ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
9/23/19 3:06 pm Than Boves <tboves...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/23/19 1:26 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob update
9/23/19 12:53 pm Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...> Central Arkansas flush with fall birding hotspots
9/23/19 12:18 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Ibis at BK
9/23/19 11:15 am Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
9/23/19 10:49 am Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Goldeneye
9/23/19 10:02 am Michael Linz <mplinz...> Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
9/23/19 9:59 am Tammy <msiinc...> Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
9/23/19 8:56 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
9/23/19 8:55 am Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
9/23/19 8:31 am Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...> Re: Red Crossbills continue near Shores Lake, Ozark NF
9/23/19 7:21 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Red Crossbills continue near Shores Lake, Ozark NF
9/23/19 7:03 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob and Fish and Game
9/22/19 11:35 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> A few fall birds on Kessler Mountain, Fayetteville
9/21/19 6:35 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Saturday Field Trip
9/21/19 2:11 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> A world worth living-in
9/21/19 1:49 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BLUE GROSBEAKS ALL BROWN AT CHESNEY TODAY
9/21/19 1:08 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: Part 2, more 3 x 10^9 birds vanish
9/21/19 11:34 am Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 9/21/2019
9/21/19 9:22 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/21/19 8:28 am Than Boves <tboves...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/21/19 7:02 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Part 2, more 3 x 10^9 birds vanish
9/21/19 6:57 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> more 3 x 10^9 birds vanish
9/20/19 4:52 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: NABCI News: 3 Billion Birds Campaign is LIVE! Webinar today at 2:30 pm Eastern Time!
9/20/19 4:30 pm Jennifer Mortensen <mortejen...> Three billion birds - resources for learning more
9/20/19 3:38 pm Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/20/19 3:35 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/20/19 3:11 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/19/19 6:47 pm Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/19/19 6:10 pm David Luneau <mdluneau...> Re: IBWO
9/19/19 5:20 pm Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/19/19 3:06 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/19/19 2:57 pm Kim Hillis <kimberlyannhillis...> Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/19/19 2:42 pm Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...> Re: Sedentary birding
9/19/19 12:09 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
9/19/19 9:03 am Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob 19 Sep
9/18/19 5:20 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Audubon Arkansas's Native Plant Sale, Oct 11-12
9/18/19 5:10 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 18
9/18/19 12:32 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Wilson Springs Preserve
9/18/19 10:16 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> Sedentary birding
9/18/19 8:35 am Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...> Birds of Late, Saw-whet Owls, Red Crossbill Alert
9/18/19 7:05 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BISON, BIRDsssss, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIEssss
9/18/19 5:41 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Bird Feeders for Tribute of Life Foundation Hospice Home Care
9/17/19 1:36 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Cave Mountain, upper Buffalo
9/17/19 9:01 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> IBWO
9/16/19 1:26 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA September Field Trip
9/16/19 10:20 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> AAS News of Members
9/15/19 3:02 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BIRDS FROM A “GIT-TOGETHER” ON SUGAR MOUNTAIN IN NORTHWEST ARKANSAS
9/15/19 5:57 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Whitney Mountain at 0-dark-30 (instead of Eagle Watch)
9/15/19 4:49 am Michael Linz <mplinz...> Probable Connecticut Warbler
9/14/19 2:21 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Dr. Kannan's Story Sent Out in EBird eNews.
9/14/19 1:33 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> WHEN WILL WE SEE THAT ROSEATE SPOONBILL, TERRY? (EAGLE WATCH NATURE TRAIL TURNS 20)
9/13/19 7:27 pm Mike Collins <mike...> update on the IBWO
9/13/19 6:51 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Re: RNPH and a Traill's Flycatcher at BKNWR
9/13/19 10:04 am plm108 <plm108...> RNPH and a Traill's Flycatcher at BKNWR
9/13/19 7:50 am Samantha Scheiman <Samantha.Scheiman...> volunteer opportunity to enhance habitat for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers, Warren Prairie Natural Area (October 5)
9/12/19 2:48 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Huge decline in songbirds linked to common insecticide - National Geographic
9/12/19 12:34 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> Bald Knob 9-12-19
9/11/19 6:00 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 11
9/11/19 5:56 pm Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...> Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
9/11/19 3:36 pm Randy <Robinson-Randy...> Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
9/11/19 3:26 pm Robert Day <rhday52...> Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
9/11/19 2:44 pm Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
9/11/19 12:42 pm Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
9/11/19 11:34 am Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
9/11/19 11:27 am CK Franklin <meshoppen...> Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
9/11/19 8:43 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Birds and Barklice at Devil's Den SP
9/10/19 9:46 pm Charles Lyon <lyon5516...> Lake Dardanelle Sabine's Gull 9-6-19
9/10/19 5:31 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Big migration at Devil's Den State Park
9/10/19 3:38 pm Tammy <msiinc...> Tricolored Munia
9/10/19 11:23 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Skepticism warranted...
9/10/19 9:23 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Trees
9/9/19 1:28 pm Bob Harden <flutterbybob...> Re: Arkansas' best birding Areas
9/9/19 7:10 am Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...> Arkansas' best birding Areas
9/9/19 6:51 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Bird Feeder Donations at ASCA Meeting
9/9/19 5:44 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Meeting, Sept. 12, Mel White - Argentina Birding
9/8/19 3:55 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BIRDY MORNING AT HOBBS STATE PARK-CONSERVATION AREA
9/8/19 6:19 am Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...> Least Flycatchers on migration in w. Arkansas
9/7/19 1:56 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Belated note -- Centerton
9/7/19 11:13 am Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 9/7/2019 - Empids/Warblers
9/7/19 10:33 am plm108 <plm108...> Southeast Arkansas Bonanza (Re-do)
9/7/19 9:30 am plm108 <plm108...> Re: Lake Monticello Birds and Drainage Update
9/7/19 9:06 am plm108 <plm108...> Lake Monticello Birds and Drainage Update
9/7/19 5:28 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Wilson Spring Preserve in Fayetteville
9/6/19 7:26 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Sabine's Gull follow-up
9/6/19 5:22 pm Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...> Sabine’s Gull
9/6/19 10:58 am JFR <johnfredman...> BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER AT BOYD POINT
9/4/19 6:48 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA Upcoming Field Trips
9/4/19 4:05 pm Kenny Nations <kennynations...> White Ibis
9/3/19 5:14 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 3
9/2/19 3:08 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Labor Day on Flint Creek Birding Trail
9/1/19 2:31 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> BIRDY MORNING AT HOBBS. FIELD TRIP NEXT SUNDAY
9/1/19 1:26 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 9/1/2019 - empids/warblers
8/31/19 4:39 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Empid migration - Beaver Lake Nursery Pond
8/31/19 4:19 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Eagle Watch turns 20 -- party September 14 -- y'all come
8/31/19 3:56 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: A meeting with the Pope May 11th 2019
8/30/19 11:33 am Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...> The Snipe Newsletter
8/30/19 9:26 am Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Union County Birds
8/29/19 5:11 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> Miller County Kite
8/27/19 6:38 pm Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Union County Birds
8/27/19 5:33 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 27
8/27/19 10:29 am plm108 <plm108...> Alder Flycatcher, Conway County
8/27/19 8:56 am DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...> Audubon Arkansas Native Plant Sale, Oct 11-12
8/27/19 8:18 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Yellow-crowned Night Heron-Sunday (25 Aug 19)
8/26/19 3:19 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Interesting birds after heavy rain in Valley
8/25/19 6:31 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Ruddy Turnstone
8/25/19 6:09 pm Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...> Lake Fayetteville - 8/25/2019
8/25/19 6:08 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> BKNWR
8/25/19 9:28 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Birding by Book - Upcoming ASCA Program
8/25/19 9:04 am Allan Mueller <akcmueller...> Faulkner County Checklist
8/24/19 3:28 pm Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...> ASCA August field trip report
 
Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 3:06 pm
From: Than Boves <tboves...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
Interesting analysis of the Science paper

https://dynamicecology.wordpress.com/2019/09/20/did-north-america-really-lose-3-billion-birds-what-does-it-mean/?fbclid=IwAR1eScNqz94-Q_C8M86bstwcT64PZ0l3TG04nia1aq9wffPx71oxraTbdeI#more-59014

--------------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
870-972-3320
Website: www.boveslab.com<http://%20www.boveslab.com>




On Sat, Sep 21, 2019 at 10:28 AM -0500, "Than Boves" <tboves...><mailto:<tboves...>> wrote:

While clearly overall this report is negative (and really not surprising for anyone that has been paying attention), I am surprised by a few specific positive trends and, assuming they are accurate, would be interested in hearing ideas that may explain these, esp. in light of the other trends from the analysis.

1) Vireos have increased by >50% since 1970??!

2) Introduced species have declined faster than any other group (-60%)?

3) Vultures have increased by 250%!

4) Nuthatches, Woodpeckers, and Brown creepers have all increased significantly

Thoughts?

--------------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
870-972-3320
Website: www.boveslab.com<http://%20www.boveslab.com>




On Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 5:11 PM -0500, "Carol Joan Patterson" <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...><mailto:<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>> wrote:

Totally agree. The situation is desperate.

On Thursday, September 19, 2019, 5:06:26 PM CDT, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:


It is my opinion that with our birds at such a critical point, everything has an impact including climate change, 3.4 billion animals killed by 100 million feral cats, window collisions, habitat loss, loss of native vegetation and replaced by exotics and non-native, more auto collisions, oil pits, loss of native insects, pesticides that impact food and reproduction and the list goes on. This will have to be dealt with on multiple fronts and anyone not actively involved in helping are part of the problem.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Kim Hillis
Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:56 PM
To: <jwdavis...>
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970

Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change?


Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do what is needed to do to reverse this trends.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.msn.com_en-2Dus_news_science_three-2Dbillion-2Dbirds-2Dhave-2Dbeen-2Dlost-2Din-2Dnorth-2Damerica-2Dsince-2D1970_ar-2DAAHxTY3-3Focid-3Dspartandhp&d=DwMCaQ&c=QzRQJlHx0ZTYmlwGx7ptjrPEeuNmnYRxm_FN73lod7w&r=7GY_tLFKiggtwGF79-jINsYKU9T9mwO7Mj-3mSpAuok&m=E8Wq3oz1tYqOlGQuKPYhHyytoObCYrArn0Vmnfuo8A8&s=NJXuhA8JtPnWG8CrZMWpXdKET9ZJtXetu5uOguT6bKo&e=>
 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 1:26 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob update
We have been studying the Ibis. They are still far out but they look greenish on the body with a brown head. We think they are Plegadis Ibis. We also saw our first Northern Harrier of the season and we heard a couple Sora.
Glenn WyattCabot


 

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Date: 9/23/19 12:53 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <DBoyles...>
Subject: Central Arkansas flush with fall birding hotspots
FYI: From the Arkansas Tourism Media Room.
View this email in your browser<https://mailchi.mp/arkansas/cen-ar-flush-with-fall-bird-hotspots?e=baae74a7cb>






[https://gallery.mailchimp.com/f238f0cdf7c12d734ddc65eec/images/30525e1a-be2c-4df0-80dc-d374ec73b6da.png]





Central Arkansas flush with fall birding spots

Zoie Clift, travel writer
Arkansas Tourism

No matter the season, Arkansas is a prime destination for birdwatching. Fall in particular is a great time to visit The Natural State’s birding areas. The season brings cooler temperatures and fall foliage that enhance the experience, while also offering the opportunity to see migratory birds passing through the state. Central Arkansas is a convenient basecamp for a variety of birding adventures.

Why does birding stand out in the fall? “In general the days are cooler with less humidity,” said Cindy Franklin, president of Audubon Society of Central Arkansas. “Resident and migratory birds are easier to see because they are on the move across the landscape and leaves are beginning to fall off trees making them more visible to casual observers.”

Franklin said that during the summer nesting season, birds tend to be secretive and often hard to see by casual observers. Once nesting season is over, bird populations begin to move about the landscape.

Franklin shared information on how the state's bird population shifts during the fall. She said Ruby-throated Hummingbirds migrate to their wintering grounds in southern Mexico and Central America with the last stragglers passing through Arkansas in late October and very early November. Many of the state’s summer resident birds like Purple Martins, Barn and Cliff Swallows, and Scissor-tailed Flycatchers, gather in flocks before heading south. As the state’s summer residents leave, winter resident birds begin to filter into the state. Common species include White-throated Sparrows and migrant Red-tailed Hawks. Waterfowl and water-associated species also winter in Arkansas and these include Snow Geese and many duck species. Loons and many species of gulls also overwinter here.

Year-round resident birds also become more visible in the fall. Franklin said Red-winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, and Brown-headed Cowbirds travel in large feeding flocks as fall progresses and gather in large communal roosts at night. Birds that glean insects on trees are easier to see once leaves fall and these include the state’s resident woodpecker species. The state’s smaller residents birds often gather in mixed feeding flocks during this time too.

Below, Franklin shares some useful details on some of the fall birding hotspots you can visit in Central Arkansas.

Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge in Bald Knob —226 species. “The wide fields and wooded lots do not look like a premier birding hotspot in central Arkansas, but looks can be deceiving. Bald Knob is an important refuge area for a large number of migratory birds in the spring and fall. Be aware that Bald Knob is also a hunting area. If you plan to go hiking, wear safety clothing during hunting season.”

Camp Robinson Special Use Area in North Little Rock—130 species. “The SUA, Special Use Area, has a driving tour that takes you through a variety of habitats including woods, meadows, a large reservoir, and touches on the shores of Lake Conway. This is good for woodland birds, waterfowl, herons, egrets, pelicans, raptors, sparrows, and warblers at various times during fall migration. Be aware that the SUA is also a hunting area.”

Bell Slough Wildlife Management Area in Mayflower— 125 species. “Bell Slough has several access points. It has an impoundment area that is a waterfowl resting area but it is hard to see ducks because of the vegetation. It has multiple trails along the ridges and backs up to Camp Robinson. Be aware that much of Bell Slough is isolated and is also a hunting area.”

Beaverfork Lake in Conway — 102 species. “This lake just north of Conway is a shallow lake. It usually has lots of ducks and other waterfowl. Beaverfork has had its share of ducks we don't always see in central Arkansas. There are lots of trees associated with woodland birds. The area is open and safe to visit.”

Murray Park/Big Dam Bridge/Cook's Landing in Little Rock and North Little Rock — 125 species. “This area is well-visited and has a variety of habitats. There are waterfowl, herons, egrets, gulls, pelicans, cormorants, raptors, woodpeckers, woodland birds, bluebirds, and sparrows. You can also watch the river for migrating shorebirds.”

Lake Maumelle in Little Rock-73 species. “There are multiple access points along Hwy 300 and Hwy 10. This area is primarily visited for waterfowl later in migration and there are ducks, loons, herons, egrets, eagles and other raptors and some woodland birds.”

Two Rivers Park in Little Rock- 123 species. “This is one of the premier parks along the Arkansas River. There are biking and hiking trails through a variety of environments along the river. You can see waterfowl, pelicans, herons, egrets, raptors, sparrows, bluebirds, and woodland birds. In the winter the grassy areas host many species of sparrows. You can also drive through the community gardens to observe sparrows and other birds up close.”

Pinnacle Mountain/Arboretum in Little Rock— 98 species. “Pinnacle Mountain State Park has a number of birdwatching areas including the Arboretum and feeders at the Visitors Center on Pinnacle Valley Road. There are streams, wooded areas, and meadows and you can see waterfowl, egrets, herons, raptors, sparrows, bluebirds, woodland birds, and lots of vultures. While at the visitor center check out the native plant gardens maintained by the Pulaski County Master Gardeners.”

Willow Beach in Scott— 120 species. “Willow Beach is a large park along the Arkansas River. There are fishing ponds, campgrounds, grassy areas, and woods plus good views of the river. Here you can see waterfowl, pelicans, herons, egrets, raptors, sparrows, bluebirds, and woodland birds. Early in migration large numbers of swallows may gather on the telephone wires near the river. It is possible to see Painted Buntings lingering in this area.”

Little Rock Audubon Center—128 species. “The Audubon Center has a one-mile ADA compliant Wildlife Observation Trail behind its headquarters. There are woods, oak savannah, and Chimney Swift towers. Here you can see raptors, woodland birds, sparrows, blackbirds, warblers and flycatchers.”

Allsopp Park in Little Rock— 57 species. “This wooded park can produce some nice sightings of raptors and woodland birds. There are many hiking paths through the woods and lots of people on the trails.”

The Audubon Society of Central Arkansas sponsors monthly birding field trips throughout Central Arkansas. They regularly visit city and county parks, national wildlife refuges, wildlife management areas, and recreation areas throughout the state. You do not have to be a member to participate. If you are a patron of the Central Arkansas Library System, you can also check out a birdwatching kit including a field guide and a pair of binoculars from each library branch. For more information on the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas, visit wp.ascabird.org<https://arkansas.us11.list-manage.com/track/click?u=f238f0cdf7c12d734ddc65eec&id=264b73e438&e=baae74a7cb>.

About Arkansas Tourism
Arkansas Tourism, a division of the Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage and Tourism, strives to expand the economic impact of travel and tourism in the state and enhance the quality of life for all Arkansans. The division manages 14 Arkansas Welcome Centers and employs more than 60 staff members across The Natural State. For more information, visit www.arkansas.com<https://arkansas.us11.list-manage.com/track/click?u=f238f0cdf7c12d734ddc65eec&id=5fec539f84&e=baae74a7cb>.









####

Copyright © 2019 Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage, and Tourism, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this message as a press release from the Arkansas.com Media Room.

Submitted by the
Arkansas Department of Parks, Heritage, and Tourism
1 Capitol Mall
Little Rock, AR 72201

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Confidentiality Notice: The information contained in this email message and any attachment(s) is the property of the State of Arkansas and may be protected by state and federal laws governing disclosure of private information. It is intended solely for the use of the entity to which this email is addressed. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that reading, copying or distributing this transmission is STRICTLY PROHIBITED. The sender has not waived any applicable privilege by sending the accompanying transmission. If you have received this transmission in error, please notify the sender, and then please delete and destroy all copies and attachments.
 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 12:18 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Ibis at BK
We are looking at 10 ibis to the north of Huntsman Road at Bald Knob. They are dark but this lighting is terrible. I'm fairly sure they are juvenile white ibis. We also heard our first marsh wren of the season.
Glenn WyattCabot


 

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Date: 9/23/19 11:15 am
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
The main goal of the National Wildlife Refuge System of the U. S. Fish and
Wildlife Service is to provide habitat for and enhance the populations of
fish and wildlife. Each refuge has its own goals for what species to
manage for . Secondary priorities include providing for recreation and
public access including hunting, fishing, birding, hiking, etc. as
appropriate for each refuge..

