Date: 7/28/20 6:12 am
From: Teresa Hertzel <teresa.hertzel...>
Subject: [obol] Fwd: [eBird Alert] Oregon Rare Bird Alert
*** Species Summary:

Trumpeter Swan (1 Lane)
Common Goldeneye (1 Lake)
Snowy Egret (1 Multnomah)
Green Heron (1 Hood River)
Pacific-slope Flycatcher (2 Union, 1 Wallowa)
Eastern Kingbird (1 Crook)
Canada Jay (Pacific) (1 Deschutes)
Juniper Titmouse (1 Klamath)
Cassin's Finch (1 Tillamook)
Red Crossbill (Sitka Spruce or type 10) (2 Tillamook)
Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (3 Deschutes, 2 Tillamook)
Red Crossbill (Douglas-fir or type 4) (1 Deschutes)
Bobolink (1 Crook)

---------------------------------------------
NOTE: all sightings are UNCONFIRMED unless indicated.

Trumpeter Swan (Cygnus buccinator) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 06:48 by Sylvia Maulding
- Forcia and Larsen Reservoir, Lane, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.0682574,-123.4793168&ll=44.0682574,-123.4793168
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71867733
- Comments: "continuing, west end marsh area."

Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) (1)
- Reported Jul 22, 2020 11:13 by Graeme Colmer
- Lakeview Settling Ponds, Lake, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.1812624,-120.3649235&ll=42.1812624,-120.3649235
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71883222
- Comments: "Female or immature male. Brown head, yellow eyes, gray body."

Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 09:53 by Linda Armstrong
- Smith and Bybee Lakes--Wetland Interlakes Trail, Multnomah, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.616676,-122.7266407&ll=45.616676,-122.7266407
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71876344
- Comments: "Black bill. Much smaller than great egrets. Known vagrant,
previously reported last weekend."

Green Heron (Butorides virescens) (2)
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 11:25 by Chris Brobin
- Hood River mouth, Hood River, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.7152892,-121.5063858&ll=45.7152892,-121.5063858
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71876938
- Comments: "Continuing."

Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Empidonax difficilis) (1)
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 09:40 by Steve Clements
- National Forest Development Road 250, Oregon, US (45.832, -117.965),
Union, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.8323497,-117.9647112&ll=45.8323497,-117.9647112
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71884078
- Comments: "Singing Western type flycatcher"

Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Empidonax difficilis) (1)
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 09:40 by Nolan Clements
- National Forest Development Road 250, Oregon, US (45.832, -117.965),
Wallowa, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.8657835,-117.8923062&ll=45.8657835,-117.8923062
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71884076
- Comments: "Singing Western type flycatcher"

Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Empidonax difficilis) (1)
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 09:40 by Arlene Blumton
- National Forest Development Road 250, Oregon, US (45.832, -117.965),
Union, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.8323497,-117.9647112&ll=45.8323497,-117.9647112
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71884077
- Comments: "Singing Western type flycatcher"

Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) (4)
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 09:30 by Central Oregon Historical Records
- Hwy 380 MP 51, Crook, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.0995921,-120.0369463&ll=44.0995921,-120.0369463
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71888983
- Media: 4 Photos

Canada Jay (Pacific) (Perisoreus canadensis [obscurus Group]) (5) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 21, 2020 07:33 by Caleb Centanni
- Deschutes—Green Lakes--east shore trail (old-growth mountain hemlock
forest), Deschutes, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.087332,-121.72771&ll=44.087332,-121.72771
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71872365
- Comments: "adult w kids. — extensive black cap. Somewhat worn in late
summer plumage but clearly darkish black allover top of head, giving almost
chickadee-like color scheme to bird. Family group of ~ 5 w very dark
fledglings. — attempted poor digibin photo"

Juniper Titmouse (Baeolophus ridgwayi) (3) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 08:36 by Julie Van Moorhem
- Willow Valley Rd, Klamath, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=42.037866,-121.187914&ll=42.037866,-121.187914
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71882056
- Comments: "2 with slight downy appearance and just a tiny crest starting
to develop. Known location. All gray with crest on head"

Cassin's Finch (Haemorhous cassinii) (1) CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 24, 2020 19:00 by Sarah Scaldeferri
- Cape Meares Lake, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.5035798,-123.9561653&ll=45.5035798,-123.9561653
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71873275
- Comments: "Among the usual House and Purples visiting the feeder this
individual stands out as something distinct. Straight beak. Bright red
crown contrasting with rosy pink on the rest of the head and neck with no
streaking on the belly. Fine black streaks observed on the undertail
coverts."

