasper. I sent an email to Little Rock asking if a video will be available on the website, or even live streamed, but haven't had a response yet. Will let you know.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/2/17 8:35 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Prions in Deer and effects on vultures, eagles, humans?
Prions are frightening for a variety of reasons. For one thing, when scientists or medical or veterinary researchers report their findings critical reading of the papers often reveal either experimental weaknesses or reveal how little is really known.


So, when I read that these prions from deer only infect deer and their close relatives, I take this with a grain of salt. How was this proven or tested? For one thing, all people (or birds or animals) react somewhat differently to everything.


An true first hand example of this: A friend of mine had high blood pressure. He was prescribed a blood pressure medication that millions of people take. But his body could not tolerate this medication. It was killing his liver and he would have died from the effects of this medication on his body. Luckily he realized something was drastically wrong, went to his doctor, they figured it out, and he stopped taking the "drug/medication". This happens all the time.


So, perhaps, out of 1,000 people, or vultures, or eagles, or crows, that ingest dead deer meat from an animal that died from prions, maybe 99% will not become infected or damaged themselves, but maybe 1% will be susceptible and die from it. That would result in 10 people, or 10 vultures, etc. being harmed by prions from the deer.


Has anyone tested prions from deer for their infectivity to humans, vultures, eagles, crows? I am certain the answer is "no". To do the experiment properly a scientist would have to test at least 1,000 people or crows, or whatever, feed them prions, and have a control group of 1000. Then they would have to watch the two groups, monitor their health, for a decade or more. This has not been done and will not be done.


Just my two cents as a person who has been a scientist for 40 years, who has conducted a hundred or more experiments resulting in peer reviewed journal articles.


I always ask myself "Where is the evidence?!" "Who proved it?!" "Does their experimental design, sample size, justify their conclusions?"


Don Steinkraus


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Sent: Thursday, March 2, 2017 10:05 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: typo

Since prions related to CWD can persist in the environment for a long time, can they be spread in the carrion-feeder droppings from feeding on infected cervids?

Jeff Short

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2017 9:13 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: typo

Should read "cervids" not corvids. I was worried about crows. J

Following my post about eagles consuming the carcass of a deer that possibly died of CWD - and there are many unobserved cases of this scavenging behavior based on the number of CWD deaths in NW Arkansas alone - Barry Haas asked about disease transmission to eagles and vultures, etc. The most recent understanding I had been given by an AGFC agent was that the disease was only transmissible to other cervids. So this week I inquired about the latest findings on CWD and scavengers, specifically raptors and other avians, as well as other non-cervid animals. I received this info from the manager of the Elk Center in Ponca. Whatever is shared in this upcoming meeting should soon be available on the AGFC website.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


The public meeting will be at 6pm on March 14th at the Carroll Electric building in Jasper. I sent an email to Little Rock asking if a video will be available on the website, or even live streamed, but haven't had a response yet. Will let you know.

 

Back to top
Date: 3/2/17 8:05 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: typo
Since prions related to CWD can persist in the environment for a long time,
can they be spread in the carrion-feeder droppings from feeding on infected
cervids?



Jeff Short



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Judy & Don
Sent: Thursday, March 02, 2017 9:13 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: typo



Should read "cervids" not corvids. I was worried about crows. J



Following my post about eagles consuming the carcass of a deer that possibly
died of CWD - and there are many unobserved cases of this scavenging
behavior based on the number of CWD deaths in NW Arkansas alone - Barry Haas
asked about disease transmission to eagles and vultures, etc. The most
recent understanding I had been given by an AGFC agent was that the disease
was only transmissible to other cervids. So this week I inquired about the
latest findings on CWD and scavengers, specifically raptors and other
avians, as well as other non-cervid animals. I received this info from the
manager of the Elk Center in Ponca. Whatever is shared in this upcoming
meeting should soon be available on the AGFC website.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County




The public meeting will be at 6pm on March 14th at the Carroll Electric
building in Jasper. I sent an email to Little Rock asking if a video will be
available on the website, or even live streamed, but haven't had a response
yet. Will let you know.


 

Back to top
Date: 3/2/17 7:13 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: typo
Should read "cervids" not corvids. I was worried about crows. J

Following my post about eagles consuming the carcass of a deer that possibly died of CWD - and there are many unobserved cases of this scavenging behavior based on the number of CWD deaths in NW Arkansas alone - Barry Haas asked about disease transmission to eagles and vultures, etc. The most recent understanding I had been given by an AGFC agent was that the disease was only transmissible to other cervids. So this week I inquired about the latest findings on CWD and scavengers, specifically raptors and other avians, as well as other non-cervid animals. I received this info from the manager of the Elk Center in Ponca. Whatever is shared in this upcoming meeting should soon be available on the AGFC website.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

> The public meeting will be at 6pm on March 14th at the Carroll Electric building in Jasper. I sent an email to Little Rock asking if a video will be available on the website, or even live streamed, but haven't had a response yet. Will let you know.

 

Back to top
Date: 3/2/17 7:08 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: CWD public meeting
Following my post about eagles consuming the carcass of a deer that possibly died of CWD - and there are many unobserved cases of this scavenging behavior based on the number of CWD deaths in NW Arkansas alone - Barry Haas asked about disease transmission to eagles and vultures, etc. The most recent understanding I had been given by an AGFC agent was that the disease was only transmissible to other corvids. So this week I inquired about the latest findings on CWD and scavengers, specifically raptors and other avians, as well as other non-cervid animals. I received this info from the manager of the Elk Center in Ponca. Whatever is shared in this upcoming meeting should soon be available on the AGFC website.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

> The public meeting will be at 6pm on March 14th at the Carroll Electric building in Jasper. I sent an email to Little Rock asking if a video will be available on the website, or even live streamed, but haven't had a response yet. Will let you know.
 

