Date: 8/1/20 6:51 am
From: Sylvia Miskoe <sylviasmiskoe...>
Subject: Re: [NHBirds] Digest for - 19 updates in 10 topics
There are my Barn swallow observations.
I have had barn swallows in my barn and ell for many years so here are my
observations:
They return about the first of May and leave about the first of August.
Always a few stragglers that still have babies.
There are at least 2 cries: a sharp high pitched chirp which is a danger
alert and a contented twittering when there is no danger. There is also
the babies' cheeping when an adult nears with food. That is a chorus and
all babies are calling with open mouths.
The birds will dive bomb a preceived intruder, giving their danger call.
Should that creature be a cat, they will fly just out of the cat's reach,
even when said cat is leaping to catch them.
There are generally 5 eggs that hatched,
as the babies grow the nest becomes crowded and I see eager mouths beg for
food
Shortly before they are able to fly successfully, one gets pushed out,
perhaps 2.The rest finish growing and fledge.
The mud nests are usually built under the flying scaffold of the barn upper
storey and often where 2 beams meet giving a 90 degree corner to anchor the
nest.
I have found nests in the el, perched on an electric light fixture which is
seldom used. They reuse the nests year after year, patching spots that are
thin.

Enjoy them
Sylvia Miskoe, Concord

On Fri, Jul 31, 2020 at 4:45 PM <nhbirds...> wrote:

> <nhbirds...>
> <https://groups.google.com/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email#!forum/nhbirds/topics> Google
> Groups
> <https://groups.google.com/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email/#!overview>
> <https://groups.google.com/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email/#!overview>
> Topic digest
> View all topics
> <https://groups.google.com/forum/?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email#!forum/nhbirds/topics>
>
> - New Yard Bird
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_0> - 4
> Updates
> - Of Cones and Cuckoos...
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_1> - 1
> Update
> - Possible Western Tanager in Durham
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_2> - 2
> Updates
> - eBird Summer Sightings Reminder
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_3> - 1
> Update
> - Acadian Flycatcher in Durham
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_4> - 1
> Update
> - Living with a Handicap
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_5> - 1
> Update
> - Barn Swallow nestling mortality question
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_6> - 4
> Updates
> - Bonaparte's Gull on Squam Lake
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_7> - 1
> Update
> - Long Pond, Benton NH.. kayak birding
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_8> - 3
> Updates
> - crossbills in Weare
> <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_group_thread_9> - 1
> Update
>
> New Yard Bird
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/49229f84074be250?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> Bob Crowley <crbob...>: Jul 31 11:54AM -0400
>
> I just had a new yard bird, a Carolina Wren on the platform feeder. !06th
> species
>
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham, NH
> Rick Steber <rcsteber50...>: Jul 31 12:52PM -0400
>
> Bob,
> That’s a nice one to have. Hope I get one too. I’ve had 2 recent adds
> myself, both flyovers. One Gr Blue Heron and a flick of Red Crossbills.
> FYI
> R
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> Wendy Rigazio <wrigazio...>: Jul 31 02:34PM -0400
>
> That’s great Bob, so nice when the birds come to you!
>
> Charlie Nims <charlie.nims...>: Jul 31 02:42PM -0400
>
> Which kind of Carolina Wren? Most likely North but given all the southern
> birds we seem to be having, perhaps a South . . . 😛
>
> Seriously, an excellent bird!! Congrats!
>
> Charlie
>
> On Jul 31, 2020, at 11:54 AM, Bob Crowley <crbob...> wrote:
>
> I just had a new yard bird, a Carolina Wren on the platform feeder. !06th
> species
>
> Bob Crowley
> Chatham, NH
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
> Of Cones and Cuckoos...
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/e1675b222091b758?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> "Pam Hunt" <biodiva...>: Jul 31 02:10PM -0400
>
> Among whatever patterns emerge in NH's avian world this summer, two stand
> heads above the other: the large influxes of cuckoos (particularly
> Yellow-billed) and Red Crossbills.
>
> A post to the "Upper Valley Birders" email list this morning, combined with
> some observations yesterday, have prompted me to chime in on the
> fascinating
> subject of how birds respond to food supplies.