Allan Mueller

On Mon, Sep 23, 2019 at 12:02 PM Michael Linz <mplinz...> wrote:

> I applaud the wildlife managers at Bald Knob for all their efforts. They
> are doing a good job with what little resources that have been made
> available to them. Bald Knob has consistently been the location in the
> state where rare birds are seen and this is in part due to the game and
> fish efforts.
>
> Michael Linz
>
> On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:56 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> wrote:
>
> Glen and others,
> A friend of mine who grew up in Bald Know had this to say about the Bald
> Knob Wildlife area. Others may know more about it at present time. This
> “may” tell you something about “the lay of the land.”
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
> “It was the Huntsman family farm. They were an LDS family - father and 2
> sons. The complete farm was huge - just about everything from just outside
> BK to the White River. The current wildlife area is only part of it.
>
> They grew rice and mostly soy beans. We use to duck hunt in there a lot.
> They had so much vandalism from people coming in to hunt that they blocked
> off most of the roads.
>
> Sometime in the -80’s? or so they went bankrupt and the land was sold off
> - mostly to the government.”
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
> Windows 10
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...>
> on behalf of Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
> *Sent:* Monday, September 23, 2019 9:02:25 AM
> *To:* <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Bald Knob and Fish and Game
>
> I have questions about the responsibilities of the Department of Fish and
> Wildlife, and I’m hoping someone here knows. I go birding at Bald Knob NWR
> quite often, once week if not more. I have noticed that for the last three
> years at least, that in the middle of July, they start coming around and
> putting gravel on some of the back roads around a couple of the ponds,
> repairing some of the bad spots that have been ignored all year. They cut
> the plants growing beside the road that have gotten so tall it is difficult
> to see the pond on the other side of the weeds. They then add, or remove
> water from a couple of the ponds/fields that weren’t fit for any bird
> except maybe a couple Great Blue Herons. They make a pond or two of mud
> and the shore birds start flocking in. Then Karen Holliday brings in a
> birding group early in August and they get to see a lot of great birds.
> Then the Department of Fish and Wildlife let everything go back to the way
> it was. This year, they made a great mud field, Karen’s group came in on a
> Saturday, by Friday that field was dry and all the birds had moved on. To
> me, it looks like the Department of Fish and Wildlife come in to make a
> good birding experience for the birding group. If that is so, I am very
> grateful to them and to Karen for coming in every year. I only wish she
> would bring a group in every Saturday.
>
> Anyhow, now for my questions. Is it the job of the Department of Fish and
> Wildlife to set up a NWR for the enjoyment of various groups, perhaps it is
> a birding group one month, a dove hunting group the next month, and deer
> hunters the next? Or is it their job to make the NWR a habitat suitable
> for fish and wildlife? For instance, shouldn’t they be maintaining those
> ponds so the shorebirds have a refuge to come to year round, and not just
> for two weeks? Or is it just their job to make sure people are properly
> and legally using the place and nothing else?
>
> It seems to me like the priority of the Department of Fish and Wildlife
> should be to make a fit habitat for the fish and wildlife, at least within
> an NWR. But, sometimes it is just way too dry out there for a lot of the
> birds that usually come through the area. And sometimes the fields are
> just too full of water. And these are all set up to be rice fields, so it
> is easy to control how wet each field is, at least when there is plenty of
> water in the river to pull from. But, if that isn’t their job, well I’d
> like to know that so I will quit being disappointed in them for not
> maintaining a good habitat for the shorebirds that migrate through every
> spring and fall.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
>
>

--
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-339-8071 cell

Be sincere even if you don't mean it.

 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 10:49 am
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Goldeneye
I just received a photograph of a juvenile goldeneye at Brady Mountain
on Lake Ouachita. I can not distinguish between the Barrow's or Common
goldeneye but either I presume would be out of season Any suggestions to
help me make a identification would be appreciated. I plan to go se it for
myself. Peace and Birds Jerry Butler

 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 10:02 am
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
I applaud the wildlife managers at Bald Knob for all their efforts. They are doing a good job with what little resources that have been made available to them. Bald Knob has consistently been the location in the state where rare birds are seen and this is in part due to the game and fish efforts.

Michael Linz

> On Sep 23, 2019, at 10:56 AM, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> wrote:
>
> Glen and others,
> A friend of mine who grew up in Bald Know had this to say about the Bald Knob Wildlife area. Others may know more about it at present time. This “may” tell you something about “the lay of the land.”
> Sally Jo Gibson
> Harrison, AR
>
> “It was the Huntsman family farm. They were an LDS family - father and 2 sons. The complete farm was huge - just about everything from just outside BK to the White River. The current wildlife area is only part of it.
>
> They grew rice and mostly soy beans. We use to duck hunt in there a lot. They had so much vandalism from people coming in to hunt that they blocked off most of the roads.
>
> Sometime in the -80’s? or so they went bankrupt and the land was sold off - mostly to the government.”
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10
>
> From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
> Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 9:02:25 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
>
> I have questions about the responsibilities of the Department of Fish and Wildlife, and I’m hoping someone here knows. I go birding at Bald Knob NWR quite often, once week if not more. I have noticed that for the last three years at least, that in the middle of July, they start coming around and putting gravel on some of the back roads around a couple of the ponds, repairing some of the bad spots that have been ignored all year. They cut the plants growing beside the road that have gotten so tall it is difficult to see the pond on the other side of the weeds. They then add, or remove water from a couple of the ponds/fields that weren’t fit for any bird except maybe a couple Great Blue Herons. They make a pond or two of mud and the shore birds start flocking in. Then Karen Holliday brings in a birding group early in August and they get to see a lot of great birds. Then the Department of Fish and Wildlife let everything go back to the way it was. This year, they made a great mud field, Karen’s group came in on a Saturday, by Friday that field was dry and all the birds had moved on. To me, it looks like the Department of Fish and Wildlife come in to make a good birding experience for the birding group. If that is so, I am very grateful to them and to Karen for coming in every year. I only wish she would bring a group in every Saturday.
>
> Anyhow, now for my questions. Is it the job of the Department of Fish and Wildlife to set up a NWR for the enjoyment of various groups, perhaps it is a birding group one month, a dove hunting group the next month, and deer hunters the next? Or is it their job to make the NWR a habitat suitable for fish and wildlife? For instance, shouldn’t they be maintaining those ponds so the shorebirds have a refuge to come to year round, and not just for two weeks? Or is it just their job to make sure people are properly and legally using the place and nothing else?
>
> It seems to me like the priority of the Department of Fish and Wildlife should be to make a fit habitat for the fish and wildlife, at least within an NWR. But, sometimes it is just way too dry out there for a lot of the birds that usually come through the area. And sometimes the fields are just too full of water. And these are all set up to be rice fields, so it is easy to control how wet each field is, at least when there is plenty of water in the river to pull from. But, if that isn’t their job, well I’d like to know that so I will quit being disappointed in them for not maintaining a good habitat for the shorebirds that migrate through every spring and fall.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot


 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 9:59 am
From: Tammy <msiinc...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
I was under the impression government funding was cut in 2017 for all wildlife refuges by the current administration.  State funding by the government was cut  at this time was well.  This was one of the first moves by our current administration that I disagreed with. Since that time EPA protections have been removed and now the Endangered Species Act has been altered. ALL changes  benefit the Oil, Gas, Coal and farming industries.  It won’t take long to destroy what so many of us hold dear.  This is not fake news but I could have some facts wrong date wise.  Bald Knob is on its own now money wise and I reckon the farmers there are looking out for their paychecks now rather than the wildlife. 

Tammy


Sent from Mail for Windows 10

From: Glenn
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 9:04 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Bald Knob and Fish and Game

I have questions about the responsibilities of the Department of Fish and Wildlife, and I’m hoping someone here knows.  I go birding at Bald Knob NWR quite often, once week if not more.  I have noticed that for the last three years at least, that in the middle of July, they start coming around and putting gravel on some of the back roads around a couple of the ponds, repairing some of the bad spots that have been ignored all year.  They cut the plants growing beside the road that have gotten so tall it is difficult to see the pond on the other side of the weeds.  They then add, or remove water from a couple of the ponds/fields that weren’t fit for any bird except maybe a couple Great Blue Herons.  They make a pond or two of mud and the shore birds start flocking in.  Then Karen Holliday brings in a birding group early in August and they get to see a lot of great birds.  Then the Department of Fish and Wildlife let everything go back to the way it was.  This year, they made a great mud field, Karen’s group came in on a Saturday, by Friday that field was dry and all the birds had moved on.  To me, it looks like the Department of Fish and Wildlife come in to make a good birding experience for the birding group.  If that is so, I am very grateful to them and to Karen for coming in every year.  I only wish she would bring a group in every Saturday.

Anyhow, now for my questions.  Is it the job of the Department of Fish and Wildlife to set up a NWR for the enjoyment of various groups, perhaps it is a birding group one month, a dove hunting group the next month, and deer hunters the next?  Or is it their job to make the NWR a habitat suitable for fish and wildlife?  For instance, shouldn’t they be maintaining those ponds so the shorebirds have a refuge to come to year round, and not just for two weeks?  Or is it just their job to make sure people are properly and legally using the place and nothing else?

It seems to me like the priority of the Department of Fish and Wildlife should be to make a fit habitat for the fish and wildlife, at least within an NWR.  But, sometimes it is just way too dry out there for a lot of the birds that usually come through the area.  And sometimes the fields are just too full of water.  And these are all set up to be rice fields, so it is easy to control how wet each field is, at least when there is plenty of water in the river to pull from.  But, if that isn’t their job, well I’d like to know that so I will quit being disappointed in them for not maintaining a good habitat for the shorebirds that migrate through every spring and fall.

Thanks!

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot



 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 8:56 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
Glen and others,
A friend of mine who grew up in Bald Know had this to say about the Bald Knob Wildlife area. Others may know more about it at present time. This may tell you something about the lay of the land.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

It was the Huntsman family farm. They were an LDS family - father and 2 sons. The complete farm was huge - just about everything from just outside BK to the White River. The current wildlife area is only part of it.

They grew rice and mostly soy beans. We use to duck hunt in there a lot. They had so much vandalism from people coming in to hunt that they blocked off most of the roads.

Sometime in the -80s? or so they went bankrupt and the land was sold off - mostly to the government.


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10

________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Sent: Monday, September 23, 2019 9:02:25 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Bald Knob and Fish and Game

I have questions about the responsibilities of the Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Im hoping someone here knows. I go birding at Bald Knob NWR quite often, once week if not more. I have noticed that for the last three years at least, that in the middle of July, they start coming around and putting gravel on some of the back roads around a couple of the ponds, repairing some of the bad spots that have been ignored all year. They cut the plants growing beside the road that have gotten so tall it is difficult to see the pond on the other side of the weeds. They then add, or remove water from a couple of the ponds/fields that werent fit for any bird except maybe a couple Great Blue Herons. They make a pond or two of mud and the shore birds start flocking in. Then Karen Holliday brings in a birding group early in August and they get to see a lot of great birds. Then the Department of Fish and Wildlife let everything go back to the way it was. This year, they made a great mud field, Karens group came in on a Saturday, by Friday that field was dry and all the birds had moved on. To me, it looks like the Department of Fish and Wildlife come in to make a good birding experience for the birding group. If that is so, I am very grateful to them and to Karen for coming in every year. I only wish she would bring a group in every Saturday.

Anyhow, now for my questions. Is it the job of the Department of Fish and Wildlife to set up a NWR for the enjoyment of various groups, perhaps it is a birding group one month, a dove hunting group the next month, and deer hunters the next? Or is it their job to make the NWR a habitat suitable for fish and wildlife? For instance, shouldnt they be maintaining those ponds so the shorebirds have a refuge to come to year round, and not just for two weeks? Or is it just their job to make sure people are properly and legally using the place and nothing else?

It seems to me like the priority of the Department of Fish and Wildlife should be to make a fit habitat for the fish and wildlife, at least within an NWR. But, sometimes it is just way too dry out there for a lot of the birds that usually come through the area. And sometimes the fields are just too full of water. And these are all set up to be rice fields, so it is easy to control how wet each field is, at least when there is plenty of water in the river to pull from. But, if that isnt their job, well Id like to know that so I will quit being disappointed in them for not maintaining a good habitat for the shorebirds that migrate through every spring and fall.

Thanks!

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot


 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 8:55 am
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
It is definitely somebody's job and it usually always comes down to money,
whether some politicians and lawyers are going to fund things with some
kind of understanding, the natural cycle of life, whether properly or
poorly.
I feel pretty sorry for agencies who often desperately need or want
the money for real worthwhile maintenance or care or 10 other reasons, but
with our near hopeless situation in the country, very often don't get it
and have to do without the funds. Run for office young people!

Bill Thurman. I'm for you.

On Mon, Sep 23, 2019, 9:03 AM Glenn <
<000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> I have questions about the responsibilities of the Department of Fish and
> Wildlife, and I’m hoping someone here knows. I go birding at Bald Knob NWR
> quite often, once week if not more. I have noticed that for the last three
> years at least, that in the middle of July, they start coming around and
> putting gravel on some of the back roads around a couple of the ponds,
> repairing some of the bad spots that have been ignored all year. They cut
> the plants growing beside the road that have gotten so tall it is difficult
> to see the pond on the other side of the weeds. They then add, or remove
> water from a couple of the ponds/fields that weren’t fit for any bird
> except maybe a couple Great Blue Herons. They make a pond or two of mud
> and the shore birds start flocking in. Then Karen Holliday brings in a
> birding group early in August and they get to see a lot of great birds.
> Then the Department of Fish and Wildlife let everything go back to the way
> it was. This year, they made a great mud field, Karen’s group came in on a
> Saturday, by Friday that field was dry and all the birds had moved on. To
> me, it looks like the Department of Fish and Wildlife come in to make a
> good birding experience for the birding group. If that is so, I am very
> grateful to them and to Karen for coming in every year. I only wish she
> would bring a group in every Saturday.
>
> Anyhow, now for my questions. Is it the job of the Department of Fish and
> Wildlife to set up a NWR for the enjoyment of various groups, perhaps it is
> a birding group one month, a dove hunting group the next month, and deer
> hunters the next? Or is it their job to make the NWR a habitat suitable
> for fish and wildlife? For instance, shouldn’t they be maintaining those
> ponds so the shorebirds have a refuge to come to year round, and not just
> for two weeks? Or is it just their job to make sure people are properly
> and legally using the place and nothing else?
>
> It seems to me like the priority of the Department of Fish and Wildlife
> should be to make a fit habitat for the fish and wildlife, at least within
> an NWR. But, sometimes it is just way too dry out there for a lot of the
> birds that usually come through the area. And sometimes the fields are
> just too full of water. And these are all set up to be rice fields, so it
> is easy to control how wet each field is, at least when there is plenty of
> water in the river to pull from. But, if that isn’t their job, well I’d
> like to know that so I will quit being disappointed in them for not
> maintaining a good habitat for the shorebirds that migrate through every
> spring and fall.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Glenn Wyatt
> Cabot
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 8:31 am
From: Judy Griffith <9waterfall9...>
Subject: Re: Red Crossbills continue near Shores Lake, Ozark NF
Fantastic!
And the Red-breasted Nuthatch continues here at Ninestone for nearly a full
year since my first field notebook entry Sep 29, 2018.

Judith
Ninestone, Carroll County


On Mon, Sep 23, 2019 at 9:21 AM Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

> Bill Beall and Jim Nieting found Red Crossbills near Shores Lake in Ozark
> National Forest on Saturday September 21. It appeared to be a small group
> (4-5). They are in the same area where we have found them repeatedly on a
> hillside with thinned Shortleaf Pine, a wide shoulder, about 1.4 miles
> south of where we usually meet for our spring field trip (parking lot for
> the recreation area). This is just a short distance south of the
> intersection of 215 and county road 75. If you look at Red Crossbill
> records in eBird, Pooja Panwar and Karen Holliday have both dropped pins
> along 215 at the same location where Bill and Jim saw the birds on
> Saturday. According to Bill, the crossbills were close enough that he heard
> them as soon as he opened the car door, but then moved off. There have been
> repeated crossbill observations in this area. Joan Reynolds photographed a
> fledgling being fed out of the nest near this location on March 4, 2017.
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 7:21 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Red Crossbills continue near Shores Lake, Ozark NF
Bill Beall and Jim Nieting found Red Crossbills near Shores Lake in Ozark National Forest on Saturday September 21. It appeared to be a small group (4-5). They are in the same area where we have found them repeatedly on a hillside with thinned Shortleaf Pine, a wide shoulder, about 1.4 miles south of where we usually meet for our spring field trip (parking lot for the recreation area). This is just a short distance south of the intersection of 215 and county road 75. If you look at Red Crossbill records in eBird, Pooja Panwar and Karen Holliday have both dropped pins along 215 at the same location where Bill and Jim saw the birds on Saturday. According to Bill, the crossbills were close enough that he heard them as soon as he opened the car door, but then moved off. There have been repeated crossbill observations in this area. Joan Reynolds photographed a fledgling being fed out of the nest near this location on March 4, 2017.


 

Back to top
Date: 9/23/19 7:03 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob and Fish and Game
I have questions about the responsibilities of the Department of Fish and Wildlife, and I’m hoping someone here knows.  I go birding at Bald Knob NWR quite often, once week if not more.  I have noticed that for the last three years at least, that in the middle of July, they start coming around and putting gravel on some of the back roads around a couple of the ponds, repairing some of the bad spots that have been ignored all year.  They cut the plants growing beside the road that have gotten so tall it is difficult to see the pond on the other side of the weeds.  They then add, or remove water from a couple of the ponds/fields that weren’t fit for any bird except maybe a couple Great Blue Herons.  They make a pond or two of mud and the shore birds start flocking in.  Then Karen Holliday brings in a birding group early in August and they get to see a lot of great birds.  Then the Department of Fish and Wildlife let everything go back to the way it was.  This year, they made a great mud field, Karen’s group came in on a Saturday, by Friday that field was dry and all the birds had moved on.  To me, it looks like the Department of Fish and Wildlife come in to make a good birding experience for the birding group.  If that is so, I am very grateful to them and to Karen for coming in every year.  I only wish she would bring a group in every Saturday.

Anyhow, now for my questions.  Is it the job of the Department of Fish and Wildlife to set up a NWR for the enjoyment of various groups, perhaps it is a birding group one month, a dove hunting group the next month, and deer hunters the next?  Or is it their job to make the NWR a habitat suitable for fish and wildlife?  For instance, shouldn’t they be maintaining those ponds so the shorebirds have a refuge to come to year round, and not just for two weeks?  Or is it just their job to make sure people are properly and legally using the place and nothing else?

It seems to me like the priority of the Department of Fish and Wildlife should be to make a fit habitat for the fish and wildlife, at least within an NWR.  But, sometimes it is just way too dry out there for a lot of the birds that usually come through the area.  And sometimes the fields are just too full of water.  And these are all set up to be rice fields, so it is easy to control how wet each field is, at least when there is plenty of water in the river to pull from.  But, if that isn’t their job, well I’d like to know that so I will quit being disappointed in them for not maintaining a good habitat for the shorebirds that migrate through every spring and fall.

Thanks!

Glenn Wyatt
Cabot


 

Back to top
Date: 9/22/19 11:35 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: A few fall birds on Kessler Mountain, Fayetteville
A couple of friends are working on a botanical survey on Kessler Mountain in Fayetteville. The spot is a slope above Finger Lane where Doug James and his family lived many years ago. I imagine half a century ago a young Professor James studied birds in the same places we visited this morning. Most interesting to me were Wood Thrushes. I saw three birds in one spot; two for sure were Wood Thrushes. In same area, a male Hooded Warbler. Yellow-throated Vireos are still singing. We got up to one spot with a sandstone ledge. A detached sandstone slab had some fascinating fossils messages about life some 300 million years ago. Trying to understand time like that is beyond me above my pay grade as we used to say in the Forest Service. Here is an eBird list for this morning, including a lousy Wood Thrush image: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S60026966.