Back to top
Date: 3/1/17 11:45 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: W-b NUTHATCHES EXCAVATING NEST IN DEVIL’S DEN SP
When Devils Den State Park was established as a Great Depression job creator, it was far away on rough Boston Mountain roads, with visitors few and far between. Now pretty spring weekends produces the great urban outflow and the Den overfloweth with noise, traffic jams, lines on trails, no place to park.
Today it was back to Depression era: almost no one except a few retirees who have no one to please except imagination. Perfect for Harveys Buttercup and White-breasted Nuthatches.

Nuthatches have started a nest in Camp Area A, around 30-35 feet up in maybe a Southern Red Oak, Quercus falcata. Theyve found a cavity formed by an old limb scar. I sat down at a picnic table and relaxed. Usually one going in and out, followed by the other, sometimes both disappeared inside, yakking away the whole time, and sometimes removing rotten wood.

I assume theyre enlarging what nature started as a limb broken off in a storm. The scar tissue forms a nice little porch-lip. The lean of the tree should keep rain out. Earth-smart those nuthatches are walking upside down on limbs and all -- and today had the world to themselves.

My initial ambition in driving down to the Den involved Harveys Buttercup, a local wildflower that pops up its elegant leaves and yellow petals early spring. My favorite Devils Den rock back slid down from the top now where it is handy to visit near the parking lot was covered with early botanical excitement, including Spring Beauties and hard-working Harveys, really cranking out those yellows.


 

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Date: 2/28/17 12:15 pm
From: <lauralea1959...> <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Red breasted nuthatch
Life bird for me. Thank you Lance Runion and Bill Holiman for sharing on EBird. 27 Lakefront Dr Little Rock
Powered by Cricket Wireless
 

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Date: 2/28/17 8:07 am
From: David Oakley <gdosr...>
Subject: Re: Presentation in Fayetteville this weekend
Kim, in hopes of eliminating possible confusion - the store is not located in the mall. It is located beside Jason’s Deli on Joyce Blvd.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

David Oakley
4779 Cedar Ridge Drive
Springdale, AR 72764
479/422-6588

“Whiskey for my men, beer for my horses"







> On Feb 27, 2017, at 9:05 PM, Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...> wrote:
>
> Alyssa DeRubeis, one of Kim Smith’s graduate students, is doing a presentation on her recent birding trip to Costa Rica (Sunday, March 5th at 1:00 p.m.) at our store at the Northwest Arkansas Mall in Fayetteville. There is no cost and no business promotion involved—we routinely schedule educational events at our stores.
>
> Thanks, and Happy Birding!
> ~Amy
>
> Amy Tucker
> Wild Birds Unlimited
> Branson, MO Fayetteville, AR
> (417) 336-2473 (479) 435-6366
>
> “We Bring People and Nature Together”


 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 8:13 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Leucistic Shoveler
We found a leucistic Northern Shoveler today in Miller County. It was near Dooley Ferry Road just west of Queen's Plantation. It is almost totally white with a bright orange bill. If you want to see the photo let me know. Or check out Arkansas Wildlife on Facebook, I posted it there.
Glenn WyattCabot

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 2/27/17 7:36 pm
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: GREAT HORNED OWL WITH SHADOW
Last Thursday Delos McCauley and I were photographing a Great Horned Owl owlet in its nest just northeast of Pine Bluff. We were in separate vehicles parked along the highway. An adult flew in and perched on a cypress branch in a position that cast its perfect shadow on the pale bark of the tree trunk. Of interest was that Delos had been focused on the nest and did not see the flight of the adult. Moments later, he saw the shadow first and then spotted the owl. If anyone has an interest, I would happy to share a photograph.
John Redman
 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 7:05 pm
From: Kimberly G. Smith <kgsmith...>
Subject: Presentation in Fayetteville this weekend
Alyssa DeRubeis, one of Kim Smith's graduate students, is doing a presentation on her recent birding trip to Costa Rica (Sunday, March 5th at 1:00 p.m.) at our store at the Northwest Arkansas Mall in Fayetteville. There is no cost and no business promotion involved-we routinely schedule educational events at our stores.

Thanks, and Happy Birding!
~Amy

Amy Tucker
Wild Birds Unlimited
Branson, MO Fayetteville, AR
(417) 336-2473 (479) 435-6366

"We Bring People and Nature Together"



 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 3:12 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: For those who care about hummingbirds
I thought that hummingbird lovers would like the opportunity to sign this petition.  Just takes a second....


----- Forwarded Message -----
From: Save Animals Facing Extinction <info...>
To: Carol Joan Patterson <joanie.patterson...>
Sent: Sunday, February 26, 2017 11:36 AM
Subject: hummingbirds EXTINCT

