ARBIRD-L
Received From Subject
7/12/20 3:02 pm Abi Peterman <00000373892bff03-dmarc-request...> Possible Yellow cardinal?
7/11/20 12:56 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: It is never boring in Israel. despite the coronavirus We're optimistic!
7/11/20 9:59 am Elizabeth Shores <efshores...> Re: Immature Red-headed & Red-bellied Woodpeckers fighting
7/11/20 9:12 am Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> Immature Red-headed & Red-bellied Woodpeckers fighting
7/11/20 8:30 am Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...> Re: AAS Newsletter - News of Members
7/10/20 5:11 pm Dottie Boyles <000002f3cfbe18c8-dmarc-request...> AAS Newsletter - News of Members
7/10/20 1:02 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Limpkin Update 7/10/20
7/10/20 1:00 pm David Arbour <arbour...> FW: Red Slough Limpkin Update
7/9/20 9:19 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - July 9 (Limpkin!)
7/9/20 4:06 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Surprise Yellow-crowned Night Heron sighting.
7/9/20 6:22 am Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Bald Knob NWR
7/8/20 12:22 pm Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...> Fw: Virtual Campfire Concert - please share this!
7/7/20 5:14 pm Susan Hardin <whizcats...> Re: Remaining nestling
7/7/20 3:55 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Remaining nestling
7/7/20 12:49 pm Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...> BKNWR Highlights
7/7/20 9:56 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Remaining nestling
7/7/20 9:30 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Ages 20 and 21 days
7/6/20 12:56 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: 19 and 20 days old
7/6/20 12:37 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> 19 and 20 days old
7/6/20 11:46 am Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...> Bird documentation photos, Part 2
7/6/20 6:45 am Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...> Birding Millwood and the Okay Levee in Howard County
7/6/20 6:10 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Western Kingbird surveys -- note from Bill Beall
7/6/20 5:40 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> ASCA Zoom Meeting: Birding Australia
7/5/20 7:00 pm auntm13 <auntm13...> Unusual behavior?
7/5/20 4:30 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Update Re: 18 and 19 days old
7/5/20 1:28 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Update Re: 18 and 19 days old
7/5/20 12:31 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> 18 and 19 days old
7/4/20 5:32 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Avian Articles
7/4/20 4:31 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> THE 4th ON FORMER BEATY PRAIRIE (MAYSVILLE)
7/4/20 12:16 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Peregrine Falcons
7/4/20 10:31 am Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Native plant bird feeder.
7/3/20 5:46 pm Kenny Nations <kennynations...> Unusual sighting
7/3/20 2:23 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Some excitement on old Norwood Prairie
7/3/20 8:24 am Allison Fowler <allisonfowler001...> Re: Stone Prairie WMA
7/3/20 6:58 am Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Re: Stone Prairie WMA
7/3/20 6:47 am Jeffrey Nolen <jnole001...> Stone Prairie WMA
7/2/20 2:34 pm Jacque Brown <bluebird2...> Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
7/2/20 4:33 am Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...> Re: Bluebirds
7/2/20 4:30 am Ed Laster <elaster523...> Re: Bluebirds
7/2/20 4:00 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Bluebirds
7/1/20 7:30 pm Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> Bluebirds
7/1/20 12:49 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Devil's Den State Park
7/1/20 10:13 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> 15 and 16 days old
7/1/20 5:33 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Eastern Bluebirds at Bella Vista
6/30/20 3:10 pm cbayona <cbayona...> Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
6/30/20 3:10 pm cbayona <cbayona...> Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
6/30/20 8:24 am Keith Newton <keithnewton...> Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
6/30/20 4:43 am Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
6/29/20 8:58 pm cbayona <cbayona...> Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
6/29/20 7:53 am Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...> Barred Owl Family, North Fayetteville
6/28/20 11:47 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Former Norwood Prairie
6/27/20 8:41 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> 11 and 12 days old
6/27/20 12:36 pm Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...> Memories from early June and birds around Fayetteville
6/27/20 11:58 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Re: Swamp Milkweed at Home Depot in Benton
6/27/20 9:54 am Joe Neal <joecneal...> Re: cerulean warblers
6/27/20 7:07 am Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...> cerulean warblers
6/26/20 1:00 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> 10- & 11-day-old RTHU nestlings in the rain
6/26/20 7:57 am Mary Ann King <office...> Re: Swamp Milkweed at Home Depot in Benton
6/26/20 7:51 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> Swamp Milkweed at Home Depot in Benton
6/25/20 7:32 pm Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...> eBird documentation photos
6/25/20 2:55 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Hummingbird nest update
6/25/20 1:58 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Hummingbird nest update
6/25/20 1:32 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> NORTHERN BOBWHITES AT CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA
6/24/20 6:10 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - June 23
6/24/20 11:25 am Joseph Neal <joeneal...> CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOWS IN A HIGHLY ENERGIZED SUMMER EVENING
6/23/20 2:16 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> hummer nest update
6/22/20 4:40 pm Don Simons <drsimons56...> Re: Hummingbird nests
6/22/20 3:49 pm Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...> Variance GRANTED for migratory habitat
6/22/20 3:28 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Not a snake!
6/22/20 2:45 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Not a snake!
6/22/20 2:24 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> hummer nest update
6/22/20 1:49 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> High drama at the hummingbird nest
6/22/20 11:39 am Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> Birds, Plants and Tent Caterpillars
6/22/20 9:33 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Roseate Spoonbill
6/22/20 8:25 am Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...> Roseate Spoonbill
6/21/20 8:48 pm Don Simons <drsimons56...> Re: Hummingbird nests
6/21/20 8:02 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Hummingbird nests
6/21/20 7:43 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Hummingbird nests
6/21/20 6:01 pm Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...> Re: Hummingbird nests
6/21/20 5:47 pm Barry Haas <bhaas...> Third (and final?) Phoebe Nesting
6/21/20 3:04 pm Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Whips
6/21/20 2:36 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> hummingbird nest update
6/21/20 10:07 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Hummingbird nests
6/21/20 10:01 am Gmail <butchchq8...> Re: Hummingbird nests
6/21/20 9:25 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: Hummingbird nests
6/21/20 7:27 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Roseate Spoonville record
6/21/20 6:22 am Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Roseate Spoonville record
6/21/20 5:47 am Don Simons <drsimons56...> Hummingbird nests
6/20/20 2:05 pm <bobcaulk...> <bobcaulk...> <bobcaulk...> Nestling Cooper's Hawks - II
6/20/20 12:13 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Centerton
6/20/20 6:26 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...> WEKIs at Sunnymede Park
6/18/20 2:12 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Hummingbird nest update
6/18/20 1:49 pm PLM108 <plm108...> Chucks and Whip-poor-wills
6/17/20 9:11 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Re: Audubon Article
6/17/20 4:33 pm Harriet Jansma <hjansma...>
6/17/20 4:29 pm Jay Jones <jonesjay62...> Re: Bird Glue Trap Dangers
6/17/20 4:19 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> Chesney Prairie Natural Area
6/17/20 4:17 pm Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...> Audubon Article
6/17/20 8:47 am Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
6/16/20 7:43 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> hummer update
6/16/20 6:29 pm Lyndal York <lrbluejay...> Rare Bird Records
6/16/20 4:04 pm David Arbour <arbour...> Red Slough Bird Survey - June 16
6/15/20 3:08 pm Devin Moon <moondevg...> Snowy Egret and Watersnake
6/15/20 2:42 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> STARRY NIGHT TO BOSTON ISLANDS, THE UPPER BUFFALO IN REVIEW
6/15/20 12:09 pm Harriet Jansma <hjansma...> Re: MIKI Show
6/15/20 11:32 am Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Re: MIKI Show
6/15/20 5:26 am Ellen C. Stern <000003272d31bd68-dmarc-request...> MIKI Show
6/14/20 9:10 pm Daniel Scheiman <birddan...> Research Request: Hummingbird Courtship Study
6/14/20 10:51 am Cheryl Johnson <cjbluebird...> Dan the Bird Man on Podcast
6/14/20 4:40 am Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...> Article from CNN about bird dialects
6/13/20 3:22 pm Cathy Marak <cmarak999...> Black-bellied Whistling Ducks Anglin Road
6/13/20 2:50 pm Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...> Camp Robinson SUA
6/13/20 2:41 pm Jeffrey Short <bashman...> FW: Hear 13 Birds Flourishing in a Newly Quiet New York - The New York Times
6/12/20 2:59 pm Joseph Neal <joeneal...> SWORDS TO PLOWSHARES, PEA RIDGE NMP
6/12/20 12:40 pm Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...> Re: Voices in the dark - some Nightjar Network tidbits
6/12/20 12:33 pm Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> Hummingbird update
6/12/20 11:14 am Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...> Re: Variance for migratory habitat
6/12/20 10:18 am Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> Re: Voices in the dark
6/12/20 6:32 am Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...> Re: Voices in the dark
6/12/20 5:54 am Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...> Variance for migratory habitat
6/12/20 4:55 am hilltower12 <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...> FW: Re: Voices in the dark
6/12/20 2:36 am Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Re: Voices in the dark
6/12/20 2:14 am Don Simons <drsimons56...> Re: Voices in the dark - some Nightjar Network tidbits
 
Back to top
Date: 7/12/20 3:02 pm
From: Abi Peterman <00000373892bff03-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Possible Yellow cardinal?
I’m not sure but I believe I may have a Yellow cardinal, it’s mate, and their fledgling in our yard. I was out feeding the chickens and noticed the fledgling on our fence. I looked up and saw a red cardinal, and then a yellow one right next to it. I tried to research and didn’t find much on sightings in Arkansas. Thought I might share with you experts and get your opinion on it!


 

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Date: 7/11/20 12:56 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: It is never boring in Israel. despite the coronavirus We're optimistic!
Fyi

[]



Dear friends,



It is never boring in Israel. despite the coronavirus We're optimistic!



1. See the story of the intruder Barn Owl chick from a neighboring nest that
took over the chicks on our online camera nesting box:

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DBgtJog0Oj5A&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C3819ac5da45c47e97aec08d825d466a4%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637300941492406427&amp;sdata=c3dG9ZfJcbUp9VxpcHeYKrpK%2BmmApc%2BPfrm3c77tAR4%3D&amp;reserved=0



See the parents feeding the chicks on the night between Friday, when they
brought 15 rodents in 7 hours!: https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F2ZgkNnF&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C3819ac5da45c47e97aec08d825d466a4%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637300941492406427&amp;sdata=kFw7s7yaukE8diER65roGdFqxR3S6P0ds1fHmblxh5U%3D&amp;reserved=0



2. A story about our project: Barn Owls as biological pest control agents
in agriculture, connecting between Palestinians, Israelis and Jordanians,
in French from channel I24:

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DyZBcWX0MUZM&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C3819ac5da45c47e97aec08d825d466a4%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637300941492406427&amp;sdata=e%2F0xsplWxvbGXA4k76jN28vDf0G8MEib%2Byag243IMVc%3D&amp;reserved=0
<https://eur06.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtu
be.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DyZBcWX0MUZM&data=02%7C01%7C%7C411199024c724888504b08d81
b56376e%7C84df9e7fe9f640afb435aaaaaaaaaaaa%7C1%7C0%7C637289404392130787&sdat
a=Cyek%2Fxz8fpMtVajlC53Y%2BqfgAR3NyNbAGl4NJ14ZfSo%3D&reserved=0>



3. Our new publication in German: "Pater Ernst Schmitz: Geistlicher und
Zoologe. Das Heilige Land zu Beginn den 20. Jahrhunderts"

For more details and purchasing online:
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fshopeu.birds.org.il%2Fen%2Ffather-ernest-schmitz-priest-and-zoologist-th&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C3819ac5da45c47e97aec08d825d466a4%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637300941492416418&amp;sdata=Yo330Zrf6YHQnlBO9CMJX%2BSPYUkiDtRzM7AmxsEuiHM%3D&amp;reserved=0
e-holy-land-at-the-beginning-of-the-20th-century



Keep safe!

Yours,

Yossi Leshem







************************

Prof. Yossi Leshem
Address: Tel Aviv University, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences,
School of Zoology
Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel.
Telefax +972-3-6406010, Tel: +972-3-6407963
Mobile phone: +972-52-3257722
E-mail <mailto:<yossile...> <yossile...>
Skype Name: leshemyossi
Home: +972-2-9932308
Visit our web site: <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.birds.org.il%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C3819ac5da45c47e97aec08d825d466a4%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637300941492416418&amp;sdata=TvIgLwaLtRNz0cZJ3%2BsP%2FEA%2FZ88Q2lB2ItBkaSaFIY8%3D&amp;reserved=0> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.birds.org.il%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C3819ac5da45c47e97aec08d825d466a4%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637300941492416418&amp;sdata=TvIgLwaLtRNz0cZJ3%2BsP%2FEA%2FZ88Q2lB2ItBkaSaFIY8%3D&amp;reserved=0




 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 9:59 am
From: Elizabeth Shores <efshores...>
Subject: Re: Immature Red-headed & Red-bellied Woodpeckers fighting
What a great show! Thanks for sharing.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 11, 2020, at 11:12 AM, Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...> wrote:
>
> 
> These woodpeckers were fighting over suet crumbs that had fallen to the ground. The Red-headed finally drove off the Red-bellied.
> Click on link below to view:
> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fdrive.google.com%2Fdrive%2Ffolders%2F1C5hoXHyhvLogolAxyPeICSgib5quNR46%3Fusp%3Dsharing&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cc041d26e31e34813bab608d825bba2f0%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637300835111577256&amp;sdata=G4OxuUbxyJOoFM5z9S%2BGKmFIUMn2AwCtjrdXy5EXRmo%3D&amp;reserved=0
>
> Delos McCauley
> Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 9:12 am
From: Delos McCauley <mccauleydelos...>
Subject: Immature Red-headed & Red-bellied Woodpeckers fighting
These woodpeckers were fighting over suet crumbs that had fallen to
the ground. The Red-headed finally drove off the Red-bellied.
Click on link below to view:
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fdrive.google.com%2Fdrive%2Ffolders%2F1C5hoXHyhvLogolAxyPeICSgib5quNR46%3Fusp%3Dsharing&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C5bfdde8ef0b546f0205008d825b50797%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637300807346312242&amp;sdata=HZUVpAjWJY5yKhz5zMai8rKafeeG65yXqFTic2yLfhY%3D&amp;reserved=0

Delos McCauley
Pine Bluff

 

Back to top
Date: 7/11/20 8:30 am
From: Kelly Chitwood <kellyannchitwood...>
Subject: Re: AAS Newsletter - News of Members
I would like to thank my fellow birders for their cards, calls and messages
of support due to the loss of my husband in May. I’m getting out some, but
this heat and covid scare has prevented me from getting too far from home.
I’m enjoying my resident roadrunners and staying safe.

On Fri, Jul 10, 2020 at 7:11 PM Dottie Boyles <
<000002f3cfbe18c8-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> If anyone has any AAS News of Members they'd like to share for the
> upcoming newsletter, please email me off list, by Wednesday, July 15th.
>
> Thanks,
> Dottie Boyles
> AAS News of Members Editor
>

 

Back to top
Date: 7/10/20 5:11 pm
From: Dottie Boyles <000002f3cfbe18c8-dmarc-request...>
Subject: AAS Newsletter - News of Members
If anyone has any AAS News of Members they'd like to share for the
upcoming newsletter, please email me off list, by Wednesday, July 15th.

Thanks,
Dottie Boyles
AAS News of Members Editor
 

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Date: 7/10/20 1:02 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Limpkin Update 7/10/20
We looked for the Limpkin this morning but struck out. I think we should
have been there 15 minutes earlier as it was heavy overcast yesterday and
today at the same time it was much lighter and the birds had started leaving
the heronry earlier than yesterday due to a clear sky. I think the bird is
probably still around and I will look for it next week. If anyone chases it
this weekend, I recommend being on the platform in the NE corner of Lotus
Lake at around 5:45 and watching for the bird to fly by. He tends to fly
real low to the surface of the water and has a real floppy flight. He will
either fly east toward you on the platform or south across Lotus Lake. If
there in the evening, be there by 8:00 and watch till sundown. Good luck
and let us know if you find it.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR






 

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Date: 7/10/20 1:00 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: FW: Red Slough Limpkin Update
I have been getting request to share this post with ARBirders that I sent to
OKBirds yesterday:



From: David Arbour [mailto:<arbour...>]
Sent: Thursday, July 09, 2020 10:48 PM
To: <OKBIRDS...>
Subject: Red Slough Limpkin Update



This morning on my bird survey I found a Limpkin in the vicinity of the
observation platform that's at the SE corner of Pintail Lake/NE corner of
Lotus Lake. Steve Metz and Matt White came over this evening and we refound
the bird and pictures were taken. The bird seems most easily seen right
after first light and again just before sundown when it flies across the
lakes coming and going from its feeding areas and its roost. Some of us are
going to be there at 6 a.m. tomorrow (Friday) morning to look for it again.
Pics will be up later.



David Arbour

De Queen, AR


 

Back to top
Date: 7/9/20 9:19 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - July 9 (Limpkin!)
It was mostly cloudy, warm, and windy in the morning; turning partly cloudy,
calm, and hot in the afternoon on the bird survey today. I started the
survey at 5:45 a.m. to catch the morning flight out of the heronry on
Pintail Lake. Highlights were a Limpkin (see my separate post about the
Limpkin), Roseate Spoonbill, and Wood Storks. There are lots of young
fledging out of their nests in the heronry and really increasing the overall
numbers. I think I got my highest count ever on Anhingas. I found 4 White
Ibis nests today also. I spent most of my survey surveying water birds and
did very little surveying of Passerines. Lots of broods of gallinules were
seen. It's a really great time to visit and bird Red Slough if you can
stand the heat and humidity. Just come early for best results and comfort.
Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 4

Wood Duck - 15

Mallard - 1

Pied-billed Grebe - 3

Neotropic Cormorant - 19

Anhinga - 164

Great-blue Heron - 4

Great Egret - 125

Snowy Egret - 200

Little-blue Heron - 212

Cattle Egret - 15000

Green Heron - 12

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 7

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 5

White Ibis - 839

Plegadis species - 4

Roseate Spoonbill - 1

Wood Stork - 2

Black Vulture - 3

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Limpkin - 1

King Rail - 2

Purple Gallinule - 29

Common Gallinule - 39

American Coot - 3

Killdeer - 1

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 2

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 11

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 1

American Crow - 1

Fish Crow - 2

Tree Swallow - 10

Barn Swallow - 8

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 1

Carolina Wren - 2

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 2

Gray Catbird - 1

European Starling - 4

Prothonotary Warbler - 3

Common Yellowthroat - 7

Yellow-breasted Chat - 5

Eastern Towhee - 4

Northern Cardinal - 6

Indigo Bunting - 6

Painted Bunting - 5

Red-winged Blackbird - 64

Common Grackle - 9

Orchard Oriole - 1





Odonates:



Citrine Forktail

Common Green Darner

Prince Baskettail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Common Whitetail

Blue Dasher



Herps:



American Alligator

Diamondback Watersnake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bullfrog



Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR












 

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Date: 7/9/20 4:06 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Surprise Yellow-crowned Night Heron sighting.
When returning home from an errand, my husband, Adam and I had a surprise sighting. A Yellow-crowned Night Heron stalking along in  a low grassy area filled with water on the North side of Col. Glenn Rd. in Little Rock. 34.712132,-92.387038Donna Haynes West Pulaski Co. 


Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 7/9/20 6:22 am
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Bald Knob NWR
A trip through BKNWR, There was a no show on the American Avocet. Did see
a few Lesser Yellowlegs, 100+ Great Blue herons, 100+ Little Blue herons,
500+ Great egrets, 50+ Killdeer, a pair of Black-bellied whistling ducks, a
pair of Black-necked stilts, 1 double crested cormorant, 3 Northern
pintail, 1 Lesser scaup, a half dozen Northern shovelers, 3 Mississippi
kites, about 20 Mallard ducks with one brood of young, and several Indigo
buntings. Shorebirds should arrive soon.

 

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Date: 7/8/20 12:22 pm
From: Carol Joan Patterson <0000003a0ccbe138-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Fw: Virtual Campfire Concert - please share this!
---------- Forwarded message ---------
From: Joanie Patterson <joanie...>
Date: Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 1:33 PM
Subject: Fwd: Virtual Campfire Concert - please share this!
To: <arbird-l...>, Joanie Patterson <joanie.patterson...>


Due to the coronavirus large gatherings are not advised.  Here is a fun, safe and easy way to virtually visit theOzark Natural Science Center .  Probably most of you have heard of the musical group Still on the Hill, most bird-friendly and talented musicians.  They and Tater, Mater & Squarsh will be performing at ONSC for this virtual concert.  You are all invited to this Ozark Natural Science Center celebration - just use the link below. 


Join us for a family-friendly, toe-tapping virtual concert featuring Still on the Hill and Tater, Mater, & Squarsh.
We'll be live-streaming songs and stories about the flora and fauna of the Ozarks while we celebrate the spirit and resilience of our community.

Tune in on Facebook Live from 4-5PM: Facebook.com/OzarkNaturalScienceCenter

This program was made possible by a grant from the Division of Arkansas Heritage, funded by your 1/8 cent conservation tax, Amendment 75.




 

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Date: 7/7/20 5:14 pm
From: Susan Hardin <whizcats...>
Subject: Re: Remaining nestling
Thank you, Janine, for making these posts a part of your daily life for almost eight weeks. They’ve been so enjoyable and a great learning opportunity for me.

Here I thought there was only one nest per summer because I hadn’t stopped to look it up, but now I know nope, it’s more than one and far more involved too. Bob Sargent would be very pleased with your keen observations and reporting skills.

Hope both of you girls enjoy the rest of your summer!

Susan Hardin
West Pulaski County


> On Jul 7, 2020, at 5:54 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
> S/he continued to seem content this afternoon, occasionally preening and buzzing.
>
> Around 4:30 s/he was in the nest, gleaning leaves that were within reach and apparently consuming tiny arthropods.
>
> And.........just now I found the nest empty.
>
> April 28 to July 7---a good run! Of course I'll be listening and looking for further developments, unlikely though it is that I'll see or hear anything definitive.
>
> I plan one more post in which I hope to mine Bob Sargent's book a little further, and compare and contrast first and second nestings.


 

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Date: 7/7/20 3:55 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Remaining nestling
S/he continued to seem content this afternoon, occasionally preening and
buzzing.

Around 4:30 s/he was in the nest, gleaning leaves that were within reach
and apparently consuming tiny arthropods.

And.........just now I found the nest empty.

April 28 to July 7---a good run!  Of course I'll be listening and
looking for further developments, unlikely though it is that I'll see or
hear anything definitive.

I plan one more post in which I hope to mine Bob Sargent's book a little
further, and compare and contrast first and second nestings.

 

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Date: 7/7/20 12:49 pm
From: Glenn <000001214b3fcb01-dmarc-request...>
Subject: BKNWR Highlights
Today 7 July 2020 at Bald Knob NWR, we saw 8 or more American avocets all with red heads. We also saw a mama black-bellied whistling-duck with 8-10 babies swimming behind.  There were also 6 lesser yellowlegs with the avocets.
Glenn Wyatt


 

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Date: 7/7/20 9:56 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Remaining nestling
...is sitting calmly in the nest, looking maybe a little smug, enjoying
the extra room.

 

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Date: 7/7/20 9:30 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Ages 20 and 21 days
I watched the nest for long periods between early morning and 10:40 a.m.

The presumed older nestling was perched on the lip of the nest at all
times, facing inward. The younger one sometimes also perched, but often
sat within the nest. Both did a lot of preening and scratching, which
young birds must do to remove feather sheaths. Both "buzzed," though the
older one did more. Their tails are still stubby, but outer retrices are
now visibly white. Primaries are not yet full length, but the older bird
was using his wings to power a change in location on nest rim.

Yesterday the older nestling was buzzing as he faced outward, and it
looked like he nearly unintentionally took off; I worried about an
accident. But he recovered his footing.

As much as they've matured, their motions often still seem wobbly. With
their not-yet-grown tail and wing feathers, I feel that /they're not
ready to fledge! /They look less mature than the singleton did at 19 days.

This morning Mom has been feeding only while standing on the branch. She
could reach the younger one who sat in the nest, but the older one,
perched on the rim, was facing away from her. He turned his head back,
and was fed over his shoulder.

When I returned to the binoculars at 11 a.m., the older nestling was
gone. Soon Mom came and fed the remaining chick a good, hearty meal.

I haven't heard the sharp, high-pitched peep of a begging fledgling, but
I'll be listening.






 

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Date: 7/6/20 12:56 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: 19 and 20 days old
Just now, after feeding one chick while standing on the branch, Mom did,
barely, find room on the nest to feed the other.  After briefly poking
and prodding, she departed and spotted something at the base of the nest
that she didn't approve of. While hovering, she pecked and pecked at it.
Finally, some insect quite a bit larger than their usual prey took
flight. She ate it.

On 7/6/2020 2:36 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
> The chicks are still in the nest. They're still gaping, and Mom feeds
> by sitting down on the branch, when she can reach them that way. If
> she can't, there's no room on the nest for her, so she hovers while
> regurgitating. Seems like that would be even harder than hovering
> while drinking.
>
> The nest has changed gradually but dramatically. Imagine it was
> constructed with 5 identical rings stacked on top of each other,
> creating a cylinder taller than it was wide. The nestlings have been
> stretching it---mostly unobservably, but I did see one foot-pounding
> once---so the inner diameter of the (imagined) top ring is now bigger
> than the outer diameter of those below it. So it's slipped down one
> level, and the nest is now a squat cup with a plump lip, wider than it
> is tall.
>
> When they're not resting, the chicks stretch, preen, scratch, yawn,
> buzz, and look around alertly. They clearly understand that what goes
> on in their vicinity is of interest and importance. Once they spotted
> something above them---I don't know whether it was relatively near, or
> a predator flying far above---and froze until the threat was gone.


 

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Date: 7/6/20 12:37 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: 19 and 20 days old
The chicks are still in the nest. They're still gaping, and Mom feeds by
sitting down on the branch, when she can reach them that way. If she
can't, there's no room on the nest for her, so she hovers while
regurgitating. Seems like that would be even harder than hovering while
drinking.

The nest has changed gradually but dramatically. Imagine it was
constructed with 5 identical rings stacked on top of each other,
creating a cylinder taller than it was wide. The nestlings have been
stretching it---mostly unobservably, but I did see one foot-pounding
once---so the inner diameter of the (imagined) top ring is now bigger
than the outer diameter of those below it. So it's slipped down one
level, and the nest is now a squat cup with a plump lip, wider than it
is tall.

When they're not resting, the chicks stretch, preen, scratch, yawn,
buzz, and look around alertly. They clearly understand that what goes on
in their vicinity is of interest and importance. Once they spotted
something above them---I don't know whether it was relatively near, or a
predator flying far above---and froze until the threat was gone.

 

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Date: 7/6/20 11:46 am
From: Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Bird documentation photos, Part 2
There is mind-boggling diversity today in the models of digital cameras, their feature sets and menu options. Given that many birder/photographers shoot jpeg rather than RAW format even if the latter is an option, the most important menu option for jpeg shooters in my opinion lies in the selection of what level of quality jpegs are captured.