 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 6:35 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Saturday Field Trip
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Saturday morning, twenty birders assembled at the first Bona Dea trail parking lot on the west side of Russellville.  It was cloudy and very muggy but not too hot. We made a quick loop of the trail. Very few birds were moving except for Blue Jays.  
We then moved to the loop trail at the second parking lot hoping our luck would change.  This longer loop was as slow as the first loop.  Birds were few and far between.  We enjoyed seeing several Brown-headed Nuthatches, Wood Ducks, Gray Catbirds, Belted Kingfishers, Green Herons, a quick fly-by of Double-crested Cormorants, White-eyed Vireos, plus more Blue Jays. We saw all the expected woodpeckers except for Northern Flicker, with several quite close.  We were excited for two of our birding buddies who each saw a life bird, one a Hairy Woodpecker and the other a Sharp-shinned Hawk. Even our more common birds can still be a real treat for our newer birders.  
We worked hard for every bird and managed to rustle up a total of 39 species.  It was still a fun day because we did a lot visiting in between the sparse bird sightings.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock/Pulaski County



 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 2:11 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: A world worth living-in
This 3 billion-bird-bomb is one more hole-in-the-dike in the global loss of biodiversity. Sooner or later we are going to run-out-of-fingers.



Last Spring’s IPBES report expects over 1 million species to become extinct and 75 % of land is severely altered by human actions. Not just some fencerows, here-and-there, but air and water quality, sustainable use issues, population growth, business and political changes, etc. Sound familiar?



If our politicians—current and future—don’t include biodiversity as a part of the Green New Deal, maybe we should insist upon it.



As Pogo said, “We have met the enemy and it is us”.



Jeff Short



From: Lynn Foster [mailto:<lfoster5211...>]
Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2019 3:07 PM
To: Jeffrey Short
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Part 2, more 3 x 10^9 birds vanish



Thanks, Jeffrey. Note that the last part of this article makes two suggestions, if you want to help birds:



First, write your representative and senators in Congress and ask them to expand the conservation provisions in the Farm Bill (which is enacted every five years or so and was just signed into law last December) to protect other birds as well as waterfowl, and



Second, write your representative and urge passage of the bipartisan Recovering America's Wildlife Act, number H.R. 3742, introduced in the House this summer. This bill if enacted would enable state agencies to better protect increasing numbers of threatened species and populations and would absolutely benefit birds. See https://wildlife.org/policy/recovering-americas-wildlife-act/.



Lynn Foster

NW of Pinnacle Mountain



On Sat, Sep 21, 2019 at 9:01 AM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

Waterfowl thriving. (Bad for aircraft!)

Take home message—Give songbirds the same amount of support as hunted birds.









Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.42.29 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.42.44 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.43.05 PM.png


 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 1:49 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BLUE GROSBEAKS ALL BROWN AT CHESNEY TODAY
Pretty windy morning at Chesney Prairie Natural Area, but better in terms of seeing birds when I walked on the north side of the tree line along Sager Creek drainage. Almost all of the birds are yellow like grass or brown like everything else. Big Bluestem Grass, Ashy Sunflower, Giant Ragweed, Poke, etc form dense habitat full of birds on the protected side. One of the American Goldfinch flocks exceeded 30 individuals. I saw the days 12 Indigo Buntings here (all brown now). Most of maybe all Dickcissels that nested at Chesney are gone, but I saw a couple in this habitat. Maybe most surprising, Blue Grosbeaks all of them brown. There were at least 5 in one flock perched on some bare limbs. Im pretty sure I missed several Common Yellowthroats and House Wrens down in the dense vegetation. A few Ladies Tresses Orchids were blooming along the path. All typical Tallgrass Prairie grasses are in their glory now: Big Bluestem, Indian Grass, Switch Grass, and Little Bluestem. Here is an eBird checklist for the morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59983286. I included photos of Blue Grosbeaks, Indigo Bunting, and Dickcissels this will give you a feel for what it was like. Plenty of dragonflies, though hard to track because of the wind. One that settled down was identified by David Oakley as a Blue-faced Meadowlark.


 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 1:08 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: Part 2, more 3 x 10^9 birds vanish
Thanks, Jeffrey. Note that the last part of this article makes two
suggestions, if you want to help birds:

First, write your representative and senators in Congress and ask them to
expand the conservation provisions in the Farm Bill (which is enacted every
five years or so and was just signed into law last December) to protect
other birds as well as waterfowl, and

Second, write your representative and urge passage of the bipartisan
Recovering America's Wildlife Act, number H.R. 3742, introduced in the
House this summer. This bill if enacted would enable state agencies to
better protect increasing numbers of threatened species and populations and
would absolutely benefit birds. See
https://wildlife.org/policy/recovering-americas-wildlife-act/.

Lynn Foster
NW of Pinnacle Mountain

On Sat, Sep 21, 2019 at 9:01 AM Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:

> Waterfowl thriving. (Bad for aircraft!)
>
> Take home message—Give songbirds the same amount of support as hunted
> birds.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> [image: Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.42.29 PM.png]
>
> [image: Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.42.44 PM.png]
>
> [image: Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.43.05 PM.png]
>

 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 11:34 am
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 9/21/2019
Windy conditions made birding quite difficult at Lake Fayetteville this morning.

Fall migrants included Yellow-billed Cuckoo (1), Chimney Swift (14), Ruby-throated Hummingbird (5), Broad-winged Hawk (1), Least Flycatcher (2), Wilson's Warbler (3), Summer Tanager (4) and Rose-breasted Grosbeak (1-FOS). A very confiding Barred Owl was observed for around 15 minutes.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59979843

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 9:22 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
NPR's "Science Friday" show yesterday had a good interview with Ken Rosenberg from Cornell on the report. A good example of birdwatcher data supported by high-technology, NEXRAD (weather radar) data.

Sid Gauthreaux' work to use mobile radar units to count and identify migrants got needed funding from DOD and the (electrical) Energy community. The USAF played a role in this by funding the basic research and development of algorithms to sort-out the bird (and some insect!) returns in the early NEXRAD prototypes.

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Than Boves
Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2019 10:28 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970

While clearly overall this report is negative (and really not surprising for anyone that has been paying attention), I am surprised by a few specific positive trends and, assuming they are accurate, would be interested in hearing ideas that may explain these, esp. in light of the other trends from the analysis.

1) Vireos have increased by >50% since 1970??!

2) Introduced species have declined faster than any other group (-60%)?

3) Vultures have increased by 250%!

4) Nuthatches, Woodpeckers, and Brown creepers have all increased significantly

Thoughts?

--------------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
870-972-3320
Website: www.boveslab.com<http://%20www.boveslab.com>




On Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 5:11 PM -0500, "Carol Joan Patterson" <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...><mailto:<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>> wrote:

Totally agree. The situation is desperate.

On Thursday, September 19, 2019, 5:06:26 PM CDT, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:


It is my opinion that with our birds at such a critical point, everything has an impact including climate change, 3.4 billion animals killed by 100 million feral cats, window collisions, habitat loss, loss of native vegetation and replaced by exotics and non-native, more auto collisions, oil pits, loss of native insects, pesticides that impact food and reproduction and the list goes on. This will have to be dealt with on multiple fronts and anyone not actively involved in helping are part of the problem.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Kim Hillis
Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:56 PM
To: <jwdavis...>
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970

Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change?


Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do what is needed to do to reverse this trends.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.msn.com_en-2Dus_news_science_three-2Dbillion-2Dbirds-2Dhave-2Dbeen-2Dlost-2Din-2Dnorth-2Damerica-2Dsince-2D1970_ar-2DAAHxTY3-3Focid-3Dspartandhp&d=DwMCaQ&c=QzRQJlHx0ZTYmlwGx7ptjrPEeuNmnYRxm_FN73lod7w&r=7GY_tLFKiggtwGF79-jINsYKU9T9mwO7Mj-3mSpAuok&m=E8Wq3oz1tYqOlGQuKPYhHyytoObCYrArn0Vmnfuo8A8&s=NJXuhA8JtPnWG8CrZMWpXdKET9ZJtXetu5uOguT6bKo&e=>
 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 8:28 am
From: Than Boves <tboves...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
While clearly overall this report is negative (and really not surprising for anyone that has been paying attention), I am surprised by a few specific positive trends and, assuming they are accurate, would be interested in hearing ideas that may explain these, esp. in light of the other trends from the analysis.

1) Vireos have increased by >50% since 1970??!

2) Introduced species have declined faster than any other group (-60%)?

3) Vultures have increased by 250%!

4) Nuthatches, Woodpeckers, and Brown creepers have all increased significantly

Thoughts?

--------------------------------------------------------
Than J. Boves, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Arkansas State University
870-972-3320
Website: www.boveslab.com<http://%20www.boveslab.com>




On Fri, Sep 20, 2019 at 5:11 PM -0500, "Carol Joan Patterson" <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...><mailto:<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>> wrote:

Totally agree. The situation is desperate.

On Thursday, September 19, 2019, 5:06:26 PM CDT, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:


It is my opinion that with our birds at such a critical point, everything has an impact including climate change, 3.4 billion animals killed by 100 million feral cats, window collisions, habitat loss, loss of native vegetation and replaced by exotics and non-native, more auto collisions, oil pits, loss of native insects, pesticides that impact food and reproduction and the list goes on. This will have to be dealt with on multiple fronts and anyone not actively involved in helping are part of the problem.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Kim Hillis
Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:56 PM
To: <jwdavis...>
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970

Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change?


Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do what is needed to do to reverse this trends.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp<https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.msn.com_en-2Dus_news_science_three-2Dbillion-2Dbirds-2Dhave-2Dbeen-2Dlost-2Din-2Dnorth-2Damerica-2Dsince-2D1970_ar-2DAAHxTY3-3Focid-3Dspartandhp&d=DwMCaQ&c=QzRQJlHx0ZTYmlwGx7ptjrPEeuNmnYRxm_FN73lod7w&r=7GY_tLFKiggtwGF79-jINsYKU9T9mwO7Mj-3mSpAuok&m=E8Wq3oz1tYqOlGQuKPYhHyytoObCYrArn0Vmnfuo8A8&s=NJXuhA8JtPnWG8CrZMWpXdKET9ZJtXetu5uOguT6bKo&e=>
 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 7:02 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Part 2, more 3 x 10^9 birds vanish
Waterfowl thriving. (Bad for aircraft!)

Take home message—Give songbirds the same amount of support as hunted birds.









Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.42.29 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.42.44 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.43.05 PM.png


 

Back to top
Date: 9/21/19 6:57 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: more 3 x 10^9 birds vanish
NYTime's; 9-19-2019; part one of two e-mails







Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.40.31 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.41.14 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.41.30 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-09-19 at 3.41.45 PM.png


 

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Date: 9/20/19 4:52 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: NABCI News: 3 Billion Birds Campaign is LIVE! Webinar today at 2:30 pm Eastern Time!
Here is a thread from DOD with some additional links.



Jeff Short



From: Bird conservation list for Department of Defense/Partners in Flight [mailto:<DODPIF-L...>] On Behalf Of Fischer, Richard A ERDC-RDE-EL-MS CIV
Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 2:10 PM
To: <DODPIF-L...>
Subject: NABCI News: 3 Billion Birds Campaign is LIVE! Webinar today at 2:30 pm Eastern Time!



https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2019/09/18/science.aaw1313



This paper in Science is perhaps one of the most important in recent history detailing the decline and loss of North American migratory birds. All of the collective actions of DoD installation NRM’s, implementing proactive conservation for migratory birds through actions articulated in our INRMP’s, really do make a difference. We have demonstrated that time and time again through focused management-based monitoring efforts. Please keep up your good work in earnest and in the face of changing legislation, budgets, and regulatory hurdles. DoD Partners in Flight stands ready to assist installations with any migratory bird issues or questions. Don’t hesitate to approach your Regional Representative, or myself, at any time. You can find our contact information on our website: https://www.denix.osd.mil/dodpif/groups/about/



Rich



Richard A. Fischer, PhD

U.S. Army Engineer R&D Center

Environmental Laboratory

3909 Halls Ferry Rd.

Vicksburg, MS 39180

502-454-4658

<Richard.A.Fischer...>

National Coordinator, DoD Partners in Flight

Lead, USACE Threatened and Endangered Species Team









From: Partners In Flight Community <PIFCOMMUNITY...> On Behalf Of Robert Ford
Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 1:41 PM
To: <PIFCOMMUNITY...>
Subject: Fwd: [EXTERNAL] NABCI News: 3 Billion Birds Campaign is LIVE! Webinar today at 2:30 pm Eastern Time!





Sent from my iPhone


Begin forwarded message:

From: Judith Scarl <jscarl...>
Date: September 19, 2019 at 2:29:44 PM EDT
To: Judith Scarl <jscarl...>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] NABCI News: 3 Billion Birds Campaign is LIVE! Webinar today at 2:30 pm Eastern Time!

Dear NABCI partners,



Many of you have heard about the startling new analyses that show that the US and Canada have lost almost 3 billion birds over the past 50 years. At 2pm today, a paper describing these analyses was published in the journal Science <Blockedhttps://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2019/09/18/science.aaw1313Blocked> , and several of NABCI’s partners have launched a major media campaign to galvanize the public and lawmakers to work together to save birds. I’m attaching a press release that provides more information; feel free to use or modify to help publicize these results and how your organization’s work helps to support bird conservation.



A new website, 3BillionBirds.org <Blockedhttps://www.3billionbirds.org/Blocked> , showcases results from the study and outlines actions that we can all take to support bird conservation. The website also provides some amazing resources you can use to promote bird conservation; check out the photos, sounds, videos, and infographics <Blockedhttps://www.3billionbirds.org/additional-mediaBlocked> that you can use for social media or other publicity. If your organization works with the public, the website has actions we can all rally around to save birds- the Seven Simple Actions to Help Birds <Blockedhttps://www.3billionbirds.org/7-simple-actionsBlocked> walks through some easy steps for bird conservation.



For more information, ABC is hosting a webinar today at 2:30 <Blockedhttps://zoom.us/meeting/register/56e9c7a3e6804181d746f627e8486654Blocked> (and I am rushing to get this email out in time!). The webinar will be recorded and distributed afterwards.



As you probably know, the data from the Science paper also provide the foundation for NABCI’s 2019 State of the Birds report, which will be released next Monday, September 23 at the AFWA meeting in St. Paul, MN. We will be distributing hard copies of the report at the meeting and in addition to a presentation to the Bird Committee, the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act updates (presented to many Committees) will feature the State of the Birds report, and the report will be presented to the state fish and wildlife agency Directors at the Business Meeting. We are working on having an announcement at the Monday night, Audubon-sponsored RAWA reception. An updated Stateofthebirds.org <Blockedhttp://Stateofthebirds.orgBlocked> website will go live on Monday as well, where you can download a PDF of the report and explore additional maps, stories, and features. In addition to the report itself, our release will feature an insert to accompany the report- the insert focuses on the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act and will be branded by the Alliance for America’s Fish and Wildlife <Blockedhttp://ournatureusa.com/Blocked> , to differentiate it from the NABCI report. For partners that can communicate about RAWA, this insert will help to connect the state story from the State of the Birds report, with the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act as a solution to the financial challenges states face. We will also have a Congressional briefing on the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act and the State of the Birds in the first half of October. So, stay tuned for another exciting announcement next week, and in the meantime, I hope you’ll explore and distribute some of the great materials generated by the 3 Billion Birds initiative!



Congratulations to the NABCI partners behind the Science paper and the media campaign- this is a big accomplishment!



Jude





_____

To unsubscribe from the PIFCOMMUNITY list, click the following link:
Blockedhttp://listserv.uark.edu/cgi-bin/wa?TICKET=NzM3MzUxIFJpY2hhcmQuQS5GaXNjaGVyQEVSREMuRFJFTi5NSUwgUElGQ09NTVVOSVRZIBxET87XZqyZ <Blockedhttp://listserv.uark.edu/cgi-bin/wa?TICKET=NzM3MzUxIFJpY2hhcmQuQS5GaXNjaGVyQEVSREMuRFJFTi5NSUwgUElGQ09NTVVOSVRZIBxET87XZqyZ&c=SIGNOFFBlocked> &c=SIGNOFFBlocked


 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/19 4:30 pm
From: Jennifer Mortensen <mortejen...>
Subject: Three billion birds - resources for learning more
As you all know by now, a study published yesterday in the journal Science revealed that since 1970, bird populations in the United States and Canada have declined by 29 percent, or almost 3 billion birds. This work is based on a robust analysis of breeding bird survey and Christmas bird count data (HOORAY for citizen science!), and bird migration observed by weather radar, among other sources.

If you're interested in learning more, some amazing materials have been put together for your use including a press release and social media templates, seven personal actions that you can take in your daily life (I also listed these below), and policy action factsheets. All are available at https://www.3billionbirds.org/

You can also access the study here: https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/DECLINE-OF-NORTH-AMERICAN-AVIFAUNA-SCIENCE-2019.pdf
Please email me directly if you'd like a version without line numbers.

Good birding,
Jen Mortensen

7 simple actions to help birds:
1. Make windows safer, day and night
2. Keep cats indoors
3. Reduce lawn, plant natives
4. Avoid pesticides
5. Drink bird-friendly coffee
6. Protect our planet from plastics
7. Watch birds, share what you see

____________________________
Jennifer Mortensen, Ph.D.
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR USA
<mortejen...>
 

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Date: 9/20/19 3:38 pm
From: Bill Thurman <bill.masterofmusic...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
Bring back more birds to the world and less people. Whatever that takes.
The solution overall is fairly simple. I know that will not be an easy snap
of the fingers.

Bill Thurman

On Fri, Sep 20, 2019, 5:11 PM Carol Joan Patterson <
<0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Totally agree. The situation is desperate.
>
> On Thursday, September 19, 2019, 5:06:26 PM CDT, Jerry Davis <
> <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
>
> It is my opinion that with our birds at such a critical point, everything
> has an impact including climate change, 3.4 billion animals killed by 100
> million feral cats, window collisions, habitat loss, loss of native
> vegetation and replaced by exotics and non-native, more auto collisions,
> oil pits, loss of native insects, pesticides that impact food and
> reproduction and the list goes on. This will have to be dealt with on
> multiple fronts and anyone not actively involved in helping are part of the
> problem.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
> *From:* Kim Hillis
> *Sent:* Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:56 PM
> *To:* <jwdavis...>
> *Cc:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since
> 1970
>
> Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change?
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
> This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing
> our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not
> only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in
> everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do
> what is needed to do to reverse this trends.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
>
>
>
> https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp
>
>

 

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Date: 9/20/19 3:35 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
You tell ‘em Jerry!

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 20, 2019, at 5:11 PM, Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> Totally agree. The situation is desperate.
>
> On Thursday, September 19, 2019, 5:06:26 PM CDT, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
>
> It is my opinion that with our birds at such a critical point, everything has an impact including climate change, 3.4 billion animals killed by 100 million feral cats, window collisions, habitat loss, loss of native vegetation and replaced by exotics and non-native, more auto collisions, oil pits, loss of native insects, pesticides that impact food and reproduction and the list goes on. This will have to be dealt with on multiple fronts and anyone not actively involved in helping are part of the problem.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
> From: Kim Hillis
> Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:56 PM
> To: <jwdavis...>
> Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
>
> Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change?
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>>
>> This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do what is needed to do to reverse this trends.
>>
>> Jerry Wayne Davis
>> Hot Springs
>>
>>
>>
>> https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp

 

Back to top
Date: 9/20/19 3:11 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
Totally agree.  The situation is desperate.

On Thursday, September 19, 2019, 5:06:26 PM CDT, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

It is my opinion that with our birds at such a critical point, everything has an impact including climate change, 3.4 billion animals killed by 100 million feral cats, window collisions, habitat loss, loss of native vegetation and replaced by exotics and non-native, more auto collisions, oil pits, loss of native insects, pesticides that impact food and reproduction and the list goes on. This will have to be dealt with on multiple fronts and anyone not actively involved in helping are part of the problem.  Jerry Wayne DavisHot Springs, AR From: Kim Hillis Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:56 PMTo: <jwdavis...> Cc: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970 Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change? 