#yiv2111847217 #yiv2111847217 body, #yiv2111847217 table, #yiv2111847217 td, #yiv2111847217 a {}#yiv2111847217 table, #yiv2111847217 td {}#yiv2111847217 img {}#yiv2111847217 #yiv2111847217 img {border:0;height:auto;line-height:100%;outline:none;text-decoration:none;}#yiv2111847217 body {height:100% !important;margin:0 !important;padding:0 !important;width:100% !important;}#yiv2111847217 #yiv2111847217 a .filtered99999 {color:inherit;text-decoration:none;font-size:inherit !important;font-family:inherit !important;font-weight:inherit;line-height:inherit !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217link-hover:hover {text-decoration:none;}#yiv2111847217 #yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217gmail-show {height:auto !important;width:auto !important;max-width:none !important;max-height:none !important;overflow:auto;visibility:visible;display:block;}#yiv2111847217 * .filtered99999 {height:auto !important;width:auto !important;max-width:none !important;max-height:none !important;overflow:auto;visibility:visible;display:block;}#yiv2111847217 @media screen and ( _filtered_a ){#yiv2111847217 #yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217webkit-show {height:auto !important;width:auto !important;max-width:none !important;max-height:none !important;overflow:auto;visibility:visible;display:block;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217webkit-hide {display:none;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217ptop50 {padding-top:50px !important;}#yiv2111847217 #yiv2111847217font-weight-normal {font-weight:normal;}}@media screen and (max-width:800px){#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217img-max {width:100% !important;max-width:100% !important;height:auto !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217full-width {max-width:100% !important;}}#yiv2111847217 @media screen and (max-width:600px){#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217responsive-topbox-item-600 {width:100% !important;min-width:100% !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-hide-topbox-item-600 {display:none;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-0-600 {padding:0px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-5-600 {padding:5px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-10-600 {padding:10px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-15-600 {padding:15px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-20-600 {padding:20px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217responsive-table {width:100% !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217responsive-table-button {width:100% !important;min-width:100% !important;max-width:100% !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-text {font-size:24px !important;line-height:26px !important;}#yiv2111847217 #yiv2111847217mobile {font-size:13px !important;letter-spacing:0px;padding:10px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-footer-logo {max-width:50% !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile {font-size:13px !important;letter-spacing:0px;padding:10px !important;}}@media screen and (max-width:480px){#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217responsive-topbox-item-480 {width:100% !important;min-width:100% !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-hide-topbox-item-480 {display:none;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-0-480 {padding:0px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-5-480 {padding:5px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-10-480 {padding:10px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-15-480 {padding:15px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-topbox-padding-20-480 {padding:20px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217mobile-hide {display:none;}#yiv2111847217 #yiv2111847217mobile-hide {display:none;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217headline {font-size:30px !important;line-height:36px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217sup {font-size:18px !important;line-height:18px !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217logo {width:85px !important;height:auto !important;}#yiv2111847217 .yiv2111847217bg {padding-top:30px !important;}}#yiv2111847217 #yiv2111847217
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Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 3:11 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
Karen Holiday and I saw one on Christmas Bird Count Jan 1 2017 Lake Dardanelles


Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 27, 2017, at 4:25 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:
>
> I've been seeing a few in the last week too...but not at my feeders.
>
> 2 Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Two Rivers Park US-AR 18 Feb 2017
> 3 Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Lake Conway--Dam US-AR 20 Feb 2017
> 4 Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Hendrix Creek Preserve US-AR 21 Feb 2017
> 5 Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Wilbur West Rd. Wetlands US-AR 25 Feb 2017
>
> Michael(Conway)
>
>
>> On Mon, Feb 27, 2017 at 3:05 PM, Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> wrote:
>> We had not one but two Orange-crowned Warblers at our suet back in early January. Only one at a time visiting the suet since. At this point there may be only one left. Also, a couple of Ruby-crowned Kinglets are regulars at the suet.
>>
>> Lyndal York
>> Mid-town Little Rock
>>
>>> On Mon, Feb 27, 2017 at 9:29 AM, Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>> I was gazing out my apartment window at the sunrise this morning, when a flicker in a bush 4ft away caught my eye. It turned out to be an Orange-crowned Warbler skulking around foraging in the leaves. I watched it for a few minutes before it disappeared.
>>>
>>> Mitchell Pruitt
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone.
>>
>
>
> 2 Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Two Rivers Park US-AR 18 Feb 2017
> 3 Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Lake Conway--Dam US-AR 20 Feb 2017
> 4 Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Hendrix Creek Preserve US-AR 21 Feb 2017
> 5 Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Wilbur West Rd. Wetlands US-AR 25 Feb 2017

 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 3:06 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: BLACK VULTURES STARTING TO NEST IN OZARKS
Here in Goshen, it seems that the Black Vulture pair are preparing to nest again on the roof of the abandoned farmhouse.  We often see at least one standing there.  Last year they raised two.  We were never certain about details as we did not want to do anything to disturb them.  Finally, Donald saw the youngsters - casually strolling down the long driveway.  They still had down on their heads.  Later we sometimes saw them on the roof.Joanie


From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Monday, February 27, 2017 4:32 PM
Subject: BLACK VULTURES STARTING TO NEST IN OZARKS

<!--#yiv1904542884 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}-->Black Vultures are starting to nest in northwest Arkansas Evidence of this are pairs of vultures perching close together on limbs adjacent bluff lines where there are shallow caves suitable for a nest. When I was out today I spotted a Black Vulture perched at entrance to an overhang or shallow cave. It was quite a ways off, so I sat in my car and watched. One bird perched at the entrance. Then above me, a second bird appeared and landed on the ledge. It turns out the ledge is a sort of dancing ground, BV-style.
They walked back and forth, craning their necks and partially opening their wings. It may be something described in Birds of North America: “… pairs perform ritualized dance in which they face each other and engage in rapid Up-Down Display accompanied by bill-gaping…” Seeing them today was luck – I was looking for wildflowers.

Caverns like this are widespread in northwest Arkansas. Around 355 million years ago, readily recognizable bands of easily eroded limey shales, ranging reddish to greenish (Northview Member), were deposited over a wide area as part of the St Joe Limestone. Wind and water has had plenty of time to erode the limey shale, leaving a shallow cave below a fine roof of erosion-resistant bedrock.
Most of these overhangs are not true caves, but they have dark places and are typically inaccessible to disturbances, which makes them prime vulture real estate. I saw eggs in one several years ago on February 27 and young were still in this nest in mid-May.