Regardless of what the camera’s menu calls it, always choose the highest possible quality setting. This will create larger, more detailed files, but storage media is comparatively inexpensive these days. Choosing to save jpegs at their highest quality setting is so very important because jpeg is a ‘lossy’ format that doesn’t make full use of the data captured by a camera’s sensor. That lost data can lead to subsequent problems and regret if, in the field, the photographer or camera makes an exposure or focus error, or the size of the subject is to small in the frame to contain apparent fine detail. Those who have the option to shoot RAW format can have less worry in this regard because RAW captures do not compress the sensor data; they utilize every bit of data that is captured.

I’m also not going to wade further into the topic of which shooting format-jpeg or RAW-is better overall. That’s one of those Coke vs Dr Pepper, Mac vs Windows sort of discussions with no clearcut answer. Let me just say that both have their pros and cons but ultimately lead to the same end result-a jpeg that can be emailed, posted to Facebook or added to an eBird checklist.

Next up in the foreseeable future will be a discussion of digital vs optical zoom.

Charles Mills
Wake Village, Texas
 

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Date: 7/6/20 6:45 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...>
Subject: Birding Millwood and the Okay Levee in Howard County
I spent the weekend in SW Arkansas, camped with family at Cottonshed Park, on the north side of Lake Millwood. I also managed to spend two mornings out on the Okay Levee, an area I hadn’t been in years! After daring to claim July “wasn’t a good month for birding” just last week, I was proved wrong by this area :-D Saturday morning on the Okay Levee boasted 57 species and the trip total was around 70 species.

Photos and a blog post to come later, but highlights for now are below:

9 species of wading bird on the Okay Levee alone!:
Tricolored Heron
Little Blue Heron
Black-crowned Night-Heron
Green Heron
Great Blue Heron
Snowy Egret
Great Egret
Cattle Egret
White Ibis

8 birds of prey:
Osprey (2 pairs with 2 different nests)
Mississippi Kite
Cooper’s Hawk
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk (borealis spp)
Turkey Vulture
Black Vulture
Barred Owl

All this in additional to LOTS of Prothonotary Warblers, which isn’t unusual for the area, but a species I haven’t seen en masse in a very long time. Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks were a welcome sight, including multiple pairs nesting in a large snag about 30 feet from our campground, out in the lake. Pine forest at the campground attracted Brown-headed Nuthatch, Pine and Yellow-throated Warblers, and Red-headed Woodpecker.

Stay tuned for photos!

Mitchell Pruitt
 

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Date: 7/6/20 6:10 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Western Kingbird surveys -- note from Bill Beall
Bill and Toka Beall performed their annual 4th of July Western Kingbird survey for Fort Smith-Van Buren on July 5th. According to Bill, kingbird results were almost exactly the same as previous years. In FS we traveled 34 miles in 4 hrs and found 43 adults and 23 fledglings at 28 locations. In VB we traveled 2 miles in 25 minutes and found 10 adults and 8 fledglings at 6 locations. Found several active nests at both areas. Could not find any birds in Moffett where we generally find 2-3 pairs. -- Bill


 

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Date: 7/6/20 5:40 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: ASCA Zoom Meeting: Birding Australia
This Thursday, July 9, is Audubon Society of Central Arkansass monthly
meeting, this time via Zoom. It will start with Patty McLean and Michael
Linzs presentation of their trip to Australia. That will be followed by
ASCAs business meeting.

Details and registration are at
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Far.audubon.org%2Fevents%2Fbirding-australia&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C3d54e0c44e9e471d90b208d821a9adde%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637296359934283447&amp;sdata=y6KjbrPNIvVZNavMIdmYIjKPm62k3x2jvhE%2FIzme4Bc%3D&amp;reserved=0. The meeting is open to
everyone but you must register to get the link to the meeting. Registration
is only for the purposes of ASCAs attendance list.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR



 

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Date: 7/5/20 7:00 pm
From: auntm13 <auntm13...>
Subject: Unusual behavior?
I witnessed some bird behavior in Stone county today that I wanted to share.  The first bit of behavior was brood parasitism in action, so not something I really wanted to see, but interesting nonetheless.  This morning I saw two White-eyed Vireos being followed by a juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird.  I have no doubt the vireos had hatched and raised the cowbird, because the juvenile was following them with its mouth open and wings fluttering, begging for food.  The second bit of behavior I wanted to see if anyone else had witnessed.  I was driving down my gravel drive, beside a field, and saw two small birds darting out from a utility pole and wire in the field.  They appeared to be catching insects and returning to their perch on the wire (flycatcher behavior).  They didn't have the profile for flycatchers, though, and one was walking up and down the pole's guidewire (NOT flycatcher behavior).  When I got my binoculars up to look, I was startled to see they were Yellow-throated Warblers!  Has anyone else ever seen them act like this?--Megan from the hills of Stone countySent via the Samsung Galaxy S8+, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone
 

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Date: 7/5/20 4:30 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Update Re: 18 and 19 days old
And another update...in just the past few hours, at least one of the
nestlings is now alertly looking around with smooth adult-like motions,
back and forth, here and there, very similar to the way Mom does while
she's incubating. A noticeable change.
One or both are also "buzzing" (wing flapping) like they cannot wait to
leave.

Seems like earlier in the day would be optimal, so they could
familiarize themselves with their surroundings and have plenty of time
to find a safe place to spend the night. We'll see....

On 7/5/2020 3:27 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
> Mom just sat down on the branch rather than up on the nest, and fed
> them horizontally, as they'd take nectar from a flower. I bet they'll
> fledge tomorrow. The typical age is 20 days, so...yeah. :)
>
> On 7/5/2020 2:31 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
>> The hummer chicks apparently weren't as distressed as dogs and humans
>> by last night's fireworks, because they're still in the nest, which
>> they're overfilling.
>>
>> Primaries are nearing full length and unsheathing, and stubby tails
>> are visibly white-tipped. Their bills are about 3/4 as long as Mom's,
>> and though they still gape to be fed, she enters them closer to base
>> than tip.
>>
>> After she's fed them, she often continues to fly along the branch
>> surveying for ants. The nestlings stay up and active for several
>> minutes, preening themselves and each other, jockeying for position,
>> and wing-flapping. They cooperate and seem glad of each other's
>> company. They still have the slightly jerky, uncoordinated movements
>> of youngsters, and have fully entered the Adorable Stage.
>>
>> I would guess they'll fledge on Tuesday (2 days from now).
>


 

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Date: 7/5/20 1:28 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Update Re: 18 and 19 days old
Mom just sat down on the branch rather than up on the nest, and fed them
horizontally, as they'd take nectar from a flower. I bet they'll fledge
tomorrow. The typical age is 20 days, so...yeah. :)

On 7/5/2020 2:31 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
> The hummer chicks apparently weren't as distressed as dogs and humans
> by last night's fireworks, because they're still in the nest, which
> they're overfilling.
>
> Primaries are nearing full length and unsheathing, and stubby tails
> are visibly white-tipped. Their bills are about 3/4 as long as Mom's,
> and though they still gape to be fed, she enters them closer to base
> than tip.
>
> After she's fed them, she often continues to fly along the branch
> surveying for ants. The nestlings stay up and active for several
> minutes, preening themselves and each other, jockeying for position,
> and wing-flapping. They cooperate and seem glad of each other's
> company. They still have the slightly jerky, uncoordinated movements
> of youngsters, and have fully entered the Adorable Stage.
>
> I would guess they'll fledge on Tuesday (2 days from now).


 

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Date: 7/5/20 12:31 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: 18 and 19 days old
The hummer chicks apparently weren't as distressed as dogs and humans by
last night's fireworks, because they're still in the nest, which they're
overfilling.

Primaries are nearing full length and unsheathing, and stubby tails are
visibly white-tipped. Their bills are about 3/4 as long as Mom's, and
though they still gape to be fed, she enters them closer to base than tip.

After she's fed them, she often continues to fly along the branch
surveying for ants. The nestlings stay up and active for several
minutes, preening themselves and each other, jockeying for position, and
wing-flapping. They cooperate and seem glad of each other's company.
They still have the slightly jerky, uncoordinated movements of
youngsters, and have fully entered the Adorable Stage.

I would guess they'll fledge on Tuesday (2 days from now).

 

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Date: 7/4/20 5:32 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Avian Articles
Dear ARBIRDers,

During these Covid days I’ve come across several avian articles that may be of interest to you, both from Wired.com:

"Hummingbirds Can See Colors We Can’t Even Imagine" @ https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftinyurl.com%2Fyaumjtuk&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C907a288118cc41f5807208d8207ad40a%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637295059207825335&amp;sdata=%2FoKVQxftDOkfA6CoIxXQ2BQtjzLAdFwOyhHqaw%2BGUVo%3D&amp;reserved=0

A Bird’s Epic Migration Stuns Scientists and Wins Online Fans @ https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftinyurl.com%2Fy8xjtw9v&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C907a288118cc41f5807208d8207ad40a%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637295059207825335&amp;sdata=4nxkzZR0M%2BZjXB2v7lApjZLNPI7aAkfs32dOf1BJybs%3D&amp;reserved=0

Enjoy.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock (where nothing especially birdy is going on),
Barry Haas
 

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Date: 7/4/20 4:31 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: THE 4th ON FORMER BEATY PRAIRIE (MAYSVILLE)
One of my fantasies is that Alice Walton is going to provide $100 MILLION to purchase properties in the Maysville area of western Benton County so we could create some public lands preservation/access associated with the former, historic Beaty Prairie. I think about such things on Leonard Ranch Road, when 3-4 Northern Bobwhites are bobbing away, like they were this morning. When I see a Loggerhead Shrike has hung up a freshly killed Least Shrew. When the hay is mowed revealing the old prairie mounds.

We had an all night rain that kept going until 7 am this morning. Then it stopped, with the air cool and humid (only 70 degrees at 9 am). With dense clouds there was no sun glare cover. No wind. No dust on graded county roads. Altogether, a perfect day for birding. Just as we arrived, the birds were shaking off the rain and starting about their business, which, on this 4th was also our business.

Besides shrikes, we had quite a few Painted Buntings and Grasshopper Sparrows in two places. One of our key targets, Swainsons Hawk, made a generous showing while being chased by Scissor-tailed Flycatchers and Eastern Kingbirds. We saw a lovely female Orchard Oriole, her hair dripping wet from the all-night rains. A Yellow-billed Cuckoo perched up in a snag, spreading its wings to dry, exposing brilliant rufous feathering in its wing.

There are Blue Grosbeaks all over. It has taken me years to realize that some of the mostly brown birds early in the season are young males. During the summer they are transitioning to the more extensive blues of the older males. This reminds me of the situation of our Painted Buntings. We saw/heard them in 6 places this morning. Some of these are green, first summer males, but as summer advances, they are transiting to the striking coat of many colors.

You can wring most of the old prairie out of productive land like former Beaty Prairie, but you cannot wring out all of it all of the time. Along roadsides, especially Highway 72 east of Maysville, tall wands of Blazing Stars are starting to dominate low heavens. Bumblebees and brilliant butterflies, like Black Swallowtails, circulate in this ephemeral ecosystem of startling royal purple.

UA-Fayetteville PhD graduate student Vivek Govind Kumar created numerous eBird checklists for various locales during the day. Here is one that involves the eastern end of Leonard Ranch Road: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71130469<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS71130469&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cf3c0f94a0f724baed3ac08d820725c92%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637295022844841152&sdata=tH7SZhRHWSM%2FlSPih%2BeXZs9nJjOueNPwqbfdQqqUbqM%3D&reserved=0>.


 

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Date: 7/4/20 12:16 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Peregrine Falcons
Traveling east from Hot Springs on Hwy US 270E, about 1 mile east of "Jones
Mill" : passed male sitting on powerline along highway, and then about
another mile along, a female, closer to waste transfer station.



We turned around, took another look and stopped for the male (no binocs, bad
backlighting for phone photos). 90% sure.



Jeff Short


 

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Date: 7/4/20 10:31 am
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Native plant bird feeder.
Since the scattering of the large winter flock of American Goldfinches, we have had a pair that has regularly visited the yard. The earliest Star Tickseed (Coreopsis pubescens) blooms began to go to seed a couple of weeks ago. The American Goldfinches have ignored the bird feeders containing Black-oil Sunflower seed (which is their favorite in the winter). They have been feeding daily on the Star Tickseed exclusively. The thing I love about this plant is it blooms until the first freeze, therefore providing food for birds and pollinators a large part of the year. They are easy to grow and do well in full - part sun. They also do well in most soil types and do equally well in moist or dry conditions. They can also be grown in pots and are suitable for container gardening even in the smallest spaces such as an apartment balcony. I would encourage everyone to grow this bird feeder. Donna Haynes West Pulaski Co.
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 7/3/20 5:46 pm
From: Kenny Nations <kennynations...>
Subject: Unusual sighting
I drove over to Bald Knob to day and saw a Ruddy Duck. I think it should
be gone by now. Certainly surprised me. There was also a pair of
Black-bellied Whistling Ducks. Other than that, just the normal birds for
this time of year.

 

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Date: 7/3/20 2:23 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Some excitement on old Norwood Prairie
Eastern Meadowlark were full of summer music this morning during a visit to the old Norwood Prairie west of Fayetteville (just west of Ozark NF at Wedington). The old prairie is marked out by extensive hayfields. These were this morning full of meadowlarks, Blue Grosbeaks, Dickcissels, and Scissor-tailed Flycatchers. What an amazing way to ring in the 4th. Where there were scattered trees, there were often Indigo Buntings, Painted Buntings, and Yellow-billed Cuckoos.

An adult Red-tailed Hawk landed on the top of a Purple Martin box, and then was harassed by a Northern Mockingbird and Purple Martins. Red-tails were easily to find since the young are constantly calling to the adults.

Lark Sparrows were on the list this morning. We found them singing in 3 or 4 spots, with decent looks at birds perched on utility wires.

On this Independence Day eve our stopping and looking at birds with binoculars aroused a farmer, who followed us on his UTV and demanded we state our business. He saw my bumper sticker SAVE THE BUFFALO AGAIN. He said with some feeling the hog factory farm buy out in the Buffalo River watershed was unfair to farming families. I mentioned they were paid $6.2 MILLION to just close down -- they retain the land. The deal was brokered by a native of the Ozarks who is also a conservative Republican Arkansas governor. Im pretty sure the Governor recognized there are a lot of farm families in the Ozarks who would take the cash and happily convert it to other opportunities associated with the farming life style. The time has passed when Americans will accept a hog factory farm spreading equivalent of a medium size citys worth of untreated hog waste in the valley of the Buffalo National River. But of course a county road on a hot July day is no place for such conversation.

Im always on the lookout for whats left of the old prairie. Most visible sign today: Compass Plants, tall and brightly blooming in ditches near fences where they escape mowing. As sun rises and makes its warming path across our July, Compass Plants point the way, or in this case, remind us of Tallgrass Prairie.

Most of this mornings birding was along Highway 244 and various side roads off 244. UA-Fayetteville PhD student Vivek Govind Kumar compiled lists submitted to eBird. Heres one of them: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71097572<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS71097572&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cc1156b7216fa4bc8e8f408d81f973279%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637294081525071138&sdata=aWpM46m72winRLN8ERL6nsuFidjJobiOYBA1eu%2FGvhw%3D&reserved=0>.


 

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Date: 7/3/20 8:24 am
From: Allison Fowler <allisonfowler001...>
Subject: Re: Stone Prairie WMA
Jeff, the best place to park is the southeast corner off of Mat Abbott rd. There is a small shale pit area just left of the gate. Unfortunately we haven’t had clearance yet to install a parking area. We hope to do so this year.

-Allison

> On Jul 3, 2020, at 8:47 AM, Jeffrey Nolen <jnole001...> wrote:
>
> Good Morning,
>
> Is anyone familiar with where the entrance/parking area for Stone Prairie WMA is? It appears to be adjacent to Camp Robinson SUA on the map but there are no signs for an entrance.
>
> Thank you,
> Jeff
> Maumelle, AR
 

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Date: 7/3/20 6:58 am
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Re: Stone Prairie WMA
The entrance to Stone Prairie WMA is on the east side at the bend in Matt
Abbott Rd. 34.970110, -92.312709. There is a small parking area. You have to
walk in.

Dan Scheiman
Little Rock, AR

On 7/3/20, 8:36 AM, "The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List on behalf of
Jeffrey Nolen" <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of <jnole001...>
wrote:

Good Morning,

Is anyone familiar with where the entrance/parking area for Stone Prairie
WMA is? It appears to be adjacent to Camp Robinson SUA on the map but there
are no signs for an entrance.

Thank you,
Jeff
Maumelle, AR



 

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Date: 7/3/20 6:47 am
From: Jeffrey Nolen <jnole001...>
Subject: Stone Prairie WMA
Good Morning,

Is anyone familiar with where the entrance/parking area for Stone Prairie
WMA is? It appears to be adjacent to Camp Robinson SUA on the map but there
are no signs for an entrance.

Thank you,
Jeff
Maumelle, AR

 

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Date: 7/2/20 2:34 pm
From: Jacque Brown <bluebird2...>
Subject: Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
I had hummingbirds that would sit on a dried patch of mowed grass for extended periods, wings and tail flaired out like it was sunning. Jacque Brown



> On Jun 30, 2020, at 5:10 PM, cbayona <cbayona...> wrote:
>
> Well, the bird sits still no movement at all, no preening or shaking, it sits still for hours,
>
> On 6/30/20 10:24 AM, Keith Newton wrote:
>> Cecil, just google dust bath for an explanation, of how it cleans the feathers of oil and maybe parasites. I have seen this before, and been curious about it too. One thing I’ve wondered, and would like to check out if anyone in the LR area has a spot like this. My hobby is macro photography, and I would like to sample the soil to see if there are any predatious insects like Owlfly larva in the soil that the birds hope to pick up and take along for a ride to rid them of some of their parasites. Most birds are able to contort their necks and beaks to preen almost all their feathers, except of course their own heads, which leads me to think this may have something to do with the bald-headed Northern Cardinals more than just molting? I have found and photographed more than a few road-kill birds that had mites on their head.
>> Like I said, If anyone in or near LR has a spot, just contact me off the server, and I’ll try get over and check it out. I wouldn’t do anything to hurt the spot, just a few shots of the soil, then maybe a kitchen sieve to see if there is anything down in the dust, and if there is, they would be returned after a few pics. K
>> Please note my new email address:
>> <keithnewton...> <mailto:<keithnewton...>
>>> On Jun 29, 2020, at 10:58 PM, cbayona <cbayona...> <mailto:<cbayona...>> wrote:
>>>
>>> I have a Red Breasted Robin that has made a depression in the ground in the yard and several times a day sits on it for hours. I went over and there are no eggs.
>>>
>>> Is this a rare behavior or do I have a crazy Robin in my yard?
>>>
>>> --
>>> Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
>
> --
> Cecil - k5nwa https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthepartsplace.k5nwa.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C1dfa43c8ed2a419bda7508d81ecfa84b%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637293224521895183&amp;sdata=ORte0zDwQk5MIfguHJR5zggZ2qIv5TpMDZLJ19fmXDs%3D&amp;reserved=0
>
> --
> Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthepartsplace.k5nwa.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C1dfa43c8ed2a419bda7508d81ecfa84b%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637293224521895183&amp;sdata=ORte0zDwQk5MIfguHJR5zggZ2qIv5TpMDZLJ19fmXDs%3D&amp;reserved=0
 

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Date: 7/2/20 4:33 am
From: Jim Dixon <jamesdixonlr...>
Subject: Re: Bluebirds
Here is an article about infanticide in Dickcissels.

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.sciencedaily.com%2Freleases%2F2018%2F04%2F180419130905.htm&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Ce4907b0d14ef475ab26908d81e7bbb32%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637292864061788841&amp;sdata=M2LsYBOAnbUabXVvyYaCBNuI6dlhXXGukrEb%2FL5gkP8%3D&amp;reserved=0


Jim Dixon
Little Rock
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jamesdixon.us%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Ce4907b0d14ef475ab26908d81e7bbb32%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637292864061788841&amp;sdata=MYpITjBJUXC9mZKfDUOxkQeQTdRUmJ12olxCsfy9g18%3D&amp;reserved=0
"There is nothing like looking, if you want to find something. You certainly usually find something, if you look, but it is not always quite the something you were after." — Thorin


-----Original Message-----
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List [mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Ed Laster
Sent: Thursday, July 02, 2020 6:20 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: Bluebirds

I have seen this behavior between what I thought were adult blue birds. One holding the other on the ground and violently pecking it for several minutes. The one being attacked would escape briefly only to be caught and attacked again. I don’t know the final outcome.

Ed Laster




> On Jul 1, 2020, at 9:31 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>
> I have been wondering about some behaveure I observed a month back. When my second batch of young bluebirds left the nest I watched both parent bluebirds fighting the babies to the ground then pecking them without stopping. I went to where this was happening and there were two of the babies that fluttered away a short distance but found another one dead. Next day found the other two dead. Next day the parents began building another nest and are now feeding the third hatch. Any input?
 

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Date: 7/2/20 4:30 am
From: Ed Laster <elaster523...>
Subject: Re: Bluebirds
I have seen this behavior between what I thought were adult blue birds. One holding the other on the ground and violently pecking it for several minutes. The one being attacked would escape briefly only to be caught and attacked again. I don’t know the final outcome.

Ed Laster




> On Jul 1, 2020, at 9:31 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>
> I have been wondering about some behaveure I observed a month back. When my second batch of young bluebirds left the nest I watched both parent bluebirds fighting the babies to the ground then pecking them without stopping. I went to where this was happening and there were two of the babies that fluttered away a short distance but found another one dead. Next day found the other two dead. Next day the parents began building another nest and are now feeding the third hatch. Any input?
 

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Date: 7/2/20 4:00 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Bluebirds
OMG! I’ve monitored bird box trails for decades and never seen or heard of such behavior! Are you quite certain the killers were the parents? I suggest you consult with the Nestwatch people at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Rick Jones

Sent from my iPad

> On Jul 1, 2020, at 9:30 PM, Terry Butler <twbutler1941...> wrote:
>
> 
> I have been wondering about some behaveure I observed a month back. When my second batch of young bluebirds left the nest I watched both parent bluebirds fighting the babies to the ground then pecking them without stopping. I went to where this was happening and there were two of the babies that fluttered away a short distance but found another one dead. Next day found the other two dead. Next day the parents began building another nest and are now feeding the third hatch. Any input?
 

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Date: 7/1/20 7:30 pm
From: Terry Butler <twbutler1941...>
Subject: Bluebirds
I have been wondering about some behaveure I observed a month back. When my
second batch of young bluebirds left the nest I watched both parent
bluebirds fighting the babies to the ground then pecking them without
stopping. I went to where this was happening and there were two of the
babies that fluttered away a short distance but found another one dead.
Next day found the other two dead. Next day the parents began building
another nest and are now feeding the third hatch. Any input?

 

Back to top
Date: 7/1/20 12:49 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Devil's Den State Park
This morning was supposed to be a trip for odes with none other than the Odonator himself, my friend David Oakley. But damselflies and dragonflies proved pretty scarce. Of course I was also birding along the way. Maybe the most interesting bird, habitat-wise anyway, was a male Ruby-throated Hummingbird foraging in fresh Butterfly Milkweed blossoms along with numerous Spicebush Swallowtails. This was along the highway right-of-way along on 170, just before drop into Devils Den State Park. I want to thank the worker mowing in this area, who obviously avoided the milkweed. Many thanks from a grateful resident of the Natural State. So our ode hunt didnt turn out so well, but there were relatively few people in the park, so was a good time for a visit, regardless of the mission. I wound up with 40 bird species. Heres my eBird submission: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71025605<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS71025605&data=02%7C01%7C%7C82166ea2a0ff4edb39ef08d81df7dbaf%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637292297664001953&sdata=2g4H3b23eDs%2BEjOqz2vNPBEipm6N%2B0sK7IErekUUaeY%3D&reserved=0>.


 

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Date: 7/1/20 10:13 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: 15 and 16 days old
The nestlings are more mature, eyes open for a few days, bills about
half as long as adults'.  They appear smaller than Mom, but appearances
are deceiving: according to the Birds of the World species account, they
now outweigh her. They have short periods of activity and preening; one
of them wing-flapped this morning.

In downpours that can start suddenly, a couple of minutes may elapse,
but then the mother flies through heavy rain to sit atop and shield
them. In one storm two days ago, a very wet leaf was blown so that it
covered the top of the nest, and she couldn't get access to the
nestlings. She was agitated, did some poking, left, returned after a few
minutes, and repeated. Fortunately, conditions soon changed and the leaf
resumed its usual position.

The babies have otherwise been able to thermoregulate for nearly a week,
and she hasn't been incubating them during the day or at night, except
in rain.
It's far from impossible for rain to develop and fall during the
night---but birds can't fly at tree level in the dark. I wonder whether
and how thermoregulating nestlings are protected from nocturnal rain.
Does she shield them? Seems likely. If so, a) does she sit on them all
night, or just very near so she can move if/when needed? and b) how does
she predict the weather?

 

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Date: 7/1/20 5:33 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Eastern Bluebirds at Bella Vista
This links to a story in this mornings Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette concerning a 40-year old project in Bella Vista that has resulted in fledging an estimated 50,000 Eastern Bluebirds. Volunteers manage boxes along golf courses, trails, cemeteries, churches, etc around Bella Vista.

Hats off to yall for a job well done and continuing

https://www.nwaonline.com/news/2020/jul/01/bluebird-volunteers-still-helping/<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nwaonline.com%2Fnews%2F2020%2Fjul%2F01%2Fbluebird-volunteers-still-helping%2F&data=02%7C01%7C%7C98f1831199474bd1e66708d81dbad0fb%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637292035494894344&sdata=qSYJ6M6u2B9pszgHKyZeTR1zsEm6ymZ5vBgIhqKmKFA%3D&reserved=0>

[https://wehco.media.clients.ellingtoncms.com/imports/adg/photos/195435661_wv-070120-femaleBluebird_ORIG_t600.jpg?4326734cdb8e39baa3579048ef63ad7b451e7676]<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nwaonline.com%2Fnews%2F2020%2Fjul%2F01%2Fbluebird-volunteers-still-helping%2F&data=02%7C01%7C%7C98f1831199474bd1e66708d81dbad0fb%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637292035494894344&sdata=qSYJ6M6u2B9pszgHKyZeTR1zsEm6ymZ5vBgIhqKmKFA%3D&reserved=0>
Bluebird volunteers still helping<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nwaonline.com%2Fnews%2F2020%2Fjul%2F01%2Fbluebird-volunteers-still-helping%2F&data=02%7C01%7C%7C98f1831199474bd1e66708d81dbad0fb%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637292035494904340&sdata=D91u62kLExflVPDzVv8W3F0CcB3bFnmZTmWnpbi4CFw%3D&reserved=0>
BELLA VISTA -- In April one of Bella Vista's oldest volunteer groups had to postpone its 40th-anniversary party, but it didn't postpone its mission. For many of the 70 volunteers, it's business as ...
www.nwaonline.com




 

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Date: 6/30/20 3:10 pm
From: cbayona <cbayona...>
Subject: Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
The grass is gone in that spot, so it's just packed clay, and it just
sits there it's not dusting itself, it just sits still for hours.


