Date: 8/1/20 1:20 am
From: <SJBIRDS...>
Subject: [SJBIRDS] File - Emergency Bird Rescue Information

From: http://www.birdrescuecenter.org/rescueinfo.htm

Emergency Help for Birds

Stop… Assess…Take Action…As a rescuer of an injured or orphaned wild bird you play a very important role.  It is VERY IMPORTANT THAT THE BIRD RECEIVE PROFESSIONAL CARE as soon as possible.  Please do not try treating the bird yourself.  With fractures and breaks, the longer the injury remains untreated, the more difficult it is to fix.  With young birds dehydration and starvation are quick to set in.

The information presented below should provide you with basic guidance to both assist with the rescue and to make the bird comfortable until it can be delivered to The Bird Rescue Center or other rehabilitation center in your local area. 

Due to limited staff and time we ask that, whenever possible, you bring injured birds to The Bird Rescue Center.  If you are unable to deliver the bird yourself, try asking a friend or neighbor. If you have exhausted all possibilities then call the Center at 707-523-2473 to ask for assistance with field rescue and transport to our facility. 

Remember - wild birds are NOT pets.  They are naturally frightened of humans and it is also against the law to keep them in your home without a permit.

What To Do First

If you spot a bird, particularly a young or juvenile that appears to be deserted or in difficulty, do not catch it right away. First take a few minutes to observe its behavior because:

In the case of a young or juvenile animal, it may simply be waiting for a parent to return. Remember, adult animals will often leave their young to hunt for food and return within a short period of time to feed/care for the offspring.

If you believe the bird is injured, in danger or has been abandoned by its parents, call The Bird Rescue Center at 523-BIRD BEFORE you pick up the animal. Injured wild birds can be dangerous and need special handling. Keep an eye on its whereabouts and describe its condition to the person you reach on the phone. They will give you the proper course of action to take for that particular animal. If, however, you are unable to reach us directly for advice, a good rule of thumb is to use common sense, stay calm and think ahead.

What to do BEFORE picking up the bird!

Before attempting to capture the bird prepare a suitable container.  A cardboard box with small air holes, just big enough for the bird to stand and turn in, is ideal and preferable to a hard-sided or large container as the bird will be less likely to injure itself if it becomes agitated inside the box.  Place an old towel in the bottom of the box.

After placing the bird in the box, be sure to close the container securely, particularly with birds-of-prey, to prevent their escape.  Remember, the sooner you place the bird into a suitable container, the calmer it will be.  It is important to reduce stress whenever possible.  

Remember, the bird needs to be kept warm and quiet.  When transporting in your car, refrain from playing the radio or speaking loudly.  Cover the box to minimize the amount of light entering into the box.

How to Pick up a Bird

For injured or young songbirds, gently cradle the bird’s body as you lift it from the ground and transfer immediately to your prepared box.

For injured or young birds-of-prey or large waterbirds such as herons and egrets, remember that they can seriously injure you with their talons and/or beaks so be sure to wear protective clothing such as a long-sleeved jacket, goggles to protect your eyes and heavy gloves to protect your hands.  The bird will be most easily caught by covering it with a towel and restraining the feet.

Follow these basic rules before and during transport:

1. Keep the animal warm, 80-90 degrees.
2. Don't feed it or give it fluids
3. Keep the container in a quiet, dark space to minimize stress
4. Stay quiet around it and don't constantly look at the bird.
5. Get it to a rehabilitation hospital as quickly as possible.
6. Never keep the animal or try to treat it yourself!

Remember, most species of birds are protected and therefore it is not legal to keep them unless you are licensed to do so. Beyond the legalities, these animals require specialized care and diets to grow up healthy and strong. It's important to turn them over to an experienced person as soon as possible.

Specific Rescue Situations
For detailed information on how to help a bird see typical situations listed below.

Found a baby bird

If the young bird is hopping and running away from you, and it is in a “safe” location, i.e., no cats or dogs in the area and not near a road, leave it be. If his parents are in the area they will probably find him but continue monitoring the situation to be sure of parental care.

If he is in immediate danger of outdoor pets, scoop him up and put in a nearby bush or shrub out of harm's way.  Confine the pet.

If you find a baby with little or no feathers and you know where the nest is, then return the bird to its nest.

If the baby/fledgling is cold to the touch, take it inside to warm before placing back in the nest.

Nestle the bird in a warm towel or use a hot water bottle with a towel between the bird and the bottle.

Place the bird in a warm dark, quiet place away from children and pets.

Do not attempt to feed baby birds or fledglings.

If you cannot find the nest or if the bird appears to be sick, injured, or your pet brought the bird home still alive, contact The Bird Rescue Center for directions on how and when to bring the bird to us.