Sent from my iPhone
On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:


This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing our birds.  Without research I have been able to see this happening not only in the US but in Latin America.  The silence is screaming in everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do what is needed to do to reverse this trends.   Jerry Wayne Davis Hot Springs       https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp

 

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Date: 9/19/19 6:47 pm
From: Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
Even though I’m not a scientist of any kind, just a lowly retired choral music teacher and church musician, I’ve given four programs on birds and pollinator gardens this year. All were well received and I had positive feedback on them. I’m doing all I can to help.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR

Sent from my iPad

On Sep 19, 2019, at 7:20 PM, Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...><mailto:<lfoster5211...>> wrote:

Dear Birders,

If you live within the KUAR broadcast area, you may have heard these one-minute broadcasts by Central Arkansas Master Naturalists. We are trying to get the word out about natural habitat and ecology to folks who may not be aware of their benefits.

https://www.ualrpublicradio.org/programs/nature-natural-state

So far, of our six spots one is on Carolina chickadees and food deserts, and one is on hummingbirds.

I believe most people want to help birds, but aren't aware of the issues.

Lynn Foster
Central Arkansas Master Naturalist

On Thu, Sep 19, 2019 at 5:06 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...><mailto:<jwdavis...>> wrote:
It is my opinion that with our birds at such a critical point, everything has an impact including climate change, 3.4 billion animals killed by 100 million feral cats, window collisions, habitat loss, loss of native vegetation and replaced by exotics and non-native, more auto collisions, oil pits, loss of native insects, pesticides that impact food and reproduction and the list goes on. This will have to be dealt with on multiple fronts and anyone not actively involved in helping are part of the problem.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Kim Hillis
Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:56 PM
To: <jwdavis...>
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970

Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change?


Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do what is needed to do to reverse this trends.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp
 

Back to top
Date: 9/19/19 6:10 pm
From: David Luneau <mdluneau...>
Subject: Re: IBWO
Here is a link so you can see it online. Pretty funny, I think.



<https://www.ispot.tv/ad/oshA/tiaa-woodpecker> https://www.ispot.tv/ad/oshA/tiaa-woodpecker



M. David Luneau, Jr., P.E.
Associate Professor of Electronics
Department of Engineering Technology
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Little Rock, AR 72204



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Sandy Berger
Sent: Tuesday, September 17, 2019 11:01 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: [ARBIRD-L] IBWO



Just saw a clever TIAA commercial featuring the Ivory-billed Woodpecker? The bird even makes the correct call. The habitat’s all wrong, but hey. Emphasizes the sometimes frustrations of birders/photographers. Saw it on AMC.



Sandy B.


 

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Date: 9/19/19 5:20 pm
From: Lynn Foster <lfoster5211...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
Dear Birders,

If you live within the KUAR broadcast area, you may have heard these
one-minute broadcasts by Central Arkansas Master Naturalists. We are trying
to get the word out about natural habitat and ecology to folks who may not
be aware of their benefits.

https://www.ualrpublicradio.org/programs/nature-natural-state

So far, of our six spots one is on Carolina chickadees and food deserts,
and one is on hummingbirds.

I believe most people want to help birds, but aren't aware of the issues.

Lynn Foster
Central Arkansas Master Naturalist

On Thu, Sep 19, 2019 at 5:06 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> It is my opinion that with our birds at such a critical point, everything
> has an impact including climate change, 3.4 billion animals killed by 100
> million feral cats, window collisions, habitat loss, loss of native
> vegetation and replaced by exotics and non-native, more auto collisions,
> oil pits, loss of native insects, pesticides that impact food and
> reproduction and the list goes on. This will have to be dealt with on
> multiple fronts and anyone not actively involved in helping are part of the
> problem.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs, AR
>
> *From:* Kim Hillis
> *Sent:* Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:56 PM
> *To:* <jwdavis...>
> *Cc:* <ARBIRD-L...>
> *Subject:* Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since
> 1970
>
> Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change?
>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
> This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing
> our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not
> only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in
> everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do
> what is needed to do to reverse this trends.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
>
>
>
> https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp
>
>

 

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Date: 9/19/19 3:06 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
It is my opinion that with our birds at such a critical point, everything has an impact including climate change, 3.4 billion animals killed by 100 million feral cats, window collisions, habitat loss, loss of native vegetation and replaced by exotics and non-native, more auto collisions, oil pits, loss of native insects, pesticides that impact food and reproduction and the list goes on. This will have to be dealt with on multiple fronts and anyone not actively involved in helping are part of the problem.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR

From: Kim Hillis
Sent: Thursday, September 19, 2019 4:56 PM
To: <jwdavis...>
Cc: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970

Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change?



Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:


This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do what is needed to do to reverse this trends.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp
 

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Date: 9/19/19 2:57 pm
From: Kim Hillis <kimberlyannhillis...>
Subject: Re: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
Wonder if this has anything to do with climate change?


Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 19, 2019, at 2:08 PM, Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:
>
> This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do what is needed to do to reverse this trends.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
>
>
> https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp

 

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Date: 9/19/19 2:42 pm
From: Jack and Pam <00000064a46c579c-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Sedentary birding
After a visit with Sally Jo a few months ago we bought one, too.  Especially nice when the windows have to be closed in hot or cold weather.
Jack
On Wednesday, September 18, 2019, 12:16:46 PM CDT, Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> wrote:

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I enjoy all the bird reports on ARBird, especially since I no longer am physically able to get out into “the field.” 

Something that I’ve used for about 35 years, and may be beneficial to other birders, is a baby monitor.  One part is outside on my open deck and the other is inside my “Birdsview Solarium,” (enclosed sunroom) Anything that makes a chirp or other sound is easily heard.  Volume can be adjusted, just as if you were monitoring a baby in another room. 

Many of you may already use these.    

Can be purchased at WalMart, Amazon, etc.

Sally Jo Gibson

Harrison, AR

 

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 

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Date: 9/19/19 12:09 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Three Billion Birds Have Been Lost In North America Since 1970
This is what those in the field have been telling people, we are losing our birds. Without research I have been able to see this happening not only in the US but in Latin America. The silence is screaming in everyone's ears into a society that is too indifferent and apathetic to do what is needed to do to reverse this trends.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs



https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/science/three-billion-birds-have-been-lost-in-north-america-since-1970/ar-AAHxTY3?ocid=spartandhp
 

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Date: 9/19/19 9:03 am
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob 19 Sep
This morning the highlights were 1 American Avocet, 3 Plovers - I think they are Golden-plovers but they had no black on the chest or belly so I'll have to look at the photos later. And 2 Upland Sandpipers.
Oh, and several hunters.

Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 9/18/19 5:20 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Audubon Arkansas's Native Plant Sale, Oct 11-12
Audubon Arkansass native plant sale is Oct 11-12.

Friday VIP Night, 5-7 pm
For a $25 donation, you can:
- Support Audubon Arkansas's conservation work
- Have your early-bird pick of plants
- Enjoy complimentary beer, wine, and hors d'oeuvres.
- Space limited! Reserve at http://ar.audubon.org/2019nativeVIP

Saturday Sale, 9 am-2 pm
Admission FREE

Held at the Little Rock Audubon Center, 4500 Springer Blvd.

Vendors include Pine Ridge Gardens and Grand Designs.

Details at https://ar.audubon.org/events/native-plant-vip-night

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 9/18/19 5:10 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 18
It was partly cloudy and hot with a moderate breeze on the bird survey
today. 52 species were found. Instead of catching the morning flight from
the heronry I decided to work migrant passerines along the woodland edges
since they have been poorly represented in my surveys the past few weeks. I
started at first light and buy the time I made it to the reservoirs and the
heronry around mid-morning there were only a couple hundred birds left in
it, mostly fledgling Cattle Egrets waiting to be fed. I'm sure there were
good numbers of roosting birds that I missed but the nesters are just about
done. Migrant Passerine numbers were low but I did better with them than I
have been doing. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 5 (also one brood of small young.)

Wood Duck - 11

Mallard - 2

Blue-winged Teal - 7

Pied-billed Grebe - 11

Neotropic Cormorant - 5

Anhinga - 30

Great-blue Heron - 7

Great Egret - 18

Snowy Egret - 55

Little-blue Heron - 16

Tricolored Heron - 1 juv.

Cattle Egret - 350

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2

White Ibis - 7

Black Vulture - 9

Turkey Vulture - 17

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 6

Purple Gallinule - 13

Common Gallinule - 48

American Coot - 2

Killdeer - 11

American Avocet - 4

Mourning Dove - 1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 1

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 3

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Least Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 3

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 14

Yellow-throated Vireo - 1 (still singing!)

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

Blue Jay - 5

American Crow - 12

Tree Swallow - 54

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 15

Cave Swallow - 1

Barn Swallow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 10

Tufted Titmouse - 7

Carolina Wren - 11

Northern Mockingbird - 2

Pine Warbler - 4

Summer Tanager - 1

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 12

Indigo Bunting - 6

Red-winged Blackbird - 5





Odonates:



Lilypad Forktail

Common Green Darner

Regal Darner

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Twelve-spotted Skimmer

Wandering Glider

Striped Saddlebags

Black Saddlebags



Herps:



American Alligator

Southern Leopard Frog (calling)

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR
















 

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Date: 9/18/19 12:32 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Wilson Springs Preserve
David Oakley and I met up this morning at Wilson Springs Preserve in Fayetteville. The Preserve is part of Northwest Arkansas Land Trust. David was looking for Autumn Meadowhawk, a dragonfly that should be out around this time or a little later. I wanted to see it as well, and also to continue checking out birds along the trails. David thinks it may still be on the early end for the dragon, bujt there were plenty of Monarchs and other butterflies. I wound up with Summer Tanager, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and a cooperative Least Flycatcher. A Blue-gray Gnatcatcher grabbed a bug right in front of me. Lots of American Goldfinches, especially around the ripe thistles. There were several Indigo Buntings, now mostly brown. One that I saw well was about 90% brown, and 10% bluish. Heres an eBird checklist https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59906085. The fall flowers are spectacular, including one of my favorites, Sawtooth Sunflower 10-feet tall. It was a pretty hot morning, so I was glad to take advantage of each of the 3-beches I encountered, each one in some shade.


 

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Date: 9/18/19 10:16 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: Sedentary birding
I enjoy all the bird reports on ARBird, especially since I no longer am physically able to get out into the field.
Something that Ive used for about 35 years, and may be beneficial to other birders, is a baby monitor. One part is outside on my open deck and the other is inside my Birdsview Solarium, (enclosed sunroom) Anything that makes a chirp or other sound is easily heard. Volume can be adjusted, just as if you were monitoring a baby in another room.
Many of you may already use these.
Can be purchased at WalMart, Amazon, etc.
Sally Jo Gibson
Harrison, AR


Sent from Mail<https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 9/18/19 8:35 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <0000000b4ac30a99-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Birds of Late, Saw-whet Owls, Red Crossbill Alert
I’ve found little time to do much intense birding lately, but have enjoyed listening and watching as I wander about Northwest Arkansas City. Just this morning, I was enjoying coffee outside and a Least Flycatcher “che-becked” briefly in a meager foraging flock of Carolina Chickadees and 1 Summer Tanager. Last week, Mississippi Kites foraged over Old Main lawn on the University of Arkansas campus, no doubt enjoying the abundance of dragonflies and occasional cicada winging from tree-to-tree. The same day as the kites, I passed through Evergreen Cemetery on the way into campus and had an Alder Flycatcher that conveniently called once from above the ancient headstones.

In other news, the Arkansas Saw-whet Owl Project will enter into its 5th season of banding this fall! Any and all are welcome and I plan to post updates soon. Nets will open during the 3rd week of October and close the 1st week of December. As of yet, there is no owl forecast, but stay tuned. It was a decent breeding season for our little owls just to the north and I have high hopes this will trickle down into NW Arkansas.

Some changes will be made to the netting operation in order to keep the study relevant, as it is not within my primary research goals these days; so you will have to come out and see for yourself!

Also, I know we have some Red Crossbill lovers on here. For those who may not be on the Missouri bird listserv or receive eBird alerts, there have already been Red Crossbills just beyond our northern border! Stay alert!

Happy End of Summer,

Mitchell Pruitt
 

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Date: 9/18/19 7:05 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BISON, BIRDsssss, BOTANY, AND BUTTERFLIEssss
On Fayettevilles and northwest Arkansass horizon (September 25-29): rumbling Harley Davidsons of Bikes, Blues, and Barbecue, a sky full of low-flying helicopters, a region-wide carnival. That means the coveted non-event Bison, Birds, Botany, and Butterflies will soon be open for business. 250,000 may crowd into Fayetteville for that BBB. A few dozen refugees may crowd The Nature Conservancys Tallgrass Prairie Preserve in the Osage Hills of northeastern Oklahoma, just north of Pawhuska. As a non-event, BBBB at Tallgrass mostly lacks structure, but we usually manage some informal field trips and the loudest sounds may be Bison or maybe flapping of Monarch wings. Well, and oil-gas rigs. Yall are welcome to meet whoever in the parking lot of Hampton Inn in Bartlesville at 7 am on both Friday and Saturday mornings (September 27, 28). There will also be an informal noon meeting of anyone interested on Friday and Saturday at the headquarters-visitor center area at Tallgrass. These are contact points. Ill be glad to provide more info. Otherwise: no registration, no fees, no anything. If you are one of those fortune enough to be able to make financial donations to good causes, please consider The Nature Conservancy. Consider this outing to Tallgrass Prairie Preserve like one of those congressional fact-finding trips in order to see what you can achieve with your generosity. I have a bird list from past trips in case anyone wants to see it. (Please request this off-line).



 

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Date: 9/18/19 5:41 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Bird Feeders for Tribute of Life Foundation Hospice Home Care
One more reminder about this request for donated bird feeders.

The Tribute of Life Foundation supports hospice patients and their families
through our association with Hospice Home Care. At their in-patient unit on
Bowman Road [Little Rock], the patients enjoy watching birds at the few
feeders we have been able to place outside their windows and I have been
asked to see if I can find some folks to donate up to two dozen more. As you
can imagine, anything that can bring a little enjoyment to those facing
their end of life journey means a lot to both our patients and their
families.

They are specifically asking for feeders where you pour in seed (e.g. tube
and hopper feeders). I've offered to collect feeders for them at the Little
Rock Audubon Center, 4500 Springer Blvd. Drop offs can be made at M-F 9-5.
Or you can deliver it directly to Hospice Home Care at 2200 S Bowman Rd.
They would like to have feeders by the end of the month. Thanks for your
consideration.

Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 9/17/19 1:36 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Cave Mountain, upper Buffalo
This morning I made a relatively brief trip to Cave Mountain in the Upper Buffalo River. This was mostly road stops for about 1.5 miles, from near the top of Cave Mountain down to the Buffalo at Boxley bridge. Birds are still singing, especially White-eyed and Yellow-throated Vireos, Hooded Warblers, etc. Pileateds are quite vocal. Near the mountain top we encountered one large mixed-species foraging flock that included Scarlet Tanager (1), Yellow-billed Cuckoo (1-2), Black-throated Green Warbler (1), and other species. Lots going on in a brief time; would sure like to know what all I missed. Local native flowers blooming included both jewelweed species, white leafcup, yellow ironweed, first fall asters, etc. At Boxley bridge, all of the flow in the Buffalo is currently under the cobbles. This trip was with artist-professor Billie Giese from Northern Illinois University School of Art and Design. I knew her many years ago, when she was an undergraduate at the UA-Fayetteville. We worked on several Walter Anderson exhibits. That was when I met Doug James and began work on the book Arkansas Birds. Here is an eBird list for this morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59882038. If youre into fall birding, its still well worth a trip, especially if you can go during the week when there is little traffic on Cave Mountain Road.


 

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Date: 9/17/19 9:01 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: IBWO
Just saw a clever TIAA commercial featuring the Ivory-billed Woodpecker?
The bird even makes the correct call. The habitat’s all wrong, but hey.
Emphasizes the sometimes frustrations of birders/photographers. Saw it on
AMC.

Sandy B.

 

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Date: 9/16/19 1:26 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA September Field Trip
This Saturday, September 21st is the date for the upcoming field trip sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas.  See details below.  Everyone is welcome, you don't have to be a member.  It will be hot, so bring plenty of water.  You can leave the trip at any time.  If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me off-list.I will be birding in Australia the month of October, so won't be able to lead that trip.  Allan Mueller has graciously agreed to lead the trip in my place.  Many thanks Allan!Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator

 
September 21Bona Dea Trails and Sanctuary—Russellville
Meet at 7:00 a.m. at the Mayflower commuter lot offI-40 West at Exit 135.  We will arrive atthe Bona Dea Trails first parking lot around 8:15 a.m. for anyone who wants tomeet us there.  Our target birds will bemigrating fall warblers.  Bona Dea Trailsis 186 acres of wetlands and woodlands in the Prairie Creek floodplain.  The trails are paved and level for easywalking.  Lunch is on your own.  There are picnic tables at Bona Dea, orseveral fast food restaurants are nearby.

From Little Rock, take I-40west to Russellville.  Take Exit 81.  Turn left off the exit ramp, then left at thelight to go south on Hwy 7.  Cross overthe interstate, take a right at the second stoplight (Lakefront Drive).  The trail’s parking area will be on your leftin less than a mile. 

October 26Bell Slough South AGFC Wildlife Management AreaMayflower, Faulkner Co.
Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the South (boardwalk) entrance into the Bell SloughWildlife Management Area (WMA) off Hwy. 365. Bell Slough is a mix of ecosystems consisting of 2,040 acres ofwoodlands and wetlands situated between Little Rock and Mayflower/Falkner Co. With extended spring flooding bringing in fresh nutrients to the moistsoil units and recent work completed by AGFC with disking and planting a supplementalcover crop, the units will provide an attractive waterfowl feeding area for thefall and winter.

 

There are 117 species of birds documented for the WMA, including thewaterfowl resting habitat.  Our targetbirds will be migrating ducks, Sora and American Bittern, wading birds such as egretsand herons, and also wintering passerines.  The Kenny Vernon Nature Trail winds throughthe wooded area and consists of three connecting trails, ranging in length fromabout a half-mile to 2 1/4 miles.  Thereis a nice mix wildflowers, which attracts numerous butterflies.  Wear study walking shoes.  Walking will be on unpaved, mostly levelpaths.  This will be a morning trip.

 From Little Rock, go west on I-40. Exit I-40 at Mayflower (Exit 135) and turn east (right) at the lightonto Hwy. 89.  Then turn south (right)just past the commuter parking lot onto the service road.  Follow the service road paralleling I-40,then veer right at the fork.  Follow thisroad until you cross the Palarm Creek bridge. Turn left into the WMA parking lot.
 November 23


DeGray LakeResort State Park—Arkadelphia

Meet at 7:30 a.m.in the commuter lot at I-430/I-630 off Shackleford Road in Little Rock. We’ll arrive around 8:45 a.m. at the Park’s Lodge for anyone who would like tomeet us there.  Our target birds will be eagles, loons, ducks, mergansers,grebes, and gulls.  Dress warm, the lake can be windy and cold.  Hatsand gloves are recommended.  Bring scope, water, and snacks.  You canbring lunch or eat in the Park’s Lodge restaurant.
 Address for thepark is:  2027 State Park Entrance Road - Bismarck, Arkansas 71929. GPS coordinates are 34.24562, -93.14840.  Go to www.degray.com for more information about the park.





