ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
12/13/18 4:31 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Douglas A. James health update
12/13/18 11:46 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
12/13/18 11:44 am Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Long tailed duck
12/13/18 11:33 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Red-breasted Nuthatch
12/13/18 10:27 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Long-Tailed Duck at Poole's Minnow Farm (Prairie County)
12/13/18 9:46 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Douglas A. James health update
12/13/18 9:25 am laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Long tailed duck at Poole yes
12/13/18 9:24 am laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...> Canvas back at Treadway yes
12/13/18 8:25 am Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Long Tailed Duck
12/13/18 7:01 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Fwd: FW: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
12/12/18 8:42 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Holiday Potluck, Dec 13
12/12/18 3:11 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Sequoyah NWR
12/12/18 1:33 pm plm108 <plm108...> Long-Tailed Duck at Poole's Minnow Farm (Prairie County)
12/12/18 6:50 am David George Krementz <krementz...> Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 10 Dec 2018 to 11 Dec 2018 (#2018-354)
12/11/18 6:18 pm Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Swans
12/11/18 5:17 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Dec. 11
12/10/18 8:28 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> quizzes
12/10/18 7:10 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Norther Shoveler (Hybrid?)
12/10/18 7:08 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Norther Shoveler (Hybrid?)
12/10/18 6:57 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Norther Shoveler (Hybrid?)
12/10/18 10:03 am Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...> 119th CBC dates - ADDING Magnolia/Lake Columbia and Felsenthal NWR
12/9/18 6:21 pm Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
12/9/18 5:37 pm plm108 <plm108...> Pacific Loon at Beaverfork Lake Continues
12/9/18 5:24 pm Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
12/9/18 4:20 pm Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
12/9/18 3:58 pm Robert Doster <calcarius...> Pine Bluff CBC - Dec. 31
12/9/18 12:32 pm Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
12/9/18 10:54 am Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
12/9/18 10:11 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> CBC Feederwatching Tips
12/9/18 10:06 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBirding the CBC
12/9/18 6:54 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Wisdom The Albatross, World's Oldest Wild Bird, Lays Another Egg : NPR
12/8/18 8:37 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Wisdom The Albatross, World's Oldest Wild Bird, Lays Another Egg : NPR
12/8/18 7:04 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
12/8/18 5:05 pm Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
12/8/18 8:12 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Trip ideas?
12/7/18 1:47 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Greater Scaup at Moberly Pond
12/6/18 6:11 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Catching and banding a saw-whet owl | NCPR News
12/6/18 1:16 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Rare Bird Reports
12/6/18 10:48 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Tundra Swan and Cackling/Richardson's Goose
12/6/18 10:37 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Tundra Swan and Cackling Goose
12/6/18 8:39 am plm108 <plm108...> Beaverfork Lake (Conway, Faulkner County)
12/6/18 8:28 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> ASCA Potluck and Silent Auction
12/6/18 8:15 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Dicamba Action Alert
12/5/18 5:13 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Reminder: Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society meeting this Saturday
12/5/18 12:08 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Re: Dicamba Action Alert
12/5/18 11:28 am perfectplaces <perfectplaces...> Re: Dicamba Action Alert
12/5/18 7:38 am Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...> Woolsey report (Washington Co)
12/5/18 7:02 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> AAST supported projects bear fruit
12/5/18 6:50 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Dicamba Action Alert
12/5/18 6:04 am Ann Honeycutt <annhoneycutt53...> Loggerhead Shrikes
12/5/18 5:21 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> HARLAN’S HAWK LIGHT MORPH AT MAYSVILLE
12/5/18 3:50 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Location change for Fayetteville CBC after count tally
12/4/18 8:39 pm Michael <mplinz...> Re: Dicamba Action Alert
12/4/18 7:49 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Sandhill Crane
12/4/18 7:47 pm Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...> Birding presentation adventure
12/4/18 4:01 pm DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Dicamba Action Alert
12/4/18 3:15 pm Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> Re: Northern Shrike
12/4/18 3:10 pm Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...> Re: Northern Shrike
12/4/18 3:08 pm Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> Northern Shrike
12/4/18 3:01 pm Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> Northern Shrike
12/4/18 1:24 pm Cheryl Johnson <cjbluebird...> Re: Lake Monticello Birds
12/4/18 12:13 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Sandhill Crane
12/4/18 12:10 pm Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Lake Monticello Birds
12/4/18 12:09 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
11/30/18 7:29 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Disappearing insects, Birds, Bats, Amphibians, and others
11/30/18 6:34 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> The Snipe Newsletter again
11/29/18 8:54 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Disappearing insects
11/29/18 6:33 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...> 119th CBC dates - ADDING 3 dates
11/29/18 6:32 pm Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Whooping Crane
11/29/18 4:34 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> questions about Cockatiel care
11/29/18 3:43 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Mallard Lake
11/29/18 3:42 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Rough-legged Hawk no
11/29/18 2:09 pm Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Rusty Blackbirds etc. in Alma
11/29/18 10:10 am Gail Miller <gail.miller...> Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
11/29/18 9:34 am Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...> Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
11/29/18 8:31 am Alton Patton <adewittpatton...> Purple finches
11/29/18 7:20 am Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Bella Vista/Bentonville CBC
11/29/18 6:49 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> The Snipe Newsletter
11/28/18 9:07 pm Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> AAS News of Members
11/28/18 7:12 pm Kennynations <kennynations...> Common Mergansers
11/28/18 5:16 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Ducks galore at Alma WTP!
11/28/18 4:21 pm Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Ducks galore at Alma WTP!
11/28/18 10:34 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Kittiwake at Toad Suck Dam
11/28/18 9:59 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
11/28/18 9:45 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Fwd: Re: Disappearing insects
11/28/18 9:43 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Ducks galore at Alma WTP!
11/28/18 9:14 am Laster/Roark <elaster523...> Re: Red-throated Loon yes
11/28/18 8:45 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Fwd: Re: Disappearing insects
11/28/18 8:25 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Disappearing insects
11/28/18 7:52 am Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> Re: Disappearing insects
11/27/18 6:42 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 27
11/27/18 2:50 pm Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> Re: Black and surf scoters
11/27/18 2:14 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Disappearing insects
11/27/18 10:18 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> 2nd Annual Wings of Winter Birding Festival, Paris, TN, January 18-20, 2019
11/27/18 9:48 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> CANVASBACKS AND GOLDENEYES AT ALMA WASTEWATER
11/27/18 9:28 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Black and surf scoters
11/26/18 9:32 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
11/26/18 2:33 pm plm108 <plm108...> Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
11/26/18 1:45 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Alma WTP
11/26/18 1:01 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Red-throated Loon yes
11/26/18 11:52 am dianemarie yates <maribird...> Re: teleportation and stunning
11/26/18 11:36 am Michael <mplinz...> Re: Kittiwake yes
11/26/18 11:14 am Michael <mplinz...> Kittiwake at Toad Suck Park Dam
11/26/18 11:13 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Kittiwake yes
11/26/18 7:44 am Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/25/18 6:28 pm Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Black-legged Kittiwake at Toad Suck Dam
11/25/18 4:39 pm Kenny Nations <kennynations...> Unusual birds for Cleburne County
11/25/18 2:38 pm plm108 <plm108...> Black-legged Kittiwake at Toad Suck Dam
11/25/18 2:22 pm Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Re: Black Scoter Yes
11/25/18 12:11 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Black Scoters
11/25/18 10:15 am James Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Black Scoter Yes
11/25/18 8:52 am Laster/Roark <elaster523...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/25/18 8:21 am Susan <sjackson2...> Whooping crane
11/25/18 7:48 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/25/18 7:29 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/25/18 7:26 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/25/18 5:00 am Don Simons <drsimons56...> Fwd: Record Number Black Scoters
11/24/18 7:40 pm Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/24/18 6:36 pm Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/24/18 4:11 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> TOOT TOOT TOOT EVERYWHERE
11/24/18 3:54 pm George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...> Harlan's Hawk...or ?
11/24/18 3:03 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/24/18 1:23 pm Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/24/18 12:15 pm David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/24/18 11:35 am Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...> Re: Record Number Black Scoters
11/24/18 11:23 am Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...> Whooping crane - yes
11/24/18 11:20 am Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...> Re: Whooping Crane still there
11/24/18 11:10 am Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> Record Number Black Scoters
11/24/18 8:31 am Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Red-throated Loon at Lake Saracen
11/24/18 8:22 am Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Red-throated Loon at Lake Saracen
11/24/18 7:58 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> teleportation and stunning
11/23/18 8:45 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Re: Red-throated Loon?
11/23/18 8:15 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Re: Red-throated Loon?
11/23/18 6:32 pm Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Red-throated Loon?
11/23/18 5:04 pm Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> Re: Food Man Has Arrived
11/23/18 3:48 pm Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...> Re: Red-throated Loon?
11/23/18 3:38 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Red-throated Loon?
11/23/18 10:38 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Lake Monticello
11/23/18 8:00 am Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Surf Scoter- Female
11/23/18 6:23 am Mary Ann King <office...> Yellowbelly sapsucker
11/22/18 6:09 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Link to Photos of Horned Grebe, A W Pelicans & E Collared-Dove
11/22/18 3:14 pm Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...> Gunnison Sage-Grouse & Southern Colorado in late April/early May.... LONG
11/22/18 10:44 am Barry Haas <bhaas...> Audubon.org: Yards With Non-Native Plants Create ‘Food Deserts’ for Bugs and Birds
11/22/18 9:36 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update and Sandhills
11/22/18 9:30 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> NOT Rose-breasted Grosbeak
11/22/18 9:24 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Rose-breasted Grosbeak
11/22/18 8:52 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: Food Man Has Arrived
11/22/18 8:36 am Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Food Man Has Arrived
11/22/18 8:02 am plm108 <plm108...> Food Man Has Arrived
11/22/18 7:30 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Re: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update and Sandhills
11/22/18 5:11 am Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...> 119th CBC dates - ADDING 3 DATES
11/22/18 2:51 am Don Simons <drsimons56...> Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update
11/21/18 8:07 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Re: Bird Guides
11/21/18 9:16 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> OUT OF THE CLOUD AND INTO YOUR HANDS: update on NWAAS meeting December 8
11/21/18 8:43 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: WHOOPER
11/21/18 7:00 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> A pair of wings
11/21/18 6:36 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Inca
11/21/18 6:16 am dianemarie yates <maribird...> Adaptation
11/21/18 5:56 am dianemarie yates <maribird...> Re: Bird Guides
11/21/18 1:17 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> New yard bird
11/20/18 7:05 pm Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Tucson
11/20/18 6:51 pm Tim Tyler <tylertim204...> Re: Whopping Crane
11/20/18 6:46 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Bird Guides
11/20/18 5:50 pm Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...> Re: Bird Guides
11/20/18 5:37 pm JoAnn Drew <000001540c75b1c3-dmarc-request...> Re: Bird Guides
11/20/18 4:55 pm plm108 <plm108...> Re: Bird Guides
11/20/18 4:34 pm <hilltower12...> <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> Re: WHOOPER
11/20/18 3:49 pm Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Re: Black scoters
11/20/18 2:16 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bird Guides
11/20/18 12:06 pm Tim Tyler <tylertim204...> Whopping Crane
11/20/18 11:02 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Thanksgiving Week Sightings (Harlan's Hawk, Roadrunner) and an Owl-update
11/20/18 8:19 am Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...> 119th Christmas Bird Count dates
11/19/18 4:24 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Rough-legged Hawk, no
11/19/18 3:03 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Today's birds on Lake Saracen
11/19/18 11:12 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Golden Eagle!
11/19/18 8:15 am Lea Crisp <leacrisp...> Re: Bella Vista/Bentonville/Centerton CBC
11/19/18 4:43 am Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: The birds of my backyard
11/18/18 8:08 pm CK Franklin <meshoppen...> The birds of my backyard
11/18/18 5:23 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> WHOOPER
11/18/18 1:01 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Whooping Crane- Yes
11/18/18 11:37 am Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Sunday Birding Centerton Vaughn and westerly
11/18/18 7:13 am Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> Re: Clay-colored Sparrow at Eagle Watch Nature Trail
11/18/18 7:11 am Rick Jones <jonesjay62...> Happy Hour Sendoff for Alyssa DeRubeis, Dec 11
11/17/18 6:19 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Black scoters
11/17/18 1:31 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Clay-colored Sparrow at Eagle Watch Nature Trail
11/17/18 8:25 am David Ray <cardcards...> Whooping crane & duck hunters
11/17/18 8:02 am David Ray <cardcards...> Re: Whooping Crane
11/16/18 6:45 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Monroe Co
11/16/18 3:02 pm Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Monroe Co
11/16/18 2:18 pm Tara Gillanders <tara.gillanders...> Mississippi River State Park CBC circle
11/16/18 1:32 pm DAN <birddan...> Whooping Crane
11/16/18 9:22 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> DeGray Lake Field Trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas
11/16/18 7:48 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Late RTHU Pulaski County
11/16/18 7:38 am Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Re: The forgotten subspecies
11/16/18 7:36 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Whooping Crane still there
11/16/18 7:10 am Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> Bella Vista/Bentonville/Centerton CBC
11/16/18 6:45 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Fayetteville CBC, Sunday, December 16, 2018
11/16/18 5:51 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> SHORT-EARED OWLS IN RIVER VALLEY
11/16/18 1:34 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Google Street View Birding
11/15/18 9:00 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
11/15/18 8:18 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> fellowshipofwings listserv
11/15/18 7:35 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: The forgotten subspecies
11/15/18 7:30 pm Cheryl Childers <cherylness...> Google Street View Birding
11/15/18 6:37 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Dardanelle Lock & Dam
11/15/18 3:39 pm Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Common loons on Lake Langhofer in Regional Park
11/15/18 1:13 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Re: The forgotten subspecies
11/15/18 9:58 am Hal Mitchell <halmitchell...> Re: The forgotten subspecies
11/15/18 9:38 am Jacob Wessels <jacoblwessels...> Re: The forgotten subspecies
11/15/18 9:16 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> The forgotten subspecies
11/15/18 7:52 am Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Wooping crane still around?
11/15/18 4:30 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> eBird Stakeout Hotspot for Whooping Crane
11/14/18 6:51 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - November 14, 2018
11/14/18 5:23 pm Sheena Hare <0000024fd2c4a332-dmarc-request...> New E-mail Adress
11/14/18 5:14 pm Sheena Hare <0000024fd2c4a332-dmarc-request...> New E-mail Adress
11/14/18 4:58 pm Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Re: Monroe Co. Whooping Crane is Countable - ABA
11/14/18 4:27 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Cackling goose
11/14/18 4:08 pm Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...> Monroe Co. Whooping Crane is Countable - ABA
11/14/18 1:22 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Buffalo Point Audubon Christmas Bird count Dec 15
11/13/18 9:08 pm Susan Hardin <whizcats...> Re: Whooping Crane
11/13/18 7:26 pm Susan Hardin <whizcats...> Re: Whooping Crane
11/13/18 4:54 pm Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> Whooping Crane
11/13/18 4:44 pm Ed Tiede <0000012caede6260-dmarc-request...> Re: ID Help
11/13/18 4:38 pm Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...> Re: ID Help
11/13/18 4:36 pm ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...> ID Help
11/13/18 12:59 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Harris's Sparrows at Maysville
 
Back to top
Date: 12/13/18 4:31 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Douglas A. James health update
Kannan, please give me a favor

Please list the books that Douglas James has written during his
life. I would like to read them, or some of them, at some point. In all the
years I've been around Arkansas, I have not met him. Thanks very much.

Bill Thurman

On Thu, Dec 13, 2018, 11:46 Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Our beloved Dr. Doug James is not doing well. He has been moved from a
> hospital to hospice care. I heard he has lost consciousness. Please keep
> him in your thoughts and prayers.
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/13/18 11:46 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Red-breasted Nuthatch
R-B Nuthatches have been hanging out for some weeks now, to the delight of feeder watchers. They’re so brazen and acrobatic! Their calls are much softer than my more commonly heard W-B Nuthatches.

Rick Jones
Sent from my iPhone

> On Dec 13, 2018, at 1:32 PM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> This morning my wife said she saw a Red-breasted Nuthatch at our feeders. I have to say I was a little skeptical, we don't have a pine tree within sight of our yard. We live in Cabot, maybe a house in our neighborhood has a pine tree, but that has to be 200 yards or more away. But, it came back! And again. I even got photos of it. So cool, a new yard bird for us.
>
> Also on this rainy day we saw a female Purple Finch for the second time ever. And then two males stopped in for a dinner of sunflower seeds. Our first ever spotting at the house of the males. What a great rainy day it is.
>
> On a sad note, I see there is a Goldfinch near our feeder post with feet up. And another one on our porch that doesn't fly away when I sit in a chair next to it. I fear we are going to lose two of these great little birds today.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot

 

Back to top
Date: 12/13/18 11:44 am
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Long tailed duck
Still present at Poole minnow farm 1:45 pm
Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 12/13/18 11:33 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Red-breasted Nuthatch
This morning my wife said she saw a Red-breasted Nuthatch at our feeders.  I have to say I was a little skeptical, we don't have a pine tree within sight of our yard.  We live in Cabot, maybe a house in our neighborhood has a pine tree, but that has to be 200 yards or more away.  But, it came back!  And again.  I even got photos of it.  So cool, a new yard bird for us. 

Also on this rainy day we saw a female Purple Finch for the second time ever.  And then two males stopped in for a dinner of sunflower seeds.  Our first ever spotting at the house of the males.  What a great rainy day it is.
On a sad note, I see there is a Goldfinch near our feeder post with feet up.  And another one on our porch that doesn't fly away when I sit in a chair next to it.  I fear we are going to lose two of these great little birds today.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 12/13/18 10:27 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Long-Tailed Duck at Poole's Minnow Farm (Prairie County)
Hi All. Several folks have asked about directions (and protocols at) this location. 
Approx address:9750 Graham Rd (Hickory Plains)
GPS Coordinates: 34.9560424, -91.7259556
Directions:From the major intersection in Hickory Plains, head south on Hwy 13. In about a mile, turn left on Graham Rd (sign may not be present). Go approx 1.5 miles and you'll see a gravel road on the left that turns into Poole's Minnow Farm. Do not enter the property but you can safely bird from here or along the road. There's a high spot on the road where a creek runs under. That's where we saw it from yesterday. It may switch to a different pond, so check them all if you don't find it. 
Hope this helps.

Patty McLean 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 12/12/18 3:32 PM (GMT-06:00) To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>, plm108 <plm108...> Subject: Long-Tailed Duck at Poole's Minnow Farm (Prairie County)
Kenny Nichols eBird report from yesterday shows a photo of a LONG-TAILED DUCK. Since Michael Linz and I have a special fondness for this species, after our chores were done, we hopped in the car and drove to Hickory Plains to see this rare visitor and what else might be in the area. The LTDU was still there, easily seen and hanging out with two Lesser Scaup in the second cell along the road (coming from the North end). No other ducks were visible for us from the road which is the only permissible viewing area.
Michael got a few photos of the LTDU and will share them later on our eBird report. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50622478
Afterwards we made a stop at Treadway's Minnow Farm and found Canvasbacks, scaup, hundreds of Ruddies, and several shorebird species including a hundred or so Yellowlegs and Dowitchers. No Waldo that we could find so heading back to Poole's. 
Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR

 

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Date: 12/13/18 9:46 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Douglas A. James health update
Our beloved Dr. Doug James is not doing well.  He has been moved from a hospital to hospice care.  I heard he has lost consciousness.  Please keep him in your thoughts and prayers.  
KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 12/13/18 9:25 am
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Long tailed duck at Poole yes

 

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Date: 12/13/18 9:24 am
From: laura davis <000000177bab20ae-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Canvas back at Treadway yes

 

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Date: 12/13/18 8:25 am
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Long Tailed Duck
The Long Tailed Duck is still on the 3rd pond at Pooles Fish Farm where they have been reported. Hanging out with 3 Lesser Scaup
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/13/18 7:01 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Fwd: FW: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today


I had sent this comparison of juncos to a friend not on our listserv. She had spent several years teaching school children on the north slope of Alaska. Thought I’d pass along this tidbit of observation.



Jeff Short



Ray’s aunt used to call these “snow birds.” She grew up in North Dakota. When I was on the North Slope, the Inupiats also called them snow birds. They signaled the time when Beluga whales would begin appearing.



Trish








 

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Date: 12/12/18 8:42 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Holiday Potluck, Dec 13
All are welcome to Audubon Society of Central ARs holiday potluck.

Meeting: December 13 - Potluck, Silent Auction, and Annual Meeting

The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas will hold its annual Holiday Potluck
and Silent Auction on Thursday, Dec. 13, from 6:009:00 p.m., at the Little
Rock Audubon Center, 4500 Springer Blvd., Little Rock. This fun-filled event
is a great opportunity to enjoy wonderful food, spread some holiday cheer,
and exchange tall birding tales with fellow birders. If you are bringing an
item for the auction please be there by 6:00 p.m. in order to get the
item(s) labeled and in place. Well begin accepting bids by 6:15 and sit
down for dinner at 6:30. Auction items can be purchased or handmade. ASCA
will provide the drinks. Plates, cups, and eating utensils will be furnished
by Audubon Arkansas.

Directions from Little Rock: Take I-440 to Exit 1, Springer Blvd. Go south
(left) on Springer Blvd. Cross over the railroad tracks, then look for the
center and Audubon Arkansas sign on the right. So bring your favorite dish
and join us on December 13.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 12/12/18 3:11 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Sequoyah NWR
During a visit today to Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in the valley of the Arkansas River in eastern Oklahoma, I was reminded of the vital role of mitigating habitat damage. In the wake of turning Arkansas River into a navigation system, Sequoyahs 20,800 acres were set aside in 1970 to provide habitat for waterfowl and other migratory birds, plus food and cover for resident wildlife. I made todays trip with Flip Putthoff, editor for NWA Outdoors (Tuesday in Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette), and Terry Stanfill, chemist retired from SWEPCO power plant in Gentry and manager of Eagle Watch Nature Trail. First birds we saw: two adult Bald Eagles at a nest. We saw three active nests during the day. Refuge staff said egg laying starts in February. This was followed immediately by an overhead flight of American White Pelicans. A mile down the road: cascade of quacking that soon resolved itself into a Mallard flock surely in the range of 5,000-10,000 birds. And just down the road from them, a blue sky turned suddenly white and dark blue, and filled with wild goose music, as several thousand Snow (and blue) Geese lifted off from a field. Could have been other goose species, but we did not have a chance to study the flock. A remarkable, over-the-top sort of a day. There were cormorants and gulls out on the Arkansas River-lake, plus a surprising flock of 15 Forsters Terns.


 

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Date: 12/12/18 1:33 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Long-Tailed Duck at Poole's Minnow Farm (Prairie County)
Kenny Nichols eBird report from yesterday shows a photo of a LONG-TAILED DUCK. Since Michael Linz and I have a special fondness for this species, after our chores were done, we hopped in the car and drove to Hickory Plains to see this rare visitor and what else might be in the area. The LTDU was still there, easily seen and hanging out with two Lesser Scaup in the second cell along the road (coming from the North end). No other ducks were visible for us from the road which is the only permissible viewing area.
Michael got a few photos of the LTDU and will share them later on our eBird report. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50622478
Afterwards we made a stop at Treadway's Minnow Farm and found Canvasbacks, scaup, hundreds of Ruddies, and several shorebird species including a hundred or so Yellowlegs and Dowitchers. No Waldo that we could find so heading back to Poole's. 
Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR

 

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Date: 12/12/18 6:50 am
From: David George Krementz <krementz...>
Subject: Re: ARBIRD-L Digest - 10 Dec 2018 to 11 Dec 2018 (#2018-354)
David

I am curious if you have seen any snipe over at Red Slough this year? I ask because the autumn conditions around AR have been ideal for holding snipe but yet I have seen almost none. I am trying to figure out what is going on??

David

David G Krementz
Emeritus
USGS Arkansas Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit
Department of Biological Sciences
1 University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
479 575 7560
<krementz...>



-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of ARBIRD-L automatic digest system
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 12:00 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: ARBIRD-L Digest - 10 Dec 2018 to 11 Dec 2018 (#2018-354)

There are 2 messages totaling 406 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:

1. Red Slough Bird Survey - Dec. 11
2. Swans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Tue, 11 Dec 2018 19:17:39 -0600
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Dec. 11

It was mostly clear, cool, and a bit windy on the bird survey today. 62 species were found. Most notable find was a small flock of Sandhill Cranes flying over coming from the SE. They were fairly low and may have been headed toward the field south of Idabel where some hung out last year (check it out Ford!). Here is my list for today:



Gadwall - 485

Mallard - 292

Northern Shoveler - 81

Northern Pintail - 28

Green-winged Teal - 203

Canvasback - 4

Ring-necked Duck - 2436

Lesser Scaup - 1

Ruddy Duck - 9

Pied-billed Grebe - 15

Double-crested Cormorant - 5

Great-blue Heron - 13

Black Vulture - 54

Turkey Vulture - 70

Bald Eagle - 1 adult

Northern Harrier - 3

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 7

Virginia Rail - 1

American Coot - 426

Sandhill Crane - 8 (flying over RS headed northwest.)

Killdeer - 1

Rock Pigeon - 1

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 2

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 3

Northern Flicker - 9

Eastern Phoebe - 7

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 17

Fish Crow -11

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 5

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 3

Marsh Wren - 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Hermit Thrush - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 3

Cedar Waxwing - 13

Orange-crowned Warbler - 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 4

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 3

Savannah Sparrow - 5

Fox Sparrow - 4

Song Sparrow - 8

Swamp Sparrow - 3

White-throated Sparrow - 9

Dark-eyed Junco - 2

Northern Cardinal - 7

Red-winged Blackbird - 564

Meadowlark species - 1

Purple Finch - 1

American Goldfinch - 4





Odonates:



Variegated Meadowhawk







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR



















------------------------------

Date: Wed, 12 Dec 2018 02:17:52 +0000
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Swans

The trumpeter swans were numerous and cooperative as was the one tundra swan and one cackling goose at Abram's ponds today. Also two snow geese, one adult and one immature , and ring-necked ducks, and one fly over adult eagle.

A D Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

------------------------------

End of ARBIRD-L Digest - 10 Dec 2018 to 11 Dec 2018 (#2018-354)
***************************************************************
 

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Date: 12/11/18 6:18 pm
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Swans
The trumpeter swans were numerous and cooperative as was the one tundra swan and one cackling goose at Abram's ponds today. Also two snow geese, one adult and one immature , and ring-necked ducks, and one fly over adult eagle.

A D Patton
Fort Smith

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>


 

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Date: 12/11/18 5:17 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Dec. 11
It was mostly clear, cool, and a bit windy on the bird survey today. 62
species were found. Most notable find was a small flock of Sandhill Cranes
flying over coming from the SE. They were fairly low and may have been
headed toward the field south of Idabel where some hung out last year (check
it out Ford!). Here is my list for today:



Gadwall - 485

Mallard - 292

Northern Shoveler - 81

Northern Pintail - 28

Green-winged Teal - 203

Canvasback - 4

Ring-necked Duck - 2436

Lesser Scaup - 1

Ruddy Duck - 9

Pied-billed Grebe - 15

Double-crested Cormorant - 5

Great-blue Heron - 13

Black Vulture - 54

Turkey Vulture - 70

Bald Eagle - 1 adult

Northern Harrier - 3

Sharp-shinned Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Red-tailed Hawk - 7

Virginia Rail - 1

American Coot - 426

Sandhill Crane - 8 (flying over RS headed northwest.)

Killdeer - 1

Rock Pigeon - 1

Eurasian Collared-Dove - 2

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 3

Northern Flicker - 9

Eastern Phoebe - 7

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 17

Fish Crow -11

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 5

Carolina Wren - 5

Winter Wren - 1

Sedge Wren - 3

Marsh Wren - 3

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 3

Eastern Bluebird - 1

Hermit Thrush - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 3

Cedar Waxwing - 13

Orange-crowned Warbler - 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 4

Common Yellowthroat - 1

Eastern Towhee - 3

Savannah Sparrow - 5

Fox Sparrow - 4

Song Sparrow - 8

Swamp Sparrow - 3

White-throated Sparrow - 9

Dark-eyed Junco - 2

Northern Cardinal - 7

Red-winged Blackbird - 564

Meadowlark species - 1

Purple Finch - 1

American Goldfinch - 4





Odonates:



Variegated Meadowhawk







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR




















 

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Date: 12/10/18 8:28 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: quizzes
Anyone ever take the quizzes on Ebird? They are fun... and if you
struggle with some ID's like myself, can also be frustrating at times.
The sound quiz I took had a LOT of duck sounds that I got wrong and even
a woodpecker with just the pecking.  It was frustrating.

And some of the pictures were frustrating at times... some, you can't
find the bird. Some can be misidentified, etc... It passes the time
though. :)

https://ebird.org/quiz/photo-and-sound#setup


And for anyone that would take a look... one of the hawks I got
wrong...  and, I'm not sure about it. It was marked as a red-tailed hawk
but there were NO patagial marks that I could see at all. The overall
shape seemed off to me. But that's what it was labeled and I just don't
know if that's what it is... or if it isn't, I don't know what it is.
Those hawks can be tricky for me. Anyone able to tell me why this is a
red-tailed if it is? or what it is if it isn't?
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S39178647

scroll down to the hawk. And thanks in advance in case I don't get back
to anyone right away.

Daniel Mason


---
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Date: 12/10/18 7:10 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Norther Shoveler (Hybrid?)
Thanks Dan…mystery solved!!!

Michael

> On Dec 10, 2018, at 9:08 PM, Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:
>
> It is normal plumage transition. According to Bird of North America:
> "Alternate I plumage. Prealternate I molt commences by late fall; plumage
> acquired by Jan Š Head and neck black with iridescent green medially. Some
> birds show a partial white crescent on face similar in shape and location
> to that found on adult male Blue-winged Teal.˛
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock
>
> On 12/10/18, 8:57 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
> Michael Linz" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <mplinz...>
> wrote:
>
>> Patty and I saw this Norther Shoveler yesterday at Lake Conway. It has a
>> white stripe on itąs face. I donąt remember ever seeing one that had
>> white on the face. Iąm wondering if it is a possible hybridŠmaybe with a
>> Blue-wing Teal.
>>
>> Check out the picture in the eBird list and let me know what you think.
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50555432
>>
>> Michael Linz and Patty McLean (Conway, AR)
>
>
 

Back to top
Date: 12/10/18 7:08 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Norther Shoveler (Hybrid?)
It is normal plumage transition. According to Bird of North America:
"Alternate I plumage. Prealternate I molt commences by late fall; plumage
acquired by Jan Head and neck black with iridescent green medially. Some
birds show a partial white crescent on face similar in shape and location
to that found on adult male Blue-winged Teal.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock

On 12/10/18, 8:57 PM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Michael Linz" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <mplinz...>
wrote:

>Patty and I saw this Norther Shoveler yesterday at Lake Conway. It has a
>white stripe on its face. I dont remember ever seeing one that had
>white on the face. Im wondering if it is a possible hybridmaybe with a
>Blue-wing Teal.
>
>Check out the picture in the eBird list and let me know what you think.
>
>https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50555432
>
>Michael Linz and Patty McLean (Conway, AR)
 

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Date: 12/10/18 6:57 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Norther Shoveler (Hybrid?)
Patty and I saw this Norther Shoveler yesterday at Lake Conway. It has a white stripe on it’s face. I don’t remember ever seeing one that had white on the face. I’m wondering if it is a possible hybrid…maybe with a Blue-wing Teal.

Check out the picture in the eBird list and let me know what you think.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50555432

Michael Linz and Patty McLean (Conway, AR)
 

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Date: 12/10/18 10:03 am
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: 119th CBC dates - ADDING Magnolia/Lake Columbia and Felsenthal NWR
Greetings all,
It's getting close to the coolest (figuratively & literally) birding of the year.

The Christmas Bird Counts are held around the Americas from 12/14 through 1/5. Counts have been done for 119 years - the oldest citizen science bird database in the hemisphere.



If you've seen any Audubon bird reports, then you know that the CBC supplied much of the data that made the reports possible. Here is your chance to help the science, building toward future planned reports!

Any birding skill level is fine.
Any length of time is welcome.
Just contact a compiler for details & area assignments to join in the fun.
It's FREE for all, though donations to Audubon are always appreciated.

If you know of counts in adjoining states, that have an AR connection, I'd love to advertise them here.



You're welcome to contact me for general information - Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us or leave a message at 479-284-3150 ext 3151. If you're looking for life birds, contact me and I can tell you which counts would give you the best chance of seeing them.

"at" = @ in the list below.



Dec 14th Fri:

JONESBORO; Virginie Rolland; vrolland "at" astate.edu

MAGNOLIA/ LAKE COLUMBIA; Darrell & Debbie Chatelain; darrell1951 "at" suddenlink.net



15th Sat:
ARKADELPHIA; Evelyn & Glenn Good; theoldcrow "at" sbcglobal.net

BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER EAST (near Buffalo Point on Hwy 14); Jack Stewart; jackstewart_us "at" yahoo.com; Sponsored by Buffalo National River Partners. Lodging is available, call Jack for details

FORT SMITH; Bill Beall; billtoka "at" mynewroads.com (Bill has been compiling for 68 years!!)

LAKE OUACHITA SP; Kayla Gomance; kayla.gomance "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Lake Ouachita SP

LITTLE ROCK; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central AR

VILLAGE CREEK SP; Heather Runyan; heather.runyon "at" arkansas.gov 870-238-9406 Sponsored by Village Creek SP.



16th Sun:

FAYETTEVILLE; Joe Neal; joeneal "at" uark.edu; Sponsored by NorthWest AR Audubon.

LONOKE; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central AR

RED SLOUGH, OK; David Arbour arbour "at" Windstream.net and Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us



17th Mon:

HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE; Chris Cash; c52cash "at" sbcglobal.net Sponsored by Hot Springs Village Audubon

MOUNTAIN HOME; Tom Krohn; dreamer "at" Yellville.net



18th Tues:

NORTH FORK of the ILLINOIS BAYOU (near Hector); Sarah Davis; sadavis "at" fs.fed.us; Sponsored by US Forest Service.



20th Thurs:

MISSISSIPPI RIVER SP (near Marianna); Tara Gillanders; tara.gillanders "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mississippi River SP

WHITE RIVER NWR; (Near St. Charles) Than Boves; tboves "at" astate.edu



21st Fri:

SYLAMORE RANGER DISTRICT; (near Mountain View); Idun Guenther; iguenther "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by US Forest Service.



22nd Sat:

BELLA VISTA/BENTONVILLE/CENTERTON: Butch Tetzlaff; butch "at" thebluebirdshed.com

CROOKED CREEK (near Harrison); Alan Gregory; quattro "at" windstream.net



28th Fri:

LAKE GEORGIA PACIFIC/ FELSENTHAL NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Felsenthal NWR and the Friends of Felsenthal NWR.



29th Sat:

CONWAY; Allan Mueller; akcmueller "at" gmail.com Co-compiler Michael Linz mplinz "at" gmail.com

HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; Shelley Todd; shelley_todd "at" nps.gov 501-620-6751 Sponsored by Hot Springs NP

WAPANOCCA NWR/SHELBY FOREST; Dick Preston; dickpreston "at" rittermail.com Co-compiler of TN side Van Harris shelbyforester1223 "at" bigriver.net Sponsored by TN Ornithological Society



31st Mon:

PINE BLUFF; Rob Doster; rdoster "at" Hotmail.com Sponsored by Three Rivers Audubon Society



Jan 1st Tues:

LAKE DARANELLE; Kenny Nichols; kingbird "at" ymail.com



3rd Thurs:

BIG LAKE NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us

TEXARKANA (northern Miller co); Don Kyle; rondokyle "at" windstream.net Meeting 7am at Rondo Methodist Church at jct of Hwy 237 & E 19th st.