On 6/30/20 6:43 AM, Jay Jones wrote:
> Is the depression dusty?
>
> On Mon, Jun 29, 2020 at 10:58 PM cbayona <cbayona...>
> <mailto:<cbayona...>> wrote:
>
> I have a Red Breasted Robin that has made a depression in the ground in
> the yard and several times a day sits on it for hours. I went over and
> there are no eggs.
>
> Is this a rare behavior or do I have a crazy Robin in my yard?
>
> --
> Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
>

--
Cecil - k5nwa https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthepartsplace.k5nwa.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C06680fff2cd5431c24f908d81d424172%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637291517970451362&amp;sdata=1eqskz4F9aCq3K4Zp9mK%2Bhz%2Fo5kViuStyDnbi%2BNxAbM%3D&amp;reserved=0

--
Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthepartsplace.k5nwa.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C06680fff2cd5431c24f908d81d424172%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637291517970451362&amp;sdata=1eqskz4F9aCq3K4Zp9mK%2Bhz%2Fo5kViuStyDnbi%2BNxAbM%3D&amp;reserved=0
 

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Date: 6/30/20 3:10 pm
From: cbayona <cbayona...>
Subject: Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
Well, the bird sits still no movement at all, no preening or shaking, it
sits still for hours,

On 6/30/20 10:24 AM, Keith Newton wrote:
> Cecil, just google dust bath for an explanation, of how it cleans the
> feathers of oil and maybe parasites. I have seen this before, and been
> curious about it too. One thing I’ve wondered, and would like to check
> out if anyone in the LR area has a spot like this. My hobby is macro
> photography, and I would like to sample the soil to see if there are any
> predatious insects like Owlfly larva in the soil that the birds hope to
> pick up and take along for a ride to rid them of some of their
> parasites. Most birds are able to contort their necks and beaks to preen
> almost all their feathers, except of course their own heads, which leads
> me to think this may have something to do with the bald-headed Northern
> Cardinals more than just molting? I have found and photographed more
> than a few road-kill birds that had mites on their head.
>
> Like I said, If anyone in or near LR has a spot, just contact me off the
> server, and I’ll try get over and check it out. I wouldn’t do anything
> to hurt the spot, just a few shots of the soil, then maybe a kitchen
> sieve  to see if there is anything down in the dust, and if there is,
> they would be returned after a few pics. K
>
>
> Please note my new email address:
> <keithnewton...> <mailto:<keithnewton...>
>
>
>
>> On Jun 29, 2020, at 10:58 PM, cbayona <cbayona...>
>> <mailto:<cbayona...>> wrote:
>>
>> I have a Red Breasted Robin that has made a depression in the ground
>> in the yard and several times a day sits on it for hours. I went over
>> and there are no eggs.
>>
>> Is this a rare behavior or do I have a crazy Robin in my yard?
>>
>> --
>> Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
>

--
Cecil - k5nwa https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthepartsplace.k5nwa.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C3f09c272bdd34de4d04c08d81d425bfe%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637291518140067565&amp;sdata=uGxy5N0BU3%2FEgBk7JBGvXofvi%2FHA8C7jKri2zSc3tH8%3D&amp;reserved=0

--
Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fthepartsplace.k5nwa.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C3f09c272bdd34de4d04c08d81d425bfe%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637291518140067565&amp;sdata=uGxy5N0BU3%2FEgBk7JBGvXofvi%2FHA8C7jKri2zSc3tH8%3D&amp;reserved=0
 

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Date: 6/30/20 8:24 am
From: Keith Newton <keithnewton...>
Subject: Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
Cecil, just google dust bath for an explanation, of how it cleans the feathers of oil and maybe parasites. I have seen this before, and been curious about it too. One thing I’ve wondered, and would like to check out if anyone in the LR area has a spot like this. My hobby is macro photography, and I would like to sample the soil to see if there are any predatious insects like Owlfly larva in the soil that the birds hope to pick up and take along for a ride to rid them of some of their parasites. Most birds are able to contort their necks and beaks to preen almost all their feathers, except of course their own heads, which leads me to think this may have something to do with the bald-headed Northern Cardinals more than just molting? I have found and photographed more than a few road-kill birds that had mites on their head.

Like I said, If anyone in or near LR has a spot, just contact me off the server, and I’ll try get over and check it out. I wouldn’t do anything to hurt the spot, just a few shots of the soil, then maybe a kitchen sieve to see if there is anything down in the dust, and if there is, they would be returned after a few pics. K


Please note my new email address:
<keithnewton...>



> On Jun 29, 2020, at 10:58 PM, cbayona <cbayona...> wrote:
>
> I have a Red Breasted Robin that has made a depression in the ground in the yard and several times a day sits on it for hours. I went over and there are no eggs.
>
> Is this a rare behavior or do I have a crazy Robin in my yard?
>
> --
> Cecil Bayona - K5nwa


 

Back to top
Date: 6/30/20 4:43 am
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
Is the depression dusty?

On Mon, Jun 29, 2020 at 10:58 PM cbayona <cbayona...> wrote:

> I have a Red Breasted Robin that has made a depression in the ground in
> the yard and several times a day sits on it for hours. I went over and
> there are no eggs.
>
> Is this a rare behavior or do I have a crazy Robin in my yard?
>
> --
> Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/29/20 8:58 pm
From: cbayona <cbayona...>
Subject: Red Breasted Robin strange behavior.
I have a Red Breasted Robin that has made a depression in the ground in
the yard and several times a day sits on it for hours. I went over and
there are no eggs.

Is this a rare behavior or do I have a crazy Robin in my yard?

--
Cecil Bayona - K5nwa
 

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Date: 6/29/20 7:53 am
From: Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...>
Subject: Barred Owl Family, North Fayetteville
Twice this week I’ve heard immature Barred Owls begging near the Mud Creek trailhead off of north Gregg in Fayetteville. Last night, around 8:45pm, I decided to go over to try my hand at seeing and photographing them. I observed at least 2 immatures giving a begging screech, as well as one parent coming in to tend to them; presumably with prey, though I didn’t see it. One immature perched in a dead snag along the paved trail, which was still pretty busy with bikers, noisy families, etc. even at twilight. Camera in hand, I tried some slow shutterspeed photography on them…worked out pretty well! Moody blue twilight, screeching young owl. Below is a link to the best photo:

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmitchellpruitt24.wixsite.com%2Fmysite%2Favifauna&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cc84ddd9feaf44084d5e408d81c3c0b70%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637290391793715031&amp;sdata=6FoFjAjCTW4JeMtyUEbXrnIEeKlhc9ePrUe0zEIgryc%3D&amp;reserved=0 <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmitchellpruitt24.wixsite.com%2Fmysite%2Favifauna&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cc84ddd9feaf44084d5e408d81c3c0b70%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637290391793715031&amp;sdata=6FoFjAjCTW4JeMtyUEbXrnIEeKlhc9ePrUe0zEIgryc%3D&amp;reserved=0>

Good birding,

Mitchell
 

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Date: 6/28/20 11:47 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Former Norwood Prairie
Norwood Community Church is reminder of a Civil War era community that was then in the middle of a former Tallgrass Prairie. Its west of Fayetteville, roughly 15 miles or so, out past Ozark National Forest at Wedington (between Fayetteville and Siloam Springs). Norwood still has some Big Bluestem grass, but is now mostly gone to fescue. Converted to farms, ranches, and dwellings for folks who work in Fayetteville or Siloam Springs. Extensive open fields remain, well-developed fencerows, and graded county roads.

I was out there this morning and picked up 47 species. Heres a link to my eBird list: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70919013<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70919013&data=02%7C01%7C%7C936d113b3a404be9e41608d81b938745%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637289667734774856&sdata=4k6Gh1sOoTRRVHw5nSd28zlcJV4aoFdp5izqJZwldPg%3D&reserved=0>. One of the targets was Lark Sparrow. I found one walking along Highway 16. There is habitat for more. Nearby a Blue Grosbeak was singing. Not so much blue yet still mostly brown, but with the proper song. A singing Painted Bunting was nearby, too. Most of the trademark prairie flora is long gone, even from roadsides, but patches remain here and there. Most notable today: Beebalm (Monarada fistulosa) in large, fragrant patches with bumblebees.

One of the best things about listening for birds is that it is generally an effective antidote to the often overwhelmingly negative messaging we pick up from the world around us, which then plays on an endless loop in our heads. Theres really nothing like an Eastern Meadowlark up close and singing to overwhelm the negatives. Its like our brains only have room for one thing or the other and happy to say, mine prefers meadowlarks. Eastern Meadowlark, the real no spin zone.


 

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Date: 6/27/20 8:41 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: 11 and 12 days old
Both bills are sometimes visible above the nest top, when the chicks are
at rest.

This afternoon, the dad-gum* oak leaf that usually partly blocks the
nest sight line was moved aside during a brief gusty period. As it was
blown around, it brushed the nest several times, making the occupants
believe Mom had arrived. They both bolted upright and I got best-ever
looks at them.
Their little bodies now have dark feathers.

*a foliar subspecies favored by birds whose nests observers would like
to view clearly

 

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Date: 6/27/20 12:36 pm
From: Mitchell Pruitt <mitchellpruitt24...>
Subject: Memories from early June and birds around Fayetteville
First, for those interested, I took a trip to Quivira National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas earlier this month. If you haven’t been, I highly recommend it…it was magical! Salt marshes meet prairie—which is a combination of short and tallgrass—to form a really cool ecosystem. Breeding shorebirds, waterfowl, and grassland birds come together, making it a fun birding trip within a reasonable distance from NW Arkansas. After several years of no posts, I’ve revived my blog with a post about my trip to Quivira INCLUDING lots of photos:

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmitchellpruitt24.wixsite.com%2Fmysite%2Fblog&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C2a4103a4e7bb491f1d3c08d81ad14ad1%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637288833487437465&amp;sdata=YO6rx9EY5Li%2BKyqcwCjZJGxoD2cZWFuKeVlb1tT%2BuJk%3D&amp;reserved=0 <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmitchellpruitt24.wixsite.com%2Fmysite%2Fblog&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C2a4103a4e7bb491f1d3c08d81ad14ad1%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637288833487437465&amp;sdata=YO6rx9EY5Li%2BKyqcwCjZJGxoD2cZWFuKeVlb1tT%2BuJk%3D&amp;reserved=0>

Second, we recently moved to northern Fayetteville. Our yard has been pretty birdy so far…it helps being adjacent to the wooded Mud Creek bottoms! Two evenings ago, a White-winged Dove called from somewhere in the neighborhood.

Good birding and stay cool,

Mitchell Pruitt



 

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Date: 6/27/20 11:58 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Re: Swamp Milkweed at Home Depot in Benton
Thanks to Mary Ann King for reminding us that there may be differences in
commercial-plant vendors related to pesticides.



The link below (from June, 2019) accuses a different,
big-box-storebought-milkweed with containing systemic pesticides that had
deleterious effects on Monarchs. There could be similar problems with the
Swamp milkweed (Asclepias incarnata 'Cinderella') we bought in Benton.



https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcommunity.homedepot.com%2Fhowto%2FDiscussionDetail%2FNature&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C97c8f20440a74d770a2808d81acbd3d2%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637288810497523623&amp;sdata=qJpTsIlCutIhh4eFW0dfBxMlsPAuPsZbOt3h6lk9cj8%3D&amp;reserved=0
<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcommunity.homedepot.com%2Fhowto%2FDiscussionDetail%2FNature%27s-Nutrients-Mi&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C97c8f20440a74d770a2808d81acbd3d2%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637288810497523623&amp;sdata=zwH38sCyfwqB9EZV9p0z%2F8OhQ0ciCmChG%2FwZQAcrSTA%3D&amp;reserved=0
lkweed-9061T000000fxxJ> 's-Nutrients-Milkweed-9061T000000fxxJ=



If you read through the thread, Home Depot responded that this milkweed is
free of systemic pesticides and there could be other potential causes
(fireants? Flea collars?) for the toxicity observed on Monarch caterpillars.




I am still trying to track down specific info on the 'Cinderella' milkweed
sold in Benton; it may take some time. It would help if the store would do
the leg-work, up-front and not patronize vendors that do not use the
appropriate care to prevent toxic chemical-use on plants they sell.



For what it is worth, the label says the milkweed is deer-resistant; two
does and a fawn were investigating my milkweed plantings this morning, and
they did not eat them, unlike most of our other plants. Only the fawn took a
nibble.



Jeff Short





From: Mary Ann King [mailto:<office...>]
Sent: Friday, June 26, 2020 9:57 AM
To: 'Jeffrey Short'; <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: RE: Swamp Milkweed at Home Depot in Benton



Be careful about buying milkweed plants from big box stores. Much of the
time they have been treated with a systemic pesticides which is bad for
caterpillars, butterflies & other critters. One should ask if they have
been treated, if a positive no cannot be given, I would not buy them.



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods NW of London







'New day, new blessing. Don't let yesterday's failures ruin the beauty of
today, because each day has its own promise of love, joy, forgiveness. Good
morning..."



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Short
Sent: Friday, June 26, 2020 9:50 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Swamp Milkweed at Home Depot in Benton



Quite a few plants available on Wed. ~$13/gal pot, and many already
budding



Worker said it may go on sale--or may be discarded--since apparently, I am
the only one buying it.



Jeff Short


 

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Date: 6/27/20 9:54 am
From: Joe Neal <joecneal...>
Subject: Re: cerulean warblers
Sally Jo Gibson, Arkansas Birder Extraordinaire Emeritus -- all your posts are welcome, from where ever. What a great way you summed this post: "I do miss being able to go on field trips, but I was always taught to “bloom where you are planted.”  I’m trying my best to do that." It is good advice for all of us.

On Saturday, June 27, 2020, 9:07:13 AM CDT, Sally Jo Gibson <sjogibson...> wrote:

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As I am now a resident of an assisted living facility in Branson, MO, I don’t feel that I should report Missouri birds to the ARBird list site.

 

However, I have been able to encourage several staff members to begin a “birding life.”  One of these very smart young ladies lives in north Boone County, Arkansas near Omaha.  She has three children under the age of seven years old and has begun teaching the older one about birds.  She and a friend have also begun a new 4-H club through the Boone County Arkansas, Extension office.

She has identified Cerulean Warblers in her area.  This morning she told me that she is becoming more observant.  As she drives home she has spotted several pairs of CEWA.  She has seen six, mostly in pairs. For those interested, she lives on Dubuque Road on the New Hope Side – where New Hope turns into Dubuque. 

 

There are several residents who live in this facility who feed birds. I’ve documented 48 species from my apartment patio since I arrived here on Dec. 31, 2019.  My favorite is the female Painted Bunting.  I haven’t seen the male yet, but the female showed up again late yesterday. My two room apartment overlooks a small concrete patio, large meadow with row of cedars on one side, with a row of deciduous trees behind that.  No water close by, but Branson is surrounded by lakes.  I’ve seen a Great Blue Heron fly over the meadow.

 

One of the male nurses has become interested in teaching his son about birds while another young staff member has set up a feeding station from her fourth floor apartment patio in Hollister. 

 

I do miss being able to go on field trips, but I was always taught to “bloom where you are planted.”  I’m trying my best to do that.

Wishing my birding friends lots of birds. 

 

Sally Jo Gibson

 

P.S.  I go up to the parlor every day and play the piano for an hour for the old folks who live here.  I’m not old yet, only 87.

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

 

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Date: 6/27/20 7:07 am
From: Sally Jo Gibson <Sjogibson...>
Subject: cerulean warblers
As I am now a resident of an assisted living facility in Branson, MO, I dont feel that I should report Missouri birds to the ARBird list site.

However, I have been able to encourage several staff members to begin a birding life. One of these very smart young ladies lives in north Boone County, Arkansas near Omaha. She has three children under the age of seven years old and has begun teaching the older one about birds. She and a friend have also begun a new 4-H club through the Boone County Arkansas, Extension office.
She has identified Cerulean Warblers in her area. This morning she told me that she is becoming more observant. As she drives home she has spotted several pairs of CEWA. She has seen six, mostly in pairs. For those interested, she lives on Dubuque Road on the New Hope Side where New Hope turns into Dubuque.

There are several residents who live in this facility who feed birds. Ive documented 48 species from my apartment patio since I arrived here on Dec. 31, 2019. My favorite is the female Painted Bunting. I havent seen the male yet, but the female showed up again late yesterday. My two room apartment overlooks a small concrete patio, large meadow with row of cedars on one side, with a row of deciduous trees behind that. No water close by, but Branson is surrounded by lakes. Ive seen a Great Blue Heron fly over the meadow.

One of the male nurses has become interested in teaching his son about birds while another young staff member has set up a feeding station from her fourth floor apartment patio in Hollister.

I do miss being able to go on field trips, but I was always taught to bloom where you are planted. Im trying my best to do that.
Wishing my birding friends lots of birds.

Sally Jo Gibson

P.S. I go up to the parlor every day and play the piano for an hour for the old folks who live here. Im not old yet, only 87.

Sent from Mail<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgo.microsoft.com%2Ffwlink%2F%3FLinkId%3D550986&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4009e64703b7421f88dc08d81aa35f60%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637288636263434089&amp;sdata=33NqgjuwtB6BivV6dkB%2FpK8U4OpJjPYc23I9hDBkMOs%3D&amp;reserved=0> for Windows 10


 

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Date: 6/26/20 1:00 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: 10- & 11-day-old RTHU nestlings in the rain
Rain began fairly suddenly around 12:30 p.m., quickly increasing from
moderate to hard, with wind. The nestlings were on their own. I could
see two bills pointed upward above the nest edge, and the babies had to
be getting soaked.

Finally, after ~4 minutes, Mom arrived. It appeared that she attempted
to feed them, but I didn't see them rise to take food---they stayed
hunkered down. She then assumed her incubation position and sheltered
them, presumably for as long as the rain continued.

 

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Date: 6/26/20 7:57 am
From: Mary Ann King <office...>
Subject: Re: Swamp Milkweed at Home Depot in Benton
Be careful about buying milkweed plants from big box stores. Much of the
time they have been treated with a systemic pesticides which is bad for
caterpillars, butterflies & other critters. One should ask if they have
been treated, if a positive no cannot be given, I would not buy them.



MaryAnn King

In the pine woods NW of London





'New day, new blessing. Don't let yesterday's failures ruin the beauty of
today, because each day has its own promise of love, joy, forgiveness. Good
morning..."



From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List
[mailto:<ARBIRD-L...>] On Behalf Of Jeffrey Short
Sent: Friday, June 26, 2020 9:50 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Swamp Milkweed at Home Depot in Benton



Quite a few plants available on Wed. ~$13/gal pot, and many already
budding



Worker said it may go on sale--or may be discarded--since apparently, I am
the only one buying it.



Jeff Short


 

Back to top
Date: 6/26/20 7:51 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: Swamp Milkweed at Home Depot in Benton
Quite a few plants available on Wed. ~$13/gal pot, and many already
budding



Worker said it may go on sale--or may be discarded--since apparently, I am
the only one buying it.



Jeff Short


 

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Date: 6/25/20 7:32 pm
From: Charles H Mills <00000218c727d931-dmarc-request...>
Subject: eBird documentation photos
As part of my Covid-19 avoidance, I have spent many hours studying photos submitted in support of Arkansas eBird checklists.

However, as educational as this process has been, it has also been a source of considerable frustration on occasion when, for example, several minutes have had to be spent looking within a photo for a bird smaller than a BB obscured by a canopy of branches and leaves. Or, on other occasions, when the photos were so badly exposed, poorly focused or a combination of the two, that significant time with image editing apps was required to recover detail necessary to even guess at an ID much less make a positive confirmation of one.

It’s easy for the original observer(s) not to see these shortcomings; they see the bird in real life, properly focused and exposed with their own vision aided or not with additional optics. That advantage disappears for people who subsequently see only the photos and are at the mercy of how a camera is programmed to process a jpeg that may be uploaded as is to eBird or later post-processed further on a computer and then uploaded.

This is the most essential point to remember. Documentation photos or video DO NOT have to be of professional quality to have great value. If they have the quality fine but, if they don’t, that’s fine too. The only thing that matters is that diagnostic field marks are present in the image and are clearly recognizable.

Perhaps a less obvious reason to submit average or better than average quality images to eBird is that the great quantity of photos archived on its servers affords birders the opportunity to conveniently study variation within the same species. This isn’t totally unlike examining study skins in a museum collection. Of course, you can’t measure size in photos but studying them is nevertheless still invaluable. Trust me when I say that, apart from acquired field experience, nothing is more educationally priceless for a birder than being able to meticulously study specimens in a museum collection.

Lastly, to provide an example of how even a truly horrible photo can sometimes be salvaged, here are two links to photos of a large falcon that I observed in February 2019 east of Texarkana in Miller County. In the original photo, the bird is obviously quite distant and was soaring further away all the time; that instant was my one and only opportunity to record any kind of image. Its silhouette is recognizable as a falcon but is it a Peregrine or Prairie? By cropping the image severely, the blackish axillars and underwing linings of a Prairie Falcon are clearly visible. With regards to quality, both photos are rubbish, but there was just enough detail digitally captured to come up with indisputable documentation.

Original, full-frame image
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fpbase.com%2Fchazmi%2Fimage%2F170822487&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C8da1f2ae1c454e177b5908d819792945%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637287355468041832&amp;sdata=5EyhITe7vjnipZ1VjGcgydv%2FSb8oKjnQkCEj9YqrCbg%3D&amp;reserved=0 <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fpbase.com%2Fchazmi%2Fimage%2F170822487&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C8da1f2ae1c454e177b5908d819792945%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637287355468041832&amp;sdata=5EyhITe7vjnipZ1VjGcgydv%2FSb8oKjnQkCEj9YqrCbg%3D&amp;reserved=0>
Same image severely cropped
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fpbase.com%2Fchazmi%2Fimage%2F168835567&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C8da1f2ae1c454e177b5908d819792945%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637287355468041832&amp;sdata=j8Sr6rFTq2ntJBIJuYkc6wQe9Wg6KlPA6Oj1CPRNYro%3D&amp;reserved=0 <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fpbase.com%2Fchazmi%2Fimage%2F168835567&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C8da1f2ae1c454e177b5908d819792945%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637287355468041832&amp;sdata=j8Sr6rFTq2ntJBIJuYkc6wQe9Wg6KlPA6Oj1CPRNYro%3D&amp;reserved=0>




 

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Date: 6/25/20 2:55 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird nest update
P.S. The nestlings are now 9 and 10 days old. Mom incubated little
yesterday, and none that I've seen today. It will be interesting to see
what she does if/when it rains again.

On 6/25/2020 3:57 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
> Yesterday I witnessed two tiny, dark, pointed butts appear in turn,
> and projectile-poop. (They've doubtless been doing this for several
> days.)
> This morning I was first able to see both nestlings at the same time,
> popping up high to be fed. And this afternoon a small bill---already
> beginning to elongate---is visible above the top of the nest, while
> the babies are at rest.
>
>


 

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Date: 6/25/20 1:58 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Hummingbird nest update
Yesterday I witnessed two tiny, dark, pointed butts appear in turn, and
projectile-poop. (They've doubtless been doing this for several days.)
This morning I was first able to see both nestlings at the same time,
popping up high to be fed. And this afternoon a small bill---already
beginning to elongate---is visible above the top of the nest, while the
babies are at rest.



 

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Date: 6/25/20 1:32 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: NORTHERN BOBWHITES AT CHESNEY PRAIRIE NATURAL AREA
In case you are in despair about Northern Bobwhites in Arkansas this is for you

Wish you could have been with us today at Chesney Prairie Natural Area (maintaining social distance, of course). Chesney is a grand total of 82-acres, the largest single block of what was once thousands of acres of Tallgrass Prairie in the Siloam Springs area. But even with such reduction, Chesney is an ecological hub for the local bobwhite population.

This morning, UA-Fayetteville PhD student Vivek Govind Kumar and I divided up and spent about 2.5 hours walking different parts of Chesney. Joe Woolbright has maintained trails that explore all of the area, so this is easily accomplished. When we finished, we marked approximate locations of singing birds on a sketch map. We ended up with 10 and perhaps as many as 12 singing bobwhites on Chesney or adjacent Chesney. This is a relatively high number.

What unites it the ecological hub -- is the native Tallgrass Prairie vegetation in Chesney. About 339 plant species, including 282 that are native to Tallgrass Prairie. There are 17 species that are tracked by State of Arkansas because of rarity. Adjacent, privately-owned fields are connected by well-grown fencerows and other cover useful to bobwhites.

Of course, what works for Ole Bob works for a lot of other birds, too. Here is a link to Viveks eBird submission: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70810149<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70810149&data=02%7C01%7C%7C2d97d9a50c5f4dbb928e08d81946da77%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637287139380490801&sdata=RUtAbJf8M%2BvyVRz10srYaKlm9Kc2%2BYzofTm2G4ANo74%3D&reserved=0>.


 

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Date: 6/24/20 6:10 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 23
It was overcast and mild on the survey yesterday. A 30 minute storm came
through and dropped a little over an inch of rain. The sun popped out for
about 30 minutes in the afternoon but then it clouded back up. Was a great
day for birds as they were very active. 70 species were found. I got
excellent looks at a King Rail sitting up in the tops of the rushes, about 4
feet above the water, in plain sight, calling. I have never seen one do
this. And I never played callback at all. The heronry is still very active
and baby gallinules are everywhere. I parked my truck where I could watch
the heronry while I ate my lunch. While eating I had not only the constant
stream of birds flying in and out of the heronry over my head feeding young
and carrying nest material, but I had the King Rail calling right behind me
and a mother Purple Gallinule with a brood of downy young at close range in
front of me. Then a group of Hyacinth Gliders (vagrant dragonflies from the
tropics) dropped in and started feeding around me. And I thought, "Does it
get any better than this?" And then I realized that yes it does sometimes.
Red Slough is a magic place. Here is my list for yesterday:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 2

Wood Duck - 28

Mallard - 2

Pied-billed Grebe - 7 (also 3 broods of young.)

Neotropic Cormorant - 30 (this is probably our record high count for this
species.)

Double-crested Cormorant - 1

Anhinga - 81

American Bittern - 1 juvenile

Least Bittern - 1

Great-blue Heron - 30

Great Egret - 104

Snowy Egret - 39

Little-blue Heron - 57

Cattle Egret - 6000

Green Heron - 10

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 6

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 5

White Ibis - 855 (two pairs were nest building.)

Turkey Vulture - 2

Mississippi Kite - 4

Red-shouldered Hawk - 3

King Rail - 1

Purple Gallinule - 44 adults (also 3 broods)

Common Gallinule - 40 adults (lots of broods.)

