Date: 8/27/20 8:44 am
From: Owen Schmidt <oschmidt...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Baird's food question

……. Sand Hopper! Thank you, Range.

<oschmidt...>
Thursday, August 27, 2020






> On Aug 26, 2020, at 10:46 PM, Range Bayer <range.bayer...> wrote:
>
> Hi,
>
> They are probably a species of beach hopper (https://www.netartsbaytoday.org/html/beach_hoppers.html <https://www.netartsbaytoday.org/html/beach_hoppers.html>). Beach hoppers are amphipod crustaceans that can live out of water. They don't fly, but they "take off" with hops. They hop by tucking their tail under their body and quickly flicking it out, hurtling them into the air (https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/wildlife-explorer/marine/crustaceans/sand-hopper <https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/wildlife-explorer/marine/crustaceans/sand-hopper>). OIMB has student projects for learning about their jumping (https://oimb.uoregon.edu/Documents/GK12/GK12-Second-BeachHopperIntro.pdf <https://oimb.uoregon.edu/Documents/GK12/GK12-Second-BeachHopperIntro.pdf>).
>
> They can be quite numerous, and other shorebirds also go after them. Sometimes they are mistakenly called sand fleas.
>
> In the top photo, the beach hopper's two antenna are pointing downward as it is upside down in that hop.
>
> One day at a time,
>
> Range Bayer, Newport, Oregon.
>
> On Wed, Aug 26, 2020 at 10:22 PM Owen Schmidt <oschmidt...> <mailto:<oschmidt...>> wrote:
>
> …… is there a critter that lives in the dry sand but can somehow become airborne to look like this, and apparently can catch the attention of a Baird’s Sandpiper:
>
> <Screen Shot 2020-08-26 at 10.09.35 PM.png>
>
>
> …… which also happens to be a favorite food for Baird’s Sandpiper, and looks like this when it lands back on the dune:
>
> <Screen Shot 2020-08-26 at 10.10.36 PM.png>
>
>
> ….. and might also help to explain why Baird’s Sandpipers are almost always found on the dry sand?
>
> <oschmidt...> <mailto:<oschmidt...>
> Wednesday, August 26, 2020
>
>
>
>
>


 
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