4th Fri:

HOLLA BEND NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Holla Bend NWR & the Friends of Holla Bend NWR.



5th Sat:

MOUNT MAGAZINE; Don Simons; don.simons "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mount Magazine SP

POND CREEK NWR; Devin Moon; moondevg "at" gmail.com and Matt Gideon; paulmatthewgideon "at" gmail.com



Counts with dates not set yet.

BAYOU DeVIEW (near Brinkley); Steve Osborne; jsteveosborne "at" gmail.com



Hope you can join the counts, Leif at Hector






This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 12/9/18 6:21 pm
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
Hi, all,

Here is an interesting page with great photos and some info on the various
Junco subspecies: https://www.thespruce.com/pictures-of-juncos-4121961


On Sun, Dec 9, 2018 at 7:24 PM Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
wrote:

> My guess is that it is the same bird. I had a partially leucistic
> White-throated Sparrow last Winter and it’s back this year!!
>
>
>
> Gail Miller
>
> Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:
> <ARBIRD-L...>] *On Behalf Of *Gmail
> *Sent:* Sunday, December 09, 2018 6:20 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
>
>
>
> Joan,
>
>
>
> Thanks for sharing this article! It was a blast from the past for me as I
> was taught ornithology by Val and Ellen and did Master’s work under one of
> Val’s former doctoral students.
>
>
>
> They are some of the best in the field.
>
>
>
> Butch
>
> Bentonville
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Dec 9, 2018, at 12:54, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>
> It is quite possibly the same individual. Juncos are known for their
> winter-site fidelity. Several banding studies have shown this. Here is a
> link to one:
> https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/auk/v099n02/p0243-p0259.pdf
>
>
>
>
> I can't imagine a second individual finding its way to that same feeder,
> but it is possible.
>
>
>
> If it is still here when Hobbs State Park starts their Birds and Breakfast
> feeder banding program in January, maybe it will be banded.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 9:04 PM Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
> wrote:
>
> I wonder if that could be the same one from last year. Interesting.
>
>
>
> On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 7:05 PM Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
> wrote:
>
> Seen this afternoon under the feeders at the Visitor's Center. 3rd
> sighting in Arkansas.
>
>

 

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Date: 12/9/18 5:37 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Pacific Loon at Beaverfork Lake Continues
After hearing from Cody Massery that he had relocated the Pacific Loon on Beaverfork Lake today, Michael Linz and I decided to trot over to see if we could snap any decent photos of this rather distant loon. Well, we could see what it was through our scopes but the photos were only slightly better than the first day we saw it (Thurs, Dec 6). Regardless, we plopped our "best" photos into our eBird report in a remote attempt to get it confirmed. One of Michael's photos included in the report shows a Common Loon alongside the Pacific. The overall size and largess of the COLO is obvious even if specific field marks are not so obvious. 
It tends to stay far out in the lake, and afternoon light has been more favorable for viewing, particularly because you'd be looking into the sun in the morning.
Anyway...here's our report with our distant and blurry photos. The second photo shows the nice roundness of its Cobra-shaped head. 
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50555449
Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR

 

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Date: 12/9/18 5:24 pm
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
My guess is that it is the same bird. I had a partially leucistic White-throated Sparrow last Winter and it’s back this year!!



Gail Miller

Conway (Faulkner Co.) AR



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Gmail
Sent: Sunday, December 09, 2018 6:20 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today



Joan,



Thanks for sharing this article! It was a blast from the past for me as I was taught ornithology by Val and Ellen and did Master’s work under one of Val’s former doctoral students.



They are some of the best in the field.



Butch

Bentonville






On Dec 9, 2018, at 12:54, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> <mailto:<joanreynolds...> > wrote:

It is quite possibly the same individual. Juncos are known for their winter-site fidelity. Several banding studies have shown this. Here is a link to one: https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/auk/v099n02/p0243-p0259.pdf



I can't imagine a second individual finding its way to that same feeder, but it is possible.



If it is still here when Hobbs State Park starts their Birds and Breakfast feeder banding program in January, maybe it will be banded.









On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 9:04 PM Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> <mailto:<kjgarrett84...> > wrote:

I wonder if that could be the same one from last year. Interesting.



On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 7:05 PM Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> <mailto:<joanreynolds...> > wrote:

Seen this afternoon under the feeders at the Visitor's Center. 3rd sighting in Arkansas.


 

Back to top
Date: 12/9/18 4:20 pm
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
Joan,

Thanks for sharing this article! It was a blast from the past for me as I was taught ornithology by Val and Ellen and did Master’s work under one of Val’s former doctoral students.

They are some of the best in the field.

Butch
Bentonville



> On Dec 9, 2018, at 12:54, Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>
> It is quite possibly the same individual. Juncos are known for their winter-site fidelity. Several banding studies have shown this. Here is a link to one: https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/auk/v099n02/p0243-p0259.pdf
>
> I can't imagine a second individual finding its way to that same feeder, but it is possible.
>
> If it is still here when Hobbs State Park starts their Birds and Breakfast feeder banding program in January, maybe it will be banded.
>
>
>
>
>> On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 9:04 PM Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:
>> I wonder if that could be the same one from last year. Interesting.
>>
>>> On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 7:05 PM Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:
>>> Seen this afternoon under the feeders at the Visitor's Center. 3rd sighting in Arkansas.

 

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Date: 12/9/18 3:58 pm
From: Robert Doster <calcarius...>
Subject: Pine Bluff CBC - Dec. 31
The Pine Bluff Christmas Bird Count will be held this year on Monday, December 31st... the 54th consecutive year for this CBC! Due to a good variety of habitats, most years over 100 species are tallied on the count. Our record high count is 121 species and last year 103 species were found. A number of rare birds have been located on the count in recent years-- Red-necked Grebe, Barnacle Goose (the first for Arkansas), "Blue" Ross's Goose, Black-bellied Whistling-Duck, Common Merganser, Brown Pelican, Laughing Gull, Black-legged Kittiwake, Rough-legged Hawk, Golden Eagle, Virginia Rail, Inca Dove, Broad-billed Hummingbird (another first for Arkansas), Blue-headed Vireo, and Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, to name a few.

To see a map of the count circle, look here:http://goo.gl/maps/Q8DVa

Please reply to me (off-list) if you're interested in joining us this year (before ringing-in the New Year). If you live in the count circle but can't get out in the field, you're welcome to participate as a feeder-watcher.

Thanks,
Rob Doster
Count Compiler

 

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Date: 12/9/18 12:32 pm
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
Some birds seem to be repeat visitors. I photographed a male Allen's hummingbird at a west Houston home in August 2013 that had been banded there in January 2013. Evidently he was back for his second winter after a round trip to the west coast.

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Sent: Sunday, December 9, 2018 12:54:22 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today

It is quite possibly the same individual. Juncos are known for their winter-site fidelity. Several banding studies have shown this. Here is a link to one: https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/auk/v099n02/p0243-p0259.pdf<https://eur01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fsora.unm.edu%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fjournals%2Fauk%2Fv099n02%2Fp0243-p0259.pdf&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cd7f7730543634057911f08d65e07c6cc%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C636799784820197223&sdata=t7UejkrZn472AXn7huRcLjNMmArfHlF93byg6X4FwNs%3D&reserved=0>

I can't imagine a second individual finding its way to that same feeder, but it is possible.

If it is still here when Hobbs State Park starts their Birds and Breakfast feeder banding program in January, maybe it will be banded.




On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 9:04 PM Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...><mailto:<kjgarrett84...>> wrote:
I wonder if that could be the same one from last year. Interesting.

On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 7:05 PM Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...><mailto:<joanreynolds...>> wrote:
Seen this afternoon under the feeders at the Visitor's Center. 3rd sighting in Arkansas.

 

Back to top
Date: 12/9/18 10:54 am
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
It is quite possibly the same individual. Juncos are known for their
winter-site fidelity. Several banding studies have shown this. Here is a
link to one:
https://sora.unm.edu/sites/default/files/journals/auk/v099n02/p0243-p0259.pdf


I can't imagine a second individual finding its way to that same feeder,
but it is possible.

If it is still here when Hobbs State Park starts their Birds and Breakfast
feeder banding program in January, maybe it will be banded.




On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 9:04 PM Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:

> I wonder if that could be the same one from last year. Interesting.
>
> On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 7:05 PM Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
> wrote:
>
>> Seen this afternoon under the feeders at the Visitor's Center. 3rd
>> sighting in Arkansas.
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/9/18 10:11 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: CBC Feederwatching Tips
If your CBC assignment is to focus on watching your yard birds, then please
do so for at least 15 consecutive minutes. For a stationary count like
feeder watching, report the highest number of individuals seen at one time
during the observation period, as well as any clearly different individuals.
Please read this short article about counting feeder birds
https://ebird.org/news/counting-102/. Report your tally as well as # of
observers, start time, and duration to your CBC compiler.

You dont have to be able to ID every species. You can use spuh taxa like
sparrow sp. (species), and blackbird sp., as well as slash taxa like
Sharp-shinned/Coopers Hawk if you dont know which Accipiter you saw. Every
bird counts for the CBC. Same rules apply to the Great Backyard Bird Count
and everyday eBirding.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 12/9/18 10:06 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBirding the CBC
Here is your annual reminder about how to eBird your section of a CBC
circle, and how to take advantage of the mobile app. Please read this
http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1010523.

The coarsest acceptable approach is a single location represented by a dot
in the middle of your section, unambiguously named [XX] CBCSection [#], and
a single day-long list under this, except for a separate list for owling.
The preferred approach is separate lists (and effort) for each distinct area
you bird a park, a birdy road, a fish farm with birds seen in between
those areas put under the overarching [XX] CBCSection [#] location. After
all your lists are in eBird (and youve shared those lists with your
teammates), use View & Explore Data>Summary Tables - Your Data to create a
Week Report starting the date of the CBC. Then select all the relevant
locations. The Species Total tab is your final tally to transfer to Excel.
Distance and time will have to be manually added.

Remember that eBird distance is ONE WAY so subtract back-tracking on a
checklist. If youve previously eBirded your section then all of your
locations are easily accessible in the app using Choose a Nearby Hotspot or
Choose a Nearby Personal Location, as well as Choose a Location from a Map.
Dont create new locations if you dont have to.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 12/9/18 6:54 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Wisdom The Albatross, World's Oldest Wild Bird, Lays Another Egg : NPR
Great story of persistence and survival.
Thanks, Barry!

Bill Thurman

On Sat, Dec 8, 2018, 22:37 Barry Haas <bhaas...> wrote:

> Wonder of wonders:
>
>
> https://www.npr.org/2018/12/07/674481057/wisdom-the-albatross-worlds-oldest-wild-bird-lays-another-egg
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 12/8/18 8:37 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Wisdom The Albatross, World's Oldest Wild Bird, Lays Another Egg : NPR
Wonder of wonders:

https://www.npr.org/2018/12/07/674481057/wisdom-the-albatross-worlds-oldest-wild-bird-lays-another-egg


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/8/18 7:04 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
I wonder if that could be the same one from last year. Interesting.

On Sat, Dec 8, 2018 at 7:05 PM Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...> wrote:

> Seen this afternoon under the feeders at the Visitor's Center. 3rd
> sighting in Arkansas.
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/8/18 5:05 pm
From: Joan Reynolds <joanreynolds...>
Subject: Gray-headed Junco at Hobbs State Park Visitor Center today
Seen this afternoon under the feeders at the Visitor's Center. 3rd
sighting in Arkansas.

 

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Date: 12/8/18 8:12 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Trip ideas?
So the 16th through the 22nd, my wife will be off from work. Most years
she takes a vacation we drive up to visit family in Massachusetts...
there's a part of me that wishes I was doing that as I could go chase a
few good winter birds up there but finances have us planning on sticking
around the state.
SO...
I'm thinking of driving somewhere in the state and not staying more than
a night or two(again, money :(  )

So I'm trying to decide what birds to try and chase and where to go...
AND find something that's REALLY cheap that doesn't involve birding as
my wife wont want to go somewhere and just birdwatch.

I'll have to spend some time on Ebird and see what birds are found in
the state that we might not see up here in Siloam Springs(NW Arkansas)

We managed to get the brown-headed nuthatch out near shores lake when we
were chasing crossbills at one point, so we don't "need" that one. And
we're thinking of chasing the red-cockaded woodpecker. I'll use Ebird
data but it sure doesn't hurt to ask around on this one. What's the best
location to track one of those down?
Are there other interesting birds that aren't found up here that we
could chase?  Haven't seen any reports on the whooping crane in a while.
Has that moved on? That would be pretty awesome to chase.
Our trip will probably be more towards the middle of the week that week.
I think I'll watch the weather and plan around it. Don't want to spend
the whole trip driving around so we'll try to just make it a day or two,
or a night or two anyway.

And again, I have to find something else to do to entertain my wife on
the trip. She wont be happy if all we do is bird...  I guess I ought to
plan on the bird part first and then try to plan other activities around
that.

Any suggestions/ideas welcome.

Daniel Mason


---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 12/7/18 1:47 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Greater Scaup at Moberly Pond
My trip up toward Centerton this morning got off to a rousing good start. A huge flock of Snow Geese maybe 1000 or more flew over headed south about 9:30.

A male Greater Scaup was the most interesting duck today. It was diving in the extensive storm water retention pond associated with Moberly apartments in Bentonville, adjacent I-49 and highway 102. In addition: Gadwall (25), Ring-necked Duck (15), American Coot (20), and Pied-billed Grebe (1). We have seen Greater Scaups here often in the past, too.

Best duck at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton was an immaculate male Canvasback. In addition: Bufflehead (24), Redhead (2), Northern Shoveler (8), Gadwall (2), and an adult Bald Eagle. There is also the big dark domestic Cayuga duck, attended by 6 Mallards.

My trip this morning was motivated by wintering Red-tailed Hawks . I refound an adult Kriders Hawk foraging along Ginn Road, 1.0 miles south of the Centerton hatchery. A bit further south, there is a western Red-tailed Hawk (B. j. calurus) that is much like the rufous morph illustrated in Wheeler (2003 especially Plate 357). This is near the dairy farm, close to intersection of Adams and Opal. It is really, really wary. Immediately south of the hatchery, along Holloway Road, there was a Harlans Hawk "black warrior" with a white upper breast. Also, at least 5 or 6 regular Red-tails.

Plenty of Harriss Sparrows in same areas, associated with White-crowned Sparrows.


 

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Date: 12/6/18 6:11 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Catching and banding a saw-whet owl | NCPR News
Segment on NPR re saw-whet Owl


https://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/story/37326/20181106/catching-and-banding-a-saw-whet-owl


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 12/6/18 1:16 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Rare Bird Reports
Arbirders:

It is time to report your rare and out of season birds for the fall season
(August throughNovember) to the on line database (
www.arbirds.org/rbreports.html ). Please submit your reports before we get
into the Christmas Counts.

Remember arbirds.org is the official reporting site for rare and out of
season birds not eBird. We have no way of easily capturing reports to eBird
and that site does not require a statement of significance of the
observation or a description of field marks used in identification.

Lyndal York, Ph.D.
Curator, Arkansas Audubon Society

 

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Date: 12/6/18 10:48 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Tundra Swan and Cackling/Richardson's Goose
Both the Tundra Swan and the Cackling/Richardson's Goose have been present
each day in the Abram ponds on Hiram rd since early November.

 

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Date: 12/6/18 10:37 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Tundra Swan and Cackling Goose
Both have been present each day in the Abram ponds since the first of
November.

 

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Date: 12/6/18 8:39 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Beaverfork Lake (Conway, Faulkner County)
Hi All. Michael Linz and I found several interesting waterfowl on the lake this cold morning: 
1 PACIFIC LOON, 9 GREATER SCAUP, and 4 COMMON GOLDENEYE

Things should pick up a bit as this cold blast of air slides across the state over the next several days. Happy Birding!

Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR

 

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Date: 12/6/18 8:28 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: ASCA Potluck and Silent Auction


Dear ARbirders:

The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas will hold its
annual Holiday Potluck and Silent Auction on Thursday, Dec. 13, from
6:00-9:00 p.m., at the Little Rock Audubon Center, 4500 Springer Blvd.,
Little Rock. This fun-filled event is a great opportunity to enjoy
wonderful food, spread some holiday cheer, and exchange tall birding tales
with fellow birders.

If you are bringing an item for the auction please
be there by 6:00 p.m. in order to get the item(s) labeled and in place.
We'll begin accepting bids by 6:15 and sit down for dinner at 6:30. Auction
items can be purchased or handmade. ASCA will provide the drinks. Plates,
cups, and eating utensils will be furnished by Audubon Arkansas.


Directions from Little Rock: Take I-440 to Exit 1, Springer Blvd. Go south
(left) on Springer Blvd. Cross over the railroad tracks, then look for the
center and Audubon Arkansas sign on the right.

So bring your favorite
dish and join us on December 13.
 

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Date: 12/6/18 8:15 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Dicamba Action Alert
Just for the record, I left my comment and submitted it in order to get
anyone who has the power to ban this sick cancerous poison. It specifically
kills bees, birds, wildlife AND humans. Crittenden Co where I live has got
to be one of the worst poison counties in the state of Arkansas. A place
awash in soybean fields.

Bill Thurman



On Tue, Dec 4, 2018, 18:01 DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> wrote:

> ARBirders,
>
>
> http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments
>
>
> Please use Audubon Arkansas's action alert to tell the AR State Plant
> Board to vote NO to extending the use of dicamba at their meeting this
> Thursday.
>
>
> Why are your comments on the herbicide dicamba needed now?
>
>
> In February, the Arkansas State Plant Board (ASPB) prohibited the
> application of dicamba on agricultural fields from April 16th through
> October 31st after receiving a record-breaking number of complaints
> alleging misuse and off-target effects. Now, despite its initial ruling and
> without any new scientific evidence, the ASPB’s Pesticide Committee has
> recommended extending use to June 15. Pesticide companies and politicians
> are behind this ploy. The ASPB needs to hear from you before they meet this
> Thursday to vote on the recommendation!
>
>
> Audubon Arkansas is against the use of dicamba past April 15. As the
> weather warms, this herbicide’s volatility increases, meaning even days
> later it can drift onto nearby native plants, which in turn can harm birds
> and pollinators. Harmful effects on honeybees have already been documented
> in Arkansas!
>
>
> Please submit comments by Thursday, December 6 at 12:00pm CT.
>
>
> Send a Comment to the AR State Plant Board by CLICKING THIS LINK!-
> http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments
>
>
> Dan Scheiman
>
> Little Rock, AR
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/5/18 5:13 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Reminder: Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society meeting this Saturday

Here's a last minute reminder:




The Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society December meeting will be onSaturday, December 8, 2018 at the Hobbs State Park Visitor Center at 2pm.  Officers will be elected.  Mitchell Pruitt, recently graduated fromthe University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, will give a presentation, enlivenedby his outstanding photographs, about a birding trip to Costa Rica led by Dr.Ragupathy Kannan. 

 

A native Arkansan, Mitchelldeveloped a love for wildlife at a young age.  At age 11, he attended theArkansas Audubon Society’s Ecology Camp, which is what originally piqued hisinterest in birds and nature.  From there, his passion for birdshas snowballed into a desire to pursue a career in ecology and conservation.  As a naturephotographer, he is interested in wildlife with an emphasis on birds. He alsoenjoys photographing dragonflies, butterflies, herps (reptiles &amphibians), and wildflowers. Over the last few years, he’s been activelypursuing a Master’s Degree in Biology, studying the Northern Saw-whet Owl, aspecies that was previously not known to occur regularly in Arkansas.  Hisresearch interests lie in birds of prey (raptor conservation) and conservationbiology. When he is not in the field or at school, he loves following birds andphoto-ops around the United States and abroad, especially to the tropics. With photography, research and writing, he is able to bring to life thewonder of science and the beauty of our natural world.  He hopes to relatethis to people everywhere, and in this way hopes to stir something insideeveryone that inspires a natural awareness and love for the Earth and itsconservation.  Mitchell, I applaud you!!

There are going to be door prizes.  Among them will be Joe Neal’sdelightful books “Birdside Baptist” and “In the Province of Birds”.  Free and open to the public.



 

Back to top
Date: 12/5/18 12:08 pm
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Dicamba Action Alert
You can also show support by showing up at tomorrow's (Dec 6) AR State Plant Board meeting at 1:30. There is no public comment portion, but there are other ways to make our message clear to vote NO.


Arkansas Agriculture Dept. Bldg. #1 Natural Resources Drive Little Rock, AR, 72205


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

> On December 5, 2018 at 1:28 PM perfectplaces <perfectplaces...> wrote:
>
>
> The use of Dicamba is becoming more widespread with the introduction of a GMO soybean that is resistant to the chemical. It is probably not used in the Refuge system, but I couldn’t be sure of that. The issue with Dicamba is that it is an old technology that they have tried to modify. While they claim that it is safer, our State Plant Board (Ph: 1-501-224-1598)had to put a stop to its use due to complaints from people whom had damages to their crops and landscapes from another’s application of the herbicide. The product has been proven to drift off target by our University of Arkansas crop scientists. Through litigation and lobbying, not science, our Plant Board has decided to have a vote to expand the herbicide’s use in Arkansas. This vote is taking place tomorrow at 1:30. Audubon Arkansas has an action notice out now to show our concern for the environment and help ensure this is a no vote on Dicamba. Please visit their website or call the Plant Board and let them know that you care.
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
> Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2018 8:50 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Dicamba Action Alert
>
>
>
> Just curious as to what Holla Bend looks like. Is dicamba used on the refuge? I've noticed that at Sequoyah NWR, in OK, there's hardly any winter grass. Maybe it's all been mowed. And the farmlands in eastern OK, and western AR, are so clean. Like Michael said, not a place left for sparrows. And without tall grass, there's no place for harriers to hunt.
>
>
>
> Sandy B
>
> Fort Smith
>
>
>
> On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 10:39 PM Michael <mplinz...> mailto:<mplinz...> > wrote:
>
> > >
> > Dan,
> >
> > Thanks for this update.
> >
> > In the Lollie Bottoms, one of my favorite birding locations in Faulkner County, I saw the effect of this terrible herbicide. Everything was dead except some crop plants. There was not a place a sparrow could hide.
> >
> > I talked to one of the farmers that used non-aerial application of a different product and he even said that he could not see how any of his fellow farmers could think this was a good thing.
> >
> > I was proud of our state when I found we had banned it. It is sad that we are one of the first to do something right and now we want to reverse it.
> >
> > Hopefully everyone will send a note and they will stick by their original decision.
> >
> >
> >
> > Michael LINZ
> >
> >
> > On Dec 4, 2018, at 6:01 PM, DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> mailto:<birddan...> > wrote:
> >
> > > > >
> > > ARBirders,
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Please use Audubon Arkansas's action alert to tell the AR State Plant Board to vote NO to extending the use of dicamba at their meeting this Thursday.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Why are your comments on the herbicide dicamba needed now?
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > In February, the Arkansas State Plant Board (ASPB) prohibited the application of dicamba on agricultural fields from April 16th through October 31st after receiving a record-breaking number of complaints alleging misuse and off-target effects. Now, despite its initial ruling and without any new scientific evidence, the ASPB’s Pesticide Committee has recommended extending use to June 15. Pesticide companies and politicians are behind this ploy. The ASPB needs to hear from you before they meet this Thursday to vote on the recommendation!
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Audubon Arkansas is against the use of dicamba past April 15. As the weather warms, this herbicide’s volatility increases, meaning even days later it can drift onto nearby native plants, which in turn can harm birds and pollinators. Harmful effects on honeybees have already been documented in Arkansas!
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Please submit comments by Thursday, December 6 at 12:00pm CT.
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Send a Comment to the AR State Plant Board by CLICKING THIS LINK!- http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Dan Scheiman
> > >
> > > Little Rock, AR
> > >
> > > > >
> > >




 

Back to top
Date: 12/5/18 11:28 am
From: perfectplaces <perfectplaces...>
Subject: Re: Dicamba Action Alert
The use of Dicamba is becoming more widespread with the introduction of a GMO soybean that is resistant to the chemical. It is probably not used in the Refuge system, but I couldn’t be sure of that. The issue with Dicamba is that it is an old technology that they have tried to modify. While they claim that it is safer, our State Plant Board (Ph: 1-501-224-1598)had to put a stop to its use due to complaints from people whom had damages to their crops and landscapes from another’s application of the herbicide. The product has been proven to drift off target by our University of Arkansas crop scientists. Through litigation and lobbying, not science, our Plant Board has decided to have a vote to expand the herbicide’s use in Arkansas. This vote is taking place tomorrow at 1:30. Audubon Arkansas has an action notice out now to show our concern for the environment and help ensure this is a no vote on Dicamba. Please visit their website or call the Plant Board and let them know that you care.



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
Sent: Wednesday, December 05, 2018 8:50 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Dicamba Action Alert



Just curious as to what Holla Bend looks like. Is dicamba used on the refuge? I've noticed that at Sequoyah NWR, in OK, there's hardly any winter grass. Maybe it's all been mowed. And the farmlands in eastern OK, and western AR, are so clean. Like Michael said, not a place left for sparrows. And without tall grass, there's no place for harriers to hunt.



Sandy B

Fort Smith



On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 10:39 PM Michael <mplinz...> wrote:

Dan,

Thanks for this update.

In the Lollie Bottoms, one of my favorite birding locations in Faulkner County, I saw the effect of this terrible herbicide. Everything was dead except some crop plants. There was not a place a sparrow could hide.

I talked to one of the farmers that used non-aerial application of a different product and he even said that he could not see how any of his fellow farmers could think this was a good thing.

I was proud of our state when I found we had banned it. It is sad that we are one of the first to do something right and now we want to reverse it.

Hopefully everyone will send a note and they will stick by their original decision.



Michael LINZ


On Dec 4, 2018, at 6:01 PM, DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> wrote:

ARBirders,



http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments



Please use Audubon Arkansas's action alert to tell the AR State Plant Board to vote NO to extending the use of dicamba at their meeting this Thursday.



Why are your comments on the herbicide dicamba needed now?



In February, the Arkansas State Plant Board (ASPB) prohibited the application of dicamba on agricultural fields from April 16th through October 31st after receiving a record-breaking number of complaints alleging misuse and off-target effects. Now, despite its initial ruling and without any new scientific evidence, the ASPB’s Pesticide Committee has recommended extending use to June 15. Pesticide companies and politicians are behind this ploy. The ASPB needs to hear from you before they meet this Thursday to vote on the recommendation!



Audubon Arkansas is against the use of dicamba past April 15. As the weather warms, this herbicide’s volatility increases, meaning even days later it can drift onto nearby native plants, which in turn can harm birds and pollinators. Harmful effects on honeybees have already been documented in Arkansas!



Please submit comments by Thursday, December 6 at 12:00pm CT.



Send a Comment to the AR State Plant Board by CLICKING THIS LINK!- http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments



Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 12/5/18 7:38 am
From: Alyssa DeRubeis <alderubeis...>
Subject: Woolsey report (Washington Co)
Mitchell Pruitt, Vivek Kumar, Jennifer Mortensen, and I braved the cold yesterday morning at Woolsey Wet Prairie in Fayetteville. The highlights included a Harlan’s morph Red-tailed Hawk flying on the south side and one lonely Sedge Wren. What was most intriguing to me though was the complete lack of Le Conte’s Sparrow. Compare this to last year’s Christmas Bird Count that tallied over 40 of these orange emberizids. I imagine that conditions on the breeding ground were not ideal, and I’d like to know if others have noticed this irruption-esque pattern over the years. (Mitchell tells me this holds true at Woolsey, NWA’s local Le Conte’s hotspot). And how does this year compare to others? Thanks and good birding!

Alyssa DeRubeis
Fayetteville, Washington Co.
 

Back to top
Date: 12/5/18 7:02 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: AAST supported projects bear fruit
Two Arkansas Audubon Society Trust supported projects were consummated recently.  Mitchell Pruitt successfully defended his MS thesis on his work on Northern Saw-whet Owls; Dr. Aditi Lele finished her Ph.D. work on interdependence of large-seeded trees and avian frugivores outside of protected areas in India.  
Congratulations to both! 
Kannan
Ft. Smith
 

Back to top
Date: 12/5/18 6:50 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Dicamba Action Alert
Just curious as to what Holla Bend looks like. Is dicamba used on the
refuge? I've noticed that at Sequoyah NWR, in OK, there's hardly any winter
grass. Maybe it's all been mowed. And the farmlands in eastern OK, and
western AR, are so clean. Like Michael said, not a place left for sparrows.
And without tall grass, there's no place for harriers to hunt.

Sandy B
Fort Smith

On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 10:39 PM Michael <mplinz...> wrote:

> Dan,
> Thanks for this update.
> In the Lollie Bottoms, one of my favorite birding locations in Faulkner
> County, I saw the effect of this terrible herbicide. Everything was dead
> except some crop plants. There was not a place a sparrow could hide.
> I talked to one of the farmers that used non-aerial application of a
> different product and he even said that he could not see how any of his
> fellow farmers could think this was a good thing.
> I was proud of our state when I found we had banned it. It is sad that we
> are one of the first to do something right and now we want to reverse it.
> Hopefully everyone will send a note and they will stick by their original
> decision.
>
> Michael LINZ
>
> On Dec 4, 2018, at 6:01 PM, DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> wrote:
>
> ARBirders,
>
>
> http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments
>
>
> Please use Audubon Arkansas's action alert to tell the AR State Plant
> Board to vote NO to extending the use of dicamba at their meeting this
> Thursday.
>
>
> Why are your comments on the herbicide dicamba needed now?
>
>
> In February, the Arkansas State Plant Board (ASPB) prohibited the
> application of dicamba on agricultural fields from April 16th through
> October 31st after receiving a record-breaking number of complaints
> alleging misuse and off-target effects. Now, despite its initial ruling and
> without any new scientific evidence, the ASPB’s Pesticide Committee has
> recommended extending use to June 15. Pesticide companies and politicians
> are behind this ploy. The ASPB needs to hear from you before they meet this
> Thursday to vote on the recommendation!
>
>
> Audubon Arkansas is against the use of dicamba past April 15. As the
> weather warms, this herbicide’s volatility increases, meaning even days
> later it can drift onto nearby native plants, which in turn can harm birds
> and pollinators. Harmful effects on honeybees have already been documented
> in Arkansas!
>
>
> Please submit comments by Thursday, December 6 at 12:00pm CT.
>
>
> Send a Comment to the AR State Plant Board by CLICKING THIS LINK!-
> http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments
>
>
> Dan Scheiman
>
> Little Rock, AR
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/5/18 6:04 am
From: Ann Honeycutt <annhoneycutt53...>
Subject: Loggerhead Shrikes
I traveled Hwy 70 yesterday and saw Loggerhead Shrikes at three locations
near Lonoke including the Hogan fish hatchery.

Ann Honeycutt
Little Rock

On Tue, Dec 4, 2018, 5:15 PM Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> wrote:

> Ok, thanks.
>
> On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 5:09 PM Will Britton <wabritton...> wrote:
>
>> Hi Pam,
>>
>> From the photo it is hard to tell exactly but that does look like a
>> Loggerhead Shrike.
>>
>> Will Britton
>>
>> On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 18:08 Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> wrote:
>>
>>> FYI. Northern Shrike I justed reported has NOT been confirmed but it did
>>> not match up for a Loggerhead. It would be nice for someone else to check
>>> and see for sure.Do not want to give the impression it was confirmed.
>>>
>>> Thanks
>>>
>>> Pam Weedman
>>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/5/18 5:21 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: HARLAN’S HAWK LIGHT MORPH AT MAYSVILLE
During a trip to Maysville December 5, David Oakley and I saw a large buteo perched on a metal fence along Highway 43 a few miles north of Maysville. When it flew the most striking characteristic was the tail, almost pure white on top except near the tip where it was darker. As it was flying away, the top of the tail was just blindingly pure white. The body was mainly white underneath, too, except for a modest amount of black streaking in the belly. We tried repeatedly to get closer for photos, but the bird was really skittish. My poor quality photo of it perched on a hay bail at distance in the field shows a grayish head with lighter color above and below the eye. After a fair amount of study at home, I realized it was a Harlans Hawk in one of its lighter morphs, rather than the big black warriors with whitish tails that are by comparison relatively easy to identify. I have no idea how numerous they are in winter here because I suspect unless the birds are close, I tend not to notice them. There was no missing this one, however. We saw it perched right along the highway several times and also watched at close range as it flew away before David had a chance for a good photograph. I had one decent chance, but my camera froze up. I got it unfrozen and ready to focus but off it flew.
Harlans Hawk was once considered a separate species, but is now mainly considered a Red-tailed Hawk subspecies. But not everyone agrees on this. Harlans has a pretty discrete nesting range in Alaska and northwest Canada, plus apparently a full range of color morphs. The whole state of Arkansas is within its winter range, providing all of us a chance to study this interesting bird.


 

Back to top
Date: 12/5/18 3:50 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Location change for Fayetteville CBC after count tally
Many of you know that our former Fayetteville CBC Compiler Doug James has been in hospital recently. While his condition is improving, Elizabeth has decided it would be better not to have the after CBC tally gathering at their home. Kim and Peggy Smith have been part of the Fayetteville CBC for many years (Kim also served as Compiler). Peggy has generously stepped in and offered to host the after count tally at her home. Otherwise, plans remain the same. Please be at Peggys by 5:30 PM so we can begin the tally at 6 PM. Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will provide pizza and beverages. As in the past, we expect this to finish by 7-7:30. The gathering is a fun social event, but its main purpose is to pull together data. Everyone is welcome to the tally, but it is important that at least one person per party either attend, or ensure the data gets delivered by someone.
Peggy Smith, 1389 S. River Meadows Drive. The Smith residence is in southeast Fayetteville. Directions from intersection of Highway 265 (Crossover Road) and Highway 16 (East Huntsville): At 265 X 16, drive east on 16 for 1.3-1.4 miles to River Meadows Drive (the turn is right off the end of the new bridge). Turn right on River Meadows and go about 0.4 miles. Parking along the street. Please try to arrive by 5:30. I'll be glad to send a Google map to Peggy's place to anyone who requests (off list please).


 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 8:39 pm
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Dicamba Action Alert
Dan,
Thanks for this update.
In the Lollie Bottoms, one of my favorite birding locations in Faulkner County, I saw the effect of this terrible herbicide. Everything was dead except some crop plants. There was not a place a sparrow could hide.
I talked to one of the farmers that used non-aerial application of a different product and he even said that he could not see how any of his fellow farmers could think this was a good thing.
I was proud of our state when I found we had banned it. It is sad that we are one of the first to do something right and now we want to reverse it.
Hopefully everyone will send a note and they will stick by their original decision.

Michael LINZ

> On Dec 4, 2018, at 6:01 PM, DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> wrote:
>
> ARBirders,
>
>
>
> http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments
>
>
>
> Please use Audubon Arkansas's action alert to tell the AR State Plant Board to vote NO to extending the use of dicamba at their meeting this Thursday.
>
>
>
> Why are your comments on the herbicide dicamba needed now?
>
>
>
> In February, the Arkansas State Plant Board (ASPB) prohibited the application of dicamba on agricultural fields from April 16th through October 31st after receiving a record-breaking number of complaints alleging misuse and off-target effects. Now, despite its initial ruling and without any new scientific evidence, the ASPB’s Pesticide Committee has recommended extending use to June 15. Pesticide companies and politicians are behind this ploy. The ASPB needs to hear from you before they meet this Thursday to vote on the recommendation!
>
>
>
> Audubon Arkansas is against the use of dicamba past April 15. As the weather warms, this herbicide’s volatility increases, meaning even days later it can drift onto nearby native plants, which in turn can harm birds and pollinators. Harmful effects on honeybees have already been documented in Arkansas!
>
>
>
> Please submit comments by Thursday, December 6 at 12:00pm CT.
>
>
>
> Send a Comment to the AR State Plant Board by CLICKING THIS LINK!- http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments
>
>
>
> Dan Scheiman
>
> Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 7:49 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Sandhill Crane
I friend reported a Sandhill Crane  in Newton County near the Parthenon two days ago.
Jack StewartNewton County
On Tuesday, December 4, 2018, 2:14:52 PM CST, Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> wrote:

LaDonna and I had one in the Paris bottoms yesterday afternoon. It was feeding in a wet area just off the highway.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50398453

Kenny NicholsDardanelle
 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 7:47 pm
From: Warbling Vireo <0000001d24760ffa-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Birding presentation adventure
This isn’t out in the field birding, but is about reaching new birders!

