Date: 2/22/21 3:38 pm
From: Robert O'Brien <baro...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Another common name
And the famous Neal Maine of Seaside and environs calls them
Buffalo-heads! They do seem to have proportionately large
heads for their little Butterball bodies.
Bob OBrien Carver OR

On Sun, Feb 14, 2021 at 6:38 AM Darrel Faxon <t4c1x...> wrote:

> Dan,
> As to Shovelers being called Soup Lips. Haven't you ever watched them
> feeding at sewage ponds, which they seem especially to love? They swim
> along with beaks in the water, sipping much like someone trying to taste
> soup, which is a little bit too hot. Seems like an appropriate name. Think
> the AOU would consider making the change?
>
> Darrel
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Owen Schmidt" <oschmidt...>
> To: "obol" <obol...>
> Cc: "Dan Gleason" <dan-gleason...>
> Sent: Saturday, February 13, 2021 9:06:40 PM
> Subject: [obol] Re: Another common name
>
> …. Lord God Bird also refers to Ivory-billed Woodpecker.
>
> There was a duck hunter walking Jackson Road at Brownsmead a week ago or
> so holding a duck. I pulled up, rolled down the window, “whatcha got
> there?” “Sprig. There's only sprig here.” Then he held up the bird.
> “Sprig hen.” Okay.
>
> Female Northern Pintail. And there were a lot in those ponds.
>
> <oschmidt...>
> Saturday, February 13, 2021
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Feb 13, 2021, at 7:35 PM, Dan Gleason <dan-gleason...>
> wrote:
> >
> > There are many colloquial and regional names associated with birds, and
> ducks in particular as hunters have come up with many creative names. Many
> years ago i started collecting names for North American birds. I found a
> little over 12,000 names before I eventually stopped actively looking.
> >
> > Butterball most often refers to Bufflehead but it has been applied to
> other ducks at times, most often to Ruddy Duck. The meat was apparently
> considered “fatty” or “buttery”, thus the nickname. Do you know where the
> name Bufflehead itself comes from? This was once considered by many to be
> the “Buffalo-headed Duck” because of the shaggy appearance of the head is
> similar to that of a buffalo. It became shortened to Bufflehead.
> >
> > In addition to Butterball, the Ruddy Duck was known by many other names.
> Shot Pouch was a frequent one. The bird was considered hard to kill and you
> may need a full pouch of shot to do so. The hard to kill reputation led to
> other nicknames as well, such as Iron Head, Lightwood Knot (lightwood is
> the wood from which turpentine is obtained and the knots are especially
> hard) and Hickory Head (hickory is a hard wood). The Ruddy Duck has close
> to 100 nicknames, some, like Bluebill are obvious and some are very
> colorful. My favorite is God-damn. This comes from a hunters magazine in
> the Carolinas in the 1880s. A local hunter was asked about these ducks. He
> said, “Most people just call them Dickeys, ya know, because of the way they
> just go dickey-dickey-dickey across the water when they take off. But
> around here we just call them God Damns because they’re so god damn to kill.
> >
> > And just a couple of other odd duck names: Cow Frog and Soup Lips. Both
> of these names refer to Northern Shoveler. I’ve never found a definitive
> reason for these names but guesses I’ve seen are: Soup Lips seems to be a
> reference to the beak shape. Cow Frog is apparently because they may sit on
> shallow, temporary ponds in cattle pastures and the green head reminds one
> of a frog. If you know a better reason for these names I’d like to know it.
> These were just guesses from someone who really didn’t know.
> >
> > It’s not just ducks. There are many other colorful names for all kinds
> of birds. Field Officer for Red-winged Blackbird (from the red epaulets on
> the wing like those on the shoulders of a military uniform. Another
> favorite is Lord God Bird. I imagine this could be fitting for the first
> time someone sees a Pileated Woodpecker.
> >
> >
> > Dan Gleason
> > Owner, Wild Birds Unlimited of Eugene
> > Ornithology Instructor, retired, University of Oregon
> > <dan-gleason...>
> >
> >
> >> On Feb 13, 2021, at 6:40 PM, Sandy Leaptrott <sandyleapt...>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Has anyone every heard Buffleheads referred to as Butter Balls? That
> is what Dad called them in Waldport, Oregon in the early 1930’s. I have no
> idea why.
> >>
> >> Sandy Leaptrott
> >> NE Portland
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> Sent from my iPad
> >> *******
> >> UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
> >> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> >> Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> >
> > *******
> > UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
> > OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> > Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
> >
>
> *******
> UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
>
> *******
> UNSUBSCRIBE: www.freelists.org/list/obol
> OBOL archives: www.freelists.org/archive/obol
> Contact moderator: <obol-moderators...>
>
>

 
Join us on Facebook!