American Coot - 6

Killdeer - 3

"Peep" species - 2 (flyovers)

Black Tern - 1 (basic plumage)

Mourning Dove - 10

Rock Pigeon - 8

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 6

Belted Kingfisher - 1

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 2

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 2

Eastern Phoebe - 4

Great-crested Flycatcher - 1

Eastern Kingbird - 2

White-eyed Vireo - 8

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

Blue Jay - 1

American Crow - 3

Fish Crow - 4

Purple Martin - 1

Tree Swallow - 19

Cliff Swallow - 4

Barn Swallow - 22

Carolina Chickadee - 2

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 16

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 2

Eastern Bluebird - 6

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

European Starling - 12

Pine Warbler - 1

Prairie Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 11

Kentucky Warbler - 2

Common Yellowthroat - 9

Yellow-breasted Chat - 6

Northern Cardinal - 16

Indigo Bunting - 18

Painted Bunting - 3

Dickcissel - 14

Red-winged Blackbird - 28

Common Grackle - 19

Brown-headed Cowbird - 4

Orchard Oriole - 2





Odonates:



Blue-fronted Dancer

Regal Darner

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Two-striped Forceptail

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slaty Skimmer

Blue Dasher

Eastern Amberwing

Hyacinth Glider - 4

Wandering Glider

Black Saddlebags



Herps:



American Alligator

Graham's Crayfish Snake

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

Green Treefrog

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog



Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR










 

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Date: 6/24/20 11:25 am
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: CHUCK-WILL’S-WIDOWS IN A HIGHLY ENERGIZED SUMMER EVENING
Arkansas back country sky is black and there are countless stars on a warm summer night. Thats what it was like last night along Highway 220, leaving Devils Den State Park, heading west down Lee Creek Valley and into Ozark National Forest. We were at the intersection of Highway 170 and 220 in the Den at 9 PM. Last nights Milky Way was actually a Galaxy of Flying Insects. I have never seen such towering swirls.

We did a slow-drive/stop-and-listen mainly for Chuck-wills-widows and Whip-poor-wills. There was just a sliver of a newish moon. We struck out on whips, but heard at least 8 chucks over about 4 miles. Some were so close we heard the often inaudible opening chuck. Others further away and part of the amazing, ancient, batrachian choir. Here is the eBird list submitted by UA Fayetteville graduate student Vivek Govind Kumar: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70780208<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70780208&data=02%7C01%7C%7Ccc9e3c614ec740e3498608d8186bf91b%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637286199297392025&sdata=WipURMo3iBuCAHZ08jPR6Qd6jDIEszDwtjr%2Bp1pzEO0%3D&reserved=0>.

Quiet summer night doesnt really fit here. Also slow-driving the road in order to watch for reptiles and amphibians. Entire amphitheater that is the valley of Lee Creek was filled by songs of frogs and toads and in several spots.


 

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Date: 6/23/20 2:16 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: hummer nest update
Two strapping nestlings are visible, with dark heads that now bob up
above the top of the nest while begging/feeding. Their eyes are still
closed, and it doesn't seem possible that their short, stubby yellow
bills could possibly elongate to adult proportions in just over two weeks.

The millipede disappeared during the night, leaving no explanation of
why an animal that lives on forest floor detritus was high in an oak
tree, causing a hummingbird considerable distress.

 

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Date: 6/22/20 4:40 pm
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird nests
I just had a female hummingbird picking bear hair I put out yesterday for nest material. I happened to have some in the yard. You will have to order bear hair from a from your local bear hair store.

Don

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 22, 2020, at 10:49 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
>  Awesome, Don! Anything they'd encounter in their natural habitat seems like should be safe, right?
>
> I really appreciate your graciousness, as well as your great stewardship (and very interesting bird reports!).
>
> -Janine
>
> On 6/21/2020 10:46 PM, Don Simons wrote:
>> As soon as I could, I took down the cotton and replaced it with bear hair. It should not be too long and tangly. Guard hairs might even wick water away.
>>
>> Don
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>>
>>> On Jun 21, 2020, at 10:02 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>>>
>>>  Hi Adam,
>>>
>>> Nice array of customers! :)
>>>
>>> Untreated coconut fiber has properties of other structural fibers that come directly from plants, so I'd sure think ought to be safe.
>>>
>>> Janine
>>>
>>> On 6/21/2020 9:43 PM, Adam Schaffer wrote:
>>>> I put out a cotton material that I think k came from a bird store once. That may have been different than another synthetic source, but I’d heard similar advice to yours and stopped. The birds seemed fairly disinterested anyway. I now leave out coconut fibers in a way. They were really just for potted plants but the birds like them so much we keep them out. The squirrels especially like them but as they get a bit rattier we’ve seen parula, gnatcatchers, and orioles use them. I think some common feeder birds may have snatched some too. The Oriole especially was interesting. I don’t have the feeling that they breed near my house and this was still in their migration peak anyway. If anyone thinks these fibers are good or bad for the birds, I’d be interested to know.
>>>>
>>>> Adam Schaffer
>>>> Bentonville
>>>>
>>>>>> On Jun 21, 2020, at 11:25 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>  I don't want to be a Debbie Downer, but cotton---or synthetics, or anything that has ever touched a machine of any kind---should never be put out for birds to use in their nests. Synthetics wrap around little feet with disastrous results.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> And I know cotton balls seem natural, but processed cotton absorbs and holds water, which spider web and natural sources of plant fiber don't. Nests that absorb and hold water invite pathogens and ectoparasites, and, far worse, can't provide thermal insulation, also with disastrous results.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Best,
>>>>>> Janine
>>>>>>
>>>>>> On 6/21/2020 7:46 AM, Don Simons wrote:
>>>>>> Even though I have not found a hummingbird nest here on Mount Mag, l know they are still in the process of building near my house. As I hunt-and-peck this note, a female is picking strands of cotton I put out for them outside my window.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Don
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 3:49 pm
From: Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Variance GRANTED for migratory habitat
Bird friends, I am DELIGHTED to tell you that the Fayetteville Planning Commission has just waved through approval for Josh Brown's variance request to create shallow pools for migratory birds, stream-side at the West Fork of the White River in East Fayetteville.
This is especially sweet coming after the recent DG article on how a private Arkansas landowner created habitat, by similar means, that has attracted nesting roseate spoonbills and other Florida-type birds.
Josh tells me that he now needs to get a grading permit, but he expects that to be less complicated than obtaining the just-won variance.
Josh sincerely thanks everybody who wrote the Commission in support of the project, especially engineer Gavin Smith.
This message forwards my earlier message announcing that the variance request was up for consideration, in case some of you missed what this is about.
A happy day for the American woodcock --Anita Schnee

~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`

Anita Schnee

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcatself.wordpress.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C88f24f22d8a445776b8108d816fe3301%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637284629367754927&amp;sdata=LLGvbn8XNe9TU9Fg6XNcXwl345NFG9yLkbnXK6RlZzM%3D&amp;reserved=0
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fafriqueaya.org%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C88f24f22d8a445776b8108d816fe3301%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637284629367754927&amp;sdata=gSwPJd0FjTIZuA1ycW8LixfWTJpii3GKG%2FgLxqoPaJY%3D&amp;reserved=0



~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`


----- Forwarded Message ----- From: Anita Schnee <yayfay...>To: Arbird <arbird-l...>Sent: Friday, June 12, 2020, 07:52:03 AM CDTSubject: Variance for migratory habitat
Hello bird friends. Here's a copy of a letter I wrote supporting my landlord's application for a variance to improve bird habitat. The application is up for approval shortly.
Wondering where that woodcock is now --Anita Schnee
* * *
June 11, 2020

Mathew Johnson, ChairFayetteville Planning Commission113 W. Mountain St.Fayetteville, AR 72701
Re: May 18, 2020 variance application by Gavin Smith for Josh BrownParcel No. 765-13117-510Migratory Bird Wetland Stopover
Dear Mr. Johnson:
I urge you to recommend the variance request submitted by engineer Gavin Smith on behalf of landowner Josh Brown. Mr. Brown wants to improve stop-over habitat for migratory birds and he seeks the City’s approval to create three linked shallow ponds on his property in eastern Fayetteville, by a bend of the West Fork of the White River near Bayyari Park.
Josh’s proposal will encourage a refuge for many threatened bird species. The need is critical. The wave of extinctions caused by habitat loss is deeply troubling. Our birds are additionally menaced by pesticides, cell towers, food-supply decline due to pollution, free-roaming domestic cats – and all this on top of the natural challenges of predation, headwinds, and unfavorable weather conditions due to the global climate melt-down.1
Josh and I visited the site in late February. We were ecstatic to flush an American woodcock there. So, while Josh’s proposal would attract a variety of waterfowl species, I restrict my advocacy here to that particular American woodcock. We saw this bird with our own eyes, so we can be sure that Mr. Brown’s site is already a welcoming one for it. 
1. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcbirds.org%2Fprogram%2Fbirds-at-risk%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C88f24f22d8a445776b8108d816fe3301%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637284629367754927&amp;sdata=2vYTuPVuC27jMfd%2B4zJeWf4HV5x5es1E5s7WoDzRQts%3D&amp;reserved=0
The woodcock is considered by the State of New York as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need. The United States Shorebird Conservation Plan notes it as a Species of High Concern, thought or known to be declining due to shrinking breeding and non-breeding grounds. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service lists the woodcock as a Game Bird Below Desired Condition, and the bird is on the Audubon Watchlist “yellowlist” of species that are slowly declining and of conservation concern nationwide.2
How extraordinary, then, that Mr. Brown’s site already invites such an important specie to land right here in our hometown. That bird’s range extends from the Canadian maritime provinces to eastern Texas3 – and here. How wonderful it would be if that lone woodcock were to be joined by a great visitation of waterfowl during the migration seasons.
Poet Emily Dickenson coined the matchless phrase “Hope is the thing with feathers.” Filmmaker Wes Craven says that birds show us that we’re “not gravity’s slave.”4 If we can provide a small refuge on our gravely damaged planet, and offer hope to our feathered fellows in the great web of life – this is the spirit of the town in which I want to live.
The Streamside Protection Zone ordinance permits “open space uses that are primarily passive in nature including: preserves, fishing areas and docks, parkland, and natural trails.”5 Mr. Brown wants to improve on an existing “open space,” the use of which, after the ponds are built, will be entirely, not just “primarily,” “passive in nature.” Josh wants tocreate an “open space” “preserve” to host weary birds who travel great distances and who could rest and commune there undisturbed. Once the ponds are built, the land would retain its character as a “preserve” in perpetuity, thanks to the conservation easement with the Ozark Land Trust. Surely that use is within the spirit of the Protection Zone ordinance.
Please recommend Mr. Brown’s variance application for approval.
Sincerely,/s/ Anita SchneeAnita SchneeAttorney at Law
2. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.audubon.org%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fdocuments%2Fhrvc_americanwoodcock.pdf&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C88f24f22d8a445776b8108d816fe3301%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637284629367764841&amp;sdata=KYPvGrQ%2BAAjGfJTfnwaXHmaIJVCqX7bE0lnQK%2B08tcs%3D&amp;reserved=0
3. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmyscmap.sc.gov%2Fcwcs%2Fpdf%2FWoodcock.pdf4&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C88f24f22d8a445776b8108d816fe3301%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637284629367764841&amp;sdata=ZlTa37gtDne1OvqjONQW0%2Fy9JAIdGHhvvcZm%2BebiiUk%3D&amp;reserved=0. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.audubon.org%2Fnews%2Fwhy-do-birds-matter5&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C88f24f22d8a445776b8108d816fe3301%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637284629367764841&amp;sdata=B%2BlO9QJ06%2FNh0C1AcVRTHFkoX9zsUOVWKJYUyN3vnuI%3D&amp;reserved=0. Tit. XV, Ch. 168, § 168.12.E.a(i) (emphasis added).

~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`

Anita Schnee

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcatself.wordpress.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C88f24f22d8a445776b8108d816fe3301%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637284629367764841&amp;sdata=tvlZ1tcUQwTXo%2FGZ%2FnK%2Fnf9mfyg3K7D72uEvfLawkkY%3D&amp;reserved=0
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fafriqueaya.org%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C88f24f22d8a445776b8108d816fe3301%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637284629367764841&amp;sdata=NpSEbezutxYhFkJM0ZdyaOfdOsJ22r489e3uNqBuY1g%3D&amp;reserved=0



~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`




 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 3:28 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Not a snake!
Illuminated by sunlight, it appears to be a /Narceus americanus/ (Giant
Millipede). 😁

On 6/22/2020 4:44 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
> Mom left for a long foraging bout, and the "snake" began to move off
> along the bottom of the branch, out toward the end. It appears to be a
> brown un-bristled caterpillar. After she returned, she looked
> considerably more relaxed. 😂😅
>
> On 6/22/2020 4:14 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
>> After ~30 min that I'm aware of, Mom left for just long enough to
>> drink nectar. When she returned, the babies were more eager to eat
>> than I've seen before; they lunged higher and "pumped" more
>> energetically. Very soon she left again for a little longer and
>> presumably nabbed a small number of insects, but didn't feed them
>> (which is usual; feeding intervals are long compared to many species).
>>
>> Each time she leaves or returns she pummels the snake, and often
>> surveys the entire branch. The snake hasn't noticeably changed position.
>


 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 2:45 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Not a snake!
Mom left for a long foraging bout, and the "snake" began to move off
along the bottom of the branch, out toward the end. It appears to be a
brown un-bristled caterpillar. After she returned, she looked
considerably more relaxed. 😂😅

On 6/22/2020 4:14 PM, Janine Perlman wrote:
> After ~30 min that I'm aware of, Mom left for just long enough to
> drink nectar. When she returned, the babies were more eager to eat
> than I've seen before; they lunged higher and "pumped" more
> energetically. Very soon she left again for a little longer and
> presumably nabbed a small number of insects, but didn't feed them
> (which is usual; feeding intervals are long compared to many species).
>
> Each time she leaves or returns she pummels the snake, and often
> surveys the entire branch. The snake hasn't noticeably changed position.


 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 2:24 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: hummer nest update
After ~30 min that I'm aware of, Mom left for just long enough to drink
nectar. When she returned, the babies were more eager to eat than I've
seen before; they lunged higher and "pumped" more energetically. Very
soon she left again for a little longer and presumably nabbed a small
number of insects, but didn't feed them (which is usual; feeding
intervals are long compared to many species).

Each time she leaves or returns she pummels the snake, and often surveys
the entire branch. The snake hasn't noticeably changed position.

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 1:49 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: High drama at the hummingbird nest
After being away from the binoculars for a couple of hours, I returned
to find Mom in a frenzied attack on the branch, at both sides of the
nest. I thought it must be an ant invasion. Then I realized it is,
seemingly, a small snake. It's brown and the size of a Ring-necked
Snake. It has now wrapped itself securely around the branch just
adjacent to the nest. Mom will not allow it to move, and it's immovable
by her.

It could, I suppose, be a large millipede, but I can't see any
segmentation, and the proportions and coil-ability appear wrong.

Seems likely she'll refuse to leave to feed as long as it's there, and
if so this could be a standoff that no one can win. My best hope is that
the presumed snake won't move for so long that she relaxes enough to go
forage, and that it stays immobile for a long time until it gives up and
leaves without a meal. That would require a lot of luck---the good kind
for the birds, not so good for the snake.

I don't know what species it could be. The branch is ~40' - 50' off the
ground.

Knowledge or speculation sought!

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 11:39 am
From: Jerry Davis <jwdavis...>
Subject: Birds, Plants and Tent Caterpillars
This is the time of year that tent caterpillars begin to show up in host trees. Inevitably the public and some birders will get a bur under their blanket because they do not like the looks of them. These caterpillars are bird food and if you are gong to have the moths, you have to have caterpillars. The arrival of the Yellow-billed Cuckoo and its nesting is in sync with this event. They have the specialized bill for tearing into the tents to get the caterpillars and when the caterpillar’s defense tent is breached, the caterpillars also are available to other birds. Some do not like the appearance of the tents but this does have a benefit to the plants as well. The large amount of fecal pellets deposited by the caterpillars makes nutrients for the trees more rapidly available versus the decomposition of leaves over a long period of time.

So when you see the tents of the Tent Caterpillars and next Fall the Fall webworms, remember that these are bird food in the caterpillar and adult moth stages. They are a beneficial part of the ecological process. Be more tolerant and understanding of what you are seeing. Our birds need them and the plants do also.

Jerry Wayne Davis
Hot Springs, AR
 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 9:33 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Roseate Spoonbill

Hello;
It is private property and the landowner does not want any visitors at the site since there are only 2 small openings in the vegetation to view the birds and he’s extremely concerned about disturbance to all the nesting wading birds.

Plus, It’s not easy to get to the site as there are a number of wrong turns and it’s difficult to turn around because it’s all dirt (mud) Driving on the narrow dirt levee is not safe for both the levee and the driver after this rain.

Karen




Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 22, 2020, at 10:25 AM, Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> 
> Is the wetland area in Portland in a public area or in a private area? I do not live very far from Portland and an not surprised at a Roseate spoonbill nest there. I've seen them nesting south of me in Richland Parish several years ago. Unfortunately that rookery is gone.
> Roselie Overby
> Oak Grove, LA

 

Back to top
Date: 6/22/20 8:25 am
From: Roselie Overby <0000005a14a66d60-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonbill
Is the wetland area in Portland in a public area or in a private area?  I do not live very far from Portland and an not surprised at a Roseate spoonbill nest there.  I've seen them nesting south of me in Richland Parish several years ago.  Unfortunately that rookery is gone.  Roselie OverbyOak Grove, LA
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 8:48 pm
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird nests
As soon as I could, I took down the cotton and replaced it with bear hair. It should not be too long and tangly. Guard hairs might even wick water away.

Don

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 21, 2020, at 10:02 PM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
>  Hi Adam,
>
> Nice array of customers! :)
>
> Untreated coconut fiber has properties of other structural fibers that come directly from plants, so I'd sure think ought to be safe.
>
> Janine
>
> On 6/21/2020 9:43 PM, Adam Schaffer wrote:
>> I put out a cotton material that I think k came from a bird store once. That may have been different than another synthetic source, but I’d heard similar advice to yours and stopped. The birds seemed fairly disinterested anyway. I now leave out coconut fibers in a way. They were really just for potted plants but the birds like them so much we keep them out. The squirrels especially like them but as they get a bit rattier we’ve seen parula, gnatcatchers, and orioles use them. I think some common feeder birds may have snatched some too. The Oriole especially was interesting. I don’t have the feeling that they breed near my house and this was still in their migration peak anyway. If anyone thinks these fibers are good or bad for the birds, I’d be interested to know.
>>
>> Adam Schaffer
>> Bentonville
>>
>>>> On Jun 21, 2020, at 11:25 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>  I don't want to be a Debbie Downer, but cotton---or synthetics, or anything that has ever touched a machine of any kind---should never be put out for birds to use in their nests. Synthetics wrap around little feet with disastrous results.
>>>>
>>>> And I know cotton balls seem natural, but processed cotton absorbs and holds water, which spider web and natural sources of plant fiber don't. Nests that absorb and hold water invite pathogens and ectoparasites, and, far worse, can't provide thermal insulation, also with disastrous results.
>>>>
>>>> Best,
>>>> Janine
>>>>
>>>> On 6/21/2020 7:46 AM, Don Simons wrote:
>>>> Even though I have not found a hummingbird nest here on Mount Mag, l know they are still in the process of building near my house. As I hunt-and-peck this note, a female is picking strands of cotton I put out for them outside my window.
>>>>
>>>> Don
>>>>
>>>> Sent from my iPad
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 8:02 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird nests
Hi Adam,

Nice array of customers! :)

Untreated coconut fiber has properties of other structural fibers that
come directly from plants, so I'd sure think ought to be safe.

Janine

On 6/21/2020 9:43 PM, Adam Schaffer wrote:
> I put out a cotton material that I think k came from a bird store once. That may have been different than another synthetic source, but I’d heard similar advice to yours and stopped. The birds seemed fairly disinterested anyway. I now leave out coconut fibers in a way. They were really just for potted plants but the birds like them so much we keep them out. The squirrels especially like them but as they get a bit rattier we’ve seen parula, gnatcatchers, and orioles use them. I think some common feeder birds may have snatched some too. The Oriole especially was interesting. I don’t have the feeling that they breed near my house and this was still in their migration peak anyway. If anyone thinks these fibers are good or bad for the birds, I’d be interested to know.
>
> Adam Schaffer
> Bentonville
>
>> On Jun 21, 2020, at 11:25 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>>
>>  I don't want to be a Debbie Downer, but cotton---or synthetics, or anything that has ever touched a machine of any kind---should never be put out for birds to use in their nests. Synthetics wrap around little feet with disastrous results.
>>
>> And I know cotton balls seem natural, but processed cotton absorbs and holds water, which spider web and natural sources of plant fiber don't. Nests that absorb and hold water invite pathogens and ectoparasites, and, far worse, can't provide thermal insulation, also with disastrous results.
>>
>> Best,
>> Janine
>>
>>> On 6/21/2020 7:46 AM, Don Simons wrote:
>>> Even though I have not found a hummingbird nest here on Mount Mag, l know they are still in the process of building near my house. As I hunt-and-peck this note, a female is picking strands of cotton I put out for them outside my window.
>>>
>>> Don
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPad


 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 7:43 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird nests
I put out a cotton material that I think k came from a bird store once. That may have been different than another synthetic source, but I’d heard similar advice to yours and stopped. The birds seemed fairly disinterested anyway. I now leave out coconut fibers in a way. They were really just for potted plants but the birds like them so much we keep them out. The squirrels especially like them but as they get a bit rattier we’ve seen parula, gnatcatchers, and orioles use them. I think some common feeder birds may have snatched some too. The Oriole especially was interesting. I don’t have the feeling that they breed near my house and this was still in their migration peak anyway. If anyone thinks these fibers are good or bad for the birds, I’d be interested to know.

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

> On Jun 21, 2020, at 11:25 AM, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
>  I don't want to be a Debbie Downer, but cotton---or synthetics, or anything that has ever touched a machine of any kind---should never be put out for birds to use in their nests. Synthetics wrap around little feet with disastrous results.
>
> And I know cotton balls seem natural, but processed cotton absorbs and holds water, which spider web and natural sources of plant fiber don't. Nests that absorb and hold water invite pathogens and ectoparasites, and, far worse, can't provide thermal insulation, also with disastrous results.
>
> Best,
> Janine
>
>> On 6/21/2020 7:46 AM, Don Simons wrote:
>> Even though I have not found a hummingbird nest here on Mount Mag, l know they are still in the process of building near my house. As I hunt-and-peck this note, a female is picking strands of cotton I put out for them outside my window.
>>
>> Don
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 6:01 pm
From: Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird nests
Hi All,

This piqued my curiosity and I did a bit of google scholar searching. I
couldn't find much except for plastics and marine birds (one article is
attached here), but I didn't come across anything else. I also only did a
very cursory search. Here are a few links that touch on the issue - they
seem to align with anecdotal observations of rehabilitators and nest
observers.

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.audubon.org%2Fnews%2Fwhat-nesting-materials-are-safe-birds&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C5bd174ea039f48c5f56f08d81647b48f%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637283844525283306&amp;sdata=YJflOU5pGSVOsvBLk3EiCkC15U3a6ebSxxsmzdrXbuA%3D&amp;reserved=0

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.allaboutbirds.org%2Fnews%2Fproviding-nest-material-for-birds-dos-donts%2F%3F__hstc%3D46425656.75757eac44eb6706051684e76be94fd2.1592787195480.1592787195480.1592787195480.1%26__hssc%3D46425656.1.1592787195481%26__hsfp%3D1776442591%23_ga%3D2.256878219.1688768649.1592787195-445647770.1592787195&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C5bd174ea039f48c5f56f08d81647b48f%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637283844525293307&amp;sdata=gg0fLPuLsLHrnZCFZi7eHJIhhgqhipV%2FvhF1HLKgMis%3D&amp;reserved=0


If anyone comes up with anything else, please share!

Katie

Kate M. Chapman, Ph.D.
Teaching Assistant Professor
Department of Psychological Science
235 Memorial Hall
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville, AR 72701
Email: <kmc025...>

Pronouns: she/her/hers
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.mypronouns.org%2Fshe-her&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C5bd174ea039f48c5f56f08d81647b48f%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637283844525293307&amp;sdata=wfDmgQFxCbVLVHAVNlRD2EgNtJgObGfV6B8TbSOyle0%3D&amp;reserved=0



On Sun, Jun 21, 2020 at 12:07 PM Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:

> Numerous reports from avian rehabilitators; I'll try to find references
> when I have more time. (And I think we all have experience with cotton
> balls!)
>
> Janine
>
> On 6/21/2020 12:00 PM, Gmail wrote:
>
> Not to be a contrarian, but are there scientific studies to back these assertions? If so, please pass those along, so I can read the articles.
>
> I am not trying to imply what you are saying isn’t true. It’s just that I always prefer to read the information from the primary literature first hand and draw my own conclusions.
>
> Thanks!
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville
>
>
> On Jun 21, 2020, at 11:25, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
>  I don't want to be a Debbie Downer, but cotton---or synthetics, or anything that has ever touched a machine of any kind---should never be put out for birds to use in their nests. Synthetics wrap around little feet with disastrous results.
>
> And I know cotton balls seem natural, but processed cotton absorbs and holds water, which spider web and natural sources of plant fiber don't. Nests that absorb and hold water invite pathogens and ectoparasites, and, far worse, can't provide thermal insulation, also with disastrous results.
>
> Best,
> Janine
>
>
> On 6/21/2020 7:46 AM, Don Simons wrote:
> Even though I have not found a hummingbird nest here on Mount Mag, l know they are still in the process of building near my house. As I hunt-and-peck this note, a female is picking strands of cotton I put out for them outside my window.
>
> Don
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 5:47 pm
From: Barry Haas <bhaas...>
Subject: Third (and final?) Phoebe Nesting
Dear ARBIRDers,

I assume this is the third and final nesting this year of the phoebes who have used our front stoop overhang as the location of their nest for many years. The first two efforts this year resulted in five fledglings each. This time there are four tiny white eggs in the nest. I’ll check again in a day or two just to make sure there won’t be a fifth again this time. Mrs. Phoebe is quite prolific.

On another subject that is not about Arkansas birds (but includes photos of birds we do have in Arkansas, if that counts) I came across an article that may interest a number of you. It is bird related and environmentally related to the removal of dams on once free-flowing streams. The result? Better habitat for fish and other aquatic species as well as birds. Who knew? Oh, that’s right, biologists. Here’s the link:

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftinyurl.com%2Fycax79j7&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C3a8ae8bff86e47876c3508d81645d0c0%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637283836404100983&amp;sdata=BB2bq7edcBF2OnOx7Nki0JVHKEAYKU7PBpb8RHSawXc%3D&amp;reserved=0

Last item- we have a male summer tanager with odd colors that’s been hanging around this spring and now summer. Instead of having consistent red feathers this bird has some areas of orange and maybe greenish tints. I don’t see it very often, but did just a moment ago. The chances of getting a picture other than in my mind are not good given the very infrequent and brief sightings. Today’s look made me wonder if it could be a hybrid of some sort. Maybe a cross with a painted bunting? It’s interesting to ponder having such off coloring.

From the deep woods just west of Little Rock,
Barry Haas
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 3:04 pm
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Whips
I did a little "adventuring" last night, which is a long story, but ended
up driving a few miles on a completely unfamiliar dirt road. As there was
no moon, and it was a still night, I decided to step every mile or so, to
listen for night birds. I heard my first Whip-poor-will in several years.
I was west of Bella Vista, near the Missouri border. Made for a good
night.

