Date: 4/2/21 12:23 pm
From: Beverly Osband <beveb...>
Subject: [Tweeters] Rufous hummingbird - Ravenna/Roosevelt
3/31 Bev Osband-- Rufous hummingbird (male) Ravenna/Roosevelt feeding at a red currant bush


-----Original Message-----
>From: <tweeters-request...>
>Sent: Apr 2, 2021 12:03 PM
>To: <tweeters...>
>Subject: Tweeters Digest, Vol 200, Issue 2
>
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>Today's Topics:
>
> 1. COHA (Diann MacRae)
> 2. Re: long-billed syndrome question - tangent (Peter H Wimberger)
> 3. Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2021-04-01
> (<birdmarymoor...>)
> 4. April Fool's Day birds -- for real, and an eBird help
> request. (Kevin Lucas)
> 5. CNN: Salmonella infections in 8 states could be tied to wild
> songbirds, CDC says (Dan Reiff)
> 6. Costal Spring Migration (Roger Moyer)
> 7. Re: Bird Names for Birds runs into an obstacle
> (NANCY AND EUGENE HUNN)
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Message: 1
>Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2021 22:40:40 +0200
>From: Diann MacRae <tvulture...>
>To: tweeters t <tweeters...>
>Subject: [Tweeters] COHA
>Message-ID:
> <trinity-14adc540-d025-436e-a771-181fe3de70e1-1617309640561@3c-app-mailcom-bs13>
>
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>------------------------------
>
>Message: 2
>Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2021 20:51:22 +0000
>From: Peter H Wimberger <phwimberger...>
>To: "<tweeters...>" <tweeters...>
>Subject: Re: [Tweeters] long-billed syndrome question - tangent
>Message-ID: <fc0d852c348c49bb9251e6616f2b0e5c...>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>Hi Tweets,
>A Caroline van Hemert tangent. If you like tales of adventure written by natural historians/birders, Caroline van Hemert wrote wonderful account of her and her husband's 4000 mile human-powered journey from Bellingham to the Arctic Ocean. She does a really nice job of blending observations of the world around her with describing the rewards and challenges of that kind of epic undertaking. And without the over-blown histrionics of a lot of adventure books.
>
>Peter Wimberger
>Tacoma, WA
>
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>------------------------------
>
>Message: 3
>Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2021 15:00:01 -0700
>From: <birdmarymoor...>
>To: "Tweeters" <tweeters...>
>Subject: [Tweeters] Marymoor Park (Redmond, King Co.) 2021-04-01
>Message-ID: <EBE46353B8AB4D91A7C66CCD11F3208F@DESKTOPER2GUVC>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
>Tweets ? we had a really good day at Marymoor, and that?s no fooling. It was a crisp 35 degrees to start, but the sun made its way through the thin overcast and by 9:00 we were too warm. Lots to look at today. Listening to birds was hampered by the American Robin Tabernacle Choir belting out all of their famous hits at full volume. We were a big group, and Jordan again volunteered to lead a group going the other direction around the loop.
>
>Highlights:
> a.. Greater White-fronted Goose ? Jordan?s group had one with a flock of Canadas. We?ve only ever had 4 later spring sightings
> b.. Cackling Goose ? Also with that flock of Canadas. Jordan said that these had extra large areas of white on the neck
> c.. Ten species of duck ? again
> d.. CALIFORNIA QUAIL ? predawn, Matt and I heard and then saw a male along the southwest edge of the East Meadow. First of Year (FOY)
> e.. TURKEY VULTURE ? Jordan?s group had one over the Lake Platform. Hours later, my group had one over the Rowing Club. (FOY)
> f.. Sharp-shinned Hawk ? My group saw one over the Pea Patch. Some people from Jordan?s group had one too.
> g.. Varied Thrush ? Jordan?s group had one
> h.. Cedar Waxwing ? my group had a small flock
> i.. AMERICAN PIPIT ? my group had one on the grass in the Dog Meadow. (FOY)
> j.. American Goldfinch ? after a 3-week absence, we had these in several locations, including some singing. Males are turning bright
> k.. Savannah Sparrow ? several birds in East Meadow, one in Pea Patch. First songs
> l.. WHITE-THROATED SPARROW ? my group had 2 birds (I think, with one being very drab) next to Dog Central
> m.. White-crowned Sparrow ? Pea Patch, among other places. Jordan?s group heard both Pugetensis and Gambeli songs
> n.. Yellow-rumped Warbler ? some singing, some nice Audubon?s males
> o.. Townsend?s Warbler ? two singing near stage ? got looks at one. Songs sounded weak, and more like Black-throated Gray
>Misses today included Virginia Rail, Cooper?s Hawk, Northern Shrike*, and Western Meadowlark.