 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 2:32 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BLACK VULTURES STARTING TO NEST IN OZARKS
Black Vultures are starting to nest in northwest Arkansas Evidence of this are pairs of vultures perching close together on limbs adjacent bluff lines where there are shallow caves suitable for a nest. When I was out today I spotted a Black Vulture perched at entrance to an overhang or shallow cave. It was quite a ways off, so I sat in my car and watched. One bird perched at the entrance. Then above me, a second bird appeared and landed on the ledge. It turns out the ledge is a sort of dancing ground, BV-style.

They walked back and forth, craning their necks and partially opening their wings. It may be something described in Birds of North America: pairs perform ritualized dance in which they face each other and engage in rapid Up-Down Display accompanied by bill-gaping Seeing them today was luck I was looking for wildflowers.

Caverns like this are widespread in northwest Arkansas. Around 355 million years ago, readily recognizable bands of easily eroded limey shales, ranging reddish to greenish (Northview Member), were deposited over a wide area as part of the St Joe Limestone. Wind and water has had plenty of time to erode the limey shale, leaving a shallow cave below a fine roof of erosion-resistant bedrock.

Most of these overhangs are not true caves, but they have dark places and are typically inaccessible to disturbances, which makes them prime vulture real estate. I saw eggs in one several years ago on February 27 and young were still in this nest in mid-May.


 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 2:26 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
I've been seeing a few in the last week too...but not at my feeders.

*2* Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Two Rivers Park
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=loc&r=L211862&time=year>
US-AR
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=subnational1&r=US-AR&time=year>
18
Feb 2017 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34483088>
*3* Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Lake Conway--Dam
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=loc&r=L807502&time=year>
US-AR
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=subnational1&r=US-AR&time=year>
20
Feb 2017 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34583104>
*4* Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Hendrix Creek Preserve
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=loc&r=L2149124&time=year>
US-AR
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=subnational1&r=US-AR&time=year>
21
Feb 2017 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34615802>
*5* Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Wilbur West Rd. Wetlands
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=loc&r=L2129015&time=year>
US-AR
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=subnational1&r=US-AR&time=year>
25
Feb 2017 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34814558>

Michael(Conway)


On Mon, Feb 27, 2017 at 3:05 PM, Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> wrote:

> We had not one but two Orange-crowned Warblers at our suet back in early
> January. Only one at a time visiting the suet since. At this point there
> may be only one left. Also, a couple of Ruby-crowned Kinglets are regulars
> at the suet.
>
> Lyndal York
> Mid-town Little Rock
>
> On Mon, Feb 27, 2017 at 9:29 AM, Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-
> <request...> wrote:
>
>> I was gazing out my apartment window at the sunrise this morning, when a
>> flicker in a bush 4ft away caught my eye. It turned out to be an
>> Orange-crowned Warbler skulking around foraging in the leaves. I watched it
>> for a few minutes before it disappeared.
>>
>> Mitchell Pruitt
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone.
>
>
>

*2* Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Two Rivers Park
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=loc&r=L211862&time=year>
US-AR
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=subnational1&r=US-AR&time=year>
18
Feb 2017 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34483088>
*3* Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Lake Conway--Dam
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=loc&r=L807502&time=year>
US-AR
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=subnational1&r=US-AR&time=year>
20
Feb 2017 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34583104>
*4* Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Hendrix Creek Preserve
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=loc&r=L2149124&time=year>
US-AR
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=subnational1&r=US-AR&time=year>
21
Feb 2017 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34615802>
*5* Orange-crowned Warbler 1 Wilbur West Rd. Wetlands
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=loc&r=L2129015&time=year>
US-AR
<http://ebird.org/ebird/MyEBird?cmd=list&rtype=subnational1&r=US-AR&time=year>
25
Feb 2017 <http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist/S34814558>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 1:50 pm
From: Alan <quattro...>
Subject: orange crowned warbler
Had one at lake Harrison a couple weeks ago but was afraid to mention it.



Alan gregory

Harrison



---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus

 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 1:06 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
We had not one but two Orange-crowned Warblers at our suet back in early
January. Only one at a time visiting the suet since. At this point there
may be only one left. Also, a couple of Ruby-crowned Kinglets are regulars
at the suet.

Lyndal York
Mid-town Little Rock

On Mon, Feb 27, 2017 at 9:29 AM, Mitchell Pruitt <
<0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I was gazing out my apartment window at the sunrise this morning, when a
> flicker in a bush 4ft away caught my eye. It turned out to be an
> Orange-crowned Warbler skulking around foraging in the leaves. I watched it
> for a few minutes before it disappeared.
>
> Mitchell Pruitt
>
> Sent from my iPhone.

 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 11:20 am
From: Norman Lavers <0000000a09e6b845-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
We have had an Orange-crowned Warbler at our suet log for a couple of weeks now here in Jonesboro and today while I was watching it (switch to arbfly mode!) the sun came out for a moment and a Spring Azure flew up and landed in the top of the plum tree which is just starting to open its flowers. It was maybe 60ºF.

Cheryl Lavers


On Monday, February 27, 2017 9:30 AM, Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> wrote:


I was gazing out my apartment window at the sunrise this morning, when a flicker in a bush 4ft away caught my eye. It turned out to be an Orange-crowned Warbler skulking around foraging in the leaves. I watched it for a few minutes before it disappeared.

Mitchell Pruitt

Sent from my iPhone.


 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 10:36 am
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: eagles
As I glanced across my desk at the bird feeder this morning I was astonished to see a mature Bald Eagle sitting on an oak limb just beyond the yard with its back toward the house. Don and I watched as the sun rose behind us, over the house, and shone on the bird, illuminating the white tail and head through branches of blooming red maple flowers. The eagle quietly watched the creek, turning its head to observe above and below the unconcerned crows and small birds, and preening.