Red Crossbill (Sitka Spruce or type 10) (Loxia curvirostra (type 10)) (15)
CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 26, 2020 17:20 by Caleb Centanni
- Clay Myers State Natural Area, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.2735671,-123.9506373&ll=45.2735671,-123.9506373
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71874523
- Media: 3 Audio
- Comments: "Confirmed by Matt Young at eBird.

Several pairs or small groups observed in different spots, many singing.
Presumed breeding. Two observed singing, one preening extensively, in dead,
lichened tops of Sitka Spruces at end of loop. No foraging observed. Photo
of one of these birds, same one of my presumed Type 10 Recordings.

Forest here is diverse. Dominant species Sitka Spruce, Shore Pine, and
Douglas-fir. High cone crops on Sitka Spruce, hundreds of new cones visible
on many. One tree on which I counted over a thousand green cones. Also many
open brown cones--seedless? Douglas-fir also has significant cone crop
similar to that seen throughout Western Oregon this spring. Between 50 and
200 green cones on most mature individuals. Shore Pines with present but
less abundant crop. 10-30 closed cones on some trees, 30-50 open brown
cones on others.

Western Hemlocks present with significant brown cone crops, no greens.
Redcedar also present, but are crossbills documented to use cypress family
cones?"

Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (Loxia curvirostra (type 3)) (4)
CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 26, 2020 17:20 by Jim Centanni
- Clay Myers State Natural Area, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.2735671,-123.9506373&ll=45.2735671,-123.9506373
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71876656
- Media: 3 Audio
- Comments: "Two recorded well and watched in pure shore pine extensively.
Spending long periods in shore pines, presumably foraging in cones, though
not directly seen (both closed and open cones present here). One beautiful
yellow female observed ten feet away at close distance for several minutes,
ground foraging by hopping around on moss, checking out a clamshell, and
presumably looking for fallen cones, all of which were Shore Pine here.
Then flew of southwest."

Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (Loxia curvirostra (type 3)) (4)
CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 26, 2020 17:20 by Caleb Centanni
- Clay Myers State Natural Area, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.2735671,-123.9506373&ll=45.2735671,-123.9506373
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71874523
- Media: 3 Audio
- Comments: "Confirmed by Matt Young at eBird.

Two recorded well and watched in pure shore pine extensively. Spending long
periods in shore pines, presumably foraging in cones, though not directly
seen (both closed and open cones present here). One beautiful yellow female
observed ten feet away at close distance for several minutes, ground
foraging by hopping around on moss, checking out a clamshell, and
presumably looking for fallen cones, all of which were Shore Pine here.
Then flew of southwest."

Red Crossbill (Sitka Spruce or type 10) (Loxia curvirostra (type 10)) (15)
CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 26, 2020 17:20 by Jim Centanni
- Clay Myers State Natural Area, Tillamook, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=45.2735671,-123.9506373&ll=45.2735671,-123.9506373
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71876656
- Media: 3 Audio
- Comments: "Pending recordings and confirmation by eBird crossbill expert.

Several pairs or small groups observed in different spots, many singing.
Presumed breeding. Two observed singing, one preening extensively, in dead,
lichened tops of Sitka Spruces at end of loop. No foraging observed. Photo
of one of these birds, same one of my presumed Type 10 Recordings.

Forest here is diverse. Dominant species Sitka Spruce, Shore Pine, and
Douglas-fir. High cone crops on Sitka Spruce, hundreds of new cones visible
on many. One tree on which I counted over a thousand green cones. Also many
open brown cones--seedless? Douglas-fir also has significant cone crop
similar to that seen throughout Western Oregon this spring. Between 50 and
200 green cones on most mature individuals. Shore Pines with present but
less abundant crop. 10-30 closed cones on some trees, 30-50 open brown
cones on others.

Western Hemlocks present with significant brown cone crops, no greens.
Redcedar also present, but are crossbills documented to use cypress family
cones?"