A local hardware store, Whit Davis Hardware, that carries a great variety of feeders and bid related products, asked Audubon Society of Central Arkansas if someone could come talk about birds for their ladies’ night, which was tonight. I volunteered, because it was closest to me, and I was available.
Apparently, while I was doing my 10 minutes about feeders, food, free field trips, and meetings, a mouse appeared on the shelving behind me, jumped off, may or may not have made contact with my pant leg (I didn’t feel it), and ran down the aisle. It may have been the most interesting presentation of the evening. 🤔
Indoor adventures!

DeLynn Hearn
317 West K Ave.
N. Little Rock, AR 72116
501-472-8769
 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 4:01 pm
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Dicamba Action Alert
ARBirders,


http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments


Please use Audubon Arkansas's action alert to tell the AR State Plant Board to vote NO to extending the use of dicamba at their meeting this Thursday.


Why are your comments on the herbicide dicamba needed now?


In February, the Arkansas State Plant Board (ASPB) prohibited the application of dicamba on agricultural fields from April 16th through October 31st after receiving a record-breaking number of complaints alleging misuse and off-target effects. Now, despite its initial ruling and without any new scientific evidence, the ASPB’s Pesticide Committee has recommended extending use to June 15. Pesticide companies and politicians are behind this ploy. The ASPB needs to hear from you before they meet this Thursday to vote on the recommendation!


Audubon Arkansas is against the use of dicamba past April 15. As the weather warms, this herbicide’s volatility increases, meaning even days later it can drift onto nearby native plants, which in turn can harm birds and pollinators. Harmful effects on honeybees have already been documented in Arkansas!


Please submit comments by Thursday, December 6 at 12:00pm CT.


Send a Comment to the AR State Plant Board by CLICKING THIS LINK!- http://ar.audubon.org/dicamba-comments


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 3:15 pm
From: Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...>
Subject: Re: Northern Shrike
Ok, thanks.

On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 5:09 PM Will Britton <wabritton...> wrote:

> Hi Pam,
>
> From the photo it is hard to tell exactly but that does look like a
> Loggerhead Shrike.
>
> Will Britton
>
> On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 18:08 Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> wrote:
>
>> FYI. Northern Shrike I justed reported has NOT been confirmed but it did
>> not match up for a Loggerhead. It would be nice for someone else to check
>> and see for sure.Do not want to give the impression it was confirmed.
>>
>> Thanks
>>
>> Pam Weedman
>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 3:10 pm
From: Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Northern Shrike
Hi Pam,

From the photo it is hard to tell exactly but that does look like a
Loggerhead Shrike.

Will Britton

On Tue, Dec 4, 2018 at 18:08 Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...> wrote:

> FYI. Northern Shrike I justed reported has NOT been confirmed but it did
> not match up for a Loggerhead. It would be nice for someone else to check
> and see for sure.Do not want to give the impression it was confirmed.
>
> Thanks
>
> Pam Weedman
>

 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 3:08 pm
From: Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...>
Subject: Northern Shrike
FYI. Northern Shrike I justed reported has NOT been confirmed but it did
not match up for a Loggerhead. It would be nice for someone else to check
and see for sure.Do not want to give the impression it was confirmed.

Thanks
Pam Weedman

 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 3:01 pm
From: Pam Weedman <pamweedman1...>
Subject: Northern Shrike
Northern Shrike seen today at intersection of Miller Road and Hwy 31 at Joe
Hogan Fish Hatchery. Less than great cell phone pictures attached.
Pam Weedman
Hot Springs

 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 1:24 pm
From: Cheryl Johnson <cjbluebird...>
Subject: Re: Lake Monticello Birds
Love the entertaining description. Sounds like a fabulous day😊

Sent from cjbluebird

> On Dec 4, 2018, at 8:23 AM, Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> wrote:
>
> My husband and I drove over to Lake Monticello to search for more scoters. According to another birder, the scoters have scooted.
>
> But that doesn't mean we were without good birding entertainment.
>
> I observed an American Crow flying low over the water. He/she grabbed a fish (quite likely a dead one) in his bill from the water in an expert maneuver. He landed near the shoreline in some grasses. Buddies joined him and a raucous interaction began. They continued this display until I realized a Bald Eagle was perched on a stump nearby. It was obvious they were "yelling" at the eagle. Moments later the eagle landed on the fish in the grasses while the crows moved back a few feet and continued to raise hell. They never attacked the eagle directly, just continued their verbal assault. Finally, the eagle had enough of their abuse and called in his wimpy voice. I heard another eagle call overhead and looked up to see an adult pair. They locked feet and spiraled madly down toward the water, breaking up just before hitting the surface. Just when it couldn't get any better, I noticed that each time the eagles called, the loons (we counted at least 10) would answer.
>
> Other species included Bufflehead, Horned and Pied-billed grebe, scaup, and two Ruddy Ducks.
>
> A great outing, despite missing the opportunity both times to see Black Scoters. Oh well.
>
> I'll take eagle action any day and loved hearing loons in Arkansas.
>
> Kelly Chitwood
>
> In other news, the Spotted Towhee has returned to our yard.
 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 12:13 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Sandhill Crane
LaDonna and I had one in the Paris bottoms yesterday afternoon. It was feeding in a wet area just off the highway.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50398453

Kenny NicholsDardanelle
 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 12:10 pm
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Lake Monticello Birds
My husband and I drove over to Lake Monticello to search for more scoters.
According to another birder, the scoters have scooted.

But that doesn't mean we were without good birding entertainment.

I observed an American Crow flying low over the water. He/she grabbed a
fish (quite likely a dead one) in his bill from the water in an expert
maneuver. He landed near the shoreline in some grasses. Buddies joined him
and a raucous interaction began. They continued this display until I
realized a Bald Eagle was perched on a stump nearby. It was obvious they
were "yelling" at the eagle. Moments later the eagle landed on the fish in
the grasses while the crows moved back a few feet and continued to raise
hell. They never attacked the eagle directly, just continued their verbal
assault. Finally, the eagle had enough of their abuse and called in his
wimpy voice. I heard another eagle call overhead and looked up to see an
adult pair. They locked feet and spiraled madly down toward the water,
breaking up just before hitting the surface. Just when it couldn't get any
better, I noticed that each time the eagles called, the loons (we counted
at least 10) would answer.

Other species included Bufflehead, Horned and Pied-billed grebe, scaup, and
two Ruddy Ducks.

A great outing, despite missing the opportunity both times to see Black
Scoters. Oh well.

I'll take eagle action any day and loved hearing loons in Arkansas.

Kelly Chitwood

In other news, the Spotted Towhee has returned to our yard.

 

Back to top
Date: 12/4/18 12:09 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
Im still taking sign-ups for the Little Rock (Saturday Dec 15) and Lonoke
(Sunday Dec 16) Christmas Bird Counts. I will be making assignments this
weekend so please speak up if you are interested.

If you live inside either circle but dont want to be in the field please
sign up to be a FEEDERWATCHER. You can watch yard birds for as little as 15
min. With so many LR birders there really ought to be way more
feeder-watching participants than I have each year. Give me your address
off-list and Ill tell you if you live inside the circle, then Ill give you
a special data sheet and instructions. Thanks.

Dan Scheiman, Compiler
Little Rock. AR




 

Back to top
Date: 11/30/18 7:29 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Disappearing insects, Birds, Bats, Amphibians, and others
The Google parent company Alphabet is funding research that may lead to the extinction of the mosquito. Most people are happy about it and if you are one that is myopic enough to think this is a good thing then you are part of the problem. http://fortune.com/2018/11/28/google-mosquitos-malaria-zika-dengue-verily-alphabet/. Don’t you realize that humans are also tied to the web of life and that male mosquitoes are a major pollinator of plants with fruits and plant material that supports other forms of life? The five year drought in Alaska that reduced mosquitoes had a significant impact on all tied to plants from birds to bears and food production for people.


“The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant, "What good is it?" If the land mechanism as a whole is good, then every part is good, whether we understand it or not. If the biota, in the course of aeons, has built something we like but do not understand, then who but a fool would discard seemingly useless parts? To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering.”
― Aldo Leopold, Round River: From the Journals of Aldo Leopold






Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR





From: <jwdavis...> <jwdavis...>
Sent: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 9:42 AM
To: Undisclosed-Recipient:;
Subject: Fw: Disappearing insects, Birds, Bats, Amphibians, and others



E. O Wilson said insects are the things that fuel the world. It does not take a smart person to understand that with insects declining worldwide that the 97% of our birds that depend on insects as well as all other species tied to the web of life will also decline. It is unrealistic to think that we can afford to pay people to pollinate food plants as China is having to do. Even 2 billion people on Earth use insects as their source of protein. Insects are connected to everything else.



Jerry Wayne Davis

Hot Springs, AR



From: Janine Perlman

Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2018 4:13 PM

To: <ARBIRD-L...>

Subject: Disappearing insects



Direct effects on Arkansas birds (and humans, and pretty nearly all others). Long, reader-friendly, and it's hard to imagine a more important topic.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html

 

Back to top
Date: 11/30/18 6:34 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: The Snipe Newsletter again

For those interested in reading The Snipe newsletter here is the new link
to it.


https://wp.ascabird.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/2018_Snipe-Dec-Feb-v53-i1.pdf
[1]

Thanks,
Dottie Boyles
Little Rock



Links:
------
[1]
https://wp.ascabird.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/2018_Snipe-Dec-Feb-v53-i1.pdf

 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/18 8:54 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Disappearing insects
Disappearing insects.     This is what the Arkansas Audubon Bird Friendly Yard program is all about.  We now have 89 certified yards in Arkansas.To request details send a message with "details please". or something similar to <bfaudubon...> or fret and do nothing.
Jack StewartNewton County

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On Wednesday, November 28, 2018, 11:45:22 AM CST, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

You are right. Thanks. Is there anyone that says they care about birds and all of these willing to give up their bug lights which do not do what they think or give up bathing their lawns in pesticides.  Reality shows that they will not. The problem is created one person at a time and will have to be corrected the same way.  E. O Wilson said insects are the things that fuel the world. It does not take a smart person to understand that with insects declining worldwide that the 97% of our birds that depend on insects as well as all other species tied to the web of life will also decline. It is unrealistic to think that we can afford to pay people to pollinate food plants as China is having to do. Even 2 billion people on Earth use insects as their source of protein. Insects are connected to everything else.   Jerry   From: Janine Perlman Sent: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 10:44 AMTo: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Fwd: Re: Disappearing insects  
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Exactly, Don.  And so go all the plants that depend on insects, and all the animals that depend on the plants and animals that depend on insects, and so on; very quickly, the entire web of life collapses.

On 11/28/2018 9:52 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:


#yiv7176196320 #yiv7176196320 -- _filtered #yiv7176196320 {panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;} _filtered #yiv7176196320 {font-family:calibri;panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}#yiv7176196320 #yiv7176196320 p.yiv7176196320msonormal, #yiv7176196320 li.yiv7176196320msonormal, #yiv7176196320 div.yiv7176196320msonormal {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:New serif;color:black;}#yiv7176196320 a:link, #yiv7176196320 span.yiv7176196320msohyperlink {color:blue;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv7176196320 a:visited, #yiv7176196320 span.yiv7176196320msohyperlinkfollowed {color:purple;text-decoration:underline;}#yiv7176196320 p.yiv7176196320msonormal0, #yiv7176196320 li.yiv7176196320msonormal0, #yiv7176196320 div.yiv7176196320msonormal0 {margin-right:0in;margin-left:0in;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:New serif;color:black;}#yiv7176196320 span.yiv7176196320emailstyle18 {font-family:sans-serif;color:#1f497d;}#yiv7176196320 .yiv7176196320msochpdefault {font-size:10.0pt;} _filtered #yiv7176196320 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}#yiv7176196320 div.yiv7176196320wordsection1 {}#yiv7176196320
As the insects go, so will the insectivorous birds, bats, amphibians, reptiles.  Humanity in the aggregate is destroying both the diversity and abundance of life. 




 

From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> On Behalf Of Janine Perlman

Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2018 4:14 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Disappearing insects
 

Direct effects on Arkansas birds (and humans, and pretty nearly all others).  Long, reader-friendly, and it's hard to imagine a more important topic.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html


 

Back to top
Date: 11/29/18 6:33 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: 119th CBC dates - ADDING 3 dates
Greetings all,
It's getting close to the coolest (figuratively & literally) birding of the year.

The Christmas Bird Counts are held around the Americas from 12/14 through 1/5. Counts have been done for 119 years - the oldest citizen science bird database in the hemisphere.



If you've seen any Audubon bird reports, then you know that the CBC supplied much of the data that made the reports possible. Here is your chance to help the science, building toward future planned reports!

Any birding skill level is fine.
Any length of time is welcome.
Just contact a compiler for details & area assignments to join in the fun.
It's FREE for all, though donations to Audubon are always appreciated.

If you know of counts in adjoining states, that have an AR connection, I'd love to advertise them here.



You're welcome to contact me for general information - Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us or leave a message at 479-284-3150 ext 3151. If you're looking for life birds, contact me and I can tell you which counts would give you the best chance of seeing them.

"at" = @ in the list below.



Dec 14th Fri:

JONESBORO; Virginie Rolland; vrolland "at" astate.edu



15th Sat:
ARKADELPHIA; Evelyn & Glenn Good; theoldcrow "at" sbcglobal.net

BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER EAST (near Buffalo Point on Hwy 14); Jack Stewart; jackstewart_us "at" yahoo.com; Sponsored by Buffalo National River Partners. Lodging is available, call Jack for details

FORT SMITH; Bill Beall; billtoka "at" mynewroads.com (Bill has been compiling for 68 years!!)

LAKE OUACHITA SP; Kayla Gomance; kayla.gomance "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Lake Ouachita SP

LITTLE ROCK; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central AR

VILLAGE CREEK SP; Heather Runyan; heather.runyon "at" arkansas.gov 870-238-9406 Sponsored by Village Creek SP.



16th Sun:

FAYETTEVILLE; Joe Neal; joeneal "at" uark.edu; Sponsored by NorthWest AR Audubon.

LONOKE; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central AR

RED SLOUGH, OK; David Arbour arbour "at" Windstream.net and Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us



17th Mon:

HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE; Chris Cash; c52cash "at" sbcglobal.net Sponsored by Hot Springs Village Audubon

MOUNTAIN HOME; Tom Krohn; dreamer "at" Yellville.net



18th Tues:

NORTH FORK of the ILLINOIS BAYOU (near Hector); Sarah Davis; sadavis "at" fs.fed.us; Sponsored by US Forest Service.



20th Thurs:

MISSISSIPPI RIVER SP (near Marianna); Tara Gillanders; tara.gillanders "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mississippi River SP

WHITE RIVER NWR; (Near St. Charles) Than Boves; tboves "at" astate.edu



21st Fri:

SYLAMORE RANGER DISTRICT; (near Mountain View); Idun Guenther; iguenther "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by US Forest Service.



22nd Sat:

BELLA VISTA/BENTONVILLE/CENTERTON: Butch Tetzlaff; butch "at" thebluebirdshed.com

CROOKED CREEK (near Harrison); Alan Gregory; quattro "at" windstream.net



29th Sat:

CONWAY; Allan Mueller; akcmueller "at" gmail.com Co-compiler Michael Linz mplinz "at" gmail.com

HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; Shelley Todd; shelley_todd "at" nps.gov 501-620-6751 Sponsored by Hot Springs NP

WAPANOCCA NWR/SHELBY FOREST; Dick Preston; dickpreston "at" rittermail.com Co-compiler of TN side Van Harris shelbyforester1223 "at" bigriver.net Sponsored by TN Ornithological Society



30th Sun:



31st Mon:

PINE BLUFF; Rob Doster; rdoster "at" Hotmail.com Sponsored by Three Rivers Audubon Society



Jan 1st Tues:

LAKE DARANELLE; Kenny Nichols; kingbird "at" ymail.com



3rd Thurs:

BIG LAKE NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us

TEXARKANA (northern Miller co); Don Kyle; rondokyle "at" windstream.net Meeting 7am at Rondo Methodist Church at jct of Hwy 237 & E 19th st.



4th Fri:

HOLLA BEND NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Holla Bend NWR & the Friends of Holla Bend NWR.



5th Sat:

MOUNT MAGAZINE; Don Simons; don.simons "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mount Magazine SP

POND CREEK NWR; Devin Moon; moondevg "at" gmail.com and Matt Gideon; paulmatthewgideon "at" gmail.com



Counts with dates not set yet.

BAYOU DeVIEW (near Brinkley); Steve Osborne; jsteveosborne "at" gmail.com

LAKE GEORGIA PACIFIC/ FELSENTHAL NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Felsenthal NWR and the Friends of Felsenthal NWR.

MAGNOLIA/ LAKE COLUMBIA; Darrell & Debbie Chatelain; darrell1951 "at" suddenlink.net



Hope you can join the counts, Leif at Hector






This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 11/29/18 6:32 pm
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Whooping Crane
I went "off to see the whooper, the wonderful whooper of Roe" again today
and she was not in the field where we had seen her on November 7. I
feared/hoped she had departed but with a little driving around I saw her
far back in another rice field South east of where she was being seen
earlier. She was there in the company of a great egret and I watched them
move together for 15 minutes or so. She then made a sudden leap and let
out a whoop as if a varmint in the stubble had disturbed her. Both she and
the egret flew high up into the air headed south and then circled west and
to the north. Letting out another whoop she landed again in the rice field
at the corner of 33 and 366 followed by the egret. I think they have a
thing going those two.

Peace and Birds

 

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Date: 11/29/18 4:34 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: questions about Cockatiel care
I am hoping that somebody can answer the following questions:
How does one get a Cockatiel to switch from seed to pellets?
How do you get a reluctant one to take baths?
Many thanks and happy birding!Joanie

 

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Date: 11/29/18 3:43 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Mallard Lake
I made the drive up to Mallard Lake today.  I saw at least 6 Bald Eagles.  They kept on moving around and so it was difficult to get an accurate count, I think there may have been 8 or more, but I did see 6 at one time and so I'm going with that number.
I also saw 141 Hooded Mergansers, though none of them close.243 Double-crested Cormorants42 Great Blue Herons, the most I think I've ever seen at one lake24 Ring-billed Gullsand 55 American White Pelicans.

Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 11/29/18 3:42 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Rough-legged Hawk no
I visited Possum Grape at 8 AM and again at 3 PM today (29 Nov.)  I did not see the hawk. 

Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 11/29/18 2:09 pm
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Rusty Blackbirds etc. in Alma
The warm weather today was good for our bodies but apparently bad for the ducks.  The large carpets of them from yesterday were mostly gone.  But we still got 43 species of birds, including Rusty Blackbirds and Purple Finches....
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50297181

KannanFt. Smith
 

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Date: 11/29/18 10:10 am
From: Gail Miller <gail.miller...>
Subject: Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
I was there yesterday, after 3:00 and I did not see it. Others were there with scopes as well.



Gail in Conway



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Nancy Young
Sent: Thursday, November 29, 2018 11:33 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam



It was not there yesterday between 1:30 and 3:00.



Nancy Young



On Wednesday, November 28, 2018, 11:59:25 AM CST, David Ray <cardcards...> <mailto:<cardcards...> > wrote:





Unable to locate kittiwake Tuesday evening between 4:30 - 5:30.

David Ray

NLR



Sent from my iPhone


On Nov 26, 2018, at 11:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> <mailto:<mplinz...> > wrote:

Here is the list from today with a little better pictures.



https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50248472



A thanks fo Terry Butler for letting me know the Kittiwake had returned today.



Michael and Patty





On Nov 26, 2018, at 4:33 PM, plm108 <plm108...> <mailto:<plm108...> > wrote:



Although it spends a lot of time near the lock wall (Faulkner County side of the Arkansas River), the best viewing spot is from Toad Suck Park WEST, across the river in Perry County. Mid afternoon has been a good time to see this juvenile in action.



We left at 4:00 and it was still active above and floating on the river (always below but not far from the dam). For county birders, it is likely you may see it in both Faulkner and Perry counties, so if you're into this sort of thing, note that there are two separate eBird hotspots for Toad Suck Park - one for the EAST side (Faulkner County) and one for the WEST side (Perry County). You can choose the hotspot where the bird actually is vs where you are standing, and if you have time, you will likely get it in both counties.





Some of Michael's photos from Sunday.



https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50217237







Patty McLean and Michael Linz,

Conway AR






 

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Date: 11/29/18 9:34 am
From: Nancy Young <0000018632ccc347-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
It was not there yesterday between 1:30 and 3:00.
Nancy Young
On Wednesday, November 28, 2018, 11:59:25 AM CST, David Ray <cardcards...> wrote:

Unable to locate kittiwake Tuesday evening between 4:30 - 5:30. David Ray NLR 

Sent from my iPhone
On Nov 26, 2018, at 11:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:



Here is the list from today with a little better pictures.
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50248472
A thanks fo Terry Butler for letting me know the Kittiwake had returned today.
Michael and Patty


On Nov 26, 2018, at 4:33 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

Although it spends a lot of time near the lock wall (Faulkner County side of the Arkansas River), the best viewing spot is from Toad Suck Park WEST, across the river in Perry County. Mid afternoon has been a good time to see this juvenile in action. 
We left at 4:00 and it was still active above and floating on the river (always below but not far from the dam). For county birders, it is likely you may see it in both Faulkner and Perry counties, so if you're into this sort of thing, note that there are two separate eBird hotspots for Toad Suck Park - one for the EAST side (Faulkner County) and one for the WEST side (Perry County). You can choose the hotspot where the bird actually is vs where you are standing, and if you have time, you will likely get it in both counties.

Some of Michael's photos from Sunday. 
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50217237


Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR


 

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Date: 11/29/18 8:31 am
From: Alton Patton <adewittpatton...>
Subject: Purple finches
Posed for pics while eating ash tree seeds at Red Slough this morning.

A. D. Patton

Get Outlook for Android<https://aka.ms/ghei36>


 

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Date: 11/29/18 7:20 am
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Bella Vista/Bentonville CBC
I apologize for sending this to the list serv, because it is directed
only at Ron Bird.

Ron, I seem to have mis-entered your personal email address, because
everything I send to you about the upcoming CBC in the Bella
Vista/Bentonville area is bouncing back.

Please send me a note at <butch...> so I can try again!

Sorry, everyone!!

Thanks!
Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville
Coordinator Bella Vista/Bentonville CBC
 

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Date: 11/29/18 6:49 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: The Snipe Newsletter

The latest version of _The Snipe_, the newsletter of the Audubon Society
of Central Arkansas, has been posted to the ASCA website and can be viewed
at
https://wp.ascabird.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/2018_Snipe-Dec-Feb-v53-i1-1.pdf
[1].

Thanks,
Dottie Boyles
Little Rock



Links:
------
[1]
https://wp.ascabird.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/2018_Snipe-Dec-Feb-v53-i1-1.pdf

 

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Date: 11/28/18 9:07 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: AAS News of Members
It's that time again... time for Arkansas Audubon Society members to share their adventures and travels for the next issue of Arkansas Birds. Deadline for submissions for the News of Members section is Saturday, Dec 1st. (sorry for the short notice)

Remember you don't have to write a novel just a short paragraph will do. So drop me a line or two and share your latest adventures during the past three months.

Thanks,
Dottie Boyles
News of Members Section Editor For Arkansas Birds


 

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Date: 11/28/18 7:12 pm
From: Kennynations <kennynations...>
Subject: Common Mergansers
I saw ten Common Mergansers today on Greer's Ferry Lake in Heber Springs (Sandy Beach Area).


Sent from my iPad
 

Back to top
Date: 11/28/18 5:16 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Ducks galore at Alma WTP!
There was a Merganser on Lake Willastein in Maumelle a few days ago.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 28, 2018, at 7:20 PM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...> wrote:
>
> I don't enjoy migraines... I get an aura right before the headache and sometimes the aura frustrates me more as it gives me vision problems. Not good when you're trying to look at something.
> Was it cold? :) I grew up in Massachusetts and while I don't LOVE cold weather, I do enjoy what it brings. And for ducks around here, the colder the better. The colder it gets the more the little farm ponds freeze up sending more and more ducks to any open water they can find. I'll bundle up as much as I can when it gets really cold and do my best to tough it out just to get some good looks at a few pintails or whatever else the cold may bring in.
> Ducks are one of my favorite bird families to watch so the effort is usually worth it for me.
> And congratulations on the merganser. They are indeed a gorgeous bird.
>
>> On Wed, Nov 28, 2018 at 11:43 AM Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>> Unable to resist Joe Neal's recent juicy postings from Alma, Cheryl Childers and I braved the cold (and a nagging migraine) to go see the ducks this morning. It was well worth it! See our list: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50277109
>>
>> Highlights included a pipit seen eating fish (!); a gorgeous male Hooded Merganser in perfect light; and rafts of Canvasbacks and Common Goldeneyes.
>>
>> p.s. My migraine lifted the moment I got the Merganser lifer :) You can tell I am not a cold weather birder.....
>>
>> Kannan
>> Ft. Smith
>
>
> --
> Daniel Mason
> www.byfellowship.com/forums.php

 

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Date: 11/28/18 4:21 pm
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Ducks galore at Alma WTP!
I don't enjoy migraines... I get an aura right before the headache and
sometimes the aura frustrates me more as it gives me vision problems. Not
good when you're trying to look at something.
Was it cold? :) I grew up in Massachusetts and while I don't LOVE cold
weather, I do enjoy what it brings. And for ducks around here, the colder
the better. The colder it gets the more the little farm ponds freeze up
sending more and more ducks to any open water they can find. I'll bundle up
as much as I can when it gets really cold and do my best to tough it out
just to get some good looks at a few pintails or whatever else the cold may
bring in.
Ducks are one of my favorite bird families to watch so the effort is
usually worth it for me.
And congratulations on the merganser. They are indeed a gorgeous bird.

On Wed, Nov 28, 2018 at 11:43 AM Ragupathy Kannan <
<0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Unable to resist Joe Neal's recent juicy postings from Alma, Cheryl
> Childers and I braved the cold (and a nagging migraine) to go see the ducks
> this morning. It was well worth it! See our list:
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50277109
>
> Highlights included a pipit seen eating fish (!); a gorgeous male Hooded
> Merganser in perfect light; and rafts of Canvasbacks and Common
> Goldeneyes.
>
> p.s. My migraine lifted the moment I got the Merganser lifer :) You can
> tell I am not a cold weather birder.....
>
> Kannan
> Ft. Smith
>


--
Daniel Mason
www.byfellowship.com/forums.php

 

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Date: 11/28/18 10:34 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Kittiwake at Toad Suck Dam
Hopefully someone will check again today. We've had luck between noon and 4:00. If you go, be sure to check the gulls floating on the water. On Monday, it seemed to spend most of its time near the concrete wall of the Lock --  floating between the dam and the big red signs. Occasionally it would join the flying foray of Ring-bills.

Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: David Ray <cardcards...> Date: 11/28/18 11:58 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
Unable to locate kittiwake Tuesday evening between 4:30 - 5:30.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 26, 2018, at 11:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:
>
> Here is the list from today with a little better pictures.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50248472
>
> A thanks fo Terry Butler for letting me know the Kittiwake had returned today.
>
> Michael and Patty
>
>> On Nov 26, 2018, at 4:33 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>>
>> Although it spends a lot of time near the lock wall (Faulkner County side of the Arkansas River), the best viewing spot is from Toad Suck Park WEST, across the river in Perry County. Mid afternoon has been a good time to see this juvenile in action.
>>
>> We left at 4:00 and it was still active above and floating on the river (always below but not far from the dam). For county birders, it is likely you may see it in both Faulkner and Perry counties, so if you're into this sort of thing, note that there are two separate eBird hotspots for Toad Suck Park - one for the EAST side (Faulkner County) and one for the WEST side (Perry County). You can choose the hotspot where the bird actually is vs where you are standing, and if you have time, you will likely get it in both counties.
>>
>>
>> Some of Michael's photos from Sunday.
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50217237
>>
>>
>>
>> Patty McLean and Michael Linz,
>> Conway AR
>>
>
 

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Date: 11/28/18 9:59 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
Unable to locate kittiwake Tuesday evening between 4:30 - 5:30.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 26, 2018, at 11:32 PM, Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:
>
> Here is the list from today with a little better pictures.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50248472
>
> A thanks fo Terry Butler for letting me know the Kittiwake had returned today.
>
> Michael and Patty
>
>> On Nov 26, 2018, at 4:33 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>>
>> Although it spends a lot of time near the lock wall (Faulkner County side of the Arkansas River), the best viewing spot is from Toad Suck Park WEST, across the river in Perry County. Mid afternoon has been a good time to see this juvenile in action.
>>
>> We left at 4:00 and it was still active above and floating on the river (always below but not far from the dam). For county birders, it is likely you may see it in both Faulkner and Perry counties, so if you're into this sort of thing, note that there are two separate eBird hotspots for Toad Suck Park - one for the EAST side (Faulkner County) and one for the WEST side (Perry County). You can choose the hotspot where the bird actually is vs where you are standing, and if you have time, you will likely get it in both counties.
>>
>>
>> Some of Michael's photos from Sunday.
>>
>> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50217237
>>
>>
>>
>> Patty McLean and Michael Linz,
>> Conway AR
>>
>

 

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Date: 11/28/18 9:45 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Fwd: Re: Disappearing insects
You are right. Thanks. Is there anyone that says they care about birds and all of these willing to give up their bug lights which do not do what they think or give up bathing their lawns in pesticides. Reality shows that they will not. The problem is created one person at a time and will have to be corrected the same way.

E. O Wilson said insects are the things that fuel the world. It does not take a smart person to understand that with insects declining worldwide that the 97% of our birds that depend on insects as well as all other species tied to the web of life will also decline. It is unrealistic to think that we can afford to pay people to pollinate food plants as China is having to do. Even 2 billion people on Earth use insects as their source of protein. Insects are connected to everything else.


Jerry


From: Janine Perlman
Sent: Wednesday, November 28, 2018 10:44 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Fwd: Re: Disappearing insects














Exactly, Don. And so go all the plants that depend on insects, and all the animals that depend on the plants and animals that depend on insects, and so on; very quickly, the entire web of life collapses.


On 11/28/2018 9:52 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:

As the insects go, so will the insectivorous birds, bats, amphibians, reptiles. Humanity in the aggregate is destroying both the diversity and abundance of life.






From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List mailto:<ARBIRD-L...> On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2018 4:14 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Disappearing insects



Direct effects on Arkansas birds (and humans, and pretty nearly all others). Long, reader-friendly, and it's hard to imagine a more important topic.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html



 

Back to top
Date: 11/28/18 9:43 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Ducks galore at Alma WTP!
Unable to resist Joe Neal's recent juicy postings from Alma, Cheryl Childers and I braved the cold (and a nagging migraine) to go see the ducks this morning.  It was well worth it!  See our list: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50277109
Highlights included a pipit seen eating fish (!); a gorgeous male Hooded Merganser in perfect light; and rafts of Canvasbacks and Common Goldeneyes.  
p.s. My migraine lifted the moment I got the Merganser lifer :)  You can tell I am not a cold weather birder.....
KannanFt. Smith
 

Back to top
Date: 11/28/18 9:14 am
From: Laster/Roark <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Red-throated Loon yes
Unable to locate it Tuesday afternoon 11/27/18.
Ed Laster



> On Nov 26, 2018, at 3:00 PM, Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> wrote:
>
> 3:00 pm: It is still here at Lake Saracen.
>
> Delos McCauley
> Pine Bluff
 

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Date: 11/28/18 8:45 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Fwd: Re: Disappearing insects










Exactly, Don.  And so go all the plants that depend on insects, and all
the animals that depend on the plants and animals that depend on
insects, and so on; very quickly, the entire web of life collapses.

On 11/28/2018 9:52 AM, Donald C. Steinkraus wrote:
>
> As the insects go, so will the insectivorous birds, bats, amphibians,
> reptiles.  Humanity in the aggregate is destroying both the diversity
> and abundance of life.
>
>
> *From:*The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
> <ARBIRD-L...> *On Behalf Of *Janine Perlman
> *Sent:* Tuesday, November 27, 2018 4:14 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Disappearing insects
>
> Direct effects on Arkansas birds (and humans, and pretty nearly all
> others).  Long, reader-friendly, and it's hard to imagine a more
> important topic.
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html
>


 

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Date: 11/28/18 8:25 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Disappearing insects
Another way of putting is, not only is the human corporate machine
destroying large numbers of existing species on earth, it will also destroy
huge numbers of whatever species are "lucky" enough to have survived. In a
world like this one, "luck" is a very relative and sometimes doubtful term.
Most truly smart people know what to do, but collectively the fat, bloated,
swollen number of the human race will never do it unless 98 - 99 per cent
of them are wiped out. And they'll eventually do that too. Sad truth and
the dirty low down. Numbers don't lie.

Bill Thurman

On Wed, Nov 28, 2018, 09:52 Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...> wrote:

> As the insects go, so will the insectivorous birds, bats, amphibians,
> reptiles. Humanity in the aggregate is destroying both the diversity and
> abundance of life.
>
>
>
>
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> *On Behalf Of *Janine Perlman
> *Sent:* Tuesday, November 27, 2018 4:14 PM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Disappearing insects
>
>
>
> Direct effects on Arkansas birds (and humans, and pretty nearly all
> others). Long, reader-friendly, and it's hard to imagine a more important
> topic.
>
> https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/28/18 7:52 am
From: Donald C. Steinkraus <steinkr...>
Subject: Re: Disappearing insects
As the insects go, so will the insectivorous birds, bats, amphibians, reptiles. Humanity in the aggregate is destroying both the diversity and abundance of life.



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> On Behalf Of Janine Perlman
Sent: Tuesday, November 27, 2018 4:14 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Disappearing insects

Direct effects on Arkansas birds (and humans, and pretty nearly all others). Long, reader-friendly, and it's hard to imagine a more important topic.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html
 

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Date: 11/27/18 6:42 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Nov. 27
It was clear and cool with a little wind on the bird survey today. 64
species were found. Purple Fiches were all over the place feeding on ash
seeds. Duck numbers are increasing. Here is my list for today:



Canada Goose - 3

Wood Duck - 1

Gadwall - 278

Mallard - 877

Northern Shoveler - 46

Northern Pintail - 120

Green-winged Teal - 335

Ring-necked Duck - 1360

Greater Scaup - 1

Hooded Merganser - 3

Ruddy Duck - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 9

Double-crested Cormorant - 5

Great-blue Heron - 6

Black Vulture - 29

Turkey Vulture - 64

Northern Harrier - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 4

American Kestrel - 2

Virginia Rail - 2

American Coot - 354

Killdeer - 1

Mourning Dove - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 3

Northern Flicker - 4

Eastern Phoebe - 6

Blue Jay - 5

American Crow - 9

Fish Crow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Tufted Titmouse - 4

Carolina Wren - 4

House Wren - 1

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 1

Marsh Wren - 2

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 2

Eastern Bluebird - 7

American Robin - 6

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Brown Thrasher - 1

American Pipit - 1

Cedar Waxwing - 16

Orange-crowned Warbler - 1

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 5

Pine Warbler - 2

Eastern Towhee - 4

Savannah Sparrow - 4

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 9

Swamp Sparrow - 9

White-throated Sparrow - 10

Dark-eyed Junco - 4

Northern Cardinal - 17

Red-winged Blackbird - 6

Eastern Meadowlark - 1

Common Grackle - 1

Purple Finch - 34 (feeding on Ash seeds.)