 


 

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Date: 9/16/19 10:20 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: AAS News of Members

Dear AAS members and fellow birders:

It's time for another issue of
Arkansas Birds, so if any of you have taken recent birding trips or just
have news.
Please share a short paragraph of your adventures/sightings with
your fellow Arkansas Audubon Society members.

Please submit to me (off
list) by Sept 20th.

Thanks,
Dottie
Arkansas Birds
News of Members
Editor


 

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Date: 9/15/19 3:02 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BIRDS FROM A “GIT-TOGETHER” ON SUGAR MOUNTAIN IN NORTHWEST ARKANSAS
Stephen Marquardt sent out a message requesting those with some interest or expertise in a variety of disciplines to come out to his place on Sugar Mountain, near West Fork, a few miles south of Fayetteville. Marquardts is locally famous for an interesting plant community, plus there is what seems to me a healthy population of reptiles, including Timber Rattlesnakes. I was there today just for 2-hours (10:30-12:30) and compiled a list of 21-species, all characteristic of upland hardwood habitats in the Ozarks. I am right at home in this country. Even after many years of tramping woodlands like this, I am still thrilled to come upon a foraging Great Crested Flycatcher and following an Eastern Wood-Pewee as it sallies out for a passing bug, then resumes all alert to its next meal -- a low perch on a handy twig stricking out from a Hickory tree. Heres my eBird report: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59833654. Snake people came up empty-handed in terms of Timbers.


 

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Date: 9/15/19 5:57 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Whitney Mountain at 0-dark-30 (instead of Eagle Watch)
Yesterday (Saturday morning) I was looking forward to a trip to an Important Bird Area, Eagle Watch Nature Trail, to celebrate EWs 20-years of unique service in wildlife education. I had been given the honor of a 5-minute talk. But the chipmunks in my yard must have gotten into my brain, and rearranged my calendar, because after all the preparing and mulling over what I could say about Terry Stanfill and EW in 5-minutes, it ALL went out the window. Instead of a party hat and cake at EW, I got up bright and early at 0-dark-30 and headed straight for Whitney Mountain on the north side of Beaver Lake. It was a very good morning, for both wildflowers and birds in fall migration. Heres an eBird list: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59817151.

But I am reminded of what I used to hear from oldtimers when I was a young man. Theyd forget something like a birthday or a wedding anniversary and blame it on oldtimers. This is a condition informally called CRS Cant Remember Sh*t which I now have apparently contracted. It sounds like it was a great day at EW, and very likely better without my 5-minutes. I certainly had a great morning with fall migration on Whitney Mountain, but I say so with regret for having missed EWs 20th bash.

EW started out when Terry Stanfill still worked at the SWEPCO plant. Hed started taking lush wildlife photos, of both plants and birds. These photos were put up in the break room inside the plant. Everyone was knocked out by his photos. Pretty soon the suits at SWEPCO allowed Terry to buoy-off a part of the lake and turn this into a wildlife education project. It has never stopped growing, casting an ever wider influence. Thats probably 5-minutes worth, so Ill stop here.


 

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Date: 9/15/19 4:49 am
From: Michael Linz <mplinz...>
Subject: Probable Connecticut Warbler
Yesterday at Bell Slough North, Allan Mueller, Cody Massery, Patty McLean and I saw a warbler that we struggled with IDing thinking it was most likely a Mourning Warbler. After reviewing pictures we have high confidence that it is a Connecticut Warbler. We will attempt to relocate it early this morning and update the list should we find it.

Some of the field marks noted:
Bold eyering
Yellow all the way back to the tail, no white at tail or feet
Pink legs
Bobbing like a water thrush


Pictures in the report below under warbler sp:
https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59795824 <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59795824>


Michael Linz and Patty McLean
 

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Date: 9/14/19 2:21 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Dr. Kannan's Story Sent Out in EBird eNews.



https://ebird.org/news/ebird-stories-ragupathy-kannan-ornithology-professor?utm_source=Cornell+Lab+eNews&utm_campaign=1eb4e0a3d7-ebird+enews+sept+2019&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_47588b5758-1eb4e0a3d7-277846765

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs.
 

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Date: 9/14/19 1:33 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: WHEN WILL WE SEE THAT ROSEATE SPOONBILL, TERRY? (EAGLE WATCH NATURE TRAIL TURNS 20)
Today is Saturday, September 14, and Eagle Watch Nature Trail, has turned 20. Time -- and a lot of very good birds seen there -- has really flown by. In the early years, Doug James and I got to know EWs creator and manager, Terry Stanfill, quite well. Terry asked us to write a review of the program that he used in supporting EWs wildlife certification. This was easy because EW is one of the best places to see a variety of both land and water birds in northwest Arkansas. Terry has continued to build a robust program of wildlife education, focused on native plants and animals. School groups in western Benton County have been his partners. His prairie restoration project gets support from the Gentry Fire Department by burning it every year. SWEPCO has provided necessary funds for trails, viewing blinds, maintenance, and other costs. In the process, EW has become a model for cooperative wildlife education. Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society sponsors regular, well-attended field trips, two each year. We were glad to support EW becoming an Important Bird Area as designated by Audubon Arkansas. We are all hoping Terry lives to be at least 100, because there are more good birds wed like to see at EW. When will see that Roseate Spoonbill, Terry?


 

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Date: 9/13/19 7:27 pm
From: Mike Collins <mike...>
Subject: update on the IBWO
I’m not an Arkansas resident, but I occasionally post updates on the IBWO. I recently published my fifth (and probably final) paper on this amazing bird. I apologize for not knowing how to include a direct link in this message, but all of the papers may be accessed near the top of the page at http://fishcrow.com

The most recent paper appears in the journal, Statistics and Public Policy. In that journal, it was appropriate to use concepts in statistics and probability to argue that video footage obtained during three of my ten sightings of the IBWO contains evidence that cannot be explained in terms of any other species. Since the scope of that journal includes public policy, it was also appropriate to include a section on a persistent pattern of folly and politics that has undermined the conservation of the IBWO for decades. I believe this is the most important part of the paper; until someone with sufficient influence recognizes that the IBWO deserves better and manages to put an end to the folly and politics, there will be no hope for the conservation of this bird.

The second most important part of the paper is an analysis of the expected waiting time for obtaining a clear photo. Nothing will change until ornithologists recognize that the IBWO is unlike any other bird and that it isn't practical to expect a clear photo for documentation. Even without the analysis, it should be obvious that the IBWO is an exceptional case on the basis of the following set of facts that is unique to this species: (1) it has a long history of rediscoveries; (2) nobody has ever managed to obtain a clear photo without knowing the location of an active nest; (3) many sightings have been reported but nobody has managed to obtain a clear photo during the past several decades; (4) ornithologists were unable to obtain a clear photo during intensive multi-year searches at sites where they were convinced these birds were present; and (5) it is a species of great interest that resides in a region that is easily accessible to a large number of bird watchers.

Geoff Hill is a distinguished ornithologist (a recipient of the Brewster Award in 2014) who has observed the IBWO and published the most informative book that exists on this bird. On the basis of those credentials, Hill should be regarded as an authority on the IBWO. A few days ago, I met with Hill to discuss the videos, each of which contains stronger evidence for the persistence of the IBWO than anything else that has been obtained during the past several decades. I had met with Hill to discuss the data several times before, and it was extremely helpful that he let me borrow a PIWO specimen for a size comparison that appears in the paper. Hill agrees that each of the videos is convincing.

I have the truth on my side, and the truth always prevails in science. For the sake of the IBWO, it would be better for the truth to prevail sooner rather than later. Despite the fact that there were published reports of sightings in Arkansas, Florida, and Louisiana barely a decade ago, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is planning to declare the IBWO extinct. It seems that this illogical move could have a negative impact on habitat protection and in other ways.

Mike Collins
Alexandria, Virginia
 

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Date: 9/13/19 6:51 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: RNPH and a Traill's Flycatcher at BKNWR
The Red-necked Phalarope was still present late this evening at Bald Knob NWR.
Kenny & LaDonna NicholsCabot

On Friday, September 13, 2019, 12:03:36 PM CDT, plm108 <plm108...> wrote:

The Red-necked Phalarope reported yesterday at Bald Knob NWR by Glenn Wyatt continues this morning. Last seen by the remaining puddles on the last cell on the right before the low water crossing. 
Also of note, there's what appears to be a Traill's Flycatcher along one of the southbound roads near this location:   https://maps.app.goo.gl/dWfvzgMKYX1fu6x96  aka  35.2191681, -91.5916372
It would not vocalize -- so not sure if it was a Willow or an Alder -- but was successfully flycatching from the power line along the gravel road. 

Patty McLean and Michael Linz,   Conway. 

 

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Date: 9/13/19 10:04 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: RNPH and a Traill's Flycatcher at BKNWR
The Red-necked Phalarope reported yesterday at Bald Knob NWR by Glenn Wyatt continues this morning. Last seen by the remaining puddles on the last cell on the right before the low water crossing. Also of note, there's what appears to be a Traill's Flycatcher along one of the southbound roads near this location:   https://maps.app.goo.gl/dWfvzgMKYX1fu6x96  aka  35.2191681, -91.5916372It would not vocalize -- so not sure if it was a Willow or an Alder -- but was successfully flycatching from the power line along the gravel road. Patty McLean and Michael Linz,   Conway. 
 

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Date: 9/13/19 7:50 am
From: Samantha Scheiman <Samantha.Scheiman...>
Subject: volunteer opportunity to enhance habitat for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers, Warren Prairie Natural Area (October 5)
Arkansas birders:

The Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission (ANHC) is hosting a volunteer event on Saturday, October 5 from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. to remove a historical trash pile and enhance habitat for the federally endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker (RCW) at Warren Prairie Natural Area. In mid-October, the ANHC and partners plan to release eight RCWs from Louisiana to Warren Prairie (through a process called translocation) to augment RCW population growth at this site. To date, years of habitat restoration, translocation of RCWs from other populations beginning in 2010, and subsequent nesting by remaining birds have ultimately resulted in 10 pairs of RCW at Warren Prairie, and the ANHC is actively restoring additional habitat to support more RCWs.

Though habitat is already in good shape, volunteers will clear woody vegetation to both enhance habitat for the new birds and increase safety for the translocation crew. In addition to mechanical removal of woody vegetation via hand tools (loppers, hand saws, etc.), volunteers will also pick up trash and visit an active RCW cluster to learn more about these unique birds that were once common in south Arkansas.

The ANHC will provide the following:

* Snacks

* Water

* Gloves

* Tools

* Sunscreen

* Bug spray

Be sure to wear sturdy boots and pants. Directions to Warren Prairie are located at the following link: http://www.naturalheritage.com/natural-areas/warren-prairie-natural-area

If at all possible, RSVP for this event by contacting my colleague Ryan Leeson at <ryan.leeson...><mailto:<ryan.leeson...> or 501.371.5631. This is especially important if you are interested in carpooling from Little Rock so she can reserve enough vehicles and provide the meeting location and time for doing so. She can also send you an event flyer (as a PDF) if desired.

Cheers,
Samantha

Samantha Scheiman
Grants Coordinator/Field Assistant

[cid:<image002.jpg...>] Arkansas Natural Heritage Commission
a division of the Department of Arkansas Heritage
1100 North Street | Little Rock, AR 72201
email: <Samantha.Scheiman...><mailto:<Samantha.Scheiman...>
office: 501.324.9614
fax: 501.324.9618
NaturalHeritage.com<http://naturalheritage.com/>
Facebook<https://www.facebook.com/arnaturalheritage/> | Instagram<https://www.instagram.com/ar_naturalheritage/>
#AuthenticArkansas
#ANHC


 

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Date: 9/12/19 2:48 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Huge decline in songbirds linked to common insecticide - National Geographic
Some may find this insightful.

Huge decline in songbirds linked to common insecticide

Neonics—pesticides introduced to plants at the seed stage—act like an appetite suppressant for birds, making them lose weight within hours.

Read in National Geographic: https://apple.news/ANBsEJloISF63KBZ1U9Jutg


Shared from Apple News

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR







 

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Date: 9/12/19 12:34 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bald Knob 9-12-19
Highlights from my morning trip to Bald Knob NWR: 1 Red-necked Phalarope, 1 Philadelphia Vireo (a lifer for me), and 1 Savannah Sparrow (the first of the season for me).  A non-bird related highlight was there were little green tree frogs everywhere.
Glenn WyattCabot

 

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Date: 9/11/19 6:00 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 11
It was partly cloudy and hot with a breeze on the bird survey today. 47
species were found. I arrived in time for the morning flight out of the
heronry. Birds started flying out while it was still dark and I could
barely make out white forms flying through my binos. Its impossible to get
an accurate count as there are hundreds of birds in the air at a time going
in every direction. I tried to count every ibis, Little-blue Heron, Snowy
Egret, Great Egret, Anhinga, and Neotropic Cormorant I could as they left
the heronry. I'm sure I missed a lot as I can't see the ones on the
backside that are headed out to the west. The Cattle Egrets I just have to
guestimate their numbers. There are still a lot of active nests, mainly
Cattle Egrets, but also some Anhingas. The big highlight was when a Wood
Stork flew in from the southeast and did a flyby over the rookery and then
headed south. Finally they show up. Hopefully the spoonbills are close
behind. We don't have much shorebird habitat this year, just a few large
puddles, but I was happy to get several species including 4 Avocets. The
Empids are still working the Rough-leaved Dogwood berries on the north levee
of Bittern Lake. I'll be glad when the weather changes and we start getting
more migrants. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 107

Wood Duck - 89

Mallard - 4

Pied-billed Grebe - 17

Neotropic Cormorant - 12 (including an adult feeding 3 fledglings.)

Anhinga - 25

Great-blue Heron - 9

Great Egret - 99

Snowy Egret - 149

Little-blue Heron - 117

Cattle Egret - ~20,000

Green Heron - 4

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 9 (including an adult feeding 3 fledglings.)

White Ibis - 80

Wood Stork - 1

Black Vulture - 24

Turkey Vulture - 36

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 4

Purple Gallinule - 33 (also 3 broods of smaller young.)

Common Gallinule - 59 (also 2 broods of smaller young.)

American Coot - 1

Killdeer - 19

American Avocet - 4

Lesser Yellowlegs - 2

Semipalmated Sandpiper - 5

Least Sandpiper - 2

Stilt Sandpiper - 2

Mourning Dove - 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 1

Pileated Woodpecker - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 2

Least Flycatcher - 3

White-eyed Vireo - 9

American Crow - 4

Fish Crow - 1

Tree Swallow - 4

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 5

Barn Swallow - 1

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 5

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Eastern Towhee - 1

Northern Cardinal - 7

Indigo Bunting - 7

Red-winged Blackbird - 67





Odonates:



Common Green Darner

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Roseate Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags



Herps:



American Alligator

Orange-striped Ribbon Snake

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronzed Frog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR














 

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Date: 9/11/19 5:56 pm
From: Jane Wiewora <janewiewora...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
About 25 RTHUs in my yard in Searcy today. The end of next week should bring peak numbers.

> On Sep 11, 2019, at 5:35 PM, Randy <Robinson-Randy...> wrote:
>
> Have gone from 2-3 last week to 8-10 last few days. West Pulaski County
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>> On Sep 11, 2019, at 4:44 PM, Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>> A couple of weeks ago, I was out of town and unable to fill my three quart feeders.
>>
>> When I returned, there were very few hummers, which I worried might be a consequence of not providing nectar. I pulled back to one feeder, filled halfway.
>>
>> Then they came back and this time, they brought their friends. At first, all three feeders were put out, filled halfway. Then they were filled to the top. Now a fourth feeder has been added.
>>
>> The hummers are buzzing like bees. I counted 12 sitting at one time with more flying around yesterday.
>>
>> But a friend who lives five miles south of me reports seeing very few.
>>
>> Alyson Hoge
>> southern Pulaski County
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> On September 11, 2019 at 1:34 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:
>>>
>>
>>> We have had a decided uptick in RTHU activity throughout the day in the past week. Karen Hart Hillcrest Little Rock.
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPhone
>>>
>>>> On Sep 11, 2019, at 1:27 PM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> It appears the RTHU numbers are significantly decreased this year. Normally during the run of days between 8/25-9/15, I have to fill some of my feeders at least twice a day. I use the First Nature 16oz feeder as my primary feeder. In past years birds would empty at least 5-6 full feeders each day. That is not happening this year. I assume the cold wet weather this spring caused high mortality among early hatchlings. I hope this decrease is temporary like I've seen in past years after periods of extreme drought or other wet springs. I would to think the decrease is not due to increased agricultural activity across the continent but I fear that may be a long range contributing factor to declines as well.
>>>>
>>>> Cindy F.
>>>> Little Rock

 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/19 3:36 pm
From: Randy <Robinson-Randy...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
Have gone from 2-3 last week to 8-10 last few days. West Pulaski County

Sent from my iPhone

> On Sep 11, 2019, at 4:44 PM, Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> A couple of weeks ago, I was out of town and unable to fill my three quart feeders.
>
> When I returned, there were very few hummers, which I worried might be a consequence of not providing nectar. I pulled back to one feeder, filled halfway.
>
> Then they came back and this time, they brought their friends. At first, all three feeders were put out, filled halfway. Then they were filled to the top. Now a fourth feeder has been added.
>
> The hummers are buzzing like bees. I counted 12 sitting at one time with more flying around yesterday.
>
> But a friend who lives five miles south of me reports seeing very few.
>
> Alyson Hoge
> southern Pulaski County
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On September 11, 2019 at 1:34 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:
>>
>
>> We have had a decided uptick in RTHU activity throughout the day in the past week. Karen Hart Hillcrest Little Rock.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Sep 11, 2019, at 1:27 PM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:
>>>
>>> It appears the RTHU numbers are significantly decreased this year. Normally during the run of days between 8/25-9/15, I have to fill some of my feeders at least twice a day. I use the First Nature 16oz feeder as my primary feeder. In past years birds would empty at least 5-6 full feeders each day. That is not happening this year. I assume the cold wet weather this spring caused high mortality among early hatchlings. I hope this decrease is temporary like I've seen in past years after periods of extreme drought or other wet springs. I would to think the decrease is not due to increased agricultural activity across the continent but I fear that may be a long range contributing factor to declines as well.
>>>
>>> Cindy F.
>>> Little Rock

 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/19 3:26 pm
From: Robert Day <rhday52...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
We live in a subdivision on W side of Bentonville; no trees on our lot. Moved in here last year and got a few hummers coming. This year we had at least 2 families coming to feeders, one from down the hill and one from up the hill. We had up to 7-8, including what we assume were some HY birds, into June, but a cold, heavy storm with high winds then may have killed some of them—numbers dropped to maybe 4-5 max after that. Then, we had what we assume was a small migration—had 9-10 fighting over the feeders about 2 weeks ago, in what I am gathering is the main migration period. Now we are back to about 4-5 birds.

The big problem is that one female has taken over the 4 large (12 oz) High-Perch feeders in the back yard. She makes life miserable for everyone else, even though there is enough food for 100 hummers out there. We also have 2 small feeders out front to help the displaced birds get some food. We are wondering if there is something we can do to reduce her monopolizing the 4 big feeders in the back yard.

