Date: 10/29/20 12:08 pm
From: Kevin Scaldeferri <kevin...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Catharus thrush phenology: eBird Target List data
From the front page of eBird, one can click on "Help", which takes you to a
page where the first listed help topic is "Get started with eBird
<https://support.ebird.org/en/support/solutions/articles/48001158707-get-started-with-ebird>".
Among other things, that page discusses "Targets".

On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 11:08 AM Bob Archer <rabican1...> wrote:

> Target is on the Explore page. You can pick counties etc and see the
> frequencies previously described. The Help area of eBird has a search
> function as well to get you instructions.
>
> Bob Archer
> pdx
>
> On Thu, Oct 29, 2020 at 9:04 AM Paul Sullivan <paultsullivan...>
> wrote:
>
>> Hi Wayne,
>>
>>
>>
>> Thanks for this information; it sheds good light on the question at hand.
>>
>>
>>
>> However, your explanation begs one question. Who knew there was
>> something called “Target” feature in eBird? And how would one ever find
>> it? Could you give a naïve, ordinary person directions to get to get to
>> such a feature?
>>
>>
>>
>> Does one have to be signed up with eBird, have a large battery of eBird
>> checklists on file, and a “wish list” of birds in location X to use the
>> “Target” feature?
>>
>>
>>
>> Asking for a friend.
>>
>>
>>
>> Paul Sullivan
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* Wayne Weber [mailto:<contopus...>]
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, October 28, 2020 8:48 PM
>> *To:* OBOL2 <obol...>
>> *Cc:* PAUL SULLIVAN <paultsullivan...>
>> *Subject:* Catharus thrush phenology: eBird Target List data
>>
>>
>>
>> Paul and Oregon Birders,
>>
>>
>>
>> In late October, Hermit Thrush is far more likely in your area than
>> Swainson’s. Swainson’s is still possible, but highly unlikely at the late
>> date of October 28.
>>
>>
>>
>> To quantify the likelihood of each species in October, I used the
>> “Target” feature of eBird for nearby counties, which lists the percentage
>> of lists containing each species for the whole month. Yamhill has a very
>> small sample size for October (327 lists), so is not very useful. However,
>> Multnomah has 8133 October lists, Washington has 5211, and Clackamas has
>> 2137. Here are the results, in percentage of October checklists containing
>> each species:
>>
>>
>>
>> MULTNOMAH
>>
>>
>>
>> Hermit Thrush 6.15%
>>
>> Swainson’s Thrush 0.87%
>>
>>
>>
>> WASHINGTON
>>
>>
>>
>> Hermit Thrush 1.34%
>>
>> Swainson’s Thrush 0.69%
>>
>>
>>
>> CLACKAMAS
>>
>>
>>
>> Hermit Thrush 3.37%
>>
>> Swainson’s Thrush 0.47%
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> As you can see, Hermit Thrush is far more frequent than Swainson’s. I am
>> surprised at the apparent scarcity of Hermit Thrushes in Washington County;
>> the data for Multnomah and Clackamas are closer to what I would expect.
>>
>>
>>
>> Of course, these data are for the entire month of October. Most of the
>> Swainson’s sightings were probably in the first week of October. In the
>> last week, I would expect that Hermit is 10 to 20 times as likely as
>> Swainson’s. However, as you know, Hermit Thrushes do spend the winter in
>> your area in small numbers.
>>
>>
>>
>> In my area (Vancouver, BC), the peak fall migration for Hermit Thrushes
>> is about mid-September to mid-October. I would expect that that they are
>> not much later (maybe a week?) in northwestern Oregon. Thus, a date of
>> October 28 is getting kind of late even for Hermit Thrush, unless your bird
>> was preparing to spend the winter.
>>
>>
>>
>> I hope these data illustrate how useful “Target Lists” can be to quantify
>> the likelihood of occurrence of any species in a particular month, at least
>> for counties with large sample sizes. (The same could be done for an entire
>> state, but this would be much less useful for a state as large as varied as
>> Oregon.)
>>
>>
>>
>> All the best,
>>
>>
>>
>> Wayne Weber
>>
>> Delta, BC, Canada
>>
>> <contopus...>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> *From:* <obol-bounce...> [mailto:<obol-bounce...>
>> <obol-bounce...>] *On Behalf Of *Paul Sullivan
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, October 28, 2020 9:44 AM
>> *To:* <obol...>; YamhillBirds
>> *Subject:* [obol] Catharus thrush phenology
>>
>>
>>
>> It’s foggy here in McMinnville this morning. Just moments ago at 9 AM, I
>> was scanning my backyard, counting the increasing number of juncos (up to
>> 12 now), when a brown bird emerged from under a bush. I thought, “Oh good,
>> a fox sparrow.”
>>
>>
>>
>> Then I realized, “No, it’s a THRUSH!” I locked on it with my binoculars
>> as it hopped straight toward me, showing the thrush, not sparrow beak. Was
>> it hermit or Swainson’s? My first thought was Swainson’s, but then I
>> thought could it be hermit? I was waiting for it to turn and show me its
>> tail, when it suddenly exploded sideways out of my field of view and was
>> gone. I haven’t seen it again.
>>
>>
>>
>> I checked my copy of The Birds of Rummel Street that tallies 23 years of
>> sightings in this backyard (1993-2016). The data displays presence or
>> absence of a given species in each of 4 weeks in each month of each year.
>>
>> Swainson’s thrushes were recorded in 58 times, all between the first week
>> of April and the first week of October.
>>
>> Hermit thrushes were recorded in 3 times between May and October, and 4
>> times between the third week of November and the second week of February.
>>
>>
>>
>> What do folks who follow phenology say?
>>
>>
>>
>> Paul Sullivan
>>
>> McMinnville
>>
>

 
Join us on Facebook!