Early last Thursday morning the crows who come for corn and peanuts were in an uproar near the creek. I thought they were yelling at an owl or a hawk as they frequently do. Later, from the kitchen, I watched a procession of over a dozen deer cross the yard past blooming daffodils then head into the woods that slope toward the stream.


It wasnt until Friday morning that I had a chance to investigate and find that a deer had very recently died there on the wooded stream bank. She was probably the one who looked ill two weeks ago and may have finally succumbed to CWD. It seems the loud crows and silent deer had all been attending her passing.

On Saturday Don moved her remains to a mound in a pasture visible from the bluff. Turkey Vultures found the deer first, and then Bald Eagles came on Sunday.

This morning there were nine mature and sub-adult Bald Eagles being nourished. The eagle we saw from the house was certainly one of them.


Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 8:59 am
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Sandhill Cranes & Fork-tailed Flycatchers
Charles,

Your post yesterday concerning the highest number of sandhill cranes you've encountered in Arkansas reminded me of an interesting story from many years ago.

In January 1995 the only recorded fork-tailed flycatcher was added to Arkansas records. The day of its original sighting was the day the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA) hosted several busloads of central Arkansans to visit Holla Bend NWR to view eagles, hawks, geese, etc., an annual winter event back then. After our day at Holla Bend and rather than following the buses to the interstate for the trip back to Little Rock, one private vehicle headed back east on state highway 154 where the bird was spotted. The fork-tailed flycatcher was originally spotted by Ragan Sutterfield who was in the vehicle with Bill Shepherd and two others. Ragan, who at the time was a very young excellent birder (maybe 14 or 15?), quickly ID'd the bird when he saw it. At least, that's what I recall. Pretty amazing at his age to recognize a species far, far from its home range.

But that's not the whole story I want to share. One or more years later Dora Weir, who had lived in Belize for something like 24 years and was revered there for her conservation work, was now living near Fayetteville at the invitation of Doug James. ASCA invited her to present a program in Little Rock, and I ended up being her chauffeur round trip. I drove from Little Rock to pick her up at her home in northwest Arkansas, and then back to Little Rock the day of her presentation. The next day taking Dora home we decided to take the state highway across Petit Jean to Holla Bend so Dora could see the refuge. When we passed the spot on Highway 154 where the fork-tailed flycatcher had been spotted, I mentioned the noteworthy sighting to her. I distinctly recall she commented it's not always what you see or how many, but where you see it. In Belize she said she had seen as many as ~10,000 fork-tailed flycatchers at one time. But the lone individual spotted here in Arkansas, far from its normal range, was more noteworthy than the thousands she had witnessed in Belize.

In the "Name the Next New Species to be Identified in Arkansas" contest some years later, I seriously doubt fork-tailed flycatcher would have made the Top 100 list had that lone individual already been documented in Arkansas.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
 

Back to top
Date: 2/27/17 7:30 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Orange-crowned Warbler in Fayetteville
I was gazing out my apartment window at the sunrise this morning, when a flicker in a bush 4ft away caught my eye. It turned out to be an Orange-crowned Warbler skulking around foraging in the leaves. I watched it for a few minutes before it disappeared.

Mitchell Pruitt

Sent from my iPhone.
 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/17 2:52 pm
From: swamp_fox <swamp_fox...>
Subject: Sandhill Cranes
After reading Michael Linz’s report Friday evening, I made a trip to eastern Miller County to look for Sandhill Cranes yesterday morning. To say I found them would be an understatement. Although congregated in 3 fields slightly different in location from past reports, I counted a total of 576 birds. That’s the highest count I’ve ever encountered in Arkansas. I watched a few small groups take flight to the southwest so it’s possible had I arrived a few moments earlier, my count of birds might have been even larger. Still, it was an experience I won’t soon forget because I’ve birded in Arkansas long enough to remember when even a single Sandhill Crane generated much excitement.

Charles Mills
Texarkana, TX 7553
 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/17 2:42 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Migratory Bird Phenology in a Changing Climate
http://wildlife.org/migratory-bird-phenology-in-a-changing-climate/


Jerry W. Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/17 11:09 am
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: FISH CROW “SPRING” ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS
Heard my first Fish Crow of 2017 in Benton County this morning just east of
Rogers.

--Joan

On Fri, Feb 24, 2017 at 4:10 PM, Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> wrote:

> Heard my first Fish Crow of 2017 while standing on my back deck at 6:45
> a.m. this morning in Maumelle. Nice way to start the day, but then I had
> to go to work instead of going birding. :-(
> Karen Holliday
>
>
> On Wednesday, February 22, 2017 7:09 PM, Jodi Morris <
> <mjodimorris...> wrote:
>
>
> Heard to Fish Crowd this morning, first in 2017, at Little Rock Central
> High.
>
> On Feb 22, 2017 4:43 PM, "Joseph Neal" <joeneal...> wrote:
>
> Fish Crows (2) were calling among more numerous American Crows in Boxley
> Valley, Buffalo National River February 19 (close to earliest arrival of
> which I’m aware, February 5). They were also calling this morning at Lake
> Fayetteville. Fish Crows don’t overwinter in northwest Arkansas. My last
> one last fall was November 5, 2016, at Lost Bridge South Park on Beaver
> Lake. Fish Crows were unreported in the western Ozarks of Arkansas until
> the 1980s, but they have steadily expanded as a nesting bird throughout our
> area, apparently at least in part a result of changing climate. National
> Audubon lists Fish Crow as a “Climate Threatened” species. According to
> Audubon’s analysis: “climate model forecasts continued shifting climate
> space for this species, most troublingly with only 23% remaining stable in
> winter, and a concurrent 26% reduction in suitable winter space.”
>
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 2/26/17 6:00 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: HARVEY’S BUTTERCUP TO AMERICAN WOODCOCK: They don’t make better Saturdays
One of the earliest flowers around the Ozarks in western Arkansas, Harveys Buttercup, is named for a 19th Century UA-Fayetteville professor, Francis Leroy Harvey, who provided its first scientific description. That first Harveys was blooming pretty-as-could-be Saturday morning on a bluff at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area.
By Saturday afternoon the scene shifted to Wedington Unit, Ozark National Forest, west of Fayetteville. Dr David Krementz shared American Woodcock displays with Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society all 15 of us on a cold but productive evening. We met in the field at 5:30 and saw a Bald Eagle disappear over Wedington Ridge. Then first one, then two, Great Horned Owls flew into the field -- followed by monkeys -- Barred Owls. Then the first star at 6:30. Then 2-3 woodcocks.
The morning hike at Hobbs also yielded bounty: white trout-lilies thriving in a glade that is now in process of restoration with removal of Eastern Red Cedars that tend to shade out and crowd out other native plant and animal species. The top of a big rock slab was covered with trout-lilies, but these appear to be not the widespread and common one Erythronium albidum, but E. mesochoreum, the prairie tout-lily, or as I prefer to call it, the glade version of E. albidum. We also had several Golden-crowned Kinglets.
Dr Douglas James, to whom Arkansans owe so much ornithologically-speaking, made the woodcock trips, with wife Elizabeth and two of his graduate students, Pooja Panwar and Anant Deswhal. Doug enjoyed woodcock peent calls, the cackles of chasing males, and heavenly twitters of birds in their display flights. These were the first woodcocks hes heard in years. This is a result of new hearing aids that he had especially tuned to pick up specific bird calls.
Our Earth is interesting and diverse, if we just let it. On Saturday, Earth pulled out all of her stops. Pump organ players out there will know what I mean by all the stops.


 

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Date: 2/25/17 2:04 pm
From: Judy & Don <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Woodcock!
On his morning run with the dogs Don flushed a Woodcock in one of the north glades near a feeder creek so there should be dancing soon! I also saw two Bald Eagles, and a Sharpie continues to terrorize the feeders.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County
 

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Date: 2/24/17 8:59 pm
From: Than Boves <tboves...>
Subject: Shrikes building nests already in Craighead Cty
While monitoring banded shrikes today, I was incredibly surprised to find a pair of shrikes building a nest already. This is incredibly early; although I haven't found data for Arkansas, according to the Texas Breeding Bird Atlas, the earliest recorded 1st egg date in that state is March 6. I think this pair might beat that!

------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Assistant Professor
Dept of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
Jonesboro, AR 72401




On Fri, Feb 24, 2017 at 10:21 PM -0600, "Michael" <mplinz...><mailto:<mplinz...>> wrote:


That's highway 296...

> On Feb 24, 2017, at 10:11 PM, Michael Linz wrote:
>
> Randy Robinson and I decided we would checkout all the Sandhill Cranes that Charles Mills has been reporting in his area. The normal amount that I see in Arkansas is 1-10 so the hundreds he has been reporting seemed exciting.
>
> Randy and I went to the eBird location on highway 274 just off of highway 82. We quickly found the Sandhills. There was a total of 4.
>
> After a short visit with one of the local farmers who was afraid we were broke down in the middle of nowhere...I could hear cranes coming in. When I looked at the back of the field it had gone from 4 to 40.
>
> We continued to watch as small groups of 1 to 10 came in. The number in the field topped out at 163.
>
> We traveled on down the road and decided to make a u-turn and return home on the back road rather then go interstate through Texarkana. As we came past the sandhill field two eagles buzzed the cranes. All the birds plus some in fields behind the one we could see all took to flight. I snapped a quick picture of one of the flocks. I got tired of counting but it looked like the one group had more than 400 birds in it.
>
> So we went from 4 to 40 to 400...amazing sight and sound anywhere but especially for Arkansas.
>
> We also saw a large flock of brewers blackbirds, pipits and a peregrine.
> A long but very nice trip.
> Thanks Charles Mills for keeping the rest of us aware of what is going on down south.
>
> Michael Linz(Central Arkansas)

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 8:21 pm
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: SW Arkansas
That's highway 296...

> On Feb 24, 2017, at 10:11 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:
>
> Randy Robinson and I decided we would checkout all the Sandhill Cranes that Charles Mills has been reporting in his area. The normal amount that I see in Arkansas is 1-10 so the hundreds he has been reporting seemed exciting.
>
> Randy and I went to the eBird location on highway 274 just off of highway 82. We quickly found the Sandhills. There was a total of 4.
>
> After a short visit with one of the local farmers who was afraid we were broke down in the middle of nowhere...I could hear cranes coming in. When I looked at the back of the field it had gone from 4 to 40.
>
> We continued to watch as small groups of 1 to 10 came in. The number in the field topped out at 163.
>
> We traveled on down the road and decided to make a u-turn and return home on the back road rather then go interstate through Texarkana. As we came past the sandhill field two eagles buzzed the cranes. All the birds plus some in fields behind the one we could see all took to flight. I snapped a quick picture of one of the flocks. I got tired of counting but it looked like the one group had more than 400 birds in it.
>
> So we went from 4 to 40 to 400...amazing sight and sound anywhere but especially for Arkansas.
>
> We also saw a large flock of brewers blackbirds, pipits and a peregrine.
> A long but very nice trip.
> Thanks Charles Mills for keeping the rest of us aware of what is going on down south.
>
> Michael Linz(Central Arkansas)
 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 8:11 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: SW Arkansas
Randy Robinson and I decided we would checkout all the Sandhill Cranes that
Charles Mills has been reporting in his area. The normal amount that I see
in Arkansas is 1-10 so the hundreds he has been reporting seemed exciting.

