Date: 8/4/22 7:45 am
From: Ruth Richards <rgrichards66...>
Subject: Re: [Tweeters] MARTHA STEWART LIVING: Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
The Dartmouth conclusions seem to contradict those of Doug Tallamy, professor of entomology and wildlife ecology at Univ of Delaware. I’m not qualified to assess these two divergent conclusions for scientific accuracy, but it does make sense to me, intuitively, that, at least for birds, the bugs they need to thrive will be found on the native plants to which they are adapted.

Dr Tallamy is also the force behind the Homegrown National Park project to regenerate biodiversity in our own back yards, which I encourage all to look in to. HOMEGROWN NATIONAL PARK <https://homegrownnationalpark.org/> My lot is on the list!

Ruth Richards
Coupeville

> On Aug 3, 2022, at 10:57 PM, Steve Hampton <stevechampton...> wrote:
>
> Agreed 100%. Plant natives. There was a great webinar presentation sponsored by WOS or a local Audubon group a few months ago. The expert shared how chickadees need 6,000 to 10,000 moth caterpillars to fledge a nest of chicks. Wow! And where do they get these? Mostly from native alder, birch, and bitter cherry trees.
>
>
>
> On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 8:13 PM Paul Bannick <paul.bannick...> <mailto:<paul.bannick...>> wrote:
> Interesting BUT if you want to our increasingly threatened native birds, garden as much as possible with the native plants that these species rely upon for food, nesting, shelter. Gardening with our native plants allow you to provide not just for nesting and wintering birds but also migrating ones.
>
> They also help retain our declining insects that birds and many other animals rely upon.
>
> We must do this for our native birds or risk losing them.
>
> Paul
>
> On Wed, Aug 3, 2022 at 1:29 PM Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...> <mailto:<dan.owl.reiff...>> wrote:
>
> Want to Attract Special Birds and Bees to Your Garden? Add Rare Plants to Your Backyard, a New Study Says
> Researchers out of Dartmouth College found that 50 percent of urban gardens in California counties have rare plants—and, in turn, they attract unique species of pollinators.
> Read in Martha Stewart Living: https://apple.news/AToTxWy4FTJGOmIXTHZfxrA <https://apple.news/AToTxWy4FTJGOmIXTHZfxrA>
>
> Shared from Apple News <https://www.apple.com/news>
>
> Sent from my iPhone
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> ​Steve Hampton​
> Port Townsend, WA (qatáy)
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