American Goldfinch - 16





Odonates:



Common Green Darner

Variegated Meadowhawk







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR
















 

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Date: 11/27/18 2:50 pm
From: Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Black and surf scoters
Glad you got to see them! That was the most exciting part of my day!
On Nov 27, 2018 11:27 AM, Glenn
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Lake Monticello: 12 black scoters and 2 surf scoters are still
hanging out as of 11:20 am on 27 Nov 2018.
Thank you, Gabe, for helping us see the black scoters.
Glenn & Michelle WyattCabot
 

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Date: 11/27/18 2:14 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Disappearing insects
Direct effects on Arkansas birds (and humans, and pretty nearly all
others).  Long, reader-friendly, and it's hard to imagine a more
important topic.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html

 

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Date: 11/27/18 10:18 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: 2nd Annual Wings of Winter Birding Festival, Paris, TN, January 18-20, 2019
It is a long drive to this festival but it does sound birdy and there are two big name speakers.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR



The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service announces The 2nd Annual Wings of Winter Birding Festival (WOW) will take place on January 18-20, 2019. Hosted and sponsored by The Friends of TN National Wildlife Refuge with over a dozen additional sponsoring agencies and organizations, this wintertime festival continues to grow in size and popularity.


Due to the demolition and subsequent rebuilding of the Paris Landing State Park Inn, the 2019 Festival has been moved just up the road to Paris, TN. Registration and the Friday and Saturday night events will take place in a wonderful venue at the Paris Fairgrounds and all field trips, as well as lodging, will be centered at the Quality Inn in Paris where we currently have 50 rooms blocked for this event.


The weekend will begin with TWO special ‘pre’ festival field trips on Friday. We will be offering a unique "behind the gates" tour of Cross Creeks NWR during the closed-sanctuary time. On this trip one can get up close to thousands of wintering waterfowl and perhaps find that ‘one rarity’ among them all. Rick Eastridge, Refuge Manager and our special guest guide and Friday night speaker, Joel Greenberg, author of “A Feathered River Across the Sky: The Passenger Pigeon’s Flight to Extinction”, will co-lead this adventure.


The second Friday ‘pre’ Festival trip will be a boating adventure aboard the CQ Princess cruising Kentucky Lake looking for eagles, waterfowl, gulls and other water-loving winter birds. Damien Simbeck and Tennessee NWR Ranger Joan Howe will co-lead this adventure. Whether you choose to stay inside in the heated cabin or venture to an outside deck you’re sure to have great close up views of life on the lake in winter.


During the heart of the Festival weekend full-day and half-day field trips will be offered both Saturday and Sunday to Tennessee and Cross Creeks NWR, Land Between the Lakes Recreation Area, Paris Landing State Park, Fort Donelson National Battlefield, Kentucky Dam, Harmon Creek WMA, Johnsonville State Park and more! Field trips will be led by expert bird guides from members of the Tennessee and Alabama and Kentucky Ornithological Society members, Refuge Managers, and Park Rangers. Keynote Speaker and acclaimed field guide author, Richard Crossley, will also lead two field trips during the weekend as well as Speaker Joel Greenberg, an acclaimed birder and Passenger Pigeon historian.


Have you ever been on a Sparrow Stomp?? Dr. Stefan Woltmann will be leading this adventure in hopes of finding the 14 species of wintering sparrows that are in the area. What about a Big Day?? You can join Mike Todd and Mark Greene and spend 12 hours zipping around trying to find the over 100 species that are present in the area during the winter months. With 15 different trips scheduled throughout the weekend you’ll be sure to find one, two or even three adventures that suit your fancy!


Registration for this great event is NOW OPEN. To register or preview all field trips, learn more about our guest speakers, about lodging and other general information pertaining to this wonderful wintertime event by visiting http://www.friendstnwr.org/wings-of-winter.html. Registration Deadline is December 15th. If you have any additional questions please contact the refuge at 731-642-2091 or <Joan_Howe...> mailto:<Joan_Howe...> .


We hope to see you this coming January 18-20, 2019 for this wonderful Wings of Winter Birding Festival!!


Joan Howe

Refuge Ranger

Tennessee NWR Complex

1371 Wildlife Drive

Springville, TN 38256

(o) 731-642-2091 x303

(c) 731-431-6765

(f) 731-644-3351
 

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Date: 11/27/18 9:48 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: CANVASBACKS AND GOLDENEYES AT ALMA WASTEWATER
Waterfowl at Alma Wastewater Treatment Facility this morning: Greater White-fronted Goose (1), Gadwall, Mallard, Northern Shoveler (~60), Canvasback (25), Ring-necked Duck, Lesser Scaup (~40), Bufflehead (~10), Common Goldeneye (20; mostly females), Hooded Merganser (1), Ruddy Duck (15), Double-crested Cormorant (1). We did not see scoters, but quite a few ducks flew off just as we arrived. The Canvasback flock, consisting of males and females, is a fairly high number for what I term Northwest Arkansas City. There were also more gulls than I have seen on past trips. They were attracted to the moving water created by a large aerator. Gulls and Northern Shovelers cued up in the most active water. Others swam or flew a short distance to perch. The gulls were mainly Bonapartes (~50) and Ring-billed (~30), with a Herring Gull (?) or two. We photographed a largish pink-legged gull in an immature plumage that will require book work. More on that later (maybe).


 

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Date: 11/27/18 9:28 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Black and surf scoters
Lake Monticello: 12 black scoters and 2 surf scoters are still hanging out as of 11:20 am on 27 Nov 2018.
Thank you, Gabe, for helping us see the black scoters.
Glenn & Michelle WyattCabot


 

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Date: 11/26/18 9:32 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
Here is the list from today with a little better pictures.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50248472 <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50248472>

A thanks fo Terry Butler for letting me know the Kittiwake had returned today.

Michael and Patty

> On Nov 26, 2018, at 4:33 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>
> Although it spends a lot of time near the lock wall (Faulkner County side of the Arkansas River), the best viewing spot is from Toad Suck Park WEST, across the river in Perry County. Mid afternoon has been a good time to see this juvenile in action.
>
> We left at 4:00 and it was still active above and floating on the river (always below but not far from the dam). For county birders, it is likely you may see it in both Faulkner and Perry counties, so if you're into this sort of thing, note that there are two separate eBird hotspots for Toad Suck Park - one for the EAST side (Faulkner County) and one for the WEST side (Perry County). You can choose the hotspot where the bird actually is vs where you are standing, and if you have time, you will likely get it in both counties.
>
>
> Some of Michael's photos from Sunday.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50217237
>
>
>
> Patty McLean and Michael Linz,
> Conway AR
>


 

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Date: 11/26/18 2:33 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Kittiwake Continues below the Toad Suck Dam
Although it spends a lot of time near the lock wall (Faulkner County side of the Arkansas River), the best viewing spot is from Toad Suck Park WEST, across the river in Perry County. Mid afternoon has been a good time to see this juvenile in action. We left at 4:00 and it was still active above and floating on the river (always below but not far from the dam). For county birders, it is likely you may see it in both Faulkner and Perry counties, so if you're into this sort of thing, note that there are two separate eBird hotspots for Toad Suck Park - one for the EAST side (Faulkner County) and one for the WEST side (Perry County). You can choose the hotspot where the bird actually is vs where you are standing, and if you have time, you will likely get it in both counties.Some of Michael's photos from Sunday. https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50217237Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR
 

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Date: 11/26/18 1:45 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Alma WTP
I made a quick stop this windy and cold morning to look for a reported male
Long-tailed Duck. I didn't see it, but there was a large raft of mixed
species including 2 adult male Black Scoters. Redheads, Common Goldeneye,
Lesser Scaup, Mallard, and Shovelers were also present. The ducks are very
skittish.
Two American Pipits were along the levees. A single Savannah Sparrow on the
barbed wire fence along Orrick Rd. on my way out. I plan to check again for
the Long-tailed Duck this week.

Cheryl Childers

 

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Date: 11/26/18 1:01 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Red-throated Loon yes
3:00 pm: It is still here at Lake Saracen.

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 11/26/18 11:52 am
From: dianemarie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: teleportation and stunning
Many years ago I dreamed every seed-eating bird I ever wanted to attract was at my feeders, & that those feeders went on & on along a trail on my place. Soon the most-wanted were joined by fictional birds in pastel blues, pinks, even lavenders.

Sent from my iPod

On Nov 24, 2018, at 9:57 AM, Daniel Mason <millipede1977...><mailto:<millipede1977...>> wrote:

I'm still waiting for that technology... to go anywhere and fast. I suppose if we did that, people would be popping up all over the place. I think I can think of more downsides than benefits to that... but still, I dream. My wife doesn't have to work today and yet, I still can't drive 4 to 5 hours one way... Would be SO awesome if I could drive out to see the whooping crane(just that one would be nice)(if it's still there) and then head down to pine bluff to see if the red-throated loon is still around... and then look for a red-cockaded woodpecker. All would be very exciting life birds.
Then, apparently several days back, a long-tailed duck was seen at the wastewater plant in alma. And of course, the day my wife has off is a Saturday and the place is closed. Driving that far to try and look over a fence for a duck among ducks... I think I'll have to bird close to home today.

Had a dream of living in a different house and seeing a hummingbird at the feeders... only we had no sugar water out. Had a rufous throad to breast and then some... in the dream I thought it was a rufous hummingbird til it turned and it had a REALLY long bill... Tried to get a picture with my phone as I didn't have my camera on me... didn't work. Went inside, mixed up 4 cups of water and 4 cups of sugar and ended up with quite a few gallons of mixture. Went out and tried filling the very odd feeders out there. Then there was something like a waxwing on a porch(that wasn't there before, the porch that is) and I tried getting a picture with my regular camera... And it decided to malfunction. Would have been an awesome photo...

Every so often, I have dreams like this. The camera issues are real and a bit more nightmarish. My camera malfunctions from time to time and it's enough to drive a person mad. Anyone else ever dream of birds?

And the "stunning" part...
We had a chickadee hit a window yesterday. Hadn't had a bird get stunned like that in a long time. My kids alerted me to the strike at the window in their room. I went outside and sure enough, there was a chickadee... dangling upside down from a branch. Possibly holding on by one foot. Just hanging, not moving. I was certain it was dead. We stood their discussing what to do with it. Finally sent my oldest in for a cardboard box and I approached the bird. I grabbed the branch it was on so I could pull it close and when I looked up, the bird was upright and looking around. It's interesting the bird managed to grab a branch before losing consciousness, if that's what happened. I stood there watching it just a few feet from me... talking to it... wondering why it hadn't flown. Internal injuries? broken wing? Finally, it flew off without a hitch. Back from the dead...
Not sure what startled the bird in the first place. Birds don't typically hit that window ever. We'll have to take some more precautions now... glad that little guy survived...

Oh, to add another topic to this rambling... Those chickadees are frustrating... well, the very low odds that a person could find a black-capped around here... I've studied how to tell them apart and, I want to pull my hair out thinking about it sometimes. Side by side comparisons make it look easy when they have two that are different enough... but, the black-capped doesn't always have such obvious marking to be able to just look at one that's hopping and flying around(or even sitting still) and just be able to ID it instantly.
Typically, that's not something to worry about here... even in NW Arkansas, we're below the line of separation between the two...(I grew up in Massachusetts so, the black-capped is on my list anyway but, would make a cool AR bird)
So the other week, my daughter and I heard a very distinct black-capped song. Two notes... clear as day, right out at the feeders. We watched and listened and watched and watched... never heard it again. Sometimes you THINK you see a chickadee that's different from the rest but then, they're moving back and forth SO much you can't keep track. Then as I go over the marks to look for(again) I read that in the area where they can both be found, they can sometimes learn the wrong sound. hmmmm
We're certain it was a black-capped song but, I'm not reporting/claiming it. Even if it was a carolina singing the wrong tune, that could mean it's from up north...

Lots of bird thoughts this morning. I really should get out there. Headed to city lake in just a bit to explore...



--
Daniel Mason
www.byfellowship.com/forums.php<http://www.byfellowship.com/forums.php>
 

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Date: 11/26/18 11:36 am
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Kittiwake yes
For you county birders the wall Glen referenced is in Faulkner county. When the bird flys half way across the river it is in Perry county. So you could create a list for each county even though you are standing on the Perry County side of the river.

There are eBird hotspots for both sides of the river (east and west).

Michael and Perry

> On Nov 26, 2018, at 1:12 PM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> The black-legged kittiwake is still at Toad Suck Park. It's been hanging out on the far side of the river against the concrete wall between the dam and the red signs.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
 

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Date: 11/26/18 11:14 am
From: Michael <mplinz...>
Subject: Kittiwake at Toad Suck Park Dam
I heard from Terry Butler a little while ago and he said the Black-legged Kittiwake has reappeared and is feeding below the dam.

He was viewing from the Perry county side.

Michael Linz
 

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Date: 11/26/18 11:13 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Kittiwake yes
The black-legged kittiwake is still at Toad Suck Park. It's been hanging out on the far side of the river against the concrete wall between the dam and the red signs.
Glenn WyattCabot


 

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Date: 11/26/18 7:44 am
From: Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
I was processing pictures today and found that there was a hen Black
Scoter, along with the drake, in the Scaup raft when I went out. Still
didn't see that one last hen.
On Nov 25, 2018 9:47 AM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

Trying this again because sometimes smartphones are nothing but
smartypants.

Lake Maumelle report:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50189111





Patty


-------- Original message --------From: plm108
<plm108...> Date: 11/25/18 9:28 AM (GMT-06:00) To:
Gabrielle Hargrove <gabefuchs...>,
<ARBIRD-L...>, plm108 <plm108...> Subject:
Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Not sure the previous link worked so sending it
againhttps://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50189111PattySent from my
Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: plm108
<plm108...> Date: 11/25/18 9:25 AM (GMT-06:00) To:
Gabrielle Hargrove <gabefuchs...>,
<ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Record Number Black
Scoters Here's a link to our Lake Monticello report from
yesterday. For those unfamiliar with this location (as we were),
open the link below and tap on MAP at the top of the checklist and
you can use it to get directions. Great potential
here!https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50189111 Patty McLean and
Michael Linz, Conway AR
 

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Date: 11/25/18 6:28 pm
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Black-legged Kittiwake at Toad Suck Dam
I have added pictures to the ebird list. Light was fading so the pictures
are not that great but they do show you what this bird looks like just
incase you want to chase it. With the dark wing pattern it is pretty easy
to pick out of the crowd.

The Kittiwake was in the last group of birds to leave for the roost at dark
so there is a good chance it will be there in the morning (or at least this
is the opinion of this optimistic birder).

Michael Linz


On Sun, Nov 25, 2018 at 4:38 PM plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

> Michael Linz and I are watching a juvenile BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE flying
> with numerous Ring-billed Gulls at the base of the dam below the bridge at
> Toad Suck Park on the Arkansas River. Michael is taking photos and will
> share them later. Best viewing area is Toad Suck Park on the WEST side of
> the river.
>
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50217237
>
>
> Patty McLean and Michael Linz
>
>
>

 

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Date: 11/25/18 4:39 pm
From: Kenny Nations <kennynations...>
Subject: Unusual birds for Cleburne County
I saw four American Avocets at Sandy Beach (Greers Ferry Lake) in Heber Springs this morning.
Kenny Nations
<kennynations...>




 

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Date: 11/25/18 2:38 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Black-legged Kittiwake at Toad Suck Dam
Michael Linz and I are watching a juvenile BLACK-LEGGED KITTIWAKE flying with numerous Ring-billed Gulls at the base of the dam below the bridge at Toad Suck Park on the Arkansas River. Michael is taking photos and will share them later. Best viewing area is Toad Suck Park on the WEST side of the river.https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50217237Patty McLean and Michael Linz 
 

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Date: 11/25/18 2:22 pm
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Re: Black Scoter Yes
Here’s a picture of the scoters from today.



https://jamesdixon.us/11-25-2018-black-scoters-lake-monticello/









Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after." — Thorin



From: James Dixon [mailto:<jamesdixonlr...>]
Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2018 12:15 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Black Scoter Yes



13 black scoters just seen along the dam of Lake Monticello. Just right out there. I visited two other spots on the lake first not much to report there









Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us <http://www.jamesdixon.us>
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after." — Thorin


 

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Date: 11/25/18 12:11 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Black Scoters
There are 13 Black Scoters near the dam road, here on Lake Monticello.
There seems to be eight males and five females.

Delos McCauley

 

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Date: 11/25/18 10:15 am
From: James Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Black Scoter Yes


13 black scoters just seen along the dam of Lake Monticello. Just right out there. I visited two other spots on the lake first not much to report there


 
Jim
Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if
you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look,
but it is not always quite the something you were after." —
Thorin
 

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Date: 11/25/18 8:52 am
From: Laster/Roark <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Well, they say cajuns will eat anything. 😁 Good ole spellcheck.


> On Nov 25, 2018, at 7:00 AM, Don Simons <drsimons56...> wrote:
>
>
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>
>> From: Don Simons <drsimons56...> <mailto:<drsimons56...>>
>> Date: November 25, 2018 at 6:59:47 AM CST
>> To: Gabrielle Hargrove <gabefuchs...> <mailto:<gabefuchs...>>
>> Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
>>
>> Louisiana has had a lot of scoters reported in various parts of the distaste lately.
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>> On Nov 24, 2018, at 9:40 PM, Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>>
>>> Welcome! That's 2 more females than we saw! If the Lesser Scaup raft is still out there are potentially a few with it. One drake was hanging out in the middle of the Scaup raft separate from the Scoter raft. Other notable birds in the raft were a couple Canvasback and Greater Scaup. Hoping to see the Surf Scoters, Mergs, and Loons when I go back out.
>>>
>>> On Nov 24, 2018 5:00 PM, plm108 <plm108...> <mailto:<plm108...>> wrote:
>>> After seeing Gabrielle's report, Michael Linz and I decided to head for Lake Monticello to look for the BLACK SCOTERS. It took a while to find them since they were completely across the lake from the dam. We actually counted THIRTEEN -- 8 males and 5 females. My first time to see a BLACK SCOTER in Arkansas and Michael's first time this year ... so a big thanks to Gabrielle for getting the word out!
>>>
>>>
>>> Also continuing were at least 2 SURF SCOTERS, one female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, a pair of AMERICAN WIGEON Zand nearly a dozen Common Loon, several of which were yodeling.
>>>
>>>
>>> Patty McLean and Michael Linz,
>>> Conway AR
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -------- Original message --------
>>> From: Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>>
>>> Date: 11/24/18 12:59 PM (GMT-06:00)
>>> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>
>>> Subject: Record Number Black Scoters
>>>
>>> Hello All, Please forgive any overt blunders as this is my first message. On 11/20/18 a group of friends and myself went to see the Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. We found 11 which turns out to have been a record number for the state (up from 2 and 4 respectively). As of today there are at least 7 still there along with Surf Scoters and a Red-breasted Merganser.
>>> Gabrielle Hargrove Gillett
>>>


 

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Date: 11/25/18 8:21 am
From: Susan <sjackson2...>
Subject: Whooping crane
Still at intersection of 33 & 366 Roe, AR in the NE part of the field. Close to the road. Very easy to see even without binoculars. 10:20 Sunday morning

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/25/18 7:48 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Trying this again because sometimes smartphones are nothing but smartypants. Lake Maumelle report:  https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50189111Patty
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 11/25/18 9:28 AM (GMT-06:00) To: Gabrielle Hargrove <gabefuchs...>, <ARBIRD-L...>, plm108 <plm108...> Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters Not sure the previous link worked so sending it againhttps://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50189111PattySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 11/25/18  9:25 AM  (GMT-06:00) To: Gabrielle Hargrove <gabefuchs...>, <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters Here's a link to our Lake Monticello  report from yesterday. For those unfamiliar with this location (as we were), open the link below and tap on MAP at the top of the checklist and you can use it to get directions. Great potential here!https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50189111Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR
 

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Date: 11/25/18 7:29 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Not sure the previous link worked so sending it againhttps://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50189111PattySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 11/25/18 9:25 AM (GMT-06:00) To: Gabrielle Hargrove <gabefuchs...>, <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters Here's a link to our Lake Monticello  report from yesterday. For those unfamiliar with this location (as we were), open the link below and tap on MAP at the top of the checklist and you can use it to get directions. Great potential here!https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50189111Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR
 

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Date: 11/25/18 7:26 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Here's a link to our Lake Monticello  report from yesterday. For those unfamiliar with this location (as we were), open the link below and tap on MAP at the top of the checklist and you can use it to get directions. Great potential here!https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S50189111Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 11/24/18 5:00 PM (GMT-06:00) To: Gabrielle Hargrove <gabefuchs...>, <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters After seeing Gabrielle's report, Michael Linz and I decided to head for Lake Monticello to look for the BLACK SCOTERS. It took a while to find them since they were completely across the lake from the dam. We actually counted THIRTEEN -- 8 males and 5 females. My first time to see a BLACK SCOTER in Arkansas and Michael's first time this year ... so a big thanks to Gabrielle for getting the word out! Also continuing were at least 2 SURF SCOTERS, one female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, a pair of AMERICAN WIGEON Zand nearly a dozen Common Loon, several of which were yodeling. Patty McLean and Michael Linz,  Conway AR
 

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Date: 11/25/18 5:00 am
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Fwd: Record Number Black Scoters


Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
> Date: November 25, 2018 at 6:59:47 AM CST
> To: Gabrielle Hargrove <gabefuchs...>
> Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
>
> Louisiana has had a lot of scoters reported in various parts of the distaste lately.
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>> On Nov 24, 2018, at 9:40 PM, Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> Welcome! That's 2 more females than we saw! If the Lesser Scaup raft is still out there are potentially a few with it. One drake was hanging out in the middle of the Scaup raft separate from the Scoter raft. Other notable birds in the raft were a couple Canvasback and Greater Scaup. Hoping to see the Surf Scoters, Mergs, and Loons when I go back out.
>>
>> On Nov 24, 2018 5:00 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:
>> After seeing Gabrielle's report, Michael Linz and I decided to head for Lake Monticello to look for the BLACK SCOTERS. It took a while to find them since they were completely across the lake from the dam. We actually counted THIRTEEN -- 8 males and 5 females. My first time to see a BLACK SCOTER in Arkansas and Michael's first time this year ... so a big thanks to Gabrielle for getting the word out!
>>
>>
>> Also continuing were at least 2 SURF SCOTERS, one female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, a pair of AMERICAN WIGEON Zand nearly a dozen Common Loon, several of which were yodeling.
>>
>>
>> Patty McLean and Michael Linz,
>> Conway AR
>>
>>
>>
>> -------- Original message --------
>> From: Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>
>> Date: 11/24/18 12:59 PM (GMT-06:00)
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Subject: Record Number Black Scoters
>>
>> Hello All, Please forgive any overt blunders as this is my first message. On 11/20/18 a group of friends and myself went to see the Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. We found 11 which turns out to have been a record number for the state (up from 2 and 4 respectively). As of today there are at least 7 still there along with Surf Scoters and a Red-breasted Merganser.
>> Gabrielle Hargrove Gillett
>>

 

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Date: 11/24/18 7:40 pm
From: Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Welcome! That's 2 more females than we saw! If the Lesser Scaup raft is
still out there are potentially a few with it. One drake was hanging
out in the middle of the Scaup raft separate from the Scoter raft.
Other notable birds in the raft were a couple Canvasback and Greater
Scaup. Hoping to see the Surf Scoters, Mergs, and Loons when I go back
out.

On Nov 24, 2018 5:00 PM, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

After seeing Gabrielle's report, Michael Linz and I decided to
head for Lake Monticello to look for the BLACK SCOTERS. It took a
while to find them since they were completely across the lake from
the dam. We actually counted THIRTEEN -- 8 males and 5 females. My
first time to see a BLACK SCOTER in Arkansas and Michael's first
time this year ... so a big thanks to Gabrielle for getting the
word out!

Also continuing were at least 2 SURF SCOTERS, one female
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, a pair of AMERICAN WIGEON Zand nearly a
dozen Common Loon, several of which were yodeling.

Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR


-------- Original message --------From: Gabrielle Hargrove
<0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> Date: 11/24/18
12:59 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject:
Record Number Black Scoters
Hello All, Please forgive any overt blunders as this is my first
message. On 11/20/18 a group of friends and myself went to see the
Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. We found 11 which turns out to
have been a record number for the state (up from 2 and 4
respectively). As of today there are at least 7 still there along
with Surf Scoters and a Red-breasted Merganser.
Gabrielle Hargrove Gillett
 

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Date: 11/24/18 6:36 pm
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Patty, sounds like this was in the afternoon. I’m going to try tomorrow. Hopefully they will be closer to the dam.



David, it is a little north of Monticello in the “wedge” between state highways 425 and 35.





Jim Dixon
Little Rock
www.jamesdixon.us
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after." — Thorin



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of plm108
Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2018 5:01 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters



After seeing Gabrielle's report, Michael Linz and I decided to head for Lake Monticello to look for the BLACK SCOTERS. It took a while to find them since they were completely across the lake from the dam. We actually counted THIRTEEN -- 8 males and 5 females. My first time to see a BLACK SCOTER in Arkansas and Michael's first time this year ... so a big thanks to Gabrielle for getting the word out!





Also continuing were at least 2 SURF SCOTERS, one female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, a pair of AMERICAN WIGEON Zand nearly a dozen Common Loon, several of which were yodeling.





Patty McLean and Michael Linz,

Conway AR







-------- Original message --------

From: Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> <mailto:<0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> >

Date: 11/24/18 12:59 PM (GMT-06:00)

To: <ARBIRD-L...> <mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>

Subject: Record Number Black Scoters



Hello All, Please forgive any overt blunders as this is my first message. On 11/20/18 a group of friends and myself went to see the Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. We found 11 which turns out to have been a record number for the state (up from 2 and 4 respectively). As of today there are at least 7 still there along with Surf Scoters and a Red-breasted Merganser.
Gabrielle Hargrove Gillett


 

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Date: 11/24/18 4:11 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: TOOT TOOT TOOT EVERYWHERE
Red-breasted Nuthatches seem to have taken over northwest Arkansas. They are typically permanent residents way north of us, in the coniferous forests of Canada, Alaska, plus northeastern and western US. I have a couple coming to my feeder in Fayetteville. Ive heard about LOTS of others, too, from all over. Birds are like people; they have to eat. So this is one of those irruption years, when they come south because their food supply has failed up north and out west. The few miles of slow driving with windows down this morning on south side of Beaver Lake yielded at least 8 along Key Road. Then the little Shortleaf Pine woodland adjacent the nursery pond yielded at least another 6-8. Toots were also coming from the pines on the other side of the pond. In short, toots toots toots everywhere.

If this continues, this could prove a relatively big year on CBCs. Fayetteville CBC has been held since its initiation by Doug James in 1961. Thats around 56 counts; Red-breasteds have been found on 35 (including count week). Often these have involved just a bird or two. Big years include 1961, 1965, 1977, 1985, 1989, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2007, 2012, and 2016. In these years, nuthatches per party hour varied from 0.11 to a peak of 0.38 in 1997.

Food shortages in northern and western forests account for most birds. However, it is interesting to think that at least a few could actually be nesting in the same native Shortleaf Pine forests in the state that apparently also support a small breeding population of Red Crossbills. Matt Young at Cornell University thinks this it is a distinct possibility that we have some breeding Red-breasted Nuthatches. So for sure most toots are immigrants here because of hunger back home, but some may be home grown. This is something to be sorted out in future years. For now, time to enjoy toots.


 

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Date: 11/24/18 3:54 pm
From: George R. Hoelzeman <vogel...>
Subject: Harlan's Hawk...or ?
A couple weeks ago when we went out to see the Whooping Crane, we also
spotted a couple buteo type hawks which I think may have been the
Harlan's variant (or sub-species or whatever its classified as).  The
key identifier was the mostly white tail which had a brownish trailing
edge, but not a particularly hard edge as in a Cooper's Hawk, etc.  The
first one we saw was pretty large - in fact I initially thought it might
be a first year Bald Eagle but as we got a better look I don't think it
was big enough for an eagle, and it had the typical Red-tail buff belly,
etc.  Also, the shape was wrong for an eagle.  The second one was also
on the large size, but it was hanging out near a more typical Red-tail
(with the diagnostic red tail) and, while it was decidedly larger, it
wasn't vastly larger...so, maybe a female?  Most of the rest of the
plumage was more typical Red-tail (darker brown, not the real light
coloring of the Krider's).

Anyway, that's what we saw.

Thoughts?

George (n. Conway Co. listening to the wrens try to chase the dog from
under the steps)
 

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Date: 11/24/18 3:03 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
After seeing Gabrielle's report, Michael Linz and I decided to head for Lake Monticello to look for the BLACK SCOTERS. It took a while to find them since they were completely across the lake from the dam. We actually counted THIRTEEN -- 8 males and 5 females. My first time to see a BLACK SCOTER in Arkansas and Michael's first time this year ... so a big thanks to Gabrielle for getting the word out! Also continuing were at least 2 SURF SCOTERS, one female RED-BREASTED MERGANSER, a pair of AMERICAN WIGEON Zand nearly a dozen Common Loon, several of which were yodeling. Patty McLean and Michael Linz,  Conway AR
-------- Original message --------From: Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...> Date: 11/24/18 12:59 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Record Number Black Scoters Hello  All, Please forgive any overt blunders as this is my first message. On 11/20/18 a group of friends and myself went to see the Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. We found 11 which turns out to have been a record number for the state (up from 2 and 4 respectively). As of today there are at least 7 still there along with Surf Scoters and a Red-breasted Merganser. Gabrielle Hargrove Gillett
 

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Date: 11/24/18 1:23 pm
From: Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Thanks Ethan! 
It's been a wild bird year all around. Lake Monticello seems to be a good stop-over for Scoters in the area, but as to why they are showing up here, I haven't a clue. 
Lake Monticello is just outside of Monticello, Arkansas in the southern portion of the state. 
Gabrielle Hargrove  On Saturday, November 24, 2018, 1:35:15 PM CST, Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...> wrote:

#yiv6135281071 html {background-color:transparent;}#yiv6135281071 body {color:#333;line-height:150%;margin:0;}#yiv6135281071 .yiv6135281071ms-outlook-ios-reference-expand {display:block;color:#999;padding:20px 0px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv6135281071 .yiv6135281071ms-outlook-ios-availability-container {max-width:500px;margin:auto;padding:12px 15px 15px 15px;border:1px solid #C7E0F4;border-radius:4px;}#yiv6135281071 #yiv6135281071 .yiv6135281071ms-outlook-ios-availability-delete-button {width:25px;min-height:25px;background-size:25px 25px;background-position:center;}#yiv6135281071 #yiv6135281071ms-outlook-ios-main-container {margin:0 0 0 0;margin-top:120;padding:8;}#yiv6135281071 #yiv6135281071ms-outlook-ios-content-container {padding:0;padding-top:12;padding-bottom:20;}#yiv6135281071 .yiv6135281071ms-outlook-ios-mention {color:#333;background-color:#f1f1f1;border-radius:4px;padding:0 2px 0 2px;text-decoration:none;}#yiv6135281071 .yiv6135281071ms-outlook-ios-mention-external {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#fdf7e7;}#yiv6135281071 .yiv6135281071ms-outlook-ios-mention-external-clear-design {color:#ba8f0d;background-color:#f1f1f1;}Awesome report Gabrielle.
This seems to be a record year for Scoters in the Mississippi flyway. There have been more reported in Arkansas than usual and my friends in coastal Louisiana have told me of rafts of hundreds in the large lakes surrounded by coast marsh.  
Does anyone have thoughts as to why there seems to be more in our flyways this year? Perhaps Hurricane Michael shifted their migration? This is the obvious explanation, but the timing doesn’t seem quite right to me.

Ethan MasseyBiologist, Ducks Unlimited, Inc.(870)-456-2715 (c)│ (870)-282-8242 (o)│ <emassey...> S. CC Camp Road, St. Charles, AR 72140
 From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <arbird-l...> on behalf of Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2018 1:10 PM
To: <arbird-l...>
Subject: Record Number Black Scoters Hello  All, Please forgive any overt blunders as this is my first message. On 11/20/18 a group of friends and myself went to see the Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. We found 11 which turns out to have been a record number for the state (up from 2 and 4 respectively). As of today there are at least 7 still there along with Surf Scoters and a Red-breasted Merganser. 
Gabrielle Hargrove Gillett

 

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Date: 11/24/18 12:15 pm
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Where is Lake Monticello? Not coming up on Google maps.
David Ray
NLR

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 24, 2018, at 1:35 PM, Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...> wrote:
>
> Awesome report Gabrielle.
>
> This seems to be a record year for Scoters in the Mississippi flyway. There have been more reported in Arkansas than usual and my friends in coastal Louisiana have told me of rafts of hundreds in the large lakes surrounded by coast marsh.
>
> Does anyone have thoughts as to why there seems to be more in our flyways this year? Perhaps Hurricane Michael shifted their migration? This is the obvious explanation, but the timing doesn’t seem quite right to me.
>
>
> Ethan Massey
> Biologist, Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
> (870)-456-2715 (c)│ (870)-282-8242 (o)│ <emassey...>
> 57 S. CC Camp Road, St. Charles, AR 72140
>
>
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <arbird-l...> on behalf of Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>
> Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2018 1:10 PM
> To: <arbird-l...>
> Subject: Record Number Black Scoters
>
> Hello All,
> Please forgive any overt blunders as this is my first message. On 11/20/18 a group of friends and myself went to see the Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. We found 11 which turns out to have been a record number for the state (up from 2 and 4 respectively). As of today there are at least 7 still there along with Surf Scoters and a Red-breasted Merganser.
>
> Gabrielle Hargrove
> Gillett
>

 

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Date: 11/24/18 11:35 am
From: Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...>
Subject: Re: Record Number Black Scoters
Awesome report Gabrielle.

This seems to be a record year for Scoters in the Mississippi flyway. There have been more reported in Arkansas than usual and my friends in coastal Louisiana have told me of rafts of hundreds in the large lakes surrounded by coast marsh.

Does anyone have thoughts as to why there seems to be more in our flyways this year? Perhaps Hurricane Michael shifted their migration? This is the obvious explanation, but the timing doesn$B!G(Bt seem quite right to me.


Ethan Massey
Biologist, Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
(870)-456-2715 (c)$B("(B (870)-282-8242 (o)$B("(B <emassey...>
57 S. CC Camp Road, St. Charles, AR 72140


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <arbird-l...> on behalf of Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Saturday, November 24, 2018 1:10 PM
To: <arbird-l...>
Subject: Record Number Black Scoters

Hello All,
Please forgive any overt blunders as this is my first message. On 11/20/18 a group of friends and myself went to see the Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. We found 11 which turns out to have been a record number for the state (up from 2 and 4 respectively). As of today there are at least 7 still there along with Surf Scoters and a Red-breasted Merganser.

Gabrielle Hargrove
Gillett


 

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Date: 11/24/18 11:23 am
From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...>
Subject: Whooping crane - yes
Still at intersection of 33 & 366 in NE side of field.


Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/24/18 11:20 am
From: Betsy's Birds <betsysbirds...>
Subject: Re: Whooping Crane still there
Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2018, at 9:36 AM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>
> We are down near Roe watching the crane. It is a ways out, but still there as of 9:35 AM, 16 Nov.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
 

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Date: 11/24/18 11:10 am
From: Gabrielle Hargrove <0000025085b7451f-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Record Number Black Scoters
Hello  All, Please forgive any overt blunders as this is my first message. On 11/20/18 a group of friends and myself went to see the Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. We found 11 which turns out to have been a record number for the state (up from 2 and 4 respectively). As of today there are at least 7 still there along with Surf Scoters and a Red-breasted Merganser. 
Gabrielle Hargrove Gillett

 

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Date: 11/24/18 8:31 am
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Red-throated Loon at Lake Saracen
It has been verified that the loon on Lake Saracen is a Red-throated.
Following is a link to photos taken near the fountain on the lake:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1OyBdnreCCC4r91ZV3Cx_slJzzJYwdTJg?usp=sharing

Delos McCauley
870 550 7861
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 11/24/18 8:22 am
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Red-throated Loon at Lake Saracen
It has been verified, a Red-throated Loon at Lake Saracen. Link follows
showing photos taken near the water fountain on the lake:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1OyBdnreCCC4r91ZV3Cx_slJzzJYwdTJg?usp=sharing

Delos McCauley
870 550 7861
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 11/24/18 7:58 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: teleportation and stunning
I'm still waiting for that technology... to go anywhere and fast. I suppose
if we did that, people would be popping up all over the place. I think I
can think of more downsides than benefits to that... but still, I dream. My
wife doesn't have to work today and yet, I still can't drive 4 to 5 hours
one way... Would be SO awesome if I could drive out to see the whooping
crane(just that one would be nice)(if it's still there) and then head down
to pine bluff to see if the red-throated loon is still around... and then
look for a red-cockaded woodpecker. All would be very exciting life birds.
Then, apparently several days back, a long-tailed duck was seen at the
wastewater plant in alma. And of course, the day my wife has off is a
Saturday and the place is closed. Driving that far to try and look over a
fence for a duck among ducks... I think I'll have to bird close to home
today.

Had a dream of living in a different house and seeing a hummingbird at the
feeders... only we had no sugar water out. Had a rufous throad to breast
and then some... in the dream I thought it was a rufous hummingbird til it
turned and it had a REALLY long bill... Tried to get a picture with my
phone as I didn't have my camera on me... didn't work. Went inside, mixed
up 4 cups of water and 4 cups of sugar and ended up with quite a few
gallons of mixture. Went out and tried filling the very odd feeders out
there. Then there was something like a waxwing on a porch(that wasn't there
before, the porch that is) and I tried getting a picture with my regular
camera... And it decided to malfunction. Would have been an awesome
photo...

Every so often, I have dreams like this. The camera issues are real and a
bit more nightmarish. My camera malfunctions from time to time and it's
enough to drive a person mad. Anyone else ever dream of birds?

And the "stunning" part...
We had a chickadee hit a window yesterday. Hadn't had a bird get stunned
like that in a long time. My kids alerted me to the strike at the window in
their room. I went outside and sure enough, there was a chickadee...
dangling upside down from a branch. Possibly holding on by one foot. Just
hanging, not moving. I was certain it was dead. We stood their discussing
what to do with it. Finally sent my oldest in for a cardboard box and I
approached the bird. I grabbed the branch it was on so I could pull it
close and when I looked up, the bird was upright and looking around. It's
interesting the bird managed to grab a branch before losing consciousness,
if that's what happened. I stood there watching it just a few feet from
me... talking to it... wondering why it hadn't flown. Internal injuries?
broken wing? Finally, it flew off without a hitch. Back from the dead...
Not sure what startled the bird in the first place. Birds don't typically
hit that window ever. We'll have to take some more precautions now... glad
that little guy survived...

Oh, to add another topic to this rambling... Those chickadees are
frustrating... well, the very low odds that a person could find a
black-capped around here... I've studied how to tell them apart and, I want
to pull my hair out thinking about it sometimes. Side by side comparisons
make it look easy when they have two that are different enough... but, the
black-capped doesn't always have such obvious marking to be able to just
look at one that's hopping and flying around(or even sitting still) and
just be able to ID it instantly.
Typically, that's not something to worry about here... even in NW Arkansas,
we're below the line of separation between the two...(I grew up in
Massachusetts so, the black-capped is on my list anyway but, would make a
cool AR bird)
So the other week, my daughter and I heard a very distinct black-capped
song. Two notes... clear as day, right out at the feeders. We watched and
listened and watched and watched... never heard it again. Sometimes you
THINK you see a chickadee that's different from the rest but then, they're
moving back and forth SO much you can't keep track. Then as I go over the
marks to look for(again) I read that in the area where they can both be
found, they can sometimes learn the wrong sound. hmmmm
We're certain it was a black-capped song but, I'm not reporting/claiming
it. Even if it was a carolina singing the wrong tune, that could mean it's
from up north...

Lots of bird thoughts this morning. I really should get out there. Headed
to city lake in just a bit to explore...



--
Daniel Mason
www.byfellowship.com/forums.php

 

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Date: 11/23/18 8:45 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Re: Red-throated Loon?
Thanks Kenny,
That is good enough for me.

Delos

On Fri, Nov 23, 2018 at 10:14 PM Kenny Nichols <kingbird...> wrote:

> Definitely a Red-throated Loon.
>
> Kenny Nichols
> Dardanelle
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Nov 23, 2018, at 5:37 PM, Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
> wrote:
>
> Glenn Wyatt and some Pine Bluff birders today saw a loon on Lake Saracen.
> I put it down as a Common Loon until Glenn called me and suggested it was a
> Red-throated Loon. I studied my photos over and tend to agree with him.
> It lacks the partial collar you normally see on the Common Loon and has a
> nice checkered back you may see on the Red-throated. Please click on the
> following link and let me know what you think:
>
>
> https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1aYTOzqiSKOGbfw-109315kDKMbwbi7pX?usp=sharing
>
> Delos McCauley
> Pine Bluff
>
>

 

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Date: 11/23/18 8:15 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Red-throated Loon?
Definitely a Red-throated Loon.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 23, 2018, at 5:37 PM, Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> wrote:
>
> Glenn Wyatt and some Pine Bluff birders today saw a loon on Lake Saracen. I put it down as a Common Loon until Glenn called me and suggested it was a Red-throated Loon. I studied my photos over and tend to agree with him. It lacks the partial collar you normally see on the Common Loon and has a nice checkered back you may see on the Red-throated. Please click on the following link and let me know what you think:
>
> https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1aYTOzqiSKOGbfw-109315kDKMbwbi7pX?usp=sharing
>
> Delos McCauley
> Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 11/23/18 6:32 pm
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Red-throated Loon?
I have seen what I think is a Red-throated on Lake Willastein in Maumelle.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 23, 2018, at 5:47 PM, Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>
> Shape of the head and shape and size of the bill indicate Red-throated Loon to me. An immature.
>
> Will Britton
>
>> On Fri, Nov 23, 2018 at 17:38 Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> wrote:
>> Glenn Wyatt and some Pine Bluff birders today saw a loon on Lake Saracen. I put it down as a Common Loon until Glenn called me and suggested it was a Red-throated Loon. I studied my photos over and tend to agree with him. It lacks the partial collar you normally see on the Common Loon and has a nice checkered back you may see on the Red-throated. Please click on the following link and let me know what you think:
>>
>> https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1aYTOzqiSKOGbfw-109315kDKMbwbi7pX?usp=sharing
>>
>>
>> Delos McCauley
>> Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/18 5:04 pm
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller...>
Subject: Re: Food Man Has Arrived
Red-breasted Nuthatches are either very brave or very stupid - or are those
the same thing!

Allan

On Thu, Nov 22, 2018 at 10:52 AM Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
wrote:

> Wonderful!!! Happy Thanksgiving to ALL from Food Lady, Don, and the Birds
> at Ninestone.
>
> Judith
>
> On Thu, Nov 22, 2018 at 10:36 AM Jack and Pam <
> <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>> Thanks Patty. I can picture Michael out there surrounded by hopeful
>> birds. We had similar experiences with the birds waiting just overhead
>> while we fill the feeder.
>> Happy Thanksgiving
>>
>> Jack
>> Newton County at Erbie where the feeders are busy
>>
>> On Thursday, November 22, 2018, 10:02:16 AM CST, plm108 <
>> <plm108...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Michael Linz and I returned from Georgia to Conway earlier this week to
>> find his feeders empty. No surprise, considering the squirrels and other
>> invaders who think they have free range over the feeders. So, last night -
>> in spite of the cold, in spite of the fact that I had just started dinner,
>> and in spite of the traffic - we ventured out to buy seeds and suet for our
>> cherished feathered friends.
>>
>> This morning, bright and early, Michael went out on his deck to fill the
>> feeders. The moment he stepped out, two White-breasted Nuthatches sounded
>> the alert: "Food Man is Here! Food Man is Here!" This was before he had
>> even opened a single bag. Before long, the silent forest burst into eager
>> Pavlovic-type sounds with several birds venturing within a few feet of
>> Michael as if to see what was on the menu ... and how soon they could get
>> to the morsels. Word travels quickly in the cold crisp air, which also
>> attracts other friends and foes. We soon noticed the birds became quiet and
>> still, and this lasted for 20-30 minutes, which makes me wonder if a hawk
>> had also been alerted to the banquet.
>>
>> Eventually the feasting was underway and the birds flew in and out so
>> fast, it was often hard to ID all of them at once. One of the first to
>> arrive was a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH who is not shy about pushing his way
>> around.
>>
>> Such a delightful way to start this special day of Thanksgiving. Here's
>> hoping everyone enjoys a hearty feast today, thanks to all the special Food
>> Men and Women in our lives.
>>
>> Patty McLean, Atlanta GA and Conway AR
>>
>>

--
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-327-8952 home
501-339-8071 cell


No one has lived the life you live.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/18 3:48 pm
From: Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Red-throated Loon?
Shape of the head and shape and size of the bill indicate Red-throated
Loon to me. An immature.

Will Britton

On Fri, Nov 23, 2018 at 17:38 Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
wrote:

> Glenn Wyatt and some Pine Bluff birders today saw a loon on Lake Saracen.
> I put it down as a Common Loon until Glenn called me and suggested it was a
> Red-throated Loon. I studied my photos over and tend to agree with him.
> It lacks the partial collar you normally see on the Common Loon and has a
> nice checkered back you may see on the Red-throated. Please click on the
> following link and let me know what you think:
>
>
> https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1aYTOzqiSKOGbfw-109315kDKMbwbi7pX?usp=sharing
>
>
> Delos McCauley
> Pine Bluff
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/18 3:38 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Red-throated Loon?
Glenn Wyatt and some Pine Bluff birders today saw a loon on Lake Saracen.
I put it down as a Common Loon until Glenn called me and suggested it was a
Red-throated Loon. I studied my photos over and tend to agree with him.
It lacks the partial collar you normally see on the Common Loon and has a
nice checkered back you may see on the Red-throated. Please click on the
following link and let me know what you think:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1aYTOzqiSKOGbfw-109315kDKMbwbi7pX?usp=sharing

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/18 10:38 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Lake Monticello
Seen late this morning:
2 scoters, one was a female surf scoter, the other probably a young surf scoter. No black scoters seen.
Also of interest were a horned grebe, a female common merganser, and a couple common loons.
Thanks, Kelly Chitwood, for the report this morning.
Glenn & Michelle WyattCabot


 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/18 8:00 am
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Surf Scoter- Female
At Lake Monticello. Yay!

Headed to Roe.

Wish us luck!

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/23/18 6:23 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Yellowbelly sapsucker
Cloudy, cool and promise of rain later so the birds are flying back & forth
to the feeders. Yellowbelly sapsucker seems to really like the dried
mealworms while the red-breasted nuthatches and white-breasted ones prefer
the sunflower chips. Chickadees and titmice are also at the feeders along
with cardinals. Red belly woodpeckers & downys visit both types.



MaryAnn King



'New day, new blessing. Don't let yesterday's failures ruin the beauty of
today, because each day has its own promise of love, joy, forgiveness. Good
morning..."




 

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Date: 11/22/18 6:09 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Link to Photos of Horned Grebe, A W Pelicans & E Collared-Dove
Click on the following link to see photos of a Horned Grebe on Lake Saracen
catching a shad; also on Lake Saracen, an American White Pelican with a
very large fish in its pouch (two blowup photos) and a couple of Eurasian
Collared-Doves I photographed today:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1okrrJ2tvOqdtg2g_Wg48YvOCpozVC1KB?usp=sharing

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 11/22/18 3:14 pm
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Gunnison Sage-Grouse & Southern Colorado in late April/early May.... LONG
Greetings all,
I'm going to try to see a Gunnison Sage-Grouse and bird Southern Colorado in late April/ early May 2019. You're welcome to join the insanity if you want!

1st Priority:
Remove my semi-nemesis status from the Gunnison Sage-Grouse. I've tried 3 times without success. Either the location or the timing weren't the best so it's only a semi-nemesis. I intend to go when "Sisk-a-dee" (www.siskadee.org) is doing their festival. If I miss it on day one then I intend to keep coming back each day, for as long as it takes, to see them dancing on the only public viewing lek, in its range.

2nd Priority:
Bird the high desert/arid lands of South West CO.

3rd Priority:
Bird the mountains along the southern CO border. In addition to normal mountains birds, will try for 3 species of Rosy-Finch. May also try for White-tailed Ptarmigan. (A mega nemesis) This won't be the best spot in CO, but it's the only place with an April sighting within the trip exploration zone. Slumgullion Pass area at 11,361'. This probably won't happen because of snow depth and road closures, but I can sure dream.

4th Priority:
Look for Eastern rarities, along the AR River, near Lamar.

5th Priority:
Explore "Canyons of the Ancients National Monument" and "Mesa Verde National Park" as a tourist.

After the first priority, the rest aren't in any real order. Can be totally flexible depending on who is on the trip and what folks want to do. I have 68 birds that I'm looking for, but if you've got a lifer's list I'll work really hard to get you as many as possible.

Logistics and issues:
Timing:
You can go for as long or short as you want. I'm probably going for 11 or so days. Can drive out with me or I can meet you in Albuquerque or Denver, or the smaller airports of Farmington NM, Durango or Grand Junction, CO. You could even fly into one airport and leave from another. If you're flying, than most of your gear could drive out with me.

The zone:
Generally exploring from Highway 50, South to the NM border.

Birding locations:
Curecanti Nat Recreation Area; Black Canyon of the Gunnison Nat Park; Canyons of the Ancients Nat Monument; Mesa Verde Nat Park; Monarch Pass; 4-5 Nat Forests or Grasslands; Bureau of Land Management lands; Monte Vista Nat Wildlife Refuge; John Martin Reservoir; State Parks and towns; I'm sure there are more places than there is time.

Birding, juggling the timing:
The Gunnison Sage-Grouse peak is approximately the last week of April; The Eastern passerine migration is May week 1 and western migration is May week 2. So not perfect timing for the 2 migrations, but we'll still see birds, just may have to work harder at it.

Driving:
I'll be renting a 4wd SUV with tire chains and fully expect that both will be needed. I will do most of the driving, but wouldn't mind some help, if you like driving.

Walking:
Mostly short walking. However, to see a Lucy's Warbler in CO, I'll will need to do a 4-6 mile round trip walk in arid/desert-like lands. You don't have to do this if you don't want.

Altitude Sickness:
Some folks aren't bothered by this, but I can get headaches. We can self-treat the illness with pre-planning. One day birding and sleeping around 6500 ft; then birding & sleeping at 7703' in Gunnison; then at 11,312' for the day at Monarch Pass then slowly descending to7000'. You may want to research this illness, for yourself.

Gunnison Sage-Grouse Lek Rules/timing:
Probably getting up around 3am; To protect the birds these rules appear to be heavily enforced by CO Game Officers. No talking or noise until the last bird leaves; No restroom for about 4hrs, until the last bird leaves; No vehicle engines running, so no heat for about 4 hrs. (Ave low temp is 15-30 degrees!) This whole section is important and worth rereading. This morning could be the roughest portion of the trip.

Costs:
I'll pay for the vehicle and the gas. Lodging, food, sisk-a-dee fee and airlines are on our own. If you'd like to go, but cash is an issue, then holler, I might be able to absorb some of the cost. No worries. Having fun is more important than $.

Lodging & Food:
No camping on this trip. Quite likely that we won't always be able to find a name brand hotel. Sit down food in the evening. Sit down lunch is also possible, if you want. Breakfast is fine, but I sure don't want to give up the best birding of the day.

Birding with me:
I've heard the words insane, intense, death-marches and driven used by folks that have birded out-of-state with me. There are probably some other words that folks use, that might be stronger language than that? I do tend to start early, bird a lot, and drive a lot and sleep/eat less.
This time I plan to be a bit more laid-back. We will still drive a lot. Surely will get 6-8 hrs sleep each night. Because I won't know the western calls, I won't be birding as hard, as normal. If it's a lifer for you, then we'll take as much time as you want on it. Will motel rather than camping. Will sit down eat sometimes, instead of on the run. I can even bird early while you're sleeping in. There will be only 1 long walk, and you don't need to take it. We will acclimatize to the altitude. We can do some tourism moments, or not, your choice.
We just need to talk/compromise before the trip, so we all have the same expectations.

Planning:
If this trip is a possibility, please reply to me by late Dec. No need to commit at this time.
In Jan, Sisk-a-dee will announce their event date. I'll email you and we'll need to commit then, so we can immediately get reservations for the event.
I've done 50+ hrs of planning so far, but we will have to late April to start precision planning what species you would like to see and what places to see.

It's all good, so if you just need some insanity in your life, reply to me off the list. Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Cheers, Leif








This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 11/22/18 10:44 am
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Audubon.org: Yards With Non-Native Plants Create ‘Food Deserts’ for Bugs and Birds
Excellent article in Audubon.org regarding the reliance of birds on native plants that support native bugs. There's useful information even for those already planting native plants:

Native Plants
Yards With Non-Native Plants Create Food Deserts for Bugs and Birds

New research finds that Carolina Chickadees require a landscape with 70 percent native plants to keep their population steady.


By Lexi Krupp

October 22, 2018

A nesting Carolina Chickadee will collect more than 400 caterpillars each day. The bugs are packed with nutrients like carotenoids that growing chicks need to thrive. Photo: Douglas Tallamy

Desire Narango has knocked on hundreds of doors in the outskirts of Washington, D.C. to make an intimate request of homeowners: permission to count and identify the trees and shrubs in their yards. Luckily for Narango, now an ecologist at the City University of New York, they almost always said yes. In her counts, shes found the tropical fronds of banana plants, pink-tufted crepe myrtles, scraggly oaks, and hundreds of other woody plants. But her interest in the greenery isnt that of a botanist. Were thinking at the scale of a bird, Narango says.

Narango and other researchers at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute wanted to know how plants in human-managed landscapes affect the reproductive success of resident bird populationsa simple question that no one had answered before. The teams research, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, found only one distinction that determines if a spot is a boom or a bust for a bird population: whether it has plants native to the area.

The scientists worked with a community science group called Neighborhood Nestwatch to monitor more than a hundred nests of Carolina Chickadees, a chirpy and insect-loving songbird, across D.C.'s suburbs. Homeowners agreed to house chickadee nest boxes on their property and, once a pair of chickadees took up residence, to allow researchers to collect data on plant and bug life in their yards. The birds' foraging range is an area larger than a football field, though, and certainly bigger than any single yard. We had to make friends with all of the neighbors so that we could sample their plant communities as well, Narango says. Then researchers recorded every bug and insect crawling on these plants to estimate the culinary options available to nesting birds.

Each plant in your landscape you should think of as a bird feeder, says Doug Tallamy, an entomologist at the University of Delaware who also worked on the study. It either has food in it, or it doesnt. (Carolina Chickadees aren't big users of actual bird feeders during nesting season, and, like most other birds, they do not feed birdseed to their chicks.)

Overall, Narango found way more insect food on native plants. That's because a tree or shrub will only have bugs if the creatures recognize the plant as food. If they havent evolved together in the same ecosystem, bugs will probably steer clear of the greenery. For example, Narango searched scores of crepe myrtle trees, a non-native popular in landscaping. I dont think we ever found a caterpillar, she says. Meanwhile, a neighboring oak tree crawls with dozens or more.

The team also monitored the nest boxes. Technicians and trained volunteers counted the number of chicks at each nest and tracked the survival of parents and fledglings. Over three breeding seasons, they monitored more than 100 nests with more than 800 birds combined. Narango used these data and 13 years of past records to model the population growth of Carolina Chickadees against the makeup of plants found at their nesting sites.

Her analysis found that chickadees could only sustain their population when at least 70 percent of plants in a nesting area were native. For species like warblers, vireos, and flycatchers that are even more reliant on bug and insects, that number is going to be higher, Narango says.

Most yards don't make the cut.

Almost all landscaping in yards, gardens, and public spaces are dominated by non-native species, says Myla Aronson, who studies urban ecology at Rutgers University and was not involved in the research. She often works with land managers who recognize the danger of invasive species, but dont understand the other downsides of non-natives species, she says. I get that question all of the time: Well, whats wrong with non-natives?

The answer comes down to the food web. Nesting birds scour for the most protein-packed, fatty foods they can find, and that superfood is plant-eating bugs like caterpillars. Those are the things that fuel that rapid growth of a baby bird, says Karin Burghardt, an ecologist at the University of Maryland who studies biodiversity in human-managed landscapes. And those bugs need native plants.

The simple connection between bird, bug, and tree means that in places tended by people, birds are at the whim of an unwitting gardener. Right now, thats a dangerous arrangement. "The fact that we are starving them by the way we landscape has not been seriously considered. Thats the big breakthrough," Tallamy says. That also means that a small decision on the scale of a yard can foster big changes for birds. "It empowers every individual landowner," he says. "You want to help the birds? Then control the plants that are in your landscape."

***

Start helping birds today! Just plug your zipcode into our handy native plant database to discover the best plants for birds in your area.
 

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Date: 11/22/18 9:36 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update and Sandhills
I am down here in sunny Florida right now, Tarpon Springs and Tampa area.
(visiting) I have not seen Whooping Cranes, obviously enough, but I've
seen many herons, egrets, gulls and several gators. Florida is quite a bit
of a crowded populated place, but more and more people in the state are
trying to protect what they have left. Even license plates have such
slogans as, "Protect our coral reefs" , "save the Florida panther" , etc.
I would truly give thanks if this continent were allowed to be
returned to nature, toxins widely banned forever, and Whooping Cranes able
to reach 75,000 instead of a pathetic 75 or 100. Then I would give thanks
as if a miracle!

Don't overeat, today! :) Bill Thurman

(from 75 degree Florida)

On Thu, Nov 22, 2018, 10:30 Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> This is such a great conservation story and reality for recovering
> Whooping Cranes. http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/news/42401 With all of the
> negative environmental conflict today, it it such a relief to see programs
> and partners like those involved in the Louisiana flock moving ahead and
> accomplishing what in my view are true modern miracles. Short, powerful,
> worthwhile read.
> LDWF Receives 12 Juvenile Whooping Cranes At Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge |
> Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
> <http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/news/42401>
> www.wlf.louisiana.gov
> Nov. 20, 2018 – Louisiana’s wild whooping crane population continues to
> grow as the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) and
> partners work to reestablish a flourishing population to the Bayou State.
> Twelve juvenile whooping cranes were received Monday (Nov. 19) at
> Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge near Grand Chenier. It will bring the Louisiana
> wild population to 75 once the new ...
>
>
> And just one more on Gulf coast region cranes: the Mississippi artist
> Walter Inglis Anderson did remarkable paintings of resident Sandhill Cranes
> near his home in Ocean Springs, Mississippi. During a series of trips I
> made down there in the late 1970s and early 1980s, I got to see some of his
> remarkable murals that included Sandhills. These were in his home at
> Shearwater Pottery and the large murals in the Ocean Springs Community
> Center. If you visit Ocean Springs-Biloxi, Mississippi, area, the Community
> Center now forms the core of the Walter Anderson Museum. Years ago, for
> security purposes, a special room was removed from his home at Shearwater
> Pottery and is now curated in the Museum. So, if you visit the Museum, you
> get to see the cranes as he knew them in the 1930s-1950s, painted in the
> now preserved room and in the big murals in the Community Center. If you
> can't make this trip, the murals in the little room are beautifully
> reproduced in the book, A Painter's Psalm, The Mural from Walter Anderson's
> Cottage (Redding S. Sugg, Jr). Parts of the expansive murals in the
> Community Center are included in The Art of Walter Anderson (edited by
> Patricia Pinson).
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> on behalf of Don Simons <drsimons56...>
> *Sent:* Thursday, November 22, 2018 4:51 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update
>
> I am forwarding this from the Louisiana list serve. It provides hope for
> more wandering whoopers to show up in Arkansas.
>
> Don
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>
> *From:* Mac Myers <budogmacm...>
> *Date:* November 21, 2018 at 10:11:24 PM CST
> *To:* <LABIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* *[LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update*
> *Reply-To:* Mac Myers <budogmacm...>
>
> Update from LDW&F
> http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/news/42401
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/18 9:30 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: NOT Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Just found out I was wrong about the Rose-breasted Grosbeak, it is a female Purple Finch.  So happy about that, it is the first Purple Finch we have seen in our yard!  Yay!
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 11/22/18 9:24 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Rose-breasted Grosbeak
We have a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak at our feeder this morning.  I'm pretty sure she should have been long gone by now. 

Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/18 8:52 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Food Man Has Arrived
Wonderful!!! Happy Thanksgiving to ALL from Food Lady, Don, and the Birds
at Ninestone.

Judith

On Thu, Nov 22, 2018 at 10:36 AM Jack and Pam <
<00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Thanks Patty. I can picture Michael out there surrounded by hopeful
> birds. We had similar experiences with the birds waiting just overhead
> while we fill the feeder.
> Happy Thanksgiving
>
> Jack
> Newton County at Erbie where the feeders are busy
>
> On Thursday, November 22, 2018, 10:02:16 AM CST, plm108 <
> <plm108...> wrote:
>
>
> Michael Linz and I returned from Georgia to Conway earlier this week to
> find his feeders empty. No surprise, considering the squirrels and other
> invaders who think they have free range over the feeders. So, last night -
> in spite of the cold, in spite of the fact that I had just started dinner,
> and in spite of the traffic - we ventured out to buy seeds and suet for our
> cherished feathered friends.
>
> This morning, bright and early, Michael went out on his deck to fill the
> feeders. The moment he stepped out, two White-breasted Nuthatches sounded
> the alert: "Food Man is Here! Food Man is Here!" This was before he had
> even opened a single bag. Before long, the silent forest burst into eager
> Pavlovic-type sounds with several birds venturing within a few feet of
> Michael as if to see what was on the menu ... and how soon they could get
> to the morsels. Word travels quickly in the cold crisp air, which also
> attracts other friends and foes. We soon noticed the birds became quiet and
> still, and this lasted for 20-30 minutes, which makes me wonder if a hawk
> had also been alerted to the banquet.
>
> Eventually the feasting was underway and the birds flew in and out so
> fast, it was often hard to ID all of them at once. One of the first to
> arrive was a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH who is not shy about pushing his way
> around.
>
> Such a delightful way to start this special day of Thanksgiving. Here's
> hoping everyone enjoys a hearty feast today, thanks to all the special Food
> Men and Women in our lives.
>
> Patty McLean, Atlanta GA and Conway AR
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/18 8:36 am
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Food Man Has Arrived
Thanks Patty. I can picture Michael out there surrounded by hopeful birds.  We had similar experiences with the birds waiting just overhead while we fill the feeder.Happy Thanksgiving
JackNewton County at Erbie where the feeders are busy
On Thursday, November 22, 2018, 10:02:16 AM CST, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

Michael Linz and I returned from Georgia to Conway earlier this week to find his feeders empty. No surprise, considering the squirrels and other invaders who think they have free range over the feeders. So, last night - in spite of the cold, in spite of the fact that I had just started dinner, and in spite of the traffic - we ventured out to buy seeds and suet for our cherished feathered friends. 
This morning, bright and early, Michael went out on his deck to fill the feeders. The moment he stepped out, two White-breasted Nuthatches sounded the alert: "Food Man is Here! Food Man is Here!" This was before he had even opened a single bag. Before long, the silent forest burst into eager Pavlovic-type sounds with several birds venturing within a few feet of Michael as if to see what was on the menu ... and how soon they could get to the morsels. Word travels quickly in the cold crisp air, which also attracts other friends and foes. We soon noticed the birds became quiet and still, and this lasted for 20-30 minutes, which makes me wonder if a hawk had also been alerted to the banquet. 
Eventually the feasting was underway and the birds flew in and out so fast, it was often hard to ID all of them at once. One of the first to arrive was a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH who is not shy about pushing his way around. 
Such a delightful way to start this special day of Thanksgiving. Here's hoping everyone enjoys a hearty feast today, thanks to all the special Food Men and Women in our lives.
Patty McLean, Atlanta GA and Conway AR

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/18 8:02 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Food Man Has Arrived
Michael Linz and I returned from Georgia to Conway earlier this week to find his feeders empty. No surprise, considering the squirrels and other invaders who think they have free range over the feeders. So, last night - in spite of the cold, in spite of the fact that I had just started dinner, and in spite of the traffic - we ventured out to buy seeds and suet for our cherished feathered friends. This morning, bright and early, Michael went out on his deck to fill the feeders. The moment he stepped out, two White-breasted Nuthatches sounded the alert: "Food Man is Here! Food Man is Here!" This was before he had even opened a single bag. Before long, the silent forest burst into eager Pavlovic-type sounds with several birds venturing within a few feet of Michael as if to see what was on the menu ... and how soon they could get to the morsels. Word travels quickly in the cold crisp air, which also attracts other friends and foes. We soon noticed the birds became quiet and still, and this lasted for 20-30 minutes, which makes me wonder if a hawk had also been alerted to the banquet. Eventually the feasting was underway and the birds flew in and out so fast, it was often hard to ID all of them at once. One of the first to arrive was a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH who is not shy about pushing his way around. Such a delightful way to start this special day of Thanksgiving. Here's hoping everyone enjoys a hearty feast today, thanks to all the special Food Men and Women in our lives.Patty McLean, Atlanta GA and Conway AR
 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/18 7:30 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update and Sandhills
This is such a great conservation story and reality for recovering Whooping Cranes. http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/news/42401 With all of the negative environmental conflict today, it it such a relief to see programs and partners like those involved in the Louisiana flock moving ahead and accomplishing what in my view are true modern miracles. Short, powerful, worthwhile read.

LDWF Receives 12 Juvenile Whooping Cranes At Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge | Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries<http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/news/42401>
www.wlf.louisiana.gov
Nov. 20, 2018 Louisianas wild whooping crane population continues to grow as the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF) and partners work to reestablish a flourishing population to the Bayou State. Twelve juvenile whooping cranes were received Monday (Nov. 19) at Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge near Grand Chenier. It will bring the Louisiana wild population to 75 once the new ...




And just one more on Gulf coast region cranes: the Mississippi artist Walter Inglis Anderson did remarkable paintings of resident Sandhill Cranes near his home in Ocean Springs, Mississippi. During a series of trips I made down there in the late 1970s and early 1980s, I got to see some of his remarkable murals that included Sandhills. These were in his home at Shearwater Pottery and the large murals in the Ocean Springs Community Center. If you visit Ocean Springs-Biloxi, Mississippi, area, the Community Center now forms the core of the Walter Anderson Museum. Years ago, for security purposes, a special room was removed from his home at Shearwater Pottery and is now curated in the Museum. So, if you visit the Museum, you get to see the cranes as he knew them in the 1930s-1950s, painted in the now preserved room and in the big murals in the Community Center. If you can't make this trip, the murals in the little room are beautifully reproduced in the book, A Painter's Psalm, The Mural from Walter Anderson's Cottage (Redding S. Sugg, Jr). Parts of the expansive murals in the Community Center are included in The Art of Walter Anderson (edited by Patricia Pinson).


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Sent: Thursday, November 22, 2018 4:51 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update

I am forwarding this from the Louisiana list serve. It provides hope for more wandering whoopers to show up in Arkansas.

Don

Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

From: Mac Myers <budogmacm...><mailto:<budogmacm...>>
Date: November 21, 2018 at 10:11:24 PM CST
To: <LABIRD-L...><mailto:<LABIRD-L...>
Subject: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update
Reply-To: Mac Myers <budogmacm...><mailto:<budogmacm...>>

Update from LDW&F
http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/news/42401

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/18 5:11 am
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: 119th CBC dates - ADDING 3 DATES


Greetings all,
It's getting close to the coolest (figuratively & literally) birding of the year.

The Christmas Bird Counts are held around the Americas from 12/14 through 1/5. Counts have been done for 119 years - the oldest citizen science bird database in the hemisphere.



If you've seen any Audubon bird reports, then you know that the CBC supplied much of the data that made the reports possible. Here is your chance to help the science, building toward future planned reports!

Any birding skill level is fine.
Any length of time is welcome.
Just contact a compiler for details & area assignments to join in the fun.
It's FREE for all, though donations to Audubon are always appreciated.

If you know of counts in adjoining states, that have an AR connection, I'd love to advertise them here.



You're welcome to contact me for general information - Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us or leave a message at 479-284-3150 ext 3151. If you're looking for life birds, contact me and I can tell you which counts would give you the best chance of seeing them.

"at" = @ in the list below.



Dec 14th Fri:

JONESBORO; Virginie Rolland; vrolland "at" astate.edu



15th Sat:
ARKADELPHIA; Evelyn & Glenn Good; theoldcrow "at" sbcglobal.net

BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER EAST (near Buffalo Point on Hwy 14); Jack Stewart; jackstewart_us "at" yahoo.com; Sponsored by Buffalo National River Partners. Lodging is available, call Jack for details

FORT SMITH; Bill Beall; billtoka "at" mynewroads.com (Bill has been compiling for 68 years!!)

LAKE OUACHITA SP; Kayla Gomance; kayla.gomance "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Lake Ouachita SP

LITTLE ROCK; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central AR

VILLAGE CREEK SP; Heather Runyan; heather.runyon "at" arkansas.gov 870-238-9406 Sponsored by Village Creek SP.



16th Sun:

FAYETTEVILLE; Joe Neal; joeneal "at" uark.edu; Sponsored by NorthWest AR Audubon.

LONOKE; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central AR

RED SLOUGH, OK; David Arbour arbour "at" Windstream.net and Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us



17th Mon:

HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE; Chris Cash; c52cash "at" sbcglobal.net Sponsored by Hot Springs Village Audubon



18th Tues:

NORTH FORK of the ILLINOIS BAYOU (near Hector); Sarah Davis; sadavis "at" fs.fed.us; Sponsored by US Forest Service.



20th Thurs:

MISSISSIPPI RIVER SP (near Marianna); Tara Gillanders; tara.gillanders "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mississippi River SP

WHITE RIVER NWR; (Near St. Charles) Than Boves; tboves "at" astate.edu



21st Fri:

SYLAMORE RANGER DISTRICT; (near Mountain View); Idun Guenther; iguenther "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by US Forest Service.



22nd Sat:

BELLA VISTA/BENTONVILLE/CENTERTON: Butch Tetzlaff; butch "at" thebluebirdshed.com

CROOKED CREEK (near Harrison); Alan Gregory; quattro "at" windstream.net



29th Sat:

CONWAY; Allan Mueller; akcmueller "at" gmail.com Co-compiler Michael Linz mplinz "at" gmail.com

HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; Shelley Todd; shelley_todd "at" nps.gov 501-620-6751 Sponsored by Hot Springs NP

WAPANOCCA NWR/SHELBY FOREST; Dick Preston; dickpreston "at" rittermail.com Co-compiler of TN side Van Harris shelbyforester1223 "at" bigriver.net Sponsored by TN Ornithological Society



30th Sun:



31st Mon:

PINE BLUFF; Rob Doster; rdoster "at" Hotmail.com Sponsored by Three Rivers Audubon Society



Jan 1st Tues:

LAKE DARANELLE; Kenny Nichols; kingbird "at" ymail.com



3rd Thurs:



4th Fri:



5th Sat:

MOUNT MAGAZINE; Don Simons; don.simons "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mount Magazine SP



Counts with dates not set yet.

