Date: 7/6/20 12:42 pm
From: David Vick <or.naturalist...>
Subject: [obol] Re: Lake County PAC-slope?
Gee, I can't wait unti they split the Gray and Dusky Flycatchers. I humbly
suggest that the new names be the Gray Dusky and the Dusky Gray. Should
make field identification a snap but good luck for all you eBirders out
there.

David Vick
Terrebonne

On Sun, Jul 5, 2020 at 2:10 PM Tom Crabtree <tc...> wrote:

> Jack,
>
>
>
> It trips rare because the default is Pacific-slope x Cordilleran (Western)
> Flycatcher for Lake County. Photos won’t do you any good for the species.
> Someone who has studied them for years indicates that he doubts any birds
> North of Arizona/New Mexico are pure birds, there is a lot of admixing
> going on. I have heard birds in Bend alternate Pac-slope and Cordilleran
> calls. I had one this summer that started with a Cordilleran note and then
> go into full Pac-slope mode.
>
>
>
> An article published last year [Linck, E., K. Epperly, P. van Else, G.
> M.. Spellman, R. W. Bryson, Jr., J. E. McCormacks, R. Canales-Del Castillo,
> and J. Klicka. 2019. Dense geographic and genomic sampling reveals
> paraphyly and a cryptic lineage in a classic sibling species complex. Syst.
> Biol. 0(0):1–11, 2019, DOI:10.1093/sysbio/syz027.] posits that there
> anywhere between one and four species involved in this complex. They favor
> either one species for all of Western North America (including hybrids) or
> two species split with one for the US and one for Mexico. Either would
> eliminate the Pacific-slope/Cordilleran conundrum that we deal with here.
> [As an aside, if you want to see a really funny interpretation, look at the
> eBird maps for Cordilleran and Pacific-slope Flycatchers along the
> Washington/Idaho border. It’s amazing how those birds can read maps!] The
> authors acknowledge that a different definition of what is a species could
> lead to four different species, but don’t resolve that question and say “a
> detailed analysis of these data will be presented elsewhere.”
>
> Here is a map showing the information their data shows the following.
> [Gray dots are Pacific-slope, yellow are Cordilleran and the orange and
> green are the Mexican forms. Where a dot has two colors it shows the
> intermixing of the forms. Unfortunately they didn’t examine any Central
> Oregon birds.
>
> It appears we haven’t heard the last word on Empidonax difficilis
> (difficilis indeed!).
>
>
>
> [image: cid:172764e62734ce8e91]
>
>
>
>
>
> Tom Crabtree, Bend
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> *From:* <obol-bounce...> [mailto:<obol-bounce...>] *On
> Behalf Of *Jack Maynard
> *Sent:* Sunday, July 05, 2020 12:35 PM
> *To:* Oregon Birders On Line
> *Subject:* [obol] Lake County PAC-slope?
>
>
>
> Hello obol,
>
> With some trepidation I am going to check in a Pacific-slope Flycatcher
> from a location SE of Lakeview in The Warner Mountains. It trips Rare. I
> have a few pics and a sound recording but very limited connectivity here.
>
>
>
> Kelli and I were birding a spot called Willow Creek campground this
> morning and heard what we thought were the distinct vocalizations of the
> Pac-slope, but thought they shouldn’t be present this far East. We heard
> at least two birds making the Ju-weeeep call and eventually saw two and
> photographed one of the birds. I’ll include a pic or two with this email. I
> won’t be able to get the sound recording uploaded until I get home to
> Portland tomorrow or Tuesday.
>
>
>
> I’ll be interested to hear from folks as to whether this was a good ID.
> Both pac-slope and Cordilleran tick rare. West of the cascades I’d call
> these pacific-slope and move on.
>
>
>
> Sorry about the blurry photos, they are the only ones I could get to
> transfer from my camera.
>
>
>

 
Join us on Facebook!