>
>
>
> Let's start with cuckoos. A colleague at Dartmouth posted something about
> caterpillars to a Valley News blog
> (
> https://www.notion.so/What-are-all-those-half-eaten-beech-leaves-on-Mt-Card
> igan-about-f2258bddfa864ded9aede74c1b0fd2f1), the gist of which is that
> researchers at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Woodstock, NH) are
> seeing their highest caterpillar numbers in 20 years. This is great news
> for
> forest birds, since it means lots of yummy squishy things to feed their
> young, and they might need all the help they can get this year because of
> the potential for high nest predation from chipmunks (in turn a result of
> last fall's bumper acorn crop, but I digress). Cuckoos are caterpillar
> specialists, particularly on hairy ones (they have adaptations to reduce
> the
> irritation these hairs can produce). You'll see more cuckoos in years with
> gypsy moth or tent caterpillar outbreaks, which are actually both a little
> below the radar this year. LAST YEAR, however, there was a small gypsy moth
> outbreak in the Connecticut River valley south of here, and I heard or saw
> multiple YB Cuckoos in Connecticut and western Mass (despite only being in
> each for a single weekend). Presumably those cuckoos had a productive
> breeding season, and this year we might be seeing the result: more cuckoos
> than usual returning from the south. In combination with lots of food (even
> if not always hairy), these cuckoos are sticking around and breeding in
> higher than usual numbers, and their offspring will likely wander off to
> whatever region in the Northeast has abundant food in 2021.
>
>
>
> Crossbills are even more notorious for their wanderings, all in response to
> the boom/bust nature of cone crops in pines, spruces, hemlocks, and other
> conifers. They'll depart an area when food is scarce, and show up in others
> when it is abundant. Last summer there was a nice movement of Red
> Crossbills
> into western and northern New Hampshire that built up into the fall and
> winter, eventually leading to birds nest building in January and February
> (since they feed their young conifer seeds, crossbills have a much less
> constrained breeding season!). Late this spring, when we were all hunkered
> down avoiding a pandemic, they started to appear in southern NH,
> particularly the highlands of the Monadnock Region
> (https://ebird.org/nh/map/redcro?neg=true
> <
> https://ebird.org/nh/map/redcro?neg=true&env.minX=-75.54551782295202&env.mi
>
> nY=42.126744408811525&env.maxX=-65.85191453084444&env.maxY=45.17428972131046
> 5&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=3&emo=5&yr=cur&byr=2020&eyr=2020>
>
> &env.minX=-75.54551782295202&env.minY=42.126744408811525&env.maxX=-65.851914
>
> 53084444&env.maxY=45.174289721310465&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=3&emo=5
> &yr=cur&byr=2020&eyr=2020). By June they'd started spilling north into the
> Concord area, and as July comes to a close they've filled in most of the
> state except the immediate seacoast and along the Massachusetts border in
> the southeast (https://ebird.org/nh/map/redcro?neg=true
> <
> https://ebird.org/nh/map/redcro?neg=true&env.minX=-75.54551782295202&env.mi
>
> nY=42.126744408811525&env.maxX=-65.85191453084444&env.maxY=45.17428972131046
> 5&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=3&emo=7&yr=cur&byr=2020&eyr=2020>
>
> &env.minX=-75.54551782295202&env.minY=42.126744408811525&env.maxX=-65.851914
>
> 53084444&env.maxY=45.174289721310465&zh=true&gp=false&ev=Z&mr=on&bmo=3&emo=7
> &yr=cur&byr=2020&eyr=2020). And once again they are starting to show signs
> of nesting. THESE crossbills could be the same ones that nested in the
> north
> over the winter, their offspring, or a combination of the two, and they are
> here because of a bumper crop of white pine cones (there are also some good
> spruce crops in the north). Yesterday morning I was listening to at least 6
> Red Crossbills in Brookline and Mason with Chris McPherson, and then went
> south of the border to Townsend, MA, only 5 miles away. I heard ONE Red
> Crossbill there in about half an hour, but no more over the next 5.5 hours
> of exploring Pepperell and Groton. During this time I was struck by the
> near
> ABSENCE of cones on the white pines, which probably explains the paucity of
> crossbills, but one can only wonder why the "sudden" shift in pine
> productivity over such a short distance. Is the absence of crossbills along
> the Mass border in southern Rockingham County a result of similar poor cone
> crops, or are there fewer birders there? I suspect the former since
> northeastern Mass is FULL of birders, and that Mar-Jul crossbill map from
> eBird shows almost no crossbills east of Worcester.
>
>
>
> How long will these crossbills stay? Probably at least a few months, at
> which point they'll wander off in search of the next good cone crop
> somewhere in North America. To find a crossbill, you'll definitely need to
> familiarize yourself with their distinctive "jip jip jip" flight call,
> since
> while they're pretty common right now I've still only seen four perched,
> and
> sometimes never see them at all as they fly high above. Recording these
> flight calls is also valuable, since there is some fascinating variation in
> calls that's associated with morphological variation tied to favored cones
> for foraging. So far during this current invasion, birders have documented
> four of the eight call types known from the U.S., but THAT is a story for
> another time (although see:
>
> https://ebird.org/news/crossbills-of-north-america-species-and-red-crossbill
> -call-types/).
