Date: 4/2/21 3:25 pm
From: WILLIAM R EDDLEMAN <eddlemanw...>
Subject: Re: No sighting - Vulture populations and roadkills, etc...
WARNING: This message has originated from an External Source. This may be a phishing expedition that can result in unauthorized access to our IT System. Please use proper judgment and caution when opening attachments, clicking links, or responding to this email.

One more thing I might add to Edge’s good summary. Many overpass/underpass corridors in the West are built on traditional migration routes of elk, deer, or other large herding mammals. These are routes taken between summer and winter ranges. The corridors may accommodate other species, but the main function is to prevent deaths during these seasonal migrations.

——Bill Eddleman, Cape Girardeau



Sent from my iPhone

> On Apr 2, 2021, at 2:39 PM, Media.com <edgew...> wrote:
>
> 
> WARNING: This message has originated from an External Source. This may be a phishing expedition that can result in unauthorized access to our IT System. Please use proper judgment and caution when opening attachments, clicking links, or responding to this email.
> Can't let this go unaddressed. Yes, the amount of trash on our highways is deplorable. Yes, its presence may draw some wildlife to roadsides. Yes, culvert-style animal crossings save wildlife.
>
> I love Colorado, too, but how much oak-hickory deciduous forest does Colorado have with highways criss-crossing every mile or so? How many opossums, raccoons, skunks, gray and fox squirrels per square mile?
>
> I kinda like our neighboring states (although I still contend that the best thing ever to come out of Kansas is I-70--and maybe a few very special people), but, seriously, again, other than extreme southern Illinois, eastern Kansas, and the miniscule amount of untilled loess hills, Iowa, Nebraska and Illinois have very small amounts of oak-hickory forest/woodland, and support substantially fewer small mammals living near highways (how's that for a run-on sentence?).
>
> It is economically unfeasible to build culvert-type animal crossings within every mile of highway--heck, we can't even afford space or dollars for shoulders along some of our ridge-riding roads. Let's not underestimate how attractive the road verge grass is for grazer/browsers like deer.
>
> One of the factors that must be considered when musing and bemoaning the loss of wildlife lives is that we have an abundance of wildlife in Missouri for a variety of reasons (most of them good reasons like our MDC and State Parks). There is a lot of habitat supporting wildlife in Missouri, rather than human housing, crop and grazing land, or desert or mountainous land.
>
> I haven't looked at any stats for this commentary, but consider Missouri's percentage of public land, percentage of land not in housing or crops, or in monotypical evergreen forest or sparse cover, etc., compared to others, and the presence of wildlife-supporting land and the resulting abundance of wildlife can be seen to be a major reason for why we have so much roadkill: we have more small mammals.
>
> Edge Wade
> Columbia, MO
> From: "Lisa Saffell" <lesfstl...>
> To: "MOBIRDS-L" <MOBIRDS-L...>
> Sent: Friday, April 2, 2021 8:53:29 AM
> Subject: Re: No sighting - Vulture populations and roadkills, etc...
>
> WARNING: This message has originated from an External Source. This may be a phishing expedition that can result in unauthorized access to our IT System. Please use proper judgment and caution when opening attachments, clicking links, or responding to this email.
> Wendy and Terry,
> Interesting thread! This is something that drives me absolutely nuts. Take a drive through other states any direction from Missouri and you will be amazed by the stark contrast in the number of roadkill and, I have to throw this out there, Trash.
>
> Wendy your questions flipped a switch in my head. I can’t help but wonder if animals are coming closer to the roads because of all the trash that people are throwing out of their car Windows. I’ve had people toss entire bags of trash out of their windows right in front me.
>
> Some of the western states have the roadkill issue figured out, for the most part, with their wildlife overpasses and underpasses. It’s a pleasure to drive through most parts of colorado. I don’t see Missouri ever incorporating anything like that into their road plans.
>
> Regards,
> Lisa Saffell