Karen Garrett
Rogers

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 2:36 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: hummingbird nest update
I haven't yet seen two babies' bills at the same time, but Mom is almost
certainly feeding two---one at a time pops up from somewhat different
locations, and they look to be different sizes. She also pokes and prods
correspondingly.

They are now ~5 and 6 days of age, and are growing at a rate that
demands >500 fruit-fly-sized insects per day each, which is the same as
the adult requirement. No wonder Mom is away often and for long periods!

 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 10:07 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird nests
Numerous reports from avian rehabilitators; I'll try to find references
when I have more time. (And I think we all have experience with cotton
balls!)

Janine

On 6/21/2020 12:00 PM, Gmail wrote:
> Not to be a contrarian, but are there scientific studies to back these assertions? If so, please pass those along, so I can read the articles.
>
> I am not trying to imply what you are saying isn’t true. It’s just that I always prefer to read the information from the primary literature first hand and draw my own conclusions.
>
> Thanks!
> Butch Tetzlaff
> Bentonville
>
>> On Jun 21, 2020, at 11:25, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>>
>>  I don't want to be a Debbie Downer, but cotton---or synthetics, or anything that has ever touched a machine of any kind---should never be put out for birds to use in their nests. Synthetics wrap around little feet with disastrous results.
>>
>> And I know cotton balls seem natural, but processed cotton absorbs and holds water, which spider web and natural sources of plant fiber don't. Nests that absorb and hold water invite pathogens and ectoparasites, and, far worse, can't provide thermal insulation, also with disastrous results.
>>
>> Best,
>> Janine
>>
>>> On 6/21/2020 7:46 AM, Don Simons wrote:
>>> Even though I have not found a hummingbird nest here on Mount Mag, l know they are still in the process of building near my house. As I hunt-and-peck this note, a female is picking strands of cotton I put out for them outside my window.
>>>
>>> Don
>>>
>>> Sent from my iPad


 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 10:01 am
From: Gmail <butchchq8...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird nests
Not to be a contrarian, but are there scientific studies to back these assertions? If so, please pass those along, so I can read the articles.

I am not trying to imply what you are saying isn’t true. It’s just that I always prefer to read the information from the primary literature first hand and draw my own conclusions.

Thanks!
Butch Tetzlaff
Bentonville

> On Jun 21, 2020, at 11:25, Janine Perlman <jpandjf...> wrote:
>
>  I don't want to be a Debbie Downer, but cotton---or synthetics, or anything that has ever touched a machine of any kind---should never be put out for birds to use in their nests. Synthetics wrap around little feet with disastrous results.
>
> And I know cotton balls seem natural, but processed cotton absorbs and holds water, which spider web and natural sources of plant fiber don't. Nests that absorb and hold water invite pathogens and ectoparasites, and, far worse, can't provide thermal insulation, also with disastrous results.
>
> Best,
> Janine
>
>> On 6/21/2020 7:46 AM, Don Simons wrote:
>> Even though I have not found a hummingbird nest here on Mount Mag, l know they are still in the process of building near my house. As I hunt-and-peck this note, a female is picking strands of cotton I put out for them outside my window.
>>
>> Don
>>
>> Sent from my iPad
>
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 9:25 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: Hummingbird nests
I don't want to be a Debbie Downer, but cotton---or synthetics, or
anything that has ever touched a machine of any kind---should never be
put out for birds to use in their nests. Synthetics wrap around little
feet with disastrous results.

And I know cotton balls seem natural, but processed cotton absorbs and
holds water, which spider web and natural sources of plant fiber don't.
Nests that absorb and hold water invite pathogens and ectoparasites,
and, far worse, can't provide thermal insulation, also with disastrous
results.

Best,
Janine

On 6/21/2020 7:46 AM, Don Simons wrote:
> Even though I have not found a hummingbird nest here on Mount Mag, l know they are still in the process of building near my house. As I hunt-and-peck this note, a female is picking strands of cotton I put out for them outside my window.
>
> Don
>
> Sent from my iPad


 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 7:27 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Roseate Spoonville record
For persons who are on Facebook, her photos can be found at Jami Linder Photography.
Karen Rowe

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 21, 2020, at 8:22 AM, Jeffrey Short <bashman...> wrote:
>
> Here is a copy of the article in the ADG today. The associated black-and-white photo in the print editions was disappointing.
>
> The photos in the link are magnificent; I'll try to provide it when available.
>
> Jeff Short
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jeff Short [mailto:<jjshort2020...>]
> Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2020 8:09 AM
> To: <bashman...>
> Subject: Roseate Spoonville record
>
> His­toric bird pho­tos
>
> Am­a­teur doc­u­ments roseate spoon­bills nest­ing in state.
>
> Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, USA Jun 21, 2020 1A
>
> Jami Lin­der vis­ited a wet­land in May to pho­to­graph birds near Port­land, an Ash­ley County town of about 400 peo­ple in south­east Arkansas.
> An avid am­a­teur wildlife pho­tog­ra­pher from Cros­sett, Lin­der works as an emer­gency room nurse in Bas­trop, La.
> “It’s my stress re­lief, I guess,” Lin­der, 53, said of her hobby.
> Af­ter her trip to the wet­land, she shared pho­tos on Face­book of a unique bird that from a dis­tance could be mis­taken for a flamingo. Among the wa­ter birds that Lin­der cap­tured pho­tos of that day was a roseate spoon­bill: a lon­g­legged, mostly pink bird with an el­e­gant white neck, a splash of red on its wings and a long bill that ta­pers be­fore widen­ing into a round spoon shape at the end.
> What Lin­der didn’t know at the time was that she had in­ad­ver­tently doc­u­mented a his­toric bird sight­ing for the state of Arkansas.
> Lin­der’s sight­ing, with sub­se­quent con­fir­ma­tion by an Arkansas Game and Fish Com­mis­sion bi­ol­o­gist who vis­ited the Ash­ley County wet­land, is be­lieved to be the first record of roseate spoon­bills lay­ing eggs and rear­ing their young in Arkansas.
> “It is ex­cit­ing, you know?” Lin­der said Thurs­day in an in­ter­view, adding that “the first is for­ever.”
> Some­one on Face­book
> (Photo sub­mit­ted by Jami Lin­der)
> A roseate spoon­bill tends to a young bird near a nest in a wet­land area in Ash­ley County. The birds are typ­i­cally found in coastal ar­eas of Texas, Florida and Mex­ico. More pho­tos at arkansason­line. com/621spoon­bill/.
> com­mented on one of Lin­der’s pho­tos to say the birds look “al­most pre­his­toric,” she said.
> The ob­ser­va­tion rings true. With the strik­ing rounded bill and red-rimmed eyes, the roseate spoon­bill seems like it flapped out of a pre­his­toric swamp, its evo­lu­tion­ary stage stuck some­where be­tween rep­tile and bird, be­fore be­ing swiped with a psy­che­delic pink paint­brush.
> Spoon­bills are typ­i­cally found in coastal ar­eas of Texas, Florida and Mex­ico, ac­cord­ing to the Audubon So­ci­ety. They feed on small fish, in­sects, cray­fish and shrimp by wad­ing in shal­low wa­ter, dip­ping their bills and feel­ing around for their quarry.
> Roseate spoon­bills were once more com­mon in the United States, be­fore ex­ten­sive hunt­ing for their pink feath­ers — which were de­sired for the hat in­dus­try — drove them nearly to ex­tinc­tion in the wild by the early 20th cen­tury, ac­cord­ing to the Game and Fish Com­mis­sion.
> Although they can be seen in south­ern Arkansas dur­ing sea­sonal vis­its in sum­mer and fall, the sight of roseate spoon­bills nest­ing in the state is ev­i­dently so rare that it had never been doc­u­mented.
> When Game and Fish wildlife bi­ol­o­gist Karen Rowe saw Lin­der’s May 17 photo of a spoon­bill on Face­book, she reached out to in­quire about the sight­ing to see if the birds were po­ten­tially nest­ing in the state.
> Rowe ini­tially as­sumed the photo was taken out­side Arkansas. When Lin­der told her the spoon­bills were seen in Ash­ley County, Rowe said she started to won­der “if we had a con­nec­tion where I could earn her trust,” she re­called with a laugh.
> “And not to be de­vi­ous, but when you’re a bird­watcher, you try to find out things about birds in the state and where they’re oc­cur­ring,” Rowe said.
> Rowe serves as the nongame bird pro­gram leader for the agency’s wildlife man­age­ment di­vi­sion. Know­ing the po­ten­tially his­toric na­ture of the roseate spoon­bill sight­ing, Rowe en­cour­aged Lin­der to see if there were any nests pic­tured in her pho­tos.
> At Rowe’s sug­ges­tion, Lin­der ex­am­ined her pho­tos, en­larg­ing them on her com­puter. Sure enough, she spot­ted some pink.
> “That kind of looks like they’re sit­ting on a nest,” Lin­der re­called think­ing.
> Lin­der and Rowe vis­ited the wet­land to­gether with the prop­erty owner May 24 to see whether roseate spoon­bills were in­deed guard­ing ram­shackle nests made of branches, which the birds pitch to­gether on small cy­press trees and shrubs. They thought they spot­ted one or two birds nest­ing, but they weren’t cer­tain, Rowe re­called.
> Later, Lin­der vis­ited the wet­land again and got con­clu­sive proof: a pho­to­graph of a baby roseate spoon­bill in the bun­dle of sticks, with an at­ten­tive par­ent spoon­bill in the frame.
> When they vis­ited the wet­land yet another time Thurs­day, they saw two ac­tive roseate spoon­bill nests with two dif­fer­ent age classes of nestlings, Rowe said.
> Lin­der orig­i­nally vis­ited the prop­erty in Ash­ley County be­cause it is owned by an ac­quain­tance, Craig Shack­elford, whom she knew through her father and one of his friends. Shack­elford and her father had raised the idea that Lin­der ought to visit the wet­land and pho­to­graph wildlife, in­clud­ing the roseate spoon­bills.
> Lin­der said she had never seen the bird any­where be­fore, much less in Arkansas.
> “It was like I had been picked up out of Arkansas and trans­ported to the Ever­glades,” Lin­der said of her first visit to the wet­land.
> As it turned out, Rowe also knew Shack­elford through work band­ing barn owls years ago, she said, and do­ing marsh bird sur­veys.
> The Ash­ley County wet­land ap­par­ently has proved to be an at­trac­tive habi­tat for birds that aren’t nor­mally seen breed­ing in the state.
> “I was lit­er­ally dumb­founded be­cause there were so many ibis and herons and egrets,” Rowe said of her re­cent visit to the prop­erty. “I’d never seen a scene like that in Arkansas, and I’ve been to some unique ar­eas. But the di­ver­sity of birds and the high level of ac­tiv­ity was just awe­some.”
> Rowe noted another po­ten­tially his­toric sight­ing in the wet­land: nest­ing white-faced ibis, another wa­ter bird that is not known to have been doc­u­mented breed­ing in Arkansas.
> Lin­der and Rowe say they ob­served the white-faced ibis in the wet­land car­ry­ing sticks — a good in­di­ca­tion of breed­ing. But be­cause the birds were far away in the wet­land’s in­te­rior, they could not get close enough to con­firm the pres­ence of eggs or young birds.
> They have been care­ful to ob­serve the wa­ter birds from a dis­tance to avoid dis­turb­ing their nest­ing, which Rowe said can be very dam­ag­ing.
> “They’re not used to peo­ple be­ing out in the wet­land with them,” Rowe said.
> An­hin­gas, another long­necked wa­ter bird, also were spot­ted with ba­bies in the wet­land. Ac­cord­ing to Audubon So­ci­ety records, an­hin­gas have not been seen breed­ing in Arkansas since 1968, Rowe said.
> What makes the recorded breed­ing of roseate spoon­bills sig­nif­i­cant, Rowe said, is that the species is not known for ex­pand­ing its range out­side the wa­ters of the south­east­ern United States.
> She sug­gested the nest­ing of the roseate spoon­bills in Arkansas has oc­curred be­cause of “man-made in­ter­ven­tion” by landown­ers like Shack­elford and others nearby, who have con­verted what was pre­vi­ously farm­land into wet­lands un­der the U.S. Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture’s Wet­lands Re­serve Pro­gram.
> As a re­sult, the sur­round­ing area in Ash­ley County can serve as a habi­tat with the ca­pac­ity to sup­port var­i­ous wad­ing birds, Rowe said.
> The wet­land is of such qual­ity that “these roseate spoon­bills didn’t leave,” Rowe said. “They stayed and nested.”
> Lyn­dal York, cu­ra­tor of records for the Arkansas Audubon So­ci­ety, re­viewed a fi­nal re­port that Rowe sub­mit­ted Thurs­day with de­tails of the his­toric sight­ing. In light of the pho­to­graphic ev­i­dence, he said, there is no ques­tion the re­port will be ac­cepted.
> “We thought maybe they were nest­ing, but no one had ever got­ten any clue as to where it was or when it was,” he said Fri­day. “So this is unique.”
> Ad­di­tion­ally, York said he be­lieves cli­mate change may be con­tribut­ing to roseate spoon­bills and other large wa­ter birds ap­pear­ing in the wet, swampy ar­eas of south Arkansas.
> “With global warm­ing, we’re see­ing a lot of species like that mov­ing into the south­ern Arkansas and west­ern Arkansas, in par­tic­u­lar, from the west,” York said. “These birds are prob­a­bly com­ing from the Gulf Coast, I would guess.”
> Lin­der and Rowe wel­comed the sight­ing of the roseate spoon­bills as a pos­i­tive event for the state at a time when bad news is never in short sup­ply. The sight­ing has spe­cial sig­nif­i­cance for Lin­der as a wildlife pho­tog­ra­pher.
> “I will have my name in the record book for­ever for doc­u­ment­ing this,” Lin­der said.
>
>
> Sent from my iPad=
 

Back to top
Date: 6/21/20 6:22 am
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Roseate Spoonville record
Here is a copy of the article in the ADG today. The associated black-and-white photo in the print editions was disappointing.

The photos in the link are magnificent; I'll try to provide it when available.

Jeff Short

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Short [mailto:<jjshort2020...>]
Sent: Sunday, June 21, 2020 8:09 AM
To: <bashman...>
Subject: Roseate Spoonville record

His­toric bird pho­tos

Am­a­teur doc­u­ments roseate spoon­bills nest­ing in state.

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, USA Jun 21, 2020 1A

Jami Lin­der vis­ited a wet­land in May to pho­to­graph birds near Port­land, an Ash­ley County town of about 400 peo­ple in south­east Arkansas.
An avid am­a­teur wildlife pho­tog­ra­pher from Cros­sett, Lin­der works as an emer­gency room nurse in Bas­trop, La.
“It’s my stress re­lief, I guess,” Lin­der, 53, said of her hobby.
Af­ter her trip to the wet­land, she shared pho­tos on Face­book of a unique bird that from a dis­tance could be mis­taken for a flamingo. Among the wa­ter birds that Lin­der cap­tured pho­tos of that day was a roseate spoon­bill: a lon­g­legged, mostly pink bird with an el­e­gant white neck, a splash of red on its wings and a long bill that ta­pers be­fore widen­ing into a round spoon shape at the end.
What Lin­der didn’t know at the time was that she had in­ad­ver­tently doc­u­mented a his­toric bird sight­ing for the state of Arkansas.
Lin­der’s sight­ing, with sub­se­quent con­fir­ma­tion by an Arkansas Game and Fish Com­mis­sion bi­ol­o­gist who vis­ited the Ash­ley County wet­land, is be­lieved to be the first record of roseate spoon­bills lay­ing eggs and rear­ing their young in Arkansas.
“It is ex­cit­ing, you know?” Lin­der said Thurs­day in an in­ter­view, adding that “the first is for­ever.”
Some­one on Face­book
(Photo sub­mit­ted by Jami Lin­der)
A roseate spoon­bill tends to a young bird near a nest in a wet­land area in Ash­ley County. The birds are typ­i­cally found in coastal ar­eas of Texas, Florida and Mex­ico. More pho­tos at arkansason­line. com/621spoon­bill/.
com­mented on one of Lin­der’s pho­tos to say the birds look “al­most pre­his­toric,” she said.
The ob­ser­va­tion rings true. With the strik­ing rounded bill and red-rimmed eyes, the roseate spoon­bill seems like it flapped out of a pre­his­toric swamp, its evo­lu­tion­ary stage stuck some­where be­tween rep­tile and bird, be­fore be­ing swiped with a psy­che­delic pink paint­brush.
Spoon­bills are typ­i­cally found in coastal ar­eas of Texas, Florida and Mex­ico, ac­cord­ing to the Audubon So­ci­ety. They feed on small fish, in­sects, cray­fish and shrimp by wad­ing in shal­low wa­ter, dip­ping their bills and feel­ing around for their quarry.
Roseate spoon­bills were once more com­mon in the United States, be­fore ex­ten­sive hunt­ing for their pink feath­ers — which were de­sired for the hat in­dus­try — drove them nearly to ex­tinc­tion in the wild by the early 20th cen­tury, ac­cord­ing to the Game and Fish Com­mis­sion.
Although they can be seen in south­ern Arkansas dur­ing sea­sonal vis­its in sum­mer and fall, the sight of roseate spoon­bills nest­ing in the state is ev­i­dently so rare that it had never been doc­u­mented.
When Game and Fish wildlife bi­ol­o­gist Karen Rowe saw Lin­der’s May 17 photo of a spoon­bill on Face­book, she reached out to in­quire about the sight­ing to see if the birds were po­ten­tially nest­ing in the state.
Rowe ini­tially as­sumed the photo was taken out­side Arkansas. When Lin­der told her the spoon­bills were seen in Ash­ley County, Rowe said she started to won­der “if we had a con­nec­tion where I could earn her trust,” she re­called with a laugh.
“And not to be de­vi­ous, but when you’re a bird­watcher, you try to find out things about birds in the state and where they’re oc­cur­ring,” Rowe said.
Rowe serves as the nongame bird pro­gram leader for the agency’s wildlife man­age­ment di­vi­sion. Know­ing the po­ten­tially his­toric na­ture of the roseate spoon­bill sight­ing, Rowe en­cour­aged Lin­der to see if there were any nests pic­tured in her pho­tos.
At Rowe’s sug­ges­tion, Lin­der ex­am­ined her pho­tos, en­larg­ing them on her com­puter. Sure enough, she spot­ted some pink.
“That kind of looks like they’re sit­ting on a nest,” Lin­der re­called think­ing.
Lin­der and Rowe vis­ited the wet­land to­gether with the prop­erty owner May 24 to see whether roseate spoon­bills were in­deed guard­ing ram­shackle nests made of branches, which the birds pitch to­gether on small cy­press trees and shrubs. They thought they spot­ted one or two birds nest­ing, but they weren’t cer­tain, Rowe re­called.
Later, Lin­der vis­ited the wet­land again and got con­clu­sive proof: a pho­to­graph of a baby roseate spoon­bill in the bun­dle of sticks, with an at­ten­tive par­ent spoon­bill in the frame.
When they vis­ited the wet­land yet another time Thurs­day, they saw two ac­tive roseate spoon­bill nests with two dif­fer­ent age classes of nestlings, Rowe said.
Lin­der orig­i­nally vis­ited the prop­erty in Ash­ley County be­cause it is owned by an ac­quain­tance, Craig Shack­elford, whom she knew through her father and one of his friends. Shack­elford and her father had raised the idea that Lin­der ought to visit the wet­land and pho­to­graph wildlife, in­clud­ing the roseate spoon­bills.
Lin­der said she had never seen the bird any­where be­fore, much less in Arkansas.
“It was like I had been picked up out of Arkansas and trans­ported to the Ever­glades,” Lin­der said of her first visit to the wet­land.
As it turned out, Rowe also knew Shack­elford through work band­ing barn owls years ago, she said, and do­ing marsh bird sur­veys.
The Ash­ley County wet­land ap­par­ently has proved to be an at­trac­tive habi­tat for birds that aren’t nor­mally seen breed­ing in the state.
“I was lit­er­ally dumb­founded be­cause there were so many ibis and herons and egrets,” Rowe said of her re­cent visit to the prop­erty. “I’d never seen a scene like that in Arkansas, and I’ve been to some unique ar­eas. But the di­ver­sity of birds and the high level of ac­tiv­ity was just awe­some.”
Rowe noted another po­ten­tially his­toric sight­ing in the wet­land: nest­ing white-faced ibis, another wa­ter bird that is not known to have been doc­u­mented breed­ing in Arkansas.
Lin­der and Rowe say they ob­served the white-faced ibis in the wet­land car­ry­ing sticks — a good in­di­ca­tion of breed­ing. But be­cause the birds were far away in the wet­land’s in­te­rior, they could not get close enough to con­firm the pres­ence of eggs or young birds.
They have been care­ful to ob­serve the wa­ter birds from a dis­tance to avoid dis­turb­ing their nest­ing, which Rowe said can be very dam­ag­ing.
“They’re not used to peo­ple be­ing out in the wet­land with them,” Rowe said.
An­hin­gas, another long­necked wa­ter bird, also were spot­ted with ba­bies in the wet­land. Ac­cord­ing to Audubon So­ci­ety records, an­hin­gas have not been seen breed­ing in Arkansas since 1968, Rowe said.
What makes the recorded breed­ing of roseate spoon­bills sig­nif­i­cant, Rowe said, is that the species is not known for ex­pand­ing its range out­side the wa­ters of the south­east­ern United States.
She sug­gested the nest­ing of the roseate spoon­bills in Arkansas has oc­curred be­cause of “man-made in­ter­ven­tion” by landown­ers like Shack­elford and others nearby, who have con­verted what was pre­vi­ously farm­land into wet­lands un­der the U.S. Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture’s Wet­lands Re­serve Pro­gram.
As a re­sult, the sur­round­ing area in Ash­ley County can serve as a habi­tat with the ca­pac­ity to sup­port var­i­ous wad­ing birds, Rowe said.
The wet­land is of such qual­ity that “these roseate spoon­bills didn’t leave,” Rowe said. “They stayed and nested.”
Lyn­dal York, cu­ra­tor of records for the Arkansas Audubon So­ci­ety, re­viewed a fi­nal re­port that Rowe sub­mit­ted Thurs­day with de­tails of the his­toric sight­ing. In light of the pho­to­graphic ev­i­dence, he said, there is no ques­tion the re­port will be ac­cepted.
“We thought maybe they were nest­ing, but no one had ever got­ten any clue as to where it was or when it was,” he said Fri­day. “So this is unique.”
Ad­di­tion­ally, York said he be­lieves cli­mate change may be con­tribut­ing to roseate spoon­bills and other large wa­ter birds ap­pear­ing in the wet, swampy ar­eas of south Arkansas.
“With global warm­ing, we’re see­ing a lot of species like that mov­ing into the south­ern Arkansas and west­ern Arkansas, in par­tic­u­lar, from the west,” York said. “These birds are prob­a­bly com­ing from the Gulf Coast, I would guess.”
Lin­der and Rowe wel­comed the sight­ing of the roseate spoon­bills as a pos­i­tive event for the state at a time when bad news is never in short sup­ply. The sight­ing has spe­cial sig­nif­i­cance for Lin­der as a wildlife pho­tog­ra­pher.
“I will have my name in the record book for­ever for doc­u­ment­ing this,” Lin­der said.


Sent from my iPad=
 

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Date: 6/21/20 5:47 am
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Hummingbird nests
Even though I have not found a hummingbird nest here on Mount Mag, l know they are still in the process of building near my house. As I hunt-and-peck this note, a female is picking strands of cotton I put out for them outside my window.

Don

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 6/20/20 2:05 pm
From: <bobcaulk...> <bobcaulk...> <bobcaulk...>
Subject: Nestling Cooper's Hawks - II
Two weeks ago we reported on 2 Cooper's Hawk nestlings in our backyard on Mt Sequoyah. The next day the expected third one appeared. We thought they were about 26 days old, but feather development suggests they nearer to 20 days old. Mom no longer spends all her time on the nest. She does stay close by and promptly appeared when a squirrel got in the nest. She still flies off to the male for food and we frequently hear them taking in the trees above our back deck. A picture taken on 6/18 can be found at https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70587111&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4c3a65aa7a704137b8c408d8155d8c4f%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637282838808992879&amp;sdata=MJNl2B6zvQ6oCoUpNCRAkKpAOCKGbt1eCXTBKNsOQFw%3D&amp;reserved=0 https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS7058711&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4c3a65aa7a704137b8c408d8155d8c4f%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637282838808992879&amp;sdata=jpr9cP4tfnC5k9g4zy3TPdtotAs3K7dpdjA5le20r6A%3D&amp;reserved=0 https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70587111&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C4c3a65aa7a704137b8c408d8155d8c4f%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637282838808992879&amp;sdata=MJNl2B6zvQ6oCoUpNCRAkKpAOCKGbt1eCXTBKNsOQFw%3D&amp;reserved=0


Bob
 

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Date: 6/20/20 12:13 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Centerton
UA-Fayetteville PhD student Vivek Govind Kumar and I spent a couple of hours this morning in the Centerton area of Benton County. This included the dairy farm complex around Vaughn and Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. Some of the interesting birds included Great-tailed Grackles (10+, including dependent young, Anglin Road-dairy), Greater Roadrunner (hatchery near office), Egyptian Geese in 2 places, several Baltimore Orioles.

This whole area is undergoing sweeping changes, so I was cheered that Loggerhead Shrikes appeared to have had a decent nesting season, with 2 birds in 2 different places. One of these was for sure associated with a nest. I suspect the other was, too. As we watched from inside the car, an adult shrike caught and impaled a bumblebee near a well-grown juvenile shrike begging (or buzzing) to be fed.

We looked for, but didnt see, the Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks photographed on Anglin Road a few days ago. There are Warbling Vireos singing in shady, wet places, all over the area. Here is Viveks eBird submission for the hatchery: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70629187<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70629187&data=02%7C01%7C%7C6d34ae954fcb42d4bd0008d8154dd7a9%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637282771355379482&sdata=GJhUSQjeSzJhT%2FaMYiDrNuEwpYrFvQ62yV2SNegK4ec%3D&reserved=0>.


 

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Date: 6/20/20 6:26 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject: WEKIs at Sunnymede Park
For the first time there are Western Kingbirds building a nest at Sunnymede
Park.

I had 30 bird species this morning, doing much of my birding by ear. I’m
trying to walk for exercise now. Must keep moving. There has been a Bell’s
Vireo and a Yellow-breasted Chat singing there for the last couple of
weeks. Heard a Painted. Many Orchard Oriole’s singing.
Lots of juveniles about. And there’s a mockingbird nest with babies right
by the parking lot.

Sandy B.
Fort Smith

 

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Date: 6/18/20 2:12 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Hummingbird nest update
I think there was a second nestling yesterday morning, one day after the
first one appeared. I'm still not entirely sure, because a) the nest is
higher than the first one, so the babies' heads are harder to see at
this early stage---though I have seen one; b) the mother often feeds
only one baby per visit---though I /think/ I've seen her feed two, and
c) a leaf often fractionally obscures the nest.

She is doing some energetic poking down around the nestling(s), which I
didn't witness in the first nest holding only one baby. By this time (2
days of age), that singleton was eliminating over the edge of the nest,
but that isn't happening here yet, and I can see Mom eating some of what
she's spearing when she pokes. (You didn't do that for your babies? Most
parents of altricial hatchlings do.)