Red Crossbill (Douglas-fir or type 4) (Loxia curvirostra (type 4)) (3)
CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 21, 2020 09:32 by Caleb Centanni
- Deschutes--old trail from Green Lakes to Corral Lake, Deschutes, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.073,-121.730524&ll=44.073,-121.730524
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71872489
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "made recording of 3 over us 10:16a, Caleb says sound like type
4, we will check sonogram to confirm , and if so, is New county bird for
us!! when they split crossbills . — Mountain hemlocks with heavy cone crop
of brown open cones. ”Presumed type 4 crossbills heading upslope toward
Green Lakes. Hemlocks here loaded with cones, all seen with open bracts.
Score 5.” — — All mountain hemlocks here, big to very big, found an
absolutely enormous one, “the super hemlock”, I don’t think we even saw any
that big in the Valley of the Giants” westside! — “We might have seen 2
there that big.” “I’ve seen coast redwoods that big, but not frequent.” —
“I haven’t.” Might be biggest tree Courtney has ever seen. Unless it was 6
individual trees that merged together? They are one trunk at base, sharing
bark, and then split off above 8-9 ft from base . Individual tree splits
above trunk are prob 500-700 years old at least. — Note we saw many
hemlocks in this area merging their trunks in union, and at Soda Creek also
saw them merging with other trees too! saw a grand fir + mountain hemlock
growing out of same old growth trunk!! — Note: All trees at Green Lakes and
Corral Lake with cones now are mountain hemlocks. (up to 6580 ft.) Hemlock
cones are almost entirely open brown cones, but we did eventually find one
hemlock nearish-by Green Lakes with closed new purply cones. No other
conifers up here have cones.
(Caleb did a lot of scanning of trees, a hundred scans, looking for
conifers with cones.)
None of the whitebark pines we saw here have cones, though there are more
of those upslope that potentially could.
So presumably the crossbills up here are prob eating mountain hemlock
cones; (or, just flyovers passing over on route to other tree patches we
didn’t see.)
— On 3rd day we finally found
a couple subalpine fir trees with new cones 2-3 miles east of Green Lakes
near Crater Creek,
and along Broken Top Trail 10 and Soda Creek Trail also many lodgepole
pines with both open and new closed cones. —

— Note 2 : Fall Creek Trail and Green Lakes and Corral Lake are virtually
entirely just mountain hemlock trees, only a small percentage of subalpine
fir mixed in. And so cool, there are some really big mountain hemlock trees
up here! ancient forest! Many trees 300-500-700-1000-plus years old! Caleb
says this species grows really slow, up here especially, so these are very
old forests, poss as old as whenever the last lava eruption was. And lots
of great big snag trees for poss owls. In the small patches of big forest
maybe 70% of the trees 31-in. or more across. “Unlogged old-growth mountain
hemlock forest. Complex structure mixed with forest openings. Small younger
elements of subalpine fir and whitebark pine.”"

Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (Loxia curvirostra (type 3)) (1)
CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 21, 2020 07:08 by Caleb Centanni
- Deschutes—Green Lakes--Campsite 19 (44.09061, -121.72937) hammocking in
mountain hemlocks (6580 ft.), Deschutes, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.09061,-121.729366&ll=44.09061,-121.729366
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71871647
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "attempted recording of flyover . Caleb has begun studying
crossbills and IDs sound of these flight calls as type-3, and will check
sonogram to confirm.

— Puzzling what as many as 3-4 types we recorded in the area are feeding
on, unless they can use open hemlock cones, which seem seedless to the
naked eye . —
—— Note: All trees at Green Lakes and Corral Lake with cones now are
mountain hemlocks. (up to 6580 ft.) Hemlock cones are almost entirely open
brown cones, but we did eventually find one hemlock nearish-by Green Lakes
with closed new purply cones. No other conifers up here have cones.
(Caleb did a lot of scanning of trees, a hundred scans, looking for
conifers with cones.)
None of the whitebark pines we saw here have cones, though there are more
of those upslope that potentially could.
So presumably the crossbills up here are prob eating mountain hemlock
cones; (or, just flyovers passing over on route to other tree patches we
didn’t see.)
— On 3rd day we finally found
a couple subalpine fir trees with new cones 2-3 miles east of Green Lakes
near Crater Creek,
and along Broken Top Trail 10 and Soda Creek Trail also many lodgepole
pines with both open and new closed cones. —