>
>Jordan?s group had 56 species, my group had 61 species though several were heard-only. Combined, we had 70 species.
>
>*Yesterday, I was there in the afternoon, and picked up three additional species: One BAND-TAILED PIGEON (FOY), one MERLIN, and one NORTHERN SHRIKE, to make 73 species for the week!
>
>I think we?re at 96 species for the year.
>
>= Michael Hobbs
>= www.marymoor.org/birding.htm
>= <BirdMarymoor...>
>
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>------------------------------
>
>Message: 4
>Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2021 21:08:01 -0700
>From: Kevin Lucas <vikingcove...>
>To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
>Subject: [Tweeters] April Fool's Day birds -- for real, and an eBird
> help request.
>Message-ID:
> <CA+YY600Y7Ayq+Q3mTDQumo5H=hufF+<d31tha9FUg5nWbqzXewg...>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
>Today I was treated with several April Fool's Day birds in the lower Yakima
>Valley. The first was a Eurasian Green-winged Teal with the boldest white
>facial markings I've seen on a Green-winged Teal. I didn't see the
>horizontal white line on its sides until I reviewed my photos. It
>April-fooled me into thinking it didn't have any white side marks.
>
>With American vs Eurasian Green-winged Teal, I see lots of eBird "complete"
>checklists here that list only Green-winged Teal (American). I can only
>identify drake (male) Green-winged Teal to American vs Eurasian vs American
>x Eurasian. Is there some trick that experts are using, other than
>assumption, to distinguish female Green-winged Teal here to be American and
>not Eurasian? Even when female Green-winged Teal flush and show their
>speculums, I think it would be tough to make the distinction on every hen
>based on field observation. I enter drakes as Green-winged Teal (American),
>and hens as simply Green-winged Teal, choosing accuracy over precision
>lumping. Perhaps there's a hen Green-winged Teal field mark I'm missing.
>
>The second treat today was a drake Blue-winged Teal. I watched him fly
>across in front of me and didn't even think to try for a photo until he'd
>flown out of view, when I realized my report would be disbelieved by the
>usual suspects. But I'd gotten a great view, and that's what it's about for
>me. It's a bit early for Blue-winged Teal here. My wife & I had seen a
>couple of Blue-winged Teal drakes on a Solstice bird count near Toppenish
>Creek in December some years back, but our sighting was dismissed by the
>local experts -- portending a pattern of such disbelief. Fortunately today,
>I got another sighting of a drake Blue-winged Teal, probably the same
>individual, and had capable cameras ready. He gave me plenty of time to
>admire him in the scope too.
>
>The third treat today was a Western Sandpiper in a flock of forty-two
>Dunlin with a Least Sandpiper. The Western Sandpiper is a bit early, and is
>flagged by eBird. The Dunlin aren't early. I've found them here in winter.
>But forty-two set off the eBird alarm. Anyway it was great to watch the dun
>ones pretty close in great light on a balmy day, and to keep seeing and
>hearing the two peeps here and there among them.
>
>Today I tried using an eBird link I'd created a few years ago. It would
>give me a list of the "earliest arrival dates" for each species in the
>county. I know that didn't show sightings not entered, nor reports not
>"confirmed", and it showed some "confirmed" reports should not be, but it
>gave me an idea if something I saw was off the charts. The bar chart
>doesn't cut it for this for me. Can anyone tell me how to navigate to such
>an arrivals report on eBird now?
>
>This is the bookmarked link I'd saved, that no longer works. It's a
>"retired tool" not an April Fool's joke per-se, but it's got me fooled:
>
>ebird.org/ebird/sightings?locInfo.regionType=subnational2&locInfo.regionCode=US-WA-077&continuous=false&beginYear=1968&endYear=2021&listType=first
>
>Thanks for your help.