> @instagram.com/lisasaffell
> @instagram.com/stl_birder
>
> On Apr 1, 2021, at 10:47 PM, Wendy Williams <alternatewilliam...> wrote:
>
> WARNING: This message has originated from an External Source. This may be a phishing expedition that can result in unauthorized access to our IT System. Please use proper judgment and caution when opening attachments, clicking links, or responding to this email.
> What can be done to decrease the amount of roadkill? Having 33 deaths in 35 miles of such diverse species is outrageous in my view. Is the speed limit too high in that area? Would signage warning of wildlife help at all? Are there opportunities fir an underpass (perhaps a culvert?). What can be done?
> Wendy Williams
> Kirkwood, MO
> St. Louis County
>
>
> Sent from AT&T Yahoo Mail for iPhone
>
> On Thursday, April 1, 2021, 6:39 PM, Terry Miller <millert832...> wrote:
>
> WARNING: This message has originated from an External Source. This may be a phishing expedition that can result in unauthorized access to our IT System. Please use proper judgment and caution when opening attachments, clicking links, or responding to this email.
> As I traveled to St. Joseph today, my wife and I noticed quite a few roadkills. So, on the way back, we kept a tally of them. For the approximately 35 miles, we were able to see 33 roadkills comprising 11 species. They were as follows:
>
> Raccoon - 10
> Opossum - 8
> Muskrat - 2
> WTDeer - 2
> E. Fox Squirrel - 2
> Red-tailed Hawk - 2
> Barred Owl -1
> Striped Skunk - 1
> E. Cottontail - 1
> Coyote - 1
> Black Rat Snake - 1
> Unknown - 2
>
> We should have kept track of Turkey Vultures on the way home as they were often visible soaring but none were near the carcasses. All this made me reflect about their population over the years? Has it increased significantly? I don't ever remember there being a lack of seeing them when it wasn't winter?
>
> I also remember as a teenager, when trapping and selling furs wasn't as taboo in our culture, that raccoons were seldom seen as roadkills. First, the population was surely lower due to all the trapping and the strong fur market. But also a person could pick up a road-killed raccoon, not even skin it, and sell it for 35.00 or more to a local fur buyer. Very few dead raccoons were ever seen on the roads because of that.
>
> The recent thread concerning Black Vultures and their predation on calves also comes to mind. In the northern part of the state, Black Vultures are not seen. I have no idea if their population has increased very much over the years or not? Would the reduced trapping of furbearers today (due to such low prices) and the associated increase in roadkills have influenced an increase in either Turkey Vultures or Black Vultures over the years?
>
> If anyone has some knowledge of their population trends, please share that information if you would?
>
> Enjoy the Spring!!
>
>
> Terry L. Miller
> Plattsburg, MO
> <millert832...>
>
> www.millerstaxidermy.net
>
> Follow me on Instagram: terryl.miller
>
> "Ever since the creation of the world his invisible nature, namely his eternal power and deity, has been clearly perceived in the things that have been made." Romans 1:20
> The Missouri Birding Society's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> Archives / Subscription options / MBS Website / Email the list owners
> ABA Birding Code of Ethics
>
> The Missouri Birding Society's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> Archives / Subscription options / MBS Website / Email the list owners
> ABA Birding Code of Ethics
>
> The Missouri Birding Society's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> Archives / Subscription options / MBS Website / Email the list owners
> ABA Birding Code of Ethics
>
>
> The Missouri Birding Society's Wild Bird Discussion Forum
> Archives / Subscription options / MBS Website / Email the list owners
> ABA Birding Code of Ethics


------------------------------------------------------------
The Missouri Birding Society's Wild Bird Discussion Forum

List archives: https://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html
MBS Website: http://mobirds.org/
Questions or comments? Email the list owners: mailto:<mobirds-l-request...>
To unsubscribe or change subscription options: https://po.missouri.edu/cgi-bin/wa?SUBED1=mobirds-l&A=1
ABA Birding Code of Ethics: http://www.aba.org/about/ethics.html
 
Join us on Facebook!