Date: 3/11/21 1:25 pm
From: Hephziabah Beulah <hephziabahb...>
Subject: [wisb] Re: Reporting nest sites
Very well said Tom.
Hep
Brookfield, WI

On Wed, Mar 10, 2021, 10:43 AM Tom Sykes <sykes...> wrote:

> From time to time the issue of reporting bird nests appears on the list.
> And while there is some disagreement about whether or not a nest site is or
> is not being disturbed by human presence, I would direct you to both the
> ABA Birding Ethics and WSO Birding Ethics sites as a reminder for those
> wondering about the ethics of reporting a nest site. WISBIRDN subscribes to
> following both.
>
> https://wsobirds.org/about-wso/code-of-ethics
>
> https://www.aba.org/aba-code-of-birding-ethics/
>
> It is true that many reports of nesting raptors appear on eBird as well as
> many other listservs and Facebook pages. Citizen Science is a great tool
> but it is also used by a few unethical people. People who don’t care about
> disturbing birds in order to get “the perfect shot”, or, people who would
> traffic in birds. Even curious onlookers. Fortunately, these people are in
> a minority. But they are out there.
>
> It’s also one thing for one or two people to observe a nest but consider a
> report in an urban area when many people arrive at the same time - as with
> the eagle nest recently reported in Walworth city. Birds may be
> intimidated. Or not. The problem is, it’s usually too late to reverse the
> damage when it’s found to be they are disturbed.
>
> Some years ago an eagle nest was reported in Horicon Marsh. Fish and
> Wildlife staff closed off the immediate area although the nest could be
> observed at some distance. The eagles were successful. There have been
> eagle nests up and down the Fox River near Appleton easily seen by anyone
> who wishes to observe at a safe distance. The same with many lakes in the
> northern part of the state.
>
> I happened to volunteer at a wildlife refuge in Florida for five months
> where a Bald Eagle had set up a nest and produced young. Although the nest
> was quite high, we roped off the area to prevent disturbing the nest site.
> These birds were quite skittish whenever anyone approached the base of the
> tree. A local member of the Audubon Society objected claiming the birds
> were not at all disturbed and was subsequently banned from the refuge when
> he ignored the roped off area and had gone so far as to fly a drone toward
> the nest to get video. And this was the local president of an Audubon
> chapter!
>
> It all boils down to using common sense and taking into consideration the
> particular situation. Just because one raptor nest doesn’t appear to be
> troubled by human activity, doesn’t necessarily apply to another raptor
> nest. Great care should be taken when reporting a sighting. If in doubt,
> don’t report.
>
> Tom Sykes
> Wisbirdn List Owner
> <sykes...>
>
>
>
>
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>

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