Date: 7/7/20 7:39 am
From: Tom Toporowski <tomtopski...>
Subject: [texbirds] Re: White-winged doves displacing Mourning Doves in Houston?
A little late, but l read all this discussion about White Wing and other doves just now.
I live in Wimberley about 18 miles west SW of San Marcos. It is on the edge of the Hill Country.
In this semi rural area WWDoves dominate. My guess is there are at least 8 to 10 WW for every MO DO.
In winter l have seen flocks of WW numbering 20 + at times. I hear way more WW on morning walks than an occasional MODO. Inca Doves are occasional in the area. Even less common are Common Ground Doves.
In the town of Wimberley itself l have seen Eurasian Collared Doves. Can’t help but wonder how their numbers may increase in the coming years.

Side note. I spend some time in the Portland OR and Vancouver WA areas. My son lives up there. Eurasian
Collared Doves are already there too.
I recall an experienced birder telling me about 20 years ago in Corpus Christi (l was
a beginning birder then) that Eurasian collared Doves we’re going to be spreading... and he was right.


Sent from my iPhone

> On Jul 6, 2020, at 9:31 PM, Armstrong, Richard H <richarda...> wrote:
>
> I just had a pair of WWDOs make a nest in my window box. Apparently they cannot see through the window. So we had a very upfront view of the whole process, from nest-building and egg laying to incubation, hatching, and all the crop-milk feeding of the fledglings. One fell off the nest and joined the cat buffet, sadly, but his sibling lived and finally flew off the other day. Richard Armstrong, Museum Park Houston
>
> <Happy_Family.jpeg>
>
>
>> On Jul 6, 2020, at 6:52 PM, Joseph Kennedy <josephkennedy36...> wrote:
>>
>> Here at my home in Houston, there are lots of white-winged doves that flight into scarf my food. But there are good numbers of mourning doves too. Not much difference in numbers over the years or a small change downward but they can be bullied by large numbers of white-wings but hold their own against the king of the doves. Wing whap and then coexist.
>>
>> All of my doves are still unmated males and white-wings have never nested in my neighborhood which is technically big thicket but borders the pinewoods with a few remaining long-leaf pines.
>>
>> Have been watching the doves for years when you could only find a couple at the courthouse in Galveston. They arrived in Houston in Bellaire and tended to follow soil patterns extending from the southwest prairie habitats. Showed up in katy but I can go in a wide circle about my house and find no nesting birds. Only single calling males that make great hawk food.
>>
>> But inca doves did vanish. The last pairs were fed on a balcony where the owner discouraged the larger birds. She moved and the incas left.
>>
>> I have only seen a single young white-wing ever at my feeders or balcony but many mourning doves every year including this year. The mourning doves also stand up to the collared doves at Krogers etc where I found a young bird this morning.
>>
>>
>>> On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 4:50 PM Armstrong, Richard H <richarda...> wrote:
>>> Thanks, y’all! I was half worried it was a stupid question. I read somewhere WW Doves breed in large colonies, so I was wondering if I am just in the middle of one over in the Museum Park district of Houston. I was just up in the hill country and was pleased to hear the plaintive coo of the Mourning Dove again, which used to wake me up every morning over in Lynn Park in Houston. Incas were also more common in that area back in the aughts, but I have not seen one in quite a while. It’s just wall to wall WW Doves here now, thick as Rock Pigeons. I guess this displacement has been quite rapid in ecological terms.
>>>
>>> It makes sense to me that WW Doves and MODOs share the same niche ecologically. Wasn’t the WW Dove hunted heavily in Mexico? Well, it certainly is not endangered in Texas!
>>>
>>>> On Jul 6, 2020, at 4:34 PM, Tolbert Greenwood <tolbertgreenwood...> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Somewhere about 40 years ago, I first saw a White-Winged Dove in Fort Worth/Tarrant county. Only saw a few but they slowly took over. I saw Mourning Doves regularly in town at my feeders and also in the suburban areas. I also saw Inca Doves fairly regularly about the same time. However, over the last 20 plus years there has been a steady decline in Mourning Doves and Inca Doves. I have not seen an Inca Dove in years. I have seen 1, that is only one, Mourning Dove in my year in the last couple of years. I have seen a pair or so of Eurasian Collared Doves a time or two each year. However, I am feeding a hundred pounds or more of bird seed to the White Wing Doves each year. They have totally taken over.
>>>>
>>>> We started seeing White Winged Doves in Austin about 45 years ago occasionally and within a few years they were the dominant dove, and moved up north slowly over then next few years. Tolbert Greenwood
>>>>
>>>>> On Mon, Jul 6, 2020 at 4:10 PM Dan Smith <dan...> wrote:
>>>>> You are correct. The White-winged Dove is a larger and more aggressive species that occupies about the same ecological niche as the Mourning Dove, especially in urban areas. They have almost entirely replaced MODOs in Austin after having shown up as a small colony in Northwest Park in north-central Austin. But they seem to have an affinity for urban areas and are not replacing MODOs out in the country as aggressively.
>>>>>
>>>>> Dan Smith
>>>>> <dan...>
>>>>> 512-451-2632
>>>>> http://www.wordsmithofaustin.com
>>>>>
>>>>> "Merchants have no country. The mere spot they stand on does not constitute so strong an attachment as that from which they draw their gains.” Thomas Jefferson, 1814.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>> On Jul 6, 2020, at 3:57 PM, Armstrong, Richard H <richarda...> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Dear Texbirders,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I don’t know if this question has been raised before, but in my anecdotal experience of living in Houston over the past 25 years, it seems to me that the White-Winged Dove is displacing the Mourning Dove. Maybe it’s just the neighborhoods I have lived in, but that seems real enough to my casual observations. Out in the countryside, I seem to see more Mourning Doves.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Grateful for any studies you know of on the matter! Richard Armstrong, Houston
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Ř­Ę‹Ť ˇž–+-ą§ ˘éíąëmŠx,~ŠÓ pHD4šś m§˙˙Ă ˙~ˇž–+-łú+ƒůb˛ßí{ â­Ű zš,ś)ŕĄűki÷âqúč™1 „CJ+)Žˆbn+^w ­†‹­ąç¤Šx)zš˘˛Č¨ účšŘ^.+-;
>>>>>> Ţ
>>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Joseph C. Kennedy
>> on Buffalo Bayou in West Houston
>> <Josephkennedy36...>
>

 
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