Robert H. Day
Bentonville
Sent from my iPad

> On Sep 11, 2019, at 4:44 PM, Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> A couple of weeks ago, I was out of town and unable to fill my three quart feeders.
>
> When I returned, there were very few hummers, which I worried might be a consequence of not providing nectar. I pulled back to one feeder, filled halfway.
>
> Then they came back and this time, they brought their friends. At first, all three feeders were put out, filled halfway. Then they were filled to the top. Now a fourth feeder has been added.
>
> The hummers are buzzing like bees. I counted 12 sitting at one time with more flying around yesterday.
>
> But a friend who lives five miles south of me reports seeing very few.
>
> Alyson Hoge
> southern Pulaski County
>
>
>
>
>
>
>> On September 11, 2019 at 1:34 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:
>>
>
>> We have had a decided uptick in RTHU activity throughout the day in the past week. Karen Hart Hillcrest Little Rock.
>>
>> Sent from my iPhone
>>
>>> On Sep 11, 2019, at 1:27 PM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:
>>>
>>> It appears the RTHU numbers are significantly decreased this year. Normally during the run of days between 8/25-9/15, I have to fill some of my feeders at least twice a day. I use the First Nature 16oz feeder as my primary feeder. In past years birds would empty at least 5-6 full feeders each day. That is not happening this year. I assume the cold wet weather this spring caused high mortality among early hatchlings. I hope this decrease is temporary like I've seen in past years after periods of extreme drought or other wet springs. I would to think the decrease is not due to increased agricultural activity across the continent but I fear that may be a long range contributing factor to declines as well.
>>>
>>> Cindy F.
>>> Little Rock

 

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Date: 9/11/19 2:44 pm
From: Alyson Hoge <000002096ce84bce-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
A couple of weeks ago, I was out of town and unable to fill my three quart feeders.

When I returned, there were very few hummers, which I worried might be a consequence of not providing nectar. I pulled back to one feeder, filled halfway. 

Then they came back and this time, they brought their friends. At first, all three feeders were put out, filled halfway. Then they were filled to the top. Now a fourth feeder has been added.

The hummers are buzzing like bees. I counted 12 sitting at one time with more flying around yesterday. 

But a friend who lives five miles south of me reports seeing very few. 

Alyson Hoge
southern Pulaski County






On September 11, 2019 at 1:34 PM, Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...> wrote:

We have had a decided uptick in RTHU activity throughout the day in the past week.    Karen Hart Hillcrest Little Rock.  

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 11, 2019, at 1:27 PM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...> wrote:

It appears the RTHU numbers are significantly decreased this year.  Normally during the run of days between 8/25-9/15, I have to fill some of my feeders at least twice a day.  I use the First Nature 16oz feeder as my primary feeder. In past years birds would empty at least 5-6 full feeders each day.  That is not happening this year.  I assume the cold wet weather this spring caused high mortality among early hatchlings.  I hope this decrease is temporary like I've seen in past years after periods of extreme drought or other wet springs.  I would to think the decrease is not due to increased agricultural activity across the continent but I fear that may be a long range contributing factor to declines as well.

Cindy F.
Little Rock

 

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Date: 9/11/19 12:42 pm
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
I have never had the numbers of Hummingbirds that you supported but numbers increase in migration in Spring and Fall. My summer number was one male and two females then it went down to two females and this week it increased to one adult male, one immature male and 4 females at this time.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs

From: CK Franklin
Sent: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 1:27 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019

It appears the RTHU numbers are significantly decreased this year. Normally during the run of days between 8/25-9/15, I have to fill some of my feeders at least twice a day. I use the First Nature 16oz feeder as my primary feeder. In past years birds would empty at least 5-6 full feeders each day. That is not happening this year. I assume the cold wet weather this spring caused high mortality among early hatchlings. I hope this decrease is temporary like I've seen in past years after periods of extreme drought or other wet springs. I would to think the decrease is not due to increased agricultural activity across the continent but I fear that may be a long range contributing factor to declines as well.


Cindy F.
Little Rock

 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/19 11:34 am
From: Karen Konarski-Hart <karen...>
Subject: Re: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
We have had a decided uptick in RTHU activity throughout the day in the past week. Karen Hart Hillcrest Little Rock.

Sent from my iPhone

On Sep 11, 2019, at 1:27 PM, CK Franklin <meshoppen...><mailto:<meshoppen...>> wrote:

It appears the RTHU numbers are significantly decreased this year. Normally during the run of days between 8/25-9/15, I have to fill some of my feeders at least twice a day. I use the First Nature 16oz feeder as my primary feeder. In past years birds would empty at least 5-6 full feeders each day. That is not happening this year. I assume the cold wet weather this spring caused high mortality among early hatchlings. I hope this decrease is temporary like I've seen in past years after periods of extreme drought or other wet springs. I would to think the decrease is not due to increased agricultural activity across the continent but I fear that may be a long range contributing factor to declines as well.

Cindy F.
Little Rock
 

Back to top
Date: 9/11/19 11:27 am
From: CK Franklin <meshoppen...>
Subject: Ruby-throated Hummingbird migration v. 2019
It appears the RTHU numbers are significantly decreased this year. Normally during the run of days between 8/25-9/15, I have to fill some of my feeders at least twice a day. I use the First Nature 16oz feeder as my primary feeder. In past years birds would empty at least 5-6 full feeders each day. That is not happening this year. I assume the cold wet weather this spring caused high mortality among early hatchlings. I hope this decrease is temporary like I've seen in past years after periods of extreme drought or other wet springs. I would to think the decrease is not due to increased agricultural activity across the continent but I fear that may be a long range contributing factor to declines as well.

Cindy F.
Little Rock

 

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Date: 9/11/19 8:43 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Birds and Barklice at Devil's Den SP
One of the most interesting mysteries from birding at Devils Den State Park yesterday was seeing a swarm of tiny insects on the bark of a sugar maple in Campground A. After a lot of searching, Im pretty sure these are barklice, and this may be one of the Common Barklice (Psocidae). What we saw yesterday looks a lot like what is illustrated here: https://bugguide.net/node/view/664. It was near these trees we found a really, mixed-species foraging flock of birds. Here is what that foraging flock contained (or was heard nearby): Yellow-billed Cuckoo ( 4; one feeding on a praying mantis), Red-bellied Woodpecker <https://ebird.org/species/rebwoo> (4 ), Downy Woodpecker <https://ebird.org/species/dowwoo> (2), Hairy Woodpecker <https://ebird.org/species/haiwoo> (2), Pileated Woodpecker <https://ebird.org/species/pilwoo> (1) Eastern Wood-Pewee <https://ebird.org/species/eawpew> (4), Empidonax sp. (1), Great Crested Flycatcher <https://ebird.org/species/grcfly> (1), White-eyed Vireo (3)<https://ebird.org/species/whevir>, Yellow-throated Vireo <https://ebird.org/species/yetvir> (2), Red-eyed Vireo <https://ebird.org/species/reevir1> (8), Blue Jay <https://ebird.org/species/blujay> (7), Fish Crow (<https://ebird.org/species/fiscro>3), Carolina Chickadee <https://ebird.org/species/carchi> (5), Tufted Titmouse <https://ebird.org/species/tuftit> (4), White-breasted Nuthatch <https://ebird.org/species/whbnut> (3), Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (<https://ebird.org/species/buggna>3), Carolina Wren <https://ebird.org/species/carwre> (2), American Robin <https://ebird.org/species/amerob> (4), American Goldfinch (<https://ebird.org/species/amegfi>3), Chipping Sparrow (<https://ebird.org/species/chispa>1), Baltimore Oriole (<https://ebird.org/species/balori>2), Tennessee Warbler <https://ebird.org/species/tenwar> (2), Northern Parula (<https://ebird.org/species/norpar>3), Chestnut-sided Warbler <https://ebird.org/species/chswar> (2), Summer Tanager (<https://ebird.org/species/sumtan>2), Scarlet Tanager (<https://ebird.org/species/scatan>2), Northern Cardinal. <https://ebird.org/species/norcar> We didnt actually see any of these birds going after barklice, but it requires no great leap of imagination to recognize elements of a healthy ecosystem. Birds and barklice may be pretty different forms of Lifes expression, but they certainly reflect diversity required to make it all work. All parts of the clock, as Aldo Leopold expressed it in A Sound County Almanac: "To save every cog and wheel is the first precaution of the intelligent tinkerer."


 

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Date: 9/10/19 9:46 pm
From: Charles Lyon <lyon5516...>
Subject: Lake Dardanelle Sabine's Gull 9-6-19
AR-birders,

This is a belated follow up to Kenny Nichol’s recent post concerning the Sabine’s Gull that he, LaDonna and I
observed on Lake Dardanelle last Friday 9-6-19. Per Kenny his last sighting for this species on Lake Dardanelle was
9-6-17 which was two years ago to the date. My last sighting for Sabine’s Gull on Cross Lake was 9-5-17 (two years minus one day to the day)
and two were in the company of an Arctic Tern on that date. Tis the season, so hopefully more are to come. Our recent 9-6-19 eBird list with
embedded photos of the immature Sabine’s Gull is below.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59565421 <https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59565421>

Charlie Lyon
Shreveport, LA
 

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Date: 9/10/19 5:31 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Big migration at Devil's Den State Park
BEST BIRDS this morning at Devils Den State Park (in order of finding): Black-throated Green Warbler, Black-billed Cuckoo, and Olive-sided Flycatcher. Vivek Govind Kumar and I were in the park starting at entrance on Highway 170, elevation 1755 feet. From there we made several stops before reaching center of the park at Lee Creek, elevation 1014 feet. This gave us the chance to sample birds in predominantly hardwoods from the top to the bottom of the Boston Mountains section of the Ozarks. Not many visitors in the Den. We had migration to ourselves.

It was a big day for Yellow-billed Cuckoos (11). The bird with a huge caterpillar at Yellow Rock overlook started-out as another, but then we got a clean look at its tail. No bold, white spots! Had to be a Black-billed Cuckoo. At last we did see the black bill, too.

For warblers this morning we identified Tennessee, Northern Parula, Chestnut-sided, Black-throated Green, Black-and-white, American Redstart, and Hooded. Four vireo species: White-eyed, Yellow-throated, Philadelphia, and Red-eyed. Lots of singing especially from White-eyed and Yellow-throated. Quite a few individuals of both tanager species.

Over approximately 4-hours we found most of the birds in 3 or 4 foraging flocks. This started out right off at 7:15 at the park entrance. A little quiet at first, but then we within a few minutes we were surrounded. Theres little as bold in nature as a male Baltimore Oriole, in the tippy-top of an oak, strongly illuminated by rising sun, background pure blue.

We hit some kind of a peak at entrance to Camp Area A. At first all we saw was a single American Robin. We walked about half the loop without finding anything new. Decided to back track and move on. Then where before was a single robin, bushes and trees suddenly full of migrants. Standing in one spot, we kept bins busy for an hour. We picked out 27 species, then again, all gone gone with the wind, except wind is from the south, where many of these birds are heading. Vivek collected eBird lists all morning. Heres the list from this one stop: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59672931.

Finally, any trip to the Den is remiss sans a Fall color report. The canopy remains mostly green, but with enough leaves falling to give birders in pursuit of migrants many a fake-out thrill as leaves fall that were first thought to be warblers. One of the first trees to turn, Blackgum, has some leaves scarlet as a nesting tanager, though all of this mornings Scarlet birds were yellow with black wings.


 

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Date: 9/10/19 3:38 pm
From: Tammy <msiinc...>
Subject: Tricolored Munia
I have a friend that posted a photo of a Tricolored Munia . He said he got it at Bald Knob and that there were two of them. He also said they may be escapes.



Sent from Mail for Windows 10


 

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Date: 9/10/19 11:23 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Skepticism warranted...
...but in our yard, I just witnessed an adult Carolina Wren, with a
short-tailed conspecific. The presumed fledgling was in a brush pile
making begging vocalizations, while the adult made typical "reassuring
parent" calls. If this is another clutch from the same resident pair, it
would be the sixth of this year, with an interval of ~35 days since the
fifth one.

Janine Perlman
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

 

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Date: 9/10/19 9:23 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Trees
Good news, indeed. Too bad we don't have that type of progressive thinking elsewhere.

Some places that the BPs have "escaped" are overrun with the nasty, second generation trees.

Just be sure not to plant your native tree underneath power lines!

Jeff Short



-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Daniel Mason
Sent: Friday, March 22, 2019 3:39 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Trees

Normally I can't stand most of the stories the "news" shares on social
media but, this one had me excited to read and share. Not 100% bird
related enough for a big discussion here but worth sharing as I'd like
to reach anyone that might be in the city of Fayetteville. This applies
to them only but is still pretty awesome to see the city doing.
In case you don't feel like clicking the story, if you live within city
limits in Fayetteville, if you get photos of you cutting down a bradford
pear in your yard, the city will give you a native tree to plant. Tell
your neighbors?
https://5newsonline.com/2019/03/21/fayetteville-sets-bounty-on-bradford-pear-trees-offers-free-tree-to-anyone-who-cuts-one-down/

Daniel Mason


---
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https://www.avast.com/antivirus
 

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Date: 9/9/19 1:28 pm
From: Bob Harden <flutterbybob...>
Subject: Re: Arkansas' best birding Areas
Great article Jerry I read it this morning

<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>
Virus-free.
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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

On Mon, Sep 9, 2019 at 9:10 AM Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
wrote:

> If you have access to the Democrat Gazette, check out the article on
> birding sites in today's Dem-Gaz Style section. Peace and Birds Jerry
> Butler
>

 

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Date: 9/9/19 7:10 am
From: Jerry Butler <jerrysharon.butler...>
Subject: Arkansas' best birding Areas
If you have access to the Democrat Gazette, check out the article on
birding sites in today's Dem-Gaz Style section. Peace and Birds Jerry
Butler

 

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Date: 9/9/19 6:51 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Bird Feeder Donations at ASCA Meeting
If you're coming to this week's ASCA meeting and you have a seed feeder to donate to Tribute of Life Foundation's hospice you can and it off to me at the meeting instead of going out to the Little Rock Audubon Center.


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 9/9/19 5:44 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Meeting, Sept. 12, Mel White - Argentina Birding
Audubon Society of Central Arkansas meets this Thursday September 12 at the
Fletcher Library at 7 PM.

This month Mel White is our presenter. He will describe his December 2018
trip to Argentina, including the bird-rich areas of Iguazu Falls, Misiones
Province, and the Entre Rios region, as well as parks and preserves in the
city of Buenos Aires. This travel tale is not to be missed!

Remember to be looking for a passage from a book of any genre that is about
birds, birders, or birding to share at our Oct. 10 meeting. Please submit
your books title and author to me (off-list) by October 8 so I can compile
a bibliography to share with the group.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 9/8/19 3:55 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BIRDY MORNING AT HOBBS STATE PARK-CONSERVATION AREA
Hot and humid for sure birdy morning at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area east of Rogers for Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip. Also, wonderful native flowers and fruits. We did a slow walk along Little Clifty Creek, including both Sinking Stream and Historic Van Winkle Trails. It took us 3-hours to cover what couldnt be more than 1-mile. So many birds. For warblers we saw or heard: Black-and white, Hooded, American Redstart, Northern Parula, Blackburnian, Yellow, Canada, and Wilsons. Highest numbers involved Hooded and Northern Parula. White-eyed Vireos were singing along the entire walk, but there were also Yellow-throated and Red-eyed to spice things up. For flycatchers: Eastern Wood-Pewee, Acadian, Traills (an Alder-Willow individual), Least, Empidonax sp., and Great Crested. Lots of singing for a fall field trip. At one point I experienced what amounts to an ornithological miracle: even with an old mans impaired hearing, I heard one of the Blackburnians! We also had both tanager species, several Yellow-billed Cuckoos, and Red-headed Woodpeckers up on the ridge in the pines. UA-Fayetteville graduate student Vivek Govind Kumar had the front of our line, found many of the singers, and kept eBird lists.

For Sinking Stream: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59607598

For Historic Van Winkle: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59609808


This field trip is always also about the native flora that makes Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area such a gem. Pawpaws were ripe and those of us interested sampled them. Ruby-throated Hummingbirds were probing the Spotted Jewelweed flowers along Little Clifty Creek. Spicebush was covered with red berries. A Green Dragon on the mossy bluff above the creek had made its extraordinary red cluster of seeds. One of the most extravagant of our natives, Great Blue Lobelia, was also in bloom. Red-spotted Purple butterflies were gathering in numbers along the path. A particularly elegant spider had red body, black-and-white legs, and a bulbous abdomen artistically black and yellow. Its expansive orb was across the trail, but just above our heads, a good deal for those in front.

Thats enough poetic gabbery -- to quote a memorable phrase from our friend Patty McLean.


 

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Date: 9/8/19 6:19 am
From: Ragupathy Kannan <0000013b0ad14faf-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Least Flycatchers on migration in w. Arkansas
It's September, and sure enough Least Flycatchers are wit-witting in my garden in Fort Smith.  I've seen them twice this month already.  They were here last September too.  Vivek Govindkumar too saw a wave of them yesterday in Lake Fayetteville.
Talking for Fall migration, several of our Arkansas land birds showed up in my ship during my research voyage in the NW Atlantic with NOAA last month.  I did not expect to see Prairie Warblers and Tree Swallows on a ship with land nowhere in sight.  Some of them perched exhausted on the ship before carrying on.  I'm finishing the process of uploading about 70 pelagic checklists to eBird.  You can catch up with my "adventures in the high seas" via my blogs from the ship, intended for a student audience.  Please forward to any prospective marine biologist you know.
rkannan2019

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Date: 9/7/19 1:56 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Belated note -- Centerton
There is currently a bit of mudflat habitat at Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton, or at least there was as of Wednesday-Thursday. One pond was drained in the upper area. The big reservoir pond has water and a lot of grassy edge. (Surely there is the FOS Wilsons Snipe there.) A couple of lower ponds are down because they are being reworked, with small pools of water and quite a bit of dried mud. Of interest to me: the female Hooded Merganser present since early May continues, in the same upper pond. Pied-billed Grebes (2) were for me FOS. Shorebirds are mainly Killdeer (~51), Solitary Sandpiper (2), Spotted Sandpiper (3), Least Sandpiper (21), and Pectoral Sandpiper (1). Plus Great Egret (3), Loggerhead Shrike (1), Green Heron (1) and Great Blue Herons (15 on Sept 5). A tiny frog made a huge leap out of shallow overflow from one of the springs. It may be one of the Cricket Frogs. Habitat is right and I have often heard that sharp CLICK CLICK (like hitting stones together).There is still an adult Bald Eagle in the area.


 

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Date: 9/7/19 11:13 am
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 9/7/2019 - Empids/Warblers
Several fall migrants were present at Lake Fayetteville this morning.

Highlights included Least Flycatcher (11), Philadelphia Vireo (2), Warbling Vireo (3), Baltimore Oriole (4), Black-and-white Warbler (3), Tennessee Warbler (1-FOS), American Redstart (3-FOS), Northern Parula (1), Yellow Warbler (1) and Wilson's Warbler (14).