>
>
>Qui tacet consentire videtur
>https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
>
>Kevin Lucas
>Yakima County, WA
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>------------------------------
>
>Message: 5
>Date: Thu, 1 Apr 2021 23:37:24 -0700
>From: Dan Reiff <dan.owl.reiff...>
>To: Tweeters <tweeters...>
>Subject: [Tweeters] CNN: Salmonella infections in 8 states could be
> tied to wild songbirds, CDC says
>Message-ID: <9E777ACB-E5F8-4C0E-B496-9ABD26B207A7...>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
>
>Salmonella infections in 8 states could be tied to wild songbirds, CDC says
>Investigators are looking into an outbreak of salmonella infections in 19 people that could be associated with sick or dead birds, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
>Read in CNN: https://apple.news/Aur2TFUmZTfmMb6wQ766P2Q
>
>
>Shared from Apple News
>
>
>
>Sent from my iPhone
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>------------------------------
>
>Message: 6
>Date: Fri, 2 Apr 2021 14:55:18 +0000
>From: Roger Moyer <rogermoyer1...>
>To: "<tweeters...>" <tweeters...>
>Subject: [Tweeters] Costal Spring Migration
>Message-ID:
> <CY4PR0401MB357185F2C9BB511226142B2FFF7A9...>
>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
>Has anyone been out to Grays and Pacific Counties to see migration. If so how is i coming along. I'm thinking about going this weekend.
>
>Roger Moyer
>Chehalis
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>------------------------------
>
>Message: 7
>Date: Fri, 2 Apr 2021 09:18:10 -0700 (PDT)
>From: NANCY AND EUGENE HUNN <enhunn323...>
>To: Matt Bartels <mattxyz...>, Tweeters
> <tweeters...>
>Subject: Re: [Tweeters] Bird Names for Birds runs into an obstacle
>Message-ID: <220638257.276366.1617380294622...>
>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
>Love it! "Quack" for duck sp.
>
>Gene Hunn
>
>> On 04/01/2021 4:20 AM Matt Bartels <mattxyz...> wrote:
>>
>>
>> As our technological capabilities have advanced, an unexpected obstacle has arisen to confound a worthwhile project. In the past year, Bird Names For Birds https://birdnamesforbirds.wordpress.com/ has elevated the long discussion over how we name birds. After beginning by calling out the problematic behavior of many species? namesakes, the discussion evolved to ask why any species should be named after humans at all?
>>
>> One recurring theme in the re-naming debates was that bird names should stop centering humans. Before long, the natural next step came to mind: Wouldn?t it be better if we could just call birds by the names they call themselves and each other? As initiative co-founder Jordan Rudder said at the time ?the solution was right there in our name: Bird names for birds!? The goal moved beyond just removing human names to the bigger aspiration to call birds what they want to be called. Until recently, this was an idea beyond our capabilities. Then suddenly, technology caught up and the seemingly impossible became reality.
>>
>> In the past decade, sensor technology has evolved faster than ever. Sensors are now increasingly able to record and translate brain activity into understandable thoughts, actions and yes, names. It was only a matter of time before a group of curious ornithologists adapted this work to ask ?what do birds call themselves and each other??
>>
>> Unfortunately, once results began to come back, problems quickly emerged. First, when scientists uncovered self-referential names, they quickly realized that birds tend to be a bit dramatic in their self-evaluations: "It is simply astounding how many species of raptor refer to themselves as essentially ?the bringer of terror from the skies? said one researcher. She continued, ?Essentially all passerines, even sparrows, use some variant of ?most beautiful creature ever? to refer to themselves. Hummingbirds found a way to combine titles of both 'most beautiful and most fierce? into their names?? What became apparent was that self-referential names would never do the trick of distinguishing between species, because only a few titles were ever in use. Of the over 10,000 species worldwide, scientists projected that only 50-100 names were in use. Birds, it turns out, are not particularly creative in their chosen names.
>>
>> The situation became even worse, believe it or not, when scientists looked at birds? names for each other. The hope for more variety was realized, but another problem emerged. As one researcher put it ?I never expected so much profanity?.We just couldn?t begin to publish the phrases that corvids use for other passerines; shorebirds use remarkably colorful names to disparage the feeding abilities of sparrows, and tubenoses uniformly use horrible language to refer to less agile flyers. There was widespread disdain for ducks and their sexual exploits that led to vulgar names that, again, could never be printed in a field guide.? Human insults turn out to be some of the most mild of the animal kingdom.
>>
>> In the end, Bird Names for Birds project is considering a name change. While less eloquent, the project may soon be known as ?Slightly Less Problematic Names for Birds" or maybe the simple ?Better Names for Birds.?
>>
>>
>> Matt Bartels
>> Seattle, WA
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Tweeters mailing list
>> <Tweeters...>
>> http://mailman11.u.washington.edu/mailman/listinfo/tweeters
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