Randy and I went to the eBird location on highway 274 just off of highway
82. We quickly found the Sandhills. There was a total of 4.

After a short visit with one of the local farmers who was afraid we were
broke down in the middle of nowhere...I could hear cranes coming in. When
I looked at the back of the field it had gone from 4 to 40.

We continued to watch as small groups of 1 to 10 came in. The number in
the field topped out at 163.

We traveled on down the road and decided to make a u-turn and return home
on the back road rather then go interstate through Texarkana. As we came
past the sandhill field two eagles buzzed the cranes. All the birds plus
some in fields behind the one we could see all took to flight. I snapped a
quick picture of one of the flocks. I got tired of counting but it looked
like the one group had more than 400 birds in it.

So we went from 4 to 40 to 400...amazing sight and sound anywhere but
especially for Arkansas.

We also saw a large flock of brewers blackbirds, pipits and a peregrine.
A long but very nice trip.
Thanks Charles Mills for keeping the rest of us aware of what is going on
down south.

Michael Linz(Central Arkansas)

 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 2:55 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: Southeast Ariz guide -finished
I've gotten several folks reply, so no need to reply.
Leif, at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 2/24/17 2:11 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: Re: FISH CROW “SPRING” ARRIVAL IN NW ARKANSAS
Heard my first Fish Crow of 2017 while standing on my back deck at 6:45 a.m. this morning in Maumelle.  Nice way to start the day, but then I had to go to work instead of going birding.  :-(
Karen Holliday

On Wednesday, February 22, 2017 7:09 PM, Jodi Morris <mjodimorris...> wrote:


Heard to Fish Crowd this morning, first in 2017, at Little Rock Central High.
On Feb 22, 2017 4:43 PM, "Joseph Neal" <joeneal...> wrote:

Fish Crows (2) were calling among more numerous American Crows in Boxley Valley, Buffalo National River February 19 (close to earliest arrival of which I’m aware, February 5). They were also calling this morning at Lake Fayetteville. Fish Crows don’t overwinter in northwest Arkansas.  My last one last fall was November 5, 2016, at Lost Bridge South Park on Beaver Lake. Fish Crows were unreported in the western Ozarks of Arkansas until the 1980s, but they have steadily expanded as a nesting bird throughout our area, apparently at least in part a result of changing climate. National Audubon lists Fish Crow as a “Climate Threatened” species. According to Audubon’s analysis: “climate model forecasts continued shifting climate space for this species, most troublingly with only 23% remaining stable in winter, and a concurrent 26% reduction in suitable winter space.”




 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 2:04 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <leanderson...>
Subject: "Finding Birds in Southeast Arizona" extra copy
Greetings all,
I've got 2 brand new copies of the eight edition of "Finding Birds in Southeast Arizona" from 2015. I'll give 1 copy to the first person that contacts me off the listserver.
Cheers, Leif at Hector




This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 2/24/17 1:46 pm
From: Charles Anderson <cmanderson...>
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings
If you want to see cedar waxwings by the hundred, head to Western Hills Park inLittle Rock. Ruth and I are seeing lots of flicks right now.

Chuck Anderson

Sent from my iPhone

> On Feb 23, 2017, at 7:17 PM, Cynthia Patton <00000151b1cba27b-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> In Fayetteville, Washington County, NW AR we had a flock of between 80-100 last Sun. In our front yard spread among 4 trees. My husband has seen two big flocks since then.
>
> Cindy
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Feb 23, 2017, at 3:57 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>>
>> Cedar waxwings are one of those birds, like robins, that migrate but can be found in AR year round. Not sure where in central AR you are but I pulled up a bar chart from pulaski county. http://ebird.org/ebird/GuideMe?cmd=decisionPage&getLocations=counties&counties=US-AR-119&yr=all&m=
>> Looks like they're not reported as often in the summer there. Here in Benton county they're here year round for sure but do seem to come in waves during migration. I'm not sure if that migration is happening yet but I did see a handful of them just the other day. On that bar chart I linked, it looks like Mar through Apr they are reported more often so things should pick up for them soon.
>>
>>> On 2/23/2017 3:50 PM, Keith de Noble wrote:
>>> Good afternoon. Has anyone spotted Cedar Waxwings yet? I've heard they may be migrating through central AR.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Keith de Noble
>>
>>
>> Virus-free. www.avast.com

 

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Date: 2/24/17 11:40 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Samsung phone lost at Woolsey Wet Prairie Sanctuary
I just heard from a fellow who just found a Samsung phone at Woolsey today (Friday). If its yours, contact me and I'll hook you up with him.

 

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Date: 2/24/17 7:56 am
From: Bill Shepherd <stoneax63...>
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings
The absolutely best place in Arkansas to see Cedar Waxwings en masse is in downtown Little Rock during the month of March. They are drawn by the hundreds to the fruits of various hollies planted around downtown buildings and often meet their demise by colliding with glass windows.


When you do see them, keep searching for the odd Bohemian. It has been decades since Arkansas's most recent record of the latter species.