BAYOU DeVIEW (near Brinkley); Steve Osborne; jsteveosborne "at" gmail.com

BIG LAKE NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us

HOLLA BEND NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Holla Bend NWR & the Friends of Holla Bend NWR.

LAKE GEORGIA PACIFIC/ FELSENTHAL NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Felsenthal NWR and the Friends of Felsenthal NWR.

MAGNOLIA/ LAKE COLUMBIA; Darrell & Debbie Chatelain; darrell1951 "at" suddenlink.net

MOUNTAIN HOME; Tom Krohn; dreamer "at" Yellville.net

POND CREEK NWR; Devin Moon; moondevg "at" gmail.com and Matt Gideon; paulmatthewgideon "at" gmail.com

TEXARKANA (northern Miller co); Don Kyle; rondokyle "at" windstream.net Meeting 7am at Rondo Methodist Church at jct of Hwy 237 & E 19th st.



Hope you can join the counts, Leif at Hector






This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/22/18 2:51 am
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Fwd: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update
I am forwarding this from the Louisiana list serve. It provides hope for more wandering whoopers to show up in Arkansas.

Don

Sent from my iPad

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Mac Myers <budogmacm...>
> Date: November 21, 2018 at 10:11:24 PM CST
> To: <LABIRD-L...>
> Subject: [LABIRD-L] Whooping Crane update
> Reply-To: Mac Myers <budogmacm...>
>
> Update from LDW&F
> http://www.wlf.louisiana.gov/news/42401

 

Back to top
Date: 11/21/18 8:07 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Re: Bird Guides
Glenn,
Hazel and I will be leaving Dec 13th on our way to LA to spend Christmas
with our youngest daughter and her family. We always travel through
southern Arizona, south of Tuscon, to bird there. We will be spending 3 or
4 days there this time. It is a great place to bird and I'll keep notes
and let you know of our experience. I read the replies you got from Davis
and Yates. They offer some new insights for me. If you get some other
private replies, I would appreciate it if you would forward them to me.

Thanks.

Delos McCauley
870 550 7861
Pine Bluff

On Wed, Nov 21, 2018 at 7:56 AM dianemarie yates <maribird...>
wrote:

> While living in Western Colorado, Joe & I went often to SE AZ. Saguaro NP
> is crowded but will net many good birds. We did better in Madera Canyon,
> east of Green Valley. Little known are the Green Jays that frequented
> feeders at the lodge & other sites, & hopefully still do.
>
> Lake Patagonia, east of the heavily-used Sierra Vista, has many (at least
> used-to-be) nice trails through both desert and chaparral. There I logged
> my 1st black-throated sparrows on a thicket edge next to an arroyo.
>
> Of course the fat Cactus Wren is everywhere. My memory of seasonal &
> migrant species escapes me and I'd have to go to my old field guide where I
> kept my list.
>
> Manuel's is the best for Mex in Green Valley come dinner time & will not
> leave you hungry.
>
>
> Sent from my iPod
>
> On Nov 20, 2018, at 4:16 PM, Glenn <
> <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
> <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
>
> My wife and I are thinking about taking a birding trip to Tucson, AZ,
> maybe in April-ish. We have never hired a bird guide before but we are
> talking about doing so out there, perhaps on our first day so he can give
> us a feel for the area. I was just wondering, what is proper etiquette?
> Is it customary to tip a bird guide? If so, how much? We always want to
> do the right thing. Thanks for the advice.
>
> And speaking of Tucson - has anybody been birding down there? We welcome
> any tips for the area. Thanks again.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/21/18 9:16 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: OUT OF THE CLOUD AND INTO YOUR HANDS: update on NWAAS meeting December 8
Our Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society annual membership meeting is on Saturday December 8, 2018, in visitor center (VC) at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area, 2pm. UA-Fayetteville graduate student, and outstanding photographer, Mitchell Pruitt will present a talk with his amazing images about a birding trip last spring to Costa Rica led by Dr. Ragupathy Kannan. There are going to be some door prizes that will hopefully lure a few of you off the couch and into the VC. One of the prizes that I know of for sure is my book Birdside Baptist. There will also be another prize, a copy of my book, In the Province of Birds. Strangely enough, and dwelling entirely in the wonderful world of Alternative Fact, both books reached a now long passed Mythical Best Seller List, sadly lost in the Mists of Deep Time. In Alternative World, one would ordinarily assume these books would be unavailable, or if still available, only in The Cloud. But just in the nick of time for our December 8 meeting, we have snatched them out of The Cloud and have a real hard copy of each for door prizes. Yes, Real Books! And besides the chance to actually hold a Real Book, Hobbs visitor center is a wonderful place, not for Alternative Birds, but Real Birds. First there is the amazing feeder array, completely visible from INSIDE the VC. Surrounding Shortleaf Pine forests are great places to see a variety of birds attracted to this natural habitat. Both the VC and immediately adjacent Ozark Plateau Trail are wheelchair accessible and meet ADA requirements. Really Accessible, not Alternatively Accessible.


 

Back to top
Date: 11/21/18 8:43 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: WHOOPER
I wholly agree! Joe and all of his fellow birders, scientists and
biologists should win a large amount of praise and honors for what they did
to save these woodpeckers. (which mean next to nothing to the vast majority
of people)

Bill Thurman

On Tue, Nov 20, 2018, 19:34 <hilltower12...> <
<000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> wrote:

>
>
> Many of you ARBIRDers know that when Joe Neal writes about Whooping Crane
> restoration & the value of saving endangered or threatened species he is
> writing from experience.
>
> I'm still very new to birding. I accidently stumbled into this great
> pastime at the age of 52, after a series of improbable events forced me to
> finally buy a some bins in March 2015.
>
> A few months before I bought my bins & went out out on my first bird
> walk, my girlfriend & I attended a public lecture about birds by Joe Neal
> at the Fayetteville Public Library. After the lecture we wanted to learn
> more about the bird life here, so we began reading both o f Joe's most
> recent, 2-part, conservation-birding-personal essay memoirs. Part I is
> called "The Birdside Baptist," published in 2010; part II is called "In the
> Province of Birds, A Memoir from Western Arkansas," published in 2011. One
> very important plot-line or thread of this two-part memoir & collection of
> environmental essays is the story of how Joe Neal & a group of dedicated
> & very resourceful U.S. Forest Service employees at the Poteau Mtn. Ranger
> Station saved the Red Cockaded Woodpecker from certain extirpation in the
> Ouachita National Forest during the late 1990s & into the first decade of
> the 2000s. Yes. Extirpated. From all of the Ouachitas. Just as they had
> disappeared from all of the Ozarks & all of eastern Arkansas, except for
> the tiny population living in the Pine City Natural Area in Monroe County.
>
> Joe & this this small group of U.S. Forest Service employees saved the
> RCWO from extirpation in the ONF without asking for extra appropriations
> from the federal govt. This feat was accomplished within their usual
> budgets. As far as I can tell, the saving of the RCWO didn't require that
> hundreds or thousands of Arkansas foresters lose their jobs. The saving of
> the RCWO didn't require the confiscation of any private land.
>
> These employees should be nominated for MacArthur Genius Fellowships. If
> you don't know this story, then I strongly urge every single one of you to
> head to a bookstore, online book dealer or public or university library &
> buy or loan "The Birdside Bap tist" & "In the Province of Birds, A Memoir
> from Western Arkansas. Then, share these books or spread this miraculous
> story with your friends & families, whether they are birders or not. We
> also must inform the non-birding & non-outdoors public just why we humans
> have an obligation to protect these creatures. It's not political.
>
> Barry Bennett
> Fayetteville
>
>
>
> ------ Original message------
> * From: *Joseph Neal
> *Date: *Sun, Nov 18, 2018 7:23 PM
> *To: *<ARBIRD-L...>;
> *Cc: *
> *Subject:*WHOOPER
>
> Leading field trips for many years, Democrat or Republican, most often I
> hear how people just love birds. Just love anything that benefits birds.
> Whoever they voted for in the most recent election, D or R, they lift their
> bins when it comes to birds. D or R, they load up feeders.
>
>
> Then I get jarred when one of these folks says, as I heard on a NWAAS
> field trip, we “can’t afford” what it costs to protect endangered species.
> I don’t know if this person is D, R, or Neither. Of course this makes an
> impression, since I invested my adult working life for recovery of
> Red-cockaded Woodpeckers in Arkansas; like the Whooping Cranes, a
> Federally-listed Endangered Species.
>
>
> Back in the 1980s, I made a couple of spring break field trips with
> Professor Douglas James’s UA-Fayetteville ornithology classes. These were
> timed so students had a chance to see Whoopers at Aransas NWR on the Texas
> coast. There had been maybe 10,000+ in Whooping Crane Country
> before Columbus is said to have “discovered” America. By 1870, maybe 1,400
> remained. By 1938, 15. When we went to Aransas, something less than 200
> Whoopers graced North America.
>
>
> Dr James took students to Aransas so they could see for themselves. You
> didn’t have to be a D, R or N. True enough, many of them just wrote down
> Whooper in their yellow notebook, then retired to beer, but some remained
> and kept thinking. It really helps when everyone is looking at the same,
> indisputable fact. Those tall white birds out there – all Whoopers. Like
> that stately, much-banded, bird right now in eastern Arkansas.
>
>
> In winter 2017, 431 Whoopers spent the winter at Aransas. Now toward the
> end of 2018, I don’t know if the Ds and Rs in DC are going to get sorted
> out. But by my calculation, 431 is double what was there during our trips
> in the 1980s.
>
>
> Maybe, despite our hostile political non-discourse, just maybe we remain
> headed in the right direction. D, R, and Ns please take note: we lift our
> bins for birds.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/21/18 7:00 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: A pair of wings
A few weeks ago I was birding city lake in Siloam Springs and I saw a big
dark object in the trees. When I used my binoculars, it looked like a pair
of wings just dangling there. A friend was there with me and it just looked
like a piece of garbage to him but, it really looked like wings to me. Over
a week later, it was still in the same spot and still looked like wings. If
it were a trash bag or something, I'm certain it would have been flapping
around and looked less rigid.
Is this a pair of wings? and if so, what kind? It's BIG and dark... I want
to say vulture but I can't rule out a young eagle. I should have had
someone look at this picture sooner either way. Hopefully the attachment
comes through.


--
Daniel Mason
www.byfellowship.com/forums.php

 

Back to top
Date: 11/21/18 6:36 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Inca
Just looked out my back door to see two Inca Doves nestled down in the
leaves of my unraked yard. Looks like the cold's not chased them away.

Sandy B
FS, AR

 

Back to top
Date: 11/21/18 6:16 am
From: dianemarie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Adaptation
Just a note. Yesterday while clearing more brush from the 2010 tornado, we watched a Winter Wren glean hibernating insects from rotting blowdown. Seemingly unafraid of the roar of the chainsaw, it stayed just beyond reach. Could it be that the little thing has learned to associate the tool with newly-accessible food sources?



Sent from my iPod
 

Back to top
Date: 11/21/18 5:56 am
From: dianemarie yates <maribird...>
Subject: Re: Bird Guides
While living in Western Colorado, Joe & I went often to SE AZ. Saguaro NP is crowded but will net many good birds. We did better in Madera Canyon, east of Green Valley. Little known are the Green Jays that frequented feeders at the lodge & other sites, & hopefully still do.

Lake Patagonia, east of the heavily-used Sierra Vista, has many (at least used-to-be) nice trails through both desert and chaparral. There I logged my 1st black-throated sparrows on a thicket edge next to an arroyo.

Of course the fat Cactus Wren is everywhere. My memory of seasonal & migrant species escapes me and I'd have to go to my old field guide where I kept my list.

Manuel's is the best for Mex in Green Valley come dinner time & will not leave you hungry.


Sent from my iPod

On Nov 20, 2018, at 4:16 PM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...><mailto:<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>> wrote:

My wife and I are thinking about taking a birding trip to Tucson, AZ, maybe in April-ish. We have never hired a bird guide before but we are talking about doing so out there, perhaps on our first day so he can give us a feel for the area. I was just wondering, what is proper etiquette? Is it customary to tip a bird guide? If so, how much? We always want to do the right thing. Thanks for the advice.

And speaking of Tucson - has anybody been birding down there? We welcome any tips for the area. Thanks again.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot
 

Back to top
Date: 11/21/18 1:17 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: New yard bird
I just heard a Barred Owl outside my house, which is pretty remarkable here
in a subdivision in suburbia. I regularly get Great Horned Owl, but I am
totally pumped to hear a BDOW. He/she was only vocalizing the last phrase
of its' call, but I heard it about a dozen times in ten minutes. I stood
out there in my pajamas and enjoyed the sweet music.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/18 7:05 pm
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Tucson
There are of course the sewage ponds. Any more I would suggest getting a local person to guide. 3 reasons...many areas of AZ are developing rapidly and even places that are listed in newsletters (much less guide books) don't exist by the time the guide is used. We went to AZ twice a year for 9 years and each time one of our areas went missing. It was a bummer to choose a place and spend valuable time getting there only to find it was gone. Second, there is unfortunately increased crime, bad people, etc and some places are just not really safe esp alone without someone who knows the area. Third, if you have special birds that you really want to see, a local can help pick the best spot and time to find them. Locals also know if there are fees or special access needed. And they know about the dangerous areas and the areas that have become birdless. We had a great guy years ago and all he asked was that we use our rental car or buy his gas and buy his lunch. Everyone is different though.

link below is for the Tucson Audubon group's Ap 2018 newsletter and gives a good idea what's around in April-Juneish as well as some good contact info.

http://tucsonaudubon.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/VF_AMJ18.pdf I envy you the great time you'll have. Karen Hart

Oh BTW...(I know the bird purists will throw rocks at me) but Rooster Cogburn's Ostrich farm between Tucson & Mesa is an interesting stop. We happen to love screw-ball local roadside attractions and the owners have AR roots and we had a long discussion about that and why all their men are called Rooster. Their ostrich feather computer dusters were a hit as stocking stuffers.



On 11/20/2018 7:50 PM, Will Britton wrote:
I have been to SE AZ in April a couple times now and it’s a pretty good time to go. A lot of the “summer” only species are back like Elf Owl, Buff-breasted Flycatcher, Greater Pewee, Brown-crested Flycatcher, Red-faced Warbler, Grace’s Warbler, the tanagers and the orioles, etc. A few things you are unlikely to get in April are Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher, Thick-billed Kingbird, and Varied Bunting because they just don’t show up until May. The later in April the better!

The weather in April is getting warmer but is quite nice and you can go up into the mountains to escape if it’s hot. I couldn’t recommend a specific guide because I’ve never used any of them but I’m sure they are great. If, however, you decide to not hire a guide the best way to plan is to decide which species you really have to see and find the locations and plan around that. Whatever you do, I can’t wait to see all your photos when you return!

Will Britton, Searcy

On Tue, Nov 20, 2018 at 16:16 Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...><mailto:<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>> wrote:
My wife and I are thinking about taking a birding trip to Tucson, AZ, maybe in April-ish. We have never hired a bird guide before but we are talking about doing so out there, perhaps on our first day so he can give us a feel for the area. I was just wondering, what is proper etiquette? Is it customary to tip a bird guide? If so, how much? We always want to do the right thing. Thanks for the advice.

And speaking of Tucson - has anybody been birding down there? We welcome any tips for the area. Thanks again.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot
 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/18 6:51 pm
From: Tim Tyler <tylertim204...>
Subject: Re: Whopping Crane
With the increase of activity concerning the Whopping crane sighting near
Roe Arkansas it would be such an added experience to add another 5 miles
to the trip and experience birding the Clarendon bridge.I have opened a
discussion in fellowshipofwings, please comment there you will find interest


On Tue, Nov 20, 2018 at 2:05 PM Tim Tyler <tylertim204...> wrote:

> The bird remains in the location as described: 1/4 mile east of Hwy 33 as
> Barry suggested
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/20/18 6:46 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Bird Guides
Glenn if you will go toward the last of April of first week in May is what I would recommend. There is a good bird guide to birding SE Arizona. I am not sure that you need to pay a guide with the right book that tells you where you can find birds just unless you want someone to help you identify them. If you are going to be in Tucson, take one day to go up Mt Lemmon starting early in the morning and drive to the top and before you get to the ski area there is a road that turns off to the Left going to Marshall Gulch. Go down this road and just before you get to the trail head there is a picnic area by the creek on the left and here you will find the Red-faced warbler, painted redstarts Cordilleran Flycatcher, Western Tanager, Yellow-eyed junco, Townsend warbler, Hepatic Tanager and others. At the ski area you may find the Gould’s turkey gobbling and further up many of the other sky island species. The Olive warbler is there but I have not found it yet but people not looking for it seems to have it in their face. On the way down at the campgrounds you will find the Black-throated Gray warbler, Jays, Lucy’s warbler, Grace’s warbler, Cactus wrens, Verdin, Pyrrhuloxia, Phainopepla, Harris Hawk, etc. Spend a day going up Madera Canyon road and Canyon. You will find many trails but the lower one up the canyon you can find the Elegant Trogon. In Texas Canyon you will find the Golden-crowned warbler. Using Tucson as a base between the Saguaro National Monument and State Parks you can spend a week. Then there is Sierra Vista and Carr Canyon, Portal, Fort Huachuca and other sites that can keep you busy for the next month.

As I said, unless you need someone to identify the birds, you can guide yourself to all of these great locations and find birds in many locals. The sky islands and riparian zones have the most concentrations. Check ebird for the latest sightings and locations. You can have a great birding trip. The August time period during their birding festival is great for hummingbird diversity but you can find many during the Spring. Some of the Sky Islands like Rustler's Park that use to be great for different birds had a big wild fire that changed the habitat and species. Tucson Audubon and Sierra Vista websites offer good information and some have birding guides. On your way out stop at Wilcox and the lake there will have water birds but numbers vary by time of year.

I wish you well in your efforts. Many of us do not get to these great birding sites as often as we would like but it is time for Barbara and I to go back.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: JoAnn Drew
Sent: Tuesday, November 20, 2018 7:37 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Bird Guides

A number of years ago my group hired Weizil Walraven (yes, that's his real name) to guide us in SE AZ...he was wonderful and his wife is a phenomenal wildlife artist...JoAnn Drew


In a message dated 11/20/2018 6:55:39 PM Central Standard Time, <plm108...> writes:

Southeastern AZ is a birders dream! How many days are you planning to be there? Aug and Sep are awesome months for hummingbirds ... but anytime you go should be very amazing. I know several field guides in the area - all top knotch. Most are their own company so tips are not usually necessary but picking up a meal on the last day or something of that nature is always appreciated.


I've never been in April but suppose it could be good for migrants. Have you looked at the bar charts to see what's possible? Birding this area of AZ has some interesting factors to consider in that they basically have a dry and rainy season. Many of the specialties don't breed (and therefore aren't so easy to find) until the "monsoon season" begins in late July. But they also have a few bird festivals and it would be worth checking those schedules. If you go during a festival, you would have local birders taking you around so you might not need a guide.


Thoughts?



Patty

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Date: 11/20/18 4:16 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Bird Guides

My wife and I are thinking about taking a birding trip to Tucson, AZ, maybe in April-ish. We have never hired a bird guide before but we are talking about doing so out there, perhaps on our first day so he can give us a feel for the area. I was just wondering, what is proper etiquette? Is it customary to tip a bird guide? If so, how much? We always want to do the right thing. Thanks for the advice.
And speaking of Tucson - has anybody been birding down there? We welcome any tips for the area. Thanks again.
Glenn WyattCabot
 

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Date: 11/20/18 5:50 pm
From: Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bird Guides
I have been to SE AZ in April a couple times now and it’s a pretty good
time to go. A lot of the “summer” only species are back like Elf Owl,
Buff-breasted Flycatcher, Greater Pewee, Brown-crested Flycatcher,
Red-faced Warbler, Grace’s Warbler, the tanagers and the orioles, etc. A
few things you are unlikely to get in April are Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher,
Thick-billed Kingbird, and Varied Bunting because they just don’t show up
until May. The later in April the better!

The weather in April is getting warmer but is quite nice and you can go up
into the mountains to escape if it’s hot. I couldn’t recommend a specific
guide because I’ve never used any of them but I’m sure they are great. If,
however, you decide to not hire a guide the best way to plan is to decide
which species you really have to see and find the locations and plan around
that. Whatever you do, I can’t wait to see all your photos when you
return!

Will Britton, Searcy

On Tue, Nov 20, 2018 at 16:16 Glenn <
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> My wife and I are thinking about taking a birding trip to Tucson, AZ,
> maybe in April-ish. We have never hired a bird guide before but we are
> talking about doing so out there, perhaps on our first day so he can give
> us a feel for the area. I was just wondering, what is proper etiquette?
> Is it customary to tip a bird guide? If so, how much? We always want to
> do the right thing. Thanks for the advice.
>
> And speaking of Tucson - has anybody been birding down there? We welcome
> any tips for the area. Thanks again.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>

 

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Date: 11/20/18 5:37 pm
From: JoAnn Drew <000001540c75b1c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Bird Guides
A number of years ago my group hired Weizil Walraven (yes, that's his real name) to guide us in SE AZ...he was wonderful and his wife is a phenomenal wildlife artist...JoAnn Drew

In a message dated 11/20/2018 6:55:39 PM Central Standard Time, <plm108...> writes:
Southeastern AZ is a birders dream! How many days are you planning to be there? Aug and Sep are awesome months for hummingbirds ... but anytime you go should be very amazing. I know several field guides in the area - all top knotch. Most are their own company so tips are not usually necessary but picking up a meal on the last day or something of that nature is always appreciated.

I've never been in April but suppose it could be good for migrants. Have you looked at the bar charts to see what's possible? Birding this area of AZ has some interesting factors to consider in that they basically have a dry and rainy season. Many of the specialties don't breed (and therefore aren't so easy to find) until the "monsoon season" begins in late July. But they also have a few bird festivals and it would be worth checking those schedules. If you go during a festival, you would have local birders taking you around so you might not need a guide.

Thoughts?


Patty
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>Date: 11/20/18 4:16 PM (GMT-06:00)To: <ARBIRD-L...>: Bird Guides
My wife and I are thinking about taking a birding trip to Tucson, AZ, maybe in April-ish.  We have never hired a bird guide before but we are talking about doing so out there, perhaps on our first day so he can give us a feel for the area.  I was just wondering, what is proper etiquette?  Is it customary to tip a bird guide?  If so, how much?  We always want to do the right thing.  Thanks for the advice.
And speaking of Tucson - has anybody been birding down there?  We welcome any tips for the area.  Thanks again.
Glenn WyattCabot
 

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Date: 11/20/18 4:55 pm
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Bird Guides
Southeastern AZ is a birders dream! How many days are you planning to be there? Aug and Sep are awesome months for hummingbirds ... but anytime you go should be very amazing. I know several field guides in the area - all top knotch. Most are their own company so tips are not usually necessary but picking up a meal on the last day or something of that nature is always appreciated. I've never been in April but suppose it could be good for migrants. Have you looked at the bar charts to see what's possible? Birding this area of AZ has some interesting factors to consider in that they basically have a dry and rainy season. Many of the specialties don't breed (and therefore aren't so easy to find) until the "monsoon season" begins in late July. But they also have a few bird festivals and it would be worth checking those schedules. If you go during a festival, you would have local birders taking you around so you might not need a guide. Thoughts? PattySent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Date: 11/20/18 4:16 PM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Bird Guides My wife and I are thinking about taking a birding trip to Tucson, AZ, maybe in April-ish.  We have never hired a bird guide before but we are talking about doing so out there, perhaps on our first day so he can give us a feel for the area.  I was just wondering, what is proper etiquette?  Is it customary to tip a bird guide?  If so, how much?  We always want to do the right thing.  Thanks for the advice.And speaking of Tucson - has anybody been birding down there?  We welcome any tips for the area.  Thanks again.Glenn WyattCabot
 

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Date: 11/20/18 4:34 pm
From: <hilltower12...> <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: WHOOPER


Many of you ARBIRDers know that when Joe Neal writes about Whooping Crane restoration & the value of saving endangered or threatened species he is writing from experience.
I'm still very new to birding. I accidently stumbled into this great pastime at the age of 52, after a series of improbable events forced me to finally buy a some bins in March 2015.
A few months before I bought my bins & went out out on my first bird walk,  my girlfriend & I attended a public lecture about birds by Joe Neal at the Fayetteville Public Library.   After the lecture we wanted to learn more about the bird life here, so we began reading both of Joe's most recent, 2-part, conservation-birding-personal essay memoirs. Part I is called "The Birdside Baptist," published in 2010; part II is called "In the Province of Birds, A Memoir from Western Arkansas," published in 2011.  One very important plot-line or thread of this two-part memoir & collection of environmental essays is the story of how Joe Neal & a group of dedicated & very resourceful U.S. Forest Service employees at the Poteau Mtn. Ranger Station saved the Red Cockaded Woodpecker from certain extirpation in the Ouachita National Forest during the late 1990s & into the first decade of the 2000s.  Yes.  Extirpated. From all of the Ouachitas.  Just as they had disappeared from all of
the Ozarks & all of eastern Arkansas, except for the tiny population living in the Pine City Natural Area in Monroe County. 
Joe & this this small group of U.S. Forest Service employees saved the RCWO from extirpation in the ONF without asking for extra appropriations from the federal govt.  This feat was accomplished within their usual budgets. As far as I can tell,  the saving of the RCWO didn't require that hundreds or thousands of Arkansas foresters lose their jobs. The saving of the RCWO didn't require the confiscation of any private land.
These employees should be nominated for MacArthur Genius Fellowships.  If you don't know this story, then I strongly urge every single one of you to head to a bookstore, online book dealer or public or university library & buy or loan "The Birdside Baptist" & "In the Province of Birds, A Memoir from Western Arkansas.  Then, share these books or spread this miraculous story with your friends & families,  whether they are birders or not.  We also must inform the non-birding & non-outdoors public just why we humans have an obligation to protect these creatures.  It's not political. 
Barry BennettFayetteville


------ Original message------From: Joseph NealDate: Sun, Nov 18, 2018 7:23 PMTo: <ARBIRD-L...>;Cc: Subject:WHOOPER




Leading field trips for many years, Democrat or Republican, most often I hear how people just love birds. Just love anything that benefits birds. Whoever they voted for in the most recent election, D or R, they lift their bins when it comes
to birds. D or R, they load up feeders.





Then I get jarred when one of these folks says, as I heard on a  NWAAS field trip, we “can’t afford” what it costs to protect endangered species. I don’t know if this person is D, R, or Neither. Of course this makes an impression, since
I invested my adult working life for recovery of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers in Arkansas; like the Whooping Cranes, a Federally-listed Endangered Species.



Back in the 1980s, I made a couple of spring break field trips with Professor Douglas James’s UA-Fayetteville ornithology classes. These were timed so students had a chance to see Whoopers at Aransas NWR on the Texas coast. There had been
maybe 10,000+ in Whooping Crane Country before Columbus is said to have “discovered” America. By 1870, maybe 1,400 remained. By 1938, 15. When we went to Aransas, something less than 200 Whoopers graced North America.



Dr James took students to Aransas so they could see for themselves. You didn’t have to be a D, R or N. True enough, many of them just wrote down Whooper in their yellow notebook, then retired to beer, but some remained and kept thinking.
It really helps when everyone is looking at the same, indisputable fact. Those tall white birds out there – all Whoopers. Like that stately, much-banded, bird right now in eastern Arkansas.



In winter 2017, 431 Whoopers spent the winter at Aransas. Now toward the end of 2018, I don’t know if the Ds and Rs in DC are going to get sorted out. But by my calculation, 431 is double what was there during our trips in the 1980s.



Maybe, despite our hostile political non-discourse, just maybe we remain headed in the right direction. D, R, and Ns please take note: we lift our bins for birds.







 

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Date: 11/20/18 3:49 pm
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Re: Black scoters
Thanks! I’ll check it out!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 17, 2018, at 8:18 PM, Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> wrote:
>
> On Facebook's What's This Bird, a lady posted a photo of four Black Scoters at Lake Monticello. Thought someone might like that info.
>
> Sandy
 

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Date: 11/20/18 2:16 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bird Guides
My wife and I are thinking about taking a birding trip to Tucson, AZ, maybe in April-ish.  We have never hired a bird guide before but we are talking about doing so out there, perhaps on our first day so he can give us a feel for the area.  I was just wondering, what is proper etiquette?  Is it customary to tip a bird guide?  If so, how much?  We always want to do the right thing.  Thanks for the advice.
And speaking of Tucson - has anybody been birding down there?  We welcome any tips for the area.  Thanks again.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 11/20/18 12:06 pm
From: Tim Tyler <tylertim204...>
Subject: Whopping Crane
The bird remains in the location as described: 1/4 mile east of Hwy 33 as
Barry suggested

 

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Date: 11/20/18 11:02 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Thanksgiving Week Sightings (Harlan's Hawk, Roadrunner) and an Owl-update
My usual route for night-time saw-whet owl field work is Hwy 45 out of Fayetteville, to Hwy. 412. Rarely do I drive the route during the day, but found myself on it today. For the THIRD year in a row, a beautiful Harlan’s Red-tailed Hawk was perched in the usual area, at the intersection of 45 and 412, near Hindsville. If that weren’t enough, on Hwy. 23, about 0.5 miles north of 412, a roadrunner lived up to its name and darted out in front of the car. It was still standing in the road as we drove away. Hopefully it doesn’t keep that up…

As for saw-whet owls this season, they have yet to arrive, and may not at this point! We have captured a big, fat ZERO. Captures in the central U.S. have been mostly adults, suggesting few young were successfully fledged on the breeding grounds of central Canada this year. Even still, adult capture rates have remained low, suggesting there was adult mortality and/or saw-whets traveled another direction this year. That sounds far-off compared to other migratory species that travel the same routes every year, but saw-whets are thought to have pretty low migration route fidelity. So maybe it isn’t too far-fetched to travel another direction in years of low food-availabitliy.

C’est la vie,

Mitchell Pruitt
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 11/20/18 8:19 am
From: Anderson, Leif E -FS <0000023579bcf9c3-dmarc-request...>
Subject: 119th Christmas Bird Count dates
Greetings all,
It's getting close to the coolest (figuratively & literally) birding of the year.

The Christmas Bird Counts are held around the Americas from 12/14 through 1/5. Counts have been done for 119 years - the oldest citizen science bird database in the hemisphere.



If you've seen any Audubon bird reports, then you know that the CBC supplied much of the data that made the reports possible. Here is your chance to help the science, building toward future planned reports!

Any birding skill level is fine.
Any length of time is welcome.
Just contact a compiler for details & area assignments to join in the fun.
It's FREE for all, though donations to Audubon are always appreciated.

If you know of counts in adjoining states, that have an AR connection, I'd love to advertise them here.



You're welcome to contact me for general information - Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us or leave a message at 479-284-3150 ext 3151. If you're looking for life birds, contact me and I can tell you which counts would give you the best chance of seeing them.

"at" = @ in the list below.



Dec 14th Fri:

JONESBORO; Virginie Rolland; vrolland "at" astate.edu



15th Sat:
ARKADELPHIA; Evelyn & Glenn Good; theoldcrow "at" sbcglobal.net

BUFFALO NATIONAL RIVER EAST (near Buffalo Point on Hwy 14); Jack Stewart; jackstewart_us "at" yahoo.com; Sponsored by Buffalo National River Partners. Lodging is available, call Jack for details

FORT SMITH; Bill Beall; billtoka "at" mynewroads.com (Bill has been compiling for 68 years!!)

LAKE OUACHITA SP; Kayla Gomance; kayla.gomance "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Lake Ouachita SP

LITTLE ROCK; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central AR

VILLAGE CREEK SP; Heather Runyan; heather.runyon "at" arkansas.gov 870-238-9406 Sponsored by Village Creek SP.



16th Sun:

LONOKE; Dan Scheiman; birddan "at" comcast.net Sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central AR

RED SLOUGH, OK; David Arbour arbour "at" Windstream.net and Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us



17th Mon:

HOT SPRINGS VILLAGE; Chris Cash; c52cash "at" sbcglobal.net Sponsored by Hot Springs Village Audubon



18th Tues:

NORTH FORK of the ILLINOIS BAYOU (near Hector); Sarah Davis; sadavis "at" fs.fed.us; Sponsored by US Forest Service.



20th Thurs:

MISSISSIPPI RIVER SP (near Marianna); Tara Gillanders; tara.gillanders "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mississippi River SP

WHITE RIVER NWR; (Near St. Charles) Than Boves; tboves "at" astate.edu



21st Fri:

SYLAMORE RANGER DISTRICT; (near Mountain View); Idun Guenther; iguenther "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by US Forest Service.



22nd Sat:

CROOKED CREEK (near Harrison); Alan Gregory; quattro "at" windstream.net



29th Sat:

CONWAY; Allan Mueller; akcmueller "at" gmail.com Co-compiler Michael Linz mplinz "at" gmail.com

HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; Shelley Todd; shelley_todd "at" nps.gov 501-620-6751 Sponsored by Hot Springs NP

WAPANOCCA NWR/SHELBY FOREST; Dick Preston; dickpreston "at" rittermail.com Co-compiler of TN side Van Harris shelbyforester1223 "at" bigriver.net Sponsored by TN Ornithological Society



30th Sun:



31st Mon:

PINE BLUFF; Rob Doster; rdoster "at" Hotmail.com Sponsored by Three Rivers Audubon Society



Jan 1st Tues:

LAKE DARANELLE; Kenny Nichols; kingbird "at" ymail.com



3rd Thurs:



4th Fri:



5th Sat:



Counts with dates not set yet.

BAYOU DeVIEW (near Brinkley); Steve Osborne; jsteveosborne "at" gmail.com

BIG LAKE NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us

FAYETTEVILLE; Joe Neal; joeneal "at" uark.edu; Sponsored by NorthWest AR Audubon.

HOLLA BEND NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Holla Bend NWR & the Friends of Holla Bend NWR.

LAKE GEORGIA PACIFIC/ FELSENTHAL NWR; Leif Anderson; Leanderson "at" fs.fed.us Sponsored by Felsenthal NWR and the Friends of Felsenthal NWR.

MAGNOLIA/ LAKE COLUMBIA; Darrell & Debbie Chatelain; darrell1951 "at" suddenlink.net

MOUNTAIN HOME; Tom Krohn; dreamer "at" Yellville.net

MOUNT MAGAZINE; Don Simons; don.simons "at" arkansas.gov Sponsored by Mount Magazine SP

POND CREEK NWR; Devin Moon; moondevg "at" gmail.com and Matt Gideon; paulmatthewgideon "at" gmail.com

TEXARKANA (northern Miller co); Don Kyle; rondokyle "at" windstream.net Meeting 7am at Rondo Methodist Church at jct of Hwy 237 & E 19th st.



Hope you can join the counts, Leif at Hector






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Date: 11/19/18 4:24 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Rough-legged Hawk, no
Today, for the 3rd time in the last couple weeks, we took a drive to Possum Grape to look for the Rough-legged Hawk.  We haven't seen it yet.  Sure hope it makes it back this year.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 11/19/18 3:03 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Today's birds on Lake Saracen
I birded Lake Saracen today from 3:00 to 3:55 and scoped the following
birds:

- Pelican, American White
- Cormorant, Double-crested
- Ducks, Rudy
- Shoveler, Northern
-
*Bufflehead (20) *
- *Grebe, Horned (20)*
- Heron, Great Blue
- Egret, Great
- Gull, Ring-billed
- Gull, Franklin's
- Tern, Least
- Gadwall
- *Canvasback (6)*
- Scaup, Lesser
- Grebe, Pied-billed
- Pigeon, Rock
- *Merganser, Hooded (45)*

Also, two *Common Loons* are still hanging out on Lake Langhofer at
Regional Park.


Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

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Date: 11/19/18 11:12 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Golden Eagle!
On Friday, Nov 16th I saw a first year Golden Eagle...clearly!
It was sitting atop a snag by the creek, and as I approached it flew off,
but its white wing patches were visible through cedars. The eagle circled
back across my view and above the cedars, landing atop another tree only
about 100 feet away. The sun was behind me and shone directly on the white
primary patches and white tail with broad dark band. After landing it
called several times, the single high 'keee' type squeal, which is so
different from the call of a Bald Eagle.
On Saturday I returned to the same site and flushed two Bald Eagles, one
mature and one immature, that also returned to a nearby tree. I'm guessing
there may be a dead deer near the stream but did not want to disturb the
birds again.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County

 

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Date: 11/19/18 8:15 am
From: Lea Crisp <leacrisp...>
Subject: Re: Bella Vista/Bentonville/Centerton CBC
Hi Butch,
I would like to participate. You could put me with Jacque Brown. Does this route start in Bella Vista or Centerton?

Lea



> On Nov 16, 2018, at 9:10 AM, Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...> wrote:
>
> Since everyone seems to be sharing the dates of their own CBC's today, I guess I'll chime in with ours as well.
>
> We have been given permission to start a CBC in north Benton County.
>
> Our date will be December 22. More information to follow.
>
> Many of you in our area have told me you would like to participate, but if there are others who would like to join us, please email be back offline at <butch...>
>
> We're looking forward to it!
>
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville

 

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Date: 11/19/18 4:43 am
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: The birds of my backyard
This report is lovely.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 18, 2018, at 10:08 PM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:
>
> It was a lovely early morning with sunshine before the clouds moved in. The morning soon became a grey monotone as a cloud front overtook central Arkansas and the ceiling dropped ever lower . Looking up it was a relief to know they would only drop rain today and not snow or ice. If the temperature was 20 degrees colder, yes, snow would have been a possibility.
>
> Yesterday I accompanied the ASCA field trip to DeGray Lake then went county birding again. I did not have time to fill my feeders before or after the expedition so that was a high priority this morning. As soon as I went out, the sparrows began teeing up on the back fence watching me like the cats do when I am serving up treats. Their birdy murmur passed through the holly bush next door and bounced back and forth through the remaining trees overhead.
>
> This year I'm serving up black oil sunflower seeds mixed with proso millet and safflower seeds. With all the acorns about the squirrels have been ignoring the seeds. That won't last long, and then my war with those pesky rodents will recommence. Back inside I keep an eye on the platform and suet feeders. Mourning Doves, chickadees, titmice, House Finches & Sparrows, and White-throated Sparrows come and go. Then Bill says he thinks he saw a Red-breasted Nuthatch slip in for a seed. Twice now in the last week I thought I heard a Red-breasted Nuthatch toot, but it was only a single note & I never saw the bird even with a brief playback. I thought perhaps I was trying too hard. I don't get them at my feeders very often and the old mature pines have been all but eliminated in the neighborhood. Sure enough the little guy flew in for another seed. It truly is an irruption year for them.
>
> This afternoon I went to the neighbor's house and claimed 6 bags of chopped of leaves for my compost pile and for mulch. As I was stowing them for future use, the neighborhood watch crows burst into full throated outrage. Sure enough they routed the local Red-tailed Hawk on its daily patrol. It flew past at roof level about 50 feet away, not so much in any particular hurry as much as there wasn't anything of note to attract it. Because the hawk did not linger, the local jay family did have time to get into the act. The sparrows flushed into the native plant foliage until the coast was clear then got back to looking for seed treats in the fallen leaves.
>
> I paused in the gloom of the late afternoon as multiple White-throats began to sing their plaintive song. Some songs were tentative and clipped, consisting mainly of "Old Sam…" and not much more. Were they this year's crop practicing their future voice? I can't say. Gradually three birds began to dominate the chorus. As they called, subtle variations crept in their songs the longer I listened. I wondered if these birds were neighbors on their breeding grounds and were continuing their verbal jousting in their winter home. I wondered if most of the birds feeding and singing were returnees or some lucky birds that followed the crowd to my house. The way some of them sit and wait makes me think they've been here before.
>
> Of all the winter birds, I think I like the White-throated Sparrows the best. They are accessible, curious, entertaining, and generally amicable during their time here. Their brief squabbles do not amount to much. I love watching the way they rake their way through the leaves looking for seeds. They talk incessantly to themselves and each other and get rather tame as the winter goes on. I've never coaxed one onto my finger yet. One can hope.
>
> In the fading light after 4:30PM I happen to catch the Ruby-throated Hummingbird on the feeder. I hadn't seen it all day & concluded it had moved on. It will soon, but it did not today.
>
>
> Cindy F.
> Little Rock

 

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Date: 11/18/18 8:08 pm
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: The birds of my backyard
It was a lovely early morning with sunshine before the clouds moved in. The morning soon became a grey monotone as a cloud front overtook central Arkansas and the ceiling dropped ever lower . Looking up it was a relief to know they would only drop rain today and not snow or ice. If the temperature was 20 degrees colder, yes, snow would have been a possibility.



Yesterday I accompanied the ASCA field trip to DeGray Lake then went county birding again. I did not have time to fill my feeders before or after the expedition so that was a high priority this morning. As soon as I went out, the sparrows began teeing up on the back fence watching me like the cats do when I am serving up treats. Their birdy murmur passed through the holly bush next door and bounced back and forth through the remaining trees overhead.



This year I'm serving up black oil sunflower seeds mixed with proso millet and safflower seeds. With all the acorns about the squirrels have been ignoring the seeds. That won't last long, and then my war with those pesky rodents will recommence. Back inside I keep an eye on the platform and suet feeders. Mourning Doves, chickadees, titmice, House Finches & Sparrows, and White-throated Sparrows come and go. Then Bill says he thinks he saw a Red-breasted Nuthatch slip in for a seed. Twice now in the last week I thought I heard a Red-breasted Nuthatch toot, but it was only a single note & I never saw the bird even with a brief playback. I thought perhaps I was trying too hard. I don't get them at my feeders very often and the old mature pines have been all but eliminated in the neighborhood. Sure enough the little guy flew in for another seed. It truly is an irruption year for them.



This afternoon I went to the neighbor's house and claimed 6 bags of chopped of leaves for my compost pile and for mulch. As I was stowing them for future use, the neighborhood watch crows burst into full throated outrage. Sure enough they routed the local Red-tailed Hawk on its daily patrol. It flew past at roof level about 50 feet away, not so much in any particular hurry as much as there wasn't anything of note to attract it. Because the hawk did not linger, the local jay family did have time to get into the act. The sparrows flushed into the native plant foliage until the coast was clear then got back to looking for seed treats in the fallen leaves.



I paused in the gloom of the late afternoon as multiple White-throats began to sing their plaintive song. Some songs were tentative and clipped, consisting mainly of "Old Sam" and not much more. Were they this year's crop practicing their future voice? I can't say. Gradually three birds began to dominate the chorus. As they called, subtle variations crept in their songs the longer I listened. I wondered if these birds were neighbors on their breeding grounds and were continuing their verbal jousting in their winter home. I wondered if most of the birds feeding and singing were returnees or some lucky birds that followed the crowd to my house. The way some of them sit and wait makes me think they've been here before.



Of all the winter birds, I think I like the White-throated Sparrows the best. They are accessible, curious, entertaining, and generally amicable during their time here. Their brief squabbles do not amount to much. I love watching the way they rake their way through the leaves looking for seeds. They talk incessantly to themselves and each other and get rather tame as the winter goes on. I've never coaxed one onto my finger yet. One can hope.



In the fading light after 4:30PM I happen to catch the Ruby-throated Hummingbird on the feeder. I hadn't seen it all day & concluded it had moved on. It will soon, but it did not today.

Cindy F.

Little Rock

 

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Date: 11/18/18 5:23 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: WHOOPER
Leading field trips for many years, Democrat or Republican, most often I hear how people just love birds. Just love anything that benefits birds. Whoever they voted for in the most recent election, D or R, they lift their bins when it comes to birds. D or R, they load up feeders.

Then I get jarred when one of these folks says, as I heard on a NWAAS field trip, we cant afford what it costs to protect endangered species. I dont know if this person is D, R, or Neither. Of course this makes an impression, since I invested my adult working life for recovery of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers in Arkansas; like the Whooping Cranes, a Federally-listed Endangered Species.

Back in the 1980s, I made a couple of spring break field trips with Professor Douglas Jamess UA-Fayetteville ornithology classes. These were timed so students had a chance to see Whoopers at Aransas NWR on the Texas coast. There had been maybe 10,000+ in Whooping Crane Country before Columbus is said to have discovered America. By 1870, maybe 1,400 remained. By 1938, 15. When we went to Aransas, something less than 200 Whoopers graced North America.

Dr James took students to Aransas so they could see for themselves. You didnt have to be a D, R or N. True enough, many of them just wrote down Whooper in their yellow notebook, then retired to beer, but some remained and kept thinking. It really helps when everyone is looking at the same, indisputable fact. Those tall white birds out there all Whoopers. Like that stately, much-banded, bird right now in eastern Arkansas.

In winter 2017, 431 Whoopers spent the winter at Aransas. Now toward the end of 2018, I dont know if the Ds and Rs in DC are going to get sorted out. But by my calculation, 431 is double what was there during our trips in the 1980s.

Maybe, despite our hostile political non-discourse, just maybe we remain headed in the right direction. D, R, and Ns please take note: we lift our bins for birds.


 

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Date: 11/18/18 1:01 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Whooping Crane- Yes
We are looking at the whooping crane right now. It is as described the other day in the field on the NE corner of Highways 33 and 366 just south of Roe. We are pulled off Highway 366 on the north side of the road about a quarter mile east of Highway 33.

Barry Haas (plus my wife Susan and two sisters-in-law)

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/18/18 11:37 am
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Sunday Birding Centerton Vaughn and westerly
So we are starting a CBC for the Bella Vista south to Vaughn area.

I went out driving the route I want to cover. I hadn’t been over much of the area in a while and I wanted to see how much human expansion had hit the area. The day started out misty and turned rainy.

I drove the route for this section which includes Seba in Centerton off of 102B going west , continue west on Mt Olive, west to Stage coach road, going north west you go outside the circle a bit to get to the west end of Fruitwood Drive, not paved , then back to Wildwood and zig zag south back down to Hwy 102. All of this is very rural and most of the roads are now paved. I did not go north of Fruitwood today. The circle goes all the way up to Hwy 72. I was not seeing much.

I went back down to see what was the edge of the circle west of Anglin and Vaughn road. The town of Vaughn is on the southern edge. Going West Anglin turns into Motley which runs all the way to Byers and then Burgin Valley road which skirts just inside the count circle. This intersects with Bethlehem. From there you can zig zag back up to Mt Olive.

On Motley just past N.Tycoon there was a large flock of Red-winged Blackbirds, Grackles and Rusty Blackbirds this flock was about 30% of each, there were probably 200 birds. Down the road a ways on Burgin Valley road was a really large flock of nearly all Great-tailed Grackles, there had to be at lest 400. Just past that flock was another of mostly Starlings, then a mix of Red-winged Blackbirds and Starlings. No Brown-headed Cowbirds seen at all.

Also on Motley road was a Roadrunner staying ahead of me on the dirt rod with no problem. All in all today was a real treat.


The Blue phase Snow Goose is still at the Carlie B Craig fish hatchery, there were also 17 Gadwalls, 20 Bufflehead, and 2 Mallards. 1 L Shrike, some Killdeer, 6 Great Blue Herons, 2 A Crows, and a Belted Kingfisher. There wasn’t much to report in Vaughn 3 Red-tailed Hawks, 1 Red-shouldered Hawk, 3 Kestrels, all sparrows I saw were White-crowed, House and a few Dark-eyed Junco.

Jacque Brown, Centerton

PS I also had Purple Finches at my house feeders Saturday. I think I have only had them here one other time. Although I will see them when out and about in the country around here.
 

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Date: 11/18/18 7:13 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Clay-colored Sparrow at Eagle Watch Nature Trail
Sparrows... some of them are like peeps that hide... I'll get better with
them some day. I can't get out of the house til 3 or so this afternoon if
I'm lucky. I wonder what the chances are I can find something like that out
there still today... I was out at city lake in Siloam Springs late
yesterday afternoon. I stepped into the brush to see if I could figure out
what kind of blackbird I was hearing but I didn't get far as a LeConte's
sparrow popped up. LOTS of swamp and song sparrows there and I quite often
get frustrated, wondering what kinds of sparrows might be right there in
front of me... popping up for a second and then, gone...
I'll have to study the clay-colored a little and try to get better at
picking something like that up if I ever see or hear one... and, if this
is late in the season, I'll have to learn when to look for them and where
as well. Gotta add birds to that life list and what better way than to
track down more birds in my own county that still manage to elude me.
Sometimes their skills at hiding frustrate me but I know this behavior
keeps them safe.

Daniel Mason


On Sat, Nov 17, 2018 at 3:31 PM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Terry Stanfill photographed a Clay-colored Sparrow at Eagle Watch Natural
> Trail this morning. Winter adult plumage. He found it in the smartweed just
> outside the new viewing blind. This is a relatively late record for
> northwest Arkansas. We have had a few even later, but not many.
>


--
Daniel Mason
www.byfellowship.com/forums.php

 

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Date: 11/18/18 7:11 am
From: Rick Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Happy Hour Sendoff for Alyssa DeRubeis, Dec 11
UA-Fayetteville graduate student Alyssa Derubeis has been studying and documenting grassland birds and the restoration of their habitats around NW Arkansas for several years. She has become well-known among natural science enthusiasts and birders. Now comes the news that she and her significant other are relocating to Canada on or about December 16. She will be missed by the many of us who have been captivated by her intelligence and gregarious nature.

Join us to honor her work and wish her a fulfilling future in Canada: Apple Blossom Brewing Company, 907 E. Lakeside Drive, F'ville (adjacent to the Veterans Memorial Park at Lake Fayetteville). 4:00 - 6:00 PM, Tuesday, December 11, 2018.

Rick Jones and Joe Neal are co-hosting.
 

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Date: 11/17/18 6:19 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Black scoters
On Facebook's What's This Bird, a lady posted a photo of four Black Scoters
at Lake Monticello. Thought someone might like that info.

Sandy

 

Back to top
Date: 11/17/18 1:31 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Clay-colored Sparrow at Eagle Watch Nature Trail
Terry Stanfill photographed a Clay-colored Sparrow at Eagle Watch Natural Trail this morning. Winter adult plumage. He found it in the smartweed just outside the new viewing blind. This is a relatively late record for northwest Arkansas. We have had a few even later, but not many.

 

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Date: 11/17/18 8:25 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Whooping crane & duck hunters
Had a crew of 5 duck hunters stop by and wanted to look through my scope and binoculars to see the whooping crane. They said they have been having lots of people from all over down here every day and they wanted to see it too. I gladly obliged.
David Ray
NLR
Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/17/18 8:02 am
From: David Ray <cardcards...>
Subject: Re: Whooping Crane
Whooping crane still present as of 10:00 a. m. Saturday morning in same location south of Roe Arkansas.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Nov 16, 2018, at 3:32 PM, DAN <birddan...> wrote:
>
> I am looking at the Whooping Crane south of Roe, Monroe Co. it is actively feeding along the east edge of the rice stubble field at the northeast corner of Hwy. 366 and 33.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>
> Sent from XFINITY Connect App
 

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Date: 11/16/18 6:45 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Monroe Co
Very very clever

On Fri, Nov 16, 2018 at 5:02 PM Karen And Jim Rowe <
<00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> A doctor that has a hunting club in Aberdeen reported to me that there
> has been a large flock of birders at the intersection of Hwys 33 and 366.
> He told me that today’s flock was the largest that area has ever seen. He
> reported that although individuals would leave, they were quickly replaced
> by new arriving individuals. He said they all appear to be healthy adults
> birders in typical ASY plumage with binoculars. He said many of the males
> had cameras with long lenses. He said he didn’t scan the flock carefully
> and some of the females may also have had cameras. He was concerned about
> the flock because he did not see any subadult or juvenile birders. I
> assured him that on weekdays, adult and juvenile birders form separate
> flocks based on age class.
>
> Sent from my iPhone

 

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Date: 11/16/18 3:02 pm
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Monroe Co
A doctor that has a hunting club in Aberdeen reported to me that there has been a large flock of birders at the intersection of Hwys 33 and 366. He told me that today’s flock was the largest that area has ever seen. He reported that although individuals would leave, they were quickly replaced by new arriving individuals. He said they all appear to be healthy adults birders in typical ASY plumage with binoculars. He said many of the males had cameras with long lenses. He said he didn’t scan the flock carefully and some of the females may also have had cameras. He was concerned about the flock because he did not see any subadult or juvenile birders. I assured him that on weekdays, adult and juvenile birders form separate flocks based on age class.

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 11/16/18 2:18 pm
From: Tara Gillanders <tara.gillanders...>
Subject: Mississippi River State Park CBC circle
Good Afternoon everyone,
We would love to have anyone interested in helping with the Mississippi River State Park Christmas Bird Count Circle. The count Circle includes the St. Francis National Forest, Mississippi River State Park, the confluence of the St. Francis and Mississippi Rivers, the northern most portion of Delta Heritage Trail State Park, plus levees and farmland. So a great mix of habitat. This year our count will be Thursday December 20th. Anyone interested please contact Tara Gillanders. E-mail is listed below

Tӓra Z Gillanders
Park Interpreter, CIG
Mississippi River State Park
2955 Hwy 44
Marianna, AR 72360
(870) 295-4040
<tara.gillanders...><mailto:<tara.gillanders...>
This electronic message transmission contains information from the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism and is confidential or privileged. The information is intended to be for the use of the individual or entity named above. If you are not the intended recipient, be aware that any disclosure, copying, distribution or use of the contents of this information is prohibited. If you have received this electronic transmission in error, please notify us by telephone (870-295-4040) immediately.



 

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Date: 11/16/18 1:32 pm
From: DAN <birddan...>
Subject: Whooping Crane
I am looking at the Whooping Crane south of Roe, Monroe Co. it is actively feeding along the east edge of the rice stubble field at the northeast corner of Hwy. 366 and 33.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

Sent from XFINITY Connect App

 

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Date: 11/16/18 9:22 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: DeGray Lake Field Trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas
Just a reminder

FIELD TRIP: NOVEMBER 17, 2018 - DEGRAY LAKE STATE PARK Meet at 7:30 a.m.
in the commuter lot at I-430/I-630 off Shackleford Road in Little Rock.
We'll arrive around 8:45 a.m. at the park's Lodge for anyone who
would like to meet us there. Our target birds will be eagles, loons,
waterfowl, grebes, and gulls. Dress warm, the lake can be windy and cold.

Hats and gloves are recommended. Bring scope, water, and snacks. You can
bring lunch or eat in the Lodge's restaurant.

Hope to see you there,
Dottie
Little Rock

 

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Date: 11/16/18 7:48 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Late RTHU Pulaski County
I have a late hummingbird visiting a feeder. Looks like a Ruby-throated to me. I posted a photo from last nights visit here:

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49961424

Cindy F
Little Rock

 

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Date: 11/16/18 7:38 am
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: The forgotten subspecies
I'm going to caution observers about reporting subspecies in general many
times.

All too often, bird banders even with the bird in the hand after taking
mensural data on tarsus length, wing chord, culmen, skull ossification,
mass, molt limits, 10th primary length, rectrix spotting, etc, still have
to consult Pyle's *Handbook of N.A. Birds* (which has no photos, in it by
the way) and use mathematical models to achieve the level of accuracy
needed for correct identification at that low level. Sometimes even at the
species level.

While it can be fun to challenge oneself in that way, most of us amateurs
should realize we are probably still guessing in most instances and should
probably leave it to the wildlife biologists to ascertain.

Butch
Bentonville


On Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 9:34 PM Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> wrote:

> There is an article in Birding magazine about abieticola Red-tailed Hawks
> https://northernredtails.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/rth_aabieticiola_north_american_birds_march_2014.pdf
>
>
> This validity of this taxon was also debated on the eBird Editors listerv,
> with one expert stating:
>
> "The proposed subspecies had a short, undistinguished history until
> recently. Todd proposed the subspecies abieticola in 1950, but the AOU
> didn't act on his proposal in its 5th Edition in 1957, which I believe was
> the last "subspecies" edition. While Dickerman and Parkes expanded on the
> appearance of the group, Wheeler reports that Dickerman walked back his
> support for the group as a subspecies based on the infrequency of the
> occurrence of the phenotype which is now considered typical of the group.
> Around the time of publication of the Birding ID article, Liguori posted an
> abieiticola ID article on his blog that stated, "not enough is known about
> it to say either way if it is a separate subspecies, as some have proposed
> in the past." Wheeler goes deeper, offering a cogent argument against
> considering abieticola a subspecies.
>
> Basic ID of the group seems far from settled. Photos of Red-tails from the
> taiga zone in McCauley show a great many birds that would look at home in
> borealis range, while birds with the look of the "classic" abieticola
> phenotype appear to show up in borealis range. I don't see much potential
> for clarity in offering abieticola as a subspecific eBird menu option.
> Identifying winter birds as abieticola south of the taiga based on
> published fieldmarks seems circular to me, and optimistic at best given the
> possibility of abieticola-like borealis, the resemblance of the textbook
> abieticola to calurus, and the possible genetic influence of calurus and
> even Harlan's. I certainly wouldn't trust most birders to make the call
> regardless of their level of expertise, or for most reviewers to accurately
> evaluate the reports."
>
> I urge caution before assigning a particular form when submitting an eBird
> checklist. Support your case.
>
> Dan Scheiman
> Little Rock, AR
>
> On 11/15/18, 11:58 AM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
> Hal Mitchell" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of
> <halmitchell...> wrote:
>
> Hey Glenn and ARBird,
>
> Nice Photos! Over the past several winter seasons I have been trying to
> document as many of these birds as possible. They really stand out. I
> think they arrive a little later in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley area
> than some of our other subspecies (Harlan’s, Krider’s, migrant Eastern’s).
> As Jacob pointed out there is some question to the validity of the
> subspecies. I have tried to come up with a list of features of a
> typical/nominate Northern RTHA but the more I see the more each individual
> has some unique phenotype I haven’t seen in others. Could this range of
> variation be acceptable for classification to a subspecies? Does the
> subspecies theory hold up at all for RTHA??? I do not know and am hopeful
> some intrepid researcher/student would take the challenge on. I think with
> a combination of selective satellite telemetry, stable isotope analysis,
> and genetic studies we could help to bring clarity to where these beautiful
> birds come from and ultimately if their breeding areas are isolated or a
> “melting pot” area with overlap among several “subspecies”. Below is an
> email I sent to the LABird listserv on the subject of subspecies in RTHA.
>
> *****************************
> I love this topic and could go on and on about red-tails. I live in the
> alluvial valley of Mississippi, and as John mentioned, it gets crazy in the
> winter. I have gone down the rabbit hole of RTHA subspecies and came up
> with more questions than answers. I spent some time over a few winters
> collecting and compiling photos of all the “types” of RTHAs nearby to where
> I live (while simultaneously harassing the experts for their opinions on
> IDs). The results can be found in this short article (
> https://tinyurl.com/ychdnl9o). The article is not meant to be an
> identification guide but more of a voucher of what occurs. Fuertes’ (
> *fuertesi*) type I have struggled with. However, I have come to my own
> conclusion that most Fuertes' that are identified away from TX and AZ are
> either intergrades of Krider’s (*kriderii*) type from the northern plains
> mixing with the more typical eastern (*borealis*) type or of a breeding
> group of light breasted eastern (*borealis*) type on the lower plains.
>
> What I find more interesting are the dark-morph birds we see regularly.
> Most folks think that if you see a dark-morph RTHA with a red tail that it
> must be a western (*calurus*,) type, but other possibilities exist. Some
> experts have noted the potential occurrence of northern RTHA (*abieticola*)
> exhibiting polymorphism, and it may have a melanistic form lurking. Alas,
> other experts say dark-morph Harlan’s (*harlani*) hawks will also show
> fully red tails often with neat banding. I recently saw a dark-morph
> Harlan's hawk likely pairing with a more classic Harlan’s hawk earlier this
> year (https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42453083). I personally don’t
> think western (*calurus*) types occur very often this far east for a
> couple of reasons: (1) Their typical range rarely extends much beyond the
> Rocky Mountains; and (2) Most of the western (*calurus*) identified are
> dark morphs which make up only a tiny fraction of the overall population;
> and it seems unlikely that so many dark-morph (*calurus) *types would be
> identified here during the winter without seeing exponentially more
> light-morph western (*calurus*) types. I have spent some time going
> through eBird reports (mainly from southeastern states) and have found more
> than a few (what I believe to be) misidentified western (*calurus*) RTHA
> that are likely part of the northern (*abieticola*) type RTHA.
>
> On the subject of short-tailed hawks, I was recently fooled by a
> strange-looking hawk that soared overhead with a dark-morph RTHA (
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42455997). The bird didn’t appear to
> have patagial bars and was very mottled on the underparts. In the field, I
> came to the conclusion that this bird was a short-tailed hawk. However,
> the hawk appeared to lack a short tail. Thus, I consulted the experts. A
> full consensus was not reached, but it was determined to be either a
> intermediate-morph Harlan’s or a hybrid of Swainson’s hawk and some type of
> RTHA.
>
> So, what did I learn in the rabbit hole? Bird phenotypes are fascinating,
> more research is needed, people don’t agree, and RTHAs are freakin’
> awesome.
> *****************************
>
> Hope all is well,
>
> Hal Mitchell
> Southaven, MS
>
> On Nov 15, 2018, at 11:16 AM, Glenn <
> <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I am talking about the Northern Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis
> abieticola).
>
> Here is the story: On 3 November I took a photo of a Red-tailed Hawk at
> Bald Knob NWR. I thought it might be a Western, so I posted it on the
> Facebook page called Raptor ID. I was asked to provide names and specifics
> to this story, so here goes. Mike Borlé said, “As Tami mentioned this bird
> is pretty great! It is an overlap bird in my book, showing traits of both
> northern and western. We have seen a handful like this over the years in
> central Alberta but few and far between. Those wide jet black patagials are
> something we don’t see every day east of the Rockies. I wouldn’t blame
> anyone for calling this a northern/ish western or western/ish northern,
> take your pick. I highly doubt it came from anywhere east of Alberta so the
> fact it’s in Arkansas is a bit of a surprise.” Tami Maffitt said, “Great
> bird! I am glad Mike asked for more photos. This bird has some similarities
> to western from underneath (fully dark throat, broad patagial markings, and
> a rufousy wash), but the black blobby bellyband, brown upper chest streaks,
> unbanded solid red tail, and pale uppertail coverts are a better fit for a
> northern bird (abieticola).”
>
> Here are a couple photos of the bird in question,
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49706617
>
> I didn’t know there was such a thing as a Northern Red-tailed Hawk. My
> Stokes Field Guide, Eastern Region doesn’t mention one. Neither does my
> Sibley Guide to Birds, 2nd Edition. eBird does have an interesting article
> about the Northerns here,
> https://ebird.org/canada/news/identifying-northern-red-tailed-hawks/ If
> you map out all the Northern Red-tailed Hawk sightings on eBird, you will
> see one has never been reported in Arkansas. Well, except for the one I
> reported on 6 November. The overlap bird talked about in the first section
> I only reported as a generic Red-tailed Hawk. On 6 November I photographed
> a second hawk. I submitted the photo to my same post on the Raptor ID
> page, thinking it was the same bird. It wasn’t. I got this response: Mike
> Borlé, “Glenn it’s even more northern-ish if that helps, from what we can
> see in this single view. Nice light upper tail coverts, heavier bellyband,
> more lightly marked wing linings with thinner and lighter, dripping or
> bleeding patagials. Less heavily marked rear end.” So now I have 2
> Northern Red-tailed Hawks at Bald Knob NWR. This second one I reported as
> a Northern making it the first reported one in the state, at least on
> eBird. Here is a photo of this second bird,
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49737059
>
> Is there any interest in this subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk? If I saw 2,
> then I’m sure others have probably seen these guys as well and just didn’t
> identify them as Northern. Anyhow, I thought I’d send this email just in
> case somebody is interested in an under-reported subspecies of Red-tailed
> Hawks in our state.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/16/18 7:36 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Whooping Crane still there

We are down near Roe watching the crane. It is a ways out, but still there as of 9:35 AM, 16 Nov.
Glenn Wyatt
 

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Date: 11/16/18 7:10 am
From: Butch Tetzlaff <butchchq8...>
Subject: Bella Vista/Bentonville/Centerton CBC
Since everyone seems to be sharing the dates of their own CBC's today, I
guess I'll chime in with ours as well.

We have been given permission to start a CBC in north Benton County.

Our date will be December 22. More information to follow.

Many of you in our area have told me you would like to participate, but if
there are others who would like to join us, please email be back offline at
<butch...>

We're looking forward to it!

Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

 

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Date: 11/16/18 6:45 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Fayetteville CBC, Sunday, December 16, 2018
Just wanted as many as possible to be aware of this years Fayetteville CBC date, Sunday December 16. I feel a heavy heart going into this CBC, having lost a long time friend, past compiler of the count, and noted scientist -- one of our very best, Kim Smith. As was the case last year, we will have the after count tally-up at Doug and Liz James place, 2604 E. Goldenrod Street in Fayetteville 72701. Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society, which sponsors this count, will provide pizza and beverages. Everyone is invited to start gathering at Doug and Lizs place around at 5:30 and thereafter. Usually by 6:30 or so we will sit for the tally up that requires about 30 minutes. Hopefully, someone from each party will be there by 6:30 with (1) a bird list and (2) the party hour stats. We wrap no later than 7:30 and hopefully leave the James household in peace. If you have questions now, call me at home, evenings best 479 521 1858.


 

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Date: 11/16/18 5:51 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SHORT-EARED OWLS IN RIVER VALLEY
Bill and Toka Beall and Joe Woolbright have seen Short-eared Owls in the past few days on the protected Tallgrass Prairies in Arkansas River Valley near Charleston. The Bealls saw a Short-eared Owl at The Nature Conservancys Presson-Oglesby Preserve on Thursday. Joe Woolbright, of Ozark Ecological Restoration, Inc was down there on the same day with prescribed burns on some of the state natural areas. He saw 2 Short-eared Owls that day. These burns involve just part of the suitable habitat, so owls (and prey) still have habitat after burns. Owls are not too hard to see from public roads if you go down there around dusk, when the Northern Harriers are going to roost, and the Short-eared Owls take over for the night.


 

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Date: 11/16/18 1:34 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Google Street View Birding
There's something that's shaped like a Pied-billed Grebe in the river,
although it might be too big. Does anyone else see it?

That *is* fun!


On Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 9:30 PM Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
wrote:

> There's a fun group on Facebook dedicated to searching for birds caught on
> the Google Street View camera.
> https://www.facebook.com/groups/2028802470510541/
> They take screenshots of the bird and post a link to the coordinates.
> There is a Google Doc that contains the group's "life list" which is an
> impressive 300+ birds worldwide so far. There's also a birder category and
> other animals category.
> I thought I'd share this for anyone who may be intrigued by this. This is
> a fun way to waste some time at work or could be a birding substitute since
> it gets dark so early now. :)
> So far I have discovered a Mourning Dove:
>
>
> https://www.google.com/maps/@35.4752107,-94.1335388,3a,15y,231.3h,111.9t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1seYSUeTuLJNoXl2dmO9zIGg!2e0
>
> and Cliff Swallows:
>
> https://www.google.com/maps/@35.3477959,-94.2996787,3a,30y,284.77h,73.21t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sKZSqGgsOZ2P2cB-ScIA7Gw!2e0
>
> Have fun!
> Cheryl Childers
>

 

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Date: 11/15/18 9:00 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Little Rock and Lonoke CBCs
Calling all Christmas Bird Counters,

Im now taking sign-ups for the Little Rock (Saturday Dec 15) and Lonoke
(Sunday Dec 16) Christmas Bird Counts.

Both counts have a great mix of habitats and have the potential to tally
over 100 species, though Lonoke does so more consistently. Rarities found in
the recent past include Rufous Hummingbird, Long-tailed Duck, Black Scoter,
Glaucous Gull, Says Phoebe, Spotted Towhee, and the state's first
Ash-throated Flycatcher!

Dan Scheiman, Compiler
Little Rock. AR




 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 8:18 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: fellowshipofwings listserv
The "fellowshipofwings listserv is back up and running.  Thanks to the UofA IT Department and to Joe Neal for making this happen.
There are 38 people on the list.  The purpose of the list is to provide a place for discussion of environmental and conservation issues that impact birds.  It was established due to complaints on this list (ArBird) when conversations strayed too far or too long into environmental topics.  So my suggestions is that we continue on this Arbird list to broach subjects that impact birds, usually due to human activities, but switch to the fellowshipofwings list when some want to go more deeply into the topic.  Anyway, that's my suggestion.
If you want to be included on the fellowshipofwings ListServ follow the directions below:(if you run into difficulties signing up let me know and I can add you manually)
From your email account:
Open a new message and remove any text, including your signature line.
In the To field, enter "<listserv...>" Leave the Subject line blank.
Enter "subscribe "UARKLIST fellowshipofwings" in the body of the email.

If you wish to unsubscribe, enter "signoff UARKLIST fellowshipofwings" in the body of the email.

Send the message.


I subscribe to this view"If you take care of the birds, you take care of most of the world's environmental problems". Thomas Lovejoy
Jack StewartNewton County where the endangered Buffalo River flows
 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 7:35 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: The forgotten subspecies
There is an article in Birding magazine about abieticola Red-tailed Hawks
https://northernredtails.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/rth_aabieticiola_north_
american_birds_march_2014.pdf

This validity of this taxon was also debated on the eBird Editors listerv,
with one expert stating:

"The proposed subspecies had a short, undistinguished history until
recently. Todd proposed the subspecies abieticola in 1950, but the AOU
didn't act on his proposal in its 5th Edition in 1957, which I believe was
the last "subspecies" edition. While Dickerman and Parkes expanded on the
appearance of the group, Wheeler reports that Dickerman walked back his
support for the group as a subspecies based on the infrequency of the
occurrence of the phenotype which is now considered typical of the group.
Around the time of publication of the Birding ID article, Liguori posted an
abieiticola ID article on his blog that stated, "not enough is known about
it to say either way if it is a separate subspecies, as some have proposed
in the past." Wheeler goes deeper, offering a cogent argument against
considering abieticola a subspecies.

Basic ID of the group seems far from settled. Photos of Red-tails from the
taiga zone in McCauley show a great many birds that would look at home in
borealis range, while birds with the look of the "classic" abieticola
phenotype appear to show up in borealis range. I don't see much potential
for clarity in offering abieticola as a subspecific eBird menu option.
Identifying winter birds as abieticola south of the taiga based on published
fieldmarks seems circular to me, and optimistic at best given the
possibility of abieticola-like borealis, the resemblance of the textbook
abieticola to calurus, and the possible genetic influence of calurus and
even Harlan's. I certainly wouldn't trust most birders to make the call
regardless of their level of expertise, or for most reviewers to accurately
evaluate the reports."