— Note 2 : Fall Creek Trail and Green Lakes and Corral Lake are virtually
entirely just mountain hemlock trees, only a small percentage of subalpine
fir mixed in. And so cool, there are some really big mountain hemlock trees
up here! ancient forest! Many trees 300-500-700-1000-plus years old! Caleb
says this species grows really slow, up here especially, so these are very
old forests, poss as old as whenever the last lava eruption was. And lots
of great big snag trees for poss owls. In the small patches of big forest
maybe 70% of the trees 31-in. or more across. “Unlogged old-growth mountain
hemlock forest. Complex structure mixed with forest openings. Small younger
elements of subalpine fir and whitebark pine.”"

Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (Loxia curvirostra (type 3)) (5)
CONFIRMED
- Reported Jul 21, 2020 07:33 by Caleb Centanni
- Deschutes—Green Lakes--east shore trail (old-growth mountain hemlock
forest), Deschutes, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.087332,-121.72771&ll=44.087332,-121.72771
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71872365
- Media: 1 Audio
- Comments: "good recording of flyover 5 (also one type-2 on recording, in
flock with them) over hemlock forest . — Puzzling what as many as 3-4
types we recorded in the area are feeding on, unless they can use open
hemlock cones, which seem seedless to the naked eye . — Note: All trees at
Green Lakes and Corral Lake with cones now are mountain hemlocks. (up to
6580 ft.) Hemlock cones are almost entirely open brown cones, but we did
eventually find one hemlock nearish-by Green Lakes with closed new purply
cones. No other conifers up here have cones.
(Caleb did a lot of scanning of trees, a hundred scans, looking for
conifers with cones.)
None of the whitebark pines we saw here have cones, though there are more
of those upslope that potentially could.
So presumably the crossbills up here are prob eating mountain hemlock
cones; (or, just flyovers passing over on route to other tree patches we
didn’t see.)
— On 3rd day we finally found
a couple subalpine fir trees with new cones 2-3 miles east of Green Lakes
near Crater Creek,
and along Broken Top Trail 10 and Soda Creek Trail also many lodgepole
pines with both open and new closed cones. —

— Note 2 : Fall Creek Trail and Green Lakes and Corral Lake are virtually
entirely just mountain hemlock trees, only a small percentage of subalpine
fir mixed in. And so cool, there are some really big mountain hemlock trees
up here! ancient forest! Many trees 300-500-700-1000-plus years old! Caleb
says this species grows really slow, up here especially, so these are very
old forests, poss as old as whenever the last lava eruption was. And lots
of great big snag trees for poss owls. In the small patches of big forest
maybe 70% of the trees 31-in. or more across. “Unlogged old-growth mountain
hemlock forest. Complex structure mixed with forest openings. Small younger
elements of subalpine fir and whitebark pine.”"

Red Crossbill (Western Hemlock or type 3) (Loxia curvirostra (type 3))
- Reported Jul 21, 2020 06:00 by Caleb Centanni
- Green Lakes, Deschutes, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.087589,-121.730745&ll=44.087589,-121.730745
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71874421
- Comments: "logging in hotspot all our species seen today here but ebirded
under separate pinpoints, so that Green Lakes bar chart will show these
species too: see our list from East shore of green lakes for confirmed
type 3 and type 2 RECR recordings : https://ebird.org/checklist/S71872364"

Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) (1)
- Reported Jul 27, 2020 07:15 by Central Oregon Historical Records
- Puckett Rd., Crook, Oregon
- Map:
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&t=p&z=13&q=44.3775088,-120.9064725&ll=44.3775088,-120.9064725
- Checklist: https://ebird.org/checklist/S71888900
- Media: 2 Photos

***********

You received this message because you are subscribed to eBird's Oregon Rare
Bird Alert

Manage your eBird alert subscriptions:
https://ebird.org/alerts

eBird Alerts provide recent reports of regionally or seasonally rare
species (Rarities Alerts) or species you have not yet observed (Needs
Alerts) in your region of interest; both Accepted and Unreviewed
observations are included. Some reports may be from private property or
inaccessible to the general public. It is the responsibility of every
eBirder to be aware of and respectful of access restrictions. For more
information, see our Terms of Use:
https://www.birds.cornell.edu/home/terms-of-use/

 
Join us on Facebook!