Bill Shepherd


Bill Shepherd 2805 Linden, Apt. 3 Little Rock, Arkansas 72205-5964 <Stoneax63...> (501) 375-3918


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Sent: Friday, February 24, 2017 8:31 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings

They very often like Two Rivers Park in western Little Rock area. Some of their favorite trees are in various parts of that park. I've seen them plenty of times. Bill Thurman

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 3:50 PM, Keith de Noble <kdenoble...><mailto:<kdenoble...>> wrote:
Good afternoon. Has anyone spotted Cedar Waxwings yet? I've heard they may be migrating through central AR.

--
Keith de Noble


 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 7:30 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Summary of North American Bird Conservation Initiative meeting 8-9 Feb 17






JOIN US IN BUILDING A VISION FOR BIRD CONSERVATION FOR THE NEXT CENTURY

Answering the Challenge of Bird Conservation

A century ago, North American bird populations had declined dramatically in the absence of regulations and other

efforts to protect them. Recognizing the importance of migratory birds to humans and the environment, in 1916

government leaders in Canada and the United States signed a treaty committing to conserve these valuable

resources that cross our borders. This groundbreaking treaty was followed 20 years later by a similar agreement

between Mexico and the United States. The result of these international agreements has been a century of

cooperative conservation of our shared migratory birds and their habitats.

However, despite the treaties’ successes, birds still need our help. The State of North America’s Birds 2016 report tells

us that while some groups of birds are thriving, others - especially long-distance international migrants - are in

urgent need of conservation action.

Recognizing that continued international collaboration is vital to conserve migratory bird populations, our three

nations have come together to start to build a vision for sustaining bird populations for the future. We invite you to

join us as we envision the next century of bird conservation.

Why Birds and Bird Conservation Matter

Successful bird conservation efforts recognize that the health of birds – and their habitats – is vital not just to

sustaining their populations, but also to building and nourishing thriving human communities, economies and

cultures, connecting people with nature, and providing valuable ecological services and benefiting many other

wildlife species. Conservation unites people across broad geographies and a variety of cultures. We build our bird

conservation vision on three key premises.

Conservation works

􀁸 Where partners come together for conservation, birds and their habitats are thriving

International cooperation brings success

􀁸 Governments and citizens are already working together to develop approaches to the conservation challenges

of the future, such as ensuring resilient landscapes and adapting to changing conditions

Everyone wins with bird conservation

􀁸 Bird conservation leads to healthy environments and ecosystems that benefit human health and human

communities

Isabel Francolini. Red Knot, Common Nighthawk, Canada Warbler. Graphite with white and black ink on Fabriano. 2016. Part of the “In Fine

Feather” art expo by students from the Department of Fine Arts at Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada.

Our Vision for the Next 100 Years of Bird Conservation

While we have clearly made many strides over the last century, we know that to confront the conservation

challenges of the next generations, we must work towards a shared vision to achieve hemispheric conservation for

migratory birds. Our vision for the next century of bird conservation includes the following elements:

􀁸 People value birds and their habitats for their ecological, economic, aesthetic, and spiritual value.

􀁸 Bird conservation aligns with human interests, and our nations work together to support the clean air and

water, food, and habitat that birds and people need.

􀁸 All sectors are committed to conservation, with governments throughout the Western Hemisphere, nongovernment

organizations, the private sector and citizens working together to conserve birds and their habitats.

􀁸 Bird populations and ecosystems are healthy, thanks to cooperative efforts

among government, industry, and the public.

How will we achieve our vision?

We must collectively take bold action to build on these values and protect our bird

communities throughout their life cycles.

We will…

􀁸 Collaborate across sectors to demonstrate how bird conservation supports

efforts to nurture healthy environments, sustain livelihoods, and improve

economic conditions for landowners and communities by encouraging

sustainable practices

􀁸 Build partnerships toward shared goals of conservation and human well-being

􀁸 Engage social scientists and economists to develop sustainable strategies that benefit birds and people

􀁸 Consider long-term drivers of change, such as global climate change and human population growth

􀁸 Continue to pursue scientific advances that will allow us to adopt more effective and innovative approaches to

achieve both bird conservation and positive socioeconomic outcomes

􀁸 Encourage shared objectives and strategies, guided by strong science, to inform individual actions that achieve

maximum return on our conservation investments and ensure resilient landscapes that can adapt to changing

conditions;

􀁸 Engage people and communities in conservation and monitoring through citizen science and education

􀁸 Focus efforts on our most vulnerable habitats, including oceans, tropical forests, and grasslands, while building

the foundation for conservation in all habitats

􀁸 Consolidate efforts internationally to ensure efficient and effective research, monitoring, conservation, and

management actions throughout the flyways of the Western Hemisphere.

Most importantly, we will do it together. A century ago we signed the first agreement to conserve migratory birds

and joined forces to protect our mutual resources. In the 21st century, we will build and expand a network of diverse

partners and learn from each other’s successes, challenges, and priorities. We will focus on habitats, flyways and

corridors that migratory birds need in order to guarantee connectivity to support birds through their full migratory

cycle.

Together, across the hemisphere, we will unite to implement a shared vision of bird conservation.

Our Invitation to You: Join the Conversation

We hope that this document will start a series of conversations with partners throughout the hemisphere about the

way forward for bird conservation in the next 100 years. We invite you to join us as we work toward developing and

implementing a vision for the future of bird conservation.

Comments? Questions? Email us at <vision...>


 

Back to top
Date: 2/24/17 6:31 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Cedar Waxwings
They very often like Two Rivers Park in western Little Rock area. Some of
their favorite trees are in various parts of that park. I've seen them
plenty of times. Bill Thurman

On Thu, Feb 23, 2017 at 3:50 PM, Keith de Noble <kdenoble...> wrote:

> Good afternoon. Has anyone spotted Cedar Waxwings yet? I've heard they
> *may* be migrating through central AR.
>
> --
> *Keith de Noble*
>

 

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