I urge caution before assigning a particular form when submitting an eBird
checklist. Support your case.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 11/15/18, 11:58 AM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Hal Mitchell" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of
<halmitchell...> wrote:

Hey Glenn and ARBird,

Nice Photos! Over the past several winter seasons I have been trying to
document as many of these birds as possible. They really stand out. I
think they arrive a little later in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley area
than some of our other subspecies (Harlans, Kriders, migrant Easterns).
As Jacob pointed out there is some question to the validity of the
subspecies. I have tried to come up with a list of features of a
typical/nominate Northern RTHA but the more I see the more each individual
has some unique phenotype I havent seen in others. Could this range of
variation be acceptable for classification to a subspecies? Does the
subspecies theory hold up at all for RTHA??? I do not know and am hopeful
some intrepid researcher/student would take the challenge on. I think with
a combination of selective satellite telemetry, stable isotope analysis, and
genetic studies we could help to bring clarity to where these beautiful
birds come from and ultimately if their breeding areas are isolated or a
melting pot area with overlap among several subspecies. Below is an
email I sent to the LABird listserv on the subject of subspecies in RTHA.

*****************************
I love this topic and could go on and on about red-tails. I live in the
alluvial valley of Mississippi, and as John mentioned, it gets crazy in the
winter. I have gone down the rabbit hole of RTHA subspecies and came up
with more questions than answers. I spent some time over a few winters
collecting and compiling photos of all the types of RTHAs nearby to where
I live (while simultaneously harassing the experts for their opinions on
IDs). The results can be found in this short article
(https://tinyurl.com/ychdnl9o). The article is not meant to be an
identification guide but more of a voucher of what occurs. Fuertes
(fuertesi) type I have struggled with. However, I have come to my own
conclusion that most Fuertes' that are identified away from TX and AZ are
either intergrades of Kriders (kriderii) type from the northern plains
mixing with the more typical eastern (borealis) type or of a breeding group
of light breasted eastern (borealis) type on the lower plains.

What I find more interesting are the dark-morph birds we see regularly.
Most folks think that if you see a dark-morph RTHA with a red tail that it
must be a western (calurus,) type, but other possibilities exist. Some
experts have noted the potential occurrence of northern RTHA (abieticola)
exhibiting polymorphism, and it may have a melanistic form lurking. Alas,
other experts say dark-morph Harlans (harlani) hawks will also show fully
red tails often with neat banding. I recently saw a dark-morph Harlan's
hawk likely pairing with a more classic Harlans hawk earlier this year
(https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42453083). I personally dont think
western (calurus) types occur very often this far east for a couple of
reasons: (1) Their typical range rarely extends much beyond the Rocky
Mountains; and (2) Most of the western (calurus) identified are dark morphs
which make up only a tiny fraction of the overall population; and it seems
unlikely that so many dark-morph (calurus) types would be identified here
during the winter without seeing exponentially more light-morph western
(calurus) types. I have spent some time going through eBird reports (mainly
from southeastern states) and have found more than a few (what I believe to
be) misidentified western (calurus) RTHA that are likely part of the
northern (abieticola) type RTHA.

On the subject of short-tailed hawks, I was recently fooled by a
strange-looking hawk that soared overhead with a dark-morph RTHA
(https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42455997). The bird didnt appear to
have patagial bars and was very mottled on the underparts. In the field, I
came to the conclusion that this bird was a short-tailed hawk. However, the
hawk appeared to lack a short tail. Thus, I consulted the experts. A full
consensus was not reached, but it was determined to be either a
intermediate-morph Harlans or a hybrid of Swainsons hawk and some type of
RTHA.

So, what did I learn in the rabbit hole? Bird phenotypes are fascinating,
more research is needed, people dont agree, and RTHAs are freakin awesome.
*****************************

Hope all is well,

Hal Mitchell
Southaven, MS

> On Nov 15, 2018, at 11:16 AM, Glenn
> <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I am talking about the Northern Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis
> abieticola).
>
> Here is the story: On 3 November I took a photo of a Red-tailed Hawk at Bald
> Knob NWR. I thought it might be a Western, so I posted it on the Facebook
> page called Raptor ID. I was asked to provide names and specifics to this
> story, so here goes. Mike Borl said, As Tami mentioned this bird is pretty
> great! It is an overlap bird in my book, showing traits of both northern and
> western. We have seen a handful like this over the years in central Alberta
> but few and far between. Those wide jet black patagials are something we dont
> see every day east of the Rockies. I wouldnt blame anyone for calling this a
> northern/ish western or western/ish northern, take your pick. I highly doubt
> it came from anywhere east of Alberta so the fact its in Arkansas is a bit of
> a surprise. Tami Maffitt said, Great bird! I am glad Mike asked for more
> photos. This bird has some similarities to western from underneath (fully dark
> throat, broad patagial markings, and a rufousy wash), but the black blobby
> bellyband, brown upper chest streaks, unbanded solid red tail, and pale
> uppertail coverts are a better fit for a northern bird (abieticola).
>
> Here are a couple photos of the bird in question,
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49706617
>
> I didnt know there was such a thing as a Northern Red-tailed Hawk. My Stokes
> Field Guide, Eastern Region doesnt mention one. Neither does my Sibley Guide
> to Birds, 2nd Edition. eBird does have an interesting article about the
> Northerns here,
> https://ebird.org/canada/news/identifying-northern-red-tailed-hawks/ If you
> map out all the Northern Red-tailed Hawk sightings on eBird, you will see one
> has never been reported in Arkansas. Well, except for the one I reported on 6
> November. The overlap bird talked about in the first section I only reported
> as a generic Red-tailed Hawk. On 6 November I photographed a second hawk. I
> submitted the photo to my same post on the Raptor ID page, thinking it was the
> same bird. It wasnt. I got this response: Mike Borl, Glenn its even more
> northern-ish if that helps, from what we can see in this single view. Nice
> light upper tail coverts, heavier bellyband, more lightly marked wing linings
> with thinner and lighter, dripping or bleeding patagials. Less heavily marked
> rear end. So now I have 2 Northern Red-tailed Hawks at Bald Knob NWR. This
> second one I reported as a Northern making it the first reported one in the
> state, at least on eBird. Here is a photo of this second bird,
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49737059
>
> Is there any interest in this subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk? If I saw 2, then
> Im sure others have probably seen these guys as well and just didnt identify
> them as Northern. Anyhow, I thought Id send this email just in case somebody
> is interested in an under-reported subspecies of Red-tailed Hawks in our
> state.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot




 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 7:30 pm
From: Cheryl Childers <cherylness...>
Subject: Google Street View Birding
There's a fun group on Facebook dedicated to searching for birds caught on
the Google Street View camera.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/2028802470510541/
They take screenshots of the bird and post a link to the coordinates. There
is a Google Doc that contains the group's "life list" which is an
impressive 300+ birds worldwide so far. There's also a birder category and
other animals category.
I thought I'd share this for anyone who may be intrigued by this. This is a
fun way to waste some time at work or could be a birding substitute since
it gets dark so early now. :)
So far I have discovered a Mourning Dove:

https://www.google.com/maps/@35.4752107,-94.1335388,3a,15y,231.3h,111.9t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1seYSUeTuLJNoXl2dmO9zIGg!2e0

and Cliff Swallows:
https://www.google.com/maps/@35.3477959,-94.2996787,3a,30y,284.77h,73.21t/data=!3m4!1e1!3m2!1sKZSqGgsOZ2P2cB-ScIA7Gw!2e0

Have fun!
Cheryl Childers

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 6:37 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Dardanelle Lock & Dam
LaDonna and I observed two female Common Mergansers and a female Red-breasted Merganser below Dardanelle Lock & Dam this afternoon. They were feeding very close to shore on the south side of the river.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 3:39 pm
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Common loons on Lake Langhofer in Regional Park
Hazel and I, at 4:45 today, scoped three Common Loons on Lake Langhofer, at
the boat ramp in Regional Park, here in Pine Bluff. Also on Lake Saracen,
we saw the following:

- Bald Eagle
- Franklin's Gulls
- Ring-billed Gulls
- Hooded Mergansers
- Buffleheads
- Double-crested Cormorants
- Horned Grebes
- Ruddy Ducks
- Pied-billed Grebes
- American White Pelicans
- Great Egrets
- Great Blue Herons

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 1:13 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Re: The forgotten subspecies
This is an interesting and well worthwhile discussion.


There is a long and well-documented history of the winter occurrence of Harlan's Hawks in northwest Arkansas, based on specimens collected around chicken houses (Wood 1932). Worth looking into, especially since I assume these have come even further east than some of the western calurus types.


This line also caught my eye: " ... it seems unlikely that so many dark-morph (calurus) types would be identified here during the winter without seeing exponentially more light-morph western (calurus) types." I'm fairly sure one reason the light morph calurus types are infrequently reported is that without careful inspection, they look superficially like the standard borealis red-tails and generally are ignored. I have photographed several of the light morph types in northwest Arkansas and probably could get more with effort.


Trying to figure this stuff out hawk by hawk sure adds a lot of birding interest in winter. That's one reason I appreciate Glenn Wyatt raising the discussion about whether or not we have the more northern red-tails in Arkansas in winter. We may actually get this figured out in 10 years or so.


Also on my list to figure out: who among the many types of Savannah Sparrows do we have wintering in Arkansas?


Plenty of room for birding and scientific hypothesis in all of this.


________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Hal Mitchell <halmitchell...>
Sent: Thursday, November 15, 2018 11:58 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: The forgotten subspecies

Hey Glenn and ARBird,

Nice Photos! Over the past several winter seasons I have been trying to document as many of these birds as possible. They really stand out. I think they arrive a little later in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley area than some of our other subspecies (Harlans, Kriders, migrant Easterns). As Jacob pointed out there is some question to the validity of the subspecies. I have tried to come up with a list of features of a typical/nominate Northern RTHA but the more I see the more each individual has some unique phenotype I havent seen in others. Could this range of variation be acceptable for classification to a subspecies? Does the subspecies theory hold up at all for RTHA??? I do not know and am hopeful some intrepid researcher/student would take the challenge on. I think with a combination of selective satellite telemetry, stable isotope analysis, and genetic studies we could help to bring clarity to where these beautiful birds come from and ultimately if their breeding areas are isolated or a melting pot area with overlap among several subspecies. Below is an email I sent to the LABird listserv on the subject of subspecies in RTHA.

*****************************
I love this topic and could go on and on about red-tails. I live in the alluvial valley of Mississippi, and as John mentioned, it gets crazy in the winter. I have gone down the rabbit hole of RTHA subspecies and came up with more questions than answers. I spent some time over a few winters collecting and compiling photos of all the types of RTHAs nearby to where I live (while simultaneously harassing the experts for their opinions on IDs). The results can be found in this short article (https://tinyurl.com/ychdnl9o). The article is not meant to be an identification guide but more of a voucher of what occurs. Fuertes (fuertesi) type I have struggled with. However, I have come to my own conclusion that most Fuertes' that are identified away from TX and AZ are either intergrades of Kriders (kriderii) type from the northern plains mixing with the more typical eastern (borealis) type or of a breeding group of light breasted eastern (borealis) type on the lower plains.

What I find more interesting are the dark-morph birds we see regularly. Most folks think that if you see a dark-morph RTHA with a red tail that it must be a western (calurus,) type, but other possibilities exist. Some experts have noted the potential occurrence of northern RTHA (abieticola) exhibiting polymorphism, and it may have a melanistic form lurking. Alas, other experts say dark-morph Harlans (harlani) hawks will also show fully red tails often with neat banding. I recently saw a dark-morph Harlan's hawk likely pairing with a more classic Harlans hawk earlier this year (https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42453083). I personally dont think western (calurus) types occur very often this far east for a couple of reasons: (1) Their typical range rarely extends much beyond the Rocky Mountains; and (2) Most of the western (calurus) identified are dark morphs which make up only a tiny fraction of the overall population; and it seems unlikely that so many dark-morph (calurus) types would be identified here during the winter without seeing exponentially more light-morph western (calurus) types. I have spent some time going through eBird reports (mainly from southeastern states) and have found more than a few (what I believe to be) misidentified western (calurus) RTHA that are likely part of the northern (abieticola) type RTHA.

On the subject of short-tailed hawks, I was recently fooled by a strange-looking hawk that soared overhead with a dark-morph RTHA (https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42455997). The bird didnt appear to have patagial bars and was very mottled on the underparts. In the field, I came to the conclusion that this bird was a short-tailed hawk. However, the hawk appeared to lack a short tail. Thus, I consulted the experts. A full consensus was not reached, but it was determined to be either a intermediate-morph Harlans or a hybrid of Swainsons hawk and some type of RTHA.

So, what did I learn in the rabbit hole? Bird phenotypes are fascinating, more research is needed, people dont agree, and RTHAs are freakin awesome.
*****************************

Hope all is well,

Hal Mitchell
Southaven, MS

On Nov 15, 2018, at 11:16 AM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...><mailto:<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>> wrote:

I am talking about the Northern Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis abieticola).

Here is the story: On 3 November I took a photo of a Red-tailed Hawk at Bald Knob NWR. I thought it might be a Western, so I posted it on the Facebook page called Raptor ID. I was asked to provide names and specifics to this story, so here goes. Mike Borl said, As Tami mentioned this bird is pretty great! It is an overlap bird in my book, showing traits of both northern and western. We have seen a handful like this over the years in central Alberta but few and far between. Those wide jet black patagials are something we dont see every day east of the Rockies. I wouldnt blame anyone for calling this a northern/ish western or western/ish northern, take your pick. I highly doubt it came from anywhere east of Alberta so the fact its in Arkansas is a bit of a surprise. Tami Maffitt said, Great bird! I am glad Mike asked for more photos. This bird has some similarities to western from underneath (fully dark throat, broad patagial markings, and a rufousy wash), but the black blobby bellyband, brown upper chest streaks, unbanded solid red tail, and pale uppertail coverts are a better fit for a northern bird (abieticola).

Here are a couple photos of the bird in question, https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49706617

I didnt know there was such a thing as a Northern Red-tailed Hawk. My Stokes Field Guide, Eastern Region doesnt mention one. Neither does my Sibley Guide to Birds, 2nd Edition. eBird does have an interesting article about the Northerns here, https://ebird.org/canada/news/identifying-northern-red-tailed-hawks/ If you map out all the Northern Red-tailed Hawk sightings on eBird, you will see one has never been reported in Arkansas. Well, except for the one I reported on 6 November. The overlap bird talked about in the first section I only reported as a generic Red-tailed Hawk. On 6 November I photographed a second hawk. I submitted the photo to my same post on the Raptor ID page, thinking it was the same bird. It wasnt. I got this response: Mike Borl, Glenn its even more northern-ish if that helps, from what we can see in this single view. Nice light upper tail coverts, heavier bellyband, more lightly marked wing linings with thinner and lighter, dripping or bleeding patagials. Less heavily marked rear end. So now I have 2 Northern Red-tailed Hawks at Bald Knob NWR. This second one I reported as a Northern making it the first reported one in the state, at least on eBird. Here is a photo of this second bird, https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49737059

Is there any interest in this subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk? If I saw 2, then Im sure others have probably seen these guys as well and just didnt identify them as Northern. Anyhow, I thought Id send this email just in case somebody is interested in an under-reported subspecies of Red-tailed Hawks in our state.

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot


 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 9:58 am
From: Hal Mitchell <halmitchell...>
Subject: Re: The forgotten subspecies
Hey Glenn and ARBird,

Nice Photos! Over the past several winter seasons I have been trying to document as many of these birds as possible. They really stand out. I think they arrive a little later in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley area than some of our other subspecies (Harlan’s, Krider’s, migrant Eastern’s). As Jacob pointed out there is some question to the validity of the subspecies. I have tried to come up with a list of features of a typical/nominate Northern RTHA but the more I see the more each individual has some unique phenotype I haven’t seen in others. Could this range of variation be acceptable for classification to a subspecies? Does the subspecies theory hold up at all for RTHA??? I do not know and am hopeful some intrepid researcher/student would take the challenge on. I think with a combination of selective satellite telemetry, stable isotope analysis, and genetic studies we could help to bring clarity to where these beautiful birds come from and ultimately if their breeding areas are isolated or a “melting pot” area with overlap among several “subspecies”. Below is an email I sent to the LABird listserv on the subject of subspecies in RTHA.

*****************************
I love this topic and could go on and on about red-tails. I live in the alluvial valley of Mississippi, and as John mentioned, it gets crazy in the winter. I have gone down the rabbit hole of RTHA subspecies and came up with more questions than answers. I spent some time over a few winters collecting and compiling photos of all the “types” of RTHAs nearby to where I live (while simultaneously harassing the experts for their opinions on IDs). The results can be found in this short article (https://tinyurl.com/ychdnl9o <https://tinyurl.com/ychdnl9o>). The article is not meant to be an identification guide but more of a voucher of what occurs. Fuertes’ (fuertesi) type I have struggled with. However, I have come to my own conclusion that most Fuertes' that are identified away from TX and AZ are either intergrades of Krider’s (kriderii) type from the northern plains mixing with the more typical eastern (borealis) type or of a breeding group of light breasted eastern (borealis) type on the lower plains.

What I find more interesting are the dark-morph birds we see regularly. Most folks think that if you see a dark-morph RTHA with a red tail that it must be a western (calurus,) type, but other possibilities exist. Some experts have noted the potential occurrence of northern RTHA (abieticola) exhibiting polymorphism, and it may have a melanistic form lurking. Alas, other experts say dark-morph Harlan’s (harlani) hawks will also show fully red tails often with neat banding. I recently saw a dark-morph Harlan's hawk likely pairing with a more classic Harlan’s hawk earlier this year (https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42453083 <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42453083>). I personally don’t think western (calurus) types occur very often this far east for a couple of reasons: (1) Their typical range rarely extends much beyond the Rocky Mountains; and (2) Most of the western (calurus) identified are dark morphs which make up only a tiny fraction of the overall population; and it seems unlikely that so many dark-morph (calurus) types would be identified here during the winter without seeing exponentially more light-morph western (calurus) types. I have spent some time going through eBird reports (mainly from southeastern states) and have found more than a few (what I believe to be) misidentified western (calurus) RTHA that are likely part of the northern (abieticola) type RTHA.

On the subject of short-tailed hawks, I was recently fooled by a strange-looking hawk that soared overhead with a dark-morph RTHA (https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42455997 <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S42455997>). The bird didn’t appear to have patagial bars and was very mottled on the underparts. In the field, I came to the conclusion that this bird was a short-tailed hawk. However, the hawk appeared to lack a short tail. Thus, I consulted the experts. A full consensus was not reached, but it was determined to be either a intermediate-morph Harlan’s or a hybrid of Swainson’s hawk and some type of RTHA.

So, what did I learn in the rabbit hole? Bird phenotypes are fascinating, more research is needed, people don’t agree, and RTHAs are freakin’ awesome.
*****************************

Hope all is well,

Hal Mitchell
Southaven, MS

> On Nov 15, 2018, at 11:16 AM, Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> I am talking about the Northern Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis abieticola).
>
> Here is the story: On 3 November I took a photo of a Red-tailed Hawk at Bald Knob NWR. I thought it might be a Western, so I posted it on the Facebook page called Raptor ID. I was asked to provide names and specifics to this story, so here goes. Mike Borlé said, “As Tami mentioned this bird is pretty great! It is an overlap bird in my book, showing traits of both northern and western. We have seen a handful like this over the years in central Alberta but few and far between. Those wide jet black patagials are something we don’t see every day east of the Rockies. I wouldn’t blame anyone for calling this a northern/ish western or western/ish northern, take your pick. I highly doubt it came from anywhere east of Alberta so the fact it’s in Arkansas is a bit of a surprise.” Tami Maffitt said, “Great bird! I am glad Mike asked for more photos. This bird has some similarities to western from underneath (fully dark throat, broad patagial markings, and a rufousy wash), but the black blobby bellyband, brown upper chest streaks, unbanded solid red tail, and pale uppertail coverts are a better fit for a northern bird (abieticola).”
>
> Here are a couple photos of the bird in question, https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49706617 <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49706617>
>
> I didn’t know there was such a thing as a Northern Red-tailed Hawk. My Stokes Field Guide, Eastern Region doesn’t mention one. Neither does my Sibley Guide to Birds, 2nd Edition. eBird does have an interesting article about the Northerns here, https://ebird.org/canada/news/identifying-northern-red-tailed-hawks/ <https://ebird.org/canada/news/identifying-northern-red-tailed-hawks/> If you map out all the Northern Red-tailed Hawk sightings on eBird, you will see one has never been reported in Arkansas. Well, except for the one I reported on 6 November. The overlap bird talked about in the first section I only reported as a generic Red-tailed Hawk. On 6 November I photographed a second hawk. I submitted the photo to my same post on the Raptor ID page, thinking it was the same bird. It wasn’t. I got this response: Mike Borlé, “Glenn it’s even more northern-ish if that helps, from what we can see in this single view. Nice light upper tail coverts, heavier bellyband, more lightly marked wing linings with thinner and lighter, dripping or bleeding patagials. Less heavily marked rear end.” So now I have 2 Northern Red-tailed Hawks at Bald Knob NWR. This second one I reported as a Northern making it the first reported one in the state, at least on eBird. Here is a photo of this second bird, https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49737059 <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49737059>
>
> Is there any interest in this subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk? If I saw 2, then I’m sure others have probably seen these guys as well and just didn’t identify them as Northern. Anyhow, I thought I’d send this email just in case somebody is interested in an under-reported subspecies of Red-tailed Hawks in our state.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot


 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 9:38 am
From: Jacob Wessels <jacoblwessels...>
Subject: Re: The forgotten subspecies
There's debate as to whether northern is a valid subspecies, with the Birds
of North America account and Brian Wheeler (in his 2018 Birds of Prey of
the East) weighing in that it is not. They state that heavily marked RTHAs
are not restricted to the putative breeding range of abieticola, among
other things. (Basically, that some RTHAs are just more heavily marked than
others.) Wheeler also states that "[t]here will always be the odd bird with
an excessive amount of melanin, but such birds are uncommon and certainly
do not make up a subspecies" and "[i]t is totally intermixed with much more
common paler types".


Jacob Wessels
Craighead Co.

On Thu, Nov 15, 2018 at 11:16 AM Glenn <
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I am talking about the Northern Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis
> abieticola).
>
> Here is the story: On 3 November I took a photo of a Red-tailed Hawk at
> Bald Knob NWR. I thought it might be a Western, so I posted it on the
> Facebook page called Raptor ID. I was asked to provide names and specifics
> to this story, so here goes. Mike Borlé said, “As Tami mentioned this bird
> is pretty great! It is an overlap bird in my book, showing traits of both
> northern and western. We have seen a handful like this over the years in
> central Alberta but few and far between. Those wide jet black patagials are
> something we don’t see every day east of the Rockies. I wouldn’t blame
> anyone for calling this a northern/ish western or western/ish northern,
> take your pick. I highly doubt it came from anywhere east of Alberta so the
> fact it’s in Arkansas is a bit of a surprise.” Tami Maffitt said, “Great
> bird! I am glad Mike asked for more photos. This bird has some similarities
> to western from underneath (fully dark throat, broad patagial markings, and
> a rufousy wash), but the black blobby bellyband, brown upper chest streaks,
> unbanded solid red tail, and pale uppertail coverts are a better fit for a
> northern bird (abieticola).”
>
> Here are a couple photos of the bird in question,
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49706617
>
> I didn’t know there was such a thing as a Northern Red-tailed Hawk. My
> Stokes Field Guide, Eastern Region doesn’t mention one. Neither does my
> Sibley Guide to Birds, 2nd Edition. eBird does have an interesting article
> about the Northerns here,
> https://ebird.org/canada/news/identifying-northern-red-tailed-hawks/ If
> you map out all the Northern Red-tailed Hawk sightings on eBird, you will
> see one has never been reported in Arkansas. Well, except for the one I
> reported on 6 November. The overlap bird talked about in the first section
> I only reported as a generic Red-tailed Hawk. On 6 November I photographed
> a second hawk. I submitted the photo to my same post on the Raptor ID
> page, thinking it was the same bird. It wasn’t. I got this response: Mike
> Borlé, “Glenn it’s even more northern-ish if that helps, from what we can
> see in this single view. Nice light upper tail coverts, heavier bellyband,
> more lightly marked wing linings with thinner and lighter, dripping or
> bleeding patagials. Less heavily marked rear end.” So now I have 2
> Northern Red-tailed Hawks at Bald Knob NWR. This second one I reported as
> a Northern making it the first reported one in the state, at least on
> eBird. Here is a photo of this second bird,
> https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49737059
>
> Is there any interest in this subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk? If I saw 2,
> then I’m sure others have probably seen these guys as well and just didn’t
> identify them as Northern. Anyhow, I thought I’d send this email just in
> case somebody is interested in an under-reported subspecies of Red-tailed
> Hawks in our state.
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 9:16 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: The forgotten subspecies
I am talking about the Northern Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis abieticola). 

Here is the story: On 3 November I took a photo of a Red-tailed Hawk at Bald Knob NWR.  I thought it might be a Western, so I posted it on the Facebook page called Raptor ID.  I was asked to provide names and specifics to this story, so here goes.  Mike Borlé said, “As Tami mentioned this bird is pretty great! It is an overlap bird in my book, showing traits of both northern and western. We have seen a handful like this over the years in central Alberta but few and far between. Those wide jet black patagials are something we don’t see every day east of the Rockies. I wouldn’t blame anyone for calling this a northern/ish western or western/ish northern, take your pick. I highly doubt it came from anywhere east of Alberta so the fact it’s in Arkansas is a bit of a surprise.”  Tami Maffitt said, “Great bird! I am glad Mike asked for more photos. This bird has some similarities to western from underneath (fully dark throat, broad patagial markings, and a rufousy wash), but the black blobby bellyband, brown upper chest streaks, unbanded solid red tail, and pale uppertail coverts are a better fit for a northern bird (abieticola).”  
Here are a couple photos of the bird in question, https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49706617
I didn’t know there was such a thing as a Northern Red-tailed Hawk.  My Stokes Field Guide, Eastern Region doesn’t mention one.  Neither does my Sibley Guide to Birds, 2nd Edition.  eBird does have an interesting article about the Northerns here, https://ebird.org/canada/news/identifying-northern-red-tailed-hawks/  If you map out all the Northern Red-tailed Hawk sightings on eBird, you will see one has never been reported in Arkansas.  Well, except for the one I reported on 6 November.  The overlap bird talked about in the first section I only reported as a generic Red-tailed Hawk.  On 6 November I photographed a second hawk.  I submitted the photo to my same post on the Raptor ID page, thinking it was the same bird.  It wasn’t.  I got this response: Mike Borlé, “Glenn it’s even more northern-ish if that helps, from what we can see in this single view. Nice light upper tail coverts, heavier bellyband, more lightly marked wing linings with thinner and lighter, dripping or bleeding patagials. Less heavily marked rear end.”  So now I have 2 Northern Red-tailed Hawks at Bald Knob NWR.  This second one I reported as a Northern making it the first reported one in the state, at least on eBird.  Here is a photo of this second bird, https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S49737059

Is there any interest in this subspecies of Red-tailed Hawk?  If I saw 2, then I’m sure others have probably seen these guys as well and just didn’t identify them as Northern.  Anyhow, I thought I’d send this email just in case somebody is interested in an under-reported subspecies of Red-tailed Hawks in our state.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 7:52 am
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Wooping crane still around?
Please let me know if the Whooper is still being seen. I plan a trip
Friday 16th.

Peace and Birds Jerry

 

Back to top
Date: 11/15/18 4:30 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: eBird Stakeout Hotspot for Whooping Crane
Because so many people are eBirding the Monroe Co. Whooping Crane and the
ABA has ruled it is countable, I have created a stakeout hotspot in eBird
called "stakeout Whooping Crane, Hwy. 33, Roe (2018). Please use this
location for your checklist. If you have already submitted a checklist
please change the location by merging your personal location into the
hotspot. Here is how you do that
https://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/1010517-how-do-i-merge-a-per
sonal-location-with-a-hotspot-?b_id=1928. Thanks.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

Back to top
Date: 11/14/18 6:51 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - November 14, 2018


It was partly cloudy, cold, and windy on the bird survey today. 56 species
were found. Was a slow day. Most notable bird was a female Purple Finch
feeding on Ash Seeds. Here is my list for today:



Snow Goose - 60

Ross' Goose - 2

Canada Goose - 2

Gadwall - 400

American Wigeon - 2

Mallard - 67

Northern Shoveler - 50

Green-winged Teal - 4

Ring-necked Duck - 2250

Bufflehead - 2

Ruddy Duck - 4

Pied-billed Grebe - 9

Double-crested Cormorant - 4

Great-blue Heron - 7

Black Vulture - 105

Turkey Vulture - 15

Northern Harrier - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Red-tailed Hawk - 3

Virginia Rail - 1

American Coot - 410

Killdeer - 12

Rock Pigeon - 7

Mourning Dove - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 3

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 4

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Northern Flicker - 3

Eastern Phoebe - 7

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 106

Carolina Chickadee - 1

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 2

House Wren - 3

Winter Wren - 2

Sedge Wren - 3

Marsh Wren - 6

Ruby-crowned Kinglet - 4

Eastern Bluebird - 1

American Robin - 41

Brown Thrasher - 2

Yellow-rumped Warbler - 24

Eastern Towhee - 2

Savannah Sparrow - 4

Fox Sparrow - 2

Song Sparrow - 8

Swamp Sparrow - 6

White-throated Sparrow - 8

White-crowned Sparrow - 1

Dark-eyed Junco - 2

Northern Cardinal - 10

Red-winged Blackbird - 61

Common Grackle - 1

Purple Finch - 1 (feeding on Ash seeds.)

American Goldfinch - 1





Odonates:



Variegated Meadowhawk







Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR












 

Back to top
Date: 11/14/18 5:23 pm
From: Sheena Hare <0000024fd2c4a332-dmarc-request...>
Subject: New E-mail Adress
I need to change my E-mail Address to - <sheena...>

Thank You!
 

Back to top
Date: 11/14/18 5:14 pm
From: Sheena Hare <0000024fd2c4a332-dmarc-request...>
Subject: New E-mail Adress
How do I change my E-mail address?
 

Back to top
Date: 11/14/18 4:58 pm
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Re: Monroe Co. Whooping Crane is Countable - ABA
Great. Thanks for the info.

Sandy

On Wed, Nov 14, 2018 at 6:08 PM Will Britton <
<000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> I asked the folks at the ABA to specifically comment on our current
> visiting Whooping Crane and they cited their guidelines in saying that this
> bird is indeed ABA countable, being that it comes from a reintroduced
> indigenous population that has successfully hatched chicks in the wild.
> After my inquiry they updated their page about reintroduced indigenous
> species to included the LA non-migratory population as now countable here:
> http://listing.aba.org/reintroduced-indigenous-species/
>
> Good birding,
>
> Will Britton - Searcy
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 11/14/18 4:27 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Cackling goose
The Cackling goose and the Tundra swan are still present with the 84
Trumpeter swans at the Abram ponds today 11/14/18.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/14/18 4:08 pm
From: Will Britton <000001a332fa81de-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Monroe Co. Whooping Crane is Countable - ABA
Hi All,

I asked the folks at the ABA to specifically comment on our current
visiting Whooping Crane and they cited their guidelines in saying that this
bird is indeed ABA countable, being that it comes from a reintroduced
indigenous population that has successfully hatched chicks in the wild.
After my inquiry they updated their page about reintroduced indigenous
species to included the LA non-migratory population as now countable here:
http://listing.aba.org/reintroduced-indigenous-species/

Good birding,

Will Britton - Searcy

 

Back to top
Date: 11/14/18 1:22 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Buffalo Point Audubon Christmas Bird count Dec 15
The 42nd Buffalo River (East) Audubon Christmas Bird Count is scheduled for Saturday, Dec 15.  There are a limited number of beds available at the Toney Bend Research facility near Rush on Friday night (Dec 14) for those wanting to be within the circle for an early start the next morning.
For further information, to sign-up, and/or to reserve a space at the field research center Friday night, contact Jack Stewart via email <fellowshipofthewings...> or by phone (870)7150-0260.
For anyone staying overnight you will need your own bedding.  Dinner (most likely pizza) will be provided.  As in the past, the count is sponsored by the Buffalo National River Partners.
Jack
 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/18 9:08 pm
From: Susan Hardin <whizcats...>
Subject: Re: Whooping Crane
So sorry to all members of the list serve and embarrassedly admit that I thought this was going only to some of my family members.

My apologies,

Susan Hardin

> On Nov 13, 2018, at 9:26 PM, Susan Hardin <whizcats...> wrote:
>
> A whooping crane has been in a rice field in Monroe County for a number of weeks and I badly want to go and see it. Had to look at map and is in far eastern Ark. I can send the original emails if anyone is interested, but we mustn’t linger too long.
>
> Sue
>
>> On Nov 13, 2018, at 6:53 PM, Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> <mailto:<janewiewora...>> wrote:
>>
>> was seen today about 2pm in the same location.
>


 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/18 7:26 pm
From: Susan Hardin <whizcats...>
Subject: Re: Whooping Crane
A whooping crane has been in a rice field in Monroe County for a number of weeks and I badly want to go and see it. Had to look at map and is in far eastern Ark. I can send the original emails if anyone is interested, but we mustn’t linger too long.

Sue

> On Nov 13, 2018, at 6:53 PM, Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> wrote:
>
> was seen today about 2pm in the same location.


 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/18 4:54 pm
From: Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...>
Subject: Whooping Crane
was seen today about 2pm in the same location.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/18 4:44 pm
From: Ed Tiede <0000012caede6260-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: ID Help
American Widgeon. Nice find though!



On Tuesday, November 13, 2018, 6:36:53 PM CST, ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...> wrote:

I photographed what I think is a Long-Tailed Duck today on the west swan pond on Hiram Rd.
I have attached a link to the photo on my website.
http://www.pbase.com/rherron/possiblelongtailduck
Could a couple of you people ID this bird for me.
Thanks.
Robert.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/18 4:38 pm
From: Ethan Massey <ethanmassey20...>
Subject: Re: ID Help
That is an American wigeon.

Ethan Massey
Biologist, Ducks Unlimited, Inc.
(870)-456-2715 (c) (870)-282-8242 (o) <emassey...>
57 S. CC Camp Road, St. Charles, AR 72140

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <arbird-l...> on behalf of ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...>
Sent: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 6:36 PM
To: <arbird-l...>
Subject: ID Help

I photographed what I think is a Long-Tailed Duck today on the west swan pond on Hiram Rd.

I have attached a link to the photo on my website.

http://www.pbase.com/rherron/possiblelongtailduck

Could a couple of you people ID this bird for me.

Thanks.

Robert.

 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/18 4:36 pm
From: ROBERT HERRON <r2herron...>
Subject: ID Help
I photographed what I think is a Long-Tailed Duck today on the west swan pond on Hiram Rd.

I have attached a link to the photo on my website.

http://www.pbase.com/rherron/possiblelongtailduck <http://www.pbase.com/rherron/possiblelongtailduck>

Could a couple of you people ID this bird for me.

Thanks.

Robert.
 

Back to top
Date: 11/13/18 12:59 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Harris's Sparrows at Maysville
Near Maysville this morning, a flock of Harriss Sparrows was associated with a much bigger flock that included Northern Cardinals, White-crowned Sparrows, Dark-eyed Juncos and others. At least 5-6 Harriss visible. I could hear others vocalizing.

We observed several large mixed-species blackbird flocks. Several of these included Rusty Blackbirds. One flock, of around 500-1000 birds also included Common Grackles, Red-winged Blackbirds, and Brown-headed cowbirds. Ten Rusties were visible among 100 or so other blackbirds on the road, so actual Rusty numbers were probably higher. We found Brewers Blackbirds in 2 spots.

Several black warrior hawks included an adult Harlans with whitish streaking on the breast. I think David Oakley got some good flight photos of this bird.

One hoped-for target included Lapland Longspurs. We found a few that rattled when a flock of Horned Larks (~100) flushed from a snowy field east of Maysville. I standing and watching when a Western Meadowlark began chucking in a tree above me.


 

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