Date: 7/25/20 6:43 pm
From: 'Molly Jacobson' via NHBirds <nhbirds...>
Subject: Re: [NHBirds] Re: Insect population shrinks
Recent research has shown that in suburban areas, nesting songbirds suffer lower reproductive success, rearing fewer chicks and traveling further to find food, where non-native ornamental vegetation dominates in yards, due to a lack of insects necessary for feeding chicks. Here's your local pollinator ecologist and birdwatcher telling you to add some native flowers, trees, grasses, and shrubs to your yard :)
-Molly
On Saturday, July 25, 2020, 06:03:56 PM EDT, John Ranta <john.f.ranta...> wrote:

Research says there are fewer birds (insectivores) because there are fewer insects. From one of many articles on the subject (https://e360.yale.edu/features/insect_numbers_declining_why_it_matters):

“Scientists cite many factors in the fall-off of the world’s insect populations, but chief among them are the ubiquitous use of pesticides, the spread of monoculture crops such as corn and soybeans, urbanization, and habitat destruction. 

A significant drop in insect populations could have far-reaching consequences for the natural world and for humans, who depend on bees and other invertebrates to pollinate crops. A study by Canadian biologists, published in 2010, suggests that North American bird species that depend on aerial insects for feeding themselves and their offspring have suffered much more pronounced declines in recent years than other perching birds that largely feed on seeds. The analysis is based on data from the North American Breeding Bird Survey. The decline in birds that feed on flying insects appears to be significantly stronger than in perching birds in general, according to co-author Silke Nebel, now with the Upper Thames River Conservation Authority in Ontario.” 
JROn Jul 25, 2020, 4:37 PM -0400, Cliff Otto <bye.bye.nh.birdy...>, wrote:

With respect to the insect population declining about 27% in the last
30 years, the bird population in North America has declined about 30%
in the last 50 years.

Are there fewer insects because there are fewer birds eating them or
are there fewer birds because there aren't as many insects to eat? Or
is it just climate change?

Clifford Otto
Manchester

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