>
>
>
> As Bob Quin would say: "Fun with Birds!"
>
>
>
> Pam Hunt
>
> Penacook
>
>
>
> "The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of those who have not viewed
> the world."
>
> - Alexander von Humboldt
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
> Possible Western Tanager in Durham
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/3e6d132a9647b008?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> "Dorsey, Kurk" <Kurk.Dorsey...>: Jul 31 02:17PM
>
> Birders
> A colleague of mine reported seeing two Western Tanagers in the Faculty
> Road neighborhood in Durham. I sent her a photo of a molting Scarlet
> Tanager, and her reply was that she saw the white wing stripe on one of the
> birds. So anyone in that part of Durham should keep eyes peeled for
> something unusual!
>
> The Acadian this morning at Oyster River Forest was calling repeatedly
> along the little stream that flows into the river in the large open field
> where the wheatear was a few years back. Ellen Snyder, who found the bird,
> got a clean look, and I got glimpses, as it favored the biggest tree along
> the rill and stayed in cover almost constantly. I am craving pizza now for
> some reason.
>
> A soaring kite was visible from the Durham library about 2:30 Thursday.
>
> Finally, there were two red crossbills at the Woodridge playing fields
> briefly Thursday morning.
>
> Kurk Dorsey
> Durham
> <raqbirds...>: Jul 31 04:58PM
>
> Hi Kurk et al,
>
> Young tanagers just out of the nest can be in what is called juvenal
> plumage, which is something we rarely see. I saw one such bird this week in
> my neighborhood and it was puzzling at first. It was streaky and had a
> noticeable white wing bar. I strongly suspect this is what your friends
> saw.
>
> This was the first time I have ever seen this plumage and it was indeed
> tricky!
> BTW- I have enjoyed your musings (and "amusings") in your posts.
>
> Robert A. QuinnMerlin Wildlife Tours 603-746-2535 office 603-568-8582 cell
>
> "Whatever befalls the earth befalls the sons and daughters of the earth."
> Chief Seattle
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Dorsey, Kurk <Kurk.Dorsey...>
> To: <nhbirds...> <nhbirds...>
> Sent: Fri, Jul 31, 2020 10:17 am
> Subject: [NHBirds] Possible Western Tanager in Durham
>
> #yiv0217831737 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;}BirdersA colleague of mine
> reported seeing two Western Tanagers in the Faculty Road neighborhood in
> Durham. I sent her a photo of a molting Scarlet Tanager, and her reply was
> that she saw the white wing stripe on one of the birds. So anyone in that
> part of Durham should keep eyes peeled for something unusual!
> The Acadian this morning at Oyster River Forest was calling repeatedly
> along the little stream that flows into the river in the large open field
> where the wheatear was a few years back. Ellen Snyder, who found the bird,
> got a clean look, and I got glimpses, as it favored the biggest tree along
> the rill and stayed in cover almost constantly. I am craving pizza now for
> some reason.
>
> A soaring kite was visible from the Durham library about 2:30 Thursday.
>
> Finally, there were two red crossbills at the Woodridge playing fields
> briefly Thursday morning.
> Kurk DorseyDurham
>
>
> --
> To Change your e-mail delivery settings (digest, daily, no mail) visit:
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> .
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
> eBird Summer Sightings Reminder
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/17e1edac112d3180?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> birdrecords <birdrecords...>: Jul 31 04:09PM
>
> A reminder to please enter your summer sightings into NH eBird (
> www.ebird.org/nh<http://www.ebird.org/nh> ) right away. The short summer
> season runs from June 1 through July 31 so data should be entered by August
> 5th! This will ensure that it is incorporated into the dataset available
> for New Hampshire Bird Records and North American Birds. It's great to have
> everyone's sightings in the database for use by both publications.
>
> Thanks!
> The New Hampshire Bird Records Team
> "New Hampshire Bird Records - your publication all about birds and birding
> in New Hampshire"
> www.nhbirdrecords.org<http://www.nhbirdrecords.org>
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
> Acadian Flycatcher in Durham
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/b3ac81bc89d860bd?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> Steve Mirick <smirick...>: Jul 31 08:22AM -0400
>
> Kurk Dorsey reports ANOTHER Acadian Flycatcher. This one found by Ellen
> Snyder. At the Oyster river forest in Durham where trail meets river.