 

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Date: 6/18/20 1:49 pm
From: PLM108 <plm108...>
Subject: Chucks and Whip-poor-wills
I’m forwarding a post from a Georgia friend who responded to a thread of questions about the number of Chucks vs Whips throughout Georgia. We likely share many of the same reasons for declines and differences in species accounts here in Arkansas. It’s an interesting read for those who may be curious about this issue.

Patty McLean,
Conway AR (where there are numerous chucks but few Whips)


From: Eran Tomer
Sent: Wednesday, April 1, 2020 11:37 AM
To: <GABO-L...>
Subject: Re: [GABO-L] Many Whip-poor-wills

Thank you for a great thread. Two points to consider:

1. Chuck-will's-widow is a "hardcore" Southeastern species that ranges
northwards and westwards only in smaller numbers, except in warmer areas.
Ecologically-speaking, it is right at home in Georgia save for higher
elevations in the Blue Ridge, where it is scarce to absent.

Whip-poor-will is a Northeastern species that ranges southward only in
smaller numbers. In Georgia it is near the edge of its ecological
"envelope". Hence it is common at higher Blue Ridge elevations given their
northerly-like environment, appreciably less common on the Piedmont and
scarce to absent in the Coastal Plain.

This is significant because species' spatial distributions become
increasingly patchy, scattered and local towards the edges of their
geographic ranges. Numbers decline commensurately. The farther a species
occurs from its range core environments, the more it encounters suboptimal
conditions and resources, plus greater ecological pressures (e.g.
competition from species better adapted to the local environment). Each
species has complex requirements and preferences that are understood
incompletely in most cases.

Therefore it isn't surprising that Chucks have a more contiguous
distribution and higher numbers in the greater Atlanta region while Whips,
close to the edge of their range, occur spottily, further apart and in
lower densities. This also makes Whips more prone to local extirpation.
Once a population starts declining it doesn't receive many (or any) young
immigrants dispersing from adjacent populations.

eBird's abundance maps show the above patterns clearly (zoom in and out for
a better perspective):

Chuck

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fscience%2Fstatus-and-trends%2Fchwwid%2Fabundance-map-breeding&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C32e1d02087b14bb7d41408d813c9028c%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637281101347837092&amp;sdata=SscwLW0DRg4dCd5RSOVAu4Yo3%2BwY%2B4ZdZyQdAR2s%2FT4%3D&amp;reserved=0

And Whip

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fscience%2Fstatus-and-trends%2Fwhip-p1%2Fabundance-map-breeding&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C32e1d02087b14bb7d41408d813c9028c%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637281101347837092&amp;sdata=%2FpHDZWOkhCIRSgNneXfg4TNgp6DY7OrOjooYF5noxLg%3D&amp;reserved=0


2. These maps display another, an all-pervasive pattern.

Habitat integrity and quality in the greater Atlanta area are compromised
severely, on multiple counts. It isn't just a matter of fragmentation and
habitat patch size, though Mark is right about larger habitat tracts'
having higher quality and harboring more (and scarcer) species.

Non-native plants and animals, higher prevalence of small predators (e.g.
raccoons, opossums, cats, rat snakes), pollution (air, water, soil, light,
noise), much lower insect biomass, greater preponderance of adaptable and
competitive species (e.g. starlings, Barred Owls) and many other factors
combine to make the region inhospitable to numerous species. The area's
abundant vegetation does support much wildlife but also masks massive
ecological decay.

Hence the greater Atlanta area constitutes a biogeographical "black hole".
Many species - birds and otherwise - that are fairly common in the
surrounding Piedmont become scarce, then absent as one moves closer to
developed areas.

This is readily evident in the field, in the Breeding Bird Atlas and on
eBird (conditions have deteriorated since the Atlas' 1990s surveys).

Perhaps the majority of Georgia species on eBird's Status page (
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fscience%2Fstatus-and-trends&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C32e1d02087b14bb7d41408d813c9028c%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637281101347837092&amp;sdata=EuaHtrxMyqditb2Ab5uYlb7qMdS3f9UFfjh4XzJL%2By0%3D&amp;reserved=0) show the glaring
Atlanta-region hole. E.g. Hooded Warbler and Louisiana Waterthrush.
Persisting species like Wood Thrush, Yellow-throated Vireo and Eastern Wood
Pewee are much scarcer near developed areas vs. further out.

Directly and indirectly, anthropogenic pressures affect ground nesters like
Chuck and Whip disproportionately. Whip would be particularly vulnerable on
the Georgia Piedmont as it is already in a suboptimal, range-edge
environment here. Sure enough, Whip's Atlanta-hole is significantly larger
than Chuck's on the eBird maps.

Kentucky Warbler and American Woodcock also suffer as ground nesters,
breeding spottily and scarcely in the Atlanta region's more developed
parts. And Northern Bobwhite exhibits this phenomenon with vengeance. Its
map looks eminently star-spangled since this species is eliminated from
even slightly-developed areas (
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fscience%2Fstatus-and-trends%2Fnorbob%2Fabundance-map&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C32e1d02087b14bb7d41408d813c9028c%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637281101347837092&amp;sdata=PBZgF3nRCDaPSx01eFctYYik%2Fpxw1AQRGwpJR8tSymQ%3D&amp;reserved=0).

Best wishes to all in these troubled times,

- Eran Tomer
Atlanta, GA

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Date: 6/17/20 9:11 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Audubon Article
Thanks for posting. Excellent article! Donna Haynes West Pulaski Co 
Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android

On Wed, Jun 17, 2020 at 6:17 PM, Kate M. Chapman<kmc025...> wrote: Audubon article about birding written by a graduate student in biology. An excellent read for anyone who is passionate about birds and birding. 
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.audubon.org%2Fnews%2Fits-time-build-truly-inclusive-outdoors&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C2b4f947e93154eff215908d8133d7ab9%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637280502053982647&amp;sdata=IaCkcd1rK4NEVrITmJj58uyhECBV7GBVzwfQKcHx4nk%3D&amp;reserved=0
 -Katie

 

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Date: 6/17/20 4:33 pm
From: Harriet Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject:
The Macaulay Library is a great resource, and its bird song recordings are linked from many species descriptions on the Cornell site. This week Joe Neal told me that the songs of Indigo Buntings vary a lot, and I confirmed this by listening to the Macaulay recordings. Still, you can tell that they are all closely related.

Harriet Jansma
Fayetteville
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 17, 2020 10:45 AM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject:

Some of you may remember Peter Boesman. He spoke at an AAS meeting many years ago.

Sandy B


https://www.macaulaylibrary.org/2020/06/16/recordist-of-note-peter-boesman/<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.macaulaylibrary.org%2F2020%2F06%2F16%2Frecordist-of-note-peter-boesman%2F&data=02%7C01%7C%7Cbc0ed576ad5449fbc9e208d812f496aa%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637280188987623685&sdata=lOPyyhfuFDox0F3Jjtr2AP%2F10NoM02abABjKbAoY1JE%3D&reserved=0>

 

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Date: 6/17/20 4:29 pm
From: Jay Jones <jonesjay62...>
Subject: Re: Bird Glue Trap Dangers
Yes. On birdbox trails if it’s bad enough to consider using it inside the
baffle, just move the pole to a new location.

On Wed, Jun 17, 2020 at 6:16 PM Jerry Davis <jwdavis...> wrote:

> Some of you know from experience the dangers of glue traps to birds. They
> do not just catch mice and insects.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
>
> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.msn.com%2Fen-us%2Fnews%2Fus%2Fpennsylvania-wildlife-center-warning-residents-of-danger-spotted-lanternfly-glue-traps-pose-to-wildlife%2Far-BB15Cj6d%3Focid%3Dmsedgdhp&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C04980d1653da404381e208d813163d35%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637280333521514646&amp;sdata=84UIYYJUUr%2BzUZzKpWiSm%2FWPre9eiptU7WoIuL4KpV8%3D&amp;reserved=0
> <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.msn.com%2Fen-us%2Fnews%2Fus%2Fpennsylvania-wildlife-center-warning-residents-of-danger-spotted-lanternfly-glue-traps-pose-to-wildlife%2Far-BB15Cj6d%3Focid%3Dmsedgdhp&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C04980d1653da404381e208d813163d35%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637280333521514646&amp;sdata=84UIYYJUUr%2BzUZzKpWiSm%2FWPre9eiptU7WoIuL4KpV8%3D&amp;reserved=0>
>
>

 

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Date: 6/17/20 4:19 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: Chesney Prairie Natural Area
Not sure what retirement age is for going on field trips. Never, hopefully, if the going is good. Even after Doug James lost his ability to walk, Joe Woolbright brought out a 4-wheeler so he could still go on our annual Northwest Arkansas Audubon Society field trip to the natural history goldmine named Chesney Prairie Natural Area in Siloam Springs. Doug went on his last field trip in November 2018 (loons on Beaver Lake) and died in December.

My first visit to Chesney was in 2002, almost 20 years ago. I was out there for another morning trip today: slow, deliberate, and on mowed paths; 1.2 miles in 2.5 hours, 44 bird species. Viveks eBird list is here: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70534826<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70534826&data=02%7C01%7C%7C3e1d9f2918664c37870708d812f2a07a%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637280180559443041&sdata=ZfWluQosmXenSEtRXsHWOyvtRxMGAm34mjjUo35OM7o%3D&reserved=0>.

Whats happened over the years is that birding has steadily to plants and bugs. I walk a few steps and listen for direction of the BOB BOB WHITEs! Check all adjoining fences for Loggerhead Shrikes. Enjoy the flowers and try to stop and look closer, for the pollinators. Today I was looking closer and spotted a damselfly that David Oakley has just informed me is a male-like female Eastern Forktail. Its a lifer for me, and maybe for Chesney, too.

Chesney is 82-acres of a Tallgrass Prairie world that has all been eradicated in northwest Arkansas. I read in the paper about futuristic plans for special space capsules where humans might be able to live when our planet, biologically-speaking, collapses. Chesney is already one of those capsules, metaphorically-speaking. And you dont even have to be a billionaire specially-selected space pioneer to go out there. In place of being strapped into a rocket, consider slow walk on several miles of recently-mowed trails. You can design your own on-this-earth planetary exploration.

In past years NWAAS has hosted a usually well-attended field trip in second week of July. This is to coincide with the blooming peak for Blazing Stars and many other flowers of the Tallgrass Prairie. Covid-19 cancelled that trip for this year, but it didnt close down Chesney. So why not just blast-off yourself! Our cancelled trip was scheduled for July 11. Ill probably go out anyway because there are many, many butterflies and other interesting insects associated with Blazing Stars.

This morning was hot and sweaty, but I covered up and hid out under my bucket hat. The whole place is covered with Obedient Plant, plus many other flowers, including Winecup, Tall Green Milkweed, New Jersey Tea, Wingstem, a low forest of Meadow Parsley, etc. As time has gone on, Ive grown more curious about the various dragonflies and damselflies, obscure moths. And what was that female Blue Grosbeak doing up in the Black Cherry tree, foraging among fruits that still look green?


 

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Date: 6/17/20 4:17 pm
From: Kate M. Chapman <kmc025...>
Subject: Audubon Article
Audubon article about birding written by a graduate student in biology. An
excellent read for anyone who is passionate about birds and birding.

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.audubon.org%2Fnews%2Fits-time-build-truly-inclusive-outdoors&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C01ccee18cea24afe484008d812e451ef%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637280119659061279&amp;sdata=YCBG2vAdNhAUpV2w%2BE7Ngk1xnwBD4fDHbhRtau3hlU4%3D&amp;reserved=0

-Katie

 

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Date: 6/17/20 8:47 am
From: Sandy Berger <sndbrgr...>
Subject:
Some of you may remember Peter Boesman. He spoke at an AAS meeting many
years ago.

Sandy B


https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.macaulaylibrary.org%2F2020%2F06%2F16%2Frecordist-of-note-peter-boesman%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C212e7b329e8f4421ef5108d812d58801%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637280055604735336&amp;sdata=BWCTXUpSwI%2FnRQ3f0%2BvIt1yObaJ98FSH6O%2BmrDOObSQ%3D&amp;reserved=0

 

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Date: 6/16/20 7:43 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: hummer update
As recently as yesterday the hummingbird has continued adding to her
nest, including a large piece of plant fluff placed on the interior.
She's built the walls up high, and sits noticeably deeper in the cup.

I'd mis-remembered the typical incubation period for eggs; it's 14 days.
As of this morning, she'd completed 14 days, and........

there's a hatchling!!!

I can't see it yet, but she's feeding it, and in other ways too her
behavior has changed markedly. She shifts around in the nest, and is
very watchful for tiny arthropods on the branch nearby, or on the nest
exterior. If she sees one, she nabs and apparently eats it. Not only
does she routinely inspect along the branch when she departs or returns,
but she'll take a quick flight for the sole purpose of removing an
interloper.

Does a hatchling attract ants (and likely ectoparasites, etc.), or are
they often around, but now posing a threat that they didn't when the
bird was in the shell---or both?

Will there be a second hatchling in 1-3 days?
Stay tuned....  :)

 

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Date: 6/16/20 6:29 pm
From: Lyndal York <lrbluejay...>
Subject: Rare Bird Records
Arbirders:
Please report your rare and out of season bird records for the spring
season, March - May, to the online database at:
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.arbirds.org%2Frbreports.html&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C92f293c6f24f4d5733f408d8125c6217%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637279535578028907&amp;sdata=yVcd9B03W0uz6ORC3c%2B%2FWrNtWRnjqE5iGFjYZ5zgXHw%3D&amp;reserved=0 . If you have confirming photos, send them
to me.

Lyndal York
Curator, Arkansas Audubon Society


.

 

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Date: 6/16/20 4:04 pm
From: David Arbour <arbour...>
Subject: Red Slough Bird Survey - June 16
It was partly cloudy, and warm, with a light wind on the survey today. 59
species were found. The heronry on Pintail Lake is still going strong. A
couple of the cormorant nests have fledged young out now and several Anhinga
nests are on the verge of doing the same. More Neotropic Cormorants have
moved onto the area and several new nests have been started. Lots of broods
out now including a brood of Purple Gallinules. Here is my list for today:



Black-bellied Whistling Duck - 7

Wood Duck - 24

Pied-billed Grebe - 5 (also 1 brood of young.)

Neotropic Cormorant - 25 (still several active nests.)

Anhinga - 82 (Many on nests in heronry.)

Least Bittern - 2

Great-blue Heron - 20

Great Egret - 58 (several active nests with young in heronry.)

Snowy Egret - 6 (2 nests found.)

Little-blue Heron - 127 (lots sitting on nests in heronry.)

Cattle Egret - 6000

Green Heron - 15

Black-crowned Night-Heron - 2

Yellow-crowned Night-Heron - 1

White Ibis - 2,140 (I saw ~4000 yesterday feeding in unit 15.)

Black Vulture - 37

Turkey Vulture - 7

Mississippi Kite - 2

Red-shouldered Hawk - 1

Purple Gallinule - 35 adults (also 1 brood)

Common Gallinule - 43 adults (also 10 broods of young.)

American Coot - 4

Mourning Dove - 8

Yellow-billed Cuckoo - 6

Red-bellied Woodpecker - 1

Downy Woodpecker - 1

Hairy Woodpecker - 1

Eastern Phoebe - 2

Scissor-tailed Flycatcher - 1

White-eyed Vireo - 9

Bell's Vireo - 1

Red-eyed Vireo - 2

American Crow - 5

Fish Crow - 2

Tree Swallow - 35

Barn Swallow - 7

Carolina Chickadee - 4

Tufted Titmouse - 2

Carolina Wren - 9

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher - 1

Eastern Bluebird - 4

Gray Catbird - 1

Northern Mockingbird - 1

Yellow-throated Warbler - 1

Pine Warbler - 1

Prothonotary Warbler - 6

Kentucky Warbler - 1

Common Yellowthroat - 17

Yellow-breasted Chat - 11

Eastern Towhee - 6

Northern Cardinal - 10

Blue Grosbeak - 1

Indigo Bunting - 12

Painted Bunting - 4

Dickcissel - 13

Red-winged Blackbird - 37

Common Grackle - 73

Brown-headed Cowbird - 4

Orchard Oriole - 7





Odonates:



Fragile Forktail

Citrine Forktail

Prince Baskettail

Royal River Cruiser

Halloween Pennant

Eastern Pondhawk

Slater Skimmer

Blue Dasher





Herps:



American Alligator

Blanchard's Cricket Frog

Green Treefrog

Bronze Frog

Bullfrog





Good birding!



David Arbour

De Queen, AR












 

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Date: 6/15/20 3:08 pm
From: Devin Moon <moondevg...>
Subject: Snowy Egret and Watersnake
We were birding in Lafayette Co. yesterday evening just south of Lewisville and we happened upon a Snowy Egret feeding in a puddle. With a view through binoculars we could see a large diamond-backed watersnake in the puddle with the Egret. The Egret had to sidestep the snake a few times but after a while they kind of got into a rhythm. The snake would go for larger frogs near or on the bank, but would scare up smaller ones in the process. The fleeing smaller frogs would go airborne and be caught by the opportunistic Egret mid leap. The two seemed like an unlikely duo and their efforts were more comedic than graceful, but they made an interesting spectacle nonetheless.

Devin
McNeil, AR

Sent from my iPad
 

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Date: 6/15/20 2:42 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: STARRY NIGHT TO BOSTON ISLANDS, THE UPPER BUFFALO IN REVIEW
Our annual Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) in the region of the upper Buffalo National River was cancelled this year due to covid-19, but the birds are still there. This morning we left Fayetteville at 3 am, got over to the Buffalo River in Boxley Valley at 4:15, then slow-drove north on Highway 43 towards the Newton-Boone County line.

In the dark of night, stars and planets ever so bright. No car headlights. Only the famous river as backdrop. Looking up into the vast, I understand how Vincent Van Gogh might have conceived his painting. On this drive in the dark, we tallied Eastern Whip-poor-wills (6) and Chuck-wills-widow (2)

By the time we reached the county line, north of Compton, it was 5:30, avian tribes wide awake and hard at it. My main goal in the trip was to assess a modest stretch of Highway 43 immediately north of Ponca. Here the elevation of the river is around 1000 feet. The mountains near intersection of Highway 103 (to Osage) X 43 are around 2200 feet. The 1200 foot difference is a rugged, heavily-forested, east-facing slope. I knew it was pretty birdy from BBS stops over the past 30 years. How birdy that I didnt realize.

Before getting onto the birds, we now had full moning light. Fog filled the valley of the Buffalo. From the high country above Ponca we could see how the hills and ridges stood above the fog like islands. This part of the Ozarks is in the Boston Mountains. So what we were seeing were the Boston Islands sort of

Over about 4-miles we tallied Cerulean Warbler (5), American Redstart (7), Black-and-white Warbler (8), Hooded Warbler (8), Kentucky Warbler (3), Ovenbird (7), Worm-eating Warbler (1), Northern Parula (6), Scarlet Tanager (7), Yellow-throated Vireo (5), Acadian Flycatcher (6), Wood Thrush (6). Here is the checklist Vivek submitted to eBird for just that stretch: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70467575<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70467575&data=02%7C01%7C%7C95bddf0d5a0448b5f67608d81175097c%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637278541645428701&sdata=T6zHkqjJNy1XIQ%2BLUQLMbEazeVFLp2TDMwnh8tyo%2BpE%3D&reserved=0>. It is a great kingdom for these neotropical migratory songbirds. We sampled just a strip, along Highway 43.

Next up, compare this array of breeding birds in the highlands north of Ponca, to the breeding birds south of Ponca, on Cave Mountain, where, adjacent the Upper Buffalo Wilderness, this rugged, forested mountain rises imposingly above Boxley Baptist Church and Boxley Bridge over the Buffalo River.

We were there at 8 am and surveyed until about 9:30. We tallied Cerulean Warbler (6), American Redstart (7), Black-and-white Warbler (8), Hooded Warbler (7), Kentucky Warbler (6), Acadian Flycatcher (8), Ovenbird (9), Worm-eating Warbler (3), Northern Parula (5), Scarlet Tanager (4), etc. Another rich list. Here is what Vivek submitted to eBird: https://ebird.org/checklist/S70468036<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70468036&data=02%7C01%7C%7C95bddf0d5a0448b5f67608d81175097c%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637278541645438694&sdata=LTgdTdsG3P0ZWq6PqcRmVEEEIYSRfgCsBImL%2FU0aWqk%3D&reserved=0>.

We saw a Cerulean Warbler carrying food, suggesting a nearby nest. We had two Blue-winged Warblers in an area of Cave Mountain where there were once small farms. And to cap it all off, Wild Hydrangeas and Leafcup (Polymnia canadensis) were in bloom along Cave Mountain Road.


 

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Date: 6/15/20 12:09 pm
From: Harriet Jansma <hjansma...>
Subject: Re: MIKI Show
Speaking of owls (and changing the subject), before dawn this morning my spouse went from our tree house summer sleeping porch into the house to make coffee. While he was gone, I suddenly heard the frantic cries of some small animal that was clearly being attacked. It seemed obvious that the prey (located right below me) was being nabbed by an owl, since there was no rustling on the ground of some other type of predator. (Other evidence: we often hear barred owls, and a couple of years ago had a pair of them nesting in that woods, raising a pair of young. I learned that summer how young barred owls beg for their dinner.)

The screams were desperate but short, and the prey soon lost its battle.

Harriet Jansma
south slope of Mount Sequoyah, Fayetteville

p.s. We also have had indigo buntings in our meadow area for several years, but only this year (this week, in fact) have I confirmed their song. We have a singer who provides constant arias at dawn and dusk and often also at lunchtime. We could tell the songs came from near the ground, among the grasses on the edges of our vegetable/flower garden. Cornell helped me with the ID. Since our outdoor sleeping arrangement and mature trees allow us to keep the house open all summer, I can hear our soloist as I write.
________________________________
From: The Birds of Arkansas Discussion List <ARBIRD-L...> on behalf of Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Sent: Monday, June 15, 2020 1:32 PM
To: <ARBIRD-L...> <ARBIRD-L...>
Subject: Re: MIKI Show

What an interesting observation!

While rehabilitating wild birds, I've seen an array of species---aside from (famously) owls---occasionally regurgitate pellets of compressed indigestible matter. It's a useful ability, presumably allowing them to eat a wider variety of foods than if they had to pass everything in the usual direction. :)

-Janine

On 6/15/2020 7:29 AM, Ellen C. Stern wrote:
Wow, I just watched a Mississippi Kite land in the bare branches at the top of my Post Oak--maybe 30 feet away from me--and spend about 15 minutes preening and stretching and fanning its feathers in full view, facing the rising sun. What a show! At the end it smoothed its feathers and shook them all back into place and made a few low calls. Then it opened its beak and retched a few times before raising its head and spewing several sprays of dark detritus--wads of insect parts, I imagine. This went on for about a minute before it flew away, maybe 5-6 blasts with chunks scattering as much as 6" from the bird. The only references I found covered MIKIs regurgitating insects into the nest.

As I sit writing this, a Brown Thrasher just landed on my suet feeder. :-)

Ellen
Central Little Rock


 

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Date: 6/15/20 11:32 am
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Re: MIKI Show
What an interesting observation!

While rehabilitating wild birds, I've seen an array of species---aside
from (famously) owls---occasionally regurgitate pellets of compressed
indigestible matter. It's a useful ability, presumably allowing them to
eat a wider variety of foods than if they had to pass everything in the
usual direction. :)

-Janine

On 6/15/2020 7:29 AM, Ellen C. Stern wrote:
> Wow, I just watched a Mississippi Kite land in the bare branches at
> the top of my Post Oak--maybe 30 feet away from me--and spend about 15
> minutes preening and stretching and fanning its feathers in full view,
> facing the rising sun. What a show! At the end it smoothed its
> feathers and shook them all back into place and made a few low calls.
> Then it opened its beak and retched a few times before raising its
> head and spewing several sprays of dark detritus--wads of insect
> parts, I imagine. This went on for about a minute before it flew away,
> maybe 5-6 blasts with chunks scattering as much as 6" from the bird.
> The only references I found covered MIKIs regurgitating insects into
> the nest.
>
> As I sit writing this, a Brown Thrasher just landed on my suet
> feeder.  :-)
>
> Ellen
> Central Little Rock


 

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Date: 6/15/20 5:26 am
From: Ellen C. Stern <000003272d31bd68-dmarc-request...>
Subject: MIKI Show
Wow, I just watched a Mississippi Kite land in the bare branches at the
top of my Post Oak--maybe 30 feet away from me--and spend about 15
minutes preening and stretching and fanning its feathers in full view,
facing the rising sun. What a show! At the end it smoothed its feathers
and shook them all back into place and made a few low calls. Then it
opened its beak and retched a few times before raising its head and
spewing several sprays of dark detritus--wads of insect parts, I
imagine. This went on for about a minute before it flew away, maybe 5-6
blasts with chunks scattering as much as 6" from the bird. The only
references I found covered MIKIs regurgitating insects into the nest.

As I sit writing this, a Brown Thrasher just landed on my suet feeder.  :-)

Ellen
Central Little Rock
 

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Date: 6/14/20 9:10 pm
From: Daniel Scheiman <birddan...>
Subject: Research Request: Hummingbird Courtship Study
Passing along a request from Dr. Kira Delmore, who has a student conducting
research in AR.


Were a group of researchers from Texas A&M on the lookout for ruby-throated
hummingbirds (delmorelab.com). Were trying to quantify their courtship
displays using video/sound equipment but have had quite a bit of trouble
finding birds this year. We realize the season is coming to an end for these
guys but if you or someone you know have rubies on your land we would really
appreciate being able to come check them out. Its great if you have feeders
to ensure there are birds around but were actually hoping to find them on
their territories, so if you have a bit of land where we can attempt to find
males on their territories that would be great.



We know this is a strange time to be doing field work but are maintaining
social distancing within our group, can wear masks when on your land and
would have no need to enter your house. Wed be happy to follow any other
guidelines you have.



Please let us know if youve got any hummers. You can email me at
<kdelmore...> or give me a call at (979) 900-2129. As I said, the
season is coming to an end so the sooner the better!


---
Kira Delmore | Assistant Professor
Biology, College of Science | Texas A&M University
3528 TAMU | College Station, TX 77843
1 (979) 900-2129 | <kdelmore...>
delmorelab.com



 

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Date: 6/14/20 10:51 am
From: Cheryl Johnson <cjbluebird...>
Subject: Dan the Bird Man on Podcast
Was excited to hear Dan interviewed on Talkin’ Birds Podcast of June 14, 2020. Great info Dan, some I wasn’t aware of. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fpodcasts.apple.com%2Fus%2Fpodcast%2Ftalkin-birds%2Fid91235908&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C81b16bd58a0644592c0308d8108b65d1%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637277538199050714&amp;sdata=0Aeb%2BhYa%2Fw%2BRSLt%2Bc%2Faa4%2BVvTmv7HNCwsul7fOkV7Mk%3D&amp;reserved=0

Sent from cjbluebird



 

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Date: 6/14/20 4:40 am
From: Vickie Becker <0000026d9f13ee10-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Article from CNN about bird dialects
Following is an interesting article from CNN on the development and functions of bird dialects.

