Date: 10/30/20 8:09 am
From: larspernorgren <larspernorgren...>
Subject: [obol] Re: California vs. Woodhouse's Scrub Jays in Oregon
Pinon pine was native to the Ft Rock basin during the post glacial maximum along with Turkeys. This based on Bidwell's archaeology in the 60s. He found pinon charcoal in caves. Nuts could have been traded far from their origin, but it's unlikely a horsefree culture would transport firewood very far. Pinon now stops a little north of Reno, but occurs in Idaho near the Utah line. I believe Scott's Oriole may breed that far north as well. Juniper Titmouse was recorded on the Dubois WY CBC in the 70s. It's interesting that its Oregon range has been stable for a century while nearly all other "southern" species have made dramatic range expansions. Joel Geier's explanation of its dependence on very old junipers for nest cavities seems highly plausible.Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
-------- Original message --------From: Jerry Tangren <kloshewoods...> Date: 10/30/20 7:55 AM (GMT-08:00) To: <rriparia...>, Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>, <namitzr...> Cc: OBOL Freelist <obol...> Subject: [obol] Re: California vs. Woodhouse's Scrub Jays in Oregon


As a note, I believe the adaptation of Woodhouses across the CA-NV cline is to extracting nuts from the pines they frequent and not so much to more arid environments.



—Jerry Tangren



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From: <obol-bounce...> <obol-bounce...> on behalf of <rriparia...> <rriparia...>
Sent: Friday, October 30, 2020 6:54:46 AM
To: Alan Contreras <acontrer56...>; <namitzr...> <namitzr...>
Cc: OBOL Freelist <obol...>
Subject: [obol] Re: California vs. Woodhouse's Scrub Jays in Oregon
 



I recall being along while Marty St. Louis when he conducted the Blizzard Gap BBS, in the mid-80s. That route starts near the very SE corner of Lake County, like maybe just a few miles north of the Nevada border. The habitat, where the few scrub
jays recorded on this route, is sage, and very scattered juniper, although, maybe not so scattered where they occurred. I do recall having a discussion with Marty about their occurrence on this route, and possibly missed seeing one or more.... can't recall
how many I saw...  My memory has an image of "valley" on the north side of Hwy 140, with junipers, so rim rock is a likely habitat feature, and so possibly some Mountain Mahogany. And, I believe Green-tailed Towhee was there too (not sure about that)
I see that the BBS data has scrub jay recorded as California/Woodhouse. Given that Namitz mentions a "discrepancy" in Oregon due to a lack of records north of Nevada's occurrence, I would suggest going directly to the stops where these jays
have been seen/detected on past counts to check, and get audio recording, along with photos. The stops are "in line" with Nevada's ebird occurrences map.
Marty may read this. If so, maybe he could comment further, and give more insight to the location(s). Maybe he's even heard them and now has a stronger opinion about what they possibly are there.


Kevin Spencer



Sent from my Verizon LG Smartphone






------ Original message------
From: Alan Contreras
Date: Thu, Oct 29, 2020 8:09 PM
To: na <mitzr...>;
Cc: OBOL Freelist;
Subject:[obol] Re: California vs. Woodhouse's Scrub Jays in Oregon



Are there any Oregon records of Woodhouse’s confirmed by photo or specimen? Do we have modern confirmation of the id of the old Steens specimens?

Alan Contreras
Eugene, Oregon

<acontrer56...>

www.alanlcontreras.com


> On Oct 29, 2020, at 8:03 PM, Russ Namitz wrote:
>
> All-
>
> There is an interesting discrepancy of accepted records of scrub jays between us (OR) and Nevada .....California on our side, Woodhouse’s on the Nevada side. Seems like the default is Woodhouse’s in Nevada and California in SE Oregon. We (OR) have photographs....just saying.
>
> Russ
>
> Sent from my iPhone5%H$HL0ÁúÞzX¬¶Ê+ƒùb²ßèn‰NâÚ­Èb½ë0Ãëyéb²Û(®Ú­Èb½ïèn‰B¢{ZrÙ¨uêÚ¶Šèn‰f¡×«jÚ+±úÞzX¬¶Ê+
*******
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