>
> Steve Mirick
> Bradford MA
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
> Living with a Handicap
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/b06b624ef69c748a?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> birdrecords <birdrecords...>: Jul 31 12:09PM
>
> Learning to live on one's own is a difficult life transition for fledgling
> birds as they begin to move about and make their own decisions. Learning to
> fly, eat and avoid predators are major life skills to be learned as quickly
> as possible to survive. Add in a handicap that makes it difficult to
> approach the usual prey, and what's a young bird to do? Read about the
> behavior modifications adopted by a young Green Heron as it learned to live
> with a handicap in the Summer 2004 issue of New Hampshire Bird Records:
> https://nhbirdrecords.org/nhbr-pdfs/V23%20N2%20Summer%202004.pdf
> ("Survival Struggles of a Young Green Heron" begins on page 45).
> Other articles in this issue include: Where to Watch Ospreys in New
> Hampshire (in 2004!); Spotlight on Worm-eating Warbler; field notes from
> the 2004 summer season and of course a Photo Quiz. Enjoy them all!
> New Hampshire Bird Records is providing free access to its archives during
> the Covid-19 outbreak to help birders find information on birding locally
> and to remind us of the joy of birding.
> For information on how to subscribe:
> http://nhbirdrecords.org/subscribe-and-support-nh-bird-records/subscribe-and-support-nh-bird-records/
> or go directly to the on-line subscription page:
> http://nh-audubon-nature-store.myshopify.com/collections/nh-bird-records-subscription/products/new-hampshire-bird-records-subscription
> From all of us at New Hampshire Bird Records-
> Stay Safe - Stay Healthy!
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
> Barn Swallow nestling mortality question
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/90780eef92fcd052?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> Phil Brown <downtownpab...>: Jul 30 08:49PM
>
> Birders,
> Sharing the observations of a friend in Unity, NH, who reports the
> following:
>
> "We hadat least 3 active barn swallow nests, 2 in the barn and 1 on the
> porch. Iwatched the one on the porch very closely. It had 5 chicks. This
> week, I foundall 5 dead on the floor over the course of 3 or 4 nights. Both
> parents werevery active in feeding. Everything appeared normal to me, and I
> wasn'tsurprised that all 5 didn't make it, but to lose them all seems
> strange. Thenests in the barn each had loss as well. Any idea whats going
> on? Theporch nest had at least 1 chick that clearly had the most vigor and
> it wasoften leaning out over the edge. Verysad."
>
>
> A few of us have been speculating about what may have been going on and
> have considered several possibilities (predation, starvation, drought, food
> contamination, parasites, etc.) but none seems a perfect fit for what was
> observed.
> Curious to know if anyone else has noticed anything similar this summer or
> in the past, or might have an idea about what was going on here.
> Thanks for any input.
> Phil BrownHancock, NH
> Catherine Fisher <catherineckx...>: Jul 30 05:11PM -0400
>
> Hi Phil,
> I wonder if your friend has house wrens or English sparrows breeding on the
> property. Both species can be very intolerant of any nesting species. At
> a nearby farm, they actively trap English sparrows because they were either
> piercing eggs or killing nestlings. I've had house wrens destroy the nests
> of phoebes and chickadees - both nests with eggs and those with nestlings.
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 4:49 PM 'Phil Brown' via NHBirds <
> Phil Brown <downtownpab...>: Jul 30 09:36PM
>
> I don't think so, Catherine, but a good thought.I think of these species
> mainly being an issue for other cavity-nesting species such as the ones you
> mentioned.
> Another thought suggested was the presence of a Cowbird chick in the nest,
> but I don't believe this was the case, either.
>
> Phil
>
> On Thursday, July 30, 2020, 5:11:52 p.m. EDT, Catherine Fisher <
> <catherineckx...> wrote:
>
> Hi Phil,I wonder if your friend has house wrens or English sparrows
> breeding on the property. Both species can be very intolerant of any
> nesting species. At a nearby farm, they actively trap English sparrows
> because they were either piercing eggs or killing nestlings. I've had
> house wrens destroy the nests of phoebes and chickadees - both nests with
> eggs and those with nestlings.
>
>
>
> On Thu, Jul 30, 2020 at 4:49 PM 'Phil Brown' via NHBirds <
> <nhbirds...> wrote:
>
> Birders,
> Sharing the observations of a friend in Unity, NH, who reports the
> following:
>
> "We hadat least 3 active barn swallow nests, 2 in the barn and 1 on the
> porch. Iwatched the one on the porch very closely. It had 5 chicks. This
> week, I foundall 5 dead on the floor over the course of 3 or 4 nights. Both
> parents werevery active in feeding. Everything appeared normal to me, and I
> wasn'tsurprised that all 5 didn't make it, but to lose them all seems
> strange. Thenests in the barn each had loss as well. Any idea whats going
> on? Theporch nest had at least 1 chick that clearly had the most vigor and
> it wasoften leaning out over the edge. Verysad."