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59582134

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 9/7/19 10:33 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Southeast Arkansas Bonanza (Re-do)
Hi All. (Resending with edits)Because Michael and I live in Central Arkansas and don't often get to see the great specialties further south, we decided to spend several days in Southeast Arkansas with good friends and look for magical things like Wood Stork, Roseate Spoonbill, Neotropic Cormorant, dark and white Ibis, Fulvous Whistling Duck and Tricolored Heron. We were blessed to find all these, thanks much to the help of others, plus we also found Inca Doves just outside Overflow NWR and Bachman Sparrows and Red-cockaded Woodpeckers at Locust Ridge Access in Felsenthal NWR. It was a treat in spite of the fact that we were a hot dusty mess by the time we got home. Here's the short version of how our first two of three days went:Late Wednesday afternoon along with dear friends Allan and Kathleen Mueller, we joined Kelly Chitwood at Thatcher Lock & Dam #8 on the Ouachita River where she's been enjoying an evening roost of hundreds of waders in a Cypress Swamp area somewhat visible from the road leading to the dam. Between 6p and 7p, we were treated to flyovers and large numbers of roosting egrets, herons, ibis, a few Wood Storks and a single Tricolored Heron. We had to leave before the pink things with that oddball bill made a showing but still a wonderful event to witness. I highly recommend it! The next day, we joined a larger group of Central Arkansas birders, spearheaded by Karen Holliday, for a morning with Dick Baxter at his farm (Camp Nine) near McGehee. We enjoyed watching numerous ducks, teal, waders and ibis flying around the vast lily pad lake. We also saw one Black-bellied and several Fulvous Whistling Ducks, Mottled Ducks and a few dark ibis flying around. Several folks also saw their first Least Bittern here. As the day continued and got hotter, we made a visit to Grand Lake near Eudora where we found a few Neotropic Cormorants, Black Tern and Caspian Tern. From there, we headed to the levee and at the top of the access road, found tons of white things, one dark ibis and shorebirds galore. Because the day was getting on and several folks wanted to add some nearby county birds to their lists, we split into separate groups and a few of us went looking for those pink things again. Finally a few hours later, Randy Robinson called and said he and Bob Harden had found some along the Mississippi River Levee a few miles north from the Lake Village entrance. With no further adieu, Michael and I headed to that spot and relocated the 4 Roseate Spoonbills, feeding in shallow water with their egret/heron cousins and watched as they flew into a Cypress tree, perhaps for their evening roost. It was the perfect ending to our time on the levee.  If anyone is interested in looking for these specialties, we're happy to share location information with you. Just send us a note and we can send our eBird lists to you with additional tips for locating.  I'm submitting a separate report about our last morning in Southeast Arkansas which was at Lake Monticello and includes the progress on draining the lake and the shorebirds that are showing up there to feed in the extensive mud now available. Happy Birding, Patty McLean and Michael Linz, Conway AR
 

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Date: 9/7/19 9:30 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Re: Lake Monticello Birds and Drainage Update
Well, hahaha ... and I can't blame it on autocorrect. I, of course, meant Lake MONTICELLO (not Maumelle) in the body of my report. Patty McLeanSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: plm108 <plm108...> Date: 9/7/19 11:05 AM (GMT-06:00) To: ARBIRD-L <ARBIRD-L...>, <plm108...> Subject: Lake Monticello Birds and Drainage Update This is mostly an update on the progress being made on the draining of Lake Monticello in Drew County. News reports are sketchy and somewhat confusing but the drain is occurring due to the critical need to repair the dam. The entire levee is closed at this time. All three road entrances to the lake are open. Officials intend to also clean the lake, removing debris and invasives. This project may take up to 2 years to complete and there are no limits on number or size of fish that can be taken during this drain. The lake is significantly lower than I expected, exposing numerous mud flats that were covered with waders and shorebirds as well as 2 eagles and two osprey working the waters. Now about the birds that Michael and I saw there on our last of a three day trip to Southeast Arkansas. The shorebird density around the lake edges was very good. We birded from the east entrance in the early morning and then from the north entrance. The west entrance would be good in the later afternoon and could potentially give good views of even more mudflats. In addition to many Least Sandpipers and Killdeer, we found 3 Stilt Sandpipers, a Black-bellied and several Semipalmated Plover, 2 Sanderling, 1 Western and several Semipalmated Sandpipers, Pectoral Sandpipers, Solitary and Spotted Sandpipers, Lesser Yellowlegs and a single Wilson's Phalarope that flew right over our heads. Another eBirder recently reported Baird's Sandpiper and Short-billed Dowitcher from here as well.There remains to be numerous opportunities to see nteresting shorebirds here as fall migration continues (and as waders go vagrant), so if you're in the area and want to increase your county numbers, this spot is highly recommended. Spring 2020 might also be promising. Patty McLean and Michael Linz,  Conway AR
 

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Date: 9/7/19 9:06 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Lake Monticello Birds and Drainage Update
This is mostly an update on the progress being made on the draining of Lake Maumelle in Drew County. News reports are sketchy and somewhat confusing but the drain is occurring due to the critical need to repair the dam. The entire levee is closed at this time. All three road entrances to the lake are open. Officials intend to also clean the lake, removing debris and invasives. This project may take up to 2 years to complete and there are no limits on number or size of fish that can be taken during this drain. The lake is significantly lower than I expected, exposing numerous mud flats that were covered with waders and shorebirds as well as 2 eagles and two osprey working the waters Now about the birds that Michael and I saw there on our last of a three day trip to Southeast Arkansas. The shorebird density around the lake edges was very good. We birded from the east entrance in the early morning and then from the north entrance. The west entrance would be good in the later afternoon and could potentially give good views of even more mudflats. In addition to many Least Sandpipers and Killdeer, we found 3 Stilt Sandpipers, a Black-bellied and several Semipalmated Plover, 2 Sanderling, 1 Western and several Semipalmated Sandpipers, Pectoral Sandpipers, Solitary and Spotted Sandpipers, Lesser Yellowlegs and a single Wilson's Phalarope that flew right over our heads. Another eBirder recently reported Baird's Sandpiper and Short-billed Dowitcher from here as well.There remains to be numerous opportunities to see nteresting shorebirds here as fall migration continues (and as waders go vagrant), so if you're in the area and want to increase your county numbers, this spot is highly recommended. Spring 2020 might also be promising. Patty McLean and Michael Linz,  Conway AR
 

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Date: 9/7/19 5:28 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Wilson Spring Preserve in Fayetteville
Birders around northwest Arkansas now have access to a large tract of native, tallgrass prairie (now quite a bit forested) bottomlands. Northwest Arkansas Land Trust opened public access to Wilson Spring Preserve yesterday. Entrance and parking on south side of Sams Club in Fayetteville. I walked this property 15 years ago with Don Nelms (entrepreneur of Adventure Subaru) who was then working with Audubon Arkansas on a plan to preserve it. A kiosk donated by the Nelms family includes a map of mowed trails. At 121 acres, its a chunk of natural landscape including prairie mounds. Along I-49, access is quick and easy. Next to the UA-Fayetteville, it will host class field trips and student research. Master Naturalists have been managing bird boxes. The Preserve protects a small fish rare in the state, Arkansas Darter. We go there on the Fayetteville Christmas Bird Count. Botanical community = diverse. American Goldfinches were working ripening thistles. American Robins were foraging on poke berries. Hairy Woodpeckers PEEK PEEK PEEK. A Red-shouldered Hawk was calling, but then it turned into a Blue Jay. I didnt follow up on any of this yesterday because I was mainly checking out the trails. The traffic sounds from adjacent I-49 are notable as you first walk in, but I had largely forgotten about it before reaching a small bridge over the Wilson Spring. Theres an eBird bar chart for WSP here: https://ebird.org/barchart?byr=1900&eyr=2019&bmo=1&emo=12&r=L502921 -- BUT you have to be cautious about using it since it includes quite a bit of data that dates back to 2000, before there was a Preserve, and before City of Fayetteville sold fields now developed into lovely homes -- where Henslows Sparrows once nested. Existing open grasslands on WSP are partially flooded because beavers have been doing their thing in Clabber Creek. Good for Wood Ducks and probably Osage Burrowing Crawfish and Swamp Sparrows in winter.


 

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Date: 9/6/19 7:26 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Sabine's Gull follow-up
Just to follow up on my earlier post... we observed the gull from a boat due south of the Lake Dardanelle visitor's center in Russellville.  As most Sabine's Gulls tend to move on rather quickly, I would think chances of relocating this bird would be low. However, should anyone try, I suggest setting up a scope at the visitor's center early in the morning and looking south-southwest as there would be no other public vantage point. Or taking a boat out. I will look in the morning from my dock and post if it is relocated.
I'm hoping Charlie Lyon will post an ebird list as i know he had some remarkable photos.

Kenny NicholsDardanelle
 

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Date: 9/6/19 5:22 pm
From: Kenny Nichols <0000011f0020ee30-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Sabine’s Gull
LaDonna, myself and Charlie Lyon found a juvenile Sabine’s Gull on Lake Dardanelle late this afternoon.

Kenny Nichols
Dardanelle

Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 9/6/19 10:58 am
From: JFR <johnfredman...>
Subject: BUFF-BREASTED SANDPIPER AT BOYD POINT
This morning, I observed and photographed a single foraging Buff-breasted Sandpiper at the Boyd Point Wastewater Treatment Facility in Pine Bluff.
John Redman
 

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Date: 9/4/19 6:48 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA Upcoming Field Trips
Below is the list of the next three months of field trips sponsored by the Audubon Society of Central Arkansas (ASCA).  Anyone interested in birds is welcome to join us, you don't have to be a member.  Trips are informal, fun, and informative; a great way to see different species of birds in different areas and habitats around the state.  Feel free to contact me off-list if you have any questions.Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip CoordinatorLittle Rock/Pulaski County

 

September 21

Bona Dea Trails and Sanctuary—Russellville

Meet at 7:00 a.m. at the Mayflower commuter lot offI-40 West at Exit 135.  We will arrive atthe Bona Dea Trails first parking lot around 8:15 a.m. for anyone who wants tomeet us there.  Our target birds will bemigrating fall warblers.  Bona Dea Trailsis 186 acres of wetlands and woodlands in the Prairie Creek floodplain.  The trails are paved and level for easywalking.  Lunch is on your own.  There are picnic tables at Bona Dea, orseveral fast food restaurants are nearby.

 From Little Rock, take I-40west to Russellville.  Take Exit 81.  Turn left off the exit ramp, then left at thelight to go south on Hwy 7.  Cross overthe interstate, take a right at the second stoplight (Lakefront Drive).  The trail’s parking area will be on your leftin less than a mile. 

  

October 26

Bell Slough South AGFC Wildlife Management Area

Mayflower, Faulkner Co.

Meet at 7:30 a.m. at the South (boardwalk) entrance into the Bell SloughWildlife Management Area (WMA) off Hwy. 365. Bell Slough is a mix of ecosystems consisting of 2,040 acres ofwoodlands and wetlands situated between Little Rock and Mayflower/Falkner Co. With extended spring flooding bringing in fresh nutrients to the moistsoil units and recent work completed by AGFC with disking and planting a supplementalcover crop, the units will provide an attractive waterfowl feeding area for thefall and winter.

 

There are 117 species of birds documented for the WMA, including thewaterfowl resting habitat.  Our targetbirds will be migrating ducks, Sora and American Bittern, wading birds such as egretsand herons, and also wintering passerines.  The Kenny Vernon Nature Trail winds throughthe wooded area and consists of three connecting trails, ranging in length fromabout a half-mile to 2 1/4 miles.  Thereis a nice mix wildflowers, which attracts numerous butterflies.  Wear study walking shoes.  Walking will be on unpaved, mostly levelpaths.  This will be a morning trip.

 From Little Rock, go west on I-40. Exit I-40 at Mayflower (Exit 135) and turn east (right) at the lightonto Hwy. 89.  Then turn south (right)just past the commuter parking lot onto the service road.  Follow the service road paralleling I-40,then veer right at the fork.  Follow thisroad until you cross the Palarm Creek bridge. Turn left into the WMA parking lot.

  

November 23

DeGray LakeResort State Park—Arkadelphia

Meet at 7:30 a.m.in the commuter lot at I-430/I-630 off Shackleford Road in Little Rock. We’ll arrive around 8:45 a.m. at the Park’s Lodge for anyone who would like tomeet us there.  Our target birds will be eagles, loons, ducks, mergansers,grebes, and gulls.  Dress warm, the lake can be windy and cold.  Hatsand gloves are recommended.  Bring scope, water, and snacks.  You canbring lunch or eat in the Park’s Lodge restaurant.

 Address for thepark is:  2027 State Park Entrance Road - Bismarck, Arkansas 71929. GPS coordinates are 34.24562, -93.14840.  Go to www.degray.com for more information about the park.






 


 

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Date: 9/4/19 4:05 pm
From: Kenny Nations <kennynations...>
Subject: White Ibis
I saw two juvenile White Ibis at Bald Knob this morning or that day s what
I believe they were. They were between me and the sun making viewing
difficult. There were goose hunters there and the shooting caused most
birds to disappear.

 

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Date: 9/3/19 5:14 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Sep. 3
It was partly cloudy and hot with a breeze on the bird survey today. 44
species were found. I didn't make it down in time to catch the morning
flight but there were still lots of birds with active nests containing young
in the heronry. There is at least still one active Neotropic Cormorant nest
containing 4 near fledgling sized young that are climbing up in the nest
tree above the nest to be fed there. There are even Anhingas sitting on
eggs still. White Ibis fledglings are all over the heronry taking their
first flights. I saw a couple juvenile Little-blue Herons chasing in flight
an adult apparently wanting to be fed. The adult led them in circles in and
around the heronry several times as if it was getting them to exercise their
wings. One of the Common Gallinule pairs that I have been watching are on
their 3rd brood of young. Its common for their species to have two broods
but I was surprised when they showed up with a 3rd brood. Purple Gallinules
apparently only produce one brood normally but I saw a couple pairs today
with small young that made me wonder. On my way into the reservoirs this
morning, I flushed a flock of 80+ Black-bellied Whistling Ducks from unit
27B. Apparently they are going to use Red Slough as a staging area like
they did last year before they make there flight south. I flushed a female
whistling Duck from a duck box today when I walked by it so apparently we
have some late nesters again this year. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 90

Wood Duck - 55

Mallard - 2

Blue-winged Teal - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 6

Neotropic Cormorant - 8

Anhinga - 60

Great-blue Heron - 8

Great Egret - 22

Snowy Egret - 62

Little-blue Heron - 25

Cattle Egret - ~4,000

Green Heron - 2

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 3 (near fledgling sized young that have climbed
out of the nest into the upper parts of the tree.)

White Ibis - 64

Black Vulture - 41

Turkey Vulture - 31

Cooper's Hawk - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 5

Red-tailed Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 27 (also 2 broods of small young.)

Common Gallinule - 54 (also 6 broods of small & medium-sized young.)

American Coot - 2

Killdeer - 9

Least Sandpiper - 1

Wilson's Snipe - 1

Mourning Dove - 1

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 4

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Alder Flycatcher - 4

Least Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 6

American Crow - 6

Tree Swallow - 1

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 12

Cliff Swallow - 2

Carolina Chickadee - 3

Carolina Wren - 6

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Yellow-breasted Chat - 1

Northern Cardinal - 4

Indigo Bunting - 11

Red-winged Blackbird - 19





Odonates:



Swamp Darner

Regal Darner

Common Green Darner

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags



Herps:



American Alligator

Western Cottonmouth





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR












 

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Date: 9/2/19 3:08 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Labor Day on Flint Creek Birding Trail
Several of us spent part of our Labor Day birding what Ive been informally calling Flint Creek Birding Trail. The trail involves stops at several locales in western Benton County all connected to one of the regions premier clear water streams, Flint Creek. We met at the Sleepy Hollow store on highway 59 near Gentry. From there, we made stops on Dawn Hill Road, including Flint Creek Nature Area and the bridge over Flint Creek at Ozark Adventist Academy. The bridge is closed, so we backtracked to get back onto Dawn Hill Road, then on to a 1.0 mile hike at Siloam Springs City Lake, and finally Eagle Watch Nature Trail on SWEPCO Lake, an impoundment of Flint Creek. We were disappointed on one of the target birds: Yellow-crowned Night-Heron. I have seen them recently at several places along Flint Creek. Based upon quite a few observations over the past decade, they must nest along Flint Creek, but are of course easily spooked, and since it was Labor Day, with lots of families out with children and dogs, I assume the herons wisely stowed away far from all prying eyes, including ours.

My favorite bird for the day was Yellow-billed Cuckoo. We either saw them or heard them at all stops. One at City Lake caught a Katydid in a tree right above us and then proceeded to remove wings as we watched. We found another target all stops: Red-headed Woodpeckers. The good number of Eastern Kingbirds made me think they have a fall roost at Siloam City Lake. The incredibly lovely Spotted Jewelweed is blooming all over. I expected to see a bunch of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds queuing up at the reddish trumpets, but didnt, and said so aloud, only to be corrected by Vivek and Barry, who had just seen one working the jewelweed patch. Then Peter saw a hummer checking out the red trumpets on a Trumpet-Creeper at Eagle Watch. The numbers of Double-crested Cormorants and Great Egrets have increased at Eagle Watch, which added to interest for our last stop.

UA-Fayetteville graduate student Vivek Govind Kumar kept our eBird lists (10 for the day). Here are a couple of the main ones. Eagle Watch: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59459468 and for the walk at Siloam City Lake: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59456930.


 

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Date: 9/1/19 2:31 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: BIRDY MORNING AT HOBBS. FIELD TRIP NEXT SUNDAY
Sinking Stream Trail at Hobbs State Park-Conservation Area was pretty birdy this morning. First nice surprise: Ovenbirds (3) bathing in a small pool in a part of the sinking stream still flowing above the chert rubble. Other warblers included Hooded (2), Northern Parula (1-2), and Worm-eating (1). White-eyed Vireos (3-4) were vocalizing a LOT. In addition, we also had Red-eyed Vireos, both Summer (1) and Scarlet (1) tanagers, Acadian Flycatcher (still singing). A rather dramatic native flower, Great Blue Lobelia is in bloom. There are fairly large fruits on the Pawpaw trees. (We had only walked part of the trail and none of Historic Van Winkle when I got a call from Joe Woolbright adjacent Chesney Prairie Natural Area where he was looking at a juvenile White Ibis out in a field!) Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society will host a field trip to Hobbs next Sunday, September 8, for a slow walk and careful inspection of both birds and native plants along the trail through Sinking Stream and Historic Van Winkle.


 

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Date: 9/1/19 1:26 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 9/1/2019 - empids/warblers
Several fall migrants were present at Lake Fayetteville this morning.

Highlights included many Empidonax flycatchers ( Least (7), Alder (1), Traill's (1), Acadian (2), unidentified empids (2)), Olive-sided Flycatcher (1), Philadelphia Vireo (1), Black-and-white Warbler (2), Yellow Warbler (7) and Wilson's Warbler (4).

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59436780

Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 8/31/19 4:39 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Empid migration - Beaver Lake Nursery Pond
Several Empidonax flycatchers were seen at Beaver Lake Nursery Pond this morning - Alder (5 - identified by diagnostic "pip" calls ), Traill's (3 - no vocalizations), Least (1).

Other migrants included Ruby-throated Hummingbird (20+), Sharp-shinned Hawk (1), Purple Martin (4), Lark Sparrow (1), Yellow-breasted Chat (1), Yellow Warbler (3), Chestnut-sided Warbler (1) and Wilson's Warbler (1).

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59410945

A few shorebirds/ducks were present at Charlie Craig Fish Hatchery - Stilt Sandpiper (3), Baird's Sandpiper (2), Least Sandpiper (4), Semipalmated Sandpiper (2), Blue-winged Teal (6).

