Date: 9/5/20 5:16 pm
From: Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: the story of Travis County's first Red Phalarope
That's the first time I have seen the picture. Cool. I doubt Harry O.
ever saw or even knew of this bird. He died a bit over three months later
and I am sure Kincaid, the Rowlett's and the other contributors to BLOT
made sure it was included in that tome. Murky waters.


On Sat, Sep 5, 2020 at 5:02 PM Tim Fennell <tfennell...> wrote:

> If you want to see a photo of what is probably this bird, you can check
> out the photo in the eBird checklist at:
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S44311205
>
> I added the Signal Smoke account to the species details in the checklist.
>
> Tim Fennell
> Round Rock,TX
>
> On Saturday, September 5, 2020, 09:44:49 AM CDT, <bertf...>
> wrote:
>
>
> Texbirders,
>
> I have been reading old issues of Signal Smoke and came across this
> interesting account of Travis birders attempting to identify a new species
> for the county.
>
> Signal Smoke, October 1963, "Birding with The Beavers. The afternoon of
> September 15, found us at the Sewage Ponds, ... Then we noticed two
> phalaropes swimming close together in the center of the largest pond. We
> immediately recognized that they were quite dark-backed and generally had
> the appearance of Northern Phalaropes; but one of the birds was obviously
> much larger than the other. During the next hour of close scrutiny from
> the bank, we became more and more suspicious of that larger, grayer,
> stouter-billed phalarope.
>
> "At last, suspicion grew into near conviction; and since a 'sanitary'
> reputation is worth even more points among birders than an eager one, we
> knew we must prove our potentially dangerous suspicion. In an act of
> utmost 'eager beaverism' John stripped to his underwear and went after the
> phalarope in its own element. John's slowly moving head must have looked
> like a duck, for the two phalaropes showed virtually no alarm at his
> approach. They simply swam slowly away, keeping just beyond arm's length.
>
> "After about 40 minutes of dog-paddling, John was inches closer. He
> reached slowly upward beneath the bird and -- and he had it! What wild,
> ecstatic joy, what cries and leaps into the air from the beavers on the
> bank accompanied his grasp of that bird, of that Red Phalarope. And a Red
> Phalarope, indeed, it was, as Kincaid was soon to certify after careful
> measurement and comparison with Ridgeway. A search of the literature
> revealed that this normally pelagic species had been recorded but 7 or 8
> times in Texas and, of course, never in Travis County. - The Beavers"
>
> Bert Frenz
>
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Belize
>
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> <Bert2...>
>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
>
>


--

Brush Freeman
<http://www.biospatialsevices.com>
Utley & Cedar Park, Texas

 
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