Birds aren't all singing the same song. They have dialects, too
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cnn.com%2F2020%2F06%2F13%2Fasia%2Fbird-dialects-song-intl-hnk%2Findex.html&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C97dffb33bb06400170de08d81057b685%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637277316196788067&amp;sdata=sHl9W0%2BKR3dY1L3NsSBWWk4ry%2FZP%2BdzFNvJXWnEsNvY%3D&amp;reserved=0


Vickie H Becker
14300 Chenal Parkway
Apt 7618
Little Rock, AR 72211

501-508-0984
<Vhbecker...>
 

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Date: 6/13/20 3:22 pm
From: Cathy Marak <cmarak999...>
Subject: Black-bellied Whistling Ducks Anglin Road
We saw three Black-bellied Whistling Ducks  at the farm pond on the
south side of Anglin road around 3:30 today, along with a Great-tailed
Grackle.

Cathy Marak
Benton County

 

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Date: 6/13/20 2:50 pm
From: Donna Haynes <00000003bd9d64d2-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Camp Robinson SUA
We toured Camp Robinson Special Use Area today. We arrived around 1:00 with the intent of observing butterflies and wildflowers. We were very surprised at how birdy it was being as it was the heat of the day. We heard Bachman's Sparrow singing. Bobwhites were heard calling all over the area. A Wild Turkey crossed the road, Summer Tanager Yellow-billed Cuckoo and Indigo Buntings were abundant. Also seen  were Yellow-breasted Chat, Chipping Sparrow, Mississippi Kite, Green Heron, Painted Bunting and many if the other usual summer birds. I can't imagine what we might has seen if we went in the early morning.  Donna HaynesWest Pulaski co.

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 

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Date: 6/13/20 2:41 pm
From: Jeffrey Short <bashman...>
Subject: FW: Hear 13 Birds Flourishing in a Newly Quiet New York - The New York Times
Here is an interesting site that I came across last week.



Sorta’ fun to have several playing at the same time…


Jeff Short








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New York is quiet. Listen to the birds.






Play







When the pandemic collided with the spring migration, the sounds of the city changed overnight. Here are 13 birds that you can hear right now.

By Antonio de Luca, Dave Taft and Umi Syam May 31, 2020

Illustrated by David Allen Sibley. Sonograms from Donald Kroodsma.

There is an obvious upside to the unnatural pall that has fallen over the city. Suddenly, in place of car horns, roaring planes, rattling trains and buses, New York City seems to be filled with bird song.

The birds are not new to the city. It’s just that the pause in the urban soundtrack happens to coincide with the peak of the spring migration along the Atlantic coast. The birds have always been here. This spring, we can hear them.

Here is a mix of the birds passing through New York right now. Some are easy to spot, and some offer more of a challenge; some are best found only in the mornings or at dusk. And some will probably only be heard, and never seen.


Yellow Billed Cuckoo


Coccyzus americanus

Yellow Billed Cuckoo

Play

LISTEN FOR

A sharp, staccato, “Kak-kak-kak-kak!” It’s the mysterious bird hiding the jungle in every Tarzan movie.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

Early mornings at the edges of woodlands. Stake out tent caterpillar nests; cuckoos have a weakness for them.

In flight, the yellow-billed cuckoo has attractive rust-colored wing patches, with white spots arranged in parallel lines along the underside of a long tail.

Long and lean, these birds perch in the dense tangles of local woodlands. Their ability to hide is legendary, but hearing them always confirms their presence, and that is always easier without airplanes overhead.


Laughing Gull


Leucophaeus atricilla

Laughing Gull

Play

LISTEN FOR

Riotous laughing, braying.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

Small and shapely, with a dark red bill and legs and a black head, the laughing gull can be spotted all day along shorelines or in the Rockaways and parts of southern Brooklyn.

Around New York City, laughing gulls have staked out a claim to the marshes of Jamaica Bay in Brooklyn and Queens, and have forced a grudging relationship with the Federal Aviation Administration at Kennedy Airport.


Scarlet Tanager


Piranga olivacea

Scarlet Tanager

Play

LISTEN FOR

A melodic trill that sounds like a robin with a sore throat.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

Thoreau put it best: “The tanager flies through the green foliage as if it would ignite the leaves.”

Scarlet tanagers prefer the crowns of trees. Despite plumage so bright they look lit from within, they stay out of sight.

Only the males show this brilliant scarlet, and only in spring. By late summer, they begin to shed their flaming red to resume a more sensible, camouflaged life in olive green. Females remain drab green all year, a better strategy for protecting valuable eggs while nesting.

During the height of the spring migration — that is, now — wander woodlands in the mornings.


Osprey


Pandion haliaetus

Osprey

Play

LISTEN FOR

A high-pitched “killy, killy, killy” or a loud chirp that carries very effectively over open water.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

There is no mistaking this graceful hawk. It has a white-crested head with dark, horizontal eye stripes. In flight, ospreys’ long wings are bent, with a dark patch at each wrist. Ospreys are found anywhere there is open water, from the Central Park Reservoir to the edges of Queens.


Black-Throated Green Warbler


Setophaga virens

Black-Throated Green Warbler

Play

LISTEN FOR

A buzzy, husky call described as “Zoo-zoo-zee-zoo!”

WHERE TO FIND ONE

These warblers challenge even binocular-wielding birders because of their preference for heights. Fortunately, the male’s distinct black markings and yellow-green face and upper body make identification pretty easy.

Males are particularly active and never seem to stop calling and flitting about the branches. Where taller trees are absent, birds may forage at lower levels.


Willet


Tringa semipalmata

Willet

Play

LISTEN FOR

A repeated and piercing “Will, will, willet, will, will, willet.” Which is why they’re called willets.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

Choose a shoreline, and you’ll hear these charismatic birds before you see them. Pelham Bay in the Bronx and Plumb Beach in Brooklyn are two places to look. During breeding, males make themselves very visible on fence posts and open snags on quiet bay beaches.


Red Tailed Hawk


Buteo jamaicensis

Red Tailed Hawk

Play

LISTEN FOR

One of the most magnificent screams in the bird kingdom.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

Red-tailed hawks seem to be all over the city, from Central Park to parkway median strips, always glaring, on the lookout for rodents.

In flight this bird spreads its broad wings and tail, often soaring on thermals. And as for that iconic cry: As impressive as bald eagles look, their high-pitched chirps can be underwhelming. When an eagle cries in a car commercial or a cowboy movie, you’re probably hearing the dubbed scream of a red-tailed hawk.


American Woodcock


Scolopax minor

American Woodcock

Play

LISTEN FOR

A unique “peenting” of the adult males.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

A landlocked shorebird with a plump body and a long, probing bill, the woodcock is unmistakable but difficult to see in dim light. Just the same, it’s worth trying to spy on one of spring’s most captivating rituals. Listen for the unusual peenting call in a field in the late evening or at dawn in spring. Stay silent and still. Breeding woodcocks will emerge and suddenly spiral upward in a mating flight that takes them 50 or 60 feet high, before falling back to their original locations.

Unfortunately, these birds seem prone to window strikes during migration, and can sometimes be observed, up close, recovering, or deceased below large buildings in early spring.


Red-Winged Blackbird


Agelaius phoeniceus

Red-Winged Blackbird

Play

LISTEN FOR

The famous (among birders) “Cock-a-r-e-e-e.” It is the sound of spring.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

Females are a streaky brown color in order to camouflage with vegetation while raising their young. But around the edges of wetlands, ponds or saltwater bays, males make themselves very visible: They are jet black in breeding season, with brilliant orange and yellow shoulders. They are unmistakable.


Wood Thrush


Hylocichla mustelina

Wood Thrush

Play

LISTEN FOR

A clear, musical three-note call, but the final syllable is an anatomical wonder: several tones produced simultaneously, resulting in a complex, oddly metallic and resonant call, like a softly echoing tambourine.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

Rusty brown overall, the wood thrush spends most of its time foraging through leaf litter looking for insects and other prey. Its breast is a warm white with well-defined speckling, and it has a prominent eye-ring. But you are more likely to hear this bird before you see it.

The call of the wood thrush is the sound of summer evenings.


Common Yellowthroat


Geothlypis trichas

Common Yellowthroat

Play

LISTEN FOR

A repetitive, piercing “witchety-witchety-witchety-witchety” from low tangles of vegetation.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

The yellowthroat prefers swampy tangled shrubbery, where it can be observed low in the branches foraging for insects.

One of the most attractive warbler species, it is easy enough to spot without binoculars. The males have a broad bandit’s mask (very pronounced during breeding season) set off by a white band. Both males and females are a warm olive green, shading toward yellow at the face and breast, the females a little less bright.


White-Throated Sparrow


Zonotrichia albicollis

White-Throated Sparrow

Play

LISTEN FOR

There are many comical mnemonics for this bird’s unique and plaintive call. Most common are probably “O sweet Canada Canada!” or the oddly specific “Sam Peabody…Peabody…Peabody.”

WHERE TO FIND ONE

The cutest, most lovable little sparrow out there. At this time of year, males are marked with bright yellow spots just above their bill (the “lores,” technically), a bright white throat and stripes across their heads, set off by crisp black markings. You’ll find them at the edges of woodlands, at bird feeders or even streetside near parks.

As days lengthen, males begin their plaintive calling, and freshen up their plumage, so that a bird who is with us most of the year suddenly appears like a recent arrival from warmer ports of call. Two forms of this bird coexist, tan-crowned and white-crowned — each attracted to the opposite color for breeding purposes.


Mourning Dove


Zenaida macroura

Mourning Dove

Play

LISTEN FOR

A mournful cooing, often mistaken by the novice for the hoot of an owl.

WHERE TO FIND ONE

The mourning dove looks like an especially graceful pigeon, with a long, pointed tail and a small head. Though they can be seen year-round, they begin their distinctive calling in spring, especially in parks, yards and wherever food is available.

David Allen Sibley is the author of "What It's Like to Be a Bird".

Dr. Donald Kroodsma is an ornithologist and the author of "Birdsong for the Curious Naturalist: Your Guide to Listening".

Supplemental recordings are from Gregory F. Budney, Lang Elliot, Matthew D. Medler, Wilbur Hershberger and the Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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Date: 6/12/20 2:59 pm
From: Joseph Neal <joeneal...>
Subject: SWORDS TO PLOWSHARES, PEA RIDGE NMP
Eastern Bluebirds were feeding young today in a nest built in one of the Civil War cannons on the Leetown Battlefield in Pea Ridge National Military Park. This will surely go down as the most unique of all bluebird boxes. When I realized they were feeding young I immediately remembered a bible verse from my youth. Looked it up when I got home. Many peoples shall come and say, Come, let us go up to the mountain of the LORD that he may teach us his ways and that we may walk in his paths. For out of Zion shall go forth the word of the Lord He shall judge between the nations they shall beat their swords into plowshares

Who would have thought bluebirds would fulfill prophecy? It wasnt just bluebirds getting into the act, either.

A Scissor-tailed Flycatcher perched on a sign in the battlefield near Elkhorn Tavern seemed to be reading the part that says, A perfect storm of shot and shell, but of course not today. Just down the tour road, an Eastern Kingbird perched on the STOP 10 sign, with a view of the field where 168 years ago young men fought, were torn up by shot and shell, and hundreds died. Today, an Eastern Meadowlark singing from atop a split rail fence.

Covid-19 has heated up in Washington and Benton counties, but it is not difficult to visit the old battlefield while maintaining social distance and masking as needed. Open air, sunshine, a bit of exercise, and few people is healthy response. Also good for the spirit: the bright yellows of Wingstem (Verbesina helianthoides).

Heres my eBird submission. It includes 44 species in about 3-hours along the tour road. https://ebird.org/checklist/S70357011<https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70357011&data=02%7C01%7C%7C30bdff6bcb82417c0ce708d80f1bcc6d%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275959357960167&sdata=lEHiYxOd0PPumckDwE%2FzT%2BUr5PGzzgAe%2F4e62ymWtVw%3D&reserved=0>

 

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Date: 6/12/20 12:40 pm
From: Adam Schaffer <000000135bd342dd-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Voices in the dark - some Nightjar Network tidbits
I actually wonder if burning might be rough on whips destroying the leaf litter they need to nest and roost in. Many of the prophylactic burns I’ve seen seem to accomplish little other than removing the leaf litter. A friend of mine once said of control burns, “when the only tool you have is a hammer, everything starts to look like a nail.”
The whip-poor-will numbers are Camp Clearfork, home of the Arkansas Audubon Society Hallerg Camp, have certainly been plummeting lately. It’s been a few years since the campers complained of being kept awake. (I find the sound soothing. It reminds me of my childhood.) The only changes in that habitat that seems readily apparent are some low-level control burns. It’s also quite likely that changes in their winter grounds are a culprit. If the saw-whet research here has taught us anything, we know that m small nocturnal birds that are quiet on their winter grounds are under-studied. I hope the world can find it in its heart to conserve this music of my childhood.

Adam Schaffer
Bentonville

> On Jun 12, 2020, at 4:14 AM, Don Simons <drsimons56...> wrote:
>
> Leif,
>
> Do you know if there are any studies on the benefits of prescribed fires on nightjar populations? Years ago, Lori conducted surveys in the Ozark National Forest and found burns to be good for Diana fritillaries. I figure it would translate for vertebrates.
>
> Don
>
> Sent from my iPad
>
>>> On Jun 11, 2020, at 8:28 PM, Anderson, Leif E -FS <000002b0bc8b0106-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>>
>> 
>> Greetings all,
>> Some tidbits from the https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nightjar.org%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Ce211db21f05e4b5e4ff708d80f086b0e%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275876113122570&amp;sdata=TabgTQAXlL2klKMSftazPVR%2FkNAj4yinsxKW6cHe7CQ%3D&amp;reserved=0
>> Some already know; some learned from the network and some bits from the AR experience.
>> The surveys have been run for 13 years.
>> If you go to the webpage you can find quite a bit about nightjars.
>> If you click on survey data you can see the ave and range per species, per state and per year.
>> Many folks probably associate nightjars most with being active around dawn and dusk. And indeed that is when they are most heard. With some nights birds only being active for a half-hour or so.
>> The next popular time is when the moon is larger; above the horizon; and actually visible from your location. The darker the moon the less activity. Higher in the sky means more activity. If you are in a steep-sided valley you may not have much activity, even with a full moon and above the horizon. Just for fun I ‘ve run some of my same routes 3 times in a night and the moon seems to have a lot to do with it. Probably more than sun rising/setting times.
>> Other limiting factors can be mostly cloudy skys and strong winds. And how noisy it is certainly limits how many birds can be heard. Last week I had some gloriously loud amphib stops, but could only hear 1 bird.
>> If I want to sample Common Nighthawks, I have to find a larger town or better yet a city.
>> Pavement vs gravel: Not a noticeable difference between the number of birds.
>> Antidotally, but not statistically, elevation can make a difference. Not many Eastern Whip-poor-wills below 400-500 ft elevation, though whips do seem to be moving into some lower elevations where I might have expected only Chuck-will-widows.
>> At the higher elevation I lose most of the chucks. So whips have a wider range with a slightly higher ave elevation. Chuck have less of an elevation range and favor the lower-mid elevations.
>> On one route I’ve had from 11-43 nightjars. Average is 18 and this year was 26. Seems to be somewhat cyclic but with a short time between the high and low peaks. There does seem to be a long term downward trend, though it’s jumbled within the cylic pattern. I’ve heard that the network plans to publish some trends across North America.
>> Like so many other ground nesting birds they are on every criitter’s menu.
>> There are usually 2 survey periods, with the first one having more territorial birds calling. This year the windows were 4/30 – 5/14 and 5/29 – 6/13. I’ve definitely had less birds in this 2nd round.
>>
>> Problems with this last week: It’s the 2nd window, so many birds are busy with young and not defending their territory as much. The window is closed after Sat, so the moon is fading; and the moon is rising later each night. Thurs night I could have only surveyed between 1:16 am and 5:40 am. That’s rough, especially if I’m also counting daylight birds.
>>
>> Next year: It would be great if more folks would get out and enjoy the night. AR is a good chuck/whip transition state, so we can add a lot to the national picture. I’ve got some routes already set up with gps coordinates and directions. So if you want to do one of these holler.
>>
>> The most fun/ startling encounter I had this year… I had 4 whips calling when I heard some nightjar soft sounds, but never saw the bird. Then one of the calling birds stopped. I didn’t know the reason until I went to get back in the truck, and had 2 birds fly out of the truck floor and come really close to me. Definitely startled me! And probably them too. Cheers, Leif
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> This electronic message contains information generated by the USDA solely for the intended recipients. Any unauthorized interception of this message or the use or disclosure of the information it contains may violate the law and subject the violator to civil or criminal penalties. If you believe you have received this message in error, please notify the sender and delete the email immediately.

 

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Date: 6/12/20 12:33 pm
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
Subject: Hummingbird update
Nest building continued through Wed. 6/10; it appeared that Tues. and
Wed. the bird mostly added adhesives, mainly sap/resin. There's been
little or no construction since. The nest now looks a little higher than
it is wide, and it appears to be sturdy. Another masterpiece!

This is day 12 of incubation, and the first hatchling may appear in the
next day or two.

 

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Date: 6/12/20 11:14 am
From: Karen And Jim Rowe <00000131a1cf8fbc-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Variance for migratory habitat
Woodcock are listed in Arkansas as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need according to the Arkansas Wildlife Action Plan.

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 12, 2020, at 7:54 AM, Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> 
> Hello bird friends. Here's a copy of a letter I wrote supporting my landlord's application for a variance to improve bird habitat. The application is up for approval shortly.
>
> Wondering where that woodcock is now --Anita Schnee
>
> * * *
>
> June 11, 2020
>
> Mathew Johnson, Chair
> Fayetteville Planning Commission
> 113 W. Mountain St.
> Fayetteville, AR 72701
>
> Re: May 18, 2020 variance application by Gavin Smith for Josh Brown
> Parcel No. 765-13117-510
> Migratory Bird Wetland Stopover
>
> Dear Mr. Johnson:
>
> I urge you to recommend the variance request submitted by engineer Gavin Smith on behalf of landowner Josh Brown. Mr. Brown wants to improve stop-over habitat for migratory birds and he seeks the City’s approval to create three linked shallow ponds on his property in eastern Fayetteville, by a bend of the West Fork of the White River near Bayyari Park.
>
> Josh’s proposal will encourage a refuge for many threatened bird species. The need is critical. The wave of extinctions caused by habitat loss is deeply troubling. Our birds are additionally menaced by pesticides, cell towers, food-supply decline due to pollution, free-roaming domestic cats – and all this on top of the natural challenges of predation, headwinds, and unfavorable weather conditions due to the global climate melt-down.1
>
> Josh and I visited the site in late February. We were ecstatic to flush an American woodcock there. So, while Josh’s proposal would attract a variety of waterfowl species, I restrict my advocacy here to that particular American woodcock. We saw this bird with our own eyes, so we can be sure that Mr. Brown’s site is already a welcoming one for it.
>
> 1. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcbirds.org%2Fprogram%2Fbirds-at-risk%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C34c8a5ce98374d948cfb08d80efc5664%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275824767990950&amp;sdata=erijESuvV56GirVNPG%2FRTjZwvaoXS37DvWRFboMDa0E%3D&amp;reserved=0
>
> The woodcock is considered by the State of New York as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need. The United States Shorebird Conservation Plan notes it as a Species of High Concern, thought or known to be declining due to shrinking breeding and non-breeding grounds. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service lists the woodcock as a Game Bird Below Desired Condition, and the bird is on the Audubon Watchlist “yellow
> list” of species that are slowly declining and of conservation concern nationwide.2
>
> How extraordinary, then, that Mr. Brown’s site already invites such an important specie to land right here in our hometown. That bird’s range extends from the Canadian maritime provinces to eastern Texas3 – and here. How wonderful it would be if that lone woodcock were to be joined by a great visitation of waterfowl during the migration seasons.
>
> Poet Emily Dickenson coined the matchless phrase “Hope is the thing with feathers.” Filmmaker Wes Craven says that birds show us that we’re “not gravity’s slave.”4 If we can provide a small refuge on our gravely damaged planet, and offer hope to our feathered fellows in the great web of life – this is the spirit of the town in which I want to live.
>
> The Streamside Protection Zone ordinance permits “open space uses that are primarily passive in nature including: preserves, fishing areas and docks, parkland, and natural trails.”5 Mr. Brown wants to improve on an existing “open space,” the use of which, after the ponds are built, will be entirely, not just “primarily,” “passive in nature.” Josh wants to
> create an “open space” “preserve” to host weary birds who travel great distances and who could rest and commune there undisturbed. Once the ponds are built, the land would retain its character as a “preserve” in perpetuity, thanks to the conservation easement with the Ozark Land Trust. Surely that use is within the spirit of the Protection Zone ordinance.
>
> Please recommend Mr. Brown’s variance application for approval.
>
> Sincerely,
> /s/ Anita Schnee
> Anita Schnee
> Attorney at Law
>
> 2. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.audubon.org%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fdocuments%2Fhrvc_americanwoodcock.pdf&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C34c8a5ce98374d948cfb08d80efc5664%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275824767990950&amp;sdata=AC3YXSDC88VP5%2F3HoKUHEYxpZ9B963ZJiUHT3Kk0n9E%3D&amp;reserved=0
>
> 3. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmyscmap.sc.gov%2Fcwcs%2Fpdf%2FWoodcock.pdf&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C34c8a5ce98374d948cfb08d80efc5664%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275824767990950&amp;sdata=X1sFVXXh%2FTMK2PAsbtfmqAKn3Phqj4fUU%2FJO9OBUjtU%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 4. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.audubon.org%2Fnews%2Fwhy-do-birds-matter&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C34c8a5ce98374d948cfb08d80efc5664%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275824767990950&amp;sdata=%2BUJY01ryA45kbBn1IfV2fQaAZehJOeBDQ8ClcQW6lX0%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 5. Tit. XV, Ch. 168, § 168.12.E.a(i) (emphasis added).
>
>
> ~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
>
> Anita Schnee
>
> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcatself.wordpress.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C34c8a5ce98374d948cfb08d80efc5664%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275824767990950&amp;sdata=5H9u%2FIL%2BfhrxjePAuJf%2BjlkNRa2c7CMmFKfhL1Ut73Q%3D&amp;reserved=0
> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fafriqueaya.org%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C34c8a5ce98374d948cfb08d80efc5664%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275824767990950&amp;sdata=%2BGBKdepKytLS0ZDrnV7a3io7iV4mmcxEdSIu6SGhORM%3D&amp;reserved=0
>
>
>
> ~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/12/20 10:18 am
From: Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Re: Voices in the dark
Oh, to hear the Whip-O-Wills again. It has been so many years ago.  Growing up in Tennessee ... and being a Boy Scout camping all over  the State and later, doing likewise in College mainly in the Upper Cumberland, we heard them every night.  So very different in tone and cadence as well as song,  from the Chuck-wills .... where are the Whips' now???  :(   


-----Original Message-----
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Fri, Jun 12, 2020 8:31 am
Subject: Re: Voices in the dark

I have never hear a whip-or-will.  However, one peaceful evening in western AR where we live, our tv was drowned out by the loudest bird call I have ever heard!  Chuck-wee-wee, chuck-wee-wee.  A  Chuck wills widow had parked itself right by our house and called incessantly!  My hubby who has hearing difficulties had no problem hearing him ‘

Sent from my iPhone
On Jun 12, 2020, at 4:36 AM, Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:


As a youngster, I can vividly recall being kept awake all night at church camp by a Whip-poor-will on a few occasions.  At this point, I would take the "noise" of Whip or Chuck over the noise from I-49, every night of the week, especially when Bikes, Blues, and BBQ hits, even though the nightjars are silent by then.  Nothing against motorcycles, but I hear them quite well from a mile away, with all the windows closed, and over two fans.  Just give me some bird sounds, any bird sounds.
Karen GarrettRogers, in the noisy northwest 
On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 11:22 PM Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...> wrote:

Speaking of being driven crazy, one night around 15 years ago, near Devil's Den, a whip had apparently come off its meds. I do believe that bird kept me up the entire night. WHIP-or-WILL. WHIP-or-WILL. WHIP-or-WILL. etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. Talk about an ear-worm. I can hear it still.

~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`

Anita Schnee

https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcatself.wordpress.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cb817a843f1864df6f6cd08d80ef4a182%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275791131600265&amp;sdata=h1Butg5Q%2B4RDxN0Q7o%2BuqCODBal68OA0QB9VBClu7KQ%3D&amp;reserved=0
https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fafriqueaya.org%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cb817a843f1864df6f6cd08d80ef4a182%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275791131610264&amp;sdata=2q0Sl7cPw4ZSR%2ByiK%2BAl9c4WCu4Vho8jkvGucQWPx7o%3D&amp;reserved=0



~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`


On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 03:05:19 PM CDT, Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:

I pulled up the Merlin App to listen to their call and instantly recognized it. I've been trying to figure it out for two years!  (I'm a BAD birder!  :( )   May,  two years ago we did a "Outer Banks" trip from Myrtle Beach all the way up  the South and North Carolina coast . We tent camped in mostly State Parks on the  "mainland". Most nights, we heard that call ... some nights, to the point of driving us crazy as it was right over our tent in the heavy woods!  No one could tell us what it was.  Last weekend, we were tent camping at at Norfork, AR below the Dam ... and again, off into the woods was the distant sound of the Chuck Wills. Very distinct. Very recognizable -- now that I know what it is!  


-----Original Message-----
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Thu, Jun 11, 2020 2:54 pm
Subject: Re: Voices in the dark

I've heard Chucks here as recently as last night, but they are noticeably fewer and later this year, and I've heard no Whips.

Janine
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.

On 6/11/2020 2:46 PM, Carol Joan Patterson wrote:


We typically hear Chuck-will's at Donald's place in Goshen.  Donald has heard them this year, but I still need to go out and listen.  I would be interested in other's input, so see where they are more or less abundant.  I call them Weird Willows, because that's what they say to me - 'Chuck, weird willow!'

