Date: 7/11/20 5:05 pm
From: Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
Bert,

Aside from crown color (red in adult), aging Sandhill Cranes in the summer
would require a close look at the feather wear, either fresh or worn. Both
adults and immatures would appear brownish. The observer's description is
lacking in that regard. Given the staccato barking call that was
described, it may, in fact, be an immature bird that is at least one year
of age, so, technically, no longer a juvenile.

Bird on!

Justin Bosler
Alpine, Texas



On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 10:12 AM <bertf...> wrote:

> Justin,
>
> Here are the original notes from the observer on why he thought it was a
> juvenile at Round Top:
>
> “I think it is a juvenile because our Birds of Texas book shows the adult
> and juvenile sand hill crane. The adult is shown as much lighter in color
> than the juvenile. The bird makes a very weird sound when beginning flight
> (it can fly, does not seem injured, although it flies close to the
> ground). Not exactly a whooping, more like a staccato barking.”
>
> Bert
>
>
>
> *From:* Justin Bosler <justin.bosler...>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 8, 2020 8:51 PM
> *To:* Bert Frenz <bertf...>
> *Cc:* Brush Freeman <brushfreeman...>; bobby schat <
> <bobbyschat...>; Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <
> <Fred.Collins...>; 4 Texbirds Maillist <Texbirds...>
> *Subject:* Re: [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
>
>
>
> Bert, Brush, and Texbirds:
>
>
>
> How do we know it was a juvenile versus an adult in its rusty-brownish
> "painted" plumage? Most populations of Sandhill Cranes are known to
> preen dirt/mud into their feathers for camouflage during the summer months
> when they can no longer rely on safety in numbers. I suspect it was a
> mis-identified summering 2nd-year/adult but photos would help to confirm
> one way or the other.
>
>
>
> As for the Granger Lake "pair", I would suspect that they never left in
> February-March (or were released by a private collector(?) or a rehabber
> recently). In addition to the records provided by Bert, there are summer
> records in the South Plains from June and July. Ill or injured cranes do a
> great job of hiding/ concealing themselves until they are healthy and
> flight capable. They can go undetected for months.
>
>
>
> For example, I surveyed this same playa regularly in spring and summer of
> 2017 and did not discover this adult until late July:
>
>
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S38332561
>
>
>
> Good birding,
>
> Justin Bosler
>
> Midland, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 8:22 PM <bertf...> wrote:
>
> Brush,
>
> While your sighing is indeed early, it is not unprecedented. A juvenile
> Sandhill Crane was reported 16 July 2004 in Round Top, Fayette County. The
> bird had been present already around 8 July and was still present 23 July.
> I wrote to you at the time, but I do not know if you had a chance to visit
> the place.
>
> Another Sandhill Crane was at Richland Creek W.M.A. Freestone on 16 Jul
> 2009 (Tim Fennell).
>
> Bert Frenz
>
> Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Central Prairie of Texas
>
> eBird reviewer, Belize
>
> NAB subregional editor, Central Oaks & Prairies of Texas
>
> <Bert2...>
>
> www.bafrenz.com
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Wednesday, July 8, 2020 1:07 PM
> *To:* bobby schat <bobbyschat...>
> *Cc:* <Fred.Collins...>; <Texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Re: Sandhills
>
>
>
> I guess I am being a bit lazy here as I could research it but it is just
> easier to ask. Where is the westernmost known general breeding location on
> the coastal plain? Is this pair considered to be the result of a
> post-breeding dispersal? To be a bit more precise on the location of
> these, a couple of miles south of Granger Lk. in Williamson Co. and south
> of Hwy 1331 near CR 418. Thank you.
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jul 8, 2020 at 9:41 AM bobby schat <bobbyschat...> wrote:
>
> Really cool to see this kind of longitudinal movement in SHCR, I have done
> some work on Mississippi Sandhill Crane NWR near Gautier Miss. Which is
> about 600 road miles east, a lot of those birds where banded, I could not
> see any bands on the cranes. This is not say there not from Miss. , some
> did get jewelry. The population in Florida are not band as well. There has
> always been the question when the resident pop. would get crowded and birds
> start to move around in some type of longitudinal migration.
>
>
>
> Sent from Mail <https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=550986> for
> Windows 10
>
>
>
> *From: *Collins, Fred (Commissioner Pct. 3) <Fred.Collins...>
> *Sent: *Tuesday, July 7, 2020 3:37 PM
> *To: *<brushfreeman...>; <texbirds...>
> <Texbirds...>
> *Subject: *[texbirds] Re: Sandhills
>
>
>
> Most surprising. Eubanks et al shows early date of Oct 13 for the UTC. I
> wonder if these are resident non migratory birds wandering in from the east?
>
>
>
>
>
> *Fred Collins*
>
> Director, Kleb Woods Nature Preserve
>
> 20303 Draper Road
>
> Tomball, Texas 77377
>
>
>
> *Commissioner Steve Radack*
>
> Precinct 3, Harris County
>
> www.pct3.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <texbirds-bounce...> <texbirds-bounce...> *On
> Behalf Of *Brush Freeman
> *Sent:* Tuesday, July 7, 2020 3:16 PM
> *To:* <texbirds...>
> *Subject:* [texbirds] Sandhills
>
>
>
>
> A pair found near Granger Lk. this AM feeding in newly disc'ed wheat field
> July 7. Thoughts for those of you not on social media.
>
>
> https://ebird.org/checklist/S71234172
> <https://gcc01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fchecklist%2FS71234172&data=02%7C01%<7Cfred.collins...>%7Cde883b5d814f4bb3fd1308d822b2b35f%7C0d9bc79c581b4477acf78d70dd3e555a%7C0%7C0%7C637297498193937661&sdata=6nzwjpeWIg1hJyBG4gMh14HYw5GXG%2BO94fdRUHlKp9o%3D&reserved=0>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
>
>
> Brush Freeman
>
> Utley & Cedar Park, Texas
>
>

 
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