Date: 1/5/21 9:54 am
From: Daniel Mason <millipede1977...>
Subject: Re: Harriers and short-ears
There's always more sightings than we see on eBird but, they aren't
commonly seen. They're VERY habitat specific and the habitat they use is
not in abundance in many parts of the state, and not birded frequently.
Where I am in Benton county, I know of a single location where a person
MIGHT find one. Then again, like a LOT of birds, not being seen doesn't
equal not being present. How much land around here is not explored
enough to know if they're around or not?
in fact, I just thought of a location that I can bet nobody has ever
reported or even tried but, I'm thinking it might be a good place. I
might have to investigate that.

A couple winters ago, I am pretty sure I heard one in my neighborhood on
at least two occasions but, I could not guarantee it. Somehow this is a
bird that is still on my needs list.
I can't say whether or not the word "rare" applies to them here but I
can say that I do not know of anywhere near me where I could go and
expect to see anything close to what people have reported over in the
prairies of OK.
Maybe some of us need to do some more investigating and find places
where they might be overlooked.

In Siloam Springs...
Daniel Mason

On 1/5/2021 8:08 AM, Jerry Davis wrote:
> I think there are sightings of Short-eared owls in Arkansas than has
> been documented in databases like eBird. This lack of data gives
> people the impression that they are rare in Arkansas rather than
> something that could be seen.
>
> Jerry Wayne Davis
> Hot Springs
>
> -----Original Message----- From: Don Simons
> Sent: Tuesday, January 5, 2021 6:54 AM
> To: <ARBIRD-L...>
> Subject: Harriers and short-ears
>
> Again, Joe Neil inspires me to comment. His recent notes about
> short-eared owls reminds me of seeing a number of them in Chicot
> county more than 20 years ago.
>
> One late afternoon I found a fallow field just off of highway 65. A
> few harriers were patrolling just above grass tops as they do. One by
> one, they would drop down into an area of the field hidden by tall
> grass. I don’t remember how many, but it was more than a few.
>
> Just as it was getting dark, out of the same area of the field, up
> popped a short-eared owl. Then another and another, I don’t remember
> how many, maybe just a few. It was as if was their turn to patrol the
> field for rodents.
>
> I thought it strange to see owls and hawks roosting in the same area.
> A check on harriers on the Cornell website allaboutbirds.org, I
> learned, “In winter, Northern Harriers roost in groups on the ground,
> sometimes with Short-eared Owls.”
>
> Something to watch for.
>
> Have an excellent year of birding.
>
> Don
>
> Sent from my iPad
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