On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 10:23:48 AM CDT, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:

Some older subscribers to ARBIRD may recall Ben and Lula Coffey, who lived in Memphis. Their home was of course named Coffee Grounds. From a technical viewpoint, they may be best remembered for banding tens of thousands of Chimney Swifts. Their banded birds led to documentation of the swift’s winter range in Peru, Chile, and Brazil. However, I was thinking about them last night for a different reason. We were out to count Eastern Whip-poor-wills and Chuck-will’s-widows. Many years ago, Ben and Lula did a lot of this night driving in eastern Arkansas. At the time, very little was known about “whip-chucks” in the Natural State. Our drive last night started out at Combs, on Highway 16 east of Fayetteville, headed south into Ozark NF toward White Rock, then back west through Bidville and Winfrey Valley, coming out at last, after 3.5 hours and 24.3-miles, on Highway 71. Results in terms of whip-chucks: not too much. I figured this wild country would turn up 40 at least. We saw one, heard two at great distance. It was calm, wind-wise, but cool (55 degrees). Why so few whip-chucks? I would be happy to hear from any one with thoughts on this. Vivek submitted an eBird checklist for the trip:  https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70298113&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cb817a843f1864df6f6cd08d80ef4a182%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275791131610264&amp;sdata=Lc8OEgScAy9X8Cyk7lpRdDbpe9jyExN0peOAqxkbVcE%3D&amp;reserved=0.    But of course a drive like this is hardly without merit. Providence makes her offerings; it is up to receive. We saw live, flying Luna Moths in at least three spots. How long has it been since I have been out and seen a beautiful, green creature like this? We encountered bats working moths and other flying insects attracted to strong lights at a few farm houses. We tallied several Barred Owls and even a Great Horned Owl, perched on a powerline. Amphibians were quite active. Most numerous: Cricket Frogs, but we also picked up American Toads, Spring Peepers, Leopard Frogs, and the single plunk of a Green Frog. In one spot, out of the dark: a very busy, singing Yellow-breasted Chat. How’s this for voices in the dark? And while the whip-chucks were surprisingly all-but-absent, this drive has only a few spots of light pollution and hence, an absolutely, extraordinary starry sky. We’d stop the car and turn off the engine to listen. While not much to tally in whip-chucks, we experienced the gift of a wonderful night sky as the ancients knew it.




 

Back to top
Date: 6/12/20 6:32 am
From: Dorothy Cooney <songbird51488...>
Subject: Re: Voices in the dark
I have never hear a whip-or-will. However, one peaceful evening in western AR where we live, our tv was drowned out by the loudest bird call I have ever heard! Chuck-wee-wee, chuck-wee-wee. A Chuck wills widow had parked itself right by our house and called incessantly! My hubby who has hearing difficulties had no problem hearing him ‘

Sent from my iPhone

> On Jun 12, 2020, at 4:36 AM, Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> wrote:
>
> As a youngster, I can vividly recall being kept awake all night at church camp by a Whip-poor-will on a few occasions. At this point, I would take the "noise" of Whip or Chuck over the noise from I-49, every night of the week, especially when Bikes, Blues, and BBQ hits, even though the nightjars are silent by then. Nothing against motorcycles, but I hear them quite well from a mile away, with all the windows closed, and over two fans. Just give me some bird sounds, any bird sounds.
>
> Karen Garrett
> Rogers, in the noisy northwest
>
>> On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 11:22 PM Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>> Speaking of being driven crazy, one night around 15 years ago, near Devil's Den, a whip had apparently come off its meds. I do believe that bird kept me up the entire night. WHIP-or-WILL. WHIP-or-WILL. WHIP-or-WILL. etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. Talk about an ear-worm. I can hear it still.
>>
>>
>> ~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
>>
>> Anita Schnee
>>
>> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcatself.wordpress.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cac9f7691bc584526270908d80ed4dd18%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275654986563860&amp;sdata=3brie17jJK701yu%2BIBkQlTBYvX7ilak9LYEwmmgUn00%3D&amp;reserved=0
>> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fafriqueaya.org%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cac9f7691bc584526270908d80ed4dd18%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275654986563860&amp;sdata=tGtQZfmj7u%2FFhha%2BVLxlXBcfSaqCkVixjhX1mj0I7i4%3D&amp;reserved=0
>>
>>
>>
>> ~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
>>
>>
>> On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 03:05:19 PM CDT, Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> I pulled up the Merlin App to listen to their call and instantly recognized it. I've been trying to figure it out for two years! (I'm a BAD birder! :( ) May, two years ago we did a "Outer Banks" trip from Myrtle Beach all the way up the South and North Carolina coast . We tent camped in mostly State Parks on the "mainland". Most nights, we heard that call ... some nights, to the point of driving us crazy as it was right over our tent in the heavy woods! No one could tell us what it was. Last weekend, we were tent camping at at Norfork, AR below the Dam ... and again, off into the woods was the distant sound of the Chuck Wills. Very distinct. Very recognizable -- now that I know what it is!
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
>> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
>> Sent: Thu, Jun 11, 2020 2:54 pm
>> Subject: Re: Voices in the dark
>>
>> I've heard Chucks here as recently as last night, but they are noticeably fewer and later this year, and I've heard no Whips.
>>
>> Janine
>> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
>>
>>> On 6/11/2020 2:46 PM, Carol Joan Patterson wrote:
>>
>> We typically hear Chuck-will's at Donald's place in Goshen. Donald has heard them this year, but I still need to go out and listen. I would be interested in other's input, so see where they are more or less abundant. I call them Weird Willows, because that's what they say to me - 'Chuck, weird willow!'
>>
>> On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 10:23:48 AM CDT, Joseph Neal <joeneal...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> Some older subscribers to ARBIRD may recall Ben and Lula Coffey, who lived in Memphis. Their home was of course named Coffee Grounds. From a technical viewpoint, they may be best remembered for banding tens of thousands of Chimney Swifts. Their banded birds led to documentation of the swift’s winter range in Peru, Chile, and Brazil. However, I was thinking about them last night for a different reason. We were out to count Eastern Whip-poor-wills and Chuck-will’s-widows.
>> Many years ago, Ben and Lula did a lot of this night driving in eastern Arkansas. At the time, very little was known about “whip-chucks” in the Natural State. Our drive last night started out at Combs, on Highway 16 east of Fayetteville, headed south into Ozark NF toward White Rock, then back west through Bidville and Winfrey Valley, coming out at last, after 3.5 hours and 24.3-miles, on Highway 71. Results in terms of whip-chucks: not too much. I figured this wild country would turn up 40 at least. We saw one, heard two at great distance. It was calm, wind-wise, but cool (55 degrees). Why so few whip-chucks? I would be happy to hear from any one with thoughts on this. Vivek submitted an eBird checklist for the trip: https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70298113&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7Cac9f7691bc584526270908d80ed4dd18%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275654986563860&amp;sdata=0YMYU8qek0wfiCBuPrjdxYoNEeJliHjFn4moWX%2Frnm8%3D&amp;reserved=0.
>> But of course a drive like this is hardly without merit. Providence makes her offerings; it is up to receive. We saw live, flying Luna Moths in at least three spots. How long has it been since I have been out and seen a beautiful, green creature like this? We encountered bats working moths and other flying insects attracted to strong lights at a few farm houses. We tallied several Barred Owls and even a Great Horned Owl, perched on a powerline.
>> Amphibians were quite active. Most numerous: Cricket Frogs, but we also picked up American Toads, Spring Peepers, Leopard Frogs, and the single plunk of a Green Frog. In one spot, out of the dark: a very busy, singing Yellow-breasted Chat. How’s this for voices in the dark?
>> And while the whip-chucks were surprisingly all-but-absent, this drive has only a few spots of light pollution and hence, an absolutely, extraordinary starry sky. We’d stop the car and turn off the engine to listen. While not much to tally in whip-chucks, we experienced the gift of a wonderful night sky as the ancients knew it.
>>
>>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/12/20 5:54 am
From: Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...>
Subject: Variance for migratory habitat
Hello bird friends. Here's a copy of a letter I wrote supporting my landlord's application for a variance to improve bird habitat. The application is up for approval shortly.
Wondering where that woodcock is now --Anita Schnee
* * *
June 11, 2020

Mathew Johnson, ChairFayetteville Planning Commission113 W. Mountain St.Fayetteville, AR 72701
Re: May 18, 2020 variance application by Gavin Smith for Josh BrownParcel No. 765-13117-510Migratory Bird Wetland Stopover
Dear Mr. Johnson:
I urge you to recommend the variance request submitted by engineer Gavin Smith on behalf of landowner Josh Brown. Mr. Brown wants to improve stop-over habitat for migratory birds and he seeks the City’s approval to create three linked shallow ponds on his property in eastern Fayetteville, by a bend of the West Fork of the White River near Bayyari Park.
Josh’s proposal will encourage a refuge for many threatened bird species. The need is critical. The wave of extinctions caused by habitat loss is deeply troubling. Our birds are additionally menaced by pesticides, cell towers, food-supply decline due to pollution, free-roaming domestic cats – and all this on top of the natural challenges of predation, headwinds, and unfavorable weather conditions due to the global climate melt-down.1
Josh and I visited the site in late February. We were ecstatic to flush an American woodcock there. So, while Josh’s proposal would attract a variety of waterfowl species, I restrict my advocacy here to that particular American woodcock. We saw this bird with our own eyes, so we can be sure that Mr. Brown’s site is already a welcoming one for it. 
1. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fabcbirds.org%2Fprogram%2Fbirds-at-risk%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C5cff5e87e3434672774508d80ecf6969%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275631905599129&amp;sdata=DbRk5Yy4X4pPezY%2FuZZDViTs%2F3j%2FfB1asypc4GzbZfw%3D&amp;reserved=0
The woodcock is considered by the State of New York as a Species of Greatest Conservation Need. The United States Shorebird Conservation Plan notes it as a Species of High Concern, thought or known to be declining due to shrinking breeding and non-breeding grounds. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service lists the woodcock as a Game Bird Below Desired Condition, and the bird is on the Audubon Watchlist “yellowlist” of species that are slowly declining and of conservation concern nationwide.2
How extraordinary, then, that Mr. Brown’s site already invites such an important specie to land right here in our hometown. That bird’s range extends from the Canadian maritime provinces to eastern Texas3 – and here. How wonderful it would be if that lone woodcock were to be joined by a great visitation of waterfowl during the migration seasons.
Poet Emily Dickenson coined the matchless phrase “Hope is the thing with feathers.” Filmmaker Wes Craven says that birds show us that we’re “not gravity’s slave.”4 If we can provide a small refuge on our gravely damaged planet, and offer hope to our feathered fellows in the great web of life – this is the spirit of the town in which I want to live.
The Streamside Protection Zone ordinance permits “open space uses that are primarily passive in nature including: preserves, fishing areas and docks, parkland, and natural trails.”5 Mr. Brown wants to improve on an existing “open space,” the use of which, after the ponds are built, will be entirely, not just “primarily,” “passive in nature.” Josh wants tocreate an “open space” “preserve” to host weary birds who travel great distances and who could rest and commune there undisturbed. Once the ponds are built, the land would retain its character as a “preserve” in perpetuity, thanks to the conservation easement with the Ozark Land Trust. Surely that use is within the spirit of the Protection Zone ordinance.
Please recommend Mr. Brown’s variance application for approval.
Sincerely,/s/ Anita SchneeAnita SchneeAttorney at Law
2. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.audubon.org%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Fdocuments%2Fhrvc_americanwoodcock.pdf&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C5cff5e87e3434672774508d80ecf6969%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275631905599129&amp;sdata=7MuJDuxQD9fRUQG7NoWHZhiIFCvxc%2BozpVeAkGQv0eU%3D&amp;reserved=0
3. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fmyscmap.sc.gov%2Fcwcs%2Fpdf%2FWoodcock.pdf4&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C5cff5e87e3434672774508d80ecf6969%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275631905599129&amp;sdata=LQtEovDChPSMsYgbHQtC%2FlZVsRvYhWEOmEkjI1ifqow%3D&amp;reserved=0. https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.audubon.org%2Fnews%2Fwhy-do-birds-matter5&amp;data=02%7C01%<7Carbird-l...>%7C5cff5e87e3434672774508d80ecf6969%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275631905599129&amp;sdata=mJ45%2BIAbuOOejAldexJ7ECu7EhzO1b9XMcOsSEhiisw%3D&amp;reserved=0. Tit. XV, Ch. 168, § 168.12.E.a(i) (emphasis added).

~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`

Anita Schnee

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Date: 6/12/20 4:55 am
From: hilltower12 <000001ab5bb2c0b4-dmarc-request...>
Subject: FW: Re: Voices in the dark
AN INTERESTING CONVERSATION FROM THE ARBIRD-L listserve, a site about birds in ArkansasSent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
-------- Original message --------From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...> Date: 6/12/20 4:36 AM (GMT-06:00) To: <ARBIRD-L...> Subject: Re: Voices in the dark As a youngster, I can vividly recall being kept awake all night at church camp by a Whip-poor-will on a few occasions.  At this point, I would take the "noise" of Whip or Chuck over the noise from I-49, every night of the week, especially when Bikes, Blues, and BBQ hits, even though the nightjars are silent by then.  Nothing against motorcycles, but I hear them quite well from a mile away, with all the windows closed, and over two fans.  Just give me some bird sounds, any bird sounds.Karen GarrettRogers, in the noisy northwest On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 11:22 PM Anita Schnee <000003224553d416-dmarc-request...> wrote:Speaking of being driven crazy, one night around 15 years ago, near Devil's Den, a whip had apparently come off its meds. I do believe that bird kept me up the entire night. WHIP-or-WILL. WHIP-or-WILL. WHIP-or-WILL. etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. Talk about an ear-worm. I can hear it still.~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`Anita Schneehttps://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http:%2F%2Fcatself.wordpress.comhttp%2F%2Fafriqueaya.org~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560~%2560&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C0177614b8ba04095740008d80ec77f5a%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275597291601269&amp;sdata=Qfz5TO%2BjbohXLGdj1rWLaux%2Be70qg1kuRv%2FIvNXffec%3D&amp;reserved=0






On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 03:05:19 PM CDT, Joe Tucker <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:



I pulled up the Merlin App to listen to their call and instantly recognized it. I've been trying to figure it out for two years!  (I'm a BAD birder!  :( )   May,  two years ago we did a "Outer Banks" trip from Myrtle Beach all the way up  the South and North Carolina coast . We tent camped in mostly State Parks on the  "mainland". Most nights, we heard that call ... some nights, to the point of driving us crazy as it was right over our tent in the heavy woods!  No one could tell us what it was.  Last weekend, we were tent camping at at Norfork, AR below the Dam ... and again, off into the woods was the distant sound of the Chuck Wills. Very distinct. Very recognizable -- now that I know what it is!  



-----Original Message-----
From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
To: <ARBIRD-L...>
Sent: Thu, Jun 11, 2020 2:54 pm
Subject: Re: Voices in the dark




I've heard Chucks here as recently as last night, but they are
noticeably fewer and later this year, and I've heard no Whips.

Janine
Alexander Mt., Saline Co.



On 6/11/2020 2:46 PM, Carol Joan
Patterson wrote:










We typically hear
Chuck-will's at Donald's place in Goshen.  Donald has heard
them this year, but I still need to go out and listen.  I
would be interested in other's input, so see where they are
more or less abundant.  I call them Weird Willows, because
that's what they say to me - 'Chuck, weird willow!'













On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 10:23:48 AM CDT, Joseph Neal
<joeneal...> wrote:



















Some older subscribers to ARBIRD may recall Ben and
Lula Coffey, who lived in Memphis. Their home was of
course named Coffee Grounds. From a technical
viewpoint, they may be best remembered for banding
tens of thousands of Chimney Swifts. Their banded
birds led to documentation of the swift’s winter
range in Peru, Chile, and Brazil. However, I was
thinking about them last night for a different
reason. We were out to count Eastern Whip-poor-wills
and Chuck-will’s-widows.




Many years ago, Ben and Lula did a lot of this night
driving in eastern Arkansas. At the time, very
little was known about “whip-chucks” in the Natural
State. Our drive last night started out at Combs, on
Highway 16 east of Fayetteville, headed south into
Ozark NF toward White Rock, then back west through
Bidville and Winfrey Valley, coming out at last,
after 3.5 hours and 24.3-miles, on Highway 71.
Results in terms of whip-chucks: not too much. I
figured this wild country would turn up 40 at least.
We saw one, heard two at great distance. It was
calm, wind-wise, but cool (55 degrees). Why so few
whip-chucks? I would be happy to hear from any one
with thoughts on this. Vivek submitted an eBird
checklist for the trip:
 https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70298113&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C0177614b8ba04095740008d80ec77f5a%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275597291601269&amp;sdata=NQ0NXXem9G%2Fvn%2BxVMIcJjyTErKwXQcUok%2FsKcwE3fiI%3D&amp;reserved=0.
  



But of course a drive like this is hardly without
merit. Providence makes her offerings; it is up to
receive. We saw live, flying Luna Moths in at least
three spots. How long has it been since I have been
out and seen a beautiful, green creature like this?
We encountered bats working moths and other flying
insects attracted to strong lights at a few farm
houses. We tallied several Barred Owls and even a
Great Horned Owl, perched on a powerline.




Amphibians were quite active. Most numerous: Cricket
Frogs, but we also picked up American Toads, Spring
Peepers, Leopard Frogs, and the single plunk of a
Green Frog. In one spot, out of the dark: a very
busy, singing Yellow-breasted Chat. How’s this for
voices in the dark?



And while the whip-chucks were surprisingly
all-but-absent, this drive has only a few spots of
light pollution and hence, an absolutely,
extraordinary starry sky. We’d stop the car and turn
off the engine to listen. While not much to tally in
whip-chucks, we experienced the gift of a wonderful
night sky as the ancients knew it.























 

Back to top
Date: 6/12/20 2:36 am
From: Karen Garrett <kjgarrett84...>
Subject: Re: Voices in the dark
As a youngster, I can vividly recall being kept awake all night at church
camp by a Whip-poor-will on a few occasions. At this point, I would take
the "noise" of Whip or Chuck over the noise from I-49, every night of the
week, especially when Bikes, Blues, and BBQ hits, even though the nightjars
are silent by then. Nothing against motorcycles, but I hear them quite
well from a mile away, with all the windows closed, and over two fans.
Just give me some bird sounds, any bird sounds.

Karen Garrett
Rogers, in the noisy northwest

On Thu, Jun 11, 2020 at 11:22 PM Anita Schnee <
<000003224553d416-dmarc-request...> wrote:

> Speaking of being driven crazy, one night around 15 years ago, near
> Devil's Den, a whip had apparently come off its meds. I do believe that
> bird kept me up the entire night. WHIP-or-WILL. WHIP-or-WILL. WHIP-or-WILL.
> etc. etc. etc. etc. etc. Talk about an ear-worm. I can hear it still.
>
>
> ~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
>
> Anita Schnee
>
> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcatself.wordpress.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C44e1421de4a44f0b9c3108d80eb41261%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275513851305078&amp;sdata=YEbEwS8iQic4gIAmrgy12m2j0tp2NBxn9kdvdIRP68c%3D&amp;reserved=0
> <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcatself.wordpress.com%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C44e1421de4a44f0b9c3108d80eb41261%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275513851305078&amp;sdata=YEbEwS8iQic4gIAmrgy12m2j0tp2NBxn9kdvdIRP68c%3D&amp;reserved=0>
> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fafriqueaya.org%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C44e1421de4a44f0b9c3108d80eb41261%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275513851305078&amp;sdata=M%2FGAhIqU1A2zfC98Bg1tlRW1uk3iTJDW7eHdNd%2FO5yo%3D&amp;reserved=0
> <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fafriqueaya.org%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C44e1421de4a44f0b9c3108d80eb41261%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275513851305078&amp;sdata=M%2FGAhIqU1A2zfC98Bg1tlRW1uk3iTJDW7eHdNd%2FO5yo%3D&amp;reserved=0>
>
>
> <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fafriqueaya.files.wordpress.com%2F2010%2F10%2Fafriqueaya_eplogo.jpg&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C44e1421de4a44f0b9c3108d80eb41261%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275513851315078&amp;sdata=9vz2lU21XZ%2BciaFwDfobP%2BtONfhZrFM8UnXIYfs85d0%3D&amp;reserved=0>
>
> ~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`~`
>
>
> On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 03:05:19 PM CDT, Joe Tucker <
> <000001df0ca37a3b-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
>
> I pulled up the Merlin App to listen to their call and instantly
> recognized it. I've been trying to figure it out for two years! (I'm a BAD
> birder! :( ) May, two years ago we did a "Outer Banks" trip from Myrtle
> Beach all the way up the South and North Carolina coast . We tent camped
> in mostly State Parks on the "mainland". Most nights, we heard that call
> ... some nights, to the point of driving us crazy as it was right over our
> tent in the heavy woods! No one could tell us what it was. Last weekend,
> we were tent camping at at Norfork, AR below the Dam ... and again, off
> into the woods was the distant sound of the Chuck Wills. Very distinct.
> Very recognizable -- now that I know what it is!
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Janine Perlman <jpandjf...>
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Sent: Thu, Jun 11, 2020 2:54 pm
> Subject: Re: Voices in the dark
>
> I've heard Chucks here as recently as last night, but they are noticeably
> fewer and later this year, and I've heard no Whips.
>
> Janine
> Alexander Mt., Saline Co.
>
> On 6/11/2020 2:46 PM, Carol Joan Patterson wrote:
>
> We typically hear Chuck-will's at Donald's place in Goshen. Donald has
> heard them this year, but I still need to go out and listen. I would be
> interested in other's input, so see where they are more or less abundant.
> I call them Weird Willows, because that's what they say to me - 'Chuck,
> weird willow!'
>
> On Thursday, June 11, 2020, 10:23:48 AM CDT, Joseph Neal
> <joeneal...> <joeneal...> wrote:
>
>
> Some older subscribers to ARBIRD may recall Ben and Lula Coffey, who lived
> in Memphis. Their home was of course named Coffee Grounds. From a technical
> viewpoint, they may be best remembered for banding tens of thousands of
> Chimney Swifts. Their banded birds led to documentation of the swift’s
> winter range in Peru, Chile, and Brazil. However, I was thinking about them
> last night for a different reason. We were out to count Eastern
> Whip-poor-wills and Chuck-will’s-widows.
> Many years ago, Ben and Lula did a lot of this night driving in eastern
> Arkansas. At the time, very little was known about “whip-chucks” in the
> Natural State. Our drive last night started out at Combs, on Highway 16
> east of Fayetteville, headed south into Ozark NF toward White Rock, then
> back west through Bidville and Winfrey Valley, coming out at last, after
> 3.5 hours and 24.3-miles, on Highway 71. Results in terms of whip-chucks:
> not too much. I figured this wild country would turn up 40 at least. We saw
> one, heard two at great distance. It was calm, wind-wise, but cool (55
> degrees). Why so few whip-chucks? I would be happy to hear from any one
> with thoughts on this. Vivek submitted an eBird checklist for the trip:
> https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70298113&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C44e1421de4a44f0b9c3108d80eb41261%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275513851315078&amp;sdata=5jZn1R3BuvM89ADTxyZ5q5ZbVImkGthkDY0WKxyTerA%3D&amp;reserved=0
> <https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS70298113&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C44e1421de4a44f0b9c3108d80eb41261%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275513851315078&amp;sdata=5jZn1R3BuvM89ADTxyZ5q5ZbVImkGthkDY0WKxyTerA%3D&amp;reserved=0>.
>
> But of course a drive like this is hardly without merit. Providence makes
> her offerings; it is up to receive. We saw live, flying Luna Moths in at
> least three spots. How long has it been since I have been out and seen a
> beautiful, green creature like this? We encountered bats working moths and
> other flying insects attracted to strong lights at a few farm houses. We
> tallied several Barred Owls and even a Great Horned Owl, perched on a
> powerline.
> Amphibians were quite active. Most numerous: Cricket Frogs, but we also
> picked up American Toads, Spring Peepers, Leopard Frogs, and the single
> plunk of a Green Frog. In one spot, out of the dark: a very busy, singing
> Yellow-breasted Chat. How’s this for voices in the dark?
> And while the whip-chucks were surprisingly all-but-absent, this drive has
> only a few spots of light pollution and hence, an absolutely, extraordinary
> starry sky. We’d stop the car and turn off the engine to listen. While not
> much to tally in whip-chucks, we experienced the gift of a wonderful night
> sky as the ancients knew it.
>
>
>

 

Back to top
Date: 6/12/20 2:14 am
From: Don Simons <drsimons56...>
Subject: Re: Voices in the dark - some Nightjar Network tidbits
Leif,

Do you know if there are any studies on the benefits of prescribed fires on nightjar populations? Years ago, Lori conducted surveys in the Ozark National Forest and found burns to be good for Diana fritillaries. I figure it would translate for vertebrates.

Don

Sent from my iPad

> On Jun 11, 2020, at 8:28 PM, Anderson, Leif E -FS <000002b0bc8b0106-dmarc-request...> wrote:
>
> 
> Greetings all,
> Some tidbits from the https://nam03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nightjar.org%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%<7CARBIRD-L...>%7C01cd6f7f7f8644aa17ff08d80eb0f2c5%7C79c742c4e61c4fa5be89a3cb566a80d1%7C0%7C0%7C637275500431238704&amp;sdata=nWfTw890r8wF0pmeCd2RkcfZzWV6laskSHWHgIgFpOg%3D&amp;reserved=0
> Some already know; some learned from the network and some bits from the AR experience.
> The surveys have been run for 13 years.
> If you go to the webpage you can find quite a bit about nightjars.
> If you click on survey data you can see the ave and range per species, per state and per year.
> Many folks probably associate nightjars most with being active around dawn and dusk. And indeed that is when they are most heard. With some nights birds only being active for a half-hour or so.
> The next popular time is when the moon is larger; above the horizon; and actually visible from your location. The darker the moon the less activity. Higher in the sky means more activity. If you are in a steep-sided valley you may not have much activity, even with a full moon and above the horizon. Just for fun I ‘ve run some of my same routes 3 times in a night and the moon seems to have a lot to do with it. Probably more than sun rising/setting times.
> Other limiting factors can be mostly cloudy skys and strong winds. And how noisy it is certainly limits how many birds can be heard. Last week I had some gloriously loud amphib stops, but could only hear 1 bird.
> If I want to sample Common Nighthawks, I have to find a larger town or better yet a city.
> Pavement vs gravel: Not a noticeable difference between the number of birds.
> Antidotally, but not statistically, elevation can make a difference. Not many Eastern Whip-poor-wills below 400-500 ft elevation, though whips do seem to be moving into some lower elevations where I might have expected only Chuck-will-widows.
> At the higher elevation I lose most of the chucks. So whips have a wider range with a slightly higher ave elevation. Chuck have less of an elevation range and favor the lower-mid elevations.
> On one route I’ve had from 11-43 nightjars. Average is 18 and this year was 26. Seems to be somewhat cyclic but with a short time between the high and low peaks. There does seem to be a long term downward trend, though it’s jumbled within the cylic pattern. I’ve heard that the network plans to publish some trends across North America.
> Like so many other ground nesting birds they are on every criitter’s menu.
> There are usually 2 survey periods, with the first one having more territorial birds calling. This year the windows were 4/30 – 5/14 and 5/29 – 6/13. I’ve definitely had less birds in this 2nd round.
>
> Problems with this last week: It’s the 2nd window, so many birds are busy with young and not defending their territory as much. The window is closed after Sat, so the moon is fading; and the moon is rising later each night. Thurs night I could have only surveyed between 1:16 am and 5:40 am. That’s rough, especially if I’m also counting daylight birds.
>
> Next year: It would be great if more folks would get out and enjoy the night. AR is a good chuck/whip transition state, so we can add a lot to the national picture. I’ve got some routes already set up with gps coordinates and directions. So if you want to do one of these holler.
>
> The most fun/ startling encounter I had this year… I had 4 whips calling when I heard some nightjar soft sounds, but never saw the bird. Then one of the calling birds stopped. I didn’t know the reason until I went to get back in the truck, and had 2 birds fly out of the truck floor and come really close to me. Definitely startled me! And probably them too. Cheers, Leif
>
>
>
>
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