Found a Bird Nest Destroyed

If the nest has been destroyed, and you are sure that the parents are still in the immediate area, you can construct a makeshift nest using a small basket or plastic container.

Put holes in the bottom of container for drainage.

Line the container with material from old nest or dry grass or leaves.

Wire your nest to a branch or place it securely in a branch fork close to or in the same spot as the old nest. If you are not sure where the bird was nesting, then call us for more information.

Place birds into new nest.

Do not attempt to feed baby birds or fledglings

Continue to monitor the situation to confirm that the parents have resumed caring for the babies.

Contact The Bird Rescue Center for directions on how and when to bring the bird to us.
 
Found an egg

If the wind or other source has knocked an egg out of its nest and if you can locate the nest, gently place egg back.

If you cannot locate the nest or think that the parents have abandoned the nest, contact The Bird Rescue Center for additional directions.

Bird tangled

If the bird is caught in something simple such as twine, string, or fishing line have someone assist you by:

Holding the bird in a clean towel.

Using baby or other blunt-tipped scissors, gently cut knots out of the string/twine being very careful to not cut the feathers.

If there are no signs of other injuries; return bird back to bush or shrub.

Be particularly attentive if the individual was caught-up in fishing line as this material can easily cut through skin and do serious damage.

If you have any doubts about the bird’s condition you can bring it in to the Center for a thorough exam.

Any signs of injury, then contact The Bird Rescue Center for additional instructions or how to locate us.

Bird caught in building/skylight/chimney     

If a bird is caught in house or other building:

Lock all pets away;

Darken room by closing blinds, shades, doors;

Leave only one exit (large bright sunny) opening for the bird to fly out.

Remove all people and activities from the vicinity of the opening and allow the bird ample time to find its way out.  Remember, it will be confused and disoriented and may take a while to find the opening.

If the bird is an owl, wait until dark and then follow the same steps.

If bird is caught in skylight:

If possible, climb up and cover the skylight completely with a dark, opaque cloth to completely block out the light.

Lock all pets away;

Leave only one exit (large bright sunny) opening for the bird to fly out.

Remove all people and activities from the vicinity of the opening and allow the bird ample time to find its way out.  Remember, it will be confused and disoriented and may take a while to find the opening.

If the bird is an owl, wait until dark and follow the same steps.

If a bird is caught in a chimney, call us for assistance. Contact The Bird Rescue Center for additional instructions or how to locate us.

Oiled or Coated bird

Place the bird in a suitable container (see the section What to do Before Picking up the Bird.

Transport immediately to The Bird Rescue Center.

Oiled birds are rapidly debilitated either by the toxic effects of ingesting oil or other toxic substances or by resulting starvation and exhaustion as they are unable to fly and secure food.

For the best hope of success, the bird must be stabilized before the substance is removed.

Contact The Bird Rescue Center for additional instructions or how to locate us.

Injured bird (wing injury, flew into a window, hit by a car, etc.)

Place the bird in a suitable container (see the section “What to do Before Picking up the Bird”
Gently and carefully pick up the bird.  If a wing or leg is injured, keep the limb aligned in its normal position as much as possible while capturing and moving the bird.

If you suspect a head injury, support the head as you move the bird to a container.

Transport to the Center as soon as possible. 

Contact The Bird Rescue Center for additional instructions or how to locate us.
 
Caught by Cat/Dog

Place the bird in a suitable container (see the section “What to do Before Picking up the Bird”)

Gently and carefully pick up the bird.  If a wing or leg is injured, keep the limb aligned in its normal position as much as possible while capturing and moving the bird.

If you suspect a head injury, support the head as you move the bird to a container.

Transport to the Center as soon as possible.  Contact The Bird Rescue Center for additional instructions or how to locate us.

Handling Raptors -- Always use extreme caution when handling birds of prey such as Hawks and Owls. 

Be especially careful of the talons and the beak which are extremely sharp and strong. 
The bird will be most easily caught by covering it with a towel and restraining the feet. 
If available, thick leather gloves can be worn but do not depend on them for total hand protection. 

If you are at all unsure of how to approach these birds contact The Bird Rescue Center for additional instructions or how to locate us.&#8232;&#8232;[ back to top ]

Handling Large Waterbirds (Herons, Bitterns, Loons) and other long-beaked birds

Like raptors, much caution should be used when approaching these birds.  They have very long, spear-like beaks that are used for catching fish and these are positioned on the end of a neck that is equivalent to a coiled spring. 

• The beaks of these birds should be held when picking them up
• A pillow case should be loosely placed over the head to prevent any injury from the beak. 
• Protect your eyes! 
• If you are at all unsure of how to approach these birds, contact The Bird Rescue Center for additional instructions or how to locate us.




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If you have discovered an injured bird, egg, nest, etc., please visit: http://www.birdrescuecenter.org/rescueinfo.htm
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