>
>
> A few of us have been speculating about what may have been going on and
> have considered several possibilities (predation, starvation, drought, food
> contamination, parasites, etc.) but none seems a perfect fit for what was
> observed.
> Curious to know if anyone else has noticed anything similar this summer or
> in the past, or might have an idea about what was going on here.
> Thanks for any input.
> Phil BrownHancock, NH
>
>
> --
> To Change your e-mail delivery settings (digest, daily, no mail) visit:
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> To view this discussion on the web visit
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> .
> Garth McElroy <mcelroy499...>: Jul 30 05:17PM -0700
>
> This is actually very interesting as we've had the same issue with our
> garage colony up here in Western Maine. We had six nests this year and in
> at least two of the nests the fledglings left the nest to early. A few of
> them had heavy mite loads and that can drive the chicks out of the nest to
> soon. We cleaned and sprayed a few of them but most did not survive. Now
> upon the second nestings we have had newly hatched chicks and even nearly
> hatched eggs dead on the floor. I'm not sure what to attribute these recent
> mortalities to at such a young age. We've only ever had the odd fledgling
> not survive and never this much mortality. Usually the first batch of
> fledlings will stay with the adults in the garage through the 2nd nesting.
> Not this year which is also strange. On the flipside our 15 or so pairs of
> tree swallows had a record year.
>
>
> Garth McElroy / McElroy Productions
> Natural History and Wildlife Filming
> www.mcelroyproductions.com
> <garth...>
> Anson, Maine USA 04911
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
> Bonaparte's Gull on Squam Lake
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/cca87a1fd1cf9ce0?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> Iain Macleod <pandiain.im...>: Jul 30 07:48PM -0400
>
> I forgot to post yesterday. While conducting a Squam Lakes Natural Science
> Center Bald Eagle tour on Tuesday on Squam Lake, we had multiple close
> views of a nice adult Bonaparte's Gull.
>
> Iain MacLeod
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
> Long Pond, Benton NH.. kayak birding
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/a2e817ab354c348a?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> Miriam Simmons <simmonsmiriamj...>: Jul 30 03:56PM -0700
>
> 2.5 hours circumference of pond, 2.4 miles, slow birding paddle.
>
> The access road to Long Pond was storm damaged and closed in October 2017.
> After many delays, and reduced funding, the White Mountain National Forest
> has finished road repairs and access is open to Long Pond. The access road
> gate officially opened 8 to 10 days ago.
>
> An amazingly quiet paddle, we were alone on the pond for 1.45 hours, until
> local kayakers accessed the pond.
>
> This was an opportunity to bird an area that had been essentially
> undisturbed for 2.5 years.
>
> Highlights
> ..at least 4 Belted Kingfisher families
> ..an Osprey at the south end of the pond with a large fish in a tall
> spruce tree.
> ..one solitary sandpiper
> ..No sightings of great blue herons, which we had seen in 2017.
>
> Here's the link to full report on eBird
>
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71960956
>
> It appears that this is the first time that Long Pond has been birded by
> boat since the road washed out in October 2017. Of particular note was the
> number of kingfishers
>
> Miriam & Roger Simmons
> Miriam Simmons <simmonsmiriamj...>: Jul 30 07:47PM -0400
>
> On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 6:56 PM Miriam Simmons <simmonsmiriamj...>
> wrote:
>
> Miriam Simmons <simmonsmiriamj...>: Jul 30 07:48PM -0400
>
>
> https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2746391822354377&id=1374312089562364
>
> Access road is off Rt 116 in Benton
>
> On Thu, Jul 30, 2020, 6:56 PM Miriam Simmons <simmonsmiriamj...>
> wrote:
>
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
> crossbills in Weare
> <http://groups.google.com/group/nhbirds/t/7011956959f63b7e?utm_source=digest&utm_medium=email>
> RG Conroy <studiobuteo...>: Jul 30 04:49PM -0400
>
> I was happily surprised to see two red crossbills (one male, one female)
> this morning!
>
> First time I’ve ever seen those around here.
>
> They were close to Great Meadow on the New Boston/Weare line.
>
>
> Rosemary Conroy
> Weare NH
> Back to top <#m_-2330516455373356965_m_-1840683604160821204_digest_top>
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