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59411085


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 8/31/19 4:19 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Eagle Watch turns 20 -- party September 14 -- y'all come
Eagle Watch Nature Trail, an Important Bird Area, is turning 20. The anniversary will be celebrated on Saturday September 14. Everyone is welcome. Bring your bins and cameras, and room for snacks. 9:30 10 a.m. Meet at Eagle Watch Pavilion. 10 a.m. Anniversary Program. 10:45 Noon Refreshments and enjoy Eagle Watch, pavilions, and boardwalk. At least tens of thousands of people have had planted within them the seed of appreciating nature while visiting Eagle Watch. It started with Terry Stanfills wildlife photography, especially of birds. Terrys photographs caught the eyes and hearts of his fellow employees and management of the SWEPCO power generating plant. The seed was planted. Though I do not believe that a plant will spring up where no seed has been, I have great faith in a seed. Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders. -- Thoreau


 

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Date: 8/31/19 3:56 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: A meeting with the Pope May 11th 2019
While cleaning out my over-flowing emailbox, I came across Dr. Lesham's
meeting with Pope Francis. (The first link is a large Powerpoint download!)



Yossi is a long-time promoter of avian conservation in search of a pathway
to peaceful cooperation as well as bird hazard prevention.



It is encouraging to hear of support of these ideals at this level.



Now we need to bring it home!



Regards,



Jeff Short



From: Yossi Leshem List
[mailto:<TAU-LIFESCI-YOSSILESHEM-EN...>] On Behalf Of Yossi
Leshem
Sent: Tuesday, May 21, 2019 8:10 AM
To: <TAU-LIFESCI-YOSSILESHEM-EN...>
Subject: A meeting with the Pope May 11th 2019



Dear friends,





Re: A meeting with Pope Franciscus at the Vatican

Saturday, May 11th 2019



1. Enclosed is a presentation from the meeting with Pope Franciscus, that
was a constitutive experience and a remarkable inspiration:

Link: https://bit.ly/2WWzk5D



2. In the framework of the desire to expand the activities that we are
holding on the subject of the use of Barn Owls as a Biological pest control
agents in Agriculture, that started in 1983 in Kibbutz Sde Eliyahu, with the
first installment of 14 nesting boxes, the project became a national
initiative in 2008 with the cooperation of Society for the Protection of
Nature in Israel (SPNI), Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Environmental
Protection and the Ministry of Regional Cooperation. Today, approximately
4,500 nesting boxes are installed. Since 2002 the project expanded to Jordan
and to the Palestinian Authority, and from 2017 it has expanded also to
Cyprus and Greece as part of a trilateral agreement between the governments.




3. About ten years ago, Prof. Alexandre Roulin of Lausanne University in
Switzerland, who is a leading figure in the world in the study of the Barn
Owls, joined the project.



4. In June 2018, we held a remarkable tour in Switzerland, in the patronage
of the President of the Swiss Confederation, Mr. Alain Berset, who invited
150 ambassadors that are stationed in Switzerland to Richterwil Farm, where
nesting boxes are installed for the Barn Owls. The visit presented the
project that is held in the Middle East, as a model for the environmental
cooperation that contributes the peace process in the area. In the tour with
the ambassadors participated Prof. Alexandre Roulin, Prof. Yossi Leshem, the
Jordanian Gen. Mansuor Abu Rashid, the chairman of the Amman Center for
Peace and Development (ACPD) and a Palestinian representative. In this tour,
which was very successful, also participated the Vatican ambassador in
Switzerland. Prof. Roulin spoke to him and to a Catholic Bishop in order to
examine the possibility of a meeting with Pope Franciscus at the Vatican.
Because the Pope is very committed to the protection of the Earth and wrote
a book called Laudato SI (Translation: Praise Be To You) on the subject:
https://bit.ly/2XWO6cB. In April 2019, an official invite for a meeting with
the Pope at the Vatican was received. The invitation was for Saturday May
11th 2019 for a meeting with the Pope for 30 minutes to which all four
representatives from the Middle East and Switzerland were invited.



5. The meeting with the Pope was an extraordinary experience. The Pope moved
us with the simplicity of his manners, his informal communication, his
intelligence, in his tremendous excitement for the protection of
biodiversity and his interest in the protection of Earth, which he
characterize as God's creation and the duty of every believer to protect and
save from extinction. The meeting was extended to 40 minutes, because of the
Pope's high interest in our activity.



6. In the beginning of the Meeting with the Pope we presented him with an
original painting of a Barn Owl with an Olive branch in the Israel-Jordanian
border, of the Swiss Painter Laurent Williger and a book on the Barn Owls
that Alex wrote (which he presented to the Pope), the photograph of the
Vatican, the Moon and Earth from "Be'ereshit" satellite (Genesis in Hebrew)
from an altitude of 400 km, and a statue of a Swift in full scale, from the
"Tree of Hope" that is located in St. John Eye Hospital in the Christian
quarter in the Old City of Jerusalem (Yossi presented to the Pope). The
Jordanian General presented to the Pope a segment of the Madaba Map of
Jerusalem and the Jordanian river that flows to the Dead Sea, and a
paintings album of the Dead Sea that slowly extinct, along with a mural of
the Dead Sea with its high species diversity. The Palestinian representative
presented three "Buma the Barn Owl" book that were printed in Hebrew, Arabic
and English (See photos in the presentation).



7.The invitees presented to the Pope the Project of the Barn Owl as
"flag-species" of Agriculture in open spaces, and his higher meaning to
nature protection , the peace process and the connection and cooperation
between Jewish and Muslim farmers. The Swift project was also presented as
"flag-species" in urban nature, as nesting in the Church of the Nativity, in
the Vatican, the Western Wall and in Mosques in Amman. We presented to the
Pope the researches about migratory storks titled: "Migratory Birds Know no
Boundaries" and as birds that unites between all people on the globe. The
Pope watched, with great deal of excitement, short films on the computer of
transmitted Migratory Storks, Shorebirds migrating from Cyberia to Australia
and New-Zealand, Hawkes migrating from North America to Argentina. We
presented to the Pope the importance of the protection of the Jordanian
river as a holly baptism site and a unique nature reserve along with the
churches in the area.



8. In the conclusion of the meeting we asked for the blessing and the
support of the Pope in advancing the subject we presented, and to examine
their expansion to the rest of the world, on a new breaking through emphasis
of combining nature protection, peace and the 3 religions. We asked the Pope
to consider hosting a conference in the Vatican of official senior religious
figures, from the three religions, scientists and environmentalists along
with world leaders.



9. The Pope asked to emphasize the subject of Human Fraternity and because
the Meeting took place on a Saturday along with 2 Muslim representatives, on
the Ramadan fest, the Pope concluded: Tonight I will Pray for you, and I ask
that you will pray for me.



Best regards,



Prof. Yossi Leshem, Prof. Alexandre Roulin, Gen. Mansour Abu Rashid and a
Palestinian representative.



10. On this occasion we are happy to send you our new newsletter that will
be published in the following days. Link: https://bit.ly/2JSekct



Enjoy your reading,



Yours,



Yossi Leshem Dan Alon





**********************

Prof. Yossi Leshem
Address: Tel Aviv University, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences,
Department of Zoology
Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel.
Telefax +972-3-6406010, Tel: +972-3-6407963
Mobile phone: +972-52-3257722
E-mail: <mailto:<yossile...> <yossile...>
Skype Name: leshemyossi
Home: +972-2-9932308
Visit our web site: <http://www.birds.org.il/> www.birds.org.il




 

Back to top
Date: 8/30/19 11:33 am
From: Dottie Boyles <ctboyles...>
Subject: The Snipe Newsletter

The latest edition of The Snipe newsletter has been posted to the Audubon
Society of Central Arkansas's website at
https://wp.ascabird.org/2019/08/28/the-snipe-newsletter-september-november-2019/
[1]

Thanks
Dottie Boyles
ASCA Newsletter Editor
Little
Rock



Links:
------
[1]
https://wp.ascabird.org/2019/08/28/the-snipe-newsletter-september-november-2019/

 

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Date: 8/30/19 9:26 am
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Union County Birds
I decided to return to Lock 8 on the Ouachita River, to count birds a
little better last evening.

I didn't count every bird seen as I was focusing primarily on the roost.

White Ibis. 120
Glossy/White-faced Ibis - 2
Anhinga - 1
Woodstorks 12
Great Egrets 50 or so
Little Blue Herons - 200 +/-
Great Blue Herons - 2
Snowy Egrets - 8
Unknown quantity of Cattle Egrets
Roseate Spoonbills - 2
Yellow-crowned Night Heron - 3

American Alligator - 1

If you are in the area, and are familiar with this location, as you drive
along the first levee before the Lock and Dam, the birds are to the right
along the shore. If you get out of your vehicle, be mindful of water
moccasins, as they are quite common along the road. Bring bug spray. We
have golfball sized horse flies.

 

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Date: 8/29/19 5:11 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: Miller County Kite
A Swallow-tailed Kite was seen on the 27th in Miller County. Photos and
info posted on Facebooks Arkansas Birders page.

We were inundated with 12 inches of rain this past weekend. So getting to
the area where Bill Beall found last years kite is impossible.

Sandy B
Fort Smith

 

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Date: 8/27/19 6:38 pm
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Union County Birds
You know Union County. That place no one birds. I think I’m the only birder down here, or I’ve simply not met any others.

But hey, we’ve got tall pines, mosquitoes by the bucketloads, ticks that carry all kinds of diseases and water moccasins as big as my arms this time of year. If you’re really careful where you step you can bird a little.

This afternoon at H.K. Thatcher Dam (Lock 8) on the Ouachita River, I braved just that and counted approximately 300-500 waders from the levee road.

Species heard/seen:

Black-crowned Night Heron, Yellow-crowned Night Heron, Green Egret, Great Egret, Blue Heron, Little Blue Heron with juveniles, White Ibis, Wood Stork, and Roseate Spoonbills.



Kelly Chitwood



Sent from my iPhone
 

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Date: 8/27/19 5:33 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - Aug. 27
Severe storms were passing over Red Slough this morning at daybreak so I
delayed my arrival to Red Slough until the storms were passed. This caused
me to miss the morning flight from the heronry and as a result, count
numbers for waders, Wood Ducks, and Red-winged Blackbirds are much lower
than normal as these species have massive flights at first light over
Pintail Lake. For the first ~3 hours of the survey it rained a moderate
constant rain which kept me in my vehicle having to survey from the window
of my truck. Almost no Passerines were active during the rain nor was there
any singing. When the rain finally quit, birds got pretty active for me.
Nothing out of the ordinary to note except for a single Black Tern flying
over unit 27B. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 12 (also 3 broods of young.)

Wood Duck - 64

Mallard - 2

Blue-winged Teal - 4

Pied-billed Grebe - 18 (also 1 brood of small young.)

Neotropic Cormorant - 14

Anhinga - 56

Great-blue Heron - 12

Great Egret - 25

Snowy Egret - 15

Little-blue Heron - 34

Cattle Egret - ~5,000

Green Heron - 5

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2 adults (Also two nests with 3 older young in
each.)

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1

White Ibis - 61

Black Vulture - 1

Red-shouldered Hawk - 2

Purple Gallinule - 19 (also 2 broods of small young.)

Common Gallinule - 55 (also 3 broods of young.)

American Coot - 1

Killdeer - 4

Black Tern - 1

Mourning Dove - 3

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2

Ruby-throated Hummingbird - 3

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Alder Flycatcher - 5

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 7

Blue Jay - 2

American Crow - 6

Northern Rough-winged Swallow - 25

Bank Swallow - 2

Cliff Swallow - 6

Barn Swallow - 10

Carolina Chickadee - 5

Carolina Wren - 3

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Gray Catbird - 2

Northern Cardinal - 6

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 40

Dickcissel - 4

Red-winged Blackbird - 75



Odonates:



Swamp Darner

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Great-blue Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Common Whitetail

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags



Herps:



American Alligator

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Southern Leopard Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog



Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR










 

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Date: 8/27/19 10:29 am
From: plm108 <plm108...>
Subject: Alder Flycatcher, Conway County
For Central Arkansas and other nearby bird chasers, Michael and I found an ALDER FLYCATCHER this morning along Shaw Bridge Rd in Conway County. It took at least an hour before it finally vocalized (pip, pip, pip) where we could identify it beyond a Traill's. There are several other flycatchers feeding in this same area including at least two Acadians and a Pewee. So patiently waiting for the ALDER to vocalize is important in confirming this hard to separate species from its Willow cousin.  All the flycatchers (some unidentified to species) appear to be eating ripening Sumac berries in a stand on the south side of the road. This is private property but there's plenty of room along the road for viewing plus the birds have occasionally visited a small stand of nearby young Acacia trees. Location information with pin dropped at the busy feeding tree:  https://goo.gl/maps/or7KKWPbKMAitg5dA.  Photos to follow on our eBird report. We have attempted to record vocalizations but the ALDER stops pipping as soon as we start the recorder. We have also observed it flicking its tail upwards which I've read is different than the downward flicking of a Willow and sometimes used to separate the two. Happy Birding All, Patty McLean and Michael Linz,  Conway 
 

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Date: 8/27/19 8:56 am
From: DAN SCHEIMAN <birddan...>
Subject: Audubon Arkansas Native Plant Sale, Oct 11-12
Mark your calendars for Audubon Arkansas's native plant sale on Saturday, October 12 from 9am-2pm (or until plants run out). This year admission is FREE!


We're also hosting a VIP night on Friday, October 11 from 5-7pm. For a $25 donation, get your early bird pick of plants, and enjoy complimentary beer, wine, and non-alcoholic beverages and hors d'oeuvres. Spots are limited and must be secured in advance. RSVP here: https://ar.audubon.org/2019nativeVIP


Dan Scheiman

Little Rock, AR

 

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Date: 8/27/19 8:18 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Yellow-crowned Night Heron-Sunday (25 Aug 19)
Observed at Ouachita River, one-half mile downstream of Remmel Dam, feeding
during minimum flow.



Jeff Short


 

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Date: 8/26/19 3:19 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Interesting birds after heavy rain in Valley
On Saturday morning Vivek Govind Kumar and I tried birding Kibler bottoms in the Arkansas River Valley, but access we typically use Westville, Thornhill, and Red Hill roads were flowing lakes, result of in excess of 9-inches of rain, starting on Thursday. It was an inconvenience for us, but modest compared to a newspaper delivery person who died in her car and at least 60 homes flooded-out in Fort Smith and surrounding communities. Vivek had to return to his PhD research, but this morning I was able to bird Kibler bottoms.

Arkansas River flood gates have been opened and the big oxbow in the bottoms is a real lake. On one end of it, 600+ Canada Geese were roosting in a field off East Arnold Road. With them, White Ibises (9), all juveniles. My previous records have involved 1-2 at most. In addition, Blue-winged Teal (15), Upland Sandpiper (1), Killdeer, and Least and Pectoral Sandpipers.

Fields adjacent the UA Vegetable Research Station on Thornhill were partially flooded. Besides Killdeer, there were Western Sandpipers (2) with trademark long bills.

Flooded oxbow extends in a broad arc covering lower areas of West-Ark Sod. More shorebirds here, including Sanderling (2), Lesser Yellowlegs (25), Stilt Sandpiper (1), and another flock of Blue-winged Teal.

I saw in this mornings paper that flooding in Fort Smith was so severe that Grand Avenue Baptist Church opened as an emergency shelter. I went to church there in my youth, now an amazing 65-years ago.

When I made my first stop this morning on Thornhill, a friendly woman named Cricket pulled up next to me. Said the water was so high on Saturday it washed up and stranded a large crappie, which she collected and put in her pond at home. Said catfish were stranded, too, but she didnt get them. Just like in the Bible, I only eat fish with scales. Somehow or another I missed this in my youthful studies, but looked it up at home: Of all the creatures living in the water of the seas and the streams, you may eat any that have fins and scales.

Getting up close to noon, with heat and humidity rising dramatically, I turned back north for home. Picked up last interesting bird of the morning: Swainsons Hawk (1).


 

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Date: 8/25/19 6:31 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Ruddy Turnstone
I forgot to add, I was one of the 50 or so birders looking all day Saturday
without locating the Turnstone.

 

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Date: 8/25/19 6:09 pm
From: Vivek Govind Kumar <vivekgk3...>
Subject: Lake Fayetteville - 8/25/2019
I visited Lake Fayetteville this morning with Todd Ballinger and Peter Shaffer.

FOS sightings included Olive-sided Flycatcher (1), Alder Flycatcher (1) and Gadwall (1).

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S59262896


Vivek Govind Kumar
Fayetteville
 

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Date: 8/25/19 6:08 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: BKNWR
Made a late evening drive through this afternoon. Of interest to me, not a
single Black-necked Stilt to be seen. Also of interest was relocating a
Ruddy Turnstone that had been seen Friday, but over 50 birders were unable
to locate it Saturday. The rest of the birds were same birds of the past
few days.

 

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Date: 8/25/19 9:28 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Birding by Book - Upcoming ASCA Program
Audubon Society of Central Arkansass Sept. speaker will be Mel White, but
for our October program Im requesting your participation.

You are invited to share a passage from a book of any genre that is about
birds, birders, or birding. Whether moving or amusing, educational or
nonsensical, a poem or a prose, we want to hear it. Each person will have up
to 5 minutes to read their selected passage aloud. Please submit your books
title and author to me (off-list) by October 8 so I can compile a
bibliography to share with the group. Start figuring out what you want to
say.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 8/25/19 9:04 am
From: Allan Mueller <akcmueller...>
Subject: Faulkner County Checklist
The Fourth Edition of the "Birds of Faulkner County, Arkansas" is now
available free for the asking.

If you would like a copy, send me a SASE (if you do not know what a SASE
is, send me an Instagram. I do not know what that is, so we will be
even). Make sure that your envelope is large enough as the checklist is
8.5" by 5.5".

--
Allan Mueller
20 Moseley Lane
Conway, AR 72032
501-339-8071 cell

Be sincere even if you don't mean it.

 

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Date: 8/24/19 3:28 pm
From: Karen Holliday <ladyhawke1...>
Subject: ASCA August field trip report
blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } In spite of dire predictions of rain for the day, forty-two birders gathered at the Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge in White County Saturday morning. Thankfully the rain held off until noon and the heavy cloud cover kept the temperature at a very comfortable mid-80's range. The group's first stop was west of the grain bins and just south off Huntsman's Road and produced two of the best birds of the trip- great looks at a cooperative Lesser Black-backed Gull and a Common Tern. In the nearby mud flat and short grass were over 400 Canada Geese, plus Blue-winged Teal, Mallards, Great Egrets, Little Blue Herons, Wilson's Snipe, Pectoral Sandpipers, and Killdeer.
Next stop was the pond just before the low water bridge where seven American Avocets were busy working the muddy water next to the road. The rest of the pond was full of American White Pelicans, Black-necked Stilts, more adult and immature Little Blue Herons, plus two Gadwall's, Long-billed and Short-billed Dowitchers, and a small group of swooping Bank Swallows and Northern Rough-winged Swallows.  A Caspian Tern circled, then sat on the mud for great looks through everyone's scopes.  
The back side of the pond held more shorebirds with Semipalmated Plovers, Stilt, Western, Semipalmated, and Least Sandpipers, plus Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Northern Shovelers, and a few Cliff Swallows. Mixed in with the numerous Great Egrets were Snowy Egrets and Great Blue Herons, plus a Spotted Sandpiper.
Last birds of the trip were a Green Heron, a Black-bellied Whistling Duck, and a very cooperative Sedge Wren. At that point, the looming rain clouds opened up and the rain moved in.  Since it was lunch time, the group said their goodbyes and headed home with to close to 45 species on their day's trip list.
Karen HollidayASCA Field Trip Coordinator Little Rock
 

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