Date: 11/17/21 7:51 am
From: Paul Plotnick <pdplot2...>
Subject: [CT Birds] Re: Snowy owls: Is this an irruption year? (Slightly off-topic)
I'm reading a book every birder should read - *A World on the Wing *by
Scott Weidensaul. Lots of nerdish details but well written, all about bird
migration and how it is tracked today. There's quite a bit on Snowy Owls.
Seems there are much less of them than previously thought as they migrate
to different places. And - contrary to popular belief, they are not
starving and stressed but mostly immature individuals relatively unafraid
of people, airplanes, etc. as they don't encounter them in the Arctic. And
- healthy rufous hummingbirds have been seen in Pennsylvania in January in
10-degree F. temperatures.

On Wed, Nov 17, 2021 at 10:38 AM Severin Uebbing <severinuebbing...>
wrote:

> That's interesting indeed! There are reports of Snowy Owls that arrived
> in western Europe by ship from northeastern North America (see
>
> https://www.researchgate.net/publication/307108742_Sneeuwuilen_uit_Canada_en_Groenland_per_schip_naar_Noordwest-Europa,
>
> has English abstract). As you say, they are scarcer there, I saw none
> during my time in Sweden. It also fits to the behavior of Snowy Owls,
> which tend to look for tundra-like open spaces and end up on
> northeastern beaches. That "beach" that some owl ended up on might just
> as well be part of a ship and that's how they end up in Europe.
>
> Severin
>
> On 11/17/21 10:01, Felix Sangari via CTBirds wrote:
> > Greetings from Spain,
> > As you have been discussing the recent sightings of snowy owls in CT I
> want to share some info with you, and ask your expert opinion.. In the last
> 10 days we have had 3 snowy owls in the north coast of Spain. The first one
> was recovered in Santander (where I live) on Nov 6th, a young male in very
> poor condition, that was taken to a rescue center but died next day. A
> female was located the 10th, and another male the 13th. Those two are
> apparently in good condition and flying around Cabo Peñas in Asturias. No
> rings or leashes that could point to an escape. As the european population
> is scarce, and there are no reported sightings between Norway and northen
> Spain, the idea is that they arrived from Canada. Are you aware of any bird
> movement, any storm, anything that could confirm this origin or explain the
> journey? Just as a curiosity, as we are more than happy to just watch these
> amazing visitors from the other side of the pond..
> > Félix J. SangariSantander (Spain)
> > PD: We are not used to watch snowies, and people from all over Spain and
> France are going there to see them, but everybody is behaving extremely
> well, and no one was closer than 100 yards the first days. Let's see if
> this respect continues..
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > CTBirds, a service of Connecticut Ornithological Association - Bringing
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>
> CTBirds, a service of Connecticut Ornithological Association - Bringing
> birders together statewide. Please support COA:
> https://www.ctbirding.org/join-us/
> CTBirds is for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut. For
> list rules and subscription information visit:
> https://www.ctbirding.org/birds-birding/ct-birds-email-list/

CTBirds, a service of Connecticut Ornithological Association - Bringing birders together statewide. Please support COA: https://www.ctbirding.org/join-us/
CTBirds is for the discussion of birds and birding in Connecticut. For list rules and subscription information visit: https://www.ctbirding.org/birds-birding/ct-birds-email-list/
 
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